SGI | UV 2000 | User guide | SGI UV 2000 User guide

SGI UV 2000 User guide
SGI® UV 2000 System User Guide
Document Number 007-5832-001
COPYRIGHT
© 2012 SGI. All rights reserved; provided portions may be copyright in third parties, as indicated elsewhere herein. No permission is granted to copy, distribute,
or create derivative works from the contents of this electronic documentation in any manner, in whole or in part, without the prior written permission of SGI.
LIMITED RIGHTS LEGEND
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in the FAR 52.227-19 and/or the DFAR 227.7202, or successive sections. Use beyond license provisions is a violation of worldwide intellectual property laws,
treaties and conventions. This document is provided with limited rights as defined in 52.227-14.
The electronic (software) version of this document was developed at private expense; if acquired under an agreement with the USA government or any
contractor thereto, it is acquired as “commercial computer software” subject to the provisions of its applicable license agreement, as specified in (a) 48 CFR
12.212 of the FAR; or, if acquired for Department of Defense units, (b) 48 CFR 227-7202 of the DoD FAR Supplement; or sections succeeding thereto.
Contractor/manufacturer is SGI, 46600 Landing Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538.
TRADEMARKS AND ATTRIBUTIONS
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Record of Revision
Version
Description
001
June 2012
First Release
007-5832-001
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Contents
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007-5832-001
List of Figures .
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List of Tables
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Audience.
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Important Information .
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Chapter Descriptions
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Related Publications .
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Conventions .
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Product Support .
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Reader Comments .
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Operation Procedures .
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Precautions .
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Safety Precautions .
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Power Connections Overview .
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System Connections Overview .
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Connecting to the UV System Control Network
System Controller Access .
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Serial Console Hardware Requirements
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Establishing a Serial Connection to the CMC on SGI UV 2000 .
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Establishing CMC IP Hardware Connections .
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Using DHCP to Establish an IP Address .
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Using a Static IP Address .
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System Control Overview
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Communicating with the System
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The SGI Management Center Graphical User Interface
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Powering-On and Off From the SGI Management Center Interface
The Command Line Interface
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Powering On and Off from the Command Line Interface .
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Command Options for Power On .
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Power On the System From the SMN Command Line.
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Specific CLI Commands Used With the SMN .
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Optional Power On From the CMC Command Line
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Booting Directly From a CMC .
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Power On the System Using the CMC Network
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Optional Power On Using the SMC to Connect to the CMC .
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Monitoring Power On
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Power off a UV System .
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Additional CLI Power Command Options .
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Using Embedded Support Partner (ESP).
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Optional Components
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PCIe Cards .
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System Control .
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Levels of System Control
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System Management Node (SMN) Overview .
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CMC Overview .
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BMC Overview .
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System Controller Interaction
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IRU Controllers .
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Chassis Management Controller Functions .
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1U Console Option .
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Flat Panel Rackmount Console Option Features
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System Overview
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System Models
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System Architecture .
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007-5832-001
Contents
System Features .
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Modularity and Scalability .
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Distributed Shared Memory (DSM)
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Distributed Shared I/O .
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Chassis Management Controller (CMC)
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ccNUMA Architecture .
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Cache Coherency .
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Non-uniform Memory Access (NUMA) .
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Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS)
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System Components .
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Bay (Unit) Numbering .
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Rack Numbering
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Optional System Components .
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Rack Information .
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SGI UV 2000 Series Rack (42U)
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SGI UV 2000 System Rack Technical Specifications .
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Optional Octal Router Chassis Information .
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Overview
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SGI UV 2000 Series NUMAlink Octal Router Chassis.
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SGI UV 2000 External NUMAlink System Technical Specifications .
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Add or Replace Procedures
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Maintenance Precautions and Procedures .
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Preparing the System for Maintenance or Upgrade
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Returning the System to Operation .
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Overview of PCI Express (PCIe) Operation
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Adding or Replacing PCIe Cards in the Expansion Enclosure .
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Removing and Replacing an IRU Enclosure Power Supply
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Installing Cards in the 1U PCIe Expansion Chassis
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Troubleshooting Chart .
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IRU Power Supply LEDs
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Compute/Memory Blade LEDs .
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Technical Specifications and Pinouts .
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System-level Specifications .
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Physical Specifications .
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Environmental Specifications
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Power Specifications .
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I/O Port Specifications
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BaseIO VGA Port Information .
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Ethernet Port.
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Serial Ports .
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USB Type A Connector .
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Safety Information and Regulatory Specifications
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Safety Information
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Regulatory Specifications
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CE Notice and Manufacturer’s Declaration of Conformity .
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Electromagnetic Emissions .
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FCC Notice (USA Only)
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Industry Canada Notice (Canada Only)
VCCI Notice (Japan Only) .
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Korean Class A Regulatory Notice .
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Shielded Cables .
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CMN Number
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Laser Compliance Statements .
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Lithium Battery Statement .
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. 92
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007-5832-001
List of Figures
007-5832-001
Figure 1-1
IRU Power Supply Cable Location Example
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Figure 1-2
Single-Phase 2-Outlet PDU Example
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4
Figure 1-3
Single-Phase 8-Outlet PDU .
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5
Figure 1-4
Three-Phase PDU Examples .
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6
Figure 1-5
System Management Node Rear Video Connections
.
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8
Figure 1-6
UV CMC Connection Faceplate Example
.
.
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8
Figure 1-7
PCIe Option Blade Example with Full-Height and Low-Profile Slots .
Figure 1-8
PCIe Option Blade Example with Two Low-Profile Slots .
.
.
.
. 24
Figure 2-1
System Management Node Front and Rear Panels .
.
.
.
. 27
Figure 2-2
SGI UV 2000 LAN-attached System Control Network Example
.
.
. 28
Figure 2-3
Optional 1U Rackmount Console
.
.
. 31
Figure 2-4
System Management Node (SMN) Direct Video Connection Ports .
.
. 32
Figure 3-1
SGI UV 2000 Single-Rack System Example
.
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. 34
Figure 3-2
SGI UV 2000 IRU and Rack .
.
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. 36
Figure 3-3
Functional Block Diagram of the Individual Rack Unit .
.
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. 38
Figure 3-4
Blade Node Block Diagram .
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. 40
Figure 3-5
SGI UV 2000 IRU System Components Example .
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. 45
Figure 3-6
BaseIO Riser Enabled Blade Front Panel Example .
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. 46
Figure 4-1
SGI UV 2000 Series Rack Example .
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. 49
Figure 4-2
Front Lock on Tall (42U) Rack .
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. 50
Figure 4-3
Optional Water-Chilled Cooling Units on Rear of SGI 42U Rack .
.
. 51
Figure 5-1
SGI UV 2000 Optional NUMAlink ORC (Rear View) .
.
.
.
. 54
Figure 5-2
SGI UV 2000 Optional ORC Chassis Example (Front View) .
.
.
. 55
Figure 6-1
Comparison of PCI/PCI-X Connector with PCI Express Connectors
.
. 59
Figure 6-2
The PCIe Expansion Enclosure .
.
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. 62
Figure 6-3
Card Slot Locations .
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. 63
Figure 6-4
Removing an Enclosure Power Supply .
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. 64
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. 24
ix
List of Figures
x
Figure 7-1
UV Compute Blade Status LED Locations Example .
.
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. 70
Figure 7-2
Full Support Sequence Example .
.
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. 71
Figure A-1
VGA Port Pinouts .
.
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. 79
Figure A-2
Ethernet Port .
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. 81
Figure A-3
Serial Port Connector .
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. 82
Figure A-4
Pin Number Locations for USB Type A Connector .
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. 84
Figure B-1
VCCI Notice (Japan Only)
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. 89
Figure B-2
Korean Class A Regulatory Notice
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. 89
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007-5832-001
List of Tables
007-5832-001
Table 4-1
Tall Rack Technical Specifications .
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. 52
Table 5-1
NUMAlink ORC Technical Specifications .
.
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. 56
Table 6-1
SGI UV 2000 PCIe Support Levels .
.
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. 60
Table 6-2
PCIe Expansion Slot Bandwidth Support Levels
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. 61
Table 7-1
Troubleshooting Chart
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. 68
Table 7-2
Power Supply LED States
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. 69
Table A-1
SGI UV 2000 System Configuration Ranges
.
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. 75
Table A-2
SGI UV 2000 Physical Specifications
.
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. 76
Table A-3
Environmental Specifications
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. 77
Table A-4
Power Specifications .
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. 78
Table A-5
VGA Pin Functions .
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. 80
Table A-6
Ethernet Pinouts .
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. 81
Table A-7
Serial Port Pinout.
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. 83
Table A-8
Pin Assignments for USB Type A Connector
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. 84
.
.
xi
About This Guide
This guide provides an overview of the architecture, general operation and descriptions of the
major components that compose the SGI UV 2000 family of servers. It also provides the standard
procedures for powering on and powering off the system, basic troubleshooting and maintenance
information, and important safety and regulatory specifications.
Audience
This guide is written for owners, system administrators, and users of SGI UV 2000 computer
systems. It is written with the assumption that the reader has a good working knowledge of
computers and computer systems.
Important Information
Warning: To avoid problems that could void your warranty, your SGI or other approved
system support engineer (SSE) should perform all the set up, addition, or replacement of
parts, cabling, and service of your SGI UV 2000 system, with the exception of the following
items that you can perform yourself:
007-5832-001
•
Using your system console controller to enter commands and perform system functions such
as powering on and powering off, as described in this guide.
•
Adding and replacing PCIe cards, as described in this guide.
•
Adding and replacing disk drives in dual-disk enabled riser blades.
•
Removing and replacing the IRU power supplies.
•
Using the On/Off switch and other switches on the rack PDUs.
•
Using the ESI/ops panel (operating panel) on optional mass storage bricks.
xiii
About This Guide
Chapter Descriptions
The following topics are covered in this guide:
xiv
•
Chapter 1, “Operation Procedures,” provides instructions for powering on and powering off
your system.
•
Chapter 2, “System Control,” describes the function of the overall system control network
interface and provides basic instructions for operating the controllers.
•
Chapter 3, “System Overview,” provides technical overview information needed to
understand the basic functional architecture of the SGI UV 2000 systems.
•
Chapter 4, “Rack Information,” describes the rack sizes and general features.
•
Chapter 6, “Add or Replace Procedures,” provides instructions for installing or removing the
customer-replaceable components of your system.
•
Chapter 5, “Optional Octal Router Chassis Information,” describes the optional NUMAlink
router technology available in SGI UV 2000 systems consisting of two or more racks. This
router technology is available in an enclosure “package” known as the Octal Router Chassis.
•
Chapter 7, “Troubleshooting and Diagnostics,” provides recommended actions if problems
occur on your system.
•
Appendix A, “Technical Specifications and Pinouts‚" provides physical, environmental, and
power specifications for your system. Also included are the pinouts for the non-proprietary
connectors.
•
Appendix B, “Safety Information and Regulatory Specifications‚" lists regulatory
information related to use of the UV 2000 system in the United States and other countries. It
also provides a list of safety instructions to follow when installing, operating, or servicing
the product.
007-5832-001
Related Publications
Related Publications
The following SGI documents are relevant to the UV 2000 series system:
•
SGI UV CMC Software User Guide
(P/N 007-5636-00x)
This guide describes how to use the system console controller commands to monitor and
manage your SGI UV 2000 system via line commands. Coverage of control includes
descriptions of the interface and usage of the commands. These commands are primarily
used when a system management node is not present in the system. Note that it does not
cover controller command information for the SGI UV 10 or UV 20.
•
SGI UV System Management Node Administrator's Guide
(P/N 007-5694-00x)
This guide covers the system management node (SMN) for SGI UV 2000 series systems. It
describes the software and hardware components used with the SMN as well as providing an
overview of the UV system control network. System network addressing is covered and a
chapter on how to use KVM to enable remote console access from the system management
node is included.
•
SGI Management Center Quick Start Guide
(P/N 007-5672-00x)
This document may be helpful to users or administrators of SGI UV systems using the SGI
Management Center interface. The guide provides introductory information on
configuration, operation and monitoring of your UV system using the management center
software.
•
SGI Management Center System Administrator’s Guide
(P/N 007-5642-00x)
This guide is intended for system administrators who work with the SGI Management
Center software GUI to manage and control SGI UV 2000 systems. Depending on your
system configuration and implementation, this guide may be optional. The manual is written
with the assumption the user has a good working knowledge of Linux.
•
SGI UV Software Install Guide
(P/N 007-5675-00x)
In UV systems that come with pre-installed Linux software operating systems; this
document describes how to re-install it when necessary.
007-5832-001
xv
About This Guide
•
SGI UV Systems Linux Configuration and Operations Guide
(P/N 007-5629-00x)
This guide is a reference document for people who manage the operation of SGI UV 2000
systems. It explains how to perform general system configuration and operation under Linux
for SGI UV. For a list of manuals supporting SGI Linux releases and SGI online resources,
see the SGI Performance Suite documentation.
•
SGI UV Systems Installation Guide
(P/N 007-5675-00x)
This guide covers software installation on UV 2000 systems and their SMNs.
•
Linux Application Tuning Guide for SGI X86-64 Based Systems
(P/N 007-5646-00x)
This guide includes a chapter that covers advanced tuning strategies for applications running
on SGI UV systems as well as other SGI X86 based systems.
