4 May 2012 Council meeting papers

4 May 2012 Council meeting papers

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

A meeting of Massey University Council will be held in the

Quad A Board Room, Level 2, Quad A Building, Albany Campus

on

Friday 4 May 2012 commencing at 11.00am

AGENDA- PART I

Official Information Act 1982 and Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act

1987

Massey University (including its Council) is subject to the Official Information Act 1982. This means that if a specific request for disclosure is made, information that it holds must be disclosed unless non-disclosure can be justified in the terms of the Official Information Act 1982.

Matters that are included in Part II and most matters in the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings are protected from disclosure under the Official Information Act 1982. That is, non-disclosure of information relating to such matters can usually be justified in terms of the Official Information Act 1982.

Therefore, care should be taken to ensure that papers relating to Part II or Finance Section matters are not seen outside Council (or its relevant Committee) and that such matters are not mentioned outside Council (or its relevant Committee).

All requests (whether written or oral) by any person who is not a Council member for information included under Part II or the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings and requests for the minutes of those parts of Council (or Committee) meetings must be referred immediately to the Registrar for decision on disclosure or otherwise. Individual members are advised not to disclose Part II or Finance Section matters.

Interest: Declaration and Disqualification

In accordance with the Education Act 1989 members are reminded that if they have any direct or indirect pecuniary interest (including their conditions of service as the Chief Executive or as a member of the staff of the institution) in a matter being considered or about to be considered by the Council (or Committee) then as soon as possible after the relevant facts have come to their knowledge they:

(a) must disclose the nature of the interest at a meeting of the Council (or Committee);

(b) must not be present during any deliberation or take part in any decision of the Council (or

Committee) with respect to that matter unless the Council decides otherwise.

Page 1 of 5

N

HI

JK

L

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Index

Number

Item

O

Paper

Number

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Welcome

1.2 Apologies

1.3 Declaration of Interest/ Register of Interest

1.4 Meeting Agenda Review

1.5 Minutes of Council meetings – Part I Meeting held on 2 March 2012

C12/34

1.6 Matters Arising

1.7 Follow-up Schedule as at 4 May 2012

1.8 Council Agenda Plan as at 4 May 2012

2.0 KEY REPORTS

2.1 Chancellor’s Report - Part I

2.1.1 Chancellor’s Report - oral

2.2 Vice-Chancellor’s Report – Part I

2.2.1 Vice-Chancellor’s Report

2.2.2 Financial Report for the three months ending 31 March

2012

C12/35

C12/36

3.0 DECISION ITEMS

PQ

R

3.1 Massey University Research Strategy

3.2

Student Fees Setting Process and Principles

C12/37

C12/38

3.3 Council Statute Approval

S

3.3.1 Graduation Statute, Procedures and Guidelines

C12/39

T

3.3.2 Massey University Council Delegation Statute 2012

C12/40

4.0 COMMITTEE, ASSOCIATED ENTITIES AND OTHER REPORTS

4.1 Academic Board Reports - Part I

UV

4.1.1 Meeting held on 21 March 2012

C12/41

W

4.1.2 Meeting held on 26 April 2012 – to be tabled

C12/42

XYX

4.2 Report on Delegation – Annual Accounts 2011

C12/43

5.0 INFORMATION/BACKGROUND ITEMS

Nil

6.0 LATE ITEMS

7.0 MOVING INTO PART II

Page 2 of 5

7.1 Exclusion of the Public

THE CHANCELLOR WILL MOVE THAT, EXCLUDING

Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar

Ms Rose Anne MacLeod, Assistant Vice-Chancellor – Finance, Strategy and

Information Technology

Mr James Gardiner, Director of Communications

Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary

WHO HAVE, IN THE OPINION OF COUNCIL, KNOWLEDGE THAT COULD BE OF

ASSISTANCE, MEMBERS OF THE PRESS AND PUBLIC BE NOW EXCLUDED FROM

THE MEETING SO THAT FOR THE UNDERNOTED REASONS THE FOLLOWING

MATTERS MAY BE DISCUSSED WITHOUT PUBLIC DISCLOSURE; THE

COMMITTEE BEING SATISFIED, WHERE APPROPRIATE, THAT THERE ARE

CONSIDERATIONS WHICH OUTWEIGH THE PUBLIC INTEREST OF DISCLOSURE.

Reference: Section 48 (1) of the Local Government and Information and Meetings Act 1987.

Reference: Section 9 as detailed hereunder of the Official Information Act 1982.

Item

Item 8.1

C12/44

Confirmation of Minutes

Item 8.2

Matters Arising

Item 8.2.1

C12/45

Criteria For Reporting By Controlled Entities

To Council

Item 8.3

Follow-up Schedule as at 4 May 2012

Item 9.1.1

Chancellor’s Report

Item 9.2.1

Vice-Chancellor’s Report

Item 9.2.2

C12/46

Financial Report for the three months ended

31 March 2102

Item 9.2.3

C12/47

Quarterly Performance Report

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

These matters were considered in Part II of the meeting held on 2 March 2012

These matters were considered in Part II of the meetings held on 2 March 2012

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

These matters were considered in Part II of the meetings held on 2 March 2012 and before

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Page 3 of 5

Item

Item 9.2.4

C12/48

Aged Debtors Report at 31 March 2012

Item 10.1

C12/49

Business Case: Institute of Veterinary,

Animal and Biomedical Sciences Complex

Upgrade

Item 10.2

C12/50

Massey University Holding Company for Off

Shore Ventures

Item 10.3

C12/51

Incorporating Māori Protocols within the

Governance Setting of the

University Report

Item 11.1.1

C12/52

Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting held on 2 March 2012

Item 10.1.2

C12/53

Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting held on 16 April 2012

Item 10.1.3

Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting held on 4 May 2012

Item 11.2

Governance Committee Report – meeting held on 3 May 2012

Item 11.3.1

C12/54

Academic Board Report – meeting held on

21 March 2012

Item 11.3.2

C12/55

Academic Board Report – meeting held on

26 April 2012

Item 11.4.1

C12/56

Massey Ventures Limited Annual Report

2010

Item 11.4.2

C12/57

Massey Ventures Limited Statement of

Corporate Intent 2012

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Page 4 of 5

Item

Item 11.5

C12/58

New Zealand School of Music Annual Report

2011

Item 11.6

C12/59

Massey University Foundation Trust Report

2011

Item 11.7

Pro Vice-Chancellor College of Arts – report on first months in position

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

AND

Item 11.0

Such matters as members of Council declare their intention to raise under Late Items in the privileged part of the meeting.

Page 5 of 5

C12 – May

Part I

Item

1. Draft Massey University

Council Graduation

Statute, Procedures And

Guidelines

Item

1. Guidelines for the

Conduct of Council and

Council Committees

Council Follow-up Schedule Part I – 4 May 2012

From last meeting

Note:

bracketed italics are completed actions

Outcome

The revised Massey University Council Graduation

Statute, Massey University Council Graduation

Procedures and Massey University Council

Graduation Guidelines to Council was provided to members was to give them the opportunity to provide feedback before the Statute, Procedures and

Guidelines were forwarded to the Senior Leadership

Team prior to coming to Council for approval.

Action

Executive Secretary to agenda for approval.

Council Follow-up Schedule Part I – 4 May 2012

Ongoing Issues

Note: bracketed italics are completed actions

Outcome

It was noted that these Guidelines address matters related to the conduct of meetings and not the conduct of individuals in their role as Council members. It was agreed that a charter addressing this matter would be prepared.

Action

Chancellor and Executive Secretary to

prepare a charter that embodies these guidelines and personal conduct of Council members and table at the Charter

Work progressing on the Charter

.

Chancellor to take to early May

Governance committee.

Oral report to Council meeting

Milestone dates

4 May 2012

Council meeting

Milestone dates

2 March 2012

Council meeting.

Early May

Governance

Committee

4 May 2012

Page 1 of 2

Item

2. Consistencies in Policies of the University and

Wholly Owned

Subsidiaries

Outcome

It was noted that wholly owned subsidiaries have their own policies and that this could result in risks resulting from inconsistencies with Massey

University’s policies e.g. Health and Safety Policy.

Action

Vice-Chancellor and Assistant Vice-

Chancellor & University Registrar were to take the matter of risks related to inconsistencies between wholly owned owned subsidiaries.

Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University

Registrar Mr Morriss noted that he would report on this issue at the 2

December 2011 Council meeting.

This was deferred to the 2 March 2012 meeting.

Report to be given at a future meeting. subsidiary policies and Massey policies to the Boards of Massey’s wholly

C12 – May

Part I

Milestone dates

2 March

2012 Council meeting

6 July 2012

Page 2 of 2

C12 – May

Part I

COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – MARCH - DECEMBER – 2012

Friday 2 March (Manawatu)

Function: Close off of previous year; Establishing parameters for new year; Strategy approval for the current year

Induction of new members

VC scene setting

Approve Road to 2020 (Feb)

Preparation for graduations and Honorary

Awards

Annual Accounts for previous year (delegation)

Review of Council performance

Strategic

Discussions

Presentation on Branding and Marketing 2012: Cas

Carter, Assistant Vice-Chancellor External

Relations

Site visits No visit – Maori Protocols Training and Hangi

Friday 4 May (Albany)

Function: Consolidation of business for current year

Monitoring progress re enrolments

Student Forum

Key Reports 

Chancellor’s Report

VC Reports - to include

VC Report

VC scene setting 2012

Financial Reports

Decision

Items

2011 Annual Accounts delegation to A&R

Committee

Conferring of Degrees & Awarding of Diplomas and Certificates at graduation ceremonies delegation

Terms of Reference- Council Committees

Policies as per schedule

Albany Campus, including student facilities and

Student Association representatives

Chancellor’s Report

VC Reports - to include

VC Report including CoRE reporting to

Council

Financial Report

Quarterly Performance Reports

Aged Debtors Report

Student Fee Setting Process and Principles

(Domestic and International)

Research Strategy

MVL Statement of Corporate Intent 2012

Maori Protocols Feedback Report

Policies as per schedule

Committee,

Associated

Entities and

Other

Audit & Risk Report – including high level risks

Academic Board Reports

Performance Review Committee Report

Honorary Awards Committee Report

Review of Council Evaluation 2011

Tracking Council Decisions and Delegations

Audit & Risk Report – including high level risks

Academic Board Reports

Governance Committee Report

Report from PVC College of Creative Arts (in person)

NZSM Annual Report 2011

Massey University Foundation Annual Report

2011

Massey Ventures Ltd Annual Report 2010

Business Cases will brought to Council for approval as appropriate

Friday 6 July (Manawatu)

Function: Strategy planning for the following year; Approval of International Fees

Approve International Student Fees

Commercialisation Strategy- AVC Finance, Strategy

and IT and AVC Research and Enterprise

Sustainability Strategy – AVC Research &Enterprise

Milson Flight Centre

Chancellor’s Report

VC Reports - to include

VC Report

Financial Reports

International Student Fees 2013

Massey Ventures Ltd Annual Report 2011

Policies as per schedule

Audit & Risk Report –including High level risks

Academic Board Reports including Chair

Academic Board Report (in person)

Report from PVC College of Business (in person)

Council Agenda Plan 2012

C12 – May

Part I

COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – MARCH - DECEMBER – 2011

Friday 7 September (Manawatu)

Function: Approval of Investment Plan and

Domestic Fees

Approve Investment Plan

Approve Domestic Student Fees

Establish Council agenda plan and schedule for following year

Friday 5 October (Wellington)

Function: Budget 2013 review

Review Operating and Capital Budget for following year

Insurance Renewal – delegate authority to approve

Strategic

Discussions

Asset Management Strategy – AVC Finance,

Strategy and IT

Site Visits Turitea Campus, including student facilities and

Student Association representatives

Key Reports 

Chancellor’s Report

VC Reports - to include

VC Report

Financial Report

Quarterly Performance Reports

Maori and Pasifika Strategy – AVC Maori and

Pasifika

Friday 7 December (Manawatu)

Function: Budget approval and Final Decisions for the current year and preparation for

following year

Approve Operating and Capital Budget for following year

Election of Chancellor and Pro-Chancellor

Committees established

Farewell to leaving Council members

Road to 2020 including Academic Reform – AVC

& University Registrar and AVC Academic and

International

Farms (adjacent to Turitea Campus)

Decision

Items

Investment Plan 2013-2015

Domestic Student Fees 2013

Draft Agenda Plan 2013

Draft Meeting Schedule 2013

Policies as per schedule

Wellington Campus, including student facilities and

Student Association representatives

Chancellor’s Report

VC Reports - to include

VC Report

Financial Report

2013 University Operating and Capital Budget

NZ School Music Statement of Corporate Intent

2013

MVL Statement of Corporate Intent 2013

Policies as per schedule

Committee,

Associated

Entities and

Other

Audit & Risk Report–including high level risks

Academic Board Reports

Honorary Awards Committee Report

Tracking Council Decisions and Delegations

Report from Massey University Foundation

Chair’s (in person)

Business Cases will brought to Council for approval as appropriate

Audit & Risk Report – including high level risks

Honorary Awards Committee Report

Notice of Intention for Chancellor and Pro

Chancellor

Graduation Schedule 2013

Chancellor’s Report

VC Reports - to include

VC Report

Financial Report

Quarterly Performance Reports

Aged Debtors Report

Road to 2020

Renewal of Insurance 2013

Student Bad Debts

Council Committee membership

Revised Guidelines for Conduct of Council and Council Committees meetings

Election of Chancellor and Pro Chancellor (as

required)

Policies as per schedule

Audit & Risk Report – including high level risks

Academic Board Reports including Chair

Academic Board Report (in person)

Honorary Awards Committee Report

Council Evaluation 2012

Council Agenda Plan 2012

C12/34 – May

Part I

MINUTES OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

A MEETING OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE

UNIVERSITY HOUSE MEETING ROOM, UNIVERSITY HOUSE,

MANAWATU CAMPUS on

FRIDAY 2 MARCH 2012 AT 11.00am

PART I

PRESENT:

Dr Russ Ballard (Chancellor) (Chair), Ms Fiona Coote, Ms Kura Denness,

Associate Professor Grant Duncan, Mr Chris Kelly, Hon Steve Maharey

(Vice-Chancellor), Dr Alison Paterson (Pro Chancellor), Ms Tiri Porter,

Professor Tony Signal, Mr Ralph Springett, Mr Ben Thorpe,

Mr Bruce Ullrich, Mr Ben Vanderkolk and Professor Cynthia White

IN ATTENDANCE: Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar

Ms R A MacLeod, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Finance, Strategy and

Information Technology (FSI)

Mr James Gardiner, Director Communications

Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary

Official Information Act 1982 and Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act

1987

Massey University (including its Council) is subject to the Official Information Act 1982. This means that if a specific request for disclosure is made, information that it holds must be disclosed unless non-disclosure can be justified in the terms of the Official Information Act 1982.

Matters that are included in Part II and most matters in the Finance Section of Council (or

Committee) meetings are protected from disclosure under the Official Information Act 1982. That is, non-disclosure of information relating to such matters can usually be justified in terms of the

Official Information Act 1982. Therefore, care should be taken to ensure that papers relating to Part

II or Finance Section matters are not seen outside Council (or its relevant Committee) and that such matters are not mentioned outside Council (or its relevant Committee).

All requests (whether written or oral) by any person who is not a Council member for information included under Part II or the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings and requests for the minutes of those parts of Council (or Committee) meetings must be referred immediately to the

Registrar for decision on disclosure or otherwise. Individual members are advised not to disclose

Part II or Finance Section matters.

Interest: Declaration and Disqualification

In accordance with the Education Act 1989 members are reminded that if they have any direct or indirect pecuniary interest (including their conditions of service as the Chief Executive or as a

Page 1 of 10

C12/34 – May

Part I

member of the staff of the institution) in a matter being considered or about to be considered by the

Council (or Committee) then as soon as possible after the relevant facts have come to their knowledge they:

(a) Must disclose the nature of the interest at a meeting of the Council (or Committee);

(b) Must not be present during any deliberation or take part in any decision of the

Council (or Committee) with respect to that matter unless the Council decides otherwise.

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 WELCOME

The Chancellor opened the meeting at 11.00am welcoming those present and noting that the press and two Tertiary Education Union representatives were present.

1.2 APOLOGIES

Apologies were received and noted from Professor Sir Ngatata Love, Mr Alastair Scott and

Ms Lesley Whyte, and for early departure from Mr Chris Kelly.

1.3 DECLARATION OF INTEREST

The Chancellor noted the Interests Register and called for any further declarations of which there were none. Members were asked to provide updated information for the Register to the

Executive Secretary.

1.4 MEETING AGENDA REVIEW

Item 10.4: Massey Ventures Limited Annual Report 2010: The Massey Ventures Limited

Annual Report 2010 had not been received for distribution. This is now to be tabled at the 4

May 2012 Council meeting.

Item 10.6: Performance Review Committee Report: This item was to be taken prior to or immediately after lunch to enable the early departure of the chair of the Committee.

Late Items Part II

Naming of Specific Laboratories, Ground Floor, Tower C, Manawatu campus: The reason for taking this item in Part II was to protect the privacy of natural persons: Reference:

Section 9 2 (a)

Page 2 of 10

C12/34 – May

Part I

1.5 CONFIRMATION OF PART I MINUTES

1.5.1 C12/05

CONFIRMATION OF PART I MINUTES - MEETING HELD ON 2 DECEMBER

2011

RESOLVED THAT THE MINUTES OF THE MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

MEETING HELD ON FRIDAY 2 DECEMBER 2011 (PART I) BE RECEIVED AND

CONFIRMED AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD

CHANCELLOR/PATERSON

Carried

1.5.2 C12/06

CONFIRMATION OF PART I MINUTES - SPECIAL MEETING HELD ON

TUESDAY 14 FEBRUARY 2012

RESOLVED THAT THE MINUTES OF THE MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

SPECIAL MEETING HELD ON TUESDAY 14 FEBRUARY 2012 (PART I) BE

RECEIVED AND CONFIRMED AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD

CHANCELLOR/SPRINGETT

Carried

1.6 MATTERS ARISING

There were no matters arising further to those on the Follow-up Schedule.

1.7 FOLLOW-UP SCHEDULE AS AT 2 MARCH 2012

The Follow-up Schedule as at 2 March 2012 was noted.

1.8 COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – UPDATE FOR 2 MARCH 2012

The Chancellor spoke to the updated Council Agenda Plan noting that Strategic Discussion and Site Visits had been scheduled. A Māori Protocols feedback paper is scheduled for the 4

May 2012 meeting. The Agenda Plan was noted.

2.0 KEY REPORTS

2.1

CHANCELLOR’S REPORTS

2.1.1 CHANCELLOR’S REPORT – oral

The Chancellor reported that since the 2 December 2011 Council meeting he had attended a variety of meetings and events. These included the following:

Page 3 of 10

C12/34 – May

Part I

Attending the Chancellors’ and Vice-Chancellors’ meeting on 8 December 2011. He noted the following had been discussed: o

There had been a lack of interest in a Governance Framework proposal that had been put forward following the changes in polytechnic governance structures; o

The student services regulations; o

The briefing to the incoming Minister; o

The Chancellor of Auckland University has taken over the chairmanship of the

Chancellors group.

The next Chancellors’ and Vice-Chancellors’ meeting is to be held on 15 and 16 March

2012 at Lincoln University.

Attending meetings of the Honorary Awards Committee and Performance Review

Committee of Council.

Continuing his bi-weekly calls to the Vice-Chancellor.

2.2 VICE-CHANCELLOR’S REPORTS

2.2.1 C12/07

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S REPORT – PART I

The Vice-Chancellor considered that the year had commenced well, with student orientations, his meetings with staff and the finalization of the Road to 2020.

He highlighted 2.4: 2012 Enrolments and 8.0: Opportunities/Threats in his report and directed Council to the appendices to his report.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL RECEIVE THE PART I VICE-CHANCELLOR’S

REPORT

CHANCELLOR

Carried

2.2.2 C12/08

FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 31 DECEMBER

2011 - PART I

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Finance, Strategy and Information Technology spoke to the report noting the unaudited outturn of $7.7 million against a budgeted $6.6 million. She also noted that Appendix 4: Capital Expenditure Report would cover only Group One Projects as Group

Two Projects had sensitive information around capital programmes, some of which would be tendered out.

Mr Kelly noted that this excellent result was achieved through the efforts of the Senior

Leadership Team in what had been a hard and challenging year.

On behalf of Council the Chancellor thanked all staff and the Senior Leadership Team for the good outturn and for the controls that had been put in place to achieve this.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL RECEIVE THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE

TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2011

CHANCELLOR

Carried

Page 4 of 10

C12/34 – May

Part I

3.0 DECISION ITEMS

3.1 COUNCIL POLICY APPROVAL

3.1.1 C12/10

PAYMENTS TO COUNCIL MEMBERS POLICY 2012

The Chancellor noted that the Government had not increased the fees payable to Council members and that in the interests of probity he was recommending that the payments to

Council members remained the same as in 2011.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE PAYMENT TO COUNCIL MEMBERS

POLICY FOR 2012 (C12/10) AS ATTACHED (APPENDIX 1)

ULLRICH/SPRINGETT

Carried

It was noted that the reimbursement of expenses applied to all Council members.

3.2 UNIVERSITY POLICY APPROVAL

3.2.1 C12/11

COMPLIANCE POLICY

It was noted that the Audit and Risk Committee recommended that Council approve the

Compliance Policy with the amendment as detailed in the resolution.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL:

1. APPROVE THE COMPLIANCE POLICY(C12/11) (APPENDIX 2) WITH THE

FOLLOWING AMENDMENT (additions in bold)

Page 1: Policy: 3 rd

paragraph: 3 rd

sentence: The Council of Massey

University, through following review by its Audit and Risk Committee…

2. NOTE THE UPDATED COMPLIANCE FRAMEWORK; AND

3. NOTE THE REGISTER OF COMPLIANCE OBLIGATIONS 2012 APPROVED

BY THE RISK MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE

DENNESS/SPRINGETT

Carried

3.2.2 C12/12

TREASURY POLICY AND TREASURY FRAMEWORK ANNUAL REVIEW

An amended Treasury Framework was tabled (Appendix 3) and an amended Appendix One of the Framework which was to replace Appendix One in the tabled Appendix 3 (Appendix

4).

It was noted that the Audit and Risk Committee recommended that Council approve the

Treasury Policy and tabled Treasury Framework with an additional amendment to the

Treasury Framework as detailed in the resolution. The amendment had been recommended because of the subjective nature of measurement used.

Page 5 of 10

C12/34 – May

Part I

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE TREASURY POLICY AND

TREASURY FRAMEWORK (C12/12 - AMENDED) (APPENDICES 3 & 4) WITH THE

FOLLOWING ADDITIONAL AMENDMENT TO THE TREASURY FRAMEWORK

(additions in bold)

Page 13 of 13: 5.3: Additional sentence: …prudent buffer for everyday needs. A

quick ratio of 1:1 ($1 of current assets-inventory to $1 of current liabilities) be maintained.

ULLRICH/PATERSON

Carried

3.3 COUNCIL COMMITTEE TERMS OF REFERENCE

3.3.1 C12/13

DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE AND MEMBERSHIP 2012

It was noted that the Disciplinary Committee membership had been updated for 2012 and that the Terms of Reference remained unchanged.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL NOTE THE DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE TERMS OF

REFERENCE AND MEMBERSHIP FOR 2012 AND APPROVE THE APPOINTMENT

OF PAUL RIEGER AND MORVA CROXAN EACH FOR A FURTHER THREE YEAR

TERM

COOTE/THORPE

Carried

3.4 SPECIFIC DELEGATIONS

3.4.1 C12/14

CONFERRING OF DEGREES AND AWARDING OF DIPLOMAS AND

CERTIFICATES – GRADUATION CEREMONIES 2012

RESOLVED THAT THE CHANCELLOR, OR HIS NOMINEE, BE AUTHORISED TO

CONFER DEGREES AND AWARD DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES AT THE

FORTHCOMING MASSEY UNIVERSITY GRADUATION CEREMONIES TO BE

HELD ON

17, 18 & 19 APRIL 2011 IN AUCKLAND;

14, 15 & 16 MAY 2011 IN PALMERSTON NORTH;

31 MAY 2011 IN WELLINGTON; AND

30 NOVEMBER 2011 IN PALMERSTON NORTH

TO THOSE REPORTED AS HAVING SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED THE

PRESCRIBED COURSES OF STUDY

PATERSON/KELLY

Carried

Page 6 of 10

C12/34 – May

Part I

3.4.2 C12/15

APPROVAL OF ANNUAL ACCOUNTS 2011 – DELEGATION TO AUDIT AND

RISK COMMITTEE

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL DELEGATE THE AUTHORITY TO THE AUDIT AND

RISK COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL TO APPROVE THE ANNUAL ACCOUNTS FOR

2011

SIGNAL/PATERSON

Carried

4.0 COMMITTEE, ASSOCIATED ENTITIES AND OTHER REPORTS

4.1 C12/16

ACADEMIC BOARD MEETING HELD ON 15 FEBRUARY 2012

Academic Board Appointee to Council Professor Signal spoke to the report noting the Draft

Research Strategy that had previously been to Council had now been fully consulted on and was expected to come to Council for approval at the 4 May 2012 meeting.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL RECEIVE THE ACADEMIC BOARD REPORT OF THE

MEETING HELD ON 15 FEBRUARY 2012

CHANCELLOR

Carried

4.2 C12/17

TRACKING COUNCIL DECISIONS AND DELEGATIONS – PART 1

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar Mr Morriss noted that this report tracked those Part I Council decisions and delegations that remained current.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL NOTE THE PART I TRACKING COUNCIL DECISIONS

AND DELEGATIONS REPORT AS AT 2 MARCH 2012

CHANCELLOR

Carried

5.0 INFORMATION/BACKGROUND ITEMS

5.1 C12/18

DRAFT MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL GRADUATION STATUTE,

PROCEDURES AND GUIDELINES

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar Mr Morriss noted that providing the revised Massey University Council Graduation Statute, Massey University Council

Graduation Procedures and Massey University Council Graduation Guidelines to Council members was to give them the opportunity to provide feedback before the Statute,

Procedures and Guidelines were forwarded to the Senior Leadership Team prior to being tabled at the 4 May 2012 Council meeting for approval.

