LAMBTON KENT DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD REGULAR BOARD MEETING PUBLIC SESSION

LAMBTON  KENT  DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD REGULAR BOARD MEETING PUBLIC SESSION
LAMBTON KENT DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
REGULAR BOARD MEETING
PUBLIC SESSION
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2011
7:00p.m.
A
Board Room
Chatham Education Centre
476 McNaughton Avenue East, Chatham , Ontario
Page Reference
1.
Call to Order
2.
Approval of Agenda
3.
Declaration of Conflict of Interest
4.
Approval of the Minutes from the September 13, 2011 Regular Board Meeting
5.
Business Arising from the Minutes
6.
Motions Emanating from the Regular Board Private Session
7.
Motion that the Actions of the Regular Board Private Session be the Action of the Board .
8.
Presentations:
9.
Delegations:
1
10. Questions from the Public
11 . Reports for Board Action
12. Reports for Board Information
a) Special Education Advisory Committee Report
Trustee Hudie
Report B-11-140
b) Ontario Public School Boards' Association Update
Trustee Goldsmith
Oral Report
d) Parent Involvement Committee Report
Director Costello
Oral Report
e) 2010/2011 EQAO Assessments
f) Summer Semester 2011
13. Correspondence
a) Letter from the Ontario Public School Boards' Association regarding
Membership (June/30/2011)
b) Letter from the Ontario Public School Boards' Association regarding
the new school year (Sept/6/2011)
c) Letter from the Ontario Public School Boards' Association to
Grand Erie District School Board Chair regard ing membership
fee calculations (Sept/9/2011)
14. New Business
15. Trustee Question Period
16. Notices of Motion
17. Future Agenda Items
Superintendents Badder/Phills
Report B-11-141
Superintendent Phills
Report B-11-142
5
6
25
26
36
37
B
18. Announcements
a) The next Board Meeting will be held on October 11 , 2011 at Chatham Regional Education Centre, 7:00 p.m .
19. Adjournment
Lambton Kent District School Board
Minutes Of The Regular Board Meeting of September 13, 2011 held at the Chatham Education Centre
Page 1
PRESENT:
Trustees:
Chair, Carmen McGregor, Vice-Chair Jane Bryce , Anika Altiman , Randy
Campbell , lan Cryer, Ruth Ann Dodman, Jack Fletcher, Elizabeth Hudie, David
Goldsmith , Judy Krall and Scott McKinlay
Student Trustees
Staff:
Elizabeth Shepherd and Amy Werden
Jim Costello, Director of Education, Ron Andruchow Superintendent of
Business and Treasurer, Joy Sadder, Dave Doey, Mike Gilfoyle and Bert Phills
Superintendents of Education
Regrets:
Manager of Human Resources Doug Bastard
Recording Secretary:
Trish Johnston , Executive Assistant and Communications Officer
Call to Order:
Chair McGregor called the Meeting to order at 7:00p.m .
#2011-243
Approval of the Agenda
Sept/13/2011
Moved by Elizabeth Hudie, seconded by Randy Campbell,
Declaration of Conflict of
Interest:
No declarations of conflict of interest were issued .
#2011-244
Approval of Minutes
Aug/30/2011
Moved by Jack Fletcher, seconded by Judy Krall ,
#2011-245
Action of the Regular
Board Private Session be
the Action of the Board
Moved by Jane Bryce, seconded by Scott McKinlay,
Presentations:
Directors' Snapshots of
Excellence
Director Costello presented Snap Shots of Excellence from around the district
which included field trip excursions, celebrity visits to schools, National Aboriginal
Day activities , various scholarship recipients, grants for landscaping
enhancements , fundraising activities and outcomes , first day of school pictures
from various sites throughout the district, enhancements made to school facilities,
partnership activities and pictures from the annual senior leadership meeting and
new teacher training .
Delegations:
Chris Robinson , Naahii
Ridge Public School ,
Concerns about Crossing
Highway 21
Chris Robinson spoke on behalf of the Naahii Ridge Public School Council
supporting quick, effective measures for providing safety for children and parents
crossing Highway 21 to get to and from school. He outlined their safety issues
associated with crossing Highway 21 and proposed short and long term solutions.
They would like to see the speed limit changed , a crossing guard hired , a sidewalk
from Hillsdale to the school on Main Street, creation of a gravel parking lot at the
school , installation of a cross walk/stop sign and the formation of a focus group.
He suggested the focus group could consist of representatives from the Board ,
Municipality, Councilors , school staff, parent council and the police. The School
Council would like to see quick action to affect the best short and long term
solutions. In response to Trustee Hudie's question , Chris Robinson clarified that
they would like to see an additional parking lot at the school , changes to the
sidewalk and the creation of a focus group. Trustee McKinlay explained that due
to the Board 's rules of order, Trustees cannot debate this topic at this time but he
would be raising it under New Business on the Agenda . It was confirmed that
"That the Agenda for the Regular Board Meeting Public Session of
September 13, 2011 be approved ."
CARRIED.
"That the Board approve the Minutes of the Regular Board Meeting of
August 30, 2011."
CARRIED.
"That the Actions of the Board in Private Session be the Action of the Board."
CARRIED.
I
Lambton Kent District School Board
Minutes Of The Regular Board Meeting of September 13, 2011 held at the Chatham Education Centre
Page2
~
there is a new sign on Highway 21 indicating motorists are entering a school zone.
Chris Robinson commented that he feels more parents from the former Ridgetown
Public School are dropping off their children which has increased the traffic.
Director Costello thanked Chris Robinson for his presentation. He clarified the
Municipality's responsibility concerning school crossing guards. He quoted the
Highway Traffic Act outlining the responsibilities of municipalities. He commented
on the process followed by the Transition Committee and the letter sent to the
Municipality inviting them to work with the Board . He shared the Minister of
Education's letter of response to the Mayor of Chatham-Kent regarding sidewalks
and crossing guards. He confirmed that student safety is critical to the Board and
supported the need for a short term solution. Chair McGregor thanked Chris
Robinson for his presentation.
World Teachers' Day
Report B-11-134
Chair McGregor advised that the 44th Session of the International Conference on
Education, the United Nations agency declared October 5th as World Teachers'
Day. The Lambton Kent District School Board is very proud of its teachers and is
certainly aware of the important role they play in the development of children.
Our teachers are very dedicated and caring individuals striving to improve
student achievement for the betterment of society. Trustees expressed
appreciation for everything teachers do to enhance learning opportunities for the
students across Lambton Kent.
#2011-246
World Teachers' Day
Moved by Jane Bryce, seconded by lan Cryer,
"That the Board observe October 5, 2011 as World Teachers' Day in the
public schools of Lambton Kent."
CARRIED.
Schedule for Regular
Board Meetings for the
period December 2011 to
December 2012
Report B-11-135
#2011-247
Schedule for Regular
Board Meetings for the
period December 2011 to
December 2012
Ontario Public School
Boards' Association
Update (OPSBA)
Report B-11-136
#2011-248
Ontario Public School
Boards' Association
Update (OPSBA)
Director Costello presented the proposed Board Meeting schedule for December
2011 to December 2012 . The schedule for Regular Meetings of the Board is set
out in the Board 's Procedural By-laws. The Board is required to annually approve
the Board Meeting schedule for the next year. The Board Meetings in January
2012 will be held on the 3rd and 5th Tuesday to accommodate the School Break
from December 26 to January 6. Due to the construction underway in the Sarnia
Board Room , Board Meetings will continue to be held in the Chatham Board Room
until the construction is completed, likely in February 2012 .
Moved by Jack Fletcher, seconded by Randy Campbell ,
"That the Board approve the Regular Board Meeting schedule for the period
December 2011 to December 2012. "
CARRIED.
Trustee Goldsmith advised that the Ministry has extended the consultation period
for its draft fund raising guideline to November 1, 2011 . OPSBA's Policy
Development Work Team has been working on a draft submission. The Retired
Teachers of Ontario are holding an all candidates session for MPP hopefuls, on
September 20, at St. Clair College, Chatham, from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m . He
encouraged everyone to attend. OPSBA regional meetings have been scheduled
for October 15, 2011 and March 24, 2012. He updated the Board on the Ministry's
six month moratorium concerning tendering for transportation services.
Moved by David Goldsmith , seconded by Ruth Ann Dodman ,
"That the Board receive the update from the Ontario Public School Boards'
Association. "
CARRIED.
Lambton Kent District School Board
Minutes Of The Regular Board Meeting of September 13, 2011 held at the Chatham Education Centre
Page3
Major Capital Projects
Update Report B-11-137
#2011-249
Major Capital Projects
Update
3
Superintendent Andruchow presented a summary of the 30 capital improvement
projects underway totaling approximately $6 .5M . He highlighted the solar panel
roof project at Chatham-Kent Secondary School, the clay track at North Lambton
Secondary School, the resurfacing of secondary gymnasium floors, the science
labs at Ridgetown District High School and the new gymnasium and kindergarten
classroom at Rosedale Public School.
