Elta | ST104N | Instruction manual | Elta ST104N Instruction manual

Elta ST104N Instruction manual
INSTRUCTION MANUAL
®
Orion IntelliScope
Computerized
Object Locator
™
#7880
Providing Exceptional Consumer Optical Products Since 1975
Customer Support (800) 676-1343
E-mail: support@telescope.com
Corporate Offices (831) 763-7000
P.O. Box 1815, Santa Cruz, CA 95061
IN 229 Rev. B 3/11/04
Coil cable jack
RS-232 jack
Backlit liquid crystal display
Illuminated
pushbuttons
User-friendly
keypad
Figure 1. The IntelliScope Computerized Object Locator.
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Congratulations on your purchase of the Orion IntelliScope™ Computerized Object Locator. When used with any of the SkyQuest
IntelliScope XT Dobsonians, the object locator (controller) will provide quick, easy access to thousands of celestial objects for viewing with your telescope.
The controller’s user-friendly keypad combined with its database of more than 14,000
celestial objects put the night sky literally at your fingertips. You just select an object to
view, press Enter, then move the telescope manually following the guide arrows on the
liquid crystal display (LCD) screen. In seconds, the IntelliScope’s high-resolution, 9,216step digital encoders pinpoint the object, placing it smack-dab in the telescope’s field of
view! Easy!
Compared to motor-dependent computerized telescopes systems, IntelliScope is faster,
quieter, easier, and more power efficient. And IntelliScope Dobs eschew the complex initialization, data entry, or “drive training” procedures required by most other computerized
telescopes. Instead, the IntelliScope setup involves simply pointing the scope to two
bright stars and pressing the Enter key. That’s it — then you’re ready for action!
These instructions will help you set up and properly operate your IntelliScope Computerized Object Locator. Please read them thoroughly.
Table of Contents
1. Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2. Alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3. Overview of Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
4. Locating the Planets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
5. Locating Deep-Sky Objects by Catalog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
6. Locating Deep-Sky Objects by Object Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
7. Locating Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
8. Tours of the Best Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
9. The Identity Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
10. Adding User-Defined Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
11. The FCN Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
12. The “Hidden” Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
13. Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Appendix A: Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24-25
Appendix B: Alignment Star Finder Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26-29
Appendix C: Constellation Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Appendix D: ST Catalog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31-46
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Parts List
Your IntelliScope™ Computerized Object Locator comes with the following parts:
Qty.
Description
1
Object locator computer (controller)
1
Altitude encoder assembly
1
Coil cable
1
Altitude encoder cable (53" long)
1
Azimuth encoder cable (24" long)
6
Wire retaining clips
2
Hook-and-loop strips (1 “hook” strip, 1 “loop” strip)
1
Plastic bumper
3
Wood screws
2
Nylon washers
1
9-volt battery
The only tool needed for installation is a Phillips-head screwdriver. Remove the optical
tube from the base to begin installation.
Note: The IntelliScope Computerized Object Locator is only compatible with Orion SkyQuest XT IntelliScope Dobsonians. If you have another Dobsonian, or any other telescope, the IntelliScope system will not function properly.
1. Installation
1) Install the altitude encoder assembly onto the base’s right side panel. This is the side
of the base opposite the side with the IntelliScope Computerized Controller Port.
Below the 5/8" through-hole in the panel, there are two predrilled starter holes in the
inwardfacing surface (Figure 2). Take two of the supplied wood screws and push them
through the two slotted holes in the bottom of the altitude encoder’s computer board.
The screw heads should be on the same side as the altitude encoder’s modular jack.
Now, with the screws pushed through the encoder board, place a nylon washer on
the end of each screw (Figure 3). Then, thread the screws into the starter holes in the
side panel. The shaft on the altitude encoder assembly should protrude through the
5/8" through-hole in the side panel. It will take a bit of dexterity to keep the washers
on the ends of the screws when installing, so don’t get frustrated if it takes a couple
tries. The screws should not be fully tightened; they should be tight, but not tight
enough to prevent the altitude encoder from moving up and down within the slots in
the encoder board.
2) There is a pilot hole above the 5/8" through hole in the right side panel’s interior surface; this is where the plastic bumper that protects the altitude encoder assembly will
be installed. Take the remaining wood screw, push it through the bumper, and thread
it into the pilot hole until tight (Figure 4).
3) Connect one end of the azimuth encoder cable (the shorter of the two cables) to the
encoder jack in the top baseplate of the Dobsonian base. Connect the other end to the
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encoder connector board that should be
already installed on the base’s left side
panel. The cable should plug into the jack
on the left side of the encoder connector
board (see Figure 5).
Altitude encoder
pilot holes
4) Connect one end of the altitude encoder
cable to the modular jack on the altitude
encoder assembly. Connect the other end of
the cable to the jack on the right side of the
encoder connector board (see Figure 5).
Figure 2. The two pilot holes used to mount
the altitude encoder assembly are located on
the interior surface of the right side panel of
the base.
Modular jack
Altitude encoder
assembly
Nylon washers
5) Use the provided wire clips to secure the
altitude and azimuth cables neatly to the
base. We recommend using two clips for
the (shorter) azimuth cable, and four clips
for the (longer) altitude cable (Figure 5a.).
The clips have adhesive backing; simply
peel the paper off the back of the clip and
press the adhesive back to the base where
you want the clip to be located.
6) Place the telescope optical tube into the
base. Be very careful not to hit the altitude
encoder with the side bearing on the tube
when doing this or damage to the encoder
could result. The bumper helps to prevent
such contact.
7) Reinstall the telescope’s tensioning knob
(the one with the Teflon and metal washers)
through the base’s left side panel (the side
that has the IntelliScope Computerized
Controller Port label) and into the threaded
hole in the center of the tube’s side bearing.
Wood screws
Figure 3. Place a nylon washer on the end
of each screw after the screws are pushed
through the altitude encoder assembly.
8) Reinstall the telescope’s retaining knob,
without its black nylon bushing, through the
altitude encoder’s aluminum shaft (now
protruding from the right side panel) and
into the tube’s side bearing (Figure 6).
Make sure this knob is fully tightened.
9) Insert one end of the coil cable into the
larger of the two jacks on the top of the
IntelliScope controller (Figure 1). Insert the
other end into the “IntelliScope
Computerized Controller Port” on the left
side of the Dobsonian base.
Figure 4. Install the bumper into the pilot
10) Two hook-and-loop strips (one strip of
“hooks” and one strip of “loops”) have been
provided to hang the IntelliScope controller
in a convenient location on the base when
not in use. Place the “hooks” strip on the
hole above the altitude encoder assembly.
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Altitude
cable
jack
Figure 6. The retaining knob now goes
Azimuth
cable jack
Figure 5. The azimuth cable plugs into the
jack on the left of the encoder connector board.
The altitude cable plugs into the jack on
the right.
through the shaft of the altitude encoder
assembly before threading into the side
bearing on the telescope tube.
back of the controller, and the “loops” strip
on the base in a convenient spot. Make
certain the location of the strip on the base
will not cause the controller to interfere
with the motions of the mount. You may
want to consider using the optional holster
instead of the supplied hook-and-loop
strips. The holster is a metal holder custom-designed to fit the IntelliScope controller. When installed at the top of the
Dobsonian base, it provides a firm mounting for the controller at a convenient position for easy access. The controller can be
removed from the holster when needed or
kept in the holster during use.
11) Slide the battery cover off the back of
the hand control and insert the 9-volt alkaline battery. Make sure the positive and
negative terminals of the battery are oriented as shown in the bottom of the battery compartment. Replace the battery
cover.
Your IntelliScope Computerized Object
Locator is now installed and ready to be
used.
Figure 5a. Use the wire clips to secure the
cables neatly to the base
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2. Alignment
This section will familiarize you with the alignment procedure for the IntelliScope system.
Powering the Controller
To turn the controller on, firmly press the Power button. The LED lights will activate and
the LCD screen will display its introduction message. The intensity of the illumination can
be adjusted by repeatedly pressing the Power button. There are five levels of LED brightness. Choose a brightness level that suits your conditions and needs. (Dimmer settings will
prolong battery life.)
To turn the controller off, press and hold the Power button for a few seconds, then
release it.
To conserve battery life, the controller is programmed to shut itself off after being idle for
15 minutes. So, make sure to press a button at least once every 15 minutes if you do not
want the controller to turn off. If the controller does turn off, you will need to perform the
initial alignment procedure again.
If the LCD screen and the buttons’ backlighting automatically begin to dim, it’s time to
change batteries.
Initial Vertical Alignment
After powering up the controller, the top line of the LCD display will read: “POINT VERTICAL.” If the vertical stop you installed on the Dobsonian base during assembly of the
telescope is properly adjusted (see below), simply rotate the telescope upwards in altitude until the bottom of the tube comes into contact with the vertical stop. Once the telescope tube is in the vertical position, press the Enter button to start the two-star alignment procedure.
Adjusting the Vertical Stop
In order for the IntelliScope system to work accurately, the vertical stop must be precisely adjusted so that the optical tube is truly perpendicular to the azimuth axis of the base
when the controller says “POINT VERTICAL.” For most IntelliScopes, the vertical stop
must use the nylon spacer, one of the 1/16"-thick washers, and the 1/32"-thick washers
to achieve this. These parts, plus an extra 1/16"-thick washer are supplied with the
Dobsonian base. If you do not have access to a carpenter’s level, then using the spacer,
1/16"-thick washer, and 1/32"-thick washer
will be the best you can do to adjust the vertical stop.
For the most precise adjustment of the vertical stop (which will allow the best pointing
accuracy to be achieved), you should use a
carpenter’s level. Any hardware store will
have one. First, make sure the base itself is
level. Place the carpenter’s level on the top
ground board and rotate the base 180˚ in
azimuth (Figure 7). The level should indicate that the base is level through the
entire rotation. If not, then reposition the
base on the ground, or place shims underneath the feet until the base stays level
though a 180˚ rotation.
Figure 7. Place a carpenter’s level on the
base as shown. The base should stay level
through a 180˚ rotation in azimuth. Once the
vertical stop is set, the base does not need to
be level to function properly.
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Next, place the nylon spacer, the 1/16"-thick
washer, and the 1/32"-thick washer on the
vertical stop screw, and thread the entire
assembly into the insert in the base’s front
brace. Now, rotate the telescope upwards in
altitude until the mirror cell of the telescope
comes into contact with the vertical stop.
Place the carpenter’s level across the top of
the telescope (see Figure 8). Is the top of
the tube level? If so, you are finished adjusting the vertical stop. If not, add or remove a
washer to the vertical stop screw until the
top of the tube is level when the mirror cell
comes into contact with the vertical stop.
Figure 8. Once
the base is leveled,
point the tube up until
the mirror cell comes
into contact with the
vertical stop. Then,
place the carpenter’s
level across the top of
the tube as shown. If
the vertical stop is set
properly, the top of
the tube should also
be level.
Once the vertical stop is accurately adjusted, it should not need adjustment again.
The base does not need to be level for the
IntelliScope system to function properly; the
base only needs leveling when initially setting the vertical stop.
Simple Two-Star Alignment
After setting the vertical position of the optical tube, a simple two-star alignment process
is all that is needed to ready the IntelliScope system for operation. This is a great simplification from other computerized systems, which require you to enter data such as your
longitude, latitude, and time zone. For the IntelliScope controller to accurately find
objects, you only need to center two bright stars in your telescope and indicate to the controller which two stars you have centered. This is quite easy to do. For your convenience,
we have provided finder charts for the alignment stars in Appendix B. Use the finder chart
to locate and identify two bright stars in your current night sky. For best results, choose
two stars that are at least 60˚ apart from each other. (The width of your fist at arm’s length
is about 10˚, so you want the stars to be at least six fist-widths apart.)
So, the optical tube is now in the vertical position and you’ve chosen two bright stars in
the sky to use for alignment. The telescope should have a high power eyepiece, such as
the 10mm Sirius Plössl, in the eyepiece holder and the finder scope should be properly
aligned with the telescope (these procedures are described in your telescope’s manual).
The LCD screen will state on its top line “ALIGN STAR 1,” with the name of a star flashing on the second line.
Use the arrow buttons to scroll through the names of the alignment stars. The up arrow
button scrolls through the stars alphabetically from A to Z. The down arrow button scrolls
alphabetically backwards, from Z to A. When you arrive at the name of the star you wish
to align on, you can begin to move the telescope so that it is pointing at that star (but don’t
press the Enter button yet).
Note: The controller will not accept Polaris as the first alignment star. This helps prevent
the pointing accuracy from decreasing over time. It is OK to use Polaris as the second
alignment star, however.
Take hold of the “navigation knob” on the optical tube and move the telescope so that it
is pointing in the general area of the alignment star. Aim the telescope so the alignment
star appears in finder scope. Be careful not to confuse the alignment star with other stars
in the area when doing this. (It will likely be the brightest star in the field of view.) Now,
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move the telescope until you have centered the star on the crosshairs of the finder scope.
Look into the eyepiece of the telescope, and you should see the alignment star in the field
of view of the eyepiece. If it isn’t, then your finder scope is out of alignment with your telescope and will need to be adjusted. Once the alignment star is in the eyepiece’s field of
view, center it in the eyepiece as best you can by making small movements to the telescope. (If you have one, an illuminated reticle eyepiece is great for centering alignment
stars). Once this is done, press the Enter button on the controller. You have now completed one-half of the two-star alignment.
The LCD screen will now read “ALIGN STAR 2” on the first line with an alignment star’s
name flashing on the second line. As before, scroll through the names of the stars with
the arrow buttons until you reach your second chosen alignment star. Repeat the procedure described above for your second alignment star. When you have aligned on the second star, press the Enter button. The LCD will then display a number. It is the alignment
error factor, or “warp” (W) factor.
The Alignment Error (Warp) Factor
The “warp” alignment error factor essentially lets you know if your alignment was accurate or not. Ideally, this number should be as low as possible, but any “W” of 0.5 or smaller is acceptable (regardless of + or - sign). Warp factors of ±0.3 and ±0.4 are the most
common. Warp factors under ±0.2 are typically not achievable. If you complete an alignment and the warp factor is larger than ±0.5 (e.g., +0.6, -0.6, +0.7, -0.7, etc.), then you
must turn the controller off (by holding down the Power button) and begin the alignment
procedure again. Otherwise, there is no guarantee that the controller will consistently
place objects within the field of view of a medium-low power eyepiece.
An unacceptable warp factor may indicate that you aligned on the wrong star or did not
have the telescope initially in a precisely vertical position. If you are having problems getting the warp factor at or below ±0.5, see the troubleshooting section in Appendix A.
Your IntelliScope Computerized Object Locator is now ready to find objects. Replace the
high- powered eyepiece you used for centering the alignment stars with a low-power,
wide-field eyepiece, such as the 25mm Sirius Plössl.
3. Overview of Controller
The IntelliScope Computerized Object Locator has been specifically designed for ease of
use. This section will help familiarize you with the basic layout and operation of the controller.
Pushbuttons
Besides the Power, Enter, ID, FCN, and up/down arrows, all pushbuttons have letters on
them with numbers above them. The letters designate the function of the pushbutton. The
numbers above them are used for entering numerical data only; the numbers are never
active until a function is first chosen. The numbers are arranged like a telephone keypad
for ease of number entry. None of the function buttons will work properly until an initial
alignment, as outlined previously, is completed. If you press a function button before the
two-star alignment is completed, the controller will display “MUST STAR ALIGN.” Turn the
unit off, then on again (by using the Power button), to begin the alignment routine again.
The Guide Arrows
The controller leads you to astronomical targets with guide arrows displayed on the LCD
screen. After an object is selected to view, you will see two guide arrows, one that points
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left or right, and one that points up or down.
Move the telescope tube in the corresponding direction of the guide arrows. If you
are standing to the left of the telescope and
facing the same direction the telescope is
pointed, the guide arrows will exactly correspond with the direction you should move
the telescope (Figure 9). Otherwise, if an
up arrow is displayed, move the telescope
tube upward, if a down arrow is displayed,
move the telescope tube downward, if a left
arrow is displayed, rotate the telescope
counterclockwise, and if a right arrow is
displayed, rotate the telescope clockwise.
There is a number next to each guide arrow
that indicates how far the telescope needs
to be moved to reach the selected object. Figure 9. If you stand to the left of the
As you move the telescope toward the telescope, and face the direction the tube is
object, this number will decrease. When pointing, the guide arrows will correspond
the number goes below ten, the figure will exactly with the direction you should move the
be displayed in tenths; this helps to make telescope in order to find the selected object.
small, precise movements to the telescope
tube in order to bring the object into your
field of view. When both numbers reach zero, stop moving the telescope. The object will
be within the field of view of a medium-low power eyepiece (25mm focal length or longer).
For example, look at Figure 10a, which shows an LCD screen for someone trying to
locate M51, otherwise known as the Whirlpool Galaxy. The first arrow is pointing right and
gives a number of 34. The second arrow is pointing up and displays the number 12. This
means that the telescope tube should be moved to the right (clockwise) and up. When
you are close to M51, the numbers will be displayed in tenths, as is shown in Figure 10b.
When the numbers reach zero (Figure 10c), the telescope will be pointed right at the
Whirlpool Galaxy.
a.
b.
c.
Figure 10a-c. This sequence of pictures illustrate how the controller’s guide arrows will look
as you are finding an object. (a.) When you are far away from the object, there will be a number
(from 10 to 179) to the left of the guide arrows. (b.) When you are close to the object, each guide
arrow will display a number on its immediate left (from 0 to 9) and immediate right (from 0 to 9);
the number on the left is whole number increments, while the number on the right is in increments
of tenths. This helps in making small movements to the telescope to pinpoint the object’s location.
(c.) When the guide arrows display “0.0 0.0”, the object will be within the field of view of the
telescope (with a 25mm or longer focal length eyepiece).