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6.0 MOVING INTO PART II

EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC

THE CHANCELLOR MOVED THAT, EXCLUDING

Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar

Ms Rose Anne MacLeod, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Finance, Strategy and

Information Technology

Mr James Gardner, Director Communications

Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary

WHO HAVE, IN THE OPINION OF COUNCIL, KNOWLEDGE THAT COULD BE OF

ASSISTANCE, MEMBERS OF THE PRESS AND PUBLIC BE NOW EXCLUDED

FROM THE MEETING SO THAT FOR THE UNDERNOTED REASONS THE

FOLLOWING MATTERS MAY BE DISCUSSED WITHOUT PUBLIC DISCLOSURE;

THE COMMITTEE BEING SATISFIED, WHERE APPROPRIATE, THAT THERE ARE

CONSIDERATIONS WHICH OUTWEIGH THE PUBLIC INTEREST OF DISCLOSURE.

Reference: Section 48 (1) of the Local Government and Information and Meetings Act

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1987.

Reference: Section 9 as detailed hereunder of the Official Information Act 1982.

Item

Item 7.1.1

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Confirmation of Minutes

Item 7.1.2

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Confirmation of Minutes

Item 7.2

Matters Arising

Item 7.3

Follow-up Schedule as at 2 March 2012

Item 8.1.1

Chancellor’s Report

Item 8.1.2

Council Evaluation 2011

Item 8.2.1

Vice-Chancellor’s Report

Item 8.2.2

Financial Report for the twelve months ended

31 December 2011

Item 9.1

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Interim Sciences Building Developments –

Albany Campus

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

These matters were considered in Part II of the meeting held on 2 December 2011

These matters were considered in Part II of the special meeting held on 14 February 2012

These matters were considered in Part II of the meetings held on 2 December 2011

These matters were considered in Part II of the meetings held on 2 December 2011 and before

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

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Item

Item 9.2

withdrawn

Item 9.3

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Property Divestment Recommendations

Item 9.4

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Naming of Building being built in

Wellington for use by the College of Creative

Arts

Item 10.1.1

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Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting held on 2 December 2011

Item 10.1.2

Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting held on 2 March 2012

Item 10.2

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Honorary Awards Committee Report – meeting held on 9 February 2012

Item 10.3

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Academic Board Report – meeting held on

15 February 2012

Item 10.4

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Massey Ventures Limited Annual Report

2010

Item 10.5

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Tracking Council Decisions and Delegation –

Part II

Item 10.6

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Performance Review Committee Report – meeting held on 31 January 2012

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

AND

Item 11.0

Such matters as members of Council declare their intention to raise under Late Items in the privileged part of the meeting.

CHANCELLOR

Carried

12.0 ITEMS MOVED FROM PART II TO PART I

The following decision was moved from Part II into Part I

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9.1

INTERIM SCIENCES BUILDING DEVELOPMENTS – ALBANY CAMPUS

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL:

1. APPROVE THE EXTENSION OF THE STUDENT AMENITIES CENTRE

PROJECT ON THE EAST PRECINCT OF THE ALBANY CAMPUS TO

INCLUDE STAGE II CONSTRUCTION AND FIT OUT FOR SCIENCE

LABORATORY SPACE TO ACCOMMODATE GROWTH IN SCIENCE

STUDENT NUMBERS;

2. APPROVE THE TOTAL PROJECT BUDGET OF UP TO $6.625 MILLION

(ROC) FOR THE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF 1,213M

2

OF

BUILDING AND LABORATORY FIT OUT TO BE FUNDED FROM THE

UNIVERSITY’S CAPITAL PROGRAMME;

3. NOTE THAT CONSEQUENT RETROFITTING OF EXISTING SPACES ON

OTEHA ROHE WILL BE FUNDED THROUGH ANY SURPLUS IN THE

$6.625 MILLION ALLOCATION WITH THE REMAINDER BEING

FUNDED THROUGH THE SPACE RECYCLING COMPONENT IN THE

CAMPUS MINOR CAPITAL WORKS BUDGET; AND

4. NOTE THAT THE 2012 – 2016 CAPITAL PROGRAMME ALLOWS FOR

$1.0M IN 2012 AND $4.610M IN 2013, AND THAT IN ORDER TO HAVE

THE FACILITY OPEN FOR START OF SEMESTER ONE 2013, THE CASH

FLOW OF THIS PROJECT WILL NEED TO BE BROUGHT FORWARD

AGAINST THE FORECAST PATTERN OF EXPENDITURE, AND THAT

OF THE COLLEGE OF SCIENCES PART B ON MANAWATU WILL BE

DELAYED TO DEFRAY THE IMPACT OF THIS MOVEMENT IN TIMING

9.4 NAMING OF BUILDING BEING BUILT IN WELLINGTON FOR USE BY

THE COLLEGE OF CREATIVE ARTS

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL:

1. APPROVE THE NAME OF TE ARA HIHIKO, AS PROPOSED BY THE

WELLINGTON TENTHS TRUST, BEING ASSIGNED TO THE NEW

CREATIVE ARTS BUILDING ON THE WELLINGTON CAMPUS; AND

2. NOTE THAT OPPORTUNITIES FOR SPONSORSHIP AND/OR NAMING

RIGHTS FOR THE BUILDING TO SIT ALONGSIDE THE MAORI NAME

ARE BEING INVESTIGATED

Signature: _______________________________________

Date

: __________________

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Part I

VICE-

CHANCELLOR’S OFFICE

To:

From:

Date:

Subject:

Members of Council

Vice-Chancellor

17 April 2012

Vice-

Chancellor’s Part I Report to Council

Period: mid-March 2012

– mid-April

Purpose:

This report is presented to update Council on key achievements, highlights and major issues arising over the period mid-March 2012 – mid-April and also seeks to give Council a flavour of the breadth and depth of University–associated activities. The report gathers together strategic items provided by college and service lines, the Vice-Chancellor’s elog and diary. Further detail is provided in the appendices to this report.

1.0 Topical Issues

1.1

Engine of the new New Zealand

As part of the evolution of the Massey brand, we have adopted the tagline “the engine of the new New Zealand”. Over the past few months the External Relations team has been working on extending the brand to showcase Massey in everything we do, including print advertising, events and event invitations, billboards, stands, posters etc. We are endeavouring to be consistent in the way we showcase Massey, to leverage off the investment we have made in the brand as much as possible.

You may have already noticed we have made a small change to our logo by adding

“University of New Zealand”. There are a number of reasons why we have added this to the logo. Identifying our location is very important when communicating with stakeholders. As we focus more on our international markets, a simple gesture like putting our location on our logo becomes much more important. It is also important for our New Zealand stakeholders.

You will notice that Victoria University calls itself the University of Wellington and Waikato,

Otago and Canterbury all claim to be the University of their region. Auckland University includes New Zealand on its logo. Massey, with its three campuses in three different locations and being the third largest university in the South Island, has a strong case for calling itself University of New Zealand. Thank you to those who have already noticed the change and communicated with me. We are aware of the history of The University of New

Zealand.

This is the year of the “new New Zealand”, by that I mean this is the year we work hard at embedding Massey’s position as the engine of the new New Zealand by theming as much as we can around the campaign.

As you know, we are using the concept of “our Defining people” to tell the story of Massey being the ‘engine’ that has helped shape New Zealand and will continue to do so while taking the best of the country to the rest of the world. If you have any ideas of a staff member,

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student or alumni who illustrates the story of Massey please contact Assistant Vice-

Chancellor (External Relations) Cas Carter or Josie Brennan in the marketing team.

1.2

Youth Event

In relation to 1.1 above, we are currently working on a youth event that aims to create New

Zealand’s new “thought leaders”. This will begin with an online competition for students to send in audio-visual presentations in which they speak about the “Future of New Zealand”. A workshop on “Thought Leadership” will follow and it is intended to culminate in the top students attending the symposium later in the year.

1.3 Massey University Foundation appeal launched

The Massey University Foundation has launched its first appeal to all alumni. A note about the appeal follows:

“Massey has always been at the forefront of new developments in teaching and research that have served New Zealand and the community. It is through our teaching, research and learning that this University is playing a key role in building a new future for this country. Two years ago Massey launched its first major fundraising campaign – Advancing New Zealand.

The campaign will enable Massey to significantly increase its income in order to build and maintain the University as world class facility that will drive this country forwards and give all

New Zealanders a better quality of life.

As part of this campaign, the Foundation has today launched its first full-scale alumni appeal.

The appeal will become an annual event on the alumni calendar and will run throughout

March. It will be sent by email and post to 84,000 alumni and will feature prominently on the

University’s home page and be supported by LinkedIn and Facebook posts. We are asking staff to support and endorse the launch of this initiative in any way they can to help ensure its success.”

2.0 Key Strategic Issues and Positioning

2.1

Special meeting of Massey University Council

On February 14 the Council met to review the University’s strategy for 2012 and discuss in depth some of its key initiatives.

The strategy The Road to 2020 was approved and an electronic copy is now available via the following link: http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/fms/About%20Massey/Documents/Defining-road-to-

2020.pdf.

Hard copies have been distributed internally to heads of departments and services. Key external stakeholders and partners will be receiving it soon.

Of particular interest to the Council was:

The new New Zealand theme and the contribution Massey can make to the future of the country. Chancellor Dr Russ Ballard and Council member Chris Kelly spoke to the areas of economic performance, the wage gap/poverty, public health, agri-food and sustainability.

The University’s capital plan and the need to address seismic issues which have arisen since the event in Canterbury. Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar Stuart

Morriss began briefing staff immediately after the Council meeting on a range of developments that will be taking place this year. Of key focus were the developments on the Manawatū campus and the relocation of the College of Education.

In summary, Massey is spending $57 million over five years on a programme of work that will enable the College of Education to relocate from Hokowhitu to Turitea and restore two of our heritage buildings. A programme of building projects and allied work streams to allow the decanting of the Sir Geoffrey Peren and Refectory buildings, the structural upgrade and restoration of those buildings and relocation of the College of

Education is under way. The programme management group is meeting regularly.

Please refer to Appendices I and II for further details. The management plan and timetable and regular updates will be posted on Staffroom under ‘College of Education

Relocation’ as this exciting programme progresses.

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The financial out-turn for 2011. A final audit has yet to take place but the University looks to have slightly exceeded its surplus target. This is good news because it signals that we are continuing to achieve financial stability and to provide for ongoing investment in key activities. The Council also discussed changes that will take place in the financial area through 2012 and 2013. Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Finance Strategy and Information

Technology) Rose Anne MacLeod will be ensuring that all budget managers are kept well informed about developments.

Steps being taken by the University to enable it to drive commercial activity. As the

University seeks to diversify its revenue base, our commercial capacity and capability is being expanded. Assistant Vice-Chancellors Professor Brigid Heywood, Stuart Morriss and Professor Ingrid Day will be leading in this area.

The results of Academic Reform. Of central interest were the suggestions to establish a

College of Health and an Institute of Education. The Council has asked the Senior

Leadership Team to develop full proposals. It noted that there are developments taking place in all colleges. Please refer to item 2.4.1 below for further detail on the project.

Internationalisation. The Council was particularly interested in the approaches being taken to manage the growth in numbers of international students. The University has a target of increasing the number of international students by 400 this year. Late last year the University released an internationalisation strategy which can be accessed via the following link: http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/index.cfm?E517D334-96BF-57F6-

8C0D-489E3D547517&E517D334-96BF-57F6-8C0D-489E3D547517

The Council meeting capped off a very positive start to the year. There is a great deal in front of us – some of which will simply arise during the year – but we are in good shape to take on the challenges.

2.2

Vice-Chancellor all-staff briefings

All-staff briefings focusing on the strategy were held on all campuses in the week February

21-24. I want to thank everyone who was able to attend. We have a challenging year ahead so it is important we are all aware of what is planned. I finished the week thinking that the sense of momentum we talked about at the end of last year has continued. If you happened to miss the meetings a recorded version of the Manawatū session on February 21 is available via the following link: http://webcast.massey.ac.nz/mediasite/SilverlightPlayer/Default.aspx?peid=3df2d9d4ad6545 a7960e6e4a2cdf21721d

2.3

Massey is a “selector” institution

One of the issues the University has had to handle in recent years is the capping of student numbers. Massey had enrolled more students that the Tertiary Education Commission was prepared to permit so we have been bringing our numbers down. It is important, however, for all staff to understand that our strategy is to encourage an increasing number of students to apply to study at Massey. This is for two reasons. First, our long-term goal is still to grow domestic student numbers, particularly at Albany. We need to be able to demonstrate to the

Government that Massey needs to grow to meet student demand. Second, our aim has always been to move from a market driven institution to a “selector” institution. This will allow us to ensure students who are most likely to benefit from attending Massey are those we enrol.

The way the University will manage this situation is through our enrolment processes.

2.4 Teaching and Learning

2.4.1 Academic Reform Project update

Further to item 2.1 above, the report on the University’s Academic Reform Project 2010-2011 can now be downloaded from the Staffroom website. The Academic Reform Project provides the foundation for Massey’s future academic development and programme of work based on enhancements and innovations to the academic portfolio.

A key outcome of the project, to date, is a Teaching and Learning Framework that articulates

Massey’s signature platforms and defining specialisations and the Massey Model of

Teaching and Learning. The framework will guide the continuing development, expansion and renewal of the qualification portfolio this year and beyond, providing the basis for

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strategic developments in terms of the areas where thinking, planning and support for staff and students will be focussed.

The project started in March 2010 to position the University with sustainable and defining programmes of study delivered in distinctive, innovative and accessible ways. It was designed to fulfil a number of broad objectives and work undertaken with the colleges and across the University has resulted in a transformed academic portfolio.

Significant changes to the qualifications have been made. Substantial rationalisation of programmes and papers provided the impetus for a number of new and future-focussed developments including new and expanded areas of specialisation, targeted intervention strategies to support student success and expanded offerings in professional and continuing education. Changes have also been made to structures for teaching and learning with enhancements to the processes for engagement in academic matters, new entities to support distance and lifelong learning, and significant changes to the college structures.

Review and redevelopment, where appropriate, of supporting policies and procedures was another area addressed and implementation of agreed changes in this area is under way.

Find out more and download the report via this link: http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/aboutmassey/university-management/avc-academic/academic-reform/academic-reform_home.cfm

2.4.2 Initiatives for improving student success and paper completion rates are under way for 2012.

The Student Engagement Stocktake is gathering information regarding activities undertaken to support student engagement across the University with a view to mapping these activities and timelines in order to improve their efficiency and effectiveness.

2.4.3 Related completions activities are also underway including the first weeks/early intervention student engagement pilot. The 2012 pilot has been extended to the Colleges of Business and Humanities and Social Sciences and 45 paper offerings (22 papers) are being covered in Semester 1. The Semester 1 round of Academic Progress Monitoring is being coordinated within the Student Evaluation and Engagement Unit and a consolidated report related to the past rounds of APM has been presented to the Teaching and Learning Committee.

2.4.4 Various activities that specifically support distance learners have commenced such as the distance learners’ first-year interventions process, the dissemination of a new brochure to help distance students understand how to prepare and get started for university study, and the formulation of specific questions related to distance learning for inclusion in the

Australasian Survey of Student Engagement (AUSSE).

2.4.5 The new National Centre for Teaching and Learning Website is now operational and linked from the main University homepage. The National Centre is also promoting the use of social media with Facebook, Twitter and YouTube accounts established for the campus Centres for

Teaching and Learning.

2.4.6 The Student Engagement and Evaluation Unit have completed a trial of the new Massey

Graduate Destination Survey which will be presented to the Teaching and Learning

Committee for approval at its March meeting. Roll-out of the new Massey GDS is intended for 2012. The New Zealand Graduate Longitudinal Study report has now been received by the University from the National Centre for Lifecourse Research and will also be presented to the Teaching and Learning Committee at the March meeting.

2.4.7 A live pilot of Video-linked teaching (VLT) facilities was launched on March 21.

2.5 Research Update

2.5.1 Institutional Review of Research (IRoR) 2011 – Performance-Based Research Fund

(PBRF) preparation

Of central importance this year will be the University’s PBRF submission. The process has and will be challenging. In response to some questions raised last week Assistant Vice-

Chancellor (Research and Enterprise) Professor Brigid Heywood provided me with an update

– please refer to Appendix III for further details. Regular updates on PBRF are provided via the Research Management Services web page.

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2.5.2 Research Communications Plan

A Research Communications Plan: Defining Themes/Defining People has been developed to showcase Massey University’s unique strengths in research. In brief Massey University is a research-led university and leading in areas that really count.

2.6 Internationalisation Update

2.6.1 Upcoming international initiatives

My international travel obligations this year include Sri Lanka in late August and Australia and Indonesia in late September. The final dates and programme are yet to be set. If there is something I can include in the visits that would be helpful to work being undertaken in these countries please let me know.

2.6.2 I also had the opportunity to continue international connections with the following:

Visited the Swiss Ambassador Marion Weichelt Krupski, in Wellington.

Attended a meeting with the International Accreditation Panel for the Bachelor of

Construction Programme.

Hosted the signing of a memorandum of understanding with the University of Missouri’s

College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. Missouri is a leading university in agriculture, science and engineering.

Hosted a visit by a delegation from Mount Royal University, Calgary, Canada led by

President Dr David Docherty and a memorandum of understanding signing. (Refer to item 3.30 above for more information.)

Hosted a visit from Argentinean Ambassador Fernando Escalona. Ambassador Escalona also presented Massey University’s top Spanish students with the Argentine Embassy

Prize. The new award recognises academic achievement in Spanish language and culture papers in the 2011 academic year.

2.6.3 Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Māori and Pasifika) Professor Sir Mason Durie delivered a keynote address at Common Roots, Common Futures: Indigenous Pathways to Self

Determination

, in Tucson, Arizona. The forum was arranged by the Harvard Project on

American Indian Economic Development, the Australian National University (National Centre for Indigenous Studies), and the University of Arizona (Native Nations Institute). Participants included four representatives from each of Canada, United States, Australia and New

Zealand. The forum provided an opportunity for Massey to join an indigenous network concerned with both social and economic development.

2.6.4 The branch manager of the Indigenous and Equity Branch of the Higher Education Division for the Australian Government Department of Education, Craig Ritchie, and a colleague, Lisa

Schofield spent a day at Massey Manawatū in March. They are conducting a review into higher education for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and were keen to learn about the

New Zealand experience vis a vis Māori and the approach taken at Massey. A useful exchange occurred with opportunities for ongoing dialogue. Among other things, they were interested in the establishment of an Indigenous Academic Leadership Centre at Massey.

2.6.5 The Massey Distance Education and Learning Futures Alliance (DELFA) hosted a blended learning workshop presented by Associate Professor Norm Vaughan and Dr Jim Zimmer from Mount Royal University. Seventy staff attended the workshop on the Manawatū campus. Please refer to item 3.30 below for further details on the Mount Royal University visit.

2.6.6 Bill Siembieda, a visiting expert from the United States, who has been working in Japan, was based at the Joint Centre for Disaster Research for four weeks last month and presented at the Emergency Management Summer Institute, March 12-16.

2.6.7 In March Professor Douglas Paton from the School of Psychology, University of Tasmania, presented a Joint Centre for Disaster Research research seminar entitled Developing

Community Adaptive Capacity for Natural Hazards: All hazards and Cross-Cultural

Perspectives

.

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2.6.8 Professor Frank Sligo will serve as a Visiting Professor at NorthEastern Normal University in

Changchun, China, for two weeks this May, helping to prepare NENU students to enter the

Master of Management in Communication in Wellington.

2.6.9 The first group of business students from the Vietnam National University in Hanoi were welcomed to the College of Business Manawatū campus recently. The 15 students are part of the 2+2 Pathway Programme arranged by the two universities, and these students started their study at Vietnam National University in 2009. Students in the programme study for two years at home, then move to New Zealand for two years to complete their business degrees at Massey University.

2.6.10 The School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing (College of Business) is hosting three overseas guests this semester – Associate Professor Teresa Heinz Housel from Hope

College in the United States, Associate Professor Paul Adams from Carleton University in

Canada, and Mr Song Qi from Communication University of China, who are offering guest lectures and collaborating in local research. Dr Teresa Heinz Housel is a specialist in researching the needs of students who are the first in their families to enrol at university.

2.6.11 The College of Education is hosting several large and important short course groups over the last few months:

- The first group of 26 teachers are from Mahasarakham University, Thailand. These teachers are completing their PhD’s and looking at New Zealand’s best practices in schools. This group will be in New Zealand from March 19 until May 5.

- The second group of 15 teachers also arrived on Monday 19 March; science teachers from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. These teachers are working with our science lecturers and teachers. This group will be in New Zealand for one week.

- March 26 saw the arrival of another 15 teachers from Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. These teachers are working with our maths lecturers and teachers. This group will be in New

Zealand for one week.

2.6.12 The second group of 14 teachers from Rajabhat Mahasarakham University (RMU), Thailand, arrived at the College of Education at the beginning of April. They are education PhD students here to develop ideas for their research topics and proposals. This group will be in

New Zealand for four weeks.

2.6.13 In addition to the above (and those mentioned in item 3.30 below), other international visits included:

Study abroad/student exchange partners IFSA Butler (Institute for Study Abroad), and

State University of New York (SUNY).

Universidad de la Republica (Uruguay).

Ambassador Shemi Tzur from the Embassy of Israel.

Indian Vice-Chancellors’ delegation from the Universities of Delhi, Mumbai, Hyderabad and the Central University of Orissa.

Dr Mosi El Soda (Faculty of Agriculture, Alexandria University).

Loyola University, Chicago.

Renmin University of China (RUC) – Visited the College of Business, Albany. Massey has a 2+2 programme with RUC's School of International Education (SIE-RUC);

Kuwait Cultural Office, Canberra, Australia - Dr Ammar Alhusaini travelled to New

Zealand to meet with International Office staff and students on the Manawatū campus. A

Draft Agreement is in the pipeline.

Kalasin Rajabhjat University (KSU) - Visited the Manawatū campus to discuss the possibility of establishing academic cooperation, and a future signing of a memorandum of understanding. This is their first visit to Massey, and it is hoped that a partnership is developed in the future.

University of Tennessee - Visited Manawatū Campus and College of Sciences.

Professor David Ostermeier is the study abroad coordinator for the College of

Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources (CASNR) at the University of Tennessee.

Discussed possibilities of CASNR students studying at Massey University for a semester and other study abroad possibilities.

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2.7

Creativity Update

2.7.1 The Creativity Working Group on the Wellington Campus met on February 29. A new calendar of events is being updated for 2012. Once updated, this calendar will be circulated to all Massey staff. The group will organise a series of meetings of staff on the Wellington campus to discuss creativity focused events and activities around the campus. The 2012

Wellington campus lecture series will be focused on creativity. Associate Professor Claire

Robinson, who leads the creativity platform will be meeting with Professor Gaven Martin, leader of the innovation platform, in March to discuss innovation/creativity relationships.

2.8

Innovation Update

2.8.1 The Innovation Group at Albany is busy reorganising itself at the moment. At a recent meeting, the suggestion was that a small steering group meet regularly while a larger forum gets together once a month. There are many streams of work operating under the innovation umbrella that will need to provide regular updates of their activities to ensure coordination.

2.8.2 The Business Student Group held an Innovation Panel Discussion on March 14 at Albany campus. Panelists Pete Russell (founder of Out of Our Own Backyard) and Mack Saraswat

(founder of Zoomapper, a social network for pets) will discuss the challenges, pitfalls, and successes of developing an innovation-based business.

2.8.3 Dr Alex Nicholls from Oxford University will give a lecture on the institutional drivers behind the emergence of social innovation on April 19. The lecture will explore what social innovation means today, why it is currently a hot topic, how it can be financed, how its impact and effects can be measured, and what policy makers are doing in this area. The lecture will take place from 6.30-8pm in the Sir Neil Waters Lecture Theatre Albany campus. It is part of the Engine of the new New Zealand Lecture Series, held in association with the New

Zealand Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship Research Centre.

2.9

Sustainability Update

2.9.1 The Steering Group on Sustainability continues its work on sustainability issues.

Specific Manawatū actions include:

The campus integrated waste management contract is being implemented.

The free bus service will incorporate changes to timetable required for the relocation from Hokowhitu with no reduction in service quality.

Campus grounds will pursue the project to gain botanical garden status.

Specific Albany actions include:

Campus Travel Plan (each campus has a Travel Plan):

- Entered into Partnership Agreement with Auckland Transport to develop and implement a Travel Plan.

- Research report on travel behaviours and issues completed.

- Albany Campus Travel Plan prepared and actions released for staff feedback.

Launch planned for April.

- Some initiatives now being implemented in conjunction with Orientation week.

Next step is the drafting of the Implementation Plan.

Albany received a campus-wide stormwater discharge consent in May 2011 that requires us to upgrade some stormwater management features. The remedial works design is now under way. Deadline for completion of physical works is May 2013.

Recycling:

- Food waste recycling is in place on a trial basis. This is the same system as was trialled and has been fully implemented at the Manawatū campus.

University-wide actions include:

The Sustainability Benchmarking System, developed with funds from the Strategic

Innovation Fund, is being updated for year-end data 2011 University-wide. Benchmark survey results are due in May-June 2012 and will show three-four years’ benchmark trends in most metrics, enabling us to examine trends.

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2.9.2 Professor Chris Ryan, Director of VEIL (Victorian Eco-Innovation Lab), University of

Melbourne, was hosted by the School of People, Environment and Planning and joined the

Challenging Sustainability strategic innovations fund project team (February 14-17) to workshop how Massey can develop its Living Lab for sustainability initiatives.

2.9.3 The second Challenging Sustainability Unconference was hosted in the School of People,

Environment and Planning on February 16, with the Hawke’s Bay Regional Council,

Palmerston North City Council and the Wellington City Council.

2.9.4 Dr Jeff McNeill, School of People, Environment and Planning organised and hosted a symposium on February 14 titled After the RMA: Environmental Governance for New

Zealand in the Twenty-first Century

.

2.9.5 As part of the Integrated Freshwater Solutions (IFS) programme, Ecological Economics

Research New Zealand hosted a week-long Multi-scale Integrated Model for Ecosystem

Services (MIMES) workshop. A number of external stakeholders were in attendance.

2.10

Gender equity update

I note that the Gender Equity Advisory Group had its inaugural meeting on March 27. This group will play an important role in advising me and the Senior Leadership Team on how we continue to advance our efforts to achieve a truly merit-based culture. This is fundamental to being a high performance University. The group will focus on strategies to lift our awareness of – and ability to achieve – a level of gender equity that defines a standard to which others will aspire.

3.0 Academic

3.1

Massey University Defining Excellence Awards

The University celebrated its outstanding staff and alumni on March 21 at the Defining

Excellence Awards in Wellington. We talk a great deal about the contribution the University seeks to make to the future of the new New Zealand while taking the best of the nation to the world. Of course, it is people who make the actual difference. Massey has outstanding staff and high achieving alumni located all over the globe. At the awards we recognised their contribution to both the University and the wider community. It was an excellent evening.

Congratulations to the alumni, researchers and teachers who were recognised for their outstanding contribution. Please refer to Appendix IV for further information. A special publication has also been produced to acknowledge these individuals and teams. An electronic copy is available via the following link: http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/fms//Massey%20News/2012/3/docs/Defining-Excellence-

Awards-2012.pdf

3.2

Māori Academic Excellence Awards

At a time when we are honouring high achievers at Massey, it is great to hear of the following news.

There are eight Massey recipients of this year's Te Amorangi National Māori Academic

Excellence Awards for PhD students: Dr Stephanie Dillon (Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Wai), Dr

Laura Howard (Ngāti Paoa, Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Maniapoto), Dr Spencer Lilley (Te

Atiawa, Muaupoko, Ngāpuhi), Dr Mieke Sachsenweger (Ngāti Tūwharetoa), Dr Isaac

Warbrick (Ngāti Rangitihi, Ngāti Whakaue, Ngāti Te Ata, Ngāpuhi), Dr Meihana Durie

(Rangitāne, Ngāti Kauwhata, Ngai Tahu, Ngāti Porou, Rongo Whakaata) and Dr Te Waaka

Melbourne (Tūhoe/Kahungunu).

Of the 38 awards, Auckland University students took 10, Massey eight, Otago seven,

Waikato five, Canterbury two, Victoria, AUT and Lincoln one each.

3.3 Massey University is ranked top in New Zealand for finance and accounting research over the past two decades in a paper published in the March 2012 edition of the journal

Accounting and Finance

. The paper An analysis of the accounting and finance research

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productivity in Australia and New Zealand in 1991-2010,

was written by academics from the

United States, Taiwan and China and shows Massey’s staff have published in more highquality journals than the staff of any other New Zealand university and over the past decade is in the top six in Australia and New Zealand combined.

3.4

Rankings

I noticed that the Nature Publishing Index 2011 for the Asia-Pacific identifies Massey

University as being in the top 100 for the region. This is well deserved recognition for the

College of Sciences staff.

3.5 Professor Hamish Gow, School of Economics and Finance, won the international effective practice award for an open source food safety knowledge network from Sloan Consortium.

Please refer to Appendix V for further details.

3.6 Education researcher, Associate Professor Jill Bevan-Brown has been recognised for her work on increasing understanding of gifted and talented Māori learners through the presentation of the inaugural Te Manu Kōtuku award at the first conference of giftEDnz, the professional association for gifted education. Please refer to Appendix VI for further information.

3.7 Professor Don Cleland, School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, has been awarded the Furkert Award for excellence in sustainability and clean technology by the

Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand. Please refer to Appendix VII for further information.

3.8 Mr Robert McKibbin, Institute of Information and Mathematical Sciences, was awarded the

Australian and New Zealand industrial and applied mathematics group (ANZIAM) medal in acknowledgement of his lifelong work in applied and industrial mathematics.

3.9 The Director of the Sleep/Wake Research Centre Professor Philippa Gander received the

Flight Safety Foundation-Airbus Human Factors in Aviation Safety Award in Dublin at the

24th Annual European Aviation Safety Seminar of the Flight Safety Foundation. This award recognises Professor Gander’s critical work in promoting the benefit of taking a more comprehensive and systematic approach to managing the many factors that result in fatiguerelated performance changes in aviation operations.

3.10 Professor Jill Hooks, School of Accountancy, has received a CPA Australia (Certified

Practicing Accountants) Global Research Perspectives grant to support her research into how changes in ownership, culture, regulation and the introduction of a competitive operating environment influence accounting by New Zealand electricity organisations.

3.11 A new hardback book Ice Blink which is dedicated to the work of Professor Anne Noble,

School of Fine Arts, with a new essay by Ian Wedde, has been published and distributed in

New Zealand by leading fine art publisher Clouds. The book was launched at City Gallery

Wellington and will be distributed in North America by RAM Publishing.

3.12 In March, Elsevier academic press published a Treatise on Estuarine and Coastal Science.

Associate Professor Marjan van den Belt, Ecological Economics Research Centre New

Zealand, is lead co-editor of volume 12 Ecological Economics of Estuaries and Coasts.

3.13 Ann Shelton, School of Fine Arts, has been nominated for an international photography and sustainability prize Prix Pictet.

3.14 College of Creative Arts exhibition OldSchool NewSchool has been announced as a finalist in the exhibition category at the New Zealand Museum Awards 2012.

3.15 College of Business staff members Warwick Stent, School of Accountancy, and Jeff Stangl ,

School of Economics and Finance, were awarded their PhDs at this month’s graduation ceremony at the Albany campus.

3.16 Professor Andy Shilton, School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, has been awarded a Marsden Grant of $647,826.

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3.17 Dr Benoit Guieysse, School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, has been awarded a

Marsden Grant of $673,913.

3.18 Dr Mat Walton, School of Health and Social Services, received $292,208 Marsden Fast Start funding over three years for project titled Developing complex evaluation strategies for

wicked problems.

3.19 Associate Professor Kathryn Rountree, School of People, Environment and Planning has received funding from Education New Zealand for a project titled NZIDR – Margaret

Nyarango

– The impact of reconstructive surgery on female genital mutilation in Burkina

Faso.

3.20 Dr Long Van Nguyen, PhD graduate from the School of Linguistics and International

Languages, is the winner of the 2012 best PhD thesis competition run by the Applied

Linguistics Association of New Zealand. Dr Nguyen PhD research was on Computer-

mediated collaborative learning in a Vietnamese tertiary EFL context: process, product, and learners' perceptions

. At Massey University Dr Nguyen was the recipient of a Vice-

Chancellor’s Doctoral Scholarship and completed numerous refereed articles during his candidature. Currently he is Head of Academic Affairs, College of Foreign Languages,

University of Danang in Viet Nam. This is the second time that a PhD thesis from Massey

University has won the association’s competition.

3.21 History, Philosophy and Classics Doctoral candidate Peter Meihana has been awarded the

Nga Pae o te Maramatanga Doctoral Bridging Grant, the Purehuroa Māori Postgraduate

Award, and the Te Mata O Te Tau Academy for Māori Research and Scholarship Doctoral

Completion Scholarship.

3.22 The International Society of Typographic Designers conferred membership on eight students studying the Bachelor of Design (Hons) programme in visual communication design (one with distinction, two with merit). The society also gave a commendation to ICD typography lecturers Annette O'Sullivan, Fay McAlpine and Donald Preston for the highest ratio of membership conferments to actual entries, in Australasia. The society accreditation is offered to students as part of their honours study. It connects students with industry members and prospective employers in New Zealand and internationally. Many past College of Creative

Arts recipients of society awards are now employed in Australia, Asia and Europe.

3.23 Two MBA students made the worldwide final of the 2012 Human Capital M-Prize. This year’s focus was on leadership, and entrants had to submit ideas about new leadership development models. Grant McIvor’s submission was titled Power to the Geeks: Can

‘techies’ be developed to lead and manage their own?, and Shelley Catlin wrote about

Transformational leadership in organisations with multiple identities

.

3.24 Bachelor of Design student Julie Jeon received a merit award for her booklet that represents the act of concealing pain.

3.25 Bachelor of Design student Gemma Chapman won the special judges award at the inaugural

Cawthron Seaweek Photo Competition.

3.26 Veterinary science student Stephanie Downer won the 2012 Russell Steel Agricultural

Scholarship

3.27 Bachelor of Agricultural Sciences student Benjamin Howard won a DairyNZ Scholarship.

3.28 Bachelor of Natural Sciences student Charlotte Robertson won a Dairy NZ Scholarship.

3.29 The inaugural New Zealand University showjumping teams competition in March saw several successes for Massey students:

Education student Chloe Aker won the championship for most points during the series.

Bachelor of Applied Sciences student Savannah Larsen-Church received third in the championship for most points during the series.

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3.30

Signings of memoranda of understanding

Thank you to those involved with the Te Wānanga o Aotearoa, Aotearoa Fisheries Ltd,

Mount Royal University (Calgary, Canada) and the University of Missouri memoranda of understanding signings in March. Forming mutually beneficial relationships is at the heart of the University’s strategy. The relationship with the Wānanga will enable us to attract more

Māori to the University, the Aotearoa Fisheries partnership will focus on food research and will see the establishment of a fellowship, the Mount Royal relationship will see the development of ongoing academic exchange and collaboration including MRU staff PhD study at Massey, while Missouri will assist in the internationalisation of our agri-food reputation. Please refer to Appendices VIII, IX, X and XI for further details.

3.31

A Centre for Government and Governance?

As the Road to 2020 Strategy takes shape, many ideas for new developments are being put forward for consideration. One such idea is to focus on government and governance.

Opportunities might include offering academic programmes offshore, engaging in new research relationships with partners at the local, national or international levels, and establishing a centre that brokers access to the University’s expertise.

A first step could be to establish the nature and scope of our current capability in government, which appears to lie in governing arrangements at the local, regional, central and international levels; the public sector; public policy; business governance; policy advice and/or evaluation; empirical and theoretical work on governance.

If you undertake teaching or have research activities in these or related areas, please send details of your work to Associate Professor Richard Shaw ([email protected]) in the

Politics Programme. He will collate the information and we will take things from there.

3.32

2012 Vice-

Chancellor’s Symposium

Please note October 30 in your diary as the date of the 2012 Vice-Chancellor’s Symposium.

This year the symposium will be hosted at the Wellington campus and more information will be available shortly on the theme.

4.0 Connections and Responsibility

4.1 With the purpose of reinforcing strong strategic connections and taking the opportunity to present the University’s point of view, I meet with, talk and interface with various people and groups around New Zealand and overseas (Please also refer to item 2.6 Internationalisation above for further detail). The following are by way of example:

Interview with the Manawatū Standard.

Spoke at the Science Communicators Conference in Wellington.

Attended Finance 2012 in Auckland at which the Minister of Finance spoke. Thanks to the staff involved with this event. I thought the very complementary comments made about Massey by both the Deputy Prime Minister and the chief executive of the Auckland

Chamber of Commerce were confirmation that Massey is making an impact.

Met with Vice-Chancellor of Victoria University of Wellington Professor Pat Walsh and

Director of the New Zealand School of Music Professor Elizabeth Hudson.

Spoke at the start of the Massey University sponsored New Zealand Cycling Women’s

Tour in the Manawatū.

Attended a BusinessNZ function in Wellington.

Attended a meeting of the Wellington Employers’ Chamber of Commerce in Wellington in late February.

Spoke at an Asure Quality function on the future of food.

Spoke at the Food Structures Digestion and Health Conference.

Hosted the signing of a memorandum of understanding with Te Wānanga o Aotearoa.

The agreement is aimed at increasing Māori access to tertiary education, streamlining academic pathways, providing postgraduate education and sharing expertise and facilities. (Please also refer to item 3.30 above for further detail.)

Attended a meeting of the Knowledge Business Committee, part of the Wellington

Employers’ Chamber of Commerce.

A speech to the Auckland Rotary Club.