Moved by Judy Krall , seconded by David Goldsmith,
"That the Board receive the progress report on the current major capital
projects. "
CARRIED.
New Business
#2011-250
Tender for a Parking Lot at
Naahii Ridge Public
School
Trustee McKinlay referred to the delegation by Chris Robinson about the safety
concerns associated with crossing Highway 21 in front of Naahii Ridge Public
School.
Moved by Scott McKinlay, seconded by David Goldsmith ,
"That the Board investigate the cost of an approximate 40 car parking lot up
to including receiving tenders for the project at Naahii Ridge Public School.
Trustee McKinlay stated that the he would like to move the process forward and
have a gravel parking lot established on the school property. He would like to see
a report back in two weeks. He commented on the need for a crosswalk rather
than another sidewalk. Superintendent Andruchow confirmed that he would have
to follow the tender guidelines that take about a month to receive the tenders.
Contractors must be given adequate time to submit tenders based on the Board's
specifications. Director Costello supported the creation of a parking lot on the
school property using Board funds. Superintendent Andruchow advised that the
parking lot at Harwich Raleigh Public School cost around $20,000.00. Trustees
expressed support for the establishment of a parking lot. Trustee Bryce provided
examples of crosswalks and stop signs utilized at other school locations to assist
with highway crossings . Trustee Hudie suggested sending a letter to the
Municipality to indicate what the Board is planning and encourage them to move
forward. Trustee Campbell advised that on the first day of school he was in the
arena parking lot observing along with a Municipal Councilor, Municipal Staff,
Chatham-Kent police , a Superintendent, a Trustee and a Bus Operator. Everyone
was working together for the safety of the students.
CARRIED.
In response to Trustee Cryer's question, Superintendent Andruchow confirmed
that if the Board issues a tender for the project, it must follow the formal process.
#2011-251
Construction of Paths
At Naahii Ridge Public
School
Moved by Scott McKinlay, seconded by Randy Campbell ,
"That the Board investigate the cost of constructing two paths or sidewalks
from the Freda Street and Hillsdale Crescent access points to Naahii Ridge
Public School. "
Trustee McKinlay explained that for safety purposes students should be
encouraged to use other access points to the school and not Main Street.
Director Costello confirmed that this idea was discussed at the Transition
Committee Meetings. Principal Anderson confirmed that the majority of students
Lambton Kent District School Board
Minutes Of The Regular Board Meeting of September 13, 2011 held at the Chatham Education Centre
Page4
~
enter through the alternative paths and all students walk out through the field to
Hillcrest Street after school. The only people crossing the street are the parents
driving their students to school. After school is busier with more parents picking
up their children. The alternative paths are grass.
CARRIED.
$2011-252
Board Reconsider Motion
to Tender Parking Lot
Construction at Naahii
Ridge Public School
Investigate Parking Lot
Construction at Naahii
Ridge Public School
Moved by lan Cryer, seconded by Ruth Ann Dodman,
'That the Board reconsider the Motion to tender the parking lot."
CARRIED .
Moved by Scott McKinlay, seconded by lan Cryer,
"That the Board investigate the cost of an approximate 40 car parking lot at
Naahii Ridge Public School. "
Moved by Jane Bryce, seconded by Ruth Ann Dodman,
'That the Motion be amended to read "That the Board investigate the cost of
an approximate 40 car parking lot at Naahii Ridge Public School as a
temporary solution. "
VOTE ON THE AMENDMENT CARRIED.
Superintendent Andruchow confirmed that the cost to create a temporary parking
area at the school could come out of the existing capital budget approved by the
Board as part of the 2011/2012 Board budget.
The original Motion was withdrawn by the Mover and Seconder.
#2011-253
Temporary Parking Lot at
Naahii Ridge Public
School Approved
Moved by David Goldsmith, seconded by Ruth Ann Dodman,
"That the Board authorize Superintendent Andruchow to use the existing
capital budget for the school project to create a temporary parking solution
as quickly as possible ."
CARRIED.
Announcements
The next Board Meeting will be held on September 27, 2011 at the Chatham
Regional Education Centre, 7:00 p.m .
Adjournment
8:54p.m.
There being no further business, Chair McGregor declared the meeting
adjourned at 8:54 p.m.
Chair of the Board
Director of Education and Secretary of the Board
LAMBTON KENT DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
REGULAR BOARD, PUBLIC SESSION
REPORT NO.: B-11-140
5
REPORT TO BOARD
FROM:
Elizabeth Hudie, Vice-Chair SPECIAL EDUCATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE
DATE:
September 27,2011
SUBJECT:
SPECIAL EDUCATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING SUMMARY
*******************************************************************************************************************
The Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC) of the Lambton Kent District School Board met on September 15,
2011 at Wallaceburg District Secondary School, Library. Following is a report of the activities of the meeting:
1.0
2010-2011 SPECIAL EQUIPMENT AMOUNT (SEA) CLAIMS
A Memo detailing costs related to the 2010-2011 Special Equipment Amount (SEA) Claims process was
received by SEAC. During the 2010-2011 school year SEA Equipment was purchased for 310 students. Costsaving measures that have been implemented over the past year were highlighted.
2.0
DRAFT ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN
Copies of the DRAFT 2011 Annual Accessibility Plan for the Lambton Kent District School Board were distributed
to each SEAC Member. The contents of the Plan was reviewed and SEAC was provided with the opportunity to
submit comments or concerns.
3.0
2010-2011 EXCEPTIONAL PUPIL SUSPENSIONS
A chart summarizing the Number of Exceptional Pupil Suspensions for 2010-2011 was reviewed. Secondary=
292, Elementary = 137, which is a significant decrease from the previous school year. Some of the initiatives
that were introduced that may have been a factor in the reduction of suspensions (e.g., functions of behaviour,
universal supports training) were discussed .
4.0
2011-2012 PRIORITY-SETTING EXERCISE
SEAC participated in a priority-setting exercise involving an in-depth look at the Board's Vision, Mission, and
Belief Statements/Goals with a focus on determining strategies to assist with the achievement of the Goals of
the Lambton Kent District School Board. The strategies submitted will be summarized and reviewed at the
October SEAC meeting .
5.0
TRI-MINISTY MEMORANDUM DATED JULY 12,2011
SEAC reviewed a Memorandum from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, the Ministry of Children and
Youth Services, and the Ministry of Education regarding services for students with special needs and the fulltime Kindergarten program . Benefits of full-time Kindergarten for students with special needs including
collaboration with agencies to provide specialized services in the school setting were discussed.
6.0
FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS
How do IEP's Translate into the New Report Card Format?
2010-2011 EQAO Results
SEA Guide for Parents and Centralized Equipment Pool
2010-2011 SEAC Survey Results from Ministry of Education
•
•
•
•
7.0
NEXT MEETING
Thursday, October 13, 2011
Location to be Announced
7:00p.m.
Rose Gallaway, SEAC Chair
LAMBTON KENT DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
REGULAR BOARD, PUBLIC SESSION
REPORT NO: B-11-141
Memorandum To: Jim Costello, Director of Education
From:
Joy Badder, Superintendent of Education - Student Achievement Elementary
Bert Phills, Superintendent of Education - Student Achievement Secondary
Date:
September 27, 2011
Re:
2010/2011 EQAO Assessments
During the 2010 - 2011 school year assessments from the Educational Quality and Accountability
Office (EQAO) were administered in the Lambton Kent District School Board. The Primary and
Junior EQAO assessments of Reading , Writing , and Mathematics were administered in Grade 3
and Grade 6 classrooms. The Grade 9 Assessment of Mathematics and Grade 10 Ontario
Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSL T) were administered in secondary schools. Append ix 1
provides a detailed description of each assessment.
EQAO PRIMARY AND JUNIOR ASSESSMENTS OF READING, WRITING AND MATHEMATICS
PRIMARY ASSESSMENT OF READING, WRITING AND MATHEMATICS
Demographic data for the Lambton Kent District School Board shows that 1441 students
participated in the Primary Assessment of Reading , Writing and Mathematics. There was a 1%
increase over the previous year in the percentage of students achieving at or above the provincial
standard in Writing , a 3% decrease in Reading and a 5% decrease in Mathematics. The success
rate in Primary Reading remained 1% above the provincial average while Primary Writing was
equal to the provincial average. Primary Mathematics was 3% below the provincial average.
The following charts show the 2010-11 results in comparison to the province.
Primary Readina
Exempt No Data NE1 Level1 Level2 Level3
<1%
1%
24%
LKDSB
1%
7%
55%
1%
1%
24%
ONTARIO 3%
6%
57%
Primary Writina
Exempt No Data NE1 Level 1 Level2 Level3
LKDSB
1%
<1%
<1% 0%
26%
69%
1%
<1% <1%
24%
68%
ONTARIO 2%
Primary Mathematics
Exempt No Data NE1 Level 1 Level2 Level3
LKDSB
1%
<1%
<1% 3%
29%
56%
ONTARIO 2%
1%
<1% 3%
25%
57%
Level4
11%
8%
Level4
3%
5%
Level4
10%
12%
Report B-11-141
Pa e 2
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
Five Year Trends - Primary Assessment
EQAO Primary Reading
'<:!'
~
rn
...J
+"
f1l
VI
80%
70%
60%
sao~
+"
c:
Q,l
"'0
:;,
-
40%
t;
30%
0
20%
Q,l
Q.O
~
10%
0%
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009- 10
2010-11
• LKDSB
54%
61%
67%
69%
66%
WONTARlO
62%
61%
61%
62%
65%
EQAO Primary Writing
'<:!'
~
rn
...J
rti
VI
t:
Q,l
"'0
:;,
....t;0
~
~
80%
70%
60%
SO%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009- 10
2010-11
• LKDSB
56%
70%
74%
72%
73%
WONTARlO
64%
66%
68%
70%
73%
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
Report B-11-141
Pa e 3
EQAO Primary Mathematics
<ot
80%
o1:l
70%
m
...J
IV
60%
...
500/o
Q)
40%
Ill
c:
"'0
:I
1ii
~
0
Q)
QO
~
30%
20%
100/o
0%
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
• LKDSB
65%
68%
73%
71%
66%
flii ONTARIO
69%
68%
7C1%
71%
69%
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
Report B-11-141
Page4
9
Gender Achievement: Primary Assessment
An area of concern, for both the Lambton Kent District School Board and the rest of Ontario,
continues to be the achievement gap between boys and girls in Reading and Writing. When
looking at the Primary results for the district, the gender gap in Reading showed an 8% decrease
to 5% while the gender gap in Writing decreased by 6% to 7%. The Primary gender gaps for the
province were 10% in Reading and 13% in Writing .
Achievement of Students with Special Needs: Primary Assessment
The Special Needs population continues to be larger in the Lambton Kent District School Board
than in the rest of the province. In the LKDSB Primary cohort, 24% of the students were identified
as students with Special Needs. This percentage was 8% greater than the Ontario Special Needs
cohort. While Special Needs populations (LKDSB and Ontario) find the assessments challenging ,
the LKDSB students with Special Needs were able to achieve at significantly higher levels in all
three components of each assessment when compared to the province.
Students with Special Needs - Primary
7(1%
4CJ%
3(1%
2CJ%
1CJ%
0%
Reading
Writing
Mathematics
• LKDSB 2010-11
39%
58%
38%
WONTARIO 2010-11
3(1%
48%
34%
Overview of Individual School Results
Appendix 2 provides individual school results. Due to the unique nature of each school,
comparisons between schools are discouraged. When viewing the results it is important to
remember that EQAO is only one piece of data and must be viewed with other data available in
schools. The Lambton Kent District School Board uses all the available data to identify strengths
and weaknesses and decide upon future instructional strategies and program priorities. EQAO is
one source of data that is used to monitor progress compared to previous assessments.
Report B-11-141
Pa e 5
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
/0
JUNIOR ASSESSMENT OF READING, WRITING AND MATHEMATICS
The demographic data for Junior students in the LKDSB shows that there were 1544 students.
Results from the Junior assessment show that the 2010-11 levels of achievement were higher in
Reading and Writing while declining slightly in Mathematics compared to 2009-10.
The
percentage of Grade 6 students in the Lambton Kent District School Board achieving or exceeding
the provincial standard improved 6% in Reading, 5% in Writing and declined 1% in Mathematics.
The Reading and Writing success rates were the highest ever achieved in the Lambton Kent
District School Board. Junior Reading has achieved four consecutive years of improvement. The
percentage of Junior students achieving level 3 or 4 was above the provincial average by 3% in
Reading , and below the provincial average by 3% in Writing and 4% in Math.
The following charts show the 2010-11 results in comparison to the province.
Junior Readina
Exempt No Data NE1
<1%
<1%
1%
LKDSB
2%
<1%
1%
ONTARIO
Level 1 Level2 Level3 Level4
3%
18%
64%
12%
4%
19%
63%
11%
Junior Writina
Exempt No Data NE1
<1%
1%
0%
LKDSB
1%
<1%
ONTARIO 2%
Level 1 Level2 Level3 Level4
<1%
28%
63%
7%
<1%
24%
63%
10%
Junior Mathematics
Exempt No Data NE1
1%
<1%
<1%
LKDSB
<1%
1%
ONTARIO 2%
Level 1 Level2 Level3 Level4
46%
9%
35%
8%
9%
29%
46%
12%
Co-hort Achievement: Junior Assessment
The co-hort of students taking the Junior EQAO Assessment in 2010-11 took the Primary EQAO
Assessment in 2007-08. In Junior Reading this co-hort improved their achievement by 16% to
77% of students achieving the provincial standard. Junior Writing remained the same with 70%
achieving the standard while Junior Math declined 14% between 2007-08 and 2010-11 to 54%.
Co-hort Achievement
Junior Assessment 2010-11
Primary Assessment 2007-08
Reading
77%
61%
Writing
70%
70%
Mathematics
54%
68%
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
Report B-11-141
Page 6
Historical Data- Junior Assessment
EQAO Junior Reading
80%
'<t
~
..
..
m
-'
ro
VI
70%
60%
500/o
c
40%
"'0
:l
30%
Q)
'Iii
.....0
Q)
tiO
~
200/o
10%
0%
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
• LKDSB
58%
67%
70%
71%
77%
WONTARlO
64%
66%
69%
72%
74%
EQAO Junior Writing
80%
'<t
~
..
("'')
-'
ro
VI
70%
60%
SO%
'E
Q)
40%
"'0
:l
30%
'Iii
.....0
Q)
tiO
~
20%
10%
0%
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
• LKDSB
51%
63%
62%
65%
70%
WONTARlO
61%
67%
67%
70%
73%
2009-10
2010-11
{/
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
Report B-11-141
Pa e 7
{;)
EQAO Junior Mathematics
2010-11
54%
58%
Gender Achievement: Junior Assessment
An area of concern, for both the Lambton Kent District School Board and the rest of Ontario,
continues to be the achievement gap between boys and girls in Reading and Writing. The
disparity of skills between the sexes that has existed in the Primary assessment is also present in
the Junior assessment. In Junior Reading , the gender gap increased by 2% to 10%, which is
equal to the provincial gap. In Junior Writing , the gender gap remained constant at 18%. The rest
of the Junior students in Ontario also demonstrated an 18% gap in Writing achievement.
Achievement of Students with Special Needs: Junior Assessment
The Special Needs population continues to be larger in the Lambton Kent District School Board
than in the rest of the province. The LKDSB Junior cohort contained 26% Special Needs students,
7% higher than the provincial average. While Special Needs populations (LKDSB and Ontario)
find the assessments challenging , the students with Special Needs in the LKDSB were able to
achieve at higher levels in all three components of each assessment when compared to the rest of
the province. There was significant improvement by LKDSB students with Special Needs in
Reading and Writing compared to 2009-10. The percentages of Special Needs students who were
able to produce work at or above the provincial standard are shown on the following chart.
Report B-11-141
Page 8
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
1~
Students with Special Needs - Junior
SO%
45%
40%
35%
30%
25%
20%
15%
100/o
5%
0%
Reading
Writing
Mathematics
• LKDSB 2010-11
46%
41%
21%
WONTARIO 2010-11
36%
36%
Overview of Individual School Results
Appendix 2 provides individual school results. Due to the unique nature of each school ,
comparisons between schools are discouraged. When viewing the results it is important to
remember that EQAO is only one piece of data and must be viewed with other data available in
schools. The Lambton Kent District School Board uses all the available data to identify strengths
and weaknesses and decide upon future instructional strategies and program priorities. EQAO is
one source of data that is used to monitor progress compared to previous assessments.
Report B-11-141
Page 9
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
14
EQAO GRADE 9 ASSESSMENTS OF MATHEMATICS
When looking at the Grade 9 Assessment of Mathematics, the demographic data shows that the
Lambton Kent District School Board had 1067 students in Academic classes and 702 students in
Applied classes. All Grade 9 students who are enrolled in an Academic or Applied Mathematics
course are expected to participate in this annual assessment. Results for LKDSB students in the
Applied program showed an 11% increase to 4 7% of students meeting or exceeding the provincial
standard. Academic courses showed a 1% increase to 78% of students achieving the provincial
standard of Levels 3 and 4.
The following charts provide a summary of the 2010-11 EQAO Assessment of Mathematics in
comparison to the provincial results:
Grade 9 Academic· All Students
No Data Below Levell
<1%
LKDSB
1%
<1%
1%
ONTARIO
Level 1 Level2
16%
5%
4%
12%
Level3
72%
72%
Level4
6%
11 %
*Totals may not equal100% due to roundmg.