•
Man pages (online)
Man pages locate and print the titled entries from the online reference manuals.
You can obtain SGI documentation, release notes, or man pages in the following ways:
•
See the SGI Technical Publications Library at http://docs.sgi.com
Various formats are available. This library contains the most recent and most comprehensive
set of online books, release notes, man pages, and other information.
•
The release notes, which contain the latest information about software and documentation in
this release, are in a file named README.SGI in the root directory of the SGI ProPack for
Linux Documentation CD.
•
You can also view man pages by typing man <title> on a command line.
SGI systems shipped with Linux include a set of Linux man pages, formatted in the standard
UNIX “man page” style. Important system configuration files and commands are documented on
man pages. These are found online on the internal system disk (or DVD) and are displayed using
the man command. References in the documentation to these pages include the name of the
command and the section number in which the command is found. For example, to display a man
page, type the request on a command line:
man commandx
xvi
007-5832-001
Conventions
For additional information about displaying man pages using the man command, see man(1). In
addition, the apropos command locates man pages based on keywords. For example, to display
a list of man pages that describe disks, type the following on a command line:
apropos disk
For information about setting up and using apropos, see apropos(1).
Conventions
The following conventions are used throughout this document:
007-5832-001
Convention
Meaning
Command
This fixed-space font denotes literal items such as commands, files,
routines, path names, signals, messages, and programming language
structures.
variable
The italic typeface denotes variable entries and words or concepts being
defined. Italic typeface is also used for book titles.
user input
This bold fixed-space font denotes literal items that the user enters in
interactive sessions. Output is shown in nonbold, fixed-space font.
[]
Brackets enclose optional portions of a command or directive line.
...
Ellipses indicate that a preceding element can be repeated.
man page(x)
Man page section identifiers appear in parentheses after man page names.
GUI element
This font denotes the names of graphical user interface (GUI) elements such
as windows, screens, dialog boxes, menus, toolbars, icons, buttons, boxes,
fields, and lists.
xvii
About This Guide
Product Support
SGI provides a comprehensive product support and maintenance program for its products, as
follows:
•
If you are in North America, contact the Technical Assistance Center at
+1 800 800 4SGI or contact your authorized service provider.
•
If you are outside North America, contact the SGI subsidiary or authorized distributor in
your country. International customers can visit http://www.sgi.com/support/
Click on the “Support Centers” link under the “Online Support” heading for information on
how to contact your nearest SGI customer support center.
Reader Comments
If you have comments about the technical accuracy, content, or organization of this document,
contact SGI. Be sure to include the title and document number of the manual with your comments.
(Online, the document number is located in the front matter of the manual. In printed manuals, the
document number is located at the bottom of each page.)
You can contact SGI in any of the following ways:
•
Send e-mail to the following address: techpubs@sgi.com
•
Contact your customer service representative and ask that an incident be filed in the SGI
incident tracking system.
•
Send mail to the following address:
Technical Publications
SGI
46600 Landing Parkway
Fremont, California 94538
SGI values your comments and will respond to them promptly.
xviii
007-5832-001
Chapter 1
1. Operation Procedures
This chapter explains the basics of how to operate your new system in the following sections:
•
“Precautions” on page 1
•
“Power Connections Overview” on page 2
•
“System Control Overview” on page 12
•
“Using Embedded Support Partner (ESP)” on page 22
•
“Optional Components” on page 23
Precautions
Before operating your system, familiarize yourself with the safety information in the following
sections:
•
“ESD Precaution” on page 1
•
“Safety Precautions” on page 2
ESD Precaution
Caution: Observe all ESD precautions. Failure to do so can result in damage to the equipment.
Wear a grounding wrist strap when you handle any ESD-sensitive device to eliminate possible
ESD damage to equipment. Connect the wrist strap cord directly to earth ground.
007-5832-001
1
1: Operation Procedures
Safety Precautions
Warning: Before operating or servicing any part of this product, read the “Safety
Information” on page 85.
Danger: Keep fingers and conductive tools away from high-voltage areas. Failure to
follow these precautions will result in serious injury or death. The high-voltage areas of the
system are indicated with high-voltage warning labels.
!
Caution: Power off the system only after the system software has been shut down in an orderly
manner. If you power off the system before you halt the operating system, data may be corrupted.
Warning: If a lithium battery is installed in your system as a soldered part, only qualified
SGI service personnel should replace this lithium battery. For a battery of another type,
replace it only with the same type or an equivalent type recommended by the battery
manufacturer, or an explosion could occur. Discard used batteries according to the
manufacturer’s instructions.
Power Connections Overview
Prior to operation, your SGI UV 2000 system should be set up and connected by a professional
installer. If you are powering on the system for the first time or want to confirm proper power
connections, follow these steps:
1.
Check to ensure that the power connector on the cable between the rack’s power distribution
units (PDUs) and the wall power-plug receptacles are securely plugged in.
2. For each individual IRU that you want to power on, make sure that the power cables are
plugged into all the IRU power supplies correctly, see the example in Figure 1-1 on page 3.
Setting the circuit breakers on the PDUs to the “On” position will apply power to the IRUs
and will start the CMCs in the IRUs. Note that the CMC in each IRU stays powered on as
2
007-5832-001
Power Connections Overview
long as there is power coming into the unit. Turn off the PDU breaker switch on each of the
PDUs that supply voltage to the IRU’s power supplies if you want to remove all power from
the unit.
Important: In a system configuration using 2-outlet single-phase PDUs, each power supply
in an IRU should be connected to a different PDU within the rack. This will ensure the
maximum amperage output of a single PDU is not exceeded if a power supply fails.
Power cord
Figure 1-1
IRU Power Supply Cable Location Example
3. If you plan to power on a server that includes optional mass storage enclosures, make sure
that the power switch on the rear of each PSU/cooling module (one or two per enclosure) is
in the 1 (on) position.
4. Make sure that all PDU circuit breaker switches (see the examples in the following three
figures) are turned on to provide power to the server when the system is powered on.
Figure 1-2 shows an example of a single-phase 2-plug PDU that can be used with the SGI UV
2000 system. This PDU can be used to distribute power to the IRUs when the system is configured
with single-phase power.
007-5832-001
3
1: Operation Procedures
Figure 1-2
Single-Phase 2-Outlet PDU Example
Figure 1-3 on page 5 shows an example of an eight-plug single-phase PDU that can be used in the
SGI UV 2000 rack system. This unit is used to support auxiliary equipment in the rack.
4
007-5832-001
Power Connections Overview
Power
distribution
unit (PDU)
Power
source
Figure 1-3
007-5832-001
Single-Phase 8-Outlet PDU
5
1: Operation Procedures
Figure 1-4 shows examples of the three-phase PDUs that can be used in the SGI UV 2000 system.
These PDUs are used to distribute power to the IRUs when the system is configured with
three-phase power
Figure 1-4
6
Three-Phase PDU Examples
007-5832-001
System Connections Overview
System Connections Overview
You can monitor and interact with your SGI UV 2000 server from the following sources:
•
Using the SGI 1U rackmount console option you can connect directly to the system
management node (SMN) for basic monitoring and administration of the system. See “1U
Console Option” in Chapter 2 for more information; SLES 11 or later is required.
•
A PC or workstation on the local area network can connect to the SMN’s external ethernet
port and set up remote console sessions or display GUI objects from the SGI Management
Center interface.
•
A serial console display can be plugged into the CMC at the rear of IRU 001. You can also
monitor IRU information and system operational status from other IRUs that are connected
to IRU 001.
These console connections enable you to view the status and error messages generated by
the chassis management controllers in your SGI UV 2000 rack. For example, you can
monitor error messages that warn of power or temperature values that are out of tolerance.
See the section “1U Console Option” in Chapter 2, for additional information.
The following subsections describe the options for establishing and using communication
connections to work with your SGI UV 2000 system.
Connecting to the UV System Control Network
The ethernet connection is the preferred method of accessing the system console.
Administrators can perform one of the following options for connectivity:
•
If the SMN is plugged into the customer LAN, connect to the SMN (SSH w/ X11
Forwarding) and start the SGI Management Center remotely.
•
An in-rack system console can be directly connected to the system management node via
VGA and PS2, see Figure 1-5 on page 8. You can then log into the SMN and perform
system administration either through CLI commands or via the SGI Management Center
interface.
Note that the CMC is factory set to DHCP mode and thus has no fixed IP address and cannot be
accessed until an IP address is established. See the subsection “Using DHCP to Establish an IP
Address” on page 10 for more information on this topic.
007-5832-001
7
1: Operation Procedures
A micro-USB serial connection can be used to communicate directly with the CMC. This
connection is typically used for service purposes or for system controller and system console
access in small systems where an in-rack system console is not used or available.
System Controller Access
Access to the SGI UV 2000 system controller network is accomplished by the following
connection methods:
•
A LAN connection to the system management node (running the SGI Management Center
software application). This can also be done using an optional VGA-connected console, see
Figure 1-5.
•
A micro-USB serial cable connection to the “Console” port (see Figure 1-6) on the CMC
(see note below). See also “Serial Console Hardware Requirements” on page 9.
Note: Each IRU has two chassis management controller (CMC) slots located in the rear of the
IRU directly below the cooling fans. Only one CMC is supported in each IRU. The CMC slot on
the right is the slot that is populated.
Mouse
VGA Port
Keyboard
Figure 1-5
System Management Node Rear Video Connections
HEARTBEAT
PWR GOOD
SMN
Figure 1-6
8
CMC
ACC
CONSOLE
RESET
UV CMC Connection Faceplate Example
007-5832-001
System Connections Overview
Serial Console Hardware Requirements
The console type and how these console types are connected to the SGI UV 2000 servers is
determined by what console option is chosen. If you have an SGI UV 2000 server and wish to use
a serially-connected “dumb terminal”, you can connect the terminal via a micro-USB serial cable
to the console port connector on the CMC. The terminal should be set to the following functional
modes:
•
Baud rate of 115,200
•
8 data bits
•
One stop bit, no parity
•
No hardware flow control (RTS/CTS)
Note that a serial console is generally connected to the first (bottom) IRU in any single rack
configuration.
Establishing a Serial Connection to the CMC on SGI UV 2000
If you have an SGI UV 2000 system and wish to use a serially-connected "dumb terminal", you
can connect the terminal via a micro-USB serial cable to the console port connector on the CMC
board of the IRU.
1.
The terminal should be set to the operational modes described in the previous subsection.
Note that a serial console is generally connected to the CMC on the first (bottom) IRU in any
single rack configuration.
2. On the system management node (SMN) port, the CMC is configured to request an IP
address via dynamic host configuration protocol (DHCP).
3. If your system does not have an SMN, the CMC address cannot be directly obtained by
DHCP and will have to be assigned, see the following subsections for more information.
Establishing CMC IP Hardware Connections
For IP address configuration, there are two options: DHCP or static IP. The following subsections
provide information on the setup and use of both.
007-5832-001
9
1: Operation Procedures
Note: Both options require the use of the CMC's serial port, refer to Figure 1-6 on page 8.
For DHCP, you must determine the IP address that the CMC has been assigned; for a static IP,
you must also configure the CMC to use the desired static IP address.
To use the serial port connection, you must attach and properly configure a micro-USB cable to
the CMC's "CONSOLE" port. Configure the serial port as described in “Serial Console Hardware
Requirements” on page 9.
When the serial port session is established, the console will show a CMC login, and the user can
login to the CMC as user "root" with password "root".
Using DHCP to Establish an IP Address
To determine the IP address assigned to the CMC, you must first establish a connection to the
CMC serial port (as indicated in the section “Serial Console Hardware Requirements” on page 9),
and run the command "ifconfig eth0". This will report the IP address that the CMC is
configured to use.
Running the CMC with DHCP is not recommended as the preferred option for SGI UV 2000
systems. The nature of DHCP makes it difficult to determine the IP address of the CMC, and it
is possible for that IP address to change over time, depending on the DHCP configuration usage.
The exception would be a configuration where the system administrator is using DHCP to assign
a "permanent" IP address to the CMC.
To switch from a static IP back to DHCP, the configuration file
/etc/sysconfig/ifcfg-eth0 on the CMC must be modified (see additional instructions
in the “Using a Static IP Address” section). The file must contain the following line to enable use
of DHCP:
BOOTPROTO=dhcp
Using a Static IP Address
To configure the CMC to use a static IP address, the user/administrator must edit the configuration
file /etc/sysconfig/ifcfg-eth0 on the CMC. The user can use the "vi" command
(i.e. "vi /etc/sysconfig/ifcfg-eth0") to modify the file.
The configuration file should be modified to contain these lines:
10
007-5832-001
System Connections Overview
BOOTPROTO=static
IPADDR=<IP address to use>
NETMASK=<netmask>
GATEWAY=<network gateway IP address>
HOSTNAME=<hostname to use>
Note that the "GATEWAY" and "HOSTNAME" lines are optional.
After modifying the file, save and write it using the vi command ":w!", and then exit vi using ":q".
Then reboot the CMC (using the "reboot" command); after it reboots, it will be configured with
the specified IP address.
007-5832-001
11
1: Operation Procedures
System Control Overview
All SGI UV 2000 system individual rack units (IRUs) use an embedded chassis management
controller (CMC). The CMC communicates with both the blade-level board management
controllers (BMCs) and the system management node (SMN), which runs the SGI Management
Center software. In concert with the SGI Management Center software, they are generically
known as the system control network.
