LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT 1310 E. Route 66 Lebanon, Missouri 65536

LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT 1310 E. Route 66 Lebanon, Missouri 65536
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOL DISTRICT
1310 E. Route 66
Lebanon, Missouri 65536
Board of Directors Meeting
Tuesday, October 16, 2012
Central Office – Board Room
5:30 p.m.
Tentative Agenda
1. Call to order by Board President. –5:30 p.m.
2. Pledge of Allegiance.
3. Approve the agenda.
4. Communications:
a. Recognitions.
b. Public Comments on Agenda Items.
c. MSBA Video.
d. LEA.
e. Administrators.
f. Board.
5. Consent Agenda Items:
a. Minutes of September 11 and 24 meetings.
b. Monthly Financial Report and Budget Revisions.
c. Personnel Report.
6. Evaluation of Programs:
a. Transportation Program.
b. Lebanon Technology and Career Center.
7. Review Items:
a. R3-10 Facility Planning.
b. CAPS Program Review.
8. Action Items:
a. High School/LTCC Course Schedule 2013-14.
b. LEF Presentation/Request.
c. Renew Bank Depository.
d. Resolution to approve a Lease Purchase Agreement for Scoreboards.
e. Journalism Trip.
f. Latin Trip.
g. Honors English Trip.
9.
Superintendent’s Report.
a. MSBA Fall Meeting.
10.
Closed Session.
a. Consideration of Personnel. 610.021(3)
b. Legal Action. 610. 021(1)
11. Return to open session.
12. Items for November Board Meeting.
13. Adjourn.
The Lebanon Education Association Update
Dear Fellow Staff,
WOW! What a great start to the 2012-2013 school
year. LEA has lots of great plans for the year
ahead.
The purpose of LEA is to:
* promote the general welfare of the faculty,
school and community by fostering a spirit of
loyalty to the profession
* provide educational services for teacher and
scholarships for local high school students
* render mutual encouragement and inspiration to
its membership
* be a voice for teachers who need representation
*serve as liaison between faculty and
administration.
LEA is an organization by teachers, for teachers.
LEA representatives will be attending each school
board meeting throughout the year and have a
chance to present items of celebration.
The LEA co-chairs also meet with Central Office
personnel during the school year to present
concerns on behalf of teachers.
We have a commitment this year to increase
communication with members and we will continue
to share celebrations with the school board.
If you have questions or concerns for LEA,
please see the list for your building
representative. We are here to help you!
If you have a great website to share with fellow
members please email
[email protected] to have it
featured in the next issue!
GO LEBANON YELLOW JACKETS!!!
Sincerely,
Your LEA Executive Committee
Dates to Remember
\September 11th- School Board Meeting
\October 1st –Last day for payroll deduction
\October 12th –Turn in celebrations to your
building rep
\October 16th- School Board Meeting
\October 31st-Last day to join LEA for 20122013!!!
Inspiration Corner
The art of teaching
is the art of assisting.
Mark Van Doren
LEA By Building
LEA Co-Chairs
Glenda Johnston-Boswell
Deborlee Mitschele- Maplecrest
Secretary- Erica McKimmey- Esther
Treasurer- Troy Westerman- Jr. High
Esther- Kristine Coffman
Maplecrest: Barb Prock and Amanda Frazier
Boswell: Lindsay Darnell and Nancy McGehee
Hillcrest: Debbie McGinnis and Angela Hough
Jr. High: Hillary Stanley and Susan Sexton
Sr. High: Kate Sutter, John Frazier, Becky Todd
and Melissa Dobbs
Alt Center: Donna Pfannenstiel
LTTC: Brian Jackson
Tech Talk
Check out this great site featuring some local
teachers!
www.teacherspayteachers.com
Minutes
Lebanon R-3 School District
September 11, 2012
ATTENDANCE
H = Here
A = Absent
H - John Carr
H - Robert O’Neil
A - Steve Hite
A- Kim Light
H - Robert Taylor
H - Jason Riggs
H - Sherry Headley
TYPE OF MEETING & LOCATION
REGULAR BOARD MEETING HELD AT ESTHER ELEMENTARY AT 5:30 P.M.
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
Robert O’Neil, Vice-President, called the meeting to order.
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
APPROVE OR CHANGE THE TENTATIVE AGENDA
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
SHERRY HEADLEY
ROBERT TAYLOR
MOTION:
I move we approve the tentative agenda with the
removal of Action Item “h”. Motion Carried: 5-0.
COMMUNICATIONS:
RECOGNITIONS- Dr. Armstrong presented transportation director Max Starnes an Exemplary Fleet
Award for having a 90% or higher rating on bus inspections. The Board thanked Max and his
maintenance crew for keeping an aging fleet in superior operating condition.
PUBLIC – None.
MSBA – A video from the Missouri School Board Association was shown to get the latest updates
on important education issues and upcoming events.
LEA – Glenda Johnston, LEA chair, informed the Board that the teaching staff has gotten off to a
great start; thanked the Board for the step on the salary schedule; and reported that 4 Lebanon
seniors were presented scholarships from LEA.
ADMINISTRATORS : None.
BOARD :
None.
1
9/11/12
BOARD MEETING – SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 – PAGE TWO
APPROVE CONSENT AGENDA
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
JOHN CARR
JASON RIGGS
MOTION:
I move we approve the Consent Agenda Items
consisting of minutes of the August 14 and 23 , 2012 meetings; and personnel report which
included the resignations of Skip Pritchett-Warehouse Manager and Gail Miller- PAT Educator and
the employment of Kyle Corcoran- HC Paraprofessional; Kandice Tiner-LAEC secretary; and Larry
Gregory-Custodian. The payment of bills totaling $1,981,1:4.44 and the treasurer’s report
were approved. Motion Carried: 5-0.
TH
RD
REVIEW & EVALUATION
LESLIE UDER GAVE A REVIEW AND EVALUATION ON THE DISTRICT’S LIBRARY/MEDIA
SERVICES.
REVIEW
THE BOARD HEARD FROM DR. ARMSTRONG AND MR. KNAPP ON THE R-3 FACILITY PLAN
INITIATIVE.
PAT BAUER GAVE A REPORT ON THE ACT; EOC SOCIAL STUDIES AND SCIENCE; AND 5 AND 8
GRADE SCIENCE RESULTS.
ACTION ITEMS
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
ROBERT TAYLOR
JASON RIGGS
MOTION:
Motion Carried: 5-0.
I move we approve the 2012A Policy updates.
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
JOHN CARR
SHERRY HEADLEY
MOTION:
with the City of Lebanon. Motion Carried: 5-0.
I move we approve the updated SRO agreement
Dr. Widhalm presented a list of dates that can be considered for interviewing/selecting an
architectural service for the district. No action was taken at this time.
2
9/11/12
BOARD MEETING – SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 – PAGE 3
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
SHERRY HEADLEY
ROBERT TAYLOR
MOTION:
Motion Carried: 5-0.
I move we approve the FY 13 bus routes.
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
JOHN CARR
ROBERT TAYLOR
MOTION:
of the Board Report. Motion Carried: 5-0.
I move we approve the FY 12 Annual Secretary
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
SHERRY HEADLEY
ROBERT TAYLOR
MOTION:
I move we approve the district’s application for
a Community Cares grant. Motion Carried: 5-0.
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
JASON RIGGS
JOHN CARR
MOTION:
surplus. Motion Carried: 5-0.
I move we declare some district property as
SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT
MSBA fall conference and meeting.
MOTION TO GO INTO CLOSED SESSION
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
JASON RIGGS
JOHN CARR
MOTION:
Carried: Roll Call Vote.
I move we go into Closed Session. Motion
ROBERT TAYLOR
JOHN CARR
STEVE HITE
KIM LIGHT
JASON RIGGS
ROBERT O’NEIL
SHERRY HEADLEY
3
YES
YES
ABSENT
ABSENT
YES
YES
YES
9/11/12
BOARD MEETING – SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 – PAGE 4
THE BOARD CAME OUT OF CLOSED SESSION AND MADE THE FOLLOWING MOTION.
ADJOURNMENT
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
SHERRY HEADLEY
JASON RIGGS
MOTION:
Motion Carried: 5-0.
I move we adjourn this meeting.
________________________________
PRESIDENT
________________________________
SECRETARY
4
9/11/12
Minutes
Lebanon R-3 School District
September 24, 2012
ATTENDANCE
H = Here
A = Absent
HHAH-
Sherry Headley
Kim Light
Steve Hite
Robert O’Neil
A - Robert Taylor
H - Jason Riggs
H - John Carr
TYPE OF MEETING & LOCATION
SPECIAL BOARD MEETING HELD AT ESTHER ELEMENTARY AT 5:30 P.M.
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
Robert O’Neil, Vice-President, called the meeting to order.
APPROVE THE AGENDA
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
JOHN CARR
JASON RIGGS
MOTION:
Motion Carried: 5-0.
I move we approve the agenda.
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
JASON RIGGS
JOHN CARR
MOTION:
I move we select SDA Sapp Design Associates as
our Architectural Firm. The remaining firms were rated as follows:
ACI/Boland, Inc.
2
Sam A. Winn & Associates
3
Hollis + Millers Architects
4
Motion Carried: 5-0.
ADJOURNMENT
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
JOHN CARR
KIM LIGHT
MOTION:
Motion Carried: 5-0.
I move we adjourn this meeting.
__________________________________
PRESIDENT
___________________________________
SECRETARY
1
9/24/12
Lebanon R-3 Finance Dashboard
Month Ending September 2012
Axis Title
Fund Balance
$17,000,000.00
$16,000,000.00
$15,000,000.00
$14,000,000.00
$13,000,000.00
$12,000,000.00
$11,000,000.00
$10,000,000.00
$9,000,000.00
$8,000,000.00
$7,000,000.00
$6,000,000.00
$5,000,000.00
$4,000,000.00
$3,000,000.00
$2,000,000.00
$1,000,000.00
$Sep-09
Fund Balance
Revenue/Expense Comparison
$45.000
$40.000
$35.000
$30.000
Fund Balance
$25.000
FY 11-12 YTD
$20.000
FY 12-13 Current YTD
$15.000
Working Budget
$10.000
$5.000
$Jan-10
May-10
Sep-10
Jan-11
May-11
Sep-11
Jan-12
May-12
current vs. prior ytd
( in Millions)
Current
FY 10-11
FY 09-10
FY 08-09
$
10.062 $
10.831 $
9.919 $
9.218
$
(0.77) $
0.91
Operating Funds
$6.599M
Total Revenue
Sep-12
Total Expenses
NOTES: Revenues at month end totaled $7.332M compared to $5.946M a year ago.
State and local funds account for the increased revenues. Local revenues are primarily
donations or reimbursements for the stadium improvements, delinquent taxes, fines and
escheats. Expenses at month end totaled $7.105M compared to $5.979M a year ago.
Expenses are detailed throughout the report.
$6.612M
Labor Costs
Overtime Trend
$18,000.00
$16,000.00
$25.000
$14,000.00
$20.000
FY 11-12 YTD
$15.000
FY 12-13 Current YTD
Working Budget
$10.000
$12,000.00
FY 08-09
$10,000.00
FY 09-10
$8,000.00
FY 10-11
$6,000.00
FY 11-12
FY 12-13
$4,000.00
$5.000
$2,000.00
$-
$Teacher Fund 020
Labor
FY 11-12 YTD
Teacher Fund 020 $
2.231
General Fund 010 $
1.205
General Fund 010
FY 12-13
Working
Current -Last
Current YTD
Budget
in k's
$
2.235 $
22.039 $
0.004
$
1.247 $
7.816 $
0.042
$
0.046
JUL
AUG
SEP
OCT
NOV
DEC
JAN
FEB
YTD
Last YTD
OT $
17,771.59 $
13,255.69
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
134%
NOTES: Labor costs are consistent with budgeted expectations for the period compared to the same period last fiscal year. Overtime is up approximately 34% compared to last
year and down 17% from the 09-10 fiscal year.
Lebanon R-3 Finance Dashboard
Month Ending September 2012
Utilities Trend
Self-Funded Health Plan
$900,000.00
$800,000.00
$600,000.00
$700,000.00
$500,000.00
$600,000.00
$400,000.00
$500,000.00
$400,000.00
$300,000.00
FY 11-12 YTD
$300,000.00
FY 12-13 Current YTD
$200,000.00
This Month
Last Year This Mo
YTD
Last YTD
$100,000.00
$200,000.00
Budget
$-
$100,000.00
$Fund Balance
Claims
Health 060
Fund Balance
Claims
Fixed Costs
FY 11-12 YTD
$ 572,899.00
$ 233,550.65
$
35,879.30
Fixed Costs
FY 12-13
Current YTD
$ 789,182.46
$ 271,049.07
$ 45,808.35
Utilities
Electric
Water/Sewer
Gas
Total
$
$
$
$
$512,200.00
$74,000.00
$125,500.00
Electric
Water/Sewer
Gas
Budget
512,200.00
74,000.00
125,500.00
711,700.00
$
$
$
$
This Month
792.00
49.40
311.51
1,152.91
Last Year This
Mo
$
56,742.28
$
6,928.88
$
1,901.44
$
65,572.60
$
$
$
$
FY 11-12 YTD
$
66,305.00
$
164,388.00
$
372,369.00
$
801,907.00
$
539,766.45
FY 12-13 Current
YTD
$
86,417.00
$
176,270.00
$
404,307.00
$
775,528.00
$
1,417,117.58
YTD
76,330.77
7,466.91
3,314.35
87,112.03
Last YTD
$ 141,287.72
$ 18,462.00
$ 11,497.18
$ 171,246.90
Other Cost Centers
$1,600,000.00
Other Cost Centers
Trans Fuel
Trans Labor
Supplies
Purch. Serv.
Capital Outlay
$1,400,000.00
$1,200,000.00
$1,000,000.00
$800,000.00
FY 11-12 YTD
$600,000.00
FY 12-13 Current YTD
FY 12-13
Budget
$0.331M
$1.292M
$1.079M
$2.658M
$ 0.974M
$400,000.00
$200,000.00
Notes:
$$0.331M
$1.292M
$1.079M
$2.658M
$ 0.974M
Trans Fuel
Trans Labor
Supplies
Purch. Serv.
Capital Outlay
NOTES: Health insurance fund had a modest rebound from August's high claims recouping a little over $50k of the $178k loss last month. Our fund balance is up 38%
over last year. Our August experience reinforces the need for a sound reserve. Utility bills were not received in time to process for the month end skewing the report
comparisons. Those totals are approximately $55,922.02 Capital outlay includes the turf installation costs and other planned projects. Fuel costs are up sharply and may
require adjustment, we'll monitor over next couple of months.
LEBANON R-III SCHOOL DISTRICT
BANK RECONCILIATION
September
30
2012
MAIN CHECKING
DEBT SERVICE
PAYPAL FOOD SERVICE
FLEX
EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PLAN
CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT
SCHOLARSHIPS
MOHEFA - ESCROW
O/S ITEMS
BANK BALANCE
Dep. In transit
O/S Items
O/S Items
Bank Changes/Charges
Taxes Dep. In Trans.
O/S Checks
September
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
7,208,796.07
1,414,749.89
751,996.44
175,520.02
863,637.43
791,179.78
$
11,205,879.63
$
$
$
$
$
30
2012
1,582.80
0.08
113.00
(1,145,434.56)
$10,062,140.95
BOOK CASH BALANCE DETAIL
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
POOLED CASH - GENERAL FUND
POOLED CASH - TEACHERS FUND
POOLED CASH - DEBT SERVICE
POOLED CASH - CAPITAL FUND
POOLED CASH- EMP BENEFIT PLAN
BOARD RESTRICTED CASH
PAYPAL FOOD SERVICE
FLEX
EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PLAN
SCHOLARSHIPS
CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT
DEBT SERVICE
MOHEFA - ESCROW
5,645,463.06
494,549.60
(395,584.52)
157,249.06
37,771.43
122,190.50
4,003.67
751,411.03
863,637.43
175,520.02
1,414,749.89
791,179.78
FUND BALANCE
September
30
2012
$
10,062,140.95
FUND BALANCE
September
30
2011
$
10,831,818.52
FUND BALANCE
September
30
2010
$
9,918,801.16
FUND BALANCE
September
30
2009
$
9,217,993.10
Operating Funds 010,020,040
Operating Funds 010,020,040
September
September
30
30
2012
2011
$
$
6,598,975.91
6,611,701.01
Joe Knapp, Chief Financial Officer
Dated
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
10/5/2012
2012-2013
Time: 12:54
Page 1
All Revenue Accounts - Board Revenue by Object-Sept 2012
I
i
1
ACCOUNT CODE
ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION
MTD ACTIVITYl
_ _ . ~ ..A~!J"~8.04
G R A~..Q..l_() TAL
0.00
WORKING
BUDGET
% REALIZED
LAST YEAR
THIS MONTH
7331914.81 ;)~ 39'263S76:t)b
18.67
. 1 931486::U
8,132,347.00
0.00
0.00
YTDACllVITY
0.00
LASTYEARI
THRU THIS MONTHl Account Type
I
~945500A1I
0.00
OBJECT 5111 TOTAL
CURRENT TAXES
OBJECT 5112 TOTAL
DELINQUENT TAXES
132,474.10
338,160.32
865.000.00
39.09
78,645.31
190,617.96
OBJECT 5113 TOTAL
PROPOSIllON C (SALES TAX)
276,811.46
893,136.60
3,560,140.00
25.09
262,560.84
866,657.60
OBJECT 5114 TOTAL
FINANCIAL INSTITUTION TAX
0.00
0.00
24.000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5115 TOTAL
MMSURTAX
0.00
0.00
512,000.00
0.00
0.00
7,690.82
344.60
344.60
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5123 TOTAL
ADULT CON EDUCATION TUITION
12,925.00
12,925.00
39,000.00
33.14
200.00
605.00
OBJECT 5124 TOTAL
VOC LPN PROGRAM
57,441.00
63,159.06
235,000.00
26.88
25,375.00
25,468.00
r-9_I!J.ECT 5121 TOTAL
REG DAY TUIllON (K-12J
7,375.93
23,438.79
127,000.00
18.46
8,070.64
26,716.25
45,258.69
106,250.48
630,000.00
20.05
46,801.87
110,670.79
25,975.40
150,200.00
- 17.29
19,721.75
28,0.23.10
147,460.62
774,698.00
19.03
80,055.10
130,284.62
OBJECT 5140 TOTAL
EARNINGS ON INVESTMENTS
OBJECT 5150 TOTAL
FOODSERVlCE
OBJECT 516S TOTAL
FOODSERVlCE (NON PROGRAM)
!6,776.75
OBJECT 5170 TOTAL
STUDENT BODY ACTIVIllES
70,457.06
OBJECT 5171 TOTAL
ATHLETIC GATE RECEIPTS
2,000.00
2,000.00
50,000.00
OBJECT 5180 TOTAL
OTHER COMMUNITY SERVICES
4,223.68
5,278.62
47,019.00
0B.lECT!i19~TOTAL
OTHER LOCAL
-115.00
25,589.66
12,900.00
OBJECT 5192 TOTAL
STADIUM DONATIONS
0.00
566,832.83
OBJECT 5193TOTAL
CENTRAL OFFICE BLDG RENTAL
0.00
OBJECT 5195 TOTAL
PRIOR PERIOD ADJUSTMENTS
0.00
OBJECT 5198 TOTAL
MISC LOCAL REVENUE
0.00
0.00
12,049.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5211 TOTAL
FINES ESCHEATS OVERPLUS ETC
0.00
13~,420.84
200,000.00
66.71
0.00
94,641.14
OBJECT 5221 TOTAL
RR AND UTILIllES
OBJECT 6311 TOTAL
BASIC FORMULA
OBJECT 5312 TOTAL
TRANSPORTAllON (STATE AID)
OBJECT 5314 TOTAL
ECSE STATE
OBJEC T 5319 TOTAL
BASIC FORMULA - CT FUND
--------------­
OBJECT 5.324 TOTAL . EDUC & SCREENINGIPAT
4.00
10,869.00
15,369.00
11.23
160.27
468.18
198.37
-146.66
553.47
0.00
0.00
0.00
425.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
41.645.56
41,645.56
..
0.00
41,063.26
400,000.00
10.27
0.00
0.00
1.p77 ,336.00
3,071.166.00
13,672,462.00
22.46
619!0,85.00
2.521,021.00
34,847.00
103,376.00
445,890.00
23.18
29,745.00
88,897.00
0.00
0.00
614,957.00
0.00
0.00
0.78
128,322.00
385,483.00
1.524,538.00
25.29
101,040.00
338,411.00
1 - - . _.. 0.00
0.00
75.000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5326 TOTAL
LTCC-PLTW
0.00
0.00
26,947.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5332 TOTAL
VOC TECH AIDE (STATE)
0.00
0.00
350.070.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT
. . . . . . 5333
. . . . . .TOTAL
....
FOODSERVlCE (STATE)
0.00
0.00
14.000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
ABE STATE
0.00
0.00
22.000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5341 TOTAL
ADULT DAYTIME TRADE
0.00
0.00
8,SOO.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5359 TOTAL
VO TECH ENHANCEMENT GRANT
0.00
6.421.00
188,634.00
3.«1
0.00
0.00
1,979.00
8.476.00
24,000.00
35.32
0.00
0.00
0.00
~
~ECT
5337 TOTAL
,2~ECT 5362 TOTAL
A+ SCHOOL GRANT
OBJECT 5381 TOTAL
EXTRAORDINARY COSTS - SP ED
0.00
61,326.12
415,815.00
14.75
0.00
OBJECT 5397 TOTAL
OTHER REVENUE (DUAL CREDlTt
0.00
4,485.00
6,SOO.00
69.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5412 TOTAL
MEDICAID
25,769.97
25,769.97
60.000.00
42.96
0.00
19.151.46
OBJECT 5421 TOTAL
VOC EDUCATION. SPECIAL PROJECTS
0.00
0.00
15,000.00
0.00
OBJECT 5422 TOTAL
BASIC FORM-FED OOT STABIL-AI!RA
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5424 TOTAL
CAREER LADDER-ARRA
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5427 TOTAL
VOC EDUCATION BASIC GRANT
0.00
63,580.18
124.169.00
51.20
106.43
OBJECT 5436 TOTAL
ABE FEDERAL
~~.~CT~!;r_TOTAL
OBJECT 5441 TOTAL
SPECIAL EO SWIS
0.00
0.00
316,721.00
315.721.00
17.532.00
17.532.00
0.00
127,041.00
0.00
4.945.87
500.00
500.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
224,064.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1 100000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
340,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
47,774.66
44,887.00
500.00
500.00
0.00
IND WITH DISIBIUTY ACT (IDEAl
0.00
0.00
796.174.00
OBJECT 5442 TOTAL
ECSE FEDERAL
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5445 TOTAL
FOOD SERVICE (FEDERAL)
0.00
OBJECT 5446 TOTAL
SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAM
0.00
-­
------------­
.
Dated
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
10/5/2012
2012-2013
Time: 12:54
Page 2
All Revenue Accounts - Board Revenue by Object-Sept 2012
,­
,,"
ACCOUNT CODE
ACCOUNT DESCRIPT!ON
OBJECT 5451 TOTAL
TITLE I ESEA
OBJECT 5455 TOTAL
MTD ACTIVITY
YTDACTIVITY'
-­
.~
WORKING'
BUDGET
% REALIZED
i
LAST YEAR
THIS MONTI'!
LAST YEAR
Account Type
THRU THIS MONTH
87,447.22
459,936.22
1,386081.00
3321
30,201.51
TITLE V
0.00
0.00
98,376.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5459 TOTAL
21 ST CENTURY· J+
0.00
0.00
147,690.00
0.00
0.00
36,823.00
OBJECT 5462 TOTAL
EMER IMMIGRATION EOUC
OBJECT 5465 TOTAL
TITLE II.A
30,201.51
0.00
0.00
12,173.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
183.80
3 :lA9.S0
177,859.00
1.83
1,066.46
48,609.10
15,759.18
OBJECT 5466 TOTAL
TITLE 11.0 ENH EDUCATION
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5472 TOTAL
School Age Community
0.00
3732.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5478 TOTAL
VOCAll0NAL REHAB
1,OQ3.00
1,003.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5481 TOTAL
SUMMER FOOD SER PROGRAM
0.00
35,793.40
38,000.00
94.19
OBJECT 5482 TOTAL
WlA • OTHER THAN OESE
0.00
7.500.00
41,000.00
1829
17.74
---­
0.00
37,683.50
9,959.20
10,889.95
OBJECT 5484 TOTAL
PELLGRANT
31,037.50
31,037.50
176,000.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 5492 TOTAL
TITLE VI.B
0.00
45,678.00
0.00
8,396.47
17,685.47
OBJECT 5493 TOTAL
IDEA, PART B (611)·ARRA
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
259,689.11
OBJECT 5494 TOTAL
IDEA, PART B (619) ECSE·ARRA
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
32,886.00
194,908,88
197,493.88
254,500.00
45,395.00
45,395.00
OBJECT 5497 TOTAL -­ COMP SCH REFORM GRANT
OBJECT 5651 TOTAL SALE OF OTHER PROPERTY
OBJECT 5691 TOTAL
BOND TEMPORARY DIRECT DEPOSIT
OBJECT 5810 TOTAL
TUI110N OTHER SCHOOLS
77.60
2,800.00
2,800.00
0.00
132,589.03
132,589.03
126,166.00
378,498.00
0.00
129,242.58
387,804.58
0.00
1,718.71
1,100,000.00
0.00
0.00
•
OBJECT 5820 TOTAL
VOCA 110NAL TUITION
0.00
0.00
69,237.00
0.16
0.00
0.00
0.00
.
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
