Raritan PX-1000 Series User guide
PX-1000 Series
User Guide
Release 2.1.5
Copyright © 2011 Raritan, Inc.
DPX2-1000-0B-v2.1.5-E
March 2011
255-80-6105-00
Safety Guidelines
WARNING! Read and understand all sections in this guide before installing or operating this product.
WARNING! Connect this product to an AC power source whose voltage is within the range specified on
the product’s nameplate. Operating this product outside the nameplate voltage range may result in
electric shock, fire, personal injury and death.
WARNING! Connect this product to an AC power source that is current limited by a suitably rated fuse
or circuit breaker in accordance with national and local electrical codes. Operating this product without
proper current limiting may result in electric shock, fire, personal injury and death.
WARNING! Connect this product to a protective earth ground. Never use a “ground lift adaptor”
between the product’s plug and the wall receptacle. Failure to connect to a protective earth ground may
result in electric shock, fire, personal injury and death.
WARNING! This product contains no user serviceable parts. Do not open, alter or disassemble this
product. All servicing must be performed by qualified personnel. Disconnect power before servicing this
product. Failure to comply with this warning may result in electric shock, personal injury and death.
WARNING! Use this product in a dry location. Failure to use this product in a dry location may result in
electric shock, personal injury and death.
WARNING! Do not rely on this product’s receptacle lamps, receptacle relay switches or any other
receptacle power on/off indicator to determine whether power is being supplied to a receptacle. Unplug
a device connected to this product before performing repair, maintenance or service on the device.
Failure to unplug a device before servicing it may result in electric shock, fire, personal injury and death.
WARNING! Only use this product to power information technology equipment that has a UL/IEC
60950-1 or equivalent rating. Attempting to power non-rated devices may result in electric shock, fire,
personal injury and death.
WARNING! Do not use this product to power inductive loads such as motors or compressors.
Attempting to power inductive loads may result in damage to the product.
WARNING! Do not use this product to power critical patient care equipment, fire or smoke alarm
systems. Use of this product to power such equipment may result in personal injury and death.
WARNING! If this product is a model that requires assembly of its line cord or plug, all such assembly
must be performed by a licensed electrician and the line cord or plugs used must be suitably rated
based on the product’s nameplate ratings and national and local electrical codes. Assembly by
unlicensed electricians or failure to use suitably rated line cords or plugs may result in electric shock,
fire, personal injury or death.
WARNING! This product contains a chemical known to the State of California to cause cancer, birth
defects, or other reproductive harm.
Safety Instructions
1. Installation of this product should only be performed by a person who has knowledge and
experience with electric power.
2. Make sure the line cord is disconnected from power before physically mounting or moving the
location of this product.
3. This product is designed to be used within an electronic equipment rack. The metal case of this
product is electrically bonded to the line cord ground wire. A threaded grounding point on the case
may be used as an additional means of protectively grounding this product and the rack.
4. Examine the branch circuit receptacle that will supply electric power to this product. Make sure the
receptacle’s power lines, neutral and protective earth ground pins are wired correctly and are the
correct voltage and phase. Make sure the branch circuit receptacle is protected by a suitably rated
fuse or circuit breaker.
5. If the product is a model that contains receptacles that can be switched on/off, electric power may
still be present at a receptacle even when it is switched off.
This document contains proprietary information that is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. No
part of this document may be photocopied, reproduced, or translated into another language without
express prior written consent of Raritan, Inc.
© Copyright 2011 Raritan, Inc. All third-party software and hardware mentioned in this document are
registered trademarks or trademarks of and are the property of their respective holders.
FCC Information
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A digital device,
pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection
against harmful interference in a commercial installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may
cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this equipment in a residential
environment may cause harmful interference.
VCCI Information (Japan)
Raritan is not responsible for damage to this product resulting from accident, disaster, misuse, abuse,
non-Raritan modification of the product, or other events outside of Raritan's reasonable control or not
arising under normal operating conditions.
Contents
Safety Guidelines
ii
Safety Instructions
iii
Applicable Models
xi
What's New in the Dominion PX User Guide
xii
Chapter 1 Introduction
1
Product Models .............................................................................................................................. 1
Product Features ........................................................................................................................... 1
Package Contents.......................................................................................................................... 2
Zero U Products................................................................................................................... 3
1U Products ......................................................................................................................... 3
2U Products ......................................................................................................................... 3
Chapter 2 Rack-Mounting the PDU
4
Rackmount Safety Guidelines ....................................................................................................... 4
Mounting Zero U Models Using Two Rear Buttons .......................................................................5
Mounting Zero U Models Using L-Brackets and Buttons............................................................... 6
Mounting 1U or 2U Models ............................................................................................................ 7
Chapter 3 Installation and Configuration
10
Before You Begin......................................................................................................................... 10
Unpacking the Product and Components..........................................................................10
Preparing the Installation Site............................................................................................10
Filling Out the Equipment Setup Worksheet .....................................................................11
Checking the Branch Circuit Rating...................................................................................11
Installing Cable Retention Clips (Optional)..................................................................................12
Connecting the PDU to a Power Source .....................................................................................13
Configuring Dominion PX ............................................................................................................ 13
Connecting the PDU to a Computer..................................................................................14
Connecting Dominion PX to Your Network .......................................................................14
Initial Network Configuration..............................................................................................16
v
Contents
Connecting Environmental Sensors (Optional) ...........................................................................20
About Contact Closure Sensors ........................................................................................22
Connecting the Asset Management Sensor (Optional) ...............................................................25
Attaching Asset Sensors to a Rack ...................................................................................25
Connecting Asset Sensors to Dominion PX ......................................................................26
Chapter 4 Using the PDU
28
Panel Components ...................................................................................................................... 28
Power Cord........................................................................................................................ 28
Outlets ............................................................................................................................... 28
Connection Ports ...............................................................................................................29
LED Display ....................................................................................................................... 31
Reset Button ...................................................................................................................... 34
Circuit Breakers ........................................................................................................................... 34
Resetting the Button-Type Circuit Breaker........................................................................35
Resetting the Handle-Type Circuit Breaker.......................................................................35
Beeper ......................................................................................................................................... 36
Chapter 5 Using the Web Interface
37
Supported Web Browsers............................................................................................................ 37
Logging in to the Web Interface................................................................................................... 38
Login .................................................................................................................................. 38
Changing Your Password..................................................................................................39
Logout .......................................................................................................................................... 40
Introduction to the Web Interface................................................................................................. 41
Menus ................................................................................................................................ 42
Dominion PX Explorer Pane..............................................................................................42
Setup Button ...................................................................................................................... 44
Status Bar .......................................................................................................................... 44
Add Page Icon ................................................................................................................... 46
Logout Button .................................................................................................................... 46
Data Pane.......................................................................................................................... 46
More Information ...............................................................................................................47
Viewing the Dashboard................................................................................................................ 51
Device Management .................................................................................................................... 51
Displaying the PDU Information ........................................................................................52
Naming the PDU................................................................................................................53
Modifying the Network Configuration.................................................................................53
Modifying the Network Service Settings............................................................................57
Setting the Date and Time.................................................................................................60
Setting Data Logging .........................................................................................................62
Configuring the SMTP Settings .........................................................................................63
Rebooting the Dominion PX Device ..................................................................................64
User Management ....................................................................................................................... 64
Creating a User Profile ......................................................................................................64
Modifying a User Profile ....................................................................................................67
Deleting a User Profile.......................................................................................................68
Changing the User List View .............................................................................................68
vi
Contents
Setting Up Roles .......................................................................................................................... 68
Setting Up Roles .......................................................................................................................... 69
Creating a Role.................................................................................................................. 69
Modifying a Role ................................................................................................................ 70
Deleting a Role .................................................................................................................. 71
Changing the Role List View .............................................................................................71
Access Security Control............................................................................................................... 72
Forcing HTTPS Encryption................................................................................................72
Configuring the Firewall.....................................................................................................72
Setting Up User Login Controls .........................................................................................77
Setting Up Role Based Access Control Rules...................................................................79
Setting Up an SSL Certificate ...................................................................................................... 83
Certificate Signing Request ...............................................................................................83
Creating a Self-Signed Certificate .....................................................................................85
Installing Existing Key and Certificate Files.......................................................................86
Downloading Key and Certificate Files..............................................................................87
Setting Up LDAP Authentication.................................................................................................. 88
Gathering the LDAP Information .......................................................................................88
Adding the LDAP Server Settings .....................................................................................89
Sorting the LDAP Access Order ........................................................................................91
Testing the LDAP Server Connection ...............................................................................92
Editing the LDAP Server Settings......................................................................................92
Deleting the LDAP Server Settings ...................................................................................92
Disabling the LDAP Authentication ...................................................................................93
Enabling LDAP and Local Authentication Services........................................................... 93
Outlet Management ..................................................................................................................... 93
Naming Outlets .................................................................................................................. 94
Checking Associated Circuit Breakers ..............................................................................94
Inlet and Circuit Breaker Management ........................................................................................95
Naming the Inlet ................................................................................................................ 95
Naming Circuit Breakers....................................................................................................96
Monitoring the Inlet ............................................................................................................ 96
Monitoring Circuit Breakers ...............................................................................................97
Setting Power Thresholds............................................................................................................ 98
Setting Inlet Thresholds.....................................................................................................98
Setting Circuit Breaker Thresholds....................................................................................99
What is Deassertion Hysteresis?.....................................................................................100
What is Assertion Timeout?.............................................................................................101
Configuring Event Rules ............................................................................................................102
Components of an Event Rule.........................................................................................102
Creating an Event Rule ...................................................................................................102
Sample Event Rules ........................................................................................................106
Modifying an Event Rule..................................................................................................108
Modifying an Action .........................................................................................................109
Deleting an Event Rule or Action.....................................................................................109
A Note about Untriggered Rules......................................................................................110
Managing Event Logging ...........................................................................................................110
Viewing the Local Event Log ...........................................................................................110
Clearing Event Entries.....................................................................................................111
Viewing Connected Users .........................................................................................................111
Monitoring Server Accessibility..................................................................................................112
Adding IT Devices for Ping Monitoring ............................................................................112
vii
Contents
Editing Ping Monitoring Settings......................................................................................113
Deleting Ping Monitoring Settings ...................................................................................113
Environmental Sensors..............................................................................................................113
Identifying Environmental Sensors ..................................................................................114
Managing Environmental Sensors...................................................................................115
Configuring Environmental Sensors ................................................................................116
Viewing Sensor Data .......................................................................................................118
Unmanaging Environmental Sensors ..............................................................................122
Asset Management ....................................................................................................................122
Configuring the Asset Sensor..........................................................................................122
Setting Asset Sensor LED Colors....................................................................................123
Changing a Specific LED's Color Settings ......................................................................123
Displaying the Asset Sensor Information ........................................................................124
Copying Configurations with Bulk Configuration .......................................................................125
Saving a Dominion PX Configuration ..............................................................................126
Copying a Dominion PX Configuration............................................................................127
Changing the Temperature Unit ................................................................................................127
Network Diagnostics ..................................................................................................................128
Pinging a Host .................................................................................................................128
Tracing the Network Route..............................................................................................129
Listing TCP Connections .................................................................................................129
Viewing the Communication Log ...............................................................................................129
Downloading Diagnostic Information .........................................................................................130
Firmware Upgrade .....................................................................................................................131
Updating the Firmware ....................................................................................................131
Viewing Firmware Update History ...................................................................................132
Full Disaster Recovery ....................................................................................................133
Updating the Asset Sensor Firmware..............................................................................133
Accessing the Help ....................................................................................................................133
Retrieving Software Packages Information .....................................................................134
Browsing through the Online Help...................................................................................134
Chapter 6 Using SNMP
136
Enabling SNMP..........................................................................................................................136
Configuring Users for Encrypted SNMP v3 ...............................................................................137
Configuring SNMP Traps...........................................................................................................138
SNMP Gets and Sets.................................................................................................................139
The Dominion PX MIB .....................................................................................................139
A Note about Enabling Thresholds ............................................................................................141
Chapter 7 Using the Command Line Interface
142
About the Interface.....................................................................................................................142
Logging in to CLI........................................................................................................................142
With HyperTerminal.........................................................................................................143
With SSH or Telnet..........................................................................................................144
Different CLI Modes and Prompts ...................................................................................145
Closing a Serial Connection ............................................................................................145
viii
Contents
Help Command ..........................................................................................................................145
Showing Information ..................................................................................................................146
Network Configuration .....................................................................................................146
Wireless Configuration ....................................................................................................146
PDU Configuration...........................................................................................................147
Networking Mode.............................................................................................................147
Network Service Settings ................................................................................................147
Outlet Information ............................................................................................................148
Inlet Information ...............................................................................................................148
Inlet Pole Sensor Information ..........................................................................................149
Circuit Breaker Information..............................................................................................150
External Sensor Information ............................................................................................151
Circuit Breaker Sensor Information .................................................................................152
Environmental Sensor Information ..................................................................................153
Security Settings..............................................................................................................154
Existing User Profiles ......................................................................................................154
Existing Roles ..................................................................................................................155
Reliability Information ......................................................................................................155
Command History............................................................................................................156
History Buffer Length.......................................................................................................156
Examples .........................................................................................................................156
Configuring the Dominion PX Device and Network ...................................................................158
Entering the Configuration Mode.....................................................................................158
PDU Configuration Commands .......................................................................................159
Networking Configuration Commands.............................................................................161
Security Configuration Commands..................................................................................169
Outlet Configuration Commands .....................................................................................177
Inlet Configuration Commands ........................................................................................178
Circuit Breaker Configuration Commands.......................................................................179
Environmental Sensor Configuration Commands ...........................................................179
Sensor Configuration Commands ...................................................................................182
User Configuration Commands .......................................................................................204
Role Configuration Commands .......................................................................................211
Multi-Command Syntax ...................................................................................................214
Querying Available Parameters for a Command.............................................................215
Quitting the Configuration Mode......................................................................................215
Unblocking a User......................................................................................................................216
Resetting Dominion PX..............................................................................................................216
Restarting the PDU..........................................................................................................216
Resetting to Factory Defaults ..........................................................................................217
Network Troubleshooting...........................................................................................................217
Entering the Diagnostic Mode .........................................................................................217
Diagnostic Commands ....................................................................................................217
Quitting the Diagnostic Mode ..........................................................................................220
ix
Contents
Retrieving Previous Commands ................................................................................................220
Automatically Completing a Command......................................................................................220
Logging out of CLI......................................................................................................................221
Appendix A Specifications
222
Maximum Ambient Operating Temperature ..............................................................................222
Serial RJ-45 Port Pinouts ..........................................................................................................222
Sensor RJ-12 Port Pinouts ........................................................................................................222
Appendix B Equipment Setup Worksheet
224
Appendix C MAC Address
228
Appendix D LDAP Configuration Illustration
229
Step A. Determine User Accounts and Groups .........................................................................229
Step B. Configure User Groups on the AD Server ....................................................................230
Step C. Configure LDAP Authentication on the Dominion PX Device.......................................231
Step D. Configure User Groups on the Dominion PX Device....................................................233
Appendix E Resetting to Factory Defaults
237
Using the Reset Button ..............................................................................................................237
Using the CLI Command ...........................................................................................................238
Appendix F Non-Zero Readings While No Loads Attached
240
Index
241
x
Applicable Models
This user guide is applicable to the PX-1000 series, whose model name
follows the PX2-1nnn format, where n is a number.
Note: For information on PX2-3nnn, PX2-4nnn and PX2-5nnn series, see
the "PX2-3000/4000/5000 Series” User Guide or online help.
xi
What's New in the Dominion PX User
Guide
The following sections have changed or information has been added to the
Dominion PX User Guide based on enhancements and changes to the
equipment and/or user documentation.
Product Features (on page 1)
Rack-Mounting the PDU (on page 4)
Configuring Dominion PX (on page 13)
About Contact Closure Sensors (on page 22)
Connecting the Asset Management Sensor (Optional) (on page 25)
Panel Components (on page 28)
Supported Web Browsers (on page 37)
Introduction to the Web Interface (on page 41)
Displaying the PDU Information (on page 52)
Modifying the Network Interface Settings (on page 55)
Setting Up Role Based Access Control Rules (on page 79)
Setting Power Thresholds (on page 98)
Monitoring Server Accessibility (on page 112)
Environmental Sensors (on page 113)
Asset Management (on page 122)
Changing the Temperature Unit (on page 127)
Network Diagnostics (on page 128)
Downloading Diagnostic Information (on page 130)
Firmware Upgrade (on page 131)
Using the Command Line Interface (on page 142)
Serial RJ-45 Port Pinouts (on page 222)
MAC Address (on page 228)
Please see the Release Notes for a more detailed explanation of the
changes applied to this version of Dominion PX.
xii
Chapter 1
Introduction
Dominion PX is an intelligent power distribution unit (PDU). The intended
use of the Raritan Dominion PX is distribution of power to information
technology equipment such as computers and communication equipment
where such equipment is typically mounted in an equipment rack located
in an information technology equipment room.
With Dominion PX, you can remotely monitor power to devices in the data
center and keep track or be notified of any significant power events or
alerts.
In This Chapter
Product Models..........................................................................................1
Product Features .......................................................................................1
Package Contents .....................................................................................2
Product Models
Dominion PX comes in several models that are built to stock and can be
obtained almost immediately. Raritan also offers custom models that are
built to order and can only be obtained on request.
Visit the Product Selector page
(http://www.raritan.com/resources/px-product-selector/) on the
Raritan website or contact your local reseller for a list of available models.
Product Features
Dominion PX models vary in sizes and features. In general, Dominion PX
features include:

The ability to monitor the following at the inlet level:
- Active energy (Wh)
- Active power (W)
- Apparent power (VA)
- Power factor
- RMS current per line (A)
- RMS voltage per line pair (V)

The ability to monitor the following at the circuit breaker level:
- Status (closed/open)
- Current drawn (A)
- Current remaining (A)
1
Chapter 1: Introduction

The ability to monitor environmental factors such as external
temperature and humidity

User-specified location attributes for environmental sensors

An audible alarm (beeper) to indicate current overload

Configurable alarm thresholds and hysteresis

Configurable assertion timeout for thresholds

The ability to remotely track the locations of IT devices on the rack
through connected asset sensors

Support for SNMP v1, v2, and v3

The ability to send traps using the SNMP protocol

The ability to store a data log of all sensor measurements and retrieve
it via SNMP
Note: Raritan's Power IQ or other external systems can retrieve the
stored data (samples) from Dominion PX.

The ability to configure and set values through SNMP, including power
threshold levels

The ability to save one Dominion PX device's configuration settings
and then deploy those settings to other Dominion PX devices

Local overcurrent protection (OCP) via branch circuit breakers or
fuses on products rated over 20A to protect connected equipment
against overload and short circuits

Measurement accuracy for the inlet:
Voltage: 1%
Current: 1%+/-0.1A
Active power: 1%
Active energy: 1%

A combination of outlet types (for example, C13 and C19 outlets) in
select models

A combination of outlet voltages (120 and 208 volts) in select models

Support for high current devices (such as Blade Servers) in select
models

The ability to diagnose the network, such as pinging a host or listing
TCP connections

Full disaster recovery option in case of a catastrophic failure during a
firmware upgrade
Package Contents
The following sub-topics describe the equipment and other material
included in the product package.
2
Chapter 1: Introduction
Zero U Products

Dominion PX device

Screws, brackets and/or buttons for Zero U

A null-modem cable with DB9 connectors on both ends (Raritan
number: 254-01-0006-00) (optional)

Cable retention clips for outlets or the inlet (for PX-1000 series only)
1U Products

Dominion PX device

1U bracket pack and screws

A null-modem cable with DB9 connectors on both ends (Raritan
number: 254-01-0006-00) (optional)

Cable retention clips for outlets or the inlet (for PX-1000 series only)
2U Products

Dominion PX device

2U bracket pack and screws

A null-modem cable with DB9 connectors on both ends (Raritan
number: 254-01-0006-00) (optional)

Cable retention clips for outlets or the inlet (for PX-1000 series only)
3
Chapter 2
Rack-Mounting the PDU
This chapter describes how to rackmount a Zero U Dominion PX device.
To mount a PX-1000 series PDU, you can use either two buttons or
L-brackets that Raritan provided.
In This Chapter
Rackmount Safety Guidelines ...................................................................4
Mounting Zero U Models Using Two Rear Buttons...................................5
Mounting Zero U Models Using L-Brackets and Buttons ..........................6
Mounting 1U or 2U Models........................................................................7
Rackmount Safety Guidelines
In Raritan products which require rack mounting, follow these precautions:

Operation temperature in a closed rack environment may be
greater than room temperature. Do not exceed the rated
maximum ambient temperature of the Power Distribution Units.
See Specifications (on page 222) in the User Guide.

Ensure sufficient airflow through the rack environment.

Mount equipment in the rack carefully to avoid uneven mechanical
loading.

Connect equipment to the supply circuit carefully to avoid
overloading circuits.

Ground all equipment properly, especially supply connections, to
the branch circuit.
4
Chapter 2: Rack-Mounting the PDU
Mounting Zero U Models Using Two Rear Buttons
The following describes how to mount a PDU using two buttons only.
To mount Zero U models using two buttons:
1. Turn to the rear of the PDU.
2. Locate two screw holes on the rear panel: one near the bottom and
the other near the top (the side of cable gland).
3. Screw a button in the screw hole near the bottom. The recommended
torque for the button is 1.96 N·m (20 kgf·cm).
4. Screw a button in the screw hole near the top. The recommended
torque for the button is 1.96 N·m (20 kgf·cm).
5
Chapter 2: Rack-Mounting the PDU
5. Ensure that the two buttons can engage their mounting holes in the
rack or cabinet simultaneously.
6. Press the Dominion PX device forward, pushing the mounting buttons
through the mounting holes, then letting the device drop slightly. This
secures the Dominion PX device in place and completes the
installation.
Mounting Zero U Models Using L-Brackets and Buttons
This section describes how to mount a PX-1000 series PDU using
L-brackets and two buttons.
To mount Zero U models using L-brackets and two buttons:
1. Align the two central holes of the L-bracket with the two screw holes
on the top of the PDU.
6
Chapter 2: Rack-Mounting the PDU
2. Screw the L-bracket to the PDU and ensure the bracket is fastened
securely.
3. Repeat Steps 1 to 2 to screw another L-bracket to the bottom of the
PDU.
4. After both L-brackets are installed on the PDU, you can choose either
of the following ways to mount the PDU in the rack.

Using rack screws, fasten the PDU to the rack through the two
upper holes of each L-bracket.

Mount the PDU by screwing a mounting button in the back center
of each L-bracket and then having both buttons engage the
mounting holes in the rack. The recommended torque for the
button is 1.96 N·m (20 kgf·cm).
Mounting 1U or 2U Models
Using the appropriate brackets and tools, fasten the 1U Dominion PX
device to the rack or cabinet.
To mount the Dominion PX device:
1. Attach one rackmount bracket to one side of the Dominion PX device.
a. Align two oval-shaped holes of the rackmount bracket with two
threaded holes on one side of the Dominion PX device.
b. Secure the rackmount bracket with two of the Raritan-provided
screws.
7
Chapter 2: Rack-Mounting the PDU
Note: The appropriate oval-shaped hole locations of the rackmount
bracket may vary according to the threaded holes on you model.
2. Repeat Step 1 for securing the other rackmount bracket to the other
side of Dominion PX.
3. Insert one end of the cable-support bar into the L-shaped hole of the
rackmount bracket, and align the hole on the end of the bar with the
threaded hole adjacent to the L-shaped hole.
4. Secure the cable-support bar with one of the Raritan-provided cap
screws.
8
Chapter 2: Rack-Mounting the PDU
5. Repeat Steps 3 to 4 to secure the other end of the cable-support bar to
the other rackmount bracket.
Mount the Dominion PX device on the rack by securing the rackmount
brackets' ears to the rack's front rails with your own screws, bolts, cage
nuts, or the like.
9
Chapter 3
Installation and Configuration
This chapter explains how to install a Dominion PX device and configure it
for network connectivity.
In This Chapter
Before You Begin ....................................................................................10
Installing Cable Retention Clips (Optional)..............................................12
Connecting the PDU to a Power Source .................................................13
Configuring Dominion PX ........................................................................13
Connecting Environmental Sensors (Optional) .......................................20
Connecting the Asset Management Sensor (Optional)...........................25
Before You Begin
Before beginning the installation, perform the following activities:

Unpack the product and components

Prepare the installation site

Fill out the equipment setup worksheet
Unpacking the Product and Components
1. Remove the Dominion PX device and other equipment from the box in
which they were shipped. See Package Contents (on page 2) for a
complete list of the contents of the box.
2. Compare the serial number of the equipment with the number on the
packing slip located on the outside of the box and make sure they
match.
3. Inspect the equipment carefully. If any of the equipment is damaged or
missing, contact Raritan's Technical Support Department for
assistance.
4. Verify that all circuit breakers on the Dominion PX device are set to
ON. If not, turn them ON.
For a PDU with fuses, ensure that all fuses are inserted and seated
properly. If there are any fuse covers, ensure that they are closed.
Note: Not all Dominion PX devices have overcurrent protection
mechanisms.
Preparing the Installation Site
1. Make sure the installation area is clean and free of extreme
temperatures and humidity.
10
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
Note: If necessary, contact Raritan Technical Support for the
maximum operating temperature for your model. See Maximum
Ambient Operating Temperature (on page 222).
2. Allow sufficient space around the Dominion PX device for cabling and
outlet connections.
3. Review the Safety Instructions (on page iii) listed in the beginning of
this user guide.
Filling Out the Equipment Setup Worksheet
An Equipment Setup Worksheet is provided in this guide. See Equipment
Setup Worksheet (on page 224). Use this worksheet to record the model,
serial number, and use of each IT device connected to Dominion PX.
As you add and remove devices, keep the worksheet up-to-date.
Checking the Branch Circuit Rating
This section describes the rating of the branch circuit supplying power to
the PDU:

The rating of the branch circuit shall be in accordance with national
and local electrical codes.

For North American, the rating of the branch circuit may be up to
125% greater than the rating of the PDU, unless prohibited by
national or local electrical codes.


20A for PDUs rated at 16A input current

30A for PDUs rated at 24A input current

40A for PDUs rated at 32A input current

50A for PDUs rated at 35A input current

50A for PDUs rated at 40A input current

60A for PDUs rated at 45A input current
In North America, external overcurrent protectors shall be certified
by UL/CSA (or equivalent certification). In other regions or
countries, make sure they comply with national and local electrical
codes.
11
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
Installing Cable Retention Clips (Optional)
If your Dominion PX device is designed to use a cable retention clip, install
the clip before connecting a power cord. A cable retention clip prevents the
connected power cord from coming loose or falling off.
These optional clips come in various sizes to accommodate diverse power
cords used on IT equipment, which are connected to C13 or C19 outlets.
You can request a cable retention kit containing different sizes of clips
from you reseller. Make sure you use a clip that fits the power cord snugly
to facilitate the installation or removal operation (for servicing).
To install and use a cable retention clip:
1. Locate two tiny holes adjacent to the outlet (or inlet).
2. Install the cable retention clip by inserting two ends of the clip into the
tiny holes.
Zero U models
1U models
3. Connect the power cord to the outlet (or inlet), and press the clip
toward the power cord until it holds the cord firmly.
Zero U models
12
1U models
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
Connecting the PDU to a Power Source
1. Verify that all circuit breakers on the Dominion PX device are set to
ON. If not, turn them ON.
For a PDU with fuses, ensure that all fuses are inserted and seated
properly. If there are any fuse covers, ensure that they are closed.
Note: Not all Dominion PX devices have overcurrent protection
mechanisms.
2. Connect each Dominion PX device to an appropriately rated branch
circuit. See the label or nameplate affixed to your Dominion PX device
for appropriate input ratings or range of ratings.
3. When a Dominion PX device powers up, it proceeds with the
power-on self test and software loading for a few moments.
4. When the software has completed loading, the LED display
illuminates.
Configuring Dominion PX
There are two alternatives to initially configure a Dominion PX device:

Connect the Dominion PX device to a computer to configure it, using a
serial connection between Dominion PX and the computer. The
computer must have a communications program such as
HyperTerminal or PuTTY. In addition, you need a null-modem cable
with DB9 connectors on both ends (Raritan part number:
254-01-0006-00).

Connect the Dominion PX device to a TCP/IP network that supports
DHCP. A Category 5e/6 UTP cable is required.
Tip: The DHCP-assigned IP address of the PDU can be retrieved
through the PDU's MAC address. You can contact your LAN
administrator for assistance. See MAC Addresses (see "MAC
Address" on page 228).
13
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
Connecting the PDU to a Computer
To configure Dominion PX using a computer, it must be connected to the
computer with an RS-232 serial interface.
See this diagram for the serial port location on Zero U models.
See this diagram for the serial port location on 1U modelss.
To connect Dominion PX to a computer via a null-modem cable:
1. Connect one end of the null-modem cable to the RS-232 port labeled
CONSOLE / MODEM on the Dominion PX device.
2. Connect the other end of the null-modem cable to the serial port (COM)
on the computer.
Note: If you plan to use the serial connection to log in to the command line
interface, leave the cable connected after the configuration is complete.
Connecting Dominion PX to Your Network
To use the web interface to administer Dominion PX, you must connect
the Dominion PX device to your local area network (LAN). Dominion PX
can be connected to a wired or wireless network.
Note: If your PDU is not implemented with the wireless networking feature,
then make a wired connection.
To make a wired connection:
1. Connect a standard Category 5e/6 UTP cable to the ETHERNET port
on the Dominion PX device.
2. Connect the other end of the cable to your LAN.
14
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
See the diagram for the ETHERNET port location on Zero U models.
For 1U models, the ETHERNET port is located on the back. See the diagram
for the port location.
To make a wireless connection:
Do one of the following:

Plug a 802.11n wireless USB LAN adapter into the USB-A port on
your Dominion PX device.

Connect a USB docking station to the USB-A port on the Dominion
PX device and plug the 802.11n wireless USB LAN adapter into
the appropriate USB port on the docking station.
Supported Wireless LAN Configuration
If you select the wireless connection, ensure that both of your wireless
USB LAN adapter and wireless network configuration meet the following
requirements.

Network type: 802.11n

Protocol: WPA2 (RSN)

Key management: WPA-PSK

Encryption: CCMP (AES)
Important: Currently only Raritan-provided wireless USB LAN
adapters are supported. You may contact Raritan Technical Support
for this information.
15
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
Initial Network Configuration
After the Dominion PX device is connected to your network, you must
provide it with an IP address and some additional networking information.
This section describes the initial configuration via a serial connection only.
Note: To configure Dominion PX via the LAN, see Using the Web
Interface (on page 37) for using the web interface.
To configure Dominion PX:
1. Go to the computer that you connected to the Dominion PX device
and open a communications program such as HyperTerminal or
PuTTY.
2. Select the appropriate serial port, and make sure the port settings are
configured as follows:

Bits per second = 115200 (115.2Kbps)

Data bits = 8

Stop bits = 1

Parity = None

Flow control = None
3. Press Enter.
4. Dominion PX prompts you to log in. Note that both of user name and
password are case sensitive.
a. At the Username prompt, type admin and press Enter.
b. At the Password prompt, type raritan and press Enter.
5. You are prompted to change the password if this is the first time you
log in to the Dominion PX device. Follow the onscreen instructions to
type your new password.
6. The # prompt appears when you log in successfully.
7. Type config and press Enter. The config:# prompt appears,
indicating that you have entered the configuration mode.
8. To configure network settings, type appropriate commands, and press
Enter. All commands are case sensitive so make sure you capitalize
them correctly.
a. To set the networking mode, type this command:
networkingMode <mode>
where <mode> is either wired for wired connection (default) or
wireless for wireless connection.
16
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
b. If you select the wireless network mode in the previous step, you
should set the Service Set Identifier (SSID), Pre-Shared Key (PSK)
and Basic Service Set Identifier (BSSID).
To set
Use this command
wireless SSID <ssid>
SSID
where <ssid> is the SSID string.
PSK
wireless PSK <psk>
where <psk> is the PSK string.
BSSID
wireless BSSID <bssid>
where <bssid> is the AP MAC address.
Tip: You can combine all commands to configure all wireless
parameters at a time. The command syntax is like this: wireless
SSID <ssid> PSK <psk> BSSID <bssid>.
c.
To set the IP configuration method, type this command:
network ipConfigurationMode <mode>
where <mode> is either dhcp for auto configuration (default) or
static for specifying a static IP address.
d. To configure IP and other network parameters, use the
commands shown in either table.

If you chose "dhcp" in Step c, you may use this command.
To set
Use this command
Preferred host network preferredHostName
<name>
name
(optional)
where <name> is the preferred host
name.

If you chose "static" in Step c, use the following commands for
setting up static-IP-related parameters.
17
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
To set
Static IP
address
Use this command
network ipAddress <ip address>
where <ip address> is the IP address
you want to assign.
Subnet mask
network subnetMask <netmask>
where <netmask> is the subnet mask.
Gateway
network gateway <ip address>
where <ip address> is the IP address of
the gateway.
Primary DNS
server
network primaryDNSServer <ip
address>
where <ip address> is the IP address of
the primary DNS server.
Secondary
DNS server
(optional)
network secondaryDNSServer
<ip address>
where <ip address> is the IP address of
the secondary DNS server.
e. The default LAN interface speed "auto" works in most of scenarios
and should not be changed unless necessary. To change it, use
this command:
network LANInterfaceSpeed <option>
where <option> is one of the options: auto, 10Mbps, or 100Mbps.
f.
The default duplex mode "auto" works in most of scenarios and
should not be changed unless necessary. To change it, type this
command:
network LANInterfaceDuplexMode <mode>
where <mode> is one of the options: half, full, or auto.
9. To quit the configuration mode with or without saving the changes,
type either command, and press Enter.
18
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
Command
apply
cancel
Description
Save all configuration changes and quit
the configuration mode.
Abort all configuration changes and quit
the configuration mode.
The # prompt appears, indicating that you have quit the configuration
mode.
10. To verify whether all settings are correct, type the following
commands one by one. Current network settings are displayed.
Command
show
networkingMode
Description
Show current networking
mode.
show network
details
Show all network parameters.
show wireless
details
Show all wireless parameters.
(Perform this command only
when you enable the wireless
mode.)
Tip: You can also type "show network" and "show wireless" to
display a shortened version of network settings.
11. If all are correct, type exit to log out of Dominion PX. If any are
incorrect, repeat Steps 7 to 10 to change any network settings.
The IP address configured may take seconds to take effect.
19
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
Connecting Environmental Sensors (Optional)
To enable Dominion PX to detect environmental conditions, connect one
or more Raritan environmental sensors to the Dominion PX device.
The maximum distance for all sensor cabling plugged into the product's
sensor port should not exceed 30 meters/100 feet. Contact Raritan
Technical Support if you have questions.
You can connect up to 16 environmental sensors to a Dominion PX device
by using a Raritan sensor hub.
A DPX-T2H2 counts as 4 sensors. A DPX-T3H1 counts as 4 sensors.
Warning: For proper operation, wait for 15~30 seconds between each
connection operation or each disconnection operation of environmental
sensors.
To directly connect one or multiple environmental sensors:

Plug the connector of the environmental sensor into the SENSOR port
on your Dominion PX device.
Note: Depending on the model you purchased, the number of
SENSOR ports varies.
To connect environmental sensors via an optional PX sensor
hub:
1. Connect a Raritan sensor hub to the Dominion PX device.
a. Plug one end of the Raritan-provided phone cable (4-wire, 6-pin,
RJ-12) into the IN port (Port 1) of the hub.
b. Plug the other end into the SENSOR port on the Dominion PX
device.
2. Connect Raritan environmental sensors to any of the four OUT ports
on the hub.
20
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
Raritan sensor hubs CANNOT be cascaded so at most a sensor hub
can be connected to each SENSOR port on the Dominion PX device.
This diagram illustrates a configuration with a sensor hub connected.
Dominion PX device
Raritan-provided phone cable
Raritan PX sensor hub
Raritan environmental sensors
21
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
About Contact Closure Sensors
Raritan's contact closure sensor (DPX-CC2-TR) can detect the
open-and-closed status of the connected detectors/switches. It requires
the integration of at least a discrete (on/off) detector/switch to work
properly. The types of discrete detectors/switches that can be plugged into
DPX-CC2-TR include those for:

Door open/closed detection

Door lock detection

Floor water detection

Smoke detection

Vibration detection
Raritan does NOT provide these discrete detectors/switches. They are
third-party probes so you must test them with Raritan's DPX-CC2-TR to
ensure they work properly.
Integration and testing for third-party detectors/switches is the sole
responsibility of the customer. Raritan cannot assume any liability as a
result of improper termination or failure (incidental or consequential) of
third-party detectors/switches that customers provide and install.
Failure to follow installation and configuration instructions can result in
false alarms or no alarms. Raritan makes no statement or claim that all
third-party detectors/switches will work with DPX-CC2-TR.
Connecting Third-Party Detectors/Switches to DPX-CC2-TR
A DPX-CC2-TR unit provides two channels for connecting two third-party
detectors/switches. There are four spring-loaded termination points on the
body of DPX-CC2-TR: the two to the right are associated with one channel
(as indicated by the LED number), and the two to the left are associated
with another channel. You must plug the third-party detectors/switches
into these termination points.
To connect third-party detectors/switches:
1. Strip the insulation around 12mm from the end of each wire of two
third-party detectors/switches.
2. Press and hold down the tiny rectangular buttons above the
termination points on the body of DPX-CC2-TR.
22
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
Note: Each button controls the spring of each corresponding
termination point.
3. Fully insert each wire of both third-party detectors/switches into each
termination point.

Plug both wires of a detector/switch into the two termination points
to the left.

Plug both wires of another detector/switch into the two termination
points to the right.
4. Release the tiny rectangular buttons after inserting four wires into four
termination points.
5. Verify that these wires are firmly fastened.
Configuring a Contact Closure Sensor
Before using DPX-CC2-TR to detect the contact closure status, water,
smoke or vibration, you must determine the normal state by adjusting its
dip switch, which controls the LED state on the body of DPX-CC2-TR. A
dip switch is associated with a channel.
To adjust the dip switch setting:
1. Place the detectors/switches connected to DPX-CC2-TR to the
position where you want to detect a specific environmental situation.
2. Uncover the dip switch on the body of DPX-CC2-TR.
3. To set the Normal state for channel 1, locate the dip switch labeled 1.
4. Use a pointed tip such as a pen to move the slide switch to the end
labeled NO (Normally Open) or NC (Normally Closed).
23
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration

Normally Open: The open status of the connected detector/switch
is considered normal.

Normally Closed: The closed status of the connected
detector/switch is considered normal. This is the default.
5. To set the Normal state for channel 2, repeat Step 4 for adjusting the
other dip switch's setting.
6. Install back the dip switch cover.
Note: The dip switch setting must be properly configured, or the sensor
LED may be incorrectly lit when in the Normal state.
Contact Closure Sensor LEDs
DPX-CC2-TR is equipped with the LEDs for showing the state of the
connected detectors/switches.
The LED is lit when the associated detector/switch is in the "abnormal"
state, which is the opposite of the Normal state. See Configuring a
Contact Closure Sensor (on page 23) for how to set the Normal state.
The meaning of a lit LED varies depending on the Normal state settings.


24
When the Normal state is set to Closed:
LED
Sensor state
Not lit
Closed
Lit
Open
When the Normal state is set to Open:
LED
Sensor state
Not lit
Open
Lit
Closed
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
Connecting the Asset Management Sensor (Optional)
You can remotely track the locations of up to 48 IT devices in the rack by
connecting an asset management sensor (asset sensor) to the Dominion
PX device after these IT devices are tagged electronically.
To use this asset management feature, you need the following items:

Raritan asset sensors: An asset sensor transmits the tagging and
positioning information to the Dominion PX device.

Raritan asset tags: An asset tag electronically tags the IT device
where it is attached.
Attaching Asset Sensors to a Rack
Each tag port on the asset sensors corresponds to a rack unit and can be
used to locate the IT devices on a specific rack (or cabinet). For each rack,
you can attach up to 6 asset sensors, consisting of one MASTER and five
SLAVE asset sensors.
Number
Item
8U MASTER asset sensor with 8 tag ports
8U SLAVE asset sensor with 8 tag ports
5U SLAVE asset sensor with 5 tag ports
To attach asset sensors to a rack:
1. Connect a MASTER asset sensor to an 8U SLAVE asset sensor.
25
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration

Plug the white male DIN connector of the slave asset sensor into
the white female DIN connector of the master asset sensor.

Make sure that the U-shaped sheet metal adjacent to the male
DIN connector is inserted into the rear slot of the master asset
sensor. It is recommended to screw up the U-shaped sheet metal
to reinforce the connection.
2. Connect another 8U slave asset sensor to the one being attached to
the master asset sensor in the same manner as Step 1.
3. Repeat Step 2 to connect more slave asset sensors. The maximum
length of the combined asset sensors can be 45U or 48U.

The final asset sensor can be 8U or 5U, depending on the height
of your rack.
4. Vertically attach the asset sensor assembly to the rack, next to the IT
equipment, making each tag port on the asset sensor horizontally
align with an IT device on the rack. The asset sensors are
automatically attracted to the rack because of magnetic stripes on the
back.
Connecting Asset Sensors to Dominion PX
You need both of asset sensors and asset tags for tracking IT devices.
Asset tags, which are affixed to IT devices, provide an ID for each IT
device, while the asset sensors transmit ID and positioning information to
the Dominion PX device.
To connect asset sensors to Dominion PX:
1. Affix an asset tag to each IT device through the tape on the tag's back.
2. Plug the connector on each asset tag into the corresponding tag port
on the asset sensor.
26
Chapter 3: Installation and Configuration
3. Connect the asset sensor on the rack to the Dominion PX device by
following this procedure:
a. Connect one end of a Category 5e/6 cable to the RJ-45 connector
on the MASTER asset sensor.
b. Connect the other end of the cable to the FEATURE port on the
Dominion PX device.
The Dominion PX device supplies power to asset sensors through
the Category 5e/6 cable.
Letter
Item
A
Dominion PX device
B
Asset sensors
C
Asset tags
D
IT devices, such as servers
Note: The PDU cannot detect how many rack units the connected asset
sensor(s) support. You must provide the information to the PDU manually.
See Configuring the Asset Sensor (on page 122).
27
Chapter 4
Using the PDU
This chapter explains how to use the Dominion PX device. It describes the
LEDs and ports on the PDU, and explains how to use the LED display
panel. It also explains how the circuit breaker (overcurrent protector)
works and when the beeper sounds.
In This Chapter
Panel Components ..................................................................................28
Circuit Breakers .......................................................................................34
Beeper .....................................................................................................36
Panel Components
Dominion PX comes in Zero U, 1U, and 2U sizes. All types of models
come with the following components on the outer panels.

Power cord

Outlets

Connection ports

LED display

Reset button
Power Cord
Most of Raritan PDUs come with an installed power cord, which is ready to
be plugged into an appropriate receptacle for receiving electricity. Such
devices cannot be rewired by the user.
Connect each Dominion PX device to an appropriately rated branch circuit.
See the label or nameplate affixed to your Dominion PX device for
appropriate input ratings or range of ratings.
There is no power switch on the Dominion PX device. To power cycle the
PDU, unplug it from the branch circuit, wait 10 seconds and then plug it
back in.
Outlets
The number of outlets varies from model to model. PX-1000 series
products are not implemented with the outlet switching feature so all
outlets are always in the ON state.
28
Chapter 4: Using the PDU
Connection Ports
Depending on the model you purchased, the number of ports available
varies.

For most of Zero U models, there are 6 ports located on the front panel
as shown below.

For 1U models, there are 7 ports located on front and back panels
respectively.
- Front panel ports:
- Back panel ports:
The port difference between Zero U and 1U models is that Zero U models
provide only one sensor port while 1U models provide two sensor ports.
The table below explains the function of each port.
Port
USB-B
Used for...
Establishing a USB connection between a computer and the Dominion PX
device. This port is reserved for a future release.
USB-A
Connecting a USB device.
This is a "host" port, which is powered, per USB 2.0 specifications.
29
Chapter 4: Using the PDU
Port
FEATURE
Used for...
Connection to some Raritan access products (such as Dominion KX II)
through the use of a power CIM, OR -Connection to a Raritan Asset Management Sensor, which allows you to
track the locations of the IT devices in the rack. See Connecting the Asset
Management Sensor (Optional) (on page 25).
Warning: This is not an RS-232 port so do NOT plug in an RS-232 device, or
damages can be caused to the device.
CONSOLE/
MODEM
Establishing a serial connection between a computer and the Dominion PX
device:
This is a standard DTE RS-232 port. You can use a null-modem cable with
two DB9 connectors on both ends to connect Dominion PX to the computer.
SENSOR
Connection to Raritan's environmental sensors.
For Zero U products, a sensor hub is required if you want to connect more
than one environmental sensor.
ETHERNET
Connecting the Dominion PX device to your company's network:
Connect a standard Cat5e/6 UTP cable to this port and connect the other end
to your network. This connection is necessary to administer or access the
Dominion PX device remotely using the web interface.
There are two small LEDs adjacent to the port:
30

Green indicates a physical link and activity.

Yellow indicates communications at 10/100 BaseT speeds.
Chapter 4: Using the PDU
LED Display
The LED display is located on the side where outlets are available. The
following picture shows the LED display.
The diagram shows the LED display on Zero U models.
The diagram shows the LED display on 1U models.
The LED display consists of:

A row displaying three digits

A row displaying two digits

Up and Down buttons

Five LEDs for measurement units
Note: When a Dominion PX device powers up, it proceeds with the
power-on self test and software loading for a few moments. When the
software has completed loading, the LED display illuminates.
Three-Digit Row
The three-digit row shows the readings for the selected component.
Values that may appear include:

Current of the selected circuit breaker

Active power or unbalanced load of the inlet

Current, voltage, or active power of the selected line
Note: L1 voltage refers to the L1-L2 or L1-N voltage, L2 voltage refers
to the L2-L3 or L2-N voltage, and L3 voltage refers to the L3-L1 or
L3-N voltage.
31
Chapter 4: Using the PDU

The text “FuP,” which indicates that the Firmware uPgrade is being
performed

The text "CbE," which indicates the selected circuit breaker has
tripped
LEDs for Measurement Units
Five small LED indicators are adjacent to the three-digit row: four
measurement units LEDs and one Sensor LED.
The measurement units vary according to the readings that appear in the
three-digit row. They are:

Amp (A) for current

Volt (V) for voltage

Kilowatt (kW) for active power

Unbalanced load (%)
One of the measurement unit LEDs will be lit to indicate the unit for the
value currently shown in the three-digit row.
The Sensor LED is lit only when Dominion PX detects the physical
connection of any environmental sensor.
-- OR --
Two-Digit Row
The two-digit row shows the number of the currently selected line or circuit
breaker. Values that may appear include:

Cx: This indicates the selected circuit breaker, where x is the circuit
breaker number. For example, C1 represents Circuit Breaker 1.

n: This indicates the neutral line on a three-phase Y-wired PDU.

Lx: This indicates the selected line of a single-inlet PDU, where x is
the line number. For example, L2 represents Line 2.
Note: For a single-phase model, L1 current represents the Unit
Current.
32
Chapter 4: Using the PDU

AP: This indicates the selected inlet's active power.

UL: This represents the selected inlet or outlet's Unbalanced Load,
which is only available for a three-phase PDU.
During the firmware upgrade, some Dominion PX models may show bx in
the two-digit row to indicate the relay or meter board numbered x is being
updated.
Automatic Mode
When left alone, the LED display cycles through the line readings and
circuit breaker readings at intervals of 10 seconds, as available for your
Dominion PX. This is the Automatic Mode.
Manual Mode
You can press the Up or Down button to enter the Manual Mode so that a
particular line or circuit breaker can be selected to show specific readings.
To operate the LED display:
1. Press the Up or Down button until the desired line or circuit breaker
number is selected in the two-digit row. Or you can press either button
to select the inlet's active power, which is shown as AP.

Pressing the
(UP) button moves up one selection.

Pressing the
(DOWN) button moves down one selection.
2. Current of the selected component is shown in the three-digit row.
Simultaneously the CURRENT(A) LED is lit. See LEDs for
Measurement Units (on page 32).
3. When selecting a line, you can press the Up and Down buttons
simultaneously to switch between voltage, active power and current
readings.

The voltage appears in this format: XXX (V). It is displayed for
about five seconds, after which the current reading re-appears.
When the voltage is displayed, the VOLTAGE(V) LED is lit.

The active power appears in one of the formats: X.XX, XX.X, and
XXX (kW). It is displayed for about five seconds, after which the
current reading re-appears. When the active power is displayed,
the POWER(kW) LED is lit.
4. When selecting the inlet (AP), it displays the active power reading.

The active power appears in one of the formats: X.XX, XX.X, and
XXX (kW). When the active power is displayed, the POWER(kW)
LED is lit.
Note: The LED display returns to the Automatic Mode after 20 seconds
elapse since the last time any button was pressed.
33
Chapter 4: Using the PDU
Note: A few Dominion PX models may show some current being drawn or
power consumption while no loads are physically attached to the PDU. For
details, see Non-Zero Readings While No Loads Attached (on page
240).
Reset Button
The reset button is located inside the small hole near the two-digit row.
The Dominion PX device can be reset to its factory default values using
this button when a serial connection is available. See Resetting to
Factory Defaults (on page 237).
Without the serial connection, pressing this reset button restarts the
Dominion PX device's software without any loss of power to outlets. This
operation also power cycles the LED display, causing the LED display to
go blank and then return to normal.
The following images indicate the location of the reset button.
Circuit Breakers
Dominion PX models rated over 20A (North American) or 16A
(international) contain branch circuit breakers. These circuit breakers
automatically trip (disconnect power) when the current flowing through the
circuit breaker exceeds its rating.
When a circuit breaker trips, power flow ceases to all outlets connected to
it. You must manually reset the circuit breaker so that affected outlets can
resume normal operation.
Depending on the model you purchased, the circuit breaker may use a
button- or handle-reset mechanism.
34
Chapter 4: Using the PDU
Resetting the Button-Type Circuit Breaker
Your button-type circuit breakers may look slightly different from the
images shown in this section, but the reset procedure remains the same.
To reset the button-type breakers:
1. Locate the breaker whose ON button is up, indicating the breaker has
tripped.
2. Examine your Dominion PX device and the connected equipment to
remove or resolve the cause that results in the overload or short circuit.
This step is required, or you cannot proceed with the next step.
3. Press the ON button until it is completely down.
Resetting the Handle-Type Circuit Breaker
Your handle-type circuit breakers may look slightly different from the
images shown in this section, but the reset procedure remains the same.
To reset the handle-type breakers:
1. Lift the hinged cover over the breaker.
2. Check if the colorful rectangle or triangle below the operating handle is
GREEN, indicating the breaker has tripped.
35
Chapter 4: Using the PDU
3. Examine your Dominion PX device and the connected equipment to
remove or resolve the cause that results in the overload or short circuit.
This step is required, or you cannot proceed with the next step.
4. Pull up the operating handle until the colorful rectangle or triangle
turns RED.
Beeper
Dominion PX includes a beeper to issue an audible alarm when a
significant situation occurs.
36

The beeper sounds an alarm within 3 seconds of a circuit breaker trip.

The beeper stops as soon as all circuit breakers have been reset.
Chapter 5
Using the Web Interface
This chapter explains how to use the web interface to administer a
Dominion PX device.
In This Chapter
Supported Web Browsers........................................................................37
Logging in to the Web Interface ..............................................................38
Logout......................................................................................................40
Introduction to the Web Interface ............................................................41
Viewing the Dashboard ...........................................................................51
Device Management................................................................................51
User Management ...................................................................................64
Setting Up Roles......................................................................................68
Setting Up Roles......................................................................................69
Access Security Control ..........................................................................72
Setting Up an SSL Certificate..................................................................83
Setting Up LDAP Authentication .............................................................88
Outlet Management .................................................................................93
Inlet and Circuit Breaker Management....................................................95
Setting Power Thresholds .......................................................................98
Configuring Event Rules........................................................................102
Managing Event Logging.......................................................................110
Viewing Connected Users .....................................................................111
Monitoring Server Accessibility..............................................................112
Environmental Sensors .........................................................................113
Asset Management................................................................................122
Copying Configurations with Bulk Configuration ...................................125
Changing the Temperature Unit ............................................................127
Network Diagnostics..............................................................................128
Viewing the Communication Log...........................................................129
Downloading Diagnostic Information.....................................................130
Firmware Upgrade.................................................................................131
Accessing the Help................................................................................133
Supported Web Browsers
The following web browsers can be used to access the Dominion PX web
interface:

Internet Explorer® 7 (IE7) and Internet Explorer® 8 (IE8)

Firefox 3.n.n (where n represents a numeric digit)

Safari, Konqueror
Note: IE6 and Chrome are NOT supported.
37
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Logging in to the Web Interface
To log in to the web interface, you must enter a user name and password.
The first time you log in to Dominion PX, use the default user name (admin)
and password (raritan). You are then prompted to change the password
for security purposes.
Exception: If you already changed the password for the admin account
during the Initial Network Configuration (on page 16), use the new
password instead to log in to the web interface, and Dominion PX will NOT
prompt you to change the password.
After successfully logging in, you can create user profiles for your other
users. These profiles define their login names and passwords. See
Creating a User Profile (on page 64).
Login
The web interface allows a maximum of 16 users to log in simultaneously.
You must enable JavaScript in the web browser for proper operation.
To log in to the web interface:
1. Open a browser, such as Microsoft Internet Explorer or Mozilla Firefox,
and type this URL:
http(s)://<ip address>
where <ip address> is the IP address of the Dominion PX device.
2. If any security alert message appears, click OK or Yes to accept. The
Login page then opens.
3. Type your user name in the User Name field, and password in the
Password field.
Note: Both the user name and password are case sensitive, so make
sure you capitalize them correctly. If you typed them incorrectly, click
Clear to clear either the inputs or any error message that appears.
4. Click Login or press Enter. The Dominion PX page opens.
38
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Note: Depending on your hardware configuration, elements shown on
the Dominion PX page may appear slightly different from this image.
Changing Your Password
Normal users can change their own passwords if they have the Change
Own Password permission. See Setting Up Roles (on page 68, on page
69).
If you are the administrator (admin), the Dominion PX web interface
automatically prompts you to change the password if this is your first time
to log in to Dominion PX.
To change your password:
1. Choose User Management > Change Password. The Change User
'XXX' Password dialog appears, where XXX is the user's login name.
2. Type the current password in the Old Password field.
3. Type your new password in the Password and Confirm Password
fields. The password can be 4 to 32 characters long. It is case
sensitive.
39
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
4. Click OK to save the changes.
Tip: If you have the Administrator Privileges, you can change other users'
passwords. See Modifying a User Profile (on page 67).
Logout
After finishing your tasks with Dominion PX, you should log out to prevent
others from accessing the web interface.
To log out of the web interface:
1. Do one of these:

Click "logout" on the top-right corner of the web interface.

Close the web browser by clicking the Close button (
top-right corner of the browser.

Close the web browser by choosing File > Close, or File > Exit.
The command varies according to the version of the browser you
use.

Choose the Refresh command or click the Refresh button on the
web browser.
) on the
2. Either the login page opens or the browser is closed, depending on
your choice for Step 1.
40
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Introduction to the Web Interface
The web interface provides two panes, a menu bar, a status bar, an Add
Page icon, and a logout button throughout every page.
Number
Web interface element
Menus
Dominion PX Explorer pane
Setup button*
Status bar
Add Page icon
Logout button
Data pane
* The Setup button is not available on some pages, such as the
Dashboard page.
For detailed information about these web interface elements, see the
sections that follow.
41
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Menus
There is a menu bar across the top of the page. You can click any menu to
select the desired menu item from the drop-down list.
Four menus are available for managing different tasks or showing
information.

User Management contains menu items for managing user profiles,
permissions (roles), and password.

Device Settings deals with device-related settings, such as the
device name, network settings, security settings, and system time.

Maintenance provides tools that are helpful for maintaining the
Dominion PX device, such as the event log, hardware information,
firmware upgrade and so on.

Help displays information regarding the firmware and all open source
packages embedded on the Dominion PX device. In addition, you can
access the user guide from this menu.
Dominion PX Explorer Pane
The hierarchical tree to the left displays the Dominion PX device you are
accessing as well as all physical components embedded on or connected
to this PDU, such as inlets, outlets, and environmental sensors. In addition,
an icon named Dashboard is available for displaying the PDU summary
information.
The tree structure comprises three hierarchical levels.
First level
Second level
Third level
Dashboard
None
None
PDU folder*
Inlet I1
None
Outlets
None
Overcurrent Protectors folder
C1 to Cn**
External Sensors
None
Asset Strip 1
None
Asset
Management
* The PDU folder is named "my PX" by default. The name changes after
customizing the device name. See Naming the PDU (on page 53).
** n represents the final number of that component.
To navigate through the tree:
1. To expand any folders, see Expanding the Tree (on page 43).
42
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
2. To show any tree item's data, click on that item. See Add Page Icon
(on page 46).
Expanding the Tree
The icons representing all components implemented on or connected to
the Dominion PX device are expanded by default. If they are hidden, you
may expand the tree manually to show all component icons.
To expand the tree:
1. By default, the PDU folder has been expanded.
Note: The PDU folder is named "my PX" by default. The name
changes after customizing the device name. See Naming the PDU
(on page 53).
If it is not expanded, click the white arrow prior to the folder icon, or
double-click the folder. The arrow then turns into a black, gradient
arrow , and icons of components or component groups appear below
the PDU folder.
2. To expand any component group at the second level, click the white
arrow prior to the folder icon, or double-click the folder.
The arrow then turns into a black, gradient arrow , and icons
representing individual components appear below the group folder.
Repeat Step 2 for other component groups you want to expand. The
expanded tree looks similar to this image.
43
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Collapsing the Tree
You can collapse the whole tree structure or a specific component group
to hide all or partial tree items.
To collapse the whole tree:

Click the black, gradient arrow
double-click the folder.
prior to the PDU folder icon, or
Note: The PDU folder is named "my PX" by default. The name
changes after customizing the device name. See Naming the PDU
(on page 53).
The arrow then turns into a white arrow , and all items below the PDU
folder disappear.
To hide some tree items:
1. Click the black, gradient arrow prior to the component group folder
that you want to collapse, or double-click the folder.
The arrow then turns into a white arrow , and all items below the
folder disappear.
2. Repeat Step 1 for other component groups you want to collapse.
Adjusting the Pane
You can change the width of the pane to make the area larger or smaller.
To adjust the pane's width:
1. Move the mouse pointer to the right border of the Dominion PX
Explorer pane.
2. When the mouse pointer turns into a two-way arrow, drag the border
horizontally to widen or shrink the pane.
Setup Button
The Setup button is available for most tree items. It triggers a setup dialog
where you can change settings for the selected tree item.
Status Bar
The status bar shows five pieces of information from left to right.

Device name:
This is the name assigned to the Dominion PX device. The default is
"my PX." See Naming the PDU (on page 53).
44
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface

IP address:
The numbers enclosed in parentheses is the IP address assigned to
the Dominion PX device. See Initial Network Configuration (on
page 16) or Modifying the Network Settings (on page 54).
Tip: The presence of the device name and IP address in the status bar
indicates the connection to the Dominion PX device. If the connection
is lost, it shows "
" instead.

Login name:
This is the user name you used to log in to the web interface.

Last login time:
This shows the date and time this login name was used to log in to the
device last time. When hovering the mouse pointer over the last login
time, detailed information about the last login is displayed, including
the access client and IP address.

System date and time:
Current date, year, and time are displayed to the right of the bar. If
hovering the mouse pointer over the system date and time, the time
zone information is also displayed.
Sometimes a flag icon ( ) may appear to the far right of the bar when a
communication error between the Dominion PX device and the graphical
user interface (GUI) occurs. When the icon appears, you can click the icon
to view the communications log. See Viewing the Communication Log
(on page 129).
45
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Add Page Icon
The Add Page icon
, located on the top of the data pane, lets you
open data pages of multiple tree items without closing any opened page.
To open new data pages:
1. Click the Add Page icon
appears.
. A new tab along with a blank data page
2. Click a tree item whose data page you want to open. The data of the
selected tree item is then displayed on the blank data page.
3. To open more data pages, repeat Steps 1 to 2. All tabs representing
opened pages are shown across the top of the page.
The following diagram shows a multi-tab example.
4. With multiple pages opened, you can take these actions:

To return to any previous data page, click the corresponding tab.
If there are too many tabs to be all shown, two arrows (
and
)
appear at the left and right borders of the pane. Click either or both
arrows to navigate through all tabs.

To close any data page, click the Close button (
corresponding tab.
) in the
Logout Button
Click the logout button when you want to log out of the web interface.
Data Pane
The right pane shows the data page of the selected tree item. The data
page includes the item's current status, settings and a Setup button (if
available).
The tab above the pane indicates the current selection of the data page.
You can change the width of the pane to make the area larger or smaller.
To adjust the pane's width:
1. Move the mouse pointer to the left border of the right pane.
2. When the mouse pointer turns into a two-way arrow, drag the border
horizontally to widen or shrink the pane.
46
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
More Information
This section explains additional web interface elements or operations that
are useful.
Warning Icon
If the value you entered in a specific field is invalid, a red warning icon
appears to the right and the field in question is surrounded by a red frame
as shown in this illustration.
When this occurs, hover your mouse pointer over the warning icon to view
the reason and modify the entered value accordingly.
The Yellow- or Red-Highlighted Reading
When a numeric sensor's reading crosses any upper or lower threshold,
the background color of the whole row turns to yellow or red for alerting
users. If any circuit breaker trips, the circuit breaker's row is also
highlighted in red.
See the table for the meaning of each color:
Color
State
White
The reading is between the lower and upper warning
thresholds, or the reading is unavailable.
Yellow
The reading drops below the lower warning threshold or
rises above the upper warning threshold.
Red
The meaning of the red color varies depending on the
sensor type:

For a numeric sensor, the color indicates the
reading drops below the lower critical threshold
or rises above the upper critical threshold.

For circuit breaker trip sensor, it means the circuit
breaker has tripped.
47
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
To find the exact meaning of the alert, read the information shown in the
State (or Status) column of the same row:

lower critical: The reading drops below the lower critical threshold.

lower warning: The reading drops below the lower warning threshold.

upper critical: The reading exceeds the upper critical threshold.

upper warning: The reading exceeds the upper warning threshold.

Open: The circuit breaker has tripped.
For information on the thresholds, see Setting Power Thresholds (on
page 98).
Changing the View of a List
Some dialogs or data pages contain a list or table, such as the Manage
Users dialog shown below. You may change the number of displayed
columns or re-sort the list for better viewing the data. Note the column or
sorting changes are not saved when quitting the dialog or data page. Next
time when the dialog or page re-opens, the list returns to the default view.
Note: Not all dialogs support the sorting or column change functions.
Changing the Column
You can hide some columns of a list or table, or adjust a specific column's
width.
To change displayed columns:
1. Hover your mouse pointer over any column header. A black triangle
appears to the far right of this column header.
48
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
2. Click the black triangle, and a drop-down menu appears.
3. Point to Columns. A submenu showing all columns appears.
4. Click any column you want to deselect or select.

To hide a column, have its checkbox deselected.

To show a column, have its checkbox selected.
To change the column width:
1. Hover the mouse pointer to the right border of the desired column.
2. When the mouse pointer turns to a two-way arrow, drag the border
horizontally to widen or shrink the column.
Changing the Sorting
By default, a list or table is sorted against the first column in the ascending
order. You can re-sort the list in a reverse order or against a different
column.
To re-sort the list by doing either of the following:

Click the column header against which you want to sort the list.
a. The first click sorts the list in the ascending order, indicated by a
blue upward-pointing triangle .
b. The second click reverses the sorting to the descending order,
indicated by a blue downward-pointing triangle .

Select a sorting command from the column menu.
a. Hover your mouse pointer over the column header against which
you want to sort the list. A black triangle
of this column header.
appears to the far right
b. Click the black triangle, and a drop-down menu appears.
c.
Select Sort Ascending or Sort Descending.
The newly selected column header is marked with the upward- or
downward-pointing triangle.
Resizing a Dialog
Most dialogs cannot be resized except for a few ones (such as the Event
Log dialog), which can be resized to display more information at a time.
To resize a dialog:
1. Hover your mouse pointer over any border of the dialog.
2. When the mouse pointer turns to a double-headed arrow, drag the
border vertically or horizontally to make the dialog bigger or smaller.
49
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Browser-Defined Shortcut Menu
A shortcut menu, which is built in the web browser, may appear when
right-clicking anywhere in the Dominion PX web interface.
The shortcut menu functions are defined by the browser. For example, the
Back command on the Internet Explorer® (IE) shortcut menu works the
same as the Back button in the IE browser. Both of these functions take
you to the previous page.
For information on each shortcut menu command or item, see the online
help or documentation accompanying your web browser.
Below is the illustration of the IE browser's shortcut menu. Available menu
commands or items may slightly differ based on your web browser
version.
50
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Viewing the Dashboard
When you log in to the web interface, the Dashboard page is displayed by
default. This page provides an overview of the Dominion PX device's
status.
The page is divided into various sections according to the component type,
such as inlet and circuit breakers.
Note: If a sensor reading row is colored, it means the sensor reading
already crosses one of the thresholds, or the circuit breaker has tripped.
See The Yellow- or Red-Highlighted Reading (on page 47).
After clicking any other icon in the hierarchical tree, the Dashboard page is
overridden. To return to the Dashboard page, click the Dashboard icon.
When the Dashboard page is opened, you can do the following to uncover
or hide specific data.
To collapse any section:
1. Locate the section you want to collapse.
2. Click the upward arrow
the section is hidden.
prior to the section title. The data specific to
To expand a collapsed section:
1. Locate the section you want to expand.
prior to the section title. The data
2. Click the downward arrow
specific to the section appears.
Device Management
Using the web interface, you can retrieve basic hardware and software
information, give Dominion PX a new device name, set the system date
and time, and modify network settings that were entered during the initial
configuration process.
51
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Displaying the PDU Information
To display information specific to the Dominion PX device that you are
using, such as inlet or outlet types, trigger the Device Information dialog.
To display the PDU-specific information:
1. Choose Maintenance > Device Information. The Device Information
dialog appears.
2. Click the tab containing the information you want to view. The number
of available tabs varies according to the model you purchased.
52
Tab
Data
Device Information
General PDU information, such as model
name, serial number, firmware version,
hardware revision, and so on.
Outlets
Each outlet's receptacle type, operating
voltage and rated current.
Inlets
Each inlet's plug type, rated voltage and
current.
Overcurrent Protectors
Each circuit breaker's type, rated current and
the outlets that it protects.
Controllers
Each inlet or outlet controller's serial number,
firmware and hardware version.
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Tab
Data
Asset Strips
The connected asset sensor's hardware ID,
boot version, application version and protocol
version.
Note: An outlet's operating voltage is derived from the inlet's rated
voltage. The result of this calculation is rounded off mathematically to
the nearest integer in volt. For example, if the calculation for the
minimum voltage is 380/sqrt(3)=219.39 , the web interface displays
219 V.
3. Enlarge the dialog if necessary. See Resizing a Dialog (on page 49).
4. You can re-sort the list or change the columns displayed. See
Changing the View of a List (on page 48).
5. Click Close to quit the dialog.
Tip: The firmware version is also available by clicking the PDU folder in the
Dominion PX Explorer pane.
Naming the PDU
The default name for Dominion PX is my PX. You may give it a unique
device name.
To change the device name:
1. Click the PDU folder.
Note: The PDU folder is named "my PX" by default. The name
changes after customizing the device name. See Naming the PDU
(on page 53).
2. Click Setup. The Pdu Setup dialog appears.
3. Type a new name in the Device Name field.
4. Click OK to save the changes.
Modifying the Network Configuration
The network settings you can change via the web interface include IPv4,
wired and wireless settings.
53
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Modifying the Network Settings
Dominion PX was configured for network connectivity during the
installation and configuration process. See Configuring Dominion PX
(on page 13). If necessary, you can modify any network settings using the
web interface.
To modify the IPv4 settings:
1. Choose Device Settings > Network. The Network Configuration dialog
appears.
2. Locate the IPv4 Configuration section.
3. In the IP Auto Configuration field, click the drop-down arrow, and
select the desired option from the list.
Option
Description
DHCP
To auto-configure Dominion PX, select DHCP.
With DHCP selected, you can enter a preferred DHCP host
name, which is optional. Type the host name in the Preferred
Hostname field.
The host name:

Consists of alphanumeric characters and/or hyphens

Cannot begin or end with a hyphen

Cannot contain more than 63 characters

Cannot contain punctuation marks, spaces, and other
symbols
Select the "Specify DNS server manually" checkbox if
necessary. Then type the address of the primary DNS server
in the Primary DNS Server field. The secondary DNS server
and DNS suffix are optional.
Static
To manually assign an IP address, select Static, and enter
the following information in the corresponding fields:

IP address

Netmask

Gateway

Primary DNS server

Secondary DNS server (optional)

DNS Suffix (optional)
4. Click OK to save the changes.
54
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Role of a DNS Server
As Internet communications are carried out on the basis of IP addresses,
appropriate DNS server settings are required for mapping domain names
(host names) to corresponding IP addresses, or Dominion PX may fail to
connect to the given host.
Therefore, DNS server settings are important for LDAP authentication.
With appropriate DNS settings, Dominion PX can resolve the LDAP
server's name to an IP address for establishing a connection. If the SSL
encryption is enabled, the DNS server settings become critical since only
fully qualified domain name can be used for specifying the LDAP server.
For information on LDAP authentication, see Setting Up LDAP
Authentication (on page 88).
Modifying the Network Interface Settings
Dominion PX supports two types of network interfaces: wired and wireless.
You should configure the network interface settings according to the
networking mode that applies. See Connecting Dominion PX to Your
Network.
Wired Network Settings
The LAN interface speed and duplex mode were set during the installation
and configuration process. See Initial Network Configuration (on page
16).
By default, the LAN speed and duplex mode are set to "Auto" (automatic),
which works in nearly all scenarios. You can change them if there are
special local requirements.
To modify the network interface settings:
1. Choose Device Settings > Network. The Network Configuration dialog
appears.
2. Locate the Interface Settings section.
3. In the Network Interface field, click the drop-down arrow, and select
Wired from the list.
4. To change the LAN speed, click the drop-down arrow in the Speed
field and select an option from the list.

Auto: System determines the optimum LAN speed through
auto-negotiation.

10 Mbit/s: The LAN speed is always 10 Mbps.

100 Mbit/s: The LAN speed is always 100 Mbps.
5. To change the duplex mode, click the drop-down arrow in the Duplex
field and select an option from the list.
55
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface

Auto: Dominion PX selects the optimum transmission mode
through auto-negotiation.

Full: Data is transmitted in both directions simultaneously.

