Qualcomm | GSP-1620 | Product specifications | Qualcomm GSP-1620 Product specifications

Qualcomm GSP-1620 Product specifications
This manual is based on the
GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem.
Software or hardware changes may
have occurred after this printing.
QUALCOMM reserves the right to make changes in
hardware, software, and technical and product specifications
without prior notice.
QUALCOMM Incorporated
5775 Morehouse Drive
San Diego, CA. 92121-1714
U.S.A.
Copyright © 2001 QUALCOMM Incorporated.
All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America.
This technology is controlled by the United States Government. Diversion contrary to U.S.
law prohibited.
QUALCOMM® is a registered trademark of QUALCOMM Incorporated.
Globalstar is a trademark of Loral QUALCOMM Satellite Services, Inc.
QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem Integrator’s Reference Manual
80-99208-1, Rev. D
April 17, 2001
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Who Should Use This Manual .................................................................. xvii
How This Manual Is Organized............................................................... xviii
Notational Conventions ............................................................................. xix
Abbreviations and Acronyms...................................................................... xx
Related Documentation............................................................................ xxiii
Cautions and Warnings ........................................................................... xxiv
Getting Started ........................................................................................1-1
GSP-1620 Modem Overview ...................................................................... 1-2
Typical Modem SCADA Applications ......................................1-3
Conceptual Overview ................................................................1-6
What’s in the Modem Integrator’s Kit? ..................................................... 1-7
What You May Need in Addition to the Kit ............................1-9
Quick Bench Set-Up ...............................................................................2-1
Connecting Hardware Components........................................................... 2-2
A Quick Tour of the Modem .....................................................2-2
Connecting the Modem Cables .................................................2-4
Connecting the Modem Interface Cable ............................2-4
Connecting Antenna Cables ...............................................2-6
Connecting the Diagnostic Cable .......................................2-7
Connecting and Mounting the Antenna ..................................2-9
Mounting the Modem .............................................................2-11
Grounding the System ............................................................2-11
Providing Power to the Modem ............................................................... 2-12
Setting Up HyperTerminal to Talk to the Modem ................................. 2-15
Testing the Modem Setup ......................................................2-16
Resetting or Powering Off the Modem ..................................2-18
Where to Go Next ..................................................................................... 2-20
80-99208-1 Rev. D
iii
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Service-Programming Modems ...........................................................3-1
UTPST Overview........................................................................................ 3-2
Using the UTPST ....................................................................................... 3-2
Re-programming Default Parameters....................................................... 3-4
Bulk-Programming Modems...................................................................... 3-7
Upgrading Modem Software...................................................................... 3-7
Making Simple Data Calls ....................................................................4-1
Checking Modem Status ............................................................................ 4-1
Making Simple Packet Data Calls ............................................................ 4-3
Making a Call from the Data Port ...........................................4-4
Entering Online-Command Mode ............................................4-5
Developing Modem Applications ........................................................5-1
Recommended Development Tools ............................................................ 5-2
SCADA Application Components .............................................................. 5-2
Packet/Asynchronous Data Overview ....................................................... 5-4
Modem Application Scenarios ................................................................... 5-5
Working with Modem Features ................................................................. 5-7
Using Data and Control Ports .................................................5-7
Data and Control Port Configurations ..............................5-8
Port Arbitration Behavior ..................................................5-9
AT Command Processing Modes ......................................5-12
Port(s) Affected by AT Commands ...................................5-13
Port Activation (DTR) Changes during Operation .........5-15
Port Use During Power On and Power Off ......................5-16
Globalstar Satellite Service ...................................................5-16
Short Messaging Service (SMS) .............................................5-17
SMS Alerts ........................................................................5-17
SMS Message Field Information ......................................5-18
SMS AT Commands ..........................................................5-18
Using SMS for Mobile-Terminated Calls ........................5-18
Globalstar Service Alerts .......................................................5-19
Service Status Message ..........................................................5-20
Position Location Determination ...........................................5-21
Using Packet Data ................................................................................... 5-21
Data Rate and Throughput ....................................................5-22
Networking Software and PPP Sessions ...............................5-22
Interoperability with Different Operating Systems .......5-22
iv
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Table of Contents
IP Addressing for the GSP-1620 Modem ...............................5-23
Dynamic IP Addressing ....................................................5-23
Fixed IP Addressing .........................................................5-24
Finding IP Addresses ........................................................5-24
Virtual Private Network Service .....................................5-24
Dormant Mode Service ...........................................................5-25
Mobile-Originated Packet Data Calls ....................................5-27
Mobile-Terminated Packet Data Calls ..................................5-27
Answering Calls Using the Data Port Only ....................5-28
Answering Calls Using the Data and Control Ports .......5-29
Roaming and Packet Data Service ........................................5-29
Using Asynchronous Data ....................................................................... 5-30
Data Rate and Throughput ....................................................5-32
Mobile-Originated Asynchronous Data Calls ........................5-32
Mobile-Terminated Asynchronous Data Calls ......................5-33
Accessing Packet Data Over an Asynchronous
Connection ...............................................................................5-34
Roaming and Asynchronous Data Service ............................5-35
Typical Modem Initialization Strings ..................................................... 5-36
AT Command Reference ........................................................................6-1
AT Command Quick Reference Tables...................................................... 6-2
AT Commands Overview ........................................................................... 6-7
Command Alphabet ..................................................................6-7
Case Sensitivity ........................................................................6-7
Command Line Format ............................................................6-7
Command Syntax .....................................................................6-8
Basic AT Commands .................................................................................. 6-8
Results Returned ......................................................................6-9
Command Echo (E) ...................................................................6-9
Get Info (I) .................................................................................6-9
Monitor Speaker Loudness (L) ...............................................6-10
Monitor Speaker Mode (M) ....................................................6-11
Select Pulse Dialing (P) ..........................................................6-11
Result Code Suppression (Q) ..................................................6-12
Select Tone Dialing (T) ...........................................................6-13
DCE Response Format (V) .....................................................6-13
Result Code Selection Command (X) .....................................6-14
Reset to Default Configuration (Z) ........................................6-15
80-99208-1 Rev. D
v
Integrator’s Reference Manual
DCE Received Line Signal Detector Behavior (&C) .............6-16
DTE Data Terminal Ready Behavior (&D) ...........................6-16
Set to Factory-Defined Configuration (&F) ...........................6-17
Basic Action Commands .......................................................................... 6-18
Answer Incoming Call (A) ......................................................6-18
Repeat Last Command (A/) ....................................................6-19
Dial (D) ....................................................................................6-20
Hook Control (H) ....................................................................6-22
Return to Online Data Mode (O) ...........................................6-23
Basic S-Registers...................................................................................... 6-24
Results Returned ....................................................................6-24
Automatic Answer (S0) ...........................................................6-25
Command Line Termination Character (S3) ........................6-25
Response Formatting Character (S4) ....................................6-26
Command Line Editing Character (S5) .................................6-27
Pause Before Blind Dialing Time (S6) ...................................6-27
Connection Completion Timeout (S7) ....................................6-28
Comma Dial Modifier Time (S8) ............................................6-29
Carrier Detect Threshold Timeout (S9) .................................6-29
Carrier Loss to Disconnect Timeout (S10) ............................6-30
DTMF Tone Duration and Spacing (S11) ..............................6-31
Globalstar-Specific S-Register Extensions.............................................. 6-31
Silent Retry Timeout (S777) ..................................................6-31
Extended Configuration AT Commands ................................................. 6-32
Set Forward MUX Option (+CMUX) .....................................6-32
Set Rm Interface Protocol (+CRM) ........................................6-33
Get Modem User Terminal ESN (+GSN) ..............................6-34
Set Character Framing (+ICF) ..............................................6-35
Set Local Flow Control (+IFC) ...............................................6-36
Set Rm Interface Command Baud Rate (+IPR) ....................6-38
Online-Command Mode Commands........................................................ 6-40
Change from Online to Online-Command Mode (+++) .........6-40
Asynchronous Data through Gateway IWF Commands ........................ 6-41
Set Remote Config String (+CFG) .........................................6-41
Data Compression Control Command (+DS) ........................6-42
Error Control Selection Command (+ES) ..............................6-45
Modulation Selection Command (+MS) .................................6-47
vi
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Table of Contents
Dormant Mode Commands ...................................................................... 6-48
Set Dormant Mode Timeout Value (+CTA) ...........................6-49
Packet No Dial ($QCPKND) ..................................................6-50
SMS Commands ....................................................................................... 6-51
SMS Move/Delete ($QCSMSM) ..............................................6-51
SMS Print ($QCSMSP) ..........................................................6-52
SMS Lock ($QCSMSL) ...........................................................6-56
SMS Alert ($QCSMSA) ..........................................................6-57
SMS Info ($QCSMSI) .............................................................6-58
Error Log Services Commands ................................................................ 6-59
Retrieve Error Log ($QCERR) ...............................................6-59
Clear Error Log ($QCCLR) ....................................................6-60
Service Status Commands ....................................................................... 6-61
Service Alert ($QCSA) ............................................................6-61
Service Status ($QCSTATUS) ................................................6-62
Special Calls and Services Commands.................................................... 6-64
Time of Day ($QCTOD) ..........................................................6-64
Position Location Service ($QCPLS) .....................................6-66
Markov Statistics ($QCMSTATS) ..........................................6-68
Set Mode ($QCMODE) ...........................................................6-69
Protocol Stack Modification Commands ................................................. 6-70
TCP Stack Changes ($QCTCP) ..............................................6-70
Use Van Jacobsen Header Compression ($QCVJ) ................6-73
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems
into OEM Products .................................................................................7-1
Integrating Modems into Products............................................................ 7-2
Modem Mechanical Description ...............................................7-3
Modem Board Layout .........................................................7-3
Modem Dimensions and Weight ........................................7-6
Modem Antenna Connectors ....................................................7-6
Data and Control Ports ............................................................7-6
DTR/DSR Signal and Power On/Off ..................................7-7
Changing Data and Control Port Configuration ...............7-8
Control Port Signals ...........................................................7-8
Data Port Signals ................................................................7-9
DB-25 Data and Control Port Pinouts ...............................7-9
Diagnostic Port .......................................................................7-12
Diagnostic Port Pinouts ....................................................7-13
80-99208-1 Rev. D
vii
Integrator’s Reference Manual
DC Power ................................................................................7-15
Surge Protection ...............................................................7-16
EMI Filtering ....................................................................7-16
Power Consumption ..........................................................7-16
Power-On ...........................................................................7-17
Power-Off ..........................................................................7-18
Hard Power Reset .............................................................7-18
Grounding ...............................................................................7-18
Modem Mounting Guidelines .................................................7-19
QUALCOMM Mark on OEM Enclosures ........................7-20
Integrated Product Regulatory Labeling .........................7-21
Mounting Antennas On-Site.................................................................... 7-22
Modem Antenna Specifications ..............................................7-22
Antenna Dimensions and Weight ....................................7-23
Antenna Depiction ............................................................7-23
Antenna Cable Specifications ................................................7-25
Calculating Antenna Cable Length .......................................7-27
Mounting Antennas at the Field Site ....................................7-27
Finding a Good Antenna Location ...................................7-27
Securing Antenna Cables .................................................7-28
Mounting and Sealing Antennas on Flat Surfaces .........7-28
Mounting and Sealing Antennas on Poles ......................7-29
Mounting Multiple Antennas ...........................................7-29
Environmental Specifications.................................................................. 7-30
GSP-1620 Modem Environments ...........................................7-30
Temperature/Humidity ..........................................................7-30
Operational .......................................................................7-30
Non-Operational ...............................................................7-30
Thermal Radiation .................................................................7-31
Altitude ...................................................................................7-32
Operational .......................................................................7-32
Non-operational ................................................................7-32
Vibration .................................................................................7-32
Operational - Random ......................................................7-32
Non-Operational - Random ..............................................7-32
Operational - Sinusoidal ...................................................7-32
Non-Operational - Sinusoidal ..........................................7-32
viii
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Table of Contents
Mechanical Shock ...................................................................7-34
Operational .......................................................................7-34
Non-Operational ...............................................................7-34
Acoustic Noise .........................................................................7-34
Digital Data Connector Durability ........................................7-34
Applied Forces ...................................................................7-34
Mating cycles .....................................................................7-34
RF Connector Durability ........................................................7-35
Materials .................................................................................7-35
Shipping ..................................................................................7-35
Dielectric Resonator Antenna (DRA) Environments.............................. 7-35
Temperature/Humidity ..........................................................7-35
Operational .......................................................................7-35
Non-Operational ...............................................................7-36
Thermal Radiation ..................................................................7-36
Icing/Freezing Rain/Snow ......................................................7-37
Altitude ....................................................................................7-37
Operational .......................................................................7-37
Non-Operational ...............................................................7-37
Vibration .................................................................................7-37
Operational - Random ......................................................7-37
Non-Operational - Random ..............................................7-37
Mechanical Shock ...................................................................7-38
Operational .......................................................................7-38
Non-Operational ...............................................................7-38
RF Connector Durability ........................................................7-39
Materials .................................................................................7-39
Shipping ..................................................................................7-39
Troubleshooting ......................................................................................8-1
Globalstar Background ........................................................................ A-1
Space Segment........................................................................................... A-2
Ground Segment........................................................................................ A-2
Coverage .................................................................................................... A-2
Carriers ...................................................................................................... A-4
Distributors and OEMs for User Terminals ............................................ A-5
80-99208-1 Rev. D
ix
Integrator’s Reference Manual
RF Certification/Restrictions .............................................................B-1
Certification ............................................................................................... B-1
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) ........................ B-2
European R&TTE Directive 1999/5/EC .................................. B-2
RF Restrictions .......................................................................................... B-3
Radio Astronomy Zones ........................................................... B-3
GPS Interference Elimination ................................................ B-3
Radio Frequency Exposure Restrictions .................................................. B-3
Electronic Device Restrictions .................................................................. B-4
Pacemakers .............................................................................. B-4
Hearing Aids ............................................................................ B-5
Other Medical Devices ............................................................. B-5
Warranty .................................................................................................. C-1
Product Support ....................................................................................D-1
QUALCOMM Globalstar Customer Service ............................................ D-1
Technical Support Information ............................................... D-1
Order Fulfillment Information ............................................... D-2
Website Information ................................................................ D-3
Contacting QUALCOMM Customer Service .......................... D-3
Contact information ........................................................... D-4
Specification Summary ........................................................................ E-1
x
80-99208-1 Rev. D
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1-1.
Typical Modem SCADA Application Using
Packet Data ...................................................................1-4
Figure 1-2.
Typical Modem SCADA Application Using
Asynchronous Data .......................................................1-5
Figure 1-3.
Conceptual Diagram of GSP-1620 Modem ..................1-6
Figure 2-1.
Simplified Top View of GSP-1620 Modem ...................2-3
Figure 2-2.
Modem Interface Cable Bridle .....................................2-4
Figure 2-3.
Modem Diagnostic Cable ..............................................2-8
Figure 2-4.
Antenna Base Showing Connectors ...........................2-10
Figure 5-1.
DCE - DTE Application Components ...........................5-3
Figure 5-2.
DTE-to-DCE Rm Interface ...........................................5-7
Figure 5-3.
Asynchronous Data Call Components .......................5-31
Figure 7-1.
GSP-1620 Modem Board Layout (Top View) ...............7-4
Figure 7-2.
GSP-1620 Modem Board Layout
(Side/ Bottom Views) .....................................................7-5
Figure 7-3.
QUALCOMM Mark for OEM Enclosures ..................7-21
Figure 7-4.
DRA Side View ............................................................7-22
Figure 7-5.
DRA View Showing Connectors .................................7-23
Figure 7-6.
DRA Top and Side Views ............................................7-24
Figure 7-7.
DRA Bottom View and Mounting Hole Locations .....7-25
Figure 7-8.
GSP-1620 Modem Temperature/Humidity
Envelope ......................................................................7-31
Figure 7-9.
GSP-1620 Modem Random Vibration Spectra ...........7-33
Figure 7-10. DRA Temperature/Humidity Envelope .....................7-36
Figure 7-11. DRA Random Vibration Spectrum .............................7-38
Figure A-1. Globalstar Coverage Availability ................................ A-3
80-99208-1 Rev. D
xi
Integrator’s Reference Manual
xii
80-99208-1 Rev. D
LIST OF TABLES
Table 1-1.
Table 1-2.
Table 2-1.
Table 3-1.
Table 3-2.
Table 5-1.
Table 5-2.
Table 5-3.
Table 5-4.
Table 5-5.
Table 6-1.
Table 6-2.
Table 6-3.
Table 6-4.
Table 6-5.
Table 6-6.
Table 6-7.
Table 7-1.
Table 7-2.
Table 7-3.
Table 7-4.
Table 7-5.
Table 8-1.
Table E-1.
Table E-2.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Typical GSP-1620 Modem Applications ......................1-3
Checklist of Modem Integrator’s Kit Components ......1-8
DTR Switch Positions ...................................................2-8
Service Programming Parameters You Must Set ......3-5
Bulk Service-Programming Options ............................3-7
Packet vs. Asynchronous Data ...................................5-4
Port Signal Lines ..........................................................5-8
Port Arbitration Behavior .........................................5-10
Port(s) Affected by AT Commands ............................5-14
Sample Typical Modem Initialization Strings .........5-36
Operational AT Commands .........................................6-2
Non-Operational AT Commands .................................6-6
Result Codes for Basic AT Parameter Commands ......6-9
Common Result Codes for S-Register Commands ....6-24
SMS Print Command Field Definitions ....................6-54
SMS Info Command Field Definitions ......................6-59
Modem Status Information .......................................6-63
Interface Connector Pinouts ......................................7-10
Diagnostic Port Pinouts .............................................7-14
Modem DC Power Consumption Estimates
at 12 V DC Input .........................................................7-17
Suggested RF Cable and Connector Suppliers ..........7-26
Swept Sine Vibration Definition ...............................7-33
Troubleshooting Modem Problems ..............................8-1
Specification Summary — GSP-1620 Modem .......... E-1
Specification Summary — Dielectric Resonator
Antenna (DRA) ............................................................ E-3
xiii
Integrator’s Reference Manual
xiv
80-99208-1 Rev. D
REVISION HISTORY
Version
Release Date
Notes
Rev. A
August 23, 2000
First Production Release
Rev. B
October 13, 2000
Revised hardware specifications
Rev. C
January 25, 2001
Release to accompany GSP-1620 modem software
version 5.2:
■
■
■
■
■
Rev. D
April 17, 2001
Updates and corrections:
■
■
■
■
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Changed modem name and manual title
(removed “packet”)
Added information about asynchronous data,
especially in Chapters 5 and 6
Revised Diagnostic cable graphic and
procedures in Chapter 2
Revised Customer Service information in
Appendix D
Added antenna specifications to Appendix E
Revised some AT command descriptions or
parameter values in Chapter 6
Added pinout information for Diagnostic port
in Chapter 7
Added references to the Modem Operation
Monitor in Chapters 2 and 6
Applied new document layout design
xv
Integrator’s Reference Manual
xvi
80-99208-1 Rev. D
ABOUT THIS MANUAL
This QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data
Modem Integrator’s Reference Manual, also referred to as the
Integrator’s Reference Manual, provides the information
needed to install and use the QUALCOMM Globalstar
GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem, also referred to as the
GSP-1620 modem in this document.
Who Should Use This Manual
This manual is intended for the following users:
•
People who set up the modem from the Modem
Integrator’s Kit on a bench for development and testing
•
Application developers who create software applications
that work with the GSP-1620 modem
•
Developers and OEMs who service-program modems to
make them work with Globalstar Service Providers
•
OEMs or system integrators who incorporate GSP-1620
modem hardware into commercial products (for example,
oil pipeline monitors)
•
OEM field technicians who install those products on site
Getting Started on page 1-1 includes a roadmap pointing
different users to relevant sections in this manual.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
xvii
Integrator’s Reference Manual
How This Manual Is Organized
This following table summarizes how information is
organized in this manual.
xviii
Chapter
Description
Chapter 1. Getting Started
Introduction to the GSP-1620 modem and
the Modem Integrator’s Kit.
Chapter 2.
Quick Bench Set-Up
Quick instructions for connecting and
powering up the modem and sending
commands via HyperTerminal.
Chapter 3.
Service-Programming Modems
Coordinating with Service Providers and
re-programming default modem
parameters.
Chapter 4.
Making Simple Data Calls
Quick tutorial on setting up a PC for
packet data, making mobile-originated
packet data calls, and using modem ports.
Chapter 5.
Developing Modem Applications
Developing software applications that
work with modem features.
Chapter 6.
AT Command Reference
Developer’s reference for AT commands,
syntax, and values.
Chapter 7.
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems
into OEM Products
Hardware descriptions of the modem and
antenna, mounting guidelines, and
environmental specifications.
Chapter 8. Troubleshooting
Suggested solutions for modem problems.
Appendix A.
Globalstar Background
Globalstar space and ground segments,
coverage and carriers.
Appendix B.
RF Certification/ Restrictions
Certification compliance and RF
restrictions for the modem and antenna.
Appendix C. Warranty
QUALCOMM warranty information for
the GSP-1620 modem.
Appendix D. Product Support
How to contact QUALCOMM Globalstar
Customer Service.
Appendix E.
Specification Summary
Quick reference list of hardware
specifications for the GSP-1620 modem
and antenna.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
About This Manual
Notational Conventions
The following table shows the notational conventions that
convey specific types of information in this manual.
Convention
Description
Commands, parameters,
values, filenames,
directory locations
Items shown in courier typeface
indicate commands, parameters,
filenames, and directory locations.
<Non-literal elements>
Items shown within angle brackets
and <courier> indicate non-literal
elements for which you type a
substitute.
Menu items and buttons
Menu items, commands, and buttons
appear in bold sans serif.
Dialog box and window titles
Dialog box and window titles appear in
bold sans serif.
Book titles and section references
Book titles and section references
appear in italics.
Steps
1
2
3
Note
Tip
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Tip
This symbol identifies “how-to”
procedure. Follow these steps to
accomplish a specific task.
This symbol identifies related
information that deserves emphasis.
This symbol identifies a shortcut or
information that you might find
handy.
Caution
This symbol identifies a potentially
hazardous situation which, if not
avoided, could damage equipment or
property.
Warning
This symbol and bold text identify
potential danger, which, if not
avoided, could cause serious injury or
death.
xix
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Abbreviations and Acronyms
xx
AC
Alternating Current
API
Application Programming Interface
AT
Attention
CCA
Circuit Card Assemblies
CDMA
Code Division Multiple Access
CDR
Call Detail Record
CD-ROM
Compact Disc Read-Only Memory
CE
Community European
CFR
Code of Federal Rules
CP
Control Port
CTS
Clear To Send
DC
Direct Current
DCD
Data Carrier Detect
DCE
Data Communications Equipment
DM
Diagnostic Monitor
DN
Directory Number
DNI
Do Not Install
DNS
Domain Name Server
DP
Data Port
DRA
Dielectric Resonator Antenna (see ODU)
DSR
Data Set Ready
DTE
Data Terminating Equipment
DTR
Data Terminal Ready
EIRP
Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power
ESD
Electrostatic Discharge
ESN
Electronic Serial Number
FAX
Facsimile
FCC
Federal Communications Commission
80-99208-1 Rev. D
About This Manual
80-99208-1 Rev. D
FDX
Full-Duplex
GAI
Globalstar Air Interface
GEO
geostationary-Earth-orbit
GLP
Globalstar Limited Partnership
GMT
Greenwich Mean Time
GND
Ground or Signal Common
GPS
Global Positioning System
GW
Gateway
IMSI
International Mobile Subscriber Identity
IP
Internet Protocol
ISP
Internet Service Provider
IWF
Interworking Function (Gateway)
LCD
Liquid Crystal Display
LEO
low-Earth-orbit
LNA
Low Noise Amplifier
MCC
Mobile Country Code
MCX
Miniature Coaxial Connector
MEO
medium-Earth-orbit
MIK
Modem Integrator’s Kit
MNC
Mobile Network Code
MPE
Maximum Permissible Exposure
MSIN
Mobile Station Identification Number
MSS
Mobile Satellite System
NAM
Number Assignment Module
ODU
Outdoor Unit (see DRA)
OEM
Original Equipment Manufacturer
OSPL
Overall Sound Pressure Level
PC
Personal Computer
PDF
Portable Document File
PDT
Pacific Daylight Time
xxi
Integrator’s Reference Manual
xxii
PLS
Position Location Service
POS
Point of Sale; or Position
PPP
Point-to-Point Protocol
PST
Pacific Standard Time
PSTN
Public Switched Telephone Network
PT
Pacific Time
QA
Quality Assurance
RF
Radio Frequency
RFR
Ready For Receive
RI
Ring Indicator
RLSD
Received Line Signal Detector
RMA
Return Material Authorization
RSSI
Received Signal Strength Indicator
RTS
Ready To Send
RTU
Remote Termination Unit
RX
Receive
RX D
Receive Data
SCADA
Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition
SLIP
Serial Line Internet Protocol
SMA
Subminiature type “A” Connector
SMS
Short Messaging Service
SMT
Surface Mount Technology
SP
Service Provider
SPC
Service Programming Code
TCP
Transmission Control Protocol
TCXO
Temperature Compensated Crystal
Oscillator
TSS
Technical Support Specialist
TTL
Transistor Transistor Logic
TX
Transmit
80-99208-1 Rev. D
About This Manual
TXD
Transmit Data
UCT
Universal Coordinated Time
URL
Uniform Resource Locator
UT
User Terminal
UTC
Universal Time Coordinated
UTPST
User Terminal Program Support Tool
VPN
Virtual Private Network
VSWR
Voltage Standing Wave Ratio
Related Documentation
Globalstar UT Program Support Tool User’s Guide,
80-98225-1.
Globalstar User Terminal Service Programming Guide,
80-98482-1.
Globalstar UTPST Script API Reference Manual, 80-99114-1.
QUALCOMM Globalstar Data User Guide, 80-99126-1.
QUALCOMM Globalstar Modem Operation Monitor User’s
Guide, 80-99399-1.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
xxiii
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Cautions and Warnings
xxiv
Warning
Before working with the modem hardware or power connections,
remove rings, watches, and other metallic objects that could cause
electrical shock or burns.
Caution
Use proper electrostatic discharge (ESD) equipment and procedures to
avoid damage to the modem.
Caution
Any changes or modifications to this equipment not expressly approved
in this document could void your warranty and your authority to operate
this equipment.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
1G
ETTING
STARTED
Welcome to the Integrator’s Reference Manual for the
QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem.
The GSP-1620 modem offers data communication solutions,
particularly for Remote Monitoring and Supervisory Control
and Data Acquisition (SCADA) applications in locations such
as power substations, telecommunication concentration
nodes, oil and gas wells, pipes, and offshore facilities.
Whether you are an application developer, system integrator,
or Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM), this
Integrator’s Reference Manual contains information you need.
If you want to:
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Go to:
■
Bench-set up, connect, and power-up the
GSP-1620 modem in the Modem
Integrator’s Kit, and get HyperTerminal
to talk to the modem
Chapter 2
■
Service-program modems to work with
your Service Provider (SP) and within the
Globalstar system
Chapter 3
■
Set up your computer for packet data and
make a simple packet data call
Chapter 4
■
Develop market-specific application
software to work with the GSP-1620
modem (using packet data or
asynchronous data)
Chapter 5
■
Understand modem AT commands
Chapter 6
■
Mount GSP-1620 modems and antennas
for market-specific OEM products
(including all hardware and
environmental specifications)
Chapter 7
■
Troubleshoot modem problems
Chapter 8
1-1
Integrator’s Reference Manual
GSP-1620 Modem Overview
The QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data
Modem delivers reliable digital data communications
wherever Globalstar data service is available, using
QUALCOMM’s patented CDMA technology and the
Globalstar Communications System’s constellation of 48
low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellites.
The GSP-1620 modem handles two kinds of data connections:
Tip
•
Packet — over the Internet or other TCP/IP
packet-switched network
•
Asynchronous — routed through the Public Switched
Telephone Network (PSTN) to a destination modem
QUALCOMM Globalstar packet data service has a lower overhead and
faster connection time than asynchronous data does. If a SCADA
application does not specifically need asynchronous data, it should use
packet data instead.
As an OEM, you directly integrate the GSP-1620 modem into
a market-specific product, to resell to a business/industrial
customer.
Note
1-2
For additional information about the Globalstar system, see Globalstar
Background, page A-1. For information about buying bulk modems from
QUALCOMM, contact QUALCOMM Globalstar Customer Service as
described in Appendix D.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Getting Started
Typical Modem SCADA Applications
In remote settings or difficult-to-access sites, acquiring and
responding to process control and alarm data can be
challenging and costly. For both system integrators and
OEMs, the QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data
Modem provides real-time, low cost, bi-directional data
communication solution applications in remote locations for
fixed or mobile use.
The GSP-1620 modem lets you retrieve data automatically
from remote sites. Unmanned sensors connected to the
GSP-1620 modem can monitor remote operations and initiate
alert notifications.
Table 1-1 lists some typical Remote Monitoring and
Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA)
applications.
Table 1-1.
Typical GSP-1620 Modem Applications
Electric Utility Industry
Remote Security Systems
Monitoring
Oil and Gas Wells, Tanks,
Pipelines, Offshore Platforms
Energy Management
Water Treatment Plants
Retail Point of Sale (POS)
Transactions
Remote Inventory
Management
Remote Banking
Electronic Billboards
Agriculture
Highway Traffic Monitoring
Aircraft Weather/Messaging
for Commercial and General
Aviation
Figure 1-1 depicts a typical use of the GSP-1620 modem for a
SCADA application using packet data.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
1-3
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Figure 1-1. Typical Modem SCADA Application Using Packet Data
Satellite
Outdoor Antenna
Rx
Tx
Globalstar
Gateway
DCE
Remote
DTE
GSP-1620
Modem
SCADA Terminal
Internet
Data Port
Control Port
Host
Server
For packet data connections, the GSP-1620 modem
essentially functions as a “node” on the Internet and, with its
fixed or dynamically assigned IP address, can be addressed in
real time as often as necessary to maintain application
control over the remote devices.
Figure 1-2 depicts a typical use of the GSP-1620 modem for a
SCADA application using asynchronous data.
1-4
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Getting Started
Figure 1-2. Typical Modem SCADA Application Using
Asynchronous Data
Satellite
Outdoor Antenna
Rx
Tx
Globalstar
Gateway
DCE
Gateway IWF Modem
Remote
DTE
GSP-1620
Modem
SCADA Terminal
PSTN
Host
Server
Data Port
Control Port
Host Modem
For asynchronous data connections, the GSP-1620 modem
can dial or be dialed by a host modem, connecting through the
Globalstar Satellite Communications System and the PSTN.
You can think of the GSP-1620 modem in Figure 1-1 and
Figure 1-2 as a 9600 bps full duplex satellite modem. The
modem uses typical Hayes AT commands (see Chapter 6, AT
Command Reference). Standard RS-232 interfaces facilitate
ease of use and OEM application integration.
For either packet or asynchronous connections, OEMs
provide the host application (server), which uses the
GSP-1620 modem to communicate with a custom SCADA
application on data terminating equipment (DTE) at a remote
site. The host application manages the field processing of
data and reports process exceptions, performance reports,
alarm conditions—in short, any data needed from the
remote site.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
1-5
Integrator’s Reference Manual
For example, in the electric utility industry, a SCADA
application using the GSP-1620 modem could remotely turn
on a pump, close a switch, open a gate, request a new meter
reading, monitor line voltage, or report on power outages.
Conceptual Overview
Figure 1-3 depicts a conceptual overview of the QUALCOMM
Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem, including its
ports and antenna.
Figure 1-3. Conceptual Diagram of GSP-1620 Modem
Outdoor
Antenna
Rx
UT Program Support Tool
(UTPST)
for service programming
Tx
Diagnostic Port
GSP-1620
Modem
Interface Port
Serial Control Port Serial Data Port
Modem AT
commands
Data
or AT
commands
DC Power
5.6V-16V
SCADA Application Terminal
1-6
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Getting Started
The GSP-1620 modem is a bare board “sandwich” stack of
Circuit Card Assemblies (CCA) containing two boards:
•
Globalstar RF board — includes the LNA, RF power amp,
upconverters and downconverters, TCXO, synthesizers,
and the remaining power electronics.
•
Globalstar Digital board — includes the processor, the
modem, and some of the power management electronics.
QUALCOMM offers the GSP-1620 modem without a
mechanical enclosure, anticipating that OEMs will integrate
and package the modem with the end-user’s application.
The GSP-1620 modem operates in the “Globalstar (or
satellite) data mode only,” as opposed to the GSP-1600
Tri-Mode Phone, which has additional terrestrial cellular
(analog and digital) and voice capabilities. The GSP-1620
modem is powered by an external power source provided by
the user.
A weatherproof Dielectric Resonator Antenna (DRA),
sometimes referred to as an Outdoor Unit (ODU), comes with
each modem. OEMs provide antenna cables (SMA to MCX
connectors), to meet customer antenna-cable length needs.
A single DB-25 (male) connector is used for the user interface
port. The DB-25 carries DC power, as well as the Data and
Control RS-232 signals, between the SCADA application
(DTE) and the modem (DCE).
A Diagnostic port on the modem allows network provisioning
(service programming) and software upgrades.
What’s in the Modem Integrator’s Kit?
Your GSP-1620 Modem Integrator’s Kit (MIK) is designed to
help you rapidly develop user applications for GSP-1620
modems.
Table 1-2 shows the items contained in your GSP-1620
Modem Integrator’s Kit (QUALCOMM part number: MCN
65-82317-1).
80-99208-1 Rev. D
1-7
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Table 1-2.
Checklist of Modem Integrator’s Kit Components
Kit Component
QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem
Dielectric Resonating Antenna (DRA)
Pair of antenna cables with connectors (for quick bench
setup of the kit modem)
Custom DB-25 cable bridle, which splits out the DE-9 Data
Port connector, the DE-9 Control Port connector, and the
DC power leads (positive, negative, and reset)
Diagnostic port cable, for service-programming the modem
or to use as alternate power source via its AC adapter
GSP-1620 modem CD-ROM containing the following:
■
■
■
■
Software code samples for modem applications
A “soft copy” (PDF file) of this Integrator’s Reference
Manual
“CDMA by QUALCOMM” logo in an Encapsulated
PostScript (EPS) file
A “soft copy” (PDF file) of the QUALCOMM Globalstar
Data User Guide, 80-99126-1EN, as a guide for the
setup of a Windows modem driver and Windows
Dial-Up Networking.
Globalstar UT Program Support Tool (UTPST), including:
■
■
■
1-8
CD-ROM containing the UTPST software and a “soft
copy” (PDF file) of the Globalstar UTPST Script API
Reference Manual, 80-99114-1
Globalstar UT Program Support Tool User’s Guide,
80-98225-1
Globalstar User Terminal Service Programming
Guide, 80-98482-1
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Getting Started
What You May Need in Addition to the Kit
The Modem Integrator’s Kit should be sufficient for setting
up one modem on a bench for development and testing.
For GSP-1620 modem development purposes (bench setup
and developing modem applications), it is recommended that
you have a Windows PC, because the Modem Integrator’s Kit
CD-ROM contains some Windows code samples.
If necessary, you can power the modem via the AC adapter on
the Diagnostic cable, but you may prefer to use your own DC
power supply. Mounting a bench modem and antenna is
optional, but would require M3 and M4 screws, respectively,
and a screwdriver.
OEMs who are packaging modems into end-user products will
need to supply mounting enclosures and customized cables.
For details, see Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM
Products on page 7-1.
