2013 - 2014 Course Description Book

2013 - 2014 Course Description Book

INDEX

Auditing a Class .................................................... 3

Child Abuse and Neglect ....................................... 5

College Entrance ................................................. 4

Disclaimer ........................................................... 1

Forwarding of School Records .............................. 4

Freshman Programs ............................................ 4

Graduation Policy for Foreign Exchange Students 3

Graduation Requirements ..................................... 2

Guidance Department .......................................... 1

Inspection of Students’ Written Records .............. 4

Policy Concerning Standardized Achievement

Tests ..................................................................... 1

Rend Lake College - Dual Credits ......................... 3

Safety Education Policy ........................................ 4

Selection of Subjects ............................................ 1

Weighted Grade Policy ......................................... 4

―Write On Illinois‖ Standards ................................ 6

COURSES & DESCRIPTIONS

Agriculture ......................................................... 19

Art ....................................................................... 16

Business Marketing and Management ............... 21

Driver Education ................................................ 18

Family and Consumer Science ........................... 24

Interrelated Cooperative Education ..................... 29

Courses Offered ................................................... 6

Description of Courses ......................................... 9

English ................................................................. 9

Foreign Language ............................................. 15

Health Science Technology ................................ 25

Technical & Engineering Education .................... 26

Mathematics ....................................................... 13

Music ................................................................. 17

Physical Education ............................................. 18

Science ............................................................... 12

Special Education ................................................ 9

Social Studies .................................................... 14

Tech Prep ........................................................... 19

IHSA AND ATHLETIC INFORMATION

Athletic Council .................................................. 33

IHSA Eligibility Rules ......................................... 29

Extracurricular Activities Tryouts and

Participation ........................................................ 33

NCAA Eligibility .................................................. 33

No-pass, No-play Policy ...................................... 29

Policy Governing Conduct & Sportsmanship ...... 32

ORGANIZATIONS, ACTIVITIES, AWARDS

Awards and Point System .................................. 40

Important Honors ............................................... 42

Library ................................................................ 37

Organizations and Activities ............................... 34

Scholarships ...................................................... 37

School Clubs ....................................................... 35

School History ..................................................... 42

School Honors ................................................... 37

Social Events ...................................................... 35

1

DISCLAIMER

This handbook is not intended to create a contractual relationship with the student; rather, it is intended to describe the school, its current practices, procedures, rules, and regulations [or code of conduct].

Membership or participation in a school-sanctioned activity is a privilege and not a property right.

THE SELECTION OF SUBJECTS

In winter and spring students select their subjects for the following year. The choosing of subjects is an important matter. Certain subjects are required for graduation from high school; others are elective. It is much easier to choose the electives if one knows what he/she wishes to do after graduation. Those who plan to go to college should give careful attention to college entrance requirements.

THE GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT

A staff of specially trained personnel comprises the

Guidance Department. These professional counselors are available to assist the students in obtaining vocational information and scholarship information, in the selection of courses of study, in the discussion of personal problems, and in many other areas of concern.

Students may come to the Guidance Office for conferences before school, after school, during lunch or by appointment. Appointments should be scheduled during study hall when possible to eliminate the need to miss class. The Guidance Department is located in Building A and is designed to provide service to all who desire.

Parents are encouraged to visit the Guidance

Department and to seek assistance in meeting the needs of their children.

POLICY CONCERNING STANDARDIZED

ACHIEVEMENT TESTS AND SCHOOL-WIDE

ASSESSMENTS

Findings and Intent of Policy

The Mt. Vernon Township High School District No.

201 is required to administer standardized achievement tests and school-wide assessments to its students. The

Board of Education finds and determines that results of those tests are extremely important both to the School

District and to the students taking those tests. Results of such tests provide critical information concerning the effectiveness of the School District’s academic program and assist school personnel in determining the correct educational placement of students. The Board further finds and determines that a small number of students have in the past not put forth proper effort to ensure maximum achievement on those tests, which has caused a detrimental effect on those students and on the School

District as a whole. Therefore, it is the intent of this policy to set forth procedures governing students’ taking standardized achievement tests and school-wide assessments and to ensure maximum effort and achievement by all students taking such tests. Those tests include but are not limited to: Fall - ACT Explore -

Freshmen, ACT PLAN - Sophomores, Practice ACT –

Juniors; Spring – ACT PLAN – Freshmen, Practice ACT –

Sophomore, PSAE – Juniors.

Students Required to Take Standardized Achievement

Tests and School-Wide Assessments

Each student enrolled in Mt. Vernon Township High

School shall be required to take standardized achievement tests and school-wide assessments for the student’s grade level on the date(s) scheduled for administration of those tests, subject to the following exceptions.

1. Students who are absent on the date(s) the tests are given shall make up the tests on alternative scheduled date(s), which may include after school hours or

Saturdays.

2. Transfer students who enroll in the School District after the last available alternative scheduled date(s) shall not be required to take such tests during the school year of their initial enrollment.

3. Special education students shall be required to take standardized achievement tests and school-wide assessments only if required by the Illinois State Board of

Education, or if the same is part of their Individualized

Educational Program (IEP).

4. The Principal or the Assistant Principal may excuse a student from taking the tests on an individual basis if extenuating circumstances warrant the same.

Completion of standardized achievement tests and school-wide assessments, except as provided hereinabove, are required. Failure to complete such tests, except as provided hereinabove, can result in disciplinary action.

Performance on Tests

All students taking standardized achievement tests and school-wide assessments are expected to put forth maximum effort. If a student’s score on a standardized test falls substantially below the level which the student would be expected to perform, based on his or her prior academic performance and prior testing results, the

Assistant Principal and/or the Principal shall conduct an investigation to determine whether the student deliberately failed to perform at his or her expected level. If the investigation reveals the student deliberately failed to perform at his or her expected level, the administration may impose discipline upon the student as provided in the

Student and Parent Handbook. Incentives will be offered to students who perform above the expected performance level for their grade or demonstrate at least a two point growth in performance.

To qualify to be a National Merit Scholar, a student must take the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT).

Please check with the Guidance Office to sign up for this exam. These tests are administered in the fall. There is a fee charged for taking this exam.

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

4 credits in Communication Arts

English IA (1/2) and English IB (1/2)

Freshman year

English II (1/2) Sophomore year

English II (1/2) or Performance Studies (1/2)

Sophomore year

American Literature A (1/2) Junior year

2

American Literature B (1/2) Junior year

English Electives Senior year

2 credits in Social Studies including

Civics (1/2) Freshman year

American History A (1/2) and American

History B (1/2) Junior or Senior year

Social Studies Elective (1/2)

3 credits in Mathematics

Freshman, Sophomore, or Junior year

(1) and Comprehensive Algebra 1.2 A and B

(1), Algebra IA (1/2) and Algebra IB (1/2), and Geometry (1), Algebra II (1), Advanced

Algebra/Trigonometry (1). Students must complete one math sequence in order to gain one credit. The second year of math depends upon which class was taken at the first level.

(Comprehensive Algebra 1.1 and 1.2 both must be taken to meet Algebra I graduation requirements.)

Students must pass Algebra IA and IB in order to meet the graduation requirement.

2 credits in Science

2 Credits in Safety Ed./P. E./Health

Freshmen P.E. 1 Credit (includes 1 semester of

Health)

Sophomore P. E. 1 Credit or

1/2 Credit P.E. and 1/2 Credit Safety Ed.

Junior P.E., unless exempted

Senior P.E., unless exempted

PSAE Prep

All junior students are required to take this course unless they are exempted based on previous standardized testing scores.

Consumer Education

Students are required to meet the consumer education requirement through enrollment in coursework that meets this requirement. Courses include Business

Technology, Resource Management, Personal Finance, and Agricultural Business and Management.

1 credit in Career and Technical Education, Art,

Music, or Foreign Language - Freshman,

Sophomore, Junior, or Senior year

Students shall be classified according to the following requirements.

1. Freshman: Any student who has documented eligibility from an eighth-grade program.

2. Sophomore: Any student who has earned

5.0 or more credits and is entering his/her second year of high school.

3. Junior: Any student who has earned 12.0 or

more credits and is entering his/her third year of high school. Students are required to take the PSAE, a graduation requirement, taken at junior status.

4. Senior: Any student who has earned 16.0 or more credits and is entering his/her fourth year of high school.

Total graduation requirements shall be: Class of 2016 –

27 credits, Class of 2015 – 27 credits, Class of 2014 – 26 credits, Class of 2013 – 24 credits. In order to receive a diploma, a student must meet all graduation requirements and must have earned at least (2) credits while in attendance as a full-time student at Mt. Vernon Township

High School.

Students must have passed tests covering the State and Federal Constitutions, as well as having met the state requirements for Consumer Education. Students must pass the Federal Constitution exam by end of the semester of the school year in which the student is enrolled in Civics. Those students failing the exam will be required to repeat Civics before receiving credit for the required course. Students must pass the Illinois

Constitution exam in their Civics class during the current semester of enrollment.

In the case of a student who must meet special college or vocational standards and also in the case of a student entering with advanced standing from another accredited high school, the Superintendent may waive certain subject requirements if clearly warranted by circumstances.

All students must be registered for at least seven (7) classes a semester, including P.E. A student should not take more than two subjects in any one area during a semester. A conference with the parent, teacher, counselor, and student is required for a student to drop below seven (7) classes.

A limited number of schedule changes may be allowed at the beginning of a semester based upon availability of classes. Students will have five days to make schedule changes at the beginning of each semester. After five days, they will have an additional ten days to drop a class and replace it with a study hall. Any drops made after fifteen days will result in a failing grade placed on the student’s transcript.

When a student with a passing grade in a required mathematics or science course withdraws at the end of the first semester with the recommendation of the teacher and approval of the administration, that student shall receive

1/2 credit for the semester, and the 1/2 credit shall apply toward meeting graduation requirements. When a student withdraws from a required mathematics or science course without teacher recommendation and administrative approval, the student shall not receive credit toward graduation until both semesters of the dropped course or both semesters of an approved alternative course are successfully completed.

Although the Board of Education of Mt. Vernon Township

High School District #201 does not recommend that a student graduate prior to the graduation of his/her class, an exception may be made by the administration and/or

Board of Education if the following requirements have been met:

3

Student must meet all graduation requirements set by the State of Illinois and Mt. Vernon Township

High School District #201

Cumulative grade point average of 3.25 or higher

Must notify principal in writing on or before May 1 of student’s junior year

Written verification of acceptance into baccalaureate program

A student who has met early graduation requirements may elect to receive a diploma and graduate with his/her class provided that the student has met all

District No. 201 graduation requirements. A student wishing to graduate under the provisions of this policy must notify the Principal in writing prior to the beginning of his/her senior year and must contact the Principal’s Office on or before March 1 prior to the expected date of graduation to allow time to order diplomas, prepare the graduation list, order announcements, etc.

Rend Lake College - Dual Credit Courses

Students (depending upon grade level) may receive college credit through a Dual Credit arrangement with

Rend Lake College upon successful completion of the requirements in the following courses:

Honors English Seminar

Spanish IV

Biology II

College Algebra

Trigonometry

Pre-Calculus

AP Calculus

Strength & Conditioning

Personal Fitness

AVC Automotive Technician I

AVC CAD/Drafting I

AVC Basic Nursing Assistant Training

AVC Care and Learning Services Management

Agricultural Business and Management

AVC Culinary Arts I

AVC Health Occupation Core Skill

AVC Manufacturing I

AVC Manufacturing II

Some dual credit classes require testing before enrollment. Testing may be in the form of ACT,

ASSET or COMPASS.

A $15 fee is charged by

Rend Lake College for dual credit classes. This fee is not covered by school fee waivers.

Graduation Policy for

Foreign Exchange Students

The Foreign Exchange Program at Mt. Vernon Township

High School is a cultural exchange program. Therefore, foreign exchange students usually are not eligible for a diploma from Mt. Vernon Township High School. However, if foreign exchange students are classified as seniors and complete the academic year at Mt. Vernon Township High

School in good standing, they may participate in the

Commencement Exercises and will receive a certificate of attendance. They will also be included in the Honors

Program if eligible. Freshman, sophomore, or junior foreign exchange students will be recognized at the

Honors Program only.

AUDITING A CLASS

A student that has successfully completed a class, but has not mastered the skills necessary for the next level, may elect to audit the class. A student electing to audit a class must be enrolled in six other classes. The grade earned while auditing a class will not be calculated in the student’s accumulative grade point average. A student may be removed from the class if satisfactory progress and/or appropriate classroom behavior is not maintained.

The teacher will be notified if a student is auditing his/her class.

SAFETY EDUCATION POLICY

A student eligible for the Safety Education course at Mt.

Vernon Township High School must receive a passing grade in at least eight courses during the two semesters prior to taking Safety Education. The exception to this procedure is that the Superintendent may waive this requirement based upon the written appeal or a student stating the reason for requesting the waiver. Students can pick up a waiver form in the Guidance Office.

WEIGHTED GRADE POLICY

Students who complete the year long Advanced

Placement courses will receive weighting when their class rank and GPA are computed. Any student who drops the class prior to the end of the year will not receive the intended benefit of the class and therefore will not receive any grade weighting. One important criterion for receiving a weighted grade involves taking the AP Exam normally administered in May. Specifically, any student who takes any AP class, completes the class, and elects NOT to take the AP Exam will receive no grade weighting. Additionally, any student who does NOT take the AP test will have the first semester weight removed from his/her GPA, which will result in a lower GPA and class rank at the end of the school year. There is a fee of approximately $80 to take each AP exam. This fee is subject to change. Some students may be eligible for a fee waiver.

Weighted grades and AP classes offered include AP

Calculus, AP Literature and Composition, AP Language and Composition, AP Biology, and AP American History.

Weighted Grade Computation

Grade Weighted with AP Exam (semester weight)

A 2.5

B 2.0

C 1.5

D 1.0

Beginning with the Class of 2014, final class rank and GPA will be calculated as follows for students who have successfully completed AP courses:

Regular grade points/Total number of credits +

Number of AP Classes/31 (Divide by 32 for all classes after 2014).

COLLEGE ENTRANCE

The Mt. Vernon Township High School is a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary

Schools which gives its graduates the privilege of entering institutions of higher education within the North Central states, provided they have credits and adequate marks in the high school subjects required by the college or

4 university for admission and have attained the specified college entrance exam score.

Students should understand that mere graduation from this high school does not admit them to college. For the benefit of the many who do not go to college some courses are offered which certain colleges may not accept for entrance.

It is, therefore, wise for a student, early in his/her high school career, or before entering high school, if possible, to decide upon the college he/she wishes to attend and select his/her high school courses to meet the entrance requirements of that institution.

The minimum college admission requirements for entry into Illinois public colleges and universities are as follows: four units in English (emphasizing written and oral communications and literature); three units in social studies (emphasizing history and government); three units in mathematics (introductory through advanced algebra, geometry, trigonometry, or fundamentals of computer programming); three units in science (laboratory sciences); and two units in foreign language, music, vocational education, or art. In general, the Mt. Vernon Township

High School will recommend as good candidates for college those who rank scholastically in the upper half of their class, provided they meet the entrance requirements of the colleges of their choice. Since college admission requirements vary, the student should check with the college that he wishes to enter to make certain he is meeting all requirements for admission.

PROGRAMS FOR FRESHMEN

Every freshman must take seven subjects, including

English I, World Geography, Civics, Biology, Mathematics,

Health, and Physical Education. Students may be permitted to take more than seven subjects in regular classes.

The required program for freshmen; therefore, will consist of English I, World Geography, Civics, Biology,

Mathematics, Health, Physical Education, and four other half subjects approved by the Guidance Director.

Additional subjects may be chosen from the approved list of freshmen courses.

FORWARDING OF SCHOOL RECORDS

Upon written request Mt. Vernon Township High School will forward a student’s educational records to a school in which that student seeks or intends to enroll.

INSPECTION OF STUDENTS’ WRITTEN RECORDS

The student’s written records are in two categories— permanent and temporary. The permanent record consists of (a) basic identifying information, including students’ and parents’ names and addresses, birthdate, and gender; (b) academic transcript, including grades, class rank, graduation date, grade level achieved, and scores on college entrance examinations; (c) attendance record; (d) accident reports and health record; (e) honors and awards received; (f) information concerning participation in schoolsponsored activities or athletics, or offices held in schoolsponsored organizations; (g) record of release of permanent record information.

The temporary record consists of (a) family background information; (b) intelligence and aptitude test scores, as

well as interest inventories; (c) reports of psychological evaluations; (d) achievement level test scores; (e) teacher deficiency and disciplinary referrals.

Students’ written records are kept on file in the Guidance

Office and Administration Office and are available to the students, parents, and/or legal guardian for inspection.

They may inspect the written records in any reasonable manner in consultation with a designated employee of the school during regular hours of the school day. A student, parent, and/or legal guardian may contact the

Administrator to gain access to the records. Access will be granted within a reasonable time but no more than 15 days after requested.

If information in a pupil’s records is disputed by the parent, student, and/or legal guardian, the parent, student, and/or legal guardian may meet with the Principal or

Superintendent within a reasonable time after the review of the records to provide for the correction, deletion, or further explanation of such information.

In the absence of any court order to the contrary to require that, upon the request of either parent of a pupil whose parents are divorced, copies of the following reports or records which reflect the pupil’s academic progress, reports of the pupil’s emotional and physical health, notices of school-initiated parent-teacher conference, notices of major school-sponsored events, such as open houses, which involve pupil-parent interaction, and copies of the school calendar regarding the child which are furnished by the school district to one parent be furnished by mail to the other parent.

The school will review students’ records periodically to make certain they are accurate. Permanent records will be maintained for not less than 60 years after a student has graduated or otherwise permanently withdrawn from school. Temporary records will be maintained for one year following graduation and/or permanent withdrawal and will be destroyed on July 1. The custodian of records is the

Principal. A student, parent, and/or legal guardian has the right to inspect and copy such records before destruction.

A charge of the actual cost for providing a copy of the school student records will be made; however, the cost shall not exceed $0.35 per page.

No individual or agency can force an individual to release his/her records. A release of students’ written record will not be made to persons or agencies unless written consent is given by parents, students, or a court order is issued. However, a release of records without parental notice or consent could be made due to an emergency release of personally identifiable information from education records...to provide for release of information in medical health or safety emergency. In certain instances where consent is not required, then written notification of such release will be given to the parents.

The school may release such information concerning a student as follows: (1) name and address; (2) gender; (3) date and place of birth; (4) major field of study; (5) participation in sponsored activities; (6) parents names and addresses; (7) period of attendance in the school; (8) degrees and awards received; and (9) grade level.

However, a student, parent, and/or legal guardian has the right to deny publication of the above mentioned information by contacting school officials. The contact

5 must be made by September 15 of each school year or the information will be released at the appropriate times.

RULES REGULATING THE INSPECTION OF

STUDENTS’ WRITTEN RECORDS

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

(FERPA) affords parents and students over 18 years of age (―eligible students‖) certain rights with respect to the student’s education records. They are:

(1) The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the District receives a request for access.

Parents or eligible students should submit to the school principal [or appropriate school official] a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect.

The principal will make arrangements for access and notify the parents or eligible students of the time and place where the records may be inspected.

(2) The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the parents or eligible student believes are inaccurate or misleading.

The parents or eligible student may ask Mt. Vernon

Township High School District 201 to amend records that they believe are inaccurate or misleading. They should write the school principal, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading.

If the District decides not to amend the record as requested by the parents or eligible student, the District will notify the parents or eligible student of the decision and advise them of their right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the parents or eligible student when notified of the right to a hearing.

(3) The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

One exception that permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the

District as an administrator, a supervisor, an instructor, or a support staff member (including health or medical staff and law enforcement unit personnel); a person serving on the School Board; a person or company with whom the

District has contracted to perform a special task (such as an attorney, an auditor, a medical consultant, or a therapist); or a parent or student serving on an official committee such as a disciplinary or grievance committee or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks.

A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.

(4) The right to file a complaint with the U.S.

Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the District to comply with the requirements of FERPA.

The address of the Office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office, U. S. Department of

Education, 600 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington,

D.C. 20202-4605.

CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT

Since July 1, 1975, certified school employees have been required to report suspected cases of child abuse.

The 81st General Assembly amended the Illinois School

Code (21-23) to provide a penalty for certified school employees who fail to report a case of suspected child abuse and/or neglect. Hereafter, certified employees who fail to report suspected child abuse or neglect face the possibility of having their state teaching certificate suspended for a period of one year. Suspension is to be done by the Regional or State Superintendent of

Education, with hearing rights afforded the teacher and with rights of appeal to the State Certification Board also available.

―WRITE ON ILLINOIS‖ STANDARDS

All written student work shall be evaluated by the Write

On Illinois standards. These standards shall apply to all curriculum areas.

1. Integration - the student’s overall writing ability.

2. Focus - the clarity with which a composition presents a clear main idea, point of view, theme, or unifying event.

3. Support/Elaboration - the degree to which the main point or event is elaborated and explained by specific detail and reasons.

4. Organization - the clarity of the logical flow of ideas and the explicitness of the text structure or plan.

5. Conventions - the use of standard written English and correct spelling.

COURSES OFFERED

FRESHMAN COURSES 2012-2013

ENGLISH

*English I (1.0)

Writing for Publication I (.5)

Writing for Publication II (.5)

SCIENCE

Biology I (1.0)

MATH

Algebra I (1.0)

Geometry (1.0)

SOCIAL STUDIES

*Civics (.5)

*World Geography (.5)

World History A (.5)

World History B (.5)

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

French I (1.0)

Spanish I (1.0)

ART

Art Appreciation (.5)

Arts and Culture (.5)

Basic Art (1.0)

MUSIC

Beginning Band (1.0)

Cadet Band (1.0)

Percussion Ensemble (1.0)

Varsity Orchestra (1.0)

Varsity Choir (1.0)

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

*Physical Education (.5)

6

Strength and Conditioning

*Health (.5)

AGRICULTURE

Basic Ag Mechanics (1.0)

Intro to Ag Industry A (.5)

Intro to Ag Industry B (.5)

SAE (FFA Recordbook freshman/sophomore) (.25)

BUSINESS, MARKETING AND

COMPUTER EDUCATION

Business & Technology Concepts A (.5)

Business & Technology Concepts B (.5)

(A/B satisfies consumer education requirement)

Keyboarding & Formatting I (.5)

Computer Concepts & Software

App. (.5)

FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES

Foods & Nutrition I (.5)

Foods & Nutrition II (.5)

Child Growth and Development (.5)

HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY

Orientation to Health Occupations (.5)

Principals of Biomedical Sciences - PLTW (1.0)

TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING

Orientation to Manufacturing I (.5)

Orientation to Manufacturing II (.5)

Communication Technology (.5)

Energy Utilization Technology (.5)

Production Technology (.5)

Transportation Technology (.5)

Introduction to Engineering Design-PLTW (1.0)

KEY

*Required Course.