Half: Data is transmitted in one direction (to or from the Dominion
PX device) at a time.
6. Click OK to save the changes.
Tip: You can check the LAN status in the Current State field, including the
speed and duplex mode.
Wireless Network Settings
Wireless SSID, PSK and BSSID parameters were set during the
installation and configuration process. See Initial Network Configuration
(on page 16). You can change them via the web interface.
To modify the wireless interface settings:
1. Choose Device Settings > Network. The Network Configuration dialog
appears.
2. Locate the Interface Settings section.
3. In the Network Interface field, click the drop-down arrow, and select
Wireless from the list.
4. Check the Hardware State field to ensure that the Dominion PX device
has detected the wireless USB LAN adapter. If not, verify whether the
USB LAN adapter is firmly connected or whether it is supported. See
Connecting Dominion PX to Your Network.
5. Type the name of the wireless access point (AP) in the SSID field.
6. Type the PSK string in the Pre-Shared Key field.
7. If the BSSID is available, select the Force AP BSSID checkbox, and
type the MAC address in the BSSID field.
Note: BSSID refers to the MAC address of an access point in the
wireless network.
8. Click OK to save the changes.
56
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Modifying the Network Service Settings
Dominion PX supports these network communication services: HTTPS,
HTTP, Telnet and SSH.
HTTPS and HTTP enable the access to the web interface, and Telnet and
SSH enable the access to the command line interface (see "Using the
Command Line Interface" on page 142).
By default, SSH is enabled, Telnet is disabled, and all TCP ports for
supported services are set to standard ports. You can change default
settings if necessary.
Note: Telnet access is disabled by default because it communicates
openly and is thus insecure.
In addition, Dominion PX also supports SNMP protocol.
Changing the HTTP(S) Settings
HTTPS uses Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) technology to encrypt all traffic
to and from the Dominion PX device so it is a more secure protocol than
HTTP.
By default, any access to Dominion PX via HTTP is automatically
redirected to HTTPS. See Forcing HTTPS Encryption (on page 72).
To change the HTTP or HTTPS port settings:
1. Choose Device Settings > Network Services > HTTP. The HTTP
Settings dialog appears.
2. To use a different port for HTTP or HTTPS, type a new port number in
the corresponding field. Valid range is 1 to 65535.
Warning: Different network services cannot share the same TCP port.
3. Click OK to save the changes.
Changing the SSH Settings
You can enable or disable the SSH access to the command line interface,
or change the default TCP port for the SSH service.
To change the SSH service settings:
1. Choose Device Settings > Network Services > SSH. The SSH
Settings dialog appears.
2. To use a different port, type a new port number in the field. Valid range
is 1 to 65535.
3. To enable the SSH application, select the Enable SSH Access
checkbox. To disable it, deselect the checkbox.
57
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
4. Click OK to save the changes.
Changing the Telnet Settings
You can enable or disable the Telnet access to the command line interface,
or change the default TCP port for the Telnet service.
To change the Telnet service settings:
1. Choose Device Settings > Network Services > Telnet. The Telnet
Settings dialog appears.
2. To use a different port, type a new port number in the field. Valid range
is 1 to 65535.
3. To enable the Telnet application, select the Enable Telnet Access
checkbox. To disable it, deselect the checkbox.
4. Click OK to save the changes.
Configuring the SNMP Settings
You can enable or disable SNMP communication between an SNMP
manager and the Dominion PX device. Enabling SNMP communication
allows Dominion PX to send SNMP trap events to the manager, as well as
allows the manager to retrieve and control the power status of each outlet.
To configure the SNMP communication:
1. Choose Device Settings > Network Services > SNMP. The SNMP
Settings dialog appears.
2. Select the "enable" checkbox in the "SNMP v1 / v2c" field to enable
communication with an SNMP manager using SNMP v1 or v2c
protocol.
58
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface

Type the SNMP read-only community string in the Read
Community String field. Usually the string is "public."

Type the read/write community string in the Write Community
String field. Usually the string is "private."
3. Select the "enable" checkbox in the "SNMP v3" field to enable
communication with an SNMP manager using SNMP v3 protocol.
Tip: You can permit or disallow a user to access Dominion PX via the
SNMP v3 protocol. See Configuring Users for Encrypted SNMP v3
(on page 137).
4. Type the SNMP MIB-II sysContact value in the sysContact field.
5. Type the SNMP MIB-II sysName value in the sysName field.
6. Type the SNMP MIB-II sysLocation value in the sysLocation field.
7. Click OK to save the changes.
Important: You must download the SNMP MIB for your Dominion PX
to use with your SNMP manager. Click Download MIB in this dialog
to download the desired MIB file. For more details, see Downloading
SNMP MIB (on page 139).
To configure SNMP managers:
1. Choose Device Settings > Network Services > SNMP. The SNMP
Settings dialog appears.
2. Click the Traps tab.
3. Select the Enabled checkbox in the "System Snmp Trap Event Rule"
field.
4. Specify SNMP managers (destinations) by doing the following:
a. You can specify up to 3 SNMP managers in the Host x fields,
where x is a number between 1 and 3.
b. Specify a port number for each SNMP manager in the Port x fields,
where x is a number between 1 and 3.
c.
Specify a community string for each SNMP manager in the
Community x fields, where x is a number between 1 and 3.
5. Click OK to save the changes.
Tip: The SNMP manager settings can be also set in the Event Rule
Settings dialog. See Modifying an Action (on page 109).
59
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Setting the Date and Time
You can set the internal clock on the Dominion PX device manually, or link
to a Network Time Protocol (NTP) server and let it set the date and time for
Dominion PX.
To set the date and time:
1. Choose Device Settings > Date/Time. The Configure Date/Time
Settings dialog appears.
2. In the Time Zone field, click the drop-down arrow, and select your time
zone from the list.
3. If the daylight saving time applies to your time zone, verify the
Automatic Daylight Saving Time Adjustment checkbox is selected.
If the daylight saving time rules are not available for the selected time
zone, the checkbox is not configurable.
4. Choose one of the methods to set the date and time:

To customize the date and time, select the User Specified Time
radio button, and then enter the date and time in appropriate fields.
Use the yyyy-mm-dd format for the date and the hh:mm:ss format
for the time.

To set the date, delete existing numbers in the Date field and
type new ones, or click the calendar icon
to select a date.
See How to Use the Calendar (on page 61) for details.

The time is measured in 24-hour format so enter 13 for 1:00pm,
14 for 2:00pm, and so on. You can enter the time by deleting
existing numbers and typing new ones in the hour, minute and
second fields, or clicking the arrows
number.

to adjust each
To let an NTP server set the date and time, select the
"Synchronize with NTP Server" radio button, and then enter the IP
address or host name of the primary NTP server in the Primary
Time Server field. A secondary NTP server is optional.
Note: If the Dominion PX device's IP address is assigned through
DHCP, the NTP server addresses may be automatically discovered.
When this occurs, the data you entered in the fields of primary and
secondary time server will be overridden.
5. Click OK to save the changes.
60
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
How to Use the Calendar
The calendar icon
next to the Date field is a convenient tool to quickly
change the year, month and date.
To select a date using the calendar:
1. To change the year shown in the calendar:
a. Click , which is next to the year, and a list of years and months
is displayed.
b. Select the desired year from the list to the right and click OK. If the
list does not show the desired year, click
or
to show
additional years.
2. To change the month shown in the calendar, do either of the following:

Click
or
months.

to show a list of years and months. Select the desired
Click
month from the list to the left and click OK.
on the top of the calendar to switch between
61
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
3. To select a date, do either of the following:

Click Today if you want to select today.
Note: On the calendar, the date for today is marked with a red frame.

Click any date on the calendar.
Setting Data Logging
The data retrieval feature allows the retrieval of Dominion PX data by an
SNMP manager, such as the data of PDU, line, and circuit breaker.
Dominion PX can store 120 measurements for each sensor in a memory
buffer. This memory buffer is known as the data log. Sensor readings in
the data log can be retrieved using SNMP.
You can configure how often measurements are written into the data log
using the Measurements Per Log Entry field. Since Dominion PX's internal
sensors are measured every second, specifying a value of 60, for example,
would cause measurements to be written to the data log once every
minute. Since there are 120 measurements of storage per sensor,
specifying a value of 60 means the log can store the last two hours of
measurements before the oldest one in log gets overwritten.
Whenever measurements are written to the log, three values for each
sensor are written: the average, minimum and maximum values. For
example, if measurements are written every minute, the average of all
measurements that occurred during the preceding 60 seconds along with
the minimum and maximum measurement values are written to the log.
Note: Dominion PX's SNMP agent must be enabled for this feature to work.
See Enabling SNMP (on page 136) for more details. In addition, using an
NTP time server ensures accurately time-stamped measurements.
Enabling Data Logging
By default, data logging is disabled. Only users having the "Administrator"
or "Change Data Logging Settings" permissions can enable or disable this
feature. See Setting Up Roles (on page 68, on page 69).
To configure the data logging feature:
1. Choose Device Settings > Data Logging. The Data Logging Options
dialog appears.
2. To enable the data logging feature, select the "enable" checkbox in
the Enable Data Logging field.
3. Type a number in the Measurements Per Log Entry field. Valid range
is from 1 to 600. The default is 60.
4. Verify that all sensor logging is enabled. If not, click Enable All in Page
to have all sensors selected.
62
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
5. Click OK to save the changes.
Note: Although it is possible to selectively enable/disable logging for
individual sensors in Step 4, it is NOT recommended and this capability
may be removed in the future.
Configuring the SMTP Settings
Dominion PX can be configured to send alerts or event messages to a
specific administrator by email. To do this, you have to configure the
SMTP settings and enter an IP address for your SMTP server and a
sender's email address.
Note: See Configuring Event Rules (on page 102) for information on
creating event rules to send email notifications.
To set the SMTP server settings:
1. Choose Device Settings > SMTP Server. The SMTP Server Settings
dialog appears.
2. Type the name or IP address of the mail server in the Server Name
field.
3. Type the port number for the SMTP server in the Port field. The default
is 25.
4. Type an email address for the sender in the Sender Email Address
field.
5. Type the number of email retries in the Number of Sending Retries
field. The default is 2 retries.
6. Type the time interval between email retries in the "Time Interval
Between Sending Retries (in minutes)" field. The time is measured in
minutes. The default is 2 minutes.
7. If your SMTP server requires password authentication, do this:
a. Select the Server Requires Authentication checkbox.
b. Type a user name in the User Name field.
c.
Type a password in the Password field.
8. Now that you have set the SMTP settings, you can test it to ensure it
work properly. Do the following:
a. Type the recipient's email address in the Recipient Email Address
field.
b. Click Send Test Email.
9. Click OK to save the changes.
10. Check if the recipient receives the email successfully.
63
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Rebooting the Dominion PX Device
You can remotely reboot the Dominion PX device via the web interface.
To restart the device:
1. Choose Maintenance > Unit Reset. The Reset Device dialog appears.
2. Click Yes to reboot Dominion PX.
3. A message appears with a countdown timer showing the remaining
time of the operation. It takes about one minute to complete.
4. When the reset is complete, the Login page opens. Now you can log
back in to the Dominion PX device.
Note: If you are not redirected to the Login page after the reset is complete,
click the underlined text "this link" in the message.
User Management
Dominion PX is shipped with one built-in user profile: admin, which is
used for initial login and configuration. This profile has full system and
outlet permissions, and should be reserved for the system administrator. It
cannot be deleted and its permissions are not user-configurable except for
the SNMP v3 permission.
All users must have a user profile, which specifies a login name and
password, and contains additional (optional) information about the user.
Every user profile must have at least a role to determine the user's system
and outlet permissions. See Setting Up Roles (on page 68, on page 69).
Tip: By default, multiple users can log in simultaneously using the same
login name.
Creating a User Profile
Creating new users adds a new login to Dominion PX.
To create a user profile:
1. Choose User Management > Users. The Manage Users dialog
appears.
64
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
2. Click New. The Create New User dialog appears.
3. Type the information about the user in the corresponding fields. Note
that User Name, Password and Confirm Password fields are required.
Field
Type this...
User Name
The name the user enters to log in to Dominion PX.

The name can be 4 to 32 characters long.

It is case sensitive.

Spaces are NOT permitted
Full Name
The user's first and last names.
Password,
The password the user enters to log in. Type it first
in the Password field and then again in the Confirm
Password field.
Confirm Password

The password can be 4 to 32 characters
long.

It is case sensitive.

Spaces are permitted.
Telephone Number A phone number where the user can be reached.
eMail Address
An email address where the user can be reached.

The email can be up to 32 characters long.

It is case sensitive.
4. Select the Enabled checkbox. If not, the user CANNOT log in to the
Dominion PX device.
5. Select the "Force password change on next login" checkbox if you
prefer a password change by the user when the user logs in for the
first time after this checkbox is enabled.
6. Click the SNMPv3 tab to set the SNMPv3 access permission. The
permission is disabled by default.
a. To permit the SNMPv3 access by this user, select the "Enable
SNMPv3 access" checkbox. Otherwise, leave the checkbox
disabled.
Note: The SNMPv3 protocol must be enabled for SNMPv3 access.
See Configuring the SNMP Settings (on page 58).
b. Set up SNMPv3 parameters if enabling the SNMPv3 access
permission.
Field
Description
Security Level
Click the drop-down arrow to select a preferred
65
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Field
Description
security level from the list:

NoAuthNoPriv: No authentication and no
privacy.

AuthNoPriv: Authentication and no privacy.

AuthPriv: Authentication and privacy. This
is the default.
Use Password as
This checkbox is configurable only if AuthNoPriv or
Authentication Pass AuthPriv is selected.
Phrase
When the checkbox is selected, the authentication
pass phrase is identical to the user's password. To
specify a different authentication pass phrase,
disable the checkbox.
Authentication Pass Type the authentication pass phrase in this field if
Phrase
the "Use Password as Authentication Pass
Phrase" checkbox is disabled.
The pass phrase must consist of 8 to 32 ASCII
printable characters.
Confirm
Re-type the same authentication pass phrase for
Authentication Pass confirmation.
Phrase
Use Authentication
Pass Phrase as
Privacy Pass
Phrase
This checkbox is configurable only if AuthPriv is
selected.
Privacy Pass
Phrase
Type the privacy pass phrase in this field if the
"Use Authentication Pass Phrase as Privacy Pass
Phrase" checkbox is disabled.
When the checkbox is selected, the privacy pass
phrase is identical to the authentication pass
phrase. To specify a different privacy pass phrase,
disable the checkbox.
The pass phrase must consist of 8 to 32 ASCII
printable characters.
66
Confirm Privacy
Pass Phrase
Re-type the same privacy pass phrase for
confirmation.
Authentication
Protocol
Click the drop-down arrow and select the desired
authentication protocol from the list. Two protocols
are available:

MD5

SHA-1 (default)
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Field
Description
Privacy Protocol
Click the drop-down arrow and select the desired
privacy protocol from the list. Two protocols are
available:

DES (default)

AES-128
7. Click the Roles tab to determine the permissions of the user.
8. Select one or multiple roles by selecting corresponding checkboxes.

The Admin role provides full permissions.

The Operator role provides limited permissions for frequently-used
functions. See Setting Up Roles (on page 68, on page 69) for the
scope of permissions. This role is selected by default.

If no roles meet your needs, you can:

Modify the permissions of an existing role: To modify the
permissions of any role, double-click the role or highlight it
and then click Edit Role. See Modifying a Role (on page 70).

Create a new role: See Creating a Role (on page 69).
Note: With multiple roles selected, a user has the union of all roles'
permissions.
9. By default the temperature unit "Celsius" ( ) is applied to all
temperatures shown on the Dominion PX web interface. To show the
temperatures in Fahrenheit for this new user, click the Preferences tab,
from the Temperature Unit's drop-down list.
and select
10. Click OK to save the changes.
Modifying a User Profile
You can change any user profile's information except for the user name.
To modify a user profile:
1. Choose User Management > Users. The Manage Users dialog
appears.
2. Select the user by clicking it.
3. Click Edit or double-click the user. The Edit User 'XXX' dialog appears,
where XXX is the user name.
4. Make all necessary changes to the information shown.
To change the password, type a new password in the Password and
Confirm Password fields. If the password field is left blank, the
password is not changed.
67
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
5. To change the SNMPv3 access permissions, click the SNMPv3 tab
and make necessary changes. For details, see Step 6 of Creating a
User Profile (on page 64).
6. To change the permissions, click the Roles tab and do one of these:

Select or deselect any role's checkbox.

To modify the permissions of any role, double-click the role or
highlight it and then click Edit Role. See Modifying a Role (on
page 70).
7. To change the temperature unit, click the Preferences tab, and select
a different option from the Temperature Unit's drop-down list.
8. Click OK to save the changes.
Deleting a User Profile
Delete outdated or redundant user profiles when necessary.
To delete user profiles:
1. Choose User Management > Users. The Manage Users dialog
appears.
2. Select the user you want to delete by clicking it. To make multiple
selections, press Ctrl+click or Shift+click to highlight multiple ones.
3. Click Delete.
4. A message appears, prompting you to confirm the operation. Click
Yes to confirm the deletion.
Changing the User List View
You may change the number of displayed columns or re-sort the list for
better viewing the data. See Changing the View of a List (on page 48).
Setting Up Roles
A role defines the operations and functions a user is permitted to perform
or access. Every user must be assigned at least a role.
Dominion PX is shipped with two built-in roles: Admin and Operator.

The Admin role provides full permissions. You can neither modify nor
delete this role.

The Operator role provides limited permissions for frequently-used
functions. You can modify or delete this role. By default, the Operator
role contains these permissions:
- View Event Settings
- View Local Event Log
68
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
- Change Event Settings
- Change Pdu, Inlet, Outlet & Overcurrent Protector Configuration
- Change Own Password
- Switch Outlet (all outlets)
The Operator role is assigned to a newly created user profile by
default. See Creating a User Profile (on page 64).
Setting Up Roles
A role defines the operations and functions a user is permitted to perform
or access. Every user must be assigned at least a role.
Dominion PX is shipped with two built-in roles: Admin and Operator.

The Admin role provides full permissions. You can neither modify nor
delete this role.

The Operator role provides limited permissions for frequently-used
functions. You can modify or delete this role. By default, the Operator
role contains these permissions:
- View Event Settings
- View Local Event Log
- Change Event Settings
- Change Pdu, Inlet, Outlet & Overcurrent Protector Configuration
- Change Own Password
The Operator role is assigned to a newly created user profile by
default. See Creating a User Profile (on page 64).
Creating a Role
Create a new role when you need a new combination of permissions.
To create a role:
1. Choose User Management > Roles. The Manage Roles dialog
appears.
Tip: You can also access the Manage Roles dialog by clicking the
Manage Roles button in the Edit User 'XXX' dialog.
2. Click New. The Create New Role dialog appears.
3. Type the role's name in the Role Name field.
4. Type a description for the role in the Description field.
5. Click the Privileges tab to assign one or multiple permissions.
a. Click Add. The "Add Privileges to new Role" dialog appears.
69
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
b. Select the permission you want from the Privileges list.
c.
If the permission you selected contains any argument setting, the
Arguments list is shown to the right. Then select one or multiple
arguments.
d. Click Add to add the selected permission (and arguments if any).
e. Repeat Steps a to d until you add all necessary permissions.
6. Click OK to save the changes.
Now you can assign the new role to any users. See Creating a User
Profile (on page 64) or Modifying a User Profile (on page 67).
Modifying a Role
You can change an existing role's settings except for the name.
To modify a role:
1. Choose User Management > Roles. The Manage Roles dialog
appears.
Tip: You can also access the Manage Roles dialog by clicking the
Manage Roles button in the Edit User 'XXX' dialog.
2. Select the role you want to modify by clicking it.
3. Click Edit or double-click the role. The Edit Role 'XXX' dialog appears,
where XXX is the role name.
Tip: You can also access the Edit Role 'XXX' dialog by clicking the Edit
Role button in the Edit User 'XXX' dialog.
4. Modify the text shown in the Description field if necessary.
5. To change the permissions, click the Privileges tab.
Note: You cannot change the Admin role's permissions.
6. To delete any permissions, do this:
a. Select the permission you want to remove by clicking it. To make
multiple selections, press Ctrl+click or Shift+click to highlight
multiple ones.
b. Click Delete.
7. To add any permissions, do this:
a. Click Add. The Add Privileges to Role 'XXX' dialog appears,
where XXX is the role name.
b. Select the permission you want from the Privileges list.
70
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
c.
If the permission you selected contains any argument setting, the
Arguments list is shown to the right. Then select one or multiple
arguments.
d. Click Add to add the selected permission (and arguments if any).
e. Repeat Steps a to d until you add all necessary permissions.
8. To change a specific permission's arguments, do this:
a. Select the permission by clicking it.
b. Click Edit. The "Edit arguments of privilege 'XXX'" dialog appears,
where XXX is the privilege name.
Note: If the permission you selected does not contain any arguments,
the Edit button is disabled.
c.
Select the argument you want. You can make multiple selections.
d. Click OK.
9. Click OK to save the changes.
Deleting a Role
You can delete any role other than the Admin role.
To delete a role:
1. Choose User Management > Roles. The Manage Roles dialog
appears.
Tip: You can also access the Manage Roles dialog by clicking the
Manage Roles button in the Edit User 'XXX' dialog.
2. Select the role you want to delete by clicking it. To make multiple
selections, press Ctrl+click or Shift+click to highlight multiple ones.
3. Click Delete.
4. A message appears, prompting you to confirm the operation. Click
Yes to confirm the deletion.
Changing the Role List View
You may change the number of displayed columns or re-sort the list for
better viewing the data. See Changing the View of a List (on page 48).
71
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Access Security Control
Dominion PX provides tools to control access. You can require HTTPS
encryption, enable the internal firewall and create firewall rules, and create
login limitations.
Tip: You can also create and install the certificate or set up external
authentication servers to control any access. See Setting Up an SSL
Certificate (on page 83) and Setting Up LDAP Authentication (on page
88).
Forcing HTTPS Encryption
HTTPS uses Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) technology to encrypt all traffic
to and from the Dominion PX device so it is a more secure protocol than
HTTP.
You can force users to access the Dominion PX web interface through the
HTTPS protocol only. By default, this protocol is enabled.
To force HTTPS access to the web interface:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Force HTTPS for Web Access.
2. A message appears, prompting you to confirm the operation. Click
Yes to enforce the HTTPS service.
3. Choose Device Settings > Security to verify the "Force HTTPS for
Web Access" checkbox is selected as shown in this diagram.
If the checkbox is not selected, repeat these steps.
After enabling the HTTPS protocol, all access attempts using HTTP are
redirected to HTTPS automatically.
Configuring the Firewall
Dominion PX has a firewall that you can configure to prevent specific IP
addresses and ranges of IP addresses from accessing the Dominion PX
device. By default the firewall is disabled.
To configure the firewall:
1. Enable the firewall. See Enabling the Firewall (on page 73).
2. Set the default policy. See Changing the Default Policy (on page
73).
3. Create firewall rules specifying which addresses to accept and which
ones to discard. See Creating Firewall Rules (on page 74).
72
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Changes made to firewall rules take effect immediately. Any unauthorized
IP activities cease instantly.
Note: The purpose of disabling the firewall by default is to prevent users
from accidentally locking themselves out of the device.
Enabling the Firewall
The firewall rules, if any, take effect only after the firewall is enabled.
To enable the Dominion PX firewall:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > IP Access Control. The
Configure IP Access Control Settings dialog appears.
2. Select the Enable IP Access Control checkbox. This enables the
firewall.
3. Click OK to save the changes.
Changing the Default Policy
After enabling the firewall, the default policy is to accept traffic from all IP
addresses. This means only IP addresses discarded by a specific rule will
NOT be permitted to access Dominion PX.
You can change the default policy to Drop or Reject, in which case traffic
from all IP addresses is discarded except the IP addresses accepted by a
specific rule.
To change the default policy:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > IP Access Control. The
Configure IP Access Control Settings dialog appears.
2. Ensure the Enable IP Access Control checkbox is selected.
3. The default policy is shown in the Default Policy field. To change it,
select a different policy from the drop-down list.

Accept: Accepts traffic from all IP addresses.

Drop: Discards traffic from all IP addresses, without sending any
failure notification to the source host.

Reject: Discards traffic from all IP addresses, and an ICMP
message is sent to the source host for failure notification.
4. Click OK to save the changes. The new default policy is applied.
73
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Creating Firewall Rules
Firewall rules determine whether to accept or discard traffic intended for
Dominion PX, based on the IP address of the host sending the traffic.
When creating firewall rules, keep these principles in mind:

Rule order is important.
When traffic reaches the Dominion PX device, the rules are executed
in numerical order. Only the first rule that matches the IP address
determines whether the traffic is accepted or discarded. Any
subsequent rules matching the IP address are ignored by Dominion
PX.

Subnet mask may be required.
When typing the IP address, you may or may not need to specify
BOTH the address and a subnet mask. The default subnet mask is /32
(that is, 255.255.255.255). You must specify a subnet mask only when
it is not the same as the default. For example, to specify a single
address in a Class C network, use this format:
x.x.x.x/24
where /24 = a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0.
To specify an entire subnet or range of addresses, change the subnet
mask accordingly.
Note: Valid IP addresses range from 0.0.0.0 through 255.255.255.255.
Make sure the IP addresses entered are within the scope.
To create firewall rules:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > IP Access Control. The
Configure IP Access Control Settings dialog appears.
2. Ensure the Enable IP Access Control checkbox is selected.
3. Create specific rules. See the table for different operations.
Action
Add a rule to the end of
the rules list
74
Procedure
 Click Append. The "Append new Rule" dialog appears.

Type an IP address and subnet mask in the IP/Mask field.

Select Accept, Drop or Reject from the drop-down list in the Policy field.

Accept: Accepts traffic from the specified IP address(es).

Drop: Discards traffic from the specified IP address(es), without
sending any failure notification to the source host.

Reject: Discards traffic from the specified IP address(es), and an
ICMP message is sent to the source host for failure notification.
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Action
Procedure
 Click OK to save the changes.
The system automatically numbers the rule.
Insert a rule between two
existing rules

Select the rule above which you want to insert a new rule. For example,
to insert a rule between rules #3 and #4, select #4.

Click Insert. The "Insert new Rule" dialog appears.

Type an IP address and subnet mask in the IP/Mask field.

Select Accept, Drop or Reject from the drop-down list in the Policy field.


Accept: Accepts traffic from the specified IP address(es).

Drop: Discards traffic from the specified IP address(es), without
sending any failure notification to the source host.

Reject: Discards traffic from the specified IP address(es), and an
ICMP message is sent to the source host for failure notification.
Click OK to save the changes.
The system inserts the rule and automatically renumbers the following rules.
4. When finished, the rules appear in the Configure IP Access Control
Settings dialog.
5. Click OK to save the changes. The rules are applied.
75
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Editing Firewall Rules
When an existing firewall rule requires updates of IP address range and/or
policy, modify them accordingly.
To modify a firewall rule:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > IP Access Control. The
Configure IP Access Control Settings dialog appears.
2. Ensure the Enable IP Access Control checkbox is selected.
3. Select the rule to be modified in the rules list.
4. Click Edit or double-click the rule. The Edit Rule dialog appears.
5. Make changes to the information shown.
6. Click OK to save the changes.
7. Click OK to quit the Configure IP Access Control Settings dialog, or
the changes are lost.
Sorting Firewall Rules
The rule order determines which one of the rules matching the same IP
address is performed.
To sort the firewall rules:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > IP Access Control. The
Configure IP Access Control Settings dialog appears.
2. Ensure the Enable IP Access Control checkbox is selected.
3. Select a specific rule by clicking it.
or
to move the selected rule up or down until it reaches
4. Click
the desired location.
5. Click OK to save the changes.
Deleting Firewall Rules
When any firewall rules become obsolete or unnecessary, remove them
from the rules list.
To delete a firewall rule:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > IP Access Control. The
Configure IP Access Control Settings dialog appears.
2. Ensure the Enable IP Access Control checkbox is selected.
3. Select the rule that you want to delete. To make multiple selections,
press Ctrl+click or Shift+click to highlight multiple ones.
76
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
4. Click Delete.
5. A message appears, prompting you to confirm the operation. Click
Yes to remove the selected rule(s) from the rules list.
6. Click OK to save the changes.
Setting Up User Login Controls
You can set up login controls to make it more difficult for hackers to access
Dominion PX and the devices connected to it. You can arrange to lock
persons out after a specified number of failed logins, limit the number of
persons who log in using the same user name at the same time, and force
users to create strong passwords.
Enabling User Blocking
User blocking determines how many times a user can attempt to log in to
Dominion PX and fail authentication before the user's login is blocked.
To enable user blocking:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Login Settings. The Login
Settings dialog appears.
2. Locate the User Blocking section.
3. To enable the user blocking feature, select the "Block user on login
failure" checkbox.
4. Type a number in the "Maximum number of failed logins" field. This is
the maximum number of failed logins the user is permitted before the
user's login is blocked from accessing the Dominion PX device.
5. To determine how long the login is blocked, select the desired length
of time from the drop-down list in the "Block timeout" field. The
following describes available options.

Infinite: This option sets no time limit on blocking the login.

X min: This type of option sets the time limit to X minutes, where X
is a number.

X h: This type of option sets the time limit to X hours, where X is a
number.

1 d: This option sets the time limit to 1 day.
6. Click OK to save the changes.
77
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Enabling Login Limitations
Login limitations determine whether more than one person can use the
same login name at the same time, and how long users are permitted to
stay idle before being forced to log out.
To enable login limitations:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Login Settings. The Login
Settings dialog appears.
2. Locate the Login Limitations section.
3. To prevent more than one person from using the same login at the
same time, select the "Prevent concurrent login with same username"
checkbox.
4. To adjust how long users can remain idle before they are forcibly
logged out by Dominion PX, select a time option in the Idle Timeout
Period field. The default is 10 minutes.

X min: This type of option sets the time limit to X minutes, where X
is a number.

X h: This type of option sets the time limit to X hours, where X is a
number.

1 d: This option sets the time limit to 1 day.
5. Click OK to save the changes.
Tip: Keep the idle timeout to 20 minutes or less if possible. This reduces
the number of idle sessions connected, and the number of simultaneous
commands sent to Dominion PX.
Enabling Strong Passwords
Use of strong passwords makes it more difficult for intruders to crack user
passwords and access the Dominion PX device. By default, strong
passwords should be at least eight characters long and contain upper- and
lower-case letters, numbers, and special characters, such as @ or &.
To force users to create strong passwords:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Password Policy. The Password
Policy dialog appears.
2. Select the Strong Passwords checkbox to activate the strong
password feature. The following are the default settings:
78
Minimum length
= 8 characters
Maximum length
= 32 characters
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
At least one lowercase character
= Required
At least one uppercase character
= Required
At least one numeric character
= Required
At least one special character
= Required
Number of restricted passwords in history
=5
Note: The maximum password length accepted by Dominion PX is 32
characters.
3. Make necessary changes to the default settings.
4. Click OK to save the changes.
Enabling Password Aging
Password Aging determines whether users are required to change
passwords at regular intervals. The default interval is 60 days.
To force users to change passwords regularly:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Password Policy. The Password
Policy dialog appears.
2. Select the Password Aging checkbox to enable the password aging
feature.
3. To determine how often users are requested to change their
passwords, select a number of days in the Password Aging Interval
field. Users are required to change their password every time that
number of days has passed.
4. Click OK to save the changes.
Setting Up Role Based Access Control Rules
Role based access control rules are similar to firewall rules, except they
are applied to members sharing a specific role. This enables you to grant
system permissions to a specific role, based on their IP addresses.
To set up role based access control rules:
1. Enable the feature. See Enabling the Feature (on page 80).
2. Set the default policy. See Changing the Default Policy (on page
80).
3. Create rules specifying which addresses to accept and which ones to
discard when the addresses are associated with a specific role. See
Creating Role Based Access Control Rules (on page 80).
Changes made do not affect users currently logged in until the next login.
79
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Enabling the Feature
You must enable this access control feature before any relevant rule can
take effect.
To enable role based access control rules:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Role Based Access Control. The
Configure Role Based Access Control Settings dialog appears.
2. Select the Enable Role Based Access Control checkbox. This enables
the feature.
3. Click OK to save the changes.
Changing the Default Policy
The default policy is to accept all traffic from all IP addresses regardless of
the role applied to the user.
To change the default policy:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Role Based Access Control. The
Configure Role Based Access Control Settings dialog appears.
2. Make sure the Enable Role Based Access Control checkbox is
selected.
3. Select the action you want from the Default Policy drop-down list.

Allow: Accepts traffic from all IP addresses regardless of the user's
role

Deny: Drops traffic from all IP addresses regardless of the user's
role
4. Click OK to save the changes.
Creating Role Based Access Control Rules
Role based access control rules accept or drop traffic, based on the user's
role and IP address. Like firewall rules, the order of rules is important,
since the rules are executed in numerical order.
To create role based access control rules:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Role Based Access Control. The
Configure Role Based Access Control Settings dialog appears.
2. Make sure the Enable Role Based Access Control checkbox is
selected.
3. Create specific rules:
80
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Action
Do this...
Add a rule to the end of
 Click Append. The "Append new Rule" dialog appears.
the rules list
 Type a starting IP address in the Starting IP Address
field.

Type an ending IP address in the Ending IP Address
field.

Select a role from the drop-down list in the Role field.
This rule applies to members of this role only.

Select Allow or Deny from the drop-down list in the
Policy field.


Allow: Accepts traffic from the specified IP address
range when the user is a member of the specified
role

Deny: Drops traffic from the specified IP address
range when the user is a member of the specified
role
Click OK to save the changes.
The system automatically numbers the rule.
Insert a rule between
two existing rules

Select the rule above which you want to insert a new
rule. For example, to insert a rule between rules #3
and #4, select #4.

Click Insert. The "Insert new Rule" dialog appears.

Type a starting IP address in the Starting IP Address
field.

Type an ending IP address in the Ending IP Address
field.

Select a role from the drop-down list in the Role field.
This rule applies to members of this role only.

Select Allow or Deny from the drop-down list in the
Policy field.


Allow: Accepts traffic from the specified IP address
range when the user is a member of the specified
role

Deny: Drops traffic from the specified IP address
range when the user is a member of the specified
role
Click OK to save the changes.
The system inserts the rule and automatically renumbers the
following rules.
4. Click OK to save the changes.
81
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Editing Role Based Access Control Rules
You can modify existing rules when these rules do not meet your needs.
To modify a role based access control rule:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Role Based Access Control. The
Configure Role Based Access Control Settings dialog appears.
2. Ensure the Enabled Role Based Access Control checkbox is selected.
3. Select the rule to be modified in the rules list.
4. Click Edit or double-click the rule. The Edit Rule dialog appears.
5. Make changes to the information shown.
6. Click OK to save the changes.
Sorting Role Based Access Control Rules
Similar to firewall rules, the order of role based access control rules
determines which one of the rules matching the same IP address is
performed.
To sort role based access control rules:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Role Based Access Control. The
Configure Role Based Access Control Settings dialog appears.
2. Ensure the Enabled Role Based Access Control checkbox is selected.
3. Select a specific rule by clicking it.
4. Click
or
to move the selected rule up or down until it reaches
the desired location.
5. Click OK to save the changes.
Deleting Role Based Access Control Rules
When any access control rule becomes unnecessary or obsolete, remove
it.
To delete a role based access control rule:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Role Based Access Control. The
Configure Role Based Access Control Settings dialog appears.
2. Ensure the Enabled Role Based Access Control checkbox is selected.
3. Select the rule to be deleted in the rules list. To make multiple
selections, press Ctrl+click or Shift+click to highlight multiple ones.
4. Click Delete.
82
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
5. A message appears, prompting you to confirm the operation. Click
Yes to confirm the deletion.
6. Click OK to save the changes.
Setting Up an SSL Certificate
Having an X.509 digital certificate ensures that both parties in an SSL
connection are who they say they are.
To obtain a certificate for Dominion PX, create a Certificate Signing
Request (CSR) and submit it to a certificate authority (CA). After the CA
processes the information in the CSR, it provides you with an SSL
certificate, which you must install on the Dominion PX device.
Note: See Forcing HTTPS Encryption (on page 72) for instructions on
forcing users to employ SSL when connecting to Dominion PX.
A CSR is not required in either of the following scenarios:

You decide to generate a self-signed certificate on the Dominion PX
device.

Appropriate, valid certificate and key files have been available.
Certificate Signing Request
When appropriate certificate and key files for Dominion PX are NOT
available, one of the alternatives is to create a CSR and private key on the
Dominion PX device, and send the CSR to a CA for signing the certificate.
Creating a Certificate Signing Request
Follow this procedure to create the CSR for your Dominion PX device.
To create a CSR:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > SSL Certificate. The Manage
SSL Certificate dialog appears.
2. Click the New SSL Certificate tab.
3. Provide the information requested.

