Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity CLC HUMAN RESOURCES

Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
CORPORATE
LEADERSHIP
COUNCIL
CORPORATE EXECUTIVE BOARD
Creating Competitive
Advantage Through
Workforce Diversity
CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
CONTENT PUBLISHING SOLUTIONS
Executive Director
Jean Martin
Production Designer
Savitha Thomas
CORPORATE EXECUTIVE BOARD
Managing Directors
Brian Kropp
Mark Van Buren
Editor
Nidhi Vikram Choudhury
www.executiveboard.com
Practice Manager
Daniel Metz
CORPORATE
LEADERSHIP
COUNCIL
Consultants
Jennifer Bustamante
Caroline Kalinoski
Analyst
Vandana Minotra
COPIES AND COPYRIGHT
LEGAL CAVEAT
As always, members are welcome to an unlimited number of copies
of the materials contained within this handout for their internal
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(including independent contractors and consultants) requires the
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(CEB). The pages herein are the intellectual property of CEB, and
CEB requires that members retain the copyright mark on all pages
reproduced.
The Corporate Executive Board Company (CEB) has worked to
ensure the accuracy of the information it provides to its members.
This report relies upon data obtained from many sources, however,
and CEB cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information or its
analysis in all cases. Furthermore, CEB is not engaged in rendering
legal, accounting, or other professional services. CEB reports
should not be construed as professional advice on any particular
set of facts or circumstances. Members requiring such services are
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programs are responsible for any claims or losses that may arise
from a) any errors or omissions in their reports, whether caused
by CEB or its sources, or b) reliance on any recommendation made
by CEB.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ŏŏŏŏŏŒđŒā
ŏāčŏŏŏŏŏŏ
ŒđŒāĀ
G4S's D&I Assessment ToolŒđŒ11
BAE Systems’ Incremental D&I MBOsŒđŒ20
ŏĂčŏŏŏŏŏŏŒđŒăĀ
BAE Systems' Influencer OutreachŒđŒ34
Sodexo’s Inclusion Competency InterviewingŒđŒ40
Telstra’s Inclusive People Management BehaviorsŒđŒ46
ŏăčŏŏŏŏŏŒđŒĆă
Cochlear’s Leadership Presence ProgramŒđŒ55
Nestlé’s Self-Sustaining Dual Career NetworkŒđŒ63
BBVA’s Gender-Blind HIPO AssessmentsŒđŒ71
Duke Energy’s Successor “Fit Scores”ŒđŒ72
Cemex México’s Data-Driven Succession PlanningŒđŒ73
ŒđŒĉĀ
Organizations identify
diversity and inclusion
(D&I) as a critical issue
to address.
ŏŏčŏŏŏŏŏ
ORGANIZATIONS
Changing Focus on Leveraging Diversity
for Business Goals Over Next Three Years
Percentage of Executives
2%
Don’t Know
ĂĀŃ
Less
Focus
ĈĉŃ
More
Focus
Human Resources
“Our balance of male and female employees and
our mix of talent is one of the keys to L’Oréal’s
success.”
Jean-Claude Le Grand
Human Resources Director, Consumer
Products and Corporate Diversity Director
L’Oréal
Board of Directors
Definitions
Diversity (n.):
“The collective mixture of
differences and similarities
that includes, for example,
individual and organizational
characteristics, values, beliefs,
experiences, backgrounds,
preferences, and behaviors”
Inclusion (n.):
“The achievement of a work
environment, in which all
individuals are treated fairly
and respectfully, have equal
access to opportunities and
resources and can contribute
fully to the organization’s
success”
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
n = 321.
“Our commitment to diversity has become
increasingly important as the marketplace has
changed.”
Executive Support for Diversity Initiatives
Percentage of Organizations
9%
Weak
āĈŃ
Neutral
John W. Rowe, MD
Executive Chairman
Aetna
Chief Executive Officer
ĈĈŃ
Strong
n = 79.
“It is diversity and inclusion that is differentiating
us as an organization and establishing our
competitive advantage in the marketplace.”
George Chavel
President and Chief Executive Officer
Sodexo
Note: Totals may not add up to 100% due to rounding.
Source: The Society for Human Resource Management, “SHRM’s Diversity and Inclusion Initiative,” 2008; Forbes Insights, “Global Diversity and Inclusion: Fostering Innovation
Through a Diverse Workforce,” July 2011; CLC Recruiting, Diversity Recruiting Survey, 2010; L’Oréal, “Diversity Are Our Priority,” http://www.loreal.com/_en/_ww/html/ourcompany/interview-of-the-corporate-diversity-director.aspx?, 2012; Aetna, 2005 Diversity Annual Report; Sodexo, 2011 Diversity and Inclusion Annual Report.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity1
Legislation, external
stakeholder demands,
and changing
demographics require
organizations to build
diverse and inclusive
workforces.
EXTERNAL PRESSURE TO IMPROVE DIVERSITY
AND INCLUSION
2. Stakeholder Demands
āċŏ!#%/(0%+*
Sample Countries Legislating Diversity and
Inclusion (Year of Recent Legislation)
Albania
(2010)
Australia
(2011)
Belgium
(2012,
Proposed)
Bolivia
(2010)
Canada
(1995)
France
(2011)
Germany
(2012,
Proposed)
Great
Britain
(2011)
Hong
Kong
(2011)
Italy
(2012,
Proposed)
Netherlands
(2012,
Proposed)
Norway
(2003)
Customers
“Whether you are buying a cup of coffee or
renovating your home, by supporting businesses
that support workplace equality you send a
powerful message that LGBT inclusion is good for
the bottom line.”
Human Rights Campaign’s Buyer’s Guide
ăċŏŏ$*#%*#ŏ!)+#.,$%/Ő
Change in the Labor Force, APAC
By Age and Gender Between 2007
and 2013; in Years
15–24
25–34
35–44
45–54
55–59
60–64
4%
3%
9%
6%
4%
2%
8%
4%
6%
Total
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
8%
5%
Change in General Population,
ġĂĈ
Percentage of Minorities in Labor
Force in 2011 and 2030
By Age Groups Between 2010
and 2060
17%
Female
30%
Male
65+
15–64
0–14
43%
15%
10%
65 and Over
Increase in Minorities in the
Labor Force, United States
67%
56%
33%
25%
30%
24%
2011
2030
(Expected)
16%
14%
2010
2060
(Expected)
Sources: ILGA Europe, “Albania protects LGBT people from discrimination,” 2 May 2010, http://www.ilga-europe.org/home/news/for_media/media_releases/albania_protects_lgbt_
people_from_discrimination; Norton Rose, “Diversity Laws: A Global Overview,” June 2011, http://www.nortonrose.com/knowledge/publications/51599/diversity-laws-aglobal-overview; Governance Metrics International, “2011 Women on Boards Report,” 8 March 2011, http://www.calstrs.com/corporategovernance/women_on_boards_2011.
pdf; US Library of Congress, “Bolivia: Law Against Racism and Any Form of Discrimination,” 18 November 2010; Canadian Department of Justice, “Employment Equity Act,”
21 March 2012; Hong Kong Equal Opportunities Commission, “Disability Discrimination Ordinance,” 2011; International Labour Organization, “Labor Code of the Russian
Federation,” 31 December 2012, http://www.ilo.org/dyn/natlex/docs/WEBTEXT/60535/65252/E01RUS01.htm; International Labour Organization, “Singapore—Country
baselines under the ILO Declaration Annual Review 2000–2008,” 15 February 2008, http://www.ilo.org/declaration/follow-up/annualreview/archiveofbaselinesbycountry/
WCMS_DECL_DISC_SGP/lang--en/index.htm; http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/statistics_explained/index.php/Population_structure_and_ageing; Walden Asset
Management, “Shareholders Urge Home Depot to Release Diversity Data,” Press Release, 24 May 2006; Human Rights Campaign, “Human Rights Campaign’s Buyer’s Guide,”
27 March 2012, http://www.hrc.org/apps/buyersguide/.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity2
Organizations can reap
substantial benefits
by building a diverse
workforce and creating
an inclusive work
environment.
DIVERSE AND INCLUSIVE WORKFORCES DRIVE
EMPLOYEE PRODUCTIVITY AND RETENTION
D&I Impact on Employee Discretionary Effort and Intent to Stay
āċāĊ4
āċāĂ4
High
āċĀĈ4
Diverse Workforceā
āċĀć4
Discretionary
Effort
Intent to Stay
Discretionary
Effort
Intent to Stay
āċāă4
Low
āċĀĉ4
ā4
ā4
Discretionary
Effort
Intent to Stay
Discretionary
Effort
Low
High
Inclusive Workforce
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
1
2
Intent to Stay
2
“Diverse workforce” is defined by the extent to which employees agree that “Diversity is well represented in my organization.”
“Inclusive workforce” is defined by the extent to which employees agree that “Divergent perspectives are valued in my organization.”
Source: CLC Human Resources, Global Labor Market Survey, 2012.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity3
Organizations can drive
positive team processes
and outcomes by building
a diverse workforce and
creating an inclusive work
environment.
D&I ALSO DRIVE TEAM COLLABORATION AND
COMMITMENT
D&I Impact on Team Processes and Outcomes
āċĆĈ4
āċĂć4
āċąĂ4
āċāĉ4
Diverse Workforceā
High
Team
Collaboration
Team
Commitment
Team
Collaboration
āċąą4
Team
Commitment
āċăă4
Low
ā4
ā4
Team
Collaboration
Team
Commitment
Team
Collaboration
Low
Team
Commitment
High
2
Inclusive Workforce
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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1
2
“Diverse workforce” is defined by the extent to which employees agree that “Diversity is well represented in my organization.”
“Inclusive workforce” is defined by the extent to which employees agree that “Divergent perspectives are valued in my organization.”
Source: CLC Human Resources, Global Labor Market Survey, 2012.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity4
Organizations use a wide
variety of approaches to
improve D&I, and many
plan to increase D&I
budgets.
ORGANIZATIONS CONTINUE TO INVEST IN A VARIETY
OF D&I EFFORTS
+))+*ŏ.#*%60%+*(ŏ,,.+$!/ŏ0+Ő),.+2%*#ŏ
Diversity and Inclusion
ĂĀāĂŏ$*#!/ŏ0+ŏĒŏ1 #!0/
Percentage of Organizations
mentoring
āĉŃ
Decrease
Compared
to 2011
diversity mission statement
ĂĆŃ
Increase
Compared
to 2011
affinity groups
business case
reverse mentoring
community involvement
internships for diverse students
unconscious bias training
employee resource groups
diversity council
diversity conferences engagement survey
apprenticeships for diverse students
global framework
diversity career fairs awareness building communications
senior-level support
executive sponsors diverse professional associations
sponsorship antidiscrimination policies
diversity leadership development
charitable contributions
inclusion training supplier diversity
corporate values
diversity scorecard
ĆĈŃ
Stay Same
Compared
to 2011
diversity training
n = 28.
“My Organization Has Policies and Programs That Promote Diversity in the Workplace”
Percentage of Employees
74%
66%
India
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
Philippines
64%
United
States
63%
United
Kingdom
61%
South
Africa
60%
Canada
57%
Australia
56%
Malaysia
52%
New
Zealand
49%
Singapore
n = 9,377.
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Source: CLC Human Resources, Diversity and Inclusion Survey, 2012; CLC Human Resources, Global Labor Market Survey, 2012.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity5
Most employees believe
their organization is
ineffective at diversity
and inclusion, however,
few organizations have
created highly diverse
and inclusive workforces.
MOST ORGANIZATIONS REMAIN INEFFECTIVE AT
BUILDING A DIVERSE AND INCLUSIVE WORKFORCE
Organizational Effectiveness at Diversityā and Inclusion2
Percentage of Employees by Country
Diversity
51%
Inclusion
51%
48%
48%
45%
45%
44%
44%
37%
44%
43%
45%
39%
37%
42%
39%
29%
India
Canada
United
States
Australia
New
Zealand
South
Africa
Philippines
United
Kingdom
31%
28% 28%
Singapore
Malaysia
n = 9,377.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
1
Organizational diversity is measured by the extent to which employees agree or strongly agree that diversity is well represented in
their organization.
2
Organizational inclusion is measured by the extent to which employees agree or strongly agree that divergent perspectives are valued
in their organization.
Source: CLC Human Resources, Global Labor Market Survey, 2012.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity6
HR executives across
geographies and
industries face shared
challenges in building
a diverse and inclusive
workforce.
■
CLC Human Resources
interviewed HR executives
at 84 organizations across
geographies and industries
about their diversity and
inclusion challenges.
HR EXECUTIVES’ D&I QUESTIONS
ā
2
ă
ą
How do we equitably hold leaders accountable for improving diversity and inclusion,
given the differing cultural, legislative, and market situations in which they operate?
How do we attract candidates to our organizations from the small and highly
competitive pool of diverse talent?
How do we ensure that new people managers are most likely to foster an inclusive
working environment?
How do we change workplace behaviors to allow all employees to contribute to their
fullest potential?
Ć
How do we increase the number of diverse employees in the leadership pipeline?
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity7
CREATING COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE THROUGH WORKFORCE DIVERSITY
I
II
III
Define Relevant
Diversity and Inclusion Objectives
Build a Diverse and
Inclusive Workforce
Create a Diverse
Leadership Pipeline
),!.0%2!ŏāčŏEnable Regional Ownership
to Address Organization-Wide D&I Challenges
),!.0%2!ŏăčŏUse Trusted Sources
to Expand the Pool of Diverse Talent
),!.0%2!ŏćčŏImprove the Leadership
Value Proposition for Diverse Talent
G4S’s D&I Assessment Tool
),!.0%2!ŏĂčŏAssess and
Incentivize Progress, Not Just Outcomes
BAE Systems’ Incremental D&I MBOs
BAE Systems’ Influencer Outreach
Cochlear’s Leadership
Presence Program
),!.0%2!ŏąčŏHire for
Inclusive Behaviors
Nestlé’s Self-Sustaining
Dual Career Network
Sodexo’s Inclusion
Competency Interviewing
),!.0%2!ŏĆčŏReinforce Inclusive
Behaviors During Critical Moments
),!.0%2!ŏĈčŏNeutralize Biases
in Talent Management Decisions
BBVA’s Gender-Blind
HIPO Assessments
Duke Energy’s
Successor “Fit Scores”
Telstra’s Inclusive
People Management Behaviors
Cemex México’s Data-Driven
Succession Planning
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity8
Regional differences
in diversity needs
and challenges make
it difficult to set and
evaluate globally
consistent D&I objectives.
DIVERSITY NEEDS AND CHALLENGES VARY ACROSS
Őŏŏŏ
Sample of Diversity Challenges
*%0! ŏ00!/čŏ“Four
generations of employees
in one organization
present a variety of
challenges.”
* čŏ“Recruiting
and retaining
indigenous individuals
is one of our key
diversity challenges.”
.!0ŏ.%0%*čŏ“How can we
help our older employees
transition into retirement,
while continuing to work as
long as they’d like to?”
$%*čŏ“Women are a
highly undertapped pool
of talent, but we haven’t
been very successful at
attracting them.”
1/0.(%čŏ
“Women are
underrepresented
in our leadership
ranks.”
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
*%0! ŏ00!/čŏ“Turnover rates
among diverse employees are
higher than our total employee
population.”
*%0! ŏ00!/čŏ“Female
representation among
our senior ranks is
seriously lacking.”
+10$ŏ".%čŏ“We must ensure
equitable representation of
Black South Africans in our
workforce.”
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity9
ŏāčŏŏŏŏŏŏ
CHALLENGE
It is difficult to set and evaluate
organizationally consistent objectives.
),!.0%2!ŏāčŏ*(!ŏ!#%+*(ŏ3*!./$%,ŏ
to Address Organization-Wide D&I Challenges
),!.0%2!ŏĂčŏ//!//ŏ* ŏ*!*0%2%6!ŏ
.+#.!//Čŏ+0ŏ
1/0ŏ10+)!/ŏ
ąĚ/ŏĒŏ//!//)!*0ŏ++(
BAE Systems’ Incremental D&I MBOs
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity10
CORPORATE
LEADERSHIP
COUNCIL
D&I ASSESSMENT TOOL
CORPORATE EXECUTIVE BOARD
OVERVIEW
G4S operates in more than 100 countries across the world with different cultures, legislation, interest levels, and
perspectives on addressing D&I. Business leaders understand and support the organization’s new D&I strategy,
designed for current and future employees, customers, and the corporate brand; however, they sometimes need
guidance on how to implement the overall strategy in their operations, given local differences.
SOLUTION HIGHLIGHTS
G4S creates a consistent framework based on common business and HR processes against which leaders can
benchmark D&I in their local operational contexts and identify opportunities for improvement:
■
Identify Core Business and HR Processes Leaders Can Assess for D&I—Identify organization-specific business and
HR processes that leaders can assess for diversity and inclusion within their operations.
■
Teach Leaders How to Embed D&I in Core Business and HR Processes—Explain how to embed D&I in core business
and HR processes through staged guidance.
■
Involve Employees to Determine Local D&I Success—Define D&I success based on local employees’ perceptions
to ensure success measures are locally relevant.
COMPANY SNAPSHOT
ąŏ,(
Industry:
2011 Sales:
Employees:
Headquarters:
Business Services
£7.52 Billion
657,000
United Kingdom
G4S focuses on advancing the safety and security of businesses
and governments, ensuring the security of key assets—people,
property, products, and reputation. G4S offers a unique
combination of personnel, project management, risk management,
and technology solutions.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity11
ąŏ$!(,/ŏ(! !./ŏ
sustainably improve
D&I by focusing on the
diversity and inclusion
of business and HR
processes within each
business unit.
