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TABLE OF CONTENTS
EXECUTIVE
SUMMARY
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ES-l
“............................“.
l-l
l-l
l-l
l-l
l-2
1.0
.................................................
INTRODUCTION
1.1 Policy.. ....................................................
1.2 Project Plans .................................................
1.3 References ..................................................
1.4 Pre-Entry Requirements ........................................
2.0
PROJECT PERSONNEL AND RESPONSIBILITIES
3.0
......................................
SITE CHARACTERIZATION
3.1 Background/Site Description ...................................
3.1.1 Site 65 -Engineer AreaDump .............................
3.1.2 Site 73 - Courthouse Bay Liquids Disposal Area ...............
3.2 Hazard Evaluation ............................................
3.2.1 ChemicalHazards ......................................
3.2.2 Physical Hazards .......................................
3.2.3 RadiationHazards ......................................
3.2.4 EnvironmentalHazards ~..................................
3.2.5 Task-Specific Hazards ..................................
3.2.6 Summary .............................................
3-l
3- 1
3-1
3-2
3-2
3-2
3-3
3-9
3-10
3-l 1
3-15
4.0
SITE
4.1
4.2
4.3
.................................................
CONTROL
SiteAccess.. ................................................
Site Conditions ...............................................
WorkZones .................................................
4.3 .l Level C and B Activities ...................................
4.3.2 Level D and D-t- Activities ................................
“Buddy System” ..............................................
Safe Work Practices ...........................................
4.5.1 Heavy Equipment .......................................
4.5.2 Drilling Operations ......................................
Sanitation Procedures/Site Precautions ............................
4-1
4-l
4-l
4-3
4-3
4-3
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-6
4-6
................................
ENVIRONMENTAL
MONITORING
...........................................
5.1 Personal Monitoring
5.2 Point Source Monitoring .......................................
5.3 Perimeter Monitoring ..........................................
5.4 Specific Air Monitoring Equipment and Frequency ..................
5.5 Equipment Maintenance and Calibration ...........................
5.6 Monitoring Documentation .....................................
5-l
5- 1
5-2
5-3
5-3
5-3
5-3
4.4
4.5
4.6
5.0
ii
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-l
TABLE
6.0
PERSONAL
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
7.0
8.9
8.10
8.11
8.12
8.13
8.14
8.15
8.16
9.0
PROCEDURES
.....................................
Scope ......................................................
Pre-Emergency Planning .......................................
Emergency Coordinator ........................................
Communications/Telephone Numbers .............................
Assembly Area ...............................................
Emergency Hospital Route .....................................
Emergency Medical Treatment ..................................
Injuries .....................................................
8.8.1 Physical Injury .........................................
8.8.2 Chemical Injury .........................................
8.8.3 Snakebite Injury ........................................
8.8.4 Spider Bite Injury .......................................
Emergency Decontamination Procedures ..........................
, ..........
Personal Protection and First Aid Equipment ............
.................................................
Notification
Hazard Assessment ...........................................
Security ....................................................
Emergency Alerting ...........................................
Training ....................................................
Spill Containment Procedures ...................................
TRAINING
9.1
9.2
..............................
PROCEDURES
Personnel Decontamination .....................................
Effectiveness of Personnel Decontamination .......................
Equipment Decontamination ....................................
Decontamination Materials .....................................
EMERGENCY
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
8.6
8.7
8.8
...........................
EQUIPMENT
Personal Protection Equipment Selection ..........................
Site-Specific Levels of Protection ................................
Respiratory Protection .........................................
6.3.1 Level B ...............................................
6.3.2 LevelC ...............................................
6.3.3 LevelD+ ..............................................
Care and Cleaning of Personal Protective Equipment .................
DECONTAMINATION
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
8.0
PROTECTIVE
OF CONTENTS
(Continued)
REQUIREMENTS
.....................................
General .....................................................
Site-Specific .................................................
. ..
111
6-l
6- 1
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-3
6-3
6-3
7-l
7- 1
7-2
7-2
7-2
8-l
8-1
S- 1
S- 1
S-2
S-4
S-4
S-4
S-7
S-7
S-7
S-S
S-S
S-9
S- 10
S-10
S-10
S-11
S- 11
S-13
S- 13
9-l
9-1
9-l
TABLE OF CONTENTS
(Continued)
10.0 MEDICAL
10.1
10.2
SURVEILLANCE
REQUIREMENTS
......................
11.0 HEALTH
AND SAFETY PLAN APPROVAL
12.0 DECLARATION
OF HEALTH
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-l
AND SAFETY PLAN REVIEW
iv
10-l
10-l
10-l
...................................................
General..
.................................................
Site-Specific
. . . . . . . . . 12-1
LIST
OF TABLES
Number
3-l
3-2
Pace
Chemical/Physical Properties and Routes of Entry for Constituents
Detected During Previous Sampling at Site 65 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Chemical/Physical Properties and Routes of Entry for Constituents
Detected During Previous Sampling at Site 73 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
5-l
Monitoring Equipment and Frequency for Sites 65 and 73 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
8-1
Emergency Telephone Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
9-l
OSHA Training History of Baker Project Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
10-l
Medical Surveillance Testing Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1O-2
LIST
OF FIGURES
4-l
4-2
LocationMap ..................................................
Typical Contamination Reduction Zone Layout .......................
4-2
4-4
8-l
HospitalRoute .................................................
Directions to the Naval and Public Hospitals .........................
8-5
8-6
8-2
LIST
A
B
C
OF ATTACHMENTS
Baker Environmental, Inc. (Baker)
Safety Standard Operating Procedures (SOPS)
Material Safety Data Sheets
Emergency Procedures for Exposure to
Hazardous Materials/Waste
EXECUTIVE
SUMMARY
The chemical hazards associated with the tasks at this site(s) are expected to include potential
exposure to varying levels of semivolatile organic compounds, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls
(PCBs), and inorganics at Site 65 and volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds,
and inorganics at Site 73.
The physical hazards include working around heavy equipment, underground/overhead utilities,
uneven/sloped terrain, boat operations, vehicle traffic, and cold stress. The environmental hazards
include potentially hazardous flora and fauna. Each of these hazards is described in Section 3 .O.
Section 5.0 describes the environmental monitoring requirements which consist of using a
photoionization detector (PID), MINIRAM personal monitor (if needed), oxygen/combustible gas
meter, and radiation survey meter.
The level of personal protection assigned for work tasks and other operations will be Levels D
through B with protection upgrades/downgrades dependent on monitoring results and the Site Health
and Safety Officer’s discretion. Section 6.0 describes the personal protective equipment to be used.
Section 8.0 describes emergency procedures, which includes Figure 8- 1, showing the route to the
nearest public and base hospitals, Figure 8-2, providing directions to the nearest public and base
hospitals, in addition to first aid procedures, communication procedures, and other site concerns.
ES-I
i-
1.0
INTRODUCTION
This Health and Safety Plan (HASP) is a Site-Specific HASP for the Remedial Investigation/
Feasibility Study (RI/FS) of Operable Unit No. 9, Sites 65 and 73, MCB Camp Lejeune,
Jacksonville, North Carolina. Field activities to be conducted include surface and subsurface soil
sampling, monitoring well installations, trenches/testpits, surface water/sediment sampling, benthic
sampling, and groundwater sampling.
1.1
Policy
It is the policy of Baker Environmental, Inc. (Baker) that all on-site hazardous waste management
activities be performed in conformance with a site-specific HASP. The HASP is written based on
the anticipated hazards and expected work conditions and applies to activities performed under this
Contract Task Order (CTO). Applicability of this HASP extends to all Baker employees, Baker’s
subcontractors, and visitors entering the site. However, subcontractors are expected to provide their
own HASP and relevant Standard Operating Procedures (SOPS)that pertain to the activities they are
contracted to perform on the site. This information will then become part of the site HASP. All
personnel must review the HASP and sign an agreement to comply with its provisions prior to
commencing any on-site work. The HASP is considered an operational document which is subject
to revisions in response to various site-specific conditions which may be encountered. However,
it may be modified/updated with the approval of the Project Health and Safety Officer (PHSO) and
Project Manager. Proper notification will be given to the Atlantic Division (LANTDIV), Naval
Facilities Engineering Command Navy Technical Representative (NTR) when significant changes
to the HASP are implemented.
The HASP is based on an outline developed by the United States Coast Guard (USCG) for
responding to hazardous chemical releases (USCG Pollution Response COMDTINST-M16456.30)
and by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Occupational Safety and
Health Administration (OSHA), USCG, and United States Environmental Protection Agency’s
(USEPA’s) recommended health and safety procedures (Occupational Safety and Health Guidance
Manual for Hazardous Waste Site Activities). This HASP, at a minimum, meets the requirements
under OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.120 and 1926.65 (Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency
Response).
1.2
Proiect
Plans
The Work Plan (detailing the tasks to be performed at each site), the Sampling and Analysis Plan
(SAP), and Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) are bound as separate documents, and will
accompany the Health and Safety Plan in the field.
1.3
References
The following publications have been referenced in the development and implementation of this
HASP.
0
American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). 1993.
Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Phvsical Agents and
Biological Exposure Indices for 1993- 1994.
l-l
The Center for Labor Education and Research, Lori P. Andrews, P.E., Editor. 1990.
Worker Protection During. Hazardous Waste Remediation, Van Nostrand Reinhold,
New York, New York.
Lewis, Richard J., Sr. 1991. Hazardous Chemicals Desk Reference, 3rd Edition,
Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, New York.
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/Occupational Safety and
Health Administration/US. Coast Guard/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
1985. Occunational Safetv and Health Guidance Manual for Hazardous Waste Site
Activities. October 1985.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration. 1993. Title 29 Code of Federal
Regulations, Parts 1910 and 1926.
United States Coast Guard. 1991. Policv for Response to Hazardous Chemical
Releases. USCG Pollution Response COMDTINST-M16465.30.
United StatesDepartment of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service,
Centers for Disease Control, NIOSH. 1990. NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical
Hazards. June 1990.
United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Emergency and
Remedial Response, Emergency Response Division. 1992. Standard Ouerating
Safetv Guides. June 1992.
1.4
Pre-Entrv
Reauirements
During site mobilization, the Site Health and Safety Officer (SHSO) will perform a reconnaissance
of each site (work areas) as identified in the Work Plan to evaluate and determine the chemical,
physical and environmental hazards, establish or confirm emergency points of contact and
procedures, and review any other issues deemed necessary to address site safety and health. The
SHSO will then conduct a health and safety briefing with site personnel (as identified in Section 2.0)
to discuss data obtained from the previous site reconnaissance, provisions outlined in this HASP,
and appropriate safety and health related procedures and protocols.
1-2
2.0
PROJECT PERSONNEL AND RESPONSIBILITIES
The following personnel are designated to carry out the statedjob functions for both project and site
activities. (Note: One person may carry out more than one job function; personnel identified are
subject to change.) The responsibilities that correspond with each job function are outlined below.
PROJECT MANAGER:
Mr. Daniel Bonk
The Project Manager will be responsible for assuring that all activities are conducted in accordance
with the HASP. The Project Manager has the authority to suspend field activities if employees are
in danger of injury or exposure to harmful agents. In addition, the Project Manager is responsible
for:
0
Assisting the Project Health and Safety Officer (PHSO), as designated below, in
Site-Specific HASP development for all phases of the project.
0
Designating a SHSO and other site personnel who will assure compliance with the
HASP.
0
Reviewing and approving the information presented in this HASP.
PROJECT HEALTH AND SAFETY OFFICER: Ms. Barbara Cummings
The PHSO will be responsible for general development of the HASP and will be the primary contact
for inquiries as to the contents of the HASP. The PHSO will be consulted before changes to the
HASP can be approved or implemented. The PHSO will also:
0
Develop new protocols or modify the HASP as appropriate and issue amendments.
0
Resolve issues that arise in the field with respect to interpretation
implementation of the HASP.
l
Monitor the field program through a regular review of field health and safety
records, on-site activity audits, or a combination of both.
l
Determine that all Baker personnel have received the required training and medical
surveillance prior to entry onto a site.
l
Coordinate the review, evaluation, and approval of the HASP.
or
SITE MANAGER: Mr. James Cult,
The Site Manager will be responsible for assuring that all day-to-day activities are conducted in
accordance with the HASP. The Site Manager has the immediate authority to suspend field
activities if employees are subjected to a situation that can be immediately dangerous to life or
health. The Site Manager’s responsibilities include:
0
Assuring that the appropriate health and safety equipment and personal protective
equipment (PPE) has arrived on site and that it is properly maintained.
2-l
Coordinating overall site accessand security measures, including documenting all
personnel arriving or departing the site (e.g., name, company and time).
-0
0
Approving all on site activities, and coordinating site safety and health issues with
the SHSO.
l
Assisting the SHSO in coordinating emergency procedures with the Naval Activity,
emergency medical responders, etc., prior to or during site mobilization activities.
Assuring compliance with site sanitation procedures and site precautions.
Coordinating activities with Baker and subcontractor personnel.
Overseeing the decontamination of field sampling equipment.
Serving as the backup/alternate Emergency Coordinator.
Assuming the responsibilities as indicated under “Field Team Leader,” in their
absence.
SITE HEALTH AND SAFETY OFFICER: Jto be nrovided in Final HASP submission)
The SHSO will be responsible for the on-site implementation of the HASP. The SHSO also has the
immediate authority to suspend field activities if the health or safety of site personnel is endangered,
and to audit the subcontractor training, fit testing, and medical surveillance records to verify
compliance. These records will be maintained at the Baker Command Post. The SHSO will also:
0
Coordinate the pre-entry briefing and subsequent briefings.
0
Assure that monitoring equipment is properly calibrated and properly operated.
0
Assure compliance with the Baker Standard Operating Procedures (SOPS) in
Attachment A.
0
Inform personnel of the material safety data sheets (MSDSs) located in
Attachment B and emergency procedures for exposure to hazardous materials/waste
presented in Attachment C.
0
Manage health and safety equipment, including instruments, respirators, PPE, etc.,
that is used during field activities.
0
Confirm emergency response provisions, as necessary, in cooperation with Naval
Activity, emergency medical care, etc., prior to or during site mobilization
activities.
2-2
-0
Monitor conditions during field activities to ensure compliance with the HASP and
evaluate if more stringent procedures or a higher level of PPE should be
implemented, and informing the PHSO and Project Manager.
l
Document, as necessary, pertinent information such as accident investigation and
reporting, designated safety inspections, a record of site conditions, personnel
involved in field activities, and any other relevant health and safety issues. This
information will become part of the official site records.
0
Oversee the decontamination of personnel and determine safe boundary procedures
for activities requiring Level C or higher protection levels.
0
Act as the Emergency Coordinator.
FIELD TEAM LEADER
{to be urovided in Final HASP submission)
The Field Team Leader will be responsible for:
0
Safety issuesrelevant to the tasks under their direction.
0
Determining safe boundary procedures for activities requiring various protection
levels.
0
Assuring that PPE is properly maintained.
0
Complying with the conditions as outlined under Field Team Members.
0
Assuming the responsibilities as indicated under “Site Manager” in their absence.
FIELD TEAM MEMBERS: (to be nrovided in Final HASP submission)
The Field Team Members will be responsible for:
0
Familiarity with the HASP.
0
Complying with the contents of the HASP.
0
Attending training sessionsto review the HASP, and staying informed of additional
safety and health information.
0
Being alert to identified and unidentified hazards, and reporting unidentified
hazards to the SHSO and Site Manager, as soon as possible.
0
Offering suggestions, ideas, or recommendations that may improve or enhance site
safety.
2-3
0
Conducting site activities in an orderly and appropriate manner.
0
Reporting accidents/injuries, however minor, to the SHSO as soon as possible.
Subcontractor personnel are responsible for:
0
Complying with the conditions as outlined under Field Team Members.
0
Complying with all OSHA regulations relevant to their work.
0
Obtaining the appropriate training, fit testing, and medical surveillance
requirements under 29 CFR 1910.120, 1926.65, and 1910.134 and providing this
documentation to the Site Manager prior to or during site mobilization.
l
Having a competent safety monitor on site.
0
Complying with the training and medical surveillance requirements as outlined in
Sections 9.0 and 10.0, respectively, and providing their own PPE that meets or
exceeds the level of protection as outlined in this HASP.
SUBCONTRACTOR COMPANIES:
(to be nrovided
Drilling Operations:
Survey Operations:
[to be nrovided
(to be nrovided
Geophysical Operations:
{to
be nrovided
Analytical Services:
in Final
in Final
in Final
in Final
HASP
HASP
HASP
HASP
submission)
submission)
submission)
submission)
LANTDIV REPRESENTATIVES:
0
Ms. Linda Berry, P.E., NTR(804) 322-4793
ACTIVITY/STATION/BASE
REPRESENTATIVES:
0
Mr. Tom Morris(910) 451-5972
0
Mr. Walt Haven(910) 451-5068
FEDERAL/STATE/LOCAL REPRESENTATIVES:
l .
Not Assigned
_-
2-4
3.0
SITE
CHARACTERIZATION
This section provides information on the background/site description, and hazard evaluation for the
activities to be conducted under this CTO.
Location:
MCB Camn Leieune. North Carolina
Start-Up Date: January 1995
Investigation Duration: Aunroximatelv 3 months
3.1
Backwound/Site
Descrhtion
A description including site history for Sites 65 and 73 is presented below.
3.1.1
Site 65 - Engineer
Area Dump
The Engineer Area Dump (Site 65) refers to a four to five acre former land disposal site situated in
the Courthouse Bay section of MCB Camp Lejeune. Courthouse Bay is located south of State Route
172 along the eastern shore of the New River. It is one of a series of small bays which are formed
by the New River.
Site 65 is a primarily wooded area located immediately west of the Marine Corps Engineer School
which occupies property between Site 65 and the bay. The school is used for maintenance, storage,
and operator training of amphibious vehicles and heavy construction equipment. The school also
utilizes a several acre parcel located just east of Site 65 to conduct heavy equipment training
activities.
Site 65 reportedly operated from 1952 to 1972. Two separate disposal areas have been reported
including: (1) a battery acid disposal area; and, (2) a liquids disposal area. There are no maps or
figures which depict the location of the disposal areas, and neither area is currently discernible due
to heavy overgrowth. Aerial photographs are available at the base Forestry Department for the years
1962,1964,1970,1973,1978,1983, and 1989. The photos up through 1973 depict disturbed areas
west of the Engineer School which represent perhaps the best available means for approximately
locating the site. In addition, Camp Lejeune base maps, available via Computer-Aided Design
Drafting (CADD), indicate the location of a burn area which was identified as part of Site 65 under
the Initial Assessment Study (IAS) by Water and Air Research (WAR, 1983). Like the disposal
area, the location of the bum area is not currently discernible from the surrounding landscape.
Beginning in 1970, the area located immediately east of Site 65 where equipment training exercises
are currently conducted also appears to be disturbed in aerial photographs.
The types of liquids which were reportedly disposed at Site 65 include petroleum, oil, and lubricant
products (POL). The IAS did not indicate that hazardous wastes were disposed at Site 65. Site
Inspection (SI) Project Plans prepared by NUS Corporation May 1, 1991, identified both POL
wastes and batteries as having been disposed at Site 65; however, the basis for the inclusion of
batteries is not known as a reference was not provided.
3-1
3.1.2
Site 73 - Courthouse
Bay Liquids
Disposal
Area
The Courthouse Bay Liquids Disposal Area (Site 73) refers to an area previously used for the
disposal of waste oil and battery acid. It is situated within the boundaries of the Amphibious Vehicle
Maintenance Facility (Building A-47) located in the Courthouse Bay section of MCB Camp
Lejeune.
According to the IAS prepared by Water and Research, Inc. (WAR, 1983) the area of suspected
waste oil and battery acid disposal covers approximately 13 acres near the center of the facility.
The proposed RI/FS will include adjacent areas of concern (AOCs) which are discussed in
Section 3.5. The size of the investigation area comprised by AOCs 1 through 6 is roughly 48 acres.
Three additional AOCs (7, 8, and 9) have been identified which represent off site surface water,
sediment, benthic, fish and crab sampling locations.
The Amphibious Vehicle Maintenance Facility started operations in 1946 and is currently active.
Available historical data indicates that an estimated 400,000 gallons of waste oil was drained
directly onto the ground surface at this facility. In addition to the waste oil, approximately 20,000
gallons of waste battery acid was also reportedly disposed. The waste battery acid was poured into
shallow hand-shoveled holes which were then backfilled. A previous report (Law-Catlin, 1993)
indicated that solvents may have also been disposed at this site.
The facility harbors several active and former petroleum product underground storage tanks (USTs).
At least one former UST at the site may have been used for the storage of solvents. Another area
where,non-petroleum type wastes are routinely handled is an active HAZMAT storage area located
near UST A47/3.
Both USTs SA21 and A47/3 where reported to be leaking. UST SA-21 was a steel 30,000 gallon
capacity tank which held diesel fuel and was installed in 1959 and subsequently removed in 1991.
UST A47/3 was a steel 30,000 gallon capacity tank which held diesel fuel. Available information
on A47/3 does not indicate when the UST was installed, however documentation shows that a
hydrostatic test was performed on A47/3 in late 1992 and that A47/3 was subsequently replaced with
a fiberglass tank.
3.2
Hazard
Evaluation
The pre-entry briefing and subsequent safety meetings will serve to address the hazards particular
to each area under investigation, such as sloping ground, uneven terrain, etc. If new hazards are
identified,’ the SHSO will then add them to the HASP in the field along with the date of
modification. Additionally, site personnel are expected to follow “safe” work practices as described
in this HASP.
3.2.1
Chemical
Hazards
Hazardous chemicals can be absorbed into the body through various pathways. These pathways
include:
l
l
Inhalation of vapors, gases,or particulates.
Ingestion of contaminated particulates from hand-to-mouth contact.
3-2
l
-0
Dermal and eye contact from direct, unprotected contact.
Absorption through the eye or skin from exposure to concentrations in the air.
The chemical exposure potential for personnel working at Sites 65 and 73 is expected to relate
directly to the chemicals detected during previous sampling investigations. Therefore, Tables 3-1
and 3-2 identify the chemical/physical properties and routes of entry, respectively, for each site.
In general, the chemicals of potential concern (COPCs) at Site 73 consist of petroleum-related
constituents such as VOCs (i.e., BTEX) and inorganics (i.e., lead, chromium, etc.). At Site 65, the
COPCs consist primarily of a few organics (e.g., SVOCs, pesticides and PCBs) and a variety of
inorganics (i.e., chromium, lead, etc.). Concentrations and frequencies, however, are low.
At each area under investigation, an effort will be made to eliminate or reduce potential routes of
exposure through the use of engineering controls (i.e., performing investigative activities in an
upwind location according to safe sampling techniques), administrative controls (i.e., effective
training programs), and PPE (i.e., chemical protective clothing, hard hats, etc.).MSDSs for
constituents that were previously identified at Sites 65 and 73 are included as Attachment B.
It is important to note that the data presented herein reflects the chemical and toxicological
properties of the specific compound in a pure, non-diluted state. As such, when these compounds
are detected in environmental media (i..e, soil, groundwater, sediment, and surface water), the
hazards are anticipated to be substantially less than those associated with exposure to “pure”
compounds. Therefore, the data will be utilized as reference information when questions arise as
to a constituents’ chemical and toxicological property or measures for emergency response.
3.2.2
Physical Hazards
Physical hazards that are potential concerns for Sites 65 and 73 are discussed in the subsections
below.
3.2.2.1 Confined Snace Entrv
Confined space entry is not anticipated during activities to be conducted at either Site 65 or Site 73,
therefore, confined space entry procedures have not been provided. However, should circumstances
arise that may require entry into a confined space, the PHSO will be contacted and entry-specific
procedures according to 29 CFR 1910.146 will be provided at that time.
3.2.2.2 Thermal Stress
Provisions for monitoring of cold stressare outlined in Attachment A - Baker Safety SOPS.
3.2.2.3 Noise
Past experience during the heavy equipment operation for this type of project have not indicated a
noise level concern in conjunction with 29 CFR 1910.95 requirements, however, hearing protection
will be available for site personnel upon request.
3-3
TABLE 3- 1
CHEMICAL/PHYSICAL
Chemical
Source
PROPERTIES
AND ROUTES OF ENTRY FOR CONSTITUENTS
DURING PREVIOUS SAMPLING
AT SITE 65
DETECTED
I
N.F.P.A.
[email protected])
Highest
Concentration
Detected
Exposure
Limit (EL)ta)
Vapor
Pressure(c)
H
F
R
Routes of Entry
As Coal Tar Pitch Volatiles
Surface Soil
53 &lkg
0.2 mg/m3
(CA)
-
-
-
NA
Inhalation, skin or eye contact
Phenols
(including 4-methylphenol)
Sediment
930 /-e/kg
19 w/k
(skin)
3
2
0
0.4
Inhalation, absorption, ingestion, skin or
eye contact
Groundwater
Surface Soil
Subsurface
Soil
Sediment
0.53 /@L
72 cLg/kg
58 /a/kg
75 @kg
lmg/m3
(CA)
---
Low
-
Inhalation, absorption, ingestion, skin or
eye contact
Pesticides:
DDT Series
(includes DDE and DDD)
PCBs:
As Aroclor 1254
Subsurface
Soil
230 dkg
0.5 mg/m3
(skin)
W-9
-
-
-
0.00006
Inhalation, absorption, ingestion, skin or
eye contact
Metals:
Arsenic
Groundwater
308 /@L
0.01 mglm3
(CA)
3
1
0
Omm
Inhalation, absorption, ingestion, skin or
eye contact
Barium
Surface Water
22.3 &L
0.5 mg/m3
1
0
2
Low
Inhalation, ingestion, skin or eye contact
Beryllium
Groundwater
4.9 kg/L
0.002 mglm3
(CA)
4
4
1
Omm
Inhalation
TABLE
CHEMICAL/PHYSICAL
Chemical
Manganese
I
Zinc
Highest
Concentration
Detected
Groundwater
Surface Water
Groundwater
Sediment
Groundwater
Lead
w
&l
PROPERTIES
AND ROUTES OF ENTRY FOR CONSTITUENTS
DURING PREVIOUS SAMPLING
AT SITE 65
Source
Chromium
I
3-l (Continued)
364 /-a/L
DETECTED
N.F.P.A.
[email protected])
Vapor
[email protected])
Exposure
Limit (EL)”
H
F
Routes of Entry
R
Ingestion, skin or eye contact
0.5 &IL
132 /@L
94 i&kg
25 1 @L
Inhalation, ingestion
158 /afkg
Inhalation
Inhalation, ingestion, skin or eye contact
I
Sediment
@) EL - Exposure Limit = A time-weighted average concentration for a normal eight-hour work day and 40-hour work week to which nearly
all workers may be repeatedly exposed day after day without expected adverse effect. The EL represents published Exposure Levels
according to the following hierarchical order: (1) OSHA PELs; (2) NIOSH R.RLs; (3) ACGIH TLVs; and, (4) other recognized sources.
@) National Fire Protection Association rating for Health (H), Flammability (F), and Reactivity (R) from 0 (insignificant) to 4 (highly
significant)
cc) Vapor Pressure = Expressed as mm/Hg at 68°F (unless otherwise mentioned).
CA - Suspected or Proven Carcinogen
Skin - Potential for dermal absorption to contribute to EL
C - Ceiling value
NA - Not Available
mg/m3 - milligrams per cubic meter (in air)
.”
TABLE
CHEMICAL/PHYSICAL
PROPERTIES
AND ROUTES OF ENTRY FOR CONSTITUENTS
DURING PREVIOUS
SAMPLING
AT SITE 73
Highest
Chemical
Source
3-2
Co~e~~~~~
I
N.F.P.A.
[email protected])
Exposure
Limit (EL)@‘)
Vapor
- [email protected]
H
F
R
DETECTED
Ionization
Potential
W>
Routes of Entry
JOCs:
senzene
Groundwater
Soils
17 %/L
~50 e/kg
1 wm
2
3
0
100
9.24
Inhalation, absorption,
ingestion, skin or eye
contact
,I -Dichloroethylene
vinylidene chloride)
Groundwater
2.3 dL
1 wm
2
4
2
99
NA
Inhalation, ingestion, skin
or eye contact
rans- 1,2-Dichloroethene
Groundwater
360 ,qg/L
200 ppm
2
3
2
260
9.65
Inhalation, ingestion, skin
or eye contact
Zthylbenzene
Groundwater
Soils
3.8 I-GIL
1,000 rmkg
100 ppm
2
3
0
9
8.76
Inhalation, ingestion, skin
or eye contact
foluene
Groundwater
Soils
41 /e/L
50 x&ii
50 mm
(skin)
2
3
0
30
8.82
Inhalation, ingestion,
absorption, skin or eye
contact
Jinyl chloride
Groundwater
74 /-efL
1 mm
2
4
2
>l atm
9.99
Inhalation
I(ylenes
Groundwater
Soils
3.0 Pli$J
4,000 es/kg
100 ppm
2
3
0
10
8.44 to
8.56
Inhalation, ingestion,
absorption, skin or eye
contact
!
TABLE 3-2 (Continued)
CHEMICAL/J?HYSICAL
Chemical
Source
PROPERTIES
AND ROUTES OF ENTRY FOR CONSTITUENTS
DURING PREVIOUS SAMPLING
AT SITE 73
Highest
Co~e~c~~~
N.F.P.A.
[email protected]’
Exposure
Limit (EL)(a) ’
H
F
R
DETECTED
Vapor
’ [email protected])
Ionization
Potential
WI
Routes of Entry
Metals:
Zadmium
Groundwater
Sediment
10 ,%3/L
690 e/kg
0.005 mg/m3
-
-
-
Omm
NA
Inhalation, ingestion
Xrromium
Groundwater
Surface Water
Sediment
95 M/L
Unknown
53,000 ,&kg
0.5 mg/m3
3
0
1
Omm
NA
Ingestion, skin or eye
contact
Lead
Groundwater
Sediment
109 [email protected]
22,200 &kg
0.05 mg/m3
-
-
-
Omm
NA
Inhalation, ingestion, skin
or eye contact
@) EL - Exposure Limit = A time-weighted average concentration for a normal eight-hour work day and 40-hour work week to which nearly all workers
may be repeatedly exposed day after day without expected adverse effect. The EL represents published Exposure Levels according to the following
hierarchical order: (1) OSHA PELs; (2) NIOSH RELs; (3) ACGIH TLVs; and, (4) other recognized sources.
@) National Fire Protection Association rating for Health (H), Flammability (F), and Reactivity (R) from 0 (insignificant) to 4 (highly significant)
cc) Vapor Pressure = Expressed as mm/Hg at 68°F (unless otherwise mentioned).
CA - Suspected or Proven Carcinogen
Skin - Potential for dermal absorption to contribute to EL
C - Ceiling value
NA - Not Available
mg/m3 - milligrams per cubic meter (in air)
ppm - parts per million (in air)
Table 3-2
3-7
3.2.2.4 Explosion and Fire
In general, the following items present potential explosion or fire hazards and will be monitored
closely as they pertain to each area under investigation:
0
Explosion and fire resulting from:
.
Heavy equipment malfunction
.
Penetration into underground utility/service lines (gas, electric, fuel)
Ignition of trapped flammable vapors
.
Vehicular accidents
.
Puncturing of drums or containers during test pitting or drilling operations
t
Ignition of flammables or combustibles during welding or cutting
l
Provisions for monitoring for potential fire/explosive conditions will include the use of an
oxygen/combustible gas meter (as indicated in Section 5.2) and the performance of utility checks
prior to conducting intrusive activities. As additional concerns are identified, provisions for making
changes to the HASP will be presented by the SHSO, as needed.
3.2.2.5 Utilities
Underground utility clearance must be obtained before any intrusive activities are performed; this
clearance will be provided by a representative from the Public Works Department at MCB Camp
Lejeune. If underground utilities are identified in these areas, the ground above the utility lines will
be physically marked (e.g., spray paint or flags). Baker personnel will notify the base
representatives at least three days prior to intrusive activities to acquire a utility clearance. A
minimum of a 24-inch tolerance zone must be used for underground utilities.
The generally accepted uniform color code for underground utilities is as follows:
0
0
0
0
0
0
Red - Electric power lines, cables, conduit and lighting cables
Yellow - Gas, oil, steam, petroleum, or gaseous materials
Orange - Communication, alarm or signal lines, cables or conduit
Blue - Water, irrigation, and slurry lines
Green - Sewers and drain lines
White - Proposed excavation
Energized overhead electric lines may present a risk of electrocution. OSHA standards require that
equipment maintain certain distances from power lines. For lines 0 to 50 kilovolts (kV), the
minimum distance is 10 feet. Lines carrying over 50 kV require that equipment maintain 10 feet,
plus an additional 0.4 inch for each 1 kV over 50. On very humid days or during episodes of rain,
these distances will be doubled.
3.2.2.6 Heavv Equiument
One of the primary physical hazards on the site is associatedwith the use of heavy equipment, which
includes the use of a drill rig and backhoe. Noise from the operation of the heavy equipment will
limit verbal warning abilities. Hand signals will be prearranged between operators and personnel
working in and around heavy equipment. Backup alarms must operate properly on the heavy
3-8
equipment. Only operators trained, qualified, and authorized will be permitted to operate the heavy
equipm%nt.
-
Drill Rig
General hazards associated with the drill rig include moving parts, such as the auger and cathead.
Personnel must remain clear of moving parts and must avoid loose-fitting clothing that can become
entangled in the moving parts. Personnel working near a drill rig must be aware of the location and
operation of the emergency shut off devices. Personnel are to stand clear of the drill rig immediately
prior to starting the engine. The drilling subcontractor representatives are to provide any other
cautions that need to be observed when working around this equipment during the HASP pre-entry
briefing.
Backhoe
During backhoe operations, a “spotter” will be in place to direct the backhoe operator. Other
personnel in the area, such as those conducting sampling, are to remain close together and in the line
of sight of the operator. These personnel can proceed to the trenching/excavation area only when
an “all clear” is given by the spotter and operator. Caution must be exercised in these work areas
to avoid slips, trips, and falls, Personnel are not nermitted to enter into anv trenches. Anv samnling
conducted will be done so from the bucket of the backhoe. Personnel must also avoid
steuninrr/walking; within 2 feet of the ton of an excavation to avoid falling or causing:the trench to
collapse. Trenches are to be filled at the end of each event, or at a minimum, at the end of each day.
32.3
Radiation
-
Hazards
Although radiological disposal at Site 65 has not been reported, a radiation survey meter will be used
as a standard operating procedure (Section 5.2 identifies the monitoring requirements) during test
pit/trench operations.
Personnel will be provided instructions on the use of the radiation meter by the SHSO prior to the
start of activities, as necessary. Any additional questions regarding the different types of ionizing
radiation or the operation of the meter will be directed to the PHSO.
32.4
Environmental
Hazards
The following paragraphs identify the potential hazards associated with flora and fauna at Site 65
and to some extent Site 73. If additional concerns are identified, they will be added to this HASP.
3-2.4.1 Hazardous Flora
Incidence of contact by individuals to poisonous/thorny plants is high, especially during surface
water and sediment sampling activities; therefore, bare skin should be covered (i.e., long pants and
shirt, steel toe boots, leather or cotton gloves, safety glasses, and head protection) as much as
practical when working in forested or densely vegetated areas. Personnel should avoid entering an
area in the direct path of known poisonous flora (i.e., poison ivy, poison oak, or poison sumac); a
secondary route should be selected. Care should also be taken when walking in such areas as uneven
terrain or vines may present a tripping hazard.
3-9
.--
,f-*.
While attempting to cut into dense underbrush, hazards exist from the sharp machete and gaspowergd weed cutter, therefore, care should be taken when using such devices. (Note: Hearing
protection, steel toe boots, gloves, and safety glassesare required when using weed cutters.) Rashes
or other injuries will be reported to the SHSO as soon as they occur or are recognized.
3.2.4.2 Hazardous Fauna
Mosquitoes and gnats pose a nuisance and physical hazard to field personnel; they distract workers,
leading to accidents, and pose a physical threat by transmitting live microorganisms. Avoiding the
use of perfumes and scented deodorants and donning light colored clothing is preferable. The use
of Avon’s “Skin So Soft” or other insect repellent is encouraged and will be provided, as needed in
the Baker Field Trailer.
Poisonous snakessuch as the rattlesnake, copperhead, and cottonmouth (water moccasin), all known
as pit vipers, are common to the United States. Snakestypically do not attack people but will bite
when provoked, angered, or accidentally injured (as when stepped on). When encountering a snake,
avoid quick/jerky motions, loud noises, and retreat slowly; do not provoke the snake. If bitten,
follow emergency procedures outlined in Section 8.8.3.
There is a potential to come in contact with other dangerous insects; these include fire ants, chiggers,
bees, wasps, hornets, mites, fleas, spiders, and ticks. ’
P-7
regarding
‘Site personnel have been provided with a copy of Baker’s policy (per our medical
the signs and symptoms of exposure for Lyme Disease.
3-10
consultant)
All personnel should perform nchecks” on each other periodically and at the end of the work shift,
especially when working in grassy or forested areas. All insect bites must be reported to the SHSO.
If a spider bite by a black widow or brown recluse is suspected, follow emergency procedures in
Section 8.8.4.
Prior to initiating site activities, each individual shall be questioned as to any known sensitivities to
the previously mentioned organisms or agents.
3.2.5
Task-Specific Hazards
Listed below are summaries for the hazards associated with each potential task for an area under
investigation. Levels of protection outlined in Section 6.0 were selected based on this task-specific
hazard identification, information obtained from previous investigations and site visits, and previous
experience with similar investigations or activities.
3.2.5.1 Task 1 - Sediment/Surface Water Samuling (Sites 65 and 73)
Chemical
0
0
0
0
Potential for contaminated material to be splashed onto body or in eyes.
Ingestion of contaminated material from hand-to-mouth contact.
Inhalation of volatile constituents or volatile fraction of semivolatile constituents
within the sediments or surface water.
Absorption of constituents through the skin.
Physical/Environmental
0
0
0
0
0
Muscle strain from boring with hand auger.
Sampling operations that occur from boats. These operations must comply with
Baker’s Safety SOP for Safe Boat Operations.
Slips/trips/falls - sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
Skin irritation from contact with insects and vegetation.
Interaction with native and feral (i.e., wild) animal life.
3.2.5.2 Task 2 - Land Survevinn (Sites 65 and 73)
Chemical
0
0
Skin contact with potentially-contaminated soil.
Ingestion of contaminated material from hand-to-mouth contact.
Physical/Environmental
0
0
0
Slips/trips/falls - sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
Skin irritation from contact with insects and vegetation.
Interaction with native and feral animal life.
3-11
3.2.5.3 Task 3 - Surface Soil Samnlinrr (Site 65)
Chemical
0
0
0
0
Skin contact with potentially-contaminated soil.
Ingestion of contaminated materials from hand-to-mouth contact.
Inhalation of volatile contaminants or volatile fraction of semivolatile
contaminants.
Absorption of constituents through the skin.
Physical/Environmental
0
0
0
0
Slips/trips/falls - sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
Skin irritation from contact with insects and vegetation.
Interaction with native and feral animal life.
Muscle strain from boring with hand auger.
3.2.5.4 Task 4 - Monitoring Well Installation (Sites 65 and 731
Chemical
0
0
0
0
Potentially-contaminated mud, soil, or grouudwater to be splashed onto body or in
eyes.
Ingestion of contaminated materials from hand-to-mouth contact.
Inhalation of volatile contaminants or volatile fraction of semivolatile
contaminants.
Absorption of groundwater through the skin.
Physical/Environmental
Heavy objects landing on foot/toe or head.
Elevated noise levels from heavy equipment operation.
Slips/trips/falls - sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
Skin irritation from contact with insects and vegetation.
Overhead hazards from drill rig operations.
Interaction with native and feral animal life.
Contact with underground utility lines.
Muscle strain from lifting hazards.
3.2.5.5 Task 5 - Monitorin
Well Develooment (Sites 65 and 73)
Chemical
0
0
0
0
Potential for groundwater to be splashed onto body or in eyes.
Ingestion of contaminated materials from hand-to-mouth contact.
Inhalation of volatile contaminants or volatile fraction of semivolatile
contaminants.
Adsorption of groundwater through the skin.
3-12
Physical/Environmental
l
0
l
Slips/trips/falls - sloped, uneven terrain.
Skin irritation from contact with insects and vegetation.
Interaction with native and feral animal life.
3.2.5.6 Task 6 - Groundwater Sampling (Sites 65 and 73)
Chemical
0
0
0
0
Potential for contaminated groundwater to be splashed onto body or in eyes.
Ingestion of contaminated materials from hand-to-mouth contact.
Inhalation of volatile contaminants or volatile fraction of semivolatile contaminants
emitting from the well opening.
Adsorption of groundwater through the skin.
Physical/Environmental
0
0
0
0
0
Skin irritation from contact with insects and vegetation.
Muscle strain from lifting bailers or removing slug.
Cuts from using knives to cut bailer rope.
Slips/trips/falls - sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
Interaction with native and feral animal life.
3.2.5.7 Task 7 - Subsurface Sampling - Soil Boring: (Sites 65 and 73)
Chemical
0
0
0
l
Potential for contaminated mud, soil, or groundwater to be splashed onto body or
in eyes.
Skin contact with potentially-contaminated soil.
Ingestion of potentially-contaminated soils from hand-to-mouth contact.
Inhalation of volatile contaminants or volatile fraction of semivolatile
contaminants.
Physical/Environmental
0
0
0
0
0’
0
0
Elevated noise levels from heavy equipment operations.
Muscle strain from lifting hazards.
Skin irritation from contact with insects and vegetation.
Contact with underground utilities.
Interaction with native and feral animal life.
Heavy objects landing on foot/toe or head.
Slips/trips/falls from sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
,-
3-13
3.2.5.8 Task 8 - Test Pit/Trenching (Site 65)
Chemical
0
0
0
0
Skin contact with contaminated soil.
Ingestion of contaminated soils from hand-to-mouth contact.
Inhalation of volatile contaminants or volatile fraction of semivolatile
contaminants.
Skin contact with potentially toxic-‘pure product” contaminants.
Physical/Environmental
l
0
Overhead hazards from backhoe operations.
Skin irritation from contact with insects and vegetation.
Contact with underground utilities.
High grade slopes that may require shoring according to OSHA Standards.
Interaction with native and feral animal life.
Explosion from contact with explosive/ignitable materials. (Refer to Section
3.2.2.4)
Elevated noise levels from heavy equipment operation.
Slips/trips/falls from sloped and uneven excavation materials or landscape.
3.2.5.9 4)
Chemical
0
0
0
Skin contact with potentially-contaminated soil or water.
Ingestion of contaminated material from hand-to-mouth contact.
Inhalation of potentially volatile contaminants or volatile fraction of semivolatile
contaminants.
PhysicaE/Environmental
0
0
0
0
0
Slips/trips/falls from elevated heights (i.e., top of roll-off box or tanker) onto
ground.
Falling into potentially-contaminated material in roll-off box.
Cuts, abrasions, or sprains from climbing onto roll-off box or tanker.
Muscle strain when using bailer or hand auger.
Hazards associated with a potential “confined space” situation.
3.2.5.9 Task 10 - Decontamination Procedures
Chemical
0
Skin or eye contact with potentially-contaminated soil, water, or decontamination
chemical.
l
Ingestion of contaminated material or decontamination chemical from hand-tomouth contact.
3-14
0
Injection of contaminated water during pressure washing of drill rig augers.
Physical/Environmental
0
0
0
l
3.2.6
Slips/trips/falls.
Skin irritation from contact with insects and vegetation.
Muscle strain from lifting and bending.
Heavy object landing on foot/toe while moving augers.
Summary
The information provided in the previous section details the potential hazards associated with the
activities conducted at Sites 65 and 73. This information is used to ascertain what levels of
protection will be required for each field activity at each area under investigation. In determining
the levels of protection, the following items are considered:
Quantity of contaminant that is available for absorption
Exposure time that is available for absorption
Frequency with which the exposure occurs
Physical form of the constituents
Presence of other constituents
Toxicity of the constituents
Ventilation, natural or otherwise
Appropriate hygienic practices
Protective equipment in use
HASP training
Based on this section and the information furnished in the previous two sections, levels of protection
will be assigned. Refer to Section 6.2, Site-Specific Levels of Protection.
3-15
4.0
SITE
CONTROL
_-
Measures need to be addressed in the HASP for managing the daily control of the site (i.e., access,
site conditions, etc.). The following subsections provide a discussion of each site control measure
that will be consistent for activities at Sites 65 and 73.
4.1
Site Access
The Site Manager is designated to coordinate overall access and security at each area under
investigation. Perimeters for activities to be conducted at Sites 65 and 73 will be established
according to the site boundary procedures identified in Section 4.3, local conditions, the items listed
below, and Navy Activity requirements.
0
Personnel will not be permitted within the Work Zone (i.e., Exclusion Zone) or
Contamination Reduction Zone without proper authorization from the SHSO.
0
All personnel arriving or departing the site will be documented in the site log book.
0
All activities on site must be cleared through the Site Manager and documented in
the site log book.
0
The on-site Command Post will be established at the Baker Field Trailer, which
will be in the Support Zone and oriented upwind from all Work Zones.
0
4.2
Figure 4- 1 insert Figure 4- 1 identifies the location of each area under investigation.
Site Conditions
Specific site conditions are as follows:
0
The prevailing wind conditions are(to be nrovided in the Final HASP submission).
0
Anticipated weather conditions include (to be nrovided in the Final HASP
submission’l.
0
Site topography consists of the following:
.
Site 65 -A flat sloping terrain with some relief where the ground has been
disturbed or material has been disposed. Area is heavily wooded. Some
military operations along the perimeters.
.
Site 73 -A flat, sloping terrain, some relief. Area is relatively open except
for a wooded area to the southwest. Area is industrialized with a lot of
activity.
4-l
_---
,-
.
P
w
LOCATION MAP
SITE 65 - ENGINEER AREA DUMP
SITE 73 - COURTHOUSE BAY LIQUIDS DISPOSAL AREA
MARINE CORPS BASE, CAMP LEJEUNE
NORTH CAROLINA
4.3
Work
Zones
To reduce the accidental spread of hazardous substancesby workers from a potentially-contaminated
area to a clean area, zones will be delineated to ensure that work activities and contamination are
contined to the appropriate areas, and to keep unauthorized personnel from entering the work zones.
The sections below identify the requirements based on the level of protection in use.
4.3.1
Level C and B Activities
All zones for activities conducted under Level C or higher protection levels shall be established
utilizing control boundaries between the Work Zone, the Contamination Reduction Zone (CRZ), and
the Support Zone (i.e., Clean Zone). These boundaries shall be defined as follows:
0
Work Zone - The area where the primary investigation activity occurs,
0
Hotline - The boundary between the Work Zone and CRZ.
0
CRZ - The area between the Work Zone and the Support Zone which is located
upwind of the site investigative activities.
0
Contamination Control Line - The boundary between the CRZ and the Support
Zone.
0
Support Zone - The outermost area next to the CRZ and upwind of the site
investigative activities.
These boundaries will be demarcated using colored boundary tape, cones, or equivalent for the
Hotline or the Decontamination Corridor of the CRZ and/or barriers for the Contamination Control
Line such as posted signs and/or barricades.
Refer to Figure 4-2 for a “General Contamination Reduction Zone Layout.” Exact locations of the
demarcated zones will be field determined by the SHSO during site mobilization.
4.3.2
Level D and D+ Activities
All zones for activities conducted under Levels D or D+ shall be established according to the
guidelines set forth in the subsections below.
4.3.2.1 Populated Areas
In populated areas,Work Zones for activities conducted under Level D or D+ protection levels shall
be established in such a manner as to preclude unauthorized personnel from entering the
investigative area. A boundary will be established to separatethe Work Zone from the Support Zone
using available materials such as the Baker Field Vehicle, natural boundaries (e.g., buildings,
structures, fences), or signs/placards, boundary tape, cones, barricades, etc.
4-3
\
\
/
\
\
\
.- -C
_’
----
/
/
A+(
P
b
FIGURE 4-2
SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM
GENERAL CONTAMINATION
REDUCTION ZONE LAYOUT
BakerEnlflronmentd
4.3.2.2 Unnonulated/Secluded Areas
In unpopulated or secluded areas,the aforementioned materials may not be used due to the exclusive
nature of the site, the short duration of the activity, and the low risk to outside populations. The
SHSO and/or Field Team Leader is responsible for making this determination.
4.4
“Buddv
Svstem”
All site activities that involve hazards and/or the potential for contact with hazardous materials will
be performed by a work team of no fewer than two people (i.e., Buddy System). For potential
“high-hazard” activities, a third person located in the Support Zone will serve as an observer or
rescue person.
4.5
Safe Work
Practices
Routine safe work practices may consist of:
0
0
0
0
0
0
i
0
0
4.5.1
Conducting operations in a manner to reduce exposure of personnel and equipment.
Implementing appropriate decontamination procedures.
Conducting sampling activities from an upwind location.
Adherence to applicable safety regulations in OSHA Standards 29 CFR 1910 and
1926.
Setting up barriers to exclude unauthorized personnel from contaminated areas.
Minimizing the number of personnel and equipment at each area under
investigation.
Establishing work zones within each area under investigation.
Establishing control points for ingress to and egress from work zones.
Heavy Equipment
The following safe work practices will be adhered to during heavy equipment operations.
/“I-
0
Hard hats will be worn at when working in a work zone with heavy equipment.
0
Heavy equipment requiring an operator will not be permitted to run unattended.
0
Heavy equipment will not be operated in a manner that will endanger persons or
property nor will the safe operating speeds or loads be exceeded.
0
Heavy equipment will be shut down and positive means taken to prevent its
operation while repairs or fueling are being performed.
0
Personnel, other than the operator, should not ride on equipment.
0
A “spotter” will be used to help direct the heavy equipment operator.
0
Personnel are to remain in the field of vision of the operator and remain clear of
moving parts.
4-5
4.5.2
l
Hand signals will be prearranged between operator and personnel working around
the heavy equipment.
0
Backup alarms must operate properly on the heavy equipment.
Drilling
--
Operations
The following safe work practices will be adhered to during drilling operations.
4.6
0
Hand signals will be prearranged between operator and personnel working around
the drill rig.
0
Personnel are to remain in the field of vision of the operator and remain clear of
moving parts where protective clothing can be entangled, i.e., Tyvek caught in the
auger.
0
Personnel working near a drill rig are to be aware of the location and operation of
the emergency shut off devices.
0
Utility clearances must be secured prior to digging (see Section 3.2.2.5).
0
The drill rig boom is to remain a minimum of 10 feet from power lines (see
Section 3.2.2.5).
l
During the HASP briefing, the supervisor of the drilling company will provide
additional precautions to be observed when working around the drill rig.
Sanitation
Procedures/Site
-..
Precautions
Provisions for sanitation procedures and site precautions to be followed on site are outlined below.
0’
A supply of clearly marked potable water, tightly closed, and equipped with a tap.
0
Single service disposal cups.
0
Outlets for non-potable water, clearly marked, for fire fighting or other purposes.
Cross-contamination of the potable supply shall be prevented.
0
One toilet facility for up to 20 personnel which is either chemical, recirculating,
combustion, or flush, depending on local code requirements. Two toilet facilities
will be required for greater than 20 personnel.
0
A place for food handling meeting applicable laws or suitable alternatives to such
facilities will be provided (i.e., nearby restaurants, food wagons, etc.).
0
Clean wash water will be available in the decontamination zone during Level C or
B activities, each Baker Field Vehicle and the Baker Field Trailer. Disposable
towelettes will also be available in each Baker Field Vehicle for periodic cleanups.
4-6
,.__
l
Eating, drinking, chewing gum or tobacco, smoking, or any practice that increases
the probability of hand-to-mouth transfer and ingestion of material is prohibited in
any area designated as contaminated. Smoking will also not be allowed in areas
where flammable materials are present. Hands and face must be thoroughly washed
before breaking for meals and upon leaving the site. “Contaminated” work
garments are not to be worn off site.
0
Whenever decontamination procedures for outer garments are in effect, the entire
body should be thoroughly washed as soon as possible after the protective garment
is removed.
Contact lenses are not oermitted to be worn on site.
Facial hair, which interferes with a satisfactory fit of the mask-to-face seal, is not
permitted on personnel who are or may be required to wear respirators.
Contact with contaminated or potentially-contaminated surfaces should be avoided.
Wherever possible, do not walk through puddles, leachate, discolored surfaces,
lean, sit or place equipment on drums/containers.
0
Medicine and alcohol can potentiate the effects of exposure to toxic chemicals,
therefore, prescribed drugs should only be taken by personnel when approved by
a qualified physician. Alcoholic beverage intake should be minimized or avoided
during after-hour operations.
Alcoholic beverages and firearms are prohibited on site.
All site personnel will observe any posted sign, warning, fence, or barrier posted
around contaminated areas.
Site personnel must wear the proper attire while on site. At a minimum, this will
include steel-toed boots, work pants (e.g.,jeans or other durable material), and work
shirt (e.g., short or long-sleeved, made of a durable material). Tank tops, muscle
shirts, and sweat pants are not permitted.
4-7
.-.
5.0
ENVIRONMENTAL
MONITORING
Environmental monitoring will be performed at each area under investigation; the level and degree
of monitoring will be dependent on each field activity. Due to the short duration and variability of
field tasks only realtime air monitoring (versus integrated air monitoring) will be used to assess
action levels. The action levels for the PID, as specified in Section 5.1 below, are based on a “worstcase” contaminated S-hour TWA-PEL of 1 ppm (i.e., benzene, etc.), and are consistent with those
listed by the USEPA in Section 6.9, of the Standard Operating Safety Guides (June, 1992).
5.1
Personal Monitorin
Personal monitoring will be accomplished using realtime environmental monitoring instrumentation
directed at the breathing zone (BZ) (the area bordered by the outside of the shoulders and from the
mid-chest to the top of the head) of work party personnel. Breathing zone monitoring will be
performed each time a reading is taken at the point source (i.e., after well is opened for groundwater
sampling, after breaking ground for soil sampling, etc.). The guidelines below identify the
protection levels required according to the concentrations measured using each piece of equipment.
0
a
l
P---.
0
(1)
(2)
Background”) = Level D/D+
>l mu (meter unit) above background for up to 1 continuous minute in the BZ =
Level C
>l mu above background for up to 15 continuous minutes in the BZ = Level B or
stop work and consult the SHSO
Instantaneous peak concentrations >5 mu in the BZ = Level B or stop work and
consult the SHSO
PID with 10.2 eV ultraviolet lamp set on the 1X Scale.
Background is typically 1 to 2 mu
MINIRAM (I) (if required)
0
0
0
a
Background to 0.5 mg/m’ = Level D
0.5 mg/m3 to G! mg/m3 = Level D+
2 2 mg/m” to <4 mg/m” = Level C
r: 4 mg/m’ = Stop Work and Consult PHSO
(1)
Action levels are based on a “worst case” PEL of 0.2 mg/m’ for coal tar pitch voiatiles (i.e.,
SVOCs). This assumesthat 10% of the soil fraction that could adsorb to soil particulates
(generated in the air) contains PAHs. Therefore, 0.2 mg/m” divided by 10% (0.1) = 2 mg/m3
in the breathing zone.
*
An OSHA PEL is a time-weighted average concentration for a normal eight-hour work day
and 40-hour work week to which nearly all workers may be repeatedly exposed day after
day without expected adverse effect.
5-l
5.2
Point
Source Monitorins
Point source monitoring which is monitoring performed at the source of the sampling/investigative
activity (i.e., borehole, monitoring well, etc.) will comply with the action levels outlined below.
Instrumentation to be used will include a PID, Oxygen/Combustible Gas Meter, and Radiation
Survey Meter.
0
If detecting levels greater than background, immediately measure the BZ levels
following the action levels set forth in Section 5.1.
0
For levels greater than 10 times the background level, retreat upwind, monitor BZ,
and return after allowing source to aerate.
0
For levels that are sustained, contact the SHSO for guidance.
OxvgenKombustible
Gas Meter(‘)
Oxygen Meter
0
0
19.5% to 23.5% = continue working
<19.5% or >23.5% = Stop Work immediately and consult the SHSO
Combustible Gas Meteb2)
0
0
(1)
(2)
cLO% of the Lower Explosive Limit (LEL) = continue working
>20% of the LEL = Stop Work immediately and consult the SHSO
Used to evaluate physical safety in conjunction with PID.
Assigned action levels are for non-confined space entry operations .
Radiation Survev Meter - Ludlum Model 3-98 Survev Meter with Model 44-2 Gamma Scintillator
Tube (external nrobe)
0
0
0
Background (typically 0.02 to 0.04 mR/hr) - Continue work
0.5 mR/hr to 1 mR/hr - Continue work, monitor levels closely
>l mR/hr - Leave work area and consult PHSO
GM Pancake Probe (internal nrobe)
0
0
0
(1)
Background (typically 50 to 70 cpm(‘)) = Continue work
Background to ~2 times Background = Continue work, monitor levels closely
>2 times Background = Retreat from work area until background levels are reached
and consult PHSO
cpm = counts per minute
5-2
As work progresses, the scope of monitoring may be extended based on monitoring results, odor
detecti&, changing work conditions, and signs or symptoms of exposure. Any or all of these
conditions will be immediately investigated and acted upon by the SHSO.
5.3
Perimeter
Monitoriw
Perimeter monitoring which is defined as monitoring performed at borders beyond the Support Zone
and often at the “fence line” will be required based on action levels that will remain consistent for
site activities. The PID, and Radiation Survey Meter action levels are outlined below.
5.4
l
The PID will be used periodically to scan the perimeter as a means of documenting
any volatile releases that may extend past the work zone, when volatile
concentrations exceed 50 mu (2 X Scale) at the point source or 10 mu (1 X Scale)
at the breathing zone.
0
The Radiation Survey Meter will be used to determine a safe distance from the
source (i.e., when levels return to background); if a radiation level exceeding 1 on
the mR/hr scale or > 2 times background on the cpm scaIe is detected.
Suecific
Air Monitoriw
Equipment
and Frequency
Monitoring equipment and frequency for each area under investigation can be found in Table 5- 1.
Action levels that govern changes in levels of protection can be found in Section 5.1.
5.5
Eauiument
Maintenance
and Calibration
Baker’s procedures for the return of equipment to inventory and for maintenance of the equipment
shall be followed in order to assure that the optimum level of operation is maintained for the item.
Equipment calibration under the direction of the SHSO will be completed daily before use and
calibration information entered onto the equipment calibration form. All forms will be maintained
on site for the duration of the project with copies to be given to the Equipment Manager once the
equipment has been returned to the office. Procedures for equipment maintenance and calibration
follow those guidelines found in the operating manual provided by the manufacturer (included with
each piece of equipment) or in Baker’s 1,
and Technical Activities Manual.
5.6
Monitoriw
Documentation
As environmental monitoring is performed, documentation of the results will be entered into the
Field Log Book of the SHSO or other personnel performing the monitoring. Documentation is to
include the date, time, instrument result, general location, and specific location such as point source,
breathing zone, or area, and weather conditions during the monitoring time period. Copies of the
Field Log Book will be placed in a binder and remain in the Baker Field Trailer on site until the end
of the field activities, whereby the log sheets will become part of the permanent file.
5-3
.-
TABLE
MONITORING
Field
Sediment/Surface
5-l
EQUIPMENT
AND FREQUENCY
CONDUCTED
AT SITES
MINIRAM
Personal
Monitor(l)
PHW
Activity
FOR EACH
65 AND 73
FIELD
ACTIVITY
Oxygen/
Combustible
Gas Meter(l)
Radiation
Survey
Meter(l)
Water Sampling
Land Surveying
Surface Soil Sampling
Monitoring
Well Installation
Monitoring
Well Development
Groundwater
Soil Boring
Sampling
Sampling
I
c
I
c
I
c
I
c
Test Pit/Trenching
Tanker/Roll-Off
I
P
C
D
A
PID
Note:
=
=
=
=
=
Box Sampling
Initially
- At start of job task to confirm designated protection level.
Periodically
- When site condition or set-up changes, or when a new area is entered.
Continuously
- Monitor levels continuously.
At the discretion of the SHSO.
According to action levels.
= Photoionization
Detector
As air concentrations
are measured, they should be documented
book. In the case of continuous monitoring,
every 15 minutes.
(1) Refer to the manufacturer’s
operating
manual
in the individual’s
and Baker SOP prior to operation.
5-4
field log
I
6.0
PERSONAL
6.1
Personal
PROTECTIVE
Protective
Equipment
EQUIPMENT
Selection
The personal protective equipment available for the various levels of protection is listed in the table
below. The assigned item number will correspond to each field activity as defined in Section 6.2.
I Item No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
F--
t
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
I
Personal Protective Equipment
Chemical-Resistant Clothing (Polyethylene-coated [email protected])
Chemical-Resistant Clothing ([email protected])
Uncoated [email protected]/[email protected] Coveralls
Normal Work Clothes or Coveralls
Air-Line Respirator (ALR) with 5-minute escape pack
Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) for rescue
NIOSH 5-minute Escape Pack (on standby)
Full-face Cartridge Respirator
Half-face Cartridge Respirator
Full-face Cartridge Respirator (on standby)
Half-face Cartridge Respirator (on standby)
Chemical-Resistant Gloves (Nitrile inner - double laver)
Chemical-Resistant Gloves (Nitrile inner - single layer)
Chemical-Resistant Gloves (Rubber/Neonrene outer)
1Chemical-Resistant Gloves (Nitrile outer)
1Work Gloves (outer)
Chemical-Resistant Overboots (with steel toe and shank)
Chemical-Resistant Overboots (w/o steel toe)
Steel Toe Boots
Safety Glasses
Safety Goggles
Face Shield
1Hard Hat
I
Hearing Protection (as necessary)
Chest/Hip Waders (as necessary)
Safety Vests
,-
6-1
6.2
Site-SDecific Levels of Protection
Based on the information provided in Section 3.O,Site Characterization, the levels of protection and
corresponding PPE have been designated for the following field activities. Upgrading or
downgrading the level of protection will be based on realtime monitoring, working conditions, and
the discretion of the SHSO.
Note: No single combination of protective equipment and clothing is capable of protection against
all hazards. PPE should be used in conjunction with safe work practices, effective decontamination,
and good personal hygiene.
Level
Location(s)
Field Activity
h-B
C
D+
D
X
Other
Personal Protective
Equipment (Item No.)
4, 12, 19, 20,25
X
X
Sites 65 and 73
Sites 65 and 73
Sites 65 and 73
Sites 65 and 73
1 Sampling
1 Monitoring Well
Installation
Monitoring Well
1 Development
1 Groundwater
1 Sampling
1 Subsurface
I
I
X
x
314, 10, 12, 16, 18/19,
20,23, 24,26
4, 10, 12, 19,20,26
X
4, 10, 12, 19,20,26
X
3f4, 10, 12, 16, 18119,
20,23,24,26
I
I
I
I
I
I
1,5,6, 12, 14, 18/19,23,
24
X
X
EXCEPT IN EMERGENCY SITUATIONS, CHANGES TO THE SPECIFIED LEVELS OF
PROTECTION SHALL ONLY BE MADE WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE SHSO AND THE
SITE MANAGER, IN CONSULTATION WITH THE PHSO AND PROJECT MANAGER.
6.3
Remiratorv
Protection
Site-specific respiratory protection requirements as outlined below will comply with the procedures
in Attachment A - Baker Safety SOPS.
6.3.1
Level B
Either the “North” NIOSH-certified Air Line Respirator (ALR) system (four-person manifold) with
5 minute escapepack or Worth” Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) will be used at this
level. The line-of-site worker will be equipped with an SCBA on standby for emergency rescue
purposes. This individual may also be responsible for monitoring the supplied air system
(comprised of a series of compressed gas cylinders containing Grade D breathing air) with the
6-2
j
!
SHSO’s approval. NOTE: Level B activities are considered to be “high-hazard” activities that will
require-a minimum of three people to perform the required tasks (refer to Section 4.4).
6.3.2
Level C
A NIOSH-certified full-face negative pressure Air-Purifying Respirator with an organic
vapor/HBPA cartridge is the appropriate cartridge for use with the detected hazardous materials and
the measured contaminant concentrations will be used at this level. Upgrades/downgrades in this
level of respiratory protection will be based on measured realtime air contaminant concentrations
(see Section 5.1) and the SHSO’s observations. (Note: Baker personnel are issued either a North
or MSA Air-Purifying Respirator).
Cartridge changeover will occur when one or more of the following have been observed: exposure
duration greater than eight hours for vapor/gas cartridges; increase in breathing resistance; a
noticeable odor or taste; eye/throat irritation; and other indicators such as end-of-service life
indicators for specialty filter cartridges.
6.3.3
Level D+
A NIOSW-certified negative pressure Air-Purifying Respirator, meeting all the requirements
identified under Level C, will remain on standby at this level.
6.4
Care and Cleanins’ of Personnel Protective Eauiument
Provisions for the care and cleaning of personal protective equipment used on site can be found in
Attachment A - Baker Safety SOPS.
6-3
7.0
DECONTAMINATION
PROCEDURES
Procedures to follow for the decontamination
materials generated during decontamination,
7.1
of personnel and equipment,
are discussed in the following
as well as handling
sections.
of
Personnel
Personnel leaving the Work Zone will be thoroughly decontaminated.
The following protocol will
be used for the decontamination
stations according to levels of protection assigned to each field
activity:
Level D
Level C
Level D+
I
1. Equipment drop
2. Boot and glove
gross contamination removal*
3. Boot and glove
wash*
4. Boot and glove
rinse*
5. Tape Removal*
6. Boot removal*
7. Glove removal*
8. Hand/Face wash
9. Equipment wipe
down
Level B
I
1. Equipment drop
2. Outer boot and glove
wash
1. Equipment drop
2. Outer boot and glove
wash
1. Equipment drop
2. Outer boot and glove
3. Outer boot and glove
rinse
4. Tape Removal
3. Outer boot and glove
rinse
4. Tape Removal
3. Outer boot and glove
rinse
4. Tape Removal
5. Outer boot and glove
removal
6. Coverall removal/
disposal
7. Inner glove
removal/disposal
8. Hand/face wash
5. Outer boot and glove
removal
6. Coverall removal/
disposal
7. Respirator removal
5. Outer boot and glove
removal
6. SCBA or escape tank
removal
7. Coverall removal/
disposal
8. SCBA or ALR face
shield removal
9. Inner glove
removal/disposal
10. Hand/face wash
9. Equipment cleaning
Wtl.Sh
8. Inner glove
removal/disposal
9. Hand/face wash
10. Respirator
cleaning/sanitizing
11. Equipment cleaning
11. Respirator
cleaning/sanitizing
12. Equipment cleaning
*Optional - depends on degree of contamination and type of PPE used.
The following
recommended
decontamination
equipment
for Level D+ protection:
0
0
0
0
l
l
l
is required for Level C and higher protection
Two small tubs (one set of wash and rinse water)
Scrub brush
Towels*
Disposable wipes*
Pressurized sprayers for rinsing
Contaminated
clothing disposal bag or drum*
Contaminated
liquids disposal drum
7-l
levels and
Respirator cleaning solution
Liquinox and water as the decontamination solution
l
0
*Minimum for Level D decontamination.
The decontamination liquids and clothing will be contained and disposed according to policy defined
in the Field Sampling Plan.
7.2
Effectiveness
of Personnel
Decontamination
The effectiveness of site decontamination methods will be evaluated by the SHSO on a periodic
basis. This evaluation may include the observation of personnel decontamination, inspection of PPE
before and after decontamination, and questioning site personnel for signs and symptoms of
exposure. Additional measures may also be employed by the SHSO at their discretion.
7.3
Eaubment
Decontamination
Provisions for the decontamination of equipment will be based on the size and type of equipment
used. Specific decontamination procedures for Sites 65 and 73 will be found in the Field Sampling
Plan.
7.4
Decontamination
Materials
The protocols outlined in the Field Sampling Plan for the handling of materials used for
decontamination such as packaging, storing, and disposing will be followed to: (1) minimize the
risk of off-site exposures that could endanger public health, and (2) limit the potential for liabilities
associatedwith handling, containment, storage, and transportation of contaminated materials. These
protocols comply with Baker’s SOP on “Handling of Site Investigation-Derived Wastes,” located
in the Standard Onerating Procedures for Administrative. Field. and Technical Activities Manual.
7-2
8.0
EMERGENCY
8.1
Scope
PROCEDURES
The activities to be conducted under this HASP are not remediation (cleanup), but investigative;
therefore the potential for a “release” to air, water, or soil is low. However, other emergencies, such
as fire or personal injury may occur. If so, local emergency response groups will be called in to
handle the incident, as necessary.
8.2
Pre-Emerpencv
Planning
All applicable Navy/local emergency response contacts (On-Scene Commander, Fire Department,
Security, Ambulance, Hospital, etc.) at MCB, Camp Lejeune will be contacted prior to or during site
mobilization activities. This notification will be performed by the SHSO and/or Site Manager. The
information discussed may include:
0
a
0
0
0
0
l
A description of site activities.
Anticipated site hazards.
Hazardous chemicals/materials brought on site.
Expected length of time on site.
Specific requirements the emergency response facilities may require.
Confirmation of emergency phone numbers.
Security measures that must be followed by site personnel.
Specific points of contact, where applicable, will be established and added to the HASP. If
requested, Material Safety Data Sheetsfor hazardous chemicals/materials brought on site (which are
maintained at the Command Post), will be provided at this time.
8.3
Emewencv
Coordinator
The SHSO acting as the Emergency Coordinator is responsible for field implementation of these
Emergency Procedures. The Emergency Coordinator is responsible for reacting (not responding)
to emergencies. As the Emergency Coordinator, specific duties include:
0
Familiarizing all on-site personnel with the emergency procedures and the
emergency coordinator’s authority.
0
Identifying the nearest telephone in the event of an emergency.
0
Communicating site emergency procedures and requirements to ail Baker and
subcontractor personnel.
0
Specifying the Site Manager as the backup/alternate Emergency Coordinator.
0
Controlling activities of subcontractors and contacting the emergency response
groups, as necessary.
8-1
0
Anticipating, identifying, and assessing fires, explosions, chemical releases, and
other emergency situations to the best of the coordinator’s ability, and providing
this information to the emergency group(s) responding.
0
Familiarity with site personnel trained in emergency first aid and adult CPR.
__
All on-site personnel, whether involved in emergency response or not, will be notified of their
responsibilities by the Emergency Coordinator in an emergency. They will be familiar with the
emergency procedures and the Emergency Coordinator’s authority.
8.4
Communications/Telenhone
Numbers
Internal communications will rely on direct communication (via verbal or two-way radios) between
site personnel. External communications will employ a telephone located in the Baker Field Trailer,
a mobile telephone for emergency use, and various telephones located throughout the Base (near the
investigation areas). Telephone communication at the Command Post will be established during site
mobilization.
The “Buddy System” will be in effect at all times; any failure of communication requires an
evaluation of whether personnel should discontinue activities.
Air horns will be used for communication during emergency evacuation of personnel. One
long (3 second) air horn blast is the emergency signal to indicate that all personnel should
evacuate the Work Zone.
,---_
Coordination between Baker and subcontractor personnel is the responsibility of the Site Manager.
The best means for securing the lines of communication will be determined at the pre-entry briefing.
Hand signals, as outlined below, will be used in the event that radio communications fail:
Hand gripping throat
(typically Level C/B activities)
Grip partner’s wrist or both hands around waist
Hands on top of head
Thumbs u
Thumbs dow
Can’t breathe
Leave area immediately
Need assistance
OK, I am all right, I understand
I do not understand
Emergency telephone numbers will be posted in the Baker Field Trailer and maintained in each
Baker Field Vehicle. The list of emergency phone numbers is presented in Table S- 1.
,.-_
8-2
TABLE
EMERGENCY
Facility
S- 1
TELEPHONE
NUMBERS
Phone Number
Off-Base
[email protected]
Phone Number
On-Base Phone(r)
Contact*
Security
4555
911 or (910)
451-4555
Response Operator
Fire (Courthouse Bay)
7221
(910) 451-7221
Response Operator
Fire (Hot Work Permit)
3004
(910)451-3004
Fire Alarm Operator
Ambulance (On-Base)
911
Ambulance (Off Base)
(*9) 455-9119
(910) 455-9119
or911
Response Operator
911 or 4840,4841,
4842
451-4840
451-4841
451-4842
Response Operator
(*9) 577-2240
(910) 577-2240
Response Operator
Emergency (One Call)
911
911
Response Operator
On- Scene Coordinator
911
(910) 451-5815
Fire Chief
Environmental
Management Division
(Em)
5068
(910) 451-5068
Mr. Neal Paul
Mr. Tom Morris
Mr. Walt Haven
Public Works
(Underground Utilities via
EMD Contact)
5874
(910) 451-5874
Mr. Neal Paul
Hospital Emergency Room
(On-Base)
Onslow County Hospital
(Off Base)
Duke Regional Poison
Control Center
Response Operator
(*2) l-800-672-1697
l-800-672-1697
(‘)
Response Operator
The following prefixes apply when using on-base telephones:
*2 - operator assisted calls including 800 numbers
*8 - long distance calls
*9 - local calls
Q) When using the mobile phone, which is programmed for the Pittsburgh area, use the phone numbers
(including area codes) for an off-base phone.
8-3
8.5
Assemblv
Area
,-_
In the event of an emergency, personnel will be instructed to meet initially at the Baker Field
Vehicle and eventually at the Baker Field Trailer. Where applicable, personnel will exit the work
area through the contamination reduction zone. If either location is inappropriate, an alternate
assembly area will be designated by the Emergency Coordinator in an upwind location from the site.
At this location, emergency needs will be provided such as:
a,
0
0
0
8.6
Assembly for evacuated personnel
First aid for injured personnel
Decontamination material
Communications
Emewencv
HosDital
Route
An emergency hospital route map (Figure 8- 1) and written directions to the hospital (Figure 8-2) will
be posted in the Baker Field Trailer and maintained in the Baker Field Vehicle. Personnel will be
informed of the location of the map and the directions to the hospital during the pre-entry briefing.
8.7
Emewencv
Medical
Treatment
This section provides information on the nearest emergency medical facility and corresponding
emergency telephone numbers.
Emergency
Medical
Services
For chemical and nonchemical exposure incidents, the nearest public hospital is:
Onslow Countv Memorial Hospital
Name
Address 3 17 Western Boulevard. Jacksonville. North Carolina
On-Base Telephone No. (“9) 577-2240
Off-Base Telephone No. (9 10) 577-2240
Note
In extreme emergencies, personnel may be transported to Building NM100 (Naval Hospital)
for initial treatment.
Local ambulance service is available from:
Name
Naval Hosnital (On Base) or Citv of Jacksonville (Off Base)
911
On-Base Telephone No
Off-Base Telephone No (9 10) 455-9 119 or 9 11
Contact will be made with emergency personnel prior to the start of activities (see Section 8.2).
8-4
Figure S- 1.
Hospital route will be included in the Final HASP.
8-5
FIGURE
DIRECTIONS
Directions
TO HOSPITAL
to Naval Hospital
Building
NM100
8-2
FROM
SITES
65 AND 73
are as follows:
la. From Site 73, proceed north on Sneads Ferry Road approximately
turn left into Marines Road.
lb. From Site 65, turn onto Marines Road and proceed northeast.
2.
Travel northeast on Marines
with Sneads Ferry Road.
3.
Turn left onto Sneads Ferry Road and proceed north (this eventually
merges with
Holcomb Boulevard) until intersecting
with Brewster Boulevard (approximately
9l/2 miles).
4.
Turn left onto Brewster Boulevard and proceed approximately
turn right, following directions to the emergency room entrance.
Directions
Road for approximately
3/4 of a mile then
to Cnslow County Memorial
1.
Follow directions
2.
Continue
3.
Continue on Route
Western Boulevard.
4.
Turn right onto Western
(approximately
1.5 miles).
5.
Hospital
6.
Follow directions
Hospital
5-l/4 miles until
intersecting
3/4 of a mile
then
are as follows:
l-3 above.
north on Holcomb
Boulevard
off the base and onto Route 24 west.
24 west for approximately
Boulevard
miles
and proceed north
is on left hand side.
to emergency
2-l/4
room entrance.
8-6
until
until
intersecting
the fifth
with
stoplight
8.8
Ini uries
If injuries ‘are not serious or life threatening, affected personnel may be transported by other site
personnel to the local medical facility, if necessary. Emergency medical response personnel will
be contacted in the event of serious or multiple injuries. Medical personnel will be provided with
all available information regarding the nature of the incident, chemicals involved, etc. Instances
requiring treatment beyond “first aid” will be handled at appropriate facilities and reported to the
Project Manager and PHSO within 24 hours.
There will be a minimum of two persons during each phase of field activities that will be trained in
standard first aid and adult CPR. These personnel will also be familiar with Baker’s program for
potential exposure to bloodborne pathogens as outlined in the Baker Safety SOPS in Attachment A.
Subcontractors will be responsible for securing proper medical attention for their employees. Baker
may assist the subcontractor as necessary.
8.8.1
Physical
Injury
If an employee working in a contaminated area is physically injured, first aid procedures are to be
followed. If the employee can be moved, he/she will be taken to the edge of the work area and
decontaminated, if necessary (refer to Section 8.9). Depending on the severity of the injury,
emergency medical response from Naval Hospital personnel may be sought to stabilize victim for
transport to public hospitals. Emergency first aid may be administered by Baker personnel prior to
transporting to an awaiting ambulance or to a local emergency medical facility, as appropriate.
8.8.2
Chemical
Injury
If the injury to a worker is chemical in nature (e.g., direct contact/exposure), the following first aid
procedures are to be instituted:
0
Eve Exuosure - If contaminated solid or liquid gets into the eyes, wash the eyes
immediately at the 15minute emergency eyewash station (or with the personal eye
wash bottle when an eye wash station is not immediately available). Obtain
medical attention immediately.
NOTE: Contact lenses will not be worn while working at any site.
0
0
Skin Exoosure - If contaminated solid or liquid gets on the skin, promptly wash the
contaminated skin using soap or mild detergent and water. If solids or liquids
penetrate through the clothing, remove the clothing immediately and wash the skin
using soap or mild detergent and water. Obtain medical attention immediately.
Swallowing - If contaminated solid or liquid has been swallowed, immediately
contact the Duke Regional Poison Control Center at l-800-672-1697. Do not
induce vomiting in an unconscious person. Obtain medical attention as directed by
the Poison Control Center.
8-7
Breathing - If a person has difficulty breathing, move the exposed person to fresh
air at once. If breathing is not evident, check for pulse and perform appropriate first
aid, either rescue breathing or CPR, depending on the condition. Obtain medical
attention immediately.
0
‘-
Procedures to follow in the event of a chemical exposure are included in Attachment C.
8.8.3
Snakebite
Injury
In the event of a snakebite injury, the following procedures will be followed.
Look for signs and symptoms such as the characteristic appearance of two small holes, usually about
a half inch apart, with surrounding discoloration, swelling, and pain. Systemic signs (which may
or may not occur) include weakness, sweating, faintness, and signs of shock.
Provide treatment as follows:
1.
Calm the victim and keep affected area still.
2.
Contact ambulance if you cannot provide victim with transportation to the nearest hospital.
3.
Wash the wound.
4.
Keep the affected area below the level of the heart if bite is on the arm or leg.
5.
Treat for shock.
6.
Monitor airway, breathing, and circulation.
7.
Obtain physical description of snake, if possible.
8.
Provide the emergency medical responder (either the ambulance attendant or the emergency
room at the hospital) with all pertinent information such as how long ago the bite occurred,
the type of snake (if known), any known allergic conditions (if known), etc.
9.
Inform the SHSO as soon as possible.
8.8.4
Spider
Bite Injury
There are two spiders commonly found in the United Stateswhose bite can be serious: the black
widow spider and the brown recluse spider. These bites may be serious, even life-threatening.
Many other spiders will bite, but they do not produce serious complications. The black widow
spider measures approximately 1 inch long with its legs extended. It is glossy black in color and has
a distinctive yellow-orange marking in the shape of an hourglass on its belly. On its back, however,
there is no marking, and unless you happen to turn the spider over, you cannot see this mark. The
danger of the black widow spider bite lies in its systemic manifestations. The venom from this
spider attacks the nervous system, resulting in severe muscle cramps with boardlike rigidity of the
-8-8
/ -.
abdominal muscles, tightness in the chest, and difficulty in breathing. Sweating, nausea, and
vomitiiig
will also occur.
The emergency treatment for the black widow spider bite is basic life support. sometimes the
individual is not even aware of having been bitten, or where. Apply cold to the site of the bite if it
can be identified. There is a specific antivenin for this spider bite that must be administered by a
physician. It is particularly important to identify the spider, and bring it in, if you can.
The brown recluse spider is a little bit smaller than the black widow spider and is dull brown in
color. It has a violin-shaped mark on its back, which can be seen when you are looking at the spider
from above. The spider gets its name because it tends to live in dark areas, comers, and old unused
buildings. The bite from this animal produces local rather than systemic manifestations. The venom
of the brown recluse spider causessevere local tissue damage and can lead to an ulcer and gangrene.
The bitten area becomes red, swollen, and tender within a few hours after the bite. A small blister
forms, and several days later, this may form a large scab, covering a deep ulcer. Death is rarely
reported, but these bites need local surgical treatment, and these patients should be brought to the
hospital. Again, if possible, identification of the spider should be carried out.
8.9
Emewencv Decontamination Procedures
In the event of a medical emergency, patients are to be adequately decontaminated before transfer
(if possible) to prevent contamination of the medical transport vehicle and medical facility.
Emergency personnel decontamination will include the following, depending on the level of
protection.
*
Levi4 D
0
l
Equipment drop
Tape, boot, and
0
glove removal
Coverall removal
Level C
Level D+
Equipment drop
Tape, outer boot, and
glove removal
l
l
l
Coverall removal/
0
l
disposal
Inner glove removal/
disposal
0
l
l
l
Equipment drop
Tape, outer boot,
and glove removal
Coverall removal/
disposal
Respirator removal
Inner glove
Level B
l
Equipment drop
Tape, outer boot, and glove
l
removal
SCBA or escape tank
l
removal
l
Coverall removal/ disposal
SCBA or ALR face shield
removal
l
Inner glove removal/
l
removal/ disposal
disposal
*
If circumstances dictate that contaminated clothing cannot be readily removed, then remove
gross contamination and wrap injured personnel with clean garments/blankets to avoid
contaminating other personnel or transporting equipment. All emergency personnel are to
be immediately informed of the injured person’s condition, potential contaminants, and
provided with all pertinent chemical data.
If necessary, one of the site personnel equipped with appropriate PPE may accompany the injured
worker and perform decontamination
with supervision
8-9
of medical personnel.
8.10
Personal
Protection
and First Aid Equiument
PPE available for emergency response will include the following:
0
0
0
0
0
0
Polyvinyl chloride boots
[email protected] suits, polyethylene coated and uncoated
Nitrile gloves (inner and outer)
Neoprene and Nitrile Gloves (outer)
Face shields and goggles
SCBAs
PPE and first aid equipment will be available in the support zone (i.e., Baker Field Vehicle and
Baker Field Trailer).
Emergency and first aid equipment can be found at the following locations:
Fire Extinguisher:
First aid kit:
Personal eye wash bottle:
Air Horn:
15-minute Emergency Eye
Wash Station
8.11
Baker Field Trailer and Contractor Field Vehicle
Baker Field Trailer and Baker Field Vehicle
Baker Field Trailer and Baker Field Vehicle
With Personnel
Near Area With Greatest Potential for Chemical
Sulash/Exnosure
Notification
/--
If the Emergency Coordinator determines that the site has an uncontrolled situation, such as a spill,
fire, or explosion, that could threaten human health or the environment, the coordinator will
immediately call the Navy On-Scene Coordinator, the Activity Contact, the Project Manager, and
the NTR as soon as possible. The notification report will include:
0’
Description of incident (e.g., release, fire).
Name and telephone number of individual reporting the emergency.
Location of incident.
Name and quantity of material (s) involved (if known).
The extent of injuries and number of casualties.
The possible hazards to human health or the environment and recommended
cleanup procedures.
Assistance that is requested.
Hazard
Assessment
0
0
0
0
l
0
8.12
The Emergency Coordinator will assesspossible hazards to human health or the environment that
may result from an uncontrolled situation, to the best of the individual’s abilities, incorporating the
following steps, as appropriate.
,-”
8-10
0
Assessthe immediate need to protect human health and safety.
0
Identify the materials involved in the incident including exposure and/or release
pathways and the quantities of materials involved.
l
Inform appropriate personnel, as identified in Section 8.11, who will determine if
release of material(s) meets USEPA requirements for reportable quantities for spills
under the RCRA or Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and
Liability Act (CERCLA).
This assessment may consider both the direct and indirect effects of the chemical release, fire,
explosion, or severe weather conditions (e.g., the effects of any toxic, irritating, or asphyxiating
gases that are liberated).
8.13
Security
During activation of these Emergency Procedures, the Emergency Coordinator or his/her designated
representative will control access to the site and maintain an incident log until the appropriate
personnel, such as the Navy On-Scene Commander, arrives and takes control. The incident log will
include:
l
0
0
0
8.14
Activities that have occurred since the incident was first reported.
Tasks currently being performed and where.
Rescue and response equipment used.
Protective equipment being used.
Em
This section outlines the emergency alerting procedures according to the location and type of
emergency.
Personnel Injury in the Work Zone:
0
Initiate a verbal warning or one long airhorn blast and move all unaffected site
personnel to the support zone (for Level D/D+) or the CRZ (for Level C or higher).
0
Send the rescue team into the Work Zone (if required) to remove the injured person
to the hotline.
0
Have the SHSO and/or Site Manager evaluate the nature of the injury and assure
that the affected person is decontaminated according to Section 8.9.
0
If required, contact an ambulance and/or the designated medical facility.
8-11
In all situations when an on-site emergency results in evacuation of the Work Zone, personnel shall
not reefiter until:
1.
The conditions resulting in the emergency have been corrected.
The hazards have been reassessed.
The HASP has been reviewed and, if appropriate, modified.
Site personnel have been briefed on any changes in the HASP.
2.
3.
4.
Personnel
_A--.
Injury
in the Support
Zone:
0
The Site Manager and SHSO will assessthe nature of the injury; if the cause of the
injury or loss of the injured person does not affect the performance of other site
personnel, operations may continue.
0
If the injury increasesthe risk to others, a verbal warning or one long airhorn blast
shall be sounded and all remaining site personnel will move to the command post
for further instructions.
0
Activities on site will stop until the added risk is mitigated.
Fire/Explosion:
Initiate a verbal warning or one long airhorn blast and move all site personnel to the
support zone (for Level D/D+) or the CRZ (for Level C or higher).
0
l
Alert the fire and security departments and move all nonessential personnel to the
Baker Command Post to await further instructions.
0
Activities will stop until the added risk is mitigated.
Personal
Other
Protective
Equipment
Failure:
0
If any site worker experiences difficulty, failure, or alteration of protective
equipment that affects the protection factor, that person and his/her buddy shall
immediately ceasework activities, leave the Work Zone, and repair or replace the
defective equipment.
0
Reentry will not be permitted until the equipment has been repaired or replaced.
Equipment
0
.-.
Failure:
If any other equipment on site fails to operate properly, the Field Team Leader shall
notify the Site Manager and SHSO to determine the effect of this failure on site
operations. If the failure affects the safety of site personnel, work with the
equipment will ceaseuntil the situation is evaluated and appropriate actions taken.
I--
8-12
8.15
Training,
Site personnel will read the details in the Emergency Procedures prior to the pre-entry briefing. The
Emergency Procedures will be reviewed by site personnel during the pre-entry briefing.
8.16
hill
Containment
Procedures
In the event that a small (less than the reportable quantity), easily-controlled spill of hazardous
substances (e.g., gasoline, oil, etc.) occurs during the implementation of field activities, spill
containment will be utilized to prevent the additional migration of contaminants through the site
area. Large, uncontrolled spills will be handled by qualified response organizations under the
direction of qualified Base personnel and/or Navy On-Scene Commander. Any release to soils or
surface waters equaling or exceeding the reportable quantities under CERCLA or the USEPA Clean
Water Act will be reported to the Environmental Management Department who in turn will report
it to the appropriate authorities.
Specific spill containment procedures will be dependent on the type of materials spilled and the type
of environment affected. Potential spill containment procedures may include diking with absorbent
material/pads, then removal or containment of the contaminated materials. Spill containment
materials will be located within close proximity to the storage area of the hazardous substances in
a manner such that the pathway remains accessible and free of obstructions. Spill containment
materials available on site may include:
0
0
l
0
Vermiculite
Ground corn cobs
Dirt or sand
Shovel
8-13
9.0
TRAINING
REQUIREMENTS
Training requirements for site personnel are outlined in the sections below.
9.1
General
All Baker employees, subcontractors, or other personnel entering the site will need to have received
training in compliance with the OSHA Standard 29CFR 1910.120. Baker employees engaged in
field activities which potentially expose workers to hazardous substances receive a minimum of 40
hours of instruction off site, and a minimum of three days actual field experience under the direct
supervision of a trained, experienced supervisor. Key points of the 40-hour training include field
demonstrations, respiratory fit testing and training, risk assessment,toxicology, chemical reactivity,
use of monitoring equipment, downrange work procedures, site safety procedures, levels of
protection, protective clothing, decontamination, and practical field exercises (e.g., donning, doffing,
and working in personal protective ensembles for personal protection Levels A, B, and C).
In addition to the initial 40-hour training program, Baker requires site employees to receive an
annual 8-hour refresher training course on the items specified by the 29 CFR 1910.120 standard.
The general purpose of the 8-hour refresher is to ensure that personnel retain the knowledge
necessary to be adequately protected and stay current with proper site health and safety procedures.
Baker also.requires that personnel involved with on-site employee supervision receive, in addition
to 40 hours initial training and three days of supervised field experience, at least eight additional
hours of specialized training at the time of job assignment. Training topics include, but are not
limited to, the employer’s safety and health program and the associated employee training program,
personal protective equipment program, spill containment program, and health hazard monitoring
procedures and techniques. The 8-hour supervisory training is required to ensure that supervisors
have the knowledge necessary to understand and use the various Health and Safety Programs and
to implement the elements of the HASP. Table 9-lprovides the appropriate OSHA Training History
for Baker Project Personnel.
9.2
Site-hecific
Training
Sitespecific training, as discussed in Section 1.4, will consist of an initial health and safety briefing
on the following information:
0
Names of individuals responsible for site health and safety and methods of
communicating safety and health concerns.
0
Roles and responsibilities of site personnel.
0
Site-specific health and safety hazards.
0
Use of PPE.
9-1
TABLE
OSHA T-G
Personnel
Daniel Bonk
HISTORY
9-l
OF BAKER
PROJECT
PERSONNEL*
Title/Role
l
Project Manager
Training
l
l
l
l
l
l
Status
40&r. training completed: 10/85
Supervisory training:
NA
8&r. refresher completed: 5194
First AidTraining:
NA
CPRTraining:
NA
Medical surveillance:
4l94
40&r. training completed: 10191
0 Supervisory training:
9191
l 8-hr. refresher completed:
B/93
l First AidTraining:
3/94
l CPRTraining:
3194
l Medical surveillance:
5194
Barbara Cummings
l
Project Health and Safety Officer
l
James Culp
l
Site Manager/Project Geologist
l
(To be provided in Final HASP
submission)
l
Site Health and Safety Offricer/
Field Team Leader
0 40&r. training completed:
l Supervisory training:
l 8&r. refresher completed:
l First Aid Training:
l CPR Training:
l Medical surveillance:
(To be provided in Final HASP
submission)
l
Environmental Scientist
l
40-hr. training completed:
0 Supervisory training:
l 8&r. refresher completed:
l First Aid Training:
l CPR Training:
l Medical surveillance:
40&r. training completed:
0 Supervisory training:
l 8-hr. refresher completed:
l First Aid Training:
l CPR Training:
o Medical surveillance:
i
TABLE
OSHA
T-G
Personnel
HISTORY
9-1 (Continued)
OF BAKER
PROJECT
PERSONNEL*
Trainher
Title/Role
Status
4O-hr. training completed:
0 Supervisory training:
a 8-hr. refresher completed:
l First Aid Training:
l CPR Training:
l Medical surveillance:
(To be provided in Final HASP
submission)
l
Environmental Scientist
l
(To be provided in Final HASP
submission)
l
Environmental Scientist
0 40-hr. training completed:
0 Supervisory training:
l 8&r. refresher completed:
l First Aid Training:
l CPR Training:
l Medical surveillance:
(To be provided in Final HASP
submission)
l
Environmental Scientist
0 40&r. training completed:
0 Supervisory training:
l 8-hr. refresher completed:
l First Aid Training:
l CPR Training:
l Medical surveillance:
(To be provided in Final HASP
submission)
l
Environmental Scientist
l
*
404s. training completed:
0 Supervisory training:
l 8-hr. refresher completed:
l First Aid/ Training:
l CPR Training:
l Medical Surveillance:
Copies of documentation pertaining to the training history of contractor and Baker personnel will be maintained
at the Baker Command Post.
NA - Not Applicable
0
Work practices by which employees can minimize risk.
0
Safe use of equipment on site.
0
Recognition of symptoms and signs of exposure to hazardous materials.
0
Site control measures.
0
Decontamination procedures.
0
Emergency procedures.
The SHSO will conduct the initial site-specific training prior to the initiation of field activities for
each new area under investigation.
9-4
10.0
MEDICAL
10.1
General
SURVEILLANCE
REQUIREMENTS
All personnel who may be exposed to materials having potentially adverse and deleterious health
effects, obtain medical clearance from Baker’s Board Certified Occupational Health Physician in
accordance with 29 CFR 1910.120(f) prior to entry onto any site. Baker’s corporate medical
surveillance program establishesa medical baseline and monitors for symptoms of overexposure for
individuals who participate in Preliminary Assessments,Site Inspections, Remedial Investigations,
Feasibility Studies, and construction-phase services at sites covered by the Department of Labor,
OSHA, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard, 29 CFR 1910.120. The
program will include a medical and work history and is intended to determine the individual’s
capability for performing on-site work, including wearing chemical protective clothing and
respiratory protective equipment in a thermally-stressed environment.
All Baker employees that will be engaged in site activities covered by the 29 CFR 1910.120 standard
receive a Group III physical examination by a occupational health physician who has provided
information on the individual’s site activities and exposure or anticipated exposure levels. This
exam is received initially upon hire, then once every 12 months thereafter. More frequent medical
examinations, consultations, and/or laboratory testing will be provided if the occupational health
physician determines that an increased frequency of examination is required. A complete Group III
medical exam includes parameters such as height, weight, vision, temperature, blood pressure, and
a complete review of occupational and medical histories. Other tests in a Group III exam include
chest x-rays, electrocardiogram, spirometry, urinalysis, and blood tests. Table 1O-l describes the
medical surveillance testing parameters performed annually on Baker employees. The need for
additional monitoring depending on site conditions will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.
