DSC | WLS900 | Operating instructions | DSC WLS900 Operating instructions

DSC WLS900 Operating instructions
Introduction
DSC Security Products has made a multimillion dollar investment into the wireless security
market. The Marquis System will be the first of many products to revolutionize the wireless
security industry.
A short list of advantages:
• Twelve minute supervisory times versus fifty to sixty minutes
• Six hour supervisory window versus twelve or twenty-four hour
• Standard batteries versus specialized batteries
• High power transmitters versus low power transmitters for better range and propagation
• 3.2" versus 9" ¼ wavelength signal for better propagation
Our new Marquis Supervised Wireless Security System is the culmination of four years of
engineering effort. It is the first Spread Spectrum system to combine true supervision and a
very high level of security into a wireless system.
The Marquis Controller is unique. While it houses the highly sensitive RF receiver and
communicator, it can be mounted almost anywhere, possibly in the bedroom by the bedside
table. Or the Controller can be mounted in a more traditional location near the telephone line
interface. One of the Controller’s unique features is its three built-in communication jacks
which will reduce your installation time.
We felt that in order for wireless to be secure, the Controller had to be separated from the
Keypad. The Marquis Keypad is a full-featured two-way 900MHz wireless device which is used
to program and operate the system from anywhere in or around the premises.
The industry said that it wanted a truly reliable wireless Sounder. The Marquis System’s
wireless Sounder is a 900Mhz transceiver. The Controller and the Sounders are continually
communicating back and forth, confirming everything each step of the way.
Instead of dual spacial diversity, where the receiver has two antennas in the same location,
DSC chose to incorporate true diversity. Each device in the system now has two paths it takes
to the Controller: each transmitter sends directly to the Controller, and to the supervised
Sounder which relays the signal to the Controller, thus providing a true second pathway.
In addition DSC has also been working on other wireless products, such as the LINKSTM series
of Long Range Radio and Cellular Communicators. To date, thousands of LINKSTM products
are installed and in use all over North America. DSC’s commitment to wireless products is
total. DSC has a group of RF engineering specialists, which is something many of our
competitors only wish they could do.
We are confident that your first experience with the Marquis Security System will be positive.
Let us know what you think. Forward your comments to:
DSC Security Products Limited
c/o Product Manager, Wireless Security Systems
1645 Flint Road
Downsview, Ontario
Canada
M3J 2J6
1
Chapter 1: Overview
Chapter 1: Overview
1 A: Glossary
Several terms are used throughout this manual to refer to parts and operations of the WLS900
System. Read the definitions below to familiarize yourself with the system and its terms.
Access Code
The 4-digit code entered by a user to arm or disarm the system. Up to 10
personal Access Codes may be programmed for different users.
Backplate
The mounting bracket used to secure each part of the WLS900 System to
the wall.
Component
Enrolling
Hexadecimal
HEX
Module
RF
Scrolling
Spread Spectrum
Wireless
Y/N
2
A part of the security system, such as a Motion Detector, Universal
Transmitter, Keypad or other part. Often, the terms “component” and
“module” will be interchangeable.
The process of adding a component to the WLS900 System. “Enrolling” a
component tells the system that a component is being added, and what
sort of component it is.
A number system that uses 0 through 9 to represent the numbers 0
through 9, and the letters A through F to represent the numbers 10
through 15. Hexadecimal numbers are used in some Programming
Sections of the WLS900 System.
An abbreviation for “hexadecimal”. This abbreviation is used in this
manual when referring to hexadecimal numbers or data entry sections.
A part of the security system, such as a Motion Detector, Universal
Transmitter, Keypad or other part. Often, the terms “module” and
“component” will be interchangeable.
An acronym for “radio frequency”. RF is often used to refer to wireless
radio transmission technology and devices.
Using the
-YES and
-NO Keys to move through messages on the
Keypad display. When the manual indicates to “scroll” to a message,
-YES or
-NO Key several times until the desired
press the
message is displayed.
A specialized radio transmission technology used by the WLS900 System.
Spread Spectrum radio technology is extremely reliable, and is very
resistant to jamming and interference.
Any system or component that uses radio signals in its operation.
Abbreviations for “Yes” and “No” used in the Keypad messages. To
answer “yes” to a question on the Keypad display, press
-YES. To
-NO.
answer “no” to a question on the Keypad display, press
Chapter 1: Overview
OVERVIEW
1 B: Components
Controller
The Controller contains the system’s main electronics,
RF receiver, communicator and back-up battery. The
Controller is connected to an AC outlet and the
telephone line. The Controller requires:
• AC Adaptor labelled “Controller”
• One 6V 1.2Ah battery
Controller Operating Temperature Range:
• 0°C to 50°C (32°F to 122°F)
Keypad
The Keypad is used to operate the system and displays
operating instructions and system information in clear,
easy-to-understand language. The Keypad requires:
• Four AA Batteries
NOTE: The keypad is shipped with 8 AA batteries.
One set of four batteries should be used for installation
and programming. When you are done installing and
programming the WLS900 system, replace the
batteries in the keypad with the second supplied set.
For more information, see section 3A “Enrolling the
First Keypad”, on page 7.
Keypad Operating Temperature Range:
• 0°C to 50°C (32°F to 122°F)
Sounder
The WLS903 Sounder is used to sound an alert when
an alarm occurs. It is used to indicate that system
functions are being performed. It also performs the
task of a RF Signal Repeater. The Sounder is connected
to an AC outlet. The Sounder requires:
• AC Adaptor labelled “Sounder”
• Four AA Batteries
Sounder Operating Temperature Range:
• 0°C to 50°C (32°F to 122°F)
WLS911 Siren
The WLS911 wireless siren is an exceptionally loud
unit with the same functions as the WLS903. It also
has a rechargeable backup battery and an output
for an additional sounding device which will only
operate when the system is in alarm.
Siren Operating Temperature Range:
• 0°C to 50°C (32°F to 122°F)
Motion Detector
The WLS904 Motion Detectors are passive infrared
motion detectors. Each Motion Detector requires
• Four AAA Batteries
Motion Detector Operating Temperature Range:
• 0°C to 50°C (32°F to 122°F)
3
Chapter 1: Overview
Universal Transmitter
WLS905
WLS907
The WLS905 and WLS907 Universal Transmitters are general purpose
detection devices that may be used as door or window contacts. Universal
Transmitters feature their own built-in contacts, and they may also be wired
with external contacts. Each Universal Transmitter requires:
• Three AAA Batteries
Universal Transmitter Operating Temperature Range:
• 0°C to 50°C (32°F to 122°F)
Smoke Detectors
The WLS906 Smoke Detectors are photoelectric smoke detectors designed
for either ceiling or wall mounting. Refer to Appendix A Guidelines for
Locating Smoke Detectors. Each Smoke Detector requires:
• Six AA Batteries
Smoke Detector Operating Temperature Range:
• 0°C to 50°C (32°F to 122°F)
Batteries
The WLS900 System is designed to use Eveready Alkaline Energizer Batteries.
Do not use other brands of batteries with the WLS900 System. Using brands other than the
Eveready Alkaline Energizer will void UL and ULC approvals, and may affect the system’s
operation.
AC Adaptors
The AC adaptors supplied for the Controller and Sounder are not interchangeable. The adaptors are clearly
labelled; ensure the Controller Adaptor is used with the Controller, and the Sounder Adaptor is used with the
Sounder.
4
Chapter 2: Getting Started
Chapter 2: Getting Started
Read Chapter One: Overview to familiarize yourself with the WLS900 System, its
components, and the terms used in this manual.
Chapter Two: Getting Started explains how to:
• Prepare the system components for installation
GETTING
STARTED
• Reset the system programming to the factory default settings
• Install the battery in the Controller
2 A: Preparing for Installation
Remove all Components from their packaging.
Do not install the batteries at this time!
Remove all Backplates from their Components
Controller
Pull the Controller slightly away from the bottom of the backplate and push up.
Keypad
Pull the Keypad slightly away from the bottom of the backplate and push up.
Sounder
Pull the Sounder slightly away from the bottom of the backplate and push up.
Universal Transmitter
WLS905: Insert a small screwdriver in the slot on the side of the Transmitter.
Gently turn the screwdriver clockwise and pull the module to the left.
Insert small screwdriver
into slot
Universal
Transmitter
Side View
Pull module from
mounting plate
WLS907: Insert a small screwdriver in the slot on the side of the
Transmitter. Push the screwdriver in and lift off the cover.
Motion Detector
Push up on the Motion Detector to remove it from its backplate.
Smoke Detector
Turn the Smoke Detector counter clockwise to remove it from its mounting
bracket.
Record the Serial Number found on the back of each component on the
For The Record page in the Programming Work Sheets booklet.
Ensure all required batteries, AC adaptors, magnets and mounting screws
are on hand.
5
Chapter 2: Getting Started
2 B: Installing the Controller Battery
Connect the 6V 1.2Ah battery.
Be sure to connect the RED lead to the
RED terminal, and the BLACK lead to the
BLACK terminal. If the connection is made in reverse, the Controller will not be damaged,
but the Controller will not function properly.
Place the battery in the Controller case as shown below.
CONTROLLER
CIRCUIT
BOARD
CONTROLLER
BATTERY
CONTROLLER
BATTERY
SHOWN
INSTALLED.
BATTERY WIRES
NOT SHOWN
FOR CLARITY.
Replace the back on the Controller case and secure the six screws.
Reconnect the AC Adaptor plug to the AC Adaptor Jack on the Controller.
6
Chapter 3: Adding Components
Chapter Three: Adding Components explains how to:
• Add the first Keypad to the system
• Enter the Enrollment Mode
• Add components to the system
• Review the list of components on the system
• Remove components from the system
Two sets of batteries are provided with the keypad. When programming the system, because
of the length of time required, as well as the amount of communication that occurs between the
keypad and controller, the life of the batteries may be reduced. This may cause a low battery
condition to occur before the expected 20 to 24 month battery life period. After programming
the system completely, replace the batteries in the keypad with the second set, to ensure they
are fresh and fully charged.
Install four of the eight supplied AA batteries in the Keypad. Refer to the label
on the back of the Keypad and ensure that the batteries are installed correctly.
When you are done installing and programming the WLS900 system, replace the four batteries in
the keypad with the second supplied set.
Press the [#] Key; this message will be
displayed.
Press the [#] Key; this message will be
displayed.
The Controller Serial Number is printed on
the back of the Controller. Enter the Controller
Serial Number.
-YES Key. When the Keypad is
Press the
successfully enrolled, it will return to its
inactive state.
Secure the Keypad to its Backplate.
This message will be displayed if the Keypad
is unable to enroll with the Controller. If the
Keypad does not enroll with the Controller,
check the following:
• Ensure that the Controller’s AC Adaptor is properly connected to the
Controller and is plugged in
• Ensure that the Keypad’s batteries are new and properly installed
• Ensure that the Controller serial number was entered correctly
• The Keypad and Controller may be out of range; try enrolling the Keypad
with the Keypad and Controller in the same room.
• Reset the Keypad and the Controller by following the instructions on
performing a hardware reset on page 43.
7
ADDING
COMPONENTS
3 A: Enrolling the First Keypad
Chapter 3: Adding Components
3 B: Entering the Enrollment Mode
∗
Enter the Installer’s Programming Mode by entering [ ][8][Installer’s Code]
(refer to Chapter 5A, How to Enter the Installer's Programming Mode.)
-Yes Key when this message
Press the
is displayed.
When this message is displayed, press the
-YES Key.
The Enrollment Message indicates how
many of each component are enrolled on
the system:
• “0U” represents the number of Universal Transmitters
• “0M” represents the number of Motion Detectors
• “0S” represents the number of Smoke Detectors
• “0A” represents the number of Sounders
• “1K” represents the number of Keypads
In this example, only 1 Keypad has been enrolled on the system. As each
component is enrolled on the system or removed from the system, the number
beside the letter representing those components will be updated.
8
Chapter 3: Adding Components
3 C: Enrolling Sounders
Enter the Enrollment Mode as described in 3 B: Entering the Enrollment Mode
Do not install batteries in the Sounder until the Sounder is ready to be mounted in its
permanent location.
ADDING
COMPONENTS
Plug the Sounder’s AC Adaptor into a wall outlet and plug the Adaptor into
the Sounder AC Jack. A loud beep will sound.
Enter the Sounder’s Serial Number on the
keypad.
-YES Key. The Sounder will
Press the
sound two short beeps.
Secure the Sounder to its Backplate. The
Sounder will again sound two short beeps.
As the Sounder is enrolled, the Enrollment
Screen will be updated to indicate how
many Sounders are installed on the system.
If a second Sounder is required, enroll the Sounder as described in Steps 1
through 5 above. As the second Sounder is enrolled, both Sounders will
beep during the enrollment.
No more then 2 sounders may be enrolled on any one system.
9
Chapter 3: Adding Components
3 D: Enrolling Detection Devices
As each detection device is enrolled it is assigned to the first available Zone. That is, the
first device will be assigned to Zone 1, the second will be assigned to Zone 2, and so on. A
maximum of 10 detection devices may be enrolled.
Enter the Serial Number of the detection
device to be enrolled.
Press the
-YES Key. The Sounders will
sound two short beeps.
Install the batteries in the detection device. Refer to the label on the back of
the unit and ensure that the batteries are installed correctly. When the
batteries are installed, the Sounders will beep twice.
Secure the detection device to its backplate.
The Sounders will again sound two short
beeps. As each device is enrolled, the
Enrollment Screen will be updated to indicate
how many components are installed on the
system.
Repeat Steps 1 through 4 above for all remaining detection devices.
• Up to 2 Keypads may be enrolled on the system
• Up to 2 Sounders may be enrolled on the system
• Up to 10 Detection Devices may be enrolled on the system
10
Chapter 3: Adding Components
3 E: Enrolling the Second Keypad
Enter the Serial Number of the Second
Keypad on the First Keypad.
Press the
-YES Key. The Sounders will
sound two short beeps and this message
will be displayed.
Install the batteries in the Second Keypad. Refer to the label on the back of
the Keypad to ensure that the batteries are installed correctly.
On the Second Keypad, press the [#] Key;
this message will be displayed.
On the Second Keypad, press the [#] Key
again; this message will be displayed.
The Controller Serial Number is printed on
the back of the Controller. Enter the Controller
Serial Number on the Second Keypad.
On the Second Keypad, press the
-YES Key. When the Keypad is
successfully enrolled, it will return to its inactive state and the Sounders will
sound two short beeps.
Secure the Second Keypad to its backplate (the Sounders will not sound
beeps when this is done). As the Keypad is enrolled, the Enrollment Screen
will be updated to indicate how many Keypads are installed on the system.
No more then 2 keypads can be enrolled on any one system.
11
Chapter 3: Adding Components
3 F: Reviewing the List of Enrolled Components
In the Installer’s Programming Mode, you can display a list of all the components enrolled on
the system. This function will display all of the detection devices and the zones they are
assigned to, as well as the number of Sounders and Keypads enrolled on the system.
Entering the Enrollment Mode
(See Section 3B to Enter the Enrollment Mode)
-YES Key when this message
Press the
is displayed.
Use the
-NO Key to scroll to this
-YES Key when this
message. Press the
message is displayed.
-YES Key to scroll through the
Use the
list of system components.
Detection Devices will be indicated with
messages similar to this one.
Sounders will be indicated with messages
similar to this one.
Keypads will be indicated with messages
similar to this one.
When all components have been displayed,
this message will be displayed.
To display the Serial Number of a
component, press the [ ] Key while
reviewing Enrolled Components List. When
the [ ] Key is pressed, a message similar to
the one shown here will be displayed for a
few seconds.
∗
∗
"ZONE LABEL" can be any discription of up to 16 letters, numbers, spaces or ASCII
* The
characters. See Section 6 for more information.
12
3 G: Removing Components from the System
Follow the procedure below to remove components from the system. You may wish to remove
components for the following reasons:
• The component is no longer required on the system
• A mistake was made in enrolling the component
• The component is not working and requires service
ADDING
COMPONENTS
Enter the Enrollment Mode as described in
3 B: Entering the Enrollment Mode
When this message is displayed, press the
-YES Key.
Use the
-NO Key to scroll to this message.
When this message is displayed, press the
-YES Key.
Use the
-NO Key to scroll through the list
of components. A message similar to this
will be displayed for each component.
When the desired component is displayed,
press the
-YES Key to remove the
component. The Sounders will sound a
single short beep and this message will be
displayed.
After a component is removed, this message
-YES Key to
will be displayed. Press the
remove another component, or press the
-NO Key.
To display the Serial Number of a
component, press the [ ] Key while viewing
the list of components. When the [ ] Key is
pressed, a message similar to the one shown
here will be displayed.
∗
∗
13
Chapter 4: Module Placement and Testing
Chapter Four: Module Placement and Testing explains how to:
• Locate and test system components
• How to enter the Placement Test Mode
Do not permanently mount any of the components until they have been tested!
4 A: Locating the Controller and Sounders
The components of the WLS900 System may be located almost anywhere on the premises.
Only the following guidelines need to be observed:
• Locate the Controller in as central a location as possible
• Locate the Controller in as elevated a location as possible
• If locating the Controller in a basement, mount the Controller as high and as close to
underside of the first floor as possible
• Avoid locations that are subject to extreme temperature variations. Avoid locations that may
be subject to excessive cold (such as an unheated garage), or excessive heat (such as an
attic). Refer to 1 B: Components, for the operating temperature range of each component.
Generally, the WLS900 components are designed to operate within the temperature range
of 0°C to 50°C (32°F to 122°F).
The First Sounder is used to help ensure that the system’s radio transmissions reach the
Controller. The First Sounder should be located within 30 feet (approximately 9 meters) of
the Controller, but no closer than 5 feet (approximately 1.5 meters) to the Controller. A
Second Sounder, if installed, may be located almost anywhere desired.
4 B: Locating System Components
Determine the location of the Controller and the First Sounder following the
guidelines noted in 4 A: Locating the Controller and Sounders.
Mount the Controller in the intended location.
Place the system components as near to their intended locations as
possible, but do not permanently install them yet.
14
4 C: Entering the Placement Test Mode
Test the placement of the First Sounder before testing other components!
Carry the Keypad to the location of the component to be tested. The location
of the Keypad will not affect the test, as the Placement Test Mode tests the
component’s ability to communicate with the Controller and Sounder, not the
Keypad.
Enter the Installer’s Programming Mode as described in 5 A: How to Enter
the Installer’s Programming Mode.
PLACEMENT
AND TESTING
-NO Key to scroll to this message.
Use the
When this message is displayed, press the
-YES Key.
Enter Programming Section [81].
With this message displayed, press the
-YES Key.
Use the
-NO Key to scroll to the first
component to be tested.
-YES Key to test the displayed
Press the
component.
Hold the component as close to its intended location as possible.
"ZONE LABEL" can be any discription of up to 16 letters, numbers, spaces or ASCII
* The
characters. See Section 6 for more information.
Test each component on the system as described here:
Keypad
Press the [#] Key to test the Keypad; the Keypad will display the test result.
Do not remove the Keypad Backplate from the Keypad
during the Placement Test.
Sounder
Door Contact
Motion Detectors
and Smoke Detectors
Remove the Sounder from its backplate, wait 5 seconds, then reattach the
Sounder to its backplate. The Keypad will display the test result after the
Sounder is reattached to its backplate.
Open and close the contact by moving the magnet or operating the
external device connected to the Door Contact. The Keypad will display
the test result after the zone is restored.
Remove the Detector from its backplate, wait 5 seconds, then
reattach the Detector to its backplate. The Keypad will display the test
result after the Detector is reattached to its backplate.
15
Chapter 4: Module Placement and Testing
Press the
-YES Key to end the test; this
message will be displayed. To continue testing,
-YES Key. To enter the Installer’s
press the
-NO Key.
Programming Mode, press the
*
The "ZONE LABEL" can
be any discription of up
to 16 letters, numbers,
spaces or ASCII
characters. See Section
6 for more information.
During the Placement Test, the Sounders will
sound and one of the messages shown here will
Location Good
be displayed. When “Location
Good” is
indicated, the Sounder will sound a single beep
beep.
Location Fair
When “Location
Fair” is indicated, the Sounder
Location BAD
will sound two beeps
beeps. When “Location
” is indicated, the Sounder will sound three
beeps
beeps.
∗
∗
Components must be mounted where “Good”
or “Fair” locations are indicated. If “Location
BAD ” is indicated, the component should be
relocated. In most cases, it may only be
necessary to move the component a short
distance from its originally intended location.
∗
∗
No sensor should be left in a location that tests ∗BAD∗.
The First Sounder must be located where the test indicates “Location Good”.
After moving a component, repeat the test. If “Good” or “Fair” locations are indicated, repeat the Placement Test
at least once to confirm the location. When test results are satisfactory, scroll to the next component and perform
the Placement Test. When satisfactory test results have been received for all components, permanently mount the
components. Refer to “Mounting the Components” in Chapter 7 for mounting instructions.
After completing a Module Placement Test, you must arm and disarm the system. Be sure
to allow the exit delay to expire before disarming the system. If you do not arm and disarm
the system, zones may show as open the next time a supervisory transmission is sent
(every 12 minutes).
4 D: A Note About WLS904 Wireless Motion Detectors:
High Traffic Shutdown Mode
To prolong battery life, the motion detector uses a feature called High Traffic Shutdown. When motion is detected,
the device will transmit to the receiver and will then shut down for six minutes. If motion is detected again during
the first six minute shutdown time, the unit will reset the shutdown timer to three minutes. Each time the detector is
tripped during the shutdown time, the timer will be reset to three minutes again. The detector will thus remain in
the shut down mode until it does not detect motion for an entire six minute period.
The High Traffic Shutdown Mode affects testing the motion detector in two ways:
• When performing the module placement test
test, the unit must be tampered by removing the unit from the
backplate and replacing it. The placement test cannot be performed by creating motion in front of the device.
• When performing a system test
test, the unit must be left idle for six minutes before testing can be performed.
Once six minutes has passed, create motion in front of the detector to see if the device is both detecting
motion and transmitting to the receiver.
Motion Detector Transmission Delay
A motion detector transmission is always delayed by six seconds. This is necessary to prevent false alarms
caused by a motion sensor transmitting before a delay zone has a chance to report. This six-second delay cannot
be altered or disabled.
Walk Test Mode
The motion detector has a walk test mode which will activate an LED for testing purposes. To put the unit in the
walk test mode, create a tamper by removing the unit from the backplate and replacing it. For the next 90
seconds, the detector’s LED will turn on for three seconds every time motion is detected. During normal operation,
this LED will not turn on.
NOTE: The Walk Test Mode will override the High Traffic Shutdown Mode.
16
Chapter 5: Installer Programming
Chapter 5: Installer Programming
Chapter Five: Installer Programming explains how to:
• Enter the Installer’s Programming Mode
• Enter data in the programming sections
• How to edit the Zone Labels
5 A: How to Enter the Installer’s Programming Mode
Press the [#] Key; this message will be
displayed.
∗
PLACEMENT
AND TESTING
Enter [ ][8]; this message will be displayed.
Enter the Installer’s Code. The default
Installer’s Code is [0900]. When the code is
entered, this message will be displayed.
Use the
-NO Key to scroll to this message.
When this message is displayed, press the
-YES Key.
17
Chapter 5: Installer Programming
5 B: Programming Data Entry Sections
For sections that require a number value to be entered, a message
similar to the one shown here will be displayed.
Section Number indicates which Section is being programmed.
Present Data displays the data presently programmed.
Range indicates the range of valid entries.
Program Item indicates the current program item.
A cursor will appear under the first digit; enter the new data or
-NO Key. When the new data is entered, the display
press the
will advance to the next program item.
To scroll through the items in a Section, press the
-NO Key. To
enter data, scroll to the desired item with the
-NO Key and then
enter the data with the number keys. Note that three digits must
-NO or [#] Keys are
be entered to program an item; if the
pressed before all three digits are entered, the data will not be
programmed and the item will remain unchanged.
To exit, press the [#] Key to return to the “Enter Program Section”
message.
Note that three digits must be entered to program an item; if the
-NO or [#] Keys are
pressed before all three digits are entered, the data will not be programmed and the item will
remain unchanged.
Entering Hexadecimal Digits
Some Data Entry Sections require that hexadecimal (“hex”)
digits be programmed. To enter the hexadecimal digits “A”
through “F”, first press the [ ] Key and then enter a number
from 1 through 6 as shown here:
∗
For Hexadecimal...
A
B
C
D
E
F
Enter...
[ ][1]
[ ][2]
[ ][3]
[ ][4]
[ ][5]
[ ][6]
∗
∗
∗
∗
∗
∗
∗
Whenever a hexadecimal digit is required, the [ ] Key must be
pressed before the number key; if the [ ] Key is not pressed, a
decimal number will be entered. When the [ ] Key is pressed to
enter a hex digit, an asterisk will appear on the display to indicate
that a hex number is to be entered. The keypad display will be
similar to the example shown here. To exit the Hex Data Entry
mode, press the [#] Key to return to the “Enter Program Section”
message.
∗
18
∗
5 C: Programming System Option Sections
System Options Programming Sections are used to enable or
disable various system functions. When a System Options Section
is entered, a message similar to the one shown here will be
displayed.
Section Number indicates which Section is being programmed.
Selected Options indicate which options have been enabled or
disabled by displaying the numbers 1 through 8.
Refer to the Programming Sections part of this manual and the
Programming Work Sheets for information on the features
programmed in each System Options Programming Section. To
enable or disable functions, enter a number from 1 to 8; the
number will either be added to or removed from the display.
To add all numbers to the display, press [9]. To clear all numbers
from the display, press [0]. Be sure to refer to the Programming
Sections and Work Sheets to determine the status of each feature
when its number is displayed or not displayed.
To exit, press the [#] Key to return to the “Enter Program Section”
message.
5 D: Exiting Installer Programming
To exit the Installer Programming Mode, press the [#] Key when
this message is displayed; the Keypad will return to its inactive
state.
19
Chapter 6: Zone Labels
Chapter 6: Zone Labels
6 A: Editing Zone Labels
Zone Labels may only be edited by entering the "Installer’s Programming" Mode, see Section 5A,
and then accessing the "System Functions".
Zone Labels are messages assigned to each Zone displayed on the Keypad. Zone Labels may be
programmed to suit the user’s needs and to make the information the system provides more
useful. For example, the label “Zone 1” could be changed to read “Front Door”. Each Zone Label
may contain letters, numbers, spaces and ASCII characters, up to 16 per label or zone.
Enter the Installer’s Programming Mode as
described in 5 A: How to Enter the Installer’s
Programming Mode.
-NO Key to scroll to this message.
Use the
When this message is displayed, press the
-YES Key.
Use the
-NO Key to scroll to this message.
When this message is displayed, press the
-YES Key.
When the
-YES Key is pressed, the label
of the first Zone will be displayed, along with
a message asking if the label shown is to be
-NO Key to scroll
edited. Press the
through the list of Zone labels, or press the
-YES Key to edit the label shown.
When a label is selected for editing, the
Label Editing Message will display the
current Zone Label, and a cursor will appear
under the first letter in the Label. Use the
-YES and
-NO Keys to move the
cursor left and right on the display. Move the
cursor to the letter to be changed.
20
Chapter 6: Zone Labels
The letters of the alphabet have been assigned to the Number Keys on the
Keypad in groups of three. To enter a letter, press a Number Key once to
enter the first letter, twice to enter the second letter, three times to enter the
third letter, and finally four times to enter the number itself. For example, to
enter the letter “F”, press the [2] Key three times. When a different key is
pressed to enter another letter, the cursor will automatically move to the right
to enter the next letter.
1
2
3
ABC1
DEF2
GHI3
4
5
6
JKL4
MNO5
PQR6
7
8
9
STU7
VWX8
YZ90
0
#
NOT USED
∗
OPTIONS
SPACE
Alphabet layout on the Keypad
To erase a letter, move the cursor to the letter before the one to be erased
using the
-YES and
-NO Keys and press the
Key.
The
Key is slightly different from the other keys: one press will produce the letter “Y”,
two presses the letter “Z”, three presses the number “9” and four presses the number “0”
(zero).
ZONE
LABELS
6 B: Label Editing Options
At any time while editing a Zone Label, press the
Key to display a list of options
Key is pressed, the
underneath the Zone Label presently being changed. When the
following message is displayed:
This option allows characters to be entered by typing in a 3-digit code. Press the
-YES Key is pressed, the next
NO Key to advance to the next option. When the
message will be displayed.
Refer to Appendix C of this manual: ASCII Character Chart. To enter a letter, enter a
3-digit number from 000 to 255. When a number is entered, the character selected will
be added and the display will return to the Label Editing Message.
This option saves the new label in the system’s memory and will exit the Zone Label
-NO Key to display the next option.
Editing Mode. Press the
This option clears the entire label. Use this option to erase a label quickly, rather than
-NO Key to display the next
having to erase each letter individually. Press the
option.
This option clears the letter above the cursor and all letters to the end of the line. Use
this option to quickly erase part of a label without erasing the letters just entered. Press
the
-NO Key to display the next option.
This option cancels the Zone Label Editing Mode without saving any changes. Use
this option to prevent changes from being made if a mistake is made in editing the
Zone Label. Press the
-NO Key to return to editing the Zone Label.
21
Chapter 7: Mounting the Components
Chapter 7: Mounting the Components
With the System disarmed, mount the components in their desired locations. Note that
when each enrolled component is removed from its backplate, the Sounder will beep to
indicate that the component’s tamper switch has been activated.
7 A: Controller
Select a dry location close to an unswitched AC source and a telephone connection.
Locate the Controller backplate on the wall and mark all desired screw locations; refer to
Figure 1. It is suggested that wall anchors be used for all screw locations. When the
anchors have been placed, secure the backplate to the wall. Avoid mounting the
Controller behind mirrors, near metal walls, metallized wallpaper, metal stands and
cabinets, etc. Secure the Controller to its backplate, and secure the adaptor power cord
to the cord stress relief clip on the Controller.
ENSURE PROPER
ORIENTATION OF
BACKPLATE. FLAT
PART OF KEYS TO
FACE TOWARDS
FLOOR.
SCREW LOCATION
Figure 1. Controller and Keypad Backplate
7 B: Sounder
The Sounder should be located so that it will be heard throughout the premises when it is
activated. If the security System features smoke and fire detection equipment, the Sounder
should be located outside of the sleeping areas.
Locate the Sounder backplate on the wall and mark all desired screw locations; refer to
Figure 2. It is suggested that wall anchors be used for all screw locations. When the
anchors have been placed, secure the backplate to the wall. Secure the Sounder to its
backplate, and secure the adaptor power cord to the cord stress relief clip on the
Sounder.
ENSURE PROPER
ORIENTATION OF
BACKPLATE.
SCREW LOCATION
Figure 2. Sounder Backplate
22
Chapter 7: Mounting the Components
7 C: Keypad
Convenience and accessibility are the main concerns for Keypad location. The Keypad
should be located as near as possible to the main entry-exit door. Mount the Keypad at
a height that makes it easily accessible for all intended users. To help prevent false
emergency key alarms, the Keypad should also be mounted so that it is out of reach of
children.
Locate the Keypad backplate on the wall and mark all desired screw locations; refer to
Figure 1. It is suggested that wall anchors be used for all screw locations. When the
anchors have been placed, secure the backplate to the wall, and secure the Keypad to
its backplate.
7 D: Motion Detector
Each Motion Detector should be located so that it provides optimal coverage of the
intended area. Refer to the WLS-904 Wireless Motion Detector Installation Instruction
Sheet for directions on mounting and adjusting the motion detector.
7 E: Universal Transmitter
Refer to the Universal Transmitter Installation Instruction Sheet for directions on
mounting the transmitter and magnets.
7 F: Smoke Detector
MOUNTING
COMPONENTS
Refer to Appendix A, Guidelines for Locating Smoke Detectors, or NFPA 72 for
information on where to locate smoke detectors. Refer to the WLS906 Installation
Instructions for further directions on locating and mounting the smoke detector.
23
Chapter 8: System Programming Sections
Chapter 8: System Programming Sections
[00]
Binary Programming
Section [00] is only to be used on instruction from DSC Technical Personnel for specialized
programming.
[01]
Zone Definitions
Program ten 2-digit zone definitions in this section. The first digit determines the zone’s audible
characteristics, while the second digit determines how the zone will operate.
All
Sensors must be enrolled before zone definitions can be changed:
• Door Contacts will enroll as Type [00]: Steady Audible Delay 1 Zones
• Motion Detectors will enroll as Type [03]: Steady Audible Interior Zones
• Smoke Detectors will enroll as Type [19]: Pulsed Audible Fire Zones
First Digit: Audible Characteristics
0 Steady Audible: During alarm, the Sounders will sound a loud, steady beep.
1 Pulsed Audible: During alarm, the Sounders will sound a loud, pulsing beep.
2 Silent: When the zone goes into alarm, the Sounders will not be activated.
Zones programmed as Fire Zones cannot be programmed for silent operation.
Second Digit: Zone Definitions
0 Delay 1
The Delay 1 Zone Definition is used for the Exit/Entry doors and uses the Exit and Entry
Delay Times programmed in Section [02].
The Exit Delay will begin once the system is armed; the Delay 1 zone may be opened and
closed during the Exit Delay without causing an alarm. With 30 seconds remaining in the
Exit Delay, the Sounders will begin to “beep” once every second. During the last 10
seconds of the Exit Delay, the Sounders will “beep” twice every second to warn that the
Exit Delay is about to expire.
All zone types, except for 24-Hour and Fire Zones, will have an Exit Delay.
After the Exit Delay expires, opening the Delay 1 zone will cause the Entry Delay to begin.
During the Entry Delay, the Sounders will sound a constant beep until the system is disarmed.
At the end of the Entry Delay, an alarm will sound if the system is not disarmed.
Notes on Exit Delay functions:
Exit Delay Termination: If any Delay zone is opened and then closed before the Exit
Delay expires, the Exit Delay will be terminated after the Delay zone is closed. This allows
the system to be armed immediately after the Delay zone is closed without having to wait
for the remaining Exit Delay time to expire. If more than one zone is to be opened during
the Exit Delay, only one of those zones may be defined as a Delay Zone. Only the last
zone to be opened and closed during the Exit Delay should be programmed as a Delay
Zone. This function is enabled in Section [07] with Item 5.
Audible Exit Fault: If a Delay zone is left open after the Exit Delay expires, the Sounders
will sound a loud alarm beep for the duration of the Entry Delay. The alarm beep is
intended to alert the user that the system has not been properly armed. If the system is
armed at this time an alarm will be generated. If reporting codes are programmed, they
will be reported to the monitoring station.
24
Chapter 8: System Programming Sections
1 Delay 2
The Delay 2 zone operates in the same manner as the Delay 1 zone but with a different
Entry Delay. The Delay 2 Entry Delay is programmed in Section [02].
2 Instant
This zone type will generate an instant alarm if the zone is opened while the system is armed.
3 Interior
This zone type will only have an Entry Delay if a Delay zone is opened before the Interior
zone is activated.
When the system is armed in the Home Mode, Interior zones will be automatically
bypassed. This feature allows the system to be armed while the user remains on the
premises.
Interior zones may be set to operate in the same manner as Delay 1 zones; refer to [07] Third
System Option Code, Interior Zone with Delay Enable / Disable.
When Interior Zone with Delay is enabled, Interior zones will function in the same manner
as Delay 1 zones when the system is armed in the Away Mode.
When Interior Zone with Delay is disabled, an immediate alarm will be generated if an
Interior zone is activated before a Delay zone while the system is armed in the Away Mode.
The Interior Zone with Delay function is programmed in Section [07] with Item 4.
4 24-hour Zone
24-hour Zone can generate an alarm whether the rest of the system is armed or
disarmed. If programmed as Audible, the Sounder will sound at full volume. If
programmed to report to a monitoring station, the 24-hour Zone Alarm Reporting Code
will be transmitted immediately without a transmission delay.
24-hour Zones intended for silent operation must be programmed as Type 4 zones; the
Type 5 24-hour Zone may not be used as a silent 24-hour Zone.
5 24-hour Medium Buzzer Zone
24-hour Medium Buzzer Zones function in the same manner as 24-hour Zones, except
that they activate the Sounder at medium volume.
24-hour Medium Buzzer Zones may not be used as silent 24-hour Zones.
6 For Future Use
“6” is not valid as a zone definition and is reserved for future use.
SYSTEM
PROGRAMMING
SECTIONS
7 For Future Use
“7” is not valid as a zone definition and is reserved for future use.
8 Keyswitch Arm
Keyswitch Arm zones are used for arming and disarming the system, and to silence the
Sounder after an alarm. A Keyswitch Zone may be set up by connecting a keyswitch to
the external contacts of a Universal Transmitter. When the Keyswitch zone is activated,
the Exit Delay will begin. When the Keyswitch zone is secured, the system will be
disarmed. If a Keypad is in use or if a zone is open when the Keyswitch Arm zone is
activated, a loud error tone will sound and the system will not arm. If programmed to do
so, the Master Code opening and closing reporting codes will be transmitted to report
Keyswitch activity.
The keyswitch used must be a two position lock.
25
Chapter 8: System Programming Sections
9 Fire
Fire Zones are 24-hour zones used specifically for fire detection devices.
Smoke Detectors must be programmed as Fire Zones. Do not use any other Zone Definition
for Smoke Detectors.
On alarm, the Sounders will sound a loud beep; the beep may be programmed as either
pulsed or steady. Alarm signals will be reported as they occur unless a Fire Transmission
Delay is programmed. Refer to Section [39] for instructions on programming the Fire
Safety Transmission Delay.
If any key is pressed during a Fire Safety Transmission Delay, the alarm will be silenced.
The alarm will also be silenced if the smoke detector on the zone is restored before the
Fire Safety Transmission Delay expires. If a keypad is in use when a Fire Zone goes into
alarm, pressing [#] during the Fire Safety Transmission Delay will also silence the alarm.
If the smoke detector is still in alarm 90 seconds after the Fire Alarm is silenced, the Fire
Safety Transmission Delay will begin again and the Sounders will again sound a loud
pulsing or steady beep. Again, any key may be pressed to silence the alarm, allowing the
user to prevent false alarms triggered by cooking smoke or other causes.
If the alarm is not silenced, the alarm will latch and will be transmitted to the monitoring station
(if a reporting code is programmed). When the alarm is transmitted, the Fire Alarm Cut-off time
programmed in Section [02] will begin; the Sounders will sound the fire alarm until the Fire
Alarm Cut-off time expires, or until an Access Code is entered on a Keypad.
If a second Fire Zone goes into alarm or if the [F] Key is pressed during the Fire Safety
Transmission Delay, the delay will be cancelled and the fire alarms will be transmitted to the
Monitoring Station immediately (if reporting codes are programmed).
[02]
System Times
Enter five 3-digit times in this section. The valid range for each entry is listed. Do not enter
hexadecimal values or “000”. The following items are programmed in this section:
• Entry Delay 1 Time (in 001 - 255 seconds)
• Entry Delay 2 Time (in 001 - 255 seconds)
• Exit Delay Time (in 001 - 255 seconds)
• Burglary Alarm Cut-off Time (in 001 - 255 minutes)
• Fire Alarm Cut-off Time (in 001 - 255 minutes)
[03]
Installer’s Code
Enter a 4-digit Installer’s Code in this section. The default Installer’s Code is [0900]. Enter the
code using the numbers “0” through “9”; do not press [ ] or [#].
∗
[04]
Master Code
Enter a 4-digit Master Code in this section. The default Master Code is [1234]. Enter the code
using the numbers “0” through “9”; do not press [ ] or [#].
∗
26
Chapter 8: System Programming Sections
[05]
First System Options
1 Quick-Exit Enable / Disable
ON: Quick-Exit Disabled.
• OFF:
Quick-Exit Enabled. With the system armed in the Home or Away Mode, enter an Access
-NO Key to scroll through the Keypad messages until the “QuickCode and use the
Exit” prompt is displayed; when displayed, press the
-YES Key to use the Quick-Exit
feature. The user will be allowed two minutes to leave the premises through a Delay Zone.
Only one Delay Zone may be activated; any other activity on another Delay Zone will
generate an alarm. If the Delay zone is still open two minutes after the Quick-Exit command
is entered, the Entry Delay will be initiated.
2 Auto-Interior Enable / Disable
ON: Auto-Interior enabled. The System will determine whether or not Interior zones are to be
automatically bypassed when the system is armed; the user will not be given the option of
arming in the Home or Away Modes.
If a Delay zone is opened and closed after an Access Code is entered to arm the system,
the system will arm in the Away Mode and all Interior zones will be armed. If no Delay zone
is opened after an Access Code is entered to arm the system, the system will arm in the
Home Mode, and Interior zones will be automatically bypassed.
In the default setting, the system allows the user to select between arming in the Home
Mode or the Away Mode. The WLS900 Owner's Manual describes arming that allows
the selection of either the Home Mode or the Away Mode. If the Auto-Interior option is to
be enabled, the user should be provided with these instructions for arming their
system:
Enter an Access Code using the Number Keys. As each digit of the
code is entered, an “X” will appear on the Keypad screen. If a
mistake is made while entering the Access Code, press the Key
to clear the mistake and enter the Code again.
If the system is ready to be armed, this message will be displayed,
then the next message will be displayed. If the system is not ready
to be armed or if there are conditions on the system of which the
user should be aware, other messages may be displayed at this
time.
If the system is ready to be armed, this message will be displayed.
Press the
-YES Key to arm the system, or press the
-NO Key
to bypass zones. When the system is armed:
• If the Entry/Exit Door is not opened and then closed during the Exit Delay, all Interior
Zones will be automatically bypassed when the system is armed.
When the
-YES Key is pressed, the Exit Delay will begin and this
message will be displayed for a few seconds. With 30 seconds
remaining in the Exit Delay, the Sounder will begin to “beep” once
every second. During the last 10 seconds of the Exit Delay, the
Sounder will “beep” twice every second. At the end of the Exit
Delay, the Sounder will be silenced and the system will be armed.
• OFF:
Auto-Interior disabled. When arming the system, the user will be prompted with Keypad
messages to arm the system in either the Home or Away Mode. Refer to the Owner's Manual
for instructions on how to arm the system when the user may select between Home Mode
and Away Mode arming.
27
SYSTEM
PROGRAMMING
SECTIONS
• All zones on the system will be active if an Entry/Exit Door is opened and then
closed during the Exit Delay.
Chapter 8: System Programming Sections
3 Door Chime Option Available / Not Available
ON: Door Chime Option is not available. The Master Code will not be able to turn the Door
Chime feature on or off; the feature will always be off.
• OFF:
Door Chime Option Available. The Master Code is able to turn the Door Chime feature
on or off. When Door Chime is turned on, the Sounders will sound a beep when Delay
1, Delay 2 and Instant Zones are activated. NOTE: If AC power for a Sounder is off for
more than 10 minutes, the Door Chime will no longer be active for the affected
Sounder.
4 One-Time Use Code Option
ON: Access Code 9 is One-Time Use Code. Access Code 9 becomes a One-Time Use Code.
The code may be used to disarm and then later rearm the system only once. After the code
is used to arm the system, it will be erased and may not be used again; another new Code
will need to be programmed. This code may be provided to infrequent users of the system,
such as baby-sitters and home service personnel.
• OFF:
Access Code 9 is a Normal Access Code. Access Code 9 functions as a normal Access
Code.
5 Sounder Shutdown Enable / Disable
ON: Sounder Shutdown enabled. The Sounder will not be activated for zones that have
exceeded the number of alarms programmed in the Swinger Shutdown counter.
• OFF:
Sounder Shutdown disabled. The Sounder will always be activated for alarms on all
zones, even after the Swinger Shutdown counter is exceeded.
6 Second Sounder Operation
ON: Second Sounder sounds for Alarms Only. The Second Sounder will only be activated
for high-volume alarms; the Second Sounder will not be activated for the Door Chime,
Entry and Exit Delays, and so on.
• OFF:
Second Sounder sounds for All Functions. The Second Sounder will be activated for
all audible indications.
7 Pre-Alert Volume Setting
ON: Pre-Alert Volume Medium. The Sounders will sound warning beeps at medium volume.
Warning beeps include the Exit and Entry Delays, audible trouble indications, Door
Chimes, and so on.
• OFF:
Pre-Alert Volume Low. The Sounders will sound warning beeps at low volume.
8 AC Trouble Indication
ON: AC Excluded from Trouble Indications. If AC power fails, the trouble condition will be
reported to the monitoring station but will not be indicated on the Keypad or Sounder.
• OFF:
AC Included in Trouble Indications. If AC power fails, the condition will be reported to
the monitoring station and will be indicated on the Keypad and with the Sounder.
• Indicates default setting
28
Chapter 8: System Programming Sections
[06]
Second System Options
1 [F] Key Disable / Enable
ON: [F] Key Disabled. The [F] Key is disabled and will not function when pressed.
• OFF:
[F] Key Enabled. When pressed and held for 2 seconds, a Fire Alarm will be
generated. An [F] Key alarm reporting code, if programmed, will be transmitted to
the monitoring station and the Sounders will sound.
2 [P] Key Disable / Enable
ON: [P] Key Disabled. The [P] Key is disabled and will not function when pressed.
• OFF:
[P] Key Enabled. When pressed and held for 2 seconds, an Alarm will be
generated. A [P] Key alarm reporting code, if programmed, will be transmitted to
the monitoring station and the Sounders will sound if programmed to do so.
3 [A] Key Disable / Enable
ON: [A] Key Disabled. The [A] Key is disabled and will not function when pressed.
• OFF:
[A] Key Enabled. When pressed and held for 2 seconds, an Auxiliary Alarm will be
generated. An [A] Key alarm reporting code, if programmed, will be transmitted to
the monitoring station. The [A] Key alarm is silent; when the [A] Key is pressed, the
Sounders will not sound. When the [A] Key alarm has been reported to the
monitoring station, the Sounders will sound several beeps to acknowledge completion
of the transmission.
4 [P] Key Audible / Silent
ON: [P] Key Audible. When the [P] Key is pressed and held for 2 seconds, the
Sounders will be activated.
• OFF:
[P] Key Silent. When the [P] Key is pressed and held for 2 seconds, the
Sounders will not be activated.
5 [F] Key Alarm Steady / Pulsed
ON: [F] Key Alarm Sounds Steady Beep. When an [F] key alarm is generated, the
Sounders will sound with a loud, steady alarm sound.
• OFF:
[F] Key Alarm Sounds with Pulsed Beep. When an [F] Key Alarm is generated,
the Sounders will sound with a loud, pulsing alarm sound.
6 Bypassing Disable / Enable
ON: Bypassing Disabled. Users will not be able to manually bypass zones.
Bypassing Enabled. Users will be able to manually bypass all zones other than
Fire Zones.
7 Keypad Lockout Enable / Disable
ON: Keypad Lockout Enabled. After four incorrect Access Codes have been entered on
the Keypad, the system will not accept further entries on the Keypad for 45 seconds;
even valid Access Codes will not be accepted.
• OFF:Keypad Lockout Disabled. The Keypad will not lock out regardless of the number
of incorrect entries made.
8 AC Frequency
ON: AC Frequency at 50Hz. Use for most European installations.
• OFF:
AC Frequency at 60Hz. Use for North American installations.
• Indicates default setting
29
SYSTEM
PROGRAMMING
SECTIONS
• OFF:
Chapter 8: System Programming Sections
[07]
Third System Options
1 Entry Delay Off Arming Option
ON: “No Entry Delay” Option Available. When arming the system in the Home Mode, the
user will be able to select whether or not Delay Zones will have an entry delay when
opened.
• OFF:
“No Entry Delay” Option Not Available. Delay Zones will always have an entry delay.
2 Silent Supervisory Fault
ON: Supervisory Faults are Troubles Only. When a Supervisory Fault occurs, a trouble
beep will sound if the system is armed or disarmed and the appropriate reporting code
will be transmitted to the monitoring station.
OFF: Silent Supervisory Fault Disabled. When a Supervisory Fault occurs, a trouble beep
will sound if the system is disarmed. When the system is armed, the system will sound
an alarm condition on the sounder(s). In both instances, the appropriate reporting code
will be transmitted to the monitoring station.
3 Tamper Faults Transmit Only while Armed
ON: Tamper Faults Transmit Only while Armed Enabled. Tamper faults generated only
while the system is armed will be reported. If a tamper fault occurs while the system is
disarmed, the Sounders will sound a trouble indication, but the fault will not be reported.
• OFF:
Tamper Faults Transmit Only while Armed Disabled. Tamper faults will always be
transmitted, regardless of whether the system is armed or disarmed.
24-Hour Zones must be bypassed to avoid alarms while changing batteries.
4 Interior Zone with Delay
ON: Interior Zone with Delay Enabled. When the system is armed in the “Away” mode,
zones programmed as “Interior” will operate in the same manner as Delay 1 zones.
However, the Interior zones will be bypassed when the system is armed in the “Home”
mode.
• OFF:
Interior Zone with Delay Disabled. When the system is armed in the “Away” mode,
zones programmed as “Interior” will generate an immediate alarm if activated. However,
the Interior zones will be bypassed when the system is armed in the “Home” mode.
5 Exit Delay Termination
ON: Exit Delay Termination Enabled. The Exit Delay will be terminated when the Entry/Exit
Delay Zone is opened and closed during the Exit Delay. All audible options associated
with the Delay will be silenced, and the system will be armed.
• OFF:
Exit Delay Termination Disabled. The Exit Delay timer will continue for the entire Exit
Delay, regardless of any zone activity during the Exit Delay. All audible options
associated with the Exit Delay will function until the Exit Delay expires.
6 Audible Home Mode Arming
ON: Audible Home Mode Arming Enabled. When the system is armed in the Home Mode,
the Exit Delay will be audible.
• OFF:
7-8
Audible Home Mode Arming Disabled. When the system is armed in Home Mode, the
Exit Delay will be silent.
For Future Use
• Indicates default setting
30
Chapter 9: Communications Programming Sections
Chapter 9: Communications Programming Sections
[20]
First Monitoring Station Telephone Number
This is the first telephone number which the communicator will dial. Enter the telephone
number the way it would be dialed on a telephone, and press [#] after the last digit to
complete entry of the number.
Up to 15 digits and special characters may be entered in the telephone number. The following
special characters may be inserted in the telephone number:
For...
Enter...
∗
∗
∗
[∗][4] (Hexadecimal D)
[∗][5] (Hexadecimal E)
[ ][2] (Hexadecimal B)
4-second pause
[ ][3] (Hexadecimal C)
Additional dial beep search
#
When the first digit of the telephone number is entered, a “D” will be displayed before the
number to represent the initial dial beep search.
How to Erase the Telephone Number
∗
To erase a telephone number, enter [ ][6] (hexadecimal F) for the first digit in the number.
[21]
Second Monitoring Station Telephone Number
This is the second telephone number the communicator will dial. Refer to Section [20] for
programming instructions.
[22]
Account Code
This Account Code will be transmitted during communications to identify the customer and
account. Enter a 4-digit code in this section; both decimal and hexadecimal digits may be
used.
∗
Where a “0” (zero) is required, enter [ ][1] (hexadecimal A). If a 3-digit Account Code is
required, as in 3/1 communication formats, enter [0] (zero) as the last digit. For example, for
Account Code 103, program “1A30”
[23] - [38]
Notes on Reporting Codes
Sections [23] through [38] contain the codes used to report various events and conditions on
the system. When an event occurs, such as an alarm or a trouble condition, the appropriate
reporting code and the Account Code programming in Section [22] will be transmitted to the
monitoring station.
If a reporting code for an event is not programmed, no transmission will
be made.
Each reporting code is entered as two digits; both decimal and
hexadecimal numbers may be entered. As each 2-digit code is
programmed, the display will automatically scroll to the next code
to be entered. As shown here, the code being programmed will be
displayed in the lower-right corner of the screen (in this case,
Reporting Code 1 of Section [23]), and the data presently
programmed will be shown in [brackets].
When the last reporting code in a programming section is entered,
the keypad will display this message. Enter the number of the next
Section to be programmed.
At any time, the [#] Key may be pressed to exit the current programming section and return to
the “Enter Program Section” message.
Only data that has been completely entered will be changed; reporting codes that are only
partially entered (for example, those where only one digit has been entered) will not be saved.
31
COMMUNICATIONS
PROGRAMMING
SECTIONS
To prevent transmissions from being made for any events, leave the programming section
unprogrammed, or program “00” as the reporting code.
Chapter 9: Communications Programming Sections
[23]
Alarm Reporting Codes, Zones 1 to 10
Program ten 2-digit alarm reporting codes for Zones 1 through 10.
Note that the use of different communications formats may determine how the Account and
reporting codes are to be programmed. The examples below illustrate how different
communication formats require different Account numbers and reporting codes.
3/1 Format, Single Line or Non-Extended Reporting
Requires:
• 3-digit Account Code in Section [22]. For example, program the Account Code as [1230]
for Account Code 123
• Format [0], [1], [2], [3], [4], [5] or [6] in Section [41] Communication Formats
• Single digit alarm reporting codes in Section [23]. For example, program [30] for the
single-digit reporting code 3
Transmission Sent: 123 3
4/2 Format, Single Line Reporting
Requires:
• 4-digit Account Code in Section [22]. For example, program [1234] for Account Code
1234
• Format [0], [1], [2], [3], [4], [5] or [6] in Section [41] Communication Formats
• Two-digit alarm reporting codes in Section [23]. For example, program [31] for the 2-digit
reporting code 31.
Transmission Sent: 1234 31
[24]
Restoral Reporting Codes, Zones 1 to 10
Program ten 2-digit zone restoral reporting codes in this section. These codes will be
transmitted for restorals on zones 1 through 10. Refer to Section [23] for programming
instructions.
[25]
Closing (Arming) Reporting Codes, Access Codes 0 to 9
Program ten 2-digit Closing Reporting Codes in this section; refer to Programming Section [23]
for programming instructions. These codes are used to report arming by Access Code.
The Closing Code will be transmitted immediately after the Exit Delay expires. If the system is
armed and then disarmed before the Exit Delay expires, no transmission will be made.
Note that Access Code 0 is the Master Code, and the Access Code 9 may be programmed to
function as a normal Access Code or as a One-Time Use Code. See Section 8-05-4.
When the system is armed with one or more zones manually bypassed, the monitoring station
can be advised of this by programming the Partial Closing Code in Section [38]. The Partial
Closing Code will only be transmitted with the Access Code Closing Code when the system has
been armed with manually bypassed zones.
[26]
Opening (Disarming) Reporting Codes, Access Codes 0 to 9
Program ten 2-digit Opening Reporting Codes in this section; refer to Programming Section [23]
for programming instructions. These codes are used to report disarming by Access Code.
[27]
Tamper Reporting Codes, Zones 1 to 10
Program ten 2-digit Tamper Reporting Codes in this section; refer to Programming Section [23]
for programming instructions. These codes will be transmitted to report tampers on zones 1
through 10. Tamper transmissions follow the Swinger Shutdown Counter (refer to Section 39).
[28]
Tamper Restoral Reporting Codes, Zones 1 to 10
Program ten 2-digit Tamper Restoral Reporting Codes in this section; refer to Programming
Section [23] for programming instructions. These codes will be transmitted to report tamper
restorals on zones 1 through 10. Tamper Restoral transmissions follow the Swinger Shutdown
Counter (refer to Section 39).
32
Chapter 9: Communications Programming Sections
[29]
Low Battery Reporting Codes, Zones 1 to 10
Program ten 2-digit Low Battery Reporting Codes in this section; refer to Programming Section
[23] for programming instructions.
These codes will be transmitted to report low battery conditions for the devices assigned to
zones 1 through 10.
[30]
Low Battery Restoral Reporting Codes, Zones 1 to 10
Program ten 2-digit Low Battery Restoral Reporting Codes in this section; refer to Programming
Section [23] for programming instructions.
These codes will be transmitted to report low battery restorals for the devices assigned to zones
1 through 10.
[31]
Supervisory Reporting Codes, Zones 1 to 10
Program ten 2-digit Supervisory Reporting Codes in this section; refer to Programming Section
[23] for programming instructions. These codes will be transmitted to report supervisory events
for zones 1 through 10.
A Supervisory Event occurs when the Controller fails to receive a signal from a system
component. If any component fails to “report in” with the Controller, a “Sensor Fault” condition
will be indicated on the Keypad and Sounder, and a Supervisory Reporting Code for the
affected zone will be transmitted to the monitoring station.
[32]
Supervisory Restoral Reporting Codes, Zones 1 to 10
Program ten 2-digit Supervisory Restoral Reporting Codes in this section; refer to Programming
Section [23] for programming instructions. These codes will be transmitted to report supervisory
event restorals for zones 1 through 10.
Supervisory restoral codes will be transmitted when the “Sensor Fault” reported for a zone is
restored.
[33]
Priority Alarms and Restorals: [F], [A], [P] and Fire Zone Trouble
Program eight 2-digit reporting codes in this section; refer to Programming Section [23] for
programming instructions.
These reporting codes are used to report Keypad Zone Alarms and Restorals. The following
codes are programmed in this section:
1 Keypad [F] Key Alarm
2 Keypad [A] Key Alarm
3 Keypad [P] Key Alarm
4 Fire Zone Trouble
5 Keypad [F] Key Restoral
6 Keypad [A] Key Restoral
7 Keypad [P] Key Restoral
8 Fire Zone Trouble Restore
Notes on Fire Zone Troubles
COMMUNICATIONS
PROGRAMMING
SECTIONS
A Fire Zone Trouble will be generated when a smoke detector has a low battery or low
sensitivity condition.
If a Fire Zone Trouble is indicated, replace the batteries in the affected smoke detector. For
information on the batteries required, refer to Chapter 1 B: Components.
If replacing the batteries does not correct the Fire Zone Trouble, the detector may have a low
sensitivity condition. Dirt in the smoke detector or environmental conditions may cause the
detector’s automatic self-test to report a low sensitivity condition. The trouble condition will be
restored when the sensitivity returns to normal. If the low sensitivity condition is due to
environmental conditions, the smoke detector may return to normal automatically.
Note: a Low Sensitivity Condition may require the detector be serviced at DSC.
If a Fire Zone Trouble condition is persistent, the smoke detector may need to be replaced.
33
Chapter 9: Communications Programming Sections
[34]
System Trouble Reporting Codes
Program eight 2-digit Maintenance Reporting Codes in this section; refer to Programming
Section [23] for programming instructions.
Reporting codes for the following events are programmed in this section:
1 Controller AC Failure Trouble
2 Controller Low Battery Trouble
3 Sounder 1 AC Failure Trouble
4 Sounder 1 Low Battery Trouble
5 Sounder 2 AC Failure Trouble
6 Sounder 2 Low Battery Trouble
7 Keypad 1 Low Battery Trouble
8 Keypad 2 Low Battery Trouble
AC Failure Trouble will be transmitted after the AC Failure Transmission
Delay Time programmed in Section [39] expires. If the trouble condition is
restored before the delay expires, no transmission will be sent.
The Controller, Sounder and Keypad Low Battery and Restoral Codes will
only be reported once during each armed period.
[35]
System Restoral Reporting Codes
Program eight 2-digit Maintenance Restoral Reporting Codes in this section; refer to
Programming Section [23] for programming instructions.
Reporting codes for the following events are programmed in this section:
1 Controller AC Failure Restoral
2 Controller Low Battery Restoral
3 Sounder 1 AC Failure Restoral
4 Sounder 1 Low Battery Restoral
5 Sounder 2 AC Failure Restoral
6 Sounder 2 Low Battery Restoral
7 Keypad 1 Low Battery Restoral
8 Keypad 2 Low Battery Restoral
[36]
Keypad and Sounder Tamper Reporting Codes
Program eight 2-digit Maintenance Reporting Codes in this section; refer to Programming
Section [23] for programming instructions.
Reporting codes for the following events are programmed in this section:
1 Sounder 1 Tamper
2 Sounder 2 Tamper
3 Sounder 1 Supervisory Condition
4 Sounder 2 Supervisory Condition
5 Keypad 1 Tamper
6 Keypad 2 Tamper
7 Keypad 1 Supervisory Condition
8 Keypad 2 Supervisory Condition
Tamper Alarms are reported when the component is removed from its
backplate. Tamper Alarm transmissions follow the Swinger Shutdown
Feature (refer to Section 39 Item 01).
Supervisory events are reported when the Controller fails to receive a
supervisory signal from a component.
34
Chapter 9: Communications Programming Sections
[37]
Keypad and Sounder Restoral Reporting Codes
Program eight 2-digit Maintenance Restoral Reporting Codes in this section; refer to
Programming Section [23] for programming instructions.
Reporting codes for the following events are programmed in this section:
1 Sounder 1 Tamper Restoral
2 Sounder 2 Tamper Restoral
3 Sounder 1 Supervisory Restoral
4 Sounder 2 Supervisory Restoral
5 Keypad 1 Tamper Restoral
6 Keypad 2 Tamper Restoral
7 Keypad 1 Supervisory Restoral
8 Keypad 2 Supervisory Restoral
Tamper transmissions follow the Swinger Shutdown Feature (refer to
Section 39 Item 01).
[38]
Additional System Reporting Codes.
Program ten 2-digit Reporting Codes in this section; refer to Programming Section [23] for
programming instructions. To disable a code, program, “00” or “FF”. Reporting Codes for the
following events are programmed in this section:
Failure to Communicate
A Failure to Communicate (FTC) code will be transmitted on the next successful
communication attempt following a communication failure. An FTC occurs when the
communicator is unsuccessful in communicating with the monitoring station after eight
attempts to each telephone number programmed.
RF Jam Detect
The RF Jam Detect code will be transmitted if the system detects an attempt to jam RF
signals or if all enrolled zones generate supervisory alarms. This code advises the
monitoring station that the Controller cannot communicate with system components and that
service is required.
Periodic Test Transmission
The Periodic Test Transmission code will be transmitted at a regular interval to confirm that
the system is able to communicate with the monitoring station. The code will be transmitted
according to the Test Transmission Cycle time programmed in Section [39] and the Test
Transmission Time of Day programmed in Section [40]. To disable the Periodic Test
Transmission, program Section 39 as hexadecimal “FF”.
Installer Lead-in Code
The Installer Lead-in Code is transmitted whenever the Installer’s Code is entered.
Installer Lead-out Code
The Installer Lead-out Code is transmitted when the Installer’s Programming Mode is exited.
Downloading Lead-out Code
The Downloading Lead-out Code is transmitted to the monitoring station when downloading
initiated by the Controller is completed.
Partial Closing Code
The Partial Closing Code will be transmitted with the Closing Reporting Code whenever the
system is armed with bypassed zones.
Opening After Alarm
The Opening After Alarm code will be transmitted with the Opening Reporting Code
whenever the system is disarmed after an alarm.
Telephone Line Monitor Restoral Code
The Telephone Line Monitor Restoral Code is transmitted when Telephone Line Monitor
trouble is restored.
35
COMMUNICATIONS
PROGRAMMING
SECTIONS
Downloading Lead-in Code
The Downloading Lead-in Code will be transmitted when the system initiates a call to the
downloading computer during User-Initiated, Installer-Initiated, Call Back or Periodic
Downloading.
Chapter 9: Communications Programming Sections
[39]
Communication Variables
Program six 3-digit codes in this section. Valid entries for all except the Swinger Shutdown
Counter are from 000 to 255; do not enter hexadecimal numbers. The following
communicator functions are programmed in this section:
Swinger Shutdown Counter (number of transmissions)
The Swinger Shutdown feature does not apply to Fire Zones; Fire Zone transmissions will
never be shut down.
The Swinger Shutdown Counter determines the maximum number of transmissions that will
be made for a zone during the armed period. Once the number of transmissions is reached,
alarms from the zone will no longer be transmitted but will still be indicated on the Sounder
and Keypad. Valid entries for the Swinger Shutdown Counter are from 000 to 015.
The system may be programmed so that the Sounder will no longer sound for alarms after
the programmed number of alarms is reached; refer to Section [05] Item 5.
The Swinger Shutdown Counter will be reset according to the setting of Option 4 in Section
[42]. When set to “transmissions limited to 24-hour period”, the Swinger Shutdown counter
will be reset at 00:00 (midnight) every day and when the system is next armed. When set to
“transmissions limited to armed period”, the Swinger Shutdown counter will be reset when
the system is next armed.
Delay Before Transmission for Burglary Zones (seconds)
Delay Before Transmission determines the delay, in seconds, before an alarm is transmitted
after a zone goes into alarm. If the system is disarmed during the transmission delay, the
alarm will not be transmitted. The Delay Before Transmission feature is intended to help
prevent false alarms by providing time to allow the user to cancel accidental alarms.
Note that the Fire and 24-hour Zones are not affected by the Delay Before Transmission
time.
AC Failure Transmission Delay (minutes)
AC Failure Transmission Delay determines the delay, in minutes, before an AC Failure
Trouble is transmitted. This delay time is intended to prevent multiple troubles and restorals
from being transmitted when intermittent AC power problems are encountered.
Test Transmission Cycle (days)
The Test Transmission Cycle time determines how often, in days, the Periodic Test
Transmission Code is transmitted to the monitoring station, or how often the Downloading
computer is called if Periodic Downloading is enabled.
Fire Safety Transmission Delay (seconds)
When a Fire Alarm is generated, the system will wait for the Fire Safety Transmission Delay
to expire before a fire alarm transmission is made. If the alarm is silenced during the delay,
the fire alarm will not be transmitted. This feature is intended to prevent false alarms by
allowing the user to cancel false alarms.
Refer to the Zone Definitions section 8-09 of this manual for more information on the
operation of Fire Zones.
Zone Low Battery Transmission Delay (days)
The Zone Low Battery Transmission Delay is used to delay the transmission of zone low
battery transmissions. When a zone reports a low battery condition, the trouble condition will
be indicated immediately on the Keypad, but the transmission to the monitoring station will
be delayed by the time programmed here. If the user does not correct the low battery
condition by the time this delay expires, the low battery condition will be transmitted.
Low battery conditions should be corrected as soon as possible. Low Battery Trouble and
Low Battery Restoral Codes will only be reported once during each armed period.
36
Chapter 9: Communications Programming Sections
[40]
Test Transmission Time of Day
This section determines when the Periodic Test Transmission will be made, or when the
Downloading computer will be called if Periodic Downloading is enabled.. Enter a 4-digit timeof-day in the 24-hour clock format; enter 00 to 23 for the hour, and 00 to 59 for minutes.
To disable the test transmission, program ‘00’ or ‘FF’ as the Periodic Test Transmission
Reporting Code in Section [38]. Periodic Downloading is enabled in Section [70].
[41]
Communicator Format Options
Enter a 2-digit code from the list below to determine which communication format will be used
for transmissions.
If the system is to report to a Sur-Gard MLR or SLR Series central station receiver, use
format [4] with 4/2 non-extended reporting.
00
Silent Knight / Ademco Slow 10 BPS, 1400Hz handshake
3/1, 4/1 and 4/2 non-extended format
01
Sescoa, Franklin, DCI, Vertex 20 BPS, 2300Hz handshake
3/1, 4/1 and 4/2 non-extended format
02
Sescoa, Franklin, DCI, Vertex 20 BPS 1400Hz handshake
3/1, 4/1 and 4/2 non-extended format
03
Radionics 40 BPS 1400Hz handshake
3/1 and 4/2 non-extended format
04
Radionics 40 BPS 2300Hz handshake
3/1 and 4/2 non-extended format
05
Radionics 40 BPS with Parity 1400Hz handshake
3/1 and 4/2 non-extended format
06
Radionics 40 BPS with Parity 2300Hz handshake
3/1 and 4/2 non-extended format
10 BPS and 20 BPS Formats
10 BPS is the standard slow format used on Silent Knight and Ademco receivers.
Data = 1900Hz, Kissoff = 1400Hz, Speed = 10 baud
20 BPS is the standard fast format used on DCI, Franklin, Sescoa and Vertex receivers
Data = 1800Hz, Kissoff = 2300Hz, Speed = 20 baud
COMMUNICATIONS
PROGRAMMING
SECTIONS
• Indicates default setting
37
Chapter 9: Communications Programming Sections
[42]
First Communicator Options
1 Communicator Disable / Enable
ON: Communicator Disabled. The system will not communicate alarms or other events.
• OFF:
Communicator Enabled. The system will communicate all events with programmed
reporting codes.
2 Dialing Format
ON: Pulse Dialing. The communicator will dial using the pulse (rotary) format.
• OFF:
DTMF Dialing. The communicator will dial using the DTMF format for the first four
dialing attempts for each programmed telephone number. For the fifth through eighth
dialing attempts, the communicator will use pulse (rotary) dialing.
3 Pulse Dialing Ratios
ON: Pulse Dialing Ratio 67/33. This setting is for European applications.
• OFF:
Pulse Dialing Ratio 60/40. This setting is for North American applications.
4 Transmission Limit Setting
ON: Transmissions Limited to 24-hour Period. The Swinger Shutdown Counter
programmed in Section [39] will be reset daily at 00:00 (midnight) and every time the
system is armed.
• OFF:
Transmissions Limited to Armed Period. The Swinger Shutdown Counter
programmed in Section [39] will be reset every time the system is armed.
5 Telephone Line Monitor
ON: Telephone Line Monitor Disabled. The system will not supervise the condition of the
telephone line.
• OFF:
Telephone Line Monitor Enabled. The system will supervise the condition of the
telephone line and indicate a Telephone Line Trouble if a problem is present.
6 Telephone Line Monitor Silent / Audible
ON: Telephone Line Monitor Silent. When the system is armed, telephone line troubles
will be indicated with a trouble indication from the Sounder. When the system is
disarmed, telephone line troubles will be indicated on the Keypad and the Sounder
will beep.
• OFF:
Telephone Line Monitor Audible. When the system is armed, telephone line
troubles will be indicated by an audible alarm on the Sounder. When the system is
disarmed, telephone line troubles will be indicated on the Keypad and the Sounder
will beep.
7 - 8 For Future Use
• Indicates default setting
38
Chapter 9: Communications Programming Sections
[43]
Second Communicator Option Code
Only one of the restoral options described below may be selected.
24-hour Zones and Fire Zones will only transmit their restoral codes when their detection
devices are mechanically restored
1 Restoral Follow Zone
Restorals Follow Zone. While the system is armed, the zone restoral code will be
transmitted immediately when the zone is restored. If a zone is still activated when the
system is disarmed, the restoral code will be transmitted when the system is
disarmed.
• ON:
OFF: Restorals Do Not Follow Zone. Only 24-hour Zones and Fire Zones will transmit their
restoral codes when the zone is restored; other zones will report restorals according
to Item 2 or 3.
2 Restorals on Sounder Time-out
ON: Restorals on Sounder Time-out Enabled. While the system is armed, burglary zone
restoral reporting codes will not be transmitted until both the Sounder Time-out has
expired and the zone has been restored. If the Sounder Time-out has expired and the
zone is still open, the restoral will be transmitted when the zone restores or when the
system is disarmed.
• OFF:
Restorals on Sounder Time-out Disabled. Zone will report restorals according to
Item 1 or 3.
3 Restorals on Disarming
ON: Restorals on Disarming Enabled. While the system is armed, burglary zone restoral
codes will only be transmitted when the system is disarmed. As a result, there will only
be one zone alarm reporting code per zone during each armed period.
• OFF:
4-8
Restorals on Disarming Disabled. Zones will report restorals according to
Item 1 or 2.
For Future Use
COMMUNICATIONS
PROGRAMMING
SECTIONS
Only one of the restoral options described above may be selected.
• Indicates default setting
39
Chapter 10: Downloading Programming Sections
Chapter 10: Downloading Programming Sections
[70]
Downloading Options
1 Ring Detect
ON: Ring Detect Enabled. The system will answer incoming calls from the downloading
computer after the number of rings programmed in Section [74].
• OFF:
Ring Detect Disabled. The system will not answer incoming calls. Downloading must
be performed with the User-Initiated, Installer-Initiated or Periodic Downloading functions.
2 Answering Machine Override
ON: Answering Machine Override Disabled. The system will only answer incoming calls
after the number of rings programmed in Section [74].
• OFF:
Answering Machine Override Enabled. The system may be connected to the same
telephone line as an answering machine. To override the answering machine, have
the downloading computer call the system and let the line ring only once or twice
then hang up the line. If the system is called back within 60 seconds, the system will
answer on the first ring.
3 Downloading Call-back
ON: Downloading Call-back Enabled. The system and the downloading computer will
both hang up after the system answers the call from the downloading computer. The
system will then call the Downloading Telephone Number programmed in Section
[71] and establish communications. If more than one downloading computer is to be
used, this feature should be disabled. If the Downloading Lead-In Code is
programmed, the system will transmit the code to the monitoring station before calling
the downloading computer.
• OFF:
Downloading Call-back Disabled. The downloading computer will have immediate
access to the system once the Downloading Access Code is confirmed as a valid
code.
4 User-Initiated Downloading
ON: User-Initiated Downloading Enabled. The user may initiate downloading by
-YES Key when prompted on the Keypad.
pressing the
User-Initiated Downloading is a Master Code Function; after
entering the Master Code, scroll until the message shown here is
displayed. Press the
-YES Key to initiate downloading.
For User-Initiated Downloading to function, a Downloading Telephone Number must be
programmed in Section [71]. Also, the downloading computer must be waiting for the
system to call before downloading can be performed.
The user should be provided with instructions as to how and when to use the UserInitiated Downloading Function.
• OFF:
User-Initiated Downloading Disabled
5 Periodic Downloading
ON: Periodic Downloading Enabled. This system will automatically place a call to the
downloading computer at the time programmed in Section [40] Test Transmission
Time of Day, and at the interval, in days, programmed in Section [39] Communication
Variables. If both Test Transmission and Periodic Downloading are enabled, the
system will transmit the test transmission first and will then call the downloading
computer. A Downloading Telephone Number must be programmed in Section [71]
Downloading Telephone Number.
• OFF:
6-8
•
40
Periodic Downloading Disabled. The system will not place calls to the downloading
computer automatically. Calls to the downloading computer must be initiated using
the User-Initiated or the Installer-Initiated Downloading functions.
For Future Use
Indicates default setting
Chapter 10: Downloading Programming Sections
[71]
Downloading Computer Telephone Number
Program the downloading computer’s telephone number in this section; refer to Programming
Section [20] for programming instructions.
[72]
Downloading Access Code
Program a 4-digit code in this section. This code is used to confirm that a valid downloading
computer is accessing the system. If the Access Code programmed in the downloading
computer does not match the system, the system will hang up.
[73]
System Identification Code
Program a 4-digit code in this section. This code is used to identify the system during
downloading.
[74]
Number of Rings Before Answering
Enter a 3-digit number in this section. This section determines the number of rings that will be
counted before the system answers an incoming call.
Installer-Initiated Downloading
Upon entering this section, the message shown here will be
displayed and the system will initiate a call to the downloading
computer. The downloading computer must be waiting for the
system to call before downloading can be performed.
DOWNLOADING
PROGRAMMING
SECTIONS
[75]
41
Chapter 11: Installer Test Modes
Chapter 11: Installer Test Modes
[80]
Installer Walk Test Mode
Upon entering this section, the message shown here will be
displayed. During the Walk Test, the Sounder will sound a loud
series of beeps as each zone is opened.
Note that Motion Detectors may not sound an alarm as they may have entered their High
Traffic Shutdown Mode. Refer to Chapter 4D: Module Placement and Testing for
instructions on testing Motion Detectors.
[81]
Module Placement Test
This test allows the Installer to determine the suitability of a proposed location for a system
component. Refer to Chapter 4: Module Placement and Testing for more information.
[82]
Sounder Test
Upon entering this section, the message shown here will be
displayed and all enrolled Sounders will sound steady alarm at
low, medium, and then high volume. The alarm will sound for a few
seconds at each volume.
[83]
Manual Dialer Test
When this section is entered, the communicator will transmit the Periodic Test Transmission
Reporting Code programmed in Section [38] to the monitoring station.
42
Chapter 12: Miscellaneous Programming Sections
Chapter 12: Miscellaneous Programming Sections
[90]
Installer Lockout Enable
Upon entering this section, the message shown here will be
-YES Key to enable the Installer Lockout,
displayed. Press the
or press the
-NO Key to exit.
Once enabled, the Installer’s Code and the Downloading Access Code are protected from
being reset by either the software or hardware reset functions. A Controller with this feature
enabled will emit a series of 16 clicks when AC power is applied to the unit or when the factory
default programming is restored by entering Section [99].
Ensure that the new Installer’s Code has been entered correctly before enabling this
feature as there will be no way to re-enter the Installer’s Programming Mode without the
correct Installer’s Code.
[91]
Installer Lockout Disable
Upon entering this section, the message shown here will be
displayed. Press the
-YES Key to disable the Installer Lockout,
-NO Key to exit.
or press the
Systems returned to DSC with the Installer’s Lockout feature enabled and no other
apparent problems will be subject to a service charge!
[99]
Restore Factory Default Programming
Upon entering this section, the message shown here will be
displayed. Press the
-YES Key to reset the system to the
-NO Key to exit.
factory default program, or press the
To perform a hardware default:
1. Remove the six screws from the back of the Controller.
2. Short the jumper pins located on the back side of the Controller circuit board. The jumper pins are
indicated by a colored dot on the circuit board.
3. Plug the AC Adaptor into a wall receptacle and insert the adaptor plug into the AC Jack on the
Controller.
4. Wait approximately 10 seconds while maintaining the short across the jumper pins.
5. Unplug the AC Adaptor from the Controller.
6. Remove the short from the jumper pins.
The Controller is now reset to the factory default programming.
After a controller default done using this section, Keypad 2 will also need to be defaulted.
See below.
To default the Keypad:
1. Remove the keypad from its backplate.
2. With the Keypad asleep, press the
-Yes Key and the
-NO Key together.
-Yes Key to
3. With this message displayed, press the
default the keypad zone labels and to delete the keypad
from the system.
-NO Key to decline the default.
If you wish to remove the keypad from the Controller, the Controller must be in range and
plugged in.
43
MISC.
PROGRAMMING
SECTIONS
4. Press the
Appendix A Guidelines for Locating Smoke Detectors
Appendix A
Guidelines for Locating Smoke Detectors
Experience has shown that all hostile fires in family living
units generate smoke to a greater or lesser extent.
Experiments using typical fires in family living units indicate
that detectable quantities of smoke precede detectable
levels of heat in most cases. For these reasons, NFPA
standard 74 requires smoke detectors to be installed
outside of each sleeping area and on each additional story
of the family unit.
The following information is for general guidance only and
it is recommended that NFPA Standard 72 (National Fire
Protection Association, One Batterymarch Park, Quincy
MA 02269) be consulted and that the smoke detector
manufacturer’s literature be used for detailed installation
instructions.
It is recommended that additional smoke detectors beyond
those required be installed for increased protection. The
added areas include: basement, bedrooms, dining rooms,
furnace room, utility room and hallways not protected by
the required detectors.
Bedroom
Bedroom
Bedroom
Bedroom
Living
Room
Dining
Room
Basement
FIG. 3: A smoke detector should be located on each
story of the living unit.
4"
(0.1m)
Ceiling
4"
(0.1m)
Max.
Acceptable
here
NEVER
HERE
12"
(0.3m)
Max.
Bedroom
Top of detector
acceptable here
Kitchen
Living Room
Wall
FIG. 1: A smoke detector should be located between
the sleeping area and the rest of the family unit.
Family Room
Bedroom
Dining
Room
Living
Room
Kitchen
Bedroom
Bedroom
FIG. 2: In the family living units with more than one
sleeping area, a smoke detector should be located to
protect each sleeping area.
44
NOTE: Measurements shown are to
the closest edge of the detector.
FIG. 4: Smoke Detector mounting - “Dead” Air Space.
The smoke from a fire generally rises to the ceiling,
spreads out across the ceiling surface and begins to
bank down from the ceiling. The corner where the
ceiling and wall meet is an air space into which the
smoke may have difficulty penetrating. In most fires,
this “dead” air space measures about 4 in. (0.1m) along
the ceiling from the corner and about 4 in. (0.1m) down
the wall as shown in Figure 4. Detectors should not be
placed in the dead” air space.
The Smoke Detector is designed to use Eveready
Energizer Alkaline Batteries. Do not use other
brands of batteries with the Smoke Detector.
Using brands other than the Eveready Energizer
will void UL and ULC approvals, and may affect
the system’s operation.
Appendix B Connecting the Controller to the Telephone Line
Appendix B
Connecting the Controller
to the Telephone Line
Telephone Connections
The second method uses the larger CA31A / RJ38A jack, and is better suited to installations where
there is direct access to the telephone line wiring.
About Jack Designations
Canada: The CA11A is a 4-conductor, Industry Canada approved, telephone line
interface connector
The CA38A is an 8-conductor, Industry Canada approved, telephone line
interface connector
United States: The RJ11 is a 4-conductor, Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
approved, telephone line interface connector
The RJ38A is an 8-conductor, Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
approved, telephone line interface connector
RJ11 / CA11 Connections
Connect the incoming line from the telephone company to the Controller’s “Line” jack, and
connect the premises telephone equipment to the “Phone” jack CA11A. Use RJ11/CA11
connectors and 4-wire modular phone cord.
No telephone equipment, such as telephones, answering machines or fax machines,
should be connected between the incoming telephone line and the Controller’s “Line”
jack. If the incoming telephone line is removed from the “Line” jack, all telephone
equipment on the premises will be disconnected from the telephone line.
PHONE
LINE
AC
LINE
4-WIRE
OR 6-WIRE
MODULAR
PHONE CORD
PHONE
NOT USED
RING
TIP
NOT USED
TO TELEPHONE LINE
NOT USED
R-1
T-1
NOT USED
TO TELEPHONE EQUIPMENT
CA38 / RJ38A Connection
Install a CA38A / RJ38A jack on the telephone line at a location on the line before all other
telephone equipment or jacks. Using 8-wire modular phone cord, make the telephone
connection to the Controller.
The CA38A / RJ38A jack features a built-in switch that will automatically reconnect the
premises telephone equipment when the plug to the Controller is removed from the jack.
PHONE
LINE
AC
CA38A/RJ38A
CONNECTOR
AND CABLE
T-1
NOT USED
NOT USED
TIP
R-1
NOT USED
NOT USED
RING
TO
TELEPHONE
JACKS AND
EQUIPMENT
PHONE
LINE
CA31A/RJ48
CONNECTOR
CONNECTOR MUST BE
INSTALLED ON PHONE
LINE BEFORE ALL
JACKS AND EQUIPMENT
45
APPENDICES
Use one of two methods to connect the telephone line to the Controller. The first method uses the
Controller’s Phone and Line jacks, and is best suited to installations where direct access to
telephone line wiring is not available, or where a phone line is dedicated to the security system.
Appendix C ASCII Character Chart
Appendix C
ASCII Character Chart
Use this chart when entering ASCII characters in the Zone Label Editing Mode.
46
032
048
064
080
096
112
160
176
192
208
224
240
033
049
065
081
097
113
161
177
193
209
225
241
034
050
066
082
098
114
162
178
194
210
226
242
035
051
067
083
099
115
163
179
195
211
227
243
036
052
068
084
100
116
164
180
196
212
228
244
037
053
069
085
101
117
165
181
197
213
229
245
038
054
070
086
102
118
166
182
198
214
230
246
039
055
071
087
103
119
167
183
199
215
231
247
040
056
072
088
104
120
168
184
200
216
232
248
041
057
073
089
105
121
169
185
201
217
233
249
042
058
074
090
106
122
170
186
202
218
234
250
043
059
075
091
107
123
171
187
203
219
235
251
044
060
076
092
108
124
172
188
204
220
236
252
045
061
077
093
109
125
173
189
205
221
237
253
046
062
078
094
110
126
174
190
206
222
238
254
047
063
079
095
111
127
175
191
207
223
239
255
LIMITED WARRANTY
Digital Security Controls Ltd. warrants the original purchaser that for a period of twelve
months from the date of purchase, the product shall be free of defects in materials and
workmanship under normal use. During the warranty period, Digital Security Controls
Ltd. shall, at its option, repair or replace any defective product upon return of the product
to its factory, at no charge for labour and materials. Any replacement and/or repaired
parts are warranted for the remainder of the original warranty or ninety (90) days, whichever is longer. The original owner must promptly notify Digital Security Controls Ltd. in
writing that there is defect in material or workmanship, such written notice to be received
in all events prior to expiration of the warranty period.
International Warranty
The warranty for international customers is the same as for any customer within Canada
and the United States, with the exception that Digital Security Controls Ltd. shall not be
responsible for any customs fees, taxes, or VAT that may be due.
Warranty Procedure
To obtain service under this warranty, please return the item(s) in question to the point of
purchase. All authorized distributors and dealers have a warranty program. Anyone returning goods to Digital Security Controls Ltd. must first obtain an authorization number. Digital Security Controls Ltd. will not accept any shipment whatsoever for which
prior authorization has not been obtained.
Conditions to Void Warranty
This warranty applies only to defects in parts and workmanship relating to normal use. It
does not cover:
• damage incurred in shipping or handling;
• damage caused by disaster such as fire, flood, wind, earthquake or lightning;
• damage due to causes beyond the control of Digital Security Controls Ltd. such as
excessive voltage, mechanical shock or water damage;
• damage caused by unauthorized attachment, alterations, modifications or foreign objects;
• damage caused by peripherals (unless such peripherals were supplied by Digital Security Controls Ltd.);
• defects caused by failure to provide a suitable installation environment for the products;
• damage caused by use of the products for purposes other than those for which it was
designed;
• damage from improper maintenance;
• damage arising out of any other abuse, mishandling or improper application of the
products.
Digital Security Controls Ltd.’s liability for failure to repair the product under this warranty after a reasonable number of attempts will be limited to a replacement of the product, as the exclusive remedy for breach of warranty. Under no circumstances shall Digital
Security Controls Ltd. be liable for any special, incidental, or consequential damages
based upon breach of warranty, breach of contract, negligence, strict liability, or any
other legal theory. Such damages include, but are not limited to, loss of profits, loss of
the product or any associated equipment, cost of capital, cost of substitute or replacement equipment, facilities or services, down time, purchaser’s time, the claims of third
parties, including customers, and injury to property.
Disclaimer of Warranties
This warranty contains the entire warranty and shall be in lieu of any and all other
warranties, whether expressed or implied (including all implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose) And of all other obligations or liabilities on the part of Digital Security Controls Ltd. Digital Security Controls Ltd.
neither assumes nor authorizes any other person purporting to act on its behalf to
modify or to change this warranty, nor to assume for it any other warranty or liability concerning this product.
This disclaimer of warranties and limited warranty are governed by the laws of the
province of Ontario, Canada.
WARNING: Digital Security Controls Ltd. recommends that the entire system be completely tested on a regular basis. However, despite frequent testing, and due to, but not
limited to, criminal tampering or electrical disruption, it is possible for this product to
fail to perform as expected.
Installer’s Lockout
Any products returned to DSC which have the Installer’s Lockout option enabled and
exhibit no other problems will be subject to a service charge.
Out of Warranty Repairs
Digital Security Controls Ltd. will at its option repair or replace out-of-warranty products which are returned to its factory according to the following conditions. Anyone
returning goods to Digital Security Controls Ltd. must first obtain an authorization number. Digital Security Controls Ltd. will not accept any shipment whatsoever for which
prior authorization has not been obtained.
Products which Digital Security Controls Ltd. determines to be repairable will be repaired
and returned. A set fee which Digital Security Controls Ltd. has predetermined and which
may be revised from time to time, will be charged for each unit repaired.
Products which Digital Security Controls Ltd. determines not to be repairable will be
replaced by the nearest equivalent product available at that time. The current market
price of the replacement product will be charged for each replacement unit.
WARNING
Please Read Carefully
Note to Installers
This warning contains vital information. As the only individual in contact with system users, it is your
responsibility to bring each item in this warning to the attention of the users of this system.
System Failures
This system has been carefully designed to be as effective as possible. There are circumstances, however, involving fire, burglary, or other types of emergencies where it may not provide protection. Any
alarm system of any type may be compromised deliberately or may fail to operate as expected for a
variety of reasons. Some but not all of these reasons may be:
■ Inadequate Installation
A security system must be installed properly in order to provide adequate protection. Every installation
should be evaluated by a security professional to ensure that all access points and areas are covered.
Locks and latches on windows and doors must be secure and operate as intended. Windows, doors,
walls, ceilings and other building materials must be of sufficient strength and construction to provide
the level of protection expected. A reevaluation must be done during and after any construction activity.
An evaluation by the fire and/or police department is highly recommended if this service is available.
■ Criminal Knowledge
This system contains security features which were known to be effective at the time of manufacture. It
is possible for persons with criminal intent to develop techniques which reduce the effectiveness of
these features. It is important that a security system be reviewed periodically to ensure that its features
remain effective and that it be updated or replaced if it is found that it does not provide the protection
expected.
■ Access by Intruders
Intruders may enter through an unprotected access point, circumvent a sensing device, evade detection
by moving through an area of insufficient coverage, disconnect a warning device, or interfere with or
prevent the proper operation of the system.
■ Power Failure
Control units, intrusion detectors, smoke detectors and many other security devices require an adequate
power supply for proper operation. If a device operates from batteries, it is possible for the batteries to fail.
Even if the batteries have not failed, they must be charged, in good condition and installed correctly. If a
device operates only by AC power, any interruption, however brief, will render that device inoperative
while it does not have power. Power interruptions of any length are often accompanied by voltage fluctuations which may damage electronic equipment such as a security system. After a power interruption has
occurred, immediately conduct a complete system test to ensure that the system operates as intended.
■ Failure of Replaceable Batteries
This system’s wireless transmitters have been designed to provide several years of battery life under normal
conditions. The expected battery life is a function of the device environment, usage and type. Ambient
conditions such as high humidity, high or low temperatures, or large temperature fluctuations may reduce the
expected battery life. While each transmitting device has a low battery monitor which identifies when the
batteries need to be replaced, this monitor may fail to operate as expected. Regular testing and maintenance
will keep the system in good operating condition.
■ Compromise of Radio Frequency (Wireless) Devices
Signals may not reach the receiver under all circumstances which could include metal objects placed on or
near the radio path or deliberate jamming or other inadvertent radio signal interference.
■ System Users
A user may not be able to operate a panic or emergency switch possibly due to permanent or temporary
physical disability, inability to reach the device in time, or unfamiliarity with the correct operation. It is
important that all system users be trained in the correct operation of the alarm system and that they
know how to respond when the system indicates an alarm.
■ Smoke Detectors
Smoke detectors that are a part of this system may not properly alert occupants of a fire for a number of
reasons, some of which follow. The smoke detectors may have been improperly installed or positioned.
Smoke may not be able to reach the smoke detectors, such as when the fire is in a chimney, walls or roofs,
or on the other side of closed doors. Smoke detectors may not detect smoke from fires on another level of
the residence or building.
Every fire is different in the amount of smoke produced and the rate of burning. Smoke detectors cannot
sense all types of fires equally well. Smoke detectors may not provide timely warning of fires caused by
carelessness or safety hazards such as smoking in bed, violent explosions, escaping gas, improper storage
of flammable materials, overloaded electrical circuits, children playing with matches or arson.
Even if the smoke detector operates as intended, there may be circumstances when there is insufficient
warning to allow all occupants to escape in time to avoid injury or death.
■ Motion Detectors
Motion detectors can only detect motion within the designated areas as shown in their respective installation instructions. They cannot discriminate between intruders and intended occupants. Motion detectors
do not provide volumetric area protection. They have multiple beams of detection and motion can only be
detected in unobstructed areas covered by these beams. They cannot detect motion which occurs behind
walls, ceilings, floor, closed doors, glass partitions, glass doors or windows. Any type of tampering whether
intentional or unintentional such as masking, painting, or spraying of any material on the lenses, mirrors,
windows or any other part of the detection system will impair its proper operation.
Passive infrared motion detectors operate by sensing changes in temperature. However their effectiveness can be reduced when the ambient temperature rises near or above body temperature or if there are
intentional or unintentional sources of heat in or near the detection area. Some of these heat sources
could be heaters, radiators, stoves, barbeques, fireplaces, sunlight, steam vents, lighting and so on.
■ Warning Devices
Warning devices such as sirens, bells, horns, or strobes may not warn people or waken someone sleeping if
there is an intervening wall or door. If warning devices are located on a different level of the residence or
premise, then it is less likely that the occupants will be alerted or awakened. Audible warning devices may be
interfered with by other noise sources such as stereos, radios, televisions, air conditioners or other appliances,
or passing traffic. Audible warning devices, however loud, may not be heard by a hearing-impaired person.
■ Telephone Lines
If telephone lines are used to transmit alarms, they may be out of service or busy for certain periods of
time. Also an intruder may cut the telephone line or defeat its operation by more sophisticated means
which may be difficult to detect.
■ Insufficient Time
There may be circumstances when the system will operate as intended, yet the occupants will not be
protected from the emergency due to their inability to respond to the warnings in a timely manner. If the
system is monitored, the response may not occur in time to protect the occupants or their belongings.
■ Component Failure
Although every effort has been made to make this system as reliable as possible, the system may fail to
function as intended due to the failure of a component.
■ Inadequate Testing
Most problems that would prevent an alarm system from operating as intended can be found by regular
testing and maintenance. The complete system should be tested weekly and immediately after a breakin, an attempted break-in, a fire, a storm, an earthquake, an accident, or any kind of construction
activity inside or outside the premises. The testing should include all sensing devices, keypads, consoles, alarm indicating devices and any other operational devices that are part of the system.
■ Security and Insurance
Regardless of its capabilities, an alarm system is not a substitute for property or life insurance. An alarm
system also is not a substitute for property owners, renters, or other occupants to act prudently to prevent
or minimize the harmful effects of an emergency situation.
© 1997 Digital Security Controls Ltd.
1645 Flint Road, Downsview, Ontario, Canada M3J 2J6
Tel. (416) 665-8460 • Fax (416) 665-7498 • Tech. Line 1-800-387-3630
Printed in Canada
29001330 R7
• W A R N I N G •
This manual contains information on limitations regarding product use and function and information
on the limitations as to liability of the manufacturer. The entire manual should be carefully read.
Wireless Security System
NOTE: Four extra AA batteries are included with each keypad.
For more information, see section 3A “Enrolling the First Keypad”, on page 7.
INSTALLATION MANUAL
Controller Software Version 2.2
Book 1
NOTICE: The Industry Canada label identifies certified equipment. This
certification means that the equipment meets certain telecommunications
network protective, operational and safety requirements. Industry Canada
does not guarantee the equipment will operate to the user’s satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is permissible to
be connected to the facilities of the local telecommunications company. The
equipment must also be installed using an acceptable method of connection.
The customer should be aware that compliance with the above conditions
may not prevent degradation of service in some situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be made by an authorized Canadian
maintenance facility designated by the supplier. Any repairs or alterations
made by the user to this equipment, or equipment malfunctions, may give the
telecommunications company cause to request the user to disconnect the
equipment.
User should ensure for their own protection that the electrical ground
connections of the power utility, telephone lines and internal metallic water
pipe system, if present, are connected together. This precaution may be
particularly important in rural areas.
CAUTION: Users should not attempt to make such connections themselves,
but should contact the appropriate electric inspection authority, or electrician,
as appropriate.
NOTICE: The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) assigned to each terminal
device provides an indication of the maximum number of terminals allowed
to be connected to a telephone interface. The termination on an interface may
consist of any combination of devices subject only to the requirement that the
sum of the Ringer Equivalence Number of all the devices does not exceed 5.
The REN of this unit is 0.1B.
AVIS: L’étiquette de l’Industrie Canada identifie le matériel homologué.
Cette étiquette certifie que le matériel est conforme à certaines normes de
protection, d’exploitation et de sécurité des réseaux de télécommunications.
Industrie Canada n’assure toutefois pas que le matériel fonctionnera à la
satisfaction de l’utilisateur.
Avant d’installer ce matériel, l’utilisateur doit s’assurer qu’il est permis de le
raccorder aux installations de l’entreprise locale de télécommunication. Le
matériel doit également être installé en suivant une méthode acceptée de
raccordement. L’abonné ne doit pas oublier qu’il est possible que la conformité
aux conditions énoncées ci-dessus n’empêchent pas la dégradation du service
dans certaines situations.
Les réparations de matériel homologué doivent être effectuées par un centre
d’entretien canadien autorisé désigné par le fournisseur. La compagnie de
télécommunications peut demander à l’utilisateur de débrancher un appareil à la
suite de réparations ou de modifications effectuées par l’utilisateur ou à cause de
mauvais fonctionnement.
Pour sa propre protection, l’utilisateur doit s’assurer que tous les fils de mise à la
terre de la source d’énergie électrique, les lignes téléphoniques et les
canalisations d’eau métalliques, s’il y en a, sont raccordés ensemble. Cette
précaution est particulièrement importante dans les régions rurales.
AVERTISSEMENT: L’utilisateur ne doit pas tenter de faire ces raccordements
lui-même; il doit avoir recours à un service d’inspection des installations
électriques, ou à un électricien, selon le cas.
AVIS: L’indice d’équivalence de la sonnerie (IES) assigné à chaque dispositif
terminal indique le nombre maximal de terminaux qui peuvent être raccordés à
une interface. La terminaison d’une interface téléphonique peut consister en une
combinaison de quelques dispositifs, à la seule condition que la somme d’indices
d’équivalence de la sonnerie de tous les dispositifs n’excède pas 5.
L’indice d’équivalence de la sonnerie (IES) de ce produit est 0.1B.
This device complies with RSS-210 of Industry Canada. Operation is subject to
the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause interference, and (2)
this device must accept any interference, including interference that may cause
undesired operation of the device.
Ce dispositif satisfait aux exigences d’Industrie Canada, prescrites dans le
document CNR-210. son utilisation est autorisée seulement aux conditions
suivantes: (1) il ne doit pas produire de brouillage et (2) l’utilisateur du dispositif
doit être prêt à accepter tout brouillage radioélectrique reçu, même si ce brouillage
est susceptible de compromettre le fonctionnement du dispositif.
FCC COMPLIANCE STATEMENT
CAUTION: Changes or modifications not expressly approved by Digital
Security Controls Ltd. could void your authority to use this equipment.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a
Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits
are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference
in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance
with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not
occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful
interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by
turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct
the interference by one or more of the following measures:
• Re-orient the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
• Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to
which the receiver is connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for
help.
The user may find the following booklet prepared by the FCC useful: “How
to Identify and Resolve Radio/Television Interference Problems”. This
booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington
D.C. 20402,
Stock # 004-000-00345-4
Important Information
This equipment complies with Part 68 of the FCC Rules. On the side of this
equipment is a label that contains, among other information, the FCC
registration number of this equipment.
Notification to Telephone Company
Upon request, the customer shall notify the telephone company of the
particular line to which the connection will be made, and provide the FCC
registration number and the ringer equivalence of the protective circuit.
FCC Registration Number: F53CAN-74834-AL-E
Ringer Equivalence Number: 0.1B
USOC Jack: RJ-31X or RJ-38X
Telephone Connection Requirements
Except for the telephone company provided ringers, all connections to the
telephone network shall be made through standard plugs and telephone
company provided jacks, or equivalent, in such a manner as to allow for
easy, immediate disconnection of the terminal equipment. Standard jacks
shall be so arranged that, if the plug connected thereto is withdrawn, no
interference to the operation of the equipment at the customer’s premises
which remains connected to the telephone network shall occur by reason
of such withdrawal.
Incidence of Harm
Should terminal equipment or protective circuitry cause harm to the
telephone network, the telephone company shall, where practicable, notify
the customer that temporary disconnection of service may be required;
however, where prior notice is not practicable, the telephone company
may temporarily discontinue service if such action is deemed reasonable
in the circumstances. In the case of such temporary discontinuance, the
telephone company shall promptly notify the customer and will be given the
opportunity to correct the situation.
Additional Telephone Company Information
The security Controller must be properly connected to the telephone line
with a USOC RJ-31X or RJ-38X telephone jack and a matching 8 pin
modular “Direct Connect Cord”.
The FCC prohibits customer-provided terminal equipment be connected to
party lines or to be used in conjunction with coin telephone service. Interconnect rules may vary from state to state.
Changes in Telephone Company Equipment of Facilities
The telephone company may make changes in its communications facilities,
equipment, operations or procedures, where such actions are reasonably
required and proper in its business. Should any such changes render the
customer’s terminal equipment incompatible with the telephone company
facilities the customer shall be given adequate notice to the effect
modifications to maintain uninterrupted service.
Ringer Equivalence Number (REN)
The REN is useful to determine the quantity of devices that you may
connect to your telephone line and still have all of those devices ring when
your telephone number is called. In most, but not all areas, the sum of the
RENs of all devices connected to one line should not exceed five (5.0). To
be certain of the number of devices that you may connect to your line, you
may want to contact your local telephone company.
Equipment Maintenance Facility
If you experience trouble with this telephone equipment, please contact the
facility indicated below for information on obtaining service or repairs. The
telephone company may ask that you disconnect this equipment from the
network until the problem has been corrected or until you are sure that the
equipment is not malfunctioning.
Digital Security Controls Ltd
160 Washburn Street
Lockport, New York, 14094
W Made and Printed in Canada
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
1
CHAPTER 1: OVERVIEW
2
1 A: Glossary ............................................................. 2
1 B: Components ...................................................... 3
CHAPTER 2: GETTING STARTED
5
2 A: Preparing for Installation ................................... 5
2 B: Installing the Controller Battery ......................... 6
CHAPTER 3: ADDING COMPONENTS
7
3 A: Enrolling the First Keypad ................................. 7
3 B: Entering the Enrollment Mode ........................... 8
3 C: Enrolling Sounders ............................................ 9
3 D: Enrolling Detection Devices ........................... 10
3 E: Enrolling the Second Keypad ......................... 11
3 F: Reviewing the List of Enrolled Components ... 12
3 G: Removing Components from the System ....... 13
CHAPTER 4: MODULE PLACEMENT AND TESTING
14
4 A: Locating the Controller and Sounders ............ 14
4 B: Locating System Components ........................ 14
4 C: Entering the Placement Test Mode ................. 15
4 D: A Note About WLS904 Wireless
Motion Detectors: ............................................. 16
CHAPTER 5: INSTALLER PROGRAMMING
17
5 A: How to Enter the Installer’s
Programming Mode ......................................... 17
5 B: Programming Data Entry Sections .................. 18
5 C: Programming System Option Sections ........... 19
5 D: Exiting Installer Programming ......................... 19
CHAPTER 6: ZONE LABELS
20
6 A: Editing Zone Labels ........................................ 20
6 B: Label Editing Options ...................................... 21
CHAPTER 7: MOUNTING THE COMPONENTS
22
7 A: Controller ......................................................... 22
7 B: Sounder ........................................................... 22
7 C: Keypad ............................................................ 23
7 D: Motion Detector ............................................... 23
7 E: Universal Transmitter ....................................... 23
7 F: Smoke Detector ............................................... 23
CHAPTER 8: SYSTEM PROGRAMMING SECTIONS24
[00] Binary Programming ........................................ 24
[01] Zone Definitions ............................................... 24
[02] System Times ................................................... 26
[03] Installer’s Code ................................................ 26
[04] Master Code ..................................................... 26
[05] First System Options ........................................ 27
1 Quick-Exit Enable / Disable ........................... 27
2 Auto-Interior Enable / Disable ....................... 27
3 Door Chime Option Available / Not Available28
4 One-Time Use Code Option .......................... 28
5 Sounder Shutdown Enable / Disable ............ 28
6 Second Sounder Operation ........................... 28
7 Pre-Alert Volume Setting ................................ 28
8 AC Trouble Indication .................................... 28
[06] Second System Options .................................. 29
1 [F] Key Disable / Enable ................................ 29
2 [P] Key Disable / Enable ............................... 29
3 [A] Key Disable / Enable ............................... 29
4 [P] Key Audible / Silent .................................. 29
5 [F] Key Alarm Steady / Pulsed ...................... 29
6 Bypassing Disable / Enable .......................... 29
7 Keypad Lockout Enable / Disable ................ 29
8 AC Frequency ................................................ 29
[07] Third System Options....................................... 30
1 Entry Delay Off Arming Option ...................... 30
2 Silent Supervisory Fault ................................. 30
3 Tamper Faults Transmit Only while Armed .... 30
4 Interior Zone with Delay ................................. 30
5 Exit Delay Termination ................................... 30
6 Audible Home Mode Arming ......................... 30
7 - 8 For Future Use ............................................ 30
CHAPTER 9: COMMUNICATIONS PROGRAMMING
SECTIONS
31
[20] First Monitoring Station Telephone Number .... 31
[21] Second Monitoring Station Telephone Number31
[22] Account Code .................................................. 31
[23] - [38] Notes on Reporting Codes ..................... 31
[23] Alarm Reporting Codes, Zones 1 to 10 ........... 32
[24] Restoral Reporting Codes, Zones 1 to 10 ....... 32
[25] Closing (Arming) Reporting Codes, Access
Codes 0 to 9 ............................................................. 32
[26] Opening (Disarming) Reporting Codes, Access
Codes 0 to 9 ............................................................. 32
[27] Tamper Reporting Codes, Zones 1 to 10 ........ 32
[28] Tamper Restoral Reporting Codes,
Zones 1 to 10 ................................................... 32
[29] Low Battery Reporting Codes, Zones 1 to 10 . 33
[30] Low Battery Restoral Reporting Codes,
Zones 1 to 10 ................................................... 33
[31] Supervisory Reporting Codes, Zones 1 to 10 . 33
[32] Supervisory Restoral Reporting Codes,
Zones 1 to 10 ................................................... 33
[33] Priority Alarms and Restorals: [F], [A], [P]
and Fire Zone Trouble ...................................... 33
[34] System Trouble Reporting Codes .................... 34
[35] System Restoral Reporting Codes .................. 34
[36] Keypad and Sounder Tamper
Reporting Codes .............................................. 34
[37] Keypad and Sounder Restoral
Reporting Codes .............................................. 35
[38] Additional System Reporting Codes. .............. 35
[39] Communication Variables ................................ 36
[40] Test Transmission Time of Day ........................ 37
[41] Communicator Format Options ....................... 37
[42] First Communicator Options ............................ 38
1 Communicator Disable / Enable ................... 38
2 Dialing Format ................................................ 38
3 Pulse Dialing Ratios ....................................... 38
4 Transmission Limit Setting ............................. 38
5 Telephone Line Monitor ................................. 38
6 Telephone Line Monitor Silent / Audible ....... 38
7 - 8 For Future Use ........................................... 38
51
i
[43] Second Communicator Option Code .............. 39
1 Restoral Follow Zone ..................................... 39
2 Restorals on Sounder Time-out ..................... 39
3 Restorals on Disarming ................................. 39
4-8 For Future Use ............................................... 39
CHAPTER 10: DOWNLOADING PROGRAMMING
SECTIONS
40
[70] Downloading Options ...................................... 40
1 Ring Detect .................................................... 40
2 Answering Machine Override ........................ 40
3 Downloading Call-back ................................. 40
4 User-Initiated Downloading ........................... 40
5 Periodic Downloading ................................... 40
6-8 For Future Use ............................................... 40
[71] Downloading Computer Telephone Number ... 41
[72] Downloading Access Code ............................. 41
[73] System Identification Code .............................. 41
[74] Number of Rings Before Answering ................ 41
[75] Installer-Initiated Downloading ........................ 41
CHAPTER 11: INSTALLER TEST MODES
42
[80] Installer Walk Test Mode .................................. 42
[81] Module Placement Test .................................... 42
[82] Sounder Test .................................................... 42
[83] Manual Dialer Test ........................................... 42
CHAPTER 12: MISCELLANEOUS PROGRAMMING
SECTIONS
43
[90] Installer Lockout Enable .................................. 43
[91] Installer Lockout Disable ................................. 43
[99] Restore Factory Default Programming ............ 43
APPENDIX A GUIDELINES FOR LOCATING SMOKE
DETECTORS
44
APPENDIX B CONNECTING THE CONTROLLER
45
APPENDIX C ASCII CHARACTER CHART
46
LIMITED WARRANTY
47
FCC COMPLIANCE STATEMENT
52
ii
inside back cover
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