Grade 9 Applied· All Students
No Data Below Levell
4%
LKDSB
6%
5%
ONTARIO
5%
Levell
8%
14%
Level2
35%
35%
Level3
40%
35%
Level4
7%
7%
*Totals may not equal100% due to roundmg.
Historical Data - Grade 9 Assessment of Mathematics
Grade 9 Academic Mathematics
..:r
~
rt')
...J
...
...
(Q
II)
c:
<1.1
"'C
::l
tii
....0
:M,
~
900/o
80%
70%
60%
SO%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
• LKDSB
67%
75%
76%
77%
78%
WONTARlO
71%
75%
77%
82%
83%
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
Report B-11-141
Page 10
I~
EQAO Grade 9 Applied Mathematics
SO%
""'
oa
!"l'l
...J
iO
...c
VI
Q.l
"'0
:;:,
....'Iii0
Q.l
QO
~
45%
40%
35%
300;{,
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
• LKOSB
37%
37%
42%
36%
47%
~ O NTARIO
35%
34%
38%
40%
42%
Gender Achievement: Grade 9 Assessment of Mathematics
The LKDSB has, in recent years, made progress in closing the achievement gap in the Grade 9
Academic Mathematics assessment. In the Academic Program, female students narrowly
outperformed males, with 78% of female students at or above the provincial standard compared to
77% of males. The provincial gap remains at 2% in favour of males. A gender gap remains in the
LKDSB Applied cohort. 52% of males in the Applied program achieved at or above the provincial
standard compared to 40% of females. The gender gap increased by 4% to 12%. The provincial
gap closed in 2010-11 to 5%.
Achievment of Students with Special Needs: Grade 9 Assessment of Mathematics
LKDSB Special Needs students continued to make up an above average percentage of the
Applied cohort. In 2010-11, the 238 Special Needs students represented 34% of the entire cohort
compared to 33% in the rest of the province. The Academic population has significantly fewer
Special Needs students. There were 4% of Academic students identified with Special Needs in the
LKDSB and 5% in Ontario. In 2010-11, 71% of LKDSB Special Needs students in Academic
classes achieved at or above the provincial standard which represented a 2% increase over the
previous year. In the province, 73% of students with Special Needs met the provincial standard.
Students with Special Needs in the Applied Program improved by 8%, with 39% of students
reaching levels 3 or 4, which is 6% above the provincial average.
Appendix 3 provides individual school results. Due to the unique nature of each school,
comparisons between schools are discouraged. When viewing the results it is important to
remember that EQAO is only one piece of data and must be viewed with other data available in
schools. The Lambton Kent District School Board uses all the available data to identify strengths
and weaknesses and decide upon future instructional strategies and program priorities. EQAO is
one source of data that is used to monitor progress compared to previous assessments.
J{p
Report B-11-141
Page 11
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
EQAO ONT ARlO SECONDARY SCHOOL LITERACY TEST
Using EQAO's Fully Participating Students, where only the students who actually participated in
the assessment are counted , LKDSB students had a 78% success rate on the assessment. This
represented a 2% decrease from the 2010 administration and was 5% below the rest of the
province. Results from the March 2011 administration of EQAO were received in late June 2011.
EQAO provides results using two reporting methods. The data for "All Eligible Students" provides
a percentage breakdown of all students who are working toward an Ontario Secondary School
Diploma. The only students excluded from the "All Eligible Students" cohort are those who were
not working toward an O.S.S.D. and were therefore exempt. "Fully Participating Students"
provides a percentage breakdown of those students who fully participated in the O.S.S.L.T.
Students are considered to have fully participated if they were present for the administration and
who , as a result, were assigned an achievement result (Successful/Not Successful).
The following charts show the participation rates and the overall results for each reporting method:
L.....
K D S B Participation Rates
Total
Total
Eligible Participating
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2316
2263
2203
2193
2080
2013
1960
2228
2201
2139
2102
1994
1883
1823
/o
Absent
%
Deferred
96%
97%
97%
96%
96%
94%
93%
78
52
49
79
46
45
66
3%
2%
2%
4%
2%
2%
3%
10
10
15
12
40
85
71
0
0
/o
<1%
<1%
1%
1%
2%
4%
4%
2010-11 L K D S B Results- First Time Eliaible Students (All Students)
All Students
LKDSB
ONTARIO
% Successful
% Not Successful
%Absent
%Deferred
72%
77%
21%
16%
3%
2%
4%
5%
2010-11 L .K .D.S.B. Results - First Time Eliaible Students (Fullv Participatina)
Participating Students
LKDSB
ONTARIO
% Successful
% Not Successful
78%
83%
22%
17%
Report B-11-141
Page 12
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
1'1-
Historical Data - OSSL T Assessment
(Fully Participating)
OSSLT Success Rates
2010-11
78%
83%
Gender Achievement: OSSLT
The gender data for LKDSB students shows that females continue to be more successful than
males on the OSSL T. The 2011 success rate for LKDSB females was 81% using Fully
Participating compared to 74% for their male counterparts. The gender gap on the OSSL T for
Fully Participating students increased to 7%. The provincial gap for the same cohort increased to
7%.
Achievment of Students with Special Needs: OSSLT
Special Needs students for the purposes of the OSSL T are defined as, "students who have been
formally identified by an Identification, Placement and Review Committee (IPRC), as well as
students who have an Individual Education Plan (IEP)". The number of students with Special
Needs in 2010-11 remained at 22% of the cohort which was 5% more than the province.
The percentage of LKDSB Special Needs students who were able to successfully complete the
OSSL T in 2010-11 decreased 2% to 47%. This was 5% below the provincial success rate. The
LKDSB deferral rate was similar to the provincial rate in 2010-11 as 9% of Special Needs students
were deferred locally compared to 11% provincial deferrals.
Program of Study Achievement: OSSL T
First-time eligible (FTE) student achievement results broken down by program of study shows a
decrease in the percentage of successful FTE students in two of the three programs (Applied and
Essential) and status quo in the third (Academic). As has been the case in each administration of
the OSSL T, students enrolled in the Academic program enjoyed the greatest success in the 2010
administration. 96% of Fully Participating Academic students successfully completed the OSSL T.
This is 1% higer than Academic students in the rest of the province. The success rate for LKDSB
Fully Participating FTE Applied students was decreased by 4% and resulted in a success rate of
57% which is 2% higher than the rest of the province. Students taking Locally Developed
(Essential) English courses continued to find the OSSL T very challenging. A 6% decrease in the
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
Report B-11-141
Page 13
percentage of successful Fully Participating FTE students resulted in a 23% success rate that was
8% higher than the rest of the province.
Previously Eligible Students: OSSLT
The Previously Eligible cohort is comprised of students who, for various reasons, had not yet met
the provincial literacy requirement. Some students had been absent, deferred, or unsuccessful in
previous years.
The 2010-11 success rate for Previously Eligible (PE) students within the LKDSB decreased 10%
to 45%, or 4% below the province. In 2010-11, the PE cohort was 56% males. The gender gap
increased 2% for LKDSB PE students. A 3% gender gap in favour of females was evident. This
gender gap is equal to the provincial rate.
The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC) was designed to provide students with
intensive support in achieving the required competencies in reading and writing, and with an
alternative means of demonstrating their literacy skills. In 2010-11, 18% of PE students in the
LKDSB chose to take the OSSLC as a way of fulfilling their literacy requirement. This is 4% below
the provincial average.
Appendix 4 shows the LKDSB results broken down by school for First Time Eligible students. The
Appendix is provided for information only as school by school comparisons are discouraged. Each
school should be considered in its own context. Valid comparisons can only be made between
schools of similar contexts.
GENERAL COMMENT
The Lambton Kent District School Board is dedicated to continuous improvement in student
learning. Through the commitment of staff and trustees, the focus on improving literacy and
numeracy has resulted in significant improvement over the past five years. These gains in student
learning would not have been possible without the dedication and expertise of all stakeholders and
additional supports approved by the Board.
RECOMMENDATION
"That the Board receive the report on the "2010-11 EQAO Assessments"
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
Report B-11-141
Page 14
J
Cj
APPENDIX 1: BACKGROUND TO THE EQAO ASSESSMENTS
Primary and Junior Assessments of Reading, Writing, and Mathematics
The Primary and Junior EQAO assessments of Reading, Writing, and Mathematics were
administered for a total of 6 hours, typically three days for two hours a day during May and June
2011. The assessment for each grade has a similar format and is comprised of three components:
Reading, Writing and Mathematics. EQAO released results to district school boards in late August
but they were confidential until September 14, 2011 at which time the provincial, board and school
results were released publicly on the EQAO web site.