10.2
Site Soecific
Prior to entry onto the site, all personnel, including subcontractors, will be required to provide
medical clearance to the SHSO from their company physician in accordance with 29 CFR
1910.120(f), stating that they are physically capable of performing the activities required of them.
The need for additional monitoring, dependent on information obtained during the site
characterization, will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. However, in the event that site
employees are injured, receive a health impairment, develop signs or symptoms which may have
resulted from exposure to hazardous substances resulting from an emergency incident, or are
exposed during an emergency incident to hazardous substancesat concentrations that are or may be
above the permissible exposure limits or the published exposure levels without the necessary
personal protective equipment being used, medical examinations and/or consultations shall be
performed according to the following schedule:
1.
As soon as possible following the emergency incident or development of signs or
symptoms.
2.
At additional times, if the examining physician determines that follow-up examinations or
consultations are medically necessary.
10-I
TABLE 10-l
MEDICAL
SURVEILLANCE
TESTING PARAMETERS*
Group II - Individuals Occasionally in the Field (1 O-30 days/year)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Medical History (Physical Exam)
Eye Exam
EKG (baseline and for individuals over 40 years of age)
Chest X-ray (baseline then every 5 years)
Spirometry
CBC with differential
SMA 12 or 26 (liver enzyme scan)
Group III - Individuals Frequently in the Field (>30 days/year)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Medical History (Physical Exam)
Eye Exam
EKG (baseline then annually for individuals over 40 years of age)
Audiometry
Chest X-ray (baseline then every 3 years)
Spirometry
CBC with differential
SMA 12 or 26 (liver enzyme scan)
Urinalysis (glucose scan)
Specific Blood and Urine Tests (dependent on field exposure)**
Group III with Asbestos - Individuals frequently in the field whom also work with asbestos
0
9
**
Group III testing with the Asbestos Medical Questionnaire w/Pulmonary Function
Test (FVCi,, and FEV,,,J
The occupational health physician has the right to reduce or expand the medical monitoring
on an annual basis as he/she deems necessary.
To be performed for individuals identified by the occupational health physician as being
chronically exposed to organic compounds.
10-2
Procedures to follow in the event of an exposure to a hazardous material/chemical are provided in
Attacfient C.
10-3
11.0
HEALTH
AND SAFETY PLAN APPROVAL
This Draft HASP has been reviewed by the following personnel prior to submission to LANTDIV.
Daniel Bonk
Name (print)
Proiect Manager
Title (print)
Signature/Date
Barbara Cumminns
Name (print)
PHSO
Title (print)
Signature/Date
Ronald Krivan
Name (print)
OA/OC Reviewer
Title (print)
Signature/Date
1l-l
12.0
DECLARATION
OF HEALTH
AND SAFETY
PLAN
RFMEW”
All site personnel indicated below have reviewed and are familiar with this Health and Safety Plan
for the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for Operable Unit No. 9, Sites 65 and 73, MCB,
Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.
(Name-Print)
(C0mw-v)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
(Cww9
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
(Comwv)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
*This page is to be reproduced to accommodate the numbers of personnel who receive training prior
to performing activities or visiting a site, and is to remain in the Baker Field Trailer (or Baker Field
Vehicle in the absence of a trailer) until demobilization.
Page --
of
12-1
ATTACHMENT
BAKER
ENVIRONMENTAL,
STANDARD
OPERATING
SAFETY
TABLE
1.0
Confined
2.0
Respiratory
3.0
Care and Cleaning
4.0
Bloodborne
5.0
Heat Stress*
6.0
Cold Stress
7.0
Safe Boat Operations
8.0
Cutting
*Not Applicable
A
OF CONTENTS
Space Entry Program*
Protection
of Personal
Pathogens
and Welding
Program
Protective
Equipment
INC.
PROCEDURES
m
2.0 - RESPIRATORY
This Respiratory
Protection
successful program.
Environmental,
Attached
presents
at the end of this program
is a copy of the following
a
Baker
PURPOSE
The purpose of the Baker Respiratory
respiratory
protection
requirements
by Baker
of the Occupational
CFR 1910.134 and 1926.103,
2.2
Protection
Program
personnel.
This
Safety and Health
“Respiratory
is to govern the selection
program
and use of
is also designed
Administration
(OSHA)
to meet
standards
29
Protection.”
SCOPE
This program
hazards
applies to Baker SRN personnel
as part of their
respiratory
equipment
2.3
RESPONSIBILITY
Baker
provides
Baker
employee.
Manager
job duties.
sites.
Baker
who may be involved
This program
the necessary respiratory
The Baker
equipment
SRN Project
for identifying
The Baker
the procedures
respiratory
to follow
Site Health
to protect the safety and health
Health
when
and Safety Oflicer
(PHSO)
of each
and Project
the need for this Respiratory
Protection
and Safety
and Site Manager
for implementing
and administering
employees
are to use and maintain
accordance with training
outlines
with potential
is required.
are responsible
responsible
field.
necessary for administering
Qualitative
Respirator Fit Test Record
Air-Supplying
Respirator Inspection Form
Air-Purifying
Respirator Inspection Form
0
0
project
the elements
PROGRAM
Inc. (Baker) forms:
0
2.1
Program
PROTECTION
received and instructions
Officer
(SHSO)
the Respiratory
the respiratory
outlined
Protection
Program
Program
protection
at
are
in the
provided
in
in this program.
Rev.: 3/94
2.4 - HAZARD
The key elements
inhalation
of a respiratory
and ingestion
variety
-
ASSESSMENT
protection
and industrial
possible hazards to which all employees
it is essential
any activities
Health
must start with an assessment
hazards present in the work area. Because Baker’s
of environmental
Therefore,
program
hygiene
studies,
services involve
it is not practical
could be exposed within
of the
to identify
a
all
the scope of this document.
that a task specific assessment be conducted prior to the initiation
on a given project.
of
This task specific assessment shall be part of the site-specific
and Safety Plan (HASP).
After a task-specific
assessment
airborne
concentrations
exposure
administrative
feasible
controls
is completed
to exceed the
should be implemented.
to reduce the airborne
and it is determined
that there is a potential
recommended
limits,
engineering
for
and
If the exposure cannot be reduced, or it is not
exposure below the recommended
limits,
respirators
will be
selected by the PHSO and/or SHSO on the basis of:
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2.5
Toxicity
Maximum
expected concentration
Oxygen levels
Warning properties of the substance(s) involved
Sorbent limitations
Facepiece fit
Mobility
requirements
Type of use (routine, escape, or emergency entry)
Possibility
of ingestion of toxic materials
Respirator attributes
TRAINING
Each respirator
explanations
0
0
0
wearer shall be given training,
and discussions
by a qualified
individual,
which will include
of:
Opportunity
to wear respiratory protection in an uncontaminated
environment.
Respirator fit testing (qualitative)
The respiratory
hazard(s) and what may occur if the respirator
is not used
properly.
The reasons for selecting a particular type of respirator.
The function, capabilities,
and limitations
of the selected respirator.
The method of donning the respirator and checking its fit and operation.
The proper wearing of the respirator.
Respirator maintenance,
repair, and cleaning.
Recognizing and handling emergency situations.
Rev.: 3194
Employees
who have attended
the 40-hour
(HAZWOPER)
will be provided
OSHA training
requirements
by qualified
reinforce
Baker
in accordance
with the basic information
and will only need to attend
personnel.
The annual
these issues on an annual
maintained
training
for a minimum
necessary
&hour
to comply
termination
with
the
session provided
refresher
Records of the training
of 30 years following
29 CFR 1910.120
a supplementary
HAZWOPER
basis.
with
will
serve to
and fit-testing
will
of employment
be
for each
employee.
2.6
TYPES
OF RESPIRATORS
Baker purchases and provides, as necessary, the following
North
0
Brand
half-face
(Model
respirators:
7700) and full-face
(Model
7600) air-purifying
respirators
North
0
Brand
positive
pressure
30-minute
Self-Contained
Breathing
Apparatus
(SCBAs) (Model 800)
North
0
Brand positive
air cylinders
Only
pressure supplied
MSA Ultra
0
MSA Comfo II half-face respirator
MSHA)
Baker
according
employees.
protection
Twin full-face respirator
equipment
to Title
certified
escape air cylinders
escape
(Model 480263)
(Model 479529)
by the appropriate
All Baker
employees
who regularly
will be issued their own haKface
30-minute
with 5-minute
approval
agencies
30, Part II of the Code of Federal Regulations,
can achieve a proper fit and is medically
Because
respirators
(Model 85500).
0
respiratory
airline
SCBAs,
positive
perform
(e.g., NIOSH,
will be distributed
tasks requiring
and/or full-face respirator,
to
respiratory
provided
the employee
capable of wearing the equipment.
pressure
are used less frequently,
supplied
airline
this equipment
respirators,
till
and 5-minute
be distributed
on an as-
needed basis.
Rev.: 3/94
)
,-
2.7 - AIR QUALITY
Compressed
air used for respiration
the requirements
Compressed
supplied
Air
of the specification
Gas Association
to respirators
cylinders
shall
Specification
couplings
gas containers
Standard
Material
Contained,
Compressed
1965, Breathing
Apparatus,
Breathing
as supplied
requirements
Compressed
A breathing
Gas Association
sorbent
capacity
shall be installed
temperature
failure,
in the system.
or carbon monoxide
the specifications
for Grade
outlined
Gas Containers
BB-A-1034a,
shall
Container
178). Air-line
inadvertent
with
American
to Identify
June
the
21, 1968, Air,
GG-BOO675b,
be of high
D Breathing
Specification
purity
air (or higher)
April
27,
and meet
the
shall be constructed
assure breathing
and alarms to indicate
alarm,
and situated
in-line
air quality.
air-purifying
A receiver
wearer to escape from a contaminated
If an oil-lubricated
compressor
compressor
failure
of
atmosphere
and overheating
is used, it shall have a high-
or both. If only a high-temperature
shall be frequently
in
with necessary safety and standby devices.
air into the system and suitable
to further
as described
G-7.1-1966.
shall be used. Compressors
to enable the respirator
air from the compressor
Compressed
Federal Specification
air shall be equipped
installed
in the event of compressor
(49 CFR Part
in accordance
compressors,
of contaminated
beds and filters
sufficient
by air
compressor
so as to avoid entry
respirators.
in the Shipping
be marked
Specification
or Interim
air may be
gases or oxygen.
Portable
Commodity
for supplying
air-type
Breathing
in
Self-Contained.
of the specification
The compressor
as described
for other gas systems to prevent
shall
Federal
Purposes;
G-7.1-1966.
of Transportation
with nonrespirable
A48.1-1954;
Air (or higher)
as prescribed
outlets
of marking
for Breathing
air,
with
(air cylinders)
Method
air shall meet at least
oxygen must never be used with air-line
of the Department
respirators
National
Specification
and maintained
be incompatible
of air-line
Breathing
Commodity
be tested
Breathing
for Grade D Breathing
from cylinders;
Regulations
shall
servicing
shall be of high purity.
tested for carbon monoxide
alarm
is used, the
to insure that it meets
above.
Rev.: 3194
2.8 - CLEANING
AND
MAINTENANCE
Respiratory
equipment
that is used on an as-needed
personnel.
This equipment
basis shall be maintained
shall be cleaned/sanitized,
then rinsed
by qualified
and air-dried,
after each
use.
Respiratory
equipment
rinsed and air-dried
that
it will
conducted
that has been issued to an employee
by the wearer, (specified
be maintained
on a regular
in clean
basis during
by OSHA
shall be cleaned/sanitized
in 29 CFR 1910.134)
and good operating
condition.
then
which ensures
Inspections
usage and prior to each project requiring
shall
be
the potential
usage of the equipment.
All respirators
protect
shall be stored in a plastic bag within
them
against
chemicals.
Cartridges
They shall
be stored to prevent
and repairs
repairs
of rubber
Baker
that will
or damaging
or other elastomer
respirator
only by appropriate
to appropriate
in a manner
cold, excessive moisture,
distortion
shall be performed
shall be reported
forms are included
2.9
heat, extreme
will not be stored while attached to an air-purifving
Parts replacement
requiring
dust, sunlight,
a cool/dry location,
at anytime.
personnel.
personnel.
parts.
Examples
Equipment
of inspection
at the end of this text.
INSPECTIONS
At the time
of cleaning,
Deteriorated
components
the respirator
will be replaced
will be replaced.
the respirator
contained
and before and after
to maintain
breathing
once a month.
the NIOSH
apparatuses
Sample
inspection
respirators
are attached.
inspected.
However,
enter the appropriate
Repair
before the respirator
components
forms for both air-purifying
respirators
to be completed
into their field logbook
form. A list of the items to be covered during
an inspection
respirators
of
and self-
after each use or at a minimum,
field projects in which a field logbook
information
be inspected.
from the manufacturer
Emergency-use
(SCBAs) will be inspected
will
is placed back into service, or
must be obtained
certification.
These forms are required
during
each use, respirators
and air supplying
each time a respirator
is in use, personnel
as an alternative
is
may
to the inspection
are as follows:
Rev.: 3194
8,
Air-Purifying
b
Respirator
_-..
(full or half-face)
Face Piece
Clean and sanitized?
Cracks, tears or holes absent?
Proper shape and flexibility
retained?
Air-purifying
element holders intact?
Stored properly, free from heat, dirt, and sunlight?
--
--)
Headstraps or Headbands
- Signs of wear or tears?
- Buckles function properly?
)
Respirator Interior
- Foreign material under valve seat?
Cracks or tears in valves/valve bodies?
-- Valve covers/bodies installed properly?
Supplied Air Respirators
) Cylinder undamaged?
) Facepiece and hoses undamaged?
) Connections undamaged?
) Apparatus complete?
) Facemask cleaned and sanitized?
) Hoses and connections cleaned?
l
-,
Note:
The date and the initials
of the qualified
individual
performing
the inspection
must be
entered into the field logbook.
2.10
FIT-TESTING
Each respirator
face-to-mask
either
wearer shall be provided
seal.
an irritant
end of text).
shall be performed,
that can properly
respirators
fit-tested
at a minimum,
Facial hair, which interferes
qualitatively
Fit-Test
test agent (see example
on an annual
pressure checks prior to entering
will be assigned
using
of form at
basis or if a different
fit-tested
for, is to be used.
a protection
factor of 10
Form is attached.
with the normally
wearer shall be required
form a secure
prior to issuance of the respirator
other than the model the wearer was previously
(APF = 10). A copy of Baker’s
respirator
shall be fit-tested
smoke or odorous vapor, or other suitable
Retesting
model respirator,
Air-purifying
Each wearer
with a respirator
effective face to mask seal, is prohibited.
to check the seal of the respirator
a harmful
by negative
Each
and positive
atmosphere.
.--
Rev.:
3J94
2.11-
MEDICAL
SURVEILLANCE
Personnel
who are or may be assigned to tasks requiring
a medical
surveillance
include,
exam,
use of respirators
program
on an annual
basis. The medical
but may not be limited
to, a history
of respiratory
and spirometry
company.
conducted
Test parameters
included
by the company’s
in Baker’s
surveillance
program
disease, work history,
physician
medical
shall participate
program
shall
a physical
and at the expense
surveillance
in
of the
are in each site-
specific HASP.
2.12
LIMITATIONS
Wearing
any respirator,
impose some physiological
devices will
amount
2.13
needed
concerns regarding
requirements
SUBCONTRACTOR
direction
of Baker
Standards
l
with
1910.134
Provide
respirator
l
Provide
resistance,
the limitations
selection
weight
of different
equipment,
of respiratory
of the respirator,
tolerance
will
protective
the type and
of the given
device.
types of PPE and the monitoring
will be addressed in the “Heat Stress” SOP.
REQUIREMENTS
Baker’s
personnel
respiratory
documentation
the employee
protection
will be expected
and 1926.103.
documentation
Therefore,
as well as the individual’s
for heat stress/strain
In compliance
with other types of protective
stress on the wearer.
be based on the breathing
of protection
Additional
alone or in conjunction
Additionally,
that their
program,
to comply
with pertinent
the subcontractor
employees
all subcontractors
sections
under
the
of OSHA
will be asked to:
have been fit-tested
on the air-purifying
is expected to use.
that their
employees
have been medically
certified
to wear a
respirator.
Rev.: 3194
AIR-PURIFYING
RESPIRATOR
INSPECTION
FORM
HEADSTRAPS
HEADBANDS
FACE PIECE
Type
(Full or
Half-Face)
c1eanaxld
sanitized?
Crachs,
Tears, or
Holes?
Proper Shape
and
Flexibility?
AirF+urQiq
Element
Holdera
operate
Correctly?
OR
RESPIRATOR
INTERIOR
Proper
Storage
FreeFrom
Heat,Dirt,
Sunlight, etc.?
Signa of
Wear or
Tear?
Bucklee
FUlEti0n
Properly?
Foreign
Material
Under
Valve Seat?
Valve Covers
end Bodies in
Good Condition
and Installed
Correctly?
Crack8 or
Teare in
Valves or
Valve Bodies?
Inspected
BY
BY
(Initials)
Date
Inspected
..
*r
=OK
X=NotOK
Rev.: 3194
AIR-SUPPLYING
RESPIRATOR
INSPECTION
FORM
I
Cylinder
Condition
@CBA or SAR) Ohwtd or Cylinder
undamaged) (NlorhIT)
Type
Facepiece
and Hoses
(Damaged or
undamaged)
Connections Apparatus
(Damaged or
Complete
undamaged)
(Yeam
Cleaned
and
Sanitized
(Yea/No)
Remarks
Inspected
BY
(Initials)
Date
Inspected
QUALITATIVE
TEST SUBJECT
RESPIRATOR
NAME
(last)
DATE
(first)
SOCIAL
SEX (M./F)
MEDICAL
SPECIALAJNUSUAL
yesNo
q
0
~1
0
•I
cl
Cl
cl
(initial)
NUMBER
DEPARTMENT
DATE
RESPIRATOR
TRAINING
DATE
CONDiTIONSlCONSIDERATIONS:
yes&
Claustrophobia
Facial hair
Eyeglasses
contacts
Other:
q
0
SECURITY
AGE
RESPIRATOR
FIT TEST RECORD
q
q
0
0
0
o
Cl
q
Scars
Broken or crooked nose
Extreme facial dimensions
Wrinkles
RESPIRATOR
Manufacturer/Model
Testing
Size
Style
Result
S-
M-
L-
Half
-
Full
-
Pass
-
Fail
-
S-
M-
L-
Half
-
Full
-
Pass
-
Fail
-
S-
M-
L-
Half
-
Full
-
Pass
-
Fail
-
Agent
Qualitative
Test
Isoamyl
Acetate
Yes:
No:
Irritant
Smoke
Yes:
,No:
No:
Other:
SELECTION
Yes:
-
TEST
(Check
Normal Breathing
Deep Breathing
Head, Side to Side
Head, Up and Down
Sensitivity
Check
Yes:
No:
-
-
Yes:
No:
-
-
Yes:
No:
EXERCISES
all that apply)
Talking
Bending
Jaw Movements
Rainbow Passage
COMMENTS:
Signed:
Signed:
(Test Subject)
(Technician/Instructor)
Rev,: 3194
3.0 - CARE AND CLEANING
OF PERSONAL
PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT
INTRODUCTION
3.1
The following
protective
procedures
equipment
cover the care and cleaning
(ppe). Note:
and are not all inclusive.
of Levels D, D + , C, and B personal
These are general procedures that apply to most situations
Procedures
are subject to change at the direction
of the Site Health
and Safety Officer (SHSO).
3.2
INSPECTION
Proper
inspection
inspection
of personal
depending
on articles
protective
equipment
Inspection
and operational
l
Inspection
of PPE as it is issued to workers.
l
Inspection
after use or training,
l
Periodic
inspection
of stored equipment.
l
Periodic
inspection
when a question
selected equipment,
or when problems
inspection
use, will be conducted
features
several
sequences
of
of PPE and its frequency of use as follows:
l
The primary
(PPE)
testing of PPE received from the factory or distributor.
and prior to maintenance.
arises concerning
with similar
of PPE in use for activities
the appropriateness
equipment
of the
arise.
at the site will occur prior to immediate
by the user to ensure that the specific device or article has been checked
out by the user, and that the user is familiar
with its use.
Rev.: 3194
3.2.F
-
Chemical Resistant Suit (Levels D + through B)
l
Determine
if suit is the one specified in the Site Health
l
Before donning,
and Safety Plan (HASP)
inspect suit for holes or tears; check to see that zippers are operable
and look for signs of suit degradation.
When wearing,
l
avoid contact with contaminated
sharp objects that can tear suit; periodically
material
where possible; be aware of
look over suit to check for major rips or
tears.
l
While
decontaminating,
material
remove gross excess of material
does not contact
inner
suit; place clothing
from suit; remove suit so that
in properly
labeled
disposal
containers.
3.2.2
Inner/Outer
Gloves (Levels D + through B)
l
Determine
l
Look for rips, tears,
direction
3.2.3
if gloves meet the specifications
Replace
as necessary
or at the
Chemically Resistant Boots (Levels D + through Bl
Determine
l
Nondisposable
Disposable
according
l
of material.
of the SHSO.
l
3.2.4
or degradation
in the site HASP.
if boots meet the specifications
boots are to be examined
boots should be examined
in the site HASP.
on a daily
prior to donning
basis before and after use.
and while in use, and disposed
to site procedures.
Safety (Steel Toe and/or Shank) Boots (Levels D through Bj
Examine
daily for gouges, open seams, etc., anything
that would lessen the integrity
of
the boot. Replace as boot becomes worn.
Rev.: 3194
Hard
3.2.5
0
3.2.6
Hats (Levels
Should be visually
Safety
0
Should be visually
D + through
Respiratory
Protection.
Protection
Disposable
0
Reusable
General
(Levels
for care of respiratory
0
3.3
D through
inspected before donning
Procedures
Hearinv
3.2.8
(Levels
for fit, cracks, and overall condition.
C)
for cracks, deteriorated
(Levels
B)
protective
D through
- Replace daily, or as material
-Inspect
EQUIPMENT
equipment
before use, clean regularly,
replace parts as necessary.
CLEIANING
procedures
for cleaning
of equipment
are listed below.
is covered under the “Respiratory
Program”
Gross Physical
large
amounts
depressor or other suitable
3.3.2
Physical/Chemical
Remove
residual
nonphosphate
SOP for
becomes worn or dirty.
site activities.
Remove
are covered in Baker’s
Bj
addressed by the SHSO prior to and during
3.3.1
parts, and overall
Replace as necessary.
Respirators
0
B)
inspected before donning
Glasses/Goggles
condition.
3.2.7
D through
Cleaning
concerns will be
of respiratory
equipment
SOP.
Removal
of contaminated
instrument,
soil or sediment
by scraping
then wipe off using a disposable
off with
wipe/paper
a tongue
towel.
Removal
contamination
detergent
Protection
Site-specific
with a soft-bristled,
long-handled
brush or equivalent
using a
solution.
Rev.: 3/94
3.3.3
Rinsinpl/Dilution
The detergent
a pressurized
3.4
solution
and residual
water using
STORAGE
Storage of ppe is an important
considerations
Different
elements
l
will be rinsed with distilled/tap
sprayer, a tub filled with clean wash water, or equivalent.
EQUIPMENT
l
contaminants
aspect to the daily care and cleaning
therefore,
the following
should be observed:
types of ppe shall be stored in a clean and dry environment,
free from
that could damage ppe.
PPE shall be stored and labeled
so that site personnel
can readily
select the specified
PPE.
a
Contaminated,
nondisposable
ppe shall be decontaminated
before returning
to the
_-.
storage area.
l
Contaminated,
disposable
PPE
disposed according to the provisions
shall
not be returned
identified
to the storage
trailer,
but
in the Site Work Plans.
Rev.: 3194
4.0 - BLOODBORNE
PATHOGENS
(Safe Handling
of First Aid Incidents)
4.1
PURPOSE
The purpose
of the Occupational
Pathogens
Standard,
Title
pathogens
such as the (HIV)
and other potentially
by OSHA,
syphilis.
The standard
The purpose
materials.
the employer
employee
of transmission
procedures
for the safe handling
other potentially
4.2
All
infectious
workers
or eliminating
from bloodborne
workers’ exposure to blood
HIV and HBV are specifically
pathogen,
such as Hepatitis
to develop a written
Bloodborne
mentioned
C, malaria,
and
exposure control plan that
(Baker)
of bloodborne
exposure control
pathogens
of fast aid incidents
in the
plan is to minimize
workplace
the
by establishing
that may expose personnel
to blood or
materials.
SCOPE
Baker
SRN
materials
personnel
who may be exposed to blood or other
as part of their job duties are required
The exposure control
plan shall be reviewed
modified
tasks and procedures
employee
positions
4.3
(OSHA)
exposure, thus reducing their risk of infection.
Environmental
possibility
Administration
is to protect
Although
any bloodborne
require8
of the Baker
1910.1030,
and (HBV) by reducing
includes
will reduce or eliminate
and Health
29 CFR Part
infectious
the standard
Safety
to follow the guidelines
and updated
that affect occupational
with occupational
potentially
infectious
set forth in this SOP.
at least annually,
to reflect new or
exposure, and to reflect new or revised
exposure.
RESPONSIBILITY
The Baker
implementing
employees.
Project
and
Health
and Safety Office (PHSO)
administering
These individuals
this
exposure
and Project Manager
Control
plan
are responsible
at project
sites for their
will be assisted in the field by the Baker Site Health
Officer (SHSO) who will be responsible
for implementing
for
and Safety
the exposure control plan.
Rev.: 3194
-
4.4 - DEFINITIONS
Bloodborne
Pathogens
has the potential
hepatitis
- Pathogenic
microorganisms
to cause disease in humans.
B virus (HBV) and human
Contaminated
potentially
that may be present in human
Two examples
immunodeficiency
Decontamination
materials
- Physically
pathogens
include,
virus (HIV).
- Means the presence or the reasonably
infectious
of bloodborne
blood and
anticipated
presence of blood or other
on an item or surface.
or chemically
removing,
inactivating,
or destroying
bloodborne
pathogens
on a surface or item to the point where they are no longer capable of transmitting
infectious
particles,
so that the surface or item is rendered safe for handling,
Exposure
Incident
- A specific eye, mouth,
pare&era1
contact with blood or other potentially
performance
of an employee’s
Occupational
parenteral
Exposure
vaginal
fluid,
contaminated
differentiate
experimental
Parenteral
needlesticks,
potentially
potentially
anticipated
cerebrospinal
amniotic
non-intact
materials
that result
infectious
fluid,
skin, eye, mouth,
infectious
- Includes
mucous
materials
fluid,
saliva
the following
synovial
in dental
fluid,
membrane,
medium
cell or tissue
or other
cultures,
solutions;
animals
infected with HIV or HBV.
- Piercing
of the mucous membranes
infectious
-
Tom
semen,
pericardial
fluid,
fluid,
any body fluid
where it is difficult
that
organ
and blood,
cultures,
organs,
or the skin barrier
or impossible
or other
to
skin) from a
and HIV-
through
is visibly
or HBV-
tissues
from
such events as
bites, cuts, and abrasions.
Waste - OSHA defines a regulated
infectious
or
body fluids:
between body fluids; any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact
human
or
from the
that may result
human
pleural
procedures,
with blood, and all body fluids in situations
culture
skin,
duties.
Materials
and HIV-containing
containing
Regulated
Infectious
secretions,
peritoneal
human;
- Reasonably
of an employee’s
Potentially
membrane,
duties.
contact with blood or other potentially
the performance
Other
other mucous
use, or disposal.
materials;
materials
contaminated
in a liquid
waste as a liquid
items
that
or semi-liquid
would
release
blood or other
blood
or other
state if compressed; items caked with dried blood or
Rev.: 3194
---
other potentially
handling;
infectious
contaminated
or other potentially
4.5
materials
that are capable of release of these materials
sharps; and pathological
infectious
PROCEDURES
and microbiological
wastes containing
modes
blood
materials.
FOR EXPOSURE
TO BLOODBORNE
PATHOGENS
The sections below will discuss the means by which Baker personnel
potential,
during
of transmission,
methods
of compliance,
medical
can determine
exposure
monitoring,
and post
exposure procedures.
Exposure
4.5.1
Determination
The exposure determination
potential,
and the activities
is based upon the job classifications
with occupational
exposure
in which these exposures can occur, as follows.
Job Classifications
0
Site Manager/Site
0
Environmental
l
Geologists
0
Other Baker Field Personnel
Exposure
Safety and Health
Officer
Scientists
Activities
0
Response to first aid incidents
0
Decontamination
and equipment
involving
of personnel,
potentially
site personnel
personal
protective
exposed to blood
equipment,
or other
work surfaces,
potentially
infectious
materials
4.5.2
Modes
Modes
of virus
transmission
of Virus
transmission
Transmission
are similar
occurs as the result
of direct
contact with an open wound, non-intact
membranes
to blood,
blood-contaminated
in the Workplace
for the viruses
blood
contact
of concern.
from
skin (e.g. chapped, abraded,
body fluids,
Primarily,
percutaneous
or dermatitis),
or concentrated
virus.
virus
inoculation,
or mucous
Protective
Rev.: 3194
measures for workers will focus on preventing
result from an injury
4.5.3.1
make
of Compliance
Universal
Precautions
and emergent
differentiation
difficult.
-
or sudden illness.
Methods
The unpredictable
exposure to blood and other body fluids that can
nature
between hazardous
Thus, all employees
blood or other potentially
blood or other potentially
of exposures likely
body fluids
materials.
infectious
materials
on a site may
and those that are not hazardous
will observe “Universal
infectious
to be encountered
Precautions”
These “Universal
to prevent
Precautions’*
will be treated
very
contact with
stress that all
as if they are known
to be
infectious.
The universal
precautions
will include:
(1)
Cover the skin, especially
(2)
Don’t touch objects that could be contaminated,
clothing
Cover mucous membranes
(4)
Prevent
surfaces,
(i.e., mouth,
nose, and eyes).
direct contact with sharps, such as needles, scalpels, or broken glass that
could pierce or puncture
Clean
such as blood-covered
or linens.
(3)
(5)
open cuts, scrapes, skin rashes, or other broken skin.
your akin.
and decontaminate
surfaces, containers,
and equipment
that may have
been exposed to blood or other body fluids.
Standard
4.5.3.2
Standard
work practices
Work
Practices
are to be implemented
exposed to blood or other potentially
specific policies
to bloodborne
or procedures
pathogens.
infectious
at all times
by all employees
materials.
Work
whose purpose is to reduce the potential
Work practices
for use by site personnel
practices
who may be
are defined
for employee
as
exposure
are described in the balance
of this section.
Rev.: 3194
,--
Personal
Hygiene
All exposed employees
During
0
will observe the following
or immediately
materials;
do not eat, drink,
or any other activity
Following
exposure to blood or other potentially
(PPE).
applying
make-up,
increased
potential
Protective
The basic premise
from exposure
apply cosmetics,
of chemical-protective
This will be performed
smoking
for hand-
or skin contact.
infectious
materials,
hands and any other exposed skin with a disinfectant
after removal
equipment
infectious
that increases the potential
mucous membrane,
water
available
chew gum, chew tobacco, smoke,
to-mouth,
will wash their
Personal
practices:
after exposure to blood or other potentially
balms or medications,
0
hygienic
gloves or other personal
before eating,
or undertaking
for hand to mouth,
urinating,
any activity
mucous membrane,
that
personnel
soap and
protective
defecating,
may result
in
or skin contact.
Equipment
for wearing
to blood
the appropriate
and other
PPE is that site personnel
potentially
infectious
materials.
must be protected
Appropriate
PPE
is
to all site personnel.
Responders
to a medical
emergencies
be present in the site trailer
and field vehicles.
level of exposure encountered.
Minor
same extent of PPE use as required
who is not bleeding,
The following
will have access to the appropriate
The PPE will
The PPE should be used in accordance with the
lacerations
or small
for massive arterial
amounts
bleeding.
of blood do not merit
Management
and has no bloody body fluids, should not routinely
PPE will be present in each Baker Field Vehicle
chemical-protective
PPE.
1.
Disposable
gloves (i-e, nitrile
2.
Resuscitation
3.
Safety glasses, goggles, or faceshields
4.
Tyveke
require
the
of the patient
the use of PPE.
and/or the Baker Site Trailer.
or latex)
equipment*
coveralls
Rev.:
3/94
*
Resuscitation
Equipment
- Because the risk of salivary transmission
of infectious
disease during artificial
ventilation
of trauma victims, pocket mouth-to-mouth
resuscitation
masks will be present in the first aid kits. The pocket mouth-tomouth resuscitation
masks are designed to isolate response personnel from
contact with the victims’ blood and blood-contaminated
saliva, respiratory
secretions, and vomitus.
Decontamination
Handling
With
procedures
Regulated
will follow those outlined
of contaminated
sharps, all other regulated
closable, color-coded,
labeled
and state regulations
must be followed for transporting
containers
that prevent
wastes must
leakage of fluids.
and disposing
be placed
All applicable
in
federal
of the wastes.
and Education
All employees
with the potential
safe handling
of first aid incidents
HASP
in each site HASP.
Wastes
the exception
Training
,-_
briefings
Pathogens
and annual
Training
4.5.4
personnel
Physician
in association
involving
subsections
established
Procedures
and Follow-Up
presents the procedures
the presence of blood or other potentially
the health
Aid Incident
If there is a reasonable
infectious
materials
and subsequently
on the
during
A for the Bloodborne
-.
by Baker’s
Board Certified
Health
with EMR, Inc.
Post-Exposure
First
Instruction,
See Appendix
refreshers.
will follow the guidelines
be taken to safeguard
4.5.5.1
training
first aid/CPR
training
Monitoring
All Baker
The following
during
exposure will receive initial
Outline.
Medical
4.5.5
for occupational
management
to follow when a first aid incident
infectious
material;
occurs
specific steps need to
of Baker site personnel.
Report
cause to believe that a potential
has been experienced,
the employee
exposure to blood or other potentially
must complete
the steps listed below.
Rev.: 3i94
‘--
9’
These
steps are required
regardless
of whether
3.
contamination
All parties
incident
Non-HBV
vaccinated
infectious
materials
participate
and
occurred.
and remove contaminated
will complete
the Supervisors
will be reported to Baker’s
Baker
employees
Human
whether
an “exposure
who respond
potentially
infectious
Incident
to ensure that no
Report Form and the
who render first aid where blood or other potentially
EMR physician
must take a copy of the Supervisors
1910.1030
Employees
clothing
Resources o&e.
are present must be seen by a designated
copy of OSHA Standard
occurred,
aid responders
will occur.
involved
The employee
of the incident.
incident”
first
occurred.
Wash area of contamination
further
vaccinated
notify the SHSO. The SHSO will determine
incident”
2.
non-HBV
an actual “exposure
Immediately
1.
incident”
when
Incident
within
24 hours
Report Form and a
to the physician.
to first
aid incidents
materials
where
involving
the presence
the determination
have 90 days following
baseline
was made
blood level collection
of blood
that
or other
an “exposure
to decide if they wish
to have their blood tested for HIV.
The confidential
medical
evaluation
1.
The circumstances
2.
If consent has been obtained
documented
3.
verification
also includes
testing
of the source individual’s
physician
If consent is not obtained
the exposed employee’s
will provide the employer
that the employee
a recommendation
will be provided
blood in order to
this will be
in writing.
If consent has been obtained,
The occupational
opinion
of the exposure.
HCV and/or HBV infectivity.
determine
includes
and follow-up will include:
within
with a confidential
has been informed
for further
evaluation
15 days following
blood will be tested.
opinion
that
of the results of the evaluation
and
or treatment.
the medical
written
A copy of this written
evaluation.
Rev.: 3/94
4.5.5.2
“Good
The OSHA
Samaritan”
standard
Behavior
does not cover “good samaritan”
behavior.
However,
provide first aid as “good samaritans”
should receive the same post incident
through
or their personal physician.
4.6
an EMR designated
of Labor, U.S. Department
protection
immunodeficiency
against
virus.
for Disease
immunodeficiency
Instruction
Federal Register
Occupational
Update
Control.
Exposure
exposure
to Bloodborne
Services.
to Hepatitis
B prevention.
Acquired
among health-
2-2.44,
and Human
B
Joint
virus
Advisory
and
human
1987; 52:41818-24.
on hepatitis
Update:
virus infection
CPL
of Health
occupational
Centers for Disease Control.
OSHA
either
29 CFR Part 1910.1030
U.S. Department
Centers
evaluation
who
REFERENCES
OSHA Title
Notice:
physician
employees
February
Pathogens
MMWR
immunodeficiency
care workers.
13, 1992,
MMWR
Enforcement
1987; 36:353-360,366.
syndrome
and human
1988; 37:229-34,239.
Procedures
for
the
Standard.
Rev.: 3194
Appendix
SUGGESTED
I.
II.
III.
BLOODBORNE
A
PATHOGENS
TRAINING
OUTLINE
Introduction
A.
Purpose of the training
B.
Overview: Bloodborne Pathogen Standard 29 CFR 1910.1030
Applicability
to Site Personnel
1.
General requirements
::
Overview of Baker exposure control plan
Bloodborne
Diseases
A.
Types
B.
Modes of Transmission
Baker
program
Exposure
Control
Plan
A.
Purpose
B.
Plan availability
C.
Bloodborne pathogen hazard recognition steps
1.
Concept of universal precautions
Blood and other potentially
infectious materials
2.
D.
Potential
exposure minimization
1.
Work practices
Personal protective equipment
2.
3.
Hygienic practices
E.
Procedures for decontamination
1.
Personnel
2.
Personal protective equipment
(PPE)
Tasks and procedures requiring
t:
Location of PPE
Disposal of PPE
kquipment
3.
4.
Work surfaces
F.
Medical
t:
G.
PPE
monitoring
Baker medical monitoring
program
Post exposure evaluation procedures
First aid incident report
t:
HBV and non-HBV vaccinated responders
C.
Exposure incidents (defined)
Confidential
medical evaluation
e.
Emergency Preparedness
1.
First aid kits
2.
Personal injury
,-:
Rev.: 3194
6.0 - COLD
STRESS
INTRODUCTION
6.1
The potential
activities
chill
exists for either
in an environment
factors
symptoms
lower
frostbite
or hypothermia
where air temperatures
air temperatures
(for both hypothermia
to occur when conducting
may fall below freezing
below freezing.
A brief description
and frostbite)
and methods
cold stress causes and symptoms
are provided
of prevention
work
or where windof the exposure
are listed in the
sections below:
6.2
CAUSES
The following
Site personnel
AND
must realize
Levels D + through
6.2.1
SYMPTOMS
that
B protective
monitoring
ensembles
the physical
for buddy monitoring
condition
of fellow
purposes.
personnel
in
will be more difficult.
Frostbite
Frostbite
is a condition
Individuals
previously
Vasoconstrictors,
frostbite.
exposed to frostbite
which include
The three
whereby
in which there is a freezing or partial
the skin begins to turn white;
begins to turn numb;
are more susceptible
tobacco products,
stages of frostbite
freezing of some part of the body.
include:
constrict
it again.
blood vessels, and can accelerate
(1) frostnip
(2) superficial
to contracting
- the beginnings
- similar
to frostnip
of frostbite
except the skin
and (3) deep - the affected area is frozen to the bone, cold, numb, and very
hard.
DO NOT:
l
Rub the frostbitten
part.
l
Use ice, snow, gasoline,
l
Use heat lamps or hot water bottles to rewarm the frostbitten
l
Place the frostbitten
or anything
cold on the frostbitten
area.
area.
area near a hot stove.
Rev.: 3194
6.2.2Hypothermia
temperature
include
.-.
Hvpothermia
is a condition
of 95”F, an average
alcohol
hypothermia.
in which the body loses heat faster than it is produced.
and drugs,
man is considered
allow
the
body
The five stages of hypothermia
to be hypothermia.
to lose heat
faster
At a body
Vasodilators,
which
which
can accelerate
include:
(1) shivering
(2) apathy, listlessness,
(3) unconsciousness,
or sleepiness
glassy stare, slow pulse or slow respiratory
rate
(4) freezing of the extremities
(5) death
The need to seek medical
the symptoms
latent
attention
and the severity
conditions
of hypothermia
sought IMMEDIATELY
and the urgency in seeking
of the symptoms
or frostbite
displayed
medical
attention
by the affected individual.
are noted or suspected, medical
to prevent permanent
injury
depends on
If the
attention
must be
or death.
_-
PREVENTION
6.3
To prevent conditions
l
from occurring
Dress in a minimum
have personnel:
of three layers:
(1) a skin layer to absorb moisture
(2) an insulating
and keep skin dry
layer
(3) an outer layer of nylon/wind-breaking
l
Avoid touching
cold surfaces (especially
material
or chemical-protective
metal) with bare skin, minimize
layer
exposed skin
surfaces.
-
l
Keep active, use warm and dry shelter areas during rest cycles.
l
Maintain
l
Use wind breaks whenever possible.
body fluids.
Rev.: 3194
CARING
6.4
The following
FOR COLD-RELATED
ILLNESS
lists the general guidelines
l
Start by treating
l
Call
to care for cold-related
any life-threatening
the local emergency
number
injuries:
problems.
for help or transport
the victim
to the nearest
hospital.
6.5
l
Move the victim
to a warm place, if possible.
l
Remove
l
Warm the victim
l
Apply other sources of heat if they are available.
any wet clothing
and dry the victim.
slowly by wrapping
in blankets
or putting
on dry clothing.
MONITORING
In cold weather,
conditions,
monitor
the outdoor
with work periods
adjusted
temperature
and wind speed to determine
accordingly.
U.S. Army Research Institute
of Environmental
wind chill effects and relative
danger of combined
The following
Medicine,
Natick,
wind chill
table (developed
Massachusetts)
by the
details the
cold and wind conditions.
Rev.:
31%
COOLING
Estimated
Wind Speed
POWER
50
OF WIND
40
ON EXPOSED
30
FLESH EXPRESSED
(under calm conditions)
20
(in mph)
AS AN EQUIVALENT
I
Actual Temperature
Reading
10
-10
Equivalent
0
TEMPERATURE
(“F)
-20
Chill Temperature
-30
-40
-50
-60
(“F)
calm
50
40
30
20
-40
-50
-60
5
48
37
27
16
-47
-57
-68
10
40
28
16
4
-70
-83
-95
15
36
22
9
-5
-85
-99
-112
20
32
18
4
-10
-96
-110
-121
25
30
16
0
-15
-29
-44
-59
-74
-88
-104
-118
-133
30
28
13
-2
-18
-33
-48
-63
-79
-94
-109
-125
-140
35
27
11
-4
-20
-35
-51
-67
-82
-98
-113
-129
-145
26
I ----LllTLJZ
10
-6
-21
-37
-53
-69
-85
-100
-116
-132
-148
40
-_.
_
_
(Windspeedsgreater
u
than 40 mph have
little additional
effect.)
.---DANGER
I
hChrWithdry&iIl
Maximum danger of
false aenee of Isecurity.
I
MCREXSlNGDANGER
Danger from freezing
of expowd flesh
within one minute.
I
I
GREAT DANGER
Flesh may freeze within
30 aeconda.
I
Trenchfoot and immersion foot may occur at any point on this chart.
Developed by U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental
Medicine, Nat&k, MA..
7.0 - SAFE BOAT
This Safe Boating
Operations
boat operating
procedures.
responsibilities,
equipment,
7.1
of the Baker
boat operating
program
is also designed
7.2
addressed in this procedure
Inc. (Baker)
include
safe
purpose, scope,
terms, and general safe practices.
Operations
to protect
Program
is to establish
personnel
from potential
to address elements
of the United
requirements
hazardous
situations.
States (U.S.)
for Recreational
for safe
This
Department
of
Boats.
SCOPE
sampling
applies
activities
for practices
to Baker
SFW projects in which Baker personnel
from boats as part of their job duties.
and procedures
to protect these employees
may be involved
This program
contains
with
requirements
from the hazards of boating
operations.
RESPONSIBILITY
Baker
responsible
SRN
Project
responsible
Health
for implementing
sites. The Baker Site Health
Bailer
The elements
U.S. Coast Guard Federal Requirements
This program
7.4
presents the Baker Environmental,
Safe Boating
procedures
Transportation,
The
Program
PURPOSE
The intent
7.3
OPERATIONS
and Safety
and administering
Officer
(PHSO)
and Project
this Safe Boat Operations
and Safety Officer (SHSO), Site Manager,
Manager
Program
are
at project
and field personnel
are
to adhere to these procedures.
TERMS
- manual
device (portable
bilge pump, bucket scoop, etc.) for bailing
water.
Bow - The forward part of a boat.
Port - The left side of a vessel as one faces the front or bow.
Rev.:
5194
Starboard
- The right hand side of a vessel as one faces the front or bow.
Stern - The rear or aft part of a boat.
Type I PFD - personal
flotation
device rating;
it is effective for all waters, especially
rough or remote waters where rescue may be delayed.
open,
It is designed to turn most unconscious
wearers in the water to a faceup position.
Type II PFD - personal flotation
device rating;
intended
for calm, inland
water or where there
is a good chance of quick rescue.
Type Iv PFD - personal
flotation
device rating;
throwable
for inland
water
It is designed to be thrown to a person in
with heavy boat traffic, where help is always present.
the water and grasped and held by the user until
device intended
rescued.
Type IV devices include
buoyant
cushions, ring buoys, and horseshoe buoys.
7.5
GENERAL
SAFE PRACTICES
.-
The following
list consists of general
These safe practices are intended
1.
Safe boat operation
(RASP)
pre-entry
2.
?
training
Fire safety - including
l
Distribution
l
Sounding
l
Engine
Training
l
Heat exposure
l
Rescue techniques
l
Sampling
and mixing
during
procedures
activities
from a boat.
to recognize.
the site health
for personal
consist of the following
fire extinguisher
distress or warning
sampling
for field personnel
of weight and movement
operation
during
can be conducted
at a minimum
l
Personnel
as a guideline
briefing.
conduct sampling
safe practices
and safety plan
who will use a boat to
dot listed items.
use
of personal inside the boat
signals
of fuel
procedures
must
be c&x-&ant
reports before leaving
of current
shore and watchful
weather
conditions
by checking
for signs of bad weather.
weather
Sampling
from
Rev.: 5194
-
boats should not be conducted
rains, electrical
3.
A minimum
capacity
during
inclement
weather
conditions,
such as, heavy
storms or flooding.
of two people should comprise the sampling
rating
for the boat should not be exceeded.
crew, however, the maximum
Only one person should move on
the boat at any one time.
4.
The motor should be turned
off during sampling,
anchoring,
or when entry or exit from
the boat takes place.
5.
Each Baker
inspections
boat should
be inspected
should be documented
annually
by a qualified
individual.
These
and any safety concerns addressed before the boat is
used on any other projects.
6. Equipment
listed in Section 7.6 of this program
inspected to assure good operating
7. PFDs
must
appropriate
meaning
be Coast Guard-approved,
in good and serviceable
size for the intended
Wearable
(boat sinking,
user.
accidents
condition,
PFDs must be readily
amount
and of
accessible,
of time
in an
on-board fire, etc.). The PFDs should not be stowed in plastic
bage, in locked or closed compartments
All boating
of the boat and
conditions.
the crew must be able to put them on in a reasonable
emergency
8.
should be maintained
must be reported
or have other gear stowed on top of them.
to the Baker
PHSO
and Project
Manager
as
Boon a8 possible.