Dated
10/5/2012
2012-2013
Time: 12:53
Page 1
All Expenditure Accounts - Board Expense By Objec-Sept 2012t
ACCOUNT CODE
I
i
I
ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION
I
,_._.~._ .•_........._._._ _ _ .._.
MTD ACTIVITY
YTDACTIVITY
,_ _3J!Od~1! ,-...1~ 692.84
WORKING
BUDGET
% REALIZED
47&:00
LAST YEAR
THIS MONTH
LAST YEAR
Account Type
THRU THIS MONTH
...!.ruJ'~!~~ ,--,----_.
g..~.M!D T~b...
OBJECT 6111 TOTAL
CERTlFICA TED ADMINISTRATORS SALARY
OBJECT 6112 TOTAL
CERTIFICATED TEACHERS SALARY
OBJECT 6113 TOTAL
OTHER CERTIFICATED SALARIES
1.6.049.89
15,049.89
OBJECT 6121 TOTAL
CERTIFICA TED PA~T TIME SALARY
26,885.19
46,325.88
OBJECT 6131 TOTAL
SUPPLEMENTAL PAY
11,561.12
50,656.67
395,011.00
OBJECT 6135 TOTAL
CERT SUPPLEMENTAL PART TIME TCHR
1 359.09
1,359.09
8,100.00
OBJECT 6141 TOTAL
CERT UN~!,ED S~~J:J::AVE SEVPAY
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 6150 TOT AL
OBJECT 6151 TOTAL
lRANS ECSE SA!':'~I!~~~ _____ ~~ ____~L~'!:.~~
CLASSIFIED SALARIES
483,207.35
OBJECT 6161 TOTAL
CLASSIFIED SAL PART TIME
17,072.32
OBJECT 6165 TOTAL
HS GATEKEEPERS SALARY
4,379.92
4,379.92
19,908.00
22.00
OBJECT 6171 TOTAL
CLASS UNUSED SICK LEAVESEV PAY
0.00
10,457.00
10,265.00
101.87
0.00
3,002.94
OBJECT 6211 TOTAL
TEACHER RETIREMENT
210,314.53
270,930.02
2,627,033.00
10.31
208,816.96
272,753.85
_
39.064
18.:19 '
3156337;30'"
9,1,23.00
9,123.00
140,921.00
6.47
11,577.32
11,577.32
1.294.767.08
1,644,040.79
16,151,832.00
10.18
1.273949.14
1.648.453.87
179.189.00
8.40
13,121.96
13.236.12
418,462.00
11.07
21,384.40
48,852.43
12.80
164.49
43,315.77
16.78
666.60
666.60
76,409.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,355.~~ _~.9,399.00
14.43
1,365.34
1,365.34
871,02.!lJ!§. f-- 5,311,027.00
16.40
481,164.15
841,528.77
19,313.91
233,733.00
8.26
16!.s~~ _ _ _ _ 18,678.35
216.68
216.68
64,220.07 1 - - - - - - ­
OBJECT 6221 TOTAL
NON TEACHER RETIREMENT
36,404.68
66,061.15
406,136.00
16.27
35,982.38
OBJECT 6231 TOTAL
OASDI
33,842.96
58,385.78
405,848.00
14.39
32,245.64
55,001.88
OBJECT 6232TOTAL
MEDICARE
25,329.02
36,459.04
323,103.00
11.29
24,855.84
35,983.89
OBJECT 6233TOTAL
CERTIFIED MEDICARE
Q.BJE~I.6~40 '!,()TAL
LIFE INSURANCE
0.00
0.00
884.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1'~!1l,1l0
258,915.32
2,088.38
23,827.00
8.76
1,782.66
2,398.82
339,201.82
2,975,562.00
11.40
258,913.14
338,256.64
11,307.01
33,807.30
117.077.00
28.88
235.45
28,189.83
0.00
1,314.91
20,000.00
6.67
4,042.34
8,044.66
180.50
564.82
1,100.00
51.35
194.66
590.36
26.17
25,65~2:27
93,560.68
OBJECT 6241 TOTAL
EMPLOYEE HEALTH INSURANCE
OBJECT 6261 TOTAL
WORI5ERll COMP INSURANCE
OBJECT 6271 TOTAL
UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION
OBJECT 6291 TOTAL
OTHER EMPLOYER PROVIDED SERVICES
OBJECT 6311 TOTAL
INSTRUCTION SERVICES
25,432.50
78,515.54
300,000.00
OBJECT 6313 TOTAL
PUPIL SERVICES
11,467.65
15,627.80
200,550.00
7.79
4,643.30
8,285.30
OBJECT 6315 TOTAL
AUDIT SERVICES
9,875.00
14,813.00
22,000.00
67.33
9,500.00
14,250.00
16.00
6,277.95
15,000.00
41.85
0.00
96.00
0.00
0.00
7,500.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
31,037.50
31,360.g0
281,500.00
11.14
31,830.64
34,620.64
44,116.00
44,116.00
246,500.00
17.90
16,901.00
16,901.00
10,889.95
OBJECT 6317TOTAL
LEGAL SERVICES
OBJEC T 6318 TOT AL
ELECTIgN SERVICES
OBJECT 6319 TOTAL
OTHER PROF AND TECH SERVICES
OBJECT 6320 TOTAL
Direct Loan ( Staffonf!
OBJECT 6321 TOTAL
W!~
2.585.00
10,085.00
41,000.00
24.60
9,959.20
OBJECT 6322 TOTAL
A+
1,979.00
8,476.00
24,000.00
35.32
0.00
0.00
9BJECT 6323 TOTAL
bl~C..:..~ C~E~l?M.I_S'§Q.uRI
0.00
4,485.00
6500.00
69.00
4350.00
4,350.00
OBJECT 6324 TOTAL
TRA
0.00
0.00
5,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 6325 TOTAL
VA Reimbul1Iement-LPN
0.00
0.00
3,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 6326 TOTAL
VOCATIONAL REHAB
0.00
0.00
OBJECT 6332 TOTAL
REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE
6,150.25
59,792.59
OBJECT 6333 TOTAL
OBJECT 6334 TOTAL
~
~~-.--.------
I
1,003.00
1 003.00
0.00
23,274.34
85,564.24
256,251.00
33.39
RENTA LSILEASES
2,178.50
12,535.50
38,142.00
32.87
2,178.50
12,535.50
RENTAL EQUIPMENT
7,836.77
31,095.10
85,926.00
36.19
15,337.53
39,392.63
18,451.92
OBJECT 6335 TOTAL
WATER AND SEWER
OBJECT 6336 TOTAL
TRASH REMOVAL
OBJECT 6343 TOTAL
OBJECT 6349 TOTAL
T~y'E.!:.
OTHER TRANSPORTATION SERVICES
OBJECT 6351 TOTAL
PROPERTY INSURANCE
--------­ -
OBJECT 6353 TOTAL
FIDELITY BOND PREMIUM
OBJECT 6360 TOTAL
COMMUNICATION
OBJECT 6351 TOTAL
COMMUNICATIONS
49.40
7,466.91
74,000.00
10.09
6,928.88
617.22
5,262.22
20,000.00
26.31
1,885.79
4,127.59
11,615.33
32,795.37
164,188.00
19.97
10,265.93
22,098.58
0.00
60.75
0.00
0.00
130,229.00
242,000.00
11.00
60.75
53.81
15.00
209,233.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
125.00
125.00
-3200.91
-1452.99
13600.00
-10.76
-966.47
-5,583.71
8,352.72
-18,199.40
29,475.00
-61.76
-26,197.59
.7,184.64
-
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
Dated
10/5/2012
2012-2013
Time: 12:53
Page 2
All Expenditure Accounts - Board Expense By Objec-Sept 2012t
ACCOUNT CODE
ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION
OBJECT 6362 TOTAL
OBJECT 6363 TOTAl
ADVERllSING
OBJECT 6371 TOTAL
OBJECT 6391 TOTAL
OBJECT 5398 TOTAL
OBJECT 6410 TOTAL
OBJECT 6411 TOTAL
OBJECT 6412 TOTAL
OBJECT 6414 TOTAL
OBJECT 6415 TOTAL
OBJECT 6431 TOTAL
PRINTING AND BINDING
DUES ANO IllEMBERSHIPS
OTHER PURCHASED SERVICES
PRIOR YEAR ADJUSTMENTS
GENERAL SUPPLIES
MAINT & REP SUPPLIES
BUS REPAIR SUPPLIES
_ _ M_
SUPPLIES
K12 SPECIAL ED TESTING SUPPLIES
TEXTBOOKS
OBJECT 6441 TOTAL
LI BRARY BO OKS
OBJECT 6451 TOTAL
OBJECT 6452 TOTAl
OBJECT 6470 TOTAL
OBJECT 6472 TOTAL
RESOURCE MATERIALS
AUDIO VISUALS
FOOD
MILK
OBJECT 6481 TOTAl
OBJECT 6483 TOTAL
OBJECT 6486 TOTAl
OBJECT6490 TOTAL
ELECTRIC
I
GAS LP
GASOLINE OIESEL
OTHER SUPPLIES
OBJECT 6531 TOTAL
IMPROVEMENT OTHER THAN B_LQ..GS
~~.I=CT 6541T()~ ~EGULAR EQUIPMENT
OBJECT 6542 TOTAL EQUIPMENT INSTRUCllONAL APPARATUS
OBJECT 6545 TOTAL K12 SPECIAL ED ASSIST TECHNOLOGY
OBJECT 6552 TOTAL PUPIL TRANSPORTA 1l0N VEHICLES
OBJECT 6591 TOTAL OTHER CAPITAL OUTLAY
.-----~
~ECT6611
TOTAL
OBJEC T 6621 TOTAL
OBJECT 6623TOTAL
OBJECT 6631 TOTAL
-­
REDEMPTION OF PRINCIPAL
SERIAL BONO INTEREST
LEASE PURCHASE AGREEMENT
FEES
WORKING
BUDGET
MTD ACTIVITY
YTDACllVITY
0.00
2,380.32
0.00
16,470.65
6,718,50
31,767.56
0.00
162,745.93
17,902.14
241.038.86
62,045.00
501,382.00
0.00
714,110.69
0.00
2,162,096.00
-9,555.74
211,172.01
0.00
0.00
0.00
1,958.39
0.00
-11.35
395.60
% REALIZED
LAST YEAR
THIS MONTH
I
LAST YEAR
THRU THIS MONTHi Account Type
500.00
0.00
8!1.03
28.85
90.29
0.00
90.29
18,500.00
6420.20
48.07
56,331.0~
16,969.60
248,159.62
33.03
0.00
236,665.67
75.19
710,628.58
223,000.00
2,500.00
94.70
26432.23
77,691.15
0.00
0.00
-505A5
0.00
2,023.29
1,000.00
8,000.00
0.00
25.29
0.00
388.00
0.00
0.00
12,234.52
4,303.00
0.00
33,934.00
6,875.00
36.05
2,795.00
1,147.34
62.59
286M
0.00
79,100.93
32,965.39
768.78
181,216.63
43,028.00
3,600.00
610,000.00
280,000.00
21.36
29.71
0.00
67,819.48
34,880.38
792.00
311.51
76~3.C!.:.77
512,200.00
125,500.00
47,752.62
3,314.35
86,588.76
0.00
91,467.86
60,932.55
29,197.55
3,162.54
896,122.49
239,330.70
90942.35
568.88
0.00
0.00
0.00
568.88
172,823.16
0.00
0.00
0.00
17,330.00
0.00
91,982.22
0.00
0.00
341.000.00
0.00
251,000.00
444,373.00
56,742.28
1,901.44
25.39
33,270.09
357.02
0.00
-4,257.00
53.86
92.37
56.89
96.01
98,455.00
1,000.00
180,000.00
0.00
1,105,000.00
156,658.00
0.00
5,000.00
15.37
14.90
2.64
-
0.00
58.72
0.00
84,043.61
26,176.52
0.00
0.00
19,315.01
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
!
I
388.00
2,795.00
12,458.07
4,065.68
54.71
126,622.37
45,959.61
141,287.72
11,497.18
67,779.52
0.00
36,823.00
202,844.53
75,104.04
0.00
164,997.02
27,360.36
32,085.74
-5.00
551.76
0.00
I
!
10/5/2012
2012-2013
Time: 12:52
Page 1
Dated
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
All Expenditure Accounts - Board Expense by Function-Sept 2012
I
ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION
ACCOUNT CODE
_"'~' _ _"
IGRAND TOTAL
MTD ACTIVITY
___"'''''''_'_'_. ____.... __. . _ 1_ _ 3,160,296.14
FUNCTION 1100 TOTAL
R~9.IJ.!.ar Pro!!rams
FUNC110N 1111 TOTAL
ES1HER ELEMENTARY
FUNC110N 1112TOTAL
FED_~RAL
FUNC110N 1116 TOTAL
MAPLECREST ELEMENTARY
..
CLASS REDUCTION ESTHER
~~-
FUNC11QN 1117TOTAL
FEDERAL CLASS REDUCTION MAPLECREST
FUNC110N 1121 TOTAL
BOSWELL ELEMENTARY
~~!£!LON 1!2} TOTAL
FUNCTION 1126 TOTAL
1--­
FUNC110N 1130 TOTAL
HILLCREST ELEMENTARY
tfUNC_110N 1131 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH ART
FUNC110N 1132TOTAL
,£Y.NC110N 1134 TOTAL
FUNC110N 1135 TOTAL
YTD ACTIVITY!
';;':'04
WORKING
BUDGET
692.84 "3g064"41~:O(j
% REALIZED
1
18.19
lAST YEAR
THIS MONTH
'. 3'166;331.30"
LAST YEAR
Account Type
THRU THIS MONTH
"m"n"",,,
0.00
1,532.16
21,514.00
7.12
0.00
4404.00
180,884.63
231,481.54
2,148,539.00
10.17
172,686.15
22~,957.80
7,971.70
7,971.70
138,025.00
5.78
10,930.82
10,930.82
158,381.47
201,645.54
2,057,693.00
9.$)
161,401.45
208,99Q.59
4,040.83
4,040.83
48,540.00
8.32
4,405.87
4405.87
140,684.36
197,331.37
1,906,259.00
10.35
__ 149,134.00
239,723.28
0.00
0.00
630.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
.­
80,742.76
125,056.88
1,030,604.00
12.14
78,550.20
115,211.31
181,671.83
238,291.67
2,220,792.00
10.73
196,511.41
226,134.35
932.22
932.22
2,559.00
36.43
612.13
612.13
JUNIOR HIGH BAND
0.00
42.00
8,333.00
0.50
133.65
776.73
JUNIOR HIGH HEALTH
0.00
0.00
382.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
JUNIQR HIGH HOME ECONOMICS
0.00
168.24
2,676.00
6.29
588.11
588.11
PRACTICAL PARENTING PARTNERSHIP
JUNIOR HIGH
FUNC110N 1136 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH INDUSTRIAL ARTS
60.00
60.00
2,952.00
2.03
276.40
276.40
FUNC110N 1137 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH LANGUAGE ARTS
218.15
756.20
5,494.00
13.76
170.84
753.98
FUNC110N 1138 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH MATH
0.00
FUNC110N 1139 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH NEWSPAPER/YEARBOOK
~Jl0N 1140 TOTAL
FUNC110N 1141 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH PHYSICAL EDUCATION
JUNIOR HIGH SCIENCE
FUNC110N 1142 TOTAL_ JUNIOR HIGH SOCIAL STUDIES
FUNC110N 1143 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGH SPEECHIDRAMA
FUNC110N 1144 TOTAL
JUNIOR HIGHYQ.~L
FUNC110N 1145 TOTAL_ JUNIOR HIGH A 1HLE11CS
~C!!..ON1150 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
FUNC110N 1151 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH ART
FUNC110N 11,52 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH BAND
0.00
173.10
4,346.00
3.98
0.00
150.00
150.00
918.00
16.34
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
2,437.00
0.00
0.00
15.00
107.15
2,517.94
6,848.00
36.17
0.00
270.10
313.84
1,070.15
5,114.00
20.93
0.00
335.52
734.49
10.00
10.00
1,539.00
0.65
157.74
331.13
430.36
2,165.00
19.88
160.68
160.68
285.2.!
1,847.58
9,490.00
19.47
591.58
2,933.58
318,657.19
386,443.94
431,135.42
_____3.~ _ _
4,590.33
3,957,266.00
9.77
326,390.03
7,604.93 ___J7,790.00
42.75
2,598.22
12,888.81
25,391,00
61.22
5,990.70
11,262.75
15,544.66
rE-U NC 11ON 1154 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH ACADEMIC QUIZ
0.00
0.00
715.00
0.00
25.00
25.00
FUNC110N 1157 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH LANGUAGE ARTS
157.66
676.70
37,665.00
i.$)
340.96
522.88
118.53
_ _TOTAL
__
FUNC110N • 1158
SENIOR HIGH MA 1H
FUNC110N 1160 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH PHYSICAL EDUCA 110N
.c~
6,829.19
14,440.00
47.29
2,524.39
4,974.17
10,555.00
81.16
772.88
2,463.90
FUNC110N 1161 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH SCIENCE
;~ _ _ .... 8,566.16
28,964.17
3,~.53
45,405.00
63.79
5,209.65
34,276.90
FUNC110N 1162 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH SOCIAL STUDIES
3,577.70
12,089.14
23,991.00
50.39
376.98
8,849.11
FUNC110N 1163 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH FOREIGN LANGUAGE
0.00
1,511.38
6,~.00
21.77
449.45
2,628.47
FUNC110N 1164 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH MUSIC
525.00
1,982.12
16,352.00
12.12
1,834.99
2,031.45
FUNCll0N 1165TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH BUSINESS EDUCATION
0.00
1,848.14
5,820.00
31.75
0.00
1,197.22
40.00
40.00
2,257.00
1.77
0.00
0.00
0.00
449.42
6,715.00
6.69
240.00
240.00
FUNC110N 1165 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH SPEECH & DEBATE
.
~~~~~~~
1i1(J.!:f..~E~_SPAPERNEARBOOK
FUNC110N 1168 TOTAL
SENIOR
FUNC110N 1169 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH DRAMA
FUNC110N 1170 TOTAL
SENIOR HIGH ATHLETICS
FUNC110N 1171 TOTAL
A+SCHOOLS
FUNCTION 1173 TOTA,L ~L l'!§_RNATIVE EDUCATION
FUNCll0N 1191 TOTAL
SUMMER SCHOOL
FUNCll0N 1200 TOTAL
Title VI
FUNCll0N 1211 TOTAL
GIFTED AND TALENTED
--~.
~uppfies
FUNC110N 1218 TOTAL
REGU-':~.~';~H_OMEBOUND
FUNCll0N 1219 TOTAL
EXT FUNDS
391.30
575.30
10,345.00
5.56
169.00
169.00
26,369.62
77,900.14
223,783.00
34.81
21,026.68
59,577.61
3,729.82
7,469.64
44,779.00
16.66
3,926.50
7,512.65
34,300.25
64,066.16
409,809.00
15.63
41,135.11
59,043.99
80.57
46,674.86
180,827.00
25.81
1,950.55
57,412.25
0.00
11,376.00
11,376.00
100.00
0.00
0.00
9,092.51
10,116.04
112,991.00
8.95
10,503.73
11,117.93
917.28
1670.95
25,150.00
6.64
0.00
·250.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00 ,
-----~--
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
10/5/2012
2012-2013
Time: 12:52
Page 2
Dated
All Expenditure Accounts - Board Expense by Function-Sept 2012
-­
ACCOUNT CODE
ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION
FUNC110N 1221 TOTAL
MILOI MOD MEN RET (DO NOT USEl
FUNC110N 1251 TOTAL
TITLE I ·Culturaltv Dlffelllnt
FUNC110N 1271 TOTAL
BILINGUAL
FUNC110N 1272 TOTAL
TITLE III
FUNC110N 1281 TOTAL
ECSE
I
I
I
i
I
LAST YEAR I
THIS MONTH
LAST YEAR Account Type
THRU THIS MONTH
MTO ACTIVITY
YTDACTIVITY
WORKING
BUDGET
302,433.05
337,057.87
3,697,403.00
9.12
294,107.00
328,348.06
65,011.06
70,819.10
767,231.00
9.23
62,536.31
65,990.05
4,141.08
4,141.08
49,850.00
8.31
4,192.37
4192.37
0.00
0.00
4,423.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
68,537.82
77,657.03
899,116.00
8.64
67,213.61
82,823.89
173.93
% REALIZED
FUNC110N 1282 TOTAL
EXTENDED SCHOOL YEAR
0.00
0.00
6,556.00
0.00
173.93
FUNC110N 1293 TOTAL
SWPBJS
1417.20
1,417.20
15,500.00
9.14
116.00
116.00
FUNC110N 1297 TOTAL
MEDICAID
4,630.10
21,378.51
60,000.00
35.63
5,025.57
6,962.38
~~11Q!'!J300].9TAL
VOCA110NALPROGRAMS
77,189.97
90,486.47
935,629.00
9.67
75,443.31
91,685.12
FUNC110N 1301 TOTAL
VOCAl1()NAL AUTO BODY
1,681.73
1,741.10
9,600.00
18.14
878.25
1,121.43
FUNC110N 1302 TOTAL
VOCA 110NAL AUTO MECHANICS
1,517.84
1,585.711
28,225.00
5.62
846.48
1,438.19
FUNC110N 1304 TOTAL
VOCA 110NAL BUSINESS B
1,760.00
0.00
1,284.75
11,180.30
~~~~~~~~~
FUNC110N 1305 TOTAL
VOCA110NALBUSINESSC
£Q.NC":!!(:l~ 130U9TAL
VOCA110NAL CARPENTRY
FUNC110N 1307 TOTAL
VOC BU~If!~§S BANKING
FUNC110N 1308 TOTAL
VOCA110NAL HOME ECONOMICS
FUNC110N 1309 TOTAL
VOCA110NAL MACHINE SHOP
FUNC110N 1311 TOTAL
VOAGL·A1
FUNC110N 1313 TOTAL
VOCA110NAL AG D·A2
0.00
.­
0.00
1,583.57
2,311.22
3,787.00
61.03
915.85
915.85
5,420.13
7,349.28
40,179.00
18.29
1,284.9.2.
2,508.87
78.94
78.94
2,140.00
3.69
15,292.41
15,768.70
640.54
2,832.90
18,048.00
15.70
23,089.68
29,548.61
32,897.97
32,897.97
109,417.00
30.07
12,834.87
13,441.75
86,40
2,323.61
31,738.00
7.32
55.24
485.24
875.48
4,141.75
10,595.00
39.09
828.00
1,113.61
12,725.65
12,853.85
26,400.00
48.69
11,563.00
11,563.00
365.22
424.59
15,700.00
2.70
139.63
139.53
0.00
0.00
4,000.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
FUNC110N 1314 TOTAL
VOCA 110NAL COMPUTER REP MAINT
FUNC110N 131~ TOTAL
VOCA110NAL WELDING
FUNC110N 1317 TOTAL
AG & SMALL !!IUS. DEV. GRANT
FUNCl1q~j1~8TOTAL
NEW FARMER PROGRAM
5,823.38
5,823.38
64160.00
9.08
5,823.79
5,823.79
FUNC110N 1319 TOTAL
LTCC PROJECT LEAD THE WAY
4,303.84
4,303.84
14,835.00
29.01
2,869.69
14,280.99
68,402.54
i
FUNCll0N 1321 TOTAL...VOCA 110NAL LPN PROGRAM
58,639.63
248414.00
23.61
19,653.88
FACS
5,506.10
5,994.30
6850.00
87.51
12,42
1,747.17
FUNC110N 1361 TOTAL
VOCAllQNAL PERKINS
6,284.94
17,110.39
96774.00
17.68
6,811.54
13,316.43
13,923.70
-.--~---
~ON 1333 TOTAL
FUNC110N 1362 TOTAL
EARLY CHILDHOO'p"pEVs.,..9~~!"!lT
FUNC110N 1364 TOTAL
BASIC SKILLS INSTRUCTOR
FUNC110N 1410 TOTAL
STUDENT ACTIVITIES
FUNC110N 1611 TOTAL
A~U_LT BASIC EDUCATION
FUNC110N 1618TOTAL
POST S~<;:()~DARY PERKINS
FUNC110N 1631 TOTAL
ADULT COMMUNITY EDUCATION
FUNC110N 1662 TOTAL
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
_ _ ~0,452.3:4 .
181.96
3,359.52
14054.00
23.90
13,636.20
8,071.57
8,071.57
97,623.00
8.27
7,113.63
7,113.63
48,077.46
178,918.41
774,698.00
23.10
76,113.38
156,343.05
2,595.19
3,271.56
69,380.00
4.72
2,764.38
4,197.08
650.53
5,109.93
8,576.00
59.68
466.90
6,171.90
285.25
2,916.25
36330.00
8.03
0.00
52.34
ADULT DAYTIME TRADE
26,438.44
28,788.74
86,000.00
33.48
1,016.95
2,470.81
56,969.00
73,263.00
491000.00
14.92
59,325.65
62,441.40
0.00
3,504.19
0.00
25,432.50
75,011.35
300,000.00
FUNC110N 1685 TOTAL
PRACTICAL NURSING PROGRAM
FUNC110N 1910 TOTAL
TUmON OUT OF DISTRICT
FUNC110N 1930 TOTAL
SP ED TUmON SEVERELY HANDICAPPED
FUNC110N 1942 TOTAL
Supl!Lemental Ed Media Services
FUNCll0N 2113 TOTAL
SOCIAL WORK SERVICES
FUNCll0N 2120 TOTAL
GUIDANCE SERVICES
FUNC110N 2121 TOTAL
K12GUIDANCE
25.00
2,012.27
22,640.68
23,640.00
70,920.00
0.00
0.00
127,950.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
3,887.37
7,767.15
52,747.00
14.73
3,946.43
7,793.47
55,757.04
133,802.75
850,172.00
15.74
72,041.92
145,992.64
0.00
4.550.00
35,139.00
12.95
1.553.74
1,630.74
0.00
0.00
550.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
HEALTH SE~y'~ES
23,832.86
49,543.12
281,552.00
17.60
24,327.48
45,390.46
~Cll0N ~210 TOTAL
RESOURCE TEACHERS
18,969.19
25.954.59
181.863.00
14.27
6,144.60
17,160.10
.F.LJ.N(:~!10N 2212TOTAL
G9~S,2000
0.00
2,000.00
2,500.00
80.00
1,420.15
1.641.67
FUNC110N 2213 TOTAL
TITLE USUBS
O.~
125.00
15000.00
0.83
0.00
440.00
FUNCll0N 2214 TOTAL
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PDC
5,700.70
15,118.25
109.356.00
13.82
6,771.81
10,263.90
FUNC110N 2123 TOT~,L ~_ERGARTEN SCREENING
FUNCll0N 2130 TOTAL
--------------~
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
10/5/2012
2012-2013
Time: 12:52
Page 3
Dated
All Expenditure Accounts - Board Expense by Function-Sept 2012
ACCOUNT CODE
ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION
MTD ACTIVITY
YTDACTIVITY
WORKING
BUDGET
% REALIZED
LAST YEAR
THIS MONTH
LAST YEAR
Account Type
THRU THIS MONTH
FUNCTION 2218 TOTAL
TITLE II EISENHOWER
1,478.14
27,889.64
47,100.00
59.21
4,725.03
FUNCTION 2219 TOTAL
CSPD
0.00
0.00
7,250.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 2220 TOTAL
EDUCATIONAL MEDIASVC
0.00
0.00
9,800.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
34,072.51
69,733.14
531,372.00
11.24
36,789.51
59,294.90
0.00
0.00
0.00
4,605.03
10,955.47
53,001.00
20.67
I£~JNCTION 2222 TOTAL
SCHOOL UBRARY SERVICES
FU NCTION 2227 TOTAL
TITLE 11- D
FUNCTION 2300 TOTAL
Title I Prooram Admin-Non ARRA
36,769.25
0.00
1,250.00
7,047.65
11,276.38
FUNCTION 2310 TOTAL
BOARD OF EDUCATION SERVICES
9,983.28
21,283.20
61,510.00
34.60
9625.00
19,799.09
FU NCTION 2320 TOTAL
EXECUTIVE ADMINISlRATION
85,679.07
284,786.76
989,946.00
28.77
78,709.51
294,160.63
FUNCTION 2405 TOTAL
SP ED ADMINISlRATION
31,056.20
58,232.31
368,264.00
15.81
31,209.70
56,969.46
FUNCTION 2406 TOTAL
SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST
5,027.24
9,670.41
54,210.00
17.84
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 2411 TOTAL
BUILDING LEVEL ADMINISlRATION
167,721.76
361,030.16
1,957,946.00
18.44
163,522.02
358,324.15
FUNCTION 2540 TOTAL
OPERATION OF PLANT
103,045.93
735,509.24
2,551,305.00
28.83
179,074.34
825,629.26
FUNCTION 2546 TOTAL
SECURITY SERVICES
4,134.39
5,845.65
38,000.00
15.38
3,510.19
3,760.94
FUNCTION 2552 TOTAL
DIST OPER lRANSPORTATION
219,881.81
623,017.68
2,322,071.00
26.83
203,434.90
478,468.78
11,036.74
11,036.74
49,314.00
22.38
6,453.92
6,453.92
2,088.77
2,088.77
27,029.00
7.73
2,301.46
2,301.45
199,219.57
351,438.35
1,723,355.00
20.39
193,039.12
287,157.98
17,095.10
17,029.50
71,560.00
23.80
4,685.11
12,036.20
842.62
1,325.62
13,500.00
9.82
868.00
1,561.00
61,022.47
405,619.47
744,145.00
64.51
86,851.29
320,277.42
FUNCTION 2554 TOTAL
K-12 SP ED TRANSPORTATION
FUNCTION 2559 TOTAL
ECSE lRANSPORTATION
FUNCTION 2560 TOTAL
FOODSERVICES
FUNCTION 2574 TOTAL
PRINTING DUPLICATING SERVICES
FUNCTION 2641 TOTAL
Human Resources-Staff Services
FUNCTION 2663 TOTAL
TECHNOLOGY COORDINATOR
FUNCTION 3511 TOTAL
PARENTS AS TEACHERS
10,339.52
11,953.78
145,811.00
8.20
10,012.36
14,362.86
FUNCTION 3512 TOTAL
EARI,..Y CHILDHOOD INST.
19,973.15
21,304.78
250,495.00
8.51
21,572.45
22,602.12
FUNCTION 3912 TOTAL
PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT
575.74
4,734.85
8,300.00
57.05
0.00
1,946.77
0.00
0.00
500.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
12,024.00
119,540.00
251,000.00
47.63
-3,157.99
43,576.36
~TION 3.914 TOTAL
FUNCTION 4000 TOTAL
TITLE 111- ELL PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT
~!.LlTIES
FUNCTION 4051 TOTAL
BLDG ACQ & CONSlRUCTION
79,443.86
776,582.49
0.00
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 4091 TOTAL
OTHER FACILITIES ACQ & CONST SERV
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
625.12
FUNCTION 5110 TOTAL
BOND PRINCIPAL
0.00
0.00
1,105,000.00
FUNCTION 5130 TOTAL
LEASE PURCHASE PRINCIPAL
0.00
0.00
0.00
FUNCTION 5210 TOTAL
BOND INTEREST
0.00
91,982.22
156,658.00
FU NCTION 5230 TOTAL
LEASE PURCHASE INTEREST
0.00
0.00
0.00
BOND AGENT FEES
0.00
0.00
5,000.00
, FUNCTION 5310 TOTAL
0.00
68.72