TARGET BUSINESS AND HR PROCESSES FOR
GLOBALLY CONSISTENT, LOCALLY RELEVANT D&I
ąĚ/ŏ,,.+$ŏ0+ŏ),.+2%*#ŏ%2!./%05ŏ* ŏ*(1/%+*
…resulting in sustainable
increases in diversity
and inclusion.
8. Community Involvement
Diversity of Workforce
se
n
tio
Increasing
inclusivity of
core business
processes
increases
employee
engagement…
d
se
ea
cr
In
an
n
te
Re
i
ct
tra
At
on
t
en
…decreases employee
turnover, and
increases attraction
of new employees…
of
l
Ta
r
ve
Di
Ĉċŏ.'!0%*#ŏ* ŏ+))1*%0%+*/
ćċŏ
+ŏ!/%#*Čŏ(!4%%(%05Čŏ* ŏ+),!*/0%+*
Ćċŏ.%*%*#ŏ* ŏ!2!(+,)!*0
ąċŏ),(+5!!ŏ-1%/%0%+*ŏ* ŏ 2*!)!*0
ăċŏ! !./$%,ŏ* ŏ+1*0%(%05
2. Measuring and Monitoring
āċŏ0.0!#5Čŏ+(%5Čŏ* ŏ(*/
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
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PRACTICE OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
COMPONENT 3
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity12
ąŏ% !*0%ü!/ŏ0$!ŏ
organization’s core
business and HR
processes leaders can
assess for diversity and
inclusion within their
operations.
■
■
IDENTIFY BUSINESS AND HR PROCESSES LEADERS
CAN ASSESS FOR D&I
Global D&I Strategy
G4S solicits input from
business leaders and
regional HR directors around
the world to understand how
they view D&I and how they
believe it can be improved.
Dimensions of D&I Assessmentā
Overall
ā
Deliver the group strategy to drive
accelerated growth and development.
Strategy, Policy, and Plans
What is the country or business unit’s concept of and approach
to diversity and inclusion, including how they are articulated and
embedded into the business?
2
Measuring and Monitoring
How is progress in diversity and inclusion measured? What
processes are in place to monitor effectiveness of the strategy
and progress in delivering it?
ă
Leadership and Accountability
To what extent do the business leaders take responsibility for
shaping, guiding, and supporting the organization’s diversity
and inclusion initiatives?
ą
Employee Acquisition and Advancement
Does the business unit or country ensure the hiring and selection
processes support the strategy of identifying and selecting the
best talent from the most diverse applicant pools?
Ć
Training and Development
To what extent is diversity and inclusion embedded in the design
and delivery of all training, development, and performance review
activity?
ć
+ŏ!/%#*Čŏ(!4%%(%05Čŏ* ŏ+),!*/0%+*
Are jobs and compensation and benefit packages designed to
accommodate the different needs of employees?
Ĉ
Marketing and Communications
To what extent is the business sensitive to the diverse needs of
the customer base? How is diversity articulated and promoted
through internal and external communications?
8
Community Involvement
To what extent does the business promote diversity and inclusion
in the links with the communities in which it operates?
I. People
To attract, recruit, and retain diverse
talent with diverse ideas to help build new
markets and expand existing ones
Organization-specific factors
(such as being a services
rather than product business
and having a decentralized
organizational structure)
are considered to determine
the business and HR
processes to evaluate as the
dimensions of the diversity
and inclusion assessment.
II. Customers
To be reflective of the customers and
communities we serve and to use our
great diversity to differentiate us from our
competitors
III. Brand
To be recognized as a good corporate
citizen that complies with legislation,
challenges inappropriate behaviors, and
promotes diversity through supply chains
and community activities
For the full Global Diversity
and Inclusion Benchmarks:
Standards for Organizations
Around the World on which
G4S based its D&I Assessment,
please see the Appendix.
1
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
G4S’s Diversity and Inclusion Assessment tool is based on Julie O’Mara and Alan Richter’s Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards
for Organizations Around the World (2006), which was subsequently updated in 2011, http://www.omaraassoc.com/pdf/GDIB_2011.pdf.
PRACTICE OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
COMPONENT 3
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity13
ąŏ!4,(%*/ŏ$+3ŏ0+ŏ
embed D&I in core
business and HR
processes through
staged guidance.
■
The five levels of progression
reflect a staged process for
sustainably embedding D&I
in the organizations’ core
business and HR processes.
ENABLE REGIONAL LEADERS TO EMBED D&I
IN CORE BUSINESSES AND HR PROCESSES
ąĚ/ŏĒŏ//!//)!*0ŏ++(ŏ0+ŏ//!//ŏ!2!(ŏ+"ŏ.+#.!//
Strategy,
Policy, and
Plans
File
Measuring and
Monitoring
Leadership and
Accountability
Employee
Acquisition and
Advancement
Job Design,
Flexibility, and
Compensation
Training and
Development
Marketing and
Communications
Community
Involvement
Edit
_
X
Strategy, Policy, and Plans
What is the country or business unit’s concept of and approach to diversity and inclusion, including how they are articulated and embedded
in the business?
āċŏ0.0%*# (Have not previously but are just starting to focus in this area)
(a) There is an equal opportunities statement or policy in place.
Not Applicable
2. Complying (Putting effort into ensuring everyone has an equal opportunity and processes are fair and equitable)
(a) A D&I assessment of the business has been completed and a plan is produced to progress.
Yes
(b)
No
(c)
Yes
ăċŏ)!
%*#ŏ(Understanding the importance of D&I policy and are working to embed it in all of their processes)
(a)
Not Applicable
(b) The business has a D&I policy that explains what the word means and both the moral and business cases.
Yes
(c)
Yes
ąċŏ*#%*# (Managing D&I at a level which differentiates you positively from your competitors)
(a)
No
(b)
Yes
(c) The D&I plan has been developed by key stakeholders across the business.
Yes
Ćċŏ! %*# (D&I is a key differentiator in the industry and in the wider community.)
(a)
No
(b) More than 95% of employees in the business unit or country completing an employee survey rate G4S as
a fair employer that values people from diverse backgrounds.
Yes
(c)
Not Applicable
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
PRACTICE OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
COMPONENT 3
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity14
ąŏ!4,(%*/ŏ$+3ŏ0+ŏ
embed D&I in core
business and HR
processes through
staged guidance
(continued).
ENABLE REGIONAL LEADERS TO EMBED D&I
IN CORE BUSINESSES AND HR PROCESSES
(CONTINUED)
ąĚ/ŏ%2!./%05ŏ* ŏ*(1/%+*ŏ0%+*ŏ(*ŏ"+.ŏ),.+2!)!*0
■
Business leaders use
the specific descriptions
in each dimension and
level to benchmark their
operations’ current state
and create action plans for
improvement.
ą2. Overall Rating Not Automatically Calculated
The overall rating is not calculated automatically
to prevent the tool from being too prescriptive.
Businesses decide this based on their
assessment for each dimension.
Diversity and Inclusion Plan
Select Overall Country/Business Rating:
Dimension
Level
1. Strategy, Policy,
and Plans
Actions Needed
ā
2. Monitoring and
Measuring
By Whom
ă
6. Job Design,
Flexibility, and
Compensation
7. Marketing and
Communications
8. Community
Involvement
2
Accountability for Progress
Actions not fulfilled in the
assessment should be noted as
actions that must be focused
on in the following year.
4. Employee
Acquisition and
Advancement
5. Training and
Development
Progress Update
Foundational
Dimensions
The overall rating cannot
be higher than the lowest
rating received for the
first three dimensions.
3. Leadership and
Accountability
By When
Guidance on Identifying Action Steps
Evidence of what demonstrates success at each level is listed within the assessment to guide leaders in
drafting actions.
Starting
There is
an equal
opportunity
statement or
related policy
in place.
Complying
“If there is no equal opportunities
statement or related policy in
place, the business must be
assessed at the ‘starting’ level. In
the interim, the G4S Group Policy
on D&I should apply.
2% !*!čŏCopy of the statement
or policy.”
The equal
opportunity
statement
is reviewed
annually by the
HR director or
another member
of the senior
management
team.
“2% !*!č Policy
should be up to date
with evidence that it is
regularly reviewed by
the HR director or other
senior manager.”
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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PRACTICE OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
COMPONENT 3
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity15
ąŏ !ü*!/ŏĒŏ
success based on local
employees’ perceptions
of progress made by
business units, ensuring
assessment’s local
relevance.
■
■
■
It is an HR standard that
all business units annually
assess D&I using the tool
and create a plan for
improvement, gathering
feedback from the regional
HR director or the head of
D&I as necessary.
To achieve an overall rating
of embedding or above,
business leaders must gather
feedback from a wide range
of stakeholders on the
business’s D&I progress.
Gathering employee input
on D&I allows for local
interpretation of each
criteria within the globally
consistent framework.
INVOLVE EMPLOYEES TO DETERMINE LOCAL
D&I SUCCESS
Local Employee Interpretation of D&I Success
Employee Focus Group in Business Unit A, Illustrative
Business Unit A’s Diversity
and Inclusion Assessment
Employee Focus Group in Business Unit B,
Illustrative
“How inclusive is
our business unit
in the training
and development
dimension?“
Business Unit B’s Diversity
and Inclusion Assessment
?
“How inclusive is
our business unit
in the training
and development
dimension?”
?
Business
Leader A
Business
Leader B
“I think we’re at the
embedding level because
the last training program
I went to addressed
difficult and sometimes
uncomfortable issues
of stereotypes and
prejudice.”
“I don’t think we’ve reached the
embedding level yet because our
training material still hasn’t been
updated to include new antidiscrimination legislation.”
“I think we’re still
at the complying
level—there are a
lot of stereotypes
common in our
culture.”
Three Benefits of Defining Success Based on Input from Employees
ŏ āċŏ ),(+5!!ŏ*##!)!*0čŏEmployees are more engaged as a result of opportunity to provide feedback.
ŏ Ăċŏ +1*0%(%05ŏ"+.ŏ),.+2!)!*0čŏBusiness leaders feel responsibility to employees to improve D&I.
ŏ ăċŏ +((5ŏ!(!2*0ŏ1!//čŏSuccess is based on local culture, perspectives, and appetite for D&I.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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PRACTICE OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
COMPONENT 3
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity16
ąĚ/ŏ//!//)!*0ŏ0++(ŏ
improves leaders’ ability
to benchmark D&I in
their local operational
contexts and identify
opportunities for
improvement.
IMPROVED ABILITY TO IMPLEMENT
GLOBAL D&I STRATEGY LOCALLY
Businesses Know Where to Focus D&I Efforts
“In a company as big and complex as
G4S, the tool is intended to help leaders
to see the D&I vision and take steps to
implement it in their existing business
processes in easily manageable and
”
measurable ways.
Head of Employee Relations,
Diversity and Inclusion
G4S plc
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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PRACTICE OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
COMPONENT 3
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity17
IMPLEMENTATION TIPS FOR DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION ASSESSMENT
TOOL
ā
2
ă
Create accountability for using the D&I assessment tool and making progress against the action plan. Tie D&I
assessment, the subsequent creation of the action plan, and progress against the plans to business leaders’ objectives
and/or compensation to increase relevance.
Ask HR and business leaders to select a representative group of local employees to provide input on D&I progress.
Ensure HR and business leaders nominate a diverse set of employees for the focus groups to avoid group think.
Provide HR support for creating action plans. Once local D&I assessment is complete, HR should support local
business leaders in creating realistic and achievable action plans for D&I improvement.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity18
ŏāčŏŏŏŏŏŏ
CHALLENGE
It is difficult to set and evaluate
organizationally consistent objectives.
),!.0%2!ŏāčŏ*(!ŏ!#%+*(ŏ3*!./$%,ŏ
to Address Organization-Wide D&I Challenges
),!.0%2!ŏĂčŏ//!//ŏ* ŏ*!*0%2%6!ŏ
.+#.!//Čŏ+0ŏ
1/0ŏ10+)!/ŏ
ąĚ/ŏĒŏ//!//)!*0ŏ++(
BAE Systems’ Incremental D&I MBOs
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity19
CORPORATE
LEADERSHIP
COUNCIL
INCREMENTAL D&I MBOs
CORPORATE EXECUTIVE BOARD
OVERVIEW
BAE Systems was struggling to make progress on its D&I objectives, despite business leaders understanding the D&I
business case and how it improves financial outcomes. BAE Systems realized that to make progress on organizational
diversity objectives, it needed to enable business leader ownership of diversity objectives and to hold leaders
accountable for progress.
SOLUTION HIGHLIGHTS
BAE Systems increases business leaders’ focus on improving diversity and inclusion outcomes by translating
organizational D&I objectives and strategy to BU-specific D&I objectives and holding leaders accountable for progress.
ŏ
āċŏ !!*0.(%6!ŏ3*!./$%,ŏ+"ŏĒŏ.%+.%0%!/ŏ0+ŏ1/%*!//ŏ! !./čŏBusiness leaders assess the current and
aspirational D&I maturity level for their business unit on BAE Systems’ maturity matrix.
ŏ Ăċŏ '!ŏ+*#ġ!.)ŏ&!0%2!/ŏ/%!.ŏ0+ŏ$%!2!ŏ5ŏ!00%*#ŏ*0!.%)ŏ0!,/čŏBusiness leaders translate maturity
aspirations into five-year and one-year D&I objectives and set milestone for the one-year objectives.
ŏ ăċŏ *!*0%2%6!ŏ.+#.!//ŏ+3. ŏĒŏ&!0%2!/ŏ$.+1#$ŏ+"0ŏ* ŏ. ŏ+1*0%(%05čŏBAE Systems embeds
accountability for D&I success through CEO and peer visibility, and a bonus component tied to progress against
D&I objectives.
COMPANY SNAPSHOT
BAE Systems
Industry:
2011 Sales:
Employees:
Aerospace
and Defense
£19.1 Billion
93,500
BAE Systems is a global defence, aerospace, and security company.
The organization delivers a full range of products and services for
air, land, and naval forces, as well as advanced electronics, security,
information technology solutions, and support services.
Headquarters: United Kingdom
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity20
When BAE Systems
discovered an urgent
need to make progress
on its D&I initiatives,
the company identified
two primary barriers it
needed to address.
TWO KEY BARRIERS TO D&I PROGRESS
āċŏŏ'ŏ+"ŏ+))+*ŏ&!0%2!/čŏ1/%*!//ŏ1*%0/ŏĨ/ĩŏ
find it difficult to achieve common D&I objectives.
Ăċŏŏ'ŏ+"ŏ+))%0)!*0čŏ1/%*!//ŏ(! !./ŏ
are not committed to making D&I progress.
Locations Where BAE Systems Has Operations
■
+*ý%0ŏ3%0$ŏ0$!.ŏ0.0!#%ŏ.%+.%0%!/čŏ
Deployment of diversity initiatives conflicts with
other strategic priorities that are tied to potential
financial gains for the business.
■
Lack of Governance to Achieve Diversity
&!0%2!/čŏBusiness leaders do not have
timelines or involvement of stakeholders to focus
urgently on achieving organizational diversity
objectives.
Business units cannot effectively implement
organizational diversity initiatives due to differences in:
■
Regional diversity laws and regulations,
■
Regional diversity norms and customs, and
■
Scale and nature of BU operations.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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SITUATION
PRACTICE
OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
COMPONENT 3
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity21
BAE Systems’
business leaders own
customization of BU D&I
objectives and are held
accountable to make
progress toward these
objectives.
■
■
■
BAE Systems’ business
leaders have ownership over
translating organizational
D&I objectives into BUspecific D&I objectives that
align with the BUs’ unique
needs and challenges.
Business leaders are held
accountable for interim steps
to achieve BU-specific D&I
objectives, rather than the
final objectives.
ESTABLISH BUSINESS LEADER OWNERSHIP
AND ACCOUNTABILITY FOR DIVERSITY
Barriers to Making Progress
on Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives
BAE Systems’ Response
0!,ŏāčŏ!!*0.(%6!ŏ3*!./$%,ŏ
Decentralize ownership of D&I priorities
to business leaders.
ChallengeŏāčŏBUs find it difficult to achieve
common D&I objectives.
0!,ŏĂčŏ!0ŏ*0!.%)ŏ&!0%2!/
Make long-term objectives easier to achieve
by setting interim steps.
BAE Systems embeds
accountability into business
leaders’ work stream through
CEO and peer visibility and
short-term incentives.
0!,ŏăčŏ1%( ŏ+"0ŏ* ŏ. ŏ+1*0%(%05
Incentivize progress toward D&I objectives
through soft and hard accountability.
Challenge 2č Business leaders are not
committed to making D&I progress.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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SITUATION
PRACTICE
OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
COMPONENT 3
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity22
BAE Systems’ business
leaders determine their
diversity priorities based
on the level of maturity
they can achieve across
Őü4! ŏ/!0ŏ+"ŏ0!#+.%!/ċ
■
■
■
BAE Systems’ diversity
function presents its
organizational diversity
strategy in a five-level
maturity matrix.
BAE Systems’ maturity
matrix tool requires leaders
to make progress across four
categories.
Leaders determine current
and aspirational maturity
levels, supervised by the
head of D&I.
DECENTRALIZE OWNERSHIP OF D&I
PRIORITIES TO BUSINESS LEADERS
BAE Systems’ Diversity and Inclusion Maturity Matrix Tool
āċŏ! !./$%,
2. Systems and Processes
ăċŏ!."+.)*!
ąċŏ+),!0!*!ŏ* ŏ,%(%05
!2!(ŏāč
Basic
!2!(ŏĂčŏ
Awareness
!2!(ŏăčŏ
Understanding
and Application
!2!(ŏąčŏ
Integrated
!2!(ŏĆčŏ
Sustainable
Maturity Level
Leaders are
familiar with
basic principles
of HR and
diversity.
Leaders and
management
have awareness
of benefits
of diverse
workforce and
inclusive culture.
Through
development
actions, all
employees
understand
how diversity
applies to their
role and work
environment.
Leaders and
management
have knowledge
and skill set
to enhance
business
performance
through
effective
inclusion.
All employees
consistently and
unconsciously
demonstrate
inclusive
behaviors. Being
inclusive is how
we do business.
■
Current
Maturity Level:
2
■
Maturity Level
After Five
Years: 4
■
■
■
Sample Indicators of Each Level
Interview
training,
including D&I
and associated
legislation, is
mandatory
for all hiring
managers.
D&I workshops
and briefings
raise
awareness
of underrepresented
population
groups.
Development
programs
have been
established
to support
specific talent
groups.
■
D&I
performance
is recognized
externally
through
receipt of
awards and
positive media.
coverage
■
Requests are
received and
supported to
share learning
at external D&I
events.
Business leaders
use indicators
embedded in
the matrix to
determine current
maturity level and
what level BU can
achieve in next
five years.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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SITUATION
PRACTICE
OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
COMPONENT 3
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity23
BAE Systems’ business
leaders translate diversity
maturity aspirations into
yearly BU-specific D&I
objectives.
ŏġŏ
ŏŏ
TO ACHIEVE BY SETTING INTERIM STEPS
Diversity Objectives Translation Process for BU Alpha
Illustrative Example
■
■
■
All business leaders establish
their five-year aspirational
maturity levels across the
four fixed categories.
ā
Declare FiveYear Maturity
Aspirations
2
Translate
Maturity
Aspirations to
Five-Year D&I
Objectives
■
Increase recruitment and
development of black population
from disadvantaged background.
■
Create a supportive work
environment for LGBT employees.
ă
Translate
Five-Year
Objectives to
One-Year D&I
Objectives
■
Provide funds and equipment to
support mathematics and science
education of black students.
■
Establish LGBT network with open
membership for all employees.
■
Continue apprenticeship program
for Black students.
Set
Milestones
for One-Year
Objectives
■
4,!0! ŏ!/1(0čŏIdentify 16
black students to receive college
scholarships for science and
engineering programs.
■
%)!(%*!/č By end of June
For Competence/Capability
dimension, BU Alpha wants to
reach 01.%05ŏ!2!(ŏąŏ5ŏĂĀāĈ.
Business
leaders declare
maturity levels
they expect to
achieve across
the next five
years for the
four fixed sets
of categories.
These aspirations drive
five-year D&I objectives that
translate into one-year D&I
objectives.
The head of D&I reviews
five-year and one-year D&I
objectives and provides
additional input.
ą
■
4,!0! ŏ!/1(0/čŏMembers of
LGBT network provide a set of
recommendations on LGBT issues.
■
%)!(%*!/čŏSet up group by end
of July.
The D&I
contact person
for each BU
helps business
leaders assess
one-year
objectives for
implementation
feasibility and
helps leaders
set milestones
that are viable.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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SITUATION
PRACTICE
OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
COMPONENT 3
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity24
BAE Systems’ business
leaders share D&I
progress with the CEO
and with peers and
receive a bonus based
on that progress.
■
BAE Systems’ CEO reviews
D&I progress with each
business leader in quarterly
business review meetings to
ensure timely achievement
of objectives.
INCENTIVIZE PROGRESS TOWARD D&I
ŏŏ
BAE Systems Embeds Soft and Hard Accountability for Diversity
Soft Accountability
Create CEO and Peer Visibility
ā
■
■
■
Business leaders share
BU’s diversity objectives,
milestones, and progress
with peer leaders in monthly
review calls, which are run
by the diversity function
with the objective of
building peer pressure.
BAE Systems’ CEO, Board,
and corporate responsibility
committee use a D&I
performance scorecard
to analyze D&I progress
at the end of the year
and make diversity bonus
recommendations.
■
Embed D&I progress updates in regularly scheduled
meetings between business leaders and CEO.
#!* ŏ3*!./$%,čŏBusiness leaders share D&I activities
and results for each quarter.
.%2!ŏ.#!*5čŏCEO reviews progress against planned
activities to instill urgency and execution.
CEO
2
Hard Accountability
Tie Bonus to D&I Progress
Business
Leader
Establish monthly review meeting where each business
leader presents objectives and progress to peer leaders.
ă
Compare actual D&I outcomes with milestones set at the
beginning of the year to decide bonus component for
senior leaders.
D&I Year-End Performance Review Sheet for BU Alpha
(Illustrative Example)
One-Year
Objectives
Duration
Milestones Achieved
Provide funds
and equipment
to support
mathematics and
science education
of black students.
End of June
%)!(%*!//čŏOn time
!/1(0čŏScholarship
granted to 14
qualifying black
students
Establish LGBT
awareness
network.
End of July
%)!(%*!//č One
month late
!/1(0č Strong
recommendations
received
#!* č Discuss BU Alpha’s
one-year objectives, targets,
and progress.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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SITUATION
PRACTICE
OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
COMPONENT 3
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity25
BAE Systems’
incremental D&I
objectives and outcomes
help improve workforce
diversity.
IMPROVED OWNERSHIP AND
ACCOUNTABILITY LEADS TO BETTER RESULTS
Percentage of Business Lines Expecting Level Improvement Across All Four Diversity Categories
2012
ąĀŃ
No
ćĀŃ
Yes
Better Performance Against Objectives
More Tangible Goals
“Setting incremental objectives is making
diversity and inclusion more tangible for our
“What gets measured gets done is definitely true
for diversity initiatives. In addition, the CEO’s
businesses. Each plan builds on the previous
involvement, peer visibility, and the financial
one to showcase what the five-year picture
linkage has created a heightened sense of
looks like. They are like steps of a ladder
accountability amongst our leaders to achieve
leading to the end point.
their objectives.
”
Donna Halkyard
Head of Diversity and Inclusion
BAE Systems
”
Donna Halkyard
Head of Diversity and Inclusion
BAE Systems
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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SITUATION
PRACTICE
OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
COMPONENT 3
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity26
IMPLEMENTATION TIPS FOR SETTING INCREMENTAL D&I MBOs
ā
2
ă
Garner senior leader support and involvement before rollout of the maturity matrix. Secure senior management
buy-in and involvement before rollout to reinforce the importance of diversity and inclusion to the organization. During
the initial rollout of D&I maturity matrix, ensure high-level of commitment and communication from senior executives
(such as CEO) directed toward business leaders.
Create defined guidelines for using the D&I maturity matrix. To ensure business leaders interpret the maturity matrix
consistently, draft specific guidelines to define successive maturity levels across these four categories: leadership,
systems and processes, performance, and competence and capability.
Provide support to business leaders in setting yearly D&I objectives. To ensure that business leaders are not setting
overly ambitious or modest D&I objectives for their business units, the diversity function (or HR function) must play an
active role in supporting business leaders in assessing maturity levels and setting incremental D&I objectives.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity27
ŏāčŏŏŏŏŏŏ
Key Takeaways
1. Create regional ownership of progress against D&I objectives
by enabling leaders to define locally relevant objectives within a
centrally determined framework.
2. Assess and incentivize progress against incremental rather than
long-term D&I goals.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity28
CREATING COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE THROUGH WORKFORCE DIVERSITY
I
II
III
Define Relevant
Diversity and Inclusion Objectives
Build a Diverse and
Inclusive Workforce
Create a Diverse
Leadership Pipeline
),!.0%2!ŏāčŏEnable Regional Ownership
to Address Organization-Wide D&I Challenges
),!.0%2!ŏăčŏUse Trusted Sources
to Expand the Pool of Diverse Talent
),!.0%2!ŏćčŏImprove the Leadership
Value Proposition for Diverse Talent
G4S’s D&I Assessment Tool
),!.0%2!ŏĂčŏAssess and
Incentivize Progress, Not Just Outcomes
BAE Systems’ Incremental D&I MBOs
BAE Systems’ Influencer Outreach
Cochlear’s Leadership
Presence Program
),!.0%2!ŏąčŏHire for
Inclusive Behaviors
Nestlé’s Self-Sustaining
Dual Career Network
Sodexo’s Inclusion
Competency Interviewing
),!.0%2!ŏĆčŏReinforce Inclusive
Behaviors During Critical Moments
),!.0%2!ŏĈčŏNeutralize Biases
in Talent Management Decisions
BBVA’s Gender-Blind
HIPO Assessments
Duke Energy’s
Successor “Fit Scores”
Telstra’s Inclusive
People Management Behaviors
Cemex México’s Data-Driven
Succession Planning
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity29
ŏĂčŏŏŏŏŏŏ
CHALLENGE
It is difficult to attract diverse candidates
and to create an environment that enables
employees to contribute to their full potential.
),!.0%2!ŏăčŏ/!ŏ.1/0! ŏ
Sources to Expand the
Pool of Diverse Talent
),!.0%2!ŏąŏčŏ%.!ŏ"+.ŏ
Inclusive Behaviors
),!.0%2!ŏĆčŏ!%*"+.!ŏ*(1/%2!ŏ
Behaviors at Critical Moments
BAE Systems’
Influencer Outreach
Sodexo’s Inclusion
Competency Interviewing
Telstra’s Inclusive
People Management Behaviors
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity30
Organizations engage
in a variety of activities
to recruit diverse
candidates.
ORGANIZATIONS CONDUCT NUMEROUS DIVERSITY
RECRUITING ACTIVITIES
Diversity Recruiting Activities
Percentage of Organizations
Building Partnerships with Diversity Associations
95%
Posting on Diversity-Focused Job Boards
95%
92%
Soliciting Referrals from Current Diverse Talent
Recruiting on Campuses for
Internships and Entry-Level Positions
90%
Brand Building and Sourcing Through LinkedIn
90%
89%
Long-Term Communication with Diverse Talent
85%
Advertising in Print Media
82%
Working with Employee Resource Groups
79%
Outsourcing to Search Firms
59%
Brand Building and Sourcing Through Facebook
Brand Building and Sourcing Through Twitter
52%
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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n = 61.
Source: CLC Recruiting, Diversity Recruiting Study, 2010.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity31
Diversity recruiting
strategies have not
been effective at
meeting organizational
recruiting goals.
ORGANIZATIONS STRUGGLE TO RECRUIT DIVERSE
TALENT
“My Organization Is Able to Effectively Recruit Diverse Talent”
Percentage of HR Executives
āĈŃ
Agree or
Strongly
Agree
ĉăŃ
Do Not Agree
n = 29.
“We’re investing more time and money in diversity recruiting, but it’s not significantly increasing our number
of diverse hires.”
Diversity Manager
Consumer Products Company
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Source: CLC Human Resources, Global Diversity and Inclusion Survey, 2012
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity32
Organizations mostly
use impersonal sources
(such as job boards and
print media) for diversity
recruiting, but diverse
candidates trust these
sources the least.
DIVERSE CANDIDATES DO NOT TRUST SOURCES THAT
ORGANIZATIONS USE MOST
Diverse Candidates’ Most Trusted
Information Sources
Employers’ Most Frequently Used Sources
for Diversity Recruiting
āĀŃ
Impersonal
Sources
ćĀŃ
Impersonal
Sources
ąĀŃ
Personal
Sources
ĊĀŃ
Personal
Sources
Examples of Personal and Impersonal Sources
Personal Sources
■
■
■
■
■
Referrals from diverse employees
In-person campus recruiting
Teachers and career advisors
Family and friends
Employee resource group contacts
Impersonal Sources
■
■
■
■
■
■
Diversity-focused job boards
Diversity associations
LinkedIn
Print media advertising
Search firms
Twitter and Facebook
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity33
BAE Systems builds its
brand in an expanded
diverse talent pool
by targeting diverse
students and the teachers
and career advisors who
influence them.
■
TARGET TRUSTED CAREER INFLUENCERS
TO EXPAND YOUR DIVERSE TALENT POOL
BAE Systems’ Three-Pronged Targeting Approach
1 INTRODUCTION FOR TEACHERS
BIOMIMICRY | DESIGN INSPIRED BY NATURE
x
In its 3.8 billion year history, nature has found
solutions to many design and engineering
problems that we are trying to solve.
The principle of following nature’s example is
not a new one. Leonardo Da Vinci’s sketchbooks
are littered with examples of drawings and ideas
closely linked to designs found in the natural
world. His helicopter idea, for example, was
inspired by a sycamore seed.
There are many examples of human-engineered
applications and living things that exhibit similar
1.1
Scientific thinking
1.2
Applications and implications of science
b) Critically analysing and evaluating evidence from observations and experiments
Career
Advisor
a) Exploring how creative application of scientific ideas can bring about technological
developments and consequent changes in the way people think and behave
2.1
Practical and enquiry skills
b) Assess risk and work safely in the laboratory, field and workplace
c) Plan and carry out practical and investigative activities, both individually and in
groups
Energy, electricity and forces
BAE Systems Education Programme - www.baesystems.com/education
BAE Systems works to create a
positive lasting memory in young
students’ minds through one-day
school road shows that:
■
Showcase work done by BAE
engineers that will excite younger
students (e.g., robots);
Present an interactive theatre show
on aspects of engineering to be
taught through school syllabus; and
Target students before they make
course selections that would make
it difficult to enter engineering later.
BAE Systems equips teachers to
influence students through classroom
interactions by:
■
■
Providing syllabus-aligned lesson
plans for teachers to identify and
encourage students’ aptitude
toward engineering; and
Guiding teachers on how to
motivate students potentially
interested in engineering.
BAE Systems prepares career
advisors to promote engineering
in counseling sessions by:
■
■
■
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Collect data and improve model
Science Programme of study for Key Stage 3, National Curriculum
Perhaps one of the most celebrated examples is
velcro, the hook and loop fastening system that
replaces the need for zips and buttons.
In 1948, the Swiss Engineer, George de Mestral
noticed that, on returning from a walk with his
dog, his trousers and his dog’s pelt were covered
with seed pods from a cocklebur, a kind of
thistle. Studying a single seed pod under a
microscope, he noted it was covered with tiny
hooks that readily attached to animal fur and
fabric fibres. De Mestral applied the plant’s
simple seed dispersal mechanism to create a
strong safe temporary fastener, calling this
product velcro, from “velours” meaning velvet,
and “cro” from crochet, meaning hook.
Create a rocket
Understand how a rocket works
Understand Newton’s Third Law of Motion
b) Forces are interactions between objects and can affect their shape and motion.
BAE Systems
£19.1 Billion
93,500
United Kingdom
x
x
About this pack
These materials are produced, copyright free for use in
schools. There are many more downloadable resources on
the BAE Systems website for both teachers and pupils at
www.baesystems.com/education
■
2011 Sales:
Employees:
Headquarters:
x
Lesson Outcomes
a) Energy can be transferred usefully, stored, or dissipated, but cannot be created or
destroyed
COMPANY SNAPSHOT
Aerospace and
Defense
fundamental characteristics. Sometimes these
are unintentional: think of the similarities
between a canoe paddle and a freshwater turtle
leg. At other times, the inventor deliberately
mimicked something in nature.
3.1
■
Industry:
Students construct a balloon-powered rocket from a Styrofoam tray, pins, tape and a flexible
straw then test it along a measured track on the floor. This is a simple way to observe
Newton’s Third Law of motion. Whilst it is possible to demonstrate Newton’s law with just a
balloon, constructing a rocket racer provides students with the opportunity to put the
action/reaction force to practical use.
Lesson Objectives
Biomimicry
- a word derived from “bios” meaning life
and “mimesis”, meaning to imitate.
Today, flight engineers at BAE Systems are
modelling new wing shapes and functions
based upon the structure of bird wings, and
scanning technology in the aircraft cockpit is
informed by the eye structure and capabilities
of the harrier, bird of prey.
BAE Systems’ road shows
consist of fun-filled
activities that promote the
engineering field and BAE
Systems and target students’
stereotypes against
engineering.
Lesson Overview
TEACHER RESOURCE PACK
The Wright brothers and other flight pioneers
commonly observed birds in their quest to
develop their flying machines.
■
to Help Diverse Students Explore
Engineering Courses
Students Select Engineering
Careers Using BAE Systems’
Branded Materials
Engineering and BAE Systems
Among Young Diverse Students
BAE Systems conducts oneday road shows for students
between the ages of nine
and thirteen at schools with
a good gender balance
or situated in diverse
neighborhoods.
ă Encourage Career Advisors
2 Prepare Teachers to Help Diverse
ā Increase Attractiveness of
PRACTICE OVERVIEW
Convincing career advisors to
help diverse students investigate
engineering rather than
shepherding them to the most
popular career streams;
Offering career advisors access
to a network of BAE Systems
employee “Education
Ambassadors” who provide advice
on engineering-related careers and
support career fairs and events; and
Providing information on the
competitiveness of compensation
in the engineering field.
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity34
BAE Systems increases
the interest of diverse
students in engineering
and draws a larger than
average proportion of
diverse students into
entry-level positions.
GREATER DIVERSE STUDENT INTEREST
IN ENGINEERING AND BAE SYSTEMS
Percentage of Students Reporting Increased
Interest in Engineering Following Road Show
Female Representation in BAE Systems’
Versus National Engineering Apprenticeship
Programs
7%
āĆŃ
No
ĉĆŃ
Yes
2%
National (UK)
BAE Systems
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
PRACTICE OVERVIEW
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity35
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity36
In 1948, the Swiss Engineer, George de Mestral
noticed that, on returning from a walk with his
dog, his trousers and his dog’s pelt were covered
with seed pods from a cocklebur, a kind of
thistle. Studying a single seed pod under a
microscope, he noted it was covered with tiny
hooks that readily attached to animal fur and
fabric fibres. De Mestral applied the plant’s
simple seed dispersal mechanism to create a
strong safe temporary fastener, calling this
product velcro, from “velours” meaning velvet,
and “cro” from crochet, meaning hook.
Perhaps one of the most celebrated examples is
velcro, the hook and loop fastening system that
replaces the need for zips and buttons.
fundamental characteristics. Sometimes these
are unintentional: think of the similarities
between a canoe paddle and a freshwater turtle
leg. At other times, the inventor deliberately
mimicked something in nature.
For more BAE Systems’ teacher and career advisor resources, please see the Appendix.
About this pack
These materials are produced, copyright free for use in
schools. There are many more downloadable resources on
the BAE Systems website for both teachers and pupils at
www.baesystems.com/education
There are many examples of human-engineered
applications and living things that exhibit similar
Today, flight engineers at BAE Systems are
modelling new wing shapes and functions
based upon the structure of bird wings, and
scanning technology in the aircraft cockpit is
informed by the eye structure and capabilities
of the harrier, bird of prey.
The Wright brothers and other flight pioneers
commonly observed birds in their quest to
develop their flying machines.
In its 3.8 billion year history, nature has found
solutions to many design and engineering
problems that we are trying to solve.
The principle of following nature’s example is
not a new one. Leonardo Da Vinci’s sketchbooks
are littered with examples of drawings and ideas
closely linked to designs found in the natural
world. His helicopter idea, for example, was
inspired by a sycamore seed.
Biomimicry
- a word derived from “bios” meaning life
and “mimesis”, meaning to imitate.
BIOMIMICRY | DESIGN INSPIRED BY NATURE
TEACHER RESOURCE PACK
1 INTRODUCTION FOR TEACHERS
4),(!čŏ!$!.ŏ* ŏ.!!.ŏ 2%/+.ŏ!/+1.!ŏ!)+*/0.0%*#ŏ.+"!//%+*(ŏ,,(%0%+*/ŏ
of Science-Focused Education
BAE SYSTEMS’ TEACHER AND
CAREER ADVISOR RESOURCES
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity37
Understand how a rocket works
Understand Newton’s Third Law of Motion
BAE Systems Education Programme - www.baesystems.com/education
b) Forces are interactions between objects and can affect their shape and motion.
a) Energy can be transferred usefully, stored, or dissipated, but cannot be created or
destroyed
Energy, electricity and forces
c) Plan and carry out practical and investigative activities, both individually and in
groups
b) Assess risk and work safely in the laboratory, field and workplace
Practical and enquiry skills
a) Exploring how creative application of scientific ideas can bring about technological
developments and consequent changes in the way people think and behave
Applications and implications of science
b) Critically analysing and evaluating evidence from observations and experiments
Scientific thinking
For more BAE Systems’ teacher and career advisor resources, please see the Appendix.
3.1
2.1
1.2
1.1
Science Programme of study for Key Stage 3, National Curriculum
x
x
Lesson Outcomes
Create a rocket
Collect data and improve model
x
x
Lesson Objectives
Students construct a balloon-powered rocket from a Styrofoam tray, pins, tape and a flexible
straw then test it along a measured track on the floor. This is a simple way to observe
Newton’s Third Law of motion. Whilst it is possible to demonstrate Newton’s law with just a
balloon, constructing a rocket racer provides students with the opportunity to put the
action/reaction force to practical use.
Lesson Overview
4),(!čŏ*#%*!!.%*#ġ+1/! ŏ!//+*ŏ(*ŏ.+2% ! ŏ0+ŏ!$!./
BAE SYSTEMS’ TEACHER AND
CAREER ADVISOR RESOURCES (CONTINUED)
IMPLEMENTATION TIPS FOR INFLUENCERS OUTREACH PROGRAM
ā
2
ă
Conduct school road shows for the most important career opportunities at your organization. Use school road
shows selectively for the careers most critical to your organization’s success to ensure the highest returns on resource
investments.
Highlight your organization’s brand on materials for classroom interactions. Consider purchasing syllabus-aligned
curriculum plans for student-teacher classroom interaction rather than preparing these in-house, but ensure that
educational materials convey your organization’s brand whenever possible.
Ask career advisors and teachers to provide input to the organization on how to optimize educational material.
Solicit advice from career advisors and teachers on how to make the educational material more engaging for students.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity38
ŏĂčŏŏŏŏŏŏ
CHALLENGE
It is difficult to attract diverse candidates
and to create an environment that enables
employees to contribute to their full potential.
),!.0%2!ŏăčŏ/!ŏ.1/0! ŏ
Sources to Expand the
Pool of Diverse Talent
),!.0%2!ŏąŏčŏ%.!ŏ"+.ŏ
Inclusive Behaviors
),!.0%2!ŏĆŏčŏ!%*"+.!ŏ*(1/%2!ŏ
Behaviors at Critical Moments
BAE Systems’
Influencer Outreach
Sodexo’s Inclusion
Competency Interviewing
Telstra’s Inclusive
People Management Behaviors
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity39
To ensure managers are
likely to be inclusive
after being hired, Sodexo
assesses candidates on
their demonstrated past
inclusive behaviors.
■
■
An employee who values
diversity—and more
importantly exhibits inclusive
behaviors—more naturally
selects, collaborates with,
and retains diverse talent.
Sodexo includes diversityand inclusion-focused
questions in both
competency-based and
hiring manager interviews.
EVALUATE FOR “INCLUSION COMPETENCY”
Elements of Inclusion in Sodexo’s Competency-Based Selection Process
Candidates for Management Positions
Validated CompetencyBased Interview
Hiring Manager
Interview
Inclusion-Related Questions from
Competency-Based Interview Guide
Inclusion-Related Questions from
Hiring Manager Interview Guide
Illustrative
Illustrative
■
$),%+*%*#ŏ%2!./%05ŏ* ŏ*(1/%+*čŏWhat
efforts have you made, or been involved with,
to foster diversity and inclusion competencies
and understanding?
■
$),%+*%*#ŏ%2!./%05ŏ* ŏ*(1/%+*čŏ
How have you handled a situation when an
employee was not accepting of others’ diverse
background?
■
!/,!0%*#ŏ%2!.#!*0ŏ!./,!0%2!/čŏTell me
about a time when you achieved superior
outcomes by incorporating divergent
perspectives.
■
!/,!0%*#ŏ%2!.#!*0ŏ!./,!0%2!/čŏWhat
have you done to further your knowledge
about diversity and inclusion? How have you
demonstrated what you have learned?
Candidate Evaluation Criteria
Illustrative
COMPANY SNAPSHOT
Sodexo, Inc.
*+3(! #!č The candidate’s understanding of diversity and inclusion is broad and includes nonstereotypical notions of diversity.
2011 Sales:
Business
Services
US$8 Billion
Employees:
120,000
4,!.%!*!č The candidate is skilled in managing diverse teams and fostering an inclusive
environment.
Headquarters:
United States
0%+*/č The candidates’ actions demonstrate his or her diversity and inclusion values.
Industry:
(1!/čŏThe candidate shows positive emotion when talking about diversity and inclusion.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Source: CLC Recruiting, Beneath the Surface of Diversity Recruiting, 2011.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity40
Select candidates
whose past actions and
experiences indicate
a high likelihood of
adopting inclusive
behaviors in addition to a
genuine appreciation for
diversity and inclusion.
INTERVIEW QUESTIONS TO ASSESS
FOR INCLUSIVE BEHAVIORS
*+3(! #!ŏ* ŏ(1!/čŏ$!ŏ* % 0!ŏ/$+3/ŏŏ0$+.+1#$ŏ1* !./0* %*#ŏ
of, and genuine appreciation for, diversity and inclusion.
How important is workforce diversity and inclusion to you?
What are the benefits of team diversity and inclusion?
Traditional approach to
assessing candidate’s
diversity and inclusion skills
Why is it important for the organization you work for to demonstrate its
diversity and inclusion values?
0%+*/ŏ* ŏ!$2%+./čŏ$!ŏ* % 0!Ě/ŏ0%+*/ŏ !)+*/0.0!ŏ!4,!.%!*!ŏ
and skill in managing diverse teams and fostering an inclusive work
environment.
What efforts have you made, or been involved with, to foster diversity
and inclusion competencies and understanding? How have you
demonstrated what you have learned?
Learn More
Beneath the Surface of Diversity
Recruiting, CLC Recruiting
This research study presents
quantitative findings and best
practices to help you identify
opportunities for Recruiting
to foster workplace inclusion
and attract and source diverse
talent.
Tell me about a time when you achieved superior outcomes by
incorporating diverse perspectives.
Behavior-focused approach
to assessing candidates’
ability to foster an inclusive
environment
Have you ever seen any bias against someone from a different
background than the norm? What did you do?
How have you handled a situation when a colleague or a direct report
was not accepting of others’ background, values, or experiences?
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Source: CLC Recruiting, Beneath the Surface of Diversity Recruiting, 2011.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity41
ŏĂčŏŏŏŏŏŏ
CHALLENGE
It is difficult to attract diverse candidates
and to create an environment that enables
employees to contribute to their full potential.
),!.0%2!ŏăčŏ/!ŏ.1/0! ŏ
Sources to Expand the
Pool of Diverse Talent
),!.0%2!ŏąŏčŏ%.!ŏ"+.ŏ
Inclusive Behaviors
),!.0%2!ŏĆŏčŏ!%*"+.!ŏ*(1/%2!ŏ
Behaviors at Critical Moments
BAE Systems’
Influencer Outreach
Sodexo’s Inclusion
Competency Interviewing
Telstra’s Inclusive
People Management Behaviors
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity42
A large majority
of organizations are
investing significant
resources in diversity and
inclusion training, which
improve the perceived
value of an inclusive work
environment.
TRAINING IMPROVES PERCEIVED VALUE OF INCLUSION
Percentage of Organizations Providing
Diversity Training
Employee Time Spend in Diversity Training
ąŏ,!./+*ŏ$+1./ŏ,!.ŏ5!.
x
āĀČĀĀĀŏ,!./+*ŏ+.#*%60%+*
=
ąĀČĀĀĀŏ,!./+*ŏ$+1./ŏ/,!*0
in diversity training
ĈāŃ
Offer
Training
n = 250.
“Employees in My Organization Understand
the Value of Diversity”
Percentage of Employees
“Senior Leaders in My Organization Are
Committed to Diversity”
Percentage of Employees
ćĆŃ
Agree
n = 9,626.
ćĂŃ
Agree
n = 9,626.
Source: SHRM, “Workplace Diversity Practices—How Has Diversity and Inclusion Changed Over Time?,” 2010; CLC Human Resources, Global Labor Market Survey, 2012.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity43
Less than one-half of
all employees across
the globe perceive their
work environments as
inclusive.
PERCEIVED VALUE DOES NOT LEAD TO INCLUSIVE
WORK ENVIRONMENT
“My Organization Values Divergent Perspectives”
Percentage of Employees
48%
India
52%
Agree
Disagree/Neutral
Canada
45%
55%
United States
45%
55%
South Africa
39%
61%
United Kingdom
39%
61%
Australia
Singapore
37%
28%
63%
72%
n = 8,151.
Source: CLC Human Resources, Global Labor Market Survey, 2012.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity44
Sustaining improvements
to inclusive behaviors
requires reinforcement
over multiple
touchpoints.
SUSTAINED INCLUSION REQUIRES REINFORCEMENT
Impact of Sustained and One-Off Approaches to Promoting Inclusion
Illustrative
Sustained Approach to Promoting Inclusion
One-Off Approach to Promoting Inclusion
Path A: Diversity and inclusion
training leads to an improvement
in inclusive behaviors immediately
following the session...
...and these behaviors are
periodically reinforced...
...leading inclusive behaviors to be
sustained over time.
Behavior Change
Reinforcement Dividend
Path B: Diversity and inclusion training
leads to an improvement in behaviors
immediately following the session...
...but lack of reinforcement
leads to a fall off in behavior
change...
...and inclusive behaviors are not
sustained over time.
Time
Repeated Learning Leads to Behavior Change
Psychology research, started by Hermann Ebbinghaus in 1885, shows that repeated teaching over time enhances longterm knowledge retention and behavior change.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Source: Bussenius, Clara E. (Trans): Ebbinghaus, Roger Hermann, and Henry A. (Trans), Memory: A Contribution to Experimental Psychology, New York: Teacher’s College Press,
1913.
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity45
Telstra provides
managers with concrete
examples of inclusive
behaviors they should
demonstrate.
■
Telstra realized that
communicating the business
case for inclusion would
help managers understand
its importance to the
organization but would not
sufficiently drive change in
managers’ behaviors.
COMMUNICATE EXAMPLES OF INCLUSIVE
BEHAVIORS
Examples of Inclusive Behaviors Communicated to Managers
To Get
Managers
to…
Telstra
Provides
Specific
Guidance and
Action Steps
…Use Diverse Talent
…Be Adaptable and Flexible
■
Proactively create work
or project teams that
use individuals’ unique
perspectives and maximize
innovation.
■
Align assignments to work
preferences of your team
members, while considering
their commitments and
aspirations outside of work.
■
Find ways to increase the
voice and visibility of all the
people on your team, so
they can fully contribute.
■
Flex communication
and management styles
depending on the audience.
■
Promote good examples of
flexible working within your
team.
…Build Strong Relationships
■
Foster trust and
understanding by getting
to know your team
members’ knowledge, skills,
experiences, and working
styles.
■
Encourage people on your
team to make connections
and grow their professional
networks.
COMPANY SNAPSHOT
Telstra Corporations Limited
2011 Sales:
Employees:
Telecommunications
AUD$25.3 Billion
43,181
Headquarters:
Australia
Industry:
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity46
Reinforce inclusive
management behaviors
at common key moments
in manager–employee
interactions.
REINFORCE INCLUSIVE BEHAVIORS DURING
CRITICAL INTERACTIONS
Reinforcement of Inclusive Management Behaviors
āċŏŏ!%*"+.!ŏ*(1/%2!ŏ*#!.ŏ!$2%+./ŏ
at Key Moments
2. Align Guidance to the Nature of the
Touchpoint
Reiterate the need for and examples of
inclusive behaviors prior to key manager–
employee interactions during which employees’
perceptions of inclusion can be most affected.
Customize examples of inclusive management
behaviors for each critical interaction.
Key Manager–Employee Interactions
Onboarding
Conversations
Team Meetings
and Brainstorming
Sessions
Performance
Reviews
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Recurring CheckIn Meetings
Professional
Development
Conversations
4),(!čŏPrior to conducting developmental conversations,
Telstra reminds managers to ask direct reports about
commitments and aspirations outside of work and to explore
opportunities for flexible work arrangements, if necessary.
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity47
To create an inclusive
work environment,
managers and peers
should demonstrate
inclusive behaviors at the
most critical moments in
the employee life cycle.
REINFORCE INCLUSIVE MANAGER AND PEER BEHAVIORS
AT CRITICAL MOMENTS IN EMPLOYEE LIFE CYCLE
To Foster Inclusion, Managers Should…
■
Onboarding
■
■
Meetings and
Projects
■
■
For detailed manager guides
on fostering inclusion at critical
moments in the employee life
cycle, please see the Appendix.
Employee Resource Portal
Give employees the
guides, training, tools,
and templates they need to take
ownership of their engagement
and career development and to
collaborate effectively with their
peers.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
Performance
Conversations
■
■
Long-Term
Development
Conversations
■
To Foster Inclusion, Peers Should…
Build rapport and establish trust with
all new hires.
Help employees build connections
within their team and across the
organization.
■
Communicate the importance and
advantages of divergent perspectives.
Create a safe environment for
dissenting opinions.
■
Communicate the importance of
a having two-way conversation to
accurately evaluate performance.
Discuss differences between
employee’s perceptions of his or
her performance and your own
assessment.
■
Consider flexible or nontraditional
career paths for employees who
create alternate paths to success.
Help identify mentors for employees
based on their specific interests,
goals, and needs.
■
■
■
■
■
Help new peers link their roles to the
organization’s business strategy.
Discuss with new team members
how the team’s unique strengths can
support organizational goals.
Collaborate with and encourage
information-sharing among all team
members.
Solicit opinions of peers with less
dominant communication styles.
Give and receive informal
feedback from peers with different
perspectives.
Identify specific examples
when giving feedback on peers’
accomplishments and development
areas.
Help peers develop new skills based
on their interests.
Provide networking opportunities
between peers to support career
pathing.
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity48
BCBS of Massachusetts
helps managers adapt
their communication
styles to ensure
constructive conflict with
employees with different
communication styles.
ŏčŏŏŏŏ
ŏŏ
Manager Guide for Addressing Team Conflict to Improve Inclusion in Meetings and Projects
Learn More
Profiles of Coaching Programs
and Tactics, CLC Learning and
Development
This collection of case profiles
provides tools and frameworks
for improving the quality
and consistency of manager
coaching.
COMPANY SNAPSHOT
Blue Cross and Blue Shield
of Massachusetts, Inc.
Industry:
2011 Sales:
Employees:
Headquarters:
Health Care
Non-Profit
3,635
United States
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Source: CLC Learning and Development, Profiles of Coaching Programs and Tactics, 2007.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity49
ŏĂčŏŏŏŏŏŏ
Key Takeaways
1. Influence the career influencers of potential candidates to expand
your diverse talent pool and improve organizational attractiveness.
2. Hire new people managers based on demonstrated inclusive
behaviors, not just on an understanding or appreciation for
diversity and inclusion.
3. Supplement one-off D&I training by reinforcing the manager
behaviors that foster an inclusive working environment at the
most critical moments in the employee life cycle.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity50
CREATING COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE THROUGH WORKFORCE DIVERSITY
I
II
III
Define Relevant
Diversity and Inclusion Objectives
Build a Diverse and
Inclusive Workforce
Create a Diverse
Leadership Pipeline
),!.0%2!ŏāčŏEnable Regional Ownership
to Address Organization-Wide D&I Challenges
),!.0%2!ŏăčŏUse Trusted Sources
to Expand the Pool of Diverse Talent
),!.0%2!ŏćčŏImprove the Leadership
Value Proposition for Diverse Talent
G4S’s D&I Assessment Tool
),!.0%2!ŏĂčŏAssess and
Incentivize Progress, Not Just Outcomes
BAE Systems’ Incremental D&I MBOs
BAE Systems’ Influencer Outreach
Cochlear’s Leadership
Presence Program
),!.0%2!ŏąčŏHire for
Inclusive Behaviors
Nestlé’s Self-Sustaining
Dual Career Network
Sodexo’s Inclusion
Competency Interviewing
),!.0%2!ŏĆčŏReinforce Inclusive
Behaviors During Critical Moments
),!.0%2!ŏĈčŏNeutralize Biases
in Talent Management Decisions
BBVA’s Gender-Blind
HIPO Assessments
Duke Energy’s
Successor “Fit Scores”
Telstra’s Inclusive
People Management Behaviors
Cemex México’s Data-Driven
Succession Planning
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity51
Despite marginal
improvements in
organizations’ workforce
diversity, organizational
leadership remains
homogenous.
ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP CONTINUES
TO LACK DIVERSITY
+.01*!ŏĆĀĀŏ4!10%2!ŏ!)ŏ!)+#.,$%/
Percentage of Group Represented Across
Organizations
European Organizations’ Executive Team
Demographics
Percentage of Women on Executive Committees
ăŃ
Female
8%
Female
ĊĈŃ
Male
92%
Male
+.01*!ŏĆĀĀŏ4!10%2!ŏ!)ŏ!)+#.,$%/
1/0.(%*ŏ!1.%0%!/ŏ4$*#!ŏ+,ŏĂĀĀŏĨŏ
ĂĀĀĩŏ.#*%60%+*Ě/ŏ%.!0+./ŏ!)+#.,$%/
Percentage of Group Represented Across
Organizations
Percentage of Women Directors in ASX 200
āăŃ
Ethnic Minority
(Black/African
American,
Hispanic/Latino,
Asian, Native
American)
āăŃ
Female
āĊŃ
Caucasian
Women
ćĉŃ
Caucasian
Men
ĉĈŃ
Male
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity52
ŏăčŏŏŏŏŏ
CHALLENGE
Despite marginal improvements in
organizations’ workforce diversity,
organizational leadership remains homogenous.
),!.0%2!ŏćčŏ),.+2!ŏ0$!ŏ! !./$%,ŏ(1!ŏ
Proposition for Diverse Talent
),!.0%2!ŏĈčŏ!10.(%6!ŏ%/!/ŏ
in Talent Management Decisions
BBVA’s Gender-Blind HIPO Assessments
Cochlear’s Leadership Presence Program
Duke Energy’s
Successor “Fit Scores”
Nestlé’s Self-Sustaining Dual Career Network
Cemex México’s Data-Driven
Succession Planning
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity53
Leadership positions
remain unattractive to
diverse talent.
LEADERSHIP POSITIONS NOT DESIRABLE TO WOMEN
Importance of Rising to Senior Management Position
Percentage of Average and High-Performing, Mid-Level Employees
■
■
■
Fewer average or highperforming women in middle
management desire to rise
to senior management
positions within their current
organization or another.
59%
Men
58%
Women
Most organizations try
to increase the number
of diverse talent in the
leadership pipeline by
focusing on increasing the
performance of diverse
talent through leadership
development programs and
mentoring.
35%
27%
The best organizations
realize that barriers
other than performance
impede the progression of
diverse talent, such as the
attractiveness of leadership
positions.
15%
6%
Unimportant
Neutral
Important
n = 6,898.
Source: CLC Human Resources, Global Labor Market Data Survey, 2012.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity54
CORPORATE
LEADERSHIP
COUNCIL
LEADERSHIP PRESENCE PROGRAM
CORPORATE EXECUTIVE BOARD
OVERVIEW
Many female, individual contributors demonstrating strong performance at Cochlear did not identify rising to senior
management as a career goal. Cochlear targeted this group of talent as a substantial opportunity to increase the
representation of women in the high-potential talent pool. Cochlear’s Leadership Presence Program helps participants
reflect on their strengths and revise their career goals to include leadership opportunities that capitalize on these
strengths.
SOLUTION HIGHLIGHTS
Cochlear aligns female, strong performers’ career goals to leadership positions through the following steps:
ŏ
āċŏ (%#*ŏ!./+*(ŏ0.!*#0$/ŏ0+ŏ! !./$%,ŏ.!!.ŏ0$/ģGuide participants to identify their strengths and reflect
on the unique impact they can have on the organization.
2. Connect Participants to Successful Peers and Leaders to Increase Personal Brand—Facilitate networking
between participants, senior leaders, and successful peers across the organization to highlight leadership
opportunities and increase their visibility during consideration of candidates for these opportunities.
COMPANY SNAPSHOT
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
Cochlear Limited
Industry:
Health Care
2011 Sales:
AUD$810 Million
Employees:
2,500
Headquarters:
Australia
Cochlear pioneered and is the global leader in the research and
development, manufacture, and marketing of implantable hearing
solutions. Cochlear’s global headquarters is located on the campus
of Macquarie University to enable links to world leading hearing
science research. A success story in the commercialization of R&D,
Cochlear is the global market leader, employs approximately 2,500
people worldwide, operates directly in over 20 countries, and sells
in over 100 countries. Over 200,000 people across more than 100
countries now experience hearing as a recipient of a Cochlear
hearing solution.
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity55
Perceived Misalignment with Leadership Roles
Lack of Networks Limits Clarity on Leadership
Opportunities
Diverse strong performers perceive leadership positions
as requiring skills and experiences different from those in
which this population believes they excel.
Actual
Strengths
Perceived
Strengths
Diverse strong performers lack a network outside their
functions and levels, preventing them from learning
about and being considered for leadership opportunities.
Leadership
Career Path
In addition, these
women lacked broader
organizational networks
that could encourage them
to pursue future leadership
opportunities.
Challenge 2
Career Path
■
Female individual
contributors demonstrating
strong performance at
Cochlear did not choose to
pursue broader management
responsibilities because they
did not appear to align with
their personal strengths and
goals.
$((!*#!ŏā
New
■
PERCEIVED MISALIGNMENT WITH LEADERSHIP
ROLES AND LIMITED NETWORKS DISCOURAGE
ADVANCEMENT
Projected
Career Path
Limited networks and
perceived misalignment
with leadership roles
prevent diverse, strong
performers from pursuing
broader leadership
responsibilities.
Actual Leadership
Requirements
Perceived
Leadership
Requirements
Cochlear’s Solution
+),+*!*0ŏā
Align Personal Strengths to Leadership Career Paths
Component 2
Connect Participants to Successful Peers and
Leaders to Increase Personal Brand
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
SITUATION
PRACTICE OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity56
Cochlear improves the
perceived attainability of
leadership positions for
strong female performers
through the Leadership
Presence Program.
■
Cochlear’s helps strong
female performers analyze
their personal strengths and
network with successful
peers and leaders.
■
As a result, participants
better understand the
requirements of leadership
and the alignment to their
preexisting strengths,
leading them to pursue
broader responsibilities
across the organization.
IMPROVE PERCEIVED ATTAINABILITY OF
LEADERSHIP FOR DIVERSE STRONG PERFORMERS
Components of Cochlear’s Leadership Presence Program
.0%%,*0ŏ+(čŏIdentify
personal strengths.
.0%%,*0ŏ+(čŏRevise career
goals to reflect strengths,
motivations, and ability to
impact the organization.
Pre-Workshop
.0%%,*0ŏ+(čŏDetermine how
to use new network to achieve
revised career goals.
Post-Workshop
Workshop
Feedback from Participant’s
Team and Reflection on Strengths
and Development Areas
Leadership Presence Exercises
Participant Presentation
to Managers and Senior Female
Leaders on Lessons Learned
Meeting with Past Participants
to Hear Lessons Learned
Lunch with Senior Female Leaders
One-on-One Coaching on Achieving Revised Career Goals
Joint Reflection on Career Goals
and Map to Achieving Them
Half-Day Refresher Workshop
Meeting with
New Participants to
Explain Lessons Learned
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
SITUATION
PRACTICE OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity57
Cochlear helps
participants reflect
on their strengths and
align them to leadership
opportunities.
■
Participants analyze their
personal strengths based on
feedback from their current
colleagues on the job.
■
Guided reflection with
other participants and with
a personal coach helps
participants realize what
their true career goals are
based on their strengths and
values.
■
This guided reflection and
networking with peers
and senior leaders help
participants understand how
leadership positions can help
them have an impact on the
organization by using their
preexisting strengths and
values.
ALIGN PERSONAL STRENGTHS TO
LEADERSHIP CAREER PATHS
Participant Reflection Questions on Personal Strengths and Career Mission Statement
2
ā
Assess Personal
Strengths
Define Personal
%//%+*Ő00!)!*0ŏ
Based on Strengths
ă
Align Career Goals
to Personal Mission
Statement
ą
Use Network
to Achieve Revised
.!!.Ő+(/
What do my teammates
believe I contribute to
my work? To my team?
To the organization?
How do my values
manifest in the
strengths that I have
identified in myself?
What unique impact
can I have on the
organization using my
strengths and values?
How can peers and
senior Ieaders help
me achieve my revised
career goals that
use my strengths
* Ő2(1!/?
What is different
between what others
identify as my
strengths and what I
do?
What is my personal
mission statement
(what do I want to
achieve in my career
using my strengths and
values)?
How can I refine my
career goals to create
closer alignment with
the impact I can have?
How do others’
perceptions of me
$!(,ŏ+.Ő$1.0 my ability
to achieve my revised
career goals? How
should I modify my
“personal brand?”
Increase Participants’ Self-Awareness of Strengths
Use Preexisting Strengths
Cochlear realizes that increasing participants’ self-awareness
of their strengths is a necessary precondition to aligning their
personal goals to leadership career goals.
Leadership presence exercises help participants realize how
they can more effectively use their strengths to achieve their
career goals.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
SITUATION
PRACTICE OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity58
Cochlear connects
participants with
successful diverse peers
and leaders to increase
their visibility in the
organization.
■
Networking to Increase Participants’ Personal Brand Across Organization
Senior Female Leaders
from Across Organization
Many diverse, strong
performers do not have
networks outside of
their own functions or
departments.
– This prevents them from
knowing what expanded
opportunities exist
in other parts of the
organization and from
being considered for
them.
■
CONNECT PARTICIPANTS TO SUCCESSFUL PEERS
Őŏŏŏŏ
Cochlear connects program
participants to peers from
across the organization, as
well as senior leaders to
increase their visibility.
Lessons learned
from program
participation
Information on
requirements
of leadership
Advice on how to
maximize learning
during program
Guidelines on how
to maximize learning
during program
Participant
Peer reflection and
consultation on alignment
between personal
strengths and leadership
Past Program Participants
from Across the
Organization
Program Participants
".+)Ő.+//ŏ0$!ŏ
Organization
Next Cohort of
.+#.)Ő.0%%,*0/ŏ
".+)Ő.+//ŏ0$!ŏ.#*%60%+*
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
SITUATION
PRACTICE OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity59
■
Cochlear’s Leadership
Presence Program
increased the desire
of strong-performing
women to pursue broader
responsibilities.
PARTICIPANTS INCREASE RESPONSIBILITIES
AND CONTRIBUTIONS
Based on feedback from
participants, managers
of participants, and
performance evaluation and
promotion data, over twothirds of participants took
on broader responsibilities.
āĊŃ
Increased
Discretionary Effort
Results of Leadership Presence Program
Ć participants remained in
role but demonstrated greater
enthusiasm to contribute
and be involved in work
(according to managers)
ā participant built her crossfunctional network required
for success in role.
ĆĂŃ
Vertical Movement
Toward Career Goals
ćŃ
Increased
Intent to Stay
2 participants were retained
as result of program
participation.
Ć participants promoted and
āā participants have taken on
broader roles and additional
responsibilities outside of
current roles.
ćĉŃŏof Participants
Take on New
Responsibilities
ćŃ
Identified Lack
of Organizational Fit
āćŃ
Lateral Movement
Toward Career Goals
2 participants left
organization as a result of
identifying the misalignment
between their personal
mission and the organization.
Ć participants took lateral
moves to roles in different
functional areas.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
SITUATION
PRACTICE OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity60
IMPLEMENTATION TIPS FOR LEADERSHIP PRESENCE PROGRAM
ā
2
ă
/!ŏ5+1.ŏ"+.)(%6! ŏăćĀġ !#.!!ŏ"!! 'ŏ,.+!//ŏ"+.ŏ% !*0%"5%*#ŏ,!./+*(ŏ/0.!*#0$/ŏ* ŏ/!(!0%*#ŏ,.+#.)ŏ
participants. Use formally obtained manager and peer feedback and calibration sessions to analyze individual’s
personal strengths and shortlist program participants.
Devote sufficient time to the leadership presence workshop. Each program component is critical for improving
female presence at leadership positions. Organizations must ensure that program participants are getting enough
time to participate in and reflect on each component before moving to the next one.
Help female senior leaders articulate necessary leadership skills and leadership career paths to program
participants. Guide senior leaders on how to identify and communicate leadership skill requirements and career paths
most suited to the preexisting strengths of program participants.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity61
Leadership positions
remain unattractive
to women due to high
perceived cost of
relocation.
UNWILLINGNESS TO RELOCATE HINDERS CAREER
ADVANCEMENT OF WOMEN
Willingness to Relocate Abroad to Advance Career
Percentage of High-Performing, Mid-Level Employees
■
High-performing, mid-level
men are 16% more likely to
be willing to relocate abroad
to advance their career than
women.
¨āăŏ
Percentage Points
77%
64%
■
Often, women in dual
careers avoid relocation due
to the potential of losing the
income from their partner’s
career.
■
This difference across
genders results in fewer
women in the leadership
pipeline.
Women
Men
n = 3,683.
Source: CLC Human Resources, Global Labor Market Data Survey, 2012.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity62
CORPORATE
LEADERSHIP
COUNCIL
SELF-SUSTAINING DUAL CAREER NETWORK
CORPORATE EXECUTIVE BOARD
OVERVIEW
Many high-potential women decline opportunities to move internationally due to the negative impact of relocation
on their spouses’ careers. This excludes many women from critical development required for advancement to senior
leadership and leads to an underrepresentation of women in leadership positions.
Nestlé and other partner organizations decrease the risk to employees in dual-income families of accepting
international positions by providing dual career support through a self-sustaining network of spouses. While Nestlé’s
International Dual Career Network provides support to international spouses of employees of both genders, more
women are in dual career families than men.
SOLUTION HIGHLIGHTS
Nestlé improves the job search opportunities for spouses in dual-income families:
ŏ
āċŏ 40!* ŏ!(+0%+*ŏ1,,+.0ŏ0+ŏ,+1/!/ģProvide local job market guidance and networking to spouses to
decrease the risk of families losing second source of income.
2. Partner with Other Organizations to Create Self-Sustaining Support Network—Partner with other organizations
to create a self-sustaining and scalable network of spouses that provides dual career support.
COMPANY SNAPSHOT
Nestlé S.A.
Industry:
2011 Sales:
Employees:
Food and
Beverage
CHF83.64 Billion
328,000
Headquarters: Switzerland
Nestlé is a global foods and nutrition, health, and wellness company,
encompassing several brands such as Nescafé, Nespresso, Nestlé
Waters, DiGiorno, Buitoni, Dreyer’s, Maggi, Milkmaid, Carnation,
and Kit Kat. The company owns Friskies, Purina, Gerber Products,
and Jenny Craig. In addition to its own products, Nestlé also owns
approximately 30% of cosmetics company L’Oréal.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity63
Nestlé increases
the possibility of
international mobility
for employees in dualincome families by
providing career support
for spouses.
■
■
■
IMPROVE GENDER BALANCE OF LEADERSHIP
PIPELINE THROUGH DUAL CAREER SUPPORT
+))+*ŏ.#*%60%+*(ŏ$((!*#!čŏ5,%(ŏ!(!.0! ŏ! !./$%,ŏ.!!.ŏ0$ŏ!-1%.!/ŏ
International Mobility, Often Excluding Women from Leadership Pipeline
Following a survey,
respondents indicate that
80% of high-potential
women (60% of men) at
Nestlé are in dual careers,
which increases the difficulty
of accepting international
positions because of the
impact of relocation on
spouses’ careers.
Nestlé’s International Dual
Career Network provides
support for international
spouses of employees of
both genders.
International
Mobility
Senior
Leadership
Middle
Management
Many women do not
accept international
positions due, in large part,
to dual career constraints.
Entry Level
Typical Career Path
for High-Potential Men
However, due to dual
careers fewer women are
internationally mobile; this
solution increases female
representation in the
leadership pipeline.
Typical Career Path
for High-Potential Women
!/0(hĚ/ŏ+(10%+*čŏ!("ġ1/0%*%*#ŏ1(ŏ
Career Network
+),+*!*0ŏā
Component 2
Extend Relocation Support to Spouses
Partner with Other Organizations to Create SelfSustaining Support Network
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
PRACTICE OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity64
Nestlé provides local job
market guidance and
networking to reduce the
risk of families losing a
second source of income.
EXTEND RELOCATION SUPPORT TO SPOUSES
Career Support for Spouses of Internationally Mobile Employees
*ċ
■
Relocated spouses often
are not native speakers of
the local language, do not
know how to find a job in
the local market, and lack
the visibility with local
employers to secure a job.
!//%+*ŏā
■
Spouses are invited to
attend sessions that
provide local job market
guidance and networking
with peer spouses and HR
professionals from nearby
multinational corporations.
In the Swiss network pilot,
between 150 and 250
spouses of relocating talent
from 30 other organizations
typically attend each
session.
Session 2
!//%+*ŏă
!//%+*ŏą
!//%+*ŏĆ
!//%+*ŏć
!//%+*ŏĈ
Session 8
Sample Dual Career Network Session Agenda
ăĀŏ%*10!/
■
Dec.
1(5
Presentation on Navigating Local
+ŏ.'!0
Local HR professionals and experts present
on topics such as:
■ How to write a CV
■ How to find jobs in local market
■ How to use social media in job search
ăĀŏ%*10!/
Breakout Sessions
■
■
ăĀŏ%*10!/
Personalized guidance from local HR
professionals and experts
Skills practice from presentations
Session Evaluation for Participants
Impact
1. Has this session helped your overall job search?
________________________________________
2. Have you received a job interview as a result of this
session?
________________________________________
3. Have you received a job offer as a result of this
session?
________________________________________
Demographics
Networking
Age: _____________________________________
Opportunities to meet:
■ HR professionals from other organizations
in network
■ Local job search experts
■ Peer spouses
Education _________________________________
Work Experience: ___________________________
Personal Experience: ________________________
Job Types of Interest : _______________________
!03+.'ŏ.#*%60%+*/ŏ!* ŏŏ.+"!//%+*(/ŏ* ŏ
+ŏ
Openings
As a requirement of network participation, organizations
provide session coordinators with a list of all current job
openings to share with participants and are encouraged
to send HR professionals to network and provide local
guidance as well.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
PRACTICE OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity65
Nestlé partners with
other organizations to
create a self-sustaining
and scalable network of
spouses that provides
dual career support.
PARTNER WITH OTHER ORGANIZATIONS TO
CREATE SELF-SUSTAINING SUPPORT NETWORK
Nestlé’s Self-Sustaining Dual Career Network
Swiss Network Pilot Example
ā
2
Nestlé Identifies Need for Dual
Career Network
Inaugural Session to Form Network
Seven organizations attend with spouses of newly
relocated talent to form International Dual Career Network.
Organizations ask spouses what type of career support
they need.
Spouses volunteer to serve on Spouse Committee,
which provides career support for peer spouses in network.1
Contacts local Chamber
of Commerce for list of
multinational corporations
with operations in area
Invites organizations to
help create network
Volunteers Find Own
Replacements
When volunteers on the Spouse
Committee find employment, they
are responsible for identifying and
transitioning their own successors.
Ć
ă
Session Provides Career Support
Spouse committee organizes
session.
Organizations rotate
responsibility for hosting
sessions.
New spouses attend session
and join network.
+.!ŏ.#*%60%+*/ŏ
+%*ŏ!03+.'
More job openings available
to spouses
More spouses join network
More spouses help coordinate
subsequent sessions
1
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Spouse Committee is composed of a
President, Communications team, Logistics
team, Network Strategy team, and KPI team.
PRACTICE OVERVIEW
ą
,+1/!/ŏ!,+.0ŏ),.+2! ŏ
+ŏ
Search and Support
Word of mouth creates
increased interest in network
from spouses and organizations.
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity66
Nestlé’s dual career
network is growing
rapidly to provide
scalable career support
to internationally mobile
women’s spouses.
■
■
■
INCREASED SPOUSE NETWORKS, INTERVIEWS,
ŏ
ŏ
Growth of Network
Number of Participants in Swiss Network Pilot
In time, Nestlé expects
the network to improve
expatriation success and
source talent.
700
Number of Organizations in Swiss Network Pilot
30
30
25
20
Due to the success of the
Swiss network pilot, Nestlé
is expanding the program
globally.
350
15
10
7
5
In partnership with Ernst
& Young, Nestlé is hosting
a conference of 30 to 40
organizations to expand the
program into new cities.
0
2011
2012
2011
2012
Impact of Network
Percentage of Participants
*0!.!/0! ŏ%*ŏ
+%*%*#ŏ0$!ŏ
International Dual Career
Network?
Contact Sue Johnson, head
of Gender Balance at Nestlé,
at [email protected] or
+41-21-924-4720 to learn more
about the global conference
on 15–16 May 2012 at Nestlé
in Vevey, Switzerland.
ĊĆŃ
Agree Session
Helped Their
Job Search
1
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Due to the rapid growth of the network, Nestlé expects this number to increase substantially as the network remains in place.
PRACTICE OVERVIEW
COMPONENT 1
COMPONENT 2
RESULTS
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity67
IMPLEMENTATION TIPS FOR SELF SUSTAINING DUAL CAREER NETWORKS
ā
2
ă
Pilot the dual career network at one location before complete rollout. Initiate the dual career network program for
the location that is most critical for the organization. Use this pilot project to develop best practices and policies for
rollout in other locations and to communicate successes.
Establish “ground rules” on the role of network organizations. Before asking organizations to join the network,
clearly define their role and expected contribution for providing career support to spouses.
Tap into skills and knowledge of previous spouse committee volunteers. Even though members of the spouse
committee appoint their successors once they find employment, they should be encouraged to share their skills and
knowledge by personally mentoring and guiding new volunteers.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity68
ŏăčŏŏŏŏŏ
CHALLENGE
Despite marginal improvements in
organizations’ workforce diversity,
organizational leadership remains homogenous.
),!.0%2!ŏćčŏ),.+2!ŏ0$!ŏ! !./$%,ŏ(1!ŏ
Proposition for Diverse Talent
),!.0%2!ŏĈčŏ!10.(%6!ŏ%/!/ŏ
in Talent Management Decisions
BBVA’s Gender-Blind HIPO Assessments
Cochlear’s Leadership Presence Program
Duke Energy’s
Successor “Fit Scores”
Nestlé’s Self-Sustaining Dual Career Network
Cemex México’s Data-Driven
Succession Planning
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity69
Organizations can never
completely eliminate the
conscious or unconscious
biases individual leaders
bring to talent decisions.
■
DESPITE ORGANIZATIONAL EFFORTS, BIAS STILL EXISTS
“My Organization Has Policies and Programs
That Promote Diversity in the Workplace”
“Senior Leaders Demonstrate a Commitment
to Diversity”
Percentage of Employees
Percentage of Employees
The best organizations
adapt talent processes to
neutralize bias individual
leaders bring, creating a
participant-independent
method for equitable talent
decisions.
ćĂŃ
Agree
ćĂŃ
Agree
n = 9,626.
n = 9,626.
ė%/.%)%*0%+*ŏ#%*/0ŏ),(+5!!/ŏ+.ŏ
+ŏ,,(%*0/ŏ/ŏ+0ŏ+(!.0! ŏ0ŏ5ŏ.#*%60%+*Ę
Percentage of Employees
31%
31%
Singapore
Malaysia
52%
53%
India
Australia
53%
Philippines
53%
South
Africa
54%
New
Zealand
55%
United
Kingdom
62%
62%
United
States
Canada
n = 9,377.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
Source: CLC Human Resources, Global Labor Market Survey, 2012.
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity70
To improve female
representation in
leadership positions,
BBVA modified its HIPO
selection process to
reduce opportunities
for biased decisions.
■
As a result of this minor
modification, BBVA
generated a 10% increase
in female representation
among its executive-level
HIPO Pool.
GENDER-BLIND HIPO ASSESSMENTS
$((!*#!čŏLow Proportion
of Female Leaders
+(10%+*čŏDiversify the Pipeline
by Increasing Objectivity in HIPO
Selection
Gender Representation in Senior
! !./$%,ŏ+/%0%+*/ČŏĂĀāĀ
ŏ,,(%0%+*/ČŏĂĀāĀ
Female HIPO Representation
Illustrative
Percentage of Women
)!č Marina
!* !.čŏFemale
#!čŏ38
ĂĀŃ
Women
+//%(!ŏ++0ŏ1/!ŏčŏLeaders’
unconscious biases
24%
HIPO Application
)!č Jorge
ĉĀŃ
Men
COMPANY SNAPSHOT
),0čŏImproved Female
Representation in Leadership
Pipeline
!* !.čŏMale
Experience:______________
#!čŏ42
________________________
Accomplishments:________
HIPO Application
_______________________
'%((/č___________________
4,!.%!*!č______________
_______________________
________________________
+),(%/$)!*0/č________
_______________________
'%((/č___________________
_______________________
14%
2010
2011
Executive-Level HIPOs
ŏ,,(%0%+*/ČŏĂĀāā
Illustrative
Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria
Industry:
2011 Sales:
Employees:
Headquarters:
Financial
Services
€33.2 Billion
106,976
Spain
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
HIPO Application 2
4,!.%!*!č______________
ŏ,,(%0%+*ŏā
________________________
+),(%/$)!*0/č________
4,!.%!*!č______________
_______________________
________________________
'%((/č___________________
+),(%/$)!*0/č________
_______________________
_______________________
Identifying information (i.e.,
candidate’s name, gender, and
age) is removed from applications
so as not to influence the
selection committee’s decisions.
'%((/č___________________
_______________________
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity71
FOCUS MANAGERS ON FIT TO BUILD
HR Successor Slate Evaluation
%XVLQHVV8QLW
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'HSDUWPHQW
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-DPHV'RQDOG%
5HSRUWV7R
FRPSOHWHGE\0DQDJHURIWKLV3RVLWLRQ
3RVLWLRQ3URILOH
3RVLWLRQ6XPPDU\
&)2IRU*OREDO(QHUJ\'LUHFWVVWUDWHJLFSODQQLQJILQDQFLDOSODQQLQJFRQWUROOHUVLQIRUPDWLRQWHFKQRORJ\KXPDQUHVRXUFHVSXEOLFDIIDLUVDQG
FRPPXQLW\DIIDLUVIXQFWLRQVIRUWKHEXVLQHVVXQLW
,QFXPEHQW
(PSOR\HH,' $JH -RE7HQXUH &RPSDQ\7HQXUH
6WRQH'HEUD0'HEELH
[
\HDU
\HDUV
/RFDWLRQ$FFRXQWDELOLW\DQG5HVSRQVLELOLW\/HYHOV
/RFDWLRQ
$FFRXQWDELOLW\/HYHO
866RXWKHDVW
3HRSOH5HVSRQVLEOH)RU
86LQ0LOOLRQV5HVSRQVLEOH)RU
PP
2SHUDWLRQDO/HDGHU
)XQFWLRQDO([SHULHQFH5HTXLUHPHQWV
)XQFWLRQ
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/HDGHUVKLSRIFURVVIXQFWLRQDOWDVNIRUFHVRUSURMHFWV
0DQDJLQJFKDOOHQJLQJILQDQFLDOLVVXHV
0DQDJLQJFKDOOHQJLQJZRUNIRUFHLVVXHV
2SHUDWLRQDOIRFXVDQGDFFRXQWDELOLW\
5HSUHVHQWLQJWKHFRUSRUDWLRQLQKLJKO\YLVLEOHIRUXPV
6WDIIUROHV
6WUDWHJLFIRFXVDQGSHUVSHFWLYH
*OREDO ([HFXWLYH 0DQDJHPHQW 6\VWHP *(06
(PSOR\HH1DPH 6WRQH'HEUD0'HEELH
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936WUDWHJLF3ODQQLQJ)LQ$GPLQ
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-DPHV'RQDOG%'RQ
5HSRUWV7R
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HR compares
position-specific
criteria against
the qualifications
of identified
successors (e.g.,
competencies,
work experiences)
to determine a
candidate’s “fit”
with the position.
+LJK
,QFXPEHQW
%XVLQHVV*URXS *OREDO(QHUJ\
/RZ
936WUDWHJLF3ODQQLQJ)LQ$GPLQ
0HGLXP
*OREDO ([HFXWLYH 0DQDJHPHQW 6\VWHP *(06
3RVLWLRQ7LWOH
&ULWLFDOLW\
Both managers and HR
identify successor slates
for specific positions
through a process that
builds in objectivity.
6XFFHVVLRQ&DQGLGDWH)RU
3RVLWLRQ
FRPSOHWHGE\(PSOR\HH
V0DQDJHU
5HDGLQHVV
7LPH)UDPH
$FFRXQWDELOLW\/HYHO
2SHUDWLRQDO/HDGHU
5HDG\1RZ
5HDG\LQWR\HDUV 2SHUDWLRQDO/HDGHU
5HDG\LQWR\HDUV %XVLQHVV6HJPHQW/HDGHU
5HDG\LQWR\HDUV %XVLQHVV6HJPHQW/HDGHU
5DQN %XVLQHVV*URXS $FFRXQWDELOLW\/HYHO
5HDGLQHVV
0DMRU$FFRPSOLVKPHQWV
6XFFHVVIXOO\LPSOHPHQWHGQHZVWUDWHJLFSODQQLQJSURFHVVWKDWZDVPDMRUFRQWULEXWRUWRH[FHHGLQJHELWWDUJHWV&RQWLQXHVWRGHPRQVWUDWH
RSHUDWLRQDOH[FHOOHQFHLQDOODVVLJQHGIXQFWLRQV6RPHLPSURYHPHQWQHHGHGLQFUHDWLQJSRVLWLYHZRUNHQYLURQPHQW7XUQRYHURIVRPHNH\SHRSOH
KDVEHHQKLJKHUWKDQH[SHFWHG
2YHUDOO3HUIRPDQFH
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6LJQLILFDQWO\([FHHGV
)LQDQFLDO5HVXOWV
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3DUWLDOO\0HHWV
2YHUDOO5DWLQJ
([FHHGV
'DWH
/HDGHUVKLS&RPSHWHQFLHV
Successor Bench Strength Analysisā
ā Managers submit
list of successors for
designated positions.
Manager
Nominations for
VP Strategic
Planning
1.. Leif Ulrich
2. Eric Weiss
3. Janet Bell
2 HR analyzes “fit” of
designated successors
for position.
ă HR runs query for
alternate qualified
successors based on
position profile.
ą Candidates from both
lists are considered in
all talent reviews.
Name
Fit
Name
Fit
1. L. Ulrich
90%
1. I. Smith
85%
Successor List,
VP Strategic
Planning
2. E. Weiss
65%
2. M. Hart
62%
1. J. Bell
93%
3. J. Bell
93%
3. S. Reid
57%
2. L. Ulrich
90%
3. I. Smith
85%
4. W. Key
49%
4. E. Weiss 65%
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
1
All examples are hypothetical.
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity72
Cemex México “weights”
the relative importance of
knowledge, experience,
performance and
potential, and personal
profiles for different
levels of leadership.
DATA-DRIVEN SUCCESSION PLANNING
Relative Weightā Assigned to Components of Leadership Value
By Level
Leadership Value Factors Scorecard
Levels from the CEO
Factors
1. Knowledge
“Preparation”
a. Undergraduate Degree
“Action”
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Ćŏ!2!(/ŏ
Ĩāst Level
Managers)
ćŏ!2!(/ŏ
(2nd Level)
Managers)
5%
8%
10%
20%
0%
10%
20%
30%
50%
40%
30%
20%
c. Cemex International Management
Program or Similar Business Training
10%
15%
20%
25%
d. Language Skills
40%
35%
30%
25%
15%
14%
13%
12%
2. Experience
a. International Experience
20%
15%
10%
10%
b. Years of Experience in Function
25%
35%
50%
60%
c. Experience in Other Functions
25%
25%
20%
15%
d. Years of Experience at Cemex
30%
25%
20%
15%
50%
48%
47%
45%
a. Performance Against Objectives
40%
40%
40%
40%
b. 360-Degree Competency
Assessment
40%
40%
40%
40%
c. Mastery of Current Position
10%
10%
10%
10%
d. Growth Potential
10%
10%
10%
10%
30%
30%
30%
25%
a. Management Styles, Interests, and
Thought Preferences
60%
60%
55%
50%
b. Emotional Intelligence
40%
40%
40%
40%
c. Problem-Solving Skills
0%
0%
5%
10%
100%
100%
100%
100%
4. Personal Profile
Total
1
ąŏ!2!(/ŏ
(BU
Directors)
b. Masters Degree
3. Performance and Potential
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
ăŏ!2!(/ŏ
(BU
VPs)
As a category,
“Performance and
Potential” factors
represent the most
important components
of leader value across
all levels of leadership
because they are key
indicators of likely
future success.
“Personal Profile”
factors represent the
second most important
components of leader
value across all levels
of leadership. In the
absence of experience
or other performance
predictors, these
behavioral attributes
help assess a leader’s
likelihood to succeed.
A leader’s total score
represents that leader’s
relative value to the
company compared to
peers. Cemex México
also aggregates this
information to provide
an assessment of
overall bench strength.
Weights indicate relative importance of a factor to leader value:
- Low Weights—Low percentages are assigned to nondifferentiating factors that are a “given” or represent
baseline requirements for a level of leadership.
- High Weights—High percentages are assigned to differentiating factors that are most important to leader
success at a particular level and thus serve as key inputs in the assessment of those leaders.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity73
Cemex maps the required
leadership attributes
for an open leadership
position against the
attributes candidates
possess to determine
a job fit score for each
candidate.
THE BEST FIT
Evaluation of Candidate Fit for Director Position
ā
!(ŏ* % 0!ŏ.+ü(!čŏ%.!0+.ŏ+/%0%+*ŏ
+0!*0%(ŏ%.!0+.ŏ1!//+.čŏ.)!*ŏ!* +6
Required Attribute
Attribute Possessed
Knowledge
8%
2
ă
Match Between Candidate
* ŏė !(Ęŏ.+ü(!č For each
factor, a candidate may receive
between 0 and 100% of the
potential “score,” depending on
how well he or she matches the
ideal candidate profile for the
position.
100%
20%
Mechanical Engineer
Master Degree
MBA
30%
MA Industrial Engineering; MBA
1.00
International Management Diplomas
IPADE/CIMP
20%
Certified International
Management Professional (CIMP)
1.00
English Skills
500+ on TOEFL or 2.5 on Cendant
30%
3.00 Cendant
1.00
14%
% Match with Experience Reqs.
75%
International Experiences
15%
Specialization in Japan (1992), Masters
Degree in United States (1997)
1.00
Operational Planning (5 Months);
Financial Planning (7 Years, 10 Months)
1.00
Corporate HR (8 Yrs.); Benefits
(8 Yrs.)
35%
25%
Years of Experience at Cemex
25%
Seven Years
1.00
Performance and Potential
48%
% Match with Perf./Pot. Reqs.
70%
40%
3.7
1.00
Performance Against Objectives
3.00 or Better
360° Competency Assessment
40%
Average
85% Versus Position
Lowest Percentage
Minimum 50% Versus Position
0.5
83%
70%
Lowest Competency
Development of Others
Proficiency in Position
Advanced
10%
Good
0.5
Growth Potential
High
10%
Medium
0.5
Personal Profile
"Human Side" Total Score
70%
Style
70%
30%
% Match with Personal Profile Reqs.
50%
78%
70%
88%
Thought Process
70%
88%
Emotional Intelligence Test Score
Total Score = 90 or More
40%
Assertiveness
Total
1.00
108
1.00
116
Empathy
85
Interpersonal Relations
89
Objectivity
118
Problem Solving
119
Control of Impulses
25
92.5%
55%
Interests
Wonderlic IQ Test Score
2
1.00
Experience
+ŏ%0ŏ+.%*#č Candidates with
total scores of 70% or higher for
a particular position are more
likely to be interviewed.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
Match with Ideal
Engineering License
Years of Experience in Other
Functions
*(5/%/ŏ+"ŏ
+ŏ!-1%.!)!*0/čŏ
Characteristics of the ideal
candidate for a position are
outlined for a set of companywide factors against which
potential successors are
compared. Factors are weighted
depending on the seniority of
the leadership job.
% Match with Knowledge Reqs.
Professional Background
Years of Experience in Position
ā
Weight
98
10%
100%
22
% Match with Total Job Reqs.
0.25
78.5%
ă
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity74
ŏăčŏŏŏŏŏ
Key Takeaways
1. Improve the leadership value proposition for diverse talent by
aligning personal goals of diverse high-potential employees
to leadership opportunities and helping reduce the personal
sacrifices necessary to advance to leadership positions.
2. Supplement efforts to eliminate bias with process changes that
neutralize the impact of bias on talent management decisions.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity75
CREATING COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE THROUGH WORKFORCE DIVERSITY
I
II
III
Define Relevant
Diversity and Inclusion Objectives
Build a Diverse and
Inclusive Workforce
Create a Diverse
Leadership Pipeline
),!.0%2!ŏāčŏEnable Regional Ownership
to Address Organization-Wide D&I Challenges
),!.0%2!ŏăčŏUse Trusted Sources
to Expand the Pool of Diverse Talent
),!.0%2!ŏćčŏImprove the Leadership
Value Proposition for Diverse Talent
G4S’s D&I Assessment Tool
),!.0%2!ŏĂčŏAssess and
Incentivize Progress, Not Just Outcomes
BAE Systems’ Incremental D&I MBOs
BAE Systems’ Influencer Outreach
Cochlear’s Leadership
Presence Program
),!.0%2!ŏąčŏHire for
Inclusive Behaviors
Nestlé’s Self-Sustaining
Dual Career Network
Sodexo’s Inclusion
Competency Interviewing
),!.0%2!ŏĆčŏReinforce Inclusive
Behaviors During Critical Moments
),!.0%2!ŏĈčŏNeutralize Biases
in Talent Management Decisions
BBVA’s Gender-Blind
HIPO Assessments
Duke Energy’s
Successor “Fit Scores”
Telstra’s Inclusive
People Management Behaviors
Cemex México’s Data-Driven
Succession Planning
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity76
SUMMARY
ā Define Relevant Diversity and Inclusion Objectives
■
Enable Regional Ownership to Address Organization-Wide D&I Challenges. Most organizations identify organization-wide D&I
goals to ensure consistent improvement across operations. The best organizations create regional ownership of progress against
D&I objectives by enabling leaders to define locally relevant objectives within a centrally determined framework. To help accomplish
these goals, organizations should identify business and HR strategies shared across operations and provide leaders with guidance
on how to assess and embed diversity and inclusion in these processes across legislative, cultural, and operational environments.
■
//!//ŏ* ŏ*!*0%2%6!ŏ.+#.!//Čŏ+0ŏ
1/0ŏ10+)!/ċŏMost organizations set global D&I standards or long-term objectives. But
to most effectively drive D&I progress, local leaders need to be given incremental objectives that take into account differences in
starting points and capabilities. To do this, organizations should work with local leaders to set feasible short-term outcomes and
visible milestones to assess progress.
2 Build a Diverse and Inclusive Workforce
■
Use Trusted Sources to Expand the Pool of Diverse Talent. Most organizations aim to achieve gains in their diversity recruitment
efforts by better targeting, or making themselves more attractive to, diverse candidates. But because these gains can be lost
when competitors adopt the same strategies, the best organizations focus on increasing the size of the diverse talent pool and
attracting a larger share of this expanded pool. The best way to do so is to use trusted, personal sources of information, or
influence career influencers, to draw diverse individuals into the talent pool and increase the attractiveness of the organization to
those individuals.
■
Hire for Inclusive Behaviors. Most organizations evaluate manager candidates for D&I knowledge and values to assess alignment
with the organization’s D&I values. The best organizations assess manager candidates for past demonstration of inclusive
behaviors to determine their likelihood to demonstrate these behaviors in the future. To help accomplish this goal, organizations
should ask manager candidates to identify specific inclusive actions and experiences that demonstrate their history of inclusive
behavior.
■
Reinforce Inclusive Behaviors During Critical Moments. To foster inclusion, most organizations rely primarily on D&I training—
which improves the perceived value of inclusion, but does not result in a more inclusive work environment. Instead, organizations
can realize a “reinforcement dividend” of improved and sustained inclusive behaviors by reinforcing inclusive manager and peer
behaviors during critical moments in the employee life cycle, such as onboarding sessions, meetings and projects, performance
conversations, and long-term development conversations.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity77
SUMMARY (CONTINUED)
ă Create a Diverse Leadership Pipeline
■
Understand and promote the leadership value proposition that is attractive to diverse high performers. Most organizations focus
on improving the skill sets of diverse talent to increase minority representation in the leadership pipeline. However, even with the
right skills, these employees often don’t see a match between themselves and their perceptions of what is expected from leaders
at their companies. The best organizations improve the leadership value proposition for diverse talent by aligning personal goals
of diverse high-performing employees to leadership opportunities and helping to reduce the personal sacrifices necessary to
advance to leadership positions.
■
Neutralize Biases in Talent Management Decisions. Despite organizational efforts to eliminate conscious or unconscious biases
affecting talent management decisions, some biases still remain. To neutralize these biases and eliminate the impact they can have
on key talent management decisions, the best organizations modify talent management processes to increase the objectivity and
equity of talent decisions.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity78
D&I STRATEGY PRIORITIZATION TOOL
■
Does your organization only operate in areas with similar diversity
and inclusion challenges?
■
Are your manager candidate assessments effective at predicting
whether new hires will demonstrate inclusive behaviors on the job?
■
Do local leaders have a shared understanding of organization-wide
D&I objectives?
■
Does your organization find it easy to ensure new people managers
adopt and maintain inclusive behaviors?
■
Do leaders know what specific goals need to be achieved at the
local level to meet organization-wide D&I objectives?
),!.0%2!ŏĆčŏ!%*"+.!ŏ*(1/%2!ŏ!$2%+./ŏ1.%*#ŏ.%0%(ŏ+)!*0/
■
Are managers at your organization given specific guidance on
how to demonstrate inclusive behaviors when onboarding new
employees?
■
Are managers at your organization given specific guidance on
how to demonstrate inclusive behaviors during meetings and
project work?
■
Are managers at your organization given specific guidance on how
to demonstrate inclusive behaviors when conducting performance
conversations with employees?
■
Are managers at your organization given specific guidance on how
to demonstrate inclusive behaviors when conducting long-term
development conversations with employees?
Do you have an effective mechanism in place to assess the local
relevance of D&I objectives?
),!.0%2!ŏĂčŏ//!//ŏ* ŏ*!*0%2%6!ŏ.+#.!//Čŏ+0ŏ
1/0ŏ10+)!/
■
■
Do business leaders at your organization know the specific actions
they need to take in the next year to progress against long-term
organizational D&I objectives?
■
Do you have a good mechanism for comparing D&I effectiveness
across local business units?
■
Are your business leaders fully committed to achieving
organizational D&I objectives?
),!.0%2!ŏăčŏ/!ŏ.1/0! ŏ+1.!/ŏ0+ŏ4,* ŏ0$!ŏ++(ŏ+"ŏ%2!./!ŏ(!*0
),!.0%2!ŏćčŏ),.+2!ŏ0$!ŏ! !./$%,ŏ(1!ŏ.+,+/%0%+*ŏ"+.ŏ%2!./!ŏ(!*0
■
Are you able to hire as many diverse employees as you would like?
■
■
Do you expect your diverse candidate pool to significantly expand
in the coming years?
Are most diverse, high-performing, mid-level employees at your
organization interested in rising to senior management?
■
Are your diversity recruitment strategies difficult for your talent
competitors to emulate?
Do all employees, regardless of diversity, face the same challenges
in following a leadership career path at your organization?
■
Are you successful in generating positive brand awareness among
new diverse entrants to the workforce?
Are dual careers easy for employees to navigate when following
a leadership career path?
),!.0%2!ŏĈčŏ!10.(%6!ŏ%/!/ŏ%*ŏ(!*0ŏ*#!)!*0ŏ!%/%+*/
■
■
No
),!.0%2!ŏąčŏ%.!ŏ"+.ŏ*(1/%2!ŏ!$2%+./
Yes
.!//ŏ.#*%60%+*ġ
No
),!.0%2!ŏāčŏ*(!ŏ!#%+*(ŏ3*!./$%,ŏ0+ŏ
Wide D&I Challenges
Yes
Use This Diagnostic Tool to Prioritize Action Steps Toward Improving Your Level of Workforce Diversity and Inclusion
■
Are talent management decisions at your organization free of bias?
■
Are talent management decisions made by managers at your
organization evaluated for potential bias?
Prioritize the diversity and inclusion strategies for which you answer “No” to the most number of questions.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity79
CORPORATE
LEADERSHIP
COUNCIL
CORPORATE EXECUTIVE BOARD
Appendix
Work–Life Preferences by Gender đ p. 81
Engagement by Gender đ p. 82
Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks (Julie O’Mara and Alan Richter) đ p. 83
Teacher and Career Advisor Resources (BAE Systems) đ p. 96
Manager Guide: Improving Inclusion in Onboarding (Philips) đ p. 100
Manager Guide: Improving Inclusion in Meetings and Projects (BNSF) đ p. 102
Manager Guide: Improving Inclusion in Performance Conversations (Belgacom) đ p. 103
Manager Guide: Improving Inclusion Through Mentoring Relationships (Syngenta) đ p. 104
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity80
Gender does not
impact a high-potential
employee’s (HIPOs)
desire for more work–life
balance.
WORK–LIFE PREFERENCES FOR HIGH-POTENTIAL
EMPLOYEES DO NOT VARY ACROSS GENDER
ėŏ+1( ŏ%'!ŏŏ
+ŏ3%0$ŏ!00!.ŏ+.'Ģ%"!ŏ(*!Ę
Percentage of High-Potential Employees
58%
Female HIPOs
Male HIPOs
53%
Agree or Strongly
Agree
n = 5,802.
Source: CLC Human Resources, Global Labor Market Survey, 2012.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity81
Employee engagement
does not vary
substantially by gender.
EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT DOES NOT VARY ACROSS
GENDER
Components of Employee Engagement
Scores on a 7-Point Scale
5.7
5.74
5.8
5.82
5.83
5.87
Global Benchmark
5.3
4.09
4.13
5.31
5.45
Male
Female
4.12
Rational Commitment
Emotional Commitment
Discretionary Effort
Intent to Stay
n = 208,431.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
Source: CLC Human Resources, Employee Engagement Survey, 2010.
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity82
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity83
Source: O’Mara, Julie and Alan Richter, Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World, 2011.
0!#+.5ŏāčŏĒŏ%/%+*Čŏ0.0!#5Čŏ* ŏ1/%*!//ŏ/!
GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
BENCHMARKS
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity84
Source: O’Mara, Julie and Alan Richter, Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World, 2011.
0!#+.5ŏĂčŏ! !./$%,ŏ* ŏ+1*0%(%05
GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
BENCHMARKS (CONTINUED)
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity85
Source: O’Mara, Julie and Alan Richter, Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World, 2011.
0!#+.5ŏăčŏ*"./0.101.!ŏ* ŏ),(!)!*00%+*
GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
BENCHMARKS (CONTINUED)
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity86
Source: O’Mara, Julie and Alan Richter, Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World, 2011.
0!#+.5ŏąčŏ!.1%0)!*0Čŏ!2!(+,)!*0Čŏ* ŏ 2*!)!*0
GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
BENCHMARKS (CONTINUED)
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity87
Source: O’Mara, Julie and Alan Richter, Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World, 2011.
0!#+.5ŏĆčŏ!*!ü0/Čŏ+.'Ģ%"!ŏ(*!Čŏ* ŏ(!4%%(%05
GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
BENCHMARKS (CONTINUED)
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity88
Source: O’Mara, Julie and Alan Richter, Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World, 2011.
0!#+.5ŏćčŏ
+ŏ!/%#*Čŏ(//%ü0%+*Čŏ* ŏ+),!*/0%+*
GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION BENCHMARKS
(CONTINUED)
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity89
Source: O’Mara, Julie and Alan Richter, Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World, 2011.
0!#+.5ŏĈčŏĒŏ 10%+*ŏ* ŏ.%*%*#
GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
BENCHMARKS (CONTINUED)
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity90
Source: O’Mara, Julie and Alan Richter, Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World, 2011.
0!#+.5ŏĉčŏ//!//)!*0Čŏ!/1.!)!*0Čŏ* ŏ!/!.$
GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
BENCHMARKS (CONTINUED)
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity91
Source: O’Mara, Julie and Alan Richter, Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World, 2011.
0!#+.5ŏĊčŏĒŏ+))1*%0%+*/
GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
BENCHMARKS (CONTINUED)
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity92
Source: O’Mara, Julie and Alan Richter, Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World, 2011.
0!#+.5ŏāĀčŏ+))1*%05Čŏ+2!.*)!*0ŏ!(0%+*/Čŏ* ŏ+%(ŏ!/,+*/%%(%05
GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
BENCHMARKS (CONTINUED)
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity93
Source: O’Mara, Julie and Alan Richter, Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World, 2011.
0!#+.5ŏāāčŏ.+ 10/ŏ* ŏ!.2%!/ŏ!2!(+,)!*0
GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
BENCHMARKS (CONTINUED)
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity94
Source: O’Mara, Julie and Alan Richter, Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World, 2011.
0!#+.5ŏāĂčŏ.'!0%*#Čŏ(!/Čŏ%/0.%10%+*Čŏ* ŏ1/0+)!.ŏ!.2%!
GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
BENCHMARKS (CONTINUED)
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity95
Source: O’Mara, Julie and Alan Richter, Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks: Standards for Organizations Around the World, 2011.
0!#+.5ŏāăčŏ1,,(%!.ŏ%2!./%05
GLOBAL DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION
BENCHMARKS (CONTINUED)
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity96
Support
in partnership with
Ask the students to explain their drawings or descriptions.
Encourage your audience to discuss any stereotypes together.
Do they all agree? Challenge engineering stereotypes.
In small teams ask your students to draw or describe
a picture of an ‘Engineer’. (This is a chance to be
creative. Perhaps you could encourage the group to
create a display for the classroom?)
Challenging Stereotypes Activity
The twenty first century continues to see an increase
in technological and engineering advancements:
including smart-phones, electric cars, high speed rail links
and countless more.
Diversity
Engineering Engagement Project
This resource is made with you,
the Club Leader, in mind to
help you feel more equipped
to engage all the members of
your club.
Some students may not understand
what engineering is, others may be fully
engaged in another subject, while for
some engineering may appear too hard
or culturally irrelevant.
It can often be hard to engage
everyone in a group.
...but
b t at
a the moment 21st century
advancements
advanc
vancements are
e being developed by a
minority of people.
and
Engineering
ct
fe
af
technology
.
..
ne
everyo
BAE SYSTEMS’ TEACHER AND CAREER
ADVISOR RESOURCES
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity97
www.stem-e-and-d-toolkit.co.uk
Visit the Equality and Diversity Toolkit at:
Useful Resource
This is a great opportunity to discuss the themes from the introduction.
The UK will need to more than double the number of working engineers
between now and 2017 with an estimated extra 587,000 needed
(The Observer, November 2009).
Looking at the working population of the UK (approximately 26.7 million
people) less than 1% are registered as engineers. In 2010 of the 235,000
registered engineering professionals in the UK, only 3.5% were women
(8,340). This means 0.03% of the working population are female
registered engineers.
Engineering is diverse so we need diverse engineers.
Construction: The tallest skyscraper in the world, the Burj Khalifa
in Dubai (below), is 828 metres high (this is the equivalent of
75 double decker buses laid end to end).
Cosmetics: Nanotechnology may sound more suitable for science
fiction, but in fact one of the most common uses is in sunscreen.
Nano-sized particles (10-9m) of zinc oxide are in sunscreen to reflect
UV light away from the skin.
Music: From MP3 players to stadium concerts, an
engineer can help ensure the sound is as good as possible.
Lots of people have a piece of cutting edge technology in
their pocket; in the first three months of 2009, 22.7 million
iPods were sold worldwide. If these had just been in the UK,
one in every three people would now own an iPod.
Why not ask your Club what they think has
been ‘engineered’? Write down their answers
on the board or flipchart. Here are some to get
you started.
A Diverse Job Activity
Engineering Engagement Project
Does this change their impression of
engineers?
Challenge small teams to match up the
profiles correctly.
Photocopy the role model profiles on
the back of this resource and cut them
out. Priya, Chloe and Simon are all STEM
Ambassadors. There are lots of other profiles
throughout the resources you can use too.
Engineers can push the boundaries
of what is possible and make the
world a better and more exciting
place to live.
Role Model
Activity –
Mix and Match
Engineering appears in so many contexts.
See the ‘Mind Maps’ in the Introduction
resource to help you explain the many
relationships engineering has with
our lives.
So providing a context or scenario with
a positive message that is relevant to
the students in your group will help
them engage.
Research evidence tells us that it is
important for students, especially
girls, to understand why they are
doing something and to see how it
contributes to society.
Engineering in Context
BAE SYSTEMS’ TEACHER AND CAREER
ADVISOR RESOURCES (CONTINUED)
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity98
How did you overcome these barriers?
Remember it is important to speak to the teacher first
to ensure your activity is suitable.
Hints
Use ‘Morning all, everyone, folks.’
Challenge gender stereotypes. Use examples which
reflect all cultures. Challenge cultural stereotypes.
Can your audience relate to the activity?
Language
Do refer to unspecified engineers as ‘she’.
Ask your audience what
they are looking for in a career.
Engineers use lots of different skills. They need to be
creative and have good people skills.
Engineers also need to be dynamic and enjoy a challenge.
Hints
Skills
If asking a question consider the likely answer from
your audience.
Avoid referring to girls or mixed groups as ‘guys’ and
avoid referring to women as ‘girls’.
Hints
Examples/references
When asking students questions, alternate between
boys and girls.
E.g. Doris and Omar.
Use names that reflect all cultures. Ensure female names
are equally put first.
Hints
In presentations and activities, monitor the ratio of girls’
names to boys’ names.
to
The best way
how diverse
te
ra
st
on
m
de
me STEM
is to invite so
engineering
speak to your
d
an
e
m
co
s to
n visit
Ambassador
e informatio
club, for mor
.uk
rg
t.o
ne
tem
networking.s
For more information on the Engineering Engagement
Project, visit The Royal Academy
of Engineering site at
www.raeng.org.uk
Names
Here are some things to remember when
presenting to groups:
Checklist
It is important
to allow time for
discussion and
reflection during this
activity – how can the
barriers be overcome?
You may find that you are able to group
them into common
categories e.g. personal,
academic or cultural.
A good way to do this is to use post-it notes for each
barrier and to stick them to a board.
Ask your club if they feel there are or have been any barriers
stopping them from following a STEM related career.
v
There are more useful ideas at STEMNetworking
http://networking.stemnet.org.uk
To see what other STEM Clubs are doing and to find all the
Engineering Engagement Project resources visit
www.stemclubs.net
People can often feel that there are barriers stopping
them from taking certain career paths and opportunities.
Make a list of barriers which you think you have
faced in your career.
More Information
Barriers
Engineering Engagement Project
BAE SYSTEMS’ TEACHER AND CAREER
ADVISOR RESOURCES (CONTINUED)
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity99
Senior Design Engineer
Process Industry
www.baesystems.com/education
Generously supported by
Engineering Engagement Project
Web: www.raeng.org.uk/eenp
Email: [email protected]
The Royal Academy of Engineering
3 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5DG
Tel: 020 7766 0600 Fax: 020 7930 1549
Web: www.raeng.org.uk
Contact Us
My first job was as a medical device design engineer – I’ve wanted to work in
the medical/pharmaceutical industry since university.
I love how rewarding my job is. I like to know that the buildings I help to design
are themselves producing things to make people happier and healthier and
sometimes even saving peoples lives. Mind you, travelling across Europe, and
working with chocolate isn’t too bad either!
I design the air-conditioning and piped services for labs and factories.
This includes visiting sites to find out what is already there, talking to the
clients to find out what they need, performing calculations, drawing layouts,
and sourcing equipment and technologies.
Chloe Agg
I would like to get involved in engineering that can help recycling and
energy saving.
I started after school with a work placement. That got me interested in engineering,
so I took an apprenticeship which included part time engineering courses at
college. That meant I was doing a job and getting paid as well as studying.
I get to travel a lot. My job has taken me to USA, Japan, Russia, France, Spain,
Romania and many other countries for different projects.
Simon Nicholas
I have a baby girl who is almost 2 years old – so she takes up most of my spare
time – but I love fashion design and I have designed and made a wedding/
reception outfits for my clients for their special days as well as my own!
My favourite project was the Chanel Mobile art Pavilion by Zaha Hadid. I travelled
to Milan, New York and Tokyo with the project and worked very closely with the
architects, façade designers, lighting designers, contractors and Chanel team.
I went to university at Imperial College, London. I studied Electrical and Electronic
Engineering with Management. I now work in large teams with architects and
lighting designers on some of the world’s most innovative buildings. I love it.
Engineering Consultant
Priya Lakhani
Role
Models
Engineering Engagement Project
BAE SYSTEMS’ TEACHER AND CAREER
ADVISOR RESOURCES (CONTINUED)
Philips provides
managers with detailed
guidance to ensure new
hires’ early employment
experiences consistently
deliver on employment
value proposition (EVP)
promises.
ŏčŏŏŏŏ
ONBOARDING
Manager Guide to Delivering on Employment Value Proposition (EVP) Promises Across Onboarding
Alignment of Touchpoints Across Induction
ā
ă
Learn More
Philips’ Life Cycle-Based EVP
Delivery, CLC Human Resources
Company Snapshot
Royal Philips Electronics N.V.
Industry:
2011 Revenue:
Employees:
Headquarters:
Health Care,
Lifestyle, and
Technology
Solutions
€22.58 Billion
125,241
The Netherlands
Point of Hire
EVP-Aligned Pre–Start Date Introduction
■ Pre-start CD-ROM
■ Personalized induction website
ŏ*/%#$0čŏOnce a candidate accepts
an offer, Philips clearly shows how the
organization will deliver on EVP promises
across onboarding.
Assessing Manager Delivery of Onboarding
Tasks
■ Clearly defined accountabilities for new
starts’ managers
ŏ*/%#$0čŏPhilips tracks delivery of six
critical manager actions and behaviors
across the onboarding period to ensure
the delivery of the EVP for early career
employees.
2
ą
Building Early Career Networks
■ Accountable Buddies
■ Online “Yellow Pages”
ŏ*/%#$0čŏStrong networks are a critical
part of Philips’ EVP; the onboarding process
facilitates cross-functional networking and
holds staff accountable for new-hire buddy
relationships.
Aligning Early Career Management
■ Standardized learning curricula for all job
families
■ Revised internal career website
ŏ*/%#$0čŏManagers encourage new
hires to access comprehensive learning
resources from early in their careers to show
how Philips can deliver on the EVP as they
progress in their careers.
Engaged and Retained at Three Months’ Tenure
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity100
New hires complete
evaluations throughout
the EVP-aligned
onboarding process.
ŏčŏŏŏ
IN ONBOARDING (CONTINUED)
Manager Guide to Assessing New Hires’ Onboarding Experience
■
This creates accountability,
and ensures that hiring
managers and buddies
fulfill their onboarding
responsibilities.
Type of Activity Monitored
End of First Week
■ Set job, behavioral, and
leadership expectations.
■ Explain organizational
structure and hierarchy.
End of First Month
Assist new-hire network
creation.
■ Explain performance
expectations.
■
End of Three Months
■ Facilitate access to
career development
resources.
“Yes/No” New-Hire Survey Questions to Establish Accountability
■
Did your hiring manager provide you with a clear expectation of your
job and its requirements?
Yes
No
■
Did your buddy guide you in understanding the company culture
and values?
Yes
No
■
Did your hiring manager explain the Philips “Way of Working” to you?
Yes
No
■
Did your buddy guide you in understanding the company’s
organizational structure?
Yes
No
■
Did your hiring manager explain how your business unit fits within
the overall company structure?
Yes
No
■
Did your buddy facilitate the necessary networking with the
appropriate people in the organization?
Yes
No
■
Did your hiring manager explain the performance evaluation system
to you?
Yes
No
■
Did you sit down with your manager to set performance goals?
Yes
No
■
Did you discuss training opportunities with your manager?
Yes
No
■
Did your manager sit down with you to create an individual
development plan?
Yes
No
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
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Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity101
BNSF Railway Company
helps managers solicit
feedback from all team
members to ensure that
meetings and project
work are inclusive.
ŏčŏŏŏ
ŏŏŏ
Manager Guide for Soliciting Team Feedback on Working Style
BNSF’s Tips for Preparing and Hosting Upward Feedback Sharing Sessions
%,ŏāčŏ*#!ŏ0$!ŏ!//%+*
■
How can I give them
a quick review of the
upward feedback process?
■
How can I reemphasize
why I think upward
feedback is important?
Learn More
Profiles of Coaching Programs
and Tactics, CLC Learning and
Development
This collection of case profiles
provides tools and frameworks
for improving the quality
and consistency of manager
coaching.
Company Snapshot
BNSF Railway Company
Industry:
Rail Transportation
2011 Revenue:
US$19.23 Billion
Employees:
38,000
Headquarters:
United States
■
■
Did I thank them for
giving me feedback and
acknowledge the risks
they took?
How much time do I want
to spend talking during
the session, and how
much time listening?
%,ŏĂčŏ!0ŏŏ+/%0%2!ŏ+*!
■
How can I describe the process
in which I determined my key
strengths and key development
areas?
■
Am I being open about my
areas of key strengths and key
development opportunities?
■
Am I willing to receive more
feedback?
■
Is everyone participating in the
discussion and, if not, how can I
include them?
■
How can I avoid being defensive
about the upward feedback I
received from my direct reports?
■
What emotions might I expect to
feel during the session, and what
might I expect my direct reports
to feel?
%,ŏăčŏŏ/0(%/$ŏŏ+1./!ŏ
of Action
■
How can I focus on using
the upward feedback in the
long run?
■
How can I solicit everyone’s
feedback on potential action
steps?
■
How can I tell my direct
reports how I plan to
address key development
opportunities?
■
How can I use the support
from my direct reports
to assess and achieve my
development goals?
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Source: CLC Learning and Development, Profiles of Coaching Programs and Tactics, 2007.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity102
Belgacom helps
managers understand
to discuss discrepancies
between self- and
downward assessments.
ŏčŏŏŏ
IN PERFORMANCE CONVERSATIONS
Manager Guide to Discuss Differences in Self and Downward Performance Review Ratings
Potential Talking Points for Framing Coaching Conversations
Illustrative
If our assessment ratings differ,ŏ0$!*ŏŏ/$+1( ŏ".)!ŏ+1.ŏ+*2!./0%+*ŏ+*ŏ0$!ŏ"+((+3%*#ŏ-1!/0%+*/č
Learn More
Profiles of Coaching Programs
and Tactics, CLC Learning and
Development
This collection of case profiles
provides tools and frameworks
for improving the quality
and consistency of manager
coaching.
Company Snapshot
■
Why do you think our perspectives differ?
■
Can you explain how you came to give yourself this rating?
■
May I explain to you how I came to give you this rating?
■
Are there specific examples you can share with me that demonstrate your effectiveness at this competency that I
may not have taken into account?
■
Are there specific examples you can share with me that demonstrate how you might fall short at this competency?
■
Are there specific challenges you face in your day-to-day work of which I should be aware?
■
How can we better communicate to ensure greater transparency and alignment in our perspectives?
If our assessment ratings align, 0$!*ŏŏ/$+1( ŏ".)!ŏ+1.ŏ+*2!./0%+*ŏ+*ŏ0$!ŏ"+((+3%*#ŏ-1!/0%+*/č
■
Can you explain examples of how you came to give yourself this rating?
■
May I explain to you how I came to give you this rating?
■
What ideas do you have for helping you further improve this development area even more?
■
Would you be amenable to serving as a mentor for peers who struggle with a competency in which you
demonstrate strength?
Belgacom SA
Industry:
2011 Revenue:
Employees:
Headquarters:
Telecommunications
€6.41 Billion
16,370
Belgium
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Source: CLC Learning and Development, Profiles of Coaching Programs and Tactics, 2007.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity103
Managers help their direct
reports learn from others’
diverse experiences
and backgrounds by
identifying mentors for
them based on both
commonalities and
differences.
ŏčŏŏŏ
THROUGH MENTORING RELATIONSHIPS
Manager Guide to Difference-Based Mentoring
Mentor Matching Criteria
Conversation
Drivers
These criteria
should match
between mentor
and mentoree
to create a
successful
mentoring
relationship.
Learn More
2011 Revenue:
Employees:
Headquarters:
Agriculture
Chemicals
US$13.27 Billion
26,200
Switzerland
Senior Global Leader
New Global Leader
Differential Criteria
Establish common ground
between the mentor and
the mentoree to build the
relationship.
Connect emerging leaders
to senior global leaders with
different knowledge and
perspectives from those in
their direct networks.
■
■
Language
Mentor Has Previously
Worked in Mentoree’s
Future Location
■
■
■
■
Knowledge
Transfer Drivers
At least two
out of the four
criteria should
be dissimilar.
Country of Operation
Function
Gender
Nationality
Key Benefits for Mentorees
Syngenta AG
Industry:
Mentoreeā
Connecting Criteria
Syngenta’s Difference-Based
Mentoring, CLC Human
Resources
Company Snapshot
Mentor
1
Ability to Build Networks with Senior Leaders
Outside of Direct Network
Knowledge of Customers in Different Markets
Cross-Cultural Knowledge
Knowledge About Organizational Processes
Cross-Functional Knowledge
Syngenta uses the term “mentoree” instead of “mentee” to further differentiate the difference-based mentoring program
from traditional mentoring programs.
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Source: CLC Human Resources, The Global Leader, 2012.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity104
Managers provide phased
guidance to help mentors
and mentorees build
successful relationships.
ŏčŏŏŏ
THROUGH MENTORING RELATIONSHIPS
(CONTINUED)
Phased Mentoring Objectives
Illustrative Example
Introductory Phase
Objective—Identify
common experiences
and interests to build
relationships.
Mentoree
Sr. Manager
Finance,
Singapore
“I work with the
Finance team based
out of Singapore.”
“I have worked in almost
all continents, including
Mentor
Asia,
and my primary
Head of
area of focus is Sales.”
Sales,
Asia-Pacific
Development Phase
Objective—Share
mentoree’s business
challenges faced in new
markets and mentor’s
past experiences.
“There are so many
channels to go through
here to get the
information I need, and
I’m not sure how to get
things done. Clearly,
there’s a different
decision-making
structure here.”
“I’ve started to get a sense
of people I need to get
in touch with for making
decisions. But, I’m still
struggling to get the
required information.”
“In this country, deference
is a really important
cultural value. When I
was working there, it
took me a while to figure
out who actually had the
information I needed and
who I needed to consult
on the decisions I was
making.”
“I found it helpful to get
to know the people who
had been in the office
for several years. They
could tell me who had
the information I needed
and how to quickly, but
respectfully, get it. Is
Gema still in the office
there? She was my key
contact for this.”
Principles for Effective Difference-Based Mentoring
■
From CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
www.clc.executiveboard.com
■
■
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
Deepening Phase
Objective—Pilot
suggestions and
discuss needed
adaptations.
Conduct kickoff meeting for program participants
to discuss objectives of program.
Encourage mentoring pairs to meet at least one to two
0%)!/ŏŐ-1.0!., face-to-face or remotely.
Encourage mentorees to share real business challenges
with their mentors.
■
■
■
Moving on Phase
Objective—Assimilate
acquired knowledge
and review
achievements.
“Thanks so much
for your valuable
guidance. I feel much
more confident in
working in an unfamiliar
environment and
figuring out where
to go for help.”
Provide mentors with opportunities to discuss challenges
0$0Ő.%/!ŏ3%0$%*ŏ)!*0+.%*#ŏ.!(0%+*/$%,/ŏ3%0$ŏ!$ŏ+0$!.ċ
Provide mentors and mentorees with access to an external
2%/+.ŏ0+Ő$!(,Ő1%( ŏ.!(0%+*/$%,/ŏ.+//ŏ#!+#.,$%!/ŏ* ŏ
cultures.
Conduct regular check-in and feedback sessions with all
program participants.
Creating Competitive Advantage Through Workforce Diversity105
CLC HUMAN RESOURCES
CORPORATE
LEADERSHIP
COUNCIL
CORPORATE EXECUTIVE BOARD
© 2012 The Corporate Executive Board Company.
All Rights Reserved. CLC3444512SYN
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