I, II, III = Courses taught in sequence.

A=1st semester class only

B=2nd semester class only

Students must be enrolled in at least seven subjects each semester.

27 credits required for graduation.

NOTE:

Freshmen with birthdays between January 1 and June 30 should sign up for:

Health first semester and Physical Education I second semester. Freshmen with birthdays between July 1 and December 31 should sign up for: Physical Education I first semester and

Health second semester.

SOPHOMORE COURSES 2012-2013

ENGLISH

*English IIA (.5)

*English IIB (.5)

Performance Studies in English (.5) 2nd Semester

Writing for Publication I (.5)

Writing for Publication II (.5)

SCIENCE

Physical Science I (1.0)

Environmental Ecology (1.0)

Earth Science (1.0)

Chemistry I (1.0)

MATH

Comprehensive Algebra 1.2 (1.0)

Algebra I (1.0)

Geometry (1.0)

Algebra II (1.0)

Advanced Algebra II/Trigonometry (1.0)

SOCIAL STUDIES

World History A (.5)

World History B (.5)

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

French I (1.0)

French II (1.0)

Spanish I (1.0)

Spanish II (1.0)

ART

Art Appreciation (.5)

Arts and Culture (.5)

Basic Art (1.0)

Two Dimensional Design A (.5)

Three Dimensional Design B (.5)

Ceramics (.5)

Ceramics II (.5)

Drawing I (.5)

Drawing II (.5)

Painting B (.5)

MUSIC

Beginning Band (1.0)

Cadet Band (1.0)

Percussion and Ensemble (1.0)

Varsity Orchestra I, II (1.0)

Symphonic Band I, II (1.0)

Symphonic Orchestra I, II (1.0)

Varsity Choir (1.0)

Treble Choir (1.0)

Concert Choir (1.0)

P.E. & DRIVER ED.

*Physical Education II (.5)

Strength & Conditioning (.5)

Personal Fitness (.5)

*Safety Education (.5)

AGRICULTURE

Basic Ag Mechanics (1.0)

Intro to Agriculture Industry A (.5)

Intro to Agriculture Industry B (.5)

Basic Horticulture Science A (.5)

Basic Horticulture Science B (.5)

Basic Agriculture Science A (.5)

Basic Agriculture Science B (.5)

SAE Supervised Agriculture Education

(FFA Recordbook freshman/sophomore)(.25)

BUSINESS, MARKETING AND

COMPUTER EDUCATION

Accounting I (1.0)

Business & Technology Concepts A (.5)

Business & Technology Concepts B (.5)

Computer Concepts & Software App. (.5)

Computer Operations and Programming (1.0)

Information Processing A - offered sem. 1 & 2 (.5)

Information Processing B - offered sem. 1 & 2 (.5)

Keyboarding & Formatting I (.5)

FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES

Foods & Nutrition I (.5)

Foods & Nutrition II (.5)

Child Growth and Development (.5)

Care and Learning Services Occupations (1.0)

HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY

Health Occupation Exploration (.5)

7

Principals of Biomedical Sciences-PLTW (1.0)

Human Body System-PLTW (1.0)

TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING

Orientation to Manufacturing I (.5)

Orientation to Manufacturing II (.5)

Communication Technology (.5)

Energy Utilization Technology (.5)

Production Technology (.5)

Transportation Technology (.5)

Introduction to Engineering Design-PLTW (1.0)

Principles of Engineering-PLTW (1.0)

KEY

*Required Course.

I, II, III = Courses taught in sequence.

A=1st semester class only

B=2nd semester class only

Students must be enrolled in at least seven subjects each semester.

27 credits required for graduation.

NOTE:Second year of science requirement may be fulfilled by completing Horticulture

Science A and B.

JUNIOR COURSES 2012-2013

ENGLISH

*PSAE Prep (.5)

*American Literature (1.0)

AP Language & Composition (1.0)

Writing for Publication I (.5)

Writing for Publication II (.5)

AP Literature & Composition (1.0)

Technical/Creative Writing (.5)

Contemporary Literature (.5)

SCIENCE

Physical Science (1.0)

Earth Science (1.0)

Chemistry I (1.0)

Chemistry II (1.0)

Environmental Ecology (1.0)

Biology II (1.0)

AP Biology (1.0)

Human Physiology (1.0)

Physics (1.0)

MATH

Algebra I (1.0)

Geometry (1.0)

Algebra II (1.0)

Advanced Algebra II/Trigonometry (1.0)

Trigonometry (.5)

College Algebra (.5)

Pre-calculus (1.0)

SOCIAL STUDIES

World History A (.5)

World History B (.5)

*American History (1.0)

AP American History (1.0)

Modern History Since 1918 (1.0)

Economics (.5)

Sociology (.5)

Psychology (.5)

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

French I, II, III (1.0)

Spanish I, II, III (1.0)

ART

Art Appreciation (.5)

Arts and Culture (.5)

Basic Art (1.0)

Two Dimensional Design A (.5)

Three Dimensional Design B (.5)

Ceramics (.5)

Ceramics II (.5)

Ceramics III (.5)

Drawing I (.5)

Drawing II (.5)

Painting B (.5)

MUSIC

Beginning Band (1.0)

Cadet Band (1.0)

Music Appreciation (.5)

Music Theory (.5)

Percussion and Ensemble (1.0)

Varsity Orchestra I, II, III (1.0)

Symphonic Band I, II, III (1.0)

Symphonic Orchestra I, II, III (1.0)

Treble Choir I, II (1.0)

Concert Choir I, II (1.0)

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

*Physical Education IIIA (.5)

*Physical Education IIIB (.5)

Strength & Conditioning (.5)

Personal Fitness (.5)

AGRICULTURE

Intro to Agriculture Industry A (.5)

Intro to Agriculture Industry B (.5)

Basic Agriculture Mechanics (1.0)

Basic Horticulture Science A (.5)

Basic Horticulture Science B (.5)

Basic Agriculture Science A (.5)

Basic Agriculture Science B (.5)

Agricultural Mechanics & Tech. (1.0)

Agriculture Business Management (1.0)

Agriculture Communications Leadership (1.0)

SAE Supervised Agriculture Ed. II

(FFA Recordbook junior/senior)(.25)

BUSINESS, MARKETING &

COMPUTER EDUCATION

Accounting I (1.0)

Accounting II (1.0)

Business & Technology Concepts A (.5)

Business & Technology Concepts B (.5)

Computer Concepts & Software (.5)

Computer Operations and Programming (1.0)

Information Processing A - offered sem. 1 & 2 (.5)

Information Processing B - offered sem. 1 & 2 (.5)

Keyboarding & Formatting I (.5)

*Personal Finance (.5)

Web Page and Interactive Media I (1.0)

FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES

Foods & Nutrition I (.5)

Foods & Nutrition II (.5)

Child Growth and Development (.5)

Care and Learning Services Occupations (1.0)

AVC Culinary Arts I (2.0)

Resource Management (.5)

Parenting (.5)

Adult Living (.5)

8

AVC Care & Learning Services Management(2.0)

HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY

Health Occupation Exploration (.5)

AVC Health Occupations Core Skills (2.0)

AVC Basic Nursing Assistant Training (2.0)

Principals of Biomedical Sciences-PLTW (1.0)

Human Body System-PLTW (1.0)

TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING

Orientation to Manufacturing I (.5)

Orientation to Manufacturing II (.5)

Communication Technology (.5)

Energy Utilization Technology (.5)

Production Technology (.5)

Transportation Technology (.5)

Introduction to Engineering Design-PLTW (1.0)

Principles of Engineering-PLTW (1.0)

Digital Electronics-PLTW (1.0)

Civil Engineering and Architecture (1.0)

Computer Integrated Manufacturing (1.0)

AVC Automotive Technician I (2.0)

AVC CAD/Drafting I (2.0)

AVC Electrical Trades (1.0)

AVC Robotics (1.0)

AVC Manufacturing I (2.0)

AVC 3-D Drawing and Animation (1.0)

KEY

*Required Course.

I, II, III = Courses taught in sequence.

A=1st semester class only

B=2nd semester class only

AP Classes = Weighted grade

Students must be enrolled in at least seven subjects each semester.

26 credits required for graduation.

SENIOR COURSES 2012-2013

ENGLISH

AP Language & Composition (1.0)

Writing for Publication I (.5)

Writing for Publication II (.5)

AP Literature & Composition (1.0)

Technical/Creative Writing (.5)

English Literature (.5)

College Prep Writing (.5)

Contemporary Literature (.5)

Honors English Seminar A (.5)

Honors English Seminar B (.5)

SCIENCE

Earth Science (1.0)

Chemistry I (1.0)

Chemistry II (1.0)

Environmental Ecology (1.0)

Biology II (1.0)

AP Biology (1.0)

Human Physiology (1.0)

Physics (1.0)

MATH

Algebra I (1.0)

Geometry (1.0)

Algebra II (1.0)

Advanced Algebra II/Trigonometry (1.0)

Trigonometry (.5)

College Algebra (.5)

Pre-calculus (1.0)

AP Calculus (1.0)

SOCIAL STUDIES

World History A (.5)

World History B (.5)

American History (1.0)

AP American History (1.0)

Modern History Since 1918 (1.0)

Economics (.5)

Sociology (.5)

Psychology (.5)

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

French I, II, III, IV (1.0)

Spanish I, II, III, IV (1.0)

ART

Art Appreciation (.5)

Arts and Culture (.5)

Basic Art (1.0)

Two Dimensional Design A (.5)

Three Dimensional Design B (.5)

Ceramics (.5)

Ceramics II (.5)

Ceramics III (.5)

Drawing I (.5)

Drawing II (.5)

Painting B (.5)

MUSIC

Beginning Band (1.0)

Cadet Band (1.0)

Music Appreciation (.5)

Music Theory (.5)

Percussion and Ensemble (1.0)

Varsity Orchestra I, II, III, IV (1.0)

Symphonic Band I, II, III, IV (1.0)

Symphonic Orchestra I, II, III, IV (1.0)

Treble Choir I, II, III (1.0)

Concert Choir I, II, III (1.0)

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

*Physical Education IVA (.5)

*Physical Education IVB (.5)

Strength & Conditioning (.5)

Personal Fitness (.5)

AGRICULTURE

Basic Agriculture Mechanics (1.0)

Intro to Ag Industry A (.5)

Intro to Ag Industry B (.5)

Basic Horticulture Science A (.5)

Basic Horticulture Science B (.5)

Basic Agriculture Science A (.5)

Basic Agriculture Science B (.5)

Agricultural Mechanics and Tech (1.0)

Agricultural Business Management (1.0)

Agricultural Communications & Leadership (1.0)

AVC Interrelated Cooperative Ed. (3.0)

See Registration Application

SAE (FFA Recordbook junior/senior)(.25)

BUSINESS, MARKETING AND

COMPUTER EDUCATION

Accounting I (1.0)

Accounting II (1.0)

Business & Technology Concepts A (.5)

Business & Technology Concepts B (.5)

(A/B – satisfies consumer education requirement)

Computer Concepts and Software (.5)

9

Computer Operations and Programming (1.0)

Information Processing A - offered sem. 1 & 2 (.5)

Information Processing B - offered sem. 1 & 2 (.5)

Keyboarding & Formatting I (.5)

Web Page and Interactive Media I (1.0)

Web Page and Interactive Media II (1.0)

AVC Interrelated Cooperative Ed. (3.0)

See registration application

FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES

Foods & Nutrition I (.5)

Foods & Nutrition II (.5)

Child Growth and Development (.5)

Care and Learning Services Occupations (1.0)

AVC Culinary Arts I (2.0)

AVC Culinary Arts II (2.0)

Resource Management (.5)

Adult Living (.5)

Parenting (.5)

AVC Care & Learning Services Management (2.0)

AVC Interrelated Cooperative Ed. (3.0)

See Registration Application

HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY

Orientation to Health Occupations (.5)

AVC Health Occupations Core Skills (2.0)

AVC Basic Nursing Assistant Training (2.0)

Principals of Biomedical Sciences-PLTW (1.0)

Human Body System-PLTW (1.0)

AVC Interrelated Cooperative Ed. (3.0)

See Registration Application

TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING

Orientation to Manufacturing I (.5)

Orientation to Manufacturing II (.5)

Communication Technology (.5)

Energy Utilization Technology (.5)

Production Technology (.5)

Transportation Technology (.5)

Introduction to Engineering Design-PLTW (1.0)

Principles of Engineering-PLTW (1.0)

Digital Electronics-PLTW (1.0)

Civil Engineering and Architecture (1.0)

Computer Integrated Manufacturing (1.0)

AVC Automotive Technician I (2.0)

AVC CAD/Drafting I (2.0)

AVC Electrical Trades (1.0)

AVC Robotics (1.0)

AVC Manufacturing I (2.0)

AVC 3-D Drawing and Animation (1.0)

AVC Automotive Technician II (2.0)

AVC CAD/Drafting II (2.0)

AVC Manufacturing II (2.0)

AVC Interrelated Cooperative Ed. (3.0)

See Registration Application

KEY

*Required Course.

I, II, III = Courses taught in sequence.

A=1st semester class only

B=2nd semester class only

AP Classes = Weighted grade

Students must be enrolled in at least seven subjects each semester.

24 credits required for graduation.

If the third year Math class was failed the third year

Math requirement for graduation may be fulfilled by completing one of the following courses:

AVC Vehicle Maintenance & Repair

AVC Drafting/CAD

AVC Electronics

AVC Manufacturing

Accounting I

Students must be enrolled in at least seven subjects each semester.

SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

The Cross-Categorical Program provides all courses required for graduation. The following courses are provided in this department for those students that are unable to be mainstreamed into regular classes: Communications, Geography,

American Problems, Independent Living, Social and

Family Living, Vocational Shop, Special Typing,

Basic Art, and STEP Cooperative.

The Self-Contained EMH and TMH Programs use a functional/age appropriate curriculum designed to teach academic skills in a practical and useful manner. The curriculum consists of the following five areas:

Community Life

Domestic Life

Fundamental Skills

Recreation - Leisure

Vocational

A complete course description may be obtained from the Department Chairman.

ENGLISH

Even though textbooks are rented, teachers of some courses may request supplementary paperback books besides those rented.

English IA – EN100A / English 1B – EN100B

English I includes the four strands of English

(reading, writing, speaking, and listening). The focus of the reading is literature including fiction (short stories and novels), non-fiction, poetry, and drama.

The fall semester features The Odyssey and the spring semester focuses on Romeo and Juliet.

Students will use the writing process to write essays

(pre-writing strategies, drafting, revising and rewriting, editing, and final copy). All incoming freshmen are required to take English 1. The course will include

PSAE preparation, with an emphasis on grammar skills, reading comprehension strategies, and logical expression.

Honors English I is for students interested in a more challenging curriculum and who are interested in

Advanced Placement English classes their junior and senior years. Students may get an application from their English teachers or from the library. Signed applications must be returned to English teachers within the first three weeks of the year. Students have two options to earn honors credit. Option number one requires the student to maintain at least a B average and complete a series of literary assignments stressing higher level thinking, reading, and writing.

Option number two requires the student to maintain a

97% average for the semester. The student will indicate which option he or she is choosing when completing the application process.

One Credit.

English IIA – EN200A

English IIA combines the study of writing and literature with a variety of speaking and listening activities. The literature includes fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and drama. The writing assignments include expository, narrative, and persuasive compositions.

Teachers may assign additional kinds of writing. The course will include PSAE preparation, with an emphasis on grammar skills, reading comprehension strategies, and logical expression. Interested students are invited to apply for honors English II. Honors

English II is for students interested in a more challenging curriculum and who are interested in

Advanced Placement English class their junior and senior years. Students may get applications from the

English teacher or from the library. Signed applications must be returned to English teachers within the first three weeks of the semester. Students have two options to earn honors credit. Option number one requires the student to maintain at least a

B average and complete a series of literary assignments stressing higher level thinking, reading, and writing. Option number two requires the student to maintain a 97% average for the semester. The student will indicate which option he or she is choosing when completing the application process.

One-half credit.

English II B – EN200B

English IIB combines the study of writing and literature with a variety of speaking and listening activities. The literature includes fiction, poetry, nonfiction, novels, and drama. The writing assignments include expository, narrative, and persuasive compositions. Teachers may assign additional kinds of writing. The course will include PSAE preparation, with an emphasis on grammar skills, reading comprehension strategies, and logical expression.

Interested students are invited to apply for honors

English II. Honors English II is for students interested in a more challenging curriculum and who are interested in Advanced Placement English class their junior and senior years. Students may get applications from the English teacher or from the library. Signed applications must be returned to English teachers within the first three weeks of the semester. Students have two options to earn honors credit. Option number one requires the student to maintain at least a

B average and complete a series of literary assignments stressing higher level thinking, reading, and writing. Option number two requires the student to maintain a 97% average for the semester. The student will indicate which option he or she is

10

choosing when completing the application process.

One-half credit.

Performance Studies – EN200

This is a spring semester course elective for sophomores only. It is designed to give students opportunities to explore advanced forms of communication. Through assignments in impromptu, informative, and persuasive public speaking, students will improve their abilities to think logically, organize ideas, and present information effectively.

Performance Studies may be used as a replacement credit for the English II B graduation requirement.

One-half credit.

PSAE Prep – PA300A / PA300B

This course is required for all juniors unless they are exempted by their Pre-ACT score. A few seniors may qualify. A one semester course designed to help juniors prepare for the PSAE.

One half credit.

American Literature A – EN300A

American Literature A is a first semester course required for junior students not enrolled in Advanced

Placement Language and Composition that has a focus the works of American writiers from the 1600’s through the 1870’s. Short stories, poems, and essays from the period are featured texts, and Arthur Miller’s play

The Crucible

is the major drama. American

Literature A writing will have an emphasis on persuasive argument. Students will also write expressively in notebooks and journals and work collaboratively in groups on projects and presentations. The course will include PSAE preparation, with an emphasis on grammar skills, reading comprehension strategies, nonfiction texts, and logical expression.

Interested students are invited to apply for Honors

English American Literature. Honors English

American Literature is for students interested in a more challenging curriculum and who are interested in

Advanced Placement English class their junior and senior years. Students may get applications from the

English teacher or from the library. Signed applications must be returned to English teachers within the first three weeks of the semester. Students have two options to earn honors credit. Option number one requires the student to maintain at least a

B average and complete a series of literary assignments stressing higher level thinking, reading, and writing. Option number two requires the student to maintain a 97% average for the semester. The student will indicate which option he or she is choosing when completing the application process.

One-half credit.

American Literature B – EN300B

American Literature B is a second semester course required for junior students not enrolled in Advanced

Placement Language and Composition that has as a focus the works of American writers from the 1870’s through today. Short stories, poems, and essays from the period are featured texts. American Literature B will include the reading of an American novel.

American Literature A will also include a research paper with instruction on MLA formatting. Students will write expressively in notebooks and journals and work collaboratively in groups on projects and presentations. The course will include PSAE preparation, with an emphasis on grammar skills, reading comprehension strategies, nonfiction texts, and logical expression. One-half credit.

Interested students are invited to apply for Honors

English American Literature. Honors English

American Literature is for students interested in a more challenging curriculum and who are interested in

Advanced Placement English class their junior and senior years. Students may get applications from the

English teacher or from the library. Signed applications must be returned to English teachers within the first three weeks of the semester. Students have two options to earn honors credit. Option number one requires the student to maintain at least a

B average and complete a series of literary assignments stressing higher level thinking, reading, and writing. Option number two requires the student to maintain a 97% average for the semester. The student will indicate which option he or she is choosing when completing the application process.

One-half credit.

Advanced Placement Language & Composition

EN310A / EN310B

AP Language and Composition will enable students to read complex texts with understanding and to write prose of sufficient richness and complexity to communicate effectively with mature readers.

Students will write in both informal and formal contexts in multiple drafts to gain authority and learn to take risks in writing. In addition, the informed use of research materials and the ability to synthesize varied sources (to evaluate, use, and cite sources) are integral parts of the AP English Language and

Composition course. Students will develop a set of skills which will allow them to formulate and defend positions in various contexts, and to read critically, realizing the validity of the texts presented. Goals of the AP English Language and Composition class include development of skills needed to use language and vocabulary needed to achieve rhetorical competence, critical reading of non-fiction and fiction texts to reinforce analytical skills, and development of an awareness for non-print and visual texts. AP

English Language and Composition students are expected to take the AP English Language Exam at the conclusion of the year. The course may be taken instead of American Literature A and B. Weighted grade upon completion of the AP English Language and Composition exam.

One credit.

Writing for Publication I – EN400A

Students who enroll in Writing for Publication I will study historical aspects of journalism and basic journalistic processes, will examine media ethics, will

11

complete research and interview activities, and will write monthly news, feature and sports stories, editorial columns and personal columns intended for

Vernois News

. publication in the student newspaper

Students will also research and write basic copy, study basic advertising principles, study graphic design, and examine basic compositional aspects of photography and shoot needed photos, all for the school yearbook,

Vernois

. Student will also research and write expressive pieces for possible publication in the school literary/visual arts magazine,

JAVA

, as well as classroom presentation. Writing for Publication I is an elective course open to freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior students who wish to become an active member of the publications program at

MVTHS. One semester; one-half credit.