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
32,085.74
0.00
-5.00
0.00
551.76
0.00
0.00
Lebanon R-3 School District
Cash Receipts- September 2012
Date
Amount
Description
09/04/2012
FOOD PROGRAM (PAY PAL)
09/04/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM
$2,010.02
$785.30
09/04/2012
FOOD PROGRAM
$3,046.20
09/04/2012
HS ATHLETIC GATE RECEIPTS
$2,000.00
09/05/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM
09/05/2012
FOOD PROGRAM
09/05/2012
DELINQUENT TAXES
$86,396.15
09/05/2012
DELINQUENT TAXES
$26,741.67
09/05/2012
DELINQUENT TAXES~ DEBT
$19,336.28
09/07/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM
09/07/2012
FOOD PROGRAM
$866.40
$1,925.69
$812.75
$1,745.74
$86.00
09/07/2012
PROSECUTING ATIORNEY BAD CHECKS
09/07/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM
$1,109.50
09/07/2012
FOOD PROGRAM
$1,721.45
09/10/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM
09/10/2012
FOOD PROGRAM
$3,253.69
09/10/2012
FOOD PROGRAM (PAY PAL)
$1,681.16
09/11/2012
ESTHER PBS-MATIAX NEU PRATER
$963.60
$903.50
09/11/2012
ESTHER FUNDRAISER
09/11/2012
SDAC 2 Q- 2012
09/12/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM
09/12/2012
FOOD PROGRAM
$1,614.56
09/13/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM
$1,001.10
09/13/2012
FOOD PROGRAM
$1,160.85
09/14/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM
09/14/2012
FOOD PROGRAM
$1,112.09
09/14/2012
FOOD PROGRAM (PAY PAL)
$1,271.42
09/14/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM
$1,007.55
$2,043.82
$118.68
$25,754.11
$788.10
$973.40
09/14/2012
FOOD PROGRAM
09/14/2012
DISABILITY DETERMINATIONS ACH
$24.91
09/14/2012
WILLOW SPRINGS CROSS CO ENTRY FEE
$50.00
09/14/2012
4 PROPANE TANKS-AMERICAN AQUA
$2,800.00
09/17/2012
MAPLECREST FUNDRAISER-LiFETOUCH
$1,268.00
09/17/2012
ATHLETIC GATE
$7,589.00
09/17/2012
JH PARTICIPATION FEE
$880.00
09/17/2012
HS PARTICIPATION FEE
$3,833.00
09/18/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM
$960.85
09/18/2012
FOOD PROGRAM
09/19/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM
09/19/2012
$1,684.30
$854.08
FOOD PROGRAM
$1,741.66
09/19/2012
LTCC A+ LOAN ADJUSTIVIENTS
$1,979.00
09/20/2012
09/20/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM
$911.10
$1,610.29
09/20/2012
FOOD PROGRAM
PELL LOANS- LTCC
09/20/2012
FOOD PROGRAM (PAY PAL)
$31,037.50
$1,418.75
1
,,/'
lebanon R-3 School District
Cash Receipts- September 2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM
.,
09/21/2012
FOOD PROGRAM
09/21/2012
09/21/2012
ADULT ED
09/21/2012
ADULT ED TUITION
AUTO COLLISION RESALE
09/21/2012
AUTO TECH RESALE
09/21/2012
09/21/2012
CNA TUITION.
COMMUNITY ED
09/21/2012
09/21/2012
FCCLA
09/21/2012 .
FFA
FFA STUDENT GRANT
09/21/2012
LPN CLUB
09/21/2012
LTCC OFFICE ACTIVITY
09/21/2012
PN TUITION
09/21/2012
PN ACTIVITY
09/21/2012
SKILLS
09/21/2012
CNA ACTIVITY
09/21/2012
SCHOOL OF THE OSAGE-IDEA SERV
09/21/2012
'. BAD CHECK
09/21/2012
BAD CHECK
09/21/2012
DRURY UNIVERSITY-CLEAN DIESEL GRANT
09/21/2012
.P·ROP C
09/21/2012
. PROP C
09/21/2012
09/21/2012 .
BASIC FORMULA-STAtE MONIES.
BASIC FORMULA-STATE MONIES'
09/21/2012
TRANSPORTATION
09/21/2014
BASIC FORMULA CLASSROOM TRUST FUND
09/21/2012
SPEC ED SWIS
09/21/2012
TITLE 1
09/21/2012
TITLE II.A
09/21/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM'
09/24/2012
FOOD PROGRAM
09/24/2012
ESTHER FUNDRAISER
09/25/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM
09/25/2012
. FOOD PROGRAM
09/25/2012
NON FOOD PROGRAM .
. 09/26/2012
FOOD PHOGRAM
09/26/2012
09/27/2012 .
DIRECT LOANS ACH- LTCe
JH VOCAL.
09/27/2012
NONFOOD PROGRAM
09/27/2012
FOOD PROGRAM
09/27/2012
HC STUDENT COUNCIL.
09/28/2012
'09/28/2012
ADULT ED
ADULT ED TUITION
09/28/2012
AUTO COLLISION RESALE
09/28/2012
AUTO TECH RESALE
,09/28/2012
BUILDING TRADES CLUB
09/28/2012
2
$840.96
$3,887.16
$2,138.00
$10,758.00
$1,123.29
$194.51
$2,260.00 .
$32.27
$370.00
$1,378.00
$200.00
$46.00
$1,083.25
$29,474.50
$7,303.00
$575.50
$1,140.00
$67.18
$60.00
$9.00
$103,216.00
$211,383.30
$65,428.16
$300,875.25
$902,625.75
$34,847.00
$128,322.00
$500.00
$87,447.22
$183.80
$1,069.84
$3,552.00
$6,434.98
$959.85
$2,175.65
$893.20
$1,838.10
$44,116.00
$9,351.55
..
$844.50
$1,445.03
. $322.19
. $290.00
$2,167.00
$250.00
$89.68
$600.00
Lebanon R-3 School District Cash Receipts- September 2012 09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012 .
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012·
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
09/28/2012
CNATUITION
CNA ACTIVITY
FCCLA
FFA
LTCC OFFICE ACTIVITY
PN TUITION
PN ACTIVITY
SKILLS-LTCC
MAIN ACCOUNT INTEREST
EMPLOYEE BENEFIT ACCOUNT INTEREST
DEBT SERVICE ACCOUNT INTEREST
HSART
HS BAND
HS CHOIR
HS DRAMA
AMERICAN HERITAGE
JR. CLASS­
HS OFFICE ACTIVITY
HS PUBLICATIONS
HSSWARM
HS PBS
FOOD PROGRAM (PAY PAL)
NON FOOD PROGRAM
FOOD PROGRAM
BAD CHECK
. BAD CHECK
BAD CHECK
STOUTLAND SCHOOLS-DJ BUTCHER SERVICES
WILLARD SCHOOLS CROSS COUNTRY
STOUTLAND SCHOOLS CROSS CO ENTRY FEE
INSURANCE TRANSFER
CNA/EMT CLEARENT
COMMUNITY ED
VOC REHAB- A. LOONEY, JR
MEDICAID ACH
Grand Total
3
$1,500.00
$368.00
$216.75
$2,292.00
$525.95
$27,966.50
$283.00
$380.00
$6,216.73
$505.08
$1,159.20
$153.00
$707.95
$5,339.00
$895.00
$3,650.00
$257.12
$3.435.00 .
$2,760.00
$42.00
$855.58
$1,637.80
$974.63
$1,681.26
$15.00
$40.00
$16.00
$369.49
$200.00
$75.00
$284,649.00
$28.00
$431.41
$1,003.00
$15.86
$2,575,686.201
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOLS CHECK REGISTER-SEPT 2012 "
I
,
321328
321329
321330
321331
321332
321333
321334
321335
321336
321337
321339
321340
321341
321342
321343
321344
321345
321346
321347
321348
321349
321350
321351
321352
321353
321354
321355
321356
321357
321358
321359
321360
321361
321362
321363
321364
321365
321366
321366
321367
321368
321369
321370
321371
321372
321373
321374
321375
321376
321377
321378
321379
321380
321381
321382
09/04/12
09/04112
09/04112
09/06112
09/06/12
09/06112
09/07/12
09/07112
09/07/12
09/07112
09/07/12
09111112
09111112
09111112
09/12112
09/12112
09/18112
09/18/12
09/18112
09118112
09/18112
09118/12
09/18/12
09118/12
09118112
09/18112
09118112
09118112
09118112
09118/12
09118/12
09118112
09118112
09118112
09/18112
09/18/12
09/18/12
09113112
09113112
09114112
09/14/12
09/14112
09114112
09/14112
09114/12
09/14112
09/14112
09114112
09114112
09/14112
09114112
09114/12
09114112
09114/12
09114112
GRASE,INC
JAYPRO SPORTS
MISSOURI AASPA-AAEE
CHECK WAS VOIDED BY USER.
AUBURN PLACE HOTEL & SUITES
ENERGY COMPANIES
BIERHALTER, DANIEL
DANIEL BIERHALTER & LTCC
LEO MORGAN FENCING
SCMCDA
SCMMEA
GUARDIAN-APPLETON
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321340
SCHOOL SPECIALTY
HORTON SMITH GOLF COURSE
YOUNG SIGNS
HERNDEN, CHELSEY
MELENDEZ-BONNOT, ELIZABETH
REESE, STEPHANIE
ALICIA ARMSTRONG & ~TCC
roLIE AVILA & LTCC
HILLARY CHRISTIAN & LTCC
MANDY DaMITZ & LTCC
PATRICIA DUNNE & LTCC
FRYMOYER, VICTORIA L
VICTORIA L FRY MOYER & LTCC
ANDREA JACKSON & LTCC
RACHEL KENADY-MUELLER & LTCC
MANDY KRAUSE & LTCC
CHRISTINE LEGG & LTCC
APRIL MARTIN & LTCC
CHERI MOONEY & LTCC
ASHLEY OGLE & LTCC .
TERESA SCHATZ & LTCC
TERESA WATTS & LTCC
CINDY WEHNER & LTCC
CANDICE YARBER & L TCC
TIME MOTION TOOLS
321366 is VOIDED
FIDELITY BROADCASTING INC
FIRST BOOK NATIONAL OFFICE
FOLLETT LIBRARY RES
HASTY, STEPHANIE M
HULL, CHERYL A
KIWANIS CLUB OF LEBANON
LACLEDE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE
MAEA SPRING CONF
MARSHFIELD HS GIRLS GOLF
MCGUIRE, WILLIAM P
MOAER
MOORE, TERESA E
MSHSAA
NEW COVENANT ACADEMY
PIZZA HUT NPC INTL
QUIZNOS SUB STORE
$2,178.50 ADMIN LEASE & PROP TAX
$472.00
$255.00
$0.00
$495.00
$26,669.27 FUEL
$10.00
$2,575.00 FALL TRA 2012
$5,424.00 LTCC FENCING PROJECT
$300.00
$180.00
$7,509.45
$0.00
$6.30
$100.00
$4,725.5050% FOOTBALL FIELD SIGN
$100.00
$168.00
$170.00
$1,387.50 PELL
$1,387.50 PELL
$1,387.50 PELL
$450.00
$1,350.00 PELL $599.50 $788.00 $1,387.50 PELL $1,387.50 PELL $1,100.00 PELL $1,387.50 PELL $975.00 PELL $325.00 $1,350.00 PELL $775.00 $1,387.50 PELL $1,387.50 PELL $1,387.50 PELL $192.07 $0.00 $2,300.00 LTCC TV ADS $29.70 $45.61 $427.70 $47.44 $99.50 $605.91 $350.00 . $125.00 .
$226.05 $90.00 $128.30 $15.00 $150.00 $36.45 $49.24 1
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOLS CHECK REGISTER- SEPT 2012 321383
321384
321385
321386
321387
321388
. 321389
321390
321391
321392
321393
321394
321395
321396
321397
321398
321399
321400
321401
321402
321403
321404
321405
321406
321407
321408
321409
321410
321411
321412
321413
321414
321415
321416
321416
321417
321418
321419
321420
321421
321422
321423
321424
321424
321425
321425
321426
321427
321428
321429
321434
321435
321436
321437
321438
09114112
09114112
09114112
09114112
09114112
09114112
09114112
09114/12
09114112
09114/12
09/14112
09/14112
09114112
09/14112
09114112
09/20/12
09/20/12
09/20112
09/20112
09/20112
09/20/12
09/20/12
09/20112
09120/12
09120/12
09120112
09/20/12
09/20112
09/20112
09/20112
09/20/12
09120/12
09/20/12
09/20/12
09/14112
09/14112
09/18112
09118112
09118/12
09118112
09/18112
091I8112
09118/12
09/18112
09118112
09/18112
09/18/12
09118/12
09118/12
09/18/12
09119112
09/19/12
09/19112
09/191l2
09/19/12
RICOH USA, INC
RIVERCUT GOLF COURSE
ROARK, RANDY B
RUETHER, KEITH
SMFOA SW MO FOOTBALL
OZARK CONFERENCE
SPRINGFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS
ST LOUIS CARDINALS
ST LOUIS CARDINALS
SULLENS, RODNEY D
TMW SPORTS LLC
UNIV OF ARKANSAS· LITTLE ROCK
WORLDS OF FUN
CROW PAINT & GLASS INC
CITY OF LEBANON CU
BUCKLEY, DAVID G
COOK, TERRY L
DAMPIER, BRIAN S
DOERR,JAMESR
DURBIN, LEO
ERICKSON, CARRIE L
GREEN, STANLEY N
HEISZ, LOREN L
HENDRIX, ROBERT E
HICKS, KATHY K
KENNEDY, VIVIAN C
MCCULLOCH, BRIAN G
MUNHOLLAND, DEANlE W
NEWELL, MICHAEL S
PATTERSON, JACKIE
UNA
SHIVERDECK, TIMOTHY A
WINKEL, MARK R
WRIGHT, JASON L
321416 is VOIDED
WRIGHT, JASON L
BIERHALTER, DANIEL
CHRISTOPHER FLORY &LTCC
GOODWIN, ADAM
ADAM GOODWIN & LTCC
MEYER, WILLIAM
WILLIAM MEYER & LTCC
321424 is VOIDED
WILSON, RAYMONA
321425 is VOIDED
RAYMONA WILSON &LTCC
WILSON, RA YMONA
RAYMONA WILSON & LTCC
BULTE COMPANY
LOWES- LAR ACCOUNT
DaMITZ, MANDY R
MANDY DaMITZ & LTCC
JUSTIN HOMAN & LTCC
McCORD, AUSTIN
AUSTIN McCORD & LTCC
$1,282.79 PRINT SHOP COpy MACHINE LEASE
$130.00
.$252.53
$1,188.95 PERCUSSION CARTS
$75.00 $150.00 $500.00 $727.00 $615.00 LTCC CAREER DAY $130.18 HS COLLEGE DAY $780.00 $1,200.00 G. KOLB FEES 2011-12-13
$75.00 $100.00 $235.49 $15.00 $15.00 $10.00 $15.00 $10.00 $15.00 $10.00 $25.00 $25.00 $20.00 $25.00 $25.00 $15.00 $25.00 $10.00 $20.00 $20.00 $25.00 $40.00 $0.00
$35.00 $1,700.00 PELL $2,200.00 PELL $185.00 $1,202.50 PELL $260.00 $2,515.00 PELL $0.00 $540.00 $0.00 $2,235.00 PELL
$645.00
$2,130.00 PELL
$39,417.5050$ DOWN PMT SCOREBOARD-BOSWELL
$3,491.41 DISTRICT SUPPLIES $904.00 $908.00 $167.00 $433.00 $2,290.00 DIRECT LOAN
2
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOLS CHECK REGISTER- SEPT 2012 321439
09119112
321440
09119112
321441
09/19112
321442
09119/12
321443
09119112
321444
09/19/12
321445
09119112
321446
09119112
321447
09/19/12
321448
09/19112
321449
09/19/12
321450
09119/12
321451
09119112
321452
09119112
321453
09/19/12
321454
09/19/12
321455
09/19/12
321456 . 09119112
321457
0911 9/12
321458
09/19112
321459
09119/12
321460
09/19/12
321461
09/19112
09119/12
321462
321463
09/19/12
321464
09/19/12
321465
09/19112
321466
09119/12
09/19/12
321467
321471
09/21112
321472
09/21112
321473
09/21112
321474
09/21112
321475
09/21112
09/21112
321476
321477
09/21112
321478
09/21112
09/21112
321479
09/21112
321480
321481
09/21112
09/21112
321482
09/24/12
321483
321484
09/24/12
09/25112
321485
09125112
321486
09/25/12
321487
09/25112
321488
321489
09/25112
09/25/12
321490
09/25/12
32149J
09/25112
321492
09/25/12
321493
09/25112
321494
09/25/12
321495
09/25112
321496
MEYER, WILLIAM
WILSON, RAYMONA
ARMSTRONG, ALICIA K
ALICIA ARMSTRONG & LTCC
JULIE AVILA & LTCC
CHRISTIAN, HILLARY N
HILLARY CHRISTIAN & LTCC
DUNNE, PATRICIA
PATRICIA DUNNE & LTCC
FRYMOYER, VICTORIA L
. JACKSON, ANDREA T
ANDREA JACKSON & LTCC
KENADY-MUELLER, RACHEL
RACHEL KENADY-MUELLER & LTCC
KRAUSE, MANDY N
MANDY KRAUSE & LTCC
LEGG, CHRISTINE M
CHRISTINE LEGG & LTCC
OGLE, ASHLEY N
ASHLEY OGLE & L TCC
SCHATZ, TERESA A
TERESA SCHATZ & LTCC
CONNER TROWER & LTCC
WATTS, TERESA D
TERESA WATTS & LTCC
WEHNER, CINDY J
CINDY WEHNER & LTCC
CARRIE WILSON & LTCC
CANDICE YARBER & LTCC
BOWLES, JOCELYN
CARGILL KITCHEN SOLUTIONS, INC
CITY OF LEBANON
ENERGY COMPANIES
JTM PROVISIONS CO
KLEINSORGE, CAROLINE L
KNAPP, JOSEPH W
ANDY LOONEY, JR & LTCC
MASN
NEGATIVE CHECK. CHECK WAS VOIDED.
RITZ EIGHT THEATRE
MAESP
TECHDEPOT
TRIPLETT, SHARlSE R.
AFLAC
AMERICAN FIDELITY ASSURANCE CO
AMERICAN FIDELITY ASSURANCE CO
AMERITAS LIFE INSURANCE CO
ANYTIME FITNESS
CAMDEN COUNTY CIRCUIT CLERK
INSURANCE
CENTRAL BANK
CINNCINATTI LIFE INSURANCE CO
CIRCUIT CLERK
CIRCUIT CLERK
CIRCUIT CLERK
COMMUNITY CARES
$4,703. 00 DIRECT LOAN
$1,733.00 DIRECT LOAN
$698.50
$1,900.50 DIRECT LOAN
$1,114.00 DIRECT LOAN
$698.50
$1,900.50 DIRECT LOAN
$661.00
$1,938.00 DIRECT LOAN
$1,402.00 DIRECT LOAN
$698.50
$1,900.50 DIRECT LOAN
$698.50
$1,900.50 DIRECT LOAN
$411.00
$2,188.00 DIRECT LOAN
$698.50
$1,900.50 DIRECT LOAN
$661.00
$1,938.00 DIRECT LOAN
$86.00
$2,513.00 DIRECT LOAN
$1,451.00 DIR
$698.50
$1,900.50 DIRECT LOAN
$203.50
$1,900.50 DIRECT LOAN
$2,599.00 DIRECT LOAN
$297.00
$102.50
$864.75
$2,271.93 LTCC METER BASE/AMP SERV
$21,032.33 FUEL
$1,317.50 FOOD
$1,006.77 READING REC MILEAGE
$54.39
$1,003.00 VOC REHAB MONIES
$180.00
$0.00
$140.00
$674.00
$797.71
$600.00
$909.46
$18,178.94
$17,128.67
$195.96
$310.98
$83.34
$284,649.00
$812.00
$167.46
$63.97
$129.26
$396.00
3
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOLS
CHECK REGISTER- SEPT 2012
321497
321498
321499
321500
321501
321502
321503
321504
321505
321506
321507
321508
321509
321510
321511
321512
321513
321514
. 321515
321516
321517
321518
321519
321520
321521
321522
321523
321524
321525
321526
321527
321528
321529
321530
321531
321532
321533
321534
321535
321536
321537
321538
321539
321540
321541
321542
321543
321544
321545
321546
321547
321548
321549
321550
321551
09125112
09/25/12
09/25112
09/25112
09/25/12
09/25112
09125112
09125112
09125112
09125112
09/25/12
09/25112
09/25/12
09/25112
09128/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09128/12
09/28112
09128/12
09/28/12
09128112
09/28112
09128112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09128/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09128112
09/28/12
09/28112
09128/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09128/12
09/28/12
09128112
09128112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
LEBANON ALL SPORTS
GREAT LIFE GOLF & FITNESS
LEBANON R3 SCHOOLS
LEBANONR-3
MERCYMCR
MNEA
MO DEPT OF HIGHER EDUCATION
MSTA
OZARKS REGIONAL YMCA
PEERS
PRE PAID LEGAL SERVICES INC
PSRS
ST JOHN'S FITNESS CENTER
TRANSAMERICA ASSURANCE CO
3M COGENT
A WISH COME TRUE
ABLENET, INC
ABRAMS LEARNING TRENDS
ABS ALLIED BUS SALES, INC
ACCURATE LABEL DESIGNS INC
.AHERA,LLC
AIREMASTER OF AM INC
AIRGAS MID AMERICA INC
ALLEN APPLIANCE
ALLISON, GREGORY F
ALWAYS FLOWERS & PLANTS
AMERICAN BAND ACCESSORIES LLC
ANDERSON DAIRY EQUIPMENT INC
ANDERSONS
ANDYS 417 RESTAURANT
APPLE COMPUTER INC
APPLE EDUCATION SALES SUPPORT
ARMSTRONG, BRADLEY C
ASBO INTERNATIONAL
ATI- ASSESSMENT TECHNOLOGIES
AUDIO ACOUSTICS INC
BAILEYS RENTAL INC
BAILEYS TV INC
BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSTORE
BARNES, GENE
BATEMAN, LARRY
BATES, DENVER
BEEZLEY, LARRY
BENTELE, KENNETH V
BEST CHEMICALS OF SPRINGFIELD
BEST REFRIGERATION CO INC
BEYOND PLAY LLC
BILLS FARM & HOME INC
BLUE BELL CREAMERIES, LP
BLUE LINE EXPRESS
BOOKS ARE FUN LTD
BRINLEY, TAMARA
BROWNING, JAY
BSN SPORTS, INC
SPORTS SUPPLY GROUP, INC
$6,580.75
$1,037.68
$268.72
$74.80
$14,893.90
$2,445.55
$331.50
$5,430.35
$2,080.80
$72,583.31
$17.00
$420,477.42
$231.28
$231.27
$44.80
$649.00
$65.00
$3,088.80 ESTHER LITERACY MATERIALS
$853.68
$108.95
$150.00
$196.76
$640.90
$86.40
$13.56
$110.00
$1,716.73 HS BAND SUPPLIES
$203.28
.' $486.59
$82.19
$1,198.00 IPAD- P.E. DEPT HS
$547.00
$236.99
$211.00
$2,268.00 PN COMP PROGRAM-LTCC
$255.72
$80.00
$245.24
$3,112.03 JH LEF PROJECT
$85.00
$128.00
$164.00
$85.00
$45.00
$142.50
$470.18
$47.85
. $310.80
$1,407.48 ICE CREAM
$28.50
$131.00
$36.63
$100.00
$3,124.15 HS ATHLETIC SUPPLIES
$641.64
4
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOLS CHECK REGISTER- SEPT 2012 321552
321553
321554
321555
321556
321557
321558
321559
321560
321561
321562
321563
321563
321564
321565
321566
321567
321568
321569
321570
321571
321572
321573
321574
321575
321576
321577
321578
321579
321580
321581
321582
321583
321584
321585
321586
321587
321588
321589
321590
321591
321592
321593
321594
321595
321596
321597
321598
321599
321600
321601
321602
321603
321604
321605
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09128112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09128112
09128/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09128/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09128/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09128112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
BUEHLER, KAY M
BUTCHER,DJ
BUTLER SUPPLY INC
CALLOWA Y HOUSE INC
CAMDENTON HIGH SCHOOL
CAMPUS TEAM WEAR
CAREERSAFE
CARTHAGE HIGH SCHOOL BAND
CASE, LAURA E
CDW GOVERNMENT INC
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321561
321563 is VOIDED
CENGAGE LEARNING
CENTRAL STATES BUS SALES INC
CENTURYLINK PHONE SERVICE
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321565
CEV MULTIMEDIA LTD
CHANNING L BETE CO INC
CIS DATA SERVICES LLC
CITY OF LEBANON
CLASSIC INDUSTRIES
CLAY, WENDELL
CLEAN UNIFORM CO
CMI EDUCATION INSTITUTE
CNA SURETY
COOPER, MAEGAN K
COPY PRODUCTS INC
COPY PRODUCTS INC
NEGATIVE CHECK. CHECK WAS VOIDED.
CPI
CREATIVE NOTEBOOK SOLUTIONS
CROW PAINT & GLASS INC
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321582
CRSADVANCEDTECHNOLOGY
CULLIGAN WATER
CUMMINS CENTRAL POWERS LLC
D&A PAINT & TRUCK
DAVIS, KEITH A
DAVIS,LYNN & MOOTS, PC
DECKER, INC
DEGRAW, MICHAEL
DELL MARKETING LP
DEPCOLLC
DIGITAL SILVER
DOGAR, ELENA L
DOLL YWOODFOUNDATION
DRAKE, MATT
DRAMATIC PUBLISHING
EBSCO ACCOUNTS RECElVABLE
EDDLEMON, MARK
UNIVERSITY OF OREGON
ELCHARRO
ELECTRONIC SOLUTIONS
ELECTRONIC VIDEO SYSTEMS
ELSEVIER
$66.05 $12.21 $1,587.00 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES $118.92 $90.00 $1,034.05 JH CHEER UNIFORMS $75.00 $200.00. $128.76 $5,588.15 JH PROJECTORIDIST SUPPLIES $0.00 $0.00 $1,211.11 LTCC TEXTBOOKS $1,365.67 BUS PARTS $3,110.32 DISTRICT PHONES • $0.00
$1,894.00 CHILD DEV PATHWAY-LTCC $470.88 $263.10 $2,714.02 SRO SALARY $563.00 $232.00 $573.57 $96.94 $125.00 $441.00 $3,206.66 COpy CHARGESIMAINTENANCE
$954.51 DUPLICATE INVOICE-CHECK VOIDED
$0.00
$1,352.00 CONF REGI MATERIALS
$254.1 0
$2,015.14 DISTRICT SUPPLIES
$0.00 $797.82 $578.70 $45.56 $1,041.50 LTCC AUTO BODY SUPPLIES $101.90 $9;875.00 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES $105.23 $200.00 $28,631.42 LTCC DELL PRECISION
$2,939.00 PLTW-AUTODESK SOFTWARE
$629.20
$26.64
$33.70
$253.80
$381.39
$395.60
$118.00
$250.00
$61.25 $189.00 $1,595.00 MC SMARTBOARDS $849.87 5
_LEBANON R-3 SCHOOLS
CHECK REGISTER- SEPT 2012
321606
321607
321608
321609
321610 .
321611
321612
321613
321614
321615
321616
321617
321618
321619
321620
321621
321622
321623
321624
321625
321626
321627
321628
321629
321630
321631
321632
321633
321634
321635
321636
321637
321638
321639
321640
321641
321642
321643
321644
321645
321646
321647 .
321648
321649
321650 .
321651
321652
321653
321654
321655
321656
321657
321658
321659
321660
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09128/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09128112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09128/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/l2
09/28/J2
09128112
09/28/12
09/28/l2
09128!l2
09/281I2
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/l2
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/l2
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09128112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09128112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
EMBRY, STEPHANIE B
EMERGENCY MEDICAL PRODUCTS EMO PLASTIC & CRAFTS
EMPLOYEE SCREENING SERV INC
ENERGY EDUCATION, INC
ENTERPRISE RENT A CAR
ESTES, STACY
E-Z DISPOSAL INC
FARMERS PRODUCE EXCHANGE CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321614 FASTENAL
FELLERS FIXTURES INC FERGUSON, LORI FIDELITY BROADCASTING INC
FLOREZ, BOB
FLOWER BASKET
FOLLETT EDUCATIONAL SERV
FOLLETT LIBRARY RES .
FORD, RONNA L
GET-ER-DUN-JON'S
GOMEZ NICHOLS, JANE
GOPHER SPORT
GRAFIX BUSINESS SOLUTIONS
GRAINGER PARTS OPERATIONS
GREENSPRO, INC
GRUMBINE, STEVE
HADDOCK COMPUTERS
HAMMOND & STEPHENS
HARRY COOPER SUPPLY
HAWTHORN SUITES
HEARTSPRING
HELTON, ALEAH
HENDERSON HEATING & COOLING
HEP SUPPLY CO INC
HERMITAGE R-4 SCHOOLS
HICKS, MARK R
HILAND DAIRY CO
HILL, STEVE
HOBART SALES & SERVICE
HOBBY LOBBY STORES INC
HODES CO
HORN, CLINT
HORTON,ROBERT
HPSOINSO HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS
HRDC
HTD BATTERY INC
HUNTER, JOEL
HUNTER, JORDAN
HYDE,LAELN
!BC SALES CORPORATION·
ID CARD GROUP
INDOFFINC
INNOVATIVE COMP ENGRAVING
INNOVATIVE EDUCATION SYSTEMS INC
IPA EDUCATIONAL SUPPLY
$7.00 $570.16
$3.50
$802.20
$6,300.00 MONTHLY FEE
$34.47
$100.00
$617.22 $212.15 $0.00
$93.14 $291.85 $105.00
$270.00
$287.20
$309.00
$469.36
$543.68
$84.87
$720.00
'$16.00
$933.66 BALL CARTS- HS P.E.
$48.39
$448.92
$155.00
$135.00
$359.50
$121.18
$63.55
$414.20
$25,432.50 RESIDENTIAL TUITION
$13.55
$4,422.47 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES
$3,187.10 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES
$90.00
$244.29
$31,557.91 MILK
.$85.00
$114.43
$587.20
$764.59