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It is easiest to move the telescope in one direction at a time (say altitude) until the corresponding number reached “0.0”. Then move the scope in the other direction (azimuth)
until that number also reads “0.0”.
If the object selected to view is currently located below the horizon, the word “HORIZON”
will flash before the guide arrows are displayed. Choose another object to view.
4. Locating the Planets
By far the most popular objects for viewing, after the Moon, are the planets. Since the
other eight planets in our solar system are also orbiting the Sun, they do not appear in
fixed positions in the night sky like deep-sky objects and stars do. Because of this, the
controller requires you to input the date before it can find the planets.
To find planets with your IntelliScope Computerized Object Locator, use the following
procedure:
1) Press the Planet button on the controller.
2) The LCD screen will display a date similar to the following:
DATE 01 JUN 2003
3) The number after the word “DATE” will be flashing and represents the day of the
month. Input the two-digit day using the number buttons.
4) The three-letter month will now be flashing. Use the arrow buttons to scroll to the
present month and then press the Enter button.
5) Now the year will flash. Input the year using the number buttons.
If you make a mistake while inputting the date, press the Enter button at any time while
still within the Planet button function. The LCD screen will then display the last date
input, with the two-digit day after the word “DATE” flashing. Input the correct date as outlined above.
Now, to choose a planet to view, press the arrow buttons and scroll through the planets.
The planet’s name will be displayed in the upper left section of the LCD screen, with the
guide arrows on the upper right of the LCD screen. Move the telescope in the corresponding direction shown by the guide arrows.
The lower left screen shows the constellation that the planet appears in, with its present
co-ordinates given in right ascension and declination. When you are finished viewing the
planet, you may scroll to another planet by using the arrow buttons.
The features and details you can see will vary from planet to planet. The following
descriptions give a brief overview of what to expect when viewing them:
MERCURY Mercury is often so close to the Sun that it cannot be seen. Sometimes it is
visible for a brief period after the Sun sets, and sometimes it’s visible in the morning just
before the Sun rises. Mercury does not really show any detail, but is quite bright. With
your telescope, you will be able to investigate this planet’s orange-colored hue. Like
Venus, Mercury sometimes appears as a crescent, rather than as a full disk.
VENUS At its brightest, Venus is the most luminous object in the sky, excluding the Sun
and the Moon. It is so bright that sometimes it is visible to the naked eye during full daylight! Ironically, Venus appears as a thin crescent, not a full disk, when at its peak brightness. Because it is close to the Sun, it never wanders too far from the morning or evening
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horizon. No surface markings can be seen on Venus, which is always shrouded in dense
clouds.
MARS The Red Planet makes its closest approach to Earth every two years. During
close approaches you’ll see a red disk, possibly some light and dark regions, and maybe
the polar ice cap. To see surface detail on Mars, you will need a high power eyepiece
and very steady air!
JUPITER The largest planet, Jupiter, is a great subject for observation. You can see the
disk of the giant planet and watch the ever-changing positions of its four largest moons
— Io, Callisto, Europa, and Ganymede. Higher power eyepieces should bring out the
cloud bands on the planet’s disk and maybe even the Great Red Spot.
SATURN The ringed planet is a breathtaking sight when it is well positioned. The tilt angle
of the rings varies over a period of many years; sometimes they are seen edge-on, while
at other times they are broadside and look like giant “ears” on each side of Saturn’s disk.
A steady atmosphere (good seeing) is necessary for a good view. You will probably see
a bright “star” close by, which is Saturn’s brightest moon, Titan.
URANUS Uranus is a faint planet, and requires high powers (at least 100x) before it
starts to show any detail that distinguishes it from stars. Uranus will appear as a pale,
blue-green disk.
NEPTUNE Like Uranus, Neptune will require high powers before showing anything to distinguish itself from stars. Neptune will appear as a bluish-colored disk, possibly with a
very faint moon nearby if you are using a larger-aperture IntelliScope.
PLUTO Smaller than our own Moon, Pluto is very, very faint and shows little more than
a point of light similar to a star. Even the Hubble Space Telescope is unable to show
much detail on Pluto. Many amateur astronomers note how Pluto moves with respect to
background stars (over several nights) in order to confirm their observation of our most
remote planet.
5. Locating Deep-Sky Objects by
Catalog
Catalogs are groups of deep sky objects of interest that have been assembled and given
designations. Very often a deep-sky object will have a catalog number, as well as a “common” name. For example, the Orion Nebula is listed in the Messier catalog as “M42.” The
controller has three catalogs built-in: The Messier catalog (M), the New General Catalog
(NGC), and the Index Catalog (IC). Many of the objects in the Messier catalog also have
NGC catalog designations.
The Messier Catalog
The Messier catalog contains 110 galaxies, nebulas, and star clusters identified by the
famous French astronomer Charles Messier and his colleagues in the late 1700’s. These
are some of the most popular celestial attractions observed by amateur astronomers.
To view an object from the Messier catalog, press the M button. Then enter the number
of the Messier object you wish to view using the numeric buttons and press the Enter
button. For example, to view Messier 57, also known as “the Ring Nebula,” you would
press the M button, then press the “5” button, then press the “7” button, followed by the
Enter button. If the number of the Messier object you wish to view contains three digits,
it is not necessary to press Enter after inputting the third digit.
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The object’s catalog designation will be shown in the upper left corner of the display
screen, with the guide arrows in the upper right. The lower left will display the constellation the object resides in and the object’s common name (if it has one) or a brief description of the object. Move the telescope in the corresponding directions shown by the guide
arrows to locate the object.
You can get more information about the selected object by pressing the Enter button.
The second line of the LCD display will then cycle information about the object you are
viewing such as its celestial coordinates (R.A. and Dec.), magnitude (brightness), size (in
arc-minutes or arc-seconds), and a brief scrolling text description.
When you are finished viewing the selected Messier object, you may scroll to another
Messier object by using the arrow buttons, or you can select another Messier object to
view by pressing the M button again.
The New General Catalog
The New General Catalog, or NGC, is a catalog of some 7,840 deep-sky objects compiled by the Danish astronomer J. L. E. Dreyer more than 100 years ago. It contains hundreds of excellent examples of each type of deep-sky object and is the most well known
and used catalog by amateur astronomers beyond the already mentioned Messier catalog. To be more precise, the version of the New General Catalog used in the IntelliScope
Computerized Object Locator is an improved version known as the “Revised New
General Catalog”; this version has many corrections from Dreyer’s original list.
To view an object from the NGC catalog, press the NGC button. Then enter the number
of the NGC object you wish to view using the numeric buttons and press Enter. For example, to view the Andromeda Galaxy, which is listed as NGC224, you would press the NGC
button, then the “2” button twice, then the “4” button, followed by the Enter button. If the
number of the NGC object you wish to view contains four digits, it is not necessary to
press Enter after inputting the fourth digit.
The object’s catalog designation will be shown in the upper left corner of the LCD screen,
with the guide arrows in the upper right. The lower left will show the constellation the
object resides in, and the object’s common name (if it has one) or a brief description of
the object will be shown in the lower right. Move the telescope in the corresponding directions shown by the guide arrows.
You can get more information about the selected object by pressing the Enter button. The
second line of the LCD display will then cycle information about the object you are viewing such as its celestial coordinates (R.A. and Dec.), magnitude (brightness), size (in arcminutes or arc-seconds), and a brief scrolling text description.
When you are finished viewing the selected NGC object, you may scroll to another NGC
object by using the arrow buttons, or you can select another NGC object to view by pressing the NGC button again.
The Index Catalog
The Index Catalog, or IC, contains 5,386 objects discovered in the decade or so after the
NGC catalog was first published. This list contains objects similar to the NGC, but IC
objects are typically fainter and more difficult to observe.
To view an object from the IC catalog, press the IC button. Then input the number of the
IC object you wish to view using the numeric buttons and press the Enter button. For
example, to view the Flaming Star Nebula, which is listed as IC405, you would press the
IC button, then the “4” button, then the “0” button, then the “5” button, followed by the
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Enter button. If the number of the IC object you wish to view contains four digits, it is not
necessary to press Enter after inputting the fourth digit.
The object’s catalog designation will be shown in the upper left corner of the LCD screen,
with the guide arrows in the upper right. The lower left will show the constellation the
object resides in, and the object’s common name (if it has one) or a brief description of
the object will be shown in the lower right. Move the telescope in the corresponding directions shown by the guide arrows.
You can get more information about the selected object by pressing the Enter button. The
second line of the LCD display will then cycle information about the object you are viewing such as its celestial coordinates (R.A. and Dec.), magnitude (brightness), size (in arcminutes or arc-seconds), and a brief scrolling text description.
When you are finished viewing the selected IC object, you may scroll to another IC object
by using the arrow buttons, or you can select another IC object to view by pressing the
IC button again.
6. Locating Deep Sky Objects by
Object Type
Rather that trying to select objects by catalog numbers, you may wish to simply view certain types of objects. This is where the Nebula, Galaxy, and Cluster buttons come in
handy. These buttons will access a selection of the best and brightest nebulas, galaxies,
and star clusters in the night sky.
The Nebula, Cluster and Galaxy buttons are organized by constellation. So, before
using these buttons, decide in which constellation you would like to view an object.
Choose a constellation that is at least 40˚ high in the sky to get a good view. If you are
unsure of the constellations currently visible in your night sky, consult a planisphere or
the monthly star chart at telescope.com.
Locating Nebulas
Amongst the most beautiful objects in the night sky, nebulas are clouds of dust and gas
that are lit by a nearby stellar source. There are several different types of nebulas; emission nebulas, which are where star systems form, planetary nebulas, which are the result
of a star dying, and reflection nebulas, which are caused by dust reflecting starlight. Most
have low surface brightness, so a dark sky free of light-pollution is best for a night of viewing nebulas.
To view a nebula, press the Nebula button on the controller. The LCD screen will then
display the word “NEBULA” with a flashing three-letter constellation designation after it.
Now, select the constellation in which you would like to view a nebula. Use the arrow buttons to scroll through the list of constellations. If you are unsure which constellation the
three-letter designation represents, refer to Appendix C. Once you have selected the constellation, press Enter. A nebula in that constellation will now appear on the LCD screen,
along with the guide arrows to lead you to the nebula. The current constellation is shown
in the lower left, and the nebula’s proper name or catalog number is in the lower right. For
more information about the nebula selected, press the Enter button.
To go to the next nebula in the selected constellation, simply press the up arrow button.
The guide arrows will now direct you to the next nebula in the constellation. If there are
no more nebulas available in that constellation, a nebula from the next constellation (in
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alphabetical order) will be displayed. To select another constellation in which to view nebulas, press the Nebula button again.
Locating Star Clusters
Star clusters are just what their name implies; groupings of stars. Star clusters come in
two main types, open and globular. Open star clusters reside within our Milky Way galaxy
and usually contain a handful of stars clustered together because they were spawned
from the same gas cloud. Globular clusters are more like miniature galaxies, with hundreds or thousands of stars packed into a spherical shape by mutual gravity. Globular
clusters reside outside the disk of the Milky Way galaxy and orbit the galaxy’s center. It is
believed that globular clusters are formed as a natural consequence of galaxy formation.
Star clusters, in general, are somewhat bright compared to other deep-sky objects, so
many will appear quite spectacular, even in the smaller telescopes.
To view a star cluster, press the Cluster button on the controller. The LCD screen will
then display the word “STAR CLUSTER” with a flashing three-letter constellation designation after it. Now, select the constellation in which you would like to view a star cluster.
Use the arrow buttons to scroll through the list of constellations. If you are unsure which
constellation the three- letter designation represents, refer to Appendix C. Once you have
selected the constellation, press Enter. A star cluster in that constellation will now appear
on the LCD screen, along with the guide arrows to lead you to the star cluster. The current constellation is shown in the lower left, and the star cluster’s proper name or catalog
number is in the lower right. For more information about the star cluster selected, press
the Enter button.
To go to the next star cluster in the selected constellation, simply press the up arrow button. The guide arrows will now direct you to the next star cluster in the constellation. If
there are no more star clusters available in that constellation, a star cluster from the next
constellation (in alphabetical order) will be displayed. To select another constellation in
which to view a star cluster, press the Cluster button again.
Locating Galaxies
Nebulas may be beautiful and star clusters impressive, but nothing has quite the breathtaking power of observing a galaxy. Galaxies are collections of billions of stars that come
in a variety of shapes and sizes. Viewing a galaxy always gives the observer a revelation
of just how vast our universe truly is. Keep in mind, however, that most galaxies are quite
faint, and may be challenging to identify, especially in smaller telescopes.
To view a galaxy, press the Galaxy button on the controller. The LCD screen will then display the word “GALAXY” with a flashing three-letter constellation designation after it. Now,
select the constellation in which you would like to view a galaxy. Use the arrow buttons to
scroll through the list of constellations. If you are unsure which constellation the three-letter designation represents, refer to Appendix C. Once you have selected the constellation, press Enter. A galaxy in that constellation will now appear on the LCD screen, along
with the guide arrows to lead you to the galaxy. The current constellation is shown in the
lower left, and the galaxy’s proper name or catalog number is in the lower right. If you
wish to have more information about the galaxy selected, press the Enter button.
To go to the next galaxy in the selected constellation, simply press the up arrow button.
The guide arrows will now direct you to the next galaxy in the constellation. If there are
no more galaxies available in that constellation, a galaxy from the next constellation (in
alphabetical order) will be displayed. To select another constellation in which to view
galaxy, press the Galaxy button again.
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7. Locating Stars
The IntelliScope database contains 837 stars. Stars always appear like tiny points of light.
Even powerful telescopes cannot magnify a star to appear as more than a point of light!
You can, however, enjoy the different colors of the stars and locate many pretty double
and multiple stars. You can also monitor variable stars from night to night to see how their
brightness changes over time.
To view a star, press the Star button on the controller. The LCD screen will then display
the word “STAR” with the word “NAMED” flashing next to it. From this screen, use the
arrow buttons to choose from “NAMED,” “DOUBLE,” “VARIABLE,” and “CATALOG.”
Named Stars
The named stars are the brightest in the night sky. These are the stars that the ancients
gave proper names to, like “Arcturus” or “Mizar.”
To select a named star, press Enter after selecting “NAMED” from the Star button choices. You can now use the arrow buttons to scroll through the list of named stars. The stars
are listed in alphabetical order. Once you have found the named star you would like to
observe, the guide arrows will direct you to move the telescope to the star’s position. The
upper left corner of the LCD screen will show the named star’s ST catalog number (the
IntelliScope’s entire ST catalog is printed in Appendix D for easy reference), and the
lower left shows the constellation in which the star resides. Pressing Enter again will display the star’s R.A. and Dec. coordinates, its magnitude, and a brief description.
To find another named star to observe, simply continue scrolling through the list of
named stars.
Double (and Multiple) Stars
Many stars in the night sky appear to be single stars, but they are not. They are actually
double or multiple star systems. Some of these systems comprise two or more stars gravitationally bound to each other, while others are just two (or more) stars in the same line
of sight. At high magnifications, it is possible to “split” many double (and multiple) stars
into their individual components. It can also be interesting to contrast and compare the
different colors and magnitudes of the stars in the system. Be aware, however, that good
seeing conditions are critical for separating close components of a double or multiple star.
To select a double (or multiple) star to observe, press Enter after selecting “DOUBLE”
from the Star button choices. The LCD screen will then display the word “DOUBLE” with
a flashing three- letter constellation designation after it. Now, select the constellation in
which you would like to view a double star. Use the arrow buttons to scroll through the list
of constellations. If you are unsure which constellation the three-letter designation represents, refer to Appendix C. Once you have selected the constellation, press Enter. A double star in that constellation will now appear on the LCD screen, along with the guide
arrows to lead you to the double star. The current constellation is shown in the lower left,
and the double star’s name is in the lower right.
Note: Double stars typically have names like “Zeta” (Greek letter designation) or a number like “36” (Flamsteed number). The full names for these double stars are actually
linked to the constellation they reside in. For example, in the constellation Andromeda,
these stars would be “Zeta And” and “36 And.”
For more information about the double star selected, press the Enter button. (The “S=”
now refers to the separation, in arc-seconds, between the double stars. For multiple stars,
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the “S=” refers to the separation between the two brightest stars. The “M=” now refers to
the magnitude of the brightest star.) To go to the next double star in the selected constellation, simply press the up arrow button. The guide arrows will now direct you to the
next double star in the constellation. If there are no more double stars available in that
constellation, a double star from the next constellation (in alphabetical order) will be displayed. To select another constellation in which to view a double star, press the Star button, select “DOUBLE”, and press Enter.
Variable Stars
Variable stars are stars that change their brightness, also called magnitude, over time.
The period of brightness change varies greatly from star to star; some variable stars
change brightness over several days while others may take several months to noticeably
change. It is fun and challenging to watch a star’s magnitude change over time.
Observers typically compare the current brightness of the variable star to other stars
around it (whose magnitudes are known and do not change over time).
To select a variable star to observe, press Enter after selecting “VARIABLE” from the
Star button choices. The LCD screen will then display the word “VARIABLE” with a flashing three-letter constellation designation after it. Now, select the constellation in which you
would like to view a variable star. Use the arrow buttons to scroll through the list of constellations. If you are unsure which constellation the three-letter designation represents,
refer to Appendix C. Once you have selected the constellation, press Enter. A variable star
in that constellation will now appear on the LCD screen, along with the guide arrows to
lead you to the variable star. The current constellation is shown in the lower left, and the
variable star’s name is in the lower right.
Note: Variable stars typically have names like “Eta” (Greek letter designation) or a letter
designation like “R.” The full names for these variable stars are actually linked to the constellation they reside in. For example, in the constellation Aquila, these stars would be
“Eta Aql” and “R Aql.”
For more information about the variable star selected, press the Enter button. (The “M=”
refers to the mean magnitude of the variable star.) To go to the next variable star in the
selected constellation, simply press the up arrow button. The guide arrows will now direct
you to the next variable star in the constellation. If there are no more variable stars available in that constellation, a variable star from the next constellation (in alphabetical order)
will be displayed. To select another constellation in which to view a variable star, press
the Star button, select “VARIABLE,” and press Enter.
Catalog (ST) Stars
The “ST” catalog contains all of the stars in the IntelliScope Computerized Object
Locator’s database. This catalog has 837 of the most interesting stars to view in the night
sky. The full list of stars appearing in the ST catalog is printed Appendix D. Generally, the
best way to use the ST catalog to observe stars is first to peruse Appendix D, and then
note the catalog number of the star you wish to observe.
To select an ST catalog star to observe, press Enter after selecting “CATALOG” from the
Star button choices. The LCD screen will then display the letter “ST” with three digits
blinking after it. Now, input the ST catalog number of the star you wish to observe, and
press Enter. If the ST catalog number of the star you wish to view contains three digits,
it is not necessary to press Enter after inputting the third digit.
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The object’s ST catalog designation will be shown in the upper left corner of the LCD
screen, with the guide arrows in the upper right. The lower left will show the constellation
the object resides in and the star’s name.
You can get more information on the star selected by pressing the Enter button. The second
line of the LCD screen will then cycle information about the object you are viewing, such as
its celestial coordinates (R.A. and Dec.), magnitude (brightness), and a brief description.
When you are finished viewing the selected star, you may scroll to another star in the ST
catalog by using the arrow buttons, or you can select another ST catalog star to view by
pressing the Star button, and pressing Enter once “CATALOG” is selected.
8. Tours of the Best Objects
The IntelliScope controller offers guided tours of the best and brightest celestial objects
visible in the sky each month. There are 12 monthly tours, each consisting of 12 preselected objects. The tours are an easy and fun way to locate and observe the finest wonders of the heavens. They are a great place to start for a beginner who is unfamiliar with
the night sky, or for a more experienced observer who wants to revisit some old favorites
or show friends or family “what’s up” on a given evening.
Starting a Tour
To start an IntelliScope tour, press the Tour button at any time after you have aligned the
IntelliScope system. The LCD screen will display “SKY TOUR” and a flashing three-letter
designation for the month. Scroll through the months by using the arrow buttons until you
reach the present month, then press the Enter button.
The LCD screen will then display the first tour object for the selected month in the lower
right of the screen, with the guide arrows in the upper right. Use the guide arrows to
point the telescope, and you will soon be observing the first astronomical showpiece of
the month.
You can get more information about the current tour object by pressing the Enter button.
The second line of the LCD screen will then cycle the following information about the
object you are viewing: its celestial co-ordinates (R.A. and Dec.), magnitude (brightness),
size (in arc minutes or seconds), and a brief text description.
When you have finished viewing the first tour object for the selected month, you can continue the tour by pressing the up arrow button to find the next object. You can exit the tour
at any time by pressing any one of the other function buttons on the controller.
Since several months’ tour objects are visible in the night sky at one time, feel free to
select a month before or after the current month. These tour objects will likely be visible
also. Remember, however, that viewing objects below 40˚ or so from the horizon will not
give the best view due to atmospheric distortion (and usually light pollution). If you are
finding that objects in the selected tour month are too close to the horizon, you should
choose a month following the selected month, or you can wait a few hours for the objects
to rise higher in the sky!
9. The Identify Function
There may come a time in your observations when you spot an unidentified deep-sky
object or star in the eyepiece and want to know what it is. With the IntelliScope
Computerized Object Locator, a simple press of a button will tell you.
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Using the ID Button
When you locate an object and center it in the eyepiece, you can identify it by simply
pressing the ID button. The LCD screen will display “IDENTIFY” with the word “ANY”
flashing. You can then use the up/and down arrow buttons to scroll through several more
specific options (“STAR”, “DOUBLE”, “CLUSTER”, “NEBULA”, and “GALAXY”). If you
know which one of these object types you are looking at, selecting the object type will
make the identification quicker and more accurate. This is because the computer will
search through a shorter list of potential object matches, and will allow proper identification if there are several objects within the same field of view. If you are unsure of the
object type you are looking at, simply select “ANY” from the list of choices. Once you have
selected the object type (or “ANY”), press the Enter button.
The identity of the object centered in the eyepiece will now be displayed in the lower right
area of the LCD screen. The constellation in which the object resides is shown in the
lower left. As always, to get more information about the object, press the Enter button.
An interesting feature of the ID function is that once initiated, it is continually active. So,
if you press the ID button, and choose “STAR”, for instance, you can move your telescope
from star to star in the sky, and the controller will automatically display the star’s identity
when you center the star in the eyepiece. This can be a fun and easy way to identify the
stars in the sky. In fact, you can even make a “Name That Star” game out of it! Point your
finger at a bright star in the sky and see if you can name it. Then, just point the telescope
at the star to see if you were correct or not. If the centered star is not in the controller’s
database, it will display the identity of the closest star that is in its database.
To exit the identify function, simply press any other of the controller’s function buttons. If
you would like to identify another object type, press the ID button again.
10. Adding User-Defined Objects
Not only does the IntelliScope’s database contain over 14,000 fascinating objects to view,
you can even add your own! Up to 99 user-defined objects can be entered into the database by means of the User button. These user-defined objects can be random stars, a
faint object not contained in the controller’s database, or just a pretty object that you
would like to come back to at some point in the future.
To enter a user-defined object into the database, you must have the right ascension (R.A.)
and declination (Dec.) coordinates for the object. If you are currently observing an object
that is not in the controller’s database and you wish to add it, but don’t know its coordinates, you can use the FCN button to obtain its coordinates (described in next section).
To input a user-defined object, begin by pressing the User button. The LCD screen will
display the word “NEW” with a two-digit number flashing after it. Since no user-defined
objects currently exist, press Enter to create user-defined (“NEW”) object number 01.
The LCD will display the R.A. and Dec. coordinates for the “NEW” object selected in the
lower left. Since no data has been input yet, these coordinates will be 00:00 +00.0. The
first four digits indicate the R.A. coordinate (in R.A. hours and minutes), and the remaining digits (and the ± sign) indicate the Dec. coordinate (in degrees). Now, press the Enter
button, and the first two digits of the R.A. coordinate (R.A. hours) will begin flashing.
Press the two numerical buttons on the keypad that correspond the hours value of the
R.A. coordinate. If the value of the R.A. hours is less than 10, make sure to enter a zero
first. Then the second two digits of the R.A. coordinate (R.A. minutes) will begin flashing.
Press the two numerical buttons that correspond to the minutes value of the R.A. coordinate. If the R.A. minutes are less than 10, make sure to enter a zero first. Next, the sign
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of the Dec. coordinate will be flashing. Use the arrow buttons to select “+” or “-”for the
Dec. coordinate. Then, the first two digits of the Dec. coordinate will begin flashing. Press
the two numerical buttons that correspond to the degrees value of the Dec. coordinate.
Then the tenth of a degree value for the Dec coordinate will begin flashing. Press the
numerical button that corresponds to the tenths of a degree value for the Dec. coordinate.
You have now input the data for your first user-defined object. Remember that this object
is now “NEW01”. If you wish to view this object in the future, press the User button, and
press Enter once “NEW01” is selected. The guide arrows will then tell you where to point
your telescope to find the user-defined object.
If you wish to input another user-defined object, select “NEW02” (by using numerical buttons or the arrow buttons) after pressing the User button and input the data as outlined
previously. If you select a “NEW” object number that you have already entered coordinates for and attempt to input new data, you will lose the data that was input previously.
You may find it convenient to keep a written log of the “NEW” objects so that you can easily keep track of them.
11. The FCN Button
The IntelliScope Computerized Object Locator has several other useful functions, a couple of which can be accessed by using the FCN (function) button.
R.A. and Dec. Coordinates
By simply pressing the FCN button, the controller will give a continuous readout of the
telescope’s current R.A. and Dec. coordinates. This can be helpful and powerful in a
number of ways. You can easily find any object in the night sky if you know its right
ascension and declination coordinates. Grab any star atlas, choose any object you wish
to view, be it faint galaxy or random star, and jot down its coordinates. Then, once you
have aligned the IntelliScope system, you can point the telescope to that location by
simply pressing the FCN button and moving the telescope until the R.A. and Dec. coordinates displayed match the coordinates of the object you wish to view. You can also
press the FCN button at any time to display the current R.A. and Dec. coordinates of
whatever you are currently viewing.
A common use for the FCN button is to locate “transient” objects, such as comets and
asteroids. To find these objects you will need to learn their coordinates from astronomy
resources, such as Astronomy, Sky & Telescope or a reliable astronomy website. Comet
and asteroid positions will change from night to night, so entering the current coordinates
into the user-defined database is generally not useful.
After pressing the FCN button, the R.A. and Dec. coordinates corresponding to the center of the telescope’s field of view are displayed on the first line of the LCD screen. The
lower left of the screen indicates the current constellation the telescope is pointing to. The
lower right numbers are the current azimuth (“AZ”) and altitude (“ALT”) coordinates of the
telescope; this information is generally not useful.
The Realignment Function
This function is useful for obtaining a new alignment fix during an observing session to
correct for small pointing errors. Use this function only when pointing accuracy for a certain area of the sky appears to be poor compared to other areas of the sky. This is evident when objects in one area of the sky consistently fall at the edge or just outside the
field of view (of the 25mm eyepiece) when the numbers on the LCD screen read 0.0 0.0.
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This can happen if the alignment stars initially chosen during setup are somewhat close
to each other (less than 60˚ apart) or if the area of sky being viewed is a considerable
distance away from the alignment stars chosen.
To improve pointing accuracy in a specific area of the sky, select an object in the locator’s
database from that region, and use the guide arrows to find the object. Precisely center
the object in the eyepiece (preferably a high-powered one). Now, press the FCN button,
and the R.A. and Dec. coordinates of the centered object will be displayed. Then, press
the Enter button. The LCD screen will now display “ALIGN OBJECT 3” on the first line, and
will be flashing the object currently centered in the telescope on the second line. Pressing
Enter again then realigns the IntelliScope system to the object centered in the telescope.
The LCD screen will display a new “warp factor” associated with the new alignment. If this
number is greater than ±0.5, you may want to consider resetting the controller to perform
another two-star alignment. Turn the controller off, then on again (with the Power button),
to do this.
If, instead of pressing Enter a second time after pressing the FCN button, you press one
of the arrow buttons, the list of initial setup alignment stars will be displayed. If you wish,
you can select one of these alignment stars to realign on. Do this by scrolling to the
desired alignment star using the arrow buttons, center the star in the telescope, and
press Enter.
In general, it will not be necessary to use the realignment function, but it is a handy feature to have at your disposal. Also, be aware that while pointing accuracy will increase in
the area of sky around the object realigned on, it may decrease in other areas of the sky.
12. The “Hidden” Functions
All of the active functions of the IntelliScope Computerized Object Locator have been outlined. There are, however, some additional “hidden” functions that may be of some use to
you. To access the hidden functions, press the Enter button while pressing the Power
button to turn the controller on. The LCD will display its introduction screen (with software
version number) and then show the words “ALT AZM TEST.” This is the first hidden function. Scroll to the other hidden functions by using the arrow buttons. The other hidden
functions are “ENCODER TEST,” “DOWNLOAD,” “CHECKSUM,” “REWRITE,” and
“CLOCK.” When the hidden function you wish to use is displayed, press Enter to select
it. To exit the currently chosen hidden function, press any button except for the Enter or
arrow buttons. To completely exit the hidden functions section of the controller, you will
need to hold the Power button down until the controller turns off.
The rest of this section gives the details and purpose of each hidden function.
Altitude and Azimuth Test
The altitude and azimuth test (“ALT AZM TEST”) is a diagnostic test that gives relative
altitude and azimuth positions for the telescope. This test will allow you to easily see if the
encoders are “talking” to the controller, and if the encoders are accurately monitoring the
telescope’s motions. To effectively use this test, make sure the telescope optical tube is
in the horizontal position when pressing the Enter and Power buttons to access the hidden functions.
Once “ALT AZM TEST” is chosen from the hidden function options, the LCD screen will
display the telescope’s current relative altitude and azimuth position (in degrees); the relative altitude is in the upper right, while the relative azimuth is in the lower right. To begin
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with, both of these numbers will be +000.0. The first two sets of numbers on the upper
and lower lines of the LCD screen are meaningless for the purposes of this test.
If you move the telescope counter-clockwise in azimuth, the number in the lower right
should increase, while if you move clockwise in azimuth, the number will decrease. If you
rotate the telescope exactly 360˚ in azimuth, the readout should return to the original
+000.0 reading.
If you move the telescope upwards in altitude, the number in the upper right should
increase, while if you move downwards in altitude, the number will decrease. If the telescope tube was perfectly horizontal when you enabled the hidden functions of the controller, then the altitude will read +090.0 when the telescope is pointed precisely vertical.
If one, or both, of the encoders are not behaving properly when performing this diagnostic test, there may be a problem with the assembly of the system, or a problem with
one of the encoder boards or discs. Also, be sure to check that all cable connections
are secure.
Encoder Test
The encoder test is another diagnostic test that gives information about the performance
of the encoders themselves. Select “ENCODER TEST” from the list of hidden functions
using the arrow buttons and press Enter.
The LCD screen will now display two lines of data. The top line of data corresponds to
the altitude encoder, while the lower line of data corresponds to the azimuth encoder. The
first two digits on each line denote the amplitude of the signal from one of the magnetic
sensors on the encoder board, the second two digits represent the amplitude from the
other sensor on the encoder board. The numbers are in hexadecimal (base 16) digits.
Therefore “A” in hexadecimal represents “11” in decimal, “B” represents “12” in decimal,
“C” represents “13,” “D” represents “14,” “E” represents “15,” and “F” represents “16.” When
moving the telescope in altitude or azimuth, you will note that each of the digit pairs rises
and falls. None of the digit pairs should ever go above “F3.” If they do, then the encoder
disk is too close to the sensors on the encoder board. This will generally not happen in
altitude, but can happen in azimuth.
If you notice that the first or second digit pair on the second line of the display goes above
“F3,” then try loosening the lock nut on the azimuth nut of the base by about 1/16 turn. If
this does not work, you will need to disassemble the azimuth encoder (azimuth encoder
disk, brass bushing, and azimuth encoder board) and reassemble it carefully according
to the instructions that came with the IntelliScope Dobsonian telescope itself.
If you notice that the two digit pairs on the first line are going above “F3,” then there is a
problem with your altitude encoder assembly. More than likely, the altitude encoder disk
is bent.
The three-digit number displayed after the digit pairs on each line is the “radius” for each
encoder. This number should not go above about 125 or below about 30. If it does, performance may be compromised for the corresponding encoder. If the number goes above
125, then the encoder disk and magnet may be too close to each other. If the number
goes below 30, then the encoder disk and magnet may be too far away from each other.
Also, if the radius varies by more than 30 counts in a cycle, encoder performance may
not be optimal, and you should contact Orion’s Customer Service Department.
The four-digit number at the end of each line is the raw encoder “ticks” in hexadecimal
numbers. This information will generally not be useful for diagnostic testing of the
encoders.
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Download
This function allows downloading of software changes and upgrades available from
Orion’s website. To use this option, you must have the optional IntelliScope-to-PC cable,
available from Orion. Check www.telescope.com for more information about available
software downloads for the IntelliScope Computerized Object Locator.
Checksum
The checksum function is used to make sure that software has loaded into the controller
properly. It has no purpose until a new software version is downloaded. Check the
IntelliScope download section on www.telescope.com to see what the proper checksum
should be for each new software version.
Rewrite
Rewrite is also only used after a new software version has been downloaded. It rewrites
the new software into its memory in order to prevent any potential problems from arising
after the software transfer.
Clock
This function allows use of the IntelliScope system with equatorial platforms for
Dobsonian telescopes. If you are using your IntelliScope with a Dobsonian equatorial
platform, press Enter when the selection “CLOCK” is displayed from the available “hidden” function choices. The LCD screen will then show the word “ON” blinking. For normal
operation of the IntelliScope system, the controller’s internal clock should be on. For use
with a Dobsonian equatorial platform, use the up or down arrow button to change “ON”
to “OFF,” and press Enter. The controller is now ready to be used with a Dobsonian equatorial platform. Now, when you press Power to turn the controller on, the LCD screen will
state “CLOCK IS OFF” on the second line of its introduction screen.
To turn the controller’s internal clock back on, access the hidden functions, select
“CLOCK,” press Enter, change the “OFF” back to “ON,” and press Enter again.
13. Specifications
Objects in database:
• 110 Messier objects
• 7840 New General Catalog objects
• 5386 Index Catalog objects
• 8 Major planets
• 99 User-defined objects
Computer interface: RS-232 port
Power: Requires one 9V battery
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following
two conditions: (1) this device nay not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device
must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired
operation.
Changes of modifications not expressly approved by the party responsible for compliance
could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
23
Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This
equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed
and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio
communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will no occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television
reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is
encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
• Connect the equipment into an output on a circuit different from that to which the
receiver is connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
• A shielded cable must be used when connecting a peripheral to the serial ports.
Appendix A: Troubleshooting the
IntelliScope System
This section is intended to help you if you are encountering any problems with your
IntelliScope system. If this information is not useful to you in determining the source of
the problem, contact Orion Technical Support via phone or email.
Azimuth encoder, in general
1. Is the azimuth axis screw’s hex lock nut tight enough? Is it too tight? Remember, it
should be tightened 3/16 to 1/4 turn past when the fender washer is no longer loose
under the nut.
2. Does the brass bushing extend slightly above the top surface of the top baseplate? If
not, the bushing or top baseplate may need replacement, or there may be an assembly problem.
3. Is the azimuth encoder disk (magnet) bent? If so, you will need to flatten it by bending.
4. Is the azimuth encoder board trimmed flush on the side in contact with the top baseplate? If not, the board will not seat flat against the baseplate and this may cause the
encoder’s sensors to come too close to the encoder disk.
5. Is the brass bushing properly registered with the azimuth encoder disk? The feature
on the front of the bushing needs to seat into the hole in the disk.
Altitude encoder, in general
6. Is the altitude encoder disk significantly bent? If so, the altitude encoder assembly will
need replacement. Also, if the altitude encoder mounting screws are loose, there is
an increased chance of the user bending the altitude encoder disk.
24
Warp factor consistently above ±0.5 but below ±2.0
7. Check accuracy of vertical stop. Use a carpenter’s level to do this.
8. Are alignment stars being centered with reasonable precision? A high-power eyepiece (at least 10mm focal length), or an illuminated reticle eyepiece (preferred) is
recommended.
9. Check encoders as outlined previously.
10. Try to use alignment stars that are well above the horizon. Light from stars is refracted as it travels through the atmosphere and starlight near the horizon has to travel
through the greatest amount of atmosphere before reaching your telescope. Stars
near the horizon can appear as much as 2° away from their actual position.
11. Avoid long delays between aligning on the first and second alignment stars. The stars
in the night sky appear to move due to the rotation of the Earth. If you take more than
a few minutes to align on the second star, this stellar motion will result in an increase
in the warp factor (and decrease the resultant pointing accuracy). This is because the
controller does not yet have a frame of reference to tell which way the stars should
appear to be moving before the second star is aligned on.
Warp numbers larger than 2.0
12. Are the stars you aligned on actually the stars you select-ed on the controller?
Consult the finder charts in Appendix A if you are unsure.
13. The encoder sensors may be coming into contact with the encoder disks. Check both
the altitude and azimuth encoders as outlined above.
Altitude readouts do not change when you move the scope
(during “ALT AZM TEST”)
14. Check the altitude cable’s connections.
15. Make sure the knob that goes through the altitude encoder is tight.
Azimuth readouts do not change when you move the scope
(during “ALT AZM TEST”)
16. Check the azimuth cable’s connections.
17. Make sure the hex lock nut on the azimuth axis screw is tight. The fender washer
underneath the hex lock nut should not be able to move. Remember, the hex lock nut
should be tightened about 3/16 to 1/4 turn beyond the point where the washer cannot move any longer.
18. Try disassembling then reassembling the azimuth encoder by disassembling the top
and bottom groundboards of the base.
If you need to contact Orion Technical Support, email support@telescope.com or call
(800) 676-1343.
25
Appendix B:
Alignment Star Finder Charts
NORTH
b
ne
De
CASSI
irf
a
O P EIA
G
CY
C EPH
k
NU
S
EUS
M
EU
S
a
Capell
PE
RS
Ve
ga
CA
ME
LO
Polaris
PAR
DAL
IS
Dip
Little
p er
DR
O
AC
INI
C A NI
MIN O S
R
Pr
oc
yo
n
ER
NC
Spic
SC
OR
U
PI
CO
ER
OS
rd
ha
Alp
S
HY
CRATER
DR
A
RVU
S
PU
HYD
PP
I
S
S
LI
BR
A
a
TAN
OC
SEX
ON
RG
O
M
VI
Siriu
s
Re
gu
lus
O
CA
LE
WEST
AM
URS
EO
MI
NO
R
O RION
ar
Miz
CANES
VE N ATI CI
B O Ö T ES
Arcturus
SERPENS
CAPUT
Denebola
L
Betelgeuse
r
OR
AJ
GEM
X
LYN
ippe
COR
B O R ONA
E A LI
S
ES
OPHIUCHUS
C a s t or
Big D
ne
Pointers
Key
sto
HER
CUL
U
TAUR
S
U RSA
MINOR
LY
RA
Rasalhague
EAST
COMA
BERENICES
RA
ANT
CEN
TAU
RU
LIA
PY
XIS
IL
W
S
O
RI
TI
N
20
00
VELA
SOUTH
SPRING
Early March
Late March
Early April
Late April
Early May
Late May
Early June
*Daylight saving time
26
1:00 AM
12:00 AM
12:00 AM*
11:00 PM*
10:00 PM*
9:00 PM*
8:00 PM (dusk)*
NORTH
PERS
LYN
X
EUS
Mir
fak
AN
CAMELOPARDALIS
OM
DR
LE
O
M
IN
OR
A
JO
Polaris
CEP
Pointers
LEO
r
pe
Dip
Little
Dip
per
RT
A
ACO
eb
as
eg
fP
DR
Den
o
re
ua
Sq
WEST
B O ÖTES
S
O
L
S
Sp
ica
S
VIRG
VU
A
ITT
LE
S
EN
RP UT
SE AP
C
Rasalhague
AQ
UI
C
BOORONA
REA
LIS
ne
ysto
Ke
A
SAG
US
INU
air
Alt
PH
ULE
DEL
E QU
HERCU
LA
Arcturus
Vega
R
LY
Albireo
C Y GNUS
P E G ASUS
RIU
AQUA
CU
COMA
B E R E NIC E S
us
PISCES
Denebola
IO
SS
LA
CE
Big
CA
US
tz
ar
Miz
HE
her
a
IA
U RSA
M IN OR
PE
Alp
S
NE I
CA ATIC
VEN
A
ED
R
U
RS
MA
PI
SC
ES
t
ea
Gr
EAST
PE
LA
OPHIUCHUS
IC
PR
CA
SC
UTU
M
OR
SERPENS
CAUDA
NU
S
s
Antare
M
IC
RO
S
CO
PIU
M
SA
GIT
TA
LIB
RA
Tea
p
ot
RIU
S
S
PU
LU
CO
AUS RONA
TRAL
IS
SCO
RPIUS
IL
W
O
RI
TI
N
20
00
TELESCOPIUM
SOUTH
SUMMER
Early June
Late June
Early July
Late July
Early August
Late August
Early September
2:00 AM*
1:00 AM*
12:00 AM*
11:00 PM*
10:00 PM*
9:00 PM*
8:00 PM (dusk)*
*Daylight saving time
27
NORTH
URSA MAJOR
Big Di
pper
M iza
ters
Poin
r
N
LY
DR
AC
O
Little
Dipp
X
er
U RSA
MIN OR
CAM
ELO
L
DA
IS
pe
S
PAR
Ca
Polaris
GE
M
INI
CU
e
lhagu
Rosa
HER
S
SERPEN
S
CAUDA
SAG
AQ
UIL
A
TUM
US
LE
UU
EQ
SCU
SU
GA
DE
S
LPH
IN U S
E
PE
ir
M
PI
Great Square
of Pegasus
ES
Alta
RO
ITTA
WEST
NUS
HU
OPHIUC
EIA
CYG
A
LYR
IOP
L AC E RTA
V U L P E CULA
C ASS
AND
A RIES
TRIA N G U L U M
SEUS
eo
Albir
P
Deneb
a
Veg
CE
HEU
S
Mirfak
PER
Algo
l
Hyades
TAURUS
SC
LE
Keystone
lla
Aldebaran
N
IDA
ER
IU S
US
CE
TU
S
US
AQUARIUS
O
IC
PR
CA
haut
Fomal
SCULP
FO
RN
AX
TOR
US
PISCIS A
PHO
T RIN
US
E NIX
S
RO
MIC
CO
IL
W
PI
SA
GI
TT
AR
ORION
Betelgeu
se
EAST
Alpheratz
DA
RN
UM
O
RI
TI
N
20
00
S
GRU
SOUTH
AUTUMN
Early September
Late September
Early October
Late October
Early November
Late November
Early December
*Daylight saving time
28
2:00 AM*
1:00 AM*
12:00 AM*
11:00 PM*
9:00 PM
8:00 PM
7:00 PM
NORTH
CYGN
U
S
HER
C
CU
LE
S
EPH
EUS
BO
CO
DRA
CE
RT
A
S
Mi
za
r
Big
tz
ME
LOP
ARDALIS
r
pe
Dip
he
ra
CA
Alp
PIS CES
ULU
ol
Alg
T RIA N G
n
ION
u se
Betelge
CET
C IN
M
AN
XT
US
OR
Mira
I
d
TA
UR
US
n
yo
oc
I
Pr
AN O
SE
S
H
ph
MO
ar
d
Rig
NO
CER
OS
el
I
ER
Sirius
AN
PY
TL
XIS
US
FO
LEP
C A NIS
MAJOR
RN
A
X
RA
US
Al
YD
DA
N
TER
CRA
s
ulu
Reg
M IN
S
Hya
des
eb
a
ra
x
ER
LEO
CANC
Pollu
r
WEST
X
Casto
PERSEUS
N
LY
LE
O MIN
OR
A RIES
ak
rf
Mi
M
OR
Denebola
la
pel
Ca
Gre
at
of
Pe
ga
su
s
ES
UR
SA
MA
J
C
BER OMA
ENIC
ES
VIRGO
EAST
Al
GE
R
Sq
ua
re
CA
SIO
ÖT
er
Dipp
U RSA
MINOR
Polaris
P EI
A
AN
PE
OM
DR
GA
SU
A
ED
S
LA
Little
C
VE AN
NA ES
TIC
I
ers
int
Po
Adhara
IA
COLU
VEL
A
PUPPIS
MBA
CA
EL
UM
IL
W
O
RI
TI
N
20
00
SOUTH
WINTER
Early December
Late December
Early January
Late January
Early February
Late February
Early March
2:00 AM
1:00 AM
12:00 AM
11:00 PM
10:00 PM
9:00 PM
8:00 PM
29
Appendix C: Constellation Abbreviations
And Andromeda
CVn Canes Venatici
Ori
Ant Antlia
Cyg Cygnus
Pav Pavo
Aps Apus
Del Delphinus
Peg Pegasus
Aql Aquila
Dor Dorado
Per Perseus
Aqr Aquarius
Dra Draco
Phe Phoenix
Ara Ara
Equ Equuleus
Pic Pictor
Ari
Eri
PsA Piscis Austrinus
Aries
Eridanus
Orion
Aur Auriga
For Fornax
Psc Pisces
Boo Boötes
Gem Gemini
Pup Puppis
Cae Caelum
Gru Grus
Pyx Pyxis
Cam Camelopardalis
Her Hercules
Ret Reticulum
Cap Capricorn
Hor Horologium
Scl Sculptor
Car Carina
Hya Hydra
Sco Scorpius
Cas Cassiopeia
Hyi Hydrus
Sct Scutum
Cen Centaurus
Ind Indus
Ser Serpens
Cep Cepheus
Lac Lacerta
Sex Sextans
Cet Cetus
Leo Leo
Sge Sagitta
Cha Chamaeleon
Lep Lepus
Sgr Sagittarius
Cir
Lib Libra
Tau Taurus
Cnc Cancer
LMi Leo Minor
Tel
CMa Canis Major
Lup Lupus
CMi Canis Minor
Lyn Lynx
TrA Triangulm
Australe
Col Columba
Lyr Lyra
Tri
Com Coma Berenices
Men Mensa
Tuc Tucana
CrA Corona
Australis
Mic Microscopium
UMa Ursa Major
Mon Monoceros
UMi Ursa Minor
CrB Corona Borealis
Mus Musca
Vel Vela
Crt
Nor Norma
Vir
Cru Crux
Oct Octans
Vol Volans
Crv Corvus
Oph Ophiuchus
Vul Vulpecula
30
Circinus
Crater
Telescopium
Triangulum
Virgo
31
Name
Name
O∑∑254
30
∑3053
SU
Ced214
∑3062
Alpheratz
∑2
Kappa
Algenib
AD
7
∑12
S
∑13
ST
Groombridge34
∑24
Iota
VX
R
∑30
AQ
Beta
∑36
Zeta
Delta
55
Schedar
O∑18
HN122
Delta
Eta
65
Do13
Lambda1
36
Navi
∑80
∑79
U
∑88
∑90
Zeta
Eta
Lux Lydiae
Mirach
Zeta
Kappa
Number
Number
ST001
ST002
ST003
ST004
ST005
ST006
ST007
ST008
ST009
ST010
ST011
ST012
ST013
ST014
ST015
ST016
ST017
ST018
ST019
ST020
ST021
ST022
ST023
ST024
ST025
ST026
ST027
ST028
ST029
ST030
ST031
ST032
ST033
ST034
ST035
ST036
ST037
ST038
ST039
ST040
ST041
ST042
ST043
ST044
ST045
ST046
ST047
ST048
ST049
SAO 181
Beta
ADS 996
h3423
74
77
Rumker 2
Dunlop 2
ADS 755
“Gamma, Tsih”
ADS 683
Alpha
ADS 588
ADS 624
Lacaille 119
ADS 449
17
ADS 246
“35, UU”
ADS 61
Alpha
ADS 102
ß 391
Gamma
ADS 180
Other
Other
RA
00 01.2
00 02.0
00 02.6
00 04.6
00 04.7
00 06.3
00 08.4
00 09.3
00 09.4
00 13.2
00 14.5
00 14.6
00 15.0
00 15.4
00 16.2
00 17.6
00 18.1
00 18.5
00 19.4
00 19.9
00 24.0
00 27.2
00 27.6
00 31.5
00 32.4
00 37.0
00 39.3
00 39.9
00 40.5
00 42.4
00 45.7
00 48.7
00 49.1
00 49.9
00 50.0
00 52.4
00 55.0
00 56.7
00 59.4
01 00.1
01 02.3
01 05.6
01 05.8
01 08.4
01 08.6
01 08.7
01 09.7
01 13.7
01 15.8
RA
Dec
+60 21
-06.0
+66 06
+43.5
+67.2
+58.4
+29 05
+79.7
-28 00
+15.2
-07.8
-18.9
+08 49
-32.1
+76.9
+50.3
+44.0
+26 08
-08.8
+44.7
+38 35
+49 59
+35.6
-63.0
+06.9
+53.9
+30.9
+21 26
+56.5
+04.2
+75.0
+07.6
+57 49
+27.7
+64.1
-69.5
+23.6
+60.7
+00 47
+44 43
+81 51
+21 28
+04 55
-55.3
-10.2
+86.3
+35.6
+07.6
-68.9
Dec
Mag
7.6
4.4
5.9
8
7.8
6.4
2.1
6.6
6.2
2.8
4.9
4.4
5.8
5.5
7
9
8
7.6
3.5
8
5.8
6.9
6.9
4.4
5.7
3.7
3.3
5.4
2.2
7.8
5.7
4.4
3.4
6.3
11
6.5
6
2.5
8.4
6
6.8
5.3
6.8
3.9
3.5
4.3
2
5.6
5.1
Mag
Sep
59"
*
15"
*
30'
1.5"
*
0.8"
2"
*
1.5°
*
12"
*
0.9"
*
39"
5"
*
*
Stellar
15"
*
27"
28"
*
*
6"
*
1.5"
36"
*
12"
4.4"
13’
21"
0.8"
*
26"
8"
Stellar
30"
33"
6.4"
*
*
*
23"
5.4"
Sep
Con
Cas
Psc
Cas
And
Cep
Cas
And
Cep
Scl
Peg
Cet
Cet
Psc
Scl
Cep
Cas
And
And
Cet
And
And
Cas
And
Tuc
Psc
Cas
And
Psc
Cas
Psc
Cas
Psc
Cas
Psc
Cas
Tuc
And
Cas
Cet
And
Cep
Psc
Psc
Phe
Cet
Cep
And
Psc
Tuc
Con
Code
5
1
5
1
130
4
21
4
4
21
1
1
5
22
4
1
2
2
21
21
22
2
1
2
2
21
21
5
21
4
2
21
5
5
120
2
4
21
3
3
22
3
2
2
21
21
21
2
2
Code
Appendix D: ST Catalog
colored double star
red variable star
colored double star
red variable star
emission nebula
double star challenge
star
double star challenge
double star challenge
star
red variable star
red variable star
colored double star
variable star
double star challenge
red variable star
double star
double star
star
star
variable star
double star
red variable star
double star
double star
star
star
colored double star
star
double star challenge
double star
star
colored double star
colored double star
scattered group of stars
double star
double star challenge
star
double star equal magnitude
double star equal magnitude
variable star
double star equal magnitude
double star
double star
star
star
star
double star
double star
32
Name
Z
∑113
Psi
R
Gamma
Achernar
51
UV
p
Nu
44
Phi
∑162
∑174
∑163
Baten Kaitos
∑178
∑180
Psi
Epsilon
∑186
56
Lambda
Upsilon
∑202
Almach
Hamal
59
Iota
∑231
∑228
∑232
∑239
Mira
Iota
∑268
∑274
Polaris
Omega
30
R
∑299
∑305
RZ
pi
∑307
R
∑330
Acamar
∑333
Epsilon
∑331
Menkar
Rho
∑320
Number
ST050
ST051
ST052
ST053
ST054
ST055
ST056
ST057
ST058
ST059
ST060
ST061
ST062
ST063
ST064
ST065
ST066
ST067
ST068
ST069
ST070
ST071
ST072
ST073
ST074
ST075
ST076
ST077
ST078
ST079
ST080
ST081
ST082
ST083
ST084
ST085
ST086
ST087
ST088
ST089
ST090
ST091
ST092
ST093
ST094
ST095
ST096
ST097
ST098
ST099
ST100
ST101
ST102
ST103
ST104
Alpha
25
ADS 2237
Theta
Epsilon
Eta
R TRI
Gamma
Alpha
h 3506
Omicron
ADS 1697
66
ADS 1709
Alpha
Gamma
Alpha
45
ADS 1538
ADS 1534
ADS 1563
Gamma
Zeta
1
Dunlop 5
106
Burnham 1103
Alpha
42
ADS 1129
Other
16.2
19.8
25.9
27.0
28.4
37.7
38.0
38.8
39.8
41.4
43.3
43.7
49.3
50.1
51.3
51.5
52.0
53.5
53.6
54.4
55.9
56.2
57.9
00.0
02.0
03.9
07.2
10.9
12.4
12.8
14.0
14.7
17.4
19.3
29.1
29.4
31.5
31.8
33.9
37.0
37.0
43.3
47.5
48.9
49.3
50.7
53.9
57.2
58.3
59.2
59.2
00.8
02.3
05.2
06.2
RA
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
03
03
03
03
Dec
+25.8
-00 31
+68.1
-32.5
-43.3
-57 14
+48.6
-18.0
-56.2
+05.5
+60.6
+50.7
+47 54
+22.3
+64 51
-10.3
+10 48
+19.3
-46.3
+63.7
+01.9
+37.3
+23.6
-21.1
+02.8
+42.3
+23.5
+39 02
+30.3
-02.4
+47.5
+30 24
+28 44
-03.0
+67.4
+55 31
+01 05
+89 16
-28 13
+24 38
+34.3
+03.2
+19 22
+69 38
+17 28
+55 53
-49.9
-00.6
-40.3
+29.3
+21 20
+52 20
+04.1
+38.8
+79 24
Mag
8.8
6.4
4.7
6.1
3.4
0.5
3.6
7
5.8
4.4
5.8
4.1
5.8
6
6.6
3.7
8.5
4.5
4.4
3.4
6.8
5.7
4.8
4
4
2.2
2
5.6
5
5.7
6.6
8
7
2
4
6.9
7.3
2
5
6.5
5.4
3.6
7.4
6.2
5.2
3.9
4.7
7.3
3.5
4.6
4.6
5.4
2.5
3.4
5.8
Sep
*
1.6"
25"
*
4’
*
*
*
11.5"
*
1.6"
*
2"
2.6"
35"
3’
3"
8"
5°
*
1"
3'
37"
*
1.6"
10"
*
16"
3.8"
16.5"
1.1"
7"
14"
*
2.2"
3"
14"
18"
11"
39"
*
2.7"
3"
Stellar
3"
28"
*
9"
8"
1.4"
1"
12"
*
*
5"
Con
Psc
Cet
Cas
Scl
Phe
Eri
And
Cet
Eri
Psc
Cas
Per
Per
Ari
Cas
Cet
Ari
Ari
Phe
Cas
Cet
And
Ari
Cet
Psc
And
Ari
And
Tri
Cet
And
Tri
Tri
Cet
Cas
Per
Cet
UMi
For
Ari
Tri
Cet
Ari
Cas
Ari
Per
Hor
Cet
Eri
Ari
Ari
Per
Cet
Per
Cep
Code
21
4
9
22
21
21
21
22
2
21
2
21
8
2
5
2
3
3
1
21
4
2
2
21
4
5
21
5
5
2
4
3
2
22
6
2
3
2
2
5
22
2
4
22
6
9
22
2
2
4
4
2
21
1
5
star
double star challenge
double star magnitude contrast
variable star
star
star
star
variable star
double star
star
double star
star
triple star challenge
double star
colored double star
double star
double star equal magnitude
double star equal magnitude
red variable star
star
double star challenge
double star
double star
star
double star challenge
colored double star
star
colored double star
colored double star
double star
double star challenge
double star equal magnitude
double star
variable star
triple star
double star
double star equal magnitude
double star
double star
colored double star
variable star
double star
double star challenge
variable star
triple star
double star magnitude contrast
variable star
double star
double star
double star challenge
double star challenge
double star
star
red variable star
colored double star
33
Name
h3568
Algol
Alpha
h3556
∑362
∑369
ADS2446
Zeta
Tau4
Toms Topaz
Mirfak
Y
∑394
∑385
∑389
Sigma
∑401
Epsilon
∑400
O∑36
U1
Omicron
Pi
Gamma
∑52
F
BE
Atik
32
Epsilon
Zaurak
Lambda
O∑531
∑485
Omicron2
Epsilon
Theta
Phi
T
∑528
ADS3169
43
ß 184
∑552
1
∑559
46
Aldebaran
Nu
53
∑572
54
R
∑590
Iota
Number
ST105
ST106
ST107
ST108
ST109
ST110
ST111
ST112
ST113
ST114
ST115
ST116
ST117
ST118
ST119
ST120
ST121
ST122
ST123
ST124
ST125
ST126
ST127
ST128
ST129
ST130
ST131
ST132
ST133
ST134
ST135
ST136
ST137
ST138
ST139
ST140
ST141
ST142
ST143
ST144
ST145
ST146
ST147
ST148
ST149
ST150
ST151
ST152
ST153
ST154
ST155
ST156
ST157
ST158
ST159
55
Dunlop 18
ADS 3305
Alpha
48
Upsilon3
Chi
Rumker 3
ADS 3137
Gamma
35
ADS 2995
SZ
40
30
∆ 16
SAO 12916
Zeta
ADS 2850
ADS 2726
26
ADS 2612
ADS 2650
ADS 2544
ADS 2472
SAO 75871
Alpha
Beta
ADS 2402
Other
07.5
08.2
12.1
12.4
16.3
17.2
17.7
18.2
19.5
20.3
24.3
27.7
28.0
29.1
30.1
30.6
31.3
32.9
35.0
40.0
41.6
44.3
46.1
47.2
48.3
48.6
49.5
54.1
54.3
57.9
58.0
00.7
07.6
07.8
15.2
16.5
17.7
20.4
22.0
22.6
22.7
24.0
27.9
31.4
32.0
33.5
33.9
35.9
36.3
38.2
38.5
40.4
40.5
43.6
50.9
RA
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
03
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
Dec
-79.0
+41.0
-29.0
-44.4
+60 02
+40 29
+38.6
-62.5
-21.8
+29.0
+49 52
+44.2
+20 27
+59.9
+59 21
+48.0
+27 34
-09.5
+60.0
+63.9
+62.6
+32.3
-12.1
-74.2
+11.2
-37 37
+65.5
+31.9
-03.0
+40 01
-13.5
+12.5
+38.1
+62 20
-07.7
-59.3
-63.3
+27.4
+19 32
+25.6
+15.1
-34.0
-21 30
+40 01
+53 55
+18 01
-06.7
+16.5
-03.4
-14.3
+26 56
-19.7
-38.2
-08 48
-53.5
Mag
5.6
2.2
4
6
8.5
6.7
7.8
5.2
3.7
4.5
1.8
8.1
7.1
4.2
6.5
4.4
6.4
3.7
6.8
6.8
8.1
3.8
4.4
3.2
5
4.9
4.5
2.9
5
2.9
3
3.3
7.4
7
4.5
4.4
6.2
5
8.4
5.5
7.3
4
7.3
7
5.4
6.9
5.7
0.9
3.9
3.9
7.3
4.3
6.7
6.7
5.6
Sep
*
*
9"
8"
*
*
7"
9"
*
*
1.4"
90"
83"
*
4"
52"
Stellar
19.4"
1.4"
*
1.7"
9"
10"
3"
4’
30"
11°
*
4"
*
*
9"
12"
15"
*
5"
3.5"
7"
3"
0.9"
5"
*
9°
*
*
7"
2.4"
2.7"
*
11"
*
1.4"
46"
Con
Hyi
Per
For
Eri
Cam
Per
Per
Ret
Eri
Ari
Per
Per
Ari
Cam
Cam
Per
Tau
Eri
Cam
Cam
Cam
Per
Eri
Hyi
Tau
Eri
Cam
Per
Eri
Per
Eri
Tau
Per
Cam
Eri
Ret
Ret
Tau
Tau
Tau
Tau
Eri
Eri
Per
Cam
Tau
Eri
Tau
Eri
Eri
Tau
Eri
Cae
Eri
Pic
Code
2
22
2
2
3
5
4
2
21
21
21
22
2
2
2
21
3
21
2
2
22
21
1
21
2
3
21
21
5
9
21
22
4
2
8
21
2
2
22
2
4
1
4
3
5
3
2
5
21
21
3
1
22
3
2
double star
variable star
double star
double star
double star equal magnitude
colored double star
double star challenge
double star
star
star
star
variable star
double star
double star
double star
star
double star equal magnitude
star
double star
double star
variable star
star
red variable star
star
double star
double star equal magnitude
star
star
colored double star
double star magnitude contrast
star
variable star
double star challenge
double star
triple star challenge
star
double star
double star
variable star
double star
double star challenge
red variable star
double star challenge
double star equal magnitude
colored double star
double star equal magnitude
double star
colored double star
star
star
double star equal magnitude
red variable star
variable star
double star equal magnitude
double star
34
Name
ST
Pi4
TT
Pi5
Omicron2
Iota
Pi6
Omega
Hinds Crimson Star
∑627
∑631
∑630
Epsilon
Zeta
W
Epsilon
Eta
O∑98
TX
SY
∑644
∑655
Rho
Rigel
∑653
Capella
S 476
h3750
UV
ADS3954
∑696
∑701
Eta
Sigma
Theta
Bellatrix
∑698
∑716
∑725
TL9
Delta
119
∑718
RT
∑747
Lambda
Trapezium
∑752
Alnilam
Phi2
Zeta
Sigma
Phact
Alnitak
U2
Number
ST160
ST161
ST162
ST163
ST164
ST165
ST166
ST167
ST168
ST169
ST170
ST171
ST172
ST173
ST174
ST175
ST176
ST177
ST178
ST179
ST180
ST181
ST182
ST183
ST184
ST185
ST186
ST187
ST188
ST189
ST190
ST191
ST192
ST193
ST194
ST195
ST196
ST197
ST198
ST199
ST200
ST201
ST202
ST203
ST204
ST205
ST206
ST207
ST208
ST209
ST210
ST211
ST212
ST213
ST214
Other
Alpha
Zeta
123
Iota
Epsilon
ADS 4182
ADS 3984
Dunlop 20
Gamma
ADS 4000
118
31
KBC Group
ADS 4134
CE
ADS 3954
ADS 3962
ADS 3978
Beta ORI
14
Alpha
Iota
10
14
8
ADS 3606
ADS 3623
10
ADS 3572
R
8
9
RV
3
51.2
51.2
51.6
54.2
56.4
57.0
58.5
59.3
59.6
00.6
00.7
02.0
02.0
02.5
05.4
05.5
06.5
07.9
09.1
09.8
10.4
12.3
13.3
14.5
15.4
16.7
19.3
20.5
21.8
21.8
22.8
23.3
24.5
24.7
24.8
25.1
25.2
29.3
29.7
30.0
32.0
32.2
32.4
33.2
35.0
35.1
35.3
35.4
36.2
36.9
37.6
38.7
39.6
40.8
42.2
RA
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
04
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
Dec
+68 10
+05.6
+28.5
+02.4
+13.5
+33.2
+01.7
+37.9
-14.8
+03 36
-13.5
+01.6
+43 49
+41.1
+01.2
-22.4
+41.2
+08 29
+39.0
-05.6
+37 17
-11.9
+02 52
-08.2
+32.7
+46 00
-18 30
-21 14
+32.5
-24.8
+03.6
-08.4
-02 24
+37.4
-52.3
+06.3
+34.9
+25 09
-01.1
+17.0
-00.3
+18.6
+49 24
+07.2
-06.0
+09 56
-05 23
-05 55
-01.2
+09.3
+21.1
-02 36
-34.1
-01.9
+62.5
Mag
9.2
3.7
8
3.7
4.1
2.7
4.5
5
5.9
6.6
7.5
6.5
2.9
3.8
8.6
3.2
3.2
5.9
8.5
9
6.8
4.5
4.5
0
5.1
0.1
6.2
4.7
7.4
5.5
5
6
3.4
5
6.8
1.6
6.6
5.8
4.7
5
2.2
4.7
7.5
8
4.8
3.4
5.1
2.9
1.7
4
3
3.7
2.6
2
7.7
Sep
Stellar
*
*
*
*
*
*
5.4"
*
21"
5.5"
15"
Stellar
*
*
*
*
0.7"
*
*
2"
13"
7"
9.4"
11"
*
39"
4"
*
3.2"
32"
6"
1.5"
9"
38"
*
31"
5"
*
5°
53"
*
8"
*
36"
4"
13"
11"
*
*
*
11"
*
2.4"
*
Con
Cam
Ori
Tau
Ori
Ori
Aur
Ori
Aur
Lep
Ori
Lep
Ori
Aur
Aur
Ori
Lep
Aur
Ori
Aur
Eri
Aur
Lep
Ori
Ori
Aur
Aur
Lep
Lep
Aur
Lep
Ori
Ori
Ori
Aur
Pic
Ori
Aur
Tau
Ori
Tau
Ori
Tau
Aur
Ori
Ori
Ori
Ori
Ori
Ori
Ori
Tau
Ori
Col
Ori
Cam
Code
1
21
22
21
21
21
21
2
22
3
2
2
22
21
22
21
21
4
22
22
4
2
5
9
6
21
3
9
22
2
2
2
4
2
2
21
2
2
21
0
2
21
3
22
2
9
7
9
21
21
21
7
21
9
22
red variable star
star
variable star
star
star
star
star
double star
variable star
double star equal magnitude
double star
double star
variable star
star
variable star
star
star
double star challenge
variable star
variable star
double star challenge
double star
colored double star
double star magnitude contrast
triple star
star
double star equal magnitude
double star magnitude contrast
variable star
double star
double star
double star
double star challenge
double star
double star
star
double star
double star
star
asterism
double star
star
double star equal magnitude
variable star
double star
double star magnitude contrast
quadruple star
double star magnitude contrast
star
star
star
quadruple star
star
double star magnitude contrast
variable star
35
Name
Gamma
Y
Mu
Saiph
∑795
Beta
Delta
Nu
∑817
Betelgeuse
U
Theta
Pi
∆23
∑855
TU
∑845
SS
Gamma
Propus
∑872
KS
Zeta
V
Mirzam
Mu
8
Canopus
BL
15
Beta
ADS5150
∑924
ADS5188
CR
∑928
ADS5201
∑929
∑939
ADS5221
Nu1
UU
ADS5240
ADS5245
South529
Innes5
ADS5265
Innes1156
SAO172106
∑953
VW
Sirius
∑948
∑958
Kappa
Number
ST215
ST216
ST217
ST218
ST219
ST220
ST221
ST222
ST223
ST224
ST225
ST226
ST227
ST228
ST229
ST230
ST231
ST232
ST233
ST234
ST235
ST236
ST237
ST238
ST239
ST240
ST241
ST242
ST243
ST244
ST245
ST246
ST247
ST248
ST249
ST250
ST251
ST252
ST253
ST254
ST255
ST256
ST257
ST258
ST259
ST260
ST261
ST262
ST263
ST264
ST265
ST266
ST267
ST268
ST269
Other
13
Alpha
12
ADS 5311
ADS 5208
ADS 5191
20
Alpha
BL
Beta
Furud
Eta
ADS 4849
41
Alpha
SAO 196149
Kappa
52
Wazn
ADS 4334
44.5
45.7
46.0
47.8
48.0
51.0
51.3
51.5
54.9
55.2
55.8
59.7
59.9
04.8
09.0
10.9
11.7
13.4
14.9
14.9
15.6
19.7
20.3
22.7
22.7
23.0
23.8
24.0
25.5
27.8
28.8
31.8
32.3
34.3
34.4
34.7
35.1
35.4
35.9
36.2
36.4
36.5
36.9
37.3
37.6
38.0
38.4
39.1
39.5
41.2
42.2
45.1
46.2
48.2
49.8
RA
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
05
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
Dec
-22.5
+20.7
-32.3
-09.7
+06 27
-35.8
-20.9
+39.1
+07 02
+07 24
+20.2
+37 13
+45.9
-48 27
+02 30
+26.0
+48 42
+47.0
-06.3
+22.5
+36.2
-05.3
-30.1
-02.2
-18.0
+22.5
+04 36
-52 42
+14.7
+20 47
-07 02
+38.9
+17.8
+38.1
+16.1
+38.4
+37.1
+37.7
+05.3
+38.0
-18.7
+38.5
+38.2
+38.4
+12.2
-61.5
+38.8
-29.1
-30.0
+08 59
+31.5
-16.7
+59 27
+55 42
-32.5
Mag
3.7
7.1
5.2
2
6.1
3.1
3.8
4
8.8
0.5
5.3
2.6
4.3
7
6
7.5
6.1
10
4
3.3
6.9
9.5
3
6
2
2.9
4.3
-0.7
8.5
6.6
3.8
11.5
6.3
6.7
8.5
7.6
7.4
7.4
8.3
8.5
6
5.1
9.7
8.8
7.6
6.4
9.6
8
7.8
7.1
8.7
-1
4.9
5.5
4
Sep
97"
*
*
*
“1.3"
*
*
30"
19"
Stellar
*
3.5"
1°
2.7"
30"
*
8"
*
8°
*
11"
*
8.5°
*
*
*
13"
*
*
27"
3"
4.5"
20"
43"
*
3.5"
2.6"
6"
30"
1.3"
17.5"
*
2.2"
10"
70"
2.4"
4.6"
0.7"
2.5°
7"
*
9"
2"
5"
*
Con
Lep
Tau
Col
Ori
Ori
Col
Lep
Aur
Ori
Ori
Ori
Aur
Aur
Pup
Ori
Gem
Aur
Aur
Mon
Gem
Aur
Mon
Cma
Mon
Cma
Gem
Mon
Car
Ori
Gem
Mon
Aur
Gem
Aur
Gem
Aur
Aur
Aur
Mon
Aur
Cma
Aur
Aur
Aur
Gem
Pic
Aur
Cma
Cma
Mon
Gem
Cma
Lyn
Lyn
Cma
Code
2
22
21
21
4
21
21
21
3
21
22
9
1
3
2
22
2
22
21
21
2
22
21
22
21
21
5
21
22
2
6
2
5
2
22
2
2
2
2
4
5
22
2
2
2
2
2
4
1
2
22
9
8
3
21
double star
variable star
star
star
double star challenge
star
star
star
double star equal magnitude
star
variable star
double star magnitude contrast
red variable star
double star equal magnitude
double star
variable star
double star
variable star
star
star
double star
variable star
star
variable star
star
star
colored double star
star
variable star
double star
triple star
double star
colored double star
double star
variable star
double star
double star
double star
double star
double star challenge
colored double star
variable star
double star
double star
double star
double star
double star
double star challenge
red variable star
double star
variable star
double star magnitude contrast
triple star challenge
double star equal magnitude
star
36
ST270
ST271
ST272
ST273
ST274
ST275
ST276
ST277
ST278
ST279
ST280
ST281
ST282
ST283
ST284
ST285
ST286
ST287
ST288
ST289
ST290
ST291
ST292
ST293
ST294
ST295
ST296
ST297
ST298
ST299
ST300
ST301
ST302
ST303
ST304
ST305
ST306
ST307
ST308
ST309
ST310
ST311
ST312
ST313
ST314
ST315
ST316
ST317
ST318
ST319
ST320
ST321
ST322
ST323
ST324
Rumker 8
17
Rumker 7
Dunlop 65
Zeta
V
Alpha
Kappa
2
ADS 6117
“HN19, h269”
Alpha
69
h 3948
55
19
4
ADS 5871
28
RV
Dunlop 42
ADS 5846
Zeta
21
22
24
Mu
16
14
Other
14
Name
∑963
GY
∑987
Omicron1
Theta
38
∑997
BG
O∑80
RV
Epsilon
Sigma
Omicron2
Dunlop38
Mekbuda
∑1009
R
W
Gamma
Tau
∑1035
∑1037
Omega
h3945
Tau
Delta
∑1062
Gamma
Sigma
∑1093
n
Castor
Upsilon
∑1121
K
Procyon
O∑179
∑1138
∑1127
∑1149
U
Chi
Dunlop59
S-h86
Naos
RT
RU
Epsilon
Gamma
Zeta
c
Beta
R
Kappa
AC
Number
53.1
53.2
54.1
54.1
54.2
54.6
56.1
56.4
58.1
58.4
58.6
01.7
03.0
04.0
04.1
05.7
07.4
08.1
08.8
11.1
12.0
12.8
14.8
16.6
18.7
20.1
22.9
28.2
29.2
30.3
34.3
34.6
35.9
36.6
38.8
39.3
44.4
45.5
47.0
49.4
55.1
56.8
59.2
02.5
03.6
05.4
07.5
07.9
09.5
12.2
15.3
16.5
16.6
19.8
22.7
RA
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
Dec
+59.5
-04.6
-05 51
-24.2
-12.0
+13 11
-14 02
+07.1
+14.2
+06.2
-29.0
-27.9
-23.8
-43.6
+20.6
+52 45
+22.7
-11 55
-70.5
+30.2
+22 17
+27.2
-26.8
-23 19
-24 57
+21 59
+55 17
+08.9
-43.3
+50.0
-23 28
+31.9
+26.9
-14 29
-26 48
+05 14
+24 23
-14 41
+64 03
+03 13
+22 00
-53.0
-50.0
+63.1
-40.0
-38.8
-22.9
-68.6
-47.3
+17 39
-62.9
+09.2
+11.7
-71.5
-15.9
Mag
5.7
9.4
7.1
3.9
4.1
4.7
5.3
9.2
7.3
7
1.5
3.5
3
5.6
3.7
6.9
6
6.4
4
4.4
8.2
7.2
3.9
4.5
4.4
3.5
5.6
4.3
3.3
8.8
5.1
2
4.1
7.9
3.8
0.4
3.7
6.1
7
7.9
8.2
3.5
6.5
6
2.3
8.5
8.9
4.4
1.9
4.7
5.3
3.5
6.1
5.4
8.9
Sep
0.4"
*
1.3"
*
*
7"
2.8"
*
2’
*
7.5"
*
*
20.5"
*
4.1"
*
Stellar
13.6"
1.9"
4"
1.3"
*
27"
15"
6"
15"
*
22"
0.8"
10"
1.8"
2.5°
7"
10"
Stellar
7"
17"
5"
22"
Stellar
4°
16"
49"
4°
*
*
6"
41"
0.6"
4"
*
*
65"
*
Con
Lyn
Mon
Mon
Cma
Cma
Gem
Cma
Mon
Gem
Mon
Cma
Cma
Cma
Pup
Gem
Lyn
Gem
CMa
Vol
Gem
Gem
Gem
Cma
CMa
CMa
Gem
Lyn
Cmi
Pup
Lyn
Pup
Gem
Gem
Pup
Pup
CMi
Gem
Pup
Cam
Cmi
Gem
Car
Pup
Cam
Pup
Pup
Pup
Vol
Vel
Cnc
Car
Cnc
Cnc
Vol
Pup
Code
4
22
4
21
21
5
9
22
0
22
2
21
21
2
22
3
22
1
2
2
3
4
21
5
6
9
6
21
2
4
3
4
1
3
3
21
9
3
6
2
22
21
2
2
21
22
22
2
2
8
2
21
22
2
22
double star challenge
variable star
double star challenge
star
star
colored double star
double star magnitude contrast
variable star
asterism
variable star
double star
star
star
double star
variable star
double star equal magnitude
variable star
red variable star
double star
double star
double star equal magnitude
double star challenge
star
colored double star
triple star
double star magnitude contrast
triple star
star
double star
double star challenge
double star equal magnitude
double star challenge
red variable star
double star equal magnitude
double star equal magnitude
star
double star magnitude contrast
double star equal magnitude
triple star
double star
variable star
star
double star
double star
star
variable star
variable star
double star
double star
triple star challenge
double star
star
variable star
double star
variable star
37
Name
31
Beta
h4903
∑1224
∑1223
h4104
∆70
h4107
∑1245
Sigma
h4128
∑1254
Alpha
Delta
∑1270
∑1268
Epsilon
∑1282
X
∑1298
Rho
∑1311
Suhail
Sigma2
a
h4188
h4191
∑1321
g
RT
∑1334
∑1338
Alpha
Kappa
∑1347
Kappa
∑1355
Alphard
∑1356
Dunlop76
∑1360
Zeta
N
∑1351
Alterf
R
∑1369
Iota
Upsilon
R
W
Y
Rasalas
h4262
Regulus
Number
ST325
ST326
ST327
ST328
ST329
ST330
ST331
ST332
ST333
ST334
ST335
ST336
ST337
ST338
ST339
ST340
ST341
ST342
ST343
ST344
ST345
ST346
ST347
ST348
ST349
ST350
ST351
ST352
ST353
ST354
ST355
ST356
ST357
ST358
ST359
ST360
ST361
ST362
ST363
ST364
ST365
ST366
ST367
ST368
ST369
ST370
ST371
ST372
ST373
ST374
ST375
ST376
ST377
ST378
ST379
Mu
ADS 7571
Alpha
Rumker 11
RV
ADS 7438
23
Lambda
Alpha
Omega
ADS 7351
40
38
Lambda
66
Innes 10
ADS 6977
Iota
5 HYA
24
Phi
Other
22.8
25.7
26.3
26.7
26.7
29.1
29.5
31.4
35.8
38.8
39.2
40.4
43.6
44.7
45.3
46.7
46.8
50.8
55.4
01.4
02.5
07.5
08.0
10.4
11.0
12.5
14.4
14.9
16.2
18.4
18.8
21.0
21.1
22.1
23.3
24.7
27.3
27.6
28.5
28.6
30.6
30.8
31.2
31.5
31.7
32.2
35.4
39.9
47.1
47.6
51.0
51.1
52.8
54.5
08.4
RA
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
08
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
09
10
Dec
+43.2
-66.1
-39.1
+24 32
+26 56
-47.9
-44 44
-39 04
+06 37
+03.3
-60.3
+19 40
-33.2
-54.7
-02.6
+28 46
+06 25
+35 03
+17.2
+32 15
+67.6
+22 59
-43 26
+67 08
-59.0
-43.6
-43 13
+52 42
-57.5
+51.4
+36 48
+38 11
+34.4
-55.0
+03 30
+26.2
+06 14
-08 40
+09.1
-45.5
+10 35
-31 53
-57.0
+63 03
+23.0
-62.8
+40.0
-01.1
-65.1
+11 26
-02.0
-23.0
+26.0
-12.9
+11 58
Mag
4.3
3.8
6.5
7.1
6.3
5.5
5
6.4
6
4.4
6.9
6.4
3.7
2.1
6.4
4
3.4
7.5
5.6
5.9
4.8
6.9
2.2
4.8
3.4
6.7
5.2
8.1
4.3
8.6
3.9
6.6
3.1
2.5
7.2
4.5
7.5
2
5.9
7.8
8.3
5.8
3.1
3.8
4.3
3.8
6.5
3.9
3.1
4.4
9
8.3
3.9
8.7
1.4
Sep
15°
6°
8"
6"
5"
3.6"
5"
4"
10"
*
1.4"
21"
*
2.6"
5"
30"
3"
4"
*
5"
1°
8"
Stellar
4"
50’
2.7’
6"
18"
5’
*
3"
1"
*
*
21"
2.1"
2.3"
Stellar
0.5"
61"
14"
8"
*
23"
*
*
25"
*
5"
Stellar
*
*
*
8"
Stellar
Con
Lyn
Vol
Pup
Cnc
Cnc
Vel
Vel
Vel
Cnc
Hya
Car
Cnc
Pyx
Vel
Hya
Cnc
Hyd
Lyn
Cnc
Cnc
Uma
Cnc
Vel
Uma
Car
Vel
Vel
Uma
Car
Uma
Lyn
Lyn
Lyn
Vel
Hya
Leo
Hya
Hya
Leo
Vel
Leo
Ant
Vel
Uma
Leo
Car
Lyn
Hya
Car
Leo
Sex
Hya
Leo
Hya
Leo
Code
21
21
2
2
3
2
2
6
2
21
4
7
21
2
2
5
9
3
22
2
21
3
21
9
21
2
9
3
21
22
4
4
21
21
2
6
3
21
4
2
3
2
21
9
21
22
2
21
2
1
22
22
21
2
21
star
star
double star
double star
double star equal magnitude
double star
double star
triple star
double star
star
double star challenge
quadruple star
star
double star
double star
colored double star
double star magnitude contrast
double star equal magnitude
variable star
double star
star
double star equal magnitude
star
double star magnitude contrast
star
double star
double star magnitude contrast
double star equal magnitude
star
variable star
double star challenge
double star challenge
star
star
double star
triple star
double star equal magnitude
star
double star challenge
double star
double star equal magnitude
double star
star
double star magnitude contrast
star
variable star
double star
star
double star
red variable star
variable star
variable star
star
double star
star
38
Name
S
ADS7704
Adhafera
q
h4306
Algieba
Tania Australis
Mu
Alpha
45
Delta
p
Rho
49
U
Gamma
U
Dunlop95
∑1466
R
VY
Delta
∑1476
Nu
54
SAO251342
Xi
Alula Borealis
∑1529
h4432
Iota
∑1540
Tau
Giausar
88
N
Innes78
∑1552
Nu
Denebola
Beta
O∑112
∑1579
Epsilon
∑1593
Zeta
Delta
∑1604
Epsilon
Rumker14
Delta
2
Epsilon
∑1627
R
Number
ST380
ST381
ST382
ST383
ST384
ST385
ST386
ST387
ST388
ST389
ST390
ST391
ST392
ST393
ST394
ST395
ST396
ST397
ST398
ST399
ST400
ST401
ST402
ST403
ST404
ST405
ST406
ST407
ST408
ST409
ST410
ST411
ST412
ST413
ST414
ST415
ST416
ST417
ST418
ST419
ST420
ST421
ST422
ST423
ST424
ST425
ST426
ST427
ST428
ST429
ST430
ST431
ST432
ST433
ST434
ADS 8489
2
65
h4486
Beta
ADS 8148
83
84
Lambda
x
ADS 8119
Nu
ADS 7979
40
x
35
47
HN 50
Gamma
Mu
42
Zeta
Other
09.4
16.3
16.7
17.1
19.1
20.0
22.3
26.1
27.2
27.6
29.6
32.0
32.8
35.0
35.2
35.5
37.6
39.3
43.4
44.6
45.1
45.8
49.3
49.6
55.6
17.5
18.2
18.5
19.4
23.4
23.9
26.8
27.9
31.4
31.8
32.3
33.6
34.7
45.9
49.1
52.9
54.6
55.1
59.6
03.5
04.3
08.4
09.5
10.1
14.0
15.1
16.1
17.6
18.1
19.6
RA
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
11
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
Dec
-61.6
+17.7
+23.4
-61.3
-64.7
+19.8
+41.5
-16.8
-31.1
+09.8
-30 36
-61.7
+09.3
+08 39
-39.6
-78.6
-13.4
-55.6
+04 44
+68.8
+67.4
-80.5
-04 01
-16.2
+24.8
-63.5
+31.5
+33.1
-01 38
-65.0
+10.5
+03 00
+02.9
+69.3
+14 21
-29 16
-40.6
+16 48
+06.5
+14 34
-33.9
+19.4
+46 29
-78.2
-02 26
+21.5
-50.7
-11 51
-22.6
-45.7
-58.7
+40.7
-68.0
-03 56
-19.3
Mag
4.5
7.2
3.4
3.4
5.6
2.5
3
3.8
4.3
6
5.7
3.3
3.9
5.7
8.1
4.1
7
4.3
6.3
7.5
5.9
4.5
6.9
3.1
4.5
7
4.5
3.5
7
5.1
4
6.2
5.5
3.8
6.4
5.8
6
6
4
2.1
4.7
8.4
6.7
5.4
8.7
6
2.6
6.6
3
5.6
2.8
6
4.1
6.6
6.7
Sep
*
1.4"
5.5’
*
2.1"
4.4"
*
*
*
3.8"
11"
*
*
2"
*
*
*
52"
7"
*
*
4.5’
2.5"
*
6.8"
7"
1.3"
7"
10"
2.3"
1.3"
29"
1.5’
20’
16"
9"
1"
3"
*
Stellar
0.9"
73"
4"
0.9"
1.3"
3.6"
4.5’
10"
*
2.9"
*
11.5"
*
20"
*
Con
Car
Leo
Leo
Car
Car
Leo
Uma
Hya
Ant
Leo
Ant
Car
Leo
Leo
Ant
Cha
Hya
Vel
Sex
Uma
Uma
Cha
Sex
Hya
Leo
Car
Uma
Uma
Leo
Mus
Leo
Leo
Leo
Dra
Leo
Hyd
Cen
Leo
Vir
Leo
Hya
Leo
Uma
Cha
Vir
Com
Cen
Crv
Crv
Cen
Cru
Cvn
Mus
Vir
Crv
Code
22
4
2
21
2
2
21
21
21
2
9
21
21
4
22
21
22
2
2
22
22
2
2
21
2
9
4
2
2
2
4
6
2
1
2
3
4
6
21
21
5
2
2
5
4
2
2
6
21
2
21
5
1
3
22
variable star
double star challenge
double star
star
double star
double star
star
star
star
double star
double star magnitude contrast
star
star
double star challenge
variable star
star
variable star
double star
double star
variable star
variable star
double star
double star
star
double star
double star magnitude contrast
double star challenge
double star
double star
double star
double star challenge
triple star
double star
red variable star
double star
double star equal magnitude
double star challenge
triple star
star
star
colored double star
double star
double star
colored double star
double star challenge
double star
double star
triple star
star
double star
star
colored double star
red variable star
double star equal magnitude
variable star
39
Name
∑1633
Epsilon
M40
17
∑1639
S
SS
Acrux
3C273
Algorab
Gacrux
∑1649
24
Alpha
ADS8612
∑1669
Gamma
Porrima
Y
Iota
Beta
Mimosa
∑1694
∑1687
Mu
Delta
Cor Caroli
RY
∑1699
Delta
Theta
∑1724
Alpha
54
J
Mizar
Spica
O∑∑123
R
∑1755
S
25
∑1763
Epsilon
∑1772
Dunlop141
T
Alkaid
∑1785
2
Upsilon
3
Zeta
Hadar
Pi
Number
ST435
ST436
ST437
ST438
ST439
ST440
ST441
ST442
ST443
ST444
ST445
ST446
ST447
ST448
ST449
ST450
ST451
ST452
ST453
ST454
ST455
ST456
ST457
ST458
ST459
ST460
ST461
ST462
ST463
ST464
ST465
ST466
ST467
ST468
ST469
ST470
ST471
ST472
ST473
ST474
ST475
ST476
ST477
ST478
ST479
ST480
ST481
ST482
ST483
ST484
ST485
ST486
ST487
ST488
ST489
Beta
k
Eta
ADS 9031
1
ADS 8974
ADS 8972
V
ADS 8934
Dunlop 133
Zeta
Alpha
Rumker 16
“51, Theta”
Alpha
Beta
32
35
Dunlop 126
h4539
Gamma
RV
h4547
Delta
Gamma
ADS 8585
RV
Alpha
Winnecke 4
ADS 8531
ADS 8539
Other
20.6
21.4
22.4
22.5
24.4
24.6
25.3
26.6
29.1
29.9
31.2
31.6
35.1
37.2
37.7
41.3
41.5
41.7
45.1
45.6
46.3
47.7
49.2
53.3
54.6
55.6
56.0
56.4
58.7
02.3
08.1
09.9
10.0
13.4
22.6
23.9
25.2
27.1
29.7
32.3
33.0
37.5
37.6
39.9
40.7
41.7
41.8
47.5
49.1
49.4
49.5
51.8
55.5
03.8
06.4
RA
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
14
14
Dec
+27 03
-60.4
+58 05
+05.3
+25.6
-49.4
+00 48
-63.1
+02.0
-16.5
-57.1
-11.1
+18 23
-69.1
-27.1
-13 01
-49.0
-01.4
+45 26
-61.0
-68.1
-59.7
+83 25
+21 14
-57.2
+03.4
+38.3
+66.0
+27 28
-71.5
-65.3
-05 32
+17 32
-18 50
-61.0
+54 56
-11.2
+64 43
-23 17
+36.8
-07.2
+36.3
-07.9
-53.5
+19 57
-54.6
-33.6
+49.3
+27.0
-34.5
+15.8
-33.0
-47.3
-60.4
-26.7
Mag
6.3
3.6
9
6.5
6.8
9.2
6
1
12.8
3
1.6
8
5
2.7
5.5
5.3
2.2
3.5
7.4
4.7
3.7
1.3
5.3
5.1
4.3
3.4
3
6.8
8.8
3.6
5.7
4.4
5
6.8
4.7
2.3
1
6.7
4
7
6
5
7.9
2.3
5.7
5.3
5.5
1.9
7.6
4.2
4.1
4.5
2.6
0.6
3.3
Sep
9"
*
50"
21"
1.6"
*
Stellar
4.4"
*
24"
10"
15"
20"
*
1.3"
5"
1"
3"
Stellar
27
1.4
*
22"
29"
35"
*
19"
*
1.5"
8’
5.3"
7"
0.5"
5"
1’
14"
*
69"
Stellar
4.4"
*
1.8"
2.8"
*
5"
5.3"
*
*
3.4"
*
*
8"
5°
*
*
Con
Com
Cru
UMa
Vir
Com
Cen
Vir
Cru
Vir
Crv
Cru
Vir
CVn
Mus
Hya
Crv
Cen
Vir
CVn
Cru
Mus
Cru
Cam
Com
Cru
Vir
Cvn
Dra
Com
Mus
Mus
Vir
Com
Vir
Cen
Uma
Vir
Dra
Hyd
Cvn
Vir
Cvn
Vir
Cen
Boo
Cen
Cen
Uma
Boo
Cen
Boo
Cen
Cen
Cen
Hya
3
21
2
2
4
22
1
2
0
2
2
2
5
21
4
3
4
2
1
2
4
21
3
9
2
1
2
22
4
21
2
8
4
2
2
2
21
5
22
2
22
9
2
21
9
2
22
21
2
21
21
2
21
21
21
Code
double star equal magnitude
star
double star
double star
double star challenge
variable star
red variable star
double star
asterism
double star
double star
double star
colored double star
star
double star challenge
double star equal magnitude
double star challenge
double star
red variable star
double star
double star challenge
star
double star equal magnitude
double star magnitude contrast
double star
red variable star
double star
variable star
double star challenge
star
double star
triple star challenge
double star challenge
double star
double star
double star
star
colored double star
variable star
double star
variable star
double star magnitude contrast
double star
star
double star magnitude contrast
double star
variable star
star
double star
star
star
double star
star
star
star
40
Name
Kappa
Kappa
∑1819
Arcturus
Iota
R
∑1834
∑1833
Dunlop159
∑1835
SHJ 179
5
Proxima
Rho
h4690
Rigil Kentaurus
Pi
∑1864
Zeta
Alpha
q
Alpha
c1
Izar
Dunlop
54
Alpha
∑1883
Mu
39
58
Kochab
Zubenelgenubi
Xi
h4715
33
Beta
Pi
44
Sigma
Dunlop178
Kappa
X
∑1932
Mu
∑1931
S
Phi1
Eta
Mu
Edasich
∑1972
Lal123
∑1954
Gamma
Number
ST490
ST491
ST492
ST493
ST494
ST495
ST496
ST497
ST498
ST499
ST500
ST501
ST502
ST503
ST504
ST505
ST506
ST507
ST508
ST509
ST510
ST511
ST512
ST513
ST514
ST515
ST516
ST517
ST518
ST519
ST520
ST521
ST522
ST523
ST524
ST525
ST526
ST527
ST528
ST529
ST530
ST531
ST532
ST533
ST534
ST535
ST536
ST537
ST538
ST539
ST540
ST541
ST542
ST543
ST544
Delta
Iota
Pi
h4753
Dunlop 177
H 28
Beta
Alpha
37
Epsilon
Dunlop 169
H 97
Dunlop 166
Alpha
ADS 9338
pi
ADS 9296
ADS 9286
ADS 9229
Alpha
ADS 9198
Other
12.9
13.5
15.3
15.7
16.2
16.6
20.3
22.6
22.6
23.4
25.5
27.5
29.9
31.8
37.3
39.6
40.7
40.7
41.1
41.9
42.0
42.5
43.7
45.0
45.2
46.0
47.9
48.9
49.3
49.7
50.3
50.7
50.9
51.4
56.5
57.3
58.5
01.8
03.8
04.1
11.6
11.9
14.3
18.3
18.5
18.7
21.4
21.8
23.2
24.5
24.9
29.2
33.1
34.8
35.1
RA
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
14
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
Dec
-10.3
+51 47
+03 08
+19 11
+51.4
-59.9
+48.5
-07 46
-58.5
+08 26
-19 58
+75.7
-62.7
+30.4
-46 08
-60 50
+16.4
+16 25
+13 44
-47.4
-37.8
-65.0
-35.2
+27 04
-55.6
-25 26
-79.0
+05 57
-14 09
+48 43
-28.0
+74.2
-16.0
+19 06
-47.9
-21 22
-43.1
-83.2
+47 39
-25.3
-45.3
-48.7
-70.1
+26 50
-47.9
+10 26
+31.4
-36.3
+30 17
+37 23
+59.0
+80 26
-24 29
+10.5
-41.2
Mag
4.2
4.4
7.8
0
4.9
5.3
8.1
7.6
5
5.1
6.4
4.3
10.7
3.6
5.4
0
5
4.9
3.8
2.3
4
3.2
4
2.4
6.2
5.2
3.8
7.6
5.4
5.7
4.4
2.1
2.8
4.6
6
5.9
2.6
5.7
4.8
3.2
6.7
3.9
8.1
6.6
5.1
7
5.8
3.6
5.6
4.3
3.3
6.9
7.5
4
2.8
Sep
*
13"
0.8"
Stellar
39"
*
1.3"
6"
9"
6"
35"
*
*
*
19"
20"
5.6"
6"
1"
*
*
16"
17’
3"
68"
8"
10°
0.7"
2"
3"
*
*
4’
7"
2.4"
23"
*
18’
1.5"
*
32"
27"
*
1.5"
1.2"
13"
*
50’
1.0"
2"
*
31"
9"
3.9"
*
Con
Vir
Boo
Vir
Boo
Boo
Cen
Boo
Vir
Cen
Boo
Lib
Umi
Cen
Boo
Lup
Cen
Boo
Boo
Boo
Lup
Cen
Cir
Cen
Boo
Cir
Hya
Aps
Vir
Lib
Boo
Hya
Umi
Lib
Boo
Lup
Lib
Lup
Oct
Boo
Lib
Lup
Lup
Tra
CrB
Lup
Ser
Crb
Lup
CrB
Boo
Dra
Umi
Lib
Ser
Lup
Code
21
5
4
21
2
22
4
3
5
2
2
21
22
21
9
2
2
2
4
21
21
2
21
5
2
2
21
4
4
2
21
21
2
5
2
2
21
2
4
1
2
2
22
4
4
2
22
21
4
6
21
2
3
2
21
star
colored double star
double star challenge
star
double star
variable star
double star challenge
double star equal magnitude
colored double star
double star
double star
star
variable star
star
double star magnitude contrast
double star
double star
double star
double star challenge
star
star
double star
star
colored double star
double star
double star
star
double star challenge
double star challenge
double star
star
star
double star
colored double star
double star
double star
star
double star
double star challenge
red variable star
double star
double star
variable star
double star challenge
double star challenge
double star
variable star
star
double star challenge
triple star
star
double star
double star equal magnitude
double star
star
41
Name
h4788
Upsilon
Omega
∑1962
Tau
∑1965
∑1967
Unukalhai
R
Kappa
R
Xi
Rho
Epsilon
Pi
T
Eta
Delta
Xi
Graffias
Omega1
Kappa
Nu
Yed Prior
∑2032
Delta
Sigma
Rho
V
Epsilon
Iota
∑2052
Antares
Lambda
R
16
H
Zeta
SU
Zeta
Atria
Eta
Epsilon
Mu
∑2118
RR
Kappa
Zeta
Epsilon1
Mu
Sabik
Rasalgethi
Delta
Pi
36
Number
ST545
ST546
ST547
ST548
ST549
ST550
ST551
ST552
ST553
ST554
ST555
ST556
ST557
ST558
ST559
ST560
ST561
ST562
ST563
ST564
ST565
ST566
ST567
ST568
ST569
ST570
ST571
ST572
ST573
ST574
ST575
ST576
ST577
ST578
ST579
ST580
ST581
ST582
ST583
ST584
ST585
ST586
ST587
ST588
ST589
ST590
ST591
ST592
ST593
ST594
ST595
ST596
ST597
ST598
ST599
Other
67
Eta
Alpha
27
20
26
ADS 10157
Alpha
13
h4853
Dunlop 201
ADS 10075
Alpha
ADS 10087
H 121
ADS 10049
Delta
“17, Sigma”
Beta
9
5
13
6
V
Rmk 21
7
40
Zeta
Gamma
Alpha
V
35
d
ADS 9705
35.9
37.0
38.1
38.7
38.7
39.4
42.7
44.3
48.6
48.7
50.7
56.9
56.9
57.6
58.9
59.5
00.1
00.3
04.4
05.4
06.8
08.1
12.0
14.3
14.7
20.3
21.2
25.6
26.7
27.2
28.0
28.9
29.4
30.9
32.7
36.2
36.4
37.2
40.6
41.3
48.7
49.8
50.2
52.3
56.4
56.6
57.7
58.6
59.6
05.3
10.4
14.6
15.0
15.0
15.3
RA
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
17
17
17
17
17
17
Dec
-45.0
-28.1
-42.6
-08 47
-29.8
+36.6
+26.3
+06.4
+28 09
+18.1
+15.1
-33 58
-29.2
+26.9
-26.1
+25 55
-38 24
-22.6
-11 22
-19.8
-20.7
+17 03
-19 28
-03.7
+33 52
-78.7
-25 35
-23.5
-12.4
-47.6
-64.1
+18.4
-26.4
+02.0
+66.8
+52 55
-35.3
-10.6
-32.4
+31.6
-69.0
-59.0
-34.3
-38.0
+65.0
-30.6
+09.4
-56.0
-53.2
+54 28
-15.7
+14.4
+24 50
+36.8
-26 36
Mag
4.7
3.6
4.3
5.8
3.7
5
4.2
2.7
5.7
4.1
5.2
5.2
3.9
4.2
2.9
2
3.6
2.3
4.2
2.5
4
5
4
2.7
5.2
4.7
2.9
5.3
7.3
4.8
5.3
7.7
1
4.2
6.7
5.1
4.2
2.6
8
3
1.9
3.8
2.3
3
7.1
5.1
3.2
3.1
4.1
4.9
2.4
3
3.2
3.2
4.3
Sep
2.2"
3"
*
12"
2°
6.3"
0.3"
*
Stellar
*
*
10"
*
*
*
Stellar
15"
*
1"
*
14’
28"
1"
*
7"
*
20"
3.1"
*
23"
20"
1.7"
3"
1.4"
*
3"
*
*
*
1.4"
*
*
*
*
1.4"
*
75’
*
40’
2"
0.6"
4.6"
10"
7°
5"
Con
Lup
Lib
Lup
Lib
Lib
Crb
Crb
Ser
CrB
Ser
Ser
Lup
Sco
Crb
Sco
CrB
Lup
Sco
Sco
Sco
Sco
Her
Sco
Oph
CrB
Aps
Sco
Oph
Oph
Nor
Tra
Her
Sco
Oph
Dra
Dra
Sco
Oph
Sco
Her
Tra
Ara
Sco
Sco
Dra
Sco
Oph
Ara
Ara
Dra
Oph
Her
Her
Her
Oph
Code
2
5
1
3
21
2
4
21
22
1
22
2
21
21
21
22
9
21
8
21
21
5
7
21
2
2
9
2
22
2
2
2
4
4
22
6
21
21
22
5
21
21
21
21
4
22
21
21
21
3
4
3
9
21
3
double star
colored double star
red variable star
double star equal magnitude
star
double star
double star challenge
star
variable star
red variable star
variable star
double star
star
star
star
variable star
double star magnitude contrast
star
triple star challenge
star
star
colored double star
quadruple star
star
double star
double star
double star magnitude contrast
double star
variable star
double star
double star
double star
double star challenge
double star challenge
variable star
triple star
star
star
variable star
colored double star
star
star
star
star
double star challenge
variable star
star
star
star
double star equal magnitude
double star challenge
double star equal magnitude
double star magnitude contrast
star
double star equal magnitude
42
Name
39
Theta
∑2161
Beta
Gamma
Sigma
h4949
∑2173
Lambda
Lesath
Alpha
Nu
Shaula
Rasalhague
Iota
∑2241
Kappa
V
Cebalrai
∑2202
SZ
SX
G
Y
Grumium
Eltanin
Barnards Star
h5003
∑2038
95
Tau
∑2276
Theta
∑2280
W
Eta
Kappa
Kaus Media
∑2306
Xi
∑2323
21
Alpha
59
Kaus Borealis
SS
Delta
T
∆222
∑2348
Alpha
O∑359
O∑358
Vega
X
Number
ST600
ST601
ST602
ST603
ST604
ST605
ST606
ST607
ST608
ST609
ST610
ST611
ST612
ST613
ST614
ST615
ST616
ST617
ST618
ST619
ST620
ST621
ST622
ST623
ST624
ST625
ST626
ST627
ST628
ST629
ST630
ST631
ST632
ST633
ST634
ST635
ST636
ST637
ST638
ST639
ST640
ST641
ST642
ST643
ST644
ST645
ST646
ST647
ST648
ST649
ST650
ST651
ST652
ST653
ST654
ADS 11483
Alpha
Kappa
Lambda
Gale 2
39
ADS 11325
1
Delta
100
ADS 11005
70
40-41
Xi
Gamma
Beta
61
Lambda
Alpha
85
Psi
76
Upsilon
49
Dunlop 216
42
“75, Rho”
Other
18.0
22.0
23.7
25.3
25.4
26.5
26.9
30.4
30.7
30.8
31.8
32.2
33.6
34.9
39.5
41.9
42.5
43.3
43.5
44.6
45.0
47.5
49.9
52.6
53.5
56.6
57.8
59.1
00.0
01.5
03.1
05.5
06.6
07.8
14.9
17.6
19.9
21.0
22.2
23.2
24.0
25.3
27.0
27.2
28.0
30.4
31.8
32.3
33.4
33.9
35.2
35.5
35.9
36.9
38.3
RA
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
Dec
-24 17
-25.0
+37 09
-55.5
-56.4
+04.1
-45.9
-01 04
+26.1
-37.3
-49.9
+55 11
-37.1
+12 34
+46.0
+72 09
-39.0
-57.7
+04.6
+02 34
-18.6
-35.7
-37.0
-06.2
+56.9
+51.5
+04 34
-30 15
+80.0
+21 36
-08.2
+02 30
-50.1
+26 06
+36.7
-36.8
+36.1
-29.8
-15 05
-61.5
+58 48
-20.5
-46.0
+00 12
-25.4
-16.9
-45.9
+37.0
-38 44
+52 18
-08.2
+23 36
+17.0
+38 47
+08.8
Mag
5.2
3.3
4.2
2.9
3.3
4.3
6
6
4.4
2.7
3
4.9
1.6
2.1
3.8
4.9
2.4
5.7
2.8
6.2
9
8.5
3.2
6
3.8
2.2
9.5
5
5.7
4.3
5.2
4
3.7
5.9
7.3
3.1
4.3
2.7
7.9
4.4
4.9
4.9
3.5
5.2
2.8
9
5
7.8
5.9
6
3.9
6.3
6.8
0
5.9
Sep
10"
*
4"
*
*
4°
2.2"
1.1"
*
*
*
62"
35’
*
*
30"
2.5°
*
*
21"
*
*
2°
*
*
*
Stellar
6"
20"
6"
1.8"
1.5"
*
14"
*
*
*
*
10"
*
4"
1.8"
6’
4"
*
*
11’
*
21"
26"
*
0.7"
1.6"
Stellar
*
Con
Oph
Oph
Her
Ara
Ara
Oph
Ara
Oph
Her
Sco
Ara
Dra
Sco
Oph
Her
Dra
Sco
Pav
Oph
Oph
Sgr
Sco
Sco
Oph
Dra
Dra
Oph
Sgr
Dra
Her
Oph
Oph
Ara
Her
Lyr
Sgr
Lyr
Sgr
Sct
Pav
Dra
Sgr
Tel
Ser
Sgr
Sgr
Tel
Lyr
CrA
Dra
Sct
Her
Her
Lyr
Oph
Code
5
21
2
21
21
21
2
4
21
21
21
3
21
21
21
2
21
22
21
3
22
22
21
22
21
21
21
5
3
3
4
4
21
3
22
21
21
21
2
21
6
4
21
5
21
22
2
1
3
2
21
4
4
21
22
colored double star
star
double star
star
star
star
double star
double star challenge
star
star
star
double star equal magnitude
star
star
star
double star
star
variable star
star
double star equal magnitude
variable star
variable star
star
variable star
star
star
star
colored double star
double star equal magnitude
double star equal magnitude
double star challenge
double star challenge
star
double star equal magnitude
variable star
star
star
star
double star
star
triple star
double star challenge
star
colored double star
star
variable star
double star
red variable star
double star equal magnitude
double star
star
double star challenge
double star challenge
star
variable star
43
Name
HK
∑2398
Double-Double
Zeta
∑2375
∑2379
R
Beta
S
∑2404
∑2420
Delta2
O∑525
Nunki
13
∑2417
ADS11871
∑2422
UV
∑2426
BrsO14
h5082
V
15
Gamma
R
∑2449
∑2474
∑2486
O∑178
Tau
RY
U
V1942
UX
RR
∑2525
h5114
Alpha
Albireo
Mu
AQ
R
HN84
54
TT
16
∑2579
O∑∑191
Tarazed
∑2580
Delta
Epsilon
∑2583
Zeta
Number
ST655
ST656
ST657
ST658
ST659
ST660
ST661
ST662
ST663
ST664
ST665
ST666
ST667
ST668
ST669
ST670
ST671
ST672
ST673
ST674
ST675
ST676
ST677
ST678
ST679
ST680
ST681
ST682
ST683
ST684
ST685
ST686
ST687
ST688
ST689
ST690
ST691
ST692
ST693
ST694
ST695
ST696
ST697
ST698
ST699
ST700
ST701
ST702
ST703
ST704
ST705
ST706
ST707
ST708
ST709
Pi
“18, Delta”
H V 137
Gamma
17
7
ADS 12767
6
Beta
38
RV
V
ADS 12447
V
60
RV
RV
ADS 11869
Sigma
R
“63, Theta”
Omicron
ADS 11825
ADS 11726
5
V
Epsilon
Other
42.8
43.0
44.3
44.8
45.5
46.5
47.5
50.0
50.3
50.8
51.2
54.5
54.9
55.3
55.3
56.3
57.0
57.1
58.6
00.0
01.1
03.1
04.4
05.0
06.4
06.4
06.4
09.1
12.1
15.3
15.5
16.5
18.8
19.2
21.6
25.5
26.6
27.8
28.7
30.7
34.1
34.3
36.8
39.4
40.7
40.9
41.8
45.0
45.9
46.3
46.4
47.4
48.2
48.7
49.0
RA
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
19
Dec
+37.0
+59.6
+39 40
+37 36
+05 30
-00 58
-05 42
+33 24
-07.9
+10 59
+59 22
+36.9
+33 58
-26.3
+43.9
+04 11
+32.9
+26.1
+14.4
+12 53
-37 03
-19 14
-05 41
-04 02
-37 00
+08 14
+07 09
+34 35
+49 51
+15.1
+73.4
-33.5
+19 37
-15.9
+76 34
+42 47
+27.3
-54.3
+24.7
+28.0
+07.4
-16.4
+50.2
+16 34
-16.3
+32.6
+50 32
+45 08
+35 01
+10.6
+33 44
+18.5
+70 16
+11.8
+19 09
Mag
9.5
8
4.7
4.4
6.2
5.8
4.5
3.5
6.8
6.9
4.9
4.5
6
2
3.9
4.1
5.4
8
8.6
7.1
6.6
6
6.6
5.4
5
5.5
7.2
6.5
6.6
5.7
4.5
6
6.6
6.4
5.9
7.1
8.1
5.7
4.4
3
4.5
9.1
6.1
6.4
5.4
7.8
6
2.9
6
2.7
5
3.8
3.8
6.1
5
Sep
*
13"
2"
44"
2"
13"
Stellar
47"
14.3"
4"
35"
*
45"
*
4"
22"
1"
0.7"
*
17"
13"
7"
Stellar
38"
3"
Stellar
8"
16"
8"
90"
*
*
Stellar
*
Stellar
Stellar
2"
70"
*
35"
*
*
*
28"
38"
*
39"
2"
39"
*
26"
*
3"
1.4"
9"
Con
Lyr
Dra
Lyr
Lyr
Ser
Aql
Sct
Lyr
Sct
Aql
Dra
Cyg
Lyr
Sgr
Lyr
Ser
Lyr
Lyr
Aql
Aql
Cra
Sgr
Aql
Aql
Aql
Aql
Aql
Lyr
Cyg
Aql
Dra
Sgr
Sge
Sgr
Dra
Lyr
Vul
Tel
Vul
Cyg
Aql
Sgr
Cyg
Sge
Sgr
Cyg
Cyg
Cyg
Cyg
Aql
Cyg
Sge
Dra
Aql
Sge
Code
22
2
7
2
3
6
22
9
2
2
2
21
5
21
21
2
4
4
22
5
3
6
1
5
3
1
2
2
3
2
21
22
22
22
1
22
2
2
21
5
21
22
22
5
2
22
3
9
5
21
9
21
9
4
2
variable star
double star
quadruple star
double star
double star equal magnitude
triple star
variable star
double star magnitude contrast
double star
double star
double star
star
colored double star
star
star
double star
double star challenge
double star challenge
variable star
colored double star
double star equal magnitude
triple star
red variable star
colored double star
double star equal magnitude
red variable star
double star
double star
double star equal magnitude
double star
star
variable star
variable star
variable star
red variable star
variable star
double star
double star
star
colored double star
star
variable star
variable star
colored double star
double star
variable star
double star equal magnitude
double star magnitude contrast
colored double star
star
double star magnitude contrast
star
double star magnitude contrast
double star challenge
double star
44
Name
Chi
Altair
Eta
57
O∑532
Psi
RR
RU
Gamma
BF
h1470
X
WZ
∑2675
∑2637
RY
FG
∑2644
RS
∑2658
Omicron1
RT
Alpha
RT
P
Alpha
∑2671
U
Dabih
39
Peacock
pi
Omicron
∑2716
V
Deneb
∑2726
Gamma
Lambda
3
S763
4
Omega
Epsilon
∑2751
∑2742
Dunlop236
Lambda
12
Xi
∑2758
24
T
Gamma
∑2780
Number
ST710
ST711
ST712
ST713
ST714
ST715
ST716
ST717
ST718
ST719
ST720
ST721
ST722
ST723
ST724
ST725
ST726
ST727
ST728
ST729
ST730
ST731
ST732
ST733
ST734
ST735
ST736
ST737
ST738
ST739
ST740
ST741
ST742
ST743
ST744
ST745
ST746
ST747
ST748
ST749
ST750
ST751
ST752
ST753
ST754
ST755
ST756
ST757
ST758
ST759
ST760
ST761
ST762
ST763
ST764
50.6
50.8
52.5
54.6
55.3
55.6
55.9
58.7
58.8
02.4
03.6
05.1
07.6
08.9
09.9
10.4
11.9
12.6
13.4
13.6
13.6
17.1
17.6
17.7
17.8
18.0
18.4
19.6
21.0
23.9
25.6
27.3
29.9
41.0
41.3
41.4
45.7
46.7
47.4
47.7
48.4
51.4
51.8
59.1
02.1
02.2
02.2
02.2
04.1
04.9
06.9
07.1
09.5
10.3
11.8
RA
19
19
19
19
Beta
19
19
19
19
12
19
20
20
20
20
Kappa
20
Theta
20
20
20
20
20
20
“ADS 13554, V 695” 20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
Beta
20
39
20
Alpha
20
20
SHJ 324
20
49
20
20
Alpha
20
52
20
20
ADS 14296
20
20
20
ADS 14360
20
18
20
1
20
ADS 14575
21
2
21
21
ADS 14556
21
21
62
21
61
21
ADS 14632
21
21
21
ADS 14749
21
Other
V
Alpha
55
Dec
+32 55
+08 52
+01.0
-08 14
+06.4
+52 26
-29.2
-41.9
+19.5
+21.1
+38 19
+20.7
+17.7
+77 43
+20 55
+36.0
+20.3
+00 52
+38.7
+53 07
+46.7
-21.3
-12.5
-39.1
+38 02
-12 32
+55 23
+47.9
-14.8
+32.2
-56.7
-18 13
-18 35
+32 18
+48.2
+45 17
+30.7
+16 07
+36.5
-05.0
-18 11
-05.6
-26.9
+04 18
+56.7
+07 11
-43.0
+07.2
-05 49
+43.9
+38 39
-25.0
+68.5
+10.1
+60.0
Mag
3.3
0.8
3.4
5.7
3.7
4.9
5.4
6
3.5
8.5
7.6
7
7
4.4
6.4
8.5
9.5
6.8
6.5
7.1
3.8
8.9
4.2
6
3
3.8
6
5.9
3.4
4.4
1.9
5.3
6.1
5.5
7.7
1.3
4.2
4.3
4.9
4.4
6.7
6.4
4.1
5.2
6.1
7.4
6
7.4
5.9
3.7
5.2
4.5
5.2
4.7
5.6
Sep
Stellar
*
*
36"
13"
3"
*
*
*
*
29"
*
*
7"
12"
*
*
3"
*
5"
*
*
44"
*
Stellar
7"
4"
*
3’
*
*
3"
19"
3"
*
*
6"
10"
0.9"
*
16"
0.8"
*
1"
1.5"
3"
57"
3"
3"
*
29"
*
*
6’
1.0"
Con
Cyg
Aql
Aql
Aql
Aql
Cyg
Sgr
Sgr
Sge
Sge
Cyg
Sge
Sge
Cep
Sge
Cyg
Sge
Aql
Cyg
Cyg
Cyg
Cap
Cap
Sgr
Cyg
Cap
Cyg
Cyg
Cap
Cyg
Pav
Cap
Cap
Cyg
Cyg
Cyg
Cyg
Del
Cyg
Aqr
Cap
Aqr
Cap
Equ
Cep
Equ
Mic
Equ
Aqr
Cyg
Cyg
Cap
Cep
Equ
Cep
Code
22
21
22
2
2
9
22
22
21
22
5
22
22
9
6
22
35
3
22
2
21
22
21
22
22
7
2
22
2
21
21
9
2
9
22
21
2
2
4
1
2
4
21
8
4
3
2
2
4
21
2
39
22
2
4
variable star
star
variable star
double star
double star
double star magnitude contrast
variable star
variable star
star
variable star
colored double star
variable star
variable star
double star magnitude contrast
triple star
variable star
planetary nebula irregular
double star equal magnitude
variable star
double star
star
variable star
star
variable star
variable star
quadruple star
double star
variable star
double star
star
star
double star magnitude contrast
double star
double star magnitude contrast
variable star
star
double star
double star
double star challenge
red variable star
double star
double star challenge
star
triple star challenge
double star challenge
double star equal magnitude
double star
double star
double star challenge
star
double star
stellar planetary nebula
variable star
double star
double star challenge
45
Name
Delta
Theta
RY
Y
Beta
S
∑2816
V460
SS
RV
Herschel’s Garnet Star
Epsilon
Lambda
AG
∑2840
∑2841
RX
∑2873
Eta
29
∑2863
O∑461
Lambda
Al Nair
∑2883
Zeta
h1746
41
1
Alpha
∑2894
Pi
S
53
Delta
Kruger60
Zeta
Delta
5
Delta2
∑2912
Roe47
8
11
Beta
Tau1
∑2947
Tau2
∑2950
h1823
Lambda
Fomalhaut
52
Scheat
Dunlop246
Number
ST765
ST766
ST767
ST768
ST769
ST770
ST771
ST772
ST773
ST774
ST775
ST776
ST777
ST778
ST779
ST780
ST781
ST782
ST783
ST784
ST785
ST786
ST787
ST788
ST789
ST790
ST791
ST792
ST793
ST794
ST795
ST796
ST797
ST798
ST799
ST800
ST801
ST802
ST803
ST804
ST805
ST806
ST807
ST808
ST809
ST810
ST811
ST812
ST813
ST814
ST815
ST816
ST817
ST818
ST819
73
Alpha
ADS 16428
Beta
69
ADS 16291
71
ADS 16317
37
h5334
ADS 15972
ADS 15758
Alpha
ß 276
S 802
“17, Xi”
ADS 15601
ADS 15431
h5278
Mu
RV
h5258
Other
14.5
19.9
20.3
24.3
28.7
35.2
39.0
42.0
42.7
43.3
43.5
44.2
50.9
51.0
52.0
54.3
56.4
58.4
00.8
02.5
03.8
03.9
06.1
08.2
10.7
10.9
13.9
14.3
16.0
18.5
18.9
23.1
26.1
26.6
27.3
28.1
28.8
29.2
29.5
29.8
30.0
32.5
35.9
40.5
42.7
47.7
49.0
49.6
51.4
51.8
52.6
57.6
59.2
03.8
07.2
RA
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
23
23
Dec
+10 00
-53.5
-10.8
-69.7
+70 33
+78 37
+57 29
+35.5
+43 35
+38.0
+58 47
+09 52
-82.7
+12.6
+55 47
+19.7
+22.9
+82 51
-28 27
-16 58
+64 38
+59.8
-39.5
-46 58
+70 07
+58.2
+39.7
-21 04
+37.7
-60.3
+37 46
-45.9
-48.4
-16 45
-65.0
+57.7
-00 01
+58 25
+47.7
-43.7
+04.4
+39 46
+39 38
+44.3
-46.9
-14.1
+68.6
-13.6
+61.7
+41 19
-07.6
-29 37
+11.7
+28.1
-50.7
Mag
4.6
4.5
8
8.6
3.3
7.4
5.6
5.6
8.2
7.1
3.4
2.5
5.4
6
5.5
6.4
8
7.1
5.8
7.2
4.3
6.7
4.5
1.7
5.7
3.4
4.5
5.3
4.1
2.9
6.1
5.8
6
6.4
4.5
9.8
4.3
3.8
4.4
4.1
5.8
5.8
6.5
4.5
2.1
5.7
7
4
6.1
7.1
3.7
1.2
6.1
2.4
6.1
Sep
48"
6"
*
*
13"
Stellar
12"
*
Stellar
*
Stellar
83"
3"
*
18"
22"
*
14"
1.9"
4"
8"
11.1"
*
Stellar
15"
*
28"
5"
*
5’
16"
2.7"
*
3"
7"
3"
2"
20"
5’
15’
1"
43"
22"
*
*
23"
4.3"
40’
1.7"
82"
*
*
0.7"
*
9"
Equ
Ind
Aqr
Pav
Cep
Cep
Cep
Cyg
Cyg
Cyg
Cep
Peg
Oct
Peg
Cep
Peg
Peg
Cep
Psa
Aqr
Cep
Cep
Gru
Gru
Cep
Cep
Lac
Aqr
Lac
Tuc
Lac
Gru
Gru
Aqr
Tuc
Cep
Aqr
Cep
Lac
Gru
Peg
Lac
Lac
Lac
Gru
Aqr
Cep
Aqr
Cep
Lac
Aqr
PsA
Peg
Peg
Gru
Con
9
2
22
22
9
1
6
22
22
22
1
9
2
22
2
2
22
3
2
3
2
2
21
21
2
21
2
5
21
21
5
2
22
3
2
2
4
5
21
1
4
7
6
21
21
2
2
21
2
7
21
21
4
21
2
Code
double star magnitude contrast
double star
variable star
variable star
double star magnitude contrast
red variable star
triple star
variable star
variable star
variable star
red variable star
double star magnitude contrast
double star
variable star
double star
double star
variable star
double star equal magnitude
double star
double star equal magnitude
double star
double star
star
star
double star
star
double star
colored double star
star
star
colored double star
double star
variable star
double star equal magnitude
double star
double star
double star challenge
colored double star
star
red variable star
double star challenge
quadruple star
triple star
star
star
double star
double star
star
double star
quadruple star
star
star
double star challenge
star
double star
46
Name
∑2978
Pi
Phi
Psi3
94
Dunlop249
99
Z
Errai
Theta
R
107
TX
∑3042
Lal192
R
Sigma
∑3050
Number
ST820
ST821
ST822
ST823
ST824
ST825
ST826
ST827
ST828
ST829
ST830
ST831
ST832
ST833
ST834
ST835
ST836
ST837
19
Gamma
Dunlop 251
ADS 16538
90
Other
07.5
07.9
14.3
19.0
19.1
23.9
26.0
33.7
39.3
39.5
43.8
46.0
46.4
51.8
54.4
58.4
59.0
59.5
RA
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
23
Dec
+32 49
+75.4
-06.0
-09.6
-13 28
-53.8
-20.6
+48 49
+77.6
-46.6
-15 17
-18 41
+03 29
+37 53
-27 03
+51 24
+55 45
+33 43
Mag
6.3
4.6
4.2
5
5.1
6.5
4.4
8
3.2
6.6
5.8
5.3
6.9
7.8
6.9
4.7
4.9
6.6
Sep
8"
1.2"
*
1.5"
13"
27"
*
Stellar
*
4"
Stellar
7"
Stellar
5"
7"
Stellar
3"
1.5"
Con
Peg
Cep
Aqr
Aqr
Aqr
Gru
Aqr
And
Cep
Phe
Aqr
Aqr
Psc
And
Scl
Cas
Cas
And
Code
2
4
1
2
5
2
21
22
21
2
22
3
1
3
2
22
5
4
double star
double star challenge
red variable star
double star
colored double star
double star
star
variable star
star
double star
variable star
double star equal magnitude
red variable star
double star equal magnitude
double star
variable star
colored double star
double star challenge
47
One-Year Limited
Warranty
This Orion IntelliScope Computerized Object Locator is
warranted against defects in materials or workmanship for
a period of one year from the date of purchase. This warranty is for the benefit of the original retail purchaser only.
During this warranty period Orion Telescopes & Binoculars
will repair or replace, at Orion’s option, any warranted
instrument that proves to be defective, provided it is
returned postage paid to: Orion Warranty Repair, 89
Hangar Way, Watsonville, CA 95076. If the product is not
registered, proof of purchase (such as a copy of the original invoice) is required.
This warranty does not apply if, in Orion’s judgment, the
instrument has been abused, mishandled, or modified, nor
does it apply to normal wear and tear. This warranty gives
you specific legal rights, and you may also have other
rights, which vary from state to state. For further warranty
service information, contact: Customer Service
Department, Orion Telescopes & Binoculars, P. O. Box
1815, Santa Cruz, CA 95061; (800) 676-1343.
Orion Telescopes & Binoculars
Post Office Box 1815, Santa Cruz, CA 95061
Customer Support Help Line (800) 676-1343 • Day or Evening
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