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Hosted a visit by Colonel Chris Parsons, the new Commander at Linton.

Attended a relationship meeting with the Palmerston North City Council.

Attended a Universities New Zealand meeting at Lincoln University in March. This was the last meeting for Vice-Chancellor Roger Field who is retiring. Dr Andrew West, currently Adjunct Professor at Waikato University, is the new Vice-Chancellor of Lincoln.

Hosted an alumni/stakeholder function at the Central Districts Field Days in March.

Massey University is a major sponsor of the field days.

Attended the Ballance Farm Environmental Awards Horizons Region dinner and presented the Massey sponsored Discovery Award.

Thanks to the many staff and students who took part in the Manawatū Relay for Life. The weather was great and the event, as usual, was pronounced a success. All proceeds go to the Cancer Society.

Caught-up with the new Tertiary Education Union representative, Doug Scott.

Attended a meeting of the Cancer Society of New Zealand Manawatū Centre.

Attended the first Combined Unions meeting for the year.

Caught up with one of our partner crown research institutes, GNS Sciences chief executive Dr Alex Malahoff.

Attended a board meeting of our partnership with Lincoln and Dairy NZ – AgriOne.

Attended a meeting with Kevin Sheehy, GM Medicines, to talk about the environment for clinical research.

Signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Aotearoa Fisheries Limited. (Refer to item

3.30 above for more information.)

Caught up with Director of the Auckland War Memorial Museum Roy Clare.

Met with Alex Baumann, Chief Executive of High Performance Sport New Zealand.

A speech to the New Zealand Higher Education Summit 2012.

Attended a ceremony to thank Dr Donald Turner for his donation of native trees which have been planted at the front of the Albany campus.

Made a presentation to the Fonterra Governance Development Programme.

Hosted a visit from local Rangitikei Member of Parliament Ian McKelvie.

Attended a discussion about the Student City concept used in Palmerston North.

Overall, the Student City group do an important job. I have, however, been a little concerned about the way some of the promotions through Student City are not being fully aligned with the direction of the University.

Met with Horizons Regional Council chief executive Michael McCartney.

Attended a meeting of the Territorial Force Employers Support Council. There are major changes taking place within the defence forces that will impact directly on Territorials and their employers. I would be interested to hear about the experiences of staff who are in the Territorials.

Attended the Territorial Force Employers Support Council Employer Awards event.

Caught up with Member of Parliament for Palmerston North Iain Lees-Galloway.

Spoke at the DEANZ 2012 conference (Distance Education Association of New Zealand) in Wellington in early April.

Caught up with chief executive Forestry Institute Jane Arnott.

Caught up with chief executive Industrial Research Ltd Shaun Coffey.

Advancing our goals of connections and responsibility, Massey University seeks to provide opportunities and platforms to connect our areas of strength with national and international experts and our wider communities of interest. With the added purpose of reinforcing strong strategic connections and taking the opportunity to advance scholarship and contribute our knowledge and expertise, the University promotes and hosts conferences, forums and other forms of participation. Please refer to Appendix XII for examples of this ongoing activity.

Central Districts Field Days, March 15-17, and National Fieldays, Mystery Creek, June

13-16

Massey will have a strong exhibition stand featuring leading Agrifood projects including

Precision Agriculture, Better Treatments for Animals and Creating Value for Foods. There will also be associated alumni stakeholder functions held. The alumni stakeholder function held on March 16 on the Central Districts Field Days site was co-hosted by the Young

Farmers Club and there was an industry panel of alumni and other experts to answer questions.

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The new director of the New Zealand Centre for Personal Finance Education, Dr Pushpa

Wood, starts in her role on May 1. The centre is a joint venture between Massey University and Westpac that aims to improve New Zealanders’ knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour towards personal finance.

4.5

4.6

4.7

The College of Business has established communication internship agreements with new host enterprises, including the National Council of Women, the RugbySite, WebZ, Wellington

Rugby League, the Ministry of Defence, and the Science Communication Association of New

Zealand.

Congratulations have gone to Professor Steve Stannard, Head of School of Sport and

Exercise, who won the Wellington-Auckland Cycle Challenge in February. Professor

Stannard is an outstanding role model to all our students at the school.

The College of Education series of monthly columns providing advice on educational issues from a parental perspective run in the Manawatū Tribune. Interest has been shown by other print media to pick up these columns.

4.8

Bereavements

4.8.1 Daniel Conforte

The staff of the Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health and the University received sad news. Mr Daniel Conforte died suddenly of a heart attack at his home in Palmerston

North on February 18. Since arriving in New Zealand from Uruguay a few years ago, Mr

Conforte has become a well known and valued member of the Massey family. Our thoughts are with Mr Conforte’s family, friends and colleagues.

4.8.2 Professor Sir Paul Callaghan

As you will be aware, Professor Sir Paul Callaghan died on March 24. Sir Paul had a long association with Massey University and will be sadly missed by his many colleagues and friends. He was an extraordinary man. His commitment to his work and to building a country where “talented people would want to live” led him to achieve things which will keep him in our minds for a very long time.

A profile of Sir Paul’s life, particularly as it relates to Massey, can be found at: http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/aboutmassey/news/article.cfm?mnarticle_uuid=D459A8BE-A498-4636-FACB-3735AF09A672.

Sir Paul was accorded many honours – amongst them was an Honorary Doctorate from

Massey University. A synopsis of his speech can be found at: http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/aboutmassey/news/article.cfm?mnarticle_uuid=DC995830-96BF-57FE-A8EA-5A701028E634.

He was one our most distinguished alumni and present in the thoughts of those who attended the Defining Excellence Awards night on March 21 in Wellington (please refer to item 3.1 above.)

5.0 Financial

5.1 The University’s 2011 Annual Report is currently going through the sign-off process. This publication incorporates the University’s financial accounts and statement of service performance. Please refer to the comment on the financial out-turn for 2011 under item 2.1 above.

5.2 The Massey University Budget Policy Statement for 2013 will also be released shortly via a video-log from Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Finance, Strategy and IT) Rose Anne MacLeod.

5.3 Led by the Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research and Enterprise), a calendar of events scheduled for 2012 has been developed that will see the commercialisation team

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engaging with individual Institutes allowing for academic staff to consult on emerging intellectual property and to disclose new IP.

5.4 Professional and Continuing Education (PaCE) began the year with 10 short courses that were offered in January (four in Science, three UNIstart, and three international study tours).

The short courses had a total of 173 participants. In addition, the English language programme began on January 11 with an increase in international student numbers compared with last year.

6.0 Enabling Excellence

6.1

Massey service culture

People and Development will be offering many opportunities for staff to gain useful knowledge and skills during the year. Given the University’s focus on performance I thought the following note from Assistant Vice-Chancellor (People and Organisational Development)

Alan Davis would be of interest.

“I would like to encourage academic and professional services leaders to attend one of four

'World Cafes' - two on the Manawatū campus (the first on 20 March), one each at Wellington

(30 March) and Albany (8 May 9-12pm) - designed to help Massey develop a highperformance culture in an organic way, informed by participation rather than being predetermined. This approach will help us deliver on the strategic goal of enabling excellence, the input of Massey leaders and their nominated staff are integral to its success. The World

Café process has been used at Massey before and is used internationally.”

More information on how to get involved is available in [email protected] and the HR website. “

I enjoyed being part of the World Cafe discussions about service. Feedback from March attendees has also been very positive. More World Cafe discussions will be held on campuses in upcoming months and I encourage all staff to take the opportunity to participate.

6.2

Opening of the Student Amenities Centre at Albany

Another major event I want to mention is the opening of the Student Amenities Centre at

Albany, by the Minister of Tertiary Education, Steven Joyce. For some time now, there has been a view that without a Student Centre on the Albany campus it was difficult to build a sense of community. The students were strongly of this view and agreed to assist in the funding of the building, which began construction last year. On the day of the official opening the sun shone, the band (Karma) played, food was served, staff and students relaxed in the plaza, the Pou pointed the way forward, speeches were made and everyone (but everyone) said how great it was to have such a wonderful building at the heart of the campus. Student

Central

has had an impact already and I have heard nothing but positive feedback. Thank you to everyone involved in bringing this project from vision to reality. Please refer to

Appendix XIII for further information. A short “Vice-Chancellor’s Video Blog – Episode 12” was also filmed and is now available on YouTube.

Over the next few months we will mark the major work that has taken place at Manawatū and open the Creative Arts building in Wellington.

6.3 The College of Creative Arts building is on track for completion on time. Landscaping will soon start around the building. The Opening Ceremony is being planned (for June 22), as well as an open day on the Saturday, June 23, for the local community to visit the facilities.

6.4 The National Centre for Teaching and Learning has launched a new Teaching and Learning

Kernels (TALK) blog (see http://masseyblogs.ac.nz/talk/), and an internal Stream environment to share information and resources across the campuses.

6.5 An inaugural Learning Development Forum was held to share recent developments with staff in the national and campus Centres for Teaching and Learning. Of particular note is the development of a Massey mediated Facebook site for distance students, and the usage statistics for OWLL which show more than 100,000 visits so far this year (an 81 per cent

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6.7

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increase in unique visitors over 2011). Notably, 24,432 visits came directly via a link within

Stream.

The Student Recruitment team has engaged in the first round of visits to schools and the planning of other engagement events. This includes supporting Polyfest and a related schools event in Auckland.

Our latest application

– History, Philosophy and Classics’ Jermaine Collection of

Classical Antiquities

While waiting for a delayed plane out of Auckland in late March, Duncan O’Hara and Mark

Brown showed me the latest app the University has in the iTunes store. It features a collection of reproduction antiquities donated to the University by Alan and Anne Jermaine.

Susan Abasa, School of People, Environment and Planning, and her postgraduate students designed the physical exhibition, while Gina Salapata, School of History, Philosophy and

Politics and a teaching award winner last year, wrote the information about each item. Ms

Abasa and staff from the Centre for Teaching and Learning, Scott Symonds and Andrew

Jamieson, applied the technology. It is a great presentation and can be found at: http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/aboutmassey/news/article.cfm?mnarticle_uuid=38053C28-B2EC-73E1-62EA-AEB82C526098

Professor Jarrod Haar has been appointed as Head of the School of Management and

Director of Te Au Rangahau, the College of Business Research Centre for Māori Business.

Professor Haar, of Ngāti Maniapoto and Ngāti Mahuta (Tainui and Waikato) descent, was previously Associate Professor of Strategy at Waikato University. Professor Haar has published more than 45 refereed articles and, in 2008, was awarded a three-year Marsden

Fast Start grant to study The Role of Māori Cultural Support for Employees and Employers.

He will split his time between the Manawatū and Albany campuses and will have teaching responsibilities on both campuses.

Highlights of meetings I have had with Massey staff and associated groups included:

Caught-up with the co-directors of the Riddet Institute, Distinguished Professor Paul

Moughan and Professor Harjinder Singh.

Hosted all-staff meetings on all campuses.

Welcomed first-year students at the commencement ceremony and dinner for the

Manawatū campus. I could not get to the welcome events for students on all campuses, but can report that the 1200 people who came to dinner in Palmerston North were very enthusiastic about starting at Massey. I got around a good number of tables and heard a lot of great feedback about the University and staff.

Visited staff at School of Health and Social Services, Albany campus.

Attended a meeting of the Massey Foundation United States Board.

Attended an Innovation Forum for the Albany campus.

Held discussions with staff (on all campuses) about how to advance the concept of the new New Zealand. I very much enjoyed these and have noticed a good deal of activity on twitter following the discussions. The aim is to run an event of some kind later in the year where leading thinkers in the country can join with Massey staff to discuss where

New Zealand’s future lies. If you are interested in joining the group please let me know.

Viewed the new video linked teaching rooms soon to be launched between the

Manawatū and Albany campuses – very impressive.

Discussions with the Creativity Group at Wellington.

Attended a farewell for Trevor Weir, Brent Costley and Dianne Fountaine-Cody.

Attended the March meeting of Council.

Viewed the all but complete Student Amenities Centre at Albany. It looks great and will add a great deal to campus life.

Visited the Plant Growth Unit, Manawatū campus.

Attended the March meeting of Tenders Board.

Attended SLT sub-committee meetings.

Met with the People and Organisational Development management group.

Met with the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic and International) management group.

Spoke at the launch of the 2012 Teaching Excellence Group Mentoring Circles.

Held a joint Professors and Associate Professors meeting at Wellington.

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Attended a reception to celebrate the opening night of the 10th anniversary Summer

Shakespeare presentation. This year it is Much Ado About Nothing.

Attended the Massey Ventures Board meeting in March.

I also enjoyed making a videolog for clubs day on the Manawatū campus. The videolog can be found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgaCrd-kVCc. As you will see, the weather was behaving itself and the students were in fine mood.

Met with the Assistant Vice-Chancellor and Registrar management group.

Met with staff from the Albany campus Registrar’s Office.

Launched the Women @ Massey Mentoring Circles on the Albany campus.

Met with professors based on the Albany and Manawatū campus.

Chaired the monthly Senior Leadership Team meeting.

Attended Tenders Board in March. Given the level of activity on each campus, Tenders

Board will be busy this year.

Launched the Service Culture World Cafe forum. (Refer to item 6.1 above for more information.)

Participated in an introductory session for new staff on the Manawatū campus.

Attended the Senior Leadership Team sub-committee meetings in mid-March.

Attended the March Academic Board meeting.

Participated in a Senior Leadership Team engagement day on Albany campus which included meetings with academic staff, professional and service staff and students. All

SLT members were on campus.

The day at Albany closed with the opening of the Student Amenities Centre and an opportunity for students and staff to mix and talk about the next steps for Massey

University at Albany. (Refer to item 6.2 above for more information.)

Met with senior leaders in the College of Education.

Considered portfolios for the tertiary teaching awards.

Attended the IVABS Inventors Presentation at the end of March.

Attended April Tenders Board.

Attended a discussion about the appointment of distinguished professors.

Chaired a further meeting of the new New Zealand group.

Met with the People, Environment and Planning staff on the Manawatū campus.

Met with Chancellor Dr Russ Ballard.

These meetings with staff are very useful. I actively seek meetings but am also pleased to be invited to discuss any of the issues the University is dealing with.

6.10 There are a lot of issues being advanced through SLT at the moment. Broad discussions and consultation has been under way on many aspects that will operationalise our strategy.

These include: Summer School offerings; fully funded students; explanation paper on costs of School of Aviation flight training devices and possible revenue generation; Research

Strategy 2012–14; Appropriate staff representation for committees; Health and Safety Plan

2012; Massey University Sustainability Framework; Research Degree Management Project;

SLT Paper Template Review; Massey University Budget Policy Statement 2013; Research

Communications Plan; Campus aligned values; Service Excellence – Professional Services staff conferences; Leave and Ancilliary Appointments Committee – February 14; 2011

Strategic Innovations Fund Grant Reports; PBRF Governance Group Report – March 6;

Portfolio Update Papers from Assistant Vice-Chancellors (Research and Enterprise; External

Relations; Academic and International; Finance, Strategy and Information Technology;

University Registrar; People and Organisational Development; Māori and Pasifika), and Pro

Vice-Chancellors (Business; Humanities and Social Sciences; Education; Creative Arts;

Sciences).

Further explanation on these items is provided in the SLT web reports available via the

University Management-Senior Leadership Team webpage http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/about-massey/university-management/universitymanagement/university-management_home.cfm.

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7.0 University Committee Appointments

7.1 On the recommendation of the Chairperson of the Massey University Human Ethics

Committee Southern A, I have approved, under delegated authority of Council, the reappointment of Dr Brian Finch for a second term from February 19 2012 to February 18

2015.

7.2 On the recommendation of the Chairperson of the Massey University Human Ethics Chairs

Committee, I have approved the appointment of Dr Brian Finch as Chair of the Massey

University Human Ethics Committee Southern A for the remainder of his second term from

June 1 2012 to February 18 2015.

7.3 On the recommendation of the Chairperson of the Appointment Committee for the Selection of Community Members of Human Ethics Committees, I have approved the appointment of

Dr Donald Campbell, as a registered health professional member, to the Massey University

Human Ethics Committee Southern A, for a three-year term from April 1 2012 to May 31

2015.

8.0 Opportunities/Threats

8.1 There is a lot of change going on this year. While every effort will be made to provide accurate and timely information, there will always be gaps. The Staffroom intranet will have

9.1 regular updates on development. If you have a question at anytime about anything please email me. I will ensure you get an accurate and rapid reply.

9.0

Overall sense/feel of the place

As mentioned in item 2.2 above, a sense of momentum seems to have continued on from last year. The theme for 2012 was “Reputation and Revenue”, and for 2012 it is “Purpose and Performance”. Our 2020 strategy gives us a clear focus and our efforts over the last few years on strategic initiatives such as shared services and academic reform are now coming to fruition. A lot of what we do this year will consolidate that focus. 2012 will be a big year.

Appendices attached:

Appendix I: Education relocation/Heritage restoration programme (Ref. item 2.1)

Appendix II: Massey to spend $57m on Manawatū campus (Ref. item 2.1)

Appendix III: Update and briefing note Institutional Review of Research 2011 and PBRF 2012

(Ref. item 2.5.1)

Appendix IV: Alumni award recognises Henry’s leadership (Ref. item 3.1)

Appendix V International award for online food safety resource (Ref. item 3.5)

Appendix VI: Bevan-Brown recognised for work with gifted Māori children (Ref. item 3.6)

Appendix VII: Award for Massey clean technology researcher (Ref. item 3.7)

Appendix VIII: Massey and Te Wānanga agree Māori education path (Ref. item 3.30)

Appendix IX Research partnership with Māori fishing business (Ref. item 3.30)

Appendix X: Massey links with Canadian university (Ref item 3.30)

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Appendix XI: Massey links with top US university (Ref. item 3.30)

Part I

Appendix XII: Connections and Responsibility: Advancing scholarship and contributing our knowledge and expertise (Ref. item 4.2)

Appendix XIII: Minister praises Student Central as campus heart (Ref. item 6.2)

Steve Maharey

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Education relocation/Heritage restoration programme

Appendix I

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University Registrar Stuart Morriss

Most staff will be aware of the recent announcement that the University Council had approved the plan to this year move ahead with the relocation of the College of Education from the Manawatu campus Hokowitu site to Turitea and the associated construction projects at Turitea that will enable this to happen, particularly the restoration and seismic strengthening of the heritage Sir Geoffrey Peren and Refectory buildings.

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar Stuart Morriss says the programme of work has been planned for a number of years and the earthquakes in Christchurch last year and in 2010 have sharpened the national focus on the need to move more rapidly to ensure risks posed by older buildings in earthquakes are minimised. For that reason the timetable for the heritage restoration and seismic strengthening of the Sir Geoffrey Peren and

Refectory has been brought forward and a decision was made to use University reserve funds as well as our normal capital expenditure budget to fund this and the relocation of the

College of Education in a project we expect to be a cost of about $57 million over five years.

Prior to the announcement, Mr Morris held meetings with as many of the staff members directly affected by the projects as possible. The reaction has been overwhelmingly positive, he says. "There is a widespread desire to bring together all the academic activities of the

Manawatu campus for the benefit of students and staff".

"It is my intention to keep all staff informed as this programme of work develops."

A Programme Steering Group consisting of the Pro Vice-Chancellors of the Colleges of

Business, Education and Humanities and Social Sciences, chaired by Mr Morriss, will

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Appendix I

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Part I

oversee the management plan, which will be co-ordinated and implemented by a

Programme Management Group chaired by Keith Harvey, Manager, Capital Development

Projects.

This group is already meeting regularly and those responsible for the various work streams involved, will be providing progress reports, which will be summarised and added to the

Heritage Restoration and College of Education Relocation Programme on the Staffroom website.

At present, the site contains the management plan, which sets out the current timetable for the programme. Inevitably, because of the size and nature of the interrelated projects, there will be changes but the prime objective is to complete the project as rapidly as possible with the least possible disruption to staff and students and advance our goal of producing the very best working and learning environment.

Staff affected will also kept informed by their managers and you are encouraged to provide feedback and suggestions through your managers. Mr Morriss is happy to meet with groups who would like to discuss this initiative, or who would like to learn more about it.

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Appendix II

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Architect's drawing of the proposed $10 million building (orange roof) to be located between the existing Business Studies Central of the left and Refectory.

Massey to spend $57m on Manawatu campus

The Sir Geoffrey Peren Building

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Appendix II

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Part I

The Refectory

Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey has announced the first stage of a $57 million project to relocate the College of Education from the Hokowhitu site to Turitea on the Manawatu campus and substantial construction and upgrading of buildings.

The total project, over five years, will involve approximately $57 million for major refurbishments, including seismic strengthening, of the Sir Geoffrey Peren and Refectory buildings, the likely construction of a new multi-storey building and alterations and upgrades to several others.

The first stage, which has a $5.6 million budget approved for this year by the University

Council, will involve construction of temporary villages on Colombo Rd and Collinson Rd to house College of Humanities and Social Sciences and College of Education staff, reconfiguration of teaching spaces in various buildings, design work for the restoration and upgrade of the Sir Geoffrey Peren Building and Refectory and relocation of the College of

Education into buildings on the Turitea site by the end of the year.

Mr Maharey says directly affected staff and student representatives have been briefed on the plans in recent days. The aim is to achieve most of the initial relocations before the end of the year. "We aim to provide the very best working and learning environment for our staff and students and this project – actually a series of inter-related projects – will do just that,"

Mr Maharey says. "Plans have been worked on for several years and it is already generating a great deal of excitement among staff and students. It will not only bring staff from the five colleges together on one site for the first time, it will also provide greater opportunities for College of Education students to join the main student body and more readily consider a wider range of study options as part of their qualifications."

The College of Education relocation, with associated construction projects, is budgeted to cost $33.2 million, including $10 million for a new multi-storey building between Business

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Appendix II

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Studies Central and Refectory, overlooking the Oval. The restoration and seismic strengthening of the heritage buildings is expected to cost about $23 million.

Mr Maharey says the major capital works developments are not confined to the Manawatu campus. "This year we are opening a new $20 million College of Creative Arts building on the Wellington campus that will enable us to proceed with plans to recruit new international postgraduate students. At Albany we are about to open a $15 million student amenities centre that will become a hub for student services, dining, shopping, clubs and social activity."

The Sir Geoffrey Peren building, constructed 1929-31 was the original base of the Massey

Agricultural College incorporating science laboratories, lecture theatres, library and office space for staff. In 2010 it was re-named after Massey's first principal. Under a conservation plan developed in 2009 it will be restored largely to its original condition as well as earthquake strengthened.

The Refectory building, built at the same time but completed in 1930, was originally the dining hall and lounge for students living on campus but later converted to teaching and office space. It will also be returned largely to its original design and a mezzanine floor, built in 1963-64, removed. College of Business staff in that building will be the first to be relocated, by the end of next month. Staff in Sir Geoffrey Peren will be relocated in July.

About 350 staff will be affected by the relocations and a similar number of College of

Education students will move from Hokowhitu to Turitea for lectures. Staff and students from Te Uru Maraurau, the College of Education's School of Maori and Multicultural

Education, will be co-located with Putahi a Toi, the Collger of Humanities and Social

Sciences' School of Maori Studies.

It is planned to have the seismic upgrade of Refectory completed by mid-2014. Sir Geoffrey

Peren should be ready for Humanities and Social Sciences staff to move back into by the start of 2015.

Some University operations will need to be temporarily relocated from Turitea to Hokowhitu while the construction work is being completed.

Relocating the College of Education will enable the New Zealand Defence Force, which already leases space at Hokowhitu to increase its presence. Negotiations are continuing with other parties interested in purchasing parts of the 10.1ha site on Centennial Drive.

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Appendix III

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UPDATE and Briefing NOTE

Institutional Review of Research 2011 and PBRF 2012

PROGRESS TO DATE

The conclusion of the 2011 Institutional Review of Research and progression with the preparation of Evidence Portfolios for the 2012 PBRF is on almost everyone’s mind just now. Each submitted portfolio (over 1100 in total) has been now been read by a team of reviewers who have provided technical notes on the content of each research portfolio and the compliance of the submitted evidence with TEC rules. The majority of the published outputs have been verified with only 10,000 left to check. The functionality of the new

Symplectic research repository has been fully stress tested and we are confident that it will port all the data into the TEC PBRF system. We have only a few hundred eligibility checks to complete across all staff profiles. Since December 1, 2011 the repository was open again to all staff and more than 1000 new items were added over a six week period as colleagues worked over the summer break on updating and refining their evidence. These are major achievements which are not readily visible to all

Many of you have been concerned about the delay in personal feedback, and rightly so.

You are anxious to complete the good work started last year and to allow appropriate time for doing so. After a pilot exercise with initial feedback it became clear that a more detailed model for advice and guidance was required. This has been implemented and the AVC R &

E will by the end of this week have personally re-read and re-assessed all portfolios and added specific and detailed comments where necessary. All Colleges with the exception of

Science have now received their feedback.

FEEDBACK

This mode of feedback has been positively, indeed warmly received by those who have been involved in the pilot. Further value has been added when staff have attended feedback meetings with the AVC R & E. In the last two weeks Brigid Heywood has met personally with over 200 staff across the Hokowhitu and Wellington campuses and meetings are running this week at Albany for CoHSS, CoE and CoB staff.

Staff are also being offered meetings with Heads of Unit and research mentors, and provided with the chance to meet with the AVC R & E on each campus. The times, venues and dates have been posted in the Research Management Services – PBRF webpage and new additional dates are being added.

DEADLINES of note:

All staff in CoCA, CoB, CoE and COHSS now have until April 23rd 2012 to complete any revisions and amendments to their portfolios and resubmit for final review and verification.