While there are assessments for each grade I division, their formats are similar and are comprised
of Reading, Writing and Mathematics. In the Reading component, students demonstrate their
knowledge and skills by reading a variety of materials, including both fiction and non-fiction. This
part of the assessment measures how well students are able to use different reading strategies
and conventions and how effectively they understand concepts, make inferences and connect
ideas. The Writing component of the assessment provides students with opportunities to
demonstrate their knowledge and skills by using various forms of writing and by writing for various
purposes. This part of the assessment measures how well students are able to use writing
strategies and language conventions and how effectively they understand assigned tasks,
organize ideas and communicate with the reader. The Reading and Writing skills that are
measured in the Primary and Junior assessments are also those measured in the Ontario
Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSL T). In the Mathematics component of the assessment,
students demonstrate their knowledge and skills by solving problems, applying procedures and
explaining their thought processes as they arrive at their answers. The students' knowledge and
skills are assessed within the five strands of mathematics: Number Sense and Numeration,
Geometry and Spatial Sense, Measurement, Patterning and Algebra, and Data Management and
Probability.
The four levels of achievement that EQAO uses to report student results are aligned with the four
levels of achievement used by the Ministry of Education. The Ministry of Education has established
Level 3 as the provincial standard. Level 3 represents the range from 8- to 8+ for students in
elementary school and the range from 70% to 79% for students in secondary school. Meeting the
standard means a student has a solid grasp of the required knowledge and skills, which is a good
indication that he or she will be ready for work in the next grade.
Grade 9 Assessment of Mathematics
The Grade 9 Assessments of Mathematics were administered to first-semester mathematics
students in January 2011 while second-semester and full-year students wrote during June 2011.
EQAO released results to district school boards in late August but they were confidential until
September 14, 2011 at which time the provincial, board and school results were released publicly
on the EQAO web site.
The Grade 9 Assessments of Mathematics are written by all students who are enrolled in Grade 9
Academic or Applied mathematics courses. Each course has its own assessment that measures
how well students have mastered the curriculum expectations for their particular course. The
assessment was administered over a two day period with each day containing 50 minutes of
working time. Student skills were assessed in the context of the strands of mathematics: number
sense and algebra, linear relations, measurement and geometry.
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
Report B-11-141
Page 15
Grade 10 Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test
The EQAO Grade 10 Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSL T) was administered for the
2010 - 2011 school year on March 31, 2011. All students in Ontario who are working toward an
Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) must successfully complete the literacy test or the
Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC) as a graduation requirement. The OSSL T
and OSSLC deal with essential "generic" literacy skills, in both Reading and Writing, that have
been developed up to and including the end of Grade 9.
The 2010-11 administration of the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) was
completed in two and a half hours on a single day. Students receive a score that combines
reading and writing to produce a "single literacy construct". Students receive a score on the
assessment which determines whether they are successful or unsuccessful. A brief description of
each component of the test follows:
Reading
Students responded to two types of questions after reading a given passage: open response (OR)
and multiple-choice (MC). These questions allowed students to demonstrate their reading skills
and apply various reading strategies:
Reading Skills
• Understand explicitly stated information and ideas
• Understand implicitly stated information and ideas
• Make connections between information and ideas in a reading selection and personal
knowledge and experience
Writing
Students demonstrated their Writing knowledge and skills by completing multiple choice
questions, two short open-response writing (SW) tasks and two long open-response (LW) tasks.
The LW tasks were the News Report and the Series of Paragraphs Expressing an Opinion. The
multiple choice (MC) questions asked students to demonstrate their knowledge of writing
structures and conventions. The Writing Skills assessed are:
• Develop a main idea with sufficient supporting details
• Organize information and ideas in a coherent manner
• Use conventions in a manner that does not distract from clear communication
EQAO developed the assessment and marked all of the students' work. The test content is not
specific to any particular grade level curriculum expectations. Academic and Applied students
wrote the same test and were assessed in the same manner. EQAO provides district results,
individual school results and Individual Student Reports (I.S.R.). A student who successfully
completes the OSSL Twill be deemed to have completed the literacy graduation requirement. In
addition to the successful or unsuccessful outcome, students receive a score on a scale from 200
to 400, in which 300 is the minimum score required for a successful outcome. In order to achieve a
scale score of 300, students are required to earn approximately 70% of the score points available
on the test. This standard was set by a standard-setting panel based on judgments of the student
performance expected for each question according to the minimum literacy skills defined for the
test.
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
Report B-11-141
Page 16
d/
APPENDIX 2: INDIVIDUAL SCHOOL RESULTS,
EQAO PRIMARY AND JUNIOR ASSESSMENT OF
READING, WRITING AND MATHEMATICS
2010-2011
Percentage of Students Achieving the Provincial Standard
Primary Assessment
Reading Writing Mathematics
Province
LKDSB
A. A. Wright
Aberarder
Bosanquet
Bridgeview
Brigden
Bright's Grove
Brooke Central
Cathcart
Colonel Cameron
Confederation
D.A.G.
Dawn-Euphemia
Dresden
East Lambton
Errol Road
Errol Village
Grand Bend
Gregory Drive
H.W. Burgess
Hanna
Harwich-Raleigh
High Park
Hillcrest
I.C.R.P.S.
John N. Given
King George VI (C)
King George VI (S)
Kinnwood
Lakeroad
Lambton Centennial
Lansdowne
London Road
McNaughton Ave.
65
66
42
78
79
67
53
90
52
66
48
81
45
86
63
82
75
95
75
100
82
54
76
29
74
71
52
74
61
82
89
75
38
57
84
73
73
58
83
79
73
68
95
61
80
61
86
45
100
74
82
78
95
67
100
68
54
71
39
75
85
52
86
61
79
89
75
53
76
82
69
66
37
72
74
53
58
81
57
68
52
91
55
100
83
73
80
100
83
100
41
46
67
13
70
62
48
74
61
64
84
71
47
71
82
Reading
Junior Assessment
Writing
Mathematics
74
77
67
90
53
83
93
86
78
98
69
71
53
81
83
67
89
83
75
89
68
75
57
81
73
70
50
70
41
83
86
92
53
96
69
77
53
62
88
78
86
74
80
89
72
64
41
69
58
54
58
90
18
67
71
73
25
89
38
68
29
75
78
44
74
83
55
64
36
43
43
46
NO
NO
NO
74
73
97
67
93
90
96
60
78
88
65
65
72
63
78
67
70
60
78
83
61
58
83
47
52
67
44
29
44
60
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
Report B-11-141
p age 17
Merlin Ave.
82
82
80
77
Mooretown
69
92
77
55
47
71
54
Q.E. II (C)
50
NO
NO
NO
83
Q.E. II (P)
29
Q.E. II (S)
23
35
33
PE McGibbon
50
58
50
59
50
62
90
R.P.S.
50
Ridgeview Moravian
71
75
64
94
85
80
Riverview
80
80
81
Rosedale
71
83
78
Sir John Moore
71
74
63
73
NO
88
South Plympton
83
75
Tecumseh
63
51
76
63
40
Thamesville
78
78
78
72
86
78
78
Tilbury
84
Victor Lauriston
61
79
68
W.J. Baird
73
64
65
58
72
72
69
Wheatley
55
Winston Churchill
52
76
64
69
NO
Wyoming
NO
93
NO
82
Zone
82
88
95
*Chart indicates the percentage of students who met the provincial standard
85
55
57
78
39
57
80
85
65
75
63
NO
59
40
65
79
65
54
64
79
68
70
20
32
64
17
27
30
71
60
61
35
NO
50
20
62
45
52
40
36
69
64
(level 3 and 4).
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
Report B-11-141
Page 18
APPENDIX 3: INDIVIDUAL SCHOOL RESULTS,
GRADE 9 ASSESSMENT OF MATHEMATICS
2010-2011
Percentage of Students Achieving the Provincial Standard
Grade 9 Assessment of Mathematics
Applied
Academic
Province
42%
83%
LKDSB
47%
78%
AMSS
46%
ND
BDHS
68%
65%
NLSS
47%
77%
JMSS
42%
71%
CKSS
34%
80%
LCCVI
59%
86%
LKCS
74%
53%
NCIVS
37%
86%
RDHS
55%
75%
SCITS
38%
76%
scss
38%
71%
TDHS
42%
74%
WDSS
52%
84%
2010-2011 EQAO Assessments
Report B-11-141
Page 19
APPENDIX 4: INDIVIDUAL SCHOOL RESULTS,
ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL LITERACY TEST
March 2011
OSSLT, First Time Eligible
Fully Participating
Successful
Province
83%
LKDSB
78%
AMSS
32%
BDHS
81%
CKSS
84%
JMSS
68%
LCCVI
92%
LKCS
76%
NLSS
80%
NCI&VS
88%
RDHS
77%
SCI&TS
72%
scss
79%
TDHS
84%
WDSS
68%
LAMBTON KENT DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
REGULAR BOARD, PUBLIC SESSION
REPORT NO: B-11-142
Report To Director of Education, Jim Costello
FROM:
Bert Phills, Superintendent of Education - Student Achievement Secondary
DATE:
September 27, 2011
SUBJECT:
Summer Semester 2011
This summer was the first year that we offered the Summer Semester Program.
