Minolta | DYNAX 60 - PART 2 | Instruction manual | Minolta DYNAX 60 - PART 2 Instruction manual

Minolta DYNAX 60 - PART 2 Instruction manual
INSTRUCTION MANUAL
FOR PROPER AND SAFE USE
Read and understand all warnings and cautions before using this
product.
WARNING
Using batteries improperly can cause them to leak harmful
solutions, overheat, or explode which may damage property or
cause personal injury. Do not ignore the following warnings:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2
Only use the batteries specified in this instruction manual.
Do not install the batteries with the polarity (+/–) reversed.
Do not use batteries which show wear or damage.
Do not expose batteries to fire, high temperatures, water, or
moisture.
Do not attempt to short or disassemble batteries.
Do not store batteries near or in metallic products.
Do not mix batteries of different types, brands, or ages.
Do not use leaking batteries. If fluid from the batteries enters your
eye, immediately rinse the eye with plenty of fresh water and
contact a doctor. If fluid from the batteries makes contact with your
skin or clothing, wash the area thoroughly with water.
Tape over lithium battery contacts to avoid short-circuiting during
disposal; always follow local regulations for battery disposal.
Do not disassemble this product. Electric shock may cause injury
if a high voltage circuit inside the product is touched. Take the
product to a Konica Minolta service facility when repairs are
required.
FOR
PROPER AND SAFE USE
WARNING
• Immediately remove the batteries and discontinue use if the
camera is dropped or subjected to an impact in which the interior,
especially the flash unit, is exposed. The flash has a high voltage
circuit which may cause an electric shock resulting in injury. The
continued use of a damaged product or part may cause injuries.
• Keep batteries or small parts that could be swallowed away from
infants. Contact a doctor immediately if an object is swallowed.
• Store this product out of reach of children. Be careful when
around children, not to harm them with the product or parts.
• Do not fire the flash directly into the eyes. It may damage
eyesight.
• Do not fire the flash at vehicle operators. It may cause a
distraction or temporary blindness which may lead to an accident.
• Do not look at the sun or strong light sources directly through the
viewfinder or lens. It may damage your eyesight or cause
blindness.
• Do not expose this product to liquids or operate this product with
wet hands. If liquid enters the product, immediately remove the
batteries and discontinue use. The continued use of a product
exposed to liquids may cause damage or injury through fire or
electric shock.
• Do not use the product near inflammable gases or liquids such as
gasoline, benzine, or paint thinner. Do not use inflammable
products such as alcohol, benzine, or paint thinner to clean the
product. The use of inflammable cleaners and solvents may
cause an explosion or fire.
• If the product emits a strange odor, heat, or smoke, discontinue
use. Immediately remove the batteries taking care not to burn
yourself. The continued use of a damaged product or part may
cause injuries.
• Take the product to a Konica Minolta service facility when repairs
are required.
3
CAUTION
• Do not point the product directly at the sun. If sunlight is focused
on an inflammable surface, a fire may result. Replace the lens cap
when the product is not in use.
• Do not use or store the product in a hot or humid environment
such as the glove compartment or trunk of a car. It may damage
the product and batteries which may result in burns or injuries
caused by heat, fire, explosion, or leaking battery fluid.
• If batteries are leaking, discontinue use of the product.
• Do not fire the flash while it is in contact with people or objects.
The flash unit discharges a large amount of energy which may
cause burns.
• Do not apply pressure to the data panel. A damaged panel may
cause injury, and the liquid from the panel may cause
inflammation. If liquid from the panel makes contact with skin
wash the area with fresh water. If liquid from the panel comes in
contact with the eyes, immediately rinse the eyes with plenty of
water and contact a doctor.
Konica Minolta is a trademark of Konica Minolta Holdings, Inc.
Dynax and Maxxum are trademarks of Konica Minolta Photo
Imaging, Inc.
4
FOR
PROPER AND SAFE USE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Thank you for purchasing this camera. Please take time to read this
manual so that you can enjoy all the features of your new camera.
Names of parts ............................................................................................8
Data panel .....................................................................................10
Viewfinder ......................................................................................11
Getting started ..........................................................................................12
Attaching the strap ........................................................................12
Attaching a lens.............................................................................13
Removing a lens............................................................................13
Installing batteries..........................................................................14
Battery condition indicator .............................................................15
Loading film ...................................................................................16
Diopter adjustment ........................................................................17
Setting the date and time - Date model ........................................18
Changing batteries - Date model ..................................................19
Basic operation ..........................................................................................20
Turning on the camera ..................................................................20
Handling the camera .....................................................................20
Taking a picture .............................................................................21
Focus signals.................................................................................22
Special focusing situations ............................................................22
Focus lock .....................................................................................23
Flash modes ..................................................................................24
Flash signals..................................................................................25
Flash range....................................................................................25
Subject programs ..........................................................................26
Film rewind ....................................................................................28
Manual rewind ...............................................................................29
A short guide to photography .....................................................................30
What is a stop? What is an Ev? ....................................................31
Advanced operation ...................................................................................32
Mode dial .......................................................................................32
About full-auto program.................................................................33
Program - P ...................................................................................34
Aperture priority - A .......................................................................35
Shutter priority - S .........................................................................36
About shutter speeds ....................................................................37
What is an f-number? ....................................................................37
Manual exposure - M.....................................................................38
5
Metering in manual exposure ........................................................39
Bulb exposures..............................................................................40
Attaching the eyepiece cap ...........................................................41
Optional viewfinder accessories....................................................41
Exposure compensation ................................................................42
Depth of field preview....................................................................43
AE lock button ...............................................................................44
About slow sync. ...........................................................................45
AF button .......................................................................................46
Manual focus - MF.........................................................................48
Function dial ..................................................................................49
Audio signals .................................................................................49
Drive modes ..................................................................................50
Continuous-advance notes............................................................51
Self-timer notes .............................................................................51
Remote control notes ....................................................................52
Multiple exposures.........................................................................53
Exposure bracketing......................................................................54
AF modes ......................................................................................56
Manual ISO....................................................................................57
Metering modes.............................................................................58
Red-eye reduction .........................................................................59
Wireless/Remote flash...................................................................60
Wireless/Remote flash notes.........................................................62
Date imprinting - Date model ........................................................63
Custom functions...........................................................................64
Custom 1 - AF/shutter priority...........................................66
Custom 2 - Film rewind ....................................................66
Custom 3 - Film leader .....................................................66
Custom 4 - DX memory ....................................................67
Custom 5 - Shutter lock (film)...........................................67
Custom 6 - Focus-hold button ..........................................67
Custom 7 - Program shift .................................................68
Custom 8 - AF button .......................................................69
Custom 9 - AEL button .....................................................70
Custom 10 - AF illuminator ...............................................70
Custom 11 - Flash metering .............................................71
Custom 12 - Focus area illumination................................72
Custom 13 - Shutter lock (lens)........................................72
Custom 14 - Shutter lock (back).......................................72
Custom 15 - Date format (Date model) ............................73
Custom function reset ...................................................................73
6
TABLE
OF CONTENTS
Accessory notes .........................................................................................74
Lens notes .....................................................................................74
Accessory flash notes ...................................................................76
High Speed Sync. (HSS)...............................................................77
Wireless Controller IR-1N..............................................................77
Troubleshooting..........................................................................................78
Care and storage .......................................................................................80
Operating conditions......................................................................80
Storage ..........................................................................................80
Cleaning ........................................................................................81
Before important events ................................................................81
Questions and service...................................................................81
Technical specifications..............................................................................82
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this
device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause
undesired operation. Changes or modifications not approved by the party responsible
for compliance could void the user's authority to operate the equipment. This equipment
has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in
accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular
installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television
reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is
encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
• Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
• Increase the separation between the equipment and the receiver.
• Connect the equipment to an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
This Class B digital apparatus complies with Canadian ICES-003.
This mark on your camera certifies that this camera meets the
requirements of the EU (European Union) concerning interference causing
equipment regulations. CE stands for Conformité Européenne (European
Conformity).
7
NAMES OF PARTS
*This camera is a sophisticated optical instrument. Care should be
taken to keep these surfaces clean. Please read the care and
storage instructions in the back of this manual (p. 80).
Self-timer lamp / Remote-control receiver (p. 51, 52)
Shutter-release button (p. 21)
Control dial
Flash* (p. 24)
Function button
Function dial (p. 49)
Strap eyelet (p. 12)
Flash-mode button (p. 24)
Exposure-compensation
button (p. 42)
Lens release (p. 13)
Lens mount
Mirror*
Lens contacts*
Depth-of-field preview button (p. 43)
The battery-chamber door (p. 14) and tripod socket are located on
the bottom of the body.
8
NAMES
OF PARTS
Eyepiece cup
Accessory shoe
Mode dial / Main switch (p. 32, 20)
Data panel
Strap eyelet (p. 12)
Manual-rewind button
(p. 29)
Back-cover release (p. 16)
Viewfinder*
Film window
Focus-mode button (p. 48)
AE lock button (p. 44)
AF button (p. 46)
Diopter-adjustment slider (p. 17)
Slide the supplied eyepiece cup
around the viewfinder frame.
9
DATA PANEL
1. Subject program indicators (p. 26)
2. Exposure-compensation indicator (p. 42)
3. Aperture display
4. Manual-focus indicator (p. 48)
5. Metering-mode indicator (p. 58)
6. Battery-condition indicator (p. 15)
7. Remote-control indicator (p. 50, 52)
8. Frame counter
9. Film-transport signals
10. Cartridge mark
11. Direct Manual Focus indicator (p. 56)
12. AF-mode indicators (p. 56)
13. Wireless / Remote flash indicator (p. 60)
14. Red-eye reduction indicator (p. 59)
15. Flash-mode indicators (p. 24)
16. High-speed sync. indicator (p. 77)
17. Self-timer indicator (p. 51)
18. Date-imprinting indicator (p. 63) (Date model)
19. Single-frame / Continuous advance indicator (p. 50)
20. Shutter-speed display
21. Multiple-exposure indicator (p. 53)
22. Exposure-bracketing indicator (p. 54)
10
NAMES
OF PARTS
VIEWFINDER
Wide focus
frame
Spot metering
area (p. 58)
Spot focus area
(p. 46)
Local focus
areas (p. 46)
1. Flash indicator (p. 25)
2. High-speed sync. indicator (p. 77)
3. Wireless / Remote flash indicator (p. 60)
4. Manual focus indicator (p. 48)
5. AE lock indicator (p. 44)
6. Focus signal (p. 22)
7. Shutter-speed display
8. Exposure-compensation indicator (p. 42)
9. Aperture display
10. Metering-mode indicator (p. 58)
11. Ev scale (p. 39, 45)
The spot focus area and local focus areas are briefly illuminated
when the focus is locked to indicate the point of focus.
11
GETTING STARTED
ATTACHING THE STRAP
With the visible protrusions on the
inside of the holder ring oriented as
shown, pass the tip of the strap
through the ring.
1
2
3
Pass the tip of the strap through the camera’s
strap eyelet from below and then the holder
ring (1). Attach the strap so the tip comes
between the strap and the camera.
Thread the tip of the strap through the inside
of the buckle and pull to tighten (2). Leave
some slack in the camera strap so the tip may be threaded through
the buckle easily.
Push the holder ring toward the strap eyelet to secure the strap to
the camera (3). Repeat with the other end of the camera strap.
12
GETTING
STARTED
ATTACHING A LENS
This camera uses interchangeable
lenses. See page 74 for compatible
lenses. Never touch the inside of the
camera, especially the lens contacts
and mirror.
Remove the body and rear lens caps.
The arrow on the rear lens cap must
be aligned to the lens mounting
index.
Align the red mounting index on the
lens and camera body (1). Carefully
insert the lens into the mount, then
turn it clockwise until it clicks into the
locked position. Do not insert the lens
at an angle. If it does not fit, check its
orientation with the index marks.
Never force the lens.
1
REMOVING A LENS
Press the lens release all the way in
(1) and turn the lens counterclockwise until it stops. Carefully
remove the lens.
1
Replace the caps on the lens and
attach the body cap or another lens
to the camera.
13
INSTALLING BATTERIES
The camera requires two 3V CR2 lithium batteries to operate. Read
the proper and safe use section on page 2 before using the
batteries. When changing batteries, confirm the mode dial is in the
off position.
Slide the battery-chamber release in
the direction shown, and open the
door. Setting the camera down with
the battery-chamber door open may
damage the camera.
Insert the batteries as indicated on
the diagram next to the battery
chamber-door. Confirm the positive
and negative battery terminals are
oriented correctly.
Push the battery-chamber door
closed until it clicks into place.
Date Model
The date display will blink when the camera is turned on until the clock
and calendar are set. To set the camera’s clock and calendar, see page
18.
The clock and calendar are powered by the camera batteries. If the
batteries are removed, the date and time are reset, and the dateimprinting function is disabled. To save the date and time when changing
batteries, see page 19.
14
GETTING
STARTED
BATTERY-CONDITION INDICATOR
The camera has a battery-condition
indicator. When the camera is on, the
indicator appears on the data panel.
If the data panel is blank, the
batteries may be exhausted or
installed incorrectly.
Full-battery indicator - power is
sufficient for all camera operations.
Low-battery indicator - indicator
blinks. All functions are operational,
but the batteries need to be replaced
soon. Flash recycling time may be
slow.
Low-battery warning - indicator
blinks and no other indicators appear
on the data panel. Power is
insufficient for camera operation and
the shutter will not release. Replace
the batteries.
Occasionally, the battery-condition indicator can give a false lowbattery warning, even though power is sufficient for operation. Turn
the camera on and off a few times to reset the display.
15
LOADING FILM
Always load or remove the film under subdued light to reduce the
chances of fogging. The camera automatically sets the correct film
speed (ISO) with DX-coded film. If non-DX-coded film is used, the
camera will use the previous roll’s film speed. See page 57 to set
the film speed manually.
Slide the back-cover release down to
open the camera.
Never touch the shutter curtain with
your fingers or the film leader. The
curtain’s
precision
design
is
extremely sensitive to pressure.
1
Insert the film cartridge into the film chamber. Extend the leader
between the guide rails to the film-tip index mark (1). If the film tip
extends beyond the index mark, take the cartridge out and rewind
the excess film back into the cartridge.
Hold the film cartridge down
so that the film lays flat.
16
GETTING
STARTED
Close the back cover. The camera
automatically advances the film to the
first frame. Take care not to catch the
strap when closing the cover.
If the film is loaded correctly, the
frame counter indicates the first
frame. The film speed (ISO) is
displayed on the data panel for 5
seconds.
If the film is loaded incorrectly, 0
blinks in the frame counter. Reload
the film.
Camera Notes
Do not use Polaroid Instant 35mm film; winding problems may occur.
Infrared film cannot be used as the camera’s frame counter sensor will fog
the film. No more than 40 exposures can be taken on one roll. When using
72-exposure film, the camera will rewind the roll after the 40th exposure.
DIOPTER ADJUSTMENT
The viewfinder has an adjustable diopter. It can be adjusted
between –2.0 and +1.0 diopter.
Carefully slide the eyepiece cup from
around the viewfinder frame by pushing
on each side of the cup.
While looking through the viewfinder,
slide the diopter-adjustment slider until
the image of the focus frame is sharp.
Replace the eyepiece cup.
Diopter-adjustment slider
17
SETTING DATE AND TIME - DATE MODEL
The camera’s clock and calendar need to be set for date imprinting.
The date blinks on the data panel when the camera is turned on if
the clock and calendar are not set or have reset because the
batteries are exhausted.
Turn the function dial to the date select position
(SEL); the calendar is displayed on the data
panel. The date format is year, month, day, and
can be changed, see page 64.
1
Turn the control dial (1) to select the date and
time registers; the selected register blinks.
calendar
To change the selected register,
press and hold the function
button (2) and turn the control
dial (3). The camera uses a 24
hour clock so 14:00 is 2pm. The
calendar is automatic from the
year 2003 to 2039.
2
Clock
3
Continue until the calendar and clock are set. Turn the function dial
to any position except DATE, SEL, or CUST to view the standard
data panel display. See page 63 on how to use the date imprinting
function.
18
GETTING
STARTED
CHANGING BATTERIES - DATE MODEL
When the batteries have been removed, the camera’s built-in clock
will stop. The following procedure stores the current time and date
when the batteries are changed.
Turn the camera on and off with the mode dial.
The camera stores the current date and time in a
memory register each time the camera is turned
off or on.
Change the batteries as described on page 14.
Turn the camera on. If normal data panel display
appears, the clock and calendar did not reset.
If the date blinks on the data panel when the camera is turned on,
the clock and calendar reset. See the facing page on how to set the
date and time.
19
BASIC OPERATION
This section covers the basic operation of the camera. Thoroughly
familiarize yourself with the operations in this section before moving
on.
TURNING THE CAMERA ON
1
To turn on the camera, simply turn the mode dial
to the appropriate mode (1). The basic operation
section assumes that the full-auto program mode
is selected - P enclosed in a circle. The full-auto
program mode simplifies the picture taking
process. For more on this and other modes, see
page 32.
HANDLING THE CAMERA
Grip the camera firmly with your right
hand, while supporting the lens with
your left. Keep your elbows at your
side and your feet shoulder-width
apart to hold the camera steady. Keep
the camera strap around your neck or
wrist in the event you accidentally
drop the camera.
The use of a tripod is recommended when using the camera in lowlight situations or when using telephoto lenses. If a tripod is not
available, lean against a wall or rest your elbows on a solid surface
to steady the camera.
20
BASIC
OPERATION
TAKING A PICTURE
Place the subject in the wide focus
frame. If using a zoom lens, rotate the
zooming ring to frame the subject.
1
Aperture
Shutter speed
Focus signal
Flash indicator
2
Press the shutter release button
partway down to activate the autofocus
and exposure systems (1). The
viewfinder focus signal (p. 22) confirms
focus and the spot or local focus area
is briefly illuminated to indicate the
point of focus. If the focus signal
blinks, repeat the procedure.
If the flash is required for the exposure,
it raises automatically and the flash
indicator appears in the viewfinder (p.
25). In low-light conditions, the flash
acts as an AF illuminator (p. 70).
The shutter speed and aperture used
for the exposure are displayed in the
viewfinder and on the data panel.
Press the shutter-release button all the
way down to take the picture (2). When
taking a picture, press the shutterrelease button gently so not the shake
the camera during the exposure.
21
FOCUS SIGNALS
The viewfinder focus signal indicates the status of the autofocus
system. Focusing time can be longer with macro or telephoto
lenses, or in low light conditions.
Focus locked.
Focus is confirmed (Continuous AF - p. 56).
Indicator blinks - cannot focus. The shutter is locked.
Focusing (Continuous AF). The shutter is locked.
When the camera cannot focus, the subject may be too close or a
special focus situations may be preventing the system from
focusing. Use focus lock or manual focus (p. 48).
Autofocus priority and shutter-release priority can be specified with
custom function 1 (p. 64).
SPECIAL FOCUSING SITUATIONS
The camera may not be able to focus in the following situations.
Use focus lock or manual focus (p. 48).
1
2
3
4
1. The subject within the focus frame is very bright, or low in
contrast.
2. Two subjects at different distances overlap in the focus frame.
3. The subject is near a very bright object or area.
4. The subject composed of alternating light and dark lines
completely fills the focus frame.
22
BASIC
OPERATION
FOCUS LOCK
Focus-lock is used for off-center subjects outside the focus frame.
Focus lock can also be used when a special focusing situation
prevents the camera from focusing by allowing the camera to be
focused on a object at the same distance as the subject.
1
Center your subject in the wide focus
frame, then press the shutter-release
button partway down to lock focus (1).
The focus is locked when focus signal
appears in the viewfinder. If the signal
blinks, the camera was unable to
focus; repeat the procedure.
Focus signal
2
The exposure is locked with focus.
Releasing the shutter button cancels
focus lock.
Continue to hold the shutter-release
button partway down and compose the
picture.
Press the shutter-release button all the
way down (2) to take the picture.
23
FLASH MODES
The built-in flash is designed to be used with lenses
with focal lengths from 28mm of longer. When using
lenses shorter than 28mm, the corners of the image
will not be fully illuminated. Remove the lens hood to
prevent lens shadowing, see page 75. The shutter
will not release while the flash is charging. Push
down the built-in flash when the camera is not in
use.
Autoflash - the built-in-flash pops up automatically when
flash illumination is required. Only available with full-auto
program, program, and subject programs (p. 32).
Fill flash - the flash fires with each exposure regardless of
the ambient light. Fill flash can be used to reduce harsh
shadows caused by strong direct light or sunshine.
Flash cancel - the flash will not fire. Used when flash
photography is prohibited, natural light is desired to
illuminate the subject, or the subject is beyond the flash
range.
To change the flash mode with full-auto
program, program, and subject
programs, press and hold the flashmode button (1) and turn the control
dial (2) until the appropriate mode is
displayed on the data panel.
2
1
When using aperture-priority, shutter-priority, or manual exposure
mode, the flash is set to flash cancel. To use fill flash, press the
flash-mode button to raise the flash. For accessory-flash
information, see page 76.
24
BASIC
OPERATION
FLASH SIGNALS
The viewfinder flash signal indicate the status of the flash.
Signal steady - flash charged and ready to fire.
Signal blinking - flash output was sufficient for exposure.
If the flash signal does not blink after taking the picture, the subject
was not within the flash range.
FLASH RANGE
The range of the built-in flash depends on the speed of the film and
the aperture used for the exposure. The subject must be within the
flash range specified in the table below to be correctly exposed.
Aperture
f/2.8
f/3.5
f/4.0
f/5.6
ISO 100
1.0 ~ 5.6m / 3.3 ~ 18.4 ft.
1.0 ~ 4.5m / 3.3 ~ 14.8 ft.
1.0 ~ 4.0m / 3.3 ~ 13.1 ft.
1.0 ~ 2.8m / 3.3 ~ 9.2 ft.
ISO400
1.0 ~ 11m / 3.3 ~ 36 ft.
1.0 ~ 9.0m / 3.3 ~ 29.6 ft.
1.0 ~ 8.0m / 3.3 ~ 26.2 ft.
1.0 ~ 5.6m / 3.3 ~ 18.4 ft.
Camera Notes
With full-auto program, program, and
subject programs, fill flash can be
used with specific single exposures.
Press and hold the flash-mode
button while pressing the shutterrelease button to make the
exposure; the flash pops up
automatically.
25
SUBJECT PROGRAMS
Subject programs optimize the camera system
for specific conditions or subjects. Five subject
programs are available.
2
Turn the mode dial (1) to the subject program
position.
1
Use the control dial (2) to
select the appropriate
program; the active
program is displayed at
the top of the data panel.
Not all camera functions can be selected with subject programs.
Portrait - optimized to create sharp images of the subject
with a soft background. Most portraits look best at a
telephoto setting; the long focal length does not exaggerate
facial features and the shallow depth of field separates the
subject from the background. Use fill flash (p. 24) with
strong direct sunlight or backlight to reduce harsh
shadows.
Landscape - optimized to create sharp landscape
photographs, while maintaining a shutter speed fast
enough to prevent blurring from camera shake. For best
results zoom to a wide-angle setting or use a wide-angle
lens. Include a foreground subject or detail to create a
feeling of depth in the picture.
When taking a portrait within a landscape, use fill flash (p.
24) with strong direct sunlight or backlight to reduce harsh
shadows, see flash range on page 25. The flash will have
no effect on the landscape. The use of a tripod is
recommended.
26
BASIC
OPERATION
Close-up - the camera selects the optimum aperture and
shutter speed combination to photograph at short object
distances. For best results use a macro lens or a macro
capable zoom lens. Focusing time can be longer with
macro lenses. The use of a tripod is recommended.
The built-in flash will overexpose subjects closer than 1.0m
(3.3 ft.). Use flash cancel. At close distances, the lens or
len hood may block the flash, creating a shadow at the
bottom of the image. The use of an accessory flash is
recommended.
Sports Action - the camera uses the fastest possible
shutter speed to stop motion and continually adjusts focus
to track the subject. The use of fast film is recommended.
When the subject is not within the flash range, use flash
cancel (p. 24). Mount the camera on a tripod or monopod
when using telephoto lenses.
Night Portrait - for photographs of people in low-light
conditions. The camera balances the ambient light
exposure with the flash exposure so the background
appears in the image. The use of fast film is recommended.
Ask the subject not to move after the flash burst as the
shutter may still be open for the background exposure. Use
a tripod to reduce camera shake.
To photograph a landscape or scene at night, set the flash
mode to flash cancel (p. 24). Dark night scenes may
prevent the AF system from focusing, use manual focus (p.
48). Night scenes tend to be better at twilight rather than in
the darkness of night. The faint light in the early evening
sky adds detail to the shadows of the scene.
27
FILM REWIND
After the last frame on the roll of film has been exposed, the camera
rewinds the film automatically. The frame counter counts down
during rewind. Do not turn the focusing ring when the film is
rewinding.
Wait until the film is completely rewound;
zero (0) is displayed on the frame counter
and the cartridge mark blinks on the data
panel to indicate the camera can be opened
to remove the film.
Slide the back-cover release down to open
the camera and remove the film. Close the
back cover taking care not to catch the strap.
To load a new roll of film, see page 16.
Although more pictures than specified on the film package may be
taken, the film processor may not print more than the number
specified on the film cartridge or the last frame may be cropped.
Camera Notes
Custom functions control film rewind (p. 64). Custom 2 disables automatic
rewind. Custom 3 specifies if the film leader is completely rewound into
the cartridge or left out.
28
BASIC
OPERATION
MANUAL REWIND
The film can be rewound manually
before the roll is finished.
Gently press the manual-rewind
button using a pen to begin rewinding
the film. Only use blunt objects.
Sharp objects may damage the
camera.
Wait until the film is completely rewound;
zero (0) is displayed on the frame counter
and the cartridge mark blinks on the data
panel to indicate the camera can be opened
to remove the film.
Slide the back-cover release down to open
the camera and remove the film. Close the
back cover taking care not to catch the strap.
To load a new roll of film, see page 16.
Camera Notes
The film-chamber lock prevents the camera from being opened while a roll
of film is loaded. The lock automatically releases when the film is
rewound.
29
A SHORT GUIDE TO PHOTOGRAPHY
Photography can be a rewarding pursuit. It is a broad and
disciplined field that can take years to master. But the pleasure in
making photographs and the joy of capturing a magical moment
cannot be compared. The guide is an introduction to some basic
photographic principles.
The lens aperture controls not only
exposure, but also depth of field;
the area between the closest object
in focus and the furthest object in
focus. The larger the aperture
value, the greater the depth of field
and the longer the shutter speed
needed to make the exposure. The
smaller the aperture value, the
shallower the depth of field and the
faster the shutter speed needed to
make the exposure. Usually
landscape photographs use a large
depth of field (large aperture value)
to keep the foreground and
background in focus, and portraits
use a shallow depth of field (small
aperture value) to separate the
subject from the background.
Depth of field also changes with
focal length. The shorter the focal
length, the greater the depth of
field; the longer the focal length,
the shallower the depth of field.
30
A SHORT
GUIDE TO PHOTOGRAPHY
The shutter controls not only
exposure, but also the ability to stop
motion. Fast shutter speeds are
used in sport photography to stop
action. Slow shutter speeds can be
used to show the flow of motion such
as water cascading over a waterfall.
The use of a tripod is recommended
with slow shutter speeds.
WHAT IS A STOP? WHAT IS AN EV?
The term “stop” comes from the name of aperture plates in old
lenses. Ev stands for exposure value. A change of one stop or one
Ev adjusts the exposure by a factor of two.
+3 stops
+2 stops
+1 stop
–1 stop
–2 stops
–3 stops
+3.0 Ev
+2.0 Ev
+1.0 Ev
Calculated exposure
–1.0 Ev
–2.0 Ev
–3.0 Ev
8X as much light
4X as much light
2X as much light
1/2 as much light
1/4 as much light
1/8 as much light
31
ADVANCED OPERATION
This section covers the advanced features of the camera. Read the
basic operation section before moving on.
MODE DIAL
The mode dial give direct access to the main
exposure modes in the camera. It also acts as the
camera’s main switch. Simply turn the dial to the
appropriate position.
Subject programs - to optimize the camera settings based
on specific subjects or situations (p. 26).
Full-auto program - camera systems are completely
automated for effortless picture taking (p. 33).
Off - to turn the camera off.
Program - aperture and shutter speeds are set
automatically by the camera (p. 34).
Aperture priority - shutter speed is set by the camera
depending on the aperture set by the photographer (p.
35).
Shutter priority - aperture is set by the camera depending
on the shutter speed set by the photographer (p. 36).
Manual exposure - the photographer sets both the shutter
speed and aperture required for the exposure (p. 38).
32
ADVANCED
OPERATION
ABOUT FULL-AUTO PROGRAM
Full-auto program completely automates the picturetaking process. If the position of the mode dial is
changed, the following are reset:
Flash mode (p. 24)
Focus area (p. 11)
Autofocus mode (p. 56)
Drive mode (p. 50)
Metering mode (p. 58)
Exposure compensation (p. 42)
Exposure bracketing (p. 54)
Multiple exposure (p. 53)
Wireless / Remote flash (p. 60)
Autoflash
Wide focus frame
Auto
Single-frame advance
14-segment
0.0
Off
Off
Off
If the required exposure is beyond the
shutter speed and aperture range, the
shutter speed and aperture displays blink
on the data panel and in the viewfinder.
In bright conditions, use a neutral density filter on the lens, load a
slower film, or, if using artificial lights, reduce the intensity of the
illumination. In dark conditions, use the built-in flash or load a faster
film.
Camera Notes
When the mode dial is turned to the full-auto program or subject-program
positions, the program, aperture-priority, shutter-priority, and manual
exposure modes are also reset.
33
PROGRAM - P
Like full-auto program, program controls both the
shutter speed and aperture required for each
exposure. The operation is the same as described in
the taking-a-picture section on page 21. However,
functions set in this mode will not reset when the
camera is turned off.
If the required exposure is beyond the
shutter speed and aperture range, the
shutter speed and aperture displays blink
on the data panel and in the viewfinder.
In bright conditions, use a neutral density filter on the lens, load a
slower film, or, if using artificial lights, reduce the intensity of the
illumination. In dark conditions, use the built-in flash or load a faster
film.
Custom function 7 allows the shutter speed and aperture
combination to be changed without affecting the total exposure. For
more information on program shift, see page 68.
Camera Notes
If the light levels are outside the metering range of the
camera, the metering-mode indicator (p. 58) on the data
panel and in the viewfinder blinks. In dark conditions, use
the camera flash. Under bright light, use a neutral density
filter to control the light level.
34
ADVANCED
OPERATION
APERTURE PRIORITY - A
Aperture priority allows the photographer to specify
the aperture; the camera sets the appropriate shutter
speed for the required exposure. The aperture not
only controls exposure, but also depth of field, the
area in front of the camera that appears sharp, see
page 30.
1
Turn the control dial (1) to adjust the aperture.
The aperture range depends on the lens. The
aperture value can be seen on the data panel and
in the viewfinder.
2
Aperture
Pressing the shutter-release button
partway down (2) displays the
corresponding shutter speed. Press
the shutter-release button all the way
down to take the picture.
If the required exposure is beyond the
shutter speed range, the shutter-speed
display blinks on the data panel and in
the viewfinder. Adjust the aperture until
the display is steady.
3
To use fill flash, press the flash-mode (3)
button to raise the flash. The shutter
speed cannot exceed the flash-sync
speed of 1/90 second. If the shutterspeed display blinks, adjust the aperture
until the display is steady.
Flash range is dependent on the
aperture, see page 25. To cancel the
flash, push the flash head down.
35
SHUTTER PRIORITY - S
Shutter priority allows the photographer to specify the
shutter speed; the camera sets the appropriate
aperture for the required exposure. Shutter speeds
not only control exposure, but also the apparent
sharpness of moving objects, see page 30.
1
Turn the control dial (1) to adjust the shutter
speed between 30 and 1/2000 second The
speeds can be seen on the data panel and in the
viewfinder.
2
Shutter
speed
Pressing the shutter-release button
partway down (2) displays the
corresponding aperture. Press the
shutter-release button all the way
down to take the picture.
If the required exposure is beyond the
aperture range, the aperture display
blinks on the data panel and in the
viewfinder. Adjust the shutter speed until
the display is steady.
3
To use fill flash, press the flash-mode (3)
button to raise the flash. The shutter
speed cannot exceed the flash-sync
speed of 1/90 second.
Flash range is dependent on the
aperture, see page 25. To cancel the
flash, push the flash head down.
36
ADVANCED
OPERATION
ABOUT SHUTTER SPEEDS
The shutter speed used for each exposure is displayed on the data
panel and in the viewfinder. The following notation is used:
The reciprocal is used for shutter speeds from
1/2000 second to 1/3 second. 125 is 1/125
second.
For shutter speeds of a half a second or longer, a
quote mark is used to denote whole seconds. 1”5
is one and a half seconds and 15” is fifteen
seconds.
WHAT IS AN ƒ-NUMBER?
An f-number indicates the relative aperture of the lens and lets us
determine how much light it lets through. But why does the number
get bigger when the amount of light decreases? The answer is in
the way it is written, f/2.0, f/8.0. etc. That means the focal length of
the lens (f) divide by 2 or 8. So a 100mm lens at f/2 has a 50mm
effective aperture (100/2) and at f/8, a 12.5mm effective aperture
(100/8). The f-number indicates the size of the aperture as a fraction
of the focal length of the lens.
The f-number series was carefully chosen to
make controlling exposures easy. In the
chart, the aperture and shutter speed
combinations give the exact same exposure.
Notice how the shutter speed changes to
compensate for the change in aperture.
f/2.8
f/4.0
f/5.6
f/8.0
f/11
f/16
f/22
f/32
1/2000s
1/1000s
1/500s
1/250s
1/125s
1/60s
1/30s
1/15s
37
MANUAL EXPOSURE - M
Manual exposure allows the photographer to specify
both the shutter speed and aperture for the exposure.
For more on aperture and shutter control, see page
30. Bulb exposures can also be made, refer to page
40.
Turn the control dial (1) to adjust the
shutter speed between 30 and 1/2000
second.
1
2
Press and hold the exposure
compensation button (2) and turn the
control dial (1) to adjust the aperture.
The aperture range depends on the
lens. The shutter speed and aperture
values are displayed on the data
panel. Press the shutter-release button
partway down to view the exposure in
the viewfinder.
To use fill flash, press the flash-mode
(3) button to raise the flash. The flash
exposure is controlled automatically by
the camera.
3
38
ADVANCED
OPERATION
The shutter speed cannot exceed the
flash-sync speed of 1/90 second.
Flash range is dependent on the
aperture, see page 25. To cancel the
flash, push the flash head down.
METERING IN MANUAL EXPOSURE
The Ev scale in the viewfinder indicates the difference between the
set exposure and the exposure determined by the camera meter.
Press the shutter-release button partway down to activate the
meter. The scale uses half stop or 0.5Ev increments. For more on
stops and Ev, see page 31.
The set exposure is one stop less (–)
than the exposure determined by the
meter.
The arrow indicates the set exposure
is two and a half stops more (+) or
less (–) than the exposure
determined by the meter.
The blinking arrow indicates the set
exposure is three or more stops
greater (+) or less (–) than the
exposure determined by the meter.
Konica Minolta History
We believe innovation and creativity is the cornerstone of our success.
The Electro-zoom X was an exercise in camera design and was unveiled
at Photokina in 1966.
The Electro-zoom X is an aperture-priority
SLR with a built-in 30 - 120mm f/3.5 zoom lens.
It took twenty 12 X 17mm images on a roll of
16mm film. The shutter button and battery
chamber are located in the grip. Only a few
prototypes were built making it one of Minolta’s
rarest camera.
39
BULB EXPOSURES
Bulb exposures can be taken in the
manual-exposure mode (p. 38). Bulb
allows the shutter to remain open for
as long as the shutter-release button is
pressed. The camera’s exposure
meter
cannot
calculate
bulb
exposures; a separate light meter is
recommended.
1
2
In manual-exposure mode, use the
control dial (1) to decrease the shutter
speed until bulb appears in the shutterspeed display on the data panel.
Press and hold the exposurecompensation button (2) and turn the
control dial to select the aperture.
Press and hold the shutter-release
button for the duration of the exposure.
The optional remote control RC-3 can
be used open and close the shutter (p.
52).
A tripod is recommended for bulb exposures. If the light level
prevents the camera from focusing, use manual focus (p. 48).
40
ADVANCED
OPERATION
ATTACHING THE EYEPIECE CAP
The supplied eyepiece cap prevents light from entering through the
viewfinder and affecting the exposure meter or fogging the film
when using the self-timer or remote control or during long
exposures.
Carefully slide the eyepiece cup
from around the viewfinder
frame by pushing on each side
of the cup.
Slide the eyepiece cap over the
viewfinder. The cap should be
attached to the camera strap to
prevent loss. Replace the
eyepiece cup after the exposure.
OPTIONAL VIEWFINDER ACCESSORIES
The Angle Finder VN and Magnifier VN can be used with this
camera. The Angle Finder makes using the camera at low angles
easier. The Magnifier enlarges the center of the viewfinder image
for critical focusing especially for macro photography.
Eyepiece Corrector 1000 series diopters can be used if the
adjustable viewfinder diopter is not sufficient.
These accessories are mounted on the viewfinder frame as
described above. For more information on these and other
accessories, contact your Konica Minolta dealer.
41
EXPOSURE COMPENSATION
Camera exposure can be changed by as much as ±3.0 Ev to make
the final image lighter or darker. For information on Ev, see page 31.
Exposure compensation cannot be used in the manual-exposure
mode.
2
1
Press and hold the exposurecompensation button (1) and turn the
control dial (2) to select the degree of
compensation. This value is displayed
in the aperture display and on the Ev
scale. For more on the Ev scale, see
page 39.
Once set, the exposure-compensation
indicator shows an increase (+) or
decrease (–) to the metered exposure.
The viewfinder Ev scale displays the
degree of compensation.
In the program, aperture-priority, and shutter-priority modes, the
degree of compensation set in one mode is applied to the other two;
exposure compensation is not reset when the camera is turned off,
but is reset if the mode dial is turned to the full-auto program or
subject program position. With full-auto program and subject
programs, exposure compensation is reset when the position of the
mode dial is changed.
42
ADVANCED
OPERATION
Exposure compensation can be used when the camera’s exposure
meter is deceived by certain conditions. For example, a very bright
scene, such as a snowy landscape or a white sandy beach, can
appear too dark in the final image. Before taking the picture,
adjusting the exposure by +1 or +2 EV will result in an image with
normal tonal values.
Metered exposure
–1.0Ev
–2.0Ev
In the example above, the dark water caused the camera to
overexpose the image making it bright and washed-out. By
compensating the exposure, detail is brought out in the leaves, and
the stones and water appear richer.
DEPTH OF FIELD PREVIEW
To provide the brightest viewfinder image possible, the camera only
closes the lens aperture during the exposure. The aperture can be
stopped down to preview its affect on depth of field (p. 30).
Focus the camera. While
looking
through
the
viewfinder, press and hold
the depth-of-field preview
button (1) to stop the lens
down to the aperture in use.
1
43
AE LOCK BUTTON
The AE-lock button locks the exposure without activating the AF
system. This allows the exposure to be set with a gray card or a
reference target outside the scene. The operation of the AE-lock
button can be changed with custom function 9 (p. 70). This button
is disabled in shutter-priority and manual-exposure modes.
Frame the exposure target in the viewfinder
depending on the metering mode in use (p. 58).
Press the AEL button (1) to lock the exposure; the
shutter speed and aperture are displayed and the
AEL indicator is displayed in the viewfinder.
Release the button to cancel the lock.
1
2
While holding the AEL button, place
the subject in the focus frame and
press the shutter-release button
partway down to focus (2). Press the
shutter-release button down all the
way to take the picture.
The exposure remains locked after the picture is taken if the AEL
button is not released.
While the exposure is locked, the camera meter is still active. The
viewfinder Ev scale shows the difference between the locked
exposure and the current light level measured with the meter.
AEL indicator
44
ADVANCED
OPERATION
Ev scale
When the Ev scale indicates 0, the locked exposure shown in the
shutter-speed and aperture displays is the same as the exposure
determined by the meter.
The metered exposure is one stop less (–)
than the locked exposure.
The arrow indicates the metered exposure
is two and a half stops more (+) or less (–)
than the locked exposure.
The blinking arrow indicates the metered
exposure is three or more stops greater
(+) or less (–) than the locked exposure.
ABOUT SLOW SYNC.
When using flash, pressing the AEL button activates the slow-sync.
function. This gives the same effect as the night portrait subject
program (p. 27) which balances the ambient light exposure with the
flash exposure so the background is recorded with the subject.
When the AEL button is pressed and held, the ambient light
exposure is determined and the flash exposure is based on the
locked aperture setting. The affect of slow sync. is only apparent in
low-light conditions. The use of a tripod is recommended with slowsync. exposures.
45
AF BUTTON
The AF button allows the camera to be focused on a specific target
using the spot focus area or one of the eight local-focus areas.
Place the spot focus area on the
subject.
Spot focus area
Press and hold the AF button (1) to
focus. The focus remains locked until
the button is released. When the
button is released, the wide focus
frame is active.
While continuing to hold the AF button,
press the shutter-release partway
down to lock the exposure, and then all
the way down to take the picture.
1
2
To use one of the eight-local focus
areas, press and hold the AF button (1)
and turn the control dial (2) to select
the area; the shutter speed display
indicates the active area.
1
The appropriate area should be placed on the subject as the
camera focuses as each area is selected.
While continuing to hold the AF button, press the shutter-release
partway down to lock the exposure, and then all the way down to
take the picture.
46
ADVANCED
OPERATION
The shutter speed display on the data panel and in the viewfinder
indicates the active focus area. The area is briefly illuminated in the
viewfinder when it is selected.
When the AF button is initially pressed, the spot focus area is active.
The control dial is used to cycle through the local-focus areas. To
select the spot focus area after selecting a local area, release and
then press the AF button again.
Camera Notes
Custom function 8 changes the operation of the AF button. See page 69
for information.
47
MANUAL FOCUS - MF
The lens can be manually focused. Simply press
the focus-mode button (1) to switch between
autofocus and manual focus. When manual focus
is active, the manual-focus indicator is displayed
on the data panel and in the viewfinder.
1
Turn the focusing ring on the lens until the
viewfinder image is sharp.
2
The AF system can assist focusing.
Place the subject in the focus frame.
While pressing the shutter-release
button partway down (2), turn the
focusing ring until the focus signal
appears.
Focus signal
When using non D series lenses, the camera switches to centerweighted metering. The metered exposure may be different in
autofocus and manual focus.
In the program, aperture-priority, shutter-priority, manual-exposure
modes, when manual focus is activated in one mode it is active in
the other three; manual focus is not reset to autofocus when the
camera is turned off, but is reset if the mode dial is turned to the fullauto program or subject program position. With full-auto program
and subject programs, manual focus is reset to autofocus when the
position of the mode dial is changed.
48
ADVANCED
OPERATION
FUNCTION DIAL
The function dial controls many of the cameras
creative functions and camera operations. for
descriptions of the functions, refer to the
appropriate sections.
Custom functions (p. 64)
Custom ISO (p. 57)
Red-eye reduction (p. 59)
Wireless / Remote flash (p. 60)
Drive modes (p. 50)
Metering modes (p. 58)
AF modes (p. 56)
Multiple exposure (p. 53)
Exposure bracketing (p. 54)
Audio signals (p. 49)
Date imprinting (p. 63) (Date model only)
Date and time setup (p. 18) (Date model only)
AUDIO SIGNALS
1
2
3
The audio signal gives a positive
confirmation for focus lock and
when using the self-timer and
remote control. The signal can be
turned off.
Turn the function dial to the audiosignal position (1). While pressing
the function button (2), turn the
control dial until “On” or “OFF” is
displayed on the data panel.
49
DRIVE MODES
1
3
2
The drive modes control how
pictures are captured. Four drive
modes are available.
Turn the function dial to the drivemode position (1).
While pressing the function button
(2), turn the control dial (3) until
the appropriate drive mode is
displayed on the data panel.
Release the function button to
complete the operation.
Single-frame advance - to take a single image each time
the shutter-release button is pressed (p. 21).
Continuous advance - to take a series of images when
the shutter-release button is pressed and held (p. 51).
Self-timer - to delay the release of the shutter by
approximately ten seconds. Used for self portraits (p. 51).
Remote control - to release the shutter from up to 5m
(16.4ft.) away with the optional Remote Control RC-3 (p.
52).
50
ADVANCED
OPERATION
CONTINUOUS-ADVANCE NOTES
The maximum frame rate with continuous advance is 3 frames per
second with a shutter speed of 1/250 or faster, no flash, single-shot
AF or manual focus, fresh batteries and no date imprinting. AF
Zoom xi and Power Zoom lenses cannot be zoomed when taking
pictures with continuous advance.
The frame rate is affected by the shutter speed, flash, and AF mode.
The built-in flash must recharge between exposures. When using
an accessory flash, the camera continues to take pictures
regardless if the flash has charged. The frame rate may be reduced
when using continuous AF or with moving subjects with Automatic
AF as the camera focuses between exposures.
SELF-TIMER NOTES
When the shutter-release button is pressed partway
down, focus and exposure is locked for the picture. Do
not stand directly in front of the camera when pressing
the shutter-release button. To change the focus point,
release the shutter button and then press it partway
down again.
Press the shutter-release button all the way down to
start the timer. The self-timer lamp on the front of the
camera blinks, then glows steadily just before the
shutter releases. The audio signal accompanies the
self-timer lamp.
To cancel the self-timer countdown, change the
position of the mode dial. The self-timer drive mode is
canceled after the picture is taken. Attach the
eyepiece cap if a bright light source is behind the
camera (p. 41).
51
REMOTE CONTROL NOTES
The camera can be operated up to 5m (16.4 ft.) away with the IR
Remote Control RC-3 (sold separately). For detailed operation,
refer to the RC-3 instruction manual. The remote-control drive mode
is set with the function dial (p. 50).
Point the remote control toward the
camera and press the release or the
delay button. If the built-in flash pops
up when the release button is
pressed, wait a few seconds for the
flash to charge and then press the
release button again.
The delay button (1) delays the release of the shutter
for two seconds. The release button (2) fires the
shutter without a delay. The subject should be
positioned within the focus frame; the focus and
exposure are set when a remote-control button is
pressed.
1
2
Focus lock can be used. To refocus the camera, press the shutterrelease button partway. Changing the position of the mode dial
cancels the focus and exposure lock.
When making bulb exposures (p. 40), the pressing the remotecontrol buttons once starts the exposure; pressing the button a
second time ends it. The delay button delays the start of the
exposure by two seconds. The remote control can also be used with
multiple exposures (p. 53) and bracketing (p. 54).
To save power, the drive mode is canceled if an operation is not
made within five minutes. Attach the eyepiece cap if a bright light
source is behind the camera (p. 41).
52
ADVANCED
OPERATION
MULTIPLE EXPOSURES
The multiple-exposure function
makes it possible to expose two or
more images on the same frame. The
built-in flash can be used, but
overexposure could result.
1
2
3
Turn the function dial to the
multiple-exposure position (1).
While pressing the function
button (2), turn the control dial
(3) until “ME” is displayed in the
frame counter. Release the
function button. The first
exposure can be taken.
ME will blink on the data panel after the
initial exposure to indicate the next exposure
will be the final one. Press the shutterrelease button to take the second exposure
and advance the film. Multiple-exposure
mode is canceled after the last exposure.
To make more than two exposures, press the function button and
turn the control dial to stop “ME” blinking after the initial exposure.
An unlimited number of exposures can be made by repeating this
procedure.
The camera meter indicates the required exposure for a single
picture. Depending on the scene, the exposure may have to be
compensated.
53
EXPOSURE BRACKETING
This function makes a three-image bracket of a scene. Bracketing
is a method of taking a series of images of a static subject in which
each image has a slight variation in exposure. Bracket your
exposures when shooting slides and other films with a small
exposure latitude.
1
3
2
Turn the function dial to the
exposure-bracketing position
(1).
While pressing the function
button (2), turn the control dial
(3) to select the bracketing
step: 0.3Ev, 0.5Ev, 0.7Ev, or
1.0Ev. The larger the number,
the greater the difference
between exposures. For more
on Ev, see page 31. Release
the function button.
Normal
Under
Over
0.3 Ev bracket
0.5 Ev bracket
1.0 Ev bracket
The order of the bracketing series is normal exposure,
underexposure, and overexposure. The built-in or accessory flash
cannot be used with bracketing; the flash is automatically canceled.
54
ADVANCED
OPERATION
When the bracketing function is initially selected, the drive mode is
automatically set to continuous advance. Compose the picture as
described in the taking-a-picture section (p. 21). The focus and
exposure are locked with the first frame.
Press and hold the shutter-release button all the way down to make
the bracketing series; three consecutive frames are taken. If the
shutter button is released before the last frame of the series is
taken, the bracket series is reset.
Changing the drive mode (p. 50) to singleframe advance, self-timer, or remote control
allows each frame to be taken each time the
shutter-release button is pressed all the way
down; the self-timer drive mode is reset after
each exposure. The data panel indicates the
next bracketing frame in the series.
To cancel the current bracketing series, turn the camera off. To
cancel the bracketing function, press the function button and turn
the control dial until “OFF” is displayed on the data panel.
Camera Notes
A button shortcut allows exposure
bracketing to be used with specific
subjects. Press and hold the
exposure-compensation
button
while pressing and holding the
shutter-release button for the
duration of the automatic threeframe 0.5 Ev bracket.
55
AF MODES
1
3
2
This function controls how the AF
system works. Four modes are
available.
Turn the function dial to the AFmode position (1).
While pressing the function button
(2), turn the control dial (3) until
the appropriate AF mode is
displayed on the data panel.
Release the function button to
complete the operation.
Automatic AF - the camera automatically switches
between single-shot AF and continuous AF.
Continuous AF - for moving subjects. The camera
continually focuses.
Single-shot AF - for static subjects. focus lock (p. 23) can
be used.
Direct Manual Focus - when focus is locked, the lens can
be manually focused. Available with D series lenses only.
The viewfinder focus signal indicates AF status.
Focus locked.
Focus is confirmed (Continuous AF).
Indicator blinks - cannot focus. The shutter is locked.
Focusing (Continuous AF). The shutter is locked.
56
ADVANCED
OPERATION
In continuous AF, the camera will continue to adjust focus when the
shutter-release button is pressed partway down. Focus lock cannot
be used.
With Direct Manual Focus (DMF), press
the shutter-release button partway down
to lock focus. When the manual focus
indicator (MF) appears, the lens can be
refocused manually. Available with D
series lenses only. When using SSM
series lenses, the DMF function
incorporated in the lens should be used.
MANUAL ISO
1
2
3
The film speed can be set
manually from ISO 6 to ISO 6400
in 1/3 Ev steps.
Turn the function dial to the ISO
position (1).
While pressing the function button
(2), turn the control dial (3) until
the appropriate ISO is displayed
on the data panel. Release the
function button to complete the
operation.
The film speed can be set for DX-coded and non-DX-coded film. A
custom ISO setting can be applied to film with the same DX code
with custom function 4 (p. 67). The film speed of a loaded roll of film
can be confirmed through the film window in the back cover of the
camera.
57
METERING MODES
1
3
2
The metering modes control how
light is measured. The metered
exposure may vary between
autofocus and manual focus.
Turn the function dial to the
metering-mode position (1).
While pressing the function button
(2), turn the control dial (3) until
the appropriate metering mode is
displayed on the data panel.
Release the function button.
14-segment honeycomb-pattern metering - the
camera’s standard metering mode appropriate for most
photographic situations. By combining information from the
autofocus system, this mode is less influenced by spot
lighting or backlighting. When using non-D series lenses
with manual focus, this mode changes to center-weighted
metering.
Center-weighted metering - light values of the entire
scene are measured with emphasis given to the central
area.
Spot metering - the area in
the spot circle in the
viewfinder
is
used
to
determine the exposure. The
spot allows a specific object to
be measured without being
influenced by bright or dark
areas within the scene.
58
ADVANCED
OPERATION
Spot metering area
RED-EYE REDUCTION
Red-eye reduction is used when taking photographs of people or
animals in low-light conditions. The red-eye effect is caused by light
reflected from the retina of the eye. The camera fires several preflashes before the main flash burst to contract the pupils of the
subject’s eyes.
1
2
3
Turn the function dial to the redeye reduction position (1).
While pressing the function button
(2), turn the control dial (3) until
“On” is displayed on the data
panel. Release the function
button.
When this function is active, the red-eye reduction indicator is
displayed on the data panel. To cancel red-eye reduction, repeat the
procedure above until “OFF” is displayed in the data panel.
Red-eye reduction can be used with autoflash and fill flash (p. 24).
It cannot be used with accessory flash units nor wireless/remote
flash control.
59
WIRELESS / REMOTE FLASH
Wireless/Remote flash allows the camera to control an off-camera
5600HS (D), 3600HS (D), 5400HS, 5400xi, or 3500xi flash unit
without the need of a cable. Single or multiple flash units can be
placed around the subject to create special lighting effects.
On-camera
flash
Wireless/
Remote
flash
The camera’s built-in flash fires to control the
off-camera flash units rather than to
illuminate the subject. See your local camera
dealer about Minolta lighting accessories.
1
Slide the Minolta 5600HS(D) or 3600HS(D)
flash on the accessory shoe until the safety
lock engages (1).
Turn on the camera and flash unit.
2
Turn the function dial to the wireless / remote
position (2).
4
3
While pressing the function button (3),
turn the control dial (4) until “On” is
displayed on the data panel. Release
the
function
button.
This
simultaneously sets the camera and
flash to the wireless mode.
Remove the flash from the camera.
60
ADVANCED
OPERATION
Press the flash mode button to raise
the flash.
Position the camera and flash around
the subject. See the following page
for the camera-to-subject and flashto-subject ranges. Make sure no
objects come between the camera
and flash unit.
The flash units can be test fired by pressing the
AEL button on the camera; custom function 9
must be set to 1 (p. 64). If the flash does not fire,
change the camera, flash, or subject position.
When the 5600HS(D) and 3600HS(D) flash is
charged, the AF illuminator on the front of the
unit blinks. Take a picture as described in the
basic operation section on page 21.
To cancel wireless/remote flash, mount the flash on the camera and
turn the function off using the function button and control dial. For
more about flash operation, refer to the manual supplied with the
flash unit.
61
WIRELESS / REMOTE FLASH NOTES
Camera-to-subject
distance
Flash-to-subject
distance
The camera and flash must
be within 5m (16.4 ft)
of the subject.
The following chart list the minimum distances required when using
Program/Maxxum Flash 5600HS (D) and 3600HS (D). For more
detailed information or when using High Speed Sync. (HSS), refer
to the flash unit manual.
Aperture
ƒ/2.8
ƒ/4.0
ƒ/5.6
Min. camera-to-subj. dist.
ISO 100
ISO 400
2.8m / 9.2ft
1.4m / 4.6ft
1.0m / 3.3ft
2.0m / 6.6ft
1.0m / 3.3ft
2.0m / 6.6ft
Min. flash-to-subj. dist.
ISO 100
ISO 400
2.8m / 9.2ft
1.4m / 4.6ft
1.0m* / 3.3ft* 2.0m / 6.6ft
1.0m* / 3.3ft* 2.0m / 6.6ft
* The maximum flash-to-subject distance when using
Program/Maxxum Flash 3600HS (D) is 3.5m (11.5ft) at ƒ/4.0 and
2.5m (8.2ft) at ƒ/5.6 with ISO 100 film.
Wireless/Remote flash performs best under subdued light or interior
lighting. Under bright light sources, the flash may not be able to
detect the control signals from the camera’s built-in flash.
When not using off-camera flash units, always turn off the wireless
flash mode; inaccurate flash exposures will result.
62
ADVANCED
OPERATION
DATE IMPRINTING - DATE MODEL
The date or the day and time the picture is taken can be imprinted
in the bottom right corner of a horizontal image. See page 18 to set
camera’s clock and calendar.
1
2
Date imprinting
3
Turn the function dial (1) to the
date position.
While pressing the function button
(2), turn the control dial (3) to
select date imprinting, time
imprinting, or imprinting off. The
date indicator remains on the
data panel to show imprinting is
active.
Time imprinting
Imprinting off
The date format is changed with custom function 15 (p. 64). Three
formats are available: year / month / day, month / day / year, and
day / month / year.
Imprinted data may be difficult to read if the lower-left corner of the
photograph is bright or non-uniform. Do not use the data back when
temperatures are outside the range of 0° to 50°C (32° to 122°F).
Since the date is recorded when the film is advanced to the next
frame, sometimes the last frame of the roll will not have the date
imprinted on it.
63
CUSTOM FUNCTIONS
Custom functions allow camera operations to be changed.
1
Turn the function dial (1) to the
custom-function position (CUST).
2
Turn the control dial (2) to select the
custom function to be changed. See
the following sections for details.
Custom function
Setting
Press and hold the function
button (3) and turn the control
dial (4) to change the customfunction setting displayed in the
frame counter.
Camera Notes
When the function dial is in the
custom-function position, the shutterrelease button is still active and
pictures can be taken. The other
camera buttons are disabled. With the
date model, the shutter-release button
is also active in the date-selection
position.
64
ADVANCED
OPERATION
3
4
Custom function
1
AF/shutter priority
2
Film rewind
3
Film leader at rewind
4
DX memory
5
Shutter lock - no film
6
Lens focus-hold button
7
Program shift
8
AF button
9
AEL button
10 AF illuminator
11 Flash metering
12 Focus area illumination
13 Shutter lock - no lens
14 Shutter lock - back open
15 Date format (Date model)
Setting
1 AF priority
2 Release priority
1 Automatic
2 Manual
1 Wind in
2 Leave out
1 Off
2 On
1 Unlocked
2 Locked
1 Focus hold
2 Continuous AF
3 Depth-of-field preview
1 Off
2 PA (Aperture shift)
3 PS (Shutter-speed shift)
1 Spot focus priority
2 AF-area selection
3 Wide / spot focus area toggle
1 Hold
2 Toggle
1 On
2 Off
1 ADI
2 TTL
1 0.3 sec. focus lock indication
2 0.6 sec. focus lock indication
3 Focus area selection only
1 Locked
2 Unlocked
1 Locked
2 Unlocked
1 Year / month / day
2 Month / day / year
3 Day / month / year
CUSTOM 1 - AF/SHUTTER PRIORITY
Custom function 1 has two settings:
1
AF priority. Shutter will not release until the camera focuses.
2
Shutter-release priority. Shutter releases even if the focus
cannot be confirmed. Use shutter-release priority when
photographing moving subjects. When using the continuousadvance drive mode, the camera does not focus between
exposures.
CUSTOM 2 - FILM REWIND
Custom function 2 has two settings:
1
Automatic. The film is automatically rewound at the end of the
roll.
2
Manual. The manual-rewind button must be pressed at the end
of the roll to initiate rewind (p. 29).
CUSTOM 3 - FILM LEADER
Custom function 3 has two settings:
1
Wind in. The film is completely rewound into
the cartridge.
2
Leave out. The film leader is exposed after
rewind. Turning the camera off during
rewinding allows the film leader to be
rewound into the cartridge by turning the
camera on after the film transport motor has
stopped.
66
ADVANCED
OPERATION
CUSTOM 4 - DX MEMORY
Custom function 4 has two settings:
1
DX Memory Off. The film speed is set automatically to the ISO
of DX-coded film. Non-DX-coded film is set to the ISO of the
previous DX-coded roll.
2
DX Memory On. A change to the ISO setting of a DX-coded film
is saved and applied to other DX-coded rolls with the same film
speed. This is used when a particular film is consistently push or
pull processed. To set film speed manually, see page 58.
CUSTOM 5 - SHUTTER LOCK (FILM)
Custom function 5 has two settings:
1
Unlocked. Shutter can be released even if no film is in the
camera.
2
Locked. Shutter cannot be released with no film in the camera;
0 blinks in the viewfinder and on the data panel as a warning
when the shutter-release button is pressed.
CUSTOM 6 - FOCUS-HOLD BUTTON
For lenses equipped with a focus-hold button. The operation of the
focus hold-button can be customized:
1
Focus Hold. Pressing the focus-hold button on the lens locks the
autofocus.
2
Continuous AF. Pressing and holding the focus-hold button
activates continuous AF. See page 56 for more information on
AF modes.
3
Depth-of-field preview. Pressing the focus-hold button stops
down the lens to the set aperture to view the affect of depth of
field on the image (p. 43).
67
CUSTOM 7 - PROGRAM SHIFT
Program shift allows the aperture and
1
shutter speeds set in full-auto
2
program and program exposure
modes to be changed without
affecting the total exposure. When
program shift is active, the autoflash
flash mode is disabled (p. 24).
Press the shutter-release button
partway down (1) to activate the
exposure system.
When the exposure is displayed, turn
the control dial (2) to change the
aperture
and
shutter
speed
combination.
Custom function 7 has three settings:
1
Off. Autoflash is available.
2
PA. The aperture can be shifted and the shutter speed
automatically compensates to provide the correct exposure.
3
Ps. The shutter speed can be shifted and the aperture
automatically compensates to provide the correct exposure.
Fill flash can be used when program shirt is selected, however the
exposure cannot be shifted. Program shift is canceled when the
flash is raised.
68
ADVANCED
OPERATION
CUSTOM 8 - AF BUTTON
The operation of the AF button can be customized:
1
Spot focus priority. When the AF button is pressed and held, the
spot focus area is active. The local focus areas can be selected
with the control dial. When the AF button is released, the wide
focus area is active. See page 46.
2
Focus area selection. The focus area can be selected between
the wide focus area, the spot focus area, or one of the eight
local-focus areas. Press the AF button and turn the control dial
to select the area. The area remains active when the AF button
is released. The area must be reset manually, or by turning the
mode dial to the full-auto program or subject program positions.
3
Wide / spot focus area toggle. Pressing the AF button switches
between the wide focus area and spot focus area.
The shutter-speed display on the data panel and in the viewfinder
indicates the active focus area when the AF button is pressed.
Wide focus area
69
CUSTOM 9 - AEL BUTTON
This custom function changes the operation of the AE lock button.
Custom function 9 has two settings:
1
Hold. Press and hold the AEL button to lock the exposure, see
page 44.
2
Toggle. Press the AEL button once to lock the exposure. Press
it a second time to cancel the lock. The lock will remain in effect
until canceled even after the exposure.
CUSTOM 10 - AF ILLUMINATOR
The built-in flash is used as an AF Illuminator. When the scene is
too dark for the camera to focus, the built-in flash fires a few short
bursts when the shutter-release button is pressed partway down to
provide the light necessary for the camera to focus.
Pressing the AF button also activates the AF illuminator. The range
of the AF Illuminator is approximately 1 to 5 m ( 3.3 to 16.4 ft.).
When an accessory flash is attached, the flash unit is used as the
AF illuminator in place of the camera’s built-in flash.
The AF illuminator will not fire in continuous AF mode or with flash
cancel. The AF illuminator may not operate with focal lengths of
300mm or longer or with 3x-1x Macro Zoom.
Custom function 10 has two settings:
1
AF Illuminator On.
2
AF Illuminator Off. An attached accessory flash’s AF illuminator
is not canceled.
70
ADVANCED
OPERATION
CUSTOM 11 - FLASH METERING
The metering mode for both the built-in and accessory flash can be
specified:
1
ADI Flash Metering. When the flash fires, ADI or pre-flash TTL
metering will be employed. Flash metering changes according
to the flash unit and lens being used, see below.
ADI (Advanced Distance Integration) metering uses the
distance information from D series lenses in addition to TTL
metering during the exposure. With the 5600HS (D), 3600HS
(D), and 2500 (D) accessory flash units, a pre-flash is also used.
With ADI metering, the exposure system is less influenced by
background conditions or the subject’s reflectance. Pre-flash
TTL uses a pre-flash to determine the reflectance of the scene
as well as controlling the flash output during the exposure.
2
TTL (Through The Lens) Flash Metering. The TTL flash
metering system controls the flash during the exposure
automatically. No pre-flash is used. To use flash or color meters,
or neutral density filters, the flash mode must be set to TTL
metering.
Flash
Camera flash
Program/Maxxum
5600HS (D)*
3600HS (D)*
2500 (D)
Program/Maxxum
5400HS*
Other flash units
D series lens
ADI
Other lenses
TTL
ADI
(with pre-flash)
Pre-flash TTL
Pre-flash TTL
Pre-flash TTL
TTL
TTL
* HSS (High Speed Sync.) must be active. If off, TTL metering is
used.
71
CUSTOM 12 - FOCUS AREA ILLUMINATION
During focus lock, the spot focus area or one of the local focus
areas are illuminated to indicate the focus point. The areas are also
illuminate when selected using the AF button (p. 46). Custom
function 12 has three settings:
1
0.3 second focus lock indication. The active AF area used for
focus is illuminated for 0.3 seconds.
2
0.6 second focus lock indication. The active AF area used for
focus is illuminated for 0.6 seconds.
3
Focus area selection only. The focus areas are only illuminated
when selected using the AF button.
CUSTOM 13 - SHUTTER LOCK (LENS)
Custom function 13 has two settings:
1
Locked. Shutter can only be released when a lens is mounted
on the camera.
2
Unlocked. Shutter can be released when no lens is mounted on
the camera. Use this setting when attaching the camera to a
telescope or microscope.
CUSTOM 14 - SHUTTER LOCK (BACK)
Custom function 14 has two settings:
1
Locked. Shutter can only be released when the back of the
camera is closed.
2
Unlocked. Shutter can be released when the back of the camera
is open.
72
ADVANCED
OPERATION
CUSTOM 15 - DATE FORMAT (DATE MODEL)
The format of the imprinted date can be changed. Custom function
15 has three settings:
1
Year / Month / Day
2
Month / Day / Year
3
Day / Month / Year
CUSTOM FUNCTION RESET
All of the custom functions can be reset to their initial setting, 1.
Custom 15 in the date model is not reset.
With the camera off, turn the function dial to
the custom function position (CUST).
While pressing the function button (1), turn
the camera on; clear (CLr) blinks on the data
panel to confirm the operation. Release the
function button.
1
73
ACCESSORY NOTES
This product is designed to work with accessories manufactured
and distributed by Konica Minolta. Using accessories or
equipment not endorsed by Konica Minolta may result in
unsatisfactory performance or damage to the product and its
accessories.
LENS NOTES
Only Minolta A-mount lenses can be used with this camera. For the
current line of our lenses, contact your Konica Minolta dealer.
This camera is sold by itself or with the following lens:
AF 28-100mm f/3.5-5.6 (D)
Construction
10 elements in 8 groups
Angle of view
75° - 24°
Minimum focus distance
0.48m / 1.6ft
Maximum magnification
0.25X
Minimum aperture
f/22-38
Filter diameter
55mm
66mm (dia.) X 78mm (L)
Dimensions
2.6in. (dia.) X 3.1in. (L)
Weight
240g / 8.5oz.
Specifications are based on the latest information available at the
time of printing and are subject to change without notice.
When the lens is not in use, always attach
the lens cap to protect front element. Press
the tabs on the lens cap to remove or
attach.
74
ACCESSORY NOTES
A lens hood improves image quality by
reducing flare, non-image forming light.
Slide the lens hood onto the bayonet
mount at the end of the lens. Turn the
hood clockwise until it clicks into place.
The hood can be reverse mounted for
storage. The lens cap can be attached
with the hood mounted.
Lens shadowing occurs when the lens or lens hood blocks part of
the output from the built-in flash. Lens shadowing appears as a
semi-circular shadow at the bottom (horizontal pictures) or side
(vertical pictures) of the image. Remove the lens hood before using
the built-in flash.
Lens shadowing may occur with the following lenses at the shorter
focal lengths:
AF
AF
AF
AF
Zoom
Zoom
Zoom
Zoom
28-70mm f/2.8G
17-35mm f/3.5G
28-135mm f/4.0-4.5
28-85mm f/3.5-4.5
The built-in flash can not be used with the following lenses:
AF 300mm f/2.8 Apo G(HS)
AF 600mm f/4.0 Apo G(HS)
AF 300mm f/2.8 Apo G(D)SSM
When using a filter with a filter factor greater than 0, or the focusrange limiter or macro release on certain lenses, the proper
exposure cannot be obtained with ADI or Pre-flash metering. Set
custom function 11 to setting 2 and set the accessory flash to a flash
mode that does not use a pre-flash.
75
ACCESSORY FLASH NOTES
When using an accessory flash, the viewfinder flash signals are the
same for the built-in flash (p. 25). The following flash units are
compatible with this camera:
Program/Maxxum Flash 5600HS (D)
Program/Maxxum Flash 3600HS (D)
Program/Maxxum Flash 2500 (D)
Macro Twin Flash 2400
Macro Ring Flash 1200
Contact your Konica Minolta dealer for information on these
products.
All Minolta i, si, and HS series flash units, and the Vectis SF-1 flash
are compatible with this camera. The Flash Shoe Adapter FS-1100
is required to mount AF series flash units (4000AF, 2800AF,
1800AF, and Macro flash 1200AF). When the FS-1100 is used, the
flash mode is set to fill flash and the AF illuminator is canceled. Xseries flash units and flash units sold by other manufacturers
cannot be used with this camera.
The flash mode of an accessory flash
can be set with the camera.
Press and hold the flash-mode button
(1) and turn the control dial (2) to
select the flash mode. Release the
button to complete the operation. The
flash mode is displayed on the data
panel.
2
The following flash accessories can be used with this camera:
Off-camera Shoe OS-1100
Off-camera Cable OC-1100
PC Terminal Adapter
76
ACCESSORY NOTES
1
HIGH SPEED SYNC. (HSS)
This camera is compatible with the High Speed Sync. (HSS)
function in the Program/Maxxum Flash 5600HS (D), 5400HS, and
3600HS (D). This allows the camera to use its full range of shutter
speeds up to 1/2000 second.
Attach a compatible flash unit to the
camera. Set the flash unit to HSS.
When the shutter speed exceeds 1/90
second, the High Speed Sync.
indicator (H) is displayed on the data
panel and in the viewfinder.
WIRELESS CONTROLLER IR-1N
The camera can be permanently damaged if used with the Wireless
Controller IR-1N.
The information in this manual is relevant for products available at
the time of printing. Contact the nearest authorized Minolta Service
facility to obtain compatibility information for products released after
this date.
77
TROUBLESHOOTING
Contact your nearest Konica Minolta Service Facility if the following
information does not cover the problem or the condition continues.
Problem
Autofocus does not
work when the
shutter-release
button is pressed
partway down.
Cause
A special focusing
situation is
preventing the AF
system from
focusing (p. 22).
Solution
Use focus lock (p.
23) or manual
focus (p. 48).
Camera is set to
manual focus.
Press the AF/MF
button.
Subject is too
close.
Check the lens’
minimum focus
distance.
Focus cannot be
confirmed.
Use focus lock (p.
23) or manual
focus (p. 48).
Camera is attached
to a microscope or
telescope.
Set custom 13 to
setting 2.
Flash fires when
the shutter-release
button is pressed
partway down.
Flash was used as
AF illuminator to
assist the autofocus
system.
To turn off the AF
illuminator, set the
flash mode to flash
cancel or custom
10 to setting 2.
Picture is blurred.
Flash did not fire in
a low-light situation
and the shutter
speed was slow.
Use fill flash, a
tripod, or faster
film.
Shutter cannot be
released.
78
TROUBLESHOOTING
Flash picture is too
dark.
Subject is beyond
flash range.
Make sure the
subject is within the
flash range.
When using the
built-in flash, the
bottom of the
picture is dark.
Lens hood was
attached or subject
distance was less
than 1m (3.3ft).
Remove the lens
hood. To prevent
lens shadowing, the
subject must be at
least 1m (3.3ft.)
from the camera.
Err appears on the
data panel.
Remove the batteries. Reinsert them after
turning the camera off and on. If normal
camera operation does not resume or the
camera malfunctions repeatedly, contact an
authorized Konica Minolta service facility.
CAUTION: if the film was not rewound, opening the back cover with
this method will fog the film; use a film changing bag, completely
dark room, or place the camera under a thick blanket.
To remove the film from the camera in case of a malfunction, use
the following procedure:
1. Turn the camera off.
2. Turn the function dial to the ISO position.
3. While pressing the function button and AEL button, turn the
camera on. The film transport motor will activate for a second to
release the film-chamber lock. The back cover can be opened.
When the camera is open, gently pull the film off the take-up
spool and rewind it back into the cartridge.
Contact an authorized Konica Minolta service facility.
79
CARE AND STORAGE
OPERATING CONDITIONS
• This camera is designed for use from -20° to 50°C (4 to 122 °F).
• Never leave your camera where it may be subjected to extreme
temperatures such as in the glove compartment of a car.
• The data panel response time will be slow at cold temperatures.
The display will temporarily darken at high temperatures, but will
be restored when the temperature normalizes.
• This camera is not waterproof or splashproof. When using the
camera in the rain, protect the camera and lens.
• Never subject the camera to extreme humidity.
• To prevent condensation from forming, place the camera in a
sealed plastic bag when bringing it from cold environment to a
warm one. Allow it to come to room temperature before removing
it from the bag.
• The low-battery indicator may appear even with fresh batteries
depending on the storage conditions. To restore camera power,
turn the camera on and off several times.
• Battery capacity decreases at colder temperatures. Keep your
camera and spare batteries in a warm inside pocket when
shooting in cold weather. Batteries will regain some of their
capacity when warmed to normal operating temperature.
STORAGE
When storing your camera for extended periods:
• Always attach the protective caps.
• Store in a cool, dry, and well-ventilated area away from dust and
chemicals such as moth balls. For long periods, place the camera
in an airtight container with a silica gel drying agent.
• Periodically release the camera’s shutter to keep it operating
properly.
• Before using the camera after prolonged storage, check that it is
operating properly.
80
CARE AND
STORAGE
CLEANING
• If the camera or lens barrel is dirty, wipe it gently with a soft, clean,
dry cloth. If the camera or lens comes in contact with sand, gently
blow away loose particles - wiping may scratch the surface.
• To clean the lens surface, first brush away any dust or sand then
gently wipe the lens with a cloth or tissue designed for optics. Use
lens cleaning fluid if necessary.
• Never place lens fluid directly on the lens.
• Never touch the interior of the camera, especially the shutter and
mirror, doing so may impair their alignment and movement.
• Dust on the mirror will not affect the exposure but may affect the
focus. Use a blower brush to remove dust from or around the
mirror.
• Never use compressed air to clean the camera’s interior; it may
damage sensitive internal components.
• Never use organic solvents to clean the camera.
• Never touch the lens surface with your fingers.
BEFORE IMPORTANT EVENTS
• Check the camera’s operation carefully, or take test photographs
before an event or journey.
• Konica Minolta is not responsible for any loss that may occur due
to an equipment malfunction.
QUESTIONS AND SERVICE
• If you have questions about your camera, contact your local
camera dealer or write to the Konica Minolta distributor in your
area.
• Before shipping your camera for repair, please contact an
authorized Konica Minolta service facility for instructions.
81
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Camera type:
Lens mount:
Viewfinder:
Shutter type:
Shutter speeds:
Flash sync. speed:
Focus system:
AF sensitivity range:
AF illuminator:
AF control:
Exposure modes:
Metering:
Metering cell:
Metering range:
Film-speed setting:
82
APPENDIX
35mm
SLR
with
built-in
flash,
autoexposure, and action predictive
autofocus.
Minolta A-type bayonet mount
SLR roof mirror type, 90% field of view.
Magnification: 0.7X
Electronically-controlled, vertical-traverse,
focal-plane type.
30 - 1/2000s, bulb
1/90s
TTL phase-detection system, multi
metering with crosshair type CCD line
sensor metering cell. Autofocus and
manual focus modes.
EV -1 to18 (ISO 100)
Built-in with range of 1.0 - 5.0m (3.3 - 16.4
ft.). Automatically activated in low-light and
low-contrast situations.
Single-shot, continuous, automatic AFmode selection, and DMF.
P, PA, Ps, A, S, M, and 5 Subject Program
modes (Portrait, Landscape, Close-up,
Sports, Night Portrait)
TTL metering, direct TTL flash metering.
14-segment honeycomb-pattern SPC for
ambient light and 4-segment flashmetering SPC for flash.
14-segment metering: EV 1 - 20,
Spot metering: EV 4 - 20
(ISO 100, f/1.4 lens)
Automatic: ISO 25 - 5000 (DX-coded film)
Manual: ISO 6 - 6400 in 1/3 Ev
increments.
Flash: ISO 25 - 1000.
Film loading:
Rewind:
Frame counter:
Flash guide number:
Flash coverage:
Power source:
Battery performance:
Flash use
0%
50%
100%
Auto load
Auto and manual rewind.
Shows number of exposures taken.
16 (ISO 100 in meters)
52 (ISO 100 in feet)
28mm focal length lens.
Two CR2 lithium batteries
Condition A
20°C/68°F -10°C/14°F
30 rolls
24 rolls
14 rolls
11 rolls
9 rolls
7 rolls
Condition B
20°C/68°F -10°C/14°F
45 rolls
35 rolls
18 rolls
14 rolls
11 rolls
9 rolls
Based on 24 exposure rolls taken at a rate of two rolls per month.
Battery performance varies with conditions.
Condition A: Minolta 28-100 f/3.5-5.6 lens focused from infinity to
2m (6.6 ft.) three times and the shutter-release button held partway
down for ten seconds before each exposure.
Condition B: Minolta 28-100 f/3.5-5.6 lens focused from infinity to
2m (6.6 ft.) and the shutter-release button held partway down for
five seconds before each exposure.
Dimensions:
Weight :
135.0 (W) x 92.0 (H) x 66.5 (D) mm
5.3 (W) x 3.6 (H) x 2.6 (D) in.
375g (13.2oz) without camera battery.
Specifications and accessories are based on the latest information
available at the time of printing and are subject to change without
notice.
83
© 2004 Konica Minolta Photo Imaging, Inc. under the
Berne Convention and the Universal Copyright Convention.
9222-2166-11 NI-B403
Printed in China
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