The SGI UV 2000 system control network provides control and monitoring functionality for each
compute blade, power supply, and fan assembly in each individual rack unit (IRU) enclosure in
the system. The IRU is a 10U-high enclosure that supplies power, cooling, network fabric
switching and system control for up to eight compute blades. A single chassis management
controller blade is installed at the rear of each IRU.
The SGI Management Center System Administrator’s Guide (P/N 007-5642-00x) provides more
detailed information on using the GUI to administer your SGI UV 2000 system.
The SGI Management Center is an application that provides control over multiple IRUs, and
communication to other UV systems. Remote administration requires that the SMN be connected
by an Ethernet connection to a private or public Local Area Network (LAN).
The CMC network in concert with the SMN provides the following functionality:
12
•
Powering the entire system on and off.
•
Powering individual IRUs on and off.
•
Power on/off individual blades in an IRU.
•
Monitoring the environmental state of the system.
•
Partitioning the system.
•
Enter controller commands to monitor or change particular system functions within a
particular IRU. See the SGI UV CMC Software User Guide (P/N 007-5636-00x) for a
complete list of command line interface (CLI) commands.
•
Provides access to the system OS console allowing you to run diagnostics and boot the
system.
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System Control Overview
Communicating with the System
The two primary ways to communicate with and administer the SGI UV 2000 system are through
SGI Management Center interface or the UV command line interface (CLI).
The SGI Management Center Graphical User Interface
The SGI Management Center interface is a server monitoring and management system. The SGI
Management Center GUI provides status metrics on operational aspects for each node in a system.
The interface can also be customized to meet the specific needs of individual systems.
The SGI Management Center System Administrator’s Guide (P/N 007-5642-00x) provides
information on using the interface to monitor and maintain your SGI UV 2000 system. Also, see
Chapter 2 in this guide for additional reference information on the SGI Management Center
interface.
Powering-On and Off From the SGI Management Center Interface
Commands issued from the SGI Management Center interface are typically sent to all enclosures
and blades in the system (up to a maximum 128 blades per SSI) depending on set parameters. SGI
Management Center services are started and stopped from scripts that exist in
/etc/init.d
SGI Management Center, is commonly installed in /opt/sgi/sgimc, and is controlled by one of
these services—this allows you to manage SGI Management Center services using standard Linux
tools such as chkconfig and service.
If your SGI Management Center interface is not already running, or you are bringing it up for the
first time, use the following steps:
1.
Power on the server running the SGI Management Center interface.
2. Open an ssh or other terminal session command line console to the SMN using a remote
workstation or local VGA terminal.
3. Use the information in the section “Power Connections Overview” on page 2 to ensure that
all system components are supplied with power and ready for bring up.
4. Log in to the SMN as root (the default password is sgisgi).
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13
1: Operation Procedures
5. On the command line, enter mgrclient and press Enter.
The SGI Management Center Login dialog box is displayed.
6. Enter a user name (root by default) and password (root by default) and click OK.
The SGI Management Center interface is displayed.
7. The power on (green button) and power off (red button) are located in the middle of the SGI
Management Center GUI’s Tool Bar - icons which provide quick access to common tasks
and features.
See the SGI Management Center System Administrator’s Guide for more information.
The Command Line Interface
The UV command line interface (CLI) is accessible by logging into either a system maintenance
node (SMN) or chassis management controller (CMC).
Note: The command line interface is virtually the same when used from either the SMN or the
CMC. Using the command line interface from the SMN may require that the command be targeted
to a specific UV 2000 system if the SMN is managing more than one SSI.
Log in as root, (default password is root) when logging into the CMC.
Login as sysco, when logging into the SMN.
Once a connection to the SMN or CMC is established, various system control commands can be
entered. See “Powering On and Off from the Command Line Interface” on page 14 for specific
examples of using the CLI commands.
Powering On and Off from the Command Line Interface
The SGI UV 2000 command line interface is accessible by logging into either the system
management node (SMN) as root or the CMC as root.
Instructions issued at the command line interface of a local console prompt typically only affect
the local partition or a part of the system. Depending on the directory level you are logged in at,
you may power up an entire partition (SSI), a single rack, or a single IRU enclosure. In CLI
command console mode, you can obtain only limited information about the overall system
configuration. An SMN has information about the IRUs in its SSI. Each IRU has information
14
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System Control Overview
about its internal blades, and also (if other IRUs are attached via NUMAlink to the IRU)
information about those IRUs.
Command Options for Power On
The following example command options can be used with either the SMN or CMC CLI:
usage: power [-vcow] on|up [system-SSN]...turns power on
-v, --verbose
-c, --clear
-o, --override
-w, --watch
verbose output
clear EFI variables (system and partition targets only)
override partition check
watch boot progress
To monitor the power-on sequence during boot, see the section “Monitoring Power On” on
page 19, the -uvpower option must be included with the command to power on.
Power On the System From the SMN Command Line
1.
Login to the SMN as root, via a terminal window similar to the following:
The default password for logging in to the SMN as root is sgisgi.
# ssh -X root@uv-system-smn
root@system-smn>
Once a connection to the SMN is established, the SMN prompt is presented and various
system control commands can be entered.
2. To see a list of available commands enter the following:
root@uv-system-smn>ls /sysco/bin/help
3. Change the working directory to sysco, similar to the following:
root@uv-system-smn>cd /sysco
In the following example the system is powered on without monitoring the progress or status
of the power-on process.When a power command is issued, it checks to see if the individaul
rack units (IRUs) are powered on; if not on, the power command powers up the IRUs and
then the blades in the IRU are powered on.
4. Enter the power on command, similar to the following:
sysco@uv-system-smn>power on
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1: Operation Procedures
The system will take time to fully power up (depending on size and options).
Specific CLI Commands Used With the SMN
The following list of available CLI commands are specifically for the SMN:
auth
authenticate SSN/APPWT change
bios
perform bios actions
bmc
access BMC shell
cmc
access CMC shell
show system configuration
config
console
help
hel
hwcfg
leds
log
power
access system consoles
list available commands
access hardware error logs
access hardware configuration variable
display system LED values
display system controller logs
access power control/status
Type '<cmd> --help' for help on individual commands.
Optional Power On From the CMC Command Line
Because every SGI UV 2000 system comes with a system management node there should be few
reasons for powering on the system from a CMC. Use the following information if you have a need
to power on from a CMC rather than the SMN CLI or the SGI Management Center GUI. If the
SMN is not available you can still boot the system directly by using the CMC, see “Booting
Directly From a CMC”.
16
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System Control Overview
Note: The command line interface for the CMC is virtually the same as that for the SMN, with
the exception that the CMC does not have the ability to target a system when multiple systems are
supported from one SMN.
Booting Directly From a CMC
If a system management node (SMN) is not available, it is possible to power on and administer
your system directly from the CMC. When available, the optional SMN should always be the
primary interface to the system.
The console type and how these console types are connected to the SGI UV 2000 systems is
determined by what console option is chosen. To monitor or administer a system through the CMC
network, you will need to establish a mini-USB serial connection to the CMC. See the information
in the following two subsections.
Power On the System Using the CMC Network
You can use a use a direct mini-USB serial connection to the CMC to power on your UV system;
note that this process is not the standard way to administer a system. Use the following steps:
1.
Establish a connection (as detailed in the previous subsections). CMCs have their rack and
“U” position set at the factory. The CMC will have an IP address, similar to the following:
172.17.<rack>.<slot>
2. You can use the IP address of the CMC to login, as follows:
ssh root@<IP-ADDRESS>
Typically, the default password for the CMC set out of the SGI factory is root. The default
password for logging in as sysco on the SMN is sgisgi.
The following example shows the CMC prompt:
SGI Chassis Manager Controller, Firmware Rev. x.x.xx
CMC:r1i1c>
This refers to rack 1, IRU 1, CMC.
3. Power up your UV system using the power on command, as follows:
CMC:r1i1c> power on
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1: Operation Procedures
The system will take time to fully power up (depending on size and options). Larger systems take
longer to fully power on. Information on booting Linux from the shell prompt is included at the
end of the subsection (“Monitoring Power On” on page 19).
Optional Power On Using the SMN to Connect to the CMC
Typically, the default password for the CMC set out of the SGI factory is root.
Use the following steps to establish a network connection from the SMN to the CMC and power
on the system using the CMC prompt and the command line interface:
1.
Establish a network connection to the CMC by using the ssh command from the SMN to
connect to the CMC, similar to the following example:
Note: This is only valid if your PC or workstation that is connected to the CMC (via the SMN
connection) has its /etc/hosts file setup to include the CMCs.
ssh root@hostname-cmc
The following example shows the CMC prompt:
SGI Chassis Manager Controller, Firmware Rev. x.x.xx
CMC:r1i1c>
This refers to rack 1, IRU 1, CMC.
2. Power up your UV system using the power-on command, as follows:
CMC:r1i1c> power on
Note that the larger a system is, the more time it will take to power up completely. Information on
booting Linux from the shell prompt is included at the end of the subsection (“Monitoring Power
On” on page 19).
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System Control Overview
Monitoring Power On
Open a separate window on your PC or workstation and establish another connection to the SMN
or CMC and use the uvcon command to open a system console and monitor the system boot
process. Use the following steps:
CMC:r1i1c> uvcon
uvcon: attempting connection to localhost...
uvcon: connection to SMN/CMC (localhost) established.
uvcon: requesting baseio console access at r001i01b00...
uvcon: tty mode enabled, use ’CTRL-]’ ’q’ to exit
uvcon: console access established
uvcon: CMC <--> BASEIO connection active
************************************************
******* START OF CACHED CONSOLE OUTPUT *******
************************************************
******** [20100512.143541] BMC r001i01b10: Cold Reset via
broadcast reset
******** [20100512.143541] BMC r001i01b07: Cold Reset via
broadcast reset
******** [20100512.143540] BMC r001i01b08: Cold Reset via
broadcast reset
******** [20100512.143540] BMC r001i01b12: Cold Reset via
broadcast reset
******** [20100512.143541] BMC r001i01b14: Cold Reset via
broadcast reset
******** [20100512.143541] BMC r001i01b04: Cold Reset via
NL
NL
NL
NL
NL
NL....
Note: Use CTRL-] q to exit the console.
Depending upon the size of your system, it can take 5 to 10 minutes for the UV system to boot to
the EFI shell. When the shell> prompt appears, enter fs0:, as follows:
shell> fs0:
At the fs0: prompt, enter the Linux boot loader information, as follows:
fs0:\> \efi\SuSE\elilo
The ELILO Linux Boot loader is called and various SGI configuration scripts are run and the
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 Service Pack x installation program appears.
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1: Operation Procedures
Power off a UV System
To power down the UV system, use the power off command, as follows:
CMC:r1i1c> power off
==== r001i01c (PRI) ====
You can also use the power status command, to check the power status of your system
CMC:r1i1c> power status
==== r001i01c (PRI) ====
on: 0, off: 32, unknown: 0, disabled: 0
The following command options can be used with the power off|down command:
usage: power [-vo] off|down [system-SSN]...turns power off
-v, --verbose
verbose output
-o, --override
override partition check
Additional CLI Power Command Options
The following are examples of command options related to power status of the system IRUs.
These commands and arguments can be used with either the SMN or CMC CLI.
usage: power [-vchow] reset [system-SSN]...toggle reset
-v, --verbose
verbose output
-c, --clear
clear EFI variables (system and partition
targets only)
-h, --hold
hold reset high
-o, --override
override partition check
-w, --watch
watch boot progress
usage: power [-v] ioreset [system-SSN]...toggle I/O reset
-v, --verbose
verbose output
usage: power [-vhow] cycle [system-SSN]...cycle power off on
-v, --verbose
verbose output
-h, --hold
hold reset high
-o, --override
override partition check
-w, --watch
watch boot progress
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System Control Overview
usage: power [-v10ud] [status] [system-SSN]...show power status
-v, --verbose
verbose output
-1, --on
show only blades with on status
-0, --off
show only blades with off status
-u, --unknown
show only blades with unknown status
-d, --disabled
show only blades with disabled status
usage: power [-ov] nmi|debug [system-SSN]...issue NMI
-o, --override
override partition check
-v, --verbose
verbose output
usage: power [-v] margin [high|low|norm|<value>] [system-SSN]...power
margin control
high|low|norm|<value>
margin state
-v, --verbose
verbose output
usage: power --help
--help
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display this help and exit
21
1: Operation Procedures
Using Embedded Support Partner (ESP)
Embedded Support Partner (ESP) automatically detects system conditions that indicate potential
future problems and then notifies the appropriate personnel. This enables you and SGI system
support engineers (SSEs) to proactively support systems and resolve issues before they develop
into actual failures.
ESP enables users to monitor one or more systems at a site from a local or remote connection. ESP
can perform the following functions:
•
Monitor the system configuration, events, performance, and availability.
•
Notify SSEs when specific events occur.
•
Generate reports.
ESP also supports the following:
•
Remote support and on-site troubleshooting.
•
System group management, which enables you to manage an entire group of systems from a
single system.
For additional information on this and other available monitoring services, see the section “SGI
Electronic Support” in Chapter 7.
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Optional Components
Optional Components
Besides adding a network-connected system console or basic VGA monitor, you can add or
replace the following hardware items on your SGI UV 2000 series server:
•
Peripheral component interface (PCIe) cards into the optional PCIe expansion chassis.
•
PCIe cards into the blade-mounted PCIe riser card.
•
Disk drives in your dual disk drive riser card equipped compute blade.
PCIe Cards
The PCIe based I/O sub-systems, are industry standard for connecting peripherals, storage, and
graphics to a processor blade. The following are the primary configurable I/O system interfaces
for the SGI UV 2000 series systems:
•
The optional full -height two-slot internal PCIe blade is a dual-node compute blade that
supports one full-height x16 PCIe Gen3 card in the top slot and one low-profile x16 PCIe
Gen3 card in the lower slot. See Figure 1-7 on page 24 for an example.
•
The optional dual low-profile PCIe blade supports two PCIe x16 Gen3 cards. See Figure 1-8
on page 24 for an example.
•
The optional external PCIe I/O expansion chassis supports up to four PCIe cards. The
external PCIe chassis is supported by connection to a compute blade using an optional host
interface card (HIC). Each x16 PCIe enabled blade host interface connector can support one
I/O expansion chassis. See Chapter 6 for more details on the optional external PCIe chassis.
Important: PCIe cards installed in an optional two-slot PCIe blade are not hot swappable or hot
pluggable. The compute blade using the PCIe riser must be powered down and removed from the
system before installation or removal of a PCIe card(s). Also see “Installing Cards in the 1U PCIe
Expansion Chassis” on page 61 for more PCIe related information.
Not all blades or PCIe cards may be available with your system configuration. Check with your
SGI sales or service representative for availability. See Chapter 6, “Add or Replace Procedures”
for detailed instructions on installing or removing PCIe cards or SGI UV 2000 system disk drives.
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1: Operation Procedures
24
Figure 1-7
PCIe Option Blade Example with Full-Height and Low-Profile Slots
Figure 1-8
PCIe Option Blade Example with Two Low-Profile Slots
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Chapter 2
2. System Control
This chapter describes the general interaction and functions of the overall SGI UV 2000 system
control. System control parameters depend somewhat on the overall size and complexity of the
SGI UV 2000 but will generally include the following three areas:
•
The system management node (SMN) which runs the SGI Management Center software
•
The chassis management controllers (CMC) boards - one per IRU
•
The individual blade-based board management controllers (BMC) - report to the CMCs
Note: While it is possible to operate and administer a very basic (single-rack) SGI UV 2000
system without using an SMN and SGI Management Center, this is an exception rather than rule.
Levels of System Control
The system control network configuration of your server will depend on the size of the system and
control options selected. Typically, an Ethernet LAN connection to the system controller network
is used. This Ethernet connection is made from a remote PC/workstation connected to the system
management node (SMN). The SMN is a separate stand-alone server installed in the SGI UV 2000
rack. The SMN acts as a gateway and buffer between the UV system control network and any
other public or private local area networks.
Important: The SGI UV system control network is a private, closed network. It should not be
reconfigured in any way to change it from the standard SGI UV factory installation. It should not
be directly connected to any other network. The UV system control network is not designed for
and does not accommodate additional network traffic, routing, address naming (other than its own
schema), or DCHP controls (other than its own configuration). The UV system control network
also is not security hardened, nor is it tolerant of heavy network traffic, and is vulnerable to Denial
of Service attacks.
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2: System Control
System Management Node (SMN) Overview
An Ethernet connection directly from the SMN (Figure 2-1 on page 27) to a local private or public
Ethernet allows the system to be administered directly from a local or remote console via the SGI
Management Center interface installed on the SMN. Note that there is no direct inter-connected
system controller function in the optional expansion PCIe modules.
The system controller network is designed into all IRUs. Controllers within the system report and
share status information via the CMC Ethernet interconnects. This maintains controller
configuration and topology information between all controllers in an SSI. Figure 2-2 on page 28
shows an example system control network using an optional and separate (remote) workstation to
monitor a single-rack SGI UV 2000 system. It is also possible to connect an optional PC or
(in-rack) console directly to the SMN, see Figure 2-4 on page 32.
Note: Mass storage option enclosures are not specifically monitored by the system controller
network. Most optional mass storage enclosures have their own internal microcontrollers for
monitoring and controlling all elements of the disk array. See the user’s guide for your mass
storage option for more information on this topic.
For information on administering network connected SGI systems using the SGI Management
Center, see the SGI Management Center System Administrator’s Guide (P/N 007-5642-00x).
26
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Levels of System Control
System
LEDs
Slim DVD drive option
System
reset
Main
power
Disk drive bays
Power Supply Module
BMC Port
Mouse
Keyboard
USB
Port 1
COM
Port1
USB
Port 0
Figure 2-1
Full-height (full-depth)
x16 PCIe slot
LAN ports 1-4
Full-height (half-depth)
x16 PCIe slot
VGA Port
System Management Node Front and Rear Panels
CMC Overview
The CMC system for the SGI UV 2000 servers manages power control and sequencing, provides
environmental control and monitoring, initiates system resets, stores identification and
configuration information, and provides console/diagnostic and scan interface. A CMC port from
each chassis management controller connects to a dedicated Ethernet switch that provides a
synchronous clock signal to all the CMCs in an SSI.
Viewing the system from the rear, the CMC blade is on the right side of the IRU. The CMC
accepts direction from the SMN and supports powering-up and powering-down individual or
groups of compute blades and environmental monitoring of all units within the IRU. The CMC
sends operational requests to the Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) on each compute
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2: System Control
blade installed. The CMC provides data collected from the compute nodes within the IRU to the
system management node upon request.
CMCs can communicate with the blade BMCs and other IRU CMCs when they are linked together
under a single system image (SSI); also called a partition. Each CMC shares its information with
the SMN as well as other CMCs within the SSI. Note that the system management node (server),
optional mass storage units and PCIe expansion enclosures do not have a CMC installed.
Remote
workstation
monitor
Local Area Network (LAN)
SG
IU
V2
00
0
SGI UV 2000 system
Local Area Network (LAN)
Cat-5 Ethernet
Figure 2-2
28
SGI UV 2000 LAN-attached System Control Network Example
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System Controller Interaction
BMC Overview
Each compute blade in an IRU has a baseboard management controller (BMC). The BMC is a
built-in specialized microcontroller hardware component that monitors and reports on the
functional “health” status of the blade. The BMC provides a key functional element in the overall
Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) architecture.
The BMC acts as an interface to the higher levels of system control such as the IRU’s CMC board
and the higher level control system used in the system management node. The BMC can report
any on-board sensor information that it has regarding temperatures, power status, operating
system condition and other functional parameters that may be reported by the blade.When any of
the preset limits fall out of bounds, the information will be reported by the BMC and an
administrator can take some corrective action. This could entail a node shutdown, reset (NMI) or
power cycling of the individual blade.
The individual blade BMCs do not have information on the status of other blades within the IRU.
This function is handled by the CMCs and the system management node. Note that blades
equipped with an optional BaseIO riser board have a dedicated BMC Ethernet port.
System Controller Interaction
In all SGI UV 2000 servers all the system controller types (SMNs, CMCs and BMCs)
communicate with each other in the following ways:
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•
System control commands and communications are passed between the SMN and CMCs via
a private dedicated gigabit Ethernet network. The CMCs communicate directly with the
BMC in each installed blade by way of the IRU’s internal backplane.
•
All CMCs can communicate with each other via an Ethernet “ring” configuration network
established within an SSI.
•
In larger configurations the system control communication path includes a private, dedicated
Ethernet switch that allows communication between an SMN and multiple SSI
environments.
29
2: System Control
IRU Controllers
All IRUs have a chassis management controller (CMC) board installed. The following subsection
describes the basic features of the controllers:
Note: For additional information on controller commands, see the SGI UV CMC Software User
Guide (P/N 007-5636-00x).
Chassis Management Controller Functions
The following list summarizes the control and monitoring functions that the CMC performs. Many
of the controller functions are common across all IRUs, however, some functions are specific to
the type of enclosure.
•
Monitors individual blade status via blade BMCs
•
Controls and monitors IRU fan speeds
•
Reads system identification (ID) PROMs
•
Monitors voltage levels and reports failures
•
Monitors and controls warning LEDs
•
Monitors the On/Off power process
•
Provides the ability to create multiple system partitions
•
Provides the ability to flash system BIOS
1U Console Option
The SGI optional 1U console (Figure 2-3 on page 31) is a rackmountable unit that includes a
built-in keyboard/touchpad. It uses a 17-inch (43-cm) LCD flat panel display of up to 1280 x 1024
pixels.
30
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IRU Controllers
1
2
3
4
Figure 2-3
Optional 1U Rackmount Console
Flat Panel Rackmount Console Option Features
The 1U flat panel console option has the following listed features:
1.
Slide Release - Move this tab sideways to slide the console out. It locks the drawer closed
when the console is not in use and prevents it from accidentally sliding open.
2. Handle - Used to push and pull the module in and out of the rack.
3. LCD Display Controls - The LCD controls include On/Off buttons and buttons to control
the position and picture settings of the LCD display.
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2: System Control
4. Power LED - Illuminates blue when the unit is receiving power.
The 1U console attaches to the system management node server using PS/2 and HD15M
connectors or to an optional KVM switch (not provided by SGI). See Figure 2-4 for the SMN
video connection points. The 1U console is basically a “dumb” VGA terminal, it cannot be used
as a workstation or loaded with any system administration program.
The 27-pound (12.27-kg) console automatically goes into sleep mode when the cover is closed.
Mouse
Keyboard
Figure 2-4
32
VGA Port
System Management Node (SMN) Direct Video Connection Ports
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Chapter 3
3. System Overview
This chapter provides an overview of the physical and architectural aspects of your SGI UV 2000
series system. The major components of the SGI UV 2000 series systems are described and
illustrated.
The SGI UV 2000 series is a family of multiprocessor distributed shared memory (DSM)
computer systems that can scale from 16 to 2,048 Intel processor cores as a cache-coherent single
system image (SSI). Future releases may scale to larger processor counts for single system image
(SSI) applications. Contact your SGI sales or service representative for the most current
information on this topic.
In a DSM system, each processor board contains memory that it shares with the other processors
in the system. Because the DSM system is modular, it combines the advantages of lower
entry-level cost with global scalability in processors, memory, and I/O. You can install and
operate the SGI UV 2000 series system in your lab or server room. Each 42U SGI rack holds one
to four 10-U high enclosures that support up to eight compute/memory and I/O sub modules
known as “blades.” These blades contain printed circuit boards (PCBs) with ASICS, processors,
memory components and I/O chipsets mounted on a mechanical carrier. The blades slide directly
in and out of the SGI UV 2000 IRU enclosures.
This chapter consists of the following sections:
•
“System Models” on page 35
•
“System Architecture” on page 37
•
“System Features” on page 39
•
“System Components” on page 44
Figure 3-1 shows the front view of a single-rack SGI UV 2000 system.
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33
3: System Overview
SG
IU
V2
00
Figure 3-1
34
0
SGI UV 2000 Single-Rack System Example
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System Models
System Models
The basic enclosure within the SGI UV 2000 system is the 10U high “individual rack unit” (IRU).
The IRU enclosure contains up to eight compute blades connected to each other via a backplane.
Each IRU has ports that are brought out to external NUMAlink 6 connectors. The 42U rack for
this server houses all IRU enclosures, option modules, and other components; up to 64 processor
sockets (512 processor cores) in a single rack. The SGI UV 2000 server system requires a
minimum of one BaseIO equipped blade for every 2,048 processor cores. Higher core counts in
an SSI may be available in future releases, check with your SGI sales or service representative for
current information.
Figure 3-2 shows an example of how IRU placement is done in a single-rack SGI UV 2000 server.
The system requires a minimum of one 42U tall rack with three single-phase power distribution
unit (PDU) plugs per IRU installed in the rack. Three outlets are required to support each of the
power supplies in an IRU and two power connections are required for an SMN.
You can also add additional PCIe expansion enclosures or RAID and non-RAID disk storage to
your server system. Power outlet needs for these options should be calculated in advance of
determining the number of outlets needed for the overall system.
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3: System Overview
UV Rack
IRU
IRU
(System Management Node)
1U (I/O) Expansion Slot
IRU
Individual Rack Unit (IRU)
IRU
Figure 3-2
36
SGI UV 2000 IRU and Rack
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System Architecture
System Architecture
The SGI UV 2000 computer system is based on a distributed shared memory (DSM) architecture.
The system uses a global-address-space, cache-coherent multiprocessor that scales up to 512
processor cores in a single rack. Because it is modular, the DSM combines the advantages of lower
entry cost with the ability to scale processor count, memory, and I/O independently in each rack.
Note that a maximum of 2,048 cores are supported on a single-system image (SSI). Larger SSI
configurations may be offered in the future, contact your SGI sales or service representative for
additional information.
The system architecture for the SGI UV 2000 system is a sixth-generation NUMAflex DSM
architecture known as NUMAlink 6 or NL6. In the NUMAlink 6 architecture, all processors and
memory can be tied together into a single logical system. This combination of processors,
memory, and internal switches constitute the interconnect fabric called NUMAlink within and
between each 10U IRU enclosure.