$156.00
$210.00.
$55.00
$250.00
$1,213.00 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES
$26.50
$60.00
$19.58
$2,268.08 BREAD ALL SCHOOLS
$61.80
$1,066.05 MC MAKEOVER SUPPLIES
$643.50
$1,650.00 SOLID WORKS CLASS PACK-LTCC
$618.84
6
.LEBANON R-3 SCHOOLS
CHECK REGISTER- SEPT 2012
321661
321662
321663
321664
321665
321666
321667
321668
321669
321670
321671
321672
321673
321674
321675
321676
321677
321678
321679
321680
321681
321682
321683
321684
321685
321686
321687
321688
321689
321690
321691
321692
321693
321694
321695
321696
321697
321698
321699
321700
321701
321702
321703
321704
321705
321706
321707
321708
321709
321710
321711
321712
321713
321714
321715 .
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09128112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09128/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09128112
09/28/12
09128112
09/28112
09/28/12
09128/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09128/12
09128/12
09128112
09/28112
09/28/12
09128112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09128/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09128112
09128112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09128/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09128112
J &K SOCCER
J D DICKINSON COMPRESSOR CO
J ROGERS ARCHITECTURE
JACOBSEN APPLIANCES INC
JAGUAR EDUCATIONAL CORP
JAYNES, RYAN
JENKINS DIESEL POWER INC
JEROME M. SATTLER, PUBLISHER, INC
JESSEN, BRIITNI
J-H EXCAVATING,INC JIM CLARK
$553.00
$984.92 LTCC SUPPLIES
$2,800.00 PROFESSIONAL SERVo LTCC
$395.00
$637.27
$62.16
$4,139.97 TRANSPORTATION SUPPLIES
·.$150.00
$387.32 $1,090.00 DITCHWORK FOR HS SCOREBOARD
$405.00 $25.00
$150.78
$441.00
$150.00
$258.00
$281.00
$255.32
$93.03
$25.00
$76,322.70 FOOD
$256.00
$582.22
$1,030.43 HS ART SUPPLIES
$75.00
$143.78
$110.00
JMARK BUSINESS SOLUTIONS INC JOHNSTONE SUPPLY
JONES SCHOOL SUPPLY CO INC
JOSTENSINC
JULIUS, BRIAN
JUNIOR LIBRARY GUILD
KILLINGSWORTH, TYE
KING, LORIL
KNAPP, JOSEPH W
KOHL WHOLESALE
KTTKRADIO
L & L KILNS MFG, INC
L & R SPECIAL TIES
LACLEDE CO C-5 SCHOOL
LACLEDE WINNELSON
LADD JR, CHARLES
LAF
LAKELAND REGIONAL SCHOOL
LAKESHORE LEARNING MATERIALS
LAMONTAGNE, PAMELA
LARRY'S TROPHIES
LA WLER, SUZANNE
LEADERSHIP RANCH
LEARNING A-Z
LEBANON DAILY RECORD
LEBANON HS PETTY CASH
LEBANON PHONE CENTER
LEBANON PUBLISHING COMPANY
LEO MORGAN FENCING
LIND SAY CHEVROLET INC'
LOWERY, KEVIN G
MAEA SPRING CONF
MO ASSOC OF NURSING HOME ADM
MARDEL
MARILYN'S NURSERY
MARK STEELE COMMUNICATIONS
MARSHALL, SARAH
MARSHFIELD COUNTRY CLUB
MARSHFIELD R I SCHOOLS
MASFAP
MASL
MASSP
MAZZIOS CORPORATION
McCARTY, JIM
$4,769.69 BUZZ DONATION PROCEEDS
$160.00
$1,115.65
$47.18
$143.50
$609.05
$665.00
$909.35
$84.70
$709.14
$1,289.80
$694.47
$2,200.00
$52.39
$288.77
$175.00
"$20.00
$75.88
$124.06
$6,474.00
$429.60
$125.00
$100.00
$400.00
$39.60
$1,950.00
$712.03
$105.00
7
ESTHER CLASSROOM SUPPLIES
BOSWELL BOOKS
JHlPAT PHONE SYSTEMS
ATHLETIC FIELD FENCING
TRANSPORTATION RADIOS
HSILTCC FALL CONF REG
LEBANON R-3 SCHOOLS
CHECK REGISTER-SEPT 2012
321716
321717
321718
321719
321720
321721
321722
321723
321724
321725
321726
321727
321728
321729
321730
321731
321732
321733
321734
321735
321736
321737
321738
321739
321740
321741
321742
321743
321744
321745
321746
321747
321748
321749
321750
321751
321752
321753
321754
321755
321756
321757
321758
321759
321760
321761
321762
321763
321764
321765
321766
321767
321768
321769
321770
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
MCCAULLEY, NOLAN
McCORMICKS
MCCTA
MCDHH
MCGRAW HILL
MEA INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPLY
MEDCO SUPPLY INC
MEEKS BUILDING CENTER
MERCY CLINIC SPRINGFIELD
MERCY HOSPITAL - LEBANON
MERCY SPECIALIZED BILLING SERV
MICKES GOLDMAN O'TOOLE, LLC
MIDWEST BEVERAGE GROUP
MSLBD ADMIN CONFERENCE
MI-KEL SUPPLY LLC
MILLER, GAIL M
MINUTEMAN PRESS INC
MISSOURI EMPLOYERS MUTUAL
MISSOURI LEAGUE FOR NURSING
MISSOURI READING INSTITUTE
MITCHELL, KATHRYN H
MBCACLINIC
MOSOUTHERNCROSSCOUNTRY
MO VOCATIONAL ENTERPRISES
MOAHPERD
MOORE, SHEILA A
MORGAN MUSIC SERVICE INC
MPS
MSBA MO SCHL BOARD ASSOC
MTCINC
MUSIC THEATRE INTERNATIONAL
NASCO
NATIONAL FASTENER CORP
NATURES BEST PET SHOP
NEIL ENTERPRISES INC
NETWATCH
NEW SYSTEM CARPET
NEWS-LEADER
NEWSWEEK INC
NICHOLS, DAKOTA
NICHOLS, SHARI
NIXA R II SCHOOL DISTRICT
NOBLE HUDSON AND SONS
NOEL, MARLENE M
OFFICE DEPOT INC
TECHDEPOT OFFUTT, LYNDA D ONE WAY WEAR SCREEN PRINTING ONLINE STORES, INC
OREILLY AUTOMOTIVE INC CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321765
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321765 ORIENTAL TRADING CO INC
NEGATIVE CHECK. CHECK WAS VOIDED.
OWEN, JANE
$85.00
$903.10
$250.00
$210.00
$2,873.32 HS GOV'T TEXTBOOKS
$840.80
$231.90
$815.69
$292.40
$132.00
$3,525.00 PT/OT THERAPY
$921.00
$495.00
$1,003.00 HS SPED CONF REG
$164.82
$59.72
$94.90
$10,883.76
$540.00
$3,240.00 ELEMENTARY PD
$196.47
$300.00
$250.00
$380.00
$175.00
$145.90
$218.50
$502.50
$4,566.67 FULL POLICY MAINT/SDAC CLAIMS
$858.33
$600.00
.$104.95
$263.86
$50.00
$130.00
$38,116.92 HS/JH SURVEILLANCE CAMERAS
$139.24
$158.34
$40.00
$16.00
$102.01
$75.00
$230.75
$88.25
$1,915.41 DIST TECHNOLOGY SUPPLIES
$2,217.48 TECH BATTERY MODULES
$13.32 $440.00 $337.69 $1,455.41 DISTRICT SUPPLIES $0.00 $0.00 $112.23 $0.00 $65.49 8
LEBANON R·3 SCHOOLS CHECK REGISTER· SEPT 2012 321771
321772
321773
321774
321775
321776
321777
321778
321779
321780
321781
321782
321783
321784
321785
321786
321787
321788
321789
321790
321791
321792
321793
321794
321795
321796
321797
321798
321799
321800
321801
321802
321803
321804
321805
321806
321807
321808
321809
321810
321811
321812
321813
321814
321815
321816
321817
321818
321819
321820
321821
321822
321823
321824
321825
09/28/12
09/28/12
09128/12
09128/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09128/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09128/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09128112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09128112
09/28/12
09128/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/281I2
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09128/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09128/12
09/28112
OZARK THERAPY INSTITUTE
OZARKO TIRE CENTERS
OZARKS COCACOLA DR PEPPER
OZARKS DELIGHT LOLLIPOPS
PACE,GLENN
PACE, JASON
PAGE OFFICE SUPPLY
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321777
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321777
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321777
P AGE PRINTING
PAPER 101
PAYNE, ELANA
NCSPEARSON
PEARSON EDUCATION ELEMENTARY
PERSCHALL, AMANDA L
PEZZETTI, TIMOTHY A
PIONEER VALLEY
PITNEY BOWES INC
PITSCO INC
POOLE, HOLLY J
PRAXAIR DISTRIBUTION, INC
PRICECUTTER
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321793
$2,014.40 OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY $2,407.63 TRANSPORTATION SUPPLIES $2,287.43 DISTRICT SUPPLIES $156.20 $85.00 $85.00 $5,663.66 DISTRICT SUPPLIES $O.OQ $0.00 $0.00 $1,719.00 VACUUMS-MAINTDEPT
$27,126.80 DISTRICT COpy PAPER
$88.93
$1,054.89 SPED SUPPLIES
$211.62
$13.32 $399.60 $213.39 $867.00 $1,237.59 JH PLTW SUPPLIES $7.00 $513.71 $1,316.51 DISTRICT SUPPLIES $0.00 $753.50 $327.60 $12,168.00 FINAL 10% COMPLETI0N-BOS AlC
$161.98
$3,343.75 THINK IT OVER BABIES-LTCC
PRO ED INC
PYRAH, JASON
QUALITY HEATING & AIR
QUILL CORPORATION
REALITY WORKS
REDICK, JASON
REEVES, CRAIG E
REPTILE EXPERIENCE
RESULTS ADVERTISING
RIDDELL ALL AMERICAN
RMS CUSTOM DRILL DESIGN
ROEBKE, MIKE
ROGERS, BELINDA C
S.M.SAT.
SAFETY KLEEN CORP
SARGENT WELCH, LLC
SAX ARTS & CRAFTS
SCHILLERS IMAGING GROUP
SCHOEN, AJ.
SCHOLASTIC BOOK CLUBS. INC
SCHOLASTIC BOOK FAIRS
SCHOLASTIC INC
SCHOLASTIC MAGAZINES
SCHOOL SPECIALTY
SEARS ROEBUCK & CO
SELLE,GREG
SEMINOLE RETAIL ENERGY, SERV SEWING MACHINES EXPRESS SHELLHORN, SCOTT A SIMPSON, REBECCA J TYLER TECHNOLOGIES INC $60.00 $170.18 $570.00 $5,801.74 JH VOLLEYBALLIDREAM TEAM $2,843.76 FOOTBALL SUPPLIES $1,025.00 HS BAND DRILLS $60.00 $761.94 $40.00 $106.00 $2,269.55 HS SCIENCE SUPPLIES $1,216.07 HS ART SUPPLIES. $615.00 $85.00 $468.00 $4,780.30 ESTHER BOOK FAIR
$81.70
$4,640.57 DISTRICT CLASSROOM MAGAZINES
$1,928.90 ESTHER STUDENT CHAIRS
$397.10 $120.00 $311.51 $27.90 $30.53 . $47.18 $5,327.84 SIS FINANCIAL SUPPORT 9
;LEBANON R-3 SCHOOLS
CHECK REGISTER- SEPT 2012
321826
321827
321828
321829
321830
321831
321832
321833
321834
321835
321836
321837
321838
321839
321840
321841
321842
321843
321844
321845
321846
321847
321848
321849
321850
321851
321852
321853
321854
321855
321856
321857
321858
321859
321860
321861
321862
321863
321864
321865
321866
321867
321868
321869
321870
321871
321872
321873
321874
321875
321876
321877
321878
321879
321880
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/281I2
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09128112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09128/12
09128112
09128112
09/28112
09/28/12
09128112
09128/12
09128/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28/12
09128/12
09128/12
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09128112
09/28112
09128112
09/28/12
09128112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28112
09/28/12
09/28/12
09/28112
SMITH PAPER
SMITH, JEFF
SMSCA
SNAP ON TOOLS
SNAPPY POPCORN CO
SOCIAL STUDIES SCHOOL SERV
SOUTHEAST MO STATE UNIV
SPRINGFIELD GROCER CO INC
SPRINGFIELD STAMP & ENGRAVING
STANTON, TOM
STAR COMMUNICATIONS
STARR DISTRIBUTING
STEPHENSON, GREG
STEVES TOWING
SUHR,MARY L
SUPER DUPER PUBLSH INC
1'S REDNECK STEAKHOUSE, INC
TEACHERS PARADISE
TEAM CONNECTION
TECHNOLOGY STUDENT ASSOC (TSA)
TH ROGERS LUMBER CO
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321846
TIME
TMW SPORTS LLC
TOOLING UNIVERSITY, LLC
TRACTOR SUPPLY
TRUCK PARTS & SUPPLY CO INC
TRUSCO MFG CO
TRUSTY, HEATHER
TUCKER, JANI L
TUCKER, ZACHARY J
TWOTREES TECHNOLOGIES
UPS STORE
US BANK EQUIPMENT FINANCE '
US SCHOOL SUPPLY, INC
VERIZON WIRELESS
VESTAL, TYLER
VEX ROBOTICS, INC
WALMART COMMUNITY
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321864
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321864
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321864
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321864
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321864
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321864
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321864
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321864
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321864
CONTINUATION STUB FOR CK 321864
WAPELHORST, KRISTINE M
WATCH D.O.G.S.
WATERS PIANO SERVICE
WEAVER, EVERETT
WEHNERSBAKERY
WIESER EDUCATIONAL, INC
$1,115.56 MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES
$40.00
$60.00
$378.29
$149.00
$45.93
$30.00
$1,883.65 FOOD
$71.10
$125.00
$415.41
$120.00
.$145.00
$703.00
$66.60
$113.97
$86.37
$66.89
$825.50
$160.00
$1,022.33 DISTRICT SUPPLIES
$0.00
$119.34
$5,122.75 ATHlESTHERllH SHlRTSIUNIFORMS
$1,386.00 ONLINE CURRICULUM LICENSE
$14.97
$392.14
$195.34
$75.00
$5.75
$124.88
$1,134.00 LENOVO THINKPADS-DIST TECH
$246.50
$4~341.00 COpy MACHINE LEASE
.$94.55
$1,114.89 DISTRICT CELL PHONES
$69.38
$14,952.77 VEX LAB-LTCC
$17,022.23 DISTRICT SUPPLIES
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$250.86
$93.00
$270.00
$120.00
$36.61
$158.38
10
.I
LE:BANON R-3 SCHOOLS
CHECK REGISTER- SEPT 2012
09/28112
321881
09/28112 '
321882
09/28/12
321883
09/28/12
321884
09/28112 .
321885
09/28/12
321886
09/28/12
321887
09/28/12
321890
3208052 9113/2012
WILKINSON PHARMACY
WILKINSON PHARMACY
WILKINSON, ANDY
WILSON, CINDY
WlTYK, BRIAN
WOLFF,ROB
CENGAGE LEARNING
COVENTRY HEALTH & LIFE INS. CO
TIME MOTION TOOLS
$79.84
$51.01
$129.00
$12.\.00
$60.00
$133.00
$],001.11 LTCC MEDICAL SUPPLIES- PN
$45,308.10
$192.07
$1,656,571.51
o
11
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
Dated : 10/5/2012
2012-2013
Time : 09:21
Page 1
Revenue :
REVISIONS <>
0 |
BUDGET
YTD ACTIVITY
ADOPTED
WORKING
BUDGET
BUDGET
REVISION 1
TOTAL
REVISIONS
664,191.00
0.00
726,504.00
0.00
37,458.50
0.00
754,519.00
22,342.00
28,015.00
22,342.00
28,015.00
22,342.00
15,029.00
135,734.00
0.00
15,000.00
24,634.00
0.00
0.00
6,421.00
0.00
8,500.00
0.00
12,173.00
-6,500.00
-24,634.00
12,173.00
-6,500.00
-24,634.00
12,173.00
OBJECT 5484 TOTAL PELL GRANT
FUND 010 TOTAL
INCIDENTAL FUND
146,975.00
297,738.00
225,000.00
264,634.00
31,037.50
37,458.50
175,000.00
218,015.00
-50,000.00
-46,619.00
-50,000.00
-46,619.00
OBJECT 5332 TOTAL VOC TECH AIDE (STATE)
FUND 020 TOTAL
TEACHER FUND
OBJECT 5359 TOTAL VO TECH ENHANCEMENT
366,453.00
366,453.00
297,870.00
297,870.00
0.00
0.00
347,870.00
347,870.00
50,000.00
50,000.00
50,000.00
50,000.00
0.00
0.00
164,000.00
164,000.00
0.00
0.00
188,634.00
188,634.00
24,634.00
24,634.00
24,634.00
24,634.00
ACCOUNT CODE
ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION
GRAND TOTAL
OBJECT 5326 TOTAL LTCC-PLTW
OBJECT 5341 TOTAL ADULT DAYTIME TRADE
OBJECT 5359 TOTAL VO TECH ENHANCEMENT
OBJECT 5462 TOTAL EMER IMMIGRATION EDUC
FUND 040 TOTAL
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND
1ST PRIOR
YEAR ACTUAL
TOTAL
Lebanon School Dist R-III
1310 East Route 66
Lebanon, MO 65536-3260
ACCOUNT CODE
ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION
GRAND TOTAL
OBJECT 6151 TOTAL CLASSIFIED SALARIES
Dated : 10/5/2012
2012-2013
Time : 08:50
Page 1
Expenses:
TOTAL
REVISIONS <>
1ST PRIOR
YEAR ACTUAL
BUDGET
YTD ACTIVITY
ADOPTED
0 |
WORKING
BUDGET
BUDGET
REVISION 1
TOTAL
REVISIONS
2,415,122.44
583,421.82
2,627,075.00
683,099.00
440,954.32
50,131.72
2,649,267.00
563,077.00
22,192.00
-120,022.00
22,192.00
-120,022.00
2,464.42
48,570.53
35,070.66
4,730.00
54,068.00
42,910.00
0.00
4,268.61
3,028.64
300.00
45,264.00
35,639.00
-4,430.00
-8,804.00
-7,271.00
-4,430.00
-8,804.00
-7,271.00
8,201.92
929.70
10,035.00
953.00
708.32
62.34
8,205.00
745.00
-1,830.00
-208.00
-1,830.00
-208.00
OBJECT 6241 TOTAL EMPLOYEE HEALTH INSURANCE
OBJECT 6311 TOTAL INSTRUCTION SERVICES
134,545.05
286,170.20
151,200.00
300,000.00
10,425.00
75,011.35
115,428.00
300,000.00
-35,772.00
0.00
-35,772.00
0.00
OBJECT 6332 TOTAL REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE
OBJECT 6334 TOTAL RENTAL EQUIPMENT
OBJECT 6343 TOTAL TRAVEL
465.74
115,361.44
19,453.46
3,500.00
83,632.00
28,550.00
86.40
30,758.60
5,075.05
2,000.00
83,632.00
23,926.00
-1,500.00
0.00
-4,624.00
-1,500.00
0.00
-4,624.00
OBJECT 6211 TOTAL TEACHER RETIREMENT
OBJECT 6221 TOTAL NON TEACHER RETIREMENT
OBJECT 6231 TOTAL OASDI
OBJECT 6232 TOTAL MEDICARE
OBJECT 6240 TOTAL LIFE INSURANCE
OBJECT 6371 TOTAL DUES AND MEMBERSHIPS
OBJECT 6391 TOTAL
OBJECT 6410 TOTAL
OBJECT 6411 TOTAL
OBJECT 6415 TOTAL
OBJECT 6431 TOTAL
OBJECT 6481 TOTAL
OBJECT 6545 TOTAL
FUND 010 TOTAL
OBJECT 6112 TOTAL
OBJECT 6113 TOTAL
OBJECT 6121 TOTAL
OBJECT 6131 TOTAL
OBJECT 6211 TOTAL
OBJECT 6221 TOTAL
OBJECT 6231 TOTAL
OBJECT 6232 TOTAL
OBJECT 6240 TOTAL
OBJECT 6241 TOTAL
FUND 020 TOTAL
OBJECT 6541 TOTAL
OBJECT 6542 TOTAL
FUND 040 TOTAL
OTHER PURCHASED SERVICES
GENERAL SUPPLIES
MAINT & REP SUPPLIES
K12 SPECIAL ED TESTING SUPPLIES
TEXTBOOKS
ELECTRIC
K12 SPECIAL ED ASSIST TECHNOLOGY
INCIDENTAL FUND
CERTIFICATED TEACHERS SALARY
OTHER CERTIFICATED SALARIES
CERTIFICATED PART TIME SALARY
SUPPLEMENTAL PAY
TEACHER RETIREMENT
NON TEACHER RETIREMENT
OASDI
MEDICARE
LIFE INSURANCE
EMPLOYEE HEALTH INSURANCE
TEACHER FUND
REGULAR EQUIPMENT
EQUIPMENT INSTRUCTIONAL
CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND
0.00
0.00
355.00
910.00
910.00
910.00
69,401.59
60,768.03
9,078.00
0.00
62,392.00
112,202.00
0.00
0.00
21,547.70
54,659.16
0.00
739.04
89,619.00
125,239.00
7,000.00
1,000.00
27,227.00
13,037.00
7,000.00
1,000.00
27,227.00
13,037.00
7,000.00
1,000.00
2,871.60
1,125.00
0.00
1,377,899.16
582,629.40
105,393.18
24,492.00
102,928.10
108,008.15
7,070.00
3,500.00
8,000.00
1,555,841.00
545,680.00
93,226.00
0.00
123,132.00
109,220.00
0.00
900.00
568.88
258,325.81
73,972.84
8,217.49
19,925.00
12,247.92
12,944.03
0.00
1,200.00
1,000.00
1,404,184.00
628,565.00
98,588.00
28,000.00
148,532.00
117,457.00
-7,070.00
-2,300.00
-7,000.00
-151,657.00
82,885.00
5,362.00
28,000.00
25,400.00
8,237.00
-7,070.00
-2,300.00
-7,000.00
-151,657.00
82,885.00
5,362.00
28,000.00
25,400.00
8,237.00
0.00
5,262.81
7,296.82
569.60
71,526.60
2,528.00
4,581.00
7,815.00
617.00
73,725.00
140.72
785.85
961.68
48.06
8,321.00
1,558.00
9,957.00
8,802.00
600.00
85,489.00
-970.00
5,376.00
987.00
-17.00
11,764.00
-970.00
5,376.00
987.00
-17.00
11,764.00
1,008,106.66
27,859.62
1,257.00
29,116.62
960,524.00
110,710.00
0.00
110,710.00
137,564.59
45,063.92
0.00
45,063.92
1,127,548.00
114,960.00
2,575.00
117,535.00
167,024.00
4,250.00
2,575.00
6,825.00
167,024.00
4,250.00
2,575.00
6,825.00
Transportation (8.13)
Goal:
To provide a safe, efficient, and consistent transportation to and from school in compliance with Missouri
statutes, regulations, and local board policies.
Evaluation:
The transportation program will be evaluated annually by the Board of Education to determine if it is
operating in a safe, efficient, and consistent manner, and if it is in compliance with Missouri laws,
regulations, and local board policies.
Evaluation Criteria –
8.13 Is the district complying with all regulations, laws, and local board policies? YES / NO
1.
Liability and property damage insurance is purchased for school buses (or
Is part of the contracted services provided by others) (537.610, RSMo).
YES – United Insurer’s - Policy SCP2831772-22
2.
Emergency evacuation drills are conducted (one per semester, K-6) and the board has prescribed drill
requirements for all students.
3.
Daily pre-trip inspections are conducted.
4.
Procedures are in effect to meet provisions of the Commercial Driver’s License Program and Controlled
Substance and Alcohol Use Act (49 CFR Part 382, et al.)
YES – Twice yearly: (1 drill front door/1 drill front & rear). Doc: Safety office, for October and March.
YES – Daily Documentation is in the Mechanic Office.
YES – File GBEBB - Quarterly – ¼ of employees. Documentation on file in Admin Asst. Office.
5.
There is written procedure for reporting positive bus driver drug test results to the Missouri Department of
Revenue (302.275, RSMo).
6.
Drivers meet state qualifications (CDL and School Bus Operator’s Permit).
7.
A written bus discipline policy has been established and implemented.
8.
All transportation contracts are in writing, dated, and properly signed. All contracts adhere to all
applicable regulations. NO – Contracted Bus services
Student loading and unloading zones are periodically reviewed for safety concerns.
YES – File GBEBB in State Handbook.
YES – Documentation on file in Safety/Training office.
YES – Student Handbooks & Transportation Rules
9.
YES – Schools & student bus stops. Route sheets are prepared by each driver and logged into system by
office staff. Documentation is kept on file.
10.
Drivers receive safety instruction on school bus operation and student management.
YES – At least 8 hours minimum from Training Officer – State requirement, plus offer more hours.
11.
In addition to the annual Highway Patrol inspections, the district has its buses inspected by a Missouri
certified inspector within 60 days of the beginning of the school year.
YES – August and March. Documentation in Mechanic office.
Documentation Required for MSIP: Please attach the following marked 8.13
• A list of all in-service training provided to transportation employees within the last year. Training Office
• Dates of school bus emergency evacuation drills conducted in the past year. Training Office
• Written Bus Discipline Policy. Handbook plus Transportation Rules
In addition, please note the location of the following information:
• District Bus Accident Forms (if any):
Safety Office
• Bus Driver Physical Examinations:
Admin Asst. Office
• Current License/Permits for Bus Drivers:
Safety Office
• Insurance Records:
Transportation Director’s Office
• Spring and Summer Inspection Reports:
Mechanic’s Office
• Transportation Contracts (if any):
N/A
• Written Procedures for Reported Positive Driver Drug Tests and Meeting Provisions of 49 CFR, Part 382 et al:
Admin Asst. Office
• Pre-Trip Inspections (daily):
Mechanic’s Office
• Review of Student Loading and Unloading Zones: Safety Office
STATE OF MISSOURI
DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION
DIVISION OF CAREER EDUCATION
P.O. BOX 480, JEFFERSON CITY, MISSOURI 65102-0480
PHONE: (573) 751-2660 FAX: (573) 526-4261
SELF-MONITORING REPORT FOR CAREER EDUCATION
School District Name
County/District Code
Lebanon R3
053-113
District Career Education Contact
Board of Education Program Review
October 16, 2012
Keith Davis
Procedures
th
School districts that are going through 4 Cycle MSIP on a given year are required to complete the Self-Monitoring Report
for Career Education. The Self-Monitoring Report for Career Education is based on the Common Standards for Career
Education Programs. Respond to each Career Education Program Standard and Quality Indicator by placing a
checkmark in the appropriate boxes. Responses are required on each item. Only one self-monitoring report is required
per district. The Self-Monitoring Report for Career Education should be mailed to:
Coordinator of Career Education
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
P.O. Box 480
Jefferson City, MO 65102-0480
Assurances
The authorized representative assures the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education that the information
presented in the Self-Monitoring Report for Career Education is correct and accurate.
Signature of Authorized Representative
Date
10/10/2012
The district operates the following approved career education programs:




x

Agriculture Education
Business Education
Family and Consumer Sciences
Health Sciences
Marketing and Cooperative Education
Project Lead the Way® (PLTW)
Trade and Industrial Education
MO500-2331 (Rev. 9-07)
1
Standard – Program Management and Planning
A system of data collection and evaluation provides the information necessary for program
development and continuous improvement resulting in high student achievement.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 1 – The program has a written statement of educational mission, goals, and objectives
which is developed with input from parents, students, administration, community, and business/industry.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 2 – There is a well-defined program plan and outline that reflects the teaching of
academic, employability, occupationally-related, and leadership skills.
Yes
No Quality Indicator 3 – There is a written plan to annually evaluate the effectiveness of the
program.
The written plan to evaluate the effectiveness of career education programs includes:
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
Measurable objectives identified for each career education program.
Established performance measures for each measurable objective.
An acceptable level of performance has been determined for each measure.
An established procedure for gathering, analyzing, and reporting data relevant to each
measure of performance.
No An established procedure for reporting the outcomes and corrective action (if necessary)
for all measurable objectives of each career education program.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 4 – An annual program budget is collaboratively developed by the teacher(s) and
administrator(s) to provide adequate funding for professional development, Career and Technical Student
Organization activities, equipment, maintenance, supplies, and materials.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 5 – A program advisory committee provides community input and support for the
program.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 6 – The teacher promotes the program to the community by providing information
about program goals and activities.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 7 – The teacher collaborates with students, parents, administrators, and guidance
counselors to assist in making informed career choices that support the student’s personal plan of study.
Please indicate program(s) that do not meet the standard or any indicator:
Standard – Curriculum
The career education program has a written curriculum for each sequential course with a
balance among classroom/laboratory instruction, leadership, and personal development.
Quality Indicator 1 – The written curriculum guide includes the required components.
 Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
Rationale
Course description
Graduate goals
Measurable learner objectives
Instructional activities
Assessments, including performance-based assessments
Cross-referenced to the Show-Me Standards
Full alignment – internal and external
Board approval
MO500-2331 (Rev. 9-07)
2
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 2 – A written grading system/policy for measurement of student achievement is in
place.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 3 – The curriculum is reviewed annually and revised as necessary to reflect changes
occurring in industry, student needs, and instructional technology.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 4 – Written articulation agreements and dual credit arrangements are developed,
implemented, and updated with postsecondary institutions.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 5 – Embedded credit opportunities are available.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 6 – The curriculum reflects a balance of Career and Technical Student Organization
(CTSO) activities and classroom/laboratory instruction to achieve curricular goals.
Please indicate program(s) that do not meet the standard or any indicator:
Standard – Instruction
Classroom instruction is congruent with the written curriculum.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 1 – Daily lesson plans and teaching calendars derived from the curriculum guide are
used to direct the instructional process.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 2 – A variety of instructional methods and strategies are used to accommodate all
learning styles.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 3 – Effective classroom management techniques facilitate instruction.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 4 – Program/course objectives, assessment methods, and performance expectations
are shared with students and parents/guardians prior to instruction.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 5 – An instructional management system exists for reporting student progress and
classroom mastery of curriculum competencies.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 6 – The teacher utilizes instructional strategies identified in the students’ Individual
Education Plan to facilitate student achievement.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 7 – School and community resources are used to effectively achieve curricular and
program goals.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 8 – Appropriate equipment and instructional materials are utilized to support the
curriculum and instructional process.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 9 – Students can acquire industry-recognized credentials, if applicable, which
demonstrate skills to meet industry accepted standards.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 10 – The instructor and the guidance staff work cooperatively to provide assistance in
the transition to the workplace and/or continued education.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 11 – Work-based learning is integral to the curriculum and program objectives.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 12 – Cooperative education is guided by Department policies for credit and supervised
employment for approved high school cooperative education programs (Policy Letter #4
http://dese.mo.gov/divcareered/Marketing/Cooperative_Education/Mark_Coop_Policies.pdf and
Graduation Handbook).
MO500-2331 (Rev. 9-07)
3
Please indicate program(s) that do not meet the standard or any indicator: We do not have a Marketing Program
Standard – Professional Development
The certificated teacher participates in ongoing, high-quality professional development
activities.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 1 – The teacher is appropriately certificated.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 2 – The teacher prepares and follows an annual professional development plan that
aligns with his/her individual performance-based teacher evaluation.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 3 – The teacher participates in technical and professional activities in the content area
and in instructional management.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 4 – The teacher maintains membership, participates, and provides leadership in
professional organizations.
Please indicate program(s) that do not meet the standard or any indicator:
Standard – Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs)
The appropriate CTSO is affiliated with the state and national organization and is an intracurricular element of the program.
The district has the following career and technical student organizations:
In-District CTSOs
DECA
FBLA
FCCLA
FFA
SkillsUSA




Number of Participants
n/a
30
63
160
220
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 1 – A program of work aligning the CTSO with curriculum goals and objectives is
developed annually by students and teachers.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 2 – Curriculum goals and objectives are achieved through the integration of CTSO
programs and activities.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 3 – The CTSO program of work includes leadership skills, career competency,
community service, and school service.
_ Yes x No
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 4 – All students participate in CTSO activities.
Quality Indicator 5 – The local CTSO chapter is recognized for meeting state and/or national
organization standards.
Please indicate program(s) that do not meet the standard or any indicator: We do not have a Marketing Program.
In FFA, Skills USA, FBLA and FCCLA we do not require ALL students to join but they are in a course where the
CTSO skills are emphasized and they will participate in activities within the classroom that are tied to the CTSO
standards. Students that do not join either feel the cost or time obligation is too much or they are just exploring a
course and not necessarily committed to that career.
LTCC is now hosting the Robotics Club (grades 6-12) and the TSA (PLTW CTSO) as options for students to
engage in activities related to their career pathway and aligned with courses offered at LTCC.
MO500-2331 (Rev. 9-07)
4
Standard – Instructional Facilities and Equipment
Facilities and equipment are safe, clean, and appropriate.
Quality Indicator 1 – Classroom and lab areas meet existing federal, state, and local health and safety
codes/standards, including ADA standards.
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 3 – Equipment is in good repair and proper working order.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 4 – Equipment is representative of that used in industry and aligns with the curriculum.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 5 – An inventory of equipment is on file and updated annually.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 6 – A district plan is in place for equipment replacement and/or immediate repair.
Quality Indicator 2 – Classroom and lab areas are appropriate for the program and conducive to student
learning.
Please indicate program(s) that do not meet the standard or any indicator:
2. Building Trades program is currently addressing their need for an updated classroom/shop with the new
building project. Early Childhood does not have room for a lab area. Although manageable, limited space for
current programs and no room for program offerings. Limited parking for students, adults, and prospective
students.
Agricultural Education Programs Only
Quality Indicator 1 – The agricultural education teacher is provided time in the school day to supervise
student experiential learning (SAE) instruction.
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 4 – The agricultural education teacher is employed 12 months to provide continuous
instruction and supervision of student experiential learning (SAE) programs.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 5 – Each agricultural education student maintains up-to-date and accurate experiential
learning (SAE) records.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 6 – The program serves the entire community by providing agricultural educational
opportunities for adults.
Yes
No
Quality Indicator 7 – The program promotes agricultural literacy within the school and community.
Quality Indicator 2 – The Program has in place a grading procedure that incorporates all components of
the instructional program (i.e. classroom/lab, experiential learning (SAE), and leadership and personal
development (FFA)).
Quality Indicator 3 – Based on career pathways/clusters, interests, and agricultural education
curriculum standards, all students have experiential learning (SAE) programs which are planned,
developed, and managed by the student with instruction and support by the agriculture teacher,
parents/guardians, and/or employer.
MO500-2331 (Rev. 9-07)
5
LTCC FY2012 Yearly Review:
•
Completed the 2nd year partnership with High School, Jr. High, and LTCC developing the
CAP (Career Advisement Professional) Program and Personal Plans of Study for 8th
grade students. Completion of the Programs of Studies for all Lebanon High
School/LTCC courses has been completed by Amanda Collins and the counselors.
•
Completed the 2nd year of the WIN (Worldwide Interactive Network) and Workkeys
program having 49 Seniors receiving a National Career Readiness Certificate. The
Missouri Career Center continues to be instrumental in assisting with the development
and application of the Workkeys program. Program continues to see benefits for
graduates as local industries/businesses are incorporating into their hiring practices as
REDI continues to promote.
•
LTCC is completing the 2nd year of MRI (Missouri Reading Initiative) training developing
strategies for improving literacy within the Tech Center Programs. MRI training,
coaching, and evaluation of student performance through the Gates-MacGinitie reading
test is being implemented during this school year.
•
Positive news for LTCC and the District came with the reauthorization of Title IV
Funding using the current accounting system used by the District. LTCC is currently
beginning the process for reauthorization that will expire in March 2013.
•
Administration developed the LTCC Ecosystem receiving positive input from the
instructors providing a roadmap toward increased student performance and authentic
assessment. The focus of the teachers is to analyze their curriculum incorporating
assessments, scoring guides, and desired outcomes for students. The program has
become the focus of each PLC.
•
The Building Trades Facility is moving forward with the interior work now being
completed. The City of Lebanon installed the electric meter last week. Plan completion
of the project is December or January depending on weather.
•
Mrs. Ford’s Culinary Arts Makeover was completed in November 2011 and has been a
welcomed addition to enhance the curriculum and student learning.
Plans, Updates, or Needs for FY2013
•
2012-2013 current enrollment is 991 (increase of 97) students including Lebanon,
Conway, Niangua, Stoutland, and Adults.
•
New Faculty in Automotive and Technical Math were hired and attended the District’s
New Teacher Institute. Both are experienced instructors with a combined 21 years of
teaching experience.
MO500-2331 (Rev. 9-07)
6
•
All Programs now required by DESE and the Federal Perkins Act to choose a national
(third Party) assessment referred to by Technical Skills Attainment exam. LTCC is also
responsible for sending school students if they are in a FACS, AG, or Business class.
All program areas administered a national 3rd party exam (end of course exam) called a
Technical Skills Attainment exam to their concentrators (students with 3 credits in
sequential courses of study or program completion of a two year program). This year
we must have 100% of completers tested.
•
We continue to promote Programs of Study to be utilized by all of our High Schools
(including sending schools) developing a rigorous high school schedule that includes
plans beyond their high school diploma with a focus based on career interest indicator
assessments. Continuation of the CAP program and student’s 6-8 year Personal Plans
of Study will continue to be implemented.
•
The 4th and final PLTW Engineering course, EDD (Engineering Design & Development)
has been added to the schedule with 10 students currently enrolled for the 2012-13
school year.
•
Professional Development: Todd Whitaker’s series on “What Great Teachers Do
Different” is being offered to LTCC teachers.
•
Pilot of Student Affective Assessment-LTCC has established and is piloting a Student
Work Ethics scoring guide analyzing student behaviors in Attendance, Work Ethic,
Safety, and Moral Behaviors. Every LTCC instructor is piloting the program in at least
one class at the Junior/Senior level with weekly entries. The program was developed in
googledocs with input electronically.
•
Both the LTCC Technical Math & Senior English instructors are working to implement
the Common Core Standards with their PLC counterparts at the High School.
•
Compass testing has been incorporated into the Trade and Industrial offerings at LTCC
as a pre-test for the Juniors and a post-test for the Seniors. The goal is to enhance
student performance on the Compass (ACT Product) as many community colleges use
the Compass as their entrance/placement exam. Our intentions are to assist students in
achieving higher scores on the Compass so the student will not have to enroll in
remedial courses at the community college level.
•
CASE Program (Curriculum for Agricultural Science Education) for AgricultureResearching the possibility of adding the CASE curriculum to our Ag Program. This
program may be a natural fit with the current curriculum being offered at LTCC. Its
design mimics that of PLTW.
•
Continued growth in Adult Education offerings. Scott Shellhorn continues to add Adult
offerings to LTCC. The 1st EMT-Basics course currently has 10 students enrolled for the
fall semester. Future plans are to add other programs that offer either a State or
National Certification. The occupational outlook for continued growth in the Health care
occupations continues to be a focus of the LTCC Adult program.
MO500-2331 (Rev. 9-07)
7
•
Counselor for Career Education is a need for LTCC. The current VRE(Vocational
Resource Educator) assists with student’s needs as does the High School Counselors,
however, with the addition of Personal Plans of Studies as well as the need for students
to be College & Career Ready, the need for a Career &Technical Education (CTE)
Counselor is a concern.
MO500-2331 (Rev. 9-07)
8
Student Affective Assessment-Rodden
Student Affective Assessment-Rodden
Daily behavior rubric for students.
* Required
Teacher List * Rodden
Rodden
Student List * Amb*,
Amb*,Justin
Justin
SAFETY
4-Independently looks out for safety of self and others, including safety procedures; safety is not an issue.
3-Usually able to keep self and others safe without supervision, aware of safety issues in environment. 2Heeding warnings, improving, safe with supervision. 1-Making corrections to level 0, problems with
supervision. 0-Ignores warnings, takes risks, unsafe to self and others.
Always follows safety rules and procedures for self and others. *
0 1 2 3 4
Ignores warnings, takes risks,
unsafe to self and others.
Independently looks out for safety of self and
others, including safety procedures; safety is not an
issue.
WORK ETHIC
4-Without supervision completes tasks, meets deadlines and pursues the next task. 3-Without supervision,
meets objectives and shows job ready work habits. 2-With supervision, meets objectives and shows job
ready work habits. 1-Making corrections of habits, attitude, and task deadlines. Submitted work does not
meet objective. 0-Lazy, procrastinates, ignores deadlines, no pride in work, does not submit work.
Displays positive attitude, work habits and would be a valued employee. *
0 1 2 3 4
Lazy, procrastinates, ignores deadlines, no
pride in work, does not submit work.
Without supervision completes tasks,
meets deadlines and pursues the next
task.
AFFECTIVE BEHAVIORS
4-Student models value of being respectful of self, others, tools, and equipment; following rules, being
cooperative and reliable, displaying proper appearance for daily tasks. 3-Respectful of self, others, tools,
and equipment; follows rules, is cooperative, reliable, and displays proper appearance for daily tasks. 2Consistently trustworthy. Places low value on being cooperative with peers and staff, following rules, having
job-ready appearance, or quality work. 1-Making corrections to issues with level 0 behaviors. 0-Never
prepared, lies, cheats, dishonest, irresponsible, or unreliable. Instigates, disrespectful, uncooperative, or
does not take direction.
file:///C|/Users/dmorris/Documents/Board/Board%202012-2013/October%20Board%20Packet/Student%20Affective%20Assessment.htm[10/12/2012 2:37:43 PM]
Student Affective Assessment-Rodden
Is trustworthy, responsible, respectful and values personal appearance and the quality of his or her work. *
0 1 2 3 4
0-Never prepared, lies, cheats, dishonest,
irresponsible, or unreliable. Instigates,
disrespectful, uncooperative, or does not
take direction.
Student models value of being respectful
of self, others, tools, and equipment;
following rules, being cooperative and
reliable, displaying proper appearance
for daily tasks.
ATTENDANCE
4-Arrives prior to beginning of class and present for all contact hours. 3-Arrives prior to beginning of class
and present for all contact hours, or if absent provides documentation. 2-Seldom tardy or absent during
class period. 1-Does not regularly attend class, tardy, no reason for absence and does not make contact
with school. 0-Excessive tardies, excessive absences not excused or documented and in jeopardy of losing
class credit.
Can communicate the importance and value of being in class, explain why attendance and time
management are crucial to being successful as a student and employee. *
0 1 2 3 4
Excessive tardies, excessive absences not excused or
documented and in jeopardy of losing class credit.
Arrives prior to beginning
of class and present for all
contact hours
Comments
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file:///C|/Users/dmorris/Documents/Board/Board%202012-2013/October%20Board%20Packet/Student%20Affective%20Assessment.htm[10/12/2012 2:37:43 PM]
THE ECOSYSTEM
CURRICULAR�AIM
PHASE�ONE
2012-2013
What Do We Want
Students to Learn?
OBJECTIVES
Instructional & Behavioral
YES
Are the Objectives
Stated Clearly?
NO
PHASE�THREE
PHASE�TWO
2013-2014
AUTHENTIC
ASSESSMENT
How Will We Know
If They Learned It?
What Will We Do If
They Didn’t Learn It?
What Will We Do If
They Did Learn It?
Are the Objectives
Broad and Measurable
or Small in Scope
and too Specific?
Small in Scope
and too Specific
Objectives Overwhelms
the Instructor;
Restate Objectives.
Is Pre-Assessment
Being Used to Drive
Instruction?
NO
Try Techniques
Such As: Pretest,
Split-and-Switch Design
Are Educational
Decisions Made Based
Upon Assessment
Outcome?
NO
Continue or Cease
Instruction for an Objective, Either for a Student
or Entire Class.
NO
YES
Are Student Behaviors
Calculated into
Grade?
YES
Is there A Scoring Guide
for Instruction (Lesson, Lab,
etc.) Developed to
Assess ALL Objective(s)?
NO
Remove them from
the Grade. Include
only Student Achievement.
DESIRED�OUTCOME
Scope & Sequence
Created
Course Syllabus
Aligned to Current
Practices, Beliefs,
and Weights
Curriculum is
Aligned Internally
and Externally
Course Matrix
Created
Authentic Assessments Created
YES
NO
Develop Scoring Guides
Assessment(s)
Determine Students
Achieved the Instructional
Objectives (In Each Domain,
if Applicable).
NO
YES
Curricular Aim Played a
Prominent Role in Choice
of Assessment Emphases.
Student met desired
Performance Level as
defined in Curricular Aim.
Was there a Positive Gain
When Comparing Post test
to Pretest Performances?
Is Attendance Calculated into Grade?
NO
ACCOUNTABILITY.
CONSISTENCY.
STABILITY.
UNITY.
Revise Assessment(s)
and/or Clearly Restate
Objectives.
Reflection
Intervention
YES
NO
Is There an Intervention
Plan in Place for Students
Needing Additional
Assistance?
Develop Intervention Plan,
Implement Instructional
Strategies.
Is Grade an Accurate
Reflection of Student
Achievement?
YES
GRADING
Only Summative
Assessments Should
be Used When Calculating Grade.
Performance Levels
(i.e. 1-4) and Policies
Defined and in Place.
Postinstruction
YES
INSTRUCTOR OUTCOMES
Version 4 042412
YES
Instruction
Preinstruction
Is Formative
Assessment Calculated into Grade?
Performance Standard
Identifies the Desired Level
of Proficiency at which
Educators Want a Content
Standard Measured.
Content Standard
Describes Knowledge
& Skills which Educators want Students
to Learn.
Content & Performance
Standards Identified
& Established
Record Absences
Separately.
YES
Instructor Can Answer
What was Taught,
How Long was it Taught,
Was it Taught Effectively?
Assessments Internally
and Externally Aligned.
Student is
Authentically Assessed.
Accurate Reflection of
Student Achievement
within Curricular Aim.
Are the Grades:
Accurate
Meaningful
Consistent
Support Learning?
Student Work Ethic
Scoring Guide Assessing Affective Domain.
Student Grade Assessing Cognitive and
Psychomotor
Domains.
STUDENT OUTCOMES
BUILDING OUTCOMES
Portfolio
Mission
Certification
Vision
TSA
BSIP
Career Placement
College Placement
Military
Copyright 2012 Davis & Shellhorn, Lebanon Technology & Career Center
CASE Course Sequences
Curriculum for Agricultural Science Education™ (CASE™) is currently developing
sequences of courses representing Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources
(AFNR) pathways in agricultural technology and systems, animal science, natural
resources and environmental science, and plant science. Currently work is focused
on the animal and plant science pathways including the introduction and capstone
courses.
Introduction to
Agriculture,
Food, and
Natural
Resources
Principles of
Agricultural Science –
Plant
Animal and Plant
Biotechnology
and/or
and/or
Principles of
Agricultural Science –
Animal
Agricultural
Technology and
Systems
Food Science and
Safety
CTE Elective
(Welding &
Fabrication)
Natural
Resources and
Environmental
Science
CTE Elective
(Ecology)
Agricultural Business,
Research, and
Development
(Capstone)
Figure 1. CASE Pathways
In Figure 1, four horizontal levels are shown. The first level is the Introductory level
consisting of only the Introduction to Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources
course designed to provide students exposure to concepts related to all pathways of
AFNR. The second level is the Foundation level and consists of four specific subject
matter courses intended to build background knowledge required for students to
develop an understanding of basic AFNR concepts. The third level of courses is the
Specialization level that refines technical skill attainment and develops a deeper
understanding of AFNR subject matter. The final level is the capstone course that
applies the knowledge and skills learned throughout to practical purposes of
agribusiness and research.
The National Council for Agricultural Education – CASE
CASE Course Sequences – Page 1
Figure 1 illustrates the pathways and defines the requirements for CASE Programs
of Study. Specifically, a CASE Program of Study requires a minimum of one course
from each level to constitute a program of study. The identified program of study
allows for common assessment of programs within each state and across the nation.
The common assessment allows for data collection of student performance for
AFNR programs based on a consistent and uniform set of measurable concepts
regardless of the specific AFNR context local programs opt to teach.
In addition to providing a logical sequence of courses and a common assessment
tool for AFNR subject matter, each CASE course provides increased rigor and
relevance for student competency. Science and mathematics are enhanced in a
deliberate method to provide the integration of science and mathematics into Career
and Technical Education (CTE) that Perkins requires. CASE curricula provide the
answers for many requirements of CTE policy and provide the roadmap for the
instruction of core AFNR concepts to develop well-educated and highly skilled
graduates.
To ensure the quality of the instruction related to each course of the sequence,
teachers must successfully complete 80 hours of professional development for each
CASE course. The professional development provides background to teachers for
effective teaching using activity-, project-, and problem-based instruction, inquirybased instruction, enhancement of science and mathematics in context, and the use
of the CASE resources.
By providing teachers a solid curriculum resource, specific professional
development, and assessment tools, the stage is set for increased student
performance. This assurance of quality allows students to become CASE certified
and provides a clear and seamless way to grant students post-secondary articulation
credit.
For more about the CASE model and CASE courses in development, please view
the website at www.case4learning.org.
The National Council for Agricultural Education – CASE
CASE Course Sequences – Page 2
Review of Spring 2012
CAREER ADVISEMENT
PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM
(CAPS)
Goals of the CAPs Program
 Every 8th grade student will take a
comprehensive career assessment
 Counselors/Administrators will train other staff
to assist in 8th grade parent/student meetings
 Counselors meet with parents/students as a
group to give information relating to their 1st
year of High School and describe the Plans of
Study and Career Clusters
 Teachers/Administrators/Counselors meet
individually with the parents/students to create
an individual Personal Plan of Study for each
student
2nd Year Changes
 2 Evening Sessions/1 Afternoon Session In Late
May/Early June
 Counselor presentation with parents & students
prior to meeting with CAPs representative
explaining Graduation Requirements, MO
Connections, A+ information
 CAPs representative met with parents &
students in a centralized location
 1 Hour was designated for parents & students to
attend the total program
 Appointments were made by 2 designated staff
within the High School/LTCC
Overview/Comparison
2011
2012
 285 meetings with parents
 199 meetings with parents
& students including JEB
and Gasconade students
 82% of the Class of 2015
met with a CAP
representative
 Program operated March April
& students including JEB
and Gasconade students
 48% of the Class of 2016
met with a CAP
representative
 Program operated MayJune
Parent Feedback
 Only 15 Parents responded to the survey
compared to 55 parents last year
 80% of respondents answered that they felt
the CAPs’ meeting was beneficial compared
to 85.4% last year
 80% felt their CAPs’ advisor was
knowledgeable compared to 83.3% last year
 66.6% of respondents felt their student is
better prepared for high school after the
CAPs meeting compared to 83.6% last year
Parent Feedback Cont’d
 86.6% felt the scheduled meeting time worked
well for their family compared to 90.9% last year
 Parents ranked the Personal Plans of Study
(6year plan) and the Career Assessment Results
as the most important aspect of the meeting
which matched last year’s data
 Changes to Schedule request ranked as the least
important aspect which matched last year’s data
 On a scale of 1-10, 10 being the best, parents
ranked the experience as a 5.4 overall compared
to 7.8 last year
Parents Comments