7.6
EQUIPMENT
The following
equipment
is required
to be available
l
Z-pound ABC type fire extinguisher
l
First aid kit
l
Minimum
l
Knife
l
Type I or Type II PFD for each crew member
l
Bailer
on each boat.
of two oars
Rev.:
5194
c
One Type IV throw flotation
device with 50 feet of line
0
Anchor with 75 feet of line
0
Waste containers
0
Safety kill switch connected to driver
0
Air horn, flashlight
0
Poly-coated
a
Towels
and orange flag
tyvek or rainsuit
HYPOTHERMIA
7.7
The effects of cold water
can cause hypothermia
symptoms
are:
of hypothermia
l
Shivering
o
Loss of coordination
a
Lethargy
0
Coma
A poly-coated
transporting
tyvek
or rainsuit
to the body within
can be used to help maintain
back to shore any individual
minutes.
Signs and
body temperatures
while
who had fallen overboard.
Rev.: 5194
,A
8.0 - CUTTING
Cutting
and welding
operations
operations
must be highly
to minimize
potential
skilled
exposure
flame or spark-producing
(attached)
8.1
Both welder
and understand
to fire, explosion,
operation
and following
SAFETY
are performed
WELDING
routinely.
Personnel
the importance
or health
is to be conducted
the provisions
AND
in these
of using safe work practices
hazards.
without
engaged
No work involving
preparing
a
a Hot Work Permit
of this procedure.
RESPONSIBILITY
and Baker
personnel
must work together
to ensure safe cutting
and welding
operations.
All personnel,
site, required
of cutting
Under
including
subcontractors,
use of personal
and welding
protective
equipment,
the potential
hazards of the work
and other safety aspects prior to initiation
procedures.
no circumstances
should work be done in front of or around the open end of piping
has not been cleaned/purged,
then checked using the Oxygen/Lower
Explosive
Limit
that
Meter.
EQUIPMENT
8.2
It is necessary to keep equipment
Equipment
8.2.1
shall be approved
Welding
Carelessness
in good working
condition
and inspect regularly
for defects.
and operated as specified by the manufacturer.
Machines
around
should be particularly
y-4
should understand
welding
machines
can lead to serious injury
or death.
The inspector
electrocution
can result.
aware of the following:
l
Never touch live metal parts with bare skin or wet clothing;
l
Do not attempt
to refuel a welding
machine
while it is in operation.
Rev.: 5194
l
Inspect all machine
l
Prevent
electrode
connections
holders
and grounding
from coming
prior to use.
in contact
with
people,
metal
objects, fuel
sources, water, or compressed gas cylinders.
l
8.2.2
‘The welder should not loop or coil the electrode cable around parts of the body.
Compressed
l
Gas Cylinders
Handling
and
governmental
l
Cylinders
of cylinders
should
be in
must always be secured and oxygen cylinders
Oxygen
accordance
with
approved
practices.
from combustible
8.2.3
storage
must be stored at least 20 feet
gas cylinders.
Use
.--
l
Do not confuse oxygen with
accelerates
combustion
air or use it as a substitute
causing flammable
materials
because it supports
to burn violently.
l
Oil or grease in the presence of oxygen may ignite or explode spontaneously.
l
Ensure that regulators
l
Never
8.3
FIRE
8.3.1
Location
l
Cutting
used in oxygen service are free of dirt, oil or grease.
use oxygen to blow out or purge vessels or pipelines
flammables
and
previously
containing
or to dust off clothing.
AND EXPLOSION
PREVENTION
of Combustibles
and welding
operations
shall be conducted in a designated
location
free from
combustibles.
Rev.: 5194
a
combustibles
8.3.2
welding
Use care when
metal
partitions
because of the possibility
or piping
of ignition
which are adjacent
to immovable
by conduction.
Fire Watch
l
Fire watchers with fire extinguishers
a
These individuals
should
or charged hoselines
be prepared
to extinguish
shall be posted.
fires in the incipient
stage or
sound an alarm and should have no other duties at the job site.
l
The fire watch should continue
or welding
8.3.3
l
Cutting
of the cutting
operation.
Fire Extinguishers
Welding
machines
location
8.3.4
for at least a half hour after completion
must
have a fire extinguisher
either on the machine
Prohibited
mounted
in an easily
accessible
or nearby.
Areas
and welding
operations
shall not be conducted
when any of the following
conditions
exist:
l
The area may contain flammable
l
Large quantities
vapors in excess of 10% of the L.E.L.
of exposed, readily
ignitable
materials
such as bulk sulfur are stored
in the area.
8.4
PERSONAL
The following
face protection,
PROTECTION
sections present the personal
respiratory
protection,
protective
equipment
such as clothing,
eye and
and noise protection.
Rev.:
5194
_^
8.4.1 - Clothing
0
To protect
the skin during
and protective
leggings,
l
aprons.
cutting
or welding
Depending
operations,
wear gauntlet
on the job, it may be necessary
type glovea
to also wear
cape sleeves or shoulder covers, and skull caps under helmets.
Sleeves and collars
should be buttoned,
clothing
with a flap, and pants should be uncuffed to prevent the retention
or buttoned
pockets should be removed
from the front of
of sparks.
l
To prevent patter from getting
l
Woolen
clothing
into shoes, use spats or have pants overlap shoes.
is preferred
but cotton
material,
preferably
flame
retardant,
is
acceptable.
l
8.4.2
Keep outer clothing
free from oil or grease.
Eye and Face Protection
l
Approved
protect
eye protection
against
flying
must be worn at all times by welders and their
sparks,
radiant
energy,
ultraviolet,
visible
assistants
to
and infrared
radiation.
l
Helmets
must be designed
to protect the face, forehead,
neck and ears from radiant
heat.
l
8.4.3
Where exposure to flash exists for the other personnel,
Respiratory
Adequate
operations.
a screen should be used.
Protection
ventilation
Respiratory
(natural
protection
or mechanical)
is necessary
in all
may also be necessary to prevent
levels to toxic fumes and gases. Avoid breathing
cutting
and welding
unacceptable
exposure
the fume plume.
Rev.: 5194
8.4.4-
Noise Protection
Engine
driven
generators,
plasma
arc cutting,
and other processes may expose personnel
If excessive noise cannot be controlled
excessive noise.
to
at the source, the use of ear plugs or
muffs is required.
8.5
HOT WORK PERMIT
No employee
is to begin
hot work unless a Hot Work Permit
responsibility
of the Site Manager
signed by the Site Manager
to request
and Site Health
this permit.
has been obtained.
The Hot Work
and Safety Officer and explained
It is the
Permit
shall be
to each affected
employee.
Note:
It is the responsibility
of the Site Manager
to see that workers comply with all safety
practices of the Hot Work Permit.
The Hot Work Permit
will be valid for a single work shift only.
than a single work shift, a new permit
shall be completed
shall be displayed
at the project site.
At the conclusion
of the project, the Hot Work Permits
On projects requiring
more
at the start of each shift. The permit
will be forwarded
to the Site Manager
and placed in the project file.
Rev.: 5/94
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Genium
Publishing
Corpofation
1145 Catalyn Street
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836 USA
(518) 377-8854
Sheet No. 296
Arsenic and Compounds
bsenfc Description: Obtained from flue dust of copper and lead smcltcrs as white arsenk (arsenic trioxide). Reduction
with charcoal and sublimation in an.N$xrent
yield~purc arsenic. Metal& arsenic is used for hardening copper, lead, and Pi
s 2
&toys; as a doping agent in germanium and silicon solid-state products, special solden; and medicine; and to make
g o
galliumarsenide
for dipolesandotherelectronicdevices.Arseniccompounds
areusedin manufacturingcertaintypesof
@ss;in textile printing,tanning,taxidermy,pharmaceuticals,
insecticides
andfungicides,pigmentproduction,and
mtifoulingpaints;andto controlsludg6formationin lubricatingoils.Arsenictrioxide isthe sourcefor 97%of all arsenic
m3ducts.
3ther Designations:CAS No. 7440-38-Zaxsen;arsenicblack As; gray arsenic;metalk arsenic.
Manufacturer: Contactyour supplieror distributor.ConsultthelatestC~cuhve&Buyer~‘ryets’r&f~ for a supplierslist
Genlum
332
49
B
Hh4lS
9rsenicandsolublecompounds,
asAs
DSHA PEL
3-hr TWA: 05 mgh’,* 0.01mglmrt
MOSH REL, 1987
Ceiling 0.002mg/m’
ACGIH TLV, 1989-90
l’LV-TWA: 0.2mg/m3
Toxkity Data#
Man,oral, TJ&: 76 mg/kgadmiuistcred
iu~ntly
.ovcra 12-year
periodaffectstheliver (tumors)andblood(hemorrhage)
Man,oral: 7857mg/.kgadministered
over 55 yearsproducesgastrointestinal
(in thestructureor functionof theesophagus),
blood(hemorrhage),
and
skinaudappendage
(dermatitis)changes
Rat,oral,TCLQ605pg/kg administered
to a 35-week pregnantrat affects
fertility (pm-andpost-implantation
mortality)
bOrganic
ccmpcuuds.
t Iwrganiccompounds.
1SeeihOSE&R%??CS
(CGO52SOW),
for additional
mutative,
reproductive,
lumorigeui~
andtoxicitydata.
Boiling Point: sublimes
at 1134‘F/612 lC
Mel&g PoJntz1497‘F/814‘C!
Vapor Pressure:1 mmat 702‘Ff372 ‘C (sublimes)
Atomic Weight: 74.92
Density: 5.7% at 57 ‘F114%
Water Solubility: lnsolublet
Appearanceand Odor: A brittle,~cry&line, silvery to blackmetalloid.odorless.
cThisdatapertains
to arsenic
only.
ExtfngutshlngMedia: Usedry chemical,Co, waterspray,or foamto fight fues.
UnusualFire or Ex-ploslonHazarciszFlammable
andslightlyexplosivein theform of dustwhenexposedto heator flame.
SpecialFire-flghting Procedures:Sincefur: mayproducetoxic fumes,weara s&contained breathingapparatus
@CBA) with a full facepiece
operatedin thepressure-demand
or positive-pressure
mode.Be awareof runoff from fire controlmethods.Do not releaseto sewersor watezways.
Stability/Polymerlzatton: Arsenicis stableat roomtemperature
in closedcontainersundernormalstorageandhandlingconditions.Hazardous
polymerirati& cannotoccur.
*
ChemicalIncompatibilities:Arseniccanreactvigorouslyoncontactwith powerfuloxidizerssuchasbromates,
peroxides,chlorates,iodates,
lithium, silver nitrate,potassium
nitrate,potassium
permanganate,
andchromium(Vl) oxide.This materialis alsoincompatiblewith halogens,
bromineazide.palladium,dirubidiumacetylide,zinc, andplatinum.
HazardousProductsof Decomposition:Thermaloxidativedecomposition
of arsenicandits compounds
producesirritating or poisonous
gases.
$&,-%a%&,
-tidd&%e’a -dterna&&with
._ ous Iaye;-%&&< palms and soles of feet), and skin eruphons,
~~~~&J.
Leukemia,
bone
marrow
depresslon,
or
aplastic
anemia
(dysfunctioning
of blood-forming
-r-u...
n
31 AlJl
.,.....,
~.~
$,.‘..)‘....
c..~
. . . . . . . ,..........,..‘.’
.
Y.
. . . . ..~.-.......~.~~~~~.:.:.~:~:.:.:.:~.:~.:.:.:.:.:.:~~.:~.:.:~.:.:.~.:::~.:.:~.:.:.~:.:.:~.:.:.:.:.:~.:~.~~:.
. , . . ~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .i . . , . : . : : , : . . . .
~~~~~~~~~~
. . . . . . . . . . ,.........n
.i.. ..A......
. . . . . . . ..A. . . . . . . .
.A..3
c...........
..A.,
..A...
2 .. ..... ..6 .
.
., .
,.......
. . . . .._....,...,....
4
... .i . .... .L .,.,...,...;
..,.........,......_,.
..<?.:...:?%L
,....._._.,_,
::..
__......
:.r.?...la.......r
,,__
i _....._
f _._..,.,.._.....,...(_
,..............._,.....
..?A
,...
~..:..:l>..S.,
__..
* Desigaationsfor arseniconly.
$ Listed asarsenicorganiccumpouads(asAs).
i,,:;::,,: ,. ,*:,..:,..:‘..
..__:
,,...
:7...:.. .:..,.,.....
::.:::j.:::j.~.:~::::...:.:::::::j:,.:’:.’......~
,,,,(,,...,,,,,,,,,.,
.. ;;,;:..;../......:.:.:.:.:
.,.,.
:...:.:.:.:.:
.,,.:.:.:.:.:.:
.,.,._.,.._..i...,._,.
.:.:..,.:.:.>
-..:,‘:.:..:.:~,::.i:
j. .:.:
y,.::,:
.y.v.>. : ,::
~~~~~~.~~~~::::~ “:y:‘.“
::; :.:...-.-.~......:.:.:.:.:.:.:.;.:...
,: .. ..............._:
.(...
:.:.:
.,.,...
.. ..,...:
:....... . ,.......,.
.....:. ..,.... ,...... .:,....,
.............. ...... ...,.....,
...../........
... ... ..... .,..,.,...,...
.........,,......., ... .,
....: / .....
.....:.
........:
L.,..
d....
5....,
Storage Requirements: Store in closed, properly labeled,containers in a cool, well-ventilated area away from all incompatible materials (Sec. 5)
and heat and ignition sources. Protect containers from physical damage.
Engineering Controls: Avoid inhalation or ingestion of dust and fumes, and skin or eye contact. Practice good personal hygiene and housekeep
ing procedures. Use only with adequateventilation and appropriate personal protective gear. Institute a respiratory protection program with
training, maintenance, inspection, and evaluation. All engineering systems should be of maximum explosion-proof design and electrically
grounded and bonded. Provide preplacementand annualphysical examination with emphasis on the skin, respiratory system, and blood.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101, .lOZ)
DOT Shipping Name: Arsenic, solid
IMO Shipping Name: Arsenic, metallic
DOT Hazard Class: Poison B
IMO Hazard Class: 6.1
ID No.: UN1558
IMO Label: Poison
DOT Label: Poison
IMDG Packaglng Group: II
DOT Packaging Requirements: 173.366
ID No.: UN1558
DOT Packaging Exceptions: 173.364
fitiDS Colfection References: 7,26,38,53,73, 8.587.88.89, 100, 103, 109, 123, 124, 126, 127, 130, 136, 138
Prepared by: MI Allison, BS; Industrial Hygiene Review: DJ Wilson, CIH; Medical Review: MJ Hardies, MD
I.44
Coprith101990by
O~~~l~~P~bli\hinxC~~d~r,,
hyc,o-crrirl
WC or rcproducUwwiUIDvt
hcpblisk’apcrmiuion
bprohibhd.Judx&Uulotbe
u* DCCWdy
0~ pWCbU&a
rupcoribility.
N&[email protected] rme.m&#c c-c hu been ukcn in the prrpuWion ofrucb inl~tb&
Ocnll~n PuMhhh~ Capaati
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u 10 Ihe ~crunr), or rujhbJiv
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- ,)
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Genium
Publishing
Corporation
1145 CataIyn street
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836 USA
(518) 377-8854
Sheet No. 297
Barium and Compounds
Barium and Compounds Description: Produced by reducing barium oxide with aluminum or @Iicon in a vacuum at high R 2
I 3,
temperature. The minerals bark (BaSOJ and wltherlte (BaCG,) am the primary sources of barium Used as lubricant for
anode rotors in X-ray tubes; a deoxidizer for copperl an extender in paints; a loader for paper, soap, rubber, and linoleum; i 42
a carrier for radium; a flue extlngulsher for uranium or plutonium fires; a rodenticide; a stabilizer and mold lubricant in the
rubber and plastics industries; a flux for magnesium alloys; getter alloys in vacuum tubes; and in spark-plug alloys and
Frary’s metal. Important barium compounds include carbonate (ceramics, rodenticide), sulfate (pigment and filler),
hydroxide (water treatment, ceramics), nitrate (pyrotechnics), chloride (chemicals), chromate (pigments), oxide (lubricants), and peroxide (bleach).
Other Deslgnatlons: CAS No. 7440-39-3; Ba.
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult the latest Chemicahveek Buyers’ GuidP) for a suppliers list.
Barium, ca 100%
OSHA PEL
S-hr TWA: 0.5 mg/m~(Barium, soluble compounds, as Ba)
NIOSH REL, 1987
None established
Cenlum
3 3 4
s
43)
HMIS
F
z
i&G:
‘Sec.8
Toxlclty Data*
None listed
ACGIH TLV, 1989-90
TLV-TWA: 0.5 mg/m’(Barium, soluble compounds, as Ba)
* Monitor RT/XS (CQ837COOO).
for additionalfuture data
Melting Polut: 1337 ‘F/725 ‘C
Vapor Pressure: 10 r&i Hg at 1920 ‘p11049 ‘C
Spe~lflc GraviG (Hz0 = 1 it 39 ‘F/4 ‘C): 351 at 68 ‘FRO %
Water Solubllity: Insoluble
Appearance and Odor: A silver white metal that Is slightly lustrous aud somewhat malleable.
Comment: Barium has a distinctive property of absorbing
gases.
* Physcial
dataaft for barium
only.
,.,.5’:........,.....,.....,.
..A..
).<2y,+,..y
A...
<..:
A.....,,,
>;.A..<.
,..,
)..>.‘..y..~~
...y.,-.:..+,y>y+...<..
.*$;>
...I.
.*..:.‘.‘;*;.;
......‘;;$...,.
.,,....
‘;‘.,,...,..
1,_..,._.,...,
yyp.,,,.,,.
jw*,_,,~~~~;~.~..~.-.~~,..-,
~
..>
n..
5’.
......,......
<...>.+..;
...$..>
..A
<.A.>
..,...,........
.......&x..+.. _:x...&...<..<..vz
fxs.4.
. . A,$
”.,..*...<..
, * .$Ap.?&
..,..
P
i.......
.r.......
>.z..b.<
.._......_A.
~,..,.~....lf~~~.X~...~~~~,...~.~
...A<.............I...$3C,........
cA.................
...A..
. >..A
......,&.A
. . ..-G*
. ..,..
.. ~,&g~~
FlashPolntr Nonereported
~hgnitlon
Temperature:Nonereported. 1 LEL: Nonesported --jii%Nonereprted
ExtlngulshingMedia: Do not usewateror foam.For smallfires,usedry chemical,sodaash,lime,or sand.For largefii, withdrawfrom area
andlet fire burn.
UnusualFlre or ExplosionHazards: In thepowderform, bariumis flammableat momtemperature.
It is alsoexplosivein the formof dustwhen
exposedto heat,flame,or by chemicalreaction.The chlorate,peroxide,andnitratecompounds
amreactiveandmaypresentfue hazardsiu
storageanduse.
SpecialFire-flghtlug Procedures:Sincefhe mayproducetoxic fumes,wear a self-contained
breathingapparatus
(SCBA) with a full facepiece
operatedin thepress-demand or positive-pressure
modeandfully encapsulating
suit.Bariummay igniteitselfif exposedto air. Be awareof
runoff from fin-econtrolmethods.Do not release
to sewersor waterways.
underspecialstorageandhandlingconditions(Sec.9). If thefreemetall.s
StabllitylPolymerizatlon: Bariumis stableat roomtemperature
exposedto air, anexplosionhaxardexistsbecause
hydrogenis liberated.Bariumcompounds
aremomstablethanelementalbarium.Hazardous
polymerizationcannotoccur.
ChemicalIncompatlbllltles:Bariumreactsviolently with water,carbontetrachloride,trichloroethylene,fluorotrichloromethane,
andtetrachloroethylene.This materialis incompatible
with acids,trichlomethylene
andwater,trichlorotrifluoroethane,
1.1.2~trichloro
trifluoro ethane,and
flurotrichloroethane.
Bariumisextremelyreactiveandreactsnadily with halogens
andammonia.Bariumcompounds
arenot asreactiveas
elementalbarium.SeeMSDSs40, 119,132,173.181.and251for specificchemicalincompatibilities.
Conditionsto Avoid: Avoid heatingbariumin hydrogento about392‘F/200 ‘C sinceit reactsviolently andformsbariumhydride(BaHJ. An
explosionhazardexistsif thefreemetalis exposedto moistair or coldwaterbecause
hydrogenis liberated.
No. 297
Barium and Compounds
4/90
Summary of Risks:Bariumpresents
mainlyanexplosionhazard.However,solublecompounds
of bariumby theoralroutearehighly toxic aad
thefatal doseof thechloridehasbeenstatedto be0.8 to 0;9 g. Deathmayoccurfrom a few hoursto a few days.The solublebariumcompounds
exerta profoundeffecton skel&l, arterial,intestinal,bronchial,andparticularlycardiacmuscle.Effectson the hematopoietic
system (responsible
for the formationof bloodor bloodcellsin theliving body) andthecerebralcortex arealsonoted.Poisoningmay alsooccurif thedustof soluble
compounds
islnhaled.‘Certaln
compounds
of bariumareirritants-oftheskin,eyes,andmucousmembranes.
Bariumoxide andbariumhydroxide,
stronglyalkalinein aqueous
solution,causesevereskinirritationandburnsof theeye.Inhalationof insolublebariumproducesabenignpneumoconiosis(baritosis).
The half-life of bariumin bonehasbeenestimated
at 50 days.
Medical ConditionsAggravated by Long-TermExposure:Nonereported.
Target Organs:Skin,eyes,mucousmembranes,
lung,heart.
Primary Entry Routes:Inhalationof dustor fume,ingestion,skinor eyecontact.
Acute Effects: Systemicabsorptionhorningestioncauses
gastroenteritis
(inflammationof the stomachliningandthe intestines),
slowpulserate
(heartmay stopwhilecontracting),musclespasm,andhypokalemia
(potassium
deficiencyin theblood).Inhalationcauses
coughing,bronchial
irritation,andpneumoconiosis.
Contactwith solublesaltscauses
dermatitis,irritationof theeyesandmucousmembranes,
andbums.During
radiologicalexamination,irmaperitoneal
(in theabdomen)
or intmthoracic(in thechest)bariumsulfatecontamination
resultingfroma complicationrupture maycausea significantinflammatoryresponse.
Chronic Effects: Althoughbaritosis(causedby inhalingbariumsulfate)produces
nodularopacitieson chestX-rays, thereis no evidenceof
clinicalillnessor bodily dysfunction.
FIRSTAID
Eyes:Flushimmediately,includingunderthe’eyelids,
gently butthoroughlywith floodingamounts
of runningwaterfor at least15min.
Skin: Qrc;cklrremovecontaminated
clothing.After rinsingaffectedskinwith floodingamounts
of water,washit with soapandwater.
Inhalatlon: Removeexposedpersonto freshair andsupportbreathingasneeded.
Ingestion:Nevergive anythingby mouthto anunconscious
or convulsingperson.If ingested,havea cons&uspersondrink 1 to 2 glasses
of
water,theninducevomiting.
After fitsit aid, get appropriatein-plant, paramedfc,or communitymedicalsupport.
Physician’sNote: Considerusingcalciumgluconatcfor muscular
spasms.
Consider
gasticlavagefollowedby salinecatharsisif solublebarium
compounds
areingested.Institutecardiacmonitoringfor all significantingestions
ofsolublebariumsalts.
i......_.
..A....
..........I:...:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:~.:.:?.:~~:...:~.:~.:.~~~..:.~~:.~:.~i~~
.:.A
:y+.;:.:.:
.......‘“...:...~.~:.:“l’
...y.7,
.....~.,....A..
y,>
~~~~~~~
;?.
x.. .. . .. .. . I... .. ........ .... ..
.:.:.x%~<
.......,...._
:...i....i.‘:,?.:::.:.:
.._,.h
?.:.r.,.~~~:~.~~.x~~~..~~.,~,..~~.?~...;:.1.
...*.,~,~.~.,!,~.,~.t,?.~
....:.... .,., .‘.. ,.___._
_-\
i
I
f,
*Designations
forbariumonly.
..A;.;,::
;::$..fl,~~.:
.::y..,..
::.:.A...:,:..,:.:.:.::::.c‘:::::
.I.::......:.:.:.:~:~:::.L:q$~:...~:~:~:~:
:.:.:.:.,
.. ...:.:.:.:...:..
:.:.:.:.:.:
..i.:
.,.,.,.,.,..._
_:,;.:::;:::::,:‘I::,:;,:.i.y..:.
c..:.:
..A.
I......
..A
:.:<.:<.:.y+:<.:.:.;
....>.._.,...,.,
.....<.i..(
......,.,.
.:.:.:.:
..:.:.:.:.~~;:.::~~.::~,;~~~~::~~::~..:~,~,~~::~.~~~:
““-““‘;““““‘:‘:‘;““i”.
......I
.,.
.v.,....;
,........i.
I..;.;
..“.<V,.
i,.....
>,.,..._._.,.__..
~:.;.:.>;.;
,‘,““.j”
L.
~~~t:~~~~~~~~~~~~~,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A.,:“’&.........,,...,..
+):.>z$
.,....+j,.
..,+,;
.,..,.
2.. &.:...15.
,..>:..
A.,.+*
,,,,A2..~~.*~~~~~~.~,:~..~.~~~.~~~~:~.~~~~~~;:
...,..,.,,,.,...,,..,..I,,I,,
,.. . ......~._~.__.,~
L.,.. .........../. ......%
....._._._..._....
A.?,:. ‘.2x::s.I....:...._____._......
Goggles:Wear rotectiveeyeglasses
or chemicalsafe o 1es;perCSHAeye andface-protection
regulations(29 CFR 1910.133).
Respirator:Fosow OSHArespiratorregulations(292ikY 1 10.134and,if necessary,
weara NIOSH-approved
respirator.For emergencyor
[email protected] (cleaningspills,reactorvessels,
or storagetar& ), wyr anSCBA.
rtre;in : Air-ptmfymg respnators
do not protectworkersm oxygendefic?entatmospheres.
gloves,boots,aprons,andgauntletsto preventskmcontact.
:5 eartmperv~ous
Ventilation: Providegeneralandlocalexplosron-proof
ventilationsystems
to maintainairborneconcentrations
belowOSHA PEL andACGIH
TLV (Sec.2). Localexhaustventilationis preferredsinceit preventscontaminant
dispersion
into the work areaby controllingit at its sourc&of,
SafetyStations:Makeavailablein thework areaemergency
eyewashstations,safety/quick-drench
showers,andwashingfacilities.
ContaminatedEqulpment:Neverwearcontactlenses
in theworkarea:softlenses
may absorb,andall lenses
concentrate,irritants.Removethis
materialfrom ur shoesandequipment,Laundercontaminated
clothingbeforewearing.
Comments:brever eat,drink, or smokein work areas.Practicegoodpersonal
hygieneafterusingthis material,especiallybeforeeating,drinking,
smoking,usingthe toilet,or applyingcosmetics.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.,.
T
,.,.,.,.....,
~.
._.,
~.~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~.~~~~~~~,~~~~~~
.........A_
.._..._..._.............._....
...... .._.._....__.,,..,__.....,,.,,........,.,.,....,,....
........._.._.._.....................................
> .
. ......%..A
......!
<_.._....
f .. . . I
StorageRequlremenb:Storeunderinertgas,petroleum,or oxygen-freeliquidin a cool,dry, well-venti!atedateaawayfrom all incompatibles
(Sec.5).
Engheerlng Controls:Bariummetalitselfpresents
mainlyanexplosionhazard.All engineering
systems
shouldbeof maximumexplosion-proof
designandelectricallygroundedandbonded.Usenonsparking
tools.Properstorageisessential.
Avoid dustinhalationandskin,eye,andmucous
membrane
contact,All processes
shouldbeenclosed
and/orexhaustventilationinstalledto keepthe dustconcentrations
belowtherecommended
levels.Practicegoodpersonalhygieneandhousekeeping
procedures.
Preemployment
andperiodicmedicalexaminations
shouldbegiven to
workersexposedto bdte dust.Preventexposingindividualswith respiratorydisorders.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.102)
IMO ShippingName:Bariumalloys,pymphoric
IMO Hazard Class:4.2
IMO Label: Spontaneously
combustible
IMDG PackagingGroup: II
j
/ID No.: UN1854
MSDS CollectionReferences:7,26,38,73, 85,87,89, 109.103,109)9.
123.124,126,127.133,136,138,139
F4
Prepared by: MJ Allison, BS; Industrial Hygiene Review: DJ Wilson, CM; Medical Review: W Silverman, MD
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Genium Publishing
Corporation
1145Calalyn aret%
Schenectady,
NY 12303-1836USA
-
Sheet No. 316
Benzene
’
m 8) 317-8854
1Issued: 11/78
Revision: E, S/90
Benzene (C‘HJ Descrlptfon: Derived by fradional distillation of coal tar, hydrode&ylation
of toluene or pyrolysis of
msdineL catalvtic reformins of uetroluun. and mlation
of tohtcne bv disnrouortionation reaction. Used as a fueb a
bennme, phene. phenyl hydride, pyrobenrol.
Manufacturer:
Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult the latest Ckeu&r&zk
Buyers’ Guidem, for a suppliers list.
Cautions: B enzem is a confiied hurnon carcirwgmby the IARC. chronic low-levrl apsure may cause cancer (leukemia) and bone
marrow damage. with injury to biood-formittg tissue. It is also a dangerous fne haxard when exposed to heat or flame.
1989 OSHA PELs
(29 CFR 1910.1000, Table 2-1-A)
8-hr TWA: 1 ppm. 3 rndrn’
15-mitt SIELr 5 ppm 15 mg/m’
1989-90 ACGJH
TL.V-TWA: 10 ppm, 32 mghnf
(29 CFR 1910.1000. Table Z-2)
8-hr TWA: 10 p&ml
Acceptable Ceiling Concentration: 25 ppm
Acceptable Maximum
Peak: 50 ppm (10 min)t
l988NIOSH
RELS
TWA: 0.1 ppm 03 mg/m’
Ceiling: 1 ppm, 3 mgkn’
t&s
l985-36 Toxicity Data*
Man. on& LDb: 50 &g/kg; no toxic effect noted
Man, inhalatiou, TC : 150 ppm inhaled intermittently over
1 yr in a number 8 discrete, separate doses affects the
blood (other changes) and nutritional and gross metabolisnj (body temperaty~~inmase)
[email protected]~tiyner
2 mg admnustered over 24 hr produc& severe
Table 2-2 apply.
t Acccptsbi&&ximum
tseeNIasB.Kr.XS(cYl
peak above the scceptable ceiling amcan&onform8-hrshit-t.
for sdditicmal inits
Belling Polntr 176 ‘F (80 ’
Molecular Weight: 78.11
Melthr Point: 42 ‘F (5.5 ‘C3
S lfk Gravity (15 ‘C/4 ‘C): 0.8787
Vapor 8 ressnre: 100 mm H at 79 ‘F (26.1 ‘C)
F ater Solublllty: SlightI (0.180 g/100 g of X-Is0 at 25 ‘C)
Vapor Densix (Air = 1): 2.f .’
%Volatile by Volume: 150
Evaporation
ate (Ether = 1): 2.8
Vlsco6lty: 0.6468 mPa at 20 nC
Appearance and Odor: A colorless liquid with a characteristic swee& aromatic odor. The odor recognition threshold (100% of panel) is approximately 5 ppm (unfatigued) in air. odor b nol an adequate warning of hazard.
StabUity/Polymertzation:
Benzene is stable at room temperature in closed containers under normal storage and handling conditions. Hazardous
lymcrization cannot occur.
i? hemical Incompatlbllitlea
Benzene explodes on contact with diborane, permanganic acid, bromine pentafluoride, peroxodisulfuric acid, and
peroxomonosulfuric acid. It ignites on contact with diox gen difhroride, dioxygenyl tetrafluoroboratc. mdine heptafluoride, and sodium peroxide
NDIC
+ water. Benzene forms sensitive, explosive mixture WI4 mdiie pcntafluoridc. omnc+ liquid oxygen, silver pcrcblorate. ~tryl $dd?s,
acid, and msenic pcntatluoride + potassium methoxide
(explodes
above 30 ‘C). A vigorous
or incandescent reaction
occurs WI
trifluoride. uranium hexatluoride. and hydrogen + Raney mckel [above 410 ‘F (210 C)]. Benxcne is incompatible with oxidizing materials.
Conditions to Avoid: Avoid heat and ignition sources.
Hazardous Products of Decompositton: Thcamal oxidative decomposition of bcnzcne CM produce toxic gases and vapors such ss carbon
No. 316
Benzene
8190
mffici&hum& and animal evidenceh human carcinogen (Group 1j.
Summary of RWrs: Prolonged skin contact or excessive inhalation of benxene vapor may cause headache,weattneSs.
a tite loss. and fatigue.
fhe most important health hazards are cancer (leukemia) and bone marrow damage with mjury to blood-forming tissue Et m chronic low-level
:x sure Higher level expo&cS may irritate the respiratory tract and cause central nervous system CNS) depression.
IMP”
rdkak Condltlons Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Exposure may wors~1 ailments of the6 tart. lungs, liver, kidneys, blood, and CNS.
ns Blood, central nervous system, bone marrow, eyes, upper respiratory tract, and skin.
ksat 0
~ZttRou*estInhaIation.skincontact.
Acute ffccts Symptoms of acute overexposure include irritation of the eyes, nose, and respiratory tract. tithlessness, euphoria, nauscq
clrowsincss, headache,diziness, and intoxtcation, Severe exposure may lead to convulsions and ~nsciousness.
Skin contact may cause a
hying rash (dermatitis).
~~$&Ef$ctst
Long-term chronic exp&ure may result in many blood disorders ranging from aplastic anemia (an inability to form blood cells)
FIRsrAm
Spill/Leak: Design andpractice a benzene qiU control and countermeawrepkm
(SCCP). Notify safety personnel, evacuate all umvxzssary
personnel,
eliminateall heatandignitionsources,andprovideadequate
ventilation.Cleanuppersonnel
shouldprotectagainstvaporinhalation,eye
contact,andskinabsorption.Absorbasmuchbenzeneaspossible
with aninert,noncombustible
ntttterial.For largespills,die far aheadof spill
andcontainliquid Usenonsparking
toolsto placewasteliquidor absorbent
into closablecont&nersfor disposal.Keepwasteout of confmed
spaces
suchassewers,watersheds,
andwaterwaysbecause
of explosiondanger.Follow applicableOSHAregulations(29CFR 1910.120).
Disposal:Contactyour supplieror a licensedcontractorfor detailedrecommendations.
FollowapplicableFederal,state,andlocalregulations.
EPA Deshmatlons
ListedasakCRA Hazardous
Waste(40CFR261.33).Hazardous
WasteNo. UO19
Listedasa CERCLAHazardous
Substance*
(40CFR302.4),ReportableQiantity (RQ): 1000lb (454kg) [* percleanWaterAct, Sec.307(a),
311 (b)(4),112;andper RCRA,Sea.30011
SARA ExtremelyHazardous
Substance
(40 CFR355):Not listed
ListedasSARA Toxic Chemical(40CFR 372.65)
OSHA De&nations
Listedasan-AirContaminant
(29CFR 1910.1000,
TablesZ-1-A andZ-2)
respirators do not protect workers in oxysen~&$i~ atmospheres.
Other: Wearimperviousgloves,boots,aprons,andgauntletsto preventskincontact.
Ventilation: Providegeneralandlocalexplosion-proof
ventilationsys- to maintainairborneconcentrations
at leastbelowthe OSHA PEX.s
(Sec.2). Localexhaustventilationispreferredsinceit preventscontammant
dispersion
into thework areaby controllingit at its s~urce.‘r~
SafetyStatlons:Makeavailablein thework areaemergency
eyewashstations,safety/quickdrencbshowers,
andwashingfacilities.
ContaminatedEquipment:Neverwearcontactlensesin thework areatsoftlenses
may absorbandall lensesconcentrate,
irritants.Removethis
SCBA. Warningl Ait-purifying
or smokein work
areas.Practice
StorageRequirements:Storein tightly closedcontainersin a cool,dry, well-ventilatedareaawayfrom all heatandignitionsourcesand
incompatible
materials.Caution!Benzene vapor muy form explosive mixtures in air. To preventstaticsparks,electricallygroundandbondall
containersandequipmentusedin shipping,receiving,or transferringoperations
in productionandstorageareas.Whenopeningor closing
benzenecontainer4usenonsparking
tools.Keepfineextinguishers
readilyavailable.
EngineeringControls:BecauseGSHA spe&cally regulates
benzene(29CFR 1910.1028).
educateworkersaboutitspotentialhazardsand
dangers.
Mii
allpossibleexposures
to carcinogens.
If possible,substitute
lesstoxic solventsfor benzene;usethismaterialwith extreme
cautionandonly if absolutelyessentialAvoid vaporinhalauonandskinandeyecontact.Useonly with adequate
ventilationandappropriate
personalprotectivegear.Institutearespiratoryprotectionprogramthat includesregulartraining,maintenance,
inspection,andevaluation.
Designate
regulatedareasof benxeneuse(seelegendin theboxbelow)andlabelbenzenecontainers
with “DANGER,CONTAINSBENZJ%E$
CANCERHAZARD.”
Otber Precautions:Providepreplacement
andperiodicmedicalexaminations
with emphasis
on ahistoryof blooddisease
or previousexposure.
Transpo&&o~
(49 6FR 172.101,.102)
DOT ShipplagName:Benzene
lM0 ShippingName:Beruene
DOT Hazard Class:Flammable
liquids
IMO Hazard Class:3.2
IDNo.: UN1114
ID No-r
1 ld
__
_.-__UN1
-_.-_-.
DOT Label Flammable
liquid
IMO Label: Fhunmable
liquid
DOT PackagingExceptions:173.118
IMDC PackagIngGroup: II
DOT PackagingRequirements:173.119
References:
1,2,12,26,73,84-94,100,101,103,109,124,126,127,132,134.136,138,
H~&ne
Review: DJ Wilson, CM, Medkal
-heparcdby: MJ AUircn, Bs; lndustrinl
MSDSCotkction
Review:
139,143
MJ Upfal, MD, MPH;
Edited
by: JR Swtarc, MS
_- \)
1Malerial Safety Dafa Sheers Collection:
Genium
Publishing
Corpoiation
1145 Catalyn Street
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836
(518) 377-8854
-.
USA
‘Sheet No. 59
Beryllium
Metal/Powder
,
Issued: 4/80
Revision: A, 1l/89
krylllu~ Metal/Powder Dekrlptlon: A naturally oeaming om found in chrysobayl (Be$iO,) or produced industrially
ramberyl (3Be.0AtaO~6Si0,). The oreis convertedto theoxideor hydroxide,thento the fluorideor chloride.The
talidemaybereducedin a furnaceby magnesium
metalor by electrolysis.An alternativepurificationprocessis a liquidiquidextractionwith anorganophosphate
chelatingagent.Usedin aerospace
stmctu~~,radiotubeparts,inertialguidance
systems,
computerparts,Be-Cualloys,gyroscopes;
usedasan additivein solidpropellantrocketfuels,asa neutronsource
whenbombarded
with alpha [email protected], andasa neutronmoderatorandreflectorin nuclearreactors.
Xher Designations:Glucinium;Be; CAS No. 7440-41-7.
tianufacturer: Contactyour supplieror distributor.ConsultthelatestCtic&eek
Buyers’ Guide (Geniumref. 73)
‘or a suppliers
list.
3erylliumandcompounds,
ca 100%
OSHA PELS
B-hrTWA: 0.002ppm
30-minSTEL 0.005ppm
Ceilinglevel: 0.025ppm
ACGXH TLV, 1989&F
TLV-TWk 0.002mg/m’
NIOSH REL#l987+
Not to exceed0.5fig/m’
. i!
Genium
Toxlclty Datat
Human,inhalation,TC,: 300mg/m’,pulmonaryeffects
Rabbit,intravenous,TD,: 20 mg/kg,neoplasticeffects
1These valuea arc for beryllium and its compounds.
1 See NtOSH, RTECS @S1750000). for additional. data with referencesto mutagenic and tmnorigenic effects.
., ........ >..”...‘~*;j./p;j/#. . “yj:“:y..s&
~...:...:.;.:.:...:.:,,.~.~
..‘.”
. ..j.“.‘.
,,..,‘...‘.%.
. :t...,
L’...‘.:.:.~.:.:.:~.:.:.:.:.:.:.:...~~...:...~:::.:~.~
y, F.j.$
,‘.,~,~.~~,
2..I‘..,,.....,.;
<.. “...,..
......::l;i..<,.>;.-:
, .,_.,., _ ;..;.,.: :;;.:
‘(‘;::$~~;:~
..:+..
y ;. .;<.,;t.
...*>,./,...... ....... I A.‘. ... ...:“I....
~~~~~~~~~~~~,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
. .,.,.,
,.,...,.
.,...:
........:.....:.f.:.:
.,.,.........
/ ‘<XV,, ..>r.-*... ..,
. .. . .. . . ....... .......>Z>...X>.~
SpecificGravity (Hz0 = 1 at 39 ‘F (4 ‘C)): 1.848at 68 ‘F (20 ‘C)
Boiling Point: 5378‘F (2970‘C)
Water Sdubillty, hot water: Slight
Melting Point: 2332‘F (1278‘C)
coldwater: Insoluble
Vapor Pressure:7.6 mmHg at 3470‘F (1910‘C)
Atomfc Weight: 9.01g/m01
Appearanceand Odor: A grayish-white metal with a hexagonalandaniostropiccrystalstructure(i.e., theirindex of refEtCtiOu varieswith
incidentlight direction),andapowderedmetal,no odor.
ExtingufshingMedia: Never usewateror Co,. Instead,smotherthe fire with anapproveddry-powderextinguisher.Sand,graphitepowder,and
sodiumchloridearealsorecommended.
UnusualFire or Earploslon
Hazards: Berylliumcanbe amoderatefire hazardif exposedto flame.Thehazardsincreaseasparticulatesixe
decreases.
A berylliumdustcloudcanbeexplosive(areaswheredustingmayoccurrequireClass2, GroupE electricalservices,
29 CPR1910.309).Thii material’scombustion
productsarehighlyfaric.
SpecialFire-fighting Procedures:Fii fightersshouldusefull protectiveclothing,eyeprotection,anda self-contained
breathingapparatus
(SCBA) with a full facepieceoperatedin thepressuredemand
or positive-pressure
mode.After exposureto a berylliumfire, they shouldclean
equipment and bathe carefully.
. . . . . . . ;‘.. . . m
‘~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.i. .... ... ... . .... .j..;..._.....:
.. ... ... .. ..... . .. ... .... .<.,.,.:...:.:,.,........._
<..<.:.:
. .... ... .... _.....,.
. ... . O..~~.~~~~~j.~~~.~~~.~
.... ... ..... ..... .
d <.a L . ....I&.< .?6.%:&&.3<RY.<.
: I(.?.?.. 1 .c.. .<< I.
* Hazardous
polymerizationcannotoccur.
StabPlty/Polymerlxatlon:Beryllium is stableat roomtemperature
in closedcontainers.
ChemicalIncompatibllltles:Acid andalkalisoluble,it reactswith strongbases
to evolve hydrogen-tWarmberylliumreactsincandescently
with phosphorus, fluorine, or chlorine. Molten lithium metalat 356l F (180‘C) severely attacks beryllium metal.
Conditionsto Avoid: Whenheatedin air or in mtxedCo, andnitrogen,berylliumis ignitable.Mixturesof thepowderedmetalwith Ccl, or
trichloroethylene
flashon heavyimpact.
HazardousProductsof Decomposltlon:Thermaloxidativedecomposition
of berylliumemitsvery toxic oxideof berylliumfumes.
* When moist, beryllium farms thin, acid-resistant oxide films on solid surfaces.
t A simple asphyxiant gas. hydrogen is extremely flammable.
~~~~~~~~~~~~1~~~~~~~~
....... . . ............
..-.-:i:i;~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Carctuogenicity:The N’fP, IARC, and ACGlH list berylliumasa carcinogen.Animalstudiesalsoindicatethat berylliumproduceslungand
bonetumors.
Summaryof Risks: Beryllium ishighly toxic by inhalationof fumeor dustandexposureto thiselementandits saltsmaycausedeath.Inhaled
beryllium is partially deposited in the lungs, the blood system, and finally the bones, thus affecting all organ systems. Since the human body does
not quickly eliminate beryllium trace amounts in urine are detectable as long as 10 years after exposure. Prolonged or repeated skin contact GUI
cause skin irritation or dermatitis. Eye contact can produce conjuctivitis and eye ulcers. If introduced through the skin via cuts or punctures,
UOnheding ulcers may develop.
Continue on next page
Copriru
hY
0
UnnmmW
I989
oenhlm
oy
Fbbltig
or
rcpduc,kx,
corpontioa
withcut
the
pb,i,hcr*,
pcrmlah
b
prduilud.
No. 59
Beryllium Met&Powder
1 l/89
Medical Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Increased risk of lung, liver, gall bladder, and We duct cancers. Target Organs:
ungs, mucous membranes, eyes, skin. Primary Entry: Inhalation. Acute Effectsr Symptoms may occur up to 72 hr after a massive exposure..
4cute inhalation can produce poeumonitis with inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tracts, nasal congestion, nonproductive coughing,
md pulmonary edema.High dose exposures may cause acute respiratory distress, brain hemorrhaging, liver inflammation, and spleen hemo*agng. Chronic Effects: Symptoms may be delayed up to 15 years. Chronic exposures result from long-term exposure to small (microgram)
quantities and can produce berylliosis. Berylliosis is a progressive granuloma formation In the lungs which eventually causes incmasing shortness
)f breath and, in some cases, death. Since it also circulates among other organs, beryllium causes eventual heart enlargement and failure, liver and
spleenenlargement,kidney stones, various malignant t_urqprs,and damaging cell death in any organ in which it accumulates.
FIRsTAlD
Eyes: Flushimmediately,
includingundertheeyelids,gentlybut thoroughlywith floodingamountsof runningwaterfor at least15min.
Skin: After rinsingaffectedareawith floodingamountsof water,washit with soapandwater.Inhalation: Removeexposedpersonto freshair
mdsupportbreathingasneeded.Ingestion:Nevergive anythiogby mouthto aounconscious
or convulsingperson.If ingested,havethat
ansciouspersondrink 1 to 2 glasses
of water,theninducerepeatedvomitinguntil vomit Isclear.Presentstudiesindicatethat berylliumis so
poorlyabsorbed
throughthe intestinaltract, thatingestionisoot animportanthazard(hdusrriul Toxicology, 3* Edition,Hamilton).
After first aId, get appropriatein-plant, paramedic,or communitymedIea1attentionand support.Watchfor signsof respiratorydeterioration,anduseoxygenasneeded.
antact or inhalationhazards.Provideventilationandremoveheatandignitionsoumes.
To preventdustingconditions,vacuumor wet mop
powderspills.Collectparticulatescrap,absorbon paper,andtransferto a sealed
recoveryor disposal
container.DIsposakDissolveberylliumin a
smallamountof 6M-HCl, filter it, andadda slightexcessof 6M-NH,OH to the filtrate usinglitmusasanindicator(blueatpH 8.3).Heatand
coagulate
theprecipitate.After 12hr, filter anddry it. Handle,bexyllium
wasteunsuitable
for recyclingin accordance
with Federal,state,andlocal
regulations.
Disposeof scrapor wastematerialby arrangingits returnto thesupplierin amutuallyacceptable
form Contactyour supplieror a
Iicensedcontractorfor detailedrecommendations.
OSHA Designations
EPA DesIgnatIona
ListedasAir Contaminant
(29 CFR 1910.1000,
RCRAHazardousWaste(40 CFR261.33):Not listed
TableZ-2)
Listedasa CBRCLAHazardous
Substance*(40CFR 302.4),ReportableQuantity (RQ):
100lb (45.4kg) [* perRCRA,Sec.3001;perCleanWaterAct, Se+ 307(a),1121
SARA ExtremelyHazardous
Substance
(40 CFR355):Not listed
SARA Toxic Chemical(40CFR372.65):Not listed
Goggles:Wearprotectiveeyeglasses
or chemicalsafetygoggles,perOSHA eye-andface-protection
regulations(29 CFR1910.133).
Respirator:WearaNIGSH-approved
respiratorfor emergency
andnonroutineusein conceotmtions
abovethe &hr, [email protected] For any,time
period,ahalf-mask,[email protected] respiratorwith a high-efficiencyfilter is suitablefor concentrations
ashigh as25-pgBe/m’(seeNIQSH,A
Recommended Standard for OccuprrtioMlExposureto BetyUiwn, Sec. 4). A powered,air-purifyingrespiratorequippedwith a “fumefilter” is
suitablefor concentrations
upto 40 pg Be/m’.A fuII facepiece,air-purifyingrespiratorwith a high-efficiencyf&r issuitabfefor concentrations
up to 100pg Be/m’.A powered,air-purifyingrespiratorequippedwith a high-efficiencyfilter, operatingin thepositive-pressure
mode,Is suitable
for concentrations
up to 1000Fg B&ns. An SCBA with a full facepieceoperated
in thepressuredemand
or positive-pressure
modeis suitablefor
concentrations
above1000pg Belm).FollowOSHA respiratorregulations(29CFR 1910.134).Warning: Air-purifying respirators
do notprotect
workersin oxygen-deficientatmospheres.
Other: Wear imperviousgloves,boots,aprons,andgauntletsto preventprolongedor Mated skin
eootaefWhenexposurelevelsexceedtheTLV, changeinto cleanprotectiveclothingandshowerat theendof your shift Ventilation: provide
generalandlocalexplosion-proof
ventilationsystemsto maintainairborneconcentrations
belowthe GSHA PBL standards
(Sec.2). Local exhaust
ventilationispreferredsinceit preveotscontaminantdispersion
into the work areaby eliminatingit at its source(Geniumref. 103).Safety
Stations:Makeavailablein thework areaemergencyeyewashstations,safety/quick-drench
showers,andwashingfacilities.Contaminated
Equipment:Neverwearcontactlensesin the work afea:softlensesmay absorb,andall lensesconcentrate,irritants.Laundercontaminated
clothingbeforewearing.Removethismaterialfrom your shoesandequipment,Comments:Nevereat,drink, or smokein work areas.Practice
goodpersonalhygieneafterusingthismaterial,especiallybeforeeating,drinking,smoking,usingthetoilet, or applyingcosmetics.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
‘.X...%.
...v...,....
%
..__.
,. ...%
.._. .,.%..
StorageRequirements:
containers
fromphysicaldamage.EngineeringControls: Provideadequate
ventilationin areaswhereberylliumcanbecomeairborne.Monitor
theseareaswith personalsamplers
to limit andcontrolexposurelevels.Teachworkersaboutberyllium’spotentialhazards.Practicegoodhousekeepingto preventaccumulation
of beryllium-containing
deposits.
Give preplacement
andannualmedicalexams(chestx-rays,baselinepulmooary functiontests[FVC, (functionalvital capacity)andFEV, (the amountof air exhaledin thefirst secondafter maximuminhalation)]andbody
weightmeasurements
to workerspossiblyexposedto concentrations
abovetheTLV. Preventexposingthosewith pulmonarydisease,
chronic
skin,liver, heart,or kidneyconditions;abnormalchestx-ray or bloodcount;or vital capacitydepression
greaterthan10%.EnsurealI engineering
systems(production,transportation)
areof maximumexplosioo-proof
design.To preventstaticsparks,electricallygroundandbondall containers
andpipelinesusedin shipping,transferring,reacting,producing,andsampling
operations.
TransportationData (49CFR 172.101,.102)
DOT ShippingName:Berylliumcompouod,n.o.s.
IMO ShlpplogName:Beryllium,metalpowder
DOT Hazard Class:PoisonB
IMO Hazard Class:6.1
DOTID No.: UN1567
IMO
Label: Poison, flammable
solid
MSDSCollection References:l-12, l&20,24-26, 81, 84,85,88-91,100,116,117
PC
Prepared by: MJ Allison, BS; Industrial Hygiene Review: DJ Wilson, CLH; Medical Review: Warren Silverman, MD
%ydxbl
0 1989 by Omlum Fublithiql Capontin
Any connnmcl.l oscarcpmducticnwi~l
tbcpblishchpcmdulm
L pobibited
Judamxbu
loch0 aitabWyof
~4escuU~y
Itr ptnbuu’lrwpomibdl~.Al~~hrcuoablo
c.,e h,kcnticn,nth
pcpr~ll~mol,uchinl~~~Ocntum~MLtblryCapa~~t~u~a,vun~~o,m~nru,rrpM~~,
wIupmribUity
., ,otbe .ccunry or ,ulhbility
druchblamalim
for ,w,b,&,n
mm* purc,m..& inkndcd p’ppox a forcomcqucncn
diauw.
ialornutbobcrcLu
~Or~~pU~~P”=F-’
“id*=-
Genium
a
’
Publishing
Corporation
One Genium P&z51
Schenectady,NY 12304-4690 USA
W8)377-8854
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Sheet No 133
Cadmium
Oxide
Issued: 4/85
Revision: A. l/93
vapor to react with air. Also produced as a by-product from silver soldering and brazing. Used as a catalyst, nematocide, and
starting material for PVC heat stabilizers; in cadmium plating baths, ceramic glazes, and phosphors. Formerly used in
vetainary medicine as an ascaricide in swine, and the manufacture of cadmium salts and electrodes for storage batteries.
Other Deslgnatlons: CAS No. 1306-19-O. cadmium monoxide, cadmium oxide fume, NCLCO2551.
Manulacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult latest Chemical Week Buyers’ [email protected])
for a suppliers lit.
FY
*
Cautions: Cadmium oxide is highly toxic by inhalation and ingestion. Acute symptoms may be delayed several hours but include
L :
pulmonary edema (fluid in lungs). which can be fatal. Chronic effects include kidney damage. Cd0 is considered a carcinogen by
PPE-sec 8
several government agencies.
*chronic clfods
Cadmium oxide, > 90%. Impurities include chloride, nitrate, sulf&e, copper, iron, and lead.
1992 OSHA PELs (as Cd)
199293 ACGIH TLV (as Cd)t 1992 Toxklty Data+
Transitional and Final Rule Llmlts TWA: 0.05 mg/m3 (dust)
Human,dust inhalation, Tc,: 40 pg/d caused a change in heart rate,
8-hr TWA: 0.2 mg/m3 (dust),
Ceiling: 0.05 mg/m3(fume)
high blood pressure, and changes in the kidney, ureter, and bladda.
0.1 mg/m3 (fume)
Mammal, oral, LDse: 72 m&kg; toxic effects not yet reviewed
1991 DFG (Germany) MAK
Ceiling: 0.6 mg/m3 (dust),
Rat, dust inhalation, TC& 23 pg/m3/5 hr given 15 weeks prior and
None establisbt~3
through
0.3 mg/m3* (fume)
the 20th day of pregnancy caused behavioral effe+ in the newborn.
1990 IDLH Level
1992 NIOSH REL
Man,
fume inhalation, T&: 8.63 mg/m3/S hr caused cough, dyspnea, and
9 mglm)
Keep as low as possible.
cyanosis.
+ In theprecas of 6(b) rulemaking;PMpoJedreduuien of 95 LO99%:
t Notice of intendedchangesto Ce&ng: 0.01 m&n’ (total dust), O.OU2mpim’ (nspirable fraction)
$ ScoNIOSH. RTECS(JW1925000,paudcr & ctyslo&) and (EVl93OOOO,,fwnc).
for additionalrcprodu&e. tumodgenic.andtoxicity data.
......_____.....__._................
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.A..
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.&..
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. :i’r. . y :.“‘““;.y ....i....:
...*Ll-i
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.....Lil._i L..... _......\
. ...n.
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4
~~~~~~~~~~~l~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.q.~..:?%
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:...:3,A,,.
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.<A:.
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.... “:‘.I.,.:
...,.. .,,..,_
., .~.~.~~.~.~.~:~.:~~.~:.,~
Y.,.....
..:‘....
.....>..jp
<
.
<. >. ,>.,M..r!
...a>..*..*:+
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:,...k..;>.
. ...).,,..<
.._:..,,,,,
*<.&
A.
Boiling Point: 2832 ‘F (1559 ‘C), sublimes
Molecular Weight: 128.4
Melting Polntnt:
-c2598‘F (c 1426‘C!)*; 1742‘F (950‘C!),decomposes?
SpecificGravity: 6.95*. 8.15t
Water Solubllity: insoluble
Vapor Pressure:1 mmHg at 1832‘F (1000‘C)
Other Solubillties:Solublein acidsandammoniumsalts,slightly in ammonium
hydroxide.
RefractionIndex: 2.49
e
Appearanceand Odor: Colorlessto white amorphous
powderor brownish-red
crystals.Fumeis odorless,tiny yellow-brownpar&dates in air.
* amorpbeos
powder.t aystals
Extingulsbing Media: Useagentssuitablefor surroundingf5q diy chemical,waterspray,fog, or regularfoam.
Unusual Fire or ExploskmHazards: Cd0 presentsonly a moderateexplosionhazardwhenin the form of dust.
SpecialFire-flghtlng Procedures:Becausefire mayproducetoxic thermaldecomposition
products,weara self-contained
breathingapparatus
(SCBA) with a full facepieceoperatedin pressure-demand
or positive-pressure
mode.Stmcturalfuefighters’protectiveclothingprovidesonly
limitedprotectionfromcadmiumoxide. Do not releaserunoff from fire controlmethodsto sewersor waterways:dike for prom disposal.
...z-,..,........
yy’.,~.,‘3s,.
,.....
~
~,“.~.,.......j..,.......~....xsy,...“~~~:
.... . y ;.....
p.p.><y.;.,<..y.y,
.<p:.A..
“...~<y.~.
~,.. )><
................ .,.. ....~..~....... ..~.~)
~
>w.‘.x.<.:...
A>.>..C.i
.. i.C.. ..1A.>.,...
.A...
W..?..
.,._..._...
..x.,*;nrn~~~~~?.!~.~~~~.~.~.~
......_
. ,.._.
.,,,,$..$.
h n...
, P.3:
..,::.I..
,..I.::
,....%
. . . i...
:,,I. .:.: _.:
..... ....‘...I..A.
__._....
....<.m>.<
...__....._....
)..._...
s.uKmih
.._.,...,.._._
<2:.,...
*;.:&I.x.:.:.:x.:.:<.:.:.:
....n..
..x.:
..... _. . _..% . . ...._.....,....,.
... b....1...
Stabllity/Polymerlzatlon: Cadmiumoxide is stableat momtemperature
in closedcontainersundernormalstorageandhandlingconditions.
Hazardous
polymerizationcannotoccur.
Chemkal IncompatlbilltleszExplodeswhenheatedwith magnesium.
Cadmium dustpresentsa fnre/explosion
ha&i if reactedwith oxidizing
agents,metals,hydrogenazide,zinc, selenium,or tellurium.
Conditionsto Avold: Excessivedustgenerationandcontactwith incompatibles.
HazardousProductsof Decomposition:Thermaloxidativedecomposition
of cadmiumoxide canproducetoxic cadmiumfumes.
Carclnogenklty: The followingagencies
list Cd0 asa carcinogen:IARC Class2A (probablycarcinogenicin humans)$ta3)
NTPClass2 (reasonably anticipatedto be [email protected] (carcinogen
definedwithoutfurthercategorization).(lss)
ACGIH TLV-A2 (suspected
humancarcinogen)>1*3)
andDK? MAK-A2 (unmistakably
carcinogenicin animalexperimentation
only).(‘s3)
Summaryof Risks: Dustor fumeinhalationgenerallyresultsin symptoms
delayedupto 24 hrs.Effectsincludea flu-like syndromesimilarto
metalfumefever characterized
by chills,fever, andmusclepainin thebackandlimbs.Pulmonaryedema(fluid in lungs)maydevelopaftersevere
exposureandsometimes
resultin death.If victim recovers.residualchanges
mayincludelungfibrosis(thickening)andvascularchanges.
Longtermexposureto Cd0 resultsin damageto thekidney. Proteinuria(proteinin urine)of low molecularweightisthe first signof tubulardysfunction.
Excessglucosein the urineis alsoseen.Bonedemineralization
similarto thatof osteoporosis
(decreased
bonedensity)occursnot asadiiect effect
of Cd0 exposurebut rather,indirectlyby alteringkidneyregulationof calciumandphosphorus
whichareneededfor strong,healthybones.Some
studieshaveshowna correlationbetweenanemia(low hemoglobin
in blood)andhighCd levels.Selenium(Se)andzinc (Zn) appearto suppress
Cd
toxicity, Sebindsup Cd preventingit fromenteringbodytissueandZn maycompetefor thesamemetabolicsite.
Conhuuonnui pogc
maorrrprohcrm
without
th.puUii* pea&&n
‘uprchibiti.
Cc++&0 1993
Gmium
FuUiis Capahn.Any ccmnnmU
No. 133 Cadmium Oxide ID3
:Hd~ril~~,~~~~~~~i~~~~~~,
.i;j::ii~.:iiii~~~,~,,~~,:
:::.,ji;l;:ic::~ii~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.;.iilij
;[email protected](j>.,.He~lth:.
Wedkal Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Kidney, blood. or respiratory disorders.
fat-get Organs: Blood. kidney. liver. respiratory system.
Primary Entry Routes: Inhalatiottt~ingestion.
Acute Effects: Inhalation may cause irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat, nausea and vomiting, abdominal colic, diarrhea, chest tightness,
cough.headache,and weakness. After 24 hrs, pulmonary edema could develop. Some kidney damage may occur after acute exposures but is
usually associated with chronic exposunz..
-.
Chronic Effects: Symptoms may be delayed several years after last exposure and include perforation of the nasal septum (tissue between the.
nostrils), loss of smell, chronic bronchitis, severe progressive emphysema, anorexia, insomnia. fatigue, pallor, anemia, kidney damage, bone
demineralization,pulmonary fibrosis and possible cancer of the respiratory
tract.
FIRST AID
Ryes: Do not allow victim to rub or keep eyes tightly shut. Gently lift eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of
water until transported to an emergency medical facility. Consult a physician immediately.
Skin: Quickly remove contaminated clothing. Rinse with flooding amounts of water for at least 15 min. Wash exposed area with soap and water.
For reddened or blistered skin, consult a physician.
Inhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathing as needed.
Ingestlon: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious or convulsiig person. Contact a poison control center. Unless otherwise advised, have
that conscious Md alert person &ii 1 to 2 glasses of water to dilute. Do not induce vomiting because of oadmium oxides irritating nature.
After first aid, get appropriate in-plant, paramedk, or community medical support.
Note to Physicians: R-2 microglobulin excretion of > 200 pg/g creatinine indicates kidney dysfunction as does a renal cortex [Cd] of 180 to 220
pg/g of wet kidney cortex. Blood Cd levels are trot indicative of exposure.
\
c-..
-, ...+.:.:.~..i:.:~~~.;~:.:
....:.:,:.:.:,
~.~:$py..c~
,:,:.:,:,:,,:
.;,,:,..:
:,:~~,~,.,:,~~.,.,.,.
<:./,..,......
:.:,~:.:.:,:.:.:.:.:.;.:.:.:.:.:.:,.:.:.:,~:,:.~~:.:.:.:...~;:.:,:.:~~.~:.:~:~~~:.~~:~~:.~~:~.~:~,:~~.~~~
:.A.:ii:~.:~::~:~~:~~~.::::::~.~~.~.~,~;:~~:~~...:...
,y:.,>
~~~~~~~~~~Il’~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~*,~,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.
g..;
..,_:
...>;,,...
f........:.:.?&:.:.:
.... _I...._...
r......_.
i.,...........,...,?
...... ..,.............. I ._..__,...,._i
/.i.. ...I....
.. ..,....
.,......,.....,...
..,....
......,.,.,...c.... .... .._.........
(,. A.5 . .. .._...._.
.I.._,,..I,....A>...
SplB/L,eak: Notify safety personnel, isolate area, deny entry and stay upwind. Cleanup personnel should protect against exposure, To avoid
excessive dust generation do ncf sweep small spills; scoop up or vacuum (with appropriate filter), place in suitable container and damp mop any
residue. Flush large spill to containment area for disposal or reclamation. Prevent entry into sewers, drains, and waterways. Follow applicable
OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120). Dlsposrdt For small amounts: react with a small amount of nitric acid to form nitrates. Evaporate in a
fume hood to a thin paste, add - l/2 L of water end saturate with hydrogen sulfide. Filter, wash, dry, and precipitate. Package and return to
supplier. Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state. and local regulations.
EPA Designations
Listed (as Cd) as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.24): DOO6.Characteristic of Toxicity, Regulatory Level = 1 mg/L
Listed (as Cd compounds) CERCLA Hazardous Substance* (40 CFR 3024): [* per RCRA, Sec. 30011 An RQ is not assigned to the broad class.
Listed as a SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355). TPQz lOO/lO,OOOlb
,.
Listed (as Cd) as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65)
‘\
t
OSHA De&nations
,-.
!
Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000, Table 2-l-A)
,..... .. I. . . ..n
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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.,......,.._.,.........................,.
z ......,.........l.
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> ..,.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. ... .... ... .... ...
,........._..:
.,.A_._
. . . . . ,...
.X
..__...............
%i
. ..t.
Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133). Because
eon&t lens use-in industry is controversial, establish your own policy.
Respirator: Seek professional advice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and, if necessary, wear a
MSHA/NIOSH-approved respirator. For any detectable concentration, use a SCBA or supplied-air respirator (SAR) with a full facepiece and
operated in pressuredemand or other positive pressure mode. The SAR must contain an auxiliary SCBA. For emergency or nonroutine operations
(cleaning spills, reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an SCBA. Warning! Air-purifying respirators do not protect workers in [email protected]
atmospheres. If respirators are used, OSHA requires a written respiratory protection program that includes at least: medical certification, training,
fit-testing, periodic environmental monitoring. maintenance, inspection cleaning, and convenient. sanitary storage areas.
Other: Wear chemically protective gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent skin contact.
Ventllatfon: Provide general and local exhaust ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations below the GSHA PELs (Sec. 2). Local
exhaust ventilation is preferred because it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlliig it at its soun~.((‘~)
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations. safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities.
Contamlnated Equipment: Separate work and street clothes and launder before reuse. Remove Cd0 from your shoes and clean PPE.
Comments: Never eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics.
Storage/Handling Requirements: Prevent damage to containers. Store in a cool, dry. well-ventilated area away from heat and magnesium.
Englneerlng Controls: To reduce potential health hazards, use sufticient dilution or local exhaust ventilation to control airborne contaminants
and to maintain concentrations at the lowest practical level. Admlnlstratlve Controls: Consider preplacement and periodic medical exams of
exposed workers that include pulmonary function tests. chest x-rays, andurinalysis. Educate personnel on the dangers of and precautions to be
used around a potential carcinogen. Label doors to rooms with Cd0 as containing a potential human carcinogen.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101)
Quantity Llmltatlons
DOT Shipping Name: Cadmium compounds
Packaging Authorizations
a) Passenger Aircraft or Raikar: 100 kg
DOT Hatird Class: 6.1
a) Exceptions: 173.153
b) Cargo Aircraft Only: 200 kg
ID No.: UN2570
b) Non-bulk Packaglng: 173.213
c) Bulk Packnging: 173.240
DOT Packing Group: III
Vessel Stowage Requirements
DOT Label: Poison, Keep away from food
a) Vessel Stowage: A
Special Provisions (172.X02):b) Other: -
- )
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Genium
-.
Publishing
Corporation
1145 Catalyn Street
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836 USA
(518) 377-8854
Sheet No. 5
Chromic Acid and Chromates
Issued:
1O/77
Revision:
C, 7/9 1
:rystailixing the&o&ate or d&romate, and then treating it with an excess of sulfuric acid. Used & ceramic glazes, .
:olored glass, dyes, batteries, explosives, water treatment, wood treatment and pre&rvatives, refractories. copper stripping, aluminum anodizing, photomechanical processing, chromium metal plating, purifying oil and acetylene, hardening
microscopic. preparation+ and manufacturing chmmated copper arsenate; and as a corrosion inhibitor, a catalyst, an
axidking agent m organic chemistry, and an etchaut for plastics.
Xher Designations: CAS No. 1333-82-O; chromic acid; chromic acid, solid (DOT); chromium anhydride; chromium (Vl) oxide;
:hromium trioxide; chromium (6+) trioxide; monochromium trioxlde; purahonic chromium trioxide. Chromic acid is the commonly used F i
nun% although true chromic acid (CryO,, CAS No. 7738-94-5) cannot be isolated from solution. Chromic acid and chromates
$s CrO,, CAS No. 7440473).
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult latest Chemical Week Buyers’ Guide0 for a suppliers list
tSec.8
Caution: A powerful oxtdixer, chromic acid may explode on contact with reducing agents and cause ignition on contact with organic
+erials. This poison and human carcinogen is corrosive to skin and irritating to mucous membranes. Eye contact may cause permanent
)lindness.
%romic acid, 99% CrO,
1990 OSHA PEL
Ceiling: 0.1 mg(CtQJ/m’
1987 IDLH Level
30 rug/m’
1990-91 ACGIH TLVs
TW+: 0.05 mg(Cr]/m’
Cerlmg: 0.1 mg/m
1990 NIOSH REL
TWA: 0.025 olg(cr(vl))/d
Ceiliog: 0.05 mg/m?lS min (Cr(Vl))
1985-86 Toxlclty Data*
Rat,oral,LD,:80mg&g
Mouse, oral, @%: 127 mg&g
Human, inhalatum, Tq exposed continuously to 110 pg over 3 years. Toxic
effects include tumongenk (carcinogenic b RTECS criteria); sense
organs and special senses (olfaction tumors r ; lungs, thorax, or respiration
(tumors).
DOE. subeutaoeous.
LD. .: 330
Extlnpulshinp: Media: Chromic acid is noncombustible., but accelerates bummg of combustibles (wood, paper, oil). For small fires, use only
wurerrnot tichemical, carbon dioxide (COJ, or halon.
Unusual Fire or Expleslon Hazardsz A powerful oxidizer, chroo&
acid ignites on contact with acetic acid and alcohol. It may react rapidly
.
enou h with organic materials to cause ignition. Contamers may explode if involved in fm.
Spec‘i, 1Fire-flghtlng Procedures: Isolate hazard area and deny entry. Since fire may produce toxic fumes, wear a self-contained breathing
apparatus @CBA) with a full facepiece operated in pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode. Cool fm-exposed containers with flooding
amounts of water sln& the decomposing material may form a hot, viscous foam that can cause containers to rupture and explode. Use cautiod
For largefires,flood areafrom a safedistance,andcool containersfrom thesidewith a watersprayuntil after fire is well out. If possiblewithout
risk, movecontainers.Stayaway from endsof ta&. For massivefire in cargoarea,usemonitornozzlesor unmanned
hoseholder.Be awareof
runoff from fire controlmethods.Do not releaseto sewersor waterways.
conditions.Hazardouspal merixationcannotoccur.
Chemkal Incompatibflit L : This materialis incompatiblewith aceticacid,aceticanhydride,acetone,alcohols,alkalimetals,ammonia,arsenic,
anthracene,
benzene,brominepentafluorine,butyric acid,camphor,chromoussulfide,diethyl ether,glycerol,hydrogensulfide,methyl alcohol.
naphthalene,
peroxyformicacid,phosphorus,
potassium
hexacyanoferrate,
pyridine.selenium,sodium,andturpentine.Chromicacidignitesethyl
alcoholandmanyhydrocarbons.
Condltioasto Avoid: Avoid excessheatandcontactwith combustible
or organicmaterials.
HazardousProductsof Decomposition:Thermaloxidative decomposition
of chromicacidcanproducecarbondioxide, smoke,andirritating
toxic fumes.
Carcinogenkity: The IARC andNTP list chromicacidandotherformsof hexavalent(VI) chrommmashumancammogens.
Summary of Risks:Chromicacidis a poisonanda powerfulirritant to skin,eyes,andrespiratorytract. Skin or lung sensitization(allergic
reactions)mayoccur.Exposurecancausedermatitis(skinrash),asthma,pulmonaryedema(fluid io lungs),kidney damage,a “chromehole,”or a
perforationof thenasalseptum(tissuebetweenuostrils).
Medical ConditionsAggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Any chroniclungor skincondition.
Target Organs:Skin, respiratorytract (includingnose,throat, airways,andlungs),andkidney.
Primary Entry Routes:Eyes,skincontact,inhalation,and ingestion.
Acute Effects: Inhalationmay cause irritation or burningof nose,throat,andair passages,
cough,wheezing.
andshortness
of breath.Higher
exposuresmaycause pulmonaryedema(fluid in lungs).Skio exposuremaycausedermatitis(skinrash),irotation, burning,itching,redness,
and
ulceration(skindestruction)which may penetrate.Eyecontactcancauseirritation. burning,lacrimatioo(watering),lossof sightandpermanent
blindnessif not removedquickly.
- Chronic Effects: Chronicinhalationof excessivelevelsmay causeepistaxis(nosebleed),
“chromeholes,”nasalcongestion,tooth.enamelerosion,
chestpain.asthma(via allergicsensitization),bronchitis,or respiratorytract cancer.Chroniceyeexposuremaycauseconjunctivitu. Skmcontact
Continueon mt 0aQf
No. 5 Chromic Acid and Chromates 7191
similar to acid rain’s onwater sources. This material’s carcinogenicity makes it hazardous to the environment in its hexavalent stat&
Environmental Degradation: The recommended disposal means are reduction, precipitation, or ion exchange. Landfill disposal is not recomImended since it raises soil acidity.
Dis osal: Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow
applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
EPf; Designations
Listed as a RCIU Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.22): Corrosive waste
RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33): Not listed
Listed as a CERCL.A Hazardous Substance* (40 CFR 302.4): Rsrtable Quantity (RQ): 10 lb (454 kg) [*per Clean Water Act, Sec. 311(b)(4)]t
SARA Extremely Hazardous Su6stan~e (40 CFR 355): Not IIS
SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65): Not listed
OSHA Designations
ListedasanAir Contaminant(29CFR 191O.lOC0,
TablesZ-l-A andZ-2)
Transportatton Data (49 CFR 172.101,.102)
DOT ShlppingName:Chromicacid,sohd
IMO Shippln Name:Chromiumtrioxide, aahydmus
IMO Hazard E lass:5.1
DOT Hazard Class:Oxidizer
ID No.: UN1463
ID No.: NA1463
DOT Label: Oxidizer
IMO Label: Oxidizer, Corrosive
IMDG PackagingGroup: II
DOT PackagingExceptions: 173.153
DOT PackagingRequirements:
173.164
MSDS CoUech~~ References:
26,38,73,8S,lOO,lOl,
Prepared
by: M G&XI,
BA; industrial
Hyglme
103,124.126,127,132,133,136,138,139,140.143,
Review: DJ Wilson, CIH; Medical Review:
MJ Upfal,
142,145,148,159
MD, MPH; Edlted
by: JR Stuart, MS
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Genium Publishing
Corporation
Sheet No. 757
Coal Tar Creosote
tar~nxlllcu? oy nlgn-tcmpcrl!nlre
stramed or hght anthracene od; as
mainly aromatic compounds such
lq fence posts, marine piling%
E thing agent for mineral separation, hop defoliant, and lubricant for die
medicine as an antiseptic, disinfectant, antipyretic, astringent, germicide, and [email protected]
Other [email protected]: CAS NO. 8001-58-9, Awpa,@ brick oil, Ca~w~ll NO. 225, coal tar oil, creosote, creosote oil,
creosotum, ctesylic creosote, heavy oil liquid pitch oil, naphthaleneoil, Preserv-o-so&,* Sakresotc,” tar oil, wash oil.
Manufacturer:
Contactyour supplieror distributor.ConsultlateatChanicolWeekBuyers’GW
for a supplierslist
Cautions:Flammable,liquidcoaltar creosoteis toxic by inhalation,ingestion,andskincontact.The IARC andNTP
classifyit asa human carcinogen.
1990 OSHA PEL
8-hr RAE 02 mg/rn%
1990.91 ACGIH TLV
TWA: 0.2 mslmJ*
l!m IDLIi
7006
1990 NiOSH REL
0.1 mg/d (cyclohexaneextractable
Level
portion)
tSec.8
198586 Toxki
Datat
Rat, oral, LD *9 25 [email protected]; toxic effects not yet reviewed
Dog.oral LLr : 600e
tdc effectsnot yet reviewed
Rat,‘ID,: 52,%16mg/kgadministered
during91 daysprior-tomating
~z+r$~~ctwe
effectson fallopiantubes-and
ovaries
b: 99g/kg producestumorsm skmandappendages
Appearanceand Odor: Putucoaltar creosoteis colorless,but theindustrialproductis ayellow to blackoily liquid with anaromaticsmoky
smellanda burningcaustictaste.
exooscd colltaioers.
Uhsual Fire or Exploskm
Hazards: Va n may travel to anignitionsoumeandflashback.Containersmay explodein heatof fne. Coaltar
creosotepresentsa vaporexplosionham3 mdoors,outdoors,andin sewers,
SpeelalFke-flghting Procedures:Sincefm mayproducetoxic fumes,weara self+xmtained
bm&ing apparatus(SCBA) with a fuli facepiece
opcded in pressure-demand
or positive-pressure
mode.Also, wearfull pr&ective clothing.Stay awayfrom endsof tanks.For massivefm in
cargoarea,usemooitornozzlesor unmanned
hoseholders;if impossible,
withdrawfrom areaandlet fire burn. Immediatelyleaveateaif you hear
a risingsoundfrom ventingsafetydeviceor noticeanyf-used
tankdiscoloration.Isolatearea for l/2 milein all directionsif fm involves
tank, rail car or tank truck. De awareof runoff from fue control methods.Do not releaseto sewersor wataways. Fully decontaminate
or properly
disposeof personalprotectiveclothing.
erixationcannot occur.
atlbllities Creosoteoil mixedwith chlorosulfonicacidin a closedcontainercausesanincreasein temperatureandpressure.
Condltlonato Avoki: Avoid excessiveheatandcootactwith chlorosulfooicacid.
~I~cl~eProducts
of Decomposltlon:Thermaloxidativedecomposition
of coaltar creosotecanproduceoxidesof carbonandthick, black,
untiJ transpolttd to an emergency medJeaJ
water for at least 15 min. For reddened or
Jngperson If ingested, have Jhatcarrcioru pasondlink1
EPA DesJgnatIoti
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33), Hazardous Material No. uO51
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance+ 40 CFR 302.4~bkQuannty(Rt3:
R
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance 40 d FJZ 355): Not
Listed as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CLR 372.65)
to2glassesof
11b(0.454kg)[*perRCRA,Sce.3001]
,_
reactor vessels, or storage~tankj), wear an
ointment to the
measure.
Ventllatlon: Provide cneral and local exhaust ventilationg?=?ylm
wJthhJgh-effJJencypa&ulatefJJkrstomaJntaJnairbomeconcen&ions below the OS !I A PEL (See. 2). Local exhaust ven tt~tspnemdsinceitprtventrwntaminantdispersionintothcworkctruby
controlling it at its source.“~
Safety Stations: M&e available in the work area emergwey eyewash stations, safety/quJckdrenclt slmwers, and washing faeilJties.
Contaminated JZqnlpment: Take particular care to avoid any wntar.nJnatJonof drains or ventJlation ducts. Remove this ma&al from your shoes
and equipment. Launder contaminated cJothin before wearing.
Comments: Never eat, dtink, of smoke Jn wo ii areas. Practice good personal hygierre after using this mate&l, especJal.lybefore eat& drJnk&,
Storae Requlrementsr Avoid physical damageto containers.StoreJna cool,dry, well-venblatedarea.Storecoal tar CIWSO~~ fa close to area of
as‘possible
to [email protected]&t.ingdistanti.
EnglneerJngControls: UseengmeerJng
wntrols to keepaJrborne
wneentrationsbelowtheOSHA PEL.InstJtutea [email protected]
[email protected] includesregulartrahrhrg,maJntenance,
inspection,andevaluation.AJwaysperformsynthesuandJrunfJJn procedures
undera
vetheaJventilationhoodandmakeregularoperationalsafetychecks.Abel doorsto roomsww co+ tar creosotew produced,?wad,
or storedas
containinga carcim en.Locateemergencyequipmentat well-markedandclearl identifiedstanonsm caseemergencyescapersnecessary.
Other Precautions:kc placementandperiodicmedicalexam&ions of exFJ workersem hasizingnsprratory, skin, liver, andkidney.
disorders,includingcomprehensive
work andmedicalhistory,physicalexamination,CXR, P& s,~urJnalysJs,
LFT, andsputumcytology aspie
attendingphysicianconsrdersappropriate.Educateworkersaboutcoaltarcreosote’s
caminogenJcrty
andproperhandlingproceduresto avotd
exposure.
Other Comments:Cautionis in or&r whenhandlingor sawingold creosote-treated
lumbersJnee
it retainsa wnsiderabteportionof creosotefor
upto25to3oyears.
Trans ortatlon Data (49 CFR 172.101)
DOT &JooJne Name:Creosote
DOT Ha&-d&tss: Flammableliquid
ID No.: -UN1136
DOT Label: Flammableliouid
USC
MSDS
hepared
CoUection
by: M
Rrkereneeski
73
Ganhon,
BA; &&al
100
101 103 124 126 127 132,133.136,138,139
140 142 143,146,148,153
159
Iievk;:
Di Wiisoa.
CIH;Mcdkal
R&w:
hrlr Uphl, MD,MPH;l&d
&lbe
by: JR Stud,
MS
--.
:
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Genium Publishing
Corporation
.:
Sheet No. 162
Copper
1145catalyn stmt
Schenectady,NY 12303-1836USA
(518) 377-8854
I Issued: n/85
Revision: A, 8190
G~BIUBI
concmrating copper orca by flotation arid leachiug or by smelting cappa ore
ReparedbysNshing,grindin&and
xmcentrates to yield a blister (96 to 98%) ooppa which is ekctrolyticaUy relined to yield 99.94 copper. Copper is the
fc
nest widely used structural metal, next to iron and ahmio~
Used in electric wiring; switches, heating, plumbiig,
ding, and building consalloys (brass, bronze, Mcd metal, beryllium-copper~
coins; chemical and pharmaceu&Xlmachinq;electroplatedprotectiveaJatings
8ndundercoatsfornickel,chromi~
zin& etc,cookingutens~
insectlides; au&ding
paints; and 8s a catalyst Coppes whiskers 8re used in theamd and tkctical composites. Copper flalres
IUCused as iusulatiou for liiuid fuels.
Other Designations:CM No. 7440-m. bmnzcpowder,copperslag-aihme, copperslag-milled.
.?i
Manufacturer: Contactyour supplie.x
or &triLmtor. Comdt the1-t CW&dBu~j
G&I&‘) for a suppks list
Cautious:CODDM
mm betoxic thrash cmtact. inhdatk &adimmtim. It may cause skin and eye irritation and metal fume fever.
Copper is *ot~c&ide&d
a fxe haxar&but
%o,”
*sec.8
fine&ticks
mar bum i;; air.
-
1989OSHA PELS
1989-90ACGIH TLVs
l!mNxOSHREL
1985-86Toxicity Data$
8-hr TWA: 1 mg/m’*
8-hr TWA: 0.1 mg/mv
TL.V-TWA:
TLV-TWA:
Nouecstablishcd
Human, oral, TD,: 120 pg/kg affects the gastmintestinal tract
(nausea or vomiting)
Rat, oral, TDL: 1210 pag (35 weeks prior to mating) affects
fertility (pre- and post-implantation mortality)
copper, ca 100%
1 [email protected]*
0.2 rn#t
# Set NKSH, R?‘.ES (GLS32SooO), for addbid
repreductive,
tumorigenic,
and toxicity
data.
Molecuhtr Weight: 63546
BoningPoint: 4703‘F (2595‘C)
.
Mel&g Pointi 1981% (1083‘C)
De~~Ity/Specifk Gravtty: 8.94
Vapor Pressure: 1 mm Hg at 2962 T (1628 ‘C!)
Water Solubllity: InsotiNe
Appearance and Odor: Solid, v&us shapes, odorless, red/brown-a&&d
metal or powder. Copper is ductile, tough, and easily worked. It is
vay resistant to cormsion, but readily attacked by alkalies.
Extinguishing Medlaz Use extiguishing media approp&te
air, and in extreme cases ignites spontaneously.
to the smrounding fire since copper does not bum. l?irne~~~
bums in
UnusualFire or Explodon Hazards Liquidcoppercxpbdcson contactwith water.High concenlrations
of fme copper particles iu the air may
present an explosion hazard.
SpeclalFire-fighting Procedures: Sii fa may prodtoxic fumes, wear a self-contained breathing [email protected]) with a full facepiece
.
operated in the pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode and a fully encapsulating suit.
StabUlty/Polymerlxa~kn:
Copper is stable at room temperature in closed containers under normal storage snd handling conditions. Howevez, on
long standing, a white, highly explosive peroxide deposit may form. Copper’s vapors are uninhibited and may form polymers in vents and flame
arreqers.
Chemkal Incompatlbilltles:
Copper reacts violently with ammonium nitrate, bmmates, iodates. chlorates. ethylene oxide, hydraxoic acid,
potassium oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide + trkNoroacetic acid,hydrogen peroxide, sodium peroxide, sodium azide, sulfuric acid, hydrogen sulfide +
air. and lead azide. A potentially explosive reaction occurs with actylenk compounds. Copper ignites on contact with chlorine, fluorine [above
250 l F (121 ‘C)]. chlorine trifluoride, and hydrazinium nitrate [above 158 ‘P (70 ‘C)). It is also incompatible with l-bromo-2-propyne;
an incandescent reaction occurs with potassium dioxide.
Condltlons to Avoid: Avoid prolonged exposure to air and moisture. OZI exposure to moist air, copper slowly converts to the carbonate.
Haxardous Products of Decomposition: Themral oxidative decomposition of copper can produce metallic oxides (copper fumes).
No. 162
Copper
8190
in laboratory animals.
Summary of Rlsksr Copper is a necessary human nutrient. excessive intake levels of which the kidneys normally elite
In individuals with
kidney disease or, rarely, Wilson!s disease (abncmnal retention and storage of copper in the body that damages the liver, kidneys, [email protected], blood,
bones, and endocrine glands), copper levels may accumulate. Significant industrial exposure to copper occurs mainly through inhalatron of fumes
during welding, smeltmg. or refinmg operations; or through exposure to copper dusts and mists during mining, extracting, refining, or manufacturing processes. Copper puticl~.~ may irritate, discolor,.and damage eyes. Exposure to copper salts in many applications is potentially toxic. Copper
dusts, fumes, and salts may irritate the upper respiratory tract. Long-term exposure may uritate the skin and discolor the skin or ham
Medlcal Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Individuals with impaired pulmonary or renal hmction should avoid cxposurc.
Target Organsr Respiratory system, skin, eyes, liver, kidneys.
Prima
Entry Routesz Inhalation, ingestion.
Acute ii! ffectsr Inhalation of copper fumes may give rise to metal fume fever (after an incubation period of about 5 hr), an allergic reaction with
flu-like symFtoms-high temperalure, metallic taste, nausea. coughing general weakness, muscle achy and exhaustion. These symptoms usually
disappear within 24 hr. llirxct contact with copper cause-s skin and (less often) eye irritation, and itching of the linings of the nox, mouth, and mapiratory tract Exposure to copper dust may cause a greenish-black skin discoloration. Copper ingestion causes nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain,
and diarrhea. Ingestion of large doses may cause stomach and intestine ulceration, jaundice, and kidney and liver damage.
Chronic Effectsr Continued exposure to copper may cause mild dermatitis and & enemtion of the mucous membranes. Repeated or prolonged
exposure to copper dusts and mtsts can discolor skin and hair and irritate the skin. w epeated inhalation can cause chronic respiratory disease.
individuals) are more susceptible to chronic copper poisoning. If undetected and untreated, this
,, . .
-1
Eyes: Gently lift the eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of water until transported to an emergency medical
facility. Consult a physician immediately.
Skin: Qt&Uy remove contaminated clothing. Rinse with flooding amounts of water for at least 15 min. For reddened or blistered skin, consult a
physician Wash affected area with soap and water.
Inhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathing with artificial respiration.
IngestIon: Never give anything by mouth to an unwnscious or convulsing person. If ingested, have that conscious
person drink 1 to 2 glasses of
water, then induce vomiting.
After first aid, get appropriate in-plant, paramedic, or community medical support
Physician’s Note: A blood count shows leucocytosis if an individual has metal fume fever. Consider chellation with penicillamlne or BAL
(British Anti-Lewisite or dimercaprol) for chronic intoxication.
Cieanup personnel shouid-protect against vapor inhalation-and skin and eye coi&% Cleamip methods such as vacuuming (with the appropriate
filter) or wet moppin minimii
dust dispusion. Absorb liquid containing copper with vermiculite, dry sand, or other inert materials. Place in ap
propriate containers Hor disposal. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120).
Dlsposai: Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detaiIed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
EPA Desirmatlons
RCRA Ha&rdous Waste (40 CFR 26133): Not listed
Listed as a CBRCLA Hazardous Substance* (40 CFR 302.4X Reportable Quantity (RQ): 5000 lb (2270 kg) [* per Clean Water Act, 307(a)]
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
Listed as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65)
I
OSHA Designations
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-1-A)
I
II
,--
\
I
sar$wearaNIOSbpprovidresgCr~. Some&ommcndations follow. For copper dust and mists greater than 50 mg/ma, wear a~high-effrciency
particulate respirator,a supplied-rur
respirator,or anSCBA,all with a fulI facepiece. For copper dust and mists greater than 2OGO mg/m’,weara
supplied-air respirator equipped either with a full facepiece operated in pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode or with a hood in continuousflow mode. For copper fumes over 100 mg/m3, wear euher a powered an-purifying respirator with a high-efficiency filter, or a supplied-ah
respirator equipped either with a full facepiece operated in pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode or with a hood in continuous-flow mode.
[email protected]~o~sdonot protectworkersut oxygen-de..Xent
atmospheres.
Other: Wear impervious gloves. boots. aprons, and gauntlets to prevent prolonged or repeated skin contact. Eye and face protection is required
when grinding, welding, cutting, or remelting. Protect skin from molten metal and radiant heat when melting scrap. Machine turnings may also
present a laceration hazard. When handling oilconraminated copper, wear rubber glovea to prevent skin contact.
Ventilation: Provide general and local explosion-proof ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations below OSHA PELs and ACGIH
TLVS (Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred since it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at its source.oan
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities.
Contamluated Equipment: Never wear contact lenses in the work areas soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate, irritants. Remove this
material from your shoes and equipment. Launder contaminated clothing before wearing.
Comments: Never eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking, using Ihe toilet. or applying cosmetics.
Storage Requlrementx
Store copper in tightly closed containers in a cool. dry, well-ventilated area. Avoid exposure to a3 and moisture.
Engineering Controls: Avoid dust and fume inhalation and direct contact with skin and eyes. Use only with adequate ventilation and appropriate
personal protective gear. Institute a respiratory protection program that inchnles regular training, maintenance, inspection, and evaluation. Practice
good personal hygiene and housekeeping procedures. Maintain exposures below the PElJTLV. Monitor copper dust and mist levels in the air.
Other Precautions: Provide placement and periodic examinations that emphasize the skin, eyes. and respiratory system. Prevent exposing
individuals with chronic res ‘ratory disease or Wilson’s disease.
Transportation
Dnta (49 CT’
FR 172.101. .102): Not listed
r-_
;
/
1 Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Genium Publishing Corporation
1145 Catalyn Saeet
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836 USA
(518) 377-8854
Sheet No. 703
l,&Dichloroethylene
'.
I Issued: 4/90
Lf-Dichloroethylene Description: An industrial solvent composed of 60% cis- and 40% traru-isomers. Both jsomrs, cis R 1
and trans, are made by partial chlorination of acetylene. Used as a g e d solvent for organic materials, lacquers, dye
extraction, thermoplastics, organic synthesis,and pdums.The trans-isomer is more widely used in industry than either s
I 2*
K 1
the cis-isomer or the mixture. Toxicity also varies between the two isomers.
Other Designations: CAS No. 0540-59-0; C , q q ; acetylenedichlorkle; ciS-1,2-dkhloroethylene;sym-dichloroethylene;
h a -1,2-dichIoroethylme,dioform.
Manulacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult the latest Chanicahuuk Blryus' GuidO",for a suppliers list.
NFPA
@
HMIS
H 2
F
R
3
1
PFW
1,2-Dichlorocthylenc, ca 100%
OSHA PEL
8-hr T W A 790 mg/m3, 200 ppm
Toxicity Data*
Rat, oral LD,: 770 m e g ; toxic effects not yet reviewed
Frog, inhalation, T G 117 mg/m3inhaled for 1hr affects the
peripheral nave and sensation (flaccid paralysis without
anesthesia); behavior (excitement); lungs, thorax,or
respiration (respiratorydepression)
ACGIH TLV, 1989-90
TLV-TWA 790 mglm', 200 ppm
NIOSH REL, 1987
790 mg/m3,200 ppm
* See NOSH, RTECS (KV9360000).for additionaltoxicity data.
Meltfng Point: -56 to -115 'FI-49 to -82 'CI
Vapor Pressure: 180 to 264 torr at 68 'Ff20'C
Vapor Density (Air = 1): 3.4
Speciftc Gravity <IzO = 1at 39 *F/4T):1 2 7 at 77 'FR5 *C
Water Solubility: Insoluble
Appearance and Odor: A colorless, low-boiling liquid with a pleasant odor.
Flash Point: 37 'FLU 'C, CC
I AutoignItion Temperature: 860 TI460 *C I LEL: 5.6% v/v
I UEL: 12.8% v/v
ExtinguishkgMedia: Use dry chemical, CO,,halon, water spray, or standard foam. Water may be ineffective unless used to blanket the fire.
Unusual Fke or Explosion Hazards This material's vapors BTC a dangerous fire hazard and moderate explosion hazard when exposed to any
heat or ignition source or oxidizer.
Special Flre-fighting Procedures Since fire may produce toxic fumes,wear a selfataincd breathing apparahu (SCBA)with a full facepiece
operated in the pressurademand or positive-pressure mode and a fully encapsulatingsuit. Vapors may travel to heat or ignition sources and flash
b k k Stay upwind and out of low areas. Be aware of runoff from fue control methods. Do not release to sewem or waterways.
StabUitylPolymerizatlon: This material is stable at mom tempemtunin closed containers under normal storage and handling conditions.
Hazardous p&muization cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatibllitks: This material b incompatible with alkalies, nitrogen tetraoxide, difluommcthylent, strong oxidizers, and dihypofluorite. When in contact with copper or copper alloys or by reaction with potassium hydroxide, explosive chloroacetyienemay be released.
Condltlons to Avoid: Addition of hot liquid to coid 1,2dichlomthylene may cause sudden emission of vapor that could flash back to an ignition
source.
Hazardous Productsof Decomposition: Thermal oxidative decomposition of 1.2-dichloroethylene can produce highly toxic fumes of chlorine
(Cl-).
No. 703
1,2-Dichloroethylene 4/90
Summary of Risks: 1,2-Dichloroethylene's most important effect is its irritation of the central nervous system (CNS) and narcosis. This material
is toxic by inhalation, ingestion, and skin contact. It is also irritating to the eyes. The trans-isomer at 2200 ppm causes nausea, vertigo, and
burning of the eyes. The trans;isomer is twice as potent as the cis-isomer. If rend effects occur, they are transient.
Medkal Condltions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: None reported.
Target Organs: Central nervous system, eyes, respiratory system.
Primary Entry Routes: Inhalation, ingestion, skin a d eye contact.
Acute Effects: Inhalation of 1,2dichloroethylene causes narcosis, resphtory l m t hitation, nausea, vomiting, tremor, weakness, central nervous
depression, and epigastric (the abdomen's upper midregion) cramps. Contact with the liquid causes eye and skin (on prolonged contact) irritation.
Ingestion causes slight depression to deep narcosis.
Chronic Effects: None reported.
FIRST AJD
Eyes: Flush immediately, including under the eyelids, gently but thoroughly with flooding amounts of running water for at least 15d n .
Skin: Quickly remove contaminated clothing. After rinsing affected skin with flooding amounts of water, wash it with soap and water.
Inhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathing as needed. Have trained personnel administer 100% oxygen, pnferably
with humidification.
Ingestlon: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious or convulsing person. If ingested, have a cmcbus person drink 1to 2 glasses of
water, then induce repeated vomiting until vomit is clear.
After flrst aid, get appropriate implant, paramedlc, or community medical support.
Physfclan's Note: Intravenous injectionsof calcium gluconate may relieve cramps and vomiting. Treat central nervous system effects symptomaticallv.
~
SpUlflLeak: Design andpractice a If-dichbroethylene spillcontrofand countermeasureplan (SCCP).Notify safety personnel, remove all heat
and ignition sources, evacuate hazard ma, and provide adequate ventilation. Cleanup personnel should protect against vapor inhalation and skin
or eye contact. Absorb small spills on paper towels. After evaporating the 1,2-dichIoroethylene from these paper towels in a fume hood, burn the
paper in a suitable location away from combustible material. Collect and atomizC large quantities in a suitable combustion chamber equipped with
an appropriate effluent gas cleaning device. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120).
Disposal: Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
EPA Designations
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33)
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance*(40 CFR 302.4), Reportable Quantity (RQ): 100 lb (45.4 kg) [* per RCRA, Sec. 3001. per Clean
Water Act, Sec. 307(a)]t
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
Listed as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65)
OSHA Designations
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1oo0, Table Z-1)
t Listed as 1.2-%runsdichloroe~~lenc.
Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles,per OSHA e y e and faceprotcction regulations (29 CFR 1910.133).
Respirator: Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and. if necessary, wear a NIOSH-approved respirator. For emergency or
nomutine operations (cleaning spills, reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wcar an SCBA.
Warning: Air-purifying respirators do not protect worken in oxygendeficientatmospheres.
Other: Wear impmious gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent prolonged or repeated skin contact. 1,2-dichlorccthylenc attacks some
forms of plastics, rubber, and coatings.
Ventilation: Provide general and local explosion-proof ventilation systems to maintain airborne concenCrations b l o w the OSHA PEL and
ACGIH TLV (Sec.2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred since it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work m a by controlling it at its
source.(103)
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safetylquickdrench showen, and washing facilities.
Contaminated Equipment: Never wear contact lenses in the work area: soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate, irritants. Remove this
material fmm your shoes and equipment. Launder contaminated clothing befon wearhg.
Comments: Never eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics.
Storage Requirements Store in tightly closed containers in a cool,well-ventilated area away from all incompatiblematerials (Scc. 5)and
oxidizing materials. Outside or detached storage is preferred. If stored inside, place containers in a standard flammable liquids storage cabinet or
room. Protect containers fromphysical damage.
Engineering Controls: Avoid vapor inhalation and skin and eye contact Use only with adequate ventilation and appropriate personal protective
gear. Institute a respiratory protection program that includes regular training, maintenance, inspection, and evaluation. 1,2dichloroethyleneis a
dangerous fire hazard. All engineering systems should be of maximum explosion-pmf design and electrically grounded and bonded. Provide
preplacement questionnaires which emphasize detecting a history of chronic respiratory disease.
Transportatlon Data (49 CFR 172.101, .102): Not listed
MSDS Collection References: 7.26.38.73.84.85.87.88.100.101.103.109, 126.127.136. 137
Genium Publishing Corp.
Materialsafety Data Sheets Collection
One Genium Plaza
Schenectady,NY 12304-4690
(518) 377-8854
DDT (Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane)
MSDS No. 155
Date of Preparation: 10/93
....
..............
ProductlChemicalName: DDT (Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane)
Chemical Formula:
(ClC6Hq)2CHCC13
CAS NO:
50-29-3
Synonyms: Agritan; 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,l,l-trichlomethan~chlorophenothan; Citox; dichlorodiphenylnichloroethane;
Dicophane; diphenyltrichloroethane; Genitox; Kopsol; NCI-cOO464; Neocid; Pentech; trichlorobis (4-chlorophenyl) ethane;
1,1~-(2,2,2-trichloroethyhylidene)bis(4-chlmbenme)~Zerdane.
Derivation: Preparedby condensing chloral or chloral hydrate with chlorobenzene in presence of sulfuric acid.
General Use: One of the most widely used contact insecticides from 1945 until its ban in 1972. Although banned in the U.S.
(except for such uses as emergency health situations and for controlling body lice), it is still widely used in the tropi& for control
of vector-carryingd i e s such as malaria, yellow fever, dengue, filariasis, louse-borne typhus, and louseborne relaping fever.
................
DDT: p'p'DDT 70%wt + o'p'DDT 30% wt (technicalgrade)
Trace Impurities: DDD, DDE
OSHA PELS
NOSH REL
10-hr TWA 0.5 mg/m3
8-hr TWA: 1 mdm3 (skin)
Ca*:
(Limit of quantitation: 0.1
ACGIH TLVs
mg/m3)
T W A 1 mum3
IDLH Level
Ca*
DFG (Germany) M A K (skin)
T W A 1 mg/m3 (total dust)
Category III:Substances with systemic
effects
Onset of effect > 2 hr.
Peak Exposure Limit: 10 mg/m3, 30
min. average value, l/shift
* Ca = Carcinogen
P
~
~~
~
**I%**
Emergency Overview *Qb**
DDT is a white to gray, crystallinesolid. Although it has been banned in the U.S.because of its persistence in
the environment and potential for bioaccumulation, DDT has not produced toxicity in workers who either
manufactured or used it (even over many years). However, this lack of toxicity is based on inhalation andskin absorption. If DDT is ingested, especially in large amounts,central nervous system effects will occur
with possible liver damage. DDT is considered a confirmed animal carcinogen and a suspected human
carcinogen.
Potential Health Effects
Primary Entry Routes: Inhalation, ingestion, skin contact.
Target Organs: Central nervous system, liver, skin, peripheral nervous system.
Acute Effects
Wilson
.A
s
l*
K 2
HMIS
H 2t
R O
Inhalation: Inhalation does not appear to cause toxicity beyond that of minor mechanical irritation.
Eye: Exposure to 423 mg/m3/l hr/day for 6 days caused eye irritation.
tChroniC
Skin: Skin absorption may occur from some DDT solutions, but degree of absorption will depend on the solvent
IPZ?
involved. Aqueous solutions and the powder or crystals are not easily absorbed.
8
Ingestion: DDT can cause a variety of centralnervous system effects if ingested. Large doses generally result in
vomiting, while smaller doses cause symptoms within 2 to 3 hr post-ingestion. Symptoms include tingling of the
lips, tongue, and face; malaise; headache; sore throat; fatigue; tremors of the head, neck, and eyelids, apprehension; ataxia; and
confusion. Convulsions and paralysis of the hands is possible in severe exposures (if vomiting does not occur). Vital signs are
usually normal, but in severe poisonings, the pulse may be irregular and abnormally slow. Based on animal studies, it is
expected that ventricular fibrillation and sudden death can occur at any time during acute poisoning. Recovery from acute
poisoning generally occurs within 24 hr except in the most serious cases.
Carcinogenicity: DDT is considered a suspected human carcinogen by several governmental agencies. IARC-2B (possibly
carcinogenic to humans, limited evidence in humans in the absence of sufficientevidence in experimental animals), NTP-2
(reasonably anticipated to be a carcinogen: limited human evidence or sufficient animal evidence), EPA-B2 (sufficientanimal
evidence; inadequate human evidence), and NIOSH-X(carcinogen defined without further categorization)
Medical Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Possibly, disorders of the central nervous system and liver.
I
MSDS No. 155
DDT (Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane)
10193
Chronic Effects: There are conflicting reports on wherhcr or not DDT produces chronic effects in humans. Although it is well
established that chronic exposure in experimental animals produces effects including liver damage, CNS degeneration,
dermatitis, weakness, convulsions, coma, and death, these effects are not confirmed in humans. Liver cancer is confirmed in
animals, but has not been documented in humans. These conflicting reports appear due to the lack of documented chronic
toxicity in workers and data showing that DDT and its metabolites are retained in the body fat for long time periods, thus
providing a basis for thepo&Ydiiry of chronic toxicity.
Other: Solvents such as kerosine are added to DDT as a vehicle and, depending on the type involved, may be more toxic than
DDT itself.
9
Inhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathing as needed.
Eye Contact: Do not allow victim to rub or keep eyes tightly shut. Gently lift eyelids and flush immediately and continuously
with flooding amounts of water until transported to an emergency medical facility. Consult a physician immediately.
Skin Contact: Quickly remove contaminated clothing. Rinse away any loose material and wash exposed area with soap and water
For reddened or blistered skin, consult a physician. Carefully dispose of contaminated clothing W u s e it may pose a f~ hazard.
Ingestion: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious or convulsingperson. Contact a poison control center. Unleikthe
poison control center advises otherwise, have the conscious and alert person'drink 1 to 2 glasses of water to dilute. Do nbt
inducevomiting. Gastric lavage should be performed promptly.
-3%
Afterfitsr aid, get appropriate in-plant, paramedic, or community medical support.
.&
Notes to Physicians: Effects may be delayed; keep under observation.
Special Precautionflrocedures: Amobarbital or pentobarbital is recommended for the relief of central neurological
manifestations;aibromoethanoland paraldehyde are recommended for allaying prolonged convulsions.
36
Genium
Flash Point: DDT itself is noncombustiblebut is dissolved in a variety of solvents. The average quoted Flash
Point is 162 'F (72.2 'C) although the specific vehicle is not identified.
Flash Point Method: CC
Autoignition Temperature: None reported
LEL: None reported
UEL: None reported
Flammability Classification: Class IIIA Combustible Liquid (varies depending on vehicle)
Extinguishing Media: For small fires, use dry chemical, water spray, or regular foam. For large fires,use
water spray, fog, or regular foam.
Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: Container may explode in heat of fire.
Hazardous Combustion Products Chloride fumes and carbon oxide gases.
Fire-Fighting Instructions: Do not release runoff from fire conml methods to sewersor waterways. Fight fire from maximum
-: . -;I .&distance. Stay away from ends of tanks.
Fire-Fighting Equipment: Because lire may produce toxic thermal decomposition products, wear a self-contained breathing
apparatus (SCBA)with a full facepiece operated in pressure-demand or positivepressuremode. Structural fire fighters'
Drotective clothinn is not effective.
@
Spill Leak Procedures: Notify safety personnel, isolate area, deny entry, and stay upwind. Shut off all ignition sources.
Cleanup personnel should protect against contamination.
Small Spills: For dry spills, carefully scoop up material or vacuum (with an approved filter). Damp mop any residue. For small
solution spills, take up with earth,sand, vermiculite, or other absorbent material and place in suitablecontainers for disposal.
Large Spills
Containment: Dike far ahead of liquid spill for later reclamation or disposal. Do not release into sewers or waterways.
Regulatory Requirements: Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120).
Handling Precautions: Use non-sparking tools to open containers. Keep dry chemical extinguisherson hand in case of fire.
Storage Requirements: Prevent physical damage to containers. Store in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area away from heat,
ignition sources, and incompatibles (Sec. 10). Do not store in aluminum or iron containers.
Engineering Controls: To prevent static sparks, electrically ground and bond all equipment used with and around DDT.
Ventilation: Provide general or local exhaust ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrationsbelow OSHA PEL
(Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred because it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at
its source.(l03)
Administrative Controls: Consider preplacement and periodic medical exams of exposed workers with emphasis on the liver
and central nervous system.
DDT (Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane)
10/93
MSDS No. 155
Respiratory Protectlon: Seek professional advice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29
CFR 1910.134) and, if necessary, wear a MSHANOSH-approved respirator. For any detectable concentration, use a SCBA
with a full facepiece and operated in pressure demand or other positive-pressure mode, or any supplied-air respirator with a full
.,A
facepiece and operated in pressure demand or othw positive-pressuremode with an auxiliary SCBA.For emergency or
nonroutine operations ("cieaningspills, reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an SCBA.Warning!Air-pwjfyingrespwators do
not profecfworkrs in o.aygen-deficientatmospheres. If respirators are used, OSHA requires a written respiratory protection
program
that includes at least: medical certification, training, fit-testing,
environmental monitoring, maintenance,
- - periodic
_
inspection, cleaning, and convenient, sanitary storage areas,
Protective ClothinglEquipment: Wear chemicallyprotective gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets made of butyl rubber to
prevent prolonged or repeated skin contact. Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye and face
protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133). Because contact lens use in industry is controversial, establish your own policy.
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing
facilities.
Contaminated Equipment: Separate contaminated work clothes from street clothes. Launder before reuse. Remove-this
material from your shoes and clean personal protective equipment.
before
Comments: Never eat, drink,or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especWklly
eating, drinking, smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics.
+%?P
Physical State: Solid
Appearance and Odor: White to gray crystals or powder which is odorless or has a slight aromatic odor.
Odor Threshold: 5.0725 mghn3
Vapor Pressure: 5.5 x lW6 mm Hg at 68 'F (20 'C)
Formula Weight: 354.48
Specific Gravity (HzO=l, at 4 T):0.98 to 0.99
Water Solubility :0.0012 ppm
Other Solubilities (g DDT/100 mL): acetone 58,95% alcohol 2, benzene 78, benzyl benzoate 42, carbon tehrachlmide45,
chlorobenzene74, cyclohexanone 116,dibutyl phthalate 33, o-dichlorobenzene 68, dichlorodiffuoromethane2, dioxane 100,
ethyl ether 28, gasoline 10, isopropanol3, kerosine 8 to 10, methylated naphthalenes40 to 60,mineral oil 5, morpholine 75,
peanut oil 11,pine oil 0 to 16, tebalin 61, aibutyl phosphate 50, and xylene 60.
Boiling Point: 365 'F (185 'C)
MeIting Point: 227 'F (108.3 'C)
Stability: DDT is stable at room temperature in closed containers under normal storage and handling cpndi$o,x# It biodegrades
i
very slowly.
Polymerization: Hazardous polymerization does not occur.
Chemical Incompatibilities: Strong oxidizers, alkaline materials, iron and aluminum salts.
Conditions to Avoid: Exposure to heat, ignition sources, and incompatibles.
Hazardous Decomposition Products: Thermal oxidative decompositionof DDT can produce carbon dioxide.
~
-~
~
Toxicity Data:*
Eye Effects: None reported.
Skin Effects: None reported.
Acute Oral Effects:
Human, oral, LDb: 500 mgkg caused
convulsions, cardiac arrhythmias, and
respiratory changes.
Rat, oral,LDSG 87 [email protected]; details not reported
*
Carcinogenicity: Rat, oral,TDh: 1225 mgkg given for 7 continuous
weeks caused liver tumors.
Mutagenicity: E. coli: 15 pmol/L caused DNA damage.
Teratogenicity: Rat, oral, TDh: 112 m a g given to a 56 day old
male caused paternal effects (spermatogenesis, testes,epididymis,
sperm duct).
MOSH. RTECS (KJ3325000). for additional toxicity data.
. .... ..
Ecotoxicity: Glass shrimp (Paluemonestes kadidensis), LC5o = 2.3 mcg/L/96 hr at 69.8 'F (21 'C); Japanese quail, 2 month old
male, (Coturnixjuponica), LD50 = 84 1 [email protected]; bluegill (Lepomis mcrochirus), LC50 = 28.7 rncg/L/36 hr.
MSDS No. 155
DDT (Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane)
10/93
Environmental Degradation: In water, DDT will adsorb strongly to sediments, significantly bioconcentrate in fish, and will be
subject to considerable evaporation with an estimated half-life of several hr to almost 50 hr from certain waters. It may
biodegrade when high concentrations of required microbes (Escherichia,Hydrogenomonas,and Saccharomyces) are present.
On land, DDT will adsorb strongly and should not appreciably leach to groundwater. It may evaporate (half-life of 100days) ,
and is subject to photooxidation from soil. DDT may significantly biodegrade in flooded soils or under anaerobic conditions
provided high populations of the required microbes are present. Half-life ranges from 2 to >15 yr. In the air, DDT is subject to
direct photooxidation and reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals (est. half-life = 2 days). Wet and dry
deposition are significant mechanisms for removal from air.
Disposal: DDT is a good candidate for rotary kiln or liquid injection incineration (furnace with afterburner and alkali scrubber).
60 to 80%removal of DDT from contaminated soils has been achieved in 10 min. by super criticalcarbon dioxide extraction.
Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicableFederal, state, and local
regulations.
Container Cleaning and Disposal: Triple rinse containers. Containers in good condition should be returned to the manufGturer
and those that are not reusable should be punctured and transported to a scrap metal facility for recycling, disposal, or [email protected] in
a designated landfill.
DOT Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101):
Shipping Name: Organochlorine
pesticides, solid toxic, n.0.s.
Shipping Symbols: Hazard Class: 6.1
ID No.: UN2761
Packing Group: 111
Label: Keep Away From Food
SDecial Provisions (172.102): -
Packaging Authorizations
a) Exceptions: 173.153
b) Non-bulk Packaging: 173.213
c) Bulk Packaging: 173.240
Quantity Limitations
a) Passenger, Aircraft, or Railcar: 100kg
b) Cargo Aircraft Only: 200 kg
Vessel Stowage Requirements
a) Vessel Stowage: A
b) Other: 40
EPA Regulations:
RCRA Hazardous Waste Number (40CFR 261.33): UO61
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste Classification (40CFR 261.33)
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance (40CFR 302.4)per RCRA, Sec. 3001:CWA, Sec. 31 1 (3x4): and CWA, Sec. 307(a)
.:.*
CERCLA Reportable Quantity (RQ), 1 Ib (0.454kg)
SARA Toxic Chemical (40CFR 372.65): Not listed
SARA EHS (Extremely Hazardous Substance) (40CFR 355): Not listed
OSHA Regulations:
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1O00. Table 2-1.2-1-A)
References: 73,101,103,124,126,127,132,133,136,139,148,153,167,168,169,176,180,183
................................. M Gannon, BA
.........PA Roy, MPH,CIH
.............. T Thoburn, MD,MPH
Prepared By
Industrial Hygiene Review
Medical Review
Disclaimer: Judgments as to the suitability of information herein for the purchaser‘s purposes are necessarily the purchaser’s
responsibility. Although reasonablecare has been taken in the preparation of such information, Genium Publishing Corporation
extends no warranties, makes no representations, and assumes no responsibility as to the accuracy or suitability of such
information for application to the purchaser’s intended purpose or for consequences of its use.
I
Page 4 of4
Coppiglu 0 1993 Ocnium PubIbh’L Capaaticm. Any urnmenid uu or rcpoduuion without thc p b l t h c h pcmiuian u prohibiud
Genium Publishing Corporation
One Genium Plaza
Schenectady, NY 123044690 USA
Material Safety Data Sheets Colleclion:
Sheet No. 385
Ethyl benzene
Ethylbenzene (C6Hs&Hs) Description: Derived by heating benzene and ethylene in presence of aluminum chloride with R 1
subsequent distillation, by fractionationdirectly from the mixed xylene stream in petroleum refining, or dehydrogenation I
3
of naphthenes. Used as a solvent, an antiknock agent in gasoline; and as an intermediate in production of synthetic rubber. S 2*
styrene, cellulose acetate, diethylbenzene.acetophenone, ethyl anthraquinone, propyl oxide, and a-methylbenzol alcohol.
K 4
*skin
Other Designations: CAS No. 10041-4,ethylbeml, EB,phenyleihane, NCLC56393.
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult latest Chemical Week Buyers' Cuidcm for a suppliers list.
abOption
HMIs
H 2t
Cautions: Ethylbenzeneis a skin and mucous membrane initant considered the most irritating of the benzene Series. Inhalation
causes acute and chronic central nervous system (CNS) effects. It is highly flammableand forms explosive mixtures with air.
-
-
F
3
R
O
PPE - soc.
t chronic
I
-
Ethylbenzene, ca S9.W.Impurities include 0.1% me& & par0 xylene, 0.1% cumene, and 0.1 % toluene.
1991 OSHA PELS
1992-93ACGM TLVs
1985-86 Toxicity Data*
8-hr"%'A: 100ppm (435mg/m3)
Twk 100ppm (434 mg/m3)
100p p d 8 hr caused eye effects,
Human, inhalation,
15-min STEL: 125 ppm (545 mdm?
STEL 1% ppm (545 mg/m3>
sleep, and respiratory changes.
&Xhl Level: 50 w m (217mg/m3)
1990DFG (Gemany) MAK
Human, lymphocyte: 1 mmoI/L induced sister chromatid
1990 IDLH Level
WA 1OO ppm (440 mg/m3)
exchange.
Category 1: local irritants
Rat. oral. LD,:3506 mg/kg: toxic effects not yet reviewed
PPm
peakExposure Limit: 200 PPm*5 min.
Rat (female). inhalation,Q loo0p p M k/day. 5 days/
1990N O S H REL
momentary value, max of 8/shift
wk,for 3 wk prior to mating and daily for 19 days of gestaTWA 100 ppm (445.mg/m3)
Danger of cutaneous absorption
tion produced pups with high incidence of extra ribs.(*m
STEL 125 ppm (545mg/m3)
~~
* See "IOSH.RTECS (DAo700000X for additionalirritation,mutation,nproductive, and toxicity data.
Melting Point: -139'F (-95'C)
Surface Tenston: 315 dyne/cm
Ionization PotentM: 8.76 eV
Viscosity: 0.64CPat 77 'F (25 'C)
Refraction Index: 1.4959 at 68 'F (20 'C)
Relative Evaporation Rate (ether = 1):0.0106
Bulk Density: 7.21 lb/Gal at 77 'F (25 'C)
Critical Temperature: 651 'F (343.9 'C)
Critical Pressure: 35.6 atm
Density: 0.863 at 77 'F (25 'C)
Water Solubility: Slightly, 14 md100 mL at 59 'F (15 'C)
Other SolubWties: Miscible in alcohol, etbm, soluble in carbon tetrachloride,benzene,
sulfur dioxide. and many organic solvents; insoluble in ammonia
Odor Threshold: 2.3 ppm
Vapor Pressure: 7.1 mm Hg at 68 'F (20-0;10 mmHg at 78.62 'F (25.9 'C);100 m m Hg
16538 'F (74.1'C)
Saturated Vapor Denslty (Air = 0.075 ib/fe o r 1.2 kg/d): 0.0768 Ib/f$ or 1.2298 kg/m3
'
Extlngukhing Medk Class 1B Flammableliquid. For small fires. use dry chemical. carbon dioxide, or 'alcohol-resistant' foam. For large fires,us
fog or 'alcohol-resistant' foam. Use water only if other agentsare unavailable; EB floats on water and may travel to an ignition source and spread
fire. Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: Burning rate = 5.8 mm/mia Vapors may travel to an ignition source and flash back. Container may
explode in heat of fire. EB poses a vapor explosion hazard indoors, outdoors. and in sewers. Special Fire-fighting Procedures: Because fire may
produce toxic thermal decompositionproducts, wear a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece operated in pressure-&man(
or positive-pressure mode. Cool container sides with water until well after fire is out. Stay away from ends of tanks. For massive fire in cargo area,
use monitor nozzles or unmanned hose holders; if impossible, withdraw from area and let fue bum.Withdraw immediatelyif you hear rising sound
from venting safety device or notice any tank discoloration due to fire. Do not release runoff from fire control methods to sewers or wataways.
StabIlItylPolymerlzation: Ethylbenzeneis stable at room temperature in closed containers under normal storage and handling conditions. Hazard01
polymerization cannot OCCUL
Chemlcal Incompatlbilltles: Reacts vigorously with oxidizers.
Conditions to Avoid: Exposure to heat and oxidizers.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition: Thermal oxidative decomposition of EB can produce acrid smoke and irritating fumes.
Sectio
-....
.
Carcinogenlcity: The IARC!164) NTP.('W and OSHA('@)do not list EB as a carcinogen:Summary of Risks: Occupational exposure to EB alonc
is rare s&ce it ii usually present together with other solvents. EB is irritating to the eyes. skin. and respiratory tract. Vapor inhaiation produces
varying degrees of CNS effects depending on concentration.The liquid is absorbed through the skin but vapors are not. 56 to 64% of inhaled
ethylbenzene is retained and metabolized. Urinary metabolites followingexposure to 23 to 85 pprn for 8 hr are mandelic acid (64%). phenylglyoxylic acid (25%). and methylphenylcarbinol/l-phenylethanol (5%). Concurrent exposure to xylene and ethylbenzene causes slower excretion
of EB metabolites. Based on the rat LDm,one manufacturer gives 3 to 4 oz. as the lethal dose for a 100 lb person.
Continue on ncxl pagc
Copyighr 0 1992GsniumPubluhing C a p a r t i o n Any cmmmcirl w o( rrpoduaDnwithout hpbllhu's p h i o n 'D pdubitsd.
No. 385
Ethylbenzene
9/92
Secti
Medical Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Skin and CNS diseases and impaired pulmonary function (especially obstructive
airway disease). Target Organs: Eyes, respiratory system, skin, CNS. blood. Primary Entry Routes: Inhalation. skin and eye contact. Acute
Effects: Vapor inhalation of 200 ppm caused transient eye irritation; lo00 ppm caused eye irritation with profuse watering (tolerance developed
rapidly); 2000 ppm caused severe and immediate eye initation and watering. nasal irritation, chest consmction, and vertigo; 5000 ppm was
intolerable and caused eye and nose irritation. Inhalation of high concentrations may cause narcosis. cramps, and death due to respiratory paralysis.
Skin exposed to pure ethyl&.llzene for 10 to 15 min absorbed 22 to 33 mglcm2/hr. Immersion of hand in solutions of 112 & 156 me/L for 1 hr
absorbed 118 & 215.7 pg/cm*/hr. respectively. Chronlc Effects: Repeated skin contact may Cause dryness. scaling. and fssuring. Workers
chronically exposed to > 100ppm complained of fatigue. sleepiness. headache, and mild irritation of the eyes and respiratory tract. Repeated vapor
inhalation may result in blood disorders. particularly leukopenia (abnormally low level of white blood cells) and lymphocytosis.
FIRST AID
Eyes: Do no! allow victim to rub or kaep eyes tightly shut. Gently lift eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of
water until transported to an emergency medical facility. Consult a physician immediately. Skin: Quickly remove contaminated clothing. Rinse
with flooding amounts of water for at least 15 min. Wash exposed area with soap and water. For reddened or blistered skin. consult a physician.
Inhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathing as needed. Ingestion: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious or
convulsing person. Contact a poison control center and unless otherwise advised, have that conrcioux Md alerl person drink 1 to 2 glasses of water
to dilute. Do not induce vomiting! Aspiration of even a small amount of EB in vomitus can cause severe damage since its low viscosity and surface
tcnsion will cause it to spread over a large area of the lung tissue.
After first ald, get appropriate in-plant, paramedic, or community medical support.
Note to Physicians: BEI = mandelic acid in urine (15 glg of creatinine), sample at end ofshift at workweeks end. Since this test is not specific,
test for EB in expired air for confirmation.
SpilVLeak: Notify safety personnel. Isolate and ventilate area. deny entry and stay upwind. Shut off all ignition sources. Cleanup personnel should
protect against vapor inhalation and s k d e y e Contact. Take up small spills with earth, sand. vermiculite. or other absorbent, noncombustible material and place in suitable container. Dike far ahead of large spill for later reclamation or disposal. Report any release >lo00lb. Follow applicable
OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120). Environmental Transport: If released to soil, EB partially evaporates into the atmosphere, with a half-life
of hrs to wks, and some leaches into groundwater, especially in soil with low organic carbon content. Biodegradation occurs with a half-life of 2
days. Some EB may absorb to sediment or bioconcentrate in fuh. Evidence points to slow bio.degradationin groundwater. In air. it reacts with
photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals with a half-life of hrs to 2 days. Additional amounts may be removed by rain. Ecotoxicity Values:
Shrimp (Mysidopsis bahiu). L,Cs = 87.6 mg/L,96 hr; sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodonvurkgutus) IXs = 275 mglW96 hr; fathead minnow
(Pimepbulespromefus)U2.s = 42.3 mgn/96 hr in hard water & 485 mSIU96 hr in softwater. Dksposal: A candidate for rotary kiln incineration at
1508 to 2912’F (820 to 1600%). liquid injection incineration at 1202 to 2912’F (650 to 16oo’C). and fluidized bed incineration at 842 to 1796‘F
(450 to 980’C). Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal. state, and local regulations.
OSHA Deslgnations
EPA Designations
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1OOO. Table 2-1-A)
Listed as aRCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.21): No. DO01
Listed as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40CFR 372.65)
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355). TPQ: Not listed
Lisced as a CERCLA HazardousSubstance* (40 CFR 3024): Final Reportable Quantity (RQ), loo0 Ib (454 kg) [* per CWA. Sec.311 @)(4) &
CWA, Sec. 307 (a)]
-
- -_
coccct lens use-in industry % controversial. establish your own p&cy. Respirator: Seek professional advice prior to selection and use. Follow
OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and, if necessary. wear a MSHNOSH-approved respirator. For < lo00 ppm. use a powered
air-purifying respirator with an appropriate organic vapor cartridge, a supplied-air respirator (SAR). SCBA. or chemical cartridge respirator with
appropriate organic vapor cartridge. For < 2000 ppm, use a SAR or SCBA with a full facepiece. For emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning
spills. reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an SCBA. Warning! Air-pwaing respirators do not protecf workers in oxygen-deficientafmospheres. If respirators are used, OSHA requires a respiratory protection program that includes at least: medical certification, training. fit-testing,
periodic environmental monitoring, maintenance, inspection, cleaning, and convenient, sanitary storage areas. Other: Wear chemically protective
gloves, boots. aprons, and gauntlets made of Viton or polyvinylchloride to prevent skin contact Ventilation: Provide general and local exhaust
vcntilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations below the OSHA PELS (Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred because it prevents
contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at its source.(103) Safety stations: Make available in the work area emergency
eyewash stations, saFety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities. Contaminated Equipment: Separate contaminated work clothes from
street clothes and launder before reuse. Remove this material from your shoes and clean PPE. Comments: Never eat, drink, or smoke in work
areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material. especially before eating, drinking, smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics.
~~
~
Storage Requirements: Store in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area away from ignition sources and oxidizers. Outside or detatched storage is
prcfer;od. Ifinside, store in a standard flammable liquids cabinet. Containers should have flame-arrester or pressure-vacuum venting. To prevent
static sparks, electrically ground and bond all equipment used with ethylbenzene. Install Class 1. Group D electrical equipment. Engineering
Controls: To reduce potential health hazards. use sufficient dilution or local exhaust ventilation to control airborne contaminants and to maintain
levcls as low as possible. Purge and ventilate reaction vessels before workers are allowed to enter for maintenance or cleanup. Administrative
Controls: Consider preplacement and periodic medical exams of exposed workers that emphasize the CNS, skin, blood. and respiratory system.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101)
DOT Shlpping Name: Ethylbenzene
Packaging Authorizations
Quantity Limitations
a) Passenger Aircraft or Railcar: 5L
a) Exceptlons: 173.150
DOT Hazard Class: 3
b) Cargo Aircraft Only: 60 L
ID No.: UN1175
b) Non-bulk Packaging: 173.202
c) Bulk Packaglng: 173.242
DOT Packing Group: II
Vessel Stowage Requirements
DOT Label: Flammable liquid
a) Vessel Stowage: B
Special Provlslons (172.102): TI
b) Other: ~‘SDSCoUeclionReferences: 26.73.100. 101, 103. 124, 126. 127.132. 133. 136,139.140.148.l53,159.162.163.164. 167.168. 171. 176.173
I’rePmd by: M Gannon, B& Industrfal Hygiene Review: D Wilson. CIH: Medical Review: w SiIvennan. MD
-
%‘FithI 0 1992by Ocniumprbli,&, corponlraL
by
ummrci.l u.c or rrpmdualon rlrhar~ ths p u b l M s p m b s i o n ir pmhibitd Judsmnu u tothc ruaubdq or m f w m l m n hc.sur toor d u p l r c h r u f 9 purpo=s
vs r r c c u d Y thc p l l d u x l s nc-ibaity.
AI&ulh rsuon.&
hu bosn ukcn in thc pq-lion of rvch inlamtioh Gniurn PubliihLy C a p a a l l c m cxunds no WUNUICS. n v b r no EprswnUliON. .ndIlaYTrys w
nc’WrlbdlV u 10 Ihe accuncy OT ruiubllity orru& donn.i,o, for .ppl,oi,on 10tlrs purehvsir vllcnihd pa la cm=qusnou ol iu u.c.
I Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
-
P
-
Geniurn Publishing Corporation
1145 Catalyn Street
Schenectady,NY 12303-1836 USA
w
Sheet No. 758
Iron
(518) 377-8854
Issued: 7/9 1
Iron (Fe) Descrlption: Occurs naturally as the second most abundant metal (-5%) in the carth's crust.Its commercial
form usually contains some carbon, phosphorus, silica, sulfur, and manganese. It has four naturally occurring isotopes: 54,
56.57 and 58, and six artificial ones: 52,53,55,59,60, and 61. Iron is purified by smelting ore with limestoneand coke in
blast furnaces (purity 91 to 92 %), or by continuousdirect reduction of iron ore with limestoneheated to 1699 'F (926 *C),
melted at 3499 '
P (1926 'C), and then reduced to iron at 2998 'F (1648 'C) with powdered coal (purity 99%). The powder
form is obtained by treating o n or scrap metal with hydrochloric acid to give femus chloride solutioo, then fatrating,
vacuum crystallzing, dehydrating, and roducing it at 1472 'F (800 'C) to metallic iron (briquettes or powda); or by
thermal decompositionof iron carbonyL Solid iron is used to alloy with carbon, manganese, chromium, nickel, and other
elements to form skeL Its radioisotopes (UFe and T e ) are used in biological traca studies. The powder form is used in
metallurgy products, magnets, high-frtquarcy cons.and autojarts; and as a catalyst in ammonia synthesis.
Other Deslgnatlons: CAS No. 7439-894. Anar En 80/150, Annco iron,"carbonyl iroo, Loha,@Suy B-2*
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult latest Chemical WeekBuyers' G u W for a suppliers list.
Genlum
@@
Powder
R
I
S
1
2
1
K l
&lid
HMIS
H 2
F
2
R 1
PPG+
*Sx.8
Cautions: Iron is moderately toxic by ingestion and inhalation of iron dusts and powder. The powder form is pyrophoric (ignites spontaneously
upon exposure to air and other substances).
mn.ca ~1 to YYA
1990 OSHA PEL
8-hr TwA: 10 mg/m3*
1990-91ACGlH TLV
TWA: 5 mg/m3+
1990NOSH REL
5 Wm3+
1985-86Toxkity Datat
Rabbit, intraperitoneal, LD,:20 mg/kg; no toxic effect noted
*Asiron oxidefumes
t Sae NIOSH. RTECS NO456550OL
..foradditionaltoxicitv data.
P
Melting Polnt: 2795 'F (1535 'C)
Density/SpeciflcGravity: 7.86 at 68 'F (20 'C)
'Vapor Pressure: 1 mm Hg at 3248 'F (1787 'C)
Water SolubiUty: Insoluble
Electrkal Resistivity: 9.71 w c m at 68 '
F (20 'C)
Appearance and Odor: Pure, solid iron is a silvery-white or gray, soft, ductile, malleable (canbe rolled, hammered, or bent), slightly magnetic
(becoming mom so as it is alloyed; for exainple, steel)metal. It is available as ingots, wire, sheets, or powder. The powder form IS black-gray.
Apply cooling water spray to firesexposed container sides until fire is welrout If possible with no risk,nmove containers from area.
Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: Since finely divided iron powder is pymphoric and ignitesupon exposure to air at normal temperatures,
fms and dust explosionscan occur in ducts or separators used to remove the dust during grinding aod polishing operations.
Special Fke-fighting Procedures: Since fin may produce toxic fumes,wear a self-containedbreathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece
operated in pressure-demandor positive-pressure mode. Fight fire from as far a distance as possible. Be awan of runoff from fire control
methods. Do not release to sewen or waterways.
*AIthoughno flash point or autoignition(empentwe is rep01~A.rememberthat the powder form is pyrophoric and can ignite spontaneously in air at mom
StabUitylPolymerlzatIon:Iron is stabk in dry- air,- but readily oxidizes in moist air to form rust. Highly
- - divided powder forms arc very unstable
and can-ignitii spontaneously in air.
Chemical Incompatibilitles: Solid or powdered iron ignites or explodes on contact with acetaldehyde, ammonium peroxodisulfate,
chloroformamidinium, chloric acid, ammonium nitrate, halogens, dinitrogen tetraoxide, nitryl fluoride, polystyrene, sodium acetylide, potassium
dichromate, peroxyfodc acid, and nihyl fluoride. Hot iron wire bums in chlorine gas and iron with water forms rust.
Conditions to Avold: Avoid generation of iron dusts and contact with the materials listed above.
Hazardous Products of Decornpvsltlon: Them1 oxidative decomposition of iron can produce toxic iron oxide fumes.
pa
.
No.758 Iron
7/91
I may be associated with an increased risk of lung cancer in miners. No other iron ores arc identified specifically as a carcinogen.
Summary of Risks: Occupational exposures usually result from dust or fume inhalation during minin ore preparation, production, and refining
of the metal and its alloys. Acuteand chronic toxicity can occur. Although ram, occupational toxicity y ingestion has occurred. Its effects are the
same as those by ingestion of large amounts of iron tablets.
Medical Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Chronic respiratory diseases.
Target Organs: Eyes, re iratory tract, liver, and pancreas.
Prlmary Entry Routes: ryes, inhalation, and ingestion.
Acute Effects: Inhalation may be irritating to the re irato tract. Eye contact may cause conjunctivitis(inflammation of the eye's lining), and
deposition of iron particles can leave a "rust rin$' o3rom%h stain on the cornea. Iron's acute toxicity results primarily from accidental or
suicidal ingestions (e.g., overdose of hncontaming vitamin pills). Initially, the patient may have vomiting, abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea,
hematemesis (vomiting blood), lethargy, and shock. After several hours, the patient may improve, but should be observed carefully, as toxicity
ma progress to development of profound shock, severe acidosis (increased acidity in blood), cyanosis (bluish skin discoloration), and fever. Two
to gur days after exposure, liver damage may occur. Within several weeks aftn exposure, in several rare cases, gastrointestinal fibrosis (scarring)
has occurred with obstruction of the digestive tract. Iron overdose may be fatal.
Chronic Effects Chronic inhalation can produce mottling (spotting) of lungs (siderosis). This condition is often without symptoms and has been
referred to as "benign radiopaque pneumoconiosis." Ingestion of greater than X
I to 100mg of iron per day may result in pathological iron
deposition in body tissues. Symptoms include fibrosis (scarring) of the pancreas, diabetes mellitus, and liver cmfiosis. Repeated iron ingestion can
produce cardiac toxicity.
FIRSTAID
Eyes: Gently lift the eyelids and flush immediately and continuouslywith flooding amounts of water until transportedto an emagency medical
facility. Consult a physician immediately.
Skin: QukZremove contaminated clothing. Rinse with flooding amounts of water for at least 15min. For reddened or blistered skin, consult a
physician. ash affected area with soap and water.
Inhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathing as needed.
Ingestion: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious or convulsing person. If ingested, have thatconsciow and okrt person drink 1to 2
glasses of water, then induce vomiting. Consult poison control center.
After first aid, get appropriate in-plant, paramedic, or communlty medical support.
Note to Physicians: Management of iron poisoning by ingestion is complex and beyond this MSDS's scope. Consult a medical toxicologist.
k
~
~~
~
Spilfiak: Notify safety p&onnel. Isolate hazard area,deny entry, and stay upwind. Shut off all ignition sources-no flares, smoking, or flames
in hazard area. Avoid dust generation by cleaning small spills with a damp mop. Since finely divided iron powder is explosive, take special care
during cleanup. For large spills, flush material with a stream of water and dike for later disposal. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR
1910.120).
DIsposa): Contact your supplier or a licensed mntractorfor detailed ncommendations. Fbllow applicableFederal, state, and local regulations.
EPA Designations
RCRA HazardousWaste (40 CFR 261.33): Not listad
CERCLA Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 302.4): Not listed
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40CFR 355): Not listed
SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 37265): Not listed
OSHA Designations
Listed (as iron oxide fumes) as an Air Contaminant (29CFR 1910.1OOO. Table 2-1-A)
Gw&s: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles. per OSHA eye and faceprotection regulations
(29CFR 1910.133). Since
cm&t lens use-in industry 'rs kmtmversial, establish yow 6% p6licy.
Respirator: Scek professional advice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and, if
necessary, wear a NIOSH-approved respirator.
Other: Wear impervious gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent any skin contact.
VentiIation: Provide general and local exhaust ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrationsbcIow the OSHA PEL (Sec. 2). h a I
exhaust ventilation is preferred since it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controllingit at its source.noJ,
Safety Stations: Make available in the work m a emergency eyewash stations, safetylquick-dnnch showas, and washing facilities.
Contaminated Equipment: Remove this material from your shoes and equipment.Launder contaminated clothing before wearing.
Comments Never eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking, using the toiIet, or applying cosmetics.
I Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
-
P
.
Geniurn Publishing Corporation
Sheet No. 713
Lead (Inorganic)
1145 calalyn Sacet
SC~~XXCW,NY
12303-1836 USA
(518)3naw
ACCIH TLV (Lead,
k, fumes and dusts)
m%A:15Opgfd
-1
1989 OSHA PELS (Ltd, iwr-
anic compounds)
b l w k 50 pgh’
Action LevelW A * :30pg/m’
19 CFR 1910.1025 Lead Standard
3lood LeadLevcl: 4opgnOo g
l 9 SFUOSH REL
1o-hrTwA:<1oopg/m’
’Aaionkvd sppliu m a n
t see N
I
o
s
H
R
,T
m(0
I Issued: 8/90
198586ToxkityDatat
Human, inhalation,%.
lOpg/m’af€ects gastromtestinai tract
and l i v a
Human, oral, T
D,: 450 mgkg ingestedo v a 6 yr affects
pexiphaai and cmtrat nervous systems
Rat,oral, TDb: 790 mg/kg affects multigencrationrepduction
uctive, md taaidty dru
luble in hot or cold watt+
V h i l y : 3 2 cp at 6213 ‘F (327.4‘C)
Appearance and odor:Bluish-white, silvery, gray,very soft mctal.
chcmi4 c a r h dioxide.WI~C?spray, or foam to extinguish fire.
Unusual Fire or Exploskn d FI.mmrblt md modaattly urplosive m the form of dust when exposed to heat or flame.
Special Flre-flghtiq proecdurra. Isolate humd area md deny =try. Since fae may pducc toxic fumes, wcar a self-contained breathhg
apparatus (SCBA) w t h a Mfirccpieccaparted m the pessu~e-demandor positive-pcsslne mode and full p r o t d v e equipment Be aware of
nmoff from fre amtrol m#hods. Do not release to sewers 01w w a y s .
ExtinguSshing Mcdi.: Use
2
expos\ae to air. H.zanlom p
o
woncmumtocnrr.
tustrr ofhydrogapemxido + doxrne explodson contact with lead. Lead is incompatiblewith sodium adde,
Cbemkd Inrompatbnltks:
with concentrated hydzogcnpaoxide, chlorine tdloride,
ad lead). Lead is attackedby pure water and weak orgmc
Carclnogenldty: Although the NTP mdOSHA& not list lead as IUrcinogen,the W C lists it IS probably Ca?cinogdto humans, but having
(usually) no human evidence. However, the k a t u r e reporu htanccs of lead-inducadnoopiasms,both benign and malignant, of the kidney and
otha organs in labom&ry h t s . Excessive upos\lrcto ksd has resulted m ncurologk disorders in infants. Exptrimental studies show kad has
reproductive and taatogenic effm- 1
animals, Human male and f a d e teproductive effects are also doannenled.
Summary d Rlsks: Lead is a pomt,systemic poison that affect a variety of organ systans, including the nervous systan, kidneys, reproductive
system, blood formation,and gastromttstinal (GI)systan. The most important way lead enters the body k through inhalation.but it can also be
ingested when lead dust or unwashed hands contUninata food. drink, or cigartttcs. Mu& of ingested lead
through feces without absorptim
into the body. Adults may absorb only 5 to 15% of ingested lead;children may absorb a much larger bachon. Once in the body. lead ~nters
the
bloodstream and circulates to verious organs. Leadamcentrates and remains in bone for many yean. The amount of lead the body stores
increases as exposure continues. with possibly cumdative effects. Depenaing on the dose m i n g the body. lead cw be deadly within several
days or affect health after many years. Very high Qses can cause brain damage (enccphdopathy).
Medkal Conditions Aggravated by Exposurr: Lcad may aggravatenervous system disordas (e.g., epilepsy. narropathiu). kidney diswe~,
high blood P K C S S(hypaknsion),
~
mfatility.md anemia. Lead-ind~& anemia and its effect on blood press~raecan aggravate cardiovascular
disease.
Continue on n a d p a g
.
~ 0 1 5 9 0 ( b n n m R U ~
Any
*dmaIIpod.cLLp . ~ p t h l n % . . L ~
.
No.713
Lead(Lnarganic) &90
ipUVLcak: Noti sdety p e r r a ~ eand
l evacuate all u n n ~ a r personnel
y
immediately. Cleanuppersonnel should protect against inhalationof
iusts or fume an contact with skin or eyes. Avoid Creating dusty conditions. Water sprays may be used m large quantities to prevent the forrna+ate filter) or wet moppin8 minimiw dust dispersion. Scoop the spilled
ion of dust.Cleanupmesuch vacuuming (with ~1
w applicableOSHAre
ons (29CFR 1910.120).
naterial into closed contamers for cfisposal or reclamation. E
I: Contact your supplia or a licensed amtractor for detailed recommcndah'ON. llow appliiblc Federal, state, and localregulations.
?
P
E~EEEstgnstims
Ated as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40CFR 26133, A
F II-EP Toxicity T a t Procemaes)
ble Quanhty (RQ): 1lb (0.454 kg) [* per CleanWater Act, Sec. 307(a)]
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance* 40CFR
A)?R
SARA Extremely HazarQus Substance (40&FR 355): Not hs?