The basic expansion building block for the NUMAlink interconnect is the processor node; each
processor node consists of a dual-Hub ASIC (also known as a HARP) and two eight-core
processors with on-chip secondary caches. The Intel processors are connected to the dual-Hub
ASIC via quick path interconnects (QPIs). Each dual-HUB ASIC is also connected to the system’s
NUMAlink interconnect fabric through one of sixteen NL6 ports.
The dual-Hub ASIC is the heart of the processor and memory node blade technology. This
specialized ASIC acts as a crossbar between the processors and the network interface. The Hub
ASIC enables any processor in the SSI to access the memory of all processors in the SSI.
Figure 3-3 on page 38 shows a functional block diagram of the SGI UV 2000 series system IRU.
System configurations of up to four IRUs can be constructed without the use of external routers.
Routerless systems can have any number of blades up to a maximum of 32. Routerless system
topologies reduce the number of external NUMAlink cables required to interconnect a system.
External optional routers are needed to support multi-rack systems with more than four IRUs, see
Chapter 5, “Optional Octal Router Chassis Information” for more information.
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37
3: System Overview
IRU Backplane Connections
-2
NI3 1-2
NI
NI1-0
NI1-0
1
2
0NI -2
2
I
N
NI3-0
2
2NI -2
0
NI
NI1-3
NI1-1
NI1-3
NI0
NI2 -3
-3
NI1-0
-2
NI3 -2
NI1
NI1-0
6
NI3-0
NI3-0
NI1-1
NI0
NI2 -3
-3
-2
NI2
-2
NI0
NI1-3
2
4
-2
NI3 -2
NI1
NI1-1
NI3-1
NI3-3
NI0
-3
NI2
-3
NI3-1
NI3-3
NI1-0
NI3-0
2
2NI -2
0
I
N
7
NI3-3
NI3-1
NI1-1
NI1-3
NI3-1
NI3-3
NI1-3
NI1-1
NI1-0
NI3-0
-2
NI2
-2
NI0
NI1-2
NI3-2
NI0
NI2 -3
-3
NI
NI2 0-3
-3
NI1-0
NI3-0
3
NI3-3
NI3-1
NI1-1
NI1-3
NI3-1
NI3-3
2
0NI -2
2
I
N
0
-2
NI3 1-2
NI NI1-0
NI0
NI2 3
-3
NI3-2
NI1-2
-2
NI2
-2
NI0
NI1-3
NI1-1
NI3-3
NI3-1
NI
NI2 0-3
-3
5
-2
NI2
-2
NI0
NI1-3
NI1-1
NI3-3
NI3-1
NI3-0
-2
NI3 -2
NI1
NI3-0
N
NI2 I0-3
-3
1-2
NI
-2
NI3
Left
Backplane
Right
Backplane
Note: this drawing only shows the cabling
between the compute blades within the
IRU. External cabling (cabling that exits
the IRU) is not shown.
Figure 3-3
38
Functional Block Diagram of the Individual Rack Unit
007-5832-001
System Features
System Features
The main features of the SGI UV 2000 series server systems are discussed in the following
sections:
•
“Modularity and Scalability” on page 39
•
“Distributed Shared Memory (DSM)” on page 39
•
“Chassis Management Controller (CMC)” on page 41
•
“Distributed Shared I/O” on page 41
•
“Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS)” on page 42
Modularity and Scalability
The SGI UV 2000 series systems are modular systems. The components are primarily housed in
building blocks referred to as individual rack units (IRUs). Additional optional mass storage may
be added to the rack along with additional IRUs. You can add different types of blade options to
a system IRU to achieve the desired system configuration. You can easily configure systems
around processing capability, I/O capability, memory size, or storage capacity. The air-cooled
IRU enclosure system has redundant, hot-swap fans and redundant, hot-swap power supplies.
Distributed Shared Memory (DSM)
In the SGI UV 2000 series server, memory is physically distributed both within and among the
IRU enclosures (compute/memory/I/O blades); however, it is accessible to and shared by all
NUMAlinked devices within the single-system image (SSI). This is to say that all NUMAlinked
components sharing a single Linux operating system, operate and share the memory “fabric” of
the system. Memory latency is the amount of time required for a processor to retrieve data from
memory. Memory latency is lowest when a processor accesses local memory. Note the following
sub-types of memory within a system:
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•
If a processor accesses memory that it is connected to on a compute node blade, the memory
is referred to as the node’s local memory. Figure 3-4 on page 40 shows a conceptual block
diagram of the blade’s memory, compute and I/O pathways.
•
If processors access memory located in other blade nodes within the IRU, (or other
NUMAlinked IRUs) the memory is referred to as remote memory.
•
The total memory within the NUMAlinked system is referred to as global memory.
39
3: System Overview
BACKPLANE CONNECTOR
DDR3
A B DDR3
A B DDR3
A B DDR3
Chan-0
Chan-1
Chan-2
A B DDR3
VPPL
Chan-3
VTT
PCIe Gen 3 X16
TOP NODE PCA
(4) QFSP
iPass
QPI
NL6
4 Channels
PSOC
SGPIO
Local Bus 0 &1
QPI
DDR3
Vcore/
VSA
P
R
O
C
QPI 1
C
O
N
N
E
C
SGPIO
T
PSOC
O
R
NL6
12 Channels
CPU/DDR3 Power
BNI Bus 0 & 1
HARP PCA
HARP CONNECTOR
Clocks
QPI
Spartan 6
FPGA
PSOC
SGPIO
Only used
for BaseIO
RSPI
Parallel Data/
Addr Bus
Clocks
PCIe X4
PCIe X4
DDR3
Only used
for BaseIO
SPI
BMC to CMCEnet
POWER
CONN
BMC to CMCEnet
CPU/DDR3 Power
DDR3
DDR3
Vcore/
VSA
BMC to CMCEnet
BMC to CMCEnet
A B DDR3
A B DDR3
A B DDR3
A B DDR3
Chan-0
Chan-1
Used for:
PCIe x16 slot or
BaseIO card
QPI
Chan-2
Chan-3
PCIe Gen 3 X16
VPPL
VTT
BOTTOM NODE PCA W/BMC
Figure 3-4
40
Blade Node Block Diagram
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System Features
Distributed Shared I/O
Like DSM, I/O devices are distributed among the blade nodes within the IRUs. Each BaseIO riser
card equipped blade node is accessible by all compute nodes within the SSI (partition) through the
NUMAlink interconnect fabric.
Chassis Management Controller (CMC)
Each IRU has a chassis management controller (CMC) located directly below the upper set of
cooling fans in the rear of the IRU. The chassis manager supports powering up and down of the
compute blades and environmental monitoring of all units within the IRU.
One GigE port from each compute blade connects to the CMC blade via the internal IRU
backplane. A second GigE port from each even number blade slot is also connected to the CMC.
This second port is used to support an optional BaseIO riser card in the even numbered slots.
ccNUMA Architecture
As the name implies, the cache-coherent non-uniform memory access (ccNUMA) architecture has
two parts, cache coherency and nonuniform memory access, which are discussed in the sections
that follow.
Cache Coherency
The SGI UV 2000 server series use caches to reduce memory latency. Although data exists in local
or remote memory, copies of the data can exist in various processor caches throughout the system.
Cache coherency keeps the cached copies consistent.
To keep the copies consistent, the ccNUMA architecture uses directory-based coherence protocol.
In directory-based coherence protocol, each block of memory (128 bytes) has an entry in a table
that is referred to as a directory. Like the blocks of memory that they represent, the directories are
distributed among the compute/memory blade nodes. A block of memory is also referred to as a
cache line.
Each directory entry indicates the state of the memory block that it represents. For example, when
the block is not cached, it is in an unowned state. When only one processor has a copy of the
memory block, it is in an exclusive state. And when more than one processor has a copy of the
block, it is in a shared state; a bit vector indicates which caches may contain a copy.
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41
3: System Overview
When a processor modifies a block of data, the processors that have the same block of data in their
caches must be notified of the modification. The SGI UV 2000 server series uses an invalidation
method to maintain cache coherence. The invalidation method purges all unmodified copies of the
block of data, and the processor that wants to modify the block receives exclusive ownership of
the block.
Non-uniform Memory Access (NUMA)
In DSM systems, memory is physically located at various distances from the processors. As a
result, memory access times (latencies) are different or “non-uniform.” For example, it takes less
time for a processor blade to reference its locally installed memory than to reference remote
memory.
Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS)
The SGI UV 2000 server series components have the following features to increase the reliability,
availability, and serviceability (RAS) of the systems.
•
•
42
Power and cooling:
–
IRU power supplies are redundant and can be hot-swapped under most circumstances.
Note that this might not be possible in a “fully loaded” system. If all the blade positions
are filled, be sure to consult with a service technician before removing a power supply
while the system is running.
–
IRUs have overcurrent protection at the blade and power supply level.
–
Fans are redundant and can be hot-swapped.
–
Fans run at multiple speeds in the IRUs. Speed increases automatically when
temperature increases or when a single fan fails.
System monitoring:
–
System controllers monitor the internal power and temperature of the IRUs, and can
automatically shut down an enclosure to prevent overheating.
–
All main memory has Intel Single Device Data Correction, to detect and correct 8
contiguous bits failing in a memory device. Additionally, the main memory can detect
and correct any two-bit errors coming from two memory devices (8 bits or more apart).
–
All high speed links including Intel Quick Path Interconnect (QPI), Intel Scalable
Memory Interconnect (SMI), and PCIe have CRC check and retry.
–
The NUMAlink interconnect network is protected by cyclic redundancy check (CRC).
007-5832-001
System Features
•
•
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–
Each blade/node installed has status LEDs that indicate the blade’s operational
condition; LEDs are readable at the front of the IRU.
–
Systems support the optional Embedded Support Partner (ESP), a tool that monitors the
system; when a condition occurs that may cause a failure, ESP notifies the appropriate
SGI personnel.
–
Systems support remote console and maintenance activities.
Power-on and boot:
–
Automatic testing occurs after you power on the system. (These power-on self-tests or
POSTs are also referred to as power-on diagnostics or PODs).
–
Processors and memory are automatically de-allocated when a self-test failure occurs.
–
Boot times are minimized.
Further RAS features:
–
Systems have a local field-replaceable unit (FRU) analyzer.
–
All system faults are logged in files.
–
Memory can be scrubbed using error checking code (ECC) when a single-bit error
occurs.
43
3: System Overview
System Components
The SGI UV 2000 series system features the following major components:
•
42U rack. This is a custom rack used for both the compute and I/O rack in the SGI UV 2000
system. Up to four IRUs can be installed in each rack. There is also space reserved for a
system management node and other optional 19-inch rackmounted components.
•
Individual Rack Unit (IRU). This enclosure contains three power supplies, 2-8
compute/memory blades, baseIO and other optional riser enabled blades for the SGI UV
2000. The enclosure is 10U high. Figure 3-5 on page 45 shows the SGI UV 2000 IRU
system components.
•
Compute blade. Holds two processor sockets and 8 or 16 memory DIMMs. Each compute
blade can be ordered with a riser card that enables the blade to support various I/O options.
•
BaseIO enabled compute blade. I/O riser enabled blade that supports all base system I/O
functions including two ethernet connectors, two SAS ports, one BMC ethernet port and
three USB ports.
Note: While the baseIO blade is capable of RAID 0 support, SGI does not recommend the
end user configure it in this way. RAID 0 offers no fault tolerance to the system disks, and a
decrease in overall system reliability. In a RAID 0 configuration, failure of either system disk
will result in data being lost on both disks, resulting in system shutdown. The SGI UV 2000
ships with RAID 1 functionality (disk mirroring) configured if the option is ordered.
•
Dual disk enabled compute blade. This riser enabled blade supports two hard disk drives
that act as the system disks for the SSI. This blade must be installed adjacent to and
physically connected with the baseIO enabled compute blade. Jbod, RAID 0 and RAID 1 are
supported. Note that you must have the baseIO riser blade optionally enabled to use RAID 1
mirroring on your system disk pair.
•
Two-Slot Internal PCIe enabled compute blade. The internal PCIe riser based compute
blade supports two internally installed PCI Express option cards. Either two half-height or
one half-height and one full-height cards are supported.
•
External PCIe enabled compute blade. This PCIe enabled board is used in conjunction
with an exteranl PCIe expansion enclosure. A x16 adapter card connects from the blade to
the external expansion enclosure, supporting up to four PCIe option cards.
Note: PCIe card options may be limited, check with your SGI sales or support representative.
44
007-5832-001
System Components
Compute
blade 3
Compute
blade 7
Compute
blade 2
Compute
blade 6
Compute
blade 1
Compute
blade 5
Compute
blade 0
Compute
blade 4
PS0
Figure 3-5
007-5832-001
PS1
PS2
SGI UV 2000 IRU System Components Example
45
SAS4-7
PCIE
3: System Overview
VGA
LAN1
SERIAL
LAN0
2
SAS0-3
1
0
USB
Figure 3-6
BMC
BaseIO Riser Enabled Blade Front Panel Example
Bay (Unit) Numbering
Bays in the racks are numbered using standard units. A standard unit (SU) or unit (U) is equal to
1.75 inches (4.445 cm). Because IRUs occupy multiple standard units, IRU locations within a rack
are identified by the bottom unit (U) in which the IRU resides. For example, in a 42U rack, an IRU
positioned in U01 through U10 is identified as U01.
Rack Numbering
Each rack is numbered with a three-digit number sequentially beginning with 001. A rack contains
IRU enclosures, optional mass storage enclosures, and potentially other options. In a single
compute rack system, the rack number is always 001.
Optional System Components
Availability of optional components for the SGI UV 2000 systems may vary based on new product
introductions or end-of-life components. Some options are listed in this manual, others may be
introduced after this document goes to production status. Check with your SGI sales or support
representative for current information on available product options not discussed in this manual.
46
007-5832-001
Chapter 4
4. Rack Information
This chapter describes the physical characteristics of the tall (42U) SGI UV 2000 racks in the
following sections:
•
“Overview” on page 47
•
“SGI UV 2000 Series Rack (42U)” on page 48
•
“SGI UV 2000 System Rack Technical Specifications” on page 52
Overview
At the time this document was published only the tall (42U) SGI UV 2000 rack (shown in
Figure 4-2) was available from the SGI factory for use with the SGI UV 2000 systems. Other racks
may be available to house the system IRUs, check with your SGI sales or service representative
for information.
007-5832-001
47
4: Rack Information
SGI UV 2000 Series Rack (42U)
The tall rack (shown in Figure 4-1 on page 49) has the following features and components:
•
Front and rear door. The front door is opened by grasping the outer end of the
rectangular-shaped door piece and pulling outward. It uses a key lock for security purposes
that should open all the front doors in a multi-rack system (see Figure 4-2 on page 50).
Note: The front door and rear door locks are keyed differently. The optional water-chilled
rear door (see Figure 4-3 on page 51) does not use a lock.
The standard rear door has a push-button key lock to prevent unauthorized access to the
system. The rear doors have a master key that locks and unlocks all rear doors in a system
made up of multiple racks. You cannot use the rear door key to secure the front door lock.
•
Cable entry/exit area. Cable access openings are located in the front floor and top of the
rack. Multiple cables are attached to the front of the IRUs; therefore, a significant part of the
cable management occurs in the front part of the rack. The stand-alone system management
nodes have cables that attach at the rear of the rack. Rear cable connections will also be
required for optional storage modules installed in the same rack with the IRU(s). Optional
inter-rack communication cables can pass through the top of the rack. These are necessary
whenever the system consists of multiple racks. I/O and power cables normally pass through
the bottom of the rack.
•
Rack structural features. The rack is mounted on four casters; the two rear casters swivel.
There are four leveling pads available at the base of the rack. The base of the rack also has
attachment points to support an optional ground strap, and/or seismic tie-downs.
•
Power distribution units in the rack. Up to 12 outlets are required for a single-rack IRU
system as follows:
–
Allow three outlets for the first IRU
–
Two outlets for a maintenance node SMN (server)
–
Two outlets for each storage or PCIe expansion chassis
–
Allow three more outlets for each additional IRU in the system
Note than an eight outlet single-phase PDU may be used for the system management node
and other optional equipment.
48
007-5832-001
SGI UV 2000 Series Rack (42U)
Each three-phase power distribution unit has 9 outlet connections.
SG
IU
V2
00
Figure 4-1
007-5832-001
0
SGI UV 2000 Series Rack Example
49
4: Rack Information
SG
IU
V2
00
Figure 4-2
50
0
Front Lock on Tall (42U) Rack
007-5832-001
SGI UV 2000 Series Rack (42U)
00
V
IU
20
SG
Figure 4-3
007-5832-001
Optional Water-Chilled Cooling Units on Rear of SGI 42U Rack
51
4: Rack Information
SGI UV 2000 System Rack Technical Specifications
Table 4-1 lists the technical specifications of the SGI UV 2000 series tall rack.
Table 4-1
Tall Rack Technical Specifications
Characteristic
Specification
Height
79.5 in. (201.9 cm)
Width
31.3 in. (79.5 cm)
Depth
45.8 in. (116.3 cm)
Single-rack shipping
weight (approximate)
2,381 lbs. (1,082 kg) air cooled
2,581 (1,173 kg) water assist cooling
Single-rack system weight 2,300 lbs. (1,045 kg) air cooled
(approximate)
2,500 lbs (1,136 kg) water assist cooling
Voltage range
North America/International
Nominal
200-240 VAC /230 VAC
Tolerance range
180-264 VAC
Frequency
North America/International
Nominal
60 Hz /50 Hz
Tolerance range
47-63 Hz
Phase required
Single-phase or 3-phase
Power requirements (max) 34.57 kVA (33.88 kW) approximate
52
Hold time
16 ms
Power cable
8 ft. (2.4 m) pluggable cords
007-5832-001
Chapter 5
5. Optional Octal Router Chassis Information
This chapter describes the optional NUMAlink router technology available in SGI UV 2000
systems consisting of two or more racks. This router technology is available in an enclosure
“package” known as the Octal Router Chassis (ORC). This optional ORC chassis can be mounted
on the top of the SGI UV 2000 rack. NUMAlink 6 advanced router technology reduces UV 2000
system data transfer latency and increases bisection bandwidth performance. Router option
information is covered in the following sections:
•
“Overview” on page 53
•
“SGI UV 2000 Series NUMAlink Octal Router Chassis” on page 54
•
“SGI UV 2000 External NUMAlink System Technical Specifications” on page 56
Overview
At the time this document was published, external NUMAlink router technology was available to
support from 2 to 512 SGI UV 2000 racks. Other “internal” NUMAlink router options are also
available for high-speed communication between smaller groups of SGI UV 2000 racks. For more
information on these topics, contact your SGI sales or service representative.
The standard routers used in the SGI UV 2000 systems are the NL6 router blades located internally
to each IRU. Each of these first level routers contain a single 16-port NL6 HARP router ASIC and
connect to eight compute nodes within the IRU. The remaining eight ports of the internal router
are used to connect to other NL6 router blades or to the Octal Router Chassis. The NUMAlink
ORC enclosure is located at the top of each SGI UV 2000 rack equipped with the option. Each
top-mounted NUMAlink ORC enclosure contains one to eight 16-port HARP ASIC based router
boards. Each of these router boards has a single NL6 HARP router ASIC. This is the same router
ASIC that is used in the NL6 router blades installed inside the system IRUs.
Note that the ORC chassis also contains a chassis management controller (CMC) board, three
power supplies and its own cooling fans.
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53
5: Optional Octal Router Chassis Information
SGI UV 2000 Series NUMAlink Octal Router Chassis
The NUMAlink 6 ORC router is a 7U-high fully self contained chassis that holds up to eight
16-port NL6 router blade assemblies. Figure 5-1 shows an example rear view of the ORC with no
power or NUMAlink cables connected.
The NUMAlink ORC is composed of the following:
•
7U-high chassis
•
Up to 8 HARP based router blade assemblies
•
Cooling-fan assemblies
•
Chassis Management Controller (CMC)/power supply assembly (with three power supplies)
HEARTBEAT
PWR GOOD
SMN
CMC
ACC
CONSOLE
RESET
BMC ETH0 LINK
HEARTBEAT
PWR GD
3.3v
12v
BMC ETH0 LINK
HEARTBEAT
PWR GD
3.3v
12v
BMC ETH0 LINK
HEARTBEAT
PWR GD
3.3v
12v
BMC ETH0 LINK
HEARTBEAT
PWR GD
3.3v
12v
BMC ETH0 LINK
HEARTBEAT
PWR GD
3.3v
12v
BMC ETH0 LINK
HEARTBEAT
PWR GD
3.3v
12v
BMC ETH0 LINK
HEARTBEAT
PWR GD
3.3v
12v
BMC ETH0 LINK
HEARTBEAT
PWR GD
3.3v
12v
Figure 5-1
54
ID
ID
ID
ID
ID
ID
ID
ID
SGI UV 2000 Optional NUMAlink ORC (Rear View)
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SGI UV 2000 Series NUMAlink Octal Router Chassis
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Figure 5-2
SGI UV 2000 Optional ORC Chassis Example (Front View)
Note: The NUMAlink unit’s CMC is connected to the CMC in each IRU installed in the rack.
007-5832-001
55
5: Optional Octal Router Chassis Information
SGI UV 2000 External NUMAlink System Technical Specifications
Table 5-1 lists the basic technical specifications of the SGI UV 2000 series external NUMAlink
ORC chassis.
Table 5-1
56
NUMAlink ORC Technical Specifications
Characteristic
Specification
Height
7U or 12.25 in. (31.1 cm)
Width
13.83 in. (35.13 cm)
Depth
14.66 in (37.24 cm)
Top-mount NUMAlink
router weight
(approximate)
53 lbs. (24.1 kg) not including attached
cables
Power supply
Three 760-Watt hot-plug power supplies
Voltage range
North America/International
Nominal
100-240 VAC /230 VAC
Frequency
North America/International
Nominal
60 Hz /50 Hz
Tolerance range
47-63 Hz
Phase required
Single-phase
Power cables
6.5 ft. (2 m) pluggable cords
007-5832-001
Chapter 6
6. Add or Replace Procedures
This chapter provides information about installing and removing PCIe cards and system disk
drives from your SGI system, as follows:
•
“Maintenance Precautions and Procedures” on page 57
•
“Adding or Replacing PCIe Cards in the Expansion Enclosure” on page 60
•
“Removing and Replacing an IRU Enclosure Power Supply” on page 64
Maintenance Precautions and Procedures
This section describes how to open the system for maintenance and upgrade, protect the
components from static damage, and return the system to operation. The following topics are
covered:
•
“Preparing the System for Maintenance or Upgrade” on page 58
•
“Returning the System to Operation” on page 58
Warning: To avoid problems that could void your warranty, your SGI or other approved
system support engineer (SSE) should perform all the setup, addition, or replacement of
parts, cabling, and service of your SGI UV 2000 system, with the exception of the following:
007-5832-001
•
Using your system console or network access workstation to enter commands and perform
system functions such as powering on and powering off, as described in this guide
•
Installing, removing or replacing cards in the optional PCIe equipped riser blade or optional
1U PCIe expansion chassis
•
Adding and replacing disk drives used with your system and using the ESI/ops panel
(operating panel) on optional mass storage
•
Removing and replacing IRU power supplies
57
6: Add or Replace Procedures
Preparing the System for Maintenance or Upgrade
To prepare the system for maintenance, follow these steps:
1.
If you are logged on to the system, log out. Follow standard procedures for gracefully
halting the operating system.
2. Go to the section “Powering-On and Off From the SGI Management Center Interface” in
Chapter 1 if you are not familiar with power down procedures.
3. After the system is powered off, locate the power distribution unit(s) (PDUs) in the front of
the rack and turn off the circuit breaker switches on each PDU.
Note: Powering the system off is not a requirement when replacing a RAID 1 system disk.
Addition of a non-RAID disk can be accomplished while the system is powered on, but the
disk is not automatically recognized by system software.
Returning the System to Operation
When you finish installing or removing components, return the system to operation as follows:
1.
Turn each of the PDU circuit breaker switches to the “on” position.
2. Power up the system. If you are not familiar with the proper power down procedure, review
the section “Powering-On and Off From the SGI Management Center Interface” in
Chapter 1.
3. Verify that the LEDs on the system power supplies and system blades turn on and illuminate
green which indicates that the power-on procedure is proceeding properly.
If your system does not boot correctly, see “Troubleshooting Chart” in Chapter 7, for
troubleshooting procedures.
58
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Overview of PCI Express (PCIe) Operation
Overview of PCI Express (PCIe) Operation
This section provides a brief overview of the PCI Express (PCIe) technology available as an
option with your system. PCI Express has both compatibility and differences with older
PCI/PCI-X technology. Check with your SGI sales or service representative for more detail on
specific PCI Express board options available with the SGI UV 2000.
PCI Express is compatible with PCI/PCI-X in the following ways:
•
Compatible software layers
•
Compatible device driver models
•
Same basic board form factors
•
PCIe controlled devices appear the same as PCI/PCI-X devices to most software
PCI Express technology is different from PCI/PCI-X in the following ways:
•
PCI Express uses a point-to-point serial interface vs. a shared parallel bus interface used in
older PCI/PCI-X technology
•
PCIe hardware connectors are not compatible with PCI/PCI-X, (see Figure 6-1)
•
Potential sustained throughput of x16 PCI Express is approximately four times that of the
fastest PCI-X throughputs
PCI 2.0 32-bit
PCI Express x1
PCI Express x16
Figure 6-1
Comparison of PCI/PCI-X Connector with PCI Express Connectors
PCI Express technology uses two pairs of wires for each transmit and receive connection (4 wires
total). These four wires are generally referred to as a lane or x1 connection - also called “by 1”.
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59
6: Add or Replace Procedures
SGI UV 2000 PCIe technology is available up to a x16 connector (64 wires) or “by 16” in PCI
Express card slots. This technology will support PCIe boards that use connectors up to x16 in size.
Table 6-1 shows this concept.
For information on which slots in the PCIe expansion chassis support what lane levels, see
Table 6-2 on page 61.
Table 6-1
SGI UV 2000 PCIe Support Levels
SGI x16 PCIe
Connectors
Support levels in
optional chassis
x1 PCIe cards
Supported in all four slots
x2 PCIe cards
Supported in all four slots
x4 PCIe cards
Supported in all four slots
x8 PCIe cards
Supported in two slots
x16 PCIe cards
1 slot supported
x32 PCIe cards
Not supported
Adding or Replacing PCIe Cards in the Expansion Enclosure
Warning: Before installing, operating, or servicing any part of this product, read the
“Safety Information” on page 85.
