annrep07

annrep07
Research Institute Leiden Observatory
(Onderzoekinstituut Sterrewacht Leiden)
Annual Report 2007
Sterrewacht Leiden
Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences
Leiden University
Niels Bohrweg 2
2333 CA Leiden
Postbus 9513
2330 RA Leiden
The Netherlands
http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl
Cover:
Design: Frans Hemelop
penningmeester/redacteur 'de Sleutelpost'
Leidsche vereeniging van postzegelverzamelaars
A Dutch stamp celebrates the bicentenary of the birth of the Leiden
astronomer Frederik Kaiser. Kaiser holds a special place in the history of
Dutch astronomy. Lacking an academic background and personal wealth
he nevertheless single-handedly managed to raise moribund Dutch
astronomy to an international level. Educated by his German-born uncle,
a proficient amateur astronomer, Kaiser soon proved himself an
exceptional talent. Starting his career as an observer in Leiden, he
eventually held the Leiden chair of astronomy. In the latter capacity he
successfully lobbied for an up-to-date, fully equipped observatory, the
first of its kind in the Netherlands. By introducing statistics and precision
measurement in Dutch astronomical practice, he ensured that Leiden
observations rivaled with the best in the world. Under his directorship
Leiden became an important node in the international astronomical
network. A prolific author, he wrote several best selling books on popular
astronomy in order to secure social support for Dutch astronomy. If
astronomy is now a flourishing field in the Netherlands, we owe this
partly to his ceaseless efforts.
(Frans van Lunteren)
An electronic version of this annual report is available on the web at
http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl/research/annualreport.php?node=23
Production Annual Report 2007:
C. Gündisch, M. Franx, A. van Genderen, J. Lub, E. van Uitert
Sterrewacht Leiden
Executive
(Directie Onderzoeksinstituut)
Director of Research
Director of Education
Executive Secretary
K. Kuijken
F.P. Israel
J. Lub
Wetenschappelijk Directeur
Onderwijs Directeur
Secretaris Instituut
Supervisory Council
(Raad van toezicht)
Prof. Dr. Ir. J.A.M. Bleeker (Chair)
Dr. B. Baud
Drs. J.F. van Duyne
Prof. Dr. Ir. W. van Saarloos
Contents:
Part I
1
Chapter
1
1
3
Review of major events
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9.
2.10
2.11
2.12
Research
Solar System
Exoplanets
Protostars and Circumstellar Disks
Star Formation
Stars and Circumstellar Matter
Structure of the Milky Way
Nearby Galaxies
High Redshift Galaxies
Theoretical Studies
Raymond & Beverly Sackler Laboratory
Instrumentation
History of Science
9
9
10
11
18
20
21
23
39
43
47
50
55
CONTENTS
3
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
Education, popularization and social events
Education
Degrees Awarded in 2007
Courses and Teaching
Popularization and Media Contacts
The Leidsch Astronomisch Dispuut ‘F. Kaiser’
Vereniging van Oud-Sterrewachters
Werkgroep Leidse Sterrewacht
59
59
61
64
67
75
75
76
Part II
77
Appendix
77
I
II
Observatory staff December 31, 2007
Committee membership
II.1
Observatory Commitees
II.2
University Committees
79
89
89
93
III
Science policy functions
IV
Visiting scientists
107
Workshops, colloquia and lectures
Workshops and Meetings
Endowed lectures
Scientific colloquia
Student colloquia
111
111
112
112
116
VI
Participation in scientific meetings
121
VII
Observing sessions abroad
143
VIII
Working visits abroad
149
V
V.1
V.2
V.3
V.4
97
CONTENTS
IX
X
X.1
X.2
X.3
X.4
X.5
Colloquia given outside Leiden
159
Scientific publications
Ph.D. Theses and Books
Articles in Refereed Journals
Conference Papers, Review Articles, etc.
Astronomical Catalogues
Other Publications
167
167
168
186
197
199
Chapter
1
Review
of
major events
Chapter
Review
of
major events
1
Dear Reader,
In this booklet we have collected the main events and achievements of De
Leidse Sterrewacht over 2007. It was a year that saw some important
changes, happy and sad farewells, and a continued thriving scientific
activity.
Let me start with the good-byes.
Our scientific director, Tim de Zeeuw, was selected as the new Director
General of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), succeeding Catherine
Cesarsky. This makes him the fourth Dutch DG of the seven incumbents
thus far, after Adriaan Blaauw, Lo Woltjer and Harry van der Laan (all past
Leiden faculty!). Tim was director of the Sterrewacht since 2003, and NOVA
director since 1993. He took up his new post in München on September 1.
Rudolf Le Poole formally retired in November, and his work was
honoured in a special one-day symposium that saw many old and new
friends come to Leiden. Organizing the event was a bit of a challenge:
4
REVIEW OF MAJOR EVENTS
Rudolf has been active in so many different fields, from interferometry to
active optics, from astrometry to sailing, that it was hard to cover everything
adequately! But it was a nice day, and the following week Rudolf was back
at work as usual albeit in a slightly smaller office.
Harry van der Laan completed his term as member and chair of our
Supervisory Board (Raad van Toezicht) in the summer, marking 40 years of
association with the Sterrewacht. The Sterrewacht will miss his valuable
support, knowledge and experience, but I hope we can still count on him for
informal help as well as the occasional after-dinner speech. Johan Bleeker
took over as the new chairman of the Raad, and Christopher Waelkens
(Leuven) agreed to join as a new member.
Also in the university there were important changes, with the retirements
of our Dean Frans Saris and Rector Magnificus Douwe Breimer. Both have
been very supportive over the years, and in recognition of this fact we
persuaded the IAU to name minor planets 10980 and 10981 after them. Long
may they watch over us!
Sadly, in November we lost a long-time friend of the Sterrewacht in Coen
Oort. As son of Jan Oort he grew up in the Sterrewacht on the Kaiserstraat,
and even though his career took him to the world of government, business
and finance, he was an invaluable supporter and helped greatly in setting up
and managing the Oort and Leids Kerkhoven-Bosscha Funds. He served on
the Raad van Toezicht from 1999 til 2006. Our warmest thoughts go out to
the Oort family. We are very grateful that Fokko van Duyne agreed to
succeed Coen.
In January 2008 we were saddened to learn that Fjeda Walraven had died
in South Africa, his adopted home land. Next year's Annual Report will
contain an in memoriam for him. A month later the sad news reached us
that Dini Ondei, the fondly remembered secretary to Jan Oort at the
Sterrewacht from the 1960s to the 1980s, had passed away.
REVIEW OF MAJOR EVENTS
5
The Sterrewacht welcomed a great number of visitors during the year.
These included the 2007 Oort Professor, Scott Tremaine (Princeton) as well
as many participants in a workshop he helped to organize at the Lorentz
Center, on near-Keplerian dynamics. Prof. Tremaine also delivered the
annual public Oort lecture on “New worlds, in search of planets outside our
solar system”. The year's Sackler lecture on ”Bringing our Galaxy's
supermassive black hole and its environs into focus with laser guide star
adaptive optics” was given by Prof. Andrea Ghez from UCLA. Numerous
workshops took place at the Sterrewacht and in the Lorentz Centre.
Being an astronomer is a privilege, and it implies that we disseminate our
discoveries and our work to as broad an audience as possible. A number of
special outreach events took place, including a symposium for Bruno Ernst
(among many other achievements founder of the public observatory
'Volkssterrewacht Simon Stevin') and an 'astronomy olympiad' for high
school students. The Universe Awareness project, run from the Sterrewacht,
promotes knowledge of astronomy among underprivileged children worldwide. The old Observatory building plays an important role in our outreach
activities: it is used regularly for lectures, tours and sky viewing as well as
for the annual exhibition on the national science day. The building is not in
the best shape, and we took part in a TV competition (ultimately
unsuccessful, alas) to win a million euro grant for restauration of the roof
and telescopes domes. Fortunately as of this writing (May 2008) the minister
of education, culture and science has set aside a large grant for the
restauration of the building.
Scientific research and teaching are of course the main activities at the
Sterrewacht, and most of this report is concerned with those. In 2007 our 18
faculty, 30 postdocs and 45 graduate students together produced some 300
publications including 171 refereed articles, 95 articles in conference
proceedings, 8 PhD theses, a book, and 14 astronomical catalogues. The 8
PhDs awarded during the year were on topics as diverse as oscillations of
stars, interstellar chemistry (alcohol!), and the formation of massive galaxies
in the early universe. Involving BSc and MSc students in research is one of
the key principles of our teaching. Sometimes this leads to spectacular
results, as when three BSc students discovered a candidate exoplanet as part
REVIEW OF MAJOR EVENTS
6
of their research project! The discovery resulted in much press coverage,
including a TV appearance on a daily talk show (at which supervisor Ignas
Snellen was asked to explain why his students only scored an 8.5...).
The year ended with two pieces of good news: Mariska Kriek was
awarded the Kok prize for the best PhD thesis of the year in the Faculty, and
2009 was designated the International Year of Astronomy by UNESCO. A
fitting end to a succesful year!
The achievements described above and in this volume are only possible
through the brilliance, dedication and hard work of the faculty, support and
temporary staff of the Sterrewacht. Together we have the privilege to
continue the great tradition of this Institute. One of the most important
figures in this tradition will be marked in 2008 as we celebrate 200 years
since the birth of Frederik Kaiser. He was director of the Sterrewacht from
1837 until his death in 1872 and engineered the construction of the
Sterrewacht building in the Hortus Botanicus. To commemorate the event a
special postage stamp was issued, which is reproduced on the cover of this
Annual Report.
I hope you enjoy reading this Annual Report.
Koen Kuijken
Scientific Director
Sterrewacht Leiden
Chapter
2
Research
Chapter
Research
2
The research activities at Leiden Observatory span a very wide range,
from small bodies in the Solar System to reionisation of the Universe and
cosmology on the largest scales. This section aims to provide an overview of
active areas of research, and a summary of the principal results obtained in
2007. To get a sense of the sheer volume of work produced by Observatory
researchers, the reader is recommended to Appendix X, which gives a
complete list of material published in 2007.
2.1. Solar System
2.1.1. Minor Planets
Many new asteroids were identified, numbered, or named by I. van
Houten-Groeneveld, continuing the work by herself and her late husband,
C.J. van Houten. Definitive numbers were given to 170 of these objects by
the Minor Planet Center (Cambridge, USA) in 2007. 50 names were given to
minor planets discovered by the Van Houtens in 2007. Of particular interest
are: (10980) Breimer, (10981) Fransaris, (11431) Karelbosscha, (11432)
Kerkhoven and (12150) De Ruyter, which have been named after Belgian or
Dutch famous people.
10
2.2. EXOPLANETS
2.2. Exoplanets
2.2.1. Transisting Planets
Snellen and collaborators continued their work on the detection and
characterisation of transiting extrasolar planets. Most of the more than 200
known extrasolar planets have been found using the radial velocity
technique. Although their orbits are well known, not much is being learned
about the planets themselves. This is very different when the orientation of a
planet is such that it transits its host star, regularly blocking off a fraction of
the star light. For these planets, the mass, radius, and average density can be
determined, and their atmospheres probed through secondary eclipse
photometry and transmission spectroscopy. Highlights of the research by
Snellen and collaborators in 2007 are the discovery of a possible new
transiting exoplanet, and very accurate observations of a transit and
secondary eclipse of the transiting exoplanet OGLE-TR-113 in K-band.
2.2.2 Exoplanet GL 86
Together with Lopez at Nice Jaffe obtained MIDI/AMBER data on the
exoplanet GL86. If successful this will represent the first detection of
exoplanets in their own emitted light.
2.3. PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS
11
2.3 Protostars and Circumstellar Disks
2.3.1. Ice survey of low-mass protostellar envelopes
Boogert (NOAO), Pontoppidan (Caltech), van Dishoeck, Lahuis and the
c2d-IRS team finished their Spitzer + ground-based 3-38 μm spectral survey
of a sample of 41 low luminosity young stellar objects (YSOs) down to protobrown dwarfs; previous mid-infrared spectra had been limited to high-mass
protostars. An important first conclusion is that all features observed toward
massive YSOs are also seen toward low mass YSOs, indicating that
processing of the ices by internal UV fields is a minor factor in the early
chemical evolution of ices. The long-known 6.0 and 6.85 μm bands are
detected toward all sources, with the most deeply embedded Class 0 YSOs
showing the deepest bands ever observed. In almost all sources the 6.0 μm
band is deeper than expected from the bending mode of pure solid H2O at
10 K alone. The depth and shape variations of the remaining 5-7 μm
absorption indicate that it consists of 5 independent components, which, by
comparison to laboratory studies from Leiden, must be from at least 8
different carriers. Simple species such as HCOOH, H2O, HCOO-, CH3OH
and NH3 are responsible for much of the absorption.
The solid CO2 15.2 μm bending mode, studied by Pontoppidan, Boogert,
van Dishoeck, Öberg and the c2d-IRS team for the same low-mass YSO
sample, indicates a CO2/H2O ice abundance ratio of 0.32 +/- 0.02,
significantly higher than that found in quiescent clouds and massive YSOs.
Decomposition of all the observed CO2 profiles requires a minimum of five
unique components. Roughly 2/3 of the CO2 ice is found in a water-rich
environment, while most of the remaining 1/3 is found in a CO-rich
environment, from comparison with Leiden laboratory data. Combined with
ground-based CO data, a model for CO2 ice formation is proposed in which
low-density clouds form the CO2:H2O component and higher density
regions the CO2:CO ice during and after the freeze-out of gas-phase CO
when the cloud collapses to form the star. Subsequent distillation of the
CO2:CO component through CO evaporation at ~20-30 K and formation of
pure CO2 via segregation from the H2O rich mantle at higher levels of
heating (>50 K) may explain the observed band splitting. Thus, as for highmass YSOs, the solid CO2 15.2 μm profile is an excellent diagnostic of
thermal processing.
12
2.3. PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS
Figure 1: Illustration of the five different components of the solid CO2 band. The
Spitzer spectra of Oph IRS 51 (left), Serpens SVS 4-5 (middle) and Oph RNO 91 (right) are
shown. The identifications are based on laboratory spectra taken in the Raymond &
Beverly Sackler laboratory (from: Pontoppidan et al.).
2.3.2. How much X-ray and UV radiation do protostars
emit?
Stäuber, Benz (both ETH Zürich), Jørgensen (CfA), van Dishoeck and coworkers published their JCMT survey of ions and radical toward low- and
high-mass protostars, with the aim to probe any high energy radiation
emitted by these sources which is not directly observable owing to their
large extinctions. The species are selected to be particularly sensitive to
either X-rays or UV radiation based on chemical models by Stäuber et al. For
high-mass sources, the CN, SO+ and CO+ abundances are best explained by
an enhanced UV field impacting gas at temperatures of a few hundred K.
For low-mass YSOs, an X-ray enhanced region close to the protostar (<500
AU) is more plausible. The observed abundances imply X-ray fluxes for the
deeply embedded Class 0 objects of LX ~ 1029-1031 erg s-1, comparable to
those observed from less deeply embedded YSOs.
2.3. PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS
13
2.3.3. PAHs in disks around young stars: spatial
distribution and sizes
Geers, van Dishoeck, Visser, Augereau (Grenoble) and co-workers used
VLT-VISIR, VLT-ISAAC and VLT-NACO spectra of 29 disks around T Tauri
and Herbig Ae stars to determine the presence and location of the emission
from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Spatial-extent profiles of the
3.3, 8.6, 11.2, and 12.6 μm PAH features and the continuum emission have
been derived. For 6 sources, the PAH spatial extent is confined to scales
typically smaller than 0.12-0.34'', corresponding to radii of 12-60 AU,
definitively associating the PAHs with the disks. For HD 100546, the 3.3 μm
emission is confined to 12 ± 3 AU, most likely associated with the outer rim
of the gap in this disk. Gaps with radii out to 10-30 AU may also affect the
observed PAH distribution for other sources.
The PAH chemistry and emission from protoplanetary disks has been
modelled by Visser, Geers, Dullemond (MPIA Heidelberg), van Dishoeck
and coworkers. PAHs can exist in different charge states and they can bear
different numbers of hydrogen atoms, with the equilibrium (steady-state)
distribution depending on the size and shape of the PAHs and on the
physical properties of the star and surrounding disk. Destruction of PAHs
by UV photons, possibly in multi-photon absorption events, is taken
explicitly into account. The chemistry model is coupled to a radiative
transfer code to provide the PAH emission together with the spectral energy
distribution (SED) from the star+disk system. It is found that normally
hydrogenated PAHs account for most of the observed PAH emission, with
neutral and positively ionized species contributing in roughly equal
amounts for Herbig Ae stars. PAHs of 50 carbon atoms are destroyed out to
100 AU in the disk's surface layer, and the resulting spatial extent of the
emission does not agree well with the observations of the 8.6 and 11.2 μm
spatial extent measured by Geers et al. Rather, large PAHs of about 100
carbon atoms or more are needed. The PAH emission from T Tauri disks is
much weaker and concentrated more towards the central star. Positively
ionized PAHs are largely absent because of the weaker radiation field.
14
2.3. PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS
2.3.4. Silicates in disks: where does the crystallization
and grain growth occur?
Merín, van Dishoeck, Augereau (Grenoble) and the c2d-IRS team
discovered as part of the “Cores to Disks” Spitzer Legacy program a very
low mass star close to the brown dwarf boundary in Lupus III, SST-Lup3-1,
with a circum(sub)stellar disk. It is the first of young brown dwarf with a
full 5-35 μm spectrum, showing strong and prominent amorphous and
crystalline silicate features out to 33 μm. The dust in the disk upper layer has
a crystalline silicate grain fraction between 15% and 33%, depending on the
assumed dust continuum. The hot (~300 K) dust responsible for the 10 μm
feature consists of a roughly equal mix of small (~0.1 μm) and large (~1.5
μm) grains, whereas the cold (~70 K) dust responsible for the longer
wavelength silicate features contains primarily large grains (>1 μm). Since
the cold dust emission arises from deeper layers in the inner (<3 AU) disk as
well as from the surface layers of the outer (3-5 AU) disk, this provides
direct evidence for combined grain growth and settling in the disk. Since
only the inner 0.02 AU of the disk is warm enough to anneal the amorphous
silicates, even the lowest fraction of 15% of crystalline material requires
either very efficient mixing or other crystallization mechanisms.
Pontoppidan, Blake (both Caltech), Stapelfeldt (JPL), Dullemond
(Heidelberg) and van Dishoeck used Spitzer IRS spectroscopy and 2D
radiative transfer modeling of the edge-on disk the “Flying Saucer” in
Ophiuchus to study the grain size distribution. Its SED exhibits the
characteristic two-peak shape predicted for a disk viewed very close to edgeon. The short-wavelength peak is entirely due to photons scattered off the
surface of the disk, while the long-wavelength peak beyond 15 μm is due to
thermal emission from the disk itsel. The depth and the wavelength of the
mid-infrared SED “valley” constrain the large grains in the disk to have sizes
of 5-10 μm at radii of 50-300 AU. The detection of relatively large grains in
the upper layers implies that vertical mixing is effective, since grain growth
models predict that such large grains would otherwise settle deep in the disk
on short timescales.
Kessler-Silacci (Texas), Dullemond (Heidelberg), Geers, van Dishoeck
and co-workers analyzed the c2d-IRS and Spitzer results which indicate that
the grain size and crystallinity may be correlated with the spectral type of
the central star and/or disk geometry. Using a simple two-layer disk model
2.3. PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS
15
it is found that the radius of the 10 μm silicate emission zone goes as
(L*/Lsolar)0.56. The observed correlations, together with simulated spectra of
olivine and pyroxene mixtures, imply a dependence of grain size on
luminosity. Combined with the fact that the emission radius is smaller for
less luminous stars, this implies that the apparent grain size of the emitting
dust is larger for low-luminosity sources. In contrast, the models suggest
that the crystallinity is only marginally affected, because for increasing
luminosity, the zone for thermal annealing (assumed to be at T>800 K) is
enlarged by roughly the same factor as the silicate emission zone. The
observed crystallinity is affected by disk geometry, however, with increased
crystallinity in flat disks. The apparent crystallinity may also increase with
grain growth due to an increase in contrast between crystalline and
amorphous bands.
2.3.5. Chemistry in Evolving Protoplanetary Disks
Hogerheijde studies the formation of stars and their planetary systems.
He focuses on observations at millimeter and infrared wavelengths, which
probe the cold gas and dust in star-forming regions and which can penetrate
the dense material surrounding young stars. Much of his research is
centered on the structure and composition of protoplanetary disks, but he
also studies the earlier phases such as prestellar cores and embedded young
stars, as well as ‘late’ phases represented by comets as left-overs from the
early Solar System. In this work he uses molecules and dust to measure
density, temperature, mass, and velocities, and employs detailed radiative
transfer methods to quantitatively interpret the observations. Throughout
this the chemical evolution is used to track the evolution of the objects,
which is possible because of the similarity of the dynamical and chemical
time scales involved. In this research, Hogerheijde works with postdoc
Crapsi, and graduate students Brinch, Panic, and Salter, as well as several
master's students (Martinez, van Weeren, Schouten, and Kockx).
In one of the research highlights of 2007, Brinch, Hogerheijde, Crapsi, and
Hill conducted comprehensive study of the Young Stellar Object L1489 IRS.
This study focused on the complex velocity field and unusual geometry of
this source: although L1489 IRS looks like a run-of-the-mill embedded object,
its resolved millimeter-interferometric image is more reminiscent of a disk
with an unusually large radius of 2000 AU. At the same time, its velocity
16
2.3. PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS
field seems dominated by rotation, but significant radial motions are also
present. To elucidate this object's structure, Brinch et al. used a wide range
of observations, from the near-infrared to the sub-millimeter regime,
including newly obtained sub-millimeter interferometry data from the
Submillimeter Array (SMA) in Hawaii. The combination of infra-red
photometry and spectroscopy on the one hand, and sub-millimeter
measurements of molecular lines on the other provided good allowed Brinch
et al. to uncover the structure of L1489 IRS on scales between a few tens of
AU out to to several thousands of AUs: L1489 IRS is surrounded by a
protoplanetary disk in Keplerian rotation deeply embedded inside a
relatively large, flattened envelope. In this envelope, material spirals in
toward the inner disk. Interestingly, the rotation axes of the disk and
envelope are misaligned by tens of degrees, suggesting that the angular
momentum axis of accreting material is not constant over time. Furthermore,
the star deep inside L1489 IRS is likely to be a very close binary, which
explains the large rotational velocities and low luminosity of the object.
2.3. PROTOSTARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS
17
Figure 2: Composite image of the HCO+ 3-2 line emission detected with the
Submillimeter Array (SMA) and the near-infrared scattered light obtained with the
Hubble Space Telescope, toward L1489 IRS. The SMA line data, shown in contour lines,
reveal the rotation in the inner envelope and disk (coded as black/white shading), and
are closely anti-correlated with the scattered light, shown in the hazy grey-scale. This
corresponds to the near-infrared photons scattering off the dense structures probed by
the HCO+ line data, and illustrates the power of high-angular resolution observations at
different wavelengths. From Brinch et al. (2007).
18
2.4. STAR FORMATION
2.4 Star Formation
2.4.1. Massive Star Formation
Van Langevelde, Hill and Torstensson continued their research into high
mass star formation regions. Their work focused on the youngest massive
stars, and the molecular environments in which they form. Young massive
stars form deeply embedded in their natal molecular cloud, where they are
optically obscured prior to main sequence evolution. They form in clustered
environments on more rapid timescales and at further distances than their
lower mass counterparts. Consequently it is difficult to pinpoint the
individual stages of the evolution of a massive star. Young massive stars are
often associated with radio continuum emission, infrared emission; maser
emission (in particular the methanol variant) as well as (sub)millimetre
continuum emission. The work of these authors focused on a sample of star
formation regions, derived from methanol maser associations.
Hill continued her work on a millimetre continuum sample derived
initially from radio continuum and methanol maser selected sources. This
program included analysing the spectral energy distribution measurements
of the sample. The results indicate the occurrence of millimetre continuum
sources that are possibly associated with the earliest stages of massive star
formation prior to the onset of methanol maser emission. However, it is not
yet clear which of these millimetre continuum sources will form stars,
although most of them contain enough mass to support the formation of
stars in excess of 10 solar masses.
In order to ascertain which of the millimetre continuum sources are
forming stars, Hill undertook a large-scale spectral line study of these
millimetre sources. To date, a sample of 80 of these millimetre sources have
been observed in 13 spectral line species, with more lines planned for the
future. These data show that the millimetre sources display rich, complex
chemistries, not unlike sources with a methanol maser association. These
spectral line species allow us to determine and examine source specific
parameters such as line width, temperature, virial mass and density, which
will allow us to obtain a handle of the physical parameters.
2.4. STAR FORMATION
19
Van Langevelde and Torstensson continued their work on the sample of
methanol masers observed with VLBI in wide-field, astrometric mode.
Interesting results were obtained on the nearby high mass young stellar
object in Cep A. In this source the masers lie in the equatorial region around
the well-known outflow source. Although the appearance is disk-like, the
kinematic structure rules out masers in a rotating accretion disk. The
following up studies target the VLBI sources in order to detect the presence
of hyper-compact HII regions. Although most of these objects have been
studied at radio wavelengths, it is possible that such (HCHII) sources have
been missed, because they are only detectable at the higher frequencies.
Indeed VLA observations at 22 GHz detected unknown compact emission in
the source W75. Observations on the ATCA and CARMA arrays will be
more conclusive on the nature of these central objects.
The new HARP facility on the JCMT allows fast studies of chemical
conditions in high mass star formation. Torstensson, Hill, van der Tak
(RUG) and van Langevelde started observations of a sample of high mass
star formation, selected on the presence of methanol masers. High frequency
thermal methanol lines can be used to quantify the temperature of the dense
molecular gas and study the abundance of methanol is these objects. The
data were of excellent quality and methods to derive physical quantities are
being developed. Early analysis indicates that some correlation can be found
between the sub-mm excitation and the presence of masers.
20
2.5. STARS AND CIRCUMSTELLAR MATTER
2.5 Stars and Circumstellar Matter
2.5.1. S Dor variables (LBVs), sgB[e]-type stars
Sterken (Brussels), van Genderen, Plummer (New Zealand) and Jones
(New Zealand) started a multi-colour photometric campaign of the S Dor
variable (or LBV) WRA 751 = V432 Car. This object, member of a very rare
group of unstable super and hypergiants, preceding the Wolf-Rayet stage,
underwent a prominent brightening phase (~ 2 magnitudes) around 2000
and reached maximum brightness (V ~ 10.5) in 2007. The last bright phase
was in the 1950s, after which it faded, showing microvariations typical for
this stage.
Van Genderen and Sterken (Brussels) started to analyze a large body of
new and published photometric data sets (VBLUW, uvby, UBV, VRI,
JHKLM) of the puzzling supergiant B[e]-type binary (P = 31d). The object
shows a peculiar emission spectrum, strong UV and IR excesses, the latter
due to free-free emission and to circumstellar dust. The object is intrinsically
variable showing one single wave per cycle (amplitude 0.6 magnitudes),
variable from cycle to cycle and is red in the maximum and blue in the
minimum.
2.5.2 Evolved stars
Amiri and van Langevelde started a project to study whether departures
from symmetry can be found in the circumstellar masers around normal
AGB stars. The aim is to see if there are relations between the presence of
magnetic fields in SiO and H2O and the departures from symmetry in the
OH masers. Together with Vlemmings (Bonn Univ) a first study
concentrates on MERLIN observations of objects with fast H2O flows. The
group was also involved in pilot observations to evaluate whether e-VLBI
techniques could be used to measure the parallax of OH/IR stars. The
campaign was the first spectral-line user experiment and was technically
successful. It turns out, however, to be difficult to catch bright OH emission
in all objects, maybe because it is too extended, maybe because the starting
positions are not accurate enough.
2.6. STRUCTURE OF THE MILKY WAY
21
2.6 Structure of the Milky Way
2.6.1. Milky Way ‘Bulge’
Soto, Kuijken and Rich (UCLA) are constructing a model of the stellar
kinematics in the Milky Way bulge/bar. It is based on new measurements of
proper motions and radial velocities from HST and the VLT, respectively.
The VLT observations use an IFU to take spectra of very crowded star fields
in the bulge, from which stellar spectra are then extracted using the precise
position information that is measured on the HST images. Repeat HST
images separated by 3--5 years allow accurate proper motions (equivalent to
30km/s accuracy at the distance of the bulge) to be measured. A separate
analysis of a data set of K giants revealed a significant vertex deviation, a
clear signature of bar-like kinematics, in the metal-rich stars, and was
published.
2.6.2 Galactic Magnetic Field
Schnitzeler and Katgert finished the reduction of 4 WSRT datasets that
are spread over the second Galactic quadrant from longitudes between 100
and 180 degrees, and at latitudes between +15 to +30 degrees, with one
dataset at -25 degrees. They used the novel technique of Faraday
tomography to analyse the relative distributions of Faraday rotating
electrons and synchrotron emitting cosmic rays along the line-of-sight.
Having information also along the depth dimension is a big improvement
over previous analyses where information was only available for the line-ofsight as a whole.
An important first result is that an unexpectedly large fraction of linesof-sight turn out to have physically separated regions with synchrotron
emission and Faraday rotation. This is counter-intuitive, since the
synchrotron-emitting cosmic rays are thought to pervade the entire ISM.
One possible explanation could be that the magnetic field is in those cases
mostly aligned with the line-of-sight: the synchrotron radiation is then
emitted perpendicular to the line-of-sight, i.e. in the plane of the sky, and it
would therefore be invisible for us.
22
2.6. STRUCTURE OF THE MILKY WAY
Another unexpected, but very significant, result is that in 2 of the 4
datasets the rotation measures of the extragalactic sources turn out to be
very different from the rotation measures of the strongest diffuse emission.
In one case, the two are different by a factor of 4, and in the other case they
even have different signs! This is a clear indication that the diffuse emission
that we observe originates fairly close to the sun or, at least, along the near
fraction of the line-of-sight through the Milky Way towards the extragalactic
sources. When the signs of the rotation measures of the extragalactic sources
and the diffuse emission are different, this must imply a large-scale reversal
of the direction of the magnetic field somewhere along the line-of-sight. This
is a bit surprising, since the dataset that shows this field reversal lies not in
the Galactic plane but at a considerable Galactic latitude, viz. at b = 15
degrees. In the 2 remaining datasets the rotation measures of the
extragalactic sources and the strongest diffuse emission agree quite well.
The goal of Schnitzeler's thesis work is twofold: to study the properties
of the magnetized warm ISM of our Galaxy in each of the datasets
individually, and also to combine the properties of these datasets to study
the properties of the second Galactic quadrant as a whole. For the first goal,
Schnitzeler obtained an MHD simulation from F. Heitsch (U. Michigan) and
M. Haverkorn (UC/Berkeley), from which the relation between the structure
in the ISM and the results of the Faraday tomography can be studied. For the
latter goal, the results of the Faraday tomography are combined with lowerresolution information on the diffuse emission from the literature, and on
the extragalactic sources, as provided e.g. by J. Brown (U. Calgary).
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
23
2.7 Nearby Galaxies
2.7.1. The SAURON project
De Zeeuw, Falcón-Barroso, McDermid, van den Bosch and Weijmans are
members or associates of the SAURON team that has built a panoramic
integral-field spectrograph for the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope on La
Palma, in a collaboration which involves groups in Lyon (Bacon) and Oxford
(Davies). SAURON was funded in part by a grant from NWO to de Zeeuw,
and was built at Observatoire de Lyon. SAURON was used to measure the
kinematics and linestrength distributions for a representative sample of 72
nearby early-type galaxies (ellipticals, lenticulars, and Sa bulges, in clusters
and in the field). The entire survey was completed in 2003, and since then
several follow-up projects were carried out on specific targets. In parallel
with the data taking, the team developed a number of tools that are key to
analyse all the resulting maps.
Falcón-Barroso, together with de Zeeuw, completed the study of the
stellar populations of the representative sample of 24 Sa galaxies part of the
the SAURON survey. The analysis showed that many galaxies contain some
younger populations (< 1 Gyr), distributed in small or large inner discs, or in
circumnuclear star forming rings. They found that the central regions of Sa
galaxies display a wide range in ages, even within the galaxies. The central
regions of early-type spirals are often dusty, with a good correlation
between the presence of young central stellar populations and a significant
amount of dust extinction. The sample has a considerable scatter in the Mgbσ relation (considered to be a relation for the oldest local galaxies), with the
largest scatter at the lowest ages. This is in disagreement with highly
inclined samples, in which generally only old stellar populations are found
in the central regions. This discrepancy can be understood if the central
regions of Sa galaxies contain at least two components: a thin, disc-like
component, often containing recent star formation, and another, ellipticallike
component, consisting of old stars and rotating more slowly, dominating the
light above the plane. The kinematical results confirmed this picture.
Van den Bosch and the SAURON team started constructing triaxial
dynamical models of the thirteen galaxies from the SAURON sample with a
kinematically decoupled core, which are thought to be triaxial. By
combining the SAURON observations and the triaxial Schwarzschild
24
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
method developed in Leiden the orbital structure and intrinsic shapes of
these objects can be studied for the first time. While the modeling is still
ongoing, the first results indicate that most of these object are near oblate
shape, while only some are significantly more triaxial.
2.7.2. The Atlas 3D project
The Atlas 3D Survey (PIs: McDermid (Leiden), Emsellem (Lyon),
Cappellari and Krajnović (Oxford)) of a complete, volume-limited sample of
early-type galaxies using the integral-field spectrograph SAURON on the
WHT, continues to gather momentum. 2007 saw the completion of two of
the four observing runs, with 17 nights of clear skies on La Palma. The
project also launched an observational campaign to measure molecular and
neutral gas components of these galaxies using the IRAM 30m telescope (PI
Combes, Paris) at Pico Veleta, Spain and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio
Telescope (PI Morganti, ASTRON) at Dwingeloo, the Netherlands. Together
with complementary imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and
Isaac Newton Telescope, and archival data from Chandra, GALEX and
Spitzer, this project aims to provide a broad but detailed view of our local
early-type galaxy population, creating a local benchmark for studies of
galaxy formation and evolution.
Observations will be completed in early 2008. This survey has Large
Program status at the WHT, and as such constitutes a legacy survey for the
WHT community. Reduced data and derived products will be made
publicly available 12 months after the final data are taken, creating the
world’s largest available database of fully-calibrated integral-field
spectroscopic data. The collaboration includes Leiden co-investigators de
Zeeuw and Falcón-Barroso, and associates Weijmans and van den Bosch, as
well as additional international collaborators.
2.7.3. Matter Distribution in the Outskirts
Weijmans reduced integral-field (SAURON) data taken at 3 half-light
radii in the early-type galaxy NGC 821. Aim of these observations is to
obtain the line-of-sight velocity distribution in the outskirts of the galaxy,
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
25
needed to constrain the mass distribution and establishing the presence of a
dark matter halo. Analysis and modeling of the data is on-going.
In addition, Weijmans and Gerssen (Potsdam) obtained time to observe
the outskirts of NGC 821 with the integral-field spectrograph PPAK, which
has a larger field of view than SAURON. Previous attempts to observe this
galaxy with this instrument were plagued by bad weather, and
unfortunately, also this time no data could be taken because of weather
conditions.
Weijmans together with van de Ven (Princeton) obtained a rotation
curve for the early-type galaxy NGC 2974. They combined the kinematics of
ionised gas (observed with SAURON) with those of Hi gas (observed with
VLA), by applying an asymmetric drift correction to the ionised gas. In
addition, they were able to separate the random motions caused by
gravitational interaction from those caused by turbulence in the ionised gas.
A dark matter halo is needed to reproduce the flat rotation curve. A
pseudoisothermal sphere provides the best model; both an NFW halo and
modified Newtonian dynamics fit the data marginally worse.
Welles (Nijmegen) with supervision from Weijmans, analysed the
velocity field of both the ionised and neutral gas in the Sa galaxy NGC 1056.
The ionised gas was observed with SAURON, and the neutral gas with the
WSRT. He extracted a rotation curve, and constructed a mass model of this
galaxy, assuming a maximal disc model. His model requires a dark matter
halo, and an isothermal sphere fits the observed rotation curve marginally
better than an NFW profile. The dark matter fraction in this galaxy is
estimated at 90 per cent. Szomoru, with supervision from Weijmans,
performed a similar analysis on the Sa galaxy NGC 2273. He also extracted a
rotation curve from both the ionised gas (SAURON) and the neutral gas
(WSRT). Results indicate the presence of a dark matter halo, and a more
detailed analysis of the velocity fields is on-going.
26
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
Figure 3: Velocity maps of the neutral hydrogen (VLA) and ionised gas and stars
(SAURON) in early-type galaxy NGC 2974. The grey box in the VLA map encloses the
SAURON fields shown at the right. The neutral and ionised gas are well aligned,
indicating that they form a single disc. By extracting the rotation curves of these maps,
we infer that at least 55 per cent of the matter in this galaxy is dark.
2.7.4. Dynamical Models and Analytic Methods
Geerts, with supervision from van den Bosch, added the light absorption
effects of dust to dynamical models of stellar systems. Dust in galaxies can
absorb a significant portion of the stellar light and thus strongly affect the
observed stellar kinematics. By constructing a dynamical model that
incorporates the dust absorption, it is possible to reconstruct the geometry of
the dust and get a better estimate of the intrinsic properties of stellar orbits
in and behind the dusty region. As a proof of concept, this new method was
applied to the spiral galaxy NGC 4526, which has a strong dust disc.
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
27
Van den Bosch and de Zeeuw, together with van de Ven (Princeton) and
Cappellari (Oxford), finished development of the Schwarzschild orbit
superposition software for triaxial galaxies. This flexible and efficient
modeling technique uses orbital families to describe a galaxy, and can be
used to fit the observed light and kinematics of stellar systems in order to
derive the dynamical structure, mass-to-light ratio, viewing angle and mass
of the central black hole. This code, developed in Leiden, is the only existing
orbit-based Schwarzschild code that can model galaxies with triaxial
geometries, allowing features such as photometric position angle twists and
kinematically decoupled components to be modelled with minimal
assumptions.