Configuration and setup of computer systems to use the
GSP-1620 modem with Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) is
beyond the scope of this document. However, the
configuration procedures for the QUALCOMM Globalstar
GSP-1600 Tri-Mode Phone are included as a reference in the
QUALCOMM Globalstar Data User Guide, 80-99126-1
(located on the kit’s CD-ROM). For example, using the
procedures in that document, you can set up a Windows
modem driver and Windows Dial-Up Networking. With the
proper DNS addresses from your Service Provider (SP) or
Internet Service Provider (ISP), you can access the Internet
using your GSP-1620 modem via the Globalstar satellite
system.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
1-9
Integrator’s Reference Manual
1-10
80-99208-1 Rev. D
2Q
UICK
BENCH SET-UP
Your GSP-1620 Modem Integrator’s Kit contains a
QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem.
This chapter tells how to quickly set up the GSP-1620 modem
on a test bench so that you can interact with it, including the
following topics:
•
Connecting hardware components as appropriate for a
bench setup
•
Providing power to the modem
•
Setting up HyperTerminal to talk to the modem and
query its status, using modem AT commands
Keep in mind that the quick bench setup shown in this
chapter differs from the setup you might use for developing
applications, integrating modems permanently into OEM
products, or for field installation.
For example, in the quick bench setup, you communicate with
the modem by typing AT commands into HyperTerminal,
whereas a SCADA application will communicate with the
modem using AT commands embedded within its code.
Also, in the quick bench setup, you can use the cables
provided in the kit to connect to the modem ports and
antenna, whereas for a SCADA field installation, OEMs will
make custom cables.
Note
Caution
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Examples in this chapter assume you are connecting a Windows PC to
the modem.
For your safety and to avoid potential damage to the equipment,
observe the Cautions and Warnings on page xxiv.
2-1
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Connecting Hardware Components
The setup process for the GSP-1620 modem includes:
Tip
•
A quick tour of the modem
•
Connecting the modem cables
❑
Connecting the Interface cable (Data port, Control
port, power) to the modem and to your PC
❑
Connecting the antenna cables (Tx, Rx) to the modem
❑
Connecting the Diagnostic cable (if you want to power
the modem from its AC adapter, service-program the
modem, or monitor some modem functions)
•
Connecting and mounting the antenna
•
Mounting the modem (optional)
•
Grounding the system
•
Providing power to the modem
•
Setting up HyperTerminal to talk to the modem and
testing your connection
A Windows PC is recommended for modem bench setup and
application development. Modems must be service programmed using
the Globalstar UT Program Support Tool, which is a Windows software
application.
A Quick Tour of the Modem
For quick bench set-up, first remove the GSP-1620 modem
from the GSP-1620 Modem Integrator’s Kit.
Caution
When handling the modem, observe precautions necessary to avoid
damage by electrostatic discharge (ESD).
Compare the GSP-1620 modem to Figure 2-1. This
illustration shows the connectors and components you will
use in the following sections.
2-2
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Quick Bench Set-Up
Figure 2-1. Simplified Top View of GSP-1620 Modem
Mounting hole
Mounting hole
Receive (Rx) antenna lead
connects here (J7)
Transmit (Tx) antenna lead
connects here (J3)
Diagnostic Port
(Diagnostic cable
connects here for
UTPST, AC power
adapter, or Modem
Operation Monitor)
Mounting hole
Mounting hole
Mounting hole
Mounting
hole
:
Interface Port:
combines Data Port,
Control Port, and DC Power input
(Modem Interface Cable from kit
connects here, or OEMs
make their own custom cables)
80-99208-1 Rev. D
2-3
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Connecting the Modem Cables
For the GSP-1620 modem to work, you must connect several
cables:
•
Modem interface cable — connects the Data port to a PC,
connects the Control port to a PC (optional), and connects
power leads to a DC power supply.
•
Antenna cables — connect the transmit (Tx, J3) and
receive (Rx, J7) leads to the Tx and Rx connectors on the
Dielectric Resonator Antenna.
•
Diagnostic cable — connects the Diagnostic port to a PC
running the Globalstar UT Program Support Tool
(UTPST) for modem service programming, or the
QUALCOMM Globalstar Modem Operation Monitor; can
also be used as an optional, alternate power supply via its
AC adapter.
Connecting the Modem Interface Cable
Your Modem Integrator’s Kit includes a custom DB-25
modem interface cable bridle, which connects to the Interface
port on the modem. The cable bridle splits out the DE-9 Data
Port and DE-9 Control Port, and the DC power connectors
(DC POWER, SIG GND, and RESET), as shown in Figure 2-2.
Figure 2-2. Modem Interface Cable Bridle
Modem Interface Cable
"P2-DATA PORT"
PC serial connector
Modem connector
To PC
"P3-CONTROL"
PC serial connector
To modem
Power connectors:
"SIG GND" (black)
"DC POWER" (red)
"RESET"
(yellow)
To DC power supply
(user-provided)
2-4
Open
(ground to reset)
To PC
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Quick Bench Set-Up
Steps
1
2
3
TO CONNECT THE INTERFACE CABLE TO THE MODEM
■
Connect the DB-25 modem connector on the interface
cable (Figure 2-2) to the interface port on the modem
(Figure 2-1).
Do not connect power yet.
Steps
1
2
3
TO CONNECT THE INTERFACE CABLES TO YOUR PC
1. On the interface cable (Figure 2-2), connect the Data port
connector (labeled “P2-DATA PORT”) to COM 1 or
another available serial COM port on your PC.
The Data port transmits packet (PPP) or asynchronous
data. You can also use it to send AT commands to the
modem. You will see an example of how this works in
Chapter 4.
2. On the interface cable (Figure 2-2), connect the Control
port connector (labeled “P3-CONTROL”) to COM 2 or
another available serial COM port on your PC (or a
different PC, if desired).
You can use the Control port to send AT commands to the
modem, without interrupting data flow on the Data port.
You will see an example of how this works in Chapter 4.
The Control port can also receive SMS messages; for
information, see Short Messaging Service (SMS) on page
5-17.
Note
80-99208-1 Rev. D
If you need to extend the interface cables to reach your PC(s), you can
use straight RS-232 9-pin serial cables (with no crossovers). For
maximum RS-232 extension cable lengths, see the TIA/EIA-232-E
specification.
2-5
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Connecting Antenna Cables
The Modem Integrator’s Kit contains two antenna cables (3
feet long) with snap-in connectors, for connecting the modem
to the Dielectric Resonator Antenna (DRA). The antenna
must be located outdoors.
Due to loss constraints on antenna length (see Calculating
Antenna Cable Length on page 7-27), if you need to extend the
kit cables to reach your antenna, it is more practical to locate
the modem closer to the antenna and extend the modem’s
serial cables instead. For a tip on how to do this, see
Connecting and Mounting the Antenna on page 2-9.
OEMs must supply custom antenna cables for their modem
applications.
Caution
Steps
1
2
3
Either antenna cable in the developer’s kit can be used for transmit or
receive; however, you must make sure not to cross them. In other
words, be careful to connect the Tx connector on the antenna to the Tx
connector (J3) on the modem, and the Rx connector on the antenna to
the Rx connector (J7) on the modem. Crossing the Tx and Rx cables
can damage the modem.
TO CONNECT THE ANTENNA CABLES TO THE MODEM
1. Select one antenna cable to be the transmit cable (it does
not matter which one).
2. Label both ends of that cable with “Tx.” For example, you
could write “Tx” on a piece of tape wrapped around each
end of the cable.
3. Plug either end of the cable marked “Tx” into the transmit
(Tx) connector (J3) on the modem, as shown in Figure 2-1.
4. Plug either end of the unmarked cable into the receive
(Rx) connector (J7) on the modem, as shown in Figure 2-1.
2-6
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Quick Bench Set-Up
Connecting the Diagnostic Cable
The Diagnostic cable lets you:
•
Service-program GSP-1620 modems, using the
Globalstar User Terminal Program Support Tool
(UTPST). For more information about the UTPST, see
UTPST Overview on page 3-2.
•
Monitor or verify some modem functions, using the
QUALCOMM Globalstar Modem Operation Monitor.
For more information, see the QUALCOMM Globalstar
Modem Operation Monitor User’s Guide, 80-99399-1.
The cable includes an optional AC adapter. If a DC power
supply is not available on your bench, you can power the
modem with the AC adapter on the Diagnostic cable.
The Diagnostic cable also includes a switch box that controls
whether the cable’s DTR (Data Terminal Ready) signal is
asserted (“POS 1 DTR to GND”) or de-asserted (“POS 2 DTR
Open” or “POS 3 Not Used”). When DTR is asserted, the
modem powers up immediately if power is provided. Before
powering down the modem with this cable attached, you must
set this switch to “POS 2” or “POS 3.”
Note
Tip
80-99208-1 Rev. D
On the switch box, “POS 2 DTR Open” and “POS 3 Not Used” are
functionally equivalent. Some cables are equipped with a two-position
switch box and do not have “POS 3.” The switch positions for these
cables are “POS 1 DTR to GND” (DTR asserted) and “POS 2 DTR
Open” (DTR de-asserted).
When the Diagnostic cable is connected but you are not using the
UTPST to service-program the modem, leave the Diagnostic cable
switch in the “POS 2 DTR Open” (de-asserted) position.
2-7
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Figure 2-3. Modem Diagnostic Cable
PC Connector
"P1 - PC"
Modem connector
"P2 - module"
Lock ring
AC Wall
adapter
Power
connector
Locking
threads
POS 2
DTR OPEN
POS 1
DTR to GRD
POS 3
NOT USED
DTR Switch box
005AA_01
Table 2-1.
DTR Switch Positions
Position
Switch Label
Effect
POS 1
DTR to GND
DTR is asserted.
POS 2
DTR Open
DTR is de-asserted.
POS 3
Not Used
DTR is de-asserted
(equivalent to POS 2).
Note: Some cables are equipped with a
two-position switch box and do not
have “POS 3.” The switch positions for
these cables are “POS 1 DTR to GND”
(DTR asserted) and “POS 2 DTR
Open” (DTR de-asserted).
2-8
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Quick Bench Set-Up
Steps
1
2
3
TO CONNECT THE DIAGNOSTIC PORT CABLE
1. Connect the DE-9 modem connector (“P2-Module”) on the
Diagnostic cable (Figure 2-3) to the 9-pin Diagnostic port
on the modem (Figure 2-1).
2. Connect the DE-9 PC connector (“P1-PC”) on the
Diagnostic cable to a COM port on your computer.
3. Locate the switch on the cable, and set it to “POS 1 DTR
to GND.”
Do not plug in the AC wall adapter yet. For information
about powering the modem, see Providing Power to the
Modem on page 2-12.
Connecting and Mounting the Antenna
The GSP-1620 modem uses a Dielectric Resonator Antenna
(DRA) with a passive transmit and an active receive section.
The transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx) connectors are labeled on
the base of the antenna.
Since the antenna communicates with Globalstar satellites, it
must be positioned outdoors where it has a clear view of the
sky, unimpeded by tall obstacles such as buildings and trees.
Caution
Tip
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Antenna cable length is limited, due to insertion loss and potential
emission problems. For details, see Antenna Cable Specifications on
page 7-25 and Calculating Antenna Cable Length on page 7-27.
For a quick setup, you may want to mount the antenna on top of a
water-tight box on your roof. Mount the modem inside the box, then run
extension cables (straight RS-232 9-pin serial cables with no
crossovers) for the power and serial connectors to your indoor bench.
(For maximum RS-232 extension cable lengths, see the TIA/EIA-232-E
specification.) A box setup lets you use the antenna cables from the kit,
without worrying about antenna cable length.
2-9
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Figure 2-4. Antenna Base Showing Connectors
O-Ring groove
RX Antenna connector
(labeled on antenna base)
TX Antenna connector
(labeled on antenna base)
Steps
1
2
3
TO MOUNT THE ANTENNA
1. Locate the antenna outdoors where it has a clear view of
the sky. Make sure the antenna is close enough to the
modem that you can use the antenna cables provided in
the Modem Integrator’s Kit.
The antenna must have a clear view of the sky to get a
strong signal.
2. Plug the antenna cable that you labeled “Tx” into the
transmit connector (also labeled Tx) on the antenna
(Figure 2-4). Make sure the other end of the cable is
connected to the J3 connector on the modem.
Caution
2-10
You must be careful to connect the Tx connector on the antenna to the
Tx connector on the modem, and the Rx connector on the antenna to
the Rx connector on the modem. Crossing the Tx and Rx cables can
damage the modem.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Quick Bench Set-Up
3. Plug the other antenna cable into the receive (Rx)
connector on the antenna.
4. Secure the antenna to a flat surface using six M4 screws
through the six mounting holes. To prevent moisture and
dirt from getting underneath the antenna and onto the
connectors, you can use an O-ring (2.050 inches in
diameter by 0.103 inch wide, silicone or ethylenepropylene) if the mounting surface is smooth, or adhesive
caulking if the surface is rough.
Note
For complete details about sealing the antenna to a flat mounting
surface, or for information about mounting antennas on poles, see
Mounting Antennas at the Field Site on page 7-27.
Mounting the Modem
For quick bench set-up, you probably do not need to mount
the modem to a surface or in an enclosure, as it would be
mounted in an OEM product for use in the field.
If you do wish to fasten the modem to a rigid structure, you
will need six M3 screws (see mounting holes in Figure 2-1).
For details, see Modem Mounting Guidelines on page 7-19.
For details on acceptable environmental conditions for the
modem, see Environmental Specifications on page 7-30.
For a tip on how to mount the modem and antenna using a
box, see Connecting and Mounting the Antenna on page 2-9.
Grounding the System
You have several options for grounding the modem; see
Grounding on page 7-18.
Caution
80-99208-1 Rev. D
The RF connector ground is the same as the signal and power ground.
Incorrectly wiring these grounds could cause ground loops in the final
installation.
2-11
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Providing Power to the Modem
The GSP-1620 modem requires input DC power of 5.6 V to
16 V, 1 Amp (maximum), with a maximum of 50 mV
peak-peak ripple and noise.
Using the contents of the Modem Integrator’s Kit, you can
power your bench modem in two ways:
•
Use the AC adapter on the Diagnostic cable
•
Use an optional DC power supply connected to the
Interface cable bridle — this allows you to monitor exact
power levels
The use of a fuse is strongly recommended in the DC power
supply. A fuse with a minimum melting I2t rating of 0.02 A2
seconds will be sufficient. For complete details about DC
power requirements and power supply impedances, see DC
Power on page 7-15.
Tip
For a quick bench setup or service programming, consider just using the
provided AC adapter to power the modem.
Caution
You CANNOT have both a DC power supply and the AC adapter
connected to the modem at the same time. This may cause the modem
to fail to power up and may damage the modem.
Note
2-12
The following power-on procedure is suitable for a bench setup.
However, if you are developing modem applications, follow the
power-on process explained in Power-On on page 7-17.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Quick Bench Set-Up
Steps
1
2
3
TO POWER THE MODEM USING THE KIT’S AC ADAPTER
1. On the Modem Interface cable bridle (shown in Figure
2-2), locate the DC POWER (red) and SIG GND (black)
connectors. Then electrically isolate each connector by
capping or taping it.
Since you will be using the AC adapter instead of a DC
power supply, it is important to isolate the DC power
connectors to prevent shock.
2. On the Modem Interface cable bridle (shown in Figure
2-2), locate the RESET lead (yellow). Electrically isolate
the RESET lead by capping or taping it.
The RESET lead is designed to reset the GSP-1620
modem whenever it is grounded for five seconds.
Electrically isolating the lead prevents it from grounding
and inadvertently resetting the modem.
3. Locate the power connector in the middle of the
Diagnostic cable (as shown in Figure 2-3), then plug the
the AC wall adapter cable into the power connector.
4. Tighten the lock ring on the adapter cable onto the
locking threads of the power connector, so the adapter
plug remains firmly seated in the power connector.
The lock ring prevents the adapter cable and Diagnostic
cable from inadvertently disconnecting and interrupting
power to the modem.
5. Make sure the switch on the Diagnostic cable is set to
“POS 1 DTR to GND.”
When this switch is set to “POS 1 DTR to GND,” DTR is
asserted on the Diagnostic cable and the modem will
power up immediately when power is applied.
6. Plug the AC wall adapter (as shown in Figure 2-3) into an
AC power wall outlet.
You are now ready to use the modem.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
2-13
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Caution
Steps
1
2
3
To power off the GSP-1620 modem, set the DTR switch to “POS 2 DTR
Open,” wait at least 10 seconds, and then disconnect power. Setting the
DTR switch to “POS 2” allows the modem to gracefully shut down. If the
modem is powered off without allowing it to go through its shutdown
sequence, some service programming values may be lost.
TO POWER THE MODEM USING AN OPTIONAL DC POWER
SUPPLY
1. Obtain an optional DC power supply, making sure that it
meets the specifications described at the beginning of this
section.
2. On the Modem Interface cable bridle (shown in Figure
2-2), locate the RESET lead (yellow). Electrically isolate
the RESET lead by capping or taping it.
The RESET lead is designed to reset the GSP-1620
modem whenever it is grounded for five seconds.
Electrically isolating the lead prevents it from grounding
and inadvertently resetting the modem.
3. Plug the DC POWER (red) and SIG GND (black) leads
from the Modem Interface cable bridle into your DC
power source.
4. Turn on the power supply.
You are now ready to use the modem.
2-14
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Quick Bench Set-Up
Setting Up HyperTerminal to Talk to the Modem
To talk to the modem you will need HyperTerminal or a
similar program on your computer. If you are using an
operating system other than Windows, you can use any
application that can talk to a serial port.
Note
For bench setup, you probably want to run HyperTerminal on the
computer connected to the Control port of the modem. For testing
purposes, you can run two different HyperTerminal sessions, one
connected to the Control port and one connected to the Data port.
Steps
TO SET UP HYPERTERMINAL AND CONNECT TO THE MODEM
1
2
3
1. Set up HyperTerminal with the correct port and speed
information for the appropriate port (or both ports, if you
have two HyperTerminal sessions).
The following are the recommended HyperTerminal
settings for the Control and Data ports:
Name
Control port: GSP1620_Control
Data port: GSP1620_Data
Connect using
Computer COM port connected to
modem Control port or Data port
Bits per second
Control port: 9600 (fixed)
Data port: 38400 (default, but can
vary from 300 to 115200)
Data bits
8
Parity
None
Stop bits
1
Flow control
Control port: None
Data port: Hardware (default and
recommended, but can vary from
None to Software)
80-99208-1 Rev. D
2-15
Integrator’s Reference Manual
2. In HyperTerminal, click OK to accept the settings.
HyperTerminal automatically attempts to connect to the
modem, and the modem powers on when HyperTerminal
asserts the RS-232 DTR signal. Once it has connected you
should see the following within a few seconds:
SELF TEST RESULT: OK
Note: The SELF TEST RESULT message appears only
during modem power-up. If the Diagnostic cable has been
connected and its switch is set to “POS 1 DTR to GND,”
then the modem has already powered up. In that case,
proceed to step 3 without waiting for the message.
3. Type AT and press Enter.
If the HyperTerminal port connection is correctly
configured, the modem should respond with:
OK
Tip
You can connect to the modem at any time by clicking HyperTerminal’s
Connect button.
Testing the Modem Setup
To ensure that the modem was set up correctly and that the
ports are working, you can check the following:
2-16
•
Control port baud rate
•
Data port baud rate
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Quick Bench Set-Up
Steps
1
2
3
TO CHECK THE BAUD RATE ON THE CONTROL PORT
1. Look at the Status bar at the bottom of the
HyperTerminal window.
It should read “9600 8-N-1.” The Control port has a fixed
baud rate of 9600. Be sure HyperTerminal is configured
accordingly.
2. To confirm that HyperTerminal can communicate with
the modem, type AT and press Enter.
The modem should respond with:
OK
Steps
1
2
3
TO CHECK THE BAUD RATE ON THE DATA PORT
■
From HyperTerminal (probably on the Control port),
type:
AT+IPR? and press Enter.
The modem should respond with the following:
+IPR: 38400 (or whatever the current baud rate is)
38400 is the default setting for the Data port. If you
change the baud rate setting for the modem’s Data port,
be sure to configure HyperTerminal accordingly.
Note
80-99208-1 Rev. D
You can enter AT+IPR? on either the Control port or the Data port, but
it always responds with the baud rate of the Data port.
2-17
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Resetting or Powering Off the Modem
This section suggests some procedures suitable for resetting
or powering off your bench modem.
If you are developing modem applications, you should
consider additional issues for these topics, in the following
sections: DTR/DSR Signal and Power On/Off on page 7-7,
Power-Off on page 7-18, Hard Power Reset on page 7-18.
Steps
1
2
3
TO RESET THE MODEM
1. On the Modem Interface cable bridle (shown in Figure
2-2), locate the RESET lead (yellow).
2. Ground the RESET lead for at least five seconds to reset
the modem.
Tip
Steps
1
2
3
When you are not using the RESET lead, cap or tape it to isolate it
electrically. This prevents it from grounding and inadvertently resetting
the modem.
TO POWER OFF THE MODEM
1. If you are running a HyperTerminal session, disconnect
from the modem by clicking HyperTerminal’s Disconnect
button.
2. Disconnect or close all other applications accessing the
modem’s serial ports (such as another HyperTerminal
session or the Globalstar User Terminal Program
Support Tool [UTPST]). It is not necessary to physically
unplug the Modem Interface cable or Diagnostic cable
from the modem.
2-18
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Quick Bench Set-Up
3. If the Diagnostic cable is connected to the modem, set the
switch to “POS 2 DTR Open.”
When this switch is set to “POS 2,” DTR is de-asserted on
the Diagnostic cable and the modem begins its shutdown
sequence.
4. Wait at least ten seconds for the modem to perform
shutdown operations and save information in memory.
The modem powers off approximately nine seconds after
all ports are disconnected (including the Diagnostic port
via the switch on the Diagnostic cable).
5. You can now safely disconnect the power supply from the
modem.
Warning
Tip
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Do not unplug the power cables while the modem is powered up,
or while the switch on the Diagnostic cable is in “POS 1.” This can
cause ESD damage to the modem and also presents a danger of
electrical shock.
When the Diagnostic cable is connected but you are not using the
UTPST to service-program the modem, leave the Diagnostic cable
switch set to “POS 2.”
2-19
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Where to Go Next
Now that the GSP-1620 modem has power and you can
communicate with it, here is where to go next:
To do this:
Service-program the modem to work
within the Globalstar system and with
your Service Provider
Chapter 3
■
Check whether the modem has Globalstar
service
Make a simple packet data call from the
modem, over-the-air
Chapter 4
■
Develop software applications to work
with GSP-1620 modem features,
including Data and Control ports, Short
Messaging Service, Globalstar alerts,
position location determination, packet
data, IP addressing, dormant mode,
asynchronous data, mobile-originated and
mobile-terminated data calls
Chapter 5
■
Refer to syntax, descriptions, and values
for supported AT commands
Chapter 6
■
Integrate GSP-1620 modems into
market-specific OEM products
Refer to a hardware description of the
modem, including mechanical
descriptions, specifications, user
interfaces, port signaling and pinouts,
and grounding
Mount modems in enclosures
Mount antennas on-site
Refer to modem hardware and
environmental specifications
Chapter 7
■
■
■
■
■
2-20
Go to:
■
80-99208-1 Rev. D
3S
ERVICE-PROGRAMMING
MODEMS
QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modems
work within the Globalstar satellite system, using “airtime”
offered by a Service Provider (SP). To operate, each GSP-1620
modem must be service programmed, meaning that certain
key parameters (such as the Globalstar IMSI) must be
configured to work with the SP.
For service programming, you connect the modem’s
Diagnostic port to a Windows 98/NT/2000 PC, using the
Diagnostic cable included in the Modem Integrator’s Kit. On
the PC, you run the Globalstar User Terminal Program
Support Tool (UTPST), which is included in your Modem
Integrator’s Kit.
This chapter discusses how to coordinate with your SP to
service-program GSP-1620 modems, including the following
topics:
•
UTPST overview
•
Using the UTPST
•
Re-programming default parameters
•
Bulk-programming modems
•
Upgrading modem software
This chapter does not discuss how to install the UTPST
software, nor does it provide complete details on how to use
the UTPST.
Note
80-99208-1 Rev. D
For detailed UTPST information, see the Globalstar UT Program
Support Tool User’s Guide (80-98225-1) in your kit. For details about all
service programming parameters, see the Globalstar User Terminal
Service Programming Guide (80-98482-1).
3-1
Integrator’s Reference Manual
UTPST Overview
The Globalstar User Terminal Program Support Tool
(UTPST) lets you view, change, and save information
pertaining to a Globalstar User Terminal (modem or phone).
You can:
Note
•
Configure system settings (that is, service program),
either directly via the UTPST’s graphical user interface,
or by writing scripts that access the UTPST’s Scripting
API.
•
Save configuration settings to a UTPST file or open them
from a file.
•
Swap or transfer configuration settings from one modem
to another.
•
Configure and generate summary data files.
•
View modem information or statistics.
•
Upgrade modem software.
To order Globalstar User Terminal Program Support Tools
(QUALCOMM part number: MCN 64-C1005-4), contact QUALCOMM
Globalstar Customer Service, as described in Appendix D.
Using the UTPST
This section tells how to connect the Diagnostic cable to a
modem in preparation for using the UTPST.
Steps
1
2
3
3-2
TO CONNECT A MODEM TO A PC FOR USING THE UTPST
1. Connect the Diagnostic cable to the Diagnostic port on the
modem and to an available COM port on your PC, as
shown in Connecting the Diagnostic Cable on page 2-7.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Service-Programming Modems
2. Make sure the power connectors of the Modem Interface
cable are not connected to a DC power supply.
3. Make sure the switch on the Diagnostic cable is set to
“POS 1 DTR to GND.”
When this switch is set to “POS 1,” DTR is asserted on the
Diagnostic cable and the modem will power up
immediately when power is applied.
4. Connect the AC adapter to the Diagnostic cable and to an
AC outlet, as shown in Providing Power to the Modem on
page 2-12.
Caution
Steps
1
2
3
If you use the AC wall adapter for service programming the modem,
make sure the power connectors of the Modem Interface cable are not
connected to a DC power supply. You CANNOT have both a DC power
supply and the AC adapter connected to the modem at the same time.
This may cause the modem to fail to power up and may damage the
modem.
TO INSTALL, RUN, AND USE THE UTPST
■
Note
80-99208-1 Rev. D
See the Globalstar UT Program Support Tool User’s
Guide (80-98225-1) in your kit for detailed information.
Connecting the UTPST to a modem requires you to enter a valid
six-digit Service Programming Code (SPC). Use the default SPC
(six zeros: 000000) unless you have been given another one.
3-3
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Re-programming Default Parameters
A GSP-1620 modem leaves the factory with a default set of
service programming parameters. Before the modem can be
activated in the field, you must re-program some of those
defaults with valid activation values for the modem’s
particular Service Provider (SP), country, and Gateway.
Caution
The first time you use the UTPST, or before you re-program any values,
make a backup copy of the UTPST parameter file.
Refer to Table 3-1 for a list of key parameters you must set,
then ask your SP for the values to program.
All parameters not mentioned in Table 3-1 are set either to a
factory default value or to a value specified by the Service
Provider. The modem will operate with those default values,
but you could also re-program them, as desired, if your
Service Provider so directs.
3-4
Caution
Service programming parameters are stored in the modem’s
non-volatile memory. If you connect the Diagnostic cable to the modem
and use the UTPST to change any parameters, it is important that you
de-assert the cable’s DTR (via “POS 2” on the cable’s switch) and wait
at least ten seconds before disconnecting power to the modem.
Otherwise, the service programming information may not be saved in
memory. See TO POWER OFF THE MODEM on page 2-18.
Tip
For more information about all service programming parameters,
including defaults and value ranges, see the Globalstar User Terminal
Service Programming Guide (80-98482-1).
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Service-Programming Modems
Table 3-1.
Service Programming Parameters You Must Set
Parameter /
Default
Description
Action Required
for the Modem to Operate
Globalstar IMSI
(Mobile Country
Code component)
The 3-digit Mobile Country Code
(MCC) component of the
Globalstar International Mobile
Subscriber Identity (IMSI). The
MCC component of the IMSI is
generally the same as the Home
Service Provider MCC (but could
be different based on the
activating SP’s requirements).
Re-program this parameter from
the factory default setting to a
valid MCC, in accordance with
the activating SP’s instructions.
The 1- to 3- digit Mobile Network
Code (MNC) component of the
Globalstar IMSI. The MNC
component of the IMSI is
generally the same as the Home
Service Provider MNC (but could
be different based on the
activating SP’s requirements).
Re-program this parameter from
the factory default setting to a
valid MCC in accordance with
the activating SP’s instructions.
The mobile station identification
number (MSIN) component of the
Globalstar IMSI.
Re-program this parameter from
the factory default setting to a
valid MSIN in accordance with
the activating SP’s instructions.
Factory default:
Unprogrammed
Globalstar IMSI
(Mobile Network
Code component)
Factory default:
Unprogrammed
Globalstar IMSI
(Mobile Station
Identification
Number (MSIN)
Globalstar Home The home gateway channel on
Gateway Channel which the modem should look for
service. Can be a value from 1
through 124.
Factory default:
Unprogrammed
Factory default:
Unprogrammed
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Where in UTPST:
Globalstar NAM dialog
Where in UTPST:
Globalstar NAM dialog
Factory default:
Unprogrammed
Globalstar Home
Gateway ID
Where in UTPST:
Globalstar NAM dialog
A numerical identifier
representing the Globalstar Home
Gateway.
Re-program this parameter from
the factory default setting to a
valid Home Gateway channel in
accordance with the activating
SP’s instructions.
Where in UTPST:
Globalstar NAM dialog
Re-program this parameter from
the factory default setting to a
valid Home Gateway ID in
accordance with the activating
SP’s instructions.
Where in UTPST:
Globalstar NAM dialog
3-5
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Table 3-1.
Service Programming Parameters You Must Set
(continued)
Parameter /
Default
Description
Action Required
for the Modem to Operate
Globalstar Home
Service Provider
Mobile Country
Code (MCC)
The 3-digit mobile country code
(MCC) representing the Home
Service Provider. Typically, the
Globalstar Home Service Provider
MCC is the same as the MCC
component of the Globalstar IMSI
(but could be different based on
the SP’s requirements).
Re-program his parameter from
the factory default setting to a
valid Globalstar Home Service
Provider MCC.
The 1- to 3-digit mobile network
code (MCC) representing the
Home Service Provider. Typically,
the Globalstar Home Service
Provider MCN is the same as the
MCN component of the Globalstar
IMSI (but could be different based
on the SP’s requirements).
Re-program his parameter from
the factory default setting to a
valid Globalstar Home Service
Provider MNC.
The Preferred Service Provider
MCC and MNC is the same as the
Globalstar MCC and MNC defined
earlier.
Specify a Home Service Provider
MCC and MNC.
Factory default:
Unprogrammed
Globalstar Home
Service Provider
Mobile Network
Code (MNC)
Factory default:
Unprogrammed
Preferred Service
Provider (Home
Service Provider)
Where in UTPST:
Globalstar NAM dialog
Where in UTPST:
Globalstar NAM dialog
Where in UTPST:
Service Providers dialog
Factory default:
Unprogrammed
3-6
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Service-Programming Modems
Bulk-Programming Modems
If you need to service-program modems in bulk, for instance
to be shipped with OEM market products, you have several
options for how to do this, as shown in Table 3-2.
Table 3-2.
Bulk Service-Programming Options
Programming Option
For More Information
Program each modem individually, using the
UTPST’s graphical user interface.
See the Globalstar UT Program
Support Tool User’s Guide,
(80-98225-1), Chapter 5,
“Configuring Phone Settings”; and
the Globalstar User Terminal
Service Programming Guide
(80-98482-1).
Program one modem, save the settings to a file,
then re-program the remaining modems by
reading in the file using the UTPST.
(Note: Some manual programming would still be
required, for example to enter the IMSI for each
modem.)
See the Globalstar UT Program
Support Tool User’s Guide, Chapter
5, “Configuring Phone Settings,”
and Chapter 6, “Saving and
Transferring Phone Settings.”
Write scripts using the UTPST’s Application
Programming Interface (API). The UTPST
Scripting API is a library of functions that access
the data items on a modem directly, without
interacting with the UTPST user interface.
See the Globalstar UTPST Script
API Reference Manual
(80-99114-1).
For instance, you could write a script that reads
configuration values from a database, then use the
UTPST Scripting API to write those values to
modems.
Use another process as required by the activating
Service Provider.
Ask your Service Provider for
details.
Upgrading Modem Software
Sometimes it might be desirable or necessary to upgrade the
software on a GSP-1620 modem. The modem contains two
different kinds of software:
•
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Main application software — contains the true
application code for the modem. All Globalstar-specific
code, user interface code, and modem code resides in the
application software.
3-7
Integrator’s Reference Manual
•
Boot block software — contains a minimal set of
functionality needed to “boot” the modem (get it started).
Most software upgrades are application upgrades. Upgrading
the boot block software is rarely required.
Once you obtain a software upgrade file from QUALCOMM
Globalstar Customer Service, you can use the UTPST to load
it onto the modem.
Steps
1
2
3
TO DETERMINE THE MODEM’S CURRENT SOFTWARE VERSION
1. Connect your PC to the modem as described in Using the
UTPST on page 3-2 and run the UTPST.
2. In the UTPST’s Phone menu, select Show Phone
Information.
The Phone Information dialog appears, including the UT
Software Version Information, for example, “R5.2.0.”
Steps
1
2
3
TO UPGRADE MODEM SOFTWARE
1. Obtain a software upgrade file from QUALCOMM
Globalstar Customer Service. To contact Customer
Service, see Appendix D.
2. Connect your PC to the modem and run the UTPST.
3. Follow the procedures documented in the Globalstar UT
Program Support Tool User’s Guide, Chapter 8,
“Upgrading Phone Software.”
Note
3-8
Upgrading boot block software requires you to short two pins on a
jumper on the modem. See the illustration and instructions in Chapter 8
of the Globalstar UT Program Support Tool User’s Guide.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
4M
AKING
SIMPLE DATA CALLS
This chapter is essentially a quick tutorial that demonstrates
making simple packet data calls from the QUALCOMM
Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem, including the
following topics:
•
Checking modem status
•
Making simple packet data calls
❑
Making a call from the Data port
❑
Entering Online-Command mode
This chapter assumes that you have connected your modem
as described in Chapter 2 and configured necessary service
programming parameters as described in Chapter 3.
In addition, examples in this chapter assume you have a
Windows PC connected to the modem, where Windows deals
with the TCP/IP and PPP protocols. When you develop
embedded SCADA applications, you can use off-the-shelf
protocol stacks or write your own.
Note
For more detailed information about making packet data calls, see
Using Packet Data on page 5-21. For information about making
asynchronous data calls, see Using Asynchronous Data on page 5-30.
Checking Modem Status
As you test a GSP-1620 modem and develop applications for
it, you will often find it helpful to check the modem’s status.
The AT$QCSTATUS command provides important information
about the modem, including whether it can “see” the
Globalstar Gateway, how strong the Globalstar signal is,
80-99208-1 Rev. D
4-1
Integrator’s Reference Manual
whether the modem has registered with the Gateway, and the
current call state.
In this case, you will be able to tell whether the modem has
been connected and service programmed properly, and thus
has Globalstar satellite service to the Gateway.
Steps
1
2
3
TO CHECK MODEM STATUS
1. Make sure that the Control port is disconnected, either
physically or by clicking the Disconnect button in a
HyperTerminal session connected to it.
2. Open a HyperTerminal session connected to the Data
port as described in Setting Up HyperTerminal to Talk to
the Modem on page 2-15, then type:
AT$QCSTATUS <Enter>
The modem should respond with a status report similar
to the following:
SERVICE AVAILABLE: YES
SERVICE MODE:GLOBALSTAR
PROVIDER:<your Service Provider’s name>
GATEWAY:<your Gateway’s number>
RSSI:<a number from 1 to 4>
REGISTRATION:<YES>
ROAMING:<NO>
CALL STATE:<IDLE>
CALL TYPE:
CALL DURATION:<0 or duration of last/current call>
CALL NUMBER:<number>
BATTERY CHARGE:<percentage>
OK
4-2
Service Status
Brief Description
SERVICE
AVAILABLE
YES if the modem has acquired Globalstar
service; otherwise NO.
SERVICE MODE
Current service mode (e.g., Globalstar).
PROVIDER
Current Service Provider.
GATEWAY
Gateway number (in decimal).
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Making Simple Data Calls
Service Status
Brief Description
RSSI
Received signal strength, from 0 (no signal)
to 4 (strong signal).
REGISTRATION
Current registration status of the modem
with the Gateway: NO (not registered) or
YES (registered)
ROAMING
YES if roaming. NO otherwise.
CALL STATE
Current call state, e.g., IDLE.
CALL TYPE
Service Option being used in the current
call (such as TIA_PPP, TIA_ASYNC,
Markov, Loopback; or blank when no call is
in progress).
CALL DURATION
Duration of the ongoing call or the last
completed call.
CALL NUMBER
Most recently called or currently calling
number.
BATTERY CHARGE
Percentage of battery life remaining.
If the modem and antenna have been set up and service
programmed correctly, SERVICE AVAILABLE should say YES,
RSSI should show a signal strength number other than 0, and
REGISTRATION should be YES. If the modem has service and is
registered, you can make packet data calls. If not, see
Chapter 8, Troubleshooting.
Tip
For more information about the modem status elements returned
by the AT$QCSTATUS command, see Service Status ($QCSTATUS) on
page 6-62.
Making Simple Packet Data Calls
This section shows how to make simple mobile-originated
packet data calls from the GSP-1620 modem by sending an
AT command from HyperTerminal to the Data port.
In the process, you get a brief introduction to using the
modem’s Data and Control ports.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
4-3
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Tip
For complete details about making calls and understanding modem port
arbitration issues, see Developing Modem Applications on page 5-1.
Making a Call from the Data Port
You can make a data call by entering AT commands in
HyperTerminal connected to the modem’s Data port. You will
be able to see the packets streaming, just as a demonstration
that the modem can make a packet data call.
Steps
1
2
3
TO MAKE A PACKET DATA CALL USING AT COMMANDS ON THE
DATA PORT
1. Make sure HyperTerminal is set up on the PC connected
to the modem’s Data port, as described in Setting Up
HyperTerminal to Talk to the Modem on page 2-15.
2. If HyperTerminal is connected to the modem on its
Control Port, you must disconnect it before you can type
AT commands on the Data port. You can leave the cable
plugged into the Control port, but disconnect from the
Control port using HyperTerminal (click the Phone icon).
3. In HyperTerminal, initiate the call on the Data port by
typing ATD#777.
#777 is a special number that tells the modem to establish
a packet data call. HyperTerminal responds with
CONNECT. You will see random characters streaming on
the screen, with an initial tilde “~” character to indicate
that this is packet data.
4-4
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Making Simple Data Calls
Entering Online-Command Mode
While a packet data call is in progress on the Data port (the
modem is in Online mode), you can interrupt the data stream
so the modem will respond to AT commands. This puts the
modem into Online-Command mode.
Steps
1
2
3
TO ENTER ONLINE-COMMAND MODE
1. While the data call is in progress on the Data port, in
HyperTerminal, type this escape sequence: +++ .
HyperTerminal responds with OK.
2. Type AT$QCSTATUS <Enter> .
The modem responds with a status report. Notice that the
CALL TYPE field reads TIA_PPP, indicating that the data
call is still in progress.
3. To terminate the call, type ATH <Enter>.
Tip
80-99208-1 Rev. D
For more information about Online-Command mode, see Change from
Online to Online-Command Mode (+++) on page 6-40.
4-5
Integrator’s Reference Manual
4-6
80-99208-1 Rev. D
5D
EVELOPING
MODEM APPLICATIONS
This chapter discusses developing market-specific software
applications to work with the QUALCOMM Globalstar
GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem, particularly Remote
Monitoring and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition
(SCADA) applications.
A GSP-1620 modem functions as a 9600 bps full duplex
satellite modem. Applications communicate with the modem
using standard “Hayes Modem” AT commands, or
initialization strings.
This chapter includes the following topics:
80-99208-1 Rev. D
•
Recommended development tools
•
SCADA application components
•
Packet/asynchronous data overview
•
Modem application scenarios
•
Working with modem features (including using Data and
Control ports, Globalstar satellite service, Short
Messaging Service, Globalstar alerts, and position
location determination)
•
Using packet data (including networking software and
PPP sessions, IP addressing, dormant mode,
mobile-originated and mobile-terminated packet data
calls, and roaming)
•
Using asynchronous data (including mobile-originated
and mobile-terminated asynchronous data calls,
accessing packet data over an asynchronous connection,
and roaming)
•
Typical modem initialization strings
5-1
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Note
For complete reference information about all modem-supported AT
commands, including syntax, descriptions, default values, and results
returned, see Chapter 6, AT Command Reference.
Recommended Development Tools
The following tools are recommended for developing
GSP-1620 modem applications:
Tip
•
A Windows computer — because the Modem Integrator’s
Kit CD-ROM contains code samples for Windows
•
HyperTerminal (or any program that talks to a serial
port) for testing AT command strings
•
Perl — because the code samples on the CD are written in
Perl; however, you can use whatever programming
language you choose (for example, C)
The CD-ROM in your Modem Integrator’s Kit contains code samples for
some typical modem application initialization strings.
SCADA Application Components
Working with a GSP-1620 modem, a SCADA application can
retrieve process control and alarm data automatically from
remote sites, using unmanned sensors to monitor operations
and initiate alert notifications.
Figure 5-1 shows the basic components of a SCADA or OEM
application that sits on top of the modem’s software, where:
5-2
•
The modem serves as the DCE (data communications
equipment) at the remote site.
•
Your SCADA application serves as the DTE (data
terminating equipment) at the remote site,
communicating with software in the modem through AT
commands sent to either the modem’s Control or Data
ports.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
•
Data flows to and from the modem over-the-air, using the
Globalstar satellites and Gateways connected to the
Internet (for packet data) or to the PSTN (for
asynchronous data).
•
A host application (server) manages remote sites (DTEs);
for example a host application might manage data from
numerous remote oil or gas wells.
Figure 5-1. DCE - DTE Application Components
Satellite
Outdoor Antenna
Tx
Rx
DCE
GSP-1620
Modem
Interface Port
Data Port
(Data or AT commands)
DTE
Internet (for PPP data)
or
PSTN (for async data)
Control Port
(modem AT commands)
SCADA Terminal
Remote
Globalstar
Gateway
Host
Server
(running your
application software)
(Host application managing remote DTEs)
80-99208-1 Rev. D
5-3
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Packet/Asynchronous Data Overview
The GSP-1620 modem handles both packet and asynchronous
data connections. For a particular SCADA application, one
may make more sense than the other. Table 5-1 compares the
two types of data.
Tip
QUALCOMM Globalstar packet data service has a lower overhead and
faster connection time than asynchronous data does. In general, if a
SCADA application does not specifically need asynchronous data, use
packet data instead.
For more details about implementation issues specific to one
type of data or the other, see Using Packet Data on page 5-21
and Using Asynchronous Data on page 5-30.
Table 5-1.
5-4
Packet vs. Asynchronous Data
Packet Data
Asynchronous Data
Connects through a
Globalstar Gateway to the
Internet.
Connects through a Globalstar
Gateway and the PSTN to a
remote host modem.
Packet data is transmitted
over the Internet to a host
server.
Asynchronous data is
transmitted to a dial-up modem
or modem bank, which must be
supplied by the host.
Typically establishes
connection within 2-3 seconds.
Typically establishes connection
in approximately 30-60 seconds,
due to modem negotiation and
training time.
No long distance charges
apply, because a connection is
made directly to the Internet.
PSTN long distance charges
may apply.
Degradation of service (in the
transmission of packets) could
occur, depending on Internet
connections and routing.
Degradation of service could
occur, depending on the quality
of lines over the PSTN. (A noisy
PSTN line can lower the data
transmission rate or introduce
errors into the data stream.)
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
Table 5-1.
Packet vs. Asynchronous Data (continued)
Packet Data
Asynchronous Data
May require a VPN and
software to get past firewalls.
May be able to directly connect
inside a firewall.
Mobile-terminated calls
require either a fixed public IP
address, or a fixed private IP
address and VPN tunnel to
the Gateway (see
Mobile-Terminated Packet
Data Calls on page 5-27).
Mobile-terminated calls can be
achieved by having the host
modem dial the phone number
of the GSP-1620 modem.
Modem Application Scenarios
Depending on the requirements of your SCADA or OEM
application, you can configure the GSP-1620 modem to work
in many different ways, using many different features. The
following are sample scenarios for how the modem might
work in a SCADA setting:
•
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Scenario 1 — Full-time packet data on-demand:
❑
The modem can both generate data or accept it from
the Gateway (see Mobile-Originated Packet Data
Calls on page 5-27 and Mobile-Terminated Packet
Data Calls on page 5-27).
❑
The modem uses dormant mode, where traffic
channel is automatically reestablished upon receipt
of PPP traffic at the modem end or IP traffic at the
Gateway end (dormant mode works for packet data
only).
❑
Since the application developer is responsible for
security issues, the application might want to query
for a password or answer calls only at certain times or
only from certain phone numbers.
5-5
Integrator’s Reference Manual
•
•
Scenario 2 — A periodic application:
❑
No auto-answer.
❑
Application powers on the modem periodically
(perhaps once a day), queries host for data, then turns
off.
❑
Application powers on the modem periodically and
sends data to the host.
❑
Useful where power usage is critical, perhaps due to
limited battery charge.
Scenario 3 — Asynchronous data application:
❑
The SCADA application keeps the GSP-1620 modem
powered up to accept incoming calls.
❑
A modem at the host server dials the GSP-1620
modem, which toggles the Ring Indicator (RI).
❑
The SCADA application decides whether to answer
the asynchronous call or whether to call back.
Any of these scenarios might be appropriate, for example, for
a SCADA application that monitors pipelines or gas wells,
depending on how much data is generated on-site and how
often the host application needs to access that data.
As these sample scenarios show, you can configure an
application for the GSP-1620 modem in many ways,
depending on factors such as the following:
5-6
•
How you decide to use the modem ports
•
Which operating systems you use
•
How you want your application to operate
•
How the SP wants to handle billing (by airtime or by byte;
contact your SP for details)
•
Whether the application will use packet or asynchronous
data connections
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
Working with Modem Features
This section discusses key features of the GSP-1620 modem
and how to use them programmatically in your application.
The features discussed in this section work with either packet
data or asynchronous data. For packet-specific features, see
Using Packet Data on page 5-21. For asynchronous-specific
features, see Using Asynchronous Data on page 5-30.
Using Data and Control Ports
The GSP-1620 modem has two serial ports: one for Data and
one for Control. The Data and Control ports make up the Rm
interface, which is the serial interface between the DTE (your
application) and the DCE (GSP-1620 modem), as shown in
Figure 5-2.
Figure 5-2. DTE-to-DCE Rm Interface
Rm Interface
Um Interface
Data Port
Control Port
TxD
RxD
DTR
DSR
RFR (RTS)
CTS
RLSD (DCD)
RI
DCE
DTE
(SCADA
Application)
80-99208-1 Rev. D
TxD
RxD
DTR
DSR
(GSP-1620
Modem)
5-7
Integrator’s Reference Manual
The Um interface shown in Figure 5-2 is the dedicated
wireless traffic channel between the GSP-1620 modem (DCE)
and the Gateway Interworking Function (IWF).
Table 5-2 shows the signal lines for each port in Figure 5-2.
Note
The modem signal naming convention assumes that the modem is the
DCE and that the user application is the DTE.
Table 5-2.
Port Signal Lines
Data Port
Control Port
GND - Signal Common
GND - Signal Common
TxD - Transmit Data
TxD - Transmit Data
RxD - Receive Data
RxD - Receive Data
DTR - Data Terminal Ready
DTR - Data Terminal Ready
DSR - Data Set Ready
DSR - Data Set Ready
RFR (RTS) - Ready for Receive
CTS - Clear To Send
RLSD (DCD) - Data Carrier
Detected
RI -Ring Indicator
Note
For a complete description of port hardware, including pinouts, see Data
and Control Ports on page 7-6.
Data and Control Port Configurations
For a data application, you can set up the modem to use
different configurations of the Data and Control ports:
•
5-8
Data port only — AT commands can be sent to the
modem only when there is no data session active (i.e., no
data is coming across the port) or when a data session is
active but the Data port is in Online-Command mode.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
•
Control port only — only AT commands can be sent to
modem (no data).
•
Data and Control ports — the DTE can receive data on
the Data port and, at the same time, communicate with
the modem on the Control port using AT commands.
The different Data and Control port configurations above are
based on which ports are defined as active:
•
A port is active if DTR is asserted on that port.
•
A port is inactive if DTR is de-asserted on that port.
Using both the Data and Control ports allows more
sophisticated communication with the modem and thus
better control of it, but requires that you understand the
modem’s port arbitration behavior.
Note
In this context, port configuration refers to which ports on the GSP-1620
modem are active, rather than to port baud rate, parity, etc.
Port Arbitration Behavior
This section describes the modem port arbitration behavior
for each of the following port configurations:
•
Data port active only
•
Control port active only
•
Both Data and Control ports active
When a port configuration change occurs due to a DTR
change, the AT command configuration parameters
maintained by the AT command processor are not modified or
reset to their default values. The parameters’ current state
will be associated with the newly activated port when the
change occurs. An AT command in progress when DTR
changes will be silently aborted.
Table 5-3 summarizes modem port arbitration behavior.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
5-9
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Table 5-3.
Port Arbitration Behavior
Control
Port Active
Data Port
Active
Port Behavior
No
No
Control and Data ports are inactive and modem is powered
down unless the Diagnostic port is active.
No
Yes
The Data port processes all data and AT commands,
including the following:
■
■
■
■
Yes
No
All AT commands are processed on the Control port. Data
calls are not supported because the Data port is inactive.
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
5-10
Online-Command mode is supported on the Data port.
All port configuration commands apply to the Data port
as defined in Port(s) Affected by AT Commands on page
5-13.
If a non-data call (e.g., Markov, Loopback) is already
active when a call is attempted with the ATD command,
the BUSY result is returned. If a data call is active, a NO
DIALTONE result is returned.
DTR cannot be used to terminate a call or enter
Online-Command state (AT&D2 or AT&D1
configurations), unless the Diagnostic port is active.
Note: This is because the modem powers down if all
DTRs are low. DTR can be used to terminate the call or
enter Online-Command mode, although the modem will
power down after approximately 1 second.
All data calls initiated using the ATD command return
NO DIALTONE.
ATD<phone number> returns NO DIALTONE.
The ATD command with #627568 (Markov test call) or
#56672225 (Loopback test call) dial strings initiates a
call if a call is not already active. If a call is already
active when the call is attempted, a BUSY result is
returned.
Port configuration commands apply to the Data port
and Control port as defined in Port(s) Affected by AT
Commands on page 5-13.
The online escape sequence “+++” surrounded by guard
time is ignored.
Online-Command mode command ATH returns OK.
ATH will terminate an active test call.
Online-Command ATO returns NO CARRIER.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
Table 5-3.
Port Arbitration Behavior (continued)
Control
Port Active
Data Port
Active
Port Behavior
Yes
Yes
All AT commands are processed on the Control port. The
Data port is used only for the transfer of packet or
asynchronous data resulting from a data call.
AT commands received on the Data port are ignored.
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
80-99208-1 Rev. D
A packet data call can be initiated on the Data port by
sending a PPP packet; for details, see Packet No Dial
($QCPKND) on page 6-50.
ATD#777 received on the Control port initiates a packet
data call on the Data port. If a non-data call (e.g.,
Markov, Loopback) is already active when the call is
attempted, a BUSY result is returned. If a data call is
active, an ERROR result is returned.
ATD<phone number> received on the Control port
initiates an asynchronous data call on the Data port.
If a non-data call (e.g., Markov, Loopback) is already
active when the call is attempted, a BUSY result is
returned. If a data call is active, an ERROR result is
returned.
The ATD command received on the Control port with
#627568 (Markov test call) or #56672225 (Loopback
test call) dial strings initiate a call if a call is not already
active. If a non-data call is already active when the call
is attempted, a BUSY result is returned. If a data call is
active, an ERROR result is returned.
Port configuration commands apply to the Data port
and Control port as defined in Port(s) Affected by AT
Commands on page 5-13.
Online-Command mode is not supported on the Data
port.
The online escape sequence “+++” surrounded by guard
time is ignored on both ports.
ATH received on the Control port terminates an active
data call or special test call. It returns OK whether or not
a call is active.
ATO received on the Control port returns OK if a call is
active; otherwise, it returns NO CARRIER.
5-11
Integrator’s Reference Manual
AT Command Processing Modes
Data services AT command processing consists of three
modes:
Steps
1
2
3
5-12
Command mode — While in the Command mode, data
service is inactive and the DCE processes AT commands
received on the Rm interface.
•
Online mode — Online mode is entered when a data
connection is established and data service becomes
active. While in the Online mode, the DCE does not
recognize AT commands on the Rm interface, but does
process in-band control data and software flow control
data.
•
Online-Command mode — During Online-Command
mode, data service is in the active state, although data is
not processed. The DCE processes all AT commands
received on the Rm interface while in Online-Command
mode.
TO ENTER ONLINE-COMMAND MODE FROM ONLINE MODE
■
Steps
1
2
3
•
Use an in-band control data escape sequence, “+++”
surrounded by guard time (see Change from Online to
Online-Command Mode (+++) on page 6-40).
or
Turn OFF the Rm interface DTR (circuit 108/2) signal
(see DTE Data Terminal Ready Behavior (&D) on page
6-16 for details).
TO TERMINATE A DATA CALL FROM ONLINE-COMMAND MODE
■
Use the ATH command (see Hook Control (H) on page
6-22).
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
Steps
1
2
3
TO RE-ENTER ONLINE MODE FROM ONLINE-COMMAND MODE
■
Use the ATO command (see Return to Online Data Mode
(O) on page 6-23).
Port(s) Affected by AT Commands
Various AT commands modify port configurations or initiate
actions on a port. Since the modem has both a Data and
Control port that can receive AT commands, the port affected
by the received AT command is defined for each applicable
port configuration. Port configuration is defined by which
ports are active (DTR asserted).
Mapping the effects of an AT command to a particular port, or
possibly ports, largely results from two factors: the AT
command processor is single-threaded, and the Control and
Data ports share a single instance of the AT command
processor.
In this single instance of the AT command processor, a table
defines default values and the state of each configurable
parameter associated with each AT command. This default
and configuration data for each command applies to one or
both ports, depending on the port configuration. Most
commands do not modify these configurable parameters.
Those commands that do modify parameters affect only the
port processing the AT commands, with some exceptions. The
exceptions, which are listed in Table 5-4 on page 5-14, are due
primarily to the following unique attributes of the Data port:
80-99208-1 Rev. D
•
The Data port supports data (packet and asynchronous).
•
The Data port supports configurable baud rate and
handshake signals.
5-13
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Nomenclature for Table 5-4
Table 5-4 defines the port(s) affected by AT commands that
may modify parameters other than those of the active AT
command port. The affected port(s) are listed for each of the
following three port configurations:
•
Data port active only
•
Control port active only
•
Both Data and Control ports active
To define the affected port(s) for each AT command listed and
for each of the three port configurations, Table 5-4 uses the
following nomenclature:
•
DATA — Applies to Data port
•
CTL — Applies to Control port
•
BOTH — Applies to both Data and Control ports
•
NA — Not applicable to a port with this active port
configuration or not applicable to a port in general
Table 5-4.
Port(s) Affected by AT Commands
Port Command Applies To:
AT Command
5-14
AT Command
Description
Data Port
Active Only
Control Port
Active Only
Data & Control
Ports Both
Active
Z
Reset to Default
Configuration
DATA
BOTH
BOTH
&C
DCE RLSD (DCD)
Behavior
DATA
DATA
DATA
&D
DTE DTR
Behavior
DATA
DATA
DATA
&F
Set to Factory
Defined Default
Configuration
DATA
BOTH
BOTH
S777
Silent Retry
Timeout
DATA
CTL
CTL
+ICF
Character
Framing Settings
DATA
NA
DATA
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
Table 5-4.
Port(s) Affected by AT Commands (continued)
Port Command Applies To:
AT Command
AT Command
Description
Data Port
Active Only
Control Port
Active Only
Data & Control
Ports Both
Active
+IFC
Local Flow Control
Settings
DATA
NA
DATA
+IPR
Rm Interface Baud
Rate Setting
DATA
NA
DATA
+CRM
Rm Interface
Protocol Setting
DATA
NA
DATA
+CTA
Dormant Mode
Timeout Setting
DATA
NA
DATA
Port Activation (DTR) Changes during Operation
When DTR changes on the Data or Control ports, the
following operational changes occur:
•
Any AT command being processed on the Control or Data
ports is terminated and the port that processes AT
commands, based upon the arbitration rules (see Port
Arbitration Behavior on page 5-9), is placed in a state to
begin processing of a new AT command.
•
If a call (data or special test call—Markov or Loopback) is
in progress, changes in DTR on the Control port will not
terminate the call.
•
If a call (data or special test call) is in progress, changes
in DTR on the Data port will terminate the call if the port
is configured to do so with AT&D2. Additionally, if none of
the DTR lines are asserted, the module will power down
terminating the call regardless of the AT&D setting (See
Power-On and Power-Off on page 7-18).
AT command configuration parameters maintained by the AT
command processor are not modified or reset to their default
values when a port configuration change occurs due to a DTR
change. The current state of these parameters is associated
with the newly activated port after the change occurs, as
defined in Table 5-4.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
5-15
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Note
For DTR signal timing requirements, see Changing Data and Control
Port Configuration on page 7-8.
Port Use During Power On and Power Off
The Data and Control ports provide a feedback mechanism to
inform the user when power on and power off are complete.
The modem powers on when either or both of the ports’ DTR
signals are asserted. The DSR signal is asserted on either or
both active ports to inform the user that the modem has
completed its start-up sequence and is ready to process AT
commands.
When the DTR signals of both ports are de-asserted for
approximately one second, the modem begins its shutdown
sequence. When this is complete, the modem powers off and
the ports’ DSR signals are de-asserted. This informs the user
that power may be removed, which may be required in
battery-powered applications.
The above discussion assumes that the Diagnostic port is not
active. This port’s DTR signal does affect power on and power
off, but the port provides no user feedback. The Diagnostic
port is designed for development and service-programming
use only.
Note
For complete details of the power on and power off process, see
Power-On and Power-Off on page 7-18.
Globalstar Satellite Service
The QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data
Modem offers full duplex (FDX) transmit and receive
capabilities at 9600 bps via the Globalstar satellite
constellation, and uses QUALCOMM’s CDMA digital
technology for reliability.
The Globalstar Air Interface (GAI) is based on a modified
(proprietary) IS-95A standard adapted for Mobile Satellite
System (MSS) operations:
•
5-16
Forward Link (Modem Receive): 2484.39 to 2499.15 MHz
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
•
Reverse Link (Modem Transmit): 1610.73 to 1625.49
MHz
Short Messaging Service (SMS)
The GSP-1620 modem supports IS-637 Mobile Terminated
Short Messaging Service (SMS). This is a separate feature
from data (packet and/or asynchronous), and may be billed
differently by the Service Provider.
Mobile-terminated SMS allows the host application to “send”
numeric, alphanumeric, or binary messages to the GSP-1620
modem. These messages are passed transparently out the
Data or Control RS-232 ports to the DTE (SCADA
application). The modem makes no attempt to construct
ASCII character data. If “control” data is sent to the modem
via the SMS option, it will be passed along transparently to
the DTE application.
The SMS feature is fully functional even if the GSP-1620
modem is active on a data call, because SMS can be accessed
on the Control port. Therefore, the host application can send
command and control information to the modem either while
it is in a data session, or idle (not in a call).
Note
Check with your Globalstar service provider to see whether the SMS
feature is available.
SMS Alerts
SMS “alerts” are asynchronous messages sent out of the Data
or Control port to the DTE application upon receipt of the
SMS message (see Using Data and Control Ports on page 5-7
for a more detailed explanation).
Port configuration determines how SMS alerts are received:
80-99208-1 Rev. D
•
If the application is using the Control port, SMS alerts
are received on the Control port, even if a call is active.
•
If the application is using the Data port only, the SMS
alert will be queued until the data session is terminated.
5-17
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Once the DTE application receives an SMS alert, it is up to
the application to read the SMS message, using the
AT$QCSMSP command.
SMS Message Field Information
SMS messages can contain the following field information:
•
Length of SMS
•
Read status (new/read)
•
Lock status
•
Call back number (if available)
•
Type (alpha, numeric, voice mail — these are
carrier-specific fields)
•
Priority (urgent, normal)
•
Time received
•
Message content
SMS AT Commands
You can use the following SMS commands:
Note
•
Navigate through SMS messages (AT$QCSMSM).
•
Delete SMS messages (AT$QCSMSM).
•
Print/display current SMS message ( AT$QCSMSP).
•
Lock or unlock SMS messages (AT$QCSMSL).
•
Turn on/off SMS alerting (AT$QCSMSA).
•
Get information on SMS messages stored in memory
(AT$QCSMSI).
For more information, see SMS Commands on page 6-51.
Using SMS for Mobile-Terminated Calls
You can use SMS as a way of answering mobile-terminated
calls (even if the Gateway software does not yet support
mobile-terminated calls).
5-18
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
Here is a brief description of how such a scenario might work:
•
The modem is idle.
•
The host application sends a short SMS message to the
modem from the Gateway, perhaps using an email
account on the Internet. (A sample email address might
be “mdn@msg.globalstarusa.com.” This is an example
only. Contact your Service Provider to get the latest SMS
message address format for your modem.)
•
Your DTE application has set up the modem to listen for
SMS messages, in one of two ways:
❑
By turning SMS alerting on (using AT$QCSMSA).
❑
By having the DTE application poll for messages with
a timer (using the AT$QCSMSI command).
•
When the modem gets an SMS alert, it notifies the DTE
application.
•
The DTE application queries the modem for the SMS
message (using AT$QCSMSP and/or AT$QCSMSM).
•
The DTE application parses the message, looking for
strings that tell it to connect to the host application.
•
The DTE originates a data call (packet or asynchronous).
Once the call has been established, the modem functions
simply as a “pipe” for data between the host server and DTE
applications.
Note
See the CD-ROM in your Modem Integrator’s Kit for a sample SMS
script. Also see SMS Commands on page 6-51.
Globalstar Service Alerts
Service alerts are sent on the Control port or queued (if only
the Data port is connected and in use) whenever a service
parameter changes:
•
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Fades — Gateway/satellite coverage is lost for any
reason.
5-19
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Note
•
Acquisition — Gateway/satellite coverage is acquired
(entering service, leaving service, or changing Service
Providers).
•
Roaming status — when the modem “roams” onto a
Gateway outside the home service area (see your Service
Provider for the scope of these areas).
For more information, see Service Alert ($QCSA) on page 6-61.
Service Status Message
The AT$QCSTATUS command gets the Service Status Message,
which you can think of as a message detailing the information
that would display on the LCD screen of the GSP-1600
Tri-Mode Phone. The Service Status Message includes the
following items:
Note
5-20
•
Service available (yes or no)
•
Current service mode
•
Current Service Provider name
•
Gateway coverage “seen” (acquired) or lack of coverage
(lost)
•
Received signal strength (RSSI bars on the phone
display)
•
Gateway registration status (“i” indicator on the phone)
•
Roaming (yes or no)
•
Current call state (in call/idle)
•
Call type
•
Call duration
For more information, see Checking Modem Status on page 4-1 and
Service Status ($QCSTATUS) on page 6-62.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
Position Location Determination
The GSP-1620 modem has a “get position” AT command,
AT$QCPLS, that provides a latitude and longitude location as
well as a confidence value.
This command has a parameter to select between getting the
current position (via making a new request) or returning the
last stored position:
Note
•
If you select the current position and you are NOT in a
call, the modem returns “ERROR.”
•
If you select the stored position and there is no stored
position (you have never done a position request), the
modem returns “ERROR.”
For more information, see Position Location Service ($QCPLS) on page
6-66.
Using Packet Data
Globalstar and the GSP-1620 modem offer direct Internet
connectivity by bridging the “last thousand mile” air gap
using LEO satellites. This section details the capabilities
offered by the GSP-1620 modem for user connectivity and
packet data transmission.
The GSP-1620 modem lets the application device (DTE)
connected to the modem originate or receive a “packet data
call.” It establishes a PPP session, connects to the Internet,
and then establishes a session with a host application at the
remote end.
Note
80-99208-1 Rev. D
For a comparison of packet and asynchronous data, see Table 5-1 on
page 5-4. For information about asynchronous data service, see Using
Asynchronous Data on page 5-30.
5-21
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Data Rate and Throughput
The GSP-1620 modem offers full duplex transmit and receive
at a Data port rate of 9600 bps. Discounting packet data
overhead bits, the measured effective “user” throughput (that
is, customer data) averages 7400 bps for packet data.
Networking Software and PPP Sessions
The modem uses PPP as the transport mechanism for data
packets. Standard networking software establishes,
manages, and tears down the PPP session. For example, the
networking software is compatible with Dial-Up Networking
(TCP/IP and PPP protocols) on Windows 95/98/NT/2000.
When you develop embedded SCADA applications, you can
use off-the-shelf protocol stacks or write your own. Any
standard RFC 1661 or RFC 1662 compliant stack should
work.
Interoperability with Different Operating Systems
The GSP-1620 modem uses standard networking software to
establish, manage, and tear down the PPP session. The
modem has been tested with the following standard operating
systems:
Note
5-22
•
Windows 95/98/2000
•
Windows NT
•
Macintosh OS
•
UNIX/Linux
For Windows 2000, a possible software driver problem exists. For more
information, contact QUALCOMM Globalstar Customer Service, as
described in Appendix D, Product Support.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
IP Addressing for the GSP-1620 Modem
The OEM or Service Provider must choose either a dynamic
or fixed Internet Protocol (IP) addressing scheme, depending
on the intended use of the GSP-1620 modem:
•
If the modem is expected to be mobile and roam between
Gateway service areas, a dynamic IP addressing scheme
should be used. A new IP address may be assigned to the
terminal equipment whenever a new packet data call is
set up.
•
If the unit is “fixed” in its position and no mobility is
involved, either a dynamic or fixed IP addressing scheme
can be used. However, if the unit is “fixed” in its position,
no mobility is involved, and the user’s application
requires a fixed IP address, then a fixed IP addressing
scheme should be used.
The difference is that in a “fixed” addressing scheme the
user’s application at a host site or server will always know the
IP address of the remote DTE (SCADA application). In a
“dynamic” addressing scheme, the IP address is not known
until the remote SCADA application/modem and the
host/server are in an active session. In both the “fixed” and
the “dynamic” addressing scheme, either the SCADA
application/modem or the host/server can initiate a call/IP
session.
Dynamic IP Addressing
A dynamic IP address pool in the Gateway can be configured
with either private IP addresses or globally routable IP
addresses. Therefore, the type of IP address assigned to a
dynamic IP user during call setup depends on the Gateway
configuration. With a dynamically assigned IP address, the
modem can roam to another Gateway and re-establish Packet
Data service by having the system automatically assign a
new dynamic IP address.
With dynamic IP addressing, the modem can initiate a call/IP
session with the host/server. Once a session is established,
the assigned IP addresses remain constant until the session
is terminated. With the added capability of dormant mode
80-99208-1 Rev. D
5-23
Integrator’s Reference Manual
(see Dormant Mode Service on page 5-25), the IP address
assigned during this session remains active even during
temporary gaps in air link coverage or when a call is
temporarily released via dormant mode.
Fixed IP Addressing
Fixed IP addresses can be assigned instead of dynamic IP
addresses. With a fixed IP address, the server or host
application can use a given specific IP address that is
permanently assigned to the modem.
Note
In the first Gateway software release that supports modems, fixed IP
addressing requires that private IP addresses be “decoded” from the
modem’s IMSI (International Mobile Subscriber Identity). This precludes
the use of fixed IP addressing with roaming between Gateways.
Finding IP Addresses
If you need more information about your IP addresses, ask
your Service Provider.
Virtual Private Network Service
Since a fixed IP addressing scheme requires the use of private
IP addresses, a virtual private network (VPN; e.g., IPSec) or
an IP-in-IP tunnel would have to be established between the
host and the Globalstar Gateway, so the host can initiate IP
sessions with the remote/SCADA unit.
Contact your network provider for help in establishing a VPN
or dedicated line between your host server and the Gateway.
When using dynamic IP addressing, an end-to-end VPN
connection can be established between the remote/SCADA
unit and the host/server.
5-24
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
Dormant Mode Service
With dormant mode service, the Globalstar system can keep
the IP session “up” at the application layer (host and SCADA
applications) while dropping the air link/traffic channel, to
conserve Globalstar resources and to decrease billing time to
the user. The traffic channel is automatically reestablished
upon receipt of PPP traffic at the SCADA application end or
IP traffic at the Globalstar Gateway. The Globalstar system
then completes the transmission, with no loss of user data.
Dormant mode can be entered in two ways:
•
By issuing the ATH777 command to the Control port, as
opposed to using the standard ATH (hang up) command,
which would drop the traffic channel and terminate the
PPP session.
•
By using a timer. The idle timer default value is currently
0 (timer is turned off). You can specify a time between 10
and 255 seconds for the idle timer to time out and tear
down the traffic channel.
During dormant mode operations, each use of the traffic
channel to send and receive PPP data will produce one billing
record (called a Call Detail Record or CDR).
Steps
1
2
3
TO SET UP DORMANT MODE AND TEST HOW THE CALL GETS
RE-ESTABLISHED
1. On the Control port, set the idle timer by typing:
ATH+CTA=10 <CR>.
This command sets an idle timer value of 10 seconds.
Note: you can specify a termination character other than
<CR> for AT commands; see Command Line Termination
Character (S3) on page 6-25.
2. Type AT&C0 <CR> to ensure that RLSD (DCD) will remain
asserted in dormant mode.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
5-25
Integrator’s Reference Manual
3. Use Dial-Up Networking to initiate a packet data call on
the Data port.
For help with Dial-Up Networking, see your Windows
documentation.
4. Start a browser, go to a Web page such as
http://www.globalstar.com , and download something.
5. Wait for the data transfer to end, then wait 10 seconds for
the idle timer to expire.
or
On the Control port, type ATH777 <CR> to hang up the call
and immediately put the modem into dormant mode.
6. On the Control port, type AT$QCSTATUS <CR> and observe
how the CALL STATE is IDLE, indicating that the modem
has entered dormant mode.
7. In your browser connected to the Data port, click another
link.
8. On the Control port, type AT$QCSTATUS <CR> and observe
how the CALL STATE is no longer IDLE.
Note
5-26
For the above example to work, AT&C0 must be set so that DCD
remains asserted in dormant mode. Otherwise, the networking
application will terminate the PPP session. For more information, see
DCE Received Line Signal Detector Behavior (&C) on page 6-16. For
more information about dormant mode, see Set Dormant Mode Timeout
Value (+CTA) on page 6-49.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
Mobile-Originated Packet Data Calls
The GSP-1620 modem lets the application device (DTE)
connected to the modem originate a packet data call.
Steps
1
2
3
TO MAKE A MOBILE-ORIGINATED PACKET DATA CALL
■
Use the ATD#777 command.
The modem returns CONNECT if the call has been
established (for other result codes, see Dial (D) on page
6-20).
For another example, see Making a Call from the Data Port
on page 4-4.
Steps
1
2
3
TO HANG UP A PACKET DATA CALL
1. Enter Online-Command mode by using the in-band
control data escape sequence, “+++” surrounded by guard
time (for details, see Change from Online to
Online-Command Mode (+++) on page 6-40).
2. Use the ATH command (to hang up and end dormant
mode).
or
Use the ATH777 command (to hang up but leave dormant
mode active).
Mobile-Terminated Packet Data Calls
The GSP-1620 modem lets the application device (DTE)
connected to the modem receive a packet data call. It is the
responsibility of the DTE application to keep the modem
powered up if it is to receive incoming packet data calls.
However, the first Gateway software release that supports
GSP-1620 modems does not support over-the-air
mobile-terminated calls. Future releases of the Gateway
software will support mobile-terminated calls to fixed IP
addresses, and no modem upgrades will be required.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
5-27
Integrator’s Reference Manual
The following sections describe how the modem itself would
deal with incoming (mobile-terminated) calls. This
information is provided for developers who wish to configure
their applications for mobile-terminated calls, in preparation
for future releases of the Gateway software.
Tip
As an alternative to mobile-terminated calls, you can have the modem
receive an SMS message, then originate a call back to the host. For
details, see Using SMS for Mobile-Terminated Calls on page 5-18.
Tip
If your Service Provider supports Caller ID, you can have the modem
receive a non-packet-data call, then originate a call back to the host. An
incoming non-packet-data call to the DCE would toggle RI and wake up
the DTE application, which could decide whether to call back. For
example, for security reasons a callback might be allowed only if the
Caller ID number is on an approved list. Check with your Service
Provider for Caller ID availability.
Answering Calls Using the Data Port Only
The Data port uses both the RI and DTR signals. How the call
is answered depends on whether DTR is high or low:
•
DP_DTR high (asserted) — the modem will auto-answer.
•
DP_DTR low (de-asserted) — the modem will not
auto-answer, but your DTE application can decide
whether to answer the call by raising DP_DTR. On an
incoming call, the modem asserts RI and displays RING
to the appropriate port (Data port in this case).
Normally, if the application is using the Data port only and
DP_DTR is low, the modem would be powered off. To power
on the modem while still leaving DP_DTR low to prevent
auto-answering, you can wire the DTR pin high on the
Diagnostic port, instead of on the Data port.
The scenario could work like this:
5-28
•
DMP_DTR is high (asserted), powering the modem on.
•
RI on the Data port asserts.
•
DP_DTR is low (de-asserted), meaning the modem will
not auto-answer.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
•
Your DTE application decides to answer the call by
asserting DP_DTR.
Different operating systems handle the DTR-DCD
handshake differently. To configure it appropriately, you can
use the AT&D and AT&C commands.
For more information, see DTE Data Terminal Ready
Behavior (&D) on page 6-16 and DCE Received Line Signal
Detector Behavior (&C) on page 6-16.
Answering Calls Using the Data and Control Ports
If your DTE application is using both the Data and Control
ports, how the call is answered depends on whether DTR is
high (asserted) or low (de-asserted) on the two ports:
•
DP_DTR asserted — the modem will auto-answer.
•
DP_DTR de-asserted but CP_DTR asserted — the modem
will not auto-answer, but your DTE application can
decide whether to monitor RI and answer calls by raising
DP_DTR. On an incoming call, the modem asserts RI on
the Data port and displays RING to the Control port.
In this scenario, keeping DTR high on the Control port
powers the modem, while allowing you to leave DP_DTR low
to prevent auto-answering.
Roaming and Packet Data Service
The GSP-1620 modem is capable of both “fixed” operation in
one location (for example, a building, tank, pipeline, or well)
or “mobile” operation for applications on trucks, rail cars,
aircraft, or shipping containers.
For packet data service, roaming operation has the following
characteristics:
80-99208-1 Rev. D
•
Roaming within a Gateway service area can keep the PPP
session up the entire time, using dormant mode.
•
Roaming between Gateway service areas is supported.
However, there is no hard hand-off capability between
5-29
Integrator’s Reference Manual
separate Gateways. The PPP session will be dropped and
will have to be reestablished by the modem.
•
Once on a new Gateway, automatic re-registration will be
performed and a new dynamic IP address will be assigned
to the modem.
•
Roaming support for “fixed” IP addressing outside the
“home” Gateway service area is not currently supported.
Future design work to allow a DNS server to map IP
addresses to IMSIs is envisioned, which would permit
worldwide fixed IP address roaming.
If service alerts are enabled, a service alert is sent out the
Data/Control port whenever the Service Provider or Gateway
changes. This includes the modem changing from roaming to
home service area and vice versa.
Using Asynchronous Data
The GSP-1620 modem lets the application device (DTE)
connected to the modem originate or receive an asynchronous
data call. It can dial or be dialed by a modem at the host
server, connecting through the Globalstar Satellite
Communications System and the PSTN.
Figure 5-3 shows the various modems (the GSP-1620 DCE
modem, the Gateway IWF modem, and the host modem) and
other components involved in an asynchronous data call.
5-30
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
Figure 5-3. Asynchronous Data Call Components
Satellite
Outdoor Antenna
Tx
Rx
Globalstar
Gateway
Gateway IWF Modem
GSP-1620
Modem
DCE
PSTN
Interface Port
Data Port
(Data or AT commands)
Control Port
(modem AT commands)
SCADA Terminal
DTE
(running your
application software)
(REMOTE end)
Host Modem
(or modem bank)
Host
Server
(HOST end)
Like most modems, the GSP-1620 modem allows you to
customize asynchronous data connections, data compression,
and so on. For details, see Chapter 6, AT Command Reference.
Note
80-99208-1 Rev. D
For a comparison of asynchronous and packet data, see Table 5-1 on
page 5-4. For information about packet data service, see Using Packet
Data on page 5-21.
5-31
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Data Rate and Throughput
For asynchronous data, the GSP-1620 modem offers full
duplex transmit and receive at a Data port rate of somewhat
less than packet data’s 9600 bps, due to additional overhead
for asynchronous data. Similarly, the measured effective
“user” throughput (that is, customer data) is somewhat less
than the 7400 bps (average) for packet data. Asynchronous
connections take longer because of PSTN modem training
time.
Tip
QUALCOMM Globalstar packet data service has a lower overhead and
faster connection time than asynchronous data does. If your SCADA
application does not specifically need asynchronous data, use packet
data instead.
Mobile-Originated Asynchronous Data Calls
The GSP-1620 modem lets the application device (DTE)
connected to it originate an asynchronous data call.
Steps
1
2
3
TO MAKE A MOBILE-ORIGINATED ASYNCHRONOUS DATA CALL
■
Use the ATD<dial string> command.
The modem returns CONNECT if the call has been
established (for other result codes, see Dial (D) on page
6-20).
Steps
1
2
3
TO HANG UP AN ASYNCHRONOUS DATA CALL
1. Enter Online-Command mode by using the in-band
control data escape sequence, “+++” surrounded by guard
time (for details, see Change from Online to
Online-Command Mode (+++) on page 6-40).
2. Use the ATH command.
Note
5-32
The ATH777 command, which hangs up a packet data call and leaves
dormant mode active, will also hang up an asynchronous data call.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
Note
You can also hang up an asynchronous data call by de-asserting DTR.
However, if DTR is high on only one port and you then de-assert it, the
modem will begin its shutdown sequence.
Mobile-Terminated Asynchronous Data Calls
The GSP-1620 modem lets the application device (DTE)
connected to it receive an asynchronous data call. It is the
responsibility of the DTE application to keep the modem
powered up if it is to receive incoming asynchronous data
calls.
Here is what happens during a mobile-terminated
asynchronous call:
80-99208-1 Rev. D
•
The host server directs a host modem to call the
GSP-1620 modem (DCE), using the Dial Number (DN)
assigned to the GSP-1620 modem by the Service Provider.
•
The incoming call toggles RI and displays RING to the
appropriate port.
•
The ATA command tells the GSP-1620 modem (DCE) to
answer an incoming call (for details, see Answer Incoming
Call (A) on page 6-18; also see Automatic Answer (S0) on
page 6-25).
•
How the modem answers the call depends on how the
ports are configured. Port behavior for incoming
asynchronous calls is the same as for packet calls. For
details, see Answering Calls Using the Data Port Only on
page 5-28 and Answering Calls Using the Data and
Control Ports on page 5-29.
5-33
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Accessing Packet Data Over an Asynchronous Connection
Once an asynchronous connection has been established for
the GSP-1620 modem, it could be used to access packet data
(using protocols such as PPP or SLIP).
If PPP is used on top of asynchronous data service, the DTE
would be assigned an IP address. PPP would be required for
Internet access using asynchronous data.
Protocols such as Z-modem or Y-modem or other proprietary
protocols could be used to transfer data between the
GSP-1620 modem and the host modem, without negotiating
PPP.
If your SCADA application requires packet data over an
asynchronous connection, here are some implementation
suggestions:
5-34
•
For PPP data, contact your Service Provider to obtain
necessary account information (whatever you would
normally need for an Internet connection, such as an IP
address, DNS information, and so on).
•
Set up the asynchronous connections for the GSP-1620
modem as described in Using Asynchronous Data on page
5-30.
•
Use the AT$QCPKND command with a value of 2, to allow
mixing packet data calls and asynchronous data calls (for
details, see Packet No Dial ($QCPKND) on page 6-50).
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
Roaming and Asynchronous Data Service
The GSP-1620 modem is capable of both “fixed” operation in
one location (for example, a building, tank, pipeline, or well)
or “mobile” operation for applications on trucks, rail cars,
aircraft, or shipping containers.
For asynchronous or “dialed” data service, roaming operation
has the following characteristics:
•
A host server can call the asynchronous Dial Number and
reach the modem, regardless of which Gateway service
area it is currently located in (just as voice GSP-1600
Tri-Mode Phones can roam and be reached in any
Gateway service area).
•
Roaming within a Gateway service area is supported for
both mobile-originated and mobile-terminated
asynchronous data calls.
•
Roaming between Gateway service areas is supported;
however, if the modem is in a call when it reaches the
edge of a service area, the call will be dropped and must
be re-established on the new Gateway.
•
Once on a new Gateway, automatic re-registration will be
performed and a new data call can be established.
•
Fixed (or dynamic) IP addresses are not required for
asynchronous data service as they are for packet data
service.
If service alerts are enabled, a service alert is sent out the
Data/Control port whenever the Service Provider or Gateway
changes. This includes the modem changing from roaming to
home service area and vice versa.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
5-35
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Typical Modem Initialization Strings
Table 5-5 summarizes some typical GSP-1620 modem
initialization strings discussed in this chapter and Chapter 4.
For complete details about these and other initialization
strings, see Chapter 6, AT Command Reference.
Table 5-5.
Sample Typical Modem Initialization Strings
To do this...
Send these
commands or strings
Where to find more
information
Default all modem settings
ATZ
Reset to Default
Configuration (Z) on page
6-15
Make a packet data call
ATD#777
Dial (D) on page 6-20
Make an asynchronous data
call
ATD<phone number>
Dial (D) on page 6-20
Make a Markov test call
ATD#627568
Dial (D) on page 6-20
Make a Loopback test call
ATD#56672225
Dial (D) on page 6-20
Hang up a packet data call
and end dormant mode; or
hang up an asynchronous
data call
ATH
Hook Control (H) on page 6-22
Hang up a packet data call
but leave dormant mode
active; or hang up an
asynchronous data call
ATH777
Hook Control (H) on page 6-22
Check modem status
(Globalstar service, signal
strength, registration,
current call state and so on)
AT$QCSTATUS
Service Status ($QCSTATUS)
on page 6-62
Set up dormant mode (with a
20-second timeout value)
AT&C0
AT+CTA=20
DCE Received Line Signal
Detector Behavior (&C) on
page 6-16; Set Dormant Mode
Timeout Value (+CTA) on
page 6-49
Enable SMS Alerting
AT$QCSMSA
SMS Alert ($QCSMSA) on
page 6-57
Read SMS messages
AT$QCSMSP
SMS Print ($QCSMSP) on
page 6-52
5-36
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Developing Modem Applications
Table 5-5.
Sample Typical Modem Initialization Strings
(continued)
To do this...
Send these
commands or strings
Where to find more
information
Enter Online-Command
Mode while a data call is
progress on the Data port,
then re-enter Online mode
+++ (surrounded by
guard time)
ATO
Change from Online to
Online-Command Mode (+++)
on page 6-40; Return to
Online Data Mode (O) on page
6-23
Enable Globalstar service
alerts
AT$QCSA
Service Alert ($QCSA) on
page 6-61
Get current position of the
modem
AT$QCPLS
Position Location Service
($QCPLS) on page 6-66
Allow the modem to mix
packet and asynchronous
data calls, by handling
packets based on the previous
dialed data call type
AT$QCPKND=2
Packet No Dial ($QCPKND)
on page 6-50
80-99208-1 Rev. D
5-37
Integrator’s Reference Manual
5-38
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6 AT C
OMMAND
REFERENCE
This chapter provides complete details about the AT
command set for the QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620
Satellite Data Modem. The AT command set is the control
interface between the Data Terminal Equipment (DTE) and
Data Communications Equipment (DCE).
For a handy quick reference to all AT commands, see the
tables at the beginning of this chapter:
•
Table 6-1, “Operational AT Commands” — lists the AT
Commands recognized by the modem software.
•
Table 6-2, “Non-Operational AT Commands” — lists
commands that are recognized, but not supported, by the
modem. For example, because the modem has no speaker,
the command to set speaker volume will neither set the
volume nor return an ERROR. The command is accepted,
but performs no action.
Reference sections in this chapter contain complete details for
each AT command, organized into the following groups:
80-99208-1 Rev. D
•
Basic AT Commands (page 6-8)
•
Basic Action Commands (page 6-18)
•
Basic S-Registers (page 6-24)
•
Globalstar-Specific S-Register Extensions (page 6-31)
•
Extended Configuration AT Commands (page 6-32)
•
Online-Command Mode Commands (page 6-40)
•
Dormant Mode Commands (page 6-48)
•
SMS Commands (page 6-51)
•
Error Log Services Commands (page 6-59)
•
Service Status Commands (page 6-61)
6-1
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Note
•
Special Calls and Services Commands (page 6-64)
•
Protocol Stack Modification Commands (page 6-70)
For details about AT commands supported by the GSP-1600 Tri-Mode
Phone, see the QUALCOMM Globalstar Data User Guide (80-99126-1).
AT Command Quick Reference Tables
For many commands listed in Table 6-1 and Table 6-2, the
entries for “Value Range,” “No Value Definition,” or
“Power-On/Reset Default” have no valid value. These entries
have different symbols in place of values:
•
A dash “-” character means that, for this command, the
value is either not present or not allowed.
•
A caret “^” character means that no current value state
(or Power-On state) is kept internally.
•
An asterisk “*” character means you should consult a
footnote for this entry.
.
Table 6-1.
AT Command
Operational AT Commands
Brief Description
Value
Range
No Value
Definition
PowerOn/
Reset
Default
(reference page)
E
Echo OFF|ON (p. 6-9)
[0-1]
0
1
I
Request Identification
Information (p. 6-9)
[0-2]
0
^
Q
Result Code Suppression
(p. 6-12)
[0-1]
0
0
V
DCE Response Format
(p. 6-13)
[0-1]
0
1
X
Result Code Selection
Command (p. 6-14)
[0-4]
0
4
Z
Reset Default Configuration
(p. 6-15)
0
0
^
&C
DCE RLSD (DCD) Behavior
(p. 6-16)
[0-2]
0
1
6-2
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Table 6-1.
AT Command
Operational AT Commands (continued)
Brief Description
Value
Range
No Value
Definition
PowerOn/
Reset
Default
(reference page)
&D
DTE DTR Behavior (p. 6-16)
[0-2]
0
2
&F
Set to QUALCOMM-Defined
Default Configuration (p. 6-17)
0
0
^
A
Answer Command (p. 6-18)
-
-
-
A/1
Repeat Last Command
(p. 6-19)
-
-
^
D
Dial (p. 6-20)
*2
*2
*2
H
Hook Control (p. 6-22)
(0, 777)
0
^
O
Return to Online State
(p. 6-23)
0
0
^
S0
Auto Answer Ring Count
(0 disables) (p. 6-25)
[0-255]
-
0
S3
Command Line Termination
Character (p. 6-25)
[0-127]
-
13
S4
Response Format Character
(p. 6-26)
[0-127]
-
10
S5
Command Edit Character
(p. 6-27)
[0-127]
-
8
S6
Pause Before Blind Dialing
Time (p. 6-27)
[2-10]
-
2
S7
Connection Completion
Timeout (p. 6-28)
[1-255]
-
50
S8
Comma Dial Modifier Time
(p. 6-29)
[0-255]
-
2
S9
Carrier Detect Threshold
Timeout (p. 6-29)
[0-255]
-
6
S10
Carrier Loss to Disconnect
Timeout (p. 6-30)
[1-255]
-
14
S11
DTMF Tone Duration and
Spacing (p. 6-31)
[50-255]
-
95
S777
Silent Retry Timeout (p. 6-31)
[0-255]
-
150
+CMUX
Set Forward MUX Option
(p. 6-32)
[1-2]
2
2
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-3
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Table 6-1.
AT Command
Operational AT Commands (continued)
Brief Description
Value
Range
No Value
Definition
PowerOn/
Reset
Default
(reference page)
+CRM
Rm Interface Protocol Setting
(p. 6-33)
[0-1]
0
0
+GSN
Read phone ESN (p. 6-34)
-
-
-
+ICF
Character Framing Settings
(p. 6-35)
[(3-3), (0-3)]
3, 3
3, 3
+IFC
Local Flow Control Settings
(p. 6-36)
[(0-3), (0-2)]
2, 2
2, 2
+IPR
Rm Interface Baud Rate
Setting (p. 6-38)
(300,
1200,
2400,
4800,
9600,
19200,
38400,
57600,
115200)
*3
*4
~+++~5
Direct the DCE to change from
online to online-command
mode (p. 6-40)
-
-
-
+CFG
Set Remote Config String
Command (p. 6-41)
*6
*6
*6
+DS
IWF (Interworking Function)
Data Compression Control
(p. 6-42)
([0-3], [0-1],
[51265535],
[6-250])
3, 0, 2048,
6
3, 0,
2048, 6
+ES
IWF Error Control Selection
(p. 6-45)
([0-4], [0-4],
[0-6])
3, 0, 2
3, 0, 2
+MS
IWF Modulation Selection
(p. 6-47)
*6
*6
*6
+CTA
Dormant Mode Timeout
Setting (p. 6-49)
[10-255]
0
0
$QCPKND
Set Packet Data Reconnect
Methods (p. 6-50)
[0-2]
0
0
$QCSMSM
SMS list traversal and
manipulation (p. 6-51)
([0-3],
[0-1])
0,0
-
6-4
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Table 6-1.
AT Command
Operational AT Commands (continued)
Brief Description
Value
Range
No Value
Definition
PowerOn/
Reset
Default
(reference page)
$QCSMSP
Print formatted information
for current SMS message
(p. 6-52)
[0-1]
0
-
$QCSMSL
Lock current SMS message
(p. 6-56)
[0-1]
1
-
$QCSMSA
Set Alert on new SMS message
arrival (p. 6-57)
[0-1]
0
0
$QCSMSI
Send SMS message count
information to DTE (p. 6-58)
-
-
-
$QCERR
Send formatted Error Log
information to DTE (p. 6-59)
-
-
-
$QCCLR
Clear Error Log (p. 6-60)
-
-
-
$QCSA
Set Alert on Service change
(p. 6-61)
[0-1]
0
0
$QCSTATUS
Send formatted Service Status
to DTE (p. 6-62)
-
-
-
$QCTOD
Send formatted Time-of-Day to
DTE (p. 6-64)
[0-1]
0
-
$QCPLS
Send formatted Position
information to DTE (p. 6-66)
([0-1],
[0-1])
0,0
-
$QCMSTATS
Send formatted Markov
statistics to DTE (p. 6-68)
-
-
-
$QCMODE
Set Mode: Auto, Globalstar
(p. 6-69)
[1-4]
1
17
$QCTCP8
TCP Stack Changes
(p. 6-70)
([0-1]9
[0-1500]
[0-1500]
[0-1500]
[0-120000]
[0-120000]
[0-1000]
[0-6000]
[0, 1-100])
$QCVJ8
Use Van Jacobsen Header
Compression (p. 6-73)
[0-1]
80-99208-1 Rev. D
0
536
536
536
500
6000
100
6000
0
1
1
6-5
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Notes for Table 6-1
1
The A/ command is a special function that does not require the S3
command terminator character and causes the execution of the
previously entered AT command.
2
See the D command description for details on parameters.
3
When no parameter value is sent with the +IPR command, the
Data port default baud rate of 38400 is assumed.
4
The default baud rate is set with the +IPR command itself. When
the modem is power-cycled, the Data port baud rate is reset to its
power-up baud rate stored in non-volatile memory.
5 The ~ character represents “guard-time” before and after the +++
escape sequence.
6
This parameter is a quoted string, saved in the modem and
downloaded to the Gateway Interworking Function modem when
establishing an asynchronous data call.
7
The modem will always power-on into Auto mode.
8
This is an advanced AT command. Do not use it if you do not
understand what it does.
9
If <tcpmod> is equal to one, the values in the rest of the variables
are put into effect. If <tcpmod> is set to zero, the rest of the values
entered into the AT command are ignored, and the default values are
restored to the internal variables.
Table 6-2.
AT Command
Non-Operational AT Commands
Brief Description
Value
Range
No Value
Definition
PowerOn/
Reset
Defaul
(reference page)
L
Monitor Speaker Loudness (p. 6-10)
[0-3]
0
^
M
Monitor Speaker Mode (p. 6-11)
[0-2]
0
^
P
Select Pulse Dialing (p. 6-11)
-
-
^
T
Select Tone Dialing (p. 6-13)
-
-
^
6-6
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
AT Commands Overview
Command Alphabet
The ASCII character set is the alphabet used for the AT
command set. Only the low order seven bits of each character
are considered significant.
Case Sensitivity
Although AT commands are specified in uppercase
throughout this Integrator’s Reference Manual, both
uppercase and lowercase are valid. The modem does not
distinguish between uppercase and lowercase letters.
Command Line Format
AT command lines are made up of three parts: the prefix, the
body, and the termination character.
The command line prefix consists of the letters AT. The
command line prefix is followed by the body, which consists of
one or more AT commands. Command syntax for each specific
AT command within the body is as specified in this document,
for example, E or $QCSTATUS.
Space characters can be used freely within the body for
formatting purposes. Command lines are terminated with the
termination character specified by S-register S3 (see
Command Line Termination Character (S3) on page 6-25).
The default value of S3 is the carriage return character <CR>
(ASCII value of 13 decimal).
You can use an alternate command line prefix, which causes
the previously entered command line (body and terminator)
to be executed. This command line prefix consists of the
letters A/.
Note
80-99208-1 Rev. D
No terminator is required after entering the / character to begin
command line execution.
6-7
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Command Syntax
For AT command syntax in this chapter, the following
definitions apply:
•
Words enclosed in <angle brackets> identify parameters
that can be specified as part of the command.
•
Syntactical elements enclosed in [square brackets] are
optional and may be omitted from the command line.
•
Syntactical elements enclosed in {brackets} are required
and must be specified as part of the command.
•
The use of | between syntactical elements indicates that
only one of the elements may be specified as part of the
command. For example, the command syntax for
S3{=<value>|?} must be either S3=<value> or S3?.
•
The + and $ characters are used to identify extended AT
commands. + and $ denote standard and
manufacturer-specific extended commands respectively.
•
A semicolon (;) is used to concatenate additional
commands (basic or extended) after an extended
command.
Basic AT Commands
This section defines the basic AT commands that the
GSP-1620 modem currently supports and the functionality
provided by each. For all basic AT commands that require a
<value> parameter, if <value> is not present then a 0 is
assumed by the receiver.
The basic AT commands described in this section return one
of two possible result codes, which are listed in Table 6-3. Any
commands with exceptions to this have separate result code
tables in their sections.
6-8
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Results Returned
Table 6-3.
Result Codes for Basic AT Parameter Commands
Result Code
Condition
OK
The command was correctly recognized and
processed with any required <value> being
set.
ERROR
The command was unrecognized, the <value>
parameter was out of range, or some syntactical
error was encountered.
Command Echo (E)
Syntax
E[<value>]
Description
Determines whether or not the DCE echoes characters
received from the DTE during the Command and
Online-Command modes.
Valid Values
0
DCE does not echo characters.
1
DCE echoes characters.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
1
Results Returned
OK or ERROR; see Table 6-3 on page 6-9 for details.
Get Info (I)
Syntax
I[<value>]
Description
This read-only command returns three different
manufacturer information strings, depending on the <value>
of the parameter sent.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-9
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Valid Values
0
MODEL NUMBER: 205
1
MODEL: GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem
2
BUILD: <associated software build string
(version information)>
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
None.
Results Returned
OK or ERROR; see Table 6-3 on page 6-9 for details.
Monitor Speaker Loudness (L)
Syntax
L[<value>]
Description
Controls the DCE speaker loudness. The modem has no
concept of a monitor speaker. Therefore, this command is
recognized, but does nothing.
Valid Values
0
Lowest speaker volume
1
Low speaker volume
2
Medium speaker volume
3
High speaker volume
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
None.
Results Returned
OK or ERROR; see Table 6-3 on page 6-9 for details.
6-10
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Monitor Speaker Mode (M)
Syntax
M[<value>]
Description
Controls when the DCE speaker is on. The modem has no
concept of a monitor speaker. Therefore, this command is
recognized but does nothing.
Values
0
Speaker is always off and never turned on.
1
Speaker on until carrier has been detected.
2
Speaker is always on when OFF-Hook.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
None.
Results Returned
OK or ERROR; see Table 6-3 on page 6-9 for details.
Select Pulse Dialing (P)
Syntax
P
Description
Causes subsequent dialed digits to be signaled using pulse
dialing. This command is recognized but does nothing.
Valid Values
None.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
None.
Results Returned
OK or ERROR; see Table 6-3 on page 6-9 for details.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-11
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Result Code Suppression (Q)
Syntax
Q[<value>]
Description
Determines whether or not result codes are transmitted from
the modem (DCE) to the DTE. When result codes are
suppressed, no result is transmitted to the DTE.
Note
Because the modem depends on the CONNECT result code returned by
the Gateway IWF (for asynchronous data calls), this command is not
transmitted as part of the remote configuration.
Valid Values
0
DTE transmits result codes.
1
Result codes are suppressed and not transmitted.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
0
Results Returned
6-12
Result Code
Condition
OK
The command was correctly recognized and
processed with any required <value> being
set.
ERROR
The command was unrecognized, the <value>
parameter was out of range or some syntactical
error was encountered.
(none)
No result codes are transmitted when <value>
is set to 1.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Select Tone Dialing (T)
Syntax
T
Description
Causes subsequent dialed digits to be signaled using DTMF
tones. This command is recognized but does nothing.
Valid Values
None.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
None.
Results Returned
OK or ERROR; see Table 6-3 on page 6-9 for details.
DCE Response Format (V)
Syntax
V[<value>]
Description
Determines the contents of the DCE header and trailer
transmitted to the DTE with result codes and information
responses. It also determines whether result codes are
transmitted in numeric or alphabetic format. The text portion
of information responses is not affected by the setting of this
parameter.
The following table shows the effect of setting this parameter
on the format of information text and result codes. The values
<S3> and <S4> represent the ASCII value of the S3 and S4
registers respectively.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
V0
V1
Information
Responses
<text><S3><S4>
<S3><S4>
<text><S3><S4>
Result Codes
<numeric
code><S3>
<S3><S4><verbose
code><S3><S4>
6-13
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Values
0
DCE transmits limited headers and trailers and
numeric result codes.
1
DCE transmits full headers and trailers and
alphabetic result codes.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
1
Results Returned
OK or ERROR; see Table 6-3 on page 6-9 for details.
Result Code Selection Command (X)
Syntax
X[<value>]
Description
Determines whether or not the DCE transmits particular
result codes to the DTE when connecting asynchronous data
services. This command is recognized but does nothing
locally. Normally it controls whether or not the DCE verifies
the presence of dial tone and/or busy signal on the line.
However, it is used only to allow a non-default value to be
sent to the Gateway IWF modem.
6-14
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Values
Note
0
CONNECT result code is given upon entering online data
state. Dial tone and busy detection are disabled.
1
CONNECT <text> result code is given upon entering
online data state. Dial tone and busy detection are
disabled.
2
CONNECT <text> result code is given upon entering
online data state. Dial tone detection is enabled, and busy
detection is disabled.
3
CONNECT <text> result code is given upon entering
online data state. Dial tone detection is disabled, and
busy detection is enabled.
4
CONNECT <text> result code is given upon entering
online data state. Dial tone and busy detection are both
enabled.
In result codes, <text> is defined by the modem hardware and is not
user-specifiable.
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
0
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
4
Results Returned
OK or ERROR; see Table 6-3 on page 6-9 for details.
Reset to Default Configuration (Z)
Syntax
Z[<value>]
Description
Sets all modem (DCE) parameters to their factory defaults,
except the Rm interface baud rate (set via the +IPR command)
and the modem call mode (set via the $QCMODE command).
Factory defaults are specified by QUALCOMM.
If the modem is in Online mode, the data call is terminated
and the modem returns to Command mode. See Set to
Factory-Defined Configuration (&F) on page 6-17 for more
details on resetting the default baud rate and mode.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-15
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Values
0
Resets parameters to their factory defaults.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
None.
Results Returned
OK or ERROR; see Table 6-3 on page 6-9 for details.
DCE Received Line Signal Detector Behavior (&C)
Syntax
&C[<value>]
Description
Defines how the DCE controls RLSD (circuit 109) in relation
to detection of the received line signal from the far end.
Valid Values
0
DCE always places RLSD in ON state.
1
DCE places RLSD in ON state when connection is
active and places in OFF state otherwise.
2
DCE winks RLSD by briefly placing RLSD in the
OFF state and then back ON when a data call ends.
This is a QUALCOMM-specific value.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
1
Results Returned
OK or ERROR; see Table 6-3 on page 6-9 for details.
DTE Data Terminal Ready Behavior (&D)
Syntax
&D[<value>]
Description
Defines how the modem (DCE) responds when the DTE
changes DTR (circuit 108/2) from ON to OFF state when a
connection is active.
6-16
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Valid Values
0
DCE ignores DTR state.
1
DCE transitions to from Online to Online-Command
mode when DTR transitions from ON-to-OFF.
2
DCE closes connection (terminates call) when DTR
transitions from ON-to-OFF.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
2
Results Returned
OK or ERROR; see Table 6-3 on page 6-9 for details.
Set to Factory-Defined Configuration (&F)
Syntax
&F[<value>]
Description
Instructs the modem (DCE) to set all parameters to their
QUALCOMM-defined defaults. This command performs the
same operation independent of whether or not <value> is
specified. QUALCOMM-defined defaults are the default
values for each AT command specified in this chapter.
This command sets the modem baud rate to its
power-on/reset default value (see Set Rm Interface Command
Baud Rate (+IPR) on page 6-38), but does not reset the
$QCMODE value to its power-on/reset value. (Compare the
behavior of the Z command, Reset to Default Configuration (Z)
on page 6-15.)
If the modem is in Online-Command mode, the data call is
released and the modem returns to Command mode.
Valid Values
0
Resets modem parameters, except <call mode>
(set via $QCMODE), to their default values.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
None.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-17
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Results Returned
OK or ERROR; see Table 6-3 on page 6-9 for details.
Basic Action Commands
This section defines the basic AT action commands for the
modem and the functionality provided by each.
Answer Incoming Call (A)
Syntax
A
Description
Instructs the GSP-1620 modem (DCE) to answer an incoming
asynchronous data call. The modem establishes a connection
with the Gateway IWF modem, transmits appropriate
configuration data to the Gateway IWF modem, sends the A
command to the Gateway IWF modem, telling it to connect to
the host modem, and waits for the CONNECT (or other) result
code.
6-18
Note
Any additional commands that appear after the A command on the
same command line are ignored.
Note
This command can be aborted by DCE reception of any character on
the Rm interface. The command is aborted only if the DCE receives the
character prior to establishing the connection and sending the CONNECT
result code.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Results Returned
Result Code
Description
OK
Command is aborted either by reception of an
additional character from the DTE or by the
DTE turning off DTR (circuit 108) for &D1 and
&D2.
Also returned if there is no incoming call to
answer.
CONNECT
Connection is successfully established (call is
active on traffic channel). This result code is
transmitted when the DCD (circuit 109) is
turned on.
NO CARRIER
The connection could not be established; service
not activated, call cannot be completed, or
service unavailable.
ERROR
Command was issued in Online-Command
mode.
Repeat Last Command (A/)
Syntax
A/
Description
Although this is technically an AT command prefix and not
an AT command, it is listed in the command section for easy
reference.
This prefix repeats execution of the last command line
entered. If no command was entered previous to entering this
command, the previous command line is considered to be
empty and no action is taken.
Note
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Previous command line execution begins immediately after / is
entered. It is not necessary to enter a termination character (carriage
return; see Command Line Termination Character (S3) on page 6-25 for
details) to begin execution of the previous command line body.
6-19
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Results Returned
Result Code
Condition
OK
Previous command line is empty.
Result from
re-execution of
the previous
command line.
Previous command line is not empty.
Dial (D)
Syntax
D<dial string>
Description
Originates a call if the dial string is valid.
Note
This command can be aborted by DCE reception of any character on
the Rm interface. This command is aborted only if the DCE receives the
character prior to establishing the connection and sending the CONNECT
result code. The dial command can also be aborted by setting the DTR
line from active to inactive when &D2 is set.
Valid Dial Strings
The dial string must be made up of valid dial string
characters and dial modifiers. Valid dial string characters
are:
#*0123456789ABCD
Valid dial string modifiers are
W,!@$TP
Valid dial string modifiers may be included in the dial string,
although they will be ignored. Any other characters within
the dial string that are not recognized as dial string
characters or dial string modifiers by the DCE will be ignored.
This allows characters such as hyphens and parentheses to be
used in the dial string for phone number formatting purposes.
The modem supports packet data, asynchronous data,
Markov, and Loopback calls. If the dial string contains one of
the dial numbers listed below in Dial String Values, a packet
6-20
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
data, Markov, or Loopback call is initiated. All other valid
dial numbers, except dial numbers 1-99, initiate an
asynchronous data call and return the result code of the
Gateway IWF modem.
Dial numbers 1-99 correspond to phone book entries and are
translated into dial numbers stored in the specified location.
If the specified phone book location is unused, no call is
attempted and NO DIALTONE is returned. If the phone book
entry exists, a call is attempted using the dial number stored.
Valid phone book entries include the Dial String Values listed
below.
If ATD is entered by itself, then the modem attempts to call the
previously called number (from the call history) if one exists.
Dial string modifiers and unrecognized characters included
in this dial string are ignored as stated above.
Dial String Values
#777
Originate a packet data call.
#627568
Originate a Markov call.
#56672225
Originate a Loopback call.
Results Returned
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Result Codes
Description
CONNECT
Connection is successfully established (call is
active on traffic channel).
NO CARRIER
Service not activated — call cannot be
completed, service unavailable, or user has
released dial command.
NO DIALTONE
Service not available — modem is not
configured for service. Also returned if a
mobile-terminated call (which sends
unsolicited result code RING to the DTE) is
answered with a D<dial string> command.
6-21
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Result Codes
Description
BUSY
The modem is currently on traffic and cannot
originate a call, the called party is busy, or the
IWF returned busy.
NO ANSWER
Returned only if the IWF modem (for
asynchronous data calls) returns NO
ANSWER.
ERROR
Invalid dial string received or a packet data call
is already active.
Hook Control (H)
Syntax
H[<value>]
Description
Controls the “Hook State” of the modem. Going “ON-Hook”
(H, H0 or H777) while in Online-Command mode is used to
terminate an active data or test call. The “OFF-Hook” state is
not recognized by the modem, so H1 returns an ERROR result
code.
The data call can be terminated in two ways: either in
Online-Command mode using the H command, or in Online
mode when the DTE sets its DTR line (circuit 108/2) inactive.
The modem must be configured with &D2 to allow the DTE to
terminate a packet data call using DTR.
Note
6-22
H777 is used to release a packet data call and have the Gateway put
the call into dormant mode. Dormant mode is not supported for
asynchronous data calls. Therefore, for an asynchronous call, H777 will
return an OK result code and release the data call, but will not attempt
to go into dormant mode.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Valid Value(s)
0
Terminates the data call and returns to Command
mode.
777
Terminates the data call as above, but instructs the
Gateway to transition into dormant mode for packet
data calls.
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
0
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
N/A
Results Returned
See Table 6-3 on page 6-9 for details.
Return to Online Data Mode (O)
Syntax
O[<value>]
Description
Returns the modem to Online mode from Online-Command
mode.
Valid Value(s)
0
If in Online-Command mode, this command returns
the phone to Online mode. Otherwise, the command
returns NO CARRIER and takes no further action.
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
0
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
N/A
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-23
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Results Returned
Result Code
Condition
CONNECT
The command was correctly recognized and
processed and the transition from
Online-Command to Online mode was
successful.
NO CARRIER
The command was correctly recognized and
processed, but the connection was not
successfully resumed.
ERROR
The command was not recognized, the <value>
parameter was out of range or some syntactical
error was encountered.
Basic S-Registers
This section defines the basic S-registers for the modem and
the functionality provided by each. Table 6-4 lists the result
codes common to all recognized S-register commands.
Results Returned
Table 6-4.
Common Result Codes for S-Register Commands
Result
Condition
OK
The <value> sent was recognized and
supported. <value> is now the new value for
the specified S-register.
ERROR
<value> is not recognized. The command is
ignored and the specified S-register is left
unchanged.
<value>
Sx? is used to query S-register x’s current
setting.
OK
6-24
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Automatic Answer (S0)
Syntax
S0{=<value>|?}
Description
The S0 parameter sets the number of rings before the modem
will auto-answer an incoming asynchronous data call.
Valid Value(s)
0
Automatic answering is disabled.
1-255
Number of rings before an incoming asynchronous
call is automatically answered.
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
N/A
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
0
Results Returned
See Table 6-4 on page 6-24 for result code details.
Command Line Termination Character (S3)
Syntax
S3{=<value>|?}
Description
Represents the value of the character recognized by the
modem as the command line termination character. When
the modem receives a command line from the DTE, this
character indicates termination of the command line. This
character is also transmitted by the modem to terminate the
result code.
If this value is changed in the command line, the response to
that command line will use the new value.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-25
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Valid Value(s)
0-127
Range of ASCII characters that can be set as the
command termination character
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
N/A
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
13
Carriage Return character
Results Returned
See Table 6-4 on page 6-24 for result code details.
Response Formatting Character (S4)
Syntax
S4{=<value>|?}
Description
Represents the value of the character transmitted as part of
the response to commands. It is used in formatting the
response and follows the S3 character in responses when V1 is
in effect.
If this value is changed in the command line, the response to
that command line will use the new value.
Valid Value(s)
0-127
Range of ASCII characters that can be set as the
command result code termination character
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
N/A
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
10
New Line character
Results Returned
See Table 6-4 on page 6-24 for result code details.
6-26
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Command Line Editing Character (S5)
Syntax
S5{=<value>|?}
Description
Represents the value of the character recognized by the
modem as the backspace character. When the modem
receives this character, it interprets it as a request to delete
the previous character in the command line currently being
entered.
Valid Value(s)
0-127
Range of ASCII characters that can be set as the line
editing (backspace) character
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
N/A
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
8
Backspace character
Results Returned
See Table 6-4 on page 6-24 for result code details.
Pause Before Blind Dialing Time (S6)
Syntax
S6{=<value>|?}
Description
Represents the amount of time the DCE waits before dialing
a valid Dial Number.
This parameter is valid only for asynchronous data services.
It is sent to the Gateway IWF modem if different from the
default value but is otherwise not used by the modem.
Valid Value(s)
2-10
Number of seconds to wait before blind dialing
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
N/A
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-27
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
2
seconds
Results Returned
See Table 6-4 on page 6-24 for result code details.
Connection Completion Timeout (S7)
Syntax
S7{=<value>|?}
Description
Specifies the number of seconds to establish an end-to-end
data connection. The modem will disconnect the line if no
connection is established within this time. See Silent Retry
Timeout (S777) on page 6-31 for similar (Globalstar-specific)
control.
This parameter is valid only for asynchronous data services.
It is sent to the Gateway IWF modem if different from the
default value but is otherwise not used by the modem.
Valid Value(s)
1-255
Number of seconds to establish a connection or call
will be disconnected
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
N/A
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
50
seconds
Results Returned
See Table 6-4 on page 6-24 for result code details.
6-28
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Comma Dial Modifier Time (S8)
Syntax
S8{=<value>|?}
Description
Specifies the amount of time, in seconds, that the modem
pauses, during dialing, when a “,” (comma) is encountered in
the dial string.
This parameter is valid only for asynchronous data services.
It is sent to the Gateway IWF modem if different from the
default value but is otherwise not used by the modem.
Valid Value(s)
0
Disabled. Modem does not pause when “,” is
encountered.
1-255
Number of seconds to pause.
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
N/A
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
2
seconds
Results Returned
See Table 6-4 on page 6-24 for result code details.
Carrier Detect Threshold Timeout (S9)
Syntax
S9{=<value>|?}
Description
Specifies the amount of time, in 0.1 second increments, that
the modem should wait before dropping DCD after the
signaling carrier is lost.
This parameter is valid only for asynchronous data services.
It is sent to the Gateway IWF modem if different from the
default value but is otherwise not used by the modem.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-29
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Valid Value(s)
0
Disabled
1-255
Number of tenths of a second delay
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
N/A
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
6
tenths of a second
Results Returned
See Table 6-4 on page 6-24 for result code details.
Carrier Loss to Disconnect Timeout (S10)
Syntax
S10{=<value>|?}
Description
Specifies the amount of time, in 0.1 second increments, that
the DCE will remain connected before dropping DCD after
the signaling carrier is lost.
This parameter is valid only for asynchronous data services.
It is sent to the Gateway IWF modem if different from the
default value but is otherwise not used by the modem.
Valid Value(s)
1-254
Number of tenths of a second to wait
255
Disable timeout
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
N/A
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
14
tenths of a second
Results Returned
See Table 6-4 on page 6-24 for result code details.
6-30
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
DTMF Tone Duration and Spacing (S11)
Syntax
S11{=<value>|?}
Description
Specifies the duration and spacing, in milliseconds, of DTMF
tones while dialing a valid number.
This parameter is valid only for asynchronous data services.
It is sent to the Gateway IWF modem if different from the
default value but is otherwise not used by the modem.
Valid Value(s)
50-255
Number of milliseconds of delay
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
N/A
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
95
milliseconds
Results Returned
See Table 6-4 on page 6-24 for result code details.
Globalstar-Specific S-Register Extensions
This section defines the GSP-1620 modem-specific S-register
extensions for the modem and their functionality.
Silent Retry Timeout (S777)
Syntax
S777{=<value>|?}
Description
Represents the duration of the “call origination silent retry
timer.” This specifies the amount of time (in seconds) the
modem will attempt to originate a call before giving up and
performing reacquisition of the Globalstar system.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-31
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Valid Value(s)
Silent-Retry timeout in seconds
0-255
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
N/A
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
150
seconds
Results Returned
See Table 6-4 on page 6-24 for result code details.
Extended Configuration AT Commands
This section defines the extended AT configuration
commands for the modem and the functionality provided by
each.
Set Forward MUX Option (+CMUX)
Syntax
+CMUX[=<value>|?|=?]
Description
Sets the modem’s multiplex option for packet data calls. The
multiplex option selects the requested rateset for IS-95 calls.
This command affects IS-95 packet data calls only. This
command does not apply to Globalstar mode, which can only
operate at 9600 baud.
+CMUX? queries the current <mux> setting. +CMUX=? queries for
the acceptable range of <value>.
Valid Value(s)
1
Selects IS-95 rateset 1. This is roughly equivalent to
9600 baud.
2
Selects IS-95 rateset 2. This is roughly equivalent to
14.4K baud.
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
2
6-32
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
2
Results Returned
Result
Condition
OK
A valid <value> was received and processed.
ERROR
<value> is not supported.
+CMUX:<value>
? is used to query current setting.
OK
+CMUX: (1-2)
=? is used to query acceptable range of
<value> parameter.
OK
Set Rm Interface Protocol (+CRM)
Syntax
+CRM[=<value>|?|=?]
Description
Sets the Rm interface protocol. When no <value> is specified,
<value> is assumed to be 1.
+CRM? queries for the current setting of the <value>.
+CRM=? queries for the acceptable range of <value>.
Valid Value(s)
0
Asynchronous Data Services
1
Packet Data Services
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
0
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
0
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-33
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Results Returned
Result
Condition
OK
A valid <value> was received and processed.
ERROR
<value> is not supported.
+CRM:<value>
? is used to query current setting.
OK
+CRM: (0-1)
=? is used to query acceptable range of
<value> parameter.
OK
Get Modem User Terminal ESN (+GSN)
Syntax
+GSN[=<value>|?|=?]
Description
This read-only command returns the modem’s ESN only
when the bare command (AT+GSN) is entered. All other legal
syntax forms simply return an OK result code.
Valid Value(s)
N/A. This parameter is read only.
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
N/A.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
N/A.
Results Returned
Result
Condition
+GSN:
OK
This is considered the OK response for any
legal syntax that does not return the
phone’s ESN.
ERROR
An illegal syntax was entered.
+GSN: <Hex ESN>
ESN is all uppercase Hex character with
no 0x prefix, or h or H suffix.
OK
6-34
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Set Character Framing (+ICF)
Syntax
+ICF[=<format>|=[<format>],[<parity>]|?|=?]
Description
Sets the modem local serial port asynchronous character
framing (start/stop bits) used for transmitting and receiving
information between modem and DTE on the Data port of the
Rm interface.
Note
This command has no effect on the configuration of the Control port of
the modem’s Rm interface. The Control port has a fixed configuration of
8 data bits, 1 stop bit and no parity running at 9600 baud.
As shown in the syntax above, either <format> or <parity>
can be optionally specified. If only one value is specified then
the other is left unchanged. If both values are left unspecified
then both are reset to their power-on default values.
Optional parameters must be separated by commas. The
commas act as place holders (in the command parser) for any
missing optional parameters.
+ICF? queries the current setting of <format> and <parity>.
+ICF=? queries for the acceptable ranges of <format> and
<parity>.
Valid Value(s)
<format>:
3
8 data bits, 1 stop bit and no parity
<parity>:
0
Even parity
1
Odd parity
2
Mark parity
3
Space parity
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
See “Description” above for values assumed when optional
parameters are missing.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-35
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
<format> = 3 (for format 3 parity value is ignored)
<parity> = 3 (no parity is actual configuration)
Results Returned
Result
Condition
OK
<format> and/or <parity> are
recognized and supported, and have
been processed correctly.
ERROR
A parameter value was out of range
or a syntax error was encountered.
+ICF: <format>,
<parity>
? is used to query current setting.
OK
+ICF: (3), (0-3)
=? is used to query acceptable range
of parameters.
OK
Set Local Flow Control (+IFC)
Syntax
+IFC[=<DCE_by_DTE>|=[<DCE_by_DTE>],
[<DTE_by_DCE>]|?|=?]
Description
Controls the operation of local flow control between the
modem (DCE) and DTE:
Note
6-36
•
<DCE_by_DTE> specifies the method of flow control to be
used by the DTE to control the flow of data from the
modem.
•
<DTE_by_DCE> specifies the method of flow control to be
used by the modem to control the flow of data from the
DTE.
This command has no effect on the configuration of the Control port of
the modem’s Rm interface. The Control port’s configuration is fixed with
no flow control.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
As shown in the syntax above, either <DCE_by_DTE> or
<DTE_by_DCE> can be optionally specified. If only one value is
specified then the other is left unchanged. If both values are
left unspecified then both are reset to their power-on default
values.
Optional parameters must be separated by commas. The
commas act as place holders (in the command parser) for any
missing optional parameter.
+IFC? queries for the current settings of <DCE_by_DTE> and
<DTE_by_DCE>. +IFC=? queries for the acceptable ranges of
<DCE_by_DTE> and <DTE_by_DCE>.
Valid Value(s)
<DCE_by_DTE>:
0
No flow control
1
Software (XON/XOFF) flow control, stripping
XON/XOFF characters from stream
2
Hardware (RFR/RTS) flow control
3
Software flow control, no stripping
<DTE_by_DCE>:
0
No flow control
1
Software XON/XOFF flow control, stripping
XON/XOFF characters from stream
2
Hardware (CTS) flow control
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
See “Description” above for values assumed when optional
parameters are missing.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
<DCE_by_DTE> = 2
<DTE_by_DCE> = 2
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-37
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Results Returned
Result
Condition
OK
Parameters are recognized and
supported, and have been processed
correctly.
ERROR
A parameter value was out of range
or a syntax error was encountered.
+IFC:<DCE_by_DTE>,
<DTE_by_DCE>
? is used to query current setting.
OK
+IFC: (0-3),(0-2)
=? is used to query acceptable range
of parameters.
OK
Set Rm Interface Command Baud Rate (+IPR)
Syntax
+IPR[=<rate>|?|=?]
Description
Specifies the baud rate at which the modem communicates
with the DTE over the Data port of the Rm interface (see
Figure 5-2 on page 5-7). If <rate> is not specified, <rate> is
set to the power-on/reset default value. When the modem is
power-cycled, the Data port baud rate is reset to its power-up
baud rate stored in non-volatile memory.
The +IPR command does not affect the modem’s call mode (set
by the $QCMODE command, as described on page 6-69).
? syntax queries for the current setting of the Data port baud
rate. =? syntax queries for the acceptable range the <rate>
parameter can be set to.
Note
6-38
The modem does not support automatic baud rate detection.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Valid Value(s)
<rate>:
300
300 baud (bits/second)
1200
1200 baud
2400
2400 baud
4800
4800 baud
9600
9600 baud
19200
19200 baud
38400
38400 baud
57600
57600 baud
115200
115200 baud
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
See “Description” above for values assumed when optional
parameters are missing.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
See “Description” above for a discussion of power-on/reset
defaults.
Results Returned
Result
Condition
OK
Parameters are recognized and
supported.
ERROR
Parameters are not recognized or
supported.
+IPR: <baudrate>
? is used to query current setting.
OK
+IPR: ( ), (<baud>
range)
=? is used to query acceptable range
of parameters.
OK
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-39
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Online-Command Mode Commands
Online-Command mode allows the Online mode data stream
to be interrupted so that AT commands are recognized and
processed. An escape sequence, injected into the data stream,
directs the modem to enter Online-Command mode from
Online mode.
All AT commands recognized in Command mode are also
recognized in Online-Command mode. The H command and
the O command are of particular use in Online-Command
mode.
When the Control port is active, the +++ escape sequence and
the O command return their normal success status, even
though the Control port’s operating mode has not changed
from Command mode.
Change from Online to Online-Command Mode (+++)
Syntax
~+++~
Description
The escape sequence that directs the modem to change from
Online to Online-Command mode. Although this is not an AT
command, it is necessary to support Online-Command mode
and is, therefore, listed here for easy reference.
The ~ character indicates the “guard-time” both before and
after the escape sequence. This “guard-time” is necessary to
differentiate between the escape sequence +++ and any other
string of three + characters inside the Online data stream.
EIA/TIA/IS-707A defines the length of the “guard-time” as
“an appropriate time.” The modem defines the “guard-time”
to be 1 second.
Note
The “+++” string is transmitted through to the host side, even if the
escape sequence is recognized.
Valid Value(s)
N/A.
6-40
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
N/A.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
N/A.
Results Returned
Result Code
Condition
OK
Escape sequence recognized.
Online-Command mode is active.
None. Continue in Online
mode.
Escape sequence was not
recognized.
Asynchronous Data through Gateway IWF Commands
These commands support asynchronous data connections.
They have no effect locally. They are merely collected locally
and sent to the Gateway IWF for processes at the beginning
of an asynchronous data call.
Set Remote Config String (+CFG)
Syntax
+CFG[=<string>|?]
Description
Sets the remote configuration string sent to the IWF. The
string, up to and including the termination character but
excluding the quote ( "") characters, is stored by the modem
and sent to the Gateway IWF prior to connecting an
asynchronous data call (either mobile-originated or
mobile-terminated).
Each transmission of a +CFG command from the DTE replaces
the contents of the previous string. The string may be up to
248 characters long.
+CFG? queries the current setting of the config <string>.
+CFG=? is not a valid query and will return an ERROR
result code.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-41
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Valid Value(s)
Any valid combination of AT commands used to configure the
IWF modem of an asynchronous data call.
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
N/A
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
""
empty string
Results Returned
Result Code
Condition
OK
A valid quoted <string> was
received and processed.
ERROR
Badly formatted <string> or
syntax is not supported.
+CFG: <string>
? is used to query current setting
enclosed in quotes ("").
OK
Data Compression Control Command (+DS)
Syntax
+DS[=[<dir>[,<comp_neg>[,<max_dict>[,<max_string>]]]
]|?|=?]
Description
This extended-format compound parameter controls the
V.42bis data compression function on the PSTN link between
the Gateway IWF and the host modem (if provided in the
IWF). It accepts four numeric subparameters:
6-42
<dir>
Specifies the desired direction(s) of operation
of the data compression function from the
DTE point of view.
<comp_neg>
Compression negotiation specifies whether or
not the DCE should continue to operate if the
desired result is not obtained.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
<max_dict>
Specifies the maximum number of dictionary
entries which should be negotiated (may be
used by the DTE to limit the codeword size
transmitted, based on its knowledge of the
nature of the data to be transmitted).
<max_string>
Specifies the maximum string length to be
negotiated (V.42bis P2).
As shown in the syntax above, any of <dir>, <comp_neg>,
<max_dict> or <max_str> may be optionally specified. If any
parameter is left unspecified, its value is left unchanged. If all
values are left unspecified then all are reset to their power-on
default values.
Optional parameters must be separated by commas. The
commas act as place holders (in the command parser) for the
missing optional parameter.
+DS? queries for the current parameter value settings.
+DS=? queries for the acceptable parameter ranges.
Valid Value(s)
<dir>:
0
Negotiated...no compression (V.42bis P0=0)
1
Transmit only
2
Receive only
3
Both directions, accept any direction (V.42bis P0=11)
<comp_neg>:
80-99208-1 Rev. D
0
Do not disconnect if V.42bis is not negotiated by the
remote DCE as specified in <dir>.
1
Disconnect if V.42bis is not negotiated by the remote
DCE as specified in <dir>.
<max_dict>
512-65535
<max_string>
6-250
6-43
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
See “Description” above for values assumed when optional
parameters are missing.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
<dir>
=3
<comp_neg>
=0
<max_dict>
= 2048
<max_string>
=6
Results Returned
Result Code
Condition
OK
Parameters are recognized and have
been processed correctly.
ERROR
A parameter value was out of range
or a syntax error was encountered.
+DS:
<dir>,<comp_neg>,
<max_dict>,
<max_string>
? is used to query current settings.
+DS: (0-3),(0-1),
(512-65535),(6-250)
=? is used to query acceptable range
of parameters.
OK
6-44
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Error Control Selection Command (+ES)
Syntax
+ES[=[<orig_rqst>[,<orig_fbk>[,<ans_fbk>]]]|?|=?]
Description
This extended-format compound parameter controls the
manner of operation of the V.42 protocol on the PSTN link
between the Gateway IWF and the host modem (if provided
in the IWF). It accepts three numeric sub-parameters:
<orig_rqst>
Specifies the initial requested mode of
operation when the IWF is operating as the
originator.
<orig_fbk>
Specifies the acceptable fallback mode of
operation when the IWF is operating as the
originator.
<ans_fbk>
Specifies the acceptable fallback mode of
operation when the IWF is operating as the
answerer.
As shown in the syntax above, any of <orig_rqst>,
<orig_fbk> or <ans_fbk> may be optionally specified. If any
parameter is left unspecified, its value is left unchanged. If all
values are left unspecified then all are reset to their power-on
default values.
Optional parameters must be separated by commas. The
commas act as place holders (in the command parser) for the
missing optional parameter.
+ES? queries for the current parameter value settings.
+ES=? queries for the acceptable parameter ranges.
Valid Value(s)
<orig_rqst>:
80-99208-1 Rev. D
0
Direct mode.
1
Initiate call with Buffered mode only.
2
Initiate V.42 without Detection Phase. If V.8 is in
use, this is a request to disable V.42 Detection Phase.
3
Initiate V.42 with Detection Phase.
4
Initiate Alternative Protocol.
6-45
Integrator’s Reference Manual
<orig_fbk>:
0
Error control optional (either LAPM or Alternative
acceptable); if error control not established, maintain
DTE-DCE data rate and use V.14 buffered mode
with flow control during non-error-control operation.
1
Error control optional (either LAPM or Alternative
acceptable); if error control not established, change
DTE-DCE data rate to match line rate and use
Direct mode.
2
Error control required (either LAPM or Alternative
acceptable); if error control not established,
disconnect.
3
Error control required (only LAPM acceptable); if
error control not established, disconnect.
4
Error control required (only Alternative protocol
acceptable); if error control not established,
disconnect.
<ans_fbk>:
6-46
0
Direct mode.
1
Error control disabled, use Buffered mode.
2
Error control optional (either LAPM or Alternative
acceptable); if error control not established, maintain
DTE-DCE data rate and use local buffering and flow
control during non-error-control operation.
3
Error control optional (either LAPM or Alternative
acceptable); if error control not established, change
DTE-DCE data rate to match line rate and use
Direct mode.
4
Error control required (either LAPM or Alternative
acceptable); if error control not established,
disconnect.
5
Error control required (only LAPM acceptable); if
error control not established, disconnect.
6
Error control required (only Alternative protocol
acceptable); if error control not established,
disconnect.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
See “Description” above for values assumed when optional
parameters are missing.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
<orig_rqst>
=3
<orig_fbk>
=0
<ans_fbk>
=2
Results Returned
Result Code
Condition
OK
Parameters are recognized and have
been processed correctly.
ERROR
A parameter value was out of range
or a syntax error was encountered.
+ES: <orig_rqst>,
<orig_fbk>,
<ans_fbk>
? is used to query current settings.
+ES:
(0-4),(0-4),(0-6)
=? is used to query acceptable range
of parameters.
OK
Modulation Selection Command (+MS)
Syntax
+MS[=[<carrier>[,<automode>[,<min_rate>[,<max_rate>
[,<min_rx_rate>[,<max_rx_rate>]]]]]]|?|=?]
Description
This extended-format compound parameter is used to control
the manner of operation of the of the modulation capabilities
in the IWF (if provided in the IWF). It accepts a single,
user-definable, string parameter that contain the parameters
listed above. This string is sent to the Gateway IWF during
configuration by the modem, but is otherwise not used locally.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-47
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Valid Value(s)
<string>
<user defined download string>
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
""
empty string
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
""
empty string
Results Returned
Result Code
Condition
OK
Parameters are recognized and have
been processed correctly.
ERROR
A parameter value was out of range
or a syntax error was encountered.
+MS: <string>
? is used to query current settings.
Dormant Mode Commands
Dormant mode allows the modem to disconnect the active
data call, to save on over-the-air usage and charges, while
allowing the Gateway to maintain the state of the current
data call (e.g., assigned IP address). This allows for faster
reconnects when more data packets need to be sent or
received.
The dormant mode AT commands are +CTA and $QCPKND. Also
see DCE Received Line Signal Detector Behavior (&C) on page
6-16.
Note
6-48
Dormant mode is not available for asynchronous calls.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Set Dormant Mode Timeout Value (+CTA)
Syntax
+CTA[=<timeout>|?|=?]
Description
Sets/tests the number of seconds of inactivity (no incoming or
outgoing PPP data) before the modem times out the active
data call and transitions to dormant mode.
This timeout is only valid while in Online mode of a data call.
While in Online-Command mode, the +CTA idle timer is
disabled. Upon re-entering Online mode the dormant mode
timer is enabled and reset to restart the timeout period.
Valid Value(s)
0
Dormant mode timeouts are disabled. The Traffic
Channel is not released during inactivity periods.
10-255
Release the Traffic Channel after <timeout>
1-second intervals have elapsed since last sending or
receiving RLP data frames on the Um interface.
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
0
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
0
Results Returned
Result
Condition
OK
<timeout> is supported and set
as the dormant mode timeout
period.
ERROR
<timeout> is not supported and
the dormant mode timeout period
is left unchanged.
+CTA: <timeout>
? is used to query current setting.
OK
+CTA: (0, 10-255)
OK
80-99208-1 Rev. D
=? is used to query acceptable
range of the <timeout>
parameter.
6-49
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Packet No Dial ($QCPKND)
Syntax
$QCPKND[=<mode>|?|=?]
Description
Modifies the behavior of the modem when it receives a data
packet, while not in a data call. This allows the modem to
originate (or not originate) a packet data call upon receipt of
a packet without first receiving a Dial command. This feature
is necessary for modem-reestablished dormant-mode packet
data calls.
Select option 0 if you are making only packet data calls. Select
option 2 if mixing packet data calls and other types of data
calls (e.g., asynchronous data). If you do not want dormant
mode, select option 1.
Valid Value(s)
0
Disable Packet No Dial. If a packet is received by the
modem while not in a data call, the modem
originates a packet data call in the current mode,
even though a Dial command was not received.
1
Enable Packet No Dial. If a packet is received by the
modem while not in a data call, the modem discards
the packet and does nothing.
2
Selective Packet No Dial. If the last data services call
initiated with the Dial command was a packet data
call, then upon receipt of a packet the modem
originates a packet data call in the current mode. If
the last data services call was NOT a packet data call
(for example it was an asynchronous call), then upon
receipt of a packet the modem discards the packet
and does nothing.
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
0
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
0
6-50
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Results Returned
Result Code
Condition
OK
<mode> is supported and the PPP behavior
is set.
ERROR
<mode> is not supported and the PPP
behavior is left unchanged.
$QCPKND:
<mode>
? is used to query current setting.
OK
$QCPKND: (0-2)
=? is used to query acceptable range if the
<mode> parameter
OK
SMS Commands
The following commands access the Short Messaging Services
(SMS) of the modem. SMS messages are stored in the modem
until the user has retrieved and deleted them. They are
presented through this interface as a list, sorted in the order
received. The application can navigate the list and
manipulate the list (print, lock and erase messages) using the
following AT commands.
SMS Move/Delete ($QCSMSM)
Syntax
$QCSMSM[=<move>|=[<move>],[<del>]|=?]
Description
Traverses the list of SMS messages, optionally moving in a
specifiable direction and/or optionally deleting the current
message before the move.
This command takes up to two optional arguments for
movement direction (<move>) and delete current message
before move (<del>). If left unspecified, the <move> is
assumed to be forward with no <del>.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-51
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Values
<move>
0
Move to the next message in the list.
1
Move to the previous message in the list.
2
Move to the top of the list.
3
Move to the end of the list.
<del>
0
NO — Do NOT delete current message before
movement.
1
YES — DO delete current message before
movement.
Default Value(s)
0,0
Move to the next message and do not delete.
Power-On Default
None.
Results Returned
Result Code
Description
OK
The move and/or delete operation was
completed successfully.
ERROR
Incorrect syntax; unsupported <move> or
<del> values; or the move or delete operation
failed.
SMS Print ($QCSMSP)
Syntax
$QCSMSP[=<tformat>]
Description
Sends a formatted, multi-line string representing the
contents of the current SMS message to the DTE. As in the
$QCTOD command, an optional parameter can specify the
format to be used when displaying the SMS message arrival
time (see Time of Day ($QCTOD) on page 6-64).
6-52
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Values
0
Same as Time-of-Day format ‘0’.
1
Same as Time-of-Day format ‘1’.
Default Value
0
Power-On Default
None.
Results Returned
Result Code
Description
<formatted
message>
If a current message exists then it will be
formatted as described below with field
definitions also given.
OK
The format of the message will be:
INDEX:<Hexadecimal index>
NEW:[<YES|NO>]
LOCKED:[<YES|NO>]
NUMBER:[<Call back #>]
TYPE:[<Type>]
PRIORITY:[<priority (4
levels)>]
TIME:[<Time Stamp>]
LENGTH:[<decimal length of
message>]
MESSAGE:[<Message Data>]
OK
Each field of the given format is defined
in Table 6-5, “SMS Print Command
Field Definitions,” on page 6-54. This
format was chosen to avoid confusion
between message text and the OK. The
LENGTH field specifies the number of
8-bit bytes in the MESSAGE field.
ERROR
Unrecognized or unsupported syntax; or
there are no messages in the phone.
Format Field Definitions
See Table 6-5.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-53
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Table 6-5.
SMS Print Command Field Definitions
Field Name
Description
INDEX:
This field is a unique 32-bit value
(expressed in Hex) given to each SMS
message stored. It allows the SMS
messages to be sorted according to their
arrival time and not their time stamp. See
the TIME field for a description of the
issues around time stamps.
NOTE: Although the INDEX field is unique
for SMS messages currently stored (it is
initialized to a value one greater than the
highest index currently stored), it can be
repeated.
Example: When the highest indexed SMS
message is erased and the phone is
immediately reset, then that index will be
used again.
NEW:
The field indicates whether this message is
a newly arrived (<NEW:YES>) message or
one that has been previously read
(<NEW:NO>). A message is marked read
(<NEW:NO>) after the $QCSMP command is
issued.
LOCKED:
This field indicates that the user has set
the LOCK flag of the SMS message (See
SMS Lock ($QCSMSL) on page 6-56 for
details). The LOCK flag prevents a
previously read message (<NEW:NO>) from
being “autodeleted” from internal storage.
Autodeletion is a mechanism by which old
SMS messages are deleted without user
intervention, when the SMS storage
memory is full, to make room for a newly
arrived message.
NOTE: Locked messages (<LOCKED:YES>)
can be manually deleted, by the user,
without first unlocking the message
(<LOCKED:NO>).
NUMBER:
6-54
This field is a sender- and applicationspecific “call back” phone number.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Table 6-5.
SMS Print Command Field Definitions (continued)
Field Name
Description
TYPE:
This field represents the SMS message
type. Possible values are:
SMSI_CPT_95
SMSI_CMT_95
SMSI_VMN_95
SMSI_CMT_91_CLI
SMSI_CMT_91_VOICE_MAIL
SMSI_CMT_91_SHORT_MSG
SMSI_AWI_95
PRIORITY:
This field represents the priority of the
received SMS message. The IS-637
standard allows for four (4) levels of
priority; 0 being the lowest and 3 being the
highest.
TIME:
This field is a time stamp placed on the
SMS message, either by the Message
Center (that sent it) or by the modem (if the
message was received with no time stamp
attached). If the Message Center attached
the time stamp it will represent the time
the message was initially sent. If, however,
the modem attaches the time stamp, it will
represent the time the message was
received (for storage).
Although the IS-637 standard requires the
message center time stamp to be specified
in UTC, it is known that some Service
Providers’ message centers use local time.
Because this condition cannot be detected
and/or corrected automatically, a
user-selectable (per NAM) switch was
implemented to set whether the received
time stamp was adjusted to UTC or not.
NOTE: Whether the time stamp
represents time sent or arrival time is not
stored, and so cannot be determined by the
user.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-55
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Table 6-5.
SMS Print Command Field Definitions (continued)
Field Name
Description
LENGTH:
This field is the decimal count of the
number of 8-bit bytes in the SMS message
MESSAGE field.
MESSAGE
This field is the user data payload sent in
the SMS message. Normally this field is
text data such as a page or e-mail.
However, for purposes of the Data Services
it can contain application-specific binary
data as well.
SMS Lock ($QCSMSL)
Syntax
$QCSMSL[=<lock>]
Description
Lock or unlock (that is, set or clear the LOCK flag of) the
current SMS message. When a message is locked, it will not
be “autodeleted.”
“Autodelete” is a mechanism used to make room for newly
arriving SMS messages, if storage memory is needed, by
erasing OLD (previously read) text messages.
Note
The user may delete locked messages without unlocking them.
Values
0
Unlock the current message (clear the lock flag).
1
Lock the current message (set the lock flag).
Default Value
1
Lock the current message.
Power-On Default
N/A.
6-56
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Results Returned
Result Code
Description
OK
The requested operation was successful.
ERROR
If an illegal value is detected or any error
associated with changing the value of the LOCK
flag.
SMS Alert ($QCSMSA)
Syntax
$QCSMSA[=<alert>|?|=?]
Description
This command sets whether the DTE is “alerted” of the
arrival of a new SMS message. This “Alert” takes the form of
sending an unsolicited result code (SMS) out the Rm interface
to the DTE (much the same as a RING indication for incoming
calls). The destination port for the SMS result code is the active
AT command port.
Values
0
Asynchronous messaging will be turned OFF.
1
Asynchronous messaging will be turned ON.
Default Value
0
Power-On Default
0
Results Returned
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Result Code
Condition
OK
<alert> is recognized and supported.
ERROR
<alert> is not supported and ignored.
6-57
Integrator’s Reference Manual
SMS Info ($QCSMSI)
Syntax
$QCSMSI
Description
Returns the current state of the SMS database. This state
includes the counts of the list storage areas: NEW URGENT, NEW,
OLD and VMN. The VMN count will always be 0 because any
arriving VMN messages will not be stored.
Values
None.
Default Value
None.
Power-On Default
None.
Results Returned
Result Code
Condition
<SMS Info>
The operation completed successfully (see
below for details on format).
OK
Where <SMS Info> is a series of formatted
lines indicating the current state of the SMS
message database. The format is given below
with field descriptions given in Table 6-6,
“SMS Info Command Field Definitions,” on
page 6-59.
TOTAL:<total saved>
URGENT:<total new urgent>
NEW:<total new>
OLD:<total old>
VMN:<total vmn> (always ’0’)
LOCKED:<total locked>
OK
ERROR
6-58
An unrecognized or unsupported syntax was
entered.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Format Field Definitions
Table 6-6.
SMS Info Command Field Definitions
Field Name
Description
TOTAL:
The total number of SMS messages saved
in internal storage.
URGENT:
The total number of NEW SMS messages
marked URGENT.
NEW:
The total number of NEW SMS messages
not marked URGENT.
OLD:
The total number of OLD/Read messages.
VMN:
The total number of VMN messages
(always ‘0’).
LOCKED:
The total number of messages (OLD or NEW)
that have been LOCKED against
“autodelete.”
Error Log Services Commands
Retrieve Error Log ($QCERR)
Syntax
$QCERR
Description
Returns the modem’s error log and build information.
Values
None.
Default Value
None.
Power-On Default
None.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6-59
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Results Returned
Result Code
Description
<Error Log
Info>
If the requested operation was performed.
OK
An unrecognized syntax was entered.
ERROR
Clear Error Log ($QCCLR)
Syntax
$QCCLR
Description
Clears the error log.
Values
None.
Default Value
None.
Power-On Default
None.
Results Returned
6-60
Result Code
Condition
OK
The Error Log was successfully cleared.
ERROR
An unrecognized syntax was entered.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Service Status Commands
Service Alert ($QCSA)
Syntax
$QCSA[=<alert>|?|=?]
Description
Turns ON or OFF the unsolicited result code “alerting” the
DTE of service changes. Changes may include items such as
fade, acquisition, roaming, etc. This “Alert” takes the form of
sending an unsolicited result code (SERVICE) out the Rm
interface to the DTE (much the same as a RING indication for
incoming calls). The destination port for the SMS result code is
the active AT command port.
Values
0
Turns OFF service alert.
1
Turns ON service alert.
Default Value
0
Power-On Default
0
Results Returned
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Result Code
Condition
OK
<alert> is recognized and supported
ERROR
An unrecognized syntax or an invalid <alert>
value was entered.
6-61
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Service Status ($QCSTATUS)
Syntax
$QCSTATUS
Description
Returns the current status of the modem. Information
returned includes whether the modem sees a Gateway, the
signal strength (RSSI), registration status, current call state,
roaming, and so on.
Values
None.
Default Value
None.
Power-On Default
None.
Results Returned
Result Code
Condition
<Service
Status>
The operation completed successfully (see
below for format; see Table 6-7 for output
values).
OK
ERROR
An unrecognized or unsupported syntax
was entered.
Where <Service Status> is a series of formatted lines
indicating the Service State of the modem. The format and
description of the output elements are:
SERVICE AVAILABLE:<YES|NO>
SERVICE MODE:<mode>
PROVIDER:<provider>
GATEWAY:<gateway>
RSSI:<rssi>
REGISTRATION:<reg_status>
ROAMING:<YES|NO>
CALL STATE:<state>
CALL TYPE:<call_type>
CALL DURATION:<duration>
CALL NUMBER:<number>
BATTERY CHARGE:<percentage>
OK
6-62
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Table 6-7.
Modem Status Information
SERVICE
AVAILABLE:
YES if the modem has acquired Globalstar
service; otherwise NO.
SERVICE MODE:
Current service mode:
NO_MODE
AUTOMATIC
GLOBALSTAR
DEEP_SLEEP
SHUTDOWN
SOFT_RESET
LPM
ANY_MODE
RESELECTION_NEXT
PROVIDER:
Current Service Provider; or blank.
GATEWAY:
Gateway number in decimal; or -1.
RSSI:
Received signal strength, from 0 to 4:
0=no signal
4=strong signal
REGISTRATION:
Current registration status of the modem
with the Gateway:
NO=not registered
YES=registered
ROAMING:
80-99208-1 Rev. D
YES if roaming. NO otherwise.
6-63
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Table 6-7.
Modem Status Information (continued)
CALL STATE:
Current call state:
IDLE
SETUP_ORIG
SILENTRETRY
SETUP_TERM
AUTORETRY
CALLINPROG
HPSE_RESUME
MULTITONE
TIMEPAUSE
CALL TYPE:
Service Option used in the current call:
SIGNALING
VOICE (not applicable for data modem)
MARKOV
LOOPBACK
TIA_PPP
TIA_ASYNC
(or blank if no call is in progress)
CALL DURATION:
Duration of the ongoing call or the last
completed call; or 0 if no call has been made
since power up
CALL NUMBER:
Most recently called or currently calling
number.
BATTERY CHARGE:
Percentage of battery life remaining.
Special Calls and Services Commands
Time of Day ($QCTOD)
Syntax
$QCTOD[=<tformat|=?>]
6-64
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Description
Exports the time of day as received from the Globalstar
system. The application can use this to obtain an accurate
time.
Values
0
Format type 0 [see below]
1
Format type 1 [see below]
Default Value
0
Power-On Default
None.
Results Returned
Result Code
Condition
<Formatted TOD>
<tformat> was a valid format specifier.
The TOD string has two possible formats:
OK
NOTE: The time is reported in UTC.
Format 0:
<YYYY>:<DOY> <HH:MM:SS>
Format 1:
<DD> <MM> <YYYY> <HH:MM:SS>
The format fields have the following
definitions:
<YYYY>
<DOY>
<HH>
<MM>
<SS>
<DD>
<MM>
ERROR
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Year
Day of Year (starting with 0
for Jan 1)
Hours, 24 hour format
Minutes
Seconds
Day of month, same as
standard calendar days
Numeric month, starting
at 1
An unsupported syntax or <tformat> was
entered. Or unable to report time because
the system has not been acquired yet.
6-65
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Position Location Service ($QCPLS)
Syntax
$QCPLS[=<position type>|=[<position type>],[<time
format>]|=?]
Description
Returns the current position of the modem and the time (in
UTC) that the position information was acquired. $QCPLS=?
queries for the acceptable ranges of <position type> and
<time format>.
Note
If additional characters are received on the same port while this
command is processing, the command will be aborted.
Note
As shown in the syntax above, either <position type> or <time
format> can be optionally specified. If only one value is specified then
the other is left unchanged. If both values are left unspecified then both
are reset to their power-on default values. Optional parameters must be
separated by commas. The commas act as place holders (in the
command parser) for the missing optional parameter.
Values
<position type>
0
Request the current position.
1
Get the last position successfully obtained.
<time format>
0
TOD format ‘0’
(See Time of Day ($QCTOD) on page 6-64.)
1
TOD format ‘1’
(See Time of Day ($QCTOD) on page 6-64.)
Default Value(s)
<position type>
0
<time format>
0
6-66
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Power-On Default
None.
Results Returned
Result Code
Condition
N: DDD MM SS
W: DDD MM SS
<position type> was a valid
position type specifier.
The format of position is given as
DEGREES (DDD), MINUTES (MM) and
SECONDS (SS) for both Longitude
(N:) and Latitude (W:) coordinates.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
TIME:<time of
position>
The time of the position measurement
(TIME:) is also returned to the DTE
and follows the format of the Time of
Day (TOD) return value (specified in
Time of Day ($QCTOD) on page 6-64).
The requested format is specified
using the second <time format>
parameter to the command.
ERR:<positioning
error>
The positioning error (i.e., estimated
accuracy) of the returned position.
(ERR:) is specified in units of distance
rather than percent. The possible
return values are:
OK
< 300m (meters)
< 1km
< 2km
< 5km
< 10km
< 20km
< 100km
ERROR
An unsupported syntax was entered.
Or unable to determine the current
position, or there is no previous
position to fetch.
6-67
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Markov Statistics ($QCMSTATS)
Syntax
$QCMSTATS
Description
Returns the statistics from the last Markov call, or the
current statistics from a Markov call in progress.
Values
None.
Default Value
None.
Power-On Default
None.
Results Returned
Result Code
Condition
<Markov Stats>
The statistics of the previous Markov call (or
current call if one is in progress).
OK
Note: The statistics may not be saved over a
power-down or reboot of the modem.
The format of the <Markov Stats> return
strings is as follows (all returned statistics are
in Hex):
<Markov Stats>
MARKOV RATE:
BIT FRAMES:
BAD FRAMES:
TOTAL FRAMES:
TOTAL FRAMES:
EXPECTED/RECEIVED RATE:
(expected rates frames are on the vertical axis;
received rate frames are on the horizontal axis,
going from zero to full in each case)
GOOD FRAMES:
(frame rate order: zero quarter half full)
ERASURES:
(frame rate order: zero quarter half full)
If no current <Markov Stats> are available
(either from a previous or current call) for
whatever reason, the <Markov Stats> table is
filled with zeros.
ERROR
6-68
An unsupported syntax was entered.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Set Mode ($QCMODE)
Syntax
$QCMODE[=<mode>|?|=?]
Description
This command sets the modem’s call mode. It does not affect
the Rm interface baud rate (set by the +IPR command, as
described on page 6-38).
Note
When the modem is powered up, the modem call mode is set to 1
(auto-detect mode). However, when the modem is reset by the Z
command, the current call mode is left unchanged. Resetting with the
&F command does reset the call mode.
Values(s)
Note
1
Auto-detect Mode
2
Globalstar Only Mode
Since the GSP-1620 modem is single-mode (Globalstar only),
“Auto-detect Mode” has the same effect as “Globalstar Only Mode.” The
GSP-1600 Tri-Mode Phone has two additional modes: digital cellular
and analog cellular.
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
1
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
1
Results Returned
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Result
Condition
OK
<mode> is supported and Call
Mode is set.
6-69
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Result
Condition
ERROR
<mode> is not supported and Call
Mode is left unchanged.
$QCMODE:<mode>
? is used to query current setting.
OK
$QCMODE:(1-2)
=? is used to query acceptable
range of the <mode> parameter.
OK
Protocol Stack Modification Commands
Caution
We strongly recommend that you do not use these commands if you do
not have a thorough understanding of what they do and of how TCP
networking works.
TCP is used to ensure end-to-end integrity of data on the
over-the-air link in an asynchronous data call. These
commands allow modification of the TCP stacks between the
modem and the Gateway IWF.
Caution
Improperly setting these commands can cause severe performance
degradation.
TCP Stack Changes ($QCTCP)
Syntax
$QCTCP[=<tcpmod>|[=<tcpmod>[,<lowertxmss>[,
<uppertxmss>[,<rxmss>[,<minrto>[,<maxrto>[,<minato>[
,<maxato>[,<maxtcpbackoff>]]]]]]]]]|?|=?]
Description
Allows you to modify the behavior of the TCP stack by
accessing to several variables that control it. This includes
the ability to change the maximum segment size for both
transmit and receive, as well as the ability to change the
values controlling the retransmit timer, and the
acknowledgment timer.
6-70
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Note
As shown in the syntax above, any of the parameters can be optionally
specified. Any unspecified value is left unchanged. Optional parameters
must be separated by commas. The commas act as place holders (in
the command parser) for the missing optional parameters.
<tcpmod>
Defines whether or not to use the default
TCP values, or to use the values passed in.
<lowertxmss>
Sets the lower bound for outgoing TCP
packet sizes.
<uppertxmss>
Sets the upper bound for outgoing TCP
packet sizes. The variable can be
overwritten during TCP negotiation if the
other end of the connection sets a TCP MSS
lower than this value.
<rxmss>
Sets the size for the incoming TCP MSS.
<minrto>
Sets the minimum value for the range used
to calculate the retransmit timeout.
<maxrto>
Sets the maximum value for the range used
to calculate the retransmit timeout.
<minato>
Set the minimum value for the range used
to calculate the acknowledgment timeout.
<maxato>
Sets the maximum values for the range
used to calculate the acknowledgment
timeout.
<tcpmaxbackoff>
Sets the number of TCP backoffs allowed
before tearing down the connection. A value
of zero will keep the phone from tearing
down the call based on the number of TCP
backoffs.
If <tcpmod> is equal to one, the values in the rest of the
variables are put into effect. If <tcpmod> is set to zero, the rest
of the values entered into the AT command are ignored, and
the default values are restored to the internal variables.
Valid Value(s)
<tcpmod>
0
Use the default values for the TCP stack.
1
Use the values passed in for the TCP stack.
<lowertxmss>
0-1500
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Lower bound for the transmit MSS
6-71
Integrator’s Reference Manual
<uppertxmss>
0-1500
Upper bound for the transmit MSS
<rxmss>
0-1500
Receive MSS requested
<minrto>
0-120000
Minimum Retransmit Timeout (in ms)
<maxrto>
0-120000
Maximum Retransmit Timeout (in ms)
<minato>
0-1000
Minimum Acknowledgment Timeout (in ms)
<maxato>
0-6000
Maximum Acknowledgment Timeout (in ms)
<maxtcpbackoff>
0
TCP backoffs will never release call.
1-100
Number of TCP backoffs before terminating call.
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
See “Description” above for values assumed when optional
parameters are missing.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
6-72
<tcpmod>
=0
<lowertxmss>
= 536
<uppertxmss>
= 536
<rxmss>
= 536
<minrto>
= 500
<maxrto>
= 6000
<minato>
= 100
<maxato>
= 6000
<tcpmaxbackoff>
=0
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AT Command Reference
Results Returned
Result Code
Condition
OK
The values entered into the
command were correct.
ERROR
Incorrect syntax, value out of range,
or incorrect number of parameters
$QCTCP: <tcpmod>,
<lowertxmss>,
<uppertxmss>,
<rxmss>,<minrto>,
<maxrto>,<minato>,
<maxato>,
<tcpmaxbackoff>
? is used to query current setting.
$QCTCP: (0-1),
(0-1500), (0,1500),
(0-1500),(0-54464),
(0-54464),(0-1000),
(0-6000),(0-100)
=? is used to query acceptable range
if the <value> parameter
Use Van Jacobsen Header Compression ($QCVJ)
Syntax
$QCVJ[=<usevj>|?|=?]
Description
Allows Van Jacobsen header compression to be turned on or
off for the next negotiated connection.
Valid Value(s)
<usevj>
0
Turn Van Jacobsen header compression off.
1
Use Van Jacobsen header compression.
Missing Parameter Default Value(s)
1
Use Van Jacobsen header compression.
Power-On/Reset Default Value(s)
<usevj>
80-99208-1 Rev. D
=1
6-73
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Results Returned
6-74
Result Code
Condition
OK
The requested operation was successful.
ERROR
If an illegal value is detected
$QCVJ: <usevj>
? Is used to query current <usevj> value.
$QCVJ: (0-1)
=? is used to query acceptable range of
parameters.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
7I
NTEGRATING GSP-1620 MODEMS
INTO OEM PRODUCTS
OEMs can buy QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite
Data Modems in bulk direct from QUALCOMM, then
integrate them into market-specific products. Bulk modems
come with antennas, but not cables.
As an OEM, you provide custom modem and antenna cables
as appropriate to your specific products. You must also mount
the modem boards in protective enclosures, which field
technicians can then install on-site, connected to antennas.
This chapter is intended for
•
OEMs who integrate GSP-1620 modem hardware into
products (for example, oil pipeline monitors)
•
Field technicians who install those products on site
It is assumed that OEMs and field technicians can work
directly from the technical specifications. This chapter
contains the following information:
•
•
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating modems into products
❑
Hardware description of the modem, including
mechanical descriptions; specifications; Data, Control
and Diagnostic port signaling and pinouts; DC power;
and grounding information
❑
Guidelines for mounting modems in enclosures
Mounting antennas on-site
❑
Antenna specifications
❑
Antenna cable specifications and lengths
7-1
Integrator’s Reference Manual
❑
•
Positioning antennas for Globalstar service, and
mounting and sealing antennas
Environmental specifications for the GSP-1620 modem
and antenna
Caution
For your safety and to avoid potential damage to the equipment,
observe the Cautions and Warnings on page xxiv.
Caution
When integrating the GSP-1620 modem and its antenna into OEM
products, be sure to abide by all RF restrictions as described in
Appendix B.
Integrating Modems into Products
This section describes the QUALCOMM Globalstar
GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem hardware, including
mechanical descriptions of the modem, its Data, Control and
Diagnostic port signals and pinouts, DC power, and
grounding.
Using this information for your specific products, you can
create custom cables, which connect a modem (the DCE) to:
Note
7-2
•
A terminal or processor (the DTE) running custom
application software for your product — using the Data
port only, or both Data and Control ports
•
An appropriate DC power source
•
A Dielectric Resonator Antenna (DRA) — for information
about installing antennas and calculating cable lengths,
see Mounting Antennas On-Site on page 7-22.
This section also describes the Diagnostic port, although typically it is
used only during development and for service programming.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
Modem Mechanical Description
The GSP-1620 modem is a sandwich made of two circuit card
assemblies (CCAs) that are open and unprotected. As a
result, the GSP-1620 modem must be shielded from direct
impacts, precipitation, and particulates.
I/O is obtained through four connectors:
•
Power, Data, and Control functions are accessed via a
25-pin “D” style connector.
•
Globalstar RF transmit signals are routed to an
MCX-style coaxial connector (labeled J3 on the board).
•
Globalstar RF receive signals are routed to an MCX-style
coaxial connector (labeled J7 on the board).
•
The Diagnostic port interface is a 9-pin “D” style
connector.
Modem Board Layout
This section includes the following technical drawings
depicting the modem:
Note
80-99208-1 Rev. D
•
GSP-1620 Modem Board Layout (Top View), Figure 7-1
•
GSP-1620 Modem Board Layout (Side and Bottom View),
Figure 7-2
In Figure 7-1 and Figure 7-2, dimensions are shown as: millimeters
[inches]. Millimeters are the controlling dimensions on these drawings.
Inch dimensions are for reference only.
7-3
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Figure 7-1. GSP-1620 Modem Board Layout (Top View)
75.00
[2.95]
31.18
[1.228]
11.84
[.466]
190.00
[7.480]
A
158.75
[6.250 ]
127.50
[5.019]
A
7.28
[.287]
A
37.51
[1.477]
7.27
[.286]
Holes marked “ A” connect to chassis ground.
7-4
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
Figure 7-2. GSP-1620 Modem Board Layout (Side/ Bottom Views)
180.00
[7.087]
100.00
[3.937]
14.04
[.553]
17.16
[.676]
80-99208-1 Rev. D
6X ø 3.50
[.138]
67.00
[2.638]
5.00
[.197]
4.00
[.157]
7-5
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Modem Dimensions and Weight
Modem dimensions are 190 x 75 x 17 millimeters (7.48 x 2.95
x 0.68 inches).
Modem weight is less than 180 grams (6.3 ounces).
Modem Antenna Connectors
The GSP-1620 modem has two (2) MCX snap-in connectors
for the antenna leads, connecting the DRA antenna to the
modem:
Caution
Caution
•
Transmit (Tx) lead is labeled J3.
•
Receive (Rx) lead is labeled J7.
When you connect antenna cables, be careful to connect the Tx
connector on the antenna to the Tx connector (J3) on the modem, and
the Rx connector on the antenna to the Rx connector (J7) on the
modem. Crossing the Tx and Rx cables can damage the modem.
The MCX connectors are secured only by a solder joint and are not
designed to withstand excessive force. When cables are connected to
these connectors, care must be taken to ensure adequate strain relief is
provided.
Data and Control Ports
The Data and Control ports are combined into a single DB-25
male upright connector, which provides the primary user
interface:
7-6
•
The connector contains two (2) 9-pin serial ports, DC
power leads, and a reset lead.
•
Line speed for the Data port is variable between 300 bps
and 115.2 kbps. (This is different from the over-the-air
Data port rate, which is 9600 bps.)
•
Line speed for the Control port is fixed at 9600 bps.
•
Signaling uses 8 bits, no parity and 1 stop bit (8,N,1).
•
All ports are ESD and short-circuit protected.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
Note
The modem signal naming convention assumes that the modem is the
DCE and that the user application is the DTE.
DTR/DSR Signal and Power On/Off
An active DTR on any of the three serial ports (Data, Control
or Diagnostic) turns on the GSP-1620 modem (if DC power is
applied first). The modem then boots up from the shut-down
state and asserts DSR to indicate that it is booted up and
ready to communicate.
The modem starts its power-down sequence only after the
DTR lines on all three serial ports connected to the modem
are de-asserted for a minimum of one second. Just before the
modem powers off, it de-asserts DSR to let the application
know that it is okay to remove DC power to the modem
without risk of losing volatile data.
This mode of operation is useful in cases where power to the
modem as well as the rest of the system might be turned off
periodically to conserve battery power.
In case the modem “hangs up” and the watchdog circuit does
not reset the modem, you can reset the modem by pulling the
MODULE_RESET_N low for a period of 5 seconds or more and
releasing it to allow it to float. Pulling the line low has the
effect of a power-on reset and not just a watchdog reset.
Caution
80-99208-1 Rev. D
The watchdog circuit is internal to the modem and is a protection against
a possible crash of the modem software. The RESET line should be
used only as a last-resort method of resetting the modem when the
application is sure that the modem is not responding to any commands.
Asserting the RESET line can result in loss of non-volatile data,
including the current state of the modem.
7-7
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Changing Data and Control Port Configuration
You may change the Data and Control port configuration at
any time, provided that the following requirements are met:
•
The minimum hold time for both asserting and
de-asserting either port DTR is 10 milliseconds.
•
The minimum time from asserting DTR to data
transmission is 10 milliseconds.
If these minimum times are not observed, AT command
processing may be affected. The maximum time for holding
all DTRs de-asserted is one second. If this time is exceeded,
the modem will begin its power-down sequence.
Whenever the DTR signal of the Data or Control port has
been de-asserted for a period of 10 seconds, the GSP-1620
modem shuts down the port’s RS-232 transmitter to conserve
power. This causes the port’s DSR signal to be de-asserted.
The effects of changing the port configuration are detailed in
Port Activation (DTR) Changes during Operation on page
5-15.
Control Port Signals
The Control port (CP) is an RS-232-level asynchronous
interface operating at 9600 bps using Transmit Data (TxD),
Receive Data (RxD), Data Terminal Ready (DTR), Data Set
Ready (DSR), and Signal Common (GND).
RxD and TxD perform data transfer and handshaking, while
DTR is used to turn on the modem and to let it know that
there is an application waiting to talk to it.
The Control port specifically allows dedicated usage of the
Data Port by the application. It allows all AT commands,
modem alerting, and SMS messages to be sent
simultaneously via a separate “control” port to/from the
modem. This separation of functionality is especially useful in
dormant mode, when the application and host sessions are
active, and thus the Data port appears active/in use, although
a Globalstar traffic channel is not up (no “In Call Status
Message”).
7-8
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
The Control port is “enabled” by asserting DTR on the Control
port.
In case of a reboot (due to fatal errors or any other reason),
the DSR line will be set inactive so that the user application
can detect a reset condition and take the necessary action.
Data Port Signals
The Data port (DP) is a hardware-flow controlled, RS-232
level, asynchronous serial interface:
•
The Data port uses the following RS-232 leads for
operations: Transmit Data (TxD), Receive Data (RxD),
Clear To Send (CTS), Data Terminal Ready (DTR), Data
Set Ready (DSR), Ready to Send (RTS), Data Carrier
Detect (DCD), Ring Indicator (RI), and Signal Common
(GND).
•
The format for data on the Data port is 8 bits, no parity
and 1 stop bit.
•
The baud rate is user-configurable to selected rates from
300 bps to 115.2 kbps. The baud rate is adjustable in
software.
•
In case of a reboot (due to fatal errors or any other
reason), the DCD and DSR lines will be set inactive so
that the user application can detect a reset condition and
take the necessary action.
•
Functionally, the Data port integrates AT commands and
alert messages as well as application data traffic.
DB-25 Data and Control Port Pinouts
Table 7-1 provides detailed information about the Interface
connector pinouts.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
7-9
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Table 7-1.
Interface Connector Pinouts
Pin
Number
Signal Name
Signal
Level
Direction
User <-> Modem
Description
1
Chassis
Ground
-
Chassis Ground
Isolated chassis ground
2
DP_TXD
RS-232
DTE -> DCE
Data port TXD
3
DP_RXD
RS-232
DTE <- DCE
Data port RXD
4
DP_RTS
RS-232
DTE -> DCE
Data port RTS
5
DP_CTS
RS-232
DTE <- DCE
Data port CTS
6
DP_DSR
RS-232
DTE <- DCE
This pin is the DSR for the
Data port and is asserted
when the modem detects
activity on the Data port
and is ready to
communicate with the
DTE over this port. This
signal is de-asserted when
the modem detects no
activity on the Data port;
or is de-asserted as an
acknowledgment to the
user, indicating that the
modem has completed its
power- down sequence
after the DTR lines of all
serial ports have
de-asserted.
7
Ground
Ground
Ground return
Ground return
8
DP_DCD
RS-232
DTE <- DCE
Data port DCD
9
DC_POWER
5.6V-16V
Modem power
10
DC_POWER
5.6V-16V
Modem power
11
Ground
Ground
Ground return
Ground return
12
CP_DTR
RS-232
DTE -> DCE
Control port DTR
13
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
14
CP_TXD
RS-232
DTE -> DCE
7-10
Control port TXD
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
Table 7-1.
Interface Connector Pinouts (continued)
Pin
Number
Signal Name
Signal
Level
Direction
User <-> Modem
Description
15
CP_DSR
RS-232
DTE <- DCE
This pin is the DSR for the
Control port and is
asserted when the modem
detects activity on the
Control port and is ready
to communicate with the
DTE over this port. This
signal is de-asserted when
the modem detects no
activity on the Control
port; or is de-asserted as
an acknowledgment to the
user, indicating that the
modem has completed its
power- down sequence as
no active DTR lines were
seen on the serial ports.
16
CP_RXD
RS-232
DTE <- DCE
Control port RXD
17
MIC_P
Analog
Input to modem
Analog Microphone Input
(Reserved for Future Use)
18
MIC_N
Analog
Input to modem
Analog Microphone Input
(Reserved for Future Use)
19
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
20
DP_DTR
RS-232
DTE -> DCE
Data port DTR
21
Ground
Ground
Ground return
Ground return
22
DP_RI
RS-232
DTE <- DCE
Data Port RI
23
SPKR_P
Analog
Output from
modem
Analog speaker output
(Reserved for Future Use)
80-99208-1 Rev. D
7-11
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Table 7-1.
Interface Connector Pinouts (continued)
Pin
Number
Signal Name
Signal
Level
Direction
User <-> Modem
Description
24
SPKR_N
Analog
Output from
modem
Analog speaker output
(Reserved for Future Use)
25
MODULE_
RESET_N
TTL
Input to modem
Hard reset of the modem,
inverted logic. This line
should be left floating for
normal modem operation.
In case the application
detects that the modem is
not responding, it can
initiate a hard reset of the
modem by pulling this line
low (below 0.3V) for more
than 5 seconds. The
modem will reboot after
the line is allowed to float.
Diagnostic Port
The Diagnostic port consists of a single DE-9 male upright
connector, located on the right side of the GSP-1620 modem
(see Figure 7-1).
By connecting a Diagnostic cable (included in the Modem
Integrator’s Kit) or a custom cable to the Diagnostic port,
you can:
Note
•
Service-program a modem or upgrade its software, using
the Globalstar User Terminal Program Support Tool
(UTPST).
•
Monitor or verify some modem functions, using the
QUALCOMM Globalstar Modem Operation Monitor.
Normal field usage does not require that a cable be connected to the
Diagnostic port on the modem, since the port is typically used for
development and programming only.
The Diagnostic cable includes a switch box that controls
whether the cable’s DTR (Data Terminal Ready) signal is
asserted (“POS 1 DTR to GND”) or de-asserted (“POS 2 DTR
Open” or “POS 3 Not Used”). When DTR is asserted, the
modem powers up immediately if power is provided. Before
7-12
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
powering down the modem with this cable attached, you must
set this switch to “POS 2” or “POS 3.” (“POS 2” and “POS 3”
are functionally equivalent.) For more information about
using the Diagnostic cable, see Connecting the Diagnostic
Cable on page 2-7.
Note
For more information about the UTPST, see UTPST Overview on page
3-2. For more information about the Operation Monitor, see the
QUALCOMM Globalstar Modem Operation Monitor User Guide
(80-99399-1).
Diagnostic Port Pinouts
Table 7-2 on page 7-14 provides detailed information about
the Diagnostic port pinouts.
The Diagnostic port uses un-translated 3.3V TTL levels. In
Table 7-2, all signals are TTL levels unless otherwise
specified.
Caution
All pins on the Diagnostic port are ESD protected but not short-circuit
protected. Care must be taken when using these pins to avoid any short
circuits to Ground/Power.
Note
Hardware flow control is required on the Diagnostic port. If the two flow
control pins are not implemented by the user, the Diagnostic port may
not function correctly.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
7-13
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Table 7-2. Diagnostic Port Pinouts
Pin
Number
Signal Name
Direction
User <-> Modem
Description
1
Ground
Ground return
Ground return
2
DM_RXD
Output from
modem
Diagnostic port RXD
3
DM_TXD
Input to modem
Diagnostic port TXD
4
DM_DTR_N
Input to modem
Diagnostic port DTR
The DTR line has only one function:
to turn on the modem when power is
applied but no other device is
connected. When DTR is asserted, the
modem powers up immediately if
power is provided.
Pulled high to input voltage through
a 47K resistor in the modem.
5
Ground
Ground return
6
Input DC POWER Input/Output
7
DM_RTS_N
Input to modem
Ground return
Used for an active translator
Diagnostic cable. 5.6V-16V,
unfiltered in the modem. If this pin is
used as the source of power to the
modem, users must provide sufficient
filtering to comply with conducted
EMI specifications; see DC Power on
page 7-15.
Diagnostic port RTS
Used for hardware flow control.
8
9
7-14
DM_CTS_N
DM_PROGRAM_
FLASH
Output from
modem
Diagnostic port CTS
Used for hardware flow control.
Allows programming of the modem.
Apply 13V +/- 10%, 50mA (maximum)
to program the flash in the modem.
This is required for all software
upgrades as well as service
programming.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
DC Power
The GSP-1620 modem requires input DC power ranging from
5.6 V to 16 V, with 1 Amp (maximum). The modem DC input
power must be clean (maximum of 50 mV peak-peak ripple
and noise) and must be within the absolute maximum voltage
range of 5.6 V to 16 V under all conditions. For typical DC
power consumption limits, see Power Consumption on page
7-16.
The GSP-1620 modem uses a DC/DC converter to source its
internal operating voltages and behaves like a constant
power load over varying input voltages that has a varying
input impedance when the modem is transmitting data. This
creates a potential for oscillations on the DC power line if the
input impedance of the modem is lower than that of the power
supply sourcing the power.
The approximate minimum input impedance of the modem is
given by R = V2/Pmax where V is the operating voltage of the
modem and Pmax is the maximum power consumed by the
modem. For example, the minimum input impedance of the
modem at 12V would be approximately 12*12/5.4 = 26.7
Ohms. Any DC power supply capable of supplying the peak
demand of 5.4W at 12V would have this output impedance.
Additional design margin of at least 20% is recommended
beyond this minimum value.
Care should be taken that if additional EMI filtering is added
(see EMI Filtering on page 7-16), the impedance as seen by
the modem’s input power supply does not exceed this value.
Warning
Do not unplug the power cables while the modem is powered up.
This can cause ESD damage to the modem and also presents a
danger of electrical shock.
Caution
You must ensure that the output impedance of the power supply
sourcing DC power to the modem is always less than that of the input
impedance of the modem. Otherwise, a potential exists for oscillations
on the DC power line and the GSP-1620 modem will not operate as
designed.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
7-15
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Caution
You CANNOT have both a DC power supply and an AC adapter
connected to the modem at the same time. This may cause the modem
to fail to power up and may damage the modem. If you connect the
Diagnostic cable to service-program the modem while using a DC
power source, make sure the AC wall adapter of the Diagnostic cable is
not plugged in to an AC outlet.
Surge Protection
As an OEM, you are responsible for ensuring that the input
voltage specification will never be exceeded.
Minimal transient protection is provided on the GSP-1620
modem board but this is intended only for low
energy/duration events (total transient power less than 1
kW). It is not intended to protect the modem in case of a
sustained over-voltage/lightning condition.
The use of a fuse is strongly recommended in the power
supply connecting to the GSP-1620 modem. The input surge
current requirements of the GSP-1620 modem are such that
a fuse with a minimum melting I2t rating of 0.02 A2 seconds
will be sufficient.
EMI Filtering
Adequate conducted EMI filtering has already been provided
in the GSP-1620 modem to pass FCC and ETSI limits.
Additional filtering should not be necessary to meet these
requirements.
Caution
Should additional filtering be necessary, you must take precautions to
ensure that the above criteria are not violated. Please contact
QUALCOMM Incorporated for further details in such a case.
Power Consumption
Power consumption depends on a variety of factors such as
transmit power, input voltage, and data rate. Table 7-3
summarizes the power consumption of the GSP-1620 modem
at an input voltage of +12 V DC. All power estimates include
7-16
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
the DC power consumption of the ODU antenna’s receive
section.
Table 7-3.
Modem DC Power Consumption Estimates at 12 V DC
Input
Mode
Minimum
Typical
Maximum
Shutdown
1.2 mW
2.4 mW
6 mW
Standby
280 mW
500 mW
2.4 W
Transmit
3.6 W
4.8 W
5.4 W
The power modes in Table 7-3 are as follows:
•
Shutdown — The modem is not operational in this state
and reverts to this state when DTR lines are inactive.
•
Standby — The receiver section in the modem is active
during this time and the modem is ready to
transmit/receive data.
•
Transmit — The modem’s transmitter is active in this
state and may be in the process of transmitting/receiving
data.
Power-On
Power-on is controlled via OR’d DTR signals from any port
(Data, Control or Diagnostic). When DTR is asserted on one
or more of the ports, the GSP-1620 modem powers up. Upon
successful power-up, the modem asserts the DSR line of each
active port to let the user know that it has booted up
successfully and is ready to accept commands. Only the Data
and Control ports include DSR lines.
Note
80-99208-1 Rev. D
At least one port DTR signal must remain asserted during the entire
power-on sequence, until a DSR signal is asserted.
7-17
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Power-Off
Power-off is also controlled via the OR’d DTR signals. When
all port DTRs have been de-asserted for a minimum of one
second, the GSP-1620 modem begins its power-down
sequence. After all software processing has concluded, the
modem powers off. This causes loss of power to the Data and
Control port RS-232 transmitters, de-asserting the ports’
DSR lines and informing the user it is safe to remove power.
Caution
Removing power before the DSR signals are de-asserted can corrupt
the modem’s service programming parameters and other data stored in
non-volatile memory.
Note
All port DTR signals must remain de-asserted during the entire
power-down sequence, until the DSR signals are de-asserted.
Note
DSR/DCD will also go inactive in case of a fatal error that causes the
modem to reboot.
Hard Power Reset
Provisions equivalent to power cycling (see Pin 25 in Table
7-1) are included to “hard reset” a GSP-1620 modem under
user control. This pin is pulled low for a minimum of five
seconds to reset the modem. The line is normally left floating.
Grounding
The GSP-1620 modem has been designed to provide flexibility
in the area of grounding, with options to make connections
between digital ground and the OEM-provided chassis
ground (metallic enclosures). These grounding options are
also independently available for the DB-25 user interface,
Diagnostic port, and associated cable shields.
The GSP-1620 modem has been certified in accordance with
the technical and regulatory requirements of the FCC and the
European Union. The modem was tested in a configuration
that did not include, or require, an enclosure or specially
7-18
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
shielded cable configuration in order to demonstrate
compliance with the requirements.
Your OEM application may need different grounding
configurations. The options are as follows:
Caution
•
Option 1 — A chassis ground connection to the modem
may be established using conductive support posts/
screws between the modem mounting holes, where the
solder mask is exposed on both sides of the board, and the
OEM-provided chassis (metallic enclosure or base).
•
Option 2 — DNI (do not install) resistors (R216 and
R217) on the modem circuit card allow for the option of
connecting digital ground and chassis ground together.
•
Option 3 — The user interface DB-25 cable shield
termination is provided through Pin 1 of the DB-25
connector. The cable shield drain wire may be connected
to this pin to provide a termination of the cable shield to
either chassis or digital ground (options 1 & 2
dependency).
The RF connector ground is the same as the signal and power ground.
As an OEM, you should understand this when designing an integrated
product for use in environments where surge protection may be
required. You should also be aware of this fact to avoid ground loops in
the final installation.
Modem Mounting Guidelines
QUALCOMM offers the GSP-1620 modem without a
mechanical enclosure, anticipating that OEMs will integrate
and package the modem into an enclosure or cabinet
appropriate to the end-user’s application. The enclosure must
shield the GSP-1620 modem from direct impacts,
precipitation, vibration, acoustic noise, and particulates.
The GSP-1620 modem has six mounting holes sized for M3
screws. All six mounting locations of the modem must be
fastened to a rigid structure to meet the vibration and shock
requirements specified in Integrating Modems into Products
on page 7-2.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
7-19
Integrator’s Reference Manual
For hole size and locations, connector locations, and overall
envelope dimensions, see Figure 7-1 on page 7-4 and Figure
7-2 on page 7-5.
Caution
Note
When you mount the GSP-1620 modem into an enclosure or onto a
surface, you must exercise care during the process. Adhere to the
following recommendations:
•
Observe handling precautions necessary to avoid damage
by ESD.
•
Fasten the modem to a planar surface of sufficient
flatness and rigidity to prevent flexing of the modem.
•
Use shock mounts when the environment includes
vibration in excess of that shown in Figure 7-9 on page
7-33.
•
Use acoustic dampening material when the environment
includes acoustic noise in excess of 110 dB OSPL (Overall
Sound Pressure Level).
•
Do not use fasteners that will damage the grounding
areas around the through holes.
•
Do not fasten the modem using tools with speed and/or
torque that will cause damage to the printed circuit
board.
•
Do not fasten the modem with enough clamping force to
damage the printed circuit board.
•
Exercise caution and do not damage components on the
modem during handling.
The GSP-1620 modem meets or exceeds all operational vibration
requirements defined in Table 7-5 when E-A-R damping feet
(MF-100-UC04-H, black) are used as shock mounts.
QUALCOMM Mark on OEM Enclosures
Each GSP-1620 based product and its packaging shall bear
the “CDMA by QUALCOMM” mark and such other mark(s) of
QUALCOMM, or those which QUALCOMM has the right to
use and permit the use of, as QUALCOMM may designate
7-20
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
from time to time upon notice to the buyer. The product
markings shall appear in a size and location reasonably
agreed to by both parties.
Figure 7-3 shows the QUALCOMM marking suitable for
OEM enclosures (included on the Modem Integrator’s Kit CD
as an Encapsulated PostScript [EPS] file).
Figure 7-3. QUALCOMM Mark for OEM Enclosures
Integrated Product Regulatory Labeling
The GSP-1620 modem as delivered by QUALCOMM
Incorporated is approved and labeled in accordance with the
requirements of the FCC and the European Union (see
Appendix B, RF Certification/Restrictions).
If the regulatory labeling is not visible when the modem is
integrated into the final product, then the labels must be
applied to the product enclosure. QUALCOMM Incorporated
authorizes the duplication and use of these regulatory
approvals on the integrated product provided that the modem
has not been modified or altered to the extent that the
electromagnetic performance has been degraded (see Modem
Mounting Guidelines on page 7-19 and Appendix B, RF
Certification/Restrictions).
The OEM or integrator is responsible for ensuring that the
product complies with all the regulatory requirements for
their target market and labeled accordingly.
The label must be located on the product in an area that can
be easily viewed and the type size must be large enough to be
legible without the aid of magnification. The integrator
labeling may be worded as follows:
“This Product Contains a Globalstar Radio Transceiver
FCC ID: J9CGSPDM1; CE 168”
80-99208-1 Rev. D
7-21
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Mounting Antennas On-Site
This section describes the Dielectric Resonator Antenna
(DRA, also called an Outdoor Unit or ODU) hardware,
including specifications for antennas and antenna cable. It
also describes how to calculate antenna cable length and
mount antennas.
Modem Antenna Specifications
The GSP-1620 modem is to be used with an aluminum
Dielectric Resonator Antenna (DRA), as shown in Figure 7-4
and Figure 7-5. The modem DRA has a passive transmit and
an active receive section. The transmit (Tx) and receive (Rx)
connectors are labeled on the antenna.
Caution
You must be careful to connect the Tx connector on the DRA to the Tx
connector on the modem, and the Rx connector on the DRA to the Rx
connector on the modem. Crossing the Tx and Rx cables can damage
the modem.
Figure 7-4. DRA Side View
7-22
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
Figure 7-5. DRA View Showing Connectors
O-Ring groove
RX Antenna connector
(labeled on antenna base)
TX Antenna connector
(labeled on antenna base)
Antenna Dimensions and Weight
The DRA antenna is 103 millimeters diameter by 63
millimeters tall (4.1 inches diameter by 2.5 inches tall).
The weight for the antenna is less than 250 grams (8.8
ounces).
Antenna Depiction
This section includes the following technical drawings that
depict the antenna:
Note
80-99208-1 Rev. D
•
GSP-1620 Antenna: DRA Top and Side Views, Figure 7-6
•
GSP-1620 Antenna: DRA Bottom View, Figure 7-7
In Figure 7-6 and Figure 7-7, dimensions are shown as: millimeters
[inches]. Millimeters are the controlling dimensions on these drawings.
Inch dimensions are for reference only.
7-23
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Figure 7-6. DRA Top and Side Views
7-24
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
22.00 mm
[.866]
23.50 mm
[.925]
44.00 mm
[1.732]
Figure 7-7. DRA Bottom View and Mounting Hole Locations
6X M4.0 X
10.00 DEEP
38.11 mm
[1.500]
Antenna Cable Specifications
The DRA antenna requires two (2) cables, one for transmit
and one for receive:
80-99208-1 Rev. D
•
The required connectors are plug SMA (DRA bulkhead) to
plug MCX (modem).
•
Transmit cable maximum 0.6 dB insertion loss @ 1618
MHz is required for the cable.
•
Receive cable maximum 3.0 dB insertion loss @ 2492 MHz
is required for the cable.
7-25
Integrator’s Reference Manual
QUALCOMM does not provide cables for OEM bulk
applications since OEMs may need cables of different lengths
for particular applications. Table 7-4 lists potential suppliers
of RF and microwave connectors and cable assemblies.
Table 7-4.
Suggested RF Cable and Connector Suppliers
Volex Inc.:
Company:
Volex Inc.
1 Batterymarch Park,
Quincy, MA 02169
USA
Tel: +1 617 376-0555
Fax: +1 617 376-0590
Email: jim_stout@volexna.com
Web: http://www.volex.com/
Times Microwave:
Company:
Sales Representative:
Times Microwave Systems
358 Hall Avenue
P.O. Box 5039
Wallingford, CT 06492-5039
Dave Murray
505 W. Ray Road
Suite #3
Chandler, AZ 85225-7283
Phone: +1 480 786-1656
Fax: +1 480 786-3684
Page: +1 800 618-6140
email: timeswest@aol.com
Tel:1(800)TMS-COAX
(867-2629)
Tel: +1 203 949-8400
Fax: +1 203 949-8423
JPM:
Company:
JPM Corporate
155 North 15th Street
Lewisburg, PA 17837
USA
Tel: +1 570 524-8225
Fax: +1 570 524-5660
Web: http://www.jpmco.com/
7-26
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
Calculating Antenna Cable Length
The maximum loss for an antenna cable of any length is 0.6
dB at 1.6 GHz for modem transmit and 3 dB at 2.5 GHz for
modem receive.
You must take these losses into account when calculating
antenna lengths for a GSP-1620 modem installation. For
example, the GSP-1620 Modem Integrator’s Kit utilizes three
feet of LMR 195 cable, which has a loss of 0.6 dB at 1.6 GHz.
Mounting Antennas at the Field Site
When mounting an antenna on-site, you must position it
properly to obtain Globalstar satellite signals. You can mount
the antenna on a flat surface or on a pole. In either case, you
should seal the antenna connectors against dirt and moisture.
Caution
The ODU antenna must be installed in a configuration that ensures a
minimum line-of-sight separation distance of 21.5 centimeters (8.5
inches) is maintained at all times between the ODU antenna and any
personnel.
Finding a Good Antenna Location
When installed in the field, the antenna of a GSP-1620
modem product must have a direct line of sight to the
Globalstar satellites. Keep in mind that Globalstar satellites
follow different paths across the sky, and you cannot predict
where they will be.
Position the DRA antenna outdoors where it has a clear view
of the sky, unimpeded by tall obstacles such as buildings and
trees.
Signal fading associated with trees, buildings, and other
obstacles that prevent a clear line-of-sight to the satellite can
cause degraded operation in a mobile environment.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
7-27
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Note
Globalstar frequencies are attenuated by wet snow. When mounting the
antenna in a snowy location, you must make provisions to prevent snow
buildup on the antenna. Wet ice/snow must be restricted to a maximum
thickness of 20 centimeters (8 inches) by suitably mounting the
antenna. See Mounting and Sealing Antennas on Poles on page 7-29.
Securing Antenna Cables
When connecting the antenna cables, the recommended
torque for the SMA connectors is 0.79 to 1.13 N⋅m (7 to 10
in⋅lb).
Mounting and Sealing Antennas on Flat Surfaces
You can mount the modem antenna (DRA) on a flat surface
with six M4 screws. Depending on whether the surface is
smooth or rough, different methods are recommended for
sealing out moisture and dirt from the antenna’s SMA
connectors, which are not sealing connectors.
If the surface is smooth, flat, and solid, you can use an O-ring
to protect the antenna’s connectors. The O-ring should be
2.050 inches in diameter by 0.103 inch wide, to fit within the
groove on the bottom of the antenna. Silicone or ethylenepropylene is the preferred material.
A recommended source is:
Parker Seal Group
18321 Jamboree Rd.
Irvine, CA 92612-1073
Tel: 800/272-7537
Fax: 949/851-2127
Parker part number: 2-137 E515-80
Description: O-ring, ethylene-propylene, 2.050 inches
diameter by 0.103 inch thick, 80 durometer
If you are mounting the antenna on rough surfaces, surfaces
which have already suffered significant environmental
damage (pitting, peeling paint, etc.), or surfaces that are not
sufficiently flat, it is recommended that you do not use an
O-ring. O-rings need smooth, flat surfaces to work.
7-28
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
Instead, you should fill the groove on the antenna, which is
normally used for the O-ring, with an adhesive caulking
material that can bond to the aluminum antenna base and
the surface to which you are mounting the antenna. The
caulk seals out moisture and dirt.
Tip
For extra protection on either flat or rough surface mounts, you can coat
the antenna’s SMA connectors before sealing the antenna base; for
details, see Mounting and Sealing Antennas on Poles.
Mounting and Sealing Antennas on Poles
Instead of mounting the modem antenna (DRA) on a flat
surface or bulkhead, you can mount it on a pole with six M4
screws. A pole mount may be desirable in snowy locations, to
prevent wet ice or snow from building up to more than the
maximum allowable thickness of 20 centimeters (8 inches).
In a pole mounting, the antenna’s SMA connectors, which
are not self-sealing, are exposed to weather and precipitation.
Therefore, you should seal the SMA connectors with a
commercially available coating for outdoor cable or electrical
connectors. For example, you could use a product such as
“Liquid Electrical Tape” from PDI Inc., which is weather and
corrosion resistant.
Mounting Multiple Antennas
If required for your application, you can mount multiple
antennas within several feet of each other without creating
significant interference.
QUALCOMM testing has determined that if two antennas
are placed near each other and transmit on different
frequencies, only a barely perceptible (1 dB or less) increase
in 1605 emission occurs when tested at full jamming power.
This maps to isolation between antennas of 20 dB. Even for
antennas whose bases were touching (zero inches separation)
the isolation was 22 dB in the worst case of rotation with
respect to one another.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
7-29
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Environmental Specifications
This section describes environmental specifications for both
the QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data
Modem and its Dielectric Resonator Antenna (DRA).
The environmental requirements specified herein are under
development and are subject to change without notice.
GSP-1620 Modem Environments
Environments affecting the GSP-1620 modem include
temperature/humidity, thermal radiation, altitude,
vibration, mechanical shock, and acoustic noise. This section
also discusses connector durability, materials, and shipping.
Temperature/Humidity
Operational
The GSP-1620 modem operates as specified during exposure
to the operational temperature/humidity envelope shown in
Figure 7-8.
Caution
Condensation on the GSP-1620 modem is not permissible.
Non-Operational
The GSP-1620 modem operates as specified after exposure to
the operational and non-operational temperature/humidity
envelopes shown in Figure 7-8.
7-30
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
Figure 7-8. GSP-1620 Modem Temperature/Humidity Envelope
90
85
80
NON-OPERATIONAL ONLY
70
DRY BULB TEMPERATURE (degrees C)
CONSTANT 39.1C DEW POINT
60
50
40
30
20
OPERATIONAL AND NON-OPERATIONAL
ENVELOPE
10
0
-10
-20
-30
-40
0
5 10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90 95 100
PERCENT RELATIVE HUMIDITY
Thermal Radiation
The temperature profile shown in Figure 7-8 includes
temperature rise due to thermal radiation, solar radiation,
and other heat loads. The GSP-1620 modem dissipates heat
that is dependent on the mode and the transmit power. The
dissipated heat is the difference between the DC input power
and the RF transmitted power.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
7-31
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Altitude
Operational
The GSP-1620 modem operates at standard atmospheric
pressure altitudes between 0 and 15,000 meters (50,000 feet).
Non-operational
The GSP-1620 modem operates as specified after storage at
pressure altitudes ranging from 0 to 15,000 meters (50,000
feet).
Vibration
Operational - Random
The GSP-1620 modem operates as specified during exposure
to the random vibration spectrum defined in Figure 7-9.
Non-Operational - Random
The GSP-1620 modem operates as specified after exposure to
the random vibration spectrum defined in Figure 7-9.
Operational - Sinusoidal
The GSP-1620 modem operates as specified after exposure to
the swept sinusoidal vibration environment defined in Table
7-5 when E-A-R damping feet (MF-100-UC04-H, black) are
used as shock mounts.
Non-Operational - Sinusoidal
The GSP-1620 modem operates as specified after exposure to
the swept sinusoidal vibration environment defined in
Table 7-5.
7-32
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
Figure 7-9. GSP-1620 Modem Random Vibration Spectra
-1
-2
NON-OPERATIONAL
SPECTRUM
7.69 Grms
-3
OPERATIONAL
SPECTRUM
0.51 Grms
2
Acceleration Spectral Density (G /Hz)
10
10
10
10
10
-4
-5
10
1
Table 7-5.
100
1000
Frequency (Hz)
Swept Sine Vibration Definition
Double Amplitude
Displacement (inch)
Acceleration
(Gs)
0.28
Operational
Operational
*
Frequency Range (Hz)
2 to 6
0.5
0.59
Non-
10000
6 to 500*
2 to 8
2.04
8 to 200
4.08
200 to 500
E-A-R damping feet (MF-100-UC04-H, black) used as shock mounts
80-99208-1 Rev. D
7-33
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Mechanical Shock
Operational
The GSP-1620 modem operates as specified while being
subjected to a half sine pulsed acceleration wave form of 11
milliseconds in duration, 2 Gs peak.
Non-Operational
The GSP-1620 modem operates as specified after being
subjected to a half sine pulsed acceleration wave form of 6
milliseconds in duration, 30 Gs peak.
Acoustic Noise
The GSP-1620 modem is sensitive to very high ambient noise
levels. Exceeding specified levels will cause degraded
performance. Steps must be taken to ensure that the noise
level at the module does not exceed 110 dB OSPL (Overall
Sound Pressure Level).
Digital Data Connector Durability
Applied Forces
The digital data connector meets all performance
requirements after application of a 24.5 newton force on the
mating connector, applied in six directions—two opposite
directions along each of three mutually perpendicular axes.
Mating cycles
The digital data connector meets all performance
requirements after a minimum of 3,000 connect/disconnect
cycles.
7-34
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
RF Connector Durability
The GSP-1620 modem RF connectors meet all performance
requirements after 500 connect/disconnect cycles at a
maximum rate of 12 cycles per minute.
Materials
The GSP-1620 modem is manufactured of non-nutrient
materials with respect to fungal growth.
Shipping
The GSP-1620 modem as packaged for shipment meets the
pre-shipment test procedures specified in the National Safe
Transit Association, Project 1A.
Dielectric Resonator Antenna (DRA) Environments
Since the GSP-1620 Dielectric Resonator Antenna (DRA)
communicates with Globalstar satellites, it must be
positioned outdoors where it has a clear view of the sky.
As a result, environments affecting the DRA include
temperature/humidity, thermal radiation, icing/freezing
rain/snow, altitude, vibration, and mechanical shock. This
section also discusses RF connector durability, materials, and
shipping.
Temperature/Humidity
Operational
The DRA operates as specified during exposure to the
operational temperature/humidity envelope shown in Figure
7-10.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
7-35
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Non-Operational
The DRA operates as specified after exposure to the
operational and non-operational temperature/humidity
envelopes shown in Figure 7-10.
Thermal Radiation
The temperature profile shown in Figure 7-10 includes
temperature rise due to thermal radiation, solar radiation,
and other heat loads.
Figure 7-10. DRA Temperature/Humidity Envelope
90
85
80
70
DRY BULB TEMPERATURE (degrees C)
CONSTANT 40C DEW POINT
60
50
40
30
20
OPERATIONAL AND NON-OPERATIONAL
ENVELOPE
10
0
-10
-20
-30
-40
0
5 10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
PERCENT RELATIVE HUMIDITY
7-36
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
Icing/Freezing Rain/Snow
Any ice or freezing rain on the radome of the ODU will cause
degraded performance. Steps must be taken to ensure that ice
formation is kept to a minimum on the ODU.
Globalstar frequencies are attenuated by wet ice and snow
and OEMs must make provisions (such as installing the
antenna on a pole) to prevent snow buildup on the antenna.
Wet ice/snow must be restricted to a maximum thickness of
20 centimeters (8 inches) by suitably mounting the antenna
(see Mounting Antennas at the Field Site on page 7-27).
Altitude
Operational
The DRA operates at standard atmospheric pressure
altitudes between 0 and 15,000 meters (50,000 feet).
Non-Operational
The DRA operates as specified after storage at pressure
altitudes ranging from 0 to 15,000 meters (50,000 feet).
Vibration
Operational - Random
The DRA operates as specified during exposure to the random
vibration spectrum defined in Figure 7-11.
Non-Operational - Random
The DRA operates as specified after exposure to the random
vibration spectrum defined in Figure 7-11.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
7-37
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Figure 7-11. DRA Random Vibration Spectrum
1.00
0.80
ACCELERATION SPECTRAL DENSITY (G2/Hz)
0.60
0.50
0.40
0.30
0.20
0.10
OPERATIONAL AND
NON-OPERATIONAL
SPECTRUM
15.6 Grms
0.08
0.06
0.05
0.04
0.03
0.02
0.01
1
10
100
1,000
10,000
FREQUENCY (Hz)
Mechanical Shock
Operational
The DRA operates as specified while being subjected to a half
sine pulsed acceleration waveform of 6 milliseconds in
duration, 30 Gs peak.
Non-Operational
The DRA operates as specified after being subjected to a half
sine pulsed acceleration waveform of 6 milliseconds in
duration, 100 Gs peak.
7-38
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products
RF Connector Durability
The DRA RF connectors meet all performance requirements
after 500 connect/disconnect cycles at a maximum rate of 12
cycles per minute.
Materials
The DRA is manufactured of non-nutrient materials with
respect to fungal growth.
Shipping
The DRA as packaged for shipment meets the pre-shipment
test procedures specified in the National Safe Transit
Association, Project 1A.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
7-39
Integrator’s Reference Manual
7-40
80-99208-1 Rev. D
8T
ROUBLESHOOTING
If you are having a problem with a QUALCOMM Globalstar
GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem, try the troubleshooting tips
in Table 8-1. If that does not solve the problem, you can
contact QUALCOMM Globalstar Customer Service, as
described in Appendix D.
Table 8-1.
Troubleshooting Modem Problems
Problem
Possible Solutions
AT$QCSTATUS command
returns RSSI: 0
■
-or-
■
DTE application determines,
after a service alert, that
there is no Globalstar signal.
-orCurrent consumption of the
modem with antenna
connected is lower by about
30mA.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
The antenna is not properly
connected, or is not outside
with a clear view of the sky.
Antenna cables may be
crossed (that is, the modem
Rx cable may be connected
to the antenna Tx Transmit
connector, and vice versa).
Make sure modem Tx is
connected to the antenna Tx
connector and the modem Rx
is connected to the antenna
Rx connector.
AT$QCSTATUS command
returns Registration: No
■
The modem may not be
service-programmed
correctly. See
Service-Programming
Modems on page 3-1 and
consult your SP to make
sure you have the correct
service programming
values.
Upon attempting a
connection, the SELF TEST
RESULT is not received within
a few seconds.
■
HyperTerminal is connected
to the wrong COM port.
The modem is not plugged in
to a power source.
■
8-1
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Table 8-1.
Troubleshooting Modem Problems (continued)
Problem
Possible Solutions
The modem does not seem to
be getting power, even
though it is plugged in.
■
■
8-2
Both the AC power
connector on the diagnostic
cable and the DC power
connector on the interface
cable are plugged in. Only
one can be used at a time.
DTR is not asserted on a
serial port. Connect one of
the modem’s serial ports
(Data, Control, or
Diagnostic).
AT commands that you type
in HyperTerminal do not
appear on the screen.
■
Command echoing has been
turned off. Type ATE1 or ATZ
to turn echoing back on.
AT commands are not
recognized on the Data port.
■
Check to see if the Control
port is active. AT commands
will not work on the Data
port when the Control port is
active.
HyperTerminal or Dial-Up
Networking cannot talk to
the modem.
■
Make sure the baud rate in
HyperTerminal or Dial-Up
Networking matches that
for the modem port. The
Control port is 9600 only;
the Data port default is
38400 but can be set to
selected rates from 300 to
115200.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AG
LOBALSTAR
BACKGROUND
Globalstar is a voice and data telecommunications system
utilizing a constellation of 48 low-Earth-orbit (LEO)
satellites, providing nearly world-wide coverage (70 o N to
70o S latitudes).
Globalstar Limited Partnership (GLP), the owner/operator of
the LEO constellation, is a strategic partnership composed of
many of the world’s leading telecommunications providers:
•
Alenia Marconi
•
China Telecom
•
DACOM
•
Daimler-Chrysler Aerospace
•
Elsacom
•
Globalstar USA, Canada, and Mexico (formerly known as
Vodaphone/Airtouch)
•
Hyundai
•
QUALCOMM Incorporated
•
Space Systems/Loral
•
TESAM (joint venture between France Telecom and
ALCATEL)
•
Vodaphone
The Globalstar system consists of a space segment, and a
ground or earth segment.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
A-1
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Space Segment
The space segment consists of 48 LEO satellites (and eight
additional in-orbit spares) built by Loral Space Systems and
operated by Globalstar Limited Partnership (GLP) in San
Jose, CA.
Compared to medium-Earth-orbit or geostationaryEarth-orbit (MEO/GEO) satellites, LEO satellites offer
several advantages: minimal delay (~250 ms or comparable to
terrestrial digital cellular), multi-satellite handoff, extremely
small antenna, lower power consumption, and lower cost.
Ground Segment
The ground segment consists of Earth stations called
Gateways, which provide service in specific geographical
areas. The Gateways are deployed worldwide and
communicate via C-band frequencies to/from the LEO
satellites, which serve as “bent pipe” transponders.
User Terminals communicate to/from a Gateway ground
station using L- and S-band frequencies, via the LEO
satellites.
A User Terminal can be either a QUALCOMM Globalstar
GSP-1600 Tri-Mode Phone, or QUALCOMM Globalstar
GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem.
Coverage
Figure A-1 shows Globalstar coverage areas and availability
dates.
A-2
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Globalstar Background
Figure A-1. Globalstar Coverage Availability
80-99208-1 Rev. D
A-3
Integrator’s Reference Manual
The map and list in Figure A-1 depict current and planned
Globalstar service coverage. Actual coverage may vary
because of Gateway deployment, local licensing and other
factors, including environmental conditions. “Service” means
that a phone can be purchased and activated in that country.
You may be able to use your Globalstar phone in areas of
extended Gateway coverage; however, neither Globalstar nor
your Service Provider warrants that call duration or quality
in these areas will meet normal system standards.
Globalstar roaming is not included. Please contact your
Service Provider for information about roaming availability.
Carriers
Each coverage territory is typically aligned with country
boundaries. A coverage territory has one or more Service
Providers (SPs) or carriers that offer service to users, similar
to a “cellular” model. Globalstar licenses the Service Provider
or carrier to offer service in a part of the worldwide coverage
area (one or more countries).
The Service Provider offers “airtime” to the OEM or end user.
It also provides a customer care center and keeps billing
records for the satellite airtime used and the data traffic sent
and received.
Service Providers vary by region around the world.
To identify the correct Service Provider in your area, refer to
the Globalstar Web page: http://www.globalstar.com.
A-4
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Globalstar Background
Distributors and OEMs for User Terminals
Customers access the Globalstar system by means of User
Terminals, either QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1600
Tri-Mode Phones, or QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620
Satellite Data Modems.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
•
For Tri-Mode Phones, cellular and satellite
distributorships serve as retail sales conduits where
customers can purchase, provision, and repair Tri-Mode
Phones throughout the world.
•
For the GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem, OEMs directly
integrate the modem into a market-specific product,
which is then resold to a business/industrial customer.
A-5
Integrator’s Reference Manual
A-6
80-99208-1 Rev. D
B RF C
ERTIFICATION/RESTRICTIONS
This appendix discusses certification compliance for the
QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem as
well as restrictions relating to RF, RF exposure, and
electronic devices.
Certification
The QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data
Modem, antenna, and cabling as supplied by QUALCOMM
Incorporated shall be compliant with the following
International standards when configured in accordance with
the QUALCOMM recommendations. Any deviation from the
guidelines or modifications to the product performed without
the permission of QUALCOMM Incorporated will invalidate
all regulatory approvals.
Compliance to the technical requirements shall be
demonstrated with the product installed in a non-metallic
enclosure, which provides no additional shielding or RF
protection. An OEM-supplied enclosure is required to protect
the product from the effects of electrostatic discharge (ESD)
and environmental conditions that result in the product
operating within its specified range.
Compliance to the technical requirements shall be
demonstrated with the product powered by a power supply
that is compliant with the rules and regulations of the FCC
and the European Community. The OEM manufacturer is
required to provide a power supply that ensures the product
continues to meet the applicable regulatory requirements for
the specific application.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
B-1
Integrator’s Reference Manual
QUALCOMM Incorporated does not accept any responsibility
for regulatory compliance of the OEM product. It is the
responsibility of the OEM manufacturer to ensure that all
regulatory requirements (e.g., FAA, Hazardous Location)
have been met for the specific application.
Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
The GSP-1620 modem configured with the QUALCOMMsupplied antenna and RF cabling is compliant and approved
in accordance with the FCC Code of Federal Rules (CFR) 47
parts:
•
Part 1 Para 1.1310 Radio Frequency Radiation Exposure
Limits
•
Part 15 Radio Frequency Devices
•
Part 25 Satellite Communications
European R&TTE Directive 1999/5/EC
The GSP-1620 modem configured with the QUALCOMMsupplied antenna and RF cabling is compliant and approved
in accordance with the essential requirements of the
European Community, under European Directive 1999/5/EC
On Radio Equipment & Telecommunications Terminal
Equipment (R&TTE Directive).
The supporting technical standards used to demonstrate
compliance are:
B-2
•
EN 300 831 Electromagnetic Compatibility
•
EN 301 441 (TBR 041) Essential Terminal Requirements
80-99208-1 Rev. D
RF Certification/Restrictions
RF Restrictions
The GSP-1620 modem must be used with the QUALCOMMprovided antenna, and no modification to the RF transmit or
receive path is permitted in the form of amplifiers.
QUALCOMM Incorporated must be consulted before any
changes can be made in the RF path, including cable length
deviations from the QUALCOMM-provided or recommended
cabling. Failure to do so may result in non-compliance with
the Globalstar communications network and Government
Radio Regulations.
Radio Astronomy Zones
Radio Astronomy exclusion zones may be blacked out of
Globalstar service. The OEM manufacturer should consult
with the Globalstar Service Provider to ensure that service is
available in the location(s) of the installed OEM product.
GPS Interference Elimination
The modem antenna must be installed a minimum distance
of 30 inches from a GPS antenna to ensure compatibility
between the two satellite systems.
Radio Frequency Exposure Restrictions
The GSP-1620 modem incorporates a relatively low-power
radio transmitter, receiver, and antenna (the DRA). When it
is ON it receives and sends radio frequency (RF) signals. In
August 1996, the Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) adopted RF exposure guidelines with safety levels for
portable wireless phones and devices. Those guidelines are
consistent with the safety standards previously set by both
US and international standards bodies:
80-99208-1 Rev. D
•
ANSI/IEEE C95.1-1992 Standard [American National
Standards Institute / Institute of Electrical and
Electronic Engineers]
•
NCRP Report 86 (1986) [National Council on Radiation
Protection and Measurements]
B-3
Integrator’s Reference Manual
•
ICNIRP (1996) [International Commission on
Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection]
•
IRPA (1991) [International Radiation Protection
Association]
The GSP-1620 modem is designed to comply with the
established ANSI, FCC, and international safety standards
for safe levels of human exposure to RF energy. Maintaining
a minimum line-of-sight separation distance of 21.5
centimeters (8.5 inches) between the transmitting antenna
and all personnel will ensure that the General
Population/Uncontrolled Exposure maximum permissible
exposure (MPE) limits are not exceeded.
This satisfies the MPE limits mandated by the FCC in 47
CFR Ch. 1 (10-1-99 Edition), Part 1, §1.1310 and defined in
the ANSI/IEEE C95.1-1992 standard, and also satisfies the
more-stringent European and international exposure limit
recommendations of IRPA (1991) and ICNIRP (1996).
Caution
The ODU antenna must be installed in a configuration that ensures a
minimum line-of-sight separation distance of 21.5 centimeters (8.5
inches) is maintained at all times between the ODU antenna and any
personnel.
Electronic Device Restrictions
Most modern electronic equipment is shielded from RF
signals. However, certain electronic equipment may not be
shielded against the RF signals from wireless phones and
modems.
Pacemakers
The Health Industry Manufacturers Association recommends
that a minimum separation distance of 15.24 centimeters (6
inches) be maintained between a handheld wireless phone
and a pacemaker to avoid potential interference with the
pacemaker.
B-4
80-99208-1 Rev. D
RF Certification/Restrictions
For a wireless modem, which has a higher power output than
a wireless phone, the distance must be increased. For a
GSP-1620 modem, a minimum separation distance of 22.67
centimeters (9 inches) should be maintained between the
transmitting modem antenna and all pacemakers. These
recommendations are consistent with the independent
research by and recommendations of Wireless Technology
Research, L.L.C.
Persons with pacemakers should follow these guidelines:
•
Always keep the modem antenna more than 22.67
centimeters (9 inches) from your pacemaker when the
modem is turned ON.
•
If you have any reason to suspect that interference is
taking place, turn your modem OFF immediately.
Hearing Aids
Some digital wireless phones and other wireless devices
(including wireless modems) may interfere with some hearing
aids. If interference occurs, you may want to consult your
Service Provider (or call the QUALCOMM Globalstar
Customer Support line to discuss alternatives).
Other Medical Devices
If you use any other personal medical device, consult the
manufacturer of your device to determine if it is adequately
shielded from external RF energy. Your physician may be
able to assist you in obtaining this information.
Do not operate your GSP-1620 modem (that is, turn your
modem OFF) in health care facilities when any regulations
posted in these areas instruct wireless phone users to do so.
Hospitals or health care facilities may be using equipment
that could be sensitive to external RF energy.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
B-5
Integrator’s Reference Manual
B-6
80-99208-1 Rev. D
CW
ARRANTY
The warranty for the QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620
Satellite Data Modem and GSP-1620 Modem Integrator’s Kit
(MIK) will be as provided for in the Supply Agreement.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
C-1
Integrator’s Reference Manual
C-2
80-99208-1 Rev. D
DP
RODUCT
SUPPORT
This appendix provides support information for the
QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem
hardware and software. It contains a description of the
support available from QUALCOMM Globalstar Customer
Service and how to contact the Technical Support and Order
Fulfillment teams.
QUALCOMM Globalstar Customer Service
The QUALCOMM Globalstar Customer Service Center,
located in the United States, provides skilled Technical
Support and Order Fulfillment staff to support customers
with technical issues, purchase order requests, and Return
Material Authorizations (RMA) for QUALCOMM-warranted
equipment. The QUALCOMM Customer Service Website
provides online information and forms for technical support
and RMA requests. See “Contacting QUALCOMM Customer
Service” on page D-3 for details.
Technical Support Information
QUALCOMM Customer Service Technical Support is
available 24 hours per day, every day, to provide
troubleshooting assistance for all QUALCOMM-provided
Globalstar products. Technical Support creates a case to
track each issue or request and works to provide a resolution.
For more information on technical support, refer to Data
Modem Troubleshooting information on the QUALCOMM
Customer Service Website.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
D-1
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Contact Technical Support for any Satellite Data Modem
related issue, including when you need to:
•
Troubleshoot a problem.
•
Inquire about a software or hardware upgrade.
•
Report a documentation issue.
•
Request a Return Material Authorization (RMA).
•
Find out the status of a technical issue or of an RMA.
•
Follow a procedure that requires Technical Support
direction.
Prior to contacting Technical Support, please do the
following:
•
Repeat the steps or procedures to resolve the problem.
•
Check the Website and documentation for solutions.
•
Identify the software version and hardware version.
•
Document steps or procedures taken.
•
Prepare to describe the problem in detail.
Order Fulfillment Information
QUALCOMM Customer Service Order Fulfillment is
available between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Pacific Time, Monday
through Friday, for Return Material Authorization (RMA)
assistance on QUALCOMM equipment and to request a
purchase order. To repair, replace, or upgrade parts, request
an RMA from QUALCOMM. Submit RMA requests to
Technical Support to create a case to track the request.
Technical Support approves RMA requests, and Order
Fulfillment validates the warranty and processes the RMA.
For more information on the RMA process, refer to RMA
information on the QUALCOMM Customer Service Website.
D-2
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Product Support
Website Information
The QUALCOMM Customer Service Website is located at
http://www.gstechsupport.qualcomm.com .
Only registered customers may use the QUALCOMM
Customer Service Website. For details on registering, go to
the login page of the Website, click “Website Registration,”
then follow the instructions to become a registered user.
The QUALCOMM Globalstar Customer Service Website
provides several resources including the following:
•
Product information for the Satellite Data Modem
•
Frequently asked questions
•
Troubleshooting information
•
Forms for technical support requests to submit a case
electronically
•
Forms for RMA requests to submit a case electronically
Contacting QUALCOMM Customer Service
QUALCOMM Globalstar Customer Service is located in the
United States and may be contacted via the Website, phone,
email, or facsimile (FAX). Skilled staff are available to assist
with technical issues and Return Material Authorizations
(RMA) processing for QUALCOMM equipment.
Technical support personnel are available 24 hours per day,
every day. Order Fulfillment personnel are available between
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Pacific Time, Monday through Friday, to
process RMA and purchase order requests. A case number is
assigned to track each technical issue or request.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
D-3
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Contact information
•
Website
The following Website address is available to registered
users. Forms are available for submitting Technical
Support issues and RMA requests.
http://www.gstechsupport.qualcomm.com
•
Phone
+1 858 651 4911
•
❑
Select 1 for Globalstar Gateway Products.
❑
Select the appropriate option for RMA or Technical
Support troubleshooting assistance.
Email
The following email addresses are available to registered
customers.
❑
gstechsupport@qualcomm.com
Submit technical support issues and RMA requests to
this email address. Be sure to provide your name,
company, location, telephone number, description of
the problem, part information, and details about the
error messages and/or log information.
❑
status.techsupport@qualcomm.com
Obtain information on the status of an existing
technical case by sending an email to this address. Be
sure to include the case number in the subject line in
the following format Case Number:12345.
❑
status.rma@qualcomm.com
Obtain information on the status of an existing RMA
case request by sending an email to this address. Be
sure to include the case number and the RMA
number, if available, in the subject line in the
following format Case Number:12345 RMA
Number:67890.
D-4
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Product Support
The following email address is available to all customers.
❑
gs.modules.info@qualcomm.com
Obtain answers for all product information questions
by sending an email to this address.
•
Facsimile (FAX)
+1 858 651 2345
Submit technical support issues and new RMA requests
to this facsimile number. Be sure to provide your name,
company, location, telephone number, description of the
problem, part information, and details about the error
messages and/or log information.
80-99208-1 Rev. D
D-5
Integrator’s Reference Manual
D-6
80-99208-1 Rev. D
ES
PECIFICATION
SUMMARY
This appendix summarizes the specifications for the
QUALCOMM Globalstar GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem
and its Dielectric Resonator Antenna (DRA).
For further discussion of hardware issues, see Chapter 7,
Integrating GSP-1620 Modems into OEM Products.
Table E-1.
Specification Summary — GSP-1620 Modem
Operating Frequencies
Transmit:
Receive:
Maximum Transmit Power
+26 dBm EIRP (0.4 W)
DC Input Voltage
+5.6 V to + 16 V
Power Consumption Estimates @ 12V Input
State
Shutdown
Standby
Transmit
Interfaces:
User Port
1610-1625 MHz
2484-2499 MHz
Min
1.2 mW
280 mW
3.6 W
Typical
2.4 mW
500 mW
4.8 W
Max
6 mW
2.4 W
5.4 W
DB25 Serial RS-232 with pin-outs for data, control,
and power
Modem Antenna Connectors
TX MCX Female
RX MCX Female
Antenna Connectors
TX SMA Female
RX SMA Female
Provisioning and Software Upgrade
DE9 Connector
Modem Dimensions
190 x 75 x 17 mm (7.48 x 2.95 x 0.68 in)
Modem Weight
Less than 180 grams (6.3 ounces)
Antenna (included)
103 mm (4.1 in) diameter by 63 mm (2.5 in) tall
Estimated weight is less than 250 grams (8.8 ounces)
80-99208-1 Rev. D
E-1
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Table E-1.
Specification Summary — GSP-1620 Modem
Antenna Cable (not included)
Two cables required: transmit and receive
Male SMA to Male MCX
Transmit cable maximum 0.6 dB insertion loss
@ 1618 MHz
Receive cable maximum 3.0 dB insertion loss
@ 2492 MHz
Certification
FCC
CE
Modem Environmental Conditions
Operating:
Storage:
Relative Humidity:
-30 °C to +60 °C
-40 °C to +85 °C
5% to 95% (under 40 °C)
The data modem is sensitive to very high ambient
noise levels. Steps must be taken to ensure that the
noise level at the modem does not exceed 110 dB OSPL
(Overall Sound Pressure Level).
Shock mounts must be used when the environment
includes excessive vibration. The GSP-1620 modem
will meet or exceed all operational vibration
requirements defined in Table 7-5 when E-A-R
damping feet (MF-100-UC04-H, black) are used as
shock mounts.
Antenna Environmental Conditions
Operating/Storage:
Relative Humidity:
-40 °C to +85 °C
5% to 100% (under 40 °C)
Signal fading associated with trees, buildings, and
other obstacles that prevent a clear line-of-sight to the
satellite can cause degraded operation.
Any ice or freezing rain on the radome of the Outdoor
Unit (ODU) will cause degraded performance. Steps
must be taken to ensure that ice formation is kept to a
minimum on the ODU.
Supporting Products
E-2
GSP-1620 Modem Integrator’s Kit (MIK)
Globalstar User Terminal Program Support Tool
(UTPST) (modem provisioning tool)
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Specification Summary
Table E-2.
Specification Summary — Dielectric Resonator
Antenna (DRA)
Parameter
TX Specification
RX Specification
Frequency Range (MHz)
1610.0-1626.5
2483.5-2500.0
Polarization
LHCP
LHCP
VSWR (50 ohm)
<2.0:1
<2.0:1
Isolation (TX→RX) (dB)
>40
>0
Maximum Gain
< 6.5
–
(0°<θ<80°) (dBic) [1]
Average Gain
>1.5
(0°<θ<80°) (dBic)
Minimum Gain
>-4.0
(0°<θ<80°) (dBic)
Maximum Axial Ratio
>1.5
(passive antenna)
>-4.0
(passive antenna)
<3.0
<3.0
RX LNA/Filter Gain (dB)
–
27 (typical at 25×C)
RX Noise Figure (dB) [2]
–
<2.1
(G/T)avg (dB/K) [3]
–
> -26
(G/T)min (dB/K) [3]
–
> -31
RX Bias DC Voltage (V)
–
+3.6
Rx DC Current (mA)
–
25 (typical)
Power Handling (Watts)
<4
–
Operating Temperature
(×C)
-40 to +85
-40 to +85
Altitude (ft)
50,000
50,000
Vibration(Grms) [4]
15.6
15.6
@ zenith (dB)
80-99208-1 Rev. D
E-3
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Table E-2.
Specification Summary — Dielectric Resonator
Antenna (DRA) (continued)
Parameter
TX Specification
RX Specification
Connector
SMA (F)
SMA (F)
Dimensions
103 mm (4.1 in) diameter by 63 mm (2.5 in) tall
Weight
< 250 g (8.8 ounces)
[1] q = 0 is zenith.
[2] combined LNA and Filter over the operating temperature
[3] at Tsky = 200 K
[4] random, 3-axis, over 15 – 2000 Hz
E-4
80-99208-1 Rev. D
INDEX
Symbols
+++ escape sequence 4-5, 5-10, 5-11,
5-37, 6-40
A
A/ 6-19
AC adapter 2-7, 2-12, 2-13
acknowledgment timer 6-70
acoustic noise 7-19, 7-34
acquisition 5-20, 6-61
active ports 5-9, 5-15
airtime 3-1, 5-6, A-4
alerts
Globalstar service 5-19, 6-61
SMS 6-57
altitude 7-32, 7-37, E-3
ambient noise E-2
Analog Microphone Input 7-11
ANSI/IEEE C95.1-1992 Standard B-3
Answer Incoming Call 6-18
answerer 6-45
antenna 1-7
cables 2-6, 7-25
calculating length 7-27
securing 7-28
caulking 2-11
connecting 2-9, 2-10
depiction 7-23
hardware 7-22
80-99208-1 Rev. D
mobile environment 7-27
mounting 2-10, 7-27
multiple 7-29
on flat surfaces 7-28
on poles 7-29
O-ring 2-11
personnel separation distance B-4
positioning outdoors 2-9, 7-27
sealing 7-28
size, weight 7-23
specifications 7-22, E-3
ANY_MODE 6-63
API 3-7
Application Programming Interface 3-7
applications
host 5-3
modem 5-1
modem scenarios 5-5
SCADA 1-1, 1-3
components 5-2
developing 5-1
arbitration, port 5-9
asynchronous data
applications 5-6
character framing 6-35
configuration string 6-41
Gateway IWF commands 6-41
mobile-originated calls 5-32
mobile-terminated calls 5-33
Index-1
Integrator’s Reference Manual
overview 1-2, 5-4
using with packet data 5-34, 6-50
AT 2-17
AT command processor 5-9, 5-13
AT commands
affecting ports 5-13
alphabet 6-7
asynchronous data Gateway
IWF 6-41
basic 6-8
basic action 6-18
case sensitivity 6-7
command line format 6-7
configuration parameters 5-9
dormant mode 6-48
error log services 6-59
extended configuration 6-32
Globalstar S-registers 6-31
non-operational 6-6
Online-Command mode 6-40
operational 6-2
overview 6-7
prefix 6-19
protocol stack modification 6-70
quick reference tables 6-2
reference section 6-1
sample 5-36
service status 6-61
SMS 6-51
special calls 6-64
S-registers 6-24
syntax 6-8
AT$QCCLR 6-60
AT$QCERR 6-59
AT$QCMODE 6-69
AT$QCMSTATS 6-68
AT$QCPKND 5-34, 6-50
Index-2
AT$QCPLS 5-21, 6-66
AT$QCSA 6-61
AT$QCSMSA 5-19, 6-57
AT$QCSMSI 5-19, 6-58
AT$QCSMSL 6-56
AT$QCSMSM 5-19, 6-51
AT$QCSMSP 5-18, 5-19, 6-52
AT$QCSTATUS 4-2, 4-5, 5-20, 5-26,
6-62
example of using 4-1
AT$QCTCP 6-70
AT$QCTOD 6-64
AT$QCVJ 6-73
AT&C 5-29, 6-16
ports affected 5-14
AT&C0 5-25, 5-26
AT&D 5-15, 5-29, 6-16
ports affected 5-14
AT&D1 5-10
AT&D2 5-10, 5-15
AT&F 6-17
ports affected 5-14
resetting call mode 6-69
AT+CFG 6-41
AT+CMUX 6-32
AT+CRM 6-33
ports affected 5-15
AT+CTA 6-49
ports affected 5-15
AT+DS 6-42
AT+ES 6-45
AT+GSN 6-34
AT+ICF 6-35
ports affected 5-14
AT+IFC 6-36
ports affected 5-15
AT+IPR 6-38
ports affected 5-15
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Index
AT+IPR? 2-17
AT+MS 6-47
ATA 5-33, 6-18
ATD 5-10, 5-11, 6-20
ATD#777 4-4, 5-10, 5-11, 5-27, 5-32
ATE 6-9
ATH 4-5, 5-10, 5-11, 5-12, 5-25, 5-27,
5-32, 5-36, 6-22
ATH+CTA 5-25
ATH777 5-25, 5-26, 5-27
ATI 6-9
ATL 6-10
ATM 6-11
ATO 5-10, 5-13, 6-23
ATP 6-11
ATQ 6-12
ATS0 6-25
ATS10 6-30
ATS11 6-31
ATS3 6-25
ATS4 6-26
ATS5 6-27
ATS6 6-27
ATS7 6-28
ATS777 6-31
ports affected 5-14
ATS8 6-29
ATS9 6-29
ATT 6-13
attenuation, by snow 7-28, 7-37
ATV 6-13
ATX 6-14
ATZ 6-15
call modes 6-69
ports affected 5-14
auto-answer 5-6, 5-28, 5-29, 6-25
Autodeletion 6-54, 6-56, 6-59
80-99208-1 Rev. D
AUTOMATIC 6-63
Automatic Answer 6-25
AUTORETRY 6-64
axial ratio, antenna E-3
B
backspace character 6-27
BATTERY CHARGE 4-3
battery-powered applications 5-6, 5-16,
7-7
baud rate 6-38
checking 2-16
configurable 5-13
Control port 2-15
Data port 2-15
bench setup 2-1
bent pipe transponders A-2
billing 5-6, 5-17, 5-25
records A-4
bits per second 2-15
blind dialing 6-27
booting up 7-7
BUILD 6-10
build information, modem 6-59
BUSY 5-10, 5-11, 6-22
busy signal 6-14
C
C programming language 5-2
cables
antenna 2-6, 7-25
connecting 2-4
custom 7-2
Diagnostic 2-7, 2-9
extending 2-5, 2-9
length deviations B-3
Modem Interface 2-4
Index-3
Integrator’s Reference Manual
shields 7-18
suppliers 7-26
CALL
DURATION 4-3, 6-64
NUMBER 4-3, 6-64
STATE 4-3, 6-64
TYPE 4-3, 6-64
call
Detail Record 5-25
history 6-21
mode, modem 6-69
Caller ID 5-28
CALLINPROG 6-64
calls
answering with Data and Control
ports 5-29
answering with Data port 5-28
asynchronous data 5-30
Loopback 4-3, 5-15, 6-21
Markov 4-3, 5-15, 6-21
mobile-originated
asynchronous 5-32
packet data 5-27
mobile-terminated
asynchronous 5-33
packet data 5-27
packet data 4-3, 6-21
special test 5-15
carriage return 6-7
Carrier Detect Threshold Timeout 6-29
Carrier Loss to Disconnect Timeout 6-30
carrier, lost 6-29, 6-30
carriers, Globalstar A-4
case sensitivity 6-7
caulking antenna 2-11, 7-29
CDMA by QUALCOMM 7-20
CDR, see Call Detail Record
certification compliance B-1
Index-4
Change from Online to Online-Command
Mode 6-40
character framing 5-14, 6-35
circuit
108 6-19
108/2 5-12, 6-16, 6-22
109 6-16, 6-19
Circuit Card Assemblies 1-7, 7-3
Clear
Error Log 6-60
To Send 5-8
code samples 5-2
codeword size 6-43
Comma Dial Modifier Time 6-29
Command
Echo 6-9
Line Editing Character 6-27
line format 6-7
Line Termination Character 6-25
mode 5-12
echoing 6-9
condensation 7-30
configuration
ports 5-8, 5-9
string 6-41
CONNECT 6-15, 6-19, 6-21, 6-24
connecting
antenna 2-9, 2-10
antenna cables 2-6
Diagnostic cable 2-9, 3-2
Interface cable 2-5
UTPST 3-2
Connection Completion Timeout 6-28
connection time 1-2, 5-4, 5-32
connectors
DB-25 7-6
digital data durability 7-34
Interface 7-9
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Index
J3 2-6, 7-3, 7-6
J7 2-6, 7-3, 7-6
MCX 7-25
baud rate 2-17
changing configuration 7-8
HyperTerminal settings 2-15
modem 7-3
modem antenna 7-6
RF durability 7-35, 7-39
line speed 7-6
making calls from 4-4
signals 7-9
Rx 2-6, 2-9, 7-22
SMA 7-25, 7-29
Tx 2-6, 2-9, 7-22
constellation, Globalstar A-1
Control port 5-7, 7-6
active 5-10
active only 5-9
baud rate 2-17
changing configuration 7-8
HyperTerminal settings 2-15
line speed 7-6
signals 7-8
coverage A-2
CP_ signals 7-10
CTS 5-8, 7-9, 7-14
Customer Service Center D-1
D
damping 7-20, 7-32, 7-33
Data and Control ports active 5-9
data call 4-3
terminating from Online-Command
mode 5-12
Data Carrier Detected 5-8
data communications equipment, see DCE
Data Compression Control
Command 6-42
Data port 5-7, 7-6
active 5-10
active only 5-8
answering calls 5-28
80-99208-1 Rev. D
transmit rate 5-22, 5-32
Data Set Read, see DSR
Data Terminal Ready, see DTR
data terminating equipment, see DTE
DB-25
cable bridle 2-4
connector 1-7, 7-6
DC POWER 2-4
DC power 2-12
impedance 7-15
modem requirements 7-15
oscillations 7-15
supply 2-12
DC/DC converter 7-15
DC_ signals 7-10
DCD 5-8, 5-29, 7-9
DCE 5-7, 5-12, 5-33, 6-1
header, trailer 6-13
Received Line Signal Detector
Behavior 6-16
Received Signal Line Detector
Behavior 5-14
reset default parameters 6-15
Response Format 6-13
response format 6-13
DE-9 connector 2-9, 7-12
DEEP_SLEEP 6-63
defaults
configuration 5-14
DCE factory parameters 6-15
modem 6-17
degradation of service 5-4
Index-5
Integrator’s Reference Manual
developing modem applications 5-1
Diagnostic
cable 2-7, 7-12
connecting for UTPST 3-2
switch box 2-7, 7-12
port 2-9, 5-16, 7-12
pinouts 7-13
dial
command 6-20
string values 6-21
valid 6-20
DTE 1-5, 5-7, 6-1
Data Terminal Ready Behavior 5-14,
6-16
DTMF
Tone Duration and Spacing 6-31
tones 6-13, 6-31
DTR 5-8, 5-10, 5-28, 7-8, 7-14
asserted 2-7, 5-9, 5-16, 7-12
on Control port 5-29
on Data port 5-28, 5-29
on Diagnostic port 5-28
tone 6-14
Dial Number 5-33, 5-35
Dial-Up Networking 5-22
dictionary entries 6-43
Dielectric Resonator Antenna, see antenna
digital
board 1-7
data connector 7-34
ground 7-18
disconnecting 6-28
distributors, User Terminal A-5
DN 5-33
DNI 7-19
DNS server 5-30
dormant mode 5-5, 5-25, 5-29, 6-22,
6-23, 6-48, 6-50
idle timer 5-25, 6-49
leaving active 5-27
setting up 5-25
timeout setting 5-15, 6-49
downconverters 1-7
DP_ signals 7-10
DRA, see antenna
DSR 5-8, 7-8, 7-9
asserted 5-16, 7-7, 7-17
Index-6
changes during operation 5-15
Control port 5-29
Data port 5-28, 5-29
DCD handshake 5-29
de-asserted 2-7, 5-9, 5-16, 7-7,
7-12, 7-18
on Data port 5-28, 5-29
Diagnostic port 5-28
hold time 7-8
modem power down 5-10
OR’d signals 7-17
signal 7-7
durability
digital connector 7-34
RF connector 7-35, 7-39
dynamic IP addressing 5-23
E
E-A-R damping feet 7-20, 7-32, 7-33,
E-2
echoing 6-9
EIA/TIA/IS-707A 6-40
electrical shock 2-19, 7-15
electronic device restrictions B-4
EMI filtering 7-15, 7-16
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Index
emissions
1605 7-29
problems 2-9
enclosures 7-19, B-1
metallic 7-18
QUALCOMM mark on 7-20
regulatory labels on 7-21
environmental specifications
antenna 7-35, E-2
modem 7-30, E-2
ERROR 6-9
error
control 6-46
log
clearing 6-60
getting 6-59
services commands 6-59
Error Control Selection Command 6-45
ESD 2-2, 2-19, 7-6, 7-20
and Diagnostic port 7-13
damage to modem 7-15
ESN 6-34
ETSI 7-16
European
R&TTE Directive B-2
Union 7-18, 7-21
extended configuration AT
commands 6-32
extending cables 2-5, 2-9
F
factory defaults 6-15, 6-17
fades 5-19, 6-61
fallback modes 6-45
fatal error 7-9, 7-18
FCC 7-16, 7-18, 7-21, B-2
FDX 5-16
Federal Communications Commission, see
FCC
filtering 7-16
firewalls 5-5
fixed IP addressing 5-23, 5-24
flash, programming 7-14
flow control 2-15
data 5-12
DCE/DTE 6-36
hardware 6-37, 7-13, 7-14
software 6-37
Forward Link 5-16
freezing rain 7-37
frequencies
attenuation 7-28
operating E-1
frequency range, antenna E-3
full duplex 1-5, 5-16, 5-22, 5-32
fungal growth 7-35, 7-39
fuses 2-12, 7-16
G
GAI 5-16
gain, antenna E-3
gas wells 5-3, 5-6
GATEWAY 4-2, 6-63
Gateways 4-2, 5-3, A-2
Home Channel 3-5
Home ID 3-5
IP addressing 5-23
IWF 6-41, 6-47
number 4-2
Packet Interworking Function 5-8
service areas 5-29, 5-35
geostationary-Earth-orbit satellites A-2
Get
Info 6-9
Modem User Terminal ESN 6-34
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Index-7
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Globalstar
Air Interface 5-16
background information A-1
Communications System 1-2
coverage A-2
Customer Service D-1
Data User Guide 1-8
ground segment A-2
Home
Gateway Channel 3-5
Gateway ID 3-5
Service Provider Mobile Country
Code 3-6
Service Provider Mobile Network
Code 3-6
IMSI 3-5
Limited Partnership (GLP) A-1
satellite
paths 7-27
service 4-2, 5-16
system 3-1
service 4-2
alerts 5-19
signal 4-1
specifications E-1
User Terminal 3-2
UT Program Support Tool, see UTPST
UTPST Script API Reference
Manual xxiii, 1-8, 3-7
Web page 5-26, A-4
GLOBALSTAR service mode 6-63
GLP A-1
GND 5-8, 7-8, 7-9
GPS interference B-3
ground
loops 2-11, 7-19
segment, Globalstar A-2
grounding 2-11
options 7-18
GSP-1600 Tri-Mode Phone A-2, A-5
LCD screen 5-20
roaming 5-35
GSP-1620 Satellite Data Modem, see
modem
guard-time 6-40
H
H777 6-22
hand-offs 5-29
handshake
DTR-DCD 5-29
signals 5-13
TxD/RxD 7-8
hanging up
calls 5-27, 5-32
modem 7-7
hard reset 7-18
hardware
antenna 7-22
flow control 7-13, 7-14
modem 7-2
Health Industry Manufacturers
Association B-4
hearing aids B-5
heat loads 7-31, 7-36
Home Service Provider 3-6
Hook Control 6-22
host
application 5-3
modem 6-45
server 5-4, 5-6, 5-23, 5-24, 5-30,
5-33, 5-35
HPSE_RESUME 6-64
humidity 7-30, 7-35, E-2
signal 7-10, 7-11, 7-14
Index-8
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Index
HyperTerminal 2-15, 5-2
checking modem status 4-2
making calls 4-4
setting up 2-15
IWF 5-8
commands 6-41
Gateway 6-41
modem 5-30, 6-14, 6-18, 6-27,
6-28, 6-29, 6-30, 6-31
I
modulation capabilities 6-47
ice 7-29, 7-37
ICNIRP (1996) B-4
IDLE 6-64
idle timer 5-25, 6-49
impacts 7-3
impedance 7-15
IMSI 3-5, 5-24, 5-30
in-band control data 5-12, 5-27, 5-32
INDEX, SMS 6-54
initialization strings 5-36
insertion loss 2-9
Interface connector
pinouts 7-9
interface connector
summary E-1
interference, antenna 7-29
Internet 1-4, 5-3, 5-21
Protocol, see IP
IP addressing 5-23
dynamic 5-23
fixed 5-24
globally routable addresses 5-23
private addresses 5-23
IP-in-IP tunnel 5-24
IPSec 5-24
IRPA (1991) B-4
IS-637 6-55
IS-95 ratesets 6-32
IS-95A 5-16
isolation, antenna 7-29, E-3
80-99208-1 Rev. D
J
J3 connector 2-6, 7-3, 7-6
J7 connector 2-6, 7-3, 7-6
JPM Corporate 7-26
jumper, shorting pins 3-8
L
labeling, regulatory 7-21
LAPM 6-46
latitude 5-21, 6-67, A-1
LEO satellites 1-2, 5-21, A-1
lightning 7-16
Linux 5-22
Liquid Electrical Tape 7-29
LNA 1-7, E-3
local flow control 5-15, 6-36
locked SMS messages 6-54, 6-56
long distance charges 5-4
longitude 5-21, 6-67
Loopback call 4-3, 5-10, 5-11, 6-21
DTR behavior 5-15
LOOPBACK call type 6-64
lost signaling carrier 6-29, 6-30
low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellites A-1
LPM 6-63
M
M3 screws 2-11, 7-19
M4 screws 2-11
Macintosh OS 5-22
Index-9
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Markov call 4-3, 5-10, 5-11, 6-21
DTR behavior 5-15
statistics 6-68
MARKOV call type 6-64
MCC 3-5, 3-6
MCX connectors 1-7, 7-3, 7-6, 7-25
mechanical shock 7-34, 7-38
medical devices B-5
medium-Earth-orbit satellites A-2
MIK, see Modem Integrator’s Kit
MNC 3-5, 3-6
Mobile
Country Code 3-5
Network Code 3-5
Satellite System 5-16
mobile-originated calls
asynchronous 5-32
packet data 5-27
mobile-terminated calls
answering with SMS 5-18
asynchronous 5-33
packet data 5-27
MODEL 6-10
NUMBER 6-10
modem
antenna connectors 7-6
application scenarios 5-5
applications 5-1
banks 5-4
board layout 7-3
booting up 7-7, 7-17
bulk programming 3-7
dimensions, weight 7-6
distributors A-5
grounding options 7-18
hardware 7-2
host 5-4, 6-45
Index-10
IWF 5-30, 6-14, 6-18, 6-27, 6-28,
6-29, 6-30, 6-31
labeling 7-21
mechanical description 7-3
mounting 7-19
overview 1-2
powering off 2-18
providing power 2-12
quick tour 2-2
re-booting 7-18
resetting 2-18
specification summary E-1
status 4-1, 6-62
surge protection 7-16
talking to via serial port 2-15
training time 5-4
upgrading software 3-7
user interface 7-6
Modem Integrator’s Kit 1-7, 2-2, 2-4
Modem Interface cable 2-4
Modem Operation Monitor, see Operation
Monitor
modes
Command 5-12
dormant 6-48
modem call 6-69
Online 4-5, 5-12
Online-Command 4-5, 5-12
power 7-17
Modulation Selection Command 6-47
MODULE_RESET_N 7-7, 7-12
Monitor
Speaker Loudness 6-10
Speaker Mode 6-11
mounting
antennas 2-10, 7-22, 7-27
modems 7-19
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Index
MPE B-4
MSIN 3-5
MSS 5-16
multiplexing, packet data 6-32
MULTITONE 6-64
MUX 6-32
Online mode 4-5, 5-12
entering from Online-Command
mode 5-13
returning to 6-23
Online-Command mode 4-5, 5-10, 5-11,
5-12, 6-40
echoing 6-9
N
entering from Online mode 5-12
terminating data calls 5-12
National Safe Transit Association 7-35,
7-39
NCRP Report 86 B-3
negotiation 6-43
networking software 5-22
NO ANSWER 6-22
NO CARRIER 5-11, 6-19, 6-21, 6-24
NO DIALTONE 5-10, 6-21
NO_MODE 6-63
noise, ambient E-2
noise, Rx E-3
noisy lines 5-4
non-data calls 5-10
non-volatile
data, losing 7-7
memory 7-18
O
operating systems 5-22
Operation Monitor 2-4, 2-7, 7-12
Original Equipment Manufacturer, see
OEMs
originator 6-45
O-rings 2-11, 7-28
oscillations, power line 7-15
OSPL 7-20, 7-34, E-2
Outdoor Unit, see ODU
Overall Sound Pressure Level 7-20, 7-34
overhead 1-2, 5-4, 5-32
P
pacemakers B-4
packet data
calls 4-3, 6-21
using AT commands 4-4
ODU 1-7, 7-22
see also antenna
OEMs 1-1, A-5
applications 5-2
mobile-originated calls 5-27
modem information 7-1
products 7-1
Off-Hook 6-22
oil wells 5-3
OK 6-9
On-Hook 6-22
using 5-21
with asynchronous data 5-34,
80-99208-1 Rev. D
mobile-terminated calls 5-27
overview 1-2, 5-4
roaming 5-29
6-50
Packet No Dial 6-50
parity 2-15, 6-35, 7-6
particulates 7-3, 7-19
passwords 5-5
Index-11
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Pause Before Blind Dialing Time 6-27
pauses, during dialing 6-29
periodic application 5-6
Perl 5-2
phone book entries 6-21
pinouts
Diagnostic port 7-13
interface connector 7-9
pipe, for data 5-19
pipelines 5-6
PLS, see Position Location Service
polarization, antenna E-3
pole-mounting antennas 7-29
ports
activation changes during
operation 5-15
active 5-9, 5-13
affected by AT commands 5-13, 5-14
arbitration 5-9
behavior 5-10
configuration 5-8, 5-9
configuration and SMS 5-17
during power on and off 5-16
see also Control port, Data port,
Diagnostic port
using Data and Control 5-7
POS 1 DTR to GND 2-7, 3-3, 7-12
POS 2 DTR Open 2-7, 7-12
POS 3 Not Used 2-7, 7-12, 7-13
Position Location
Determination 5-21
Service 6-66
POWER 7-14
power
consumption 7-16, E-1
DC requirements 7-15
ground 7-19
handling, antenna E-3
Index-12
maximum transmit E-1
modes 7-17
on/off 7-7, 7-17, 7-18
port use during 5-16
requirements 2-12
powering modem
off 2-18
with AC adapter 2-13
with DC power supply 2-14
PPP
session 5-22
with asychronous data 5-34
precipitation 7-3, 7-19
Preferred Service Provider 3-6
printing SMS message 6-52
product support D-1
PROGRAM 7-14
protocol stacks 5-22
PROVIDER 4-2, 6-63
provisioning 3-1, E-1
PSTN 1-2, 5-3, 5-4, 6-42, 6-45
Public Switched Telephone Network, see
PSTN
pulse dialing 6-11
Q
QUALCOMM
defaults for modem 6-17
mark on enclosures 7-20
R
R&TTE Directive B-2
R216, R217 7-19
Radio Astronomy exclusion zones B-3
reboot 7-9
receive section, antenna 7-22
Received Line Signal Detector, see RLSD
received signal strength 4-3
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Index
REGISTRATION 4-3, 6-63
registration, Gateway 5-30
regulatory
labeling 7-21
requirements 7-21
Repeat Last Command 6-19
re-programming service parameters 3-4
RESELECTION_NEXT 6-63
RESET 2-4
lead 2-18, 7-7
Reset to Default Configuration 5-14, 6-15
resetting modem 2-18, 7-18
resistors 7-19
Response Formatting Character 6-26
Result Code
Selection Command 6-14
Suppression 6-12
result codes 6-13
common S-register 6-24
selection 6-14
retransmit timer 6-70
Retrieve Error Log 6-59
Return to Online Data Mode 6-23
Reverse Link 5-17
RF
board 1-7
certification B-1
connector durability 7-35, 7-39
connector ground 7-19
exposure guidelines B-3
path changes B-3
power amp 1-7
restrictions B-1, B-3
RFC 1661, 1662 5-22
RFR 5-8, 6-37
RI 5-8, 5-28, 5-29, 5-33, 7-9
asserted on Data port 5-28
RING 5-28, 5-29, 5-33, 6-21, 6-61
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Ring Indicator, see RI
RLSD 5-8, 5-25, 6-16
Rm interface 5-7, 5-12, 6-38
baud rate 5-15, 6-15, 6-38
DTR (circuit 108/2) 5-12
protocol setting 5-15, 6-33
ROAMING 4-3, 6-63
roaming 6-61
asynchronous 5-35
between Gateway service areas 5-35
fixed IP addresses 5-24
packet data 5-29
status 5-20
within Gateway service areas 5-35
routing asynchronous data 1-2
RS-232
interfaces 1-5
maximum cable lengths 2-9
ports 5-17
transmitter 7-8
RSSI 4-3, 5-20, 6-63
RTS 5-8, 6-37, 7-9, 7-14
Rx connector 2-6, 2-9, 7-22
RxD 5-8, 7-8, 7-9, 7-14
S
safety standards B-4
satellites 2-9
Globalstar A-1
MEO/GEO A-2
SCADA applications 1-1, 1-3
components 5-2
developing 5-1
sample scenarios 5-5
scripting 3-7
sealing antennas 7-28
security 5-5
Index-13
Integrator’s Reference Manual
Select
Pulse Dialing 6-11
setting up
dormant mode 5-25
Tone Dialing 6-13
SELF TEST 2-16
separation distance B-4
serial port 6-35
server
DNS 5-30
host 5-4, 5-6, 5-23, 5-24, 5-30,
HyperTerminal 2-15
SETUP_ORIG 6-64
SETUP_TERM 6-64
shipping 7-35, 7-39
shock mounts 7-20, 7-32, 7-33, E-2
Short Messaging Service, see SMS
short-circuits 7-6, 7-13
SHUTDOWN 6-63
shutdown mode 7-17
SIG GND 2-4
signal
fading E-2
5-33, 5-35
service
alerts 5-19, 6-61
degradation 5-4
programming 3-1, 7-12
bulk modems 3-7
corrupting 7-18
parameters 3-4
providers 3-1, A-4
current 4-2
status commands 6-61
status message 5-20
Service Alert 6-61
SERVICE AVAILABLE 4-2, 6-63
SERVICE MODE 4-2, 6-63
Service Programming Code 3-3
Service Status 6-62
Set
Character Framing 6-35
Dormant Mode Timeout Value 6-49
Forward MUX Option 6-32
Local Flow Control 6-36
Mode 6-69
Remote Config String 6-41
Rm Interface Command Baud
Rate 6-38
Rm Interface Protocol 6-33
to Factory Defined
Configuration 5-14, 6-17
Index-14
ground 7-19
lines 5-8
lost carrier 6-29, 6-30
naming convention 5-8
ports 5-8
strength 4-3
SIGNALING 6-64
Silent Retry Timeout 5-14, 6-31
SILENTRETRY 6-64
sinusoidal 7-32
SLIP 5-34
SMA connectors 1-7, 7-25
sealing 7-29
SMS 5-17
alerts 5-17, 6-57
AT commands 5-18, 6-51
autodelete 6-54, 6-56, 6-59
database state 6-58
email address 5-19
Info 6-58
locked messages 6-54, 6-56
Message Center 6-55
message field information 5-18
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Index
mobile-terminated 5-17
calls 5-18
Move/Delete 6-51
port configuration 5-17
Print 6-52
printing current message 6-52
sample script 5-19
traversing message list 6-51
SMS Lock 6-56
snow 7-28, 7-29, 7-37
SOFT_RESET 6-63
software version, determining 3-8
solar radiation 7-31, 7-36
solder mask 7-19
SP, see service providers 3-1
SPC 3-3
speaker
loudness 6-10
on/off 6-11
special calls and services 6-64
specifications
antenna 7-22, E-3
antenna cable 7-25
environmental 7-30, 7-35
modem E-1
summary E-1
S-registers 6-24
extensions 6-31
stacks 5-22
modification commands 6-70
standby mode 7-17
start/stop bits 6-35
status, checking modem 4-1, 4-2, 5-20,
6-62
stop bits 2-15, 7-6
Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition,
see SCADA
suppliers, RF cables 7-26
80-99208-1 Rev. D
support, product D-1
surge protection 7-16, 7-19
switch box 2-7, 7-12
syntax, command 6-8
synthesizers 1-7
T
TCP
networking 6-70
Stack Changes 6-70
TCP/IP 1-2
TCXO 1-7
Technical Support D-1
temperature 7-30, 7-35
antenna E-3
termination character 5-25, 6-7
changing 6-25
thermal radiation 7-31, 7-36
throughput 5-22, 5-32
TIA/EIA-232-E specification 2-5, 2-9
TIA_ASYNC 4-3, 6-64
TIA_PPP 4-3, 4-5, 6-64
tilde character 4-4
Time of Day 6-64
time stamp, SMS 6-55
timeout
connection 6-28
dormant mode 6-49
Globalstar-specific 6-31
silent retry 6-32
TIMEPAUSE 6-64
timer
call origination silent retry 6-31
dormant mode idle 5-25, 6-49
TCP stack 6-70
Times Microwave Systems 7-26
timing, DTR 7-8
tone dialing 6-13
Index-15
Integrator’s Reference Manual
tools, recommended development 5-2
traffic channel 5-8, 5-25
transmit
mode 7-17
section, antenna 7-22
troubleshooting 8-1
TTL levels 7-13
Tx connector 2-6, 2-9, 7-22
TxD 5-8, 7-8, 7-9, 7-14
U
Um interface 5-8, 6-49
UNIX computers 5-22
upconverters 1-7
upgrading software 3-7
Use Van Jacobsen Header
Compression 6-73
user interface, modem 7-6
User Terminals 3-2, A-2
distributors A-5
UTPST
connecting to modem 3-2
installing and running 3-3
overview 3-2
Scripting API 3-7
VPN 5-5, 5-24
VSWR E-3
W
warranty C-1
watchdog circuit 7-7
weight
antenna 7-23, E-1, E-4
modem 7-6, E-1
Windows computers 5-2
95/98/2000 5-22
NT 5-22
Wireless Technology Research,
L.L.C B-5
X
XON/XOFF 6-37
Y
Y-modem 5-34
Z
Z-modem 5-34
V
V.42 protocol 6-45
V.42bis data compression 6-42
V.8 6-45
Van Jacobsen header compression 6-73
vibration 7-19, 7-32, 7-37, E-2, E-3
virtual private network, see VPN
VMN messages 6-59
VOICE 6-64
Volex Inc. 7-26
voltages, input 7-16, E-1
Index-16
80-99208-1 Rev. D
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising