Allen-Bradley | Rockwell Automation 1734-AENT | User manual | Allen-Bradley Rockwell Automation 1734-AENT User manual

EtherNet/IP Modules in Logix5000 Control
Systems
Catalog Numbers 1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2F, 1756-EN2T, 1756-EN2TR,
1756-EN2TXT, 1768-ENBT, 1769-L23E-QB1B, 1769-L23E-QBFC1B, 1769L32E, 1769-L35E, 1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, 1783-ETAP2F, 1794-AENT, 20COMM-E, 22-COMM-E, 1734-AENT, 1734-AENTR
User Manual
Important User Information
Solid state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical equipment. Safety Guidelines
for the Application, Installation and Maintenance of Solid State Controls (publication SGI-1.1 available from your local Rockwell
Automation sales office or online at http://www.rockwellautomation.com/literature/) describes some important differences
between solid state equipment and hard-wired electromechanical devices. Because of this difference, and also because of the
wide variety of uses for solid state equipment, all persons responsible for applying this equipment must satisfy themselves that
each intended application of this equipment is acceptable.
In no event will Rockwell Automation, Inc. be responsible or liable for indirect or consequential damages resulting from the use
or application of this equipment.
The examples and diagrams in this manual are included solely for illustrative purposes. Because of the many variables and
requirements associated with any particular installation, Rockwell Automation, Inc. cannot assume responsibility or liability for
actual use based on the examples and diagrams.
No patent liability is assumed by Rockwell Automation, Inc. with respect to use of information, circuits, equipment, or software
described in this manual.
Reproduction of the contents of this manual, in whole or in part, without written permission of Rockwell Automation, Inc., is
prohibited.
Throughout this manual, when necessary, we use notes to make you aware of safety considerations.
WARNING
IMPORTANT
ATTENTION
SHOCK HAZARD
BURN HAZARD
Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can cause an explosion in a hazardous environment,
which may lead to personal injury or death, property damage, or economic loss.
Identifies information that is critical for successful application and understanding of the product.
Identifies information about practices or circumstances that can lead to personal injury or death, property damage,
or economic loss. Attentions help you identify a hazard, avoid a hazard, and recognize the consequence
Labels may be on or inside the equipment, for example, a drive or motor, to alert people that dangerous voltage may
be present.
Labels may be on or inside the equipment, for example, a drive or motor, to alert people that surfaces may reach
dangerous temperatures.
Allen-Bradley, ArmorPOINT, CompactLogix, ControlLogix, DriveLogix, FLEX I/O, FlexLogix, Guard I/O, Logix5000, POINT I/O, Rockwell Automation, RSLinx, RSLogix 5000, Stratix 6000, Stratix 8000, and
TechConnect are trademarks of Rockwell Automation, Inc.
Trademarks not belonging to Rockwell Automation are property of their respective companies.
Summary of Changes
Introduction
This release of this document contains new and updated information. To find
new and updated information, look for change bars, as shown next to this
paragraph.
Updated Information
The document contains these changes.
Topic
Page
Description of 1783-ETAP1F and 1783-ETAP2F EtherNet/IP
Fiber Taps to the EtherNet/IP Overview chapter
13
Updated Rockwell Automation Products with Embedded
Switch Technology section
58
1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, and 1783-ETAP2F EtherNet/IP Tap
Status Indicators
187
Additional less significant changes have been made throughout the document.
Change bars mark all changes.
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3
Summary of Changes
Notes:
4
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Table of Contents
Preface
Purpose of This Manual. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Who Should Use This Publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Chapter 1
EtherNet/IP Overview
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
1756-ENBT Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
1756-EN2F, 1756-EN2T, 1756-EN2TR, and
1756-EN2TXT Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1768-ENBT Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1769-L23E-QB1B, 1769-L23E-QBFC1B Packaged Controllers . . . . 17
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
1769-L32E and 1769-L35E Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, and 1783-ETAP2F
EtherNet/IP Taps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1788-ENBT Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1794-AENT Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1734-AENT and 1734-AENTR Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1738-AENT and 1738-AENTR Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
20-COMM-E Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
22-COMM-E Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
EtherNet/IP Communication Modules in a Control System . . . . . . . 23
Installing Communication Modules or Other Devices on
the EtherNet/IP Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Safety I/O in EtherNet/IP Control Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
I/O Module Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Guard I/O Catalog Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
CIP Safety in EtherNet/IP Safety Architectures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Bridge Across Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
EtherNet/IP Network Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Chapter 2
Configure a Workstation to
Operate on an EtherNet/IP
Network
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Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Configure the Ethernet Communication Driver in
RSLinx Software. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
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Chapter 3
Configure Stratix Switches
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Select a Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Set Up the Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Switch Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Chapter 4
Configure an EtherNet/IP Module
to Operate on the Network
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Determine Network Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Set the IP Network Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Assign Network Parameters via the BOOTP/DHCP Utility . . . . . . . 45
Other Methods to Assign Network Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Configure the Module with RSLinx Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Configure Your Module with RSLogix 5000 Software . . . . . . . . . 50
Use DHCP Software to Set the IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Duplicate IP Address Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Detection of Duplicate IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
IP Address Swapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
DNS Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Use EtherNet/IP Modules in a Logix5000
Controller Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Chapter 5
Configure a Supervisor on a
Device-level Ring Network
6
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Rockwell Automation Products with Embedded
Switch Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Features Common to Products with Embedded
Switch Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Supervisor Node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Ring Node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Construct the Physical Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Configure Supervisor Nodes on a DLR Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Configure a Ring Supervisor in RSLogix 5000
Programming Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Enable Ring Supervisor in RSLogix 5000
Programming Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Configure and Enable a Ring Supervisor in RSLinx Classic
Communication Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Complete the Physical Connections of the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Verify Supervisor Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Troubleshoot DLR Network Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
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Chapter 6
Control I/O
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Set Up the Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Add Distributed I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Add a Module. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Select a Communication Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Choosing a Direct or Rack-optimized Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Ownership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Select a Remote Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Set the Requested Packet Interval (RPI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Access Distributed I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Chapter 7
Interlocking and Data Transfer
Between Controllers
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Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Set Up the Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Logix5000 Controller Combinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Tag Guidelines for Produced or Consumed Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Connections for Produced and Consumed Tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Produce a Tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Configure the Produced Tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Consume Data Produced by Another Controller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Add the Producer Controller to the Consumer’s
I/O Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Create the Consumed Tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Guidelines for Message (MSG) Instructions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Connections for Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Cache Message Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Enter Message Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Add the EtherNet/IP Module to the Local Controller’s
I/O Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Enter a Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Configure a MSG Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Communicate with PLC-5 or SLC Processors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Converting between INTs and DINTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Mapping Tags. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Receive MSGs from PLC-5 or SLC 500 Processors . . . . . . . . . . 118
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Table of Contents
Chapter 8
Send Email
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
EtherNet/IP Module as an Email Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Send Email Via a Controller-initiated Message Instruction . . . . . . . . 121
Create String Tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Enter the Ladder Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Configure the MSG Instruction That Identifies the
Mail Relay Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Configure the MSG Instruction That Contains the
Email Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
Enter Email Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Possible Email Status Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Chapter 9
Communicate with PanelView
Terminals
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Set Up the Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Logix5000 Controller Combinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Connections to PanelView Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Add a PanelView Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Organize Controller Data for a PanelView Terminal. . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Connections to RSView Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Chapter 10
Monitor Diagnostics
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Diagnostic Web Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Network Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Explicit Message Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
I/O Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Ethernet Statistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Chapter 11
Troubleshoot an EtherNet/IP
Module
8
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Access Web Browser Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Diagnostic Overview Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Message Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
I/O Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Ethernet Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Switch Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Internet Group Multicast Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Virtual Local Area Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Port Mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
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Chapter 12
USB Serial Communication
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Set Up the Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Configure a Module Via the USB Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Set Up a USB Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Flash Upgrade Firmware through a USB Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Appendix A
Status Indicators
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
1756-ENBT EtherNet/IP Module Status Indicators. . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
1756-EN2F EtherNet/IP Module Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
1756-EN2T EtherNet/IP Module Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
1756-EN2TR EtherNet/IP Module Status Indicators. . . . . . . . . . . . 175
1756-EN2TXT ControlLogix-XT EtherNet/IP Bridge
Module Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
1769-L23E-QB1B and 1769-L23E-QBFC1B Controllers
Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
I/O Status Indicators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
1769-L32E and 1769-L35E Controllers Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . 183
1768-ENBT Module Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, and 1783-ETAP2F
EtherNet/IP Tap Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
1788-ENBT EtherNet/IP Daughtercard Status Indicators. . . . . . . . 189
1734-AENT and 1734-AENTR EtherNet/IP
POINT I/O Adapter Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192
1738-AENTR ArmorPOINT I/O 2-port EtherNet/IP
Adapter Status Indicators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195
1794-AENT EtherNet/IP FLEX I/O Adapter
Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
20-COMM-E Module Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
22-COMM-E Module Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205
Appendix B
Fiber Cable and LC Connector
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Appendix C
EtherNet/IP Network Connections Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
CIP Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
TCP Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
Multicast Address Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Requested Packet Interval (RPI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
9
Table of Contents
Appendix D
EtherNet/IP Network Overview
Index
10
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Ethernet Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Use of the Common Industrial Protocol (CIP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
Configuration Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Gateways . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220
Subnet Mask. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
Manual Configuration on an Ethernet Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Change Ports on an Ethernet Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Additional Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
Preface
Purpose of This Manual
This manual describes how you can use EtherNet/IP modules with your
Logix5000 controller and communicate with various devices on the Ethernet
network.
Who Should Use
This Publication
You should use this manual if you program applications that use Ethernet with
one of these Logix5000 controllers:
• CompactLogix controller
• ControlLogix controller
• FlexLogix controller
You should also understand:
• networking concepts.
• RSLogix 5000 programming software.
• RSLinx Classic programming software.
11Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
11
Preface
Notes:
12
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
Chapter
1
EtherNet/IP Overview
Introduction
13Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
The Logix5000 family of controllers offers several EtherNet/IP
communication modules.
Topic
Page
1756-ENBT Module
15
1756-EN2F, 1756-EN2T, 1756-EN2TR, and 1756-EN2TXT Modules
15
1768-ENBT Module
17
1769-L23E-QB1B, 1769-L23E-QBFC1B Packaged Controllers
17
1769-L32E and 1769-L35E Controllers
18
1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, and 1783-ETAP2F EtherNet/IP Taps
18
1788-ENBT Module
19
1794-AENT Adapter
20
1734-AENT and 1734-AENTR Adapters
20
1738-AENT and 1738-AENTR Adapters
21
20-COMM-E Module
21
22-COMM-E Module
22
EtherNet/IP Communication Modules in a Control System
23
Safety I/O in EtherNet/IP Control Systems
24
Bridge Across Networks
27
EtherNet/IP Network Specifications
30
13
Chapter 1
EtherNet/IP Overview
Select a module based on the EtherNet/IP functions the application requires.
EtherNet/IP Module Functions and Applications
Module
Works With a Controller to Interfaces With
Originate Communication Distributed I/O Modules
(Scanner/Bridge)
(Adapter) or End Node
1734-AENT
X
1738-AENT, 1734-AENTR
X
1756-ENBT
X
X
1756-EN2F
X
X
1756-EN2T, 1756-EN2TR,
1756-EN2TXT
X
X
1768-ENBT
X
1769-L23E-QB1B,
1769-L23E-QBFC1B
X
1769-L32E, 1769-L35E
X
1788-ENBT
X
1794-AENT
X
2x-COMM-E
X
The EtherNet/IP communication modules:
• support messaging, produced/consumed tags, and distributed I/O.
• encapsulate messages within standard TCP/UDP/IP protocol.
• share a common application layer with ControlNet and DeviceNet
network protocols.
• interface via RJ45, category 5, unshielded, twisted-pair cable, except for
the 1756-EN2F fiber cable, which has a fiber connector.
• support half/full duplex 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps operation.
• require no network scheduling.
• require no routing tables.
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Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
EtherNet/IP Overview
1756-ENBT Module
Chapter 1
The 1756-ENBT module operates either as an interface for a ControlLogix
controller to communicate with other devices over an EtherNet/IP network
or as an adapter for 1756 I/O modules on an EtherNet/IP network. This
module supports:
• control of I/O.
• communication via produced/consumed tags and MSG instructions.
• communication with HMI.
• configuration and programming, such as uploading and downloading.
• an adapter for 1756 I/O modules.
• a web server to provide diagnostic and status information.
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
1756-ENBT ControlLogix EtherNet/IP Bridge Module
Installation Instructions, publication 1756-IN019
Details how to install the module and provides technical specifications.
1756-ENBT ControlLogix Redundancy System Revision 15
User Manual, publication 1756-UM523
Details how to use and maintain a ControlLogix redundancy system.
1756-EN2F, 1756-EN2T,
1756-EN2TR, and
1756-EN2TXT Modules
1756-EN2T
The following modules perform the same functions as the 1756-ENBT
module but with twice the capacity for demanding applications.
•
•
•
•
1756-EN2F ControlLogix EtherNet/IP fiber module
1756-EN2T ControlLogix EtherNet/IP bridge module
1756-EN2TR ControlLogix EtherNet/IP 2-port module
1756-EN2TXT ControlLogix-XT EtherNet/IP module
All modules support:
•
•
•
•
•
•
control of I/O.
communication via produced/consumed tags and MSG instructions.
communication with HMI.
configuration and programming, such as uploading and downloading.
an adapter for 1756 I/O modules.
USB serial communication, enabling a laptop or workstation to access
and program a Logix5000 controller. For more information, see the
chapter USB Port Connection.
• a web server to provide diagnostic and status information.
• rotary switches for quick IP address configuration.
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
15
Chapter 1
EtherNet/IP Overview
The 1756-EN2F module only supports an LC fiber connector to support
additional applications. For more information on LC fiber connectors, see
Fiber Cable and LC Connector on page 209.
The 1756-EN2TR module only supports connection of a ControlLogix
system to a linear or device level ring (DLR) network.
The 1756-EN2TXT module only supports use of the module in extreme
temperatures. The module is capable of operating in temperatures from
-25…70° C (-13…158° F).
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
1756-EN2T ControlLogix EtherNet/IP Bridge Module
Installation Instructions, publication 1756-IN603
Details how to install the module and provides technical specifications.
1756-EN2TR ControlLogix EtherNet/IP 2-port Module
Installation Instructions , publication 1756-IN612
Details how to install the module and provides technical specifications.
1756-EN2F ControlLogix EtherNet/IP Fiber Module
Installation Instructions, publication 1756-IN606
Details how to install the fiber module and provides technical
specifications.
1756-EN2TXT ControlLogix-XT EtherNet/IP Bridge Module
Installation Instructions, publication 1756-IN635
Details how to install the fiber module and provides technical
specifications.
16
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
EtherNet/IP Overview
1768-ENBT Module
Chapter 1
The 1768-ENBT module is an interface that enables a 1768-L43 or 1768-L45
CompactLogix controller to communicate with devices over an EtherNet/IP
network. The module supports:
•
•
•
•
•
control of I/O.
communication via produced/consumed tags and MSG instructions.
communication with HMI.
configuration and programming, such as uploading and downloading.
a web server to provide diagnostic and status information.
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
1768-ENBT CompactLogix EtherNet/IP Communication
Module Installation Instructions, publication 1768-IN002
Details how to install the module and provides technical specifications.
1768 CompactLogix Controllers User Manual, publication
1768-UM001
Details how to program and maintain the controller.
1769-L23E-QB1B,
1769-L23E-QBFC1B
Packaged Controllers
1769-L23E-QB1B
The 1769-L23E-QB1B and 1769-L23E-QBFC1B CompactLogix packaged
controllers have an integrated EtherNet/IP port. Through this port, the
controller supports:
•
•
•
•
•
control of I/O.
communication via produced/consumed tags and MSG instructions.
communication with HMI.
configuration and programming, such as uploading and downloading.
a web server to provide diagnostic and status information.
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
1769-L23E-QB1B, 1769-L23E-QBFC1B CompactLogix
Packaged Controller Installation Instructions, publication
1769-IN082
Details how to install the controller and provides technical specifications.
1769-L23E-QB1B, 1769-L23E-QBFC1B CompactLogix
Packaged Controller Quick Start and User Manual,
publication IASIMP-QS010
Details how to program and maintain controllers.
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
17
Chapter 1
EtherNet/IP Overview
1769-L32E and 1769-L35E
Controllers
The 1769-L32E and 1769-L35E CompactLogix controllers have an integrated
EtherNet/IP port. Through this port, the controller supports:
•
•
•
•
•
control of I/O.
communication via produced/consumed tags and MSG instructions.
communication with HMI.
configuration and programming, such as uploading and downloading.
a web server to provide diagnostic and status information.
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
1769-L32E and 1769-L35E CompactLogix Controller
Installation Instructions, publication 1769-IN020
Details how to install the controller and provides technical specifications.
1769-L32E and 1769-L35E CompactLogix System User
Manual, publication 1769-UM011
Details how to program and maintain controllers.
1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F,
and 1783-ETAP2F
EtherNet/IP Taps
1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F and 1783-ETAP2F taps allow devices that do not
support embedded switch technology to connect to linear and DLR networks.
Each tap supports:
• a device port on the front of the tap to connect to other devices.
• two network ports to connect the tap to linear and DLR networks.
• the functionality to divide an Ethernet network into segments and direct
network traffic more efficiently than using repeating hubs.
• the functionality to connect one of the tap ports to a single device
segments the network so you can dedicate bandwidth to that device.
• multiple simultaneous communication between devices on different
ports.
18
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
EtherNet/IP Overview
Chapter 1
The network ports used to connect to linear or DLR networks are different for
each tap. The following table describes the types of taps used with each tap:
Cat. No.
Network Ports
Description
1783-ETAP
2 copper
Two copper network ports connect the tap to
copper linear or DLR networks.
1783-ETAP1F
1 copper
One copper network port connects the tap to a
copper linear or DLR network, and one fiber-optic
network port connects the tap to a fiber-optic
linear or DLR network.
1 fiber
This tap is commonly used to connect a copper
section with a fiber-optic section of the same
network.
1783-ETAP2F
2 fiber
Two fiber-optic network ports connect the tap to a
fiber-optic linear or DLR network.
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
Three-Port EtherNet Tap Installation Instructions,
publication 1783-IN007
Details how to install the tap and provides technical specifications.
EtherNet/IP Fiber Tap Installation Instructions, publication
1783-IN008
Details how to install the tap and provides technical specifications.
EtherNet/IP Ring Topology Application Manual, publication
ENET-AP005
Details how to use the tap in a ring topology.
1788-ENBT Module
The 1788-ENBT module operates as an interface for a FlexLogix and
DriveLogix controller to communicate with other devices over an
EtherNet/IP network. This module supports:
• control of I/O.
• communication via produced/consumed tags and MSG instructions.
• communication with HMI.
• configuration and programming, such as uploading and downloading.
• a web server to provide diagnostic and status information.
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
1788-ENBT EtherNet/IP Daughtercard Installation
Instructions, publication 1788-IN054
Details how to install the daughtercard and provides technical
specifications.
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19
Chapter 1
EtherNet/IP Overview
1794-AENT Adapter
The 1794-AENT adapter operates as an adapter for FLEX I/O modules on
an EtherNet/IP network. This module supports:
• control of I/O.
• module configuration.
• a web server to provide diagnostic and status information.
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
1794-AENT FLEX I/O EtherNet/IP Adapter Module
Installation Instructions, publication 1794-IN082
Details how to install the adapter and provides technical specifications.
1734-AENT and 1734-AENTR
Adapters
The 1734-AENT and 1794-AENTR adapters operate as adapters for POINT
I/O modules on an EtherNet/IP network. These adapters support:
• control of I/O.
• module configuration.
• linear and device level ring (DLR) topologies on the 1734-AENTR
adapter only.
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
1734-AENT POINT I/O Ethernet Adapter Installation
Instructions, publication 1734-IN590
Details how to install the adapter and provides technical specifications.
1734-AENT POINT I/O Ethernet Adapter User Manual,
publication 1734-UM011
Details how to configure and maintain an installed adapter.
20
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
EtherNet/IP Overview
1738-AENT and 1738-AENTR
Adapters
EtherNet I/P
The 1738-AENT and 1738-AENTR adapters operate as adapters for
ArmorPOINT I/O modules on an EtherNet/IP network. These
adapters support:
1738-AENT
• control of I/O.
• module configuration.
• linear and device level ring (DLR) topologies on the 1738-AENTR
adapter only.
x100
0
2
8
6
A
0
8
6
x1
I
P
4
x10
2
D
D
2
R
E
S
S
4
0
8
6
PWR
4
Chapter 1
Adapter
Status
Network
Activity
Network
Status
PointBus
Status
System
Power
Adapter
Power
™
conformance tested
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
ArmorPOINT 2-Port EtherNet/IP Adapter Installation
Instructions, publication 1738-IN028
Details how to install the adapters and provide technical specifications.
POINT I/O 2-Port Ethernet Adapter User Manual,
publication 1734-UM014
Details how to configure and maintain an installed adapter.
20-COMM-E Module
The 20-COMM-E module operates as an adapter and provides an internal
EtherNet/IP connection for PowerFlex 70, 700, 700S and 700H drives, and
other DPI-based host devices. This module supports:
•
•
•
•
configuration.
collection of data.
peer-to-peer capability.
a web server to provide diagnostic and status information.
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
20-COMM-E PowerFlex EtherNet/IP Adapter User Manual,
publication 20COMM-UM010
Details how to program and maintain the adapter.
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21
Chapter 1
EtherNet/IP Overview
22-COMM-E Module
The 22-COMM-E module operates as an adapter and provides an internal
EtherNet/IP connection for PowerFlex 40 AC drives. This module supports:
•
•
•
•
user configuration of a module via a process display window.
e-mail notification of faults.
monitoring of a diagnostics and event queue.
direct launching of Drive Explorer or Drive Executive on a workstation
to connect online over Ethernet.
• multi-drive support of up to five PowerFlex 4 and 40 AC drives to
connect to a single node on an EtherNet/IP network, ultimately
reducing hardware costs.
Additional Resources
Resource
Description
22-COMM-E PowerFlex EtherNet/IP Adapter User Manual,
publication 22COMM-UM004
Details how to program and maintain the adapter.
22
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
EtherNet/IP Overview
EtherNet/IP Communication
Modules in a Control
System
Chapter 1
These diagrams show how EtherNet/IP modules can fit into a control system.
EtherNet/IP Network Overview
1769-L23Ex
Distributed I/O
1756-ENBT
1756 I/O modules
1769-L3xE
1768-L4x
1768-ENBT
Switch
PowerFlex
drive
1794-AENT
1794 I/O modules
1734-AENT
1734 I/O modules
Workstation
1783-ETAP
Workstation
1783-ETAP
1783-ETAP
PanelView terminal
1783-ETAP
PowerFlex drive
1756-ENBT
1756 I/O modules
1734-AENTR
1734 I/O modules
1738-AENTR
1738 I/O modules
In this example:
• the controllers can produce and consume tags with each other.
• the controllers can initiate MSG instructions that send/receive data or
configure devices.
• the workstation can upload/download projects to the controllers.
• the workstation can configure devices on the EtherNet/IP network.
These diagrams show how EtherNet/IP modules can fit into a control system.
IMPORTANT
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
For more information on how some EtherNet/IP modules and
tapscan be used in a linear or DLR network, see Configure a
Supervisor on a Device-level Ring Network on page 57.
23
Chapter 1
EtherNet/IP Overview
Installing Communication Modules or Other Devices on the
EtherNet/IP Network
In addition to using the installation instructions for each Rockwell Automation
EtherNet/IP device you install in your control system, you should also consult
the EtherNet/IP Media Planning and Installation Manual available from
ODVA, the organization that supports network technologies built on the
Common Industrial Protocol (CIP).
You can obtain EtherNet/IP Media Planning and Installation Manual at the
ODVA website, that is, http://www.odva.org.
Safety I/O in EtherNet/IP
Control Systems
Rockwell Automation offers the Guard I/O product line that implements the
EtherNet/IP safety protocol. This section provides an overview of the
modules use in a safety system.
For more information on using Guard I/O modules, see Guard I/O
EtherNet/IP Safety Modules user manual, publication 1791ES-UM001.
I/O Module Overview
The Guard I/O modules implement the CIP-safety protocol extensions over
EtherNet/IP networks and provide various features for a safety system.
Use the modules to construct a safety-control network system that meets the
requirements up to Safety Integrity Level 3 (SIL 3) as defined in IEC 61508,
Functional Safety of Electrical, Electronic, and Programmable Electronic
Safety-related Systems, and the requirements for Safety Category 4 of the EN
954-1 standard, Safety of machinery - Safety related parts of control systems.
Remote I/O communication for safety I/O data are performed through safety
connections supporting CIP safety over an EtherNet/IP network, and data
processing is performed in the safety controller.
The status and fault diagnostics of the I/O modules are monitored by a safety
controller through a safety connection using a new or existing EtherNet/IP
network.
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Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
EtherNet/IP Overview
Chapter 1
The following is a list of features common to Guard I/O modules:
• CIP-safety and EtherNet/IP protocol conformance
• Safety inputs
– Safety devices, such as emergency stop push buttons, gate switches,
and safety light curtains, can be connected.
– Dual-channel mode evaluates consistency between two input signals
(channels), which allows use of the module for Safety Category 3
and 4.
– The time of a logical discrepancy between two channels can be
monitored using a discrepancy time setting.
– An external wiring short-circuit check is possible when inputs are
wired in combination with test outputs.
– Independently adjustable on and off delay is available per channel.
• Test outputs
– Separate test outputs are provided for short circuit detection of a
safety input (or inputs).
– Power (24V) can be supplied to devices, such as safety sensors.
– Test outputs can be configured as standard outputs.
– All Guard I/O modules have numerous test outputs, of which some
can be used for broken wire detection of a muting lamp.
• Safety outputs
– Dual-channel mode evaluates consistency between two output signals
(channels).
– Safety outputs can be pulse tested to detect field wiring shorts to
24V DC and 0V DC.
• I/O status data - In addition to I/O data, the module includes status
data for monitoring I/O circuits.
• Removable I/O connectors - I/O connectors support mechanical
keying.
Guard I/O Catalog Numbers
See the table for a listing of the types of Guard I/O modules.
Types of Guard I/O Modules
Catalog Number
1791ES-IB16
1791ES-IB8XOBV4
(1)
Description
Safety input module
Safety I/O module with solid state outputs
Enclosure
Type
Rating
Safety
Inputs
Meets IP20 16
8
Test
Outputs(1)
Safety Outputs
16
8
4 bipolar pairs
Solid State
Broken wires can be detected on the muting outputs.
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
25
Chapter 1
EtherNet/IP Overview
CIP Safety in EtherNet/IP Safety Architectures
Use Guard I/O modules in EtherNet/IP safety architectures as shown in the
figure. The Guard I/O family is a set of I/O modules that when connected to
an EtherNet/IP safety network are suitable for applications up to SIL3, as
defined in the IEC 61508 standard, and Safety Category 4, as defined in the
EN 954-1 standard.
Safety Interlocking and Control via CIP Safety
RSLogix Software
RSView Software
Ethernet
ControlNet
DeviceNet
DeviceNet
DeviceNet
EtherNet/IP
ControlNet
DeviceNet
Standard Communication
Safety Communication
Safety controllers control the safety outputs. Safety or standard controllers can
control the standard outputs.
For more information on using Guard I/O modules, see Guard I/O
EtherNet/IP Safety Modules user manual, publication 1791ES-UM001.
26
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
EtherNet/IP Overview
Bridge Across Networks
Chapter 1
Some EtherNet/IP modules support the ability to bridge or route
communication through devices, depending on the capabilities of the platform
and communication devices.
IMPORTANT
The update time of local I/O modules may increase when
bridging messages.
EtherNet/IP modules do not support the transfer of data to and
from I/O modules across two or more segments of any network.
You have a bridge when you have a connection between communication
devices on two networks. For example, this bridge device has both
EtherNet/IP and DeviceNet connections, enabling Device 1 on the
EtherNet/IP network to communicate with Device 2 on a DeviceNet network
through the bridge.
Bridge Device
Device 1
EtherNet/IP
Switch
Bridge
DeviceNet
Device 2
CIP Message Bridging
CIP messages that originateon this network
Can bridge to this network
EtherNet/IP
ControlNet
DeviceNet
RS-232 Serial
EtherNet/IP
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
ControlNet
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
RS-232
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Here, a workstation configures a drive on a DeviceNet network and bridges
EtherNet/IP networks to reach the drive.
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
27
Chapter 1
EtherNet/IP Overview
Drive Configuration and Programming
PanelView Station
EtherNet/IP
Switch
Bridge
DeviceNet
Drive
The bridge can be an EtherNet/IP-to-DeviceNet bridging device or a
Logix5000 system with an EtherNet/IP communication module and a
DeviceNet communication module.
The bridge can be a:
• ControlLogix chassis with a 1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2F, 1756-EN2T,
1756-EN2TR, 1756-EN2TXT, and 1756-DNB module.
The controller is not required.
• 1769-L23E-QB1B, 1756-L23E-QBFC1B, 1769-L32E, 1769-L35E
CompactLogix controller with 1769-SDN module.
• 1768-L43 or 1768-L45 CompactLogix controller with 1768-ENBT and
1769-SDN modules.
• 1788-EN2DN linking device.
Status data can also be transferred from a DeviceNet network through the
Logix5000 controller to a RSView32 operator interface. For a CompactLogix
or FlexLogix controller, map the data into the DeviceNet I/O image and then
use RSLinx OPC software from the workstation to the Logix5000 controller
over the EtherNet/IP network. This avoids using the limited bridging
resources of the CompactLogix or FlexLogix controller.
You cannot bridge EtherNet/IP I/O across networks. I/O modules must be
configured in either a local chassis or a remote chassis. You cannot go through
a gateway chassis to control I/O even though, in some circumstances,
RSLogix 5000 programming software accepts such a configuration in the I/O
Configuration folder.
28
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
EtherNet/IP Overview
Chapter 1
DeviceNet Bridge Linking to an EtherNet/IP Network
1
2
3
4
5
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
Item
Description
1
EtherNet/IP network
2
EtherNet/IP bridge in ControlLogix system
3
DeviceNet bridge in same ControlLogix system
4
DeviceNet network
5
Distributed DeviceNet devices
29
Chapter 1
EtherNet/IP Overview
EtherNet/IP Network
Specifications
These are the EtherNet/IP network connection specifications.
EtherNet/IP Network Specifications
Catalog
Number
Connections
TCP
CIP
1734-AENT,
1734-AENTR
32
20
1738-AENT,
1738-AENTR
32
1756-ENBT
CIP Unconnected
Messages (backplane +
Ethernet)
Packet
Rates (packets/
second)(1)
I/O
HMI/MSG
32
5000
900
20
32
5000
64
128(2)
64 + 64
1756-EN2F
128
256(2)
1756-EN2T,
1756-ENT2TR,
1756-EN2TXT
128
1756-EWEB
1768-ENBT(3)
SNMP
Support
(password
required)
Media
Support
Twisted Pair
Fiber
No
Yes
No
900
No
Yes
No
5000
900
Yes
Yes
No
128 + 128
10,000
3200
Yes
No
Yes
256(2)
128 + 128
10,000
3200
Yes
Yes
No
64
128(2)
128 + 128
N/A
900
Yes
Yes
No
32
64(2)
32 + 32
5000
960
Yes
Yes
No
64
128
1768-EWEB
64
128(2)
128 + 128
N/A
960
Yes
Yes
No
1769-L23Ex
8
32(2)
32 + 32
2000
380
Yes
Yes
No
1769-L3xE
64
32(2)
32 + 32
4000
760
Yes
Yes
No
1783-ETAP
64
N/A
N/A
N/A
900
No
Yes
No
1783-ETAP1F,
1756-ETAP2F
64
N/A
N/A
N/A
900
No
Yes
Yes
1794-AENT
64
64
N/A
9500
N/A
Yes
Yes
No
2x-COMM-E
30
16
16
400
50
No
Yes
No
(1)
Total packet rate = I/O Produced Tag, max + HMI/MSG, max. Packet rates will vary depending on packet size. For more detailed specifications, see the EDS file for a
specific catalog number.
(2)
CIP connections for these devices can be used for all explicit or all implicit applications.
Example: A 1756-ENBT has a total of 64 CIP connections and can be used for any combination of connections.
(3)
The number of TCP and CIP connections supported by the 1768-ENBT module depends on the firmware revision you are using. If you are using firmware revision 1.x, the
module supports 32 TCP connections and 64 CIP connections. If you are using firmware revision 2.x or later, the module supports 64 TCP connections and 128 CIP
connections.
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Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
EtherNet/IP Overview
Chapter 1
EtherNet/IP Network Specifications
Catalog
Number
Produced/Consumed Tags
Number of Multicast Tags,
Max
Unicast Available(1)
1734-AENT,
1734-AENTR
N/A
RSLogix 5000 programming
software, version 18
Socket
Services
Speed
Duplex
(Half/Full)
Duplicate IP
Detection
(starting revision)
No
10/100
Revision 2.x 1734-AENT
Revision 3.x 1734-AENTR
1738-AENT,
1738-AENTR
N/A
RSLogix 5000 programming
software, version 18
No
10/100
Revision 2.x 1738-AENT
Revision 3.x 1738-AENTR
1756-ENBT
32(2)
RSLogix 5000 programming
software, version 16
No
10/100
Revision 3.3
1756-EN2F
32(2)
RSLogix 5000 programming
software, version 16
No
10/100
Revision 1.x
1756-EN2T,
1756-EN2TR,
1756-EN2TXT
32(2)
RSLogix 5000 programming
software, version 16 1756-EN2T
No
10/100
Revision 1.x
RSLogix 5000 programming
software, version 17.01 1756-EN2TR
1756-EWEB
N/A
N/A
Yes
10/100
Revision 2.2
1768-ENBT
32(2)
RSLogix 5000 programming
software, version 16
No
10/100
Revision 1.x
1768-EWEB
N/A
N/A
Yes
10/100
Revision 1.x
1769-L23Ex
32(2)
RSLogix 5000 programming
software, version 17
No
10/100
Revision 16
1769-L3xE
32(2)
RSLogix 5000 programming
software, version 16
No
10/100
Revision 15
1783-ETAP
N/A
N/A
No
10/100
Revision 1.x
1783-ETAP1F,
1783-ETAP2F
N/A
N/A
No
10/100
Revision 2.x
1794-AENT
N/A
N/A
No
10/100
Revision 3.x
2x-COMM-E
N/A
N/A
No
10/100
Revision 1.1
(1)
These are the maximum number of I/O CIP connections.
(2)
Each controller can send a maximum of 32 produced tags to one single consuming controller. If these same tags are sent to multiple consumers, the maximum number
is 31.
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
31
Chapter 1
EtherNet/IP Overview
IMPORTANT
Non-CIP communication requires 1756-EWEB, 1768-EWEB or
MicroLogix 1400 embedded web server sockets.
For more information on the 1756-EWEB or 1768-EWEB
modules, see the EtherNet/IP Web Server User Manual,
publication ENET-UM527.
For more information on the enhanced MicroLogix 1400
controllers, see the MicroLogix 1400 Embedded Web Server
User Manual, publication 1766-UM002
32
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
Chapter
2
Configure a Workstation to Operate on an
EtherNet/IP Network
Introduction
This chapter describes how to configure a workstation to operate on an
EtherNet/IP network.
You need to load an Ethernet communication driver for all Rockwell Software
applications to communicate with devices on an EtherNet/IP network. A
workstation needs this driver to:
• upload and download controller projects over the EtherNet/IP network
via RSLogix 5000 programming software.
• configure EtherNet/IP network parameters for devices on the network
via RSNetWorx for EtherNet/IP software.
• collect controller data for PanelView terminals and RSView applications.
You can choose from any of three Ethernet drives:
• AB_ETHIP
• AB_ETH
• TCP
We recommend that you use the AB_ETHIP driver.
Before loading a communication driver, make sure:
• the Ethernet communication card is already installed in the workstation.
• the IP address and other network parameters are correctly configured
for the workstation.
• the workstation is properly connected to the EtherNet/IP network.
See the documentation for the appropriate Ethernet communication module
for information on installing and configuring the module.
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33
Chapter 2
Configure a Workstation to Operate on an EtherNet/IP Network
Configure the Ethernet
Communication Driver in
RSLinx Software
To configure the Ethernet communication driver, perform this procedure.
1. In RSLinx software, from the Communications pull-down menu,
choose Configure Drivers.
The Configure Drivers dialog box appears.
2. From Available Driver Types pull-down menu, choose EtherNet/IP
Driver or Ethernet devices and click Add New.
The Add New RSLinx Driver dialog box appears.
3. Type a name for the new driver and click OK.
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Configure a Workstation to Operate on an EtherNet/IP Network
Chapter 2
The Configure driver dialog box appears.
4. Select Browse Local Subnet.
5. Click Apply.
6. Click OK.
This new driver is now available.
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
35
Chapter 2
Configure a Workstation to Operate on an EtherNet/IP Network
Notes:
36
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
Chapter
3
Configure Stratix Switches
Introduction
This chapter describes how you can use a Stratix switch.
Topic
Page
Set Up the Hardware
38
Select a Switch
37
Switch Features
38
Additional Resources
39
Stratix switches provide a rugged, easy-to-use, secure switching infrastructure
for harsh environments. You can connect these switches to network devices
such as servers, routers, and other switches. In industrial environments, you
can connect any Ethernet-enabled industrial communication devices including
programmable log controllers (PLC’s), human-machine interfaces (HMI’s),
drives, sensors, and I/O.
Select a Switch
Select the switch depending on the application and environment.
If your application
Select
• Integrates enterprise and manufacturing Stratix 8000 modular, managed switch
environments
• Requires I/O and Produced/Consumed
communication
• Requires diagnostics data
• Requires security options
• Integrates plant floor devices
Stratix 6000 fixed, managed switch
• Requires I/O and Produced/Consumed
communication
• Require diagnostics data
• Requires security options
• Requires easy set-up and direct
relacement of switches
Stratix 2000 unmanaged switch
• Meets IP20 or IP67 standards
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37
Chapter 3
Configure Stratix Switches
Set Up the Hardware
In this example, multiple Ethernet-enabled devices are connected via a Stratix
switch.
EtherNet/IP-enabled Devices Connected Via a Stratix Switch
3
4
1
2
Switch Features
5
Device
Description
1
HMI device
2
Drive
3
Stratix switch
4
Logix chassis
5
Distributed I/O
The features available vary according to the switch you select.
Stratix Features
Switch
Stratix 8000
Configuration Features
• IT-friendly configuration
tool – Cisco Command
Line Interface, Cisco
Network Assistant,
Device Manager
• Express setup – quick
start-up feature
38
Monitoring Features
• RSLogix 5000
pre-defined tags allow
easy access for HMI
development
• Sample face plates
available for View
applications
Security Features
• Supports all security
features available in the
Cisco Catalyst line of
switches including:
- 802.1x industry
standard
authentication
• “Smartport” – easy
switch port optimization
feature
- MAC ID device
authentication
• Web enabled
configuration using
embedded web pages
- ACL (Access Control
List)
• AOP configuration
stored as part of project
in RSLogix 5000
- Port control
Maintenance Features
• Removable
CompactFlash card
holds OS and
configuration of the
switch which can be
easily transferred to a
new one
• Standard DHCP Option
82 support enables
fixed IP address
assignment to switch
ports
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
Configure Stratix Switches
Chapter 3
Stratix Features
Switch
Stratix 6000
Configuration Features
Monitoring Features
• Real-time diagnostics
available in embedded
web pages
• Default IP address
allows quick start up
• Web enabled
configuration using
embedded web pages
• AOP configuration
stored as part of project
in RSLogix 5000
• RSLogix 5000
pre-defined tags allow
easy access for HMI
development
- Traffic level monitor
w/ alarms
• Sample face plates
available for View
applications
Stratix 2000
No parameters to configure No diagnostics are
for unmanaged switches
available in unmanaged
switches
Additional Resources
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
Security Features
• Supports all security
features available in the
Cisco Catalyst line of
switches including:
- Port control
- MAC ID device
authentication
- Switch access
username/password
authentication
No security features
available in unmanaged
switches
Maintenance Features
• Parameter settings held
in Logix project and are
automatically
downloaded after
switch replacement (IP
address must be set
prior to download)
• DHCP per port ensures
connected devices are
assigned the right
addresses after
replacement
Direct replacement - no
set-up or configuration
required
These documents contain additional information concerning related Rockwell
Automation products.
Resource
Description
Stratix 8000 and 8300 Ethernet
Managed Switches Installation
Instructions, publication
1783-IN005
Describes how to install and configure the switch.
Stratix 6000 Ethernet Managed
Switches Installation
Instructions, publication
1783-IN004
Describes how to install and configure the switch.
Stratix 2000 Ethernet
Unmanaged Switch Installation
Instructions, publication
1783-IN001
Describes how to install and configure the switch.
Stratix 8000 Ethernet Managed
Switches Hardware User
Manual, publication
1783-UM002
Provides detailed information on installing and using
your switches.
Stratix 8000 and 8300 Ethernet
Managed Switches Sofware
user Manual, publication
1783-UM003
Provides detailed information on configuring and
managing your switches.
Stratix 6000 Ethernet Managed
Switch User Manual,
publication 1783-UM001
Provides detailed information on configuring and
managing your switches.
Device Manager online help
(provided with the switch)
Provides context-sensitive information on configuring
and using the switch, including system messages.
39
Chapter 3
Configure Stratix Switches
Notes:
40
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
Chapter
4
Configure an EtherNet/IP Module to Operate
on the Network
Introduction
This chapter describes how to configure an EtherNet/IP communication
module to operate on an EtherNet/IP network.
Topic
Page
Determine Network Parameters
41
Set the IP Network Address
43
Assign Network Parameters via the BOOTP/DHCP Utility
45
Other Methods to Assign Network Parameters
47
Duplicate IP Address Detection
51
IP Address Swapping
53
DNS Addressing
54
Use EtherNet/IP Modules in a Logix5000 Controller Application
55
When you first install a Rockwell Automation EtherNet/IP module, the
module is BOOTP/DHCP enabled.
Determine Network
Parameters
To operate an EtherNet/IP network, you must define these parameters.
EtherNet/IP Network Parameters
EtherNet/IP Network Parameter
Description
IP address
The IP address uniquely identifies the module. The IP address is in the form xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
where each xxx is a number from 0. . .255. However, there are some reserved values that
you cannot use as the first octet in the address.
For example, you cannot use:
• 001.xxx.xxx.xxx
• 127.xxx.xxx.xxx
• 223 to 255.xxx.xxx.xxx
Subnet mask
Subnet addressing is an extension of the IP address scheme that allows a site to use a
single network ID for multiple physical networks. Routing outside of the site continues by
dividing the IP address into a net ID and a host ID via the class. Inside a site, the subnet
mask is used to redivide the IP address into a custom network ID portion and host ID
portion. This field is set to 0.0.0.0 by default.
If you change the subnet mask of an already-configured module, you must cycle power to
the module for the change to take effect.
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Chapter 4
Configure an EtherNet/IP Module to Operate on the Network
EtherNet/IP Network Parameters
EtherNet/IP Network Parameter
Description
Gateway
A gateway connects individual physical networks into a system of networks. When a node
needs to communicate with a node on another network, a gateway transfers the data
between the two networks. This field is set to 0.0.0.0 by default.
If you use DNS addressing, or reference the module via host name in MSG
instructions, define these parameters.
EtherNet/IP Network Parameters for DNS Addressing
EtherNet/IP Network Parameter
Description
Host name
A host name is part of a text address that identifies the host for a module. The full text
address of a module is host_name.domain_name.
Domain name
A domain name is part of a text address that identifies the domain in which the module
resides. The full text address of a module is host_name.domain_name. The domain name
has a 48-character limit.
If you specify a DNS server, you must enter a domain name. Also, if you send email from
the module, some mail relay servers require a domain name during the initial handshake
of the SMTP session.
Primary DNS server address
Secondary DNS server address
This identifies any DNS servers used in the network. You must have a DNS server
configured if you specified a domain name or a host name in the module’s configuration.
The DNS server converts the domain name or host name to an IP address that can be used
by the network.
For more information on DNS addressing, see page 54.
Check with your Ethernet network administrator to determine if you need to
specify these parameters.
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Configure an EtherNet/IP Module to Operate on the Network
Set the IP Network Address
Chapter 4
EtherNet/IP modules ship with the IP address configuration switches set to
999 and DHCP enabled. You can set the network Internet Protocol (IP)
address by:
• using the switches available on some modules.
IMPORTANT
The switches on 1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F and
1783-ETAP2F taps are used somewhat differently than
other EtherNet/IP modules.
For more information on how to use switches on the
taps, see either of the following:
• EtherNet/IP Tap Installation Instructions, pubication
1783-IN007
• EtherNet/IP Fiber Tap Installation Instructions,
publication 1783-IN008
• using a Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP)/Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol (DHCP) server, such as the Rockwell Automation
BOOTP-DHCP server utility.
• using RSLinx software or RSLogix 5000 programming software.
IMPORTANT
The adapter reads the configuration switches only when
you cycle power to determine if the switches are set to a
valid number.
Valid settings range from 001...255, with some
exceptions. There are some reserved values that you
cannot use as the first octet in the address.
For example, you cannot use:
• 001.xxx.xxx.xxx
• 127.xxx.xxx.xxx
• 223 to 255.xxx.xxx.xxx
To restore the factory default settings on the module, set
the switches to 888.
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Chapter 4
Configure an EtherNet/IP Module to Operate on the Network
The graphic below shows how your module’s IP address is set.
Module power-up
No
No
Is DHCP or
BOOTP
enabled?
Adapter uses IP
address stored in
nonvolatile memory
Module
IP address
between
001-254?
Yes
Yes
Module requests
address from
DHCP/BOOTP server
Module using a
valid IP address1
1 - If necessary, you can set the module switches to 888 to restore the IP address to the factory default value of 999. In this case, cycle power to the
module after restoring the factory default settings and begin the flowchart process again.
For more detailed information, see the table below.
IP Network Address Configuration Switch Settings
If the
Switches are set to a valid number
Then
• The adapter’s IP address will be 192.168.1.xxx (where xxx represents the number set on
the switches).
• The adapter’s subnet mask will be 255.255.255.0, with the gateway address set to
0.0.0.0.
• The adapter will not have a host name assigned, or use any Domain Name System when
using the thumbwheel settings.
Switches are set to an invalid number
• The module checks to see if DHCP or BOOTP is enabled. If either is, the module requests
an IP address from a DHCP/BOOTP server. The DHCP/BOOTP server will also assign
other Transport Control Protocol (TCP) parameters.
• If you have used software to preconfigure an IP address, and DHCP or BOOTP is
disabled, the module will use the configured IP address.
DHCP is not enabled
• The adapter will use the IP address and any otherTCP configurable parameters stored in
nonvolatile memory.
Important: The factory default switch setting is 999, and DHCP is enabled.
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Assign Network
Parameters via the
BOOTP/DHCP Utility
Chapter 4
By default, the EtherNet/IP module is BOOTP enabled. The
BOOTP/DHCP utility is a standalone program that is located in the:
• BOOTP-DHCP Server folder accessed from the Start menu.
• Tools directory on the RSLogix 5000 installation CD.
IMPORTANT
Before you start the BOOTP/DHCP utility, make sure you have
the hardware (MAC) address of the module. The hardware
address is on a sticker on the side of the EtherNet/IP module.
The hardware address in a format similar to:
00-0b-db-14-55-35.
This utility recognizes BOOTP-enabled devices and provides an interface to
configure a static IP address for each device.
To assign network parameters via the BOOTP/DHCP utility, perform this
procedure.
1. Start the BOOTP/DHCP software.
2. Select Tool →Network Settings.
3. If appropriate for the network, enter the subnet mask, gateway address,
primary/secondary server addresses, and domain name.
4. Click OK.
The Request History panel displays the hardware addresses of modules
issuing BOOTP requests.
5. Double-click the hardware (MAC) address of the module to be
configured.
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Chapter 4
Configure an EtherNet/IP Module to Operate on the Network
The hardware address is on a sticker on the side of the EtherNet/IP
module. The format of the hardware address resembles
00-0b-db-14-55-35.
The New Entry window appears with the module’s Ethernet Address
(MAC).
6. Enter the IP address, host name, and a module description.
7. Click OK.
8. To permanently assign this configuration to the module, highlight the
module and click the Disable BOOTP/DHCP button.
When power is recycled, the module uses the assigned configuration and
does not issue a BOOTP request.
If you do not select the Disable BOOTP/DHCP button, on a power
cycle, the host controller clears the current IP configuration and will
again begin sending BOOTP requests.
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Other Methods to Assign
Network Parameters
Chapter 4
There are other methods to assign network parameters.
Assignment of Network Parameters
If
• A BOOTP server is not available
Use this method for assigning network parameter
Page
RSLinx software
48
• The EtherNet/IP module is connected to another
NetLinx network
The RSLogix 5000 project is online with the controller that RSLogix 5000 programming software
communicates to or through the EtherNet/IP module
50
DHCP is enabled (not BOOTP) for the EtherNet/IP module
DHCP software
51
You need to cycle power to your device for some reason
Thumbwheel switches
43
These factors might affect your choice of method:
• Network isolation from or integration into the plant/enterprise network
• Network size
For large networks, even isolated networks, it might be more convenient
and safer to use a BOOTP/DHCP server rather than RSLogix 5000 or
RSLinx software. The BOOTP/DHCP server also limits the possibility
of assigning duplicate IP addresses.
• Company policies and procedures dealing with plant floor network
installation and maintenance
• Level of involvement by IT personnel in plant floor network installation
and maintenance
• Type of training offered to control engineers and maintenance
personnel
If you use the Rockwell Automation BOOTP or DHCP server in an uplinked
subnet where an enterprise DHCP server exists, a module may get an address
from the enterprise server before the Rockwell Automation utility even sees
the module. You might have to disconnect from the uplink to set the address
and configure the module to retain its static address before reconnecting to the
uplink. This is not a problem if you have node names configured in the module
and leave DHCP enabled.
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Chapter 4
Configure an EtherNet/IP Module to Operate on the Network
Configure the Module with RSLinx Software
To use RSLinx software to configure the EtherNet/IP module, perform this
procedure.
1. Make sure the module is installed and started.
2. In RSLinx software, from the Communications pull-down menu,
choose RSWho.
The RSWho dialog box appears.
3. Navigate in RSWho to the Ethernet network.
4. Right-click the EtherNet/IP module and select Module Configuration.
The Module Configuration dialog box appears.
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Chapter 4
5. Click the Port Configuration tab.
6. For Network Configuration Type, select Static to permanently assign
this configuration to the port.
IMPORTANT
If you select Dynamic, on a power cycle, the controller
clears the current IP configuration and resumes sending
BOOTP requests.
a.
b.
c.
d.
In the IP Address field, type the IP address.
In the Network Mask field, type the network mask address.
In the Gateway Address field, type the gateway address.
In the Primary Name Server field, type the name of the primary
server.
e. In the Secondary Name Server field, type the name of the secondary
server.
f. In the Domain Name field, type the domain name.
g. In the Host Name field, type the host name.
7. Configure the port settings.
To
Then
Use the default port speed
and duplex settings
Leave checked the Auto-negotiate port speed and
duplex check box.
Important: The default port speed is 100, and the
default duplex setting is Full.
Manually configure your
port’s speed and duplex
settings.
a.Uncheck the Auto-negotiate port speed and
duplex check box.
b. From the Current Port Speed pull-down menu,
select a port speed.
c. From the Current Duplex pull-down menu,
choose Half Duplex.
8. Click OK.
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Chapter 4
Configure an EtherNet/IP Module to Operate on the Network
Configure Your Module with RSLogix 5000 Software
To use RSLogix 5000 programming software to configure the EtherNet/IP
module, perform this procedure.
1. Make sure the module is installed, started and connected to the
controller via a serial, or other network, connection.
2. In the Controller Organizer of RSLogix 5000 programming software,
right-click the EtherNet/IP module and choose Properties.
The Module Properties dialog box appears. The example screen below
shows the Module Properties dialog box for the 1756-ENBT module.
3. Click the Port Configuration tab.
4. In the IP Address field, type the IP address.
a. In the other fields, type the other network parameters, if needed.
IMPORTANT
The fields that appear vary from one EtherNet/IP
module to another.
5. Click Apply.
6. Click OK.
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Chapter 4
Use DHCP Software to Set the IP Address
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) software automatically assigns
IP addresses to client stations logging onto a TCP/IP network. DHCP is
based on BOOTP and maintains some backward compatibility. The main
difference is that BOOTP allows for manual configuration (static), while
DHCP allows for both static and dynamic allocation of network addresses and
configurations to newly attached modules.
Be cautious when using DHCP software to configure a module. A BOOTP
client, such as the EtherNet/IP modules, can boot from a DHCP server only
if the DHCP server is specifically written to also handle BOOTP queries. This
is specific to the DHCP software package used. Consult your system
administrator to see if a DHCP package supports BOOTP commands and
manual IP allocation.
ATTENTION
The EtherNet/IP module must be assigned a fixed network
address. The IP address of this module must not be dynamically
provided.
Failure to observe this precaution may result in unintended
machine motion or loss of process control.
Duplicate IP Address
Detection
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
Some EtherNet/IP modules (and their future revisions) support duplicate IP
address detection.
Cat. No.
Firmware Revision
1734-AENT, 1734-AENTR
2.1 and later
1738-AENT, 1738-AENTR
3.002 and later
1756-ENBT
3.2 and later
1756-EN2F
1.x and later
1756-EN2T
1.x and later
1756-EN2TR
1.x and later
1756-EN2TRXT
1.x and later
1768-ENBT
1.x and later
1769-L2x
17.01 and later
1769-L32E and 1769-L35E
15.01 and later
1783-ETAP
1.x and later
1783-ETAP1F, 1783-ETAP2F
2.x and later
51
Chapter 4
Configure an EtherNet/IP Module to Operate on the Network
Cat. No.
Firmware Revision
1788-ENBT
2.1 and later
1794-AENT
Series A - 3.x and later
Series B - 4.1 and later
2x-COMM-E
1.1 and later
When you change the IP address or connect one of these modules to an
EtherNet/IP network, the module checks to make sure that the IP address
assigned to this module does not match the address of any other network
device. If the module determines that another device on the network with a
matching IP address, the EtherNet/IP port of the module goes into conflict
mode, where the module’s:
• OK status indicator blinks red.
• Network (NET) status indicator is solid red.
• front display indicates the conflict (1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2F,
1756-EN2T, 1756-EN2TR, and 1756-EN2TXT).
The display scrolls:OK <IP_address_of_this_module> Duplicate IP
<Mac_address_of_duplicate_node_detected>
For example: OK 10.88.60.196 Duplicate IP - 00:00:BC:02:34:B4
To resolve this conflict, use the instructions in this chapter to change the IP
address of the module. Then cycle power to the module or reset the modules,
such as disconnecting and then reconnecting the EtherNet/IP cable cable.
Two modules could possibly detect a conflict simultaneously. If this occurs,
perform this procedure.
1. Remove the module with the incorrect IP address or correct its conflict.
2. Cycle power to the second module or disconnect its EtherNet/IP cable
3. Reconnect the cable.
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Detection of Duplicate IP Addresses
Devices in conflict over an IP address behave differently depending on
whether connections have been established to either of the modules and
whether both modules support duplicate IP address detection.
Device Conflict Over Duplicate IP Addresses
If
Then
Both modules support duplicate IP address
detection
The first started module uses and retains its IP address.
Both modules support duplicate IP address
detection and are started at roughly the same
time
They surrender the IP address and enter conflict mode
One module supports duplicate IP address
detection and a second module does not
The second module generally keeps its IP address, regardless of which module first
obtains the IP address.
The other module will detect a conflict, give up the IP address and enter conflict mode.
The module that supports duplicate IP address detection will detect the conflict and
give up the IP address.
IP Address Swapping
This EtherNet/IP modules supports IP address swapping in ControlLogix
redundancy systems:
• 1756-ENBT, firmware revision 3.1 and later
• 1756-EN2T, firmware revision 2.003 and later
• 1756-EN2TR, firmware revision 2.x and later
• 1756-EN2TXT, firmware revision 2.1 and later
During a switchover in ControlLogix redundancy systems, these module swaps
its IP address with its partner modules in the other redundant chassis.
For more information about IP address swapping, see the ControlLogix
Redundancy User Manual, publication 1756-UM523. When using publication
1756-UM23, be aware that neither the 1756-EN2TR module nor the
1756-EN2TXT module supports redundancy.
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DNS Addressing
To further qualify a module’s address, use DNS addressing to specify a host
name for a module, which also includes specifying a domain name and DNS
servers. DNS addressing makes it possible to set up similar network structures
and IP address sequences under different domains.
DNS addressing is only necessary if you refer to the module by host name,
such as in path descriptions in MSG instructions.
To use DNS addressing, perform this procedure.
1. Assign a host name to the module.
A network administrator should be able to assign a host name. Valid
host names should be IEC-1131-3 compliant.
2. Configure the module's parameters.
3. In addition to the IP address, subnet mask, and gateway address,
configure a host name for the module, domain name, and
primary/secondary DNS server addresses.
In the DNS server, the host name must match the IP address of the
module.
IMPORTANT
Make sure the DNS enable bit is set.
If you configure your module using RSLinx software,
version 2.41, the enable bit is cleared and DNS
addressing will not work. If you configure your module
using the Port Configuration tab in RSLogix 5000
programming software, the enable bit is set, so DNS
addressing should work.
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4. In RSLogix 5000 programming software, add the module to the I/O
configuration tree.
See Add a Moduleon page 79.
IMPORTANT
IMPORTANT
Use EtherNet/IP Modules in
a Logix5000 Controller
Application
If a child module resides in the same domain as its
parent module, just enter the host name. If the child
module’s domain differs from that of its parent module,
enter the host name and the domain name (host.domain)
You can also use DNS addressing in a module profile in
the I/O controller tree or in a message path. If the
destination module’s domain name differs from that of
the source module, use a fully-qualified DNS name
(hostname.domainname). For example, to send a
message from ENBT1.location1.companyA to
ENTB1.location2.companyA, the host names match, but
the domains differ. Without the entry of a fully qualified
DNS name, the module adds the default domain name to
the specified host name.
After installing an EtherNet/IP module and setting its IP address, add the
module to the Controller Organizer in an RSLogix 5000 project. This addition
establishes I/O control.
You must download that project to the host controller before operation can
begin. When the controller begins operation, it establishes a connection with
the EtherNet/IP module. The module’s configuration determines its behavior.
For more information on configuring and placing a workstation (for
developing an RSLogix 5000 project) on an EtherNet/IP network, see
Configure a Workstation to Operate on an EtherNet/IP Network on page 33.
For information on controlling I/O, see Control I/O on page 77.
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Chapter
5
Configure a Supervisor on a Device-level
Ring Network
Introduction
A Device-level Ring (DLR) network is a single-fault tolerant ring network
intended for the interconnection of automation devices.
Topic
Page
Rockwell Automation Products with Embedded Switch Technology
58
Construct the Physical Network
63
Configure Supervisor Nodes on a DLR Network
64
Complete the Physical Connections of the Network
74
Verify Supervisor Configuration
75
Troubleshoot DLR Network Issues
75
The ring topology provides:
•
•
•
•
media redundancy.
fast network fault detection and reconfiguration.
the resiliency of a single-fault tolerant network.
easy implementation without any additional hardware requirements.
IMPORTANT
This section describes how to configure a ring supervisor on a
DLR network. This section does not fully describe a DLR
network itself.
See the EtherNet/IP Embedded Switch Technology Application
Guide, publication ENET-AP005, for information on:
• a DLR overview.
• how to fully configure a DLR network.
• how to monitor a DLR network.
• how to troubleshoot a DLR network.
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Rockwell Automation
Products with Embedded
Switch Technology
The current Rockwell Automation products that you can use to construct a
DLR or linear network include:
• 1756-EN2TR ControlLogix EtherNet/IP 2-port module - Allows
ControlLogix controllers, I/O modules and communication modules to
connect to the DLR or linear network.
• 1783 EtherNet/IP taps - Allow devices that do not support embedded
switch technology to connect to a linear or a DLR network. Each tap
uses a device port on the front of the tap to connect to devices that do
not support the embedded switch technology to connect to linear or
DLR networks. The taps have two network ports to connect to linear or
DLR networks.
The network ports used to connect to linear or DLR networks are
different for each type of tap. The following table describes the types of
taps used with each tap:
Cat. No.
Network Ports
Description
1783-ETAP
2 copper
Two copper network ports connect the tap
to copper linear or DLR networks.
1783-ETAP1F
1 copper
One copper network port connects the tap
to a copper linear or DLR network, and one
fiber-optic network port connects the tap
to a fiber-optic linear or DLR network.
1 fiber
This tap is commonly used to connect a
copper section with a fiber-optic section of
the same network.
1783-ETAP2F
2 fiber
Two fiber-optic network ports connect the
tap to a fiber-optic linear or DLR network.
The primary advantages of using fiber-optic networks is the availability
of increased distances between network nodes and greater noise
immunity on the network.
• 1734-AENTR, POINT I/O 2-port Ethernet adapter - Allows POINT
I/O modules to connect to the DLR or linear network.
• 1738-AENTR, ArmorPOINT 2-port Ethernet adapter - Allows
ArmorPOINT I/O modules to connect to the DLR or linear network.
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• Any 1732E ArmorBlock I/O EtherNet/IP modules with a catalog
number ending in R, including:
– 1732E-IB16M12R
– 1732E-OB16M12R
– 1732E-16CFGM12R
– 1732E-IB16M12DR
– 1732E-OB16M12DR
– 1732E-8X8M12DR
– 1732E-IB16M12SOEDR
Features Common to Products with Embedded Switch Technology
The products described on page 58 have certain features in common.
• Each product supports the management of network traffic to ensure
timely delivery of critical data, that is, QoS and IGMP protocols are
supported.
• Each product is designed according to the open ODVA specification
for EtherNet/IP. Because of this design, third-party products may be
designed, according the ODVA specification, to operate on a DLR or
linear network. To see the ODVA specification, go to:
http://www.odva.org/
• For DLR networks, ring recovery time is less than 3ms for a
50-node ring.
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• Each product supports a 1588 transparent clock for CIP motion and
CIP Sync applications.
CIP Sync technology can be used in Logix control systems to
synchronize clocks across a system operating on the EtherNet/IP
network. This technology supports highly distributed applications that
require such functions as timestamping, sequence of events recording,
distributed motion control, and increased control coordination.
For example, with CIP Sync technology, a single ControlLogix
controller can establish a master time and then, using ControlLogix
Ethernet modules, propogate that time to all necessary devices on the
network.
For more information on how to use CIP Synch technology, see the
Integrated Architecture and CIP Sync Configuration Application
Solution, publication IA-AP003.
• Each of the products described on page 58 has 2 ports to connect to a
linear or DLR network in a single subnet. You cannot use these ports as
two Network Interface Cards (NICs) connected to two different
subnets.
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Example Device-level Ring Topology
1783-ETAP
1756-EN2TR
1783-ETAP
1783-ETAP
1756-EN2TR
1734-AENTR
1738-AENTR
Supervisor Node
A DLR network requires at least one node to be configured as ring supervisor.
Currently, two Rockwell Automation products support the ring supervisor
functionality.
• 1756-EN2TR, ControlLogix EtherNet/IP 2-port module
• 1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, and 1783-ETAP2F EtherNet/IP taps
IMPORTANT
Out of the box, the supervisor-capable devices have their
supervisor function disabled so they are ready to participate in
either a linear/star network topology, or as a ring node on an
existing DLR network.
In a DLR network, you must configure at least one of the
supervisor-capable devices as the ring supervisor before
physically connecting the ring. If not, the DLR network will
not work.
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Active Ring Supervisor
When multiple nodes are enabled as supervisor, the node with the numerically
highest precedence value becomes the active ring supervisor; the other nodes
automatically become back-up supervisors.
The ring supervisor provides two main functions:
• Manage traffic on the DLR network
• Collect diagnostic information for the network
Back-up Supervisor Node
At any point in time, there will only be one active supervisor on a DLR
network. However, we recommend that you can configure at least one other
supervisor-capable node to act as back-up supervisor nodes. During normal
operation, a back-up supervisor behaves like a ring node. If the active
supervisor node faults, the back-up supervisor with the next numerically
highest precedence becomes the active supervisor.
If multiple supervisors are configured with the same precedence value (the
factory default value for all supervisor-capable devices is 0), the node with the
numerically highest MAC address becomes the active supervisor.
IMPORTANT
While a back-up supervisor is not required on a DLR network,
we recommend that you configure at least one ring supervisors
for your ring network.
We recommend that you:
• configure at least one back-up supervisor.
• configure your desired active ring supervisor with a numerically higher
precedence value as compared to the back-up supervisors.
• keep track of your network’s supervisor-precedence values for all
supervisor-enabled nodes.
For more information about how to configure a supervisor, see Configure
Supervisor Nodes on a DLR Network on page 64.
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Ring Node
A ring node is any node that operates on the network to process data that is
transmitted over the network or to pass on the data to the next node on the
network. When a fault occurs on the DLR network, these reconfigure
themselves and relearn the network topology. Additionally, ring nodes can
report fault locations to the active ring supervisor.
Construct the Physical
Network
The first thing you must do to create a new DLR network is physically connect
all necessary devices to the network. However, you should leave at least one
connection unmade, that is, temporarily omit the physical connection between
two nodes on the ring, as the factory default settings of DLR devices are set to
operate in linear/star mode or as ring nodes on existing DLR networks.
The figure below shows an example of a new DLR network with one physical
connection left open.
Example Device-level Ring Topology with One Connection Left Unmade
Last physical
connection is
not made.
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Configure Supervisor
Nodes on a DLR Network
After you have installed all devices on the DLR network, you must configure
the supervisor node. Ring nodes do not require any configuration.
Before you can complete a DLR network, that is, configure all devices on the
network and make all physical connections, you must configure and enable a
ring supervisor in:
• RSLogix 5000 programming software
or
• RSLinx Classic communication software
This section shows how to use RSLogix 5000 programming software,
beginning on page 65, and RSLinx Classic communication software, beginning
on page 71, to configure and enable a ring supervisor. When using either
software, the 1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, and 1783-ETAP2F taps have
additional configuration parameters.
IMPORTANT
In addition to using the software listed above to configure and
enable a ring supervisor, you can use the DIP switches on your
tap to automatically configure the tap to be a ring supervisor.
For more information on how to use the DIP switches on your
EtherNet/IP tap, see the EtherNet/IP Embedded Switch
Technology Application Guide, publication ENET-AP005.
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Configure a Ring Supervisor in RSLogix 5000
Programming Software
To configure the 1756-EN2TR module or the 1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F or
1783-ETAP2F taps as a ring supervisor, use the device’s Add-on Profile
(AOP) in RSLogix 5000 programming software, version 17.01.
To download AOP’s, go to: http://support.rockwellautomation.com/controlflash/LogixProfiler.asp
IMPORTANT
Depending on the firmware revision of your product, you must use a specific AOP version.
Cat. No.
Firmware Revision
Required Add-on Profile
Revision
1756-EN2TR
2.1(1)
1.x or later
3.x or later
2.x or later
1.1(2)
1.x or later
2.x or later
2.x or later
2.x or later
2.x or later
1783-ETAP
1783-ETAP1F
1783-ETAP2F
(1)
You can use the ControlFLASH Firmware Upgrade software to upgrade a 1756-EN2TR module from firmware revision 2.1 to 3.x or later.
(2)
You can use the ControlFLASH Firmware Upgrade software to upgrade a 1783-ETAP tap from firmware revision 1.1 to 2.x or later.
To download new firmware, go to: http://www.rockwellautomation.com/support/americas/index_en.html
If you upgrade the firmware revision on your module or tap, you must use the required AOP revision listed above for that revision. For
example, if you upgrade your 1756-EN2TR module to firmware revision 3.x or later, you must use AOP revision 2.x or later in your RSLogix
5000 programming software.
Additionally, if you upgrade the firmware revision on your module or tap, you must also use the required RSLinx communication software
for that firmware revision. For more information on which RSLinx communication software version is required for each firmware revision,
see page 71.
For both the 1756-EN2TR module and 1783-ETAP tap, make sure that the Major Revision configured on the
General tab of the device’s RSLogix 5000 programming software configuration matches the major revision
of the physical module.
If the device configuration on the General tab does not match the physical module, the programming
software alerts you to this mismatch when you attempt to configure the Internet Protocol, Port
Configuration and Network tabs for that device.
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To configure the ring supervisor in RSLogix 5000 programming software,
follow these steps.
IMPORTANT
The steps to configure a ring supervisor via software are
basically the same for the 1756-EN2TR module and the
1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, and 1783-ETAP2F taps. This example
shows how to configure the 1756-EN2TR module.
You need to configure only the 1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, and
1783-ETAP2F taps in your I/O Configuration if you plan to
enable the tap as a ring supervisor. If you do not plan to use the
tap as a ring supervisor, we recommend that you do not add it
to your I/O Configuration.
Additionally, if you want to configure a 1783-ETAP,
1783-ETAP1F, or 1783-ETAP2F tap as a supervisor via software
or with its DIP switchs, you must first assign it an IP address.
The tap does not require an IP address if it is used as a ring
node or has its supervisor function enabled by DIP switch
For more information on how to use a tap’s switch to configure
it as a ring supervisor, see the EtherNet/IP Embedded Switch
Technology Application Guide, publication ENET-AP005.
1. Add the module to your project.
a. Right-click 1756 Backplane and choose New Module.
a
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b. Select the module.
c. Click OK.
b
c
2. Complete configuration information for the module in your
RSLogix 5000 project.
The graphic below shows the I/O configuration for an example DLR
network.
3. Download to your Logix controller.
4. Go online with the controller and leave it in Program mode.
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Enable Ring Supervisor in RSLogix 5000 Programming Software
To enable a ring supervisor, you must use an AOP in RSLogix 5000
programming software, version 17.01. After you have added your
1756-EN2TR module or 1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, or 1783-ETAP2F tap to
your RSLogix 5000 project, you must enable the ring supervisor.
IMPORTANT
If you are using RSLogix 5000 programming software to
configure your ring supervisor and monitor diagnostics of your
DLR network, you must be online with your controller.
To enable the 1756-EN2TR module or 1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, or
1783-ETAP2F tap as a ring supervisor, follow these steps.
IMPORTANT
The steps to enable a ring supervisor are basically the same for
both the 1756-EN2TR module and the 1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F,
or 1783-ETAP2F tap. This example shows how to do it for the
1756-EN2TR module.
1. With your project online with the controller, double-click a
supervisor-capable device in the I/O configuration tree.
Double-click the
module.
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2. Click the Network tab to enable Supervisor Mode.
Click here to enable
Supervisor Mode.
Configuration takes affect immediately; you do not need to click Apply
or OK.
3. Click the Advanced button to configure supervisor-related parameters,
as shown in the screen shot below.
For the Supervisor Precedence parameter, you must click Set after
entering a value.
4. Click Set.
IMPORTANT
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ID, we recommend that you only use the default values.
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Functionality
Description
Default Setting
Supervisor
Precedence
You must configure a supervisor precedence number for each device configured as a ring
supervisor. The highest possible supervisor precedence value is 255.
0
When multiple nodes are enabled as supervisor, the node with the highest precedence value is
assigned as the active ring supervisor; the other nodes automatically become back-up supervisors.
We recommend that you:
• configure back-up supervisor nodes.
• set your desired Active Ring Supervisor with a relatively high supervisor-precedence value
compared to the back-up nodes.
• keep track of your network’s supervisor-precedence values.
If multiple supervisors are configured with the same precedence value (the factory default value
for all supervisor-capable devices is 0), the node with the numerically highest MAC address
becomes the active supervisor.
Beacon Interval
Frequency of the active ring supervisor transmitting a beacon frame through both of its Ethernet
ports. This parameter is user configurable for any time between 200µS and 100mS.
400 µS
Beacon Timeout
The beacon timeout is amount of time nodes wait before timing out the reception of beacon
frames and taking appropriate action. Supervisors support a range from 400µS to 500mS.
1960 µS
Ring Protocol
VLAN ID
Reserved for future use.
0
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Configure and Enable a Ring Supervisor in RSLinx Classic
Communication Software
You can configure and enable a ring supervisor for your DLR network
through RSLinx Classic communication software.
Depending on the firmware revision of your product, you must use specific versions of RSLinx
communication software.
IMPORTANT
Cat. No.
Firmware Revision
Required RSLinx
Commmunication Software
Version
1756-EN2TR
2.1(1)
2.55 or later
3.x or later
2.56 or later
1.1(2)
2.55 or later
2.x or later
2.56 or later
2.x or later
2.56 or later
1783-ETAP
1783-ETAP1F
1783-ETAP2F
(1)
You can use the ControlFLASH Firmware Upgrade software to upgrade a 1756-EN2TR module from firmware revision 2.1 to 3.x or later.
(2)
You can use the ControlFLASH Firmware Updgrade software to upgrade a 1783-ETAP tap from firmware revision 1.1 to 2.x or later.
To download new firmware, go to: http://www.rockwellautomation.com/support/americas/index_en.html
If you upgrade the firmware revision on your module or tap, you must use the required RSLinx communication software version listed
above for that firmware revision. For example, if you upgrade your 1756-EN2TR module to firmware revision 3.x or later, you must use
RSLinx communication software, version 2.56 or later.
Additionally, if you upgrade the firmware revision on your module or tap, you must also use the required AOP revision for that firmware
revision. For more information on which AOP revision is required for each firmware revision, see page 65.
This example is for the 1783-ETAP tap. Follow these steps.
1. Launch RSLinx communication software.
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2. Browse to the DLR network that you are setting up.
TIP
If you do not have the Electronic Data Sheet (EDS) file installed
on the module configured to be the ring supervisor, it will
appear with a question mark (?). To obtain and use the EDS file:
• right-click the module and choose to upload the EDS file from the
device.
or
• download the EDS file from:
http://www.rockwellautomation.com/resources/eds/
3. Access the supervisor-capable node’s properties.
a. Right-click the node.
b. Choose Module Configuration.
a
b
The General tab appears with information about the module that is not
configurable.
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4. Click the Network tab to enable Supervisor Mode.
Click here to enable
Supervisor Mode.
Configuration takes affect immediately; you do not need to click Apply
or OK.
5. Click the Advanced button to configure supervisor-related parameters.
6. Click Set.
IMPORTANT
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Complete the Physical
Connections of the
Network
After you configure and enable your ring supervisor nodes, you must complete
the physical connection of your new DLR network to make it complete and
fully functional.
The figure below shows an example DLR network with all physical
connections complete.
Example Device-level Ring Topology with All Connections Complete
Last physical
connection is
made.
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Verify Supervisor
Configuration
Chapter 5
You may want to verify that your supervisor configuration has taken place and
that the ring network is functioning properly. You can verify that configuration
and a normally functioning network in either RSLogix 5000 programming
software or RSLinx Classic software.
1. Access the module properties as shown previously in this chapter.
2. Click the Network tab.
3. Check the Network Topology and Network Status fields.
They should display Ring and Normal respectively, as shown below.
Check these fields.
For a 1756-EN2TR module, you can also verify the supervisor configuration
through the module’s diagnostic web pages. For more information on
monitoring diagnostics via an EtherNet/IP module’s web pages, see Monitor
Diagnostics on page 137.
Troubleshoot DLR
Network Issues
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For a full description of how to troubleshoot DLR network issues, such as
replacing a node on a DLR network, see the EtherNet/IP Embedded Switch
Technology Application Guide, publication ENET-AP005.
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Chapter
6
Control I/O
Introduction
This chapter describes how a controller controls distributed I/O over an
EtherNet/IP network. The controller requires a communication module to
connect to the network. Distributed I/O modules require an adapter to
connect to the network.
Set Up the Hardware
Topic
Page
Set Up the Hardware
77
Select a Remote Adapter
87
Set the Requested Packet Interval (RPI)
88
Access Distributed I/O
90
In this example, the Logix5000 controller has an EtherNet/IP communication
module to connect to the EtherNet/IP network. The distributed (remote) I/O
has an EtherNet/IP adapter to connect it to the EtherNet/IP network.
Distributed I/O over an EtherNet/IP Network
Data
A
C
B
Workstation
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Item
Description
A
Local chassis containing a Logix5000 Controller with EtherNet/IP
Communication Module
B
Switch
C
Remote chassis containing distributed I/O modules with an EtherNet/IP
adapter
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Control I/O
The Logix5000 controller can communicate with each I/O module directly
(direct connection). Or you can configure a rack-optimized connection to the
EtherNet/IP adapter to send data to any digital I/O modules. Analog modules
always require direct connections.
You must:
• set the IP addresses for each EtherNet/IP module.
• connect all wiring and cabling properly.
• configure the communication driver (such as AB-ETHIP-1) for the
programming workstation.
Add Distributed I/O
To communicate with a system’s I/O modules, add bridge, adapter, and I/O
modules to the controller’s I/O Configuration folder. Within the folder,
organize the modules into a hierarchy (tree/branch, parent/child).
For a typical distributed I/O network, such as the one shown below,
Controller
Local
Communication
Module
Remote
Adapter
I/O
Module
Device
you build the I/O configuration with the following steps.
1. Add the local communication module, that is, the bridge.
2. Add the remote adapter for the distributed I/O chassis or DIN rail.
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3. Add the I/O module.
IMPORTANT
I/O is controlled on the same subnet and can’t be processed via
a router.
Add a Module
To add a module to the I/O Configuration folder, perform this procedure.
1. In the Controller Organizer of RSLogix 5000 programming software,
right-click branch to which you want to add the module and choose
New Module.
The Select Module dialog box appears.
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2. Expand the module type and choose the module you wish to add and
click OK.
The Select Major Revision dialog box appears.
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3. From the Major Revision pull-down menu, choose the major revision of
the I/O module you want to add and click OK.
The Module Properties dialog box appears.
4. In the Name field, type the name of your I/O module.
5. In the Slot field, type the slot number in which your I/O module will
reside.
6. From the Comm Format pull-down menu, choose a communication
format.
For more information on the selection of communication formats, see
Set the Requested Packet Interval (RPI) on page 88.
7. Click OK to see the rest of the Module Properties dialog boxs.
8. Configure the module as necessary.
9. Click Finish.
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Select a Communication
Format
When configuring an I/O module, select its communication format. The
chosen communication format determines the data structure for the module’s
tags. Many I/O modules support different formats. Each format uses a
different data structure. The chosen communication format determines:
• direct or rack-optimized connection.
• ownership.
Communication Formats
Type of I/O
module
Desired Connection Type
Required Communication Format
That Specifies
Digital
A rack-optimized connection
Rack Optimization
To use specialty features of the
module, such as diagnostics,
timestamps, or electronic fuses
Full Diagnostics
A direct connection
Scheduled Data
Digital
CST Timestamped
Input Data
Output Data
Analog
A direct connection
(only direct connection is
supported for analog modules)
Float Data
Integer Data
CST Timestamped
See online help in RSLogix 5000 programming software for specific
communication formats per I/O module.
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Choosing a Direct or Rack-optimized Connection
The Logix5000 controller uses connections to transmit I/O data. These
connections can be direct connections or rack-optimized connections.
Term
Definition
Direct connection
A direct connection is a real-time, data transfer link between the controller and an I/O
module. The controller maintains and monitors the connection with the I/O module. Any
break in the connection, such as a module fault or the removal of a module while under
power, sets fault bits in the data area associated with the module.
A direct connection
is any connection
that does not use the
Rack Optimization
Comm Format.
Rack-optimized
connection
For digital I/O modules, you can select rack-optimized communication. A rack-optimized
connection consolidates connection usage between the controller and all the digital I/O
modules in the chassis (or DIN rail). Rather than having individual, direct connections for
each I/O module, there is one connection for the entire chassis (or DIN rail).
Rack-optimized
connection
IMPORTANT
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If you use various 1756 EtherNet/IP communication modules in
a remote chassis, such as a 1756-ENBT with a 1756-EN2T, do
not use the rack-optimized communication format with this
remote chassis. If you must use the rack-optimized
communication format with a remote 1756 chassis, put the
1756-EN2T and 1756-ENBT modules in a separate remote
chassis.
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Direct Connections For I/O Modules
In this example, assume that each distributed I/O module is configured for a
direct connection to the controller.
Controller With EtherNet/IP
Communication Module
Switch
EtherNet/IP Network
EtherNet/IP Adapters
With I/O Modules
Digital I/O Modules
Analog I/O Modules
Digital I/O Modules
Example - System Connections
System Connections
Amount
Controller to local EtherNet/IP communication module
0
Controller to EtherNet/IP adapter
Direct connection for digital I/O module
Direct connection for analog I/O module
4
2
Total connections used 6
If you have many modules, direct connections to each module may not be
feasible because you could use up the number of connections and packets per
second supported by the module.
See Rack-optimized Connections For I/O Modules on page 85 to conserve
connection use and network traffic.
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Rack-optimized Connections For I/O Modules
In this example, assume that each digital I/O module is configured for a
rack-optimized connection to the controller. Analog modules must be
configured for direct connections.
Controller With EtherNet/IP
Communication Module
Switch
EtherNet/IP Network
EtherNet/IP Adapters
With I/O Modules
Digital I/O Modules
Analog I/O Modules
Digital I/O Modules
Example - System Connections
System Connections
Amount
Controller to local EtherNet/IP communication module
0
Controller to EtherNet/IP adapter with digital modules
(rack-optimized connection to each adapter)
2
Controller to EtherNet/IP adapter with analog modules
(direct connection for each analog I/O module)
2
Total Connections used 4
The rack-optimized connection conserves connections, but can limit the status
and diagnostic information that is available from the I/O modules.
To optimize the number of available connections, use a rack-optimized
connection between any digital I/O that allows it and the remote adapter that
connects the distributed I/O to the controller via the communication module.
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Ownership
In a Logix5000 system, modules multicast data. Therefore, multiple modules
can receive the same data at the same time from a single module. When
choosing a communication format, decide whether to establish an
owner-controller or listen-only relationship with the module.
Types of Module Ownership
Owner controller
The controller that creates the primary configuration and communication connection to a module. The owner
controller writes configuration data and can establish a connection to the module.
An owner connection is any
connection that does not include
Listen-Only in its Comm Format.
Listen-only connection
An I/O connection where another controller owns/provides the configuration data for the I/O module. A
controller using a listen-only connection only monitors the module. It does not write configuration data and
can only maintain a connection to the I/O module when the owner controller is actively controlling the I/O
module.
Listen-only connection
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Choosing a Type of Module Ownership
If the module
is an
And another controller And you want to
Then use this type of connection
Input module
Does not own the module
Owner
Owns the module
Maintain communication with the module if it
loses communication with the other controller
Owner
Use the same configuration as the other
owner controller.
Stop communication with the module if it loses Listen-only
communication with the other controller
Output module
Does not own the module
Owner
Owns the module
Listen-only
Input and Output Modules - Differences in Ownership
Control
This Ownership
Description
Input modules
Owner
An input module is configured by a controller that establishes a connection as an owner. This
configuring controller is the first controller to establish an owner connection.
Once an input module has been configured and owned by a controller, other controllers can
establish owner connections to that module. This allows additional owners to continue to receive
multicast data if the original owner controller breaks its connection to the module. Additional
owners must have the identical configuration data and communication format as the original owner
controller; otherwise, the connection attempt is rejected.
Output
modules
Listen-only
Once an input module has been configured and owned by a controller, other controllers can
establish a listen-only connection to that module. These controllers can receive multicast data
while another controller owns the module. If all owner controllers break their connections to the
input module, all controllers with listen-only connections no longer receive multicast data.
Owner
An output module is configured by a controller that establishes a connection as an owner. Only one
owner connection is allowed for an output module. If another controller attempts to establish an
owner connection, the connection attempt is rejected.
Listen-only
Once an output module has been configured and owned by one controller, other controllers must
establish listen-only connections to that module. These controllers can receive multicast data while
another controller owns the module. If the owner controller breaks its connection to the output
module, all controllers with listen-only connections no longer receive multicast data.
Select a Remote Adapter
Choice of Remote Adapter
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Type of Distributed I/O
Required Remote Adapters
1756 ControlLogix I/O
1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2T, or 1756-EN2TR
1794 FLEX I/O
1794-AENT
1734 POINT I/O
1734-AENT
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Set the Requested Packet
Interval (RPI)
When you configure an I/O module, you define the requested packet interval
(RPI) rate for the module. Only data-producing modules require an RPI. For
example, a local EtherNet/IP communication module requires no RPI
because it produces no data for the system but acts only as a bridge.
To set an RPI, perform this procedure.
1. Make sure the module is installed, started and connected to the
controller via a serial, or other network, connection.
2. In the Controller Organizer of RSLogix 5000 programming software,
right-click the EtherNet/IP module and choose Properties.
The Module Properties dialog box appears.
3. Click the Connection tab.
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4. From the Requested Packet Interval (RPI) menu, select the rate at which
you want data to be updated over a connection.
Only set the RPI to the rate the application requires.
IMPORTANT
The RPI determines the number of packets per second
that the module will produce on a connection. Each
module can only produce a limited number of packets
per second. Exceeding this limit prevents the module
from opening more connections.
5. Click OK.
Unlike EtherNet/IP modules, in Logix5000 controllers, I/O values update at
an interval set via the project’s I/O configuration folder. The values update
asynchronously to the execution of logic. At the specified interval, the
controller updates a value independently from the execution of logic.
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Access Distributed I/O
I/O information is presented as a structure of multiple fields, which depends
on the specific features of the I/O module. The name of the structure is based
on the location of the I/O module in the system. Each I/O tag is
automatically created when you configure the I/O module through the
programming software. Each tag name follows this format:
Location:SlotNumber:Type.MemberName.SubMemberName.Bit
This address variable
Is
Location
Identifies network location
LOCAL = local DIN rail or chassis
ADAPTER_NAME = identifies remote adapter or bridge
SlotNumber
Slot number of I/O module in its chassis
Type
Type of data
I = input
O = output
C = configuration
S = status
MemberName
Specific data from the I/O module, which depends on the type of data the module can store
For example, Data and Fault are possible fields of data for an I/O module. Data is the common name for
values the are sent to or received from I/O points.
SubMemberName
Specific data related to a MemberName
Bit (optional)
Specific point on the I/O module, which depends on the size of the I/O module (0...31 for a 32-point
module)
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EXAMPLE
1
2
3
4
Example
Module
Example Tag Names (automatically created by the software)
1
Remote 1794-AENT adapter
“FLEX_io_adapter”
FLEX_io_adapter:I
FLEX_io_adapter:I.SlotStatusBits
FLEX_io_adapter:I.Data
FLEX_io_adapter:O
FLEX_io_adapter:O.Data
2
Remote 1794-IA16
“input_module” in slot 0
FLEX_io_adapter:0:C
FLEX_io_adapter:0:C.Config
FLEX_io_adapter:0:C.DelayTime_0
FLEX_io_adapter:0:C.DelayTime_1
FLEX_io_adapter:0:C.DelayTime_2
FLEX_io_adapter:0:C.DelayTime_3
FLEX_io_adapter:0:C.DelayTime_4
FLEX_io_adapter:0:C.DelayTime_5
FLEX_io_adapter:0:I
Rack-optimized connection
3
Remote 1794-OB16
“output_module” in slot 1
Rack-optimized connection
4
Remote 1794-IF2XOF2I
“combo_analog” in slot 2
Direct connection
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FLEX_io_adapter:1:C
FLEX_io_adapter:1:C.SSData
FLEX_io_adapter:1:O
FLEX_io_adapter:1:O.Data
FLEX_io_adapter:2:C
FLEX_io_adapter:2:C.InputFIlter
FLEX_io_adapter:2:C.InputConfiguration
FLEX_io_adapter:2:C.OutputConfiguration
FLEX_io_adapter:2:C.RTSInterval
FLEX_io_adapter:2:C.SSCh0OuputData
FLEX_io_adapter:2:C.SSCH1OutputData
FLEX_io_adapter:2:I
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The choice of rack optimization for an I/O module creates tags as aliases for
the adapter module’s tags. This logic displays the device’s tag as an alias for a
the adapter module’s tag. In this example, the tag name of the adapter is in
angle brackets.
Tag Name of the I/O Device
Tag Name of the Adapter
Conveyor:2:I.0
<Conveyor:I.Data[2].0>
Additional Resources
This document contains additional information on controlling I/O:
EtherNet/IP Performance Application Solution, publication ENET-AP001.
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7
Interlocking and Data Transfer
Between Controllers
Introduction
This chapter describes how to share data by interlocking controllers
(producing and consuming tags) and transferring messages between
controllers via an EtherNet/IP network.
Communciation Methods
If you want to
And the data
Then
Page
Interlock operations
Resides on Logix5000 controllers
Produce and consume a tag
95
Transfer data
Needs regular delivery at an interval that you specify
Produce and consume a tag
95
Is sent when a specific condition occurs in your application
Execute a message (MSG) instruction 105
Set Up the Hardware
In this example, the controller in the local chassis produces a tag that the
Logix5000 controller in the remote chassis consumes. The local controller can
also send a MSG instruction to the remote controller.
Sharing Data and Transferring Messages
Data
A
C
B
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Item
Description
A
Local chassis containing a Logix5000 Controller with EtherNet/IP
Communication Module
B
Switch
C
Remote chassis containing a Logix5000 Controller with EtherNet/IP
Communication Module
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Logix5000 Controller Combinations
Choosing a Communication Module
Controllers
Communication Modules
1756 ControlLogix
1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2T, 1756-EN2TR,
1756-EN2TXT, or 1756-EN2F communication
module
1768 CompactLogix
1768-ENBT communication module
1769-L23E-QB1B, 1769-L23E-QBFC1B,
1769-L32E and 1769-L35E CompactLogix
A built-in EtherNet/IP port
1794 FlexLogix
1788-ENBT EtherNet/IP communication
card
PowerFlex 700S with DriveLogix controller
1788-ENBT EtherNet/IP communication
card
Make sure to:
• set the IP addresses and other network parameters for each
EtherNet/IP communication module.
• connect all wiring and cabling.
• configure the communication driver (such as AB-ETHIP-1) for the
programming workstation
IMPORTANT
94
If you are sharing tags between ControlLogix controllers and
the controllers are sharing only tags, not sending messages, set
the communication format of the 1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2F,
1756-EN2T, or 1756-EN2TXT module to None.
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Tag Guidelines for
Produced or
Consumed Data
Chapter 7
To properly organize tags for produced or consumed data (shared data),
follow these guidelines.
Guidelines for the Organization of Tags
Guideline
Details
Create the tags at the
controller scope.
You can share only controller-scoped tags.
Use one of these data types:
• To share other data types, create a user-defined data type that contains the required data.
• Use the same data type for the produced tag and corresponding consumed tag or tags.
· DINT
· REAL
· array of DINTs or REALs
· user-defined
Limit the size of the tag
to ≤ 500 bytes.
If transferring more than 500 bytes, create logic to transfer the data in packets.
Combine data that goes to the same
controller.
If producing several tags for the same controller:
A size of < 125 DINT words will keep total bytes within 500. This helps reduce the total number of
packets for transactions.
• Group the data into one or more user-defined data types. This method uses fewer connections
than does producing each tag separately.
• Group the data according to similar update intervals. To conserve network bandwidth, use a
greater RPI for less critical data.
For example, you could create one tag for data that is critical and another tag for data that is not
as critical.
Terminology
A Logix5000 controller can produce (broadcast) and consume (receive)
system-shared tags.
Tag Definitions
Term
Definition
Produced tag
A tag that a controller makes available for use by other controllers. Multiple controllers can simultaneously
consume (receive) the data. A produced tag sends its data to one or more consumed tags (consumers) without
using logic. The produced tag sends its data at the RPI of the consuming tag.
Consumed tag
A tag that receives the data of a produced tag. The data type of the consumed tag must match the data type
(including any array dimensions) of the produced tag. The RPI of the consumed tag determines the period at
which the data updates.
To share produced or consumed tags, two controllers must be attached to the
same EtherNet/IP subnet. Two controllers cannot bridge produced or
consumed tags over two subnets.
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Connections for Produced
and Consumed Tags
Logix controllers can produce (broadcast) and consume (receive)
system-shared tags that are sent and received via the EtherNet/IP
communication module. Produced and consumed tags each require
connections.
Required Connections for Produced and Consumed Tags
Tag Type
Required Connections
Produced
The local controller (producing) must have one connection for the produced tag and the first consumer and one more
connection for each additional consumer (heartbeat). The produced tag requires two connections.
As you increase the number of controllers that can consume a produced tag, you also reduce the number of connections the
controller has available for other operations, such as communication and I/O.
Consumed
Each consumed tag requires one connection for the controller that is consuming the tag.
All EtherNet/IP modules support as many as 32 produced multicast
connections. Because each tag that passes through an EtherNet/IP module
uses a single connection, the number of available connections limits the total
number of tags that can be produced or consumed. If the communication
module uses all of its connections for I/O and other communication modules,
no connections remain for produced and consumed tags.
IMPORTANT
Depending on whether it is producing or consuming a tag, a
Logix5000 controller uses its connections differently.
Number Connections for Produced and Consumed Tags
Type of Tag
Device
Number of Connections Used
Produced tag
Logix5000 controller
Number_of_consumers + 1
EtherNet/IP module
1
Logix5000 controller
1
Consumed tag
EtherNet/IP module
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The graphic below shows a Logix5000 controller producing a single tag for
consumption by another Logix5000 controller. In this example, the producing
controller uses 2 connections and every other Logix module/controller uses
only 1 connection.
Logix5000 Controllerin Local Chassis Producing a Single Tag for a Logix5000
Controller in a Remote Chassis
Local Controller - 1768 CompactLogix controller
Remote Controller - 1756 ControlLogix controller
Connections Used = 2 (1 + Number of consumers)
Connections Used = 1
Local Communication
Module - 1768-ENBT
Remote Communication
Module - 1756-EN2T
Connections Used = 1
Connections Used = 1
At its limits, a Logix5000 controller that produced 125 tags, each with only 1
consumer, the controller would use all of its available 250 connections. In this
example, the EtherNet modules used to communicate the tags would only use
125 connections. An example of the different
TCP and CIP connection capacities vary for all EtherNet/IP modules.
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Packets/Second
TCP Connections
CIP Connections
1756-ENBT
5000
64
128
1756-EN2F
10,000
128
256
1756-EN2T
10,000
128
256
1756-EN2TR
10,000
128
256
1756-EN2TXT
10,000
128
256
1768-ENBT
5000
32
64
1769-L23E-QB1B,
1769-L23E-QBFC1B
2000
8
32
1769-L32E
4000
64
32
1769-L35E
4000
64
32
1788-ENBT
4000
64
32
1794-AENT
9500
64
64
2x-COMM-E
400
30
16
1734-AENT
5000
64
20
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Produce a Tag
To produce a tag, configure the produced tag in the RSLogix 5000 project for
the local (producer) controller. You do not have to configure the consumer
controllers in the I/O Configuration folder of the producer controller.
Configure the Produced Tag
To configure the produced tag, perform this procedure.
1. In the producer’s controller organizer in RSLogix 5000 programming
software, right-click the Controller Tags folder and select Edit Tags.
The Controller Tags dialog box appears.
You can produce only controller-scoped tags.
2. In the Controller Tags window, right-click the tag that you want to
produce and choose Edit Tag Properties.
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The Tag Properties dialog box appears.
3. From the Type pull-down menu, select Produced.
4. Click Connection.
The Produced Tag Connection dialog box appears.
5. In the Max Consumers field, type the maximum number of controllers
that will consume (receive) the tag.
6. Click OK.
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Consume Data Produced by
Another Controller
To consume a produced tag, specify both the producer controller and the
produced tag in the RSLogix 5000 project for the remote (consumer)
Logix5000 controller.
Add the Producer Controller to the Consumer’s I/O Configuration
Add the producer controller to the remote controller’s I/O Configuration
folder. In the folder, organize the controllers and communication modules into
a hierarchy of tree/branch and parent/child.
For the addition of a Producer controller, such as shown below,
Consumer
Controller
Local
Communication
Module
Remote
Communication
Module
Producer
Controller
you build the I/O configuration with the following steps.
1. Add the local communication module for the consumer controller.
2. Add the remote communication module for the producer controller.
3. Add the producer controller.
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To add a module to the I/O Configuration folder, perform this procedure.
1. In RSLogix 5000 programming software, right-click the level to which
you want to add the new module and choose New Module.
The Select Module Type dialog box appears.
2. Click the By Category tab and browse for your EtherNet/IP
communication module.
3. Click OK.
The Select Major Revision dialog box appears.
4. From the Major Revision pull-down menu, choose the correct revision
and click OK.
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The New Module dialog box appears.
5. Configure your new module.
a. In the Name field, type the name of your module.
b. From the Comm Format pull-down menu, select a communication
format.
IMPORTANT
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
When consuming a tag, select None as the
Communication Format.
In the Slot field, type the chassis slot number.
In the Chassis Size field, type the chassis size.
From the Revision pull-down menu, select a revision number.
In the IP Address field, type the module IP address.
From the Electronic Keying pull-down menu, select Disable Keying.
6. Click OK.
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Create the Consumed Tag
To create the consumed tag, perform this procedure.
1. In the consumer controller’s project in RSLogix 5000 programming
software, right-click the Controller Tags folder and choose Edit Tags.
The Controllers Tag dialog box appears.
Only controller-scoped tags can consume data.
2. In the Controller Tags window, right-click the tag that will consume the
data and choose Edit Tag Properties.
The Tag Properties dialog box appears.
3. From the Type pull-down menu, choose Consumed.
4. In the Data Type field, enter a data type that matches the type assigned
to the produced tag.
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5. Click Connection.
The Consumed Tag Connection dialog box appears.
6. From the Producer pull-down menu, choose the controller that
produces the data.
7. In the Remote Data field, type the tag name or instance number of the
produced data.
8. In the RPI field, type the requested packet interval (RPI) for the
connection.
Only set the RPI to the rate the application requires.
IMPORTANT
The RPI determines the number of packets per second
that the module will produce on a connection. Each
module can only produce a limited number of packets
per second. Exceeding this limit prevents the module
from opening more connections.
For information on RPI and how it affects the actual packet interval
(API), see the EtherNet/IP Performance Application Solution,
publication ENET-AP001.
9. Click OK.
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Guidelines for Message
(MSG) Instructions
Chapter 7
Follow these guidelines.
MSG Instruction Guidelines
Guideline
Details
For each MSG instruction, create a control tag.
Each MSG instruction requires its own control tag.
· Data type = MESSAGE
· Scope = controller
· The tag cannot be part of an array or a user-defined data type.
Keep the source and destination data at the
controller scope.
A MSG instruction can access only tags that are in the Controller Tags folder.
If your MSG is to a module that uses 16-bit
integers, use a buffer of INTs in the MSG and
DINTs throughout the project.
If your message is to a module that uses 16-bit integers, such as a PLC-5 or SLC 500
controller, and it transfers integers (not REALs), use a buffer of INTs in the message and
DINTs throughout the project.
This increases the efficiency of your project because Logix5000 controllers execute
more efficiently and use less memory when working with 32-bit integers (DINTs).
Cache the connected MSGs that execute most
frequently.
Cache the connection for those MSG instructions that execute most frequently, up to
the maximum number permissible for your controller revision.
This optimizes execution time because the controller does not have to open a
connection each time the message executes.
If you want to enable more than 16 MSGs at
one time, use some type of management
strategy.
If you enable more than 16 MSGs at one time, some MSG instructions may experience
delays in entering the queue. To guarantee the execution of each message, either:
· enable each message in sequence.
· enable the messages in groups.
· program a message to communicate with multiple modules.
· program logic to coordinate the execution of messages.
Keep the number of unconnected and uncached The controller can have 10...40 unconnected buffers. The default number is 10.
MSGs less than the number of unconnected
· If all the unconnected buffers are in use when an instruction leaves the message
buffers.
queue, the instruction errors and does not transfer the data.
· You can increase the number of unconnected buffers to a maximum of 40.
For more information on programming MSG instructions, see the Logix5000
Controller General Instructions Reference Manual, publication 1756-RM003.
The individual system user manuals for Logix5000 controllers also provide
MSG examples unique to specific controller platforms.
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Connections for Messages
Messages transfer data to other modules, such as other controllers or operator
interfaces. Each message uses one connection, regardless of how many
modules are in the message path. To conserve connections, you can configure
one message to read from or write to multiple modules.
These connected messages can leave the connection open (cache) or close the
connection when the message is done transmitting.
Message Connections
Type of Message
Communication Method Used
Connection Used
CIP data table read or write
CIP
Yes
PLC2, PLC3, PLC5, or SLC (all
types)
CIP
No
CIP with Source ID
No
DH+
Yes
CIP
Your choice(1)
CIP generic
Block-transfer read or write
(1)
Yes
You can connect CIP generic messages, but for most applications we recommend you leave CIP generic
messages unconnected.
Cache Message Connections
Guidelines for Caching Message Connections
Message Execution
Instruction
Repeated
Cache the connection.
Important: Caching keeps the connection open and optimizes
execution time. Opening a connection each time the message
executes increases execution time.
Infrequent
Do not cache the connection.
Important: Not caching closes the connection upon
completion of the message, freeing up the connection for other
uses.
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Enter Message Logic
To send or receive data from an EtherNet/IP module via a message, you must
program a MSG instruction in the local controller’s logic. If the target module
is configured in the I/O Configuration folder of the controller, browse to
select the module or manually enter the message path in the MSG instruction.
Add the EtherNet/IP Module to the Local Controller’s I/O
Configuration
IMPORTANT
The number of TCP and CIP connections supported by the
1768-ENBT module depends on the firmware revision you are
using. If you are using firmware revision 1.x, the module
supports 32 TCP connections and 64 CIP connections. If you are
using firmware revision 2.x or later, the module supports 64 TCP
connections and 128 CIP connections.
To use the Browse button to select the target device of a MSG instruction, add
that remote device to the I/O Configuration folder of the local controller.
Within the I/O Configuration folder, organize the local and remote devices
into a hierarchy of tree/branch, parent/child.
For a typical local/remote MSG structure, such as the one shown below,
Local
Controller
Local
Communication
Module
Remote
Communication
Module
Remote
Controller
you build the I/O configuration with the following steps.
1. Add the local communication module for the local controller.
2. Add the remote communication module for the remote controller.
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3. Add the remote controller.
Select a communication format for a communication module based on the
modules in its remote chassis.
Module Communication Formats
If
Select a communication format that specifies
The remote chassis contains only analog modules, diagnostic digital modules, None
fused output modules, or communication modules
The remote chassis only contains standard, digital input and output modules
(no diagnostic modules or fused output modules)
Rack Optimization
You want to receive I/O module and chassis slot information from a
rack-optimized remote chassis owned by another controller
Listen-Only Rack Optimization
To add a module to the I/O Configuration folder, perform this procedure.
1. In RSLogix 5000 programming software, right-click the level to which
you want to add the new module and choose New Module.
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The Select Module Type dialog box appears.
2. Click the By Category tab and browse for your EtherNet/IP
communication module.
3. Click OK.
The Select Major Revision dialog box appears.
4. From the Major Revision pull-down menu, choose the correct revision
and click OK.
The New Module dialog box appears.
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5. Configure your new module.
a. In the Name field, type the name of your module.
b. From the Comm Format pull-down menu, select a communication
format.
c. In the Slot field, type the chassis slot number.
d. In the Chassis Size field, type the chassis size.
e. From the Revision pull-down menu, select a revision number.
f. In the IP Address field, type the module IP address.
g. From the Electronic Keying pull-down menu, select Compatible
Module.
6. Click OK.
Enter a Message
To enter a message, perform this procedure.
1. Use relay ladder logic to enter a MSG instruction.
2. Click the button
EXAMPLE
...
to configure the MSG instruction.
Enter a MSG instruction
If count_send = 1 and count_msg.EN = 0 (MSG instruction is not already enabled), then execute a MSG instruction that sends data to
another controller.
count_send
110
count_msg.en
/
MSG
Type - Unconfigured
Message Control
count_msg ...
EN
DN
ER
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Configure a MSG
Instruction
Chapter 7
To configure a MSG instruction, perform this procedure.
1. Click
...
in the MSG box.
The Message Configuration dialog box appears.
2. Click the Configuration tab and specify the type of MSG instruction.
Configure a MSG to a Logix5000 Controller
If you want to
For this item
Type or select
Read (receive) the data
Message Type
CIP Data Table Read
Source Element
First element of the tag that contains data in the other controller
Number of Elements
Number of elements to transfer
Destination Tag
First element of the tag (controller-scoped) in this controller for the data
Message Type
CIP Data Table Write
Source Tag
First element of the tag (controller-scoped) in this controller that
contains the data
Number of Elements
Number of elements to transfer
Destination Element
First element of the tag for the data in the other controller
Write (send) the data
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Configure a MSG to an SLC 500 Processor
If the data is
And you want to
For this item
Type or select
Integer
Read (receive) data
Message Type
SLC Typed Read
Source Element
Data table address in the SLC 500 controller (for example, N7:10)
Number of Elements
Number of integers to transfer
Destination Tag
First element of int_buffer
Message Type
SLC Typed Write
Source Tag
First Element of int_buffer
Number of Elements
Number of integers to transfer
Destination Element
Data table address in the SLC 500 controller (for example, N7:10)
Message Type
SLC Typed Read
Source Element
Data table address in the SLC 500 controller (for example, F8:0)
Number of Elements
Number of values to transfer
Destination Tag
First element of the tag (controller-scoped) in this controller for
the data
Message Type
SLC Typed Write
Source Tag
First element of the tag (controller-scoped) in this controller that
contains the data
Number of Elements
Number of values to transfer
Destination Element
Data table address in the SLC 500 controller (for example, F8:0)
Write (send) data
Floating-point (REAL)
Read (receive) data
Write (send) data
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Configure a MSG to a PLC-5 Processor
If the data is
And you want to
For this item
Type or select
Integer
Read (receive) data
Message Type
PLC5 Typed Read
Source Element
Data table address in the PLC-5 controller (for example, N7:10)
Number of Elements
Number of integers to transfer
Destination Tag
First element of int_buffer
Message Type
PLC5 Typed Write
Source Tag
First element of int_buffer
Number of Elements
Number of integers to transfer
Destination Element
Data Table address in the PLC-5 controller (for example, N7:10)
Message Type
PLC5 Typed Read
Source Element
Data table address in the PLC-5 controller (for example, F8:0)
Number of Elements
Number of values to transfer
Destination Tag
First element of the tag (controller-scoped) in this controller for
the data
Message Type
PLC5 Typed Write
Source Tag
First element of the tag (controller-scoped) in this controller
that contains the data
Number of Elements
Number of values to transfer
Destination Element
Data table address in the PLC-5 controller (for example, F8:0)
Write (send) data
Floating-point (REAL)
Read (receive) data
Write (send) data
3. Click the Communication tab.
4. In the Path field, type the communication path.
For a message to a ControlLogix controller, this RSLogix Message
Configuration dialog box appears.
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For a message to a SLC 500 or PLC-5 processor, this RSLogix Message
Configuration dialog box appears.
5. If the target module is configured in the I/O Configuration folder of
the originating controller, click Browse to select the module or manually
enter the path to the target module.
A manually entered path begins with the name of the local EtherNet/IP
module, the port the message exits (2 for EtherNet/IP), and the IP
address of the next module in the path, which could be the target
module.
EXAMPLE
Communication path from a Logix5000 controller to a Logix5000 controller over
an EtherNet/IP network
Ethernet Network
5
5
5
0
E
N
B
T
Message
IP Address
127.127.127.12
5
5
5
0
E
N
B
T
washer, 2, 127.127.127.12, 1, 0
114
Where
Indicates
Washer
Name of the 1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2T, or 1756-EN2F module
2
Ethernet port of the 1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2T, or EN2F module
127.127.127.
12
IP address of the 1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2T, or 1756-EN2F module in
the destination chassis
1
Backplane port of the 1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2T, or 1756-EN2F
module in the destination chassis
0
Slot number of the destination controller
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Communicate with PLC-5 or
SLC Processors
Chapter 7
If the message is to a PLC-5 or SLC 500 processor and it reads or writes
integers (not REALs), use a buffer of INTs in the message. Remember that:
• Logix5000 controllers execute more efficiently and use less memory
when working with 32-bit integers (DINTs).
• PLC-5 and SLC 500 processors require 16-bit integers.
• Messages require an INT buffer.
• Data can be moved into or out of the buffer as needed.
Converting between INTs and DINTs
If the message is to a device that uses 16-bit integers, such as a PLC-5 or SLC
500 controller, and it transfers integers (not REALs), use a buffer of INTs in
the message and DINTs throughout the project. This increases the efficiency
of your project.
1
Read 16-Bit Integers
2
Data From
the Device
Buffer of INTs
DINTs For Use In
the Project
Word 1
INT_Buffer[0]
DINT_Array[0]
Word 2
INT_Buffer[1]
DINT_Array[1]
Word 3
INT_Buffer[2]
DINT_Array[2]
1. The Message (MSG) instruction reads 16-bit integers (INTs) from the
device and stores them in a temporary array of INTs.
2. An File Arith/Logical (FAL) instruction converts the INTs to DINTs
for use by other instructions in your project.
1
Write 16-Bit Integers
2
DINTs From the
Project
Buffer of INTs
Data For the
Device
DINT_Array[0]
INT_Buffer[0]
Word 1
DINT_Array[1]
INT_Buffer[1]
Word 2
DINT_Array[2]
INT_Buffer[2]
Word 3
1. An FAL instruction converts the DINTs from the Logix5000 controller
to INTs.
2. The MSG instruction writes the INTs from the temporary array to the
device.
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Mapping Tags
A Logix5000 controller stores tag names on the controller so that other
devices can read or write data without having to know physical memory
locations. Many products only understand PLC/SLC data tables, so the
Logix5000 controller offers a PLC/SLC mapping function that enables you to
map Logix tag names to memory locations.
• You have to map only the file numbers that are used in messages; the
other file numbers do not need to be mapped.
• The mapping table is loaded into the controller and is used whenever a
logical address accesses data.
• You can access only controller-scoped tags (global data).
• For each file that is referenced in a PLC-5 or SLC command, make a
map entry by:
– typing the PLC/SLC file number of the logical address.
– typing or selecting the Logix5000 controller-scoped (global) tag that
supplies or receives data for the file number. (You can map multiple
files to the same tag.)
· For PLC-2 commands, specify the tag that supplies or receives the data.
When mapping tags:
• do not use file numbers 0, 1, and 2. These files are reserved for Output,
Input, and Status files in a PLC-5 processor.
• use PLC-5 mapping only for tag arrays of data type INT, DINT, or
REAL. Attempting to map elements of system structures may produce
undesirable effects.
• use the PLC file identifier of N or B when accessing elements in an INT
tag array.
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This example shows how to use a buffer of INTs.
EXAMPLE
Read integers from a PLC-5 controller.
When condition turns on, reads 16-bit integer values (INTs) and stores them in int_buffer. Then the FAL
instruction moves the values to dint_array. This converts the values to 32-bit integers (DINTs), for use by
other instructions in the ControlLogix controller.
EXAMPLE
Write integers to a PLC-5 controller.
When condition turns on, moves the values in dint_array to int_buffer. This converts the values to 16-bit
integers (INTs). Then the message instruction sends int_buffer to the other controller.
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Where
Is an
dint_array
Array of DINTs that are used in the ControlLogix controller
int_buffer
Array of INTs with the same number of elements as
dint_array
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Receive MSGs from PLC-5 or SLC 500 Processors
To receive MSGs from PLC-5 or SLC 500 processors,
1. If the originating controller is a PLC-5 or SLC 500 processor, in the
MSG instruction, select PLC5.
If the controller For this section
is a
And this item
Specify
PLC-5
Communication Command
PLC-5 Typed Read or PLC-5 Typed Write
Data Table Address
Starting address of the data in the PLC-5 controller
Size in Elements
Number of elements to read or write
Port Number
2
Data Table Address
Type, in quotation marks [“ “], the name of the tag in the
ControlLogix controller (for example, “count”).
MultiHop
Select Yes.
Communication Command
PLC5 Read or PLC5 Write
Data Table Address
Starting address of the data in the SLC 500 controller
Size in Elements
Number of elements to read or write
Channel
1
Data Table Address
Type, in quotation marks [“ “], the name of the tag in the
ControlLogix controller (for example, “count”).
MultiHop
Select Yes
This PLC-5
Target Device
SLC 500
This Controller
Target Device
2. On the MultiHop tab, specify:
• the IP address of the EtherNet/IP communication module that is
local to the Logix5000 controller.
• the slot number of the Logix5000 controller.
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8
Send Email
Introduction
This chapter describes how to send an email through an EtherNet/IP module.
Topic
Page
EtherNet/IP Module as an Email Client
119
Send Email Via a Controller-initiated Message Instruction
121
Create String Tags
121
Enter the Ladder Logic
125
Configure the MSG Instruction That Identifies the Mail Relay Server
125
Configure the MSG Instruction That Contains the Email Text
127
Enter Email Text
129
Possible Email Status Codes
129
For email, the EtherNet/IP module can be remote or local to the controller.
EtherNet/IP Module as an
Email Client
The EtherNet/IP module is an email client that uses a mail relay server to
send email.
IMPORTANT
The EtherNet/IP module can send an email to only one recipient
at a time. It cannot mail to a distribution list.
Ethernet Email
If you want to
Then
Send an email to specific personnel when a controller application
generates an alarm or reaches a certain condition
Program the controller to send a MSG instruction to the EtherNet/IP
module
Send controller or application status information on a regular basis
to a project manager
The MSG instruction then instructs the EtherNet/IP module to send
the email text (contained within the MSG instruction) to the mail
relay server.
Multiple controllers can use the same EtherNet/IP module to
initiate email.
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The EtherNet/IP module sends only the content of a MSG instruction as an
email to a mail relay server. Delivery of the email depends on the mail relay
server. The EtherNet/IP module does not receive email.
Sample System
Firewall/Router
ControlLogix Controller With 1756-ENBT,
1756-EN2F, 1756-EN2T, or 1756-EN2TR Module
Ethernet Switch
Mail Relay Server
FlexLogix Controller
Ethernet Switch
1769-L35E CompactLogix
Controller
Sample System Capabilities
Device
Capability
ControlLogix controller
Send a MSG instruction to the 1756-ENBT module to initiate sending an email to the mail relay server.
FlexLogix controller
CompactLogix controller
Use the path of the MSG instruction to identify the 1756-ENBT module as the target of the MSG
instruction.
Send an email to the mail relay server from the email interface on the Send an Email link.
1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2F,
1756-EN2T, 1756-EN2TR,
1756-EN2TXT module
This interface requires entry of all email information.
Mail relay server
Send email to specified recipients.
The mail relay server determines the delivery of any email sent through an EtherNet/IP module, whether
via a MSG instruction or from its built-in interface.
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Send Email Via a
Controller-initiated
Message Instruction
Chapter 8
A Logix controller can send a generic CIP message instruction to the
EtherNet/IP module that instructs the module to send an email message to a
SMTP mail relay server using the standard SMTP protocol. This automatically
communicates controller data and application conditions to appropriate
personnel.
IMPORTANT
Be careful to write the ladder logic to ensure the MSG
instructions are not continuously triggered to send email
messages.
Some mail relay servers require a domain name be provided during the initial
handshake of the SMTP session. For these mail relay servers, specify a domain
name when configuring the EtherNet/IP module’s network settings.
For additional information, see Configure an EtherNet/IP Module to Operate
on the Network on page 41.
Create String Tags
You need three controller-scoped string tags. Each tag performs one of these
functions:
• Identifies the mail server
• Contains the email text
• Contains the status of the email transmission
The default STRING data type supports up to 82 characters. In most cases,
this is sufficient to contain the address of the mail server. For example, to
create tag EmailConfigstring of type STRING, perform this procedure.
1. Click ... in the Value column of the Controller Tags dialog box to
display the String Browser dialog box.
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The String Browser dialog box appears.
2. Enter the IP address or host name of the mail server.
3. Click OK.
The tags for the email text and transmission status can contain up to 474
characters. For these tags, you must create a user-defined STRING data
type. The default STRING data type in RSLogix 5000 programming
software is not large enough for most email text.
To create a user-defined STRING data type, perform this procedure.
1. In the Data Types folder in RSLogix 5000 programming software,
navigate to the Strings folder and double-click a String data type.
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The String dialog box appears.
New Controller-scoped Tags
2. In the Name field, type a String type, such as EmailString.
3. Create one controller-scoped tag, such as EWEB_EMAIL, of this new
data type to contain the email text.
4. Create a second controller-scoped tag, such as EmailDstStr, of this new
data type to contain the transmission status.
Both of these tags are of type EmailString.
5. Click
...
in the Value column of the Controller Tags dialog box.
Tag for Status
Tag for Email Text
The String Browser dialog box appears.
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6. Type your email.
The text of the email does not have to be static. You can program a
controller project to collect specific data to be sent in an email.
7. Click OK.
For more information on using ladder logic to manipulate string data, see the
Logix5000 Controllers Common Procedures Programming Manual, publication
1756-PM001.
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Enter the Ladder Logic
Ladder logic requires two MSG instructions. One MSG instruction configures
the mail server and needs to be executed only once. The second MSG
instruction triggers the email. Execute this email MSG instruction as often as
needed.
The first rung configures the mail server. The second rung sends the email
text.
Configure the MSG Instruction That Identifies the Mail Relay
Server
To configure the MSG instruction that identifies the mail relay server, perform
this procedure.
1. In the MSG instruction, click the Communication tab.
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2. In the Path field, type the path for the MSG instruction.
The path starts with the controller initiating the MSG instruction.
a. Enter the number of the port from which the message exits and the
address of the next module in the path.
For example, if the EtherNet/IP module is in the same chassis as the
controller and is in slot 2, the path is: 1, 2.
For more information on configuring the path of a MSG instruction,
see the Logix5000 Controllers General Instructions Reference Manual,
publication 1756-RM003.
3. Click the Configuration tab.
The Source Length is the number of characters in the
STRING tag that identifies the mail relay server plus 4
characters.
In this example, the tag contains 13 characters.
4. Configure the MSG parameters for sending an email.
a. From the Service Type pull-down menu, choose Attribute Single
b. In the Instance field, type 1.
c. In the Class field, type 32f.
d. In the Attribute field, type 5.
e. From the Source Element pull-down menu, choose the tag that
contains your email text.
f. In the Source Length field, type the number of characters in the email
plus four.
In this example, you would enter 13 for the number of characters
plus 4 for a total of 17.
After the MSG instruction that configures the mail relay server executes
successfully, the controller stores the mail relay server information in
nonvolatile memory. The controller retains this information, even
through power cycles, until another MSG instruction changes the
information.
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Configure the MSG Instruction That Contains the Email Text
To configure the MSG instruction that contains the email text, perform this
procedure.
1. Click the Configuration tab.
The Source Length is the number of characters in the email tag plus 4
characters.
In this example, the email text contains 65 characters.
2. Configure the MSG parameters for sending an email.
a. From the Service Type pull-down menu, choose Custom.
b. In the Service Code field, type 4b.
c. In the Instance field, type 1.
d. In the Class field, type 32f.
e. In the Attribute field, type 0.
f. From the Source Element pull-down menu, choose the tag that
contains your email text.
g. In the Source Length field, type the number of characters in the email
plus four.
In this example, you would enter 65 for the number of characters
plus 4 for a total of 69.
h. From the Destination pull-down menu, choose a tag to contain the
status of your email transmission.
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3. Click the Communication tab.
4. In the Path field, type the path from the controller to the EtherNet/IP
module.
The path starts with the controller initiating the MSG instruction. The
second number in the path represents the port from which the message
exits and the address of the next module in the path.
For example, if the EtherNet/IP module is in the same chassis as the
controller and is in slot 2, the path is: 1, 2.
5. If all the devices in the path are configured in the initiating controller’s
I/O Configuration tree, click Browse to select the target module.
The software automatically fills in the path.
6. Click OK.
For more information on configuring the path of an MSG instruction, see the
Logix5000 Controllers General Instructions Reference Manual, publication
1756-RM003.
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Use the string browser to enter the text of the email. To include To:, From:,
and Subject: fields in the email, use <CR><LF> symbols to separate each of
these fields. The To: and From fields are required; the Subject: field is optional.
For example:
To: email address of recipient <CR><LF>
From: email address of sender <CR><LF>
Subject: subject of message <CR><LF>
body of email message
An email message must not exceed 474 characters in length. An additional
4-byte string-length value is added to the tag. As a result, the maximum source
length is 478 characters.
Possible Email Status
Codes
Examine the destination element of the email MSG to see whether the email
was successfully delivered to the mail relay server. A successful delivery
indicates that the mail relay server placed the email message in a queue for
delivery, but it does not mean the intended recipient received the email
message. These are the possible codes that a destination element could
contain.
Email Status Code Descriptions
Error
Code
(Hex)
Extended- Description
error
Code
(Hex)
0x00
None
Delivery successful to the mail relay server.
0x02
None
Resource unavailable. The email object was unable to obtain memory resources to initiate the SMTP session.
0x08
None
Unsupported Service Request. Make sure the service code is 0x4B and the Class is 0x32F.
0x11
None
Reply data too large. The Destination string must reserve space for the SMTP server reply message. The maximum
reply can be 470 bytes.
0x13
None
Configuration data size too short. The Source Length is less than the Source Element string size plus the 4-byte length.
The Source Length must equal the Source Element string size + 4.
0x15
None
Configuration data size too large. The Source Length is greater than the Source Element string size plus the 4-byte
length. The Source Length must equal the Source Element string size + 4.
0x19
None
Data write failure. An error occurred when attempting to write the SMTP server address (attribute 4) to non-volatile
memory.
0xFF
0x0100
Error returned by email server; check the Destination string for reason. The email message was not queued for
delivery.
0x0101
SMTP mail server not configured. Attribute 5 was not set with a SMTP server address.
0x0102
“To:” address not specified. Attribute 1 was not set with a “To:” address AND there is not a “To:” field header in the
email body.
0x0103
“From:” address not specified. Attribute 2 was not set with a “From:” address AND there is not a “From:” field header
in the email body.
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Email Status Code Descriptions
Error
Code
(Hex)
Extended- Description
error
Code
(Hex)
0xFF
0x0104
Unable to connect to SMTP mail server set in Attribute 5. If the mail server address is a host name, make sure that the
device supports DNS, and that a Name Server is configured. If the hostname is not fully qualified, for example,
“mailhost” and not “mailhost.xx.yy.com” then the domain must be configured as “xx.yy.com”. Try “ping <mail server
address>” to insure the mail server is reachable from your network. Also try “telnet <mail server address> 25” which
attempts to initiate a SMTP session with the mail server via telnet over port 25. (If you connect then enter “QUIT”).
0x0105
Communication error with SMTP mail server. An error occurred after the initial connection with the SMTP mail server.
See the ASCII text following the error code for more details as to the type of error.
0x0106
SMTP mail server host name DNS query did not complete. A previous send service request with a host name as the
SMTP mail server address did not yet complete. Note that a timeout for a DNS lookup with an invalid host name can
take up to 3 minutes. Long timeouts can also occur if a domain name or name server is not configured correctly.
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Chapter
9
Communicate with PanelView Terminals
Introduction
This chapter describes how a controller uses an EtherNet/IP communication
module to communicate with PanelView and PanelView Plus terminals over
an EtherNet/IP network.
Set Up the Hardware
Topic
Page
Set Up the Hardware
131
Connections to PanelView Terminals
132
Add a PanelView Terminal
133
Organize Controller Data for a PanelView Terminal
136
Connections to RSView Applications
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In this example, the controller in the local chassis shares data with an HMI
application on the EtherNet/IP network. This application could be running a:
• PanelView terminal.
• PanelView Plus terminal.
• workstation running RSView 32 software.
• workstation running an RSView Enterprise application, such as RSView
Machine Edition or RSView Supervisory Edition.
Ethernet Communication with Panelview
Data
A
C
B
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Description
A
Local chassis containing a Logix5000 controller and EtherNet/IP connection
B
Switch
C
HMI device with EtherNet/IP connectivity
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Logix5000 Controller Combinations
Choosing a Communication Module
Controllers
Communication Modules
1756 ControlLogix
1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2F, 1756-EN2T,
1756-EN2TR, or 1756-EN2TXT
communication modules
1768 CompactLogix
1768-ENBT communication module
1769-L23E-Q1B, 1769-L23E-QBFC1B,
1769-L32E, or 1769-L35E CompactLogix
A built-in EtherNet/IP port
1794 FlexLogix
1788-ENBT EtherNet/IP communication
module
PowerFlex 700S with DriveLogix
1788-ENBT EtherNet/IP communication
module
Make sure to:
· set the IP addresses for the controller’s EtherNet/IP communication
module and the HMI terminal.
· connect all wiring and cabling.
Connections to PanelView
Terminals
To establish communication between a PanelView or PanelView Plus terminal,
specify controller connections.
PanelView Terminal Connections
Terminal Type
Type of Communication
PanelView
PanelView Plus
Implicit (connected)
Supported
Not supported
Supported
Supported
• Logix controller communicates to the PanelView terminal like an I/O module.
• You must add the PanelView terminal to the I/O configuration tree for the controller project.
Explicit (unconnected)
• Communication is set up in PanelBuilder or RSView ME software.
• All communication is initiated by the PanelView or PanelView Plus terminal.
When communicating implicitly (PanelView terminals only), the controller
uses one connection for each terminal. Make sure to account for these
connections when designing the system. The Logix5000 controllers:
· firmware revisions 11 and earlier support up to 16 bidirectional implicit
buffers (connections).
· firmware revisions 12 or later support up to 32 bidirectional implicit
buffers (connections).
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The larger number of implicit buffers enables significantly more PanelView
terminals to simultaneously request data from the controller via implicit
communication.
When communicating explicitly, the controller supports 40 outgoing and 3
incoming buffers. This number of incoming buffers limits how many terminals
can simultaneously request data from a controller via explicit communication.
In other words, while a system can have multiple terminals, only three
terminals can explicitly request data from a Logix controller at the same time.
Add a PanelView Terminal
To add a Panelview terminal, perform this procedure.
1. In the Controller Organizer of the RSLogix 5000 programming
software, right-click I/O Configuration to select New Module.
The Select Module dialog box appears.
2. Click the By Category tab.
3. Browse to your EtherNet/IP communication module and click OK.
The Select Major Revision dialog box appears.
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4. From the Major Revision pull-down menu, choose a revision and click
OK.
The New Module dialog box appears.
a. In the Name field, type the name of your new module.
b. From the Comm Format pull-down menu, choose a communication
format.
c. In the Slot field, type the number of the slot where the new module
will reside.
d. In Chassis Size field, type the chassis size.
e. In the IP Address field, type the IP address.
f. From the Electronic Keying pull-down menu, choose Disable Keying
and click OK.
5. In the Controller Organizer of RSLogix 5000 programming software,
right-click the local EtherNet/IP communication module you just
added and select New Module.
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The Select Module Type dialog box appears.
6. Right-click to select New Module, and add an
ETHERNET-PANELVIEW.
7. Click OK.
The Module Properties dialog box appears.
a. In the Name field, type the name of your new module.
b. From the Comm Format pull-down menu, choose Data-DINT.
c. From the Electronic Keying pull-down menu, choose Disable
Keying.
d. In the IP Address field, type the IP address.
e. In the Input and Output fields, type the connection parameters.
IMPORTANT
You can establish up to eight different instances with each
terminal. For example, one controller can use all eight
instances. Or eight controllers can each use one instance.
f. Click Finish.
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Organize Controller Data
for a PanelView Terminal
Organize data for a PanelView terminal based on how the data is used.
Controller Data Organization
For data that is
Do this
Time critical (for example, data
that controls a machine)
Use the I/O tags of the terminal.
Not time critical
Create arrays to store the data.
The tags for this data were created when you added the terminal to the I/O configuration of the
controller. They resemble the I/O modules’ tags.
1. For each screen, create a BOOL array with enough elements for the bit-level objects on the screen.
For example, the BOOL[32] array gives you 32 bits for push buttons or indicators.
2. For each screen, create a DINT array with enough elements for the word-level objects on the
screen.
For example, the DINT[28] array provides 28 values for numeric entry controls or numeric displays.
To access the I/O tags of the PanelView or PanelView Plus terminal, use the
following address format:
Terminal Function
Requirement
Writes the data
name_of_terminal:I.Data[x].y
Reads the data
name_of_terminal:O.Data[x].y
where:
This address variable Is
Connections to RSView
Applications
name_of_terminal
Name of the instance in the I/O configuration of the controller.
x
Element of the input (I) or output (O) structure.
y
Bit number within the input or output element.
To establish communication to an RSView application, configure RSLinx
software to collect tags from the controller. An RSView 32 or RSView
Enterprise application uses RSLinx software as a data server.
RSLinx Enterprise software defaults to four read connections and one write
connection per configured controller. Modify the RSLinx software
configuration as needed.
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Chapter
10
Monitor Diagnostics
Introduction
The EtherNet/IP communication modules provide several web diagnostic
pages. This chapter illustrates each of these web diagnostic pages and defines
the terms presented on each screen.
Topic
Page
Diagnostic Web Pages
138
Network Settings
141
Explicit Message Connections
142
I/O Connections
143
Ethernet Statistics
144
IMPORTANT
To access any of these diagnostic web pages and troubleshoot
problems which you may be able to diagnose via one of these
web diagnostic pages, see Troubleshoot an EtherNet/IP Module
on page 147.
A 1783-ETAP tap using firmware revision 1.1 does not support
diagnostic web pages. You must upgrade the tap to firmware
revision 2.x or later to use diagnostic web pages.
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Diagnostic Web Pages
The Diagnostic Overview web page presents a summary of the current
configuration and overall status of the module.
Diagnostic Overview Web Page
This field
Specifies
Ethernet Link
Speed
Whether the Ethernet port is operating at 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps.
Duplex
Whether the Ethernet port is operating at half duplex or full duplex.
Autonegotiate Status
Whether the port speed and duplex mode were determined via autonegotiation or manual
configuration.
System Resource Utilization
CPU
Current percent CPU utilization for the module.
Web Server
Server Errors
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Number of requests to the module with an invalid URL.
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Diagnostic Overview Web Page
This field
Specifies
Redirects
Number of requests for a Web page that were redirected by the module (for example, requesting
“/” is redirected to “/index.html”).
Timeouts
Number of times a connection timeout occurred while processing a Web page.
Access Violations
Number of times a page has been requested for which the user has insufficient privilege.
Page Hits
Number of times a Web page was successfully accessed.
Form Hits
Number of times a Web page form was accessed.
Total Hits
Total number of Web page access attempts.
CIP Connection Statistics
Current CIP MSG Connections
Current number of CIP connections for message.
CIP MSG Connection Limit
Maximum number of CIP connections for messages allowed.
Max MSG Connections Observed
Maximum observed number of CIP connections for messages.
Current CIP I/O Connections
Current number of CIP connections for I/O.
CIP I/O Connection Limit
Maximum number of CIP connections allowed for I/O.
Max I/O Connections Observed
Maximum observed number of CIP connections for I/O.
Conn Opens
Number of CIP connection open requests.
Open Errors
Number of CIP connection open request errors.
Conn Closes
Number of CIP connection close requests.
Close Errors
Number of CIP connection close request errors.
Conn Timeouts
Number of CIP connection timeouts.
TCP Connections (CIP)
Current TCP Connections
Current number of active TCP connections for CIP messaging.
TCP Connection Limit
Maximum number of TCP connections for CIP messaging allowed.
Maximum Observed
Maximum observed number of TCP connections for CIP messaging.
CIP Messaging Statistics
Messages Sent
Number of CIP connected messages (packets) sent.
Messages Received
Number of CIP connected messages (packets) received.
UCMM Sent
Number of CIP unconnected messages (packets) sent.
UCMM Received
Number of CIP unconnected messages (packets) received.
I/O Packet / Second Statistics
Total
Total number of Class 1 UDP packets the module transmitted and received in the last one-second
snapshot.
The Total is the sum of the Sent, Received, Inhibited, and Rejected numbers.
Sent
Number of Class 1 UDP packets the module transmitted in the last one-second snapshot.
Received
Number of Class 1 UDP packets the module received in the last one-second snapshot.
Inhibited
Number of Class 1 UDP packets the module inhibited in the last one-second snapshot.
Packets are inhibited if a COS module produces packets faster than 25% of the connection’s RPI.
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Diagnostic Overview Web Page
This field
Rejected
Specifies
Number of Class 1 UDP packets the module rejected in the last one-second snapshot.
These packets were messages received and then rejected because the connection was closed or
there was a duplicate multicast address.
Capacity
Number of Class 1 UDP packets the module can handle over the Ethernet network at any time.
Actual Reserve
Actual Reserve = Capacity - Total.
This is based on the total of number packets the module has transmitted/received in the last
one-second snapshot.
Theoretical Reserve
Theoretical Reserve = Capacity - the sum of the theoretical packet/second of all connections based
on the RPI.
I/O Packet Counter Statistics
Total
Cumulative number of Class 1 UDP packets the module transmitted/received.
The Total is the sum of the Sent, Received, Inhibited, and Rejected numbers.
Sent
Cumulative number of Class 1 UDP packets the module transmitted.
Received
Cumulative number of Class 1 UDP packets the module received.
Inhibited
Cumulative number of Class 1 UDP packets the module inhibited.
Packets are inhibited if a COS module produces packets faster than 1/4 of the connection’s RPI.
Rejected
Cumulative number of Class 1 UDP packets the module rejected.
These packets were messages received and then rejected because the connection was closed or
there was a duplicate multicast address.
Missed
Cumulative number packets that were not received in order.
Each UDP packet has a sequence number and if a packet is missing (corrupted or dropped), the
module will recognize this void upon receipt of the next packet received.
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Network Settings
Chapter 10
The Network Settings web page presents a summary of the current Ethernet
configuration for the module. This information advises you what has and has
not been configured and has nothing directly to do with troubleshooting.
IMPORTANT
Any unconfigured fields remain blank.
Network Settings Web Page
This field
Specifies
Network Interface
Ethernet Address (MAC)
Ethernet (MAC) address of the module.
IP Address
IP address for the module.
Subnet Mask
Subnet mask for the module.
Default Gateway
Gateway address for the module.
Primary Name Server
Primary name server.
Secondary Name Server
Secondary name server.
Default Domain Name
Default domain name for the module.
Host Name
Host name for the module.
Name Resolution
Whether or not Domain Name System (DNS) resolution is enabled.
SMTP Server
SMTP server address for the module (required for email).
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Network Settings Web Page
This field
Specifies
Ethernet Interface Configuration
Obtain Network Configuration
Whether the module is configured to obtain its network parameters (IP address) via
BOOTP, DHCP, or from static configuration.
Ethernet Link
Autonegotiate Status
Whether the Ethernet port is operating at 10 or 100 MBps.
Port Speed
Whether the Ethernet port is operating at half duplex or full duplex.
Duplex Mode
Whether the port speed and duplex mode were determined via autonegotiation or manual
configuration.
Explicit Message
Connections
The Message Connections diagnostic web page presents a summary of
messages bridged through or initiated by the module.
Message Connections Web Page
This field
Specifies
Conn #
The relative index of this connection (on the Message Connections page).
Connection ID
The unique identifier for each connection.
Originator
The IP address of the device that originated the connection on an Ethernet network.
Target
The IP address of the device that is the target of the connection on an Ethernet network.
This may not be the ultimate target of the connection. For example, the target could be a
Logix controller in a chassis.
Bridged
Whether the connection bridges through the module.
State
The current state of the connection:
·
·
·
·
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Active
Closing
Faulted
Reserved
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I/O Connections
Chapter 10
The I/O Connections diagnostic web page presents a summary of I/O
connections initiated by the module.
Each Class 1 UDP connection has a receive/transmit (Rcv/Xmt) pair of data
and heartbeat. The originator of a connection listens on the multicast address
to receive the data. The target of the connection receives the heartbeat.
In this example, the Web page is for the module at address 10.88.60.194. This
module (10.88.60.194) originated a connection to 10.88.60.188 with an RPI of
10.
I/O Connections Web Page
This field
Specifies
Conn S#/Up Time
Connection serial number and the elapsed time the connection has been maintained.
Rcv/Xmt
Connection was received or transmitted from this source address.
Connection ID
Connection identifier.
Source
IP address of the Rcv/Xmt packet.
(T) = target; (O) = originator.
Dest
Destination address.
Multicast Address
Connection targets produce at this multicast address.
Connection originators listen on this multicast address.
RPI
Programmed connection RPI.
Lost
Total number of packets received where the Common Packet Encapsulation sequence
number is less than the last received on this connection.
Size
Size of class 1 UDP packet data (in bytes).
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Ethernet Statistics
The Ethernet Statistics diagnostic web page presents a summary of the status
of communication activity on the Ethernet network.
Ethernet Statistics Web Page
This field
Specifies
Ethernet Link
Speed
Whether the Ethernet port is operating at 10 or 100 MBps.
Duplex
Whether the Ethernet port is operating at half duplex or full duplex.
Autonegotiate Status
Whether the port speed and duplex mode were determined via autonegotiation or
whether they were manually configured.
Interface Counters
144
In Octets
Octets received on the Ethernet interface.
In Ucast Packets
Unicast packets received on the Ethernet interface.
In NUcast Packets
Nonunicast packets received on the Ethernet interface.
In Discards
Inbound packets received on the Ethernet interface but discarded.
In Errors
Inbound packets that contain errors, not including Discards.
In Unknown Protos
Inbound packets with unknown protocol.
Out Octets
Octets sent on the Ethernet interface.
Out Ucast Packets
Unicast packets sent on the Ethernet interface.
Out NUcast Packets
Nonunicast packets sent on the Ethernet interface.
Out Discards
Outbound packets discarded.
Out Errors
Outbound packets that contain errors.
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Ethernet Statistics Web Page
This field
Specifies
Media Counters
Alignment Errors
A frame containing bits that do not total an integral multiple of eight.
FCS Errors
A frame containing eight bits, at least one of which has been corrupted.
Single Collisions
The number of outgoing packets that encountered only one collision during transmission.
Multiple Collisions
The number of outgoing packets that encountered 2...15 collisions during transmission.
SQE Test Errors
A test to detect the collision-present circuit between a transceiver and a network
interface card (NIC).
Important: Because most NICs now have an integrated transceiver, the SQE test is
unnecessary. Ignore this media counter.
Deferred Transmissions
The number of outgoing packets whose transmission is deferred because the network is
busy when the first attempt is made to send them.
Late Collisions
The number of times two devices transmit data simultaneously.
Excessive Collisions
The number of frames that experience 16 consecutive collisions.
MAC Transmit Errors
Frames for which transmission fails due to an internal MAC sublayer transmit error.
Carrier Sense Errors
Times that the carrier sense condition was lost or never asserted when attempting to
transmit a frame.
Frame Too Long
The number of incoming packets that exceed the maximum Ethernet packet size.
MAC Receive Errors
Frames for which reception on the Ethernet interface failed due to an internal MAC
sublayer receive error.
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Notes:
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Chapter
11
Troubleshoot an EtherNet/IP Module
Introduction
This chapter explains how to troubleshoot problems with your EtherNet/IP
communication modules.
Topic
Page
Access Web Browser Support
147
Switch Considerations
157
Internet Group Multicast Protocol
157
Virtual Local Area Networks
158
Port Mirroring
159
Troubleshooting Content Guide
For
Consult these sections
Basic troubleshooting help
Web Browser Support
Advice on choosing the correct switch to
troubleshoot module problems
Switch Considerations
Advanced troubleshooting help
• Internet Group Multicast Protocol
• Virtual Local Area Networks
• Port Mirroring
Access Web
Browser Support
To troubleshoot most possible problems with your EtherNet/IP
communication module, you need to access the module’s diagnostic web
pages.
Required Web Diagnostic Pages
Technical Issue
Web Diagnostic Page
Port speed or settings
Required converter type
Diagnostic Overview Statistics
CPU utilization
Number of missed I/O packets
Status of connections
Status of I/O connections
Number of lost I/O connections
Intermittent Ethernet connectivity
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Message Connections
I/O Connections
Ethernet Statistics
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To access your EtherNet/IP communication module diagnostic web pages,
perform this procedure.
1. Open your web browser.
2. In the Address field, type your EtherNet/IP module internet protocol
(IP) address and hit Enter.
The diagnostic web home page appears.
Ethernet/IP Module Internet Protocol (IP) Address
IMPORTANT
148
The diagnostic web pages illustrated in this chapter use the
1756-ENBT EtherNet/IP module as an example. It is not the only
EtherNet/IP module that supports web diagnostic pages.
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Diagnostic Overview Statistics
To view the diagnostic overview statistics for your EtherNet/IP
communication module, perform this procedure.
1. Open the Diagnostics folder and select Diagnostics Overview.
The Diagnostic Overview web page appears, along with the tabs for the
other four diagnostic web pages.
IMPORTANT
The Network Settings web page shows your module’s
configuration settings and is not used in the
troubleshooting process.
We recommend that you monitor the diagnostics circled
in the graphic below.
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2. Review the values in the Ethernet Link table.
If
Speed is
100 or
1000
Mbps
10
Mbps
Duplex is
Full
And you
Then
Do not want to change your port
speed
No action is required.
Want to reduce your port speed to 10
Mbps
You must manually configure your module and reset your module.
See Configure the Module with RSLinx Software on page 48.
Want to increase your port speed to
100 Mbps
Reset your module or see Configure the Module with RSLinx Software
on page 48.
Do not want to change your port
speed
No action is required.
Are sending large amounts of data
No action is required.
Important: 100 Mbps is the default port speed.
Important: Full Duplex is the default port setting.
Full-duplex ports eliminate collisions because each device has separate
channels for the transmission and receipt of large amounts of data.
Half
Are not sending large amounts of data No action is required.
Important: Delays due to collisions or switch traffic are usually
negligible, but can become a problem if you need to send a lot of data.
Are sending large amounts of data
Autonegotiate Speed Are using a fiber converter
Status is
and/or
Duplex
Are not using a fiber converter
Change your module’s Duplex setting to Full. See Configure the Module
with RSLinx Software on page 48.
Change your module’s Autonegotiate status to None. See Configure the
Module with RSLinx Software on page 48.
Important: Fiber links do not support autonegotiation.
No action is required.
Important: Speed and/or Duplex is the default setting.
Autonegotation enables devices to select the best way to communicate
without you having to do any configuring. All devices with an Ethernet
speed rating of 100 Mbps are required to support autonegotiation.
None
150
Are not using a fiber converter
Change your module’s Autonegotiate status to Speed and/or Duplex.
See Configure the Module with RSLinx Software on page 48.
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Chapter 11
3. Review the System Resource Utilization table to evaluate your CPU
utilization.
If the CPU utilization rate is
Then
0...80%
No action is required.
Important: This is the optimal rate.
Greater than 80%
• Take steps to reduce your CPU utilization. See Internet Group Multicast Protocol on
page 157.
• Adjust your connection’s requested packet interval (RPI).
• Reduce the number of devices connected to your module.
Important: Your EtherNet/IP communication module can function at 100% CPU capacity,
but at or near this rate, you run the risk of CPU saturation and performance problems.
4. Review the Missed field in the I/O Packet Counter Statistics table.
This field shows how many I/O packets have been missed. Your
EtherNet/IP communication module may lose I/O packets due to:
• packets being produced faster than the connection’s requested packet
interval (RPI). This happens for change-of-state connections or a new
consumer requesting a faster RPI than the first consumer.
• a packet having been received out of sequence.
a. If more than zero packets have been recorded as lost, review the
Inhibited and Rejected fields in the I/O Packet Counter Statistics
table.
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If
Then
There are more than zero
inhibited I/O packets
Reconfigure your module to produce packets no more quickly than the connection’s RPI. See Configure Your
Module with RSLogix 5000 Software on page 50.
There are more than zero
rejected I/O packets
View the Message Connections diagnostic web page to confirm what, if any, connections are closed. See
Message Connections on page 152.
Important: If more than four I/O packets have been rejected, your module has probably lost its connection.
There are possibly duplicate module IP addresses.
Observe your module’s status indicators and take recommended actions. See Status Indicators on page 167.
Important: Many EtherNet/IP communication modules can detect duplicate IP addresses. See Duplicate IP
Address Detection on page 51.
A packet has possibly been received out of sequence and rejected because the previous packet was inhibited.
Reconfigure your module to produce packets no more quickly than the connection’s RPI. See Configure Your
Module with RSLogix 5000 Software on page 50.
Message Connections
If you want to check the status of your module connections, click the Message
Connections tab.
The Message Connections diagnostic web page appears.
These are the four connection states:
•
•
•
•
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Active
Closing
Faulted
Reserved
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I/O Connections
If you want to check the status of your module’s I/O connections, click the
I/O Connections tab.
The I/O Connections diagnostic web page appears.
The Lost column shows the number of I/O packets that were not received.
IMPORTANT
To troubleshoot lost I/O packets, review the I/O Packet Counter
Statistics table in the Diagnostic Overview tab. See page 151.
Ethernet Statistics
Your EtherNet/IP communication module may experience intermittent
network connectivity due to:
• a duplex mismatch.
• electrical noise induced into a cable or resulting from a Logix/switch
ground potential difference.
• bad hardware, such as a cable or switch part.
Before troubleshooting this problem, familiarize yourself with these Ethernet
statistics, or media counters.
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Ethernet Media Counters
Media Counter
Definition
Alignment Errors
A frame containing bits that do not total an integral multiple of eight.
Alignment errors often result from:
• starting or stopping of module.
• MAC-layer packet formation problems.
• cabling problems that corrupt or eliminate data.
• packets passing through more than two cascaded multiport transceivers.
FCS Errors
A frame containing eight bits, at least one of which has been corrupted.
FCS errors often result from:
• starting or stopping the module.
• cabling problems that corrupt data.
Important: Even though the acceptable Ethernet bit-error rate is 1 in 108, the typical rate is 1 in 1012 or better.
Single Collisions
The number of outgoing packets that encountered only one collision during transmission.
Multiple Collisions
The number of outgoing packets that encountered 2...15 collisions during transmission.
SQE Test Errors
A test to detect the collision-present circuit between a transceiver and a network interface card (NIC).
Important: Because most NICs now have an integrated transceiver, the SQE test is unnecessary. Ignore this media
counter.
Deferred
Transmissions
The number of outgoing packets whose transmission is deferred because the network is busy when the first attempt
is made to send them.
Important: The module will only defer the first attempt to transmit a packet. After the first attempt, the module will
transmit the packet without checking. However, if the network is still busy, a collision will be recorded.
Late Collisions
The number of times two devices transmit data simultaneously.
Neither device detects a collision because the time it takes to send the signal from one end of the network to the
other exceeds the time needed to put the entire packet on the network. Consequently, neither device senses the
other’s transmission until the entire packet is out on the network.
Late collisions often result from:
• excessive network segment length.
• repeaters between devices.
Important: Large and small packets can be affected by late collisions. However, the transmitter cannot detect late
collisions between small packets. Consequently, a network that experiences measurable late collisions between
large packets will also lose small packets.
Excessive
Collisions
The number of frames that experience 16 consecutive collisions.
MAC Transmit
Errors
The number of frames for which transmission via a particular interface fails due to an internal MAC sublayer
transmission error.
Important: MAC transmit errors are only counted if either late collisions, excessive collisions, or carrier sense errors
are not counted.
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Chapter 11
Ethernet Media Counters
Media Counter
Definition
MAC Receive
Errors
The number of frames for which reception via a particular interface fails due to an internal MAC sublayer
transmission error.
Important: MAC receive errors are only counted if either the frame too long count, alignment errors, or FCS errors
are not counted.
Carrier Sense
Errors
Carrier sense errors fall into these categories:
• No Carrier Sense Present - The number of times the carrier is not present when a transmission starts.
• Carrier Sense Lost - The number of times the carrier is lost during a transmission.
Carrier sense errors usually indicate a problem with a cable on the Ethernet infrastructure.
Frame Too Long
The number of incoming packets that exceed the maximum Ethernet packet size.
To troubleshoot intermittent Ethernet connectivity, perform this procedure.
1. Click the Ethernet Statistics tab.
The Ethernet Statistics diagnostic web page appears.
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2. Review the values in the Media Counters table.
If
Then
Any media counters are greater than zero You need to investigate further.
These errors are counted:
· Alignment
· FCS
· Carrier Sense
A duplex mismatch exists between your EtherNet/IP module and the switch port.
To clear the duplex mismatch:
a. Configure the EtherNet/IP module and the corresponding Ethernet switch
port for a forced operation, not autonegotiation. See Configure the Module
with RSLinx Software on page 48.
b. Verify that the firmware revision of your Logix controller and switch or
converter are identical.
c. If the revisions are not identical, replace the controller, switch or converter
so that they match.
Single Collisions or Multiple Collisions
are greater than zero
Late Collisions are greater than zero
No action is required.
Important: If two stations attempt to transmit data simultaneously, the packets
collide with each other. However, collisions are not errors and do not indicate a
network problem. The number of network collisions can vary greatly due to traffic
patterns or CPU utilization. Consequently, there is no set range of acceptable
collisions for each outgoing packet. Collisions are a normal aspect of Ethernet
networking.
a. Check to see if a network segment is too long.
b. Remove repeaters from between devices.
Excessive Collisions are greater than zero Calculate your network’s typical rate of excessive collisions and decide whether
the rate of packet loss will affect your network’s performance.
Important: Excessive collisions indicate that your network has become
congested. For each collision after the sixteenth, your network drops a packet.
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MAC Transit Errors are greater than zero
No action is required.
Frame Too Long is greater than zero
Limit the size of your tags to ≤ 500 bytes. See Tag Guidelines for Produced or
Consumed Data on page 95.
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Troubleshoot an EtherNet/IP Module
Switch Considerations
Chapter 11
To help troubleshoot your EtherNet/IP network, you must use a managed
switch. Some of the important features in a managed switch include:
• Internet Group Multicast Protocol (IGMP) snooping.
• support for Virtual Local Area Networks (VLAN).
• port mirroring.
IMPORTANT
Use a switch equipped with wire-speed switching fabric. The
switch fabric is a measure of the maximum traffic that a switch
can handle without dropping a packet and without storing a
packet in memory. Wire-speed switching fabric refers to a
switch that can handle the maximum data rate of the network
on each of its ports.
Switches are typically rated in Gbps. For a 10-port switch
connected to EtherNet/IP products, the maximum data rate
needed is typically 100...200 MB/s. Therefore, a 10-port-switch
rated at least 1 GB/s should be adequate for an EtherNet/IP
application.
Internet Group Multicast Protocol
EtherNet/IP implicit (I/O) messaging mostly uses IP multicasting to
distribute I/O control data, which is consistent with the CIP
produced/consumer model. Most switches retransmit multicast packets and
broadcast packets to all ports.
IGMP snooping constrains the flooding of multicast traffic by dynamically
configuring switch ports so that multicast traffic is forwarded only to ports
associated with a particular IP multicast group. This also helps minimize the
CPU utilization rate.
Switches that support IGMP snooping learn which ports have devices that are
part of a particular multicast group and only forward the multicast packets to
the ports that are part of the multicast group.
IMPORTANT
Not all switches support the IGMP snooping querier function,
that is, snooping. Those that do not support IGMP snooping
querier require a router. For switches that do support IGMP
snooping, you can configure them to conduct the polling.
IGMP snooping cannot control unicast or broadcast traffic. To learn how to
control unicast or broadcast traffic, see Virtual Local Area Networks on
page 158.
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This example assumes that the switch does not support IGMP snooping
querier function, so a router is required.
IGMP Snooping Example
Plant Network
Router sends out IGMP polls to
determine members of a multicast group.
Switch listens to the polls and responses and
identifies members of each multicast group.
I/O
(Multicast Producer)
I/O
(Multicast Producer)
Controller
(Consumer)
I/O
(Multicast Producer)
Virtual Local Area Networks
With a managed switch, you can establish virtual local area networks (VLAN)
to segregate various kinds of network traffic and also increase security between
your networks. You could create multiple isolated networks so that the traffic
from one network does not burden the other network.
As with IGMP snooping, VLAN can control multicast traffic. However, unlike
IGMP snooping, VLAN can also control and block:
· unicast traffic.
· broadcast traffic.
Virtual Local Area Networks (VLAN)
Controller A
Workstation
Controller B
Switch
VLAN A
VLAN 2
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
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Chapter 11
Port Mirroring
Select a managed switch that supports port mirroring. With port mirroring,
you can direct frames being transmitted on one port to another port for
analysis by a traffic analyzer. Besides monitoring your Ethernet media
counters, port mirroring enables you to immediately spot anomalies in traffic
flow. A traffic analyzer can monitor the traffic on a given port and
troubleshoot a problem. Without port mirroring, you cannot see frames on
other ports. With hubs this is not an issue because all frames are transmitted
out all ports. The effective support and maintenance of Ethernet networks
often depends on reliable traffic analysis.
The benefits of port mirroring include:
• monitoring explicit messages between controllers.
• monitoring implicit or I/O traffic.
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Notes:
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Chapter
12
USB Serial Communication
Introduction
This chapter describes how to configure RSLinx software to use a USB port
and how you can and cannot flash upgrade firmware via a USB port.
Topic
Page
Configure a Module Via the USB Port
162
Flash Upgrade Firmware through a USB Port
165
Two EtherNet/IP modules support USB serial communication.
•
•
•
•
Set Up the Hardware
1756-EN2F
1756-EN2T
1756-EN2TR
1756-EN2TXT
In this example, the controller in the local chassis produces a tag that the
Logix5000 controller in the remote chassis consumes. The local controller can
also send a MSG instruction to the remote controller.
Sharing Data and Transferring Messages
A
USB connection
EtherNet/IP
B
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C
Item
Description
A
Local chassis containing a Logix5000 controller and a 1756-EN2T,
1756-EN2TR, 1756-EN2TXT, or 1756-EN2F module
B
Remote chassis containing a Logix5000 controller with an EtherNet/IP
connection
C
Remote chassis containing Logix5000 controller
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USB Serial Communication
Configure a Module Via
the USB Port
WARNING
ATTENTION
The USB port is intended for temporary local programming
purposes only and not intended for permanent connection. If
you connect or disconnect the USB cable with power applied to
this module or any device on the USB network, an electrical arc
can occur. This could cause an explosion in hazardous location
installations. A Samtec Inc. RSP-119350 USB cable is required
to maintain hazardous location certifications.
Be sure that power is removed or the area is nonhazardous
before proceeding
The module has a USB device port. To use the USB port, you must have
RSLinx software, version 2.51 or later, installed on your computer. Use a USB
cable to connect your computer to the USB port. The connection lets you
download programs to controllers and configure other devices, which are
accessible by the module, directly from your computer.
IMPORTANT
162
The USB cable is not to exceed 3.0 m (9.84 ft) and must not
contain hubs.
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USB Serial Communication
Chapter 12
Set Up a USB Driver
To configure RSLinx software to use a USB port, you need to first set up a
USB driver. To set up a USB driver, perform this procedure.
1. Connect your EtherNet/IP module to your computer by installing a
USB cable in your module’s USB port.
The RSLinx Found New Hardware Wizard dialog box appears.
2. Select Install the Software Automatically.
3. Click Next.
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These RSLinx dialog boxes appear consecutively.
4. Click Finish to set up your USB driver.
5. In RSLinx software, from the Communications pull-down menu,
choose RSWho.
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USB Serial Communication
Chapter 12
The RSLinx Workstation organizer appears.
Virtual Chassis Driver
USB Port Driver
Your 1756-EN2T module appears under two different drivers, a virtual
chassis and the USB port.
Flash Upgrade Firmware
through a USB Port
IMPORTANT
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Do not simultaneously flash upgrade the firmware for more
than one module at a time through a USB port. If you do, one or
more of the flash updates may fail in the middle of the upgrade.
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USB Serial Communication
Notes:
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Appendix
A
Status Indicators
Introduction
This appendix provides status indicator descriptions for several
communication modules, adapters, and controllers.
Topic
Page
1756-ENBT EtherNet/IP Module Status Indicators
169
1756-EN2F EtherNet/IP Module Status Indicators
171
1756-EN2T EtherNet/IP Module Status Indicators
173
1756-EN2TR EtherNet/IP Module Status Indicators
175
1756-EN2TXT ControlLogix-XT EtherNet/IP Bridge Module Status
Indicators
177
1769-L23E-QB1B and 1769-L23E-QBFC1B Controllers Status
Indicators
178
1769-L32E and 1769-L35E Controllers Status Indicators
183
1768-ENBT Module Status Indicators
185
1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, and 1783-ETAP2F EtherNet/IP Tap Status
Indicators
187
1788-ENBT EtherNet/IP Daughtercard Status Indicators
189
1734-AENT and 1734-AENTR EtherNet/IP POINT I/O Adapter Status
Indicators
192
1738-AENTR ArmorPOINT I/O 2-port EtherNet/IP Adapter Status
Indicators
195
1794-AENT EtherNet/IP FLEX I/O Adapter Status Indicators
199
20-COMM-E Module Status Indicators
201
22-COMM-E Module Status Indicators
205
Status indicators common to all modules, cards and controllers presented in
this chapter include:
• Link Status Indicator (LNK).
• Network Status Indicator (NET).
• Health Status Indicator (OK).
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Status Indicators
Other important status indicators on some products presented in this chapter
include:
•
•
•
•
•
Module Status Indicator (MS).
Utilization Percent Indicator (U%).
POINTBus Status Indicator.
System Power Indicator.
Field Power Indicator.
Status Indicators
Status Indicator
Explanation
Link Status
Shows whether or not data is being transmitted.
Network Status
Shows whether or not a network connection has been established.
Network Activity
Shows whether or not data is being transmitted.
Health Status
Shows whether power has been applied to the module.
Module Status
Shows the state of the module, such as the running of a self test,
the updating of firmware, or operating normally without a network
connection.
Important: The Module Status Display window displays scrolling
messages that identify more specifically the module condition.
Utilization Percent
Shows the percentage of available data transmission capacity
currently in use.
Important: This indicator is only available on the
1788-ENBT module.
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POINTBus
Shows whether adapter power has been applied.
System Power
Shows whether backplane power has been applied or exceeded.
Field Power
Shows whether field power has been applied.
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Status Indicators
1756-ENBT EtherNet/IP
Module Status Indicators
Appendix A
The 1756-ENBT EtherNet/IP communication module has several status
indicators.
1756-ENBT EtherNet/IP Module Status Indicators
Module Status
Display
Link Status
Indicator
Health Status Indicator
Network Status Indicator
Network (NET) Status Indicator
Indicator
condition
Status
Off
Description
The module is not powered, or does not have an IP address.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing
green
The controller has an IP address, but no CIP connections are established.
IP
Address/Mask/Gateway
Config Invalid
If no connections are configured, this is normal operation. No action is required.
If connections are configured, check connection originator for connection error code.
Green
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX OK
The module has an IP address and at least one established connection. This is normal operation
and no action is required.
Flashing red Class x Connection
Timeout
One or more of the connections in which the module is the target has timed out. Reestablish the
connection.
Red
A duplicate IP address has been detected. Make sure that the the IP address assigned to this
module is not identical to that of any other device already on the network.
Duplicate IP XX:XX of
xx:xx:xx is using the IP
address of this module
If the NET status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Verify there is chassis power.
2. Verify that the module is completely inserted into the chassis and
backplane.
3. Make sure the module has been configured.
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Status Indicators
Link Status Indicator
Indicator
condition
Status
Description
Off
Link lost
No data is being transmitted. Check to see if any cables are disconnected.
Green
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX OK
The module is ready to communicate. No action is required.
Flashing green
Data is being transmitted. No action is required.
OK Status Indicator
Indicator
condition
Status
Description
Off
The module does not have 24V DC power.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing green BOOTP - XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX or
xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx
DHCP - XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
The module is not configured. Configure the module.
Green
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX OK
The module is operating correctly. No action is required.
Flashing red
Duplicate IP XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
A device with the Ethernet MAC address of xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx is using the IP address
of this module.
Make sure that the the IP address assigned to this module is not the same as that for
any other device already on the network.
Red
Flash Update
A firmware update is in progress. No action is required.
Severe Fault
An unrecoverable fault has been detected.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing
red/green
Rev %d.%d.%d
The module is performing a self test while it is being started. No action is required.
If the OK status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Verify that there is chassis power.
2. Verify that the module is completely inserted into the chassis and
backplane.
If the OK indicator is red, take the following actions.
1. Cycle power to the module.
2. If this does not clear the fault, replace the module.
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1756-EN2F EtherNet/IP
Module Status Indicators
Appendix A
The 1756-EN2F EtherNet/IP communication module has several
status indicators.
1756-EN2F EtherNet/IP Fiber Module Status Indicators
Module Status
Display
Link Status
Indicator
Health Status Indicator
Network Status Indicator
Network (NET) Status Indicator
Indicator
condition
Status
Off
Description
The module is not powered, or does not have an IP address.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing
green
IP
Address/Mask/Gate
way Config Invalid
The controller has an IP address, but no CIP connections are established.
If no connections are configured, this is normal operation. No action is required.
If connections are configured, check connection originator for connection error code.
Green
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX OK The module has an IP address and at least one established connection. No action is required.
Flashing
red
Class x Connection
Timeout
Red
Duplicate IP XX:XX of A duplicate IP address has been detected. Make sure that the the IP address assigned to this
xx:xx:xx is using the IP module is not identical to that of any other device already on the network.
address of this
module
One or more of the connections in which the module is the target has timed out. Reestablish the
connection.
If the NET status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Verify there is chassis power.
2. Verify that the module is completely inserted into the chassis and
backplane.
3. Make sure the module has been configured with a valid IP address.
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Status Indicators
Link Status Indicator
Indicator
condition
Status
Description
Off
Link lost
No data is being transmitted. Check to see if any cables are disconnected.
Green
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX OK The module is ready to communicate. No action is required.
Flashing
green
Data transmission in progress. No action is required.
OK Status Indicator
Indicator
condition
Status
Off
Description
The module does not have 24V DC power.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing
green
BOOTP - XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX or
xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx
DHCP - XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
The module is not configured. Configure the module.
Green
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX OK
The module is operating correctly. No action is required.
Flashing
red
Red
Duplicate IP XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
A device with the Ethernet MAC address of xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx is using the IP address of
this module.
Make sure that the the IP address assigned to this module is not identical to that of any
other device already on the network.
Flash Update
A firmware update is in progress. No action is required.
Severe Fault
An unrecoverable fault has been detected.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing
red/green
Rev %d.%d.%d
The module is performing a self test while it is being started. No action is required.
If the OK status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Verify that there is chassis power.
2. Verify that the module is completely inserted into the chassis and
backplane.
If the OK status indicator is red, take the following actions.
1. Cycle power to the module.
2. If this does not clear the fault, replace the module.
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1756-EN2T EtherNet/IP
Module Status Indicators
Appendix A
The 1756-EN2T EtherNet/IP communication modules have several status
indicators.
1756-EN2T EtherNet/IP Module Status Indicators
Module Status
Display
Link Status
Indicator
Health Status Indicator
Network Status Indicator
Network (NET) Status Indicator
Indicator
Condition
Status
Off
Description
The module is not powered, or does not have an IP address.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing
green
IP
Address/Mask/Gateway
Config Invalid
The controller has an IP address, but no CIP connections are established.
If no connections are configured, this is normal operation. No action is required.
If connections are configured, check connection originator for connection error code.
Green
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX OK
The module has an IP address and at least one established connection. No action is required.
Flashing
red
Class x Connection
Timeout
One or more of the connections in which the module is the target has timed out. Reestablish the
connection.
Red
Duplicate IP XX:XX of
xx:xx:xx is using the IP
address of this module
A duplicate IP address has been detected.
Make sure that the the IP address assigned to this module is not the same as that for any other
device already on the network.
If the NET status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Verify there is chassis power.
2. Verify that the module is completely inserted into the chassis and
backplane.
3. Make sure the module has been configured.
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Status Indicators
Link Status Indicator
Indicator
Condition
Status
Description
Off
Link lost
No data is being transmitted. Check to see if any cables are disconnected.
Green
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX OK
The module is ready to communicate. No action is required.
Flashing
green
Data transmission is in progress. No action is required.
OK Status Indicator
Indicator
Condition
Status
Off
Description
The module does not have 24V DC power.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing
green
BOOTP - XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX or
xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx
DHCP - XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
The module is not configured. Configure the module.
Green
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX OK
The module is operating correctly. No action is required.
Flashing
red
Duplicate IP XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
A device with the Ethernet MAC address of xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx is using the IP address of
this module.
Make sure that the the IP address assigned to this module is not identical to that of any
other device already on the network.
Red
Flash Update
A firmware update is in progress. No action is required.
Severe Fault
An unrecoverable fault has been detected.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing
red/green
Rev %d.%d.%d
The module is performing a self test while it is being started. No action is required.
If the OK status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Verify that there is chassis power.
2. Verify that the module is completely inserted into the chassis and
backplane.
If the OK status indicator is red, take the following actions.
1. Cycle power to the module.
2. If this does not clear the fault, replace the module.
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Status Indicators
1756-EN2TR EtherNet/IP
Module Status Indicators
Appendix A
The 1756-EN2TR EtherNet/IP communication module has several
status indicators.
1756-EN2TR EtherNet/IP Module Status Indicators
Module Status
Display
Link 1 Status
Indicator
Health Status Indicator -
Link 2 Status Indicator
Link Status Indicators
Indicator
Status
Description
LNK1,
LNK2
Off
No link, or port administratively disabled, or port disabled due to rapid ring faults (LNK2).
Green
One of these conditions exists:
• A link exists on the port
• The ring network is operating normally on active ring supervisor (LNK2)
• Ring partial network fault detected on active ring supervisor (LNK2)
Flashing green
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Activity exists on the port
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Appendix A
Status Indicators
OK Status Indicator
OK
Off
Module does not have 24V DC power. Verify that there is chassis power and the module is
completely inserted into chassis and backplane.
Flashing green
Module is not configured.
Green
Module is operating correctly.
Flashing red
Module detected a recoverable fault. A configuration error may have caused the fault.
Red
Recycle power to the module. If this does not clear the fault, replace the module. Check the
module configuration and, if necessary, reconfigure the module.
Red and alphanumeric display The main firmware image needs to be updated. Follow the corrective action below.
scrolls 'Image Update
Needed'
Flashing red and green
Module performing power-up self-test. Wait for the module to complete powering up and
performing self-test.
If the OK status indicator Red and alphanumeric display scrolls
'Image Update Needed', take the following actions.
1. Update the firmware image.
2. Once the image is updated, recycle power.
3. If this does not clear the fault, replace the module.
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Status Indicators
1756-EN2TXT
ControlLogix-XT
EtherNet/IP Bridge Module
Status Indicators
Appendix A
The 1756-EN2TXT EtherNet/IP communication module has several
status indicators.
1756-EN2TXT EtherNet/IP Module Status Indicators
Module Status
Display
Link 1 Status
Indicator
Health Status Indicator -
Link 2 Status Indicator
NET Status Indicators
Indicator
Status
Description
Link
Off
The module is not ready to communicate. Verify that the module is on.
Green
The module is ready to communicate.
Flashing green
The module is communicating over the network.
NET Status Indicators
Indicator
Status
Description
NET
Off
The module is not powered. Verify that there is chassis power and that the module is
completely inserted into the chassis and backplane.
The module does not have a valid IP address. Make sure the module has been configured
with a valid IP address.
Green
The module has an IP address and at least one established connection.
Flashing green
The module has an IP address, but has no established connections.
Red
The module is attempting to use an IP address already in use on the network. Assign a
unique IP address to the module.
Flashing red
One or more of the connections in which the module is the target has timed out.
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Status Indicators
OK Status Indicators
Indicator
Status
Description
OK
Off
Verify that the module has 24V DC chassis power and that the module is completely
inserted into chassis and backplane.
Green
The module is operating correctly.
Flashing green
The module is not configured.
Red
The module detected an unrecoverable fault. Cycle power to the module. If this does not
clear the fault, replace the module.
Flashing red
The module detected a recoverable fault. A configuration error may have caused the fault.
Check the module configuration. If necessary, reconfigure the module.
Red and alphanumeric display Update the firmware image. Once the image is updated, cycle power. If this does not clear
the fault, replace the module.
scrolls 'Image Update
Needed'
Flashing red and green
The module is performing a power-up self-test.
1769-L23E-QB1B and
1769-L23E-QBFC1B
Controllers Status
Indicators
The 1769-L23E-Q1B and 1769-L23E-QBFC1B CompactLogix controllers
have several status indicators.
TIP
When power is first applied to the controller, the OK, NS, MS,
and LNK status indicators display a complex sequence of
varying red and green states. This sequence indicates the
power-up self test and takes approximately 1…2 minutes for
the packaged controller to complete.
1769-L2x CompactLogix Controller Status Indicators
I/O Status Indicators
Packaged Controller
Status Indicator
DC Inputs
RUN
FORCE
BATT
DC Outputs
Power Supply Status
Analog I/O HSC
CompactLogix L23E
I/O
OK
DCH 0
CompactLogix L23E
NS
IP
LNK
Network and Link
Status Indicator
MS
Module Status Indicator
CH 1
RS-232 Serial Port
Status Indicators
CH 0
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Status Indicators
Appendix A
Packaged Controller Status Indicators
Indicator
Status
Description
RUN
Off
The packaged controller is in program or test mode.
Steady green
The packaged controller is in run mode.
Off
Either:
FORCE
• No tags contain I/O force values.
• I/O forces are inactive (disabled).
Steady amber
Either:
• I/O forces are active (enabled).
• I/O forces values may or may not exist.
BATT
Flashing amber
One or more input or output addresses have been forced to an On or Off
condition, but the forces have not been enabled.
Off
The battery supports memory.
Steady red
The battery is either:
• not installed.
• 95% dischared and should be replaced.
I/O
Off
Either:
• There are no devices in the I/O configuration of the packaged controller.
• The packaged controller does not contain a project.
Steady green
The packaged controller is communicating with all the devices in its I/O
configuration.
Flashing green
One or more devices in the I/O configuration of the packaged controller are not
responding.
Flashing red
Either:
• The packaged controller is not communicating with any devices.
• The packaged controller is faulted.
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Status Indicators
Packaged Controller Status Indicators
Indicator
Status
Description
OK
Off
No power is applied.
Flashing red
One of the following conditions exists:
• The packaged controller requires a firmware update.
• A major recoverable fault occurred on the packaged controller. To clear the
fault, perform this procedure.
• Turn the packaged controller keyswitch from PROG to RUN to PROG.
• Go online with RSLogix 5000 software.
• A nonrecoverable major fault occurred on the packaged controller. In this
case, the packaged controller:
a. OK indicator initially displays steady red.
b. Resets, clearing the project from memory.
c. Sets the OK indicator to flashing red.
d. Produces a major recoverable fault.
e. Generates a fault code in the RSLogix 5000 project.
The fault code displayed in RSLogix 5000 software and the subsequent fault
recovery method depends upon your system.
Steady red
Upon power-up, the OK indicator is steadily red for a few moments. This is
normal behavior and is not a fault.
If the OK indicator is steadily red for more than a few moments or changes to
steadily red while in use, then a nonrecoverable major fault has occurred and
project memory has been cleared.
To recover from a major fault, cycle power to the packaged controller,
re-download the project, and put the packaged controller in Run mode.
If the OK indicator remains steadily red, contact your Rockwell Automation
representative or local distributor.
180
Steady green
The packaged controller is OK.
Flashing green
The packaged controller is storing or loading a project to or from nonvolatile
memory.
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Status Indicators
Appendix A
Packaged Controller Status Indicators
Indicator
Status
Description
MS
Off
The packaged controller does not have power. Check the controller power
supply.
Flashing green
The port is in standby mode; it does not have an IP address and is operating in
BOOTP mode. Verify that the BOOTP server is running.
Steady green
The port is operating correctly. No action is required.
Steady red
The packaged controller is holding the port in reset or the packaged controller
has faulted. Clear the fault. If the fault will not clear, replace the packaged
controller.
The port is performing its power-up self test. No action is required.
A non-recoverable fault has occurred. Cycle power to the controller. If the fault
will not clear, replace the packaged controller.
NET
Flashing red
The port firmware is being uploaded. No action is required.
Off
The port is not initialized; it does not have an IP address and is operating in
BOOTP mode. Verify that the BOOTP server is running.
Flashing green
The port has an IP address, but no CIP connections are established.
If no connections are configured, no action is required.
If connections are configured, check connection originator for connection error
code.
LNK
Steady green
The port has an IP address and CIP connections (Class 1 or Class 3) are
established. No action is required.
Steady red
Duplicate IP adddress has been detected. Verify that all IP addresses are
unique.
Flashing red/green
The port is performing its power-up self test. No action is required.
Off
The port is not connected to a powered Ethernet device. Therefore, the
controller cannot communicate over an Ethernet network.
Verify that all Ethernet cables are connected.
Verify that Ethernet switch is powered.
Flashing green
The port is performing its power-up self test. No action required.
The port is communicating on Ethernet. No action required.
CH0
CH1
Steady green
The port is connected to a powered Ethernet device. Therefore, the controller
can communicate over an Ethernet network. No action required.
Off
Channel 0 configuration differs from the default serial configuration.
Steady green
Channel 0 has the default serial configuration.
Off
No RS-232 activity.
Flashing green
RS-232 activity.
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Appendix A
Status Indicators
I/O Status Indicators
Indicator
Description
Digital Inputs
There is one status indicator for each digital input point of the
CompactLogix packaged controller. When an input is ON, the
corresponding input light is on (amber).
Digital Outputs
There is one status indicator for each digital output point of the
CompactLogix packaged controller. When an output is ON, the
corresponding output light is on (amber).
Analog I/O
The analog I/O have one status indicator - the OK status indicator.
If the indicator is green, the analog I/O have power, have passed
internal diagnostics, and are communicating properly. If analog
I/O OK indicator is off, a fault is present.
High Speed Counter
The high-speed counters have 12 status indicators. Use this table
to interpret the HSC status indicators.
I/O Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
0, 1, 2, and 3
Amber
The corresponding output is ON.
A0, A1, B0, B1, Z0
and Z1
Amber
The corresponding input is ON.
FUSE
Red
An overcurrent condition is present.
OK
Off
No power to the High Speed Counter.
Flashing red, brief
The HSC is testing itself; this usually occurs at start-up.
Steady green
The HSC is operating normally.
Flashing green
The HSC is in Run mode.
Steady red
A fault has occurrred.
Flashing red, continuous
An HSC configuration error exists.
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Status Indicators
1769-L32E and 1769-L35E
Controllers Status
Indicators
Appendix A
The 1769-L32E and 1769-L35E CompactLogix controllers have several status
indicators.
1769-L3xx CompactLogix Controller Status Indicators
Module Status (MS) Indicator
Network Status (NS) Indicator
Health Status Indicator (LNK)
Status Indicators
Indicator
Status
Description
MS
Off
The controller has no power. Check the controller power supply.
Flashing green
The controller does not have an IP address and is operating in BOOTP mode.
Verify that the BOOTP server is running.
Green
The controller is operating correctly. No action is required.
Red
The controller is holding the port in reset or the controller is faulted. Follow the
corrective action below.
The controller is performing a self test while it is being started. No action is
required.
An unrecoverable fault has occurred. Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing red
A duplicate IP address has been detected. Make sure that the the IP address
assigned to this module is not identical to that of any other device already on
the network.
The controller firmware is being updated. No action is required.
NS
Off
The controller does not have an IP address and is operating in BOOTP mode.
Verify that the BOOTP server is running.
Flashing green
The controller has an IP address, but no CIP connections are established.
Follow the corrective action below.
Green
The controller has an IP address and CIP connections (Class 1 or Class 3) are
established. No action is required.
Red
A duplicate IP address has been detected. Make sure that the IP address
assigned to this module is not the same as that for any other device already on
the network.
Flashing red/green
The controller is performing a self test while it is being started. No action is
required.
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Appendix A
Status Indicators
Status Indicators
Indicator
Status
Description
LNK
Off
The port is not connected to a powered Ethernet device. The controller cannot
communicate over an Ethernet network. Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing green
The controller is performing a self test while it is being started. No action is
required.
The controller is communicating on an Ethernet network. No action is required.
Green
The port is connected to a powered Ethernet device. The controller can
communicate over an Ethernet network. No action is required.
If the MS status indicator is red, take the following actions.
1. Clear the controller fault or cycle power to the controller.
2. If the fault will not clear, replace the controller.
If the NS status indicator is flashing green, take the following actions.
1. If no connections are configured, this is normal, and no action is
required.
2. If connections are configured, check connection originator for
connection error code.
If the LNK status indicator is green, take the following actions.
1. Verify that all Ethernet cables are connected.
2. Verify that Ethernet switch is powered.
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Status Indicators
1768-ENBT Module
Status Indicators
Appendix A
The 1768-ENBT CompactLogix EtherNet/IP communication module has
several status indicators.
1768-ENBT EtherNet/IP Module Status Indicators
Module Status
Display
LINK NET OK
Link Status
Indicator
LINK NET OK
Health Status Indicator
Network Status Indicator
Network (NET) Status Indicator
Indicator
Condition
Status
Description
Off
The module is not powered, or does not have an IP address.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing
green
Controller Comm Problem
The controller has an IP address, but no CIP connections are established.
If no connections are configured, this is normal operation. No action is
required.
If connections are configured, check the connection originator for a connection
error code.
Green
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX OK
The module has an IP address and at least one established connection. No
action is required.
Flashing red Class x Connection Timeout
One or more of the connections in which the module is the target has timed
out. Reestablish the connection.
Red
A duplicate IP address has been detected.
Duplicate IP XX:XX of xx:xx:xx is using the
IP address of this module
Make sure that the the IP address assigned to this module is not identical to
that of any other device already on the network.
If the NET status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Verify there is chassis power.
2. Verify that the module is completely inserted into the chassis and
backplane.
3. Make sure the module has been configured.
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Appendix A
Status Indicators
Link Status Indicator
Indicator
Condition
Status
Description
Off
Link lost
No data is being transmitted. Check to see if any cables are disconnected.
Green
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX OK
The module is ready to communicate. No action is required.
Flashing
green
Data is being transmitted. The module is communicating over the network. No
action is required.
OK Status Indicator
Indicator
Condition
Status
Description
Off
The module does not have 5V DC power.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing
Green
The module is not configured. Configure the module
BOOTP - XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX or
xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx
DHCP - XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
Green
XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX OK
The module is operating correctly. No action is required.
Flashing red Duplicate IP XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX
A device with the Ethernet MAC address of xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx is using the IP
address of this module.
Make sure that the the IP address assigned to this module is not identical to
that of any other device already on the network.
Flash Update
Flashing Red Rev %d.%d.%d
and Green
A firmware update is in progress. No action is required.
The module is performing a self test while it is being started. No action is
required.
If the OK status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Verify there is power.
2. Verify that the module is properly installed.
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Status Indicators
1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F,
and 1783-ETAP2F
EtherNet/IP Tap Status
Indicators
Appendix A
The 1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, and 1783-ETAP2F EtherNet/IP taps have
several status indicators.
1783-ETAP EtherNet/IP Tap Status Indicators
OK Status
Indicator
Link 1 & 2
Status
Indicators
Device Port
Status
Indicators
OK Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
OK
Off
Tap is not powered
Flashing green
Tap is not configured
Solid green
Tap is powered, configured, and operating correctly
Flashing red
One of the following:
• Recoverable fault detected, such as duplicate IP address
• Flash update in progress is detected
Solid red
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Unrecoverable fault detected
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Appendix A
Status Indicators
LINK 1, 2, DEVICE Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
LINK 1, 2,
DEVICE
Off
One of the following conditions exists:
• No link
• Port administratively disabled
• Port disabled because of rapid-ring fault condition, and this tap is the active ring
supervisor (LINK 2)
• Ring network has encountered a rare, partial network fault, and this tap is the
active supervisor (LINK 2)
Solid green
One of these conditions exists:
• A 100 Mbps (full or half duplex) link exists(1) and there is no activity.
• Ring network is operating normally, and this tap is the active supervisor (LINK 2)
Flashing green
A 100 Mbps link exists and there is activity
Solid yellow
One of the following conditions exists:
• A 10 Mbps (full or half duplex) link exists and there is no activity.
• Ring network is operating normally, and this tap is the active supervisor (LINK 2)
Flashing yellow
(1)
188
A 10 Mbps link exists and there is activity
All fiber-optic interfaces will be 100 Mbps, full duplex.
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Status Indicators
1788-ENBT EtherNet/IP
Daughtercard Status
Indicators
Appendix A
The 1788-ENBT EtherNet/IP communication daughtercard has several status
indicators.
IMPORTANT
The 1788-ENBT card does not display any scrolling messages.
1788-ENBT EtherNet/IP Daughtercard Status Indicators
Network Status
Indicator
Module Status
Indicator
Link Status
Indicator
M
S
N
S
LNK U%
Utilization Percent Indicator
Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
MS
Off
The daughtercard has no power.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing green
The daughtercard does not have an IP address and is operating in BOOTP
mode. Verify that the BOOTP server is running.
Green
The daughtercard is operating correctly. No action required.
Red
The host is holding the daughtercard in reset or the host is faulted.
Follow the corrective action below.
The daughtercard is performing a self test while it is being started. No action
is required.
An unrecoverable fault has occurred.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing red
A duplicate IP address has been detected. Make sure that the the IP address
assigned to this module is not identical to that of any other device already on
the network.
The daughtercard firmware is being updated. No action is required.
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Appendix A
Status Indicators
Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
NS
Off
The daughtercard does not have an IP address and is operating in BOOTP
mode. Verify that the BOOTP server is running.
Flashing green
The daughtercard has an IP address, but no CIP connections are established.
Follow the corrective action below.
Green
The daughtercard has an IP address and CIP connections (Class 1 or Class 3)
are established. No action is required.
Red
A duplicate IP address has been detected. Make sure that the IP address
assigned to this module is not the same as that for any other device already on
the network.
Off
The daughtercard is not connected to a powered Ethernet module. The
daughtercard cannot communicate on an Ethernet network.
LNK
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing green
The daughtercard is performing a self test while it is being started. No action
is required.
The daughtercard is communicating on an Ethernet network. No action is
required.
U%
Green
The daughtercard is connected to a powered Ethernet module. The
daughtercard can communicate on an Ethernet network. No action is required.
Off
The I/O packet rate to/from this daughtercard is less than 80% of the available
packet rate, and less than 80% of the 32 available I/O connections are
currently in use. No action is required.
Flashing green
The I/O packet rate to/from this daughtercard is at least 80% of the available
packet rate (4000 packets/s). That is, the I/O packet rate is at least 3200
packets/s. No action is required.
At least 80% of the 32 available connections are currently in use. That is, from
26 to 31 I/O connections are in use. No action is required.
190
Green
All 32 of the daughtercard’s I/O connections are currently in use. No action is
required.
Flashing red/green
The daughtercard is performing a self test while it is being started. No action
is required.
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Status Indicators
Appendix A
If the MS indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Check the host power supply.
2. Verify that the daughtercard is firmly seated in the host’s slot.
3. Replace daughtercard or host.
If the MS indicator is red and the host is holding the
daughtercard in reset or the host is faulted, take the following
actions.
1. Verify that the daughtercard is firmly seated in the host’s slot.
2. Clear the host’s fault.
3. Replace daughtercard or host.
If the MS indicator is red and an unrecoverable fault has
occurred, take the following actions.
1. Cycle power to the host.
2. Replace the daughtercard or host.
If the NS status indicator is flashing green, take the following actions.
1. If no connections are configured, this is normal operation.
No action is required.
2. If connections are configured, check connection originator for
connection error code.
If the LNK status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Verify that all Ethernet cables are connected.
2. Verify that the Ethernet switch is powered.
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Appendix A
Status Indicators
1734-AENT and 1734-AENTR
EtherNet/IP POINT I/O
Adapter Status Indicators
The 1734-AENT and 1734-AENTR EtherNet/IP POINT I/O adapters have
several status indicators.
IMPORTANT
The 1734-AENT and 1734-AENTR adapters do not display any
scrolling messages.
1734-AENT EtherNet/IP POINT I/O Adapter Status Indicators
Module Status Indicator
Network Activity Status
Network Status Indicator
System Power
Status Indicator
POINTBus Status Indicator
Field Power Status Indicator
Module Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
Module
Status
Off
No power is being applied to device. Apply power to the device.
Flashing Red/Green
Status indicator cycle power test (module self-test) is being conducted. No
action is required.
Solid Green
The device is operating normally. No action is required.
Flashing Red
Firmware (NVS) is being updated or the address switches have changed.
Follow the corrective action below.
Network
Activity
Status
192
Solid Red
Self-test failure is present (checksum failure, or ramtest failure at cycle
power); firmware fatal error is present. Replace the adapter.
Off
No link exists. Verify network cabling, and correct, if necessary.
Flashing Green/Off
I/O is being transmitted or received. No action is required.
Steady Green
A link exists. No action is required.
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Status Indicators
Appendix A
Module Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
Network
Status
Off
The module has no IP address.
POINTBus
Status
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing Green
The module has an IP address, but no CIP connections. No action is required.
Solid Green
The module is online and has an IP address and CIP connections. No action is
required.
Flashing Red
One or more CIP connections have timed out. Check for I/O module failure and
controller operation, and correct, if necessary.
Solid Red
A duplicate IP address has been detected. Verify IP address setting and correct,
if necessary.
Flashing Red/Green
The module is performing a normal self-test, which only occurs during the
cycle-power test. No action is required.
Off
Power has not been applied to the device.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing Red/Green
Flashing Red
Status indicator cycle-power test is being performed. No action is required.
• When power is cycled, the number of expected modules does not equal the
number of modules present.
• A module is missing.
• A node fault (I/O connection timeout) occurred.
Follow the corrective action below.
System
Power
Status
Solid Red
The adapter is bus off. Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing Green
A firmware (NVS) update is in progress. No action is required.
Solid Green
An adapter is online with connections established. No action is required.
Off
Field power is off or a DC-DC converter problem exists.
Follow the corrective action below.
Green
Field Power Off
Status
Green
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DC-DC converter is active (5V). No action is required.
Field power is off. Apply field power.
24V power is present. No action is required.
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Appendix A
Status Indicators
If the Module status indicator is flashing red, take the following
actions.
1. Complete firmware update.
2. Verify address switches.
If the Network status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Apply power to device.
2. Verify, and correct, IP address, if necessary.
If the POINTBus status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Apply power to device
2. Check module status indicator.
If the POINTBus status indicator is flashing red, take the following
actions.
1. Configure the chassis size.
2. Check for missing module and reinstall, if necessary.
3. Check for I/O module failure and correct, if necessary.
If the POINTBus status indicator is solid red, take the following
actions.
1. Cycle power to device.
2. If condition persists, replace device.
If the System Power status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Verify that power is on, and apply power if needed.
2. Verify backplane power has not been exceeded, and correct.
3. Replace 1734-AENT module.
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Status Indicators
1738-AENTR ArmorPOINT
I/O 2-port EtherNet/IP
Adapter Status Indicators
Appendix A
The 1738-AENTR ArmorPOINT I/O 2-port EtherNet/IP adapter has
several status indicators.
IMPORTANT
The 1738-AENTR adapter does not display scrolling messages.
1738-AENTR ArmorPOINT I/O 2-port EtherNet/IP Adapter Status Indicators
Link 1 Activity/Status Indicator
Link 2 Activity/Status Indicator
Adapter Status Indicator
Network Activity Indicator
Network Status Indicator
POINTBus Status Indicator
System Power Indicator
Adapter Power Indicator
Link 1 or Link 2 Activity/Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
Link 1 or
Link 2
Activity
/Status
Off
No link established. Verify network cabling and correct, if necessary.
Green
Link established at 100 Mbps. No action is required.
Flashing green
Transmit or receive activity present at 100 Mbps. No action is required.
Yellow
Link established at 10 Mbps. No action is required.
Flashing yellow
Transmit or receive activity present at 10 Mbps. No action is required.
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Appendix A
Status Indicators
Adapter Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
Adapter
Status
Off
No power applied to the adapter. Apply power to the adapter.
Green
Adapter is operating properly. No action required.
Flashing red/green
The adapter is in self-test mode. No action required.
Flashing red
A recoverable fault has been detected due to the one of the following
conditions:
• A firmware (NVS) update is in process. Allow the process to complete.
• The address switches have been changed. Verify the address switches are
correct.
Red
An unrecoverable fault has been detected due to one of the following
conditions:
• A self-test failure
• A firmware fatal error
In both cases, you must replace the adapter.
Network Activity Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
Network
Activity
Off
No link established with Port 1 or Port 2. Verify network cabling and, if
necessary, correct.
Green
One of the following conditions has been detected:
• Link established with Port 1 and/or Port 2 at 100 Mbps
• Link established with Port 1 and Port 2. One link is at 100 Mbps and one at
10 Mbps.
In either case, no action is required.
Flashing green
One of the following conditions has been detected:
• Transmit or receive activity present on Port 1 and/or Port 2 at 100 Mbps.
• Transmit or receive activity present on Port 1 and/or Port 2. One port at 100
Mbps and one port at 10 Mbps.
In either case, no action is required.
196
Yellow
Link established with Port 1 and/or Port 2 at 10 Mbps. No action is required.
Flashing yellow
Transmit or receive activity present on Port 1 and/or Port at 10 Mbps. No action
is required.
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Status Indicators
Appendix A
Network Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
Network
Status
Off
Adapter is not initialized and does not have an IP address. Apply power to the
device, verify the IP address and set/correct, if necessary.
Green
Adapter is online, has an IP address, and CIP connections are established. No
action is required.
Flashing green
Adapter has an IP address, but no CIP connections are established. Establish
CIP connections, if necessary. Otherwise, no action is required.
Flashing red/green
Adapter is in self-test. No action is required.
Flashing red
One or more CIP connections has timed out. Check for I/O module failure and
controller operation and correct if necessary.
Red
Duplicate IP address is detected. Verify the IP address setting and correct as
needed.
POINTBus Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
POINTBus
Status
Off
Adapter is not online due to one of the following conditions:
• Adapter is not powered. Check the Adapter Status indicator.
• Adapter has not completed dup_MAC_id test. Apply power to the device,
wait for dup_MAC_id to complete and correct, if necessary.
Green
Adapter is online and has connections established. No action is required.
Flashing green
Adapter is online but has not connection established. A firmware (NVS) update
is in progress. Wait for the firmware update to complete.
Flashing red/green
Status indicator cycle power test present. No action is required.
Flashing red
One of the following conditions has been detected:
• Adapter has detected a network access error and is in communication
faulted state.
• Adapter has received and accepted an Identify Communication Faulted
Request.
In either case, verify that the adapter is properly installed and reinstall, if
necessary.
Red
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An unrecoverable fault has occurred. Follow the corrective action below.
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Appendix A
Status Indicators
If the POINTBus status indicator is red, take the following actions.
1. Make sure an I/O module is not using a MAC ID = 0.
2. Make sure all backplane modules are communicating at the proper baud
rate.
3. Cycle power to the device.
4. If the condition persists, replace the adapter.
System Power Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
System
Power
Off
Adapter power is off or DC-DC converter problem is present. Follow the
corrective action below.
Green
System power is on; DC-DC converter output is active (5V). No action is
required.
If the System Power status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Verify power is on.
2. Apply power, if necessary.
3. Verify backplane power is not exceeded and correct, if necessary.
4. Replace the device.
Adapter Power Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
Adapter
Power
Off
Adapter is not active because power is off. Apply adapter power.
Green
24V DC input power is present. No action is required.
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Status Indicators
1794-AENT EtherNet/IP
FLEX I/O Adapter Status
Indicators
Appendix A
The 1794-AENT EtherNet/IP FLEX I/O adapter has several status
indicators.
IMPORTANT
The 1794-AENT adapter does not display any scrolling
messages.
1794-AENT EtherNet/IP Flex I/O Adapter Status Indicators
Module Status
Indicator
Module Status
Network Status
Network Status
Indicator
Link Status
Link Status Indicator
Module Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
Module
Status
Off
The module does not have 24V DC power. Make sure power is being supplied
to the module.
Flashing green
The module is not configured. Configure the module.
Green
The module is operating correctly. No action is required.
Flashing red
A recoverable fault has been detected. Verify that the module is configured
correctly.
Red
An unrecoverable fault has been detected.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing red/green
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The module is performing a self test while the module is being started. No
action is required.
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Status Indicators
Module Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
Network
Status
Off
Power has not been applied to the module, or the module does not have an IP
address.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing green
The module has obtained an IP address, but has no established connections.
If no connections are configured, this is normal operation. No action is
required.
If connections are configured, check connection originator for connection error
code.
Link Status
Green
The module has an IP address and at least one established connection. No
action is required.
Flashing red
One or more of the connections in which the module is the target has timed
out. Reestablish the connection.
Flashing red/green
The module is performing a self test while it is being started. No action is
required.
Red
Adapter has detected that its IP address is already in use. Configure the
adapter with a unique IP address.
Off
No data is being transmitted. No action is required.
Flashing green
The module is ready to communicate. No action is required.
Green
Data is being transmitted. No action is required.
If the Module status indicator is red, take the following actions.
1. Recycle power to the module.
2. If this does not clear the fault, replace the module.
If the Network status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Verify there is power.
2. Verify that the module is correctly wired to the power supply.
3. Make sure the module is configured.
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20-COMM-E Module
Status Indicators
Appendix A
The 20-COMM-E module has four status indicators.
20-COMM-E Status Indicators
PORT - DPI Connection Status
MOD - Adapter Status
NET A - EtherNet/IP Connection Status
NET B - EtherNet/IP Transmit Status
Module Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
PORT
Off
The adapter is not powered or is not properly connected to the drive.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing red
The adapter is not receiving a ping message from the drive.
Follow the corrective action below.
Solid Red
The drive has refused an I/O connection from the adapter. Another DPI
peripheral is using the same DPI port as the adapter.
Another DPI peripheral is using the same DPI port as the adapter.
Follow the corrective action below.
Orange
The adapter is connected to a product that does not support Allen-Bradley DPI
communication.
Connect the adapter to a product that supports Allen-Bradley DPI
communication (for example, a PowerFlex 7-Class drive).
Flashing Green
The adapter is establishing an I/O connection to the drive. No action is
required.
Solid Green
The adapter is properly connected and is communicating with the drive. No
action is required.
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Status Indicators
Module Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
MOD
Off
The adapter is not powered or is not properly connected to the drive. Securely
connect the adapter to the drive using the Internal Interface (ribbon) cable.
Apply power to the drive (or adapter if mounted in a DPI External Comms Kit).
Flashing Red
The adapter has failed the firmware test or the adapter is being flash
upgraded. Follow the corrective action below.
Solid Red
The adapter has failed the hardware test. Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing Green
The adapter is operational, but is not transferring I/O data. Follow the
corrective action below.
Solid Green
The adapter is operational and transferring I/O data. No action is required.
Off
One of the following:
NET A
• The adapter and/or network is not powered. In this case, securely connect
the adapter to the drive using the Internal Interface (ribbon) cable and to the
network using an Ethernet cable.
• The adapter is not properly connected to the network. In this case, correctly
connect the Ethernet cable to the Ethernet connector.
• The adapter needs an IP address. In this case, set a unique IP address using
a BOOTP server or by disabling BOOTP and using adapter parameters.
Additionally, make sure you have properly applied power to the drive (or
adapter, if mounted in a DPI External Comms kit) and the network.
NET B
Solid Red
The adapter failed the duplicate IP address detection test. Configure the
adapter to use a unique IP address and cycle power.
Flashing Red
An EtherNet/IP connection has timed out. Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing Red/Green
The adapter is performing a self-test. No action is required.
Flashing Green
The adapter is properly connected but is not communicating with any devices
on the network. Follow the corrective action below.
Solid Green
The adapter is properly connected and communicating on the network. No
action is required.
Off
The adapter is not powered or is nottransmitting on the network. If the adapter
is not idle, follow the corrective action below.
Flashing Green
The adapter is transmitting on the network. No action is required.
If the PORT status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Securely connect the adapter to the drive using the Internal Interface
(ribbon) cable.
2. Apply power to the drive (or adapter if mounted in a DPI External
Comms Kit).
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Appendix A
If the PORT status indicator is flashing red, take the following actions.
1. Verify that cables are securely connected and not damaged; replace
cables if necessary.
2. Cycle power to the drive (or adapter, if mounted in a DPI External
Comms kit).
If the PORT status indicator is solid red, take any of the following
actions.
IMPORTANT
Cycle power to the drive (or adapter if mounted in a DPI
External Comms Kit) after making any of the following
corrections.
• Verify that all DPI cables on the drive are securely connected and not
damaged. Replace cables if necessary.
• Verify that the DPI drive supports Datalinks.
• Configure the adapter to use a Datalink that is not already being used by
another peripheral.
If the MOD status indicator is flashing red, take the following actions.
1. Clear faults in the adapter.
2. Cycle power to the drive (or adapter if mounted in a DPI External
Comms Kit).
If cycling power does not correct the problem, the adapter parameter
settings may have been corrupted.
3. Reset defaults and reconfigure the adapter.
4. If resetting defaults does not correct the problem, flash the adapter with
the latest firmware release.
If the MOD status indicator is solid red, take the following actions.
1. Cycle power to the drive (or adapter if mounted in a DPI External
Comms Kit).
2. Replace the adapter.
If the MOD status indicator is flashing green, take the following
actions.
1. Place the scanner in RUN mode.
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Status Indicators
2. Program the controller to recognize and transmit I/O to the adapter.
3. Configure the adapter for the program in the controller.
4. Normal behavior if no DPI I/O is enabled.
If the NET A status indicator is flashing red, take the following actions.
1. Place the scanner in RUN mode, or apply power to the peer device that
will send I/O.
2. Check the amount of traffic on the network.
If the NET A status indicator is flashing green, take the following
actions.
1. Place the controller in RUN mode, or apply power to the peer device
that will send I/O.
2. Program the controller or peer device to recognize and transmit I/O or
make a messaging connection to the adapter.
3. Configure the adapter for the program in the controller or the I/O from
the peer device.
If the NET B status indicator is off and the NET A indicator is off,
take the following actions.
1. Securely connect the adapter to the drive using the Internal Interface
(ribbon) cable and to the network using an Ethernet cable.
2. Correctly connect the Ethernet cable to the Ethernet connector.
3. Set a unique IP address using a BOOTP server or by disabling BOOTP
and using adapter parameters.
If the NET B status indicator is off and the NET A indicator is
solid red, configure the adapter to use a unique IP address and cycle power.
If the NET B status indicator is off and the NET A indicator is
flashing red/green or solid red, take the following actions.
1. Check the IP address in the adapter and scanner, and verify that the
controller can communicate with the adapter.
2. Ping the adapter.
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22-COMM-E Module
Status Indicators
Appendix A
The 22-COMM-E module has four status indicators.
22-COMM-E Status Indicators
PORT - DPI Connection Status
MOD - Adapter Status
NET A - EtherNet/IP Connection Status
NET B - EtherNet/IP Transmit Status
Module Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
PORT
Off
The adapter is not powered or is not properly connected to the drive.
Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing Red
In Single mode, the adapter is not receiving communication from the drive.
In Multi-Drive mode, the adapter is not receiving communication from a drive,
or a drive is not an Allen-Bradley drive.
Follow the corrective action below.
MOD
Flashing Green
The adapter is establishing communication with the drive. No action required.
This status indicator will turn solid green or flashing red.
Solid Green
The adapter is properly connected and is communicating with the drive. No
action required.
Orange
In Single mode, the drive is not an Allen-Bradley drive. Use an Allen-Bradley
PowerFlex 40 drive.
Off
The adapter is not powered or is not properly connected to the drive. Follow the
corrective action below.
Flashing Red
The adapter has failed the firmware test. Follow the corrective action below.
Solid Red
The adapter has failed the hardware test. Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing Green
The adapter is operational, but is not transferring I/O data. Follow the
corrective action below.
Solid Green
The adapter is operational and transferring I/O data. Follow the corrective
action below. No action is required.
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Appendix A
Status Indicators
Module Status Indicator
Indicator
Status
Description
NET A
Off
One of the following:
• The adapter and/or network is not powered.
• The adapter is not properly connected to the network.
• The adapter needs an IP address.
Follow the corrective action below.
NET B
Solid Red
The adapter failed the duplicate IP address detection test. Configure the
adapter to use a unique IP address and cycle power.
Flashing Red
An EtherNet/IP connection has timed out. Follow the corrective action below.
Flashing Green
The adapter is properly connected but is not communicating with any devices
on the network.
Solid Green
The adapter is properly connected and communicating on the network. No
action is required.
Off
If the adapter is idle, normal condition. No action is required.
If the adapter is not idle, then the adapter is not powered or is not transmitting
on the network. In this case, follow the corrective action below.
Flashing Green
The adapter is transmitting on the network. No action is required.
If the PORT status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Securely connect the adapter to the drive using the Internal Interface
(ribbon) cable.
2. Apply power to the drive.
If the PORT status indicator is flashing red, take the following actions.
1. Verify the setting for Parameter 22 - [DSI I/O Cfg].
2. Verify that cables are securely connected and not damaged; replace
cables if necessary.
3. Cycle power to the drive.
4. Use Allen-Bradley PowerFlex 4/40 drives.
If the MOD status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Securely connect the adapter to the drive using the Internal Interface
(ribbon) cable.
2. Apply power to the drive.
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Appendix A
If the MOD status indicator is flashing red, take the following actions.
1. Cycle power to the drive.
2. If cycling power does not correct the problem, the adapter parameter
settings may have been corrupted. Reset defaults and reconfigure the
adapter.
3. If resetting defaults does not correct the problem, flash the adapter with
the latest firmware release.
If the MOD status indicator is solid red, take the following actions.
1. Cycle power to the drive.
2. Replace the adapter.
If the MOD status indicator is flashing green, take the following
actions.
1. Place the scanner in RUN mode.
2. Program the controller to recognize and transmit I/O to the adapter.
3. Configure the adapter for the program in the controller.
4. Normal behavior if no DPI I/O is enabled.
If the NET A status indicator is off, take the following actions.
1. Securely connect the adapter to the drive using the Internal Interface
(ribbon) cable and to the network using an Ethernet cable.
2. Correctly connect the Ethernet cable to the Ethernet connector.
3. Set a unique IP address using a BOOTP server or by disabling BOOTP
and using adapter parameters.
4. Apply power to the drive (or adapter, if mounted in a DPI External
Comms kit) and network.
If the NET A status indicator is flashing red, take the following actions.
1. Place the scanner in RUN mode.
2. Check the amount of traffic on the network.
If the NET A status indicator is flashing green, take the following actions.
1. Place the controller in RUN mode.
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Status Indicators
2. Program the controller or peer device to recognize and transmit I/O or
make a messaging connection to the adapter.
3. Configure the adapter for the program in the controller or the I/O from
the peer device.
If the NET B status indicator is off and the NET A indicator is off,
take the following actions.
1. Securely connect the adapter to the drive using the Internal Interface
(ribbon) cable and to the network using an Ethernet cable.
2. Correctly connect the Ethernet cable to the Ethernet connector.
3. Set a unique IP address using a BOOTP server or by disabling BOOTP
and using adapter parameters.
If the NET B status indicator is off and the NET A indicator is
solid red, take the following actions.
1. Configure the adapter to use a unique IP address.
2. Cycle power to the adapter.
If the NET B status indicator is off and the NET A indicator is
flashing red/green or red, take the following actions.
1. Check the IP address in the adapter and scanner, and verify that the
controller can communicate with the adapter.
2. Ping the adapter.
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Appendix
B
Fiber Cable and LC Connector
Introduction
This appendix provides specifications for the fiber cable and LC connector
used with the 1756-EN2F EtherNet/IP fiber module or the 1783-ETAP1F
and 1783-ETAP2F EtherNet/IP fiber taps.
Fiber Cable
Specifications
The 1756-EN2F EtherNet/IP fiber module and the 1783-ETAP1F and
1783-ETAP2F EtherNet/IP fiber taps use a fiber cable and LC connector.
The fiber cable is typically used in 1 m (3 ft), 2 m, (6 ft), 3 m (9 ft), 5 m (15 ft),
and 100 m (300 ft) lengths but supports lengths up to 2 km (1.24 mi) ..
IMPORTANT
You can special order a fiber cable in any length up to 2 km
(1.24 mi) from your fiber cable vendor.
The fiber cable and LC connector support the following specifications.
Attribute
Value
Fiber Transceiver Type
100Base-FX IEEE802.3u
Optical Wavelength
1310 nm no cap
Transmitter Launch Power at Beginning of
Life (BOL), min
-19 dBm into 62.5/125 µm fiber, N/A = 0.275
Allow -1 dB at End of Life (EOL)
Receiver Sensitivity, Min
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-22.5 dBm into 50/125 µm fiber, N/A = 0.20
-31.8 dBm
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Appendix B
Fiber Cable and LC Connector
Attribute
Value
Receiver Sensitivity, Max
-14 dBm
Fiber Channel Power Budget at Rated BER
(Two connected modules or taps, either the
1756-EN2F EtherNet/IP fiber module, or
1783-ETAP1F or 1783-ETAP2F EtherNet/IP
fiber taps)
12.8 dB for 62.5/125 µm multimode fiber
Fiber Type
Glass
9.3 dB for 50/125 µm multimode fiber
62.5/125 µm and 50/125 µm multimode
fiber
Simplex or duplex
Jacket type and jacket diameter is
dependent on connector selection
Graded Index (GI) fiber
Per IEC 60794-1-1, IEC 60793-2-10 category
A1 fibers
Connector Type
IEC 61754-20 LC connector, maximum
insertion loss 0.75 dB per connection
Channel Length, Max
2 km (1.24 mi) (1)
(1)
The channel, that is, connectors and cable, must not exceed the allowable power budget.
IMPORTANT
210
You should allow at least 5.08 cm (2 in.) for the fiber cable bend
radius. Contact the cable manufacturer for more information on
recommended cable bend radius.
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Fiber Cable and LC Connector
EXAMPLE
Appendix B
In the example shown here, the channel insertion loss is calculated for an optical channel based on the
following factors:
• 1 dB/km fiber
• 0.75 dB per adapter
Note that in this example, the end connectors are not factored in the calculations.
0.75 dB
Fiber 1 dB/km
0.75km
0.75 dB
Fiber 1 dB/km
0.75 dB
1km
+
0.75 dB
+ 1 dB
Fiber 1 dB/km
0.25km
+ 0.75dB
+ 0.25 dB
Total channel insertion loss = 3.5 db
The maximum power budget for this example is 12.8 dB for 62.5/125 um fiber. Therefore, the channel
insertion loss for the example of 3.5 dB is less than the maximum power budget.
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Appendix B
Fiber Cable and LC Connector
Notes:
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Appendix
C
EtherNet/IP Network Connections
Introduction
EtherNet/IP communication modules use connections to manage
communication. A connection is a point-to-point communication mechanism
used to transfer data between a transmitter and a receiver. The EtherNet/IP
communication modules use these connections:
• CIP connections for Logix-based communication.
A CIP connection transfers data from one Logix application running on
one end node to a second Logix application running on another end
node. A CIP connection is established over a TCP connection.
• TCP/IP connections for EtherNet/IP communication.
A single TCP connection can support multiple CIP connections.
CIP Connections
Topic
Page
CIP Connections
213
TCP Connections
214
Multicast Address Limit
215
Connected modules communicate more reliably than do unconnected
modules.
Examples of functions supported by CIP implicit (connected) messaging
include:
• Logix controller message transfer to Logix controller.
• I/O or produced/consumed tag.
• program upload.
• RSLinx DDE/OPC client.
• PanelView polling of Logix controller.
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Appendix C
EtherNet/IP Network Connections
Types of CIP Connections
CIP Connection Type
Description
Bridged
A bridged connection is a connection that passes through the EtherNet/IP module. The end point of the
connection is a module other than the EtherNet/IP module.
Example: a connection from a controller through a 1756-ENBT module to another controller.
Rack-optimized
A rack-optimized connection is a connection to a rack or assembly object in the EtherNet/IP module. Data
from selected I/O modules is collected and produced on one connection (the rack-optimized connection)
rather than on a separate direct connection for each module.
Direct
A direct connection is a connection from a controller to a specific I/O module, as opposed to a rack-optimized
connection.
The Logix5000 controller supports 250 connections, but the limit of
connections ultimately resides in the communication module you use for the
connection. If a message path routes through a communication module or
card, the connection related to the message also counts towards the
connection limit of the communication module or card.
TCP Connections
An EtherNet/IP module uses one TCP connection for each IP address to
which the EtherNet/IP module is connected. Multiple CIP connections can
go through a single TCP connection. Examples of TCP connections include:
• HMI (human-machine interface) to a controller that supports
EtherNet/IP communication.
• Logix MSG instruction to a controller or workstation.
• OPC or DDE accessing a controller.
• I/O data.
• produced or consumed tags.
The 1756-ENBT, 1788-ENBT, and 1794-AENT modules each support 64
TCP connections.
A TCP connection is established when a controller initiates one. For example,
when controller A sends a MSG to controller B, the Ethernet modules
associated with controller A and controller B both have a TCP connections.
Additionally, if controller B initiates a MSG to controller A, both Ethernet
modules now have 2 TCP connections in use. For any further
commuinications, such as MSG exchanges, producing tags, or I/O
communication, bridging between Ethernet module associated with
controllers A and B modules, no more TCP connections are required.
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Multicast Address Limit
Appendix C
Connections that produce data over an Ethernet network use multicast
addresses. EtherNet/IP modules support a maximum of 32 unique multicast
addresses. The actual address, such as 239.192.22.121, is determined by the
EtherNet/IP module.
Example 1: An Ethernet adapter that produces data uses a unique multicast
address for each I/O connection.
Example 2: A Logix controller that produces tags uses a unique multicast
address for each produced tag.
The multicast address limit is independent of the connection limit for a
module. Not all connections require a multicast address. And for produced
and consumed tags, one produced tag requires one multicast address and one
connection for each consumer. For multiple consumers, the one multicast
address would use multiple connections.
Requested Packet
Interval (RPI)
The RPI is the update rate specified for a particular piece of data on the
network. The RPI can be specified for an entire rack (using a rack-optimized
connection) or for a particular module (using a direct connection).
When adding a module to the I/O configuration of a controller, you must
configure the RPI. This value specifies how often to produce the data for that
module. For example, if you specify an RPI of 50 ms, every 50 ms the I/O
module sends its data to the controller or that the controller sends its data to
the I/O module.
RPIs are used only for implicit connections, such as produced/consumed tags
and I/O. For example, a local EtherNet/IP communication module does not
require an RPI because it does not produce data for the system but acts only as
a bridge to remote modules.
Set the RPI only as fast as needed by the application. The RPI also determines
the number of packets per second that the module will produce on a
connection.
Each module has a limit on the total number of implicit packets per second.
The total includes the sum of sent and received implicit packets. The packet
rate for implicit messages is for implicit only, and neither matches nor includes
the explicit packet rate.
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Appendix C
EtherNet/IP Network Connections
Notes:
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Appendix
D
EtherNet/IP Network Overview
Introduction
This appendix defines some basic Ethernet network concepts and how the
EtherNet/IP protocol is used for control.
Ethernet Protocols
Topic
Page
Ethernet Protocols
217
Configuration Requirements
219
Manual Configuration on an Ethernet Switch
222
Change Ports on an Ethernet Switch
222
Additional Resources
222
On the most basic level, Ethernet is a wire or cable that connects computers
and peripheral modules so that they can communicate. The actual wire used
for the network is referred to as the network medium. Beyond the physical
medium, all Ethernet networks support protocols that provide sophisticated
data transfer and network management capability.
Protocol Descriptions
Protocol
Description
Transmission control
protocol/internet protocol
(TCP/IP)
TCP/IP is a transport-layer protocol (TCP) and a network-layer protocol (IP) commonly used in business
environments for communication within networks and across internetworks. The EtherNet/IP
communication modules use TCP/IP for explicit messaging, that is, messages in which time is not a
critical factor, such as uploading or downloading programs.
User datagram
protocol/Internet protocol
(UDP/IP)
UDP is a much simpler transport protocol. It is connectionless and provides a simple means of sending
datagrams between two modules. UDP is used by applications that implement their own handshaking
between modules and only require minimal transport service. UDP is smaller, simpler, and faster than
TCP and can operate in unicast, multicast, or broadcast mode. The EtherNet/IP communication modules
use UDP/IP for real time I/O messaging.
CIP
CIP applies a common application layer over an Ethernet network by encapsulating messages in
TCP/UDP/IP. This common application layer is the control and information protocol (CIP), which provides
interoperability and interchangeability of industrial automation and control modules on an Ethernet
network. EtherNet/IP supports both real-time I/O (implicit messaging) and explicit messaging.
See the EtherNet/IP Performance and Application Guide, publication ENET-AP001, for more information
on EtherNet/IP.
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Appendix D
EtherNet/IP Network Overview
Protocol Descriptions
Protocol
Description
Simple network management
protocol (SNMP)
SNMP is a standard for network management within TCP/IP environments. This protocol enables client
applications monitor and manage network information on host computers and gateways. This protocol
is password-protected.
SNMP uses a distributed architecture consisting of management systems and agents. Data is passed
from SNMP agents, which are hardware or software processes reporting activity in each network
module (switch, router or bridge) to the workstation console used to oversee the network. The agents
return information contained in a management information base (MIB), which is a data structure that
defines what is obtainable from the module and what can be controlled.
Internet Group Management
protocol (IGMP) snooping
IGMP snooping enables switches to route multicast traffic by distributing each packet only to the ports
that need to receive it. Many switches support this feature. However, for IGMP snooping to work, most
of these switches require a system router. If your control system is a stand-alone network or is required
to continue performing if the router is out of service, make sure the switch you are using supports IGMP
snooping without a router present.
This feature is highly recommended for EtherNet/IP systems the control I/O.
Use of the Common Industrial Protocol (CIP)
The EtherNet/IP communication modules use the Common Industrial
Protocol (CIP). CIP is the application layer protocol specified for
EtherNet/IP, the Ethernet Industrial Protocol, as well as for ControlNet and
DeviceNet.
CIP is a message-based protocol that implements a relative path to send a
message from the producing module in a system to the consuming modules.
The producing module contains the path information that steers the message
along the proper route to reach its consumers. Since the producing module
holds this information, other modules along the path simply pass it along
because they do not need to store the information. This information handling
has two significant benefits.
• You do not need to configure routing tables in the bridging module,
which greatly simplifies maintenance and module replacement.
• You maintain full control over the route taken by each message, which
enables you to select alternative paths for the same end module.
CIP uses the producer/consumer networking model instead of a
source/destination (master/slave) model. The producer/consumer model
reduces network traffic and increases speed of transmission.
In traditional I/O systems, controllers poll input modules to obtain their input
status. In the CIP system, digital input modules are not polled by a controller.
Instead, they produce (multicast) their data either upon a change of state
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Appendix D
(COS) or at a requested packet interval (RPI). The frequency of update
depends upon the options chosen during configuration and where on the
network the input module resides. The input module, therefore, is a producer
of input data and the controller is a consumer of the data.
The controller can also produce data for other controllers to consume. The
produced and consumed data is accessible by multiple controllers over the
Logix backplane and over the EtherNet/IP network. This data exchange
conforms to the producer/consumer model.
Configuration
Requirements
Before you can use an EtherNet/IP module, you must configure its IP
address, gateway address, and subnet mask.
IP Address
The IP address identifies each node on the IP network or system of connected
networks. Each TCP/IP node on a network must have a unique IP address.
IMPORTANT
Contact your network administrator or the Network Information
Center for a unique fixed IP address to assign to the EtherNet/IP
module.
The IP address is 32 bits long and has a network ID part and a host ID part.
Because networks vary in size, there are four types of networks.
EtherNet/IP Network Types
Network Type
For
Class A
Large networks with many devices
Class B
Medium-sized networks
Class C
Small networks (fewer than 256 devices)
Class D
Multicast addresses
The network class determines how an IP address is formatted.
8
Class A
0
0
Class B
0
1
Class C
0
1 1
0
Class D
0
1 1
0
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16
network (7 bits)
16
8
network (14 bits)
0
16
8
network (21 bits)
8
1
24
local address (24 bits)
24
local address (16 bits)
31
31
24
16
24
multicast address (28 bits)
31
local address (8 bits)
31
219
Appendix D
EtherNet/IP Network Overview
Each node on the same physical network must have an IP address of the same
class and must have the same network ID. Each node on the same network
must have a different local address (host ID), thus giving it a unique IP
address.
IP addresses are written as four-decimal integers (0...255) separated by periods
where each integer gives the value of one byte of the IP address.
For example, the 32-bit IP address:
10000010 00000000 00000000 00000001 is written as 130.0.0.1.
IP Address Class
Class
Leftmost Bits
Start Address
Finish Address
A
0xxx
0.0.0.
127.255.255.255
B
10xx
128.0.0.0
191.255.255.255
C
110x
192.0.0.0
223.255.255.255
D
1110
224.0.0.0
239.255.255.255
Gateways
A gateway connects individual physical networks into a system of networks.
When a node needs to communicate with a node on another network, a
gateway transfers the data between the two networks. The following figure
shows gateway G connecting Network 1 with Network 2.
A
128.1.0.1
Network 1
128.1.0.2
G
C
B
128.2.0.1
128.2.0.3
128.2.0.2
Network 2
When host B with IP address 128.2.0.1 communicates with host C, it knows
from C’s IP address that C is on the same network. In an Ethernet
environment, B can then resolve C’s IP address to a MAC address and
communicate with C directly.
220
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EtherNet/IP Network Overview
Appendix D
When host B communicates with host A, it knows from A’s IP address that A
is on another network because the network IDs differ. To send data to A, B
must have the IP address of the gateway connecting the two networks. In this
example, the gateway’s IP address on Network 2 is 128.2.0.3.
The gateway has two IP addresses (128.1.0.2 and 128.2.0.3). Network 1 hosts
must use the first IP address, and Network 2 hosts must use the second IP
address. To be usable, a host’s gateway IP address must match its own net ID.
Subnet Mask
Subnet addressing is an extension of the IP address scheme that enables a site
to use a single net ID for multiple physical networks. Routing outside of the
site continues by dividing the IP address into a net ID and a host ID via the IP
class. Inside a site, the subnet mask is used to redivide the IP address into a
custom net ID portion and host ID portion.
Take Network 2 (a Class B network) in the previous example and add another
physical network. Selecting this subnet mask would add two additional net ID
bits allowing for four physical networks.
11111111 11111111 11000000 00000000 = 255.255.192.0
Two bits of the Class B host ID have been used to extend the net ID. Each
unique combination of bits in the part of the host ID where subnet mask bits
are 1 specifies a different physical network.
New Configuration
A
128.1.0.1
Network 1
128.1.0.2
G
C
B
128.2.64.1
128.2.64.3
128.2.64.2
Network 2.1
G2
D
E
128.2.128.1
128.2.128.3
128.2.128.2
Network 2.2
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221
Appendix D
EtherNet/IP Network Overview
A second network with Hosts D and E has been added. Gateway G2 connects
Network 2.1 with Network 2.2. Hosts D and E will use Gateway G2 to
communicate with hosts not on Network 2.2. Hosts B and C will use Gateway
G to communicate with hosts not on Network 2.1. When B is communicating
with D, G (the configured Gateway for B) will route the data from B to D...G2.
Manual Configuration on an
Ethernet Switch
The EtherNet/IP modules support these Ethernet settings.
· 10 MBps half-duplex or full-duplex
· 100 MBps half-duplex or full-duplex
Mode selection can be automatic, based on the IEEE 802.3 autonegotiation
protocol. Or, with RSLogix 5000 programming software, version 12 and later,
you can manually set the communication rate and duplex mode of the
communication module and the switch port that is connected to the module.
If you manually set the communication rate and duplex mode, the settings of
the communication module and the switch port must match.
Change Ports on an
Ethernet Switch
If you reconnect the EtherNet/IP module from one port to another,
regardless of whether the new port is on the same or a different switch (or a
hub), perform this procedure.
1. Disconnect the cable from the port to which the EtherNet/IP module
is currently connected.
2. Wait until the EtherNet/IP module Link Status status indicator is off.
3. Connect the cable to the new port.
This procedure restarts the autonegotiation process at the EtherNet/IP
module side. Another option is to restart the EtherNet/IP module itself.
Additional Resources
222
For more information about TCP/IP and Ethernet technologies, see these
publications.
Publication Title
ISBN Number
Internetworking with TCP/IP Volume 1: Protocols and Architecture, 2nd ed.
by Douglas E. Comer
ISBN 0-13-216987-8
The Ethernet Management Guide – Keeping The Link
ISBN 0-07-046320-4
An Introduction to TCP/IP
ISBN 3-540-96651-X
Computer Networks
by Andrew S. Tanenbaum
ISBN 0-13-162959-X
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
Index
Numerics
1732E modules 59
1734-AENT and 1734-AENTR modules 58
additional resources 20
overview 20
status indicators 192
1738-AENT and 1738-AENTR modules 58
additional resources 21
overview 21
status indicators 195
1756-EN2F module
additional resources 16
overview 15
status indicators 171
1756-EN2T module
additional resources 16
overview 15
status indicators 173
1756-EN2TR module
additional resources 16
overview 15
status indicators 175
use on a device-level ring 58
1756-EN2TXT module
additional resources 16
overview 15
status indicators 177
1756-ENBT module
additional resources 15
overview 15
status indicators 169
1768-ENBT module
additional resources 17
overview 17
status indicators 185
1769-L23E-QB1B and 1769-L23E-QBFC1B
modules
additional resources 17
overview 17
status indicators 178
1769-L32E and 1769-L35E modules
additional resources 18
overview 18
status indicators 183
1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, and
1783-ETAP2F taps
additional resources 19
overview 18
status indicators 187
use on a device-level ring 58
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
1788-ENBT module
additional resources 19
overview 19
status indicators 189
1794-AENT module
additional resources 20
overview 20
status indicators 199
2x-COMM-E modules
additional resources 22
overview 22
status indicators 201, 205
A
access distributed I/O modules 90-92
add distributed I/O modules
overview 78-81
selecting a remote adapter 87
with RSLogix 5000 programming
software 91
additional resources
1734-AENT and 1734-AENTR modules 20
1738-AENT and 1738-AENTR modules 21
1756-EN2F module 16
1756-EN2T module 16
1756-EN2TR module 16
1756-EN2TXT module 16
1756-ENBT module 15
1756-EWEB and 1768-EWEB modules 32
1768-ENBT module 17
1769-L23E-QB1B and 1769-L23E-QBFC1B
modules 17
1769-L32E and 1769-L35E modules 18
1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, and
1783-ETAP2F taps 19
1788-ENBT module 19
1794-AENT module 20
2x-COMM-E modules 22
Guard I/O modules 26
Stratix switches 39
add-on profile 65
architectures
safety 26
B
beacon interval 70
beacon timeout 70
BOOTP/DHCP server
setting IP network address 45-46
bridging
with EtherNet/IP modules 27-29
223
Index
C
change ports 222
CIP connections 30, 213
communication driver 34-35
communication format 82-87
choosing direct or rack-optimized
connection 83
direct connections 84
ownership 86-87
rack-optimized connections 85
configuration parameters
beacon interval 70
beacon timeout 70
ring protocol VLAN ID 70
configure
DHCP software 51
EtherNet/IP modules 41-55
MSG instructions 127
personal computer 33-35
RSLinx communication software 48-49
RSLogix 5000 programming software 50
Stratix switches 37-39
connections
caching MSG instructions 106
CIP 30, 213
data transfer 106
I/O 83
interlocking 96
messaging 106
multicast address limits 215
overview 213-215
produced and consumed tags 96
TCP 30, 214
to PanelView terminals 132
to RSView applications 136
troubleshooting 152
consume tags 95, 100-104
control application 55
control I/O
adding distributed I/O modules 78-81
communication format 82-87
connections 83
hardware 77-92
ownership 86
RPI 88
control system 23
controller ownership 86
convert between INTs and DINTs 115
224
D
data transfer
caching connections 106
configuring 111-114
connections 106
guidelines 105
logic 107-110
mapping tags 116
overview 93-118
to PLC-5 or SLC processors 115
device-level ring network 57-75
supervisor node 61-62
DHCP software 51
diagnostics
Ethernet statistics 144
message connections 142
monitor 137-145
network settings 141
overview 138
direct connection 83
DNS addressing 54-55
domain name 42
download 55
driver 34-35
duplicate address detection 51-53
E
email
MSG instruction 127
overview 119
send through an EtherNet/IP module
119-130
sending via MSG instruction 121-128
status codes 129
text format 129
Ethernet protocols 217-219
EtherNet/IP modules
bridging 27-29
configuring 41-55
connections 213-215
control application 55
features 13-31
network overview 217-222
network specifications 30
set IP network address 43
setting IP network address 43
status indicators 167-208
using in control system 23
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
Index
examples
accessing distributed I/O modules 91
bridging 29
buffering INTs 117
RSLinx communication software bridging
28
F
fiber cable
specifications 209
flash upgrade firmware
USB port 165
G
gateway 42, 220
Guard I/O modules 25
in EtherNet/IP system 24
H
host name 42
I
I/O
controlling over EtherNet/IP 77-92
interlocking
connections 96
consume tags 100-104
organize tags 95
overview 93-118
produce tags 98-99
terminology 95
IP addresses
definition 41
DHCP software 51
duplication address detection 51-53
network address configuration switch
settings 44
overview 219
RSLinx communication software 48-49
RSLogix 5000 programming software 50
set 43
swapping in redundant systems 53
M
manual configuration 222
map tags 116
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
messaging
caching connections 106
configuring 111-114
connections 106
guidelines 105
logic 107-110
mapping tags 116
overview 93-118
to PLC-5 or SLC processor 115
MSG instruction
caching connections 106
configuring 111-114
connections 106
logic 107-110
mapping tags 116
sending email 127
sending via an email 121-128
to PLC-5 or SLC processors 115
MSG instructions
guidelines 105
N
network address
DNS addressing 54-55
set IP network address 43
network overview
modules in an EtherNet/IP control system
23
network parameters 47
DNS addressing 42
domain name 42
gateway 42
host name 42
IP addresses 41
subnet mask 41
O
ownership 86
listen-only connection 86
owner controller 86
P
PanelView terminals
adding in RSLogix 5000 programming
software 133-135
communication with Logix controller over
EtherNet/IP 131-136
determining connections 132
organizing controller data 136
set up hardware 131
225
Index
personal computers
placing on network 33-35
PLC-5 processor 115
produce tags 95, 98-99
produced and consumed tags
connections 96
consume tags 100-104
number of multicast 31
organize tags 95
overview 93-118
produce tags 98-99
set up hardware 93
terminology 95
R
rack-optimized connection 83
remote adapter 87
requested packet interval 88-89, 215
ring protocol VLAN ID 70
ring supervisor
configure with RSLogix 5000
programming software 64
enable in RSLogix 5000 programming
software 68
RPI 88
RSLinx communication software
bridging 28
communication driver 34-35
configuring network parameters 48-49
RSLogix 5000 programming software
adding a PanelView terminal 133-135
adding distributed I/O modules 78-81, 91
configure a ring supervisor 64
consume a tag 100-104
enable ring supervisor 68
produce a tag 98-99
set the requested packet interval 88-89
setting IP network address 43
verify supervisor configuration 75
S
safety
additional resources 26
architectures 26
Guard I/O modules in EtherNet/IP system
24
select a remote adapter 87
serial communication
USB port 161-165
226
set IP network address 43
BOOTP/DHCP server 45-46
RSLinx communication software or
RSLogix 5000 programming software 43
thumbwheel switch 43
set the requested packet interval
with RSLogix 5000 programming
software 88-89
set up hardware
data transfer 93
I/O modules over EtherNet/IP 77
interlocking 93
messaging 93
PanelView terminals and Logix
controllers 131
produced and consumed tags 93
Stratix switches 38
to share data via a USB port 161
set up I/O
controlling I/O 77-92
set up USB driver 163
SLC processor 115
specifications
EtherNet/IP network 30
fiber cable 209
status codes
email 129
status indicators
1734-AENT and 1734-AENTR modules
192
1738-AENT and 1738-AENTR modules
195
1756-EN2F module 171
1756-EN2T module 173
1756-EN2TR module 175
1756-EN2TXT module 177
1756-ENBT module 169
1768-ENBT module 185
1769-L23E-QB1B and 1769-L23E-QBFC1B
modules 178
1769-L32E and 1769-L35E modules
status indicators 183
1783-ETAP, 1783-ETAP1F, and
1783-ETAP2F taps 187
1788-ENBT module 189
1794-AENT module 199
2x-COMM-E modules 201, 205
EtherNet/IP Modules 167-208
Stratix switches 37-39
additional resources 39
features 38-39
select a switch 37
set up hardware 38
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Index
string tags 121
subnet mask 41, 221
supervisor configuration
verify 75
supervisor node 61-62
swap IP addresses 53
switch considerations 157-159
switches 222
IP network address configuration settings
44
select a Stratix switch 37
Stratix switch features 38-39
Stratix switches 37-39
T
tags
produced and consumed 31
TCP connections 214
thumbwheel switch
set IP network address 43
Publication ENET-UM001I-EN-P - January 2010
troubleshoot
DLR network 75
Ethernet statistics 153-156
EtherNet/IP modules 147-159
I/O connections 153
message connections 152
switch considerations 157-159
web browser support 147-156
with a virtual local area network 158
U
USB port
configure a module 162-165
flash upgrade firmware 165
serial communication 161-165
set up hardware 161
W
web browser support 147-156
227
Index
228
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