Writing for Publication II – EN400B

Students who enroll in Writing for Publication II will be responsible for completing independent projects of their choice that relate specifically to one of the

Vernois Publications Group publication areas. This includes, but is not limited to, research and interviews for writing monthly news and feature stories, opinions and columns intended for publication in the student newspaper,

Vernois News

; research for advanced compositional aspects of photography and the conducting of photo shoots, all for the school yearbook,

Vernois

; and writing expressively for possible publication in the school literary magazine,

JAVA , as well as classroom presentation. Writing for

Publication II is an elective course open to freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior students, especially students who wish to lead

Yearbook and/or

Vernois News

JAVA Magazine

,

Vernois

. Students taking

Writing for Publication II must have successfully completed Writing for Publication I. Those students who wish to serve as editor in chief of Vernois News must successful complete both Writing for Publication

I and II prior to becoming editor in chief. Enrollment in

Independent Study Writing for Publication is also required to serve as editor in chief. One semester; one-half credit.

Advanced Placement Literature & Composition

EN410A / EN410B

This course offers college-bound juniors and seniors experience in analyzing works of poetry and literary prose for stylistic elements in the manner of the College Board Advanced Placement Examinations in ―English: Literature and Composition.‖ The course will prepare students to take the Advanced Placement examinations in English. AP English Literature and

Composition students are expected to take the AP

English Literature Exam at the conclusion of the year.

Weighted grade upon completion of the AP English

Literature and Composition exam.

One credit.

Technical/Creative Writing – EN420

This is a one semester elective for juniors and seniors. It provides students with opportunities to write creatively and to produce workplace and real-world documents such as brochures, posters, advertising copy, resumes, letters of application, memos, and manuals. One-half credit.

Survey of English Literature – EN430

Survey of English Literature is a semester course dealing with the study of the cultural history and the significant writings and writers of England. Students enrolled in Survey of English Literature are collegebound seniors who have selected English Literature as an elective. One-half credit.

College Prep Writing – EN440

This semester course is planned as a review and a learning course especially for college-bound students.

The course will cover techniques of writing for college with an emphasis on expository writing and research, critical reviews, answering essay examination questions and other types of writing. Students enrolled in College Prep Writing are college-bound seniors who have elected to take the course.

One-half credit.

Contemporary Literature – EN450

In this English elective, students will read contemporary literature from the past 15 years, which supplements their experiences and gives them insight into other cultures and lives. Students will also complete writing and speaking assignments associated with their reading. One-half credit.

Honors English Seminar A – EN460A

Students may receive high school and an Illinois college credit for this course (Illinois community colleges and state universities), provided they earn at least a C for a final grade. This course will be taught as a freshman college course. Students will use the library, learn to read more closely and effectively, and to write good expository prose based on personal observations and readings. Students are required to take the Rend Lake College departmental final examination. One-half credit.

Honors English Seminar B - EN460B

Students may receive high school and an Illinois college credit for this course (Illinois community colleges and state universities), provided they earn at least a C for a final grade. This course will be taught as the second freshman level English class. The students will read and write a variety of compositions, including a research paper. Students are required to take the Rend Lake College departmental final examination. One-half credit.

Independent Study Writing for Publication

Students who enroll in Independent Study are sophomore, junior, or senior students who have successfully completed Writing for Publication I and II and who are actively working with one of the Vernois

Publication Group branches, Vernois News

JAVA Magazine

, Vernois

. Classes are Yearbook, and/or designated as ISWP – Newspaper, ISWP – Yearbook, or ISWP – JAVA. Students who wish to enroll must

12

obtain the recommendation of the teacher advising the publication and principal approval. Enrollment is limited. One semester; one-half credit.

SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

Physical Science – SC110A / SC110B

Physical Science is a lab science class that consists of text study, lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and some laboratory work.

During the first semester of Physical Science, students will study science skills, properties of matter, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonds, chemical reactions.

During the second semester of Physical Science, students will study Earth’s interior, Earth’s surface, weather and climate, the solar system, exploring the universe. One credit.

Biology I – SC200A / SC200B

Biology I is a lab science class involving the studies of different aspects of living systems. Units of study include biochemistry, genetics, cell structure, microbiology, and zoology. One credit.

Earth Science – SC210A / SC210B

Earth Science is the branch of Science which studies planet Earth and its setting in the universe.

Areas to be explored include astronomy, geology, and meteorology. Course content is presented through lectures, discussions, video programs, demonstrations, and some lab experiences.

One credit.

Environmental Ecology – SC220A / SC220B

This course is designed to engage students in active investigation of the quality and availability of environmental factors in their local community. This course will examine the cultural, social and economic factors that are vital to the development of solutions to environmental problems. We will study the Earth as a single interconnected entity composed of multiple systems. Examination of changes in natural systems over time and their ability to recover will be conducted. The flow of energy through these systems, the recycling of matter and the impact of technology and human population growth on the environment will be analyzed. The focus of this course is to provide students with the practical and conceptual tools necessary to make informed decisions. One credit.

Chemistry I – SC300A / SC300B

Chemistry is the science which investigates the structure and properties of matter from the individual atom to the most complex compound. Through lecture, class discussion, and much actual laboratory experience, students are encouraged to wonder, think, and learn about the ―make up‖ of the interesting world in which they live. Prerequisite: Physical

Science or Freshman Biology and successful completion of Algebra I. One credit.

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Chemistry II – SC410A / SC410B

Chemistry II explores additional topics not covered in Chemistry I. Also, some of the topics covered previously are explored in more depth. In addition to expanding their knowledge of chemistry, students will also strengthen both their study skills and their abilities in logical reasoning. The material is covered via lecture, class discussion, and laboratory experiences. Prerequisite: Chemistry I (It is recommended that the student has attained a grade of

C or better in Chemistry I before enrolling in

Chemistry II.) One credit.

Biology II – SC310A / SC310B

Biology II is a college preparatory, laboratory based course designed to stimulate and challenge those students with a high interest in the life sciences. The course will provide a problem-solving approach to methods and techniques in organic chemical analysis, cellular chemistry with specific attention given to energy mechanisms for life and microbiology.

The improvement of reading skills - drawing inferences, perceiving details, comprehending word meanings in context and understanding ideas - is a major goal. Prerequisite: Biology I and a score of 20 on the reading portion of the ACT, or a score of 40 on the Rend Lake ASSET Test, or exempt via the

COMPASS test taken on campus. Students may receive high school credit and Illinois college credit.

One credit.

Advanced Placement Biology – SC320A / SC320B

AP Biology is a college level, laboratory based course, with emphasis on problem solving. The syllabus provided by the Advanced Placement

Program of the College Board will be followed. The following topics will be covered: (1) Molecules and

Cells with emphasis on Biological Chemistry,

Biosynthesis, and Cytology. (2) Molecular Genetics and Heredity with emphasis on recombinant DNA theory. (3) Population Dynamics with emphasis on intra and inter-relationships among organisms and their environment. Prerequisite: Biology I and

Chemistry I with a grade of B in both courses and teacher recommendation. AP Biology students are expected to take the AP Biology Exam at the conclusion of the year. Weighted grade upon completion of the AP Biology exam. One credit.

Human Physiology – SC330A / SC330B

Human Anatomy and Physiology students study the structure and the function of the human body. This course includes a detailed study of the major organ systems found in the human body—aided by the dissection of the fetal pig.

Human Anatomy and Physiology is designed for students interested in becoming a medical doctor, nurse, medical technician, physical therapist, P. E. teacher, coach or any student interested in this field of science. Prerequisite: Biology I. One credit.

Physics – SC400A / SC400B

This is a two-semester college preparatory course which consists of lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory work. Students who are interested in knowing more about the physical world in which they live will study basic physics topics such as

Kinematics, Newton’s Laws, Vectors, Momentum,

Work, Energy, Power, Circular Motion,

Thermodynamics, Waves, and Flight. Prerequisite:

Physical Science or Freshman Biology and successful completion of Algebra I. One credit.

MATHEMATICS

Algebra I – MA120A / MA120B

The first semester of Algebra I includes the study of basic terms and symbols of algebra, properties of real numbers, and operations with the real numbers. Also included is the study of open sentences, the properties of order, solutions of equations, linear equations, linear graphs, and the coordinate plane.

The second semester of Algebra I includes the study of monomials, polynomials, rational expressions, and irrational expressions, and how to perform the four fundamental operations with them.

Also included is the study of relations and functions with their graphs. Special emphasis is placed on the use of algebra in problem solving. Prerequisite: Pre-

Algebra or equivalent. One credit.

Geometry – MA200A / MA200B

The first semester of Geometry includes the study of points, lines and planes, deductive reasoning, parallel lines, and congruent triangles. Algebra concepts and skills are also interwoven with the geometric concepts.

The second semester of Geometry includes the study of quadrilaterals, similar polygons, right triangles, and the inequalities in geometry.

Prerequisite: Algebra I. One credit.

PSAE Prep – PA300A / PA300B

This course is required for all juniors unless they are exempted by their Pre-ACT score. A few seniors may qualify. A one semester course designed to help juniors prepare for the PSAE. One-half credit.

Algebra II – MA300A / MA300B

Algebra II is a one-year course that includes a review of Algebra I topics and the study of more advanced topics in Algebra.

The first semester includes the study of equations and inequalities, linear equations and functions, systems of equations and inequalities, and quadratic functions. The second semester includes the study of polynomial functions, powers and radicals, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite:

Algebra 1 and Geometry. One credit.

Advanced Algebra II/Trigonometry–MA310A / MA310B

The first semester of Advanced Algebra

II/Trigonometry will begin with a quick review of all the topics of Algebra I. The first semester of Advanced

Algebra II/Trigonometry will also include the study of advanced factoring, systems of linear equations, graphing linear and quadratic functions, linear inequalities, exponents, radicals, complex numbers, absolute values inequalities, and solving word problems. Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry with a grade of B or above.

Trigonometry – MA320A

Trigonometry is a one-semester course that includes a study of radian and degree measures, trigonometric functions and identities and their use in solving triangles and practical problems. Also included are graphical methods, graphing calculators, solving trigonometric equations, and vectors.

Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra II. Students may receive high school credit and Illinois college credit.

One-half credit.

College Algebra – MA320B

College Algebra is a one-semester course that includes a study of solutions and graphs of linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, analysis of functions, and their graphs. Also covered are conic sections, solution and graphing of systems of equations and inequalities, matrices and determinants. Graphing calculators and real-life applications will be used throughout the course.

Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra II. Students may receive high school credit and Illinois college credit.

One-half credit.

Precalculus – MA400A / MA400B

Precalculus is a one-year course incorporating graphing technology to enhance the teaching and learning of mathematics.

The first semester includes a quick review of basic algebra and geometry skills, and an in-depth study of linear and polynomial functions. The second semester includes the study of exponential, logarithmic, rational and trigonometric functions.

Specific subtopics include best-fit lines, applications, absolute value equations and inequalities, domain, range, composition of functions, parametric equations, transformations, inverse functions, quadratic functions, complex numbers, interest and annuity problems, trigonometric applications and identities, conic sections, and matrices. Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra

II/Trigonometry or Trigonometry/College Algebra.

Students may receive high school credit and Illinois college credit. One credit.

Advanced Placement Calculus AP – MA410A/MA410B

The first semester of AP Calculus will include the study of elementary functions, properties of functions, and limits. It will also cover the study of differential calculus including the first and second derivative and applications of the derivative.

The second semester of AP Calculus will cover the study of integral calculus. This will include antiderivatives, applications of antiderivatives,

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techniques of integration, the definite integral and applications of the integral. Prerequisite: Precalculus or Trigonometry and College Algebra with a grade of

A. Students may receive high school credit and

Illinois college credit. One credit.

SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT

Civics – SO100B

Civics, a one-semester course required at the freshmen level, is a study of national, state and local government with special emphasis on both the U.S. and Illinois Constitutions. Underlying the course of study, there is an attempt to make the student aware of the rights, duties, and responsibilities of the individual in a democratic society. Students completing Civics with a passing grade will have fulfilled graduation requirements for passage of the

U.S. Constitution and Illinois Constitution tests.

One-half credit.

World Geography A – SO110A

This first semester course seeks to develop an awareness of the influence which physical characteristics of the different areas of the earth have upon man’s cultural activities in those areas. By studying these influences, students can better understand the problems that exist in those areas in today’s world. Students will apply basic geographic skills and the five themes of geography to the following regions of the world: United States and

Canada. One-half credit

World Geography B – SO110B

This second semester course seeks to develop an awareness of the influence which physical characteristics of the different areas of the earth have upon man’s cultural activities in those areas. A study of those influences can lead to a better understanding of the problems that exist in those areas in today’s world. Students will apply basic geographic skills and the five themes of geography to the following regions of the world: Latin America, Western Europe, Eastern

Europe, Northern Eurasia, Southwest Asia, South

Asia, East Asia, and the Pacific World. One-half credit

World History A – SO120A

World History A—very early times to 1100 A.D.—is s first semester course which presents a general view of the development of mankind from early man through the middle ages. Early Incas and Aztecs in America, and Civilizations in India and China are included.

One-half credit.

World History B – SO120B

World History B—after 1500 A.D.—is a second semester course which presents a general view of man in modern civilization since the middle ages. This course includes the time of the French Revolution, the rise of communism, World War I, the rise of Hitler, and

World War II. If time permits, the post World War II era is included. One-half credit.

American History A – SO300A

This semester course, required of juniors or seniors, surveys our nation’s history from its beginnings to the end of the Civil War in 1865.

Emphasis is given to the development of democratic representative government, territorial expansion, and the development of our nation. One-half credit.

American History B – SO300B

This semester course, required of juniors or seniors, surveys our nation’s history from 1865 to the present. Special emphasis is given to the settlement of the west, the economic changes making the United

States a major power, the forces influencing

Americans, and the role of the U.S. in world affairs.

One-half credit.

Advanced Placement American History -

SO310A/SO310B

This course is important for college bound juniors and seniors as it replaces American History for advanced students. While it covers traditional subjects from the Colonial Era through the Twentieth Century and satisfies the requirement for proficiency in the U.

S. Constitution, it also exposes students to a variety of topics, concepts, and issues not ordinarily covered in the regular curriculum. In addition students are encouraged to investigate historical problems, develop opinions, and defend positions – thus developing critical thinking skills they will use in college and later careers. AP American History students are expected to take the AP American

History Exam at the conclusion of the year. One credit. Weighted grade upon completion of the AP

American History exam.

Modern History Since 1918 – SO400A / SO400B

This course, available to seniors and those juniors with a C average or above, is designed to help develop an understanding of today’s world by the study of recent history since World War I including the emerging nations of Africa, developments in Asia, and current world affairs with emphasis on cause and effect relationships. One credit.

Economics – SO410

A one-semester course open to juniors and seniors.

A very vital course to a better understanding of the

American free enterprise system as it relates to the other economic systems of the world. Units of study include: consumption, production, exchange, money, credit and banking, distribution of personal income, the stock market, government and the economy, major economic problems, and recent trends in economics. Taught second semester only.

One-half credit.

Sociology – SO430

A one-semester course, open to juniors and seniors, which studies the way men behave in their culture which is usually determined by their relations to each other and by their membership in groups. Family problems, marriage and divorce, education, minority

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groups, religion, crime, and delinquency are also studied from a social point of view. Taught first semester only. One-half credit.

Psychology – SO440

A one-semester course, open to juniors and seniors.

A study is made of the activities of the normal adult and his response to different situations. The development of personality, how to study effectively, and explanation of intelligence testing as well as situations common to everyday life are studied.

Taught second semester only. One-half credit.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

Students who are interested in foreign language in preparation for college are urged to begin their study of foreign language no later than their sophomore year. Students are reminded that two years of the same foreign language are required for entrance into many colleges.

French I – FL100A / FL100B

French 1, a full-year course open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, seniors, is the rigorous study of basic, everyday French. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring practical vocabulary, grammar, and conversational skills, and achieving a basic understanding of the French culture and geography.

Students will engage in basic writing, reading, listening, and speaking activities. Students planning to go to college need this course (or Spanish I) since most colleges require a student to have passed at least two years of the same foreign language. One credit.

French II – FL200A / FL200B

The second year of French offers a review of the essentials of the first year plus a more in-depth study of grammar which is used to maintain conversational skills. More emphasis is placed on reading, writing, vocabulary building and comprehension. Students who plan to further their education and/or to travel would benefit from this course. One credit.

French III – FL300A / FL300B

French IV – FL400A / FL400B

French III/IV completes and refines the study of

French grammar. It is designed for students who are interested in a more comprehensive study of the literature and culture of the French people. A wide variety of poetry and literature is read in the latter part of this course. Students who appreciate the French language and who plan to travel or further their education in the humanities would benefit from this course. One credit.

Spanish I – FL110A / FL110B

Spanish I, a full-year course open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors, is the rigorous study of basic, everyday Spanish. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring practical vocabulary, grammar, and conversational skills, and achieving a basic

16 understanding of Hispanic culture and geography.

Students will engage in basic writing, reading, listening, and speaking activities. Students planning to go to college need this course (or French I) since most colleges require a student to have passed at least two years of the same foreign language. One credit.

Spanish II – FL210A / FL210B

A full year course that offers a review of the essentials of the first year plus continued study of more advanced vocabulary, grammar, and conversational skills, as well as some Spanish history and geography. Students will engage in more advanced reading, writing, listening, and speaking activities. Students planning to further their education, increase their job options, or travel would benefit from this course. One credit.

Spanish III – FL310A / FL310B

A full year course that offers an accelerated review of basic grammar and vocabulary from the first two years plus a more intensive study of advanced vocabulary, grammar, and conversational skills.

Students will engage in more complex reading, writing, listening, and speaking activities, including hear and speaking primarily Spanish during class time. Students planning to further their education, increase their job options, or travel would benefit from this course. Prerequisite: Spanish II. One credit.

Spanish IV – FL410A / FL410B

A full year course that reinforces the basics of the other three years plus offers an intensive study of advanced vocabulary, grammar, and conversational skills. Students will engage in complex reading, writing, listening, and speaking activities, including constant use of Spanish in class and exposure to

Hispanic art and literature. Students planning to further their education, increase their job options, or travel would benefit from this course. Prerequisite:

Spanish III. Students may receive high school credit and Illinois college credit. One credit.

ART DEPARTMENT

Basic Art – AR100A / AR100B

Basic Art is a two-semester, introductory course for freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Students will study the elements and principles of art through a variety of art media and techniques. Art history is incorporated into assignments. Students will use art terms and vocabulary in written assignments, individuality, creative expression; problem-solving skills are stressed. No prerequisite. One credit.

Two-Dimensional Design A – AR200A

A semester course involving the understanding and use of effective design composition through the exploration of the elements and principles of art.

Students will work with design concepts using a variety of media and techniques. Individual problem solving and creativity is stressed. Students are

encouraged to analyze their own art works and those of others through written and/or verbal critiques.

Some areas of study are printmaking, graphic design, cover illustration, lettering, and computer art.

Prerequisite: Basic Art. One-half credit.

Three Dimensional Design B – AR200B

A semester course using the project method of instruction to incorporate the elements and principles of art into three-dimensional forms. Students are encouraged to develop the ability to think abstractly through the use of visualization and creativity. They explore a variety of media, techniques and styles in art history as well as contemporary times. Students may use written and/or verbal critiques to evaluate their designs. Prerequisite: Basic Art. One-half credit.

Ceramics I – AR210

A semester course in which students are taught to incorporate the elements and principles of art into handbuilt and wheel thrown clay projects. Students will explore a variety of decorating and glazing techniques. Students will evaluate their work through written and/or oral critiques. Prerequisite: Basic Art.

One-half credit.

Ceramics II – AR210B

Ceramics II give the advanced art student a perspective of what type of art careers are available to the three-dimensionally inclined student. In this class students use different medias of clay to explore different careers in industrial ceramics, environmental design, industrial design, and film animation and special effects. Prerequisite: Basic Art, an A or B in

Ceramics I and written teacher approval. One-half credit.

Ceramics III – AR210C

This advanced ceramics course is designed for serious art, specifically ceramic art students. Students will expand upon their knowledge from Ceramics I and

II by choosing their building methods in order to fulfill thematic assignments. Assignments are Problem

Based and open to interpretation. Students will also participate in fund-raiser activities as part of the course. Research on ceramic artists and ceramic history is practiced in this course. Students will also have first hand studio maintenance by mixing clay, unloading kilns, and helping to mix glazes.

Prerequisite: C or higher in Ceramics II. One-half credit.

Drawing I – AR230A

A semester course dealing with the development of representational drawing skills and the use of basic drawing media. Students will explore how line, value, shape, and texture are used to create visually interesting drawings. Students will be expected to participate in the assessment of their own work.

Prerequisite: Basic Art. Taught first semester only.

One-half credit.

Drawing II – AR230B

A semester course which deals with the further development of representational drawing skills.

Students will study color and color drawing media such as colored pencils and oil pastels. Projects will have an art historical basis. Students will be expected to participate in the assessment of their own works.

Students will be encouraged to develop good working practices and to work independently on projects of their own choosing. Prerequisite: Basic Art, Drawing

I. Taught second semester only. One-half credit.

Painting B – AR300

A semester course in which students to explore color theory using a variety of painting media.

Students will also study historically significant work of art by master painters. Students will use art terms and vocabulary to write critical evaluations of their own work. Prerequisite: Three semester credits in Art and written teacher approval. One-half credit.

Art & Culture – AR001

This class appeals to a variety of students. Art students as well as students who enjoy sociology, geography, and history will enjoy learning about multiple cultures through the arts. We will study a vast range of cultures from African, Southeast Asian,

Aboriginal, South Indian, and more. Alongside each culture in focus, students will create an art and/or craft from that culture. This class is meant to build appreciation for ethnic societies and cultures through their artistic traditions. No prerequisite required. Onehalf credit.