After sucessfully showing that with this method it is possible to recover
the intrinsic kinematical properties with a priori knowledge about the
viewing angles of a galaxy, van den Bosch and van de Ven started a project
to constrain the viewing angles of giant elliptical galaxies. To achieve this,
they applied the triaxial modeling machinery to a large number of
theoretical mock galaxies and found that the shape can be recovered reliable
in most cases. By applying this extensively tested triaxial modeling
technique it is now possible to study the ‘fossil record’ embedded in giant
elliptical galaxies and determine their formation history and evolution.
Van den Bosch & de Zeeuw studied the central black holes in the nearby
elliptical galaxies M32 and NGC 3379 using axisymmetric three-integral
models and triaxial models, and confirmed that both methods find identical
results for M32. They found that the black hole mass in NGC 3379 more than
doubled, when they assumed the best-fitting triaxial intrinsic shape instead
of an axisymmetric shape. This result may influence our understanding of
the super massive black hole demography, as a significant fraction of the
galaxies that host the most massive black holes are thought to be triaxial.
2.7.5. Star-Forming Nuclear Rings
Falcón-Barroso, together with Böker (ESTEC), Schinnerer (Heidelberg),
Knapen (Tenerife) and Ryder (Epping) completed the study of star-forming
nuclear rings based on integral-field near-IR SINFONI observations in a
sample of 5 galaxies. They constructed maps of various emission lines that
reveal the individual star forming regions (”hot spots”) delineating the
28
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
rings. They derived the morphological parameters of the rings, and
constructed velocity fields of the stars and the emission line gas. They
proposed a qualitative, but robust, diagnostic for relative hot spot ages
based on the intensity ratios of the emission lines Brγ, He I, and [Fe II].
Application of this diagnostic to the data provided tentative support for a
scenario in which star formation in the rings is triggered predominantly at
two well-defined regions close to, and downstream from, the intersection of
dust lanes along the bar with the inner Lindblad resonance.
2.7.6. Bars
In order to gain a better understanding of galaxy evolution and its
relation to star formation, Toonen, together with Falcón-Barroso, Fathi
(Tenerife) and Beckman (Tenerife) studied the kinematics on large and small
scales in the disc galaxy NGC 6946. With its disturbed morphology, NGC
6946 is a perfect example to study the orbital make-up of disc galaxies and
origin of substructures. Toonen and collaborators modeled the velocity field
by the thin disc approximation and subsequently improved on this with a
model based on the harmonic expansion along tilted rings. Because of the
resolution the models do not show the inner bar, but they do confirm the
presence of the main bar. Furthermore, it was shown that the bars can be
linked to the presence of resonance radii. Toonen applied the Tremaine &
Weinberg method and found not one, but two distinct pattern speeds. This
shows that the main bar rotates at a pattern speed which could be up to two
times as high as that of the main pattern. From a study of luminosity vs.
velocity dispersion in individual Hii regions, the star formation regions
seem not to be in virial equilibrium, nor are they strongly affected by the
main bar.
Falcón-Barroso supervised the research project of Adriana de LorenzoCáceres, a PhD student at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias on a joint
visit to ESTEC and the Sterrewacht Leiden under the EARA program. The
project was dedicated to study the kinematics and stellar populations of
double-barred galaxies using SAURON integral-field spectroscopy.
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
29
2.7.7. Distribution of Dark Matter
Kuijken works on the distribution of dark matter in the universe,
principally through analysis of stellar dynamics in galaxies, and
gravitational lensing. A significant portion of this work relies on purposebuilt instrumentation, viz. the Planetary Nebulae Spectrograph (PN.S) built
for the William Herschel Telescope, and the wide-field camera OmegaCAM
for the ESO VLT Survey Telescope.
2.7.8. The PN.S project
With the PN.S team (Douglas, Arnaboldi, Capaccioli, Coccato, Freeman,
Gerhard, Merrifield, Napolitano, Noordermeer, Romanowsky) the study of
elliptical galaxy halos continued. The PN.S finds, and measures velocities
for, planetary nebulae (PNe) in external galaxies from a single observation.
The ongoing survey typically yields 100-200 PNe per galaxy, mostly at large
radii from the center where their motions are dominated by the dark matter
halo potential. A dozen galaxies now have good datasets. A highlight of
2007 was the publication of the analysis on NGC3379, an elliptical galaxy
with a curiously falling velocity dispersion. On the face of it the results
imply a rather light-weight dark matter halo around this galaxy, but
projection effects might conspire to hide most of the orbital motion in the
plane of the sky. A novel "made-to-measure N-body code", NMAGIC,
developed in the group of Gerhard (MPE) has been applied to the data in
order to explore in more detail what modelling freedom the data still allow.
A side-project of the PN.S project is kinematic maps S0 galaxies, with which
the rotation and dispersion properties of the outermost stars are being
investigated.
2.7.9. Weak Lensing
Weak gravitational lensing can be used to study the mass distribution
around galaxies, as well as on larger scales. With this in mind the KiDS
project was conceived, a large collaboration of 9 institutes in Europe (PI
Kuijken) which will map 1500 square degrees of sky in good seeing
conditions from Paranal with OmegaCAM on the VST. Unfortunately the
telescope construction has been long delayed, with start of operations in
30
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
early 2009 considered likely at the time of writing. During 2007 preparations
for KiDS continued in algorithm development for multi-colour photometry
and for weak lensing measurement.
Since 2007 the KiDS project benefits from Leiden's participation in a
European training network, ‘DUEL’, built around the scientific challenges in
determining the cosmological model with weak lensing measurements. The
lensing group in Leiden was fortified in the autumn of 2007 with postdocs
Schrabback and Hildebrandt, and PhD students van Uitert and Welander.
2.7.10. Dust and gas in the Small Magellanic Cloud
As part of a large international team of astronomers, Israel studied
infrared emission from the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) observed with
Spitzer Space Observatory. They found that PAH abundances have large
spatial variations probably represebnting the effects of photodestruction.
They also cataloged about 400,000 mid- and far-infrared point sources in the
SMC. The sources detected at the longest wavelengths fall into four main
categories: (1) Young stellar objects bright at 5.8 microns but having very
faint optical counterparts and very red mid-infrared colors; (2) carbon stars
bright in the mid-infrared, mildly red colors; (3) Oxygen-rich evolved stars,
bright in both the optical and the mid-infrared, with neutral colors; and (4)
unreddened early B stars (B3-O9) with a large 24 micron excess. This excess
is reminiscent of debris disks and is detected in only a small fraction of these
stars (<~5%). The majority of the brightest infrared point sources in the SMC
fall into groups 1-3.
Together with a subset of this team, Israel studied the dust content of the
SMC from its far-infrared emission. They found a total dust mass of M(dust)
= 3x105 M(o), implying a dust-to-total-hydrogen ratio of about 1:700.
Assuming the dust to trace the total gas column, they used a method
pioneered by Israel to derive H2 surface densities across the SMC, and
found a total H2 mass M(H2) = 3.2x107 M(o) with a distribution similar to
that of the CO, but more extended. On average, H2 is more extended than
CO by a factor of about 1.3. The implied CO-to-H2 conversion factor over
the whole SMC is X(CO)= 13×1021 cm-2 (K km s-1)-1. Over the volume
occupied by CO the conversion factor is lower, X(CO) = 6×1021 cm-2
(K km s-1)-1, but still a few times larger than that found using virial mass
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
31
methods. The molecular peaks have H2 surface densities similar to those in
Milky Way GMCs, and correspondingly low extinctions of about A(V) = 1-2
mag. For a given hydrostatic gas pressure, the SMC has a 2-3 times lower
ratio of molecular to atomic gas than spiral galaxies. Combined with lower
mean densities, this results in this galaxy having only 10% of its gas in the
molecular phase.
2.7.11. The nucleus of Centaurus A
Together with a team headed by Meisenheimer (MPI Heidelberg), Jaffe,
Israel and Raban, Röttgering investigated the origin of mid-infrared
radiation from the core of the strong radio source Centaurus A. They carried
out interferometric observations with the MID-infrared Interferometer
(MIDI) at ESO's VLTI telescope array. The interferometric measurements
were spectrally resolved in the wavelength range 8 to 13 micron and had a
spatial resolution of 15 milli-arcseconds at the shortest wavelengths. The
team obtained supplementary observations in the near-infrared with the
adaptive optics instrument NACO, and at mm wavelengths with SEST and
JCMT. They found that the mid-infrared emission from the Cen A core is
dominated by an unresolved point source, and an extended component with
a diameter of about 0.6 pc which is probably a thin dusty disk with its axis
aligned with the radio jet. The disk contributes between 20% and 40% to the
nuclear flux from Centaurus A and contains dust at about 240 K. The
unresolved emission is probably dominated by a synchrotron source. with a
spectrum characterized by an Fν~ν-0.36 power-law, cutting off exponentially
towards high frequencies at νc = 8 × 1013 Hz and becoming optically thick at
about 45 GHz. The magnetic field strength was estimated at 26 microTesla.
The team found evidence to doubt the often-advertised concept of a ‘misdirected BL Lac object’. The estimated thermal luminosity of the core is
intermediate between the values for highly efficiently accreting AGN (e.g.
Seyfert galaxies) and those of typical FR I radio galaxies. This luminosity,
which is predominantly released in X-rays, is most likely generated in an
Advection Dominated Accretion Flow (ADAF) and seems just sufficient to
heat the dusty disk.
32
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
2.7.12. MIDI Observations of AGN
Jaffe continued his work on midInfrared interferometric observations of
AGNs with the VLTI instrument MIDI in collaboration with Raban and
Röttgering at Leiden, and colleagues at MPIA Heidelberg and Potsdam. At
the first sight, the results for the dust structures in the Seyfert 2 galaxies
NGC 1068 and Circinus look quite similar: they both contain an elongated
inner component which seems to be embedded into a larger dust
distribution, which is heated to about 300 K. The observed difference in
torus size can be expected from the fact that NGC 1068 is about 10 times
more luminous than Circinus. In both sources the inner component is
aligned with the location of water masers.
Despite the apparent complexity in torus properties, the essential
assumption of the unified scheme remains unchallenged: it is still possible
that Seyfert 1s and Seyfert 2s are intrinsically the same class of objects. In
order to verify this generic assumption, an AGN snapshot survey was
carried during the guaranteed time observations of the MIDI consortium. It
tried to identify all those AGN which are bright enough in the N-band to be
observed with MIDI. For 10 of the 14 targets MIDI could detect
interferometric fringes.
2.7.13. Starburst activity in M82
Brandl has continued the work on starburst activity in various
environments, from local massive HII regions to distant ULIRGs. The
studies are mainly based on observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope
and involve collaborators at Cornell University and the Spitzer Science
Center at Caltech. The members of the starburst group at Leiden included
Brent Groves, Pedro Beirao, Juan Rafael Martinez Galarza, Bas Nefs, Wouter
Spaan, and Hugo Zeballos Pinto.
PhD Student Beirao, Brandl and Groves worked on the mid-IR spectral
analysis of the central region of the starburst galaxy M82. They found a good
correlation of the dust extinction with the CO 1-0 emission. The emission
from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) follows closely the
ionization structure along the galactic disk, and the observed variations of
the relative PAH feature strengths can be explained by extinction effects.
The hardness of the ionization field is quite low on average and shows very
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
33
little spatial fluctuations, suggesting no significant recent epoch of starburst
activity. Despite the large reservoir of dust and molecular gas in the central
area of the galaxy the star formation rate appears to have decreased
significantly over the last 5 Myr, suggesting that negative feedback processes
limit the starburst activity.
2.7.14. Element abundances in local massive HII regions
Together with colleagues at Cornell, Brandl investigated the chemical
abundances of three massive HII regions at different metallicities: NGC3603
in the Milky Way, 30Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and N66 in the
Small Magellanic Cloud. Using the fine structure emission lines of [SIII],
[SIV], [ArIII], [NeII], [NeIII], [FeII], and [FeIII] they found that the alphaelements Ne, S, and Ar scale with each other, in good agreement with the
abundances derived from the optical. However, the Ne/S ratio is higher
than the solar value in the three giant HII regions and points toward a
moderate depletion of sulfur on dust grains. The neon and sulfur
abundances display a remarkably small dispersion (0.11dex in 15 positions
in 30Doradus), suggesting a relatively homogeneous ISM, even though
small-scale mixing cannot be ruled out.
2.7.15. Dust in low-metallicity dwarf galaxies
Brandl, together with collaborators at Cornell, continued the work on
blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies. Deep Spitzer observations of I Zw 18,
which has the second lowest metallicity measured in a star-forming object,
yielded no emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).
However, in contrast to other very low-metallicity galaxies, the 15 - 70 μm
continuum emission of I Zw 18 has a much steeper slope, more characteristic
of a typical starburst galaxy of solar abundance. They also extended the
study to include 13 of the most metal-deficient BCDs known, and found that
the mid-IR abundance measurements of neon and fur are consistent with the
oxygen abundance derived from optical lines. The main result is that either
the metallicities of dust-enshrouded regions in BCDs are similar to the
optically accessible regions, or that -- if they are different -- they do not
contribute substantially to the total infrared emission of the host galaxy.
34
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
2.7.16. Infrared properties of ultra-luminous infrared
galaxies
In collaboration with colleagues from IPAC/Caltech and Cornell, Brandl
investigated the mid-IR properties of a sample of about hundred ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) observed with Spitzer. They found that
the far-infrared spectral slope is strongly correlated with PAH equivalent
width, but not with silicate optical depth. The detection of the high
excitation [Ne V] line in just under half the sample implies that an AGN
contributes significantly to the mid-IR flux in approximately 40% of ULIRGs.
ULIRGs with moderate silicate absorption (0.8 < optical depth at 9.8microns
< 2.4) are likely to be powered mainly by star formation, while ULIRGs with
weak (<0.8) or strong (>2.4) silicate absorption contain an IR-luminous
AGN.
2.7.17. Characterization of a ground-based line
diagnostics
Together with masters student Nefs, Groves and Brandl investigated the
theoretical and obervational errors by replacing the mid-IR [Ne III] line
(which is unobservable from the ground) with the [S IV] line. The work,
based on a large sample of objects of various types yielded a quantitative
assessment of the accuracy of a key diagnostic feature to measure the
hardness of the interstellar radiation field.
2.7.18. Nearby Clusters of Galaxies
Katgert and Biviano (Trieste) studied the evidence for kinematical and
dynamical substructure in the clusters in the ESO Nearby Abell Cluster
Survey. They devised a new method to quantify the probability that a given
galaxy finds itself in cold and/or moving group within its cluster. The
results of their analysis are very promising and the identification of
substructures appears quite convincing. However, the performance of their
method must be calibrated and for that they have used numerical
simulations, in which all 6 phase-space coordinates are available, so that the
real kinematical and dynamical substructure can be detected.
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
35
By projecting the 6-d information to 2+1-d (i.e. projected position and
l.o.s. velocity) as in the observations, pseudo observations can be generated
and the method for detecting substructure can then be applied to those. In
that way, the effects of projection, i.e. dilution of substructure and
contamination along the line-of-sight can be quantified. A general
conclusion is that real moving substructures are more readily and reliably
recovered in projection than cold substructures.
2.7.19. Starburst galaxies
The research of Van der Werf and his group has concentrated on nearby
starburst galaxies, ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), and active
galactic nuclei (AGNs). Starbursts are spectacular phenomena, which
represent episodes in the evolution of galaxies characterized by the rapid
conversion of gas into stars. During such a phase the host galaxy rapidly
evolves in stellar and gas content, luminosity, colour, metallicity, and (often)
morphology. The most spectacular starbursts occur in ULIRGs, which form
stars at a rate sufficient to form a complete stellar population on a short
timescale. Given their dusty nature, the objects are best studied at long
wavelengths, from the near-infrared to the submillimetre.
2.7.20. Ground-based mid-infrared observations of
starburst galaxies
In 2007, Van der Werf and his group studied a number of nearby
starburst galaxies with the ESO/VLT using SINFONI (in NOVA Guaranteed
Time) and VISIR. The SINFONI part of this work is carried out by Vermaas
(PhD student supervised by Van der Werf), while the VISIR part was carried
out by Snijders, who defended her PhD thesis in Leiden in 2007. A highlight
of this work is the development of a "ground-based-only" set of diagnostics,
in collaboration with Kewley (University of Hawaii). Ground-based midinfrared observations are restricted to a restricted set of lines ([NeII], [ArIII],
[SIII] and [SIV]), but have the advantage over observations from space of
vastly superior resolution: with VISIR at the VLT, diffraction-limited
resolution (0.3" at 10 micron) was routinely achieved, while the
corresponding resolution with the Spitzer Space Telescope is 3". VISIR
36
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
observatations of superstarclusters in the Antennae (NGC4038/4039) show
significant spectral differences with Spitzer observations, leading to
quantitatively different results. This underlines the need for angular
resolution in observations of this kind. The most important results are the
diffuse nature of the PAH emission, which is therefore not directly related to
the most recent (i.e., current) star formation, and the high densities and
ionization parameters derived for the superstarclusters. These results could
only be obtained with the spatial resolution provided by VISIR.
2.7.21. The nuclear black hole of Centaurus A and its
environment
In 2007, Van der Werf, Reunanen and De Zeeuw completed their analysis
of the circumnuclear region of the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A. This
project, led by Neumayer (MPIA Heidelberg), used SINFONI data in NOVA
Guaranteed Time. With adaptive optics, the resolution was 0.12", so that the
region of influence of the black hole could easity be resolved. The key results
are that lines of higher excitation are more and more affected by nongravitational motions, thus compromising earlier estimates of the black hole
mass. In contrast, the H2 emission displays pure rotation in a warped but
otherwise regular disk (see Fig. 4 for the velocity field). The black hole mass
is determined to be 4.5x107 Msun, which brings Cen A in full agreement
with the relation between black hole mass and velocity dispersion for
galaxies. The warped molecular disk displays a number of ridges and peaks
which can be interpreted as shocks or spiral arms, but which have no
corresponding features in the velocity field. The disk must play a central role
in feeding the nuclear black hole.
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
37
Figure 4 Velocity field of the 2.12 micron H2 line in the nuclear region of Cen A,
obtained with SINFONI (Neumayer et al., 2007). The left panel shows the observed
velocity field, the central panel a model with a black hole of 4.5x107 Msun and the right
panel shows the difference between these. The black line shows the line of modes of the
warped disk, along which rotation curves have been extracted, which are shown in the
bottom panels (diamonds: model; crosses: data).
2.7.22. The molecular gas in the ultra-luminous infrared
galaxy Mrk231
In collaboration with Papadopoulos (ETH, Zürich) and Isaak (Cardiff),
Van der Werf completed his study of the warm and dense molecular gas in
Mrk231. The first detections of CO(4-3) and (6-5) of a ULIRG were obtained,
resulting in a fascinating new picture of the starforming interstellar medium
(ISM) in this object. While in lower luminosity objects such as the Milky
Way, cooling is totally dominated by the 158 micron [CII] line, in Mrk231 the
total cooling by CO emission (integrated over the rotational ladder) is
comparable to that by CO (see Fig. 5). This effect becomes clear only when
CO (4-3) and higher lines are observed, since the warm dense gas
component producing the CO cooling is totally dominates the high-J lines,
while the lower-J lines are dominated by a more diffuse gas component.
38
2.7 NEARBY GALAXIES
Physically, these results point towards dense photon-dominated regions
(PDRs), where the ionized carbon layer is thin; therefore the CO layer is
located close to the source of heating and a significant column density of
warm dense gas results. In Mrk231, this gas component dominates the mass
budget. Given that mid-J CO lines and [CII] lines will be fundamental
probes of high-z galaxies with ALMA, these results have important
consequences for the interpretation of future ALMA measurements of high-z
galaxies.
Figure 5: Cooling budget of the warm dense gas in Mrk231. Plotted are the total line
luminosities of the diffuse and dense gas phases, distributed over the CO rotational
ladder. the CO lines are based on measurements up to J=6-5 (except for 5-4 which is an
interpolation), and error bars for these are shown. For higher lines the luminosities are
based on the model derived from the lower lines. Also shown are the total CO
luminosities of the diffuse and dense gas phases separately, the luminosity of the [CII]
158 micron line, and the total luminosity of the two [CI] lines (from Papadopoulos et al.,
2007).
2.8 HIGH REDSHIFT GALAXIES
39
2.8 High Redshift Galaxies
2.8.1. AGN
Snellen and collaborators continued their work on the evolution of radioloud active galactic nuclei. Together with de Vries and Schilizzi very young
radio galaxies are studied, which shed new light on why certain galaxies
become active and how the central activity influences the surrounding
galaxy. Together with Rigby and Best (IfA, Edinburgh) the high redshift
space density and cosmological evolution has been measured of Fanaroff &
Riley Class I radio galaxies, indicating modest density enhancements at
redshifts of >1.0.
2.8.2. Two modes of accretion in powerful radio
galaxies
The XMM-Large Scale Structure field (XMM-LSS) is a 10 square degree
extragalactic window observed by the XMM-Newton X-ray satellite in the
0.1 − 10 keV energy band. The XMM-LSS area has been followed up with a
broad range of extragalactic surveys. Tasse, Rottgering et al. carried out low
frequency radio surveys of the XMM-LSS field using the Very Large Array
(Tasse et al. 2006) at 74 and 325 MHz, and the Giant Meterwave Radio
Telescope (GMRT) at 230 and 610 MHz. Subsequently estimates of
photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and specific star formation rates were
determind for ~ 3 x 106 galaxies in the CFHTLS-W1 field, using the ZPEG
photometric redshift code. This data set enabled them to to constrain the
small (~ 75 kpc) and large (~ 450 kpc) scale environments of radio sources
independently from their stellar mass estimates. Subsequent analysis
showed that there are two distinct types of radio sources, whose radio
source activity seem to be triggered by two different mechanisms. The first
population, which dominates at high stellar masses (M > 1010.5−1010.8 M~) is
that of massive elliptical galaxies, lying in galaxy groups or clusters, where
the radio source is triggered by the cooling of the hot gas in their
atmosphere. At these stellar masses, the fraction of galaxies that host radioloud is essentially the same as that in the local Universe. The second
population of radio sources have lower stellar masses, lie in large scale
underdensities, and show excess mid-IR emission consistent with a hidden
40
2.8 HIGH REDSHIFT GALAXIES
radiatively efficient active nucleus. The radio-loud fraction at these masses is
increased relative to the local Universe.
The observed environmental dichotomy suggest that the activity in low
stellar mass systems is driven by galaxy interactions or mergers while for the
massive galaxies the activity is driven by hot gas cooling from an X-ray
emitting atmosphere.
2.8.3. The Combined EIS-NVSS Survey Of Radio
Sources (CENSORS)
The Combined EIS-NVSS Survey Of Radio Sources (CENSORS) is a 1.4GHz radio survey selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and
complete to a flux density of 7.2mJy. Brookes, Best, Peacock, Röttgering and
Dunlop finished spectroscopic observations of 143 of the 150 CENSORS
sources. The primary motivation for these observations is to achieve
sufficient spectroscopic completeness so that the sample can be used to
investigate the evolution of radio sources.
2.8.4. Proto-clusters
Venemans, Röttgering, Miley and collaborators presented the results of a
large program conducted with the Very Large Telescope and augmented by
observations with the Keck telescope to search for forming clusters of
galaxies near powerful radio galaxies at 2.0 < z < 5.2. Narrow band imaging
was used to select candidate Lyα emitting galaxies in 3×3 Mpc2 areas near
the radio galaxies. A total of 300 candidate emitters were found and followup spectroscopy was performed on 152 candidates in seven of the radio
galaxy fields. Of these, 139 were confirmed to be Lyα emitters, four were
low redshift interlopers and nine were non-detections. At least six of the
eight fields are overdense in Lyα emitters by a factor 3-5 as compared to the
field density of Lyα emitters at similar redshifts, although the statistics in
our highest redshift field (z = 5.2) are poor. The protoclusters have sizes of at
least 1.75 Mpc, and have masses in the range 2-9 × 1014 M~. The velocity
dispersion of the emitters increases with cosmic time, in agreement with the
dark matter velocity dispersion in numerical simulations of forming massive
clusters.
2.8 HIGH REDSHIFT GALAXIES
41
2.8.5. Lyα halos
Reuland, Röttgering and Miley present the results of an optical and near-IR
spectroscopic study of giant nebular emission-line halos associated with
three z>3 radio galaxies, 4C 41.17, 4C 60.07, and B2 0902+34. The outer
regions of these halos show quiet kinematics with typical velocity
dispersions of a few hundred km s-1 and velocity shears that can mostly be
interpreted as being due to rotation. The inner regions show shocked
cocoons of gas closely associated with the radio lobes.The dynamical
structures traced in the Lyα line are, in most cases, closely echoed in the
carbon and oxygen lines. This shows that the Lyα line is produced in a
highly clumped medium of small filling factor and can therefore be used as
a tracer of the dynamics of high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs). It is
concluded that these HzRGs are undergoing a final jet-induced phase of star
formation with ejection of most of their interstellar medium before becoming
‘red and dead’ elliptical galaxies.
2.8.6. Galaxy Evolution
Franx and collaborators studied the evolution and formation of galaxies.
This work focusses on observational studies on galaxies from z=7 to z=0,
selected by a variety of techniques. This includes the study of massive
galaxies at z=1.5-4, selected by near-ir imaging. This search technique
enables the construction of mass selected samples at this redshift range,
thereby providing a good census of the mass distribution of galaxies. Below,
some of the results are described.
In collaboration with Quadri and van Dokkum (Yale University), and
colleagues, the correlation function of massive red galaxies at redshift from 2
to 3 was determined. The galaxies are very strongly correlated, a result
which is very difficult to model in current theories. Further confirmation
using different fields is required.
Toft, Zirm, Franx and collaborators studied the sizes and star formation
rates of galaxies at redshifts around 2.5. Deep imaging taken with the
Hubble Space Telescope in the H-band were used to determine the sizes,
and the Spitzer Telescope was used to measure star formation rates. In both
fields studied (Hubble Deep Field South, and the field of MS1054-03) there
was a good correlation between size and specific star formation rate:
42
2.8 HIGH REDSHIFT GALAXIES
galaxies with low specific star formation rate had small sizes, galaxies with
high specific star formation rate had large sizes for their mass. This shows
how strong the variety of galaxies is at high redshift, analogous to the
variety seen in the local universe.
In collaboration with Holden (Santa Cruz), and collaborators, Franx
studied the evolution of the morphologies in clusters. The galaxies were
selected by stellar mass, estimated from the rest frame luminosities and
colors. This newly defined sample showed no evolution of the
morphological mix of galaxies in clusters as a function of redshift. This is
very different from luminosity selected samples which do show a strong
evolution. The evolution in the latter samples are caused by luminosity
evolution of very low mass galaxies.
Van der Wel, Franx, and colleagues studied the evolution of
morphologies of massive galaxies in the field. Similar to the result in the
study described above, no evolution in the morphologies is found between a
redshift of 1 and 0, if the galaxies are selected by stellar mass. Apparently,
galaxies evolve along the morphology density relation, which remains rather
Constant with redshift.
Bouwens, Illingworth (Santa Cruz), Franx and Ford (Baltimore) studied
the evolution of the luminosity function of galaxies between a redshift of 4
and 6. Very deep fields observed with the Hubble Space Telescopes were
analyzed. The luminosity functions were found to have steep slopes at all
redshifts, close to -1.7. The characteristic luminosity in the UV brightens
considerably from z=6 to z=4 (by 0.7 magnitude). The luminosity functions
show very small evolution at the faint end, i.e., they overlap.
2.9 THEORETICAL STUDIES
43
2.9.Theoretical Studies
2.9.1. Supermassive Black Holes and Compact Objects
In 2007, Levin has continues theoretical research into astrophysics of
neutron stars and supermassive black holes. 2 major results were published
in 2007:
1. Levin has worked out the theory of oscillating magnetars, and has
shown how this new theory can explain observations of Quasi-Periodic
Oscillations in the tail of giant magnetar flares. This makes for the first time
the case of using asterosesmology to probe magnetar interiours. (published
in MNRAS, 377, 159)
2. Levin has worked out a theory of formation of massive stars in black
hole accretion discs, and connected this theory with the observed population
of young stars in the Galactic Center. This paper also makes a prediction of a
novel source of gravitational waves: an inspiral of a stellar-mass black hole,
which is born in the massive accretion disc, into the disc's host supermassive
black hole. This type of signal should be observable by future space-based
gravitational-wave detector, LISA.
2.9.2. Detecting cosmic strings
Together with Vachaspati (Case Western Reserve) and Siemens
(CalTech), Kuijken studied the effect and observability of a cosmic string
when it passes in front of a distant quasar. Cosmic strings induce double
images of distant sources, and boost the total detected flux even when the
individual images are too close to be resolved. For sufficiently compact
sources this flux increase is a factor of two. A signature of such
'microlensing' by cosmic strings is therefore a temporary doubling of the
brightess of a source (see Figure 6).
The study concluded that this phenomenon will in practice be very
difficult to detect, in view of (i) limits on the number and mass density of
cosmic strings from the CMB fluctuation spectrum (ii) the finite size of
bright quasar cores, and (iii) the attention span of even the most tenaceous
astronomer.
44
2.9 THEORETICAL STUDIES
Figure 6: Microlensing by a cosmic string that passes in front of a distant, compact
source. The dotted outline shows the source as it would appear without the string; the
shaded images show what would be observed on the sky. The plotted lightcurve shows
how the total flux detected from the source temporarily doubles as the string passes
between us and the source.
2.9.3. Theory of Galaxy Formation
Simulating the formation and evolution of galaxies and the
intergalactic medium
Dalla Vecchia, Duffy, Haas, Schaye, van de Voort and Wiersma, working
together with Springel (MPA), Theuns (Durham) and others, used the
LOFAR correlator, an IBM Bluegene/L computer, to run large-scale,
cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations. The simulations were run with
the code Gadget III, augmented with new modules for star formation,
galactic winds, chemodynamics, and cooling. They also wrote software for
the analysis of the simulations, including programs to do population
synthesis and visualization and codes for the creation of halo catalogues and
absorption spectra. The simulations will be used to study the formation of
galaxies and the evolution of the intergalactic medium.
2.9 THEORETICAL STUDIES
45
Radiative transfer for smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations
Pawlik and Schaye have worked on the development of a module for the
transfer of ionizing radiation radiative in the Smoothed Particle
Hydrodynamics code Gadget. The method takes advantage of Gadget's
parallelization scheme and runs on distributed memory systems. It is
spatially adaptive and well-suited for problems with a large number of
sources.
The intergalactic medium in the vicinity of Lyman-break galaxies
Rakic, Schaye, Steidel (Caltech), and Aguirre (UC Santa Cruz) have
searched for correlations between the distance to Lyman-break galaxies and
absorption by the intergalactic medium in the spectra of background
quasars. Using pixel optical depth techniques they found that the absorption
by HI, CIV, and OVI is significantly enhanced within a few comoving Mpc
of the galaxies.
The small-scale distribution of intergalactic heavy elements.
Schaye, Carswell (Cambridge) and Kim (Potsdam) carried out a survey for
high-metallicity CIV absorbers at redshift z ≈ 2.3 in 9 high-quality quasar
spectra. Using a novel analysis technique, based on detections of CIV lines
and automatically determined upper limits on the column densities of HI,
CIII, NV, and OVI, they found a large (dN/dz > 7) population of photoionized, compact (R ~ 102 pc), metal-rich (Z Z ) CIV clouds with moderate
densities (nH ~ 10-3.5 cm-3), properties that they showed are robust with
respect to uncertainties in the ionization model. In particular, local sources
of ionizing radiation,overabundance of oxygen, departures from ionization
equilibrium, and collisional ionization would all imply more compact
clouds. The clouds are too small to be self-gravitating and pressure
confinement is only consistent under special conditions. They argued that
the clouds are, in any case, likely to be short-lived and demonstrated that
this implies that the clouds could easily have been responsible for the
transport of all metals that end up in the intergalactic medium (IGM). When
metal-rich clouds reach pressure equilibrium with the general, photoionized IGM, the heavy elements will still be concentrated in small highmetallicity patches, but they will look like ordinary, low-metallicity
absorbers. They concluded that intergalactic metals are poorly mixed on
small scales and that nearly all of the IGM, and thus the Universe, may
therefore be of primordial composition.
46
2.9 THEORETICAL STUDIES
2.9.4. Modelling of starburst/AGN galaxies
Groves (research fellow) has worked on both AGN and starburst
galaxies. Together with the IR group at MPE, he examined the shape of the
silicate emission feature and the possible contribution from the narrow line
region. A major work of the last year was the creation of a series of model
templates for starbursting galaxies with M. Dopita of ANU, which can be
used to determine fundamental physical parameters of these galaxies, such
as star formation rate and ISM pressure. These studies have been accepted
for publication in ApJ.
2.10 RAYMOND & BEVERLY SACKLER LABORATORY
47
2.10. Raymond & Beverly Sackler
Laboratory
The experiments in the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for
Astrophysics simulate inter- and circumstellar processes under laboratory
controlled conditions. The focus is on gas phase studies of molecular
transients of astrophysical interest and on solid state studies of inter- and
circumstellar ice analogues. The results are interpreted in terms of
unambiguous physical-chemical models to understand and to guide
astronomical observations and as input in astrochemical models. Theoretical
support is available to extend applications beyond experimental conclusions.
The laboratory comprises six experiments: SPIRAS and LEXUS focus on
the spectra characterization of unstable (radical and ionic) species in the gas
phase and CESSS, CRYOPAD, SURFRESIDE and the HV-setup are used to
study the physical and chemical parameters that govern inter- and
circumstellar processes in ices.
In 2007 the Laboratory group consisted of Harold Linnartz (Associate
Professor for Laboratory Astrophysics), three postdocs - Guido Fuchs (until
March), Herma Cuppen, and Claire Romanzin (from November) - six PhD
students - Suzanne Bisschop (PhD on November 8th), Sergio Ioppolo, Karin
Öberg, Nadine Wehres, Harald Verbraak, and Jordy Bouwman – and
Greenberg Fellow, Zainab Awad (Egypt, until March). The group hosted
undergraduate student from Maryland, USA; Martha Beckwith. The
laboratory works together with the in-house astrochemistry group of Ewine
van Dishoeck.
Some high-lights of 2007:
-
Öberg and Bouwman succeeded to explain the anomalous behavior
of vibrational water bands in astronomical observations in a
systematic spectroscopic study of H2O:CO and H2O:CO2 ices,
-
Bisschop, Fuchs and Ioppolo were able to prove that complex
molecules – methanol and ethanol – form in ice upon bombardment
of CO and acetaldehyde ice,
2.10 RAYMOND & BEVERLY SACKLER LABORATORY
48
-
Cuppen extended laboratory conclusions beyond the experimental
limitations using Monte Carlo simulations,
-
Öberg discovered a remarkably efficient photodesorption process
emitting CO into the gas phase upon XUV irradiation of interstellar
CO-ice analogues,
-
Acharyya and Fuchs showed that the low O2 abundance in space is
not due to invisible oxygen frozen onto dust particles.
Detailed information with experimental data, supporting links and
pictures is available from the laboratory homepage: http://www.laboratoryastrophysics.eu.
Figure 7: Preparing interstellar ice chemistry at one of the UHV setups in the
Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics.
2.10 RAYMOND & BEVERLY SACKLER LABORATORY
49
Al-Halabi and van Dishoeck performed classical trajectory calculations
on the adsorption of H atoms to water ice at surface temperatures of 10 K.
The adsorption probability as function of incident H-atom energy can be
fitted to a simple decay function, with probabilities close to unity at 10 K.
Very similar adsorption probabilities are found for both types of ices, even
though the average binding energy of the trapped H atoms of 650 +/- 10 K
for amorphous ice is significantly higher than that found for crystalline ice of
400 +/- 5 K. As a result, the residence time τ of H atoms adsorbed on
amorphous ice is orders of magnitude longer than that on crystalline ice
suggesting that H2 formation on crystalline ice is quite limited compared to
that on porous ice, consistent with laboratory experiments. The ‘hotdiffusion’ distance travelled by the impinging atom over the surface before
being thermalized is found to be large, about 30 Angstrom at incident
energies of 100 K. The diffusion coefficient of thermally trapped H atoms is
calculated for the first time. These data are important ingredients for models
to describe the formation of H2 on interstellar ices and reactions of H atoms
with other species at the ice surface.
50
2.11 INSTRUMENTATION
2.11 Instrumentation
2.11.1. Gaia
Brown and Marrese are involved in the preparations for the data
processing for ESA's Gaia mission, scheduled for launch in 2011, which aims
at providing a stereoscopic census of the Milky Way galaxy by measuring
highly accurate astrometry (position, parallaxes and proper motions),
photometry and radial velocities for 1 billion stars and other objects to 20th
magnitude. In the middle of 2007 the preliminary design review for the
mission was successfully concluded. Brown participated in this process as a
reviewer on the payload panel.
Leiden is involved specifically in the preparations of the photometric data
processing for Gaia. The photometric data for Gaia will be collected through
low dispersion spectrophotometry with prisms. The main activities in 2007
were:
1) The Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) was
formally recognized by ESA in the middle of 2007 and the system
requirements review for DPAC was held at the end of 2007 and successfully
concluded. Brown participated in the preparation of the documentation for
this review.
2) Brown and Marrese in collaboration with groups in Rome and
Bordeaux finalized the system requirements and the description of the data
flows within and between the subsystems of the photometric processing
pipeline for which Leiden leads the development. In addition they worked
on the definition of the data model for the photometric processing pipeline.
The data model forms an essential ingredient of the infrastructure of the
pipeline.
3) Marrese studied the problem of wavelength calibration for the prism
spectra, which are obtained without a wavelength reference. In collaboration
with Busso (Teramo) Marrese studied the question of what fraction of
sources will suffer from crowding when observed with the photometric
instrument. The result is important for the assessment of the necessary
processing power for and affordable complexity of the photometric data
processing. Marrese also studied the problem of automatically locating the
prism spectra within the data space through edge detection techniques.
2.11 INSTRUMENTATION
51
4) A major concern for the Gaia mission is the effect of radiation damage
to the CCDs (due to Solar wind and cosmic ray protons). The consequence
will be an increased level of charge transfer inefficiency which will cause a
loss of signal as well as a distortion of the image. The latter will cause
systematic errors in the astrometry if not carefully controlled. A large effort
is underway within the Gaia project to tackle this problem both through
testing of irradiated CCDs by Astrium and the development by DPAC of
data processing methods that can deal with the effects of radiation damage.
In this context Brown implemented the first simulations of CTI effects in
CCDs operated in time-delayed integration mode. The simulations are based
on a heuristic model developed by Astrium and they have been
incorporated in to the Gaia pixel level image simulator.
2.11.2. MUSE and ASSIST
MUSE, the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer is a 2nd generation
instrument for the VLT, featuring Wide-Field, Adaptive Optics Assisted
Integral Field Spectroscopy. The MUSE Preliminary Design review took
place in July 2007 and after its positive review and subsequent approval by
ESO for the go-ahead, MUSE now entered its Final Design Phase. The MUSE
consortium currently consists of 7 insitutes and is lead by the Observatory of
Lyon. NOVA, by way of Leiden Observatory, is mainly involved in the
interface between MUSE and its Adaptive Optics system (GALACSI), the
preparations for scientific operation of MUSE - like the ETC and Operation
and Calibration of MUSE - and the MUSE science team. MUSE is currently
preparing for its Final Design Review, expected to take place in November
2008.
ASSIST - the Adaptive Secondary Setup and Instrument STimulator is the
test system for the VLT Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) and will allow for
verification of the operation of the various hardware and software systems
for the AOF without the need for - sometimes long - on-sky testing. ASSIST,
as designed by Deep, Hallibert, Jolissaint, Kendrew, Stuik and Wiegers
passed it Preliminary Design review by ESO in October 2007 and entered its
final design phase. The ASSIST team is now preparing for the Final Design
Review, expected to take place in June 2008.
2.11 INSTRUMENTATION
52
The main results for 2007 were:
1) MUSE passed its Preliminary Design Review
2) ASSIST passed its Preliminary Design Review
2.11.3. The Mid-infrared ELT Imager and Spectrograph
METIS
Brandl's main work on instrumentation - besides JWST-MIRI - focused on
METIS, the Mid-infrared ELT Imager and Spectrograph (formerly called
MIDIR). Following the EU-funded so-called Small Study, the Point Design
Study started in November 2007 and will complete by the end of 2008.
METIS is one of three instruments selected by OPTICON for such a study.
The first milestone is the establishment of the detailed METIS science case,
from which the top level instrument requirements will be derived. The main
METIS team at Leiden includes, besides Brandl, Molster, Kendrew, Stuik,
and Jolissaint on the technical side and van Dishoeck and van der Werf on
the science side. In November 2007 ESO issued a call for proposals for the
phase-A study of a mid-IR instrument for the E-ELT. The METIS
consortium, including teams from NOVA (PI), MPIA, UK-ATC, KU Leuven
and CEA-Saclay, will perform a phase-A study for this ambitious
instrument.
2.11.4. LOFAR
LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array, is a next-generation low frequency
radio telescope currently being constructed in the Netherlands. The initial
array will comprise minimal 36 stations distributed over an area of diameter
of 100 km observing in the frequency range of 10 to 240 MHz. This array is
planned to be completed in 2009. Further extensions on a European scale is
currently being pursued by a number of European countries, including
Germany, UK, Sweden, Poland, France and Italy.
Deep LOFAR surveys of the accessible sky at a number of key
frequencies will provide unique catalogues of radio sources for investigating
several fundamental questions in astrophysics, including the formation of
massive black holes, galaxies and clusters of galaxies. Because the LOFAR
surveys will probe unexplored parameter space, it is likely that new
2.11 INSTRUMENTATION
53
phenomena will be discovered. The design of the surveys has been driven
by 3 important topics: (i) z>6 radio galaxies, (ii) diffuse radio emission in
galaxy clusters, and (iii) distant star forming galaxies.
Early 2007, the LOFAR prototype station CS1, and its the entire imaging
pipeline was in place. Beams were formed at the station level and
transported to the BlueGene correlator through an optical fiber network and
subsequently visibilities were produced. The hard work to understand the
calibration resulted in impressive all-sky maps (see figure 8). In November
2007, the first international LOFAR station (IS DE-1) has been completed in
the direct neighbourhood of the 100m Effelsberg radio telescope in a
collaboration between ASTRON and MPIfR.
Members of the survey team (Intema) have carried out observation
campaigns with low frequency facilities such as the GMRT to study the
ionosphere and actively develop calibration strategies in collaboration with
ASTRON. Mohan in collaboration with Usov released a first version of a
source extraction algorithm to detect sources and measure source
characteristics fitting the needs of the survey KSP and LOFAR. The software
has also been tested successfully on CS1 images. Pandey and Omar are
contributing to commissioning work of CS1.
54
2.11 INSTRUMENTATION
Figure 8: Images of CS1 data at 60 MHz containing about 800 sources.
2.12 HISTORY OF SCIENCE
55
2.12 History of Science
Van Delft holds an appointment of one day a week as associate professor
in the history of science located at Leiden Observatory. His research in 2007
focussed on the Leiden cryogenic laboratory (Cailletet compressor,
International Temperature Scale), on the later years of Paul Ehrenfest and on
Gerhart Wolfgang Rathenau.
Chapter
3
Education,
popularization
and social events
Chapter
Education,
popularization
and social events
3
3.1. Education
3.1.1. Organisation
Education and training of students is a major priority of Leiden
Observatory. In 2007, 18 freshmen started their studies in astronomy, and
the same number of students started their second bachelor year. The total
number of students registered at the Observatory was 98, including
Bachelors, Masters, and old-style doctoral students. Several students from
Delft Technical University (from the applied physics department) took
courses of the Leiden astronomy curriculum as part of the requirements for
a minor in astronomy.
The committee charged with evaluating the educational programs
provided by the various schools within the Faculty of Mathematics made its
site visit in January 2007. In its report later that year, it approved the
astronomy program as a whole, but recommended improvements in several
areas, which we are currently addressing.
Three staff members acted (part-time) as study advisers. Snellen was the
freshman-student adviser and he also coordinated the various activities
directed at secondary school students, such as pre-university college and
LappTop courses, open days, guest lectures etc. Linnartz was study adviser
for the remainder of the Bachelor programme, while Röttgering was
60
3.1. EDUCATION
master-programme study advisor. Administrative support was provided by
Drost and Gerstel.
In addition to regular counseling by the student advisor, incoming
students were assigned to small groups meeting at regular intervals with a
staff mentor (Schaye and Linnartz) and a senior student mentor (Van de
Broek and Van de Sande). Freshman student tutoring was done by senior
students (Breemer, Van Dalen, Smit, and six physics students). In the tutor
program, physics and astronomy students are provided, on a voluntary but
regular basis, with coaching by senior students.
As part of the introductory astronomy course, students were taken to the
Artis Planetarium in Amsterdam for a lesson in coordinate systems, time
and constellations in the sky (van der Werf). As part of the second-year
training in practical astronomy, four honors students and two master
students were offered the opportunity to take part in a specially arranged
observing trip to the Isaac-Newton-Telescope on La Palma, Canary Islands
(Snellen, Le Poole).
At the request of both astronomy and physics, the mathematics
department provided, for the first time, a parallel course Analysis 3NA in
which (astro)physical application of the mathematical tools is emphasized.
Unlike the regular course Analysis 3, this parallel course does not prepare
for Analysis 4.
At the end of the year, there were 10 old-style ’doctoraal’ students and 20
master students, seven of them from outside The Netherlands. In 2007, 8
students began their master study, whereas 9 students obtained their
master's degree and 13 students their ‘doctoraal’ degree. All master students
now have their individually tailored study plan.
The astronomy curriculum is monitored by the ‘Opleidingscommissie’
(education committee), which advises the Director of Education on all
relevant matters, and which was chaired by Van der Werf. Other members
are Icke, Schaye, Intema and Damen, as well as de Valk, van den Broek,
Straatman, Langelaan and Pijloo for the student body. Under the authority
of the Opleidingscomissie, the lecture course monitoring system (SRS) was
continued. In this system, students provide feedback to lecturers during and
after the course.
3.2. DEGREES AWARDED IN 2007
61
The quality of curriculum and exams is guarded by the
‘Examencommissie’ (Exam Committee) chaired by Lub and with Israel,
Groenen (physics), Hogerheijde and Van der Werf as members.
Admission to the master-curriculum for students without a BSc in
astronomy from a Netherlands university requires a recommendation by the
‘Toelatingscommissie’ (admissions committee) chaired by Franx and having
Israel, Kuijken and Röttgering as members.
3.2. Degrees awarded in 2007
3.2.1. Ph.D. degrees
A total of eight graduate students successfully defended their Ph.D.
theses in 2007 and were duly awarded their Ph. D. degree: They are:
Jelle Ritzerveld
February 14
Titel thesis:
Promotor:
The Simplicity of Transport. Triangulating the
First Light
Vincent Icke
Fred Lahuis
May 9
Titel thesis:
Promotor:
Molecular fingerprints of star formation
throughout the Universe: a space-based
infrared study
Ewine van Dishoeck
Saskia Hekker
September 18
Titel thesis:
Radial velocity variations in Red Giant Stars:
Pulsations, spots and planets
Andreas Quirrenbach, Conny Aerts
Ignas Snellen
Promotor:
Co-promotor:;
3.2. DEGREES AWARDED IN 2007
62
Mariska Kriek
September 26
Titel thesis:
Promotor:
The many phases of massive galaxies. A NearInfrared spectroscopic study of galaxies in the
early universe
Marijn Franx, Pieter van Dokkum
Stijn Wuyts
September 27
Titel thesis:
Promotor:
Red Galaxies at High Redshift
Marijn Franx, Pieter van Dokkum
Vincent Geers
October 23
Titel thesis:
Promotor:
Co-promotor:
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Disks
around Young Solar-type Stars
Ewine van Dishoeck
Harold Linnartz
Suzanne Bisschop
November 8
Titel thesis:
Promotor:
Co-promotor:
Complex Molecules in the Laboratory and
Star Forming Regions
Ewine van Dishoeck
Harold Linnartz
Leonie Snijders
November 28
Titel thesis:
Promotor:
Co-promotor:
Extreme star formation in starburst galaxies
Marijn Franx
Paul van der Werf
3.2. DEGREES AWARDED IN 2007
63
3.2.2. Master’s degrees (Doctoraal diploma’s)
The following 22 students were awarded Master’s/Doctoral degrees in
2007:
Name
Raymond Oonk
Maarten B. van Hoven
Maurice Westmaas
Date
Jan 30
Feb 27
Feb 27
Isabel Martins e Oliveira
Olivera Rakic
Jochem Haverhoek
Arno Kockx
Feb 27
Mar 27
Apr 24
Jun 26
Floor Roduner
Robert Berkhout
Christopher Bonnett
Jun 26
Jun 26
Sjoerd Ophof
Reinout van Weeren
Art Bos
Edo van Uitert
Eveline van
Scherpenzeel
Berry Holl
Adriaan Kroonenberg
Bart Clauwens
Juan Rafael Martinez
Galarza
Ernst de Mooij
Ann Marie Madigan
Mark den Brok
Aug 28
Aug 28
Aug 28
Sep 25
Oct 30
Oct 30
Oct 30
Oct 30
Nov 27
Nov 27
Nov 27
Nov 27
Dec 18
Present Position
Ph.D. candidate, Leiden Observatory
Ph.D. candidate, Leiden Observatory
Business Analyst, Accenture
Consultancy
Ph.D. candidate, Leiden Observatory
Ph.D. candidate, Leiden Observatory
Secondary School Teacher
Softare company Tessella Support
Services
Boston Consultancy Group
ABN Amro Banking
Ph.D. candidate, Université de Paris,
France
Atlas Origin
Ph.D. candidate, Leiden Observatory
LURIS
Ph.D. candidate, Leiden Observatory
Ortec Planning en Optimalisatie
Ph.D. candidate, Lund Observatory,
Sweden
Management Advisor
Own company
Ph.D. candidate, Leiden Observatory
Ph.D. candidate, Leiden Observatory
Ph.D. candidate, Leiden Observatory
Ph.D. candidate, Kapteyn Institute,
Groningen
3.3. COURSES AND TEACHING
64
3.2.3. Bachelor’s degrees
A total of 9 students obtained their Bachelor's degree:
Name
Tijl Kindt
Daniel Szomoru
Saskia van den Broek
Remco van den Burg
Meta de Hoon
Jesse van de Sande
Charlotte de Valk
Francis Vuijsje
Daniel Geerts
Date
Mar 23
May 25
Sep 14
Sep 14
Sep 14
Sep 14
Sep 14
Sep 14
Sep 14
3.3 Courses and teaching
3.3.1. Courses tought by Observatory staff curriculum
2007 - 2008
Elementary courses:
Semester
Course title
Teacher
1
2
3
3
4
5
5
5-6
6
7-10
Introduction astrophysics
Astronomy lab 1
Stars
Modern astronomical research
Astronomy lab 2
Observational techniques 1
Radiative processes
Bachelor research project
Introduction observatory
Student colloquium
F. Israel
P.P. van der Werf
A. Brown
H. Linnartz
I. Snellen
R.S. Le Poole
M.R. Hogerheijde
W.J. Jaffe
E.R. Deul
Y. Levin
3.3. COURSES AND TEACHING
65
Advanced Courses (Keuzevakken; semesters 7, 8, 9, 10):
Active Galaxy Nuclei
Stellar Dynamics
Computational Dynamics
Detection of Light
Digital Image Processing
Adaptive Optics in Astronomy
Cosmology
Stellar Evolution
Space-based Astronomy
Inter University Advanced
Astronomy Course on AstroParticles
Astrochemistry
Physics of Scientific Space Instruments
H.J.A. Röttgering
C. Hopman
V. Icke
B. Brandl
E.A. Hendriks and
L.J. van Vliet (TUD)
L. Jolissaint
V. Icke
J. Lub / P.T. de Zeeuw
M.W.M. de Graauw
H. Falcke (RU),
C. Timmermans (RU),
J. Hoerandel (RU),
G. Nelemans (RU)
E. van Dishoeck
M.W. Beijersbergen
Pre University Program
LAPP-Top, the Leiden Advanced Pre-University Program for Top
Students, is aimed at enthusiastic and ambitious 5th and 6th grade highschool students. Candidates are selected on the basis of their high-school
performances and their enthusiasm to participate. The LAPP-Top students
have taken part in 6 to 8 meetings from January till May, following the
program of their own choice.
The Sterrewacht has been participating in the LAPP-TOP program since
its start in 2001. In that pilot year five students participated, in 2002/2003
six, in 2003/2004 eleven, in 2004/2005 thirty-three, in 2005/2006 seventeen,
in 2006/2007 twenty-seven and in 2007/2008 sixteen.
The astronomy LAPP-TOP program was developed by Van der Werf
from 2002 onward. Since 2005 the project is coordinated by Snellen. In eight
sessions the following subjects were treated:
3.3. COURSES AND TEACHING
66
Extrasolar planets
The Milky Way and other galaxies
Practicum: distances in the Universe
Gas and Radiation
Quasars, black holes and active galactic nuclei
Practicum: The black hole in the center of our
Milky Way
Cosmology
Excursion to the radio telescopes in
Westerbork and Dwingeloo
I. Snellen
J. Schaye
V. Icke
H. Röttgering
P. Katgert
After successfully completing the program participants have been
awarded with a certificate from the University of Leiden. High-school
students are allowed to use this project as part of their final exams.
Other Courses:
Katgert gave a non-credit introductory course on fourier transforms in
astronomy.
Jolissaint gave a serie of lectures at TU Delft on astronomical adaptive
optics for master students.
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
67
3.4. Popularization and Media Contacts
3.4.1. Organisation
Astronomy has a strong appeal to the general public, and is well
represented in the media. Our staff, PhD students and undergraduate
students spend considerable time and effort to explain the exciting results of
astronomy to the general public, in the form of lectures, press releases and
newspaper articles, courses, public days at the old observatory, and
television and radio programmes. These efforts are very successful every
year, and help to make young high school students enthusiastic about
science in general, and astronomy in particular. They play a very important
role in maintaining the student inflow, and in keeping Leiden Observatory
known throughout the country.
3.4.2. Dutch Astronomy Olympiad
Leiden Observatory hosted the first Dutch Astronomy Olympiad: a
contest for high school students. This Olympiad was developed and
organised by the NeSO (Nederlandse Sterrenkunde Olympiade) committee,
which consisted of van den Berg, Haas, Helder (Utrecht), Snellen, de Vries
and Weijmans.
After a first round on the internet, (www.sterrenkundeolympiade.nl), 20
high school students were invited for a Masterclass in astronomy. During
one week, they attended lectures and working classes, taught by astronomy
teachers from Leiden, Groningen, Utrecht and Amsterdam. The masterclass
was concluded with a final at Space Expo (Noordwijk), with Joost Broens
(Leusden) as the winner. He won a digital camera and an observing trip to
the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope at La Palma. Masha Galperina (Enschede)
came second and Jorryt Matthee (Roermond) third.
Several institutions and companies sponsored the Astronomy Olympiad,
among which the Ministery of Education, Culture and Science, NOVA,
NWO, Leiden University and Leiden Observatory.
Media Contacts NeSO Committee:
Een minuutje (Metro, 6 March 2007)
Sterrenkunde Olympiade (Leidsch Dagblad, 9 March 2007)
68
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
Win een trip naar de sterren (AD, 10 March 2007)
Olympiade: het heelal in drie kwartier (NRC, 10 July 2007)
Radio Nens, interview Weijmans (7 July 2007)
Olympiade! (Natuurwetenschap en Techniek, September 2007)
3.4.3. Public Lectures and Media Interviews
Bouwman
‘Astronomy in space and the laboratory’ (Technische Hogeschool Rijswijk; Sep
20)
Brandl
‘Das Europäische Extremely Large Telescope’(Amateur Astronomen Club
Nordenham, Germany, June 7)
Brown
‘Gaia - Een stereoscopische kaart van de Melkweg’ (Universiteit van Aruba,
Aruba; Mar 1)
Idem (Colegio Arubano, Aruba; Mar 6)
Idem (KNVWS, Leeuwarden; Apr 28)
Idem (KNVWS, Zwolle; Sep 27)
de Vries
‘Het Zonnestelsel’ (St. Josephschool, Leiden; Jan 18)
‘De (on)eindigheid van het Heelal’ (Hoezo? Teleac Radio; Jun 4)
Haas
‘How to grow galaxies in a computer’ (International Festival for Astronomy;
Nov 11)
‘De vorming van sterrenstelsels’ (several JWG occasions)
‘Beginnerscursus Deepsky’ (JWG beginnerscursus)
‘Kosmologie’ (several JWG occasions)
‘Vorming van sterren en sterrenhopen’ (several JWG occasions)
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
69
Hogerheijde
‘De vorming van sterren en planeten’ (gastles VWO; Feb 12)
Idem (Mar 29)
‘Waarnemingen van de vorming van sterren en planeten’ (publiekslezing; Nov
21)
Idem (Nov 27)
‘IMC Weekendschool Den Haag’ (Apr 1)
Hopman
‘De wisselwerking tussen sterren en zware zwarte gaten’ (Arnhemse vereniging
voor weer- en sterrenkunde, Oct 17)
Icke
’Precisie-kosmologie’ (Rotary Haarlem; Jan 24)
Interview (Weekendschool Krant; Jan 30)
’Christiaan Huygens en de wiskunde’ (Natl. Wiskunde Dagen; Feb 02)
‘Gas en straling’ (LAPPtop; Feb 07)
‘Het Heelal als leermeester’ (Comenius, Groningen; Mar 16)
‘Niks relatief’ (Studium Generale, Tilburg; Mar 20)
‘Symmetrie’ (Science Café Leiden; Mar 21)
Interview (Schilperoord/Volkskrant; Mar 22)
‘Truth in science’ (DasArts Workshop, Amsterdam; Mar 28)
‘Van Aristoteles to Huygens’ (Boekhandel Donner, Rotterdam; Mar 30)
Interview (BNR Radio; Mar 31)
‘Sterrenkunde’ (Weekendschool Amsterdam ZO; Apr 01)
‘Ontstaan van sterrenstelsels’ (JWG Leiden; Apr 13)
‘Waarom is het 's nachts donker?’ (Ouderdag Sterrenkunde; Apr 14)
‘Het hele Heelal’ (Wolfert van Borselen School, Rotterdam; Apr 17)
‘Sterrenkunde’(Weekendschool Amsterdam Noord; May 13)
‘Niks Relatief’ (Multi, Antalya; Jun 06)
Interview (Quote Magazine; Jun 12)
‘Evolutie van het Heelal’ (Op de Hoogte, Den Haag; Jun 15)
Award ceremony (Sterrenkunde Olympiade, ESTEC; Jul 07)
’Sterrenkunde’ (Weekendschool Amsterdam West; Sep 23)
‘Donkere materie en energie’ (Museum Boerhaave; Oct 17)
Interview (RVU; Oct 29)
‘Het Heelal als leermeester’ (Comenius, Groningen; Nov 16)
70
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
‘Het ontstaan van het Heelal’ (Jong Diligentia, Den Haag; Nov 12)
‘Was er wel een Oerknal?’ (Eerstejaarssymposium Leidsche Flesch; Nov 19)
‘Ruimtereizen met Huygens’ (SV Arago, TU Twente; Nov 21)
‘Christiaan Huygens als ruimtevaarder’ (Cleveringa Lezing, Brussel; Nov 26)
‘Was er wel een Oerknal?’ (Van der Waals Symposium; Dec 18)
Intema
‘Speuren naar groepen sterrenstelsels in het jonge heelal’ (Oral Presentation
Sterrenwacht Almere; Mar 27)
Idem (Vereniging voor Sterrenkunde Midden-Limburg, Roermond; June 10
Israel
‘China’s Antisatellietwapen’ (VPRO Nieuwsradio, Feb 2)
‘Wat doet een sterrenkundige?’ (Witte School Noordwijk, Apr 26)
‘50 Years after Sputnik’ (FWN Leiden, Oct 4)
Idem (HoeZo Teleac Radio, Oct 4)
Katgert
‘Terugkijken naar de Oerknal’ (Theresia Lyceum Tilburg; Feb 14)
Idem (Vechtdal College Hardenberg; Dec 13)
‘Het Uitdijend Heelal’ (Kennemerland College Beverwijk; Mar 23)
Idem (OSG De Ring van Putten Spijkenisse; Mar 30)
Idem (Oosterlicht College Nieuwegein; May 8)
Idem (College Het Loo Voorburg; May 31)
Idem (Farel College Ridderkerk; June 4)
Idem (De Goudse Waarden Gouda; Oct 10)
‘Moderne Kosmologie’ (HOVO Leiden; Feb 22, Mar 3, Mar 8, Mar 15, Mar 22,
Mar 29, Apr 5, Apr 12, Apr 19)
‘Ons Huidig Wereldbeeld’ (HOVO Leiden; Aug 20)
‘Kosmologie: de film van het Heelal’ (HOVO Delft; Mar 28)
Kuijken
‘Tasten in het duister’ (Margiet van der Heyden in NRC; Jan 20)
‘Hoe werkt een zwaartekrachtlens?’ (Bruno Ernst Symposium, Leiden; Mar 27)
‘Changing the Guard’ (Universiteit Leiden Nieuwsbrief; Jul 3)
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
‘Donkere Materie: Zoeken, maar waarnaar?’ (Jos Engels in Trouw-de
verdieping; Jul 25)
‘Wat doet een astronoom?’ (interview Bassisschoolproject de Driehoek,
Barendrecht; Sep 26)
‘Hoe groot is de ruimte?’ (Montessorischool, Oegstgeest; Nov 20)
Linnartz
Observatory representative press releases. Press releases 2007:
‘Fotonen in het vroege heelal waren niet nuchter’
‘Nederlandse Sterrenkunde Olympiade van start’
‘Ultraviolet licht pusht chemie tussen de sterren’
‘Sterbevingen laten rode reuzen rillen’
‘Neon licht maakt reclame voor planeetvorming’
‘Sterrenstelsels lijden onder jeugdtrauma’
‘Astrochemici vinden alcohol in kosmische cocktail’
‘Leidse studenten ontdekken mogelijk exoplaneet’
‘Vingerafdrukken van het heelal’
Ödman
‘Total Lunar Eclipse Skypecast’ (Internet broadcast, Mar 3)
‘How to become an astronomer’ (Discussions with pupils, South African
National Science Week, May 13–20)
Observing sessions with local communities in Sutherland (Sutherland, South
African National Science Week: May 13–20)
Salter
‘Observing at Mauna Kea’ (Public Talk, Mauna Kea Observatory Visitor's
Center, Nov 4)
Schaye
‘De Melkweg’ (Lezing Studium Generale TU Delft; Sep 4)
Smit
‘Licht van Gewicht: Gravitationele Lenzen en Donkere Materie’ (Public Lecture
AWSV Metius; April 27)
71
72
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
Idem (Public Lecture KNWVS Hoorn; May 11)
‘Kosmische Samenzweringen: Waarom Wij?’ (Public Lecture KNWVS
Zaanstreek; May 24)
Snellen
‘Zijn wij alleen’ (Science Cafe Nijmegen, Oct 16)
Studenten ontdekken mogelijke exoplaneet (radio, newspapers, tv, press release
Nov 6)
van Bemmel
‘Radio-astronomie met de Low Frequency Array’ (KNVWS talk, Roermond, Mar
11)
Idem (KNVWS talk, Leiden Sep. 28)
‘Radio sterrenkunde’ (JWG Leiden, Nov 9)
van Delft
‘Over het nut van kranenvet’ (Werkgroep materiële cultuur van wetenschap,
Museum Boerhaave, Jan 19)
‘Preventing Theft: The Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory in World War II’ (congres
Science and World War II, Museum Boerhaave, Jan 26)
‘Koude, Kunst en de Tweede Gouden Eeuw’ (openingscollege ‘Van Chaos tot
Kosmos’, Universiteit Leiden, Feb 5)
‘Flogiston: tussen alchemie en moderne scheikunde’ (Lustrumbijeenkomst
Algemene Studenten Vereniging Prometheus Leiden, Mar 17)
‘Fit to Print: Science in the Newspaper’ (Lorentz Center-workshop ‘Show
Physics’, Leiden, Mar 27)
‘Reis naar het absolute nulpunt’ (KunstWetenschapSalon ‘De Nul’, Leiden, Apr
12)
‘Paul Ehrenfest (1880-1933) en de zwaarte van de moderne fysica’ (Festival S5,
Scheltema complex, Leiden, Apr 21)
‘Dat mag in de krant’, (Lezing voor masterstudenten journalistiek
Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Museum Boerhaave, Apr 27)
‘Heike Kamerlingh Onnes en de Tweede Gouden Eeuw’ (College geschiedenis
van de natuurwetenschappen Universiteit Leiden, Museum Boerhaave, May
14)
‘Preventing Theft: The Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory in World War II’
(colloquium wetenschapsgeschiedenis Universiteit van Milaan, May 16)
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
73
‘Freezing Physics: the Cailletet Compressor of Heike Kamerlingh Onnes’ (XXVI
Scientific Instruments Commission Symposium, Cambridge,USA, Sep 8)
‘Einstein in Leiden’ (Rotary De Burcht, Leiden, Oct 11)
‘Dat mag in de krant: over wetenschap en de pers’ (Collegereeks ‘Fysica en
Samenleving’, Universiteit Leiden, Oct 12)
‘Over het belang van wetenschap in een vitrine, (Collegereeks ‘Fysica en
Samenleving’, Universiteit Leiden, Nov 2)
‘Vliegende tapijten in de hyperruimte’ (KunstWetenschapSalon ‘De Snede’,
Museum Boerhaave, Nov 24)
van Dishoeck
‘Van moleculen tot planeten’ (Natuurkundig Gezelschap, Utrecht, Mar 6)
‘Planeetvorming’ (Interview Mare, Mar 8)
‘Zo min mogelijk mee’ (Interview Mare, june)
Interview (Elsevier, July 7, pp. 122-124)
‘Het moleculaire heelal en HIFI’ (ESTEC, Noordwijk; Sep 11)
‘Op de oevers van het heelal’ (Interview Volkskrant, Sep 22)
‘Toponderzoek: concurrentie’ (Interview Financieel Dagblad, Oct 12
‘Van moleculen tot planeten’ (Avond van Wetenschap en Maatschappij, Den
Haag; Nov 5)
‘Diepte interview Gender Awareness Participation Process’
(Stichting NCWT, nov)
‘Van moleculen tot planeten’(Physica, Alkmaar, Dec 3)
van Langevelde
‘e-VLBI, a real-time telescope spanning Europe’ (Leidsche fles praatje, Leiden,
Feb 7)
‘Een telescoop zo groot als Europa’ (JIVE/ASTRON Open dag, Westerbork, Oct
21)
Wehres
Preparation, presentation and explanation of astronomy related experiments
(The National Science Day)
Weijmans
‘Sterrenstelsels’ (KNVWS Noord-Drenthe; Feb 2)
74
3.4. POPULARIZATION AND MEDIA CONTACTS
idem (Avondje Sterrewacht; Dec 20)
‘Donkere Materie’ (KNVWS Amsterdam; Feb 20)
idem (KNVWS Arnhem; Feb 21)
idem (Sterrenwacht Almere; Feb 27)
idem (KNVWS Rotterdam; Sep 21)
idem (KNVWS Zuid-Holland Zuid; Nov 2)
Wuyts
‘Tot de grenzen van het heelal’ (Public Lecture KNVWS 's Hertogenbosch;
Feb 21)
’Sterrenstelsels lijden onder jeugdtrauma’ (Sterrewacht Press Release, Sep 27)
3.5 LEIDSCH ASTRONOMISCH DISPUUT ‘F. KAISER’ &
3.6 VERENIGING VAN OUD-STERREWACHTERS
75
3.5 The Leidsch Astronomisch Dispuut ‘F. Kaiser’
In the first half of 2007, Liviu Stirbat and Sander de Kievit constituted the
Kaiser board, after Rafael Martinez and Susanne Brown left. Freeke van der
Voort was appointed by the Observatory to take over the organization of the
tours of the Old Observatory. Students and members of the WLS gave
regular tours to visitors.
In November 2007, Kaiser organized a successful movie night with the
movie ‘The Dish’.
Around that time, a new board consisting of Jesse van de Sande, Saskia
van der Broek, Gilles Otten and Tri Laksmana Astraatmadja was appointed,
which will lead Kaiser into 2008.
3.6 Vereniging van Oud-Sterrewachters
The ‘Vereniging van Oud-Sterrewachters’ (VO-S; http://www.vo-s.nl/)
is the official association of Sterrewacht/Observatory (ex-)affiliates. It has
been in existence for over 10 years now and has seen another active year. As
usual, the 140 members were offered a variety of activities. These included a
social drink prior to the Oort Lecture and an annual meeting. This year, the
annual meeting was held in Utrecht and involved, among others, a visit of
the Sonnenborgh Observatory. At the meeting, the ‘Kaiserprijs’ was
awarded to the ‘NeSO Commission 2007’ which had organised a successful
astronomy competition challenge for high-school students. VO-S members
also received two newsletters with Sterrewacht news and were offered an
electronic member dictionary.
76
3.7 WERKGROEP LEIDSE STERREWACHT
3.7 Werkgroep Leidse Sterrewacht
The WLS has been active at the Oude Leidse Sterrewacht since 25 years.
At the request of the Astronomy Department the WLS started in 1982 to
maintain and repair the historical instruments, which are, thanks to the
WLS, still working and in use. Once a year the WLS organizes Open Days,
which are well attended, and, on a regular base, guided tours. On March 17th
2007 the WLS celebrated its 25th anniversary at the Oude Sterrewacht.
During the day several lectures were given. Besides, the WLS organized an
exhibition on the Oude Sterrewacht that showed the original instruments.
Appendix
I
Observatory staff
December 31, 2007
Appendix
Observatory staff
December 31, 2007
I
Names, e-mail addresses, room numbers, and telephone numbers of all
current personnel can be found on the Sterrewacht website:
http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl/people
Telephone extensions should always be preceded by (071) 527 …
(from inside The Netherlands) or by +31-71-527 … (from abroad)
Full Professors:
E.F. van Dishoeck
M. Franx
V. Icke
F.P. Israel
K. Kuijken
G.K. Miley (KNAW)
P.T. de Zeeuw (0.0)
Full Professors by Special Appointments:
M.A.Th.M. de Graauw
(SRON Groningen, for J.H. Oort Fund)
M.A.C. Perryman
(ESTEC, for Leiden University Fund)
H.A. Quirrenbach
(Landessternwarte Heidelberg, Faculty W&N)
R.T. Schilizzi
(ISPO, Faculty W&N)
F. van Lunteren
(UL(0.5)/VU(0.3)
80
APPENDIX I. OBSERVATORY STAFF DECEMBER 31, 2007
Associate Professors and Assistant Professors / Tenured Staff:
B.R. Brandl
H. Linnartz
A. Brown (NWO Gaia)
J. Lub
D. van Delft (0.0) *
R.S. Le Poole (0.0)
M. Hogerheijde
H.J.A. Röttgering
W.J. Jaffe
J.Schaye
R Katgert
I.A.G. Snellen
H.J. van Langevelde (0.0) **
R. Stuik (NOVA Muse)
Y. Levin (0.8)
P.P. van der Werf
NOVA office:
E. van Dishoeck
W.H.W.M.Boland
T. Brouwer
K. Groen
Science director
Managing director
financial controller (0.2)
management assistant
Management Support and Secretaries:
J.C. Drost
A. van der Tang
K. Groen
L. van der Veld
C.C. Gündisch
B. de Kanter (voluntary)
Computer staff:
E.R. Deul
D. J. Jansen
T. Bot
A. Vos
manager, computer group
scientific programmer
programmer
programmer
Visiting Scientists:
M.J. Betlem
R. Blandford (Stanford, USA)
P. Ehrenfreund (LIC)
M. Jourdain de Muizon
J.K. Katgert-Merkelijn
M. Spaans (RUG)
R. Stark (NWO)
D. Stinebring (Oberlin College, USA)
J.A. Stüwe
S. Tremaine (IAS, USA)
Emeriti:
A. Blaauw (also: Groningen)
W.B. Burton
A.M. van Genderen
H.J. Habing
I. van Houten-Groeneveld
K.K. Kwee
R.S. LePoole
A. Ollongren
C. van Schooneveld
J. Tinbergen
* Director Boerhaave Museum; ** Staff, JIVE, Dwingeloo
APPENDIX I. OBSERVATORY STAFF DECEMBER 31, 2007
Postdocs and Project Personnel:
R. Alexander
NWO
I. van Bemmel
UL, EU SKADS
C. Booth
NWO, EU-EXT
S.J.T. Bottinelli
NWO
H. Cuppen
NWO, VENI
C. DallaVecchia
EU-EXT
A. Deep
NOVA
J. Falćon Barroso EU
G. Fuchs
NOVA, Sackler
B. Groves
UL
P. Hallibert
NOVA Muse
N. Hatch
UL, KNAW
H. Hildebrandt
EU
T. Hill
NOVA
C. Hopman
NWO, VENI
L. Jolissaint
NOVA
S. Kendrew
NOVA
R. Köhler
S. Levin-O’Donnell
P. Marrese
R.J. Mathar
R. McDermid
B. Merin Martin
C.J. Ödman
A. Omar
M. Pandey
R. Quadri
N.M. Ramanujam
J.P. Reunanen
C. Romanzin
T. Schrabback
O. Usov
R. Williams
81
NWO, VICI
UNAWE
NWO, GAIA
NWO, VICI
NOVA, Glass
Spain/Spinoza
KNAW/UNAWE
NWO
NWO, LOFAR
NOVA, UL
NOVA, LOFAR
NOVA Sinfoni
UL/NOVA
NWO
UL, SNN LOFAR
NWO
82
APPENDIX I. OBSERVATORY STAFF DECEMBER 31, 2007
Ph.D. Students:
S. Albrecht
N. Amiri *
J. Bast *
P. Beirao
R. van den Bosch
J. Bouwman
C. Brinch
M. Damen
M. Haas
R. van Haasteren *
M. van Hoven *
H. Intema
S. Ioppolo
T. van Kempen
C. Kruip *
E. Kuiper *
D.J.P. Lommen
A.M Madigan *
J.R. Martinez Galarza
F. Maschietto
E. Micelotta
E. de Mooij
K.I. Öberg
I. Oliveira
R. Oonk *
J.-P. Paardekoper
1,9,10
12
3
1
3
8
3,5
1,2
1
3
1
2,6
2
3,4
2
3
2
3
2
3
1,5
1
5
1,4
1
2
O. Panic
A.H. Pawlik
F. Petrignani
T. Prod’homme *
D. Raban
O. Rakic
H. Rampadarath *
D. Salter
D.H.F.M. Schnitzeler
D.M. Smit
M.H.Soto Vicencio
L. van Starkenburg (0.8)
C. Tasse
K. Torstensson
E.N. Taylor
E. van Uitert *
M. Velander *
H.E. Verbraak
L. Vermaas
R.Visser
N.deVries
R. van Weeren *
N. Wehres
A. Weijmans
R. Wiersma
3,5
5
7
5
3
3
12
1
3
3
1
1,2
1
12
3
1
5
8
2
4
1
1,6
13
3
11
Funding notes:
1. funded by Leiden University; 2. funding through NOVA program; 3. funded by
NWO, via Leiden University; 4. funding from Spinoza award; 5. funding by EU; 6.
funding from KNAW; 7. funding by SRON; 8. employed by FOM; 9. funded by
NOVA2 OPTICON; 10. funded from VICI Quirrenbach; 11. funded from EU
Excellence grant; 12. funded by JIVE – EU ESTRELA netwerk; 13, funded by
Groningen – EU Molecular Universe Network
* denotes employment for only part of the year - see section staff changes.
APPENDIX I. OBSERVATORY STAFF DECEMBER 31, 2007
Senior Students (doct.):
N.J.C.P.Baars
B. van Dam
M. van den Berg
S.Y. Brown
E.E. Caris alias Reynders
N. ter Haar
M. Hamelink
Msc Students:
T.L. Astraatmadja
S. van den Broek
R. van der Burg
A. Jeeson Daniel
T.D.J. Kindt
S.V. Nefs
A. Rahmati
M. van Riet
S. Rusli
Bsc Students:
B. Beemster
B. Berwanger
T. Boekholt
Y. van Boheemen
N. Bremer
R. Buurman
M. van Daalen
H. Gorter
G. Hijmans
S. Hiltemann
J. Hoekstra
D. Huijser
I. Icke
M. Israël
A. Klaassens
N. van der Marel
T. Nak
G. van Hal
P. Herfst
S. de Kievit
C.H. van der Sluis
W.R. Spaan
R. Tan
J. van de Sande
H. Schouten
L. Stirbat
D. Szomoru
S. Toonen
C.H.M. de Valk
F. van de Voort
F. Vuijsje
H. Zeballos Pinto
T. Nota
W. de Pous
R. van Rooijen
I.R. Rosenbrand
W.C. Schrier
J.A.P. Severijnen
A. Shulevski
R. van der Smeede
R. Smit
J. Sprangers
P. Stout
P. Vandevelde
N. Verhart
A.W. de Vries
M. van Woerden
S. Zeegers
Note:
BSc students listed are only those from the 3rd year on.
83
84
APPENDIX I. OBSERVATORY STAFF DECEMBER 31, 2007
Staff changes in 2007:
Name (funded by)
R. Alexander (NWO)
N. Amiri (JIVE, EU)
J. Bast (Spinoza, NWO)
S. Bisschop (UL, NOVA)
C. Booth (NWO, EU)
E. de Mooij (UL)
A. Deep (UL, NOVA)
A. Duffy (EU)
G. Fuchs (UL, NOVA)
V. Geers (UL)
S. Hekker (UL)
H. Hildebrandt (EU)
L. Jolissaint (UL, NOVA)
S. Kendrew (UL, NOVA)
M. Kriek (NWO)
C. Kruip (UL, NOVA)
E. Kuiper (NWO)
F. Lahuis (SRON, Spinoza)
R. LePoole (UL)
S. Levin-O'Donnell (UNAWE)
A. M. Madigan (NWO)
J.R. Martinez Galarza (UL, NOVA)
R. McDermid (UL, NOVA)
E. Micelotta (EU)
E. Micelotta (UL)
E. de Mooij (UL)
C. Ödman (KNAW)
C. Ödman (UNAWE)
I. Oliveira (Spinoza, UL)
R. Oonk (UL)
M. Pandey (NWO)
O. Panic (EU)
O. Panic (NWO)
M. Perryman
T. Prod'homme (EU)
R. Quadri (UL, NOVA)
O. Rakic (NWO)
N.M. Ramanujam (SNN-LOFAR)
N.M. Ramanujam (NOVA)
start
end
01-10-2007
01-12-2007
01-04-2007
01-11-2007
01-10-2007
01-12-2007
01-06-2007
01-07-2007
30-06-2007
31-10-2007
14-11-2007
01-11-2007
01-03-2007
01-02-2007
01-10-2007
01-05-2007
01-10-2007
01-05-2007
01-12-2007
01-07-2007
01-12-2007
01-10-2007
01-11-2007
14-11-2007
15-11-2007
01-12-2007
30-06-2007
01-07-2007
01-03-2007
01-02-2007
01-06-2007
14-08-2007
15-08-2007
01-01-2007
15-09-2007
01-11-2007
01-04-2007
30-06-2007
01-07-2007
APPENDIX I. OBSERVATORY STAFF DECEMBER 31, 2007
H. Rampadarath (JIVE)
J. Reunanen (NOVA)
J. Ritzerveld (NWO)
C. Romanzin (UL, NOVA)
T. Schrabback (NWO)
L. Snijders (UL)
C. Tasse (UL)
S. Tremaine (J.H. Oort Fonds)
S. Tremaine (J.H. Oort Fonds)
A. van der Tang (UL)
R. van Haasteren (NWO)
M. van Hoven (UL)
F. van Lunteren (UL)
E. van Uitert (UL)
R. van Weeren (KNAW)
M. Velander (EU)
R. Visser
C. Vlahakis (NWO)
S. Wuyts
85
01-09-2007
31-10-2007
01-03-2007
01-11-2007
01-11-2007
16-04-2007
28-05-2007
01-02-2007
01-05-2007
01-04-2007
01-09-2007
01-11-2007
22-09-2007
01-09-2007
01-01-2007
01-09-2007
01-10-2007
31-12-2007
20-04-2007
16-06-2007
01-10-2007
Appendix
II
Committee
membership
Appendix
II
Committee
membership
II.1. Observatory Committees
(As on December 31, 2007)
Directorate
(Directie onderzoekinstituut)
K. Kuijken (director of research)
F.P. Israel (director of education)
J. Lub (institute manager)
Observatory management team
(Management Team Sterrewacht)
K.H. Kuijken (chair)
E.R. Deul
K. Groen (minutes)
C.C. Gündisch
F.P. Israel
J. Lub
Oversight council
(Raad van Toezicht)
J.A.M. Bleeker (chair)
B. Baud
J.F. van Duyne
W. van Saarloos
vacature
Research committee
(Onderzoek-commissie OZ)
M. Franx (chair)
H. Cuppen
A.G.A. Brown
W. Jaffe
Y. Levin
P.P. van der Werf
90
APPENDIX II. COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
Research institute scientific council
(Wetenschappelijke raad onderzoekinstituut)
W. Boland
H.J. van Langevelde
B. Brandl
R.S. Le Poole
A.G.A. Brown
Y. Levin
D. van Delft
H.V.J. Linnartz
E.R. Deul
J. Lub
E.F. van Dishoeck
F. van Lunteren
M. Franx
G.K. Miley
M. Garrett
M. Perryman
T. de Graauw
A. Quirrenbach
H. Habing
H.J.A. Röttgering
M. Hogerheijde
J. Schaye
V. Icke
I. Snellen
F.P. Israel
R. Stuik
W.J. Jaffe (chair)
P.P. van der Werf
P. Katgert
P.T. de Zeeuw
K.H. Kuijken
Institute council
(Instituutsraad)
E. Deul (chair)
J. Drost
F.P. Israel
W.J. Jaffe
M. Smit
Astronomy education committee
(Opleidingscommissie OC)
P.P. van der Werf (chair)
M.C. Damen
C. de Valk
J.C. Drost (minutes)
M. Franx
V. Icke
P. Langelaan
H. Linnartz
J.T. Pijloo
J. Schaye
H. Röttgering
S. van den Broek
Astronomy board of examiners
(Examencommissie)
J. Lub (chair)
E. Groenen (Physics)
F.P. Israel
M. Hogerheijde
P.P. van der Werf
APPENDIX II. COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
Oort scholarship committee
M. Franx (chair)
F.P. Israel
H. Röttgering
J. Schaye
Mayo Greenberg prize committee
G. Miley (chair)
E.F. van Dishoeck
P. Katgert
H. Linnartz
J. Lub
MSc admission advisory committee
M. Franx (chair)
F.P. Israel
K. Kuijken
H.J. Röttgering
Graduate student review committee
(Commissie studievoortgang promovendi)
M. Franx (chair)
H. Linnartz
W. Boland
J. Schaye
Colloquia commitee
Y. Levin
J. Schaye
Computer committee
A.G.A. Brown (chair)
B. Brandl
C. Dalla Vecchia
K. Groen
C. Hopman
M. Smit
R. Williams
Library committee
W.J. Jaffe (chair)
F.P. Israel
J. Lub
Public outreach committee
F.P. Israel (chair)
V. Icke
M. Damen
T. van Kempen
N. de Vries
91
92
APPENDIX II. COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
Social committee
M. Smit (chair)
J. Bast
A.G.A. Brown
E. Caris alias Reynders
C. Gündisch
C. Hopman
D. Raban
I.A.G. Snellen
APPENDIX II. COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
II.2. Membership of University
Committees
(As on december 31, 2007)
van Dishoeck
Chair, Faculty Research Committee (WECO)
Member, Raad van Toezicht, Leiden Institute of Physics (LION)
Member, Lorentz Center Astronomy Board
Franx
Member, Faculty Research Committee (WECO)
Director, Leids Kerkhoven-Bosscha Foundation
Director, Leids Sterrewacht Foundation
Director, Jan Hendrik Oort Foundation
Hogerheijde
Member, Board of Directors, Leids Kerkhoven-Bosscha Fonds
Member, Board of Directors, Leids Sterrewacht Fonds
Member, Board of Directors, Jan Hendrik Oort Foundation
Icke
Member, Advisory Council, Faculty of Creative and Performing Arts
Member, Belvédère Committee
Israel
Member, Committee of Education Directors, School of Sciences
Member, Board of Graduate School, School of Sciences
Jaffe
Member, Observatory Research Committee
Chairman, Observatory Scientific Council (Wetenschappelijk Raad)
Kuijken
Member, Faculty Science Committee (WECO) (-Jun)
Chair, Observatory Research Committee (-Jun)
Member, Chair, Observatory Management Team
Study Advisor BSc students (-Jul)
Chair, search Committee astronomy professor
93
APPENDIX II. COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
94
Member, search Committee director Lorentz Centre
Member, search Committee Teylers professor of history of science
Member, search Committee Boerhave professor
Member, board of directors Leidsch Kerkhoven-Bosscha Fonds
Member, board International Center
Chairman, board of directors Leids Sterrewacht Fonds
Chairman, board of directors Oort Fonds
Linnartz
Observatory representative national science day
Observatory representative press releases
Study advisor bachelor students (2nd/3rd year) astronomy
Member, FMD/ELD user committee
Röttgering
Member, Education Committee
Snellen
Member, Leiden International Student Fund (LISF) committee
Member, Facultair Wervingsoverleg
Member, PR committee Physics/Astronomy
Member, Nederlandse Sterrenkunde Olympiade
van der Werf
Chairman, Education Committee Astronomy
Member, Joint Education Committee Physics and Astronomy
Member, Research Committee
Member, Examination Committee
Organist of the Academy Auditorium
Appendix
III
Science
policy
functions
Appendix
Science
policy
functions
III
Brandl
Member, NL-PC (Dutch observing program committee)
Deputy workpackage manager, ELT Design Study WP11000 (Instrumentation)
PI, concept study of MIDIR (E-ELT mid-IR instrument)
Deputy Co-PI, European JWST-MIRI consortium
Co-Investigator, Spitzer-IRS
Member, OPTICON Key technologies working group
Chair, Scientific Organizing Committee of the Conference on ‘400 Years of
Astronomical Telecopes’
Member, Review Panel, Deutsche Forschungs Gemeinschaft
Brown
Member, IAU Commissions 8, 37
Member, Gaia Science Team
Member, Gaia coordination unit 5 `Photometric processing' management team
Member, EU Marie-Curie RTN European Leadership in Space Astrometry
(ELSA)
Franx
Chair, Nova network 1 science team
Member, MUSE science team
Member, JWST-NIRSPEC science team
Member, JWST Science Working Group
Member, ACS science team
Chair, ESO-ELT Science Working Group
Member, ESO-ELT Science and Engineering Core Working Group
Member, NL-PC Allocation Committee
98
APPENDIX III. SCIENCE POLICY FUNCTIONS
Hogerheijde
Member, ALMA Science Advisory Committee
Member, ALMA European Science Advisory Committee
Member, ALMA Science Integrated Project Team
Member, ALMA Regional Center Coordinating Committee
Member, IRAM Programme Committee
Member, NWO VENI selection committee
Member, NWO/Vrije Competitie selection committee
Member, Review committee JCMT Science Archive ADP Requirements
Project scientist for CHAMP+/Netherlands
Co-Coordinator, JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey
Member, SOC/LOC workshop ‘Scientific Exploitation of the Enhanced-SMA‘
(Leiden, NL; Feb 1-2)
Member, SOC NAASC workshop ‘Transformational Science with ALMA:
Through Disks to Stars and Planets‘ (Charlottesville, USA; Jun 22-24)
Icke
Member, National Committee on Astronomy Education
Member, Minnaert Committee (NOVA Outreach)
Member, Netherlands Astronomical Society Education Committee
Member, Editorial Council Natuur & Techniek
Member, Board of Directors, National Science Museum NEMO
Member, Advisory Council, Technika 10
Member, Board of Directors, Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Natuurkunde
Member, Jury ‘Rubicon’ (NWO)
Member, Jury P.C. Hooft Prize for Literature
Member, Jury, Annual Prize ‘Wetenschap en Maatschappij’
Member of the Redactieraad, Winkler Prins 10
Israel
Member, NWO Selection Committee for VIDI Awards
Member, Panel C European Southern Observatory (ESO) Observing
Programmes Committee (OPC)
Member, International Astronomical Union (IAU) Commissions 28, 40 and 51
Member, Science Team Herschel-HIFI
Member, Science Team JWST-MIRI
Member, ScienceTeam APEX-CHAMP+
Member, Editorial Board Europhysics News (EPN)
Jaffe
Director, NEVEC
Member, IAU Commission 40, 28
APPENDIX III. SCIENCE POLICY FUNCTIONS
99
Chairman, ESO User's Committee
Member ESO Contact Committee
Member FITS Working Group
Katgert
Secretary/Treasurer, Leids Kerkhoven-Bosscha Fonds
Secretary/Treasurer, Leids Sterrewacht Fonds
Secretary/Treasurer, Jan Hendrik Oort Fonds
Kuijken
Advisor to National Delegate, ESO Council (Sep-)
Chair, ESO contact committee (Sep-)
Member, board of directors Kapteyn fonds
Member, bestuur ASTRON
Member, board NOVA (Jul-)
Key researcher, NOVA Dieptestrategie
Member, NOVA Instrument Steering Committee (-Apr)
Member, ESO KMOS Instrument Science Team
Member, astronomy programme board Lorentz Centre
Principal Investigator, ESO KiDS Survey
Principal Investigator, OmegaCAM project
Co-investigator, ESO VIKING Public Survey
Co-investigator, Planetary Nebulae Spectrograph project
Deputy coordinator, DUEL EU-FP6 Network
Local coordinator, EVALSO EU-FP7 programme
Member, board EARA
Member, board MICADO E-ELT instrument design study
External reviewer, DFG Schwerpunktprogram
External member, FWO-Flanders astronomy & physics programme committee
External member, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen Faculty tenure commitee
Linnartz
Workgroup leader FOM group FOM-L-027
Workgroup leader FP6 RTN program 'The Molecular Universe'
Member, FOM-NWO working group 'COMOP'
Member, CW-NWO working group 'Spectroscopy and Theory'
Member, NWO Rubicon grant allocation committee
Member, HRSMC research school
Member international scientific committee for workshop on infrared plasma
spectroscopy
Editor, Comments on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (part of Phys.
Scripta)
100
APPENDIX III. SCIENCE POLICY FUNCTIONS
Lub
Secretary, Netherlands Committee for Astronomy
Member, Board Astronomy & Astrophysics
Miley
Vice President, International Astronomical Union responsible for Education and
Development
Chair, International Universe Awareness Steering Committee
Chair, LOFAR Research Management Committee
Chair, INAF Visiting Committee for Istituto di Radioastronomia (IRA)
Chair, INAF Visiting Committee for Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari
(OAC)
Member Executive Committee International Astronomical Union
Member, LOFAR Astronomy Research Committee
Member, Board of Governors of the LOFAR Foundation
Member, Max Planck Institut fur Radioastronomie Fachbeirat
Member, Board EU SKADS Project
Röttgering
Member, Mid-Infrared interferometric instrument for VLTI (MIDI) Science Team
Member, NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder Science Working group (TPF-SW)
Member, ESA's Terrestrial Exo-Planet Science Advisory Team (Te-SAT)
Member, LOFAR's Astronomy Research Committee
Principle Investigator, Development and commissioning of LOFAR for
Astronomy (DCLA)
Member, Development and commissioning of LOFAR for Astronomy (DCLA)
management team
Member, Omegacam Science team
Member, XMM Large Scale Structure Consortium
Member, SOC of EU funded graduate school ‘Active Galactic Nuclei at the
highest angular resolutions: Theory and Observations’
Member, SOC conference ‘Astrophysics in the LOFAR Era’
Member, SOC conference ‘An XXL extragalactic survey: prospects for the XMM
next decade’
Member, SOC conference ‘Astrophysics with E-LOFAR’
Member, Curatorium of the professorship at Leiden University ‘Experimental
Astroparticle physics’
Schaye
Member of the steering committee, Virgo Consortium for Cosmological
Supercomputer Simulations
Co-Investigator, MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer)
APPENDIX III. SCIENCE POLICY FUNCTIONS
101
Co-Investigator, ISTOS (Imaging Spectroscopic Telescope for Origins Surveys)
Key researcher, NOVA (the Dutch research school for astronomy)
Member, LOFAR epoch of reionization science team
Member, MUSE science team
Member, EDGE science team (Explorer of Diffuse Emission and Gamma-ray
burst Explosions)
Member, ISSI team on Non-virialized X-ray components in clusters of galaxies
NL-representative, Euro-VO Data Center Alliance, Theoretical astrophysics
expert group
Chair, SOC and LOC, Lorentz Center workshop ‘Computational Cosmology’
Member, Scientific Organizing Committee, IAU symposium 244: ‘Dark Galaxies
and Lost Baryons’
Member, National Research Initiative E-science
PI, Marie Curie Excellence Team
PI, OWLS collaboration
van Delft
Member commissie wetenschapsgeschiedenis KNAW
Member Interdisciplinary Program Board Lorentz Center / NIAS
Member adviesraad tijdschrift NWT (Natuur, Wetenschap en Techniek)
Member Scientific Organizing Committee conference ‘400 Years of Telescopes’
Member Scientific Organizing Committee workshop ‘Artificial Cold and
International Cooperation in Science’, Lorentz Center
Member Raad van Advies Jaarboek KennisSamenleving
Member commissie Duizend Meesterwerken, Digitale Bibliotheek der
Nederlandse Letterkunde
Ambassador Platform bètatechniek
Member begeleidingscommissie Digitaal Wetenschapshistorisch Centrum,
Huygens Instituut
van der Werf
Member, JCMT Board
Chairman, JCMT Survey Oversight Committee (JSOC)
Principal Investigator, SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey
Principal Investigator, NOVA components of SINFONI
Co-investigator, HIFI
Member, European Instrument for SPICA (ESI) study team
Member, Far-InfraRed Interferometer (FIRI) study team
Member, VISIR Science Team
Member, JWST-MIRI European Science Team
Member, METIS Study Team
102
APPENDIX III. SCIENCE POLICY FUNCTIONS
van Dishoeck
Scientific Director, Netherlands Research School for Astronomy (NOVA)
Associate Editor, Annual Reviews of Astronomy & Astrophysics
Member, ALMA Board
Member, SRON Board
Member, MPIA-Heidelberg Fachbeirat
Member, INAF visiting committee Arcetri
Member, SMA Advisory Committee
Member, Spitzer Time Allocation Committee GO4
Member, Herschel-HIFI Science team
Member, ASTRONET Science Vision Panel-C
Member, VICI committee EW
Co-PI, European JWST-MIRI consortium
Chair, IAU Working Group on Astrochemistry
Member, IAU Commission 14, working group on ‘molecular data’
Coordinator, Herschel-HIFI WISH Key Program
Coordinator, NOVA network II on ‘Birth and Death of Stars and Planets’
Coordinator, Dutch node EU-PLANET network
Chair, Scientific Organising Committee, Science with the eSMA, Leiden
Member, Scientific Organising Committee, Molecules in Space and in the
Laboratory, Paris
Member, Scientific Organising Committee, Astrophysics in the next decade:
JWST and concurrent facilities, Tucson
Member, Search committee Wykeham Professor of Physics, Oxford University
Member, PhD committee D. Bodewits, RuG
Member, PhD committee D. Poelman, RuG
Member, PhD committee M. van der Loo, RU
van Langevelde
Member, ESO STC
Member, ESO VLTI overview committee
Member, ESO contactcommissie
Member, LOFAR DCLA review committee??
Member, NOVA Instrumentation Steering Committee
Member EVN board
Member, RadioNet Board and Executive Board
PI, ALBUS project
Coordinator EXPReS, board member and member management team
PI, FABRIC project
PI, SCARIe project
Member, ESTRELA board
Member SKADS board
APPENDIX III. SCIENCE POLICY FUNCTIONS
Member PrepSKA board
Member European SKA Consortium
Weijmans
Member, National Education Committee Astronomy (LOCNOC)
103
Appendix
IV
Visiting
scientists
Appendix
IV
Visiting
scientists
Name
Dates
Institute
Y. Goranova
Jan 1 - Dec 1
J. Kurk
Jan 1–5
T. Theuns
S. Bertone
B. Morgado
H. Perets
Jan 8- 12
Feb 6-12
Mar 5-30
May 30 - Jun 5
Aug 14-15
Mar 12 – Aug 1
Mar 17-23
Max Planck Institut für
Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching,
Germany
Max Planck Institut für Astronomie,
Heidelberg, Germany
Durham University, U.K.
Sussex University, U.K.
R. Blandford
C. Booth
S. Tremaine
W.D. Cotton
A. Biviano
S. Tremaine
R. Dave
M. Beckwith
W. van Breugel
Mar 27-30
April 3-7
April 16-20
April 18-20
May 21-28
May 28 – June 16
June 1
June 1 – Aug 10
June 13-14
S. Walch
June 18-27
University of Porto, Portugal
Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot,
Israel
Stanford, USA
Durham University, U.K.
IAS, Princeton, USA
NRAO Charlottesville, USA
Osservatorio Astronomico, Trieste, Italy
IAS, Princeton, USA
University of Arizona, USA
Goucher college, Maryland, USA
Lawrence Livermore National Lab.,
Livermore, USA
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität,
München, Germany
108
APPENDIX IV. VISITING SCIENTISTS
A.S. Cohen
M. Haverkorn
J. Bernard-Salas
H. Hoekstra
L. Fu
M. Güdel
June 18-29
June 28
July 16-25
Jule 21-29
Aug 1 – Oct 29
Sep 1 – Nov 1
B.P. Venemans
M. Merrifield
P. van Dokkum
R.A. Overzier
Sep 10-20
Sep 13-15
Sep 25-28
Oct 15-22
R. van der Marel
Oct 16-18
W.D. Cotton
N. Nevasba
A. Biviano
A. Duffy
L. Kewley
T. Tepper-Garcia
N. Amiri
D. Semenov
Oct 24-26
Nov 5-9
Nov 19-27
Nov 20-29
Nov 24-29
Nov 28-30
From Dec 1
Dec 6-7
Y.
Pavlyuchenkov
P. Sarre
A. Gurkan
Dec 6-7
Dec 6–7
many visits
throughout the
year
Naval Research Lab., Washington, USA
UC/Berkeley, USA
Cornell University, USA
University of Victoria, Canada
Institute d'Astrophysique Paris, France
Institut für Astronomie, ETH Zürich,
Switzerland
IoA Cambridge University, UK
University of Nottingham, UK
Yale, USA
Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik,
Garching, Germany
Space Telescope Science Institute,
Baltimore, USA
NRAO Charlottesville, USA
Meudon
Osservatorio Astronomico, Trieste, Italy
Manchester University, U.K.
IoA, Univ of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
Potsdam University, Germany
ASTRON, Dwingeloo,. Netherlands
Max Planck Institut für Astronomie,
Heidelberg, Germany
Max Planck Institut für Astronomie,
Heidelberg, Germany
The University of Nottingham, U.K.
Universiteit van Amsterdam,
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Appendix
V
Workshops,
lectures,
and colloquia
in Leiden
Appendix
Workshops,
lectures and
colloquia in Leiden
V
V.1. Workshops
Most of the workshops were held in the Lorentz Center, an international center
which coordinates and hosts workshops in the sciences. In 2007 the Leiden
astronomers contributed to the following workshops there:
January 15 - 19
Computational Cosmology
J. Schaye, C.S. Frenk, S.D.M. White
February 1 - 2
eSMA workshop
S. Bottinelli, M. Hogerheijde, E. van Dishoeck
February 19 - 23
MUSE Busy Week
R.M. McDermid, R. Stuik
March 6 - 8
Extragalactic surveys with LOFAR
H. Röttgering, P. Barthel, G.K. Miley, R. Morganti, I. Snellen
May 29 - June 1
N-body dynamics in near-Keplerian potentials
K.H. Kuijken, Y. Levin, S. Portegies Zwart, S. Tremaine
112
APPENDIX V. WORKSHOPS, LECTURES AND COLLOQUIA
August 6 - 17
From Massive Stars to Supernova Remnants
R.A. Chevalier, C. Fransson, N. Langer, J. Vink
September 5 - 7
MIRI
J. Blommaert, T. Lim, A. Glasse, S. Kendrew, B. Vandenbussche, T. Grundy
November 19 - 28
ELSA school on the Science of Gaia
A.G.A. Brown, L. Lindegren, M. Kontizas, C. Turon, K. Muinonen
December 10 - 12
The prospects of LOFAR surveys
H.J.A. Röttgering, P.D. Barthel, P.N. Best, R. Beck, G.K. Miley, R. Morganti, I.
Snellen
V.2. Endowed Lectures
Date
Speaker (affiliation)
Title
Apr 18
Scott Tremaine
(IAS, Princeton, USA)
Andrea Ghez
(UCLA, USA)
New Worlds: the Search for Planets
ouside the Solar System (Oort lecture)
Bringing our Galaxy's supermassive
black hole and its environs into focus
with laser guide star nadaptive optics
(Sackler Lecture)
Nov 5
V.3. Scientific Colloquia
Date
Speaker (affiliation)
Title
18 jan
Volker Springel (MPA,
Heidelberg, Germany)
Jelle Ritzerveld, (Sterrewacht
Leiden, Netherlands)
Supermassive black holes and cosmic
rays in simulations of galaxy formation
The simplicity of transport:
Triangulating the first light
24 jan
APPENDIX V. WORKSHOPS, LECTURES AND COLLOQUIA
01 feb
15 feb
19 feb
22 feb
26 feb
01 mar
02 mar
05 mar
07 mar
08 mar
13 mar
22 mar
29 mar
30 mar
05 apr
12 apr
19 apr
Steven Furlanetto (Yale
University, USA)
Felix Aharonian (MPI-K,
Heidelberg, Germany &
Institute for Advanced
Studies, Dublin, Ireland)
Lisa Kewley (University of
Hawaii, USA)
Inga Kamp (STScI, Baltimore,
USA)
Aldo Serenelli (IAS,
Princeton, USA)
Omar Almaini (University of
Nottingham, UK)
Jarle Brinchmann
(Universidade do Porto,
Portugal)
Daniel Stern (JPL, Pasadena,
USA)
Amina Helmi (Universiteit
Groningen, Netherlands)
Philip Best (University of
Edinburgh, UK)
Joss Bland-Hawthorn (AngloAustralian Observatory,
Epping, Australia)
Daniel Eisenstein (Steward
Observatory, Tucson, USA)
Mike Irwin (Institute of
Astronomy, Cambridge, UK)
James Lloyd (Cornell
University, Ithaka, USA)
Heino Falcke
(Astron/Nijmegen,
Netherlands)
Gijs Nelemans (Universiteit
Nijmegen, Netherlands)
Scott Tremaine (IAS,
Princeton, USA)
113
Cosmology at low radio frequencies:
The 21 cm transition
Very high energy gamma ray sources
The Cosmic Star Formation and
Metallicity History of Galaxies
Probing protoplanetary disk evolution
... or How to make a Solar System
Trouble in paradise: The solar
abundance problem
The UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey:
Results from year one
The emission line properties of galaxies
at low and high redshift
Spitzer mid-infrared identification of a
large population of luminous, obscured
active galaxies
Cosmology with the Galaxy
The importance of AGN heating for
elliptical galaxies and clusters
The outer regions of disk galaxies:
what are we learning?
Dark energy and cosmic sound
(NOVA colloquium)
Near-field cosmology with Local Group
galaxies
Exploring low mass stars, brown dwarfs
and exoplanets with adaptive optics and
precision radial velocities
Radio detection of cosmic rays and
neutrinos with LOPES & LOFAR
Ultra-compact binaries
The long-term stability of planetary
systems
114
26 apr
03 may
07 may
10 may
24 may
31 may
07 sep
10 sep
13 sep
17 sep
19 sep
20 sep
27 sep
28 sep
04 oct
11 oct
APPENDIX V. WORKSHOPS, LECTURES AND COLLOQUIA
Alice Quillen (University of
Rochester, USA)
Laura Ferrarese (Herzberg
Institute of Astrophysics,
Victoria, Canada)
Fred Lahuis (Sterrewacht
Leiden, Netherlands)
Steven Stahler (University of
California, Berkeley, USA)
Reinhard Genzel (MPE,
Garching, Germany &
University of California,
Berkeley, USA
Daniel Jaffe (University of
Texas, Austin, USA)
Michael Burton (University of
New South Wales, Sydney,
Australia)
Saskia Hekker (Sterrewacht
Leiden, Netherlands)
Michael Merrifield
(University of Nottingham,
UK)
Hans Kjeldsen (University of
Aarhus, Denmark)
Stijn Wuyts (Sterrewacht
Leiden, Netherlands)
Mariska Kriek (Sterrewacht
Leiden, Netherlands)
Garth Illingworth (University
of California Santa Cruz,
USA)
Pieter van Dokkum (Yale
University, New Haven,
USA)
Cyril Tasse (Sterrewacht
Leiden, Netherlands)
Katherine Blundell (Oxford
University, UK)
Sculpting circumstellar disks
The inner workings of early-type
galaxies: Cores, stellar nuclei and
supermassive black holes
Molecular fingerprints of star formation
throughout the universe - a space-based
infrared study
From clouds to clusters: A tale of Orion
High-z galaxy dynamics
Very low mass brown dwarfs with
protoplanetary disks
The earliest stages of massive star
formation
Radial velocity variations of K giants:
pulsations, spots and planets
21st Century galaxy dynamics (at 19th
century prices)
Measurements of stellar structure
through Asteroseismology
Models and observations of red galaxies
at z~2.5
The formation history of massive
galaxies
The highest redshift galaxies: Galaxy
buildup in the first 2 billion years
WANTED (dead or alive): The
progenitors of massive galaxies
Triggering processes and evolution of
AGN in the XMM-Large Scale
Structure survey
Evolving and revolving: the relativistic
jets of SS433
APPENDIX V. WORKSHOPS, LECTURES AND COLLOQUIA
17 oct
18 oct
25 oct
29 oct
31 oct
01 nov
05 nov
Roeland van der Marel
(STScI, Baltimore, USA)
Vincent Geers (Sterrewacht
Leiden, Netherlands)
Pierre Cox (IRAM, Grenoble,
France)
Leonie Snijders (Sterrewacht
Leiden, Netherlands)
Suzanne Bisschop
(Sterrewacht Leiden,
Netherlands)
Andrew King (University of
Leicester, UK)
Andrea Ghez (UCLA, USA)
08 nov
Bruce Draine (Princeton
University, USA)
15 nov
Eric Bell (MPIA, Heidelberg,
Germany)
Floor van Leeuwen (Institute
of Astronomy, Cambridge,
UK)
Francoise Combes (Paris
Observatory, France)
22 nov
29 nov
06 dec
Peter Sarre (University of
Nottingham, UK)
115
The Dynamics of the Galaxies in the
Local Group
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in
disks around young solar-type stars
The 'new' IRAM Plateau de Bure
Interferometer
Extreme star formation in starburst
galaxies
Complex molecules in the laboratory
and star forming regions
Evolution of black hole mass and spin in
active galactic nuclei
Bringing our Galaxy's supermassive
black hole and its environs into focus
with laser guide star adaptive optics
Dust Masses, PAH Fractions, and
Starlight Intensities in the SINGS
Galaxies
The evolution of disk galaxies in a dark
matter-dominated Universe
Exploring astrometric data
Some phenomena of galaxy dynamics:
problems of the standard model and
comparison with MOND
(NOVA colloquium)
The diffuse interstellar bands: The
longest standing problem in
astronomical spectroscopy
116
APPENDIX V. WORKSHOPS, LECTURES AND COLLOQUIA
V.4. Student Colloquia
Date
Speaker
Title
16 feb
Maurice Westmaas
21 feb
Maarten van Hoven
23 feb
Isa Oliveira
19 mar
Olivera Rakic
24 apr
Bart Clauwens
12 jun
Floor Roduner
14 jun
Robert Berkhout
05 jul
Berry Holl
10 jul
Art Bos
16 aug
Reinier Tan
23 aug
Christopher Bonnett
21 sep
02 oct
Adriaan Kroonenberg
Eveline van Scherpenzeel
16 oct
Edo van Uitert
13 nov
Silvia Toonen
20 nov
Susanne Brown
The Characterization of Phaseplates for
an Astronomical Adaptive Optics Test
Bed
Tidal Excitation of Stellar Modes
During Close Gravitational Encounters
with an Intermediate Mass Black Hole
Multiwavelength Study of a New
Young Stellar Population in the
Serpens Molecular Cloud
Observations of the Intergalactic
Medium near Lyman Break Galaxies
Full 1-loop corrections to D-term
Inflation Potential
Grids in the Walraven photometric
system and their application to S
Norma and l Carinae
Evolution of the bursting-layer wave
during a Type-1 X-ray burst
Ionospheric calibration study for
LOFAR
IRS spectroscopy of Massive YSOs in
W49A
Implementation of two control
algorithms on HORATIO
Constraining Cosmology Using the Full
Lensing Surface Density Obtained by
Weak Lensing
Ionised gas in early-type galaxies
How many photons are needed to ionize
the Universe?
The measurement of weak gravitational
lensing: STEP4 & KISS
The kinematics of the ionized gas in
NGC 6946: Large and small scales
PAH emission, dust emission and
extinction in NGC253
APPENDIX V. WORKSHOPS, LECTURES AND COLLOQUIA
22 nov
Ernst de Mooij
23 nov
Ann Marie Madigan
07 dec
Mark den Brok
117
The colour-radius relation for lowredshift galaxies from the SDSS
Resonant Relaxation near Massive
Black-Holes
Atomic and molecular gas around three
galactic H II regions
Appendix
VI
Participation
in scientific
meetings
Appendix
Participation
in scientific
meetings
VI
Albrecht
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
‘The Rossiter-McLaughlin effect in the eclipsing binary system V1143 Cyg’
Amiri
ESTRELA Workshop (Manchester, UK; Oct 8-11)
‘Circumstellar Masers of AGB stars’
Bonn-Dwingeloo High Resolution Radio Astronomy meeting
(Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Oct 30)
Bast
Molecules in Space & Laboratory (Paris, France; May 14-18)
‘SiS line emission as a probe of chemistry and grain formation in circumstellar
envelopes of AGB stars’
Vatican Observatory Summer School on Observations and Theoretical
understanding of Extrasolar Planets and Brown Dwarfs (Rome, Italy;
Jun 9 - Jul 6 )
‘AGB stars and Planet Formation’
NOVA Fall School (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Oct 8-12)
‘Physical and Chemical structure of Protoplanetary disks’
Beirao
4th Spitzer Conference - The Evolving ISM in the Milky Way and
Nearby Galaxies (Pasadena, USA; Dec 2-5)
‘Spatially Resolved Spitzer-IRS Spectroscpy of the Central Region of M82’
122
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Bisschop
Dust, gas and chemistry in space (Belfast, UK; Jan 4-5)
‘Infrared spectroscopy of HCOOH interstellar ice analogues’
Molecules in Space & Laboratory (Paris, France; May 14-18)
‘H-atom bombardment of HCOOH, CO2 and CH3CHO containing ices’
New astronomical challenges for surface science (Edinburgh, UK; Jun 15)
‘H-atom bombradment experiments on CO2, HCOOH and CH3CHO containing
ices’
Booth
Virgo Consortium Meeting (Durham, UK; Dec 17-19)
‘New Additions to the OWLS Project’
Bottinelli
eSMA workshop (Leiden, Netherlands; Feb 1-2)
Molecules in Space and Laboratory (Paris, France; May 14-18)
Transformational Science with ALMA (Charlottesville, USA; Jun 22-24)
ALMA Community Meeting (Garching, Germany; Sep 3-9)
c2d meetings? (Mar 12-16 and Sep 29-Oct 2)
Bouwman
Dust, Gas and Chemistry in Space (Belfast, UK, Jan 4-5)
‘Effects of CO, O2, N2 and CO2 impurities on spectroscopic features of
interstellar water ice’
FOM [email protected] (Veldhoven, Netherlands, Jan 23-24)
‘A new setup for optical and near UV spectroscopy of interstellar ice analogs’
NWO CW meeting spectroscopy and theory (Lunteren, Netherlands,
Jan 29-30)
‘A new setup for optical and near UV spectroscopy of interstellar ice analogs’
31st Annual Scientific Meeting of the Division of Atomic, Molecular
and Optical Physics of the Dutch Physical Society (Lunteren,
Netherlands, Apr 4-5)
‘A new setup for optical and near UV spectroscopy of interstellar ice analogs’
Molecules in Space and the Laboratory (Paris, France, May 14-18)
‘A new setup for optical and near UV spectroscopy of interstellar ice analogs’
Cavity Ringdown User Meeting 2007 (Greifswald, Germany, Sep 17-19)
‘A new setup for optical and near UV spectroscopy of interstellar ice analogs’
ISM/CSM meeting (Leiden, Netherlands, Oct 12)
‘Spectroscopy of CO2/H2O and CO/H20 ice mixtures’
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
123
Brandl
ASTRONET strategy meeting (Poitiers, France; Jan 22-25)
‘The role of starbursts in galaxy evolution: IMF and inner structure’
JW Pel Retirement Symposium (Groningen, Netherlands; Apr 13)
‘Bigger is Better - mid-IR Astronomy with ELTs’
Brown
Gaia Inter-CU First Look meeting (Heidelberg, Germany; Feb 6)
‘ CU5 contributions to First Look processing’
Gaia Coordination Unit 3 'Core Processing' meeting (Dresden, Germany;
Mar 15-16)
Gaia combined coordination unit 5 'Photometric processing' and CU7
'Variability analysis' meeting (Bologna, Italy; Mar 19-23)
Gaia Java07 workshop (Villafranca del Castillo, Spain; June 19-21)
Gaia CU5/CU5 2D imaging meeting (Brussels, Belgium; June 28)
Gaia Initial Data Treatment and First-Look meeting (Barcelona, Spain;
Sep 5-6)
‘Dealing with CCD radiation damage: Consequences for IDT and FL’
Gaia Coordination Unit 5 'Photometric Processing' (Leiden, Netherlands;
Sep 18-19)
IAU Symposium 248: `A Giant Step:from Milli- to Micro-arcsecond
Astrometry' (Shanghai, China; Oct 15-19)
‘Conference summary’ (invited)
ELSA school on the science of Gaia (Leiden, Netherlands; Nov 19-28)
‘Interpretation of astrometric survey data’
Gaia Intermediate Data Update kick-off meeting (Heidelberg, Germany;
Dec 17)
Cuppen
Dust, Gas and Chemistry (Belfast, UK; Jan 4-5)
‘Monte Carlo Simulations of Ices’
Molecules in Space and Laboratory (Paris, France; May 14-18)
‘Monte Carlo Studies of Surface Chemistry’
New Astronomical Challenges for Surface Science (Edinburg, UK;
June 13-15)
‘Monte Carlo Simulations of Water Ice’
ISM/CSM meeting (Leiden, The Netherlands; Oct 12)
‘Monte Carlo studies of interstellar surface chemistry’
124
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Dalla Vecchia
Computational Cosmology Workshop (Leiden, The Netherlands;
Jan 15-19)
‘Star forming OWLS’
Next generation of computational models of baryonic physics in galaxy
formation: from protostellar cores to disk galaxies (Zürich,
Switzerland; Sep 17-21)
‘On the relation between the Schmidt and Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation laws’
Virgo Meeting (Durham, UK; Dec 17-19)
‘Type II SN feedback in OWLS’
Damen
Galaxy Growth in a Dark Universe (Heidelberg, Germany; July 16-20)
‘SIMPLE: the Spitzer/MUSYC legacy survey in the extended CDFS’
de Vries
IAU Symposium 245: Formation and Evolution of Galaxy Bulges
(Oxford, UK; Jul 16-20)
‘Massive Galaxies with Very Young AGN’
Franx
ESO ELT-Science Working Group (Garching, Germany; Jan 19)
Origin of Galaxies (Obergurgl, Austria, Mar 26-27)
ESO ELT-Science Working Group (Garching, Germany; Apr 2-3)
ESO ELT-ESE (Garching, Germany; Apr 3-4)
JWST Nirspec Science Team (Madrid, Spain; Apr 23-25)
The Impact of AGN Feedback on Galaxy Evolution (Ringberg, Germany;
May 22-25)
ESO ELT-Science Working Group (Garching, Germany; May 28-30)
ERC review meeting (Brussels, Belgium; June 18-21)
JWST Science Working Group (Berkeley, USA; June 25-27)
Legacy of Multiwavelength Surveys (Xining, China; Aug 20-25)
ACS Science Team meeting (Jackson Hole, USA; Sep 16-22)
ESO ELT-ESE (Garching, Germany; Oct 3-4)
VLT instruments in the era of the ELT (Garching, Germany; Oct 8-11)
ERC review meeting (Brussels, Belgium; Nov 5-8)
JWST Nirspec Science Team (Lyon, France; Nov18-20)
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
125
Groves
The Origin of Galaxies (Obergurgl, Austria; Mar 24-29)
‘IR Emission from the NLR: Constraining the Contribution’
Pathways Through an Eclectic Universe (Tenerife, Spain; Apr 23-27)
‘Distinguishing AGN and Starformation’
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
‘Do Low Metallicity AGN Exist’ (Poster)
MAGPOP: Garching Spectra Workshop (Garching, Germany; May 28-31)
‘Understanding the Emission Lines from SDSS’
Obscured AGN across Cosmic Time (Seeon, Germany; June 5-8)
‘IR Emission from the NLR: Constraining the Contribution of AGN’
MAGPOP Network Meeting (Malta; Oct 29-31)
‘Controlling Parameters of the Starburst SED’
Haas
Virgo Meeting (Leiden, Netherlands; Jan 15-19)
‘Shaping the Luminosity Function: The effect of dust attenuation’
Gas Accretion and Star Formation in Galaxies (Garching, Germany;
Sept 10-14)
Next generation of computational models of baryonic physics in galaxy
formation: from protostellar cores to disk galaxies (Zürich, Switzerland;
Sept 17-21)
‘The importance of Dust for the Galaxy Luminosity Function’
Virgo Meeting (Durham, UK; Dec 17-19)
‘Stellar masses and star formation rates of OWLS halos & Column densities of
OWLS halos’
Hatch
Tracing Cosmic Evolution with Clusters of Galaxies: Six Years Later
(Sesto, Italy; June 25-29)
‘The immediate environment of a forming BCG at z=2’
Galaxy Growth in a dark Universe (Heidelberg, Germany; July 16-20)
‘The immediate environment of a forming BCG at z=2’
EARA Lyman alpha workshop (Paris, France; Oct 15-17)
‘The relationship between the Lyman-alpha halo and the diffuse UV continuum
surrounding a z=2 radio galaxy’
The prospects of LOFAR surveys (Leiden, The Netherlands; Dec 10-12)
126
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Hill
IAU 242: Astrophysical Masers and their environments (Alice Springs,
Australia; Mar 12-16)
‘Profiling Young Masive Stars ‘
CASA tutorial workshop (Garching, Germany; July 9-11)
ALMA community meeting (Garching, Germany; Sep 3-4)
Surveys for ALMA (Garching, Germany; Sep 5-6)
Massive Star Formation: Observations Confront Theory (Heidelberg,
Germany; Sep 9-14)
‘Identifying Young Massive Stars ‘
ATNF Astrofest 2007 (Sydney, Australia; Dec. 6)
‘Do all massive cores form stars? A CO and CS Mopra study of southern cores’
Hogerheijde
Scientific Exploitation of the Enhanced-SMA (Leiden, Netherlands;
Feb 1-2)
NOVA Science Day (Utrecht, Netherlands; Aug 27)
ALMA Community Day and Workshop on Surveys with ALMA
(Garching, Germany, Sep 3-6)
'First results from the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey'
Hopman
Lorentz workshop: N-body dynamics in near-Keplerian potentials
(Leiden, Netherlands; May 29 - Jun 1)
‘The dynamics of stellar inspiral into a massive black hole’
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands
May 14-16)
‘Gravitational waves from compact remnants orbiting massive black holes’
DAD07 (Leiden, Netherlands; Mar 26-27
‘Resonant relaxation near massive black holes’
Intema
LOFAR Surveys Workshop (Leiden, Netherlands; Mar 6-8)
‘LOFAR Ionospheric Calibration’
LOFAR Surveys Team Meeting (Leiden, Netherlands; Apr 10)
Workshop ‘Astrophysics in the LOFAR Era’ (Emmen, Netherlands;
Apr 23-27)
Ionosphere Meeting (Leiden, Netherlands; June 22)
‘Ionospheric Modeling using the Peeling Scheme’
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
127
LOFAR DCLA Project Meeting (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; June 26-27)
‘Ionospheric Modeling using the Peeling Scheme’
LIONS Kick-off Meeting (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Oct 9)
‘Ionospheric Modeling using the Peeling Scheme’
IONO - LOFAR Consulting Meeting (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Oct 17-19)
LOFAR Surveys Workshop (Leiden, Netherlands; Dec 10-12)
SKADS LIONS Long Baseline Meeting (Leiden, Netherlands; Dec 13)
‘Ionospheric Modeling using the Peeling Scheme’
Ioppolo
Dust, Gas and Chemistry in Space (Belfast, UK, Jan 4-5)
‘Laboratory study of CO ice hydrogenation’
FOM [email protected] (Veldhoven, Netherlands, Jan 23-24)
‘Laboratory study of CO ice hydrogenation’
Molecules in Space and the Laboratory (Paris, France, May 14-18)
‘Laboratory study of CO ice hydrogenation’
Israel
eSMA Workshop (Leiden, Netherlands, Feb 1-2)
Herschel Open Time Key Program Workshop (Noordwijk, Netherlands;
Feb 20-21)
Extragalactic surveys with LOFAR (Leiden, Netherlands; Mar 6-8)
Tracing Dust in Spiral Galaxies, ESF Workshop (Gent, Belgium;
May 14-16)
ARENA Workshop on Submm Astronomy from Dome C (Saclay, France;
June 25-27)
‘ISM Processing in the Magellanic Clouds’
FIR Workshop 2007: Far-Infrared and Submillimeter Emission of the
Interstellar Medium: Models meet extragalactic and Galactic
Observations (Bad Honnef, Germany, Nov 5-9)
‘The dense molecular medium in 100 galaxy nuclei’
Jaffe
ESO Calibration Workshop (Garching, Germany, Jan 24-26)
VLT in the Epoch of the ELT (Garching, Germany, Oct 10-12)
128
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Kendrew
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
‘MIDIR: A Mid-IR Instrument for the European Extremely Large
Telescope’OSA Topical meeting on Adaptive Optics: Analysis and
Methods (Vancouver, Canada; June 18-20)
'Adaptive Optics Challenges for Mid-IR ELT Instrumentation'
SPIE Optics & Photonics 2007 (San Diego, USA; Aug 26-30)
'Mid-infrared instrumentation for the European Extremely Large Telescope'
Lorentz Center Workshop on MIRI testing (Leiden, Netherlands; Sep 5-7)
Kruip
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
Radiative transfer workshop (Durham, UK; Sep 3-7)
Adaptive-mesh simulations with FLASH (Bremen, Germany; Oct 15-18)
IAU Symposium 250 on Massive Stars as Cosmic Engines (Kauai Island,
Hawaii; Dec 10-14)
‘Radiative Transport Using SimpleX’
Kuijken
LOFAR Surveys (Leiden, Lorentz Center; Mar 5-8)
‘Lensing with LOFAR’
Probing the Universe with Weak Lensing (Marseille, France; Apr 24-25)
‘Lensing with KiDS: studying dark matter and dark energy with light rays’
The Dark Side of the Universe 07 (Minnesota, USA; Jun 5-10)
idem
From giant arcs to CMB lensing: 20 years of gravitational distortion
(Paris, France; Jul 2-6)
‘STEP: The shear testing programme’
STEP workshop (JPL, USA; Aug 20-24)
‘Shears from shapelets’
‘The KiDS Survey’
‘Using the STEP4 simulations’
Weak Lensing and Photometric Redshifts (University of British
Columbia, Canada; Sep 5-7)
‘GaaP Photometry’
‘The KiDS Survey’
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
129
DUEL Workshop (Royal Observatory Edinburgh, UK; Oct 8-9)
‘Wide-field lensing surveys’
‘Measuring Shear’
Astroparticle Physics Symposium #9 (Kapteyn Institute Groningen,
Netherlands; Oct 12)
‘Lensing with KiDS: studying dark matter and dark energy with light rays’
Cosmic Strings and Superstrings in Observational Cosmology
(Astroparticle and Cosmology, Paris 7, France; Dec 10-13)
‘Microlensing by Cosmic Strings’
Levin, (Sarah)
Communicating Astronomy to the Public 2007 (Athens, Greece; Oct 8-11)
‘UNAWE: Humanizing Astronomy’
Linnartz
Dust, Gas and Chemistry in Space (Belfast, UK, Jan 4-5)
FOM [email protected] (Veldhoven, Netherlands, Jan 23-24)
NWO CW meeting spectroscopy and theory (Lunteren, Netherlands,
Jan 29-30)
Dutch inter/circumstellar matter meetings (Amsterdam-Feb, Leiden-Oct)
Molecular Universe Midterm Review meeting (Perugia, Italy; Mar 19-21)
Molecules in Space and Laboratory – international astrophysics and
astrochemistry meeting (Paris, France; May 14-18)
1st international summer school on infrared plasma spectroscopy
(Greifswald, Germany; July 23-24)
2nd international workshop on infrared plasma spectroscopy
(Greifswald, Germany; July 24-27)
7th international meeting on cavity ring down spectroscopy (Greifswald,
Germany; Sep 18–19)
FOM – MAP meeting (Nijmegen, Netherlands; Oct)
HRSMC research school meeting (Amsterdam, Netherlands, Nov 22)
Lommen
eSMA meeting (Leiden, Netherlands; Feb 1-2)
‘Observing young disks’
Origin Of Solar Systems (Gordon Research Conference) (South Hadley,
MA, USA; July 8-13)
‘SMA observations of young disks: separating envelope, disk, and stellar masses
in class I YSOs’
130
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Lub
Between Cepheids and Mid IR instrumentation symposium ter ere van
pensionering Prof. D. J.W. Pel (Groningen, Netherlands; Apr 13-14)
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
XXI Century Challenges for Stellar Evolution (Cefalu, Sicily, Italy;
Aug 27 - Sept 3)
Maschietto
The Origin of Galaxies: Exploring Galaxy Evolution with the New
Generation of Infrared-Millimeter Facilities (Obergurgl, Austria;
Mar 24-29)
‘OIII emitters in HzRG’
Tracing Cosmic Evolution with Clusters of Galaxies: Six Years Later;
(Sesto (BZ), Italy; June 25-29)
‘OIII emission lines in H-z protoclusters’
Miley
Workshop on LOFAR Surveys (LC, Leiden, Netherlands; March 7-9)
NRAO 50th Anniversary Conference (Charlottesville, USA; June 19–22)
50th Anniversary of Lovell Telescope (Manchester, UK; Oct 3–5)
IYA and Communicating Astronomy to the Public (Athens, Greece;
Oct 10–12)
Workshop on LOFAR Surveys (LC, Leiden, Netherlands; Dec 10-13)
Öberg
Dust, Gas and Chemistry in Space (Belfast, UK, Jan 4-5)
‘Photodesorption of CO ice’
FOM [email protected] (Veldhoven, Netherlands, Jan 23-24)
‘Photodesorption of CO ice’
31st Annual Scientific Meeting of the Division of Atomic, Molecular
and Optical Physics of the Dutch Physical Society (Lunteren,
Netherlands, Apr 4-5)
‘Photodesorption of Interstellar CO ice Analogs’
Molecules in Space and the Laboratory (Paris, France, May 14-18)
‘Photodesorption of Ices’
HRSMC Symposium (Amsterdam, Netherlands, Nov 22)
‘Photodesorption of Interstellar Ice analogs’
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
131
Ödman
ESO IYA meeting (Garching, Germany; Mar 2–4)
‘The Universe Awareness Programme’
‘Report on the Lunar Eclipse Skypecast’
Meeting of the Royal Astronomical Society (London, UK; Mar 9)
‘The Universe Awareness Programme’
Planetarium through ages: Vision 2027 (Mumbai, India; Mar 19-20)
‘Universe Awareness for Young Children’
Universe Awareness Tamil Nadu Science Forum workshop (Chennai,
India; Mar 25–27)
‘The Universe Awareness Programme’
‘The International Experience of UNAWE’
National Astronomy Meeting (Preston, UK; Apr 15–18)
‘Universe Awareness in the UK: all about opportunities’
Chair of one of the two the Education and Outreach sessions
National Science Week (Cape Town, South Africa; May 12–19)
‘Universe Awareness: Inspiring young children’
Building the Scientific Mind (Vancouver, Canada; May 28 – June 31)
‘Inspiring Young Children with the beautiful universe’
Essential Contact (Granada, Spain; June 30 – July 2)
‘Essential Contact - Hall of the Universe: some ideas’
International Astronautical Congress (Hyderabad, India; Sep 24–28)
‘The Universe Awareness Programme’
Forum on Space and Civil Society (Vienna, Austria; Oct 8–9)
Communicating Astronomy to the Public 2007 (Athens, Greece;
Oct 10–11)
‘Universe Awareness Internationally’ (poster)
Oliveira
From Stars to Planets (Gainesville, USA; April 11-14)
‘Protoplanetary Disk Evolution in Serpens’
Omar
Astrophysics in the LOFAR Era (Emmen, The Netherlands; Apr 23-27)
HI Survival Through Cosmic Times (Sarteano, Italy; June 11-15)
‘HI survival in a group environment’
132
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Oonk
Tracing Cosmic Evolution with Clusters of Galaxies: Six Years later
(Sesto (BZ) Alto Adige, Italy; Jun 24-30)
Paardekooper
First Stars Workshop (Copenhagen, Denmark; Apr 16-20)
'First Light in the Primordial Gas: Radiation Hydrodynamics of the First Stars'
New Trends in Radiation Hydrodynamics (Stockholm, Sweden;
May 9-11)
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
'First Light in the Primordial Gas: Radiation Hydrodynamics of the First Stars'
First Stars III (Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA; July 16-20)
'First Light in the Primordial Gas: Radiation Hydrodynamics of the First Stars'
Radiative transfer workshop (Durham, UK; Sep 3-7)
'Triangulating Radiation: SimpleX Radiative Transfer'
Adaptive-mesh simulations with FLASH (Bremen, Germany; Oct 15-18)
'Triangulating Radiation: SimpleX Radiative Transfer'
Pandey-Pommier
LOFAR- CS1 meetings (weekly meeting, ASTRON, Dwingeloo,
Netherlands)
Young LOFAR meeting (Amsterdam, Netherlands; Nov 26)
LOFAR survey workshop (Leiden, Netherlands; Dec 12-15)
Panic
Marie Curie Research Training Network (MOLECULAR UNIVERSE),
2nd year and Mid-Term Review Meeting (Perugia, Italy; 19-21 March
2007)
‘High resolution molecular line observations of circumstellar disks’
Dutch ISM/CSM Meeting (Amsterdam, Netherlands; Apr 21)
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
Transformational Science with ALMA: from Disks to Stars and Planets
(Charlottesville, Virginia, USA; June 22-24)
‘Molecular Gas and Dust Content of the Disk around HD169142’
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Pawlik
Computational Cosmology (Leiden, Netherlands; Jan 15-19
‘Radiative Transfer in GADGET’
New Trends in Radiation Hydrodynamics (Stockholm, Sweden;
May 9-11)
‘Cosmological Radiative Transfer in GADGET’
11th Paris Cosmology Colloqium (Paris, France; Aug 16-18)
Radiative Transfer Workshop (Durham, England; Sep 3-7)
‘Radiative Transfer in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics’
Prod’homme
NOVA Fall School (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Oct 8-12)
ELSA school on the science of Gaia (Leiden, Netherlands; Nov 19-28)
Raban
Obscured AGNs across cosmic time (Seeon, Germany, Jun 5-8)
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
VLTI school (Torun, Poland; Aug 26 – Sep 7)
Rakic
Computational Cosmology (Leiden, Netherlands; Jan 15-19)
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
HI Survival through Cosmic Times (Siena, Italy; June 11-15)
‘Observations of HI near Lyman Break Galaxies’
Galaxy Growth in a Dark Universe (Heidelberg, Germany; Jul 16-20)
‘Observations of HI and CIV near Lyman Break Galaxies’
Next Generation of Computational Models of Baryonic Physics in
Galaxy Formation (Zürich, Switzerland; Sep 17-21)
Rampadarath
NOVA Fall School (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Oct 8-12)
Röttgering
Herschel Open Time Key Program Workshop (ESTEC, Noordwijk,
Netherlands; Feb 20-21)
133
134
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Extragalactic surveys with LOFAR (Lorentz Center, Leiden, Netherlands;
Mar 6-8
‘Current survey plans and main goals’
International MeerKAT Meeting (Amsterdam, Netherlands; Apr 20-21)
‘The use of MeerKAT for continuum surveys’
Astrophysics in the LOFAR era (Emmen, Netherlands; Apr 23-27)
‘Survey Key Science Project Plans’
AAS meeting: Wide-Field Surveys in the 21st Century (Honolulu,
Hawaii; May 26 - June 2)
‘Wide field surveys with LOFAR’
SKADS Meeting (Jodrell Bank, Manchester, UK; June 6)
‘Ionosphere Calibration’
XMM-LSS survey consortium meeting (Universite' de Luminy, Marseille,
France; June 14-15)
‘LOFAR - Opening up a New Window on the Universe’
SKADS meeting (Institute d'Astrophysique, Paris, France; Oct 9)
‘SKA and ionospheric calibration’
Darwin science team meeting (Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS),
Paris, France; Dec 6-7)
‘Astrophysical Imaging with Darwin - Next steps’
‘NL/European technical projects related to Darwin’
The prospects of LOFAR surveys (Lorentz center, Leiden, Netherlands:
Dec 10-12)
‘Survey project’
Salter
eSMA Workshop (Leiden, Netherlands; Feb 1-2)
From Stars to Planets: Connecting Our Understanding of Star and Planet
Formation (Gainesville, Florida; Apr 11-14)
‘Microgravity Experiments Probing Collision Processes in the Solar Nebula’
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
‘Microgravity Experiments Probing Collision Processes in the Solar Nebula’
VLTI Summer School (Porto, Portugal; May 27 - Jun 8)
‘Microgravity Experiments Probing Collision Processes in the Solar Nebula’
NOVA Fall School (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Oct 8-12)
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
135
Schaye
Computational Cosmology (Leiden, Netherlands; Jan 15- 19)
‘The OverWhelmingly Large Simulations project’
EDGE workshop (Utrecht, Netherlands; Mar 19-21)
HI Survival through Cosmic Times (Spineto, Italy; Jun 11-15)
‘Does nearly all of the intergalactic HI reside in metal-free gas?’ (invited talk)
‘Star formation thresholds and the HI-H_2 transition’ (invited talk)
Dark Galaxies & Lost Baryons (Cardiff, UK; Jun 25-29)
‘Star Formation Thresholds and Kennicutt-Schmidt laws’ (invited review)
Gas Accretion and Star Formation in Galaxies (Garching, Germany;
Sep 10-14)
‘How Feedback Influences the IGM and its Metals’ (invited talk)
Next generation of computational models of baryonic physics in galaxy
formation: from protostellar cores to disk galaxies (Zürich, Switzerland;
Sep 17-21)
‘First Results from OWLS: the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations Project’
Virgo collaboration meeting (Durham, UK; Dec 17-19)
‘The OverWhelmingly Large Simulations project’
Smit
Outstanding Questions for the Standard Cosmological Model (London,
UK; March 26-29)
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
DUEL Kick-off Meeting (Edinburgh, UK; Oct 8-9)
Snellen
Approaching Micro-Arcsecond Resolution with VSOP-2: Astrophysics
and Technology (Conference Hall at ISAS/JAXA, Sagamihara, Kanagawa,
Japan; Dec 3-7)
‘GPS and CSS sources and space VLBI’ (title talk)
Soto
IAU 245: Formation and Evolution of Galaxy Bulges (Oxford, UK;
July 16-20)
‘3-Dimensional Kinematics in Low Foreground Extinction Windows of the
Galactic Bulge’
136
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Stuik
OSA Topical Meeting on Adaptive Optics (Vancouver, Canada;
June 18-20)
‘Integrated Testing of the ESO AO Facility: The Development of ASSIST’
SPIE Conference on Optics and Photonics (San Diego, USA; Aug 26-30)
‘ASSIST: development of a test-infrastructure for the VLT AO facility’
Taylor
IAU Symposium 244: Dark Galaxies and Lost Baryons (Cardiff, UK;
June 25-29)
‘Dark Galaxies: the interface between galaxy- and star-formation’
Galaxy Growth in a Dark Universe (Heidelberg, Germany; July 16-20)
‘The Emergence of the Red Galaxy Sequence’ (Poster)
Panoramic Views of Galaxy Formation and Evolution (Hayama, Japan;
Dec 11-15)
‘Massive Galaxy Formation and the Rise of the Red Sequence’
Torstensson
ESTRELA Workshop (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Jan 15-18)
‘Methanol masers - tracers of massive star formation’
eSMA Workshop (Leiden, Netherlands; Feb 1-2)
IAU Symposium 242 (Alice Springs, Australia; March 12-16)
‘Where methanol masers spring’
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
‘Where methanol masers spring’
Young European Radio Astronomer's Conference (YERAC) (Bordeaux,
France; Sept 4-7)
‘Methanol masers - tracing high-mass star-formation’
Massive Star Formation: Observations confront Theory (Heidelberg,
Germany; Sept 10-14)
‘Where methanol masers spring’
ESTRELA Workshop (Manchester, UK; Oct 8-11)
‘Methanol masers - tracing high-mass star-formation’
Bonn-Dwingeloo High Resolution Radio Astronomy meeting
(Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Oct 30)
‘Where methanol masers spring’
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
137
Usov
Astron meeting (Dwingeloo, Netherlands, weekly)
van Bemmel
Young LOFAR day (Groningen, Netherlands, Feb 22)
LOFAR Surveys (Leiden, Netherlands, Mar 6-8)
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands,
May 14-16) (Chair of LOC)
Modern Radio Universe 2007 (Manchester, UK, Oct 1-4)
‘Ionospheric limitations for LOFAR and SKA’
LIONS kick-off (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Oct 10)
LOFAR Calibration workshop (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Oct 16-18)
LIONS: LOFAR IONospheric Simulations’
LOFAR Surveys (Leiden, Netherlands, Dec 10-12)
‘LIONS: LOFAR IONospheric Simulations (update)’
LIONS long baseline meeting (Leiden, Netherlands; Dec 13)
‘LIONS: LOFAR IONospheric Simulations (update)’
van Delft
Science and World War II (Museum Boerhaave, Leiden, Netherlands,
Jan 25-26)
Show Physics (Lorentz Center, Leiden, Netherlands, Mar 26-30)
XXVI Scientific Instrument Commission Symposium (Cambridge, USA;
Sep 6-11)
van der Werf
Extragalactic surveys with LOFAR (Leiden, The Netherlands; Mar 6-8)
’LOFAR and high-redshift starburst galaxies’
The Origin of Galaxies: Exploring Galaxy Evolution with the New
Generation of Infrared-Millimetre Facilities (Obergurgl, Austria;
Mar 24-29)
‘Legacy Surveys with SCUBA-2’
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
Legacy of multi-wavelength surveys (Xining, China; Aug 19-25)
‘The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey
ALMA Community meeting (Garching, Germany; Sep 3-4)
‘The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope’
Surveys for ALMA (Garching, Germany; Sep 5-6)
138
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
van Dishoeck
A science vision for European astronomy (Poitiers, France; Jan 22-24)
Science with the eSMA (Leiden, Netherlands; Feb 1-2)
‘Introduction into eSMA science’ (invited review)
From stars to planets (Gainesville, USA; Apr 11-14)
‘Chemistry in evolving protoplanetary disks’ (invited talk)
Molecules in space and the laboratory (Paris, France; May 14-18)
‘New instruments for new insight’ (invited review)
Canadian astronomical society meeting (Kingston, Canada; June 5-7)
‘Spitzer observations of star- and planet-forming regions: from ice cold to
steaming hot’ (Petrie award lecture)
NOCA science day (Utrecht, Netherlands; Aug 27)
‘Future of the NOVA Network program’
Astrophysics in the next decade: JWST and concurrent facilities (Tucson,
USA; Sep 24-28)
‘Astrochemistry of dense protostellar environments’ (invited review)
From cores to disks: Spitzer-IRS meeting (Pasadena, USA; Sep 29 - Oct 2)
SOFIA 2020 vision workshop (Pasadena, USA; Dec 6-7)
‘SOFIA science opportunities to 2020’ (invited review)
van Haasteren
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
NOVA Fall School (Dwingeloo, Netherlands, Oct 8-12)
van Kempen
Herschel Open Time Key Projects (Noordwijk, Netherlands Feb 22-25)
van Langevelde
eSMA workshop (Leiden, Netherlands; Feb 1-2)
EVN2015 workshop (Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Feb 28 - Mrt2)
24th Asia-Pacific Network Meeting (Xi'An, China; Aug 25-30)
‘e-VLBI a real-time telescope of intercontinental dimensions’
Massive Star Formation; Observations confront theory (Heidelberg,
Germany; Sep 10-14)
European Radio Interferometry School (Bonn, Germany; Sep 12-13)
‘The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA)’
e-VLBI symposium (Bonn, Germany; Sep 17-18)
Modern Radio Universe (Manchester, UK; Oct 1-5)
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
139
van Weeren
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands,
May 14-16)
‘Chemical Evolution of a Collapsing Prestellar Core’
X-shooter GTO meeting (Nijmegen, Netherlands, Nov 7)
'LOFAR sources with extreme spectra and the quest for galaxies at z > 6'
MCCT-SKADS Training School (Bologna, Italy, Sep 23-29)
Vermaas
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
The evolving ISM in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies (Pasadena,
USA; Dec 2-5)
‘The nuclear starburst of M83 revealed with SINFONI’ (poster)
Visser
Dust, Gas and Chemistry in Space (Belfast, UK; Jan 4-5)
’PAH chemistry and IR emission from circumstellar disks’
Spitzer c2d/IRS team meeting (Leiden, the Netherlands; Mar 12-16)
ISM/CSM Meeting (Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Apr 5)
’PAH chemistry and IR emission from circumstellar disks’
Molecules in Space and Laboratory (Paris, France; May 14-18)
‘PAH chemistry and IR emission from circumstellar disks’
Wehres
Chemische Wetenschappen, Spectroscopy and Theory (Lunteren,
Netherlands; Jan 29-30)
‘High Resolution Spectroscopy of Molecular Transients of Astrophysical Interest’
Marie Curie FP6 Network Meeting and Midterm Review (Perugia, Italy;
March 19-22)
‘The Molecular Universe’
Molecules in Space and Laboratory (Paris, France; May 13-18)
High Resolution Spectroscopy of Molecular Transients of Astrophysical
Interest
Joined Marie Curie FP6/IRAM Observing Summer School 2007
(Pradollano, Spain; Sep 28 – Oct 05)
Weijmans
SAURON team meeting (Groningen, Netherlands; Jan 17-19)
140
APPENDIX VI. PARTICIPATION IN SCIENTIFIC MEETINGS
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands;
May 14-16)
‘Cold and hot gas in NGC 2974: from 100 pc to 10 kpc scales’
‘Getting high school students into astronomy: the first Dutch Astronomy
Olympiad’
Summer School on Formation and Evolution of Galaxy Bulges (Oxford,
UK; July 12-13)
SAURON team meeting (Oxford, UK; July 23-25)
ATLAS3D team meeting (Oxford, UK; July 25-27)
SAURON team meeting (Leiden, Netherlands; Dec 10-13)
Wiersma
Computational Cosmology (Leiden, Netherlands; Jan 15-19)
Nederlandse Astronomen Conferentie (Veldhoven, Netherlands,
May 14-16)
Galaxy growth in a dark Universe (Heidelberg, Germany, July 16-20)
‘Chemodynamics in Cosmological Simulations: Where are the metals?’
Williams
Galaxy Growth in a Dark Universe (Heidelberg, Germany; Jul 16-20)
‘Warm-Hot Absorbers at z=0: Galactic or extragalactic?’
Appendix
VII
Observing
sessions
abroad
VII
Appendix
Observing
sessions
abroad
Albrecht
TNG (La Palma, Spain; July 27-03)
Bast
VLT-CRIRES (Paranal, Chile; Aug 29 - Sep 6)
Bottinelli
Green Bank Telescope (Green Bank, West Virginia, USA; Dec 26 2006-Jan 9)
Institut de RadioAstronomie MillimŽtrique 30 m Telescope (Pico Veleta,
Spain; Mar 27-Apr 3)
James Clerk Maxwell Telescope / expanded SubMillimeter Array (Mauna
Kea, Hawai`i, USA; May 29-Jun 1)
James Clerk Maxwell Telescope / expanded SubMillimeter Array (Mauna
Kea, Hawai`i, USA; Aug 27-Sep 1)
Institut de RadioAstronomie Millimétrique 30 m Telescope (Pico Veleta, Spain;
Nov 13-20)
Institut de RadioAstronomie Millimétrique 30 m Telescope (Pico Veleta, Spain;
Dec 15-21)
de Mooij
Observatorio del Teide, Telescopio Carloz Sanchez (Tenerife, Spain; Dec 14-22)
Franx
Keck Observatory (Mona Kea, Hawaii, USA; Jan 9-13)
Hatch
William Herschel Telescope (La Palma, Spain; Dec 28-30)
144
APPENDIX VII. OBSERVING SESSIONS ABROAD
Hill
Submillimetre Array (SMA) (Hilo, Hawaii; Apr 1-9)
Paul Wild Observatory Mopra Telescope (Narrabri, Australia; Aug 13-20)
APEX telescope (San Pedro, Chile; Oct 15-24)
Jaffe
Cerro Paranal (Paranal, Chile; June 21-30)
Cerro Paranal (Paranal, Chile; Nov 13-27)
Kuijken
William Herschel Telescope (La Palma, Spain; Feb 12-20)
Lommen
Submillimeter Array (Mauna Kea, HI, USA; July 14-22)
Miley
Australian Telescope (Narrabri, Australia; Sep 10–14)
Oliveira
WHT (La Palma, Spain; June 9-11)
VLT/ESO (Paranal, Chile; Oct 10-18)
Omar
Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (Pune, India; Mar 01-17)
Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (Pune, India; July 17-29)
Pandey-Pommier
Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (Pune, India, Aug 15 – sep 4)
Raban
Paranal VLTI 8m (Paranal, Chile, Feb 6-7)
Paranal VLTI 8m (Paranal, Chile, Apr 16-17)
Paranal VLTI 1.8m (Paranal, Chile, Oct 6-7)
Salter
JCMT (Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA; Nov 1-8)
Snellen
Isaac Newton Telescope, Isaac Newton Group (La Palma, Spain; May 4-9)
Torstensson
JCMT (Hilo, Hawaii, USA; Jun 15-18)
APPENDIX VII. OBSERVING SESSIONS ABROAD
van der Werf
ESO (Paranal, Chile; Dec 30-31)
van Dishoeck
VLT-CRIRES (Paranal, Chile; April 21-28)
APEX (San Pedro, Chile; June 21-25)
APEX (San Pedro, Chile; November 1-4)
van Kempen
James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (Mauna Kea, Hawaii; Feb 3–9)
APEX (San Pedro de Atacama, Chile; June 14 - July 3)
James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (Mauna Kea, Hawaii; July 3–11)
APEX (San Pedro de Atacama, Chile; Oct 21 - Nov 6)
van Weeren
GMRT (Pune, India, Jul 17-25)
Vermaas
VLT (Paranal, Chile; Dec 29-30)
Wehres
IRAM Observatory (Pradollano, Spain; Sep 28 – Oct 5)
Weijmans
3.5m Telescope (Calar Alto, Spain; Jan 21-23)
Williams
William Herschel 4.2 m Telescope (La Palma, Spain; Nov 7-11)
145
Appendix
VIII
Working
visits
abroad
Appendix
Working
visits
abroad
VIII
Albrecht
MPIA (Heidelberg, Germany; Mar 13-17)
MPIA (Heidelberg, Germany; Dec 16-19)
Alexander
Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge (Cambridge, UK, Nov 12-17)
Amiri
Bonn University (Bonn, Germany, Dec 12-14)
Bast
Caltech (Pasadena, USA; Sep 15 - Oct 6)
Bottinelli
Observatoire de Bordeaux (Bordeaux, France; Feb 7-11)
Center for Astrophysics (Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; Aug 20-24)
IPAC/Caltech (Pasadena, California, USA; Oct 3-10)
Center for Astrophysics (Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; Oct 15-24)
Observatoire de Bordeaux (Bordeaux, France; Dec 8-14)
Bouwman
University College Cork (Cork, Ireland, Apr 15-20)
Brandl
MIRI European Consortium Meeting (Toulouse, France; Mar 13-16)
Cornell University (Ithaca, USA; May 2-13)
JWST Partner Workshop (Dublin, Ireland; June 11-13)
ELT Design Study mid-term review (Garching, Germany; June 13-14)
150
APPENDIX VIII: WORKING VISITS ABROAD
GranteCan Instrument PDR (Review), (Mexico City, Mexico; June 30 - July 5)
MIRI European Consortium Meeting (Heidelberg, Germany; Oct 24 - 26)
Brown
Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (Monte Porzio, Italy; Jan 18-19)
Cuppen
Aarhus University (Aarhus, Denmark; Ma 14-16)
Cologne University (Cologne, Germany; May 8-9)
Dalla Vecchia
MPA (Garching, Germany; Mar 26-30)
Damen
Department of Astronomy, Yale University (New Haven, USA, Apr, 9-29)
Franx
University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, USA, Jan 4-8)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Mar 13-14)
Yale University (New Haven, USA; Apr 14-18)
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Cambridge, USA; Apr 18-19)
University of California, Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, USA, June 28-30)
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Cambridge, USA; July 27-Aug
19)
Yale University(New Haven, USA; Nov 11-15)
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Cambridge, USA; Nov 16-17)
MPIA (Heidelberg, Germany; Dec 18-20)
Groves
MPE (Garching, Germany; Apr 1-4)
Hatch
Jila (Boulder, USA; Aug 1-17)
Institute of Astronomy (Cambridge, UK; Nov 12-16)
Hill
University of NSW (Sydney, Australia; Mar 3-10)
University of NSW (Sydney, Australia; Mar 18-31)
University of NSW (Sydney, Australia; Aug 7-12)
University of NSW (Sydney, Australia; Aug 21-31)
University of NSW (Sydney, Australia; Dec 3-21)
APPENDIX VIII: WORKING VISITS ABROAD
151
Hopman
Max-Planck Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik (Potsdam, Germany, June 6-8)
Weizmann Inst. of Science (Rehovot, Israel; July 20 - Aug 6)
IoA (Cambridge, UK, Nov 28 - Dec 2).
Intema
NRAO (Charlottesville, VA, USA; Feb 5-16)
NRAO (Charlottesville, VA, USA; July 4-12)
Ioppolo
Inaf - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Catania University (Catania, Italy;
Apr 7-30)
Israel
ESO-OPC (Garching, Germany; May 22-24)
DPG EPN Board (Berlin, Germany; Oct 27)
ESO-OPC (Garching, Germany; Dec 20-22)
Jaffe
MPIA (Heidelberg, Germany; Feb 5-9)
Observatoire de Nice, (Nice, France; Feb 6-7)
MPIA (Heidelberg, Germany; March 12-13)
ESO (Garching Germany; April 2-4)
MPIfR (Bonn, Germany; April 4-6)
ESO (Garching, Germany; April 16-17)
Observatoire de Nice (Nice, France; April 23-24)
MPIA (heidelberg, Germany; Oct. 4-5)
Observatoire de Nice (Nice, France; Oct 16-17)
Observatoire de Nice, (Nice, France; Nov 16-17)
MPIA (Heidelberg, Germany; Nov 23-24)
Katgert
Osservatorio Astronomico (Trieste, Italy; Jul 4-14)
Kendrew
MIRI test team meeting (Didcot, UK; Apr 25-26)
MIRI EGSE training (Didcot, UK; June 11-13)
MIRI EC meeting (Heidelberg, Germany; Oct 24-26)
UK Astronomy Technology Centre (Edinburgh, UK; Nov 27)
152
APPENDIX VIII: WORKING VISITS ABROAD
Kuijken
University Observatory München (München, Germany; Jan 26-27)
Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (Didcot, UK; Oct 1-2)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Dec 4-5)
Basel Astronomy Institute (Basel, Switzerland; Dec 14)
Levin, (Sarah)
Frankfurt Book Fair (Frankfurt, Germany; Oct 13-14)
Linnartz
University College Cork (Cork, Ireland; February)
Physica Scripta / IOP board meeting (Bristol, UK; March)
FP7 ITN kick-off meeting UCL (London, UK; March)
CERN (Geneva, Zwitserland; June)
INP Greifswald (Greifswald, Germany; June)
Astronomical Institute University Leuven (Leuven, Belgium; regular)
Sackler Foundation (New York, USA; December)
Lommen
Institute for Astronomy (Manoa, HI, USA; July 24-25)
Swinburne University (Melbourne, Australia; Nov10-24)
[email protected] (Canberra, Australia; Nov 24 - Dec 4)
Lub
Akademie der Wissenschaften (Vienna, Austria; May 4 - 6)
Astronomy and Astrophysics Board
Maschietto
IoA Cambridge University (Cambridge, UK; Feb 10-16)
Micelotta
Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris (IAP) (Paris, France; Mar 1st - Nov 15)
Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS) (Orsay, France; Mar 1st - Dec 16)
Miley
IAU EC, South African Astronomical Observatory (Cape Town, South Africa;
May 15–18)
UNAWE ISC, South African Astronomical Observatory (Cape Town, South
Africa; May 24–25)
UNAWE ISC, UNESCO (Paris, France; Sep 3)
ACS, Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, USA; Sep 17–18)
CONGO, UNOOSA (Vienna, Austria; Octber 8–10)
APPENDIX VIII: WORKING VISITS ABROAD
UNAWE, DG Research, European Union (Brussels Belgium; Nov 20)
Istituto Radioastronomia (Bologna, Italy; Nov 25–29)
Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (Bonn, Germany; Dec 17-19)
Ödman
UNESCO (Paris, France; Jan 6–9)
Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (Madrid, Spain; Jan 25-26)
Institute for Computational Cosmology (Durham, UK; Mar 10-13)
Tamil Nadu Science Forum (Chennai, India; Mar 21–25)
Unizul Science Centre (Richard’s Bay, South Africa; Apr 30)
Ministry of Education (Mbabane, Swaziland; May 2)
Catembe Science Centre (Catembe, Mozambique; May 3)
Ministry of Education (Maseru, Lesotho; May 8)
SAAO (Cape Town, South Africa; May 16–23)
Universe Awareness ISC Meeting (Cape Town, South Africa; May 24–25)
Herzberg Institute (Victoria, Canada; June 1-3)
Pratham Mumbai and Hyderabad offices (Hyderabad, India; Sep 29)
Oliveira
California Institute of Technology (Pasadena, USA; Mar 15 – Dec 31)
Röttgering
Max Planck Institut for Astronomy (Heidelberg, Germany; April 15-17)
Royal Observatory Edinburgh (Edinburgh, UK; June 12)
Salter
Strathclyde University (Glasgow, Scotland, UK; Mar 2-5)
Schaye
Institute of Astronomy (Edinburgh, UK; Oct 31 - Nov 1)
Snellen
Observatoire de Paris (Paris, France; Nov 26)
Stuik
ESO (Garching, Germany; Mar 21)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Jul 17)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Aug 9)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Oct 29-30)
Observatoire de Lyon (Lyon, France; Dec 17-20)
153
154
APPENDIX VIII: WORKING VISITS ABROAD
Taylor
MPIA (Heidelberg, Germany; Feb 26-Mar 9)
van der Werf
Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (Toulouse, France; Mar 13)
Observatoire de Geneve (Geneva, Switzerland; Mar 15-16)
Queen's University (Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK; May 24-25)
European Southern Observatory (Garching, Germany; Oct 19)
Joint Astronomy Center (Hilo, Hawii, USA; Nov 26-27)
van Dishoeck
Max Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (Garching, Germany;
Mar 1-3)
CNES (Toulouse, France; Mar 13-14)
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Tokyo, Japan; Mar 27)
Annual Reviews (Palo Alto, USA; Apr 15)
IPAC (Pasadena, USA; Apr 16-20)
Max Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (Garching, Germany;
May 7-8)
University of Chicago (Chicago, USA; June 8)
IAS (Dublin, Ierland; June 11-12)
ALMA offices (Santiago, Chile; June 26-29)
Max Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (Garching, Germany;
Aug 6-19)
Center for Astrophysics (Cambridge, USA; Sep 4-5)
Max Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (Garching, Germany;
Sep 20-21)
California Institute of Technology (Pasadena, USA; Sep 29-Oct 2)
Max Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (Garching, Germany;
Oct 6-7)
Max Planck Institut für Astronomie (Heidelberg; Oct 8-9)
Max Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (Garching, Germany;
Oct 17-22)
Max Planck Institut für Astronomie (Heidelberg; Oct 24-25)
ALMA offices (San Pedro, Chile; Oct 29-31)
Max Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (Garching, Germany;
Nov 15-19)
University of Durham (Durham, UK; Nov 21)
California Institute of Technology (Pasadena, USA; Dec 5-7)
Osservatorio Arcetri (Florence, Italy; Dec 13-14)
APPENDIX VIII: WORKING VISITS ABROAD
van Kempen
MPE (Garching, Germany; Dec 17-24)
van Langevelde
Shanghai Observatory (Shanghai, China; Aug 22-25)
Visser
MPIA (Heidelberg, Germany; Nov 9-16)
MPE (Garching, Germany; Dec 17-21)
Wehres
Institute of Astronomy (Leuven, Belgium; Feb 20)
Institute of Astronomy (Leuven, Belgium; Sep 05)
Institute of Astronomy (Leuven, Belgium; Sep 26)
Institute of Astronomy (Leuven, Belgium; Nov 21)
Weijmans
Observatoire de Lyon (Lyon, France; Mar 12-16)
University of Oxford (Oxford, UK; July 16-20)
University of Durham (Durham, UK; Nov 6-9)
ESO (Garching, Germany; Nov 19-23)
Wuyts
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Cambridge, USA; Apr 15 May 5)
Williams
Yale University (New Haven, CT, USA; Apr 30 - May 24)
155
Appendix
IX
Colloquia
given
outside Leiden
Appendix
Colloquia
given
outside Leiden
IX
Alexander
Formation & Dynamics of the Galactic Centre Stellar Discs
University of Leicester, Leicester, UK, Dec 12
Bast
SiS line emission as a probe of chemistry and grain formation in circumstellar envelopes
of AGB stars
Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, Colombia; Aug 21
Bottinelli
Hot corinos: pre-biotic molecules around solar-type protostars
Observatoire de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France; Feb 8
Idem
Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; Aug 24
Idem
Joint Astronomy Center, Hilo, Hawai`i, USA; Aug 27
Brandl
Starburst Studies with Spitzer
Max Planck Institut fuer Radiastronomie, Bonn, Germany; Feb 2
Idem
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA; April 30
Idem
Cornell University, Ithaca, USA; May 9
Brown
Gaia - taking the Galactic census
Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Monte Porzio, Italy; Jan 18
160
APPENDIX IX. COLLOQUIA GIVEN OUTSIDE LEIDEN
Idem
Sterrenkundig Instituut, Utrecht, Netherlands; Feb 7
Cuppen
Monte Carlo Simulations of Interstellar Surface Chemistry
Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; Mar 14
Idem
Cologne University,Cologne, Germany; May 8
Idem
Universiteit Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands; Oct 30
Hatch
Diffuse UV light in the Spiderweb: Evidence for star formation outside galaxies
Jila, Boulder, USA; Aug 17
Hill
Profiling Young Massive Stars University of New South Wales
Kensington, Australia; Mar 7
Idem
Submillimetre Array, Hilo, Hawaii; Apr 2
Idem
SRON, Groningen, Netherlands; Sept 17
Idem
JIVE, Dwingeloo, Netherlands; Sept 20
‘Examining the Evolutionary Sequence of Massive Star Formation’
University of Exeter, Exeter, UK; Oct 4
Hopman
Stellar dynamics near massive black holes
Max-Planck Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Potsdam, Germany, June 7
Intema
Large-scale structure of Lyman break galaxies around a radio galaxy protocluster at
redshift z ~ 4
NRAO, Charlottesville VA, USA; Feb 13
Kendrew
MIDIR: A mid-infrared instrument for the E-ELT
University College London, London, UK; Nov 26
APPENDIX IX. COLLOQUIA GIVEN OUTSIDE LEIDEN
161
Kuijken
The KiDS Survey
Astronomy Dept., Nijmegen, Netherlands; Jun 13
Levin, (Sarah)
UNAWE: Humanizing Astronomy
National Observatory of Athens, Greece; Oct 9
Linnartz
General physics colloquium
University of Cork, Ireland; February
Plasma and Surface Science in Molecular Astrophysics
FOM Institute for Plasma Physics (Nieuwegein, Netherlands; Nov 29)
Lommen
The first steps in Planet Formation: finding pebbles in southern protoplanetary disks
IfA, Manoa, HI, USA; July 25
Multi-wavelength observations of grain growth in protoplanetary disks
Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia; Nov 13
Idem
[email protected], Canberra, Australia; Dec 4
Micelotta
A Spitzer Study of the Supernova Remnant N157B Environment
Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (IAS) Orsay, France; Apr 20
A Supernova in a Star Forming Region: N157B in the LMC
Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris (IAP) Paris, France; June 28
Miley
Probing the Early Universe with Radio Galaxies
Limerick University, Limerick, Ireland, Feb 27
Idem
Dublin City University, Ireland, March 1
Idem
University College Cork, Ireland, March 5
Idem
Institute for Mathematics, Chennai, India, March 28
Idem
KNAW, Netherlands, Sep 24
162
APPENDIX IX. COLLOQUIA GIVEN OUTSIDE LEIDEN
Ödman
The Universe Awareness Programme – UK possibilities
(Durham, UK; Mar 13)
Universe Awareness: Sparking young children’s curiosity
(SAAO, Cape Town, South Africa; May 23)
Oliveira
Disk Evolution in Serpens
Caltech, Pasadena, USA; Oct 1
Raban
The obscuring torus in NGC 1068
Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; May 26
Röttgering
LOFAR - Opening up a New Window on the Universe
Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg, Germany; Feb 6
Idem
Istituto di Radioastronomia, Bologna, Italy; Oct 15
Schaye
The Chemical Enrichment of the Intergalactic Medium
Edinburgh, U.K.; Oct 31
Schnitzeler
WSRT Faraday tomography of the Galactic ISM
University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada; Apr 15
Idem
Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Penticton, Canada; Apr 19
Vlahakis
Dust in Nearby Galaxies
Universiteit Gent, Belgium; Nov 30
van Dishoeck
Spitzer Observations of Gas and Dust in Star- and Planet-forming Regions: Ice Cold
and Steaming Hot
Munich Joint Colloquium, Garching, Germany; Mar 1
Idem
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo, Japan; Mar 27
Idem
Astronomy Department, University of Chicago, Chicago, USA; June 8
APPENDIX IX. COLLOQUIA GIVEN OUTSIDE LEIDEN
163
Idem
APEX, San Pedro, Chile; June 24
Building planets and the ingredients of life between the stars: Grubb Parson prize
lecture
Physics and Astronomy Department, Durham, UK; Nov 21
Spitzer Observations of Gas and Dust in Star- and Planet-forming Regions: Ice Cold
and Steaming Hot
Physics and Astronomy Department, Durham, UK; Nov 21
van Langevelde
JIVE: progress with e-VLBI and science highlights
Shanghai, China; Aug 24
van Weeren
LOFAR: sky models and CS1 images
NCRA, Pune, India, Jul 24
Wuyts
Red galaxies at z~2.5: confronting simulations with observations
MPIA, Heidelberg, Germany; Jan 11
Appendix
X
Scientific
publications
Appendix
Scientific
publications
X
X.1. Ph.D. Theses and Books
S. E. Bisschop, Complex Molecules in the Laboratory and Star Forming
Regions, Ph.D. thesis, Leiden University, November 2007.
V. C. Geers, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Disks around Young Solartype Stars, Ph.D. thesis, Leiden University, October 2007.
S. Hekker, Radial velocity variations in Red Giant Stars: Pulsations, spots and
planets, Ph.D. thesis, Leiden University, September 2007.
M. T. Kriek, The many phases of massive galaxies. A Near-Infrared
spectroscopic study of galaxies in the early universe, Ph.D. thesis, Leiden
University, September 2007.
F. Lahuis, Molecular fingerprints of star formation throughout the Universe: a
space-based infrared study, Ph.D. thesis, Leiden University, May 2007.
N. G. H. Ritzerveld, The Simplicity of Transport. Triangulating the First Light,
Ph.D. thesis, Leiden University, February 2007.
L. Snijders, Extreme star formation in starburst galaxies, Ph.D. thesis, Leiden
University, November 2007.
D. van Delft, Freezing Physics; Heike Kamerlingh Onnes and the Quest for
Cold (Edita, Amsterdam 2007).
S. E. R. Wuyts, Red Galaxies at High Redshift, Ph.D. thesis, Leiden University,
September 2007.
168
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
X.2. Articles in Refereed Journals
K. Acharyya, G. W. Fuchs, H. J. Fraser, E. F. van Dishoeck, and H. Linnartz,
Desorption of CO and O2 interstellar ice analogs, Astron. Astrophys. 466, 1005–
1012.
A. Al-Halabi and E. F. van Dishoeck, Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion on
amorphous solid water ice, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 382, 1648–1656.
S. Albrecht, S. Reffert, I. Snellen, A. Quirrenbach, and D. S. Mitchell, The
spin axes orbital alignment of both stars within the eclipsing binary system
V1143 Cyg using the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, Astron. Astrophys. 474, 565–
573.
L. Armus, V. Charmandaris, J. Bernard-Salas, H. W. W. Spoon, J. A. Marshall,
S. J. U. Higdon, V. Desai, H. I. Teplitz, L. Hao, D. Devost, B. R. Brandl, Y. Wu,
G. C. Sloan, B. T. Soifer, J. R. Houck, and T. L. Herter, Observations of
Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer
Space Telescope. II. The IRAS Bright Galaxy Sample, Astrophys. J. 656, 148–167.
O. Asvany, E. Hugo, F. Müller, F. Kühnemann, S. Schiller, J. Tennyson, and S.
Schlemmer, Overtone spectroscopy of H2D+ and D2H+ using laser induced
reactions, J. of Chem. Phys. 127, 154317-154318.
L. Bai, D. Marcillac, G. H. Rieke, M. J. Rieke, K.-V. H. Tran, J. L. Hinz, G.
Rudnick, D. M. Kelly, and M. Blaylock, IR Observations of MS 1054-03: Star
Formation and Its Evolution in Rich Galaxy Clusters, Astrophys. J. 664, 181–
197.
A. O. Benz, P. Stäuber, T. L. Bourke, F. F. S. van der Tak, E. F. van Dishoeck,
and J. K. Jørgensen, Energetic radiation and the sulfur chemistry of
protostellar envelopes: submillimeter interferometry of AFGL 2591, Astron.
Astrophys. 475, 549–558.
S. E. Bisschop, G. W. Fuchs, A. C. A. Boogert, E. F. van Dishoeck, and H.
Linnartz, Infrared spectroscopy of HCOOH in interstellar ice analogues,
Astron. Astrophys. 470, 749–759.
S. E. Bisschop, G. W. Fuchs, E. F. van Dishoeck, and H. Linnartz, H-atom
bombardment of CO2, HCOOH, and CH3CHO containing ices, Astron.
Astrophys. 474, 1061–1071.
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
169
S. E. Bisschop, J. K. Jørgensen, E. F. van Dishoeck, and E. B. M. de Wachter,
Testing grain-surface chemistry in massive hot-core regions, Astron. Astrophys.
465, 913–929.
A. D. Bolatto, J. D. Simon, S. Stanimirovi´c, J. T. van Loon, R. Y. Shah, K. Venn,
A. K. Leroy, K. Sandstrom, J. M. Jackson, F. P. Israel, A. Li, L. Staveley-Smith,
C. Bot, F. Boulanger, and M. Rubio, The Spitzer Survey of the Small
Magellanic Cloud: S3MC Imaging and Photometry in the Mid- and FarInfrared Wave Bands, Astrophys. J. 655, 212–232.
C. M. Booth and T. Theuns, Neutral hydrogen in galactic fountains, Monthly
Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 381, L89–L93.
C. G. Bornancini, C. De Breuck, W. de Vries, S. Croft, W. van Breugel, H.
Röttgering, and D. Minniti, Imaging and spectroscopy of ultrasteep spectrum
radio sources, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 378, 551–562.
S. Bottinelli, C. Ceccarelli, J. P. Williams, and B. Lefloch, Hot corinos in NGC
1333-IRAS4B and IRAS2A, Astron. Astrophys. 463, 601–610.
R. J. Bouwens, G. D. Illingworth, M. Franx, and H. Ford, UV Luminosity
Functions at z~4, 5, and 6 from the Hubble Ultra Deep Field and Other Deep
Hubble Space Telescope ACS Fields: Evolution and Star Formation History,
Astrophys. J. 670, 928–958.
J. Bouwman, W. Ludwig, Z. Awad, K. I. Öberg, G. W. Fuchs, E. F. Van
Dishoeck, and H. Linnartz, Band profiles and band strengths in mixed
H2O:CO ices, Astron. Astrophys. 476, 995–1003.
C. Brinch, A. Crapsi, M. R. Hogerheijde, and J. K. Jørgensen, Structure and
dynamics of the class I young stellar object L1489 IRS, Astron. Astrophys. 461,
1037–1047.
C. Brinch, A. Crapsi, J. K. Jørgensen, M. R. Hogerheijde, and T. Hill, A
deeply embedded young protoplanetary disk around L1489 IRS observed by
the Submillimeter Array, Astron. Astrophys. 475, 915–923.
B. R. Brandl, J. Bernard-Salas, H. W. W. Spoon, D. Devost, G. C. Sloan, S.
Guilles, Y. Wu, J. R. Houck, D. W. Weedman, L. Armus, P. N. Appleton, B. T.
Soifer, V. Charmandaris, L. Hao, J. A. Marshall, S. J. Higdon, and T. L. Herter,
Erratum: The Mid-Infrared Properties of Starburst Galaxies from Spitzer-IRS
Spectroscopy (ApJ, 653, 1129 [2006]), ApJ, 665, 884–885
T. Y. Brooke, T. L. Huard, T. L. Bourke, A. C. A. Boogert, L. E. Allen, G. A.
Blake, N. J. Evans, II, P. M. Harvey, D. W. Koerner, L. G. Mundy, P. C. Myers,
D. L. Padgett, A. I. Sargent, K. R. Stapelfeldt, E. F. van Dishoeck, N. Chapman,
170
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
L. Cieza, M. M. Dunham, S.-P. Lai, A. Porras, W. Spiesman, P. J. Teuben, C. H.
Young, Z. Wahhaj, and C. W. Lee, The Spitzer c2d Survey of Nearby Dense
Cores. IV. Revealing the Embedded Cluster in B59, Astrophys. J. 655, 364–374.
J. M. Brown, G. A. Blake, C. P. Dullemond, B. Merín, J. C. Augereau, A. C. A.
Boogert, N. J. Evans, II, V. C. Geers, F. Lahuis, J. E. Kessler-Silacci, K. M.
Pontoppidan, and E. F. van Dishoeck, Cold Disks: Spitzer Spectroscopy of
Disks around Young Stars with Large Gaps, Astrophys. J. Lett. 664, L107–L110.
M. Cappellari, E. Emsellem, R. Bacon, M. Bureau, R. L. Davies, P. T. de
Zeeuw, J. Falcón-Barroso, D. Krajnović, H. Kuntschner, R. M. McDermid, R.
F. Peletier, M. Sarzi, R. C. E. van den Bosch, and G. van de Ven, The SAURON
project - X. The orbital anisotropy of elliptical and lenticular galaxies:
revisiting the (V/σ, ε) diagram with integral-field stellar kinematics, Monthly
Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 379, 418–444.
C. L. Carilli, R. Wang, M. B. van Hoven, K. Dwarakanath, J. N. Chengalur,
and S. Wyithe, A Search for H I 21 cm Absorption toward the Highest Redshift
(z~5.2) Radio-loud Objects, Astron. J. 133, 2841–2845.
A. J. Cenarro, R. F. Peletier, P. S´anchez-Blázquez, S. O. Selam, E. Toloba, N.
Cardiel, J. Falcón-Barroso, J. Gorgas, J. Jiménez-Vicente, and A. Vazdekis,
Medium-resolution Isaac Newton Telescope library of empirical spectra - II.
The stellar atmospheric parameters, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 374, 664–
690.
Q. Chang, H. M. Cuppen, and E. Herbst, Gas-grain chemistry in cold
interstellar cloud cores with a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to surface
chemistry, Astron. Astrophys. 469, 973–983.
N. L. Chapman, S.-P. Lai, L. G. Mundy, N. J. Evans, II, T. Y. Brooke, L. A.
Cieza, W. J. Spiesman, L. M. Rebull, K. R. Stapelfeldt, A. Noriega-Crespo, L.
Lanz, L. E. Allen, G. A. Blake, T. L. Bourke, P. M. Harvey, T. L. Huard, J. K.
Jørgensen, D. W. Koerner, P. C. Myers, D. L. Padgett, A. I. Sargent, P. Teuben,
E. F. van Dishoeck, Z. Wahhaj, and K. E. Young, The Spitzer c2d Survey of
Large, Nearby, Interstellar Clouds. IV. Lupus Observed with MIPS, Astrophys.
J. 667, 288–302.
L. Cieza, D. L. Padgett, K. R. Stapelfeldt, J.-C. Augereau, P. Harvey, N. J.
Evans, II, B. Merín, D. Koerner, A. Sargent, E. F. van Dishoeck, L. Allen, G.
Blake, T. Brooke, N. Chapman, T. Huard, S.-P. Lai, L. Mundy, P. C. Myers, W.
Spiesman, and Z. Wahhaj, The Spitzer c2d Survey of Weak-Line T Tauri Stars.
II. New Constraints on the Timescale for Planet Building, Astrophys. J. 667,
308–328.
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
171
D. M. Clark, S. S. Eikenberry, B. R. Brandl, J. C. Wilson, J. C. Carson, C. P.
Henderson, T. L. Hayward, D. J. Barry, A. F. Ptak, and E. J. M. Colbert,
Infrared Counterparts to Chandra X-Ray Sources in the Antennae, Astrophys. J.
658, 319–327.
D. M. Clark, S. S. Eikenberry, B. R. Brandl, J. C. Wilson, J. C. Carson, C. P.
Henderson, T. L. Hayward, D. J. Barry, A. F. Ptak, and E. J. M. Colbert,
Erratum: Infrared Counterparts to Chandra X-Ray Sources in the Antennae
(ApJ, 658, 319), ApJ, 668, 1266–1266
A. Crapsi, P. Caselli, M. C. Walmsley, and M. Tafalla, Observing the gas
temperature drop in the high-density nucleus of L 1544, Astron. Astrophys. 470,
221–230.
J.-G. Cuby, P. Hibon, C. Lidman, O. Le Fèvre, R. Gilmozzi, A. Moorwood, and
P. van der Werf, A narrow-band search for Lyα emitting galaxies at z = 8.8,
Astron. Astrophys. 461, 911–916.
M. S. Cunha, C. Aerts, J. Christensen-Dalsgaard, A. Baglin, L. Bigot, T. M.
Brown, C. Catala, O. L. Creevey, A. D. de Souza, P. Eggenberger, P. J. V.
Garcia, F. Grundahl, P. Kervella, D. W. Kurtz, P. Mathias, A. Miglio, M. J. P. F.
G. Monteiro, G. Perrin, F. P. Pijpers, D. Pourbaix, A. Quirrenbach, K.
Rousselet-Perraut, T. C. Teixeira, F. Th´evenin, and M. J. Thompson,
Asteroseismology and interferometry, Astron. Astrophys. Review 14, 217–360.
M. R. Cunningham, P. A. Jones, P. D. Godfrey, D. M. Cragg, I. Bains, M. G.
Burton, P. Calisse, N. H. M. Crighton, S. J. Curran, T. M. Davis, J. T. Dempsey,
B. Fulton, M. G. Hidas, T. Hill, L. Kedziora-Chudczer, V. Minier, M. B. Pracy,
C. Purcell, J. Shobbrook, and T. Travouillon, A search for propylene oxide and
glycine in Sagittarius B2 (LMH) and Orion, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc.
376, 1201–1210.
H. M. Cuppen and E. Herbst, Simulation of the Formation and Morphology of
Ice Mantles on Interstellar Grains, Astrophys. J. 668, 294–309.
F. J. de Heer, H. Linnartz, and H. H. Stroke, PREFACE: Pierre Jacquinot–
pioneer in high-resolution spectroscopy and science statesman, Physica Scripta
76, 123.
M. A. Deij, H. M. Cuppen, H. Meekes, and E. Vlieg, Steps on surfaces in
modeling crystal growth, Crystal Growth & Design 7, 1936–1942.
V. Desai, L. Armus, H. W. W. Spoon, V. Charmandaris, J. Bernard-Salas, B. R.
Brandl, D. Farrah, B. T. Soifer, H. I. Teplitz, P. M. Ogle, D. Devost, S. J. U.
172
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
Higdon, J. A. Marshall, and J. R. Houck, PAH Emission from Ultraluminous
Infrared Galaxies, Astrophys. J. 669, 810–820.
N. de Vries, I. A. G. Snellen, R. T. Schilizzi, M. D. Lehnert, and M. N.
Bremer, Complete identification of the Parkes half-Jansky sample of GHz
peaked spectrum radio galaxies, Astron. Astrophys. 464, 879–883.
M. A. Dopita, M. Reuland, W. van Breugel, W. de Vries, S. A. Stanford, H.
Röttgering, G.Miley, B. Venemans, H. Spinrad, S. Dawson, A. Dey, M. Lacy,
D. Stern, and A. Bunker, Halo ejection in distant radio galaxies: jet feedback in
massive galaxy formation, A. Space Sci. 311, 305–309.
N. G. Douglas, N. R. Napolitano, A. J. Romanowsky, L. Coccato, K. Kuijken,
M. R. Merrifield, M. Arnaboldi, O. Gerhard, K. C. Freeman, H. R. Merrett, E.
Noordermeer, and M. Capaccioli, The PN.S Elliptical Galaxy Survey: Data
Reduction, Planetary Nebula Catalog, and Basic Dynamics for NGC 3379,
Astrophys. J. 664, 257–276.
C. C. Dow-Hygelund, B. P. Holden, R. J. Bouwens, G. D. Illingworth, A. van
der Wel, M. Franx, P. G. van Dokkum, H. Ford, P. Rosati, D. Magee, and A.
Zirm, Spectroscopy of z~6 i-Dropout Galaxies: Frequency of Lyα Emission
and the Sizes of Lyα-emitting Galaxies, Astrophys. J. 660, 47–61.
C. P. Dullemond, T. Henning, R. Visser, V. C. Geers, E. F. van Dishoeck, and
K. M. Pontoppidan, Dust sedimentation in protoplanetary disks with
polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, Astron. Astrophys. 473, 457–466.
J. Eastman, P. Martini, G. Sivakoff, D. D. Kelson, J. S. Mulchaey, and K.-V.
Tran, First Measurement of a Rapid Increase in the AGN Fraction in HighRedshift Clusters of Galaxies, Astrophys. J. Lett. 664, L9–L12.
E. Emsellem, M. Cappellari, D. Krajnović, G. van de Ven, R. Bacon, M.
Bureau, R. L. Davies, P. T. de Zeeuw, J. Falcón-Barroso, H. Kuntschner, R.
McDermid, R. F. Peletier, and M. Sarzi, The SAURON project - IX. A
kinematic classification for early-type galaxies, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc.
379, 401–417.
D. Farrah, J. Bernard-Salas, H. W. W. Spoon, B. T. Soifer, L. Armus, B. Brandl,
V. Charmandaris, V. Desai, S. Higdon, D. Devost, and J. Houck, HighResolution Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies,
Astrophys. J. 667, 149–169.
K. Fathi, S. Toonen, J. Falcón-Barroso, J. E. Beckman, O. Hernandez, O.
Daigle, C. Carignan, and T. de Zeeuw, Quantifying Resonant Structure in
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
173
NGC 6946 from Two-dimensional Kinematics, Astrophys. J. Lett. 667, L137–
L140.
D. L. Fields, S. Mathur, Y. Krongold, R. Williams, and F. Nicastro, The Weak
Absorbing Outflow in AGN Mrk 279: Evidence of Supersolar Metal
Abundances, Astrophys. J. 666, 828–834.
A. Fuente, C. Ceccarelli, R. Neri, T. Alonso-Albi, P. Caselli, D. Johnstone, E. F.
van Dishoeck, and F. Wyrowski, Protostellar clusters in intermediate mass
(IM) star forming regions, Astron. Astrophys. 468, L37–L40.
K. Ganda, R. F. Peletier, R. M. McDermid, J. Falcón-Barroso, P. T. de Zeeuw,
R. Bacon, M. Cappellari, R. L. Davies, E. Emsellem, D. Krajnović, H.
Kuntschner, M. Sarzi, and G. van de Ven, Absorption-line strengths of 18
latetype spiral galaxies observed with SAURON, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr.
Soc. 380, 506–540.
D. A. García-Hernández, P. García-Lario, B. Plez, A. Manchado, F. D’Antona,
J. Lub, and H. Habing, Lithium and zirconium abundances in massive
Galactic O-rich AGB stars, Astron. Astrophys. 462, 711–730.
E. Gawiser, H. Francke, K. Lai, K. Schawinski, C. Gronwall, R. Ciardullo, R.
Quadri, A. Orsi, L. F. Barrientos, G. A. Blanc, G. Fazio, J. J. Feldmeier, J.-S.
Huang, L. Infante, P. Lira, N. Padilla, E. N. Taylor, E. Treister, C. M. Urry, P.
G. van Dokkum, and S. N. Virani, Lyα-Emitting Galaxies at z = 3.1: L*
Progenitors Experiencing Rapid Star Formation, Astrophys. J. 671, 278–284.
V. C. Geers, K. M. Pontoppidan, E. F. van Dishoeck, C. P. Dullemond, J.-C.
Augereau, B. Merín, I. Oliveira, and J. W. Pel, Spatial separation of small and
large grains in the transitional disk around the young star IRS 48, Astron.
Astrophys. 469, L35–L38.
V. C. Geers, E. F. van Dishoeck, R. Visser, K.M. Pontoppidan, J.-C. Augereau,
E. Habart, and A. M. Lagrange, Spatially extended polycyclic aromatic
hydrocarbons in circumstellar disks around T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars,
Astron. Astrophys. 476, 279–289.
D. A. Gouliermis, T. Henning, W. Brandner, A. E. Dolphin, M. Rosa, and B.
Brandl, Discovery of the Pre-Main-Sequence Population of the Stellar
Association LH 95 in the Large Magellanic Cloud with Hubble Space
Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys Observations, Astrophys. J. Lett. 665,
L27–L30.
C. A. Grady, G. Schneider, K. Hamaguchi, M. L. Sitko, W. J. Carpenter, D.
Hines, K. A. Collins, G. M. Williger, B. E. Woodgate, T. Henning, F. M´enard,
174
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
D. Wilner, R. Petre, P. Palunas, A. Quirrenbach, J. A. Nuth, III, M. D.
Silverstone, and J. S. Kim, The Disk and Environment of a Young Vega
Analog: HD 169142, Astrophys. J. 665, 1391–1406.
M. A. T. Groenewegen, P. R. Wood, G. C. Sloan, J. A. D. L. Blommaert, M.- R.
L. Cioni, M. W. Feast, S. Hony, M. Matsuura, J. W. Menzies, E. A. Olivier, E.
Vanhollebeke, J. T. van Loon, P. A. Whitelock, A. A. Zijlstra, H. J. Habing, and
E. Lagadec, Luminosities and mass-loss rates of carbon stars in the Magellanic
Clouds, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 376, 313–337.
M. Gullieuszik, M. Rejkuba, M. R. Cioni, H. J. Habing, and E. V. Held,
Nearinfrared photometry of carbon stars in the Sagittarius dwarf irregular
galaxy and DDO 210, Astron. Astrophys. 475, 467–477.
M. A. Gürkan and C. Hopman, Resonant relaxation near a massive black hole:
the dependence on eccentricity, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 379, 1083–1088.
P. Harvey, B. Merín, T. L. Huard, L. M. Rebull, N. Chapman, N. J. Evans, II,
and P. C. Myers, The Spitzer c2d Survey of Large, Nearby, Interstellar Clouds.
IX. The Serpens YSO Population as Observed with IRAC and MIPS, Astrophys.
J. 663, 1149–1173.
P. M. Harvey, L. M. Rebull, T. Brooke, W. J. Spiesman, N. Chapman, T. L.
Huard, N. J. Evans, II, L. Cieza, S.-P. Lai, L. E. Allen, L. G. Mundy, D. L.
Padgett, A. I. Sargent, K. R. Stapelfeldt, P. C. Myers, E. F. van Dishoeck, G. A.
Blake, and D. W. Koerner, The Spitzer c2d Survey of Large, Nearby,
Interstellar Clouds. VIII. Serpens Observed with MIPS, Astrophys. J. 663, 1139–
1148.
N. A. Hatch, C. S. Crawford, and A. C. Fabian, Ionized nebulae surrounding
brightest cluster galaxies, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 380, 33–43.
N. A. Hatch, R. A. Overzier, H. J. A. Röttgering, J. D. Kurk, and G. K.Miley,
Diffuse UV light associated with the Spiderweb Galaxy: evidence for in situ
star formation outside galaxies, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. , 1150–+.
S. Hekker and J. Meléndez, Precise radial velocities of giant stars. III.
Spectroscopic stellar parameters, Astron. Astrophys. 475, 1003–1009.
B. P. Holden, G. D. Illingworth, M. Franx, J. P. Blakeslee, M. Postman, D. D.
Kelson, A. van der Wel, R. Demarco, D. K. Magee, K.-V. Tran, A. Zirm, H.
Ford, P. Rosati, and N. Homeier, Mass Selection and the Evolution of the
Morphology- Density Relation from z = 0.8 to 0, Astrophys. J. 670, 190–205.
C. Hopman, M. Freitag, and S. L. Larson, Gravitational wave bursts from the
Galactic massive black hole, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 378, 129–136.
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
175
A. M. Hughes, D. J. Wilner, N. Calvet, P. D’Alessio, M. J. Claussen, and M. R.
Hogerheijde, An Inner Hole in the Disk around TW Hydrae Resolved in 7
mm Dust Emission, Astrophys. J. 664, 536–542.
J. A. Johnson, D. A. Fischer, G. W. Marcy, J. T. Wright, P. Driscoll, R. P. Butler,
S. Hekker, S. Reffert, and S. S. Vogt, Retired A Stars and Their Companions:
Exoplanets Orbiting Three Intermediate-Mass Subgiants, Astrophys. J. 665,
785–793.
R. M. Johnstone, N. A. Hatch, G. J. Ferland, A. C. Fabian, C. S. Crawford, and
R. J. Wilman, Discovery of atomic and molecular mid-infrared emission lines
in off-nuclear regions of NGC 1275 and NGC4696 with the Spitzer Space
Telescope, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 382, 1246–1260.
B. Jonkheid, C. P. Dullemond, M. R. Hogerheijde, and E. F. van Dishoeck,
Chemistry and line emission from evolving Herbig Ae disks, Astron.
Astrophys. 463, 203–216.
J. K. Jørgensen, T. L. Bourke, P. C. Myers, J. Di Francesco, E. F. van Dishoeck,
C.-F. Lee, N. Ohashi, F. L. Schöier, S. Takakuwa, D. J. Wilner, and Q. Zhang,
PROSAC: A Submillimeter Array Survey of Low-Mass Protostars. I. Overview
of Program: Envelopes, Disks, Outflows, and Hot Cores, Astrophys. J. 659, 479–
498.
S. Kendrew, P. Doel, D. Brooks, A.M. King, C. Dorn, C. Yates, R.M. Dwan, I.
Richardson, and G. Evans, A Prototype carbon fibre composite deformable
mirror, Optical Engineering 46, 094003.
J. E. Kessler-Silacci, C. P. Dullemond, J.-C. Augereau, B. Merín, V. C. Geers, E.
F. van Dishoeck, N. J. Evans, II, and G. A. Blake, and J. Brown, Probing
Protoplanetary Disks with Silicate Emission: Where Is the Silicate Emission
Zone?, Astrophys. J. 659, 680–684.
H.-S. Kim, S. Kim, J.-Y. Bak, M. Garcia, B. Brandl, K. Xiao, W. Walsh, R. C.
Smith, and S. Youn, IRAC Observations of CO J = 4 –> 3 High-Velocity Cloud
in the 30 Doradus Complex in the Large Magellanic Cloud, Astrophys. J. 669,
1003–1010.
M. B. N. Kouwenhoven, A. G. A. Brown, and L. Kaper, A brown dwarf desert
for intermediate mass stars in Scorpius OB2?, Astron. Astrophys. 464, 581–599.
M. B. N. Kouwenhoven, A. G. A. Brown, S. F. Portegies Zwart, and L. Kaper,
The primordial binary population. II.. Recovering the binary population for
intermediate mass stars in Scorpius OB2, Astron. Astrophys. 474, 77–104.
176
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
M. B. N. Kouwenhoven, M. Bureau, S. Kim, and P. T. de Zeeuw, Optical BVI
imaging and H I synthesis observations of the dwarf irregular Galaxy ESO
364-G029, Astron. Astrophys. 470, 123–135.
M. Kriek, P. G. van Dokkum, M. Franx, G. D. Illingworth, P. Coppi, N. M.
Förster Schreiber, E. Gawiser, I. Labbé, P. Lira, D. Marchesini, R. Quadri, G.
Rudnick, E. N. Taylor, C. M. Urry, and P. P. van derWerf, The Origin of Line
Emission in Massive z~2.3 Galaxies: Evidence for Cosmic Downsizing of AGN
Host Galaxies, Astrophys. J. 669, 776–790.
I. Labbé, M. Franx, G. Rudnick, N. M. Förster Schreiber, P. G. van Dokkum, A.
Moorwood, H.-W. Rix, H. Röttgering, I. Trujillo, and P. van der Werf, The
Color-Magnitude Distribution of Field Galaxies to z~3: The Evolution and
Modeling of the Blue Sequence, Astrophys. J. 665, 944–972.
F. Lahuis, H. W. W. Spoon, A. G. G. M. Tielens, S. D. Doty, L. Armus, V.
Charmandaris, J. R. Houck, P. Stäuber, and E. F. van Dishoeck, Infrared
Molecular Starburst Fingerprints in Deeply Obscured (Ultra)Luminous
Infrared Galaxy Nuclei, Astrophys. J. 659, 296–304.
F. Lahuis, E. F. van Dishoeck, G. A. Blake, N. J. Evans, II, J. E. Kessler-Silacci,
and K. M. Pontoppidan, c2d Spitzer IRS Spectra of Disks around T Tauri Stars.
III. [Ne II], [Fe I], and H2 Gas-Phase Lines, Astrophys. J. 665, 492–511.
V. Lebouteiller, B. Brandl, J. Bernard-Salas, D. Devost, and J. R. Houck, PAH
Strength and the Interstellar Radiation Field around the Massive Young
Cluster NGC 3603, Astrophys. J. 665, 390–401.
D.-H. Lee, S. Pak, W. V. D. Dixon, and E. F. van Dishoeck, Ultraviolet Excited
High-J Molecular Hydrogen in Photodissociation Regions, Astrophys. J. 655,
940–945.
A. Leroy, A. Bolatto, S. Stanimirovic, N. Mizuno, F. Israel, and C. Bot, The
Spitzer Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud: Far-Infrared Emission and Cold
Gas in the Small Magellanic Cloud, Astrophys. J. 658, 1027–1046.
Y. Levin, On the theory of magnetar QPOs, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 377,
159–167.
Y. Levin, Starbursts near supermassive black holes: young stars in the Galactic
Centre, and gravitational waves in LISA band, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc.
374, 515–524.
D. Lommen, C. M. Wright, S. T. Maddison, J. K. Jørgensen, T. L. Bourke, E. F.
van Dishoeck, A. Hughes, D. J. Wilner, M. Burton, and H. J. van Langevelde,
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
177
Investigating grain growth in disks around southern T Tauri stars at
millimetre wavelengths, Astron. Astrophys. 462, 211–220.
D. Marchesini, P. van Dokkum, R. Quadri, G. Rudnick, M. Franx, P. Lira, S.
Wuyts, E. Gawiser, D. Christlein, and S. Toft, The Rest-Frame Optical
Luminosity Functions of Galaxies at 2<=z<=3.5, Astrophys. J. 656, 42–65.
R. Massey, C. Heymans, J. Bergé, G. Bernstein, S. Bridle, D. Clowe, H. Dahle,
R. Ellis, T. Erben, M. Hetterscheidt, F.W. High, C. Hirata, H. Hoekstra, P.
Hudelot, M. Jarvis, D. Johnston, K. Kuijken, V. Margoniner, R. Mandelbaum,
Y. Mellier, R. Nakajima, S. Paulin-Henriksson, M. Peeples, C. Roat, A.
Refregier, J. Rhodes, T. Schrabback, M. Schirmer, U. Seljak, E. Semboloni, and
L. van Waerbeke, The Shear Testing Programme 2: Factors affecting highprecision weak-lensing analyses, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 376, 13–38.
R. J. Mathar, Refractive index of humid air in the infrared: model fits, Journal
of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics 9, 470–476.
R. J. Mathar, Table of Feynman diagrams of the interacting Fermion Green’s
function, International Journal of Quantum Chemistry 107, 1975–1984.
R. J. Mathar, The Abcd Formula of Phase Definition in Optical Interferometry:
Combined Effect of Air Dispersion and Broad Passband, Baltic Astronomy 16,
287–308.
B. C.Matthews, J. S. Greaves,W. S. Holland, M. C.Wyatt, M. J. Barlow, P.
Bastien, C. A. Beichman, A. Biggs, H. M. Butner, W. R. F. Dent, J. Di Francesco,
C. Dominik, L. Fissel, P. Friberg, A. G. Gibb, M. Halpern, R. J. Ivison, R.
Jayawardhana, T. Jenness, D. Johnstone, J. J. Kavelaars, J. L. Marshall, N.
Phillips, G. Schieven, I. A. G. Snellen, H. J. Walker, D. Ward-Thompson, B.
Weferling, G. J. White, J. Yates, M. Zhu, and A. Craigon, An Unbiased Survey
of 500 Nearby Stars for Debris Disks: A JCMT Legacy Program, Publ. Astron.
Soc. Pacific 119, 842–854.
R.M.McDermid, E. Emsellem, K. L. Shapiro, R. Bacon, M. Bureau, M.
Cappellari, R. L. Davies, T. de Zeeuw, J. Falcón-Barroso, D. Krajnović, H.
Kuntschner, R. F. Peletier, M. Sarzi, and G. V. de Ven, Connecting stars and
ionised gas with integral-field spectroscopy, New Astronomy Review 51, 13–17.
R. Meijerink, M. Spaans, and F. P. Israel, Diagnostics of irradiated dense gas
in galaxy nuclei. II. A grid of XDR and PDR models, Astron. Astrophys. 461,
793–811.
K. Meisenheimer, K. R. W. Tristram, W. Jaffe, F. Israel, N. Neumayer, D.
Raban, H. Röttgering, W. D. Cotton, U. Graser, T. Henning, C. Leinert, B.
178
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
Lopez, G. Perrin, and A. Prieto, Resolving the innermost parsec of Centaurus
A at midinfrared wavelengths, Astron. Astrophys. 471, 453–465.
B. Merín, J.-C. Augereau, E. F. van Dishoeck, J. Kessler-Silacci, C. P.
Dullemond, G. A. Blake, F. Lahuis, J. M. Brown, V. C. Geers, K. M.
Pontoppidan, F. Comerón, A. Frasca, S. Guieu, J. M. Alcalá, A. C. A. Boogert,
N. J. Evans, II, P. D’Alessio, L. G. Mundy, and N. Chapman, Abundant
Crystalline Silicates in the Disk of a Very Low Mass Star, Astrophys. J. 661, 361–
367.
M. Messineo, M. G. Petr-Gotzens, F. Schuller, K. M. Menten, H. J. Habing, M.
Kissler-Patig, A. Modigliani, and J. Reunanen, Integral-field spectroscopy of
the Galactic cluster [DBS2003]8. Discovery of an ultra-compact HII region and
its ionizing star in the bright rimmed cloud SFO49, Astron. Astrophys. 472, 471–
482.
C. G. Mundell, G. Dumas, E. Schinnerer, N. Nagar, S. Haan, E. Wilcots, A. S.
Wilson, E. Emsellem, P. Ferruit, R. F. Peletier, and P. T. de Zeeuw, 3D studies
of neutral and ionised gas and stars in seyfert and inactive galaxies, New
Astronomy Review 51, 34–37.
R. Neri, A. Fuente, C. Ceccarelli, P. Caselli, D. Johnstone, E. F. van Dishoeck,
F. Wyrowski, M. Tafalla, B. Lefloch, and R. Plume, The IC1396N proto-cluster
at a scale of ~250 AU, Astron. Astrophys. 468, L33–L36.
N. Neumayer, M. Cappellari, J. Reunanen, H.-W. Rix, P. P. van der Werf, P. T.
de Zeeuw, and R. I. Davies, The Central Parsecs of Centaurus A:
Highexcitation Gas, a Molecular Disk, and the Mass of the Black Hole,
Astrophys. J. 671, 1329–1344.
A. K. Y. Ngai, S. T. Persijn, F. J. M. Harren, H. Verbraak, and H. Linnartz,
Selective trace gas detection of complex molecules with a continuous wave
optical parametric oscillator using a planar jet expansion, Applied Physics
Letters 90, 081109-081112.
K. I. Öberg, H. J. Fraser, A. C. A. Boogert, S. E. Bisschop, G. W. Fuchs, E. F.
van Dishoeck, and H. Linnartz, Effects of CO2 on H2O band profiles and
band strengths in mixed H2O:CO2 ices, Astron. Astrophys. 462, 1187–1198.
K. I. Öberg, G. W. Fuchs, Z. Awad, H. J. Fraser, S. Schlemmer, E. F. Van
Dishoeck, and H. Linnartz, Photodesorption of CO Ice, Astrophys. J. Lett. 662,
L23–L26.
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
179
C. J. Ödman, Education & Public Outreach: Odman: Universe Awareness:
Making young children aware of the universe, Astronomy and Geophysics 48,
4.20–4.21.
C. J. Ödman, Universe Awareness, The Observatory, 127, 272.
T. A. Oosterloo, R. Morganti, P. T. de Zeeuw, R. M. McDermid, D. Krajnović,
M. Cappellari, F. Kenn, A. Weijmans, and M. Sarzi, The kinematics and
morphology of the HI in gas-poor galaxies, New Astronomy Review 51, 8–12.
R. A. Overzier, G. K.Miley, and H. C. Ford, Witnessing the formation of a
brightest cluster galaxy at z > 2, New Astronomy Review 51, 202–205.
F. Pacaud, M. Pierre, C. Adami, B. Altieri, S. Andreon, L. Chiappetti, A. Detal,
P.-A. Duc, G. Galaz, A. Gueguen, J.-P. Le Fèvre, G. Hertling, C. Libbrecht, J.-B.
Melin, T. J. Ponman, H. Quintana, A. Refregier, P.-G. Sprimont, J. Surdej, I.
Valtchanov, J. P. Willis, D. Alloin, M. Birkinshaw, M. N. Bremer, O. Garcet, C.
Jean, L. R. Jones, O. Le Fèvre, D. Maccagni, A. Mazure, D. Proust, H. J. A.
Röttgering, and G. Trinchieri, The XMM-LSS survey: the Class 1 cluster
sample over the initial 5 deg2 and its cosmological modelling, Monthly Notices
Roy. Astr. Soc. 382, 1289–1308.
P. Padelis, P. van der Werf, T. Greve, M. Xilouris, K. Isaak, and Y. Gao,
Towards a complete picture of the molecular ISM in local Luminous Infrared
Galaxies: first results from the JCMT/IRAM line survey, Astronomische
Nachrichten 328, 644.
P. P. Papadopoulos, K. G. Isaak, and P. P. van der Werf, First CO J = 6-5 and J
= 4-3 Detections in Local ULIRGs: The Dense Gas in Markarian 231 and Its
Cooling Budget, Astrophys. J. 668, 815–825.
C. Papovich, G. Rudnick, E. Le Floc’h, P. G. van Dokkum, G. H. Rieke, E. N.
Taylor, L. Armus, E. Gawiser, J. Huang, D. Marcillac, and M. Franx, Spitzer
Mid- to Far-Infrared Flux Densities of Distant Galaxies, Astrophys. J. 668, 45–
61.
B. F. Parsons, S. M. Sheehan, T. A. Yen, D. Neumark, N. Wehres and R.
Weinkauf, Anion photoelectron imaging of deprotonated thymine and
cytosine, PCCP, 9, 3291-3297
R. F. Peletier, J. Falcón-Barroso, R. Bacon, M. Cappellari, R. L. Davies, P. T. de
Zeeuw, E. Emsellem, K. Ganda, D. Krajnović, H. Kuntschner, R. M.
McDermid, M. Sarzi, and G. van de Ven, The SAURON project - XI. Stellar
populations from absorption-line strength maps of 24 early-type spirals,
Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 379, 445–468.
180
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
R. F. Peletier, K. Fathi, E. L. Allard, J. H. Knapen, M. Sarzi, G. van de Ven, J.
Falcón-Barroso, M. Cappellari, P. T. de Zeeuw, and E. Emsellem, Stars and
gas in the inner parts of galaxies seen in SAURON integral field observations,
New Astronomy Review 51, 29–33.
H. B. Perets, C. Hopman, and T. Alexander, Massive Perturber-driven
Interactions between Stars and a Massive Black Hole, Astrophys. J. 656, 709–
720.
M. Pierre, L. Chiappetti, F. Pacaud, A. Gueguen, C. Libbrecht, B. Altieri, H.
Aussel, P. Gandhi, O. Garcet, E. Gosset, L. Paioro, T. J. Ponman, A. M. Read,
A. Refregier, J.-L. Starck, J. Surdej, I. Valtchanov, C. Adami, D. Alloin, A.
Alshino, S. Andreon, M. Birkinshaw, M. Bremer, A. Detal, P.-A. Duc, G. Galaz,
L. Jones, J.-P. Le Fèvre, O. Le Fèvre, D. Maccagni, A. Mazure, H. Quintana, H.
J. A. Röttgering, P.-G. Sprimont, C. Tasse, G. Trinchieri, and J. P. Willis, The
XMM-Large Scale Structure catalogue: X-ray sources and associated optical
data. Version I, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 382, 279–290.
R. Plume, G. A. Fuller, F. Helmich, F. F. S. van der Tak, H. Roberts, J. Bowey, J.
Buckle, H. Butner, E. Caux, C. Ceccarelli, E. F. van Dishoeck, P. Friberg, A. G.
Gibb, J. Hatchell, M. R. Hogerheijde, H. Matthews, T. J. Millar, G. Mitchell, T.
J. T. Moore, V. Ossenkopf, J. M. C. Rawlings, J. Richer, M. Roellig, P. Schilke,
M. Spaans, A. G. G. M. Tielens, M. A. Thompson, S. Viti, B. Weferling, G. J.
White, J. Wouterloot, J. Yates, and M. Zhu, The James Clerk Maxwell
Telescope Spectral Legacy Survey, Publ. Astron. Soc. Pacific 119, 102–111.
K. M. Pontoppidan, C. P. Dullemond, G. A. Blake, A. C. A. Boogert, E. F. van
Dishoeck, N. J. Evans, II, J. Kessler-Silacci, and F. Lahuis, Modeling Spitzer
Observations of VV Ser. I. The Circumstellar Disk of a UX Orionis Star,
Astrophys. J. 656, 980–990.
K. M. Pontoppidan, C. P. Dullemond, G. A. Blake, N. J. Evans, II, V. C. Geers,
P. M. Harvey, and W. Spiesman, Modeling Spitzer Observations of VV Ser. II.
An Extended Quantum-heated Nebula and a Disk Shadow, Astrophys. J. 656,
991–1000.
K. M. Pontoppidan, K. R. Stapelfeldt, G. A. Blake, E. F. van Dishoeck, and C.
P. Dullemond, Deep Spitzer Spectroscopy of the ‘Flying Saucer’ Edge-on Disk:
Large Grains beyond 50 AU, Astrophys. J. Lett. 658, L111–L114.
A. Porras, J. K. Jørgensen, L. E. Allen, N. J. Evans, II, T. L. Bourke, J. M. Alcalá,
M. M. Dunham, G. A. Blake, N. Chapman, L. Cieza, P. M. Harvey, T. L.
Huard, D. W. Koerner, L. G. Mundy, P. C. Myers, D. L. Padgett, A. I. Sargent,
K. R. Stapelfeldt, P. Teuben, E. F. van Dishoeck, Z. Wahhaj, and K. E. Young,
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
181
The Spitzer c2d Survey of Large, Nearby, Interstellar Clouds. V. Chamaeleon
II Observed with IRAC, Astrophys. J. 656, 493–504.
S. F. Portegies Zwart and S. P. Rusli, The evolution of binary star clusters and
the nature of NGC 2136/NGC 2137, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 374, 931–
940.
R. Quadri, D. Marchesini, P. van Dokkum, E. Gawiser, M. Franx, P. Lira, G.
Rudnick, C. M. Urry, J. Maza, M. Kriek, L. F. Barrientos, G. A. Blanc, F. J.
Castander, D. Christlein, P. S. Coppi, P. B. Hall, D. Herrera, L. Infante, E. N.
Taylor, E. Treister, and J. P. Willis, The Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile
(MUSYC): Deep Near-Infrared Imaging and the Selection of Distant Galaxies,
Astron. J. 134, 1103–1117.
R. Quadri, P. van Dokkum, E. Gawiser, M. Franx, D. Marchesini, P. Lira, G.
Rudnick, D. Herrera, J. Maza, M. Kriek, I. Labbé, and H. Francke, Clustering
of K-selected Galaxies at 2 < z < 3.5: Evidence for a Color-Density Relation,
Astrophys. J. 654, 138–152.
S. P. Quanz, T. Henning, J. Bouwman, H. Linz, and F. Lahuis, Deeply
Embedded Objects and Shocked Molecular Hydrogen: The Environment of
the FU Orionis Stars RNO 1B/1C, Astrophys. J. 658, 487–497.
S. P. Quanz, T. Henning, J. Bouwman, R. van Boekel, A. Juhász, H. Linz, K. M.
Pontoppidan, and F. Lahuis, Evolution of Dust and Ice Features around FU
Orionis Objects, Astrophys. J. 668, 359–383.
T. Ratzka, C. Leinert, T. Henning, J. Bouwman, C. P. Dullemond, and W. Jaffe,
High spatial resolution mid-infrared observations of the low-mass young star
TW Hydrae, Astron. Astrophys. 471, 173–185.
T. Ratzka, C. Leinert, T. Henning, J. Bouwman, C. P. Dullemond, and W. Jaffe,
Structure and Dust Composition of the TW Hya Disc, Astronomische
Nachrichten 328, 651.
L. M. Rebull, K. R. Stapelfeldt, N. J. Evans, II, J. K. Jørgensen, P. M. Harvey, T.
Y. Brooke, T. L. Bourke, D. L. Padgett, N. L. Chapman, S.-P. Lai, W. J.
Spiesman, A. Noriega-Crespo, B. Merín, T. Huard, L. E. Allen, G. A. Blake, T.
Jarrett, D. W. Koerner, L. G. Mundy, P. C. Myers, A. I. Sargent, E. F. van
Dishoeck, Z.Wahhaj, and K. E. Young, The Spitzer c2d Survey of Large,
Nearby, Interstellar Clouds. VI. Perseus Observed with MIPS, Astrophys. J.
Suppl. Ser. 171, 447–477.
M. Reuland, W. van Breugel, W. de Vries, M. A. Dopita, A. Dey, G. Miley, H.
Röttgering, B. Venemans, S. A. Stanford, M. Lacy, H. Spinrad, S. Dawson, D.
182
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
Stern, and A. Bunker, Metal-Enriched Gaseous Halos around Distant Radio
Galaxies: Clues to Feedback in Galaxy Formation, Astron. J. 133, 2607–2623.
A. M. S. Richards, T. W. B. Muxlow, R. Beswick, M. G. Allen, K. Benson, R. C.
Dickson, M. A. Garrett, S. T. Garrington, E. Gonzalez-Solarez, P. A. Harrison,
A. J. Holloway, M. M. Kettenis, R. A. Laing, E. A. Richards, H. Thrall, H. J. van
Langevelde, N. A. Walton, P. N. Wilkinson, and N. Winstanley, Using VO
tools to investigate distant radio starbursts hosting obscured AGN in the
HDF(N) region, Astron. Astrophys. 472, 805–822.
E. E. Rigby, I. A. G. Snellen, and P. N. Best, A sample of mJy radio sources at
1.4 GHz in the Lynx and Hercules fields - I. Radio imaging, multicolour
photometry and spectroscopy, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 380, 1449–1466.
M. Röllig, N. P. Abel, T. Bell, F. Bensch, J. Black, G. J. Ferland, B. Jonkheid, I.
Kamp, M. J. Kaufman, J. Le Bourlot, F. Le Petit, R. Meijerink, O. Morata, V.
Ossenkopf, E. Roueff, G. Shaw, M. Spaans, A. Sternberg, J. Stutzki, W.-F. Thi,
E. F. van Dishoeck, P. A. M. van Hoof, S. Viti, and M. G. Wolfire, A photon
dominated region code comparison study, Astron. Astrophys. 467, 187–206.
M. Sarzi, R. Bacon, M. Cappellari, R. L. Davies, E. Emsellem, J. FalcónBarroso, D. Krajnović, H. Kuntschner, R. M. McDermid, R. F. Peletier, T. de
Zeeuw, and G. van de Ven, On the origin and fate of ionised-gas in early-type
galaxies: The SAURON perspective, New Astronomy Review 51, 18–23.
J. Schaye, R. F. Carswell, and T.-S. Kim, A large population of metal-rich,
compact, intergalactic CIV absorbers - evidence for poor small-scale metal
mixing, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 379, 1169–1194.
R. A. Scheepmaker, M. R. Haas, M. Gieles, N. Bastian, S. S. Larsen, and H. J. G.
L. M. Lamers, ACS imaging of star clusters in M 51. I. Identification and radius
distribution, Astron. Astrophys. 469, 925–940.
D. H. F. M. Schnitzeler, P. Katgert, and A. G. de Bruyn, WSRT Faraday
tomography of the Galactic ISM at λ ~ 0.86 m. First results for a field at (l,
b)=(181°,20°), Astron. Astrophys. 471, L21–L24.
D. H. F. M. Schnitzeler, P. Katgert, M. Haverkorn, and A. G. de Bruyn, The
WENSS & Dwingeloo surveys and the Galactic magnetic field, Astron.
Astrophys. 461, 963–976.
F. L. Schöier, J. Bast, H. Olofsson, and M. Lindqvist, The abundance of SiS in
circumstellar envelopes around AGB stars, Astron. Astrophys. 473, 871–882.
N. Seymour, D. Stern, C. De Breuck, J. Vernet, A. Rettura, M. Dickinson, A.
Dey, P. Eisenhardt, R. Fosbury, M. Lacy, P. McCarthy, G. Miley, B. Rocca-
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
183
Volmerange, H. Röttgering, S. A. Stanford, H. Teplitz, W. van Breugel, and A.
Zirm, The Massive Hosts of Radio Galaxies across Cosmic Time, Astrophys. J.
Suppl. Ser. 171, 353–375.
I. A. G. Snellen and E. Covino, K-band transit and secondary eclipse
photometry of exoplanet OGLE-TR-113b, Monthly Notices Roy. Astr. Soc. 375,
307–312.
I. A. G. Snellen, R. F. J. van der Burg, M. D. J. de Hoon, and F. N. Vuijsje, A
search for transiting extrasolar planet candidates in the OGLE-II microlens
database of the galactic plane, Astron. Astrophys. 476, 1357–1363.
L. Snijders, L. J. Kewley, and P. P. van der Werf, Mid-Infrared Diagnostics of
Starburst Galaxies: Clumpy, Dense Structures in Star-Forming Regions in the
Antennae (NGC 4038/4039), Astrophys. J. 669, 269–288.
M. Soto, D. Minniti, and M. Rejkuba, Spectroscopic and light curve
characterization of bulge microlensing events, Astron. Astrophys. 466, 157–164.
M. Soto, R. M. Rich, and K. Kuijken, Evidence of a Metal-rich Galactic Bar
from the Vertex Deviation of the Velocity Ellipsoid, Astrophys. J. Lett. 665, L31–
L34.
R. Soummer, A. Ferrari, C. Aime, and L. Jolissaint, Speckle Noise and
Dynamic Range in Coronagraphic Images, Astrophys. J. 669, 642–656.
H. W. W. Spoon, J. A. Marshall, J. R. Houck, M. Elitzur, L. Hao, L. Armus, B.
R. Brandl, and V. Charmandaris, Mid-Infrared Galaxy Classification Based on
Silicate Obscuration and PAH Equivalent Width, Astrophys. J. Lett. 654, L49–
L52.
P. Stäuber, A. O. Benz, J. K. Jørgensen, E. F. van Dishoeck, S. D. Doty, and F.
F. S. van der Tak, Tracing high energy radiation with molecular lines near
deeply embedded protostars, Astron. Astrophys. 466, 977–988.
C. Tadhunter, D. Dicken, J. Holt, K. Inskip, R. Morganti, D. Axon, C.
Buchanan, R. González Delgado, P. Barthel, and I. van Bemmel, The Heating
Mechanism for the Warm/Cool Dust in Powerful, Radio-loud Active Galactic
Nuclei, Astrophys. J. Lett. 661, L13–L16.
C. Tasse, H. J. A. Röttgering, P. N. Best, A. S. Cohen, M. Pierre, and
R.Wilman, GMRT observations of the XMM large scale structure survey field,
Astron. Astrophys. 471, 1105–1116.
S. Toft, P. van Dokkum, M. Franx, I. Labbe, N. M. Förster Schreiber, S. Wuyts,
T. Webb, G. Rudnick, A. Zirm, M. Kriek, P. van der Werf, J. P. Blakeslee, G.
184
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
Illingworth, H.-W. Rix, C. Papovich, and A. Moorwood, Hubble Space
Telescope and Spitzer Imaging of Red and Blue Galaxies at z ~ 2.5: A
Correlation between Size and Star Formation Activity from Compact
Quiescent Galaxies to Extended Star-forming Galaxies, Astrophys. J. 671, 285–
302.
K.-V. H. Tran, M. Franx, G. D. Illingworth, P. van Dokkum, D. D. Kelson, J. P.
Blakeslee, and M. Postman, A Keck Spectroscopic Survey of MS 1054-03 (z =
0.83): Forming the Red Sequence, Astrophys. J. 661, 750–767.
K. R. W. Tristram, K. Meisenheimer, W. Jaffe, and D. Raban, The
circumnuclear dust in nearby AGN resolved by mid-infrared interferometry,
Astronomische Nachrichten 328, 673.
K. R.W. Tristram, K.Meisenheimer, W. Jaffe, M. Schartmann, H.-W. Rix, C.
Leinert, S. Morel, M. Wittkowski, H. Röttgering, G. Perrin, B. Lopez, D.
Raban, W. D. Cotton, U. Graser, F. Paresce, and T. Henning, Resolving the
complex structure of the dust torus in the active nucleus of the Circinus
galaxy, Astron. Astrophys. 474, 837–850.
F. F. S. van der Tak, J. H. Black, F. L. Schöier, D. J. Jansen, and E. F. Van
Dishoeck, A computer programfor fast non-LTE analysis of interstellar line
spectra. With diagnostic plots to interpret observed line intensity ratios,
Astron. Astrophys. 468, 627–635.
A. van der Wel, M. Franx, G. D. Illingworth, and P. G. van Dokkum, Low Star
Formation Rates for z = 1 Early-Type Galaxies in the Very Deep GOODS MIPS
Imaging: Implications for Their Optical/Near-Infrared Spectral Energy
Distributions, Astrophys. J. 666, 863–869.
A. van der Wel, B. P. Holden, M. Franx, G. D. Illingworth, M. P. Postman, D.
D. Kelson, I. Labbé, S. Wuyts, J. P. Blakeslee, and H. C. Ford, The Evolution of
the Field and Cluster Morphology-Density Relation for Mass-Selected Samples
of Galaxies, Astrophys. J. 670, 206–220.
A. M. van Genderen and C. Sterken, Orbital effects on the light curves of
ηCar, BP Cru, and Other Eccentric Binaries, Informational Bulletin on Variable
Stars 5782, 1.
T. A. van Kempen, E. F. van Dishoeck, C. Brinch, and M. R. Hogerheijde,
Searching for gas-rich disks around T Tauri stars in Lupus, Astron. Astrophys.
461, 983–990.
B. P. Venemans, H. J. A. Röttgering, G. K. Miley, W. J. M. van Breugel, C. De
Breuck, J. D. Kurk, L. Pentericci, S. A. Stanford, R. A. Overzier, S. Croft, and H.
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
185
Ford, Protoclusters associated with z > 2 radio galaxies . I. Characteristics of
high redshift protoclusters, Astron. Astrophys. 461, 823–845.
H. Verbraak, A. K. Y. Ngai, S. T. Persijn, F. J. M. Harren, and H. Linnartz,
Mid-infrared continuous wave cavity ring down spectroscopy of molecular
ions using an optical parametric oscillator, Chemical Physics Letters 442, 145–
149.
H. Verbraak, D. Verdes, and H. Linnartz, A systematic study of ion and
cluster ion formation in continuous supersonic planar plasma, International
Journal of Mass Spectrometry 267, 248–255.
R. Visser, V. C. Geers, C. P. Dullemond, J.-C. Augereau, K. M. Pontoppidan,
and E. F. van Dishoeck, PAH chemistry and IR emission from circumstellar
disks, Astron. Astrophys. 466, 229–241.
W. H. T. Vlemmings and H. J. van Langevelde, Improved VLBI astrometry of
OH maser stars, Astron. Astrophys. 472, 547–553.
E. A. Volkers, J. Bulthuis, S. Stolte, R. Jost, N. Wehres, and H. Linnartz,
Vibronic spectrum of 15N16O2 between 415 and 440 nm, Journal of Molecular
Spectroscopy 245, 1–6.
D. Ward-Thompson, J. Di Francesco, J. Hatchell, M. R. Hogerheijde, D.
Nutter, P. Bastien, S. Basu, I. Bonnell, J. Bowey, C. Brunt, J. Buckle, H. Butner,
B. Cavanagh, A. Chrysostomou, E. Curtis, C. J. Davis, W. R. F. Dent, E. van
Dishoeck, M. G. Edmunds, M. Fich, J. Fiege, L. Fissel, P. Friberg, R. Friesen,
W. Frieswijk, G. A. Fuller, A. Gosling, S. Graves, J. S. Greaves, F. Helmich, R.
E. Hills, W. S. Holland, M. Houde, R. Jayawardhana, D. Johnstone, G. Joncas,
H. Kirk, J. M. Kirk, L. B. G. Knee, B. Matthews, H. Matthews, C. Matzner, G.
H. Moriarty-Schieven, D. Naylor, R. Padman, R. Plume, J. M. C. Rawlings, R.
O. Redman, M. Reid, J. S. Richer, R. Shipman, R. J. Simpson, M. Spaans, D.
Stamatellos, Y. G. Tsamis, S. Viti, B. Weferling, G. J. White, A. P. Whitworth, J.
Wouterloot, J. Yates, and M. Zhu, The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Legacy
Survey of Nearby Star-forming Regions in the Gould Belt, Publ. Astron. Soc.
Pacific 119, 855–870.
T. M. A. Webb, K.-V. H. Tran, S. J. Lilly, and P. van der Werf, Deep
Submillimeter Observations of Two Lyα-emitting Galaxies at z ~ 6.5,
Astrophys. J. 659, 76–83.
R. J.Williams, S. Mathur, F. Nicastro, and M. Elvis, Chandra and Far
Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Observations of z _ 0 Warm-Hot Gas
toward PKS 2155-304, Astrophys. J. 665, 247–256.
186
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
Y. Wu, V. Charmandaris, L. K. Hunt, J. Bernard-Salas, B. R. Brandl, J. A.
Marshall, V. Lebouteiller, L. Hao, and J. R. Houck, Dust in the Extremely
Metal-Poor Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy I Zw 18: The Spitzer Mid-infrared
View, Astrophys. J. 662, 952–958.
S. Wuyts, I. Labbé, M. Franx, G. Rudnick, P. G. van Dokkum, G. G. Fazio, N.
M. Förster Schreiber, J. Huang, A. F. M. Moorwood, H.-W. Rix, H. Röttgering,
and P. van der Werf, What Do We Learn from IRAC Observations of Galaxies
at 2 < z < 3.5?, Astrophys. J. 655, 51–65.
A.W. Zirm, A. van derWel, M. Franx, I. Labbé, I. Trujillo, P. van Dokkum, S.
Toft, E. Daddi, G. Rudnick, H.-W. Rix, H. J. A. Röttgering, and P. van der
Werf, NICMOS Imaging of DRGs in the HDF-S: A Relation between Star
Formation and Size at z ~2.5, Astrophys. J. 656, 66–72.
X.3. Conference Papers, Review Articles,
etc.
A. Aguirre and J. Schaye, How Did the IGM become Enriched?, EAS
Publications Series, EAS Publications Series, vol. 24, 2007, pp. 165–175.
S. Albrecht, S. Reffert, A. Quirrenbach, D. S. Mitchell, and I. Snellen, The
Rossiter-McLaughlin Effect in the Eclipsing Binary System V1143 Cyg – First
Results, Solar and Stellar Physics Through Eclipses (O. Demircan, S. O. Selam,
and B. Albayrak, eds.), Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series,
vol. 370, May 2007, pp. 218.
G. A. Baratta, R. Brunetto, G. Caniglia, D. Fulvio, S. Ioppolo, G. Leto, M. E.
Palumbo, F. Spinella, and G. Strazzulla, Ion irradiation of TNO surface
analogue ice mixtures: the chemistry ., Memorie della Societa Astronomica
Italiana Supplement 11, pp. 185.
A. Bartkiewicz, M. Szymczak, and H. J. van Langevelde, Methanol masers
and massive star formation, IAU Symposium (B. G. Elmegreen and J. Palous,
eds.), IAU Symposium, vol. 237, 2007, pp. 395–395.
A. Bartkiewicz, H.J. van Langevelde, M. Szymczak, A. Brunthaler, G23.657
0.127, what can we learn from a perfect methanol maser source? Astrophysical
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
187
Masers and their Environments, Proceedings of IAU Symposium 242, eds J.M.
Chapman & W.A. Baan, pp. 190
J. Bast, F. Schöier and H. Olofsson, SiS line emission as a probe of chemistry
and grain formation in circumstellar envelopes of AGB stars, Proceeding of
Molecules in Space & Laboratory, May 2007
A. Bayo, J. Stauffer, S. Carey, and B. Brandl, On The Youngest Members Of 30
Doradus As Seen With Spitzer/IRAC, American Astronomical Society
Meeting Abstracts, vol. 211, December 2007, #62.11
C. A. Beichman, M. Fridlund, W. A. Traub, K. R. Stapelfeldt, A. Quirrenbach,
and S. Seager, Comparative Planetology and the Search for Life Beyond the
Solar System, Protostars and Planets V (B. Reipurth, D. Jewitt, and K. Keil,
eds.), 2007, pp. 915–928.
E. A. Bergin, Y. Aikawa, G. A. Blake, and E. F. van Dishoeck, The Chemical
Evolution of Protoplanetary Disks, Protostars and Planets V (B. Reipurth, D.
Jewitt, and K. Keil, eds.), 2007, pp. 751–766.
T. Böker, J. Falcón-Barroso, J. H. Knapen, E. Schinnerer, E. Allard, and S.
Ryder, A SINFONI view of the nuclear star formation ring in NGC 613, IAU
Symposium, IAU Symposium, vol. 241, August 2007, pp. 497–498.
A. P. Boss, R. P. Butler, W. B. Hubbard, P. A. Ianna, M. Kürster, J. J. Lissauer,
M. Mayor, K. J. Meech, F. Mignard, A. J. Penny, A. Quirrenbach, J. C. Tarter,
and A. Vidal-Madjar, Working Group on Extrasolar Planets, Transactions of
the International Astronomical Union, Series A 26, pp. 183–186.
S. Bottinelli, A.C.A. Boogert, E. van Dishoeck, K. Öberg, NH3 and CH3OH
in the ices surrounding low-mass YSOs, in ‘Molecules in Space and
Laboratory’, Proceedings of the Conference held in Paris, France, May 14-18,
2007. Editors: J.L. Lemaire, F. Combes. Publisher: S. Diana., pp. 11
B. R. Brandl, S. F. Portegies Zwart, A. F. J. Moffat, and D. F. Chernoff, On the
Origin of the Most Massive Stars Around R136, Massive Stars in Interactive
Binaries (N. St.-Louis and A. F. J. Moffat, eds.), Astronomical Society of the
Pacific Conference Series, vol. 367, 2007, pp. 629.
J. Brown, G. Blake, A. Boogert, K. Pontoppidan, B.Merín, V. Geers, and E. van
Dishoeck, Mid-IR imaging of proto-planetary disks with inner gaps, NOAO
Proposal ID #2007A-0434, February 2007, pp. 434.
M. Bureau, R. Bacon, M. Cappellari, F. Combes, R. L. Davies, P. T. de Zeeuw,
E. Emsellem, J. Falcón-Barroso, H. Jeong, D. Krajnović, H. Kuntschner, R. M.
McDermid, R. F. Peletier, M. Sarzi, K. L. Shapiro, G. van de Ven, S. K. Yi, and
188
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
L. M. Young, Star Formation in Nearby Early-Type Galaxies: Mapping in UV,
Optical and CO, IAU Symposium (F. Combes and J. Palous, eds.), IAU
Symposium, vol. 235, 2007, pp. 304–304.
H.M. Cuppen, and E. Herbst, Monte Carlo Studies of Surface Chemistry.
Molecules in Space and Laboratory, meeting held in Paris, France, May 14-18,
2007. Editors: J.L. Lemaire, F. Combes. Publisher: S. Diana., p.117
M. Dehn, C. Helling, P. Woitke, and P. Hauschildt, The influence of
convective energy transport on dust formation in brown dwarf atmospheres,
IAU Symposium (F. Kupka, I. Roxburgh, and K. Chan, eds.), IAU Symposium,
vol. 239, May 2007, pp. 227–229.
J.W. den Herder, L. Piro, T. Ohashi, L. Amati, J. Atteia, S. Barthelmy, M.
Barbera, D. Barret, S. Basso, M. Boer, S. Borgani, O. Boyarskiy, E. Branchini, G.
Branduardi-Raymont, M. Briggs, G. Brunetti, C. Budtz-Jorgensenf, D.
Burrows, S. Campana, E. Caroli, G. Chincarini, F. Christensen, M. Cocchi, A.
Comastri, A. Corsi, V. Cotroneo, P. Conconi, L. Colasanti, G. Cusamano, A. de
Rosa, M. Del Santo, S. Ettori, Y. Ezoe, L. Ferrari, M. Feroci, M. Finger, G.
Fishman, R. Fujimoto, M. Galeazzi, A. Galli, F. Gatti, N. Gehrels, B. Gendre, G.
Ghirlanda, G. Ghisellini, P. Giommi, M. Girardi, L. Guzzo, F. Haardt, I.
Hepburn, W. Hermsen, H. Hoevers, A. Holland, J. In’t Zand, Y. Ishisaki, H.
Kawahara, N. Kawai, J. Kaastra, M. Kippen, P. A. J. de Korte, C. Kouveliotou,
A. Kusenko, C. Labanti, R. Lieu, C. Macculi, K. Makishima, G. Matt, P.
Mazotta, D. McCammon, M. M´endez, T. Mineo, S. Mitchell, K. Mitsuda, S.
Molendi, L. Moscardini, R. Mushotzky, L. Natalucci, F. Nicastro, P. O’Brien, J.
Osborne, F. Paerels, M. Page, S. Paltani, G. Pareschi, E. Perinati, C. Perola, T.
Ponman, A. Rasmussen, M. Roncarelli, P. Rosati, O. Ruchayskiy, E. Quadrini,
I. Sakurai, R. Salvaterra, S. Sasaki, G. Sato, J. Schaye, J. Schmidtt, S. Scioritino,
M. Shaposhnikov, K. Shinozaki, D. Spiga, Y. Suto, G. Tagliaferri, T. Takahashi,
Y. Takei, Y. Tawara, P. Tozzi, H. Tsunemi, T. Tsuru, P. Ubertini, E. Ursino, M.
Viel, J. Vink, N. White, R. Willingale, R. Wijers, K. Yoshikawa, and N.
Yamasaki, EDGE: explorer of diffuse emission and gamma-ray burst
explosions, Optics for EUV, X-Ray, and Gamma-Ray Astronomy III. Edited by
O’Dell, Stephen L.; Pareschi, Giovanni. Proceedings of the SPIE, Volume 6688,
pp. 668805 (2007)., Presented at the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation
Engineers (SPIE) Conference, vol. 6688, September 2007.
N. de Vries, I.A.G. Snellen, R.T. Schilizzi, M.D. Lehnert, M.N. Bremer, in the
proceedings of "Formation and Evolution of Galaxy Bulges", IAUS 245; M.
Bureau, E. Athanassoula & B. Barbuy, eds.
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
189
T. de Zeeuw, Island Universes, Island Universes - Structure and Evolution of
Disk Galaxies, Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings, ISBN 978-1-40205572-0, Springer, 2007, pp. 571–578.
H. Falcke, M. P. van Haarlem, A. G. de Bruyn, R. Braun, H. J. A. Röttgering, B.
Stappers, W. H. W. M. Boland, H. R. Butcher, E. J. de Geus, L. Koopmans, R.
Fender, J. Kuijpers, G. K. Miley, R. T. Schilizzi, C. Vogt, R. A. M. J. Wijers, M.
Wise, W. N. Brouw, J. P. Hamaker, J. E. Noordam, T. Oosterloo, L. Bähren, M.
A. Brentjens, S. J. Wijnholds, J. D. Bregman, W. A.van Cappellen, A. W. Gunst,
G. W. Kant, J. Reitsma, K. van der Schaaf, C. M. de Vos, A very brief
description of LOFAR -- the Low Frequency Array, Highlights of Astronomy,
14, pp. 386-387
J. Falcón-Barroso, R. Bacon, M. Bureau, M. Cappellari, R. L. Davies, P. T. de
Zeeuw, E. Emsellem, K. Fathi, D. Krajnovic, H. Kuntschner, R. M. McDermid,
R. F. Peletier, and M. Sarzi, A Sauron Study of Stars and Gas in SA Bulges,
Island Universes- Structure and Evolution of Disk Galaxies, Astrophysics and
Space Science Proceedings, ISBN 978-1-4020-5572-0, Springer, 2007, pp. 201–
206.
J. Falcón-Barroso, R. Bacon, M. Cappellari, R. Davies, P. T. de Zeeuw, E.
Emsellem, D. Krajnović, H. Kuntschner, R. M. McDermid, R. F. Peletier, M.
Sarzi, and G. van de Ven, Stellar Populations in KDCs of Sa Galaxies, IAU
Symposium, IAU Symposium, vol. 241, August 2007, pp. 470–474.
K. Fathi, G. V. D. Ven, R. Peletier, E. Emsellem, J. Falcón-Barroso, M.
Cappellari, and T. de Zeeuw, Two-Dimensional Kinematics of a Bar and
Central Disk in NGC5448, Island Universes - Structure and Evolution of Disk
Galaxies, Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings, ISBN 978-1-4020-55720, Springer, 2007, pp. 125–128.
T. Feder, Astronomy Outreach used for Social Good, Physics Today, vol. 60,
issue 6, pp. 30-31
D. Floyd, M. Chiaberge, E. S. Perlman, B. Sparks, F. D. Macchetto, J. Madrid, S.
Baum, C. O’Dea, D. Axon, A. Quillen, A. Capetti, G. Miley, and S. Tinarelli, A
near-infrared view of the 3CR: properties of hosts and nuclei?, IAU
Symposium (V. Karas and G. Matt, eds.), IAU Symposium, vol. 238, April
2007, pp. 365–366.
K. Ganda, R. F. Peletier, J. Falcón-Barroso, and R. M. McDermid,
Twodimensional spectroscopy of late-type spirals, IAU Symposium, vol. 241,
August 2007, pp. 511–512.
190
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
E. J. Gawiser, P. G. van Dokkum, P. Lira, C. M. Urry, G. A. Blanc, M. Damen,
D. Herrera, I. Labbe, D. Marchesini, R. Quadri, E. N. Taylor, E. Treister, and
MUSYC Collaboration, The MUSYC Public Data Release, American
Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts, vol. 210, May 2007, #12.02.
G. F. Gilmore and R. T. Schilizzi, Special Session 1 Large astronomical
facilities of the next decade, Highlights of Astronomy 14, pp. 519.
B. Groves, The Narrow-line Region: Current Models and Future Questions,
Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series (L. C. Ho and J.-W.
Wang, eds.), Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series, vol. 373,
October 2007, pp. 511.
N. A. Hatch, C. S. Crawford, A. C. Fabian, Ionized Gas in Cluster Cores,
Heating versus Cooling in Galaxies and Clusters of Galaxies, ESO
Astrophysics Symposia, ISBN 978-3-540-73483-3. Springer-Verlag Berlin
Heidelberg, 2007, pp. 318
S. Hekker, I.A.G. Snellen, C. Aerts, A. Quirrenbach, S. Reffert, D.S. Mitchell,
Radial velocities of giant stars: an investigation of line profile variations in the
proceedings of the Helas II workshop: Helioseismology, Asteroseismology
and MHD Connections; published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series,
ed. L. Gizon.
E. V. Held, Y. Momany, L. Rizzi, I. Saviane, L. R. Bedin, M. Gullieuszik, G.
Bertelli, E. Nasi, M. Clemens, M. R. Rich, and K. Kuijken, The star formation
history of the dwarf irregular galaxy SagDIG, IAU Symposium, IAU
Symposium, vol. 241, August 2007, pp. 339–340.
T. Hill, M. G.Burton, M. R. Cunningham, V. Minier, Profiling Young Massive
Stars, in Proceedings of the Conference "IAU 242: Astrophysical Masers and
their environments", held March 12-16, 2007, in Alice Springs, Australia
R. Indebetouw, G. de Messieres, S. Madden, C. Engelbracht, J. Smith, M.
Meixner, B. Brandl, F. Boulanger, F. Galliano, K. Gordon, J. Hora, L. Smith, X.
Tielens, M. Werner and M. Wolfire, Spitzer's View of Parsec-scale Ionization
Structure in 30 Doradus, American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts,
vol. 211, December 2007, #139.22
S. Ioppolo, G. W. Fuchs, S. E. Bisschop, E. F. van Dishoeck, H. Linnartz,
Laboratory study of CO ice hydrogenation, Conference Proceedings:
Molecules in Space and the Laboratory, Paris, France, May 14-18 2007
F. P. Israel, Summary: Modern Views of the Magellanic Clouds, EAS
Publications Series, EAS Publications Series, vol. 25, 2007, pp. 137–138.
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
191
W. Jaffe, D. Raban, H. Röttgering, K. Meisenheimer, and K. Tristram, MidInfrared Interferometric Observations of AGNs, Astronomical Society of the
Pacific Conference Series (L. C. Ho and J.-W. Wang, eds.), Astronomical
Society of the Pacific Conference Series, vol. 373, October 2007, pp. 439.
S. Kendrew, B. Brandl, R. Lenzen, L. Venema, H. U. Käufl, G. Finger, A.
Glasse, and R. Stuik, Mid-infrared instrumentation for the European
Extremely Large Telescope, Cryogenic Optical Systems and Instruments XII.
Edited by Heaney, James B.; Burriesci, Lawrence G.. Proceedings of the SPIE,
Volume 6692, pp. 66920B (2007)., Presented at the Society of Photo-Optical
Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference, vol. 6692, October 2007.
S. Kendrew, R. Stuik, B. Brandl, R. Lenzen, L. Venema, U. Kaeufl, and A.
Glasse, Adaptive Optics Challenges for Mid-IR ELT Instrumentation, in
Adaptive Optics: Analysis and Methods/Computational Optical Sensing and
Imaging/Information Photonics/Signal Recovery and Synthesis Topical
Meetings, OSA Technical Digest (Optical Society of America, 2007), paper
AW4
K. K. Knudsen,.P. P. van der Werf, M. Franx, N. M. Förster Schreiber, P. G.
van Dokkum, G. D. Illingworth, I. Labbé, A. Moorwood, H.-W. Rix & G.
Rudnick, Obscured star formation in Distant Red Galaxies - 850 μm detection
in Cosmic Frontiers, eds. N. Metcalfe & T. Shanks, ASP Conference Series 379,
p. 306
R. Köhler, M. G. Petr-Gotzens, M. J. McCaughrean, J. Bouvier, G. Duchêne, A.
Quirrenbach, and H. Zinnecker, Binary Stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster,
IAU Symposium, IAU Symposium, vol. 240, August 2007, pp. 114–116.
M. B. N. Kouwenhoven, A. G. A. Brown, S. F. Portegies Zwart, and L. Kaper,
Finding the Primordial Binary Population in Sco OB2: on the interpretation of
binary star observations, IAU Symposium, IAU Symposium, vol. 240, August
2007, pp. 388.
K. Kuijken, Large surveys and the Virtual Observatory, Highlights of
Astronomy 14, pp. 580.
R. Launhardt, T. Henning, D. Queloz, and A. Quirrenbach, Towards HighPrecision Astrometry: Differential Delay Lines for [email protected], Exploring
the Cosmic Frontier: Astrophysical Instruments for the 21st Century, ESO
Astrophysics Symposia, European Southern Observatory series, ISBN 978-3540-39755-7, Springer, 2007, pp. 265–266.
H. Linnartz, K. Acharyya, Z. Awad, S.E. Bisschop, S. Bottinelli, J. Bouwman,
H.M. Cuppen, G.W. Fuchs, S. Ioppolo, K.I. Oberg, E.F. van Dishoek, Solid
192
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
state astrophysics and -chemistry four questions- four answers, Conference
Proceedings: Molecules in Space and Laboratory, Paris, France, May 14-18,
2007. Editors: J.L. Lemaire, F. Combes. Publisher: S. Diana., pp.47
S. D. Lord, P. van der Werf, P. Papadopoulos, M. Wiedner, T. Greve, H. Smith,
M. Xilouris, A. Weiss, F. Walter, V. Charmandaris, C. Kramer, M. Spaans, L.
Spinoglio, J. Mazzarella, D. Sanders, R. Meijerink, J. Fischer, K. Isaak, L.
Armus, and A. Evans, An Unbiased Herschel Space Observatory
Spectroscopic Survey of [U]LIRGS in the Local Universe, American
Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts, vol. 210, May 2007, #11.07.
K.-H. Mack, M. Vigotti, L. Gregorini, U. Klein, W. Tschager, R. T. Schilizzi,
and I. A. G. Snellen, The B3 VLA Sample at Low Frequencies: Results from a
Survey at 74 MHz, Exploring the Cosmic Frontier: Astrophysical Instruments
for the 21st Century, ESO Astrophysics Symposia, European Southern
Observatory series, ISBN 978-3-540-39755-7, Springer, 2007, pp. 137–138.
J. M. Martín-Hernández, E. Mármol-Queraltó, J. Gorgas, N. Cardiel, P.
Sánchez-Blázquez, A. J. Cenarro, R. F. Peletier, A. Vazdekis, and J. FalcónBarroso, New Empirical Fitting Functions of the Lick/IDS indices using
MILES, IAU Symposium, IAU Symposium, vol. 241, August 2007, pp. 99–100.
R.M.McDermid, E. Emsellem, K. L. Shapiro, R. Bacon, M. Bureau, M.
Cappellari, R. L. Davies, T. de Zeeuw, J. Falcón-Barroso, D. Krajnović, H.
Kuntschner, R. F. Peletier, and M. Sarzi, Stellar Populations of Decoupled
Cores in E/S0 Galaxies with sauron and oasis, IAU Symposium, IAU
Symposium, vol. 241, August 2007, pp. 399–403.
R.M.McDermid, E. Emsellem, K. L. Shapiro, R. Bacon, M. Bureau, M.
Cappellari, R. L. Davies, T. de Zeeuw, J. Falcón-Barroso, D. Krajnović, H.
Kuntschner, R. F. Peletier, and M. Sarzi, Stellar Populations of Kinematically
Decoupled Cores in E/S0 Galaxies, IAU Symposium (F. Combes and J. Palous,
eds.), IAU Symposium, vol. 235, 2007, pp. 122–122.
M. Messineo, K. M. Menten, H. J. Habing, M. Petr-Gotzens, and F. Schuller,
Structure of the Milky Way and the distribution of young stellar clusters, IAU
Symposium, IAU Symposium, vol. 241, August 2007, pp. 254–255.
B. Montesinos, C. Eiroa, B. Merín, and A. Mora, Gravities and Metallicities of
Stars with Protoplanetary Disks, Revista Mexicana de Astronomia y
Astrofisica Conference Series, Revista Mexicana de Astronomia y Astrofisica
Conference Series, vol. 29, June 2007, pp. 150–150.
R.M. Myers, D. Bonaccini Calia, M.N. Devaney, S. Esposito, S.J. Goodsell, A.V.
Goncharov, J.C. Guerra, H. Guillet de Chatellus, M.A. Harrison, R.
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
193
Holzloehner, E. Marchetti, T.J. Morris, E. Pinna, J. Pique, S. Rabien, M. Reyes
Garcia-Talavera, E. Ribak, R.G.M. Rutten, H. Schnetler, M. Strachan, R. Stuik,
G.Talbot, S.M. Tulloch, The European LGS test facility, Proc. SPIE 6691-23,
2007
K.I. Öberg, G.W. Fuchs, E.F. van Dishoeck, Photodesorption of ices,
Molecules in Space and Laboratory, meeting held in Paris, France, May 14-18;
Editors: J.L. Lemaire, F. Combes. Publisher: S. Diana, pp. 80
C.J. Ödman, Universe Awareness: Inspiring young children with the beautiful
universe, Building the Scientific Mind 2007, Vancouver May 28–31, 2007.
J.-P. Paardekooper, V. Icke and J. Ritzerveld, Radiation Hydrodynamics of
First Stars with SimpleX Radiative Transfer, to appear in proceedings of ‘First
Stars III’, Santa Fe, New Mexico, July 16-20, 2007.
C. J. Papovich, G. Rudnick, E. Le Floc’h, P. G. van Dokkum, G. H. Rieke, E. N.
Taylor, L. Armus, E. Gawiser, D. Marcillac, J. Huang, and M. Franx, Spitzer
Mid-to-Far-Infrared Flux Densities of Distant Galaxies, American
Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts, vol. 210, May 2007, #08.13.
Z. Paragi, C. Kouveliotou, M. A. Garrett, E. Ramirez-Ruiz, H. J. van
Langevelde, A. Szomoru, and M. Argo, e-VLBI detection of SN2007gr, The
Astronomer’s Telegram 1215.
J. W. Pel and J. Lub, The Walraven VBLUW Photometric System: 32 Years of
5-Channel Photometry, The Future of Photometric, Spectrophotometric and
Polarimetric Standardization (C. Sterken, ed.), Astronomical Society of the
Pacific Conference Series, vol. 364, April 2007, pp. 63–76.
R. F. Peletier, J. Falcón-Barroso, K. Ganda, R. Bacon, M. Cappellari, R. L.
Davies, P. T. de Zeeuw, E. Emsellem, D. Krajnović, H. Kuntschner, R. M.
McDermid, M. Sarzi, and G. van de Ven, The Nature of Galactic Bulges from
SAURON Absorption Line Strength Maps, IAU Symposium, IAU Symposium,
vol. 241, August 2007, pp. 485–488.
M. A. C. Perryman, Detection and Characterization of Extra-Solar Planets:
Future Space Missions, Exploring the Cosmic Frontier: Astrophysical
Instruments for the 21st Century, ESO Astrophysics Symposia, European
Southern Observatory series, ISBN 978-3-540-39755-7, Springer, 2007, pp. 237–
252.
A. Quirrenbach, AGN Research with Future Interferometric Arrays,
Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series (L. C. Ho and J.-W.
194
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
Wang, eds.), Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series, vol. 373,
October 2007, pp. 697.
A. Quirrenbach, Prospects for an Extremely Large Synthesis Array, Exploring
the Cosmic Frontier: Astrophysical Instruments for the 21st Century, ESO
Astrophysics Symposia, European Southern Observatory series, ISBN 978-3540-39755-7, Springer, 2007, pp. 61–62.
A. M. S. Richards, I. Bains, A. Bartkiewicz, R. J. Cohen, P. J. Diamond, S. Etoka,
M. D. Gray, E. E. Lekht, M. R. W. Masheder, E. Mendoza-Torres, K.
Murakawa, M. Szymczak, H. J. van Langevelde, W. H. T. Vlemmings, J. A.
Yates, Turbulent, steamy Red Supergiant winds, Astrophysical Masers and
their Environments, Proceedings of IAU Symposium 242, eds J. M. Chapman
& W. A. Baan, pp. 261
A. M. S. Richards, R. Beswick, S. T. Garrington, T. W. B. Muxlow, H. Thrall, M.
A. Garrett, M. Kettenis, H. J. van Langevelde, E. Gonzalez-Solarez, N. A.
Walton, and M. G. Allen, High-z radio starbursts host X-ray AGN, IAU
Symposium (F. Combes and J. Palous, eds.), IAU Symposium, vol. 235, pp.
422–422.
A. M. S. Richards, R .J. Beswick, S. T. Garrington, T. W. B. Muxlow, H. Thrall,
M. A. Garrett, M. Kettenis, H. J. van Langevelde, E. Gonzalez-Solarez, N. A.
Walton, M. G. Allen, High-z radio starbursts host obscured X-ray AGN, in At
the Edge of the Universe: Latest Results from the Deepest Astronomical
Surveys, eds Afonso et al., ASP Conference Series, Vol. 380, pp. 27
H. Röttgering, LOFAR - Opening up a New Window on the Universe,
American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts, vol. 210, May 2007, #66.04.
R. T. Schilizzi, The Square Kilometre Array, Highlights of Astronomy 14, pp.
539–540.
L. D. Schmadel, R. Stoss, G. Burkhardt, W. Paech, and I. van HoutenGroeneveld, Digitization of the Palomar–Leiden Survey and Trojan Survey
Plates, Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series (S. Ricketts, C.
Birdie, and E. Isaksson, eds.), Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference
Series, vol. 377, October 2007, pp. 294.
M. Schweitzer, D. Lutz, E. Sturm, R. Genzel, S. Veilleux, D. Rupke, D.-C. Kim,
A. J. Baker, B. Groves, D. Tomono, H. Netzer, and A. Sternberg, Silicate
Emission in AGN: Emission from the Torus or (and) Extended Emission?,
Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series (L. C. Ho and J.-W.
Wang, eds.), Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series, vol. 373,
October 2007, pp. 501.
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
195
R. Siebenmorgen, A. Smette, H. U. Käufl, A. Seifahrt, S. Uttenthaler, A. Bik, M.
Casali, S. Hubrig, Y. Jung, F. Kerber, J. Melnick, A. Moorwood, J.-F. Pirard, H.
Sana, E. Valenti, L. Tacconi-Garman, M. Hilker, F. Primas, P. J. Amado, A.
Carmona, E. F. van Dishoeck, C. Foellmi, M. Goto, R. Gredel, E. Günther, B.
Gustaffson, D. Kurtz, C. Lidman, H. Linz, F. Martins, K. Menten, C. Moutou,
P. E. Nissen, D. Nürnberger, and A. Reiners, Exploring the Near-Infrared at
High Spatial and Spectral Resolution: First Results from CRIRES Science
Verification, The Messenger 128, pp. 17.
R. L. Smith, K. M. Pontoppidan, E. D. Young, M. R. Morris, and E. F. van
Dishoeck, Detection of Rare CO Isotopologues in Protostellar Disks: An
Infrared Investigation of Molecular Self Shielding, Workshop on the
Chronology of Meteorites and the Early Solar System, held November 5-7,
2007 in Kauai, Hawaii. LPI Contribution No. 1374, p.158-159, 2007, pp. 158–
159.
I. Snellen, Transit and Secondary Eclipse Photometry in the Near-Infrared,
Transiting Extrapolar PlanetsWorkshop (C. Afonso, D.Weldrake, and T.
Henning, eds.), Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series, vol. 366,
July 2007, pp. 236.
L. Snijders, L. J. Kewley, P. P. van der Werf, and B. R. Brandl, UCHII regions
in the Antennae, IAU Symposium (B. G. Elmegreen and J. Palous, eds.), IAU
Symposium, vol. 237, 2007, pp. 476–476.
L. Snijders and P. P. van der Werf, Island Universes Colliding, Island
Universes - Structure and Evolution of Disk Galaxies, Astrophysics and Space
Science Proceedings, ISBN 978-1-4020-5572-0, Springer, 2007, pp. 453–456.
M. Soto, K. H. Kuijken, and J. Lub, The 3-DIMENSIONAL Dynamics of the
Galactic Bulge, Island Universes - Structure and Evolution of Disk Galaxies,
Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings, ISBN 978-1-4020-5572-0,
Springer, 2007, pp. 153–156.
C. Sterken, A.M. van Genderen, G. Weigelt, and A. Kaufer, η Carinae 2009.0:
One of the Most Remarkable Stars in the Sky, The Messenger 130, pp. 32–36.
R. Stuik, R. Arsenault, A. Deep, B. Delabre, P. Hallibert, L. Jolissaint, N.
Hubin, S. Kendrew, P.-Y. Madec, J. Paufique, S. Stroebele ASSIST:
Development of a test-infrastructure for the VLT AO facility, Proc. SPIE 669103, 2007
R. Stuik, R. Arsenault, B. Delabre, S. Esposito, P. Hallibert, N. Hubin, S.
Kendrew, A. Quirrenbach, A. Riccardi, and S. Stroebele, Integrated Testing of
the ESO AO Facility: The Development of ASSIST, in Adaptive Optics:
196
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
Analysis and Methods/Computational Optical Sensing and Imaging/
Information Photonics/Signal Recovery and Synthesis Topical Meetings,
OSA Technical Digest (Optical Society of America, 2007), paper ATuC8.
J. Surdej, A. Chelli, P. Garcia, T. Henning, and A. Quirrenbach, The European
Interferometry Initiative (EII) within OPTICON, EAS Publications Series, EAS
Publications Series, vol. 25, 2007, pp. 301–308.
K.J.E. Torstensson, H.-J. van Langevelde & S. Bourke, Where methanol
masers spring, Astrophysical Masers and their Environments, Proceedings of
the Astronomical Union, IAU Symposium, Volume 242, eds J.M. Chapman &
W.A. Baan, pp. 178
K. R. W. Tristram, K. Meisenheimer, W. Jaffe, and W. D. Cotton, Mapping the
circumnuclear dust in nearby AGN with MIDI, IAU Symposium (V. Karas and
G. Matt, eds.), IAU Symposium, vol. 238, April 2007, pp. 93–98.
I. Trujillo, N. M. Förster Schreiber, G. Rudnick, M. Barden, M. Franx, H. Rix, J.
A. R. Caldwell, D. H. McIntosh, A. Zirm, B. Häußler, P. G. van Dokkum, I.
Labbé, A. Moorwood, H. Röttgering, A. van der Wel, P. van der Werf, and L.
van Starkenburg, Size Evolution of Galaxies Since Z~3:COMBINING SDSS,
GEMS and Fires, Island Universes - Structure and Evolution of Disk Galaxies,
Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings, ISBN 978-1-4020-5572-0,
Springer, 2007, pp. 481–86.
I. van Bemmel, H. Röttgering, Ionospheric limitations for LOFAR and SKA,
proceedings of MRU2007, PoS
R. C. E. van den Bosch, G. van de Ven, M. Cappellari, and P. T. de Zeeuw,
Triaxial orbit-based model of NGC 4365, IAU Symposium (V. Karas and G.
Matt, eds.), IAU Symposium, vol. 238, April 2007, pp. 331–332.
E. F. van Dishoeck, Building Complex Molecules During Star- and Planet
Formation: Synergy of Infrared and Millimeter Observations, Exploring the
Cosmic Frontier: Astrophysical Instruments for the 21st Century, ESO
Astrophysics Symposia, European Southern Observatory series, ISBN 978-3540-39755-7, Springer, 2007, pp. 201–204.
E. F. van Dishoeck, Ice in the nurseries of stars and planets, Findings on Ice,
PARS foundation, ed. H. Aardse & A. van Baalen (Lars Müller publishers),
pp. 38-40.
E. van Dishoeck, Water in het Heelal (Zenit, juni 2007, pp. 264-268)
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
197
I. van Houten-Groeneveld, M. E. Brown, C. Trujillo, D. Rabinowitz, and M. E.
Schwamb, Minor Planet Observations [675 Palomar Mountain], Minor Planet
Circulars 6045, 2.
I. van Houten-Groeneveld, T. Gehrels, and R. Stoss, Minor Planet
Observations [675 Palomar Mountain], Minor Planet Circulars 5958, 7.
A. Vazdekis, N. Cardiel, A. J. Cenarro, J. L. Cervantes, J. Falcón-Barroso, J.
Gorgas, J. Jiménez-Vicente, J. M. Martín-Hernández, R. F. Peletier, P. SánchezBlázquez, S. O. Selam, and E. Toloba, Stellar Population SEDs at 2.3?, IAU
Symposium, IAU Symposium, vol. 241, August 2007, pp. 133–137.
G. Verdoes Kleijn, R. Vermeij, E. Valentijn, and K. Kuijken, The Secondary
Standards Programme for OmegaCAM, The Future of Photometric,
Spectrophotometric and Polarimetric Standardization (C. Sterken, ed.),
Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series, vol. 364, April 2007, pp.
103.
R. Visser, V.C. Geers, C.P. Dullemond, J.-C. Augereau, K.M. Pontoppidan,
and E.F. van Dishoeck, PAH chemistry and IR emission from circumstellar
disks, Molecules in Space and Laboratory, December 2007, pp. 102-105
W. H. T. Vlemmings, H. J. van Langevelde, Improving the parallaxes of OH
bearing Miras, Astrophysical Masers and their Environments, Proceedings of
IAU Symposium 242, eds J.M. Chapman & W.A. Baan, pp. 342
A. Weijmans, D. Krajnović, T. A. Oosterloo, R. Morganti, and P. T. de Zeeuw,
Dark Matter in NGC 2974, IAU Symposium (F. Combes and J. Palous, eds.),
IAU Symposium, vol. 235, 2007, pp. 147–147.
P. Whitelock, O. Gerhard, Y. Efremov, W. Evans, C. Flynn, J. Grindlay, B.
Nordström, M. Perryman, R. Wyse, and C. Yuan, Commission 33: Structure
and Dynamics of the Galactic System, Transactions of the International
Astronomical Union, Series A 26, pp. 275–276.
X.4. Astronomical Catalogues
A. J. Cenarro, R. F. Peletier, P. Sanchez-Blazquez, S. O. Selam, E. Toloba, N.
Cardiel, J. Falcón-Barroso, J. Gorgas, J. Jimenez-Vicente, and A. Vazdekis,
Medium-resolution Isaac Newton Telescope library of empirical spectra - II.
The stellar atmospheric parameters., VizieR Online Data Catalog 837.
198
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
M. A. T. Groenewegen, P. R. Wood, G. C. Sloan, J. A. D. L. Blommaert, M.-R.
L. Cioni, M. W. Feast, S. Hony, M. Matsuura, J. W. Menzies, E. A. Olivier, E.
Vanhollebeke, J. T. van Loon, P. A. Whitelock, A. A. Zijlstra, H. J. Habing, and
E. Lagadec, Carbon star in Magellanic Cloud (Groenewegen+, 2007), VizieR
Online Data Catalog 837.
S. Hekker and J. Melendez, Precise radial velocities of G and K giant stars
(Hekker+ 2007), VizieR Online Data Catalog 347.
R. Köhler, M. G. Petr-Gotzens, M. J. McCaughrean, J. Bouvier, G. Duchene, A.
Quirrenbach, and H. Zinnecker, Binary stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster
(Koehler+, 2006), VizieR Online Data Catalog 345.
M. B. N. Kouwenhoven, A. G. A. Brown, and L. Kaper, Sco OB2 intermediatemass stars (Kouwenhoven+, 2007), VizieR Online Data Catalog 346.
P. McDonald, U. Seljak, S. Burles, D. J. Schlegel, D. H. Weinberg, R. Cen, D.
Shih, J. Schaye, D. P. Schneider, N. A. Bahcall, J. W. Briggs, J. Brinkmann, R. J.
Brunner, M. Fukugita, J. E. Gunn, Z. Ivezic, S. Kent, R. H. Lupton, and D. E.
vanden Berk, Ly{alpha} forest power spectrum from the SDSS (McDonald+,
2006), VizieR Online Data Catalog 216.
M. Pierre, L. Chiappetti, F. Pacaud, A. Gueguen, C. Libbrecht, B. Altieri, H.
Aussel, P. Gandhi, O. Garcet, E. Gosset, L. Paioro, T. J. Ponman, A. M. Read,
A. Refregier, J.-L. Starck, J. Surdej, I. Valtchanov, C. Adami, D. Alloin, A.
Alshino, S. Andreon, M. Birkinshaw, M. Bremer, A. Detal, P.-A. Duc, G. Galaz,
L. Jones, J.-P. Le Fevre, O. Le Fevre, D. Maccagni, A. Mazure, H. Quintana, H.
J. A. Röttgering, P.-G. Sprimont, C. Tasse, G. Trinchieri, and J. P. Willis,
XMM-LSS catalogue. Version I. (Pierre+, 2007), VizieR Online Data Catalog
838.
A. M. S. Richards, T. W. B. Muxlow, R. Beswick, M. G. Allen, K. Benson, R. C.
Dickson, M. A. Garrett, S. T. Garrington, E. Gonzalez-Solarez, P. A. Harrison,
A. J. Holloway, M. M. Kettenis, R. A. Laing, E. A. Richards, H. Thrall, H. J. van
Langevelde, N. A. Walton, P. N. Wilkinson, and N. Winstanley, Radio-X-ray
sources in the HDF(N) region. (Richards+, 2007), VizieR Online Data Catalog
347.
P. Sanchez-Blazquez, R. F. Peletier, J. Jimenez-Vicente, N. Cardiel, A. J.
Cenarro, J. Falcón-Barroso, J. Gorgas, S. Selam, and A. Vazdekis, MILES
library of empirical spectra (Sanchez-blazquez+, 2006), VizieR Online Data
Catalog 837.
P. Sanchez-Blazquez, R. F. Peletier, J. Jimenez-Vicente, N. Cardiel, A. J.
Cenarro, J. Falcón-Barroso, J. Gorgas, S. Selam, and A. Vazdekis, MILES
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
199
library of empirical spectra (Sanchez-blazquez+, 2006), VizieR Online Data
Catalog 737.
M. Soto, D. Minniti, and M. Rejkuba, Bulge Microlensing Events (Soto+, 2007),
VizieR Online Data Catalog 346.
C. Tasse, A. S. Cohen, H. J. A. Röttgering, N. E. Kassim, M. Pierre, R. Perley,
P. Best, M. Birkinshaw, M. Bremer, and H. Liang, XMM-LSS field at 74 and
325MHz (Tasse+, 2006), VizieR Online Data Catalog 345.
C. Tasse, H. J. A. Röttgering, P. N. Best, A. S. Cohen, M. Pierre, and
R.Wilman, XMM-LSS at 240MHz and 610MHz (Tasse+, 2007), VizieR Online
Data Catalog 347.
B. P. Venemans, H. J. A. Röttgering, G. K. Miley, W. J. M. van Breugel, C. De
Breuck, J. D. Kurk, L. Pentericci, S. A. Stanford, R. A. Overzier, S. Croft, and
H. Ford, Candidate Lyα emitting galaxies (Venemans+, 2007), VizieR Online
Data Catalog 346.
X.5. Other Publications
D. van Delft, Einstein in Leiden, in Leiden Einstein, Leids Jaarboekje 2007, 153176.
D. van Delft, Kunstnier van Kolff, in: Tiny Monquil-Broersen (red.),
Universitaire collecties in Nederland (Zwolle 2007) 21.
D. van Delft, Een onbekende brief van Einstein, Nederlands Tijdschrift voor
Natuurkunde (augustus 2007), 268-269.
D. van Delft, Rathenau, Gerhart Wolfgang (1911-1989), Biografisch
Woordenboek van Nederland (21 november 2007).
D. van Delft, Het is dwaasheid van ons kritisch vermogen te laten afhangen
wat waar en onwaar is, De Gids, themanummer ; De titels van Montaigne’
(juli-augustus-september 2007) 616-619.
D. van Delft, Een koppige kortsluiting, NRC Handelsblad (13 augustus 2007)
pagina 16.
D. van Delft, Review of Rienk Vermij, Een kleine geschiedenis van de wetenschap
(Uitgeverij Nieuwezijds 2006), in: Bijdragen en Mededelingen betreffende de
Geschiedenis der Nederlanden 122 (2007) 425-426.
200
APPENDIX X. SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS
D. van Delft, Review of ‘Een Hollander naar Mekka’, catalogus bij de
tentoonstelling ‘Christiaan Snouck Hurgronje (1857-1936): oriëntalist’ in de
universiteitsbibliotheek Leiden, NRC Handelsblad (4 februari 2007), bijlage
Wetenschap & Onderwijs, pagina 51.
D. van Delft, Review of ‘Dat zit zo’, Jo Hermans, Hoor je beter in het donker
(BétaText 2007), NRC Handelsblad (18 april 2007) pagina 22.
D. van Delft, Review of ‘Onontkoombare emotie’, James McAllister (ed.),
Knowledge in Fermant: Dilemmas in Science, Scolarship and Society (Leiden
University Press 2007), NRC Handelsblad (21 april 2007), bijlage Wetenschap &
Onderwijs, pagina 46.
D. van Delft, Review of ‘Al-Galilei kwam niet’, Floris Cohen, De herschepping
van de wereld (Bert Bakker 2007), NRC Handelsblad (23 november 2007), bijlage
Boeken, pagina 1-2.
D. van Delft, Facilitating Leiden's Cold: the International Association of
Refrigeration and the Internationalisation of Heike Kamerlingh Onnes's
Cryogenic Laboratory, Centaurus, 49, 227-245.
D. van Delft, Tegen de roof: het Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium in
oorlogstijd, Gewina 30, 247-264.
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement