LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT 1310 E. Route 66 Lebanon, Missouri 65536

LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT 1310 E. Route 66 Lebanon, Missouri 65536
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
1310 E. Route 66
Lebanon, Missouri 65536
Board of Directors Meeting
Tuesday, September 16, 2014
Central Office – Board Room
5:30 p.m.
Tentative Agenda
1. Call to order by Board President.
2. Pledge of Allegiance.
3. Approve the agenda.
4. Communications:
a. Recognitions.
b. Public Comments on Agenda Items.
c. MSBA Video.
d. LEA.
e. Administrators.
f. Board.
5. Consent Agenda Items:
a. Minutes of August 12 and 20 meetings.
b. Monthly Financial Report.
c. Personnel Report.
6. Action Items:
a. Annual Secretary of the Board Report.
b. FY 15 Bus Routes.
c. FY 15 Career Ladder Participants.
7. Evaluation of Programs:
a. Library/Media Services.
8. Review Items:
a. FY 14 APR and ACT Reports.
b. JH Soccer.
9. Superintendent’s Report:
a. Middle School Project Update.
b. MSBA Regional Fall Meeting.
10. Closed Session.
a. Consideration of Personnel. 610.021(3).
b. Legal Action. 610. 021(1).
11. Return to open session.
12. Items for October Board Meeting.
13. Adjourn.
Minutes
Lebanon R-3 School District
August 12, 2014
ATTENDANCE
H = Here
A = Absent
HAHH-
Bob O’Neil
John Carr
Sherry Headley
Kim Light
H - Jeremiah Hough
AJason Riggs
H - Ken Eldridge
TYPE OF MEETING & LOCATION
REGULAR BOARD MEETING HELD AT THE CENTRAL OFFICE BOARD ROOM AT 5:30 P.M.
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
Bob O’Neil, President, called the meeting to order.
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
APPROVE OR CHANGE THE TENTATIVE AGENDA
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
JEREMIAH HOUGH
KEN ELDRIDGE
MOTION:
Motion Carried: 5-0.
I move we approve the tentative agenda.
COMMUNICATIONS:
RECOGNITIONS: Michele Hedges recognized the District for receiving all gold awards for each
building for the Positive Behavior Intervention Support Program. Lebanon was the only district
in the state that had all buildings receive the gold award. Assistant High School Principal Craig
Reeves, thanked the board and administration for their support while he was deployed to Kuwait
last school year.
PUBLIC – None.
MSBA – A video was shown to get the latest updates on important education issues and upcoming
events produced by MSBA.
LEA – None.
ADMINISTRATORS - None.
BOARD - None.
1
8/12/14
BOARD MEETING – AUGUST 12, 2014 – PAGE TWO
APPROVE CONSENT AGENDA
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
KIM LIGHT
JEREMIAH HOUGH
MOTION:
I move we approve the Consent Agenda Items
consisting of minutes of the July 15 meeting, the payment of bills totaling $1,333,803.83 and
the treasurer’s report. The personnel report was approved and consisted of the resignation of
Danielle Romay- HS Drama teacher; and offered contracts to Karissa Talty- HS Drama teacher,
and Susan Long, part time JH reading teacher. Motion Carried: 5-0.
th
ACTION ITEMS
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
KEN ELDRIDGE
KIM LIGHT
MOTION:
I move we approve a resolution supporting the
Laclede County Mitigation Plan. Motion Carried: 5-0.
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
SHERRY HEADLEY
JEREMIAH HOUGH
MOTION:
Motion Carried: 5-0.
I move we approve the residency waivers.
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
JEREMIAH HOUGH
KIM LIGHT
MOTION:
I move we approve an agreement for the
district’s financial underwriting services with George K. Baum. This agreement will be for a
period of 3 years. Motion Carried: 5-0.
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
SHERRY HEADLEY
JEREMIAH HOUGH
MOTION:
I move we approve setting a date of August 20 ,
2014 at noon for a special board meeting. Motion Carried: 5-0.
th
REVIEW ITEMS
THE BOARD HEARD A REPORT FROM MICHELE HEDGES ON THE ACHIEVEMENT DATA FROM LAST
YEAR’S ASSESSMENTS.
2
8/12/14
BOARD MEETING – AUGUST 12, 2014 – PAGE THREE
SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT


Summer Maintenance Projects.
Start of School Events.
MOTION TO GO INTO CLOSED SESSION
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
SHERRY HEADLEY
JEREMIAH HOUGH
MOTION:
Carried: Roll Call Vote.
I move we go into Closed Session. Motion
BOB O’NEIL
JEREMIAH HOUGH
SHERRY HEADLEY
KEN ELDRIDGE
JASON RIGGS
JOHN CARR
KIM LIGHT
YES
YES
YES
YES
ABSENT
ABSENT
YES
THE BOARD CAME OUT OF CLOSED SESSION AND MADE THE FOLLOWING MOTIONS:
ADJOURNMENT
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
KEN ELDRIDGE
JEREMIAH HOUGH
MOTION:
Motion Carried: 5-0.
I move we adjourn this meeting.
________________________________
PRESIDENT
________________________________
SECRETARY
3
8/12/14
4
8/12/14
Minutes
Lebanon R-3 School District
August 20, 2014
H = Here
HHAH-
ATTENDANCE
A = Absent
P = Partial
Bob O’Neil
Jason Riggs
John Carr
Jeremiah Hough
H - Ken Eldridge
H - Kim Light
H - Sherry Headley
TYPE OF MEETING & LOCATION
SPECIAL BOARD MEETING HELD AT THE CENTRAL OFFICE BOARDROOM AT 12:00 NOON.
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
Bob O’Neil, President, called the meeting to order.
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
JEREMIAH HOUGH
JASON RIGGS
MOTION:
I move we approve the agenda with the change
of moving the closed session before the review item on the agenda.
Motion Carried: 6-0.
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
JASON RIGGS
KEN ELDRIDGE
MOTION:
I move we set the total levy at $3.22 using
Amendment 2 to set the operating levy at $2.75 for the 2014-2015 school year.
Motion Carried: 6-0.
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
JEREMIAH HOUGH
KIM LIGHT
MOTION:
I move we increase the total debt service levy by
$0.3700 cents due to passage of the bond issue. The new debt service levy will be $0.8400
cents making the total levy $3.5900.
Motion Carried: 6-0.
1
8/20/14
MOTION TO GO INTO CLOSED SESSION
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
JEREMIAH HOUGH
SHERRY HEADLEY
MOTION: I move we go into Closed Session.
MOTION CARRIED: ROLL CALL VOTE.
SHERRY HEADLEY
JOHN CARR
JEREMIAH HOUGH
KIM LIGHT
JASON RIGGS
KEN ELDRIDGE
BOB O’NEIL
YES
ABSENT
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
THE BOARD CAME OUT OF CLOSED SESSION AND HEARD A REPORT FROM SAPP DESIGN
ASSOCIATES ON THE DESIGN OF THE NEW MIDDLE SCHOOL.
BOARD MEMBER SHERRY HEADLEY LEFT THE MEETING AT 12:50 P.M.
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
KIM LIGHT
KEN ELDRIDGE
MOTION:
I move we approve the design development to
date as presented by Sapp Design Associates. Motion Carried: 5-0.
ADJOURNMENT
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
KIM LIGHT
JEREMIAH HOUGH
MOTION:
Motion Carried: 5-0.
I move we adjourn this meeting.
_______________________________
PRESIDENT
___________________________________
SECRETARY
2
8/20/14
LEBANON R-III SCHOOL DISTRICT
BANK RECONCILIATION
August
31
2014
MAIN CHECKING
DEBT SERVICE
PAYPAL FOOD SERVICE
DONATED IMPROVEMENTS
EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PLAN
LEB R-3 BLDG CONST
CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT
SCHOLARSHIPS
MOHEFA - ESCROW
O/S ITEMS
BANK BALANCE
Dep. In transit
O/S Items
Bank Changes/Charges
Taxes Dep. In Trans.
O/S Checks
August
31
2014
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
6,645,209.11
1,521,823.33
202,186.43
460,115.03
9,637,155.93
182,664.93
904,780.73
642,519.78
$
20,196,455.27
$
$
$
$
$
0.08
22,945.25
113.00
(1,694,755.58)
18,524,758.02
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
13,302,277.00
(5,388,463.83)
(363,945.62)
(2,095,053.98)
(729,813.21)
9,637,155.93
259,388.77
191,309.35
460,114.83
904,780.73
182,664.93
1,521,823.34
642,519.78
BOOK CASH BALANCE DETAIL
POOLED CASH - GENERAL FUND
POOLED CASH - TEACHERS FUND
POOLED CASH - DEBT SERVICE
POOLED CASH - CAPITAL FUND
POOLED CASH CONSTRUCTION
POOLED CASH- EMP BENEFIT PLAN
LEB R-3 BLDG CONST.
BOARD RESTRICTED CASH
PAYPAL FOOD SERVICE
DONATED IMPROVEMENTS
EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PLAN
SCHOLARSHIPS
CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT
DEBT SERVICE
MOHEFA - ESCROW
FUND BALANCE
August
31
2014
$
18,524,758.02 $
FUND BALANCE
August
31
2013
$
11,236,927.25
FUND BALANCE
August
31
2012
$
10,817,117.50
FUND BALANCE
August
31
2011
$
11,986,059.54
Operating Funds 010,020,040
Operating Funds 010,020,040
August
August
31
31
2014
2013
$
$
6,260,812.89
7,560,930.58
Adam Dameron, Chief Financial Officer
8,887,602.09
Lebanon R-3 Finance Dashboard
Month Ending August 31, 2014
Axis Title
Fund Balance
Revenue/Expense Comparison
$24,000,000
$22,000,000
$20,000,000
$18,000,000
$16,000,000
$14,000,000
$12,000,000
$10,000,000
$8,000,000
$6,000,000
$4,000,000
$2,000,000
$Aug-11 Nov-11 Feb-12 May-12 Aug-12 Nov-12 Feb-13 May-13 Aug-13 Nov-13 Feb. 14 May-14 Aug-14
Fund Balance
current vs. prior ytd
Operating Funds
( in Millions)
Current
FY 13-14
FY 12-13
FY 11-12
$
18.524 $
11.236 $
10.817 $
11.986
$
7.288 $
0.419
$
6.260
$
$45.000
$40.000
$35.000
$30.000
$25.000
FY 13-14 YTD
$20.000
FY 14-15 Current YTD
$15.000
Working Budget
$10.000
$5.000
$Total Revenue
Total Expenses
NOTES: Through August, the District has collected $3.956M in revenue and has
expensed $3.892M. This compares to $3.981M in revenue and $3.553M in expenses at
this point last year. The increase in expenses is due to the costs associated with the
middle school, which equal $729,813 year-to-date.
7.560
Labor Costs
Overtime Trend
$20,000
$18,000
$25.000
$16,000
$14,000
$20.000
FY 13-14 YTD
$15.000
FY 14-15 Current YTD
Working Budget
$10.000
FY 11-12
$10,000
FY 12-13
$8,000
FY 13-14
$6,000
FY14-15
$4,000
$5.000
$-
$12,000
$2,000
Teacher Fund 020
Labor
FY 13-14 YTD
Teacher Fund 020 $
0.517
General Fund 010 $
0.583
$-
General Fund 010
FY 14-15
Current YTD
$
0.471
$
0.490
Working Budget
$
22.457
$
8.773
JUL
Current -Last
in k's
$
(0.046)
$
(0.093)
$
(0.139)
NOTES: Overtime costs through August are about one-third of the amount at this time last year.
AUG
SEP
OCT
OT $
NOV
DEC
YTD
1,578.28
JAN
$
FEB
MAR
Last YTD
4,910.15
APR
MAY
32%
JUN
Lebanon R-3 Finance Dashboard
Month Ending August 31, 2014
Utilities Trend
Self-Funded Health Plan
$1,000,000.00
$900,000.00
$600,000.00
$800,000.00
$500,000.00
$700,000.00
This Month
$400,000.00
$600,000.00
Last Year This Mo
$500,000.00
FY 13-14 YTD
$300,000.00
$400,000.00
FY 14-15 YTD
$200,000.00
Last YTD
$100,000.00
Budget
$300,000.00
$200,000.00
YTD
$-
$100,000.00
$Fund Balance
Claims
Health 060
Fund Balance
Claims
Fixed Costs
Fixed Costs
FY 13-14 YTD
FY 14-15 YTD
$ 920,100.00 $
460,114.83
$ 277,356.00 $
546,609.36
$ 217,868.42 $
46,096.23
Utilities
Electric
Water/Sewer
Gas
Total
$
$
$
$
$515,450.00
$74,000.00
$125,500.00
Electric
Water/Sewer
Gas
Budget
515,450.00
74,000.00
125,500.00
714,950.00
$
$
$
$
This Month
24,361.47
2,262.39
1,009.50
27,633.36
Last Year This
Mo
$
23,263.78
$
1,860.40
$
694.81
$
25,818.99
$
$
$
$
FY 13-14 YTD
$
31,531.56
$
57,307.76
$
330,662.37
$
622,167.17
$
783,514.50
FY 14-15 YTD
$
22,710.02
$
55,115.20
$
291,735.84
$
415,206.59
$ 1,735,801.88
YTD
62,973.89
7,209.82
3,773.23
73,956.94
$
$
$
$
Last YTD
55,622.05
7,488.07
3,289.52
66,399.64
Other Cost Centers
$1,800,000.00
Other Cost Centers
Trans Fuel
Trans Labor
Supplies
Purch. Serv.
Capital Outlay
$1,600,000.00
$1,400,000.00
$1,200,000.00
$1,000,000.00
FY 13-14 YTD
$800,000.00
FY 14-15 YTD
$600,000.00
FY 14-15
Budget
$0.361M
$1.508M
$0.988M
$2.446M
$1.220M
$400,000.00
$200,000.00
$-
Notes:
$0.361M
$1.508M
$0.988M
$2.446M
$1.220M
Trans Fuel
Trans Labor
Supplies
Purch. Serv.
Capital Outlay
NOTES: The Health fund balance is down compared to August 2013 due to a significant increase in claims. There are still some ongoing claims issues that could have a
major impact to the fund balance. Fuel costs are down compared to this time last year. This is due to some stockpiling that was done last year. The current year fuel
expenses are more in line with prior years. Purchased Services expenses are down this year partly because the District prepaid some insurance costs in FY13-14. The
increase in capital outlay includes expenses for the middle school project ($729k), roofing projects ($54k), and the high school library renovation ($170k). Although the
library renovation was paid by donors and not District funds, the expenses are included in the capital outlay total.
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
Dated : 9/3/2014
2014-2015
Time : 11:52
Page 1
All Revenue Accounts - Board Revenue by Object-AUG 2014
Account Code
Account Description
GRAND TOTAL
MTD Activity
YTD Activity
Working
Budget
% Realized
Last Year
This Month
Last Year
Account Type
Thru This Month
2,013,142.07
3,956,436.85
40,829,933.65
9.69
1,844,151.95
0.00
0.00
8,675,697.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
50,986.19
132,450.36
858,036.00
15.44
50,403.30
102,827.48
3,981,091.71
OBJECT 5111 TOTAL
CURRENT TAXES
OBJECT 5112 TOTAL
DELINQUENT TAXES
OBJECT 5113 TOTAL
PROPOSITION C (SALES TAX)
324,678.22
569,503.07
4,044,075.00
14.08
306,008.57
651,967.82
OBJECT 5114 TOTAL
FINANCIAL INSTITUTION TAX
0.00
0.00
43,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5115 TOTAL
M M SURTAX
0.00
0.00
568,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5123 TOTAL
ADULT CON EDUCATION TUITION
0.00
0.00
21,000.00
0.00
700.00
700.00
OBJECT 5124 TOTAL
VOC LPN PROGRAM
0.00
0.00
0.00
17,272.50
17,272.50
OBJECT 5140 TOTAL
EARNINGS ON INVESTMENTS
7,121.43
14,434.50
97,000.00
8,429.01
16,648.32
OBJECT 5142 TOTAL
ACCRUED INTEREST ON BONDS SOLD
2,872.07
5,743.29
0.00
OBJECT 5150 TOTAL
FOOD SERVICE
60,501.84
60,501.84
530,000.00
OBJECT 5165 TOTAL
FOOD SERVICE ( NON PROGRAM)
11,763.65
11,763.65
OBJECT 5170 TOTAL
STUDENT BODY ACTIVITIES
49,736.16
63,441.16
OBJECT 5171 TOTAL
ATHLETIC GATE RECEIPTS
0.00
OBJECT 5180 TOTAL
OTHER COMMUNITY SERVICES
112.00
OBJECT 5190 TOTAL
OTHER LOCAL
970.80
1,099.30
OBJECT 5192 TOTAL
STADIUM DONATIONS
0.00
73,550.72
OBJECT 5198 TOTAL
MISC LOCAL REVENUE
OBJECT 5211 TOTAL
FINES ESCHEATS OVERPLUS ETC
OBJECT 5221 TOTAL
RR AND UTILITIES
OBJECT 5311 TOTAL
BASIC FORMULA
OBJECT 5312 TOTAL
TRANSPORTATION (STATE AID)
OBJECT 5314 TOTAL
ECSE STATE
OBJECT 5319 TOTAL
BASIC FORMULA - CT FUND
OBJECT 5324 TOTAL
OBJECT 5326 TOTAL
14.88
0.00
0.00
11.42
57,626.94
57,828.75
150,200.00
7.83
13,721.24
13,721.24
774,698.00
8.19
68,001.41
75,021.41
0.00
43,500.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
112.00
15,000.00
0.75
350.00
350.00
12,900.00
8.52
1,705.18
2,968.11
153,651.00
47.87
0.00
19,900.00
0.00
0.00
6,694.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
176,037.83
176,037.83
303,000.00
58.10
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
425,500.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,015,460.00
2,174,227.00
14,770,437.00
14.72
989,903.00
1,980,311.00
36,000.00
72,000.00
412,000.00
17.48
31,767.00
63,534.00
0.00
0.00
640,421.65
0.00
0.00
0.00
115,206.00
214,595.00
1,652,104.00
12.99
149,026.00
311,437.00
EDUC & SCREENING/PAT
0.00
0.00
25,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
LTCC-PLTW
0.00
0.00
26,947.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5332 TOTAL
VOC TECH AIDE (STATE)
0.00
0.00
348,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5333 TOTAL
FOOD SERVICE (STATE)
0.00
0.00
14,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5341 TOTAL
ADULT DAYTIME TRADE
0.00
0.00
8,500.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5359 TOTAL
VO TECH ENHANCEMENT GRANT
0.00
0.00
168,631.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5362 TOTAL
A+ SCHOOL GRANT
0.00
0.00
24,000.00
0.00
4,402.00
10,093.00
OBJECT 5381 TOTAL
EXTRAORDINARY COSTS - SP ED
0.00
0.00
592,092.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5397 TOTAL
OTHER REVENUE (DUAL CREDIT)
0.00
0.00
19,000.00
0.00
4,635.00
4,635.00
OBJECT 5412 TOTAL
MEDICAID
0.00
0.00
73,250.00
0.00
0.00
18.41
OBJECT 5421 TOTAL
VOC EDUCATION, SPECIAL PROJECTS
0.00
0.00
6,000.00
0.00
0.00
8,336.00
OBJECT 5427 TOTAL
VOC EDUCATION BASIC GRANT
0.00
0.00
110,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5437 TOTAL
SPECIAL ED SWIS
0.00
0.00
529.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5441 TOTAL
IND WITH DISIBILITY ACT (IDEA)
0.00
0.00
745,625.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5442 TOTAL
ECSE FEDERAL
0.00
0.00
225,451.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5445 TOTAL
FOOD SERVICE (FEDERAL)
0.00
0.00
1,140,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5446 TOTAL
SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAM
0.00
0.00
340,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5451 TOTAL
TITLE I ESEA
0.00
0.00
1,251,900.00
0.00
0.00
267,776.58
OBJECT 5455 TOTAL
TITLE V
0.00
0.00
82,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5462 TOTAL
EMER IMMIGRATION EDUC
0.00
0.00
18,000.00
0.00
0.00
5,012.62
OBJECT 5465 TOTAL
TITLE II .A
0.00
0.00
39,114.62
OBJECT 5472 TOTAL
School Age Community
OBJECT 5481 TOTAL
SUMMER FOOD SER PROGRAM
0.00
0.00
169,595.00
4,763.00
4,763.00
0.00
0.00
70,627.25
38,000.00
185.86
2,114.00
9,426.00
4,860.80
38,721.81
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
Dated : 9/3/2014
2014-2015
Time : 11:52
Page 2
All Revenue Accounts - Board Revenue by Object-AUG 2014
MTD Activity
YTD Activity
Working
Budget
% Realized
Last Year
This Month
WIA - OTHER THAN DESE
0.00
0.00
27,500.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
TITLE VI.B
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18,263.00
OBJECT 5497 TOTAL
COMP SCH REFORM GRANT
0.00
0.00
5,000.00
3,745.00
3,745.00
OBJECT 5650 TOTAL
VOCATIONAL HOUSE SALES
0.00
0.00
0.00
200.00
200.00
OBJECT 5651 TOTAL
SALE OF OTHER PROPERTY
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,753.70
OBJECT 5691 TOTAL
BOND TEMPORARY DIRECT DEPOSIT
154,654.00
309,308.00
0.00
129,281.00
258,562.00
OBJECT 5810 TOTAL
TUITION OTHER SCHOOLS
2,278.88
2,278.88
1,100,000.00
0.21
0.00
946.34
OBJECT 5820 TOTAL
VOCATIONAL TUITION
0.00
0.00
74,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
Account Code
Account Description
OBJECT 5482 TOTAL
OBJECT 5492 TOTAL
0.00
Last Year
Account Type
Thru This Month
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
Dated : 9/3/2014
2014-2015
Time : 11:50
Page 1
All Expenditure Accounts - Board Expense By Object-AUG 2014
Account Code
Account Description
GRAND TOTAL
OBJECT 6111 TOTAL
CERTIFICATED ADMINISTRATORS SALARY
OBJECT 6112 TOTAL
CERTIFICATED TEACHERS SALARY
OBJECT 6113 TOTAL
OTHER CERTIFICATED SALARIES
OBJECT 6121 TOTAL
CERTIFICATED PART TIME SALARY
OBJECT 6131 TOTAL
SUPPLEMENTAL PAY
OBJECT 6135 TOTAL
CERT SUPPLEMENTAL PART TIME TCHR
OBJECT 6141 TOTAL
MTD Activity
YTD Activity
Working
Budget
% Realized
Last Year
This Month
Last Year
Account Type
Thru This Month
2,312,663.38
3,892,258.56
40,695,854.00
9.56
2,175,252.78
150.00
300.00
104,021.00
0.29
0.00
0.00
271,105.20
358,950.12
16,628,297.00
2.16
304,458.21
376,736.30
3,552,570.55
0.00
0.00
122,300.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
22,767.25
22,867.25
382,467.00
5.98
22,907.00
22,907.00
6,347.50
6,849.53
278,029.00
2.46
7,775.00
25,064.30
0.00
0.00
8,100.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
CERT UNUSED SICK LEAVE SEV PAY
0.00
522.00
77,165.00
0.68
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 6150 TOTAL
TRANS ECSE SAL DRIVER
0.00
0.00
7,576.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 6151 TOTAL
CLASSIFIED SALARIES
196,567.49
390,342.38
6,000,756.00
6.50
240,643.74
405,799.11
OBJECT 6161 TOTAL
CLASSIFIED SAL PART TIME
355.28
355.28
194,367.00
0.18
3,124.65
4,311.76
OBJECT 6165 TOTAL
HS GATEKEEPERS SALARY
0.00
0.00
21,168.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 6171 TOTAL
CLASS UNUSED SICK LEAVE SEV PAY
0.00
1,050.00
10,365.00
10.13
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 6211 TOTAL
TEACHER RETIREMENT
43,788.88
55,789.54
2,688,714.00
2.07
49,059.73
62,649.24
OBJECT 6221 TOTAL
NON TEACHER RETIREMENT
15,255.99
29,210.76
458,077.00
6.38
18,926.50
31,730.38
OBJECT 6231 TOTAL
OASDI
12,062.17
24,231.54
445,454.00
5.44
15,457.23
25,533.30
OBJECT 6232 TOTAL
MEDICARE
6,855.27
10,736.67
342,127.00
3.14
8,051.67
11,569.90
OBJECT 6233 TOTAL
CERTIFIED MEDICARE
0.00
0.00
600.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 6240 TOTAL
LIFE INSURANCE
292.84
462.74
23,555.00
1.96
325.48
492.14
OBJECT 6241 TOTAL
EMPLOYEE HEALTH INSURANCE
OBJECT 6261 TOTAL
WORKERS COMP INSURANCE
OBJECT 6271 TOTAL
UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION
OBJECT 6291 TOTAL
OTHER EMPLOYER PROVIDED SERVICES
OBJECT 6311 TOTAL
INSTRUCTION SERVICES
OBJECT 6313 TOTAL
PUPIL SERVICES
OBJECT 6315 TOTAL
AUDIT SERVICES
OBJECT 6317 TOTAL
LEGAL SERVICES
OBJECT 6318 TOTAL
ELECTION SERVICES
OBJECT 6319 TOTAL
OTHER PROF AND TECH SERVICES
OBJECT 6321 TOTAL
OBJECT 6322 TOTAL
51,299.50
80,074.00
3,102,872.00
2.58
55,532.00
83,038.20
-24,646.15
-23,789.01
314,428.00
-7.57
20,762.52
41,266.66
3,845.00
3,845.00
20,000.00
19.23
9,718.86
9,718.86
41.63
203.35
1,100.00
18.49
146.13
280.32
25,839.25
76,416.32
287,000.00
26.63
25,738.15
51,269.55
1,149.01
3,717.80
186,000.00
2.00
2,189.55
3,992.34
0.00
17,317.50
22,000.00
78.72
0.00
0.00
189.00
-4,499.82
30,000.00
-15.00
4,150.09
6,683.72
0.00
0.00
7,500.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6,046.12
9,312.03
91,500.00
10.18
3,200.77
3,200.77
WIA
0.00
0.00
4,200.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
A+
0.00
0.00
4,200.00
0.00
4,657.00
10,348.00
OBJECT 6323 TOTAL
LTCC- ACCESS MISSOURI
0.00
0.00
0.00
4,380.00
4,380.00
OBJECT 6324 TOTAL
TRA
0.00
0.00
5,000.00
OBJECT 6325 TOTAL
VA Reimbursement-LPN
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 6332 TOTAL
REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE
36,956.21
51,273.58
303,851.00
OBJECT 6333 TOTAL
RENTALS/LEASES
8,178.50
10,357.00
38,142.00
OBJECT 6334 TOTAL
RENTAL EQUIPMENT
8,509.62
17,588.53
OBJECT 6335 TOTAL
WATER AND SEWER
2,262.39
OBJECT 6336 TOTAL
TRASH REMOVAL
OBJECT 6343 TOTAL
TRAVEL
OBJECT 6349 TOTAL
OTHER TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
0.00
27.75
0.00
OBJECT 6351 TOTAL
PROPERTY INSURANCE
0.00
13,682.00
291,000.00
OBJECT 6360 TOTAL
COMMUNICATION
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 6361 TOTAL
COMMUNICATIONS
-27,293.78
-21,471.61
OBJECT 6362 TOTAL
ADVERTISING
0.00
0.00
200.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 6363 TOTAL
PRINTING AND BINDING
10,496.69
10,496.69
29,750.00
35.28
13,014.77
13,014.77
OBJECT 6371 TOTAL
DUES AND MEMBERSHIPS
18,672.34
21,289.70
65,790.00
32.36
2,059.00
12,818.48
0.00
0.00
0.00
3,745.00
3,745.00
16.87
71,587.07
99,475.90
27.15
8,178.50
10,357.00
122,000.00
14.42
7,570.98
15,048.73
7,209.82
74,000.00
9.74
1,860.40
7,488.07
1,937.00
3,877.70
20,000.00
19.39
1,725.00
1,830.00
12,995.71
25,095.24
209,477.00
11.98
14,342.40
21,372.17
0.00
33.00
4.70
69,284.00
138,596.00
13,500.00
0.00
-3,217.23
1,284.77
29,475.00
-72.85
8,328.90
13,069.23
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
Dated : 9/3/2014
2014-2015
Time : 11:50
Page 2
All Expenditure Accounts - Board Expense By Object-AUG 2014
Account Code
Account Description
OBJECT 6391 TOTAL
OTHER PURCHASED SERVICES
OBJECT 6410 TOTAL
GENERAL SUPPLIES
OBJECT 6411 TOTAL
MAINT & REP SUPPLIES
OBJECT 6414 TOTAL
SUPPLIES
OBJECT 6415 TOTAL
K12 SPECIAL ED TESTING SUPPLIES
OBJECT 6431 TOTAL
TEXTBOOKS
OBJECT 6441 TOTAL
MTD Activity
YTD Activity
Working
Budget
% Realized
Last Year
This Month
Last Year
Account Type
Thru This Month
64,420.12
173,516.36
611,506.00
28.38
96,309.09
204,159.67
243,959.62
513,049.54
2,014,426.00
25.47
457,584.64
777,205.13
21,952.03
54,308.48
263,200.00
20.63
26,165.40
57,153.51
0.00
0.00
1,000.00
0.00
0.00
562.11
214.94
284.94
12,000.00
2.37
161.49
889.88
0.00
0.00
770.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
LIBRARY BOOKS
2,477.78
6,638.69
31,780.00
20.89
3,825.34
12,559.09
OBJECT 6451 TOTAL
RESOURCE MATERIALS
1,213.16
1,995.87
6,325.00
31.56
2,375.21
3,522.91
OBJECT 6452 TOTAL
AUDIO VISUALS
0.00
0.00
3,600.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 6470 TOTAL
FOOD
95,066.51
95,066.51
800,000.00
11.88
81,703.58
79,459.54
OBJECT 6472 TOTAL
MILK
16,407.63
17,911.92
325,000.00
5.51
22,087.80
23,380.33
OBJECT 6481 TOTAL
ELECTRIC
24,361.47
62,973.89
515,450.00
12.22
23,263.78
55,622.05
OBJECT 6483 TOTAL
GAS LP
1,009.50
3,773.23
125,500.00
3.01
694.81
3,289.52
OBJECT 6486 TOTAL
GASOLINE DIESEL
20,518.46
23,245.86
361,000.00
6.44
1,831.12
31,772.23
OBJECT 6490 TOTAL
OTHER SUPPLIES
375.11
OBJECT 6521 TOTAL
BUILDINGS
OBJECT 6531 TOTAL
IMPROVEMENT OTHER THAN BLDGS