Art Appreciation – AR002

This class learns to look at both artists and artworks in order to better appreciate and understand the value such artists and artworks hold in society both yesterday and today. Sources of study include selective readings, slide lectures, and class discussions. The most important purpose of this course is for students to further enhance an interest and an aesthetic development in the visual arts. A broad range of artistic movements and styles will range from great masters like Leonardo Da Vinci to pop culture street artist Keith Haring. One-half credit.

MUSIC DEPARTMENT

Beginning Band – MU105A / MU105B

Beginning Band is a course designed for students who wish to learn a woodwind or brass instrument, who have little or no previous instrumental training.

Basic playing skills as well as music literacy will be covered in this course. The student and instructor will select an appropriate instrument on which to begin.

The instruments offered for beginning instruction include flute, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, or baritone. Concert performance will not be emphasized in Beginning Band. After successful completion of Beginning Band and with the approval of the instructor, students may enroll in Cadet Band the following year. One credit.

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Cadet Band - MU100A / MU100B

Cadet Band is designed for students who have previous experience reading music and playing in band on a woodwind or brass instrument. All incoming freshman wind students with previous experience are to enroll in this course. In Cadet Band, students will receive continuing and enhanced instruction on playing techniques in their instruments, enhance their music reading abilities, and increase their overall performance skill. Members of the Cadet Band will perform in several extra-curricular concerts during the year. Members will also participate in marching band and pep band performances. Upon successful completion of the Cadet Band Course and with the approval of the director, students may progress into the Symphonic Band. One credit.

Percussion Ensemble – MU110A / MU110B

Percussion Ensemble is designed for students who have previous experience reading music and playing in band on a percussion instrument. All incoming freshman percussion students with previous experience are to enroll in this course. In Percussion

Ensemble, students will receive continuing and enhanced instruction on playing techniques for all the percussion instruments used in the high school band, enhance their music reading abilities, and increase their overall performance skill. Members of the

Percussion Ensemble will perform in several extracurricular concerts during the year. Members will also participate in marching band and pep band performances. Upon successful completion of the

Percussion Ensemble course and with the approval of the director, student may progress into the Symphonic

Band. One Credit.

Symphonic Band I – MU130A / MU130B

Symphonic Band II – MU230A / MU230B

Symphonic Band III – MU330A / MU330B

Symphonic Band IV – MU430A / MU430B

Symphonic Band is a select group of woodwind, brass, and percussion players whose performance and ability warrant an opportunity for top performance.

Prerequisites for this group (by audition) are usually one year in the Percussion Ensemble and/or Cadet

Band. Hence, membership is largely from the junior and senior classes except where instrumentation necessitates to the contrary. All the activities of the

Cadet Band and such others as the director might designate are the activities of this performance group.

Meets daily for one full credit per year.

Varsity Orchestra I – MU120A / MU120B

Varsity Orchestra II – MU220A / MU220B

Varsity Strings (Orchestra) is composed of first year students. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of music and string playing. Students will participate in a variety of concerts, for example, the Fall Concert, the Christmas Musicale, the Music in

Our Schools Concert, D201F Concert, as well as soloensemble contest. One credit.

Symphonic Orchestra I – MU140A / MU140B

Symphonic Orchestra II – MU240A / MU240B

Symphonic Orchestra III – MU340A / MU340B

Symphonic Orchestra IV – MU440A / MU440B

Symphonic Orchestra memberships are those strings which have completed the curricular requirements of the Varsity group. Membership is usually sophomores, juniors, and seniors (and wind and percussion players are select members of the top chairs of the Symphonic Band). The operetta,

Christmas program concerts, tours, solos and ensembles, all state activities, the honors program, and other activities constitute the opportunities for performance of this group. This group meets daily for one unit of credit for strings and service points for wind-percussion players. One credit.

Varsity Choir I – MU180A / MU180B

Varsity Choir II – MU270A / MU270B

The Varsity Choir is a choir that emphasizes vocal technique, music reading, and the basic elements of choral music. This is a mixed SATB choir and is designed for all students who like to sing and want to improve their voices and musical skills. The choir participates in the Fall Concert, Christmas Musicale, and D201F Concert. Rehearsals are almost all on school time. One credit.

Treble Choir I – MU250A / MU250B

Treble Choir II – MU350A / MU350B

Treble Choir III – MU450A / MU450B

The Treble Choir is the second step in the vocal music sequence for girls. Continuation of the work started in the Varsity Choir (in basic fundamentals of the vocal technique and music reading) is the objective. A greater emphasis on public performance includes participation in the Christmas Musicale, concerts, solos and/or ensembles, Contest Girls

Chorus, and other community performances. One credit.

Concert Choir I – MU260A / MU260B

Concert Choir II – MU360A / MU360B

Concert Choir III – MU460A / MU460B

The Concert Choir is the top mixed choir at Mt.

Vernon High School. Admission to the choir is on an audition basis. Students must demonstrate proficiency in vocal technique and music reading skills during their audition. This choir is for advanced sophomore, junior, and senior singers.

The Concert Choir will continue to develop advanced vocal technique and music reading skills, there will be a great emphasis on performance including: Fall Concert, Christmas Musicale, solos and ensembles, State Contest, commencement, Operetta, and All-State Festivals (selected members) and other

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public appearances designated by the director with the approval of the school. One credit.

Modern Music Appreciation MU480

This course is designed for students who enjoy listening to music and are interested in analyzing and discussing many genres of music. The course will primarily cover American popular music from the

20 th

Century to the present time; however music from multiple styles and cultures will be discussed.

The course will cover the basic constructive aspects of music (physical sound, melody, harmony, rhythm, texture) as well as pivotal artists, genres, and ideas in music and culture throughout America. The role of music in the media (film, TV) will be discussed as well. Students will complete some hands-on projects involving basic recording and mixed media production.

AP Music Theory – MU470A / MU470B

AP Music Theory is designed for students interested in understanding the processes and concepts behind composing and writing music.

Students will learn the basics of music notation, composing melodies, chord construction, and harmony. Students will have the opportunity to compose and arrange their own music. No previous music experience is required. This course is highly recommended for students considering a career in music or who may study music at the college level.

DRIVER EDUCATION

Safety Education – PH201A / PH201B

To meet State legal requirements, eligible sophomores will be required to enroll in one semester of Safety Education. A student eligible for the Safety

Education course at Mt. Vernon Township High

School must receive a passing grade in at least eight courses during the two semesters prior to taking

Safety Education. The exception to this procedure is that the Superintendent may waive this requirement based upon the written appeal of a student stating the reason for requesting the waiver. Students can pick up a waiver form in the Guidance Office. This course will include instruction in Driver Education, Driver

Training Simulation, and behind-the-wheel Driver

Training. In order to obtain a driver’s license at sixteen years of age, a student must complete this course. One-half credit.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

I.Philosophy. Throughout the history of education, it has been an accepted principle that the development of a healthy body is an integral part of the total educational program. Mt. Vernon Township High

School adheres to this principle. It is the philosophy of this high school that every student will be

―physically educated‖ to the best of his/her ability.

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II.Objectives. The major objective of the physical education program is the development and maintenance of:

A. Physical fitness and motor skills. Students will be expected to develop a level of fitness and motor skill with the limits being only the individual student’s ability.

B. Social Efficiency. Simply stated, this is the ability to get along with others and exhibit desirable standards of conduct.

C. Recreational Competency. Recreational skills should be mastered early so that the individual can participate in and learn to enjoy the various activities well enough to carry them on throughout a lifetime.

D. Intellectual Competency. To insure continued participation in physical activities, the student should develop an adequate knowledge and understanding of the values inherent in the activities.

E. Health. One semester of Health will be included in Freshman Physical Education. This required course provides teaching and learning experiences for the purpose of influencing knowledge, habits, and attitudes pertaining to the students’ own health.

Physical Education I – PH100A / PH100B

Grade 9 - freshmen. Introduction to team and individual sports. Class will focus on motor skill development and movement patterns needed to perform a variety of physical activities. Students will be introduced to fitness concepts and the healthrelated fitness components of flexibility, muscular strength, muscular endurance, cardiovascular endurance, and body composition. One-half credit.

Basic PE – PH200A / PH200B

Grade 10 – Sophomores, grade 11 – juniors, grade

12 – seniors. Advanced team and individual sports, plus lifetime activities. Class will focus on fitness concepts and developing personal fitness goals addressing the health-related fitness components of flexibility, muscular strength, muscular endurance, cardiovascular endurance, and body composition.

This class will concentrate on lifetime activities, strategy, problem solving, and team building. One-half credit.

Strength and Conditioning - PH300A / PH300B

Grade 10 – Sophomores, grade 11 – juniors, grade

12 – seniors. This section is a specialized course for, but not limited to, the high school athlete. The students will develop and implement an individualized weight-training program. This class emphasizes physical development and improvement through weight training, aerobic exercise, plyometric exercise, and a wide variety of sport-specific training techniques. Classes will concentrate on fitness concepts and developing personal fitness goals addressing the health-related fitness components of flexibility, muscular strength, muscular endurance, cardiovascular endurance, and body composition. In addition to the physical training aspect students will learn team-building skills, basic nutrition, anatomy, and physiology of exercise. One-half credit.

Personal Fitness - PH400A / PH400B

Grade 10 – Sophomores, grade 11 – juniors, grade

12 – seniors. Personal fitness is designed for the individual who wants to improve his or her total all around fitness. The class is designed to engage the student in anaerobic and aerobic activities through circuit training techniques. The class emphasizes total body training to decrease total body fat percentage while increasing muscle mass and flexibility along with improving overall fitness and wellbeing. One-half credit.

RDS/AREA VOCATIONAL CENTER PROGRAMS

Tech Prep Definition

What is Tech Prep? Tech Prep is a program of study which begins in high school, continues at a postsecondary institution and culminates in an associate of applied science degree, two-year certificate or two-year apprenticeship in one of the

Career Interest Areas (Agriculture and Natural

Resources, Arts and Communications, Business and

Administrative Services, Health Care, Human and

Family Services, Industrial and Engineering

Technology) and leads to related meaningful employment.

Who is a Tech Prep Student? A Tech Prep students is one who is seeking further education after high school and has a written career plan that identifies a sequence of courses that leads to a Tech Prep occupation as a career goal. Students may begin as early as 9th grade and no later than 11th grade to select a Tech Prep sequence of courses. Students may revise their program of study as they move toward their career goal.

What is a Tech Prep Sequence of courses? A Tech

Prep sequence of courses consists of programspecific core academic and technical courses taught at a minimum during the two years of secondary school preceding graduation and at least the following: a. two years of postsecondary education in a no duplicative course of study leading to an associate of applied science degree or two-year certificate in a specific career field, or b.two years of an apprenticeship following high school.

The sequence must include integrated academic and technical content, workplace skills, and instruction delivered both at the worksite and in the school/college setting. Programs may begin as early as the 9th grade and may also articulate from a community college to a four-year baccalaureate degree.

What courses of study are available for Tech Prep?

1. Industrial Technicians

2.Engineer Technicians

3. Business Management

4. Nurses

5. Health Information (Medical Records Technician)

6. Radiology Technologist

7. Respiratory Therapist

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8. Biomedical Technicians

9. Automotive Technicians

10.Child Care Admin./Dir.

11.Agribusiness Management

12.Manufacturing Technician

13.Culinary Art Management

14.Horticulture

Make an appointment with your counselor to get more information on how to enroll in a Tech Prep course of study.

AGRICULTURE EDUCATION

Basic Agriculture Mechanics - AG001A / AG001B

In this course, theory and hands-on experiences provide opportunities for students to develop basic knowledge and skills in agricultural mechanics.

Instructional areas include the basic fundamentals of maintaining and repairing small gasoline engines, basic electricity, welding, construction, cold metal work, and operating agricultural equipment safely.

Improving workplace and computer skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience

(SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts. Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors. One credit.

Introduction to Agriculture Industry A – AG100A

This orientation course provides an opportunity for students to learn how the agricultural industry is organized; its major components; the economic influence of agriculture at state, national and international levels; and the scope and types of job opportunities in the agricultural field. Basic concepts in forestry, plant science, wildlife management, natural resources, food science, food science technology, environmental science and parliamentary procedures will be presented. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in

FFA student organization activities and Supervised

Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors. One-half credit.

Introduction to Agriculture Industry B – AG100B

This orientation course provides an opportunity for students to learn how the agricultural industry is organized; its major components; the economic influence of agriculture at state, national and international levels; and the scope and types of job opportunities in the agricultural field. Basic concepts in animal science including small and large animal production, animal wellness and management, and agricultural science and technology will be presented.

Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience

(SAE) projects is an integral course component for

leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts. Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors and senior. One-half credit.

Basic Horticultural Science A – AG110A

This course is designed to develop knowledge and skills in the following areas: plant identification; floral design; using soil and other plant growing media; propagating horticultural plants; basics of growing horticultural plants in greenhouse and nursery settings; constructing, maintaining and using plantgrowing structures; operating, repairing and maintaining equipment used in the horticultural field.

Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience

(SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts. Offered to sophomore, juniors and seniors. One-half credit.

Basic Horticultural Science B – AG110B

This course is designed to develop knowledge and skills in the following areas: plant identification; floral design; landscape design and maintenance; fruit and nut production; vegetable production; crop science; gardening; basics of growing horticultural plants in greenhouse and nursery settings; constructing, maintaining and using plant-growing structures; operating, repairing and maintaining equipment used in the horticultural field. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised

Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

Offered to sophomore, juniors and seniors. One-half credit.

Basic Agriculture Science A – AG200A

This orientation course builds on basic skills and knowledge gained in the Introduction to the

Agricultural Industry course. Major units of instruction include agricultural research, soil science, plant science on many plant characteristics, health care and fertilizers to help plants in the fields and gardens also, biotechnology, advanced animal science. Many applied science and math skills and concepts will be stressed throughout the course as they relate to each area of soil and plants. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus in this course for many of the 300 agriculture careers. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised

Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts to teach careers and pay for college. Offered to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. One-half credit.

Basic Agriculture Science B – AG200B

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This orientation course builds on basic skills and knowledge gained in the Introduction to the

Agricultural Industry course. Major units of instruction include animal sciences in cattle, swine, sheep, horses, meat science, advanced plant science, biotechnology, advanced animal science. Many applied science and math skills and concepts will be stressed throughout the course as they relate to each area. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus in this course. Your participation in the FFA student organization activities and Supervised

Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts to prepare you for over 300 agriculture careers. The first semester of Agriculture Science is recommended before entering this course unless an agreement is made by the Agriculture Department. Offered to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. One-half credit.

Supervised Agriculture Education (SAE) I

This course is designed to establish knowledge and skills in various agricultural careers. Students will gain credit by establishing a project at their home, at a local business, or at their school usually after normal school hours. Example projects may include, but are not limited to: working at a garden center, raising vegetables/grain/livestock, conducting agriscience experiments in a greenhouse, and training horses at a stable. Students will be required to verify their experiences by keeping written or computerized records including: business agreements, budgets, inventories, daily activities, hours worked, income and expenses, total earnings, depreciation, and net worth.

Instructor supervision will be conducted to the student’s home or place of employment. SAE records should be evaluated at least once per month. In addition, SAE lessons are integrated in each agricultural course. SAE participation can lead to fulltime employment, scholarships, and awards through the FFA. Offered to freshman and sophomores. 1/4 credit each year (1.0 credit maximum)

Agricultural Mechanics and Technology -

AG300A / AG300B

This course will concentrate on expanding student’s knowledge and experiences with agricultural mechanics technologies utilized in the agricultural industry. Units of instruction included are: design, construction, fabrication, maintenance, welding, electricity/electronics, internal combustion engines, hydraulics, and employability skills. Careers of agricultural construction engineer, electrician, plumber, welder, equipment designer, parts manager, safety inspector, welder, and other related occupations will be examined. Improving workplace and computer skills will be a focus. Participation in

FFA student organization activities and Supervised

Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

Offered to juniors and seniors. One credit.

Agricultural Business and Management -

AG310A / AG310B

This course will develop students' understanding of the agricultural industry relating to the United States and World marketplace. Instructional units include: marketing and trading of agricultural products, international agriculture, imports and exports, agricultural law, taxes, governmental regulations and policies, and advanced computerized record keeping.

Student skills will be enhanced in math, reading comprehension, and writing through agribusiness applications. Employability skills will be developed with resume writing and interviewing techniques to gain employment. Post-secondary education will be explored at agricultural colleges and universities.

Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience

(SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts. Offered to juniors and seniors. One credit. Students may receive high school credit and Illinois college credit.

Agricultural Communications and Leadership –

AG312A / AG312B

This course is designed to provide students with communication and leadership skills that will help them to work with others, make career advancements, and prepare for success in local, state, national, and international agriculture. Students will analyze current agricultural issues and determine how they affect people on all sides of the issue. The students then learn and enhance their written and oral communication skills by presenting their views and opinions to the class. Students learn how to arrange and present debates, speeches, and interviews to be effective leaders in today’s society. Students will further enhance their potential for leadership development, personal growth, and career success thought leadership development and experiences.

Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experiences (SAE) projects is an integral course integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

Offered to juniors and seniors. One credit.

Supervised Agriculture Education (SAE) II

This course is designed to improve and expand knowledge and skills in various agricultural careers.

Students will gain credit by continuing a project at their home, at a local business, or at their school usually after normal school hours. Students are encouraged to add additional projects, experiences, scope, and growth involving managerial and decision making skills. Students will be required to verify their experiences by keeping written or computerized records including: business agreements, budgets, inventories, daily activities, hours worked, income and expenses, total earnings, depreciation, and net worth.

Instructor supervision will be conducted to the

22 student’s home or place of employment. SAE records should be evaluated at least once per month.

In addition, SAE lessons are integrated into each agricultural course. SAE participation can lead to fulltime employment, scholarships, and awards through the FFA. Offered to juniors and seniors. Onefourth credit.

Interrelated Cooperative Education – BU500A /

BU500B

This course is designed for senior students interested in pursuing careers in occupations related to agricultural education. Students are released from school for their paid cooperative education work experience and participate in 200 minutes per week of related classroom instruction. Classroom instruction focuses on providing students with job survival skills, career exploration skills related to the job, as well as improving students' abilities to interact positively with others. For skills related to the job, refer to the skill development course outlines and the task list of the desired occupational program.

The course content includes the following broad areas of emphasis: further career education opportunities, planning for the future, job-seeking skills, personal development, human relationships, legal protection and responsibilities, economics and the job, organizations, and job termination. Classroom and worksite instruction is based on the tasks in an occupation. Prerequisite: Completion of one credit of skill-specific training in an approved CTE program recommended Offered to seniors. Three credits.

BUSINESS, MARKETING AND COMPUTER

EDUCATION

Business and Technology Concepts A – BU100A

In this first semester course, students will be provided with an overview of all aspects of business, marketing and management, including the concepts, functions, and skills required for meeting the challenges of operating a business in a global economy. Topics covered will include the various forms of business ownership, including entrepreneurship, as well as the basic functional areas of business (finance, management, marketing, administration and production). Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. One-half credit.

Business and Technology Concepts B – BU100B

In this second semester course, students will be introduced to a wide range of careers in fields such as accounting, financial services, information technology, marketing, and management. Emphasis will be placed on using the computer while studying applications in these careers along with communication skills

(thinking, listening, composing, revising, editing, and speaking), math and problem solving. Business ethics, as well as other workplace skills, will be taught and integrated within this course. Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. One-half credit.

(A/B -- Satisfies Consumer Education Requirement)

Keyboarding and Formatting I – BU110A

Keyboarding and Formatting I is a course designed to develop basic skills in touch keyboarding techniques for entering alphabetic, numeric, and symbol information found on computers. Students will learn to edit and format text and paragraphs, change fonts, work with headers and footers, cut and paste text, create and use tab keys, create labels, and work with multiple windows. Students will format documents such as letters, envelopes, memorandums, reports, and tables for personal, educational, and business uses. During the second half of the course, major emphasis is placed on formatting documents, improving proofreading skills, and increasing speed and accuracy. Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. One-half credit.

Computer Concepts and Software Applications –

BU120

Computer Concepts and Software Applications is a course designed to develop awareness and understanding of application software and equipment used by employees to perform tasks in business, marketing and management. Students will apply problem-solving skills to hands-on, real-life situations using a variety of software applications, such as word processing, spreadsheets, database management, presentation software, and desktop publishing.

Students will learn to conduct research on the

Internet, explore topics related to computer concepts, operating systems, telecommunications and emerging technologies. The development of employability skills, as well as transition skills, will be included in the course as well as an understanding of the ethical considerations that arise in using information processing equipment and gaining access to available databases. A two week keyboarding refresher unit will be included in this course. Prerequisite: Keyboarding and Formatting I or keyboarding proficiency of at least

35 net words per minute recommended. Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. One-half credit.

Accounting I – BU200A / BU200B

Accounting I is a skill level course that is of value to all students pursuing a strong background in business, marketing, and management. This course includes planned learning experiences that develop initial and basic skills used in systematically computing, classifying, recording, verifying and maintaining numerical data involved in financial and product control records including the paying and receiving of money. Instruction includes information on keeping financial records, summarizing them for convenient interpretation, and analyzing them to provide assistance to management for decision making. Accounting computer applications should be integrated throughout the course where applicable. In addition to stressing basic fundamentals and terminology of accounting, instruction should provide initial understanding of the preparation of budgets and

23 financial reports, operation of related business machines and equipment, and career opportunities in the accounting field. Processing employee benefits may also be included. Practice sets with business papers will be used to emphasize actual business records management. Offered to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. One credit.

Business Law BU206A/ BU206B

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic legal principles common to all aspects of business and personal law. Business topics include contract law, business ownership including intellectual property, financial law, and national and international laws. Personal topics include marriage and divorce law, purchasing appropriate insurance, renting and owning real estate, employment law, and consumer protection laws.