This section provides instructions for adding or replacing a PCIe card in a PCIe expansion
enclosure installed in your system. To maximize the operating efficiency of your cards, be sure to
read all the introductory matter before beginning the installation.
!
60
Caution: To protect the PCIe cards from ESD damage, SGI recommends that you use a
grounding wrist strap while installing a PCIe card.
007-5832-001
Adding or Replacing PCIe Cards in the Expansion Enclosure
Installing Cards in the 1U PCIe Expansion Chassis
The PCIe expansion chassis functions in a similar manner to a computer chassis that supports PCIe
slots. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions or restrictions for installing their card.
Important: Replacement (swapping) of a PCIe card in the 1U chassis may be done while the
system is powered on. Addition of a new card while the system is running requires a reboot to
initiate recognition and functionality. Removal (without replacement) of an existing PCIe card
may cause system error messages. When installing PCIe cards, ensure that the input current rating
specified on the AC input label is not exceeded.
The EB4-1U-SGI chassis provides space for up to four (4) PCIe cards in the following “lane”
bandwidth configurations:
Table 6-2
PCIe Expansion Slot Bandwidth Support Levels
PCIe expansion
enclosure slot #
PCIe connector level
supported by slot
PCIe slot number location
in board “carriage”
Slot 1
Up to x16
Bottom-left side
Slot 2
Up to x4
Top-left side
Slot 3
Up to x8
Top-right side
Slot 4
Up to x4
Bottom-right side
Note: Before installing the PCIe expansion cards, be sure to remove each respective slot cover
and use its screw to secure your expansion card in place.
1.
Working from the front of the expansion chassis, locate the two “thumb screws” that hold
the PCIe board “carriage” in the expansion chassis.
2. Turn the two thumb screws counter-clockwise until they disengage from the 1U chassis.
3. Pull the T-shaped board “carriage” out of the chassis until the slots are clear of the unit.
4. Select an available slot based on the lane support your PCIe card requires, see Table 6-2.
5. Remove the metal slot cover from the selected slot and retain its screw.
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61
6: Add or Replace Procedures
6. Fit the PCIe card into the slot connector with the connector(s) extending out the front of the
bracket, then secure the board with the screw that previously held the metal slot cover.
7. Push the PCIe board “carriage” back into the enclosure until it is seated and twist the
retaining thumb screws clockwise (right) until fully secure.
Important: After installation, be sure to power on the PCIe expansion enclosure before
re-booting your system.
Figure 6-2
62
The PCIe Expansion Enclosure
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Adding or Replacing PCIe Cards in the Expansion Enclosure
Figure 6-3
007-5832-001
Card Slot Locations
63
6: Add or Replace Procedures
Removing and Replacing an IRU Enclosure Power Supply
To remove and replace power supplies in an SGI UV 2000 IRU, you do not need any tools. Under
most circumstances a single power supply in an IRU can be replaced without shutting down the
enclosure or the complete system. In the case of a fully configured (loaded) enclosure, this may
not be possible.
Caution: The body of the power supply may be hot; allow time for cooling and handle with care.
Use the following steps to replace a power supply in the blade enclosure box:
1.
Open the front door of the rack and locate the power supply that needs replacement.
2. Disengage the power-cord retention clip and disconnect the power cord from the power
supply that needs replacement.
Press latch
to release
Figure 6-4
64
Removing an Enclosure Power Supply
007-5832-001
Adding or Replacing PCIe Cards in the Expansion Enclosure
3. Press the retention latch of the power supply toward the power connector to release the
supply from the enclosure, see Figure 6-4 on page 64.
4. Using the power supply handle, pull the power supply straight out until it is partly out of the
chassis. Use one hand to support the bottom of the supply as you fully extract it from the
enclosure.
5. Align the rear of the replacement power supply with the enclosure opening.
6. Slide the power supply into the chassis until the retention latch engages - you should hear an
audible click.
7. Reconnect the power cord to the supply and engage the retention clip.
Note: If AC power to the rear fan assembly is disconnected prior to the replacement procedure,
all the fans will come on and run at top speed when power is reapplied. The speeds will readjust
when normal communication with the IRU’s CMC is fully established.
Replacing an IRU Enclosure Power Supply
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65
Chapter 7
7. Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
This chapter provides the following sections to help you troubleshoot your system:
007-5832-001
•
“Troubleshooting Chart” on page 68
•
“LED Status Indicators” on page 69
•
“SGI Electronic Support” on page 71
67
7: Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Troubleshooting Chart
Table 7-1 lists recommended actions for problems that can occur. To solve problems that are not
listed in this table, use the SGI Electronic Support system or contact your SGI system support
representative. For more information about the SGI Electronic Support system, see the “SGI
Electronic Support” on page 71. For an international list of SGI support centers, see:
http://www.sgi.com/support/supportcenters.html
Table 7-1
Troubleshooting Chart
Problem Description
Recommended Action
The system will not power on.
Ensure that the power cords of the IRU are seated properly
in the power receptacles.
Ensure that the PDU circuit breakers are on and properly
connected to the wall source.
If the power cord is plugged in and the circuit breaker is on,
contact your technical support organization.
An individual IRU will not power on.
Ensure the power cables of the IRU are plugged in.
Confirm the PDU(s) supporting the IRU are on.
No status LEDs are lighted on an individual
blade.
Confirm the blade is firmly seated in the IRU enclosure.
See also “Compute/Memory Blade LEDs” on page 70.
The system will not boot the operating system. Contact your SGI support organization:
http://www.sgi.com/support/supportcenters.html
The amber (yellow) status LED of an IRU
Ensure the power cable to the supply is firmly connected at
power supply is lit or the LED is not lit at all. both ends and that the PDU is turned to on. Check and
See Table 7-2 on page 69.
confirm the supply is fully plugged in. If the green LED
does not light, contact your support organization.
The PWR LED of a populated PCIe slot is not Reseat the PCI card.
illuminated.
68
The Fault LED of a populated PCIe slot is
illuminated (on).
Reseat the card. If the fault LED remains on, replace the
card.
The amber LED of a disk drive is on.
Replace the disk drive.
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LED Status Indicators
LED Status Indicators
There are a number of LEDs on the front of the IRUs that can help you detect, identify and
potentially correct functional interruptions in the system. The following subsections describe
these LEDs and ways to use them to understand potential problem areas.
IRU Power Supply LEDs
Each power supply installed in an IRU has a bi-color status LED. The LED will either light green
or amber (yellow), or flash green or yellow to indicate the status of the individual supply. See
Table 7-2 for a complete list.
Table 7-2
007-5832-001
Power Supply LED States
Power supply status
Green LED
Amber LED
No AC power to the supply
Off
Off
Power supply has failed
Off
On
Power supply problem warning
Off
Blinking
AC available to supply (standby)
but IRU is off
Blinking
Off
Power supply on (IRU on)
On
Off
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7: Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
Compute/Memory Blade LEDs
Each compute/memory blade installed in an IRU has a total of seven LED indicators visable
behind the perforated sheetmetal of the blade.
At the bottom end (or left side) of the blade (from left to right):
•
System power good green LED
•
BMC heartbeat green LED
•
Blue unit identifier (UID) LED
•
BMC Ethernet 1 green LED
•
BMC Ethernet 0 green LED
•
Green 3.3V auxiliary power LED
•
Green 12V power good LED
If the blade is properly seated and the system is powered on and there is no LED activity showing
on the blade, it must be replaced. Figure 7-1 shows the locations of the blade LEDs.
Green LEDs
Green LEDs
Blue LED
Figure 7-1
70
UV Compute Blade Status LED Locations Example
007-5832-001
SGI Electronic Support
SGI Electronic Support
SGI Electronic Support provides system support and problem-solving services that function
automatically, which helps resolve problems before they can affect system availability or develop
into actual failures. SGI Electronic Support integrates several services so they work together to
monitor your system, notify you if a problem exists, and search for solutions to problems.
Figure 7-2 shows the sequence of events that occurs if you use all of the SGI Electronic Support
capabilities.
1
Customer's system
Implement
solution
2
6
e-mail
3
Supportfolio
Online
5
Page or e-mail
alert
View the case
solutions
SGI customer and
SGI support engineer
SGI global
customer support
center
4
SGI Knowledgebase
Figure 7-2
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Full Support Sequence Example
71
7: Troubleshooting and Diagnostics
The sequence of events can be described as follows:
1.
Embedded Support Partner (ESP) software monitors your system 24 hours a day.
2. When a specified system event is detected, ESP notifies SGI via e-mail (plain text or
encrypted).
3. Applications that are running at SGI analyze the information, determine whether a support
case should be opened, and open a case if necessary. You and SGI support engineers are
contacted (via pager or e-mail) with the case ID and problem description.
4. SGI Knowledgebase searches thousands of tested solutions for possible fixes to the problem.
Solutions that are located in SGI Knowledgebase are attached to the service case.
5. You and the SGI support engineers can view and manage the case by using Supportfolio
Online as well as search for additional solutions or schedule maintenance.
6. Implement the solution.
Most of these actions occur automatically, and you may receive solutions to problems before they
affect system availability. You also may be able to return your system to service sooner if it is out
of service.
In addition to the event monitoring and problem reporting, SGI Electronic Support monitors both
system configuration (to help with asset management) and system availability and performance
(to help with capacity planning).
72
007-5832-001
SGI Electronic Support
The following three components compose the integrated SGI Electronic Support system:
SGI Embedded Support Partner (ESP) is a set of tools and utilities that are embedded in the
SGI Linux ProPack release. ESP can monitor a single system or group of systems for system
events, software and hardware failures, availability, performance, and configuration changes, and
then perform actions based on those events. ESP can detect system conditions that indicate
potential problems, and then alert appropriate personnel by pager, console messages, or e-mail
(plain text or encrypted). You also can configure ESP to notify an SGI call center about problems;
ESP then sends e-mail to SGI with information about the event.
SGI Knowledgebase is a database of solutions to problems and answers to questions that can be
searched by sophisticated knowledge management tools. You can log on to SGI Knowledgebase
at any time to describe a problem or ask a question. Knowledgebase searches thousands of
possible causes, problem descriptions, fixes, and how-to instructions for the solutions that best
match your description or question.
Supportfolio Online is a customer support resource that includes the latest information about
patch sets, bug reports, and software releases.
The complete SGI Electronic Support services are available to customers who have a valid SGI
Warranty, FullCare, FullExpress, or Mission-Critical support contract. To purchase a support
contract that allows you to use the complete SGI Electronic Support services, contact your SGI
sales representative. For more information about the various support contracts, see the following
Web page:
http://www.sgi.com/support
For more information about SGI Electronic Support, see the following Web page:
http://www.sgi.com/support/es
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73
Appendix A
A. Technical Specifications and Pinouts
This appendix contains technical specification information about your system, as follows:
•
“System-level Specifications” on page 75
•
“Physical Specifications” on page 76
•
“Environmental Specifications” on page 77
•
“Power Specifications” on page 78
•
“I/O Port Specifications” on page 79
System-level Specifications
Table A-1 summarizes the SGI UV 2000 system configuration ranges. Note that while each
compute/memory blade holds two processor sockets (one per node board); each socket can
support four, six, or eight processor “cores”.
Table A-1
SGI UV 2000 System Configuration Ranges
Category
Minimum
Maximum
Processors
32 processor cores (2 blades)a 2,048 processor cores (per SSI)
Individual Rack Units (IRUs)
1 per rack
4 per rack
Blades per IRU
2 per IRU
8 per IRU
Compute/memory blade DIMM
capacity
8 DIMMs per blade
16 DIMMs per blade
CMC units
1 per IRU
1 per IRU
Number of baseIO riser enabled
blades
One per SSI
One per SSI
a. Dual-node blades support eight to 16 cores per blade.
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75
A: Technical Specifications and Pinouts
Physical Specifications
Table A-2 shows the physical specifications of the SGI UV 2000 system.
Table A-2
SGI UV 2000 Physical Specifications
Feature
Specification
Dimensions for a single 24-inch
Height: 79.5 in. (201.9 cm)
wide tall rack, including doors and Width: 31.3 in. (79.5 cm)
side panels
Depth: 43.45 in. (110. 4 cm)
Shipping dimensions
Height: 81.25 in. (206.4 cm)
Width: 42 in. (106.7 cm)
Depth: 52 in. (132.1 cm)
Single-rack shipping weight
(approximate)
2,381 lbs. (1,082 kg) air cooled
2,581 lbs. (1,173 kg) water assist cooling
Single-rack system weight
(approximate)
2,300 lbs. (1,045 kg) air cooled
2,500 lbs. (1,136 kg) water assist cooling
Access requirements
Front
48 in. (121.9 cm)
Rear
48 in. (121.9 cm)
Side
None
10U-high Individual Rack Unit
(IRU) enclosure specifications
Dimensions: 17.5 in high x 19 in (flange width) wide x 27 in deep
44.45 cm high x 48.26 cm wide x 68.58 cm deep
Note: Racks equipped with optional top-mounted NUMAlink (ORC) routers have an additional
weight of 53 lbs. (24.1 kg) plus the weight of additional cables.
76
007-5832-001
Environmental Specifications
Environmental Specifications
Table A-3 lists the environmental specifications of the system.
Table A-3
Environmental Specifications
Feature
Specification
Temperature tolerance
(operating)
+5 C (41 F) to +35 C (95 F) (up to 1500 m / 5000 ft.)
+5 C (41 F) to +30 C (86 F) (1500 m to 3000 m /5000 ft. to 10,000 ft.)
Temperature tolerance
(non-operating)
-40 C (-40 F) to +60 C (140 F)
Relative humidity
10% to 80% operating (no condensation)
8% to 95% non-operating (no condensation)
Heat dissipation full
007-5832-001
SGI UV 2000 (rack)
115.6 kBTU/hr maximum (based on 33.88 kW) approximate
Cooling requirement
Ambient air or optional water cooling
Air flow: intake (front),
exhaust (rear)
Approximately 2,800 CFM (normal operation)
Maximum altitude
10,000 ft. (3,049 m) operating
40,000 ft. (12,195 m) non-operating
77
A: Technical Specifications and Pinouts
Power Specifications
Table A-4 shows the power specifications for the system.
Table A-4
Power Specifications
Feature
Specification
Single-phase power requirements
Voltage
200-240V (180-254 VAC min/max)
Frequency
50-60 Hz
Power
33.88 kW per rack
Hold-up time
16 ms
Three-phase power requirements
Voltage
US/Japan 208V (180-254 VAC)
International 400V (312-440 VAC)
78
Frequency
50-60 Hz
Power
33.88 kW per compute rack
Total harmonic distortion
Less than 10% at full load
007-5832-001
I/O Port Specifications
I/O Port Specifications
This section contains specifications and port pinout information for the base I/O ports of your
system, as follows:
•
“BaseIO VGA Port Information” on page 79
•
“Ethernet Port” on page 81
•
“Serial Ports” on page 82
•
“USB Type A Connector” on page 84
BaseIO VGA Port Information
The 15-pin VGA port on the baseIO blade (see Figure A-1) has the following features:
•
Server-class 2D hardware acceleration support with integrated 24-bit RAMDAC
•
Display resolution up to 1600 x 1200 @ 60Hz
•
Up to 128 Mbytes DDRII memory interface support
•
A single USB keyboard/mouse is supported by the baseIO blade connectors
The baseIO VGA interface (see Table A-5 on page 80) can be used for all basic interaction with
your SGI UV 2000 system. Note that it does not provide a direct interconnect to the system CMC
or SMN.
5
1
10
6
15
Figure A-1
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11
VGA Port Pinouts
79
A: Technical Specifications and Pinouts
Table A-5
80
VGA Pin Functions
Pin Number
Function
1
Red
2
Green
3
Blue
4
N/C
5
Ground
6
Ground
7
Ground
8
Ground
9
Ground
10
Ground
11
N/C
12
DDCDAT
13
HSYNC
14
VSYNC
15
DDCCLK
007-5832-001
I/O Port Specifications
Ethernet Port
The system auto-selects the Ethernet port speed and type (duplex vs. half-duplex) when the server
is booted, based on what it is connected to. Figure A-2 shows the Ethernet port.
Pin 4
Pin 5
Pin 6
Pin 3
Pin 7
Pin 2
Pin 1
Pin 8
Figure A-2
Ethernet Port
Table A-6 shows the cable pinout assignments for the Ethernet port operating in 10/100-Base-T
mode and also operating in 1000Base-T mode.
Table A-6
Ethernet Pinouts
Ethernet 10/100Base-T Pinouts
Gigabit Ethernet Pinouts
Pins
Assignment
Pins
Assignment
1
Transmit +
1
Transmit/Receive 0 +
2
Transmit –
2
Transmit/Receive 0 –
3
Receive +
3
Transmit/Receive 1 +
4
NU
4
Transmit/Receive 2 +
5
NU
5
Transmit/Receive 2 –
6
Receive –
6
Transmit/Receive 1 –
7
NU
7
Transmit/Receive 3 +
8
NU
8
Transmit/Receive 3 –
NU = Not used
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81
A: Technical Specifications and Pinouts
Serial Ports
The IRU and the optional router modules have 9-pin serial interface connectors. These ports are
for console interface and are capable of transferring data at rates as high as 230 kbps. Other
features of the ports include the following:
•
Programmable data, parity, and stop bits
•
Programmable baud rate and modem control
Figure A-3 shows a serial port.
Pin 3
Transmit
Data (TXD)
Pin 2
Receive Data
(RXD)
Pin 1
Data Carrier
Detect (DCD)
(not used)
Pin 4
Data Terminal
Ready (DTR)
(not used)
Pin 5
Ground
Pin 6
Data Set
Ready (DSR)
(not used)
Pin 7
Request to
Send (RTS)
Figure A-3
82
Pin 9
Ringing Indicator (RI)
(not used)
Pin 8
Clear to Send
(CTS)
Serial Port Connector
007-5832-001
I/O Port Specifications
Table A-7 shows pinout assignments for the 9-pin male DB-9 connector.
Table A-7
007-5832-001
Serial Port Pinout
Pin
Assignment
Description
1
DCD
Data carrier detect
2
RXD
Receive data
3
TXD
Transmit data
4
DTR
Data terminal ready
5
GND
Signal ground
6
DSR
Data set ready
7
RTS
Request to send
8
CTS
Clear to send
9
RI
Ring indicator
83
A: Technical Specifications and Pinouts
USB Type A Connector
Figure A-4 shows the USB type A connector provided on the baseIO riser blade that supports
general USB applications and optional keyboard and mouse configurations.
Table A-8 lists the pin assignments for the USB type A connector.
1
84
2
3
4
Figure A-4
Pin Number Locations for USB Type A Connector
Table A-8
Pin Assignments for USB Type A Connector
Signal
Color
Pin Number
VCC
Red
1
-Data
White
2
+Data
Green
3
Ground
Black
4
007-5832-001
Appendix B
B. Safety Information and Regulatory Specifications
This appendix provides safety information and regulatory specifications for your system in the
following sections:
•
“Safety Information” on page 85
•
“Regulatory Specifications” on page 87
Safety Information
Read and follow these instructions carefully:
1.
Follow all warnings and instructions marked on the product and noted in the documentation
included with this product.
2. Unplug this product before cleaning. Do not use liquid cleaners or aerosol cleaners. Use a
damp cloth for cleaning.
3. Do not use this product near water.
4. Do not place this product or components of this product on an unstable cart, stand, or table.
The product may fall, causing serious damage to the product.
5. Slots and openings in the system are provided for ventilation. To ensure reliable operation of
the product and to protect it from overheating, these openings must not be blocked or
covered. This product should never be placed near or over a radiator or heat register, or in a
built-in installation, unless proper ventilation is provided.
6. This product should be operated from the type of power indicated on the marking label. If
you are not sure of the type of power available, consult your dealer or local power company.
7. Do not allow anything to rest on the power cord. Do not locate this product where people
will walk on the cord.
8. Never push objects of any kind into this product through cabinet slots as they may touch
dangerous voltage points or short out parts that could result in a fire or electric shock. Never
spill liquid of any kind on the product.
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85
B: Safety Information and Regulatory Specifications
9. Do not attempt to service this product yourself except as noted in this guide. Opening or
removing covers of node and switch internal components may expose you to dangerous
voltage points or other risks. Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel.
10. Unplug this product from the wall outlet and refer servicing to qualified service personnel
under the following conditions:
•
When the power cord or plug is damaged or frayed.
•
If liquid has been spilled into the product.
•
If the product has been exposed to rain or water.
•
If the product does not operate normally when the operating instructions are followed.
Adjust only those controls that are covered by the operating instructions since improper
adjustment of other controls may result in damage and will often require extensive work
by a qualified technician to restore the product to normal condition.
•
If the product has been dropped or the cabinet has been damaged.
•
If the product exhibits a distinct change in performance, indicating a need for service.
11. If a lithium battery is a soldered part, only qualified SGI service personnel should replace
this lithium battery. For other types, replace it only with the same type or an equivalent type
recommended by the battery manufacturer, or the battery could explode. Discard used
batteries according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
12. Use only the proper type of power supply cord set (provided with the system) for this unit.
13. Do not attempt to move the system alone. Moving a rack requires at least two people.
14. Keep all system cables neatly organized in the cable management system. Loose cables are a
tripping hazard that cause injury or damage the system.
86
007-5832-001
Regulatory Specifications
Regulatory Specifications
The following topics are covered in this section:
•
“CMN Number” on page 87
•
“CE Notice and Manufacturer’s Declaration of Conformity” on page 87
•
“Electromagnetic Emissions” on page 88
•
“Shielded Cables” on page 90
•
“Electrostatic Discharge” on page 90
•
“Laser Compliance Statements” on page 91
•
“Lithium Battery Statement” on page 92
This SGI system conforms to several national and international specifications and European
Directives listed on the “Manufacturer’s Declaration of Conformity.” The CE mark insignia
displayed on each device is an indication of conformity to the European requirements.
!
Caution: This product has several governmental and third-party approvals, licenses, and permits.
Do not modify this product in any way that is not expressly approved by SGI. If you do, you may
lose these approvals and your governmental agency authority to operate this device.
CMN Number
The model number, or CMN number, for the system is on the system label, which is mounted
inside the rear door on the base of the rack.
CE Notice and Manufacturer’s Declaration of Conformity
The “CE” symbol indicates compliance of the device to directives of the European Community.
A “Declaration of Conformity” in accordance with the standards has been made and is available
from SGI upon request.
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87
B: Safety Information and Regulatory Specifications
Electromagnetic Emissions
This section provides the contents of electromagnetic emissions notices from various countries.
FCC Notice (USA Only)
This equipment complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two
conditions:
•
This device may not cause harmful interference.
•
This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause
undesired operation.
Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital
device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable
protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a commercial
environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not
installed and used in accordance with the instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to
radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference, in which case you will be required to correct the interference at your own expense.
If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on, you are encouraged to try to correct the
interference by using one or more of the following methods:
•
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
•
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
•
Connect the equipment to an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is
connected.
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
!
88
Caution: Changes or modifications to the equipment not expressly approved by the party
responsible for compliance could void your authority to operate the equipment.
007-5832-001
Regulatory Specifications
Industry Canada Notice (Canada Only)
This Class A digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing
Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique német pas de perturbations radioélectriques dépassant les normes
applicables aux appareils numériques de Classe A préscrites dans le Règlement sur les
interferences radioélectriques établi par le Ministère des Communications du Canada.
VCCI Notice (Japan Only)
Figure B-1
VCCI Notice (Japan Only)
Korean Class A Regulatory Notice
Figure B-2
007-5832-001
Korean Class A Regulatory Notice
89
B: Safety Information and Regulatory Specifications
Shielded Cables
This SGI system is FCC-compliant under test conditions that include the use of shielded cables
between the system and its peripherals. Your system and any peripherals you purchase from SGI
have shielded cables. Shielded cables reduce the possibility of interference with radio, television,
and other devices. If you use any cables that are not from SGI, ensure that they are shielded.
Telephone cables do not need to be shielded.
Optional monitor cables supplied with your system use additional filtering molded into the cable
jacket to reduce radio frequency interference. Always use the cable supplied with your system. If
your monitor cable becomes damaged, obtain a replacement cable from SGI.
Electrostatic Discharge
SGI designs and tests its products to be immune to the effects of electrostatic discharge (ESD).
ESD is a source of electromagnetic interference and can cause problems ranging from data errors
and lockups to permanent component damage.
It is important that you keep all the covers and doors, including the plastics, in place while you are
operating the system. The shielded cables that came with the unit and its peripherals should be
installed correctly, with all thumbscrews fastened securely.
An ESD wrist strap may be included with some products, such as memory or PCI upgrades. The
wrist strap is used during the installation of these upgrades to prevent the flow of static electricity,
and it should protect your system from ESD damage.
90
007-5832-001
Regulatory Specifications
Laser Compliance Statements
The DVD-ROM drive in this computer is a Class 1 laser product. The DVD-ROM drive’s
classification label is located on the drive.
Warning: Avoid exposure to the invisible laser radiation beam when the device is open.
Warning: Attention: Radiation du faisceau laser invisible en cas d’ouverture. Evitter
toute exposition aux rayons.
Warning: Vorsicht: Unsichtbare Laserstrahlung, Wenn Abdeckung geöffnet, nicht dem
Strahl aussetzen.
Warning: Advertencia: Radiación láser invisible al ser abierto. Evite exponerse a los
rayos.
Warning: Advarsel: Laserstråling vedåbning se ikke ind i strålen
Warning: Varo! Lavattaessa Olet Alttina Lasersåteilylle
Warning: Varning: Laserstrålning når denna del år öppnad ålå tuijota såteeseenstirra ej
in i strålen.
Warning: Varning: Laserstrålning nar denna del år öppnadstirra ej in i strålen.
Warning: Advarsel: Laserstråling nar deksel åpnesstirr ikke inn i strålen.
007-5832-001
91
B: Safety Information and Regulatory Specifications
Lithium Battery Statement
Warning: There is danger of explosion if a lithium battery is incorrectly replaced in this
product. Replace a battery only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the
manufacturer. Dispose of used batteries according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
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007-5832-001
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