Microwave Data Systems | MDS entraNET 2400 | Specifications | Microwave Data Systems MDS entraNET 2400 Specifications

Microwave Data Systems MDS entraNET 2400 Specifications
MDS entraNET™900
MDS entraNET™2400
Access Point
Remote
900 MHz and 2400 MHz
Extended Range IP Networking Transceivers
Firmware Code 3.0
05-4055A01, Rev. D
FEBRUARY 2008
Reference Manual
GE MDS
Quick Start Instructions
Listed below are the basic steps for installing GE MDS entraNET transceivers. Refer to the
appropriate sections in the manual for detailed information.
1.
Initial Checkout
• Set the equipment up in a tabletop arrangement as described in 2 TABLETOP SETUP AND
EVALUATION, (beginning on Page 15).
• Follow all steps to ensure proper cable connections and unit configuration. As a minimum, Access
Points must have the following programmed: IP Address, IP Network identifier, and Radio Network
Address. (RF output power and Password should also be reviewed and set if necessary.) Remote
radios normally require only a Radio Network Address to be set. (Note: The Remote Radio Network Address must match that of the AP.)
• Connect data equipment to the transceivers. Use LAN/ETH ports for Ethernet systems, or COM2
ports for Serial data systems.
• Verify proper exchange of data communications by viewing the LEDs. The following indications
should be seen on the LED panel within 30 seconds of startup:
PWR—Lit continuously
LINK—Lit continuously
ETH—Lit continuously (unless Sleep is activated)
COM2—Blinking to indicate exchange of data communications
2.
Endpoint Connectivity (PING) Test—for Ethernet Systems Only
• For Ethernet systems, verify the link integrity between the Access Point and endpoint devices connected to Remotes by issuing a PING command from the AP. Below is a basic setup diagram for
the PING test. (NOTE: Endpoint devices must have a compatible IP address for this test to work.)
PC RUNNING PING UTILITY
ACCESS POINT
CROSS-OVER
CABLE
ETHERNET REMOTE
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ETHERNET ENDPOINT
(Device Being Pinged)
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3.
Set Configuration of AP and Remote Radios
• Refer to 3 AP MANAGEMENT beginning on Page 29 for details on connecting to the AP and
using the built-in menu system. Refer to 4 REMOTE RADIO MANAGEMENT beginning on
Page 99 for details on programming Remotes.
• If you have a large number of radios to configure, a configuration script may be used to speed the
process. See USING CONFIGURATION SCRIPTS beginning on Page 181 for details.
4.
Install the Equipment in the Field
• Refer to 6 INSTALLATION beginning on Page 147 for details on site selection, mounting, cabling,
and antenna/feedline recommendations.
• After basic installation, optimize the performance of the radio network following the recommendations beginning on Page 160.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1 INTRODUCING THE
GE MDS entraNET SYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.1 ABOUT THIS MANUAL ........................................................................................................ 3
1.1.1 Supplemental Information Online ............................................................................................... 3
1.2 PRODUCT DESCRIPTION................................................................................................... 3
1.2.1 Model Offerings .......................................................................................................................... 6
1.3 APPLICATIONS .................................................................................................................... 6
1.3.1 Long-Range Wireless LAN ......................................................................................................... 6
Antenna Placement.......................................................................................................................... 6
Communication Rules...................................................................................................................... 6
1.3.2 Combining Serial and Ethernet Devices ..................................................................................... 7
1.3.3 DNP3 Protocol-Aware Networks ................................................................................................8
1.3.4 Upgrading an Older Wireless Network with
Serial Interfaces .................................................................................................................................... 9
Replacing Legacy Wireless Products .............................................................................................. 9
Supplementing a Legacy Wireless Network with IP Services.......................................................... 9
1.3.5 P22 Protected Network (Redundant) Configuration ...................................................................9
1.4 GE MDS SECURITY SUITE ............................................................................................... 10
1.4.1 Intrusion Detection via SNMP Traps ........................................................................................ 11
1.5 ACCESSORIES .................................................................................................................. 12
2 TABLETOP SETUP AND
EVALUATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................ 17
2.2 CONNECTOR OVERVIEW ................................................................................................ 17
2.3 TEST SETUP...................................................................................................................... 18
STEP 1—CONNECT THE ANTENNA PORTS ............................................................................. 19
STEP 2—MEASURE AND CONNECT DC POWER ..................................................................... 19
STEP 3—CONFIGURE THE AP ................................................................................................... 22
Log-in and Configuration................................................................................................................ 22
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Set Key AP Parameters ................................................................................................................. 23
STEP 4—CONFIGURE THE REMOTE RADIO ............................................................................ 24
Log-in and Configuration................................................................................................................ 24
Set or Verify Network Address ....................................................................................................... 25
STEP 5—CONNECT TERMINAL EQUIPMENT............................................................................ 26
Ethernet Device Connection to Remote......................................................................................... 26
Serial Device Connection to Remote .............................................................................................26
STEP 6—CHECK FOR NORMAL OPERATION ........................................................................... 26
2.3.1 Verify Connectivity (PING command) ....................................................................................... 27
Serial Connections......................................................................................................................... 27
3 AP MANAGEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................ 31
3.1.1 PC-Based Configuration Software ............................................................................................ 31
3.1.2 Menu Structure ......................................................................................................................... 32
3.1.3 Differences in the User Interfaces ............................................................................................ 35
3.2 ACCESSING THE MENU SYSTEM ................................................................................... 36
3.2.1 Methods of Control ................................................................................................................... 36
3.2.2 PC Connection and Log-In Procedures .................................................................................... 37
3.2.3 Navigating the Menus ............................................................................................................... 42
Navigating via Terminal or Telnet Sessions
Recommended for first-time users................................................................................................. 42
Navigating via a Web Browser ....................................................................................................... 42
3.3 BASIC DEVICE INFORMATION......................................................................................... 43
3.3.1 Starting Information Screen ...................................................................................................... 43
3.3.2 Main Menu ................................................................................................................................ 44
3.4 CONFIGURING NETWORK PARAMETERS ..................................................................... 45
3.4.1
3.4.2
3.4.3
3.4.4
3.4.5
3.4.6
Network Configuration Menu .................................................................................................... 45
IP Configuration Menu .............................................................................................................. 46
Wireless MAC Configuration Menu .......................................................................................... 48
Mobility Configuration Menu ..................................................................................................... 49
SNMP Agent Configuration Menu ............................................................................................ 50
Bridge Configuration Menu ....................................................................................................... 51
3.5 CONFIGURING RADIO PARAMETERS ............................................................................ 52
3.5.1 Radio Configuration Menu ........................................................................................................ 52
Skip Zones Menu ........................................................................................................................... 53
3.6 CONFIGURING THE SERIAL INTERFACES..................................................................... 54
3.6.1 Overview .................................................................................................................................. 54
Serial-to-Serial Services ................................................................................................................ 55
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IP-to-Serial Services ...................................................................................................................... 55
Configuration.................................................................................................................................. 56
Serial Configuration Wizard ...........................................................................................................56
3.6.2 Local Serial Configuration Menu ..............................................................................................57
View Current Settings Screen—Serial-to-Serial Example ............................................................. 59
View Current Settings Screen—Unicast UDP Mode Example....................................................... 61
3.6.3 Remote Serial Gateway Configuration (IP-to-Remote Serial) .................................................. 62
3.7 SECURITY CONFIGURATION........................................................................................... 64
3.7.1 Security Configuration Menu .................................................................................................... 65
3.8 WIRELESS NETWORK MENU .......................................................................................... 69
3.8.1 Remote Management Submenu ..............................................................................................70
Manage Selected Remote Submenu
.......................................................................................................................................................71
Broadcast Remote Reprogramming Menu
.......................................................................................................................................................72
Remote Database Menu ................................................................................................................ 74
Group Database Menu................................................................................................................... 75
Endpoint Database Menu .............................................................................................................. 75
Access Point Database Menu........................................................................................................ 76
3.9 STATISTICS AND EVENT LOG ......................................................................................... 77
3.9.1 COM1 and COM2 Data Statistics Menus ................................................................................ 78
3.9.2 Remote Serial Gateway Statistics ............................................................................................ 79
3.9.3 Ethernet and Wireless Packet Statistics ................................................................................... 80
Ethernet Packet Statistics .............................................................................................................. 80
Wireless Packet Statistics .............................................................................................................. 80
3.9.4 Radio Packet Statistics ............................................................................................................. 81
3.9.5 Event Log Menu ....................................................................................................................... 82
Time and Date Stamping................................................................................................................ 82
3.10 DEVICE INFORMATION MENU ....................................................................................... 84
Device Names Menu...................................................................................................................... 85
3.11 MAINTENANCE AND TOOLS .......................................................................................... 85
3.11.1 Reprogramming Menu ...........................................................................................................86
3.11.2 Configuration Scripts Menu ................................................................................................... 87
A Brief Description of Configuration Files ...................................................................................... 87
3.11.3 RSG Configuration Script Menu ............................................................................................ 89
3.11.4 Authorization Codes Menu .................................................................................................... 91
3.11.5 Transmitter Test Menu ...........................................................................................................92
3.12 REDUNDANCY MENU ..................................................................................................... 93
Packet Rx Errors Exceeded Threshold Menu................................................................................ 96
3.13 DNP3 ROUTING MENU ................................................................................................... 97
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4 REMOTE RADIO MANAGEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
4.1 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................. 101
4.2 Programming Methods...................................................................................................... 101
4.2.1 Terminal Interface Mode .........................................................................................................101
4.2.2 Remote Management via the AP ...........................................................................................101
4.3 Log-in Procedure .............................................................................................................. 101
4.4 Commands........................................................................................................................ 102
4.4.1 Entering Remote Commands .................................................................................................102
4.5 Minimum Configuration for Remotes ................................................................................ 102
4.5.1 Detailed Command Descriptions ............................................................................................103
4.6 UPGRADING REMOTE FIRMWARE ................................................................................117
5 SAMPLE CONFIGURATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
5.1 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................. 121
5.2 IP-to-Local Serial Application Example............................................................................. 121
Establishing a Connection ...........................................................................................................121
5.3 IP-to-Remote Serial Application Example......................................................................... 122
5.3.1 Endpoint Device Connected to the AP ...................................................................................123
5.4 Point-to-Point, Serial-to-Serial Application Example......................................................... 123
5.4.1 Step-by-step Instructions for Configuring a Point-to-Point Serial Connection ........................124
5.5 Point-to-Multipoint, Serial-to-Serial Application Example.................................................. 132
5.5.1 Step-by-Step Instructions for Configuring a Point-to-Multipoint Serial Connection ................133
5.6 Mixed-Mode Application Example..................................................................................... 140
5.6.1 Operation and Data Flow ........................................................................................................140
5.7 Group Broadcast Session Example .................................................................................. 142
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6 INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
6.1 INSTALLATION ................................................................................................................. 149
6.1.1 General Requirements ...........................................................................................................149
6.1.2 Site Selection .........................................................................................................................149
6.1.3 Conducting a Site Survey .......................................................................................................150
Terrain and Signal Strength..........................................................................................................150
A Word About Radio Interference ................................................................................................150
Mounting Dimensions for Radios .................................................................................................152
6.1.4 Antenna and Feedline Selection ............................................................................................153
Antennas......................................................................................................................................153
Feedlines .....................................................................................................................................154
6.2 HOW MUCH OUTPUT POWER CAN BE USED?
(U.S.A. and Canada, 900 MHz systems) .................................................................................. 156
6.2.1 Calculating System Gain ........................................................................................................156
6.3 HOW MUCH OUTPUT POWER CAN BE USED?
(U.S.A. and Canada, 2400 MHz systems) ................................................................................ 157
6.3.1 Calculating System Gain ........................................................................................................157
6.4 HOW MUCH OUTPUT POWER CAN BE USED? (ETSI 2400 MHz systems)................. 158
6.4.1 Calculating System Gain ........................................................................................................159
6.5 OPTIMIZING PERFORMANCE ........................................................................................ 160
6.5.1 Principles of Wireless Network Operation ..............................................................................160
6.5.2 Aiming Directive Antennas for Maximum RSSI ......................................................................162
Procedure ....................................................................................................................................162
6.5.3 Tips for Improving Data Throughput .......................................................................................163
To Maximize Throughput of Data and Reduce Latency Time ......................................................163
To Maximize Overall Data Performance ......................................................................................164
7 TROUBLESHOOTING AND RADIO TESTS . . . . . 165
7.1 TROUBLESHOOTING...................................................................................................... 167
7.1.1 Interpreting the Front Panel LEDs ..........................................................................................167
7.1.2 Troubleshooting Using the Embedded Management System ................................................168
Serial Port and Remote Serial Statistics Menu ............................................................................171
Diagnostic Tools...........................................................................................................................171
7.1.3 Using Logged Operation Events .............................................................................................172
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8 TECHNICAL REFERENCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
8.1 UPGRADING AP FIRMWARE .......................................................................................... 179
8.2 USING CONFIGURATION SCRIPTS ............................................................................... 181
Sample of an Exported Configuration File ...................................................................................182
Editing Configuration Files ...........................................................................................................186
8.3 DATA INTERFACE CONNECTORS ................................................................................. 187
8.3.1 LAN/ETH Port .........................................................................................................................187
8.3.2 COM1 Port .............................................................................................................................188
8.3.3 COM2 Port .............................................................................................................................189
8.4 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS....................................................................................... 189
8.5 dBm-WATTS-VOLTS CONVERSION CHART .................................................................. 193
9 TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
Copyright Notice
This publication is protected by U.S.A. copyright law. Copyright 2007, GE MDS. All rights reserved.
ISO 9001 Registration
GE MDS adheres to the internationally-accepted ISO 9001 quality system standard.
Related Materials on the Internet
Data sheets, frequently asked questions, application notes, information on firmware upgrades, and other valuable
information can be found on the GE MDS Web site at www.GEmds.com.
About GE MDS
Over two decades ago, GE MDS began building radios for business-critical applications. Since then, we’ve installed
more than 500,000 radios in over 110 countries. To succeed, we overcame impassable terrain, brutal operating conditions and disparate, complex network configurations. We also became experts in wireless communication standards
and system applications worldwide. The result of our efforts is that today, thousands of utilities around the world rely
on GE MDS-based wireless networks to manage their most critical assets.
The majority of GE MDS radios deployed since 1985 are still installed and performing within our customers' wireless
networks. That’s because we design and manufacture our products in-house, according to ISO 9001 which allows us
to control and meet stringent global quality standards.
Thanks to our durable products and comprehensive solutions, GE MDS is the wireless leader in industrial automation—including oil and gas production and transportation, water/wastewater treatment, supply and transportation,
electric transmission and distribution and many other utility applications. GE MDS is also at the forefront of wireless
communications for private and public infrastructure and online transaction processing. Now is an exciting time for
GE MDS and our customers as we look forward to further demonstrating our abilities in new and emerging markets.
As your wireless needs change you can continue to expect more from GE MDS. We'll always put the performance of
your network above all. Visit us at www.GEmds.com for more information.
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OPERATIONAL & SAFETY NOTICES
U.S. Installations: Professional installation required. The radio equipment
RF Exposure described in this guide emits radio frequency energy. Although the power level is
low, the concentrated energy from a directional antenna may pose a health hazard.
For 900 MHz units, do not allow people to come closer than 23 cm (9 inches) to
the antenna. For 2.4 GHz units, do not allow people to come closer than 5 cm (2
inches) to the antenna. These distances apply whether the transmitter is operated
in indoor or outdoor environments. More information on RF exposure is available
on the Internet at www.fcc.gov/oet/info/documents/bulletins.
ETSI Installations: In regions where the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) standards apply, 2.4 GHz units with a maximum output
power of 100 mW EIRP are supplied. Do not allow people to come closer than 2.2
cm (1 inch) to the antenna.
CSA/US Notice
The transceiver has been recognized for use in hazardous locations by the Canadian Standards Association
(CSA), which also issues the U.S. mark of approval. The CSA Certification is in accordance with CSA STD
C22.2 No. 213-M1987.
FCC Part 15 Notice
The transceiver complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this
device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation. This device is specifically designed to be used under Section 15.247 of
the FCC Rules and Regulations. Any unauthorized modification or changes to this device without the express approval
of GE MDS may void the user’s authority to operate this device. Furthermore, this device is intended to be used only
when installed in accordance with the instructions outlined in this manual. Failure to comply with these instructions
may also void the user’s authority to operate this device.
Manual Revision and Accuracy
While every reasonable effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this manual, product improvements may result
in minor differences between the manual and the product shipped to you. If you have additional questions or need an
exact specification for a product, please contact our Customer Service Team using the information at the back of this
guide. In addition, manual updates can often be found on the GE MDS Web site at www.GEmds.com.
Environmental Information
The manufacture of this equipment has required the extraction and use of natural resources. Improper disposal may
contaminate the environment and present a health risk due to hazardous substances contained within. To avoid dissemination of these substances into our environment, and to limit the demand on natural resources, we encourage you to
use the appropriate recycling systems for disposal. These systems will reuse or recycle most of the materials found in
this equipment in a sound way. Please contact GE MDS or your supplier for more information on the proper disposal
of this equipment.
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INTRODUCING THE
GE MDS entraNET SYSTEM
1 Chapter Counter Reset Paragraph
1.1 ABOUT THIS MANUAL
3
1.1.1 Supplemental Information Online .................................................. 3
1.2 PRODUCT DESCRIPTION
3
1.2.1 Model Offerings ............................................................................. 6
1.3 APPLICATIONS
6
1.3.1 Long-Range Wireless LAN ............................................................ 6
Antenna Placement ............................................................................ 6
Communication Rules ........................................................................ 6
1.3.2 Combining Serial and Ethernet Devices ....................................... 7
1.3.3 DNP3 Protocol-Aware Networks ................................................... 8
1.3.4 Upgrading an Older Wireless Network with
Serial Interfaces ....................................................................................... 9
Replacing Legacy Wireless Products ................................................. 9
Supplementing a Legacy Wireless Network with IP Services ............ 9
1.3.5 P22 Protected Network (Redundant) Configuration ...................... 9
1.4 GE MDS SECURITY SUITE
10
1.4.1 Intrusion Detection via SNMP Traps ........................................... 11
1.5 ACCESSORIES
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1.1
ABOUT THIS MANUAL
This guide provides installation and operating instructions for the GE
MDS entraNET 900TM and GE MDS entraNET 2400TM series radio
system. The guide is intended for use by those who install, configure,
and operate the entraNET wireless network.
Quick Start instructions are provided on the inside front cover of this
guide. They provide the basic steps for installing and operating the
transceivers, but do not cover all of the configurable parameters. The
main section of this guide contains complete information on menu functions, as well as detailed installation, operation, and troubleshooting
information. This guide is arranged into the following eight chapters:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Chapter 1—Introducing the MDS entraNET System (Page 1)
Chapter 2—Tabletop Setup and Evaluation (Page 15)
Chapter 3—Access Point (AP) Management (Page 29)
Chapter 4—Remote Radio Management (Page 99)
Chapter 5—Sample Configurations (Page 119)
Chapter 6—Installation (Page 147)
Chapter 7—Troubleshooting and Radio Tests (Page 165)
Chapter 8—Technical Reference (Page 177)
Chapter 9—Terms and Abbreviations (Page 195). Terms
defined in Chapter 9 are italicized on first appearance.
1.1.1 Supplemental Information Online
Release notes, manual updates, and other supplemental materials are
available online for many GE MDS products. For more information,
visit us at online at www.GEmds.com.
1.2
PRODUCT DESCRIPTION
The entraNET system is an easy-to-install wireless solution supporting
long-range serial and Ethernet data transmission at speeds up to
106 kbps. The system includes an Access Point (AP) transceiver and a
Remote transceiver capable of serial and Ethernet communication.
These radios serve a variety of network configurations. Figure 1-1
shows the two radios.
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Invisible place holder
Access Point
Remote
Figure 1-1. GE MDS entraNET Transceiver Models
Robust Radio
Operation
GE MDS entraNET transceivers use an advanced Media Access Controller (MAC) to ensure network access for stations with data to send.
The MAC permits data to be sent from endpoint devices on an
on-demand basis, preventing over-the-air data collisions and ensuring
that data gets through as intended. MAC functionality eliminates the
need for active polling of Remotes, a key requirement in
Report-by-Exception (RBE) applications.
Rugged Packaging
GE MDS entraNET radios are housed in compact and rugged die-cast
cases that need only be protected from direct exposure to the weather.
The transceivers are supplied with flat surface-mounting brackets or
optional 35mm DIN rail brackets, depending on customer requirements.
Simple Installation
Basic installation typically employs an omni-directional antenna at the
AP site and a directional antenna at each associated Remote site. The
antenna is a vital link in the system and must be chosen and installed correctly. INSTALLATION on Page 149 provides guidance on choosing
proper antennas and installation sites.
To establish basic service, connect an antenna, connect an Ethernet
LAN (Local Area Network) to the AP, connect a serial or Ethernet
device to the Remotes, apply power, set a few operating parameters via
a personal computer, and you are done. No license is required for operation in the U.S.A., Canada, and many other countries. Check the regulations in your country before placing the radios on the air.
GE MDS Security
Suite
4
Network security is a vital issue in today’s wireless world. The GE
MDS entraNET system provides multiple tools to help you build a network that minimizes the risk of eavesdropping or unauthorized access.
Some security features are inherent to radio operation, such as the use of
spread-spectrum transmission; other techniques are built into the radio
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firmware, including data encryption, enabling or disabling remote
access channels, and password protection.
Remember, security is not a one-step process that can be simply turned
on and forgotten. It must be practiced and enforced at multiple levels,
every day. Section 1.4 contains additional information about entraNET
security features.
License-Free
Operation
The transceivers are designed for frequency-hopping spread-spectrum
operation in the license-free 900 MHz or 2400 MHz band. They can provide reliable long distance communications over line-of-sight signal
paths.
Multiple Services
Networks can include a mixture of equipment requiring Ethernet and
serial data interfaces on the same cell or AP. This flexibility allows the
transceiver to provide services in data networks that are on a migration
path from legacy serial or EIA-232-based hardware to faster and more
easily interfaced Ethernet systems.
Flexible
Management
Configuration, troubleshooting and other management activities are performed using a connected PC, locally or remotely. Modes of access
include a local RS-232 console, local or remote IP access through
Ethernet, Telnet, or a Web browser, and Simple Network Management
Protocol (SNMP).
Feature Summary
The GE MDS entraNET design makes installation and configuration an
easy task, while allowing for configuration changes in the future.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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Long-range transmission over favorable, unobstructed terrain, with
sufficient antenna heights
Low power consumption—Sleep and Shutdown modes to enable
solar-powered operation
Repeater configurations—A repeater scheme can be established to
extend the transmission range or to work around obstructions in a
network. This is accomplished by connecting two radios back to
back at a single site.
Industrial-grade product—Extended temperature range for trouble-free operation in extreme environments
Robust radio communications—Designed to perform in high-interference environments
GE MDS Security Suite—Blocks common attack schemes and prevents “rogue” hardware from gaining access to or control of a network. Common attack events are logged and reported via alarms.
Fast, 106 kbps data speed—Ten times faster than 9.6 kbps radios
Simple setup—Ethernet bridge configuration option requires minimal setup
Serial ports—Gateway for serial interface equipment to IP or Ethernet networks with an embedded terminal server
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1.2.1 Model Offerings
The GE MDS entraNET system includes two primary radio types— APs
and Remotes. Table 1-1 summarizes the interface capabilities for each
entraNET radio type.
NOTE: A Remote serves only one endpoint MAC address, even if a
bridge or hub is used.
Table 1-1. GE MDS entraNET Models and Data Interface Services
Model
LAN/ETH
COM1*
COM2
AP
LAN
Yes
Yes
Remote
ETH
Yes
Yes
NOTES
*This connector provides access to the radio menu system.
1.3
APPLICATIONS
The following sections describe typical entraNET installations. All
installations should be reviewed by a network manager to ensure proper
integration with existing equipment.
1.3.1 Long-Range Wireless LAN
The wireless LAN is a common application of the entraNET system. It
consists of a central control station (AP) and one or more associated
Remote radios, as shown in Figure 1-2 on Page 7. A LAN provides communications between a central LAN/WAN and remote Ethernet endpoints. Remote radios can support one Ethernet endpoint each.
The operation of the radio system is transparent to the computer equipment connected to it. As such, the system behaves just as it would in a
hardwired arrangement, with respect to data format and integrity.
Over-the-air messages are exchanged at the Ethernet level, including all
types of IP traffic.
Antenna Placement
The AP antenna is positioned at a location from which it can reliably
communicate with all of the Remote radios in the system. Commonly,
this is a relatively high location on top of a building, communications
tower or other elevated point.
Communication Rules
• A Remote transceiver can only talk over-the-air to an AP.
• Peer-to-peer communications between Remotes can take place indirectly through the AP.
• An AP can only talk over-the-air to Remote radios; however, two
APs can communicate with each other through their Ethernet connectors when a wired LAN/WAN is utilized.
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LAN
WAN/LAN
Figure 1-2. Typical Wireless LAN System
1.3.2 Combining Serial and Ethernet Devices
Prior to the introduction of the entraNET series, multiple networks were
often needed to service different types of communication protocols. An
entraNET system provides this functionality through a single AP radio.
Each of the Remote radios in a system can be connected via IP to different SCADA or telemetry hosts, transporting different (or the same)
protocols. Both data streams are completely independent, and the transceiver provides seamless, simultaneous operation, as shown in
Figure 1-3.
Invisible place holder
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RTU
EIA-232
LINK
COM1
COM2
PWR
SCADA Host
Modbus/IP
Access Point
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LINK
PWR
HUB
HUB
1
COM
2
COM
EIA-232
LAN
Serial
Device
LINK
COM1
COM2
PWR
WAN
Serial Polling
Converter
ROUTER
Remote
TCP/IP
HUB
HUB
Ethernet
Device
LINK
COM1
COM2
PWR
PC Running
NetView
SCADA Host
Total Flow
Figure 1-3. Multiple Protocol Network
By using a single AP, the cost of infrastructure deployment is cut in half,
with only one antenna, one feedline, and one lightning protector
required. Other cost reductions come from the system as a whole,
including reduced management requirements when using GE
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MDS NETview Management System (MS) software. In addition,
entraNET offers nearly unlimited potential for future applications that
run over IP and Ethernet services.
In an IP-to-serial scenario, every Remote is sent information received by
the AP Ethernet port. Likewise, information received at the Remote
serial port is transmitted to the AP, and the AP delivers this information
through its Ethernet port in the form of an IP packet.
Additionally, the AP serial port can be used as a virtual Remote. This
means that encapsulated serial information received by the AP is sent
out the serial port of all Remotes as well as the AP serial port. The
reverse is also true, meaning that data received by the serial port of any
Remote or the AP serial port is encapsulated and sent out the AP
Ethernet port.
This arrangement can be used to connect an endpoint device at a
Repeater site without the need for an additional Remote radio.
1.3.3 DNP3 Protocol-Aware Networks
The GE MDS implementation of Distributed Network Protocol 3
(DNP3) allows the transfer and routing of DNP3 messages between
serial devices, while also supporting the conversion to an IP Ethernet
network. As DNP3 messages are routed through the system, the APs
“learn” the locations of all end devices, regardless of whether they are
configured for serial or Ethernet communication, eliminating the need
to configure their individual locations.
DNP3 devices with an Ethernet or IP interface can be connected to a
transceiver in one of two ways:
• To the Ethernet port of an AP radio
• To the Ethernet port of a Remote radio
DNP3 devices with a serial RS-232 interface can be connected to a
transceiver in one of two ways:
• To the serial port of an AP radio
• To the serial port of a Remote radio
The capability for DNP3 message routing is optional for the transceiver.
An Authorization Key is required to enable this functionality, and is
available for purchase from GE MDS.
NOTE: Detailed information on the DNP3 protocol is available on the
DNP Users’ Group Web site at www.dnp.org.
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1.3.4 Upgrading an Older Wireless Network with
Serial Interfaces
Millions of wireless data products have been sold in the last two decades
for licensed and license-free operation, many of them manufactured by
GE MDS. There are several ways that these systems can benefit from
employing GE MDS entraNET wireless equipment, including flexible
serial and Ethernet interfaces, higher data throughput, and ease of installation.
GE MDS entraNET radios are well suited to replace leased lines, dial-up
lines, or existing data radios by taking advantage of the built-in serial
and Ethernet interfaces on the transceiver. The sections below discuss
two common scenarios.
Replacing Legacy Wireless Products
In most cases, legacy radio transceivers supporting serial interface
equipment can be replaced with GE MDS entraNET radios with little or
no special configuration. This equipment can be connected to GE MDS
entraNET radios through the COM1 or COM2 port with a DB-25 to RJ-45
cable wired for EIA-232 signaling. The COM2 port supports standard
EIA-232 signaling and acts as a data communications equipment (DCE)
device.
NOTE: Several previous GE MDS-brand products contained signal
lines on their interface connectors that are not used or required
on entraNET radios. Consult the equipment manual(s) for
interface pinout information, and connect only the required
pins.
Supplementing a Legacy Wireless Network with IP Services
GE MDS entraNET Remotes support most polled protocols. The serial
interfaces encapsulate serial data in two different modes: connectionless
(User Datagram Protocol, or UDP) and connection-oriented (Transmission Control Protocol, or TCP).
For complete details on serial gateway interface modes, see “CONFIGURING THE SERIAL INTERFACES” on Page 54.
1.3.5 P22 Protected Network (Redundant)
Configuration
For mission-critical applications, GE MDS offers the Protected Network Station. This radio incorporates two entraNET AP transceivers,
two power supplies, and a switchover logic board that automatically
selects between Transceiver A and Transceiver B as the active radio.
Figure 1-4 shows a view of the protected chassis. For system-level
information on this product, see GE MDS publication 05-4161A01.
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9
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Figure 1-4. GE MDS P22 Protected Network Station
(incorporates two GE MDS entraNET APs)
1.4
GE MDS SECURITY SUITE
Today, the operation and management of an enterprise is becoming
increasingly dependent on electronic information flow. An accompanying concern becomes the security of the communication infrastructure
and the security of the data itself.
The GE MDS entraNET is capable of dealing with many common security issues. Table 1-2 profiles security risks and how the GE MDS
entraNET provides a solution for minimizing vulnerability.
Table 1-2. Security Risk Management
Security Risk
The GE MDS entraNET Solution
Unauthorized access to the backbone
network through a foreign remote radio
9Approved Remotes List
“Rogue” AP, where a foreign AP takes
control of some or all Remote radios and
thus remote devices
9Approved AP List
“Dictionary attacks”, where an intruder
runs a program that sequentially tries to
break a password
9 Failed log-in lockdown
Denial of service, where Remote radios
could be reconfigured with bad
parameters, bringing the network down
9 Remote log-in
9 Local console log-in
9 HTTP (Hypertext Transfer
Only radios on the Approved
Remotes list connect
A Remote connects only to APs on
its Approved AP List
After three tries, a transceiver
ignores log-in requests for five
minutes. Critical event reports
(traps) are generated as well.
Protocol) and Telnet disabled,
enabling only local management
services
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Table 1-2. Security Risk Management
Security Risk
The GE MDS entraNET Solution
Airsnort and other war-driving intruders in
parking lots, near buildings, etc.
9Frequency-hopping spread
spectrum (FHSS) does not talk
over the air with standard 802.11b
cards
9The transceiver cannot be put in a
“promiscuous” mode
9Proprietary data framing
Eavesdropping, intercepting messages
9128-bit encryption
Key cracking
9Automatic Key Rotation algorithm.
In addition, a Force Key Rotation
command is available to
immediately rotate the keys of the
AP and synchronize all Remotes
with it.
Replaying messages
9128-bit encryption with rotating
keys
Unprotected access to configuration via
SNMP
9Non-secure SNMP versions can be
enabled or disabled at will.
9SNMPv3 password protection
Potential, ongoing attacks
9Provides early warning via SNMP
through critical event reports of
unauthorized log-in attempts and
suspicious activities
1.4.1 Intrusion Detection via SNMP Traps
In addition to the operative tools and techniques, the entraNET system
provides an SNMP-based network management system with traps
(alarms) that report suspicious activities or events. These include:
• Log-in attempt limit exceeded (accessed via HTTP)
• Successful log-in or logout (accessed via HTTP)
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1.5
ACCESSORIES
GE MDS entraNET transceivers may be used with one or more of the
accessories listed in Table 1-3. Contact GE MDS for ordering details.
Table 1-3. Accessories
12
Accessory
Description
GE MDS Part
No.
AC Power
Adapter Kit
A small power supply module designed for
continuous service. UL approved. Input:
120/220; Output: 13.8 Vdc at 2.5 A
01-3682A02
OmniDirectional
Antennas
Rugged antennas well suited for use at AP
installations. Ask your GE MDS Sales
Representative for details.
Contact GE
MDS
Yagi Antenna
(Directional)
Rugged antennas well suited for use at Remote
installations. Ask your GE MDS Sales
Representative for details.
Contact GE
MDS
TNC Male-to-N
Female Adapter
One-piece RF adaptor plug.
97-1677A161
TNC Male-to-N
Female Adapter
Cable
Short length of coaxial cable used to connect
the TNC antenna connector to a Type N
connector commonly used on large-diameter
coaxial cables.
97-1677A159
(3 ft./1m)
2-Pin Power
Plug
Mates with power connector on the transceiver.
Screw terminals are provided for wires; locking
screws are threaded to prevent accidental
disconnection.
73-1194A39
Ethernet RJ-45
Straight-thru
Cable (CAT5)
Cable assembly normally used to connect an
Ethernet device or LAN to the transceiver. Both
ends of the cable are wired identically.
(Cable length ≈ 3 ft./1m)
97-1870A20
Ethernet RJ-45
Crossover
Cable (CAT5)
Cable assembly used to connect an AP to an
Ethernet endpoint. (Cable length ≈ 3 ft./1m)
97-1870A21
RJ-12 to DB-9
Female Adapter
Allows access to Data Serial port COM1 on
Remotes or APs.
73-2434A02
RJ-45 to DB-9
Female Adapter
Allows access to Data Serial port COM2 on
Remotes or APs.
73-2434A12
EIA-232
Shielded Data
Cable
Shielded cable terminated with a DB-9 male
connector on one end, and a DB-9 female on
the other end; 6 ft./1.8m long.
97-1971A03
Fuse
Small, board-mounted fuse used to protect
against overcurrent conditions.
29-1784A03
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
97-1677A160
(6 ft./1.8m)
05-4055A01, Rev. D
Table 1-3. Accessories
05-4055A01, Rev. D
Accessory
Description
GE MDS Part
No.
Flat-Surface
Mounting
Brackets and
Screws
Brackets: 2″x 3″ plates designed to be screwed
onto the bottom of the radio for
surface-mounting the radio.
82-1753-A01
Screws: 6-32, 1/4″ with locking adhesive.
(Industry Standard MS 51957-26)
70-2620-A01
DIN Rail
Mounting
Bracket
Bracket used to attach the transceiver to
standard 35 mm DIN rails commonly found in
equipment cabinets and panels.
03-4124A01
(Remote)
Ethernet Surge
Protector
Protects against voltage spikes or surges on
Ethernet lines. These conditions may be
caused by nearby lightning strikes or transient
conditions.
29-4018A01
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
03-4125A02
(AP)
13
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TABLETOP SETUP AND
EVALUATION
2 Chapter Counter Reset Paragraph
2.1 INTRODUCTION
17
2.2 CONNECTOR OVERVIEW
17
2.3 TEST SETUP
18
STEP 1—CONNECT THE ANTENNA PORTS ................................ 19
STEP 2—MEASURE AND CONNECT DC POWER........................ 19
STEP 3—CONFIGURE THE AP ...................................................... 22
Log-in and Configuration .................................................................. 22
Set Key AP Parameters.................................................................... 23
STEP 4—CONFIGURE THE REMOTE RADIO ............................... 24
Log-in and Configuration .................................................................. 24
Set or Verify Network Address.......................................................... 25
STEP 5—CONNECT TERMINAL EQUIPMENT .............................. 26
Ethernet Device Connection to Remote ........................................... 26
Serial Device Connection to Remote................................................ 26
STEP 6—CHECK FOR NORMAL OPERATION .............................. 26
2.3.1 Verify Connectivity (PING command) .......................................... 27
Serial Connections ........................................................................... 27
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2.1
INTRODUCTION
Prior to installation in the field, it is recommended that you set up the
radio system in an office or lab and become familiar with its operation
and features. This also allows tests of various network designs and configurations prior to arrival at a field site. A tabletop test can be performed with any number of radios.
This section describes the hardware setup and software configuration
needed for testing an Ethernet connection. To simulate data traffic flow
over the radio network, a PC or LAN is connected to the LAN port of the
AP and used to PING (Packet INternet Groper) a device connected to
the Remote transceiver.
NOTE: It is important to use a radio system network address and
device IP address that are different from any radios currently
in use in your region or network. This greatly reduces the
possibility of disruption to traffic on existing systems during
testing.
A recommended technique for minimizing the chance of radio
network address conflicts is to use the last four digits of the AP
serial number.
2.2
CONNECTOR OVERVIEW
The following illustrations provide a reference to all of the interface
connectors present on entraNET transceivers. Review these items to
help you make the connections described in this section.
Figure 2-1 shows the interface connectors for the AP transceiver.
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LAN
◆10-Base-T
◆ IP/Ethernet Port
◆IP Address: 192.168.0.1
ANTENNA
◆ 50Ω TNC
◆ +30 dBm/1W Out (Max.)
◆ –30 dBm Input (Max.)
PRIMARY POWER
◆ 6–30 Vdc
(800 ma @ 13.8 Vdc)
COM1
◆ Negative Ground
◆DCE (Console/Terminal only)
◆ 19,200 bps/8N1
◆No Handshaking
◆ RS/EIA-232
COM2
◆ DCE (Connects to serial data equip.)
◆ 9,600 bps/8N1
◆ Full Handshaking
◆ RS/EIA-232
Figure 2-1. AP Interface Connectors
Figure 2-2 shows the interface connectors for the Remote transceiver.
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ANTENNA
◆ 50Ω TNC
◆ +30 dBm/1W Out (Max.)
◆ –30 dBm Input (Max.)
LAN
◆10-Base-T
◆ IP/Ethernet Port
◆No IP Address–Endpoint
Bridge Only
PRIMARY POWER
◆ 6–30 Vdc
(600 ma @ 13.8 Vdc)
◆ Negative Ground
COM2
◆DCE (Connects to serial data equip.)
◆ 115,200 bps/8N1
◆Full Handshaking
◆ RS/EIA-232
COM1
◆DCE (Console/Terminal only)
◆ 19,200 bps/8N1
◆No Handshaking
◆ RS/EIA-232
Figure 2-2. Remote Interface Connectors
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2.3
TEST SETUP
The following steps explain how to make connections to the transceiver
system, power it up, and set basic configuration. After these steps are
complete, the system is ready for field installation.
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STEP 1—CONNECT THE ANTENNA PORTS
Figure 2-3 is a drawing of a tabletop arrangement. Connect the antenna
ports of each transceiver as shown through attenuators and an RF power
divider. This provides for stable communications between each radio,
while preventing interference to nearby electronic equipment.
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Remote
RWP
POWER ATTENUATORS
• Fixed or adjustable
• 1W Minimum Rating
2MOC
C
1MO
L
KNI
Remote
Remote
KNI L
1MO
C
2MO
C
RW
P
KNI L
1MO
C
2MO
C
RW
P
Access Point
NLIK
P
R
W
OC
2M
1MOC
NAL
COMPUTER
POWER DIVIDER
NON-RADIATING ATTENUATORS
• Install on unused divider ports (if any)
• 1W Minimum Rating
Figure 2-3. Typical Setup for Tabletop Radio Testing
NOTE: It is very important to use attenuation between radios in the test
setup. The amount of attenuation required depends on the
number of radios being tested and the desired signal strength
(Received Signal Strength Indicator, or RSSI) at each transceiver during the test. In no case should a signal greater than
–30 dBm be applied to any transceiver in the test setup. A
transmit RF power output level of +20 dBm (100 mW) is
recommended. This can be set via the radio menu (Main Menu >
Radio Configuration > RF Output Power Setpoint).
STEP 2—MEASURE AND CONNECT DC POWER
The power applied to transceivers (AP and Remotes) must be within
6–30 Vdc and be capable of continuously providing a minimum of 11
Watts. (Typical power consumption is 800 mA at 13.8 Vdc for the AP
and 600 mA at 13.8 Vdc for Remotes.)
A power connector with screw terminals is provided with each radio.
Strip the wire leads to 6 mm (0.25"). Be sure to observe proper polarity,
as shown in Figure 2-4, with the positive lead (+) on the left.
NOTE: It takes about 30 seconds for the AP transceiver to power up
and be ready for operation. The Remote requires approximately five seconds to power up.
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Lead
Binding
Screws (2)
Wire Ports
Figure 2-4. Power Connector
(polarity: left +, right –)
CAUTION
POSSIBLE
POSSIBLE
EQUIPMENT
EQUIPMENT
DAMAGE
DAMAGE
Power Supply
Connections at 28
Vdc
The transceiver must be used only with negative-ground systems. Make sure the polarity of the
power source is correct. The radio is protected from
reverse polarity by an internal diode and an on-board
fuse.
Common 28 Vdc supplies are often high-current power supplies
designed primarily to charge battery banks. The radio can be operated
from these supplies, providing there are no transients on the leads as
power is applied to the radio. Transients can be created that rise above
30 Vdc to a voltage that exceeds the primary voltage rating of the radio
and can destroy its voltage regulators and other components. It is important to keep this potential hazard in mind when designing 28 Vdc power
supply connections for the radio.
• Use a two-conductor cable to power to the radio. Then the currents in the positive and negative wires are equal and opposite,
causing their magnetic fields to cancel. The result is no net
inductance in the connection to cause voltage overshoot.
• Do not connect a radio to a power supply that is already powered up, unless necessary (that is, when connecting a radio to a
battery bank and charger). When power is applied by switching
on a power supply, the rise time of the supply is too slow to
cause overshoot.
• Typically, there are multiple return paths for the negative side
of the power supply, through the coaxial cable shield and the
chassis, for example. Any imbalance in the currents in the
power cable results in voltage overshoot, so this should be minimized during initial power-up if the supply cannot be turned
off.
• Add a 1 to 2 Ω, 2 Watt resistor in series with the positive lead.
This greatly limits voltage overshoot. Since these radios draw
very little current in receive mode, and transmit only briefly,
there is little loss in power efficiency. In transmit, the voltage
drop is minimal and has no effect.
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• Minimize the length of the power cabling, within reason.
• When power is applied from a power source having a relatively
high (1 or 2 Ω) source impedance, or from a power source without a large amount of output capacitance, no overshoot occurs.
Therefore, use a power supply that is rated appropriately for the
radio if possible—avoid using power supplies that far exceed
the radio's current requirements.
Please direct any questions you may have about interfacing to GE MDS
radios to GE MDS Technical Services at TechSupport@GEmds.com, or
telephone +1-585-241-5510.
STEP 3—CONFIGURE THE AP
The instructions below summarize essential AP settings for tabletop
testing. For detailed AP log-in and menu navigation instructions, see
ACCESSING THE MENU SYSTEM on Page 36.
Log-in and Configuration
The AP must be configured first, as Remote transceivers depend on the
AP beacon signal to achieve a connected (linked) state. Figure 2-5
shows the basic setup for configuring an AP with a personal computer.
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Access Point
K
LIN
PWR
COM2
COM1
LAN
COM1 or LAN Po
(see text)
PC Running Terminal Session
(19,200 bps, 8N1)
Figure 2-5. AP Configuration Setup
Console Terminal
Connection
(recommended for
first-time log-in)
To configure the AP via a console terminal:
1. Connect a PC to the COM1 port on the radio.
2. Establish a terminal session (using HyperTerminal, for example)
using the following data parameters:
•
•
•
•
•
•
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19200 bps
8 bits
no parity
one stop bit (8N1)
hardware flow control disabled
VT100 emulation
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
21
NOTE: The exact parameters given above must be used for console
terminal communication. Improper settings are a common
cause of difficulty.
Telnet Connection
Using the AP LAN
Port (a valid IP
address must be set)
To configure the AP via its LAN port:
1. Connect a PC Ethernet port to the AP with an Ethernet crossover
cable.
NOTE: The radio must first have a valid IP address programmed—the
default IP address is 192.168.1.1.
2. Log in to the AP as follows:
a. Press the ENTER key to receive the login prompt. The COM1/LAN
LED flashes to indicate data communications.
a. At the login prompt, enter the username (admin is the default
username). Press ENTER .
b. At the Password prompt, enter the password (admin is the default
password). Press ENTER . Upon successful log-in, the Starting
Information Screen appears.
3. Review the current menu settings and make any necessary changes.
Refer to Set Key AP Parameters on Page 22 for
configuration guidance.
4. Repeat Steps 1–3 for any other AP radios in your system.
NOTE: You can save time by using configuration scripts to uniformly
configure multiple transceivers. This technique is discussed in
the Configuration Scripts Menu on Page 87.
Set Key AP Parameters
Table 2-1 provides a listing of key AP operating parameters, their
default settings, and their values or range. Typically, these are the only
settings that need to be set or reviewed for a basic check of the radio
system. A complete list of AP commands appears in CHAPTER 3 AP
MANAGEMENT, beginning on Page 29.
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Table 2-1. Key AP Parameters and Defaults
Menu Item
Management System Location
Default
Values or Range
IP Address
Main Menu >> Network
Configuration > IP
Configuration
192.168.1.1
Contact your Network
Administrator.
IP Address
Mode
Main Menu >> Network
Configuration > IP
Configuration
Static
Static | Dynamic
IP Netmask
Main Menu >>
Network Configuration > IP
Configuration
255.255.0.0
Settable per customer
requirements
Net Address
Main Menu >>
Network Configuration >
Wireless MAC Configuration
9999
1-15 alphanumeric characters*
RF Output
Power
(non-ETSI)
Main Menu >>
Radio Configuration >
900 MHz: 30 dBm
900 MHz: 20–30 dBm
2.4 GHz: 27 dBm
2.4 GHz: 17-27 dBm
RF Output
Power (ETSI)
Main Menu >>
Radio Configuration >
2.4 GHz: 20 dBm
2.4 GHz: 10-20 dBm
Password
Changes
Main Menu >>
Security Configuration >
User Passwords
Administrator Password:
admin (lower case)
• 1–8 alphanumeric characters
If IP Address Mode (below) is set
to Dynamic, IP Address is
configured automatically.
Guest Password:
guest (lower case)
• Passwords are case sensitive;
can be mixed case
* We recommend setting Net Address to the last four digits of the AP serial number to reduce the chance of conflict
with other nearby entraNET systems.
STEP 4—CONFIGURE THE REMOTE RADIO
The instructions below summarize essential Remote settings for
tabletop testing. For detailed log-in and menu navigation instructions,
see CHAPTER 4 REMOTE RADIO MANAGEMENT, beginning on
Page 99.
Log-in and Configuration
Prepare the Remote for configuration as follows:
1. Connect a PC to the COM1 port on the radio.
2. Establish a terminal session (using HyperTerminal, for example)
using the following data parameters:
•
•
•
•
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8 bits
no parity
one stop bit (8N1)
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
23
• hardware flow control disabled
• VT100 emulation
NOTE: The exact parameters given above must be used for console
terminal communication. Improper settings are a common
cause of difficulty.
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holder
Remote
RWP
2MOC
C
1MO
L
KNI
COM1 Port
PC Running Terminal Session
(19,200 bps, 8N1)
Figure 2-6. Remote Configuration Setup
3. Press
ENTER
several times to receive the entranet> prompt. (The
blinks to indicate data communication.)
COM1/ETH LED
4. At the entranet> prompt, enter login. Press
ENTER .
5. At the next prompt, enter the username (the default username is
admin). Press ENTER .
6. At next prompt, enter the password (the default password is admin).
Press ENTER . The radio is now ready to accept commands.
Set or Verify Network Address
The only setting normally required for initial checkout of a Remote
radio is the network address. All radios in a given network must be programmed with the same network address as the AP, or communication
is impossible. Follow the steps below to check the address, and program
a new one if necessary.
1. Enter the RADIO NETADDR= command. This displays the currently
programmed network address.
2. If changes are required, enter the RADIO NETADDR=<netaddr> command, where <netaddr> is 1-15 alphanumeric characters. (The network address of the Remote radio must match that of the AP.)
3. Verify that the LINK LED lights to indicate successful connection
with the AP. (It may take several seconds for the LED to light.)
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05-4055A01, Rev. D
4. Repeat Steps 1–3 for each Remote radio to be installed in
the network.
This concludes the basic setup of a Remote radio. A full listing of
Remote programming commands is given in CHAPTER 4 REMOTE
RADIO MANAGEMENT, beginning on Page 99.
With all radios connected, you are ready to connect data devices to the
transceivers so that their operation can be tested over the wireless network. This is discussed in the next step.
STEP 5—CONNECT TERMINAL EQUIPMENT
This step describes connection of external data equipment to the Remote
radio. Verify that your transceiver is capable of supporting your devices.
(See Table 1-1 on Page 6 for a summary of model capabilities.)
Be sure not to overload the radio network with high-bandwidth LAN
traffic during this test. Refer to the Bridge Configuration Menu on
Page 51 for more information.
Ethernet Device Connection to Remote
NOTE: Verify that the Remote ETH port is enabled (on) using the ETH
command. If it is not, use the ETH=ON command to enable the
port.
Connect an Ethernet endpoint to the Remote ETH port. The ETH port
supports any Ethernet-compatible device. This includes a device that
uses the Internet Protocol (IP).
Serial Device Connection to Remote
Connect a serial device to the Remote COM2 port and verify that the port
settings are compatible with the connected device (baud rate, data
format, etc.).
STEP 6—CHECK FOR NORMAL OPERATION
With data equipment connected, you are ready to check the transceivers
for normal operation.
Observe the transceiver LEDs on the top cover for the proper indications. In a normally operating system, the following LED indications
should be seen within 30 seconds of start-up:
•
•
•
•
05-4055A01, Rev. D
PWR—Lit continuously
LINK—Lit continuously (unless Sleep is enabled)
ETH—On, or blinks intermittently
COM1/COM2—Blinks to indicate data communications
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
25
Table 2-2 provides details on the LED functions for Remotes and AP
radios.
Table 2-2. Transceiver LED Functions
LED Label
Activity
Indication
LAN/ETH
ON
LAN or endpoint detected
Blinking
Data TX or RX
OFF
LAN or endpoint not detected
COM1
(MGT System)
Blinking
Data TX or RX
OFF
No data activity
COM2
Blinking
Data TX or RX
OFF
No data activity
ON
Primary power (DC) present
Blinking
Radio in “Alarmed” state
OFF
Primary power (DC) absent
LINK (AP)
ON
Lights when radio has finished
its startup cycle. Remains lit.
LINK (Remote)
ON
Connected to an AP
OFF
Not connected to an AP
PWR
2.3.1 Verify Connectivity (PING command)
If the radio LEDs indicate that the radio network is operating properly,
you can use the PING command from the AP to verify the link integrity
between the AP and an endpoint device connected to the Remote radio.
Figure 2-7 shows the typical arrangement for this test.
NOTE: To conduct a PING test, an Ethernet-enabled device must be
connected to the Remote, and it must have a compatible IP
address. Remote radios do not have an IP address and cannot
be verified directly using this method.
PC RUNNING PING UTILITY
CROSSOVER
CABLE
REMOTE
ACCESS POINT
LIN
K
LAN
CO
M1
LAN
CO
M2
CO
M1
CO
M2
LAN
PORT
PW
R
LIN
K
PW
R
LAN
PORT
STRAIGHT-THRO
CABLE
ETHERNET ENDPOINT
(Device Being PINGed)
Figure 2-7. PING Test Setup
(to test connectivity between an AP and an Ethernet endpoint)
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Serial Connections
To check a serial connection, refer to Local Serial Configuration Menu
on Page 57. This section contains details on establishing an IP-to-serial
or serial-to-serial connection.
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K
LIN
R
PW
M2
CO
M1
CO
N
LA
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K
LIN
R
PW
M2
CO
M1
CO
N
LA
3
AP MANAGEMENT
3 Chapter Counter Reset Paragraph
3.1 INTRODUCTION
31
3.1.1 PC-Based Configuration Software .............................................. 31
3.1.2 Menu Structure ............................................................................ 32
3.1.3 Differences in the User Interfaces ............................................... 35
3.2 ACCESSING THE MENU SYSTEM
36
3.2.1 Methods of Control ...................................................................... 36
3.2.2 PC Connection and Log-In Procedures ...................................... 37
3.2.3 Navigating the Menus .................................................................42
Navigating via Terminal or Telnet Sessions
Recommended for first-time users ................................................... 42
Navigating via a Web Browser.......................................................... 42
3.3 BASIC DEVICE INFORMATION
43
3.3.1 Starting Information Screen ......................................................... 43
3.3.2 Main Menu .................................................................................. 44
3.4 CONFIGURING NETWORK PARAMETERS
3.4.1
3.4.2
3.4.3
3.4.4
3.4.5
3.4.6
45
Network Configuration Menu ....................................................... 45
IP Configuration Menu ................................................................ 46
Wireless MAC Configuration Menu ............................................. 48
Mobility Configuration Menu ........................................................ 49
SNMP Agent Configuration Menu ............................................... 50
Bridge Configuration Menu ......................................................... 51
3.5 CONFIGURING RADIO PARAMETERS
52
3.5.1 Radio Configuration Menu .......................................................... 52
Skip Zones Menu.............................................................................. 53
3.6 CONFIGURING THE SERIAL INTERFACES
54
3.6.1 Overview ..................................................................................... 54
Serial-to-Serial Services ................................................................... 55
IP-to-Serial Services ......................................................................... 55
Configuration .................................................................................... 56
Serial Configuration Wizard .............................................................. 56
3.6.2 Local Serial Configuration Menu ................................................. 57
View Current Settings Screen—Serial-to-Serial Example ................ 59
View Current Settings Screen—Unicast UDP Mode Example ......... 61
3.6.3 Remote Serial Gateway Configuration (IP-to-Remote Serial) ..... 62
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3.7 SECURITY CONFIGURATION
64
3.7.1 Security Configuration Menu ....................................................... 65
3.8 WIRELESS NETWORK MENU
69
3.8.1 Remote Management Submenu ................................................. 70
Manage Selected Remote Submenu
.......................................................................................................... 71
Broadcast Remote Reprogramming Menu
.......................................................................................................... 72
Remote Database Menu................................................................... 74
Group Database Menu ..................................................................... 75
Endpoint Database Menu .................................................................75
Access Point Database Menu .......................................................... 76
3.9 STATISTICS AND EVENT LOG
77
3.9.1 COM1 and COM2 Data Statistics Menus ................................... 78
3.9.2 Remote Serial Gateway Statistics ............................................... 79
3.9.3 Ethernet and Wireless Packet Statistics ...................................... 80
Ethernet Packet Statistics .................................................................80
Wireless Packet Statistics.................................................................80
3.9.4 Radio Packet Statistics ................................................................ 81
3.9.5 Event Log Menu .......................................................................... 82
Time and Date Stamping .................................................................. 82
3.10 DEVICE INFORMATION MENU
84
Device Names Menu ........................................................................ 85
3.11 MAINTENANCE AND TOOLS
85
3.11.1 Reprogramming Menu .............................................................. 86
3.11.2 Configuration Scripts Menu ...................................................... 87
A Brief Description of Configuration Files ......................................... 87
3.11.3 RSG Configuration Script Menu ............................................... 89
3.11.4 Authorization Codes Menu ....................................................... 91
3.11.5 Transmitter Test Menu .............................................................. 92
3.12 REDUNDANCY MENU
93
Packet Rx Errors Exceeded Threshold Menu .................................. 96
30
3.13 DNP3 ROUTING MENU
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3.1
INTRODUCTION
The GE MDS entraNET AP embedded Management System (MS) is
accessible through various data interfaces. These include the COM1
(serial) port, LAN (Ethernet) port, and SNMP. Essentially the same capabilities are available through any of these paths.
For SNMP management, the transceiver is compatible with GE MDS
NETview MS™ software. Refer to GE MDS publication 05-2973A01
for more information on this product. For support of other SNMP software, a set of MIB files is available for download from the GE MDS
Web site at www.GEmds.com.
The entraNET MS has the following functions:
• 3.4 CONFIGURING NETWORK PARAMETERS (beginning
on page 45)
• 3.5 CONFIGURING RADIO PARAMETERS (beginning on
page 52)
• 3.6 CONFIGURING THE SERIAL INTERFACES (beginning
on page 54)
• 3.7 SECURITY CONFIGURATION (beginning on page 64)
• 3.8 WIRELESS NETWORK MENU (beginning on page 69)
• 3.9 STATISTICS AND EVENT LOG (beginning on page 77)
• 3.10 DEVICE INFORMATION MENU (beginning on page 84)
• 3.11 MAINTENANCE AND TOOLS (beginning on page 85)
• 3.12 REDUNDANCY MENU (beginning on page 93)
• 3.13 DNP3 ROUTING MENU (beginning on page 97)
Each of these sections has a focus that is reflected in its heading. The
section you are now reading provides you with information on connecting to the AP, how to navigate through its menus, and how to perform some top-level configuration tasks.
3.1.1 PC-Based Configuration Software
The GE MDS Remote Access Manager Application (Part Number
06-4490A01) makes it possible to authenticate all Access Points and
associated Remotes from a PC, without having to update individual
radios. The software maintains a Master Approved Remotes List, and all
participating access points are synchronized with this list. Contact GE
MDS for more information.
NOTE: If a PC is connected to a Remote radio while the Remote is
asleep, the PC does not enable its Ethernet adapter, as it
believes the port is disconnected. Also, if a PC is connected to
a Remote and the radio goes to sleep, the PC goes into a “port
disconnected” state. The PC must be properly configured to
avoid these scenarios.
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The commands for Remote radios are presented separately in
CHAPTER 4 REMOTE RADIO MANAGEMENT, beginning on Page
99.
NOTE: Any parameter options, ranges, or default values are displayed
at the end of the field description between square brackets. The
default value is always shown last in a series of items. For
example:
[Range, Options or Description; Default]
3.1.2 Menu Structure
The following illustrations (Figure 3-1 and Figure 3-2) show an overall
view of the entraNET MS. Detailed information for screens and menu
items is provided on the pages that follow.
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Invisible place holder
MAIN MENU—Diagram 1 of 2
Starting Information Screen (read-only items)
Network
Configuration
Ethernet Address
IP Configuration
IP Address
IP Netmask
IP Gateway
Wireless MAC Config.
Radio
Configuration
Local Serial
Configuration
RF Output
Power
Com 1/2 Serial
Data Wizard
Dwell Time
COM1/2
Serial Data Config.
Contention Window
(Min.)
Contention Window
(Max.)
Repeat Count
Net Address
Retry Count
X Address
Skip Zone Options
FEC
Zones 1-8
Port Status
Remote Serial
Gateway
RSG Talkback Enable
RSG Talkback Timeout
RSG Entries
Remote Serial Wizard
Security
Configuration
Approved Remotes
Encryption Enable
HTTP Access
Telnet Access
SNMP Mode
Mode
Various submenus/parameters,
depending on mode selected
Serial
Approved Remotes List
Add Remote
Network
DNP3
Delete Remote
RSG Routing (COM2 Only)
Add Associated
Remotes
Mobility Configuration
Delete All
BSP Routing Enable
IAPP Enable
Various submenus/parameters,
depending on mode selected
Unit Update Enable
Encryption Phrase
HTTP Security Mode
Auto Key Rotation
IAPP Multicast Address
Forced Key Rotation
IAPP Multicast Port
Max Remotes
IAPP Multicast TTL
User Passwords
IAPP Unicast Port
Bridge Configuration
Ethernet Bridging
Bridge Priority
Bridge Hello Time
Bridge Forward Delay
SNMP Configuration
Read Community
Write Community
Trap Community
NOTES
• Chart shows top-level view only. The pages that follow
provide detailed screen-by-screen explanations.
• Not all items are-user configurable
• Some menu items depend on Device Mode
• Spacebar used to make some menu selections
v3 Auth Password
v3 Priv Password
SNMP Mode
Trap Version
Auth Trap Enable
v3 Password Mode
Trap Managers
Figure 3-1. entraNET MS Menu Flowchart
(diagram 1 of 2)
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Invisible place holder
MAIN MENU—Chart 2 of 2
Starting Information Screen (read-only items)
Wireless Network
Statistics/Event Log
Database Timeout
COM 1/2 Data Stats
Max Remotes
Remote Management
Manage Selected Remote
Bdcst. Rem. Reprogramming
Remote Database
Model Number
Serial Number
Bytes in Port
Uptime
Bytes out Port
Remote to Manage
Device
Information
Bytes in Socket
Bytes out Socket
Clear Statistics
Remote Serial Gateway Statistics
Group Database
Maintenance/Tools
Reprogramming
TFTP Host Address
Redundancy
DNP3 Routing
Redundancy Configuration
DNP Routing Enable
Network Event Triggers
DNP Multicast Address
Hardware Event Triggers
DNP Multicast Port
Filename
Date
TFTP Timeout
Time
Retrieve File
Date Format
Image Verify
Console Baud Rate
Image Copy
Device Names Menu
Reboot Device
Redundancy Config. Options
DNP Unicast Port
Force Switchover
DNP Routing Database
Current Firmware
Endpoint Database
UnitID
Access Point Database
Com Port
Endpoint Logging
Local IP Port
Device Name
Configuration/RSG Scripts
Contact
Client IP Address
State (transport, status,
client address)
Packets In
Location
Host Address
Description
Filename
TFTP Timeout
Retrieve File
Bytes In
Send File
Packets Out
Ping Utility
Bytes Out
Ethernet Packet Statistics/
Radio Packet Statistics
IP Address
Count
Packet Size
Packets Received
Packets Sent
Execute Ping
Authorization Codes
Bytes Received
Authorization Key
Bytes Sent
Packets Dropped
Receive Errors
Lost Carrier Detected
(Ethernet Only)
Event Log
Authorized Features
Transmitter Test
Frequency
Duration
Current Alarms
Tx Key
View Event Log
Send Event Log
TFTP Host Address
TFTP Host Filename
TFTP Timeout
NOTES
• Chart shows top-level view only. The pages that follow
provide detailed screen-by-screen explanations.
• Not all items are-user configurable
• Some menu items depend on Device Mode
• Spacebar used to make some menu selections
Syslog Server
Figure 3-2. entraNET MS Menu Flowchart
(diagram 2 of 2)
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3.1.3 Differences in the User Interfaces
There are slight differences in navigation between Telnet, terminal, and
Web interfaces. Generally, the screen content is the same. There are
minor differences in capabilities from limitations of the access channel.
Below are samples of the Starting Information Screen as seen through a
terminal session and a Web browser.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-3. View of entraNET MS Using a Terminal Session
(a Telnet session is similar)
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-4. View of the entraNET MS from a Web Browser
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3.2
ACCESSING THE MENU SYSTEM
The radio has no external controls. All configuration, diagnostics and
control is performed electronically using a connected PC. This section
explains how to connect a PC, log in to the radio, and access the built-in
menu screens.
3.2.1 Methods of Control
The radio configuration menus may be accessed in several ways:
• Local Console—This is the primary method used for the examples in this manual. Connect a PC directly to the COM 1 port on
the radio using a serial communications cable and launch a terminal communications program such as HyperTerminal. This
method provides text-based access to the radio menu. Console
control is a hardware-based technique, and is intended for local
use only.
• Telnet*—Connect a PC to the LAN port on the radio, either
directly or via a network, and launch a Telnet session. This
method provides text-based access to the radio menu, similar to
a Local Console session. Telnet sessions may be run locally or
remotely through an IP connection.
• Web Browser*—Connect a PC to the LAN port on the radio,
either directly or via a network, and open a Web browser (Internet Explorer, Netscape, etc.) This method provides a graphical
representation of each screen, just as you see when viewing an
Internet Web site. The menu screens look a little different from
other methods of control, but the content and organization of
screen items is similar. Web browser sessions may be run
locally or remotely via the Internet.
*
Telnet and Web browser sessions require the use of a straight-through or Ethernet crossover
cable, depending on the whether the PC-to-radio connection is made directly or through an
Ethernet switch or hub. For direct connection, a crossover cable is required; for connection
via a switch or hub, a straight-through cable is needed.
To identify the cable type, hold the two cable ends side by side and in the same plug
orientation (that is, both locking tabs are up or down). Now look at the individual wire colors
on each plug. If the wires on both plugs are ordered in the same sequence from left to right,
the cable is a straight-through type. If they are not in the same order, it may be a crossover
cable, or it may be wired for some other application. Refer to DATA INTERFACE
CONNECTORS on Page 187 for detailed pinout information.
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3.2.2 PC Connection and Log-In Procedures
The following steps describe how to access the radio menu. These steps
require a PC to be connected to the COM 1 or LAN port on the radio, as
shown in Figure 3-5.
To COM1 or LAN Port
(See Text)
US
B
LA
N
CO
M1
CO
M2
CO
M3
PW
R
Serial or Ethernet
Crossover Cable
(See Text)
Configuration PC
Figure 3-5. PC Configuration Setup
Starting a Local
Console Session
(recommended for
first-time users)
1. Connect a serial communications cable between the PC and the
COM 1 port on the radio. If necessary, a cable may be constructed for
this purpose, as shown in Figure 3-6.
Invisible place holder
RJ-11 PLUG
(TO MDS PRODUCT)
1
6
RJ-11 PIN LAYOUT
DB-9 FEMALE
(TO COMPUTER)
4 TXD
RXD 2
5 RXD
TXD 3
6 GND
GND 5
Figure 3-6. Serial Communications Cable (RJ-11 to DB-9)
(maximum recommended cable length is 50 ft./15m)
2. Launch a terminal emulation program such as HyperTerminal.
TIP: The HyperTerminal program can be accessed on most PCs by
selecting Start > Programs > Accessories > Communications
> HyperTerminal.
3. Configure the connection with the following settings:
•
•
•
•
•
•
19200 bps
8 bits
no parity
one stop bit (8N1)
hardware flow control disabled
VT100 emulation
The exact parameters given above must be used for console terminal communication. Improper settings are a common cause
of difficulty.
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NOTE: If the radio is powered up or restarted while connected to a
terminal, a series of pages of text relating to the startup of the
internal microcomputer is displayed. Wait for the log-in screen
before proceeding.
4. Press
ENTER
to receive the login prompt.
5. Enter the username (the default username is admin). Press
ENTER .
6. Enter your password (the default password is admin). (For security,
your password keystrokes do not appear on the screen.) Press
ENTER .
NOTE: Passwords are case sensitive. Do not use punctuation marks.
You may use up to eight alphanumeric characters.
The Starting Information Screen is displayed (Figure 3-7). From
here, you can review basic information about the radio, or press G to
proceed to the Main Menu.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-7. Starting Information Screen—Local Console Session
Starting a Telnet
Session
NOTE: This method requires that you know the IP address of the radio
beforehand. If you do not know the address, use the Local
Console method (above) and access the Starting Information
Screen. The address is displayed on this screen.
1. Connect a PC to the LAN port on the radio, either directly or via a
network. If connecting directly, use an Ethernet crossover cable; if
connecting via a network, use a straight-through cable. The LAN
LED lights to indicate an active connection.
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NOTE: When using a Local Area Network (LAN) to access the radio,
it may be necessary to change the computer IP access to the
LAN in order to be compatible with the entraNET radio
(compatible subnets). You can identify or verify the radio IP
address by using a Local Console session to communicate with
the entraNET radio through its COM 1 port and viewing the
Starting Information Screen.
2. Start the Telnet program on your computer, targeting the IP address
of the radio to which you are connected, and press ENTER .
TIP: A Telnet session can be started on most PCs by selecting Start > Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt. At the command prompt
window, enter the word telnet, followed by the radio IP address (for
example, telnet 10.1.1.168). Press ENTER to display the Telnet log-in
screen.
NOTE: Never connect multiple radios to a network with the same IP
address. Address conflicts result in improper operation.
3. Enter the username (the username default is admin). Press
ENTER .
Next, the Password prompt appears. Enter your password (the default
password is admin). (For security, your password keystrokes do not
appear on the screen.) Press ENTER .
The Starting Information Screen is displayed (Figure 3-8). From
here, you can review basic information about the radio, or press G to
proceed to the Main Menu.
NOTE: Passwords are case sensitive. Do not use punctuation marks.
You may use up to eight alphanumeric characters.
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Invisible place holder
Figure 3-8. Starting Information Screen—Telnet Example
Starting a Web
Browser Session
NOTE: This method requires that you know the IP address of the radio
you are connecting to. If you do not know the address, start a
Local Console session (see Starting a Local Console Session
(recommended for first-time users) on Page 37) and access the
Starting Information Screen. The IP address is displayed on
this screen.
1. Connect a PC to the LAN port on the radio, either directly or via a
network. If connecting directly, use an Ethernet crossover cable; if
connecting via a network, use a straight-through cable. The LAN
LED lights to indicate an active connection.
2. Open a Web browser on your computer (Internet Explorer, Netscape
Navigator, etc.).
3. Enter the radio IP address and press
ENTER .
4. A log-in page is displayed (Figure 3-1) where you enter a user name
and password to access the radio menu. Note that the default entries
are made in lower case (default username: admin; default password:
admin).
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Invisible place holder
admin
Figure 3-9. Log-in Page when using a Web Browser
NOTE: Passwords are case sensitive. Do not use punctuation marks.
You may use up to eight alphanumeric characters.
5. Click OK. The radio responds with a startup menu as in Figure 3-10.
From here, you can review basic information about the radio, or
click on one of the menu items at the left side of the page.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-10. Starting Information Page—Web Browser Example
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3.2.3 Navigating the Menus
Navigating via Terminal or Telnet Sessions
Recommended for first-time users
Local console and Telnet sessions use multi-layered text menu systems
that are nearly identical.
• To select a menu item, press the letter shown at the beginning of
that item. This takes you to an associated screen where settings
may be viewed or changed.
• To return to the previous menu (in most cases), press ESCAPE .
In general, the top portion of menu screens show read-only information
(with no menu selection letter). The bottom portion of the screen contains parameters that can be selected for further information, alteration
of values, or to navigate to other submenus.
When you arrive at a screen with user-definable parameter fields:
• Press the letter shown at the beginning of the user-definable
parameter.
If there is a user-definable value, the field clears to the right of
the menu item, and you can enter the value you wish to use.
In some cases, when you select a parameter, you see a prompt
at the bottom of the screen that says Choose an Option. Press
SPACE to step through the available selections.
• Press ENTER to accept the displayed parameter (the one you
entered, or the one you chose by pressing SPACE ). In some
cases, several parameters may be changed and then saved by a
single keystroke.
• To cancel the parameter change, simply press ESCAPE to restore
the previous value.
Log Out via Terminal
Emulator or Telnet
From the Main Menu Screen, press Q to quit and terminate the session.
Navigating via a Web Browser
Navigating with a Web browser is straightforward, with a scrollable,
clickable “page” instead of a command-line interface. The primary navigation menu is permanently located on the left-hand side of this page.
Click on a desired menu item to display it.
NOTE: To maintain security, it is best to log out of the menu system
entirely when you are done working with it. If you do not log
out, the session automatically ends after 10 minutes
of inactivity.
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Log Out via Web
Browser
Click on Logout in the left-hand frame of the browser window. The
right-hand frame changes to a log-out page. Follow the remaining
instructions on this screen.
This completes the instructions for connecting to the entraNET radio for
PC configuration and control. The next section contains detailed menu
screens and settings that you can use to specify the behavior of the radio.
3.3
BASIC DEVICE INFORMATION
3.3.1 Starting Information Screen
Upon successful log-in to the menu system, the Starting Information
Screen appears. This screen provides a read-only overview of the current operating conditions on the transceiver (see Figure 3-11). (Some
items can be changed using the Device Information Screen described on
Page 84.)
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-11. Starting Information Screen
•
Device Name—This
is a user-defined name for the radio that
appears on every screen (40 characters maximum).
• IP Address—Shows the radio Internet Protocol (IP) address.
• Device Status—Shows the transceiver condition:
• Operational—The radio is operating normally
• Alarmed—An alarm event has been logged and not cleared.
NOTE: If an alarm is present when this screen is displayed, an “A”
appears to the left of the Device Status field. (The PWR LED
also flashes.) Typing “A” on your keyboard takes you directly
to the Current Alarms Screen.
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•
•
•
•
•
•
Associated Remotes—
Shows current number of Remote radios
associated with the AP.
Location—User-definable string that can be used to identify the
radio location (40 characters maximum).
Serial Number—Unique identifier for this device. It must be provided to GE MDS when purchasing Authorization Keys to
upgrade radio capabilities. (See “ Authorization Codes Menu”
on Page 91.)
Uptime—Elapsed time since the transceiver was powered up.
Current Firmware—Version of firmware that is currently active in
the radio.
Current User—Privilege level at which the user has logged in.
3.3.2 Main Menu
The Main Menu (Figure 3-12) is the entryway to all customer-definable
features. The radio Device Name appears at the top of this and all other
screens as a reminder of the radio that is being interrogated.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-12. Main Menu
Invisible place holder
•
Starting Information Screen—Select this item to return to the Start-
ing Information Screen. (See “Starting Information Screen” on
Page 43.)
• Network Configuration—Tools to configure the transceiver data
network layer. (See “Network Configuration Menu” on
Page 45.)
• Radio Configuration—Tools to configure the transceiver wireless
(radio) functions. (See “Radio Configuration Menu” on
Page 52.)
• Local Serial Configuration—Tools to configure the AP COM1 and
COM2 serial ports. (See “Local Serial Configuration Menu” on
Page 57.)
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
3.4
Remote Serial Gateway—Tools
to configure the data connections
to the Remote transceiver serial ports. (See “Remote Serial
Gateway Configuration (IP-to-Remote Serial)” on Page 62.)
Security Configuration—Tools to configure the transceiver security services. (See “SECURITY CONFIGURATION” on
Page 64.)
Wireless Network—Tools to manage Remote and AP databases,
and manage Remote radios. (See “WIRELESS NETWORK
MENU” on Page 69.)
Statistics/Event Log—Tools to measure the radio and data layer
network performance. (See “STATISTICS AND EVENT LOG”
on Page 77.)
Device Information—Top-level customer-specific and definable
parameters, such as the date, time, console baud rate, and device
name information. (See “DEVICE INFORMATION MENU” on
Page 84.)
Maintenance/Tools—Tools for upgrading and selecting firmware
images and configuration files, and applying Authorization
Keys to change radio capabilities. (See “MAINTENANCE AND
TOOLS” on Page 85.)
Redundancy—Places the radio in a “1+1” redundancy-compatible mode. This mode is specifically for use with GE MDS P22
packaged model chassis. Please check with your GE MDS sales
representative for available configurations.
(See “REDUNDANCY MENU” on Page 93.)
DNP3 Routing—This selection provides access to a submenu
where DNP3 routing attributes can be managed. (See “DNP3
ROUTING MENU” on Page 97.)
CONFIGURING NETWORK
PARAMETERS
3.4.1 Network Configuration Menu
The Network Configuration Menu (Figure 3-13) is the home of all IPand Ethernet-level parameters.
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Invisible place holder
Figure 3-13. Network Configuration Menu
(From Access Point)
This menu is subdivided into the following sections:
•
IP Configuration—The
•
Wireless MAC Configuration—Parameters
•
•
Mobility Configuration—Parameters
transceiver IP address, netmask, and gate-
way addresses.
for the Media Access
Control (MAC) wireless protocol.
that control handoffs.
SNMP Configuration—Details that control the operation of the
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). SNMP is used
in conjunction with GE MDS NETview MS software.
See publication 05-2973A01 for details.
• Bridge Configuration—Specialized parameters for the operation
of Ethernet bridging, including priority and forward
delay settings.
3.4.2 IP Configuration Menu
The radios use a local IP address to support remote management and
serial device services. The IP address of a radio can be set as a static IP
address or as a dynamic IP address using the IP Configuration Menu
(Figure 3-14).
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Figure 3-14. IP Configuration Menu
When static IP addressing is used, the user must manually configure the
IP address and other parameters. When dynamic addressing is used, the
radio uses a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Client process to obtain an IP address from a DHCP Server, along with other
parameters such as a net mask and a default gateway.
CAUTION:Changes to any of the following parameters while communicating over the network (LAN or over-the-air) may cause a
loss of communication with the unit being configured.
Communication will need to be re-established using the new
IP address.
•
how the IP address of this device is
obtained: either statically configured, or dynamically assigned
from a DHCP server. [Static, Dynamic; Static]
• Static IP Address—(We recommend that you review this setting.)
Essential for connectivity to the transceiver MS via the LAN
port and to encapsulate serial data over an IP. Enter any valid IP
address that will be unique within the network. [192.168.1.1]
•
•
•
•
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IP Address Mode—Defines
This field is unnecessary if DHCP is enabled.
Static IP Netmask—The IPv4 local subnet mask. This field is
unnecessary if DHCP is enabled. [255.255.0.0]
Static IP Gateway—The IPv4 address of the network gateway
device, typically a router. This field is unnecessary if DHCP is
enabled, or if all devices are on the same subnet. [0.0.0.0]
Current IP Address—(We recommend that you review this setting.) Displays the IP address.
Current IP Netmask—Displays the IPv4 local subnet mask.
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•
Current IP Gateway—Displays
the IPv4 address of the default
gateway device; typically a router.
NOTE: The radio is not a router, so all IP parameters access local
management only, and have no effect on the routing of system
data.
3.4.3 Wireless MAC Configuration Menu
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-15. Wireless Mac Configuration Menu
Invisible place holder
must review this setting.) ID of the network to which this radio belongs (1-15 alphanumeric characters). An address is essential for connection of Remotes to the
AP in the entraNET network. The radio network address is not
programmed at the factory. [9999]
• X Address—Extended Address, used for installations with multiple APs supporting mobility. This address must be a unique
value for each AP. This parameter has no effect in single AP networks. [0]
• FEC—Forward Error Correction status (enabled or disabled).
The FEC setting has a significant effect on the throughput or
speed of the radio network. For a discussion of this and other
issues affecting throughput, see “OPTIMIZING PERFORMANCE” on Page 160. In particular, Table 6-7 of this section
shows the FEC settings and how they relate to hop times and the
bytes-per-packet rate. [Enabled, Disabled; Disabled]
•
48
Net(work) Address—(You
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3.4.4 Mobility Configuration Menu
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-16. Mobility Configuration Menu
Invisible place holder
•
BSP Routing Enable—This parameter controls intra-cell transmission and routing of Basic Serial Protocol packets.[Enabled, Disabled; Disabled]
•
IAPP Enable—This
•
•
•
•
•
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parameter enables the Inter-Access Point
Protocol (IAPP), which allows APs to pass payload data over
the Ethernet LAN. [Enabled, Disabled; Disabled]
Unit Update Enable—This parameter allows the AP to immediately send out an IAPP update when a Remote connects
or disconnects. [Enabled, Disabled; Disabled]
IAPP Multicast Address—An address that allows multicast messaging to travel to all radios in a subnetwork (all radios with a
common network address). [224.254.1.1]
IAPP Multicast Port—An assigned software port that allows multicast messaging to travel to all radios in a subnetwork (all
radios with a common network address). [39990]
IAPP Multicast TTL—Multicast “time to live” number. This is the
number of hops that a message is allowed to make before it is
no longer transportable. This feature prevents “infinite life”
packets that degrade system performance. [1-15; 1]
IAPP Unicast Port—An address that allows messaging to travel to
a specific radio when that message has originated from another
subnetwork. [39990]
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3.4.5 SNMP Agent Configuration Menu
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-17. SNMP Agent Configuration Menu
Invisible place holder
This menu provides configuration and control of SNMP functionality.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
50
SNMP V3 Agent ID—The
alphanumeric string that appears in the
upper right-hand corner of the screen. The entry of this string is
required in non-GE MDS SNMP manager programs (for example, SNMPc). Refer to program documentation for details.
SNMP Read community—Community name with SNMP
read-level access. Any eight-character alphanumeric string.
SNMP Write community—Community name with SNMP
write-level access. Any eight-character alphanumeric string.
SNMP Trap community—Community name with SNMP access to
receive traps. Any eight-character alphanumeric string.
Snmp v3 Auth Password—The password used in an MD5 (Message-Digest algorithm 5) hash along with the message data to
create a message digest. The digest is used by the SNMP entities
to validate the source of the packet. The password can be any
alphanumeric string between eight and 30 characters in length.
Snmp v3 Priv Password—The privacy password stored in the
transceiver flash memory. The password is used in DES (Data
Encryption Standard) encryption, and can be any alphanumeric
string between eight and 30 characters in length. It is used when
the SNMP Agent is managing passwords locally (or initially for
all cases on restart).
SNMP Mode—Set or display current state of the SNMP agent.
[Disabled, v1 only, v2 only, v3 only, v1-v2, v1-v2-v3; v1-v2-v3]
Trap Version—Set the SNMP version for traps. [v1 Traps, v2 Traps,
v3 Traps; v1 Traps]
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•
Auth Trap Enable—Current
abled/Enabled; Disabled]
state of the authentication traps. [Dis-
•
SNMP v3 Password Mode—Determines whether v3 passwords are
managed locally or via an SNMP Manager. The different behaviors of the Agent, depending on the mode selected, are described
in SNMP Mode above. [Manager, Local; Manager]
• Trap Manager (#1–#4)— Table of up to four locations that traps are
sent to. [Any valid IP address]
3.4.6 Bridge Configuration Menu
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-18. Bridge Configuration Menu
Invisible place holder
the type of Ethernet frames sent over
the air to Remote radios. [All, Disabled, No Broadcast/Multicast,
IP/ARP Only; All]
• Bridge Priority—This value is used along with the MAC address
to define the bridge ID. The Bridge ID is used by the Spanning
Tree protocol to determine the root bridge in the network. This
value is useful for forcing a certain bridge to always be the root.
• Bridge Hello Time—Defines how often Spanning Tree protocol
Bridge Protocol Data Units (BPDU) are sent out by the AP.
Each bridge in the network should have the same hello time.
[Number of seconds; 2]
• Bridge Forward Delay—This value decides how long a bridge is in
the “learning” and “listening” states. Traffic begins forwarding
through the bridge after twice the Forward Delay time. [Number
of seconds; 5]
•
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3.5
CONFIGURING RADIO
PARAMETERS
There are two primary data layers in the GE MDS entraNET network—
radio (RF) and data. The data layer is dependent on the radio layer to
work properly. The Radio Configuration Menu is the primary menu
used to set radio parameters. This screen includes the Skip Zone Options
Submenu.
3.5.1 Radio Configuration Menu
Figure 3-19. Radio Configuration Menu
From Access Point
•
•
•
•
•
52
RF Output Power—(We
recommend that you review this setting.)
This selection is used to set the RF output level of the transceiver. Settings are displayed in dBm, and must comply with
regulatory limitations for your area. (See Table 2-1 for default
settings and range.) [20-30; 30]
Dwell Time—Duration of one hop on a particular frequency in the
hopping pattern. This field is only changeable on an AP;
Remotes get their value from the AP upon association. Dwell
time is the same as hop time. [7, 14, 28 msec; 14 msec]
Contention Window Min—Sets the number of random contention
slots to use on first attempt. [0-15; 2]
Contention Window Max—Sets the maximum number of random
contention slots to use. [0-15; 10]
Broadcast Repeat Count—Because broadcast messages are not
acknowledged, noisy environments may prevent some Remotes
from receiving a broadcast. This parameter sets the number of
times that point-to-multipoint messages are transmitted by the
AP. Higher values increase the reliability of communications,
but also increase over-the-air congestion. [0-14; 3]
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•
Unicast Retry Count—Sets
the maximum number of attempts
made to deliver point-to-point messages. Higher values are
more reliable, but increase over-the-air congestion. [0-14; 10]
• Skip Zones (editable at AP only)—Displays the current use of frequency zones. Each zone consists of 16 RF channels. See “Skip
Zones Menu” on Page 53 for details.
Skip Zones Menu
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-20. Skip Zones Menu
(“Commit changes” displayed only on AP—After a change is made)
Invisible place holder
This screen displays the current use of eight frequency operating
zones in the network. Zones can be toggled between Active and
Skipped at APs by first keying in the letter of the zone to be
changed, and then press SPACE to toggle between the two options
for each zone. The screen is read-only at Remote radios, and
Remotes must be synchronized to the AP to display valid status.
Skipping zones is one way of dealing with constant interference on
one or more frequencies. See “A Word About Radio Interference”
on Page 150 for more interference-combatting techniques.
When you have made the desired changes to the Skip Zones Menu,
select Commit Changes to implement the new settings. These
changes are forwarded to all radios in the network through the AP
beacon signal.
NOTE: In the U.S.A., up to four zones may be skipped for 900 MHz
systems, and a maximum of three skipped for 2.4 GHz
systems, per FCC regulations. The skip function may be
disabled in some radios, due to regulatory requirements in
some countries.
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Table 3-1 shows the frequency range covered by each zone for 900
MHz radios. Table 3-2 shows the same information for 2400 MHz
radios.
Table 3-1. Frequency Zones
(900 MHz systems)
ZONE 1
ZONE 2
ZONE 3
ZONE 4
ZONE 5
ZONE 6
ZONE 7
ZONE 8
902.200
to
905.200
905.400
to
908.400
908.600
to
911.600
911.800
to
914.800
915.000
to
918.000
918.200
to
921.200
921.400
to
924.400
924.600
to
927.600
Table 3-2. Frequency Zones
(2400 MHz systems)
ZONE 1
ZONE 2
ZONE 3
ZONE 4
ZONE 5
ZONE 6
ZONE 7 ZONE 8
2401.6
to
2404.6
2404.8
to
2407.8
2408.0
to
2411.0
2411.2
to
2414.2
2414.4
to
2417.4
2417.6
to
2420.6
2420.8
to
2423.8
2424.0
to
2427.0
NOTE: Use caution when changing the operating band of 2.4 GHz
radios. If a Remote and AP are set to different bands, and
communication is lost with the AP, you may have to visit the
Remote site to restore operation.
3.6
CONFIGURING THE SERIAL
INTERFACES
3.6.1 Overview
To understand the operation of the radio system, it may be helpful to
visualize the AP and the Remotes as being in a single box, with the AP
ports on one side and all of the Remotes on the other side (see
Figure 3-21). In practice, the radios are typically separated by considerable distances, but thinking of them grouped in the same box is helpful
for this discussion.
Most data routing is done at the AP, so the majority of system configuration must also be performed at the AP. The AP requires configuration
of its local interfaces (Ethernet or Serial) and knowledge of its remote
interfaces, which are physically located at the Remote radios. There are
also a few parameters that may be configured at the individual Remote
radios.
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Invisible place holder
IP-TO-LOCAL SERIAL EXAMPLE
(showing port steering)
Ethernet
Serial
ACCESS POINT
(AP)
SERIAL-TO-SERIAL EXAMPLE
(Showing Remote port routing)
Serial Data
ACCESS POINT
(AP)
REMOTE 1
Serial Data
REMOTE 2
Serial Data
REMOTE 3
Serial Data
REMOTE 4
Serial Data
Figure 3-21. Conceptual Views of Radio System Usage
The AP includes an embedded terminal server that provides access to
Remote serial ports via an IP or serial connection at the AP. In this
capacity, it acts as a gateway between IP and remote serial devices (thus
the name “serial gateway”), or a transparent over-the-air serial-to-serial
connection.
Serial-to-Serial Services
When the AP transceiver has remote serial units and is primarily passing
RS-232 (serial-based) traffic, it may be necessary to implement
serial-to-serial interface transfers, as shown in the lower part of
Figure 3-21. Additional information for serial-to-serial wireless networks is provided on Pages 123 and 132 of this manual.
IP-to-Serial Services
When the AP transceiver is used as an IP-to-serial gateway, two types
of IP terminal services are available—TCP and UDP. TCP provides a
connection-oriented link, with end-to-end acknowledgment of data.
This requires some added overhead, but provides confirmation that data
has been successfully conveyed, which may be needed for mission-critical applications.
UDP, on the other hand, provides a best-effort delivery service with less
overhead than TCP. It basically broadcasts data, transmitting information packets without an expected acknowledgment. This method minimizes overhead requirements and is acceptable for repetitive exchanges
of information, where an occasional missed packet would not
affect performance.
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Most polled protocols are best served by UDP services, as the protocol
itself has built-in recovery mechanisms (error correction). UDP provides the needed multidrop operation by means of multicast addressing,
where multiple remote devices receive and process the same
poll message.
On the other hand, TCP services are best suited for applications that do
not have a recovery mechanism and must have the guaranteed delivery
that TCP provides despite its extra overhead. The IP-to-Serial example
shows how to do this. See “IP-to-Local Serial Application Example” on
Page 121.
To configure either of these services, use the Serial Configuration Menu
(Figure 3-22 on Page 57).
To configure IP-to-remote serial services, use the Remote Serial
Gateway Menu (Figure 3-28 on Page 64).
Configuration
There are several configuration parameters for the remote serial gateway
found under the Serial Configuration Menu. Note that some of the
parameters are not applicable to IP-to-serial mode. After making
changes to the configuration, you must use the Commit Changes option to
cause the transceiver to implement the requested changes.
If you are connecting EIA-232 serial devices to the transceiver, review
these parameters carefully.
Serial Configuration Wizard
The Serial Configuration Wizard, available through the Local Serial
Configuration Menu, is recommended for configuration of serial ports.
The Wizard uses a step-by-step process that eliminates conflicting settings and streamlines complex configurations.
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3.6.2 Local Serial Configuration Menu
Figure 3-22. COM1/2—Local Serial Configuration Menu
•
Port Status (COM1, COM2)—Defines whether the specified
port is enabled or disabled to pass payload data. COM1 is
typically disabled to allow it to be used for console
terminal control.
NOTE: If COM1 is inadvertently enabled, it will become impossible to
log in using a console terminal connected to the COM1
connector. This problem can be remedied by typing the Hayes
modem-compatible escape sequence of SHIFT + + + followed
by ENTER . This restores COM1 to console terminal mode. You
must log in again.
•
Serial Configuration Wizard—This is a tool for configuration of
the serial ports using a step-by-step process. When the
Wizard is started, you may choose between beginning the
step-by-step process, or simply viewing the current settings
(see Figure 3-23).
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Figure 3-23. Serial Configuration Wizard (Initial Screen)
To start the Serial Configuration Wizard, choose Begin Wizard. The
Wizard presents an opening screen (Figure 3-24) where you select the
method the host computer uses to connect to the radio.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-24. Serial Configuration Wizard Menu
(Host Connection screen)
Next, a series of screens are presented where you set all of the parameters needed for proper operation of the serial port(s). The screens provide text that assist you in making your selections.
At the end of the configuration process, the View Current Settings
Screen is displayed, where all of the settings can be reviewed and
changes made if necessary. Once you are satisfied with the settings, you
can commit the changes and exit the Serial Configuration Wizard by
choosing the last selection on the View Current Settings Menu.
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View Current Settings Screen—Serial-to-Serial Example
If you choose View Current Settings from the Serial Configuration Wizard
Menu, you see a summary screen (Figure 3-25) showing the serial configuration settings. (This is the same screen that is also shown at the end
of the configuration process.) Here, you may choose the letter of an item
to change, or exit the Serial Configuration Wizard completely.
NOTE: Selecting any item other than Commit Changes and Exit Wizard
returns you to the configuration process. After making the
necessary change(s), you can use the Continue Wizard selection
repeatedly to reach the end of the configuration process, and
then exit.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-25. Serial Configuration Current Settings Screen
(Serial-to-Serial example)
The following text explains the key settings for the Serial Configuration
Menu (serial-to-serial example).
•
Port Status—This
selection is used to enable or disable the
serial data port for payload data operation. Normally, COM1
is set to Disabled to permit console terminal operation.
NOTE: When COM1 is enabled for data, management of the radio
through COM1 is disabled. This problem can be remedied by
typing the escape sequence SHIFT + + + followed by ENTER .
This restores COM1 to console terminal mode. You must log in
again.
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•
Mode—Set the method the
[Serial, Network; Network]
•
Remote UnitID—Specify the Remote(s) that transmissions are
directed to. Enter “broadcast” to send transmissions to all
Remotes, or enter the Unit ID number of a particular Remote
for unicast (directed) data. The Unit ID defaults to the last
four digits of the radio serial number, but can be set to any
32-bit integer. [Remote ID, Broadcast; Broadcast]
Remote COM Port—Choose which serial port on the Remote
radios that all data are sent through (COM1 or COM2). [COM1,
COM2; COM2]
Baud Rate—Set the data rate (payload) for the COM port in
bits per second. [1200–115200; 19200]
Byte Format—Set the interface signaling parameters: baud
rate (see Baud Rate above for allowable range), data bits,
parity, and stop bits. [7N1, 7E1, 7O1, 8N1, 8E1, 8O1; 8N1]
Buffer Size—Select the appropriate value for the buffer size
for each serial message. The maximum AP buffer size for
incoming serial data is 256 bytes. Incoming serial packets
(from the RTU) larger than 256 bytes are split by the AP into
256 byte packets before being transmitted over the air. The
associated remote(s) on receiving these packets transmit
them out of the serial port as separate packets. This parameter
does not affect serial data/packets received by the AP (from
remotes) over the air and transmitted out of the local AP
serial port. [32, 64, 128, 256 bytes; 64]
Inter-Packet Delay—Set the number of characters that signify
the end of a message (inter-character time-out). A transceiver
receiving data through the serial port sends an
end-of-message signal to the remote end. MODBUS®
defines a “3.5-character” parameter. [0–65535; 4]
Commit Changes and Exit Wizard—Implements the settings
shown on the screen and closes the Serial
Configuration Wizard.
•
•
•
•
•
•
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host uses to connect to the radio.
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View Current Settings Screen—Unicast UDP Mode Example
Figure 3-26 shows a sample View Current Settings Screen for a system
configured for Unicast UDP mode. The selections shown are similar to
the serial-to-serial example above, but some items are UDP specific.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-26. Serial Configuration Current Settings Screen
The following text explains the key settings for the Serial Configuration
Menu (Unicast UDP example).
•
Port Status—This
selection is used to enable or disable the
serial data port for payload data operation. Normally, COM1
is disabled to permit Console Terminal operation.
NOTE: When COM1 is enabled for data, management of the radio
through COM1 is disabled. This problem can be remedied by
typing the escape sequence SHIFT + + + followed by ENTER .
This restores COM1 to console terminal mode. You must log in
again.
Mode—Used to set the method the host uses to connect to the
radio. [Serial, Network; Network]
• RX IP Port—This selection is used to specify which local IP
port address should be used to receive data from the host, as
well as the IP address and port number of the host to send
data to at the remote end.
• TX IP Address—This selection is used to specify the local IP
address used to receive data from the host, as well as the IP
•
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
address and port number of the host to send data to (at the
remote end).
TX IP Port—A dynamically assigned software port used by
external applications such as HMI interfaces, host polling
programs, etc.
Talkback Enable—Used to enable or disable Talkback mode.
[Enabled, Disabled; Disabled]
Baud Rate—This menu item is used to set the data rate
(payload) for the COM port in bits per second. [1,200–115,200;
19200]
Byte Format—This item allows you to set the interface
signaling parameters: baud rate (see Baud Rate above for the
allowable range), data bits, parity, and stop bits. [7N1, 7E1,
7O1, 8N1, 8E1, 8O1; 8N1]
Buffer Size—This selection selects the size of the buffer
available for passing serial traffic. The maximum AP buffer
size for incoming serial data is 256 bytes. Incoming serial
packets (from the RTU) larger than 256 bytes are split by the
AP into 256 byte packets before being transmitted over the
air. The associated remote(s) on receiving these packets
transmits them out of the serial port as separate packets. This
parameter does not affect serial data/packets received by the
AP (from remotes) over the air and transmitted out of the
local AP serial port. [16, 32, 64, 128, 256; 64 Bytes]
Inter-Packet Delay— Specifies the number of characters that
signify the end of a message (inter-character time-out). A
transceiver receiving data through the serial port sends an
end-of-message signal to the remote end. MODBUS defines
a “3.5-character” parameter. [0–65535; 4]
Commit Changes and Exit Wizard—Implements the settings
shown on the screen and closes the Serial
Configuration Wizard.
3.6.3 Remote Serial Gateway Configuration
(IP-to-Remote Serial)
The Remote Serial Gateway (RSG) Menu (Figure 3-27) controls the IP
encapsulation behavior of all Remote radios. The gateway function is
essentially a table with one entry for each Remote radio passing serial
data. No further configuration is required at Remote radios.
The AP can be configured to accept IP traffic to be exchanged with
devices connected to the serial ports of one or more Remotes.
Figure 3-27 shows the starting point for configuring the remote serial
gateway settings.
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Invisible place holder
Figure 3-27. Remote Serial Gateway Menu—Initial Screen
•
RSG Talkback Enable (UDP IP-to-Serial)—When Talkback is
enabled and the RSG is set up for UDP mode, a message
from a Remote radio (usually a reply to a poll) is sent to the
last IP address or port that a message was received from.
[Enabled, Disabled; Enabled]
• RSG Talkback Timeout—This selection is used to set a time
limit after which, if no data has been received from the IP
host, the RSG talkback feature expires. When this happens,
the RSG reverts to its configured IP address and port for
upstream data destined for an IP host. [Time in seconds; 30]
• RSG Entries—This selection allows entry of key RSG
parameters including Unit ID, COM port setting, Mode, and
Local IP Port. This screen is shown in Figure 3-28.
• Remote Serial Wizard—This tool assists you in adding or
changing a configuration to your remote serial gateway
entries. These are the same settings contained in RSG Entries
Screen above, but the Remote Serial Wizard presents a
step-by-step series of screens with explanatory text to assist
you in making your selections.
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Invisible place holder
Figure 3-28. Remote Serial Gateway (RSG) Entries Menu
(TCP configuration; UDP is similar)
•
•
•
•
•
•
Unit ID—Enter Broadcast,
or enter the Unit ID of the Remote
for unicast (directed) data. The Unit ID defaults to the last
four digits of the radio serial number, but can be set to any
32-bit integer. If set to Broadcast, then all remotes are
targeted.
Group Id—Identifies a group used for serial multicast traffic.
When set to a non-zero value, the Unit Id and COM Port
parameters are not available because the entry identifies a
Group, and a Group does not use these parameters. Unit Id and
COM Port parameters are available when this value is set to
zero. [0-15; 0]
COM Port—The remote serial port associated with this IP
connection.
Mode—The type of IP port, or socket, used by the AP for
encapsulation of serial traffic. [TCP Server; UDP]
Local IP Port—The IP port number at the AP to which the
application must connect when exchanging data with the
corresponding remote radio(s).
TCP Keepalive—This value sets the number of seconds that a
TCP connection can be inactive before it is disconnected. If
the value is set to zero, the port is off. [0-600; 5]
NOTE: Although a Group is defined at the AP, the members of the
group are defined at each remote radio. See “Group Database
Menu” on Page 75 for more information.
3.7
SECURITY CONFIGURATION
The entraNET system contains built-in security features for your transceivers and the network. These options start with controlling remote
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access to the network via Telnet, Web browser, and SNMP. Other areas
include multiple levels of encryption and MD5-level security for HTTP
connections. The Security Configuration Menu (Figure 3-29) contains
all of the settings related to these functions.
NOTE: Security enhancements in entraNET 2.3.0 firmware necessitate that encryption must be turned OFF prior to upgrading
entraNET Remote radios with the new firmware. Failure to
turn encryption off results in loss of communication between
an AP and entraNET Remote radios. Once the firmware
upgrade is complete, encryption may be re-enabled.
Additionally, any changes to encryption settings should be
made first at all Remote radios, then at the AP. This prevents a
loss of communication between the AP and Remote radios due
to security mismatches. Communication loss requires a
personal visit to each affected remote site, where restoration
can be performed at the Remote itself (see CHAPTER 4
REMOTE RADIO MANAGEMENT, beginning on Page 99).
3.7.1 Security Configuration Menu
The Security Configuration Menu (Figure 3-29) allows settings of several parameters related to network access, user credentials, and encryption. A review of each item on the menu is important to safeguarding
your network from unauthorized access. Review these settings occasionally to make sure they are applicable to the current state of
your network.
Figure 3-29. Security Configuration Menu
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Approve Remotes—Enables
authentication of Remote radios
before granting access to the network. Enabling forces the entraNET radio to check the Approved Remotes List (described
below) before continuing the authorization process. Before
enabling this option, at least one entry must already exist in the
Approved Remotes List. [Enabled, Disabled; Disabled]
Encryption Enable— Enable encryption of over-the-air data packets. Enabling forces the transceiver to use 128-bit encryption on
all over-the-air messages. This option requires the Encryption
Phrase (see below) to be previously configured. [Enabled, Disabled; Enabled]
HTTP Access—Prevents remote access through HTTP (a Web
browser) on Port 80. [Enabled, Disabled; Enabled]
Telnet Access—Prevents remote access through Telnet sessions
on Port 23. [Enabled, Disabled; Enabled]
SNMP Mode— Prevents remote access through SNMP commands on Port 161. [Disabled, v1 only; v2 only, v3 only, v1-v2,
v1-v2-v3; v1-v2-v3]
Approved Remotes List (Menu)—Presents a menu where the creation and management of Remote radios allowed to communicate with the AP is performed. For more information, refer to
Approved Remotes List Menu below.
Remote Access Manager—Allows management of the Approved
Remotes List using optional GE MDS Remote Access Manager
software (Part Number 06-4490A01). Set the Remote multicast
address to use with the Remote Access IP setting (listed below).
[Enabled, Disabled; Disabled]
Encryption Phrase—An alphanumeric phrase added to the
encryption algorithm. A minimum of eight characters must be
entered for this string. [Any 8-41 character alphanumeric string;
Blank]
NOTE: When changing the Encryption Phrase, it is recommended that
you change the most distant Remotes first, followed by the
APs, so that proper association occurs.
•
HTTP Security Mode—Select
the security mode or level of log-in
using an HTTP browser. Disabling HTTP Access prevents access
through HTTP. HTTP Security Mode is functional if HTTP Access is
enabled. [Basic Auth, MD5 Digest; Basic Auth]
Basic mode requires a password, but the actual password text is
transmitted unencrypted.
is more secure because it encrypts the password.
• Auto Key Rotation—Used to select whether or not the encryption
key is automatically rotated (changed) periodically. [Enabled,
Disabled; Enabled]
MD5 Digest
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•
Force Key Rotation—This selection invokes an immediate change
in the encryption key. For this function to work, encryption
must be enabled, a valid Encryption Phrase must be set, and key
rotation must be enabled. Note that there is no feedback on the
screen—the change takes place as soon as the menu selection is
made.
• Max Remotes—Maximum number of Remotes permitted to be
connected to (served by) this AP. [Default=50]
• User Passwords—Administrative and Guest password for this
radio. Used at log-in via the COM1 Port, Telnet session, and
Web browser session.
To reset the admin password to the factory default (“admin”)
(Figure 3-30):
1.At the login prompt, type authcode.
2.At the password prompt, type authcode.
3.At the authorization prompt, enter the authorization code.
[Up to eight case-sensitive, non-blank, alphanumeric characters;
admin]
Figure 3-30. Reset Password to Factory Default
TIP: For enhanced security, consider using a misspelled word. This
helps protect against sophisticated hackers who may use a database
of common words (as, for example, in a dictionary attack) to determine a password. An even better approach is to use a password that
includes some numbers. Making the password as long as possible
(up to the full eight characters) also improves its security.
•
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Remote Access IP—Remote
multicast address to use when running optional GE MDS Remote Access Manager software (see
Remote Access Manager above). [Default=239.254.1.10]
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Approved Remotes List Menu
Figure 3-31. Approved Remotes List Menu
The AP restricts communication to only those Remotes included in the
Approved Remotes List. Messages received from Remotes that are not
in this list are discarded.
•
Add Approved Remote—Enter
the Remote serial number. This
entry must consist of seven or more characters.
[Serial number of Remote–at least seven characters]
• Delete Approved Remote—Enter the Remote serial number.
NOTE: For security, delete
radio immediately.
•
•
•
•
•
•
68
a
decommissioned
or
stolen
Previous Page—Returns
you to the last page viewed within the
Approved Remotes Menu.
Add Associated Remotes—Adds all currently associated Remotes
(1-1024) to the approved Remote list. Alternatively, you can
enter each Remote serial number manually.
Delete All—Completely purges all Remotes from the current list.
Next Page—Moves you to the next page within the Approved
Remotes List Menu.
Number of Remotes—Shows the number of Remotes that are currently connected to the AP.
Approved Remotes List—Simple listing of the serial numbers of
Remotes that are authorized to communicate with this AP. If a
Remote is not on this list, it cannot associate with this AP.
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3.8
WIRELESS NETWORK MENU
The Wireless Network Menu (Figure 3-32) monitors the operation of
Remote radios in the network, regardless of the type of data they are
passing (Ethernet or serial) from the perspective of the AP. This information is stored in a local database at the AP, and is not sent to the
Remotes.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-32. Wireless Network Menu
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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Database Timeout—Number
of minutes until a database entry
expires. Remotes must be refreshed through a handshake process to stay in the database. This allows decommissioned or
faulty radios to fall out of the database. [1-720; 10]
Max Remotes—Maximum number of Remotes allowed to associate with the AP. [1-1024;100]
Remote Management—Presents a menu for management of a particular Remote. See “Remote Management Menu” on Page 70
for more information.
Remote Database—Lists all Remotes connected to this AP.
See “Remote Database Menu” on Page 74 for more information.
Group Database—Lists all Remotes connected to this AP that
belong to a specific Group. See “Group Database Menu” on
Page 75 for more information.
Endpoint Database—Lists the IP or MAC addresses of Ethernet
endpoints connected to Remote radios. See “Endpoint Database Menu” on Page 75 for more information.
Access Point Database—Lists the APs in the wireless network
(Inter-Access Point Protocol must be enabled [see “Mobility
Configuration Menu” on Page 49] for this function to work).
IAPP traffic can be passed via these transceivers. See “Access
Point Database Menu” on Page 76 for more information.
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•
EndPoint Logging—This selection is used to specify whether endpoint logging is enabled or disabled. [Enabled, Disabled; Enabled]
3.8.1 Remote Management Menu
The Remote Management Menu (Figure 3-33) allows selection of a particular Remote to manage, based on the radio Unit ID number (generally
the last four digits of its serial number).
Figure 3-33. Remote Management Menu
•
Remote to Manage—Radio address of the Remote to be managed
•
Manage Selected Remote—Displays
(typically a four-digit code).
the screen shown in
Figure 3-34. It contains several parameters that are used to set
the characteristics of Remote radios in the network.
• Broadcast Remote Programming—Selecting this item brings up a
submenu (Figure 3-36) where you may initiate the broadcast of
new firmware images and Remote restart commands.
NOTE: Before programming a Remote radio over the air, be sure to set
ETHERNET BRIDGING (see “Bridge Configuration Menu” on
Page 51) from ALL (default) to either DISABLED or NO BROADCAST/MULTICAST.
Otherwise, you may experience sync errors, or programming
may not complete. Excessive broadcast/multicast traffic from
a connected LAN can also cause problems.
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Manage Selected Remote Menu
Figure 3-34. Manage Selected Remote Menu
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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Device Information—Selecting
this item brings up a submenu
(Figure 3-36) where you may change a Remote radio Owner,
Name, and Location. Hardware and software version information,
including the bootloader version, is also displayed.
Network—Tool for control of the Ethernet port (enable
or disable).
Radio—Tool for setting the transmit power level (in dBm).
Serial Configuration—Tool for configuring COM1 and COM2
parameters, including port mode, baud rate, byte format,
inter-packet delay, and buffer size.
Statistics—Presents packet throughput and retry data for the
selected Remote.
Remote Reprogramming—Brings up a submenu (Figure 3-35) for
sending new firmware images to specific Remotes, and for
specifying the image that will be active when the radio is
restarted.
Authorization—Brings up a submenu showing the authorized
capabilities of the Remote entered in the Unit ID field (enabled
or disabled): Ethernet capabilities, network management, serial
capabilities, and multiple endpoints.
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Figure 3-35. Remote Reprogramming Menu (Single Remote)
•
Remote to Manage—This
Invisible place holder
field shows the Unit ID of the Remote
to be managed.
•
Package (Image) to Transmit—There
are two available firmware
images in the AP. This allows selection of either image to be
transmitted to the remote.
• Send Images—Begins transmitting the selected firmware image
to the Remote.
• Remote Reboot—Restarts the Remote radio with one of the two
firmware images.
Broadcast Remote Reprogramming Menu
Figure 3-36. Broadcast Remote Reprogramming Menu
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Broadcast
reprogramming with
different firmware
versions on a
network
Broadcast reprogramming is used to upgrade the firmware of all radios
in a network. If your network contains a mix of radios with 2.x and 3.x
version firmware, it is normal to see the status message “Some Remotes
Failed Programming”.
For example, if you select 2.x firmware to reprogram, only the older
remotes will accept the image; if you select 3.x firmware, only new
remotes will accept the firmware. Release 3.x firmware can only be
installed on radios equipped with 2 MB expanded flash memory.
Release 2.x is compatible only with older radios having 1 MB flash
memory.
Use the Manage Selected Remote Menu on Page 71 to determine which
radios were not upgraded.
The Broadcasting Remote Reprogramming menu items are:
•
Package to Transmit—Identifies
which of the two available firmware images (1 or 2) will be sent to the associated Remotes.
• Broadcast Images—Starts transmission of the selected firmware
package to all associated Remotes.
• Status—Shows either Not Started, or the progress (in percent) of
a firmware image transmission. At the end of a transmission, the
word Complete is displayed.
• Broadcast Remote Reboot—Causes a reboot of all associated
Remotes to the new (offline) firmware image. This image then
becomes the active firmware file.
The bottom of this screen shows the software versions of the OIB and
TOR boards inside the entraNET radio. The OIB is the interface board
section of the transceiver; the TOR is the radio section of the transceiver.
Both sections use different portions of the firmware package; thus the
difference in the version numbers.
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Remote Database Menu
The Remote Database Menu (Figure 3-37) shows several parameters
related to the associated Remotes. It is updated about once every 8 seconds.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-37. Remote Database Menu
•
•
•
UnitID—The
unit ID of the associated remote.
State—Shows whether or not the Remote is connected to the AP.
AgeOut—Number of minutes until the entry expires and is removed
from the table. Each AP maintains a table with the addresses of the
devices it communicates with. The AgeOut countdown is restarted to
the Database Timeout value every time a message to or from that
device is detected. If no traffic with that device occurs, and it does
not respond to a final handshake request, it then “ages out” of the
table.
An expired Remote must reconnect before it is again included in the
table. (See Database Timeout on the Wireless Network Menu,
Figure 3-32 on Page 69.)
•
TX Pkts—Number
of packets sent to this Remote.
• RX Pkts—Number of packets received from this Remote.
• Num EPs—Number of endpoints connected to this Remote.
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Group Database Menu
The Group Database Menu (Figure 3-38) shows the remotes associated
with this AP that belong to the specified Group ID.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-38. Group Database Menu
•
Group ID—Allows the selection of a particular group and displays the
remote radios defined for the group. [0-15; 0]
• UnitID—The unit ID of the associated remote.
• GroupID—The ID number of the group.
• Com Port—The COM port that the remote uses to pass the serial
multicast traffic associated with this Group ID.
Endpoint Database Menu
The Endpoint Database Menu shows all non-entraNET Ethernet devices
that are known to the transceiver; this is equivalent to the AP table of IP
devices. The list shows endpoint MAC and IP addresses, as well as
packet exchange data.
NOTE: A Remote does not have an IP address; rather, it acts as a transparent bridge for IP traffic to the connected Ethernet endpoint.
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Invisible place holder
Figure 3-39. Endpoint Database Menu
(Lists all equipment attached to Remote transceivers in the network)
•
•
•
•
•
•
MAC Address—Ethernet
address of the endpoint device.
AgeOut—Number of minutes until the device (address) is removed
from the table.
Each transceiver maintains a table with the addresses of the devices
it communicates with. The age time countdown is restarted to its
default setting every time a message to or from that device is
detected. If no traffic with that device happens, it then “ages out” of
the table. When traffic is detected, it is included again in the table.
Via Remote—Unit ID of the transceiver connected to this device.
IP Address—IP Address of endpoint device (not the Remote radio
itself).
TxPkt—Number of packets received from the endpoint device and
passed over the air.
RxPkts—Over-the-air data packets received by the transceiver and
passed on to the endpoint device.
Access Point Database Menu
The Access Point Database Menu (Figure 3-40) lists all APs contained
in the wireless network, and includes details about each radio.
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Invisible place holder
Figure 3-40. Access Point Database
•
•
•
serial number for the AP.
IP Address—IP Address of the AP.
Number of Remotes—Current number of Remotes connected to
the AP.
• List of Remotes—Lists all Remotes (by Unit ID number) that are
currently connected to the AP.
3.9
Serial Number—Factory-assigned
STATISTICS AND EVENT LOG
The Statistics/Event Log Menu (Figure 3-41) contains a variety of items
related to the health and performance of the wireless network. Data
throughput statistics, as well as past and present events and alarms, are
all presented and stored in this menu area.
Figure 3-41. Statistics/Event Log Menu (Main Screen)
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•
•
•
•
•
COM1/COM2 Data Statistics—These screens show in and out bytes
for the COM1 and COM2 ports.
Remote Serial Gateway Statistics—Shows Unit ID, status, and
throughput data for associated Remotes.
Ethernet Packet Statistics—Shows vital data on packets, in and out
bytes, errors detected, and lost Ethernet carriers.
Radio Packet Statistics—Summarizes data packets sent and
received by the radio, including overflows, good or failed data,
retries, and timeouts.
Event Log—Database of past and present events and alarms for
the wireless network. A listing of event log codes appears in
Table 7-5 on Page 172.
3.9.1 COM1 and COM2 DataInvisible
Statistics place
Menusholder
Figure 3-42. Com1/2 Data Statistics Menu
Invisible place holder
of bytes received by the transceiver
through the serial interface.
• Bytes out on port—Number of bytes transmitted by the transceiver
through the serial interface.
• Bytes in on socket—Number of bytes received by the transceiver
through the IP socket.
• Bytes out on socket—Number of bytes transmitted by the transceiver through the IP socket.
•
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Bytes in on port—Number
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3.9.2 Remote Serial Gateway Statistics Menu
The Remote Serial Gateway Statistics menu (Figure 3-43) summarizes
port activity for Remote Serial Gateway entries that have been set up for
IP-to-Remote serial data. These values are reset to zero when a radio is
restarted.
Figure 3-43. Serial Data Statistics Menu
(Both COM1 and COM2 are shown, if applicable)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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Index—Sequential
number assigned to the associated Remote.
UnitID—The unit ID of the associated Remote. Group ID are dis-
played, when defined, to show statistics. A Group ID is identified as Grp x.
Com—Communication port being monitored (COM1 or COM2).
IP Port—IP port associated with the listed device.
State—State of the AP server for this Remote.
[Listening; Connected]
Remote:P,B—Displays the incoming port byte count.
Socket:P,B—Displays the outgoing port byte count.
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3.9.3 Ethernet and Wireless Packet Statistics Menu
The Ethernet/Wireless Packet Statistics menu (Figure 3-44) shows vital
data on packets and bytes sent or received, and errors detected. The
screen is updated about every three seconds.
Figure 3-44. Sample Packet Statistics Menu
Ethernet Packet Statistics
• Packets received—Packets received through the Ethernet port of
the transceiver.
• Packets sent—Packets send through the Ethernet port of the
transceiver.
• Bytes received—Data bytes received by this radio.
• Bytes sent—Data bytes sent by this radio.
• Packets dropped—Received packets dropped from a lack
of buffers.
• Receive errors—Packets discarded after more than five retries.
• Lost carrier detected—Number of times the carrier signal on the
Ethernet port has been missing. This count increase significantly when the Ethernet cable is inserted or removed.
• Clear Statistics—Resets the statistics counter.
Wireless Packet Statistics
• Packets received—Over-the-air data packets received by this
radio.
• Packets sent—Over-the-air data packets sent by this radio.
• Bytes received—Over-the-air data bytes received by this radio.
• Bytes sent—Over-the-air data bytes sent by this radio.
• Packets dropped—Received packets dropped from a lack
of buffers.
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•
Receive errors—Packets
that do not pass a Cyclic Redundancy
Check (CRC). This may be due to transmissions corrupted by
RF interference.
• Clear Statistics—Resets the statistics counter.
3.9.4 Radio Packet Statistics Menu
The previous screen dealt with Ethernet-related information. The Radio
Packet Statistics screen (Figure 3-45) contains statistics that relate
directly to over-the-air transmission of data. It provides valuable insight
into the quality of the RF link between entraNET radios with respect to
the handling of data packets.
Figure 3-45. Radio Packet Statistics Menu
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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Overflow—TX
packets with “LCP buffer overflow data”
responses.
No Ack—Number of packets that were sent but
not acknowledged.
Lost Data—TX packets lost; over-the-air retries exceeded.
Timeout—TX data packets lost; contention timeout.
Good Data—Data packets with CRC “good” responses.
Failed—TX packets failed; data integrity failed.
Over the Air Data—Data packets successfully delivered over the
air.
Frags—Total fragments of data received.
Retries—Total number of times packets were re-transmitted.
Diags—TX packets with “Remote not synchronized” data
responses.
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3.9.5 Event Log Menu
The microprocessor within the transceiver monitors many operational
parameters and logs them. Events are classified into four levels of
importance, which are described in Table 3-3. Some of these events
result from a condition that prevents the normal operation of the radio—
these are “critical” events. These cause the radio to enter an “alarmed”
state, and the POWER LED to blink, until the condition is corrected. All
events are stored in the Events Log, which holds about 5,000 entries.
Table 3-3. Event Classifications
Level
Description or Impact
Informational
Normal operating activities
Minor
Does not affect radio operation
Major
Degraded radio performance, but still
capable of operation
Critical
The radio cannot operate
Time and Date Stamping
The events stored in the Event Log are time stamped using the time and
date. You must manually enter the date and time at the AP.
(See “DEVICE INFORMATION MENU” on Page 84.) The manually
set time and date clock is backed up by an internal battery.
Figure 3-46. Event Log Menu
•
events that have
placed the radio in the alarmed state.
• View Event Log (see Figure 3-47)—Lists events stored in the current log. Some of these events are stored in volatile memory,
and are lost if power is removed.
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Current Alarms (Telnet or Terminal only)—Lists
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Invisible place holder
Figure 3-47. View Event Log Screen
•
Clear Event Log—Purges
Invisible place holder
the log of all stored events.
TIP: Save your Event Log before clearing it to retain potentially valuable troubleshooting information. See USING
CONFIGURATION SCRIPTS on Page 181 for an overview on how to transfer files from the transceiver to a
computer on the network using TFTP (Trivial File
Transfer Protocol).
•
(Telnet or Terminal only)—Initiates TFTP transfer of the Event Log in a plain text (ASCII) file to a TFTP server
on the connected LAN.
• Event Log Host Address (Telnet or Terminal only)—IP address of
the computer on which the TFTP server resides.
[Any valid IP address; 127.0.0.1]
• Event Log Host Filename (Telnet or Terminal only)—Name to be
given to the Event Log file sent to the TFTP server for
archiving.
[Any 40-char alphanumeric string; eventlog.txt]
Send Event Log
NOTE: You may wish to change the Event Log file name to reflect the
type of log you intend to archive, or its date.
•
(Telnet or Terminal only)—Number of seconds
the TFTP server waits for a packet ACK (acknowledgment)
from the transceiver before suspending the file transfer. [10 to
120 seconds; 30]
• Syslog Server Address—The radio can also pass log messages on
as they occur to a syslog server. Use this field to enter the IP
address of this server. [Valid server IP address]
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3.10 DEVICE INFORMATION MENU
The Device Information menu (Figure 3-48) displays basic administrative data on the radio to which you are connected. It also provides a date
and time display, Console Baud Rate setting, and customer-specific
parameters under the Device Names selection.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-48. Device Information Menu
•
•
Model (display only)—Model
type of the connected radio.
number of the connected
•
•
Uptime (display only)—Elapsed
Serial Number (display only)—Serial
radio.
time since powering up the radio.
Date—Current date being used for the transceiver logs
(customer settable).
• Time—Current time of day (customer settable). Setting:
HH:MM
• Date Format—Select a presentation format:
• Generic = dd Mmm yyyy
• European = dd-mm-yyyy
• U.S.A. = mm-dd-yyyy
NOTE: The date and time are maintained by an internal battery
module, which is not customer serviceable.
setting the console baud rate to
match the connected terminal.
• Device Names Menu (Figure 3-49)—The Device Name is used by
the transceiver as the network realm name and as the
entraNET MS screen heading. The contact, location, and
description fields for each radio can be used to record whatever
radio-specific information is useful to your organization; the
information appears on this screen only.
•
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Console Baud Rate—Allows
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Device Names Menu
Figure 3-49. Device Names Menu
•
Device Name—Device
Name, used by the transceiver as the
realm name for network security and menu headings.
• Contact—Customer defined; appears on this screen only.
• Location—Customer defined; appears on this screen only.
• Description—Customer defined; appears on this screen only.
3.11 MAINTENANCE AND TOOLS
In the course of operating your network, you may want to take advantage of product improvements, and to read and archive the configuration
of your individual transceivers. The Maintenance Menu provides several tools to make this possible. This section provides detailed information on how to use these services.
Key maintenance tasks are:
• Reprogramming— Managing and selecting the radio operating
system firmware resources. See “ Reprogramming Menu” on
Page 86.
• Configuration Scripts—Saving and importing data files containing radio operating parameters or settings.
See “ Configuration Scripts Menu” on Page 87.
• RSG Configuration Scripts—Scripts for configuring the
Remote Serial Gateway. See “Remote Serial Gateway Configuration (IP-to-Remote Serial)” on Page 62.
• PING Utility—Diagnostic tool to test network connectivity.
See “ PING Utility Menu” on Page 90.
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• Authorization Codes (Keys)—Alter the radio capabilities by
enabling the built-in resources via purchased keys.
See “ Authorization Codes Menu” on Page 91.
• Transmitter Test—Diagnostic commands for RF transmitter.
See “ Transmitter Test Menu” on Page 92.
Figure 3-50. Maintenance/Tools Menu
3.11.1 Reprogramming Menu
The AP transceiver has two copies of the firmware (microprocessor
code) used for the operating system and applications. One copy is active
and the second one is standing by, ready to be used. Using the Reprogramming Menu (Figure 3-51), you can upload a new release into the
inactive position and place it in service whenever you desire.
NOTE: See “UPGRADING AP FIRMWARE” on Page 179 for
complete details on downloading new firmware code into the
transceiver via TFTP.
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Figure 3-51. Reprogramming Menu
•
TFTP Host Address—IP address of the host computer from which
to get the file. [Any valid IP address]
•
Firmware Filename—Name
•
•
•
•
•
•
of file to be received from the TFTP
server. Verify that this string corresponds to the TFTP directory
location. May require a sub-directory; for
example: entranet/bkrfto-1_0_0.gpk. [Any 40-character alphanumeric
string]
TFTP Timeout—Time in seconds the TFTP server waits for a
packet ACK (acknowledgment) from the transceiver before suspending the file transfer. [10 to 120 seconds; 30]
Retrieve File—Initiate the file transfer from the TFTP server.
Placed into inactive firmware position in the transceiver
non-volatile memory. [Y, N]
Image Verify—Initiate the verification of the integrity of firmware
file held in the radio.
Image Copy—Initiate the copying of the active firmware into the
inactive image.
Reboot Device—Initiate restarting the transceiver. This interrupts
data traffic through this radio and the network, if performed on
an AP. Use this command to toggle between firmware images.
Current Firmware—Shows the current firmware revision level.
3.11.2 Configuration Scripts Menu
A Brief Description of Configuration Files
If you plan to have more than a few transceivers in your network, you
may want to use the Configuration Scripts Menu (Figure 3-52) to configure similar radios from a common set of parameters. Over 50 customer settings that optimize the network are saved in a configuration file
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(data file). However, only a few essential parameters need to be
reviewed and altered to use the file with another transceiver.
A configuration file makes it easy to apply your unique settings to any
transceiver(s) you wish. Configuration files also provide you with a tool
to restore parameters to a known working set, in the event that a parameter is improperly set and performance is affected. See “USING CONFIGURATION SCRIPTS” on Page 181 for detailed instructions and a
sample configuration file.
Figure 3-52. Configuration Files Menu
•
TFTP Host Address—IP
address of the computer on which the
TFTP server resides. [Any valid IP address]
• Config Filename—Name of the file containing the configuration
profile to be transferred to the TFTP server. The configuration
information is in ASCII format. May require a sub-directory; for
example: config\entranet-config.txt. [Any 40-character alphanumeric
string]
NOTE: The filename field is used in identifying the desired incoming
file and as the name of file being exported to the TFTP server.
Before exporting the configuration profile, you may wish to
name it something that reflect radio services or identification.
•
in seconds the TFTP server waits for a
packet ACK (acknowledgment) from the transceiver before suspending the file transfer. [10 to 120 seconds; 30]
• Retrieve File—Initiate the file transfer of the configuration file
from the TFTP server into the transceiver.
• Send File—Initiate the file transfer from the current configuration file to the TFTP server.
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TFTP Timeout—Time
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3.11.3 RSG Configuration Scripts Menu
The RSG Configuration Scripts Menu (Figure 3-53) is used to manage
the download of configuration script files for the transceiver.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-53. RSG Configuration Script Menu
•
•
•
•
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RSG Config Host Address—This is the IP address of the host com-
puter. This computer also runs a TFTP server to transmit or
receive configuration files.
RSG Config Filename—The name of the file that has been created
or uploaded from an existing AP. This file contains all of the
programmable parameters of the transceiver.
TFTP Timeout—This field shows the amount of time that the
radio receiving information waits before reporting a
fault condition.
Send File—Sends the onboard configuration file to a remote host
device.
Retrieve File—This command initiates the download of the configuration file from the TFTP server PC.
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PING Utility Menu
The PING Utility Menu (Figure 3-54) is used to verify IP connectivity
with LAN nodes or Ethernet endpoints.
Figure 3-54. PING Utility Menu
•
•
•
•
Address to Ping—Address
to send a PING. [Any valid IP address]
Count—Number of PING packets to be sent.
Packet Size—Size in bytes of each PING data packet.
Ping—Start sending PING packets to address shown on screen.
The process can be stopped at any time by pressing CTRL C on
the PC keyboard.
The screen then displays a detailed report of PING activity. Press
any key after viewing the results to return to this menu.
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3.11.4 Authorization Codes Menu
Figure 3-55. Authorization Codes Menu
•
Authorization Key—Accept
an Authorization Key into the transceiver non-volatile memory.
• Authorized Features (display only)—Presents a list of authorized
features. At the time of publication, available features include
GE MDS NETview MS and DNP3 Handling.
In the examples shown, GE MDS NETview MS is shown as an
authorized and enabled feature, and DNP3 Handling is disabled.
NETview MS software helps you monitor system performance,
configure network elements, detect faults, and correct problems
from the convenience of an office or at any other point in the
network. For more information, refer to GE MDS publication
05-2973A01.
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3.11.5 Transmitter Test Menu
This screen (Figure 3-56) allows testing of the radio transceiver RF
transmitter section (power amplifier). Selections of specific frequencies
and key duration, as well as transmit key behavior, can be modified from
this screen. This function is useful for troubleshooting specific radio
amplifier issues.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-56. Transmitter Test Menu
•
to set the carrier frequency used during transmitter testing.
[900 MHz radios: 902.200000-927.600000; 916.000000 MHz]
[2.4 GHz radios: 2400.00000-2483.500000; 2400.000000 MHz]
• Duration—Sets the key duration time for transmitter testing.
[1-600 seconds; 600]
• TX Key—Used to activate the transmitter on the test frequency.
There are two modes: Normal and Forced. Normal is the default
selection, and keeps the transmitter in standard frequency hopping configuration. Forced keys the transmitter on the specified
test frequency. [Normal, Forced; Normal]
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3.12 REDUNDANCY MENU
Redundancy is available only at the AP. The Redundancy Menu
(Figure 3-57) is used in protected installations where a backup transceiver can be immediately placed online if a primary radio fails. This
protects against “single point of failure” scenarios. The Redundancy
Menu contains selections and settings that are used to manage redundancy functions.
NOTE: Redundancy functions require the presence of a
specially-constructed supervisory board (GE MDS Part No.
03-6061Axx). Ask your GE MDS representative for details.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-57. Redundancy Menu
•
selection is used to enable or
disable redundancy operation. When the supervisory board
detects an alarm condition, the currently selected transceiver is
disabled, and the backup transceiver comes online. [Enabled, Disabled; Enabled]
• Network Event Triggers—This selection presents a submenu (see
Figure 3-58) with Ethernet- (network) related alarm conditions.
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Invisible place holder
Figure 3-58. Network Event Triggers Menu
•
Hardware Event Triggers—This selection presents a submenu (see
Figure 3-59) with parameters related to local alarm conditions.
Invisible place holder
Figure 3-59. Hardware Event Triggers Menu
•
Redundancy Configuration Options—This selection presents a sub-
menu (see Figure 3-60) for network event duration settings (for
example, if a PING attempt fails after so many minutes, a contingency action is taken, such as the radio switching from the
active to the standby radio).
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Figure 3-60. Redundancy Configuration Options Menu
•
•
•
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Force Switchover—This selection invokes an immediate switcho-
ver from the active to the standby radio.
Invisible place holder
Network Interface Error—This selection is used to enable or disable redundancy switchover on the occurrence of a Network
Interface Error. [Enabled, Disabled; Enabled]
Frequency Not Calibrated—This selection is used to enable or disable redundancy switchover if a frequency calibration error
occurs. If this error occurs, the radio requires factory servicing.
[Enabled, Disabled; Enabled]
Power Not Calibrated—This selection is used to enable or disable
redundancy switchover if an RF power calibration error occurs.
If an error occurs, the radio requires factory servicing. [Enabled,
Disabled; Enabled]
Lack of Associated Remotes Exceeded Threshold—This selection
brings up another screen (Figure 3-61) where you can specify
the duration of time that a redundant AP waits before considering itself to be malfunctioning. (A system must have at least one
associated Remote to be functional.)
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Invisible place holder
Figure 3-61. Lack of Associated Remotes Exceeded Threshold
Menu
•
Packet Receive Errors Exceeded Threshold—This
selection brings
up another screen (see Packet Rx Errors Exceeded Threshold
Menu below) where you can specify the number of packet errors
that must be exceeded in a given time frame before a redundant
AP considers itself to be malfunctioning.
• Lack of Remotes for—number of seconds that a redundant AP
waits before considering itself to be malfunctioning.
Packet Rx Errors Exceeded Threshold Menu
This screen (Figure 3-62) contains two settings relating to Packet
Receive errors. One setting sets the number of missed packets, and the
other sets a time interval after which an error is declared. The settings
work together, and both criteria must be met before a redundancy
switchover occurs.
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Invisible place holder
Figure 3-62. Packet Rx Errors Exceeded Threshold Menu
These configuration settings are intended for data-intensive applications
and must be customized for your specific application.
Maximum Receive Errors—Here, you specify the number of packet errors
that must be exceeded before a redundant AP considers itself to be malfunctioning. This setting works in conjunction with the Interval setting
below. [0-1000; 300]
•
Receive Error Count Interval—This
field is used for entering the
number of seconds to count Packet Receive errors (works with
Maximum Receive Errors above). [Time interval; 300 seconds]
3.13 DNP3 ROUTING MENU
This menu (Figure 3-63) is used to configure the AP to support DNP3
protocol routing. See also DNP3 Protocol-Aware Networks on Page 8.
NOTE: Detailed information on the DNP3 protocol is available on the
DNP Users’ Group Web site at www.dnp.org.
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Figure 3-63. DNP3 Routing Menu
•
DNP Routing Enable—Enables or disables the DNP3
routing function. [Enabled, Disabled; Disabled]
•
DNP Multicast Address—Specifies
the group address with which
to exchange UDP-encapsulated messages with other IP devices
that are DNP3 aware. This includes PCs, endpoint devices, and
other APs. When a DNP3 packet is received and no routing
information exists for the target device (see DNP3 routing database below), the AP sends the packet to all other IP devices in
an attempt to find a radio that recognizes the address. [Valid IP
address; 224.254.1.1]
• DNP Multicast Port—Specifies the IP port number used for all
DNP3 Multicast messaging. [0-65535; 20000]
• DNP Unicast Port—This field specifies the IP port number used to
establish a socket to other IP devices. This UDP port (along with
the AP local IP address) is used to encapsulate DNP3 messages
over IP. [0-65535; 20001]
• DNP3 Routing Database—This selection brings up a screen where
the current DNP3 routing information known by the AP can be
viewed.
NOTE: For installations that include multiple APs, it is important to
properly configure IAPP, which is located within the Mobility
Menu. IAPP allows APs to share their DNP3
routing information.
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REMOTE RADIO
MANAGEMENT
4 Chapter Counter Reset Paragraph
4.1 INTRODUCTION
101
4.2 Programming Methods
101
4.2.1 Terminal Interface Mode ............................................................101
4.2.2 Remote Management via the AP ..............................................101
4.3 Log-in Procedure
101
4.4 Commands
102
4.4.1 Entering Remote Commands ....................................................102
4.5 Minimum Configuration for Remotes
102
4.5.1 Detailed Command Descriptions ...............................................103
4.6 UPGRADING REMOTE FIRMWARE
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4.1
INTRODUCTION
Local configuration of Remote transceivers is performed through a PC
terminal connected to the COM1 port of the radio. This section explains
how to establish a console session with the Remote, and provides a complete list of commands.
4.2
Programming Methods
4.2.1 Terminal Interface Mode
A PC program such as HyperTerminal may be used to establish a terminal session with the Remote transceiver. The PC must be connected
to the radio via its COM1 connector. Refer to PC Connection and Log-In
Procedures on Page 37 for detailed cabling information.
TIP: The HyperTerminal communications program can be accessed on
most PCs by selecting Start > Programs > Accessories > Communications >
HyperTerminal.
The following terminal settings must be used to communicate with the
Remote transceiver:
•
•
•
•
•
•
19,200 bps data rate
8 data bits
no parity
one stop bit (8N1)
hardware flow control disabled
ANSI or VT100 emulation.
NOTE: The exact parameters given above must be used for terminal
communication. Improper settings are a common cause of
difficulty.
4.2.2 Remote Management via the AP
Several Remote parameters may be configured over the air using the AP
Management System. For more information on Remote Management
via the AP, refer to WIRELESS NETWORK MENU on Page 69.
4.3
Log-in Procedure
You must log into the radio in order to issue commands. The log-in procedure for a Remote is somewhat different than for an AP. Follow the
procedure below:
1. At the entranet> prompt, enter login.
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2. At the username prompt, enter your username (admin is the default).
3. At the Password prompt, enter your password (admin is the default).
4.4
Commands
Table 4-1 provides a quick reference to the various commands for the
Remote transceiver. Detailed descriptions for these commands follow in
Section 4.5.1.
4.4.1 Entering Remote Commands
To enter a command:
• Type the command (including any spaces), then press
ENTER .
To request or set a value:
• Type the command, press =, then press
ENTER .
For example:
• Type COMMAND_ARGUMENT= to query a setting or value.
• Type COMMAND_ARGUMENT=VALUE to set values.
To get help with a command:
• Type the command, press
4.5
SPACE
, press ?, then press
ENTER .
Minimum Configuration for Remotes
Remote radios require little configuration to operate, as most of the configuration is conducted at the AP. The minimum set of parameters that
needs to be set for a Remote are:
RADIO UNIT—32-bit
radio address. Defaults to the radio serial
number, but is settable.
RADIO NETADDR—Radio
network address. Must match the AP
address.
—RF output power setting in decibels (dB). The
range is 20-30 for non-ETSI 900 MHz radios, 20-27 for
non-ETSI 2400 MHz radios, and 10-20 for ETSI 2400 MHz
radios.
RADIO PWR
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Table 4-1. Remote Commands—Quick Reference
COMMAND
_? (after a command)
DESCRIPTION
COMMAND
DESCRIPTION
When entered after a command in this list,
shows detailed information and allowable
entries
HELP
Lists commands supported for the logged-in
user. (See also the ? command at the beginning of this table.)
ALARM
Displays current alarm conditions by class
LOG
Sets or displays the event log information
APLIST
Sets or displays serial numbers of up to 50 APs
with which the Remote can associate
LOGIN
Secure log-in. Prompts for the case-sensitive
username and password.
AUTH
Sets or displays the Authorization Key and a list
of authorized features
LOGOUT
Logs the user off and ends the terminal session
COM1
Sets or displays the configuration of COM1 port
(baud rate, data format, buffer size,
inter-packet gap)
MESSAGE
Sets the default priority level for message packets (low, normal, high)
COM2
Sets or displays the configuration of COM2 port
(baud rate, data format, buffer size,
inter-packet gap)
PASSWORD
Sets the user log-in password for the user at
current access level or below
CONFIG
Shows the dump configuration of all settable
parameters
PROGRAM
VERIFY
Performs a checksum verification on one of six
parameters
DEVICE
Sets or displays the device configuration,
including owner, company, and serial number
RADIO
Sets or displays the radio configuration and status
DIRECT
Sets or displays the configuration for direct
mode operation
REBOOT
Restarts the radio firmware
ENCRYPT
Sets or displays the configuration for data
encryption
SLEEP
Sets the low-power operating mode: Sleep or
Shutdown
ETH
Sets or displays the Ethernet port configuration
STATS
Shows radio statistics
HANDOFF
Sets or displays the hand-off configuration
STATTRACKER
When enabled (STATTRACKER ON), sends
UDP packets from the Ethernet port on the
Remote radio every time a wireless packet is
received
VER
Displays the current version number
4.5.1 Detailed Command Descriptions
ALARM
Displays the current alarm conditions by severity level. For each level,
the specific events that caused an alarm are listed, along with a brief
description of each alarm. Alarm levels are:
ALL—All alarm classes
INFORM—Non-persistent information
MINOR—Minor alarm
MAJOR—Major alarm
CRITICAL—Critical alarm
Optional argument:
HEX= —Displays
the hex bit codes for the current alarm condition by
class. For each specific event that causes an alarm, the corresponding bit
is set. Event numbers are matched to the appropriate hex code by a relationship of 2n.
APLIST
Configures a list of approved APs.
Optional arguments:
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APx=<integer> —Configures a list of approved APs. x is a number from
1–50, and integer is the serial number of an approved AP (1–99999999).
To delete an entry, enter a serial number of 0; this indicates that the slot
is not filled.
AP1=<integer>Serial
AP2=<integer>Serial
Number of approved AP
Number of approved AP
.
.
.
AP50=<integer>Serial
Number of approved AP
CLEAR—Clears
all entries in the AP list. Be sure to set RESTRICT to OFF
before using this command to avoid restricting Remotes to associating
with an empty list.
CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
RESTRICT=<ON|OFF>—Turns
on or off restricting registration to APs in
the list.
ON—The Remote can only associate with an AP
OFF—The Remote can associate with any AP.
AUTH
on the list.
Displays the list of authorized features, or changes the Authorization
Key that controls these features.
Optional arguments:
KEY=<key>—Enter a valid authorization key (1–16 characters), which is
used to enable or disable software features.
(Example: AUTH KEY=123456abcdef)
CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
COM1
Optional arguments:
BAUD=<bps>—Sets or displays the baud rate setting as 1200, 2400, 4800,
9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, or 115200 bps.
BUFFER=<bytes>—Sets
or displays the maximum COM1 port buffer size
(1–1500).
CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
DEFAULT=<mode>—Sets or displays the COM1 port default mode on
startup. DEFAULT cannot be set to DATA unless the device has been autho-
rized for serial payload.
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CONSOLE: COM1 defaults to command-line mode
DATA: COM1 defaults to transparent data mode
BSP: COM1 defaults to in Basic Serial Protocol mode
INT_LOOP: COM1 defaults to internal loopback mode
EXT_LOOP: COM1 defaults to external loopback mode
FORMAT=<format>—Sets or displays the COM1 port data characters,
parity, and stop bits setting. Valid data parameters are:
7N1—seven char bits, no parity, one stop bit
7N2—seven char bits, no parity, two stop bits
7O1—seven char bits, odd parity, one stop bit
7O2— seven char bits, odd parity, two stop bits
7E1—seven char bits, even parity, one stop bit
7E2—seven char bits, even parity, two stop bits
8N1—eight char bits, no parity, one stop bit (default
8N1—eight char bits, no parity, two stop bits
8O1—eight char bits, odd parity, one stop bit
8O1—eight char bits, odd parity, two stop bits
8E1—eight char bits, even parity, one stop bit
8E2—eight char bits, even parity, two stop bits
setting)
NOTE: Entering data formats other than those listed above may cause
undesired operation.
GROUP=<ID>—Sets
or displays the Group ID that this transceiver
belongs to at the AP, for purposes of serial data multicasting (0-15).
INTERGAP=—Sets
or displays the transceiver inter-packet gap status.
Optional arguments:
IO—For incoming and outgoing serial data
IN—For incoming serial data only
IOL—For incoming and outgoing (low latency) serial
INL—For incoming (low latency) serial data only
data
MODE=<mode>—Sets the console port interface mode. MODE cannot be
set to DATA unless the device has been authorized for serial payload. To
escape from data mode, enter three consecutive + characters to COM1
with at least 100 mSec between entries.
CONSOLE—Places COM1 in command-line mode
DATA—Places COM1 in transparent data mode
BSP—Places COM1 in Basic Serial Protocol mode
INT_LOOP—Places COM1 in internal loopback mode
EXT_LOOP—Places COM1 in external loopback mode
RXDELAYCHARS= —Sets
the inter-packet receive gap size in character
times (1-65535).
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TXDELAY= —Sets the inter-packet delay in milliseconds (1-65535). The
minimum TXDELAY setting should be set to two times the Dwelltime setting. When TXDELAY is set to less than twice the Dwelltime setting, the
measured inter-packet delay can increase up to one dwelltime (7,14, or
28 ms) period.
COM2
Sets or displays the COM2 port configuration.
Optional arguments:
BAUD=<bps>—Sets
or displays baud rate setting as 1200, 2400, 4800,
9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, or 115200 bps.
BUFFER=<bytes>—Sets
or displays the COM2 port maximum buffer size
(1–1500). The maximum Remote buffer size for incoming serial data is
1500 bytes. The Remote can thus buffer up to 1500 bytes of serial data
(from the RTU) before splitting the serial data into separate packets.
Each packet, when transmitted over the air to an AP, is transmitted out
of the AP local serial port as a separate packet. This parameter does not
affect serial data/packets received by the Remote over the air and transmitted out of the local Remote serial port.
CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
DEFAULT=<mode>—Sets or displays the COM1 port default mode on
startup. DEFAULT cannot be set to DATA unless the device has been authorized for serial payload.
CONSOLE—COM1
DATA—COM1
BSP—COM1
defaults to command-line mode
defaults to transparent data mode
defaults to Basic Serial Protocol mode
INT_LOOP—COM1
defaults to internal loopback mode
EXT_LOOP—COM1
FLOWCTRL=<mode>—Sets
defaults to external loopback mode
or displays the transceiver hardware flow
control status.
Optional arguments:
NONE—Hardware flow control disabled
CTS_CTRL—CTS (Clear-to-Send) flow control
CTS_RTS—CTS follows RTS (Ready-to-Send) flow control
RTS_CTS—DCE RTS/CTS hardware-based flow control
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NOTE: You can use the CTS output from an entraNET radio for Data
Carrier Detect (DCD) sense. It is always asserted (high) when
flow control is set to NONE.
The radio asserts this line as long as it can accept
data on the serial port. When the radio’s internal serial buffers
are full and it can’t accept any more data on the port, it deasserts (low) the CTS line.
CTS_CTRL:
CTS_RTS: CTS follows RTS logic. When RTS is asserted by
the DTE/PC and the internal serial buffers are not full, the
radio asserts CTS as well. When RTS is deasserted, CTS is
deasserted as well.
RTS_CTS: In this case, RTS and CTS behave independently.
RTS is asserted by the DTE/PC as long as it can accept radio
data. When its buffers are full, the DTE/PC deasserts its RTS
line. The radio detects this change and stops transmitting data.
The CTS line in this mode behaves the same as in CTS_CTRL
mode.
FORMAT=<format>—Sets or displays the COM2 port data characters,
parity, and stop bits setting. Valid data parameters are:
7N1—seven char bits, no parity, one stop bit
7N2—seven char bits, no parity, two stop bits
7O1—seven char bits, odd parity, one stop bit
7O2— seven char bits, odd parity, two stop bits
7E1—seven char bits, even parity, one stop bit
7E2—seven char bits, even parity, two stop bits
8N1—eight char bits, no parity, one stop bit (default
8N1—eight char bits, no parity, two stop bits
8O1—eight char bits, odd parity, one stop bit
8O1—eight char bits, odd parity, two stop bits
8E1—eight char bits, even parity, one stop bit
8E2—eight char bits, even parity, two stop bits
setting)
NOTE: Entering data formats other than those listed above may cause
undesired operation.
GROUP=<ID>—Sets
or displays the Group ID that this transceiver
belongs to at the AP, for purposes of serial data multicasting (0-15).
INTERGAP—Sets
or displays the transceiver inter-packet gap status.
Optional arguments:
IO—For incoming or outgoing serial data
IN—For incoming serial data only
IOL—For incoming or outgoing (low latency) serial
INL—For incoming (low latency) serial data only
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MODE=<mode>—Sets the console port interface mode. MODE cannot be
set to DATA unless the device has been authorized for serial payload. To
escape from data mode, enter three consecutive + characters to COM2
with at least 100 mSec between entries.
CONSOLE—Places COM2 in command-line mode
DATA—Places COM2 in transparent data mode
BSP—Places COM2 in Basic Serial Protocol mode
INT_LOOP—Places COM2 in internal loopback mode
EXT_LOOP—Places COM2 in external loopback mode
RXDELAYCHARS= —Sets
the inter-packet receive gap size in character
times (1-65535).
TXDELAY= —Sets the inter-packet delay in milliseconds (1-65535). The
minimum TXDELAY setting should be set to two times the Dwelltime setting. When TXDELAY is set to less than twice the Dwelltime setting, the
measured inter-packet delay can increase up to one dwelltime (7,14, or
28 ms) period.
CONFIG
Saves or displays the current configuration. The output is in a format
that may be copied back into the command line in order to set
the configuration.
Optional arguments:
SHOW—Displays the current configuration. This is a read-only response.
SAVE=FACT—Programs
the current configuration into the Factory
Default configuration table. The factory default is used to restore the
configuration when the system detects a data corruption.
DEVICE
Displays the device configuration, and allows setting of the OWNER,
and LOCATION.
NAME,
Optional arguments:
CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
COMPANY—(read
MODEL—(read
only) Displays the radio model number.
PRODUCT—(read
REV—(read
only) Displays the company name.
only) Displays the product name.
only) Displays the software revision ID.
OWNER—Sets
or displays the owner information (1-40 ASCII charac-
ters).
NAME—Sets
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or displays the radio name (1-40 ASCII characters).
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LOCATION—Sets
or displays the radio location (1-40 ASCII characters).
UPTIME—(read only) Displays
<YY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss>.
SER—Device
DIRECT
the current system uptime in the format
serial number.
Sets or displays the configuration for direct-mode operation
(Remote-to-Remote). This is a special mode intended primarily for railroad applications where Remotes communicate with each other.
Optional arguments:
CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
CWMIN=<range integer>—In ROOT
mode, this command sets the Minimum Contention Windows size (<CWMAX+1).
0: Min=0
15: Max=15
CWMAX=<range integer>—In ROOT mode, this
imum Contention Windows (>CWMIN-1).
command sets the Max-
0: Min=0
15: Max=15
DEFAULT=<mode>—Sets
or displays the default power-up state direct
mode.
ON: Default direct state is Direct Mode
OFF: Default direct state is Infrastructure Mode
EXT: Default direct state is controlled by an external
FEC=<ON|OFF>—In ROOT
I/O pin
mode, this command sets the Forward Error
Correction setting.
ON: FEC on
OFF: FEC off
HOPTIME=<ms>—In ROOT mode, this command sets the time between fre-
quency hops:
7: 7 milliseconds
14: 14 milliseconds
28: 28 milliseconds
MODE=<mode>—Sets
operation to Direct or Infrastructure mode.
ON: Enter Direct mode
OFF: Enter Infrastructure mode
EXT: Enter Direct mode by external
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NETADDR=<netaddr>—Sets
or displays the network (system) address
(0-30000) when in direct mode.
PWR=<range integer>—In ROOT mode, this command sets the radio power
setting in dBm (the range depends on the radio model).
REPEAT=<range integer>—In ROOT
mode, this command sets the Broad-
base Repeat Count.
0: Min=0
15: Max=15
RETRY=<range integer>—In ROOT
mode, this command sets the Max-
imum Unicast Retry Count.
0: Min=0
15: Max=15
SKIPZONES=<bitmap>—In ROOT mode, this command sets the Skip zones
Binary Map (HEX: preceded by 0x).
bit0:ZONE1;
bit1:ZONE2;
bit2:ZONE3;
bit3:ZONE4;
1=Skipped 0=Active
1=Skipped 0=Active
1=Skipped 0=Active
1=Skipped 0=Active
bit4:ZONE5;
bit5:ZONE6;
bit6:ZONE7;
bit7:ZONE8;
1=Skipped 0=Active
1=Skipped 0=Active
1=Skipped 0=Active
1=Skipped 0=Active
STATE=—(read
only) Displays the current Direct mode status.
Currently operating in Infrastructure mode
Currently operating in Direct mode
TYPE=—Sets
or displays the role of this radio in Direct mode.
NODE:
ROOT:
ENCRYPT
Operates as one of the Node Remotes
Operates as the Single Root Remote
Sets or displays the configuration for data encryption.
Optional arguments:
MODE=<ON|OFF>—Sets
or displays the data encryption mode.
ON: Data encryption on
OFF: Data encryption off
PHRASE=<string>—Sets
or displays the Encryption Pass Phrase (8–41
characters).
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CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
ETH
Sets or displays the configuration of the Ethernet port. The port can be
set to a specific Ethernet address (static mode), or the address can be
determined automatically based on the first received packet (autoselect
mode).
Optional arguments:
ENDPT=<string of bytes in hex that is the endpoint MAC address>—Sets or dis-
plays the Ethernet endpoint address, and sets the endpoint address
behavior. The Ethernet address must be in the following format:
xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx.
Set ETH ENDPT to the device’s Ethernet address, or set the address to a
string of zeros to use the address of the source of the first received
packet.
ENDPTMODE=<auto, static>—Displays
the endpoint IP address behavior:
AUTO—Endpoint
address is automatically set to the source
address of the first received packet
STATIC—Endpoint address is manually configured
MODE=<ON|OFF>—Determines
whether the Ethernet port is enabled
or disabled.
ON: Ethernet port is enabled
OFF: Ethernet port is disabled
CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
HANDOFF
Sets or displays the hand-off configuration.
Optional arguments:
ACKAVG=<percent>—The
percentage of hops for which data transmission was successful (an ACK for the hop was received). This average is
sampled every hop over an interval as defined by HANDOFF ACKAVGINT=.
ACKAVGINT=<integer>—ACKAVG averaging interval, defined as averaging
ACKs received over 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, or 128 hops.
ACKAVGTHRESH=<percent>—The hand-off threshold for ACK averaging
(1–99).
BLOCKTIME=<seconds>—Sets
or displays the time in seconds (0–255) to
block access to an AP after hand-off.
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CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
COUNT=<integer>—Number
MODE=<mode>—Sets
of hand-offs that occurred.
or displays the hand-off configuration, or disables
hand-offs.
OFF:
Hand-off is deactivated
ACK: The Remote hands off when ACKAVG= is below the programmed threshold ACKAVGTHRESH=.
RSSI:
The remote hands off when RSSIAVG= is below the programmed threshold RSSIAVGTHRESH=.
ACKRSSI: The remote
RSSIAVG= falls below
hands off when either ACKAVG= or
its programmed threshold.
RSSIAVG=<RSSI -dBm>—Current
RSSI average dBm. This average is
determined by sampling, as defined by RSSIAVGINT=.
RSSIAVGINT=<integer>—RSSI
1:
2:
4:
8:
16:
32:
64:
128:
256:
sampling frequency, defined as:
One sample every 61 hops
Two samples every 122 hops
Four samples every 244 hops
Eight samples every 488 hops
16 samples every 976 hops
32 samples every 1952 hops
64 samples every 3904 hops
128 samples every 7808 hops
256 samples every 15616 hops
RSSIAVGTHRESH=<RSSI -dBm>—The
hand-off threshold for RSSI aver-
aging (–120 dBm to –50 dBm).
HELP
Lists commands supported for the current user log-in level.
LOG
Sets or displays the event log information, and displays the number of
entries in the event log. Optional arguments are used to clear or display
the log.
Optional arguments:
CLEAR—Clear
the event log
SHOW—Show the event log
TOTAL= —Number of event log
entries in log. Read only.
CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
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NOTE: The entraNET remote does not have a real-time clock, but the
AP does. When a remote synchronizes and associates with an
AP, the actual date/time information is sent from the AP to the
remote. This allows the remote to assign the actual date and
time to event entries in the log. If the remote is not synchronized to an AP, event log entries on the remote are displayed
with a date/time stamp that represents the remote’s uptime (the
amount of time since the last reboot of the remote) rather than
an actual date/time stamp.
LOGIN
This command is used for secure log-in to the radio. At the prompt, enter
the case-sensitive username and password. Each of these entries can be
up to eight characters long.
LOGOUT
Logs the user out of the command interface.
MESSAGE
Sets or displays the default packet priority.
Optional arguments:
LOW—Default
priority setting is low.
NORMAL—Default
HIGH—Default
priority setting is normal.
priority setting is high.
CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
PASSWORD
Sets the log-in password for the user at current access level or below.
Optional arguments:
<username>—The
PROGRAM
VERIFY=
log-in username to be associated with the password.
Performs a checksum verification of one of the parameters listed below.
NOTE: Do not enter PROGRAM alone, without the VERIFY= qualifier,
unless instructed by GE MDS technical personnel. Such an
entry causes the radio to enter the Bootloader mode, which, if
improperly used, causes an undesired state in the radio.
If you are instructed to enter the Bootloader mode by GE MDS,
be aware that selecting y automatically changes the console
baud rate to 115200 bps. Failure to change the terminal
program to match this baud rate will cause communications
errors.
Optional arguments:
ALL—All
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BOOT—Bootloader
RADIO
Image
APP1—Firmware
application image 1
APP2—Firmware
application image 2
TOR1—Tor
1 Image
TOR2—Tor
2 Image
Sets or displays the radio configuration and status.
Optional arguments:
AP=
—(read only) Displays the associated AP Serial Number.
ASSOC=—(read
only) Displays whether or not the Remote radio has
been associated with an AP.
CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
NETADDR=<string>—The
current network address (1-15 alphanumeric
characters).
PWR=<dBm>—Sets or displays the current power setting. The value is in
dBm, with an acceptable range of 0–30 for 900 MHz radios, 10–20 dBm
for 2.4 GHz ETSI radios, or 17–27 dBm for 2.4 GHz non-ETSI radios.
QUALITY=—(read only) Displays the quality of the over-the-air link,
expressed as a percent (0-100). Quality is calculated from the successful
reception of ACK packets sent by the AP (0-100).
REFRESH=<refresh>—Connection
refresh period in seconds (0–255).
—(read only) Shows the Received Signal Strength (RSSI). The
value is shown in dBm, with a range of –120–0. This value is refreshed
every three seconds.
RSSI=
SYNC=
—(read only) Shows the current state of radio synchronization.
TX KEY=<on, off>—Starts
or stops the transmitter test.
TX FREQ=<valid frequency range>—Sets
or displays the carrier frequency
(in MHz) for transmitter tests. The valid range is 902.2–927.6 for 900
MHz radios, or 2400.6–2482 for 2.4 GHz radios.
UNIT=<unit>—The
32-bit user-programmable radio address, which
defaults to the radio serial number, but can be changed.
REBOOT
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Restarts the radio firmware.
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Optional arguments:
SAME—Restarts
the radio with the active firmware image
OTHER—Restarts
SLEEP
the radio with the inactive image
APP1—Restarts
the radio with Application Image 1
APP2—Restarts
the radio with Application Image 2
Sets or displays the low-power operating mode. These modes are commonly used where power consumption must be kept to a minimum, such
as in solar-powered installations.
Optional arguments:
CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
DTRSENSE=<low, high>—Select
the level of RS-232 DTR signal used by
the endpoint device to wake the radio:
LOW: DTR Active LOW
HIGH: DTR Active HIGH
When WAKE is set to DTR, the radio will wake on receiving this signal
from the endpoint device.
HANGTIME=<hangtime in ms>—Minimum
wake time in milliseconds
(100–60000) before returning to Low Power mode.
INDICATOR=<on|off>—Indicates whether or not the Sleep indicator LED is
active.
ON: Sleep Mode indicator is on
OFF: Sleep Mode indicator is off
MODE=<mode>—Set
NONE:
the mode as follows:
Normal operation; the radio does not sleep
SLEEP: Sleep mode is enabled. In this mode, the radio draws less
than 20 mA at 12 Volts. It can be brought back online (ready to
send data) within 75 milliseconds. Wake-up is accomplished by
asserting the DTR line on the COM2 port, or by the appearance
of payload data at the active COM port.
Sleep mode also works on the Ethernet interface, except that the
endpoint device must not require Ethernet pulse signals in order
to send data. This mode is similar to a PC Ethernet port “Wake
on data” setting.
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SHUTDOWN: Shutdown mode is enabled. In this mode, the radio
draws less than 1 mA at a supply voltage of 12 Vdc. Note that
this mode requires a longer wake-up time—almost as long as if
the radio were de-powered.
NOW=<setting>—This command is used to place the radio into immediate
Sleep or Shutdown mode.
Sleep: The radio immediately enters Sleep mode.
Shutdown: The radio immediately shuts down, drawing less than
1 mA at a supply voltage of 12 Vdc.
WAKE=<dtr, data>—Selects
a control option to activate (enter) or deactivate (exit) Sleep or Shutdown modes.
DTR: Wake under DTR signal
DATA: Wake up on data
STATS
control
Displays radio statistics. If <device> (RADIO,COM1,COM2,ETH) is omitted,
all statistics are displayed.
Optional arguments:
ALL:
Displays all statistics
RADIO:
COM1:
Displays radio packet statistics
Displays COM1 packet statistics
COM2:Displays COM2
ETH:
Displays Ethernet packet statistics
RESET:
STATTRACKER
packet statistics
Resets packet statistics for the indicated interface
When the STATTRACKER mode is turned on, the Remote transceiver
sends out UDP packets with a broadcast destination IP address. The
command has a user-defined port number between 30000 and 60000,
and sends packets consisting of:
• RSSI statistics
• Receive byte errors
• Connectivity
• Transmit byte errors
• Packets received
• Total fragments
• Packets transmitted
• Total retries
• Packets dropped
• Bytes received
• Bytes transmitted
The source MAC address in the UDP packet is the MAC address from
the entraNET AP. These monitoring packets are sent out every time
there is over-the-air traffic.
This command is designed to work with the GE MDS Mobility Application available from GE GE MDS (Part No. 06-4157A01).
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Optional arguments:
ON:
Turns the Stattracker function on
OFF:
Turns the Stattracker function off
30000–60000:
Allowable range of port numbers that may be entered
CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
VER
Displays the current software version information.
Optional arguments:
CMD—Displays all settable optional arguments and their current values.
You can copy this list to a text file as a record of your configuration.
CONFIG=
EVENT=
H2H=
—Displays the Configuration Table version number.
—Displays the Event List version number.
—Displays the Host-to-Host protocol version number.
HREV=
—Displays the OIB board hardware version number.
IMAGE=<image>—Displays
LOG=
the number of the currently active image.
—Displays the current log version number.
RADIOSW=
—Displays the current software version number (xx.yy.zz).
SREV1= —Displays
the software version number (xx.yy.zz).
SREV2= —Displays
the software version number (xx.yy.zz).
XHREV= —Displays
the radio board hardware revision number.
XSREV1=
—Displays the radio software version.
XSREV2=
—Displays the radio software version.
4.6
UPGRADING REMOTE FIRMWARE
Remote radio firmware may be upgraded using the Remote Firmware
Upgrade Utility available from GE MDS. A local PC connection to the
radio is required to use this utility.
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Figure 4-1. Remote Firmware Upgrade Utility—Initial Screen
A brief description of each screen item is given below.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
118
File—Allows
exiting the utility.
Options—Here, you can select to extract S28 files, display the
debugging log, or show file versions.
Help—Shows the copyright and version information.
Com Port—Identifies the COM port on the computer to be used
for upgrading radio firmware.
User Name, Password—Here, you enter the username and password that have been configured at the radio.
Browse Package—Allows selection of an upgrade file to be
loaded into the radio. This functions in a similar manner to that
seen in the Windows environment.
Upgrade Firmware—This button initiates the file transfer to the
radio.
Reboot to new image after download—When checked, the radio
reboots with the new firmware just loaded.
Change Baud Rate—When checked, the utility automatically
changes its baud rate to match that set in the radio.
Retrieve/Restore Configuration—When checked, this saves a copy
of your configuration. GE MDS recommends that you check
this box before upgrading to ensure that you have a back-up
copy of your configuration.
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SAMPLE
CONFIGURATIONS
5 Chapter Counter Reset Paragraph
5.1 INTRODUCTION
121
5.2 IP-to-Local Serial Application Example
121
Establishing a Connection ..............................................................121
5.3 IP-to-Remote Serial Application Example
122
5.3.1 Endpoint Device Connected to the AP ......................................123
5.4 Point-to-Point, Serial-to-Serial Application Example
123
5.4.1 Step-by-step Instructions for Configuring a Point-to-Point Serial
Connection ...........................................................................................124
5.5 Point-to-Multipoint, Serial-to-Serial Application Example
132
5.5.1 Step-by-Step Instructions for Configuring a Point-to-Multipoint
Serial Connection .................................................................................133
5.6 Mixed-Mode Application Example
140
5.6.1 Operation and Data Flow ..........................................................140
5.7 Group Broadcast Session Example
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5.1
INTRODUCTION
This chapter provides details of how radios should be configured and
connected for specific applications, such as IP-to-serial and
serial-to-serial configurations. Only the most relevant parameters are
shown for the sake of simplicity. All other parameters are assumed to be
set at their default values.
5.2
IP-to-Local Serial Application
Example
You may use either UDP or TCP to establish communications with the
entraNET radio. The choice depends on the type of device you are communicating with at the other end of the IP network. This example uses
TCP to illustrate this function.
In TCP mode, the transceiver remains in a passive state, offering a
socket for connection. When a request is received, data received by the
AP serial port is sent out through the IP socket and vice versa, until the
connection is closed or the link is interrupted. The TCP session has a
10-minute time-out. If inactive for that time, it ends the session. The
transceiver offers the port for connection again after this time.
See Figure 5-1 and Table 5-1.
Establishing a Connection
From the PC, establish a TCP connection to the IP address of the
Remote transceiver and to the IP port as configured earlier (typically
30011). A Telnet client application can be used to establish this connection. Data can now be sent between the PC and the endpoint device.
Computer or Network
192.168.0.10
Access Point
192.168.0.1
Ethernet
Cable*
NKIL
RWP
2MOC
EIA-232
RTU
1MOC
NAL
*Use crossover cable for computer; straight-through cable for network
Figure 5-1. IP-to-Local Serial Application Diagram
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Table 5-1. IP-to-Local Serial Port Application Configuration
IP-to-local serial connection (Local Serial Gateway)
5.3
Radio Location
Menu Item
Setting
AP (COM2)
Port Status
Enabled
Mode
TCP
RX IP Port
30011
Baud Rate
19200
Byte Format
8N1
Buffer Size
256 Bytes
IP-to-Remote Serial Application
Example
This configuration makes any data sent or received with the AP via an
IP port number appear via the serial port of a single Remote (or of all
Remotes, if “Broadcast” is selected for Remote ID).
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Remotes
Terminal
or Computer
192.168.0.10
Access Point
192.168.0.1
EIA-232
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Ethernet
LINK
PWR
1
COM
2
COM
LAN
EIA-232
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Figure 5-2. IP-to-Remote Serial Application Diagram
Table 5-2. IP-to-Remote Serial Application Configuration
GE MDS entraNET
Radio Location
Menu Item
Setting
AP (COM2)
Remote ID
1155883
COM Port
COM2
Mode
TCP Server
Radio IP Port
30066
Mode
COM2 in transparent data mode
Baud
19200
Format
8N1
Buffer
256
DelayChars
4
Remote radio (COM2)
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5.3.1 Endpoint Device Connected to the AP
In this arrangement, information received via an AP Ethernet port is sent
to the serial port of the Remotes and the AP local serial port. The reverse
is also true, meaning that any data received from the serial port of any
Remote or the AP local serial port is encapsulated into an IP packet and
sent out the AP Ethernet port.
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or Computer
192.168.0.10
Remotes
Access Point
EIA-232
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Ethernet
LINK
PWR
1
COM
2
COM
LAN
EIA-232
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EIA-232
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RTU
Figure 5-3. Co-located Endpoint Device and AP
Table 5-3. IP-to-Remote Serial Application Configuration
GE MDS entraNET
Radio Location
Menu Item
Setting
AP (COM2)
Remote ID
1155883
COM Port
COM2
Mode
RSG COM2 Handler
Radio IP Port
30066
Mode
COM2 in transparent data mode
Baud
19200
Format
8N1
Buffer
256
DelayChars
4
Intergap
TX data only
Remote radio (COM2)
5.4
Point-to-Point, Serial-to-Serial
Application Example
Once the transceivers are configured and the changes have been executed, they begin processing any data presented at the COM ports. Data
presented at the AP COM port is packetized and sent over the air via a
proprietary protocol to the Remote. Upon receiving the packet, the
Remote sends the data from its COM port. Likewise, data presented at
the Remote COM port is packetized, sent to the AP, stripped, and sent
from the AP COM port. Note that this configuration does not use multicast addressing.
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192.168.0.10
192.168.0.1
EIA-232
EIA-232
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1
COM
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M2
2
COM
PW
R
LAN
Terminal
or Computer
RTU
Access Point
Remote
Figure 5-4. Point-to-Point Serial-to-Serial Application Diagram
Use the Serial Configuration Wizard (Local Serial Configuration menu)
to make the settings listed in the table below. Following the table are
step-by-step screen images of the Wizard.
Table 5-4. Point-to-Point Serial-to-Serial Configuration
GE MDS entraNET
radio Location
Menu Item
Setting
AP (COM2)
Port Status
Enabled
Mode
Serial-to-Serial
Remote UnitID
1155999 (example)
Rem. COM Port
COM2
Baud Rate
19200
Byte Format
8N1
Buffer Size
256 Bytes
Inter-Packet Delay
4
Mode
Data
Baud
19200
Format
8N1
Buffer
256
DelayChars
4
Remote radio (COM2)
5.4.1 Step-by-step Instructions for Configuring a
Point-to-Point Serial Connection
1. Connect a powered AP radio to a PC.
2. At the PC, open a connection with the Access Point radio using a
terminal, Telnet, or Web browser session.
3. Press G to display the Main Menu.
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4. From the Main Menu, press D to select Local Serial Configuration.
.
Figure 5-5. Main Menu
5. The Local Serial Configuration menu displays the status of the AP
COM1 and COM2 ports (enabled or disabled). Set the COM2 port to
“enabled”.
Press C to select COM2, then press SPACE to toggle between
“enabled” and “disabled”. Press ENTER when “enabled” is displayed
to select it.
Then press D to continue.
Figure 5-6. Port Configuration Setting
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6. Press A to start the Serial Configuration Wizard.
Figure 5-7. Begin the Serial Configuration Wizard
7. The first screen of the Serial Configuration Wizard prompts for the
connection type. Press A to select “Serial”.
Figure 5-8. Connection Type Selection Screen
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8. The Wizard displays a prompt to select a point-to-point or
point-to-multipoint connection. Press A to select “One Remote”
(point-to-point).
Figure 5-9. Point-to-Point Selection
9. The Wizard displays a prompt for the Unit ID of the single Remote
radio. Press A to set the Remote ID (generally the last four digits of
the Remote serial number). Type the Unit ID of the Remote radio.
Press ENTER to accept the Unit ID. Then press N to continue.
Figure 5-10. Set Remote Unit ID
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10.The next screen prompts for the input serial data port. Press A and
then press SPACE to toggle to COM2. Press ENTER to accept the displayed selection. Then press N to continue.
Figure 5-11. Select Remote Port
11.The next screen prompts for the baud rate and byte format.
Press A to set the Data Baud Rate. Press SPACE to cycle through the
baud rate options until “19200” is displayed. Press ENTER to accept
the Data Baud Rate.
Press B to set the Data Byte Format. Press SPACE to cycle through
the byte format options until “8N1” is displayed. Press ENTER to
accept the Data Byte Format. Then press N to continue.
Figure 5-12. Set Data Baud Rate and Data Byte Format
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12.The next screen prompts for the data buffer size and inter-packet
frame delay.
Press A to select Buffer Size. Press SPACE to cycle through the
buffer size options until “256” is displayed. Press ENTER to accept
the Buffer Size.
Press B to select Inter Frame Delay. Press SPACE to cycle through
the options until “4 Character Times” is displayed. Press ENTER to
accept the Inter Frame Delay. Then press N to continue.
Figure 5-13. Set Buffer Size and Inter Frame Delay
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13.The next screen prompts for the Port Status. Press A to select Port
Status. Press SPACE to toggle between “enabled” and “disabled”.
Press ENTER when “enabled” is displayed. Then press N to continue.
Figure 5-14. Enable Port
14.The final screen displays all the previous settings for your review.
The settings should be:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
130
COM2 Port Status: Enabled
COM2 Mode: Serial to Serial
COM2 Remote Unit ID: [Unit ID displayed]
COM2 Remote COM Port: COM2
COM2 Baud Rate: 19200
COM2 Byte Format: 8N1
COM2 Buffer Size: 256 Bytes
COM2 Inter Packet Delay: 4 Character lines
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Figure 5-15. Final Configuration Settings Display
If the settings shown on screen match the ones listed above, press X
to commit the changes and exit the Serial Configuration Wizard.
If not, press the letter of the item to change, press SPACE to cycle
through the choices, then press ENTER to accept the displayed
choice. Then press N as many times as necessary to return to the settings display. When all the entries are correct, press X to commit the
changes and exit the Serial Configuration Wizard.
In the future, if you need to set up another radio or make changes, you
can go directly to this screen by pressing B instead of A in step 5 above.
Figure 5-16. View Current Settings
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5.5
Point-to-Multipoint, Serial-to-Serial
Application Example
The operation and data flow for this mode is very similar to a
point-to-point serial-to-serial application, except that it uses multicast
addressing. The primary difference is that data presented at the AP COM
port is packetized and sent to all of the Remotes. Upon receiving the
packet all of the Remotes, the data is stripped out of the packet and sent
from the COM port. Likewise, data presented at any of the Remote COM
ports is packetized, sent to the AP, stripped, and sent from the AP COM
port.
Invisible place holder
RTU
192.168.0.10
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192.168.0.1
2M
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RW
P
Remote
NKIL
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EIA-232
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1M
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Terminal
or Computer
RTU
RWP
2MOC
1MOC
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2M
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Access Point
RW
P
Remote
KN I
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2M
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RTU
Remote
Figure 5-17. Point-to-Multipoint Serial-to-Serial Diagram
Table 5-5. Point-to-Multipoint Serial-to-Serial Configuration
GE MDS entraNET radio Location
Menu Item
Setting
AP (COM2)
Port Status
Enabled
Mode
Serial-to-Serial
Remote UnitID
Broadcast
Remote COM port
COM2
Baud Rate
19200
Byte Format
8N1
Buffer Size
256 Bytes
Inter-Packet Delay
4
Mode
Data
Baud
19200
Format
8N1
Buffer
256
DelayChars
4
Remote radio (COM2)
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5.5.1 Step-by-Step Instructions for Configuring a
Point-to-Multipoint Serial Connection
1. Connect a powered AP radio to a PC.
2. At the PC, open a connection with the Access Point radio using a
terminal, Telnet, or Web browser session.
3. Press G to display the Main Menu.
4. From the Main Menu, press D to select Local Serial Configuration.
Figure 5-18. Main Menu
5. The Local Serial Configuration menu displays the status of the AP
COM1 and COM2 ports (enabled or disabled). Set the COM2 port to
“enabled”.
Press C to select COM2, then press SPACE to toggle between
“enabled” and “disabled”. Press ENTER when “enabled” is displayed
to select it.
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Then press D to continue.
Figure 5-19. Port Configuration Setting
6. Press A to start the Serial Configuration Wizard.
Figure 5-20. Begin the Serial Configuration Wizard
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7. The first screen of the Serial Configuration Wizard prompts for the
connection type. Press A to select “Serial”.
Figure 5-21. Connection Type Selection Screen
8. The Wizard displays a prompt to select a point-to-point or
point-to-multipoint connection. Press B to select “All Remotes”
(broadcast).
Figure 5-22. Point-to-Multipoint Selection
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9. The next screen prompts for the input serial data port. Press A and
then press SPACE to toggle to COM2. Press ENTER to accept the displayed selection. Then press N to continue.
Figure 5-23. Select Remote Port
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10.The next screen prompts for the baud rate and byte format.
Press A to set the Data Baud Rate. Press SPACE to cycle through the
baud rate options until the baud rate for your equipment is displayed. (In the example below, the baud rate is 19200.) Press ENTER
to accept the Data Baud Rate.
Press B to set the Data Byte Format. Press SPACE to cycle through
the byte format options until “8N1” is displayed. Press ENTER to
accept the Data Byte Format. Then press N to continue.
Figure 5-24. Set Data Baud Rate and Data Byte Format
11.The next screen prompts for the data buffer size and inter-packet
frame delay.
Press A to select Buffer Size. Press SPACE to cycle through the
buffer size options until “256” is displayed. Press ENTER to accept
the Buffer Size.
Press B to select Inter Frame Delay. Press SPACE to cycle through
the options until “4 Character Times” is displayed. Press ENTER to
accept the Inter Frame Delay. Then press N to continue.
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137
Figure 5-25. Set Buffer Size and Inter Frame Delay
12.The next screen prompts for the Port Status. Press A to select Port
Status. Press SPACE to toggle between “enabled” and “disabled”.
Press ENTER when “enabled” is displayed. Then press N to continue.
Figure 5-26. Enable Port
13.The final screen displays all the previous settings for your review.
The settings should be:
• COM2 Port Status: Enabled
• COM2 Mode: Serial to Serial
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•
•
•
•
•
•
COM2 Remote Unit ID: broadcast
COM2 Remote COM Port: COM2
COM2 Baud Rate: 19200
COM2 Byte Format: 8N1
COM2 Buffer Size: 256 Bytes
COM2 Inter Packet Delay: 4 Character lines
Figure 5-27. Final Configuration Settings Display
If the settings shown on screen match the ones listed above, press X
to commit the changes and exit the Serial Configuration Wizard.
If not, press the letter of the item to change, press SPACE to cycle
through the choices, or type the Unit ID if it is incorrect, then press
ENTER to accept the displayed choice. Then press N as many times
as necessary to return to the settings display. When all the entries are
correct, press X to commit the changes and exit the Serial Configuration Wizard.
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In the future, if you need to set up another radio or make changes, you
can go directly to this screen by pressing B instead of A in step 5 above.
Figure 5-28. View Current Settings
5.6
Mixed-Mode Application Example
In this configuration, the Host PC can use both TCP and serial-to-serial
data paths to reach the endpoint devices. This may be helpful when a
mixed collection of endpoint devices is present, where some endpoint
devices operate via Ethernet while others are polled via a serial port. See
Figure 5-29 on Page 141 and Table 5-6 on Page 141.
5.6.1 Operation and Data Flow
• Communicate with endpoint devices A and B by sending and
receiving data from the AP COM2 port.
• Communicate with endpoint devices C and D by Telneting to
the IP address of each endpoint device.
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• All communication paths can be used simultaneously.
RTU–A
EIA-232
LIN
K
CO
M1
CO
M2
PW
R
Remote 1
Access Point
EIA-232
LIN
K
CO
M1
CO
M2
RTU–B
PW
R
Remote 2
LINK
R
PW
Ethernet
Crosssover
Terminal
or Computer
1
COM
2
COM
LAN
RTU–C
Ethernet
LIN
K
CO
M1
CO
M2
EIA-232
PW
R
Remote 3
Ethernet
LIN
K
CO
M1
CO
M2
PW
R
RTU–D
Remote 4
Figure 5-29. Mixed Modes Application Diagram
Table 5-6. Serial Port Application Configuration
GE MDS entraNET
radio Location
Menu Item
Setting
AP (COM2)
Port Status
Enabled
Mode
Serial-to-Serial
Remote UnitID
Broadcast
Remote COM Port
COM2
Baud Rate
19200
Byte Format
8N1
Buffer size
256 Bytes
Inter-Packet Delay
4 Characters
Mode
Data
Baud Rate
19200
Data Format
8N1
Buffer Size
256
DelayChars
4
Mode
On
Remote radios 1 and 2
(COM2)
Remote radios 3 and 4
(ETH)
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141
5.7
Configuring a Group Broadcast
Session
The following procedure demonstrates how to configure a group broadcast session with Group ID 1:
1. Select D to enter the Remote Serial Wizard.
Figure 5-30. Remote Serial Wizard
2. Select A to choose TCP.
Figure 5-31. Select TCP Host Connection
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3. Select B to choose Continue Wizard.
Figure 5-32. TCP Data Connection Settings
4. Select B to choose Continue Wizard.
Figure 5-33. IP Port Settings
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143
5. Select C to choose Multicast to Some Remotes.
Figure 5-34. Multicast to Some Remotes
6. Select B to Continue Wizard.
Figure 5-35. Group ID 1
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7. Select X to Commit Changes and Exit Wizard.
Figure 5-36. Commit Changes and Exit Wizard
8. Enter Y to confirm the changes.
Figure 5-37. Confirm Changes
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K
LIN
R
PW
M2
CO
M1
CO
N
LA
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K
LIN
R
PW
M2
CO
M1
CO
N
LA
6
INSTALLATION
6 chapter Counter reset Paragraph
6.1 INSTALLATION
149
6.1.1 General Requirements ..............................................................149
6.1.2 Site Selection ............................................................................149
6.1.3 Conducting a Site Survey ..........................................................150
Terrain and Signal Strength ............................................................150
A Word About Radio Interference...................................................150
Mounting Dimensions for Radios....................................................152
6.1.4 Antenna and Feedline Selection ...............................................153
Antennas ........................................................................................153
Feedlines ........................................................................................154
6.2 HOW MUCH OUTPUT POWER CAN BE USED?
(U.S.A. and Canada, 900 MHz systems)
156
6.2.1 Calculating System Gain ...........................................................156
6.3 HOW MUCH OUTPUT POWER CAN BE USED?
(U.S.A. and Canada, 2400 MHz systems)
157
6.3.1 Calculating System Gain ...........................................................157
6.4 HOW MUCH OUTPUT POWER CAN BE USED? (ETSI 2400
MHz systems)
158
6.4.1 Calculating System Gain ...........................................................159
6.5 OPTIMIZING PERFORMANCE
160
6.5.1 Principles of Wireless Network Operation .................................160
6.5.2 Aiming Directive Antennas for Maximum RSSI .........................162
Procedure .......................................................................................162
6.5.3 Tips for Improving Data Throughput ..........................................163
To Maximize Throughput of Data and Reduce Latency Time .........163
To Maximize Overall Data Performance .........................................164
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K
LIN
R
PW
M2
CO
M1
CO
N
LA
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6.1
INSTALLATION
This section provides tips for selecting an appropriate site, choosing an
antenna system, and reducing the chance of harmful interference.
6.1.1 General Requirements
There are three main requirements for installing a transceiver—adequate and stable primary power, a good antenna system, and the correct
interface between the transceiver and the data device. Figure 6-1 shows
a typical Remote installation.
Invisible place holder
TO
ANTENNA SYSTEM
LO
W-
COMPUTER
W/TERMINAL
EMULATOR
INE
DL
EE
F
SS
TRANSCEIVER
LO
NKLI
O
CM
1
O
CM
2
W
RP
POWER SUPPLY
6–30 VDC @ 8 Watts
Negative Ground Only
SERIAL OR
ETHERNET RTU
Figure 6-1. Typical Transceiver Installation
(Remote shown)
6.1.2 Site Selection
Suitable installation sites should provide:
• Protection from direct weather exposure
• A source of adequate and stable primary power
• Suitable entrances for antenna, interface or other required
cabling
• Antenna location that provides as unobstructed a transmission
path as possible in the direction of the associated station(s)
These requirements can be quickly determined in most cases. A possible
exception is the last item—verifying that an unobstructed transmission
path exists. Radio signals travel primarily by line of sight, and obstructions between the sending and receiving stations affect system performance. If you are not familiar with the effects of terrain and other
obstructions on radio transmission, the discussion below provides
helpful background.
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6.1.3 Conducting a Site Survey
If you are in doubt about the suitability of the radio sites in your system,
it is best to evaluate them before a permanent installation is begun. This
can be done with an on-the-air test (the preferred method); or indirectly,
using path-study software.
An on-the-air test is preferred because it allows you to see firsthand the
factors involved at an installation site and to directly observe the quality
of system operation. Even if a computer path study was conducted earlier, this test should be done to verify the predicted results.
The test can be performed by first installing a radio and antenna at the
proposed AP station site (one per system). Then visit the remote site(s)
with a transceiver and a hand-held antenna. (A PC with a network
adapter can be connected to each radio in the network to simulate data
during this test using the PING command.)
With the hand-held antenna positioned near the proposed mounting
spot, a technician can check for synchronization with the AP station
(shown by a lit LINK LED on the front panel) and measure the reported
RSSI value using the RADIO RSSI= command. If adequate signal strength
cannot be obtained, it may be necessary to mount the station antennas
higher, use higher gain antennas, select a different site, or consider
installing a repeater station.
Terrain and Signal Strength
While the 900 MHz and 2400 MHz license-free bands offer many
advantages for data transmission services, signal propagation is affected
by attenuation from obstructions such as terrain, foliage or buildings in
the transmission path.
A line-of-sight transmission path between the central transceiver and its
associated transceiver site(s) is highly desirable and provides the most
reliable communications link.
Much depends on the minimum signal strength that can be tolerated in
a given system. Although the exact figure differs from one system to
another, a Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) of –100 dBm or
stronger provides acceptable performance in many systems. While the
equipment works at lower-strength signals, signals stronger than
– 90 dBm provide a fade margin of 15 dB to account for variations in
signal strength that may occur from time to time. RSSI can be measured
with a terminal connected to the transceiver COM1 port. See “Aiming
Directive Antennas for Maximum RSSI” on Page 162 for details.
A Word About Radio Interference
The transceivers share the radio-frequency spectrum with other services
and Part 15 (license-free) devices in the U.S.A. As such, near 100%
error-free communications may not be achieved in a given location, and
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some level of interference should be expected. However, flexible design
and hopping techniques should allow adequate performance, as long as
care is taken in choosing station location, configuration of radio parameters, and software or protocol techniques.
In general, keep the following points in mind when setting up your communications network:
• Systems installed in rural areas are least likely to encounter
interference; those in suburban and urban environments are
more likely to be affected by other devices operating in the
license-free frequency band and by adjacent licensed services.
• Use a directional antenna at remote sites whenever possible.
Although these antennas may be more costly than omnidirectional types, they confine the transmission and reception pattern
to a comparatively narrow lobe, which minimizes interference
to (and from) stations located outside the pattern.
• If interference is suspected from a nearby licensed system (such
as a paging transmitter), it may be helpful to use horizontal
polarization of all antennas in the network. Because most other
services use vertical polarization in this band, an additional 20
dB of attenuation to interference can be achieved by using horizontal polarization.
•
•
•
•
Another approach is to use a bandpass filter to attenuate all signals outside the desired band.
Multiple AP radios can co-exist in proximity to each other with
only very minor interference. Each network address has a different hop pattern. Additional isolation can be achieved by using
separate directional antennas with as much vertical or horizontal
separation as is practical.
If constant interference is present in a particular frequency zone,
it may be necessary to “skip” that zone from the hopping pattern. The radio includes built-in software to help you identify
and remove blocked frequency zones from its hopping pattern.
See “Skip Zones Menu” on Page 53 for more information.
If interference problems persist even after skipping some zones,
try reducing the length of data streams. Groups of short data
streams have a better chance of getting through in the presence
of interference than do long streams.
The power output of all radios in a system should be set for the
lowest level necessary for reliable communications. This lessens the chance of causing unnecessary interference to nearby
systems.
If you are not familiar with these interference-control techniques, contact your GE MDS Sales Representative or the GE MDS Technical Support Department for more information.
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Mounting Dimensions for Radios
Figure 6-2 shows the dimensions of the AP transceiver with mounting
brackets attached. Figure 6-3 shows the same view for a Remote transceiver. When mounting entraNET transceivers, choose a location that
provides easy access to the connectors on the end of the radio and an
unobstructed view of the LED status indicators.
Invisible place holder
2.75″ (7 cm)
.
7.25″ (18.4 cm)
Figure 6-2. AP Mounting Bracket Spacing
2.75″ (7 cm)
Invisible place holder
6.69″ (16.99 cm)
Figure 6-3. Remote Mounting Brackets Spacing
NOTE: To prevent moisture from entering the radio, do not mount the
radio with the cable connectors pointing up. Also, dress all
cables to prevent moisture from running along the cables and
into the radio.
DIN Rail Mounting
Option
152
The radio is available with an optional 35 mm DIN Rail Mounting
Bracket (Part No. 03-4022A02). Equipment cabinets and racks of recent
design often employ this type of mounting. A transceiver with a DIN
bracket can be quickly installed or removed without tools. Figure 6-4 on
Page 153 shows how the DIN rail bracket attaches to the back of the
radio, and how the entire radio attaches to the mounting rail.
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
05-4055A01, Rev. D
Invisible place holder
Step 1: Attach the bracket using the
the two screws provided. (Attach to
the end opposite the connectors.)
Step 2: Snap the assembly onto the
DIN rail. To remove the radio,
pull down on the release tab.
Figure 6-4. DIN Rail Mounting Details for GE MDS Equipment
6.1.4 Antenna and Feedline Selection
Antennas
The equipment can be used with a number of antennas. The antenna type
used depends on the physical size and layout of a system. Contact your
GE MDS representative for specific recommendations on antenna types
and hardware sources.
In general, an omnidirectional antenna (Figure 6-5) is used at the AP station site. This provides equal coverage to all of the remote sites.
NOTE: Antenna polarization is important. The wrong polarization
causes a signal reduction of 20 dB or more. Most systems
using a gain-type omnidirectional antenna at the AP station
employ vertical polarization (elements oriented perpendicular
to the horizon) of the signal; therefore, the Remote antenna(s)
must also be vertically polarized.
Horizontally polarized omnidirectional antennas are also
available. Contact your GE MDS representative for details.
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Invisible place holder
High-gain Type
Unity-gain Type
Figure 6-5. Typical Omnidirectional Antennas
At remote sites, and for radios in point-to-point LANs, a directional
Yagi (Figure 6-6) antenna is generally recommended to minimize interference to and from other radio systems. Antennas are available from a
number of manufacturers.
Invisible place holder
Figure 6-6. Typical Yagi Antenna
(mounted to mast)
NOTE: It is essential that all antenna systems incorporate appropriate
lightning protection. Information on lightning protection and
grounding considerations can be obtained from the Polyphaser
Corporation (www.polyphaser.com). The firm’s Web site
offers free engineering notes, as well as information on lightning protection devices.
Feedlines
The choice of feedline used with the antenna should be carefully considered. Poor-quality coaxial cables should be avoided, as they degrade
both transmission and reception. The cable should be kept as short as
possible to minimize signal loss.
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For 900 MHz systems with cable runs of less than 20 ft./6m, an inexpensive cable type such as Type RG-8A/U may be acceptable. For longer
runs, or for 2400 MHz systems, we recommend using a low-loss cable
type such as Andrew Corp. HELIAX® cable.
The choice of cable depends on the required length, cost considerations,
and the amount of signal loss that can be tolerated. Table 6-1 lists several types of popular feedlines and indicates the signal losses (in dB) that
result when using various lengths of cable at 900 MHz. Table 6-2 shows
the same data for 2400 MHz systems.
Table 6-1. Length versus Loss in Coaxial Cables at 900 MHz
Cable Type
10 Feet
(3.05 m)
50 Feet
(15.24 m)
100 Feet
(30.48 m)
500 Feet
(152.4 m)
LMR-400
0.39 dB
1.95 dB
3.90 dB
Unacceptable
Loss
1/2 inch HELIAX
0.23 dB
1.15 dB
2.29 dB
11.45 dB
7/8 inch HELIAX
0.13 dB
0.64 dB
1.28 dB
6.40 dB
1-1/4 inch HELIAX
0.10 dB
0.48 dB
0.95 dB
4.75 dB
1-5/8 inch HELIAX
0.08 dB
0.40 dB
0.80 dB
4.00 dB
.
Table 6-2. Length versus Loss in Coaxial Cables at 2400 MHz
Cable Type
10 Feet
(3.05 m)
50 Feet
(15.24 m)
100 Feet
(30.48 m)
500 Feet
(152.4 m)
LMR-400
0.70 dB
3.50 dB
6.61 dB
Unacceptable
Loss
1/2 inch HELIAX
0.35 dB
1.73 dB
3.46 dB
17.3 dB
7/8 inch HELIAX
0.20 dB
0.99 dB
1.97 dB
9.85 dB
1-1/4 inch HELIAX
0.15 dB
0.73 dB
1.45 dB
7.50 dB
1-5/8 inch HELIAX
0.13 dB
0.63 dB
1.25 dB
6.25 dB
Maintaining Compliance at 900 MHz
(U.S.A. and Canada Only)
Table 6-3 outlines the minimum lengths of RG-214 coaxial cable that
must be used with common GE MDS omnidirectional antennas to
maintain compliance with the FCC and IC maximum limit of
+36 dBm for license-free 900 MHz systems.
Table 6-3. Minimum Feedline Length versus Antenna Gain
(RG-214 coaxial cable)
05-4055A01, Rev. D
Antenna Gain
(dBd)
Antenna Gain
(dBi)
Minimum Feedline
Length (Loss in dB)
Power Level
at Minimum Length
Unity (0 dB)
2.15 dBi
3 meters (1.0 dB)
+31.15 dBi
3 dBd
5.15 dBi
3 meters (1.0 dB)
+34.15 dBi
5 dBd
7.15 dBi
3.1 meters (1.2 dB)
+35.95 dBi
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155
6.2
HOW MUCH OUTPUT POWER CAN
BE USED?
(U.S.A. and Canada, 900 MHz systems)
900 MHz transceivers are normally supplied from the factory set for +30
dBm (1 Watt) RF power output; this is the maximum transmitter output
power allowed under FCC and Industry Canada rules. The power must
be decreased from this level if the antenna system gain exceeds 6 dBi.
The allowable level is dependent on the antenna gain, feedline loss, and
the transmitter output power setting.
NOTE: In regions where ETSI standards apply, the maximum allowable RF output is generally limited to 100 mW (+20 dBm) on
2400 MHz. License-free operation on 900 MHz is not
permitted. For more information, see HOW MUCH OUTPUT
POWER CAN BE USED? (ETSI 2400 MHz systems) on
Page 158.
6.2.1 Calculating System Gain
To determine the maximum allowable power setting of the radio, perform the following steps:
1. Determine the antenna system gain by subtracting the feedline loss
(in dB) from the antenna gain (in dBi). For example, if the antenna
gain is 10 dBi, and the feedline loss is 2 dB, the antenna system gain
is 8 dB.
2. Subtract the antenna system gain from 36 dBm (the maximum
allowable EIRP). The result indicates the maximum transmitter
power (in dBm) allowed under the rules. In the example above, this
is 28 dBm.
3. If the maximum transmitter power allowed is less than 30 dBm,
reduce the transmit power accordingly using the radio menu system
(Main Menu>Radio Configuration>RF Output Power Setpoint), or introduce
additional feedline loss. The EIRP of the antenna system should
never exceed 36 dBi.
For convenience, Table 6-4 lists several antenna system gains and
shows the maximum allowable power setting of the radio. Note that a
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gain of 6 dB or less entitles you to operate the radio at full power output
30 dBm (1 Watt).
Table 6-4. Antenna System Gain versus Power Output Setting
(U.S.A. and Canada only)
Antenna System Gain
Maximum Power
Setting
EIRP
(in dBm)
(in dBm)
6 (or less)
30
36
8
28
36
10
26
36
12
24
36
14
22
36
16
20
36
(Antenna Gain in dBi*
minus Feedline Loss in dB†)
* Most antenna manufacturers rate antenna gain in dBd in their literature. To convert to dBi, add 2.15 dB.
† Feedline loss varies by cable type and length. To determine the loss
for common lengths of feedline, see Table 6-1 on Page 155.
To convert dBm to Watts, refer to the chart shown on Page 193.
6.3
HOW MUCH OUTPUT POWER CAN
BE USED?
(U.S.A. and Canada, 2400 MHz systems)
Non-ETSI 2400 MHz transceivers are normally supplied from the factory set for +27 dBm (0.5 Watt) RF power output; this is the maximum
transmitter output power allowed under FCC and Industry Canada rules.
The power must be decreased from this level if the antenna system gain
exceeds 0 dBi. The allowable level depends on the antenna gain, feedline loss, and the transmitter output power setting.
NOTE: In regions where ETSI requirements apply, the maximum
allowable RF output is generally limited to 100 mW (+20
dBm) on 2400 MHz. License-free operation on 900 MHz is not
permitted. For more information, see HOW MUCH OUTPUT
POWER CAN BE USED? (ETSI 2400 MHz systems) on
Page 158.
6.3.1 Calculating System Gain
To determine the maximum allowable power setting of the radio, perform the following steps:
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1. Determine the antenna system gain by subtracting the feedline loss
(in dB) from the antenna gain (in dBi). For example, if the antenna
gain is 10 dBi, and the feedline loss is 2 dB, the antenna system gain
is 8 dB.
2. Subtract the antenna system gain from 27 dBm (the maximum
allowable EIRP). The result indicates the maximum transmitter
power (in dBm) allowed under the rules. In the example above, this
is 19 dBm.
3. If the maximum transmitter power allowed is less than 27 dBm,
reduce the transmit power accordingly using the radio menu system
(Main Menu>Radio Configuration>RF Output Power Setpoint), or introduce
additional feedline loss. The EIRP of the antenna system should
never exceed 27 dBi.
For convenience, Table 6-5 lists several antenna system gains and
shows the maximum allowable power setting. Note that a gain of 0 dB
entitles you to operate the radio at full power output 27 dBm (0.5 Watt).
To convert dBm to Watts, refer to Table 8-4 on Page 193.
Table 6-5. Antenna System Gain versus Power Output Setting
(U.S.A. and Canada only)
Antenna System Gain
Maximum Power
Setting
EIRP
(in dBm)
(in dBm)
0
27
27
5
22
27
7
20
27
9
18
27
12
15
27
15
12
27
(Antenna Gain in dBi*
minus Feedline Loss in dB†)
* Most antenna manufacturers rate antenna gain in dBd in their literature. To convert to dBi, add 2.15 dB.
† Feedline loss varies by cable type and length. To determine the loss
for common lengths of feedline, see Table 6-1 on Page 155.
6.4
HOW MUCH OUTPUT POWER CAN
BE USED? (ETSI 2400 MHz
systems)
In regions where ETSI requirements apply, 2400 MHz transceivers are
supplied from the factory with a +20 dBm (100 mW) RF power setting;
this is the maximum EIRP transmitter output power allowed under ETSI
standards. The power must be decreased from this level if the antenna
system gain exceeds 0 dBi. The allowable level is dependent on the
antenna gain, feedline loss, and the transmitter output power setting.
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NOTE: Some EU countries mandate lower power outputs and
frequency limitations from those referenced here. For
example, in France, the transceiver may only be operated in
band C (2.4528-2.4782 GHz) at a power level of 10 dBm. Be
sure to check the requirements for your region before placing
the transmitter on the air.
6.4.1 Calculating System Gain
To determine the maximum allowable power setting of the radio, perform the following steps:
1. Determine the antenna system gain by subtracting the feedline loss
(in dB) from the antenna gain (in dBi). For example, if the antenna
gain is 10 dBi, and the feedline loss is 2 dB, the antenna system gain
is 8 dB.
2. Subtract the antenna system gain from 20 dBm (the maximum
allowable EIRP). The result indicates the maximum transmitter
power (in dBm) allowed under the rules. In the example above, this
is 12 dBm.
3. If the maximum transmitter power allowed is less than 20 dBm,
reduce the transmit power accordingly using the radio menu system
(Main Menu>Radio Configuration>RF Output Power Setpoint), or introduce
additional feedline loss. The EIRP of the antenna system should
never exceed 20 dBi.
For convenience, Table 6-6 lists several antenna system gains and
shows the maximum allowable power setting of the radio. Note that a
gain of 0 dB or less entitles you to operate the radio at full power output
+20 dBm (100 mW). To convert dBm to Watts, refer to Table 8-4 on
Page 193.
Table 6-6. Antenna System Gain versus Power Output Setting
(for ETSI compliance)
Antenna System Gain
Maximum Power
Setting
EIRP
(in dBm)
(in dBi)
0 (or less)
20
20
3
17
20
6
14
20
9
11
20
10
10
20
(Antenna Gain in dBi*
minus Feedline Loss in dB†)
* Most antenna manufacturers rate antenna gain in dBd in their literature. To convert to dBi, add 2.15 dB.
† Feedline loss varies by cable type and length. To determine the loss
for common lengths of feedline, see Table 6-2 on Page 155.
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6.5
OPTIMIZING PERFORMANCE
After the basic operation of the radio has been established, you may
wish to optimize network performance using some of the suggestions in
this section. The effectiveness of these techniques vary with the design
of your system and the format of the data being sent.
There are two major areas for possible improvement—the radio and the
data network. The following sections provide you with a variety of items
to check and on many occasions, ways to correct or improve
their performance.
6.5.1 Principles of Wireless Network Operation
The following points are of value in dealing with the networking aspects
of the transceiver.
1. The AP serves as a network bridge
• The transceiver goes through a “listening and learning” period
at start-up before it sends any packets over either of its ports.
This lasts about 10 seconds after the CPU operating system finishes its startup cycle.
• The bridge code in the transceiver operates and makes decisions
about packet forwarding just like any other bridge. The bridge
code builds a list of source MAC addresses that it has seen on
each of its ports. There are a few general rules that are followed
when a packet is received on any port:
• If the destination address is a multicast or broadcast address,
forward the packet to all other ports.
• If the destination address is not known, forward the packet to
all other ports.
• If the destination address is known, forward the packet to the
port that the destination is known to be on (usually the RF
port).
• The bridge code uses Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) to prevent
loops from being created when connecting bridges in parallel.
For example, connecting two Remotes to the same wired LAN
could create a loop if STP was not used. Every bridge running
STP sends out Bridge Protocol Data Units (BPDUs) at regular
intervals so that the spanning tree can be built and maintained.
BPDUs are 60-byte multicast Ethernet frames.
2. Throughput calculations must take into account all overhead.
• Throughput over the air is affected by several factors, including:
how compressible the data is, how efficiently the over-the-air
bandwidth is used (which varies by packet size and dwell time),
and the quality of the link.
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• The number of bytes they can fit into a hop, depending on hop
time, is:
Table 6-1. Number of bytes per hop
Hop time
(MS)
FEC
Bytes/hop
7
45
7
FEC
14
11
139
14
FEC
59
FEC
151
28
324
28
Included in the byte count is 9 bytes of overhead per packet. So,
at 7MS without FEC, a 1000 byte packet requires 1009 bytes
split into 45 bytes/hop, or 23 hops. 1026 bytes of data also
requires 23 hops; however, a 1027-byte data packet requires 24
hops.
• If any transceiver in your network is connected to a large LAN,
such as may be found in a large office complex, there may be
undesired multicast or broadcast traffic over the air.
3. Station-to-Station Traffic
• When sending frames from one remote endpoint to another
remote endpoint via an AP transceiver (see Figure 6-7),
throughput is halved at best. This is because all frames must go
through the AP. Therefore, in the previous 100 byte UDP example, the number of over-the-air bytes is 380 bytes (190 bytes
times 2) if the frame has to go station to station.
Invisible place holder
192.168.0.10
Access Point
LINK
PWR
1
COM
192.168.0.1
2
COM
LAN
Terminal
or Computer
192.168
Remote
192.168.0.50
R
PW
1
COM
ETH
LINK
R
PW
1
COM
ETH
LINK
RTU
Remote
RTU
Message Destin
Message Source
Figure 6-7. Endpoint-to-Endpoint Communication via an AP
4. Interference has a direct correlation to throughput.
• Interference could be caused by any unnecessary traffic on the
network from unrelated activities, or radio interference.
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6.5.2 Aiming Directive Antennas for Maximum RSSI
The wireless network integrity depends, in a large part, on stable radio
signal levels being received at each end of a data link. In general, signal
levels stronger than –90 dBm provides the basis for reliable communication that includes a 15 dB fade margin. As the distance between the
AP and Remotes increases, the influence of terrain, foliage, and
man-made obstructions become more influential, and the use of directional antennas at remote locations becomes necessary. Directional
antennas usually require some fine-tuning of their bearing to optimize
the received signal strength. The transceiver has a built-in received
signal strength indicator (RSSI) that can be used to tell you when the
antenna is in a position that provides the optimum received signal.
RSSI measurements and Wireless Packet Statistics are based on multiple samples over a period of several seconds. The average of these
measurements is displayed by the entraNET MS.
The measurement and antenna alignment process usually takes 10 or
more minutes at each transceiver.
The path to the Management System Menu item is shown in bold text
below each step of the procedure.
Procedure
1. Verify that the Remote is associated with an AP radio. Observe the
condition of the LINK LED.
LINK LED = on or blinking
This indicates that you have an adequate signal level for the
measurements, and it is safe to proceed.
2. View and record the Radio Retries and No Ack counts on the Radio
Packet Statistics Screen (Figure 3-45 on Page 81). This information
will be used later.
3. Clear the Radio Statistics history.
4. Read the RSSI level at the Remote (RADIO RSSI=).
5. Optimize the RSSI by slowly adjusting the direction of the antenna
and watching for a peak in received signal strength. Get the RSSI
indication several times after making each adjustment, so that the
RSSI accurately reflects any change in the link signal strength. The
higher the indication (less negative), the stronger the signal level
(that is, –60 is better than –70).
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6. View the Radio Retries and No Ack counts at the point of maximum
RSSI level. They should be the same or lower than the previous
reading.
(Main Menu > Performance Information > Packet Statistics > Wireless Packet
Statistics)
If the RSSI peak results in an increase in the Radio Retries and No Ack
counts, the antenna may be aimed at an undesired signal source. Try
a different antenna orientation.
6.5.3 Tips for Improving Data Throughput
Some suggestions are offered below for maximizing the throughput of
the radio system. It is important to realize that an exact formula for every
radio system cannot be given. Much depends on the number of radios
contained in the radio system, the size of data strings being sent, the type
of data being sent, zone quality (interference potential) and data speed.
You should find several items here, however, that can be applied to your
radio system.
To Maximize Throughput of Data and Reduce Latency Time
• (AP only) Increment the Hop Time to the maximum of 28 msec.
This lowers the overhead, since it stays longer on a channel. The
drawback is that if a particular channel becomes blocked, it will
take longer to hop to another channel.
(Main Menu>Radio Configuration>hop Time)
• Match the buffer sizes and hop times to accommodate the
majority of message sizes. For example, a 7 msec hop time is
best suited to short data bursts, such as in telemetry applications.
A 28 msec hop time is better suited to large data strings, such as
sending Web pages over the radio link.
The following table offers suggested settings for four different message
sizes.
Table 6-7. Hop Time Setting versus Message Size
Hop Time
(msec)
FEC Status*
Bytes per
Packet
28
OFF
325
ON
151
OFF
139
ON
59
OFF
45
ON
11
14
7
* FEC ON is generally not recommended if optimal
throughput is desired. The transceiver Repeat-Retry
function is a more efficient means of ensuring message
delivery.
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NOTE: Reprogramming does not work over the air when the settings
Hop Time=7, FEC=On and Encryption=On are used at the AP.
To Maximize Overall Data Performance
• Change the Buffer Size for serial ports to the maximum of 1500.
Longer packets are sent over the air, reducing overhead. On the
down side, if a packet is corrupted, it takes longer to
be retransmitted.
• Use the Packet Statistics Menu to check Packets Received by
Zone.
Counts should be evenly distributed across all zones. Block the
zones at the AP that have poor performance. (Main Menu > Radio
Configuration > Skip Zone Option)
• Use the Packet Statistics Menu to check for errors, retries and
dropped packets. Do the same with Ethernet traffic.
Note that with weak signals, interference, or hidden nodes, the
optimal performance may be lower due to collisions and retries.
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7
TROUBLESHOOTING
AND RADIO TESTS
7 Chapter Counter Reset Paragraph
7.1 TROUBLESHOOTING
167
7.1.1 Interpreting the Front Panel LEDs .............................................167
7.1.2 Troubleshooting Using the Embedded Management System ...168
Serial Port and Remote Serial Statistics Menu ...............................171
Diagnostic Tools .............................................................................171
7.1.3 Using Logged Operation Events ...............................................172
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7.1
TROUBLESHOOTING
Successful troubleshooting of a wireless system is not difficult, but
requires a logical approach. It is best to begin troubleshooting at the AP
radio, as the rest of the system depends on the AP for synchronization
data. If the AP has problems, the operation of the entire wireless network is affected.
When communication problems are found, it is good practice to begin
by checking the simple things. Applying basic troubleshooting techniques in a logical progression can identify many problems.
Multiple
Communication
Layers
It is important to remember the operation of the network is built upon a
radio communications link. On top of that are two data levels—wireless
MAC, and the data layer. The wireless aspect of the AP and the Remotes
radios to be connected must operating properly so data-layer traffic can
function.
Radio Configuration
There are over 50 parameters in the entraNET MS. With so many settings, a parameter may be incorrectly set, and then what was changed is
forgotten.
To help you avoid these problems, we recommend creating an archive
of the transceiver profile when your installation is complete in a Configuration File. This file can be reloaded into the transceiver to restore the
radio to the factory defaults or to known working settings. For details on
creating and archiving Configuration Files, see “ PING Utility Menu”
on Page 90.
GE MDS Assistance
If problems cannot be resolved using the guidance provided here, review
the GE MDS Web site’s technical support area for recent software or
firmware updates, general troubleshooting help, and service information. Additional help is available through the GE MDS Technical Support Department. (See TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE on the inside of the
rear cover.)
7.1.1 Interpreting the Front Panel LEDs
An important set of troubleshooting tools are the LED status indicators
on the front panel of the transceiver. They should be checked whenever
a problem is suspected. Table 2-2 on Page 26 describes the function of
each status LED. Table 7-1 below provides suggestions for resolving
common system difficulties using the LEDs, and Table 7-3 provides
other simple techniques.
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Table 7-1. Symptom-Based Troubleshooting Using LEDs
Symptom
Possible Cause and Resolution
PWR LED does not
turn on.
a. The voltage is too low, or is the wrong polarity. Check for
the proper supply voltage at the power connector (6–30
Vdc). See Figure 2-4 on Page 20 for polarity details.
b. This is a transient condition. Cycle the power and wait
about 30 seconds for the radio to restart. Recheck for
normal operation.
