US Robotics | SportsterVoice | User`s guide | US Robotics SportsterVoice User`s guide

US Robotics SportsterVoice User`s guide
User’s Guide
SPORTSTER VOICE
33.600 and 28.800 Faxmodem
U.S. Robotics and the U.S. Robotics logo are registered trademarks of U.S. Robotics. Any trademarks, trade
names, service marks, or service names owned or registered by any other company and used in this manual are
the property of their respective companies.
© 1996 by U.S. Robotics.
7770 North Frontage Road
Skokie, IL 60077-2690
All Rights Reserved
This manual covers installation and operating instructions for the following U.S. Robotics modems:
· Sportster Voice 33.600 and 28.800 Faxmodem
This product complies with the Low Voltage Directive (LVD) and Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) directive.
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Introduction to U.S. Robotics.............................................................. 1
Introduction to Modem Technology ................................................... 2
Features ............................................................................................. 3
External Modem Installation ............................................................... 5
Internal Modem Installation ................................................................ 8
Communications Software ............................................................... 13
Troubleshooting................................................................................ 16
U.S. Robotics Online Resources...................................................... 21
Glossary ........................................................................................... 24
Quick Reference .............................................................................. 34
S-Registers.......................................................................... 47
Warranty........................................................................................... 55
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$FFHVV
Congratulations! You have just purchased the Sportster Voice faxmodem. Since 1976, U.S. Robotics has grown to
become a key manufacturer and developer of information access technology. U.S. Robotics' advanced technology
allows you to use your faxmodem to open up a new world of information access.
As an innovator in the data communications field, U.S. Robotics has a history of bringing the latest technology to
market at an affordable price.
U.S. Robotics owns the core technology, known as the data pump, that works in its access products. This allows
U.S. Robotics to bring new technologies and features to market faster and at a lower cost while passing the savings
on to you.
For more information on U.S. Robotics, visit the U.S. Robotics World Wide Web Home Page at:
http://www.usr.com
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A modem is a computer peripheral that allows you to connect and communicate with other computers via telephone
lines. Modems allow you to combine the power of your computer with the global reach of the telephone system.
Because ordinary telephone lines cannot carry digital information, a modem changes the digital data from your
computer into analog data, a format that can be carried. In a similar manner, the modem receiving the call then
changes the analog signal back into digital data that the computer can digest. This shift of digital data into analog
data and back again allows two computers to “speak” with one another. Called modulation/ demodulation, this
transformation of signals is how the modem received its name.
With a modem and a standard telephone line, you can send faxes to the office or important customers without
leaving your computer. And with an online or internet connection, you can share recipes with fellow gourmets, catch
up on the latest news, view a weather map from Singapore, keep in touch with distant friends by electronic mail,
surf the World Wide Web and much more.
2
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Data Communications
Your modem offers a range of internationally accepted standard modulation methods and protocols. It utilizes
hardware-based V.42/MNP 2-4 error control and V.42 bis/ MNP 5 data compression.
Your modem will transmit at speeds up to 33.600 bps with throughput to 115.200 bps. Also, it is universally
compatible with the following standards: V.34, V.FC, V.32 bis, V.32, V.22 bis, Bell 212A/V.22, V.23, V.25 and Bell
103/V.21 modems.
Fax Capability
You can use your modem with Class 1 or Class 2.0 fax software to exchange faxes with Group 3 fax machines
worldwide at speeds up to 14.400 bps.
Plug and Play
Plug and Play allows a computer to configure the modem's settings automatically. Your computer sets the optimal
configuration for the modem and your software applications automatically adjust to that configuration.
Once your system sets the configuration, it will use this configuration every time you turn on your machine.
3
Speakerphone
You can use your new Sportster as a full-duplex speakerphone without the echoing sound of some speakerphones.
The full-duplex feature allows you to speak at the same time as someone on the other end without losing any sound
quality. This affords you all the convenience of a speakerphone without the extra hardware and cords for the home
or office.
External modems have built-in microphones and you can attach a microphone and speaker to the internal models.
Personal Voice Mail
With Personal Voice Mail, your modem is a full-featured messaging system offering business-quality voice mail
features in the convenience of your home or office.
Using this feature, you can send voice greetings and record voice messages like a standard answering machine
with several “voice mailboxes” on one system. You can even access your voice messages remotely. Your modem
will autodetect incoming fax/voice/data calls and provides fax-on-demand services you can tailor to your needs.
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Getting Started
This chapter will walk you through the installation of your external modem with your personal computer.
Before getting started, make sure that you have the following items:
· Modem
· Serial Cable
· Data/Fax/Voice software and Manual
· RJ11 phone cord
· Power Adapter
· Telephone plug
· Analog (Standard) Telephone Jack
· This Guide
There are two parts to installation: software and hardware. Software allows you to communicate with your modem
so that you can send and receive data and faxes, as well as activate voice features. Software installation is
discussed in your communications software manual. Hardware is the modem itself, which will be connected to your
computer by the serial cable.
5
Hardware Installation Steps
Before you begin the modem installation, turn off your computer and any attached devices, such as a printer. Follow
these steps to install your modem. Refer to the drawing below of the back panel.
1. Connect the serial cable to the modem and to the computer.
When looking for your serial port label on
the back of your
computer, select COM, MODEM, RS-232, or SERIAL.
Do NOT select AUX, GAME, LPT, or PARALLEL.
Note which serial port you selected.
This information will be necessary when installing your
communications software.
2.
Plug the power adapter into the power jack and into a standard
3. Plug one end of the phone cord into the telephone jack (labeled
case) and the other
end into a phone wall jack.
wall outlet.
with a wall plug icon on the bottom of the
4. If you wish to use your modem and phone through the same
phone wall jack, plug your phone's cord
into the modem's other jack (labeled with a phone icon on the bottom of the case).
(Country
Specific)
5. You can also use the speaker jack if you have your own
next page and consult your software manual.
Volume
Power
on/off
To computer
To power
To wall To phone source
To speaker jack
6
speaker. For more information, see the
Speaker Attachment
An optional 8 ohm speaker or headset can be connected to the 3.5 mm speaker jack located on the back of your
Sportster. This accessory may provide higher sound quality, but it is not necessary to utilize your voice features.
Microphone
The microphone that is built into your modem is located on the front panel.
Installing your Software
1. Insert the software diskette included with your modem or
other software, consult its own manual for installation procedures.
another modem software disk. If using
2.
From Program Manager, choose File. Then choose Run and
type a:\install and press <Enter>.
3.
Once the software is installed, enter the software group and click
on the application icon.
You have successfully finished installing your modem and software.
7
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Getting Started
This chapter will walk you through the installation of your internal modem. Before getting started, make sure that
you have the following items:
· Modem
· Data/Fax/Voice software and Manual
· RJ11phone cord
· Telephone plug
· Analog (Standard) Telephone Jack
· Phillips Head Screwdriver or 1/4" Hex Screwdriver
· This Guide
Also, be sure that you have an available 8- or 16-bit expansion slot in your computer.