Listed as a SARA Toxic chanical(40 CFR 372.65)
OSHA Designations
Listed~ls
an Air C
o
d (29 CFR 1910.1ooO. Table 2-1-A)
*
Goggles- Wear p t c c t i v or~+cmkal
~ ~ s$ety gogglp, per OSHA eye- and facc-p.reguI?tions (29 CFR 1910.133).
d v i c e prior to reqmatar sclecxlon lud use. Follow OSHA respaatolregulabons (29CFR 1910,134)and, ifnecesR e s p l r ~ t o r :Seek profess
reactor vessels. or storage tanksj, wear an
wear a NIOSH-approved rcspiratbr. For emkgency or nomoutine operations (cleaning
i 3 A . Warning! Air-purjSiingrupkators do n ~ protect
l
workers ino~gm-defrcicnr
atmarp u.
Other: Wear i m p i o u s gloves, boots, ~tprans,and auntlets to prevent skin conteb. htective clothing made of man-made fibers and lacking
m - u p s , pleats,or
kets retain less dust from
.
Ventllatloa: Pr0viJY-d
and local ventilation systcms to maintain pirborne wnmaltiotu below the OSHA PEL (set. 2). L O C exhaust
~
ventilation is p r c f d sincc it events contarninantdispersioninto the w ~ r a
krea b c o n m ~ g
it at its s o u t x x ~ )
Safety Statfons:Make s
v
a
l
i
b
r
mrhe work area emergency eyewash Stations,Saferylquickdratchshowers, and washing facilities.
Contamlnated Equipment: N e v a wear contact lenses in the work aru: soft lases may .bsorb.and dl lenses con~enrrate.initants. Remove this
material from uf shoes and equipment. Launder contamharedclothing More weu'mg.
eat, drink, or smoke in work =us. Practice good pasonrl hygiene afser using this material,'cspecialiy,w&hg hands before
Comments:
eatin& drinking,smoking, using the toilet, or ppplyingcosmetics.
-
ludf
Storage Requirements Store in tightly closed amtainen in a 0001dry.wd-ventifated ~ T U away from dl incompatible mataialsdirect
sunlight, and heat ard ignition source.
Engineering Controk: Educate worker about I d s hazards. Follow Md infmcmployoesof t+e lead standard (29CFR 19lO.loZS). Avoid inhaleon of lead dust and fumes and ingestion of lead. Use only with
personal tcct~vegear and adequate venttlmon. Insutut&a
that includes regular training. m a i n r w t i c n , &aluahn.
Avoid creating dusty conditions. Segregate
tory protectionpro
wntarninated%%ing. Take precautions to ~ o t e claundry
t
pusonncl. Practice good
al [email protected] and housekeepingprocedures.
or a variety of reasom. the k ~ concentration
d
in worimom air may v t -late
*withthc b l \ m i E e v e b m individuals.
Other Precautions: Providepreplacement and periodic medical cxBrmnatKms wluch?
m
e
blood, ne~voujsystem. gastrointestina3 tract, and
lodne~s,including a c o q h blood wunt and urinalysis. Ruxive a wmpl& history inc uding ~ C V ~ O Uslag&
S
and h 0 S p i - a
dwgk,
~ ~ ~ ~ a l c o ~ l c o n n r m p t i o l q p r o ~ e ~ d r u g m l a k e . m d ~ o n a l'ond
m dlead exposure. Maintam records for
airbornee x p u r e monitorin an loyec camplam& and *ysia=
opinions for at kast 40years or duration of
m
survei
hyrin (ZPP) arc useful ind+~tors ofyour bodfs lead
employment plus mycars. Measurement of bloodfead
(PbB) and zinc proto
uchve health effeds to parents and
abdorption level. Mamutin woxica PbBs at or below 40 pg/lOO g of whole blood p % n i m i z ~advdeveloping fetus, maintain the PbBsof workers intending to have children bebw [email protected] g. Elevated Bs increase your risk of dssease. and
the longer you have clcvated PbBs,the greata your chance of subatant~alpumaneat damage.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.102)
IMO Shipping Name: Lead compou;lds, soluble, n.0.s.
M O Hazard Clnss: 6.1
ID No.: UN2291
IMO Label: St. Andrews Cross (X. Stow away from foodstuffs)
IMDC Packaging Croup: Ill
x-
. he1
%b"d
Genium Publishing Corporation
-
1145 Catalyn Street
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836 USA
Mderial Safety Dahz Sheets Collection:
Sheet No. 148
Manganese MetaVPowder
(518) m-8854
Issued: 9/85
Revision: A. 11/89
4anganese MetaUPmder Description: A metallic elemmt Bssociakd with imn ores such as pyrolusite, manganitt,
R
silomelane, and rhodochrosite found mainly in open-hearth slags. Manganese is obtained hpm the reduction of the oxide I
s
rilh aluminum or carbon. Pure manganese is obtained electrically from chloride or sulfate solution. Used in fenoalloys
steel manufactwe); for wagon buffen, mck crushen, railway points and crossings; as a purifying and scavenging agent in
netal production; in the manufacture of aluminum by Toth process, drycell batteries, glass, welding rods,inks, Nbber and
,rood preservatives, paints, and Ceramics; high-purity salt for various chemical uses.
)ther Designations: Manganese; colloidal manganese; magnacat; Mn;CAS No. 7439-96-5.
danufachuer. Contact your supplier or distributor. Consultthe latest ChemicalweekBuyers' Guide ( M u m ref. 73)
or a suppliers list.
1
3
-1
Genlum
@
HMIS
H 3
F 2
R 1
PFG*
langanese, ca 1005%
ISHA PEL
Zeiling limit 5 mg/m' (manganese compounds,
asMn)
ACGM TLVs, 1988-89
TLV-"wk 5 mg/m' (dust and compounds)
T L V - W k 1 mg/m'(fUnre)
STEL 3 [email protected]' (fume)
NIOSH REL,1987
Ceiling limit:5 mg/d (manganeseand
compounds, as Mn)
Toxicity Data*
Human, inhalation, T q . 2300 pglm'
See NIOSH, RTECS (009275000). for additional data with nferenwto mutrgenicand hmrorigeniceffects.
3 o h g Poht 3803 'F (2095'C)*
Neltfng Pohk 2300 'F (1260'C)
Vapor Pressure: 1 mm Hg at 2358 'F (1292 'C)
Atomic Weight: 54.94
Specific Gravity (H,O 5 1 at 39 '
F (4 T)):7.20
Water Solubility: Impure Mn decomposes slowly
4ppearance and Odor: Reddish-grey or silvery powder or metal. No odor.
Extinguishing Media: Use dry chemical extinguishing agent designed for metal Ties.
Unusual Fire or Explodon Hazards: Manganese dust or powder is flammable and moderately explosive when exposed to flame or heated in
mbon dioxide. Mixtures of manganese dust and aluminum dust may explode in air. Ammoniumnitratc and manganese may explode when
heated. Flammable hydrogen gas is generated under Certain conditions (Sec. 5).
Special Fire-nghtlng Procedures: Wear a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece operated in the pressure-demand or
positive-pressure mode.
* Manganese metaVpowdercan present a dust explosionhazardunderfavoring conditions of partick size and airtnnne dust dispersioll The minimumexplosive
cwcentntionof Mn is 0.125 om3.with a minirmmienitica temDmhua of842 '
P (450 *a.
Oxwen ccnccntrationsof less than 15% anvent ismition.
StabUitylPolymerizatlon: Manganese is stable at room temperature in closed containers. Hazardous polymerizationcannot occur.
Chemlcal IncompatSbUlties: The powdered metal ignites on contact with hydrogen peroxide, bromine pentafluoride, fluorine,chlorine and heat,
and sulfur dioxide and heat. It reacts violently with oxidants and nitrogen dioxide (NO& and incandescentlywith nitric acid, phosphorus. and
nitxyl fluoride. Manganese reacts slowly with water at 21'F (100 *C),forming hydrogen gas (flammable). Contact with acids (includingdilute
acids) readily dissolves Mn,with the evolution of hydrogen. Hot, concenhated potassium and sodium hydroxides also dissolve Mn,forming
hydrogen and manganese hydroxide.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition: Thermal oxidative decomposition of manganese can produce manganese oxides.
....
I Material Safe1.y
- - Data Sheets Collection:
Genium Publishing Corporation
Sheet No. 355
Phenol
1145 Catalyn Street
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836 USA
(518)
.
. 377-8854
I Issued: 9/80
Revision: C,11/90
Phenol (C,H.OH) Descriptlon: One of many aromatic compounds in coal tar. Made by alkylating benzene with pmpyl- R 1
:ne then o&king the resulting cumene to prbduce phenol aid acetone. Used as a feeddockin ma%ufacturhg v d o u s >henoulcresins, caprolactum, bis-phenol-A, and other chemicals and drugs; a disinfectant; a fuel-oil sludge inhibitor; a
K 2
zagcnt in chemical analysis; in producing or manufacturing a large variety of aromatic compounds including fertilizers,
Skin
illuminating gas, coke, explosives, lampblack, paints, paint removers, asbestos goods, wood preservatives, textiles,
absorption
perfumes, bakelite, rubber, and other plastics; in medical and industrial organic compounds and dyes; and in germicidal
paints and slimicides. Phenol has been identified in cigarette smoke and automobile exhaust.
Other Designations: CAS No. 0108-95-2, carbolic acid, hydmxybenzene, monohydmxy benzene, oxybenzene, phenic
acid, phenyl alcohol, phenyl hydroxide.
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult the latest ChemicalweekBuyers' &id&') for a suppliers list.
Cautions: Phenol has a marked corrosive effect on any tissue. Eye contact may cause severe damage and bZindness. Its primary entry
route is Uuough skin absorption.Systemic absorption may cause fiver and kidney damage, convulsions(seizures). or death.
!*
Phenol, ca 100%
1989 OSHA PEL (Skin)
1990-91ACGIH TLV (Skin)
8-hrTWA: 5 ppm, 19 mg/m3 T W A 5 ppm, 19 mg/m3
1988MOSH REL
TWA: 5 ppm, 19 mg/m3
Ceiling 15.6 ppm, 60 mg/m3
1987IDLH Level
250 ppm
NFPA
@
HMIS
H 3
F
2
R O
PPGt
t Sec. 8
1985-86Toxicity Data*
Mammal,inhalation, LC :74 mg/m'
Rat, oral, LD :317 m&; toxic effects include
behavorial aanges (convulsions or effect on
seizure threshold)
Rabbit, eye, TC, -:5 mg produces severe
SeeNIOSH,RTECS (SJ3325000),for additionalimtative, mutative, reproductive,
tumorigenic. and toxicitv data.
I
.
'
.~~
~~
~
-<
~
~
Water Solubility: 1g dissolies in about 15 ml H,C
Melthi-Point: 109.4 'F (43 'C)
pH: 6 (aqueo;s blution)
Viscosity: 12.7 centipoise at 64.9 P (18.3 'C)
Molecular Weight: 94.1 1
Vapor Pressure: 0.3513 mm Hg at 77 '
F (25 'C)
Appearance and Odor: White crystalline solid with a characteristicsharp medicinal sweet, tangy odor detectable above 0.05 ppm. Phenol turns
pink or red if it contains impurities or is exposed to heat or light.
Extinguishing Media: Use water spray, carbon dioxide, dry chemical, or alcohol-type foam to extinguish f m involving phenol. Do not use a
solid stream of water since the stream scatters and spreads fie. Use water spray to cool fre-exposed tanks/containers.
Unusual Fire or Ekploslon Hazards: Phenol presents a moderate fm hazard when exposed to heat, flame, or oxidizers. When heated, it emits
toxic fumes and vapors that form explosive mixtures with air. Air mixtures containing 3 to 10% phenol are explosive. Solid phenol bums with difficulty, giving off heavy smoke.
Special Fire-fightingProcedures: Since fm may produce toxic fumes, wear a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece
omated in the Dressure-demand or wsitive-Dressure mode and full Drotective clothinn. Be aware of runoff from fre control methods. Water
wn-g
phedol can cause severc chemical-burns. Do not release tb sewers or wateGays.
StabilitplPolymerizatlon:Phenol is stable at mom temperature in closed containers under normal storage and handling conditions. Hazardous
polymerization cannot occur.
ChemicalIncomDatibllities:In Reneral. Dhenol is incompatible with strong oxidizing aEents and halogens. It coaaulates colodion and moteins. A
potentially explodve reaction o&-mw i g formaldehyde, peroxydisulfuric &id, peroxy&nosulfuric acid, sodiumktrite + heat, and aliminum
chloride + nitromethane (at 110 'C/100 bar). A violent reaction occurs with butadiene, sodium nitrite + frifluoroaceticacid. and aluminum
chloride + nitrobenzene at 248 'F (120 T).
Combining phenol with mineral oxidizing acids results in fire; with acetaldehyde results in violcnt
condensation; with isocyanaks results in heat generation and violent polymerization, with calcium hypochlorite results in an exothermicreaction
producing toxic fumes which may ignite; and with nitrides results in heat and flammablegas generation. Hot phenol is corrosive to many metals,
including aluminum, lead, magnesium, and zinc. Reaction with these materials causes phenol lo discolor.
Conditions to Avoid: Avoid heating Dhenol above 122 'F (90 -0.
Hazardous Products of Decompos'hion: Thermal oxidatiGe dec6mposition of phenol can produce oxides of carbon and water.
Summary of Risk. Phend is a general protopl&mic poison that is corro&e to any living tissue it contacts. Toxicity most likdy results fr6m
dermal (skin) contact or ingestion. Skin absorption occurs readily with a rapid onset of symptoms or dcath (within 30 min to several hours).
Contact with cycs may cause scvcrc damage and blindncss. Ingcstion of 1 g may be fatal. Although phenol is irritating to the respiratory tracl, due
to its low volatility and good waning properties, inhalation is lypically less of a concern. Chronic toxic effects are uncommon, but may include
digestive disturbances, neurological disordcrs. skin rash (dermatitis), and liver and kidney damage.
Medical Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Individuals with chronic respiratory disordcrs, prc-cxisting skin disorders,
convulsive disordcrs, or kidney or liver abnormalities may be at increased risk from phcnol exposure.
Target Organs: Livcr, kidncys, ncrvous systcm, and skin.
Primary Entry Routes: Skin absorption. cyc contact, ingestion, and inhalation.
Acute Effects: Skin contact rcsulfs in whitc. wrinkled discoloration. followcd by a scvcrc burn or syslcmic poisoning if removed improperly.
Continue on next page
Ccpyd~M01990CeniumPublithingCorporation
Any c0mmersi.l UK or I C p o d U C l b wilhwl VW publirhcrlr p c r m k h b ptohibilcd.
No. 355
Phenol
11/90
Phenol ingestion cancause g a n y n e and corrosion of lips, mouth, throat, esophagus, and stomach if not properly decontamhak+ (see First Aid).
Although not immediately Pam ul skm contact can cause serious burns and systemic toxicity. In addition to skin bums and respratow tract
irritation, systemic absorption ma cause pallor, anorexia (appetite loss), nauiea, vomitin diarrhea, weakness, muscle aches, darkend urine,
headache, tmnitus (rin ing in earsl, sweaeg, conplsions, cyanosis (bluish coloration of&s andlor fiigertips). shock, unconsciousness.
nspiratory falure. antdeath. After ingesbon, major percutaneous (skin), or inhalation exposures, collapse and death can be rapid. Ingestion can
cause severe tissue corrosion or g a n r affecting lips, mouth, throat, esopha s, and stomach. Eye contact can cause severe corrosive damage to
the eye (con'unctival edema, come opacification, and hypesthesia) and possige blindness.
Chronic Ed.e+: Ch,roqic phenol poisoning is rarely reported. Symptoms include yomiting. difficult swallowing, diarrhea, appetite loss, .
headache, fiuntmg, drmmss, darkened m e , and mental disturbances. chronic e-m
can cause Lath from liver and kidne damage.
Repeated skin contact with phenol or phenol-bearing products can result in dermahtiswith dark pigmentation (ochronosis) of
,and whites of
sh
!iE&E)*
Eyes: Gently lift the eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of water for at least 15 min. Consult a physician im-
mediately.
Skfn: Speedy action is critica1,Flood exposed area with water and uickly remove contaminated c1othing.h soon uspossible.repeatedly spray
or swab with the decontaminahngagent polyethyleneglycol-300 (F'iG). Immerse extremitiesin PEG.Rescue rsonnel should rotect themselves
from skin contact with phenol. Do not use greases,powders, or omtments to treat phenol bums. Never delay pEnol removal if JEG is not readily
available. Use soap and water instead.
Inhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathing as needed.
Ingestion: Speed is essenthl in the treatment of orolpoisopling. Impxliately consult a physician and poison center. Never ive anything by
mouth to an unconscious or convulsingperson. Admister to that coRTciousperson 15 to 30 cc castor oil or another vegeta%leoil,and be
prepared to induce vomiting upon aphysician's advice. Vegetable oils slow hen01 absorption and reduce local damage.
After flrst ald, get a roprlate b-plant, paramedic, o r community m e d a l su
Note to Ph icians: g a t ingestion with gastric lavage using 40% aqueous B a c t d $ k e , milk, or water until henolic odor is eliminated. Then
give 15 to cc castor or vegetab.le oiL Debride necrotic skin. Monitor vital signs, flwd status, electrolytes, B&
renal and hepatic function, and
electrocardiogram. Manage sedabon, seizures, renal fiuluie, and fluid electrolyteimbalances symptomaticallyas indicated.
8
r detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
HazardousWaste (40 CFR 26133)
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance* (40 CFR 302.4): Reportable Quantity (RQ, lo00 lb (454 kg) [+ per Clean Water Act, Sec. [email protected])(4),
Sec. 307(a), and r RCRA,Sec. 3001J
Listed as a SARA EtremelyHazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): RQ, lo00 lb; Threshold Planning Quantity (TPQ), 3O/lO,OOO lb
Listed as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFX 372.65)
OSHA Desimations
'
.Institute
Educate workers about phenol's hazards and
a respiratory protection p r o r a t h a t
ation at the site of chemical release.
achce good
Transportation Da?a (49 CFR 172.101, -102)
DOT Shipping Name: Phenol
IMO Shipplng Name: Phenol
DOT Hazard Class: Poison B
IMO Hazard Class: 6.1
ID No.: UN1671
I D No.: UN1671
DOT Label: Poison
IMO Label: Poison
DOT Packaging Exceptions: 173.364
IMDG Packaging Group: I1
DOT Packaging Requirements: 173.369
MSDS CoUccriOn References: 1.2-12,IS, 19.23,24.26,31,34,37,38,59.73,79,84,85,89,100.101,103.124,126.127.132,133,
148.149
136.138-140.143. 146,
I Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
GP
Genium Publishing Corporation
-
-
One Genium Plaza
Schenectady, NY 12304-4690 USA
Sheet No. 683
(518) 377-8854
Issued: 11/88
Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)
Revision: A. 9/92
__ -
A
biphenyl nucleus (Go benzene nuclei co&ected by a single CC bond) in which any or all of the hydrogen atoms have been I
4
redaced bv chlorine. commercial m s are mixtures of chlorinated biDhenv1 isomers with varying dearees of chlorination. S '3
P&ared &dustriallyby the chlorination of biphenyl with anhydrous &lo&e in the presence Gf acataiyst such as f d c
K 1
chloride or iron filings. Except for limited research and development applications, FCBs have not been produced in the US * skin
since 1977. When large quantities of PCBs were manufactured in the US, they were marketed under the tradename Aroclor aborplion HMIS
(Monsanto) and were characterized by four digit numbers. The fmt two digits indicatingbiphenyls (12). rriphenyls (54). or
H2#
F l
both (25.44);the last two digits indicating the weight percent of chlorine. PCBs' thermal stability, nonflammability, and
R O
high dielectric capability made them very useful in electrical equipment. Formerly used as additivesin hydraulic fluids, heat
PPEt
transfer systems, lubricants. cutting oils,printer's ink, fin retardants, asphalt, brake linings, automobilebody sealants,
t-8
plasticizas, adhesives, syntheticrubber, floor tile, wax extenders, dedusting agents, pesticide extenders, and carbonless
#Ch&C
reproducingpaper. PCBs are still used inCertain existing electrical capacitors and transformers that require enhanced
Effects
elecbical promtion to avoid heating from sustained electric faults.
Other Designations: CAS No. 1336-36-3, Aroclor, Clophen, Chlorextol, chlorinated biphenyls. chlorinated diphenyl,
chlori~teddiihenylene. chloro biphenyl, chloro-1.1-biphenyl, Dykanol, Fendor, herteen. Kaneclor. Montar,Noflamol,
Phenoclor, Pyralene, Pyranol, Santotherm. Sovol, Therminol FR-1 .
Cautions: PCBs are potent liver toxins that may be absorbed through skin Potentially, chronic or delayed toxicity is significant because PCBs
accumulate in fatty tissue and may reasonably be anticipated to be carcinogens. PCBs are a bioaccumulativeenvironmental hazard. When
bumed, decommition products may be more hazardous than the PCBs.
PCBs, contain various levels of polychlorinated dibemfurans and chlorinated naphthalenes as wntamhls
1985-86Toxicity Data*
1991 OSHA PELS, Skin
at, o ~TD:
. IZO m*g administerid intermittently for 25
8-hr TWA (Chlorodiphenyl, 42% chlorine): 1 mg/m3
weeks produced liver tumors.
8-hrTWA (Chlorodiphenyl. 54% chlorine): 0.5 m g / d
Mammal, oral,
325 mgllrg administered to female for
1990DFG (Germany) MAK, Danger of Cutaneous Absorption
30 days prior to mating and from the 1st to the 36th day of
T W A (Chlarodiphenyl, 42% chlorine): 0.1 ppm (1 mg/d)
Festation produced effects on newborn (stillbiah; live birth
CategoryIJE Substances with systemic effects, onset of effect > 2 hr..
-index: viability index).
half-life > shift length (strongly cumulative)
1990NIOSH REL
Short-term Level: 1ppm, 30 min., average value, 1per shift
TWA (Chlorodiphenyl, 42% chlorine): 0.001 mg/m3
TWA (Chlorodiphenyl, 54% chlorine): 0.05 ppm (0.5 mg/m3)
TWA (Chlorodiphenyl, 54% chlorine): 0.001 m g / d
Category Ilk (see above)
Short-term Level: 0 5 ppm. 30 min., average value. 1per shift
1992-93ACGIH TLVs, Skin *
TWA (Chlorodipheny&42% chlorine): 1m g / d
TWA (Chlorodiphenyl, 54% chlorine): 0.5 mg/m3
* These guidelines offerreasonably good protcaiOn against systunic intoxication. but may not guarantee that chlomcnewon't occur.
t SeeNOSH, R7'ECS (I'Ql35oooO), for additional repFoductive. tumorigcnic, and toxicity data.
Appearance and Odor: PCBs vary from mobile oily liquids to white crystallime solids and hard noncrystalline resins. depending upon
chlorine content.
* Physical and chemical properties vary widely according to degree and to the position ofchlorination.
Extlngulshing M e d k Use exting&hingmediasuitablto thesurrounding fire. Use dry chemical, foam, carbon dioxide (coz).or water spray.
Water spray may be ineffective. Use water spray to cool fue-exposed containersor transfomers. Do not scatter PCBs with high-pressure water
streams. Unusual Fire o r Explosion Hazards: Combustion products (hydrogen chloride, phosgene, polychlorinateddibenzofurans. and furans)
are more hazardous than the PCBs themselves. Special Fire-flghtlng Procedures: Because fire may produce toxic thermal decomposition
products. wear a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepieceoperated in pressuredemand or positivepressure mode. Approach fmfrom upwind to avoid highly toxic decompositionproducts. Structural fuefighter's protective clothing will provide litnited protection.
Do not release runoff from fue control methods to sewers or waterways. Dike for later disposal.
Flash points shown arc a range
- for various PCBs. Some forms do not have flash points.
ShbllltylPolyrnerizatlon: PCBs are very stable materials but are subject to photodechlorination when exposed to sunlight or UV (spectral region
above 290 nanometers). Hazardous polymerization cannot occur. Chemical Incornpatlbllllies: PCBs are chemically inert and resistant to
oxidation. acids, and bases. Conditions to Avold: Avoid heat and ignition sourccs.
Hazardous Products of Decompositlon: Thermal oxidative decomposition (1 112-1202 'F (600-650 'c>]of K B s can produce highly toxic
derivatives, including polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxins(PCDDs). polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). hydrogen chloride, phosgene and
other irritants.
No. 683
Polvchlorinated Bbhenvls K B s )
9192
can be passed in breast milk. PCBs can kffect the reproductive system of adults. Medical Conditlons Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure:
Skin, liver, and respiratory disease. Target Organs: Skin, liver. eyes, mucous membranes. and respiratory tract. Primary Entry Routes:
Inhalation, dermal contact. ingestion. Acute Effects: Exposure to PCB vapor or mist is severely irritating to the skin, eyes, nose, throat, and upper
respiratory tract, Intense acute exposure to high concentrationsmay result in eye, lung, and liver injury. Systemiceffects include nausea, vomitmg,
increased blood pressure. fatigue, weight loss. jaundice, edema and abdominal pain. Cognitive. neurobehavior and psychomotor impairment and
memory loss have also been seen afta acute exposure. Chronic Effects: Repeated exposure to PCBs can cause chloroacne: redness. swelling,
dryness,thickening and darkening of the skin and nails: swelliig and burning of the eyes, and excessive eye discharge: distinctivehair follicles:
gastrointestinal disturbances: neurological symptoms including headache, dizziness, depression, nervousness, numbness of the extremities, and
joint and muscle pain; liver enlargement; menstrual changes in women; and chronic bronchitis. Cancer, primarily liver, is also a possible result of
exposure, but data is inconclusive.
FIR= AID Eyes: Do no1 allow victim to rub or keep eyes tightly shut. Rinsing eyes with medical oil (olive, mineral) initially may remove PCB
and halt initation better than water rinsing alone. Gently lift eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of water until
transported to an emergency medical faciiity. Consult a physician immediately. Skin: Quickly remove contaminated clothing. Rinse with flooding
amounts of water for at least 15 min. Wash exposed area with soap and water. Multiple soap and water washings are necessary. Avoid the use of
organic solvents to clean the skin. For reddened or blistered skin, consult a physician. Inhalatlon: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support
breathing as needed. Ingestlon: In most cases, accidental PCB ingestion will not be recognized until long after vomiting would be of any value.
Never give anything by mouth to q unconscious or convulsingperson. Vomiting of the pure substance may cause aspiration. Consult a physician.
Note to Physicians: Monitor patients for increased hepatic enzymes, chloroacne. and eye., gastrointestinal. and neurologic symptoms listed above.
Diannostic tests include blood levels of PCBs and altered liver enzymes.
SpilYLeak: Notify safety personnel, evacuate all unnecessary personnel, provide adequate ventilation, and isolate hazard area. Cleanup personnel
should protect against vapor inhalation and skin or eye contact For small spills, take up with sand or other noncombustible material and place into
containers for later disposal. For larger spills. dike far ahead of spill to contain for later disposal. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR
1910.120). Environmental Transport: P C B s have been shown to bioconcentrate significantly in aquatic organisms. Ecotoxicity: Bluegill, T h
0.278 ppm/96 hr. Mallard Duck. LDS: 2000 ppm. Environmental Degradation: In general. the persistence of PCBs increases with an increase
degree of chlorination. Sol1 AbsorptionlMobillty: PCBs are tightly absorbed in soil and generally do not leach significantlyin most aqueous soil
systems. However, in the presence of organic soIvents, PCBs may leach rapidly through the soil. Volatilization of PCBs from soil may be slow, but
over time may be significant Disposal: Approved PCB disposal methods include: incineration with scrubbing, high-efficiency boilers, landfirils. anc
EPA-approved alternative disposal methods. Each disposal method has various criteria. Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed
recommendations. Follow applicableFederal, state. and local regulations.
EPA Designations
RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33): Not listed
OSHA Designations
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance(40 CFR 355): Not listed
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000, TableZ-LA)
Listed as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65)
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance* (40 CFR 3024): Final ReportableQuantity (RQ). 1 lb (0.454 kg) [* per CWA. Sec. 311(b)(4)
and 307(a)l
Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133). Because
contact lens use in industry is controversial. establish your own policy. Respirator: Seek professional advice prior to respirator selection and use.
Follow OSHA remirator remlations (29 CFR 1910.134) and if necessary. wear a MSWIOSH-apmved respirator. Select respiratorbased on its
suitability to provide adequGe work& protection for given worlciing condtions. level of airborne con<rnination;and presence of sufficient oxygen.
Minimum respiratory protection should include a combination dust-fume-mbt and organic vapor cartridge or canister or air-su~lied,depending
upon the situation. For emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning spills. reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an SCBA. arning!Airpurifying respirators do not protect workers in oxygen-dejcienl atmospheres.If [email protected] are used. OSHA requires a written respiratoryprotecenvironmental monitoring, maintenance, inspection, cleaning.
tion program that includes at least: medical certification, training. fit-testing, p-c
and convenient, sanitary storage areas. Other: Weat chemicallyprotective gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent all skin contact. Butyl
rubber. neoprene, Teflon, and fluorocarbon rubber have break through times greater than 8 hrs. Ventilation: Provide general and local exhaust
ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations below the OSHA PEL (Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred because it prevents
contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at its source.('03) Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash
stations, safety/quickdrench showers, and washing facilities. Contamlnated Equipment: Separate contaminated work clothes from street clothes
and launder before reuse. Segregatecontaminated clothing in such a manner so that there is no direct contact by laundry personnel. Implement
quality assurance to ascertain the completenessof the cleaning procedures. Remove this material from your shoes and clean PPE. Comments:
Never eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene. after using this material, especially before eating, drinking, smoking,
I
Contibls: T6 reduce potential health ha&ds. use sufficientdilution or local exhaust vendladon to co&ol airborne contamhnts and tomaintain
concentrations at the lowest practical level. Administrative Controls: Inform employees of the adverse health effects associated with PCBs. Limit
access to PCB work areas to authorized personnel. Consider preplacement and periodic medical examinations with emphasis on the skin. liver,
lung. and reproductive system. Monitor PCB blood levels. Consider possible effects on the fetus. Keep medical records for the entire length of
employment and for the following 30 yrs.
Trnnsportation Data (49 CFR 172.101)
DOT Shipping Name: Polychlorinated biphenyls
Packagln Authorizations
Quantity Limitations
DOT Hazard Class: 9
a) Passenger Aircraft or Railcar: 100 L
a) Exceptfons: 173.155
ID No.: UN2315
b) Cargo Aircraft Only: 220 L
b) Non-bulk Packagln : 173.202
DOT Packing Group: n
c) Bulk Packaging: 17!.241
Vessel Stowage Requirements
DOT Lnbel: CLASS 9
a) Vessel Stowage: A
SpeChl Provklons (172.102): 9. N81
b) Other: 34
MSDSCdcclion Rcfercnces:26.73.89.100.
101. 103.124. 126. 127.132. 133. 136.163. 164,168,169,174. 175. 180
Genium Publishing Corporation
One Genium Plaza
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Sheet No. 317
Schenectady. NY 12304-4690USA
(5 18)377-8854
.-..
Toluene
Issued: 8/79
Revision: E,9/92
'
:
-
vomatization of saturated arkatichydrocarborn-or by hctional dktill&on of coal-! light sil and purified by rectificaion. Used widely as a solvent (replacing benzene in many cases) for oils, resins, adhesives, natural rubba, coal tar, asphalt.
?itch, acetyl celluloses. cellulose paints and varnishes; a diluent for photogravure inks, raw m a W far organic synthesis
:benzoyl& benzilidencchlorides, saccharine,'I",
toluene diisocyanate. and many dyestuffs), in aviation and high octane
mtomobile gasoline,as a nonclinical thermometer liquid and suspension solution for navigational insmmenu.
Other Designations: CAS No. 108-88-3,
Methacide, methylbenzene. methylbenml phenylmethane, toluoL Toln-sol.
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult latest Chemical Week Buycrs'[email protected])
for a suppliers list.
S
Cautlons: Toluene is an eye, skin. and respiratory tract initant becoming narcotic at high centratious. Liver and lddney damage
has occurred. Pregnant women chronically exposed to toluene have shown teratogenic effects. Tolueneis highly flammable.
8-hrT W A 100pprn (375 mg/n?)
15-min STEL: 150ppm (560 mg/m3)
1990 IDLH Level
TWA: 50 ppm (188mgh?)
1990DFG (Germany) MAK*
TWA: 100ppm (380mg/n?)
Half-life:2 hr to end of shift
Category II:Substances with systemic effects
Peak Exposure Limit: 500 ppm, 30 min
average value, 2lsliift
2OOo PPm
1990 NIOSH RELs
T W k 1OO ppm (375mg/m3)
STEL: 150ppm (560 mg/m3)-:' .
* Available trfonation suggests damage to the developingfetus is probable.
2*
K 3
:[email protected]
HMIS
H
F
R
2 - E
3
0
PPE-Sec. 8
Man, inhalation, TC& 100ppm caused hallucinations,
and changes in motor activity and changes in
psychophysiologicaltests.
Human, oral, LDb: 50 m a g ; toxic effects not
yet reviewed
Human,eye: 300 ppm
irritation.
Rat,oral,LDG 5000 m a g
Rat,E v a 30pmoVL caused DNA damage.
Boiling Poinnt:232 'F (110.6 'C)
Water Solubility: Very slightly soluble, 0.6 m a at 68 '
F (20 'C)
Other Solubilities: Soluble in acetone, alcohol, ether, benzene, chloroform. glacial acetic
F (-95'C)
Melting Point: -139'
Molecular Weight: 92.15
acid, petroleum ether, and carbon disulfide.
Vapor Pressure: 22 mm Hg at 68 'F (20 *C);36.7 mm Hg at s$ 'F (30'C)
Density: 0.866 at 68 'F (2014 'C)
Saturated Vapor Density (Air = 0.075 lb/fi or 1.2 kglm3): 0.0797 lb/ft3 or 1.2755 kg/m3
Surface Tension: 29 dyne/cm at 68 'F (20'C)
Viscosity: 0.59 CPat 68 'P (20 'C)
Odor Threshold (range of all referenced values): 0.021 to 69ppm
Refraction Index: 1.4967 at 20 *C/D
Amearance and Odor: Colorless lictuid with a sickly sweet odor.
____
o---o
--
spray may be ineffectiveas tolu& floatson warn and mai actually spread fire. Unksual Fire or Explosion Hazards:Cor\Fentrated vapors are
heavier than air and may travel to an ignition some and flash back. Container may explode in heat of fire. Toluenes' burning rate = 5.7 mm/min
and its flame speed = 37 cm/sec. Vapor poses an explosion hazard indoors. outdoors. and in sewers. May accumulate static electricity. Special
Flre-fighting Procedures: Because fxe may produce toxic k m a l decomposition products, weax a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA)
with a full facepieceoperated in pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode. Structural firelighter's protective clothing provides only limited
protection,Apply cooling water to sides oftanksuntil well after fire is out. Stay away from ends of tanks. For massive fire in cargo area, use
monitor nozzles or unmanned hose holders; if impossible, withdraw from fire and let bum. Withdraw immediately if you hear a rising sound from
venting safety device or notice any tank discoloration due to f i e because a BLEVE (boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion) may be imminent.
Do not release runoff from fire control methods to sewersor waterways.
Stability/Polymerhtion: Toluene is stable atmom femperatnrein closed containers under normal storage and handling conditions. Hazardous
polymebti6n can't occur. Chemical incompatibllitk- Strong oxidizers. concentrated nitric acid, nitric acid + sulfuricacid, dinitrogen temxide,
silver perchloratc,bromine aifluoride, tetratii~omethane,and 1,3dichloro-5$-dime~yl-2hyl-2,Qimidazolididione.
Conditions to Avoid: Contact with
heat, ignition sources, or incompatibles. Hazardous Products of Decomposition: Thermal oxidative decomposition of toluene can produce carbon
dioxide. and acrid. irritatina smoke.
Carcinogenicity: The IARC1([email protected])NTP1(*Wand OSHA('@) do not list toluene as a carcinogen. Summary of Risks: Toluene is imtating to the eyes,
nose, and respiratory tract, Inhalation of high concentrations produces a narcotic effect sometimes leading to coma as well as liver and kidney
damage. 93% of inhaled toluene is retained in the body of which 80% is metabolized to benzoic acid. then to hippuric acid and excreted in urine.
The remainder is metabolized to o-cresol and excreted or exhaled unchanged. Toluene metabolism is inhibited by alcohol ingestion and is synergistic with benzene, asphalt fumes, or chlorinated hydrocarbons (i.e. pachloroethylene). Toluene is readily absorbed through the skin at 14 to 23 mg/
cm2/hr. Toluene is absorbed quicker during exercise than at rest and appears to be retained longer in obese versus thin victims: presumably due to its
lipid solubility. There is inconsistent data on toluene's ability to damage bone marrow; chronic poisoning has resulted in anemia and leucopenia witb
biopsy showing bone marrow hypo-plasia. These reports are few and some authorities argue that the effects may have been due to benzene contaminants. Chronic inhalation during pregnancy has bccn associated with tcratogenic effects o n the fetus including microcephaly. CNS dysfunction,
attentional deficits. developmentaldelay + language impairmenk growth retardation. and physical defects including a small midface. short palpebral
fissures, with deep-set cyes. low-set ears, flat nasal bridge with a small nose. micrognathia. and blunt fingertips. There is some evidence that tobene
causes an autoimmune illncss in which the body produces antibodies that cause inflammation of its own kidney.
Continue on ncx! pa&
r-vrbk
Q 1007 C m h m RlNbhin. Cnmmcinn Any c r m m r o i d
YIC
OT
rrrxndvclion wizhhart t
k plblbkfa psrmiubn b pmhibiab
>_.-317
-
Tnliicne
- -.- - - -
9/92
- ,- -
edicnl Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Alcoholism and CNS, kidney, skin. or liver disease. Target Organs: CNS. liver,
hey, skin. I'rimary Entry Routes: Inhalation, skin contact/absorption. Acute Effects: Vapor inhalation causes respiratory tract irritation, fatigue,
akness. confusion, dizziness, headache. dilated pupils, watering eyes, nervousness, insomnia, parasthesk. and vertigo progressing to narcotic coma.
ath may result From cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation with catecholamines loss. Liquid splashed in the eye causes conjunctival irritation,
d e n t corneal damage and possible bums. Prolonged skin contact leads to drying and f i u r e d dermatitis. Ingestion causes GI tract fitation and
mptoms associated with inhalation. Chronfc Effects: Symptoms include mucous membrane initation. headache, vertigo, nausea, appetitelossand
ahol intolerance. Repeated heavy exposure may result in encephalopathies (cerebellar ataxia and cognitive dysfunction), liver enlargement, and
iney dystrophy (wasting away). Symptoms usually appear at workdays end,worsen at weeks end and decrease or disappear over the weekend.
RST AID Eyes: Do nor allow victim to rub or keep eyes tightly shut. Gently lift eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding
munts of water until transported to an emergency medical facility. Consult an ophthalmologist immediately. Skin: Quickfy remove contaminated
,thing. Rinse with flooding amounts of water for at least 15 min. Wash exposed area with soap and water. Inhalation: Remove exposed person to
s h air and support breathing as needed. Ingestlon: Never give anything by mouth to an unconsdous or convulsing person. Contact a poison control
nter and unless otherwise advised, have that conrciour a d alert person drink 1 to 2 glasses of water to dilute. Do not induce vomiting because of
nger of aspiration into the lungs. Gastric lavage may be indicated if large amounts are swallowad; potential toxicity needs to be weighed against
?iration risk when deciding for or against gastric lavage. Note to Physicians: Monitor cardiac function. If indicated, use epinephrine and other
techolamines carefully, because of the possibility of a lowered myocardial threshold to the arrhythmogeniceffects of such substances. Obtain CBC.
tctrolytes, and urinalysis. Monitor arterial blood gases. If toluene has > 0.02%(200ppm) benzene, evaluate for potential benzene toxicity. BEI:
uric acid in urine, sample at shift end (2.5 g/g creatinine); Toluene in venous blood, sample at shift end (1.0 mg/L).
.-
.-
. ,i
t i c a k : &[email protected] safety personnel, isolate and ventilate area, deny entry, and stay upwind. Cleanup personnel protect against inhalation and skideye
ntact. Use water spray to cool and disperse vapors but it may not prevent ignition in closed spacm. Cellosolve. hycar absorbent materials, and
rorocarbon water can also be used for vapor suppression/mtainment. Take up small spill with earth,sand, vermiculite, or other absorbent,
ncombustible material. Dike far ahead of large spills for later reclamation or disposal. For water spills. (10 ppm or greater) apply activated carbon at
X the spilled amount and remove trapped material with suction hoses or use mechanical dredgeSniftsto remove immobilized masses of pollutants
d precipitates. Toluene can undergo fluidized bed incineration at 842 to 1796 'F (450 to 980 'C), rotary kiln incineration at 1508 to 2912 'F (820 to
00 *C), or liquid injection incineration at 1202 to 2912 'F (650 to 1600 'C).Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120). Ecotoxlcity
dues: Blue gill. LCso = 17 mg/L,t24 hr,shrimp (Crungot$racis coron),LCM= 4.3 pp&6 hr; fathead minnow (Pimephulespromelus),LCs= 36.2
hr. Environmental Degradatlon: If released to land, toluene evaporates and undergoesinicrobil degradation. In water, toluene volatilizes
d biodegrades with a half-life of days to several weeks. In air, toluene degrades by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals.
sposal: Treat contaminated water by gravity separation of solids, followed by skimming of surface. Pass through dual media filtration and carbon
swption units (carbon ratio 1 kg to 10 kg soluble material). Return waste water from backwash to gravity separator. Contact your supplier or a
ensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
?A Designations
OSHA Designations
sted as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40CFR 261.33): No. U220
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1OOO. Table 2-1-A)
UEA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 353, TFQ Not listed
sted as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance* (40 CFR 302.4): Final Reportable Quantity (RQ), lo00 lb (454 kg)
p per RCRA. Sec. 3001: CWA. Sec. 311 @)(4);CWA, Sec. 307 (a)]
sted as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65): Not listed
oggles: Wear protective eyeglasses with shatter-resistant glass and sideshields or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye- and face-protection
gulations (29 CFR 1910.133). Because contact lens use in industry is controversial, establish your own policy. Respirator: Seek professional
.vice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFX 1910.134) and,if necessary, wear a M S M O S H 'proved respirator. For < 100 ppm. use any chemical cartridge respirator with appropriate organic vapor cartridges, any supplied-air respirator
AR), or SCBA. For < 200 ppm. use any SAR operated in continuous-flow mode, any SAR or SCBA with a full facepiece, or any &-purifying
spirator with a full facepiece having a chin-style, front or back mounted organic vapor canister. For emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning
ills. reactor vessels. or storage tanks), wear an SCBA. warning!Air-pwfiing respiratorsdo not protect workers in oxygen-deficientatmospheres.
respirators are used, OSHA requires a written respktoxy protection program that includes at least medical certification. d i n g . fit-testing,
siodic environmental monitoring, maintenance, inspection, cleaning, and convenient, sanitary storage areas. Other: Wear chemically protective
oves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent skin contact. Polyvinyl alcohol with a breakthroughtime of > 8 hr, Teflon and Viton are recomended as suitable materials for PPE.Ventitation: hovide general and local exhaust ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations below
e CSHA PELS (Sec.2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred becauseit prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at its
arce.(lm)Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities.
ontaminated Equipment: Separate contaminated work clothes from street clothes and launder before reuse. Remove toluene from your shoes and
ean PPE. Comments: Never eat,d r i i or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material. especially before eating,
inkinn.
- smoking.usinn the toilet.- or amlvins
... .-cosmetics.
m a g e Requirements: Prevent physical damage to containers. Store in a cool. dry. well-ventilated area away from ignition sources and incomitibltk. Outside or detached storage is preferred. If stored inside, use a standard flammable liquids warehouse. room,& cabinet. To prevent static
larks. electrically ground and bond all equipment used with toluene. Do not use open lights in toluene areas. Install Class 1. Group D electrical
pipment. Check that toluene is free of or contains c 1% benzene before use. Engineering Controls: To reduce potential health hazards, use
ffident dilution or local exhaust ventilation to control airborne contaminants and to maintain concentrations at the lowest practical level. Adminisative Controls: Adopt controls for confined spaces (29 CFR 1910.146) if entering areas of unknown toluene levels (holes, wells, storage tanks).
msider preplacement and periodic medical exams of exposed workers that emphasize the CNS. liver, kidney, and skin. Include hemocytometxic
Id thrombocyte count in cases where benzene is a contaminant of toluene. Monitor air at regular intervals to ensure effective ventilation.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101)
OT Shipping Name: Toluene
Packaging Authorizations
uantity Limitations
Vessel Stowage Requirements
OT Hazard Class: 3
a) Exceptions: 150
Passenger Aircraft or Railcar: 5L Vessel Stowage: B
NO.: UN1294
b) Non-bulk Packagin :202
b) Cargo Alrcraft only: 60L
Other: -OT Packin Group: D[
c) Bulk P:irk:iging: 245
OT Label: bammable Liquid
m i a l Provisions (172.102):TI
3
SDscollcclion References: 26,73.100.101. 103.124. 1%. 127.132. 140.148.153.159, 163.164.167.169.171. 174.175,176. 180.
'epared by: M Cannon. BA; Industrial Hygiene Review: PA Roy, CIH. MPH; Medical Review: AC Darhngton, MD. MPH
-
i
Genium Publishing Corporation
One Genium Plaza
Schenectady, NY 12304-4690 USA
(518) 377-8854
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Sheet No. 382
Vinyl Chloride
Issued: 7/78
Revision: C.9/92
Vlnvl Chloride (C9HICI) DescriDtion: Derived from ethylene dichloride and alcohd :wtassium. by reaction of acetylene
. . . I ,
an$hy&ogen chloride (as gas or iiquids). or by oxychl&tion where ethylene reactswith hydrochl6ric acid and oxygen.
Inhibitors such as butyl catechol, hydroquinone, or phenol are added to prevent polymerization. Used in the plastics industry
for the production of polyvinyl chloride resins. in organic synthesis and f m e r l y as a refrigerant. extraction solvent, and
propellant (banned in 1974 because of its carcinogenicactivity).
Other Designations: CAS No. 75-014. chlomethylene,chlomethme, ethylene monochloride, Trovidur, VC. VCM.
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult latest Chemical Week Buyers'GuidF)) for a suppliers list.
Cautions: Vinyl chloride is a confirmed human carcinogen. Vapor inhalation leads to central nervous system (CNS)
depression. The liquid can cause frostbite. It is a flammablegas at room temperature and polymerizes on exposure to air or
sunlight. Avoid exposure to VC through engineeringcontrols and wearing PPE
I
R
2
K
4
.
NFPA
::@
HMIS
H 3'
F 4
R 2
PPE Sec. 8
* chronic cffecls
-
Vinyl Chloride, ca 98 to 999k Impurities include watez, acetaldehyde, hydrogen chloride, hydrogenperoxide, methyl chloride, butane,
lJ-butadiene, chlorophene, diacetylene, vmyl acetylene, and propine.
1991 OSHA PELS
199293 ACGIH TLV
1985-86 Toxkity Datat
Man,inhalation,
Intermittent exposure to 200 ppm for 14yr
T W k 5 ppm (13 mg/m3)
8-hrTWA I ppm
TLV-A1
caused livez tumors.
Ceiling: 5 ppm; OSHA-X
Man, inhalation,TC,: 30 mg/m3/5 yr caused spermatogenesis.
I990NTOSH REL
1990 DFG (Germany) TRK*
Human, inhalation,Tc: Continuousexposure to 300 m g h 3 for an
Existing Installations: 3 ppm
undeteadned number of weeks caused blood tumors.
NIOSH-X
MAK-A1
Rat, oral, LDG 500 mg/kg; toxic effects not yet reviewed
Other Solubilities: alcohol, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, ether, hydrocarbon and oils.
Freezlng Point: -245 'F (-159.7 'C)
Vapor Pressure: 2530 mm Hg at 68 '
F (20T), 400 mm Hg at -18.4 'F (-28 'C)
Molecular Weight: 62.5
Critical Temperature: 304.7 'F (1515 'C)
Specific Gravity: 0.9106 at 68 'F (20 'C)
Critfcal Pressure: 56.8 atm
Ionization Potential: 9.99 eV
Viscosity: 0.01072 cP at 68 'F (20*C),gas; 0.28 cP at -4 'F (-20 *C),liquid
Refraction Index: 1370 at 20 'C/D
Surface Tension: 23.1 dyne/cm at -4 '
F (-20 'C)
Appearance and Odor: A gas at room temperature. Usually found as a compressed/
Odor Threshold: 2000 to SO00 ppm*
cooled liquid. The colorless Iiquid forms a vapor with a pIeasant ethereal odor.
Vapor Density (Air I1): 2.155
*'The actual vapor concentrationthat can be detectedby humans has not been adequately detamined and varies from one individual to another, from hpuritia,
and mbablv from exoomre duration. The odor threshold is not an aceuratc warnha of urnsure.
Extinguishing Media: For small fiies. use fAy chemical or carbon dioxide. For large fires, use water spray, fog. or regular foam. Unusual Fire
or Explosion Hazards: Large fires can be practically inextinguishable. Vapors may travel to an ignition source and flash back. VC may
polymedze in cylinders or tank cars and explode in heat of fire. Vapors pose an explosion hazard indoors,outdoors. and in sewers. VC decomposes in fire to hydrogen chloride, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and phosgene. Burning rate = 4.3 mm/mii. Special Fire-fighting Procedures: Because fire may produce toxic thermal decomposition products. wtar a self-containedbreathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece
operated in pressuredemand or positivepressure mode. Stop gas leak if possible. Let tank, tank car, or tank truckburn unless leak can be
stopped. For massive fxe in cargo area, use monitor nozzles or unmanned hose h o l m if thii is impossible. withdraw from area and let fire bum.
Withdraw immediately if you hear a rising sound from venting safety device or notice any tank discoloration due to fire. Do not release runoff
from fiie control methods to sewers or waterways.
StabUity/Po&merization: Longterm exposure to air may result in formation of paoxides which initiates explosive polymerizationof the chloride.
VC can polymerize on exposure to light or in presence of a catalyst. Chemical Incompatibillties: VC can explode on contact with oxide of
nitrogen, may liberate hydrogen chloride on exposure to strong alkalies, and is incompatible with capper. oxidizers. aluminum, and peroxides. In
the presence of moisture. VC attacks iron and steel. Conditions to Avold: Exposure to sunlight, air. heat,and incompatibles. Hazardous
Products of Decomposition: Thermal oxidativedecomposition of vinyl chloride can produce carbon oxides, and chloride gas.
Carcinogenicity: Vinyl chloride is listed as a carcinogen by the IARC (Class 1. suffiient human evidence)$164)NTP (Class 1, suficienr hwnan
evidence)!*@) NIOSH (Class X. carcinogen defined without further c a t e g ~ r i z a f i o n ) ! ~ACGM
~ ~ ) (TLV-A1, confumed human carcinogen).('63)
and OSHA (Class X,carcinogen defined withoutfurther caregorizaDFG (MAK-A1. capable of inducing d i g n a k tumors in
tion).('@) Liver tumors (angiosarcomas) are confirmed from VC exposure. Other tumors of the CNS. respiratory system, blood, and lymphatic
system have occurred from exposure to the polyvinyl chloride manufacture process but VC itself may not be the causative agent Summary of
Risks: Vapor inhalation causes varying degrees of CNS depression wilh noticeable anesthetic effects at levels of 1% (10,OOO ppm). Studies have
shown loss of libido and sperm in men exposed to VC and in Russian studics. 77% of exposed women experienced ovarian dysfunction, benign
uterine growths, and prolapsed genital organs. However, no teratogenic effects have been seen in offspring of exposed workers.
Continue on next pop
pars that metabolism is necessary before many of Vc's toxic effects occur. Some vinyl chloride is exhaled unchanged but most is metabolized to
nacetaldehyde. Skin absorption may occur if liquid is confined on skin but absorbed amount would be small. It is possible that the phenol inhibitor
be absorbed as well. The compressed_liquidcan cause frostbite. Vapors are severely irritating to the eyes. Chronic exposure can cause cancer and a
of syndromes known as vinyl chloride disease. Medical Condltlons Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Liver. cardiac, pulmonary, and
ective tissue disorders. Target Organs: Liver, CNS. respiratory and lymphatic systems, bone, and connective tissue of the skin. Primary Entry
Les: Inhalation, skin/eye contact. AcuteEffectsXNSeffects include fatigue, headache, vertigo, ataxia, euphoria. visual disturbances, dulling of
m y cues. numbness and tingling in the extremities. narcosis, unconsciousness,and death due to respiratory failure. Respiratory problems include
nea, asthma, and pneumonoconiosis. Chronic Effects: Repeated exposure has lead to liver m w , confimed because of the otherwise rarity of its
(angiosarcoma). Tumors in other organs have occurred in the polyvinyl chloride industry but agents other than VC m y be responsible; authorities
till debating this issue. A h a d of other effects are associated with VC exposure. Acro-osteolysk k associated with hand cleaning of polymerization
Ps and characterized by dissolution of bone in the hands, especially when associated with resorption. Raynaud's Phenomenon is a vascular disorder
-4
by recurrent spasm of the capillaries and especially those of the fmgers and toes on exposure to cold. This is usually accompanied by pain and in
re cases may progress to local gangrene. Sclerodmatous skin changes (affecting the dorsal hands and distal forearms) are seen and described as a
ly progressive disease marked by deposition of fibrous connective tissue in the skin. The skin becomes thickened and raised nodules appear.
ralgias (pain in one or more joints) and blood changes with decreased platelet number and capillary abnormalities may also occur.
ST AID Eyes: Do not allow victim to rub or keep eyes tightly shut Gently lift eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding
unts of water until transported to an emergency medical facility. Consult a physician immediately. Skin: QukkZy remove contaminated clothing.
c with flooding amounts of water for at least 15min Wash exposed area with soap and water. For reddened or blistered skin, consult a physician.
iostbite, immerse affected area in 107.6 'F (42 'C)water until completely rewarmed. Do not use dry heat. Inhalation: Remove exposed person to
iair and support breathing as needed. Ingestion: Unlikely! VC is a gas above 7 'F (-14T). Note to Physlclans: Endotracheal intubation may be
xs. Report any release > 1 Ib. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120). Envlronmental Transport: VC reacts with hydroxyl
als in the trophosphere with a half-life of 1.2 days. The half-life = a few hr in photochemical smog. Reaction products in the air include chlorotldehyde. hydrogen chloride, chloroethylene, epoxide, formaldehyde, formyl chloride. formic acid, and carbon monoxide. In soil, VC rapidly volatilWhat does not evaporate will be highly mobile and may leach into groundwater. In water, VC.k not expected to hydrolyze, bioconcentrate, or
deep with a current of 3 meter/=
rb to sediment.It will rapidly volatilize
rapid. Soil AbsorptioxdMobtllty:
I wind velocity of 3 meter/sec. In waters co
tential to leach into groundwater.
I an estimated solubility of 2,700 ppm,
04:
Dilute any waste compressed liquid to a 1% solution and remove phenol inhibitor as sodium. Pour onto vermiculite. sodium bicarbonate, or a
& soda ash mixture (90/10). Add slaked lime if fluoride is present. Mix in paper boxes, place in inchaator, cover with scrap wood and paper, and
e with excelsior train. Another method is to dissolve waste in a flammable solvent and spray in incinerator firebox equipped with an afterburner and
!iscrubber. Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
,Designatlons
OSHA Designations
d as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40
L
i
s
t
e
d as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1OO0, Table 2-1-A)
A Extremely Hazardous Substance.
XI as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65)
d as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance* (40 CFR 302.4): E i l Reportable Quantity (RQ), 1 lb (0.454 kg) [* per CWA. Sec. 307 (a); CAA. Sec.
-.._
,
gles: Weir protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye- and face-protectionregulations (29 CFR 1910.133). Because contact
use in industry is controversial, establish your own policy. Respirator: Seek professional advice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA
ZFR 1910.134) and, if necessary, wear a MSWIOSH-approved respirator. According to MOSH(l48?for any detectable concentration use a SCBA
lppliedair respirator with a full facepiece operated in pressure-demand or other positive pressure mode. See 29 CFR 1910.1017 for detailed OSHA
irator recommendations. For emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning spills. reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an SCBA. Warning! Air&ins respirators & not protect workers in oxygen-deficient atmospheres. If respirators are used. OSHA requires a written respiratory protection
fam that includes at least medical certification. training, fit-testing. periodic environmental monitoring, maintenance, inspection. cleaning. and
m i e n s sanitary storage areas. Other: Wear chemically protective gloves. boots, aprons, and gauntlets made of Viton or chlorinated polyethylene to
ent skin contact. Ventilation: Provide general and local exhaust ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations below the OSHA PEL'S (Sec
acal exhaust ventilation is preferred because it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at its source.(103)Safety Stations
z available in the work area emergency eyewash stations. safety/quickdrench showers. and washing facilities. Contaminated Equipment: Separate
k clothes from street clothes, launder before reuse and clean PPE. Comments: Never eas drink or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal
me after using this material, especially before eating. drinking. smoking, using the toiles or applying cosmetics.
a g e Requlrements: Store in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area in clearly labeled containers. Outside or detached storage is preferred. Large amounts
ild be stored in steel containers under pressure. Keep separate from incompatibles (Sec. 5). Venting, under pressure. should be safety relief. At atm,
jng should be pressure vacuum. Regularly monitor inhibitor levels. To avoid static sparks, electrically ground and bond all equipment used with VC.
id open flames, spark formation and eleceic discharges around VC. Engineering Controls: To reduce potential health hazards, use sufficient
tion or local exhaust ventilation to control airborne contaminants and to maintain concentrations at the lowest practical level. Install Class 1, Group D
trical equipment. Administrative Controls: Inform VC exposed personnel of hazards associated with its use. Preplacement and periodic medical
11s of workers exposed above the action level is mandatory under OSHA 29 CFR (1910.1017). Monitor for liver cancer, scleroderma, pneumonitis.
jng abnormalities. and acro-osteolysis.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101)
T Shipping Name: Vinyl Chloride
Pnckaglng Authorlzatlons
Quantity Limitations
T Hazard Class: 2.1
a) Exceptions: 173.306
a) Passenger Aircraft or Rabcar: Forbidden
Vo.: UN1086
b) Cargo Aircraft Only: 150 kg
b) Non-bulk Packaglng: 173.304
T Packing Group: -c) Bulk Packaging: 173.314 & 173.315
Vessel Stowage Requirements
T Label: Flammable Gas
a) Vessel Stowage: B
Provklons (172.102): B44
b) Other: 40
' S C o f f e d o n References: 26.73.100.101. 103. 124. 126, 127. 132. 133.136.140,148.149,153.159.162.163.164,
167.168. 171. 174. 175
by: M Gannon, BA; Industrial Hygiene Review: PA Roy, MPH.CIH; Medical Revlew: AC Darlingion. MPH. M D
i ~ ~ ~ ~ 2 ~ G c n i u m ~ b I l h i n l C o r p a . l i m . ~ c o ~ i . l u r o r ~ p ~ ~ ~ ~ r i r ~ ~ p l b t h d r p v m i . ~ i ousnccesa
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--.-.,-_..-'..y,..:..,m.~nnl.ml--rr
~wr,,,-m.-,,~.~,t.,,w
Genium Publishing Corporation
1145 Catalyn Street
Schenectady,NY 12303-1836 USA
(518) 377-8854
I Mderiul Safety
- - Data Sheets Collection:
Sheet No. 708
Vinylidene Chloride
I Issued: 4/90
VinylMene Chloride Description: Prepared from ethylene chloride. Also prepared from vinyl chloride by successive
R 3
chlorination and dehydrochlorination steps. Used primarily as a co-monomer in producing vinylidene copolymers
([email protected], [email protected]) for fibs and coatings. Also used in producing methyl chloroform. vinyl chloride resins, plastics,
K 4
chloracetyl chloride; in adhesives; as a component of syntheticfibers, a chemical intermediate in vinylidene fluoride
synthesis; and for l,l,l-trichioroethane. A common constituentin our environment, measurable quantities of vinyiidene
chloride are found in poorly ventilated areas with a high concentration of plastics. It is a notable contaminant in recycled
air environments such as nuclear submarines and spacecraft
Other Designations: CAS No. 0075354; CJi$$I,l-DCE; 1,ldichloroethene; usymdichloroethylene;VDC; vinylidene dichloride.
Manufacturer: Contact your supplieror distributor. Consult the latest CWcheekBlcye7s' Guidem,for a suppliers list.
Comment: At temperatures above 32 T I 0 *Cand especially in the presence of oxygenor other suitable catalysts, vinylidene chloride polymerizs to a plastic. Therefore, commercialproducts may contain small proportions of inhibitors to
pmerve the monomer.
i i
NFPA
@
HMlS
H 2
P 4
R 2
PPG*
* k 8
Vinylidene chloride, ca 10096
OSHA PEL
8-hrTWA: 1ppm, 4 mgIm3
ACGM TLVS,1989-90
TLV-WA 5 ppm, 20 mglm'
TLV-STEL 20 ppm, 79 mglm'
NIOSH REL,1981
None established
Toxiclty Data.
Mouse,skin, TDb:4840 mgflrg has tumrigenic effects on skin, appendages, lungs. thorax, and respiration
Rat, inhalation,IEs: 6350 p p d 4 hr
Human,inhalation, T G 25 ppm produces changes in behavior (general
anesthetic). the fiver, kidney, ureter, and bladder
* s6eNOSH. RTECS (YZ8061oOO), for additional mutative, reprodudive, tumorigenic, and toxicity dab.
Boiling Point. 89.1 'FBl.7 *Cat 760 mm Hg
Meltkg Poink -188.5 TI-122.5 *C
Vapor Pressure: 591 mm Hg at 77 TL?5'C
Vapor Density (Air = 1): 3.4
Molecular Welght: 96.94 glmol
Speclfk Gravity -0 = 1at 39 OF14 O
W
.
12329 at 68 'FnO .C
Water Solubility: Sparingly soluble (0.04 % Wthrol in water at 68 T/20'C)
Appearance and Odor:Colorless, volatile liquid with a mild, sweet odor that resembles chloroform.Most persons can detect vinylidene chloride
at lo00 ppm, but others can detect it at less than 500 ppm. Neither odor is adequate to warn of excessiveexposure.
Extingurshfng Media: Use dry chemical, alcohol foam, or carbon dioxide. Use water to cool firecxposed containers..
Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: Vinylidene chloride is a very flammable and volatile liquid with a burning rate of 2.7 mmlmin. This
material is a very dangerous faehazard and moderately explosive when exposed to heat or flame.It may explode spontaneously since the vapor
forms explosive mixtures with air. At elevated temperatures,polymerization may take place and containers may rupture.
SpecialFire-flghting Procedures: Since vinylidem chloride may be poisonous if inhaled or absorbed through the skin,wear a self-contained
breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece operated in thegressure-dcmandor positive-pmsure mode with a fully encapsulating suit. Keep
unnecessary people away from the hazard area Vapors may travel to an ignition source and Rash back. Be aware of runoff from fire ccntrol
methods. Do not release to sewers or waterways.
StabllitvlPolvmeriztlon:Vinylidene chloride is self-reactive. If s t o d between -40 'PI40 'C and 77 W25 'C in air without an inhibitor. this
materiairapidly absorbs oxygen and forms a violently explosive peroxide. The heat of polymerization is -185 caVg (inhibited). When unstable, vinylidene chloride decomposes into chlorine, hydrogen chloride, phosgene, and formaldehyde. Hazardous polymerization can occur if exposed to
sunlight, air, copper, aluminum, or heat.
Chemical Incompatibilities: This material reacts violently with chlorosul€onic acid, nitric acid, and oleum; and vigorously with oxidizing materials.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition: Thermal oxidative decomposition of vinylidene chloride can produce highly toxic fumes of chlorine
(ClJ and hydrogen chloridc (HCI).
No. 708
Vinylidene Chloride
4/90
..
Section 6. Health Hazard Data
Carclnogenlcity: Neither the F P . IARC, nor OSHA lists vinytidene chloride ?sa carcinogen, althpugh the ACGIH suggesls it is a suspected
carcinogen. Various anunal studies s u y t a high rate of cancer in species-speclficteshn application to humans does not appear valid.
Summary of Risks: Vinytidene chlon e is an irritant to the skin, eyes, and mucous memfjanes, although any inhibitor in vinylidene chloride
may partl cause thc irritation. VDC is narcotic at concentrations greater than 4000 ppm, and has caused liver and kidne in'ury in experimental :
animals. Jolutions conlaining the inhibitor MEHQ (monomethyl ether of hydroquinone) may cause leucoderma (white
and serious eye
'
sh{
2 x i a l Conditions Aggravated by Long-T&n Exposure: None reported.
Target Organs: Skin, eyes, central nervous system, liver, and kidneys.
Primar Entry Routes: Inhalation.
Acute dffects: Inhalation of VDC causes narcosis and respiratory irritation. Concentrationsof 4000 p m lead to symptoms of drunkenness and
eventually unconsciousness if the exposure continues. In monke studies, exposure to 200 ppm causefacute liver injury with a mechanism
similar to carbon tetrachloride. Animal studies indicate acute kiluey changes in high-level exposures. Eye contact may cause conjunctivitis,
transient corneal in'u and kitis. VDC also causes skin and mucous membrane initation.
Chronlc Effects: &i$chxunic inhalation, vinylidene chloride may cause hepatic and renal dysfunction. In monkey studies, long-term inhalation
at a 48-p m level caused liver and kidney damage and death.
FIRSTL
SpLlYLeak: Design andpractice a vinylidene chloride spill controland counrenneaswepkur (SCCP).Notify safety personnel, evacuate all
unnecessary personnel from hazard area,remove all heat and ignition sourceq and ventilate area. Cleanup personnel should protect ag&st
inhalation and skin and eye contacf For lab spills, absorb the spill with paper towels and place in a hood to allow liquid to evaporate. For large
spills, absorb bulk spill with cement powder, fly ash, sawdust, or commercial sorbents. Place waste in appropriatedisposal containers. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120).
Dkposal: Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicableFederal, state, and local regulations.
EPA Designations
RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33): Not listed
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance* (40 CFR 302.4), Reportable Quantity (RQ): 5000 lb (2270 kg) [* per Clean Water Act, Sec.31 (b)(4)
Sec. 307(a); per RCRA, Sec. 30013
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
Listed as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65)
OSHA Designations
Air Contaminant(29 CFR 1910.1OO0, Subpart2):Not listed
Goggles: Wear rotective eyeglasses or chemical safe o les, per OSHA e y e and faceprotection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133).
Respirator: Fo8ow OSHA respirator re ations (29 gF% %0.134) and, if necessq, wear a NIOSH-approved respgator. R q i r a t o canisters
containing alkaline materials should noteused because dichloro acetylenecan be f o d . For emergency or nonroutme operaborn (c?khg
ills, reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an SCBA.
fP;arnh :Air-purify.ing respirators do not protect workers in oxygendeficientatmospheres.
Other: &ear impervious gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent skin contact. Rubber gloves are recommenk.
Ventilatlon: Provide eneral and local explosion-proof ventilation systems to maintainairborne concenlratioqs below $e OSHA PEL and
ACGIH TLVs (Sec.2f Local explosion-proof exhaust ventilationis preferred smce it prevents contaminantdispersion into the work area by controlling it at its so~rce.C'~9
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations,safetylquick-drench showers,and washing facilities.
Contaminated Equipment: Never wear contact lenses in the work area: soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate, irritants. Remove this
material from ur shoes and equipment. Launder contaminated clothing before wearing.
eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especiallybefore eating, drinking,
Comments:
smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics.
d%r
water,-and other polymerization initiators under a nitrogen blanket (at lcpsi pressure and an oxygen Antent less than 100 ppm).Outside or
detached storage is preferable. If stored inside, store in a standard flammable liquids storage cabinet separate from oxidizing materials and
incompatible materials (Sec. 5).
Engineering Controls: VDC requires special handlmg, precautions, and employee training. Do not handle VDC without adequate ventilation and
personal protective gear. Limit exposures to vinylidenechloride by improving housekeeping procedures. Keep VDC away from all heat and
ignition sources. All engineering systems should be of maximum explosion-proof design, electricallygrounded, and bonded.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101, .102)
IMO Shipping Name: Viylideae chloride, inhibited
DOT Shipping Name: Vinylidene chloride, inhibited
IMO Hazard Class: 3.1
DOT Hazard Class: Flammabie liquid
IMO Label: Flammable liquid
I D No.: UN1303
DOT Label: Flammable liquid
IMDG Packaging Group: I
I D No.: UN13M
DOT Packaging Requirements 173.1 19
DOT Packaging Exceptions: 173.118
MsDS Collection References: 7,26,38,53.73,84,85.87,89.
100, 103,124. 126, 127, 129, 134, 136
Prepared by: MJ Allison, BS;Industrial Hygiene Review: DJ Wilson, CM; Medical Review: W Silverman, MD
ua
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Nlhcugh rcrrooablr c u e h u been ULcn in the prcpualion&such InlumutiOq Otnllun P u b l W CapaatlCn caucdr no w d a . d u m r s p e x n l ~ l h.od
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-
Genium Publishing
- Coworation
One Genium Plaza
Schenectady, NY 123044690 USA
I Material Safety
- - Data Sheets Collection:
I
Sheet No. 318
Xylene (Mixed Isomers)
(518) 377-8854
).>uru-(b-)] with the large& :r&xtion
&ing m- xyleme. Xylem k OM
from coal tar, toluene by tra-mlkylation, and .
Dseudocumene. used in the manufacture of dyes. resins. mmts. varnkhcs and o t h a organics: as a generd solvent for
fidhesives. a cleaning agent in microscope technique; 8s solvcnt for Canada balsam m%rosc&py; as a fuel component; in
K 3
aviation gasoline, protective coatings, sterilizing catgut, hydmgm peroxide, perfumes, insect repellants. pharmaceuticals, and
the leather industry; in the production of phthalic anhydridt, itophthalic. and terephthalic acids and their dimethyl esters
which are used in the manufacture of polyester fibers, and as an hdiect food additive as a component of adhesives. Around
the home, xylene is found as vehicles in paints, paint removers. degreasing cleaners, lacquas, glues and cements and as
solvenr/vehicles for pesticides.
Other Designations: CAS No. 1330-20-7 [95-47&, 108-383; 106-42-3 (o-,m-, p-isomm)]. dimethylbenzem,
methyltoluene, NCIC55232, Violet 3. xyloL
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult latest Chemical WeekBuyers' [email protected]) for a suppliem list.
Cautions: Xylene is an eye, skin, and mucous membrane irritant and may be narcotic in high concentrations. It is a dangerous fire ..mud. $
*
-
Xylene (mixed isomers): the commercial product genaally contains 40% m-xylene; 20% each of 0-xylem, p-xylene, and e t h y l b e m q and small
quantities of toluene. Unpurified xylene may contain pseudocumene.
1991 OSHA PELS
1992-93 ACGIH TLVs
1985-86Toxicity Data*
.
Human, inhalation, TG:200 pprn produced
8-hrTWA: 100ppm (435 mg/m3)
TWA: 100pprn (434 &n?
15-min STEL: 150ppm (6.55 mg/m3)
150ppm (651 mghrs)
olfaction effects, conjunctiva irritation, and other
BEI (Biological Expowre Index) Methylhippuric
changes involving the lungs, thorax, or respiration.
1990 IDLH Level
M a inhalation, IA& loo00 p p d 6 hr; toxic
acids in urine at end of shift 15 g/g creatinine
PPm
effects not yet reviewed.
1990 DFG (Germany) MAK
Human, oral,
50 m a g no toxic &ect noted.
1990 NIOSH RELs
T W k 100ppm (440mgld)
Rat, oral,LDS: 4300 mg/kg; toxic effect not yet
TWA: 100ppm (435 mg/m3).
Category II:Substances with systemic effects
reviewed.
STEL: 150 ppm (6.55 mglm )
Half-liife: < 2 hr
Rat. inmation. L% 5000 ~ ~ k toxic
d effects
4
peak ~xposure:
200 ppm,30 -, average value,
not yet reviewed.
4peakspershift
See MOSH, RTECS (XEZlOOOOO),for addiliond toxicity data.
~~
Boiling Point Range: 279 to 284 'F (137 to 140 'C)*
Boiling Point: orfbo: 291 'F (144 *C);mefu:281.8 T (138.8 'C);
para: 281.3 'F(l38.5 'C)
Freezing PointhfeltIng Point: ortho: -13 'F (-25 *C);
meta: -53.3 *F(-47.4 T);
puru: 55 to 57 'F (13 to 14 'C)
Vapor Pressure: 6.72 mm Hg at 70 'F 1 'C)
Saturated Vapor Density (Air = 1.2 kg I&: 1.23 kdd. 0.077 Ibdfe
Appearance and Odor: Clear, sweet-smelling liquid.
* hfataialswith wider and narrowerkilinnraneesuc canmadallv available.
P
Molecular Weight: 106.16
Specifk Gravity: 0.864 at 20 'Cf4 'C
Water Solubffity: Practically insoluble
Other Solubilities: Miscible with absolute alcohol, ether, and
many other organic liquids.
OctanoUWater Partition Coefficient: logKow = 3.12-3.20
Odor Threshold: 1 ppm
VrscoSlty: 6 2 . 6 SUS
liiuid (which floatson water) may travel to an i
~UICO
and flashback. The heat of Fm may cause c o n t h e n to explode and/or prodice
irritating or poisonous decomposition products.
may present a vapor explosion hazard indoors. outdoors. or in sewers. Accumulated static
electricity may occur ftom vapor or liquid flow sufficient to cause ignition. Special Firefighting Procedures: Because fire may produce toxic
thermal decomposition products, wear a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece operated in pressuredemand or positivepressure mode. Structural firefighter's protective clothing will p v i d e limited protection. If feasible and without risk. move containers Prom fire area.
Othenvise, cool f i i x p o s e d containers until well after fmk extinguished. Stay clear of tank ends. Use unmanned hose holder or monitor nozzles for
massive cargo fires. If impossible, withdraw from area and k
t Fue bum. Withdraw immediately in caseof any tank discoloration or rising sound from
venting safety device. Do not release runoff fiom fire control methods to sewers or waterways.
cannot occur.Xylene is easily chlorinat&, sullonated. or nitrated. Chemical IncompatlbYUitIes: hcom;atib&ies -%dude strong
polym&ti&
(dichlorohydrantoin). Xylene attacks some forms of plastics, rubber, and
acids and oxidizcrS and 1,3dichloro-S,5dimethyl-2~4-imidamlidindione
coatings. Condltlons to Avoid: Avoid heat and ignition sourccs and incompatibles. Hazardous Products of Decomposition: Thermal oxidative
decommsition of xvlene can Droduce carbon dioxide. carbon monoxide. and various hydrocarbon Droducts.
Carcinogenlcity: The IARC,('*) "I?,('@)
and OSHA(**) do not list xyiene as a carcinogen. Summary of Rkks: Xylene is an eye, mucous
membrane, and respiratory tract irritant. Irritation starts at 200 ppm; severe breathing difficulties which may be delayed in onset can occur at high
concentrations. It is a central nervous system (CNS)depressant and at high concentrations can cause coma. Kidney and liver damage can occur with
xylene exposure. With prolonged or repeated cutaneous exposure, xylene produces a defatting dermatitis. Chronic toxicity is not well defined, but it
is less toxic &an benzene. Prior to the 1950s. benzene was often found as a contaminant of xylene and the effects attributed to xylene such as blood
dyscrasias are questionable. Since the late 1950s. xylcncs have been virtually benzene-free and blood dyscrasias have not been associated with
xylenes. Chronic exposure to high concentrations of xylene in animal studies have demonstrated milk reversible decrease in red and white cell
counts as well as incrcascs in platelet counts.
Continue on next pa84
CopYrigh 8 1992 Gni-
hhlihin' Cmpontion Any cunmrci.1
UT 01 rqxodua'm-.&I
ihc p l b l l h c h pcrmbion t prohibid.
No. 3 18
Xvlene (Mixed Isomers)
9/92
irregularity was reported in association with workplace exposure to xylem perhaps due to effects on liver metabolism. Xylene crosses the human
placenta, but does not appear to be teratogenic under conditions testcd to date. Medical Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: CNS.
respiratory, eye, skin, gastrointestinal (GI), liver and kidney disorders. Target Organs: CNS. eyes, GI tract. liver, kidneys, and skin. Primary
Entry Routes: Inhalation, skin abarption (slight), eye contact, ingestion. Acute ETTects: Inhalation of high xylene concentrations may cause
dizziness: nausea. vomiting. and abdominal pain: eye, nose, and throat initation: respiratory tract initation leading to pulmonary edema (fluid in
lung); drowsiness: and unconsciousness. Direct eye contact can result in conjunctivitisand corneal burns. Ingestion may cause a buming sensation
in the orepharynx and stomach and transient CNS depression. Chronk Ecfects: Repeated or prolonged skin contact may cause drying and defatting of the skin leading to dermatitis. Repeated eye exposure to high vapor concentrations may cause reversible eye damage, peripheral and central
neuropathy. and liver damage. Other symptoms of chronic exposure include headache, fatigue. irritability, chronic bronchitis. and GI disturbances
such as nausea, loss of appetite, and gas.
FIRST AID Emergencypersonnelshouldprofect against exposure. Eyes: Do not allow victim to rub or keep eyes tightly shut. Gently lift eyelids
and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of water until transported to an emergency medical facility. Consult a physician
immediately. Skin: Quickly remove contaminated clothing. Rinse with f l d i g amounts of water for at least 15 min. Wash exposed area with soap
and water. For reddened or blistered skin. consult a physician. Carehlly dispose of contaminated clothing as it may pose a fae hazard. Inhalation:
Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathing as nesded. Monitor exposed person for respiratory distress. Ingestion: Never give.
anything by mouth to an unconscious or convulsing person. Contact a poison control center and unless othenvise advised, do not induce uomtrngl If
spontaneous vomiting should occur, keep exposed person's head below the hips to prevent aspiration (breathing liquid xylene into the lungs).
Aspiration of a few millimeters ofxylene can cause chem*calpnewnonifis,pulmonury
edemu. and hemorrhage. Note to Physlchns: Hippuric acid
or the ether glucuronide of ortho-toluic acid may be useful in diagnosis of mefu-,pura- and ortho-xylene exposure,respectively. Considet gastric
lavage if a large quantity of xylene was ingested. Proceed gastric lavage with protection of the airway from aspiration; consider endotracheal
intubation with inflated cuff.
.
pkmnnel should iroteciagainst v a h inhalation and skin &Lye contact. If feasible and withok undue risk, stop leak. Use appropriate foam b
blanket release and suppress vapors. Water spray may reduce vapor, but does not prevent ignition in closed spaces. For small spills,absorb on paper
and evaporate in appropriate exhaust hood or absorb with sand or some non-combustibleabsorbent and place in containers for later disposal. For
large spills dike far ahead of liquid to contain. Do not allow xylene to enter a confiied space such as sewers or drains. On land, dike to contain or
divert to impermeable holding area. Apply water spray to control flammable vapor and remove material with pumps or vacuum equipment. On
water, contain material with natural barriers. booms, or weirs: apply universal gelling agen6 and use. suction hoses to remove spilled material.
Report any release in excess of lo00 lb. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120). Environmental Transport: Little bioconcen&tion is expected. Biological oxygen demand 5 (after 5 days at 20 T): 0.64 (no stated isomer). Ecotoxicity values: LD, Goldfish, 13 mg/U24 hr,
conditions of bioassay not specified, no specific isomer. Environmental Degradation: In the atmosphere, xylenes degrade by reacting with
photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals with a half-life ranging from 1-1.7 hr. in the summer to 10-18 hr in winter or a typical loss of 67-864
per day. Xylenes are resistant to hydrolysis. Soil AbsorptlonlMobillty: Xylenes have low to moderate adsorption to soil and when spilled on land.
will volatilize and leach into groundwater. Disposal: As a hydrocarbon, xylene is a good candidate for controlled incineration. Contact your supplier
or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
EPA Designations
OSHA Deslgnatlons
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1OOO. Table Z-1-A)
SARA Extrernelv Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
Listed as a SARk Toxic Chemical (40 C'FR 372.65) .
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33): No. U239, FOO3 (spent solvent)
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance* (40CFR 302.4): Final Reportable Quantity (RQ), lo00 lb (454 kg) [* per Clean Water Act,
Sec. 31UbM4): ~ eRCRA.
r
Sec. 30011
I
Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and, if necessary,. wear a MSHA/NIOSH-appmved respirator. For concentrations >lo00
ppm, use any chemical Cartridgerespirator with organic vapor cartridges; any powered. air-purifying respkitor with organic vapor cartridges: any
supplied-air respirator; or any self-contained breathing apparatus. For emergency or nomutine operations (cleaning spills. reactor vessels. or
storage tanks), wear an SCBA.Wm'ng! Air-pwifiing respirators do not protect workers in oxygen-deficientatmospheres.If respirators are used,
Other: Wear chemically protective gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent all skin contact. With breakthrough times > 8 hr, consider
polyvinyl alcohol and fluorocarbon rubber (Viton) as materials for PPE Ventilation: Provide general and local exhaust ventilation systems to
mamtain airborne concentrations%elow the OSHA PELS (Sec. 2). Localexhaust ventfiation is prefmed because it prevents contaminant dispersion
into the work area by controlling it a t its source.(103)Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations,safety/quickdrench showers. and washing facilities. Contaminated Equipment: Separatecontaminated work clothes from street clothes. Launder contami~ t e work
d clothing before wearing. Remove this material from yonr shoes and clean PPE. Comments: Never eat,drink. or smoke in work areas.
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Genium Publishing Corporation
1145 Catalyn Street
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836USA
(518)377-8854
-
...~
..-.
Sheet No. 73
Zinc MetaVPowder
Issued: 7/80
I
Revision: A. 11/89
Zlnc MetaVPowder Description: A metallic el-t
extracted from o m which are f i t roasted to form zinc oxide and. R
then: 1) the zinc oxide is leached from the roasted material with sulhvic acid to form a Zinc sulfate solution which is
I
elcctm~yzcdin cells to deposit zinc on cathodes and 2) the zinc oxide is rcduad with carbon in retorts (distilling vessels) s
to yield distilled and condensed zinc. Used as ingredient m alloys such as brass, bronze, and diacasting alloys; galvanizing K
sheet iron; for electrical apparatus, especially castings, building materials, dry cell b a t t a b , automotiveequipment,
household utensils, railroad car linings;as a fungicide; in nutrition (essential growth element); as reagent in analytical
chemistxy; in bleaching bone glue+manufacturing sodium hydrosulfitc, and insulin zinc salts.
Other Desfgnations: Blue powda; spelter; granular bnc;jasad;mcrriUite;pasc0;Za; CAS No. 7440666.
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. coluult the latest ChpnicalwcekBuyus' Guide (Genium ref. 73)
for a suppliers list.
1
1
1
1
W A
A
9
HMIS
H O
P 1
R 1
PPG*
*em.
P
Zinc meWpowder, ca 99%
OSHA PEL
None established+
ACGIH TLV, 1989-90
None established*
MOSH REL, 1987
None established*
Toxiclty Datat
Human. inhalation, T G 124 mg/m3/50min,
pulmonary systemeffects
o)
The cumntOSHA standad and ACGIH (1989-1990) TWA for* oxide
fumes is 5 m e . ?he ACGM TWA for zinc oxide dust is 10 mglm', poviding
that total contains no asbestos and is el%crystallime silica. NIOSH has ncommtndeda 1 W TWA of 5 mglm'anda ceiling levd of 15 Wm' (15-min sample)
for zinc oxide fume. ?be TLV-TWA level was ret to v e n t meblfume fever.
r
Melting Point: 419 'F (787'C)
SpecllIc Gravity (HLO = 1 at 39 '
F (4*C)> 7.13 at77 T (25 'C)
Vapor Pressure: 1 mm Hg at 909 'F (487'C)
Water Solubility: Insoluble
BrineU Hardness: 31
Index of IExplosibllity, Zn Powder (4.lweak,A 0 severe): 0.1
Appearance and Odor: Bluish-white lustrous metal. also f d y divided forms.
I
I
05 ozKt)
Ektinguishtng Media: Use specialdry chcdcalorcleaadrpsandlll~usec0,Using adinctstreamof water may scattathe fircordispersc
dusf mating a potentially explosive mixture if exposed to heat or ignition sources. A wata spray may be used to cool firacxpasedcoataincrs
and disperse vapors.
Unusual Fire or Exploslon Hazards: Flammablehydrogen gas is libaattd by reaction with alkalihydroxides (sodium, potassium, and calcium
hydroxides), acids, or even wata (when material is in dustform) and is an explosion hazard in a codirned space. In a f i i zinc may melt,
vaporize, and bum to formZn0 fumes (Sec.2).
Special Fire-flghting Procedures: For majOr fires,or if large quantitiesof this mataialare involved, fire fighters should weat appropriate
protective clothing and nspirahy.protectiou. Wear a self-containedbreathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full faccpitceoperated in the pnssura
demand or positivepressure mode.
P
StabUlty/Polymerilatlon: Zinc is stable in dry air at mom tempaature. Moist zinc dust can react exothermicallyand ignite spontaneouslyin air.
Hazardous polymerization cannot occur.
Chemlcal Incompatibllltles: Zinc dust is an explosion hazard when reacted with acids. chlorates. oxidiziig agents (sulfur and oxygen), halogenated hydrocarbons, hydrazinc mononitrate, hydmxylamine. ammonium nih-ate, barium dioxide, barium nitrate, cadmium, performic acid,
manganese chloride, nitric acid, ethyl acetoacetateand triimmoneopcntyl alcohol. tellurium.carbon disulfide, lead azide, magnesium and barium
nitrate and barium dioxide, selenium, sodium peroxide, potassium nitrate, and water. 10 humans, a toxic effect results from inhaling 124 mg/m' of
zinc metaVpowderfor 50 min.
Hazardous Products of Decomposltlon: Thamal oxidative decomposition ofzinc can produce highly toxic fumes. Above 999 'F (537 'C)
vaporized zinc bums in air with a blue-green flame to produce zinc oxide fumcs.
CoprLblO1989OcdumPubl~capmLicQ
Any Uwmcrrtd tllc OT fcpvductlo. r ( W t mC plblwld. pamlslm b pohlMM.
1
%
No.73
Zinc Metal/Powder
11/89
Summa; of Risks: Zinc is rela$vely nontoxic, but when combined with other materials such as oxygen or mineral acids, the multing C O ~
pounds can have toxic effects. It is not readily absorbed through the skin, gastrointestinal (GI tract), or lungs. Although most inorganic zinc compounds arc potential causes of gastroentaic irritation. a high-level dosc is relatively nontoxic when ingested. Zinc is considered essential to life.
Ingestion of soluble salts may caw nausa and vomiting, sluggishness, and light-headedness. Inhalation of zinc fumes normally genaakd by
zinc and extreme heat may cause metcllfumc leva,which is accompanied by throat dryness aod irritation, coughing, weakness, dyspnca, and
generalized aching that generally passes within hr. These symptom usually begin 3 to 10hr after exposure and resolve within 24 to 48 hr. Inhalation of zinc dust may cause mild irritation to the upper respiratory tract.hlonged skin cootact with zinc may cause a mild,drying dermatitis.
Medical Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Since metallic zinc particulates can be considered a niusrmce dust, repeated
inhalation of zinc dust could lead to respiratory complications.
Target Organs:Respiratory system.
Primary Entry: Inhalation, ingestion.
Acute Effects: Metal fume fever is an acute, self-limiting condition,without recognized complications, aftereffects, or cfironic forms. Symptoms
appear several hours after exposure. Removal from exposure normally alleviates symptoms with no rtsidual or chronic effects. A d
e
w of
tolerance may result from continued exposure, but is quickly lost after a day or two of nonexposun.
Chronic Effects:
Zinc and dnc powder have little history of causing chronic effects.
FIRSTAID
Eyes: Flush immediately, includmg under the eyelids, gently but thoroughly with flooding amounts of running water for at least 15min.
Skla. After rinsing affected m a with flooding amounts of water, wash it with soap and water.
Inhalatlon: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathing as needed.
Ingestlon: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious or convulsmg person. If ingested, have that conscious person drink 1to 2 glasses of
water, then induce repeated vomiting until vomit is clear. Physictan’s Note: Calcium disodium cdetate (CaNqEDTA) has been used medically
to incnase the rate of zinc removal from the body; however, this usually results from chronic fume exposure or exposure to zinc salts. not to zinc
metal powders.
1 Alter flrst aid. mt a ~ ~ r o o r i aIn-Dlant,
te
Darsmedic, or community medlcal attenth and sn~port.
’
1
inhalation and eye contact.Use nonsparking tools for cleanup. Sweep or othemise place the spilled material in en appropriate, pnssure-vented,
dry-metal container (with lid) for later disposal. Container should be pnssure vented. Avoid CreatiDg airborne dust conditions.
Disposal: Contact your supplieror a licensed contractor for detailed ~mmendations.Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
OSHA Designations
Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1OO0, SubpartZ):Not listed
EPA Designations
RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33): Not listed
Listed as a CERCLA ,HazardousSubstance+(40 CFR 302.4), Reportable Quantity (RQ: lo00lb (454 kg) [* per cleanWater Act, Sec.307(a)]
SARA Extremely HazardousSubstance(40CFR 355): Not listed
Respirator:For zinc oxide dust or fumeconcentrationsup to 50 mg/dand 2% mglm? use, nspectivdy, a fume Oighcfficiency partrculate)
reapirabror an air-supplied or self-contained respirator with P full facepiece. Follow OSHA rcsjhtorrcgulations(29 CFR 1910.134). For emsgency or nomutine operations (cleaning spiIk, reactor vessels, or storage tnnlts). wear an SCBk
Warning: Air-purifying respiratorsdo not protect workas in oxygadeficient afmosphas.
Other: Wear imperviousgloves, boots, aprons, and gauntleb to prevent pmlotlged mrepeattd skin contacf
Ventilation: Ptovidc general and local explosion-proof ventilation systems to maintain airborae concentmtions~
below established TLVs-”As
(Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is pref&
shce it prevents contaminant diqmsirn into the work area by eliminating it at its source (Gcniuxn
ref. 103).
Safety Statlons: Make available in the work a& emergency eyewash atationS.saf~lquick-drenchshowers. and washing facilities.
Contaminated Equlpment: Never wear contact lenses in the work ~~cta:
soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concartrate, irritants.Launder
contaminated clothing beforc wearing. Remove this material from your shoes and cqUipment.Wash thoroughly before changing to sereet clothes.
Comments:Never eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good pasonal hygiene after usmg this material,especially before eating, ddnkhg,
I
Never store with acids, halogenated hydrocarbons, or strong alkalis.
Engineerlng Controls: Avoid breathing dust or fumes.Use good housekeeping and cleaning techniques to minimize airborneparticulates and to
prevent dust accumulation. Provide suitable training in personal hygiene and in the cause and effect of metal fume fever. Prevent exposure of
workers with respiratory problems or gastrointestinal disorders.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.102)
IMO Shlpplng Name: Zinc, powder or dust, ppphoric
IMO Shipping Name: Zinc,powder or dust, wnpyrophoric
IMO Hazard Class: 4.2
N O Hazard Class: 4.3
IMO Label: Spontaneously combustible
N O Label: Dangerous when wet
IMDG Packaglng Group: 11
IMDG Packaging Group: I1
MSDS Collcclion References: 2.4-1 1.24. 31, 39-41.80,81,84,85.91, 109
P
Prepared by: MJ Allison. BS: Industrial HyGene Review: DJ Wilson, CM; Medical Review: Warren Silverman, MD
ATTACHMENT C
--
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES FOR EXPOSURE TO
HAZARDOUS MATERIALSMTASTE
1. Call ambulance or transport individual to hospitallclinic immediately. Monitor airway,
breathing and circulation during trip to hospital or while waiting for the ambulance.
Administer first aid or CPR, as necessary. Don't forget to take the HASP with you; it
contains information on the contaminants expected to be found on site and will assist the
physician in hidher assessment of the exposure.
2. Fill in Potential Exposure Report, answering each of the questions to the best of your
ability.
3. Contact our physician(s) at EMR as soon as possible. The procedure is as follows:
a. Call EMR at 1-800-229-3674!
b. Ask to speak with:
Dr.David L. Barnes;
Dr. Elaine Theriault; or
Ms.T.J. Wolff, R.N.
Note. During nonbusiness hours (after 6 p.m.) call 1-800-229-3674
and follow directions for
paging the aforementioned individuals.
4. Once in contact with any of these individuals, explain what has happened (they will
review the information on the form with you and may ask you to fax the form to them, if
possible), and allow either of them to speak with the attending physician.
5. When asked about payment (and they will ask), inform the Hospital/Clinic/Physicianthat
this is a "work related injury" and have them contact the Benefits Coordinator at
(412) 269-2744. Have invoices sent to:
Michael Baker Jr. Inc.
Attn: Benefits Coordinator
Airport Office Park,Bldg. 3
Coraopolis, PA 15108
6. Contact the Project Manager and the Project Health and Safety Officer as soon as it is
feasible, but wait no longer than 24 hours.
Page 1 of 2
POTENTIAL EXPOSURE REPORT
Name:
Date of Exposure:
Social Security No.:
Age:
I.
Sex:
ExposiigAgent
Name of Product or Chemicals (if known)
Characteristics (if the name is not known)
Solid
II.
Liquid
Gas
Fume
Mist
Vapor
Dose Determinants
What was individual doing?
How long did individual work in area before signshymptoms developed?
W a s protective gear being used? If yes, what was the PPE?
Was there skin contact?
W a s the exposing agent inhaled?
W e r e other persons exposed? If yes, did they experience symptoms?
EL
Signs and Symptoms (check off appropriate symptoms)
Immediately with Exposure:
0 Burning of eyes, nose, or throat
Tearing
0 Headache
0 Cough
111 Shortness of breath
0 Delirium
0
0
0
0
Chest tightness/pressure
Nausedvomiting
Dizziness
Weakness
0 Heat flashes
0 Other
Delayed Slymptoms:
0 Weakness
Nausedvomiting
0 Shortness of breath
0 Cough
0
0
0
0
0
Loss of appetite
Abdominal pain
Headache
Numbness/tingling
Other
rx-
Page 2 of 2
POTENTIAL EXPOSURE REPORT
Present Status of Symptoms (check off appropriate symptoms)
0 Burning of eyes, nose, or throat
0 Tearing
0 Headache
Cl Cough
0 Shortness of breath
0 Chest tightnesdpressure
0 Cyanosis (bluish skin color)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Nauseahomiting
Dizziness
Weakness
Loss of appetite
Abdominal pain
Numbnesdtingling
Other
Have symptoms (please check off appropriate response and give duration of
symptoms):
Improved
V.
Remain Unchanged
Treatment of Symptoms (check off appropriate response)
None
n
Worsened
Self-medicated
Name
(Attending physician)
w. HoSpital/Clhk
Source:
EMR, Inc,
Physician treated
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