Having the large group meeting, followed by the one-on-one session with the CAP's advisor
worked very well. I would love to have a similar follow-up meeting at the end of each of the four
years of HS to continue the advisement process.
This program has much potential but I believe the CAPS advisor needs more information. I still
don't believe my child has signed up for the right credits to graduate. It was good to see the
advisor, but wouldn't this be better with the counselor who we will deal with for the next 4 years?
The people were nice, the meeting was pointless
I think you did a wonderful job. I didn't see any area that needed improving. Great Job!!!! Thank
you for the help. There was info I didn't know about and the 6 years planning was a great help.
Keep up the great work. Thanks again.
This probably should have been done BEFORE schedules were made out, and the 6 year plan
really works best to start at year 6 with where you want to be and then plan how to get there,
instead of "what can I do from this point forward with what I've already taken". There were lots of
things that had to be erased, because prerequisites were not met.
I really like the idea of this program, and our adviser was very helpful, however, when my child
mentioned that he was interested in a medical military career, I feel that she maybe didn't steer
him into as many appropriate classes that were available to him, nor did she suggest a local
recruiter. All in All a good experience, Keep up the good work
JEB students should take the career connections test before they come to one of these meetings
because the advisor was a little lost when we got to her as to what classes my son should take in
order to be a conservation agent.
Teacher Comments

Was there anything you felt you needed more training over?

Responses:

No. But I did feel more confident since I’ve done it before, i.e. had some practice looking the the scheduling book .

Classes in the LTCC, such as the new engineering path.

No.

If anything, just an initial debriefing of the common things: grad requirements, a little more about the web site the parents can visit, A+
requirements, etc. For me, I felt a little unsure about some of the programs LTCC offers or much about what they are if I was familiar with
them.

LTCC Programs and progression of classes knowing what kind of classes to schedule SPED kids for (not knowing if they would be in
regular core classes or not)

I thought I had an adequate amount of training.

Personally, I am not real comfortable with the requirements for the high school. However, having the booklet helped.

No

It would be helpful to have more scheduling books available for everyone as you look to fill other electives that don’t exactly fit into the
path the student had chosen.

No, but it helped that I did it last year.

No.

We need schedule books for all the teachers.

No, after participating last year and this year, I felt that everything went smoothly. I did run to a social studies teacher to ask a question
about requirements once, but I don’t think that was because of any lack of training.

No.
Teacher Comments cont’d

What was the most difficult part of being a CAP?

Responses:

Students having no idea what they wanted to do. The lack of a career pathway interest survey made planning less productive than last
year.

Helping the student who did not know what he wanted to do and was not interested in anything on his survey.

So many of the kids I met with didn’t complete the interest inventory in 8th grade correctly. Most said they diddn’t even know what the
questions were asking or they were just trying to get through it. It made it difficult to discuss a future career. I just asked them what they
wanted to do at that point in time and went from there. It just seemed that the career interest inventory was wasted time and provided
no talking points.

For me, the most difficult part was not being fully versed in some of the program of LTCC to make sure I was tailoring the track to the
individual student’s needs with confidence.

Not having an easy way to get answers to questions. Maybe a CAP from LHS< SPED and LTCC with extra training could be “roving
experts” or sit together at a front table for people to approach.

Knowing what other classes were options in the high school. It would be helpful to all have a schedule book next year so we could define
a class for them if they asked.

Some of the students/families were not interested in the planning, which made it difficult to complete the form. Also the students from
JEB had not previously completed the online inventory.

Last year we could control our time better, and opportunities to meet with families,

Nothing.

Not knowing anything about the students I ended up with until the minute they walked in the cafeteria.

Nothing really difficult this year. Last year getting in contact with the parents was difficult.

Making the students pick a “favorite” interest.

It’s difficult when parent’s ask questions beyond my knowledge, but it’s very helpful to have counselors, principals and teacher from other
departments around that I can run and ask.

Staying within the time limits to be ready for the next group coming in
Teacher Comments cont’d

What was the best part of being a CAP?

Responses:

Giving students ideas about OPTIONS – helping them see how open their future is, but how their education choices can help or hinder their
dreams.

Helping the students who needed to get started on their path in the 9th grade. For instance, two of the students I helped needed to get into
Animal Science in 9th or 10th grade.

I love giving a one-on-one meeting with parents as their child is entering high school.

I enjoyed meeting with the families. They all seemed very receptive. Also, the amount of people I could turn to if I had a question (I would just
rather not have to do that as much as I did.)

Seeing kids I’ve had in Jr. High cross country and others who will be in my future classes.

Meeting student and parents. I always enjoy students and parents.

The best part for me is meeting the students and their parents. Also this year it was nice having everyone together versus doing it the way we did
last year (individually with a list of students) The teamwork was great. I felt more comfortable from a safety perspective, as well as, froma
knowledge/professional perspective (someone was available to answer questions if I couldn’t)

The feeling that we made a difference and started relationship building with students and their families.

Getting to meet with the great kids.

Meeting with students and getting to know them just a little bit.

Helping incoming Freshman and parents see all the possibilities our two schools offer.

The parent contact and starting those conversations.

I really enjoy meeting students and their parents at this exciting time for them. Especially as a freshman teacher, it gets me excited about the
students I will see (and maybe have in class) next year. It’s awesome to be one of the first welcoming people they meet at the high school.

Talking with both parents and students together about their goals for the future.
Teacher Comments Cont’d
 Further comments:
 I loved it Keith. I just needed the experience I now have. I would
love to do it next year.
 The only two items I recall were:
The changes of the 16 career cluster names going to the different
categories, mainly, to match the applications without going to a list of
vague names to see which Health Service/Manufacturing app to use.
 Making sure everyone has a booklet to view graduation
requirements/class offerings. The last day, we had at least six booklets.
The first two sessions, I think we only had two.


 I felt the process went VERY smoothly. I only wish I could have met
with more families than I did. When possible, it would be great to
see the stats on how many went through the process (compared to
last year).
Teacher Comments Cont’d









Are you willing to serve as a CAP again next year?
Responses:
Yes.
Yes, I would be glad to help next year if I can.
Yes, this formt was much easier for the CAPS. I
wasn’t sure I wanted to do it again the old way, but I
would in this format.
Possibly
Yes I would be “willing”.
Possibly.
Sure thing.
Teacher Comments cont’d

Any ideas for improving the process?

Responses:

Go back to the interest survey (which was used last year) taken in 8th grade because students do not know “what they want to be”. Keep encouraging
parents to come. This is SO great to see. I always tell “my” students before they leave how fortunate they are to have parents come. I can also tell most
parents feel this is the first time the school district has actually asked ANY input from them, and the parents like it.

Providing a catalog to each of us ahead of time, before the training, the providing a question/answer time over it.

I like this year so much better than last year because of large group meetings instead of individual ones. I would have done it anyway because I enjoy
welcoming the families to the high school and the stipend is nice, but I liked the limited times.

By hearing comments from those who served both last year and this, it seems much better this year. Personally, I don’t know what to do to better
improve anything. I thought it ran smoothly. If anything, having a guidance counselor in the meeting room might have come in handy a few times in
place of digging through a course handbook.

Have aides or dept. leaders type up a list of classes in order that one would take if they wanted to be in the senior level, like Building Trades or AP
Literature – then compile them to use it as a cheat sheet.

No, it was very organized and we had everything we needed. I was glad we didn’t have to contact parents.

I have no ideas for further improvement. As I mentioned earlier, this year was an improvement over last year.

Some of us who didn’t mind contacting families, could help with that process.

Change to being during the school year for more participation from families.

Having a stapler and having a course booklet for each CAP representative.

Process went much smoother this year.

Maybe model the process before the visit with parents. Also, have the counselors do their presentation with us so we can build on it. I thought it was a
success and liked it much better this year.

Offering three times for parents and students to come was a FANTASTIC idea. I think that worked our very well and should be done again next year. I
also think it’s good to have counselors, principals, and teachers from all departments involved for when parents have very specific questions that their
CAP might not know the answer to. I had to run to a counselor or another teacher a couple of times with a question, and another CAP asked me about
specific English classes. It’s good to have all kinds of knowledgeable resources around to help.

None that I can think of.
Recommendations
 Schedule the actual meeting times closer to
the students completing their schedules.
Possibly in late March or early April.
 Establish coordinator of the program.
 Increase training for the CAPs advisors to
ensure quality and consistent information to
the parents & students.
 Increase participation from the parents &
students
Computer Application II
Course Description
The Computer Applications II course fits in both of the attached paths. However, an interesting
piece of information is that every program at OTC requires this class as part of their course
work. So, any student attending OTC will be required to take this class. Really makes it
important in both time and money.
Course description: This is a “hands on” class learning to use the most common software
programs and information resource facilities. This course provides a look at the structure and
components of microcomputers, their operating systems, and an introduction to various
applications with emphasis on word processing, database management, spreadsheet applications,
presentation software, and Internet usage. This course will be offered in cooperation with OTC
for dual credit. Preparation will be made to successfully complete the Microsoft certification
program.
Note: Mrs. Long has been approved as an instructor by OTC to offer this course as Dual Credit.
LTCC/OTC
Course Syllabus
Dual Credit
Computer Applications II/CIS-101 - Personal Computer Applications
Instructor: Ellen Long
E-mail: [email protected]
Office Phone: 532-5494
Office: LTCC
Prerequisite
None required. Keyboarding skill of 25 WPM.
Credit Hours
1 credit at LTCC/3 hours: (Lecture and in-class lab) OTC
•
Text
Microsoft Office 2010 Introductory (With Computer Essential Concepts, Windows
7, Security and Internet Explorer) – Custom Edition for Ozarks Technical
Community College by Course Technology CENGAGE Learning, Shelly
Cashman Series by Gary Shelly & Misty Vermaat (ISBN-978-1-4390-7840-2)
Materials
Students are encouraged to organize class notes and papers in a 3-ring, loose-leaf
notebook. Students may (but are not required to) purchase a USB memory storage
device.
Course Rationale
This course will teach students microcomputer skills using the computer application
products from the business community, enabling the students to confidently work with
these products.
Catalog Description
This is a “hands on” class learning to use the most common software programs and
information resource facilities. This course provides a look at the structure and
components of microcomputers, their operating systems, and an introduction to various
applications with emphasis on word processing, database management, spreadsheet
applications, presentation software, and Internet usage.
Course Objectives
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Identify and discuss components of micro-computing systems and their
interrelations including hardware and software and computer security issues.
2. Use reasoning, creative thinking, problem solving techniques and
microcomputer applications to solve organizational problems.
3. Create, manipulate and format word processing documents.
4. Write spreadsheet formulas and functions, develop charts and use spreadsheet
tools to conduct basic what-if analysis of numerical data.
5. Use database tools to organize, maintain and process information.
6. Use presentation software to present information and ideas.
7. Use the Internet as an effective resource of information.
8. Use tutorials, on-line help, information resources and reference manuals to
access information about microcomputer applications.
Grade Rationale
Total Score Out
of 100%
Letter Grade
Description of Activity
90% or more
A
Computer Lab/Homework
Assignments/Employability
Skills*
Unit Exams
Final Exam
80 – 89%
70 – 79%
60 – 69%
Less than
60%
B
C
D
F
% of Final
Grade
50%
30%
20%
*Employability skills include the following characteristics:
• Punctuality
• Good attendance
• A cooperative and positive attitude
• Effective verbal and written communication skills
• A strong work ethic
*It is imperative that a student demonstrate these employability characteristics in order to
be successful in business and industry. A student’s mastery of these skills will be
considered when determining semester grades.
Content Outline
The course objectives will be met by following this general outline of topics:
UNIT 1 – Using Microcomputers, Security, Information Resources, User Interfaces and
Internet
UNIT 2 – Word Processing
UNIT 3 – Electronic Spreadsheets
UNIT 4 – Database Management
UNIT 5 – Presentation Software
Attendance:
Attendance is important, both at school and at work. Just as your employers expect you to
be dependable at work, I expect you to attend class. You are expected to be in class on
time, every time.
If you miss class, you will miss important information that may not be covered
elsewhere. When makeup work is allowed, the student alone is responsible for making up
any missed work.
Business, Management &Technology Career Cluster
Digital Design Career Pathway
Freshman
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
• Computer Applications
• Introduction to Business
• Internet
• Business Communications
• Desktop Publishing
• Digital Multimedia (with permission of instructor)
• Track I: Web Design
• Track II: Digital Multimedia
• Track I: Business Technology (Capstone)
• Track II: Web Design
Lebanon School District • Business/Technology PLC
Created 2/17/12
Lebanon Technology and Career Center
COURSE SYLLABUS
COURSE NUMBER: 034305
COURSE TITLE: ENTREPRENEURSHIP
COURSE CREDIT: 1 credit
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and
skills leading to the development of a business plan for small business ownership. An important
part of the course will be the incorporation of marketing, staffing, and financial considerations.
INSTRUCTIONAL PHILOSOPHY: Learning activities in the classroom include:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Teacher-led instruction, cooperative learning, student seatwork, project-based
learning and lab exercises that are varied for the type of learner.
All students are required to participate in all class and computer lab exercises.
Optimal learning, considering individual student strength and weaknesses, will be
used.
Technology will be utilized on a daily basis to increase student achievement.
The classroom is arranged so that all student computers, one per student, are facing
the Promethean Board.
Classes are structured to allow students to experience an effective mix of activities,
which hold student interest.
PREREQUISITE: none
COURSE COMPETENCIES
A.
SAFETY AND ETHICS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Identify major causes of work-related accidents in offices.
Describe the threats to a computer network, methods of avoiding attacks, and
options in dealing with computer virus attacks.
Identify potential abuse and unethical uses of computers and networks.
Explain the consequences of illegal, social, and unethical uses of information
technologies (e.g., piracy; illegal downloading; licensing infringement;
inappropriate uses of software, hardware, and mobile devices).
Differentiate between freeware, shareware, and public domain software
copyrights.
Discuss computer crimes, terms of use, and legal issues such as copyright laws,
fair use laws, and ethics pertaining to scanned and downloaded clip art images,
photographs, documents, video, recorded sounds and music, trademarks, and
other elements for use in Web publications.
Identify internet etiquette including the use of e-mail, social networking, blogs,
texting, and chatting.
8.
Describe ethical and legal practices in business professions such as
safeguarding the confidentiality of business-related information.
B. EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS
1.
Identify positive work practices (e.g., appropriate dress code for the
workplace, personal grooming, punctuality, time management, organization).
2.
Demonstrate positive interpersonal skills (e.g., communication, respect,
teamwork).
C. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
1.
Explain how related student organizations are integral parts of career and
technology education courses.
2.
Explain the goals and objectives of related student organizations.
3.
List opportunities available to students through participation in related student
organization conferences/competitions, community service, philanthropy, and
other activities.
4.
Explain how participation in career and technology education student
organizations can promote lifelong responsibility for community service and
professional development.
D. ENTREPRENEURIAL CHARACTERISTICS
1. Identify characteristics of entrepreneurs.
2. Complete a self-analysis to identify his/her needs.
3.
Define economic terms such as monopoly, scarcity, elastic good, inelastic
good, public good, fixed cost, variable cost, opportunity cost, and breakeven
point.
E. BUSINESS STRUCTURES
1.
2.
List the advantages and disadvantages of different types of business ownership.
Distinguish between four ways in which a business may be acquired and/or
operated (purchase an existing business, enter the family business, purchase a
franchise, or start a new business).
3. Identify opportunities of traditional and non-traditional business ventures (e.g.,
e-commerce, online auctions, bartering, social advertising).
4. Compare and contrast characteristics of business-to-business transactions and
business-to-consumer transactions.
5. Identify and define the growth stages of traditional and non-traditional
businesses.
F. FINANCING A BUSINESS
1.
2.
Identify different types of bank loans.
Explain Small Business Administration loans.
3.
Describe other sources that can provide debt capital (e.g., partnerships, venture
capitalists, friends, family, etc.).
G. BUSINESS ECONOMICS
1.
Identify characteristics of domestic and global market economies and their
various structures (e.g., command market, mixed, socialist, etc.).
2. Explain the concept of supply and demand.
3. Define economic terms such as monopoly, scarcity, elastic good, inelastic
good, public good, fixed cost, variable cost, opportunity cost, and break-even
point.
H. BUSINESS PLAN
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Discuss the purposes for creating a business plan.
Describe the parts of a business plan.
Select a business opportunity based on research.
Identify industry trends, competition, and market segment using various
research techniques.
Define the industry characteristics, major competitors, and market segment.
Determine the marketing mix (product, price, place, and promotion).
Select appropriate medium (e.g., physical location, web, mobile transport, etc.).
Design a physical layout to meet the needs of the business medium.
Estimate the cost of equipment, supplies, and inventory.
Develop an organizational chart.
Prepare a management plan (incorporate legal requirements, business
protection, and operations).
Prepare a pro forma budget.
Interpret financial statements (balance sheet, income statement, cash flow
projections, and summary of sales and cash receipts).
Complete a pro forma income statement and balance sheet.
Estimate start-up costs and projected business expenses for one year and the
funding needed to begin the business using the pro forma income statement.
I. LEGAL REGULATIONS AND HUMAN RESOURCES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Explain federal, state, and local regulations that affect small business
ownership.
Define employer/employee taxes requirements.
Define sales tax requirements.
Identify types of insurance for employees and businesses (e.g., medical, dental,
life, property and casualty, workman’s compensation, etc.).
Identify domestic (intrastate and interstate) and global trade laws (tariffs,
quotas, etc.) as they pertain to traditional and non-traditional business.
Identify government sites useful to business.
Create job descriptions for every job.
8.
9.
10.
Describe various recruitment techniques.
Identify components of an employee policies and procedures manual (e.g.,
acceptable use policy, technology abuse, non-compete policy, grievance,
compensation and benefits, training and retention, etc.).
Identify legal hiring practices and anti-discrimination laws and practices.
J. BUSINESS PROCESSES
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
K.
Discuss selling products and services through traditional and non-traditional
systems (e.g., storefronts, Web sites, auctions, etc.).
Explain the kinds of ordering, payment, and delivery services required for
traditional and non-traditional types of business purchases.
Describe tracking, confirmation and delivery of products and services.
Define terms related to online business (e.g., HTTPS, SSL and data encryption,
search engine ranking, site traffic, key words/meta tags, etc.).
Identify security issues for traditional and non-traditional businesses (e.g.,
viruses, hacking, phishing, client information, theft, fraud, shoplifting, etc.).
Illustrate the process of placing a secure order and payment using online
services from a customer and company perspective.
PUBLIC RELATIONS AND CUSTOMER SERVICE
1.
2.
Describe the objectives of a public relations program.
Identify the role of business to promote goodwill (e.g., community service,
social responsibility, environmental impact, etc.) and customer loyalty.
3. Identify domestic and international cultural differences that affect business.
4. Describe cost-effective advertising and sales techniques that promote your
company.
5. Describe the steps of the sales process (e.g., approach, determining needs,
demonstrate answering questions, close, suggestion selling, follow-up).
L. E-COMMERCE BASICS
1.
2.
3.
4.
Define e-commerce.
Explain the development of e-commerce.
Compare and contrast characteristics of business-to-business e-commerce and
business-consumer e-commerce.
Identify and define the growth stages of an e-commerce business.
M. TECHNICAL ISSUES FOR BUSINESS
1.
Identify methods of determining the Internet identity of a business (hosting
your own domain, subleasing a domain, and virtual domain hosting).
2.
3.
4.
Identify how to obtain an Internet name (Internet Network Information Center
www.internic.net).
Identify security issues for a company doing business online (viruses and
hacking).
Define the function of “firewall” software.
N. ONLINE PURCHASES
1.
2.
Describe how to place a secure order for a consumer product and track its
delivery status.
Explain the kinds of ordering, payment, and delivery information required for
online business purchases.
O. DOING BUSINESS ONLINE
1.
2.
3.
4.
Discuss selling products through online catalogs and order systems.
Describe how to track and deliver products using the Internet.
Describe the kinds of electronic post-sale services.
Describe types of banner advertising on the Web and discuss the benefits and
drawbacks of each type.
5.
Discuss ways to promote your company Web site and get your site in a search
engine’s catalog.
6.
Identify factors that affect the value of currency.
7.
Calculate foreign exchange rates of various currencies.
8.
Identify the main activities of the World Bank and the International Monetary
Fund.
9.
Develop international promotion-marketing strategies.
10. Determine invoice, delivery, and payment policies for foreign trade.
11. Identify international cultural differences that affect electronic business.
12. Plan, research, and write a report on the global market.
LEGAL ENVIRONMENT
1.
2.
3.
4.
Identify security and private issues facing an e-business.
Identify trade laws as they pertain to e-commerce.
Analyze ethical issues as they pertain to global business marketing.
Research legal requirements for conducting international trade.
COURSE EVALUATION:
Tests and Projects: 60%
Quizzes: 20%
Class-work and Homework: 20%
Exams count as 20% of the final grade.
Business, Management &Technology Career Cluster
Finance Career Pathway
• Track I:
• Personal Finance and/or
Sophomore • Accounting I
Junior
Senior
• Track I: Accounting II
• Track II:Banking and Finance I
• Track I: Banking and Finance I
• Track II: Banking and Finance II
Lebanon School District • Business/Technology PLC
Created 2/17/12
Business, Management &Technology Career Cluster
General Business Career Pathway
Freshman
• Computer Applications
• Introduction to Business
• Any 3 of the following:
• Internet
• Business Communications
• Desktop Publishing
• Digital Multimedia
Sophomore/
(prerequisite: Comp Applications)
Junior
• Business Entrepreneurship
• Personal Finance
• Business Technology I (Junior Year)
Senior
• Business Technology (Capstone) OR
• Computer Applications II with Microsoft
User Certification
Lebanon School District • Business/Technology PLC
Created 2/17/12
Modified 4/20/12
Business, Management &Technology Career Cluster
Information Processing Career Pathway
Freshman
Sophomore/
Junior
Senior
• Computer Applications
• Introduction to Business
• Any 3 of the following:
• Internet
• Business Communications
• Desktop Publishing
• Digital Multimedia
(prerequisite: Comp Applications)
• Business Enrepreneurship
• Business Technology (Capstone)
OR
• Computer Applications II with Microsoft
Software User Certification
Lebanon School District • Business/Technology PLC
Created 2/17/12
Modified 4/20/12
Business, Management &Technology Career Cluster
PC Repair/Computer Networking &
Forensics Career Pathway
• Computer Applications
Freshman • Introduction to Business
• Internet
• Digital Multimedia (with permission of
Sophomore
instructor)
Junior
Senior
• PC Repair
• Computer Networking and Forensics
Lebanon School District • Business/Technology PLC
Created 2/17/12
Natural Resources and Conversation Management
Grade 10,11,12
1 Credit
Prerequisite-Agricultural Science I
This course will cover the basics of habitat conservation, forest products,
soil & water conservation, water & air quality, and fish & wildlife
management including the study of environmental sciences. The history
of conservation and the current concepts of wildlife management will be
used to help each student develop a conservation plan for their own
acreage. All students will have the opportunity to be involved in
leadership activities through the FFA and are encouraged to maintain
their SAE program.
Possible Objectives could include the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Agriculture in an Environmentally Conscience Society
Air
Biomes
Conservation versus Preservation
Ecosystems
Energy
Fisheries
Forestry
Geospatial Technology
Global Natural Resources Issues
Human Impact on Natural Resources
Invasive Species
Meeting the Demands of Future Natural Resource Needs
Natural Resources Careers and SAE
Social Concerns
Soil Conservation and Quality
Sustainability
Waste Management
Water Conservation and Quality
Wildlife Management
Natural Resources & Conservation Management
Directions: Evaluate the student by checking the appropriate number to indicate the degree of
competence. The rating for each task should reflect employability readiness rather than the grades
given in class.
Rating Scale: 3 = Mastered – can work independently with no supervision
2 = Requires Supervision – can perform task completely with limited supervision
1 = Not Mastered – requires instruction and close supervision
N = No Exposure – no experience or knowledge regarding this task
3
2
1
N
Natural Resource Conservation
1. Define and describe natural resource conservation.
2. Compare historical fish and wildlife trends and the public’s response.
3. Outline the variety of jobs in conservation organizations, educational
requirements, employment opportunities and how to prepare for a
professional conservational career.
4. Distinguish the difference between basic fish and wildlife legalities and
ethics.
3
2
1
N
Fish and Wildlife Values
1. Calculate the commercial value of fish and wildlife resources and how it
can benefit the economy and landowners.
2. List the different recreational values of fish and wildlife resources.
3. Explain how naturally-occurring living organisms benefit humans and the
environment.
4. Describe the social values and benefits associated with fish and wildlife
resources.
5. Describe the esthetic value of fish and wildlife resources.
6. Describe the scientific and educational values of fish and wildlife
resources.
7. Evaluate the negative impacts wild animals have on humans and the
objective of wildlife damage control.
3
2
1
N
Habitat Management Principles and Techniques
1. Explain ecological principles and how they apply to fish and wildlife
management.
2. Design a cropland management plan for wildlife.
3. Select grassland management practices that improve livestock forage and
wildlife habitat.
4. Assess how forest management can be used to improve wildlife habitat.
5. Define and describe wetlands and their importance.
6. Describe stream behavior and relate how it affects fish and wildlife
habitat.
7. Plan a pond using appropriate construction and management techniques.
8. Describe the government conservation assistance available to Missouri
landowners.
3
2
1
N
Animal Life Histories
1. Outline life history of the bobwhite quail.
2. Outline life history of the white-tailed deer.
3. Outline life history of the largemouth bass.
4. Outline the life history of the bald eagle.
3
2
1
N
Fish and Wildlife Protection
1. Relate the reasons for fish and wildlife regulations and describe how they
are made and enforced in Missouri.
2. Describe the legal process associated with fish and wildlife violations.
Course:
ACT Prep
Target Population:
Juniors and Seniors
Instructors:
ACT Trained Coaches
Credit:
Semester Credit (1/2 unit)
Course Rationale
With adequate preparation and practice, college-bound students can improve their ACT scores
significantly. Lebanon High School has a responsibility to ensure that all graduates have access to the
post-secondary learning institution of their choice. This course is intended to help students attain a scores
necessary for college admission and scholarship opportunities.
Course Description
The purpose of ACT Prep at Lebanon High School is to assist college-bound juniors and seniors better
prepare for the ACT examination. The course will provide an overview of the test including all five areas
of the test: English, math, reading, science, and writing; practical and proven test taking strategies;
content-specific review; and ample opportunities for students to complete simulated ACT examinations.
Each student will receive an ACT Prep Guide and access to online resources. Students will earn a grade
of pass/fail depending upon the grading criteria established by ACT coaches. Students may earn ½ unit
of elective credit upon the successful completion of this course.
New Math Course
Course Title: Intermediate Algebra 1
Grade Level(s): 9 – 12 (mainly 9th)
Unit of Credit: 1 unit, ½ credit
Full Year or Semester Course
AP or Dual Enrollment or Neither
Core or Elective
Teacher: Melissa Dobbs / Kim Lloyd
Course Rationale : To prepare students for the Common Core Mathematics Assessment
This class will be for students who struggled in 8th grade math or Algebra. Students
will take this course to receive Algebra 1 content in one year.
Course Description: We will be teaching the same concepts, meeting the same ELO’s as our current
Algebra 1 course.
Essential Learner Outcomes: current Algebra 1 ELO’s
Pre-Requisites: teacher recommendation
Weighted Grade or Traditional Grade
Textbook and/or other Instructional Resources:
Algebra 1 Concepts and Skills AND Algebra 1
Concepts: McDougal Littell: ISBN 9780618374205
$70
(will need 1 more classroom set of 30…$2400)
Algebra 1: McDougal Littell: ISBN 0-618-88815-2
$70
(will use existing supply as a supplemental resource)
New Math Course
Course Title: Intermediate Algebra 2
Grade Level(s): 11 – 12 (mainly 11th)
Unit of Credit: 1 unit, ½ credit
Full Year or Semester Course
AP or Dual Enrollment or Neither
Core or Elective
Teacher: Julie Carr / Ben Nail
Course Rationale : To prepare students for the Common Core Mathematics Assessment
This class will be for students who struggled in geometry or took Intermediate
Geometry. Students will take this course to receive Algebra 2 content.
Course Description: We will be teaching the same concepts, meeting the same ELO’s as our current
Algebra 2 course.
Essential Learner Outcomes: current Algebra 2 ELO’s
Pre-Requisites: teacher recommendation
Weighted Grade or Traditional Grade
Textbook and/or other Instructional Resources:
Algebra 2 Concepts and Skills AND Geometry
Concepts: McDougal Littell: ISBN 9780030358296 $70
(will need 2 more classroom sets of 30…$5000)
Algebra 2: McDougal Littell: ISBN 9780618595419 $70
(will use existing supply as a supplemental resource)
TO:
FROM:
SUBJECT:
Kevin Lowery
Jina Richardson, Math Department Chair
New Math Courses for 2013-14
There are 5 courses that the math department would like to have for next year (2014). Most are not
“new”…just newly named and reorganized. I have the proposals typed and am checking with Donna to
see if “Intermediate” is a word that is accepted on transcripts and NCAA. With Common Core coming we
need ALL students to receive Algebra 2 content by the end of their junior year.
Here are the proposed course titles:
Intermediate Algebra 1 (will replace “Applied Algebra A”/ “Applied Algebra B”)
Intermediate Geometry (will replace “Applied Geometry”)
Intermediate Algebra 2 (new course – for students who struggle in math but need algebra 2 content for
Common Core)
Algebra 1 First Semester Concepts (the algebra 1 course I currently teach, just a name to set it apart
from regular algebra 1 courses for scheduling purposes)
Algebra 1 Second Semester Concepts (the algebra 1 course I currently teach, just a name to set it
apart from regular algebra 1 courses for scheduling purposes)
Biomedical Innovation Course
Description
In this capstone course, students apply their knowledge and skills to answer questions
or solve problems related to the biomedical sciences. Students design innovative
solutions for the health challenges of the 21st century as they work through
progressively challenging open-ended problems, addressing topics such as clinical
medicine, physiology, biomedical engineering, and public health. They have the
opportunity to work on an independent project and may work with a mentor or advisor
from a university, hospital, physician’s office, or industry. Throughout the course,
students are expected to present their work to an adult audience that may include
representatives from the local business and healthcare community.
Project Lead The Way, Inc.
Copyright 2011
DRAFT – DO NOT COPY OR DISTRIBUTE
BI Course Description – Page 1
Biomedical Innovation Problem
Summaries
Problem One: Design of an Effective Emergency Room
In this problem, students apply their knowledge of emergency medical careers,
diagnostic testing and patient evaluation, human body systems, and medical
interventions to analyze the workings of an emergency room and discuss inefficiencies
that may hinder appropriate clinical care. Student teams will work collaboratively to
design a more efficient emergency medicine delivery system. As students work through
their designs, they will review research methods, practice effective presentation skills,
and learn project management techniques.
Problem Two: Exploring Human Physiology
In this problem, students build upon what they know about the research process in
order to design, conduct, and analyze an experimental study. Students will choose a
question relating to one or more body systems that they are interested in studying and
will work with a team to investigate and answer that question. As students work through
the experimental process, they will review and expand what they know about
experimental design, collection of data, statistical analysis of data, and the presentation
of data.
Problem Three: Design of a Medical Innovation
In this problem, students review the diseases and disorders as well as the
corresponding medical interventions they have investigated in the previous courses and
propose a new or better medical device, pharmaceutical, surgical procedure, or genetic
intervention. Students will work with a team to build a prototype, model, or schematic of
the intervention as well as develop a marketing plan for the product. As students work
through this problem, they will review the design process, complete a literature review,
and further practice effective presentation skills.
Problem Four: Environmental Health
In this problem, students will explore how substances or chemicals in the environment
impact human health. Students will investigate a disease cluster in a fictional family and
assess the activities of the individuals for environmental risks. Students will test water
samples for the presence of contaminants that could be detrimental to human health
and use molecular biology techniques to identify specific microorganisms. Students will
also design an experiment to test the effects of a particular chemical and doses of that
chemical on plant growth. Students will then compile a comprehensive environmental
health profile for their local area. They will use publicly available databases, as well as
personal contacts and visits, to uncover possible sources of environmental
contamination in the community and to assess risk and level of exposure to people,
Project Lead The Way, Inc.
Copyright 2011
DRAFT – DO NOT COPY OR DISTRIBUTE
BI Course Problem Summaries – Page 1
wildlife, and environmental resources. Students will use their compiled information to
design an action plan to increase awareness, monitor resources or individuals in the
community, improve conditions, and ensure a clean and safe environment.
Problem Five: Combating a Public Health Issue
In this problem, students draw on information they have learned in the previous courses
about public health, epidemiology, and disease diagnosis to work through one of two
epidemiology studies. In each study, students will analyze data to define the outbreak,
generate a hypothesis by diagnosing the patients’ symptoms and identifying the disease
pathogen, design and analyze an epidemiological study to test the hypothesis, and
outline a plan for initiating control and prevention measures. Students will then identify a
local, national, or global public health crisis and write a mini-grant proposal, based on
the National Institutes of Health grant structure, outlining a plan with intervention
strategies. As students work through this problem, they will review evidence analysis,
the design process, methodology, and analyze study data to evaluate risk.
Problem Six: Molecular Biology in Action (Optional)
In this problem, students will complete a multi-step, long-term molecular biology
experiment. Students will design and work through a protocol to construct and clone
recombinant DNA. They will perform DNA ligation and transformation, as well as
restriction analysis of the completed plasmid. Alternatively, students will work through a
more in-depth DNA cloning and sequencing project. This laboratory investigation
provides students with the opportunity to isolate plant DNA, perform a ligation and
transformation, purify a plasmid, submit DNA for sequencing, and present all work to
GenBank, the NIH genetic sequence database, for publication. As students work
through either of these problems, they will learn new laboratory skills, practice
laboratory troubleshooting techniques, as well as review proper protocol for research
notebook documentation.
Problem Seven: Forensic Autopsy (Optional)
In this problem, students will work as medical experts to work through mysterious
deaths. First, as forensic pathologists, students will examine a fetal pig using the same
protocol as a human autopsy, including examination of the tissues, organs, systems,
and body fluids, and note any abnormalities. Second, students will draw on information
they have learned in the previous courses about human body systems to design a
fictional death. Students will showcase the clues left behind in the body and tell the
story of how the person died through documents including an autopsy report, and
medical history forms. Students will finally be tasked with solving another group’s
mystery.
Problem Eight: Independent Project (Optional)
In this problem, students will work independently to determine an area of interest in the
biomedical sciences and outline milestones in a long-term open-ended problem.
Students will use skills learned in the previous courses as well as the previous problems
to help them complete their project. Student work will include completing a literature
review, writing and carrying out the methodology for their project, analyzing the results,
making adjustments as needed, and finally presenting the results of their work to an
Project Lead The Way, Inc.
Copyright 2011
DRAFT – DO NOT COPY OR DISTRIBUTE
BI Course Problem Summaries – Page 2
adult audience. Students may work with mentors or advisors from a university, hospital,
physician’s office, or industry partner to help guide them as they complete their work.
Project Lead The Way, Inc.
Copyright 2011
DRAFT – DO NOT COPY OR DISTRIBUTE
BI Course Problem Summaries – Page 3
Proposal to Add Physics I to Weighted Class List
Physics I Grades 11 and 12
Prerequisites: Math courses with a B average. Concurrently with Algebra II. Math Analysis is
recommended.
Physics I is the first course in a two course sequence in which student learning will focus on the
foundational concepts of Physics. The development of analytical thinking skills, integration of
mathematics, science, and technology will prepare students for post-secondary education.
Measurement, technique, and discovery will be stressed in the laboratory. Topics of study
covered include: vectors, laws of motion, kinematics, force, work and energy, momentum,
circular and rotational motion, solids and fluids, and thermodynamics.
Rationale to add Physics I to Weighted Class list:
•
•
•
•
On DESE’s list of advanced courses
Available only to Juniors and Seniors
Requires a prerequisite
Supported by science and math department heads
If approved it is recommended that the weighted grade start with the Class of 2015. The Class
of 2015 will be juniors during the 2013-2014 school year. This allows all students in the Class of
2015 an equal opportunity to take the same number of weighted classes during their junior and
senior years.
Lebanon High School
Publications Department
Lebanon High School
777 Brice Street
Lebanon, MO 65536
Phone 417.532.9144 Ext. 1336
Email shasty or [email protected]
JEA/NSPA Convention in San
Antonio
Lebanon High School Publications
Department’s Best Way to Maximize Student
Learning
JEA/NSPA
Convention
JEA/NSPA Convention in San Antonio
Lebanon High School Publications Department’s Best Way to
Maximize Student Learning
Reasons for Proposal
1) The Lebanon R-III school district advocates and emphasizes the importance of
professional learning committees and professional development for faculty through
monthly early-out days and the wealth of opportunities to attend workshops. With the
encouragement and support of the administration, some departments and committees
also seek to broaden and to bestow their knowledge and experience by participation
in conferences. Our mission statement makes it clear as to why we pursue to grow so
profoundly as educators: “To maximize learning for all students.”
2) Our goals as a publications department is to give our staffs the tools, the knowledge,
and the experience necessary to be successful journalists and successful in college.
Given the opportunity, our students’ education would be maximized through
participating in the JEA/NSPA conventions.
Influences and Inspirations
As members of the Journalism Education Association (JEA) we had the opportunity to
attend a national journalism convention. This convention, which is geared towards
advisors and their staff, gives the students and their teachers ample opportunity to meet
with staffs from across the nation and glean from them the knowledge needed to run a
successful, educational and enjoyable journalism program.
JEA/NSPA Convention as an Educational Experience

The JEA/NSPA Convention is a perfect way for teachers of interscholastic
press to communicate with one another about how to effectively teach journalism for
certification, as well as, how to incorporate what you learn into your classroom.

The JEA/NSPA Convention equals an opportunity for education. JEA and NSPA
offers a test for those interested in receiving certification in Journalism (CJE) or a
Master’s in Journalism (MJE).

Networking is key. With over 3,000 students from across the United States our staffs
would have the amazing opportunity to talk with, compete with and learn from others
who share their common interest. At the convention in Philadelphia we collaborated
with teachers interested in forming a national PLC for journalism teachers. This PLC
would include people just like us who teach journalism, but have other commitments
in drama, technology, communication or language.
Workshops we attended include such topics as: how to be a successful advisor, writing ads that sell,
proper AP style, common core, standards-based grading, how to use after school time effectively,
creating lay-outs for InDesign, creating spreads, learning how to write journalistically, training editors to
be leaders and using professional publications to influence current design.
Convention Highlights
1) Keynote addresses by some of the nation’s top newsmakers and reporters
2) More than 200 learning sessions in newspaper, yearbook, broadcast, advising and
press law
3) Special pre-convention workshops and issue seminars
4) Media and sight-seeing tours to top attractions and publications
5) On-site critiques and write off competitions
Convention Expenses and Information
The following expenses are based upon two faculty and six students. Students will be responsible
for the expenses noted plus food. The publication department will pay for the students’ registration
fee and travel. Each teacher would be responsible for half of the budget concerning the following:
1) Dates: November 15 -18 , 2012
th
th
2) Travel: Traveling in a 60 passenger charter bus
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Managed by Willard High School
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Includes Lebanon High School, Willard High School and Central High School
3) Hotel Accommodations (students will cover this cost individually): $250 per
person for 3 nights ($3415 --5 rooms,3 nights and this includes tip for the charter bus
driver)
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San Antonio Marriott Riverwalk Hotel; downtown San Antonio
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$199 Triple (2 beds, 3-4 persons) 16.75% tax per room, per night
4) Convention Registration: $112 per person ($1568—2 adults and 12 students)
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Includes basic registration, keynote speaker session, and a t-shirt
Per Person
Group
Coach bus with two other schools
Convention Expense
$90
$1120
Hotel Accommodations
$258
$3100
$516 covers teacher accommodations
$112
$1568
$224 covers teacher accommodations
Convention Registration
(14 persons)
2
Expenses Covered
This article originally appeared in the spring 2004 edition of Communication: Journalism Education Today.
Traveling to a National Convention
Go Zany with Others. Fly to a New World.
By Susan Massy, Gloria Olman and Karl Grubaugh
Each year, the Journalism Education Association and the National Scholastic Press Association co-host two
national conventions, one on the East Coast or Midwest in the fall and one on the West Coast in the
spring. Use these forms and guides to make your convention experience a pleasurable and informative
one.
The conventions are designed to be educational, first and foremost, and entertaining and enlightening as
well. The hundreds of sessions at each convention offer students the opportunity to learn about everything
from digital photography to copy editing from some of the finest instructors and journalists in the
profession.
The Convention Hotel
One of the first decisions you'll have to make when planning to attend
the convention is where to stay. The convention hotel is not only where
most of the students and advisers stay. It is also where most of the
instructions, sessions and activities take place. Use the reservation
forms provided by JEA to book reservations early because the hotel
is always full.
1. Be polite on the elevator. Use it only when necessary. Do not do
“cute” things such as shriek, jump or push more buttons than you
need to. And try not to douse yourself with too much cologne
before getting into this cramped space.
2. No hotel has enough elevators. When other conventions fill most of
the rooms, they do not pack in as many visitors as the JEA/NSPA
conventions do. For that reason, elevators may be crowded, and
students should plan ahead. For instance, a trip back to the room
right before Write-offs is not a good idea because being in the
contest room promptly is vital.
3. Do not run up and down the halls yelling or talking obnoxiously.
Walk.
4. Quiet is the key word. When groups of teens think they are quiet,
most adults think they are loud. Be more quiet than usual. What
would be the impact if people mistake you for a 20-something
sponsor rather than a 14-year-old tag-along?
5. Help the housekeeper with your room by doing the following:
• Leave all of your towels in one big pile in the bathtub.
• Gather the trash into one pile (preferably in the
wastebasket).
• Most housekeepers earn only minimum wage and have
a lot of work to do when there is only one, neat
business traveler in the room, let alone a hoard of
messy teens. Leave a tip and identify it as a tip.
Top Educators
Kathy Habiger is one of the educators who
speaks regularly at conventions. At each
convention, there are more than 200 sessions
from which to choose. Topics include
everything from writing active leads to
shooting quality sports photos to covering
school news on the radio. Photo by Clilf
Palmberg.
Rule of Thirds
During the write-off critiques on Friday
afternoon, students have their own work
critiqued by professionals and educators.
Many of the carry-in competitions involve
personalized critiques. Photo by Bradley
Wilson.
6. While you are in the room, lock the extra locks. Do not rely simply
on the automatic lock, which can be opened if someone gets a
master key.
7. Never open the door for someone unless you know who he or she
is. If the person says they are with the hotel, call the front desk and
ask.
8. Do not leave valuables in the room when you are gone.
9. In case of fire or another emergency, find the stairs and count the
doors from your room to the stair exit door. Keep a key near the
door to grab on the way out in case you find you are safer in the
room than out in the hall or stairway. Read other directions
typically found on the back of your hotel room door.
Why Use the Convention Hotel?
By Linda Puntney
I received a phone call the other day from an experienced adviser
asking if it would matter if an entire state delegation blocked rooms
outside the convention hotel.
Keynote Fame
Bob Schieffer, anchor and moderator of “Face
the Nation,” was one of the keynote speakers
at national conventions in Washington, D.C. (fall
2003). Photo by Kelly Glasscock.
The question was a distant threat, really. It was about a convention some years from now, but the lump in
my throat and my audible gasp were in the now. I experience them every time we plan a convention and
every time my name goes on a hotel contract on behalf of JEA.
Of course, it does matter a great deal.
Convention meeting space is expensive. But hotels provide the meeting space to groups based on
anticipated revenue for the hotel. Some groups, in addition to the room revenue generated, have hundreds
of thousands of dollars in food and beverage (liquor) expenses with the hotel — a factor that makes it
easy for them to provide meeting facilities for free.
Other groups, such as JEA/NSPA high school journalism conventions, generate no liquor revenue and, in the
eyes of the hotel, little food revenue.
What we bring to a hotel is room nights. That’s our bargaining power. Without it, registration fees would
have to skyrocket to pay for the meeting rooms.
In one recent convention, for example the hotel relied on us to generate 3,545 total room nights. If we
hadn’t met our block, we would have been charged on a sliding scale for the meeting space. Not meeting
our block could mean we would pay as much as $55,000 for the meeting rooms. Having to pay those kinds
of fees would spell financial ruin for both our non-profit organizations.
In essence, those who support the convention by staying in a designated convention hotel are paying, in
large part, for the meeting space. Those who choose to stay elsewhere are not paying their fair share.
Not staying in designated convention hotel blocks also means the organizations can not track how many
room nights have been picked up. Room rates and meeting space allotment are often determined – at the
least influenced – by room pick-up history.
Airline Travel
You'll also have to figure out how to get there. Pay attention to the JEA Web site as airlines will often offer
JEA/NSPA convention attendees a discount. While airline travel may still be one of the safest ways to
travel, it is not hassle free. Designed to protect the nation’s transportation system, the Transportation
Security Administration (TSA) manages airline security and publishes pages of guidelines to help expedite
passage through security checkpoints. For more information, check out the TSA Web site.
Pack smart
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Carry-on baggage is luggage that you take on board the airplane with you. Most airlines allow each
traveler one carry-on in addition to one personal item, such as a laptop computer, purse, small
backpack, briefcase or camera case.
Checked baggage is luggage you check in at the ticket counter or at curbside. It will not be accessible
during your flight.
Check ahead of time with your airline or travel agent to determine the airline’s baggage policy,
including number of pieces you can bring as well as size and weight limitations.
Carry-on baggage is limited to one carry-on bag plus one personal item. Personal items include
laptops, purses, small backpacks, briefcases, or camera cases.
Place identification tags with your name, address and phone number on all of your baggage, including
your laptop computer. It is a good idea to place an identification tag inside your baggage as well.
Avoid over packing so that your articles don’t spill out if your bag is opened for inspection. If possible,
spread your contents over several bags. Check with your airline or travel agent for maximum weight
limitations.
Pack shoes, boots, sneakers and other footwear on top of other contents in your luggage.
Avoid packing food and drink items in checked baggage.
Don’t stack piles of books or documents on top of one another. Spread them out within your baggage.
Think carefully about the personal items you place in your carry-on baggage. The screeners may have
to open your bag and examine its contents.
Put personal belongings in clear plastic bags to reduce the chance that a TSA screener will have to
handle them.
Wait to wrap your gifts. Be aware that wrapped gifts may need to be opened for inspection. This
applies to both carry-on and checked baggage.
Metal detectors
Any metal detected at the checkpoint must be identified. If you set off the alarm, you may be required to
undergo a secondary screening, including a hand-wanding and a pat-down inspection.
Remove metal items at the security checkpoint, and place them in the bins provided. The bins will be sent
through the X-ray machine. Save time by not wearing metal items or by placing such items in your carry-on
baggage before getting in line.
Avoid wearing clothing, jewelry or other accessories that contain metal when traveling. Hidden items, such
as body piercings, may result in a pat-down inspection. You may be asked to remove your body piercing in
private as an alternative to the pat-down search. Avoid items such as:
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Jewelry (pins, necklaces, bracelets, rings, watches, earrings, body piercings, cuff links, lanyard or bolo
tie)
Shoes with steel tips, heels, shanks, buckles or nails
Clothing with metal buttons, snaps or studs
Metal hair barrettes or other hair decoration
Belt buckles
Under-wire brassieres
Place metal items in carry-on luggage or in the bins provided before going through metal detectors,
including:
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Keys, loose change
Mobile phones, pagers and personal data assistants (PDAs)
Instead, place jewelry and other metal items in your carry-on baggage until you clear security.
Pack your outer coat or jacket in your baggage when possible. Outer coats including trench coats, ski
jackets, leather jackets, overcoats and parkas must go through the X-ray machine for inspection. If you
choose to wear an outer coat to the checkpoint, you will need to either place it in your carry-on or put it
in the bin that is provided for you. You will not need to remove suit jackets or blazers unless requested
by the screener.
Travel Safety and Etiquette
Airline etiquette missteps usually center around luggage, personal space and talking. Follow these simple
steps and your flight will be easier for everyone, including yourself.
Boarding
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Don’t expect to carry on excessive luggage or oversize bags. Airlines are enforcing regulations.
Security is paramount, and space is limited.
Carry your bag in front of you as you walk down the aisle. Over-the-shoulder luggage can hit
passengers who are already seated. And certainly that tactic can be injurious.
Store your bag under the seat in front of you or in the overhead bin adjacent to your seat. Don’t put
your bag in a bin near the front of the plane for a quick exit — it means someone else will have to
wait until the entire plane has emptied to walk back to get his or her bag.
Place your coat and jacket on top of your luggage in the overhead bins. Don’t place them next to your
luggage because space is at a premium.
Sit in your assigned seat. You are not to switch seats.
Settling In
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Don’t hog the armrests.
Don’t crank up the volume when you listen to music with a Walkman — the loud noise is irritating.
Don’t recline your seat when meals are served. Airlines may be expanding the legroom in coach, but
space is still limited.
Don’t invade your neighbor’s “personal space.” Be considerate.
Feet often swell on long flights, and many passengers remove their shoes for comfort. Feet can smell. If
you do take off your shoes, please wear slipper sox to contain the wafting aroma. People notice.
Enjoying the Flight
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Don’t be a bore. There is nothing worse than being held captive by a talkative seat-mate. Don’t force
your conversation on the person next to you.
If someone is driving you crazy with their (dull) life story — it is acceptable to tell them you’re too busy,
tired, sick or whatever to talk. But don’t be rude. Some people are nervous fliers and talk compulsively.
Don’t grab the seat in front of you when you get up — it is disturbing to the person sitting there. Use
your armrests to get up.
Don’t kick the seat in front of you.
Don’t hold conversations across the aisle or from row to row. It is annoying to other passengers.
Don’t clog up the aisles while the flight attendants are using the food and beverage carts.
Don’t sleep on your seat mate’s shoulder.
Heading Out
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Don’t jump up and try to be the first one off — unless you’re in the front row. Wait your turn, which will
occur in a matter of minutes, and the exiting process will move smoothly for everyone.
Flight attendants are right — items can shift in the overhead compartments during flight. Be careful
opening the bins. Accidents can be nasty.
Remember to carry your luggage in front of you as you depart.
Don’t linger in the jetway waiting for your colleagues. Wait at the gate so everyone can exit without
delays.
Traveling with film
WARNING: Equipment used for screening checked baggage will damage your undeveloped film. Equipment
used for screening will NOT damage digital camera equipment or storage media.
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Never place undeveloped film in your checked baggage.
Place film in your carry-on baggage or request a hand inspection.
Carry-on screening equipment might also damage certain film if the film passes through more than five
times.
General principles
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None of the screening equipment — neither the machines used for checked baggage nor those used for
carry-on baggage — will affect digital camera images or film that has already been processed,
slides, videos, photo compact discs or picture discs.
Remove all film from your checked baggage and place it in your carry-on baggage. The X-ray
machine that screens your carry-on baggage at the passenger security checkpoint will not affect
undeveloped film under ISO 800. At the passenger security checkpoint, you should remove film rated
higher than ISO 800 from your carry-on baggage and ask for a hand inspection.
If the same roll of film, even film rated slower than ISO 800, is exposed to X-ray inspections more than
five times before it is developed, damage may occur. Protect your film by requesting a hand-inspection
for your film if it has already passed through the carry-on baggage screening equipment (X-ray) more
than five times.
Other Tips and Precautions
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If you plan to request a hand inspection of your film, you should carry your film in clear canisters, or
take the film out of solid colored canisters and put it into clear plastic bags, to expedite the screening
process.
If you are going to be traveling through multiple X-ray examinations with the same rolls of
undeveloped film, you may want to request a hand-inspection of your film. However, non-U.S. airports
may not honor this request.
Consider having your exposed film processed locally before passing through airport security on your
return trip.
Do not place your film in lead-lined bags since the lead bag will have to be hand-inspected. If you
have concerns about the impact of the X-ray machine on undeveloped film, request a hand inspection.
Consider the safety and the convenience of disposable cameras for a convention trip.
How to Dress
Remember, we represent our school, our city, our state and, most importantly, ourselves. The people we will
meet on this trip will form their opinions of us and of our program within the first five seconds of meeting us.
First impressions, good or bad, are not quickly forgotten. Their impressions will be based on the way we
are dressed and the way we act. Our actions should create an impression that we can be proud of.
Girls
You will need the following clothes for the trip:
Three dresses/skirts/slacks for convention sessions.
Jeans (no holes) or shorts are appropriate for
sightseeing days.
• Tastefully casual (but comfortable) clothes for traveling
and the awards ceremony.
• You should be well groomed throughout the trip.
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Boys
You will need the following clothing for the trip:
Attractive shirts and slacks (one or two pairs) for each
day of convention sessions (business-casual dress is
appropriate)
• Jeans (no holes) or shorts for sightseeing days.
• Tastefully casual (but comfortable) clothes for traveling
and for the awards presentation.
• You should be clean shaven throughout the trip.
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Convention Hotel
Claire Meyers from Convent of the Sacred
Heart in San Francisco enjoys the Friday
night dance at the fall 2003 convention at
the Washington Hilton. The official
convention hotel is the center of all
activity, everything from student dances to
most conference sessions. Photo by Jeanel
Drake.
Everyone
Hats are acceptable only in casual situations (for example, sightseeing). Hats must be worn with the bills
forward. They must be removed in buildings and on public transportation.
Avoid wearing highly visible and expensive accessories, such as coats, jewelry or shoes.
Put your money in the front pocket of your jeans or shorts, not in a back pocket. Keep a
firm grip on your camera. Do not invite a mugging.
• Leave your purse in the hotel in your luggage (not lying around the room).
• Keep a firm grip on your camera with your camera strap always around your neck or
arm.
• School dress code rules apply except in special situations.
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Money
Everyone will need spending money best carried in the form of traveler’s checks or credit cards. Meals are
almost always more expensive in tourist destination cities.
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Put your money in the front pocket of your pants or shorts, not in a back pocket.
Don’t store all your money or credit cards in one place.
Feedback
Please see attached form.
Feedback
Karl Grubaugh asks his students to write down anything they might find useful in their student publications.
Simple. Gloria Olman goes a step further and gives her students a form asking students to give feedback
on such choices as their first impressions of the city, the best thing so far, best piece of advice they learned,
what they can’t wait to tell the other staffers and the top three reasons we need these JEA conventions.
Thank you
Some advisers ask their students to formally thank the presenters, who have often spent hours researching
and planning for their 50-minute session. To formalize that, some students jot down what they learn in a
thank you for presenters. This serves to benefit the students, who have to articulate what they learned, as
well as the instructor, who receives formal feedback from the students. It also shows the appreciation the
students have for the presentation.
Students become teachers
Not every student on staff can attend the national convention. It’s too expensive and a logistical challenge;
however, the students who do attend can write summaries of the sessions they attend to give to other
students back at school. The effort to share will have positive benefits both for the school and for the
journalism program.
Manners
How to proceed
DO order appropriately.
DO order more than a house salad or an appetizer if the group is there to eat a meal.
DO say please and thank you. Verbal acknowledgement is as important as monetary rewards.
DO know what silverware to use. Always work from the outside in.DO place your napkin in your
lap, not around your neck.
• DO keep your napkin in your lap until everyone at the table has finished eating. Do not hand it
to the server or place it on top of your plate when you are finished.
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What to avoid
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DON’T order more food than you could possibly eat.
DON’T share food. Tasting other people’s food is acceptable only if the owner places it on an
unused separate side plate. Never eat from another person’s plate or use another person’s
utensils.
DON’T chew gum in a restaurant. Remove it from your mouth before entering the restaurant. Do
not place gum on the edge of your plate, in your napkin or under the table. Find a waste can.
DON’T talk with your mouth full.
DON’T slurp soup or suck pasta to get it into your mouth.
DON’T save silverware for later courses. The only exception is your knife, which should be
placed on the bread plate.
DON’T request more of an item. (Example: Proper — “May I have a salad?” Improper — “May
I have more salad?”) The latter implies that you are being rude to your server. However, most
restaurants will give refills for water, iced tea and coffee. For hot tea, they may bring another
pot of hot water. Inquiries or requests for liquid refills are appropriate if done politely.
DON’T tell the server you are finished or to take your plate. The placement of a fork and a
knife in the center of your plate will indicate to the server that you have finished the course.
Tipping
As a measure of good etiquette, students should plan to tip accordingly. Service industry workers can be
your best friends or your greatest enemies. Work to keep them on your side. Their income depends on the
quality of their services and on your generosity and thoughtfulness.
Baggage handlers, cab drivers, bell boys, and airport attendants
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Tips should be equivalent to 50¢ per bag. (Example: 4 bags @ 50¢ = $2)
For an odd number of bags, you should round up. (Example: 3 bags @ 50¢ = $1.50, but you
should tip $2)
• Always keep $1 bills with you for tipping. Never tip with change.
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Restaurant servers
Tip a minimum of 15 percent for service in a restaurant (also applies to room service orders).
(Example: $20 bill + 15% tip ($3) = $23 total bill)
• Usually it is excessive to tip more than 20 percent.
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Other Services
Hotel employees should be tipped when you ask for and receive services that require them to go beyond
normally accepted duties of their job. Remember these people may have gone out of their way to help
you. They should receive tips for special services, such as delivering an iron/ironing board to your room,
delivering a roll-away bed to your room or delivering extra towels, pillows or blankets to your room.
Rules
The statements below, initiated as a result of convention experiences, provide refinement or elaborations of
Journalism Education Association convention rules. They may be helpful additions or clarifications for
communicating with your staff.
Hotel behavior
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Students will be held liable for any damage they cause to hotel rooms and facilities.
If the school receives a bill for damages to a hotel room, each student in the room will pay an
equal percentage of the cost of the bill unless the student or students who caused the damage
accept responsibility.
Rudeness to hotel guests and hotel employees, misuse of or reckless behavior on the hotel
elevators, excessive noise in any hotel area, destruction of property or any other inappropriate
behavior is not acceptable. This kind of behavior can lead to expulsion from the hotel and/or
criminal prosecution.
Movement in the hotel.
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No student is to leave his or her hotel room after curfew for any reason unless the publications
adviser is notified of an emergency that requires leaving the room.
Minor infractions of this rule may result in the student being excluded from future travel. Students
involved in major infractions may be sent home.
No student is to be in a hotel room of any person who is a part of another school’s delegation.
No student is to leave the hotel without the knowledge and express consent of the adviser.
No student is to leave the hotel after dark without an adult chaperone.
No student will be off the floor of the hotel rooms or the convention meeting rooms without at
least one other member of the school’s delegation.
tobacco and medications.
Any use or possession of alcohol or drugs is forbidden and will result in immediate expulsion from
the convention, contacting of parents or guardians and immediately being sent home.
Tobacco use or possession is prohibited.
School policies regarding cigarettes and smoking will be enforced during the trip.
Students are not to smoke at any time during the trip. Smoking is forbidden even in the privacy of
the hotel room.
Students must give their prescription medications to the adviser at the beginning of the trip and
list any such medications on the district medical form.
Convention participation
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Students are expected to wear their convention name badges at all times while in the convention
hotel. For security reasons, students should remove their name badges when leaving the hotel.
Students are expected to attend a session during every session opportunity and will be asked to
complete a session summary form.
Students will be sent home for any violation of local, state or federal laws.
Students may be sent home any time the adviser or chaperone thinks that the offender is too much
of a security/trust risk to remain a part of the group.
The offender’s parents will be called and asked to make arrangements to pick up the offender
immediately. The offender will be delivered to the main lobby of the hotel. At this point, the
offender is no longer associated with the group, and the school withdraws its responsibility for the
student. If the offense committed is a crime, such as possession or use of controlled substances,
local authorities will be notified and the offender will be turned over to them, at which time the
school’s responsibility for the offender is terminated. Parents will be notified.
I hereby authorize my credit card to be charged for a one-way airfare should my child violate
these rules and need to be transported home for disciplinary reasons. I agree that the
publications adviser and chaperones on the trip have the sole discretion to decide whether such
action is necessary. Should the charge be refused, I hereby agree to reimburse the teacher or
parent who must charge my child’s flight to his or her own credit card.
Submitted by Karl Grubaugh, Susan Massy and Carol Singletary
Communication with parents is critical for a successful convention experience.
Sample Letter
Dear Parents:
Thank you for permitting your student to attend the Journalism Education Association/National Scholastic Press Association convention. I
especially appreciate the chance to take these students under current world conditions, and I understand your concern for our safety. I will
do all in my power to ensure our safety. This is an excellent educational experience, and I am confident the time and money will be well
spent.
Flight information:
[Include flight information here including airline, flight number and arrival/depature times.]
Transportation:
We will leave at precisely [Insert exact time and location.]. If any parent can drive to the airport, it would really help. We need enough
space to carry [x] passengers and luggage. Otherwise, we will take charter vans from school to the airport. Students should bring their
luggage to school and store it in the classroom. We must get boarding passes, check luggage and go through security. Each person must
carry a photo ID. I am allowing ample time to cope with traffic, security, etc. Students can eat at the airport after we check in.
Students will walk and carry their own luggage so they should pack light.
We will take a shuttle service from the airport to the hotel. The same shuttle service will return us to the airport.
Drivers from airport: Please meet us at the baggage pickup to organize groups for the trip home. You will not be permitted at the gate.
We need room for [X] passengers. Students will return to the school at [time].
Hotel/Rooms:
We will be staying at the [Insert hotel address and phone number.]. I have requested that our rooms are non-smoking, located in a block,
but that cannot be guaranteed. (Person listed first is first on hotel register in case you need to reach that room. The hotel also has me
listed as the adviser for the group.)
Room arrangements are as follows:
[List room assignments here.]
The hotel will shut off outgoing long distance phone service in all student rooms, but you may call them. They can call out from pay phones
in the hotel, and they may not add any charges to the room bill. Many students carry phone cards to make calling home easier.
Money:
Students should bring adequate spending money for meals and other activities. (Travelers’ checks should be fine if students have photo
IDs.) I hope to take them to a fun, western restaurant one evening. JEA has activities for students every evening so they can meet some of
the other 4,000+ delegates and have fun. We will also visit as many historic/interesting places as time permits.
Students will need:
• $10/each for shuttle service to/from airport,
• $5/each for tips
• $100/each (approx. $25/day/person) for meals. Many students also pack juice boxes, granola bars, etc., for breakfast and snacks.
• $?? souvenirs and spending money
Activities:
In addition to convention activities, we will tour this city as time allows. (Meaning: Students can sleep at home; in this city they will make
the most of every moment.)
[TBA based on what your adviser has assigned you]
That also means students should get extra rest before they leave because they have a busy agenda. Remember: At home they can sleep
or shop at the Gap and Banana Republic; not on this trip. They have places to go and things to see that they cannot do at home.
Again, thank you for allowing your student to participate. I know this group will represent us well. To help you, I will send you a list of
each student in our group, with hotel room designation, home address and phone number. I will also give each student other information
as I receive it.
If you have any other questions, please call me at [Insert home/work/mobile phone numbers here.].
Convention Attendance Form
Student Name ___________________________ Date ______.______._________ Session Time ____________
Session Title ________________________________________ Session Presenter ________________________
Three Things you Learned in this
Session:
One practical example of how we
can use this knowledge (be specific)
SUMMING IT ALL UP
The presenter’s best quote
1.
include, something we can
exemplifies what the
(ie. something new we can
change, a new process…)
2.
3.
Any additional notes, comments and suggestions (REQUIRED):
(a quote that you believe
presentation was all about)
B
Rome and Paris: Spring Break 2014
I would like permission to take our students abroad during Spring Break of 2014. This
trip would differ from trips in the past in that the Latin classes will combine with the
French classes and travel to Paris and Rome. The trip will run during Spring Break 2014
to ensure our students have the best prices available to them, enabling more students to
go. Absences from school will be kept at a minimum, and will depend on out departure
date.
This trip has several good things about it. It will allow Latin and French students to see
the monuments they have studied in class (the Eiffel Tower, the Palace at Versailles, the
Colosseum, the Vatican, Pompeii, etc); it will allow the French students to interact in
French with real French citizens; it will immerse students in the cultures of two different
countries. I want the students to be able to personally see things we study in class and
from what they see and experience, and be able to better understand Roman and French
cultures, which have influence on western cultures today.
This trip will be with EF Tours. I will not be conducting any fundraisers for this event.
This trip will be limited to students who are continuing their study of Latin or French
during the following school-year (levels 2-4). From these students, I may choose to not
take a student should they have disciplinary referrals.
As of now I have had around 40 students express interest in going on the trip; I suspect
around 25 students will actually end up enrolling for the trip. Chaperones include myself,
Shannon Piehl, Clinton Cooper, and John Frazier; parents of Latin and French students
are also welcome to go on the trip.
Costs:
Students: approximately $3300*, plus lunch and spending money
Adults: approximately $3600*, plus lunch and spending money
*current cost includes a day trip to Pompeii and Versailles; price is subject to change.
Itinerary
Day 1: Flight overnight to Italy from Springfield, MO
Day 2: Rome: Meet the tour director at the airport
Day 3: Rome:
• Take a guided tour of the Vatican City
• Visit the Sistine Chapel
• Visit St. Peter’s Basilica
• Take a guided tour of Rome
o Visit the Colosseum
o Visit the Roman Forum
o Take a self-guided walking tour of Rome:
 Trevi Fountain
 Pantheon
 Piazza Navona
 Spanish Steps
Day 4: Travel to and tour the ancient city of Pompeii
**If we do not have enough students sign up, this will be a free, structured day in
Rome. Overall cost of the trip would be reduced by $105
Day 5: Florence
• Travel to Florence
• Take a guided tour of Florence
• Visit the Duomo
• See a leather making demonstration
• Board a night train to Paris
Day 6: Paris
• Arrive in Paris
• Take a walking tour of Paris
• Visit the Louvre
• Visit Notre Dame Cathedral
Day 7: Travel to and tour the Palace of Versailles
**If we do not have enough students sign up, this will be a free, structured day in
Paris. Overall cost of the trip would be reduced by $98
Day 8: Depart for home
England, Ireland, and Wales: Summer 2013
In a technology driven world which constantly preaches that newer is better, the value of classic literature is
a difficult message for teachers to give and for students to receive. Conveying the relevancy of literary work
is equally challenging for the English teacher. Seeing the homes of authors whose works they have read,
however, could prove to be powerful and engaging for our students today. Imagine stepping into
Shakespeare’s home and walking the same streets as Charles Dickens! These are the experiences we
want to offer our advanced English students.
Our goal in offering an opportunity to travel abroad to our English students is not only to provide for them
exposure to the world, and to bring to them the very lives of the authors they have studied, but also to
reward them for the hard work they have done. We have outstanding students in the English department,
and the incredible work they complete deserves the opportunity of seeing and experiencing what has been,
until now, merely fiction. We plan to tour castles, British historical sites, and of course, major literary
landmarks of England, Ireland, and Wales.
Once again, we will be using the company EF Tours to plan and guide our trip. We will not be conducting
any fundraisers for this event. This trip will be limited to students who enroll in advanced English courses
during their freshmen through senior years. (From these students, we may choose to not take a student
should they have disciplinary referrals.)
Upon approval of the proposed trip, we will begin actively promoting participation and recruiting interested
students. Chaperones include Aimee Hays and Lisa Anthony; parents of honors English students are also
welcomed to go on the trip.
Targeted departure date:
June 11- June 19, 2013; nine days
Costs:
Students: approximately $3322 plus lunch and spending money
Adults: approximately $3657*, plus lunch and spending money
Proposed Itinerary
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Day 1: Fly overnight to Ireland
Day 2: Shannon • Killarney
Day 3: Killarney
Day 4: Killarney • Dublin
Day 5: Dublin
Day 6: Dublin • North Wales
Day 7: Stratford • Oxford • London
Day 8: London
Day 9: Depart for home
*Tentative Itinerary – subject to change
Sun
Mon
1
Tue
2
Wed
3
Thu
4
BRING IN PENNIES (COINS) FOR COMMUNITY CARES
FUND DRIVE
New Staff PBIS training
3:40-4:30 Library
7
14 Toby E…….BD
8
9 Debbie B….BD
Smokey Bear Assembly
TUTORING STARTS
Technology District Mtg TUES & THURS
5:15 pm
Dickey’s Prom Fundraiser
10 Lisa F…..BD
Joel Hunter...BD
15
Grading Practices
Districk Mtg—3:45
17
16 Kristine C….BD
Fri
5 Marianne E….BD
Sat
6
Community Cares &
KJEL 2012 Radio-Thon
Civic Center 6 am-5 pm
11
FIRST QUARTER
ENDS
12
PD DAY ...NO
SCHOOL
13
18
19 Molinda M...BD
Danielle Shoemaker..BD
Report Cards Out
20
Reptile Experience
BOARD MEETING
Cheer Camp 3:30-5:30 in the gym w/ K-6 students
21
22 Lynette A ...BD
PARENT-TEACHER
CONFERENCE
4:30-8:30 PM
Food available beginning at 4:30
23
24
28
29
30
31 HALLOWEEN
PARTIES
1:45 Parade Start
Last home football game
25
26
PARENT-TEACHER
CONFERENCE
NO SCHOOL
4:30-8:30 PM
Food available beginNing at 4:30
27
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