In the Subject section:
Field
Type this information
Country (ISO Code)
The country where your company is located. Use the standard ISO
country code. For a list of ISO codes, visit the ISO website
(http://www.iso.org/iso/country_codes/iso_3166_code_lists.htm).
State or Province
The full name of the state or province where your company is located.
Locality
The city where your company is located.
83
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Field
Type this information
Organization
The registered name of your company.
Organizational Unit
The name of your department.
Common Name
The fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of your Dominion PX device.
Email Address
An email address where you or another administrative user can be
reached.
Note: All fields in the Subject section are mandatory, except for the
Organization, Organizational Unit and Email Address fields. If you
generate a CSR without values entered in the required fields, you
cannot obtain third party certificates.

In the Key Creation Parameters section:
Field
Do this
Key Length
Select the key length (bits) from the drop-down list in this field. A larger
key length enhances the security, but slows down the Dominion PX
device's response.
Self Sign
For requesting a certificate signed by the CA, ensure this
checkbox is NOT selected.
Challenge
Type a password. The password is used to protect the certificate or
CSR. This information is optional, and the value should be 4 to 64
characters long.
The password is case sensitive, so ensure you capitalize the letters
correctly.
Confirm Challenge
Type the same password again for confirmation.
4. Click Create New SSL Key to create both the CSR and private key.
This may take several minutes to complete.
5. To download the newly-created CSR to your computer, click
Download Certificate Signing Request.
a. You are prompted to open or save the file. Click Save to save it on
your computer.
b. After the file is stored on your computer, submit it to a CA to obtain
the digital certificate.
c.
If desired, click Delete Certificate Signing Request to remove the
CSR file permanently from the Dominion PX device.
6. To store the newly-created private key on your computer, click
Download Key. You are prompted to open or save the file. Click Save
to save it on your computer.
7. Click Close to quit the dialog.
84
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Installing a CA-Signed Certificate
After the CA provides a signed certificate according to the CSR you
submitted, you must install it on the Dominion PX device.
To install the certificate:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > SSL Certificate. The Manage
SSL Certificate dialog appears.
2. Click the New SSL Certificate tab.
3. In the Certificate File field, click Browse to select the certificate file
provided by the CA.
4. Click Upload. The certificate is installed on the Dominion PX device.
Tip: To verify whether the certificate has been installed successfully,
click the Active SSL Certificate tab later.
5. Click Close to quit the dialog.
Creating a Self-Signed Certificate
When appropriate certificate and key files for the Dominion PX device are
unavailable, the alternative other than submitting a CSR to the CA is to
generate a self-signed certificate.
To create and install a self-signed certificate:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > SSL Certificate. The Manage
SSL Certificate dialog appears.
2. Click the New SSL Certificate tab.
3. Provide the information requested.
Field
Type this information
Country (ISO Code)
The country where your company is located. Use the standard ISO
country code. For a list of ISO codes, visit the ISO website
(http://www.iso.org/iso/country_codes/iso_3166_code_lists.htm).
State or Province
The full name of the state or province where your company is located.
Locality
The city where your company is located.
Organization
The registered name of your company.
Organizational Unit
The name of your department.
Common Name
The fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of your Dominion PX device.
Email Address
An email address where you or another administrative user can be
reached.
85
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Field
Type this information
Key Length
Select the key length (bits) from the drop-down list in this field. A larger
key length enhances the security, but slows down the Dominion PX
device's response.
Self Sign
Ensure this checkbox is selected, which indicates that you are
creating a self-signed certificate.
Validity in days
This field appears after the Self Sign checkbox is selected. Type the
number of days for which the self-signed certificate is valid in this field.
Note: All fields in the Subject section are mandatory, except for the
Organization, Organizational Unit and Email Address fields.
A password is not required for a self-signed certificate so the
Challenge and Confirm Challenge fields disappear after the Self Sign
checkbox is selected.
4. Click Create New SSL Key to create both the self-signed certificate
and private key. This may take several minutes to complete.
5. You can also do any of the following:

Click "Install Key and Certificate" to immediately install the
self-signed certificate and private key. When any confirmation and
security messages appear, click Yes to continue.
Tip: To verify whether the certificate has been installed successfully,
click the Active SSL Certificate tab later.

To download the self-signed certificate or private key, click
Download Certificate or Download Key. You are prompted to open
or save the file. Click Save to save it on your computer.

To remove the self-signed certificate and private key permanently
from the Dominion PX device, click "Delete Key and Certificate".
6. If you installed the self-signed certificate in Step 5, after the installation
completes, the Dominion PX device resets and the login page
re-opens.
Installing Existing Key and Certificate Files
If the SSL certificate and private key files are already available, you can
install them directly without going through the process of creating a CSR
or a self-signed certificate.
To install the existing key and certificate files:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > SSL Certificate. The Manage
SSL Certificate dialog appears.
2. Click the New SSL Certificate tab.
86
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
3. Select the "Upload Key and Certificate" checkbox. The Key File and
Certificate File fields appear.
4. In the Key File field, click Browse to select the private key file.
5. In the Certificate File field, click Browse to select the certificate file.
6. Click Upload. The selected files are installed on the Dominion PX
device.
Tip: To verify whether the certificate has been installed successfully,
click the Active SSL Certificate tab later.
7. Click Close to quit the dialog.
Downloading Key and Certificate Files
You can download the key and certificate files currently installed on the
Dominion PX device for backup or other operations. For example, you can
install the files on a replacement Dominion PX device, add the certificate
to your browser and so on.
To download the certificate and key files from a Dominion PX
device:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > SSL Certificate. The Manage
SSL Certificate dialog appears.
2. The Active SSL Certificate tab should open. If not, click it.
3. Click Download Key to download the private key file installed on the
Dominion PX device. You are prompted to open or save the file. Click
Save to save it on your computer.
4. Click Download Certificate to download the certificate file installed on
the Dominion PX device. You are prompted to open or save the file.
Click Save to save it on your computer.
5. Click Close to quit the dialog.
87
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Setting Up LDAP Authentication
For security purposes, users attempting to log in to Dominion PX must be
authenticated. Dominion PX supports the access using one of the
following authentication mechanisms:

Local database of user profiles on the Dominion PX device

Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP)
By default, Dominion PX is configured for local authentication. If you stay
with this method, you do not need to do anything other than create user
profiles for each authorized user. If you prefer to use an external LDAP
server, you must:

Provide Dominion PX with information about the LDAP server.

Create user profiles for users who are authenticated externally
because a user profile on the Dominion PX device determines the
role(s) applied to the user, and determines the permissions for the
user accordingly.
When configured for LDAP authentication, all Dominion PX users must
have an account on the LDAP server. Local-authentication-only users will
have no access to Dominion PX except for the admin, who always can
access Dominion PX.
Gathering the LDAP Information
It requires knowledge of your LDAP server and directory settings to
configure Dominion PX for LDAP authentication. If you are not familiar with
the settings, consult your LDAP administrator for help.
To configure LDAP authentication, you need to check:

The IP address or hostname of the LDAP server

Whether the Secure LDAP protocol (LDAP over SSL) is being used

If Secure LDAP is in use, consult your LDAP administrator for the
CA certificate file.

The network port used by the LDAP server

The type of the LDAP server, usually one of the following options:

OpenLDAP


88
If using an OpenLDAP server, consult the LDAP administrator
for the Bind Distinguished Name (DN) and password.
Microsoft Active Directory® (AD)
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface

If using a Microsoft Active Directory server, consult your AD
administrator for the name of the Active Directory Domain.

The Base DN of the server (used for searching for users)

The login name attribute (or AuthorizationString)

The user entry object class

The user search subfilter (or BaseSearch)
Adding the LDAP Server Settings
To activate and use external LDAP/LDAPS server authentication, enable
LDAP authentication and enter the information you have gathered for any
LDAP/LDAPS server.
Note: An LDAPS server refers to an SSL-secured LDAP server.
To add the LDAP/LDAPS server settings:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Authentication. The
Authentication Settings dialog appears.
2. Select the LDAP radio button to activate remote LDAP/LDAPS server
authentication.
3. Click New to add an LDAP/LDAPS server for authentication. The
"Create new LDAP Server Configuration" dialog appears.
4. IP Address / Hostname - Type the IP address or hostname of your
LDAP/LDAPS authentication server.
Important: Without the SSL encryption enabled, you can type either
the domain name or IP address in this field, but you must type the fully
qualified domain name if the SSL encryption is enabled.
5. Type of external LDAP/LDAPS server. Choose from among the
options available:

OpenLDAP

Microsoft Active Directory. Active Directory is an implementation
of LDAP/LDAPS directory services by Microsoft for use in
Windows environments.
6. LDAP over SSL - Select this checkbox if you would like to use SSL.
Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) is a cryptographic protocol that allows
Dominion PX to communicate securely with the LDAP/LDAPS server.
A certificate file is required when enabling the encryption.
7. Port - The default Port is 389. Either use the standard LDAP TCP port
or specify another port.
8. SSL Port - The default is 636. Either use the default port or specify
another port. This field is enabled when the "LDAP over SSL"
checkbox is selected.
89
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
9. Use only trusted LDAP Server Certificates - Select this checkbox if
you would like to use a trusted LDAP server certificate file, that is, a
certificate file signed by the CA. When NOT selected, you can use all
LDAP/LDAPS server certificates, including a self-signed certificate
file.
10. Server Certificate - Consult your authentication server administrator to
get the CA certificate file for the LDAP/LDAPS server. Use the Browse
button to navigate to the certificate file. This field is required when the
"LDAP over SSL" checkbox is selected.
11. Anonymous Bind - If the external OpenLDAP server permits
anonymous queries to the LDAP directory, you may select this
checkbox. When selected, go to Step 15 since it is not necessary to
specify the Bind Distinguished Name (DN) and Bind Password.
12. Use Bind Credentials - To provide authentication information for the
"bind" operation to the Microsoft Active Directory server, select this
checkbox.
13. Bind DN - Specify the DN of the user who is permitted to search the
LDAP directory in the defined search base.
14. Bind Password and Confirm Bind Password - Enter the Bind password
in the Bind Password field first and then the Confirm Bind Password
field. This information is required if the Use Bind Credentials checkbox
is selected.
15. Base DN for Search - Enter the name you want to bind against the
LDAP/LDAPS (up to 31 characters), and where in the database to
begin searching for the specified Base DN. An example Base Search
value might be: cn=Users,dc=raritan,dc=com. Consult your
authentication server administrator for the appropriate values to enter
into these fields.
16. Type the following information in the corresponding fields. LDAP
needs this information to verify user names and passwords.

Login name attribute (also called AuthorizationString)

User entry object class

User search subfilter (also called BaseSearch)
Note: Dominion PX will preoccupy the login name attribute and user
entry object class with default values, which should not be changed
unless required.
17. Active Directory Domain - Type the name of the Active Directory
Domain. For example, testradius.com. Consult with your Active
Directory Administrator for a specific domain name.
18. To verify if the LDAP/LDAPS configuration is done correctly, you may
click Test Connection to check whether Dominion PX can connect to
the LDAP/LDAPS server successfully.
90
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Tip: You can also do this by using the Test Connection button in the
Authentication Settings dialog.
19. Click OK to save the changes. The new LDAP server is listed in the
Authentication Settings dialog.
20. To add additional LDAP/LDAPS servers, repeat Steps 3 to 19.
21. Click OK to save the changes. The LDAP authentication is now in
place.
Note: If the Dominion PX clock and the LDAP server clock are out of sync,
the certificates are considered expired and users are unable to
authenticate using LDAP. To ensure proper synchronization,
administrators should configure Dominion PX and the LDAP server to use
the same NTP server.
More Information about AD Configuration
For more information about the LDAP configuration using Microsoft Active
Directory, see LDAP Configuration Illustration (on page 229).
Sorting the LDAP Access Order
The order of the LDAP list determines the access priority of remote
LDAP/LDAPS servers. Dominion PX first tries to access the top
LDAP/LDAPS server in the list for authentication, then the next one if the
access to the first one fails, and so on until the Dominion PX device
successfully connects to one of the listed LDAP/LDAPS servers.
Note: After successfully connecting to one LDAP/LDAPS server,
Dominion PX STOPS trying to access the remaining LDAP/LDAPS
servers in the list regardless of the user authentication result.
To re-sort the LDAP server access list:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Authentication. The
Authentication Settings dialog appears.
2. Select the LDAP/LDAPS server whose priority you want to change.
3. Click "Move up" or "Move down" until the selected server reaches the
desired position in the list.
4. Click OK to save the changes.
91
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Testing the LDAP Server Connection
You can test the connection to any LDAP/LDAPS server to verify the
server accessibility or the validity of the authentication settings.
To test the connection to an LDAP/LDAPS server:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Authentication. The
Authentication Settings dialog appears.
2. Select the LDAP/LDAPS server that you want to test.
3. Click Test Connection to start the connection test.
Editing the LDAP Server Settings
If the configuration on any LDAP/LDAPS server has been changed, such
as the port number, bind DN and password, you must modify the
LDAP/LDAPS settings on the Dominion PX device accordingly, or the
authentication fails.
To modify the LDAP authentication configuration:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Authentication. The
Authentication Settings dialog appears.
2. Select the LDAP/LDAPS server that you want to edit.
3. Click Edit. The Edit LDAP Server Configuration dialog appears.
4. Make necessary changes to the information shown.
5. Click OK to save the changes.
Deleting the LDAP Server Settings
You can delete the authentication settings of a specific LDAP/LDAPS
server when the server is not available or used for remote authentication.
To remove one or multiple LDAP/LDAPS servers:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Authentication. The
Authentication Settings dialog appears.
2. Select the LDAP/LDAPS server that you want to remove. To make
multiple selections, press Ctrl+click or Shift+click to highlight multiple
ones.
3. Click Delete.
4. A message appears, prompting you to confirm the operation. Click
Yes to confirm the deletion.
5. Click OK to save the changes.
92
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Disabling the LDAP Authentication
When the remote authentication service is disabled, Dominion PX
authenticates users against the local database stored on the Dominion PX
device.
To disable the LDAP authentication service:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Authentication. The
Authentication Settings dialog appears.
2. Select the Local Authentication radio button.
3. Click OK to save the changes.
Enabling LDAP and Local Authentication Services
To make authentication function properly all the time -- even when
external authentication is not available, you can enable both the local and
remote authentication services.
When both authentication services are enabled, Dominion PX follows
these rules for authentication:

When any of the LDAP/LDAPS servers in the access list is accessible,
Dominion PX authenticates against the connected LDAP/LDAPS
server only.

When the connection to every LDAP/LDAPS server fails, Dominion
PX allows authentication against the local database.
To enable both authentication services:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Authentication. The
Authentication Settings dialog appears.
2. Ensure the LDAP radio button has been selected.
3. Select the "Use Local Authentication if Remote Authentication service
is not available" checkbox.
4. Click OK to save the changes.
Outlet Management
Dominion PX allows you to remotely customize the name of each outlet
through the web interface. In addition, you can remotely check which
circuit breaker is associated with each outlet.
93
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Naming Outlets
You can give each outlet a name up to 32 characters long to identify the
equipment connected to it.
The customized name is displayed along with the label in parentheses
throughout the web interface.
Note: In this context, the label refers to the outlet number.
To name an outlet:
1. If the PDU folder is not expanded, expand it to show all components
and component groups. See Expanding the Tree (on page 43).
2. Click Outlets in the Dominion PX Explorer pane, and the Outlets page
opens in the right pane.
3. Click the outlet you want in the right pane.
4. Click Setup. The setup dialog for the selected outlet appears.
5. Type a name in the Outlet Name field.
6. Click OK to save the changes.
Checking Associated Circuit Breakers
To find out each outlet is protected by which circuit breaker, you can check
the Outlets page.
Tip: This type of information is also available by choosing Maintenance >
Device Information. See Displaying the PDU Information (on page 52).
To check associated circuit breaker for all outlets:
1. If the PDU folder is not expanded, expand it to show all components
and component groups. See Expanding the Tree (on page 43).
2. Click Outlets in the Dominion PX Explorer pane, and the Outlets page
opens in the right pane.
94
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
All outlets are listed with associated circuit breakers shown in the
Overcurrent Protector column.
Inlet and Circuit Breaker Management
You can name each inlet and circuit breaker or monitor their status.
Naming the Inlet
You can customize the inlet's name for your own purpose.
The customized name is displayed along with the label in parentheses
throughout the web interface.
Note: In this context, the label refers to the inlet number, such as I1.
To name the inlet:
1. If the PDU folder is not expanded, expand it to show all components
and component groups. See Expanding the Tree (on page 43).
2. Click Inlet I1 in the Dominion PX Explorer pane, and the Inlet I1 page
opens in the right pane.
3. Click Setup. The Inlet Setup dialog appears.
4. Type a new name in the Name field.
5. Click OK to save the changes.
95
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Naming Circuit Breakers
You can name each circuit breaker for easily identifying them.
The customized name is displayed along with the label in parentheses
throughout the web interface.
Note: In this context, the label refers to the circuit breaker number, such as
C1.
To name a circuit breaker:
1. Expand the Overcurrent Protectors folder to show all circuit breakers
in the Dominion PX Explorer pane. See Expanding the Tree (on page
43).
2. Click the desired circuit breaker in the Dominion PX Explorer pane,
and the page for this circuit breaker opens in the right pane.
3. Click Setup. The Overcurrent Protector Setup dialog appears.
4. Type a new name in the Name field.
5. Click OK to save the changes.
Monitoring the Inlet
You can view the inlet's details, including its:

Label (number)

Customized name

Inlet sensor readings:
- Active energy (Wh)
- Active power (W)
- Apparent power (VA)
- Power factor
- RMS current per line (A)
- RMS voltage per line pair (V)
Note: If a sensor reading row is colored, it means the sensor reading
already crosses one of the thresholds, or the circuit breaker has tripped.
See The Yellow- or Red-Highlighted Reading (on page 47).
There are two ways to access the inlet information.
To get the overview of the inlet status:
1. Click the Dashboard icon in the Dominion PX Explorer pane, and the
Dashboard page opens in the right pane.
96
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
2. Locate the Inlet section on the Dashboard page.
To view the inlet's details:
1. If the PDU folder is not expanded, expand it to show all components
and component groups. See Expanding the Tree (on page 43).
2. Click Inlet I1 in the Dominion PX Explorer pane, and the Inlet I1 page
opens in the right pane.
Note: A few Dominion PX models may show some current being drawn or
power consumption while no loads are physically attached to the PDU. For
details, see Non-Zero Readings While No Loads Attached (on page
240).
Monitoring Circuit Breakers
Each circuit breaker on the Dominion PX device delivers power to a bank
of outlets, and draws power from one or two lines.
You can view the circuit breaker's details, including its:

Label (number)

Name

Status (closed/open)

Lines associated with the circuit breaker

Sensor readings:
- Current drawn (A)
- Current remaining (A)
Note: If a sensor reading row is colored, it means the sensor reading
already crosses one of the thresholds, or the circuit breaker has tripped.
See The Yellow- or Red-Highlighted Reading (on page 47).
You can view the summary of all circuit breakers at a time or the status of
individual circuit breakers.
To view all circuit breakers' status:
You can check the status of all circuit breakers at a time via either the
Dashboard or Overcurrent Protectors page.

Using the Dashboard page:
a. Click the Dashboard icon in the Dominion PX Explorer pane, and
the Dashboard page opens in the right pane.
b. Locate the Overcurrent Protectors section on the Dashboard
page.

Using the Overcurrent Protectors page:
97
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
a. If the PDU folder is not expanded, expand it to show all
components and component groups. See Expanding the Tree
(on page 43).
b. Click Overcurrent Protectors in the Dominion PX Explorer pane,
and the Overcurrent Protectors page opens in the right pane.
To view a circuit breaker's details:
1. Expand the Overcurrent Protectors folder to show all circuit breakers
in the Dominion PX Explorer pane. See Expanding the Tree (on page
43).
2. Click the desired circuit breaker in the Dominion PX Explorer pane,
and the page for this circuit breaker opens in the right pane.
Setting Power Thresholds
Setting and enabling the thresholds causes Dominion PX to generate alert
notifications when it detects that any component's power state crosses the
thresholds.
Usually there are four thresholds for each sensor: Lower Critical, Lower
Warning, Upper Warning and Upper Critical.

Upper and Lower Warning thresholds indicate the sensor reading
enters the warning range before the critical threshold.

Upper and Lower Critical thresholds indicate the sensor reading is at
the critical level.
To avoid generating a large amount of alert events, the deassertion
hysteresis for each threshold is enabled. You can change the default
hysteresis value if necessary. For more information on the deassertion
hysteresis, see What is Deassertion Hysteresis? (on page 100) .
Note: After setting the thresholds, remember to configure the event rules.
See Configuring Event Rules (on page 102).
Setting Inlet Thresholds
You can set the inlet thresholds so that the alerts are generated when the
inlet current and/or voltage crosses the thresholds.
To set the inlet thresholds:
1. If the PDU folder is not expanded, expand it to show all components
and component groups. See Expanding the Tree (on page 43).
2. Click Inlet I1 in the Dominion PX Explorer pane, and the Inlet I1 page
opens in the right pane.
3. Click Setup. The Inlet Setup dialog appears.
98
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
4. In the Threshold Configuration table, click the sensor row that you
want to configure.
5. Click Edit. A threshold setup dialog for the selected sensor appears.
6. Set up the Lower Critical, Lower Warning, Upper Warning and Upper
Critical thresholds respectively.

To enable any threshold, select the corresponding checkbox. To
disable a threshold, deselect the checkbox.

After any threshold is enabled, type an appropriate numeric value
in the accompanying text box.

To enable the deassertion hysteresis for all thresholds, type a
numeric value other than zero in the Deassertion Hysteresis field.
See What is Deassertion Hysteresis? (on page 100) for the
function of deassertion hysteresis.

To enable the assertion timeout for all thresholds, type a numeric
value other than zero in the Assertion Timeout (samples) field.
This value determines how many samples should be generated
before any warning or critical condition is asserted. See What is
Assertion Timeout? (on page 101).
7. Click Ok in the threshold setup dialog to retain the changes.
8. To set the thresholds for other sensors, repeat Steps 4 to 8.
9. Click OK to save the changes.
Important: The final step is required or the threshold changes are
not saved.
Setting Circuit Breaker Thresholds
Setting the circuit breaker thresholds enables the PDU to generate alerts
when the circuit breaker crosses the thresholds.
To set the circuit breaker thresholds:
1. Expand the Overcurrent Protectors folder to show all circuit breakers
in the Dominion PX Explorer pane. See Expanding the Tree (on page
43).
2. Click the desired circuit breaker in the Dominion PX Explorer pane,
and the page for this circuit breaker opens in the right pane.
3. Click Setup. The Overcurrent Protector Setup dialog appears.
4. In the Threshold Configuration table, click the sensor row that you
want to configure.
5. Click Edit. A threshold setup dialog for the selected sensor appears.
6. Set up the Lower Critical, Lower Warning, Upper Warning and Upper
Critical thresholds respectively.
99
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface

To enable any threshold, select the corresponding checkbox. To
disable a threshold, deselect the checkbox.

After any threshold is enabled, type an appropriate numeric value
in the accompanying text box.

To enable the deassertion hysteresis for all thresholds, type a
numeric value other than zero in the Deassertion Hysteresis field.
See What is Deassertion Hysteresis? (on page 100) for the
function of deassertion hysteresis.

To enable the assertion timeout for all thresholds, type a numeric
value other than zero in the Assertion Timeout (samples) field.
This value determines how many samples should be generated
before any warning or critical condition is asserted. See What is
Assertion Timeout? (on page 101).
7. Click OK to save the changes.
What is Deassertion Hysteresis?
The hysteresis setting determines when a threshold condition is reset.
This diagram illustrates how hysteresis values relate to thresholds:
Upper Critical Threshold
Hysteresis
Upper Critical Reset
Upper Warning Threshold
Hysteresis
Upper Warning Reset
Lower Warning Reset
Hysteresis
Lower Warning Threshold
Lower Critical Reset
Hysteresis
100
Lower Critical Threshold
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
The hysteresis values define a reset threshold. For upper thresholds, the
measurement must fall past this reset threshold before a deassertion
event is generated. For lower thresholds, the measurement must rise
above this reset threshold before a deassertion event is generated.
Example: When Hysteresis is Useful
This example demonstrates when a deassertion hysteresis is useful.
The current critical threshold for the inlet is set to 19 amps (A). The current
draw rises to 20A, triggering a Current Critical alert. The current then
continues to fluctuate between 18.1A and 20A.
With the hysteresis set to 1A, Dominion PX continues to indicate that the
current on the inlet is above critical. Without hysteresis (that is, the
hysteresis is set to zero), Dominion PX would de-assert the condition each
time the current dropped to 18.9A, and re-assert the condition each time
the current reached 19A or higher. With the fluctuating current, this could
result in a number of repeating SNMP traps, and/or an e-mail account full
of repeating SMTP alert notifications.
Example: When to Disable Hysteresis
This is an example of when you want to disable hysteresis for the inlet -that is, set the hysteresis to zero.
The upper warning threshold for current in the inlet is set to 15A. In normal
usage, the inlet draws 14.6A of current. A spike in demand causes the
current to reach 16A, triggering an alert. The current then settles to the
normal draw of 14.6A.
With hysteresis set to zero, Dominion PX de-asserts the condition once
the current drops to 14.9A. Otherwise the inlet would still be considered
above the warning threshold as long as the current never dropped to
14.0A. The condition would not de-assert, even if the current returned to
normal.
What is Assertion Timeout?
When the assertion timeout is enabled, a specific number of consecutive
measurement samples that crosses a specific threshold must be
generated before any warning or critical condition is asserted. This
prevents a number of threshold alerts from being generated if the
measurements return to normal immediately after rising above any upper
threshold or dropping below any lower threshold.
101
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Configuring Event Rules
A benefit of the product's intelligence is its ability to notify you of and react
to a change in conditions. This event notification or reaction is an "event
rule."
Dominion PX is shipped with two built-in event rules, which cannot be
deleted.

System Event Log Rule: This rule causes ANY event occurred to
Dominion PX to be recorded in the internal log. The rule is enabled by
default.

System SNMP Trap Rule: This rule causes SNMP traps to be sent to
specified IP addresses or hosts when ANY event occurs to Dominion
PX. The rule is disabled by default.
If these two do not satisfy your needs, you can create additional rules to
respond to different events.
Note: Internet Explorer® 8 (IE8) does not use compiled JAVA script. When
using IE8 to create or change event rules, the CPU performance may be
degraded, resulting in the appearance of the connection time out message.
When this occurs, click Ignore to continue.
Components of an Event Rule
An event rule defines what Dominion PX does in certain situations and is
composed of two parts:

Event: This is the situation where Dominion PX or part of it meets a
certain condition. For example, the inlet's voltage exceeds the warning
threshold.

Action: This is the response to the event. For example, Dominion PX
notifies the system administrator of the event and records the event in
the log.
Creating an Event Rule
The best way to create a new set of event rule, in sequence, is:
102

Create actions for responding to one or multiple events.

Create rules to determine what actions are taken when these events
occur.
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Creating Actions
Dominion PX comes with two built-in actions:

System Event Log Action: This action records the selected event in
the internal log when the event occurs.

System SNMP Trap Action: This action sends SNMP traps to one or
multiple IP addresses after the selected event occurs.
Note: No IP addresses are specified for the "System SNMP Trap Action"
by default so you must specify IP addresses before applying this action to
any event rule.
The built-in actions cannot be deleted. If these actions do not satisfy your
needs, then create new ones.
To create new actions:
1. Choose Device Settings > Event Rules. The Event Rule Settings
dialog appears.
2. Click the Actions tab.
3. Click New Action.
4. In the "Action name" field, type a new name for the action. The default
name is New Action <number>, where <number> is a sequential
number.
5. In the Action field, click the drop-down arrow, and select the desired
action from the list in response to the selected event.

Log event message: This option records the selected events in the
internal log.

Send SMTP message: This option notifies one or multiple persons
of the selected events by e-mail.

Send SNMP trap: This option sends SNMP traps to one or multiple
SNMP managers.

Syslog message: This option makes Dominion PX automatically
forward event messages to the specified syslog server.
6. Complete further settings for the selected action if necesssary.

Send SMTP message: This option requires you to specify the
email address(es) of the recipient(s), and determine which SMTP
server settings to apply.
103
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface



In the "Recipients email addresses" field, specify the email
address(es). Use a comma to separate multiple email
addresses.

To use the SMTP server specified in the SMTP Server
Settings dialog, select the Use Default SMTP Server
checkbox. To use a different SMTP server, select the Use
Custom SMTP Settings checkbox. If the SMTP server
settings are not configured yet, click Configure. See
Configuring the SMTP Settings (on page 63) for the
information of each field.
Send SNMP trap: You need to specify SNMP managers and
associated settings for this option.

You can specify up to 3 SNMP managers in the Host x fields,
where x is a number between 1 and 3.

Specify a port number for each SNMP manager in the Port x
fields, where x is a number between 1 and 3.

Specify a community string for each SNMP manager in the
Community x fields, where x is a number between 1 and 3.
Syslog message: Specify the IP address to which syslog is
forwarded in the "Syslog server" field, and an appropriate port
number in the Port field.
7. Click Save to save the new action.
Note: If you do not click Save before quitting the current settings page,
a message appears. Then click Yes to save the changes, Discard to
abort the changes or Cancel to return to the current settings page.
8. To create additional actions, repeat Steps 3 to 7.
9. Click Close to quit the dialog.
Creating Rules
After required actions are available, you can create event rules to
determine what actions are taken to respond to specific events.
By default, Dominion PX provides two built-in event rules -- System Event
Log Rule and System SNMP Trap Rule. If the built-in rules do not satisfy
you needs, create new ones.
Note: For information on the built-in event rules, see Configuring Event
Rules (on page 102).
To create event rules:
1. Choose Device Settings > Event Rules. The Event Rule Settings
dialog appears.
104
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
2. On the Rules tab, click New Rule.
3. In the "Rule name" field, type a new name for identifying the rule. The
default name is New Rule <number>, where <number> is a sequential
number.
4. Select the Enabled checkbox to enable this event rule.
5. Click Event to select an event for which you want to trigger an action.
A pull-down menu showing all types of events appears.

Select the desired event type from the pull-down menu, and if a
submenu appears, continue the navigation until the desired event
is selected.
Note: Selection of the option "<Any sub-event>" means that all events
occurred to the selected menu item will trigger actions.
6. In the "Trigger condition" field, select the "Asserted," "Deasserted" or
"Both" radio button.

Asserted: Dominion PX takes the action only when the event
occurs. This means the status of the described event transits from
FALSE to TRUE.

Deasserted: Dominion PX takes the action only when the event
condition disappears. This means the status of the described
event transits from TRUE to FALSE.

Both: Dominion PX takes the action both when the event occurs
(asserts) and when the event condition disappears (deasserts).
7. In the Actions field, click the drop-down arrow, select the desired
action from the list, and click the Add Action button
add the action.
to
The added action will be listed in the list box to the right of the Actions
filed.
8. To add additional actions, repeat Step 7.
9. To remove any added action, select it from the list box, and click the
"Remove selected Action" button
.
10. Click Save to save the new event rule.
Note: If you do not click Save before quitting the current settings page,
a message appears. Then click Yes to save the changes, Discard to
abort the changes or Cancel to return to the current settings page.
11. Repeat Steps 2 to 10 to create additional event rules.
12. Click Close to quit the dialog.
105
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Sample Event Rules
Sample PDU-Level Event Rule
In this example, we want Dominion PX to record the firmware upgrade
failure in the internal log when it happens. The sample event rule looks like
this:

Event: Events > Device > Firmware update failed

Trigger condition: asserted

Actions: System Event Log Action
To create the above event rule:
1. Select Events > Device to indicate we are specifying an event at the
PDU level.
2. Select "Firmware update failed" in the submenu because we want
Dominion PX to respond to the event related to firmware upgrade
failure.
3. Select System Event Log Action as we intend to record the firmware
update failure event in the internal log.
4. Select the "asserted" radio button since we want the selected event to
be recorded only when it occurs.
Sample Outlet-Level Event Rule
In this example, we want Dominion PX to send SNMP traps to the SNMP
manager both when any sensor reading of outlet 3 crosses any threshold
and when it returns to normal. To do that we would set up an event rule like
this:

Event: Events > Outlet > Outlet 3 > Sensor > Any sub-event

Trigger condition: both

Actions: System SNMP Trap Action
To create the above event rule:
1. Select Events > Outlet to indicate we are specifying an event at the
outlet level.
2. Select "Outlet 3" from the submenu because that is the outlet in
question.
3. Select "Sensor" to refer to sensor readings.
4. Select "Any sub-event" because we want to specify all events related
to all types of outlet sensors and thresholds, such as current, voltage,
upper critical threshold, upper warning threshold, lower critical
threshold, lower warning threshold, and so on.
106
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
5. Select "System SNMP Trap Action" to send SNMP traps to respond to
the specified event.
6. Select the "both" radio button so that the SNMP traps are sent both
when any sensor reading of outlet 3 moves past any threshold into the
warning or critical range and when the sensor reading returns to
normal.
For example, when the outlet 3's voltage crosses into the upper
warning range, the SNMP traps are sent, and when the voltage drops
below the upper warning threshold, the SNMP traps are sent again.
Sample Inlet-Level Event Rule
In this example, we want Dominion PX to send SNMP traps to the SNMP
manager both when any sensor reading of the Inlet I1 crosses any
threshold and when it returns to normal. The event rule is set like this:

Event: Events > Inlet > Inlet I1 > Sensor > Any sub-event

Trigger condition: both

Actions: System SNMP Trap Action
To create the above event rule:
1. Select Events > Inlet to indicate we are specifying an event at the inlet
level.
2. Select "Inlet I1" from the submenu because that is the inlet in
question.
3. Select "Sensor" to refer to sensor readings.
4. Select "Any sub-event" because we want to specify all events related
to all types of inlet sensors and thresholds, such as current, voltage,
upper critical threshold, upper warning threshold, lower critical
threshold, lower warning threshold, and so on.
5. Select "System SNMP Trap Action" to send SNMP traps to respond to
the specified event.
6. Select the "both" radio button so that the SNMP traps are sent both
when any sensor reading of Inlet I1 moves past any threshold into the
warning or critical range and when the sensor reading returns to
normal.
For example, when the Inlet I1's voltage crosses into the upper
warning range, the SNMP traps are sent, and when the voltage drops
below the upper warning threshold, the SNMP traps are sent again.
107
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Modifying an Event Rule
You can change an event rule's event, action, trigger condition and other
settings, if any.
Exception: Events and actions selected in the built-in event rules are not
changeable, including System Event Log Rule and System SNMP Trap
Rule.
To modify an event rule:
1. Choose Device Settings > Event Rules. The Event Rule Settings
dialog appears.
2. On the Rules tab, select the event rule that you want to modify in the
left pane.
3. To disable the event rule, deselect the Enabled checkbox.
4. To change the event, click the desired tab in the Event field and select
a different item from the pull-down menu or submenu.
For example, in a user activity event rule for the "admin" user, you can
click the "admin" tab to display a pull-down submenu showing all user
names, and then select a different user name or all user names
(referred to as <Any user>).
5. If radio buttons are available, you may select a radio button other than
the current selection to change the rule triggering condition.
6. To change the action(s), do any of the following in the Actions field:

To add a new action, click the drop-down arrow, select the action
from the list, and click the Add Action button .