OBJECT 6541 TOTAL
REGULAR EQUIPMENT
OBJECT 6542 TOTAL
EQUIPMENT INSTRUCTIONAL APPARATUS
OBJECT 6545 TOTAL
K12 SPECIAL ED ASSIST TECHNOLOGY
OBJECT 6552 TOTAL
PUPIL TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES
OBJECT 6591 TOTAL
OBJECT 6611 TOTAL
OBJECT 6613 TOTAL
PRINCIPAL LEASE PURCHASE
OBJECT 6631 TOTAL
FEES
0.00
0.00
0.00
375.11
476,437.57
729,813.21
0.00
0.00
0.00
50,280.51
109,773.98
301,000.00
36.47
58,633.52
201,090.52
408,937.86
681,625.21
424,545.00
160.55
269,305.26
340,544.30
30,513.47
71,397.65
142,800.00
50.00
2,940.00
71,827.79
0.00
0.00
10,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
94,528.10
94,528.10
184,682.00
51.18
128,313.56
170,051.89
OTHER CAPITAL OUTLAY
0.00
75.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
REDEMPTION OF PRINCIPAL
0.00
0.00
1,333,005.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
48,338.74
48,338.74
157,142.00
30.76
0.00
0.00
0.00
250.00
5,000.00
5.00
0.00
0.00
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
Dated : 9/3/2014
2014-2015
Time : 11:44
Page 1
All Expenditure Accounts - Board Expense by Function-Aug 2014
Account Code
Account Description
GRAND TOTAL
FUNCTION 1100 TOTAL
Regular Programs
FUNCTION 1111 TOTAL
ESTHER ELEMENTARY
FUNCTION 1112 TOTAL
FEDERAL CLASS REDUCTION ESTHER
FUNCTION 1116 TOTAL
MAPLECREST ELEMENTARY
FUNCTION 1117 TOTAL
FEDERAL CLASS REDUCTION MAPLECREST
FUNCTION 1121 TOTAL
BOSWELL ELEMENTARY
FUNCTION 1122 TOTAL
PRACTICAL PARENTING PARTNERSHIP
FUNCTION 1126 TOTAL
HILLCREST ELEMENTARY
FUNCTION 1130 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH
FUNCTION 1131 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH ART
FUNCTION 1132 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH BAND
FUNCTION 1134 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH HEALTH
FUNCTION 1135 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH HOME ECONOMICS
FUNCTION 1136 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH INDUSTRIAL ARTS
FUNCTION 1137 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH LANGUAGE ARTS
FUNCTION 1138 TOTAL
FUNCTION 1139 TOTAL
FUNCTION 1140 TOTAL
MTD Activity
YTD Activity
Working
Budget
% Realized
Last Year
This Month
Last Year
Account Type
Thru This Month
2,312,663.38
3,892,258.56
40,695,854.00
9.56
2,175,252.78
0.00
0.00
18,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
19,032.66
67,841.48
2,309,485.00
2.94
22,331.49
51,395.84
3,552,570.55
0.00
0.00
87,400.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
26,742.88
79,263.81
2,087,346.00
3.80
30,537.82
60,730.15
150.00
300.00
50,929.00
0.59
0.00
0.00
28,575.08
99,807.93
1,921,814.00
5.19
14,255.24
72,500.40
0.00
0.00
630.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12,508.20
17,089.88
1,010,549.00
1.69
13,336.52
19,267.47
9,238.49
13,053.44
2,275,596.00
0.57
12,417.91
13,701.13
0.00
0.00
2,559.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
235.00
235.00
8,258.00
2.85
477.70
477.70
0.00
0.00
382.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
26.50
26.50
2,676.00
0.99
496.53
496.53
0.00
0.00
2,952.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
541.61
541.61
3,518.00
15.40
1,773.03
1,773.03
JUNIOR HIGH MATH
0.00
0.00
3,946.00
0.00
856.50
856.50
JUNIOR HIGH NEWSPAPER/YEARBOOK
0.00
0.00
918.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
JUNIOR HIGH PHYSICAL EDUCATION
684.52
684.52
2,437.00
28.09
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 1141 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH SCIENCE
168.39
168.39
5,168.00
3.26
1,243.41
1,336.63
FUNCTION 1142 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH SOCIAL STUDIES
726.25
795.90
4,564.00
17.44
2,053.53
2,053.53
FUNCTION 1143 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH SPEECH/DRAMA
0.00
0.00
1,539.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 1144 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH VOCAL
484.86
484.86
2,165.00
22.40
76.00
76.00
FUNCTION 1145 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH ATHLETICS
FUNCTION 1150 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
FUNCTION 1151 TOTAL
FUNCTION 1152 TOTAL
FUNCTION 1154 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH ACADEMIC QUIZ
FUNCTION 1157 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH LANGUAGE ARTS
FUNCTION 1158 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH MATH
271.81
351.70
FUNCTION 1160 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH PHYSICAL EDUCATION
2,089.15
4,322.56
FUNCTION 1161 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH SCIENCE
8,584.28
11,622.24
FUNCTION 1162 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH SOCIAL STUDIES
1,115.29
FUNCTION 1163 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH FOREIGN LANGUAGE
241.40
FUNCTION 1164 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH MUSIC
FUNCTION 1165 TOTAL
0.00
0.00
9,690.00
0.00
-622.40
2,220.00
44,639.30
58,583.53
4,096,033.00
1.43
50,851.25
67,201.26
SENIOR HIGH ART
2,884.91
7,826.08
23,607.00
33.15
1,534.07
7,199.31
SENIOR HIGH BAND
2,742.33
8,807.47
26,391.00
33.37
4,268.99
4,268.99
0.00
0.00
885.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
452.23
452.23
12,090.00
3.74
27,034.71
30,932.81
6,040.00
5.82
938.48
1,615.34
10,555.00
40.95
0.00
1,912.70
29,852.00
38.93
1,888.73
12,299.45
6,076.34
28,437.00
21.37
2,309.12
15,277.05
296.40
4,164.00
7.12
932.31
3,619.01
1,304.70
1,821.70
12,852.00
14.17
752.90
2,052.90
SENIOR HIGH BUSINESS EDUCATION
0.00
0.00
5,820.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 1166 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH SPEECH & DEBATE
0.00
0.00
2,267.00
0.00
414.00
414.00
FUNCTION 1168 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH NEWSPAPER/YEARBOOK
1,050.20
1,050.20
6,715.00
15.64
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 1169 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH DRAMA
65.29
257.03
10,345.00
2.48
295.00
295.00
FUNCTION 1170 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH ATHLETICS
32,393.25
50,992.85
218,097.00
23.38
39,615.15
64,663.48
FUNCTION 1171 TOTAL
A+ SCHOOLS
0.00
0.00
40,877.00
0.00
3,922.68
3,922.68
FUNCTION 1173 TOTAL
ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION
22,178.66
22,440.31
406,749.00
5.52
22,395.81
22,544.47
FUNCTION 1191 TOTAL
SUMMER SCHOOL
158.79
162.85
201,035.00
0.08
FUNCTION 1200 TOTAL
Title VI Supplies
0.00
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 1211 TOTAL
GIFTED AND TALENTED
282.33
540.28
175,493.00
FUNCTION 1218 TOTAL
REGULAR ED HOMEBOUND
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 1221 TOTAL
MILD/ MOD MEN RET
19,111.09
28,778.07
421.71
32,555.03
15,476.10
15,476.10
0.31
134.00
134.00
12,925.00
0.00
618.75
618.75
4,000,193.00
0.72
31,011.36
40,008.20
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
Dated : 9/3/2014
2014-2015
Time : 11:44
Page 2
All Expenditure Accounts - Board Expense by Function-Aug 2014
MTD Activity
YTD Activity
Working
Budget
% Realized
Last Year
This Month
2,796.63
5,846.05
822,219.00
0.71
1,509.17
0.00
0.00
52,271.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15,819.04
18,727.49
1,129,868.00
1.66
15,387.39
17,705.08
649.32
649.32
8,225.00
7.89
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
15,086.00
0.00
146.52
-103.48
MEDICAID
12,973.09
17,401.88
72,922.00
23.86
14,283.82
16,680.45
VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS
15,352.45
28,823.47
1,098,309.00
2.62
20,051.96
29,130.61
FUNCTION 1301 TOTAL
VOCATIONAL AUTO BODY
148.05
148.05
13,985.00
1.06
47.96
47.96
FUNCTION 1302 TOTAL
VOCATIONAL AUTO MECHANICS
508.66
538.64
31,445.00
1.71
9,394.74
12,396.12
FUNCTION 1305 TOTAL
VOCATIONAL BUSINESS C
0.00
0.00
7,289.00
0.00
17,025.00
17,025.00
FUNCTION 1306 TOTAL
VOCATIONAL CARPENTRY
3,101.32
3,101.32
13,361.00
23.21
4,471.72
4,471.72
FUNCTION 1307 TOTAL
VOC BUSINESS BANKING
311.58
311.58
5,820.00
5.35
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 1308 TOTAL
VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS
0.00
0.00
13,081.00
0.00
3,517.67
3,517.67
FUNCTION 1309 TOTAL
VOCATIONAL MACHINE SHOP
279.26
279.26
26,638.00
1.05
820.67
820.67
FUNCTION 1311 TOTAL
VO AG L-A1
442.27
442.27
16,844.00
2.63
3,625.67
3,706.67
FUNCTION 1313 TOTAL
VOCATIONAL AG D-A2
900.06
900.06
14,821.00
6.07
409.32
409.32
FUNCTION 1314 TOTAL
VOCATIONAL COMPUTER REP MAINT
0.00
0.00
20,955.00
0.00
428.38
428.38
FUNCTION 1316 TOTAL
VOCATIONAL WELDING
175.15
175.15
42,067.00
0.42
3,999.11
3,999.11
FUNCTION 1317 TOTAL
AG & SMALL BUS. DEV. GRANT
0.00
0.00
4,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 1318 TOTAL
NEW FARMER PROGRAM
0.00
0.00
78,650.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 1319 TOTAL
LTCC PROJECT LEAD THE WAY
399.60
3,399.60
56,685.00
6.00
3,538.54
3,538.54
FUNCTION 1321 TOTAL
VOCATIONAL LPN PROGRAM
2,348.18
2,348.18
16,350.00
14.36
19,381.22
38,307.10
FUNCTION 1333 TOTAL
FACS
2,615.40
2,615.40
4,500.00
58.12
35.00
35.00
FUNCTION 1361 TOTAL
VOCATIONAL PERKINS
7,633.94
9,051.98
107,235.00
8.44
8,289.89
11,734.99
FUNCTION 1362 TOTAL
EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT
FUNCTION 1410 TOTAL
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
FUNCTION 1611 TOTAL
FUNCTION 1618 TOTAL
FUNCTION 1619 TOTAL
LTCC COMPUTER PROGRAMMING
FUNCTION 1631 TOTAL
Account Code
Account Description
FUNCTION 1251 TOTAL
TITLE I -Culturally Different
FUNCTION 1271 TOTAL
BILINGUAL
FUNCTION 1281 TOTAL
ECSE
FUNCTION 1282 TOTAL
EXTENDED SCHOOL YEAR
FUNCTION 1293 TOTAL
SWPBIS
FUNCTION 1297 TOTAL
FUNCTION 1300 TOTAL
Last Year
Account Type
Thru This Month
1,509.17
191.03
191.03
16,810.00
1.14
1,070.97
1,070.97
48,912.23
91,527.25
774,698.00
11.81
32,318.30
92,286.30
ADULT BASIC EDUCATION
0.00
0.00
0.00
2,179.29
2,179.29
POST SECONDARY PERKINS
0.00
0.00
4,250.00
0.00
1,250.00
1,250.00
3,858.37
3,858.37
4,000.00
96.46
0.00
0.00
ADULT COMMUNITY EDUCATION
40.00
40.00
33,530.00
0.12
175.24
175.24
FUNCTION 1662 TOTAL
ADULT DAYTIME TRADE
20.95
41.90
21,000.00
0.20
FUNCTION 1685 TOTAL
PRACTICAL NURSING PROGRAM
0.00
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 1910 TOTAL
TUITION OUT OF DISTRICT
FUNCTION 1930 TOTAL
SP ED TUITION SEVERELY HANDICAPPED
FUNCTION 2113 TOTAL
SCHOOL/HOME COORD
FUNCTION 2120 TOTAL
GUIDANCE SERVICES
FUNCTION 2121 TOTAL
K 12 GUIDANCE
FUNCTION 2123 TOTAL
KINDERGARTEN SCREENING
FUNCTION 2130 TOTAL
HEALTH SERVICES
FUNCTION 2210 TOTAL
RESOURCE TEACHERS
FUNCTION 2212 TOTAL
GOALS 2000
FUNCTION 2213 TOTAL
TITLE II SUBS
FUNCTION 2214 TOTAL
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PDC
FUNCTION 2218 TOTAL
TITLE II EISENHOWER
FUNCTION 2219 TOTAL
FUNCTION 2220 TOTAL
FUNCTION 2222 TOTAL
SCHOOL LIBRARY SERVICES
569.25
1,466.32
0.00
25,270.00
74,950.00
287,000.00
284.10
305.05
12,782.00
18,473.00
0.00
29.55
26.11
25,738.15
51,240.00
3,913.13
3,951.18
67,363.95
70,025.38
18,151.44
0.00
0.00
0.00
63,657.01
67,221.56
853,431.00
7.88
5,060.75
5,060.75
35,139.00
14.40
0.00
0.00
0.00
550.00
0.00
206.03
206.03
27,350.97
28,478.89
321,446.00
8.86
28,965.85
29,733.35
7,787.24
15,290.42
167,215.00
9.14
5,059.60
6,559.60
0.00
0.00
13,265.00
0.00
985.58
985.58
5,841.12
6,352.12
15,000.00
42.35
3,105.77
3,105.77
8,737.35
9,634.11
145,399.00
6.63
4,400.83
7,864.18
23,085.01
23,085.01
22,100.00
104.46
23,635.23
25,635.23
CSPD
0.00
0.00
14,246.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
EDUCATIONAL MEDIA SVC
0.00
0.00
600.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10,323.72
18,792.66
515,267.00
3.65
11,774.35
26,551.11
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
Dated : 9/3/2014
2014-2015
Time : 11:44
Page 3
All Expenditure Accounts - Board Expense by Function-Aug 2014
Account Code
Account Description
FUNCTION 2227 TOTAL
TITLE II - D
FUNCTION 2300 TOTAL
Title I Program Admin-Non ARRA
FUNCTION 2310 TOTAL
BOARD OF EDUCATION SERVICES
FUNCTION 2320 TOTAL
MTD Activity
YTD Activity
Working
Budget
% Realized
Last Year
This Month
Last Year
Account Type
Thru This Month
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
-1,500.00
5,069.00
6,157.59
67,129.00
9.17
6,057.00
6,057.00
235.09
12,972.52
76,510.00
16.96
4,349.19
6,882.82
EXECUTIVE ADMINISTRATION
99,327.96
237,972.48
1,055,453.00
22.55
315,428.94
447,283.73
FUNCTION 2405 TOTAL
SP ED ADMINISTRATION
20,360.48
34,613.21
486,466.00
7.12
16,153.56
30,962.20
FUNCTION 2406 TOTAL
SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST
4,436.51
4,436.51
57,211.00
7.75
4,911.98
5,640.37
FUNCTION 2411 TOTAL
BUILDING LEVEL ADMINISTRATION
254,272.22
339,555.01
2,011,315.00
16.88
183,649.05
205,233.39
FUNCTION 2540 TOTAL
OPERATION OF PLANT
289,682.88
653,778.32
3,018,467.00
21.66
311,045.18
629,260.52
FUNCTION 2546 TOTAL
SECURITY SERVICES
20,487.04
23,241.95
73,000.00
31.84
141,748.07
150,371.19
FUNCTION 2552 TOTAL
DIST OPER TRANSPORTATION
175,603.49
233,607.78
2,602,692.00
8.98
205,843.14
319,066.52
FUNCTION 2554 TOTAL
K-12 SP ED TRANSPORTATION
3,324.30
3,324.30
86,804.00
3.83
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 2559 TOTAL
ECSE TRANSPORTATION
0.00
0.00
19,393.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 2560 TOTAL
FOOD SERVICES
150,027.30
163,959.39
1,967,811.00
8.33
131,716.02
141,490.39
FUNCTION 2574 TOTAL
PRINTING DUPLICATING SERVICES
-3,778.14
3,641.86
83,591.00
4.36
-8,405.16
-3,934.97
FUNCTION 2641 TOTAL
Human Resources-Staff Services
44.80
44.80
13,500.00
0.33
0.00
3,826.00
FUNCTION 2663 TOTAL
TECHNOLOGY COORDINATOR
178,351.28
356,782.21
818,053.00
43.61
145,472.18
327,770.32
FUNCTION 3511 TOTAL
PARENTS AS TEACHERS
3,401.26
3,571.81
144,644.00
2.47
2,172.60
2,598.04
FUNCTION 3512 TOTAL
EARLY CHILDHOOD INST.
922.64
922.64
247,853.00
0.37
514.24
1,095.99
FUNCTION 3912 TOTAL
PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT
0.00
0.00
8,300.00
0.00
342.75
342.75
FUNCTION 4000 TOTAL
FACILITIES
0.00
75.00
301,000.00
0.02
37,522.00
158,479.00
FUNCTION 4031 TOTAL
Function Description Not Found
476,437.57
729,813.21
0.00
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 4051 TOTAL
BLDG ACQ & CONSTRUCTION
50,280.51
109,773.98
0.00
21,111.52
42,611.52
FUNCTION 5110 TOTAL
BOND PRINCIPAL
FUNCTION 5130 TOTAL
LEASE PURCHASE PRINCIPAL
FUNCTION 5300 TOTAL
FUNCTION 5310 TOTAL
0.00
0.00
1,333,005.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
48,338.74
48,338.74
157,142.00
30.76
0.00
0.00
AGENT FEES
0.00
250.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
BOND AGENT FEES
0.00
0.00
5,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
Date
Lebanon R-3 School District
Cash Receipts- August 2014
Description
Amount
08/04/2014
08/04/2014
08/04/2014
08/05/2014
08/06/2014
08/06/2014
08/07/2014
08/07/2014
08/07/2014
08/07/2014
08/07/2014
08/07/2014
08/08/2014
08/08/2014
08/13/2014
08/13/2014
08/14/2014
08/14/2014
08/15/2014
08/15/2014
08/15/2014
08/15/2014
08/15/2014
08/15/2014
08/15/2014
08/18/2014
08/18/2014
08/18/2014
08/19/2014
08/19/2014
08/20/2014
08/20/2014
08/21/2014
08/21/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
DELINQUENT TAXES
DELINQUENT TAXES
DELINQUENT TAXES- DEBT
FOOD PROGRAM
HILLCREST PBS
HILLCREST OFFICE ACTIVITY
GASCONADE SCHOOL PAT SERVICES
LAF 3RD QUARTER CC GRANT
DANIELLE ROMAY CONTRACT PENALTY
LUTHY TEACHING SCHOLARSHIP
LACLEDE ELECTRIC PATRONAGE CHECK
LACLEDE ELECTRIC PATRONAGE CHECK
FOOD PROGRAM
MC FUNDRAISER
NON FOOD PROGRAM
FOOD PROGRAM
NON FOOD PROGRAM
FOOD PROGRAM
ESTHER PBS
HC FUNDRAISER
NON FOOD PROGRAM
FOOD PROGRAM
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY- BAD CHECK
MO EMPLOYERS PHONE SURVEY
ARVEST BANK- JACKET STRONG DONATION
NON FOOD PROGRAM
FOOD PROGRAM
DISABILITY DETERMINATIONNON FOOD PROGRAM
FOOD PROGRAM
NON- FOOD PROGRAM
FOOD PROGRAM
NON FOOD PROGRAM
FOOD PROGRAM
FOOD PROGRAM (PAY PAL)
FOOD PROGRAM
NON FOOD PROGRAM
HS BAND
HS HOSPITALITY COMMITTEE
HS AMERICAN HERITAGE
HS OFFICE ACTIVITY
HS PUBLICATIONS
HS STUCO
$33,251.86
$10,292.24
$7,442.09
$445.33
$360.00
$360.40
$2,278.88
$1,450.00
$750.00
$182.00
$63.85
$86.95
$2,454.75
$3,120.57
$671.10
$18,927.83
$946.60
$6,927.97
$318.00
$1,953.41
$866.30
$4,305.05
$50.00
$45.00
$1,000.00
$876.25
$4,803.10
$41.74
$845.85
$2,475.45
$923.80
$1,477.46
$1,055.83
$1,878.02
$6,499.62
$1,749.32
$870.70
$6,241.00
$407.49
$2,100.00
$9,216.58
$1,141.00
$875.86
1
Lebanon R-3 School District
Cash Receipts- August 2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/22/2014
08/25/2014
08/25/2014
08/26/2014
08/26/2014
08/26/2014
08/26/2014
08/26/2014
08/26/2014
08/26/2014
08/26/2014
08/26/2014
08/26/2014
08/26/2014
08/27/2014
08/27/2014
08/28/2014
08/28/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
DUAL ENROLLMENT- HS
HS JACKET STRONG
WILDERNESS ACTIVITY CLUB
PROP C
PROP C
BASIC FORMULA-STATE MONIES
BASIC FORMULA-STATE MONIES
TRANSPORTATION
BASIC FORMULA- CLASSROOM TRUST FUND
SCHOOL AGE COMMUNITY
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
PROSECUTING ATTORNEY
HEALTH INSURANCE TRANSFER
HEALTH INSURANCE TRANSFER
HEALTH INSURANCE TRANSFER
NON FOOD PROGRAM
FOOD PROGRAM
HILLCREST PBS
HS GENERAL ATHLETICS
HS CHEER ACTIVITY
HS FOOTBALL ACTIVITY
HS BASS FISHING CLUB
HS BASEBALL ACTIVITY
HS SOFTBALL ACTIVITY
HS CROSS COUNTRY
HS GIRL'S TENNIS
FOOD PROGRAM
NON FOOD PROGRAM
NON FOOD PROGRAM
FOOD PROGRAM
NON FOOD PROGRAM
FOOD PROGRAM
SURPLUS LAND
SURPLUS LAND INTEREST
FINE MONEY
FINE MONEY INTEREST
NON FOOD PROGRAM
FOOD PROGRAM
ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL OFFICE ACT
MAIN ACCOUNT INTEREST
EMPLOYEE BENEFIT ACCT INTEREST
DEBT SERVICE ACCT INTEREST
DONATED IMPROVEMENTS ACCT INTEREST
2
$150.00
$5,950.00
$249.00
$247,936.10
$76,742.12
$292,528.50
$877,585.50
$36,000.00
$115,206.00
$4,763.00
$58.00
$112.00
$20.00
$55,418.00
$29,269.50
$195,389.50
$959.70
$2,953.90
$2,060.00
$365.17
$46.60
$4,070.45
$160.00
$840.80
$673.00
$185.50
$559.50
$2,106.71
$937.05
$850.30
$1,259.46
$979.82
$1,172.91
$2,282.56
$67.55
$173,755.27
$12.07
$980.35
$1,307.43
$19.20
$5,579.64
$469.32
$1,290.60
$171.57
Lebanon R-3 School District
Cash Receipts- August 2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
08/29/2014
Grand Total
BOND CONSTRUCTION ACCT INTEREST
JH FACS
JH OFFICE
JH ART
JH TEACHER'S LOUNGE
JH VOCAL
JH P.E.
JH ATHLETIC PART FEES
3
$2,872.07
$555.00
$10.00
$985.00
$167.08
$835.00
$48.81
$2,880.00
$2,293,875.86
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
CHECK REGISTER-AUGUST 2014
332910
332911
332912
332913
332913
332914
332915
332916
332917
332918
332919
332920
332921
332922
332923
332924
332925
332926
332927
332928
332929
332930
332931
332932
332933
332938
332939
332940
332941
332942
332943
332944
332945
332946
332947
332948
332949
08/01/14
08/01/14
08/05/14
08/08/14
08/05/14
08/06/14
08/07/14
08/07/14
08/07/14
08/07/14
08/07/14
08/07/14
08/07/14
08/07/14
08/07/14
08/08/14
08/11/14
08/11/14
08/11/14
08/11/14
08/11/14
08/11/14
08/12/14
08/12/14
08/12/14
08/14/14
08/14/14
08/14/14
08/14/14
08/14/14
08/14/14
08/14/14
08/14/14
08/14/14
08/14/14
08/14/14
08/14/14
GRASE, INC
PURCHASE POWER
PETTY CASH ADMIN
332913 IS VOIDED
3M COGENT
SCHOOL OF PERFORMING ARTS
SOMMERER, BRIAN G
DIV OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY
LACLEDE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
LOWES- LAR ACCOUNT
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 332918
TRACTOR SUPPLY
VERIZON WIRELESS
ALBRIGHT, ROBERT W
MO DEPT OF HEALTH
3M COGENT
COOK, TERRY L
DURBIN, LEO
ELSEA, CHRISTINE E
SHIVERDECK, TIMOTHY A
WRIGHT, JASON L
SCOTT BACKOVICH COMMUNICATIONS
MERCY CLINIC SPRINGFIELD
MERCY SPECIALIZED BILLING SERV
PEARSON EDUCATION
CHRISTAL, REBECCA R
CITY OF LEBANON CU
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 332939
HOBBY LOBBY STORES INC
INDOFF INC
INSTRUCTIONAL COACHING GROUP
JIM CLARK
LEBANON SCHOLARSHIP FUND
MARDEL
PEREGOY, DANIEL E
SPEDTRACK
TAPSON, IAN
$2,178.50
$4,500.00
$916.00
$0.00
$48.80
$1,367.50
$425.60
$3,845.00
$531.43
$12,236.19
$0.00
$30.95
$840.71
$72.80
$10.00
$44.80
$5.00
$15.00
$221.75
$5.00
$15.00
$1,700.00
$99.45
$1,518.75
$14,666.11
$150.00
$24,575.57
$0.00
$547.46
$1,839.00
$550.00
$3,346.69
$3,170.00
$289.01
$1,224.00
$5,200.00
$1,257.66
1
ADMIN LEASE & PROP TAX
POSTAGE
FOOD SERVICE START UP MONEY-CAFETERIAS
HS DANCE TEAM WORKSHOP
UNEMPLOYMENT
DISTRICT SUPPLIES/ HS LIBRARY PROJECT
HS 1ST DAY OF SCHOOL SPEAKER
OT/PT THERAPY
MC MATH TEXTBOOKS
DISTRICT UTILITIES
LTCC RESTROOM PARTITIONS
HS MUSIC LAB/PUB LAB COUNTERS INSTALLED
FFA SCHOLARSHIPS
DRIVER'S ED COURSEWORK
SPEDTRACK ANNUAL FEE
DRIVER'S ED COURSEWORK
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
CHECK REGISTER-AUGUST 2014
332950
332951
332952
332953
332954
332955
332956
332957
332958
332959
332960
332961
332962
332963
332964
332965
332966
332967
332968
332969
332970
332971
332972
332973
332974
332975
332976
332977
332978
332979
332980
332981
332982
332983
332984
332985
332986
08/14/14
08/15/14
08/15/14
08/15/14
08/15/14
08/15/14
08/15/14
08/15/14
08/15/14
08/15/14
08/15/14
08/15/14
08/18/14
08/18/14
08/18/14
08/18/14
08/18/14
08/19/14
08/19/14
08/20/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
WIDHALM, DR. DUANE
ALLISON, BRITTNI
CHRISTIAN, WILL A
COPLING, TRENTON S
CROWELL, RONALD E
DECKER, BRIAN L
HOUGH, LESLEY M
LOWERY, MOLLY E
LYBARGER, TOBEN
MOORE, TERESA E
THORNHILL, ADAM
WADE, WILLIAM GARETT
MFA OIL
MFA OIL COMPANY
US BANK EQUIPMENT FINANCE
VISA
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 332965
BAILEYS TV INC
EMPLOYEE SCREENING SERV INC
BAILEYS TV INC
AFLAC
AMERICAN FIDELITY CO
AMERICAN FIDELITY CO
AMERITAS LIFE INSURANCE CO
CENTRAL BANK
INSURANCE
CINNCINATTI LIFE INSURANCE CO
CIRCUIT CLERK
CIRCUIT CLERK
COMMUNITY CARES
DELTA DENTAL
DELTA VISION
GREAT LIFE GOLF & FITNESS
LEBANON R3 SCHOOLS
LEBANON R-3
MERCY FITNESS CENTER
COVENTRY HEALTH CARE
OZARKS REGIONAL YMCA
$84.05
$894.88
$230.72
$414.40
$391.83
$125.44
$439.04
$230.72
$125.44
$333.15
$331.52
$259.84
$20,328.28
$190.18
$230.00
$8,886.78
$0.00
$15,793.33
$40.00
$2,280.00
$288.89
$4,325.06
$2,907.63
$18.44
$55,418.00
$127.48
$101.15
$301.41
$85.00
$5,080.49
$804.05
$426.19
$124.42
$10.00
$105.46
$10,145.60
$235.46
2
JUNE-JULY ATHLETIC MILEAGE
BUS FUEL
DIST TECH NETWORK TESTERS/ SUPPLIES
HS LIBRARY PROJECT
HS LIBRARY PROJECT
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
CHECK REGISTER-AUGUST 2014
332987
332988
332989
332990
332991
332992
332993
332994
332995
332996
332997
332998
332999
333000
333001
333002
333003
333006
333007
333008
333009
333010
333011
333012
333013
333014
333015
333016
333017
333018
333019
333020
333021
333022
333023
333024
333025
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/21/14
08/22/14
08/22/14
08/22/14
08/22/14
08/22/14
08/22/14
08/22/14
08/22/14
08/22/14
08/22/14
08/25/14
08/25/14
08/25/14
08/27/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
PEERS
PSRS
SUN LIFE FINANCIAL
TRANSAMERICA ASSURANCE CO
BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSTORE
CITY OF LEBANON CU
FIDELITY BROADCASTING INC
MCDHH
PITNEY BOWES INC
TRUE CONSTRUCTION, INC
US BANCORP GOV`T FINANCE, INC
CAMDENTON HIGH SCHOOL
MARSHFIELD HIGH SCHOOL
SCHOOL OF THE OSAGE
MSHSAA
COMMERCE BANK, N.A.
LACLEDE COUNTY HEALTH DEPT
TILLER, RICHARD
ACCURATE LABEL DESIGNS INC
ACT ASPIRE, LLC
ADMIRE, SANDRA M
ADVERTISING PREMIUM SALES INC
AGILE SPORTS TECHNOLOGIES
AHERA, LLC
AIREMASTER OF AM INC
AIRGAS MID AMERICA INC
ALICE TRAINING INSTITUTE, LLC
AMERICAN SOLUTIONS
ANDERSONS
ANDYS 417 RESTAURANT
ANIXTER, INC
APPLE COMPUTER INC
APPLEBY REAL ESTATE CO
ARBOR SCIENTIFIC
ARCH FORD EDUCATION
ASCA
ASCA
$30,443.38
$87,360.26
$1,133.60
$55.52
$838.96
$1,516.86
$44.95
$270.00
$638.16
$50,046.25
$63,495.75
$150.00
$130.00
$125.00
$6,417.84
$31,032.35
$144.00
$1,345.54
$108.95
$1,020.00
$9.58
$198.62
$1,599.00
$150.00
$362.22
$334.67
$495.00
$382.37
$1,327.56
$637.50
$12,794.25
$31,683.99
$6,000.00
$72.15
$74.58
$430.48
$99.00
3
DISTRICT UTILITIES
HS ATH RESTROOM PROJECT
SCHOOL BUSSES CONTRACT PMT
HS ACTIVITIES REG/ INSURANCE FEE
3 BUS LEASES
ENERGY SPEC CONF FLIGHT/HOTEL/ EXPENSES
SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT
FOOTBALL VIDEO EDITING TOOLS
ELEMENTARY SUPPLIES MC/HC
HS LIBRARY/DIST TECHNOLOGY SUPPLIES
HS/DIST IMACS
ALT SCHOOL LEASE
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
CHECK REGISTER-AUGUST 2014
333026
333027
333028
333029
333030
333031
333032
333033
333034
333035
333036
333037
333038
333038
333039
333040
333041
333042
333043
333044
333045
333046
333047
333048
333049
333050
333051
333052
333053
333054
333055
333056
333057
333058
333059
333060
333061
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/29/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
ASCD
ASPEN CHEMICAL & SUPPLY
ASSATOSH VAIDYA
NEGATIVE CHECK. CHECK WAS VOIDED.
ATLAS SECURITY SERVICE INC
B & H PHOTO & VIDEO
BAILEYS TV INC
BARKER, ROBERT N
BENNETT SPRINGS LODGE RESTAURANT
BENTELE, DIANA L
BERRY ENTERPRISES
BLICK ART
BOLIVAR R1 SCHOOLS
333038 IS VOIDED
BOWMAN, ERIN
BRAIN POP LLC
BRIAN TATE COMPOSITIONS
BRINKLEY, MICHELLE
BROYLES, INC.-SPRINGFIELD
BSN SPORTS, INC
BUEHLER, KAY M
BURNELL, SHARON
BURRIS, PATRICIA M
C & C FARM & HOME
CALLOWAY HOUSE INC
CALTON, GAIL L
CAMPBELL, BRYAN W
CAPITOL PLAZA HOTEL
CARE SALES & SERVICE
CARGILL KITCHEN SOLUTIONS, INC
CARROT TOP INDUSTRIES INC
CDW GOVERNMENT INC
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333056
CENERGISTIC, INC.
CENTRAL STATES BUS SALES INC
CENTURYLINK PHONE SERVICE
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333060
$79.00
$1,629.00
$99.60
$0.00
$2,367.12
$357.27
$214.76
$78.96
$158.54
$189.28
$1,200.00
$287.24
$150.00
$0.00
$788.88
$1,345.00
$400.00
$117.52
$1,178.90
$20,011.30
$22.96
$11.00
$23.97
$128.86
$68.93
$80.88
$123.65
$647.35
$16,545.18
$631.80
$352.05
$12,717.16
$0.00
$6,300.00
$3,605.20
$3,949.86
$0.00
4
FOOD SERVICE SUPPLIES
DISTRICT SECURITY
HS FLAG POLE INSTALLATION
HC 12 MONTHS SUBSCRIPTION
BUS PARTS
FOOTBALL/ SOCCER JERSEYS/ FOLDING CHAIRS
MAPLECREST HOOD
DISTRICT TECH SUPPLIES/ CHROME BOOKS
MONTHLY FEE
BUS PARTS
DISTRICT PHONE SERVICE
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
CHECK REGISTER-AUGUST 2014
333062
333063
333064
333065
333066
333067
333068
333069
333070
333071
333072
333073
333074
333075
333076
333077
333078
333079
333080
333081
333082
333083
333084
333085
333086
333087
333088
333089
333090
333091
333092
333093
333094
333095
333096
333097
333098
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
CHANNING L BETE CO INC
CHILDREN`S LITERATURE FESTIVAL
CHILDREN`S PLUS, INC.
CHRISTENSEN, DEANNE K
CIS DATA SERVICES LLC
CITY OF LEBANON
CLASSIC INDUSTRIES
SCHOOL SPECIALTY
CLEAN UNIFORM CO
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333070
CNA SURETY
COLLINS, AMANDA R
COLUMBIA BAND INSTRUMENT CO
COMMERCE BANK, N.A.
CONTINUUM RETAIL ENERGY SERVICES
COPY PRODUCTS INC
COUNTRY INN & SUITES
NEGATIVE CHECK. CHECK WAS VOIDED.
CROW PAINT & GLASS INC
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333080
CULLIGAN WATER
CUSTOM HOME ELEVATORS
DARNELL, LINDSAY J
DAVIS PUBLICATIONS INC
DAVIS, KEITH A
DAVIS, RICK
DELL MARKETING LP
DEMCO INC
DICKEY`S BARBECUE PIT
DIGITAL 2000, INC
DIGITAL SILVER
DOLLYWOOD FOUNDATION
JOHN DEERE FINANCIAL
EARTHGRAINS BAKING CO INC
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333095
EBSCO INFORMATION SERVICES
EL CHARRO
$74.80
$180.00
$990.35
$236.88
$392.00
$250.00
$118.00
$2,218.29
$761.81
$0.00
$125.00
$536.15
$1,850.00
$48,338.74
$1,009.50
$1,049.31
$393.76
$0.00
$1,896.67
$0.00
$194.30
$35.50
$2,663.46
$164.95
$230.27
$142.87
$56,267.18
$11.94
$43.55
$761.31
$1,577.75
$9.90
$245.87
$2,252.60
$0.00
$1,382.92
$77.47
5
ESTHER ART SUPPLIES/ELEM SUPPLIES
HS BAND REPAIRS
DIGITAL SCOREBOARD LEASE PMT
NATURAL GAS
DISTRICT COPY CHARGES
DISTRICT SUPPLIES
GIFTED CLASS CERTIFICATION FEES REIMB.
DIST TECH INTEL PROCESSORS
JH/MC T-SHIRTS
BREAD
LIBRARY BOOKS
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
CHECK REGISTER-AUGUST 2014
333099
333100
333101
333102
333103
333104
333105
333106
333107
333108
333109
333110
333111
333112
333113
333114
333115
333116
333117
333118
333119
333120
333121
333122
333123
333124
333125
333126
333127
333128
333129
333130
333131
333132
333133
333134
333135
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
ELSEVIER
EMO PLASTIC & CRAFTS
EMPLOYEE SCREENING SERV INC
ESC PRODUCTIONS
E-Z DISPOSAL INC
FALCON FLOOR COVERING
FARMERS PRODUCE EXCHANGE
FAST EDDIES MUFFLER & EXHAUST
FASTENAL
FEINER SUPPLY
FELLERS FIXTURES INC
FLINN SCIENTIFIC INC
FLOWER BASKET
FREESTYLE
GECKO MICROSOLUTIONS, INC
GOFORTH, JAMIE E
GORDON STOWE & ASSOCIATES INC
GREEN, STANLEY N
HADDOCK COMPUTERS
HANGSAFE HOOKS
HEARTSPRING
HELIAS CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL
HELTON, ALEAH
HENDERSON HEATING & COOLING
HEP SUPPLY CO INC
HILAND DAIRY CO
HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS
HORONZY, CATHY
HOUGH, LESLEY M
HOWARD, DAN
HOWE, SHALYN
HOWERTON, DENNIS
HTD BATTERY INC
HUDSON, REBECCA A
INDEPENDENCE 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
INMAN, THOMAS F
INTERSTATE BATTERY
$2,348.18
$17.50
$43.60
$764.56
$1,937.00
$159.00
$418.20
$12.00
$253.38
$158.90
$1,687.20
$4,761.81
$381.57
$174.99
$430.00
$138.97
$198.00
$169.12
$21,440.00
$799.80
$25,270.00
$150.00
$31.03
$7,580.00
$1,560.09
$16,407.63
$100.70
$150.00
$129.99
$90.00
$58.07
$102.50
$251.60
$198.80
$569.25
$422.01
$108.08
6
LTCC HEALTH CAREERS TEXTBOOKS
DISTRICT TRASH SERVICE
FOOD SERVICE SUPPLIES
HS SCIENCE SUPPLIES
HS LIBRARY ACTIVPANELS
RESIDENTIAL TUITION
HS LIBRARY YORK PKG/DIST REPAIRS
HS LIBRARY/DIST SUPPLIES
MILK ALL SCHOOLS
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
CHECK REGISTER-AUGUST 2014
333136
333137
333138
333139
333140
333141
333142
333143
333144
333145
333146
333147
333148
333149
333150
333151
333152
333153
333154
333155
333156
333157
333158
333159
333160
333161
333162
333163
333164
333165
333166
333167
333168
333169
333170
333171
333172
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
IPA EDUCATIONAL SUPPLY
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333136
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333136
J & K SOCCER
JACKSON, JEFFERY BRIAN
JACKSON-TOOMBS, JERA
JAYNES, RYAN
NEGATIVE CHECK. CHECK WAS VOIDED.
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333143
JIM CLARK
JMARK BUSINESS SOLUTIONS INC
NEGATIVE CHECK. CHECK WAS VOIDED.
JONES, TARA K
AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY
JTM PROVISIONS CO
JUNIOR LIBRARY GUILD
KELLE`
KELLEY, BRENDAN M
KENNEY-HALL CONSTRUCTION CO
KING, SUSAN M
KIWANIS CLUB OF LEBANON
KNAPP, TYLER
KOHL WHOLESALE
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333158
KRONOS INC
L & R SPECIALTIES
LACLEDE WINNELSON
LAKESHORE LEARNING MATERIALS
LAMONTAGNE, PAMELA
LEADING EDGE LAMINATING
LEBANON BOOKS
GREAT LIFE GOLF & FITNESS
LEBANON DAILY RECORD
LEBANON PHONE CENTER
LESSONPIX, INC
LIGHTSPEED TECHNOLOGIES INC
LINDSAY CHEVROLET INC
$2,838.29
$0.00
$0.00
$2,590.00
$129.36
$67.33
$40.38
$0.00
$0.00
$1,910.00
$13,691.84
$0.00
$26.88
$75.00
$304.00
$366.00
$876.82
$483.84
$20,220.00
$15.97
$194.00
$11.82
$96,286.14
$0.00
$261.00
$330.00
$100.41
$34.99
$16.86
$459.80
$283.29
$200.00
$442.40
$746.94
$36.00
$4,802.96
$85.00
7
ELEM SCHOOL SUPPLIES
HS SOCCER WARM-UPS (BOOSTER CLUB)
MC BOOKCASES/ CUBICLES
HS LIBRARY WIRELESS/UPGRADES
DIST SECURITY PROJECT FINAL PMT
FOOD
SPED REDCAT
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
CHECK REGISTER-AUGUST 2014
333173
333174
333175
333176
333177
333178
333179
333180
333181
333182
333183
333183
333184
333185
333186
333187
333188
333189
333190
333191
333192
333193
333194
333195
333196
333197
333198
333199
333200
333201
333202
333203
333204
333205
333206
333207
333208
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/29/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
LIPPY, III, BILL
LONG, G KENNETH
LOOKOUT BOOKS
LTCC PETTY CASH
MACGILL & CO
MAESP
MISSOURI ASSOC OF NURSING HOME ADM
MAPLECREST PETTY CASH
MARK STEELE COMMUNICATIONS
MAZZIOS CORPORATION
McGRAW-HILL GLOBAL EDUCATION
333183 IS VOIDED
MCGRAW-HILL SCHOOL EDUCATION
MDTA
MECKEM, KERI
MEEKS BUILDING CENTER
MERCY SPECIALIZED BILLING SERV
MICKES GOLDMAN O`TOOLE, LLC
MIDWEST SPORTS SUPPLY
NEGATIVE CHECK. CHECK WAS VOIDED.
MI-KEL INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY LLC
MILLER, JESSEN S
MILLSAP, TRACY
TEACHERGAMING LLC
MISSOURI EAGLE, LLC
MISSOURI READING INSTITUTE
MISSOURI TURF PAINT
MODERN CLEANERS
MONOPRICE
MOORE, SHEILA A
MORGAN MUSIC SERVICE INC
MORRIS, DEBORAH A
MORRIS, SAUNDRA J
MOVIE LICENSING USA
MRS CLARKS FOODS INC
MTC INC
MUDGE, LAURA
$257.00
$1,263.00
$213.57
$100.00
$1,455.05
$4,936.00
$40.00
$300.00
$2,512.85
$804.26
$5,028.57
$0.00
$2,385.95
$35.00
$17.68
$99.99
$618.75
$189.00
$968.15
$0.00
$183.70
$3.81
$131.02
$140.00
$60.00
$4,400.00
$149.98
$100.00
$564.70
$574.27
$122.00
$37.63
$135.00
$1,266.00
$69.25
$286.38
$235.00
8
CONTRACT LABOR- HS LIBRARY
DISTRICT NURSING SUPPLIES
MAESP/NAESP DUES
DISTRICT RADIOS
SPRING MAP/ LTCC STUDENT BOOKS
ESTHER READING SERIES
HS TENNIS BAGS
2014-15 PD ELA TEACHERS
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE LICENSE
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
CHECK REGISTER-AUGUST 2014
333209
333210
333211
333212
333213
333214
333215
333216
333217
333218
333219
333220
333221
333222
333223
333224
333225
333226
333227
333228
333229
333230
333231
333232
333233
333234
333235
333236
333237
333238
333239
333240
333241
333242
333243
333244
333245
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
NAPT
NASCO
NATIONAL FASTENER CORP
NETWATCH
NEW SYSTEM CARPET
NICHOLS, SHARI
NOBLE HUDSON AND SONS
ODYSSEY WARE INC
ON POINT DESIGN
OREILLY AUTOMOTIVE INC
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333218
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333218
ORIENTAL TRADING CO INC
OTT FOOD PRODUCT
OZARK DELIGHT LOLLIPOPS
OZARK THERAPY INSTITUTE
OZARKO TIRE CENTERS
OZARKS COCACOLA DR PEPPER
OZARKS FOOD EQUIPMENT
PAGE OFFICE SUPPLY
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333228
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333228
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333228
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333228
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333228
PAGE PRINTIING
PALMERTON & PARRISH, INC
PAR INC
PARTY STATION INFLATABLES
PARTY TOWN
PAYNE, CINDY L
PAYNE, ELANA
PEARSON EDUCATION
NCS PEARSON
PENCIL WHOLESALE COMPANY
J.W. PEPPER & SON, INC
PERENNIAL DESIGN CO
$38.00
$242.19
$592.83
$8,952.48
$3,516.10
$96.32
$217.60
$13,500.00
$1,912.50
$1,141.34
$0.00
$0.00
$255.97
$558.60
$192.00
$440.26
$20,537.47
$9.81
$2,352.82
$20,295.17
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$2,434.50
$3,325.00
$58.00
$1,100.00
$284.00
$77.96
$24.47
$7,932.76
$1,273.45
$562.85
$633.94
$47.20
9
SOFTWARE RENEWAL- DISTRICT TECH
BOSWELL BATHROOM CLEANER
ON-LINE RENEWAL
HS/BOSWELL SHIRTS
DISTRICT SUPPLIES
BUS TIRES
FOOD
DISTRICT SUPPLIES
PRE-TRIP BOOKS/BUSINESS CARDS/ DIST PRINTING
GEOTECHNICAL ENG. REPORT- MIDDLE SCHOOL PROJ
BOSWELL CARNIVAL INFLATABLES
LTCC MATH FOR THE TRADE BOOKS
TESTING MATERIALS
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
CHECK REGISTER-AUGUST 2014
333246
333247
333248
333249
333250
333251
333252
333253
333254
333255
333256
333257
333258
333259
333260
333261
333262
333263
333264
333265
333266
333267
333268
333269
333270
333271
333272
333273
333274
333275
333276
333277
333278
333279
333280
333281
333282
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
PERMA-BOUND INC
PERRY`S CABINET TOPS
PHILLIPS PINEWOOD MULCH INC
POOLE TECHNOLOGY GROUP
PRICECUTTER
PROCK, ELDON D
PUCKETT, JASON
PUT-IN-CUPS
QUALITY HEATING & AIR
RAPID SIGNS
REALLY GOOD STUFF INC
REDICK, JERRY
REED SPRINGS R IV SCHOOL DISTRICT
RESULTS ADVERTISING
RICHARDSON CARPET
RICOH USA, INC
RIDDELL ALL AMERICAN
RIDDLES, ERIC
RIGGS, JEANNETTE T
HM RECEIVABLES CO LLC
ROBERT S. SHOTTS, INC
ROBERTS, KRISTINA
RODDEN, ADAM L
ROWLETT, TWILA M
RUSHING, BRECK
SAFETY KLEEN CORP
SAM`S DIGITAL, LLC
SAPP DESIGN
WARD`S SCIENCE
SCHEUERMAN, SARAH
SCHILLERS IMAGING GROUP
SCHOLASTIC MAGAZINES
SCHOOL BUS SAFETY CO
SCHOOL DATEBOOKS, INC
SCHOOL MATE
SCHOOL OUTFITTERS
SCHOOL SPECIALTY
$5,476.64
$825.00
$1,677.50
$40.00
$330.53
$102.50
$150.00
$316.99
$1,365.00
$915.00
$139.88
$985.00
$75.00
$12,998.55
$10,983.41
$2,931.10
$3,166.89
$123.20
$122.33
$84.15
$3,960.00
$44.80
$202.46
$52.11
$310.92
$106.00
$154.00
$469,386.83
$362.84
$561.00
$3,760.00
$3,531.47
$140.00
$735.00
$1,120.00
$888.43
$1,506.20
10
DISTRICT LIBRARY SUPPLIES
PLAYGROUND WOOD FIBER
LTCC REPLACED COMPRESSOR
MC SIGNS/ BUZZ
JH SMARTBOARD INSTALLATION
HS STRONG SHIRTS/DIST SHIRTS/ATHLETICS
HS LIBRARY FLOORING/INSTALL
COPY MACHINE LEASE & COPIES
YOUTH FOOTBALL HELMETS
SURVEY LOT 1- MIDDLE SCHOOL PROJECT
MIDDLE SCHOOL/ ATH COMPLEX PROJECT
INSTALLED SMARTBOARDS- MC
DISTRICT STUDENT MAGAZINES
MC PLANNERS
ELEMENTARY SUPPLIES
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
CHECK REGISTER-AUGUST 2014
333283
333284
333285
333286
333287
333288
333289
333290
333291
333292
333293
333294
333295
333296
333297
333298
333299
333300
333301
333302
333303
333304
333305
333306
333307
333308
333309
333310
333311
333312
333313
333314
333315
333316
333317
333318
333319
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
SHINDIGZ
SIMPSON, CHARLES
TYLER TECHNOLOGIES INC
SKETCH FOR SCHOOLS
SMCAA
SMITH PAPER
SMITH, MICHAEL R
SNAP ON TOOLS
SOLARWINDS
SONIC RESTAURANT
SPOR, HEATHER
SPRINGFIELD GROCER CO INC
OZARK CONFERENCE
PARKVIEW HIGH SCHOOL BAND
STAMM, BRITTANY L
STARNES, MATTHEW S
STARR DISTRIBUTING
STILES ROOFING INC
STOELTING COMPANY
SUCCESS BY DESIGN INC
SUHR, MARY L
SULLENS, RODNEY D
SUTHERLANDS
T`S REDNECK STEAKHOUSE, INC
TALBOTT, RICHARD D
TEACHERS PAY TEACHERS
TH ROGERS LUMBER CO
THE CERAMIC SHOP
THOMPSON, MELANIE D
TIME
TOOMBS, RYAN
TRIUMPH ENGRAVING SHOPPE
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333314
TRUCK PARTS & SUPPLY CO INC
TRUSTY, HEATHER
TUCKER, JANI L
TWO GUYS MUSIC
$368.89
$285.92
$8,722.62
$335.25
$250.00
$2,390.23
$112.00
$54.51
$8,075.00
$225.00
$150.00
$831.92
$600.00
$250.00
$30.24
$680.40
$480.00
$84,862.00
$50.94
$1,385.28
$268.72
$447.50
$44.97
$222.89
$161.84
$22.75
$594.16
$176.18
$103.60
$111.50
$65.66
$3,007.00
$0.00
$6.06
$150.00
$19.60
$4,670.00
11
SIS SUPPORT/ STUDENT DATA
MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES
WEB HELP LICENSE DIST TECH
FINAL PMT BOSWELL GYM
MC STUDENT PLANNERS
DIST SIGNS/ DOOR PLATES
HS LIBRARY SPEAKER/CABLES/ INSTALL
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
CHECK REGISTER-AUGUST 2014
333320
333321
333322
333323
333324
333325
333326
333327
333327
333328
333329
333330
333331
333332
333333
333334
333335
333336
333337
333338
333339
333340
333341
333342
333343
333344
333345
333346
333347
333348
333349
333350
333351
333352
333353
333354
333355
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
U S TOY CO INC
ULINE
UNIV OF MO COLUMBIA
UNIV OF MO COLUMBIA- AR
US BANK EQUIPMENT FINANCE
USDA DONATED FOOD ACCOUNT
VERNIER
WALMART SUPERCENTER
333327 IS VOIDED
WALMART COMMUNITY
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CHECK 333328
WARDS NATURAL SCIENCE LLC
WATERS PIANO SERVICE
WEATHERCRAFT, INC 2014
WEAVER, JANELLE S
WEAVER, NATHAN L
WEBSTER, DEBORAH S
WEHNERS BAKERY
$210.42
$518.75
$42,854.68
$3,900.00
$4,341.00
$105.00
$1,974.31
$400.69
$0.00
$42,159.14
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$99.37
$95.00
$100,035.00
$173.60
$28.56
$94.30
$100.89
12
MORENET EQUIP MAINTENANCE
RPDC EVAL TRAINING SYSTEM
COPY MACHINE LEASE & COPIES
HS SCIENCE SUPPLIES
DISTRICT CLASSROOM SUPPLIES
CARR GYM PROGRESS BILLING #1
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
CHECK REGISTER-AUGUST 2014
333356
333357
333358
333359
333360
333361
333362
333363
333364
333365
333366
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/28/14
08/29/14
08/29/14
08/29/14
WHALEY FOODSERVICE REPAIRS INC
WORTHINGTON DIRECT INC
YOUNG SIGNS
WALMART COMMUNITY
MO SOUTHERN CROSS COUNTRY
NIXA JUNIOR HIGH
OZARK CONFERENCE
ST LOUIS UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL
MSU WOMEN`S GOLF RELAYS
STEWART GOLF COURSE
MCGRAW-HILL SCHOOL EDUCATION
$1,793.90 FOOD SERVICE SUPPLIES
$3,440.85 MC CLASSROOM FURNITURE
$650.00
$400.69
$250.00
$75.00
$60.00
$370.00
$40.00
$50.00
$5,028.57 SPRING MAP/ LTCC STUDENT BOOKS
$1,973,653.80
13
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
Version: Open
:
State of Missouri
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
School Finance Section
ANNUAL SECRETARY OF THE BOARD REPORT (ASBR)
Fiscal Year 2013-2014
SECTION 162.821, RSMo, requires that one copy be filed with ... the Department of
Elementary and Secondary Education on or before August 15, 2014.
SECTION 161.527, RSMo, concerning financially stressed school districts, requires that one
copy be filed with the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education by July 15, 2014,
to be eligible for the Proposition C rollback exemption.
Part I Summary
Total Assessed Valuation as of December 31, 2013 298,035,906
(Exclude Tax Increment Financing AV)
Basis of Accounting
CASH
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Special
Revenue
(Teachers) Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
2013-2014 Levy Unadjusted
2.1000
0.6500
0.4700
0.0000
3.2200
2013-2014 Levy Adjusted
2.1000
0.6500
0.4700
0.0000
3.2200
8,587,150.14
0.00
1,250,268.09
1,000,000.00
10,837,418.23
3111
Beginning Fund Balances
5899
Total Revenue (See Part II)
14,273,715.59
22,261,639.02
1,512,347.54
11,985,554.54
50,033,256.69
5999
Total Revenue And Balances
22,860,865.73
22,261,639.02
2,762,615.63
12,985,554.54
60,870,674.92
5510
Transfer To
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6710
Transfer From
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
9999
Expenditures (See Part III)
16,118,757.72
22,261,639.02
1,293,441.00
2,256,241.53
41,930,079.27
3112
Ending Fund Balances
6,742,108.01
0.00
1,469,174.63
10,729,313.01
18,940,595.65
3412
Restr Fund Balances
1,752,429.59
0.00
0.00
9,631,412.64
11,383,842.23
Unrestricted Ending Fund Balance (Incidental + Teachers Funds)
13.00%
Part I Restricted Balance
Restricted Balance Purpose
1001
Professional Development
1002
At Risk
1003
Student Scholarships
1004
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Special
Revenue
(Teachers) Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
28,517.86
0.00
0.00
0.00
28,517.86
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
904,780.73
0.00
0.00
0.00
904,780.73
Bond Proceeds
0.00
0.00
0.00
9,631,412.64
9,631,412.64
1005
Escrow Amt for Crossover Refunding of Bonded
Debt
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1006
Sinking Fund
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1009
Other
819,131.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
819,131.00
1099
Total
1,752,429.59
0.00
0.00
9,631,412.64
11,383,842.23
Page 1 of 15
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
:
Version: Open
Part I-A Transfer From and To Funds Detail
Transfer Type
Transfer From
Transfer To
Amount
002
Teachers Fund
General (Incidental) Fund
Special Revenue (Teachers) Fund
0.00
003
Debt Service Balance
Debt Service Fund
Capital Projects Fund
0.00
004
Transportation Calc Cost
General (Incidental) Fund
Capital Projects Fund
0.00
005
Area Career Center
General (Incidental) Fund
Capital Projects Fund
0.00
006
Grant Match
General (Incidental) Fund
Capital Projects Fund
0.00
007
DNR Energy Conservation Loans
General (Incidental) Fund
Capital Projects Fund
0.00
008
Food Services
General (Incidental) Fund
Capital Projects Fund
0.00
009
Student Activities
General (Incidental) Fund
Capital Projects Fund
0.00
010
$162,326 or 7%xSATxWADA
General (Incidental) Fund
Capital Projects Fund
0.00
011
Capital Projects Fund Interest
Capital Projects Fund
General (Incidental) Fund
0.00
012
Unspent Bond Proceeds
Capital Projects Fund
Debt Service Fund
0.00
014
Capital Projects Unrestricted Funds
Capital Projects Fund
General (Incidental) Fund
0.00
015
FY06 Designated Levy or 5%xSATxWADA
(Debt Service)
General (Incidental) Fund
Debt Service Fund
0.00
016
FY06 Designated Levy or 5%xSATxWADA
(Capital Projects)
General (Incidental) Fund
Capital Projects Fund
0.00
017
Lease Purchase prior to 01/01/97
General (Incidental) Fund
Capital Projects Fund
0.00
018
Guaranteed Energy Performance Savings
Contract
General (Incidental) Fund
Capital Projects Fund
0.00
019
Excess Incidental Fund Balance
General (Incidental) Fund
Special Revenue (Teachers) Fund
0.00
Totals
Transfer From
6710
Transfer To
5510
General (Incidental) Fund
0.00
0.00
Special Revenue (Teachers) Fund
0.00
0.00
Debt Service Fund
0.00
0.00
Capital Projects Fund
0.00
0.00
Total
0.00
0.00
Part II Revenue Summary
Local Revenue Detail
Revenue
Code Description
5111
Current Taxes
5112
Delinquent Taxes
5113
School District Trust Fund (Prop C)
5114
Financial Institution Tax
5115
5116
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Special
Revenue
(Teachers) Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
5,480,814.47
1,696,442.58
1,226,658.46
0.00
8,403,915.51
685,297.75
212,115.97
153,376.17
0.00
1,050,789.89
0.00
3,854,392.07
-
-
3,854,392.07
20,512.90
6,349.23
4,590.99
0.00
31,453.12
M&M Surtax
0.00
114,722.61
82,953.27
370,642.28
568,318.16
In Lieu of Tax
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
Page 2 of 15
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
:
Version: Open
Part II Revenue Summary
Local Revenue Detail
Revenue
Code Description
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Special
Revenue
(Teachers) Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
5117
City Sales Tax
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5121
Tuition From Individuals (K - 12)
0.00
10,178.87
-
-
10,178.87
5122
Summer School Tuition (K - 12)
0.00
0.00
-
-
0.00
5123
Tuition - Post Secondary
94,019.50
0.00
-
-
94,019.50
5131
Transportation Fees From Patrons
0.00
-
-
-
0.00
5140
Earnings on Investments
85,659.20
0.00
15,285.44
6,307.53
107,252.17
5150
Food Service Program
451,433.63
-
-
-
451,433.63
5165
Food Service Non-Program
177,249.10
-
-
-
177,249.10
5170
Student Activities
942,087.07
0.00
-
0.00
942,087.07
5180
Community Services
8,712.56
0.00
0.00
0.00
8,712.56
5190
Other - From Local Sources
57,530.26
0.00
0.00
215,470.73
273,000.99
5199
Local - Subtotal
8,003,316.44
5,894,201.33
1,482,864.33
592,420.54
15,972,802.64
County Revenue Detail
Revenue
Code Description
5211
Fines, Escheats, Etc.
5221
State Assessed Utilities
5222
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Special
Revenue
(Teachers) Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
-
304,368.30
-
-
304,368.30
396,972.34
0.00
29,483.21
0.00
426,455.55
County Stock Insurance Fund
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5231
Fed Prop (Include Fed Forest, Flood & Mineral)
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5232
Penalties, Concentrated Animal Feed Oper
-
0.00
-
-
0.00
5237
Other - County
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
5299
County - Subtotal
396,972.34
304,368.30
29,483.21
0.00
730,823.85
State Revenue Detail
Revenue
Code Description
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Special
Revenue
(Teachers) Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
5311
Basic Formula - State Monies
269,684.79
13,823,674.21
-
-
14,093,359.00
5312
Transportation
433,051.00
-
-
-
433,051.00
5314
Early Childhood Special Education
865,872.65
0.00
-
0.00
865,872.65
5317
Career Ladder
-
0.00
-
-
0.00
5319
Basic Formula - Classroom Trust Fund
218,000.00
0.00
0.00
1,471,626.00
1,689,626.00
5322
Career Education/At Risk
20,000.00
0.00
-
-
20,000.00
5324
Educational Screening Prog/PAT
56,843.79
0.00
-
-
56,843.79
Page 3 of 15
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
:
Version: Open
Part II Revenue Summary
State Revenue Detail
Revenue
Code Description
5325
Small Schools Grant
5332
Career Education
5333
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Special
Revenue
(Teachers) Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
0.00
0.00
-
-
0.00
1,276.00
300,428.00
-
0.00
301,704.00
Food Service - State
20,009.26
-
-
-
20,009.26
5337
Adult Education & Literacy (AEL)
65,429.04
0.00
-
0.00
65,429.04
5359
Career Education Enhancement Grant
0.00
0.00
-
71,508.00
71,508.00
5366
MO Dept of Nat Res (DNR) Energy Loan
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
5369
Residential Placement/Excess Cost
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
5371
Readers For The Blind
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
5372
State Emer Management Agency (SEMA)
Funds
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
5381
High Need Fund
554,070.11
0.00
-
0.00
554,070.11
5382
Missouri Preschool Project
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
5397
Other - State
4,635.00
0.00
-
0.00
4,635.00
5399
State - Subtotal
2,508,871.64
14,124,102.21
0.00
1,543,134.00
18,176,107.85
Federal Revenue Detail
Revenue
Code Description
5411
Impact Aid (P.L. 81-874)
5412
Medicaid
5418
Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC)
5421
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Special
Revenue
(Teachers) Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
91,201.82
0.00
-
0.00
91,201.82
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
Child Development Associate (CDA) Grant
16,336.00
0.00
-
0.00
16,336.00
5427
Perkins Basic Grant, Career Education
32,890.21
84,632.98
-
0.00
117,523.19
5436
Adult Education & Literacy (AEL)
703.10
0.00
-
0.00
703.10
5437
IDEA Grants
40,394.37
0.00
-
0.00
40,394.37
5438
Non-IDEA Special Education Grants
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
5441
IDEA Entitlement Funds, Part B IDEA
711,625.00
34,000.00
-
0.00
745,625.00
5442
Early Childhood Special Education - Federal
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
5445
School Lunch Program
1,187,437.86
-
-
-
1,187,437.86
5446
School Breakfast Program
364,126.37
-
-
-
364,126.37
5447
Special Milk Program
0.00
-
-
-
0.00
5448
After School Snack Program
0.00
-
-
-
0.00
5449
Fresh Fruits and Vegetable Program
0.00
-
-
-
0.00
5451
Title I - ESEA
439,490.49
823,651.00
-
0.00
1,263,141.49
Page 4 of 15
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
:
Version: Open
Part II Revenue Summary
Federal Revenue Detail
Revenue
Code Description
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Special
Revenue
(Teachers) Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
5452
Title I, Part C - Migrant Education
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
5459
21st Century Community Learning Centers
Grant
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
5462
Title III, ESEA - English Language Acquisition
18,309.30
0.00
-
0.00
18,309.30
5463
Educ For Homeless Children & Youth
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
5465
Title II, Part A, ESEA - Teacher & Principal Quali
204,466.62
0.00
-
0.00
204,466.62
5472
Childcare Development Fund Grant
34,468.00
0.00
-
0.00
34,468.00
5477
Federal Emergency Mgt Agency (FEMA) Funds
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
5478
Vocational Rehabilitation
0.00
0.00
-
-
0.00
5481
Dept of Health Food Service Program
38,721.81
0.00
-
0.00
38,721.81
5483
Headstart
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
5484
Pell Grants
0.00
-
-
-
0.00
5486
Impact Aid, Restricted Purpose
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
5492
Title VI, Part B Rural Education Initiative
94,438.72
0.00
0.00
0.00
94,438.72
5497
Other - Federal
11,408.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
11,408.00
5499
Federal - Subtotal
3,286,017.67
942,283.98
0.00
0.00
4,228,301.65
Page 5 of 15
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
:
Version: Open
Part II Revenue Summary
Other Revenue Detail
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Revenue
Code Description
Special
Revenue
(Teachers) Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
5611
Sale of Bonds
-
-
-
9,850,000.00
9,850,000.00
5613
Sales of Bonds - QZAB (ARRA)
-
-
-
0.00
0.00
5631
Net Insurance Recovery
0.00
-
-
0.00
0.00
5641
Sale of School Buses
-
-
-
0.00
0.00
5651
Sale of Other Property
375.00
-
-
0.00
375.00
5692
Refunding Bonds
-
-
0.00
-
0.00
5699
Other Revenue Subtotal
375.00
0.00
0.00
9,850,000.00
9,850,375.00
5810
Tuition From Other Districts
0.00
996,683.20
-
-
996,683.20
5820
Area Voc Fees From Other LEAs
78,162.50
0.00
-
-
78,162.50
5830
Contracted Educational Services
0.00
0.00
-
-
0.00
5841
Transportation From Other LEAs for NonDisabled Ro
0.00
-
-
-
0.00
5842
Trans. Amts. from other LEAs for K-12 Disabled
Stu
0.00
-
-
0.00
0.00
5843
Transportation from other LEAs for ECSE
0.00
-
-
-
0.00
5898
Receipts Other Districts - Subtotal
78,162.50
996,683.20
0.00
0.00
1,074,845.70
Revenue Grand Total
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Revenue
Code Description
5899
Total Revenues
Special
Revenue
(Teachers) Fund
14,273,715.59
22,261,639.02
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
1,512,347.54
Total
All
Funds
11,985,554.54
50,033,256.69
Part III-A Expenditures - Program/Fund
INSTRUCTION EXPENDITURES
Function
Code
Description
1110
Elementary
1130
Middle/Junior High
1150
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Special
Revenue
(Teachers)
Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
682,239.89
6,573,064.79
-
64,432.93
7,319,737.61
95,278.87
2,187,710.26
-
0.00
2,282,989.13
Senior High
660,778.38
4,321,410.61
-
18,052.25
5,000,241.24
1191
Summer School (Regular)
102,151.38
210,229.09
-
0.00
312,380.47
1192
Juvenile Program
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
1210
Gifted
24,442.25
119,765.88
-
0.00
144,208.13
1221
Special Education and Related Services
1,545,401.67
2,446,989.74
-
10,082.75
4,002,474.16
1223
Coordinated Early Intervening Services
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
1224
Proportionate Share Services
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
Page 6 of 15
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
:
Version: Open
Part III-A Expenditures - Program/Fund
1250
Supplemental Instruction
1271
Bilingual
1280
100,481.69
649,755.75
-
0.00
750,237.44
1,594.29
51,101.52
-
0.00
52,695.81
Early Childhood Special Education
450,597.78
548,549.15
-
0.00
999,146.93
1300
Career Education Programs
159,769.34
1,251,672.77
-
97,356.70
1,508,798.81
1400
Student Activities
859,932.60
0.00
-
0.00
859,932.60
1911
Tuition to Other Districts within the State
35,484.04
0.00
-
-
35,484.04
1912
Tuition to Districts Outside the State & Private S
0.00
0.00
-
-
0.00
1921
Area Career Center Fees
0.00
0.00
-
-
0.00
1931
Tuition, Special Ed Program within the State
279,366.65
0.00
-
-
279,366.65
1932
Tuition, Spec Ed Prog Outside the State & Private
0.00
0.00
-
-
0.00
1941
Contracted Education Services
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
1942
Supplemental Education Services
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
1999
Total Instruction (K-12 only)
4,997,518.83
18,360,249.56
-
189,924.63
23,547,693.02
SUPPORT SERVICES
Function
Code
Description
2110
Attendance
2120
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Special
Revenue
(Teachers)
Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
22,743.21
0.00
-
0.00
22,743.21
Guidance
125,408.91
737,459.38
-
0.00
862,868.29
2130 - 2190
Health, Psych, Speech and Audio
378,968.89
4,067.98
-
0.00
383,036.87
2210
Improvement of Instruction
83,406.45
144,855.81
-
0.00
228,262.26
2214
Professional Development
60,101.05
51,540.64
-
-
111,641.69
2220 - 2290
Media Services (Library)
141,771.60
376,833.65
-
0.00
518,605.25
2310
Board of Education Services
104,207.69
41,354.47
-
0.00
145,562.16
2320 - 2330
Executive Administration
856,807.49
481,245.72
0.00
15,254.52
1,353,307.73
2400
Building Level Administration
674,639.03
1,763,596.70
-
45,075.00
2,483,310.73
2510
Business, Fiscal, Internal Service (2510,20,70,90)
37,294.96
0.00
-
0.00
37,294.96
2540
Operation of Plant
3,258,731.44
0.00
-
77,001.00
3,335,732.44
2546
Security Services
87,821.89
613.66
-
244,700.10
333,135.65
2551
Pupil Transportation, Contracted
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
2552
Pupil Transportation, District Owned
2,361,632.81
0.00
-
185,391.32
2,547,024.13
2553
Contracted K-12 Disabled Transportation Services
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
2554
District Operated K-12 Disabled Trans. Services
98,463.25
0.00
-
0.00
98,463.25
2555
Payment to Other Districts for Non-Disabled Trans.
0.00
-
-
-
0.00
2556
Payments to Other Dist. for K-12 Disabled Trans.
0.00
-
-
-
0.00
Page 7 of 15
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
:
Version: Open
Part III-A Expenditures - Program/Fund
2557
School Choice Transportation Costs
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
2558
Non-Allowable Transportation Expenditure
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
2559
Early Childhood Special Education Trans. Serv.
19,900.67
0.00
-
0.00
19,900.67
2561
Food Services
2,081,132.64
0.00
-
13,028.31
2,094,160.95
2569
Food Service - Title I
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
2600
Central Office Support Services
450,386.49
90,797.32
-
266,399.89
807,583.70
2900
Other Supporting Services
0.00
0.00
-
0.00
0.00
2998
Total Support Services
10,843,418.47
3,692,365.33
0.00
846,850.14
15,382,633.94
2999
Total Instruction & Support
15,840,937.30
22,052,614.89
0.00
1,036,774.77
38,930,326.96
NON-INSTRUCTION/SUPPORT SERVICES
Special
Revenue
(Teachers)
Fund
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Function
Code
Description
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
1610
Adult Basic Education
87,241.39
0.00
-
0.00
87,241.39
1620 - 1690
Adult Continuing Education
15,258.91
0.00
-
0.00
15,258.91
3000
Community Services
175,320.12
209,024.13
-
0.00
384,344.25
4000
Facilities Acquisition and Construction
-
-
-
954,060.91
954,060.91
5100
Principal
0.00
-
1,200,000.00
142,392.80
1,342,392.80
5200
Interest
0.00
0.00
92,805.00
24,263.05
117,068.05
5300
Other (Fin Fees, Etc)
0.00
0.00
636.00
98,750.00
99,386.00
9998
Total Non-Instruction/Support
277,820.42
209,024.13
1,293,441.00
1,219,466.76
2,999,752.31
Part III-A Expenditures Grand Total
Function
Code
Description
General
(Incidental)
Fund
9999
Grand Total
16,118,757.72
Special
Revenue
(Teachers)
Fund
22,261,639.02
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
2,256,241.53
41,930,079.27
Debt
ServiceFund
1,293,441.00
Part III-B Expenditures - Program/Object
INSTRUCTION EXPENDITURES
6150
6110
NonCertificated Certificated
Salaries
Salaries
6200
Employee
Benefits
6300
Purchased
Services
6400
6500
Capital
Outlay
Function
Code
Description
1110
Elementary
5,095,270.29
254,138.10
1,579,871.79
78,143.31
247,881.19
64,432.93
7,319,737.61
1130
Middle/Junior High
1,706,990.64
27,206.44
489,973.42
20,276.22
38,542.41
0.00
2,282,989.13
1150
Senior High
3,395,379.86
96,517.68
965,372.21
218,382.20
306,537.04
18,052.25
5,000,241.24
Supplies
Total
Page 8 of 15
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
:
Version: Open
Part III-B Expenditures - Program/Object
INSTRUCTION EXPENDITURES
Function
Code
Description
1191
Summer School (Regular)
1192
Juvenile Program
1210
Gifted
1221
Special Education and Related
Services
1223
6150
6110
NonCertificated Certificated
Salaries
Salaries
6200
Employee
Benefits
6300
Purchased
Services
6400
6500
Capital
Outlay
Supplies
Total
181,334.03
79,229.93
39,135.53
65.28
12,615.70
0.00
312,380.47
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
93,247.71
0.00
26,518.17
2,588.53
21,853.72
0.00
144,208.13
1,873,195.46
925,762.68
965,004.96
177,111.04
51,317.27
10,082.75
4,002,474.16
Coordinated Early Intervening
Services
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1224
Proportionate Share Services
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1250
Supplemental Instruction
504,932.26
64,739.29
170,304.21
0.00
10,261.68
0.00
750,237.44
1271
Bilingual
39,072.96
0.00
12,028.56
0.00
1,594.29
0.00
52,695.81
1280
Early Childhood Special Education
427,248.65
270,011.86
240,410.94
39,818.38
21,657.10
0.00
999,146.93
1300
Career Education Programs
984,737.17
12,489.25
269,026.21
72,304.52
72,884.96
97,356.70
1,508,798.81
1400
Student Activities
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
859,932.60
0.00
859,932.60
1911
Tuition to Other Districts within the
State
-
-
-
35,484.04
-
-
35,484.04
1912
Tuition to Districts Outside the
State & Private S
-
-
-
0.00
-
-
0.00
1921
Area Career Center Fees
-
-
-
0.00
-
-
0.00
1931
Tuition, Special Ed Program within
the State
-
-
-
279,366.65
-
-
279,366.65
1932
Tuition, Spec Ed Prog Outside the
State & Private
-
-
-
0.00
-
-
0.00
1941
Contracted Education Services
-
-
-
0.00
-
-
0.00
1942
Supplemental Education Services
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1999
Total Instruction (K-12 only)
14,301,409.03
1,730,095.23
4,757,646.00
923,540.17
1,645,077.96
189,924.63
23,547,693.02
SUPPORT SERVICES
Function
Code
Description
2110
Attendance
2120
Guidance
6150
6110
NonCertificated Certificated
Salaries
Salaries
6200
Employee
Benefits
6300
Purchased
Services
6400
Supplies
6500
Capital
Outlay
Total
0.00
17,950.50
4,754.66
0.00
38.05
0.00
22,743.21
580,125.44
62,413.44
176,588.79
4,008.99
39,731.63
0.00
862,868.29
Page 9 of 15
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
:
Version: Open
Part III-B Expenditures - Program/Object
SUPPORT SERVICES
Function
Code
Description
2130 - 2190
Health, Psych, Speech and Audio
2210
6150
6110
NonCertificated Certificated
Salaries
Salaries
6200
Employee
Benefits
6300
Purchased
Services
6400
6500
Capital
Outlay
Supplies
Total
3,678.54
241,434.96
74,264.29
2,958.65
60,700.43
0.00
383,036.87
Improvement of Instruction
121,640.24
11,562.37
26,947.82
62,586.23
5,525.60
0.00
228,262.26
2214
Professional Development
45,294.02
0.00
6,246.62
43,303.75
16,797.30
-
111,641.69
2220 - 2290
Media Services (Library)
296,082.11
39,097.92
97,524.58
3,741.95
82,158.69
0.00
518,605.25
2310
Board of Education Services
33,140.50
15,021.43
15,775.91
78,164.34
3,459.98
0.00
145,562.16
2320 - 2330
Executive Administration
403,609.76
256,111.01
184,908.15
222,702.97
270,721.32
15,254.52
1,353,307.73
2400
Building Level Administration
1,420,822.95
447,065.22
503,928.46
20,573.03
45,846.07
45,075.00
2,483,310.73
2510
Business, Fiscal, Internal Service
(2510,20,70,90)
0.00
19,510.34
6,701.59
11,083.03
0.00
0.00
37,294.96
2540
Operation of Plant
0.00
963,473.51
583,453.35
944,959.24
766,845.34
77,001.00
3,335,732.44
2546
Security Services
531.50
0.00
82.16
86,414.32
1,407.57
244,700.10
333,135.65
2551
Pupil Transportation, Contracted
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2552
Pupil Transportation, District
Owned
0.00
1,284,552.46
428,000.44
184,506.07
464,573.84
185,391.32
2,547,024.13
2553
Contracted K-12 Disabled
Transportation Services
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2554
District Operated K-12 Disabled
Trans. Services
0.00
67,307.36
30,403.81
0.00
752.08
0.00
98,463.25
2555
Payment to Other Districts for NonDisabled Trans.
-
-
-
0.00
-
-
0.00
2556
Payments to Other Dist. for K-12
Disabled Trans.
-
-
-
0.00
-
-
0.00
2557
School Choice Transportation
Costs
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2558
Non-Allowable Transportation
Expenditure
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2559
Early Childhood Special Education
Trans. Serv.
0.00
12,644.74
7,255.93
0.00
0.00
0.00
19,900.67
2561
Food Services
0.00
563,262.23
228,385.28
39,532.09
1,249,953.04
13,028.31
2,094,160.95
2569
Food Service - Title I
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2600
Central Office Support Services
74,187.96
190,160.28
65,672.19
178,078.40
33,084.98
266,399.89
807,583.70
2900
Other Supporting Services
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2998
Total Support Services
2,979,113.02
4,191,567.77
2,440,894.03
1,882,613.06
3,041,595.92
846,850.14
15,382,633.94
Page 10 of 15
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
:
Version: Open
Part III-B Expenditures - Program/Object
SUPPORT SERVICES
6150
6110
NonCertificated Certificated
Salaries
Salaries
Function
Code
Description
2999
Total Instruction & Support
17,280,522.05
6200
Employee
Benefits
5,921,663.00
6300
Purchased
Services
7,198,540.03
6400
6500
Capital
Outlay
Supplies
2,806,153.23
4,686,673.88
Total
1,036,774.77
38,930,326.96
NON-INSTRUCTION/SUPPORT SERVICES
6150
6110
NonCertificated Certificated
Salaries
Salaries
6200
Employee
Benefits
6300
Purchased
Services
6400
6500
Capital
Outlay
6600
Other
Objects
Function
Code
Description
1610
Adult Basic Education
-
65,462.60
10,613.51
10,011.71
1,153.57
-
-
87,241.39
1620 - 1690
Adult Continuing
Education
-
-
-
8,323.00
6,935.91
-
-
15,258.91
3000
Community Services
169,653.83
115,046.73
77,851.16
9,671.58
12,120.95
-
-
384,344.25
4000
Facilities Acquisition
and Construction
-
-
-
-
-
954,060.91
-
954,060.91
5100
Principal
-
-
-
-
-
-
1,342,392.80
1,342,392.80
5200
Interest
-
-
-
-
-
-
117,068.05
117,068.05
5300
Other (Fin Fees, Etc)
-
-
-
-
-
-
99,386.00
99,386.00
9998
Total NonInstruction/Support
169,653.83
180,509.33
88,464.67
28,006.29
20,210.43
954,060.91
1,558,846.85
2,999,752.31
Supplies
Total
Part III-B Expenditures Grand Total
Function
Code
Description
9999
Grand Total
6150
6110
NonCertificated Certificated
Salaries
Salaries
17,450,175.88
6,102,172.33
6200
Employee
Benefits
7,287,004.70
6300
Purchased
Services
2,834,159.52
6400
6500
Capital
Outlay
Supplies
4,706,884.31
1,990,835.68
6600
Other
Objects
Total
1,558,846.85
41,930,079.27
Part III-C Expenditures - Object/Fund
SALARY & EMPLOYEE BENEFITS
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Special
Revenue
(Teachers)
Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
Object
Code
Description
6100
Salaries
6,102,172.33
17,450,175.88
-
-
23,552,348.21
6199
Salaries - Subtotal
6,102,172.33
17,450,175.88
-
-
23,552,348.21
6211
Teacher Retirement
8,951.93
2,675,645.34
-
-
2,684,597.27
6221
Non-Teacher Retirement
441,588.10
1,844.20
-
-
443,432.30
6231
Old Age Survivor and Disability (OASDI)
359,982.44
50,301.79
-
-
410,284.23
Page 11 of 15
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
:
Version: Open
Part III-C Expenditures - Object/Fund
SALARY & EMPLOYEE BENEFITS
Object
Code
Description
6232
Medicare
6240 - 6270
Employee Insurance
6290
Other Benefits
6299
Employee Benefits - Subtotal
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Special
Revenue
(Teachers)
Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
84,596.29
238,658.45
-
-
323,254.74
1,578,770.29
1,845,013.36
-
-
3,423,783.65
1,652.51
0.00
-
-
1,652.51
2,475,541.56
4,811,463.14
-
0.00
7,287,004.70
PURCHASED SERVICES & SUPPLIES
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Special
Revenue
(Teachers)
Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
Object
Code
Description
6311
Tuition
314,850.69
0.00
-
-
314,850.69
6312 - 6314
Professional Services
262,834.54
0.00
-
-
262,834.54
6315
Audit Services
17,454.76
-
-
-
17,454.76
6316 & 6318 6319
Technical Services
101,075.80
-
-
-
101,075.80
6317
Legal Services
43,169.28
-
-
-
43,169.28
6330 - 6339
Property Services
477,523.16
-
-
-
477,523.16
6341
Contracted Transportation To and From School
0.00
-
-
-
0.00
6342
Other Contracted Pupil Transportation (Non-Route)
0.00
-
-
-
0.00
6343 - 6349
Travel
147,017.16
-
-
-
147,017.16
6351
Property Insurance
765,532.00
-
-
-
765,532.00
6352
Liability Insurance
0.00
-
-
-
0.00
6353
Fidelity Premium
0.00
-
-
-
0.00
6359
Judgments Against LEA
0.00
0.00
-
-
0.00
6360 - 6390
Other Purchased Services & Prior Year Adj
704,702.13
0.00
0.00
0.00
704,702.13
6399
Purchased Services - Subtotal
2,834,159.52
0.00
0.00
0.00
2,834,159.52
6410
General Supplies
2,555,227.82
-
-
-
2,555,227.82
6430
Regular Textbook
440.00
-
-
-
440.00
6440
Library Books
32,130.80
-
-
-
32,130.80
6450
Periodicals
9,287.25
-
-
-
9,287.25
6460
Warehouse Adjustments
0.00
-
-
-
0.00
6471
Food Service - Food Only
1,181,187.07
-
-
-
1,181,187.07
6480
Energy Supplies/Service
924,031.33
-
-
-
924,031.33
6490
Other Supplies
4,580.04
-
-
-
4,580.04
Page 12 of 15
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
:
Version: Open
Part III-C Expenditures - Object/Fund
PURCHASED SERVICES & SUPPLIES
Object
Code
Description
6499
Supplies - Subtotal
Special
Revenue
(Teachers)
Fund
General
(Incidental)
Fund
4,706,884.31
Debt
Service
Fund
-
Capital
Projects
Fund
-
Total
All
Funds
-
4,706,884.31
CAPITAL OUTLAY & OTHER OBJECTS
Special
Revenue
(Teachers)
Fund
General
(Incidental)
Fund
Debt
Service
Fund
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
Object
Code
Description
6510
Land
-
-
-
358,645.00
358,645.00
6520
Buildings
-
-
-
123,368.42
123,368.42
6530
Improvement To Sites
-
-
-
440,106.49
440,106.49
6541
Equipment - General
-
-
-
763,667.30
763,667.30
6542
Equipment - Instructional Apparatus
-
-
-
87,716.15
87,716.15
6551
Vehicles (Except School Buses)
-
-
-
0.00
0.00
6552
School Buses
-
-
-
185,391.32
185,391.32
6553
School Buses - Purchased with Specific Funds
-
-
-
0.00
0.00
6590
Other Capital Outlay
-
-
-
31,941.00
31,941.00
6599
Capital Outlay - Subtotal
0.00
-
-
1,990,835.68
1,990,835.68
6610
Principal
0.00
-
1,200,000.00
142,392.80
1,342,392.80
6620
Interest
0.00
0.00
92,805.00
24,263.05
117,068.05
6630
Other (Fin. Fees, Etc.)
0.00
0.00
636.00
98,750.00
99,386.00
6699
Other Objects - Subtotal
0.00
0.00
1,293,441.00
265,405.85
1,558,846.85
Part III-C Expenditures - Grand Total
Object
Code
Description
General
(Incidental)
Fund
9999
Grand Total
16,118,757.72
Special
Revenue
(Teachers)
Fund
22,261,639.02
Debt
Service
Fund
1,293,441.00
Capital
Projects
Fund
Total
All
Funds
2,256,241.53
41,930,079.27
Part III-C Expenditures - Individual Expenditure Amounts
Line #
Description
Amount
8010
Expenditures for Building Project(s) (Funded by Bond Issue Proceeds)
0.00
8011
Expenditures for Building Project(s) (Funded by Impact Aid Proceeds)
0.00
8015
Total Expenditures Free & Reduced Lunch/At Risk
0.00
Page 13 of 15
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
:
Version: Open
Part IV Long and Short Term Debt
8001
Balance
Beginning of
Year
General Obligations Bonds
8002
Amount
Borrowed
During Year
8003
Amount Repaid
During Year
8004
Balance End of
Year
8005
Interest Paid
During Year
5,856,623.20
9,850,000.00
1,200,000.00
14,506,623.20
92,805.00
Lease Purchase
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
DNR Energy Loan
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
Guaranteed Energy Cost Savings Contract
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
872,981.30
314,190.00
327,784.12
859,387.18
24,263.05
6,729,604.50
10,164,190.00
1,527,784.12
15,366,010.38
117,068.05
Tax Anticipation Note (TAN)
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
Advance Funding
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
Revenue Bonds
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
6,729,604.50
10,164,190.00
1,527,784.12
15,366,010.38
117,068.05
Other Debt
SubTotal
Total All Debt
General Obligation Bonds (Bonded Indebtedness)
Section 164.121
Type of
Bond Issue
Series
Length
Term
New Issue
2014
10
8001
Balance
Beginning of
Year
Total General Obligation Bonds (Bonded
Indebtedness)
8002
Amount
Borrowed
During Year
8003
Amount Repaid
During Year
8004
Balance End of
Year
8005
Interest Paid
During Year
5,856,623.20
9,850,000.00
1,200,000.00
14,506,623.20
92,805.00
5,856,623.20
9,850,000.00
1,200,000.00
14,506,623.20
92,805.00
Portion of 8002 ''Amount Borrowed During Year'' Refunding Bonds
Lease Purchase
Section 177.088
Type of
Lease
Purchase
Length
Term
Begin
Date
Refinance
Date
Original
Principal
8001
Balance
Beginning of
Year
8002
Amount
Borrowed
During Year
8003
Amount
Repaid
During Year
8004
Balance End
of
Year
8005
Interest Paid
During Year
8002
Amount
Borrowed
During Year
8003
Amount
Repaid
During Year
8004
Balance End
of
Year
8005
Interest Paid
During Year
8003
Amount
Repaid
During Year
8004
Balance
End of
Year
8005
Interest Paid
During Year
There is no Lease Purchase debt.
DNR Energy Loan
Section 640.653
Type of
Project
Length
Term
Begin
Date
Original
Principal
8001
Balance
Beginning of
Year
There is no DNR Energy Loan debt.
Guaranteed Energy Cost Savings Contract
Section 8.231
Vendor
Name
Method
of
Financing
Length
Term
Begin
Date
Original
Principal
8001
Balance
Beginning of
Year
8002
Amount
Borrowed
During Year
There is no Guaranteed Energy Cost Savings Contract debt.
Page 14 of 15
Year: 2013-2014
District 053-113 LEBANON R-III
:
Other Debt
Section 177.082, etc.
Original
Principal
8001
Balance
Beginning of
Year
8002
Amount
Borrowed
During Year
8003
8004
Amount
Balance End
Repaid
of
During Year
Year
8005
Interest Paid
During Year
Length
Term
Begin
Date
BUS - BLUE
BIRD COMPANY
5
07/21/2009
77,490.00
16,161.26
0.00
16,161.26
0.00
724.02
BUS COMMERCE
BANK
4
07/01/2011
117,500.00
70,462.13
0.00
46,304.80
24,157.33
3,401.30
IMPROVEMENT
S - COMMERCE
BANK
5
06/01/2012
500,000.00
405,596.51
0.00
97,122.31
308,474.20
11,681.18
EQUIPMENT COMMERCE
BANK
3
09/26/2012
138,835.00
138,835.00
0.00
45,270.49
93,564.51
3,068.25
BUS - US BANK
4
08/08/2012
304,925.00
241,926.40
0.00
58,719.79
183,206.61
4,768.30
BUSES COMMERCE
BANK
5
07/11/2013
314,190.00
0.00
314,190.00
64,205.47
249,984.53
620.00
872,981.30
314,190.00
327,784.12
859,387.18
24,263.05
Debt
Refinance
Date
Version: Open
Total Other Debt
Tax Anticipation Note (TAN)
Section 165.131
Fund
Borrowed
For
Date
Paid
Off
Begin
Date
Original
Principal
8001
Balance
Beginning of
Year
8002
Amount
Borrowed
During Year
8003
8004
Amount
Balance End
Repaid
of
During Year
Year
8005
Interest Paid
During Year
8002
Amount
Borrowed
During Year
8003
8004
Amount
Balance End
Repaid
of
During Year
Year
8005
Interest Paid
During Year
8003
Amount
Repaid
During Year
8005
Interest Paid
During Year
There is no Tax Anticipation Note (TAN) debt.
Advance Funding
Section 360.106/165.131
Begin
Date
Refinance
Date
Original
Principal
8001
Balance
Beginning of
Year
There is no Advance Funding debt.
Revenue Bonds (Bonded Indebtedness)
Section 164.231
Type of
Revenue
Generating
Facility
Type of
Issue
Series
Length
Term
Refinance
Date
8001
Balance
Beginning of
Year
8002
Amount
Borrowed
During Year
8004
Balance End
of
Year
There is no Revenue Bond debt.
Page 15 of 15
Library/Media Services (6.8)
2014
Evaluation Criteria
6.8.1
1. The library media specialist(s) are a part of the literacy program within the
school and/or district in the following ways:
The mission of the library media center program is to enable students to be effective
users of information by providing materials and services to meet individual needs. The
goals include:
1. To support, enhance, and enrich the curriculum.
2. To provide materials and services that will contribute to the students’ individual
growth and development.
3. To provide leadership in the use of information and instructional technologies.
4. To plan cooperatively with educators in the design of learning strategies.
Library media specialists assist the literacy program by providing a variety of materials
that cover a wide range of reading levels for both academic and recreational reading.
The library media specialists are an integral part in the implementation of the district’s
Missouri Reading Initiative Program and the building reading programs.
The library media specialists promote information literacy in the development of research
skills.
2. The library media center and the library media specialist(s) are included in the
district’s plan to improve student achievement in the following ways:
Strategy 1.2.1 of CSIP goal one states “Curriculum will be maintained and implemented
in a manner that best supports student achievement.” Action step 6 states that the LMC’s
will be used to support curricular objectives.
Strategy 1.2.4 of CSIP goal one states “Building budgets and other revenue sources will
be used that best support student achievement.” Action step 3 states that LMC materials
will be purchased to support instructional curriculum.
1
3. Students are taught information literacy skills by:
_X_ teachers independently
_X_ library media specialists independently
_X_ teachers and library media specialists collaboratively (team planning and team
teaching)
_X_ other:
Library aides trained by library media specialists (includes student workers as well as
paid staff)
do/do not collaborate on the planning
4. Teachers and library media specialists
and delivery of instruction. Explain.
Library media specialists attend departmental/grade level PLCs to participate in
curriculum development and to provide opportunity for input in the selection of library
media materials. Library media specialists collaborate with individual teachers on the
planning and delivery of specific topics, units, projects, and/or assignments. Library
media specialists keep teachers informed of materials available for use with specific
topics, units, projects, and/or assignments.
5. What extra library programming is undertaken by certificated staff?
E
JH
HS
LMC PROGRAMMING
X
X
X
-community programs
X
-summer library programs
X
X
X
-collaboration with the public library
X
-after school programming
-Saturday hours
-evening hours
6. Each LMC resources
are/are not easily available to students and staff.
LMC resources are easily available to students and staff. Each LMC is open and staffed
throughout the school day and before and after school hours.
2
7a. The most recent District Census of Technology indicates the following
instructional technology is present in the LMC.
Satellite or cable reception
Computers
Internet/MOREnet connection
Local computer networks
Projection equipment (including whiteboards, video projectors, scan/converters, large
screen TVs, Smartboards, document cameras, etc.)
LMCs also have TVs, VCRs, DVD players and recorders, digital cameras, video
cameras, radios, cassette players and recorders, Nooks, and Ipads.
7b. How do library media specialists and teachers use technology in the LMC to
support instruction? Explain.
The catalog for each library’s collection is accessed through computers in the library as
well as computers throughout the building. Destiny, the web-based operating system for
all Lebanon R-3 libraries, allows all students, staff, and community members to access
each building’s catalog through the internet.
The Accelerated Reader program is still accessed through computers in the library as well
as computers throughout the building. The AR test program (STAR) is online.
Computers in the LMCs are used to aide in the selection of material, in developing library
skills, in research, and in preparing reports. TVs, VCRs, DVD players, video cameras,
digital cameras, cassette players, Nooks, and Ipads are available for teachers to use in
their classrooms to enhance instruction.
Library Media Specialists administer Scantron tests and End of Course exams in support
of district performance goals.
The recent upgrade to Destiny allows for library resources to be used on mobile devices.
District library media specialists are increasing the number of ebooks and audiobooks
available for students and teachers to download and use on their own devices.
3
6.8.2
1. Are the LMC goals and measurable objectives aligned with the district’s CSIP?
The LMC goals and objectives support, enhance, and enrich curricular objectives. (CSIP
Goal 1)
The LMC provides materials to promote
- literacy and the enjoyment of reading (CSIP Goal 1)
- character education (CSIP Goal 1)
- personal career goals (CSIP Goal. 1)
- technology literacy (CSIP Goal 3)
- health and wellness, including substance abuse and violence (CSIP Goal 1)
The LMCs provide opportunities for parents and patrons to be involved. (CSIP Goal. 4)
The LMC’s are active participants in the interview process for new building staff.
(CSIP Goal. 2)
2. How are the LMC goals and measurable objectives evaluated?
Each library media specialist conducts an annual self evaluation to determine if LMC
goals and objectives are being met. Other tools that are used to evaluate goals and
objectives include The Standards for Missouri School Library Media Centers (developed
by DESE), building needs assessment surveys, library advisory committees, and informal
communication with faculty, administrators, and students.
3. The following board policies were/were not reviewed within the last five
years.
Last Adopted
Board Policy
2004
Confidentiality of Library Records
2004
Copyright
2004
Selection and reconsideration
2004
Acceptance use policy for accessing the Internet
2004
Intellectual access for all LMC resources
These policies were last adopted in 2004. We don’t know when they were last reviewed.
4
6.8.3
What criteria does the Lebanon School District use to evaluate the quality of its
LMC resource collection and its adequacy to meet the needs of its students and
teachers?
The strength of a library media center is partially determined by the availability of
resources in all formats. The Standards for Missouri School Library Media Centers,
developed by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, provides
the guidelines designed to identify characteristics of resource collections.
The district library media specialists as a group form a district-wide PLC. The library
PLC is examining the Common Core State Standards and Common Core Curriculum
Maps to evaluate the adequacy of the collection to meet the needs of the students and
teachers of each building.
5
2014 School Annual Performance Report (APR) - Final
School Summary Report
MSIP 5
JOE D. ESTHER ELEM. PK-01 (4020)
LEBANON R-III (053113)
Back to MSIP 5
To Supporting Data
MSIP 5 Standards
Points Possible
Points Earned
4. Attendance
10.0
7.5
Percent Earned
75.0%
Total
10.0
7.5
75.0%
Total Points Earned: Total points earned is a calculation of status and progress or status and growth, and not to exceed the total status points possible.
Academic Achievement: Displays the percent proficient or advanced and the MAP Performance Index (MPI) for all MAP assessments by subject area. The MPI is used to calculate status
and progress measures.
Subgroup Achievement: Displays the percent proficient or advanced and the MAP Performance Index (MPI) by subject area for students who are included in the super subgroup (Hispanic,
Black, FRL, IEP, ELL). The MPI is used to calculate the status and progress measures.
CCR 1-3: The percent of graduates scoring at or above the state standard the ACT®, SAT®, COMPASS® or the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).
CCR 4: The percent of graduates who earned a qualifying score on the AP, IB or Technical Skills Attainment (TSA) assessments or a qualifying grade in AP, IB, early college, dual enrollment,
or approved dual credit courses.
CCR 5-6: The percent of graduates who attend post-secondary education or training, are in the military, or who complete a Department-approved Career Education program and are placed in
an occupation directly related to their training by the number of graduates.
HSR: The percent of advancing Grade 8 students who earned a qualifying score on MAP end-of-course assessments.
~ - Less than three years of data.
# - Current year participation rate issue.
### - Prior year participation rate issue resulting in less than three years of data being available.
# @@ - Prior year participation rate issue and a cell size of 30 reportable students was not met after adding all three years of data. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
# @ - Prior year participation rate issue and a cell size of 30 reportable students was not met in a given year. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
@ - A cell size of 30 reportable students was not met after adding all three years of data. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
@@ - A cell size of 30 reportable students was not met in a given year. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
## - Participation rate issue in a prior year.
Accreditation classification recommendations will be made on APR status and APR status trends over multiple years and may include other factors as appropriate, e.g. CSIP goals, previous
Department MSIP findings, financial status and/or leadership stability.
Data as of:8/15/2014
Report as of: 8/26/2014
1
2014 School Annual Performance Report (APR) - Final
School Summary Report
MSIP 5
MAPLECREST ELEM. 02-03 (4060)
LEBANON R-III (053113)
Back to MSIP 5
To Supporting Data
MSIP 5 Standards
Points Possible
Points Earned
Percent Earned
English Language Arts
16.0
9.0
56.3%
Mathematics
16.0
9.0
56.3%
32.0
18.0
56.3%
English Language Arts
4.0
2.0
50.0%
Mathematics
4.0
3.0
75.0%
8.0
5.0
62.5%
4. Attendance
10.0
10.0
100.0%
Total
50.0
33.0
66.0%
1. Academic Achievement
Total Points Earned
2. Subgroup Achievement
Total Points Earned
Data as of:8/15/2014
Report as of: 8/26/2014
1
2014 School Annual Performance Report (APR) - Final
School Summary Report
MSIP 5
MAPLECREST ELEM. 02-03 (4060)
LEBANON R-III (053113)
Back to MSIP 5
To Supporting Data
Total Points Earned: Total points earned is a calculation of status and progress or status and growth, and not to exceed the total status points possible.
Academic Achievement: Displays the percent proficient or advanced and the MAP Performance Index (MPI) for all MAP assessments by subject area. The MPI is used to calculate status
and progress measures.
Subgroup Achievement: Displays the percent proficient or advanced and the MAP Performance Index (MPI) by subject area for students who are included in the super subgroup (Hispanic,
Black, FRL, IEP, ELL). The MPI is used to calculate the status and progress measures.
CCR 1-3: The percent of graduates scoring at or above the state standard the ACT®, SAT®, COMPASS® or the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).
CCR 4: The percent of graduates who earned a qualifying score on the AP, IB or Technical Skills Attainment (TSA) assessments or a qualifying grade in AP, IB, early college, dual enrollment,
or approved dual credit courses.
CCR 5-6: The percent of graduates who attend post-secondary education or training, are in the military, or who complete a Department-approved Career Education program and are placed in
an occupation directly related to their training by the number of graduates.
HSR: The percent of advancing Grade 8 students who earned a qualifying score on MAP end-of-course assessments.
~ - Less than three years of data.
# - Current year participation rate issue.
### - Prior year participation rate issue resulting in less than three years of data being available.
# @@ - Prior year participation rate issue and a cell size of 30 reportable students was not met after adding all three years of data. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
# @ - Prior year participation rate issue and a cell size of 30 reportable students was not met in a given year. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
@ - A cell size of 30 reportable students was not met after adding all three years of data. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
@@ - A cell size of 30 reportable students was not met in a given year. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
## - Participation rate issue in a prior year.
Accreditation classification recommendations will be made on APR status and APR status trends over multiple years and may include other factors as appropriate, e.g. CSIP goals, previous
Department MSIP findings, financial status and/or leadership stability.
Data as of:8/15/2014
Report as of: 8/26/2014
2
2014 School Annual Performance Report (APR) - Final
School Summary Report
MSIP 5
BOSWELL ELEM. 04-05 (4080)
LEBANON R-III (053113)
Back to MSIP 5
To Supporting Data
MSIP 5 Standards
Points Possible
Points Earned
Percent Earned
1. Academic Achievement
English Language Arts
16.0
9.0
56.3%
Mathematics
16.0
16.0
100.0%
Science
16.0
16.0
100.0%
48.0
41.0
85.4%
English Language Arts
4.0
2.0
50.0%
Mathematics
4.0
4.0
100.0%
Total Points Earned
2. Subgroup Achievement
Science
4.0
3.0
75.0%
12.0
9.0
75.0%
4. Attendance
10.0
10.0
100.0%
Total
70.0
60.0
85.7%
Total Points Earned
Data as of:8/15/2014
Report as of: 8/26/2014
1
2014 School Annual Performance Report (APR) - Final
School Summary Report
MSIP 5
BOSWELL ELEM. 04-05 (4080)
LEBANON R-III (053113)
Back to MSIP 5
To Supporting Data
Total Points Earned: Total points earned is a calculation of status and progress or status and growth, and not to exceed the total status points possible.
Academic Achievement: Displays the percent proficient or advanced and the MAP Performance Index (MPI) for all MAP assessments by subject area. The MPI is used to calculate status
and progress measures.
Subgroup Achievement: Displays the percent proficient or advanced and the MAP Performance Index (MPI) by subject area for students who are included in the super subgroup (Hispanic,
Black, FRL, IEP, ELL). The MPI is used to calculate the status and progress measures.
CCR 1-3: The percent of graduates scoring at or above the state standard the ACT®, SAT®, COMPASS® or the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).
CCR 4: The percent of graduates who earned a qualifying score on the AP, IB or Technical Skills Attainment (TSA) assessments or a qualifying grade in AP, IB, early college, dual enrollment,
or approved dual credit courses.
CCR 5-6: The percent of graduates who attend post-secondary education or training, are in the military, or who complete a Department-approved Career Education program and are placed in
an occupation directly related to their training by the number of graduates.
HSR: The percent of advancing Grade 8 students who earned a qualifying score on MAP end-of-course assessments.
~ - Less than three years of data.
# - Current year participation rate issue.
### - Prior year participation rate issue resulting in less than three years of data being available.
# @@ - Prior year participation rate issue and a cell size of 30 reportable students was not met after adding all three years of data. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
# @ - Prior year participation rate issue and a cell size of 30 reportable students was not met in a given year. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
@ - A cell size of 30 reportable students was not met after adding all three years of data. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
@@ - A cell size of 30 reportable students was not met in a given year. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
## - Participation rate issue in a prior year.
Accreditation classification recommendations will be made on APR status and APR status trends over multiple years and may include other factors as appropriate, e.g. CSIP goals, previous
Department MSIP findings, financial status and/or leadership stability.
Data as of:8/15/2014
Report as of: 8/26/2014
2
2014 School Annual Performance Report (APR) - Final
School Summary Report
MSIP 5
HILLCREST SCHOOL 06-06 (4040)
LEBANON R-III (053113)
Back to MSIP 5
To Supporting Data
MSIP 5 Standards
Points Possible
Points Earned
Percent Earned
English Language Arts
16.0
15.0
93.8%
Mathematics
16.0
12.0
75.0%
32.0
27.0
84.4%
English Language Arts
4.0
2.0
50.0%
Mathematics
4.0
3.0
75.0%
8.0
5.0
62.5%
4. Attendance
10.0
10.0
100.0%
Total
50.0
42.0
84.0%
1. Academic Achievement
Total Points Earned
2. Subgroup Achievement
Total Points Earned
Data as of:8/15/2014
Report as of: 8/26/2014
1
2014 School Annual Performance Report (APR) - Final
School Summary Report
MSIP 5
HILLCREST SCHOOL 06-06 (4040)
LEBANON R-III (053113)
Back to MSIP 5
To Supporting Data
Total Points Earned: Total points earned is a calculation of status and progress or status and growth, and not to exceed the total status points possible.
Academic Achievement: Displays the percent proficient or advanced and the MAP Performance Index (MPI) for all MAP assessments by subject area. The MPI is used to calculate status
and progress measures.
Subgroup Achievement: Displays the percent proficient or advanced and the MAP Performance Index (MPI) by subject area for students who are included in the super subgroup (Hispanic,
Black, FRL, IEP, ELL). The MPI is used to calculate the status and progress measures.
CCR 1-3: The percent of graduates scoring at or above the state standard the ACT®, SAT®, COMPASS® or the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).
CCR 4: The percent of graduates who earned a qualifying score on the AP, IB or Technical Skills Attainment (TSA) assessments or a qualifying grade in AP, IB, early college, dual enrollment,
or approved dual credit courses.
CCR 5-6: The percent of graduates who attend post-secondary education or training, are in the military, or who complete a Department-approved Career Education program and are placed in
an occupation directly related to their training by the number of graduates.
HSR: The percent of advancing Grade 8 students who earned a qualifying score on MAP end-of-course assessments.
~ - Less than three years of data.
# - Current year participation rate issue.
### - Prior year participation rate issue resulting in less than three years of data being available.
# @@ - Prior year participation rate issue and a cell size of 30 reportable students was not met after adding all three years of data. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
# @ - Prior year participation rate issue and a cell size of 30 reportable students was not met in a given year. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
@ - A cell size of 30 reportable students was not met after adding all three years of data. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
@@ - A cell size of 30 reportable students was not met in a given year. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
## - Participation rate issue in a prior year.
Accreditation classification recommendations will be made on APR status and APR status trends over multiple years and may include other factors as appropriate, e.g. CSIP goals, previous
Department MSIP findings, financial status and/or leadership stability.
Data as of:8/15/2014
Report as of: 8/26/2014
2
2014 School Annual Performance Report (APR) - Final
School Summary Report
MSIP 5
LEBANON JR. HIGH 07-08 (2050)
LEBANON R-III (053113)
Back to MSIP 5
To Supporting Data
MSIP 5 Standards
Points Possible
Points Earned
Percent Earned
English Language Arts
16.0
16.0
100.0%
Mathematics
16.0
16.0
100.0%
Science
16.0
16.0
100.0%
48.0
48.0
100.0%
English Language Arts
4.0
4.0
100.0%
Mathematics
4.0
4.0
100.0%
1. Academic Achievement
Total Points Earned
2. Subgroup Achievement
Science
4.0
4.0
100.0%
12.0
12.0
100.0%
4. Attendance
10.0
10.0
100.0%
Total
70.0
70.0
100.0%
Total Points Earned
Data as of:8/15/2014
Report as of: 8/26/2014
1
2014 School Annual Performance Report (APR) - Final
School Summary Report
MSIP 5
LEBANON JR. HIGH 07-08 (2050)
LEBANON R-III (053113)
Back to MSIP 5
To Supporting Data
Total Points Earned: Total points earned is a calculation of status and progress or status and growth, and not to exceed the total status points possible.
Academic Achievement: Displays the percent proficient or advanced and the MAP Performance Index (MPI) for all MAP assessments by subject area. The MPI is used to calculate status
and progress measures.
Subgroup Achievement: Displays the percent proficient or advanced and the MAP Performance Index (MPI) by subject area for students who are included in the super subgroup (Hispanic,
Black, FRL, IEP, ELL). The MPI is used to calculate the status and progress measures.
CCR 1-3: The percent of graduates scoring at or above the state standard the ACT®, SAT®, COMPASS® or the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).
CCR 4: The percent of graduates who earned a qualifying score on the AP, IB or Technical Skills Attainment (TSA) assessments or a qualifying grade in AP, IB, early college, dual enrollment,
or approved dual credit courses.
CCR 5-6: The percent of graduates who attend post-secondary education or training, are in the military, or who complete a Department-approved Career Education program and are placed in
an occupation directly related to their training by the number of graduates.
HSR: The percent of advancing Grade 8 students who earned a qualifying score on MAP end-of-course assessments.
~ - Less than three years of data.
# - Current year participation rate issue.
### - Prior year participation rate issue resulting in less than three years of data being available.
# @@ - Prior year participation rate issue and a cell size of 30 reportable students was not met after adding all three years of data. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
# @ - Prior year participation rate issue and a cell size of 30 reportable students was not met in a given year. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
@ - A cell size of 30 reportable students was not met after adding all three years of data. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
@@ - A cell size of 30 reportable students was not met in a given year. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
## - Participation rate issue in a prior year.
Accreditation classification recommendations will be made on APR status and APR status trends over multiple years and may include other factors as appropriate, e.g. CSIP goals, previous
Department MSIP findings, financial status and/or leadership stability.
Data as of:8/15/2014
Report as of: 8/26/2014
2
2014 School Annual Performance Report (APR) - Final
School Summary Report
MSIP 5
LEBANON SR. HIGH 09-12 (1050)
LEBANON R-III (053113)
Back to MSIP 5
To Supporting Data
MSIP 5 Standards
Points Possible
Points Earned
Percent Earned
English Language Arts
16.0
16.0
100.0%
Mathematics
16.0
16.0
100.0%
Science
16.0
16.0
100.0%
Social Studies
8.0
8.0
100.0%
56.0
56.0
100.0%
English Language Arts
4.0
4.0
100.0%
Mathematics
4.0
4.0
100.0%
Science
4.0
4.0
100.0%
Social Studies
2.0
2.0
100.0%
14.0
14.0
100.0%
*1-3 CCR Assessments
10.0
10.0
100.0%
*4 Advanced Placement
10.0
9.5
95.0%
*5-6 Postsecondary Placement
10.0
7.5
75.0%
30.0
27.0
90.0%
10.0
10.0
100.0%
1. Academic Achievement
Total Points Earned
2. Subgroup Achievement
Total Points Earned
3. College and Career Ready (CCR)
Total Points Earned
4. Attendance
5. Graduation Rate
30.0
30.0
100.0%
Total
140.0
137.0
97.9%
Data as of:8/15/2014
Report as of: 8/26/2014
1
2014 School Annual Performance Report (APR) - Final
School Summary Report
MSIP 5
LEBANON SR. HIGH 09-12 (1050)
LEBANON R-III (053113)
Back to MSIP 5
To Supporting Data
Total Points Earned: Total points earned is a calculation of status and progress or status and growth, and not to exceed the total status points possible.
Academic Achievement: Displays the percent proficient or advanced and the MAP Performance Index (MPI) for all MAP assessments by subject area. The MPI is used to calculate status
and progress measures.
Subgroup Achievement: Displays the percent proficient or advanced and the MAP Performance Index (MPI) by subject area for students who are included in the super subgroup (Hispanic,
Black, FRL, IEP, ELL). The MPI is used to calculate the status and progress measures.
CCR 1-3: The percent of graduates scoring at or above the state standard the ACT®, SAT®, COMPASS® or the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).
CCR 4: The percent of graduates who earned a qualifying score on the AP, IB or Technical Skills Attainment (TSA) assessments or a qualifying grade in AP, IB, early college, dual enrollment,
or approved dual credit courses.
CCR 5-6: The percent of graduates who attend post-secondary education or training, are in the military, or who complete a Department-approved Career Education program and are placed in
an occupation directly related to their training by the number of graduates.
HSR: The percent of advancing Grade 8 students who earned a qualifying score on MAP end-of-course assessments.
~ - Less than three years of data.
# - Current year participation rate issue.
### - Prior year participation rate issue resulting in less than three years of data being available.
# @@ - Prior year participation rate issue and a cell size of 30 reportable students was not met after adding all three years of data. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
# @ - Prior year participation rate issue and a cell size of 30 reportable students was not met in a given year. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
@ - A cell size of 30 reportable students was not met after adding all three years of data. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
@@ - A cell size of 30 reportable students was not met in a given year. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
## - Participation rate issue in a prior year.
Accreditation classification recommendations will be made on APR status and APR status trends over multiple years and may include other factors as appropriate, e.g. CSIP goals, previous
Department MSIP findings, financial status and/or leadership stability.
Data as of:8/15/2014
Report as of: 8/26/2014
2
2014 LEA Annual Performance Report (APR) - Final
LEA Summary Report
MSIP 5
LEBANON R-III (053113)
Back to MSIP 5
To Supporting Data
APR Total Points
Percent of
Points
2013
2014
132.5/140
134.5/140
94.6%
96.1%
MSIP 5 Standards
2015
Points Possible Points Earned
Percent Earned
1. Academic Achievement
56.0
55.0
98.2%
2. Subgroup Achievement
14.0
13.0
92.9%
3. College and Career Ready (CCR)
30.0
27.0
90.0%
4. Attendance
10.0
9.5
95.0%
5. Graduation Rate
30.0
30.0
100.0%
Total
140.0
134.5
96.1%
Data as of:8/15/2014
Report as of: 8/26/2014
1
2014 LEA Annual Performance Report (APR) - Final
LEA Summary Report
MSIP 5
LEBANON R-III (053113)
Back to MSIP 5
To Supporting Data
MSIP 5 Standards
Points Possible
Points Earned
Percent Earned
English Language Arts
16.0
15.0
93.8%
Mathematics
16.0
16.0
100.0%
Science
16.0
16.0
100.0%
Social Studies
8.0
8.0
100.0%
56.0
55.0
98.2%
English Language Arts
4.0
3.0
75.0%
Mathematics
4.0
4.0
100.0%
Science
4.0
4.0
100.0%
1. Academic Achievement
Total Points Earned
2. Subgroup Achievement
Social Studies
2.0
2.0
100.0%
14.0
13.0
92.9%
*1-3 CCR Assessments
10.0
10.0
100.0%
*4 Advanced Placement
10.0
9.5
95.0%
*5-6 Postsecondary Placement
10.0
7.5
75.0%
30.0
27.0
90.0%
10.0
9.5
95.0%
Total Points Earned
3. College and Career Ready (CCR)
Total Points Earned
4. Attendance
5. Graduation Rate
30.0
30.0
100.0%
Total
140.0
134.5
96.1%
Data as of:8/15/2014
Report as of: 8/26/2014
2
2014 LEA Annual Performance Report (APR) - Final
LEA Summary Report
MSIP 5
LEBANON R-III (053113)
Back to MSIP 5
To Supporting Data
Total Points Earned: Total points earned is a calculation of status and progress or status and growth, and not to exceed the total status points possible.
Academic Achievement: Displays the percent proficient or advanced and the MAP Performance Index (MPI) for all MAP assessments by subject area. The MPI is used to calculate status
and progress measures.
Subgroup Achievement: Displays the percent proficient or advanced and the MAP Performance Index (MPI) by subject area for students who are included in the super subgroup (Hispanic,
Black, FRL, IEP, ELL). The MPI is used to calculate the status and progress measures.
CCR 1-3: The percent of graduates scoring at or above the state standard the ACT®, SAT®, COMPASS® or the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB).
CCR 4: The percent of graduates who earned a qualifying score on the AP, IB or Technical Skills Attainment (TSA) assessments or a qualifying grade in AP, IB, early college, dual enrollment,
or approved dual credit courses.
CCR 5-6: The percent of graduates who attend post-secondary education or training, are in the military, or who complete a Department-approved Career Education program and are placed in
an occupation directly related to their training by the number of graduates.
HSR: The percent of advancing Grade 8 students who earned a qualifying score on MAP end-of-course assessments.
~ - Less than three years of data.
# - Current year participation rate issue.
### - Prior year participation rate issue resulting in less than three years of data being available.
# @@ - Prior year participation rate issue and a cell size of 30 reportable students was not met after adding all three years of data. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
# @ - Prior year participation rate issue and a cell size of 30 reportable students was not met in a given year. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
@ - A cell size of 30 reportable students was not met after adding all three years of data. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
@@ - A cell size of 30 reportable students was not met in a given year. Refer to Achievement Level Report for supporting data.
## - Participation rate issue in a prior year.
Accreditation classification recommendations will be made on APR status and APR status trends over multiple years and may include other factors as appropriate, e.g. CSIP goals, previous
Department MSIP findings, financial status and/or leadership stability.
Data as of:8/15/2014
Report as of: 8/26/2014
3
Curriculum Overview
Grade: Kindergarten
Content: Mathematics
K-12 Practices / Dispositions
1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving
them.
2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3: Construct viable arguments and critique the
reasoning of others.
4: Model with mathematics.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
5: Use appropriate tools strategically.
6: Attend to precision.
7: Look for and make use of structure.
8: Look for and express regularity in
repeated reasoning.
KINDERGARTEN MATHEMATICS END-OF-YEAR OBJECTIVES
Know numbers and the counting sequence
Count to tell the number of objects
Compare numbers
Understand addition as “putting together” and “adding to” and understand
subtraction as “taking apart” and “taking from”
Work with numbers 11-19 to gain foundations for place value
Describe and compare measurable attributes
Classify objects and count the number of objects in each category
Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes,
cones, cylinders, and spheres)
Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes
Curriculum Overview
Grade: Kindergarten
Content: Mathematics
KINDERGARTEN MATHEMATICS SUPPORTING DOCUMENT
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
Know number names and the count sequence.
1. Count to 100 by ones and by tens.
2. Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence (instead of
having to begin at 1).
3. Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20
(with 0 representing a count of no objects).
Count to tell the number of objects.
4. Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to
cardinality.
a. When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each
object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and
only one object.
b. Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted.
The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in
which they were counted.
c. Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one
larger.
5. Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a
rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a
number from 1–20, count out that many objects.
Compare numbers.
6. Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to
the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting
strategies.(include groups with up to 10 objects)
7. Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.
Understand addition, and understand subtraction.
8. Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings1, sounds
acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.
9. Solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10, e.g., by
using objects or drawings to represent the problem.
10. Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using
objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation.
11. For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given
number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record the answer with a drawing or
equation.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: Kindergarten
Content: Mathematics
12. Fluently add and subtract within 5.
Work with numbers 11-19 to gain foundations for place value.
13. Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g.,
by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing
or equation (such as 18 = 10 + 8); understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones
and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
Describe and compare measurable attributes.
14. Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight. Describe several
measurable attributes of a single object.
15. Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object
has "more of"/"less of" the attribute, and describe the difference.
Classify objects and count the number of objects in each category.
16. Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and
sort the categories by count.
Identify and describe shapes.
17. Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative
positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind,
and next to.
18. Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.
19. Identify shapes as two-dimensional or three-dimensional.
Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes.
20. Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and
orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts and
other attributes.
21. Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls)
and drawing shapes.
22. Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: Kindergarten
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 1st Grade
Content: Mathematics
K-12 Practices / Dispositions
1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving
them.
2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3: Construct viable arguments and critique the
reasoning of others.
4: Model with mathematics.
5: Use appropriate tools strategically.
6: Attend to precision.
7: Look for and make use of structure.
8: Look for and express regularity in
repeated reasoning.
1st GRADE MATHEMATICS END-OF-YEAR OBJECTIVES
1. Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
2. Understand and apply properties of operations and the relationship between
addition and subtraction.
3. Add and subtract within 20.
4. Work with addition and subtraction equations.
5. Extend the counting sequence.
6. Understand place value.
7. Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.
8. Measure lengths indirectly and by iterating length units.
9. Tell and write time.
10. Represent and interpret data.
11. Reason with shapes and their attributes.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 1st Grade
Content: Mathematics
1st GRADE MATHEMATICS SUPPORTING DOCUMENT
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
1. Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding
to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions,
e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to
represent the problem.
2. Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or
equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown
number to represent the problem.
Understand and apply properties of operations and the relationship between addition and
subtraction.
3. Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract.
4. Understand subtraction as an unknown-addend problem. For example, subtract 10 - 8 by
finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8.
Add and subtract within 20.
5. Relate counting to addition and subtraction.
6. Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10.
Use strategies such as counting on; making ten; decomposing a number leading to a ten;
using the relationship between addition and subtraction; and creating equivalent but easier
or known sums.
7. Work with addition and subtraction equations.
8. Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and
subtraction are true or false.
9. Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation relating three
whole numbers.
Extend the counting sequence.
10. Count to 120, starting at any number less than 120. In this range, read and write numerals
and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.
Understand place value.
11. Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones.
Understand the following as special cases:
a. 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones — called a "ten."
b. The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six,
seven, eight, or nine ones.
c. The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six,
seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).
12. Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the
results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and <.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 1st Grade
Content: Mathematics
Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.
13. Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a
two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using concrete models or drawings and strategies
based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and
subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.
Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones; and
sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.
14. Given a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the number, without having
to count; explain the reasoning used.
15. Subtract multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 from multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (positive
or zero differences), using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value,
properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate
the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.
Measure lengths indirectly and by iterating length units.
16. Order three objects by length; compare the lengths of two objects indirectly by using a third
object.
17. Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of
a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an
object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps. Limit to
contexts where the object being measured is spanned by a whole number of length units with
no gaps or overlaps.
Tell and write time.
18. Tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks.
Represent and interpret data.
19. Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions
about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or
less are in one category than in another.
Reason with shapes and their attributes.
20. Distinguish between defining attributes versus non-defining attributes; build and draw shapes
to possess defining attributes.
21. Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and
quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular
cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes
from the composite shape.1
22. Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, describe the shares using the
words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of.
Describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that
decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 1st Grade
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 2nd Grade
Content: Mathematics
K-12 Practices / Dispositions
1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving
them.
2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3: Construct viable arguments and critique the
reasoning of others.
4: Model with mathematics.
5: Use appropriate tools strategically.
6: Attend to precision.
7: Look for and make use of structure.
8: Look for and express regularity in
repeated reasoning.
2nd GRADE MATHEMATICS END-OF-YEAR OBJECTIVES
1. Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
2. Add and subtract within 20.
3. Work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication.
4. Understand place value.
5. Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.
6. Measure and estimate lengths in standard units.
7. Relate addition and subtraction to length.
8. Work with time and money.
9. Represent and interpret data.
10. Reason with shapes and their attributes.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 2nd Grade
Content: Mathematics
2nd GRADE MATHEMATICS SUPPORTING DOCUMENT
End-of-year Objectives wth Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
1. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one- and two-step word problems involving
situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with
unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the
unknown number to represent the problem.
Add and subtract within 20.
2. Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies.2 By end of Grade 2, know from
memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.
Work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication.
3. Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members,
e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write an equation to express an even number
as a sum of two equal addends.
4. Use addition to find the total number of objects arranged in rectangular arrays with up to 5
rows and up to 5 columns; write an equation to express the total as a sum of equal addends.
Understand place value.
5. Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds,
tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand the following as
special cases:
a. 100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens — called a "hundred."
b. The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three,
four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0 tens and 0 ones).
6. Count within 1000; skip-count by 5s, 10s, and 100s.
7. Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded
form.
8. Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits,
using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.
Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.
9. Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of
operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
10. Add up to four two-digit numbers using strategies based on place value and properties of
operations.
11. Add and subtract within 1000, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on
place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and
subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method. Understand that in adding or subtracting
three-digit numbers, one adds or subtracts hundreds and hundreds, tens and tens, ones and
ones; and sometimes it is necessary to compose or decompose tens or hundreds.
12. Mentally add 10 or 100 to a given number 100-900, and mentally subtract 10 or 100 from a
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 2nd Grade
Content: Mathematics
given number 100-900.
13. Explain why addition and subtraction strategies work, using place value and the properties of
operations.
Measure and estimate lengths in standard units.
14. Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers,
yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes.
15. Measure the length of an object twice, using length units of different lengths for the two
measurements; describe how the two measurements relate to the size of the unit chosen.
16. Estimate lengths using units of inches, feet, centimeters, and meters.
17. Measure to determine how much longer one object is than another, expressing the length
difference in terms of a standard length unit.
Relate addition and subtraction to length.
18. Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve word problems involving lengths that are
given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as drawings of rulers) and equations
with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
19. Represent whole numbers as lengths from 0 on a number line diagram with equally spaced
points corresponding to the numbers 0, 1, 2, ..., and represent whole-number sums and
differences within 100 on a number line diagram.
Work with time and money.
20. Tell and write time from analog and digital clocks to the nearest five minutes, using a.m. and
p.m.
21. Solve word problems involving dollar bills, quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies, using $ and ¢
symbols appropriately.
Represent and interpret data.
22. Generate measurement data by measuring lengths of several objects to the nearest whole
unit, or by making repeated measurements of the same object. Show the measurements by
making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in whole-number units.
23. Draw a picture graph and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up
to four categories. Solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems using
information presented in a bar graph.
Reason with shapes and their attributes.
24. Recognize and draw shapes having specified attributes, such as a given number of
angles or a given number of equal faces. Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons,
hexagons, and cubes.
25. Partition a rectangle into rows and columns of same-size squares and count to find
the total number of them.
26. Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal shares, describe the
shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc., and describe the whole
as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. Recognize that equal shares of identical
wholes need not have the same shape.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 2nd Grade
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 3rd Grade
Content: Mathematics
K-12 Practices / Dispositions
1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving
them.
2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3: Construct viable arguments and critique the
reasoning of others.
4: Model with mathematics.
5: Use appropriate tools strategically.
6: Attend to precision.
7: Look for and make use of structure.
8: Look for and express regularity in
repeated reasoning.
3rd GRADE MATHEMATICS END-OF-YEAR OBJECTIVES
1. Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.
2. Understand properties of multiplication and the relationship between
multiplication and division.
3. Multiply and divide within 100.
4. Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in
arithmetic.
5. Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit
arithmetic.
6. Develop understanding of fractions as numbers.
7. Solve problems involving measurement and estimation of intervals of time, liquid
volumes, and masses of objects.
8. Represent and interpret data.
9. Geometric measurement: understand concepts of area and relate area to
multiplication and to addition.
10. Geometric measurement: recognize perimeter as an attribute of plane figures and
distinguish between linear and area measures.
11. Reason with shapes and their attributes.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 3rd Grade
Content: Mathematics
3rd GRADE MATHEMATICS SUPPORTING DOCUMENT
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division.
1. Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5
groups of 7 objects each.
2. Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of
objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of
shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each.
3. Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving
equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with
a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
4. Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three
whole numbers.
Understand properties of multiplication and the relationship between multiplication and division.
5. Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide.
6. Understand division as an unknown-factor problem.
Multiply and divide within 100.
7. Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between
multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties
of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit
numbers.
Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic.
8. Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using
equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of
answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.3
9. Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table),
and explain them using properties of operations.
Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.
10. Use place value understanding to round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.
11. Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value,
properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
12. Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (e.g., 9 × 80, 5 × 60)
using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.
Develop understanding of fractions as numbers.
13. Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned
into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.
14. Understand a fraction as a number on the number line; represent fractions on a number line
diagram.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 3rd Grade
Content: Mathematics
a. Represent a fraction 1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to
1 as the whole and partitioning it into b equal parts. Recognize that each part has size
1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the
number line.
b. Represent a fraction a/b on a number line diagram by marking off a lengths 1/b from
0. Recognize that the resulting interval has size a/b and that its endpoint locates the
number a/b on the number line.
15. Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about
their size.
a. Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, or the same
point on a number line.
b. Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions, e.g., 1/2 = 2/4, 4/6 = 2/3. Explain
why the fractions are equivalent, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
c. Express whole numbers as fractions, and recognize fractions that are equivalent to
whole numbers.
d. Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator by
reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two
fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the
symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
Solve problems involving measurement and estimation.
16. Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word
problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing
the problem on a number line diagram.
17. Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g),
kilograms (kg), and liters (l). Add, subtract, multiply, or divide to solve one-step word
problems involving masses or volumes that are given in the same units, e.g., by using
drawings to represent the problem.
Represent and interpret data.
18. Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several
categories. Solve one- and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using
information presented in scaled bar graphs.
19. Generate measurement data by measuring lengths using rulers marked with halves and
fourths of an inch. Show the data by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked
off in appropriate units— whole numbers, halves, or quarters.
Geometric measurement: understand concepts of area and relate area to multiplication and to
addition.
20. Recognize area as an attribute of plane figures and understand concepts of area
measurement.
a. A square with side length 1 unit, called "a unit square," is said to have "one square
unit" of area, and can be used to measure area.
b. A plane figure which can be covered without gaps or overlaps by n unit squares is said
to have an area of n square units.
21. Measure areas by counting unit squares (square cm, square m, square in, square ft, and
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 3rd Grade
Content: Mathematics
improvised units).
22. Relate area to the operations of multiplication and addition.
a. Find the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths by tiling it, and show
that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths.
b. Multiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles with whole-number side lengths in
the context of solving real world and mathematical problems, and represent wholenumber products as rectangular areas in mathematical reasoning.
c. Use tiling to show in a concrete case that the area of a rectangle with whole-number
side lengths a and b + c is the sum of a × b and a × c. Use area models to represent
the distributive property in mathematical reasoning.
d. Recognize area as additive. Find areas of rectilinear figures by decomposing them into
non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts,
applying this technique to solve real world problems.
Geometric measurement: recognize perimeter.
23. Solve real world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons, including
finding the perimeter given the side lengths, finding an unknown side length, and exhibiting
rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different
perimeters.
Reason with shapes and their attributes.
24. Understand that shapes in different categories (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may
share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger
category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of
quadrilaterals, and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these
subcategories.
25. Partition shapes into parts with equal areas. Express the area of each part as a unit fraction of
the whole.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 3rd Grade
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 1st Grade
Content: Mathematics
K-12 Practices / Dispositions
1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving
them.
2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3: Construct viable arguments and critique the
reasoning of others.
4: Model with mathematics.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
5: Use appropriate tools strategically.
6: Attend to precision.
7: Look for and make use of structure.
8: Look for and express regularity in
repeated reasoning.
4th GRADE MATHEMATICS END-OF-YEAR OBJECTIVES
Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve problems.
Gain familiarity with factors and multiples.
Generate and analyze patterns.
Generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers.
Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit
arithmetic.
6. Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering.
7. Build fractions from unit fractions by applying and extending previous
understandings of operations on whole numbers.
8. Understand decimal notation for fractions, and compare decimal fractions.
9. Solve problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements from a
larger unit to a smaller unit.
10. Represent and interpret data.
11. Geometric measurement: understand concepts of angle and measure angles.
12. Draw and identify lines and angles, and classify shapes by properties of their lines
and angles.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 1st Grade
Content: Mathematics
4th GRADE MATHEMATICS SUPPORTING DOCUMENT
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve problems.
1. Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison, e.g., interpret 35 = 5 × 7 as a statement
that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5. Represent verbal statements of
multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations.
2. Multiply or divide to solve word problems involving multiplicative comparison, e.g., by using
drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem,
distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison.
3. Solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and having whole-number
answers using the four operations, including problems in which remainders must be
interpreted. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the
unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and
estimation strategies including rounding.
Gain familiarity with factors and multiples.
4. Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is
a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100
is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the
range 1-100 is prime or composite.
Generate and analyze patterns.
5. Generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule. Identify apparent features of
the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself.
Generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers.
6. Recognize that in a multi-digit whole number, a digit in one place represents ten times what it
represents in the place to its right.
7. Read and write multi-digit whole numbers using base-ten numerals, number names, and
expanded form. Compare two multi-digit numbers based on meanings of the digits in each
place, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.
8. Use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place.
Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.
9. Fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.
10. Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number, and multiply two
two-digit numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations.
Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area
models.
11. Find whole-number quotients and remainders with up to four-digit dividends and one-digit
divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the
relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 1st Grade
Content: Mathematics
using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.
Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering.
12. Explain why a fraction a/b is equivalent to a fraction (n × a)/(n × b) by using visual fraction
models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two
fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate
equivalent fractions.
13. Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators, e.g., by
creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark fraction
such as 1/2. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the
same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, or <, and justify the
conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
Build fractions from unit fractions.
14. Understand a fraction a/b with a > 1 as a sum of fractions 1/b.
a. Understand addition and subtraction of fractions as joining and separating parts
referring to the same whole.
b. Decompose a fraction into a sum of fractions with the same denominator in more
than one way, recording each decomposition by an equation. Justify decompositions,
e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
c. Add and subtract mixed numbers with like denominators, e.g., by replacing each
mixed number with an equivalent fraction, and/or by using properties of operations
and the relationship between addition and subtraction.
d. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the
same whole and having like denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models and
equations to represent the problem.
15. Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction by a whole
number.
16. Understand a fraction a/b as a multiple of 1/b.
17. Understand a multiple of a/b as a multiple of 1/b, and use this understanding to multiply a
fraction by a whole number.
18. Solve word problems involving multiplication of a fraction by a whole number, e.g., by using
visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem.
Understand decimal notation for fractions, and compare decimal fractions.
19. Express a fraction with denominator 10 as an equivalent fraction with denominator 100, and
use this technique to add two fractions with respective denominators 10 and 100.
20. Use decimal notation for fractions with denominators 10 or 100.
21. Compare two decimals to hundredths by reasoning about their size. Recognize that
comparisons are valid only when the two decimals refer to the same whole. Record the
results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a
visual model.
Solve problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements.
22. Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm; kg,
g; lb, oz.; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 1st Grade
Content: Mathematics
a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two-column
table.
23. Use the four operations to solve word problems involving distances, intervals of time, liquid
volumes, masses of objects, and money, including problems involving simple fractions or
decimals, and problems that require expressing measurements given in a larger unit in terms
of a smaller unit. Represent measurement quantities using diagrams such as number line
diagrams that feature a measurement scale.
24. Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical
problems.
Represent and interpret data.
25. Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8).
Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions by using information presented
in line plots.
Geometric measurement: understand concepts of angle and measure angles.
26. Recognize angles as geometric shapes that are formed wherever two rays share a common
endpoint, and understand concepts of angle measurement:
a. An angle is measured with reference to a circle with its center at the common
endpoint of the rays, by considering the fraction of the circular arc between the
points where the two rays intersect the circle. An angle that turns through 1/360 of a
circle is called a "one-degree angle," and can be used to measure angles.
b. An angle that turns through n one-degree angles is said to have an angle measure of
n degrees.
27. Measure angles in whole-number degrees using a protractor. Sketch angles of specified
measure.
28. Recognize angle measure as additive. When an angle is decomposed into non-overlapping
parts, the angle measure of the whole is the sum of the angle measures of the parts. Solve
addition and subtraction problems to find unknown angles on a diagram in real world and
mathematical problems, e.g., by using an equation with a symbol for the unknown angle
measure.
Draw and identify lines and angles, and classify shapes by properties of their lines and angles.
29. Draw points, lines, line segments, rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and
parallel lines. Identify these in two-dimensional figures.
30. Classify two-dimensional figures based on the presence or absence of parallel or
perpendicular lines, or the presence or absence of angles of a specified size. Recognize right
triangles as a category, and identify right triangles.
31. Recognize a line of symmetry for a two-dimensional figure as a line across the figure such that
the figure can be folded along the line into matching parts. Identify line-symmetric figures
and draw lines of symmetry.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 5th Grade
Content: Mathematics
K-12 Practices / Dispositions
1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving
them.
2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3: Construct viable arguments and critique the
reasoning of others.
4: Model with mathematics.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5: Use appropriate tools strategically.
6: Attend to precision.
7: Look for and make use of structure.
8: Look for and express regularity in
repeated reasoning.
5th GRADE MATHEMATICS END-OF-YEAR OBJECTIVES
Write and interpret numerical expressions.
Analyze patterns and relationships.
Understand the place value system.
Perform operations with multi-digit whole numbers and with decimals to
hundredths.
5. Use equivalent fractions as a strategy to add and subtract fractions.
6. Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division to multiply
and divide fractions.
7. Convert like measurement units within a given measurement system.
8. Represent and interpret data.
9. Geometric measurement: understand concepts of volume and relate volume to
multiplication and to addition.
10. Graph points on the coordinate plane to solve real-world and mathematical
problems.
11. Classify two-dimensional figures into categories based on their properties.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 5th Grade
Content: Mathematics
5th GRADE MATHEMATICS SUPPORTING DOCUMENT
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
Write and interpret numerical expressions.
1. Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with
these symbols.
2. Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical
expressions without evaluating them.
Analyze patterns and relationships.
3. Generate two numerical patterns using two given rules. Identify apparent relationships
between corresponding terms. Form ordered pairs consisting of corresponding terms from
the two patterns, and graph the ordered pairs on a coordinate plane.
Understand the place value system.
4. Recognize that in a multi-digit number, a digit in one place represents 10 times as much as it
represents in the place to its right and 1/10 of what it represents in the place to its left.
5. Explain patterns in the number of zeros of the product when multiplying a number by powers
of 10, and explain patterns in the placement of the decimal point when a decimal is multiplied
or divided by a power of 10. Use whole-number exponents to denote powers of 10.
6. Read, write, and compare decimals to thousandths.
a. Read and write decimals to thousandths using base-ten numerals, number names,
and expanded form, e.g., 347.392 = 3 × 100 + 4 × 10 + 7 × 1 + 3 × (1/10) + 9 × (1/100)
+ 2 × (1/1000).
b. Compare two decimals to thousandths based on meanings of the digits in each place,
using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.
7. Use place value understanding to round decimals to any place.
Perform operations with multi-digit whole numbers and with decimals to hundredths.
8. Fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm.
9. Find whole-number quotients of whole numbers with up to four-digit dividends and two-digit
divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the
relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by
using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.
10. Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals to hundredths, using concrete models or
drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the
relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and
explain the reasoning used.
Use equivalent fractions as a strategy to add and subtract fractions.
11. Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing
given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or
difference of fractions with like denominators.
12. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same
whole, including cases of unlike denominators, e.g., by using visual fraction models or
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 5th Grade
Content: Mathematics
equations to represent the problem. Use benchmark fractions and number sense of fractions
to estimate mentally and assess the reasonableness of answers.
Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division.
13. Interpret a fraction as division of the numerator by the denominator (a/b = a ÷ b). Solve word
problems involving division of whole numbers leading to answers in the form of fractions or
mixed numbers, e.g., by using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem.
14. Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction or whole
number by a fraction.
a. Interpret the product (a/b) × q as a parts of a partition of q into b equal parts;
equivalently, as the result of a sequence of operations a × q ÷ b.
b. Find the area of a rectangle with fractional side lengths by tiling it with unit squares of
the appropriate unit fraction side lengths, and show that the area is the same as
would be found by multiplying the side lengths. Multiply fractional side lengths to
find areas of rectangles, and represent fraction products as rectangular areas.
15. Interpret multiplication as scaling (resizing), by:
a. Comparing the size of a product to the size of one factor on the basis of the size of
the other factor, without performing the indicated multiplication.
b. Explaining why multiplying a given number by a fraction greater than 1 results in a
product greater than the given number (recognizing multiplication by whole numbers
greater than 1 as a familiar case); explaining why multiplying a given number by a
fraction less than 1 results in a product smaller than the given number; and relating
the principle of fraction equivalence a/b = (n × a)/(n × b) to the effect of
multiplying a/b by 1.
16. Solve real world problems involving multiplication of fractions and mixed numbers, e.g., by
using visual fraction models or equations to represent the problem.
17. Apply and extend previous understandings of division to divide unit fractions by whole
numbers and whole numbers by unit fractions.
a. Interpret division of a unit fraction by a non-zero whole number, and compute such
quotients.
b. Interpret division of a whole number by a unit fraction, and compute such quotients.
c. Solve real world problems involving division of unit fractions by non-zero whole
numbers and division of whole numbers by unit fractions, e.g., by using visual fraction
models and equations to represent the problem.
Convert like measurement units within a given measurement system.
18. Convert among different-sized standard measurement units within a given measurement
system (e.g., convert 5 cm to 0.05 m), and use these conversions in solving multi-step, real
world problems.
Represent and interpret data.
19. Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8).
Use operations on fractions for this grade to solve problems involving information presented
in line plots.
Geometric measurement: understand concepts of volume.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 5th Grade
Content: Mathematics
20. Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume
measurement.
a. A cube with side length 1 unit, called a "unit cube," is said to have "one cubic unit" of
volume, and can be used to measure volume.
b. A solid figure which can be packed without gaps or overlaps using n unit cubes is said
to have a volume of n cubic units.
21. Measure volumes by counting unit cubes, using cubic cm, cubic in, cubic ft, and improvised
units.
22. Relate volume to the operations of multiplication and addition and solve real world and
mathematical problems involving volume.
a. Find the volume of a right rectangular prism with whole-number side lengths by
packing it with unit cubes, and show that the volume is the same as would be found
by multiplying the edge lengths, equivalently by multiplying the height by the area of
the base. Represent threefold whole-number products as volumes, e.g., to represent
the associative property of multiplication.
b. Apply the formulas V = l × w × h and V = b × h for rectangular prisms to find volumes
of right rectangular prisms with whole-number edge lengths in the context of solving
real world and mathematical problems.
c. Recognize volume as additive. Find volumes of solid figures composed of two nonoverlapping right rectangular prisms by adding the volumes of the non-overlapping
parts, applying this technique to solve real world problems.
Graph points on the coordinate plane to solve real-world and mathematical problems.
23. Use a pair of perpendicular number lines, called axes, to define a coordinate system, with the
intersection of the lines (the origin) arranged to coincide with the 0 on each line and a given
point in the plane located by using an ordered pair of numbers, called its coordinates.
Understand that the first number indicates how far to travel from the origin in the direction
of one axis, and the second number indicates how far to travel in the direction of the second
axis, with the convention that the names of the two axes and the coordinates correspond
(e.g., x-axis and x-coordinate, y-axis and y-coordinate).
24. Represent real world and mathematical problems by graphing points in the first quadrant of
the coordinate plane, and interpret coordinate values of points in the context of the situation.
Classify two-dimensional figures into categories based on their properties.
25. Understand that attributes belonging to a category of two-dimensional figures also belong to
all subcategories of that category. For example, all rectangles have four right angles and
squares are rectangles, so all squares have four right angles.
26. Classify two-dimensional figures in a hierarchy based on properties.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 5th Grade
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 6th Grade
Content: Mathematics
K-12 Practices / Dispositions
1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving
them.
2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3: Construct viable arguments and critique the
reasoning of others.
4: Model with mathematics.
5: Use appropriate tools strategically.
6: Attend to precision.
7: Look for and make use of structure.
8: Look for and express regularity in
repeated reasoning.
6th GRADE MATHEMATICS END-OF-YEAR OBJECTIVES
1. Understand ratio concepts and use ratio reasoning to solve problems
2. Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division to divide
fractions by fractions.
3. Multiply and divide multi-digit numbers and find common factors and multiples.
4. Apply and extend previous understandings of numbers to the system of rational
numbers.
5. Apply and extend previous understandings of arithmetic to algebraic expressions.
6. Reason about and solve one-variable equations and inequalities.
7. Represent and analyze quantitative relationships between dependent and
independent variables.
8. Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, surface area, and
volume.
9. Develop understanding of statistical variability.
10. Summarize and describe distributions.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 6th Grade
Content: Mathematics
6th GRADE MATHEMATICS SUPPORTING DOCUMENT
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
Understand ratio concepts and use ratio reasoning to solve problems.
1. Understand the concept of a ratio and use ratio language to describe a ratio relationship
between two quantities.
2. Understand the concept of a unit rate a/b associated with a ratio a:b with b ≠ 0, and use rate
language in the context of a ratio relationship.
3. Use ratio and rate reasoning to solve real-world and mathematical problems, e.g., by
reasoning about tables of equivalent ratios, tape diagrams, double number line diagrams, or
equations.
a. Make tables of equivalent ratios relating quantities with whole-number
measurements, find missing values in the tables, and plot the pairs of values on the
coordinate plane. Use tables to compare ratios.
b. Solve unit rate problems including those involving unit pricing and constant speed.
c. Find a percent of a quantity as a rate per 100 (e.g., 30% of a quantity means 30/100
times the quantity); solve problems involving finding the whole, given a part and the
percent.
d. Use ratio reasoning to convert measurement units; manipulate and transform units
appropriately when multiplying or dividing quantities.
Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division to divide fractions by
fractions.
4. Interpret and compute quotients of fractions, and solve word problems involving division of
fractions by fractions, e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the
problem.
Compute fluently with multi-digit numbers and find common factors and multiples.
5. Fluently divide multi-digit numbers using the standard algorithm.
6. Fluently add, subtract, multiply, and divide multi-digit decimals using the standard algorithm
for each operation.
7. Find the greatest common factor of two whole numbers less than or equal to 100 and the
least common multiple of two whole numbers less than or equal to 12. Use the distributive
property to express a sum of two whole numbers 1-100 with a common factor as a multiple
of a sum of two whole numbers with no common factor. For example, express 36 + 8 as 4 (9 +
2)..
Apply and extend previous understandings of numbers to the system of rational numbers.
8. Understand that positive and negative numbers are used together to describe quantities
having opposite directions or values (e.g., temperature above/below zero, elevation
above/below sea level, credits/debits, positive/negative electric charge); use positive and
negative numbers to represent quantities in real-world contexts, explaining the meaning of 0
in each situation.
9. Understand a rational number as a point on the number line. Extend number line diagrams
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 6th Grade
Content: Mathematics
and coordinate axes familiar from previous grades to represent points on the line and in the
plane with negative number coordinates.
a. Recognize opposite signs of numbers as indicating locations on opposite sides of 0 on
the number line; recognize that the opposite of the opposite of a number is the
number itself, e.g., -(-3) = 3, and that 0 is its own opposite.
b. Understand signs of numbers in ordered pairs as indicating locations in quadrants of
the coordinate plane; recognize that when two ordered pairs differ only by signs, the
locations of the points are related by reflections across one or both axes.
c. Find and position integers and other rational numbers on a horizontal or vertical
number line diagram; find and position pairs of integers and other rational numbers
on a coordinate plane.
10. Understand ordering and absolute value of rational numbers.
a. ret statements of inequality as statements about the relative position of two numbers
on a number line diagram.
b. Write, interpret, and explain statements of order for rational numbers in real-world
contexts.
c. Understand the absolute value of a rational number as its distance from 0 on the
number line; interpret absolute value as magnitude for a positive or negative quantity
in a real-world situation.
d. Distinguish comparisons of absolute value from statements about order.
11. Solve real-world and mathematical problems by graphing points in all four quadrants of the
coordinate plane. Include use of coordinates and absolute value to find distances between
points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate.
Apply and extend previous understandings of arithmetic to algebraic expressions.
12. Write and evaluate numerical expressions involving whole-number exponents.
13. Write, read, and evaluate expressions in which letters stand for numbers.
a. Write expressions that record operations with numbers and with letters standing for
numbers.
b. Identify parts of an expression using mathematical terms (sum, term, product, factor,
quotient, coefficient); view one or more parts of an expression as a single entity.
c. Evaluate expressions at specific values of their variables. Include expressions that
arise from formulas used in real-world problems. Perform arithmetic operations,
including those involving whole-number exponents, in the conventional order when
there are no parentheses to specify a particular order (Order of Operations).
14. Apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions.
15. Identify when two expressions are equivalent (i.e., when the two expressions name the same
number regardless of which value is substituted into them).
Reason about and solve one-variable equations and inequalities.
16. Understand solving an equation or inequality as a process of answering a question: which
values from a specified set, if any, make the equation or inequality true? Use substitution to
determine whether a given number in a specified set makes an equation or inequality true.
17. Use variables to represent numbers and write expressions when solving a real-world or
mathematical problem; understand that a variable can represent an unknown number, or,
depending on the purpose at hand, any number in a specified set.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 6th Grade
Content: Mathematics
18. Solve real-world and mathematical problems by writing and solving equations of the form
x + p = q and px = q for cases in which p, q and x are all nonnegative rational numbers.
19. Write an inequality of the form x > c or x < c to represent a constraint or condition in a realworld or mathematical problem. Recognize that inequalities of the form x > c or x < c have
infinitely many solutions; represent solutions of such inequalities on number line diagrams.
Represent and analyze quantitative relationships between dependent and independent variables.
20. Use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship
to one another; write an equation to express one quantity, thought of as the dependent
variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought of as the independent variable. Analyze the
relationship between the dependent and independent variables using graphs and tables, and
relate these to the equation.
Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, surface area, and volume.
21. Find the area of right triangles, other triangles, special quadrilaterals, and polygons by
composing into rectangles or decomposing into triangles and other shapes; apply these
techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical problems.
22. Find the volume of a right rectangular prism with fractional edge lengths by packing it with
unit cubes of the appropriate unit fraction edge lengths, and show that the volume is the
same as would be found by multiplying the edge lengths of the prism. Apply the formulas V = l
w h and V = b h to find volumes of right rectangular prisms with fractional edge lengths in the
context of solving real-world and mathematical problems.
23. Draw polygons in the coordinate plane given coordinates for the vertices; use coordinates to
find the length of a side joining points with the same first coordinate or the same second
coordinate. Apply these techniques in the context of solving real-world and mathematical
problems.
24. Represent three-dimensional figures using nets made up of rectangles and triangles, and use
the nets to find the surface area of these figures. Apply these techniques in the context of
solving real-world and mathematical problems.
Develop understanding of statistical variability.
25. Recognize a statistical question as one that anticipates variability in the data related to the
question and accounts for it in the answers.
26. Understand that a set of data collected to answer a statistical question has a distribution
which can be described by its center, spread, and overall shape.
27. Recognize that a measure of center for a numerical data set summarizes all of its values with
a single number, while a measure of variation describes how its values vary with a single
number.
Summarize and describe distributions.
28. Display numerical data in plots on a number line, including dot plots, histograms, and box
plots.
29. Summarize numerical data sets in relation to their context, such as by:
a. Reporting the number of observations.
b. Describing the nature of the attribute under investigation, including how it was
measured and its units of measurement.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 6th Grade
Content: Mathematics
c. Giving quantitative measures of center (median and/or mean) and variability
(interquartile range and/or mean absolute deviation), as well as describing any
overall pattern and any striking deviations from the overall pattern with reference to
the context in which the data were gathered.
d. Relating the choice of measures of center and variability to the shape of the data
distribution and the context in which the data were gathered.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 6th Grade
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 6th Grade
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 7th Grade
Content: Mathematics
K-12 Practices / Dispositions
1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving
them.
2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3: Construct viable arguments and critique the
reasoning of others.
4: Model with mathematics.
5: Use appropriate tools strategically.
6: Attend to precision.
7: Look for and make use of structure.
8: Look for and express regularity in
repeated reasoning.
7th GRADE MATHEMATICS END-OF-YEAR OBJECTIVES
1. Analyze proportional relationships and use them to solve real-world and
mathematical problems.
2. Apply and extend previous understandings of operations with fractions to add,
subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers.
3. Use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions.
4. Solve real-life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic
expressions and equations.
5. Draw, construct and describe geometrical figures and describe the relationships
between them.
6. Solve real-life and mathematical problems involving angle measure, area, surface
area, and volume.
7. Use random sampling to draw inferences about a population.
8. Draw informal comparative inferences about two populations.
9. Investigate chance processes and develop, use, and evaluate probability models.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 7th Grade
Content: Mathematics
7th GRADE MATHEMATICS SUPPORTING DOCUMENT
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
Analyze proportional relationships and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems.
1. Compute unit rates associated with ratios of fractions, including ratios of lengths, areas and
other quantities measured in like or different units.
2. Recognize and represent proportional relationships between quantities.
a. Decide whether two quantities are in a proportional relationship, e.g., by testing for
equivalent ratios in a table or graphing on a coordinate plane and observing whether
the graph is a straight line through the origin.
b. Identify the constant of proportionality (unit rate) in tables, graphs, equations,
diagrams, and verbal descriptions of proportional relationships.
c. Represent proportional relationships by equations.
d. Explain what a point (x, y) on the graph of a proportional relationship means in terms
of the situation, with special attention to the points (0, 0) and (1, r) where r is the unit
rate.
3. Use proportional relationships to solve multistep ratio and percent problems. Examples:
simple interest, tax, markups and markdowns, gratuities and commissions, fees, percent
increase and decrease, percent error.
Apply and extend previous understandings of operations with fractions.
4. Apply and extend previous understandings of addition and subtraction to add and subtract
rational numbers; represent addition and subtraction on a horizontal or vertical number line
diagram.
a. Describe situations in which opposite quantities combine to make 0.
b. Understand p + q as the number located a distance |q| from p, in the positive or
negative direction depending on whether q is positive or negative. Show that a
number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses). Interpret sums of
rational numbers by describing real-world contexts.
c. Understand subtraction of rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p - q = p+
(-q). Show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the
absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in real-world contexts.
d. Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract rational numbers.
5. Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division and of fractions to
multiply and divide rational numbers.
a. Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by
requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly
the distributive property, leading to products such as (-1)(-1) = 1 and the rules for
multiplying signed numbers. Interpret products of rational numbers by describing
real-world contexts.
b. Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and
every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number. If p and q are
integers, then -(p/q) = (-p)/q = p/(-q). Interpret quotients of rational numbers by
describing real-world contexts.
c. Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide rational numbers.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 7th Grade
Content: Mathematics
d. Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division; know that the decimal
form of a rational number terminates in 0s or eventually repeats.
6. Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving the four operations with rational
numbers.
Use properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions.
7. Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear
expressions with rational coefficients.
8. Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can shed
light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related.
Solve real-life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic expressions and
equations.
9. Solve multi-step real-life and mathematical problems posed with positive and negative
rational numbers in any form (whole numbers, fractions, and decimals), using tools
strategically. Apply properties of operations to calculate with numbers in any form; convert
between forms as appropriate; and assess the reasonableness of answers using mental
computation and estimation strategies.
10. Use variables to represent quantities in a real-world or mathematical problem, and construct
simple equations and inequalities to solve problems by reasoning about the quantities.
a. Solve word problems leading to equations of the form px + q = r and p(x + q) = r,
where p, q, and r are specific rational numbers. Solve equations of these forms
fluently. Compare an algebraic solution to an arithmetic solution, identifying the
sequence of the operations used in each approach.
b. Solve word problems leading to inequalities of the form px + q > r or px + q < r, where
p, q, and r are specific rational numbers. Graph the solution set of the inequality and
interpret it in the context of the problem.
Draw construct, and describe geometrical figures and describe the relationships between them.
11. Solve problems involving scale drawings of geometric figures, including computing actual
lengths and areas from a scale drawing and reproducing a scale drawing at a different scale.
12. Draw (freehand, with ruler and protractor, and with technology) geometric shapes with given
conditions. Focus on constructing triangles from three measures of angles or sides, noticing
when the conditions determine a unique triangle, more than one triangle, or no triangle.
13. Describe the two-dimensional figures that result from slicing three-dimensional figures, as in
plane sections of right rectangular prisms and right rectangular pyramids.
Solve real-life and mathematical problems involving angle measure, area, surface area, and volume.
14. Know the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle and use them to solve problems;
give an informal derivation of the relationship between the circumference and area of a
circle.
15. Use facts about supplementary, complementary, vertical, and adjacent angles in a multi-step
problem to write and solve simple equations for an unknown angle in a figure.
16. Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, volume and surface area of twoand three-dimensional objects composed of triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, cubes, and
right prisms.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 7th Grade
Content: Mathematics
Use random sampling to draw inferences about a population.
17. Understand that statistics can be used to gain information about a population by examining a
sample of the population; generalizations about a population from a sample are valid only if
the sample is representative of that population. Understand that random sampling tends to
produce representative samples and support valid inferences.
18. Use data from a random sample to draw inferences about a population with an unknown
characteristic of interest. Generate multiple samples (or simulated samples) of the same size
to gauge the variation in estimates or predictions.
Draw informal comparative inferences about two populations.
19. Informally assess the degree of visual overlap of two numerical data distributions with similar
variabilities, measuring the difference between the centers by expressing it as a multiple of a
measure of variability.
20. Use measures of center and measures of variability for numerical data from random samples
to draw informal comparative inferences about two populations.
Investigate chance processes and develop, use, and evaluate probability models.
21. Understand that the probability of a chance event is a number between 0 and 1 that
expresses the likelihood of the event occurring. Larger numbers indicate greater likelihood. A
probability near 0 indicates an unlikely event, a probability around 1/2 indicates an event that
is neither unlikely nor likely, and a probability near 1 indicates a likely event.
22. Approximate the probability of a chance event by collecting data on the chance process that
produces it and observing its long-run relative frequency, and predict the approximate
relative frequency given the probability.
23. Develop a probability model and use it to find probabilities of events. Compare probabilities
from a model to observed frequencies; if the agreement is not good, explain possible sources
of the discrepancy.
a. Develop a uniform probability model by assigning equal probability to all outcomes,
and use the model to determine probabilities of events.
b. Develop a probability model (which may not be uniform) by observing frequencies in
data generated from a chance process.
24. Find probabilities of compound events using organized lists, tables, tree diagrams, and
simulation.
a. Understand that, just as with simple events, the probability of a compound event is
the fraction of outcomes in the sample space for which the compound event occurs.
b. Represent sample spaces for compound events using methods such as organized lists,
tables and tree diagrams. For an event described in everyday language (e.g., "rolling
double sixes"), identify the outcomes in the sample space which compose the event.
c. Design and use a simulation to generate frequencies for compound events.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 7th Grade
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 7th Grade
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 8th Grade
Content: Mathematics
K-12 Practices / Dispositions
1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving
them.
2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3: Construct viable arguments and critique the
reasoning of others.
4: Model with mathematics.
5: Use appropriate tools strategically.
6: Attend to precision.
7: Look for and make use of structure.
8: Look for and express regularity in
repeated reasoning.
8th GRADE MATHEMATICS END-OF-YEAR OBJECTIVES
1. Know that there are numbers that are not rational, and approximate them by
rational numbers.
2. Work with radicals and integer exponents.
3. Understand the connections between proportional relationships, lines, and linear
equations.
4. Analyze and solve linear equations and pairs of simultaneous linear equations.
5. Define, evaluate, and compare functions.
6. Use functions to model relationships between quantities.
7. Understand congruence and similarity using physical models, transparencies, or
geometry software.
8. Understand and apply the Pythagorean Theorem.
9. Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving volume of cylinders, cones
and spheres.
10. Investigate patterns of association in bivariate data.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 8th Grade
Content: Mathematics
8th GRADE MATHEMATICS SUPPORTING DOCUMENT
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
Know that there are numbers that are not rational, and approximate them by rational numbers.
1. Know that numbers that are not rational are called irrational. Understand informally that
every number has a decimal expansion; for rational numbers show that the decimal
expansion repeats eventually, and convert a decimal expansion which repeats eventually into
a rational number.
2. Use rational approximations of irrational numbers to compare the size of irrational numbers,
locate them approximately on a number line diagram, and estimate the value of expressions
(e.g., π2).
Expressions and Equations Work with radicals and integer exponents.
3. Know and apply the properties of integer exponents to generate equivalent numerical
expressions. For example, 32 × 3-5 = 3-3 = 1/33 = 1/27.
4. Use square root and cube root symbols to represent solutions to equations of the
form x2= p and x3 = p, where p is a positive rational number. Evaluate square roots of small
perfect squares and cube roots of small perfect cubes. Know that √2 is irrational.
5. Use numbers expressed in the form of a single digit times an integer power of 10 to estimate
very large or very small quantities, and to express how many times as much one is than the
other.
6. Perform operations with numbers expressed in scientific notation, including problems where
both decimal and scientific notation are used. Use scientific notation and choose units of
appropriate size for measurements of very large or very small quantities (e.g., use millimeters
per year for seafloor spreading). Interpret scientific notation that has been generated by
technology
Understand the connections between proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations.
7. Graph proportional relationships, interpreting the unit rate as the slope of the graph.
Compare two different proportional relationships represented in different ways. For example,
compare a distance-time graph to a distance-time equation to determine which of two
moving objects has greater speed.
8. Use similar triangles to explain why the slope m is the same between any two distinct points
on a non-vertical line in the coordinate plane; derive the equation y = mx for a line through
the origin and the equation y = mx + b for a line intercepting the vertical axis at b.
Analyze and solve linear equations and pairs of simultaneous linear equations.
9. Solve linear equations in one variable.
a. Give examples of linear equations in one variable with one solution, infinitely many
solutions, or no solutions. Show which of these possibilities is the case by successively
transforming the given equation into simpler forms, until an equivalent equation of
the form x = a, a = a, or a = b results (where a and b are different numbers).
b. Solve linear equations with rational number coefficients, including equations whose
solutions require expanding expressions using the distributive property and collecting
like terms.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 8th Grade
Content: Mathematics
10. Analyze and solve pairs of simultaneous linear equations.
a. Understand that solutions to a system of two linear equations in two variables
correspond to points of intersection of their graphs, because points of intersection
satisfy both equations simultaneously.
b. Solve systems of two linear equations in two variables algebraically, and estimate
solutions by graphing the equations. Solve simple cases by inspection.
c. Solve real-world and mathematical problems leading to two linear equations in two
variables.
Define, evaluate, and compare functions.
11. Understand that a function is a rule that assigns to each input exactly one output. The graph
of a function is the set of ordered pairs consisting of an input and the corresponding output.1
12. Compare properties of two functions each represented in a different way (algebraically,
graphically, numerically in tables, or by verbal descriptions).
13. Interpret the equation y = mx + b as defining a linear function, whose graph is a straight line;
give examples of functions that are not linear.
Use functions to model relationships between quantities.
14. Construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities. Determine the
rate of change and initial value of the function from a description of a relationship or from
two (x, y) values, including reading these from a table or from a graph. Interpret the rate of
change and initial value of a linear function in terms of the situation it models, and in terms of
its graph or a table of values.
15. Describe qualitatively the functional relationship between two quantities by analyzing a graph
(e.g., where the function is increasing or decreasing, linear or nonlinear). Sketch a graph that
exhibits the qualitative features of a function that has been described verbally.
Understand congruence and similarity using physical models, transparencies, or geometry software.
16. Verify experimentally the properties of rotations, reflections, and translations:
a. Lines are taken to lines, and line segments to line segments of the same length.
b. Angles are taken to angles of the same measure.
c. Parallel lines are taken to parallel lines.
17. Understand that a two-dimensional figure is congruent to another if the second can be
obtained from the first by a sequence of rotations, reflections, and translations; given two
congruent figures, describe a sequence that exhibits the congruence between them.
18. Describe the effect of dilations, translations, rotations, and reflections on two-dimensional
figures using coordinates.
19. Understand that a two-dimensional figure is similar to another if the second can be obtained
from the first by a sequence of rotations, reflections, translations, and dilations; given two
similar two-dimensional figures, describe a sequence that exhibits the similarity between
them.
20. Use informal arguments to establish facts about the angle sum and exterior angle of triangles,
about the angles created when parallel lines are cut by a transversal, and the angle-angle
criterion for similarity of triangles.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 8th Grade
Content: Mathematics
Understand and apply the Pythagorean Theorem.
21. Explain a proof of the Pythagorean Theorem and its converse.
22. Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to determine unknown side lengths in right triangles in realworld and mathematical problems in two and three dimensions.
23. Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to find the distance between two points in a coordinate
system.
Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving volume of cylinders, cones, and spheres.
24. Know the formulas for the volumes of cones, cylinders, and spheres and use them to solve
real-world and mathematical problems.
Investigate patterns of association in bivariate data.
25. Construct and interpret scatter plots for bivariate measurement data to investigate patterns
of association between two quantities. Describe patterns such as clustering, outliers, positive
or negative association, linear association, and nonlinear association.
26. Know that straight lines are widely used to model relationships between two quantitative
variables. For scatter plots that suggest a linear association, informally fit a straight line, and
informally assess the model fit by judging the closeness of the data points to the line.
27. Use the equation of a linear model to solve problems in the context of bivariate measurement
data, interpreting the slope and intercept.
28. Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by
displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. Construct and interpret a
two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same
subjects. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible
association between the two variables.
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 8th Grade
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
Grade: 8th Grade
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
Course: Algebra I
Content: Mathematics
K-12 Practices / Dispositions
1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving
them.
2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3: Construct viable arguments and critique the
reasoning of others.
4: Model with mathematics.
5: Use appropriate tools strategically.
6: Attend to precision.
7: Look for and make use of structure.
8: Look for and express regularity in
repeated reasoning.
ALGEBRA 1 END-OF-YEAR OBJECTIVES
1. Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems.
2. Interpret the structure of expressions.
3. Create equations that describe numbers or relationships.
4. Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning.
5. Solve equations and inequalities in one variable.
6. Extend the properties of exponents to rational exponents.
7. Solve systems of equations.
8. Represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically.
9. Understand the concept of a function and use function notation.
10. Interpret functions that arise in applications in terms of a context.
11. Analyze functions using different representations.
12. Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities.
13. Build new functions from existing functions.
14. Construct and compare linear, quadratic, and exponential models and solve
problems.
15. Interpret expressions for functions in terms of the situation they model.
16. Summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or measurement
variable.
17. Summarize, represent, and interpret data on two categorical and quantitative
variables.
18. Interpret linear models.
19. Interpret the structure of expressions.
20. Write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
Curriculum Overview
Course: Algebra I
Content: Mathematics
21. Perform arithmetic operations on polynomials.
22. Create equations that describe numbers or relationships.
23. Solve equations and inequalities in one variable.
24. Solve systems of equations.
25. Use properties of rational and irrational numbers.
26. Interpret functions that arise in applications in terms of a context.
27. Analyze functions using different representations.
28. Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities.
29. Build new functions from existing functions.
30. Construct and compare linear, quadratic, and exponential models and solve
problems.
Curriculum Overview
Course: Algebra I
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
Course: Algebra I
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
Course: Algebra II
Content: Mathematics
K-12 Practices / Dispositions
1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving
them.
2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3: Construct viable arguments and critique the
reasoning of others.
4: Model with mathematics.
5: Use appropriate tools strategically.
6: Attend to precision.
7: Look for and make use of structure.
8: Look for and express regularity in
repeated reasoning.
ALGEBRA II END-OF-YEAR OBJECTIVES
1. Perform arithmetic operations with complex numbers.
2. Use complex numbers in polynomial identities and equations.
3. Interpret the structure of expressions.
4. Write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems.
5. Perform arithmetic operations on polynomials.
6. Understand the relationship between zeros and factors of polynomials.
7. Use polynomial identities to solve problems.
8. Rewrite rational expressions.
9. Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning.
10. Represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically.
11. Analyze functions using different representations.
12. Extend the domain of trigonometric functions using the unit circle.
13. Model periodic phenomena with trigonometric function.
14. Prove and apply trigonometric identities.
15. Create equations that describe numbers or relationships.
16. Interpret functions that arise in applications in terms of a context.
17. Analyze functions using different representations.
18. Build a function that models a relationship between two quantities.
19. Build new functions from existing functions.
20. Construct and compare linear, quadratic, and exponential models and solve
problems.
21. Summarize, represent, and interpret data on single count or measurement variable.
22. Understand and evaluate random processes underlying statistical experiments.
23. Make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments and
Curriculum Overview
Course: Algebra II
observational studies.
24. Use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions.
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
Course: Geometry
Content: Mathematics
K-12 Practices / Dispositions
1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving
them.
2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3: Construct viable arguments and critique the
reasoning of others.
4: Model with mathematics.
5: Use appropriate tools strategically.
6: Attend to precision.
7: Look for and make use of structure.
8: Look for and express regularity in
repeated reasoning.
GEOMETRY END-OF-YEAR OBJECTIVES
1. Experiment with transformations in the plane
2. Understand congruence in terms of rigid motions
3. Prove geometric theorems
4. Make geometric constructions
5. Understand similarity in terms of similarity transformations
6. Prove theorems involving similarity
7. Define trigonometric ratios and solve problems involving right triangles
8. Apply trigonometry to general triangles
9. Explain volume formulas and use them to solve problems
10. Visualize relationships between two-dimensional and three-dimensional objects
11. Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically
12. Translate between the geometric description and the equation for a conic section [a
circle]
13. Understand and apply theorems about circles
14. Find arc lengths and areas of sectors of circles
15. Translate between the geometric description and the equation for a conic section
16. Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically
17. Apply geometric concepts in modeling situations
18. Understand independence and conditional probability and use them to interpret
data
19. Use the rules of probability to compute probabilities of compound events in a
uniform probability model
20. Use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions
Curriculum Overview
Course: Geometry
Content: Mathematics
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: Kindergarten
Content: English Language Arts
Learning to Read: Foundational Skills
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print.
a.
b.
c.
d.
Follow words from left to right, top to bottom, and page by page.
Recognize that spoken words are represented in written language by specific sequences of letters.
Understand that words are separated by spaces in print.
Recognize and name all upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet.
2. Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Recognize and produce rhyming words.
Count, pronounce, blend, and segment syllables in spoken words.
Blend and segment onsets and rimes of single-syllable spoken words.
Isolate and pronounce the initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in three-phoneme
(consonant-vowel-consonant, or CVC) words.* (This does not include CVCs ending with /l/, /r/, or /x/.)
Add or substitute individual sounds (phonemes) in simple, one-syllable words to make new words.
3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
a.
b.
c.
d.
4.
Demonstrate basic knowledge of one-to-one letter-sound correspondences by producing the primary
sound or many of the most frequent sounds for each consonant.
Associate the long and short sounds with the common spellings (graphemes) for the five major vowels.
Read common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she, my, is, are, do, does).
Distinguish between similarly spelled words by identifying the sounds of the letters that differ.
Read emergent-reader texts with purpose and understanding.
Reading: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension
End-of-year Objectives
1. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
2. With prompting and support, retell familiar stories in literature, identify the main topic of
informational text, including key details of both literature and text.
3. With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story, and
describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.
4. Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
5. Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems); identify the front cover, back cover,
and title page of a book.
6. With prompting and support, name the author and illustrator of a story or informational text and
define the role of each in telling the story or information in a text.
7. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story or text
in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).
8. With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.
9. With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters
Page 1 of 4
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: Kindergarten
Content: English Language Arts
in familiar stories, and identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same
topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).
10. Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research
End-of-year Objectives
1. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion pieces in which they
tell a reader the topic or the name of the book they are writing about and state an opinion or
preference about the topic or book (e.g., My favorite book is...).
2. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory
texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the
topic.
3. Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a single event or several
loosely linked events, tell about the events in the order in which they occurred, and provide a
reaction to what happened.
4. [progression begins at 3rd grade]
5. With guidance and support from adults, respond to questions and suggestions from peers and
add details to strengthen writing as needed.
6. With guidance and support from adults, explore a variety of digital tools to produce and
publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.
7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of books by a
favorite author and express opinions about them).
8. With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather
information from provided sources to answer a question.
Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and
texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
a.
b.
Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking
about the topics and texts under discussion).
Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges.
2. Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other
media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if
something is not understood.
3. Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is
not understood.
Page 2 of 4
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: Kindergarten
Content: English Language Arts
4. Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide
additional detail.
5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail.
6. Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.
Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing
or speaking.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Print many upper- and lowercase letters.
Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.
Form regular plural nouns orally by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog, dogs; wish, wishes).
Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).
Use the most frequently occurring prepositions (e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of, by, with).
Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and
spelling when writing.
a. Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I
b. Recognize and name end punctuation.
c. Write a letter or letters for most consonant and short-vowel sounds (phonemes).
d. Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships.
3. [progression begins in 2nd grade]
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on
kindergarten reading and content.
a.
b.
Identify new meanings for familiar words and apply them accurately (e.g., knowing duck is a bird
and learning the verb to duck).
Use the most frequently occurring inflections and affixes (e.g., -ed, -s, re-, un-, pre-, -ful, -less) as
a clue to the meaning of an unknown word.
5. With guidance and support from adults, explore word relationships and nuances in word
meanings.
a.
b.
c.
d.
Sort common objects into categories (e.g., shapes, foods) to gain a sense of the concepts the
categories represent.
Demonstrate understanding of frequently occurring verbs and adjectives by relating them to
their opposites (antonyms).
Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., note places at school that are
colorful).
Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs describing the same general action (e.g., walk,
march, strut, prance) by acting out the meanings.
Page 3 of 4
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: Kindergarten
Content: English Language Arts
6. Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and
responding to texts.
Page 4 of 4
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 1st Grade
Content: English Language Arts
Learning to Read: Foundational Skills
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print.
a.
Recognize the distinguishing features of a sentence (e.g., first word, capitalization, ending punctuation).
2. Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).
a.
b.
c.
d.
Distinguish long from short vowel sounds in spoken single-syllable words.
Orally produce single-syllable words by blending sounds (phonemes), including consonant blends.
Isolate and pronounce initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in spoken single-syllable words.
Segment spoken single-syllable words into their complete sequence of individual sounds (phonemes).
3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
4.
Know the spelling-sound correspondences for common consonant digraphs.
Decode regularly spelled one-syllable words.
Know final -e and common vowel team conventions for representing long vowel sounds.
Use knowledge that every syllable must have a vowel sound to determine the number of syllables in a
printed word.
Decode two-syllable words following basic patterns by breaking the words into syllables.
Read words with inflectional endings.
Recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.
Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
a.
b.
c.
Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
Read grade-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.
Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
Reading: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension
End-of-year Objectives
1. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
2. Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or
lesson. With informational text, identify the main topic and retell key details.
3. Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details. With informational
text, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in
the text.
4. Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses. With
informational text, ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words
and phrases.
5. Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information,
drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types. Know and use various text features (e.g.,
headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons) to locate key facts or information
Page 1 of 4
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 1st Grade
Content: English Language Arts
in informational text.
6. Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text. With informational text, distinguish
between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the
words.
7. Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events, and key ideas
(in informational text) .
8. Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.
9. Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories; identify basic
similarities in and differences between two informational texts on the same topic (e.g., in
illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).
10. With prompting and support, read prose and poetry, and informational text, of appropriate
complexity for grade 1.
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research
End-of-year Objectives
1. Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing
about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the
topic, and provide some sense of closure.
3. Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include
some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and
provide some sense of closure.
4. [progression begins at 3rd grade]
5. With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to questions and
suggestions from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.
6. With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish
writing, including in collaboration with peers.
7. Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of "how-to" books
on a given topic and use them to write a sequence of instructions).
8. With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather
information from provided sources to answer a question.
Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1.
Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts
with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
a.
Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a
Page 2 of 4
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 1st Grade
b.
c.
Content: English Language Arts
time about the topics and texts under discussion).
Build on others' talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple
exchanges.
Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion.
2. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented
orally or through other media.
3. Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to gather additional
information or clarify something that is not understood.
4. Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings
clearly.
5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas,
thoughts, and feelings.
6. Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation.
Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing
or speaking.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
Print all upper- and lowercase letters.
Use common, proper, and possessive nouns.
Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences
Use personal, possessive, and indefinite pronouns
Use verbs to convey a sense of past, present, and future
Use frequently occurring adjectives.
Use frequently occurring conjunctions
Use determiners (e.g., articles, demonstratives).
Use frequently occurring prepositions
Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and
exclamatory sentences in response to prompts.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and
spelling when writing.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Capitalize dates and names of people.
Use end punctuation for sentences.
Use commas in dates and to separate single words in a series.
Use conventional spelling for words with common spelling patterns and for frequently occurring
irregular words.
Spell untaught words phonetically, drawing on phonemic awareness and spelling conventions.
3. [progression begins at 2nd grade]
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on
grade 1 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.
Page 3 of 4
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 1st Grade
a.
b.
c.
Content: English Language Arts
Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
Use frequently occurring affixes as a clue to the meaning of a word.
Identify frequently occurring root words (e.g., look) and their inflectional forms (e.g., looks,
looked, looking).
5. With guidance and support from adults, demonstrate understanding of word relationships and
nuances in word meanings.
a.
b.
c.
d.
6.
Sort words into categories (e.g., colors, clothing) to gain a sense of the concepts the categories
represent.
Define words by category and by one or more key attributes (e.g., a duck is a bird that swims; a
tiger is a large cat with stripes).
Identify real-life connections between words and their use (e.g., note places at home that are
cozy).
Distinguish shades of meaning among verbs differing in manner (e.g., look, peek, glance, stare,
glare, scowl) and adjectives differing in intensity (e.g., large, gigantic) by defining or choosing
them or by acting out the meanings.
Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and
responding to texts, including using frequently occurring conjunctions to signal simple
relationships.
Page 4 of 4
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 2nd Grade
Content: English Language Arts
Learning to Read: Foundational Skills
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. [end of progression]
2.
[end of progression]
3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
Distinguish long and short vowels when reading regularly spelled one-syllable
words.
b. Know spelling-sound correspondences for additional common vowel teams.
c. Decode regularly spelled two-syllable words with long vowels.
d. Decode words with common prefixes and suffixes.
e. Identify words with inconsistent but common spelling-sound correspondences.
f. Recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.
4. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
a. Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
b. Read grade-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression
on successive readings.
c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding,
rereading as necessary.
a.
Reading: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension
End-of-year Objectives
1. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to
demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
2. Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and
determine their central message, lesson, or moral. With informational text,
identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific
paragraphs within the text.
3. Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.
Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or
concepts, or steps in technical procedures in informational text.
4. Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes,
repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song. Determine
the meaning of words and phrases in informational text relevant to a grade 2 topic
or subject area.
5. Describe the overall structure of a story, including describing how the beginning
introduces the story and the ending concludes the action. Know and use various
Page 1 of 5
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 2nd Grade
Content: English Language Arts
text features (e.g., captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic
menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in informational text efficiently.
6. Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by
speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.
Identify the main purpose of an informational text, including what the author
wants to answer, explain, or describe.
7. Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text
to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot. In informational
text, explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine works)
contribute to and clarify a text.
8. Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text.
9. Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story by different
authors or from different cultures. With informational text, compare and contrast
the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic.
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature - including stories and
poetry - and informational texts - including history/social studies, science, and
technical texts - in the grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research
End-of-year Objectives
1. Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing
about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking
words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a
concluding statement or section.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts
and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or
section.
3. Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short
sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings,
use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.
4. [progression begins at 3rd grade]
5. With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and
strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.
6. With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce
Page 2 of 5
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 2nd Grade
Content: English Language Arts
and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.
7. Participate in shared research and writing projects.
8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided
sources to answer a question.
Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2
topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with
care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
b. Build on others' talk in conversations by responding to the comments of
others by linking their comments to the remarks of others.
c. Ask for clarification and further explanation as needed about the topics
and texts under discussion.
Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information
presented orally or through other media.
Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to clarify
comprehension, gather additional information, or deepen understanding of a
topic or issue.
Tell a story or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant,
descriptive details, speaking audibly in coherent sentences.
Create audio recordings of stories or poems; add drawings or other visual
displays to stories or recounts of experiences when appropriate to clarify ideas,
thoughts, and feelings.
Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to
provide requested detail or clarification
Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when
writing or speaking.
Page 3 of 5
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 2nd Grade
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Content: English Language Arts
Use collective nouns
Form and use frequently occurring irregular plural nouns.
Use reflexive pronouns
Form and use the past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs
Use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on
what is to be modified
Produce, expand, and rearrange complete simple and compound
sentences
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation,
and spelling when writing.
a.
b.
Capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names.
Use commas in greetings and closings of letters..
Use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring
possessives.
d. Generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words.
e. Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to
check and correct spellings.
3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or
listening
a. Compare formal and informal uses of English
c.
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases
based on grade 2 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.
a. Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
b. Determine the meaning of the new word formed when a known prefix is
added to a known word
c. Use a known root word as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word with
the same root
d. Use knowledge of the meaning of individual words to predict the meaning
of compound words
e. Use glossaries and beginning dictionaries, both print and digital, to
determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases
5. Demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
a.
b.
Identify real-life connections between words and their use
Distinguish shades of meaning among closely related verbs (e.g., toss,
Page 4 of 5
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 2nd Grade
Content: English Language Arts
throw, hurl) and closely related adjectives (e.g., thin, slender, skinny,
scrawny).
6. Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to,
and responding to texts, including using adjectives and adverbs to describe.
Page 5 of 5
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 3rd Grade
Content: English Language Arts
Learning to Read: Foundational Skills
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. [end of progression]
2.
[end of progression]
3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
a. Identify and know the meaning of the most common prefixes and derivational
suffixes.
b. Decode words with common Latin suffixes.
c. Decode multisyllable words
d. Read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.
4. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
a. Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
b. Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and
expression on successive readings
c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding,
rereading as necessary.
Reading: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension
End-of-year Objectives
1. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring
explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
2. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures;
determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed
through key details in the text. Determine the main idea of informational text;
recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.
3. Describe characters in a story and explain how their actions contribute to the
sequence of events. With informational text, describe the relationship between a
series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical
procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and
cause/effect.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
distinguishing literal from nonliteral language. Determine the meaning of general
academic and domain-specific words and phrases in informational text relevant to
a grade 3 topic or subject area.
5. Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a
text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive
Page 1 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 3rd Grade
Content: English Language Arts
part builds on earlier sections. In informational text, use text features and search
tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a
given topic efficiently.
6. Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the
characters in literature. With informational text, distinguish their own point of
view from that of the author of a text.
7. Explain how specific aspects of a text's illustrations contribute to what is
conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a
character or setting). In informational text, use information gained from
illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate
understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur).
8. Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in
a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence).
9. Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the
same author about the same or similar characters. With informational text,
compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two
texts on the same topic.
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature - including stories,
dramas, and poetry - and informational texts - including history/social studies,
science, and technical texts - at the high end of the grades 2-3 text complexity
band independently and proficiently.
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with
reasons.
a. Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and
create an organizational structure that lists reasons.
b. Provide reasons that support the opinion.
c. Use linking words and phrases to connect opinion and reasons.
d. Provide a concluding statement or section.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and
information clearly.
a. Introduce a topic and group related information together; include
illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension.
Page 2 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 3rd Grade
Content: English Language Arts
b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details.
c. Use linking words and phrases to connect ideas within categories of
information.
d. Provide a concluding statement or section.
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
a. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize
an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
b. Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to
develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to
situations.
c. Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order.
d. Provide a sense of closure.
4. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen
writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen
writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
6. With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish
writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with
others.
7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic.
8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and
digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided
categories.
9. [progression begins in 4th grade]
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of
discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1.
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts,
Page 3 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 3rd Grade
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Content: English Language Arts
building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material;
explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about
the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in
respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time
about the topics and texts under discussion).
c. Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on
topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others.
d. Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion.
Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or
information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually,
quantitatively, and orally.
Ask and answer questions about information from a speaker, offering
appropriate elaboration and detail.
Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with
appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an
understandable pace.
Create engaging audio recordings of stories or poems that demonstrate fluid
reading at an understandable pace; add visual displays when appropriate to
emphasize or enhance certain facts or details.
Speak in complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to
provide requested detail or clarification
Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
a. Explain the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in
general and their functions in particular sentences
b. Form and use regular and irregular plural nouns.
c. Use abstract nouns
Page 4 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 3rd Grade
Content: English Language Arts
d.
e.
f.
g.
Form and use regular and irregular verbs
Form and use the simple verb tenses.
Ensure subject-verb and pronoun-antecedent agreement
Form and use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs, and
choose between them depending on what is to be modified.
h. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.
i. Produce simple, compound, and complex sentences
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
a. Capitalize appropriate words in titles
b. Use commas in addresses.
c. Use commas and quotation marks in dialogue.
d. Form and use possessives.
e. Use conventional spelling for high-frequency and other studied words and
for adding suffixes to base words
f. Use spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, positionbased spellings, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts) in
writing words
g. Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to
check and correct spellings
3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or
listening
a. Choose words and phrases for effect
b. Recognize and observe differences between the conventions of spoken
and written standard English.
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning word and
phrases based on grade 3 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies.
a. Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
b. Determine the meaning of the new word formed when a known affix is
added to a known word
c. Use a known root word as a clue to the meaning of an unknown word with
the same root
d. Use glossaries or beginning dictionaries, both print and digital, to
Page 5 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 3rd Grade
Content: English Language Arts
determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.
5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and
nuances in word meanings.
a. Distinguish the literal and nonliteral meanings of words and phrases in
context
b. Identify real-life connections between words and their use
c. Distinguish shades of meaning among related words that describe states
of mind or degrees of certainty (e.g., knew, believed, suspected, heard,
wondered).
6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate conversational, general academic,
and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal spatial and
temporal relationships
Page 6 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 4th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
Learning to Read: Foundational Skills
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. [end of progression]
2.
[end of progression]
3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
a. Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication
patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar
multisyllabic words in context and out of context
4. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
a. Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
b. Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and
expression on successive readings
c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding,
rereading as necessary.
Reading: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says
explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text;
summarize the text. With informational text, determine the main idea and explain
how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.
3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on
specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions). With
informational text, explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical,
scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific
information in the text.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology. With
informational text, determine the meaning of general academic and domainspecific words or phrases relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.
5. Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the
structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama (e.g., casts of
characters, settings, descriptions, dialogue, stage directions) when writing or
speaking about a text. When using informational text, describe the overall
structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events,
Page 1 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 4th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.
6. Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are
narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations. With
informational text, compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of
the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information
provided.
7. Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral
presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific
descriptions and directions in the text. With informational text, interpret
information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs,
diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and
explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which
it appears.
8. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points
in a text.
9. Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g.,
opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories,
myths, and traditional literature from different cultures. With informational text,
integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak
about the subject knowledgeably.
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature - including stories,
dramas, and poetry - and informational texts - including history/social studies,
science, and technical texts - in the grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently,
with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons
and information.
a. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an
organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the
writer's purpose
b. Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details.
c. Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases
d. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion
presented.
Page 2 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 4th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
information clearly.
a. Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and
sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia
when useful to aiding comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or
other information and examples related to the topic.
c. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases
d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or
explain the topic
e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or
explanation presented.
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator
and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show
the responses of characters to situations..
c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of
events.
d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey
experiences and events precisely.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization
are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen
writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the
Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate
with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a
minimum of one page in a single sitting.
Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of
different aspects of a topic.
Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information
from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and
provide a list of sources.
Page 3 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 4th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research.
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of
discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts,
building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material;
explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about
the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.
c. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on
information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and
link to the remarks of others.
d. Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and
understanding in light of the discussion.
Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse
media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular
points.
Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized
manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support
main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to
enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting
ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group
discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation.
Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
Page 4 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 4th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when
writing or speaking.
a. Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative
adverbs (where, when, why).
b. Form and use the progressive verb tenses.
c. Use modal auxiliaries (e.g., can, may, must) to convey various conditions.
d. Order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns
e. Form and use prepositional phrases.
f. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate
fragments and run-ons.
g. Correctly use frequently confused words (e.g., to, too, two; there, their)
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
a. Use correct capitalization.
b. Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations
from a text.
c. Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence.
d. Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.
3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or
listening
a. Choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely.
b. Choose punctuation for effect.
c. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g.,
presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate
(e.g., small-group discussion).
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on grade 4 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies.
a. Use context (e.g., definitions, examples, or restatements in text) as a clue
to the meaning of a word or phrase.
b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues
to the meaning of a word
c. Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses),
both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify
the precise meaning of key words and phrases.
5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and
nuances in word meanings.
a. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors in context.
Page 5 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 4th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
b. Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and
proverbs.
c. Demonstrate understanding of words by relating them to their opposites
(antonyms) and to words with similar but not identical meanings
(synonyms).
6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domainspecific words and phrases, including those that signal precise actions, emotions,
or states of being and that are basic to a particular topic.
Page 6 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 5th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
Learning to Read: Foundational Skills
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. [end of progression]
2.
[end of progression]
3. Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
a. Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication
patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar
multisyllabic words in context and out of context
4. Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
a. Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
b. Read grade-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and
expression on successive readings
c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding,
rereading as necessary.
Reading: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension
End-of-year Objectives
1. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and
when drawing inferences from the text.
2. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text;
summarize the text. With informational text determine two or more main ideas of
a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.
3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on
specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions). In
informational text - historical, scientific, or technical text - explain the relationships
or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts based
on specific information in the text.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative language such as metaphors and similes. With informational
text, determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and
phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area.
5. Explain how a series of chapters, scenes, or stanzas fits together to provide the
overall structure of a particular story, drama, or poem. When using informational
text, compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison,
cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two
or more texts.
Page 1 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 5th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
6. With literature, describe how a narrator's or speaker's point of view influences
how events are described. With informational text, analyze multiple accounts of
the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point
of view they represent.
7. Analyze how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone,
or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale,
myth, poem). With informational text. draw on information from multiple print or
digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly
or to solve a problem efficiently.
8. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points
in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s).
9. Compare and contrast stories in the same genre (e.g., mysteries and adventure
stories) on their approaches to similar themes and topics. With informational text,
integrate information from several informational texts on the same topic in order
to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature - including stories,
dramas, and poetry - and informational texts - including history/social studies,
science, and technical texts - in the grades 4-5 text complexity band proficiently,
with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons
and information.
a. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an
organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support
the writer's purpose.
b. Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.
c. Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses
d. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion
presented.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and
information clearly.
a. Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and
group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings),
illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or
other information and examples related to the topic.
Page 2 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 5th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
c. Link ideas within and across categories of information using words,
phrases, and clauses
d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or
explain the topic.
e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or
explanation presented.
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.
a. Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator
and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally.
b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, description, and pacing, to
develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to
situations.
c. Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and clauses to manage the
sequence of events.
d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey
experiences and events precisely.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization
are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
5. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen
writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new
approach.
6. With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the
Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate
with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a
minimum of two pages in a single sitting.
7. Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge
through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
8. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information
from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes
and finished work, and provide a list of sources.
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research.
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of
discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Page 3 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 5th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts,
building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material;
explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about
the topic to explore ideas under discussion.
b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.
c. Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that
contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.
d. Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of
information and knowledge gained from the discussions.
2. Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media
and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
3. Summarize the points a speaker makes and explain how each claim is
supported by reasons and evidence.
4. Report on a topic or text or present an opinion, sequencing ideas logically and
using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas
or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
5. Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in
presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or
themes.
6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, using formal English when
appropriate to task and situation.
Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learningd
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
a. Explain the function of conjunctions, prepositions, and interjections in
general and their function in particular sentences.
b. Form and use the perfect verb tenses.
c. Use verb tense to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.
d. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense
Page 4 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 5th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
e. Use correlative conjunctions
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
a. Use punctuation to separate items in a series.
b. Use a comma to separate an introductory element from the rest of the
sentence.
c. Use a comma to set off the words yes and no (e.g., Yes, thank you), to set
off a tag question from the rest of the sentence (e.g., It's true, isn't it?),
and to indicate direct address (e.g., Is that you, Steve?).
d. Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate titles of works.
e. Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.
3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or
listening
a. Expand, combine, and reduce sentences for meaning, reader/listener
interest, and style.
b. Compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g., dialects, registers)
used in stories, dramas, or poems
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on grade 5 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies.
a. Use context (e.g., cause/effect relationships and comparisons in text) as a
clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues
to the meaning of a word
c. Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses),
both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify
the precise meaning of key words and phrases.
5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and
nuances in word meanings.
a. Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context.
b. Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and
proverbs.
c. Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonyms, antonyms,
homographs) to better understand each of the words.
6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domainspecific words and phrases, including those that signal contrast, addition, and
other logical relationships.
Page 5 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 5th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
Page 6 of 6
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 6th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
Reading Literature: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension
Reading Standard and End-of-year Objective
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
1. Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as
well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through
particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal
opinions or judgments.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course
of a text.
3. Describe how a particular story's or drama's plot unfolds in a series of
episodes as well as how the characters respond or change as the plot moves
toward a resolution.
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of a specific
word choice on meaning and tone.
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and
the whole.
5. Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the
overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the theme,
setting, or plot.
Page 1 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 6th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
6. Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker
in a text.
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
7. Compare and contrast the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to
listening to or viewing an audio, video, or live version of the text, including
contrasting what they "see" and "hear" when reading the text to what they
perceive when they listen or watch.
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity
of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
8. [not applicable to literature]
Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build
knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
9. Compare and contrast texts in different forms or genres (e.g., stories and
poems; historical novels and fantasy stories) in terms of their approaches to
similar themes and topics.
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
proficiently.
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories,
dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
Reading Informational Text: Text complexity & the growth of comprehension
Reading Standard and End-of-year Objective
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
1. Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as
Page 2 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 6th Grade
well as inferences drawn from the text.
Content: English Language Arts
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
2. Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular
details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or
judgments.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course
of a text.
3. Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced,
illustrated, and elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples or anecdotes).
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and
the whole.
5. Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into
the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of the ideas.
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it
is conveyed in the text.
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
7. Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually,
quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a
topic or issue.
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity
Page 3 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 6th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
8. Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, distinguishing
claims that are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build
knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
9. Compare and contrast one author's presentation of events with that of
another (e.g., a memoir written by and a biography on the same person).
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
proficiently.
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the
grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the
high end of the range.
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence
a. Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly.
b. Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible
sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s)
and reasons.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style.
e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument
presented.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas,
concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of
relevant content.
a. Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using
strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and
cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts,
tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details,
quotations, or other information and examples.
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Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 6th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
c. Use appropriate transitions to clarify the relationships among ideas and
concepts.
d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or
explain the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style.
f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the
information or explanation presented.
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event
sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and introducing a
narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds
naturally and logically.
b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to
develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence
and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another.
d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory
language to convey experiences and events.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization,
and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
5. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and
strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying
a new approach.
6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well
as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of
keyboarding skills to type a minimum of three pages in a single sitting.
7. Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several
sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate.
8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the
credibility of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of
others while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information
for sources.
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research.
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of
Page 5 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 6th Grade
discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Content: English Language Arts
Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and
issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material;
explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic,
text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, set specific goals and deadlines, and
define individual roles as needed.
c. Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail by
making comments that contribute to the topic, text, or issue under
discussion.
d. Review the key ideas expressed and demonstrate understanding of
multiple perspectives through reflection and paraphrasing.
2. Interpret information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually,
quantitatively, orally) and explain how it contributes to a topic, text, or issue
under study.
3. Delineate a speaker's argument and specific claims, distinguishing claims that
are supported by reasons and evidence from claims that are not.
4. Present claims and findings, sequencing ideas logically and using pertinent
descriptions, facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or themes; use
appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
5. Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, images, music, sound) and
visual displays in presentations to clarify information.
6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of
formal English when indicated or appropriate.
Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
a. Ensure that pronouns are in the proper case (subjective, objective,
possessive).
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Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 6th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
b. Use intensive pronouns
c. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in pronoun number and
person.
d. Recognize and correct vague pronouns (i.e., ones with unclear or
ambiguous antecedents).
e. Recognize variations from standard English in their own and others'
writing and speaking, and identify and use strategies to improve
expression in conventional language.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
a. Use punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off
nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements
b. Spell correctly.
3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or
listening
a. Vary sentence patterns for meaning, reader/listener interest, and style.
b. Maintain consistency in style and tone.
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on grade 6 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies.
a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a
word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a
word or phrase.
b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues
to the meaning of a word
c. Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses),
both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or
clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.
d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase
(e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances
in word meanings.
a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., personification) in context.
b. Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., cause/effect,
part/whole, item/category) to better understand each of the words.
c. Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar
denotations (definitions)
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Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 6th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
6.Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domainspecific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or
phrase important to comprehension or expression.
Page 8 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 7th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
Reading Literature: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension
Reading Standard and End-of-year Objective
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
1. Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text
says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development
over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course
of a text.
3. Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how
setting shapes the characters or plot).
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes
and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza
of a poem or section of a story or drama.
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and
the whole.
5. Analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet)
contributes to its meaning.
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
6. Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different
Page 1 of 9
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 7th Grade
characters or narrators in a text.
Content: English Language Arts
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
7. Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed,
staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to
each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity
of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
8. [not applicable to literature]
Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build
knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
9. Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and
a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how
authors of fiction use or alter history.
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
proficiently.
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories,
dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
Reading Informational Text: Text complexity & the growth of comprehension
Reading Standard and End-of-year Objective
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
1. Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text
says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
Page 2 of 9
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 7th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
2. Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development
over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course
of a text.
3. Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text
(e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence
ideas or events).
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of
a specific word choice on meaning and tone.
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and
the whole.
5. Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the
major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how
the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
7. Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the
text, analyzing each medium's portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of
a speech affects the impact of the words).
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity
of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
8. Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing
whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to
Page 3 of 9
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 7th Grade
support the claims.
Content: English Language Arts
Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build
knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
9. Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their
presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or
advancing different interpretations of facts.
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
proficiently.
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the
grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the
high end of the range.
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence
a. Introduce claim(s), acknowledge alternate or opposing claims, and
organize the reasons and evidence logically.
b. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using
accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the
topic or text.
c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the
relationships among claim(s), reasons, and evidence.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style.
e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports
the argument presented.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas,
concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of
relevant content.
a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas,
concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition,
classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting
(e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful
to aiding comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details,
Page 4 of 9
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 7th Grade
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Content: English Language Arts
quotations, or other information and examples.
c. Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships
among ideas and concepts.
d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or
explain the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style.
f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports
the information or explanation presented.
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event
sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view
and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence
that unfolds naturally and logically.
b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to
develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence
and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another.
d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory
language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated
experiences or events.
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization,
and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and
strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying
a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been
addressed.
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link
to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including
linking to and citing sources.
Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several
sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further
research and investigation.
Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using
search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and
quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding
plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
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Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 7th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research.
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of
discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Page 6 of 9
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 7th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and
issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under
study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the
topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
b. Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals
and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
c. Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others' questions
and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the
discussion back on topic as needed
d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted,
modify their own views.
2. Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and
formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a
topic, text, or issue under study.
3. Delineate a speaker's argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness
of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
4. Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent
manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use
appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
5. Include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to clarify
claims and findings and emphasize salient points.
6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of
formal English when indicated or appropriate.
Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
a. Explain the function of phrases and clauses in general and their function in
specific sentences.
Page 7 of 9
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 7th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
b. Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex
sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas.
c. Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting
misplaced and dangling modifiers.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
a. Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives
b. Spell correctly.
3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or
listening
a. Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing
and eliminating wordiness and redundancy.
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies.
a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a
word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a
word or phrase.
b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues
to the meaning of a word
c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries,
glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation
of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.
d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase
(e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances
in word meanings.
a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological
allusions) in context.
b. Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonym/antonym,
analogy) to better understand each of the words.
c. Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar
denotations (definitions)
6.Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific
words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase
important to comprehension or expression.
Page 8 of 9
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 7th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
Page 9 of 9
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 8th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
Reading Literature: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension
Reading Standard and End-of-year Objective
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
1. Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the
text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development
over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting,
and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course
of a text.
3. Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama
propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific
word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other
texts.
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and
the whole.
5. Compare and contrast the structure of two or more texts and analyze how
the differing structure of each text contributes to its meaning and style.
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
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Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 8th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
6. Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the
audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such
effects as suspense or humor.
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
7. Analyze the extent to which a filmed or live production of a story or drama
stays faithful to or departs from the text or script, evaluating the choices made
by the director or actors.
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity
of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
8. [not applicable to literature]
Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build
knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
9. Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events,
or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as
the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new.
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
proficiently.
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories,
dramas, and poems, at the high end of grades 6-8 text complexity band
independently and proficiently.
Reading Informational Text: Text complexity & the growth of comprehension
Reading Standard and End-of-year Objective
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
1. Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the
text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
Page 2 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 8th Grade
the key supporting details and ideas.
Content: English Language Arts
2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the
course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an
objective summary of the text.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course
of a text.
3. Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between
individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or
categories).
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of
specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to
other texts.
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and
the whole.
5. Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the
role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept.
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how
the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints.
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
7. Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g.,
print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea.
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity
Page 3 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 8th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing
whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient;
recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced.
Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build
knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
9. Analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on
the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or
interpretation.
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
proficiently.
10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high
end of the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence
a. Introduce claim(s), acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from
alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence
logically.
b. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using
accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the
topic or text.
c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the
relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style.
e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports
the argument presented.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas,
concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of
relevant content.
a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas,
concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting
Page 4 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 8th Grade
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Content: English Language Arts
(e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful
to aiding comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete
details, quotations, or other information and examples.
c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to create cohesion and clarify the
relationships among ideas and concepts.
d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or
explain the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style.
f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports
the information or explanation presented.
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event
sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view
and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence
that unfolds naturally and logically.
b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, and
reflection, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
c. Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey
sequence, signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another, and
show the relationships among experiences and events.
d. Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory
language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated
experiences or events
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization,
and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and
strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying
a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been
addressed.
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and
present the relationships between information and ideas efficiently as well as
to interact and collaborate with others
Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a selfgenerated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional
related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration.
Page 5 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 8th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using
search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and
quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding
plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research.
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of
discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in
groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and
issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under
study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the
topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.
b. Follow rules for collegial discussions and decision-making, track progress
toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.
c. Pose questions that connect the ideas of several speakers and respond to
others' questions and comments with relevant evidence, observations,
and ideas.
d. Acknowledge new information expressed by others, and, when warranted,
qualify or justify their own views in light of the evidence presented.
Analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse media and formats
(e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and evaluate the motives (e.g., social,
commercial, political) behind its presentation.
Delineate a speaker's argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness
of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the evidence and identifying
when irrelevant evidence is introduced.
Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent
manner with relevant evidence, sound valid reasoning, and well-chosen details;
use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify
information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest.
Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of
Page 6 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 8th Grade
formal English when indicated or appropriate.
Content: English Language Arts
Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
a. Explain the function of verbals (gerunds, participles, infinitives) in general
and their function in particular sentences.
b. Form and use verbs in the active and passive voice.
c. Form and use verbs in the indicative, imperative, interrogative,
conditional, and subjunctive mood.
d. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb voice and mood.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
a. Use punctuation (comma, ellipsis, dash) to indicate a pause or break.
b. Use an ellipsis to indicate an omission.
c. Spell correctly.
3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or
listening
a. Use verbs in the active and passive voice and in the conditional and
subjunctive mood to achieve particular effects (e.g., emphasizing the actor
or the action; expressing uncertainty or describing a state contrary to
fact).
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on grade 8 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies.
a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a
word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a
word or phrase.
b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues
to the meaning of a word
c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries,
glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation
Page 7 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 8th Grade
Content: English Language Arts
of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.
d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase
(e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances
in word meanings.
a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g. verbal irony, puns) in context.
b. Use the relationship between particular words to better understand each
of the words.
c. Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar
denotations (definitions)
6. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domainspecific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or
phrase important to comprehension or expression.
Page 8 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 9th Grade
Course: English I
Reading Literature: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension
Reading Standard and End-of-year Objective
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its
development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is
shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course
of a text.
3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting
motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters,
and advance the plot or develop the theme.
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text,
including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact
of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a
sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and
the whole.
5. Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order
events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing,
Page 1 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 9th Grade
flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
Course: English I
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
6. Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work
of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of
world literature.
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different
artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity
of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
8. [not applicable to literature]
Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build
knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
9. Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific
work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or
how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
proficiently.
10. By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories,
dramas, and poems, in the grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently, with
scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
Reading Informational Text: Text complexity & the growth of comprehension
Reading Standard and End-of-year Objective
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the
Page 2 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 9th Grade
text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Course: English I
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the
course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by
specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course
of a text.
3. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events,
including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and
developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the
cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and
the whole.
5. Analyze in detail how an author's ideas or claims are developed and refined
by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section
or chapter).
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an
author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
7. Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a
person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are
Page 3 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 9th Grade
emphasized in each account.
Course: English I
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity
of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing
whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient;
identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build
knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
9. Analyze seminal U.S. documents of historical and literary significance,
including how they address related themes and concepts.
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
proficiently.
10. By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literacy nonfiction in the
grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the
high end of the range.
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts,
using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or
opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear
relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each
while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that
anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns.
c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text,
create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and
reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and
counterclaims.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending
to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports
Page 4 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 9th Grade
Course: English I
the argument presented.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas,
concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective
selection, organization, and analysis of content.
a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to
make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g.,
headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to
aiding comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts,
extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information
and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.
c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the
text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas
and concepts.
d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the
complexity of the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending
to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports
the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or
the significance of the topic).
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or
observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing
a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences
or events.
b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection,
and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
c. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one
another to create a coherent whole.
d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to
convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or
characters.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is
experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization,
and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Page 5 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 9th Grade
Course: English I
5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and audience.
6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update
individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology's capacity
to link to other information and to display information flexibly and
dynamically.
7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question
(including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden
the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject,
demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
8. Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital
sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each
source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text
selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a
standard format for citation.
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research.
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of
tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1.
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (oneon-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 9 topics,
texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and
persuasively.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under
study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from
texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful,
well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making
(e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of
alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate
the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively
Page 6 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 9th Grade
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Course: English I
incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge
ideas and conclusions.
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of
agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify
their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of
the evidence and reasoning presented.
Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or
formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and
accuracy of each source.
Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric,
identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and
logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the
organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose,
audience, and task.
Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and
interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings,
reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of
formal English when indicated or appropriate.
Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
a. Use parallel structure.
b. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial,
prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun,
relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and
interest to writing or presentations.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
a. Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more
closely related independent clauses.
Page 7 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 9th Grade
Course: English I
b. Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation.
c. Spell correctly.
3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different
contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more
fully when reading or listening.
a. Write and edit work so that it conforms to the guidelines in a style manual
appropriate for the discipline and writing type.
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on grade 9 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies.
a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a
word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a
word or phrase.
b. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different
meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate,
advocacy).
c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries,
glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation
of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or
its etymology.
d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase
(e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances
in word meanings.
a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and
analyze their role in the text.
b. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
6. Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and
phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and
career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge
when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
Page 8 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 10th Grade
Course: English II
Reading Literature: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension
Reading Standard and End-of-year Objective
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says
explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its
development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is
shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the
text.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course
of a text.
3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting
motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters,
and advance the plot or develop the theme.
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text,
including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact
of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a
sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and
the whole.
5. Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure a text, order
events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing,
Page 1 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 10th Grade
flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
Course: English II
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
6. Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work
of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of
world literature.
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different
artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity
of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
8. [not applicable to literature]
Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build
knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
9. Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific
work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or
how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
proficiently.
10. By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories,
dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 9-10 text complexity band
independently and proficiently.
Reading Informational Text: Text complexity & the growth of comprehension
Reading Standard and End-of-year Objective
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the
Page 2 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 10th Grade
text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
Course: English II
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the
course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by
specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course
of a text.
3. Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events,
including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and
developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the
cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone.
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and
the whole.
5. Analyze in detail how an author's ideas or claims are developed and refined
by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section
or chapter).
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an
author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
7. Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a
person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are
Page 3 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 10th Grade
emphasized in each account.
Course: English II
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity
of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing
whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient;
identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.
Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build
knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
9. Analyze seminal U.S. documents of historical and literary significance,
including how they address related themes and concepts.
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
proficiently.
10. By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high
end of the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts,
using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
a. Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or
opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear
relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each
while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that
anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns.
c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text,
create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and
reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and
counterclaims.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending
to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports
the argument presented.
Page 4 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 10th Grade
Course: English II
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas,
concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective
selection, organization, and analysis of content.
a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to
make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g.,
headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to
aiding comprehension.
b. Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts,
extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information
and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.
c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the
text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas
and concepts.
d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the
complexity of the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending
to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports
the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or
the significance of the topic).
3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or
observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing
a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences
or events.
b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection,
and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
c. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one
another to create a coherent whole.
d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to
convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or
characters.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is
experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.
4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization,
and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing,
Page 5 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 10th Grade
Course: English II
rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and audience.
6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update
individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology's capacity
to link to other information and to display information flexibly and
dynamically.
7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question
(including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden
the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject,
demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
8. Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital
sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each
source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text
selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a
standard format for citation.
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research.
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of
tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1.
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (oneon-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 10 topics,
texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and
persuasively.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under
study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from
texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful,
well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making
(e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of
alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate
the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively
incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge
Page 6 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 10th Grade
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Course: English II
ideas and conclusions.
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of
agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify
their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of
the evidence and reasoning presented.
Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or
formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and
accuracy of each source.
Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric,
identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and
logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the
organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose,
audience, and task.
Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and
interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings,
reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of
formal English when indicated or appropriate.
Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and
usage when writing or speaking.
a. Use parallel structure.
b. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial,
prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun,
relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and
interest to writing or presentations.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
a. Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more
closely related independent clauses.
Page 7 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 10th Grade
Course: English II
b. Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation.
c. Spell correctly.
3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different
contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more
fully when reading or listening.
a. Write and edit work so that it conforms to the guidelines in a style manual
appropriate for the discipline and writing type.
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on grade 10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies.
a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a
word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a
word or phrase.
b. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different
meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate,
advocacy).
c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries,
glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation
of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or
its etymology.
d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase
(e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances
in word meanings.
a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron) in context and
analyze their role in the text.
b. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
6. Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and
phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and
career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge
when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
Page 8 of 8
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 11th Grade
Course: English III
Reading Literature: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension
Reading Standard and End-of-year Objective
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the
text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including
determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their
development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build
on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary
of the text.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course
of a text.
3. Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and
relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is
ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text,
including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific
word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or
language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare
as well as other authors.).
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and
the whole.
Page 1 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 11th Grade
Course: English III
5. Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts
of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide
a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning
as well as its aesthetic impact.
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
6. Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what
is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony,
or understatement).
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
7. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded
or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each
version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare
and one play by an American dramatist.)
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity
of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
8. [not applicable to literature]
Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build
knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
9. Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentiethcentury foundational works of American literature, including how two or more
texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
proficiently.
10. By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literature, including stories,
dramas, and poems, in the grades 11-CCR text complexity band proficiently,
with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
Page 2 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 11th Grade
Course: English III
Reading Informational Text: Text complexity & the growth of comprehension
Reading Standard and End-of-year Objective
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the
text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including
determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
2. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their
development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build
on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of
the text.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course
of a text.
3. Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how
specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the
text.
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an
author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a
text.
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and
the whole.
Page 3 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 11th Grade
Course: English III
5. Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his
or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points
clear, convincing, and engaging.
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text in which the
rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to
the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different
media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to
address a question or solve a problem.
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity
of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
8. Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the
application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S.
Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes,
and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential
addresses).
Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build
knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
9. Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S.
documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of
Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and
Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical
features.
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
proficiently.
10. By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the
grades 11-CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at
the high end of the range.
Page 4 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 11th Grade
Course: English III
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts,
using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
a. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the
claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and
create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims,
reasons, and evidence.
b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the
most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and
limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge
level, concerns, values, and possible biases.
c. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major
sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between
claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between
claim(s) and counterclaims.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending
to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports
the argument presented.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas,
concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective
selection, organization, and analysis of content.
a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so
that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified
whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables),
and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
b. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and
relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other
information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the
topic.
c. Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major
sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among
complex ideas and concepts.
d. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as
metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending
Page 5 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 11th Grade
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Course: English III
to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports
the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or
the significance of the topic).
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or
observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of
view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth
progression of experiences or events.
b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection,
and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
c. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one
another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and
outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).
d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to
convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or
characters.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is
experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization,
and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and audience.
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update
individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback,
including new arguments or information.
Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question
(including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden
the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject,
demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital
sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and
limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience;
integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas,
avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a
standard format for citation.
Page 6 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 11th Grade
Course: English III
9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research.
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of
tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Page 7 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 11th Grade
Course: English III
Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (oneon-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 11 topics,
texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and
persuasively.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under
study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from
texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful,
well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
b. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decisionmaking, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as
needed.
c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe
reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a
topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and
promote divergent and creative perspectives.
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments,
claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions
when possible; and determine what additional information or research is
required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.
Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and
media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions
and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and
noting any discrepancies among the data.
Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric,
assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of
emphasis, and tone used.
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and
distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning,
alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization,
development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a
range of formal and informal tasks.
Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and
interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings,
Page 8 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 11th Grade
Course: English III
reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of
formal English when indicated or appropriate.
Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
a. Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change
over time, and is sometimes contested.
b. Resolve issues of complex or contested usage, consulting references (e.g.,
Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, Garner's Modern
American Usage) as needed.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
a. Observe hyphenation conventions
b. Spell correctly.
3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different
contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more
fully when reading or listening.
a. Vary syntax for effect, consulting references (e.g., Tufte's Artful Sentences)
for guidance as needed; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of
complex texts when reading.
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on grade 11 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies.
a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a
word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a
word or phrase.
b. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different
meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).
c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries,
glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation
of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its
Page 9 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 11th Grade
Course: English III
etymology, or its standard usage
d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase
(e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances
in word meanings.
a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and
analyze their role in the text.
b. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
6. Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and
phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and
career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge
when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
Page 10 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 12th Grade
Course: English IV
Reading Literature: Text complexity and the growth of comprehension
Reading Standard and End-of-year Objective
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the
text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including
determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their
development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build
on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary
of the text.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course
of a text.
3. Analyze the impact of the author's choices regarding how to develop and
relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is
ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text,
including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific
word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or
language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare
as well as other authors.).
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and
the whole.
Page 1 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 12th Grade
Course: English IV
5. Analyze how an author's choices concerning how to structure specific parts
of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide
a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning
as well as its aesthetic impact.
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
6. Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what
is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony,
or understatement).
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
7. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded
or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each
version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare
and one play by an American dramatist.)
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity
of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
8. [not applicable to literature]
Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build
knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
9. Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentiethcentury foundational works of American literature, including how two or more
texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
proficiently.
10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literature, including stories,
dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 11-CCR text complexity band
independently and proficiently.
Page 2 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 12th Grade
Course: English IV
Reading Informational Text: Text complexity & the growth of comprehension
Reading Standard and End-of-year Objective
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences
from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the
text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including
determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize
the key supporting details and ideas.
2. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their
development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build
on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of
the text.
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course
of a text.
3. Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how
specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the
text.
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text,
including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an
author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a
text.
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and
the whole.
Page 3 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 12th Grade
Course: English IV
5. Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his
or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points
clear, convincing, and engaging.
Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
6. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text in which the
rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to
the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including
visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
7. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different
media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to
address a question or solve a problem.
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity
of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
8. Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the
application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S.
Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes,
and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential
addresses).
Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build
knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
9. Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S.
documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of
Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and
Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical
features.
Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and
proficiently.
10. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high
end of the grades 11-CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently.
Page 4 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 12th Grade
Course: English IV
Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts,
using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
a. Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the
claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and
create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims,
reasons, and evidence.
b. Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly and thoroughly, supplying the
most relevant evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and
limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge
level, concerns, values, and possible biases.
c. Use words, phrases, and clauses as well as varied syntax to link the major
sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between
claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between
claim(s) and counterclaims.
d. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending
to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports
the argument presented.
2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas,
concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective
selection, organization, and analysis of content.
a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so
that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified
whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables),
and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
b. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and
relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other
information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the
topic.
c. Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major
sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among
complex ideas and concepts.
d. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as
metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic.
e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending
to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
Page 5 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 12th Grade
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Course: English IV
f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports
the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or
the significance of the topic).
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using
effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
a. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or
observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of
view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth
progression of experiences or events.
b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection,
and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
c. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one
another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and
outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution).
d. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to
convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or
characters.
e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is
experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization,
and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing,
rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most
significant for a specific purpose and audience.
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update
individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback,
including new arguments or information.
Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question
(including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden
the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject,
demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital
sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and
limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience;
integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas,
avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a
standard format for citation.
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,
Page 6 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 12th Grade
Course: English IV
reflection, and research.
10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and
revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of
tasks, purposes, and audiences.
Page 7 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 12th Grade
Course: English IV
Speaking and Listening: Flexible communication and collaboration
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (oneon-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 12 topics,
texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and
persuasively.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under
study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from
texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful,
well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
b. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decisionmaking, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as
needed.
c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe
reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a
topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and
promote divergent and creative perspectives.
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments,
claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions
when possible; and determine what additional information or research is
required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.
Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and
media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) in order to make informed decisions
and solve problems, evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source and
noting any discrepancies among the data.
Evaluate a speaker's point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric,
assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of
emphasis, and tone used.
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and
distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning,
alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization,
development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a
range of formal and informal tasks.
Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and
interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings,
Page 8 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 12th Grade
Course: English IV
reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of
formal English when indicated or appropriate.
Language: Conventions, effective use, and vocabulary
End-of-year Objectives with Teachers’ Targets for Student Learning
1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
when writing or speaking.
a. Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change
over time, and is sometimes contested.
b. Resolve issues of complex or contested usage, consulting references (e.g.,
Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, Garner's Modern
American Usage) as needed.
2. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling when writing.
a. Observe hyphenation conventions
b. Spell correctly.
3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different
contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more
fully when reading or listening.
a. Vary syntax for effect, consulting references (e.g., Tufte's Artful Sentences)
for guidance as needed; apply an understanding of syntax to the study of
complex texts when reading.
4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on grade 12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies.
a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a
word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a
word or phrase.
b. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different
meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).
c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries,
glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation
of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its
Page 9 of 10
Curriculum Overview
GRADE LEVEL: 12th Grade
Course: English IV
etymology, or its standard usage
d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase
(e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships and nuances
in word meanings.
a. Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and
analyze their role in the text.
b. Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.
6. Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and
phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and
career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge
when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.
Page 10 of 10
Proposal for Adding Junior High Soccer
Proposed by: Matt Jernigan
Lebanon High School Boys and Girls Soccer Coach
Proposal
We are asking that boys’ and girls’ soccer be added as school sponsored sports at Lebanon
Junior High with the first official girl’s season being Spring 2015 and the first official boy’s
season being the Fall of 2015. Each boys’ and girls’ team would be either a combined 7th and
8th grade team or one team per grade-level depending on the number of players that come out
(there would be no co-ed teams). We are asking for a $750 supplies budget (per sport) to help
supply gear and league entry fees. We are also asking for a $1500 stipend (per sport) to hire a
coach. The team’s practices would be held at Boswell Elementary or Maplecrest Elementary on
the existing fields and the games would be played in Springfield at Lake Country Soccer
Complex. No funds are being requested for new facilities. The teams will use old high school
uniforms for the start of the program, so there would be no cost for new uniforms.
Rational for Junior High Soccer Program
Soccer is gaining popularity, not only across the country but here in Lebanon. There
approximately 450 K-6th graders that play soccer for the local Lebanon Soccer Association. Even
with this popularity, there is still a glaring void in Lebanon’s soccer programs, and that is at the
Junior High level. Each year we lose students who played soccer for LSA, but get to junior high
and do not have a team to play on. Most of those students end up not participating in any
sports at the junior high. We also lose those players to competing sports such as football for
the boys and track for the girls because they have a junior high program and there is not a
junior high program for soccer. Also, due to the lack of a junior high team, we are at a
disadvantage of not knowing what our incoming freshman class will bring to the high school
each year. This makes it hard to know if we will have a Junior Varsity team or not until practices
begin in August.
Arguably the hardest part of not having a junior high team is that we are falling behind in the
development of our players for the high school level. We compete at the high school level
against teams such as Kickapoo, Glendale, Nixa, Ozark and Bolivar, all of which have developed
middle school programs. Each year those schools have between 20 and 50 players that develop
their skills each day as a part of a middle school soccer program. Each of these teams play in a
middle school league in Springfield at Lake Country Soccer Complex. Here at Lebanon, we have
tried to get several non-school sponsored teams together to play in these leagues, but we have
not been able to do so. The reason is not because of a lack of interest, but because of cost and
transportation to the games. Just this fall, we had over twenty boys sign up for the junior high
“Club” soccer team. Out of those twenty boys, eleven of them said they could not play because
their family could not afford the cost and transportation each week to Springfield. We also had
seven students that wanted to play soccer for our club team, but ended up joining other sports
because “I don’t have to pay to run or play Cross Country and Football” and their parents
wouldn’t allow them to play soccer since the soccer team charged and they had to drive their
child to the games.
If we are approved, we will be joining the middle school league in Springfield that currently has
teams from all of the Springfield middle schools, as well as Branson, Nixa, Ozark, Willard,
Catholic, Bolivar, Greenwood, Cassville, Rogersville and New Covenant. Many of these schools
also have multiple teams in this league. The league would be ten to twelve weeks long and
would include one game per week. We would also compete in an “end-of-the-year”
tournament for the league. It would give our students a chance to grow as a team and
compete. We anticipate there to be from 20 to 40 players on each the boys’ and girls’ teams.
Not only would adding junior high soccer improve our high school programs in the future, it
would also give as many as 80 students a year the chance to get involved at our junior high that
would otherwise not be involved without soccer.
Thank you for your consideration for this program.
Respectfully,
Matt Jernigan
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