Installation
There are two parts to the installation of your modem: hardware and software. Hardware is the modem itself, which
will be installed inside of your computer. Your modem should be installed before your software.
Software allows you to communicate with your modem so that you can send and receive faxes, call an online
service to access e-mail, call a local Bulletin Board (BBS), or surf the Internet via the World Wide Web. Software
installation is discussed in your communications software manual.
8
Plug and Play Feature
Your new modem features Plug and Play installation, the fastest, easiest way to add new devices to your PC.
Plug and Play allows a computer to configure the modem's settings automatically. Your computer sets the optimal
configuration for the modem and your software applications automatically adjust to that configuration.
Most operating systems, including Windows 95, support Plug and Play. Configuring your new modem with
Windows 95 is addressed near the end of this chapter.
Consult your software manual or computer manufacturer to see whether your system supports the Plug and Play
features.
Once your system sets the configuration, it will use this configuration every time you turn on your machine.
In order to activate the Plug and Play feature with your modem, you must take off all the contacts on the COM port
and IRQ jumpers on the modem. You will be able to tell which COM port your modem has been set to by having
your communications software search for the COM port. Later sections of this chapter will explain how to locate
and change the COM port and IRQ settings.
Locating the Jumpers
Using the drawing of the modem to the right, find where the COM port and IRQ jumpers are located on your
modem.
COM
0 1 SEL
IRQ
2 3 4 5 7
9
If You are Using Plug and Play...
Take off all of the connections on the COM port and IRQ jumpers. Your jumpers should look like the following
illustration.
CO
0
1
2
M
SE
L
3
IR Q
4
5
7
If You are NOT Using Plug and Play...
Your modem was shipped with jumpers set at COM 2 and IRQ 3. See the figure in the section titled Locating the
Jumpers.
To change the settings on your modem, lift the black plastic pieces and place them on the contacts to match the
desired settings. The settings are as follows:
0
1
SE
0
L
1
SE
L
COM 1
COM 2
0
1
SE
0
L
1
COM 3
SE
L
COM 4
To change the settings on your modem, lift the black plastic pieces and place them on the contacts to match the
desired settings. The settings are as follows:
The following is a list of recommended combinations of COM port and IRQ settings when not using Plug and Play:
COM 1, IRQ 4. COM 2, IRQ 3
COM 3, IRQ 4. COM 4, IRQ 3
10
Installing the Modem
1.
Before installing your modem, write your modem's serial number
here:________________________.
2. (You can find the serial number on the white sticker under the
outside of the box.)
bar code on the modem and on the
3.
such as a printer.
Turn off and unplug your computer and any peripheral devices,
4. Remove the computer's cover. Refer to the computer manual, if
screws to remove before
sliding the cover off.
necessary, to see which rear panel
5.
available expansion slot.
Unscrew and remove the solid bracket at the back of any
6. Insert the modem board into the slot you have chosen with the
firmly in the slot's
groove.
gold leads on the modem board's edge
7. Once the modem is in place, screw the bracket at the back of
panel. This ensures that
the modem board is firmly in place.
the modem firmly to the computer's rear
8.
cables and power cords.
Replace the computer cover and all its screws. Reattach all
9. If you currently have a phone plugged into the wall jack,
disconnect it. Plug one end of the phone
cable that came with
the modem into the TELCO jack at the rear of the modem. Plug the other end of the cable
into the wall jack.
11
Configuring with Windows 95
After removing all the connectors from the modem’s jumpers and installing the modem, turn your computer on.
Then follow these steps:
1. In the New Hardware Found dialog box, select the Select from a
on the OK button.
list of alternate drivers option. Then click
2. In the Select Hardware Type dialog box, find and click on the
button.
Modem selection. Then click on the OK
3. In the Install New Modem dialog box, find and click on the U.S.
list.
Robotics selection in the Manufacturers
4.
list. Then click on the OK button.
Next, find and click on your modem model listed in the Models
Windows 95 has now been configured to work with your new modem. Now you’re ready to install your software.
Installing your Software
1. Insert the software diskette included with your modem or
another modem software disk. If using other
software, consult
its own manual for installation procedures.
2.
From Program Manager, choose File. Then choose Run and
type a:\install and press <Enter>.
3.
Once the software is installed, enter the software group and click
on the application icon.
You have successfully finished installing your modem and software.
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Note: If you are using the communications software included with your modem, you can disregard this chapter.
However, if you are using your own communications software, please refer to the software's manual and this
chapter.
Communications software allows you to change settings and issue commands to your modem.
The software included with your modem is preconfigured for optimal performance with the Sportster. Refer to the
software manual for any additional information. Be sure to install software after the modem is installed.
Configuring Your Modem
Some programs allow you to select your modem type from a menu. Select the appropriate U.S. Robotics Sportster
High Speed modem. If yours is not present, try a Courier Dual Standard, V.32 bis, V.FC, or V. 34.
Other programs require you to enter an initialization string in the software Modem Setup screen. If this is the case,
enter the following string to initialize your modem with the optimal settings for your pc:
AT&F1<Enter>.
These settings include: hardware flow control, a fixed serial port rate, and full result codes.
If you must use software flow control, enter the following string:
AT&F2<Enter>
13
Configuring Your Software
1.
Turn on your computer (and modem if you have an external).
2.
Install your communications software (refer to the software's
documentation).
3.
If you have an external modem, follow this step.
Otherwise, skip to step 4.
· From DOS, change to your Windows directory and
type MSD.
· Type C for COM Ports. Find the line UART Chip Used and
match it with the COM Port
column to which you attached
your modem to determine the UART type (usually 8250,
16450, or 16550). Remember your UART type for step 5.
4.
Start your communications software program.
5. Set the software's serial port (baud) rate based on your UART
referred to as
autobaud, select OFF).
UART
16550
16450
8250
type. Also, fix or lock the serial port rate (if
Serial Rate
115.2K or 57.6K bps
38.4K bps
19.2K bps
Note: All internal Sportsters have a 16550 UART on the modem. Some software packages offer 12.000 bps
as a serial port rate. Do NOT select this option. Your modem will not function properly with that setting.
6. Specify the serial (COM) port used by the modem in your
communications software if working in
DOS. The default
configuration on internal modems is COM 2, IRQ 3, unless you have changed it.
For external modems, check the serial port to
which your modem is connected.
7. Specify your modem's flow control setting: RTS/CTS for
hardware flow control (highly
recommended) or XON/XOFF for
software flow control. You should disable the flow control
method you are not using.
14
Testing Your Installation
1. To test your modem and software installation, perform the
software function that puts your computer
in Terminal mode. In
Terminal mode, a cursor appears on your screen, allowing you to send commands
directly to the modem.
2.
To determine if your computer and modem are communicating
command: AT E1 Q V1<Enter>
properly, type the following
· If the COM port and IRQ settings are correct on your
modem responds: OK
modem and in your software, the
· If the characters you type do not appear, no OK appears, or
the Troubleshooting section
in this guide.
double characters appear, see
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Before the modems connect…
If your modem doesn't respond to any AT commands,
·
Make sure the modem is on.
·
Make sure you selected the correct COM port and IRQ in your
communications software, and/or in your
Windows Control
Panel.
·
Make sure the computer is in Terminal mode.
·
Type in all upper (AT) or lower (at) case.
·
There may be a COM port/IRQ conflict. Refer back to Internal
Installation. You will need to remove your
modem from the PC
and change your COM port and IRQ settings. Lift the black
plastic shunts off
the modem and replace the COM port shunt to 3 and the IRQ shunt to 5. If you change your COM port and IRQ
settings, also make the changes in your software and in
Windows.
If your modem displays double characters on your monitor,
·
Both your modem's and software's local echoes are on and need to be turned off by typing the command
ATE0<Enter>.
If your modem doesn't go off hook to dial a number or doesn't answer the phone,
·
·
·
16
Make sure the phone cord is connect to the jack on the modem
Review your software manual to see what DTR operations are
Make sure that your software has auto answer enabled.
labeled TELCO and to a phone wall jack.
required.
If both modems exchange carrier signals but fail to establish a communications link,
·
Place the call again. The telephone company routes all calls,
call.
·
Call a different modem to see if the problem persists.
first tried to call.
even local calls, differently each time you
The problem may be with the modem you
If your modem doesn't connect at 2400 bps with a 2400 bps modem,
·
The remote modem might be an older 2400 bps modem that
error control with the
following command: AT&M0<Enter>
·
Try connecting with the remote modem again.
·
When the call is finished, remember to reset the modem:
does not support error control. Disable
ATZ<Enter>
During data transfer…
If your screen displays random or garbage characters,
·
Set your software to the same word length, parity, and Stop bits
·
Make sure that your software and modem are set to the same
variable serial port
rate.
·
Type the following command to load the template that enables
optimal settings.
AT&F1<Enter>
·
Disable any Terminate and Stay Resident (TSR) programs
as the remote modem.
flow control setting and to either a fixed or
hardware flow control as well as other
running in the background.
17
If your communications software is reporting many Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) errors and low
Characters Per Second (CPS),
·
You might have a bad phone line. Place the call again. The
phone company routes calls differently
each time you call.
·
Type the following command to load the template that enables
hardware flow control as well as other
optimal settings:
AT&F1<Enter>
·
Lower the serial port rate in your communications software to
38.400 bps or 19.200 bps.
·
Try a different file transfer protocol (do not use Xmodem if other
protocols are available). Disable any
Terminate and Stay
Resident (TSR) programs running in the background.
If errors are occurring in your V.17 fax transmissions,
·
Enter the following initialization string in your software modem
setup screen: AT&H3&I2&R2S7=90
·
Disable any Terminate and Stay Resident (TSR) programs that
are running in the background.
·
If your problems occur when you send faxes from Windows and
your computer had a 16550 UART, load
the comdriver that
came with your fax software. (This
may require re-installing the
software.)
Internal modem users only: If you have run DOS 6.0's Double Spaced program, do the following before
running any fax software.
Windows Users:
· Open the Windows SYSTEM.INI file.
· Add the following line under the [386 Enh] header:
· EMMEXCLUDE=C800-D1FF
Non-Windows Users:
· Open the DOS CONFIG.SYS file.
· Add the second line below the first:
· device=c:\dos\himem.sys
· device=c:\dos\emm386.exe noems x=c800-d1ff
· When you are completed, reboot your computer.
18
If you are running DOS 6.0, run the following DOS program before you run your fax software.
·
Type VER at the DOS prompt to determine your version of DOS.
·
Run the program MEMMAKER.EXE from the DOS directory
prompt. This program loads all of your
Terminate and Stay
Resident (TSR) programs in the most efficient order.
Are you still having problems?
Review this manual.
Call or visit your modem dealer. They will be able to give you assistance. This is much more efficient and timesaving than returning the modem to U.S. Robotics.
If your dealer can't help you, contact U.S. Robotics Customer Support. When you call, specify your modem serial
number (found on the modem and on the outside of the box), the software being used, and, if possible, the contents
of your ATI7 screen.
USR BBS: 01734-692200
USR FaxBack: 01734-228299
CompuServe: GO USROBOTICS
Internet: uksupport@usr.com
Fax: 01734-694222
Hotline: 01734-441000
If you must return the modem to us...
·
Contact U.S. Robotics Customer Support to obtain a
Return Materials Authorization (RMA) number.
You must have an RMA number before returning the modem to us.
·
Ship the unit, postage paid, in a strong box made of corrugated
(preferably the original container).
cardboard with plenty of packing material
·
Include your RMA number, name, and address on the shipping
label as well as inside the package.
·
Ship to the following address:
U.S. Robotics
Customer Support Services
650 Wharfdale Road,
Winnersh, Wokingham,
Berks RG41 5TP
19
865RERWLFV2QOLQH5HVRXUFHV
Connecting to the U.S. Robotics BBS
To connect to the U.S. Robotics Bulletin Board System, follow these steps:
1.
Start your communications software. The software settings for
ANSI terminal emulation
Data Bits: 8
Parity: None
Stop Bits: 1
the BBS are as follows:
2.
Put your computer in Terminal mode. Enter the following
ATDT 01734692200<Enter>
command:
3. If this is your first time connecting to our BBS, you will be asked
well as fill out a
questionnaire.
to enter your name and a password, as
4. When you finish registering, press enter with each prompt until
appropriate letter to
perform the desired function.
you come to the main menu. Select the
20
Downloading the Technical Reference Guide
1.
To download the Technical Reference Guide, follow these steps:
2.
From the main menu, select D for Download a file.
3. Enter filename to Download (Enter) = none? appears on the
to receive. You have
three manual formats from which to choose:
screen. Type the name of the file you wish
4. SP_WORD.ZIP—The Guide in a zipped Word for Windows v6.0
uncompress this file.
PKUNZIP.EXE is also available on the BBS.
format. You will need PKUNZIP.EXE to
5.
SP_HELP.ZIP—The Guide in a zipped Windows Help format.
6.
SP_ASCI.TXT—The Guide in an uncompressed ASCII format.
7. Protocol Type for Transfer. Your selection depends on what your software supports. If possible, make
Zmodem your first
choice. Xmodem should be your last choice since it is very
slow.
8. Depending on the software you are using, you will either be
prompted where you want the file placed,
or the file will be
placed in the directory where your communications software is loaded.
9. When the file transfer is complete, and you are ready to leave
main menu.
the BBS, select G for Good-bye from the
21
U.S. Robotics offers a number of other online technical support options. Choose any one of the following if you
need help with your new Sportster.
Internet FTP
Provides free library containing the same files as the BBS site. FTP to ftp.usr.com.
Internet On Demand
Provides automatic technical support through a library containing product information, quick reference cards and
installation help. To obtain an index of available documents, send blank e-mail to eurosupport@usr.com. To have a
document e-mailed to you, send a document's 3-digit number as the subject.
World Wide Web
A U.S. Robotics Home Page containing the same information as the Internet on Demand listing as well as
information about U.S. Robotics. Logon to http://www.usr.com.
CompuServe
Access the same information as the Internet FTP site. Connect through the Modem Vendor Forum or e-mail us
through CompuServe Mail for a response within 24 hours. Modem vendor forum address is GO USROBOTICS,
Modem Vendor Section #4. Address message to 76711,707.
America Online
Connect to U.S. Robotics through America Online. Go to the Keyword field and type USROBOTICS to connect to
the U.S. Robotics BBS for Macintosh computer users.
Fax and Technical Support Hotline
Technical questions about U.S. Robotics modems can also be answered via fax or by technical support
representatives.
Fax
Hotline
22
01734-694222
01734-441000
*ORVVDU\
Cross references are printed in boldface. Cross references with items in the Command Summary chapter are
printed in italics.
Analog Loopback
A modem self-test in which data from the keyboard or an internal test pattern is sent to the modem's transmitter,
modulated into analog form, looped back to the receiver, and demodulated into digital form.
Analog Signals
A variety of signals and wavelengths that can be transmitted over communications lines such as the sound of a
voice over the phone line. Contrast with digital signals.
Answer Mode
The mode used by your modem when answering an incoming call from an originating modem. The transmit/receive
frequencies are the reverse of the originating modem, which is in Originate mode.
Application
A computer program designed to perform a specific function, such as a word processor or a spreadsheet.
ARQ
Automatic Repeat reQuest. A general term for a function that automatically allows your modem to detect flawed
data and retransmit it. See MNP and V.42.
ASCII
American Standard Code for Information Interchange.
A 7bit binary code (0's, 1's) used to represent letters, numbers, and special characters such as $, !, and /.
23
Asynchronous Transmission
Data transmission in which the length of time between transmitted characters may vary. Because the time lapses
between transmitted characters are not uniform, the receiving modem must be signaled as to when the data bits of
a character begin and when they end. The addition of Start and Stop bits to each character serves this purpose.
Auto Answer
Sets the modem to pick up the phone line when it detects a certain number of rings. See S-register (S0) in
Technical Quick Reference.
Auto Dial
A process where your modem dials a call for you. The dialing process is initiated by sending an ATDT (dial tone) or
ATDP (dial pulse) command followed by the telephone number to dial. Auto Dial is used to dila voice numbers.
See command Dn.
Baud Rate
A term used to measure the speed of an analog transmission from one point to another. Although not technically
accurate, baud rate is commonly used to mean bit rate.
Binary Digit
A 0 or 1, reflecting the use of the binary numbering system (only two digits). Used because the computer
recognizes either of two states, OFF or ON. Shortened form of binary digit is bit.
Bit Rate
Also referred to as transmission rate. The number of binary digits, or bits, transmitted per second (bps).
Communications channels using telephone channel modems are established at set bit rates, commonly 300, 1200,
2400, 4800, 9600, 14.400 and higher.
Bits Per Second (BPS)
The bits (binary digits) per second rate. Thousands of bits per second are expressed as kilobits per second or
kbps.
Buffer
A memory area used as temporary storage during input and output operations. An example is the modem's
command buffer.
24
Byte
A group of binary digits stored and operated upon as a unit. A byte may have a coded value equal to a character
in the ASCII code (letters, numbers) or have some other value meaningful to the computer. In user documentation,
the term usually refers to 8-bit units or characters. 1 kilobyte (Kbyte) is equal to 1.024 bytes or characters; 640
Kbytes indicates 655.360 bytes or characters.
Carrier
A tone signifying a connection the modem can alter to communicate data across telephone lines.
Character A representation, coded in binary digits, of a letter, number, or other symbol.
Characters Per Second (CPS)
A data transfer rate generally estimated from the bit rate and the character length. For example, at 2400 bps,
8-bit characters with Start and Stop bits (for a total of ten bits per character) will be transmitted at a rate of
approximately 240 characters per second (cps). Some protocols, such as error-control protocols, employ advanced
techniques such as longer transmission frames and data compression to increase cps.
Class 1 and 2.0
International standards used between facsimile application programs and facsimile modems for sending and
receiving faxes.
Cyclic Redundancy Checking (CRC)
An error-detection technique consisting of a cyclic algorithm performed on each block or frame of data by both
sending and receiving modems. The sending modem inserts the results of its computation in each data block in the
form of a CRC code. The receiving modem compares its results with the received CRC code and responds with
either a positive or negative acknowledgment.
Data Communications
A type of communications in which computers are able to exchange data over an electronic medium.
25
Data Compression Table
A table containing values assigned for each character during a call under MNP5 data compression. Default values
in the table are continually altered and built during each call: the longer the table, the more efficient throughput
gained.
Data Mode
The mode in which the fax modem is capable of sending and receiving data files. A standard modem without fax
capabilities is always in data mode.
DCE
Data Communications (or Circuit-Terminating) Equipment, such as dial-up modems that establish and control the
data link via the telephone network.
Default
Any setting assumed, at startup or reset, by the computer's software and attached devices, and operational until
changed by the user or software.
Detect Phase
In the ITU-T V.42 error-control protocol, the first stage in establishing if both modems attempting to connect have
V.42 capability.
Dictionary
The term used for compression codes built by the V.42 bis data compression algorithm.
Digital Loopback
A test that checks the modem's RS-232 interface and the cable that connects the terminal or computer and the
modem. The modem receives data (in the form of digital signals) from the computer or terminal, and immediately
returns the data to the screen for verification.
Digital Signals
Discrete, uniform signals. In this manual, the term refers to the binary digits 0 and 1. Contrast with analog
signals.
26
DTE
Data Terminal (or Terminating) Equipment. A computer that generates or is the final destination of data.
Duplex
Indicates a communications channel capable of carrying signals in both directions. See Half Duplex, Full Duplex.
EIA
Electronic Industries Association, which defines electronic standards in the U.S.
Error Control
Various techniques that check the reliability of characters (parity) or blocks of data. V.42 and MNP error-control
protocols use error detection (CRC) and retransmission of flawed frames (ARQ).
Facsimile
A method for transmitting the image on a page from one point to another. Commonly referred to as fax.
Fax Mode
The mode in which the fax modem is capable of sending and receiving files in a facsimile format. See definitions for
V.17, V.27ter, V.29.
Flow Control
A mechanism that compensates for differences in the flow of data input to and output from a modem or other
device. See commands &Hn, &In, &Rn.
Frame
A data communications term for a block of data with header and trailer information attached. The added
information usually includes a frame number, block size data, error-check codes, and Start/End indicators.
Full Duplex
Signal flow in both directions at the same time. In microcomputer communications, may refer to the suppression of
the online Local Echo.
27
Half Duplex
Signal flow in both directions, but only one way at a time. In microcomputer communications, may refer to activation
of the online Local Echo, which causes the modem to send a copy of the transmitted data to the screen of the
sending computer.
Hz
Hertz, a frequency measurement unit used internationally to indicate one cycle per second.
ITU-T
An international organization that defines standards for telegraphic and telephone equipment. For example, the Bell
212A standard for 1200-bps communication in North America is observed internationally as ITU-T V.22. For 2400bps communication, most U.S. manufacturers observe V.22 bis. The initials ITU-T represent the French name; in
English it's known as the International Telegraph and Telephone Consultative Committee.
LAPM
Link Access Procedure for Modems, an error-control protocol defined in ITU-T Recommendation V.42. Like the
MNP protocols, LAPM uses cyclic redundancy checking (CRC) and retransmission of corrupted data (ARQ) to
ensure data reliability.
Local Echo
A modem feature that enables the modem to display keyboard commands and transmitted data on the screen. See
command Hn.
MNP
Microcom Networking Protocol, an error-control protocol developed by Microcom, Inc., and now in the public
domain. There are several different MNP protocols, but the most commonly used one ensures error-free
transmission through error detection (CRC) and retransmission of errored frames.
Modem
A device that transmits/receives computer data through a communications channel such as radio or telephone
lines. It also changes signals received from the phone line back to digital signals before passing them to the
receiving computer.
28
Nonvolatile Memory (NVRAM)
User-programmable random access memory whose data is retained when power is turned off. On the Sportster, it
includes four stored phone numbers and the modem settings.
OFF/ON Hook
Modem operations that are the equivalent of manually lifting a phone receiver (taking it off-hook) and replacing it
(going on-hook).
Online Fallback/Fall Forward
A feature that allows high-speed, error-control modems to monitor line quality and fall back to the next lower speed
in a defined range if line quality diminishes; as line conditions improve, the modems switch up to the next higher
speed.
Originate Mode
The mode used by your modem when initiating an outgoing call to a destination modem. The transmit/receive
frequencies are the reverse of the called modem, which is in Answer mode.
Parity
A simple error-detection method that checks the validity of a transmitted character. Character checking has been
surpassed by more reliable and efficient forms of error checking, including V.42 and MNP 2-4 protocols. Either the
same type of parity must be used by two communicating computers, or both may omit parity.
Protocol
A system of rules and procedures governing communications between two or more devices. Protocols vary, but
communicating devices must follow the same protocol in order to exchange data. The format of the data, readiness
to receive or send, error detection and error correction are some of the operations that may be defined in protocols.
RAM
Random Access Memory. Memory that is available for use when the modem is turned on, but that clears of all
information when the power is turned off. The modem's RAM holds the current operational settings, a flow control
buffer, and a command buffer.
29
Remote Digital Loopback
A test that checks the phone link and a remote modem's transmitter and receiver.
Remote Echo
A copy of the data received by the remote system, returned to the sending system, and displayed on the screen.
Remote echoing is a function of the remote system.
ROM
Read Only Memory. Permanent memory, not user-programmable.
Serial Transmission
The consecutive flow of data in a single channel. Compare to parallel transmissions where data flows
simultaneously in multiple channels.
Start/Stop Bits
The signaling bits attached to a character before the character is transmitted during Asynchronous Transmission.
Terminal
A device whose keyboard and display are used for sending and receiving data over a communications link. Differs
from a microcomputer or a mainframe in that it has little or no internal processing capabilities.
Terminal Mode
Software mode that allows direct communication with the modem. Also known as command mode.
Throughput
The amount of actual user data transmitted per second without the overhead of protocol information such as Start
and Stop bits or frame headers and trailers. Compare characters per second.
V.8
The ITU-T standard specification that covers the initial handshaking process.
30
V.17 Fax
A ITU-T standard for making facsimile connections at 14.400 bps, 12.000 bps, 9.600 bps, 7.200 bps.
V.21
A ITU-T standard for modems operating in asynchronous mode at speeds up to 300 bps, full-duplex, on public
switched telephone networks.
V.22
A ITU-T standard for modem communications at 1200 bps, compatible with the Bell 212A standard observed in the
U.S. and Canada.
V.22 bis
A ITU-T standard for modem communications at 2400 bps. The standard includes an automatic link negotiation
fallback to 1200 bps and compatibility with Bell 212A/V.22 modems.
V.27
A ITU-T standard for facsimile operations that specifies modulation at 4800 bps, with fallback to 2400 bps.
V.29
A ITU-T standard for facsimile operations that specifies modulation at 9600 bps, with fallback to 7200 bps.
V.32
A ITU-T standard for modem communications at 9600 bps and 4800 bps. V.32 modems fall back to 4800 bps
when line quality is impaired.
V.32 bis
A ITU-T standard that extends the V.32 connection range: 4800, 7200, 9600, 12,000, and 14,400 bps. V.32 bis
modems fall back to the next lower speed when line quality is impaired, fall back further as necessary, and also fall
forward (switch back up) when line conditions improve.
V.34
An ITU-T standard that currently allows data rates as high as 33,600 bps.
31
V.42
A ITU-T standard for modem communications that defines a two-stage process of detection and negotiation for
LAPM error control.
V.42 bis
An extension of ITU-T V.42 that defines a specific data compression scheme for use during V.42 connections.
Xmodem
The first of a family of error control software protocols used to transfer files between modems. These protocols
are in the public domain and are available from many bulletin board services.
XON/XOFF
Standard ASCII control characters used to tell an intelligent device to stop/resume transmitting data.
Ymodem
An error-checking protocol that can send several files of data at a time in 1024-byte (1K) blocks. This protocol can
use either checksums or CRC for error checking.
Ymodem G
Similar to Ymodem, except it includes no error checking, which makes it faster.
Zmodem
Similar to Xmodem and Ymodem, except it includes batch transfer, the ability to recover from a partially complete
transfer, an autostart feature, and improved efficiency.
32
4XLFN5HIHUHQFH
Introduction
The Quick Reference appendix includes information about the following:
· Front Panel Lights
· Command Summary
· S-Registers
33
Front Panel Lights (external modems only)
Symbol
Meaning
Status
AA
Auto Answer/
Answer
Answer mode: ON when
register S0 is set to 1 or higher
answering a call; OFF when modem
there is an incoming call.
ON if modem receives a valid data
modem, indicating that data
if CD override is ON (&C0).
Flashes when modem sends result
Light flashes when
CD
Carrier Detect
remote
possible. Always ON
RD
Received Data
data bits.
SD
Send Data
TR
Data Terminal
ignores DTR) if
CS
Clear to Send
flow control
ARQ/
Error Control/
FAX
Fax Operations
establishes an
modem retransmits data to
OH
Off Hook
modem is
34
Flashes when computer sends a
ON if modem receives a DTR
Ready signal from computer.
the DTR override is ON (&D0).
ON until modem lowers CTS when
is enabled (&H1, &H3).
Data Mode: Automatic Repeat
ON if modem is set to &M4 or &M5
error control connection. Flashes
remote modem. Fax Mode: Flashes
ON when modem accesses the
On Hook.
(Auto Answer), and when
originates a call.
signal (carrier) from a
transmission is
codes or passes received
data bit.
Always ON (modem
Transmit Data hardware
Request.
and successfully
when
to indicate fax mode.
phone line. OFF when
Command Summary
· Type commands in either upper or lower case, not a
combination. Use the Backspace key to
delete errors. (You
cannot delete the original AT command since it is not stored in the modem
buffer.)
· If a command has numeric options and you don’t include a
number, zero is assumed. For example, if
you type ATB, the
command ATB0 is assumed.
· Every command but A/, +++ and A> must begin with the AT
prefix and be entered by pressing a
carriage return (Enter key).
· The maximum command length is 60 characters. The modem
doesn’t count the AT prefix, carriage
returns, or spaces.
Note: Defaults are marked with an asterisk (*).
Command Set
$
Displays a basic command list; online help.
A
Manual Answer: goes off hook in answer mode.
Pressing any key aborts the operations.
A/
AT
Re-executes the last issued command. Used
prefix or a Carriage Return.
mainly to redial. This does not require the
A>
Re-executes the last command that was executed
AT prefix
or carriage return.
Any key
Aborts off-hook dial/answer operation and
AT
Required command prefix, except with A/, +++
code.
Bn
*
ten times. Command does not require an
hangs up.
and A>. Use alone to test for OK result
U.S./ITU-T answer sequence.
B0
ITU-T V.25 answer sequence
B1
U.S. answer tone
35
Dn
*
DL
Dials the specified phone number. Includes the
P
Pulse (rotary) dial
T
Tone dial
,
(Comma) Two-second pause; linked to S8
;
(Semicolon) Return to Command mode
!
(Exclamation point) Flashes the switch
/
Delays for 125 msec. before proceeding
W
Wait for second dial tone (X3 or higher);
@
Dials, waits for quiet answer, and continues
R
Originates call using answer (reverse)
#,*
Extended touch tone pad tones
register
after dialing
hook
with dial string
linked to S6 register
(X3 or higher)
frequencies
Dials the last-dialed number.
DSn Dials the phone number string stored in NVRAM
are
stored with the &Zn=s command.
D$
Displays a list of Dial commands.
En
Sets local echo.
E0
Echo OFF
E1
Modem displays keyboard commands
*
following:
at position n (n = 0*3). Phone numbers
Fn
Sets online local echo of transmitted data ON/OFF.
F0
Local echo ON. Modem sends a copy of
system to your
screen.
*
F1
Local echo OFF. Receiving system may
receives.
36
data it sends to the remote
send a remote echo of data it
Hn
Controls ON/OFF hook.
H0
Hangs up (goes on hook)
H1
Goes off hook
In
Displays the following information.
I0
Four-digit product code
I1
Results of ROM checksum
I2
Results of RAM self test
I3
Product type
I4
Current modem settings
I5
Nonvolatile memory (NVRAM) settings
I6
Link diagnostics
I7
Product configuration
I9
Plug and Play information
I11 Call statistics
Ln
Controls speaker volume.
L0
Low
L1
Low
L2
Medium
L3
High
*
Mn
*
Operates speaker.
M0 Speaker always OFF
M1 Speaker ON until CONNECT
M2 Speaker always ON
M3 Speaker ON after dial, until CONNECT
On
Returns online.
O0
Returns online
O1
Returns online and retrains
P
Sets pulse dial (for phone lines that don’t support
touch-tone dialing).
37
Qn
*
Displays/suppresses result codes.
Q0
Displays result codes
Q1
Quiet mode; no result codes
Q2
Displays result codes only in Originate
Q3
Displays result codes only in Ring mode.
Sr.b=n
Sets bit .b of register r to n (0/OFF or 1/ON).
Sr=n
Sets register r to n.
Sn?
Displays contents of S-Register n.
S$
Displays a list of the S-Registers.
T
Sets tone dial.
Vn
Displays verbal/numeric result codes.
V0 Numeric codes
V1 Verbal codes
*
38
mode
Xn
Sets result code displayed. Default is X4.
Xn Setting
Result Codes
X0
X1
X2
X3
X4
0/OK
1/CONNECT
2/RING
3/NO CARRIER
4/ERROR
5/CONNECT 1200
6/NO DIAL TONE
7/BUSY
8/NO ANSWER*
10/CONNECT 2400
13/CONNECT 9600
18/CONNECT 4800
20/CONNECT 7200
21/CONNECT 12000
25/CONNECT 14400
43/CONNECT 16800
85/CONNECT 19200
91/CONNECT 21600
99/CONNECT 24000
103/CONNECT 26400
107/CONNECT 28800
151/CONNECT 31200
155/CONNECT 33600
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Functions
Adaptive Dialing
Wait for 2nd Dial Tone (W)
Wait for Answer (@)
Fast Dial
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
* Requires @ in dial string; replaces
NO CARRIER
39
Yn
*
Selects power-on/reset default configuration.
Y0
Default is profile 0 setting in NVRAM
Y1
Default is profile 1 setting in NVRAM
Y2
Generic Template (&F0)
Y3
Hardware Flow Control (&F1)
Y4
Software Flow Control (&F2)
Zn
Resets modem.
Z0
Resets modem to NVRAM profile selected
Z1
Resets modem to NVRAM profile 0
Z2
Resets modem to NVRAM profile 1
Z3
Resets modem to factory default profile 0 (&F0)
Z4
Resets modem to factory default profile 1 (&F1)
Z5
Resets modem to factory default profile 2 (&F2)
&$
Displays a list of ampersand (&) commands.
&An Enables/disables ARQ codes.
&A0 ARQ result codes disabled
&A1 ARQ result codes enabled
&A2 V- modulation indicator added
*
&A3 Protocol indicators added - LAPM/MNP/NONE
(data
compression)
&Bn Sets modem’s serial port rate.
&B0 Variable, follows connection rate
*
&B1 Fixed serial port rate
&B2 Fixed in ARQ mode, variable in non-ARQ mode
&Cn Controls Carrier Detect (CD) signal.
&C0 CD override
*
&C1 Normal CD operations
&Dn Controls Data Terminal Ready (DTR) operations.
&D0 DTR override
&D1 Reserved
*
&D2 Normal DTR operations
40
by Y command
(error control) and V42bis/MNP5
&Fn
Loads a read-only (non-programmable) factory
&F0 Generic template
&F1 Hardware flow control template
&F2 Software flow control template
&Gn Sets Guard Tone.
*
&G0 No guard tone, U.S. and Canada
&G1 550 Hz guard tone, some European countries,
&G2 1800 Hz guard tone, U.K., requires B0 setting
configuration.
requires B0 setting.
&Hn Sets Transmit Data(TD) flow control (also see &Rn)
&H0 Flow control disabled
*
&H1 Hardware flow control, Clear to Send (CTS)
&H2 Software flow control, XON/XOFF
&H3 Hardware and software flow control
&In
*
Sets Receive Data (RD) software flow control
&I0 Software flow control disabled
&I1 XON/XOFF signals to your modem and remote
&I2 XON/XOFF signals to your modem only
(see also &Rn).
system
&Kn Enables/disables data compression.
&K0 Data compression disabled
*
&K1 Auto enable/disable
&K2 Data compression enabled
&K3 MNP5 compression disabled
&Mn Sets Error Control (ARQ) 1200 bps and higher.
&M0 Normal mode, error control disabled
&M1 Reserved
&M2 Reserved
&M3 Reserved
*
&M4 Normal/ARQ
&M5 ARQ mode
41
&Nn Sets connect speed. If connection cannot be established at
*
&N0
Variable rate
&N1
300 bps
&N2
1200 bps
&N3
2400 bps
&N4
4800 bps
&N5
7200 bps
&N6
9600 bps
&N7
12.000 bps
&N8
14.400 bps
&N9
16.800 bps
&N10
19.200 bps
&N11
21.600 bps
&N12
24.000 bps
&N13
26.400 bps
&N14
28.800 bps
&N15
31.200 bps
&N16
33.600 bps
this speed, the modem will hang up.
Note: When &N is used in conjunction with &U, &N sets the highest speed at which your modem will connect, and
&U sets the lowest speed at which the modems will connect. The factory default settings for these values should be
sufficient for most users.
&U=0
&U>0
42
&N=0
Connects at best possible
speed between your modem
and remote modem
&N>0
Connects at speed defined
by &N
Connects at any speed
faster than the value of &U.
Connects at any speed
between &N and &U.
&Pn Sets pulse (rotary) dial make/break ratio.
*
&P0 U.S./Canada ratio, 39%/61%
&P1 U.K. ratio, 33%/67%
&Rn Sets Receive Data (RD) hardware flow control,
&Hn).
&R0 Reserved
&R1 Modem ignores RTS
*
&R2 Received Data to computer only on RTS
Request to Send (RTS) (see also &In and
&Sn Controls Data Set Ready (DSR) operations.
*
&S0 DSR override; always ON
&S1 Modem controls DSR
&Tn Begins test modes.
&T0 Ends testing
&T1 Initiates Analog Loopback
&T2 Reserved
&T3 Initiates Local Digital Loopback
&T4 Enables Remote Digital Loopback
*
&T5 Prohibits Remote Digital Loopback
&T6 Initiates Remote Digital Loopback
&T7 Initiates Remote Digital with self-test and
&T8 Initiates Analog Loopback with self-test
error detector
and error detector
43
&Un Sets floor connect speed when &Un is set greater than 0.
&Nn is the ceiling connect speed. See &Nn.
*
&U0
Disabled
&U1
300 bps
&U2
1200 bps
&U3
2400 bps
&U4
4800 bps
&U5
7200 bps
&U6
9600 bps
&U7
12.000 bps
&U8
14.400 bps
&U9
16.800 bps
&U10 19.200 bps
&U11 21.600 bps
&U12 24.000 bps
&U13 26.400 bps
&U14 28.800 bps
&U15 31.200 bps
&U16 33.600 bps
&W n Writes current configuration to NVRAM templates.
&W0 Modifies the NVRAM 0 template (Y0)
&W1 Modifies the NVRAM 1 template (Y1)
&Yn Sets break handling.
&Y0
Destructive, but doesn’t send break
*
&Y1
Destructive, expedited
&Y2
Nondestructive, expedited
&Y3
Reserved
44
&Zn=s
Writes phone number string s to NVRAM at position
n (n = 0*3).
&Zn=L
Writes last executed dial string to NVRAM at position
n (n = 0*3).
&Zn?
Displays the phone number stored at position
n (n = 0*3).
<Ctrl>C
Cancels the display of the help screens.
<Ctrl>K
Cancels the display of the help screens.
<Ctrl>S
Pauses help screens.
+++
Escapes to online-command mode.
45
S-Registers
To change a setting, use the ATSr=n command, where r is the register and n is a decimal value from 0*255 (unless
otherwise indicated).
Register Default
Function
S0
1
Mode. When set
Sets the number of rings on which to
to 0, Auto Answer is disabled.
answer in Auto Answer
S1
(read only).
Counts and stores the number of rings
from an incoming call
Stores the ASCII decimal code for the
is "+."
escape code character.
0
S2
43
Default character
S3
13
Stores the ASCII code for the Carriage
Return character <CR>.
S4
10
Stores the ASCII decimal code for the Line
Feed character <LF>.
S5
<BS>.
8
Stores the ASCII decimal code for the
Backspace character
S6
dialing.
2
Sets the number of seconds the modem
waits for dial tone before
S7
60
answers before
code.
Sets the number of seconds the modem
returning on-hook and sending a No Carrier
waits for a carrier or
result
S8
command.
Sets the duration, in seconds, for the pause
(,) option in the Dial
2
S9
6
Sets the required duration, in tenths of a
modem’s carrier signal
before recognition by your modem.
46
second, of the remote
Register Default
Function
S10
7
Sets the duration, in tenths of a second, that
the modem waits after
loss of carrier before
hanging up. This guard time allows the
modem to
distinguish between a line hit, or
other disturbances that momentarily break the
connection, from a true disconnect (hang up)
by the remote modem.
While we don’t recommend connecting the
modem to a line with call
waiting, if you have
it, you may wish to adjust this setting upward
to prevent the
modem from misinterpreting
the second call signal as a disconnect by the
remote modem. A better alternative is to ask
your phone company how to temporarily
disable call waiting (usually *70). For
example: ATDT *70 phone number.
is lost. Dropping
S11
dialing.
70
S12
50
escape code
Note: If you set S10 = 255, the modem will
DTR hangs up the modem.
not hang up when carrier
Sets the duration and spacing, in
milliseconds, for tone
Sets the duration, in fiftieths of a second, of
sequence.
the guard time for the
47
Register Default
Function
S13
0
Bit-mapped register. Select the bit(s) you
the total of the values
in the Value column. For example,
ATS13 = 17 enables bit 0 (value is 1) and
bit 4 (value is 16).
Bit
Value
0
1
1
2
buffer from 1.5K to 128
2
4
3
8
number stored in NVRAM at
4
16
the number stored in NVRAM
5
32
6
64
7
128
want on and set S13 to
Result
Reset when DTR drops.
Reset non-MNP transmit
bytes.*
Set backspace key to delete.
On DTR signal, auto dial the
position 0.
At power on/reset, Auto Dial
at position 0.
Reserved.
Reserved.
Disconnect on escape code.
* The 1.5K-byte non-ARQ buffer allows data transfer with Xmodem- and Ymodem-type file transfer protocols
without using flow control.
The 128-byte option lets remote users with slower modems keep data you’re sending from scrolling off their
screens. When remote users send your computer an XOFF (Ctrl-S) and you stop transmitting, the data in transit
from your modem’s buffer doesn’t exceed the size of their screen.
This is also very helpful in situations when a remote modem/printer application is losing characters.
48
Register Default
S14
0
S15
0
instructions for S13.
Function
Reserved.
Bit-mapped register setup. To set the
Bit
0
1
Value
1
2
2
4
Disable ARQ/MNP for
3
8
Disable MNP
4
5
6
7
16
32
64
128
register, see
Result
Disable ARQ/MNP for V.22.
Disable ARQ/MNP for
V.22 bis.
V.32/V.32bis.
handshake.
S16
0
instructions for S13.
Bit-mapped register setup. To set the
Bit
0
1
2-7
S17
0
Disable MNP level 4.
Disable MNP level 3.
MNP incompatibility.
Disable V.42 operation.
Value
1
2
4-128
register, see
Result
Reserved.
Touch tone dialing test.
Reserved.
Reserved.
S18
0
Test timer for &T loopback testing.
Sets the time in
seconds of testing
before the modem automatically times
out and terminates the test. When
set to 0, the timer is disabled. Valid
range is 1-255.
49
Register Default
Function
S19
0
Sets the duration, in minutes, for the
inactivity timer.
The timer activates when
there is nodata activity on the phone line; at
time-out the modem hangs up. S19 = 0
disables the timer.
S20
0
Reserved.
S21
10
Sets the length, in 10-millisecond units, of
the modem to the computer;
applies to MNP or V.42 mode only.
breaks sent from
S22
17
Stores the ASCII decimal code for the
XON character.
S23
19
Stores the ASCII decimal code for the
XOFF character.
S24
0
Reserved.
S25
20
Sets the duration, in hundredths of a
second, that DTR
must be dropped so
that the modem doesn’t interpret a random
glitch as a DTR loss. (Most users will want to
use the default; this register is useful for
setting compatibility with older systems
running under
older operating software.)
S26
50
0
Reserved.
Register Default
Function
S27
0
instructions for S13.
Bit-mapped register setup. To set the
register, see
Bit
Value
Result
0
1
Enables ITU-T V.21
modulation at 300 bps for
overseas calls; in V.21
mode, the modem answers
both overseas
and domestic
(U.S. and
Canada) calls, but
only originates V.21 calls.
(Default Bell 103)
1
2
Enables unencoded (nontrellis coded) modulation in
V.32 mode; rarely used part
of ITU-T Recommendation
V.32.
2
4
Disables V.32 modulation.
3
8
Disables 2100 Hz answer
tone to allow two V.42
modems to connect
more quickly.
4
16
Enables V.23 fallback mode.
5
32
Disables V.32 bis mode.
6
64
Reserved.
7
128
Software compatibility mode.
This setting disables the
codes and displays the 9600
code instead. The actual rate
of the call can be
viewed on
the ATI6 screen. Used for
unusual software
incompatibilities. Some
software may not accept
7200, 12.000 and
14.400 bps
or greater result codes.
51
Register Default
S28
0
8
255
Function
Eliminates the V.32 answer tones for a faster
Default item, all times are in tenths of
Disables all connections except V.32 at
9600 bps.
S29
20
Sets the duration, in tenths of a second, of
mode fallback timer.
S30
20
Reserved.
S31
128
Volume control for speakerphone.
S32
2
instructions for S13.
Bit mapped register setup. To set the
Bit
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
S33
S13.
0
Value
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
the V.21 answer
register, see the
Result
V.8 Call Indicate enabled.
Enables V.8 mode.
Disable V.FC modulation.
Disable V.34 modulation.
Disable 33.6 kbps support.
Reserved.
Reserved.
Reserved.
Bit mapped register setup. To set the register,
Bit
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
52
Value
1
2
4
8
16
32
64
128
connection.
seconds.
Result
Disable 2400 symbol rate.
Disable 2743 symbol rate.
Disable 2800 symbol rate.
Disable 3000 symbol rate.
Disable 3200 symbol rate.
Disable 3429 rate.
Reserved.
Disable shaping.
see the instructions for
Register Default
Function
S34
for S13.
Bit mapped register setup. To set registers,
0
Bit
0
Value
1
Result
Disable 8S-2D trellis
1
2
Disable 16S-4D trellis
2
4
Disable 32S-2D trellis
3
8
Disable 64S-4D trellis
4
5
6
7
16
32
64
128
see instructions
encoding.
encoding.
encoding.
encoding.
S35-S37
Disable non-linear coding.
Disable TX level deviation.
Disable Pre-emphasis.
Disable Pre-coding.
Reserved.
S38
0
Sets an optional delay, in seconds, before a
forced hang-up
and clearing of the Transmit
buffer when DTR drops during an ARQ call.
This allows time for a remote modem to
acknowledge receipt of all transmitted
data
before it is disconnected. The modem
immediately
hangs up when DTR drops.
This option only applies to connections
terminated by
dropping DTR. If the modem
receives the ATH command, it ignores S38
and immediately hangs up.
53
/LPLWHG:DUUDQW\
U.S. Robotics Access Corp. warrants to the original end-user purchaser that this product will be free from defects in
materials and workmanship for a period of five years from the date of purchase. During the limited warranty period,
and upon proof of purchase, the product will be repaired or replaced (with the same or a similar model, which may
be a refurbished model) at U.S. Robotics’ option, without charge for either parts or labor. This limited warranty shall
not apply if the product is modified, tampered with, misused, or subjected to abnormal working conditions (including,
but not limited to, lightning and water damage).
THIS LIMITED WARRANTY DOES NOT GUARANTEE YOU UNINTERRUPTED SERVICE. REPAIR OR
REPLACEMENT AS PROVIDED UNDER THIS LIMITED WARRANTY IS THE EXCLUSIVE REMEDY OF THE
PURCHASER. THIS LIMITED WARRANTY IS IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR USE OR PURPOSE. U.S. ROBOTICS SHALL IN NO EVENT BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL,
INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OF ANY KIND OR CHARACTER,
INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, LOSS OF REVENUE OR PROFITS, FAILURE TO REALIZE SAVINGS OR
OTHER BENEFITS, LOSS OF DATA OR USE, DAMAGE TO EQUIPMENT, AND CLAIMS AGAINST THE
PURCHASER BY ANY THIRD PERSON, EVEN IF U.S. ROBOTICS HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY
OF SUCH DAMAGES.
This limited warranty gives you specific legal rights. You may have others, which vary from nation to nation. Some
nations do not allow limitations on duration of an implied warranty, or the exclusion or limitation of incidental or
consequential damages, so the above exclusion or limitation may not apply to you.
54
To obtain service under this limited warranty, contact the U.S. Robotics Technical Support Department at 01734441000 or by mail at U.S. Robotics Customer Support Services, 650 Wharfdale Road, Winnersh, Wokingham,
Berks. You will be given a Return Authorization Number (“RMA”) to help U.S. Robotics keep track of your limited
warranty request. Once you have received your RMA number, take or send the product, postage prepaid and
insured, to U.S. Robotics at the above address. Include proof of the date of purchase.
IMPORTANT: If you send your unit, pack it securely, and be sure that your RMA number is visible on the outside of
the package.
55
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