To remove any added action, select it from the list box, and click
the "Remove selected Action" button
.
7. Click Save to save the changes.
Note: If you do not click Save before quitting the current settings page,
a message appears. Then click Yes to save the changes, Discard to
abort the changes or Cancel to return to the current settings page.
8. Click Close to quit the dialog.
108
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Modifying an Action
An existing action can be changed so that all event rules where this action
is involved change their behavior accordingly.
Exception: The built-in action "System Event Log Action" is not
user-configurable.
To modify an action:
1. Choose Device Settings > Event Rules. The Event Rule Settings
dialog appears.
2. Click the Actions tab.
3. Select the action that you want to modify from the left list.
4. Make necessary changes to the information shown.
5. Click Save to save the changes.
Note: If you do not click Save before quitting the current settings page,
a message appears. Then click Yes to save the changes, Discard to
abort the changes or Cancel to return to the current settings page.
6. Click Close to quit the dialog.
Deleting an Event Rule or Action
If any event rule or action is obsolete, simply remove it.
Note: You cannot delete the built-in event rules and actions.
To delete an event rule or action:
1. Choose Device Settings > Event Rules. The Event Rule Settings
dialog appears.
2. To delete an event rule:
a. Ensure the Rules tab is selected. If not, click the Rules tab.
b. Select the desired rule from the left list, and click Delete Rule.
c.
A message appears, prompting you to confirm the operation. Click
Yes to confirm the deletion.
3. To delete an action:
a. Click the Actions tab.
b. Select the desired action from the left list, and click Delete Action.
c.
A message appears, prompting you to confirm the operation. Click
Yes to confirm the deletion.
4. Click Close to quit the dialog.
109
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
A Note about Untriggered Rules
In some cases, a measurement exceeds a threshold causing Dominion
PX to generate an alert. The measurement then returns to a value within
the threshold, but Dominion PX does not generate an alert message for
the Deassertion event. Such scenarios can occur due to the hysteresis
tracking Dominion PX uses. See What is Deassertion Hysteresis? (on
page 100).
Managing Event Logging
By default, Dominion PX captures certain system events and saves them
in a local (internal) event log.
Viewing the Local Event Log
You can view up to 2,000 historical events that occurred to the Dominion
PX device in the local event log.
When the log already contains 2,000 entries, each new entry overwrites
the oldest entry.
To display the local log:
1. Choose Maintenance > View Event Log. The Event Log dialog
appears.
Each event entry in the local log consists of:

Date and time of the event

Type of the event

A description of the event
2. The dialog shows the last page by default. You can:

Switch between different pages by doing one of the following:
- Click
- Click
or
or
to go to the first or last page.
to go to the prior or next page.
- Type a number in the Page text box and press Enter to go to a
specific page.

Select a log entry from the list and click Show Details to view
detailed information of the selected entry.
Note: Sometimes when the dialog is too narrow, the icon takes the
place of the Show Details button. In that case, click
to view details.
3. Enlarge the dialog if necessary. See Resizing a Dialog (on page 49).
110
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
4. You can re-sort the list or change the columns displayed. See
Changing the View of a List (on page 48).
5. Click Close to quit the dialog.
Clearing Event Entries
If it is not necessary to keep existing event history, you can remove all of it
from the local log.
To delete all event entries:
1. Choose Maintenance > View Event Log. The Event Log dialog
appears.
2. Click Clear Event Log.
3. Click Close to quit the dialog.
Viewing Connected Users
You can see which users are being connected to the Dominion PX device
and their status on the web interface. Besides, if you have the
administrator privileges, you can terminate any user's connection to the
Dominion PX device.
To view connected users:
1. Choose Maintenance > Connected Users. The Connected Users
dialog appears, showing a list of connected users with the following
information:

User Name -- the login name of each connected user.

IP Address -- the IP address of each user's host.

Client Type -- the column shows the interface through which the
user is connected to Dominion PX.

Idle Time -- the length of time for which a user remains idle. The
unit "min" represents minutes.
2. To disconnect any user, click the corresponding Disconnect button.

A dialog appears, prompting you to confirm the operation.

Click Yes to disconnect the user or No to abort the operation.
3. You may change the sorting order of the list if necessary. See
Changing the Sorting (on page 49).
4. Click Close to quit the dialog.
111
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Monitoring Server Accessibility
You can monitor whether specific IT devices are alive by having the
Dominion PX device continuously ping them. An IT device's successful
response to the pings indicates that the IT device is still alive and can be
remotely accessed.
Adding IT Devices for Ping Monitoring
You can have Dominion PX monitor the accessibility of any IT equipment,
such as DB servers and remote authentication servers.
To add IT equipment for ping monitoring:
1. Choose Device Settings > Server Reachability. The Server
Reachability dialog appears.
2. Click New. The Add New Server dialog appears.
3. By default, the "Enable Ping Monitoring for this Server" checkbox is
selected. If not, select it to enable the ping monitoring feature.
4. Provide the information required.
Field
Description
IP Address/Hostname IP address or host name of the IT
equipment whose accessibility you want to
monitor.
Number of Successful The number of successful pings required to
Pings to Enable
enable this feature. Valid range is 0 to 200.
Feature
Wait Time (in
seconds) after
Successful Ping
The wait time before sending the next ping if
the previous ping was successfully
responded. Valid range is 5 to 600
(seconds).
Wait Time (in
seconds) after
Unsuccessful Ping
The wait time before sending the next ping if
the previous ping was not responded. Valid
range is 3 to 600 (seconds).
Number of
Consecutive
Unsuccessful Pings
for Failure
The number of consecutive pings without
any response before the IT equipment is
declared unresponsive. Valid range is 1 to
100.
Wait Time (in
seconds) before
Resuming Pinging
The wait time before resuming pinging after
the IT equipment is declared unresponsive.
Valid range is 1 to 1200 (seconds).
5. Click OK to save the changes.
112
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
6. To add more IT devices, repeat Steps 2 to 5.
7. Click Close to quit the dialog.
Editing Ping Monitoring Settings
You can edit the ping monitoring settings for any IT device whenever it
requires changes.
To modify the ping monitoring settings for an IT device:
1. Choose Device Settings > Server Reachability. The Server
Reachability dialog appears.
2. Select the IT device whose settings you want to modify by clicking it.
3. Click Edit or double-click the IT device. The Edit Server 'XXX' dialog
appears, where XXX is the IP address or host name of the IT device.
4. Make changes to the information shown.
5. Click OK to save the changes.
Deleting Ping Monitoring Settings
When it is not necessary to monitor the accessibility of any IT device, just
remove it.
To delete ping monitoring settings for an IT device:
1. Choose Device Settings > Server Reachability. The Server
Reachability dialog appears.
2. Select the IT device whose ping monitoring settings you want to
remove by clicking it. To make multiple selections, press Ctrl+click or
Shift+click to highlight multiple ones.
3. Click Delete.
4. A message appears, prompting you to confirm the operation. Click
Yes to confirm the deletion.
5. Click Close to quit the dialog.
Environmental Sensors
Dominion PX can monitor the environmental conditions, such as
temperature and humidity, where environmental sensors are placed.
To add environmental sensors:
1. Physically connect environmental sensors to the Dominion PX device.
See Connecting Environmental Sensors (Optional).
113
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
2. Log in to the Dominion PX web interface. Dominion PX should have
detected the connected sensors, and display them in the web
interface.
3. Identify each sensor through the sensor's serial number. See
Identifying Environmental Sensors (on page 114).
4. Dominion PX should automatically manage the detected sensors.
Verify whether detected sensors are managed. If not, have them
managed. See Managing Environmental Sensors (on page 115).
5. Configure the sensors. See Configuring Environmental Sensors
(on page 116). The steps include:
a. Name the sensor.
b. Mark the sensor's physical location in the rack or server room.
Identifying Environmental Sensors
A sensor includes a serial number tag on the sensor cable.
The serial number for each sensor appears listed with each sensor
detected by Dominion PX in the web interface.
Match the serial number from the tag to those listed in the sensor table.
114
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Managing Environmental Sensors
Dominion PX starts to retrieve an environmental sensor's reading and/or
state and records the state transitions after the environmental sensor is
managed.
The Dominion PX device can manage a maximum of 16 environmental
sensors.
When there are less than 16 managed sensors, Dominion PX
automatically brings detected environmental sensors under management.
You should only have to manually manage a sensor when it is not under
management.
To manually manage an environmental sensor:
1. If the PDU folder is not expanded, expand it to show all components
and component groups. See Expanding the Tree (on page 43).
2. Click External Sensors in the Dominion PX Explorer pane, and the
External Sensors page opens in the right pane.
3. Click the sensor you want to manage.
Note: To identify all detected sensors, see Identifying
Environmental Sensors (on page 114).
4. Click Manage. The "Manage sensor <serial number> (<sensor type>)"
dialog appears, where <serial number> is the sensor's serial number
and <sensor type> is the sensor's type.
Note: For a contact closure sensor, a channel number is added to the
end of the <sensor type>.
5. There are two ways to manage the sensor:

To manage this sensor and let Dominion PX assign a number to it,
select "Automatically assign a sensor number." This method does
not release any managed sensors.

To manage this sensor by assigning the number you want to it,
select "Manually select a sensor number." Then click the
drop-down arrow to select a number.
If the number you assigned was occupied by a managed sensor,
that sensor is released after losing its number.
6. Click OK. Dominion PX starts to track and display the sensor's reading
and/or state.
7. To manage additional sensors, repeat Steps 3 to 6.
115
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Note: When the number of managed sensors reaches the maximum, you
CANNOT manage additional sensors until you remove or replace any
managed sensors. To remove a sensor, see Unmanaging
Environmental Sensors (on page 122).
Configuring Environmental Sensors
You may change the default name for easily identifying the managed
sensor, and describe its location with X, Y and Z coordinates.
To configure environmental sensors:
1. If the PDU folder is not expanded, expand it to show all components
and component groups. See Expanding the Tree (on page 43).
2. Click External Sensors in the Dominion PX Explorer pane, and the
External Sensors page opens in the right pane.
3. Select the sensor that you want to configure.
4. Click Setup. The "Setup of external sensor <number>" dialog appears,
where <number> is the number assigned to this sensor.
5. If the selected environmental sensor is the Raritan contact closure
sensor connected with a third-party detector/switch, select the
appropriate sensor type in the Binary Sensor Subtype field.

Contact: The detector/switch is designed to detect the door lock or
door open/closed status.

Smoke Detection: The detector/switch is designed to detect the
appearance of smoke.

Water Detection: The detector/switch is designed to detect the
appearance of water on the floor.

Vibration: The detector/switch is designed to detect the vibration in
the floor.
6. Type a new name in the Name field.
7. Describe the sensor's location by assigning alphanumeric values to
the X, Y and Z coordinates. See Describing the Sensor Location
(on page 118).
8. If the selected environmental sensor is a numeric sensor, its threshold
settings are displayed in the dialog. Click Edit to adjust the threshold
settings, including thresholds, deassertion hysteresis and assertion
timeout.
116

To enable any threshold, select the corresponding checkbox. To
disable a threshold, deselect the checkbox.

After any threshold is enabled, type an appropriate numeric value
in the accompanying text box.
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface

To enable the deassertion hysteresis for all thresholds, type a
numeric value other than zero in the Deassertion Hysteresis field.
See What is Deassertion Hysteresis? (on page 100) for the
function of deassertion hysteresis.

To enable the assertion timeout for all thresholds, type a numeric
value other than zero in the Assertion Timeout (samples) field.
This value determines how many samples should be generated
before any warning or critical condition is asserted. See What is
Assertion Timeout? (on page 101).

The Upper Critical and Lower Critical values are points at which
Dominion PX considers the operating environment is critical and
outside the range of the acceptable threshold.
9. Click OK to save the changes.
Setting the Z Coordinate Format
You can use either the number of rack units or a descriptive text to
describe the vertical locations (Z coordinates) of environmental sensors.
To determine the Z coordinate format:
1. Click the PDU folder.
Note: The PDU folder is named "my PX" by default. The name
changes after customizing the device name. See Naming the PDU
(on page 53).
2. Click Setup. The Pdu Setup dialog appears.
3. In the "External sensors Z coordinate" field, click the drop-down arrow
and select an option from the list.

Rack Units: The height of the Z coordinate is measured in
standard rack units. When this is selected, you can type a numeric
value in the rack unit to describe the Z coordinate of any
environmental sensors.

Free-Form: Any alphanumeric string can be used for specifying
the Z coordinate.
4. Click OK to save the changes.
117
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Describing the Sensor Location
Use the X, Y and Z coordinates to describe each sensor's physical
location. You can use these location values to track records of
environmental conditions in fixed locations around your IT equipment. The
X, Y and Z values act as additional attributes and are not tied to any
specific measurement scheme. If you choose to, you can use
non-measurement values. For example:
X = Brown Cabinet Row
Y = Third Rack
Z = Top of Cabinet
Values for the X, Y and Z coordinates may consist of:

For X and Y: Any combination of alphanumeric characters. The
coordinate value can be 0 to 32 characters long.

For Z when the Z coordinate format is set to Rack Units, any numeric
value ranging from 0 to 60.

For Z when the Z coordinate format is set to Free-Form, any
alphanumeric characters from 0 to 32 characters.
Tip: To configure and retrieve these coordinate values over SNMP, see
the Dominion PX MIB. To configure and retrieve these values over the CLI,
see Using the Command Line Interface (on page 142).
Viewing Sensor Data
Readings of the environmental sensors will display in the web interface
after these sensors are properly connected and managed.
The Dashboard page shows the information for managed environmental
sensors only, while the External Sensors page shows the information for
both of managed and unmanaged ones.
To view managed environmental sensors only:
1. Click the Dashboard icon in the Dominion PX Explorer pane, and the
Dashboard page opens in the right pane.
2. Locate the External Sensors section on the Dashboard page. The
section shows:

Total number of managed sensors

Total number of unmanaged sensors

Information of each managed sensor, including:
- Name
- Reading
118
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
- State
To view both of managed and unmanaged environmental
sensors:
1. If the PDU folder is not expanded, expand it to show all components
and component groups. See Expanding the Tree (on page 43).
2. Click External Sensors in the Dominion PX Explorer pane, and the
External Sensors page opens in the right pane.
Detailed information for each connected sensor is displayed,
including:

Label (number)

Serial number

Sensor type

Name

Reading

State

Channel (for a contact closure sensor only)
Sensor Measurement Accuracy
Raritan environmental sensors are with the following factory specifications.
Calibration is not required for environmental sensors.

Temperature: +/-2%

Humidity: +/-5%
States of Managed Sensors
An environmental sensor shows the state after being managed.
Available sensor states vary depending on the sensor type -- numeric or
discrete. For example, a contact closure sensor is a discrete sensor so it
switches between three states only -- unavailable, alarmed and normal.
Note: Numeric sensors use numeric values to indicate the environmental
or internal conditions while discrete sensors use alphabetical characters to
indicate the state.
Sensor state
Applicable to
unavailable
All sensors
alarmed
Discrete sensors
normal
All sensors
below lower critical
Numeric sensors
119
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Sensor state
Applicable to
below lower warning
Numeric sensors
above upper warning
Numeric sensors
above upper critical
Numeric sensors
"unavailable" State
The unavailable state means the connectivity to the sensor is lost.
Dominion PX pings all managed sensors at regular intervals in seconds. If
it does not detect a particular sensor for three consecutive scans, the
unavailable state is displayed for the sensor.
When the communication with a contact closure sensor's processor is lost,
all detectors (that is, all switches) connected to the same sensor module
show the "unavailable" state.
Note: When the sensor is deemed unavailable, the existing sensor
configuration remains unchanged. For example, the ID number assigned
to the sensor remains associated with it.
Dominion PX continues to ping unavailable sensors, and moves out of the
unavailable state after detecting the sensor for two consecutive scans.
"normal" State
This state indicates the sensor is in the normal state.
For a contact closure sensor, this state is the normal state you have set via
the sensor's dip switch.

If the normal state is set to Normally Closed, the normal state means
the contact closure switch is closed.

If the normal state is set to Normally Open, the normal state means
the contact closure switch is open.
Note: See Configuring a Contact Closure Sensor (on page 23) for
setting the normal state.
For a numeric sensor, this state means the sensor reading is within the
acceptable range as indicated below:
Lower Warning threshold <= Reading < Upper Warning threshold
Note: The symbol <= means smaller than (<) or equal to (=).
120
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
"alarmed" State
The state means the sensor is in the "abnormal" state, which is the
opposite of the normal state. Only a discrete sensor shows this state.
For a contact closure sensor, the meaning of this state varies based on the
sensor's normal state setting.

If the normal state is set to Normally Closed, the alarmed state means
the contact closure switch is open.

If the normal state is set to Normally Open, the alarmed state means
the contact closure switch is closed.
Tip: A contact closure sensor's LED is lit when in the alarmed state. If the
sensor module has two channels for connecting two switches, two LEDs
are available. Check which contact closure switch is in the "abnormal"
status according to the channel number of the LED.
"below lower critical" State
Only a numeric sensor shows this state.
This state means the sensor reading is below the lower critical threshold
as indicated below:
Reading < Lower Critical Threshold
"below lower warning" State
Only a numeric sensor shows this state.
This state means the sensor reading is below the lower warning threshold
as indicated below:
Lower Critical Threshold <= Reading < Lower Warning Threshold
Note: The symbol <= means smaller than (<) or equal to (=).
"above upper warningl" State
Only a numeric sensor shows this state.
This state means the sensor reading is above the upper warning threshold
as indicated below:
Upper Warning Threshold <= Reading < Upper Critical Threshold
Note: The symbol <= means smaller than (<) or equal to (=).
"above upper critical" State
Only a numeric sensor shows this state.
This state means the sensor reading is above the upper critical threshold
as indicated below:
Upper Critical Threshold <= Reading
121
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Note: The symbol <= means smaller than (<) or equal to (=).
Unmanaging Environmental Sensors
When it is unnecessary to monitor a particular environmental factor, you
can unmanage or release the corresponding environmental sensor so that
the Dominion PX device stops retrieving the sensor's reading and/or state.
To release a managed sensor:
1. If the PDU folder is not expanded, expand it to show all components
and component groups. See Expanding the Tree (on page 43).
2. Click External Sensors in the Dominion PX Explorer pane, and the
External Sensors page opens in the right pane.
3. Click the sensor you want to unmanage.
4. Click Release.
After a sensor is removed from management, the ID number assigned to
the sensor is released and can be automatically assigned to any new
sensor.
Asset Management
Configure the asset management settings only when an asset sensor is
physically connected to the Dominion PX device.
Configuring the Asset Sensor
Dominion PX cannot detect how many rack units a connected asset
sensor supports so you must provide this information manually.
To prevent the sensor LEDs from being lit permanently, enable LED scan
mode so they are lit upon scan. This saves power.
To configure an asset sensor (Asset Strip):
1. Click the asset sensor in the left pane. The asset sensor's page opens
in the right pane.
Note: The asset sensor is named "Asset Strip 1" by default. The name
changes after being customized.
2. Click Configure Asset Strip or double-click the asset sensor. The
setup dialog for the selected asset sensor appears.
Tip: You can also trigger the same dialog by clicking Asset
Management in the left pane, selecting the asset sensor in the right
pane, and clicking Configure Asset Strip.
122
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
3. To rename the asset sensor, type a new name in the Name field.
4. Type the total number of rack units the connected asset sensor
supports in the Channel Count field. The web interface shows 48 rack
units by default.
5. To enable LED scan mode, select the "enable" checkbox. Optional.
6. Click OK to save the changes.
Setting Asset Sensor LED Colors
Each LED on the asset sensor indicate the presence and absence of a
connected asset tag by changing its color.
You can configure or change the color settings for all LEDs on an asset
sensor by following the procedure below.
This feature is accessible only by users with administrative privileges.
To set a different LED color:
1. Choose Device Settings > Asset Management. The Configure Asset
Management Settings dialog appears.
2. In the "Color with connected Tag" field, either click a color or type the
hexadecimal RGB value of the desired color, which will be used to
indicate the presence of a connected tag.
3. In the "Color without connected Tag" field, either click a color or type
the hexadecimal RGB value of the desired color, which will be used to
indicate the absence of a connected tag.
4. Click OK to save the changes.
Tip: To make a specific LED's colors different from other LEDs, see
Changing a Specific LED's Color Settings (on page 123).
Changing a Specific LED's Color Settings
You can change the color settings of a specific LED on the asset sensor so
that the LED behaves differently from other LEDs.
To change an LED's settings:
1. Click the asset sensor in the left pane. The asset sensor's page opens
in the right pane.
Note: The asset sensor is named "Asset Strip 1" by default. The name
changes after being customized.
2. Select the rack unit whose LED settings you want to change.
3. Click Configure Rack Unit or double-click the selected rack unit. The
setup dialog for the selected rack unit appears.
123
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
4. Select either Auto or Manual Override as this LED's color settings.

Auto (based on Tag): This is the default setting. With this option
selected, the LED follows the global LED color settings. See
Setting Asset Sensor LED Colors (on page 123).

Manual Override: This option differentiates this LED's behavior.
After selecting this option, you must select an LED mode and/or
color to have the LED permanently be in the selected mode and/or
show the selected color.

LED Mode: Select On to have the LED stay lit permanently, Off
to have it stay off, or Blinking to have it blink all the time.

LED Color: If you select On or Blinking in the LED Mode field,
select a color to be shown by clicking that color.
5. Click OK to save the changes.
Displaying the Asset Sensor Information
The hardware and software information of the connected asset sensor is
available through the web interface.
To display the asset sensor information:
1. Choose Maintenance > Device Information. The Device Information
dialog appears.
2. Click the Asset Strips tab, where the asset sensor data is displayed.
3. Click Close to quit the dialog.
124
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Copying Configurations with Bulk Configuration
The Bulk Configuration feature lets you save the settings of a configured
Dominion PX device to your PC. This file can be used to copy that
configuration to other Dominion PX devices of the same model or to
restore the settings to previous configuration on the same Dominion PX
device.
Users saving and copying Dominion PX configurations require the
Administrator Privileges.
125
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Saving a Dominion PX Configuration
A source device is an already configured Dominion PX device that is used
to create a configuration file containing the settings that can be shared
between Dominion PX devices. These settings include user and role
configurations, thresholds, event rules, security settings, and so on.
This file does NOT contain device-specific information, including:

Device name

System name, system contact and system location

Network settings (IP address, gateway, netmask and so on)

Device logs

Outlet names

Outlet status

Environmental sensor names

Environmental sensor states and values

Certificate for SSL
Because the date and time settings are saved in the configuration file,
users should exercise caution when distributing the configuration file to
Dominion PX devices in a different time zone than the source device.
To save a configuration file:
1. Choose Maintenance > Bulk Configuration. The Bulk Configuration
dialog appears.
2. Click Download Bulk Configuration.
3. When the web browser prompts you to open or save the configuration
file, click Save. Choose a suitable location and save the configuration
file to your PC.
The file is saved in the XML format, and its content is encrypted using the
AES-128 encryption algorithm.
126
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Copying a Dominion PX Configuration
A target device is a Dominion PX device that loads another Dominion PX
device's configuration file. Copying a Dominion PX configuration to a
target device adjusts that Dominion PX device's settings to match those of
the source Dominion PX device. In order to successfully restore a
Dominion PX configuration:

The user must be the Admin user. Or the Admin role is assigned to the
user.

The target Dominion PX device must be the same model type as the
source Dominion PX device.

The target Dominion PX device must be running the same firmware
version as the source Dominion PX device.
To copy a Dominion PX Configuration:
1. Log in to the target device's web interface.
2. If the target device's firmware version does not match that of the
source device, update the target's firmware. See Firmware Upgrade
(on page 131).
3. Choose Maintenance > Bulk Configuration. The Bulk Configuration
dialog appears.
4. In the Copy Bulk Configuration section, click Browse and select the
configuration file on your PC.
5. Click Upload Bulk Configuration to copy the file. A message appears,
prompting you to confirm the operation.
6. Click Yes to confirm the opeartion.
7. The Dominion PX device resets and the Login page re-appears,
indicating that the configuration copy is complete.
Changing the Temperature Unit
Dominion PX can show temperatures in either Fahrenheit or Celsius
based on the login name. The default temperature unit is Celsius. Only a
user with the administrator privileges can change this setting for each
user.
To set the preferred temperature unit:
1. Choose User Management > Users. The Manage Users dialog
appears.
2. Select the user by clicking it.
3. Click Edit or double-click the user. The Edit User 'XXX' dialog appears,
where XXX is the user name.
4. Click the Preferences tab.
127
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
5. In the Temperature Unit field, click the drop-down arrow, and select
the desired option from the list.

: This option displays the temperature in Celsius.

: This option displays the temperature in Fahrenheit.
6. Click OK to save the changes.
Tip: You can determine the desired temperature unit when creating user
profiles. See Creating a User Profile (on page 64).
Network Diagnostics
Dominion PX provides two tools on the web interface for troubleshooting
potential networking issues.

Ping

Trace Route

List TCP Connections
Tip: These network diagnostic tools are also available through CLI. See
Network Troubleshooting (on page 217).
Pinging a Host
The Ping tool is useful for discovering whether a host is accessible through
the network or Internet.
To ping a host:
1. Choose Maintenance > Network Diagnostics > Ping. The Ping
Network Host dialog appears.
2. In the Host Name field, type the name or IP address of the host that
you want to check.
3. In the Number of Requests field, type a number up to 10 or adjust the
value by clicking either arrow. This number determines how many
packets are sent for pinging the host.
4. Click Run Ping to start pinging the host. A dialog appears, displaying
the Ping results.
5. Click Close to quit the dialog.
128
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Tracing the Network Route
Trace Route lets you find out the route over the network between two
hosts or systems.
To trace the route for a host:
1. Choose Maintenance > Network Diagnostics > Trace Route. The
Trace Route to Host dialog appears.
2. Type the IP address or name of the host whose route you want to
check in the Host Name field.
3. Click Run. A dialog appears, displaying the Trace Route results.
4. Click Close to quit the dialog.
Listing TCP Connections
You can use the "List TCP Connections" to display a list of TCP
connections.
To trace the route for a host:
1. Choose Maintenance > Network Diagnostics > List TCP Connections.
The TCP connections dialog appears.
2. Click Close to quit the dialog.
Viewing the Communication Log
Dominion PX allows you to inspect all communications occurred between
the Dominion PX device and its graphical user interface (GUI). The
information is usually useful for a technical support engineer only and you
may not need to view it.
This feature is accessible only by users with administrative privileges.
To view the communication log:
1. Choose Maintenance > View Communication Log. The
Communication Log dialog appears.
2. The dialog shows the last page by default. You can:

Switch between different pages by doing one of the following:
- Click
- Click
or
or
to go to the first or last page.
to go to the prior or next page.
- Type a number in the Page text box and press Enter to go to a
specific page.

Select a log entry from the list and click Show Details to view
detailed information of the selected entry.
129
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Note: Sometimes when the dialog is too narrow, the icon takes the
place of the Show Details button. In that case, click
to view details.
3. To immediately update the communication log, click
.
4. To save the communication log on your computer, click
.
5. Enlarge the dialog if necessary. See Resizing a Dialog (on page 49).
6. You can re-sort the list or change the columns displayed. See
Changing the View of a List (on page 48).
7. Click Close to quit the dialog.
Downloading Diagnostic Information
This function is for use by Raritan Field Engineers or when you are
directed by Raritan Technical Support.
You can download the diagnostic file from the Dominion PX device to a
client machine. The file is compressed into a .tgz file and should be sent to
Raritan Technical Support for interpretation.
This feature is accessible only by users with administrative privileges.
To retrieve a diagnostic file:
1. Choose Maintenance > Download Diagnostic Information. The File
Download dialog appears.
2. Click Save. The Save As dialog appears.
3. Navigate to the desired directory and click Save.
4. E-mail this file as instructed by Raritan Technical Support.
130
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Firmware Upgrade
You may upgrade your Dominion PX device to benefit from the latest
enhancements, improvements and features.
Updating the Firmware
You must be the system administrator or log in to the user profile with the
Firmware Update permission to update the Dominion PX device's
firmware.
If applicable to your model, download the latest firmware file from the
Raritan website, read the release notes, then start the upgrade. If you
have any questions or concerns about the upgrade, contact Raritan
Technical Support BEFORE upgrading.
Warning: Do NOT perform the firmware upgrade over a wireless
connection.
To update the firmware:
1. Choose Maintenance > Update Firmware. The Firmware Update
dialog appears.
2. In the Firmware File field, click Browse to select an appropriate
firmware file.
3. Click Upload. A progress bar appears to indicate the upload status.
4. When the upload is complete, version information of both the existing
firmware and uploaded firmware is shown, providing you a last chance
to terminate the update.
5. To view the certificate of the uploaded firmware, click View Certificate.
Optional.
6. To proceed with the update, click Update Firmware. The update may
take several minutes.
Warning: Do NOT power off the Dominion PX device during the
update.
During the firmware update:

A progress bar appears in the web interface, indicating the update
status.

On the Dominion PX device, the three-digit LED display shows
“FUP.”

No users can successfully log in to Dominion PX.

In the web interface, all logged-in users see the Dominion PX time
out message, and the "disconnected" state is shown in the status
bar.
131
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface

The user management operation, if any, is forced to suspend.
7. When the update is complete, a message appears, indicating the
update is successful.
8. The Dominion PX device resets, and the Login page re-appears. You
can now log in and resume your operation.
Note 1: The other logged-in users are also logged out when the firmware
update is complete.
Note 2: If you are using Dominion PX with an SNMP manager, you
should re-download the Dominion PX MIB after the firmware update.
This ensures your SNMP manager has the correct MIB for the latest
release you are using. See Using SNMP (on page 136).
A Note about Firmware Upgrade Time
The PDU firmware upgrade time varies from unit to unit, depending on
various external and internal factors.
External factors include, but are not limited to: network throughput,
firmware file size, and speed at which the firmware is retrieved from the
storage location. Internal factors include: the necessity of upgrading the
firmware on the microcontroller and the number of microcontrollers that
require upgrade (which depends on the number of outlets). The
microcontroller is upgraded only when required. Therefore, the length of
firmware upgrade time ranges from approximately 3 minutes (without any
microcontroller updated) to almost 7 minutes (with all microcontrollers for
48 outlets updated). Take the above factors into account when estimating
the PDU's firmware upgrade time.
The time indicated in this note is for web-interface-based upgrades.
Upgrades through other management systems, such as Raritan's Power
IQ, may take additional time beyond the control of the PDU itself. This note
does not address the upgrades using other management systems.
Viewing Firmware Update History
The firmware upgrade history, if available, is permanently stored on the
Dominion PX device.
This history indicates when a firmware upgrade event occurred, the prior
and new versions associated with the firmware upgrade event, and the
upgrade result.
To view the firmware update history:
1. Choose Maintenance > View Firmware Update History. The Firmware
Update History dialog appears, with the following information
displayed.
132
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface

Date and time of the firmware upgrade event

Previous firmware version

Update firmware version

Firmware upgrade result
2. You may change the number of displayed columns or re-sort the list
for better viewing the data. See Changing the View of a List (on
page 48).
3. To view the details of any firmware upgrade event, select it and click
Details. The Firmware Update Details dialog appears, showing
detailed information of the selected event.
4. Click Close to quit the dialog.
Full Disaster Recovery
If the firmware upgrade fails, causing the Dominion PX device to stop
working, you can recover it by using a special utility rather than returning
the PDU to Raritan.
Contact Raritan Technical Support for the recovery utility, which works in
Windows XP/Vista/7 and Linux. In addition, an appropriate Dominion PX
firmware file is required in the recovery procedure.
Updating the Asset Sensor Firmware
After connecting the asset sensor to the Dominion PX device, it
automatically checks its firmware version against the version of the asset
sensor firmware stored in the Dominion PX firmware. If the asset sensor
firmware version on the Dominion PX device is different, the asset sensor
automatically starts upgrading its firmware in the background.
During the firmware upgrade, the following events take place:

The asset sensor is completely lit up, with the blinking LEDs changing
the color from red to green.

A firmware upgrade process is indicated in the Dominion PX web
interface.

An SNMP trap is sent to indicate the firmware upgrade event.
Accessing the Help
The Help menu provides:

Current firmware and software packages information

A link to the Dominion PX User Guide (that is, the online help)
133
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface
Retrieving Software Packages Information
You can check the current firmware version and the information of all open
source packages embedded in the Dominion PX device through the web
interface.
To retrieve the embedded software packages information:
1. Choose Help > About Dominion PX. The About Dominion PX dialog
appears, with a list of open source packages displayed.
2. You can click any link in the dialog to access related information or
download any software package.
Browsing through the Online Help
The Dominion PX User Guide is also provided in the form of online help,
and accessible over the Internet.
To use online help, Active Content must be enabled in your browser. If you
are using Internet Explorer 7, you must enable Scriplets. Consult your
browser help for information on enabling these features.
To use the Dominion PX online help:
1. Choose Help > User Guide. The online help opens in the default web
browser.
2. To view the content of any topic, click the topic in the left pane. Then
its content is displayed in the right pane.
3. To select a different topic, do any of the following:

To view the next topic, click the Next icon

To view the previous topic, click the Previous icon

To view the first topic, click the Home icon
in the toolbar.
.
.
4. To expand or collapse a topic that contains sub-topics, do the
following:

To expand any topic, click the white arrow prior to the topic, or
double-click that topic. The arrow turns into a black, gradient
arrow , and sub-topics appear below the topic.

To collapse any expanded topic, click the black, gradient arrow
prior to the topic, or double-click the expanded topic. The arrow
then turns into a white arrow , and all sub-topics below that topic
disappear.
5. To search for specific information, type the key word(s) or string(s) in
to
the Search text box, and press Enter or click the Search icon
start the search.
134
Chapter 5: Using the Web Interface

If necessary, select the "Match partial words" checkbox to include
information matching part of the words entered in the Search text
box.
The search results are displayed in the left pane.
6. To have the left pane show the list of topics, click the Contents tab at
the bottom.
7. To show the Index page, click the Index tab.
8. To email any URL link to the currently selected topic to any person,
click the "Email this page" icon
in the toolbar.
9. To email your comments or suggestions regarding the user guide to
Raritan, click the "Send feedback" icon
.
10. To print the currently selected topic, click the "Print this page" icon
.
135
Chapter 6
Using SNMP
This SNMP section helps you set up Dominion PX for use with an SNMP
manager. Dominion PX can be configured to send traps to an SNMP
manager, as well as receive GET and SET commands in order to retrieve
status and configure some basic settings.
In This Chapter
Enabling SNMP .....................................................................................136
Configuring Users for Encrypted SNMP v3 ...........................................137
Configuring SNMP Traps.......................................................................138
SNMP Gets and Sets ............................................................................139
A Note about Enabling Thresholds........................................................141
Enabling SNMP
To communicate with an SNMP manager, you must first enable the SNMP
agent on the Dominion PX device.
To enable SNMP:
1. Choose Device Settings > Network Services > SNMP. The SNMP
Settings dialog appears.
2. Select the "enable" checkbox in the "SNMP v1 / v2c" field to enable
communication with an SNMP manager using SNMP v1 or v2c
protocol.
136
Chapter 6: Using SNMP

Type the SNMP read-only community string in the Read
Community String field. Usually the string is "public."

Type the read/write community string in the Write Community
String field. Usually the string is "private."
3. Select the "enable" checkbox in the "SNMP v3" field to enable
communication with an SNMP manager using SNMP v3 protocol.
Tip: You can permit or disallow a user to access Dominion PX via the
SNMP v3 protocol. See Configuring Users for Encrypted SNMP v3
(on page 137).
4. Type the SNMP MIB-II sysContact value in the sysContact field.
5. Type the SNMP MIB-II sysName value in the sysName field.
6. Type the SNMP MIB-II sysLocation value in the sysLocation field.
7. Click OK to save the changes.
Important: You must download the SNMP MIB for your Dominion PX
to use with your SNMP manager. Click Download MIB in this dialog
to download the desired MIB file. For more details, see Downloading
SNMP MIB (on page 139).
Configuring Users for Encrypted SNMP v3
The SNMP v3 protocol allows for encrypted communication. To take
advantage of this, users need to have an Authentication Pass Phrase and
Privacy Pass Phrase, which act as shared secrets between them and
Dominion PX.
To configure users for SNMP v3 encrypted communication:
1. Choose User Management > Users. The Manage Users dialog
appears.
2. Select the user by clicking it.
3. Click Edit or double-click the user. The Edit User 'XXX' dialog appears,
where XXX is the user name.
4. To change the SNMPv3 access permissions, click the SNMPv3 tab
and make necessary changes. For details, see Step 6 of Creating a
User Profile (on page 64).
5. Click OK to save the changes. The user is now set up for encrypted
SNMP v3 communication.
137
Chapter 6: Using SNMP
Configuring SNMP Traps
Dominion PX automatically keeps an internal log of events that occur. See
Configuring Event Rules (on page 102). These events can also be used
to send SNMP traps to a third party manager.
To configure Dominion PX to send SNMP traps:
1. Choose Device Settings > Event Rules. The Event Rule Settings
dialog appears.
2. On the Rules tab, select the System SNMP Trap Rule.
3. Select the Enabled checkbox to enable this event rule.
4. Click Save to save the changes.
5. Click the Actions tab if you have not configured the SNMP trap
actions.
6. Select System SNMP Trap Action to set up the trap destinations.
7. Type an IP address in the Host 1 field. This is the address to which
traps are sent by the SNMP system agent.
8. Type the communication port number in the Port 1 field.
9. Type the name of the SNMP community in the Community field. The
community is the group representing Dominion PX and all SNMP
management stations.
10. To specify more than one SNMP trap destination, repeat Steps 8 to 10
for additional destinations. A maximum of 3 destinations can be
specified.
11. Click Save to save the changes.
12. Click Close to quit the dialog.
Note: You should update the MIB used by your SNMP manager when
updating to a new Dominion PX release. This ensures your SNMP
manager has the correct MIB for the release you are using. See
Downloading SNMP MIB (on page 139).
138
Chapter 6: Using SNMP
SNMP Gets and Sets
In addition to sending traps, Dominion PX is able to receive SNMP get and
set requests from third-party SNMP managers.

Get requests are used to retrieve information about Dominion PX,
such as the system location, and the current on a specific outlet.

Set requests are used to configure a subset of the information, such
as the SNMP system name.
Note: The SNMP system name is the Dominion PX device name.
When you change the SNMP system name, the device name shown
in the web interface is also changed.
Valid objects for these requests are limited to those found in the SNMP
MIB-II System Group and the custom Dominion PX MIB.
The Dominion PX MIB
The SNMP MIB file is required for using your Dominion PX device with an
SNMP manager. An SNMP MIB file describes the SNMP functions.
Downloading SNMP MIB
The SNMP MIB file for Dominion PX can be easily downloaded from the
web interface. There are two ways to download the SNMP MIB file.
To download the file from the SNMP Settings dialog:
1. Choose Device Settings > Network Services > SNMP. The SNMP
Settings dialog appears.
2. Click Download MIB.
3. Click Save to save the file onto your computer.
Note: The above method downloads the PDU-MIB file.
To download the file from the Device Information dialog:
1. Choose Maintenance > Device Information. The Device Information
dialog appears.
2. Click the "download" link in the PDU-MIB or
ASSETMANAGEMENT-MIB field to download the desired SNMP MIB
file.

PDU-MIB: The SNMP MIB file for Dominion PX's power
management.

ASSETMANAGEMENT-MIB: The SNMP MIB file for the Raritan
asset management sensors.
3. Click Save to save the file onto your computer.
139
Chapter 6: Using SNMP
Layout
Opening the MIB reveals the custom objects that describe the Dominion
PX system at the unit level as well as at the individual-outlet level.
As standard, these objects are first presented at the beginning of the file,
listed under their parent group. The objects then appear again individually,
defined and described in detail.
For example, the measurementsGroup group contains objects for sensor
readings of Dominion PX as a whole. One object listed under this group,
measurementsUnitSensorValue, is described later in the MIB as "The
sensor value". pduRatedCurrent, part of the configGroup group,
describes the PDU current rating.
140
Chapter 6: Using SNMP
SNMP Sets and Thresholds
Some objects can be configured from the SNMP manager using SNMP
set commands. Objects that can be configured have a MAX-ACCESS
level of "read-write" in the MIB.
These objects include threshold objects, causing Dominion PX to
generate a warning and send an SNMP trap when certain parameters are
exceeded. See Setting Power Thresholds (on page 98) for a description
of how thresholds work.
Note: When configuring the thresholds via SNMP set commands, ensure
the value of upper critical threshold is higher than that of upper warning
threshold.
A Note about Enabling Thresholds
When enabling previously disabled thresholds via SNMP, make sure to
set a correct value for all thresholds that are supposed to be enabled prior
to actually enabling them. Otherwise, you may get an error message.
141
Chapter 7
Using the Command Line Interface
This section explains how to use the command line interface (CLI) to
administer a Dominion PX device.
In This Chapter
About the Interface ................................................................................142
Logging in to CLI ...................................................................................142
Help Command......................................................................................145
Showing Information..............................................................................146
Configuring the Dominion PX Device and Network...............................158
Unblocking a User .................................................................................216
Resetting Dominion PX .........................................................................216
Network Troubleshooting.......................................................................217
Retrieving Previous Commands............................................................220
Automatically Completing a Command .................................................220
Logging out of CLI .................................................................................221
About the Interface
Dominion PX provides a command line interface that enables data center
administrators to perform some basic management tasks.
Using this interface, you can do the following:

Reset the Dominion PX device

Display the Dominion PX and network information, such as the device
name, firmware version, IP address, and so on

Configure the Dominion PX and network settings

Troubleshoot network problems
You can access the interface over a serial connection using a terminal
emulation program such as HyperTerminal, or via a Telnet or SSH client
such as PuTTY.
Note: Telnet access is disabled by default because it communicates
openly and is thus insecure. To enable Telnet, see Modifying the
Network Service Settings (on page 57).
Logging in to CLI
Logging in via HyperTerminal over a serial connection is a little different
than logging in using SSH or Telnet.
142
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
With HyperTerminal
You can use any terminal emulation programs for local access to the
command line interface.
This section illustrates HyperTerminal, which is part of Windows operating
systems prior to Windows Vista.
To log in using HyperTerminal:
1. Connect your computer to the serial port on the Dominion PX device
via a serial cable.
2. Launch HyperTerminal on your computer and open a console window.
When the window first opens, it is blank.
Make sure serial port settings use this configuration:

Bits per second = 115200 (115.2Kbps)

Data bits = 8

Stop bits = 1

Parity = None

Flow control = None
3. Press Enter. The Username prompt appears.
4. Type a name and press Enter. The name is case sensitive, so make
sure you capitalize the correct letters. Then you are prompted to enter
a password.
5. Type a password and press Enter. The password is case sensitive, so
make sure you capitalize the correct letters.
After properly entering the password, the # or > system prompt
appears. See Different CLI Modes and Prompts (on page 145) for
details.
Tip: The "Last Login" information, including the date and time, is also
displayed if the same user profile was once used to log in to the
Dominion PX web interface or CLI.
6. You are now logged in to the command line interface and can begin
administering the Dominion PX device.
143
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
With SSH or Telnet
You can remotely log in to the command line interface using an SSH or
Telnet client, such as PuTTY.
Note: PuTTY is a free program you can download from the Internet. See
PuTTY's documentation for details on configuration.
To log in using SSH or Telnet:
1. Ensure SSH or Telnet has been enabled. See Modifying the
Network Service Settings (on page 57).
2. Launch an SSH or Telnet client and open a console window. A login
prompt appears.
3. Type a name and press Enter. The name is case sensitive, so make
sure you capitalize the correct letters.
Note: If using the SSH client, the name must NOT exceed 25
characters. Otherwise, the login fails.
Then you are prompted to enter a password.
4. Type a password and press Enter. The password is case sensitive, so
make sure you capitalize the correct letters.
5. After properly entering the password, the # or > system prompt
appears. See Different CLI Modes and Prompts (on page 145) for
details.
Tip: The "Last Login" information, including the date and time, is also
displayed if the same user profile was once used to log in to the
Dominion PX web interface or CLI.
6. You are now logged in to the command line interface and can begin
administering the Dominion PX device.
144
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Different CLI Modes and Prompts
Depending on the login name you use and the mode you enter, the system
prompt in the CLI varies.

User Mode: When you log in as a normal user, who does not have full
permissions to configure the Dominion PX device, the > prompt
appears.

Administrator Mode: When you log in as an administrator, who has full
permissions to configure the Dominion PX device, the # prompt
appears.

Configuration Mode: You can enter the configuration mode from the
administrator mode. In this mode, the prompt changes to config:#
and you can change Dominion PX device and network configurations.
See Entering the Configuration Mode (on page 158).

Diagnostic Mode: You can enter the diagnostic mode from the
administrator mode. In this mode, the prompt changes to diag:> and
you can perform the network troubleshooting commands, such as the
ping command. See Entering the Diagnostic Mode (on page 217).
Closing a Serial Connection
Close the window or terminal emulation program when you finish
accessing a Dominion PX device over the serial connection.
When accessing or upgrading multiple Dominion PX devices, do not
transfer the serial cable from one device to another without closing the
serial connection window first.
Help Command
The help command shows a list of main CLI commands. This is helpful
when you are not familiar with the commands.
The help command syntax is:
#
help
Press Enter after typing the command, and a list of main commands is
displayed.
Tip: You can check what parameters are available for a specific CLI
command by adding a question mark to the end of the command. See
Querying Available Parameters for a Command (on page 215).
145
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Showing Information
You can use the show commands to view current settings or status of the
Dominion PX device or part of it, such as the IP address, networking mode,
firmware version, circuit breaker state, inlet ratings, and so on.
Many show commands have two formats: one with the parameter "details"
and the other without. The difference is that the command without the
parameter "details" displays a shortened version of information while the
other displays in-depth information.
After typing a show command, press Enter to execute it.
Note: Depending on your login name, the # prompt may be replaced by the
> prompt.
Network Configuration
This command shows the network configuration, such as the IP address,
gateway, and subnet mask.
#
show network
To show detailed information, add the parameter "details" to the end of the
command.
#
show network details
Wireless Configuration
This command shows the wireless configuration of the Dominion PX
device, such as the SSID parameter.
#
show wireless
To show detailed information, add the parameter "details" to the end of the
command.
#
146
show wireless details
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
PDU Configuration
This command shows the PDU configuration, such as the device name,
firmware version and model type.
#
show pdu
To show detailed information, add the parameter "details" to the end of the
command.
#
show pdu details
Networking Mode
This command shows whether the current networking mode is wired or
wireless. Currently Dominion PX supports the wired networking mode
only.
#
show networkingMode
Network Service Settings
This command shows the network service settings, including the TCP
ports for HTTP and HTTPS services.
#
show networkservices
147
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Outlet Information
This command syntax shows the outlet information.
#
show outlets <n>
To show detailed information, add the parameter "details" to the end of the
command.
#
show outlets <n> details
Variables:

<n> is one of the options: all, or a number.
Option
Description
all
Displays the information for all outlets.
A specific outlet Displays the information for the specified outlet
number
only.
Displayed information:

Without the parameter "details," only the outlet name is displayed.

With the parameter "details," more outlet information is displayed in
addition to the outlet name, such as the outlet rating.
Inlet Information
This command syntax shows the inlet information.
#
show inlets <n>
To show detailed information, add the parameter "details" to the end of the
command.
#
show inlets <n> details
Variables:

148
<n> is one of the options: all, or a number.
Option
Description
all
Displays the information for all inlets.
A specific inlet
number
Displays the information for the specified inlet only.
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Displayed information:

Without the parameter "details," only the inlet's L1, L2 and L3 current
values and inlet name are displayed.

With the parameter "details," more inlet information is displayed in
addition to the RMS current values, such as the inlet's RMS current,
voltage, and active power.
Inlet Pole Sensor Information
This command is available only for a three-phase PDU except for an
inline monitor.
This command syntax shows the specified inlet pole sensor's information.
#
show sensor inletpole <n> <p> <sensor type>
To show detailed information, add the parameter "details" to the end of the
command.
#
show sensor inletpole <n> <p> <sensor type> details
Variables:

<n> is the number of the inlet whose pole sensors you want to query.

<p> is the label of the inlet pole whose sensors you want to query.

Pole
Label
<p>
Current sensor
Voltage sensor
1
L1
L1
L1 - L2
2
L2
L2
L2 - L3
3
L3
L3
L3 - L1
<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
voltage
Voltage sensor
activePower
Active power sensor
apparentPower
Apparent power sensor
powerFactor
Power factor sensor
149
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Sensor type
Description
activeEnergy
Active energy sensor
Displayed information:

Without the parameter "details," only the reading, state, threshold,
hysteresis and assertion delay settings of the specified inlet pole
sensor are displayed.

With the parameter "details," more sensor information is displayed,
including accuracy, resolution, tolerance, and range.

If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message "Sensor is
not available" is displayed.
Circuit Breaker Information
This command is NOT available for a PDU without any overcurrent
protection mechanism.
This command syntax shows the circuit breaker information.
#
show ocp <n>
To show detailed information, add the parameter "details" to the end of the
command.
#
show ocp <n> details
Variables:

<n> is one of the options: all, or a number.
Option
Description
all
Displays the information for all circuit breakers.
A specific circuit Displays the information for the specified circuit
breaker number breaker only.
Displayed information:
150

Without the parameter "details," only the circuit breaker status and
name are displayed.

With the parameter "details," more circuit breaker information is
displayed in addition to status, such as the rating and RMS current
value.
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
External Sensor Information
This command syntax shows the environmental sensor's information.
#
show externalsensors <n>
To show detailed information, add the parameter "details" to the end of the
command.
#
show externalsensors <n> details
Variables:

<n> is one of the options: all, or a number.
Option
Description
all
Displays the information for all environmental
sensors.
A specific
Displays the information for the specified
environmental environmental sensor only.
sensor number*
* The environmental sensor number is the ID number assigned to the
sensor, which can be found on the External Sensor page of the PDU's
web interface.
Displayed information:

Without the parameter "details," only the sensor ID, sensory type and
reading are displayed.
Note: A discrete (on/off) sensor displays the sensor state instead of
the reading.

With the parameter "details," more environmental sensor information
is displayed in addition to the ID and reading, such as the serial
number and X, Y, and Z coordinates.
151
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Circuit Breaker Sensor Information
This command is NOT available for a PDU without any overcurrent
protection mechanism.
This command syntax shows the specified circuit breaker sensor's
information.
#
show sensor ocp <n> <sensor type>
To show detailed information, add the parameter "details" to the end of the
command.
#
show sensor ocp <n> <sensor type> details
Variables:

<n> is the number of the circuit breaker whose sensors you want to
query.

<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
Displayed information:
152

Without the parameter "details," only the reading, state, threshold and
hysteresis settings of the specified circuit breaker sensor are
displayed.

With the parameter "details," more sensor information is displayed,
including accuracy, resolution, tolerance, and range.

If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message "Sensor is
not available" is displayed.
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Environmental Sensor Information
This command syntax shows specified environmental sensor's
information.
#
show sensor externalsensor <n>
To show detailed information, add the parameter "details" to the end of the
command.
#
show sensor externalsensor <n> details
Variables:

<n> is the environmental sensor number. The environmental sensor
number is the ID number assigned to the sensor, which can be found
on the External Sensor page of the PDU's web interface.
Displayed information:

Without the parameter "details," only the reading, state, threshold,
hysteresis and assertion delay settings of the specified environmental
sensor are displayed.

With the parameter "details," more sensor information is displayed,
including accuracy, resolution, tolerance, and range.

If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message "Sensor is
not available" is displayed.
Note: For a discrete (on/off) sensor, only the sensor type and state are
displayed no matter which command is performed.
153
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Security Settings
This command shows the security settings of the Dominion PX device.
#
show security
To show detailed information, add the parameter "details" to the end of the
command.
#
show security details
Displayed information:

Without the parameter "details," the information including IP access
control, role based access control, password policy, and HTTPS
encryption is displayed.

With the parameter "details," more sensor information is displayed,
such as user blocking time and user idle timeout, is displayed.
Existing User Profiles
This command shows the data of one or all existing user profiles.
#
show user <user_name>
To show detailed information, add the parameter "details" to the end of the
command.
#
show user <user_name> details
Variables:

<user_name> is the name of the user whose profile you want to query.
The variable can be one of the options: all or a user's name.
Option
Description
all
This option shows all existing user profiles.
Tip: This is the default option. You can also
leave out the "all" option to display all user
profiles, that is, show user.
a specific user's name This option shows the profile of the
specified user only.
154
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Displayed information:

Without the parameter "details," only four pieces of user information
are displayed: user name, "enabled" status, SNMP v3 access
privilege, and role(s).

With the parameter "details," more user information is displayed, such
as the telephone number, e-mail address, preferred temperature unit
and so on.
Existing Roles
This command shows the data of one or all existing roles.
#
show roles <role_name>
Variables:

<role_name> is the name of the role whose permissions you want to
query. The variable can be one of the following options:
Option
Description
all
This option shows all existing roles.
Tip: This is the default option. You can also
leave out the "all" option to display all roles,
that is, show roles.
a specific role's name
This option shows the data of the specified
role only.
Displayed information:

Role settings are displayed, including the role description and
privileges.
Reliability Information
This command shows the reliability data.
#
show reliability data
This command shows the reliability error log.
#
show reliability errorlog
155
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Command History
This command syntax shows the command history for current connection
session.
#
show history
Displayed information:

A list of commands that were previously entered in the current session
is displayed.
History Buffer Length
This command syntax shows the length of the history buffer for storing the
history commands.
#
show history bufferlength
Displayed information:

The current history buffer length is displayed.
Examples
This section provides examples of the show command.
Example 1 - Basic Network Information
The diagram shows the output of the show network command.
156
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Example 2 - In-Depth Network Information
More information is displayed when typing the show network details
command.
Example 3 - Basic PDU Information
The diagram shows the output of the show pdu command.
157
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Example 4 - In-Depth PDU Information
More information is displayed when typing the show pdu details command.
Configuring the Dominion PX Device and Network
To configure the Dominion PX device or network settings through the CLI,
you must log in as the administrator.
Entering the Configuration Mode
You must enter the configuration mode since configuration commands
function in the configuration mode only.
To enter the configuration mode:
1. Ensure you have entered the administrator mode and the # prompt is
displayed.
2. Type config and press Enter. The config:# prompt appears,
indicating that you have entered the configuration mode.
3. Now you can type any configuration command and press Enter to
change the settings.
Important: To apply new configuration settings, you must issue the
"apply" command before closing the terminal emulation program.
Closing the program does not save any configuration changes. See
Quitting the Configuration Mode (on page 215).
158
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
PDU Configuration Commands
A PDU configuration command begins with pdu. You can use the PDU
configuration commands to change the settings that apply to the whole
Dominion PX device.
The commands are case sensitive so ensure you capitalize them
correctly.
Changing the PDU Name
This command syntax changes the Dominion PX device's name.
config:#
pdu name "<name>"
Variables:

<name> is a string comprising up to 32 ASCII printable characters.
The <name> variable must be enclosed in quotes when it contains
spaces.
Example
The following command assigns the name "my px12" to the PDU.
config:#
pdu name "my px12"
Enabling or Disabling Data Logging
This command syntax enables or disables the data logging feature.
config:#
pdu dataRetrieval <option>
Variables:

<option> is one of the options: enable or disable.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the data logging feature.
disable
Disables the data logging feature.
For more information, see Setting Data Logging (on page 62).
159
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Example
The following command enables the data logging feature.
config:#
pdu dataRetrieval enable
Setting the Data Logging Measurements Per Entry
This command syntax defines the number of measurements accumulated
per log entry.
config:#
pdu measurementsPerLogEntry <number>
Variables:

<number> is an integer between 1 and 600. The default is 60 samples
per log entry.
For more information, see Setting Data Logging (on page 62).
Example
The following command determines that 66 measurements are
accumulated per log entry for internal sensors, that is, 66 seconds.
config:#
pdu measurementsPerLogEntry 66
Setting the Z Coordinate Format for Environmental Sensors
This command syntax enables or disables the use of rack units for
specifying the height (Z coordinate) of environmental sensors.
config:#
pdu externalSensorsZCoordinateFormat <option>
Variables:

160
<option> is one of the options: rackUnits or freeForm.
Option
Description
rackUnits
The height of the Z coordinate is measured in
standard rack units. When this is selected, you can
type a numeric value in the rack unit to describe
the Z coordinate of any environmental sensors.
freeForm
Any alphanumeric string can be used for specifying
the Z coordinate.
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Note: After determining the format for the Z coordinate, you can set a
value for it. See Setting the Z Coordinate (on page 181).
Example
The following command determines that the unit of rack is used for
specifying the Z coordinate of environmental sensors.
config:#
pdu externalSensorsZCoordinateFormat rackUnits
Networking Configuration Commands
A number of network settings can be changed through the CLI, such as
the IP address, transmission speed, duplex mode, and so on.
Setting the Networking Mode
If your Dominion PX device is implemented with both of the wired and
wireless networking mechanisms, you must determine which mechanism
is enabled for network connectivity before further configuring networking
parameters.
This command syntax enables the wired or wireless networking mode.
config:#
networkingMode <mode>
Variables:

<mode> is one of the modes: wired or wireless.
Mode
Description
wired
Enables the wired networking mode.
wireless
Enables the wireless networking mode.
Note: If you enable the wireless networking mode, and Dominion PX does
not detect any wireless USB LAN adapter or the connected wireless USB
LAN adapter is not supported, the message "Supported Wireless device
not found" is displayed.
Example
The following command enables the wired networking mode.
config:#
networkingMode wired
161
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Setting the Wireless Parameters
You must configure wireless parameters, including Service Set Identifier
(SSID), Pre-Shared Key (PSK), and Basic Service Set Identifier (BSSID)
after the wireless networking mode is enabled.
A wireless configuration command begins with wireless.
Note: If current networking mode is not wireless, the SSID, PSK and
BSSID values are not applied until the networking mode is changed to
"wireless." In addition, a message appears, indicating that the active
network interface is not wireless.
The commands are case sensitive so ensure you capitalize them
correctly.
Setting the SSID
This command syntax specifies the SSID string.
config:#
wireless SSID <ssid>
Variables:

<ssid> is the name of the wireless access point, which consists of:
- Up to 32 ASCII characters
- No spaces
- ASCII codes 0x20 ~ 0x7E
Example
The following command assigns "myssid" as the SSID.
config:#
wireless SSID myssid
Setting the PSK
This command syntax configures the PSK passphrase.
config:#
wireless PSK <psk>
Variables:

<psk> is a string or passphrase that consists of:
- Up to 32 ASCII characters
- No spaces
- ASCII codes 0x20 ~ 0x7E
162
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Example
This command assigns "encryp-key" as the PSK.
config:#
wireless PSK encryp-key
Setting the BSSID
This command syntax specifies the BSSID.
config:#
wireless BSSID <bssid>
Variables:
 <bssid> is the MAC address of the wireless access point.
Example
The following command specifies that the BSSID is 00:14:6C:7E:43:81.
config:#
wireless BSSID 00:14:6C:7E:43:81
Setting the Network Parameters
A network configuration command begins with network.
The commands are case sensitive so ensure you capitalize them
correctly.
Setting the IP Configuration Mode
This command syntax selects the IP configuration mode.
config:#
network ipConfigurationMode <mode>
Variables:

<mode> is one of the modes: dhcp or static.
Mode
Description
dhcp
The IP configuration mode is set to DHCP.
static
The IP configuration mode is set to static IP
address.
Example
The following command enables the Static IP configuration mode.
config:#
network ipConfigurationMode static
163
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Changing the LAN Interface Speed
This command syntax determines the LAN interface speed.
config:#
network LANInterfaceSpeed <option>
Variables:

<option> is one of the options: auto, 10Mbps, 100Mbps or 1000Mbps.
Note that the option "1000Mbps" is applicable only to the models
implemented with the Gigabit Ethernet capability.
Option
Description
auto
System determines the optimum LAN speed through
auto-negotiation.
10Mbps
The LAN speed is always 10 Mbps.
100Mbps
The LAN speed is always 100 Mbps.
1000Mbps
The LAN speed is always 1 Gbps (for special models
only).
Example
The following command lets Dominion PX determine the optimal LAN
interface speed through auto-negotiation.
config:#
network LANInterfaceSpeed auto
Changing the LAN Duplex Mode
This command syntax determines the LAN interface duplex mode.
config:#
network LANInterfaceDuplexMode <mode>
Variables:

<mode> is one of the modes: auto, half or full.
Option
Description
auto
Dominion PX selects the optimum transmission
mode through auto-negotiation.
half
Half duplex:
Data is transmitted in one direction (to or from the
Dominion PX device) at a time.
164
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Option
Description
full
Full duplex:
Data is transmitted in both directions
simultaneously.
Example
The following command lets Dominion PX determine the optimal
transmission mode through auto-negotiation.
config:#
network LANInterfaceDuplexMode auto
Setting the Preferred Host Name
After selecting DHCP as the IP configuration mode, you can specify the
preferred host name, which is optional. The following is the command
syntax:
config:#
network preferredHostName <name>
Variables:

<name> is a host name which:

Consists of alphanumeric characters and/or hyphens

Cannot begin or end with a hyphen

Cannot contain more than 63 characters

Cannot contain punctuation marks, spaces, and other symbols
Example
The following command sets the preferred host name to "my-host."
config:#
network preferredHostName my-host
Setting the IP Address
After selecting the static IP configuration mode, you can use this
command syntax to assign a permanent IP address to the Dominion PX
device.
config:#
network ipAddress <ip address>
Variables:

<ip address> is the IP address being assigned to your Dominion PX
device. The value ranges from 0.0.0.0 to 255.255.255.255.
165
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Example
The following command assigns the static IP address "192.168.84.222" to
the Dominion PX device.
config:#
network ipAddress 192.168.84.222
Setting the Subnet Mask
After selecting the static IP configuration mode, you can use this
command syntax to define the subnet mask.
config:#
network subnetMask <netmask>
Variables:

<netmask> is the subnet mask address. The value ranges from
0.0.0.0 to 255.255.255.255.
Example
The following command sets the subnet mask to 192.168.84.0.
config:#
network subnetMask 192.168.84.0
Setting the Gateway
After selecting the static IP configuration mode, you can use this
command syntax to specify the gateway.
config:#
network gateway <ip address>
Variables:

<ip address> is the IP address of the gateway. The value ranges from
0.0.0.0 to 255.255.255.255.
Example
The following command sets the gateway to 255.255.255.0.
config:#
166
network gateway 255.255.255.0
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Setting the Primary DNS Server
After selecting the static IP configuration mode, you can use this
command syntax to specify the primary DNS server.
config:#
network primaryDNSServer <ip address>
Variables:

<ip address> is the IP address of the primary DNS server. The value
ranges from 0.0.0.0 to 255.255.255.255.
Example
The following command determines that the primary DNS server is
192.168.84.30.
config:#
network primaryDNSServer 192.168.84.30
Setting the Secondary DNS Server
After selecting the static IP configuration mode, you can use this
command syntax to specify the secondary DNS server.
config:#
network secondaryDNSServer <ip address>
Variables:

<ip address> is the IP address of the secondary DNS server. The
value ranges from 0.0.0.0 to 255.255.255.255.
Example
The following command determines that the secondary DNS server is
192.168.84.33.
config:#
network secondaryDNSServer 192.168.84.33
167
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Overriding the DHCP-Assigned DNS Server
After specifying the primary/secondary DNS server, you can use this
command to override the DHCP-assigned DNS server with the one you
specified.
config:#
network overrideDNS <option>
Variables:

<option> is one of the options: enable or disable.
Option
Description
enable
This option overrides the DHCP-assigned DNS
server with the primary/secondary DNS server you
assign.
disable
This option disables the overriding and resumes
using the DHCP-assigned DNS server.
Example
The following command overrides the DHCP-assigned DNS server with
the one you specified.
config:#
network overrideDNS enable
Setting the Network Service Parameters
A network service command begins with networkservices.
Changing the HTTP Port
This command syntax changes the HTTP port.
config:#
networkservices httpPort <n>
Variables:

<n> is a TCP port number between 1 and 65535. The default HTTP
port is 80.
Example
The following command sets the HTTP port to 81.
config:#
168
networkservices httpPort 81
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Changing the HTTPS Port
This command syntax changes the HTTPS port.
config:#
networkservices httpsPort <n>
Variables:

<n> is a TCP port number between 1 and 65535. The default HTTPS
port is 443.
Example
The following command sets the HTTPS port to 333.
config:#
networkservices httpsPort 333
Security Configuration Commands
A security configuration command begins with security.
IP Access Control
You can modify, add or delete an IP access control rule through the
command line interface. An IP access control configuration command
begins with security ipAccessControl.
Modifying the IP Access Control Parameters
There are different commands for modifying different IP access control
parameters.
To enable or disable the IP access control feature, use this
command syntax:
config:#
security ipAccessControl enabled <option>
To determine the default policy, use this command syntax:
config:#
security ipAccessControl defaultPolicy <policy>
Variables:

<option> is one of the options: true or false.
Option
Description
true
Enables the IP access control feature.
169
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface

Option
Description
false
Disables the IP access control feature.
<policy> is one of the options: accept, drop or reject.
Option
Description
accept
Accepts traffic from all IP addresses.
drop
Discards traffic from all IP addresses, without
sending any failure notification to the source host.
reject
Discards traffic from all IP addresses, and an ICMP
message is sent to the source host for failure
notification.
Tip: You can combine both commands to modify both of IP access control
parameters at a time. See Multi-Command Syntax (on page 214).
Example
The following command sets up two parameters of the IP access control
feature.
config:#
security ipAccessControl enabled true defaultPolicy accept
Results:

The IP access control feature is enabled.

The default policy is set to "accept."
Adding an IP Access Control Rule
Depending on where you want to add a new IP access control rule in the
list, the command syntax for adding a rule varies.
To add a new IP access control rule to the bottom of the list, use
this command syntax:
config:#
security ipAccessControl rule add <ip_mask> <option>
To add a new IP access control rule and insert it above or below
a specific rule number, use this command syntax:
config:#
security ipAccessControl rule add <ip_mask> <option> <insert> <rule_number>
-- OR --
170
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
config:#
security ipAccessControl rule add <insert> <rule_number> <ip_mask> <option>
Variables:

<ip_mask> is the combination of the IP address and mask values. For
example, 192.168.94.222/24.

<option> is one of the options: accept, drop or reject.

Option
Description
accept
Accepts traffic from the specified IP address(es).
drop
Discards traffic from the specified IP address(es),
without sending any failure notification to the
source host.
reject
Discards traffic from the specified IP address(es),
and an ICMP message is sent to the source host
for failure notification.
<insert> is one of the options: insertAbove or insertBelow.
Option
Description
insertAbove
Inserts the new rule above the specified rule
number. Then:
new rule's number = the specified rule number
insertBelow
Inserts the new rule below the specified rule
number. Then:
new rule's number = the specified rule number + 1

<rule_number> is the number of the existing rule which you want to
insert the new rule above or below.
Example
The following command adds a new IP access control rule and specifies
its location in the list.
config:#
security ipAccessControl rule add 192.168.84.123/24 accept insertAbove 5
Results:

A new IP access control rule is added, allowing all packets from the IP
addrress 192.168.84.123 to be accepted.

The newly-added rule is inserted above the 5th rule. That is, the new
rule becomes the 5th rule, and the original 5th rule becomes the 6th
rule.
171
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Deleting an IP Access Control Rule
This command removes a specific rule from the list.
config:#
security ipAccessControl rule delete <rule_number>
Variables:

<rule_number> is the number of the existing rule that you want to
remove.
Example
The following command removes the 5th rule from the IP access control
list.
config:#
security ipAccessControl rule delete 5
HTTPS Access
This command determines whether the HTTPS access to the Dominion
PX web interface is forced. If yes, all HTTP access attempts are
automatically directed to HTTPS.
config:#
security enforceHttpsForWebAccess <option>
Variables:

<option> is one of the options: enable or disable.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the HTTPS access to the web interface.
disable
Disables the HTTPS access to the web interface.
Example
The following command disables the HTTPS access feature.
config:#
172
security enforceHttpsForWebAccess disable
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Login Limitation
The login limitation feature contains various parameters that you can
modify with different commands.
To enable or disable the single login feature, use this command
syntax:
config:#
security loginLimits singleLogin <option1>
To enable or disable the password aging feature, use this
command syntax:
config:#
security loginLimits passwordAging <option2>
To determine the password aging time interval, use this
command syntax:
config:#
security loginLimits passwordAgingInterval <value1>
To determine the idle timeout value, use this command syntax:
config:#
security loginLimits idleTimeout <value2>
Variables:


<option1> is one of the options: enable or disable.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the single login feature.
disable
Disables the single login feature.
<option2> is one of the options: enable or disable.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the password aging feature.
disable
Disables the password aging feature.
173
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface

<value1> is a numeric value in days set for the password aging
interval. The interval ranges from 7 to 365 days.

<value2> is a numeric value in minutes set for the idle timeout. The
timeout ranges from 1 to 1440 minutes (24 hours).
Tip: You can combine multiple commands to modify the login limitation
parameters at a time. See Multi-Command Syntax (on page 214).
Example
The following command sets up three parameters for the login limitation
feature.
config:#
security loginLimits singleLogin disable passwordAging enable
passwordAgingInterval 90
Results:

The single login feature is disabled.

The password aging feature is enabled.

The password aging interval is set to 90 days.
User Blocking
There are different commands for changing different user blocking
parameters. These commands begin with security userBlocking.
To determine the maximum number of failed logins before
blocking a user, use this command syntax:
config:#
security userBlocking maximumNumberOfFailedLogins <value1>
To determine how long a user's login is blocked, use this
command syntax:
config:#
security userBlocking blockTime <value2>
Variables:

<value1> is an integer between 3 and 10, or unlimited, which sets no
limit on the maximum number of failed logins and thus disables the
user blocking function.

<value2> is a numeric value in minutes.
Tip: You can combine multiple commands to modify the user blocking
parameters at a time. See Multi-Command Syntax (on page 214).
174
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Example
The following command sets up two user blocking parameters.
config:#
security userBlocking maximumNumberOfFailedLogins 5 blockTime 30
Results:

The maximum number of failed logins is set to 5.

The user blocking time is set to 30 minutes.
Strong Passwords
There are various commands to modify strong password parameters.
These commands begin with security strongPasswords.
To enable or disable the strong password feature, use this
command syntax:
config:#
security strongPasswords enabled <option1>
To determine the minimum length of the password, use this
command syntax:
config:#
security strongPasswords minimumLength <value1>
To determine the maximum length of the password, use this
command syntax:
config:#
security strongPasswords maximumLength <value2>
To determine whether a strong password includes at least a
lowercase character, use this command syntax:
config:#
security strongPasswords enforceAtLeastOneLowerCaseCharacter <option2>
To determine whether a strong password includes at least a
uppercase character, use this command syntax:
175
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
config:#
security strongPasswords enforceAtLeastOneUpperCaseCharacter <option3>
To determine whether a strong password includes at least a
numeric character, use this command syntax:
config:#
security strongPasswords enforceAtLeastOneNumericCharacter <option4>
To determine whether a strong password includes at least a
special character, use this command syntax:
config:#
security strongPasswords enforceAtLeastOneSpecialCharacter <option5>
To determine the number of previous passwords that should not
be repeated when forcing the password change, use this
command syntax:
config:#
security strongPasswords passwordHistoryDepth <value3>
Variables:

Option
Description
true
Enables the strong password feature.
false
Disables the strong password feature.

<value1> is an integer between 8 and 32.

<value2> is an integer between 16 and 64.

<option2> is one of the options: enable or disable.

176
<option1> is one of the options: true or false.
Option
Description
enable
At least one lowercase character is required.
disable
No lowercase character is required.
<option3> is one of the options: enable or disable.
Option
Description
enable
At least one uppercase character is required.
disable
No uppercase character is required.
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface



<option4> is one of the options: enable or disable.
Option
Description
enable
At least one numeric character is required.
disable
No numeric character is required.
<option5> is one of the options: enable or disable.
Option
Description
enable
At least one special character is required.
disable
No special character is required.
<value3> is an integer between 1 and 12.
Tip: You can combine multiple commands to modify several strong
password parameters at a time. See Multi-Command Syntax (on page
214).
Example
The following command sets up seven strong passwords parameters.
config:#
security strongPasswords enable enforceAtLeastOneLowerCaseCharacter enable
enforceAtLeastOneUpperCaseCharacter disable
enforceAtLeastOneNumericCharacter enable enforceAtLeastOneSpecialCharacter
disable passwordHistoryDepth 7
Results:

The strong password feature is enabled.

A strong password is required.

The password must have at least one lowercase character.

The password does not require uppercase characters.

The password must have at least one numeric character.

The password does not require special characters.

When changing the password, users are prevented from repeating
any of the previous 7 passwords.
Outlet Configuration Commands
An outlet configuration command begins with outlet. Such command
allows you to configure an individual outlet.
177
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Changing the Outlet Name
This command syntax names an outlet.
config:#
outlet <n> name "<name>"
Variables:

<n> is the number of the outlet that you want to configure.

<name> is a string comprising up to 32 ASCII printable characters.
The <name> variable must be enclosed in quotes when it contains
spaces.
Example
The following command assigns the name "Win XP" to outlet 8.
config:#
outlet 8 name "Win XP"
Inlet Configuration Commands
An inlet configuration command begins with inlet. You can configure an
inlet by using the inlet configuration command.
Changing the Inlet Name
This command syntax names an inlet.
config:#
inlet <n> name "<name>"
Variables:

<n> is the number of the inlet that you want to configure. The value is
an integer between 1 and 50.

<name> is a string comprising up to 32 ASCII printable characters.
The <name> variable must be enclosed in quotes when it contains
spaces.
Example
The following command assigns the name "AC source" to the inlet 1.
config:#
178
inlet 1 name "AC source"
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Circuit Breaker Configuration Commands
A circuit breaker configuration command begins with ocp. The command
configures an individual circuit breaker.
Changing the Circuit Breaker Name
This command syntax names a circuit breaker.
config:#
ocp <n> name "<name>"
Variables:

<n> is the number of the circuit breaker that you want to configure.
The value is an integer between 1 and 50.

<name> is a string comprising up to 32 ASCII printable characters.
The <name> variable must be enclosed in quotes when it contains
spaces.
Example
The command assigns the name "Email servers CB" to the circuit breaker
3.
config:#
ocp 3 name "Email servers CB"
Environmental Sensor Configuration Commands
An environmental sensor configuration command begins with
externalsensor. You can configure the name and location parameters for
an individual environmental sensor.
Changing the Sensor Name
This command syntax names an environmental sensor.
config:#
externalsensor <n> name "<name>"
Variables:

<n> is the ID number of the environmental sensor that you want to
configure. The number is assigned and shown on the Dominion PX
web interface. It is an integer between 1 and 16.

<name> is a string comprising up to 32 ASCII printable characters.
The <name> variable must be enclosed in quotes when it contains
spaces.
179
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Example
The following command assigns the name "Cabinet humidity" to the
environmental sensor with the ID number 4.
config:#
externalsensor 4 name "Cabinet humidity"
Setting the X Coordinate
This command syntax specifies the X coordinate of an environmental
sensor.
config:#
externalsensor <n> xlabel "<coordinate>"
Variables:

<n> is the ID number of the environmental sensor that you want to
configure. The number is assigned and shown on the Dominion PX
web interface. It is an integer between 1 and 16.

<coordinate> is a string comprising up to 24 ASCII printable
characters, and it must be enclosed in quotes.
Example
The following command sets the value "The 2nd cabinet" to the X
coordinate of the environmental sensor with the ID number 4.
config:#
externalsensor 4 xlabel "The 2nd cabinet"
Setting the Y Coordinate
This command syntax specifies the Y coordinate of an environmental
sensor.
config:#
externalsensor <n> ylabel "<coordinate>"
Variables:
180

<n> is the ID number of the environmental sensor that you want to
configure. The number is assigned and shown on the Dominion PX
web interface. It is an integer between 1 and 16.

<coordinate> is a string comprising up to 24 ASCII printable
characters, and it must be enclosed in quotes.
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Example
The following command sets the value "The 4th row" to the Y coordinate of
the environmental sensor with the ID number 4.
config:#
externalsensor 4 ylabel "The 4th row"
Setting the Z Coordinate
This command syntax specifies the Z coordinate of an environmental
sensor.
config:#
externalsensor <n> zlabel "<coordinate>"
Variables:

<n> is the ID number of the environmental sensor that you want to
configure. The number is assigned and shown on the Dominion PX
web interface. It is an integer between 1 and 16.

<coordinate> is a string comprising up to 24 ASCII printable
characters, and it must be enclosed in quotes.
Tip: You can specify the Z coordinate using the rack units. See Setting
the Z Coordinate Format for Environmental Sensors (on page 160).
Example
The following command sets the value "The 5th rack" to the Z coordinate
of the environmental sensor with the ID number 4 after the Z coordinate's
format is set to freeForm.
config:#
externalsensor 4 zlabel "The 5th rack"
Changing the Sensor Description
This command syntax provides a description for a specific environmental
sensor.
config:#
externalsensor <n> description "<description>"
Variables:

<n> is the ID number of the environmental sensor that you want to
configure. The number is assigned and shown on the Dominion PX
web interface. It is an integer between 1 and 16.

<description> is a string comprising up to 64 ASCII printable
characters, and it must be enclosed in quotes.
181
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Example
The following command gives the description "humidity detection" to the
environmental sensor with the ID number 4.
config:#
externalsensor 4 description "humidity detection"
Sensor Configuration Commands
A sensor configuration command begins with sensor. You can use the
commands to configure the threshold and hysteresis values for any sensor
associated with the following items:

Inlets

Inlet poles (for three-phase PDUs only)

Circuit breakers

Environmental sensors
It is permitted to assign a new value to the threshold at any time regardless
of whether the threshold is being enabled.
Commands for Inlet Sensors
A sensor configuration command for inlets begins with sensor inlet.
Setting the Inlet's Upper Critical Threshold
This command syntax configures the Upper Critical threshold of an inlet.
config:#
sensor inlet <n> <sensor type> upperCritical <option>
Variables:
182

<n> is the number of the inlet that you want to configure.

<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
voltage
Voltage sensor
activePower
Active power sensor
apparentPower
Apparent power sensor
powerFactor
Power factor sensor
activeEnergy
Active energy sensor
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Sensor type
Description
unbalancedCurrent
Unbalanced current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the upper critical threshold for the
specified inlet sensor.
disable
Disables the upper critical threshold for the
specified inlet sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the upper critical threshold of the
specified inlet sensor without enabling or disabling
the threshold.
Example
The following command enables the Upper Critical threshold for the inlet 1
RMS current.
config:#
sensor inlet 1 current upperCritical enable
Setting the Inlet's Upper Warning Threshold
This command syntax configures the Upper Warning threshold of an inlet.
config:#
sensor inlet <n> <sensor type> upperWarning <option>
Variables:

<n> is the number of the inlet that you want to configure.

<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
voltage
Voltage sensor
activePower
Active power sensor
apparentPower
Apparent power sensor
powerFactor
Power factor sensor
activeEnergy
Active energy sensor
183
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Sensor type
Description
unbalancedCurrent
Unbalanced current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the upper warning threshold for the
specified inlet sensor.
disable
Disables the upper warning threshold for the
specified inlet sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the upper warning threshold of the
specified inlet sensor without enabling or disabling
the threshold.
Example
The following command sets the Upper Warning threshold for the inlet 1
RMS current to 27A.
config:#
sensor inlet 1 current upperWarning 27
Setting the Inlet's Lower Critical Threshold
This command syntax configures the Lower Critical threshold of an inlet.
config:#
sensor inlet <n> <sensor type> lowerCritical <option>
Variables:
184

<n> is the number of the inlet that you want to configure.

<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
voltage
Voltage sensor
activePower
Active power sensor
apparentPower
Apparent power sensor
powerFactor
Power factor sensor
activeEnergy
Active energy sensor
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Sensor type
Description
unbalancedCurrent
Unbalanced current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the lower critical threshold for the
specified inlet sensor.
disable
Disables the lower critical threshold for the
specified inlet sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the lower critical threshold of the
specified inlet sensor without enabling or disabling
the threshold.
Example
The following command disables the Lower Critical threshold for the inlet 1
RMS current.
config:#
sensor inlet 1 current lowerCritical disable
Setting the Inlet's Lower Warning Threshold
This command syntax configures the Lower Warning threshold of an inlet.
config:#
sensor inlet <n> <sensor type> lowerWarning <option>
Variables:

<n> is the number of the inlet that you want to configure.

<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
voltage
Voltage sensor
activePower
Active power sensor
apparentPower
Apparent power sensor
powerFactor
Power factor sensor
activeEnergy
Active energy sensor
185
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Sensor type
Description
unbalancedCurrent
Unbalanced current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the lower warning threshold for the
specified inlet sensor.
disable
Disables the lower warning threshold for the
specified inlet sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the lower warning threshold of the
specified inlet sensor without enabling or disabling
the threshold.
Example
The following command sets the Lower Warning threshold for the inlet 1
RMS current to 20A.
config:#
sensor inlet 1 current lowerWarning 20
Setting the Inlet's Deassertion Hysteresis
This command syntax configures the deassertion hysteresis value of an
inlet.
config:#
sensor inlet <n> <sensor type> hysteresis <value>
Variables:
186

<n> is the number of the inlet that you want to configure.

<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
voltage
Voltage sensor
activePower
Active power sensor
apparentPower
Apparent power sensor
powerFactor
Power factor sensor
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Sensor type
Description
activeEnergy
Active energy sensor
unbalancedCurrent
Unbalanced current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.

<value> is a numeric value that is assigned to the hysteresis for the
specified inlet sensor. See What is Deassertion Hysteresis? (on
page 100) for how the deassertion hysteresis works.
Example
The following command sets the deassertion hysteresis for the inlet 1
RMS current to 0.3A.
config:#
sensor inlet 1 current hysteresis 0.3
Commands for Inlet Pole Sensors
A sensor configuration command for inlet poles begins with sensor
inletpole.
Setting the Upper Critical Threshold for an Inlet Pole
This command syntax configures the Upper Critical threshold of an inlet
pole.
config:#
sensor inletpole <n> <p> <sensor type> upperCritical <option>
Variables:

<n> is the number of the inlet whose pole sensors you want to
configure.

<p> is the label of the inlet pole that you want to configure.

Pole
Label
<p>
Current sensor
Voltage sensor
1
L1
L1
L1 - L2
2
L2
L2
L2 - L3
3
L3
L3
L3 - L1
<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
187
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Sensor type
Description
voltage
Voltage sensor
activePower
Active power sensor
apparentPower
Apparent power sensor
powerFactor
Power factor sensor
activeEnergy
Active energy sensor
unbalancedCurrent
Unbalanced current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the upper critical threshold for the
specified inlet pole sensor.
disable
Disables the upper critical threshold for the
specified inlet pole sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the upper critical threshold of the
specified inlet pole sensor without enabling or
disabling the threshold.
Example
The following command disables the Upper Critical threshold for the pole 3
(L3-L1) voltage of the inlet 1.
config:#
sensor inletpole 1 L3 voltage upperCritical disable
Setting the Upper Warning Threshold for an Inlet Pole
This command syntax configures the Upper Warning threshold of an inlet
pole.
188
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
config:#
sensor inletpole <n> <p> <sensor type> upperWarning <option>
Variables:

<n> is the number of the inlet whose pole sensors you want to
configure.

<p> is the label of the inlet pole that you want to configure.

Pole
Label
<p>
Current sensor
Voltage sensor
1
L1
L1
L1 - L2
2
L2
L2
L2 - L3
3
L3
L3
L3 - L1
<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
voltage
Voltage sensor
activePower
Active power sensor
apparentPower
Apparent power sensor
powerFactor
Power factor sensor
activeEnergy
Active energy sensor
unbalancedCurrent
Unbalanced current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the upper warning threshold for the
specified inlet pole sensor.
disable
Disables the upper warning threshold for the
specified inlet pole sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the upper warning threshold of the
specified inlet pole sensor without enabling or
disabling the threshold.
189
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Example
The following command sets the Upper Warning threshold for the pole 2
(L2-L3) voltage of the inlet 1 to 180V.
config:#
sensor inletpole 1 L2 voltage upperWarning 180
Setting the Lower Critical Threshold for an Inlet Pole
This command syntax configures the Lower Critical threshold of an inlet
pole.
config:#
sensor inletpole <n> <p> <sensor type> lowerCritical <option>
Variables:

<n> is the number of the inlet whose pole sensors you want to
configure.

<p> is the label of the inlet pole that you want to configure.

Pole
Label
<p>
Current sensor
Voltage sensor
1
L1
L1
L1 - L2
2
L2
L2
L2 - L3
3
L3
L3
L3 - L1
<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
voltage
Voltage sensor
activePower
Active power sensor
apparentPower
Apparent power sensor
powerFactor
Power factor sensor
activeEnergy
Active energy sensor
unbalancedCurrent
Unbalanced current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.
190
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the lower critical threshold for the
specified inlet pole sensor.
disable
Disables the lower critical threshold for the
specified inlet pole sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the lower critical threshold of the
specified inlet pole sensor without enabling or
disabling the threshold.
Example
The following command enables the Lower Critical threshold for the pole 2
(L2-L3) voltage of the inlet 1.
config:#
sensor inletpole 1 L2 voltage lowerCritical enable
Setting the Lower Warning Threshold for an Inlet Pole
This command syntax configures the Lower Warning threshold of an inlet
pole.
config:#
sensor inletpole <n> <p> <sensor type> lowerWarning <option>
Variables:

<n> is the number of the inlet whose pole sensors you want to
configure.

<p> is the label of the inlet pole that you want to configure.

Pole
Label
<p>
Current sensor
Voltage sensor
1
L1
L1
L1 - L2
2
L2
L2
L2 - L3
3
L3
L3
L3 - L1
<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
voltage
Voltage sensor
activePower
Active power sensor
191
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Sensor type
Description
apparentPower
Apparent power sensor
powerFactor
Power factor sensor
activeEnergy
Active energy sensor
unbalancedCurrent
Unbalanced current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the lower warning threshold for the
specified inlet pole sensor.
disable
Disables the lower warning threshold for the
specified inlet pole sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the lower warning threshold of the
specified inlet pole sensor without enabling or
disabling the threshold.
Example
The following command sets the Lower Warning threshold for the pole 3
(L3-L1) voltage of the inlet 1 to 190V.
config:#
sensor inletpole 1 L3 voltage lowerWarning 190
Setting the Inlet Pole's Deassertion Hysteresis
This command syntax configures the deassertion hysteresis value of an
inlet pole.
config:#
sensor inletpole <n> <p> <sensor type> hysteresis <value>
Variables:
192

<n> is the number of the inlet whose pole sensors you want to
configure.

<p> is the label of the inlet pole that you want to configure.
Pole
Label
<p>
Current sensor
Voltage sensor
1
L1
L1
L1 - L2
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface

Pole
Label
<p>
Current sensor
Voltage sensor
2
L2
L2
L2 - L3
3
L3
L3
L3 - L1
<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
voltage
Voltage sensor
activePower
Active power sensor
apparentPower
Apparent power sensor
powerFactor
Power factor sensor
activeEnergy
Active energy sensor
unbalancedCurrent
Unbalanced current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.

<value> is a numeric value that is assigned to the hysteresis for the
specified inlet pole sensor. See What is Deassertion Hysteresis?
(on page 100) for how the deassertion hysteresis works.
Example
The following command sets the deassertion hysteresis for the pole 2
(L2-L3) voltage of the inlet 1 to 0.5A.
config:#
sensor inletpole 1 L2 current hysteresis 0.5
Commands for Circuit Breaker Sensors
A sensor configuration command for circuit breakers begins with sensor
ocp.
193
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Setting the Upper Critical Threshold for a Circuit Breaker
This command syntax configures the Upper Critical threshold of a circuit
breaker.
config:#
sensor ocp <n> <sensor type> upperCritical <option>
Variables:

<n> is the number of the circuit breaker that you want to configure.

<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the upper critical threshold for the
specified circuit breaker sensor.
disable
Disables the upper critical threshold for the
specified circuit breaker sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the upper critical threshold of the
specified circuit breaker sensor without enabling or
disabling the threshold.
Example
The following command sets the Upper Critical threshold for the 3rd circuit
breaker to 16A.
config:#
194
sensor ocp 3 current upperCritical 16
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Setting the Upper Warning Threshold for a Circuit Breaker
This command syntax configures the Upper Warning threshold of a circuit
breaker.
config:#
sensor ocp <n> <sensor type> upperWarning <option>
Variables:

<n> is the number of the circuit breaker that you want to configure.

<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the upper warning threshold for the
specified circuit breaker sensor.
disable
Disables the upper warning threshold for the
specified circuit breaker sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the upper warning threshold of the
specified circuit breaker sensor without enabling or
disabling the threshold.
Example
The following command enables the Upper Warning threshold for the 3rd
circuit breaker.
config:#
sensor ocp 3 current upperWarning enable
195
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Setting the Lower Critical Threshold for a Circuit Breaker
This command syntax configures the Lower Critical threshold of a circuit
breaker.
config:#
sensor ocp <n> <sensor type> lowerCritical <option>
Variables:

<n> is the number of the circuit breaker that you want to configure.

<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the lower critical threshold for the
specified circuit breaker sensor.
disable
Disables the lower critical threshold for the
specified circuit breaker sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the lower critical threshold of the
specified circuit breaker sensor without enabling or
disabling the threshold.
Example
The following command sets the Lower Critical threshold for the 3rd circuit
breaker to 5A.
config:#
196
sensor ocp 3 current lowerCritical 5
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Setting the Lower Warning Threshold for a Circuit Breaker
This command syntax configures the Lower Warning threshold of a circuit
breaker.
config:#
sensor ocp <n> <sensor type> lowerWarning <option>
Variables:

<n> is the number of the circuit breaker that you want to configure.

<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the lower warning threshold for the
specified circuit breaker sensor.
disable
Disables the lower warning threshold for the
specified circuit breaker sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the lower warning threshold of the
specified circuit breaker sensor without enabling or
disabling the threshold.
Example
The following command enables the Lower Warning threshold for the 3rd
circuit breaker.
config:#
sensor ocp 3 current lowerWarning enable
197
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Setting the Circuit Breaker's Deassertion Hysteresis
This command syntax configures the deassertion hysteresis value of a
circuit breaker.
config:#
sensor ocp <n> <sensor type> hysteresis <value>
Variables:

<n> is the number of the circuit breaker that you want to configure.

<sensor type> is one of the following sensor types:
Sensor type
Description
current
Current sensor
Note: If the requested sensor type is not supported, the message
"Sensor is not available" is displayed.

<value> is a numeric value that is assigned to the hysteresis for the
specified circuit breaker sensor. See What is Deassertion
Hysteresis? (on page 100) for how the deassertion hysteresis works.
Example
The following command sets the deassertion hysteresis for the RMS
current of the 3rd circuit breaker to 1A.
config:#
sensor ocp 3 current hysteresis 1
Commands for Environmental Sensors
A sensor configuration command for environmental sensors begins with
sensor externalsensor.
Setting the Sensor's Upper Critical Threshold
This command syntax configures the Upper Critical threshold of a numeric
environmental sensor.
198
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
config:#
sensor externalsensor <n> <sensor type> upperCritical <option>
Variables:

<n> is the ID number of the environmental sensor that you want to
configure. The number is assigned and shown on the Dominion PX
web interface. It is an integer between 1 and 16.

<sensor type> is one of these sensor types: temperature or humidity.
Note: If the specified sensor type does not match the type of the
specified environmental sensor, this error message appears:
"Specified sensor type 'XXX' does not match the sensor's type
(<sensortype>)," where XXX is the specified sensor type, and
<sensortype> is the correct sensor type.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the upper critical threshold for the
specified environmental sensor.
disable
Disables the upper critical threshold for the
specified environmental sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the upper critical threshold of the
specified environmental sensor without enabling
or disabling the threshold.
Example
The following command sets the Upper Critical threshold of the
environmental "temperature" sensor with the ID number 2 to 40 degrees
Celsius.
config:#
sensor externalsensor 2 temperature upperCritical 40
Setting the Sensor's Upper Warning Threshold
This command syntax configures the Upper Warning threshold of a
numeric environmental sensor.
199
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
config:#
sensor externalsensor <n> <sensor type> upperWarning <option>
Variables:

<n> is the ID number of the environmental sensor that you want to
configure. The number is assigned and shown on the Dominion PX
web interface. It is an integer between 1 and 16.

<sensor type> is one of these sensor types: temperature or humidity.
Note: If the specified sensor type does not match the type of the
specified environmental sensor, this error message appears:
"Specified sensor type 'XXX' does not match the sensor's type
(<sensortype>)," where XXX is the specified sensor type, and
<sensortype> is the correct sensor type.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the upper warning threshold for the
specified environmental sensor.
disable
Disables the upper warning threshold for the
specified environmental sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the upper warning threshold of the
specified environmental sensor without enabling or
disabling the threshold.
Example
The following command enables the Upper Warning threshold of the
environmental "temperature" sensor with the ID number 4.
config:#
sensor externalsensor 4 temperature upperWarning enable
Setting the Sensor's Lower Critical Threshold
This command syntax configures the Lower Critical threshold of a numeric
environmental sensor.
200
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
config:#
sensor externalsensor <n> <sensor type> lowerCritical <option>
Variables:

<n> is the ID number of the environmental sensor that you want to
configure. The number is assigned and shown on the Dominion PX
web interface. It is an integer between 1 and 16.

<sensor type> is one of these sensor types: temperature or humidity.
Note: If the specified sensor type does not match the type of the
specified environmental sensor, this error message appears:
"Specified sensor type 'XXX' does not match the sensor's type
(<sensortype>)," where XXX is the specified sensor type, and
<sensortype> is the correct sensor type.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the lower critical threshold for the
specified environmental sensor.
disable
Disables the lower critical threshold for the
specified environmental sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the lower critical threshold of the
specified environmental sensor without enabling or
disabling the threshold.
Example
The following command sets the Lower Critical threshold of the
environmental "humidity" sensor with the ID number 1 to 15%.
config:#
sensor externalsensor 1 humidity lowerCritical 15
Setting the Sensor's Lower Warning Threshold
This command syntax configures the Lower Warning threshold of a
numeric environmental sensor.
201
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
config:#
sensor externalsensor <n> <sensor type> lowerWarning <option>
Variables:

<n> is the ID number of the environmental sensor that you want to
configure. The number is assigned and shown on the Dominion PX
web interface. It is an integer between 1 and 16.

<sensor type> is one of these sensor types: temperature or humidity.
Note: If the specified sensor type does not match the type of the
specified environmental sensor, this error message appears:
"Specified sensor type 'XXX' does not match the sensor's type
(<sensortype>)," where XXX is the specified sensor type, and
<sensortype> is the correct sensor type.

<option> is one of the options: enable, disable or a numeric value.
Option
Description
enable
Enables the lower warning threshold for the
specified environmental sensor.
disable
Disables the lower warning threshold for the
specified environmental sensor.
A numeric value Sets a value for the lower warning threshold of the
specified environmental sensor without enabling or
disabling the threshold.
Example
The following command disables the Lower Warning threshold of the
environmental "humidity" sensor with the ID number 3.
config:#
sensor externalsensor 3 humidity lowerWarning disable
Setting the Sensor's Deassertion Hysteresis
This command syntax configures the deassertion hysteresis value of a
numeric environmental sensor.
202
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
config:#
sensor externalsensor <n> <sensor type> hysteresis <value>
Variables:

<n> is the ID number of the environmental sensor that you want to
configure. The number is assigned and shown on the Dominion PX
web interface. It is an integer between 1 and 16.

<sensor type> is one of these sensor types: temperature or humidity.
Note: If the specified sensor type does not match the type of the
specified environmental sensor, this error message appears:
"Specified sensor type 'XXX' does not match the sensor's type
(<sensortype>)," where XXX is the specified sensor type, and
<sensortype> is the correct sensor type.

<value> is a numeric value that is assigned to the hysteresis for the
specified environmental sensor. See What is Deassertion
Hysteresis? (on page 100) for how the deassertion hysteresis works.
Example
The following command sets the deassertion hysteresis of the
environmental "temperature" sensor with the ID number 4 to 2 degrees
Celsius.
config:#
sensor externalsensor 4 temperature hysteresis 2
Setting the Sensor's Assertion Timeout
This command syntax configures the assertion timeout value of a numeric
environmental sensor.
config:#
sensor externalsensor <n> <sensor type> assertionTimeout
<value>
Variables:

<n> is the ID number of the environmental sensor that you want to
configure. The number is assigned and shown on the Dominion PX
web interface. It is an integer between 1 and 16.

<sensor type> is one of these sensor types: temperature or humidity.
Note: If the specified sensor type does not match the type of the
specified environmental sensor, this error message appears:
"Specified sensor type 'XXX' does not match the sensor's type
(<sensortype>)," where XXX is the specified sensor type, and
<sensortype> is the correct sensor type.
203
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface

<value> is a numeric value (in samples) that is assigned to the
assertion timeout for the specified environmental sensor. See What is
Assertion Timeout? (on page 101).
Example
The following command sets the assertion timeout of the environmental
"temperature" sensor with the ID number 4 to 3 samples.
config:#
sensor externalsensor 4 temperature assertionTimeout 3
User Configuration Commands
Most of user configuration commands begin with user except for the
password change command.
Creating a User Profile
This command syntax creates a new user profile.
config:#
user create "<name>" <option> <roles>
After performing the user creation command, Dominion PX prompts you to
assign a password to the newly-created user. Then:
1. Type the password and press Enter.
2. Re-type the same password for confirmation and press Enter.
Variables:

<name> is a string comprising up to 32 ASCII printable characters.
The <name> variable must be enclosed in quotes when it contains
spaces.

<option> is one of the options: enable or disable.

204
Option
Description
enable
Enables the newly-created user profile.
disable
Disables the newly-created user profile.
<roles> is a role or a list of comma-separated roles assigned to the
specified user profile.
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Example
The following command creates a new user profile and sets up two
parameters for the new user.
config:#
user create "May" enable admin
Results:

A new user profile "May" is created.

The new user profile is enabled.

The admin role is assigned to the new user profile.
Modifying a User Profile
A user profile contains various parameters that you can modify.
To change a user's password, use this command syntax:
config:#
user modify "<name>" <password>
After performing the above command, Dominion PX prompts you to enter
a new password. Then:
1. Type a new password and press Enter.
2. Re-type the new password for confirmation and press Enter.
205
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
To change a user's full name, use this command syntax:
config:#
user modify "<name>" fullname "<full_name>"
To change a user's telephone number, use this command
syntax:
config:#
user modify "<name>" telephoneNumber "<phone_number>"
To change a user's email address, use this command syntax:
config:#
user modify "<name>" eMailAddress "<email_address>"
To enable or disable a user profile, use this command syntax:
config:#
user modify "<name>" enabled <option1>
This command syntax determines whether the password change
is forced when a user logs in to the specified user profile next
time:
config:#
user modify "<name>" forcePasswordChangeOnNextLogin <option2>
To enable or disable the SNMP v3 access to Dominion PX for the
specified user, use this command syntax:
config:#
user modify "<name>" snmpv3Access <option3>
To determine the security level, use this command syntax:
config:#
user modify "<name>" securityLevel <option4>
This command syntax determines whether the authentication
passphrase is identical to the password:
206
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
config:#
user modify "<name>" usePasswordAsAuthenticationPassPhrase <option5>
To determine the authentication passphrase, use this command
syntax:
config:#
user modify "<name>" authenticationPassPhrase "<authentication_passphrase>"
This command syntax determines whether the privacy
passphrase is identical to the authentication passphrase:
config:#
user modify "<name>" useAuthenticationPassPhraseAsPrivacyPassPhrase <option6>
To determine the privacy passphrase, use this command syntax:
207
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
config:#
user modify "<name>" privacyPassPhrase "<privacy_passphrase>"
To determine the authentication protocol, use this command
syntax:
config:#
user modify "<name>" authenticationProtocol <option7>
To determine the privacy protocol, use this command syntax:
config:#
user modify "<name>" privacyProtocol <option8>
To change the role(s) of the specified user, use this command
syntax:
config:#
user modify "<name>" roles <roles>
Variables:

<name> is a string comprising up to 32 ASCII printable characters.
The <name> variable must be enclosed in quotes when it contains
spaces.

<password> is the current password for the specified user profile.

<full_name> is a string comprising up to 32 ASCII printable characters.
The <full_name> variable must be enclosed in quotes when it
contains spaces.

<phone_number> is the phone number that can reach the specified
user. The <phone_number> variable must be enclosed in quotes.

<email_address> is the email address of the specified user. The
<email_address> variable must be enclosed in quotes.

<option1> is one of the options: true or false.

208
Option
Description
true
Enables the specified user profile.
false
Disables the specified user profile.
<option2> is one of the options: true or false.
Option
Description
true
A password change is forced on the user's next
login.
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface



Option
Description
false
No password change is forced on the user's next
login.
<option3> is one of the options: enabled or disabled.
Option
Description
enabled
Enables the SNMP v3 access permission for the
specified user.
disabled
Disables the SNMP v3 access permission for the
specified user.
<option4> is one of the options: noAuthNoPriv, authNoPriv or
authPriv.
Option
Description
noAuthNoPriv
No authentication and no privacy.
authNoPriv
Authentication and no privacy.
authPriv
Authentication and privacy.
<option5> is one of the options: true or false.
Option
Description
true
Authentication passphrase is identical to the
password.
false
Authentication passphrase is different from the
password.

<authentication_passphrase> is a string used as an authentication
passphrase, comprising up to 32 ASCII printable characters. The
authentication passphrase must be enclosed in quotes.

<option6> is one of the options: true or false.
Option
Description
true
Privacy passphrase is identical to the
authentication passphrase.
false
Privacy passphrase is different from the
authentication passphrase.
209
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface

<privacy_passphrase> is a string used as a privacy passphrase,
comprising up to 32 ASCII printable characters. The privacy
passphrase must be enclosed in quotes.

<option7> is one of the options: MD5 or SHA-1.


Option
Description
MD5
MD5 authentication protocol is applied.
SHA-1
SHA-1 authentication protocol is applied.
<option8> is one of the options: DES or AES-128.
Option
Description
DES
DES privacy protocol is applied.
AES-128
AES-128 privacy protocol is applied.
<roles> is a role or a list of comma-separated roles assigned to the
specified user profile.
Tip: You can combine all commands to modify the parameters of a specific
user profile at a time. See Multi-Command Syntax (on page 214).
Example
The following command modifies three parameters for the user profile -May:
config:#
user modify "May" fullname "May Turner" enabled true snmpv3Access enabled
Results:

The full name is specified as May Turner.

The user profile is enabled.

The user's SNMP v3 access permission is enabled.
Deleting a User Profile
This command syntax deletes an existing user profile.
config:#
user delete "<name>"
Example
The following command deletes the user profile -- May.
config:#
210
user delete "May"
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Changing Your Own Password
This command syntax changes your password. This command does not
begin with user.
config:#
password
After performing this command, Dominion PX prompts you to first enter
the existing password and then the new password.
Example
To change your password, follow this procedure:
1. Type the following command and press Enter.
config:#
password
2. Type the existing password and press Enter when the following
prompt appears.
Existing Password:
3. Type the new password and press Enter when the following prompt
appears.
New Password:
4. Re-type the new password for confirmation and press Enter when the
following prompt appears.
Confirm New Password:
Role Configuration Commands
A role configuration command begins with role.
Creating a Role
This command syntax creates a new role, with a list of
semicolon-separated privileges assigned to the role.
config:#
role create "<name>" <privilege1>;<privilege2>;<privilege3>...
If a specific privilege contains any arguments, the privilege should be
followed by a colon and the argument(s).
211
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
config:#
role create "<name>" <privilege1>:<argument1>,<argument2>...;
<privilege2>:<argument1>,<argument2>...;
<privilege3>:<argument1>,<argument2>...;
...
Variables:

<name> is a string comprising up to 32 ASCII printable characters.
The <name> variable must be enclosed in quotes when it contains
spaces.

<privilege1>, <privilege2>, <privilege3> and the like are names of the
privileges assigned to the role.

<argument1>, <argument2> and the like are arguments set for a
particular privilege.
Example
The following command creates a new role and assigns privileges to the
role.
config:#
role create tester firmwareupdate;viewEventSettings
Results:

A new role "tester" is created.

Two privileges are assigned to the role: firmware update and view
event settings.
Modifying a Role
You can modify diverse parameters of an existing role, including the
privileges assigned to the role.
To modify a role's description, use this command syntax:
config:#
role modify "<name>" description <description>
To add privileges to a specific role, use this command syntax:
Multiple privileges should be separated with a semi-colon.
config:#
role modify "<name>" addPrivileges
<privilege1>;<privilege2>;<privilege3>...
If a specific privilege contains any arguments, add a colon and then
the argument(s) after the privilege.
212
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
config:#
role modify "<name>" addPrivileges
<privilege1>:<argument1>,<argument2>...;
<privilege2>:<argument1>,<argument2>...;
<privilege3>:<argument1>,<argument2>...;
...
To remove specific privileges from a role, use this command
syntax:
Multiple privileges should be separated with a semi-colon.
config:#
role modify "<name>" removePrivileges
<privilege1>;<privilege2>;<privilege3>...
If a specific privilege contains any arguments, add a colon and then
the argument(s) after the privilege.
config:#
role modify "<name>" removePrivileges
<privilege1>:<argument1>,<argument2>...;
<privilege2>:<argument1>,<argument2>...;
<privilege3>:<argument1>,<argument2>...;
...
Note: When removing privileges from a role, make sure the specified
privileges and arguments (if any) exactly match those assigned to the role.
Otherwise, the command fails to remove the privileges that you want to
remove.
Variables:

<name> is a string comprising up to 32 ASCII printable characters.
The <name> variable must be enclosed in quotes when it contains
spaces.

<privilege1>, <privilege2>, <privilege3> and the like are names of the
privileges assigned to the role.

<argument1>, <argument2> and the like are arguments set for a
particular privilege.
Example
The following command modifies the privileges of the role "tester."
config:#
role modify tester addPrivileges changeAuthentication removePrivileges
firmwareupgrade
Results:

The "change authentication" privilege is added to the role.

The "firmware upgrade" privilege is removed from the role.
213
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Deleting a Role
This command syntax deletes an existing role.
config:#
role delete "<name>"
Example
The following command deletes an existing role.
config:#
role delete tester
Multi-Command Syntax
To shorten the configuration time, you can combine various configuration
commands in one command and perform all of them at a time.
A multi-command syntax looks like this:
<setting 1> <value 1> <setting 2> <value 2> <setting 3>
<value 3> ...
Example 1 - Combination of IP, Subnet Mask and Gateway Parameters
The following multi-command syntax configures IP address, subnet mask
and gateway for the network connectivity simultaneously.
config:#
network ipAddress 192.168.84.225 subnetMask 255.255.255.0
gateway 192.168.84.0
Results:

The IP address is set to 192.168.84.225.

The subnet mask is set to 255.255.255.0.

The gateway is set to 192.168.84.0.
Example 2 - Combination of Upper Critical and Upper Warning Settings
The following multi-command syntax simultaneously configures Upper
Critical and Upper Warning thresholds for the RMS current of the 3rd
circuit breaker.
214
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
config:#
sensor ocp 3 current upperCritical enable upperCritical 25
upperWarning enable upperWarning 20
Results:

The Upper Critical threshold of the 3rd circuit breaker's RMS current is
enabled.

The Upper Critical threshold of the 3rd circuit breaker's RMS current is
set to 25A.

The Upper Warning threshold of the 3rd circuit breaker's RMS current
is enabled.

The Upper Warning threshold of the 3rd circuit breaker's RMS current
is set to 20A.
Querying Available Parameters for a Command
If you are not sure what commands are available for a particular type of
CLI command, you can have the CLI show them by adding a space and
then a question mark to the end of that command. A list of available
parameters and their descriptions will be displayed.
The following shows a few query examples.
To query available network configuration parameters, the syntax
is:
config:#
network ?
To query available role configuration parameters, the syntax is:
config:#
role ?
Quitting the Configuration Mode
Both of "apply" and "cancel" commands let you quit the configuration
mode. The difference is that "apply" saves all changes you made in the
configuration mode while "cancel" aborts all changes.
To quit the configuration mode, use either command:
config:#
apply
-- OR -config:#
cancel
The # prompt appears after pressing Enter, indicating that you have
entered the administrator mode.
215
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Unblocking a User
If any user is blocked from accessing Dominion PX, you can unblock them
over a serial connection.
To unblock a user:
1. Log in to the CLI interface using any terminal program via a serial
connection. See With HyperTerminal (on page 143).
2. When the Username prompt appears, type unblock and press Enter.
3. When the "Username to unblock" prompt appears, type the login
name of the user to be unblocked and press Enter.
4. A message appears, indicating that the specified user was unblocked
successfully.
Resetting Dominion PX
You can reset Dominion PX to factory defaults or simply restart it using the
CLI commands.
Restarting the PDU
This command restarts the Dominion PX device. It is not a factory default
reset.
To restart the Dominion PX device:
1. Ensure you have entered the administrator mode and the # prompt is
displayed.
2. Type either of the following commands to restart the Dominion PX
device.
#
reset pdu unit
-- OR --
#
reset pdu unit /y
3. If you entered the command without "/y" in Step 2, a message
appears prompting you to confirm the operation. Type y to confirm the
reset.
4. Wait until the Username prompt appears, indicating the reset is
complete.
216
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Resetting to Factory Defaults
This command restores all settings of the Dominion PX device to factory
defaults.
To reset Dominion PX settings, use either command:
#
reset factorydefaults
-- OR --
#
reset factorydefaults /y
See Using the Command Line Interface (see "Using the CLI
Command" on page 238) for more information.
Network Troubleshooting
Dominion PX provides 4 diagnostic commands for troubleshooting
network problems: nslookup, netstat, ping, and traceroute. The diagnostic
commands function as corresponding Linux commands and can get
corresponding Linux outputs.
Entering the Diagnostic Mode
Diagnostic commands function in the diagnostic mode only.
To enter the diagnostic mode:
1. Ensure you have entered the administrator mode and the # prompt is
displayed.
2. Type diag and press Enter. The diag> prompt appears, indicating
that you have entered the diagnostic mode.
3. Now you can type any diagnostic commands for troubleshooting.
Diagnostic Commands
The diagnostic command syntax varies from command to command.
Querying the DNS Servers
This command syntax queries Internet domain name server (DNS)
information of a network host.
diag>
nslookup <host>
Variables:

<host> is the name or IP address of the host whose DNS information
you want to query.
217
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Example
The following command checks the DNS information regarding the host
192.168.84.222.
diag>
nslookup 192.168.84.222
Showing the Network Connections
This command syntax displays network connections and/or status of
ports.
diag>
netstat <option>
Variables:

<option> is one of the options: ports or connections.
Option
Description
ports
Shows TCP/UDP ports.
connections
Shows network connections.
Example
The following command displays the server connections to your Dominion
PX device.
diag>
218
netstat connections
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Testing the Network Connectivity
This command syntax sends the ICMP ECHO_REQUEST message to a
network host for checking its network connectivity. If the output shows the
host is responding properly, the network connectivity is good, or the host is
not being connected to the network.
diag>
ping <host>
Variables:

<host> is the host name or IP address whose networking connectivity
you want to check.
Options:

You can include any or all of additional options listed below in the ping
command.
Options
Description
count <number1>
Determines the number of messages to be
sent. <number1> is an integer number.
size <number2>
Determines the packet size. <number2> is an
integer number in bytes.
timeout <number3>
Determines the waiting period before timeout.
<number3> is an integer number in seconds.
The command looks like this syntax when it includes all options:
diag>
ping <host> count <number1> size <number2> timeout <number3>
Example
The following command checks the network connectivity of the host
192.168.84.222 by sending the ICMP ECHO_REQUEST message to the
host for 5 times.
diag>
ping count 5 192.168.84.222
219
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
Tracing the Route
This command syntax traces the network route between your Dominion
PX device and a network host.
diag>
traceroute <host>
Variables:

<host> is the name or IP address of the host you want to trace.
Example
The following command displays the existing network routing for the host
192.168.84.222.
diag>
traceroute 192.168.84.222
Quitting the Diagnostic Mode
To quit the diagnostic mode, use this command:
diag>
exit
The # prompt appears after pressing Enter, indicating that you have
entered the administrator mode.
Retrieving Previous Commands
If you would like to retrieve any command that was previously typed in the
same connection session, press the Up arrow ( ) on the keyboard until
the desired command is displayed.
Automatically Completing a Command
A CLI command always consists of several words. For some unique CLI
commands, such as the "reset" command, you can easily complete them
by pressing the Tab or Ctrl+i instead of typing the whole command word
by word.
To have a unique command completed automatically:
1. Type initial letters or words of the command. For example, type the
first word of the "reset factorydefaults" command, that is,
reset.
220
Chapter 7: Using the Command Line Interface
2. Press Tab or Ctrl+i until the complete command appears. For example,
although you typed only one word for the reset command, the rest of
the command appears after pressing Tab or Ctrl+i.
Logging out of CLI
After completing your tasks using the CLI, always log out of the CLI to
prevent others from accessing the CLI.
To log out of the CLI:
1. Ensure you have entered the administrator mode and the # prompt is
displayed.
2. Type exit and press Enter.
221
Appendix A Specifications
In This Chapter
Maximum Ambient Operating Temperature ..........................................222
Serial RJ-45 Port Pinouts ......................................................................222
Sensor RJ-12 Port Pinouts ....................................................................222
Maximum Ambient Operating Temperature
The maximum ambient operating temperature (TMA) for Dominion PX
varies from 50 to 60 degrees Celsius, depending on the model and
certification standard (CE or UL). If necessary, contact Raritan Technical
Support for this information for your model.
Specification
Measure
Max Ambient Temperature
50~60 degrees Celsius
Serial RJ-45 Port Pinouts
RJ-45 Pin/signal definition
Pin No.
Signal
Direction
Description
1
DCD
Input
Data
2
RxD
Input
Receive data (data in)
3
TxD
Output
Transmit data
4
DTR
Output
Data terminal ready
5
GND
―
Signal ground
6
DSR
Input
Data set ready
7
RTS
Output
Request to send
8
CTS
Input
Clear to send
9
RI
Input
Ring indicator
Sensor RJ-12 Port Pinouts
RJ-12 Pin/signal definition
Pin No.
Signal
Direction
Description
222
Appendix A: Specifications
RJ-12 Pin/signal definition
1
+12V
―
Power
(500mA, fuse protected)
2
GND
―
3
RS485
(Data +)
bi-direction Data Line +
al
4
RS485
bi-direction Data Line al
(Data -)
5
GND
6
1-wire
―
Signal Ground
Signal Ground
Used for Feature Port
223
Appendix B Equipment Setup Worksheet
Dominion PX Series Model
____________
Dominion PX Series Serial Number
OUTLET 1
OUTLET 2
MODEL
MODEL
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
USE
USE
USE
OUTLET 4
OUTLET 5
OUTLET 6
MODEL
MODEL
MODEL
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
USE
USE
USE
____________
OUTLET 3
MODEL
224
Appendix B: Equipment Setup Worksheet
OUTLET 7
OUTLET 8
OUTLET 9
MODEL
MODEL
MODEL
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
USE
USE
USE
OUTLET 10
OUTLET 11
OUTLET 12
MODEL
MODEL
MODEL
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
USE
USE
USE
OUTLET 13
OUTLET 14
OUTLET 15
MODEL
MODEL
MODEL
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
USE
USE
USE
225
Appendix B: Equipment Setup Worksheet
OUTLET 16
OUTLET 17
OUTLET 18
MODEL
MODEL
MODEL
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
USE
USE
USE
OUTLET 19
OUTLET 20
OUTLET 21
MODEL
MODEL
MODEL
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
USE
USE
USE
226
Appendix B: Equipment Setup Worksheet
OUTLET 22
OUTLET 23
OUTLET 24
MODEL
MODEL
MODEL
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
SERIAL NUMBER
USE
USE
USE
Types of adapters
_________________________________________________________
Types of cables
_________________________________________________________
Name of software program
_________________________________________________________
227
Appendix C MAC Address
A label is affixed to a Dominion PX device, near the LED display, showing
both the serial number and MAC address of the PDU.
If necessary, you can find the PDU's IP address through the MAC address
by using commonly-used network tools. Contact your LAN administrator
for assistance.
228
Appendix D LDAP Configuration Illustration
This section provides an LDAP example for illustrating the configuration
procedure using Microsoft Active Directory® (AD). To configure LDAP
authentication, four main steps are required:
a. Determine user accounts and groups intended for Dominion PX
b. Create user groups for Dominion PX on the AD server
c.
Configure LDAP authentication on the Dominion PX device
d. Configure roles on the Dominion PX device
In This Chapter
Step A. Determine User Accounts and Groups .................................... 229
Step B. Configure User Groups on the AD Server ............................... 230
Step C. Configure LDAP Authentication on the Dominion PX Device.. 231
Step D. Configure User Groups on the Dominion PX Device............... 233
Step A. Determine User Accounts and Groups
Determine the user accounts and groups that are authenticated for
accessing Dominion PX. In this example, we will create two user groups
with different permissions. Each group will consist of two user accounts
available on the AD server.
User groups
User accounts (members)
PX_User
usera
pxuser2
PX_Admin
userb
pxuser
Group permissions:

The PX_User group will have neither system permissions nor outlet
permissions.

The PX_Admin group will have full system and outlet permissions.
229
Appendix D: LDAP Configuration Illustration
Step B. Configure User Groups on the AD Server
You must create the groups for Dominion PX on the AD server, and then
make appropriate users members of these groups.
In this illustration, we assume:

The groups for Dominion PX are named PX_Admin and PX_User.

User accounts pxuser, pxuser2, usera and userb already exist on the
AD server.
To configure the user groups on the AD server:
1. On the AD server, create new groups -- PX_Admin and PX_User.
Note: See the documentation or online help accompanying Microsoft
AD for detailed instructions.
2. Add the pxuser2 and usera accounts to the PX_User group.
3. Add the pxuser and userb accounts to the PX_Admin group.
4. Verify whether each group comprises correct users.
230
Appendix D: LDAP Configuration Illustration
Step C. Configure LDAP Authentication on the Dominion PX Device
You must enable and set up LDAP authentication properly on the
Dominion PX device to use external authentication.
In the illustration, we assume:

The DNS server settings have been configured properly. See
Modifying the Network Settings (on page 54) and Role of a DNS
Server (on page 55).

The AD server's domain name is techadssl.com, and its IP address is
192.168.56.3.

The AD protocol is NOT encrypted over SSL.

The AD server uses the default TCP port 389.
To configure LDAP authentication:
1. Choose Device Settings > Security > Authentication. The
Authentication Settings dialog appears.
2. Select the LDAP radio button to activate remote LDAP/LDAPS server
authentication.
3. Click New to add an LDAP/LDAPS server for authentication. The
"Create new LDAP Server Configuration" dialog appears.
4. Provide Dominion PX with the information about the AD server.

IP Address / Hostname - Type the domain name techadssl.com
or IP address 192.168.56.3.
Important: Without the SSL encryption enabled, you can type either
the domain name or IP address in this field, but you must type the fully
qualified domain name if the SSL encryption is enabled.

Use settings from LDAP server - Leave the checkbox deselected.

Type of LDAP Server - Select "Microsoft Active Directory" from the
drop-down list.

LDAP over SSL - Have the checkbox deselected since the SSL
encryption is not applied in this example.

Port - Ensure the field is set to 389.

SSL Port and Server Certificate - Skip the two fields since the SSL
encryption is not enabled.

Bind DN, Bind Password and Confirm Bind Password -- Skip the
three fields since the selected type of LDAP server is Microsoft
Active Directory.

Base DN for Search - Type dc=techadssl,dc=com as the
starting point where your search begins on the AD server.
231
Appendix D: LDAP Configuration Illustration

Login Name Attribute - Ensure the field is set to
sAMAccountName because the LDAP server is Microsoft Active
Directory.

User Entry Object Class - Ensure the field is set to user because
the LDAP server is Microsoft Active Directory.

User Search Subfilter - The field is optional. The subfilter
information is also useful for filtering out additional objects in a
large directory structure. In this example, we leave it blank.

Active Directory Domain - Type techadssl.com.
Note: For more information on LDAP configuration, see Setting Up
LDAP Authentication (on page 88).
232
Appendix D: LDAP Configuration Illustration
5. Click OK to save the changes. The LDAP server is saved.
6. Click OK to save the changes. The LDAP authentication is activated.
Note: If the Dominion PX clock and the LDAP server clock are out of sync,
the certificates are considered expired and users are unable to
authenticate using LDAP. To ensure proper synchronization,
administrators should configure Dominion PX and the LDAP server to use
the same NTP server.
Step D. Configure User Groups on the Dominion PX Device
A role on the Dominion PX device determines the system and outlet
permissions. You must create the roles whose names are identical to the
user groups created for Dominion PX on the AD server or authorization will
fail. Therefore, we will create the roles named PX_User and PX_Admin on
the PDU.
In this illustration, we assume:

Users assigned to the PX_User role can neither configure Dominion
PX nor access the outlets.

Users assigned to the PX_Admin role have the Administrator
permissions so they can both configure Dominion PX and access the
outlets.
To create the PX_User role with appropriate permissions
assigned:
1. Choose User Management > Roles. The Manage Roles dialog
appears.
Tip: You can also access the Manage Roles dialog by clicking the
Manage Roles button in the Edit User 'XXX' dialog.
2. Click New. The Create New Role dialog appears.
3. Type PX_User in the Role Name field.
4. Type a description for the PX_User role in the Description field. In this
example, we type "The role can only view PX settings" to describe the
role.
5. Click the Privileges tab to select all View XXX permissions (where
XXX is the name of the setting). A View XXX permission lets users
view the XXX settings without the capability to configure or change
them.
a. Click Add. The "Add Privileges to new Role" dialog appears.
b. Select a permission beginning with the word "View" from the
Privileges list, such as View Event Settings.
c.
Click Add.
233
Appendix D: LDAP Configuration Illustration
d. Repeat Steps a to c to add all permissions beginning with "View."
6. Click OK to save the changes. The PX_User role is created.
7. Keep the Manage Roles dialog opened to create the PX_Admin role.
To create the PX_Admin role with full permissions assigned:
1. Click New. The Create New Role dialog appears.
2. Type PX_Admin in the Role Name field.
234
Appendix D: LDAP Configuration Illustration
3. Type a description for the PX_Admin role in the Description field. In
this example, we type "The role includes all privileges" to describe the
role.
4. Click the Privileges tab to select the Administrator permission. The
Administrator permission allows users to configure or change all
Dominion PX settings.
a. Click Add. The "Add Privileges to new Role" dialog appears.
b. Select the permission named Administrator Privileges from the
Privileges list.
c.
Click Add.
235
Appendix D: LDAP Configuration Illustration
5. Click OK to save the changes. The PX_Admin role is created.
6. Click Close to quit the dialog.
236
Appendix E Resetting to Factory Defaults
For security reasons, the Dominion PX device can be reset to factory
defaults only at the local serial console.
Important: Exercise caution before resetting Dominion PX to its
factory defaults. This erases any existing information and
customized settings, such as user profiles and threshold values.
You can use either the reset button or the command line interface (CLI) to
reset Dominion PX.
In This Chapter
Using the Reset Button..........................................................................237
Using the CLI Command .......................................................................238
Using the Reset Button
This section describes how to reset the Dominion PX device via the reset
button.
To reset to factory defaults using the reset button:
1. Connect a computer to the Dominion PX device over a serial
connection.
2. Launch a terminal emulation program such as HyperTerminal, Kermit,
or PuTTY, and open a window on the Dominion PX. For information
on the serial port configuration, see Step 2 of Initial Network
Configuration (on page 16).
3. Press (and release) the Reset button of Dominion PX while pressing
the Esc key of the keyboard several times in rapid succession. A
prompt (=>) should appear after about one second.
4. Type defaults to reset the Dominion PX to its factory defaults.
5. Wait until the Username prompt appears, indicating the reset is
complete.
237
Appendix E: Resetting to Factory Defaults
The diagram shows the location of the reset button on Zero U models.
The diagram shows the location of the reset button on 1U models.
Note: HyperTerminal is available on Windows operating systems prior to
Windows Vista. For Windows Vista or later versions, you may use PuTTY,
which is a free program you can download from the Internet. See PuTTY's
documentation for details on configuration.
Using the CLI Command
The Command Line Interface (CLI) provides a reset command for
restoring Dominion PX to factory defaults. See Using the Command Line
Interface (on page 142).
To reset to factory defaults using the CLI command:
1. Connect a computer to the Dominion PX device over a serial
connection.
2. Launch a terminal emulation program such as HyperTerminal, Kermit,
or PuTTY, and open a window on the Dominion PX. For information
on the serial port configuration, see Step 2 of Initial Network
Configuration (on page 16).
3. Log in to the CLI by typing the user name "admin" and its password.
See Step 4 of Initial Network Configuration (on page 16).
4. After the # system prompt appears, type either of the following
commands and press Enter.
#
reset factorydefaults
-- OR --
#
reset factorydefaults /y
5. If you entered the command without "/y" in Step 4, a message
appears prompting you to confirm the operation. Type y to confirm the
reset.
238
Appendix E: Resetting to Factory Defaults
6. Wait until the Username prompt appears, indicating the reset is
complete.
239
Appendix F Non-Zero Readings While No Loads
Attached
When no loads are physically attached to any outlets or lines, it is likely
some Dominion PX models still show non-zero current or active power
readings for the inlet in the web interface and/or LED display. This section
explains why a PDU shows these readings when there are no loads
attached.

The PDU shows non-zero current readings.
Reason: The current readings reflect the power consumption of the
PDU's meter and controller boards. This is because the
measurements are taken at the input lines to the PDU.

The PDU shows zero current readings while showing non-zero
active power readings.
Reason: When no loads are connected, the PDU shows its own power
consumption, usually a very low single-digit number, such as 2~3W.
Power consumption varies depending on the rated voltage. For
example, the active power reading shows 3W for 240V, but 6W for
120V. The PDU displays the current readings at the minimum of
1/10th of an ampere, such as 1.1A, 10.2A and the like. Without any
loads attached, the current reading may show 0.0A because the
current value is rounded off when the actual current value is below
1/10th of an ampere. For example, the actual current value for the 3W,
240V case is 0.0125A, which is shown as 0.0A after being rounded up
to the 1/10th of an ampere.
Note: In this scenario, the active power reading for the inlet shows
zero in the LED display, which is inconsistent with the corresponding
reading shown in the web interface.
240
Index
1
1U Products • 3
2
2U Products • 3
A
A Note about Enabling Thresholds • 143
A Note about Firmware Upgrade Time • 134
A Note about Untriggered Rules • 112
About Contact Closure Sensors • xii, 22
About the Interface • 144
Access Security Control • 73
Accessing the Help • 136
Add Page Icon • 44, 47
Adding an IP Access Control Rule • 172
Adding IT Devices for Ping Monitoring • 114
Adding the LDAP Server Settings • 91
Adjusting the Pane • 45
Applicable Models • xi
Asset Management • xii, 124
Attaching Asset Sensors to a Rack • 25
Automatic Mode • 34
Automatically Completing a Command • 222
B
Beeper • 37
Before You Begin • 10
Browser-Defined Shortcut Menu • 51
Browsing through the Online Help • 136
C
Certificate Signing Request • 85
Changing a Specific LED's Color Settings • 125
Changing the Circuit Breaker Name • 181
Changing the Column • 49
Changing the Default Policy • 74, 81, 82
Changing the HTTP Port • 170
Changing the HTTP(S) Settings • 58
Changing the HTTPS Port • 171
Changing the Inlet Name • 180
Changing the LAN Duplex Mode • 166
Changing the LAN Interface Speed • 166
Changing the Outlet Name • 180
Changing the PDU Name • 161
Changing the Role List View • 73
Changing the Sensor Description • 183
Changing the Sensor Name • 181
Changing the Sorting • 50, 113
Changing the SSH Settings • 58
Changing the Telnet Settings • 59
Changing the Temperature Unit • xii, 129
Changing the User List View • 70
Changing the View of a List • 49, 54, 70, 73,
113, 132, 135
Changing Your Own Password • 213
Changing Your Password • 40
Checking Associated Circuit Breakers • 96
Checking the Branch Circuit Rating • 11
Circuit Breaker Configuration Commands • 181
Circuit Breaker Information • 152
Circuit Breaker Sensor Information • 154
Circuit Breakers • 35
Clearing Event Entries • 113
Closing a Serial Connection • 147
Collapsing the Tree • 45
Command History • 158
Commands for Circuit Breaker Sensors • 195
Commands for Environmental Sensors • 200
Commands for Inlet Pole Sensors • 189
Commands for Inlet Sensors • 184
Components of an Event Rule • 104
Configuring a Contact Closure Sensor • 23, 24,
122
Configuring Dominion PX • xii, 13, 55
Configuring Environmental Sensors • 116, 118
Configuring Event Rules • 64, 100, 104, 106,
140
Configuring SNMP Traps • 140
Configuring the Asset Sensor • 28, 124
Configuring the Dominion PX Device and
Network • 160
Configuring the Firewall • 74
Configuring the SMTP Settings • 64, 106
Configuring the SNMP Settings • 59, 67
Configuring Users for Encrypted SNMP v3 • 60,
139
Connecting Asset Sensors to Dominion PX • 27
Connecting Dominion PX to Your Network • 14
Connecting Environmental Sensors
(Optional) • 20
Connecting the Asset Management Sensor
(Optional) • xii, 25, 31
Connecting the PDU to a Computer • 14
Connecting the PDU to a Power Source • 13
241
Index
Connecting Third-Party Detectors/Switches to
DPX-CC2-TR • 22
Connection Ports • 30
Contact Closure Sensor LEDs • 24
Copying a Dominion PX Configuration • 129
Copying Configurations with Bulk
Configuration • 127
Creating a Certificate Signing Request • 85
Creating a Role • 68, 71, 213
Creating a Self-Signed Certificate • 87
Creating a User Profile • 39, 66, 69, 70, 71, 130,
139, 206
Creating Actions • 105
Creating an Event Rule • 104
Creating Firewall Rules • 74, 75
Creating Role Based Access Control Rules • 81,
82
Creating Rules • 106
D
Data Pane • 47
Deleting a Role • 72, 216
Deleting a User Profile • 69, 212
Deleting an Event Rule or Action • 111
Deleting an IP Access Control Rule • 174
Deleting Firewall Rules • 78
Deleting Ping Monitoring Settings • 115
Deleting Role Based Access Control Rules • 84
Deleting the LDAP Server Settings • 94
Describing the Sensor Location • 118, 120
Device Management • 52
Diagnostic Commands • 219
Different CLI Modes and Prompts • 145, 146,
147
Disabling the LDAP Authentication • 95
Displaying the Asset Sensor Information • 126
Displaying the PDU Information • xii, 53, 96
Dominion PX Explorer Pane • 43
Downloading Diagnostic Information • xii, 132
Downloading Key and Certificate Files • 89
Downloading SNMP MIB • 60, 139, 140, 141
E
Editing Firewall Rules • 77
Editing Ping Monitoring Settings • 115
Editing Role Based Access Control Rules • 83
Editing the LDAP Server Settings • 94
Enabling Data Logging • 63
Enabling LDAP and Local Authentication
Services • 95
242
Enabling Login Limitations • 79
Enabling or Disabling Data Logging • 161
Enabling Password Aging • 81
Enabling SNMP • 63, 138
Enabling Strong Passwords • 80
Enabling the Feature • 81
Enabling the Firewall • 74
Enabling User Blocking • 79
Entering the Configuration Mode • 147, 160
Entering the Diagnostic Mode • 147, 219
Environmental Sensor Configuration
Commands • 181
Environmental Sensor Information • 155
Environmental Sensors • xii, 115
Equipment Setup Worksheet • 11, 226
Example • 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167,
168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 176, 177,
179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, 186, 187,
188, 189, 190, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197,
198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206,
207, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 220, 221, 222
When Hysteresis is Useful • 103
When to Disable Hysteresis • 103
Example 1 - Basic Network Information • 158
Example 1 - Combination of IP, Subnet Mask
and Gateway Parameters • 216
Example 2 - Combination of Upper Critical and
Upper Warning Settings • 217
Example 2 - In-Depth Network Information •
159
Example 3 - Basic PDU Information • 159
Example 4 - In-Depth PDU Information • 160
Examples • 158
Existing Roles • 157
Existing User Profiles • 156
Expanding the Tree • 43, 44, 96, 97, 98, 99,
100, 101, 117, 118, 121, 124
External Sensor Information • 153
F
Filling Out the Equipment Setup Worksheet •
11
Firmware Upgrade • xii, 129, 133
Forcing HTTPS Encryption • 58, 73, 85
Full Disaster Recovery • 135
G
Gathering the LDAP Information • 90
Index
H
Help Command • 147
History Buffer Length • 158
How to Use the Calendar • 61, 62
HTTPS Access • 174
I
Identifying Environmental Sensors • 116, 117
Initial Network Configuration • 16, 39, 46, 56,
57, 239, 240
Inlet and Circuit Breaker Management • 97
Inlet Configuration Commands • 180
Inlet Information • 150
Inlet Pole Sensor Information • 151
Installation and Configuration • 10
Installing a CA-Signed Certificate • 87
Installing Cable Retention Clips (Optional) • 12
Installing Existing Key and Certificate Files • 88
Introduction • 1
Introduction to the Web Interface • xii, 42
IP Access Control • 171
L
Layout • 142
LDAP Configuration Illustration • 93, 231
LED Display • 32
LEDs for Measurement Units • 33, 34
Listing TCP Connections • 131
Logging in to CLI • 144
Logging in to the Web Interface • 39
Logging out of CLI • 223
Login • 39
Login Limitation • 175
Logout • 41
Logout Button • 47
M
MAC Address • xii, 13, 230
Managing Environmental Sensors • 116, 117
Managing Event Logging • 112
Manual Mode • 34
Maximum Ambient Operating Temperature • 11,
224
Menus • 43
Modifying a Role • 68, 69, 71, 214
Modifying a User Profile • 41, 69, 71, 207
Modifying an Action • 60, 111
Modifying an Event Rule • 110
Modifying the IP Access Control Parameters •
171
Modifying the Network Configuration • 54
Modifying the Network Interface Settings • xii,
56
Modifying the Network Service Settings • 58,
144, 146
Modifying the Network Settings • 46, 55, 233
Monitoring Circuit Breakers • 99
Monitoring Server Accessibility • xii, 114
Monitoring the Inlet • 98
More Information • 48
More Information about AD Configuration • 93
Mounting 1U or 2U Models • 7
Mounting Zero U Models Using L-Brackets and
Buttons • 6
Mounting Zero U Models Using Two Rear
Buttons • 5
Multi-Command Syntax • 172, 176, 179, 212,
216
N
Naming Circuit Breakers • 98
Naming Outlets • 96
Naming the Inlet • 97
Naming the PDU • 43, 44, 45, 54, 119
Network Configuration • 148
Network Diagnostics • xii, 130
Network Service Settings • 149
Network Troubleshooting • 130, 219
Networking Configuration Commands • 163
Networking Mode • 149
Non-Zero Readings While No Loads Attached •
35, 99, 242
O
Outlet Configuration Commands • 179
Outlet Information • 150
Outlet Management • 95
Outlets • 29
Overriding the DHCP-Assigned DNS Server •
170
P
Package Contents • 3, 10
Panel Components • xii, 29
PDU Configuration • 149
PDU Configuration Commands • 161
Pinging a Host • 130
Power Cord • 29
Preparing the Installation Site • 10
Product Features • xii, 1
Product Models • 1
243
Index
Q
Querying Available Parameters for a
Command • 147, 217
Querying the DNS Servers • 220
Quitting the Configuration Mode • 161, 217
Quitting the Diagnostic Mode • 222
R
Rackmount Safety Guidelines • 4
Rack-Mounting the PDU • xii, 4
Rebooting the Dominion PX Device • 65
Reliability Information • 157
Reset Button • 35
Resetting Dominion PX • 218
Resetting the Button-Type Circuit Breaker • 36
Resetting the Handle-Type Circuit Breaker • 36
Resetting to Factory Defaults • 35, 219, 239
Resizing a Dialog • 50, 54, 113, 132
Restarting the PDU • 218
Retrieving Previous Commands • 222
Retrieving Software Packages Information •
136
Role Configuration Commands • 213
Role of a DNS Server • 56, 233
S
Safety Guidelines • ii
Safety Instructions • iii, 11
Sample Event Rules • 108
Sample Inlet-Level Event Rule • 109
Sample Outlet-Level Event Rule • 108
Sample PDU-Level Event Rule • 108
Saving a Dominion PX Configuration • 128
Security Configuration Commands • 171
Security Settings • 156
Sensor Configuration Commands • 184
Sensor Measurement Accuracy • 121
Sensor RJ-12 Port Pinouts • 224
Serial RJ-45 Port Pinouts • xii, 224
Setting Asset Sensor LED Colors • 125, 126
Setting Circuit Breaker Thresholds • 101
Setting Data Logging • 63, 161, 162
Setting Inlet Thresholds • 100
Setting Power Thresholds • xii, 49, 100, 143
Setting the BSSID • 165
Setting the Circuit Breaker's Deassertion
Hysteresis • 200
Setting the Data Logging Measurements Per
Entry • 162
244
Setting the Date and Time • 61
Setting the Gateway • 168
Setting the Inlet Pole's Deassertion
Hysteresis • 194
Setting the Inlet's Deassertion Hysteresis • 188
Setting the Inlet's Lower Critical Threshold •
186
Setting the Inlet's Lower Warning Threshold •
187
Setting the Inlet's Upper Critical Threshold •
184
Setting the Inlet's Upper Warning Threshold •
185
Setting the IP Address • 167
Setting the IP Configuration Mode • 165
Setting the Lower Critical Threshold for a
Circuit Breaker • 198
Setting the Lower Critical Threshold for an Inlet
Pole • 192
Setting the Lower Warning Threshold for a
Circuit Breaker • 199
Setting the Lower Warning Threshold for an
Inlet Pole • 193
Setting the Network Parameters • 165
Setting the Network Service Parameters • 170
Setting the Networking Mode • 163
Setting the Preferred Host Name • 167
Setting the Primary DNS Server • 169
Setting the PSK • 164
Setting the Secondary DNS Server • 169
Setting the Sensor's Assertion Timeout • 205
Setting the Sensor's Deassertion Hysteresis •
204
Setting the Sensor's Lower Critical Threshold •
202
Setting the Sensor's Lower Warning
Threshold • 203
Setting the Sensor's Upper Critical Threshold •
200
Setting the Sensor's Upper Warning
Threshold • 201
Setting the SSID • 164
Setting the Subnet Mask • 168
Setting the Upper Critical Threshold for a
Circuit Breaker • 196
Setting the Upper Critical Threshold for an Inlet
Pole • 189
Setting the Upper Warning Threshold for a
Circuit Breaker • 197
Setting the Upper Warning Threshold for an
Inlet Pole • 190
Index
Setting the Wireless Parameters • 164
Setting the X Coordinate • 182
Setting the Y Coordinate • 182
Setting the Z Coordinate • 163, 183
Setting the Z Coordinate Format • 119
Setting the Z Coordinate Format for
Environmental Sensors • 162, 183
Setting Up an SSL Certificate • 73, 85
Setting Up LDAP Authentication • 56, 73, 90,
234
Setting Up Role Based Access Control Rules •
xii, 81
Setting Up Roles • 40, 63, 65, 68, 70
Setting Up User Login Controls • 78
Setup Button • 45
Showing Information • 148
Showing the Network Connections • 220
SNMP Gets and Sets • 141
SNMP Sets and Thresholds • 143
Sorting Firewall Rules • 78
Sorting Role Based Access Control Rules • 84
Sorting the LDAP Access Order • 93
Specifications • 4, 224
States of Managed Sensors • 121
Status Bar • 45
Step A. Determine User Accounts and Groups •
231
Step B. Configure User Groups on the AD
Server • 232
Step C. Configure LDAP Authentication on the
Dominion PX Device • 233
Step D. Configure User Groups on the
Dominion PX Device • 235
Strong Passwords • 177
Supported Web Browsers • xii, 38
Supported Wireless LAN Configuration • 15
T
Testing the LDAP Server Connection • 94
Testing the Network Connectivity • 221
The Dominion PX MIB • 141
The Yellow- or Red-Highlighted Reading • 48,
52, 98, 99
Three-Digit Row • 32
Tracing the Network Route • 131
Tracing the Route • 222
Two-Digit Row • 33
Unmanaging Environmental Sensors • 118,
124
Unpacking the Product and Components • 10
Updating the Asset Sensor Firmware • 136
Updating the Firmware • 133
User Blocking • 176
User Configuration Commands • 206
User Management • 65
Using SNMP • 134, 138
Using the CLI Command • 219, 240
Using the Command Line Interface • xii, 58,
120, 144, 240
Using the PDU • 29
Using the Reset Button • 239
Using the Web Interface • 16, 38
V
Viewing Connected Users • 113
Viewing Firmware Update History • 135
Viewing Sensor Data • 120
Viewing the Communication Log • 46, 131
Viewing the Dashboard • 52
Viewing the Local Event Log • 112
W
Warning Icon • 48
What is Assertion Timeout? • 101, 102, 103,
119, 206
What is Deassertion Hysteresis? • 100, 101,
102, 112, 119, 189, 195, 200, 205
What's New in the Dominion PX User Guide •
xii
Wired Network Settings • 56
Wireless Configuration • 148
Wireless Network Settings • 57
With HyperTerminal • 145, 218
With SSH or Telnet • 146
Z
Zero U Products • 3
U
Unblocking a User • 218
245
U.S./Canada/Latin America
Monday - Friday
8 a.m. - 6 p.m. ET
Phone: 800-724-8090 or 732-764-8886
For CommandCenter NOC: Press 6, then Press 1
For CommandCenter Secure Gateway: Press 6, then Press 2
Fax: 732-764-8887
Email for CommandCenter NOC: tech-ccnoc@raritan.com
Email for all other products: tech@raritan.com
China
Europe
Europe
Monday - Friday
8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. GMT+1 CET
Phone: +31-10-2844040
Email: tech.europe@raritan.com
United Kingdom
Monday - Friday
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. GMT
Phone +44(0)20-7090-1390
Beijing
France
Monday - Friday
9 a.m. - 6 p.m. local time
Phone: +86-10-88091890
Monday - Friday
8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. GMT+1 CET
Phone: +33-1-47-56-20-39
Shanghai
Germany
Monday - Friday
9 a.m. - 6 p.m. local time
Phone: +86-21-5425-2499
Monday - Friday
8:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. GMT+1 CET
Phone: +49-20-17-47-98-0
Email: rg-support@raritan.com
GuangZhou
Monday - Friday
9 a.m. - 6 p.m. local time
Phone: +86-20-8755-5561
India
Monday - Friday
9 a.m. - 6 p.m. local time
Phone: +91-124-410-7881
Japan
Monday - Friday
9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. local time
Phone: +81-3-3523-5991
Email: support.japan@raritan.com
Melbourne, Australia
Monday - Friday
9:00 a.m. - 6 p.m. local time
Phone: +61-3-9866-6887
Taiwan
Monday - Friday
9 a.m. - 6 p.m. GMT -5 Standard -4 Daylight
Phone: +886-2-8919-1333
Email: support.apac@raritan.com
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising