SENATE

Office of the University Secretary

Tel (250) 721-8101, Fax (250) 72 1-6 223

SENATE

Notice of

Meeting and Agenda

University of Victoria

The next open meeting of the Senate of the University of Victoria is scheduled for Friday,

April 4, 2014 at 3:30 p.m. in the Senate and Board Chambers, University Centre, Room

AlSO.

AGENDA as reviewed by the Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance.

1. APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA

ACTION

2. MINUTES

a. March 7, 2014 (SEN-APR 4/14-1)

Motion: That the minutes of the open session of the meeting of the

Senate held on March 7, 2014 be approved and that the approved minutes be circulated in the usual way.

3. BUSINESS ARISING FROM THE MINUTES a. Update on Faculty of Graduate Studies governance

ACTION

4. REMARKS FROM THE CHAIR

INFORMATION

5. CORRESPONDENCE a . 2013-14 Annual Report on the Implementation of the Strategic Plan

(SEN-APR-4/14-2)

Motion: That Senate receive the 2013-14 annual report on the implementation of the Strategic Plan for information. b. Update on integrated planning and budget framework

ACTION

INFORMATION

6. PROPOSALS AND REPORTS FROM SENATE COMMITTEES

a. Senate Committee on Admission, Re-registration and Transfer

- Dr. Adam Monahan, Chair

1.

Creation of Admission Requirements for the Faculty of Education ,

Pre-Elementary Education (SEN-APR 4/14-3)

Motion: That Senate approve the creation of admission requirements for secondary school applicants to the Faculty of Education, Pre-

Elementary Education effective May 1, 2014 and the following addition to the admission section of the undergraduate academic calendar:

ACTION

Faculty of Education , Pre-Elementary Education

English 11

Foundations of Math 11 or Pre-calculus 11

One approved science 11

Social Studies 11

English 12 or English 12 First Peoples plus three approved academic 12 courses with an average of at least

70%

b . Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance- Prof. Jamie Cassels, Chair i. Revisions to the Terms of Reference for the Senate Committee on

Planning (SEN-APR 4/14-4)

ACTION

Motion: That Senate approve the revisions to the terms of reference for the Senate Committee on Planning. c. Senate Committee on A wards - Dr. Annalee Lepp, Chair

ACTION

i. New and Revised Awards

(SEN-APR 4/14-5)

Motion: That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of

Governors that it also approve , the new and revised awards set out in the attached document:

• Robert and Ellen Pearce Scholarship (revised)

*

• Daughters of the American Revolution Scholarship (new)

• Peninsula Co-op Bud Nunn Entrance Award (new)

• Peninsula Co-op Jack Groves Entrance Award (new)

• Kootenay Bar Association Memorial Bursary in Law (revised)

• Black Press Business Scholarship (revised)

• Philomela Choir Scholarship (new)

• Peninsula Co-op Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education

Award (new)

• Peninsula Co-op Pat Fafard Entrance Award (new)

• Peninsula Co-op Sus Tabata Entrance Award (new)

• Rehana A. Meghani Memorial Scholarship (new) *

• Eloise Spitzer Scholarship for Indigenous Women (new) *

* Administered by the University of Victoria Foundation

d. Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching – Dr. Janni Aragon, Chair

INFORMATION

i. Revising and updating UVic’s university-wide learning

outcomes (SEN-APR 4/14-6)

e. Senate Committee on Planning - Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair

ACTION

i. Renewal of the Centre on Aging (SEN-APR 4/14-7)

Motion: That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of

Governors that it also approve, the renewal of Approved Centre Status for the Centre on Aging (COAG) for the five year period April 1, 2014 through March 31, 2019. ii. Renewal of the Institute for Integrated Energy Systems

(SEN-APR 4/14-8)

Motion: That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of

Governors that it also approve, the renewal of Approved Centre Status for the Institute for Integrated Energy Systems (IESVic) for the five year period April 1, 2014 through March 31, 2019. iii. Discontinuation of Certificate in Financial Planning

(SEN-APR 4/14-9)

Motion: That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of

Governors that it also approve, the discontinuation of the Certificate in

Financial Planning. iv. Proposal to Change Department’s Name from “History in Art” to

“Art History and Visual Studies” (SEN-APR 4/14-10)

Motion: That Senate approve the Proposal to Change Department’s

Name from “History in Art” to “Art History and Visual Studies”.

ACTION

ACTION

ACTION

v. Proposal for a Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities

(SEN-APR 4/14-11).

Motion: That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of

Governors that it also approve, subject to funding, the establishment of a Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities, as described in the document "Proposal for a Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities", dated February 23, 2014, and that this approval be withdrawn if the program should not be offered within five years of the granting of approval.

7. PROPOSALS AND REPORTS FROM FACULTIES

ACTION

8. PROPOSALS AND REPORTS FROM THE VICE-PRESIDENT ACADEMIC AND

PROVOST a. Procedures for Academic Accommodation and Access for Graduate

Students with Disabilities

(SEN-APR 4/14-12)

ACTION b.

Motion: That Senate approve the Procedures for Academic

Accommodation and Access for Graduate Students with Disabilities, effective May 1, 2014.

Other matters

INFORMATION

9. OTHER BUSINESS a.

2013 Policy Review Annual Report (SEN-APR 4/14-13)

Motion: That the Senate receive, for information, the 2013 Policy

Review Annual Report.

10. ADJOURNMENT

ACTION

SEN-APR 4/14-1

Page 1 of 9

DRAFT MINUTES

A meeting of the Senate of the University of Victoria was held on March 7, 2014 at 3:30 p.m. in the Senate and Board Chambers, University Centre, Room A180.

1.

APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA

Motion: (J. Aragon/S. Blackstone)

That the agenda be approved as circulated.

CARRIED

2. MINUTES

Motion: (S. Klein/M. Kennedy)

That the minutes of the open session of the meeting of the Senate held on

February 7, 2014 be approved and that the approved minutes be circulated in the usual way.

CARRIED

3. BUSINESS ARISING FROM THE MINUTES

Dr. Eastman reminded members of Senate of the discussion at the last meeting regarding the academic year important dates. She said it would not be possible to change the time for the

National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women event this year. Doing so could cause disruption to other class schedules. In addition, the committee reviewing the event was expected to come forward with recommendations and it would not be appropriate to implement changes before receiving those.

4. REMARKS FROM THE CHAIR a. President’s Report

Prof. Cassels provided a report on the federal budget released on February 11, 2014. He said there had been an increase in funding to each of the granting councils. In addition, the establishment of the Canada First Research Excellence Fund had been announced. Prof. Cassels also reported on new investments in internships.

With respect to the provincial budget released on February 18, 2014, Prof. Cassels said the expected reductions in funding to post-secondary had been confirmed. He said it had not yet been confirmed how the reductions would be distributed across institutions but that a pro rata distribution was expected. Prof. Cassels said the anticipated reductions had been built into this

Open Senate Meeting

March 7, 2014

SEN-APR 4/14-1

Page 2 of 9 year’s budget but the university would have to focus on advocacy as it looked towards next year.

Prof. Cassels provided Senate members with information regarding changes to the carbon offsets program outlined in the provincial budget.

Prof. Cassels reminded members of Senate that IDEAFest was underway. He hoped everyone had taken the opportunity to participate in the successful event.

Prof. Cassels reported that the five post-secondary institutions on Vancouver Island had recently signed an agreement re-affirming their commitment to work together to strengthen post-secondary education on the island.

With respect to recent UVic events, Prof. Cassels provided a report on the President’s

Distinguished Service Awards, the Co-op and Career employer appreciation event, the Victoria

Leadership Awards and the Joint Senate Board Retreat.

b. Other matters

Prof. Cassels invited Carmen Charette, Vice-President External Relations to provide an update on the UVic Difference project. Ms. Charette reminded members of Senate of the report she gave at the last meeting, noting that 8000 responses had been received to the survey that was distributed.

Ms. Charette invited members of Senate to engage in the project further by attending one of the

FutureCast Dialogues scheduled for the following week.

5. CORRESPONDENCE

There was none.

6. PROPOSALS AND REPORTS FROM SENATE COMMITTEES a. Senate Committee on Admission, Re-registration and Transfer i. Proposed creation of a new admission category called “Special Access Pathway”

Dr. Webb supported the proposal, which he thought would reduce administrative workload and provide better support to students. He suggested it would be useful to follow this proposal with a formal review of the governance structure for the Pathway Program. Dr. Webb commented that some challenges with respect to the structure of the program had been experienced and that a review of this structure would allow for further support to both students and academic units. Dr.

Tremblay responded that the Pathway Program began as a pilot program. She agreed that this was the right time to create a more formal governance structure to support it, and said she would provide a report back to Senate.

Motion: (A. Monahan/M. MacDonald)

That Senate approve the creation of a new admission category called

“Special Access Pathway” for students applying to the Pathway

Program.

Open Senate Meeting

March 7, 2014

SEN-APR 4/14-1

Page 3 of 9

AND

That Senate approve the addition of the following description of the new admission category to the section of the undergraduate academic calendar entitled “Other Applicant Categories”, effective

May 1, 2014:

Special Access Pathway

Applicants who satisfy the academic requirements for admission, including the requirements to enter a specific degree program, who do not meet the minimum English language proficiency requirements and who have a minimum IELTS score of 5.5 or a minimum TOEFL score of 71 may enrol in the 12 month Pathway

Program in order to enhance their language skills while undertaking coursework for academic credit. Upon satisfaction of both the

English language proficiency requirements and achievement of the required minimum GPA of 2.0 (or higher if required by the relevant

Faculty) in all credit courses attempted, the student may progress into a regular program.

Students who do not meet these requirements will not be eligible to progress into a regular program, however, a record of the Pathway

Program studies, including all academic credit awarded, will be retained as part of the academic record and will appear on the official transcript.

CARRIED b. Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance i. Appointments to the 2013/14 Senate Committees

Motion: (K. Gillis/S. Blackstone)

That Senate approve the appointments to the 2013/2014 Senate committees for the terms indicated in the attached document.

CARRIED c. Senate Committee on Awards i. New and Revised Awards

Motion: (A. Lepp/M. Kennedy)

That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of Governors that it also approve, the new and revised awards set out in the attached document:

• Karen McFadzean Bursary (new) *

• Paul R.N. Spencer Bursary (new)

Open Senate Meeting

March 7, 2014

SEN-APR 4/14-1

Page 4 of 9

• Gina Quijano Unsung Hero Award (new) *

* Administered by the University of Victoria Foundation

CARRIED

7. PROPOSALS AND REPORTS FROM FACULTIES a. Faculty of Graduate Studies i. Faculty Governance Structure

Dr. Capson provided a PowerPoint presentation on a proposed new governance structure for the

Faculty of Graduate Studies. He reviewed the current governance structure for the faculty and commented on growth and change in recent years. Dr. Capson indicated that the current governance structure for the faculty was ineffective and had low levels of participation. He confirmed that there was consensus among those who had been consulted that the university was not well served by the current model. Dr. Capson outlined a proposed model for governance of the

Faculty of Graduate Studies, which included creation of a faculty council. He outlined two possible membership models for the faculty council, one that included all graduate advisors and another that included elected and proportional representation based on the number of graduate students in a faculty’s programs. Dr. Capson asked members of Senate for feedback on the proposal.

Dr. Burke asked how a decision between options for the faculty council would be made. Prof.

Cassels explained that Senate had authority to approve governance structures for the faculties and that a recommendation would be presented to Senate for consideration and approval.

Dr. Lewis Hammond said that, given the diversity of graduate programs, she favoured the model that included the graduate advisors. She thought this model would assist with improving communications, although she recognized that the large number of members would mean the council might not be as nimble as one with smaller membership.

Dr. Blackstone also supported the model that included all of the graduate advisors. She noted that representation for her faculty would significantly decrease if proportional representation based on enrolment was the basis for membership on the council.

Dr. Dechev commented that the Faculty of Graduate Studies serves many purposes, one of which is to graduate students. From his perspective, it was important to ensure that faculties serving large numbers of graduate students had an adequate voice. For that reason, he favoured a model based on proportional representation.

Dr. Webb expressed support for bringing forward a proposal to Senate for approval this year. He said he thought it was important to change the governance structure for the faculty and said he was less concerned with which model was presented. Dr. Webb did note that the model based on graduate advisors might be so large that members will not feel accountable to the body.

Open Senate Meeting

March 7, 2014

SEN-APR 4/14-1

Page 5 of 9

Dr. Chapman noted that the number of graduate students was the same in both models and suggested that the number be increased in the model with larger membership.

Dr. Wyatt commented on the diversity in graduate programs and suggested that smaller units could end up in unworkable situations if their perspectives were not represented on the council. She wondered if participation in the faculty council could be added to the position expectations for graduate advisors in order to ensure attendance at meeting. Dr. Kennedy noted that members of

Senate understand the expectations regarding their attendance and thought these kinds of expectations could be successfully extended to the faculty council.

Dr. Gillis thought the council would be more nimble with a smaller number of members. She said she appreciated the pros and cons of both options, and suggested that the larger model might be accommodated through an effective committee structure.

Dr. Tiedje asked if the models could be combined to achieve the objectives of both. He suggested that all graduate advisors could serve on the council, with a limited number having voting rights.

Dr. Klein wondered why it was necessary to establish a faculty council because all matters considered by the faculty require approval by Senate. He expressed concern about the impact of expectations regarding governance and administrative service on small faculties. Dr. Klein thought it would be worth investigating why attendance levels were so low.

Dr. Archibald shared feedback from members of his faculty, who favoured the graduate advisors model. He thought voting and quorum procedures could be used to ensure equity between faculties.

Dr. Mateer commented that, as Chair of the Senate Committee on Planning, she thought it would be very useful to have program proposals fully and meaningfully vetted by a faculty council in the

Faculty of Graduate Studies.

Dr. Webber supported the graduate advisors model. He thought it would be important for the

Graduate Executive Committee to continue to play a role, with the council focusing on matters at a higher level. Dr. Webber said the critical point was that the current model was untenable. He said he preferred either model over the current situation.

Mr. Arora said he preferred the elected representative model, which had a higher proportion of students. He thought it was important that the student perspective be adequately represented on the council. Dr. Capson agreed.

Prof. Cassels suggested that a straw vote might provide Dr. Capson with guidance going forward.

He indicated that the vote would not be binding but would help to determine which model Senate members preferred. A straw vote was conducted. Fifteen members selected the graduate advisors model. Fourteen members selected the elected representatives model. Eleven members selected a hybrid model. Three members indicated that they preferred none of the models or objected to the proposal.

Open Senate Meeting

March 7, 2014

SEN-APR 4/14-1

Page 6 of 9

8. OTHER BUSINESS a. Art Collections Policy (BP3310)

Dr. Blackstone expressed support for the proposed policy. She commented on the calibre and diversity of the university’s art collection and thought it was appropriate to develop a policy that would ensure proper care and an improved connection to the university’s teaching and research mission.

Dr. Wyatt asked about the consultation process for acquisition and deaccessioning of artwork. She thought it was important to conduct adequate consultation to determine how and by whom artwork is being used for teaching. Ms. Charette responded that careful consideration is being given to how to best support the academic mission of the university. Mary Jo Hughes, Director of the Legacy

Art Galleries provided a brief explanation of the decision making process for acquisition and deaccessioning. Dr. Wyatt said she would prefer to see explicit reference to consultation included in the procedures.

Dr. Burke said it was regrettable that the consequence of recent changes was that the collection was now less accessible to those who use it for an academic purpose. He thought the collection should be accessible to as many members of the university community as possible. Ms. Charette responded that, out of 27000 pieces in the collection, approximately 1000 pieces had been classified as cultural property. She explained that there are strict requirements the university must follow to protect cultural property for future generations. Ms. Hughes explained that approximately 100 pieces of cultural property had been removed from display around campus.

Dr. Baer commented on the sections of the policy and procedures regarding loans. He noted that loans are at the discretion of the director. Dr. Baer asked about the criteria being applied to determine whether loans will be approved and thought there were more criteria being applied than those outlined in the procedures. He said he would be more comfortable if loan requests were considered by a committee, instead of leaving the decision in the hands of one person.

Dr. Webber supported the policy and thought it was appropriate that the university was professionalizing the way in which its art collection is managed. He expressed one concern with the procedures, which was that they indicated that the collection would simply be managed as a museum. Dr. Webber commented that artwork on campus is used for other purposes, for example to send messages. He commented on placement of artwork outside the First People’s House, noting that it was not simply placed there in accordance with museum standards. Dr. Webber said he was worried that the larger purposes for displaying artwork could be lost.

Dr. Webb said he appreciated the policy and was struck by the extent which Senate members care about the university’s art collection. He suggested it might be appropriate to table approval of the policy in order to allow the feedback to be considered and incorporated, as appropriate. Prof.

Cassels asked if there were any regulatory requirements that demanded immediate approval of the policy. Ms. Charette said the policy was required to meet federal regulations but that some time could be taken to consider the feedback received.

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March 7, 2014

SEN-APR 4/14-1

Page 7 of 9

Dr. Beam asked if the procedures would be brought back to Senate with the policy. Prof. Cassels said the policy would be brought to Senate for approval, and the procedures would be provided for information.

Motion: (M. Webb/M. Kennedy)

That the Art Collections Policy (BP3310) be tabled to a future meeting of Senate.

CARRIED

9. PROPOSALS AND REPORTS FROM THE VICE-PRESIDENT ACADEMIC AND

PROVOST

Dr. Tremblay provided an update on the core review. She said the university had submitted its interim report, which would be made available on the Senate SharePoint site.

Dr. Tremblay reported on the enhanced planning process. She said a website providing information about the process had been set up and encouraged Senate members to review the information.

There being no other business, the meeting was adjourned at 4:50 p.m.

Open Senate Meeting

March 7, 2014

Name

Carrie Andersen

Janni Aragon

John Archibald

Pavan Arora

Doug Baer

Sikata Banerjee

Rachel Barr

Nav Bassi

Sara Beam

Peter Bell

Jonathan Bengtson

Sarah Blackstone

Howard Brunt

Robert Burke

Jared Burnett-Mccreery

Gillian Calder

Rosaline Canessa

David Capson

Oscar Casiro

Jamie Cassels

Alison Chapman

Lauren Charlton

Carolyn Crippen

Nikolai Dechev

Florin Diacu

Peter Driessen

Jim Dunsdon

Julia Eastman

Murray Farmer

Mark Gillen

Kathryn Gillis

Reuven Gordon

Rebecca Grant

Nadia Hamdon

Matthew Hammer

Linda Hannah

Lucia Heffelfinger Orser

Susan Karim

Peter Keller

Mary Kennedy

Saul Klein

Patricia Kostek

Robbyn Lanning_

Annalee Lepp

Susan Lewis Hammond

Robert Lipson

Maureen MacDonald

Bowen Macy

Andrew Marton

Catherine Mateer

Cathy Mcintyre

Lianne McLarty

Kelsey Mech

Adam Monahan

Yianni Pappas-Acreman

Laura Parisi

Leslee Francis Pelton

Mary Ellen Purkis

Ted Riecken

Emily Rogers

Abdul Roudsari

Esther Sangster-Gormley

Brock Smith

Tracie Smith

Ann Stahl

Gina Starblanket

Nick Tang

Thomas Tiedje

Reeta Tremblay

Alicia Ulysses

John Walsh

Michael Webb

Jeremy Webber

Margot Wilson

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SEN-APR 4/14-1

Page 8 of 9

By Invitation

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Chair of Senate

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Secretary of Senate

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SEN-APR 4/14-1

Page 9 of 9

MEMBERSHIP OF THE SENATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA

Effective December 12, 2013

EX OFFICIO MEMBERS- University Act: Section 35 (2) (a-t)

Chancellor: Murray Farmer (31 / 12114)

President and Vice Chancellor: Jamie Cassels, Chair

MEMBERS ELECTED BY THE FACULTY

MEMBERS

(continued)

V.P. Academic & Provost: Reeta Tremblay

V.P

. Research: Howard Brunt

Dean, Peter B . Gustavson School of Business:

Susan Lewis Hammond-FINE

Adam Monahan - SCIE

Les l ee Francis Pelton- EDUC

(30/6 / 14)

(30 / 6/14)

(30 / 6 / 14)

(30/6/16)

Sau l K l e i n

Dean ofEducation: Ted Riecken

Dean ofEngineering: Thomas Tiedje

Dean of Continuing Studies: Maureen MacDonald

Ann Stahl - SOSC

Victoria Wyatt- FINE

Margot Wilson- SOSC

(30

(30

/

/

6/16)

6 / 15)

Dean of Fine Arts: Sarah Blackstone

Dean of Graduate Studies: David Capson

Dean ofHumanities: John Archibald

Dean ofHSD: Mary Ellen Purk i s, Vice-Chair

Dean of Law: Jeremy Webber

Dean of Science: Robert Lipson

Dean of Social Sciences : Peter Keller

University Librarian: Jonathan Bengtson

MEMBERS ELECTED BY THE FACULTIES - Section

35(2)(g)

BUSI: Rebecca Grant (30 / 6 / 16)

Brock Smith (30 / 6 / 15)

EDUC: Carolyn Crippen (30/6 / 16)

Mary Kennedy (30 / 6 / 14)

ENGR : Peter Driessen (30 / 6 / 16)

Nikolai Dechev (30 / 6/14)

FINE: Patricia Kostek (30 / 6/15)

Lianne McLarty (30 / 6 / 16)

GRAD: Sara Beam (30 / 6/16)

John Walsh (30 / 6114)

HUMA: Abdul Roudsari (30 / 6 / 15)

MEMBERS ELECTED FROM THE STUDENT

ASSOCIATION- Section 35 (2) (h)

Pavan Arora (GRAD)

Rachel Barr (SOSC)

(30/6/14)

Peter Bell (GRAD)

Jared Burnett-Mccreery (ENGR)

Nadia Hamdon (SOSC)

Matthew Hammer (HUMS)

"

"

"

"

"

Susan Karim (EDUC)

Bowen Macy (SOSC)

Kelsey Mech (SC IE)

Lucia Heffelfinger Orser (HUMS)

Yianni Pappas-Acreman (LAW)

Emily Rogers (HUMA)

Gina Starblanket (GRAD)

"

"

"

"

"

"

"

"

Nick Tang (SCIE)

TBA (BUSI)

TBA (FINE)

"

"

.

MEMBERS ELECTED BY THE CONVOCATION

-Section 35 (2) (i)

Esther Sangster-Gormley (30 / 6 /1 6)

HUMS : Annalee Lepp (30 / 6 / 16)

Laura Parisi (30 / 6115)

LA WF: Gillian Calder (30 / 6 / 14)

Nav Bassi

Linda Hannah

Robbyn Lanning

Cathy Mcintyre

(31 / 1 2 114)

(31 / 12114)

(31112114)

(31112/14)

Mark Gillen (30/6 / 16)

SCIE : Robert Burke (30 / 6 / 14)

Florin Diacu (30/6114)

SOSC : Rosaline Canessa (30 / 6 / 15)

Michael Webb (30 / 6 / 14)

ADDITIONAL MEMBERS - Section 35 (2) (k)

Head , Div i sion of Medical Sciences : Oscar Casiro

Member elected by the Professional Librarians:

Tracie Smith (30 / 06 / 15)

Continuing Sessional : Alicia Ulysses (30 / 06114)

MEMBERS ELECTED BY THE FACULTY MEMBERS

-Sections 35 (2) (g)

Janni Aragon- SOSC

Doug Baer- SOSC

Sikata Banerjee - HUMS (30

(30

(30

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6

6 /

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14)

6116)

Alison Chapman - HUMS

Kathryn Gillis- SCIE

Reuven Gordon- ENGR

(30

(30

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6115)

6

6 /

/ 14)

14)

SECRETARY OF SENATE- Section 64 (2)

University Secretary: Julia Eastman

BY INVITATION Seated with specified speaking rights

Assoc. V.P

. International- Andrew Marton

Assoc . V .

P. Student Affairs: Jim Dunsdon

Assoc. V.P. Academic Planning: Catherine Mateer

Registrar: Lauren Charlton

Associate University Secretary: Carrie Andersen l

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University of Victoria

Office of the

President

Office of the P r esident

ASB A220, Box 1700 STN CSC

Victoria BC V8W 2Y2

Tel250-721-7002 I Fax 250-721-8654

Email: [email protected] I Web: www.uvic.ca/president

SEN-APR 4/14-2

Page 1 of 15

M MO

Date: 18 March 2014

To: Members of Senate

From: Professor Jamie Cassels, QC

President and Vice-Chancellor

Re: 2013-14 Annual Report on the lmpl mentation of the Strategic Plan

The 2012 Strategic Plan, in its "Implementation and accountability" section, stipulates that:

The realization of this strategic plan will involve all members of the university community. Its implementation will be led by the President and will be the responsibility of academic and administrative leaders at all levels in the university. Through the integrated planning process, led by the Vice-President Academic and Provost, the strategic plan will shape medium-term planning, the annual budget process and the university's activities and operations.

Information on progress in the implementation of the strategic plan will be provided in the context of the Planning and Budget Framework and will be reported by the President to the

Planning and Priorities Committee, the Senate, the Board of Governors and the uruversity community.

In that context, I am therefore providing an update on the implementation of the Strategic Plan.

My priority over the fall was to engage in "Campus Conversations" to introduce myself to campus in my new role, learn more about the strengths and issues of concern in the various areas, and develop focus and priorities for the next five years. I conducted over 50 of these "Campus Conversations", during which it was confirmed to me that on the whole the strategic plan resonates well on campus and that there is also agreement that we need to focus and prioritize our efforts.

As part of the process, the Planning and Priorities Committee met to take stock of the strategic planning process and to reflect on the potential for setting priorities and on mechanisms for tracking progress.

In my brief report on the Campus Conversations, I confirm our determination to fulfill our obligations to students and to society and I highlight some key areas. Further work is underway to define more clearly what it means to be "a university of choice" and to build on excellence - in education for undergraduate and graduate students; in research, scholarship and creative activity; and in supporting and engaging our people. The report recognizes the need to strengthen our internal and external communications and to develop transparent tools and processes that will allow us to optimize resources and to align them with

SEN-APR 4/14-2

Page 2 of 15 our priorities. The report also identifies several specific strategic plan objectives that have assumed greater priority.

We are consequently in the process of developing "Enhanced Planning" tools and mechanisms. The first phase consists of identifying key indicators that relate to areas of focus, and in the future we will make use of those indicators to track our performance and to report out.

As envisaged in the Strategic Plan, Part I ofthe 2014-15 Budget Framework (attached) provides an update on the current status of accomplishments, highlights challenges and opportunities and outlines the priorities for 2014-15.

Attach.

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Page 3 of 15

PART I

Integrated Planning Framework

In February of 2012, after extensive consultation with students, faculty, staff, alumni and the community, the university’s Senate and the Board of Governors approved an updated Strategic

Plan, “A Vision for the Future – Building on Excellence.” Building on the success of the 2007 plan,

“A Vision for the Future – Building on Strength,” the current plan reaffirms and recommits to its goals: to attract and support outstanding people, to build the quality of our programs in research and education and to strengthen linkages with our external communities locally and around the world. It rearticulates our vision of being a university of choice for outstanding students, faculty and staff; a university that best integrates outstanding scholarship with inspired teaching and active community engagement; a university whose distinguishing characteristic above all is a tradition of uncompromising excellence.

The Plan takes fully into account a changing environment for post-secondary education: an environment characterized by global shifts in education and research, developing demographic and labour market trends, continuing economic uncertainty, changes in the BC post-secondary system, and an accelerated pace of technological change. As these changes come to bear upon how our institution evolves, they are obliging us to differentiate ourselves further from other institutions at all levels - regionally, nationally and internationally. Importantly, the Plan makes even more explicit our commitment to broadening the student learning environment by enhancing experiential learning opportunities and through the integration of education and research, and to internationalization through an expansion of opportunities for student and faculty exchanges, and increasing international student enrolment. It also reaffirms our deep commitment to Aboriginal students and Aboriginal communities. Finally, as we confront these less lenient, more challenging times, the Plan places heavy emphasis on three things: integrated planning, fiscal responsibility, and careful attention to priorities and outcomes; these are absolutely essential for achieving our goals within the current context.

Since August, President Cassels has been actively engaged in a series of campus conversations and consultations with the faculty, staff and students across campus in order “to develop an even sharper and widely shared vision of this university's distinctive characteristics and strengths, to prioritize the many worthwhile objectives set out in the plan, and to explore the most effective ways for us to realize our goals together.”

( https://www.uvic.ca/president/activities/talks/ConversationsReport2014.pdf

).

One of the major outcomes of the Presidential consultations with the community relates to the identification and articulation of areas of focus within the Plan. In his “Report to the university community on campus conversations,” President Cassels reaffirms UVic’s vision to be “a university of choice” and emphasizes that in order to further enhance a research-inspired learning community, we are to build upon our prevailing culture of excellence. Moreover, he emphasizes that three things need to be done: “further focus and build on our strengths; better align resources with priorities; communicate and engage more effectively internally and externally.” He concludes:

“…we have an excellent foundation upon which to continue building. We can do that by continuing to focus on our tradition of excellence in undergraduate and graduate teaching and learning, taking advantage of UVic’s size and character as a learning community and

building on our particular strengths in experiential and research-enriched learning.

We will build on our strengths in research, scholarship and creative activity across the

spectrum of our academic programs, and also in areas and clusters of particular strength.

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Page 4 of 15

To do this effectively we must develop a research plan that addresses both the most pressing operational needs for research support, and the strategic needs relating to areas

of focus, partnerships, knowledge mobilization and community engagement.

We must continue to build on UVic’s greatest strength—its talented people and collegial environment. Faculty and staff concerns regarding support and inclusion must be addressed, along with compensation issues, albeit within the limits of governmental and budget constraints, and always with an eye to what is best for our students and the communities we serve. And we must all work together to maintain and enhance UVic’s

culture of inclusion, respect and collaboration.

Finally, we need to improve planning and communications. To do this requires that we develop more robust and transparent processes for academic, operational and budget planning, aim for a more rigorous alignment of resources and priorities, and improve our

mechanisms for two-way communication and engagement, both internally and externally.”

Making Choices

The focused strategic priorities emerging out of the Presidential consultations within the framework of the 2012 strategic plan aim to position the university optimally within the new realities of fiscal challenges, public accountability and the need to differentiate the university in a competitive national and international environment. After completing a decade of growth, we are well positioned to take advantage of our medium size: growing only strategically, particularly at the graduate level, while re-affirming our commitment to quality undergraduate education in a research-intensive environment. We need particularly to pay attention to student engagement and experiential learning, to our commitment to a culture that is driven by research and discovery and to our commitment to civic and community engagement – the distinguishing features of the

University of Victoria. With respect to research strength, the university has emerged as one of

Canada’s premier research institutions and is now consistently ranked amongst the best in the world in a number of areas of global significance. Sustainable research infrastructure and support programs will have to be maintained in order to ensure our internationally competitive standing.

We need to properly align our resources with priorities. We need to deploy our existing resources more effectively, ensuring that we choose carefully where we place emphasis, how we optimize our investments, and how we grow our revenues from other sources. We will need to maintain a flexible, nimble and adroit approach in all our future activities. We will have to create opportunities, take advantage of those opportunities that are presented to us and make what may be difficult choices in order to adhere to our commitment to quality and to the priorities within the

Strategic Plan.

In order to deal with shortfalls in revenue in the past, the university implemented across-the-board budget reductions in the past four years (2.0% for 2009-10; 1.5% for 2011-12 and 2012-13; 4.0% for 2013-14). During the past year, in order to mitigate the impact of future budget reductions, we have undertaken planning exercises to both explore and implement (to a limited extent) initiatives for optimization of the use of our resources, both academic and administrative, such as smart growth (improved classroom utilization, instructional capacity and class size), retirement planning, improved IT service delivery, energy savings opportunities, review of guidelines and processes for travel and shared services across the post-secondary institutions in BC with a focus on procurement and information technology). While this is beneficial, we require a systemic and a long term approach towards the alignment of our resources with our priorities so that we do not subject our community to constant across-the-board reductions.

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Page 5 of 15

Given the expectation of continued budget shortfalls, this past year the integrated planning group, as well as the Deans and Directors, actively and seriously engaged in discussion of some difficult and fundamental questions regarding quality, efficiency and optimization and the budget process.

The outcome of these discussions has informed the enhanced planning process for making data- driven budgetary and programmatic choices. Many universities are facing similar challenges and different approaches are being used to address the issue of alignment of resources with priorities.

Some are using the Dickeson approach/model for program prioritization (a central university-wide task force, ranking all programs into quintiles, categorizing programs under different “buckets” – whether to enhance, maintain or eliminate these), some are experimenting with new budget models such as responsibility centre management or activity based budgets, and others are using both these approaches. It was important for us to ask the question: what is the right approach for

UVic for aligning priorities with resource allocation? We have concluded that an alternate approach would best fit our institution. The Dickeson approach requires extensive efforts, creates high institutional anxiety, has high costs and has raised the great concern that afterwards many institutions are able to bring about only little or no change. In addition, there is the observed perception that the process is centrally driven and, thus, there is a lack of ownership over decision-making by administrative leaders at all levels of the university on both the academic and non-academic sides of the institution. We firmly believe that instead of relying upon the Dickeson approach, we can make use of our existing planning process at UVic to undertake the exercise of making choices within the focused priorities laid out in the strategic plan. And while this is the case, we can improve upon planning processes by ensuring greater transparency and enhancing the requisite tools to Faculties, Departments and Schools to assist them in making choices.

There will also be a parallel process, to be initiated by the Executive, to explore whether there are opportunities to improve our current budget allocation model in order to best support the choices we will need to make for our university now and in the future.

We envision the enhanced planning approach to be multi phased, transparent, evidence based and consistently applied across programs and administrative services.

Enhanced Planning: Making Choices

Phase 1: Tools and Information

December 2013 - Fall 2014

Create a set of standardized criteria and data against which to assess quality, cost and contribution of programs and activities, to be updated periodically and made sufficiently robust to enable differentiated budget allocations by university decision makers at all levels.

The Working Group, along with an Advisory Committee, will develop and recommend to

Integrated Planning a set of criteria that can be measured and reported; recommend a process for identifying, gathering, reporting and comparing the information; recommend the appropriate unit levels for the criteria (e.g., Faculty, department, program, service unit or service, etc.); develop a planning timeline; develop a consultation and communication plan; oversee the gathering of the information and report out as per the communication plan.

Phase 2: Making Choices

Fall 2014 - Spring 2015

The Planning Process at the Faculty and the Unit level – will use the information and data gathered by the Working Group to make well-informed choices within each department and then within each portfolio. We do not anticipate a change to the approaches in the existing planning, decision-making and accountability structures at the decanal/director/chair levels.

Integrated Planning to recommend the design of a comprehensive process for decision making to the President.

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Page 6 of 15

• Once the process is considered by the Executive and approved by the President, oversight of its implementation will be the responsibility of Integrated Planning.

While we are undertaking the Enhanced Planning: Making Choices exercise, we will be pursuing the following priorities for 2014-15.

Priorities for 2014-15

Within this context, our foremost priorities for 2014-15 will remain student engagement (including recruitment and retention), promoting the quality of our academic and research programs, dealing with faculty retention and the salaries conundrum (public sector constraints and comparatively lower faculty salaries), fund raising, and the development of a communication and engagement strategy for both our internal and external communities. We will also be following through on other priorities to which commitments have been already made. It is imperative to note that we intend to accomplish the above either through internal reallocation of existing budgets, one-time funding or increasing our international undergraduate revenues. As a result of the financial pressures, we do not anticipate having much new incremental funding to allocate to our identified priorities. Non- recurring funds will be utilized as appropriate to support areas of priority such as undergraduate entrance scholarships, and information technology.

Student Recruitment: Attracting the best and the brightest

Since 2000-01 there has been a 26% increase in total enrolment at the university. Undergraduate enrolments have grown by 21% and our graduate enrolments by 64%. In 2013-14 overall enrolment numbers are about 100 FTE over our government funded target and our entry class is approximately 13% higher than last year and with quality improving from 81% to 83% for entry

GPA. And although we are 330 FTE over the international undergraduate student target, we are still about 770 FTE below the overall target at the undergraduate level. At the graduate level, however, we are about 800 FTE above target.

Undergraduate Students

Over the last couple of years, the growth rate at the undergraduate level has tailed off and it is becoming increasingly challenging to attract highly qualified undergraduate applicants. The supply of potential applicants is limited by low to negative growth in the youth population, with a decline in the provincial population of 18-29 year-olds expected to continue in 2014/15. These demographic changes, coupled with the rapid expansion of the BC post-secondary system (now including 6 new teaching universities), pose some special challenges and opportunities for UVic. The annual rate of undergraduate growth is expected to slow. Student recruitment will become far more competitive, and our students will continue to come from farther afield nationally and internationally. Our goal must be to continue to attract diverse groups of excellent students who continue to inspire excellent teaching and research. We must also recognize the increased need for strategically targeted distance and continuing education in some of our programs. Although

GPA cut-offs for admissions to UVic have varied over the past 10 years, there continues to be high academic standards for admitted students. (S.2)

In order to meet our goals of reaching our undergraduate enrolment targets while ensuring a diverse, high quality student body, UVic will have to:

• Implement our enhanced scholarship program to sharpen our competitiveness in attracting the best and the brightest.

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• Focus on greater coordination between Student Recruitment and the Faculties around conversion activities.

• Focus its efforts on enrolment management strategies such as targeted recruitment strategies and campaigns both within and outside BC.

• Rethink the balance between the undergraduate and graduate student numbers.

• Determine how best to add residence capacity in order to be able to attract students that are outside the Greater Victoria area; provincially, nationally and internationally.

Graduate Students

Our graduate student population is growing rapidly, increasing by 46% since 2004-05. Becoming more research-intensive has meant more pressure for UVic to enhance the ratio of graduate to undergraduate students, a trend that has implications for academic programming and resource allocation. We would need to strategically manage this growth by making conscious choices and align this growth with our resources, including competitive student funding, and with faculty research strengths and professional outcomes, and by balancing the quality of undergraduate and graduate teaching. (S.4)

International Students

The Strategic Plan provides a vision for expanding the university’s already significant range of international activities over the next five years. It proposes doubling the international student body, enhancing student mobility programs, and deepening research and exchange relationships globally. We have set a target of 1250 FTE for undergraduates and 800 for graduate students to be accomplished by 2015-16 (an increase of 56% over a four-year period from 900 FTE undergraduate and 473 FTE graduate currently), a target towards which we are fully on track this year. We are in the second year of our Pathways Program – offering credit courses in the discipline of Economics, Engineering and Science to students who possess limited English language capability. Our challenge remains to find appropriate classroom space for this program while we are in the process of building an extension to the Continuing Studies building. Several other initiatives are being undertaken including research support for visiting international scholars in the International Office, improved services for international research, an International Commons in the Library, and The Learning without Borders program (pedagogical grants to advance the internationalization of the curriculum). The funding required for various international initiatives, particularly the recruitment and support of international students, will come from the partial use of the increased revenues generated by growth in the international student body. Our challenge will be to maintain these numbers further diversify our international population, and provide proper support services to these students. We must also recognize the impact of an increased international student body in certain Faculties and departments and, in consequence, provide support to these units to provide quality education to our students. (S.20)

Aboriginal Students

Aboriginal people and their communities, including First Nations, Métis, Inuit and non-status

Aboriginal peoples of Canada, continue to be disadvantaged in access to and full participation in economic and social prosperity. High school graduation rates among Aboriginal youth are much lower than the general population and unemployment among working-age Aboriginal people is three times higher than among the non-Aboriginal population. Increasing the participation of

Aboriginal people in education will not only help fill labour and skills shortages in the provincial economy, but will also have a positive effect on individuals, families, and their communities and on the overall economic and social prosperity of the Province. The university has increased the number of aboriginal students from 80 in 2001/02 to over 800 in 2012-13. The university is

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Page 8 of 15 committed to increasing the number of Indigenous students graduating from all Faculties, building on our commitment to our unique relationship with the First Peoples of Canada. Our goals continue to be to (S.3):

Further strengthening relationships and build partnerships with local Indigenous communities; and

• Identifying opportunities to build outreach programming based on Aboriginal Service Plan and LE,NONET partners/stakeholders’ capacity development needs and interests to capitalize on available soft funds; research /develop best practices in Indigenous student recruitment; and review faculty specific admission policies.

Student Success and Broadening Student Experience: Creating conditions that matter

Currently, UVic students report robust levels of student engagement – each year our NSSE scores

(National Survey of Student Engagement) are higher than those of most research-intensive universities and consistently exceed those of the other BC research universities. Similarly, program satisfaction levels from recent graduates are the highest of any BC research university and have remained such over the past decade. We have done well, but the increasingly competitive world in which we find ourselves requires us not only to do well but to do better. There has been a substantial increase in capacity across the province and an increased competition among post-secondary institutions for students, exacerbated by a declining youth population.

Attracting more students, especially quality students, would require us to differentiate ourselves from other institutions and requires us to clearly articulate what UVic offers in terms of student success which others do not.

Given that our student body is becoming diverse, we need to develop a complex and well- articulated set of responses. Students who come to UVic will need active support to achieve their goals. Student success has to be our central focus and improving student engagement and success will be a key to maintaining and enhancing the quality of our institution. (S.17, S.18; S.19)

In addition, our first-year retention rate is lower than that seen at other BC research universities and has been declining, particularly for those students admitted with a high school GPA of less than 80%. This would require that, a) we recruit quality students; and b) we ensure that support and academic advising structures are in place and are effective in improving our retention.

Similarly, our seven-year graduation rate lags those of the other BC research universities. This clearly indicates that more must be done to support students throughout their program and help them complete their degrees on time.

An institutional level Student Success Group (SSG) was established in early 2013 to move forward the student success project. Its memberships include Associate Vice-President Student Affairs,

Associate Vice-President Academic Planning, all deans or their delegates (associate deans), directors from all academic support units, the founding faculty member of Education 101, one undergraduate and one graduate student and the director of Communications and Marketing. The group is chaired by the Provost who reports on a regular basis to the Deans Council on the activities and the agenda of the SSG. Its goals are to:

• Effectively establish what student success means at UVic and then support our students in achieving their goals;

Clearly articulate the UVic advantage and define the distinguishing characteristics of the

UVic experience that make a convincing case for students to choose to come to UVic;

• Take advantage of our size and capitalize on our strong points of interdisciplinarity, experiential learning, enhanced faculty student interaction, integration of research and learning at the undergraduate level;

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• Generate an integrated action plan, review our exemplary practices and effectively learn from within by identifying, sharing and combining those specific experiences and contexts associated with student learning and student success;

• Establish a success oriented campus culture and learning environment by creating synergy and complementarity of existing and future institutional policies, programs and practices;

• Build accountability into our system and build a student success-focused culture at all levels and in all sectors of the university and ensure that student success remains the university’s central focus at all levels and in all sectors.

Faculty Engagement and Retention

During the past decade UVic witnessed renewal and growth of its full-time faculty, with more than

50% of our current professoriate and librarians being hired during that period. Due to budget reductions (faculty vacancies being used to meet budget reduction targets) and the impact of the elimination of mandatory retirement (with a huge spike in the retention of our faculty beyond age

65), we have slowed down the pace of new faculty hiring. Our recruitment of faculty will have to be strategic, consistent with our research and educational priorities. The Deans of each Faculty have identified their priority areas in their academic plans and these priorities will have to align with those of the institution. All vacancies require Vice-Presidential approval and a rationale. In a resource-constrained environment, we will need to focus our growth in those areas where we choose to develop a nationally and internationally recognized critical mass of excellence. As always, however, retaining and recruiting exceptional faculty members requires the university to provide an environment that supports their academic ambitions. The Strategic Plan has set ambitious goals for faculty retention – “ensure that faculty retention places us in the top 20 percent of Canadian Universities.” To accomplish this, we must continue to develop and implement programs that encourage the success of new and continuing faculty (S.6; S.11). We do not presently face any significant recruitment and retention issues. Although, as mentioned above, the number of searches and recruitments has decreased substantially in the last three years, a significant proportion of candidates who have accepted positions at the University of Victoria were the Faculties’ first choice of applicants. Our retention rate is robust. However, the university does suffer from a negative salary differential as compared to our comparator universities. There is a perception amongst the faculty members that they are not being valued and their salaries are not commensurate with the quality and excellence for which UVic is known nationally and internationally. We will work to better understand and make progress where our faculty total compensation packages are not competitive with our comparator universities and then determine how we can move forward with making any changes necessary to ensure that we can attract and retain faculty. President Cassels notes, on page 6 of his report on Campus Conversations, “UVic faculty salaries are indeed low relative to other Canadian universities. Although this problem is largely the result of historical circumstances and of externally imposed constraints, it has resulted in some feeling undervalued. This must be addressed, albeit recognizing governmental and budget constraints. Within a measure of regulatory flexibility, careful longer-range academic and budget planning, and with an eye always on what is best for our students and society, we will aim for improvement.”

Academic Development: Programs, Quality and Academic Support

The Strategic Plan for the University of Victoria sets the goal to offer programs in teaching, research and support of such quality as to place us in the upper 20 per cent of a national set of comparable programs as judged by peer evaluation. President Cassels reaffirms, in his report on

Campus Conversations, “Our first priority must be to build on our strength in undergraduate and graduate education by continuing to promote excellence in teaching and learning overall, and

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Page 10 of 15 emphasizing areas of strength that may further differentiate us when students are making their choice.” (p. 3). Given our size and the economic and enrolment climate, we must build our areas of focus carefully, with the choice of disciplines and specialities being driven by our strengths and aspirations in teaching, research and scholarship, by focusing on questions of an enduring nature, and by responding to the evolving needs of society.

The slowing pace of growth, other than strategic growth at the graduate level and internationally, presents opportunities to consolidate some of the gains we have made, to focus on quality enhancement, to capitalize on our strength as a mid-sized research-intensive university, and generally to ensure that our research and educational activities are integrated and mutually enriching (S.12; S13: S.14). Within this context, we will be doing the following:

• We remain committed to ensuring excellence and quality of our programs, both teaching and research. The 2013 Quality Exercise, in which all academic units participated and which entailed identifying unit level goals for enhancing quality in the student experience, the learning environment, and research, will be folded in the Enhanced Planning: Making

Choices initiative.

• The process for undertaking and making effective use of Academic Program Reviews has itself undergone review. A revised policy, which more clearly articulates the steps taken following the review to act on recommendations, as well as more robust engagement of academic deans in the APR process, was presented to Senate for approval in February

2014.

• The process for budget planning in the Faculties is informed by Faculty and unit strategic plans, information from the regular academic program reviews, and recent enrolment performance as an indicator of student demand. The Faculties provide three- to five-year plans that inform the allocation of funding. Due to the cessation of provincial growth funds, the emphasis in the immediate future is to ensure that the enrolment targets assigned to each Faculty are met (and if not, make adjustments to the targets and resources), student outcomes are achieved and that there is a proper aligning of resources with areas of student interest, quality of the programs and faculty research strength. Over the next three years, any further undergraduate growth will be highly focused and will depend upon locating and negotiating specific sources of support from government, upon special fees or upon other external sources. In the last few years all new academic programs have been developed in areas where there is significant student interest and in which the university is well prepared to support, based on the teaching and research expertise of its faculty, financial resources and available space. As noted above and called for in the Strategic

Plan, we will, to the extent possible, continue to focus on strategic growth in graduate studies, subject to the ability to reallocate existing funds or generate new funds to support the program.

• A 5th cohort of 60 Bachelor of Commerce students was approved to begin in 2013-14, and an additional cohort was approved in the 2014-15 budget. There is a strong demand for this undergraduate business program from highly qualified students. This program will be financed through the additional tuition revenues generated.

• The full Civil Engineering proposal did not receive any provincial funding, but a Bachelor in

Civil Engineering was approved by the university and the Degree Quality Assessment

Board. It remains our top priority for seeking funding support from the province. Support for a small initial program was initially developed through the reallocation of internal resources in the Faculty of Engineering and a small initial cohort of students was admitted

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Page 11 of 15 to the program in 2013-14. It appears that demand for this program will be substantial as evidenced by the impressive recent growth in application numbers and admissions. A

Bachelor in Biomedical Engineering was also approved by the university and the Degree

Quality Assessment Board. Support for this program was also generated by redirecting resources within the Engineering faculty and a small cohort of students intending to study

Biomedical Engineering was admitted in 2013-14. For 2014-15, the Faculty of Engineering has revised its undergraduate target upward by 100 FTE and is projecting further planned growth of another 100 FTE in 2015-16. This growth is to be supported by base allocation funding to the Faculty of Engineering from the VPAC budget. Similarly in response to the increasing student demand, the Masters in Global Business program in Gustavson School of Business will expand with a cohort of 20 FTE in January 2015 and then with an additional 20 FTE cohort in January 2016. The base funding will be provided from the central budget from the anticipated tuition for these cohorts. Space remains a crucial issue for the expansion of programs in Business and Engineering and requires careful planning.

The VPFO’s office is working closely with VPAC in determining whether there are sufficient space resources available for the success of these programs. Other program developments are as follows:

• Four new PhD programs, Philosophy, Greek and Roman Studies, Environmental

Studies, and Health Information Science, received approval from the Ministry in 2013.

All these programs will be small and can be delivered within existing resources; the proposed PhD in Health Information Science program will be supported through a differential level of tuition.

• In 2012 and 2013, five small academic programs were recommended for closure due to lack of sufficient student interest and enrolment over several years, and others may be identified by respective academic units and Faculties for potential closure in the course of the Enhanced Planning: Making Choices exercise.

• One of our top priorities will continue to involve generating support from the provincial government for the institution of a provincial graduate funding program following the examples of Alberta, Quebec and Ontario. Meanwhile the Dean of Graduate Studies has undertaken a review of the graduate funding formula to ensure that our fellowship awards remain competitive with Canadian research-intensive universities.

• Budget planning in student affairs, administrative and other support areas is based on strategic plans and service plans (and their associated resourcing plans) developed to accommodate growth and maintain or enhance levels of service and support. In light of the budget constraints, any resource allocations will be accommodated from the existing budgets. It is imperative that we support initiatives that enhance student retention, the integration of research and education, experiential learning opportunities and the promotion of internationalization and community engagement. Support for these key initiatives would originate either from reallocation within the existing budgets or from revenues emanating from increased numbers of undergraduate international students.

Education Technology

Technology resources and systems are increasingly important in the delivery of high quality educational programs. Instructors are making more and more use of educational technologies, including course-based learning management systems (LMS), access to a broad range of online resources, integration of social media, student and course evaluation, and many components of

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Page 12 of 15 course and program delivery. There is increasing interest and demand from instructors for access to and support in using effective educational technologies. There is rapid change in this field and the university needs to be well-situated to understand, evaluate and adopt those technologies that will most benefit our programs.

Over 2012-2013, a cross-institutional review of existing support for educational technology was completed with broad input from faculty and staff. Recommendations from the review included the development of integrated support for educational technology, with a new office combining personnel from the Learning systems and Distance Education in Continuing Studies – and including strong faculty-based connections. (S.15) This restructuring is currently underway.

• Another recommendation from the review, the development of a leadership position in this area, reporting to the AVP Academic Planning, was approved. An initial search for a

Director of Technology Integrated Learning undertaken in Spring 2013 was not successful but in January 2014 there was an internal secondment of an Acting Director Technology

Integrated Learning.

• The new Academic and Student Services Committee, part of the new IT governance process, began meeting formally in Fall 2013, a critical new committee which will assist in the selection and prioritization of educational technologies.

• Ongoing technology related projects supporting academic programs and services include: a new system for Course Scheduling, enhanced and online Course Experience Survey, centralized advising software, and an upgrade of Moodle (now Course Spaces) as the centrally supported LMS.

Sustaining Research Excellence

The remarkable growth in the university’s research funding and its impact nationally and internationally has greatly enhanced our reputation, helped attract and retain high quality students and faculty, and increased our benefit to society. Consistently ranked in the top tier of Canadian universities on measures of research impact, the university is now recognized at the international level through prestigious rating organizations such as the Times Higher Education World Ranking system. President Cassels observes in his report on Campus Conversations, “We must also build on UVic’s strength in the quality and impact of its research endeavours. Our faculty achieve excellent results in research, scholarship and creative activity, and this success builds our reputation worldwide, helps to attract excellent faculty, staff and students to our university, enriches our educational programs and makes important contributions to society. We can build on that success.” (p.5)

Our researchers have been highly successful in attracting competitive peer-reviewed funding in the range of $100M annually over the past five years, much of which either directly or indirectly supports students. The university is now home to a number of internationally recognized research platforms and has had an excellent record of competing for research operating and infrastructure support.

However, increasing research intensity and success carries with it a significant challenge in terms of sustaining the necessary operating and maintenance funding required to optimize the value of our investments in people, programs, and infrastructure. Providing our researchers with the necessary support systems and programs to help them succeed requires significant resources; these funds are collectively called the indirect costs of research. While we have seen modest increases in the amount of funding provided through funding agencies and organizations for

SEN-APR 4/14-2

Page 13 of 15 meeting the indirect costs of research, they have not come close to meeting the estimated 40% of the direct costs of research that are required. To meet this shortfall will require additional effort to ensure that indirect funding is maximized through funding agreements and that development priorities align with research priorities wherever possible. We must also increase our emphasis on developing strong research partnerships with government, industry, community agencies and other academic institutions; a new research support unit, UVic Research Partnerships, UVic

Research Partnerships and Knowledge Mobilization (RPKM) was implemented in 2013 to maximize the quality and value of university research partnerships. It is also critical that we better integrate our educational and research strengths so that we can maximize the synergies that result from our investments. Becoming more research intensive has increased the pressure to enhance the ratio of graduate to undergraduate students, a trend that has implications for academic programming and resource allocation. Building on the university’s overall strategic plan, a comprehensive research planning process will be conducted during 2013-14 under the direction of the new VPR in close collaboration with the VPAC to better support our strategic areas of research and to maximize their alignment with academic programs. (S.21; S.22; S.23)

Communications and Marketing Strategy

Work is accelerating on key strategy 31 (a) of the university’s Strategic Plan to “increase UVic’s sense of community as well as external profile through the development of a new communications strategy that highlights UVic’s strengths and creates an awareness of the important contributions our university is making in addressing the key challenges facing our society and where UVic is providing regional, national and international leadership”. (S.31)

The goal of The UVic Difference: Positioning for Success project is to renew and sharpen UVic’s positioning and messaging in response to changes in our university and our world. This process is being led by a broadly-representative steering committee appointed by the President and chaired by the VP External Relations. This work is being assisted by an external agency chosen through an international competition. Building on the President’s campus conversations and UVic’s strategic plan, the steering committee advises and informs the process, drawing on its members’ knowledge of UVic, our key constituencies and audiences, and the challenges and opportunities in front of us. The project is engaging the entire campus community at several stages to help answer the question, “why choose UVic?” if we are going to remain a university of choice for students, faculty, staff, donors, employers and the diverse communities we serve in an increasingly competitive environment. It will result in a widely supported statement of what sets

UVic apart from its competitors and a comprehensive communications and marketing plan which can be deployed by all units on campus to achieve their strategic goals.

The university’s Communications and Marketing departments are in the final stages of fully integrating into a single unit to make the highest and best use of the skills and talents of its staff to provide strategic and tactical leadership to the university in these areas. The increasing need to enhance internal engagement within the university community on a range of issues such as UVic’s budget and prioritization challenges, and the opportunities presented by the positioning and communications and marketing activities will also drive significant initiatives to develop an internal communications strategy and engagement framework over the course of the year.

Systems and Processes

Our systems and processes are critical to achieving the strategies in our Strategic Plan. These systems and processes play a vital role in our teaching and learning, research and administrative activities. (S.26; S.27) During the last year we implemented a new governance structure to ensure that we focus on, and allocate our limited resources to the highest priority initiatives that can best contribute to achieving our strategic goals. With the implementation of the new structure, we have

SEN-APR 4/14-2

Page 14 of 15 seen increased diversity in the types and areas of projects and support. In particular, the introduction of a new structure that looks solely at academic supports has resulted in the initiation of projects that will provide significant benefits for students.

Over the next three years we will continue to develop more robust systems and processes with a particular focus on education technology (see above), enhancing data security, supporting our academic priorities, and ensuring we have adequate data centre capacity and technology infrastructure to support the university now and in the future. By leveraging technology, we will also increase efficiency in our academic and administrative activities. We will make it easier for

Faculty, staff and students to access and use all our systems and will continue with cross- institutional reviews of major administrative and non-academic support processes in order to standardize, simplify and increase efficiencies.

Staff Recruitment, Retention and Engagement

The university’s staff members play a vital role in enabling the university to fulfill its mission. In many cases they are the first point of contact for our students and our community. Through the support and services they provide to our students and faculty, and by maintaining a high-quality physical environment, they make it possible to accomplish our goals. Over the next three years we will be increasing our commitment to ensuring that staff feel valued, are supported and are best positioned to contribute to the university’s mission. This will require, as a minimum, an integrated communication strategy, access to management and leadership development, and ongoing support for professional development, mentorship and other training opportunities. We will also continue to provide support to assist staff in successful transitions whether that is a change in roles and responsibilities, retirement or return to work. We expect that the university will continue to experience change, particularly as we work through a challenging fiscal environment. It is critical that we recognize the impact of these changes on staff and ensure that staff have access to the information and supports necessary to navigate the changes and to assist our campus community to do the same. (S.8; S.11)

Facilities

In the previous decade we completed a capital expansion and renewal program in excess of

$220M. Current priorities, as outlined in the current capital plan, include the Centre for Athletics,

Recreation and Special Abilities (CARSA), renovations to McKinnon, residence renewal and expansion, seismic upgrade and infrastructure renewal and an expansion to the Continuing

Studies Building. Given constrained financial times, there is currently limited funding available from the province for capital expansion in the next three years. Our highest priority project, for both university resources (already set aside) and fundraising, is CARSA. Together with CARSA, our confirmed focus will be on maintaining our existing facilities and determining how we can increase our student residence capacity within the current provincial constraints that do not allow us to increase our borrowing.

We will use the information obtained from the completion of an Energy Capital Master Plan, and a comprehensive building condition assessment and seismic review of all of our existing buildings, to inform the allocation of resources and submission of minor projects to the Ministry. We will also use this information to better understand the risks related to deferred maintenance and prepare plans for implementing highest priority renewal projects should funding become available. We will implement reasonable pay back projects identified as part of the Energy Capital Master Plan with the first project being completing the feasibility assessment for a heating facility that would meet our heating needs into the future in a way that could reduce campus greenhouse gases and/or reduce our energy costs.

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Page 15 of 15

We will also commence work on the new Campus Plan within the next 12 months. As identified in the Strategic Plan, we will review space utilization and will identify opportunities for space optimization. Within the current capital plan, we have identified an additional academic building as a priority but have not determined the scope or academic programs that would be accommodated within a new building. While we recognize that it might not be possible to move forward on a new academic building in the near future due to a shortage of both capital funding as well as ongoing operating funding, it is important that we develop a clear understanding of our academic capital priorities. While this is the case, expansion of the Business and Economics Building has been identified as a capital project that is important to the university and would proceed if funds can be raised externally. (S. 34)

Fund Raising

UVic is committed to diversifying its revenue sources to achieve its objectives in support of our mission. (S. 33) Philanthropy from individuals, corporations and foundations is an essential component of that diversification. In order to ensure that our mission-based program is well integrated throughout the institution and effectively manages donor relations, our new Associate

Vice-President is leading the development and implementation of a framework that will guide our fundraising activities and enhance our priority-setting processes to better align our fundraising priorities with the strategic plan and with our academic, capital and research priorities. Key to the success of our university-wide fundraising program is a new integrated donor-centered prospect management approach that is being implemented to ensure that all of us is responsible for the best match of prospects interests with UVic priorities regardless of faculty prospect assignments.

Rebuilding a strong pipeline for major and principal gifts, as well as enhancing stewardship of current donors, is a high priority. New metrics are being implemented to keep fundraising staff on track, thanks to new systems and procedures being enacted through The Raiser’s Edge database management.

Alumni are important partners in our fundraising efforts and in the life and work of our university.

We are developing a fully integrated strategy of alumni engagement that will enhance the participation of our alumni for our mutual benefit.

CARSA is our top priority for philanthropic fundraising and corporate sponsorships in preparation for the opening of the facility in late spring 2015 so that we are fully operational for the fall 2015.

Recognizing the evolving opportunities and challenges for fundraising, we are engaging in a new approach of blended solicitation opportunities between corporate and fundraising, as well as between faculties, not only for CARSA, but for all donors/prospects, where appropriate.

Finally, we are implementing a multipronged short and long-term plan for fundraising for entrance scholarships that will engage all faculties and the Office of Student Awards and Financial Aid.

We will be pursuing the above priorities for 2014-15 while we undertake the Enhanced Planning:

Making Choices exercise. As noted earlier in this document, we intend to accomplish these priorities either through internal reallocation of existing budgets, one-time funding or increasing our international undergraduate revenues.

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Page 1 of 5

Memo

Date: March 4, 2014

To: Members of Senate

From: Adam Monahan

Chair, Senate Committee on Admission, Re-registration, and Transfer (SCART)

Re: Creation of admission requirements for the Faculty of Education, Pre-Elementary Education

At the February 18, 2014 meeting of SCART, the committee considered a proposal from the Faculty of

Education, to create new admission requirements for secondary students who wish to apply to Pre-

Elementary Education. The Committee voted in favour of recommending the creation of these new admission requirements to Senate. Attached is a memo from Wendy Joyce, Director of Undergraduate

Admissions, discussing the rationale for this proposed change as well as the approved calendar change from the Faculty of Education.

Recommended Motion:

That Senate approve the creation of admission requirements for secondary school applicants to the

Faculty of Education, Pre-Elementary Education effective May 1, 2014 and the following addition to the admission section of the undergraduate academic calendar:

Faculty of Education, Pre-Elementary Education

English 11

Foundations of Math 11 or Pre-calculus 11 one approved science 11

Social Studies 11

English 12 or English 12 First Peoples plus three approved academic 12 courses with an average of at least 70%.

2013/2014 Senate Committee on Admission, Re-Registration, and Transfer

A. Monahan (Chair), P. Konkin (Secretary), K. Hume (Secretary), J. Lynn, L. Hannah, K. Stewart, L. Gammon, L.F. Pelton,

A. Chapman, D. Foster, R. Barr, N. Tang, T. Haskett, C. Holder, A. Heinl, D. O'Brien, L. Charlton, L. Barnas

SEN-APR 4/14-3

Page 2 of 5

MEMO

Date: February 28, 2014

To: The Senate Committee on Admission, Re-registration and Transfer

From: Wendy Joyce, Director of Undergraduate Admissions, on behalf of the Faculty of Education

Re: Proposed creation of new admission requirements for the Faculty of Education, Pre-Elementary

Education

Background

The Faculty of Education currently provides entry to their degree programs at the 2 nd year level or higher only.

Students wishing to enter any of these programs must first complete 12 or more units of courses while registered in another faculty or while attending another postsecondary institution.

Secondary school students often enquire about applying directly to Year 1 in the Faculty of Education and are told that this is not an option. In particular, an interest in Year 1 entry has been expressed by students who wish to pursue a Bachelor of Education in Elementary Education. It is believed that many students decide on an

Elementary teaching career quite early, while Secondary teaching tends to be a decision made after university studies are well underway. With this in mind, the Faculty of Education would like to provide the ability for students who are intending to enter the Elementary Education program the option to begin their first year of studies as a Pre-Elementary Education student in the Faculty of Education. They would still be required to complete the first year course requirements to be selected and continue on to the regular Elementary Education program in 2 nd year.

Along with providing an option to those who are seeking an earlier pathway, there are a number of positive reasons why the ability to admit students directly into the Faculty of Education during first year of studies is desirable. Pre-Elementary Education would:

Give students an earlier sense of belonging in their chosen faculty.

Provide the ability to identify a potential cohort of students in advance and offer them more specific advising.

Attract outstanding students who might otherwise choose to begin their studies elsewhere.

Engage and connect students in support of retention initiatives.

NOTE: The Faculty of Education departmental curriculum changes indicating that Secondary school students to may apply directly to Year 1 in the Faculty of Education Elementary program were considered and approved by Senate at the February 2014 meeting as part of the cycle 1 curriculum submission.

Proposal

It is proposed that Senate approve the creation of new admission requirements that would provide secondary students with the opportunity to enter the Faculty of Education directly in first year to coincide with the senate approved faculty curriculum change. Admission standards similar to the Faculties of Humanities and Social

Sciences are proposed.

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Page 3 of 5

Recommended Motion

That Senate approve the creation of admission requirements for secondary school applicants to the Faculty of

Education, Pre-Elementary Education effective May 1, 2014 with the following addition to the “Admission

Requirements” section of the undergraduate academic calendar:

Proposed Calendar Entry (Under Year 1 Admission Requirements – current page 24 2013-14 calendar)

Faculty of Education, Pre-Elementary Education

English 11

Foundations of Math 11 or Pre-calculus 11 one approved science 11 course

Social Studies 11

English 12 or English 12 First Peoples plus three approved academic 12 courses with an average of at least 70%.

UVic Program Curriculum Change

1. admissibility to the university

2. at least 15 units of credit that include: a) 3 .0 units of approved English

1 b) 3 .0 units of approved Canadian studies

2 c) 3 .0 units of approved laboratory science

3 d) 3

.0 units of approved mathematics with a minimum grade-point average of3.0 e) 3 .0 units of approved elective

5

3. demonstrated competency in written English (see 8 .1)

4. a sessional grade-point average of at least 4 .0 (B-) on the most recent session and, if that session is less than 12 units, a grade-point average of at least 4 .0 on the most recent 12 units. Grades for duplicate course work taken during the most recent session are not normally included .

5. successful participation in an intervie•N usually held in April may be required .

Additional information about the admission requirements can be found online at www.uvic.ca/education/

All requirements for admission must be completed by April 30 and documented by May 31. into the Bachelor of Education (Elementary Curriculum) program for year_2 if the student satisfies the program admission requirements outlined in section 11.2.1.

11.2.1 Admission Requirements

The requirements for admission to year 2 of the BEd .(flementary Curriculum) program are:

1. admissibility to the university

2. at least 15 units of credit that include:

• 3 .0 units of approved English

1

• 3 .0 units of approved Canadian studies

2

• 3 .0 units of approved laboratory science

3

.. units of approved mathematics with a minimum grade-point av('rage of 3

.0 (C+)

4

., 3 .0 units of approved elective

5

3. demonstrated competency in written English (refer to section 8.1)

4. a sessional grade-point average of at least 4 .0 (B-) on the most recent session and, if that session is less than 12 units, a grade-point average of at l<~ast

4 .0 on the most recent 12 units. Grades for duplicate course work taken during the most recent session are not normally included.

5. Participation in an interview may also be required.

Maximum enrolments have been established; therefore, the faculty cannot guarantee that all qualified candidates will be accepted. Accepted candidates will be notified as early as possible, but final acceptance may not be until late June.

Additional information about the admission requirements can be found online at www.uvic.ca/education/

Notes:

Approved courses include:

1. Two of ENGL 146, 147.

2. Select from CS 102, ECON 100, HIST 130, 131, 132, POLI101, 201, SOC! 103.

3. Select from ASTR 101, 102, BIOL 190A, 1908, EOS 110, 120, one of EPHE 141 or 241, GEOG 103 and PHYS 102. EOS 120 is recommended as it includes a lab designed for prospective teachers. GEOG 103 is not open to students with credit in any of GEOG 110, 120, EOS 110,120 if taken prior to May 2011.

Courses completed more than ten years ago are not normally accepted.

4. Two of MATH 100 or 102, 101, 151, 161,162, MATH 161 and 162 are recommended. A

C+ average is required to demonstrate competency in mathematics. Courses completed more than ten ago are not normally accepted.

All requirements for admission must be completed by April 30 and documented by

May 31.

Maximum enrolments have been established; therefore, the faculty cannot guarantee that all qualified candidates will be accepted. Accepted candidates will be notified as early as possible, but final acceptance may not be confirmed until late June.

Notes:

Approved courses include:

1. Two of ENGL 135, 146, 147.

2. Select from CS 102, ECON 100, HSTR 230A, 2308, POLl 101, 201, SOCI 103.

3. Select from ASTR 101, 102, BIOL 190A, 190B, EOS 110, 120, one of EPHE 141 or

Curriculum and Calendar Office Use Only -2-Dec-13

SEN-APR 4/14-3

Page 5 of 5

Office of the University Secretary

PO Box 1700 STN CSC

Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada

Tel 250-721-8101 Fax 250-721-6223

E-mail [email protected]

Web http://www.uvic.ca/universitysecretary/

Date:

To:

March 14, 2014

Senate Committee on Admission, Re-registration and Transfer

From:

Re:

Carrie Andersen

Secretary, Senate Committee on Academic Standards

Creation of admission requirements for the Faculty of Education, Pre-

Elementary Education

At its March 13, 2014 meeting, the Senate Committee on Academic Standards reviewed the proposal to establish admission requirements for the Faculty of Education, Pre-Elementary

Education. This is to confirm that committee members had no concerns with the academic standards aspects of the proposal.

SEN-APR 4/14-4

Page 1 of 5

Senate Committee on

Agenda and Governance

Date:

To:

March 21, 2014

Senate

From:

Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance

Re:

Revisions to the Terms of Reference for Senate Committee on Planning

The Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance met on March 21, 2014 to consider revisions to the terms of reference for the Senate Committee on Planning. Details of the proposed revisions are set out in the attached documents.

Recommended Motion

That Senate approve the revisions to the terms of reference for the Senate Committee on Planning.

Respectfully submitted,

2013/14 Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance

Jamie Cassels, Chair

Peter Bell, student senator

Robert Burke, Science

Julia Eastman, University Secretary

Kathy Gillis, Science

Robbyn Lanning, Convocation senator

Reuven Gordon, Engineering

Mary Ellen Purkis, Human and Social Development

Tracie Smith, Library

Reeta Tremblay, Vice-President Academic and Provost

Michael Webb, Social Sciences

Carrie Andersen (Secretary)

SEN-APR 4/14-4

Page 2 of 5

Office of the University Secretary

PO Box 1700 STN CSC

Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada

Tel 250-721-8101 Fax 250-721-6223

E-mail [email protected]

Web http://www.uvic.ca/universitysecretary/

Date:

March 12, 2014

To:

Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance

From:

Carrie Andersen

Associate University Secretary

Re: Senate Committee on Planning Terms of Reference

Membership in the Senate Committee on Planning currently includes eight (8) faculty members (at least two (2) of whom must be members of Senate) and a non-voting representative from the Division of Continuing Studies. Many of the other Senate committees include voting members from each of the faculties and divisions. Because the work of the

Senate Committee on Planning reaches across the university and impacts each of the faculties and divisions, it is recommended that the membership be revised to include ten

(10) voting faculty members representing the faculties and two (2) voting representatives from the divisions (Continuing Studies and Medical Sciences).

Revised terms of reference for the committee are attached. These were reviewed and approved by the Senate Committee on Planning at its March 11, 2014 meeting.

Recommended motion:

That the Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance approve, and recommend to Senate that it approve, the revised terms of reference for the Senate Committee on Planning.

SEN-APR 4/14-4

Page 3 of 5

The Committee shall:

SENATE COMMITTEE ON PLANNING

TERMS OF REFERENCE

l. Study, and submit recommendations to Senate concerning, proposals for the creation or disestablishment of programs, faculties, schools, departments, centres and institutes and major modifications of existing programs;

2. Assist and advise Senate, after due consultation with the faculties, in the formulation of appropriate academic policy; and

3. Advise Senate and the President on academic issues as required.

Senate standing and ad hoc committee meetings are normally closed. A committee may determine that the whole or part of any committee discussion or document presented to the committee shall be held in confidence.

Interaction between the Deans and committee

The agenda and minutes of all meetings will be sent to all the Deans.

The Dean of any Faculty or Division (or designate) involved in a matter being discussed by the Senate Committee on Planning should attend the presentation.

Composition

• 8

10 faculty members representing the faculties (at least 2 of whom shall be members of Senate) (voting)

2 members representing the divisions (Continuing Studies and Medical Sciences)

(voting)

• 2 students - including at least 1 student member of Senate; 1 undergraduate student representative, 1 graduate student representative; the student who is not a member of Senate is to be nominated by the UVSS or the GSS as appropriate

(voting)

• 1 Dean, nominated by the Deans (voting)*

• the President or nominee (ex officio, voting)

• the Vice-President Academic and Provost (ex officio, voting)

• the Associate Vice-President Academic Planning (Chair)

(ex officio, voting)

• the Vice-President Research (ex officio, voting)

• the Registrar (ex officio, non-voting)

• the Director or designate, Cooperative Education and Career Services (ex officio, non-voting)

• the University Secretary or designate (ex officio, non-voting)

• A representative from the Division of Continuing Studies (non-voting)

Total membership – 19 (15 voting members)

SEN-APR 4/14-4

Page 4 of 5

The secretary of the committee is a representative from the Office of the Vice President

Academic and Provost.

*the Dean will be nominated by and from the Deans for a three-year term, the nomination being sent to the Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance for approval by Senate. It is understood that a Dean may be re-appointed, if the Deans so desire.

Approved by Senate September 14, 1983

Revised September 16, 1987

Revised November 16, 1992

Revised November 3, 1994

Revised March 1, 2000

Revised February 4, 2005

Revised February 6, 2006

Revised October 5, 2007

Revised May 4, 2012

Revised October 5, 2012

Revised October 4, 2013

Revised December 6, 2013

SEN-APR 4/14-4

Page 5 of 5

Associate Vice-President Academic Planning

PO Box 1700 STN CSC

Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada

Tel (250) 721-7012 Fax (250) 721-7216

E-mail [email protected] Web http://www.uvic.ca/vpac

Date:

To:

From:

Re:

March 12, 2014

The Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance

Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair, Senate Committee on Planning

Senate Committee on Planning Terms of Reference

At its meeting of 11 March 2014, the Senate Committee on Planning discussed and approved the revision of the Senate Committee on Planning Terms of Reference. The following motion is recommended:

That the Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance approve, and recommend to Senate that it also approve, the revisions to the Senate Committee on Planning Terms of Reference.

:mam

Committee Membership:

Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair

Ms. Lauren Charlton

Dr. Stan Dosso

Ms. Katrina Flanders

Dr. Reuven Gordon

Ms. Carrie Anderson

Dr. Howard Brunt

Dr. Maureen MacDonald

Dr. Timothy Iles

Dr. Merwan Engineer

_____________________________________________

Dr. Reeta Tremblay

Dr. David Boag

Dr. Catherine McGregor

Dr. Victoria Wyatt

Dr. Anne Bruce

Dr. Ann Stahl

Ms. Emily Rogers

Ms. Norah McRae

Dr. Sarah Blackstone

Ms. Jess Gelowsky (Secretary)

SEN-APR 4/14-5

Page 1 of 4

MEMORANDUM

TO: Secretary of Senate

University of Victoria

Student Awards and Financial Aid

Email: [email protected]

Tel: (250) 721-8425

Fax: (250) 721-8757

DATE: March 18, 2014

University Secretary’s Office

FR: Lori Nolt, Director, Student Awards and Financial Aid

Secretary, Senate Committee on Awards

RE:

Awards Recommended to Senate for Approval

The Senate Committee on Awards recommends that the Senate approves and recommends to the Board of

Governors the following awards:

*Administered by the University of Victoria Foundation

Additions are underlined

Deletions are struck through

ROBERT AND ELLEN PEARCE SCHOLARSHIP* (REVISED)

Two scholarships of $5,000 each are awarded to outstanding students entering the University of

Victoria from Canadian Secondary Schools or BC Regional Colleges, Colleges, or Universities.

If the students maintain a grade point average of 7.50 or higher, the scholarships are automatically renewed for a period of four years each year for up to a maximum of three years.

To be automatically renewed, a student must have completed a total of 12 or more academic units in any two terms of study between May and April and maintained a grade point average of

7.50 or higher on the best 12 units. A student whose grade point average falls below 7.50 may file a written appeal with the Senate Committee on Awards to seek special consideration for the renewal of the scholarship. Students registered in a co-op or work experience work term will automatically be renewed when they next complete 12 or more academic units in two terms, provided they have a grade point average of 7.50 or higher in the two terms. Any student who takes neither a co-op or work experience work term or academic units for one or more terms may forfeit their scholarship.

DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION SCHOLARSHIP (NEW)

A scholarship of $200 is awarded to an academically outstanding history major entering their 4 th year who has demonstrated understanding of American history.

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Page 2 of 4

PENINSULA CO-OP BUD NUNN ENTRANCE AWARD (NEW)

A scholarship of $1,000 is awarded to an academically outstanding undergraduate student who has contributed to their community and/or school in an outstanding way through volunteer or extra-curricular activities. The recipient must be a Peninsula Co-op member or the immediate family of a member. Immediate family of the student includes parents, step-parents, guardians, siblings, grandparents, uncles and aunts. Students and immediate family must have had active membership prior to September 1st of the previous year and must currently be in good standing with Peninsula Co-op. The recipient must be enrolled full-time at UVic and must attend UVic within the same year as their secondary school graduation.

PENINSULA CO-OP JACK GROVES ENTRANCE AWARD (NEW)

A scholarship of $1,000 is awarded to an academically outstanding undergraduate student who has contributed to their community and/or school in an outstanding way through volunteer or extra-curricular activities. The recipient must be a Peninsula Co-op member or the immediate family of a member. Immediate family of the student includes parents, step-parents, guardians, siblings, grandparents, uncles and aunts. Students and immediate family must have had active membership prior to September 1st of the previous year and must currently be in good standing with Peninsula Co-op. The recipient must be enrolled full-time at UVic and must attend UVic within the same year as their secondary school graduation.

KOOTENAY BAR ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL BURSARY IN LAW (REVISED)

A bursary of $1,000 is awarded to a student in the Faculty of Law who has contributed to courses in litigation and criminal law. Preference will be given to a student from the Kootenays.

A $1,000 annual bursary is offered by the Kootenay Bar Association to a student in financial need in any year of study in the Juris Doctor (J. D.) Program of the Faculty of Law. While preference is to be given to students in financial need with ties to the Kootenays, such as graduation from a high school in the region, selection of a suitable recipient will remain at the discretion of the Faculty of Law.

BLACK PRESS BUSINESS SCHOLARSHIP (REVISED)

Up to thirty-seven scholarships of $5,000 each are awarded to outstanding undergraduate students entering or continuing in the Peter B. Gustavson School of Business, one scholarship to a student from each district on the attached table. Applications together with a letter stating the applicant's future goals, career ambitions/aspirations and a letter of reference must be submitted to the Peter B. Gustavson School of Business by February 28th. Applications to the Bachelor of

Commerce program, which include the applicant’s future goals, career ambitions/aspirations and a letter of reference, will be used to select recipients for this scholarship. Payment of this scholarship will be done made in two installments, the first in September and the second in

January. The second installment will be dependent upon the recipient maintaining a full time registration in the Peter B. Gustavson School of Business.

PHILOMELA CHOIR SCHOLARSHIP (NEW)

A scholarship of $1,000 is awarded to an academically outstanding undergraduate or graduate student enrolled in the Philomela Women’s Choir who is pursuing a degree in Music or Music

Education.

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PENINSULA CO-OP EXERCISE SCIENCE, PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION

AWARD

(NEW)

A scholarship of $1,000 is awarded to an academically outstanding undergraduate student pursuing a degree in the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education who has contributed to their community and/or school in an outstanding way through volunteer or extracurricular activities. The recipient must be a Peninsula Co-op member or the immediate family of a member. Immediate family of the student includes parents, step-parents, guardians, siblings, grandparents, uncles and aunts. Students and immediate family must have had active membership prior to September 1st of the previous year and must currently be in good standing with Peninsula Co-op.

PENINSULA CO-OP PAT FAFARD ENTRANCE AWARD (NEW)

A scholarship of $1,000 is awarded to an academically outstanding undergraduate student pursuing a degree at the Peter B. Gustavson School of Business who has contributed to their community and/or school in an outstanding way through volunteer or extra-curricular activities.

The recipient must be a Peninsula Co-op member or the immediate family of a member.

Immediate family of the student includes parents, step-parents, guardians, siblings, grandparents, uncles and aunts. Students and immediate family must have had active membership prior to

September 1st of the previous year and must currently be in good standing with Peninsula Co-op.

The recipient must be enrolled full-time at UVic and must attend UVic within the same year as their secondary school graduation.

PENINSULA CO-OP SUS TABATA ENTRANCE AWARD (NEW)

A scholarship of $1,000 is awarded to an academically outstanding undergraduate student pursuing a degree in the Faculty of Science or the Faculty of Engineering who has contributed to their community and/or school in an outstanding way through volunteer or extra-curricular activities. The recipient must be a Peninsula Co-op member or the immediate family of a member. Immediate family of the student includes parents, step-parents, guardians, siblings, grandparents, uncles and aunts. Students and immediate family must have had active membership prior to September 1st of the previous year and must currently be in good

standing

with Peninsula Co-op. The recipient must be enrolled full-time at UVic and must attend UVic within the same year as their secondary school graduation.

REHANA A. MEGHANI MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP* (NEW)

One scholarship is awarded to an academically outstanding student entering the Faculty of Law

J.D. program. Preference will be given to a student who has a demonstrated passion for working in international relations, human rights and/or social justice fields, and has demonstrated commitment to public service and volunteerism.

ELOISE SPITZER SCHOLARSHIP FOR INDIGENOUS WOMEN* (NEW)

A scholarship is awarded to an Indigenous, female student in her 2 nd

or 3 rd

year of the Faculty of

Law J.D. program who has persevered through challenging circumstances. Eligible students must be in good academic standing. Nomination of student recipient will be made by the Faculty of

Law.

_______________________________

Lori Nolt

2013/2014 Senate Committee on Awards

A. Lepp (Chair), L. Nolt (Secretary), P. Arora, A. Baniasadi, K. Barnes, A. Cirillo,

C. Crippen, L. Charlton, B. Macy, Y. Rondeau, J. Walsh, M. Wilson, J. Wood

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Office of the University Secretary

PO Box 1700 STN CSC

Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada

Tel 250-721-8101 Fax 250-721-6223

E-mail [email protected]

Web http://www.uvic.ca/universitysecretary/

Date:

To:

From:

Re:

February 26, 2014

Senate

Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching

Revising and updating UVic’s university-wide learning outcomes

Since the 2012/13 academic year, the Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching has engaged in discussions regarding learning outcomes and learning and teaching goals and values. After conducting a thorough review of the issue and initiatives already in place at UVic, the committee embarked on development of updated university-wide learning outcomes. To reaffirm prior Senate intent, the purpose of published university-wide learning outcomes is to articulate the learning outcomes students will have the opportunity, and are encouraged, to achieve during their education at the

University of Victoria. These learning outcomes should include a broad range of high level skills that are relevant across all disciplines. They should provide clear guidance about the skills and capacities students can expect to achieve as part of their UVic education, without imposing any prescriptive requirements on how these will be delivered. Faculties, units and programs will interpret these outcomes in ways that are discipline-specific, using the university-wide learning outcomes as guide posts for developing program-specific and course-specific learning outcomes. Students in different programs will therefore achieve these outcomes in different ways according to the appropriate standards of their respective fields of study.

Following its thorough analysis and consultation, the Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching is now recommending approval of an updated and revised set of university-wide learning outcomes. If approved, the revised Learning Outcomes will replace the Generic Goals of a University Education which are currently published in the academic calendar.

Attached please find the proposed University of Victoria Learning Outcomes, as well as a memorandum outlining history and context, UVic initiatives and the process undertaken by the Senate

Committee on Learning and Teaching to update UVic’s university-wide learning outcomes.

The proposal is being presented to Senate at this time for discussion. The Senate Committee on

Learning and Teaching looks forward to receiving your comments before finalizing the proposal and submitting it to Senate for approval.

Respectfully submitted,

2013/14 Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching

Janni Aragon (Chair), Social Sciences

Andreas Bergen, Graduate Student

Teresa Dawson, Director, Learning and Teaching Centre

Gweneth Doane, Graduate Studies

Peter Driessen, Engineering

Kayleigh Erickson, UVSS Representative

Dale Ganley, Peter B. Gustavson School of Business

Kathy Gaul, Faculty of Education

Valerie Gonzales, Alumni Association

Nadia Hamdon, Undergraduate Student

Linda Hannah, Convocation Senator

Lucia Heffelfinger Orser, Student Senator

Robert Howell, Law

Mark Laidlaw, Science

David Leach, Fine Arts

Catherine Mateer, Associate Vice-President Academic Planning

Kurt McBurney, Medical Sciences

Norah McRae, Director, Co-op Education and Career Services

Jeannine Moreau, Faculty of Human and Social Development

Rebecca Raworth, McPherson Library

Caron Rollins, McPherson Library

Richard Rush, Continuing Studies

Paul Stokes, Chief Information Officer

Scott Woodcock, Humanities

Carrie Andersen, Associate University Secretary (Secretary)

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University of Victoria Learning Outcomes

Society requires that people with diverse backgrounds come together and work toward resolving complex environmental, ethical, scientific and social problems. In addition to substantive content knowledge in students’ specific fields of study, all students at the University of Victoria are encouraged to take advantage of opportunities they will be given to achieve the following learning outcomes:

Intellectual, academic and practical skills in:

Inquiry, analysis, and problem solving

Critical, innovative, and creative thinking

Effective written, visual, and oral communication

Numerical literacy

Critical evaluation of qualitative and quantitative information

Critical management of information, including in digital environments

Collaboration and the ability to work in teams

Personal and social responsibility capacities:

Informed civic engagement and understanding – from local to global

Intercultural knowledge and sensitivity

Ethical and professional reasoning and action

Life-long learning

These goals are achieved through:

Academic and co-curricular programs of the highest quality

Integration of research and teaching across the curriculum

Practice and support of relevant skills through progressively more challenging problems, assignments, projects, and standards for performance

Opportunities for research, experiential, and work-integrated learning

Active engagement with diverse communities, societal issues and meaningful intellectual challenges

Faculties, units and programs will interpret these outcomes in ways that are discipline-specific, using the university-wide learning outcomes as guide posts for developing program-specific and course-specific learning outcomes. Students in different programs will therefore achieve these outcomes in different ways according to the appropriate standards of their respective fields of study.

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Senate Committee on

Learning and Teaching

Date:

To:

From:

Re:

February 26, 2014

Senate

Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching

Revising and updating UVic’s university-wide learning outcomes

1

History and Context: A Brief Review of the Literature on Learning Outcomes

The literature on learning outcomes has a long and well-established history.

2

Bloom’s (1956) seminal

work (outlining a hierarchy of levels of learning) is most often cited and has been re-worked and re-

interpreted in many forms since that time. However, there are many others. Astin at UCLA, for example, has an enviable longitudinal database that he has used to track (and publish for general benefit regarding) trends as to “what matters in college” for about 30 years (Astin, 1993 is the latest edition).

More recently Kuh’s (1995 and 2001) work linking outcomes to student success has been used to underpin the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) to which many Canadian universities now contribute.

The basic premise of the learning outcomes field is that, in general, teachers teach most effectively and students learn most effectively if they know explicitly and clearly what outcomes they are collectively aiming to achieve.

1

This memo was drafted at the request of the Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching, Subcommittee

on the Learning and Teaching Statement by the following: Teresa Dawson, Catherine Mateer, Norah

McRae and Joe Parsons. The authors would also like to acknowledge the research assistance of Lesley

Scott in their work.

2

The Learning Outcomes literature is considerable. What is provided here is a very rudimentary summary. For those with greater interest, additional resources can be provided by request from the

Learning and Teaching Centre [email protected]

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One of the earlier scholars who wrote about the value of specifying what a learner would be able to do after completion of learning was Robert Mager (1961, 1975). Mager used the term “instructional objectives.” Other rough synonyms have been suggested over the years (behavioural objectives, learning objectives, learning aims, learning goals, competencies, and most recently learning outcomes). Some writers have made distinctions among these various terms (Kennedy, Hyland & Ryan, 2006), but often the terms have been used interchangeably to refer to potentially measurable activities of learners following a learning process.

It is important to distinguish two current meanings of “learning outcomes.” The first meaning is when

“learning outcomes” refers to broadly-defined, desired changes in learners’ knowledge, abilities, attitudes and skills. Examples of this use of the term abound and have received considerable attention and research in North America (e.g., Astin, 1993; Kuh, 1995; Pace, 1984; Pascarella, 1985; Pascarella &

Terenzini, 1991; Tam, 2007; Tinto, 1993) and abroad (Ellington, 1999; Bohlinger, 2012). Often a small set of broadly defined categories are specified and put into overarching frameworks. Sometimes their measurement and correlation to possible influences are researched through self-report instruments like the CSEQ (Pace, 1984) or the NSSE (Kuh, 2001). It is important to notice that in these cases the measurement of outcomes is indirect – changes in desired behaviours are “measured” not by directly assessing the target repertoires of the learners, but by asking learners to report on their repertoires.

When one considers the broad definition of such learning outcomes, it is understandable why direct measurement is a challenge.

Some attempts have been made to develop more direct measures of broad learning outcomes. For example, the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) is a standardized testing initiative developed in the

US. It uses a "value-added" outcome model to examine a college or university's contribution to student learning. The CLA measures are designed to test for critical thinking, analytical reasoning, problem solving and written communication skills. The assessment consists of open-ended questions, is administered to students online, and controls for incoming academic ability. http://cae.org/performance-assessment/category/cla-overview/

A second meaning of learning outcomes refers to the specification of directly measurable properties of a learner’s behaviour. Mager’s (1975) “instructional objectives” would represent this meaning of learning outcome. Mager’s specification of instructional objectives actually involved more than the specification of the activities of the learner. Indeed, Mager wisely recognized that a complete description of learning needs to specify three elements: the performance of the learner, the conditions under which the performance occurs, and the criteria that must be satisfied for mastery to be claimed.

“Performance” refers to the behaviour of the learner; what the learner does. The many definitions of learning outcomes frequently refer to categories in the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains, using the classification schemes proposed by Benjamin Bloom and colleagues (Bloom, 1956; Krathwohl,

Bloom, & Masia, 1964). Sometimes these domains are paraphrased as thinking, feeling and doing, respectively. Krathwohl and colleagues cautioned that these domains do not represent fundamental distinctions among behaviour. Rather, the categories represent groupings that match the way that educators traditionally group learning objectives (e.g. Moreshead, 1965).

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“Conditions” refers to the explication of the circumstances under which the learner engages in the performance. Given X (conditions) the learner will Y (performance). Specification of the performance alone is insufficient, since the same performance under different conditions is not the same. To illustrate with a very simple example, if we assert that the desired performance is that a child says four, we know very little. Is the child imitating the utterance of another person? Is the child naming the symbol “4”? Is the child reading the word “four”? Or is the child responding to “2 + 2 =” or perhaps √16?” In higher education contexts, the conditions under which performances occur vary even more widely. Indeed, many repertoires targeted in higher education are most relevant after the course has ended, where conditions vary even more widely.

“Criteria” refers to the assessment of learners’ mastery of the performance under specified conditions.

How much or how well must the learner perform to convince the instructor that learning has occurred?

Criteria can be quantitative or qualitative, or a combination. Possibly the most frequently used criterion is “percentage correct,” especially for objective examinations. Other, less popular quantitative criteria include speed (most exams are time-limited), latency, amount completed or frequency. Qualitative criteria are more difficult to list since the variety of qualities is immense and varies from discipline to discipline. Often the particular qualitative criteria are specified in a rubric.

UVic as an Early Adopter of Using Learning Outcomes to Articulate the

Benefits of a University Degree

A good example of the first category of learning outcomes identified above (i.e. broadly defined learning outcomes) has a long and well-accepted tradition at UVic. Since 1999 the University Calendar has contained a section called “Generic Goals of a University Education.” Figure 1 below shows the current

(2013/14) entry from http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2013/CAL/TUofV/index.html

. These generic goals, though somewhat outdated in their specific language, contain many of the same sentiments that continue to resonate with the university community to this day.

These “generic goals” lay out a set of knowledge, skills and abilities that every graduate should have the opportunity to develop and be able to demonstrate and are essentially what we would now refer to as the

“university’s learning outcomes.” They include the following categories: higher learning, habits of thought, discovery and creativity, forms of communication and extended learning.

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Figure 1: Generic Goals of a University Education. UVic Calendar 2013/14. Retrieved at http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2013/CAL/TUofV/index.html

Learning outcomes of the second type are especially useful for the design of courses and parts of courses at UVic. An instructor can start by defining the ultimate, terminal learning outcomes for a course. Suboutcomes can then be defined that embrace the particular performances, conditions and criteria that are pertinent to course content. Learning outcomes that specify performance, conditions and criteria may be used to guide the sequencing of instruction to facilitate mastery of the ultimate learning outcomes. For example, complex performances can be broken into components that can be learned and combined into composites. Similarly, terminal conditions can be systematically adjusted to move the learner from “easy” to “difficult” or from “simple” to “complex.” And, in similar fashion, criteria can be systematically varied from “relaxed” to “stringent.”

Students at the university then achieve the broad first category outcomes through quality standards that are easily comprehensible and transparent and communicated to students via individual program and course-defined goals of the second category. When combined with a learner-centred approach (that focuses on what is learned rather than on what is taught) and an openness to continuous student feedback on the learning process (as well as on the services that support their learning), a robust system of continuous instructional improvement results.

Recent International Focus on Quality in Higher Education and its Relation to

Learning Outcomes

Given the potential connection between learning outcomes and measurement of achievement, it is perhaps not surprising that more recently, as a result of politically-driven calls for public accountability, a

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“quality movement” has emerged in higher education that draws upon the learning outcomes literature.

Proponents of this movement have suggested the use of specified but more general learning outcomes to

assess the quality of a student’s educational experience at university.

3

The argument is that program

development and review have traditionally focused on whether sufficient numbers of qualified faculty

members are available to teach in the particular program. While that is important, it is argued that there should be equal concern about assuring what students get out of the program, what they come away with in terms of knowledge and skills and capacity to either go on to further study or to go out and enter the labour market.

As part of this quality movement, Governments in Australia, the UK and Hong Kong (as well as elsewhere) have launched wide-ranging initiatives to try and establish benchmarks and hold institutions accountable

to defined learning outcomes with varying degrees of success e.g. Brookes and Becket (2007); and

Henard and Mitterle (2010).

4

European countries were early adopters of learning outcomes in this way through the Tuning Process, an initiative now more than a decade old, that seeks to harmonize skills and

competencies at the subject or program level. Its aim is to facilitate degree recognition, credit transfers and the mobility of students across jurisdictions. The approach has spread throughout many other parts of the world including Latin America, Russia, Africa, Asia, the U.S and Canada.

In the US, Harvard’s past President Derek Bok has long lamented the failure of a US education to meet student needs (see for example most recently, Bok, 2013). The publication in 2011 of the contentious book, Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses, by Richard Arum and Josipa Roska, further called into question how much postsecondary students were learning. The authors claimed that universities have been failing their students in meeting certain basic writing, critical thinking, team-work and leadership-type skills. As a result, many US universities and colleges have moved quickly to declare their learning outcomes for students (and their parents) on public websites and other institutional documents.

The Current Canadian Context

For a variety of the reasons outlined above, therefore, a growing number of Canadian universities are adopting student learning outcomes as a means of ensuring the quality of their degrees, as well as helping students move between institutions within Canada and abroad.

In Ontario, the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario ( http://www.heqco.ca/en-

CA/Pages/Home.aspx

was established in 2005. Partially in response, the Ontario Universities Council on

Quality Assurance was established in 2010 by the Council of Ontario Universities to assure the quality of university degrees and programs offered in the province http://www.oucqa.ca/ . The most recent report of the Auditor General of Ontario continues to call on the provincial government to work with universities to develop “meaningful measures” for student learning outcomes as a way to maintain teaching quality, to

3

Usually program-level rather than course-level, so the first category defined above.

4

Please see reference section for more references and examples.

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By way of example, the University of Guelph adopted five learning outcomes for all of its degree programs. They are the following: critical and creative thinking, literacy, global understanding, communication, and professional and ethical behaviour. The outcomes are designed to give students a clear understanding of the broad skills they will acquire in a program beyond knowledge and content.

The Current BC Context

The Ministry of Advanced Education released a paper in April 2012 on British Columbia’s Quality

Assurance of Post-Secondary Education Framework. The paper outlines a plan for achieving quality across post-secondary institutions. Objective 2.1 is to ‘Identify and demonstrate high quality outcomes.’

This objective includes the following descriptions:

Articulating, measuring and reporting outcomes provides increased accountability to students and their families, employers, the public, government and other stakeholders. Of increasing prominence are learning outcomes.

Post‐secondary institutions have traditionally established the name and type of credential awarded.

The Canadian Degree Qualifications Framework sets out degree‐level standards that institutions are required to observe and the Degree Quality Assessment Board confirms adherence to these standards through the quality assurance process. At the diploma and certificate level, there are some expectations of what those credentials represent particularly in regulated professions where competency‐based standards have been established. However, there still remains a large portion of programs where there are no agreed upon standards on what those credentials represent or what the learning outcomes are. Greater consistency in learning outcomes across the entire system will make it easier for students and employers to assess the value of these credentials.

Qualifications Frameworks are used in other countries to outline the expected learning outcomes at each qualification level. A qualifications framework will provide clarity to students, prospective employers and other stakeholders on what students should know and be able to do by the end of a program regardless of where the student receives their education.

The Ministry also states that the quality assurance (QA) process should be founded on two premises:

Institutions should be accountable for the extent to which students achieve the outcomes promised or implied in their programs and advertising.

Institutions must have a commitment to continuous improvement.

Already, as part of its annual Accountability Report to the Ministry of Advanced Education, the University of Victoria provides Performance Measure Results. These are reports on the degree to which students who graduated from the University two years earlier report that they achieved skills in a range of areas.

These are essentially learning outcomes. This list includes Written Communication, Oral Communication,

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Group Collaboration, Critical Analysis, Problem Resolution, Learning on your own, and Reading. These seven areas of ‘skill development’ roll up into a Skill Development Average. The Target Skill Development

Average for universities is = to or > than 85%. In 2012/13 the University of Victoria just achieved its target with a graduate reported Skill Development Average of 83.7 +/- 1.4%.

The point of providing this description of the university’s annual Performance Measure is that we are already being evaluated on a set of learning outcomes laid out by the Province. Yet many faculty, instructors and students may not be aware of this. Articulating and adopting a revised and updated set of university-wide learning outcomes would make our goals for student learning more explicit for everyone in today’s language and also meet the accountability needs to the government.

The Use of Learning Outcomes to Support Students at UVic: Current Best

Practices University-wide

UVic’s Pattern of Nested Learning Outcomes Articulated at Different Scales

Current best practices regarding the use of learning outcomes to support students at UVic can be seen at different scales and in a variety of contexts across the university. Teresa Dawson in her recent (2013) A

Guide to Program and Curricular Planning at UVic illustrates this as a series of nested learning outcomes, beginning with the institutional context (the learning outcomes for all programs) and then moving to the individual program level and finally through to specific outcomes for courses (see Figure below). Ideally, there should be (and there often is), general alignment between the goals at each level.

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As stated above, the concept of learning outcomes (even if the specific terms itself is not used) generally resonates across the university community and can be seen very clearly (and quite extensively) in a number of key initiatives that have built over a period of time. In particular, these include: i. the development of learning outcomes for programs (and or parts of programs) as a crucial first step in the process of program design or redesign during the curricular retreats facilitated by the

Learning and Teaching Centre at the request of individual deans, directors or chairs; ii. the self-reported results of the recent campus-wide Quality Exercise; iii. leadership by the professional schools in developing measurable learning outcomes to meet national and or international accreditation standards; iv. and the development and publishing of core and discipline-specific competencies for co-op education in every degree program.

Each of these is outlined in more detail below.

i. Learning from University Initiatives: Defining learning outcomes as a crucial first step in the program curricular retreat process to design and redesign programs

Since 2007, the Learning and Teaching Centre has worked with over half the academic units across campus to facilitate 35 curricular planning retreats in support of their programs. Six additional retreats are scheduled for Spring 2014, at which time the Learning and Teaching Centre will have worked with academic units in every disciplinary faculty (Education, Engineering, Fine Arts, HSD, Humanities, Science,

Social Sciences and Business) except Law. In addition, work has been facilitated with individual course design faculty teams from Law, Medical Sciences and Continuing Studies (so that some faculty in those units are also familiar with the principles employed). The Centre has worked with new and proposed programs, interdisciplinary programs, graduate programs, programs requiring accreditation by professional bodies and Co-op and Career. The results of the work have been used to support academic units in many different ways including allowing deans, chairs and directors to develop documents for, or in response to, external review.

The process of facilitating program curricular planning retreats, along with detailed information for units, is now set out in A Guide to Program and Curricular Planning at UVic (Dawson, 2013) and is based on the work with unit’s conducted in the intervening period. As outlined in the Guide, a key part of the process involves units first participating in the careful generation of collective program learning outcomes. This is most effective by far when all colleagues teaching in the program are included in the discussion.

Dawson (2013, p. 11) reports that in her experience with UVic units

learning outcomes for programs usually fall into two categories: a) learning outcomes that are

general and overarching and common to most programs (e.g. the ability to think critically in the discipline, a sense of civic engagement and responsibility, global citizenship, excellent communications skills, and so on) and b) learning outcomes that are specific to a particular program in a particular discipline at UVic. It is always important in the latter case both to give a sense that the program is well‐rounded (if possible) as well as to be really clear what is unique about this program at UVic. Why would you want to study this here? … If they are to have any meaning, such unique learning outcomes

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can only be generated by the teachers within the program themselves and in a community setting.

Colleagues have to come together and agree on what attributes they want graduates from their program(s) to have (at least in a general sense) if they are to have meaning for them as they articulate them in their own very different ways in their courses. Such outcomes in other words must come from within if they are to impact students positively, and all colleagues must be consulted and involved if they are to be adopted and internalised. For this reason the campus‐wide learning outcomes initiative is wisely broad and flexible enough in its structure to allow for the individuality of

programs to shine through, as well as being consistent enough for external reporting purposes.”

The many academic units who have been working for several years now on their program outcomes in a deep and sustained way, have already independently arrived as a community (perhaps unknowingly) at a set of common university-wide learning outcomes seen in a) above. They have each done this independently but Dawson reports that “when one looks at the general program goals arrived at independently by units for the general, there is remarkable and heartening overlap with the revised university-wide goals that are now proposed.” In this sense, the academic units have already provided a ground truth for the central concept.

ii. Learning from University Initiatives: Provost’s Quality Exercise

Interestingly this collective consensus can be seen also in the outcomes of the Quality Exercise. In the fall of 2012, the Office of the Vice-President Academic and Provost asked all faculties and academic units to undertake a planning exercise aimed at identifying both campus-wide and unit specific goals and metrics that became known as “the quality exercise.” The goals of the exercise were to identify “strategies, activities or initiatives that will increase the quality of the learning and teaching in the unit and enhance the learning experience of students.” As Katy Mateer reports, “although the faculties and academic units took up the Quality Exercise in different ways, and units and programs differ in their particular pedagogies, there was a surprising amount of consistency across units in the kind of learning enhancements that were being developed. These quality goals reflected, and are consistent with, the fundamental goals within the Strategic Plan.”

Common goals and themes that emerged across many units and that were included in Dr. Mateer’s summary report (2013) include:

• Curricular review and redesign including the articulation, measurement and communication of learning outcomes across programs and courses (as above)

• Integration of Co-op and other experiential learning opportunities in the course/curricular design, and ensuring that those opportunities are reflected in classroom room and include student reflection

• Improved faculty and unit level advising and academic support

• Initiatives to increase the integration of teaching and research across all levels of the undergraduate curriculum

• Enhancement of the first year curriculum to more effectively engage and support student success

• Development and identification of gateway courses allowing for flexible entry into the program at other than first or even second year

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• Development of capstone courses and experiences

• Supporting course unions and other student groups, development of student study and social space, enhancement of student awards and celebration of student success on websites and in activities

iii. Learning from University Initiatives: Leadership from the professional schools

Some of the biggest adopters of the concept of measurable learning outcomes for ongoing quality improvement in Canada have been the professional fields such as Business, Engineering, Nursing and

Clinical Psychology. In such contexts professional accreditation bodies have taken a leadership role in integrating expected and measurable learning outcomes into required accreditation standards. UVic’s

professional faculties, in turn, are often contributing significant leadership to these regional and national

debates.

5

Increasingly this trend towards disciplinary learning outcomes is being seen in other academic associations as well, such as the Canadian Association of Geographers

6

iv. Learning from University Initiatives: Development of Core and Discipline Specific

Competencies for Co-operative Education

At UVic Co-op has also taken a leadership role by developing Co-op “competencies” (akin in many ways to

“learning outcomes”) for all programs, which are attainable and measurable.

The Co-operative Education program established an Experiential Learning Committee (ELC) in November

2007 to focus the efforts of the co-op program on strategies that would enhance students’ learning through their co-op experiences.

The composition of the committee reflected all faculties. This group determined that the assessment of student competencies (knowledge, skills and abilities) stood out as an educational strategy that would strengthen links between academic and workplace learning, provide clarity about this learning and enable students to articulate their competencies to others. An extensive investigation of competency frameworks used at other organizations and universities in Canada and internationally followed (please see reference section below). This investigation led to the development of ten core competencies that were determined to be relevant to all discipline areas on campus. These ten core competencies were formalized and launched as an institutional pilot throughout all 224 program areas in 2010: personal management, communication, managing information, research and analysis, project and task management, teamwork, commitment to quality, professional behavior, social responsibility and continuous learning.

5

See for example the Faculty of Engineering’s contributions to the Engineering Graduate Attributes

Development Project http://egad.engineering.queensu.ca/

6

See for example the Canadian Association of Geographers http://www.cag- acg.ca/files/pdf/geography_degree_jobs.pdf

(p. 7)

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The development of discipline-specific competencies and cross-cultural competencies was completed through 2011/12 in collaboration with faculty, students and employers in each program area. In the summer of 2012 a competency assessment module was launched through the co-op and career database allowing for on-line assessment. In 2012/13 a pilot co-curricular record was launched with the ten core competencies used to assess learning. Currently, this competency framework pilot is being used throughout all career, co-op, work experience, internship, community service learning and co-curricular programs. There are resources available on the co-op and career website and curriculum to support student understanding and use of the competency framework and assessment tools.

The Process of Generating a Teaching and Learning Statement for the

University Including Updating our High-Level Learning Outcomes

Since the 2012/13 academic year, the Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching has engaged in discussions regarding learning outcomes and learning and teaching goals and values. These discussions were initiated, in part, by the Ministry of Advanced Education’s interest in developing a provincial-wide quality assurance framework. At the same time, departments across campus were engaging in the

Provost’s Quality Exercise, in which they identified goals for enhancing the learning environment and the student experience. Emerging from this exercise it was evident that many departments, whether through

Learning and Teaching Centre facilitated curricular retreats, or in other ways, have begun to engage in the process of curriculum review and identification of learning outcomes as outlined above. They are carefully considering how to ensure that the primary goals for a program are met within the program requirements.

In its consideration of learning outcomes, it was acknowledged by members of the Senate Committee on

Learning and Teaching that there are many paths to achieve a particular broad learning outcome and that the mechanisms used vary across departments and disciplines, as well as from instructor to instructor.

Committee members agreed, however, that some standard learning outcomes could continue to be identified at an institutional level (as they had since 1999), and that these could be appropriately applied across programs and curricula.

In spring 2013, the Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching established a sub-committee to draft a

university-wide learning and teaching statement, the goal of which would be to set out the variety and

diversity of ways in which learning and teaching may occur at the university.

7

Part of the role of the subcommittee in this context was to review and revise the university’s broad, high-level learning outcomes

that students are encouraged to pursue and that are recorded in the Calendar in somewhat outdated

7

Members of the Subcommittee were the following: Janni Aragon, Mauricio Garcia-Barrera, Teresa

Dawson, Gweneth Doane, Catherine Mateer, Norah McRae and Joe Parsons. Members would also like to acknowledge the contributions of Lisa Surridge in early drafts of the proposal.

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Page 15 of 28 language. The statement was drafted over the summer and preliminary consultations were conducted in

Fall 2013. A significant amount of feedback was received from the groups and individuals consulted.

In general, there appeared to be support for the scale and scope of the proposed updated learning outcomes, as well as a strong emphasis on the importance of engaging in ongoing discussions across campus regarding both the outcomes and the statement. The sub-committee carefully considered all feedback received regarding the proposed learning and teaching statement and shared this with the

Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching as a whole. Following thorough discussion, the committee agreed to place priority on updating the university-wide learning outcomes (over which there was considerable agreement and for which there was already precedent in the Calendar) before proceeding with the rest of the statement.

A Proposal to Revise and Update our University-wide Learning Outcomes

To reaffirm prior Senate intent, the purpose of published university-wide learning outcomes is to

articulate the learning outcomes students will have the opportunity, and are encouraged, to achieve

during their education at the University of Victoria.

8

These learning outcomes should include a broad

range of high level skills that are relevant across all disciplines. They should provide clear guidance about

the skills and capacities students can expect to achieve as part of their UVic education, without imposing any prescriptive requirements on how these will be delivered.

Faculties, units and programs will interpret these outcomes in ways that are discipline-specific, using the university-wide learning outcomes as guide posts for developing program-specific and course-specific learning outcomes. Students in different programs will therefore achieve these outcomes in different ways according to the appropriate standards of their respective fields of study.

In updating the university-wide learning outcomes, the Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching consulted widely, as follows:

Vice-President Academic and Provost

Associate Deans

Graduate students

Undergraduate students

Convocation members of Senate

Learning and Teaching Centre Advisory Committee

Town hall sessions open to all faculty, librarians and staff

Website with opportunity to provide feedback by email

8

See Appendix B for the historical UVic Senate record regarding the development and implementation of generic university wide goals, approved in principle in October 1998.

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Chairs and Directors

Deans

Student members of Senate

Division of Continuing Studies

Co-operative Education and Career Services

The Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching also analyzed and built on other university initiatives focused on: the program outcomes work of academic units resulting from curricular review retreats, the

Quality exercise results and the development of core competencies in Co-op, as described above.

Part of the process used in the proposed updating of the university-wide learning outcomes was to compare the draft revised outcomes with the competencies developed in the co-op pilot. Each outcome was cross-referenced with the co-op competencies to identify gaps and commonalities. This comparison revealed significant overlap between the two approaches with some areas of difference; the co-op competencies had identified continuous learning while the university-wide learning outcomes identified quantitative reasoning. In summary, it was determined that the co-op competencies can be adjusted to align with the revised university-wide learning outcomes once these are finalized to allow for a consistent institutional approach.

Proposal

Following its thorough analysis and consultation, and the work of its Subcommittee, the Senate

Committee on Learning and Teaching is now recommending approval of an updated and revised set of university-wide learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are set out in Appendix A.

If approved, the revised Learning Outcomes will replace the 1998 ones in the Calendar. In addition, the opportunity would be taken to communicate them in other ways e.g. posted on the university website, referenced in strategic planning documents and used to help align (existing) and establish (new) programs.

Recognizing that the university should continue to analyze and assess the learning outcomes students should have the opportunity to achieve during their education, it is proposed that the university-wide learning outcomes be reviewed after three years. The outcome of this review and any recommendations for revisions to the learning outcomes will be presented to Senate for approval.

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Appendix A – Proposed University of Victoria Learning Outcomes

(Revised and expanded from the 1998 original by the Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching)

University of Victoria Learning Outcomes

Society requires that people with diverse backgrounds come together and work toward resolving complex environmental, ethical, scientific and social problems. In addition to substantive content knowledge in students’ specific fields of study, all students at the University of Victoria are encouraged to take advantage of opportunities they will be given to achieve the following learning outcomes:

Intellectual, academic and practical skills in:

Inquiry, analysis, and problem solving

Critical, innovative, and creative thinking

Effective written, visual, and oral communication

Numerical literacy

Critical evaluation of qualitative and quantitative information

Critical management of information, including in digital environments

Collaboration and the ability to work in teams

Personal and social responsibility capacities:

Informed civic engagement and understanding – from local to global

Intercultural knowledge and sensitivity

Ethical and professional reasoning and action

Life‐long learning

These goals are achieved through:

Academic and co‐curricular programs of the highest quality

Integration of research and teaching across the curriculum

Practice and support of relevant skills through progressively more challenging problems, assignments, projects, and standards for performance

Opportunities for research, experiential, and work‐integrated learning

Active engagement with diverse communities, societal issues and meaningful intellectual challenges

Faculties, units and programs will interpret these outcomes in ways that are discipline‐specific, using the university‐wide learning outcomes as guide posts for developing program‐specific and course‐specific learning outcomes. Students in different programs will therefore achieve these outcomes in different ways according to the appropriate standards of their respective fields of study.

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Appendix B – The Senate record from 1998 regarding the original approval of the “Generic Goals of a University Education.”

To LEARN • To T H I NK • To DISCOVER • To COMMUN I CATE • To CoNTI NU E LEARN IN G

MEMO R ANDUM

UNIVERSITY OF V I CTOR I A

O ffi ce of t he P re s ident

February 5, 19 98

T o: Membe r s of the U ni versity Co mmu n ity

From: David F. St r o n g, Chair

The P lanning a nd Pri orities Co mmittee

Re: Draf t Generi c and Ess e nt i al Goals of an University Educatio n

The Planning and Prioriti es Co mmit tee, after a l eng thy review of many nspecr s of the Uni versi r y, has begun to fulfill it s ro le in the im p l ementation of t h e Stra t e g ic Plan .

One recommendation that it thought was key was number 1 . (a) of th e Strategic Pio n :

The U n iversi t y s h o u l d de fi ne th e essential and ge n eric goals of an u ndergrad u ate ed u ca ti on at t h e U n i v e r s it y o f V i c t o ria a n d, i n l i g h t o f t h o se goa l s, r egula rl y r ev i ew degree a n d program re q ui r eme n ts, incl u di n g quinquennial reviews of all p rogram s.

The Co mmittee sees thi s document a s a first s t ep i n a continuing dialogue. The C ommittee decided to include grad u at e studies a n d t o develop objectives t h at woul d fulfiJI this recomme n d atio n.

In br ief, the

five

goal s are to l earn, t o th i nk , t o co m municate, to d isco\':er, a n d to continue l earni n g .

Th e attac h ed r eport ex pand s on th ese five goals o includes a cotTiment sectio n and issues of impl e mentation.

The Co mmitt ee sees these goals a s being a n important consideration i n the lon gterm p l a nnin g and pr ior i ty setting of the Uzii ve r sity. O n ce a final set of goals h a.s been esta bli shed, the Committee will u se the goa l s to give me a dvic e o n priorities with r eg ard to t h e imp l ementa ti on of t h e Strategic P l a n an d on resource all ocation .

The Co mmitt ee seeks iopu rftom Jll area s of the Uni•ocr~ i ty . Unirs and dep a r tm e n ts,

1 as well as i ndivi dua l s, arc encourag e d t o consider and d ebate the propose d goa l s.

We l oo k f o rw a rd t o your co mm e n t s and suggestions for impl e mentation. Please forward you r responses to the

University

Secreta ry (s sc un [email protected] uvi c .ca

) b y

Marc h 1 3 t h , 1 998.

David F. S tr ong, C h ai r

Plann ing and P r i oriti es Committee:

REPORT OF THE PlANN I NG AND P R IORITIES COMMITTEE

OF THE UNIVERSITY OF V I OORIA ON THE OB J EO I VES OF

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE EDUCATION

INTRODUG I ON :

The Plannin g and Prioriti es Co m mittee of th e University of V ictoria describe s f ive objectiv es in this d oc um ent which w e th ink repres ent a n impo rta n t pa rt of o ur mi ssion . M oreove r , we believe that t h ey a r e objectives which will be u seful at an o perational l e vel for r e views of bo t h ex i s ting aca d e mi c P rogra m s an d dec i s i o n s con cerni ng new ones. Thi s is nor an exhaus ti ve list of objectives, a nd we expect in th e months ahead to a d d to t h em .

Th e d oc ument re cog nize s a nd r es p ec t s the diversity of d iscip lin es an d the diHercnt ways in w b ich faculties and d epartments car r y our their academ ic m iss ion s.

We also r ecognize th a t s om e facultjes an d d ep amn ents h ave been or are wo r king along s imil a r lin es. F o r ex am ple , we hav e mer with t h e Dean 's Councii subco mmittee on a co r e c u rriculu m , a n d h ave r eceived the draft repon of t h e Faculty of Arts and Science Ad H oc Committee on B r ea dth of Degree Requir e m ents and M obi lity b e tw ee n Scie n ce , H uman ities and Soc ial Sciences .

In t h e comme n taries att ached ro each objective we ha ve set ou t in gener al t e rm s the contex t in which t h e o bj ectives w ill be pla y ed out, and the implica ti ons of the objectives for fu tur e p lan n ing. I n t h e sec t i ons h ea d e d " I ssues of lmp lementationn we in clud e mo re spec ifi c th o u g h ts about wa ys in wh ich th e objec ti ves should o r m i g ht be tr ans lated into a ction . Th e ob j ectives, comments an d issues of imp l ementation arc d esigned t o be r ea d t oge th e r .

SPECIAL IN SERT FEBRUARY 1'J98

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Page 19 of 28

To

LEARN •

To

THI NK •

To

DI SCOV E R •

T o

COMMUNlCATE •

To

CONTINUE LEARNING

Th e docum e n t acceprs the principles set out in the

Mission Statement of the University, found at page ii of the Strategic Plan, a s the underlying concext of our work .

We arc committed tO the follow ing princip l es :

1 . Freedom of s peech and i nquiry; o p en and rational di scussio n; inte lle ctual and ethical integrit y.

2. Commirment t o t eaching, l earning, and re search as necessities in a heal th y democratic society.

3.

Equi ty in opportunities and emp l oyment for all across rbe camp us.

4 . Collegia l form s o f governance t h at provide appropria te opportunities fo r participation of all members of the University commu nity.

5. Environment s for work and st ud y that arc safe and healthy , fo s ter mutual respect and civility, and s upport our recognition that our p eop l e are our primary strength.

6 .

Publi c and int ernal account abil i ty.

The members of t h e Comm ittee hope t h at you will give us the benefit of your thoughts and ideas abour-what you read in this document. They will help us in shaping these objectives, in encouraging aC3dcmic unirs to work towards their implem e ntation, and in moving ahead with our work generally.

OBJECTIVES OF UNDERGRADUATE

AND GRADUATE EDUCATION AT THE

UNIVERSITY OF V I OORIA

A.

TO

LEARN:

To encourage stude nt s to understa n d and appreciate the various manif es tation s and diverse c ultura l co nt exts of human knowled ge arid c r eat i ve exp r essio n , whet h er they are . produ ce d a nd r ep roduced within or across s p ecific disciplin es.

COMMENT:

We recognize fuUy that most often the acqu i sition of knowledge by university s rudents is necessarily bas ' ed in p artic ul ar disciplin es . For many stud ents it is the starting place for learnin g. 1-towever, it should also b e r ecog ni ze d that knowledge in a particular discipline can rare ly be isolated from other bodies of knowledge.

Moreover, the reality is that, in a complex, p l uralist society such as ours, the sources of knowledge and creative expression are diverse and overlapping. Those sources include knowledge and creative work produced by aca d ewic n::~carch, by scie mific experiment, by artistic inspiration , by pro fess ional expertise , practice al'ld und erstanding, by spiritua l in sig ht, by community discussion, by cusrom and tradition, by disc ou r se and sroty reUing and by various forms of popular culture. These forms of knowledge often cross conventional disciplinary boundaries, and requir e the development of interdiscip lin ary a nd crossdisciplinary understanding in srudents, as well as an understanding of the diverse cult ural contex t s of knowledge a nd creative expression.

Learning requires the development of an ability to absorb and integrate knowledge and creative forms.

Literacy, creative· sensitivity and numera .

cy are important aims in this process, as well as an introduction to computer-base d and other communiC~tion technologies.

An understanding of the contexts, as well as rl1e .

impact of the uses of knowledg e is important . A greater emphasis on eco logical and feminist knowledge and va l ue s, on intercu ltu ral and multicultural sensitivity, and on the global effects of transnational forces and trends i s need ed in rhe aC3dernic program.

Learning . in the conrcmporMy world wil l lead to a g•·carer stress on in t erdisciplinary an d crossdi sc iplinary courses and resea r c h so that st udents can see a n d experience the linkages between discipli n es.

An undemand ing of the breadth of knowledge and creativ e endeavour becomes essential no mauer in what disciplinary area students do the majority of their learning.

I SSUES OF IMPLEMENTATION:

1.

This objective raises the possibility of cc • ·tai n facu l ti es incl ud ing c ore co11rses in curricula to e n s ur e t h at students are exposed to dh·crsc inteUecrua l cballc•,gcs.

Other faculties might ensure exposure to these e lements of lea r ning basis using a portfolio' approach that demonstrates substantive skill re qu irements that arc interspersed throughout the curricula.

2.

The Aboriginal peoples h~ve particular constitution a l right s, includin g t h at of se lf government, and are accorded status as th e original inhabitants of this l and mass. The University should provide opporturtities for both Aboriginal and non Aboriginal people to incorporat e into their understanding knowledge about th e cultures of, and generated by, Aboriginal communities.

3 . Thi s obje~tive requires that the University Library be upgraded an d it s co l l ection expande d to provide g r ea ter access to knowledge and creative expression in the diver se forms in which they arc p roduced.

4. In so far as enriching the fenUn.isr and multicultural aspects of the curriculum arc concerned, it is impon:anr that greater diversiry among the faculry teaching at rhc

Unive r sity of Victoria is achieved.

I A portfolio is

4

Cllmulative co llection of evickncc o howing experience, slcills, and tt;tining thot a student ha< ocquirtd beyond the mjuiremtntS of a sp«ifitd program. Some foculries may facilitate • student's developm<nt of a porrfoho by indic.1tiog how course. fulfiU the essential

goals

of an tdueuion

(lit eracy, nwnttacy, problem sohing, teamwork. intctpc:tSonnl skills, emical and aesthetic understanding, SCJtntilic Iinney, o:te). Courses '""l' be 1drnrifird in th e

CAI!'!ntbr hv nn icon fh nr indicare..c; rhat mev

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~rude.."!t.~ i n

:tr'IV bn,1n· :.nrl rh !!t

r

I~I"'V

W()lolA

~

11;11 ,.t,.,.

I"(IIIO(ttl; .. ......,..,..,."

,..r ...

---:~...

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C' .. r i ........

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Page 20 of 28

To LEARN

+

To THINK

+

To DISCOVER

+

To COMMUNICATE

+

To CONTINUE LEARNING

B.

TO

THINK

To help students enhance th e ir capacity f o r critical and s trategic thought , their s ensitivity to the ethical dimensio n o f making deci sio n s, an d th e ab ility to exercise wise judgment in hum a n affairs.

COMMENT:

Lea rn ing entails assessing, critiquing and working wi th know led ge and creative expression. I t is important to determ in e w hether and h ow s uch k n ow l e d ge a nd cre at i ve experie nce are to be used, to und e r sta nd t h e human con di t ion , to mak e intelligent a nd, h opefully, w i se and principled political, soc i a l , eco nomic , l ega l , sci entific and c ultur a l deci s ion s .

Thi s objective points in th e dire c ti on of expos in g st u dents to th e c hallen ges of problem so lvin g, et hics, cre at i ve thinkin g and performance, wh e th e r i nd i vi du a ll y or in g r oups or teams.

To the extent t h at our soc iety require s that p eople with d iverse backgrounds come together co work on a nd resolve complicated s cientific , e nvir on m ental, socia l an d et hi cal prob l ems, it also poi n ts in th e dir ect i on of more inte r disciplinary and crossdisciplinary expos ure.

E ncour ag ing s tud e nts to l e arn about and to u se comp ut er a nd ot h er information technologies is important co this objective.

ISSUES OF IMPLEMENTATION:

1.

The co lia bor~t iv e . probl e m so l vi n g or c r ea tiv e express i on . aspects of this ob j ective may be incl ude d in e i t h er core co ur ses or b y a portf o l io approach, as men t i on ed above.

2. With the assistance of those faculty members . already using problem-solvi~g and cre at ive expression techniqu es, a nd of the Learning and Teac hin g Centre , opportunities sho ul d be create d for a lar ger number of faculty members to b e expose d to this approac h to teaching and learning.

C.

TO COMMUN

I

CA

TE:

To ena bl e students to com munic ate clearly an d coher ently, employing b o th traditional and innovat i ve m9 d es of interaction in or der to transmit creative ideas and strategies as well as kno w l e d ge.

COMMENT : co ' mmuni cat ion with oth e rs, whether in ora l , a uditor y, writte n , v i s ual or di g i ta l form , i s an impo rta n t co m ponent of knowledge and creative expression . We s hould therefore prov i de ex p erience in l earning about, utilizing and eva l uating t h ese diver se modes of comm uni cat i on, and co give s tudents the opportunity to d e velop th e · in terperso n al ski ll s whic h make for effective communi cat i on.

This objective encourages th e dev e l opment of programs th~t n ~P u~rlnnc;: mnrl pc;: nf rn mmnni r~ tinn in r ln rlinP d ents w ho canno t spe nd any or a ll their ti me

(e .

g. disability or the frag ili ty of t h eir financia l sta tu s) o n ca m pus, this objective c h a ll enges the University to m eet these goa l s through the expa nded use of distrib u ted learning.

ISSUES OF IMPLEMENTATION:

1. For some faculties this object i ve may be pur sued by including oral and written commun i cation and co ll ab~ ­ rative sk ill s in particular r e quired co ur ses, while others may offer i t b y use of a portfolio r eq uirem e n t .

2. To further this ob j ective t h e assista n ce of co ll eagues , th e L earni n g and Teac h ing Centre, Com pu ting Services, and th e Library sho uld b e e nli s t e d t o pr ovide a great e r numb e r of faculty m embers a nd admin i st'ra ti ve a nd tec hni ca l staff w ith in s i g ht into the benefits of web searching , l ist se rv e r s, an d constructing a n d utilizing web s ite s and other sim .

ilar innovations for i n struct i ona l purpose s. T h e assistance of the Division of Co ntinuin g

Studies an d th e Learning and Teaching Centre · s h o u l d be soug h t to ensure that more f ac ulty members are introduc e d to th e p ptent i al fo r distributed learning in th e ir disciplines .

3. The objective also points in the dire ction of u p grading the University Lib rary and com puter and d istance communica tion facilities co prov i de the capacity for the diverse modes needed.

. D.

TO

DISCOVER:

To t each st ude nts th e va lue of scholarly resear ch and creative endeavour, enco ura ging them to appreciate the imp o rtant role these pl ay in the advancement of knowledge and inducing graduate s tudents in particular to participate act iv e ly in the pro duc tion a nd dissemination of such knowledge.

,

COMMENT:

In order for students to develop a n in terest in research, and how k n owledge and creative expression are generated and di ssemi n a ted, it is im portant t h a t ways and means are found t o expose students more directl y to t h e re l ationship berween the research and creative endeavo u rs of fa c ulty and their teaching.

The object i ve for und e r grad uat e st udent s is t o prov id e ex p e ri e n ce o n h ow r esearc h i s brought into, and inform s, l earning and teachin g. It is a l so i mp ortant to ens ur e t h at, as far as possib l e , unde r g r aduate s tu den t' s h ave th e opportunity to e ng age in a researc h or creative exercise as part of their prog r a m.

For graduate s t udents the focus is ex t e nd ed so that the student b ecomes a key p l ay er in the re se arc h a nd scho l arly life of t h e uni ve r sity by generating and disseminating knowledg e and creative understandin g with the benef i t of mentorin g provided by faculty.

ISSUES OF IMPLEMENTATION:

DRAFT - February 26, 2014

To LEARN

+

To THINK

+

To DISCOVER

+

To COMMUNICATE

+

To CONTINUE LEARNING

2. Facul t ies an d departments shou ld consider ways and means o f providing the opportunit y for a ll u n de r graduate students to engage in at l east one r esearch o r c r e ative expression project, whether individu al or collect i ve in c har acter.

3 . The Fa culry of Graduate Studies and individual departments should ens ure that the s upervi sion and men toei n g of graduate students p r ovides the quality d irection, counsel and support which they need.

Moreo ve~ where avai labl e , coUaborative research with a fa c u l ty member o r members sho uJd be encouraged , and ways and m e~ m s ex plored for encouraging the publicati on of both indi vidual and collaborative research which recogni1.cs fully th e co ntributi o n of the graduate srudem/s in que sti on.

4. The Faculty of Graduate Studie s and ind i vidual d e partments sho uld endeavour to ensure that graduate s tud e n rs engaged in scholarly resea r ch or creative expressio n have the opportunity to teach or tutor, to make the con n ec ti on between the two pa r ts of an aca d e ~ mic's role, and to allow t h em t o use their own research in reaching .

5. The Vice President Research sho u l d develop as a pr i ority the facilitating of individual and collabo r ative re searc h p r ojects involv in g junior members of faculty, so that momentum developed during grad uat e s tudi es and post~docroral prog r ams is s u s tained and nurtured.

E.

TO CoNTINUE LEARNING :

To instill i n stude nt s a d esire for th e self-enrich ment t o be gai n ed fr o m lif e l ong l earning, a l erti n g them to th e range o f opportunities for further ed u cation, b ot h intel l ecrua l and practica l , avai labl e in the univer si ty setti n g.

C OMMENT:

All roo often education, even at a unjver si ry level, i s cons tructed, imparted or interpreted a s a series of hur ~ dies o n e has ro travers e to get to a particular and desired end, be it advance d s tudi es, professional s tudi es o r a particular caree r . The r e is va lu e in s rre ss ing in uni versities t h e educa tional process a s a continuum which idea ll y is never comp l ete, and that a univers i ty ed u cation i s merely t h e sta r t to what can be an inre ll cc rua ll y ch al l e n ging, soc ia ll y empowering and sometimes materi ally rewar d ing lifetime q u est.

I t is one thing to pur o ur t hi s message to students, anothe r t o make op por tunities avai l able for continuing learning ro take p l ace. Universities should be deep l y invo l ved in both projects by ensuri n g tha t wh e rever learning rakes place ir i s an intellectual a nd m i nd expanding p u rsuit, and by developing and implementing programs which e nri ch the continuing e ducation in the community at large.

I SSUES OF IMPLEMENTATION:

1. Faculties and departments should be abl e to show students that know l edge and c r eative expression acquired in a univer s ity can be used nor only in d ev el oping career choices, but also as a means ro inte.llcctual

, empowering and emotionally satisfying pursuits.

2. This objective points to the expansion of distributed learning ar rhe University, and faculties s h ould be encouraged to look se riou s l y at how di st ributed learning m ight be made more readil y available.

3. Steps shou l d be t aken t hrough, and with the assi stance of, Continuing Studies t o extend credit, non-c r edit and co nfer ence a n d work sho p offe rin gs which pr ovide oppor tuniti es for continuing education, as we ll as showcasing the unique scho l a r s hip and reaching which goes on at the University of Victor i a. The Alumn i

Association may well have a usefu l co nsultative , and perhaps even a mark eting r ole to p l ay he r e.

Respectfully submirted,

Dr. Mary Wynn e , Ashford

Dr. Chris Barnes

Mr.

David Clode

Dr. Evelyn Cobley

Dr. Penny Codding

Mr . john Fraser

Ms. Sherry MacLeod

Ms. Morag MacNeil

Dr. Jim McDavid

Prof. john McLaren

Dr. Bruce More

Dr. Don Rowl att

Dr. David Strong

Dr . Nancy Turner

Dr . Renni e Warburton

Jan u ary 23,

1998

SEN-APR 4/14-6

Page 21 of 28

S P E C I A

1.

I

N S

E R .

T f 1i 8 R U A R V I 9 9

8

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Page 22 of 28

MEMORANDUM

TO:

RE:

FROM :

::~~F.~~

Chair, Pla~g s Comm i ttee '

Essential and Generic Goals of a University Education

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA

Office of the President

September 3, 1998

Last fall , as a first step in implementing the University's Strategic Plan, the Planning and Priorities

Committee developed the essential and generic goals of a university education as recommended in the Plan .

After drafting a set of goals , it circulated these widely to faculty , staff and srudents through the Ring and the Marlier and asked for feedback. The feedback was mainly positive and the Committee is now requesting that Senate adopt the following goals for inclusion in the Calendar.

A) To Learn:

To encourage students to under s tand and appreciate the various manifestations and diverse cultural contexts of hu11Uln knowledge and creative expression, whether they are produced an.d reproduced within or across specific disciplines.

B)

C)

D)

E)

To Think:

To help students enhance their capacity for critical and strategic thought, their sensitivity to the ethical dimension of making decisions, and the ability 10 exercise wise judgmem in hunlan affairs.

To Communicate:

To enable students ro communicate clearly and coherently , employer both traditional and innovative .

modes of imeraction in order to transmit creative ideas and s trategies as well as lawwledge.

To Discover:

To teach students the value ofscholaT/y research and creative endeavour, en c ouraging them to appreciate the important role these play in the advancement of knowledge and inducing gradua1e students in particular co participate a .

ctively in the production and dissemiru:ztion of such knowledge.

To Continue Learning:

To instill in students a desire for the self-enrichment to be gained from life-long learning, alerting them to the range of opportunities for further education, both int e llectual and practical, available in the uni v ersity setting.

P a ge2

[:0 01 34

Th e complete report including u comment a ry a.ud i ss ue s of itnpletncnmti o n for each g oaJ i s a ttached for int'orm a tion. The Plannin g. and Pri o ri•j e$ Co mmit ;rce c ontint.a

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References

Learning Outcomes and Quality Assurance

9

Astin, A.W. (1993), What Matters in College? Four Critical Years Revisited, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.

Bloom, B. (1956) Taxonomy of educational objectives: the classification of educational goals: Handbook I,

cognitive domain / by a committee of college and university examiners; Benjamin S. Bloom, (Ed).

New York ; Toronto : Longmans, Green. LB17 T3 v.1

This book is the original analysis of the cognitive domain. Reading through this book one discovers that Bloom and colleagues categorized cognitive domain learning into many more divisions that the six often cited.

Bok, Derek (2013). Higher Education in America. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Bohlinger, S. (2012). Qualifications frameworks and learning outcomes: challenges for Europe’s lifelong learning area, Journal of Education and Work, 25:3, 279-297.

This article provides a review of European experience with learning outcomes and qualifications frameworks. Political, conceptual and procedural issues are discussed.

Brookes, M., & Becket, N. (2007). Quality management in higher education: a review of international issues

and practice. The international journal for quality and standards. 1 (1), pp 85-121. Retrieved from http://bsieducation.elysium-ltd.net/Education/downloads/ijqs/paper3.pdf

Dawson, T. (2013). A Guide to Program and Curricular Planning at UVic. Learning and Teaching Centre, the University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://www.ltc.uvic.ca/initiatives/index.php

.

Ellington, H. (1999). Generic level learning outcome templates: a tool for benchmarking student achievement levels throughout a university, Quality Assurance in Education, Vol. 7 Iss: 1, 47 – 58.

Hejazi, B. (2010, August). Learning outcomes based approach. Challenges facing Canadian quality

assurance in a global context. Canadian Institute for Studies in Education. University of Toronto.

Retrieved http://www.academia.edu/1373798/Learning_Outcomes_Based_Approach_Challenges_

Facing_Canadian_Quality_Assurance_in_a_Global_Context#

Henard, F., & Mitterle, A. (2010). Governance and quality guidelines in higher education. A review of

governance arrangements and quality assurance guidelines. OECD Higher Education Programme.

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Kennedy, D., Hyland, Aine, & Ryan, N. (2006) Writing and using learning outcomes: A practical guide. In,

Implementing Bologna in your institution, C 3.4-1, 1-30. http://sss.dcu.ie/afi/docs/bologna/writing_and_using_learning_outcomes.pdf

9

Includes some selected annotations.

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This is an excellent guide to the writing and implementation of learning outcomes for instructional design. Learning outcomes are defined, distinguished from similar terms, explicated with examples and non-examples, and linked to assessment. Some advantages to the use of learning outcomes are described, and potential problems with learning outcomes are discussed. Highly recommended.

Krathwohl, D. R. (2002). A revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy: An overview. Theory into Practice, 41(4), 212-

218.

This article presents the revision of the original taxonomy of the cognitive domain (Bloom, 1956).

The revision makes several important adjustments to the taxonomy. First, the “knowledge” dimension in the revision has four subcategories instead of three, adding “metacognitive knowledge.” The major six categories were renamed and reordered in the revision, using verb forms rather than nouns (“remembering” rather than “knowledge”; “understanding” rather than

“comprehension”; “applying” rather than “application”, “analyzing” rather than “analysis”; and

“evaluating” rather than “evaluation”. “Synthesis” has become “creating”.

Krathwohl, D.R., Bloom, B.S., & Masia, B.B. (1964). Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of

educational goals. Handbook II: The affective domain. New York: David McKay. LB17 T3 v.2

This book follows upon the first handbook, extending the analysis into the affective domain. The authors are careful to point out that the cognitive and affective domains are not fundamentally different types of behaviour, even though educators often treat them as different.

Kuh, G.D. (1995). The other curricula: out-of-class experiences associated with student learning and personal development, Journal of Higher Education, Vol. 66, pp. 123-55.

Kuh, G. D. (2001). The National Survey of Student Engagement: Conceptual framework and overview of

psychometric properties. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University, Center for Postsecondary Research.

Mager, Robert F. (1961, 1975). Preparing Instructional Objectives, Belmont, CA: Pitman

Learning. LB1029 A85M2 1975

This small book is a gem. It leads the reader through the three essential components of instructional objectives: performance, conditions and criteria. Most of the examples are from the lower levels of the cognitive domain. The book periodically quizzes the reader and allows quicker learners to skip remedial instruction.

Mateer, C. (2013). “Report on the Quality Exercise at UVic.” Quality Exercise Summary retrieved from http://www.uvic.ca/vpacademic/assets/docs/budget/QualityExerciseSummary_20131015.p

df

Morshead, R.W. (1965). Taxonomy of Educational Objectives Handbook II: Affective Domain. Studies in

Philosophy and Education, 4(1), 164-170. (Copy attached)

This short article is a review of Krathwohl, Bloom & Masia’s book on the affective domain.

Pace, R. (1984). Measuring the Quality of College Student Experiences, UCLA Center for the Study of

Evaluation, Los Angeles, CA.

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Pace, R. (1987). CSEQ: Test Manual and Norms, UCLA Center for the Study of Evaluation, Los Angeles, CA.

Pascarella, E. (1985). College environmental influences on learning and cognitive development: a critical review and synthesis, in Smart, J. (Ed.), Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research, Vol. 1,

Agathon Press, New York, NY.

Pascarella, E. & Terenzini, P. (1991). How College Affects Students, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.

Tam, M. (2006). Assessing quality experience and learning outcomes: part 1: instrument and analysis,

Quality Assurance in Education, Vol. 14 No. 1, 75-87.

Tam, M. (2007). Assessing quality experience and learning outcomes: Part II: findings and discussion,

Quality Assurance in Education, Vol. 15 Iss: 1,61-76.

Tinto, V. (1993). Learning College: Rethinking the Causes and Cures of Student Attrition (2

nd

Edition), The

University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL.

Co-op competencies

Alberta Corporate Human Resources. Alberta Public Service Competency Model. Retrieved July 9, 2008.

Website: http://www.chr.alberta.ca/?file=learning/competencies/apscomp/ aps-competencies

Amulya, Joy (2004). What is Reflective Practice? Retrieved July 10, 2008, from The Center for Reflective

Community Practice at MIT. Website: http://web.mit.edu/crcp/Archived/vitaldiff1/Documents

/what%20is%20reflective%20practice.pdf

Association for Experiential Education (2008). What is Experiential Education? Retrieved July 10, 2008.

Website: http://www.aee.org/customer/pages.php?pageid=47

BC Public Service Competency Dictionary. Retrieved July 9, 2008. Website: http://www.bcpublicservice.ca/down/pdfs/competency_dictionary.pdf

Canadian Council on Learning (2008). The Benefits of Experiential Learning, Retrieved July 10, 2008.

Website: http://www.ccl-cca.ca/CCL/Reports/LessonsInLearning/

LinL20080221BenefitsofExperientialLearning.htm

Conference Board of Canada Employability Skills (2001). Retrieved July 9, 2008. Website: http://www.conferenceboard.ca/education/learning-tools/employability-skills.htm

Conference Board of Canada (2003). Turning Skills into Competencies Retrieved July 10, 2008.

Website: http://www.conferenceboard.ca/education/reports/default.htm

Core Competencies TVCA – Valencia Community College. Retrieved March 3, 2008. Website: http://www.valenciacc.edu/competencies/

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Evers, Fred & Mitchell, Janet (2005). Competency‐Based Education in the 21

st

Century Universities.

Educational Research & Development Unit, University of Guelph, Ontario.

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Iowa State University Core Competencies – Leadership Journey. Retrieved March 3, 2008. Website: http://www.sac.iastate.edu/leadership/?at=core

Kelly, Ron (2008). Graduate Skills: What Employers Want. Retrieved July 10, 2008, from Graduate

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Website: http://www.vcu.edu/uc/core/

Quality Assurance Agencies: Australia, Hong Kong, and U.K

Australia

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Dr Carol Nicoll, Chief Commissioner and Chief Executive Officer. Commission and Senior Management

Team. See: http://www.teqsa.gov.au/about/governance

Australian Government. Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency. (2013) TEQSA Annual Report

2012‐13. Retrieved from http://www.teqsa.gov.au/news-publications/annual-reports/2013

Shah, M, Nair, C.S., & Wilson, M. (2012). Quality Assurance in Australian Higher Education: Historical and

Future Development. Retrieved from http://www.academia.edu/566941/Quality_assurance_in_Australian_higher_education_histo rical_and_future_development

Hong Kong

Hong Kong Council for Accreditation of Academic and Vocational Qualifications

(HKCAAVQ) http://www.hkcaa.edu.hk/en/about-us/about-hkcaavq

The Honourable Martin LIAO Cheung-kong, Chairman. The Council. http://www.hkcaa.edu.hk/en/aboutus/the-council-membership-list

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The Hong Kong Council for Accreditation of Academic and Vocational Qualifications. (2013). Annual

Report 2012/2013. Refining the QA model. Towards an enabling approach. Retrieved from http://www.hkcaa.edu.hk/files/publications/annual-reports/AR2012-2013.pdf

UK

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Pages/default.aspx

Mr Anthony McClaran, Chief Executive of QAA.

Directorate. http://www.qaa.ac.uk/AboutUs/corporate/Pages/Directorate.aspx

The Quality Assurance Agency. (2009). An introduction to QAA. Retrieved from http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Pages/An-introduction-to-

QAA.aspx

The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. (2012). Enhancement Led Institutional Review.

University of Edinburgh. November 2011. Retrieved from http://www.qaa.ac.uk/InstitutionReports/reports/Documents/RG_851a_Edinburgh.pdf

SEN-APR 4/14-7

Page 1 of 5

Associate Vice-President Academic Planning

PO Box 1700 STN CSC

Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada

Tel (250) 721-7012 Fax (250) 721-7216

E-mail [email protected] Web http://www.uvic.ca/vpac

Date:

To:

From:

Re:

March 12, 2014

The Secretary of the Senate

Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair, Senate Committee on Planning

Renewal of the Centre on Aging

At its meeting of 11 March 2014, the Senate Committee on Planning discussed and approved the Renewal of the Centre on Aging. The following motion is recommended:

That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of Governors that it also approve the renewal of Approved

Centre Status for the Centre on Aging (COAG) for the five year period April 1, 2014 through March 31, 2019.

:mam

Committee Membership:

Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair

Ms. Lauren Charlton

Dr. Stan Dosso

Ms. Katrina Flanders

Dr. Reuven Gordon

Ms. Carrie Anderson

Dr. Howard Brunt

Dr. Maureen MacDonald

Dr. Timothy Iles

Dr. Merwan Engineer

_____________________________________________

Dr. Reeta Tremblay

Dr. David Boag

Dr. Catherine McGregor

Dr. Victoria Wyatt

Dr. Anne Bruce

Dr. Ann Stahl

Ms. Emily Rogers

Ms. Norah McRae

Dr. Sarah Blackstone

Ms. Jess Gelowsky (Secretary)

SEN-APR 4/14-7

Page 2 of 5

M E M O R A N D U M 

 

 

Date:  January 22, 2014 

To:   Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair of the Senate Committee on Planning 

 

 

From:   Dr. Howard Brunt,  Vice‐President Research

Re:   Renewal of  the Centre on Aging (COAG) 

 

An external review of the COAG was conducted on November 13‐14, 2013 and the appended report was  provided by the review panel on December 16, 2013. 

The review panel report is a comprehensive and well balanced assessment of the COAG.  In particular,  the report recommends continuation of the COAG and is very positive about the contribution that COAG  makes to enhance the reputation of the University.  In the executive summary of the report, the panel  describes the COAG as: 

a Centre of Excellence in research and community engagement 

an outstanding and exemplary Research Centre in the field of Aging in Canada and 

internationally 

a model Centre on Aging in all of Canada 

Undergraduate Student Involvement 

The review report (page 9) includes a comment, ‘No evidence of undergraduate involvement was  provided.’  This is not accurate. 

Sections 3.4.1 and 3.5.1 of the COAG self‐study articulate the Centre’s involvement in:  a) undergraduate program development (e.g., Centre’s representation on the advisory board of  the School of Public Health and Social Policy that has an undergraduate program in “Healthy 

Aging”; and the development of an Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society);  b) providing employment for undergraduate students to engage in research activities;  c) hosting recipients of Jamie Cassels Undergraduate Research Awards (JCURAs) to engage in  research at the Centre on Aging;  d) the initiation, negotiation and instruction of an interdisciplinary, intergenerational  undergraduate course on aging; and  e) the establishment of the Centre on Aging Teaching Resource Toolkit that provides easily  accessible materials to support instructors in teaching aging‐ related content at UVic. 

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Panel’s Recommendations 

1)  The University of Victoria should continue to fund and support its Centre on Aging. 

This is taken as a recommendation to renew approval of the COAG.  The COAG self‐study document  and the external review report both provide strong evidence in support of this recommendation.   

The recommendation to continue funding and other support for the Centre is accepted as advice.  

The ongoing support of the COAG will be subject to the consideration of available financial and other  resources within the full spectrum of activity in the research portfolio. 

2)  The University should clarify the proportion of the mandate that should be dedicated to research vs. 

community outreach 

While it is important to consider the balance of activity in the Centre, research and community  outreach should be viewed as a continuum, particularly in an area addressing the needs of society,  such as the study of aging, where one clearly complements the other.  A research Centre should  develop a mandate appropriate to its goals and aspirations with guidance from the University’s 

Strategic Plan and the University’s Policy on the Establishment and Review of Research Centres, both  of which emphasize the importance of research as well as the importance of engagement with the  community.  

Dr. Tuokko will complete her term as COAG Director in June 2014.  However, she has suggested, and I  fully endorse, that the balance between the many roles the Centre plays will be undertaken by future 

Directors in the development of a strategic plan for COAG (see 3 below).  The AVP Research will  provide guidance as the COAG research plan is developed. 

3)  Consideration be given to a strategic research plan outlining areas of research priority for the     purposes of resource allocation and future planning. 

The University will be developing a strategic research plan under the guidance of the next VP 

Research (expected start date July 2014).  All research Centres will be engaged in that process. This  will inform the manner in which the COAG develops its own plan.  The COAG is strongly encouraged  to institute a process that will engage all researchers studying aging as well as other stakeholders. 

4)  Consideration should be given to the possibility of strategically expanding the Centre’s mandate to  areas such as medicine, basic and engineering science given that there may be research strength  within the institution in such areas. This could be potentially achieved with an increased COAG role of 

University of Victoria faculty members working in those areas. Expansion to basic science would  facilitate interdisciplinary and a more comprehensive understanding of the aging process. 

The COAG should give consideration to the ways in which the Centre can strategically pursue  opportunities to enhance engagement with researchers from these areas and that should clearly be  part of the COAG strategic plan (3 above).  Interest in doing so was expressed in section 3.2.1 of the 

Centre’s self‐study document. I note that there is already some engagement with these areas upon  which enhanced activity can be built. 

5) The Centre should explore ways of re‐engaging and expanding the Friends of the COAG group. 

Opportunities through programs such as VERA, Snapshots and Masterminds are available to re‐ engage these volunteers/seniors. Individuals may be able to be recruited at the many Café 

Scientifiques sponsored by the COAG. 

SEN-APR 4/14-7

Page 4 of 5

The COAG has indicated agreement with this recommendation and has specified a number of  initiatives Centre is taking in that regard.  The recent move of the COAG to R Hut has made the 

Centre more accessible to the off‐campus community, the Friends of COAG in particular. 

6)  Although staff members expressed satisfaction with the current model of staff work allocation, given  the considerable discontent among faculty, this model should be re‐examined and the concerns  addressed. 

To address these concerns, the COAG Director and the AVP Research are consulting with  representatives from UVic Human Resources to explore opportunities for a facilitated process with 

COAG staff and faculty. 

7)  Specific attention should be paid to resolving internal differences related to resource and staff  workload allocation to ensure the smooth operation of the Centre. Failure to address these issues may  eventually be detrimental to the COAG success. 

These issues will be addressed through the facilitated process with Centre staff and faculty being  considered in response to recommendation 6.  These considerations will also be better clarified as 

COAG develops its strategic plan. 

8) Consideration should be given to the possibility of creating definitions of core faculty or centre fellows 

(e.g., those who are physically located at the centre and use substantial centre infrastructure) and for  those who are affiliates but not core faculty. Together with such a distinction, there should be a clear  mechanism (e.g., regular meetings) through which core members can influence Centre decisions and  direction. 

The COAG has indicated they agree with the recommendation of ensuring that there are clear  mechanisms through which research affiliates can engage with the Centre. While it is natural that  there will be different levels of engagement by researchers located at the Centre and those affiliated  but not located within the Centre, it is equally important to not create artificial distinctions and to  ensure Centre resources are effectively used to support and promote all COAG related activity. 

The Director has indicated that appropriate meetings are being reinstated now that the move to R 

Hut, which has caused significant administrative and time pressures, is complete.  The Director and  the next Director should build on this to increase buy‐in from across the COAG community. 

9) Consideration should also be given to creating an Associate Director position with specific portfolios. 

This would help alleviate the Director’s work load and allow for additional input in decision making. 

The creation of an Associate Director must be based on the demonstration of need with specific well‐ defined roles duties and responsibilities. The COAG will be responsible for resourcing such a position. 

 

 

10) The COAG should strive to create more opportunities for students to be together as a cohort (e.g.,  social events for students; a seminar series for students, representing various disciplines, to present  their research). 

The COAG Director has advised that students affiliated with the COAG are naturally quite engaged  with their home units. Dr. Tuokko has indicated a number of COAG activities that are directed to  student interaction and engagement, and that the Centre will continue to provide support and  assistance in facilitating these activities. 

 

SEN-APR 4/14-7

Page 5 of 5

Conclusion and Recommendation 

The external review panel has provided a very positive assessment of the COAG and has recommended  its continuation. 

After reviewing the documentation and the Review Panel Report in particular, I recommend that the 

Senate Committee on Planning approve the following motion: 

 

  cc:   

That the Senate Committee on Planning recommends that Senate approve and recommend to the 

Board of Governors that it also approve the renewal of Approved Centre Status for the Centre on 

Aging (COAG) for the five year period April 1, 2014 through March 31, 2019.  This recommendation  is not contingent upon the suggestions in the external review report relating to resources, which  are advice to the Vice‐President Research. 

 

By copy of this memorandum, I am notifying the COAG, through the Director, that the next review of the 

Centre will include an assessment of the progress the Centre has made on the recommendations in the 

Review Panel Report and the further suggestions noted above.  This does not restrict the Centre from  undertaking other initiatives as appropriate. 

H. Tuokko, COAG Director 

 

SEN-APR 4/14-8

Page 1 of 4

Associate Vice-President Academic Planning

PO Box 1700 STN CSC

Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada

Tel (250) 721-7012 Fax (250) 721-7216

E-mail [email protected] Web http://www.uvic.ca/vpac

Date:

To:

From:

Re:

March 12, 2014

The Secretary of the Senate

Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair, Senate Committee on Planning

Renewal of the Institute for Integrated Energy Systems

At its meeting of 11 March 2014, the Senate Committee on Planning discussed and approved the Renewal of the Institute for Integrated Energy Systems. The following motion is recommended:

That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of Governors that is also approve the renewal of Approved

Centre Status for the Institute for Integrated Energy Systems (IESVic) for the five year period April 1, 2014 through March 31, 2019.

:mam

Committee Membership:

Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair

Ms. Lauren Charlton

Dr. Stan Dosso

Ms. Katrina Flanders

Dr. Reuven Gordon

Ms. Carrie Anderson

Dr. Howard Brunt

Dr. Maureen MacDonald

Dr. Timothy Iles

Dr. Merwan Engineer

_____________________________________________

Dr. Reeta Tremblay

Dr. David Boag

Dr. Catherine McGregor

Dr. Victoria Wyatt

Dr. Anne Bruce

Dr. Ann Stahl

Ms. Emily Rogers

Ms. Norah McRae

Dr. Sarah Blackstone

Ms. Jess Gelowsky (Secretary)

SEN-APR 4/14-8

Page 2 of 4

M E M O R A N D U M

Date: 

To:  

February 20, 2014 

Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair of the Senate Committee on Planning 

From:   Dr. Howard Brunt,  Vice‐President Research 

Re:   Renewal of  the Institute for Integrated Energy Systems (IESVIC) 

An external review of the IESVic was conducted on December 10‐11, 2013 and the appended report was  provided by the review panel on January 21, 2014.  The Review Panel specifically commented on the 

  quality of the review documentation prepared by IESVic. 

The review panel report is a comprehensive and informative assessment of IESVIC.  In particular, the 

Executive Report is highly positive on both the current activities of IESVic and the opportunities for 

  enhanced activity.  The Executive Summary of the Panel report states: 

The Institute for Integrated Energy Systems Victoria (IESVic) is a vigorous Research Centre at the 

University of Victoria. Data of the past five‐year period shows a substantial increase in external  research funding, a strong publication record, and excellent engagement with international  programs and alumni. This has been achieved with modest and constant base funding levels and  with a strong esprit de corps built by IESVic members and centred in the limited space assigned to 

IESVic. 

 

A.  The Review Panel commented positively on: 

‐ increased numbers of HQP, increased research funding and the increased number research  publications since the last review 

‐ the collegiality and sense of belonging expressed by IESVic members: staff, faculty and students 

‐ the extent to which IESVic allowed collaboration and HQP training that would not otherwise  occur 

‐ the University’s return on investment for its support of IESVic – the panel characterized this as 

“UVic gets excellent value for money” 

‐ the collaboration with Universität Oldenberg 

‐ the interaction with PICS 

‐ IESVic’s continued engagement with its alumni 

‐ the two administrative support personnel in IESVic (Sue Walton and Peggy White ) whom the 

Panel characterized as “essential to IESVic’s operations, and to maintaining the strong  collegiality and student satisfaction” 

1

SEN-APR 4/14-8

Page 3 of 4

 

B. The Review Panel indicated the following should be considered and addressed: 

‐ the lack of a formal IESVic membership agreement 

‐ succession planning for the next Director 

‐ extending collaboration with other possible academic partners e.g. the three other partners that  participate with Universität Oldenberg in the European Masters program in Wind Energy 

‐ space, especially for graduate students and post‐docs 

‐ engagement of more faculty members outside Mechanical Engineering 

‐ creating an External Advisory Panel and enhancing industrial collaboration 

‐ increasing external funding for energy systems modeling which is seen as the main vehicle of  collaboration within IESVic and which is an area for which IESVic is well‐known 

 

Review Panel Recommendations

1. An external advisory panel should be appointed and tasked with securing industry funding for an 

 

Industrial Research Chair in an area relevant area

Agreed that an external advisory panel is needed for the ongoing development of IESVic.  The same  issue arose in the consideration of Dr. Wild’s reappointment as Director and he advises that he is  working on creating a panel.  When the panel is formed it should consider the IRC suggestion along  with other opportunities for enhanced external funding. 

 

2. IESVic should seek external funding for the energy systems modeling as a high priority

 

The Director has indicated that this is indeed underway. 

 

3. UVic should review its support for IESVic with the intention of maintaining and extending the 

administrative support, enhancing its support of HQP training and development, and providing 

 

suitable space for researchers

This recommendation will be taken into account by the AVPR in the ongoing consideration of  institutional support for all research centres at UVic. 

 

4. The collaboration with Universität Oldenberg should be protected and extended

 

The Director has indicated initiatives are underway that address this recommendation. 

 

5. IESVic should develop and implement a Membership Agreement

 

Agreed.  This will assist in providing clarity and support for the ongoing operation of IESVic.  The 

Director has indicated a draft agreement is under development and will be considered by the IESVic  membership. 

2

SEN-APR 4/14-8

Page 4 of 4

 

6. The VP Research should consult the Dean of Engineering to address the problems of limited space for 

 

IESVic

The AVPR will bring the concerns to the attention of the Dean of Engineering 

 

 

Conclusion and Recommendation 

The external review panel has provided a positive assessment of IESVIC and their report is strongly  supportive of the renewal of IESVic. 

 

After reviewing the review documentation prepared by IESVic, the Review Panel Report and the 

 

Director’s response to the Review Report, I recommend that the Senate Committee on Planning approve  the following motion: 

That the Senate Committee on Planning recommends that Senate approve and recommend to  the Board of Governors that it also approve the renewal of Approved Centre Status for the 

Institute for Integrated Energy Systems (IESVic) for the five year period April 1, 2014 through 

March 31, 2019 .  This recommendation is not contingent upon the suggestions in the  external review report relating to resources, which are advice to the Vice‐President Research. 

 

By copy of this memorandum, I am notifying IESVic through the Director, that the next review of  the Institute will include an assessment of the progress IESVic has made on recommendations 1, 

2, 4 and 5 in the Review Panel Report and on the items from the Report noted under B above.  

 

This does not restrict the Centre from undertaking other initiatives as appropriate. 

  cc:    P. Wild, IESVic Director 

3

SEN-APR 4/14-9

Page 1 of 2

Associate Vice-President Academic Planning

PO Box 1700 STN CSC

Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada

Tel (250) 721-7012 Fax (250) 721-7216

E-mail [email protected] Web http://www.uvic.ca/vpac

Date:

To:

From:

Re:

March 12, 2014

The Secretary of the Senate

Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair, Senate Committee on Planning

Discontinuation of Certificate in Financial Planning

At its meeting of 11 March 2014, the Senate Committee on Planning discussed and approved the Division of Continuing Studies discontinuing the Certificate in Financial Planning. The following motion is recommended:

That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of Governors that it also approve, the discontinuation of the

Certificate in Financial Planning.

:mam

Committee Membership:

Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair

Ms. Lauren Charlton

Dr. Stan Dosso

Ms. Katrina Flanders

Dr. Reuven Gordon

Ms. Carrie Anderson

Dr. Howard Brunt

Dr. Maureen MacDonald

Dr. Timothy Iles

Dr. Merwan Engineer

_____________________________________________

Dr. Reeta Tremblay

Dr. David Boag

Dr. Catherine McGregor

Dr. Victoria Wyatt

Dr. Anne Bruce

Dr. Ann Stahl

Ms. Emily Rogers

Ms. Norah McRae

Dr. Sarah Blackstone

Ms. Jess Gelowsky (Secretary)

SEN-APR 4/14-9

Page 2 of 2

Office of the Dean

Continuing Studies

Room 358

3800 Finnerty Road

Victoria, BC

V8P 5C2

Tel: 250-721-8456

Fax: 250-721-8774 http://www.uvcs.uvic.ca

/,',lmintj!lwllltupe_;

;v/wyoum<

March 13, 2014

To:

From:

~M~r

Chair, Senate Committee on Planning

Maureen MacDonald

-;l{

. .. •

a?··-"

I~

Chair, Senate Committee on Continuing Studies ·

~

12

,·f

,

Re:

Certificate in Financial Planning

Please be advised that on January 21, 2014 the Senate Committee on Continuing

Studies moved to have this program permanently discontinued effective immediately.

The Certificate in Financial Planning was approved in 2009. With the financial crisis the market for this type of programming decreased and has not recovered.

There is also increased competition in the field as Camosun College now offers similar courses for credit and the Canadian Financial Standards Board has now increased the number of on line courses available and offers them at a lower cost.

The Division has had to cancel offerings over the last few years due to a lack of students.

At this time we no longer see potential for this program and as such we recommend that we permanently discontinue the program. There are currently no students in the program as they have transitioned to the Canadian Financial

Standards Board program. The last course offering was the fall of 2011.

Accordingly, there will be no impact on students. jta

SEN-APR 4/14-10

Page 1 of 5

Associate Vice-President Academic Planning

PO Box 1700 STN CSC

Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada

Tel (250) 721-7012 Fax (250) 721-7216

E-mail [email protected] Web http://www.uvic.ca/vpac

Date:

To:

From:

Re:

March 12, 2014

The Secretary of the Senate

Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair, Senate Committee on Planning

Proposal to Change Department’s Name from ‘History in Art’ to ‘Art History

and Visual Studies

At its meeting of 11 March 2014, the Senate Committee on Planning discussed and approved the Proposal to Change Department’s Name from ‘History in Art’ to ‘Art History and Visual Studies. The following motion is recommended:

That Senate approve the Proposal to Change Department’s Name from ‘History in Art’ to ‘Art History and Visual Studies.’

:mam

Committee Membership:

Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair

Ms. Lauren Charlton

Dr. Stan Dosso

Ms. Katrina Flanders

Dr. Reuven Gordon

Ms. Carrie Anderson

Dr. Howard Brunt

Dr. Maureen MacDonald

Dr. Timothy Iles

Dr. Merwan Engineer

_____________________________________________

Dr. Reeta Tremblay

Dr. David Boag

Dr. Catherine McGregor

Dr. Victoria Wyatt

Dr. Anne Bruce

Dr. Ann Stahl

Ms. Emily Rogers

Ms. Norah McRae

Dr. Sarah Blackstone

Ms. Jess Gelowsky (Secretary)

SEN-APR 4/14-10

Page 2 of 5

Uni v ersity of Vict o ria

Department of History in Art

Fine Arts Complex, Room 151

PO Box 17 0 0, Stn esc

Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 2Y2

Tel : (250) 721-7942, Fax: (250) 721-7941

March 6, 2014.

Dear Dr. Mateer, Associate Vice-President Academic Planning, (Chair), Senate Committee on Planning, and committee members:

Please find attached two documents regarding a proposed name change for the Department of History in

Art . The first is a detailed rationale for why we seek to change the department name to Art History and

Visual Studies . The second document is the consultation packet.

As you can see, the response to our proposed change is very positive. Please get in touch if you have additional questions.

Yours,

Catherine Harding, Dr.

Chair, History in Art, and Associate Professor, Late Medieval and Early Renaissance Italian Art

PastPresident, UAAC-AAUC (2011)

UVIC/VPAC

RECEIVED

Roply..m:

MAR 1 2 2014

I file:

1

SEN-APR 4/14-10

Page 3 of 5

University of Victoria - Department of History in Art

Proposal to Change the Department's Name to

'Art

History and Visual Studies'

Dated: February 25, 2014

From: Dr. Catherine Harding on behalf of the members of the Department of

History in Art, University of Victoria

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The Department of History in Art wishes to change the unit's name to 'Art History and Visual Studies'. On September 16, 2013, as a result of a curriculum retreat held at the Learning and Teaching Centre, the faculty members of the Department of History in

Art moved unanimously to ask that the unit's name be changed from 'History in Art' to 'Art History and Visual Studies'. The proposed new name of the department responds better to the current teaching/ research expertise in the department, as well as meeting students' needs to identify more clearly with a recognizable profile in the related disciplines of Art History and Visual

Studies.

OVERVIEW /TIME LINE:

The current proposal includes a section on the background of the original name, as well as a justification for the change. We are preparing a package that demonstrates broad consultation and review across many partners, from students, to outside community members, other art history departments in British Columbia, local museum and gallery specialists, and a selected number of art history departments within Canada.

We ask that this change become effective once the name change has been reviewed and accepted at all levels of the University ofVictoria. We are not seeking a retroactive application of the new departmental name for the degrees of students who graduated from

. our department before the change.

BACKGROUND:

The Department of History in Art at the University of Victoria wa~ founded in 1969, when the Department of Fine Arts (founded in 1964) split into Visual Arts and History in Art. The first Chair, Alan Gowans, had a vision of a department whose scope would include all major world civilizations, and whose approach to the study of their visual cultures wocld be from the viewpoint of the social function of art-making. Professor Gowans published over 20 books and articles in which he articulated this path-breaking approach to art history, which was in the vanguard of its day in art historical scholarship.

Below is a sampling of quotes and commentary on his vision of Art History as a historical and contemporary framework of understanding that would embrace what is now known in the field as Visual Studies and Material Culture Studies.

"The question is not what is art, but what is it that arts do, in and for society," Alan Gowans,

HA 120 textbook, 1970.

SEN-APR 4/14-10

Page 4 of 5

"He had a genius for taking any artifact and seeing it had a sort of cultural relevance to your life", [emphasis added] as noted by John Crosby Freeman, writing about Gowan's impact in the obituary of Alan Gowans. [Obituary composed by Adam Bernstein,

The Washington Post,

08/21/2001.]

"Gowans believed in an expanded Art History, with a focus on how artifacts actually function for the members of society, and for society as a unit. He focused on the popular/ commercial arts well before his time, enquiring how we understand all historic arts.

[He asserted] ... that High art as well as Low, functioned in and for society, for their social functions were similar. And further, understanding historical and contemporary art makes them instruments of historical research of a truly objective kind," book review of A.

Gowan's

Learning to See, by J.F. O'Leary, 1984.

The above quotations leave no doubt about the unique perspective of Professor Alan

Gowans, and they help us understand why the Department was associated with the phrase

'History in Art' from 1969 to the present . It is important to note that, to the best of our knowledge, our name is unique within the world.

Alan Gowans was not alone in the community of art historians in wanting to promote scholarship on a broad range of artifacts across world cultures. The discipline of art history now encompasses a spectrum of possible names, such as Visual Culture, Visual Studies,

Visual Culture Studies, and so on. These branches of the same art historical tree often originated in the 1960's as a rebellion against what was perceived as narrowness within traditional academic disciplines, including traditional art history : Briefly, terms such as 'visual culture' or 'visual studies' are used today to signify the social, political, and cultural significance of any human creation that is primarily meant to be experienced visually. Such a definition makes clear how this expansionist definition of the appropriate objects of scrutiny for the art historian has transformed the field. With the academy's drive towards interdisciplinary thought, it is common to find art history melding with various perspectives, such as cultural anthropology, archeology, cultural studies, design history, and the sociology of art. The reasons why this unit wishes to change its name are given below .

JUSTIFICATION FOR PROPOSED NAME CHANGE:

The Department proposes that our name be changed to 'Department of Art History and

Visual Studies' to provide a clear designation of our department that is consistent with developments in art history since the 1960s. This proposal emerges from an extensive consultation process on undergraduate and graduate curriculum, which has been ongoing since fall 2013.

The change would help to strengthen the identity of our department from something rare and not easily understood, to a phrase that represents current practices within our department and in the discipline at national and international levels. The link between 'art history ' and 'visual studies' demonstrates that we do not focus exclusively on higher forms of art, but rather embrace any number of media and creative art practices on a worldwide stage.

The term 'Visual Studies' forms an excellent complement to our offerings in Film Studies.

SEN-APR 4/14-10

Page 5 of 5

List of People and Institutions Consulted:

INTERNAL:

Emma Engen (Vice President, History in Art Student Association), 10 undergraduates consulted

Lorena Calahorrano, HA Master's student

J enelle Pasiechnik, HA Master's student

Anne Napoli, HA Master's student

Regan Shrumm, HA Master's student

Terry Flynn, HA Master's student

Natalie Masson, HA Master's student

Alanah Garcin, HA Master's student

Melissa Berry, HA doctoral student

David Christopher, HA doctoral student

Brian Pollick, HA doctoral student

Susan Hawkins, HA doctoral student

Behrang Nabavinejad, HA doctoral student

Professor Daniel Laskarin, Chair, Department of Visual Arts

Tania Muir, Director, Cultural Resource Management, Continuing Studies, U .

Vic

Caroline Riedel, Curator of Collections, Legacy Gallery

Mary J o Hughes, Director, Legacy Gallery

John Archibald, Dean of Humanities

David Capson, Dean of Graduate Studies

EXTERNAL:

Jon Tupper, Director, Art Gallery of Greater Victoria

John O'Brian, Professor, Department of

Art

History, Visual Art and Theory, UBC

David Bogen, Vice-President Academic Provost, Emily Carr University of

Art and Design

Elspeth Pratt, Director, School for the Contemporary Arts, SFU

Dorinda Neave, Department of Art History, Capilano University

Cathleen Hoeinger,

D~partment of Art History, Queen's University

Cynthia Hammond, Department of art History, Concordia University

Email consultation requested but no response:

Department of Art and Design, Vancouver Island University

Department of Art History and Visual Culture, University of British Columbia Okanagan

Department of Art History and Visual Studies, University of the Fraser Valley

2

SEN-APR 4/14-11

Page 1 of 23

Associate Vice-President Academic Planning

PO Box 1700 STN CSC

Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada

Tel (250) 721-7012 Fax (250) 721-7216

E-mail [email protected] Web http://www.uvic.ca/vpac

Date:

To:

From:

Re:

March 12, 2014

The Secretary of the Senate

Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair, Senate Committee on Planning

Proposal for a Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities

At its meeting of 11 March 2014, the Senate Committee on Planning discussed and approved the Proposal for a Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities. The following motion is recommended:

That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of Governors that it also approve, subject to funding, the establishment of a Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities, as described in the document “Proposal for a

Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities”, dated February 23, 2014, and that this approval be withdrawn if the program should not be offered within five years of the granting of approval.

:mam

Committee Membership:

Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair

Ms. Lauren Charlton

Dr. Stan Dosso

Ms. Katrina Flanders

Dr. Reuven Gordon

Ms. Carrie Anderson

Dr. Howard Brunt

Dr. Maureen MacDonald

Dr. Timothy Iles

Dr. Merwan Engineer

_____________________________________________

Dr. Reeta Tremblay

Dr. David Boag

Dr. Catherine McGregor

Dr. Victoria Wyatt

Dr. Anne Bruce

Dr. Ann Stahl

Ms. Emily Rogers

Ms. Norah McRae

Dr. Sarah Blackstone

Ms. Jess Gelowsky (Secretary)

SEN-APR 4/14-11

Page 2 of 23

Proposal  for  a      

Graduate  Certificate  in  Digital  Humanities     based  in  the    

Digital  Humanities  Summer  Institute  (DHSI)  and  its  International  Network  

 

[23  February  2014.    This  document  reflects  all  changes  recommended  by  the     sponsoring  academic  Department  and  Faculty,  FGS  GEC  and  GARO,  and  FGS  All     at  earlier  meetings,  as  well  as  emendations  suggested  by  the  AVPAP]  

 

 

1.  Identification  of  new  program  

1.1.  Name:    

Graduate  Certificate  in  Digital  Humanities  

1.2.  Academic  units  (Faculties,  departments,  or  schools)  offering  the  new  program:    

FGS  and  English  (program  home),  in  association  with  the  DHSI  (and  its  International  Network  via   the  Electronic  Textual  Cultures  Lab)  

1.3.  Anticipated  program  start  date:    

First  intake  September  2014  

1.4.  Name,  title,  phone  number  and  e-­‐mail  address  of  contact  person(s)  

Ray  Siemens,  Distinguished  Professor  and  CRC  

 

 

   Director,  Digital  Humanities  Summer  Institute  

   Director,  Electronic  Textual  Cultures  Lab  

   250.721.7255,  [email protected]  

2.  History  and  context  of  the  program    

What  Are  We  Proposing?  

There  is  a  current  and  growing  need  for  training  in  digital  humanities  tools  and  techniques   among  graduate  students,  academics,  librarians,  and  those  in  extra-­‐academic  sectors.    We   propose  a  UVic-­‐based  Graduate  Certificate  Program  in  Digital  Humanities  that  meets  the  needs   of  this  group  and  is  based  on  a  foundation  laid  by  our  Digital  Humanities  Summer  Institute  

 

(DHSI;  http://dhsi.org/).    

Our  chief  models  for  this  program  are  the  Master  of  Global  Business  program  (for  its  

UVic-­‐centred  but  partner-­‐distributed  curriculum  delivery  element,  and  related  

Entrepreneurship  Graduate  Certificate  and  Diploma  Programs),  the  Masters  of  Community  

Development  (for  its  UVic  cohort-­‐based  initial  contact,  and  distributed  /  distance  methods   thereafter),  and  the  Learning  and  Teaching  in  Higher  Education  /  LATHE  program  (for  its   integration  with  current  graduate  programs  across  disciplines,  and  its  economic  model).      

The  program  will  be  offered  and  administered  by  English  at  UVic,  in  association  with  the  

DHSI  and  its  international  network  and,  through  this  network,  its  international  partners;  DHSI   and  this  network  is  administered  in  the  Electronic  Textual  Cultures  Lab  in  the  English  

Department  /  Faculty  of  Humanities  at  UVic,  and  with  a  cohort  of  international  leaders  in  the  

Digital  Humanities  currently  offers  courses  that  comprise  the  proposed  curriculum  at  UVic  and   around  the  world.  

1

SEN-APR 4/14-11

Page 3 of 23

Discussions  with  all  those  with  whom  we  have  consulted  about  this  program  suggest   that  we  should  anticipate  this  program  laddering,  readily.  

 

What  are  Digital  Humanities?  (Via  extant  materials,  drawn  widely,  and  adapted  to  purpose.)  

Digital  Humanities  is  an  umbrella  term  for  a  wide  array  of  practices  for  creating,   applying,  and  interpreting  new  digital  and  information  technologies.  These  practices  are  not   limited  to  conventional  humanities  departments,  but  affect  every  humanistic  field  at  the   university,  including  history,  anthropology,  arts  and  architecture,  information  studies,  film  and   media  studies,  archaeology,  geography,  and  the  social  sciences.  At  the  same  time,  Digital  

Humanities  is  a  natural  outgrowth  and  expansion  of  the  traditional  scope  of  the  Humanities,   not  a  replacement  or  rejection  of  humanistic  inquiry.  In  fact,  the  role  of  the  humanist  is  critical   at  this  historic  moment,  as  our  cultural  legacy  migrates  to  digital  formats  and  our  relation  to  

  knowledge,  cultural  material,  technology,  and  society  is  radically  re-­‐conceptualized.    

The  ever-­‐evolving  developments  in  computing  and  their  performative  and  analytical   capacity  have  created  an  environment  for  a  quantum  leap  in  humanities  research  and  practice.  

Digital  Humanities  is  a  field  of  study,  research,  teaching,  and  invention  concerned  with  the   intersection  of  computing,  information  management  and  the  humanities.  It  is  methodological   by  nature  and  multidisciplinary  in  scope  involving  the  investigation,  analysis,  synthesis  and   presentation  of  information  in  electronic  form.  As  a  field,  Digital  Humanities  has  a  wide  brief:   from  the  theoretical  and  technical  issues  of  converting  the  analogue  to  the  digital,  to  the   problems  and  challenges  associated  with  the  preservation  and  curation  of  born  digital  objects,   to  the  development  of  new  modes  of  research  through  the  reconstruction  of  ancient  sites  in   virtual  worlds  or  through  new  algorithms  and  visualisations  that  allow  the  interrogation  of   hundreds,  thousands,  even  millions  of  books  at  one  time.    

As  such,  Digital  Humanities  is  fundamentally  interdisciplinary,  engaging  fields  such  as   literature,  language,  history,  social  justice,  and  the  arts;  in  this  context,  digital  tools  are   developed,  tested,  and  used  to  support  innovative  analysis  and  new  conventions  for   representation,  documentation,  narration,  and  expression.    Digital  humanists  do  not  only   create  digital  artefacts,  but  study  how  these  media  affect  the  disciplines  in  which  they  are  used.  

Moreover,  the  needs  of  disciplinary  practice  in  the  humanities  also  informs  and  contributes  to   developments  in  computer  science.  The  computational  tools  and  methods  used  in  Digital  

Humanities  cuts  across  disciplinary  practice  in  the  humanities  to  provide  shared  focal  points,   such  as  the  preservation  and  curation  of  digital  data;  the  aesthetics  of  the  digital  (from   individual  objects  to  entire  worlds),  as  well  as  the  creation  of  the  born-­‐digital.      

Already  within  the  broad  field  of  Digital  Humanities,  we  are  seeing  a  flowering  of   interdisciplinary,  collaborative,  and  technologically-­‐sophisticated  research  and  pedagogy  that  is   producing  new  modes  of  knowledge  formation,  reaching  new  audiences  for  digital  scholarship,   and  setting  new  intellectual  agendas  and  priorities  for  the  twenty-­‐first  century.    Put  another   way,  within  this  larger  context  the  Digital  Humanities  can  be  characterized  as  follows:  

1.  Interdisciplinary:  Digital  Humanities  scholarship  not  only  cuts  across  and  unifies   traditional  fields  in  the  humanities  (literature,  history,  the  arts)  but  also  brings  the  tools—both   technological  and  methodological—of  other  disciplines  to  bear  on  the  analysis  of  culture  and   society.  For  example,  tools  from  Geographic  Information  Systems  (GIS)  help  historians  to  map   the  transmission  of  cultural  artifacts;  architectural  modeling  and  simulation  tools  aid  

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Page 4 of 23 archaeologists  in  the  investigation  and  recreation  of  ancient  city  spaces  and  societies;  text-­‐ analysis  and  data-­‐mining  tools  help  linguists  and  literary  scholars  to  detect  and  analyze  patterns   in  the  study  of  complex  textual  corpora.    The  library  is  a  key  partner  in  facilitating  this   interdisciplinarity.  

2.  Collaborative:  Digital  Humanities  scholarship  is  team-­‐based,  often  engaging   humanists,  technologists,  social  scientists,  artists,  architects,  information  scientists,  and   computer  scientists  in  conceptualizing  and  solving  problems.  Information  and  computer   scientists  may  help  humanists  discover  patterns  or  come  up  with  ways  to  optimize  the  search   and  retrieval  process  when  mining  large-­‐scale  cultural  datasets.  At  the  same  time,  humanists   and  social  scientists  may  help  technologists  by  providing  real-­‐world  data  and  experiences  to   test  theoretical  algorithms  or  conceive  new  tools.  Working  with  artists  and  designers,  digital   humanists  participate  in  the  creation  of  user  interfaces,  information  navigation  systems,  and   content  management  systems,  all  of  which  directly  impact  research  and  pedagogy.  

3.  Socially  Engaged:  Digital  Humanities  scholarship  opens  and  extends  the  reach  of  the   university  by  bridging  diverse  communities.  Building  on  the  community  engagement  and   activism  of  the  professional  schools,  digital  humanists  often  work  with  external  cultural   institutions  (museums,  archives,  historical  societies,  and  libraries)  as  well  as  with  local   communities,  advocacy  groups,  non-­‐profits,  and  schools.  By  bringing  together  academic  and   local  experts,  new  knowledge  and  new  forms  of  civic  engagement  emerge  for  community-­‐ based  learning  experiences.  

4.  Global:  The  new  audience  for  Digital  Humanities  scholarship  and  pedagogy  is  truly   global.  Because  this  scholarship  is  primarily  web-­‐based,  the  general  public  can  not  only  access  it   but  also  engage  critically  with  it.  New  publication  venues  such  as  Google  Earth  and  new   broadcasting  systems  and  virtual  worlds  such  as  Second  Life  facilitate  long-­‐distance  learning.  

5.  Timely  and  Relevant:  Digital  Humanities  is  engaged  with  the  rapidly  changing  world   of  today.  It  is  imperative  that  we  prepare  our  students—both  undergraduate  and  graduate—to   be  competitive  in  the  job  market  of  the  twenty-­‐first  century.  Digital  Humanities  teaches   students  the  critical  thinking  skills,  media  literacies,  and  technical  knowledge  necessary  for   success  in  the  digital  information  age.  

Where  are  the  Digital  Humanities  Happening?    

(Via  extant  materials,  drawn  widely,  and  adapted  to  purpose.)  

Over  the  past  decade,  many  leading  universities  –  outside  of  UVic  and  our  own  pioneering   efforts  here  –  have  recognized  the  profoundly  transformative  effect  that  new  media  and  digital   technologies  have  had  on  research  and  teaching.    The  Centre  for  Computing  in  the  Humanities  

(CCH)  was  established  at  U  Toronto  in  the  late  1980s,  offering  training  workshops  in  the  area  in   addition  to  sustaining  a  research  mandate.    The  University  of  Virginia’s  Institute  for  the  

Advanced  Technology  in  the  Humanities  was  established  in  the  early  1990s  via  a  partnership   with  its  Library  –  a  model  quickly  followed  by  the  University  of  Maryland  and,  later,  Nebraska;  

IATH  currently  supports  more  than  forty  Digital  Humanities  research  projects,  and  designed  a   curriculum  for  a  masters  program  in  Digital  Humanities  (but  did  not  deliver  it  due  to  retention   issues,  with  key  faculty  lost  to  UIUC,  UCLA,  and  elsewhere).    The  Department  of  Digital  

Humanities  at  King’s  College  London  was  established,  first,  as  a  research  and  teaching  centre  in   the  mid-­‐1990s.    In  2001,  Stanford  established  its  Humanities  Laboratory,  a  collaborative   research  environment  for  supporting  cross-­‐disciplinary,  technologically  transformative,  

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Page 5 of 23 intellectually  rigorous,  multi-­‐institutional  projects,  bringing  Humanities  scholars  together  with   artists,  technologists,  and  scientists  in  a  laboratory  setting.  Duke,  a  founding  member  of  the   international  consortium  HASTAC  (Humanities,  Arts,  Science,  and  Technology  Advanced  

Collaboratory),  adopted  a  similar  model  for  the  establishment  of  its  interdisciplinary  programs   in  "New  Technologies  in  Society"  and  "Information  Science  and  Information  Studies"  as  well  as   its  John  Hope  Franklin  Humanities  Institute;  in  2007,  Duke  received  a  multi-­‐year  Mellon  grant  to   build  a  "horizontal"  program  in  Visual  Studies,  which  operates—at  all  levels—at  the  interface   between  science,  social  science,  and  humanities.  Other  top-­‐tier  universities  such  as  Harvard,  

Dartmouth,  USC,  Berkeley,  Princeton,  Georgia  Tech,  and  University  of  Michigan  have  begun  to   aggressively  hire  in  the  multidisciplinary  fields  represented  by  Digital  Humanities.  In  addition,   centers,  labs,  and  institutes  devoted  to  specific  sub-­‐fields  of  Digital  Humanities  can  be  found  at  

USC,  Brown,  and  MIT.  USC,  in  particular,  has  emerged  as  a  leader  in  the  field  by  harnessing  a   substantial  amount  of  institutional  and  extramural  support  to  create  the  Institute  for  

Multimedia  Literacy,  the  Institute  for  Creative  Technologies,  and  Vectors,  a  radical  reinvention  

  of  the  electronic  journal  format.  

A  specifically  Canadian  understanding  of  the  Digital  Humanities,  in  its  international   context,  can  be  found  in  Ray  Siemens  and  David  Moorman,  eds.  

Mind  Technologies:  Humanities  

Computing  and  the  Canadian  Academic  Community

 (Calgary:  U  Calgary  Press,  2006).  

 

 

Why  Use  our  UVic  Digital  Humanities  Summer  Institute  as  a  Foundation  for  this  Program?  

The  chief  reason  to  do  so  is  the  leadership  role  DHSI  has  in  the  field,  which  is   represented  in  an  alumni  group  of  ca.  2000;  a  partner  and  sponsor  network  of  over  a  dozen   institutions,  plus  large  research  programs,  scholarly  societies,  and  organisations;  an   international  instructor  network  of  over  50  field  leaders  and  expert  practitioners;  and  a   growing  international  curricular  network.    In  2012,  DHSI  drew  423  participants,  in  2013,  almost  

500.  

These  networks  tie  in  directly  to  well-­‐established  and  innovative  new  initiatives  that   impact  the  humanities  via  adoption  of  digital  methods.    One  recent  observation  made  by  

HASTAC  –  the  Humanities,  Arts,  Science  and  Technology  Advanced  Collaboratory,  a  group  with   over  9,000  members  across  some  120  institutions  ( http://hastac.org/ )  and,  as  of  this  year,  a  

DHSI  partner  –  notes  that  the  innovative  disciplinary  practices  practiced  by  leading  groups  such   as  the  DHSI,  the  Cornell  School  of  Criticism  and  Theory,  and  others  can  be  imagined  to  lead,   naturally,  into  innovative  departmental  offerings  such  as  we  propose.    A  joint  focused  meeting   this  past  March  of  the  Consortium  of  Humanities  Centres  and  Institutes  and  the  Scholarly  

Communication  Institute  addressed  this  specifically,  at  which  the  DHSI  director  was  present;   so,  too,  is  this  being  addresses  by  the  director  across  a  series  of  keynote  addresses  and  invited   talks  this  year  at  a  number  of  places  including  Yale,  Berkeley,  Bern,  Leipzig,  UC  London,  

Sydney,  Wellington,  Kyoto,  and  beyond.  

-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐-­‐  

DHSI  is  a  summer  institute  that  has  its  origins,  in  2001  at  Vancouver  Island  University,   in  a  collection  of  early-­‐career  scholars  that  wished  to  build  a  supportive  community  of  practice   around  computational  application  in  the  humanities  by  teach  each  other;  under  the  ITST   program,  it  grew  from  an  adhoc  event  that  drew  between  20-­‐35  people  to,  by  2013,  an  event  

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Page 6 of 23 drawing  some  500  participants  and,  in  itself,  a  classroom  without  walls  -­‐-­‐  with  some  2,000   alumni  from  around  the  world,  and  expectations  of  regular,  annual  operation  to  the  extent   that  researchers  in  Canada  and  around  the  world  count  on  DHSI  to  provide  an  essential   component  of  their  research  training  and  community  building.    A  full  listing  of  institutions  that   have  participated  in  DHSI  since  its  inception  is  available  below.  

The  chief  intended  outcome  of  the  institute  is  the  training  of  HQP  via  a  forward-­‐looking   strategy  of  digitally-­‐mediated  support,  promotion,  and  sustenance  of  the  arts  and  humanities,   and  its  products,  in  Canada  and  around  the  world.  Other  intended  outcomes  include:   opportunities  for  people  to  learn  and  reflect  upon  new  digital  media,  multimedia,  and  text-­‐ based  computing  technologies;  opportunities  to  use  these  technologies  for  interpretation  and   analysis;  support  for  the  application  of  such  technologies  in  research,  conception,  modeling,   testing,  and  efficient  dissemination;  and  the  promotion  of  national  and  international  networks   and  partnerships  that  connect  individual  researchers  and  communities  in  various  sectors.  The  

DHSI  responds  directly  to  well-­‐documented  needs  in  arts  and  humanities  communities,  by   providing  an  intensive  environment  that  facilitates  skill  acquisition  and  development,  the   creation  and  dissemination  of  new  tools  and  research,  and  collaboration  and  community   building.  This  training  produces  computationally-­‐savvy  arts  and  humanities  HQP  for  a   burgeoning  area  in  our  workforce.  

DHSI  has  grown  with  the  field  of  digital  humanities,  which  itself  has  its  origin  in   humanities  computing—a  dynamic  area  of  research  inquiry  that  has  developed  over  the  course   of  the  last  century.  Best  defined  loosely  as  that  which  lies  at  the  intersection  of  computation   methods  and  humanities  scholarship  (as  per  McCarty;  see  also  Burnard),  the  field  of  humanities   computing  has  gained  significant  momentum  during  the  past  decade,  in  keeping  with  the   growing  importance  of  computing  in  society.  The  growth  of  humanities  computing  can  be  seen   in  the  increasing  number  of  institutions  integrating  humanities  computing  in  its  curriculum,  the   expanding  community  of  people  who  carry  out  research  and  participate  in  research-­‐training  in   humanities  computing,  and  in  the  significant  recognition  given  to  humanities  computing  by   national  agencies  such  as  SSHRC  in  documents  that  outline  the  necessity  of  further  study  and   development  of  "mind  technologies"  (the  computer-­‐assisted  tools,  methodologies,  and   structures  that  properly  capture  the  ways  in  which  those  in  the  arts  and  humanities  carry  out   the  practices  associated  with  their  disciplines  [SSHRC];  see  also  Siemens  and  Moorman).    

In  brief,  exemplary  tasks  associated  with  humanities  computing  include  the  following:   electronic  publishing  and  using  electronic  media  to  re-­‐purpose  materials  previously  stored  in   other  archival  forms;  the  use  of  automated  means  to  represent  print-­‐,  visual-­‐,  and  audio-­‐based   material  in  tagged  and  searchable  electronic  textual  form;  and  sophisticated  textual  analysis   processes  that  are  based  in  the  humanities  but  have  implications  for  other  fields.  In  the  creative   arts,  the  computer  assists  in  processes  of  writing,  composition,  arrangement,  and  staging.  

Digital  technologies  also  make  possible  new  methods  of  display,  performance,  and  other  forms   of  dissemination.  Further,  in  disciplines  that  place  strong  emphasis  on  knowledge-­‐transfer,   humanities  computing  experts  lead  research  into  the  use  of  technology  as  pedagogical  tool.  

These  are  areas  essential  to  our  digital  economy.  

It  is  very  important  to  emphasise  that  there  is  currently  no  other  venue  offering  such  a   productive  confluence  of  people,  disciplines,  ideas,  and  skills  as  the  Digital  Humanities  Summer  

Institute  and  its  network.  UVic’s  extant  investment  in  DHSI  has  been  noticed:  the  institute  has  

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Page 7 of 23 drawn  considerable  international  and  applied-­‐academic  attention  in  places  such  as  the  

Chronicle  of  Higher  Education  and  the  journal  Information  Quarterly  (see  Benton  2008;  Meloni  

2010;  Bialkowski,  Niles,  and  Galey  2011;  Pannapacker  2012).  

The  DHSI  naturally  augments  acknowledged  national  strengths  and  will  highlight  the   work  of  Canadians  in  a  national  and  international  context.  At  the  same  time,  the  institute   allows  those  based  locally,  nationally,  and  internationally  to  compare  and  explore  the  ways  in   which  they  have  introduced,  or  are  planning  to  introduce,  computing  methodologies  into  their   own,  or  their  institution’s,  traditional  arts  and  humanities  pursuits.    

While  skills  training  in  individual  areas  that  apply  to  computing  in  the  humanities,  such   as  encoding  and  digitisation,  is  sometimes  available  elsewhere,  the  closure  of  the  CETH  

Summer  Seminar  and  the  Oxford  Humanities  Computing  Summer  School  offerings,  and  the   decline  in  general  offerings  from  groups  such  as  Toronto’s  former  Centre  for  Computing  in  the  

Humanities,  has  limited  the  number  of  national  and  international  venues  offering  the   opportunities  the  proposed  summer  institute  offers;  and,  while  humanities  computing  offerings   are  on  the  rise  at  several  national  universities  (including  Acadia,  Alberta,  and  McMaster),  these   offerings  are  tailored  to  the  needs  of  undergraduate  and  graduate  students  at  the  host   institutions  and  are  not  available  in  a  format  convenient  for  students,  staff,  and  faculty  at  other   institutions.    Smaller,  more  focused  institutes  serve  emerging  niche  needs  in  an  excellent  way  –   and  our  institute  has  worked  with,  and  assisted,  many  of  these  as  they  have  emerged  –  but   none  provides  the  breadth,  depth,  community,  and  links  to  professional  structures  that  our   institute  is  capable  of  offering.    

To  learn  more  about  DHSI,  its  curriculum  (28  courses  for  2014),  it  Colloquium  (ca  50   presenters  on  average),  and  more,  please  visit  the  website  at  http://dhsi.org/.    

An  Overview  of  DHSI’s  Operational  Structure,  Pertinent  to  this  Proposal  

The  DHSI  is  hosted  by  the  University  of  Victoria's  Electronic  Textual  Cultures  Lab  (ETCL),   which  acts  as  coordination-­‐point  for  a  network  of  local,  national,  and  international  partners   who  work  together  to  ensure  the  pertinence  of  DHSI’s  focal  points  and  goals,  the  success  of  its   pragmatic  matters  of  implementation  toward  those  points  and  goals,  and  the  very  necessary   community-­‐building  around  common  methodological  practices  that  lie  at  the  heart  of  the   digital  humanities.  Local  sponsors  and  supporters  of  the  DHSI  included,  in  2012,  the  ETCL,  U  

Victoria’s  Faculty  of  Humanities,  and  its  Humanities  Computing  and  Media  Centre.  

Organisationally,  the  institute  is  sponsored  by  the  Alliance  of  Digital  Humanities  Organisations  

(ADHO),  the  Canadian  Federation  for  the  Humanities  and  Social  Sciences  (CFHSS),  the  Society   for  the  History  of  Authorship,  Reading  and  Publishing  (SHARP),  the  Canadian  Society  for  Digital  

Humanities  /  Société  canadienne  des  humanités  numériques  (CSDH/SCHN),  the  Association  for  

Computers  and  the  Humanities  (ACH),  and  others.    Institutionally,  it  is  co-­‐sponsored  by  the  

University  of  Victoria  and  its  Library,  the  University  of  British  Columbia  Library,  the  College  of  

Arts  at  University  of  Guelph,  Texas  A&M  University,  the  Centre  for  Digital  Humanities  in  the  

Department  of  English  at  Ryerson  University,  the  Faculty  of  Arts  at  University  of  Waterloo,  the  

Brittain  Fellowship  at  Georgia  Tech,  the  Simpson  Center  for  the  Humanities  at  University  of  

Washington,  the  Graduate  School  of  Humanities  and  Sociology/Faculty  of  Letters  at  University   of  Tokyo,  English,  North  Carolina  State  U,  the  Digital  Humanities  Center  for  Japanese  Arts  and  

Culture,  Ritsumeikan  U,  Vancouver  Island  University  (Office  of  the  Provost  and  VP),  Hamilton  

College  DHi,  and  beyond.    It  also  is  co-­‐sponsored  by  a  number  of  very  prominent  large  research  

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Page 8 of 23 projects,  among  them  the  Editing  Modernism  in  Canada  (EMiC)  project,  Modernist  Versions  

Project  (MVP),  NINES,  and  the  Implementing  New  Knowledge  Environments  (INKE)  project.      A  

  current  list  of  sponsors  and  partners  is  available  on  the  DHSI  website.  

The  DHSI  organising  committee  is  a  consultative  group,  comprised  of  a  number  of   advisors  that  have,  variously  and  since  2001,  provided  expert  advice  as  needed  about  all   elements  of  the  DHSI.    They  include  leading  research  theorists,  practitioners,  and   administrators  in  the  digital  arts  and  humanities,  representing  a  wealth  of  experience  in   institute  planning  and  development,  comprised  also  of  representatives  of  sponsoring  groups   and  our  pool  of  instructors,  as  well  as  those  whose  training  endeavours  inform,  or  are  informed   by,  what  we  do  at  DHSI.  

DHSI  is  active  in  its  engagement  of  its  sponsors,  partners,  and  its  stakeholder   community  –  through  its  organisational  partners  but  also,  more  directly,  represented  by  its  

2000-­‐strong  alumni  group  –  and  each  group  is  consulted  via  representatives  onsite,  through  the  

DHSI  email  discussion  list,  and  through  other  social  media  facilitated  means  about  the  content   and  the  operation  of  the  DHSI.    Such  consultation  has  had  direct  and  immediate  impact  on  DHSI   curriculum,  particularly  manifest  in  the  expanded  offerings  for  2013  which  encompass  a   number  of  new,  cutting  edge  areas  within  the  context  of  the  digital  arts  and  humanities  and   which  has  led  to  the  DHSI-­‐centred  international  training  network  that  will  support  this  program   as  well.  

DHSI  Chief  Participant  Group,  by  Institution  (2001-­‐12)  

1. Acadia  University  

2. Arnamagnaean  Institute,  

Copenhagen  

3. Athabasca  University  

4. Atlanta  Technical  College  

5. Ball  State  University  

6. Bard  Graduate  Center  

7. Bessemer  Historical  Society  

8. Bloomsburg  University  

9. Boston  College  

10. Boston  University  

11. Brigham  Young  University  

12. Brock  University  

13. Brown  University  

14. Bryn  Mawr  College    

15. California  State  University,  

Northridge  

16. Canadian  Mennonite  University    

17. Capilano  University  

18. Carleton  University  

19. Case  Western  Reserve  University  

20. CDRH,  University  Nebraska-­‐

Lincoln  

21. Center  for  Advanced  Study  in  the  

Visual  Arts,  The  National  Gallery   of  Art  

22. Centre  for  Interdisciplinary  

Research  in  Music  Media  and  

Technology,  McGill  University  

23. Chapman  University  

24. Chulalongkorn  University,  

Thailand  

25. City  University  of  New  York  

26. City  University  of  New  York,  

Graduate  Center  

27. Concordia  University  

28. Cornell  University  

29. Coventry  University  

30. Dalhousie  University  

31. Douglas  College  

32. Dublin,  Digital  Humanities  

Observatory  

33. Duke  University  

34. Ecole  Nationale  des  Chartes  

35. Emory  University  

36. Eötvös  Loránd  University,  

Hungary  

37. Fairfield  University  

38. G.  D'Annunzio  University,  Chieti  

39. George  Mason  University  

40. Georgia  Institute  of  Technology  

41. Grant  MacEwan  University  

42. Greater  Victoria  Public  Library  

43. Grey  Highlands  Public  Library  

44. Hamilton  College  

45. Harvard  University  

46. Hope  College  

47. Indiana  University  

48. Institute  for  the  German   language  

49. King's  College  London  

50. Lakehead  University  

51. Laval  University  

52. Leiden  University  

53. Malaspina  University-­‐College  

54. McGill  University  

55. McMaster  University  

56. Montpellier  University  

57. Mount  Holyoke  College  

58. Mount  Royal  College  

59. Mount  Royal  University  

60. National  Taiwan  University  

61. National  University  Ireland,  

Galway  

62. Nazareth  College  

63. New  York  University  

64. New  Zealand  Electronic  Text  

Centre  

65. Newberry  Library  

66. North  Carolina  State  University  

67. Northern  Michigan  University  

68. Northwestern  University  

69. Notre  Dame  University  

70. Oberlin  College  

71. Old  Dominion  University  

72. Pennsylvania  State  University  

73. Princeton  University  

74. Purdue  University  

75. Queen  Mary  University  of  

London  

76. Queen's  University  Belfast  

77. Queen's  University  Kingston  

78. Royal  Academy  of  Dutch  

Language  and  Literature  

79. Rutgers  University  

80. Ryerson  University  

81. San  Francisco  State  University  

82. Simon  Fraser  University  

83. South  Gujarat  University  

84. St.  Cloud  State  University  

85. St.  Norbert  College  

86. Stanford  University  

87. SUNY  Buffalo  

88. Texas  A&M  University  

89. Trent  University  

90. Trinity  College  Dublin  

91. Truman  State  University  

92. University  College  Cork  

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93. University  College  London  

94. University  of  Alberta    

95. University  of  Art  and  Design  

Helsinki  

96. University  of  Arts,  London  

97. University  of  Birmingham  

98. University  of  British  Columbia  

99. University  of  Calgary  

100. University  of  California,  Berkeley  

101. University  of  California,  Davis  

102. University  of  California,  Irvine  

103. University  of  California,  Los  

Angeles  

104. University  of  California,  Santa  

Barbara  

105. University  of  California,  Santa  

Cruz  

106. University  of  Cambridge  

107. University  of  Cambridge,  

Cambridge  Historical  Society  

108. University  of  Central  Florida  

109. University  of  Chicago  

110. University  of  Georgia    

111. University  of  Guelph  

112. University  of  Haifa  Israel  

113. University  of  Houston  

114. University  of  Illinois,  Chicago  

115. University  of  Illinois,  Urbana-­‐

Champaign  

116. University  of  Iowa  

117. University  of  Kansas  

118. University  of  Kentucky  

119. University  of  Leeds  

120. University  of  Lethbridge  

 

Works  Cited  in  this  Document  

121. University  of  Louisiana    

122. University  of  Manitoba  

123. University  of  Maryland  

124. University  of  Maryland,  Institute   for  Technology  in  the  Humanities  

125. University  of  Melbourne  

126. University  of  Michigan  

127. University  of  Minnesota  

128. University  of  Missouri,  Columbia  

129. University  of  Moncton  

130. University  of  Montréal  

131. University  of  Nebraska-­‐Lincoln  

132. University  of  New  Brunswick  

133. University  of  New  Brunswick  

134. University  of  Newcastle,  NSW  

135. University  of  North  Carolina    

136. University  of  North  Carolina  at  

Chapel  Hill  

137. University  of  Oregon  

138. University  of  Ottawa  

139. University  of  Oxford  

140. University  of  PEI  

141. University  of  Pennsylvania  

142. University  of  Puget  Sound  

143. University  of  Quebec  at  Montreal  

144. University  of  Regina  

145. University  of  Rochester  

146. University  of  Saskatchewan  

147. University  of  Southern  California  

148. University  of  Sydney,  NSW  

149. University  of  Texas,  Austin  

150. University  of  Texas,  El  Paso  

151. University  of  Tokyo  

152. University  of  Toronto  

153. University  of  Toronto,  

Scarborough  

154. University  of  Tsukuba  

155. University  of  Tulsa  

156. University  of  Victoria  

157. University  of  Vienna  

158. University  of  Virginia  

159. University  of  Washington  

160. University  of  Waterloo  

161. University  of  Western  Ontario  

162. University  of  Winnipeg  

163. University  of  Wisconsin,  Madison  

164. University  of  York,  England  

165. Vancouver  Island  University  

166. Vassar  College  

167. Victoria  University  of  Wellington  

168. Vilnius  University  

169. Virginia  Commonwealth  

University  Qatar    

170. Washington  State  University  

171. Washington  University  Saint  

Louis  

172. Wayne  State  University  

173. Wellesley  College  

174. West  Chester  University  

Pennsylvania  

175. Westchester  Community  College  

176. Western  Illinois  University  

177. Western  University  

178. Wheaton  College,  Massachusetts  

179. Willamette  University  

180. Yale  University  

181. York  University  

• Benton,  Thomas  H.  “Summer  Camp  for  Digital  Humanists:  An  English  professor  immerses   himself  in  an  emerging  field  that  has  already  begun  to  redefine  academic  work.”  Chronicle  

of  Higher  Education  (27  June  2008).  URL:  

<http://chronicle.com/jobs/news/2008/06/2008062701c.htm>.    

• Bialkowski,  Voytek,  Rebecca  Niles,  and  Alan  Galey.    "The  Digital  Humanities  Summer  

Institute  and  Extra-­‐Institutional  Modes  of  Engagement."    Information  Quarterly  3.3  

(2011):  19-­‐29.  <http://www.ischool.utoronto.ca/system/files/pages/publications/fiq_3-­‐

3.pdf#page=19>.  

• Brown,  Susan,  and  Patricia  Clements,  et  al.  “Tag  Team:  Computing,  Collaborators,  and  the  

History  of  Women's  Writing  in  the  British  Isles.”  37-­‐52  in  Technologising  the  Humanities  /  

Humanitising  the  Technologies.  R.G.  Siemens  and  W.  Winder,  eds.  [A  joint  special  issue  of]  

Text  Technology  8.2  (1998).  URL:  <http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/epc/chwp/orlando/>.  

• Burnard,  Lou.  "About  Humanities  Computing."  Humanities  Computing  Seminar,  Virginia  

(1999).  URL:  <http://www.hcu.ox.ac.uk/humcomp.html>.  

• HASTAC.    “The  Future  of  Higher  Education.”    <http://hastac.org/forums/future-­‐higher-­‐ education>.    (28  November  2012).  

• McCarty,  Willard.  "What  is  Humanities  Computing?  Toward  a  Definition  of  the  Field."  URL:  

<http://ilex.cc.kcl.ac.uk/wlm/essays/what/>.  

• Meloni,  Julie.    “Reporting  from  ‘Academic  Summer  Camp’:  the  Digital  Humanities  Summer  

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Institute.”  Chronicle  of  Higher  Education  (10  June  2010).  URL:  

<http://chronicle.com/blogPost/Reporting-­‐from-­‐Academic/24672/>.  

• Pannapacker,  William.    “No  DH,  No  Interview.”    Chronicle  of  Higher  Education  (22  July  

2012).  URL:  <http://chronicle.com/article/No-­‐DH-­‐No-­‐Interview/132959/>.    

• Schreibman,  Susan,  Ray  Siemens,  and  John  Unsworth.  The  Blackwell  Companion  to  Digital  

Humanities.  Oxford:  Blackwell,  2004.  

• Siemens,  Ray,  and  David  Moorman,  eds.  Mind  Technologies:  Humanities  Computing  and  

the  Canadian  Academic  Community.  Calgary:  U  Calgary  P,  2006.  

• SSHRC.  "New  Information  Technologies:  Living  with  a  Transforming  Partner."  Alternative  

Wor(l)ds:  The  Humanities  in  2010  [A  Preliminary  Report  on  the  SSHRC  Conference].  URL:  

<http://www.humanities-­‐2010.sshrc.ca/english/p-­‐demers_report.html#liberal_arts>.  

 

 

3.  Aims,  goals  and/or  objectives    

Condensed  from  the  above,  we  propose  a  UVic-­‐based  Graduate  Certificate  Program  in  Digital  

Humanities  that  meets  the  current  and  growing  need  for  training  in  digital  humanities  tools  and   techniques  among  graduate  students,  academics,  librarians,  and  those  in  extra-­‐academic   sectors.    This  program  is  based  on  a  foundation  laid  by  our  Digital  Humanities  Summer  Institute  

(DHSI;  http://dhsi.org/),  and  there  is  considerable  will  among  the  DHSI  network  for  such  a   program.    Our  chief  models  for  this  program  are  the  Master  of  Global  Business  program  (for  its  

UVic-­‐centred  but  partner-­‐distributed  curriculum  delivery  element,  and  related  

Entrepreneurship  Graduate  Certificate  and  Diploma  Programs),  the  Masters  of  Community  

Development  (for  its  UVic  cohort-­‐based  initial  contact,  and  distributed  /  distance  methods   thereafter),  and  the  Learning  and  Teaching  in  Higher  Education  /  LATHE  program  (for  its   integration  with  current  graduate  programs  across  disciplines,  and  its  economic  model).

 

3.1.  Distinctive  characteristics    

At  the  time  this  proposal  saw  first  development,  there  were  no  equivalent  certificate  programs   of  this  caliber  and  rigor  offered  in  British  Columbia,  nor  outside  the  country,  nor  is  the   proposed  program  similar  in  structure  to  others  offered  at  universities  and  colleges  in  Canada   or  elsewhere,  though  there  are  graduate  programs  in  Humanities  Computing  and,  at  UVic,  a   joint  undergraduate  minor  (Humanities  and  CS)  in  consideration  at  the  moment.    Important  to   note  is  the  uniqueness  of  conjoint  area  local  offering  (especially  with  the  Library’s  central   involvement),  integration  with  an  international  training  network  that  is  UVic-­‐based  (so,  includes   and  international  element  and  concomitant  potential  for  cultural  immersion),  and  will  draw  on   the  highly  international  community  that  DHSI  itself  represents  (since  inception,  we’ve  drawn   some  1/3  from  within  100  miles  of  Victoria,  some  1/3  from  the  rest  of  North  America,  and  some  

1/3  from  the  rest  of  the  world  –  from  every  continent  save  Antarctica).  

  As  planning  toward  this  program  has  continued  over  the  past  several  years,  a  number  of   certificate  programs  have  emerged  at  places  like  UCLA,  U  Nebraska,  and  others,  but  none  with   the  same  caliber,  rigour,  and  reach  as  what  we  propose  in  this  document  have  emerged.    This   program  will  be  distinct,  internationally,  and  a  leader  among  others  because  of  its  foundation  in  

DHSI.  

3.2.  Anticipated  contribution  to  the  UVic,  Faculty,  and  academic  unit’s  strategic  plans    

This  curriculum  addresses  strategic  priorities  at  levels  of  the  department  (English,  in  areas  of  

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Page 11 of 23 literacy,  textual  studies,  and  computationally-­‐facilitated  reading,  writing  and  analysis,  among   others),  the  faculty  (in  digital  humanities  and  humanities  computing),  and  the  institution  (in  line   with  strategic  priorities  associated  with  technological  change,  internationalisation,  graduate   and  community  on-­‐going  education,  and  computational  modeling  and  information  processing,   among  others).  

3.3.  Target  audience,  student  and  labour  market  demand    

A  moderate  estimate  made  at  an  earlier  planning  meeting  of  the  DHSI’s  international  training   network  suggested  that,  by  2014,  we  might  expect  this  network  to  be  training  some  1,400   individuals  on  an  annual  basis;  the  2013  DHSI  had  some  500  participants.    This  group   anticipated,  of  those  annually  being  trained  in  this  way,  about  5-­‐10%  would  be  interested  in  a   certificate  program,  related  to  their  current  educational  endeavour  or  to  their  increased   professional  qualification.    So,  some  70-­‐140  which  we  anticipate  to  follow  standard  DHSI   enrollment  patterns  of  about  1/3  from  the  library  community,  1/3  graduate  students  enrolled   in  existing  programs  at  UVic  and  elsewhere  taking  this  program  concurrently,  and  the   remainder  humanities  faculty  and  staff;  faculty,  staff,  and  graduate  student  participants  are   chiefly  from  the  humanities,  but  also  drawn  from  the  education,  social  science,  and  creative  

  arts  disciplines,  occasionally  from  computer  science.  

This  projection  was  substantiated  to  some  degree,  and  expanded,  in  an  October  2012   survey  distributed  among  DHSI  alumni  and  community  members,  for  which  we  received  a  16%   response  rate.    86  respondents  indicated  that  they  were  interested  in  beginning  the  program  

this  year.    Further,  from  among  respondents,  199  indicated  that  they  were  interested  in   enrolling  in  a  program  as  we  envision,  with  an  additional  26  indicating  that  they  would  be   interested  in  supporting  this  program  as  an  instructor  or  partner,  and/or  saw  value  in  being   able  to  recommend  such  a  program  to  others.    In  terms  of  when  they  would  like  to  enrol  in  the   program,  36%  of  the  full  response  group  indicated  that  they  would  like  to  enrol  this  year,   drawing  on  past  DHSI  course  credit  toward  the  certificate;  11%  indicated  they  would  like  to   enrol  this  year  with  no  past  credit  considered,  19%  next  year,  8%  the  year  after  next,  and  26%   at  some  point  in  the  future,  depending  on  circumstances.    The  main  ‘types’  of  enrolees  who   responded  included  university  faculty  (23%),  graduate  students  in  existing  programs  (36%),   those  working  in  the  library  or  alternative-­‐academic  positions  (33%),  and  those  in  other   positions,  including  business  and  industry  (8%).    Of  those  who  responded  and  indicated  they   would  like  to  enrol,  17%  were  from  within  100  miles  of  Victoria,  28%  from  elsewhere  in  Canada,  

46%  elsewhere  in  North  America  outside  of  Canada,  7%  from  Europe,  and  3%  from  the  rest  of  

  the  world.    

4.  Admission  requirements,  Administration  

Application  to  this  program  is  to  Grad  Studies  via  regular  admission  procedures,  with  the   administrative  structure  also  of  the  English  Department.    Typically,  the  application  deadline  will   be  in  the  fall  term  (typically  15  September),  with  offers  made  in  the  spring  term  (typically  15  

January)  for  a  May  start.      

To  administer  the  program,  English  will  establish  a  DH  program  committee  (newly   created,  consisting  of  4  or  5  graduate  faculty  members  with  experience  in  the  area)  to  assess   applications  and  make  recommendations  for  admission  to  FGS;  the  chair  of  this  committee  will   be  the  Director  of  the  program,  and  will  report  to  the  Chair  of  English.    For  program  advice  and  

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Page 12 of 23 support,  each  student  accepted  into  the  program  will  be  assigned  to  a  faculty  mentor,  the   instructor  of  their  cohort  foundation  seminar,  Introduction  to  Digital  Humanities  (details  of  this   course  below),  which  will  contain  up  to  15  students.      

The  program  committee  will  also  be  responsible  for  making  recommendations  to  FGS  on   transfer  credit  requests,  via  external  transfer,  for  the  two  courses  (of  five)  in  the  program  that   can  be  taken  outside  of  UVic  as  part  of  the  program  requirements;  this  will  be  governed  by   existing  Letter  of  Permission  (LofP)  policies  and  those  relating  to  Block  Transfer  model  of   transfer  credit.    Typically,  such  credit  will  be  granted  for  courses  taken  at  other  institutions  and   institutes  partnered  with  DHSI,  applied  across  the  board  or  in  a  case-­‐by-­‐case  manner,  where   the  following  requirements  are  met  as  determined  by  the  DH  program  committee:  (a)  35   program  contact  hours,  (b)  a  course  outline  approved  by  the  program  committee,  and  (c)   appropriate  instructor  qualifications.    Such  courses  will  be  indicated  as  Pass/Fail  (i.e.  not   graded,  and  not  part  of  GPA  calculations)  on  the  UVic  transcript.  (Worth  noting,  the  majority  of   courses  offered  by  DHSI  network  partners  already  meet  burdens  associated  with  instructional   credit  at  UVic,  and  have  been  accepted  for  graduate,  undergraduate,  and  professional  training   credit  at  a  number  of  institutions  beyond  UVic,  including  many  in  our  region  via  the  Western  

Dean’s  Agreement.)    As  well,  internal  transfer  of  course  credit  from  another  UVic  degree  may   be  granted  for  two  courses  (of  five)  in  the  program,  providing  those  courses  are  among  those   associated  with  this  certificate.  

 

5.  Areas  of  specialization  and  evidence  of  adequate  faculty  complement.    

UVic  Humanities  has  a  Canada  Research  Chair  in  Humanities  Computing,  a  faculty-­‐level  advisory   committee  on  Digital  Humanities  issues,  a  community  of  some  50  local  DH-­‐active  scholars   affiliated  with  the  Electronic  Textual  Cultures  Lab  (which,  as  such,  acts  as  a  locus  for  research,   teaching,  service  and  promotion  of  the  field)  and  the  Maker  Lab,  a  DH  support  unit  in  the  

Humanities  Computing  and  Multimedia  Centre,  and  wealth  of  engagement  beyond  this  group.    

There  are  currently  two  tenure  stream  faculty  in  Humanities  (both  in  the  department  of  

English)  whose  positions  are  explicitly  in  the  field  of  Digital  Humanities,  and  many  more  across   the  faculty  who  have  DH  expertise  of  various  kinds.  

Additional  faculty  members  may  be  required  to  meet  the  leadership,  teaching,  and   supervision  demands  of  the  proposed  programs.  This  can  be  met,  in  part  by  assigning  DH-­‐active   faculty  (activity  being  measured  by  typical  measures  of  field  activity,  including  specialised   publishing  and  presenting  activity),  or  hiring  new  faculty  and  teaching-­‐dedicated  postdocs  on   limited  term  appointments.  As  well,  for  the  majority  of  its  instruction  this  program  draws  on   faculty  drawn  from  other  locations  (for  DHSI)  or  at  other  locations  (in  the  DHSI-­‐centred  training   network  on  which  this  program  is  founded).  

 

6.  Curriculum  design    

HQP  training  outcomes  that  can  be  expected  by  the  graduate  students,  faculty,  and  staff   trained  at  the  institute  are  along  the  lines  of  those  articulated  by  groups  such  as  the  Orlando  

Project  (see  Brown  and  Clements).  Participants  will  build  on  activities  central  to  their  work  by   developing  valuable  computing  skills  associated  with  research  in  the  humanities  but  that  are   also  transportable  well  beyond  academic  pursuits.  These  activities  include:  bringing  materials   into  digital  form  (through  document  scanners  and  other  data  input  devices),  organising  and  

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Page 13 of 23 demarcating  that  material  with  adherence  to  commonly-­‐used  tagging  methodologies  for   textual  and  graphical  computer  database  programs,  analytical  endeavor,  and  assisting  in  the   preparation  of  material  in  electronic  form  for  publication  –  and  well  beyond  into  significantly   advanced  new  media  skills  that  are  easily  transferrable  beyond  the  specific  domain  in  which  the   training  occurs.      Most  important  in  terms  of  outcomes,  those  involved  in  this  program  will   enhance  their  existing  research  strategies  and  analytical  skills  as  they  explore—in  concept  and   application—the  integration  of  computing  techniques  with  those  strategies  and  skills.    

Graduate-­‐student  researchers  in  particular  can  expect  to  augment  and  strengthen  the  critical   and  methodological  training  that  they  will  be  receiving  in  their  academic  programs  by  adding   computing  skills  that  are  highly-­‐valued  in  all  sectors.    

Requirements  for  graduation  are  the  completion  of  a  total  of  5  courses,  as  below,  each   proficiency-­‐based  and  involving  a  minimum  of  35  contact  hours:  

1. DHUM  501:  Introduction  to  Digital  Humanities    (1.5  units,  compressed  format)  

• Proposed  Calendar  Description:  Surveys  and  explores  intellectual  traditions  and   emergent  concerns  associated  with  computing  in  the  arts  and  humanities.  Topics   include  digital  representation,  analysis,  communication,  and  creation,  and  involve   theoretical  considerations  and  pragmatic  approaches.    Typically  offered  the  week   before  the  Digital  Humanities  Summer  Institute  (see  <www.dhsi.org>).  

• Course  Curriculum  Change  Rationale:  This  course  adapts  ongoing  course  Engl  507  for   the  specific  purpose  of  the  Graduate  Certificate  in  Digital  Humanities.    See   http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2011/CDs/ENGL/507.html.  

• Comment:  A  compressed  seminar  taken  in  cohorts  of  15  at  UVic,  the  week  before  

DHSI.    Its  models  are  the  seminar  format  and  basic  content  of  ENGL  507  (see  an   example  of  this  syllabus  at  http://web.uvic.ca/~englblog/507s2012/about/)  and  the   cohort-­‐building  components  of  the  MACD  on-­‐campus  cohort  residency  period  (see   http://www.uvic.ca/hsd/publicadmin/programs/graduate/maInCommunityDevelop ment/courseinformation/index.php).  It  will  have  components  beyond  its  35  contact   hours  over  the  5  in-­‐person  days,  with  assignments  and  evaluation  based  on  its   models.  

2. Any  other  four  digital  humanities  course  offerings,  across  DHSI  at  UVic,  other  local   offerings  of  digital  humanities  courses  within  the  faculty,  and  (up  to  two)  at  institutes  in   the  DHSI  network  and/or  institutions  affiliated  with  the  certificate  program.    These   courses  must  be  drawn  from  the  following  areas,  at  least  one  per  area  (see   http://dhsi.org/courses.php  for  course  descriptions  for  the  below),  and  will  be  assigned   the  related  course  numbers  as  below:     i. DHUM  502:  Core  Concepts  and  Skills  (1.5  units,  compressed  format)    

• Proposed  Calendar  Description:  Focuses  on  fundamental  concepts   and  skills  in  the  Digital  Humanities,  with  curriculum  offered  by  the  

Digital  Humanities  Summer  Institute  (see  <www.dhsi.org>)  or   equivalent  topical  seminars  listed  annually  by  the  Faculty  of  

Humanities.    Typical  offerings  include  DHSI’s  Textual  Encoding  

Fundamentals,  Digitisation  Fundamentals,  Fundamentals  of  

Programming/Coding  for  Human(s|ists).  

• Course  Curriculum  Change  Rationale:    This  course  adapts  ongoing  

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Graduate  Certificate  in  Digital  Humanities.    See   http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2011/CDs/ENGL/509.html  and   http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2011/CDs/HUMA/491.html.  

• Comment:  Evaluation  is  as  per  that  already  accepted  for  DHUM  491   and  ENGL  509.    Individual  DHSI  course  descriptions  are  available  at   http://www.dhsi.org/courses.php;  course  outlines,  syllabi,  readings,   and  other  curricular  materials  are  available  via   http://www.dhsi.org/content/2013Curriculum/,   http://www.dhsi.org/content/2012Curriculum/,  and  the  UVic  

Bookstore  (at   http://www.uvicbookstore.ca/general/search.php?subject=conf).   ii. DHUM  503:  Remediation  and  Curation  (1.5  units,  compressed  format)  

• Proposed  Calendar  Description:  Focuses  on  intellectual  traditions,   emergent  concerns,  and  applications  related  to  digital  remediation   and  curation,  with  curriculum  offered  by  the  Digital  Humanities  

Summer  Institute  (see  <www.dhsi.org>)  or  equivalent  topical   seminars  listed  annually  by  the  Faculty  of  Humanities.    Examples   include  XSLT,  Databases,  Drupal,  Digital  Editions,  Pre-­‐Digital  Book.  

• Course  Curriculum  Change  Rationale:    This  course  adapts  ongoing   courses  DHUM  491  and  ENGL  509  for  the  specific  purpose  of  the  

Graduate  Certificate  in  Digital  Humanities.    See   http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2011/CDs/ENGL/509.html  and   http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2011/CDs/HUMA/491.html.  

• Comment:  Evaluation  is  as  per  that  already  accepted  for  DHUM  491   and  ENGL  509.    Individual  DHSI  course  descriptions  are  available  at   http://www.dhsi.org/courses.php;  course  outlines,  syllabi,  readings,   and  other  curricular  materials  are  available  via   http://www.dhsi.org/content/2013Curriculum/,   http://www.dhsi.org/content/2012Curriculum/,  and  the  UVic  

Bookstore  (at   http://www.uvicbookstore.ca/general/search.php?subject=conf).   iii. DHUM  504:  Creation,  Communication,  and  Dissemination  (1.5  units,   compressed  format)  

• Proposed  Calendar  Description:  Focuses  on  intellectual  traditions,   emergent  concerns,  and  applications  related  to  creation,   communication,  and  dissemination,  with  curriculum  offered  by  the  

Digital  Humanities  Summer  Institute  (see  <www.dhsi.org>)  or   equivalent  topical  seminars  listed  annually  by  the  Faculty  of  

Humanities.    Examples  include  Multimedia,  Social  Media,  Mobile  

Computing,  Physical  Computing.  

• Course  Curriculum  Change  Rationale:    This  course  adapts  ongoing   courses  DHUM  491  and  ENGL  509  for  the  specific  purpose  of  the  

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Graduate  Certificate  in  Digital  Humanities.    See   http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2011/CDs/ENGL/509.html  and   http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2011/CDs/HUMA/491.html.  

• Comment:  Evaluation  is  as  per  that  already  accepted  for  DHUM  491   and  ENGL  509.    Individual  DHSI  course  descriptions  are  available  at   http://www.dhsi.org/courses.php;  course  outlines,  syllabi,  readings,   and  other  curricular  materials  are  available  via   http://www.dhsi.org/content/2013Curriculum/,   http://www.dhsi.org/content/2012Curriculum/,  and  the  UVic  

Bookstore  (at   http://www.uvicbookstore.ca/general/search.php?subject=conf).   iv. DHUM  505:  Analysis,  Teaching,  and  Administration  (1.5  units,  compressed   format)  

• Proposed  Calendar  Description:  Focuses  on  intellectual  traditions,   emergent  concerns,  and  applications  pertinent  to  analysis,  teaching,   and  administration,  with  curriculum  offered  by  the  Digital  Humanities  

Summer  Institute  (see  <www.dhsi.org>)  or  equivalent  topical   seminars  listed  annually  by  the  Faculty  of  Humanities.    Examples   include  GIS,  Text  Analysis,  Augmented  Reality,  Computer  Gaming,  

SEASR,  Digital  Pedagogy,  Large  Project  Planning  and  Administration.  

• Course  Curriculum  Change  Rationale:    This  course  adapts  ongoing   courses  DHUM  491  and  ENGL  509  for  the  specific  purpose  of  the  

Graduate  Certificate  in  Digital  Humanities.    See   http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2011/CDs/ENGL/509.html  and   http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2011/CDs/HUMA/491.html.  

• Comment:  Evaluation  is  as  per  that  already  accepted  for  DHUM  491   and  ENGL  509.    Individual  DHSI  course  descriptions  are  available  at   http://www.dhsi.org/courses.php;  course  outlines,  syllabi,  readings,   and  other  curricular  materials  are  available  via   http://www.dhsi.org/content/2013Curriculum/,   http://www.dhsi.org/content/2012Curriculum/,  and  the  UVic  

Bookstore  (at   http://www.uvicbookstore.ca/general/search.php?subject=conf).  

Students  enrolled  in  DHUM  491  and  ENGL  509  (as  well  as  a  number  of  others,  here  and  at  other   institutions  via  various  agreements)  as  part  of  existing  degree  programs  have  for  the  past   number  of  years  already  received  credit  for  DHSI  courses  in  which  they  were  taught  alongside   those  who  were  not  seeking  university  credit  for  their  work  in  the  DHSI  course;  approved  a   number  of  years  ago,  the  requirements  of  DHUM  491  and  ENGL  509  set  out  the  pertinent   criteria  for  those  who  receive  credit  for  these  courses.    Our  proposal  uses  these  accepted   criteria  as  a  foundation  for  DHUM  502,  503,  504,  and  505  course  credit  toward  the  graduate   certificate,  and  the  fee  structures  for  such  is  already  functionally  in  place,  having  supported  this   sort  of  activity  for  a  number  of  years  (though  the  in  the  next  phase  of  the  proposal,  as  per   guidelines,  this  will  be  fully  articulated  and  a  streamlined  model  proposed);  as  agreed  with  

GARO,  we  will  work  with  this  baseline  language:  “The  program  fee  will  be  applied  to  each  

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Page 16 of 23 course  taken  for  credit  in  the  program,  regardless  of  whether  the  student  is  in  a  degree   program  or  in  the  certificate  program.”    Extant  x-­‐listing  as  above,  and  possibly  beyond  (in   discussion  with  other  departments  and  faculties),  will  be  maintained.    

Credit  for  courses  taken  via  extra-­‐institutional  delivery  (of  the  maximum  two  courses   outside  of  UVic)  are  handled  as  above,  #4  paragraph  3,  and  are  predicated  on  equivalence  to   evaluation  as  per  that  already  accepted  for  DHUM  491  and  ENGL  509,  to  curriculum  as  per  that   outlined  at  http://www.dhsi.org/courses.php,  and  to  content  as  per  that  outlined  at     http://www.dhsi.org/content/2013Curriculum/,   http://www.dhsi.org/content/2012Curriculum/,  and  the  UVic  Bookstore  (at   http://www.uvicbookstore.ca/general/search.php?subject=conf).    The  adjacent  chart  gives  a   sense  of  course  co-­‐relation;  as  agreed  with  GARO,  we  will  work  with  this  baseline  language:  

“Transfer  credit  is  available  for  up  to  2  courses  that  meet  program  criteria,  following  standard  

UVic  procedures  and  considered  on  an  individual  basis.    Courses  offered  by  those  institutions  in   the  DH  Training  Network  are  considered  to  meet  the  program  criteria.”  

 

 

A  transcript  of  one  graduating  with  this  certificate  might  look  approximately  as  below,  for  one   who  would  take  all  credits  at  UVic:  

Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities (2015)

Summer 14

Winter 14-15

DHUM 501: Introduction to Digital Humanities

DHUM 502: Core Concepts and Skills

1.5

1.5

DHUM 503: Remediation and Curation 1.5

DHUM 504: Creation, Communication, and Disseminatio 1.5

DHUM 505: Analysis, Teaching, and Administration 1.5

A+

A-

A

B+

A

Much  of  the  infrastructure  to  support  this  proposal  is  either  in  place  (at  UVic)  or   emerging,  though  may  require  a  formalisation  and  professional/faculty  sustenance  to  bring  it   up  to  spec  like  similar  programs  across  campus.  

The  program  will  be  offered  and  administered  by  English  at  UVic,  in  association  with  the  

DHSI  and  its  international  network  and,  through  this  network,  its  international  partners;  DHSI   and  this  network  is  administered  in  the  Electronic  Textual  Cultures  Lab  in  the  English  

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Department  /  Faculty  of  Humanities  at  UVic,  and  with  a  cohort  of  international  leaders  in  the  

Digital  Humanities  currently  offers  courses  that  comprise  the  proposed  curriculum  at  UVic  and   around  the  world.  

 

6.1.  Schedule  of  course  delivery    

Each  student  will  take  the  cohort-­‐foundational  Introduction  to  Digital  Humanities  at  UVic,  and   then  choose  the  remaining  four  courses  in  the  certificate  from  among  UVic  /  DHSI  offerings  or  

(up  to  two)  from  among  offerings  at  a  partner  institute  in  our  network  or  related  institution.  

6.2.  Delivery  methods  

Typically,  these  courses  are  taught  in  person  with  a  built  in  lab  component.    In  future  one  might   imagine  online  courses  as  well.  

6.3.  Linkages  between  the  learning  outcomes  and  the  curriculum  design    

The  curriculum  of  this  program  blends  computational  methods  and  theories  with  humanities   research  and  pedagogy,  specifically  addressing  the  demand  for  graduates  who  are  proficient  in   computing  and  will  contribute  to  growth  areas  such  as  information  management,  multimedia   communication,  social  computing,  game  design,  digital  preservation,  and  data  visualization;  at   the  same  time,  the  program  also  prepares  graduates  for  active  participation  in  the  digital   dimensions  of  humanities  research,  including  prototyping,  encoding,  and  data  processing.  

Graduates  of  the  program  are  well  positioned  for  project  coordination  and  leadership  roles  in   emerging  digital,  mobile,  and  database-­‐driven  projects,  serving  as  informed  liaisons  between   programmers,  technical  writers,  new  media  artists,  researchers,  and  user  communities  –  and   well  beyond.    Graduates  of  this  program  will  be  able  to:    

• Identify  key  aspects  of  liberal  arts  and  humanities  traditions  in  digital  culture  and   pertinent  computational  contexts.  

• Develop  competences  at  the  intersection  of  critical  thinking  and  computational   practices  and  mobilize  them  toward  problems  relevant  to  society  at  large.    

• Create,  document  and  catalogue  digital  data,  including  authoring  electronic  texts.  

• Conduct  humanities  research  based  on  digital  data  through  qualitative  and  quantitative   methods.    

• Analyze  and  reflect  on  the  social  and  technical  aspects  and  impacts  of  Digital  

Humanities.    

• Demonstrate  the  ability  to  work  as  collaborators  and  managers  in  multi-­‐disciplinary   teams  and  projects.  

6.4.  Use  and  purpose  of  practica,  Co-­‐op,  or  work  terms  

  Practica,  co-­‐op  placements,  and  work  terms  are  not  a  component  of  this  program.  

6.5.  Residency  requirements  and  anticipated  times  to  completion  

Students  must  participate  in  the  Introduction  to  Digital  Humanities  (a  compressed  course  taken   in  cohort  at  UVic,  the  week  before  DHSI);  of  the  five  courses  in  this  program,  two  can  be  taken   outside  of  the  UVic  campus.  

6.6.  Policies  on  student  evaluation    

Primary  student  supervision,  both  academically  and  administratively,  falls  under  the   responsibility  of  the  program  director  and  delegates,  including  a  cohort  supervisor  (instructor   to  the  cohort  entry  course,  Introduction  to  Digital  Humanities),  and  individual  instructors  in  the   courses  that  are  part  of  the  program.  

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7.  Enrolment  plan  for  the  length  of  the  program    

The  maximum  annual  intake  for  the  program  can  be  flexible  and  responsive  to  community   demand.    Earlier  consultation  and  response  has  suggested  that  we  might  be  able  to  expect  high   demand  in  the  first  instance,  some  70  in  the  first  or  second  annual  cohort;  as  the  cohort  entry   course  is  offered  in  seminar  format  (max  15  students  per  section,  at  current  levels)  such  intake   would  require  a  significant  adjustment  of  current  capacity  at  UVic,  and  in  itself  may  act  as   regulator  of  cohort  size  across  the  years.    We  imagine  achieving  steady  state  in  our  third  year,   beginning  slowly  perhaps  with  a  cohort  of  15-­‐30  (1-­‐2  sections  of  the  cohort  introduction   courses,  and  offering  related  courses  in  and  around  the  time  of  DHSI  in  similarly  compressed   format),  and  ultimately  imagining  a  cohort  of  some  60-­‐75  (4-­‐5  cohort  introduction  courses)  on   an  annual  basis.  

The  table  below  shows  a  suggested  the  intake  and  full-­‐time  equivalent  (FTE)  for  each   entry  year:  

Program  Year   Entry  Year  

Number   of  

Students  

Admitted  

EETS  per    Academic  

Year  (I  year   program,  of  5   credits,  2  of  which   can  be  taken  

outside  of  UVic)  

Total  Annual  

EETS  

2014/2015  

Year  1  

2015/2016  

Year  2  

May  2015  

May  2016  

15-­‐30  

30-­‐45  

9-­‐30  

18-­‐45  

9-­‐30  

18-­‐45  

2016/2017  

Steady  State  

May  2017   60-­‐75   36-­‐75   36-­‐75  

 

8.  Plans  for  on-­‐going  assessment  of  program  success    

Program  success  will  be  measured  by  standard  measures  across  the  groups  involved,  including   by:  a)  enrolment,  b)  student  assessment,  c)  employment  and  placement  of  graduates.    

 

9.  Related  programs  in  your  own  or  other  British  Columbia  post-­‐secondary  institutions    

At  the  time  this  proposal  saw  first  development,  there  were  no  equivalent  certificate  programs   of  this  caliber  and  rigor  offered  in  British  Columbia,  nor  outside  the  country;  nor,  now,  is  the   proposed  program  similar  in  structure  to  others  offered  at  universities  and  colleges  in  Canada   or  elsewhere,  though  there  are  graduate  programs  in  Humanities  Computing  and,  at  UVic,  a  

  joint  undergraduate  minor  (Humanities  and  CS)  in  consideration  at  the  moment.  

This  program  will  be  distinct,  internationally,  and  a  leader  among  others  because  of  its   foundation.    Elsewhere,  there  are  two  established  full-­‐time  MA  programs  in  Digital Humanities,   at  University  of  Alberta  (called  Humanities  Computing,  1998-­‐;  Siemens  helped  found  this   program)  and  Kings  College  London  (2002-­‐;  Siemens  has  taught  in  this  program);  a  number  of   other  programs  have  recently  emerged:  an  MPhil  in  Digital  Humanities  and  Culture  at  Trinity  

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College  Dublin  (2011-),  an  MA  in  Digital  Humanities  at  NUI  Maynooth  (2010-­‐),  an  MA/MSc  in  

Digital  Humanities  at  University  College London  (2011-­‐),  and  an  MA  in Digital  Humanities  

(Loyola  University;  2012-­‐).    There  are  several  emerging  ad  hoc  certificate  programs,  like  that  at  

Nipissing  U,  which  allows  undergrads  who  complete  a  course  trajectory  involving  equivalents  to   our  HUMA  150,  250/350,  and  450  courses,  plus  several  designated  electives,  for  a  line  on  their   transcript.    Further,  as  planning  toward  this  program  has  continued  over  the  past  several  years,   a  number  of  certificate  programs  have  emerged  at  places  like  UCLA,  U  Nebraska,  and  others,   but  none  with  the  same  caliber,  rigour,  and  reach  as  what  we  propose  in  this  document  have   emerged.  

This  supports  the  value  and  demand  of  having  such  a  program.  UVic  will  be  able  to  take   advantage  of  being  the  first  University  in  British  Columbia  to  offer  a  certificate  and  diploma  in   this  area  and,  tide  as  it  is  to  a  training  institute  and  network,  the  first  program  in  the  world  of   its  kind,  offering  something  unique  and  more  flexible  than  any  other  extant  program.  

 

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10.  Evidence  of  support  from  other  academic  units,  relevant  post-­‐secondary  institutions,  and   regulatory  or  professional  bodies,  where  applicable    

 

Appended  to  this  file:  

 

Representing  Operational  Partners,  Faculty  of  Humanities  

1. Ray  Siemens,  Electronic  Textual  Cultures  Lab  and  Digital  Humanities  Summer  

Institute  (operating  the  program,  managing  the  partner  network)  

2. Robert  Miles,  Department  of  English  (administrative  home)  

3. John  Archibald,  Faculty  of  Humanities  (administrative  faculty)  

Representing  Involved  and  Invested  Members  of  the  UVic  Community  

4. Tom  Tiedje,  Faculty  of  Engineering    

5. Peter  Keller,  Faculty  of  Social  Science  

6. David  Leach,  Writing  &  Technology  and  Society  Program  

7. Lynne  van  Leuven,  Faculty  of  Fine  Arts  

8. Catherine  Harding,  Department  of  History  in  Art    

9. Robert  Lipson,  Faculty  of  Science  

10. Ted  Reicken,  Faculty  of  Education  

11. Oscar  Casiro,  Faculty  of  Medicine  

12. Jonathan  Bengtson,  McPherson  Library  

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Appendices  (Appendices  will  be  attached  to  this  proposal  as  warranted  by  next  steps.)    

*  -­‐  Brief  on  Governance  and  Transfer  Credit  /  PLA  

 

A.  Short  faculty  cv’s    

B.  Calendar  curriculum  change  forms    

C.  Enrolment  plan  from  section  7  above      

D.  Recruitment  &  Marketing  plan  (Consult  with  recruitment  team  &  UVic  Communications)    

E.  Letters  of  support    

 

 

 

 

 

F.  Business  plan     a.  Income  generated     b.  Faculty  appointments  required     c.  Staff  requirements     d.  Space  requirements     e.  Library  requirements  (Include  evidence  of  consultation  with  UVic  Librarian)       f.  Other  instructional  costs  

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*  Brief  on  Governance  and  Transfer  Credit  /  PLA  

To  administer  the  program,  English  will  establish  a  DH  program  committee  (newly   created,  consisting  of  4  or  5  graduate  faculty  members  with  experience  in  the  area)  to  assess   applications  and  make  recommendations  for  admission  to  FGS;  the  chair  of  this  committee  will   be  the  Director  of  the  program,  and  will  report  to  the  Chair  of  English.    For  program  advice  and   support,  each  student  accepted  into  the  program  will  be  assigned  to  a  faculty  mentor,  the   instructor  of  their  cohort  foundation  seminar,  Introduction  to  Digital  Humanities  (details  of  this   course  below),  which  will  contain  up  to  15  students.      

The  program  committee  will  also  be  responsible  for  making  recommendations  to  FGS  on   transfer  credit  requests,  via  external  transfer,  for  the  two  courses  (of  five)  in  the  program  that   can  be  taken  outside  of  UVic  as  part  of  the  program  requirements;  this  will  be  governed  by   existing  Letter  of  Permission  (LofP)  policies  and  those  relating  to  Block  Transfer  model  of   transfer  credit.    Typically,  such  credit  will  be  granted  for  courses  taken  at  other  institutions  and   institutes  partnered  with  DHSI,  applied  across  the  board  or  in  a  case-­‐by-­‐case  manner,  where   the  following  requirements  are  met  as  determined  by  the  DH  program  committee:  (a)  35   program  contact  hours,  (b)  a  course  outline  approved  by  the  program  committee,  and  (c)   appropriate  instructor  qualifications.    Such  courses  will  be  indicated  as  Pass/Fail  (i.e.  not   graded,  and  not  part  of  GPA  calculations)  on  the  UVic  transcript.  (Worth  noting,  the  majority  of   courses  offered  by  DHSI  network  partners  already  meet  burdens  associated  with  instructional   credit  at  UVic,  and  have  been  accepted  for  graduate,  undergraduate,  and  professional  training   credit  at  a  number  of  institutions  beyond  UVic,  including  many  in  our  region  via  the  Western  

Dean’s  Agreement.)    As  well,  internal  transfer  of  course  credit  from  another  UVic  degree  may   be  granted  for  two  courses  (of  five)  in  the  program,  providing  those  courses  are  among  those   associated  with  this  certificate.  

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Letters  of  Support  

1. Representing  Operational  Partners,  Faculty  of  Humanities   i. Ray  Siemens,  Electronic  Textual  Cultures  Lab  and  Digital  Humanities  

Summer  Institute  (operating  the  program,  managing  the  partner   network)   ii. Robert  Miles,  Department  of  English  (administrative  home)   iii. John  Archibald,  Faculty  of  Humanities  (administrative  faculty)  

2. Representing  Core  UVic  Partners   i. Sue  Whitesides,  Department  of  Computer  Science   ii. Jonathan  Bengtson,  McPherson  Library  

3. Representing  Involved  and  Invested  Members  of  the  UVic  Community   i. Tom  Tiedje,  Faculty  of  Engineering     ii. Peter  Keller,  Faculty  of  Social  Science   i. David  Leach,  Technology  and  Society  Program   iii. Lynne  van  Leuven,  Faculty  of  Fine  Arts   i. Catherine  Harding,  Department  of  History  in  Art  Robert  Lipson,  

Faculty  of  Science   iv. Ted  Reicken,  Faculty  of  Education   v. Oscar  Casiro,  Faculty  of  Medicine  

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DATE: March 19, 2014

TO:

Senate

FROM: Dr. Reeta Tremblay, Vice-President Academic and Provost

RE: Procedures for Academic Accommodation and Access for Graduate Students with Disabilities

At the February meeting, members of Senate had the opportunity to provide feedback on proposed new

Procedures for Academic Accommodation and Access for Graduate Students with Disabilities. Several questions were raised at the February meeting requiring clarification as discussed below.

Essential Course or Program Requirements

1. Senators sought clarification with respect to the section of the procedures referencing “essential requirements”.

Generally, academic accommodations are provided to students with disabilities to remove and prevent barriers that may interfere with the student’s full participation in the learning environment.

The academic accommodation process is individualized in that accommodation plans will vary from one student with a disability to the next. There may be times when some elements of a course or program could be considered “non-essential” such as those that would not impact the successful completion of the learning outcomes if they were waived.

Essential requirements refer to the components in a course or program that are vital or indispensable and are determined by the academic unit. When the procedures refer to a student

‘meeting essential requirements’ this means that a Graduate Student must acquire or demonstrate the knowledge and skills during the course or program (with or without academic accommodations) for the student to successfully meet the course or program learning outcomes/objectives.

Academic accommodations may include alternative methods for meeting essential requirements.

Whether a requested accommodation would fundamentally alter an essential requirement of a course or program will generally need to be determined on a case-by-case basis. In such a case, collaboration between the Graduate Supervisor (and/or instructor), the Faculty of Graduate Studies and others may be required as set out in section 26.00 of the draft procedures. If a workable accommodation cannot be reached, a formal review under sections 29.00 - 34.00 of the procedures may be requested.

It is important to note that, in some circumstances, the nature and degree of a disability may mean that no reasonable accommodation would enable a graduate student to meet the essential requirements of a course or program. Where no reasonable academic accommodation can be provided, the university may deny an accommodation in order to maintain the academic integrity of a course or program in accordance with section 24.00 of the procedures.

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For clarification, a more detailed definition of essential requirements has been added to the draft procedures in section 3.00.

Accommodations Related to Thesis Extension and Funding Requirements

2. A question was raised about an academic accommodation that would provide a Graduate Student additional time to complete a thesis and the potential impact that substantial extra time could have on a graduate supervisor’s funding agreement when there are deadlines required for completing research.

Such cases are highly variable depending on the Graduate Student’s disability, the nature of the research and the terms of the funding agreement and need to be examined on a case-by-case basis.

The draft procedures are intended to provide a framework for ensuring collaborative processes and that consultation occurs in order to find an appropriate resolution to such situations.

In a case where a Graduate Student’s accommodation could have a significant impact on a graduate supervisor (e.g., extension of a thesis completion affecting a Graduate Supervisor’s research grant), a provision was included in the draft procedures encouraging the Graduate Supervisor to consult with the Faculty of Graduate Studies and others on appropriate academic accommodations or requirements (section 26.03). As such a case will have its own unique characteristics, legal advice may be required. The formal review process embedded in sections 29.00 - 36.00 of the procedures could be used as a mechanism to resolve issues related to accommodations that may have a significant impact on a funding agreement or other complex issues.

Defining Graduate Supervisor (co-supervisor)

3. A suggestion was made at the February Senate meeting to formally define the term ‘Graduate

Supervisor (co-supervisor)’ in the procedures. A definition has been included in section 5.00 of the draft procedures.

In summary, as a result of the feedback received by Senate at its February meeting, three revisions were made to the draft procedures including inclusion of:

1. a definition of ‘essential requirements’ and ‘meeting essential requirements’

2. a statement clarifying that the Graduate Supervisor may confidentially consult with the Faculty of

Graduate Studies and others on appropriate Academic Accommodations when required (section

26.03).

3. a definition for ‘Graduate Supervisor (co-supervisor)’ (Section 5.00).

The background memo from the February Senate Meeting outlining the purpose of the procedures and the development/consultation process is attached as well as the revised draft procedures.

The draft procedures are now being brought forward to Senate for approval.

Motion

THAT Senate approve the Procedures for Academic Accommodation and Access for Graduate Students with Disabilities, effective May 1, 2014.

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PROCEDURES FOR ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATION AND ACCESS

FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Procedural Authority: Senate

Procedural Officers: Dean of Graduate Studies and

Effective Date: TBD

Supersedes: New

Last Editorial Change:

Associate Vice-President Student Affairs

Parent Policy: Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities (AC1205)

PURPOSE

1.00 The purpose of these procedures is to assist in implementing the university’s Academic

Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities Policy (AC1205) for Graduate

Students.

DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these procedures:

2.00 The definitions contained within the university Academic Accommodation and Access for

Students with Disabilities Policy (AC1205), with the exception of the definition s of

Student and Essential Requirement , apply to these procedures. (Note: key definitions in

Policy AC1205 include: Academic Accommodation, Accessibility, Essential Requirements, and Undue Hardship).

3.00 Essential Requirements mean the components in a course or program that are vital or indispensable. ‘Meeting Essential Requirements’ refers to the knowledge and skills that a Graduate Student must acquire or demonstrate (with or without Academic

Accommodations) during the course or program for the student to successfully meet the course or program learning outcomes/objectives.

4.00 Graduate Student means a student who is registered in an existing graduate program at the university.

5.00 Graduate Supervisor (or Co-Supervisor) means a member of the Faculty of

Graduate Studies who has the responsibility of supervising a Graduate Student.

6.00 Prospective Graduate Student means an individual who is currently considering or in the process of applying to a graduate program at the university.

7.00 Support Person means an individual who provides support or advice to a Graduate

Student during a formal review process under sections 29.00 - 36.00 of these procedures.

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8.00 Unit means academic or administrative areas at the university, including but not limited to: faculties, divisions, departments, schools, offices and centres.

SCOPE

9.00 These procedures apply to Academic Accommodation and Access for Graduate Students only and do not apply to undergraduate students or Continuing Studies students.

10.00 These procedures do not apply to Graduate Students’ employment relationships.

Employment accommodations are managed in accordance with applicable collective agreements, university policies and the university’s regular employment practices.

PROCEDURES

Protection of Graduate Student Personal Information

11.00 The university is committed to protecting all personal information that Graduate

Students with Disabilities disclose. The personal information of Graduate Students with

Disabilities shall be managed and protected in accordance with the BC Human Rights

Code, the

Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act

, and the university’s

Protection of Privacy (GV0235) and Records Management (IM7700) policies and procedures.

Determining Essential Course and Program Requirements

12.00 Academic Units are responsible for identifying and evaluating the program requirements they consider essential including skills, knowledge and attitudes. Program and course objectives and learning outcomes should be included in this process.

Accessibility Statement for Course Outline

13.00 It is recommended that instructors include a statement in their Course Outline that:

(a) indicates their willingness to assist in the provision of Academic Accommodations;

(b) informs Graduate Students of the university’s responsibility to provide necessary

Academic Accommodations; and

(c) informs Graduate Students about the role of the Resource Centre for Students with a

Disability (hereinafter referred to as the ‘RCSD’).

13.01 The current statement is available on the Learning and Teaching Centre’s (LTC) website and will be provided annually by the LTC to Academic Units through documents and programming pertaining to course outlines and syllabi.

Applications from Students with Disabilities

14.00 The university encourages applications from Prospective Graduate Students with

Disabilities. The university will accept qualified candidates for admission to graduate programs by examining each Prospective Graduate Student's academic record in accordance with the Graduate Academic Calendar .

14.01 Prospective Graduate Students with Disabilities who have general questions about potential Academic Accommodations or other support services available at

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Page 5 of 38 the university, or who have encountered barriers in the application process are encouraged to initially contact the RCSD or the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

15.00 Prospective Graduate Students with Disabilities who are denied admission to the university who can prove extenuating circumstances or provide information that was not presented initially may forward a written request for a review of their application to the

Dean of Graduate Studies. The request should include any relevant additional information combined with any supporting documents. The Dean of Graduate Studies

(or designate) will consider the documentation presented and will make a decision on the application, subject to review by the Senate Committee on Appeals in accordance with its terms of reference.

Disclosure and Preliminary Evaluation of Academic Accommodation Arrangements

16.00 Graduate Students seeking Academic Accommodations are encouraged to disclose their

Disability to the RCSD as early as possible in order to ensure:

(a) the appropriate assessment of supporting medical documentation and of requested

Academic Accommodations;

(b) that there is sufficient time to obtain necessary documentation as set out in section

19.00 of these procedures;

(c) that recommendations on Academic Accommodations can be made to the Faculty of

Graduate Studies or the Academic Unit administering the program; and

(d) that Academic Accommodation arrangements can be implemented in a timely manner.

17.00 Graduate Students with a Disability may, at their discretion, elect:

(a) to disclose their Disability to the RCSD;

(b) to disclose their Disability to the Faculty of Graduate Studies or the Academic Unit administering the graduate program (e.g., their Graduate Supervisor); or

(c) not to disclose their Disability to any area of the university.

17.01 If a Graduate Student elects not to disclose his or her Disability, the university cannot ensure the appropriate evaluation or implementation of any necessary

Academic Accommodations.

17.02 Graduate Students who request Academic Accommodations or services from the

RCSD

RCSD are required to provide appropriate documentation as set out in section

19.00 - 20.00 of these procedures.

Registration with the Resource Centre for Students with a Disability

18.00 Newly admitted Graduate Students who elect to disclose their Disability to the RCSD in order to request Academic Accommodations should contact the RCSD and register as early as possible.

18.01 Graduate Students who have recent diagnoses may register with the RCSD at any time.

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Documentation of Disability

19.00 Graduate Students who register with the RCSD for the purpose of requesting Academic

Accommodations must submit documentation of Disability that:

(a) confirms the rationale for reasonable Academic Accommodations;

(b) is from medical professionals with appropriate credentials; and

(c) should indicate:

(I) the diagnosing professional’s name, title, phone number, address, official stamp or letterhead and signature;

(II) the date of the assessment;

(III) a statement of the nature of the Disability including the impact of medication;

(IV) an explanation of the functional impact of the Disability on the pursuit of a graduate education; and

(V) advice about measures that the university might consider when developing and implementing an Academic Accommodation.

19.01 The university is not responsible for the assessment or diagnosis of a Graduate

Student’s Disability and does not cover costs related to medical documentation.

19.02 A diagnosis of Disability alone does not guarantee the provision of Academic

Accommodations.

20.00 Services and accommodations experienced in other institutions or jurisdictions may differ from what is provided at the University of Victoria. The RCSD will review submitted documentation with the Graduate Student in order to assess appropriate Academic

Accommodations.

Services Provided by the RCSD

21.00 Graduate Students who are registered with the RCSD may meet with an RCSD advisor in order to:

(a) receive advice and support;

(b) review the documentation of Disability;

(c) determine eligibility for Academic Accommodations and services on the basis of documentation and assistance in implementing such Accommodations when necessary;

(d) receive assistance in obtaining grants and bursaries;

(e) receive referrals to other available resources; and

(f) coordinate accessible learning materials and services with sufficient notice (see

Appendix ‘A’).

Reaching Academic Accommodation

22.00 The nature of graduate courses and programs are varied and complex. A variety of

Academic Accommodations may be available for Graduate Students with Disabilities with documented disabilities. Examples of Academic Accommodations that may be available to Graduate Students are included in Appendix ‘A’ of these procedures.

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23.00 The provision of an Academic Accommodation provides Graduate Students with a

Disability an alternative means of meeting the Essential Requirements of a course or program. Fulfilling essential course or program requirements within the established time limits as set out in the Graduate Academic Calendar remains the Graduate Student’s responsibility.

24.00 The university will provide an Academic Accommodation to a Graduate Student with a

Disability unless doing so will cause an Undue Hardship. However, in seeking to develop and implement an Academic Accommodation, the university is not required to continue to search for an Academic Accommodation once a reasonable Academic Accommodation has been identified. Undue hardship is defined in the university’s Academic

Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities policy (AC1205).

24.01 In some circumstances, the nature and degree of a Graduate Student’s Disability may mean that no reasonable Academic Accommodation would enable the

Graduate Student to meet the documented Essential Requirements of a course or program. Where no reasonable Academic Accommodation can be provided, the university may deny an Academic Accommodation(s) in order to maintain the academic integrity of a course or program. A Graduate Student cannot be presumed to be incapable of meeting the Essential Requirements of a course or program unless reasonable efforts have been made to assess all Academic

Accommodation options.

25.00 All Graduate Students requesting Academic Accommodations are required to:

(a) meet the degree requirements of their program;

(b) acquire and/or demonstrate the requisite knowledge, skills, and attitudes of their graduate degree and degree components, in order to successfully meet the Essential

Requirements and the expectations of a graduate course or program; and

(c) participate fully in the process of developing an appropriate Academic

Accommodation plan which may include:

(I) seeking out the advice and assessment of the RCSD, maintaining contact with the RCSD as necessary and meeting established timelines;

(II) actively engaging with RCSD staff, the Graduate Supervisor, instructors and others as necessary in their efforts to develop and implement an Academic

Accommodation plan for the Graduate Student; and

(III) providing sufficient detail to the RCSD about the Disability and any impact on academic activities as a Graduate Student.

25.01 If a Graduate Student with a Disability does not cooperate or fully participate in the development and implementation of an Academic Accommodation, it may lead to:

(a) an incomplete or insufficient Academic Accommodation plan; or

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(b) the university’s inability to develop or implement an appropriate Academic

Accommodation plan.

26.00 The university strongly encourages early consultation and collaboration between the

Graduate Student, the Graduate Supervisor and/or instructor, the Faculty of Graduate

Studies, the RCSD, and the LTC. Early consultation and collaboration helps ensure that:

(a) accessibility considerations and learning outcomes are reviewed and evaluated; and

(b) Academic Accommodation arrangements can be assessed and implemented in a timely and appropriate manner.

26.01 At any point in the Academic Accommodation process, the Graduate Student may, as necessary, confidentially consult with the RCSD, the Faculty of Graduate

Studies, the Graduate Supervisor and others on appropriate Academic

Accommodations.

26.02 As necessary and with the Graduate Student’s written consent, the Faculty of

Graduate Studies may collaborate with the RCSD and/or the Dean (or designate) of the Academic Unit administering the program in order to review and initiate

Academic Accommodation arrangements in a timely manner.

2 6 .03 At any point in the Academic Accommodation process, the Graduate Supervisor may confidentially consult with the Faculty of Graduate Studies on appropriate

Academic Accommodations or requirements.

26.04 In the event that any issues arise pertaining to the Graduate Student’s ability, even if reasonably accommodated, to fulfill the Essential Requirements of a program, such issues should be discussed by the Graduate Student and/or the

Graduate Supervisor with the Dean of Graduate Studies (or designate).

26.05 The Dean of Graduate Studies (or designate) will review the Essential

Requirements of the course or program and collaborate with the Graduate

Student, the pertinent Graduate Supervisor and the RCSD to determine what, if any, Academic Accommodations might be reasonable to enable the applicant to meet the Essential Requirements.

27.00 A Graduate Student who disagrees with the RCSD’s initial Academic Accommodation recommendations or other proposed Academic Accommodation should consult the

Manager of the RCSD and the Dean of Graduate Studies (or designate) to discuss any concerns.

28.00 A Graduate Supervisor or instructor who disagrees with the RCSD’s Academic

Accommodation recommendation or other proposed Academic Accommodation should initially consult the Chair or Dean (or designate) of the Academic Unit administering the program to discuss any concerns.

28.01 Where necessary, the Dean or Associate Dean (or designate) from the Academic

Unit who disagrees with the RCSD’s initial Academic Accommodation

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Page 9 of 38 recommendation or other proposed Academic Accommodation should contact the

Manager of the RCSD and the Dean of Graduate Studies (or designate) to determine whether informal resolution is possible.

29.00 Where further resolution is required, or where there are issues or difficulties surrounding the implementation of an Academic Accommodation that have not been resolved informally, the Graduate Student, Dean (or designate) of the Academic Unit or Graduate

Supervisor may submit a written request to the Associate Vice-President Student Affairs for formal review.

29.01 The purpose of the formal review is to make recommendations for implementing appropriate actions to the Dean of Graduate Studies in a timely manner.

30.00 The formal review request should include:

(a) the rationale for the review;

(b) documentation in support of the request; and

(c) the requester’s preferred outcome.

30.01 Prior to the formal review, the Associate Vice-President Student Affairs (or designate) may request documentation from the instructor(s); Graduate

Supervisor; Chair or Dean of the Academic Unit administering the program summarizing the:

(a) learning outcomes and Essential Requirements for the course or graduate program; and

(b) issue(s) or difficulties surrounding the implementation of the Academic

Accommodation.

31.00 The Associate Vice-President Student Affairs (or designate) shall normally conduct the formal review within ten (10) university business days of receiving the review request.

32.00 The formal review shall include consultation with the individuals involved in the

Academic Accommodation and others who can provide specific expertise in resolving the implementation of appropriate Academic Accommodations.

32.01 Based on the nature of the Academic Accommodation, the Associate Vice-

President Student Affairs shall either:

(a) facilitate a meeting with necessary individuals which may include but is not limited to:

• the Graduate Student and his or her Support Person;

• representation from the Academic Unit administering the graduate program (e.g., Graduate Supervisor, Chair, Associate Dean and/or Dean);

• an Associate Dean from the Faculty of Graduate Studies;

• an individual(s) with expertise in the specific area of Accommodation(s);

• an individual(s) with expertise in the pertinent academic program;

• an Associate Vice-President in the Vice-President Academic and Provost’s office; and

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• the Director of Equity and Human Rights.

(b) individually consult necessary individuals such as those provided in 32.01 (a) above in instances where there may be confidentiality concerns or other difficulties in completing the review in a timely manner.

32.02 Prior to taking any action under 32.01, the Associate Vice-President Student

Affairs (or designate) shall consult the Graduate Student regarding the formal review process and any potential confidentiality issues or other concerns relating to the individuals that will be consulted during the formal review process.

32.03 Upon request, all materials and aspects of the formal review process will be provided in an accessible format.

32.04 Individuals involved in the formal review process may submit supporting materials to the Associate Vice-President Student Affairs for consideration during the formal review. A summary of submitted materials will be provided to participants in the formal review process upon request.

33.00 The Associate Vice-President Student Affairs will review all relevant documentation and submissions. Upon completion of the formal review, the Associate Vice-President

Student Affairs will make recommendations to the Dean of Graduate Studies on an appropriate Academic Accommodation on the basis of:

(a) the consultation results;

(b) the documented expected learning outcomes and Essential Requirements of the course or program;

(c) the Graduate Student’s current functional limitations and barriers;

(d) the Academic Accommodations that have been assessed and implemented; and

(e) whether or not there is appropriate evidence and data to support a claim of Undue

Hardship.

34.00 The Dean of Graduate Studies (or designate) will review and determine whether to implement the recommendation(s) and shall notify the Graduate Supervisor, Graduate

Student and others as necessary in writing of the decision normally within five (5) university business days of receiving the recommendation(s). The notification shall include the rationale for the decision and any alternate resolution as applicable.

35.00 Where the Graduate Student is unsatisfied with the outcome of the formal review or with the Dean of Graduate Studies’ decision, the Graduate Student may appeal to the

Senate Committee on Appeals in accordance with its Terms of Reference and Procedural

Guidelines .

35.01 The Senate Committee on Appeals has jurisdiction to review decisions on matters involving the application of academic regulations or requirements. The Senate

Committee on Appeals has no jurisdiction to consider a decision where the sole

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Page 11 of 38 question in the Graduate Student’s appeal turns on a question of academic judgment.

35.02 The Senate Committee on Appeals’ decision is final within the university.

36.00 When a formal review is pending, the Manager of the RCSD, the Dean of Graduate

Studies (or designate) and the Graduate Supervisor shall review the Academic

Accommodation plan to determine what aspects of the plan, if any, can be immediately implemented on an interim basis pending the completion of the formal review or appeal process.

Academic Concessions, Extensions and Leaves of Absence

37.00 A Graduate Student may request academic concession in accordance with the Graduate

Calendar.

38.00 Graduate Students who have reasons to request extensions can request extensions in accordance with the:

(a) Leaves of Absence and Withdrawal from Graduate Programs section of the academic calendar ;

(b) Leave of Absence with Permission form;

(c) Request for Program Extension form; and/or

(d) Request for Candidacy Extension form.

RELEVANT LEGISLATION

University Act

Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act

BC Human Rights Code

RELATED POLICIES AND DOCUMENTS

Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities policy (AC1205)

Protection of Privacy policy (GV0235)

Records Management policy (IM7700)

Employment Accommodation policy (HR6115)

University of Victoria Graduate Studies Academic Calendar

Relevant Faculty of Graduate Studies Policies and Forms

• Leaves of Absence and Withdrawal from Graduate Programs

• Leave of Absence with Permission form ;

• Request for program extension form; and/or

• Request for candidacy extension form.

• Responsibilities in the Supervisory Relationship policy

Appendices

Appendix ‘A’ - Examples of Academic Accommodations Available for Graduate Students

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APPENDIX ‘A’ - EXAMPLES OF ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATIONS

AVAILABLE FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

Procedural Authority: Vice-President Academic and Provost

Procedural Officer: Dean of Graduate Studies and

Associate Vice-President Student Affairs

Parent Policy: Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities (AC1205)

Effective Date: TBD

Supersedes: New

Last Editorial Change:

PURPOSE

1.00 The purpose of this document is to provide examples of resources and Academic

Accommodations available to instructors and Graduate Students at the University.

Course and Program Accessibility

2.00 Guidance is available for instructors on developing courses that are accessible for all students through the Learning and Teaching Centre (LTC). For example:

• Universal Instructional Design -Guide on Creating an Accessible Curriculum: ltc.uvic.ca/servicesprograms/publications/documents/____UVicUIDBook.pdf

• Sample Course Outline Accessibility statement: www.ltc.uvic.ca/servicesprograms/support/index.php

• Learning Systems – Instructional Technology Support: http://elearning.uvic.ca/toolkit

Application and Evaluation Process

3.00 Providing accessibility in the application process may include application materials in alternative format and evaluation of applicants for graduate programs through an accessibility lens.

Examples of Academic Accommodations

Note: the following appendix provides examples of Academic Accommodations at the university and is intended to help clarify the type of accommodations that may be available at the university for Graduate Students. The following section is not intended to provide an exhaustive list as each Academic Accommodation decision is based on assessment of pertinent documentation and a Graduate Student’s individual circumstances.

4.00 The nature of graduate courses and programs is varied and complex. A variety of

Academic Accommodations may be available for supporting Graduate Students with

Disabilities including the following:

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(I)

Course and Exam Accommodations:

Course-based Academic Accommodations for students enable access to essential course content and activities. The need to access lectures, labs, written assignments, fieldwork, class discussions and technology may require reasonable accommodations such as notetakers, sign language interpreters, preferential seating, more flexible attendance requirements, assignment substitutions, classes in accessible locations and adaptive technology. Some Graduate

Students may require a range of accommodations for various activities in order to meet learning outcomes.

Graduate Students who are required to write tests and exams may need adjustments to time, the use of technology, a substitute method of assessment

(such as a paper or short-answer exam instead of a multiple choice exam), and/or to write in a distraction-reduced environment.

(II) Thesis Preparation - Academic Accommodations surrounding thesispreparation deadlines are determined on a case-by-case basis in accordance with

Faculty of Graduate Studies guidelines.

(III)

Candidacy - Academic Accommodations surrounding candidacy deadlines are determined on a case-by-case basis in accordance with Faculty of Graduate

Studies guidelines.

(IV)

Thesis Defense - Academic Accommodations for Graduate Students defending a thesis may include, but are not limited to: room selection, additional time to complete the defense in accordance with the established time limits as set out in the Graduate Academic Calendar .

Work Term Accommodations

5.00 The determination of whether a work term accommodation is reasonable is fact specific to the Graduate Student and the position and involves a process in which the faculty and the graduate student collaboratively:

(a) identify the impact of the disability on the performance of the essential job functions and workflow;

(b) explore possible reasonable accommodations to mitigate barriers; and

(c) maintain essential functions and performance standards of the appointment.

5.01 Graduate Students should notify the Cooperative Education Program and Career

Services office and their graduate advisor in advance of a work term placement if a specific accommodation is being sought for the work placement. The

Cooperative Education Program and Career Services office will work collaboratively with the employer, the Graduate Supervisor, and others, where appropriate, to support suitable accommodations.

Registration for Academic Accommodations that Require Additional Time to Implement

6.00 Examples of Academic Accommodations that require advanced planning and early registration include but are not limited to:

(a) Course or research materials in alternative formats;

(b) Sign language interpreting or transcribing; and

(c) Substantial modifications to a physical environment such as a lab.

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DATE:

TO:

FROM:

RE:

December 11, 2013

Senate

Dr. Reeta Tremblay, Vice-President Academic and Provost

Procedures for Academic Accommodation and Access for Graduate Students with

Disabilities

BACKGROUND

The university policy on Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities (Policy

AC1205) has been in effect since 1997; however, the university currently does not have specific academic accommodation procedures for graduate students. While Policy AC1205 applies generally to graduate students, graduate students are not specifically mentioned in the document and there is minimal direction provided for resolving accommodation issues specific to graduate students. In the fall of 2011, the university implemented academic accommodation procedures specifically for undergraduate students.

Issues related to academic accommodation for graduate students continue to expand in scope and complexity. Often there are fewer obvious academic accommodations and services available as a student advances in their academic career. Therefore, the need has been identified to create procedures that help support graduate students and those involved in the provision of academic accommodations for graduate students. Currently, only one Canadian university has detailed academic accommodation procedures for graduate students.

Student Affairs and the Faculty of Graduate Studies have led the process to develop comprehensive draft procedures specific to graduate students. A small working group comprised of the following individuals was struck to draft these procedures: Joel Lynn, Executive Director Student Services, Dr.

Margot Wilson, Associate Dean Faculty of Graduate Studies, Laurie Keenan, Manager, Resource Centre for Students with a Disability, and Jonathan Derry, Manager, Policy Development and Judicial Affairs.

The draft procedures are attached to this memo. The procedures have been designed to:

• provide information for individuals with disabilities related to applying for admission to graduate programs at the university;

• set out options available to encourage reporting in order to facilitate appropriate support to all individuals involved in the accommodation process (students, faculty and staff);

• address confidentiality issues and highlight how student personal information is protected throughout the accommodation process;

• include the processes used by the Resource Centre for Students with a Disability (RCSD) including timelines and documentation requirements for requesting academic accommodation;

• provide general information on academic accommodations that may be available to graduate students;

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• clarify the roles and responsibilities of various individuals and areas involved in the academic accommodation process (e.g., Graduate Students, Faculty of Graduate Studies, faculties administering graduate programs, graduate supervisors, the RCSD, etc); and

• set out processes to assist graduate students and/or faculty members with resolving issues or difficulties related to the implementation of an academic accommodation plan.

In the development of these procedures, the working group:

• reviewed other North American universities’ related policies, procedures and practices;

• conducted a review of best practices and standards;

• reviewed position papers and research conducted by external organizations, committees and qualified practitioners;

• developed a combined document that identifies related issues and discusses the intended scope of the procedures;

• determined which aspects of the existing undergraduate accommodation procedures are also applicable to graduate students; and

• reviewed privacy and confidentiality issues related to accommodating graduate students.

Consultation Process

The working group also conducted consultations with multiple stakeholders including:

Co-operative Education and Career Services

Advisory Committee on Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with a Disability

Faculty members with specific credentials or research interests in academic accommodations

Equity and Human Rights Office

Learning and Teaching Centre

Deans’ Council

Graduate Studies’ Executive Committee

Graduate Studies’ Faculty Council

Graduate Students’ Society Executive Board

Ministry of Advanced Education

• the Ombudsperson

Society for Students with a Disability

Graduate students registered with the RCSD to receive academic accommodations

Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching

The feedback collected during the consultation process has been incorporated into the attached draft procedures as appropriate.

I would like to bring the draft procedures forward to Senate for information purposes. Following the

January Senate meeting, the working group will review any comments made by Senate, consult as necessary and finalize the draft procedures with the intent of bringing the procedures forward for

Senate’s approval in Spring, 2014.

Attachments:

Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities Policy (AC1205)

Draft - Procedures for Academic Accommodation and Access for Graduate Students (For Information)

Draft - Appendix ‘A’ - Examples of Academic Accommodations Available for Graduate Students (For

Information)

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ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATION AND

ACCESS FOR STUDENTS WITH

DISABILITIES

Associated Procedures:

University Policy No.: AC1205

Classification: Academic and Students

Approving Authority: Senate

Effective Date: January/06

Supersedes: June/97

Last Editorial Change: June/11

Mandated Review:

Procedures for Academic Accommodation and Access for Undergraduate Students with

Disabilities

1. POLICY PURPOSE

In accordance with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the B.C. Human Rights

Code, and the University of Victoria Policy on Human Rights, Equity and Fairness, the

University of Victoria (the “University”) will promote and protect the rights and dignity of students with disabilities and will create a safe, respectful and supportive environment for all members of the university community. This policy aims to make the University as accessible as possible so that students with disabilities can participate in the activities of the University as equal members of the university community.

2. POLICY STATEMENT

The University endeavours to provide the best educational experience for all its students. The academic excellence for which the University strives is unattainable without a commitment to human rights, equity, fairness and diversity. The provision of reasonable academic accommodation allows students with disabilities to meet and demonstrate the University’s high standards in a fair and equitable manner.

This policy is guided by the following principles:

2.1 The University celebrates diversity within its community and welcomes the contributions, experiences and full participation of persons with disabilities as valued members of the university community;

2.2 All members of the university community share the responsibility to promote equality, remove barriers, and create a respectful and inclusive learning environment. Persons with disabilities will be involved in the development of policies and programs and in decisions that directly affect them;

2.3 The University will take steps to dispel stereotypes and prejudices about persons with disabilities and promote an understanding of persons with disabilities as equal members of the University community;

2.4 An inclusive learning environment may require the provision of suitable individual academic accommodation for persons with disabilities and the University has a

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Appendix 1, Definitions);

2.5 If a suitable academic accommodation cannot be agreed upon, the University recognizes the right of students to appeal the academic accommodation decision as described in Sections 4.2 and 4.3 below.

3.

RESPONSIBILITIES

Appropriate academic accommodation entails shared responsibilities and communication among university staff, faculty, and students .

3.1 The University will provide appropriate mechanisms to implement the provisions of this policy in a reasonably timely and effective manner.

Specifically, the University will:

(a) Through the Office of the Vice-President Academic and Provost, appoint and maintain an Advisory Committee on Academic Accommodation and

Access for Students with Disabilities that will address issues relevant to the implementation and improvement of this policy. This committee will provide a report of its activities to Senate on an annual basis;

(b) Support the operations of the Resource Centre for Students with a

Disability (RCSD) to fulfill its mandate to:

(i) inform and assist faculty and staff in providing suitable student academic accommodation and understanding disability issues;

(ii) offer advice, guidance and support for students requiring academic accommodation; on the basis of supporting documentation, make recommendations and decisions regarding academic accommodation in a timely manner;

(c) Give persons with disabilities equal consideration for admission to any program offered by the University for which they are academically qualified;

(d) Make its courses or programs accessible to qualified students with disabilities up to the point of undue hardship and within those limits, modify course or program components to meet the needs of students;

(e) Handle personal information concerning students with a disability in accordance with the requirements of the Freedom of Information and

Protection of Privacy Act;

(f) Inform and educate its students, staff, instructors, faculty members and administrators about the provisions of this policy and the means for appropriately implementing them.

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3.2 Students with disabilities seeking academic accommodation are expected to contact the RCSD to initiate the process of determining and arranging the appropriate academic accommodation in individual situations.

Specifically, students with disabilities will:

(a) Identify their individual needs and provide appropriate documentation of their disabilities with sufficient notice given to enable the University to make the necessary academic accommodations;

(b) Engage in discussions and explorations of appropriate academic accommodation options that will facilitate their access to university academic programs or services;

(c) Where appropriate, take reasonable measures to address their particular needs and personal requirements relating to the need for academic accommodation;

(d) Fulfill their part in implementing the provisions of the academic accommodation.

4. REACHING ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATION

Ongoing communication and a collaborative working relationship between all parties involved in the accommodation process are essential to meet the students’ needs for academic accommodation.

4.1 The RCSD has the responsibility to coordinate the process of reviewing requests for academic accommodation, make decisions about provisions for academic accommodation, and communicate relevant information to the student and, as appropriate, to faculty and staff of the university.

4.2 When a student, instructor or Department Chair is dissatisfied or disagrees with the academic accommodation, the RCSD Coordinator will review the concerns.

Other experts including advocates who may be helpful in resolving the situation may also be consulted as a part of an informal review and mediation process.

4.3 If the matter is not resolved through an informal process, the student, instructor or

Department Chair may request a formal review by the Associate Vice-President

Academic and Student Affairs. This office will conduct a timely review, involving individuals who are knowledgeable about accessibility, academic accommodation, human rights issues, and the particular issues being adjudicated. The Associate Vice-President Academic and Student Affairs will make final recommendations for appropriate action.

4.4 The student may appeal to the Senate Committee on Appeals if the student has grounds to believe that the decision did not meet the appropriate standards of procedural fairness.

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APPENDIX 1 – DEFINITIONS

The following definitions are provided as a guideline to clarify the meaning and intent of the

Policy on Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities.

Student

A student is a person who is registered in at least one course in on- or off-campus programs at the University of Victoria. Prospective students, persons recently enrolled at UVic, or persons intending to continue from a previous session as a continuing student will also receive consideration under this policy.

Disability

Disability has traditionally been defined as a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. The social model of disability locates impairment not within the individual but within the physical, social and attitudinal barriers that exist in society.

For the purposes of this policy, a student with a disability is a person who has a long-term or recurring physical, mental, sensory, psychiatric or learning impairment.

Accessibility

Accessibility refers to the degree to which university environments, facilities, procedures and teaching and learning materials are usable by all people, with or without adaptation or special design. Many barriers to full participation reside in the environment (physical, curricular, attitudinal, informational, etc.).

Essential Requirement

Essential requirements are those activities which are considered essential to the course of instruction or program of studies or which are directly related to licensing or field-based employment requirements.

Academic Accommodation

Academic Accommodation is rooted in the legal concept of “reasonable accommodation” which refers to reasonable efforts to modify requirements so that people with disabilities are able to participate in a process or perform an essential function. When university environments, facilities, procedures, teaching and learning materials and methods of assessment are not designed in a manner that is accessible to all students, academic accommodations may be needed.

An academic accommodation is an individualized modification of environments, materials or requirements which provides the student with an alternative means of meeting essential course or program requirements.

Academic accommodations are individualized for a particular student and may include (but are not limited to):

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(a) adaptation, substitution or deletion of a component of a program, course, assignment or method of assessment;

(b) provision of a service.

Undue Hardship

Undue hardship is the test of reasonable accommodation. What constitutes undue hardship will vary according to the unique circumstances of each situation. The following would likely constitute undue hardship:

(a) when accommodation alternatives would result in an essential course or program requirement being unmet; or

(b) when the accommodation would result in a risk to public safety or a substantial risk of personal injury to a student; or

(c) when financial cost is such that the operations of the university would be fundamentally diminished, or a program or service would cease to exist due to the financial burden of the accommodation.

Revised June 97

Reviewed October 1999

Revised June 2000

Revised May 2001

Revised January 2006

AUTHORITIES AND OFFICERS

I.

II.

III.

IV.

Approving Authority: Senate

Designated Executive Officer: Vice-President Academic and Provost

Procedural Authority: Senate

Procedural Officer: Associate Vice-President Student Affairs

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PROCEDURES FOR ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATION AND ACCESS FOR

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Procedural Authority: Senate

Procedural Officer: Associate Vice-President Student Affairs

Parent Policy: Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities (AC1205)

Effective Date:

September 2011

Supersedes: New

Last Editorial Change:

PURPOSE

1.00 The purpose of these procedures is to assist in implementing the university’s Academic

Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities Policy (AC1205) for undergraduate students.

DEFINITIONS

For the purpose of these procedures:

2.00 Definitions contained in the university’s Academic Accommodation and Access for

Students with Disabilities policy (AC1205) , with the exception of the definition of

Student, apply to these procedures.

3.00 Support Person means an individual who provides support or advice to a Student during an Academic Accommodation process under these procedures.

4.00 Student means a student who is registered as a candidate for a University of Victoria degree, or in credit courses leading to a University of Victoria diploma or certificate.

SCOPE

5.00 These procedures apply to the Academic Accommodation of undergraduate Students.

These procedures do not apply to Students in non-credit programs in the Division of

Continuing Studies or to Graduate Students.

PROCEDURES

Confidentiality

6.00 The personal information of Students with a disability shall be managed and protected in accordance with the

Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, and associated procedures.

and the university’s Protection of Privacy (GV0235) and Records Management (IM7700) policies

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Admissions

7.00 The university’s academic calendar and website contain information for Students with

Disabilities applying for admission to the university.

Admission under Special Access Category

8.00 If academic achievements have been significantly and adversely affected by health or

Disability, applicants may wish to apply for admission consideration under the

Special

Access Category

. More information is available at: http://registrar.uvic.ca/undergrad/admissions/requirements/special.html

8.01 Special Access admission information for the Faculty of Law is available at: http://www.law.uvic.ca/prospective/jd/special.php

Disclosure

9.00 Students are not required to declare a disability when applying for admission to the university unless applying under the Special Access category referenced above. Students who request Academic Accommodations or services from the Resource Centre for

Students with a Disability (RCSD) will need to provide appropriate documentation as set out below.

Transitioning Students

10.00 Services and accommodations experienced at other educational sectors or institutions

(e.g., high school, college) may differ from what is provided at the university. The university does not assume responsibility for identifying Students with Disabilities, or the assessment or diagnosis of a Disability.

RCSD

Registration with the RCSD

11.00 Students are advised to register with the RCSD as early as possible to avoid a delay in service. Newly admitted Students should contact the RCSD and register upon admission.

Requesting Accommodation

12.00 Students requesting Academic Accommodation will meet with an RCSD advisor to request Accommodations.

Deadlines

13.00 The RCSD has deadlines for requesting exam accommodations and services for Students as follows:

(a) Registering with the RCSD

The deadline for requesting fall semester Accommodation (via a memo requesting that the RCSD contact the Student’s instructors) is October 31 st contact the Student’s instructors) is February 28 th

.

. The deadline for requesting winter semester Accommodation (via a memo requesting that the RCSD

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(b) Midterms

All mid-term exam forms must be returned to the RCSD at least two (2) weeks prior to the scheduled date of the exam.

(c) Final Exams

The deadline for submitting a final exam form for December finals is two weeks prior to the first day of the final exam period in December. The deadline for submitting a final exam form for April finals is two weeks prior to the first day of the final exam period in April.

(d) Summer Courses

Given the condensed nature of summer course offerings, Students registered in summer courses should request Academic Accommodations as soon as possible.

Change in Disability Status

14.00 Students who have recent diagnoses or require a change in their Academic

Accommodations may still request Accommodations after the deadlines stated above.

Documentation of Disability

15.00 The university will review documentation to determine appropriate Academic

Accommodation. For the purpose of Academic Accommodation, the documentation of

Disability:

(a) must confirm a rationale for reasonable Academic Accommodations;

(b) must be from professionals with appropriate credentials (see Appendix 3); and

(c) should include the:

• diagnosing professional’s name, title, phone number, address, official stamp or letterhead and signature;

• date of the assessment;

• statement of the nature of the disability including the impact of medication;

• explanation of the functional impact of the Disability on the pursuit of a postsecondary education; and

• recommendations for Academic Accommodation that will assist in the pursuit of a post-secondary education, specifically linking the recommended Accommodation to the impact of the Disability.

15.01 The university does not cover costs related to medical documentation.

15.02 A diagnosis of Disability alone does not guarantee Academic Accommodations.

Note: Appendix 3 contains additional guidance on documentation.

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Services Provided by the RCSD

16.00 After a Student has submitted appropriate documentation and met with the RCSD, the

RCSD will:

(a) review the documentation of Disability;

(b) determine eligibility for Academic Accommodation and services on the basis of documentation and assist in implementing these Accommodations when necessary by providing, where appropriate, an initial written recommendation;

(c) explain the operational procedures of the RCSD (see Appendix 1 and Appendix 2);

(d) provide assistance in obtaining grants and bursaries;

(e) provide referrals to other resources on campus; and

(f) with sufficient notice, coordinate sign language interpreting in classrooms and provide accessible course information.

Determining Essential Course and Program Requirements

17.00 Academic units are responsible for identifying and evaluating program requirements it considers essential including skills, knowledge, and attitudes. Course objectives and learning outcomes should be included in this process. Evaluation for a subsequent purpose such as those of a licensing body or for potential workplace requirements should not be considered. The focus must be on meeting the requirements of a specific course or university program.

Accessibility Statement for Course Syllabus

18.00 It is recommended that instructors include a statement in their syllabus indicating their willingness to assist in the provision of Academic Accommodations and informing the

Student of the role of the RCSD and the university’s responsibility to provide necessary

Academic Accommodation. The current statement is available through the Learning and

Teaching Centre and the RCSD.

Accommodation Programs and Services

19.00 Course-based Academic Accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

(a) sign language interpreting or captioning;

(b) assignment substitution (e.g., substituting an oral for a written report);

(c) overheads, or note taking assistance;

(d) copies of instructor’s notes (as appropriate);

(e) additional time to complete in-class assignments;

(f) transcriptions of course material to alternate formats;

(g) permission to audio record lectures;

(h) the use of FM systems;

(i) wheelchair accessible tables and computer workstations; and/or

(j) preferred seating.

20.00 Exam-based Academic Accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

(a) additional time to complete exams;

(b) provision of a distraction-reduced environment;

(c) supervised rest breaks;

(d) exams in e-text format;

(e) exam questions read aloud with computer software;

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(f) voice recognition software;

(g) large print exams or magnification with CCTV;

(h) use of a word processor, spell check, or grammar check;

(i) calculator and/or formula sheet; and/or

(j) visual (sign) language interpreting.

Additional Registration Information

Registration for Accommodations that Require Additional Time to Implement

21.00 Examples of Academic Accommodations that require advanced planning and early course registration include but are not limited to:

(a) Texts and course packs in alternative formats;

(b) Sign language interpreting or captioning;

(c) Substantial modifications to classroom furniture; and

(d) Lab work requiring an assistant or adaptation of the schedule.

If the RCSD determines eligibility for early registration, an RCSD advisor will notify

Undergraduate Records who will assign the earliest registration date and time specific to the Student’s year of study and e-mail this information to the Student. For Faculty of

Law Students, the RCSD advisor will notify the Faculty of Law directly for early registration purposes.

22.00 Requests for early registration, alternative texts or material, or visual language interpreting should be made by the Student as soon as the Student knows the courses that he or she will be enrolled in. While some texts and course materials may already be available in the required format, it may take several weeks for delivery.

Requests for Reduced Course Loads

23.00 Students with Disabilities who have reason to take a reduced course load may request approval from their respective faculty or academic departments. Student loans, scholarships, work-study and on-campus housing requiring full-time registration may also be accessed by a Student who is studying part-time for reasons of Disability.

Students must be registered in a minimum 40% course load.

Academic Advising

24.00 Academic Advisors are available in each faculty for the purpose of assisting decisions about academic programs and courses. Contact information for the advising centres on campus can be found at: http://registrar.uvic.ca/summer/adreg/advising.html

.

Way-finding on Campus

25.00 Students with visual impairments who require assistance with finding buildings or classrooms should make that request to the RCSD at least two weeks in advance of requiring that assistance. If mobility training is required, Students will be directed to contact the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) for more extensive navigational training.

Visual Language Interpreting

25.01 Interpreters and captionists are contracted to work with Students on the basis of the course timetable provided to the RCSD.

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25.02 Interpreters are hired on a contract basis based on experience, education, suitability and availability.

Student Participation in the Academic Accommodation Process

26.00 Students must participate in the process of developing an Academic Accommodation plan. This includes working with instructors, Chairs, Directors, Deans and faculties to develop Academic Accommodations that are appropriate to the requirements of the course and utilizing available resources and support services provided by the university.

The provision of an Academic Accommodation provides Students with a Disability an alternative means of meeting essential course or program requirements. Fulfilling essential course or program requirements remain the Student’s responsibility.

Reaching Academic Accommodation

27.00 An instructor may only deny an Academic Accommodation where the instructor believes that it will constitute Undue Hardship as defined in the university Academic

Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities policy (AC1205).

28.00 An instructor or Student who disagrees with the RCSD’s initial Academic Accommodation recommendation or other proposed Academic Accommodations should contact the RCSD advisor/manager to initially discuss the issue.

28.01 Where necessary, further consultation may also occur with:

(a) the pertinent department Chair, Director or Dean (or designate); and

(b) the medical professional who recommended the Academic Accommodation in the original documentation.

29.00 Where further resolution is required, or where there are issues or difficulties surrounding the implementation of an Academic Accommodation that have not been resolved informally, the Student, Instructor, Chair or Director may submit a request to the

Associate Vice-President Student Affairs (or designate) for formal review.

29.01 The purpose of the formal review is to make recommendations for implementing appropriate actions to the pertinent Dean (or designate) in a timely manner.

30.00 The formal review request should include:

(a) the rationale for the review;

(b) documentation in support of the request; and

(c) the requester’s preferred outcome.

30.01 Prior to the formal review, the Associate Vice-President Student Affairs may request documentation from the instructor(s) outlining the:

(a) learning outcomes and Essential Requirements for the course or program; and

(b) issue(s) or difficulties surrounding the implementation of the Academic

Accommodation.

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31.00 The Associate Vice-President Student Affairs shall normally conduct the formal review within five (5) university business days of receiving the review request.

32.00 The formal review shall include consultation with the individuals involved in the

Academic Accommodation and others who can provide specific expertise in resolving the implementation of appropriate Academic Accommodations.

32.01 Based on the nature of the Academic Accommodation, the Associate Vice-

President Student Affairs shall either:

(a) facilitate a meeting with necessary individuals including but not limited to:

• the Student and his or her Support Person;

• the instructor;

• the Chair, director or Dean (or designate);

• an individual(s) with expertise in the specific area of Accommodation(s);

• an Associate Vice-President in the Vice-President Academic and Provost’s office; and

• the Director of Equity and Human Rights.

(b) individually consult necessary individuals such as those provided in (a) above in instances where there may be confidentiality concerns or other difficulties in completing the review in a timely manner.

32.02 Prior to taking any action under 32.01, the Associate Vice-President Student

Affairs (or designate) shall consult the Student regarding the review process and any potential confidentiality issues or concerns relating to the individuals that will be consulted during the formal review.

32.03 Individuals involved in the Academic Accommodation may submit supporting materials to the Associate Vice-President Student Affairs for consideration during the formal review.

33.00 The Associate Vice-President Student Affairs (or designate) will review all relevant documentation and submissions. Upon completion of the formal review, the Associate

Vice-President Student Affairs will make a recommendation to the pertinent Dean (or designate) on an appropriate Academic Accommodation on the basis of the:

(a)

(b)

(c) consultation results;

Student’s current functional limitations; and the documented expected learning outcomes of the course or program.

34.00 The Dean (or designate) will review and determine whether to implement the recommendation(s). The Dean shall notify the instructor and Student in writing of the determination within two (2) university business days of receiving the recommendation.

The notification shall include the rationale for the decision and any alternate resolution as applicable.

35.00 Where the Student is unsatisfied with the outcome of the review or with the Dean’s decision, the Student may appeal to the Senate Committee on Appeals in accordance

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35.01 The Senate Committee on Appeals decision is final within the university.

36.00 To assist Students with their coursework when a formal review or appeal is pending, the

RCSD and the instructor(s) shall assess the Academic Accommodation plan to determine what aspects of the plan, if any, can be immediately implemented on an interim basis pending the completion of the review or appeal.

Academic Concessions

37.00 Academic concessions are available to Students when medical or other issues are so severe as to:

(a)

(b) prevent the Student from completing the courses or examinations listed; or justify some academic concession as specified by a physician, registered psychologist or counsellor.

37.01 A Student wishing to initiate an academic concession request shall refer to information provided by the Registrar: http://registrar.uvic.ca/undergrad/records/documents/def.html

37.02 A Student with extenuating circumstances may appeal in writing with supporting documentation to the Fee Reduction Appeals Committee. http://registrar.uvic.ca/undergrad/records/documents/frac.html

Admission Appeals to the Senate Committee on Admissions, Re-Registration and Transfer

38.00 Applicants with Disabilities who are denied admission to the university who can prove extenuating circumstances or provide information that was not presented initially may forward a written request for a review of their application to the Senate Committee on

Admission, Re-registration and Transfer (SCART). The request should include any additional information combined with any supporting documents from persons familiar with the applicant's abilities and circumstances. SCART will consider the documentation presented and will make a decision on the application, subject to review by the Senate

Committee on Appeals on the grounds of specific procedural error.

Work Term Placements

39.00 Students should notify the Cooperative Education Program and Career Services office in advance of a work term placement if a specific Accommodation is required for the work placement. The Cooperative Education Program and Career Services office will work in consultation with the employer and the faculty, where appropriate, to support suitable

Accommodations.

40.00 Students should notify their faculty in advance of their practicum if a specific

Accommodation is required related to the practicum. The faculty will work with the employer as appropriate to support suitable Accommodations in the practicum.

Library Assistance

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41.00 Students are advised to contact the loan desk in any of the university’s libraries for assistance with library related services. Additional information on the Libraries’ services for Students with a disability is available at: http://www.uvic.ca/library/use/info/accessibility/index.php

RELATED DOCUMENTS

Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities policy (AC1205)

Protection of Privacy policy (GV0235)

Records Management policy (IM7700)

Appendix 1- Notification of Instructors by the RCSD

Appendix 2 - Accommodated Exam Procedure at the RCSD

Appendix 3 - Documentation of Disability

Appendix 4 - Assistive Technology

Appendix 5 - Learning Assistance Services

Appendix 6 - Transportation

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Appendix 1

Notification of Instructors by the RCSD

After registering with the RCSD, the Student completes and submits a request for “memos to instructors” form to the

RCSD front desk at the beginning of the term.

The RCSD advisor writes a memo to the instructor(s) named on the form and sends it through the intercampus mail. This takes approximately 4 days.

The memo notifies the instructor(s) that a student is registered with the RCSD and requires specific in-class and/or exam accommodations.

Academic Accommodation memos are released to the individuals named in writing on the request form. The memo’s collection, protection, retention and disclosure is governed by provisions of the

Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy A the university’s Protection of Privacy policy (GV0235) and associated procedures. copy, one is left in the Student pickup box at the RCSD. ct and

If the check box at the bottom of the request form indicates the Student would like a

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Appendix 2

Accommodated Exam Procedure at the RCSD

Students must submit a completed exam arrangement form to the RCSD for each exam to be written in the RCSD testing centre. This must be done each semester, by the stated deadline (note: deadlines are provided on the RCSD website, and by hand-out and email notification).

If exam arrangements are included as an Academic Accommodation on the memo to instructors requested (steps 1&2 above), the Student takes an Exam Arrangement Form to the instructor(s) to fill out for each exam.

This should be done as early in the term as possible (i.e. the second week of class for midterms and quizzes, and when finals dates are announced).

Ordinarily, one form for each exam is needed, but some instructors may include multiple exam dates on a single form.

The Student will return completed Exam Arrangement Forms to the RCSD front desk two weeks prior to mid-terms and tests, and by the stated date for Final Exam arrangements.

The exam is scheduled by the exam coordinator based on the details of the completed Exam Arrangement Form and the availability of invigilation and exam writing space.

Students should then pick up the pink copy of the processed Exam

Arrangement form, which includes instructions for when and where the exam is to be written.

There is a student pickup box at the RCSD where these forms are left when completed. The RCSD does not contact or remind Students about exam arrangements.

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Exams locations include the following:

• RCSD main office, Campus Services Building

• S-Hut Exam Centre

• Classrooms during final exams

Exams take place during the following times:

8am to 10pm Monday to Friday

8am to 10pm Monday to Saturday during final exams (December and April)

• Instructors can choose to accommodate within their departments.

• Only materials and devices that are listed by instructors on exam arrangement forms may be brought into the testing room.

• Students who are unable to complete exams due to illness or other disruptions must provide evidence from Health Services or other medical professionals to their instructors.

• Students who have questions while writing in the RCSD may contact their instructors. In cases where it is not possible to contact the instructor, the Student may write question(s) on the exam paper and continue to complete the exam.

• Breaks may be taken in cases where this is indicated in the documentation of disability as an appropriate accommodation and an advisor at the RCSD has approved it.

• A staff member of the RCSD will return exams the next day to the department, requesting a signature.

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Appendix 3

Documentation of Disability

(Adapted from AHEAD website November, 2009)

1. The credentials of the evaluator(s)

Good documentation is provided by a licensed or otherwise properly credentialed health professional that has undergone appropriate and comprehensive training, has relevant experience, and has no personal relationship with the individual being evaluated. A good match between the credentials of the individual making the diagnosis and the condition being reported is expected (e.g., an orthopedic limitation might be documented by a physician, but not a licensed psychologist). The health care professional making the diagnosis should be licensed with a regulatory body within the jurisdiction in which they practice.

2. A diagnostic statement identifying the disability

Good documentation includes a diagnostic statement that describes how the condition was diagnosed, provides information on the functional impact, and details the typical progression or prognosis of the condition. A DSM-IV diagnosis, with a full clinical description will convey the necessary information.

3. A description of the diagnostic methodology used

Good documentation includes a description of the diagnostic criteria, evaluation methods, procedures, tests and dates of administration, as well as a clinical narrative, observation, and specific results. Where appropriate to the nature of the disability, having both summary data and specific test scores (with the norming population identified) within the report is important.

Diagnostic methods that are congruent with the particular disability and current professional practices in the field are recommended. Methods may include formal instruments, medical examinations, structured interview protocols, performance observations and unstructured interviews. If results from informal, non-standardized or less common methods of evaluation are reported, an explanation of their role and significance in the diagnostic process will strengthen their value in providing useful information.

4. A description of the current functional limitations

Information on how the disabling condition(s) currently impacts the individual provides useful information for both establishing a disability and identifying possible accommodations. A combination of the results of formal evaluation procedures, clinical narrative, and the individual’s self report is the most comprehensive approach to fully documenting impact. Good documentation is thorough enough to demonstrate whether and how a major life activity is substantially limited by providing a clear sense of the severity, frequency and pervasiveness of the condition(s).

Changing conditions and/or changes in how the condition impacts the individual brought on by growth and development may warrant more frequent updates in order to provide an accurate picture.

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5. A description of the expected progression or stability of the disability

It is helpful when documentation provides information on expected changes in the functional impact of the disability over time and context. Information on the cyclical or episodic nature of the disability and known or suspected environmental triggers to episodes provides opportunities to anticipate and plan for varying functional impacts. If the condition is not stable, information on interventions (including the individual’s own strategies) for exacerbations and recommended timelines for re-evaluation are most helpful.

6. A description of current and past accommodations, services and/or

medications

The most comprehensive documentation will include a description of both current and past medications, auxiliary aids, assistive devices, support services, and accommodations, including their effectiveness in ameliorating functional impacts of the disability. A discussion of any significant side effects from current medications or services that may impact physical, perceptual, behavioral or cognitive performance is helpful when included in the report. While accommodations provided in another setting are not binding on the University of Victoria, they may provide insight in making current decisions.

7. Recommendations for accommodations, adaptive devices, assistive services,

compensatory strategies, and/or collateral support services

Recommendations from professionals with a history of working with the individual provide valuable information for review and the planning process. It is most helpful when recommended accommodations and strategies are logically related to functional limitations; if connections are not obvious, a clear explanation of their relationship can be useful in decision-making. While the RCSD has no obligation to provide or adopt recommendations made by outside entities, those that are congruent with the programs offered may be appropriate. When recommendations go beyond equitable and inclusive services, they may still be useful in suggesting alternative accommodations and/or services.

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Appendix 4

Assistive Technology

Three dedicated assistive technology labs are maintained on campus by the RCSD. Keys for these labs for Students registered with the RCSD can be requested at the RCSD.

The RCSD provides computers with assistive software to Students for the purpose of completing exams (in RCSD exam centres). Eligibility to use such devices in exams is determined when

Students register for services and accommodations at the RCSD.

The RCSD maintains a small loan bank of assistive technology that can be loaned to Students registered with the RCSD on a short-term basis. Such equipment is usually loaned to Students whose equipment is being repaired at critical points in a semester.

The RCSD encourages Students to apply for grants that make such technology available to eligible Students at no cost.

The RCSD can provide individual technology consultation for you if you are a Student with a disability currently enrolled at the University of Victoria. Consultation involves:

• identifying areas in which technology may support a Student’s educational goals;

• providing information and demonstrations of technology-based solutions; and

• referral to other agencies as necessary

Training can be provided to Students wishing to learn to use an assistive software application through the RCSD.

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Appendix 5

Learning Assistance Services

There is a variety of learning assistance services available at the RCSD. There are fees associated with each type of assistance.

The online Tutor Registry through university Career Services provides a list of current Students who are willing to tutor a variety of subjects. It is available at: http://www.careerservices.uvic.ca/tutor/

Some departments and instructors keep a list of tutors with expertise relevant to specific courses of study. Students should contact departmental offices for further information.

Students eligible for a Canada Study Grant can apply through the grant application at the RCSD to request funding for tutoring or learning strategists. Students who are not eligible for this funding pay for the tutoring privately.

The Peer Learning Strategists Program through the RCSD helps eligible Students with learning disabilities to develop skills and strategies that will address their learning needs and focus on their strengths.

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Appendix 6

Transportation

UPass (Bus Pass for Students)

http://www.uvss.uvic.ca/sustainability/upass.html

The UPass is a transportation alternative that allows all Students to use the Victoria Regional

Transit System at a significantly reduced rate. All Students registered at the University of

Victoria and taking at least one course are eligible to receive a U-Pass.

Students may have the UPass fees dropped by discussing with an advisor at the RCSD. For example, legally blind Students who have a CNIB NID card which covers transit fare may request to have the UPass fees dismissed.

Legally Blind Passengers

http://www.cnib.ca/community/bc-yukon/2005-transit-pass.htm

A CNIB NID is accepted as fare on all BC Transit and TransLink conventional transit systems.

Taxi Saver

http://www.bctransit.com/regions/vic/accessible/taxi_saver.cfm

Students required a handyPASS to use this program. The handyPASS is a picture identification that allows Students to purchase TaxiSaver coupons. The pass also allows your attendant to travel free on the regular bus. handyPASS is available only to permanent handyDART users in the Victoria region.

handyDART

http://www.bctransit.com/regions/vic/accessible/handydart.cfm

handyDART is a door-to-door shared-ride custom transportation service. This service is for people who are unable to use the regular transit service some or all of the time due to mobility issues associated with a permanent or temporary physical or cognitive disability. Students must be registered with handyDART to use the service.

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Office of the President

ASB A220, Box 1700 STN CSC

Victoria BC V8W 2Y2

Tel250-721-7002

1

Fax 250-721-8654

Email: [email protected]

1

Web: www.uvic.ca/president

University of Victoria

Office of the

President

Date: 18 March 2014

To: Members of Senate

From: Professor Jamie Cassels, QC

President and Vice-Chancellor

Re: 2013 Policy Review Annual Report

The Policy on University Policies and Procedures (GV0100) calls for the President to report annually the Board of Governors and the Senate on university policies developed and reviewed during the year.

The 2013 Policy Review Annual Report captures university policy activities and accomplishments in

2013 and outlines current policy activities and priorities for 2014. Information about university policies is available on the University Secretary's website at www.uvic.ca/universitysecretary/policies.

MOTION:

THAT the Senate receive, for information, the 2013 Policy Review Annual Report.

Attachment: 2013 Policy Review Annual Report.

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Date:

To:

March 17, 2014

Members of the Board of Governors and Senate

From: Prof. Jamie Cassels, President

Re: 2013 Policy Review Annual Report

1. Introduction

The university’s Policy on University Policies and Procedures (GV0100) was approved by

Senate and the Board of Governors in order to establish a consistent framework for the development and review of university policies and procedures. The goal in implementing the policy framework is to create and maintain a collection of userfriendly policies and procedures that is current and relevant to the needs of the university community.

This report responds to the requirement in the Policy on University Policies and

Procedures to report annually to Senate and the Board of Governors on the development and review of university policies and procedures. The Policy states:

The President will report annually to the Board of Governors and the Senate on

University Policies developed and reviewed during the year and the action taken or recommended.

The report also identifies university policy related priorities for 2014.

2. Update on the Implementation of the Policy Framework

Overall, the university continued its progress in 2013 in implementing the university policy framework. The responsibility for drafting of new policies and the revising of existing policies has been assumed by the president’s office or individual vicepresidents’ offices. The University Secretary’s office continues to coordinate policy development and ensures new policies and policy changes are consistent with the Policy on University Policies and Procedures.

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Table 1 provides an update on the progress since this framework was adopted in late

2007.

Table 1: Progress since the Adoption of the University Policy Framework

o

84 policies have been reviewed and amended while 60 policies have been rescinded;

11 new policies and 27 new procedures have been developed and implemented; o there has been an overall reduction in the number of university policies from approximately 200 to 141 through rescinding, relocation and consolidation efforts;

31 policies were re-assigned to new approving authorities based on current portfolios and responsibilities; o major university policy projects were completed developing new and substantially revising existing research, information management, and decanal appointment policies and procedures; o a new university policy website was implemented providing a variety of policy resources and more convenient options to locate relevant policies and procedures; o a new functional classification system was implemented; o a cyclical policy review schedule for all policies and procedures was adopted to track targeted review dates and to ensure regular review and updates occur; and o new templates were developed to assist with policy development and review.

3. Summary of 2013 Policy Activities

(a)

New Policies and Procedures Developed or Under

Development

In 2013, the following new university policies and procedures were approved or were under development:

APPROVED

Policy or Procedure

1. University Signage policy

(BP3140)

Purpose and Rationale for Development

Completed: September 2013. Replaced rescinded policies

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UNDER DEVELOPMENT

Policy or Procedure Purpose and Rationale for Development

1. Procedures for Appointment,

Review and Re-Appointment of

Associate Deans

(consolidation) (NEW)

2. Art Collection Policy and

Procedures (NEW: BP3310)

3. Art Museum Policy (NEW:

BP3305)

Under development

Nearing completion

4. Booking of University Facilities or Space for Secondary

Purposes (NEW: BP3700)

Nearing completion. To replace existing

Maltwood Art Museum and Gallery Policy

(BP3300)

Under development. To replace the existing booking policies.

5. Communication Policy (NEW)

Under development

6. Poster, Banner and Handbill

Under development

Guidelines (NEW)

7. Research Funding Management and Financial Accountability

(NEW)

Under development

(b)

Revised Policies and Procedures

In 2013, the following university policies and procedures were revised:

Policy or Procedure

1. Buildings and Grounds Usage

Policy (BP3105)

2. Procedures on Curriculum

Submissions (Policy on

Calendar Submissions AC1120)

3. Fair Dealings Guidelines

Summary of Amendments

Completed: September 2013

Completed: May 2013

Completed: May 2013

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Policy or Procedure

(Records Management Policy

IM7700)

4. Fundraising and Gift

Acceptance Policy (ER4105)

5. Furnishings, Fittings & Finishes

Policy (BP3130)

6. Liability Insurance Policy

(FM5300)

7. Procedures for Management of

University Records (Records

Management Policy IM7700)

8. Naming of Facilities and

Physical Assets Policy (BP3100)

9. Procedures for the Search,

Appointment, or

Reappointment of the President and Vice-Chancellor (GV0300)

10. Procedures for the

Appointment and Re-

Appointment of the Vice-

President Research (GV0310)

11. Procedures for the

Appointment for the Vice-

President Finance and

Operations (GV0315)

12. Procedures for the

Appointment of the Vice-

President External Relations

(GV0320)

13. Procedures for the

Appointment of the University

Secretary (Registrar) (GV0325)

Summary of Amendments

Completed: May 2013

Completed: September 2013

Completed: April 2013

Completed: June 2013

Completed: May 2013

Completed: May 2013

Completed: January 2013

Completed: January 2013

Completed: January 2013

Completed: January 2013

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(c)

Rescinded Policies and Procedures

In 2013, the university rescinded the following policies and procedures that no longer met the university policy standard or had been superseded by other policies or documents.

Policy or Procedure Rationale for Rescinding

1. Bomb Threats Policy (SS9110)

Rescinded – The policy did not meet the university policy standard pursuant to the

Policy on University Policies and Procedures

(GV0100). In order to meet the university policy standard, a policy must be current and relevant. University policies must also be principle-based statements to be followed in carrying out the activities of the university and must have broad application throughout the university.

2. Exterior Signs Policy (BP3115)

Rescinded – The existing policy was combined with the Interior Signs Policy and renamed the University Signage Policy

BP3140.

3. Interior Signs Policy (BP3120)

Rescinded – The existing policy was

4. Policy relating to the Use of

Hallway, Corridor and Other

Circulation Space (BP3110)

combined with the Exterior Signs Policy and renamed the University Signage Policy

BP3140.

Rescinded - Policy concepts from the

Building Usage Policy (BP3105) and the

Policy relating to the Use of Hallway,

Corridor and other Circulation Space

(BP3110) have been combined to create a more inclusive document which has been renamed the Buildings and Grounds Usage

Policy (BP3105).

5. UVic Public Communications

Policy for Program/Service

Interruptions (AD2305)

Rescinded – The policy did not meet the university policy standard pursuant to the

Policy on University Policies and Procedures

(GV0100). In order to meet the university policy standard, a policy must be current

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Policy or Procedure Rationale for Rescinding

and relevant. University policies must also be principle-based statements to be followed in carrying out the activities of the university and must have broad application throughout the university.

(d)

Policies with Transferred Approving Authority

In 2013 no approving authorities were transferred based on current organizational responsibilities.

4. University Policy Goals and Priorities for 2014

(a)

Finalize University Policies Under Review – brought forward from 2011, 2012 and 2013

Policy or Procedure Status

1. Academic Program Review

(AC1145)

2. Teaching and Organization of

Courses and Programs (AC1150)

3. Accommodation for Students on

Days of Religious Observance

(AC1210)

4. Ethical Assessment of the

Institutional Quality of Programs and Services (AD2205)

5. Motor Vehicle Pool (AD2315)

6. University Facility and Space

Booking policies:

(a) External Bookings of University

Space (BP3400)

(b) Use of University Facilities of

Academic Departments by

Targeted for completion in Spring 2014

Targeted for completion in Spring 2014

Targeted for completion in Fall 2014

To be rescinded. Completed: February 2014

Targeted for completion in June 2014

Under review as part of project to review university’s booking policies. Targeted for completion in 2014

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Policy or Procedure Status

External Organizations (BP3405)

(c) University Centre Foyer Booking

(BP3410)

(d) University Centre A180 Booking

(BP3415)

(e) Operation of the Cadboro

Commons Building (BP3420)

(f) Booking Policy - Residence &

Food Facilities (BP3425)

(g) Booking of Physical Education,

Athletics and Recreational

Facilities (BP3430)

(h) University Centre Auditorium:

General Use & Booking (BP3435)

7. Booking of University Facilities or Space for Secondary

Purposes (NEW: BP3700)

8. Policies related to student residences

(a) Student Residences Policy

(BP3500)

(b) Operation of Family Housing

Policy (BP3505)

(c) Residence Services - Budget

Policy (FM5515)

Targeted for completion in 2014

Targeted for completion in Spring 2015

9. Signing Authority (FM5100)

10. Short Term Investment Policy

(FM5200)

Targeted for completion in December 2014

Targeted for completion in December 2014

11. Intellectual Property (GV0215)

Targeted for completion in Spring 2015

12. Statement of Policy Regarding

Deans of Faculties (GV0660)

Targeted completion in 2015

Targeted for completion in 2015

13. Procedures for the Appointment of Chairs of Departments or

Divisions (GV0700)

14. Professional Development

Expenses Excluded

Completed: February 2014

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Policy or Procedure

Management Staff (HR6400)

15. Prevention of Violence in the

Workplace (SS9120)

16. Procedures for Academic

Accommodation and Access for

Graduate Students (AC1205)

17. Social Responsibility and UVic

Investments Policy (FM5215)

18. Determination of Employment

Relationship (HR6325)

19. Distribution of News and

Information Publications on

Campus (IM7400)

20. Electronic Records Management

Guidelines (IM7700)

21. Procedures for Appointment,

Review and Re-Appointment of

Associate Deans (consolidation)

(NEW)

22. Art Collection Policy and

Procedures (NEW: BP3310)

23. Art Museum Policy (NEW:

BP3305)

24. Communication Policy (NEW)

Status

Targeted for completion in December 2014

Targeted for completion in May 2014

Targeted for completion in December 2014

Targeted for completion in December 2014

Under review as part of project to review the university’s communication policies

Targeted for completion in 2014

Targeted for completion in 2015

Targeted for completion in March 2014

Targeted for completion in March 2014

Targeted for completion in 2014

25. Poster, Banner and Handbill

Guidelines (NEW)

26. Research Funding Management and Financial Accountability

(NEW)

Targeted for completion in Spring 2014

Targeted for completion in December 2014

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(b)

Finalize Other University Policies/Projects Targeted in 2014

Policy or Procedure

1. Liquor Policy (AD2400)

2. Fair Dealing Guidelines

3. Discrimination and Harassment

Policy (GV0205)

Status

Targeted for completion in Fall 2014

Completed: March 2014

Targeted for completion in Fall 2014

4. Purchasing Services Policy

(FM5105)

5. Protection of Privacy Policy

(GV0235)

6. Records Management Policy

(IM7700)

7. Information Security Policy

(IM7800)

Targeted for completion in December 2014

Targeted for completion in 2014

Targeted for completion in 2014

Targeted for completion in 2014

8. Policy on University Policies and

Procedures

Targeted for completion in Fall 2014

(c)

Other Policy Related Priorities

Other university policy-related priorities for 2014 include:

• continue to identify and rescind or relocate university policies and procedures that no longer meet the university policy standard; and

• continue to analyze and determine where additional new university policies and procedures are required and where related policies can be consolidated.

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