Computer Operations and Programming – BU210A /

BU210B

Computer Operations and Programming is a skilllevel course designed to develop computer programming and program design skills through the use of various programming languages such as Visual

Basic, C+, Java, and other object-oriented languages.

Students will be exposed to the fundamentals of system analysis and design (e.g. flowcharting, diagramming, system design and planning), and the systems development life cycle. Instruction will include basic programming tools that are common to many programming languages. These may include items such as input/output statements, constants, assignment statements, string and numeric variable types, conditional processing, and branching and looping control structures. Students will learn programming techniques such as counting, averaging, rounding, and generation of random numbers to develop a good programming technique. Students will apply what they learn to create programs and applications that solve real world business related problems. Students will create programs to store, locate and retrieve data. Offered to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. One credit.

Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, and Publisher - BU220A

Students in Microsoft IT Academies benefit from world-class Microsoft curriculum and software tools to tackle real-world challenges in the classroom environment. In the first part, students will learn to use the newest version of Microsoft Word interface, commands, and features to create, enhance, customize, share and create complex documents, and publish them. In the second part, students will learn to use the newest version of Microsoft

PowerPoint interface, commands, and features to create, enhance, customize, and deliver presentations. In the last part, students will learn to use the basic features of the newest version of

Publisher to create, customize, and publish a publication. Students will receive a certificate of completion upon successful completion of the

course. Students may then apply to take the

Microsoft Office Specialist (Word) examination for certification. The cost of the examination is to be paid by the student.

Microsoft Excel and Access - BU220B

Students in Microsoft Excel and Access benefit from world-class Microsoft curriculum and cuttingedge software tools to tackle real-world challenges in the classroom environment. The first part of the class is designed to help you use the newest version of Microsoft Excel interface, commands, and features to present, analyze, and manipulate various types of data. Students will learn to manage workbooks as well as how to manage, manipulate, and format data. In the second part of the class, students will learn how to create and work with a database and its objects by using the new and improved features in newest version of Microsoft

Access. Students will learn how to create, modify, and locate information as well as how to create programmable elements and share and distribute database information. Students will receive a certificate of completion upon successful completion of the course. Students may then apply to take the

Microsoft Office Specialist (Excel) examination for certification. The cost of the examination is to be paid by the student.

Accounting II – BU300A / BU300B

Accounting II is a skill-level course that builds upon the foundation established in Accounting I. This course is planned to help students develop a deeper knowledge of the principles of accounting. More emphasis will be placed on cost accounting, tax accounting, accounting for corporations, and computer automated accounting. The student gains practical knowledge of accounting through the use of computerized practice sets. This course will provide additional background for the college bound business student as well as the student who desires to go directly into the business world. Prerequisite:

Completion of Accounting I with a grade of "C" or better. Offered juniors, and seniors. One credit.

Personal Finance – BU305

(Satisfies Consumer Education Requirement)

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts and principles involved in managing one’s personal finances.

Topics will include savings, credit, insurance, taxes and social security, spending patterns and budget planning, contracts, and consumer protection.

Product Oriented Marketing & Marketing

Fundamentals – BU310A / BU310B

Product Marketing/Marketing Fundamentals is a year course offered to juniors and seniors who are interested in the field of selling as a vocation. Juniors who are interested in taking the Work Experience

Program during their senior year should take this course to confirm their interest in the field. Product

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Marketing emphasizes the marketing functions of retailing and wholesaling. The student will complete a computer simulation for a retail business. In addition, importance is placed on job values, sales presentations, display, advertising, entrepreneurship, and other areas of distribution. Offered to juniors and seniors. One credit

Web Page and Interactive Media

Development I – BU320A/ BU320B

Web Page and Interactive Media Development I is a skill-level course designed to prepare students to plan, design, create and maintain web pages and sites. Students will learn the fundamentals of web page design using HTML, HTML editors, and graphic editors as well as programming tools such as

JavaScript. Students will work in a project-based environment to create a working website. Students will learn to create pages, add hyperlinks, make tables and frames, create forms, integrate images, and set styles. Students will use image-editing programs to manipulate scanned images, computer graphics, and original artwork. Instruction will include creating graphical headers, interactive menus and buttons, and visually appealing backgrounds. Students will use hardware and software to capture, edit, create, and compress audio and video clips. Prerequisite:

Keyboarding and Formatting I recommended. Offered to juniors and seniors. One credit

Web Page and Graphic Media

Development II – BU420A / BU420B

Web Page and Interactive Media Development II is a skill-level course for students who have completed

Web Page and Interactive Media Development I.

Instruction will include using multimedia authoring applications and programming tools such as

JavaScript to create a web site that combines text, hyperlinks, images, video, and sound. Instruction will include using hardware and software to capture, edit, create, and compress audio and video clips as well as create animated text, graphics, and images. Other topics will include using tables to align images with text, creating newspaper-style columns, and inserting side menus and call-outs. Students will learn how to

BU305

elements to enhance web pages. Students will learn to create dynamic forms that include multiple-choice questions, comment boxes, and buttons. Students will learn how to connect to a database and retrieve and write data.

Students are encouraged to develop a portfolio project that demonstrates their expertise in areas such as multimedia authoring, web development, audio and video editing, and advanced JavaScript applications to create interactive web pages. This course is conducted as an Independent Study– developing and updating the MVTHS Web Page, creating brochures, handouts, schedules for the high school as needed. Prerequisite: Web Page and

Interactive Media Development I. Offered to seniors.

One credit.

Interrelated Cooperative Education – BU500A /

BU500B

This course is designed for senior students interested in pursuing careers in occupations related to business, marketing and computer education.

Students are released from school for their paid cooperative education work experience and participate in 200 minutes per week of related classroom instruction. Classroom instruction focuses on providing students with job survival skills, career exploration skills related to the job, as well as improving students' abilities to interact positively with others. For skills related to the job, refer to the skill development course outlines and the task list of the desired occupational program.

The course content includes the following broad areas of emphasis: further career education opportunities, planning for the future, job-seeking skills, personal development, human relationships, legal protection and responsibilities, economics and the job, organizations, and job termination. Classroom and worksite instruction is based on the tasks in an occupation. Prerequisite: Completion of one credit of skill-specific training in an approved CTE program recommended. Offered to seniors. Three credits.

FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES

Foods and Nutrition I – FA100

This course includes the basic classroom and laboratory experiences needed to develop a knowledge and understanding of basic food principles and nutrition for people of all ages. Course content centers around: food service and preparation management using the decision-making process; meeting basic needs by applying nutrition concepts; meeting health and safety needs in planning, preparing and serving food; maximizing resources when planning/preparing/serving food; promoting hospitality in food practices; and analyzing individual and family nutritional needs in relation to change.

Information related to careers in foods and nutrition is incorporated throughout the course. Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors. One-half credit.

Foods and Nutrition II – FA102

Provides principles of application into the hospitality industry, including nutrition, culinary, and entrepreneurial opportunities. Course content includes the following: selection, purchase, preparation, and conservation of food, dietary needs and trends, regional & international cuisine, safety and sanitation, and careers in food service industries.

All of these concepts can be interpreted through laboratory experiences. Prerequisite: Foods and

Nutrition I. One-half credit.

Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences

Careers - FA103

This course introduces students to the field of family and consumer sciences and the many career opportunities available in this broad field. The course includes theory and laboratory experiences in the following content areas: Nutrition and culinary arts; textiles and design; family, career, and community leadership development; resource management; human development and life-long learning; facility design, care, and management; and interpersonal relationships and life management skills.

Child Growth and Development – FA110

This non-laboratory orientation level course emphasizes knowledge and understanding of the intellectual, physical, social and emotional development of children from conception through adolescence. The content should center around the following duty areas: managing and organizing child development by applying decision-making and goalsetting skills; promoting child development by applying physical, social, intellectual and emotional principles; practicing health and safety standards for children; providing experiences encouraging children to maximize resources; encouraging human relations skills in children; and evaluating family and career changes in relation to impact on children. Information related to careers in child, day care and educational services is incorporated throughout the course.

Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors. One-half credit.

Care and Learning Services Occupations –

FA200A / FA200B

This course provides students with information and practical experiences needed for the development of competencies related to child, day care and education services occupations. Laboratory experiences, either in a school-based or worksite learning facility, are included throughout the class. Students meet standards in developing programs and assisting with children's and/or adult's activities. Classroom study includes the philosophy and management of care centers and the state and local regulations governing care-giving operations. The main learning experiences will involve actual work with children/adults simulating those found in business and industry, as well as preparation for developing and facilitating these activities. Offered to sophomores, juniors and seniors. One credit.

Culinary Arts I – FA300A / FA300B

This introductory course provides students interested in a career in food service with practical knowledge and theory as well as introducing and mastering appropriate culinary skills needed for the food service industry. Students will receive instruction through classroom and laboratory experiences by using commercial equipment for preparing food in small and large quantities. Study will include: orientation to all aspects of the food industry, food preparation, quantity production, quality control of food preparation, safety and sanitation, and planning

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and budgeting. The course provides students with the necessary information and experience to prepare them for the Department of Public Health sanitation examination. Training experiences involve equipment and facilities that simulate those found in business and industry. Student will be introduced and encouraged to participate in FCCLA leadership

Activities. Prerequisite: Food and Nutrition I. Offered to juniors and seniors. Two credits. Students may receive high school credit and Illinois college credit.

Culinary Arts II – FA310A / FA310B

This advanced course is a continuation of Culinary

Arts I using classroom and laboratory instruction appropriate for the food service industry. Culinary skills will be further developed and reinforced in the areas of: selecting food, food preparation, planning menus, catering, quantity cooking, using commercial equipment, planning and decision making. More emphasis is placed on management/budgeting skills, human relations, and personnel selection and supervision. Training experiences involve equipment and facilities that simulate those found in business and industry. Student will be introduced and encouraged to participate in FCCLA leadership

Activities. Offered to juniors and seniors. Two credits.

Students may receive high school credit and Illinois college credit.

Resource Management – FA320

This course focuses on the understandings and skills needed to make decisions about the use of resources and prevention strategies which contribute to an improved quality of life. The course content includes the following duty areas: utilizing resources and consumer information by applying goal-setting and decision-making skills; evaluating use of resources to meet social, physical and psychological needs; maintaining health standards by applying safety information; applying consumer rights and responsibilities in the marketplace; accomplishing mutual goals by utilizing human resources; and analyzing resource/consumer management skills necessary to make decisions. This course meets the content requirements (installment purchasing, budgeting, comparison of prices and an understanding of the roles of consumers interacting with agriculture, business labor unions and government in formulating and achieving the goals of the mixed free enterprise system) for consumer education instruction as required by the School Code of Illinois (Section 27-12.1). Offered to juniors and seniors. One-half credit.

Parenting – FA330

This course helps students understand the responsibilities, satisfactions and stresses of parenthood. Many types of parenting situations are examined. Stress prevention and management are emphasized. Community agencies that help parents deal with various types of parenting situations are identified. Course content includes the following duty areas: managing and organizing parenting by

26 applying decision-making and goal-setting skills; applying the basic principles of the parenting process; practicing health and safety standards as related to parenting; providing experiences which encourage parents and children to maximize resources; encouraging human relations skills in children/adolescents; and evaluating impact on parenting of family and career changes. Special attention is given to the needs of teenage parents and to the importance of readiness for parenthood.

Offered to juniors and seniors. One-half credit.

Adult Living – FA340

This course is designed to assist individuals and families in achieving life satisfaction through responsible participation as adults in the home, community and workplace. Emphasis is placed on the development of prevention strategies which will assist individuals in responding to situations in terms of their identified values and goals. The course content includes: developing short and long-range plans, demonstrating goal-setting and decision-making skills; evaluating and adapting basic needs to assume roles and responsibilities; recognizing and following health practices that assist in coping, selecting and using resources to enhance individual growth and development; developing effective relationships to promote communication with others; and evaluating family and career changes The course helps students identify resources that will assist them in managing life situations. Offered to juniors and seniors. One-half credit.

Care and Learning Services Management –

FA350A / FA350B

This course emphasizes the skills associated with the administration of the infant, child and adult care facilities and with education facilities. Skills, strategies and issues related to caring for infants and special needs children and adults, where applicable, are included. Emphasis is placed on career opportunities, communication skills, human relations and the service needs of clients in the occupational area. The major learning experiences will involve actual work with children and/or adults in facilities simulating those found in education and industry, and discussion of the situations and problems that arise during the learning experiences. The morning class major learning experiences will consist of practicum in the on-site preschool at Mt. Vernon Township High School. The afternoon class will be off-site at St. Marys Grade

School and Mt. Vernon Primary Center. State licensing regulation related to all aspects of caregiving are stressed throughout the course. Offered to juniors and seniors. Two credits. Students may receive high school credit and Illinois college credit.

Interrelated Cooperative Education – BU500A /

BU500B

This course is designed for senior students interested in pursuing careers in occupations related to family and consumer sciences. Students are released from school for their paid cooperative

education work experience and participate in 200 minutes per week of related classroom instruction.

Classroom instruction focuses on providing students with job survival skills, career exploration skills related to the job, as well as improving students' abilities to interact positively with others. For skills related to the job, refer to the skill development course outlines and the task list of the desired occupational program.

The course content includes the following broad areas of emphasis: further career education opportunities, planning for the future, job-seeking skills, personal development, human relationships, legal protection and responsibilities, economics and the job, organizations, and job termination. Classroom and worksite instruction is based on the tasks in an occupation. Prerequisite: Completion of one credit of skill-specific training in an approved CTE program recommended. Offered to seniors. Three credits.

HEALTH SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY

Orientation to Health Occupations – HE100

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to various types of occupations in the health field and to assist students in matching personal abilities to a tentative career choice. The course content provides in-depth information about health careers, along with the occupational, educational, and attitudinal requirements needed to be successful. Basic first aid and CPR are also taught. The course is offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors. One-half credit.

Principles of Biomedical Sciences –

HE160A / HE1600B

Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Principles of the

Biomedical Sciences provides an introduction to this field through ―hands-on‖ projects and problems.

Student work involves the study of human medicine, research processes and an introduction to bioinformatics. Students investigate the human body systems and various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. A theme through the course is to determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person. After determining the factors responsible for the death, the students investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life.

Key biological concepts included in the curriculum are: homeostasis, metabolism, inheritance of traits, feedback systems, and defense against disease.

Engineering principles such as the design process, feedback loops, fluid dynamics, and the relationship of structure to function will be included where appropriate. The course is designed to provide an overview of all courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and to lay the scientific foundation necessary for student success in the subsequent courses.

Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors. – certain prerequisites must be met before enrollment. One credit.

Health Occupations Related Skills -

HE225A / HE225B

The course will expose students to the variety of opportunities available within the health care industry (e.g., such as nursing, therapy, vision and dental care, administrative services, and lab technology) which include classroom and community-based activities. The main purpose of this course is to assist students in further development of their self-concept and in matching personal abilities and interest to a tentative career choice. Course content will provide in-depth information into health occupations careers and trends, the occupational and educational opportunities and the educational, physical, emotional and attitudinal requirements. Basic first aid and CPR are also taught.

Human Body System – HE260A / HE260B

Students engage in the study of the processes, structures, and interactions of the human body systems. Important concepts in the course include: communication, transport of substances, locomotion, metabolic processes, defense, and protection. The central theme is how the body systems work together to maintain homeostasis and good health. The systems are studied as ―parts of a whole,‖ working together to keep the amazing human machine functioning at an optimal level. Students design experiments, investigate the structures and functions of body systems, and use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary actions, and respiratory operation. Students work through interesting real world cases and often play the role of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries.

Prerequisites: completion of Principles of Biomedical

Sciences with a C or better, grade of B or above in

Algebra II or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or higher. Explore (math/science) 17+, Plan

(math/science) 19+. One credit.

Health Occupation – HE300A/ HE300B

This Health Occupations Core Skill class is open to junior and senior students who have an interest in the health field. The course includes affective, cognitive, and psychomotor skills which are common to most

Health Occupations. Students spend time in the classroom learning basic medical terminology, body structure and function, and mastering tasks for various medical occupations. Second semester students will be certified in CPR/First Aid/AED as well as complete the 40-Hour First Responder course. Once completed, students will be eligible to sit for the Illinois state test for licensure. Students will also be rotated through clinical departments such as; x-ray,

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occupational therapy, physical therapy, laboratory, respiratory therapy, surgery, dietary. Medical offices, which include veterinarian, dental, physical medicine, and other related health departments, are also included in the rotation. Student performance, in the clinical setting, is evaluated by the department supervisors and the regular classroom teacher. Final grades are determined by the classroom teacher. It is recommended that the Health Occupations Core

Skills course be taken before the Health Care Aide.

Students are responsible for a uniform and white shoes as well as a watch with second hand and black

EMS pants. Offered to juniors and seniors. Two credits. Students may receive high school credit and

Illinois college credit.

Medical Interventions (MI) – HE360A / HE360B

Project Lead the Way (PLTW) – Foundation Course

Students investigate a variety of interventions involved in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease as they follow the life of a fictitious family.

The course is a ―How-To‖ manual for maintaining overall health and homeostasis in the body.

Students explore how to prevent and fight infection; screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; prevent, diagnose and treat cancer; and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Through these scenarios, students are exposed to a range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics.

Basic Nursing Assistant Training – HE400A / HE400B

The course is composed of a combination of subject matter and experiences designed to perform tasks of individuals receiving nursing services. The student learns those competencies needed to perform as a nurse assistant under the direction of the registered nurse. The units of instruction should include the role of the nurse assistant while covering general health care topics; medical terminology; patients/clients and their environment; special feeding techniques; psychological support and, in long term and terminal illness, death and dying (e.g., chronically ill, children, new mothers, and so on); and all other basic nursing skills. Topics covered typically include normal growth and development; feeding, transporting patients, hygiene, and disease prevention; first aid and CPR; observing and reporting; care of equipment and supplies; doctor, nurse, and patient relationships and roles; procedure policies; medical and professional ethics; and care of various kinds of patients – including long-term care residents. Students will receive a certificate of completion in Basic Nurse Assistant

Training upon successful completion of the course.

Students may then apply to take the Nurse Assistant

Training examination for certification. Passing this exam is necessary in order to be placed on the registry for the Illinois Department of Public Health as a Certified Nurse Assistant (C.N.A.). The cost of the

C.N.A. examination is to be paid by the student.

Supplies needed for this course are a watch with

28 second hand, transfer belt, stethoscope, blood pressure cuff, uniform, and white shoes. Students are also required to submit to medical screening and criminal background check. Offered to juniors and seniors. Two credits. Students may receive high school credit and Illinois college credit.

Interrelated Cooperative Education – BU500A /

BU500B

This course is designed for senior students interested in pursuing careers in occupations related to health science. Students are released from school for their paid cooperative education work experience and participate in 200 minutes per week of related classroom instruction. Classroom instruction focuses on providing students with job survival skills, career

HE360A/B

others. For skills related to the job, refer to the skill development course outlines and the task list of the desired occupational program.

The course content includes the following broad areas of emphasis: further career education opportunities, planning for the future, job-seeking skills, personal development, human relationships, legal protection and responsibilities, economics and the job, organizations, and job termination. Classroom and worksite instruction is based on the tasks in an occupation. Prerequisite: Completion of one credit of skill-specific training in an approved CTE program recommended. Offered to seniors. Three credits.

TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING EDUCATION

Orientation to Manufacturing I – IN200A

This introductory course is designed to allow students to develop a knowledge of concepts in manufacturing in a global society and its impact on our lives and our environment. This course will emphasize the laboratory approach. Class activities will include demonstrations and applications of manufacturing systems, materials, tools, and machines. Students will apply mathematics and technical knowledge to problem solving. Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors. One-half credit.

Orientation to Manufacturing II – IN200B

This introductory course is designed to allow students to become aware of the role that welding and cutting of materials play in manufacturing technology.

General knowledge and understanding will be developed in arc and wire feed welding, oxyacetylene welding and cutting, manual, semi-automatic, and plasma cutting, air-arc metal removal, T.I.G. welding, and the use of computers and robotics as they relate to these processes. The laboratory approach will be emphasized. Students will apply mathematics and technical knowledge to problem solving.

Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors. One-half credit.

Communications Technology (Drafting) – IN210

Communications Technology is a course designed to foster an awareness and understanding of the technologies used to communicate in our modern society. Students will gain experience in the areas of design and drafting, radio and television broadcasting, computers in communication, photography, graphic arts, and telecommunications.Offered to freshmen & sophomores. One-half credit.

Energy Utilization Technology (Electricity) – IN220

Energy Utilization Technology is a course designed to foster an awareness and understanding of how we use energy in our industrial technological society.

Areas of study will include conversion of energy; electrical fundamentals; solar energy resources; alternate energy resources such as wind, water, and geothermal; fossil fuels; nuclear power; energy conservation; and computer uses in energy technology. Students will use laboratory experiences to become familiar with current energy technologies.

Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors. One-half credit.

Production Technology (Construction) – IN230

Production Technology is a course designed to foster an awareness and understanding of manufacturing and construction technology. Through a variety of learning activities, students are exposed to many career opportunities in the production field.

Experiences in manufacturing include product design, materials and processes, tools and equipment, including computers, safety procedures, corporate structure, management, research and development, production planning, mass production, marketing and servicing. In construction, students will be exposed to site preparation, foundations, building structures, installing utilities, and finishing and servicing structures. Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors. One-half credit.

Transportation Technology (Small Engines) – IN240

Transportation Technology is a course designed to foster an awareness and understanding of the various transportation customs that make up our mobile society. Through laboratory activities the student will be exposed to the technologies of and career opportunities involved in material handling, atmospheric and space transportation, marine transportation, terrestrial transportation, and computer uses in transportation technology. Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors. One-half credit.