There were 696 students involved in the summer semester program this year. Of the 696
students who initially enrolled in summer semester, only 12 dropped out and left the program.
This compares with 159 who completed courses last summer. Students in Summer Semester
earned 588 credits compared with 147 that were earned the previous year. This is an increase
of 441 credits over the previous year.
Further analysis of the data shows that 588 credits were completed successfully out of 667 total
credits attempted . This is an 88% success rate for the Summer Semester courses. This
compares with a 92% success rate for Summer School 2010.
For the first time in a number of years the attendance in summer semester has increased. One
factor that may explain this could be the expanded use of elearning courses which gave
students greater accessibility to a greater number of courses.
ONTARIO PUBLIC
SCHOOL BOARDS'
AssociATION
LeadJDg Ecluc:ation'slldvocates
Ontario Public School Boards' Association
439 University Avenue, 18th Floor
Toronto, ON M5G 1Y8
Tel: (416) 340-2540
Fax: (416) 340-7571
[email protected]
www.opsba.org
Catherine Fife
President
Gail Anderson
Executive Director
June 30, 2011
Chair Carmen McGregor and Members of the Lambton Kent District School Board:
The Ontario Public School Boards' Association is a unique association whose members are affiliated for the sole
purpose of giving strength to the voice of public education in Ontario. OPSBA, being governed and controlled
by its member Boards is a leader for excellence in funding, education policy, governance and labour relations.
OPSBA's mission is to promote and enhance public education by: helping Member Boards to fulfil their
mandates; developing effective partnerships with other groups interested in public education; and providing a
strong and effective voice on behalf of public education in Ontario.
This has been an invigorating year full of change and achievements. With a new Executive team, we launched
into action on OPSBA's key priorities and, at the same time, directed considerable energy to preparing for the
changes brought by the October 2010 municipal elections.
OPSBA is committed to supporting every public school board trustee in the province in the vital role they
undertake on behalf of Ontario's students and their familie s. We took leadership in developing Good
Governance: a Guide for Trustees, School Boards, Directors of Education and Communities. This
comprehensive resource provides valuable information on the complex roles and responsibilities of trustees and
school boards. Further support has been provided through a full range of Professional Development modules
specifically tailored to the needs of tru stees. Several of these modules formed the basis of a Certification
Program offered in conjunction with the Schulich School of Business; this was made available to OPSBA
Members at the 2011Public Education Symposium. Many individual boards have expanded the professional
learning through sessions, also based on the modules, and specifically designed for their own board environment.
We are proud of these resources and particularly proud that they emerged from the needs articulated by our own
Members.
On the legislative and regulatory front, a very strong focus for OPSBA was the ongoing measures for
implementation of the Full-Day Early Learning Kindergarten Program. OPSBA staff worked closely with
education and community partners as well as Ministry staff to ensure that the challenges experienced by our
member boards were fully considered in the planning. Thi s led to considerable influence in such aspects as
structuring of fees and third party provi sion of the Extended Day portion of the program.
As a result of our Whole Child priority, our Association has taken a strong leadership role in mobilizing action
around the issues of children and youth mental health . We have been successful in forming a Coalition that
in volves not only our education partners but representatives from the health and mental health sectors, from
community agencies, student and youth associations and from parent organizations. A highly successful Summit
on Children and Youth Mental Health took place in June 2011 and attracted over 500 participants. This is an
1
important milestone and invigorates our commitment to achieve accelerated and sustained change in the public
policies that affect the supports and services available to young people and their families.
We have emerged as a strong voice of advocacy for equitable education funding for First Nation students. We
have been active in the Shannen's Dream initiative and have presented on the issue to the Canadian Council of
Ministers of Education. As an Association we see the need for equity between First Nation schools and
provincial schools as an issue of national importance. Education is the most effective investment to interrupt the
cycles of poverty, ill-health and despair that have been visited on many First Nation communities and we must
partner with them in the pursuit of justice.
The Association has excellent everyday working relationships with the Minister of Education and her political
staff, the Premier's office, and the senior staff at the Ministry of Education, who rely on OPSBA to speak for all
public school boards on the diverse range of issues that affect the education experience of students and the
operation of our schools. Beyond this, we ensure there is continuing dialogue with politicians from all parties
and we work to build partnerships with the many education-based organizations in the province and beyond.
OPSBA offers programs and services that are highly cost effective and the monetary benefits of membership far
exceed, not only the membership fee itself, but the outcomes that can be achieved by individual Boards seeking
action alone. In this regard, the attached documents outline (a) a provincial overview of OPSBA achievements
in the area of Education Finance, and (b) the range of benefits and services OPSBA offers its members and
examples of positive implications for your board. Taking together the direct value of services provided by
OPSBA and the indirect benefits created by OPSBA coordination and advocacy as set out in these documents,
the per pupil value to your board equates to $402.89. By comparison, the per pupil cost of OPSBA membership
fees is $2.27.
We are an issues-driven, problem solving organization dedicated to serving our members and we represent an
influential force in the shaping of education policy and school board governance in the province. We invite you
to review the specific information relevant to OPSBA's services to the Lambton Kent District School Board and
welcome your membership and participation in OPSBA in the coming year.
Sincerely,
Gail Anderson
Executive Director
Catherine Fife
President
Copy:
Jim Costello, Director of Education
Enclosure:
Benefits of Membership document
2
ONTARIO PUBLIC
SCHOOL BOARDS'
AssociATION
Leacllng Education.. .lldvoc:atH
Benefits of OPSBA Membership
OPSBA has earned respect as the voice of public education and is positioned to advance the
interests of Member Boards in the critical area of influencing public policy and education
investment in the province. On the provincial stage we work successfully to advance clear,
cohesive and authoritative messages that get to the heart of the pressing issues and needs
of school boards today. OPSBA will, with your support, continue to strengthen a remarkable
school system where all students achieve and where children come first.
The active focus on priorities determined by Member Boards drives the work of the Ontario
Public School Boards' Association. Our significant successes are described throughout this
report. This important domain of the Association 's work is managed alongside a range of
day-to-day services designed to offer timely, knowledgeable and responsive support to
Member Boards. The Association's range of high-quality services to Member Boards include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Government relations and lobbying
Legislative monitoring and policy development
Labour relations research, collective bargaining
co-ordination and sharing of information
Professional development and conferences
Communications and media relations
Education program advocacy and policy development
Regional services
Financial database which permits timely analysis
Legal defence for public education
In today's Ontario, the strong, unified voice that flows from membership in the Ontario
Public School Boards' Association is critical to successful advocacy. Provincial governments
are not structured to respond readily to the concerns of individual boards. Standing together
in common purpose, we have the strength, expertise and broad spectrum of practical
experience to take on the challenges that come with promoting the highest standards of
student achievement. And together we can address ways to remove the barriers to
achievement faced by many students. The daily work and commitment of OPSBA are
grounded in a belief in the value of a strong public education system that is accessible to all
students and is governed by democratically elected local school boards. This is what OPSBA
stands for.
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ONTARIO PUBLIC
SCHOOL BOARDS'
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Leadblg Education's &dwc:atea
Benefits of OPSBA Membership
In a nutshell we offer you ten good reasons to be a Member of OPSBA:
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Successful and effective collective bargaining
Access to energy savings, management of police records checks, and other
education services through OPSBA's partnership with the Ontario Education
Services Corporation (OESC)
Effective lobbying on issues that make a difference for students: education
funding, full-day kindergarten, children and youth mental health, special
education, information technology
High quality professional development for school trustees
Media relations and information services support on all key issues
United and credible voice in advocacy and action in legislative and policy
changes
Democratic environment and responsiveness to Member needs
Practical support for complying with legislative change: Safe Schools,
Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA)
Strategic relations with education partners across Ontario and Canada
Respected source of consultation by the Provincial Government for all
education initiatives
The following pages provide more detailed information on the benefits of membership
highlighting benefits that are specific to Lambton Kent DSB.
1.
Access Copyright Advocacy
OPSBA staff plays a critical role in advocating formally on behalf of all Boards in the
province on the cost of copyright for use of learning materials in all schools. OPSBA works
directly with the Council of Ministers of Education of Canada on this issue and is an official
objector on behalf of all Boards in the on-going negotiations regarding costs for copyright
per student payable by all Boards. In June 2009 the Copyright Board of Canada certified a
tariff of $5.16 per FTE for the photocopying of published works in K-12 schools. (Access
Copyright originally filed for a tariff of $12 per FTE which we challenged.) The Objectors
appealed the Copyright Board decision to the Federal Court of Appeal which in turn rendered
a decision largely in favour of Access Copyright. Dissatisfied with the Federal Court of
Appeal decision, the Objectors sought leave to appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada. The
two issues under review by the Federal Court of Appeal were the Board's assessment of fair
dealing and its interpretation of the tests and examinations exemption in section 29.4 of the
Copyright Act. In its decision, the Federal Court of Appeal upheld the Copyright Board's
assessment of fair dealing. The Objectors are appealing this part of the Federal Court of
Appeal's decision to the Supreme Court of Canada. On the issue of tests and examination,
the Court found that the Copyright Board had not considered all the requisite elements of
the exemption and requested that the matter be remitted back to the Copyright Board for
reconsideration. With this in mind, the decision of the Copyright Board has saved Lambton
Kent DSB $154,633 in fees for the 2009/10 fiscal year.
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Leadiag Education's Aclwc:atn
Benefits of OPSBA Membership
In addition Access Copyright has filed a proposed tariff ($15.00 per student) with the
Copyright Board for every elementary and secondary school outside Quebec, including K-12
independent schools, for 2010-2012. Should this tariff be accepted the cost increase would
be an additional $134,587 for Lambton Kent DSB on an annual basis. The Association
continues to explore a more efficient and reasonable long-term approach to managing
copyright fees for the province's school boards.
2.
School Energy Coalition
Boards must be members of OPSBA to participate in the School Energy Coalition (SEC). The
Ontario Education Services Corporation (OESC) on behalf of all Boards in the province
administers the SEC. The initiatives of OPSBA/OESC have achieved remarkable results in
reducing energy costs. Since the beginning of this initiative, interventions on natural gas
and electricity rates have saved boards at least $85.1 million, with ongoing annual savings
of $10.0 million. What does this means for Lambton Kent DSB? From 2003/04 to 2009/10
intervention has cost $0.72 per pupil, while savings are estimated at $41.73 per pupil.
3.
Police Record Check Services
All Boards in the province are currently under contract with the Ontario Education Services
Corporation (OESC). This non-profit agency, established in 2002 by all four School Boards'
Associations and the Council of Directors of Education, provides high quality services to all
Boards in the province at costs significantly below what individual Boards would incur in
providing the service independently.
OESC completes the Police Record Checks on Service Providers to Boards in the province,
adjudicates them to a common high standard, and issues special ID Cards that are valid for
up to 2 years. Individual Service Providers must carry these cards with them when entering
any publicly funded school in Ontario. A conservative estimate is that this service, available
only to member Boards of OPSBA or one of the partner School Boards' Associations, would
cost boards tens of thousands of dollars per year to provide independently. The added
value of this service is that it saves Boards from setting up onerous and frustrating
individual arrangements with the Service Providers. The service provided by OESC is paid
for entirely by the individual Service Providers, is transferable across all schools in the
province, and costs school boards nothing.
4.
Behaviour Management Systems
Boards contract individually with OESC for this service, which provides certification training
for up to 14% of the Boards' staff in non-violent crisis intervention, as required by the
Ministry of Labour. Prior to the development of this service, boards had no option but to
purchase training through U.S.-based programs at a much higher cost. The training costs
for Behaviour Management Systems are less than 50% of the costs of alternative programs.
At a conservative estimate, the minimum total annual savings on average to each member
board of just these first four programs/services is almost $12.00 per student. These are
savings that the Board can redirect for other priorities such as student achievement. The
estimated savings are expected to grow. By contrast, OPSBA membership fee for 2010/11
amounts to $2.27 per student.
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ONTARIO PUBLIC
SCHOOL BOARDS'
ASSOCIATION
Leading Education's Advoc:atH
Benefits of OPSBA Membership
School boards benefit from these savings because there is an Ontario Public School Boards'
Association which makes these services available to its member Boards. In the case of the
School Energy Coalition and the Access Copyright interventions, individual Boards cannot
provide these services but they can reap the benefits because of their membership in
OPSBA. In the case of Police Record Check Services and Behaviour Management Systems
Training, the Boards could, arguably, provide these services. However, the costs to the
individual board would be considerably in excess of what they can achieve through
contracting with OESC. Membership in OPSBA gives each individual board not just a
stronger voice but also a clear financial advantage.
In addition to the four programs and services described above, membership in OPSBA
provides the following specific financial benefits and savings to your Board:
5.
Legal opinions
Legal opinions from top lawyers on significant policy issues with impact on all boards (we
assume that if you did not have access to these opinions that you would seek and pay for
independent legal advice).
Since January 2003 the cost of opinions is $311,517.
LABOUR RELATIONS SERVICES
Boards in Ontario bargain in a provincial context. While Boards still bargain locally, the
teacher and support staff unions bargain provincially and have traditionally selected
individual Boards as "targets". OPSBA, with the support of its Member Boards, has taken a
leadership role in coordinating provincial bargaining actions among Boards. OPSBA actively
engages with Member Boards in the process and provides critical labour relations/collective
bargaining resources, which many Human Resources and bargaining professionals, including
staff in your Board, consider essential, now and in the future.
With OPSBA membership your Labour Relations staff have access to the following services:
6.
Negotiation and Implementation of Agreements
Labour Relations Staff have access to the OPSBA Provincial Team responsible for
negotiations and have been supported through the conclusion of local negotiations, and the
implementation of local and provincial agreements.
For the 2008- 12 PDT agreement the cost was $811,511.
7.
Legal opinions on Labour Relations/Bargaining issues
(not included in (5) above)
Since January 2003 the cost of these opinions is $326,656.
8.
Provincial Portal
The Provincial Portal successfully links school board practitioners throughout the province
and provides immediate access not only to the status of negotiations and settlements, but
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ONTARIO PUBLIC
SCHOOL BOARDS'
AssociATION
Leading Education's .lldvocates
Benefits of OPSBA Membership
to an ever-increasing number of labour relations and human resources information. The
Provincial Portal will be a vital resource in the next round of bargaining, as it enables your
staff to share contract language, compare union proposals, and discuss emerging issues. All
LabRnet resources are now available through the Portal, and several important
enhancements have been built-in. Costs of establishing the enhanced Provincial Portal
(replacing LabRnet) are estimated at over $500,000 and annual costs of maintaining the
database are well over $100,000. Access to this service is considered invaluable by your
Board's human resources/labour relations staff. They can inform you directly about their
views on this and other labour relations services provided by OPSBA.
9.
Same-day Service for Queries
Response to most queries within 24 hours, expert legal opm1ons on issues of provincial
importance when required, and the ability to survey all Boards on issues important to your
Board at no direct cost to you.
10.
OPSBA Leadership in Collective Bargaining
The Ministry turns to OPSBA to act as the public boards' lead in preparing and organizing for
the Provincial Discussion Tables that create the master agreements upon which local
bargaining is based. During the last round of bargaining (in 2008/09) with the unanimous
approval of the OPSBA Board of Directors representing all public school boards, OPSBA
formed 5 Teams to conduct the provincial discussions. A member of OPSBA's Executive
Council served on each of these teams.
Over the winter/spring of 2008-09, OPSBA successfully negotiated provincial frameworks as
the basis for local bargaining for all teacher and support staff unions. In the local bargaining
process, OPSBA staff played a key role that included providing advice on a "24/7'' basis to
all Boards during the negotiations that successfully achieved new 4-year collective
agreements with all staff groups for the period 2008-2012. In 2010 OPSBA took the lead in
bargaining a provincial agreement that covered the newly created "Designated Early
Childhood Educator" positions.
Membership in OPSBA is key to your Board's participation in the Provincial Discussion Table
(PDT) process and will be significant in managing the outcomes of PDT Agreements over the
next four years as well as benefiting from ongoing implementation advice and support.
One key message in the OPSBA 2010/11 Funding Brief was that there would be full funding
for the PDT agreement. Detail of the amount provided through Grants for Student Needs to
Lambton Kent DSB is provided at item 14.
11.
Templates/Resources
OPSBA has developed a variety of templates that save staff time and real money for Boards
by utilizing recommended Board Policies and Procedures that are based on successful
practices. Subject specific specialists from a wide variety of boards are involved and all
resources developed for Member Boards receive close legal scrutiny.
Relevant examples include "Workplace Conflict Prevention and Resolution" and Equity and
Inclusive Education" policies and procedures which were developed and provided free of
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ONTARIO PUBLIC
SCHOOL BOARDS'
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Lead!Dg Education._ .lldwc:ates
Benefits of OPSBA Membership
charge to all Member Boards . OPSBA, in partnership with OESC, also took the lead in the
design of two Equity conferences, securing Ministry funding to subsidize attendance by
Board staff and trustees.
Most recently OPSBA, through OESC, worked on resources to support boards in
implementing the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act; these included an online
training module for all staff and a tips booklet on Accessible Customer Service. OPSBA has
also developed a common framework for partnership agreements between school boards
and third party operators for the delivery of Full Day Kindergarten before-and-after school
programs. This is a tool to support local partnership agreements between school boards and
third party operators.
LOBBYING FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION FUNDING
As part of our lobbying efforts related to Grants for Student Needs, OPSBA produced the
document: OPSBA BRIEF ON 2010-11 GSN FUNDING. This document, together with presentations
to the Ministries of Finance and Education listed a series of 6 key recommendations and 13
ongoing issues identified through feedback from member Boards:
A. KEY FUNDING FOCUS
o
o
o
o
o
o
PDTA Commitments
Board Administrative Funding
"Green" School Initiatives and Energy Efficiency Initiatives
Provincial Budget Challenges
Funding Model Review
Integrity of Grant Calculations
B. ISSUES IDENTIFIED FROM MEMBER BOARDS
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Transportation
Early Learning Program (ELP)
Special Education
Salary Gap
AODA Initiatives
Good Places to Learn (GPL) Funding
Declining Enrolment Fund ing
o
o
o
o
o
o
Legal Costs re: grievances and other
labour issues
Primary Class Size Cap (PCS)
Instructional Technology
Mental Health Supports
Poverty Reduction Strategies
Employee Benefits
Of the 6 key recommendations, 4 were fully or partially implemented. Of the 13 previously
identified areas, 6 were fully implemented, 8 were partially implemented, and 5 were not
implemented .
Specific areas, identified in the OPSBA Funding Brief and which are consistent with the Key
Work of OPSBA for 2010/10, received in -year grant adjustments and included the following :
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ONTARIO PUBLIC
SCHOOL BOARDS'
AssociATION
LeacllDg Eclucattoa's .l.ctvoc:atn
Benefits of OPSBA Membership
12.
Safe schools
OPSBA argued that the Ministry increase the funding provided to boards to further
strengthen safety measures, programs and services such as psychological assessments for
students and staff in schools. As a result of this intervention an additional grant in the form
of the Safe School Supplement was added to the GSN's in 2008/09. The amount in 2010/11
for Lambton Kent DSB was $449,658. In addition, in-year funding enhancements identified
in memo B06 (2010) provided Lambton Kent DSB with a further $41,645.
13.
First Nations and Aboriginal Funding
Many boards, particularly Northern Boards, have significant numbers of aboriginal students
attending their schools, many of whom live off-reserve and are funded through the
provincial funding model, not federally funded through tuition agreements. To address the
unique needs and to support the success of these students, boards have added special
programs and staff. Boards have, in the past, funded these additional resources from other
grants and revenues.
OPSBA has argued that specific additional grant funding is required to address achievement
gaps and support aboriginal student success. The Ministry has responded in years following
2007 and for the 2010/11 fiscal year an additional $992,342 has been provided to Lambton
Kent DSB.
To address specific Aboriginal Education needs for Aboriginal Self ID and FNMI
Implementation, additional in-year funding was provided to Lambton Kent DSB in the
amount of $57,450 through memo B16 (2010).
14.
Funding of Provincial Discussion Table (PDT) Agreements
One of the major ongoing themes in recent annual OPSBA funding briefs has been the
requirement for the Ministry to completely fund PDT agreements, to this end the Ministry
announced through memo B10 (2008) a full set of enhancements to the 2008/09 to
2012/13 Grants for Student Needs including salary and benefit benchmark enhancements
for teaching and non-teaching employee groups, elementary supervision, secondary
programming, occasional teachers, and professional development and training for education
support staff. The amount provided in memo B10 (2008) for the fiscal year 2010/11 for
Lambton Kent DSB amounted to $3,786,808.
15.
Special Education
As the Ministry continues to receive input from their various Education Partners, additional
funding of $26.9 Million was added in 2009/10 to provide stable funding levels.
OPSBA continues to be involved in discussions with the Minister, Ministry of Education and
other Partner organizations on the future funding model for special education in order to
ensure that the money allocated to special education is distributed in a way that reflects the
incidence of students with high needs in both growing enrolment and declining enrolment
boards. One area Lambton Kent DSB received in-year adjustments for was support for
Autism. The amount provided in memo B06 (2010) for Support and was $46,953.
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ONTARIO PUBLIC
SCHOOL BOARDS'
ASSOCIATION
LeadiDg Education's .llctvocates
Benefits of OPSBA Membership
16.
Early Learning
Early Learning Program (ELP) - Concern was expressed by member Boards about what the
real costs of implementation of ELP will be . OPSBA has been active on various Ministry
implementation advisory and reference groups, advocating for the needs of boards. The
Ministry provided details regarding annual operational funding through memo B12 (2009).
The amount provided for Lambton Kent DSB was $1,691,892 . In addition the Ministry
provided $170,000 in memo B07 (2010) for additional one time purchases of equipment.
17.
Governance
OPSBA regularly provides leading edge professional development on current education
issues for trustees through events such as the Public Education Symposium (PES) and the
Conference at AGM. A key focus over the past year has been the development of a series of
modules to support the role of boards and trustees, with a specific emphasis on governance.
A number of these modules formed the basis of a Certification Program in Governance
provided at the 2011 PES. An online version of the modules with additional resources will
shortly be available through OPSBA's website.
18.
Funding Model Review
While the Ministry has not yet undertaken a full, comprehensive review of the funding
model, there are several review working groups and consultations underway as follows:
• Declining Enrolment Consultation
• Special Education Consultation and Review
• Board Adm inistration & Governance Working Group
• School Operations Working Group
OPSBA is non-profit, non-partisan, democratically run and exists to serve its
members by illfluencing government legislation and policy and by providing
valuable services to member Boards much more cost effectively than can be
provided by individual Boards acting in isolation. We are an issues-driven,
problem solving organization that is dedicated to serving its members.
June 2011
Page 8
O NTARIO P UBUC
SCHOOL BOARDS'
A SSOCIATION
LeacllDg Education'• Advocates
Ontario Public School Boards' Assoc iation
439 University Avenue, 18th Floor
Toronto, ON M5G 1Y8
Tel : (416) 340-2540
Fax: (416) 340-7571
web [email protected] opsba.org
www.opsba.org
Catherine Fife
President
Gail Anderson
Executive Director
September 6, 2011
Greetings to the Director of Education and Chair of the Board,
A new school year speaks of the promise of success and calls on our energies to
reach higher in our efforts to support our students. The Ontario Public School
Boards' Association is committed to working with you in our shared goals of making
our school system not only the best in the world but renowned for a climate that
fosters student well-being.
The trustee leaders of our Executive Council and our staff are at your service. We
take pride in our capacity to respond quickly to requests for assistance and for
information. We encourage you to phone or email us when additional expertise, data
or provincial perspectives would help you in your work.
·
We have enclosed copies of the OPSBA 2010-2011 Annual Report which was released
at our Annual General Meeting in July. Trustees who attended the event will already
have seen the publication, but we thought it would be useful for you to receive a copy
as well. We encourage you to take a look at the range of issues OPSBA addressed on
behalf of our Member Boards in the past year and at the many successes that were
achieved. In all the work we do we rely on the collaboration of our Member Boards and
appreciate the quality of outcomes that emerge when we speak with one voice. If you
would like additional copies of the report, please contact our office.
In the year ahead we will invest our energies in advancing the important priorities
recently reaffirmed by our members. We wish you , your trustees, staff and students
every success for 2011-12.
Sincerely,
Catherine Fife,
President
Enclosures
O NTARIO P UBLIC
SCHOOL BOARDS'
AssociATION
Leadillg Education's .ldwcates
Onta rio Public School Boa rds ' Associati on
439 University Avenue, 18th Floor
Toronto, ON M5G 1Y8
Tel : (416) 340-2540
Fax: (416) 340-7571
[email protected]
www.opsba .org
Catherine
Fife
President
Gail
Anderson
Executive
Director
September 9, 2011
Carol Ann Sloat
Chair
Grand Erie District School Board
349 Erie Avenue
Brantford , Ontario
N3T 5V3
Dear Carol Ann,
I am in receipt of your letter dated August 291h expressing the board 's concern regarding the
current OPSBA membership fee calculation.
Through the last two years the OPSBA fee formula was frozen (with an adjustment for inflation
in 2011-2012) so that the organization could undertake a review of the membership fee formula .
It is our intention to introduce a new fee formula for the calculation of the fees for 2012-13. It is
our goal to have a membership fee formula that adequately sustains OPSBA to meet the needs
of all member school boards and is broadly accepted by all member boards as fair and
equitable.
We are coordinating our fee review with the review of the Administration Funding Model that is
currently underway through the Ministry of Education. The association fee paid by school
boards is funded through the Administration Funding Envelope and so any change to our fee
calculation should be coordinated with the funding review.
We appreciate the strong support that OPSBA receives from Grand Erie District School Board. I
agree with your assessment that OPSBA will continue to be a very valuable asset for all public
school boards in Ontario. As always , I appreciate your input regarding the OPSBA membership
fee formula as we continue our review.
Yours sincerely,
(l_n. -:If
Catherine Fife
President
Copy:
Chairs, Public School Boards of Ontario
OPSBA Board of Directors Members
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