LINK LED does not
turn on.
a. The Remote network address does not match the desired
AP. Verify that the system has a unique network address.
b. The Remote is not yet associated with a transceiver having
the same network address. Use the RADIO command to
check the status of the process of associating the radio
with the AP.
c. Poor antenna system. Check the antenna, feedline, and
connectors. Reflected power should be less than 10% of
the forward power reading (SWR 2:1 or lower). Also, check
for the proper heading of the directional antennas as
described in Aiming Directive Antennas for Maximum RSSI
on Page 162.
PWR LED is
blinking.
The radio is reporting an alarm condition. View the current
alarms and the Event Log. Correct the problem if possible
(see “Using Logged Operation Events” on Page 172).
Blinking continues until the source of the alarm is corrected
(for example, a valid IP address is entered, etc.).
LAN/ETH LED
does not turn on.
a. Verify that the Ethernet cable is connected at both ends.
COM1 or COM2
LED does not show
traffic.
Check the configuration of COM port and the remote serial
gateway settings.
b. Verify that the proper type of Ethernet cable
(straight-through or crossover) is used. See Table 7-2
below for the proper cable type.
Table 7-2 shows the proper type of Ethernet cable to use with the radio
when connecting to external devices.
Table 7-2. Proper Ethernet Cable Type
Radio Type
Connected Device
Cable Type Required
AP
Hub or network switch
Straight-through
AP
PC
Crossover
Remote
PC
Straight-through
Remote
Hub or network switch
Select for the external
device port
7.1.2 Troubleshooting Using the Embedded
Management System
If following the suggestions in Table 7-1 does not resolve the problem,
there are some additional tools and techniques that can be used. The
Embedded Management System is a good source of information that
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may be used remotely to provide preliminary diagnostic information, or
may even provide a path to correcting the problem.
Table 7-3. Troubleshooting with the Embedded
Management System
Symptom
Possible Cause and Resolution
Remote does not
associate
a. Verify that the AP has a sufficiently large number in the
“Max Remotes” parameter of the Network Configuration
Menu.
b. If “Approved Remotes” is enabled on the Security
Configuration Menu (at the AP), verify that the correct
serial number is listed in the Approved Remotes List.
c. On the Remote, if “Restrict” is turned on in the APLIST
command, verify that the AP is included in the list of
Approved APs.
d. Check for the proper heading of directional antennas as
described in Aiming Directive Antennas for Maximum
RSSI on Page 162.
e. The encryption mode is not set correctly in all radios of the
network.
f. If this occurs after upgrading firmware, disable encryption,
then re-enter the encryption phrase using eight to 41
characters in all radio devices. Finally, re-enable
encryption.
Cannot access the
entraNET AP Menu
(through COM1)
a. Check for secure cable connections. The serial data cable
should be as short as possible, never exceeding 50
ft./15m.
b. If the radio is an AP, connect using a Telnet session or a
Web browser.
c. Disable the serial mode for COM1
(Serial Gateway Configuration>COM1 Serial Data
Port>Status>Disabled)
Or, if you know the radio data configuration, follow the
numbered steps below:
1. Connect to COM1 via a terminal set to VT100 and
the port data baud rate.
2. Enter + + + ENTER
3. Change the terminal baud rate to match the transceiver console baud rate.
4. Enter + + + ENTER
Cannot access the
Remote command
interface
a. Check for secure cable connections. Serial data cable
should be as short as possible, never exceeding 50 feet
(15 meters).
b. Connect to the AP menu and manage the Remote via the
Serial Configuration menu. Check the configuration for
COM1 or COM2, as applicable.
Display on terminal
or Telnet screen is
garbled
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a. Verify that the terminal or terminal emulator or Telnet
application is set to VT100. Restart the terminal program.
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Table 7-3. Troubleshooting with the Embedded
Management System (Continued)
Symptom
Possible Cause and Resolution
Cannot pass IP
data to the WAN.
a. Verify the AP IP settings.
b. Use the PING command to test communication with the AP
and endpoints connected to Remote radios in the local
radio system.
c. If successful with the local PING, attempt to PING an IP
radio attached to a radio.
d. If successful with the LAN PINGs, try connecting to a
known radio in the WAN.
Wireless retry
count is too high
There may be Radio Frequency Interference (RFI).
a. If omnidirectional antennas are used, consider changing to
directional antennas. This often limits interference to and
from other stations.
b. Try skipping some zones where persistent interference is
suspected, or packets per zone are disparate.
c. The installation of a filter in the antenna feedline may be
necessary. Consult GE MDS for further assistance.
Password
forgotten.
a. Connect to the transceiver using a terminal through the
COM1 port.
b. Call GE MDS. Get a password-resetting Authorization Key.
c. Enter the Authorization Key at the login prompt as a
password.
The following is a summary of how several screens in the entraNET MS
can be used as diagnostic tools. For information on how to connect to
the entraNET MS, see “STEP 3—CONFIGURE THE AP” on Page 21.
Ethernet Packet Statistics Menu
(See Figure 3-44 on Page 80 for detailed information)
This screen provides detailed information on data exchanges between
the radio being viewed and the network through the network layer.
These include:
Wireless Packet Statistics
• Packets received
• Packets dropped
• Packets sent
• Receive errors
• Bytes received
• Retries
• Bytes sent
• Retry errors
Ethernet Packet Statistics
• Packets received
• Packets dropped
• Packets sent
• Receive errors
• Bytes received
• Retries
• Bytes sent
• Retry errors
• Lost carrier detected
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The most significant fields are Retries, Retry Errors, Receive Errors, and
Lost Carrier Detected. If the data values are more than 10% of their sent
and received counterparts, or the Lost Carrier Detected value is greater
than a few dozen, there may be trouble with interference, or a loss of the
Ethernet signal. Note that this does not refer to the over-the-air (RF) carrier, but only to the Ethernet carrier.
When troubleshooting throughput quality issues, a check should also be
made of the Radio Packet Statistics Screen shown in Figure 3-45 on
Page 81. This menu provides a review of packet statistics from a radio
link (RF) perspective.
It is also helpful to check the RSSI of incoming signals. If the RSSI
levels in each zone are within a few decibels (dB) of each other, but less
than –90 dBm, then check the aiming of the antenna system.
See “Aiming Directive Antennas for Maximum RSSI” on Page 162 for
details.
NOTE: The average signal level should be –95 dBm or stronger for
reliable performance with an allowance for fade margin.
Another place to look for trouble is in Packets Received by Zone. The
packets should be evenly distributed across all zones (1-5% variation).
If they are not, interference in the disparate zones should be suspected.
Blocking these zones may eliminate or reduce harmful interference.
See “Skip Zones Menu” on Page 53 for more information.
When dealing with radio interference troubles, be sure to review A Word
About Radio Interference on Page 150.
Serial Port and Remote Serial Statistics Menu
(See Figure 3-43 on Page 79 for detailed information)
This screen provides top-level information on data exchanges between
the radio serial ports and the network through the wireless and the
Ethernet (data) layers. These include:
• Bytes In On Port xxx
• Bytes In On Socket xxx
• Bytes Out On Port xxx
• Bytes Out On Socket xxx
You can use this information as an indicator of port activity at the data
and IP levels.
Diagnostic Tools
(See MAINTENANCE AND TOOLS on Page 85)
The AP Maintenance Menu contains a tool that is especially useful to
network technicians—the PING utility. The PING utility can be used to
verify reachability of Ethernet devices connected to the network.
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7.1.3 Using Logged Operation Events
(See Event Log Menu on Page 82)
The transceiver microprocessor monitors many operational parameters
and logs them as various classes of “events.” If the event is one that
affects performance, it is an “alarmed” event. There are also normal or
routine events such as those marking the restarting of the system, implementation of parameter changes, and external access to the entraNET
MS. Informational events are stored in temporary (RAM) memory that
is lost in the absence of primary power, and alarms are stored in permanent memory (flash memory) until cleared by your request. Table 3-3
summarizes these classifications.
Table 7-4. Event Classifications
Level
Description or Impact
Storage
Informational
Normal operating activities
Flash
Memory
Minor
Does not affect radio operation
RAM
Major
Degraded radio performance but
still capable of operation
RAM
Critical
Prevents the radio from
operating
RAM
These events are stored in the transceiver Event Log, and can be a valuable aid in troubleshooting radio problems or detecting attempts to
breach network security.
Table 7-5 lists all of the transceiver event codes and provides a brief
description of their meaning.
Table 7-5. GE MDS entraNET Event Codes
Index
172
Event Type
Event Name
String
Clear String
Set String
0
EVENT_IPADDR
IP Address
Valid
Invalid
1
EVENT_IPMASK
IP Mask
Valid
Invalid
2
EVENT_MACADDR
MAC Address
Valid
Invalid
3
EVENT_SYSTEM_ERROR
System Error
Cleared
Please
Reboot
4
EVENT_BRIDGE
Network
Interface
OK
Error
5
EVENT_FREQ_CAL
Frequency
Calibrated
Not
Calibrated
6
EVENT_POWER_CAL
Power
Calibrated
Not
Calibrated
7
EVENT_FLASH_TEST
Flash Test
Passed
Failed
8
EVENT_RSSI_CAL
RSSI
Calibrated
Not
Calibrated
9
EVENT_RAD_NO_NETWORK_
ADDRESS
Net Address
Programmed
Not
Programmed
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Table 7-5. GE MDS entraNET Event Codes
Index
05-4055A01, Rev. D
Event Type
Event Name
String
Clear String
Set String
10
EVENT_RAD_RX_TIMEOUT
RX Timeout
Cleared
Set
11
EVENT_RAD_NVMEM_FAULT
NV Memory
Fault
Cleared
Set
12
EVENT_RAD_NOT_CALIBRATED
TOR Not
Calibrated
Cleared
Set
13
EVENT_RAD_OUT_OF_LOCK
TOR
Synthesizer
Locked
Out of Lock
14
EVENT_RAD_AUTHORIZATION_
FAULT
Authorization
Fault
Cleared
Set
15
EVENT_RAD_HARDWARE_
MISMATCH
TOR Hardware
OK
Mismatched
16
EVENT_RAD_TOR_FIRMWARE_
STATE
TOR Firmware
OK
Not
Programmed
17
EVENT_RADIO_PARM_NOT_SET
TOR Parm not
set
Cleared
Set
18
EVENT_SPARE18
Spare 18
Cleared
Set
19
EVENT_SPARE19
Spare 19
Cleared
Set
20
EVENT_SPARE20
Spare 20
Cleared
Set
21
EVENT_SPARE21
Spare 21
Cleared
Set
22
EVENT_SPARE22
Spare 22
Cleared
Set
23
EVENT_SPARE23
Spare 23
Cleared
Set
24
EVENT_SPARE24
Spare 24
Cleared
Set
25
EVENT_SPARE25
Spare 25
Cleared
Set
26
EVENT_SPARE26
Spare 26
Cleared
Set
27
EVENT_SPARE27
Spare 27
Cleared
Set
28
EVENT_SPARE28
Spare 28
Cleared
Set
29
EVENT_SPARE29
Spare 29
Cleared
Set
30
EVENT_SPARE30
Spare 30
Cleared
Set
31
EVENT_SPARE31
Spare 31
Cleared
Set
33
EVENT_BOOTUP
System Bootup
--
--
34
EVENT_REBOOT
User Selected
Reboot
--
--
35
EVENT_REPROG_STARTED
Reprogramming
--
Started
36
EVENT_REPROG_COMPLETE
Reprogramming
--
Complete
37
EVENT_REPROG_FAILED
Reprogramming
--
Failed
38
EVENT_TELNET_LOGIN
Telnet User
Logged Out
Logged In
39
EVENT_HTTP_LOGIN
HTTP User
Logged Out
Logged In
40
EVENT_LOG_CLEAR
Event Log
Cleared
--
--
41
EVENT_REMOTE_CONN
Remote
Disassociated
Associated
42
EVENT_DHCP_SERVER
DHCP Server
Enabled
Disabled
43
EVENT_DHCP_CLIENT
DHCP Client
Enabled
Disabled
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Table 7-5. GE MDS entraNET Event Codes
Index
174
Event Type
Event Name
String
Clear String
Set String
44
EVENT_DHCP_ADDRESS
Obtained DHCP
Address
--
--
45
EVENT_TIME_NOT_SET
Date or time Not
Set
--
--
46
EVENT_TIME_BY_USER
Date or time
Changed by
User
--
--
47
EVENT_TIME_FROM_SERVER
Date or time
from Server
--
--
48
EVENT_CONSOLE_LOGIN
Console User
Logged Out
Logged In
49
EVENT_CONSOLE_LOCKDOWN
Console Access
--
Locked for 5
minutes
50
EVENT_TELNET_LOCKDOWN
Telnet Access
--
Locked for 5
minutes
51
EVENT_HTTP_LOCKDOWN
HTTP Access
--
Locked for 5
minutes
52
EVENT_PARM_CHANGED
Parameter
Changed
--
--
53
EVENT_CFGSCRIPT
Configuration
Script
Generated
Received
54
EVENT_AUTH_KEY
Auth Key
Entered
Valid
- Invalid
55
EVENT_AUTH_DEMO
Demo
Authorization
Enabled
Expired
56
EVENT_MAX_DEMOS
Max Demos
Reset
Reached
57
EVENT_RAD_TEMPERATURE
TOR
Temperature
OK
Out of Range
58
EVENT_RAD_RX_SIGNAL
RX Signal
Strength
OK
LOW
59
EVENT_RAD_RF_PWR_OUTPUT
RF Output
Power
OK
Out of Range
60
EVENT_RAD_PWR_DC_IN
TOR DC Input
OK
Out of Range
61
EVENT_RAD_DATA_FRAMING
LCP Data
Framing
Cleared
Error
62
EVENT_RAD_DATA_PARITY
LCP Data Parity
Cleared
Error
63
EVENT_RAD_NO_UNIT_ADDR
TOR Unit
Address
OK
Not
Programmed
64
EVENT_IAPP_PEER
IAPP Peer
Removed
Added
65
EVENT_INTERNAL_ERROR
Internal Error
--
--
66
EVENT_IAPP_UNIT_UPDATE
IAPP Unit
Update
Received
Sent
67
EVENT_SHRD_KEY_CHAL
Shared Key
Challenge
Passed
Failed
68
EVENT_REDUND_LACK_
REMOTES
Redundant
Lack of
Remotes
Switchover
Switchover
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
05-4055A01, Rev. D
Table 7-5. GE MDS entraNET Event Codes
Index
05-4055A01, Rev. D
Event Type
Event Name
String
Clear String
Set String
69
EVENT_REDUND_RECV_ERR
Redundant
Packet Receive
Switchover
Switchover
70
EVENT_REDUND_FORCED
Forced
Redundant
Switchover
Switchover
71
EVENT_ICOPY_STARTED
Image Copy
--
Started
72
EVENT_ICOPY_COMPLETE
Image Copy
--
Complete
73
EVENT_ICOPY_FAILED
Image Copy
--
Failed
74
EVENT_ENDPOINT_ADDED
Endpoint
Removed
Added
75
EVENT_BROADCAST_REPROG
Broadcast
Reprogram
Complete
Started
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K
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M2
CO
M1
CO
N
LA
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8
TECHNICAL REFERENCE
8 Chapter Counter Reset Paragraph
8.1 UPGRADING AP FIRMWARE
179
8.2 USING CONFIGURATION SCRIPTS
181
Sample of an Exported Configuration File ......................................182
Editing Configuration Files..............................................................186
8.3 DATA INTERFACE CONNECTORS
187
8.3.1 LAN/ETH Port ...........................................................................187
8.3.2 COM1 Port ................................................................................188
8.3.3 COM2 Port ................................................................................189
05-4055A01, Rev. D
8.4 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
189
8.5 dBm-WATTS-VOLTS CONVERSION CHART
193
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8.1
UPGRADING AP FIRMWARE
GE MDS occasionally offers upgrades to the transceiver firmware. One
version of the firmware provides core software resources for all radio
models. Uploading new firmware into the radio does not alter any privileges provided by Authorization Keys, and does not require the transceiver to be taken offline until you want to operate the radio from the
new firmware image in the radio.
You must use the entraNET MS for all firmware activities, including
uploading from a TFTP server.
NOTE: To upgrade the Remote firmware, refer to UPGRADING
REMOTE FIRMWARE on Page 117.
The uploads can be initiated through any of the three entraNET MS
gateways:
• Terminal emulator—Connect a PC directly to the transceiver
COM1 port via a serial cable and use a terminal emulator program on the PC such as HyperTerminal.
• Telnet—Use a network connection for text-based access to the
Management System.
• Web browser—Connect a PC directly to the transceiver LAN
port or associated network and open a Web browser on the PC.
For information on downloading firmware code, please visit the GE
MDS Web site at www.GEmds.com/service/technical/support.
Upgrading the
Transceiver
Firmware
To install firmware using TFTP, you need:
• A PC with a TFTP server running. (You can download a TFTP
server from the GE MDS Web site at
www.GEmds.com/service/technical/support/
downloads.asp.)
• The IP address of the PC running the TFTP server.
If you do not know your computer IP address (Windows PC), select
Start>Run and enter winipcfg or ipconfig to determine this information. The
radio IP address can be found under the Network Configuration Menu.
(See “Network Configuration Menu” on Page 45.)
There are several options for connecting the transceiver and computer
control point to the firmware server. Figure 8-1 and Figure 8-2 show
two variations.With either method, it is essential that all of the equipment be on the same subnet.
05-4055A01, Rev. D
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179
Invisible place holder
LOCAL PC
WITH FIRMWARE FILES
TP R
TFRVE ET
E
S TELN
&
ACCESS POINT
CROSSOV
ER
C
NAL
1MOC
2MOC
ABL
E
RWP
NKIL
LAN
PORT
IP ADDRESS: 192.168.0.1
IP ADDRESS: 192.168.0.10
INITIATE UPLOAD
FROM HERE
Figure 8-1. Upgrade Configuration—Option 1
(TFTP Server and Firmware File on Same CPU)
Invisible place holder
REMOTE PC
W/FIRMWARE FILES
TFTP
SERVER
HUB/LAN/WAN/MAN
TCP/IP
ETHERNET
PORT
ACCESS POINT
IP ADDRESS: 192.168.0.1
IP ADDRESS: 192.168.0.10.0
LAN
PORT
NAL
1MOC
2MOC
RWP
NKIL
L
NA
MI AM
R
R
TE OG
PR
LOCAL PC
COM1, 2, ETC.
(DTE)
IN
9-P
W/
SERIAL CABLE
P. COM1
DA PORT
A
12
(DCE)
RJ-
INITIATE UPLOAD
FROM HERE
Figure 8-2. Upgrade Configuration—Option 2
(TFTP server and firmware file on remote server)
NOTE: Transferring the radio firmware image file, which is about 3
MB, may take several minutes, depending on traffic between
the TFTP server and the transceiver.
Regardless of your connection to the transceiver, loading firmware or configuration files into the flash RAM within the radio
is much slower than loading software onto a PC hard drive or
RAM.
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Upgrade Procedure
To upgrade the transceiver firmware file (filename.gpk), use the procedure below.
1. Launch a TFTP server on a PC connected either directly or via a
LAN to the transceiver Ethernet port (LAN). Configure the server to
allow downloads from the directory containing the firmware image
file.
2. Connect to the entraNET MS using a Web browser or Telnet session
via the LAN, or Terminal emulator via the COM1 port, whichever is
easier.
3. Go to the entraNET MS Reprogramming Menu.
(Main Menu>Maintenance Menu>Reprogramming Menu)
4. Fill in the information for the following:
•
TFTP Host Address—IP
Address of server (host computer) running TFTP server.
• Retrieve File—Name of file (filename.gpk) to be pulled from the
TFTP server holding the firmware file.
5. Pull the firmware file through the TFTP server into the entraNET
radio.
(Main Menu>Maintenance Menu>Reprogramming Menu>Retrieve File)
• Transfer status messages are displayed at the PC. You can cancel the transfer at any time by pressing CTRL C.
• If the transfer does not start, verify that the AP and the PC can
PING each other.
6. Restart the transceiver with the new firmware image to make it
active.
Main Menu>Maintenance Menu>Reprogramming Menu>Reboot Device
7. Test the transceiver for normal operation.
End of procedure.
8.2
USING CONFIGURATION SCRIPTS
Configuration scripts can be created and downloaded from the transceiver that contain a wealth of information on the radio. This file can
serve many purposes, not the least of which is to keep a copy of the radio
configuration at a point in time. These files can also be used to view the
setup of a radio without needing to connect to it. Examining archival
files can be a useful source of information during troubleshooting.
The next few sections describe the contents of this file, and explain how
to use it as a template for configuring multiple transceivers with the
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same profile. Ultimately, standardized files can be uploaded into the
transceiver to speed up the installation process.
Configuration files can also be uploaded into a transceiver to restore the
settings of a radio using a previously saved configuration of the radio.
This is particularly convenient after finishing a test using some experimental settings.
Sample of an Exported Configuration File
The following is a sample of a typical configuration file produced by a
transceiver that contains over 150 parameters, many of which are user
definable. The presentation has been slightly altered to allow notes to
appear below associated parameter lines. Some of the values used in the
calibration of the built-in test equipment have been deleted to reduce
space. This presentation is offered as a guide to the type of information
contained in the file. See “Editing Configuration Files” on Page 186
for further information.
NOTE: The parameter names and the data values from the Exported
Configuration File are shown in bold text. Any description is
found below in an indented paragraph. Descriptions for parameters that are functionally identical to both COM1 and COM2
are not repeated.
Beginning of Configuration File
; MDS entraNET
; Created 01-03-2003 6:59:41
IP Address: 192.168.1.1
The IPv4 address of this radio. This field is unnecessary if DHCP is
enabled.
Changing the IP value via the network causes a loss of communication with other devices unaware of the new address.
IP Netmask: 255.255.255.0
The IPv4 local subnet mask. This field is unnecessary if DHCP is
enabled.
IP Gateway: 0.0.0.0
The IPv4 address of the network gateway device, typically a router.
This field is unnecessary if DHCP is enabled.
Ethernet Address: 00:06:3D:00:00:5D
The physical Ethernet MAC address of the radio. This value is set
at the factory and cannot be changed.
Model Number: 900
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05-4055A01, Rev. D
The radio model number. This value is set at the factory and cannot
be changed.
Serial Number: 1026295
The radio serial number. This value is set at the factory and cannot
be changed.
Unit Name: Library Admin Office
A name for this radio. It appears at the top of every menu screen.
Owner: Hilltop College MIS
The name of the owner of this radio.
Contact: John Galt X232
The contact person for this radio.
Description: Link to Campus Server
A brief description of this radio.
Location: Hollister Bldg. RM450
The physical location of this radio.
Com2 Port Config: 8N1
The character size, parity type, and number of stop bits to be used.
Max Remotes Allowed: 50
The maximum number of Remotes allowed to connect to this AP.
Device Mode: Access Point
Configures the radio to act as a Remote or an AP. The Access Point
option is not allowed unless the radio is specifically ordered as
such, or an Authorization Key has been purchased to allow it.
Hop Time: 28
The amount of time that a radio spends at any given frequency. This
field is controlled by the AP. Remotes obtain the appropriate value
upon association with the AP.
Network Address: 100
The ID of the network that this radio belongs to. The radio only
communicates with devices having identical network addresses.
Date Format: Generic
Specifies the date format:
• Generic: dd Mmm yyyy
• European: dd-mm-yyyy
• U.S.A.: mm-dd-yyyy
Console Baud: 19200
The baud rate of the serial menu console. The default value is
19200 bps.
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Company Name: MDS
Version Name: 06-1234567
Product Name: entraNET
RF Output Power Setpoint: 30
The desired amount of RF output power, measured in dBm.
Active Boot Image: 0
Skipped Hop Zone1: Active
Skipped Hop Zone2: Skip
Skipped Hop Zone3: Active
Skipped Hop Zone4: Active
Skipped Hop Zone5: Active
Skipped Hop Zone6: Active
Skipped Hop Zone7: Active
Skipped Hop Zone8: Active
Skipped Hop Zone9: Active
Skipped Hop Zone10: Active
Firmware TFTP Host IP: 63.249.227.105
Address of the TFTP host from which firmware images
are downloaded.
Firmware TFTP Filename: entraNET-bkrto-3_0_0.gpk
Eventlog TFTP Host IP: 192.168.1.3
Address of the TFTP host to which to send the event log.
Eventlog TFTP Filename: eventlog.txt
Config Script TFTP Host IP: 192.168.1.33
Address of the TFTP host to which to send or receive the configuration script.
Config Script TFTP Filename: entraNET_config.txt
SNMP Read Community: public
Community string for read access using SNMPv1.
SNMP Write Community: private
Community string for write access using SNMPv1.
SNMP Trap Community: public
Community string sent with traps using SNMPv1.
SNMP Trap Manager #1: 0.0.0.0
The IP address of an SNMP manager to receive traps.
SNMP Trap Manager #2: 0.0.0.0
SNMP Trap Manager #3: 0.0.0.0
SNMP Trap Manager #4: 0.0.0.0
Auth trap enable: disabled
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Setting to enable SNMP authentication traps.
Trap Version: v1 Traps
The SNMP trap format.
Package 1 Version: 1.1.0
Indicates the version of firmware in Image 1.
Package 2 Version: 1.1.0
TFTP Timeout: 20
COM1 Serial Data Enable: disabled
Setting to enable the COM1 data mode.
COM1 Serial Data Mode: UDP
IP protocol for the COM1 data mode.
COM1 Serial Data Baud Rate: 9600
Baud rate for the COM1 data mode.
COM1 Serial Data Tx IP Address: 0.0.0.0
COM1 data
is sent to this IP address.
COM1 Serial Data Tx IP Port: 0
COM1 data
is sent to this IP port.
COM1 Serial Data Rx IP Port: 0
COM1 data
is received on this IP port.
COM2 Serial Data Enable: enabled
COM2 Serial Data Mode: UDP
COM2 Serial Data Baud Rate: 9600
COM2 Serial Data Tx IP Address: 169.254.10.2
COM2 Serial Data Tx IP Port: 0
COM2 Serial Data Rx IP Port: 0
COM1 Serial Data Rx IP Address: 0.0.0.0
COM1 data
is received on this IP address.
COM2 Serial Data Rx IP Address: 169.254.0.2
COM2 Serial Data Flow Control: disabled
Setting to enable hardware flow control (RTS/CTS) in COM2 data
mode.
SNTP Server IP: 0.0.0.0
The IPv4 address of NTP/SNTP time server.
COM1 Serial Data Delimiter Chars: 4
Minimum number of characters that constitute a gap in inter-packet
delay for COM1.
COM2 Serial Data Delimiter Chars: 4
COM1 Serial Data Buffer Size: 20
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GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
185
Number of output characters buffered in inter-packet delay for
COM1.
Com2 Serial Data Buffer Size: 20
RF Frequency Hopping Format: USA or CANADA
(read only) The frequency-hopping rules the radio is configured to
operate under.
SNMP Enable: disabled
Enable or disable the SNMP agent.
Approved Remotes List Enable: disabled
Enable or disable the Approved Remotes List.
Encryption Enable: disabled
Enable or disable over-the-air data encryption.
HTTP Enable: enabled
Enable or disable the HTTP interface.
Telnet Enable: enabled
Enable or disable the Telnet interface.
HTTP MD5 Authentication: disabled
Enable or disable MD5 digest authentication.
End of Configuration File
Editing Configuration Files
Once the AP radio operation is fine-tuned, use the Configuration
Scripts Menu on Page 87 to save a copy of the configuration on a PC.
The file can then be used as a source to generate modified copies
adjusted to match other devices. The configuration files can be modified
using a text editor or an automated process (not provided by GE MDS).
We recommend that you review and update the following parameters for
each individual radio. Other parameters may also be changed.
Table 8-1. Common User-Definable Parameters
Field
Comment
Range
IP Address
Unique for each individual radio
Any legal IP address
IP Gateway
May change for different groups or
locations
Any legal IP address
Unit Name
Should reflect a specific device.
Any 20-character
alphanumeric string
This information appears in
entraNET MS headings.
186
Location
Used only as reference for network
administration
Any 40-character
alphanumeric string
Radio Net(work)
Address
Used to identify different groups or
locations
1-20000
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
05-4055A01, Rev. D
Each resulting file should be saved with a different name. We recommend using directories and file names that reflect the location of the
radio to facilitate its identification.
• You may include only parameters you want to change.
• Change only the parameter values.
• Capitalization counts in some field parameters (for example,
System Mode)
• Comment fields
Editing Rules
a. Edit or delete anything on each line to the right of the
comment delimiter (the semicolon ; ).
b. Comments can be of any length, but must be on the same
line as the parameter, or on a new line that begins with a
semicolon character.
c. Comments after parameters included in files exported
from a transceiver do not need to be present in your customized files.
8.3
DATA INTERFACE CONNECTORS
Three types of data interface connectors are used on entraNET transceivers. The first, the LAN/ETH port (LAN on the AP, ETH on the remote),
is a metallized RJ-45 connector. The other two are standard modular
types—RJ-12 for the COM1 port, and RJ-45 for the COM2 port. This
section provides illustrations and pinout information for all of these data
connectors.
CAUTION
RADIO
INTERFERENCE
POTENTIAL
The transceiver meets U.S.A. FCC Part 15, Class A limits when used
with shielded data cables not exceeding 3 ft./0.9m.
8.3.1 LAN/ETH Port
This port is used to connect to an Ethernet network at an AP or to the
endpoint of a Remote.
• To connect a PC directly to the AP LAN port, an RJ-45 to RJ-45
crossover cable is required. At the Remote, a straight-through
cable is required.
• To connect the AP to a Ethernet hub or bridge, use a
straight-through cable.
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The connector uses standard Ethernet RJ-45 cables and wiring. The
pinout graphic and table below may be used to construct a custom cable,
if required.
12345678
Figure 8-3. LAN/ETH Port (RJ-45) Pinout
(viewed from the outside of the radio)
Pin
Functions
Ref.
1
Transmit Data (TX) Out
High
2
Transmit Data (TX) Out
Low
3
Receive Data (RX) In
High
4
Unused
--
5
Unused
--
6
Receive Data (RX) In
Low
7
Unused
--
8
Unused
--
8.3.2 COM1 Port
A PC may be connected to the Remote transceiver COM1 port (RJ-12)
for diagnostics and configuration. Pinout information for the COM1 port
is provided in Figure 8-4 and Table 8-2.
123456
Figure 8-4. COM1 Port (DCE)
(viewed from the outside of the radio)
Table 8-2. COM1 Port Pinout, RS-232 Interface
188
Pin
Functions
1
Unused
2
Unused
3
Unused
4
Receive Data (RXD)
Out
5
Transmit Data (TXD)
In
6
Ground
—
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
COM1 Port
(DCE)
05-4055A01, Rev. D
8.3.3 COM2 Port
A terminal device may be connected to the transceiver COM2 port
(RJ-45) for payload data connection. Pinout information for the COM2
port is provided in Figure 8-5 and Table 8-3.
12345678
Figure 8-5. COM2 Port (DCE)
(viewed from the outside of the radio)
Table 8-3. COM2 Port, EIA-232 Interface
8.4
Pin
Functions
COM2 Port
(DCE)
1
Unused
2
Data Carrier Detect (DCD)
Out
3
Data Terminal Ready (DTR)
In
4
Signal Ground (GND)
—
5
Receive Data (RXD)
Out
6
Transmit Data (TXD)
In
7
Clear-to-Send (CTS)
Out
8
Request-to-Send (RTS)
In
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Below are the technical specifications for entraNET 900 and 2400
models. Specifications that are unique to a particular model are identified by frequency range (900 MHz or 2400 MHz).
GENERAL
Data Rate:
106 kbps over the air
Frequency Band:
900 MHz models: 902–928 MHz ISM band
2400 MHz models: 2401.6-2477.8 MHz in the
following bands:
2401.6-2427.0 MHz (Band A)
2427.2-2452.6 MHz (Band B)
2452.8-2478.2 MHz (Band C)
Configurations:
Access Point, Remote
Spreading Mode:
Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS)
Frequency Channels:
Selectable; 64 to 128 in increments of 16
MTBF (Mean Time
Between Failures):
35 years (Telcordia Method 1, Case 3)
Startup Time:
05-4055A01, Rev. D
AP: about 30 seconds
Remote: about 1 second
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
189
Time Required for Remote
to Connect with AP:
typically less than 1 second
RADIO CHARACTERISTICS
System Gain:
2400 MHz: 131 dB
900 MHz: 136 dB
Carrier Power:
900 MHz: 20-30 dBm
2400 MHz: 20-27 dBm
2400 MHz ETSI: 10-20 dBm
Output Impedance:
50 Ohms
Occupied Bandwidth:
200 kHz
Modulation:
Two-level CPFSK (Continuous-Phase FSK)
Receiver Sensitivity:
2400 MHz: typically -104 dBm (1 x 10-6 BER)
900 MHz: typically -105 dBm (1 x 10-6 BER)
Frequency Hopping Range:
Eight user-definable 3.2 MHz-wide zones,
each containing 16 frequencies
Hop Pattern:
Based on network address
Frequency Stability:
30 ppm
TRANSMITTER:
Duty Cycle:
Continuous
Spurious:
–67 dBc
RECEIVER:
Type:
Double-conversion superheterodyne
Intermodulation:
59 dB minimum (EIA)
Desensitization:
70 dB
Spurious:
60 dB
PHYSICAL INTERFACE
Ethernet Port:
10BaseT, RJ-45, 10 Mbps
Serial Port:
RS-232/V.24, RJ-45, DCE
1,200-115,200 bps asynchronous
Antenna Connector:
TNC female
LED Indicators:
LAN (AP), ETH (Remote), COM1, COM2, PWR,
LINK
DATA CHARACTERISTICS
Protocols Supported:
• IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers) 802.3 (single device at Remote)
(Ethernet)
• IP or Ethernet (DHCP, ICMP (Internet Control
Message Protocol), UDP, TCP, ARP)
• Encapsulation over IP (tunneling) for serial async
multidrop protocols, including MODBUS, DNP.3,
Bisync, BSAP, DF1, TotalFlow, Poll Select
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TRANSCEIVER MANAGEMENT
Methods Supported (AP):
• HTTP (embedded Web server)—pending
• Telnet
• Local console via COM1 port
• SNMPv1/2/3. MIB II, Enterprise MIB—pending
• SYSLOG
• GE MDS NETview MSTM—pending
Methods Supported (Remote):
Local console via COM1 port
ENVIRONMENTAL
Temperature Range:
-40C to +70C (-33.8F to +158F)
Humidity:
95% at +40° C (104° F); non-condensing
Input Power:
6.0*–30 Vdc (13.8 Vdc nominal)
*Measured at the radio connector, not the source
Power Consumption:
7.05 Watts maximum at 1 Watt RF output
(See below for details by model and voltage)
Transmit:
900 MHz AP:
1175 mA at 6 Vdc
525 mA at 13.8 Vdc
270 mA at 30 Vdc
900 MHz Remote:
1025 mA at 6 Vdc
600 mA at 13.8 Vdc
240 mA at 30 Vdc
2400 MHz AP:
1091.7 mA at 6 Vdc
488.5 mA at 13.8 Vdc
253.3 mA at 30 Vdc
2400 MHz Remote:
941.7 mA at 6 Vdc
433.8 mA at 13.8 Vdc
223.3 mA at 30 Vdc
Receive:
900 MHz AP:
510 mA at 6 Vdc
220 mA at 13.8 Vdc
115 mA at 30 Vdc
900 MHz Remote:
260 mA at 6 Vdc
120 mA at 13.8 Vdc
65 mA at 30 Vdc
2400 MHz AP:
533.3 mA at 6 Vdc
230.1 mA at 13.8 Vdc
119.7 mA at 30 Vdc
2400 MHz Remote:
283.3 mA at 30 Vdc
130.1 mA at 13.8 Vdc
69.7 mA at 30 Vdc
Sleep (all remotes):
05-4055A01, Rev. D
130 mA at 6 Vdc
15 mA at 12 Vdc
8 mA at 30 Vdc
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
191
Shutdown (all remotes):
0.37 mA at 6 Vdc
0.55 mA at 12 Vdc
0.78 mA at 30 Vdc
MECHANICAL
Case:
Cast aluminum
Mounting Options:
Flat surface mount brackets, 35 mm DIN rail
Dimensions
(Excluding mtg. hardware):
AP: 3.15 H x 17.2 W x 11.2 D cm
(1.25 H x 6.75 W x 4.5 D in.)