Introduction to Engineering Design – IN150A / IN150B

Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Introduction to

Engineering Design is for students interested in

Engineering and/or Architecture related fields. Units of study include sketching, Multi-Views, Pictorial and

3DDrawing, Sections, Dimensioning, Auxiliary, and

Architectural drawings. Portfolios are developed by the students, containing different mediums, such as

29 drawing, sketching, digital pictures, film clips, and computer files, to record and illustrate their design process. Concepts of careers, design, techniques, forms and shapes, geometry, graphing, adaptations, quality control, packaging, and cost analysis are taught in a logical fashion and applied in this handson curriculum. Students will be expected to use 2D and 3D CAD software to solve problems and present designs. Powerful Autodesk software such as

AutoCAD and Inventor will be utilized. Technical reading and math skills are needed. This course is part of a nationally recognized program called Project

Lead The Way (PLTW). Offered to freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors – certain prerequisites must be met before enrollment. One credit.

Principles of Engineering – IN153A / IN153B

This Project Lead the Way (PLTW) course helps students understand the field of engineering/engineering technology by exploring various technology systems and manufacturing processes help students learn how engineers and technicians use math, science and technology in an engineering problem solving process to benefit people. Topics include the design process, CAD usage, material strength testing, structural analysis, and other engineering topics. Furthermore, the course includes concerns about social and political consequences of technological change. Unit topics include defining types of engineering, communication and documentation, engineering systems, statics and strength of materials, materials and materials testing, engineering for reliability, and dynamic/kinematics.

This course is part of a nationally recognized program called Project Lead The Way. More information can be found at the web site www.PLTW.org Offered to sophomores, juniors and seniors – certain prerequisites must be met before enrollment. One credit.

Digital Electronics – IN155A / IN155B

This course is the study of electronic circuits that are used to process and control digital signals. Digital electronics is the foundation of all modern electronic devices such as cellular phones, MP3 players, laptop computers, digital cameras, and high-definition televisions. The major focus of the DE course is to expose students to the design process of combinational and sequential logic design, teamwork, communication methods, engineering standards, and technical documentation. Computer simulation software is used to design and test digital circuitry prior to the actual construction of circuits and devices.

This course is part of a nationally recognized program called Project Lead the Way. Prerequisite: completion of IED/POE, grade of B or above in

Algebra II or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II or higher, Explore (math/science) 17+, Plan

(math/science) 19+, PACT (math/science) 20+. One credit.

Civil Engineering & Architecture – IN160A / IN160B

The major focus of this course is completing longterm projects that involve the development of property sites. As students learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture, they apply what they learn to the design and development of a property.

The course provides teachers and students freedom to develop the property as a simulation or to students to model the experiences that civil engineers and architects face. Students work in teams, exploring hands-on activities and projects to learn the characteristics of civil engineering and architecture. In addition, students use 3D design software to help them design solutions to solve major course projects.

Students learn about documenting their project, solving problems, and communicating their solutions to their peers and members of the professional community of civil engineering and architecture.

Prerequisite: completion of IED/POE, grade of B or above in Algebra II or concurrent enrollment in

Algebra II or higher, Explore (math/science) 17+, Plan

(math/science) 19+, PACT (math/science) 20+. This course can be taken concurrently with Digital

Electronics. One credit.

Computer Integrated Manufacturing – IN165A /

IN165B

Computer Integrated Manufacturing is a specialized course within the Engineering Academy. This course teaches the fundamentals of computerized manufacturing technology. It builds on the solidmodeling skills developed in the Introduction to

Engineering Design Course. Students use 3-D computer software to solve design problems. They assess their solutions through the relationship of design, function and materials, modify their designs, and use prototyping equipment to produce 3-D models. Prerequisite: completion of IED/POE, grade of B or above in Algebra II or concurrent enrollment in

Algebra II or higher, Explore (math/science) 17+, Plan

(math/science) 19+, PACT (math/science) 20+. This course can be taken concurrently with Digital

Electronics. One credit.

Small Engine Repair – IN306A / IN306B

Small engine repair is an instructional program that prepares individuals to troubleshoot, service, and repair a variety of small internal-combustion engines, involving both two and four cycle engines used on portable power equipment. Planned activities will allow students to become knowledgeable of fundamental principles and technical skills related to troubleshooting, repairing, identifying parts and making precision measurements. Safety will be a key component of this class. Students will also be exposed to career opportunities related to small engines.

Automotive Technician I – IN310A / IN310B

This course introduces students to the basic skills needed to inspect, maintain, and repair automobiles and light trucks that run on gasoline, electricity, or alternative fuels. Instructional units include engine performance, automotive electrical system, integrated computer systems, lubrication, exhaust and emission control, steering and suspension, fuel systems, cooling system, braking, and powertrain. Offered to juniors and seniors. Two credits.

CAD/Drafting I – IN320A / IN320B

This course is for students who are interested in careers in drafting, design, architecture, construction management, interior design, graphic arts, engineering and other related professions. Students will learn to make drawings and read blueprints in the same manner as professionals in the careers listed above. Students will learn to use drafting tools to make drawings by hand. They will also learn to use computer aided drafting (CAD) to make drawings by computer. The classroom is equipped with professional CAD systems which include some of the latest and most powerful software. No previous experience with computers or drafting is needed. The main requirement for enrollment in the course is a sincere desire to learn the "language of industry"....drafting. Success in college (technology, architecture, and engineering) or technical school and success on industrial jobs can be improved by completion of this course. College credit can be received by students who complete this course and achieve a minimum score on a Proficiency Test. Open to juniors and seniors. Two credits. Students may receive high school credit and Illinois college credit.

Electrical Trades – IN330A / IN330B

A lab based course that utilizes hands-on activities to provide learning experiences in basic electronics.

Students will learn the fundamental theories, formulas and concepts of modern electronics. An emphasis is placed on electronic components as they pertain to industrial and commercial circuits. Topics include power supplies, relays, transistor switching, motor controls, robotics and sensors, alarm systems and computer interfacing. Students will design, construct and troubleshoot projects and printed circuit boards throughout the course. This course would provide

IN306A/B

engineers, or anyone interested in the field of electronics and computers. Open to juniors and seniors. Two credits.

Robotics – IN335A/ IN335B

Robotics is a course that introduces students to robotics through the investigation of the electromechanical systems that are used in robots.

Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in the course to design and build a robot. This course is intended for students who have an interest in electronics and robotics. Topics covered in the course may include mechanics, electrical and motor controls, pneumatics, computer basics, and programmable logic controllers. Prerequisite: communication/energy/production/transportation.

One Credit.

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Manufacturing I – IN340A / IN340B

This course offers a planned sequence of learning experiences which provide students with the opportunities to develop competencies needed for employment in a variety of manufacturing-related occupations. Course content will emphasize competencies common to many occupations such as applying safety practices, selecting materials, metal fabrication, performing benchwork operations, performing precision measurement, performing layouts, performing housekeeping activities and setting and operating a variety of tools used for separating, machining, forming and combining materials, blueprint reading and related math. Offered to juniors and seniors. Two credits. Students may receive high school and Illinois college credit.

Commercial & Advertising Art IIN346A / IN346B

This course is designed to provide students with the skills needed for a career in the fields of advertising, commercial art, graphic design, web site development, and graphic illustrator. Students learn to apply artistic design and layout principles along with text, graphics, drawing, rendering, sound, video, and

2D/3D animation integration to develop various print, video, and digital products. Students use hardware and software programs to create, manipulate, color, paint, and layer scanned images, computer graphics, and original artwork. Students use hardware and software to capture, edit, create, and compress audio and video clips. Students use animation and 2D/3D hardware and software to create animated text, graphics, and images. Students apply artistic techniques to design and create advertisements, displays, publications, technical illustrations, marketing brochures, logos, trademarks, packaging, video graphics, and computer-generated media.

Automotive Technician II – IN410A / IN410B

This course is a continuation of and builds on the skills and concepts introduced in Automotive

Technician I. This course includes instructional units in alternative fuel systems, computerized diagnostics, new vehicle servicing, automotive heating and air conditioning, transmissions, testing and diagnostics, drivetrain and overall automobile performance.

Prerequisite is Automotive Technician I. Offered to seniors. Two credits.

CAD/Drafting II – IN420A / IN420B

This course builds on the skills developed in

Drafting/CAD I and allows the student to begin learning to perform tasks in a selected specialty.

Students who like architecture will learn the skills necessary to draw a set of house plans. Students who like machines will learn skills necessary to complete drawings for manufactured parts for automobiles and other consumer products. Students will learn to plan, research materials, determine requirements, and organize activities to complete a drawing. Students will continue to develop skills and complete drawings with professional computer aided drafting (CAD) systems. Students who successfully complete this course will be prepared for beginning employment and (or) greater success in college or technical school programs. Prerequisite: Drafting/CAD I. Offered to seniors. Two credits.

Manufacturing II – IN440A / IN440B

This second training level course should offer experiences, which expand upon competencies achieved during Manufacturing Occupations I. This course will begin to offer students the opportunity to specialize in specific areas of manufacturing such as machine tool set-up and operation, welding, quality control, automated machine set-up and operation and sheet metal fabrication. Course content might include the following areas: metallurgy and heat treatment of metal, advanced machine set-up and operation, numerical control/computer, numerical control machining, performing supervisory functions and installation, and maintenance and repair of machinery, blueprint reading and related math. Prerequisite:

Manufacturing I. Offered to seniors. Two credits.

Interrelated Cooperative Education –

BU500A / BU500B

This course is designed for senior students interested in pursuing careers in occupations related to agricultural education. Students are released from school for their paid cooperative education work experience and participate in 200 minutes per week of related classroom instruction. Classroom instruction focuses on providing students with job survival skills, career exploration skills related to the job, as well as improving students' abilities to interact positively with others. For skills related to the job, refer to the skill development course outlines and the task list of the desired occupational program.

The course content includes the following broad areas of emphasis: further career education opportunities, planning for the future, job-seeking skills, personal development, human relationships, legal protection and responsibilities, economics and the job, organizations, and job termination. Classroom and worksite instruction is based on the tasks in an occupation. Prerequisite: Completion of one credit of skill-specific training in an approved CTE program recommended. Offered to seniors. Three credits.

NO-PASS, NO-PLAY POLICY

Selection of members or participants is at the discretion of the teachers, sponsors, or coaches, provided that the selection criteria conform to the

District’s Policies. Participation in co-curricular activities is dependent upon course selection and successful progress in those courses. In order to be eligible to participate in any school-sponsored or school-supported athletic or extracurricular activity, a student must be passing a minimum of five (5) classes. Students shall, unless they are entering high school for the first time, have credit on the school records for twenty-five (25) credit hours (5 classes) of high school work for the previous semester. Such work shall have been completed in the semester for

31

which credit is granted or in a recognized summer school program which has been approved by the

Board of Education and for which graduation credit is received. Any student participant failing to meet these academic criteria shall be suspended from the activity for seven (7) calendar days or until the specified academic criteria are met, whichever is longer.

IHSA ELIGIBILITY RULES

When you become a member of an interscholastic athletic team at your high school, you will find that both your school and the IHSA will have rules you must follow in order to be eligible for interscholastic sports participation. The IHSA’s rules have been adopted by the high schools which are members of

IHSA as part of the Association’s constitution and bylaws. They must be followed as minimum standards for all interscholastic athletic competition in any member high school. Your high school may have additional requirements, but they may not be less stringent than these statewide minimums.

The principal of your school is responsible to see that only eligible students represent the school in interscholastic athletics. Any question concerning your athletic eligibility should be referred to your principal, who has a complete copy of all IHSA eligibility rules, including the Association’s due process procedure.

Only the IHSA Executive Director is authorized to make formal rulings on eligibility, so if your principal has questions or wishes assistance in answering your questions, the principal should contact the IHSA

Office.

Information contained here highlights only the most important features of the IHSA by-laws regarding interscholastic athletic eligibility. It is designed to make you aware of major requirements you must meet to be eligible to compete in interscholastic athletics. The information here is only a general description of major by-law provisions and does not contain the statement of the by-laws in their entirety.

You will lose eligibility for interscholastic athletics if you violate IHSA by-laws. Therefore, it is extremely important that you review this material with your parents, your coaches, your athletic director, and your principal to thoroughly understand the IHSA eligibility by-laws and how they relate to you.

ATTENDANCE

1.You may represent only the school you attend.

Participation on a cooperative team of which your school is a member is acceptable.

2. You must be enrolled and attending classes in your high school no later than the beginning of the

11th school day of the semester.

3. If you attend school for ten (10) or more days during any one semester, it will count as one of the eight (8) semesters of high school attendance during which you may possibly have athletic eligibility.

4.If you have a lapse in school connection for ten

(10) or more consecutive school days during a semester, you are subject to ineligibility for the rest of the semester. The specific terms of your extended

32 absence must be reviewed by the Executive Director to determine if it is ―lapse in school connection or not.‖

SCHOLASTIC STANDING

1. You must pass twenty-five (25) credit hours of high school work per week. Generally, twenty-five

(25) credit hours is the equivalent of five (5) ―full credit‖ courses.

2.You must have passed and received credit toward graduation for twenty-five (25) (credit hours of high school work for the entire previous semester to be eligible at all during the ensuing semester.

RESIDENCE

Your eligibility is dependent on the location of the residence where you live full time with your parents, parent who has been assigned custody by the court, or court appointed legal guardian. (If you do not reside with both of your biological parents, your eligibility may be subject to special provisions. Check with your principal to be sure you are eligible before you participate.)

You may be eligible if you are entering high school as a freshman and:

1. You attend the public high school in the district in which you live full time with both of your parents; or

2. You have paid tuition to attend a public school for a minimum of 7th and 8th grades in a district other than the one where you live with your parents, and you continue to pay tuition as a high school student in that same district; or

3.You attend a private/parochial school located within the boundaries of the public school district where you live with your parents or court appointed legal guardian; or

4.You attend a private/parochial high school and have attended a private/parochial school for 7th and

8th grades, or for any four (4) grades from kindergarten through eighth grades; or

5.You attended the private/parochial high school which one or both of your birth parents attended or where one of your parents’ current spouse attended; or

6.You attend a private/parochial high school located within a thirty (30) mile radius of the residence where you live with your parents.

TRANSFER

1.In all transfer cases, both the principal of the school from which you transfer and the principal of the school into which you transfer must concur with the transfer in writing on a form provided by the IHSA

Office. You cannot be eligible when you transfer until this form is fully executed and on file in the school office.

2. If you transfer after classes begin for the current school term, you will definitely be ineligible for thirty days from the date you start attending classes at the new high school. In addition, you will be ineligible for that entire school term in any sport in which you engage in any team activity, including but not limited to try-outs, drills, physical practice sessions, team meetings, playing in a contest, etc., at the school from

which you transferred. For example, if you were out for cross country at the school from which you transfer and transfer after classes have started for the school term, you will be ineligible for cross country that entire school term at the new school.

3. If you transfer attendance from one high school to another high school, you will be ineligible unless: a.Your transfer is in conjunction with a change in residence by both you and your parents, custodial parent, or court appointed guardian from one public school district to a different public school district; b.Your transfer is between high schools within a public school district and both you and your parents, custodial parent, or court appointed guardian change residence to the district attendance area for the school to which you transfer; c.Your transfer is from a private/parochial school to your home public high school, you are entering a public high school for the first time, and the principals of both your former and the new school approve your transfer; d.Your transfer is from one private/parochial school to another private/parochial school located within a thirty (30) mile radius of the residence where you live with your parents, custodial parent, or court appointed guardian, you are changing high schools for the first time, and the principals of both your former and the new school approve your transfer; e.Your parents are divorced or legally separated; you transfer to a new school in conjunction with a modification or other change in legal custody between your parents by action of a judge; and required court documents are on file at the school into which you transfer.

4.If you transfer in conjunction with a change in legal guardianship, a ruling on your eligibility must be obtained from the IHSA Office.

5. If you transfer attendance from one school to another while you are ineligible for any season, the period of ineligibility imposed prior to your transfer will be enforced at the school to which you transfer, even if you are otherwise in compliance with the by-laws.

6.Any questions about your eligibility in any of these instances must be resolved by a formal ruling from the

IHSA Executive Director.

7.In all other transfer situations, a ruling by the IHSA

Executive Director is necessary to determine your eligibility. This ruling must be obtained in writing by the principal of the school into which you transfer before you participate in an interscholastic athletic contest.

PARTICIPATION LIMITATIONS

1. After you enroll in ninth (9th) grade, you may be eligible for no more than the first eight (8) semesters you attend school. If you attend school for ten (10) or more days in a semester, that counts as a semester of attendance. You are not guaranteed eight semesters of eligibility, but that is the maximum number of semesters of high school attendance during which you may possibly have eligibility.

2. Your 7th and 8th semesters of high school attendance must be consecutive.

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3. After you enroll in ninth (9th) grade, you will not be eligible for more than four (4) years of competition in any sport. You are not guaranteed four (4) years of competition, but that is the maximum amount of competition you may have.

AGE

You will become ineligible on the date you become twenty (20) years of age, unless your twentieth (20th) birthday occurs during a sport season. In that case, you will become ineligible in regard to age at the beginning of the sport season during which which your twentieth (20th) birthday occurs.

USE OF PLAYERS

You may not appear at a contest in the uniform of your school while you are ineligible. This means that you may not dress or sit on the bench in uniform if you are not eligible to play. Also, you may not compete as an ―exhibition‖ contestant if you are not eligible.

PARTICIPATING UNDER A FALSE NAME

If you compete under a name other than your own, your principal will immediately suspend you from further competition and you and any other person(s) who contributed to the violation of this by-law will be subject to penalties.

PHYSICAL EXAMINATION

You must annually have placed on file with your principal a certificate of physical fitness, signed by a licensed physician, in order to practice or participate.

Your physical examination each year is good for only one (1) year from the date of the exam. The physician’s report must be on file with your high school principal.

AMATEUR STATUS

1. If you win or place in actual competition, you may accept a medal or trophy for that accomplishment, without limit to its cost.

2. For participating in competition in an interscholastic sport, or for athletic honors or recognition in a sport, you may receive any type of award (except cash, check, or legal tender) that does not exceed $20 fair market value. There is no limitation on the value of your school letter.

3. The amateur rule does not prohibit you from being paid to referee, receiving pay for teaching lessons or coaching in a little kids league, etc. It only applies to your own competition in an athletic contest.

4. If you violate the amateur rule, you become ineligible in the sport in which you violate. You must be reinstated by the Executive Director before you may compete again.

RECRUITING OF ATHLETES

1. The by-laws prohibit recruiting of high school students for athletics. If you are solicited to enroll in or transfer to a school to participate in athletics, you are being illegally recruited and your eligibility is in jeopardy.

2. You will lose your eligibility if you enroll in or transfer to a school in response to recruiting efforts by any persons or group of persons, connected with or not connected with the school, related to athletic participation.

3. You will lose your eligibility if you receive special benefits or privileges as a prospective student-athlete which are not uniformly made available to all students who attend your school.

4. You may not receive an ―athletic scholarship‖ or any other special benefit from your school, provided because you participate in athletics.

5. It is a violation for any student-athlete to receive or be offered remuneration or any special inducement which is not made available to all applicants who apply to or enroll in the school.

Special inducement includes, but is not limited to: a.Offer or acceptance of money or other valuable consideration such as free or reduced tuition during the regular year or summer school by anyone connected with the school. b.Offer or acceptance of room, board, or clothing or financial allotment for clothing. c.Offer or acceptance of pay for work that is not performed or that is in excess of the amount regularly paid for such service. d.Offer or acceptance of free transportation by any school connected person. e.Offer or acceptance of a residence with any school connected person. f.Offer or acceptance of any privilege not afforded to non-athletes. g.Offer or acceptance of free or reduced rent for parents. h.Offer or acceptance of payment of moving expenses of parents or assistance with the moving of parents. i.Offer or acceptance of employment of parent(s) in order to entice the family to move to a certain community if someone connected with the school makes the offer. j. Offer or acceptance of help in securing a college athletic scholarship.

6. It is also a violation to induce or attempt to induce or encourage any prospective student to attend any member school for the purpose of participating in athletics, even when special remuneration or inducement is not given. Please remember that you may not be offered or receive any benefit, service, privilege, or opportunity which is not also provided or made available to all prospective students at that school.

SCHOOL TEAM SPORTS SEASON

1. Each sport conducted by IHSA member schools has a starting and ending date. Your school may not organize a team, begin practice, or participate in contests in a given sport until the authorized starting date. Your school may not continue to practice or participate in contests after the authorized ending date. This means that: a. During the school year, you may not participate on a non-school team coached by any member of

34 your school’s coaching staff unless it meets specific criteria established by the by-laws. b. No school coach may require you to participate

in an out-of-season sport program as a requirement for being a member of a school team.

2. Violation of the sport season by-laws will result in penalty to you and/or to your school’s coaching personnel.

PLAYING IN NON-SCHOOL COMPETITION

1. During the time you are participating on a school team in a sport at your high school, you may neither play on a non-school team nor compete in non-school competition as an individual in that same sport or in any skill of that sport.

2. If you participate in non-school competition during a sport season and subsequently wish to join the school team in the same sport, you will not be eligible.

3. If you wish to participate in a competition sponsored and conducted by the National Governing

Body for the sport, you principal must request approval in writing from the IHSA Office prior to any such participation.

4. You may try out for a non-school team while you are on your school’s team in that same sport, but you may not practice, receive instruction, participate in workouts, or participate in competition with a nonschool team in that same sport until you cease being a member of your school’s team. You cease being a member of your school’s team when the team(s) of which you are a member terminates for the school term.

5. You will become ineligible if you play on any junior college, college, or university team during your high school career.

ALL-STAR PARTICIPATION

1. After you have completed your high school eligibility for football, basketball, soccer, or volleyball, you may participate in one (1) all-star contest in any of these sports and still play for other school teams, provided: a. the high school season in that sport has been completed; b. the all-star contest has been approved by the

IHSA. You may lose your eligibility for other interscholastic sports if you play in all-star competition in any of these sports under any other conditions.

2. You are not restricted from participating in all-star competition in sports other than football, basketball, soccer, or volleyball, except that you may not do so during the school season for the sport.

COACHING SCHOOLS

1. A coaching school, camp or clinic is defined as any program, sponsored by an organization or individual, which provides instruction in sports theory and/or skills; which does not culminate in competition, and which is attend by more than two (2) persons from the school which the student attends.

2. During the school term, you may not attend a coaching school or clinic for any interscholastic sport.

3. You may attend a coaching school, camp, or clinic during the summer (that period between the close of school in the spring and the opening of school in the fall) within the following criteria: a. You may not attend a coaching school, camp or clinic for any sport after Saturday of Week No. 4 in the

IHSA Standardized Calendar.

MISBEHAVIOR DURING CONTESTS

1. If you violate the ethics of competition or the principles of good sportsmanship, you may be barred from interscholastic athletic contests, either as a participant or spectator or both.

2. If you are ejected from a contest for unsportsmanlike conduct, you will be ineligible for your team’s next contest. You are also subject to other penalties.

3. Any other person(s) found to be in violation of the ethics of competition or principles of good sportsmanship may also be barred from interscholastic athletic contests.

POLICY GOVERNING THE CONDUCT AND

SPORTSMANSHIP FOR PERSONS AND

SPECTATORS IN ATTENDANCE AT SCHOOL-

SPONSORED OR RELATED ACTIVITIES,

FUNCTIONS AND MEETINGS,

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES, AND ATHLETIC

EVENTS

Any person may attend school-sponsored or related activities, functions and meetings, extracurricular activities, and athletic events held upon grounds of

Mt. Vernon Township High School District No. 201 to which the student is otherwise permitted or entitled to attend.

No person shall do any of the following acts while in attendance at school-sponsored or related activities, functions and meetings, extracurricular activities, and athletic events held upon grounds of or sponsored by

Mt. Vernon Township High School District No. 201:

1. Do any act which is insulting or provoking in nature against any official, employee, or agent of the

District.

2. Do any act which causes personal injury or which is intended to cause personal injury or which the person knows or should know created a substantial risk of injury to any person.

3. Do any act which causes damage to property or which is intended to cause damage to property or which the person knows or should know creates a substantial risk of damage to property of any person.

4. Do any act which is intended to disrupt the performance or continuance of any school-sponsored or related activities, functions and meetings, extracurricular activities, and athletic events.

5. Do any act which is intended to impede or disrupt the proper observance of or participation in any school-sponsored or related activities, functions and meetings, extracurricular activities, and athletic events.

6. Enter upon or remain in any area not reserved for spectators or persons otherwise in attendance at school-sponsored or related activities, functions and

35 meetings, extracurricular activities, and athletic events or enter or remain in any area which serves as proper ingress or egress to any school-sponsored or related activities, functions and meetings, extracurricular activities, and athletic events.

PENALTY: Any person who violates Paragraphs 1,

2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 of this Policy, may be:

A. Restricted by the Board President,

Superintendent, Building Principal, or their designees, to observance of or attendance at any schoolsponsored or related activities, functions and meetings, extracurricular activities, and athletic events from a particular place or area.

B.Removed from or ordered evicted from any building, grounds or place at which any schoolsponsored or related activities, functions and meetings, extracurricular activities, and athletic events are held by the Board President, Superintendent,

Building Principal, or their designees.

C.Prohibited from further attendance at any schoolsponsored or related activities, functions and meetings, extracurricular activities, and athletic events for up to one (1) year.

In the case of the imposition of Penalty C of this

Policy, the following procedure shall apply:

Within ten (10) days from the commission of any act prohibited by this Policy, the Board President,

Superintendent, Building Principal, or their designees, may in writing, deliver to the Board of Education or

Superintendent, as applicable, a complaint against any person alleging the commission of any act prohibited by this Policy; that Penalty C of this Policy shall be sought to be imposed; and for what length of time Penalty C should be in effect if imposed. A copy of the complaint shall be delivered by mail or in person to the person alleged to have committed the act, together with a copy of this Policy.

If the person alleged to have committed the act prohibited so requests, a hearing shall be held as soon as is practicable before the Board of Education or Superintendent, or their designees, as applicable, except that the persons designated may not be the person who was the complainant. The complainant and the person alleged to have violated this Policy may appear at the hearing. No formal rules of procedure or evidence will apply. At the hearing it shall be determined i) whether the person did, in fact, commit the alleged act; ii) whether Penalty C is appropriate; and iii) if Penalty C is appropriate, for what length of time it should be imposed.

For determining ii) and iii) above, the following shall be taken into account:

A.The nature and severity of the act.

B.Whether or not the person who committed the act prohibited under this Policy has committed other acts prohibited under this Policy, either before or after the act which is the subject of the hearing.

C.The age, intelligence, and maturity of the person who committed the prohibited act.

D.Whether the person’s presence at any school- sponsored or related activities, functions and meetings, extracurricular activities, and athletic events

constitutes a threat to any other persons, property, or the events.

Upon the completion of the hearing, the Board of

Education or Superintendent, or their designees, as the case may be, shall determine whether the prohibited act was committed; whether Penalty C is appropriate; and if Penalty C is appropriate, for what length of time it should be imposed.

The person accused of the act shall be notified in writing of said determination. If the complainant or the person who committed the prohibited act is dissatisfied with the decision of the Superintendent or his designee, that person may file a written notice of appeal of the decision with the Secretary of the Board of Education. Upon receipt of such a notice, the

Secretary shall cause the matter to be placed upon the agenda of the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of Education; at which time the Board of

Education shall consider the matter de novo according to the same rules and procedure as set forth in this Policy for the initial hearing before the

Superintendent or his designee.

Nothing in this Policy shall prevent the application of other disciplinary rules of the Board, including, but not limited to, those rules relating to detentions, suspensions, or expulsions and criminal sanctions.

Athletic Council

The purpose of the Athletic Council is to review and make recommendations when students are involved in controversial issues that jeopardize the integrity of the Mt. Vernon Township High School Athletic

Department. The Council shall consist of the Athletic

Director, Assistant Principal, three coaches not directly involved with the athlete or sport in question, and two non-coaching faculty members. The Athletic

Director will serve as the chairperson of the Council.

The Council will not review cases involving disciplinary action against student athletes that are already covered in the Student and Parent Handbook or Athletic Policy Manual.

The Board of Education or Administration can ask the Council to review and make recommendations on any issue they feel is in the best interest of Mt. Vernon

Township High School and/or the student athlete.

Extracurricular Activities

Tryouts and Participation

Individuals must be enrolled and attending Mt.

Vernon Township High School in order to participate in the school’s activities. Eighth grade students may participate in pom pon and cheerleading tryouts in their eighth grade year providing they reside in District

201 at the time of tryouts.

NCAA Academic Eligibility for Student Athletes

Division I

Qualifier – if you enroll in a Division I college and want to participate in athletics or receive an athletics scholarship, you must meet the following academic standards:

Graduate from high school

Complete the 16 core courses listed below

Present a minimum required GPA in core

courses

Achieve a combined ACT or SAT sum

score that matches your core-course GPA in

the GPA and test score index (see www.ncaaclearinghouse.net

for more

information). Test scores must be sent

directly by the testing agency.

Division I - 16 Core Courses

4 years of English

3 years of math (Algebra I or higher)

2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school)

1 year of additional English, math or natural/physical science

2 years of social science

4 years of additional courses (from any area above, foreign language or nondoctrinal religion/philosophy)

Division II

Qualifier – if you enroll in a Division II college and want to participate in athletics or receive an athletics scholarship, you must meet the following academic standards:

Graduate from high school

Complete the 14 core courses listed below

Present a 2.00 GPA in core courses

Achieve a combined SAT score of 820 or a

sum score of 68 on the ACT. Test scores

must be sent directly by the testing agency.

Division II – 14 Core Courses

3 years of English

2 years of math (Algebra I or higher)

2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school)

2 years of social science

3 years of additional courses (from any area above, foreign language or nondoctrinal religion/philosophy)

Beginning August 1, 2013, students planning

to attend a NCAA Division II institution will

be required to complete 16 core courses.

ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES

Student Council

The Student Council serves as the guiding organization for all student organizations. Students may run for four representative-at-large positions elected by the entire student body. Students may also run for class officer positions of president, vicepresident, secretary and treasurer, and two representative positions. Students who run for

Student Council who are unsuccessful may also petition onto Student Council to serve as a probationary representative-at-large. Sophomore, junior and senior members are elected in the spring, freshmen are elected, and petitioners at large are selected in the fall.

Student Council serves as the link between

Administration and the student body, and each member is subject to the Student Conduct Code.

Student Council executes Homecoming Week, Spring

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Fling Week and other social and service events throughout the school year. Two faculty members advise the group.

Hi-Tri League

Hi-Tri is an organization for girls, founded at Mt.

Vernon Township High School in 1925. Hi-Tri activities include a picnic at the beginning of each school year, membership drive, induction ceremony,

Christmas charitable project, sweetheart dance, and

Mother-Daughter/Senior Farewell Tea. An elected council of officers representing each class plans the activities. A freshman council election is held at the beginning of each school year. Council members from each of the other classes are elected in the spring for the following year.

Musical Events

The high school band plays for football and basketball games, marches in parades, and appears on other programs. The orchestra, chorus, and

Concert Choir furnish music for plays, honors program, commencement, and make other appearances.

However, the greater musical events of the year are the annual operetta, the Christmas musicale, the alldepartment concerts, and the district and state music contests.

Dramatics

The drama department joins with the music department in producing an operetta. The most recently added program is a presentation by

Children’s Theatre.

The Speech and Acting Team

The Speech and Acting Team is a competitive organization which fosters individual growth and creativity through the spoken arts. Team members compete in local, regional, and state tournaments for awards in the following areas: Serious and Humorous

Acting Events; Radio Speaking; Original Comedy;

Prose and Poetry Reading; and other speech-related events. Highlights of the season will be acting workshops, weekend tournaments, and overnight trips. Team members will be announced after allschool auditions are held in early September.

The Vernois - School Yearbook

The Vernois yearbook is designed entirely by students. Vernois yearbook is the official historical record each school year. Vernois yearbook prides itself on providing outstanding photography and quality journalism. Editorial Staff positions include editor-in-chief, managing editor, photography editor, business manager, copy editor, as well as several section leadership positions. Participation is open, however, sophomore, junior or senior students who have successfully completed Writing for Publication I and II are encouraged to apply for staff positions. Staff is limited to a total of 10-15 students.

The Vernois News - School Newspaper

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The Vernois News is the student newspaper at

MVTHS. Monthly issues of 16-20 pages from August through May. Editorial Staff positions include executive editor-in-chief, managing editor, communications director, news/feature editor, opinions editor, arts/entertainment editor, sports editor and Blue Print editor. Participation is open, however, sophomore, junior or seniors students who have successfully completed Writing for Publication I and II are encouraged to apply for staff positions.

JAVA

Since 1976, JAVA is a literary/creative arts magazine that showcases student poetry, prose, artwork and photography. Participation is open, but interested student should speak with the JAVA editorial staff mid-first semester; magazine editing and formatting begin second semester. Staff positions are limited to 8-10 students. Successful completion of

Writing for Publications I and II is encouraged.

Athletic Sports

The sports in which the high school competes with other schools are football, wrestling, basketball, track, baseball, volleyball, softball, golf, tennis, and cross country.

Anyone interested in these sports should contact the coaches and appear when the coaches call meetings for those interested.

School Trips

Musical organizations, clubs, publication staffs, and other groups sometimes make trips to other schools or towns. It is a regulation of the school that such trips be approved by the Principal and that a teacher or other adult chaperone go in each car or bus.

Students on trips are expected to conduct themselves properly, to avoid rowdyism or other misbehavior, and to cooperate with the teacher in charge. They should be suitably attired.

SOCIAL EVENTS

Junior-Senior Prom

One of the traditions of the school is the Junior-

Senior Prom, which is the social activity planned primarily for the pleasure of the juniors and seniors of the high school. The Student Council has set up certain rules concerning attendance. Any junior or senior of the Mt. Vernon Township High School in good standing may attend as a date companion.

However, any student who has been suspended from school and has not been readmitted cannot attend the Prom, nor can any student attend who has been expelled during the current school year. Any junior or senior of our high school who is married may bring the spouse. Being engaged does not qualify.

Any junior, senior, or graduate of a high school who is 20 years of age or younger may attend as a date companion of a junior or senior of the Mt. Vernon

Township High School, provided that the student of our high school will assume full responsibility for the

behavior of the date. Any student who falsifies a request for a guest ticket in order to attend the Junior-

Senior Prom is subject to discipline which may include, but not be limited to, barring from future

Proms. Also, if the one involved is noticed by a faculty member during the Junior-Senior Prom activities, that student will be asked to leave and not appear at the remaining activities. Any student attending the Prom or any of the related activities who is suspected of gross misconduct will be placed in the custody of the local authorities. The parents will be notified immediately.

In the event that excessive cases of gross misconduct are observed during the course of the

Prom and the activities, attendance at the Prom for the following year will be restricted to juniors and seniors only of the Mt. Vernon Township High School.

If the gross misconduct persists after the attendance has been restricted to juniors and seniors of our high school only, then the annual Junior-Senior Prom will be removed from the calendar of events of this high school.

A Prom attendant must be a junior in good standing.

Hi-Tri Picnic

A picnic is scheduled at the beginning of the school year for all girls attending Mt. Vernon High School.

Hi-Tri Sweetheart Dance

This event is sponsored and planned by Hi-Tri members and is open to all high school students.

There is a sweetheart queen and king from each class.

Hi-Tri Mother-Daughter Senior Farewell Tea

Hi-Tri members invite their mothers to this end-ofthe-year event. A special program is planned including entertainment and recognition of seniors.

SCHOOL CLUBS

Fun, fellowship, and education may be derived from membership in school clubs. If you are seriously interested, attend meetings regularly and take active part in the programs. You will profit from membership.

FBLA - Future Business Leaders of America

FBLA is an organization whose purpose is to bring business and education together in a positive way through activities and competitions. The following are some of the goals that have been established for

FBLA chapters: develop competent, aggressive business leadership, strengthen the confidence of students in themselves and their work, assist students in the establishment of occupational goals, and facilitate the transition from school to work. Any student that is currently enrolled in a business class or has previously taken any business class is eligible to join. Membership dues are approximately $10 per year. FBLA is sponsored by the business department of MVTHS. See any business teacher for more information or to join the club.

FFA

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The Mt. Vernon FFA stands for the National FFA

Organization which is an agriculture club that goes along with the agriculture classes at Mt. Vernon High

School. The young men and women at Mt. Vernon

High School are encouraged to be members of the

FFA to learn about the 250 careers in the field of agriculture. The students participate against other high school students in career development events in meat science, ag sales, ag computer, poultry science, dairy and livestock genetics, mechanics, agriculture business management, parliamentary procedures, public speaking, land use and crop judging, forestry, horticulture, and writing career events. The students have monthly meetings at 6:30 p.m. in 115 H during the first Monday, Tuesday, or Thursday night of each month. The club does over 30 community service activities and attends the State FFA convention and the National FFA convention. Many social and team building skills are learned for many skills in life.

FCCLA - Family, Career, & Community Leaders of

America

Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America is an organization for all high school students who are in or have successfully completed one semester of

Consumer & Family Sciences. FCCLA programs and activities encourage and support skill development for careers, individual growth, leadership, character, and family and community involvement. These skills are used in the home, community and workplace.

Competitive events, peer education projects, service learning projects and other activities provide a variety of ways for students to put learning into action. See one of the family and consumer science teachers to join FCCLA.

French Club

The French Club is an extracurricular organization whose aims are to give students the opportunity to use some of the French they have learned and to give them a chance to have fun while learning about

French culture. Any student who has completed one year of French may join the club, whether or not he is currently enrolled in a French class. Throughout the year there are parties and projects celebrating various

French holidays and special occasions.

Creative Writing Club

The Creative Writing Club, open to all students interested in creative writing of any kind, meets every three block Thursday from 2:30-3:30 in the library.

Participants may come to as many or as few meetings as they wish. Activities include reading, critiquing, and writing. Students are welcome to participate actively or to listen only. Check in the library for details. This organization is an extension of the library’s activities.

Thespian Society

Troop 804 of the National Thespian Society is an honor society for students who perform meritorious work in dramatic arts. Membership is obtained by earning points as established by the national office.

Membership is open to all students desiring to

participate in dramatic activities. Meetings are called by the president or sponsor.

Youth & Government

Youth & Government is a YMCA sponsored activity which stresses that ―democracy must be learned by each generation.‖ Youth & Government activities during the school year lead to participation in a mock state legislative session and/or a model supreme court in Springfield at the State Capitol. The program is open to sophomore, junior, and senior students on an invitation and interest basis. All meetings are after school hours. A registration/participation fee is charged.

HOSA (Health Occupations Students of America)

HOSA is an integral part of the Health Occupations classroom program. The organization strives to develop leadership skills and involvement in community health activities. Every student involved with the Health Occupations Program becomes a member and has the opportunity to compete in state and national competition in the spring. HOSA dues are paid from fund-raising efforts. Meetings are part of classroom schedule.

Skills USA

Skills USA is a national organization for students enrolled in trade, industrial technical, and health occupations programs. Skills USA strives to complement the program in which the students are enrolled. Skills USA students are involved with leadership, school, and community projects and career initiative activity. The club offers state and national competition for the students who want to strive to be the best in their field of study.

Science Club

Science Club is an extracurricular organization designed to provide enrichment and interest in the various science related fields. This club is open to all high school students with an interest in science. The group’s activities include presenters, field trips, and films to acquaint members with socially relevant science topics.

Lifesavers

Lifesavers is a group of skilled student listeners who are trained to help their peers deal with the personal problems normal teenagers face.

Math Team

Math Team is for all academically talented and motivated students. Competition starts at the local level and advances to the state level.

Chess Team

The chess team/club is open to anyone interested in chess. The club is for those who would like to learn how to play or just play for fun. The team is for those who like the competitive aspect of chess. We have meets, travel to other schools for competition, and participate in the State Chess Tournament in Peoria.

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Scholar Bowl

Students interested in competing in a trivia game involving general academic questions may want to try out for Scholar Bowl. The team competes in five meets, and possibly ―Scholastic Hi-Q,‖ a televised event through WSIU.

World-Wide Youth in Science & Engineering

(WYSE)

WYSE Academic Challenge is an academic competition sponsored by U of I. Competition is in

Biology, Chemistry, Computers, English, Engineering,

Graphics, Mathematics, and Physics. WYSE participation is for all academically talented and motivated students. Competition begins at the local level, proceeding to state and national levels.

THE LIBRARY/MEDIA CENTER

The library, located on the third floor of Building C, provides materials for personal reading, research, and class assignments. Books, magazines, newspapers, vertical files, video cassettes, CD roms, computers, software, and Internet access make up the collection.

Interlibrary loan requests, which allow students to borrow materials from other libraries in the Shawnee

Library System, are available by request.

Materials may be checked out and renewed for short periods of time. Failure to return materials will result in fines. Students must pay for materials lost.

Student assistants help the staff with the many tasks of the library’s busy schedule. Students interested in being assistants should pick up an application in the library. Students may be assistants before school, during lunch periods, during study hall periods, and after school.

Besides regular school hours, the library is open before school from 8:00-8:25 a.m., during the lunch periods, and during ELO.

SCHOOL HONORS

National Honor Society

The highest honor that can be attained by a student of Mt. Vernon Township High School is election to membership in the National Honor Society for

Secondary Schools. It corresponds in importance to

Phi Beta Kappa in colleges.

Scholarship, leadership, character, and service shall be the criteria for selection. In this school sophomores and juniors are chosen for membership.

Students must have a 3.75 grade point average and make application and be chosen to be considered for membership in the National Honor Society.

All National Honor Society members must maintain a minimum 3.65 grade point average in order to remain in good membership standing.

A transfer student shall not be considered for membership until he/she has completed a minimum of one semester in this high school. However, if the transfer student has proof of an existing membership in the National Honor Society, he/she will become a member immediately.

Scholarships

Silas and Mary Kate Echols Scholarship–established in 1955 in honor of Mr. Silas Echols, principal of Mt.

Vernon High, 1915-1947. A monetary award presented to the graduating senior who ranks highest scholastically. Recipient chooses college.

Student Council Scholarship–established in 1967 by the members of the Mt. Vernon Township High School

Student Council. A monetary award presented to the graduating senior with the highest academic average in the curriculum (academic or vocational) opposite the Silas Echols Scholarship winner. No restrictions placed on selection of institution for advanced training.

Mt. Vernon Business & Professional Women’s Club

Scholarships–established in 1968. Two monetary awards presented to graduating seniors planning to enroll in Rend Lake College or Kaskaskia College.

Wilma K. Harpole Scholarship is presented to one of the top ranking seniors entering the field of business.

Dora M. Brydon Scholarship is presented to a senior with high scholastic rank, planning to major in the medical field. Students cannot be recipients of another scholarship.

Lloyd R. DeWitt Journalism Scholarship–each year a graduating senior staff member will be chosen by the Journalism teacher, the Guidance Director, and the Principal to receive the Lloyd R. DeWitt

Journalism Scholarship. This monetary scholarship will be awarded to the outstanding senior staff member who has completed a course in journalism, ranks in the upper one-third of the class, is a major staff member of the school newspaper, plans to enroll in an academic curriculum in college, has been a good school citizen, has made a significant contribution to the school newspaper, and has completed the application for the award.

Rotary’s Lumbattis Memorial Scholarship Award– established in 1970 by the Mt. Vernon Rotary Club in memory of Dr. M. M. Lumbattis. The award is to be given to a graduating senior of the Mt. Vernon

Township High School. The award is based on scholarship ability plus service (above self).

Preceptor Chi’s Donna Bryant Memorial

Scholarship–established in 1971 and will be given to a graduating senior who plans to attend Rend Lake

College and who will need the award in order to continue his/her education.

Mt. Vernon Kiwanis Club Randy Smith Memorial

Scholarship–established in 1973 by the Kiwanis Club in memory of Randy Smith. The scholarship is to be given to a graduating senior of Mt. Vernon Township

High School who plans to attend Rend Lake College.

Good Samaritan Hospital Auxiliary Scholarship– established in 1972 by the Good Samaritan Auxiliary for the purpose of rewarding a Good Samaritan candy striper who is a graduating senior in good academic standing and who intends to pursue a career in the health field at an accredited school or college offering technical training in the health area.

National Honor Society Salutatorian Scholarship– established in 1973 by the Mt. Vernon Township High

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School National Honor Society for purpose of honoring the second highest graduating senior academically.

Mt. Vernon Kiwanis Club Pete Harp Memorial

Scholarship–established in 1974 for the purpose of rewarding a graduating senior who plans to attend

Rend Lake College. There is no restriction on the individual’s choice of curriculum. The award is based on scholastic ability and financial need.

Business and Professional Women’s Club Florence

Kane Scholarship – This scholarship was established in 2006 by the Business and Professional Women’s

Club. The award will be given to a student going to

Rend Lake or Kaskaskia College and planning on entering the field of business.

Sons Of The American Legion Scholarship – Several

$500 scholarships will be awarded to residents of

Jefferson County who are members of, or whose parents or grandparents are members of the

American Legion, American Legion Auxiliary, or Sons of the American Legion. The scholarships are based on career and educational goals, grades achieved in high school or in post-secondary work, and involvement in extra curricular and community activities.

Jefferson County Retired Teachers Association

Scholarship - Seniors who plan to attend college and major in the field of education may apply for this scholarship. Applicants should have a high ACT composite score and/or a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. Applications must be accompanied by two letters of recommendation.

Livingston Pharmacy Scholarship–This award established in 1975 by J. C. and Mary Livingston is to be given to a graduating senior who plans to enroll in a recognized institution of higher education, preferably a School of Pharmacy. The student must have displayed satisfactory academic aptitude as well as demonstrated leadership abilities in curricular and extracurricular activities. The student must also have been enrolled in secondary school programs that will entitle that student to entrance to a recognized institution of higher education in the field of medicine.

Wendell J. McReynolds Memorial Scholarship–This award was established in 1976 by the Mt. Vernon

Jaycees in memory of Wendell J. McReynolds. This award will be given to a graduating senior who plans to enroll in an institution of Vocational Education or an institution of higher learning. The student must need the award in order to continue his education.

Rams Booster Club Athletic Scholarships– established in 1978 by members of the Rams Booster

Club. A girl athlete and boy athlete, as selected by a vote of the coaches and administrators, will each receive a $1,000 scholarship. Qualifications for this award are as follows: must be a graduating senior, must carry at least a ―C‖ average, must have completed two sport seasons his/her senior year, and must be accepted by a 2-year or 4-year college of his/her choice by May 15th of his/her senior year.

Frederick Oehm, Sr., Educational Foundation Fund

Award–This award was established in 1979 by

Katherine Oehm Jarrell in memory of her father,

Frederick Oehm, Sr. Graduating students who plan to enroll in a university, college, or specialized institution of training in the fall semester after graduation are eligible to apply. A student must submit an application, high school transcript, and complete an essay, project, or experiment as designated by the Mt.

Vernon Township High School Board of Education.

The award will be given to those students who best meet the criteria established by the Board. The children of employees of US Bank, of members of the

Board of Education, and of the school administration are not eligible for this award.

Mt. Vernon West Rotary Club Award–This award was established in 1983 to be given to a graduating senior who plans to enroll in a college or a university and major in the field of Fine and/or Performing Arts.

The student must rank in the top 25% of the graduating class and have participated in the various high school Fine and/or Performing Arts activities.

D. Clarence Wilson Memorial Award–This award was established in 1981 and is given to a graduating student who plans to enroll in an institution of higher education in the field of architecture, engineering, or related area of study. Award will be won by the applicant who has for seven semesters the highest scholastic average, plus highest percentage of attendance.

Mt. Vernon High School Education Association

Scholarship–This scholarship was established in

1984-85 school year by the Mt. Vernon High School

Education Association. This award is to be given to a senior who intends to enter the teaching profession.

To be eligible to apply, graduating seniors must (a) plan to become a teacher, (b) hold a 3.0 or better grade point average, (c) enroll in a college or university the fall semester after graduation. A student must submit an application, high school transcript, and a complete essay as designated by the

Mt. Vernon High School Education Association. The scholarship will be given to the student who best meets the criteria established by the selection committee of the MHEA.

Delta Rho’s Thelma Latta Music Scholarship– established in 1987 by Delta Rho Sorority. This award is to be given to a graduating senior planning to enroll in the field of music. The award is based on rank in class, grade point average, participation in music organizations, and reason for entering the music field.

Mt. Vernon Masonic Lodge Hubert Payne Memorial

Scholarship Award–established in 1988. This monetary award is to be given to a graduating senior planning to enroll in a college, university, or vocational school. The student must have a 3.000 GPA or better based on seven semesters and have participated in various high school and community activities. The student must indicate there is a financial need in order to continue his/her education.

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J. D. Shields Memorial Scholarship Award - This award was established in 1989 by the Mt. Vernon

Township High School Board of Education. This award is to be given to a Mt. Vernon High School graduating senior who plans to enroll in a university, college, or specialized institution of training. The recipient of the award shall be chosen from those students nominated by the faculty, who made applications, and submitted all designated materials on the application form. The award is based on a student’s career goals, leadership, service, and scholarship.

Dr. G. L. Taylor Memorial Scholarship Award - This award was established in 1990 to be awarded to a graduating senior who plans to enroll in a medical field. The award is based on rank in class, grade point average, community service, and reasons for entering the medical field. The student must indicate a financial need in order to continue his/her education.

C. E. Brehm Foundation Scholarship - This scholarship was established in 1991 by the C. E.

Brehm Foundation. The award is to be given to a deserving graduating Mt. Vernon Township High

School senior who ranks in the top 25% of the class, has shown leadership abilities in curricular and extracurricular and/or community activities, and can show there is a financial need in order to continue his/her education.

Archie E. Woodrome Memorial Scholarship-This scholarship award was established in 1993 by the

Woodrome family. This monetary award is to be given to a Mt. Vernon High graduating senior who plans to enter the teaching profession. The student must have a GPA of 3.00 or better based on seven semesters and must have participated in various high school activities. The recipient cannot receive another local monetary award.

The Anne R. Beveridge Memorial Scholarship

Award - This award was established in 1994. The recipient of the award will be chosen from those Mt.

Vernon Township High School graduating seniors who have participated three years in the Mt. Vernon

High School YMCA Youth & Government Program and who have a 3.500 GPA or better. The recipient may attend the college, university, or vocational school of his/her choice.

Peggy K. Simmons Memorial Scholarship – This scholarship was established in 1998 by the family of

Peggy K. Simmons. The recipient of this scholarship will be chosen from those seniors who have completed the application and submitted the designated materials. Applicants must have at least a

3.8 GPA and plan to major in the humanities, liberal arts, fine arts, or education. The recipient may attend the college or university of his/her choice.

Hi-Tri League Scholarship – This scholarship was established in 2000 by the Mt. Vernon Twp. High

School Hi-Tri League. The recipient of this scholarship will be chosen from those senior Hi-Tri members who have completed the application and submitted the designated materials. Applicants must have at least a

2.5 GPA and must have participated in Hi-Tri activities. The recipient may attend the college, university, or vocational school of her choice.

Hi-Tri League Ashlee L. Bailey Memorial

Scholarship – This scholarship was established in

2002 by the Mt. Vernon Twp. High School Hi-Tri

League. The recipient of this scholarship will be chosen from senior Hi-Tri members who have participated in Hi-Tri activities and the Mt. Vernon

Twp. High School Music Department. Applicants must have at least a 2.5 GPA. The recipient may attend the college or university, or vocational school of her choice.

Ray & Lorena Tibbs Art Scholarship–This scholarship was established in 2000 by the Tibbs family. The recipient must be a graduating senior who plans to attend college and pursue a career in the field or art. Applicants must show financial need. The recipient may attend the college, university, or vocational school of their choice.

Mt. Vernon Kiwanis Club Charles Rohlfing Memorial

Scholarship–established in 2001 by the Kiwanis Club in memory of Charles Rohlfing. The scholarship is to be given to a graduating senior of Mt. Vernon

Township High School who plans to attend Rend Lake

College.

Mt. Vernon Jaycee’s Joe Torregrossa Memorial

Scholarship-This scholarship was established in 2002 by the Mt. Vernon Jaycee’s in memory of Joe

Torregrossa. This award will be given to a graduating senior who plans to enroll in an institution of higher learning. Applicants must need the award in order to continue their education.

Peoples National Bank Scholarship-This scholarship was established in 2002 by Peoples National Bank.

The recipient will be chosen on the basis of positive leadership and character exhibited in academic and extracurricular school activities, and in community and/or religious activities. The student must have maintained at least a B average for seven semesters and the student or at least one parent or guardian must be a customer of Peoples National Bank.

Coaches Memorial Scholarship – This scholarship was established in 2008. It is to be awarded to a graduating senior who has participated in athletics at

Mt. Vernon Township High School for at least one year. The recipient must attend Rend Lake College.

Everett D. and Nola V. Greer Scholarship – This scholarship was established in 2009 by Nola V.

Greer. In odd-numbered graduating years the recipient must be a graduating senior who has a 3.00

GPA or better based on seven semesters and has been accepted into a four-year college or university.

In even-numbered years the recipient will be a graduating senior with a 2.5 or higher GPA and accepted into a junior college or vocational school.

The student may major in the field of their choice. The applicant must have participated in various high school and community activities and indicate there is a financial need to continue their education.

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James J. McMillan Scholarship – This scholarship is awarded annually to a senior who has endured some form of health difficulties during his/her high school career.

Darlene Franscavitch Scholarship - This scholarship was formed in 2010 to honor the outstanding service of Mrs. Darlene Franscavitch, the first teacher in the health service aide program.

Students applying for this scholarship must have been active in Health Occupation Students of America

(HOSA) for two years, have a minimum 3.0 GPA, plan on majoring in a health care field, and complete an application process.

Maintenance-Culinary Arts Scholarship: This scholarship was established in 2010 by the

Maintenance and Cafeteria Workers Union.

Applicants must be planning to pursue a 2-year degree in either Industrial Maintenance or Culinary

Arts. The recipient may attend the college, university, or vocational school of their choice.

District 80 Scholarship: This award was established in 2011 by the Mount Vernon City Schools Foundation and is funded by a gift from Dr. Kevin and Mrs. Cheryl

Settle. The District 80 Scholarship will be awarded to a graduating senior who is the child or grandchild of a current or retired District 80 employee or Board member. Applicants will be judged on scholarship, attendance, participation in extracurricular activities, community service, and career goals.

Bob Troutt Memorial Foundation Art Scholarship:

The Bob Troutt Memorial Foundation established this award during the 2010-11 school year. The scholarship will be given to a student planning to major in fine or performing arts. Applications must be accompanied by a piece of artwork or film/video of performing arts. The artwork becomes the property of the Foundation.

Community First Bank Fellowship of Christian

Athletes Scholarship: Established in 2011, Community

First Bank will be awarding an annual scholarship of

$500 to MVTHS Seniors. Applicants must be a member of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and have a GPA of 3.25 to be considered for this award.

Recipients will be chosen based on academic achievement, community service initiatives, letters of reference and response to an essay question.

MVTHS Sports Hall of Fame Scholarship:

Established in 2011, the MVTHS Sports Hall of Fame will annually present to one male and one female graduate a monetary award at the conclusion of each school year. The dollar amount of the award might vary, but the first year it will be $500 each. The award winners must be graduating seniors who plan on furthering their post-high school education (trade school, junior college, four-year college, etc.) The award will be paid to the educational institution of the recipients’ choice. The Sports Hall of Fame

Committee will select the award recipients after talking with the coaching staff near the completion of each school year. The recipients will be athletes that have been ―team players‖, worked hard at their

respective sports, were positive representatives of

MVTHS, have been solid citizens in the community, and tended to be over-achievers. Special consideration will be given to multi-sport, four-year athletes. The awards will be presented annually at the end-of-the-year Spring awards banquet by a member of the Hall of Fame committee.

AWARDS AND POINT SYSTEM

Scholastic Honor Roll

At the end of each quarter a scholastic honor roll is announced by the office and published in the Mt.

Vernon Register News and the Mt. Vernon Sentinel.

In determining scholastic averages, a grade of A is counted as 4, B as 3, C as 2, and D as 1.

Students qualifying for the Honor Roll are those taking four or more subjects for credit toward graduation and making a total of 3.5 GPA or more points, provided that they have no grade lower than C.

Perfect Attendance

The Perfect Attendance Award was instituted to recognize students who have perfect attendance as verified in the official attendance register. Students are eligible for this award if they are not marked absent any half or full day of school. Missing one block in any one school day is considered a half day absence. Any student missing 2 or more blocks in a given day will be marked absent for a full day. Senior students who have perfect attendance during any year of high school will be recognized during the Honors

Program. Seniors must apply for perfect attendance recognition by May 10. The attendance policy used by

Mt. Vernon High School is in compliance with the

Illinois School Code.

Scholastic Honors

Calculations for honors shall be based on grades earned at the end of eight semesters of grades. Only the final grade in a course shall be counted. The point values and the rounding off to three decimal places shall be used in the determination of grade point average.

Grade point average is determined by dividing the number of credits into the number of points earned.

For example, a student earning 21 credits with 20

―A’s‖ and 1 ―B‖ would have a higher G.P.A. (3.952) than a student earning 20 credits with 19 ―A’s‖ and 1

―B‖ (3.950). Any credit allowed to apply toward graduation by Mt. Vernon High School shall be counted in computing honors.

3.900 - 4.000 summa cum laude

3.750 - 3.899 magna cum laude

3.500 - 3.749 cum laude

Class Rankings and Grade Point Average

Final ranking of students will be made on the basis of eight semesters of course work being defined as those earned credits which are counted toward graduation.

In determining current grade point average and class rank, the school officials will count courses

43 completed. Rank will be determined by a numeric listing of grade point average.

Policy for Awarding of Letters

Mt. Vernon Township High School shall award letters for Art, Athletics, WYSE, Math Team, Music,

Publications, Scholarship, Speech & Acting, Student

Council and Service. In order to be eligible for these awards, the student must meet the following general requirements:

1. Be enrolled as a full-time student during the semester in which the honor is earned.

2. Abide by the school’s rules on conduct and attendance.

3. Be recommended by one or more members of the faculty.

Specific requirements for each type of letter shall be established by the faculty member or members responsible for the activity in which the award is earned.

Letters for Art

Letters for art are awarded to senior students who have excelled in art. The recipients must meet the following requirements:

1. Have completed six semesters of art.

2. Have won an award in a regional, state, or national art contest.

3. Have participated in a school-sponsored art activity for at least three semesters.

4. Have a least a 3.5 grade point average in art.

Students receiving the art letter must also meet the general requirements for the awarding of letters established by the Board of Education.

Letters for Athletics

Each year a student wins honors in athletics, he is awarded a seven-inch block M with suitable designation thereon to indicate the sport and the amount of service rendered. Athletic honors are awarded by the faculty on the basis of the recommendations of coaches, provided that no honor shall be awarded to one who does not carry twenty hours’ work during the semester of final service for which the honor is awarded. A seven inch block M with MGR on one side on the M may be given athletic managers.

Letters for WYSE

Letters for performance in the World-wide Youth in

Science and Engineering academic competition are awarded to any student whose team and/or individual performance meet(s) the established criteria. These criteria include:

1. Be a member of the team which advances to the state competition, or

2. Place first or second as an individual at the sectional competition, thereby advancing to the state competition as an individual, or

3. Place first, second, or third in at least one subject at both the regional and state competition in the same year, or

4. Place first, second, or third in at least one subject in two different years at either the regional or sectional competition, and

5. Have the recommendation of the sponsor(s).

Competition subject areas are: biology, chemistry, computer fundamentals, engineering graphics,

English, mathematics, and physics. Students may compete in any two or more of these areas.

Letters for Math Team

School letters will be awarded to members of the

Math Team who meet the following criteria: (1) meet the general requirements as listed in the

Student/Parent Handbook; (2) attend and participate in the ICTM Regional; (3) attend and participate in the

SIU Math Field Day; (4) attend and participate in the

ICTM State Final, if qualified. A written excuse from a parent or guardian approved by the sponsor(s) is the only exception; (5) be recommended by a sponsor. A student who is disrespectful or shows lack of integrity will not be eligible to receive a letter. Senior plaques will be awarded to seniors who have qualified for a

Math Team letter each of their four years of high school.

Letters for Music

Fourth year students who have rendered special service in music are awarded an emblem consisting of a five-inch lyre with an M in the center. To win this emblem one must meet the standards set by the faculty, among which are proficiency, satisfactory conduct, regular attendance, punctuality, and faithful cooperation. The emblem is awarded by the faculty on the basis of the recommendations of the Director of

Music.

Letters for Scholarship

Letters for scholarship will be awarded to seniors whose average for seven semesters is 3.50.

However, transfer students who do only their last year’s work in this school are required to make an average of 3.50 for the first semester of this year.

Scholarship honors may be awarded to members of academic teams provided such honors have been approved by the Board of Education.

Letters for Student Council

Letters of participation for Student Council will be awarded to students based on the following criteria:

1. Student must remain in good standing all four quarters.

2. Student must have participated in a variety of functions during the school year.

Letters for Speech and Acting

Letters of participation and achievement in the

Speech and Acting Team will be awarded to students based on the following criteria:

1. The students must attend at least 5 Egyptian

Forensics League tournaments over the course of the season.

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2. The student must be an active participant within the team and contribute to the development of other competitors.

3. The student will attend scheduled rehearsals.

4. Every novice competitor is required to attend the

EFL Workshop for New Members.

Recommendations for awarding a letter of participation and achievement will be made by the faculty sponsors.

Letters for Publication

To letter in newspaper, yearbook, broadcasting, or the school’s literary magazine, students must successfully complete four semesters of service as outlined by the sponsors. Letters shall be awarded to students who participate in broadcasting and/or publishing outside class in nongraded activities.

Students must complete a log detailing their hours and accomplishments and/or tasks completed outside class. Final sponsor approval is required.

Letters for Service

Service letters are awarded to seniors who earn 16 or more points in various activities provided the service is rendered in more than one type of activity and under the supervision of more than one teacher.

Points allowed for various services are given below.

In order to earn service points, the student must render at least one semester of service in a given activity unless the nature of the activity makes this impossible. Only whole numbers are used to record service points.

Any activity requiring an hour of time each day of the school year is worth four (4) points. Thus an activity requiring 40 hours of time is worth one (1) point. This standard should be followed by sponsors in evaluating any activity for which service points are granted except for those listed below.

Of these sixteen (16) service points, not more than twelve (12) can be obtained from one department; the other four (4) must be obtained from another department.

Recording Service Points

Service points must be recorded for the activity for which they are awarded. Service points must be recorded in the Main Office the year they are earned.

It is the responsibility of the student to pick up Service

Points form, to have teachers/sponsors verify points, and to return form to the Main Office. The student may, upon request, check the number of points earned by going to the Main Office and consulting with the office staff. The student is charged with the responsibility of seeing that he receives credit for service points during the year earned. Service points will not be accepted for previous years.

One service point may be given for each 40 hours of the students’ free time expended in service to the school.

4 Points Per Semester

President and Secretary of Executive Student

Council

Major part in play; minor parts to be ranked in proportion

3 Points Per Semester

Executive Student Council Vice President

Executive Student Council Treasurer

2 Points Per Semester

Flag Line - Pom Pon Squad

Band members wind and percussion playing in

Symphonic Orchestra

Club/Organization President

Jazz Band

Staff Assistants

State or National Contest Winner

Student Council Members

Peer Helpers

1 Point Per Semester

Perfect Attendance

Children’s Theatre

Other Club/Organization Officers

1 Point Per Year

Life Savers

Academic Club/Organization

Honors Night

A special program is presented near the end of the school year for recognition of all senior students who have won honors during the year. At this time certain awards are made and several scholarships are given.

SCHOOL HISTORY

The Mt. Vernon Township High School is the successor to the high school formerly maintained by the city of Mt. Vernon (District 80) in the old Franklin

School Building which was razed in 1949. The High

School was maintained in this building from

September, 1880, until May, 1905, and its first graduating class in 1884 had 14 members.

Mt. Vernon Township High School began work in what is now known as Building B in 1905 with a teaching staff of 7 members and an enrollment of 162.

In 1906 the first graduating class from this building had 13 graduates.

Building C was added to the school in 1921,

Building A, the auditorium and the gymnasium in

1936-37, and the Vocational Building in 1950. The school celebrated its fiftieth anniversary in October

1955. In 1963-64 Building G was completed, a new heating plant was installed, and Buildings B and C were remodeled. In the fall of 1964 the Community

College moved into Building B.

In 1967 the Community College became Rend Lake

College under a separate board of education and is now housed in its new campus located near Ina,

Illinois.

The Career Education Center, Building H, was completed and occupied in 1979.

IMPORTANT HONORS

45

State Basketball Champions 1920, 1949, 1950,

1954.

State Music Sweepstakes Champions 1949, 1951,

1956, 1957, 1961, 1962, 1963, all time high point record 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973,

1974, 1975 (867 points), 1979, 1980, 1981, 1984,

1985, 1986, 1987, and 1997 (second)

Vernois News - NSPA All-American 1947, 1948,

1949, 1950, 1951, 1953, 1954, 1956, 1969. SISPA

Blue Banner Award 2010, 2011.

Vernois Yearbook - SISPA Golden Dozen Award

2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2010,

2011.

Automotive Troubleshooting (Plymouth - AAA) -

National Finalist - 1972, 1973, 1976, 1978, 1979 (4th place), 1986 (4th place), 1987 (4th place)

Illinois Student Historians 1995, 1996

National Council of Teachers of English

Achievement Awards in Writing 1995, 1997.

Illinois English Bulletin; Best Student Poetry and

Prose 1998.

Golden Apple Scholar of Illinois 1999.

International Special Olympics Student Athlete

2007.

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