Remote: 2.5 x 12.7 x 8.9 cm
(1 H x 5 W x 3.5 D in.)
Weight:
AP: 1.4 lb./635g
Remote: 1.04 lb./472g
AGENCY APPROVALS
• FCC Part 15.247
• Industry Canada RSS-210 and RSS-139
• ETSI
• CSA/US Class 1, Div. 2; Groups A, B, C and D
hazardous locations
• Contact GE MDS for information on availability
and governmental approvals in other countries
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8.5
dBm-WATTS-VOLTS CONVERSION
CHART
Table 8-4 is provided as a convenience for determining the equivalent
voltage or wattage of an RF power expressed in dBm.
Table 8-4. dBm-Watts-Volts Conversion—for 50 ohm systems
05-4055A01, Rev. D
dBm V
Po
dBm V
Po
dBm mV
+53
+50
+49
+48
+47
+46
+45
+44
+43
+42
+41
+40
+39
+38
+37
+36
+35
+34
+33
+32
+31
+30
+29
+28
+27
+26
+25
+24
+23
+22
+21
+20
+19
+18
+17
+16
+15
+14
+13
+12
+11
+10
+9
+8
+7
+6
+5
+4
+3
+2
+1
200W
100W
80W
64W
50W
40W
32W
25W
20W
16W
12.5W
10W
8W
6.4W
5W
4W
3.2W
2.5W
2W
1.6W
1.25W
1.0W
800mW
640mW
500mW
400mW
320mW
250mW
200mW
160mW
125mW
100mW
80mW
64mW
50mW
40mW
32mW
25mW
20mW
16mW
12.5mW
10mW
8mW
6.4mW
5mW
4mW
3.2mW
2.5mW
2.0mW
1.6mW
1.25mW
0
-1
-2
-3
-4
-5
-6
-7
-8
-9
-10
-11
-12
-13
-14
-15
-16
1.0mW
.80mW
.64mW
.50mW
.40mW
.32mW
.25mW
.20mW
.16mW
.125mW
.10mW
-49
-50
-51
-52
-53
-54
-55
-56
-57
-58
-59
-60
-61
-62
-63
-64
100.0
70.7
64.0
58.0
50.0
44.5
40.0
32.5
32.0
28.0
26.2
22.5
20.0
18.0
16.0
14.1
12.5
11.5
10.0
9.0
8.0
7.10
6.40
5.80
5.00
4.45
4.00
3.55
3.20
2.80
2.52
2.25
2.00
1.80
1.60
1.41
1.25
1.15
1.00
.90
.80
.71
.64
.58
.500
.445
.400
.355
.320
.280
.252
.225
.200
.180
.160
.141
.125
.115
.100
.090
.080
.071
.064
.058
.050
.045
.040
.0355
dBm µV
dBm mV
-17
-18
-19
-20
-21
-22
-23
-24
-25
-26
-27
-28
-29
-30
-31
-32
-33
-34
-35
-36
-37
-38
-39
-40
-41
-42
-43
-44
-45
-46
-47
-48
31.5
28.5
25.1
22.5
20.0
17.9
15.9
14.1
12.8
11.5
10.0
8.9
8.0
7.1
6.25
5.8
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.5
3.2
2.85
2.5
2.25
2.0
1.8
1.6
1.4
1.25
1.18
1.00
0.90
Po
.01mW
.001mW
.1µW
-65
-66
-67
-68
-69
-70
-71
-72
-73
-74
-75
-76
-77
-78
-79
-80
-81
-82
-83
-84
-85
-86
-87
-88
-89
-90
-91
-92
-93
-94
-95
-96
-97
Po
0.80
0.71 .01µW
0.64
0.57
0.50
0.45
0.40
0.351
0.32
0.286
0.251
0.225 .001µW
0.200
0.180
0.160
0.141
128
115
100
90
80
71
65
58
50
45
40
35
32
29
25
22.5
20.0
18.0
16.0
11.1
12.9
11.5
10.0
9.0
8.0
7.1
6.1
5.75
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.51
3.2
Po
.1nW
.01nW
.001nW
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
dBm µV
-98
-99
-100
-101
-102
-103
-104
-105
-106
2.9
2.51
2.25
2.0
1.8
1.6
1.41
1.27
1.18
dBm nV
-107
-108
-109
-110
-111
-112
-113
-114
-115
-116
-117
-118
-119
-120
-121
-122
-123
-124
-125
-126
-127
-128
-129
-130
-131
-132
-133
-134
-135
-136
-137
-138
-139
-140
1000
900
800
710
640
580
500
450
400
355
325
285
251
225
200
180
160
141
128
117
100
90
80
71
61
58
50
45
40
35
33
29
25
23
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.001pW
.1ƒW
.01ƒW
193
K
LIN
R
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M2
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M1
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05-4055A01, Rev. D
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LIN
R
PW
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M1
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9
TERMS AND
ABBREVIATIONS
9 Chapter Counter Reset Paragraph
10
If you are new to wireless IP or Ethernet systems, some of the terms used
in this guide may be unfamiliar. The following glossary explains many
of these terms and is helpful in understanding the operation of the transceiver system.
Access Point (AP)—The transceiver in the network that provides synchronization information to one or more associated Remote radios.
Antenna System Gain—A figure, normally expressed in dB, representing the power increase resulting from the use of a gain-type antenna.
System losses (from the feedline and coaxial connectors, for example)
are subtracted from this figure to calculate the total antenna system gain.
AP—See Access Point.
Associated—Condition in which the frequency hopping pattern of the
Remote is synchronized with the AP station in a network, is recognized
by the AP, and is ready to pass traffic.
Authorization Key—Alphanumeric string (code) that is used to enable
additional capabilities in a transceiver.
Bit—The smallest unit of digital data, often represented by a one or a
zero. Eight bits (plus start, stop, and parity bits) usually comprise a byte.
Bits per second—See bps.
bps—Bits per second. A measure of the information transfer rate of digital data across a communication channel.
Byte—A string of digital data usually made up of eight data bits and
start, stop, and parity bits.
Data Communications Equipment—See DCE.
dBi—Decibels referenced to an “ideal” isotropic radiator in free space.
Frequently used to express antenna gain.
dBm—Decibels referenced to one milliwatt. An absolute unit used to
measure signal power, as in transmitter power output, or received signal
strength. A chart for dBm-Watts-Volts conversion can be found on
Page 165.
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DCE—Data Communications Equipment. In data communications terminology, this is the “modem” side of a computer-to-modem connection. The transceiver COM1 and COM2 ports are set as DCE.
Decibel (dB)—A measure of the ratio between two signal levels. Frequently used to express the gain (or loss) of a system.
DES—Data Encryption Standard. More information on DES is available at www.itl.nist.gov/fipspubs/fip46-2.htm.
DHCP—Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. An Internet standard
that allows a client (that is, any computer or network device) to obtain
an IP address from a server on the network. This allows network administrators to avoid the tedious process of manually configuring and managing IP addresses for a large number of users and devices.
When a network device powers on, if it is configured to use DHCP, it
contacts a DHCP server on the network and requests an IP address. The
DHCP server provides an address from a pool of addresses allocated by
the network administrator. The network device may use this address on
a “time lease” basis, or indefinitely, depending on the policy set by the
network administrator.
DNP3—Distributed Network Protocol 3. DNP3 is an industry-standard
protocol that was initially created for communication between electrical
substation devices. Today, this non-proprietary protocol is being widely
adopted for a variety of other applications. Although DNP3 is typically
employed in a client-server environment, this serial protocol is one of
only a few that allow peer-to-peer communication between devices
without the need for a host computer. It does this in the same way that
IP supports peer-to-peer communication in an Ethernet environment.
Encapsulation—Process by which a complete data packet, such as
MODBUS frame or any other polled asynchronous protocol frame, is
placed in the data portion of another protocol frame (for example, IP) to
be transported over a network.
Typically this action is done at the receiving end, before being sent as an
IP packet to a network. A similar reversed process is applied at the other
end of the network extracting the data from the IP envelope, resulting in
the original packet in the original protocol.
Endpoint—Ethernet or IP data equipment connected to the ports of the
transceiver.
Fade Margin—The greatest tolerable reduction in average received
signal strength anticipated under most conditions. Provides an allowance for reduced signal strength due to multipath, slight antenna movement or changing atmospheric losses. A fade margin of 15 to 20 dB is
usually sufficient in most systems.
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FHSS—Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum. A common transmission
technique used by license-free transceivers.
Frame—A segment of data that adheres to a specific data protocol and
contains definite start and end points. It provides a method of synchronizing transmissions.
Frequency Hopping—The spread spectrum technique used by the
transceivers, where two or more associated radios change their operating frequencies several times per second using a set pattern. Since the
pattern appears to jump around, it is said to “hop” from one frequency
to another.
Frequency Zone—A segment of radio spectrum containing the transmitters lower and upper frequency limits. For a chart of 900 MHz and
2400 MHz frequency zones, see Table 3-1 and Table 3-2 on Page 54.
Group ID—The identification number of the group.
Hardware Flow Control—A transceiver feature used to prevent data
buffer overruns when handling high-speed data from the connected data
communications device. When the buffer approaches overflow, the
radio drops the clear-to-send (CTS) line, instructing the connected
device to delay further transmission until CTS again returns to the high
state.
Host Computer—The computer installed at the master station site, that
controls the collection of data from one or more remote sites.
HTTP—Hypertext Transfer Protocol
IAPP—Inter-Access Point Protocol. A protocol by which APs share
information between the Remotes that are connected to them. This
allows relevant data to travel across commonly-connected radio subnetworks from outlying Remotes to other outlying Remotes.
ICMP—Internet Control Message Protocol
IEEE—Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers
Image (File)—Data file that contains the operating system and other
essential resources for the basic operation of the transceiver CPU.
Intergap—See Inter-Packet Delay
Inter-Packet Delay—A technique used in GE MDS devices that
accommodates protocols that do not tolerate gaps in the middle of a
frame (for example, MODBUS ASCII). In these protocols, gaps are
interpreted by the connected device as an end-of-frame indication,
which may cause errors. Inter-packet delay resolves this through the use
of buffers.
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197
kbps—kilobits per second. See bps.
LAN—Local Area Network
Latency—The delay (usually expressed in milliseconds) between when
data is applied at the transmit port at one radio, until it appears at the
receive port at the other radio.
MAS—Multiple Address System. A radio system where a central
master station communicates with several remote stations for the purpose of gathering telemetry data. Figure 1-2 on Page 7 shows an
example of an MAS system.
MCU—Microcontroller Unit. This is the processor responsible for controlling system start-up, synthesizer loading, hop timing, and key-up
control.
MD5—Message-Digest algorithm 5. A highly secure data encoding
scheme. MD5 is a one-way hash algorithm that takes any length of data
and produces a 128 bit “fingerprint”. This fingerprint is “non-reversible,” it is computationally infeasible to determine the file based on the
fingerprint. For more details check out “RFC 1321” on the Internet.
Microcontroller Unit—See MCU.
Mobility—Refers to a station that moves about while maintaining
active connections with the network. Mobility generally implies physical motion. The movement of the station is not limited to a specific network and IP subnet. In order for a station to be mobile it must establish
and tear down connections with various APs as it moves through the
APs' territory. In order to do this, the station employs roaming and
Mobile IP.
MTBF—Mean Time Between Failures
Multiple Address System (MAS)—See Point-Multipoint System.
Network Address—User-definable integer that is used to identify a
group of transceivers that form a communications network. The AP and
all Remotes within a given system should have the same network
address.
Network-Wide Diagnostics—An advanced method of controlling and
interrogating GE MDS radios in a radio network.
PHY—Physical layer of the Ethernet LAN.
PING—Packet INternet Groper. Diagnostic message generally used to
test reachability of a network device, either over a wired or
wireless network.
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Point-Multipoint System—A radio communications network or
system designed with a central control station that exchanges data with
a number of remote locations equipped with terminal equipment.
Poll—A request for data issued from the host computer (or master PLC)
to a Remote radio.
Portability—Refers to the ability of a transceiver to connect to an AP
from multiple locations without the need to reconfigure the network settings. For example, a transceiver located in one place and connected to
an AP can be turned off, moved to another place, turned back on; and,
when the right information is entered, can immediately reconnect to the
AP without intervention.
PLC—Programmable Logic Controller. A dedicated microprocessor
configured for a specific application with discrete inputs and outputs. It
can serve as a host or as an endpoint device.
Remote—A transceiver in a network that communicates with an associated AP radio.
RFI—Radio Frequency Interference
Roaming—The ability of a station to automatically switch its wireless
connection between various APs as the need arises. A station may roam
from one AP to another because the signal strength or quality of the AP
signal has degraded below what another AP can provide. When two APs
are co-located for redundancy, roaming allows the stations to switch
between the radios to provide a robust network.
Roaming may also be employed in conjunction with Portability where
the station has been moved beyond the range of the original AP to which
it was associated. As the station comes in range of a new station, it
switches its connection to the stronger signal. Roaming refers to a station's logical, not necessarily physical, move between APs within a specific network and IP subnet.
RSSI—Received Signal Strength Indicator
SCADA—Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition. An overall term
for the functions commonly provided through an MAS radio system.
Skip Zone(s)—Groups of operating channels (frequencies) deleted
from the radio transmitter and receiver operating range.
SNMP—Simple Network Management Protocol
SNR—Signal-to-Noise Ratio. A measurement of relative received
signal quality. High ratios likely result in better signal detection
and performance.
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STP—Spanning Tree Protocol
Standing-Wave Ratio—See SWR.
SWR—Standing-Wave Ratio. A parameter related to the ratio between
forward transmitter power and the reflected power from the antenna
system. As a general guideline, reflected power should not exceed 10%
of the forward power (≈ 2:1 SWR).
TCP—Transmission Control Protocol. A “guaranteed delivery” protocol used to set up a connection between two devices with acknowledgements (ACK/NACK), and retries if the data is not received
properly. Requires more overhead than UDP (see below) but is sometimes required in mission-critical systems.
Terminal Server—A device that provides a common connection point
for serial terminals (PCs, printers, endpoint devices, etc.) to a Local or
Wide Area Network (LAN/WAN). The terminal converts serial data
from these terminals into Internet Protocol (IP). The entraNET AP contains a built-in terminal server.
Throughput—A measure of the quantity of data sent and the speed with
which it is transferred in a network.
TFTP—Trivial File Transfer Protocol
UDP—User Datagram Protocol. A basic transmission protocol with low
overhead requirements but with no acknowledgement or retry capability. It is often used for broadcast transmission where acknowledgements are not required, and incomplete messages are discarded by the
receiving station.
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INDEX
A
AC Power Adapter Kit 12
Access Point 3
Database 69
Database Menu 76
local console 36
menu structure 32
operating parameters 22
Telnet 36
Web browser 36
accessories 12
ACKAVG 111
ACKAVGINT 111
ACKAVGTHRESH 111
Add
Approved Remote 68
Associated Remotes 68
Address to Ping 90
Administrator Password 23
AgeOut 74, 76
ALARM 103
ALL 113, 116
antenna
aiming 162
directional 4, 151
feedline 154
location 149
omni-directional 4, 12
placement 6
port 19
selection 153
system gain vs. power output setting, table 157, 158, 159
Yagi 12, 154
illustrated 154
AP 6, 114
APLIST 103
APP1 114, 115
APP2 114, 115
applications
long range wireless LAN 6
Approve Remotes 66
Approved
Remotes List 66, 68
Remotes List Menu 68
APx 104
ASSOC 114
Associated Remotes 44
attenuator 19
AUTH 104
Trap Enable 51
Authorization 71
Codes Menu 91
Key 91
05-4055A01, Rev. D
Authorized Features 91
Auto Key Rotation 66
B
band
2400 MHz 5
900 MHz 5
BAUD 104, 106
Rate 60, 62
BLOCKTIME 111
BOOT 114
BPS (bits-per-seond), defined 195
Bridge
Configuration 46
Configuration Menu 51
Forward Delay 51
Hello Time 51
Priority 51
Broadcast
Images 73
Remote
Programming 70
Reboot 73
Reprogramming Menu 72
Repeat Count 52
reprogramming 73
Browse Package 118
BSP Routing Enable 49
BUFFER 104, 106
Size 60, 62
Byte
defined 195
Format 60, 62
Bytes
in on port 78
in on socket 78
out on port 78
out on socket 78
received 80
sent 80
C
cable
coaxial 155
data equipment to DATA INTERFACE connector 101
DB-25 to RJ-45 9
EIA-232 Shielded Data 12
Ethernet crossover 12, 22, 36, 38, 40
Ethernet straight-thru 12
serial communications 36
straight-through 36, 38, 40
TNC Male-to-N Female Adapter 12
Change Baud Rate 118
CLEAR 104, 112
Event Log 83
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
I-1
Statistics 80, 81
CMD 104, 106, 108, 109, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 117
COM 79
Data Statistics 78
Data Statistics Menu 78
Port 64, 75
COM1 37, 39, 104, 116, 188
port 9, 21
COM2 106, 116, 189
port 9
Commands 102
most often used commands 103
network configuration 103
remote 102
SKIP (set/display frequency zone to skip) 54
communication rules 6
COMPANY 108
CONFIG 108, 117
Filename 88
configuration
AP 21
Remote 23
remote serial gateway 62
script 22, 181
Scripts Menu 87
connection
IP-to-serial 27
serial-to-serial 27
connectors 18
data interface 187
Console Baud Rate 84
Contact 85
Contention Window
Max 52
Min 52
Count 90, 112
CRC 81
crossover cable 38, 40
Current
Alarms 82
Firmware 44, 87
IP Address 47
IP Gateway 48
IP Netmask 47
User 44
CWMAX 109
CWMIN 109
Cyclic Redundancy Check 81
D
data communications equipment 9
data throughput
improving 163
Database Timeout 69
Date 84
Format 84
date
stamp 82
DB-25 to RJ-45 cable 9
dBi, defined 195
dBm, defined 195
I-2
DCE 9
defined 196
Decibel (dB), defined 195
DEFAULT 104, 106, 109
Delete
All 68
Approved Remote 68
Description 85
DEVICE 108
Device
Information 45, 71
Information Menu 84
Name 43, 85
Names Menu 85
Status 43
Alarmed 43
Operational 43
Diags 81
dimensions 152
DIN
rail 152
rail brackets 4
Rail Mounting Bracket 13
DIRECT 109
directional antenna 4
Display
skipped frequency zones (SKIP command) 54
DNP
Multicast
Address 98
Port 98
Routing Enable 98
Unicast Port 98
DNP3 8
Routing 45
Routing Database 98
Routing Menu 97
DTE, defined 196
DTRSENSE 115
Duration 92
Dwell Time 52
E
EIA-232 5, 56
signaling 9
Enable
skipped zone (SKIP command) 54
encapsulation 62
ENCRYPT 110
Encryption 5, 11, 64
Enable 66
Phrase 66
Endpoint
Database 69
Database Menu 75
device 123
Logging 69
ENDPT 111
ENDPTMODE 111
entraNET Transceiver models 4
Equalization, defined 196
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05-4055A01, Rev. D
error correction 56
ETH 111, 116
Ethernet 5
Bridging 51
crossover cable 22
device connection to remote 25
LAN 4
Packet Statistics 78
Packet Statistics Menu 80
Event 117
codes 172
Log 78
Host Address 83
Host Filename 83
Menu 82
Event Log Menu 82
F
Fade margin, defined 196
Failed 81
FEC 48, 109
feedline 154
selection 153
firmware
Filename 87
upgrading 179
FLOWCTRL 106
Force
Key Rotation 67
Switchover 95
FORMAT 105, 107
Forward Error Correction 48
Frags 81
Frame, defined 197
Frequency 92
hopping 5
defined 197
Not Calibrated 95
zone, defined 197
Zones 54
fuse 12, 20
G
gain
system 156
GE MDS entraNET models 6
GE MDS Security Suite 4, 10
Good Data 81
Group 105, 107
Database 69
Database Menu 75
ID 64, 75
Guest Password 23
H
H2H 117
HANDOFF 111
HANGTIME 115
Hardware
Event Triggers 94
Event Triggers Menu 94
flow control, defined 197
HELP 112
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HEX 103
HIGH 113
hop time 52
Hopping, defined 197
HOPTIME 109
Host computer, defined 197
HREV 117
HTTP 11, 64
Access 66
Security Mode 66
HyperTerminal 21, 23, 36, 37, 101
I
IAPP 98
Enable 49
Multicast
Address 49
Port 49
TTL 49
Unicast Port 49
Illustrations
antenna, Yagi 154
bench test setup 19
point-to-point link 7
remote station arrangement 149
typical MAS network 7
IMAGE 117
Image
Copy 87
Verify 87
Index 79
INDICATOR 115
Installation
connecting transceiver to data equipment 101
requirements 149
site
selection 149
survey 150
interference 151, 161
about 150
INTERGAP 105, 107
Inter-Packet Delay 60, 62
IP 6, 26
Address 22, 23, 26, 43, 76, 77
Address Mode 47
Configuration 46
netmask 23
Port 79
-to-remote serial configuration 62
-to-Serial Services 55
K
KEY 104
L
Lack of Associated Remotes Exceeded Threshold 95
Lack of Remotes for 96
LAN port 17, 22, 38, 40
LAN/ETH 187
latency time
reducing 163
Latency, defined 197
LED
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
I-3
COM1 25, 26
COM1/ETH 24
COM2 25, 26
ETH 25
functions 26
LAN 38, 40
LAN/ETH 26
LINK 24, 26, 150, 162
PWR 25, 26, 43, 82
troubleshooting with 168
Legacy Wireless Products 9
line-of-sight 5
LINK 25
List of Remotes 77
Local
console 36
Console session 37, 42
IP Port 64
Serial Configuration 44
Serial Configuration Menu 57
Location 44, 85, 109
LOG 112, 117
LOGIN 113
log-in
AP 21
procedure 101
Remote 23
LOGOUT 113
long range wireless LAN 6
Lost carrier detected 80
Lost Data 81
LOW 113
M
MAC 4, 6
Address 76
Maintenance/Tools 45
Menu 86
Manage Selected Remote 70
Max Remotes 67, 69
Maximum Receive Errors 97
MCU (Microcontroller Unit), defined 198
MD5 Digest 66
Media Access Controller 4
menu
access point database 76
approved remotes list 68
authorization codes 91
broadcast remote reprogramming 72
COM data statistics 78
configuration scripts 87
device information 84
device names 85
DNP3 routing 97
endpoint database 75
ethernet packet statistics 80
event log 82
group database 75
hardware event triggers 94
lack of associated remotes exceeded threshold 96
local serial configuration 57
I-4
maintenance/tools 86
manage selected remote 71
mobility 98
network event triggers 94
packet RX errors exceeded threshold 97
PING utility 90
radio packet statistics 81
redundancy 93
configuration options 95
remote
database 74
management 70
serial gateway 62, 63
serial gateway entries 64
serial gateway statistics 79
reprogramming 86
RSG configuration scripts 89
security configuration 65
serial configuration wizard 58
statistics/event log 77
transmitter test 92
wireless network 69
wireless packet statistics 80
MESSAGE 113
Mobility
Configuration 46
Configuration Menu 49
Mobility Menu 98
MODE 60, 61, 64, 105, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 115
terminal interface 101
MODEL 84, 108
mounting
bracket 152
dimensions 152
Multiple Address System (MAS)
defined 198
network, illustrated 7
N
NAME 108
net address 23, 48
NETADDR 110, 114
NETview MS software 8, 31
Network 71
address 24
defined 198
bridge 160
configuration commands 103
Ethernet 4
Event Triggers 93
Menu 94
Interface Error 95
-wide diagnostics, defined 198
wireless LAN 6
Network Configuration 44
Next Page 68
No Ack 81
NORMAL 113
NOW 116
Num EPs 74
Number of Remotes 68, 77
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05-4055A01, Rev. D
O
omni-directional antenna 4, 12
Operating
Commands 101–117
parameters (Access Point) 22
OTHER 115
Over the Air Data 81
Overflow 81
OWNER 108
P
Package to Transmit 72, 73
Packet
Receive Errors Exceeded Threshold 96
Size 90
Packets
dropped 80
received 80
sent 80
password 23, 113, 118
Administrator 23
Guest 23
protection 5
performance
optimizing 160
PHRASE 110
Ping 26, 90
test setup 26
PING Utility Menu 90
PLC (Programmable Logic Controller), defined 199
Point-to-multipoint system
defined 198
Point-to-point system
link, illustrated 7
Poll, defined 199
port
Access Point interface connectors 18
antenna 19
COM1 9, 21, 23, 31, 36, 37, 39, 188
COM2 9, 25, 189
ETH 25
Ethernet Remote interface connectors 18
LAN 17, 22, 31, 36, 37, 38, 40, 47
LAN/ETH 187
Status 59, 61
Power
How much can be used (ETSI, 2400 MHz)? 158
How much can be used (USA/Canada, 2400 MHz)? 157
How much can be used (USA/Canada, 900 MHz)? 156
Not Calibrated 95
Previous Page 68
Procedures
antenna and feedline selection 153
connecting data equipment to DATA INTERFACE connector 101
site selection 149
troubleshooting 167–175
PRODUCT 108
PROGRAM VERIFY 113
Protected Network Station 9
protocol
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DNP3 8
HTTP 11, 64
IP 25
SNMP 11, 31, 64
TCP 9, 121
UDP 9, 121
PWR 110, 114
Q
QUALITY 114
R
RADIO 114, 116
NETADDR 102
PWR 102
UNIT 102
Radio 71
bench test setup, illustrated 19
Configuration 44
Configuration Menu 52
Packet Statistics 78
Menu 81
RADIOSW 117
RBE 4
Reboot 114
Device 87
to new image after download 118
Receive
Error Count Interval 97
errors 80, 81
Received Signal Strength Indication 150
Redundancy 45
Configuration 93
Configuration Options 94
Menu 95
Redundancy Menu 93
REFRESH 114
release notes 3
Remote 6
access channels 5
Access IP 67
Access Manager 66
COM Port 60
commands 102
Database 69
Database Menu 74
Firmware Upgrade Utility 117
IP 5
Management 69
Menu 70
via the AP 101
minimum configuration 102
P,B 79
radio firmware 117
radio, defined 199
Reboot 72
Reprogramming 71
Serial Gateway 45
Configuration 62
Entries Menu 64
Menu 62, 63
Statistics 78
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
I-5
Statistics Menu 79
Serial Wizard 63
station
typical arrangement, illustrated 149
to Manage 70, 72
transceiver 3
UnitID 60
REPEAT 110
Report-by-Exception 4
Reprogramming Menu 86
RESET 116
RESTRICT 104
Retries 81
Retrieve File 87, 88, 89
Retrieve/Restore Configuration 118
RETRY 110
REV 108
RF
Output Power 23, 52
power divider 19
RS-232 55
RSG
Config Filename 89
Config Host Address 89
Configuration Scripts Menu 89
Entries 63
Talkback Enable 63
Talkback Timeout 63
RSSI 19, 114, 150, 162
RSSIAVG 112
RSSIAVGINT 112
RSSIAVGTHRESH 112
RX
IP Port 61
Pkts 74, 76
RXDELAYCHARS 105, 108
S
SAME 115
SAVE 108
SCADA 7
defined 199
screen
serial configuration current settings 61
view current settings 59, 61
script
configuration 181
editing 186
Security
Configuration 45
Configuration Menu 65
risks and solutions 10
suite 4
Send
Event Log 83
File 88, 89
Images 72
SER 109
Serial 5
Configuration 71
Current Settings Screen 61
I-6
Wizard 56
Wizard Menu 58
gateway 9, 55
interfaces 54
Number 44, 77, 84
-to-Serial Example 59
-to-Serial Services 55
serial
device connection to remote 25
services
IP-to-serial 55
serial-to-serial 55
Set
frequency zone to skip (SKIP command) 54
SHOW 108
signal strength 19
Simple Network Management Protocol 5
site
selection 149
survey 150
Skip
command (set/display frequency zone to skip) 54
Zones 53
Menu 53
SKIP command (set/display frequency zone to skip) 54
SKIPZONES 110
SLEEP 115
SNMP 5, 11, 31, 64
Agent Configuration Menu 50
Configuration 46
Mode 50, 66
Read community 50
Trap community 50
Traps 11
V3 Agent ID 50
v3 Auth Password 50
v3 Password Mode 51
v3 Priv Password 50
Write community 50
Socket
P,B 79
software
GE MDS Security Suite 10
NETview MS 8, 31
spread-spectrum 4, 5
SREV1 117
SREV2 117
Starting Information Screen 44
STATE 110
State 74, 79
Static IP
Address 47
Gateway 47
Netmask 47
Statistics 71
Event Log 45
Event Log Menu 77
STATS 116
STATTRACKER 116
Status 73
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
05-4055A01, Rev. D
straight-through cable 38, 40
SWR (Standing Wave Ratio)
defined 200
SYNC 114
Syslog Server Address 83
system gain 156
calculating 157, 159
T
Tables
antenna system gain vs. power output setting 157, 158,
159
troubleshooting 169
tabletop testing 19, 21
Talkback Enable 62
TCP 9, 55, 121
Keepalive 64
Technical reference 179–193
Technical specifications 189–195
Telnet 5, 36, 64
Access 66
Connection 22
session 35, 38, 42
terminal
equipment 25
Interface Mode 101
server 55
session 35
settings 101
test setup 18
Testing
bench setup, illustrated 19
TFTP
Host Address 87, 88
Timeout 83, 87, 88, 89
Time 84
time stamp 82
Timeout 81
TOR1 114
TOR2 114
Transceiver
connecting to data equipment 101
transmission
Control Protocol 9
path 150
Transmitter Test Menu 92
transparent over-the-air serial-to-serial connection 55
Trap
Manager 51
Version 50
Troubleshooting 167–175
table 169
TX
FREQ 114
IP Address 61
IP Port 62
Key 92, 114
Pkts 74
TXDELAY 106, 108
TxPkt 76
TYPE 110
05-4055A01, Rev. D
U
UDP 9, 55, 61, 121
IP-to-Serial 63
Unicast
Retry Count 53
UDP 61
Mode Example 61
Unit 114
Update Enable 49
UnitID 64, 74, 75, 79
Upgrade Firmware 118
Uptime 44, 84, 109
User
Datagram Protocol 9
interface 35
Telnet session 35
terminal session 35
Web browser session 35
Name 118
Password 67, 118
V
VER 117
Via Remote 76
View
Current Settings Screen 59, 61
Event Log 82
W
WAKE 116
Web
browser 5, 40, 42, 64
Wireless
MAC Configuration 46
Menu 48
Network 45
Network Menu 69
Packet Statistics Menu 80
X
X Address 48
XHREV 117
Y
Yagi antenna 12
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
I-7
I-8
GE MDS entraNET Reference Manual
05-4055A01, Rev. D
IN CASE OF DIFFICULTY...
GE MDS products are designed for long life and trouble-free operation. However, this equipment,
as with all electronic equipment, may have an occasional component failure. The following information will assist you in the event that servicing becomes necessary.
TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
Technical assistance for GE MDS products is available from our Technical Support Department
during business hours (8:00 A.M.–5:30 P.M. Eastern Time). When calling, please give the complete model number of the radio, along with a description of the trouble/symptom(s) that you are
experiencing. In many cases, problems can be resolved over the telephone, without the need for
returning the unit to the factory. Please use one of the following means for product assistance:
Phone: 585 241-5510
E-Mail: TechSupport@GEmds.com
FAX: 585 242-8369
Web: www.GEmds.com
FACTORY SERVICE
Component-level repair of radio equipment is not recommended in the field. Many components
are installed using surface-mount technology, which requires specialized training and equipment
for proper servicing. For this reason, the equipment should be returned to the factory for any PC
board repairs. The factory is best equipped to diagnose, repair and align your radio to its proper
operating specifications.
If return of the equipment is necessary, you will be issued a Service Request Order (SRO) number.
The SRO number will help expedite the repair so that the equipment can be repaired and returned
to you as quickly as possible. Please be sure to include the SRO number on the outside of the shipping box, and on any correspondence relating to the repair. No equipment will be accepted for
repair without an SRO number.
A statement should accompany the radio describing, in detail, the trouble symptom(s), and a
description of any associated equipment normally connected to the radio. It is also important to
include the name and telephone number of a person in your organization who can be contacted if
additional information is required.
The radio must be properly packed for return to the factory. The original shipping container and
packaging materials should be used whenever possible. All factory returns should be addressed to:
GE MDS
Product Services Department
(SRO No. XXXX)
175 Science Parkway
Rochester, NY 14620 USA
When repairs have been completed, the equipment will be returned to you by the same shipping
method used to send it to the factory. Please specify if you wish to make different shipping
arrangements. To inquire about an in-process repair, you may contact our Product Services Group
at 585-241-5540 (FAX: 585-242-8400), or by e-mail at ProductServices@GEmds.com.
GE MDS, LLC
175 Science Parkway
Rochester, NY 14620
General Business: +1 585 242-9600
FAX: +1 585 242-9620
Web: www.GEmds.com
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