SCIENCE

Science staff will receive their feedback on Friday 2nd March 2012 and separate processes are being developed with support from PVC Professor Anderson and the Institute Heads to manage this delay, including an agreed push back of the submission deadline to May 7th

2012

for this college only. Also a revised series of feedback sessions and workshops are being timetabled for Science on each campus to align with this process.

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FINAL PUSH

Appendix III

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At this busy time of year when everyone has to work on many different important projects alongside teaching and manage these various competing commitments then coping with the final stages of the PBRF submission process is not easy for any one. Staff need to be confident that every little bit of effort that they invest in refining and improving the presentation of six years of research will be worthwhile. Those who feel they need support to make the final changes must make their requirements known their Heads of Unit and to the AVC R & E if that is appropriate. There is time for one final push and I am confident that all our staff want the best outcome and will therefore make every effort to improve the quality of their own portfolios and by extension the overall profile of Massey research.

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Alumni award recognises Henry's leadership

Appendix IV

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Part I

Read the special edition of DefiningNZ magazine

Rugby World Cup winning coach Sir Graham Henry, Russia-based economist and merchant banker Stephen Jennings and highly regarded New Zealand businesswoman and company director Sue Suckling are among those recognised as distinguished alumni of

Massey University at an awards function in Wellington tonight.

Sir Graham Henry, who graduated in 1980 with a Bachelor of Education, won the supreme honour – the Sir Geoffrey Peren Medal – at this year’s Defining Excellence Awards.

The awards recognise achievements by Massey graduates and by staff in research and teaching. Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey says Massey aims to be New Zealand's defining university through its contribution to the future of the nation. "We do that by taking the best of the new New Zealand to the rest of the world. Of course, it is people who make the actual difference. Massey has outstanding staff and high-achieving alumni located all over the globe. Tonight we recognise their contribution to both the University and to the wider community."

The Sir Geoffrey Peren Medal, named after Massey founding principal, recognises a graduate who has reached the highest level of achievement in business or professional life or who has been of significant service to the University, community or nation.

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Sir Graham's award is in recognition of his teaching and rugby coaching. He was a teacher at Auckland Grammar School when he studied by distance learning for his degree over six years and he was headmaster of Kelston Boys' High School for nine years before becoming a professional rugby coach in 1996.

He credits his university and teaching days with giving him the skills to become the nation's premier rugby coach. “I was involved in education for 25 years. I loved it and got a lot of personal satisfaction out of it,” he says.

Mr Jennings was also honoured with the Distinguished Alumni Achievement Award. Mr

Jennings has achieved phenomenal success in his chosen field, surviving multiple economic challenges, including several global financial crises, to be one of the top market makers in the Russian merchant-banking sector.

He says his professional life and career really kicked off at Massey “My love and passion formally began during my time at Massey University and my aspiration to go and work for the New Zealand treasury also developed in that time,” he says. “The economics I began to learn during those years, together with having an open kiwi mind-set, has helped me on many occasions to look objectively at opportunities and to persevere with opportunities in countries that many other people at that time were just too scared to tread.”

Other alumni honoured at the ceremony are Sue Suckling (Distinguished Alumni

Achievement Award for her contribution to science, innovation and business), Dennis Oliver

(Distinguished Alumni Service Award for service to the community and nation) and Luke Di

Somma (Distinguished Young Alumni Award for his contribution to music).

Others recognised for their achievements in research and teaching were:

Massey University Research Medals (2011)

Individual – Professor Paul Moughan, Early Career – Dr Lara Shepherd, Supervisor –

Professor Michael McManus, Team – Sleep/Wake Research Centre.

Teaching Excellence Awards (2011)

Sustained Commitment to Teaching Excellence Awards – Dr Mark Henrickson, Dr Nigel

Parsons and Dr Gina Salapata. Excellence in Teaching First-Year Students – Professor

Tony Signal. Excellence in Teaching Support – Neil Ward. The Darrylin O’Dea Award in the

Field of e-Learning – Dr Brennon Wood.

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International award for online food safety resource

Appendix V

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Professor Hamish Gow.

An open source Food Safety Knowledge Network devised by a Massey University Professor has won a major international award for improving food safety practices in developing countries.

Professor of Agribusiness Hamish Gow oversaw the development of the network that has been recognised with the international effective practice award by the Sloan Consortium.

He worked with a team at Michigan State University on the project that provides Third World food producers free and open access to best practice food safety guidelines.

“The project got started when I was director of Partnerships for Food Industry

Development,” he says. “We needed a more effective and scalable model for reaching small and medium enterprises and farmers in developing countries with extension and capacity building.”

The network provides a set of steps that any producer can access that will take them from no food safety capacity to meeting international standards, Professor Gow says.

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Appendix V

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“We approached the Global Food Safety Initiative, a group comprising some of the biggest food producers in the world, and put together some technical working groups to create the competency requirements,” he says. “This involved four or five companies putting their food safety training manuals on the table. We built a set of training materials that are now available online and through regional and international consultants.”

The network appears to have had pleasing results, with anecdotal evidence showing there has been a big impact on food safety in some countries. “In Ukraine, I’m told, they have gone from 20 per cent compliance to 90 per cent,” he says.

Professor Gow says it is a model that is perfectly suited for knowledge transfer in the New

Zealand agricultural sector. “This is a different type of model for engagement. It could help solve the extension problem with disseminating the latest research and best practices to farmers in an easily accessible manner out of Massey and other research organisations. It’s an advanced way of writing a textbook that has a lot more impact.”

Professor Gow’s work fits well with other projects at the University including the World Bank project that has seen public health and veterinary professionals taught master’s programmes through distance programmes devised and offered by Massey staff. The

University has also begun offering short courses to Agribusiness managers in a joint initiative with Lincoln University.

The Sloan Consortium is an institutional and professional leadership organisation dedicated to integrating online education into the mainstream of higher education.

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Appendix VI

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Associate Professor Jill Bevan-Brown

Bevan-Brown recognised for work with gifted Māori children

Massey University education researcher, Associate Professor Jill Bevan-Brown has been recognised for her work on increasing understanding of gifted and talented Māori learners.

Dr Bevan-Brown will be presented with the inaugural Te Manu Kotuku award later this month at the first conference of giftEDnz, the Professional Association for Gifted Education.

The University will also be recognised for its leadership in the field, with Associate Professor

Jill Bevan-Brown to be awarded the inaugural Te Manu Kotuku award for her work into understanding gifted and talented Māori learners.

GiftEDnz chair Associate Professor Tracy Riley, also from Massey's College of Education, says Dr Bevan-Brown is "the leading light" in this area of research. “She has contributed the greatest amount of research into our understanding of Māori gifted and talented learners.”

Dr Bevan-Brown describes what she says is relatively common scenario of a quiet, wellliked, sociable Māori school pupil with a recognised ability to gather other children around themselves and bring out the best in them in class and in the playground. A confident leader but the child does not seek recognition and, despite being liked by teachers, is overlooked when it comes to recognising the pupils who are gifted.

It’s a common and complex problem, Dr Bevan-Brown says. "In New Zealand schools we tend to focus on academic things – and that is perfectly valid for Māori students – but giftedness in Māori students is broader. Social giftedness is just as important. Being outstanding in manaakitanga [hospitality] for example, is just as important as being gifted in maths.”

But those skills are harder to recognise, particularly by teachers who are not aware of what to look for or who are culturally remote from their Māori pupils. And because there is a

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shortage of Māori teachers, and even fewer who specialise in special needs, Māori pupils may not be getting the support they need.

Dr Bevan-Brown says her research with Maori pupils has found that giftedness can manifest itself in groups, as well as individually. She uses a musical analogy to explain how this works: Individually a musician might be recognised as talented but when they come together with other talented artists, the results are brilliant.

Typically though, teachers will try to identify the gifted individual within the group “who’s done all the work, who’s provided the spark of genius. But there could be three Māori children working together, uplifting each other’s talent to produce something great. If you separate them out, then you lose that spark.”

Dr Bevan-Brown is quick to point out that group giftedness is not instead of individual talent

– it can be in addition to. “Māori preferences for working in groups can’t be at the expense of looking for individual talent," she says.

"There is an erroneous belief that Māori children won’t want to stand out so are uncomfortable with their giftedness. But if Māori children are in a supportive and valuing environment they are quite happy to exhibit their ability. “Individual success is celebrated. If students feel safe and understood they won’t feel whakamā [shy, inadequate] about showing their skills, because they know that they wont be perceived as being whakahïhï

[arrogant or conceited] and that others will celebrate their success.”

She cites her own experience: There’s no chance that her nephew Tamati Ellison is going to be able to let his national and international success on the rugby field go to his head. His whānau are proud, and Tamati’s skill and success are celebrated and supported but if he was to become whakahihi he would be quickly pulled into line, she says.

While there are Māori, Pākehā and other teachers all over the country doing a wonderful job to provide that supportive environment, she says, the shortage of Maori teachers does make it harder for students.

“Research shows that Maori feel more comfortable working with other Maori. Just seeing another brown face makes Maori more likely to engage, for example,” she says.

She says the issues that the shortage of Maori teachers create for gifted students apply to all special needs students. ”Maori teachers working with Maori special needs students will most likely have greater understanding of cultural implications of their special needs and they can often interact with whanau more effectively to provide better service to the students and their families.”

Massey University, in collaboration with the University of Canterbury, offers a Post

Graduate Diploma in Specialist Teaching, which she would love to see more Maori students enrolling in. “We have some excellent Maori students doing this Diploma but we need lots more.”

Again, she says, it comes down to providing a supportive, caring classroom environment. “If students are having difficulty learning and don’t feel comfortable about showing they are struggling it is easier to be disruptive. They lose less face by being removed than staying in the classroom and admitting they can’t do it.”

Dr Bevan-Brown says a lot of behavioural problems occur when pupils don’t feel safe being themselves in class. But if teachers get it right and set work at appropriate levels then

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Appendix VI

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performances will match expectations. “If you don’t expect them to perform, then they won’t.”

Feeling liked and valued is particularly important for Māori children because they are from a minority group “and there is always the potential to be disadvantaged – and children realise that".

She says that despite her concerns, there is a lot to celebrate. “Many gains have been made in recent years, and I feel real aroha for those teachers that are doing a wonderful job. There is lots of really good work being done by Pākehā teachers in this area, but we need more Māori teachers – not instead of, but as well as.

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Appendix VII

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Professor Don Cleland

Award for Massey clean technology researcher

Massey University’s Professor Don Cleland has been awarded the Furkert Award for excellence in sustainability and clean technology by the Institution of Professional

Engineers New Zealand.

Professor Cleland, a fellow of the institution, is head of the School of Engineering and

Advanced Technology. Since completing a PhD in food engineering at Massey in 1985 he has conducted world-class research on matters related to energy efficiency of refrigeration systems, and how to improve the efficiency of heat pump systems.

He is expert at converting research results into design, and analysis methods and software.

These outputs are widely used by industrial engineering manufacturers and practitioners.

Since 1987, on more than 20 occasions, he has co-taught a five-day industry course on

Cost-Effective Refrigeration that has heavy emphasis on energy efficiency.

In 1994 he was appointed Electricity Commission of New Zealand Professor of

Thermoprocess Technology where he led the development of heat pump technology using natural refrigerants as a possible future technology to minimise green house gas and ozone depleting substance emissions. He has undertaken major consulting contracts related to energy efficiency of refrigeration systems in Australia, the United States and New Zealand.

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The international refrigeration community has recognised his expertise on the coupling of energy efficient refrigeration with end-user demands in the food industry through a number of awards and fellowships.

Professor Cleland will be presented with his award at a black tie function in Wellington tonight.

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Appendix VIII

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Te Wānanga o Aotearoa Pouhere Bentham Ohia and Massey Vice-Chancellor Steve

Maharey sign the agreement (photo 14). Senior cultural advisor and foundation member

Marie Panapa (Aunty Ma) also signed the agreement on behalf of Te Wānanga.

Massey and Te Wānanga agree Māori education path

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Appendix VIII

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Te Wānanga o Aotearoa Cultural Adviser Paraone Gloyne speaks holding the hoe (oar) presented to commemorate the signing of the Memorandum. Named Hoetahi, the hoe represents “rowing in unison” and symbolises the two institutions moving forward together.

An agreement between Massey University and Te Wānanga o Aotearoa aimed at providing more integrated tertiary education opportunities for Māori was signed yesterday at the

University's Manawatu campus.

Discussions between the two institutions have been in progress for more than a year. Both have agreed that Māori educational advancement can be accelerated with the creation of pathways that facilitate entry into higher education and lead on to lifelong learning with expanded career options.

The agreement was signed by Te Wānanga o Aotearoa Pouhere (chief executive) Bentham

Ohia and Massey Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey.

It covers all Massey campuses – Albany, Manawatū, Wellington and its internationally recognised distance learning programme – and the more than 11 campuses and 80 delivery sites run throughout New Zealand by Te Wānanga, which is based in Te Awamutu.

Massey Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Māori and Pasifika)

Professor Sir Mason Durie says the agreement represents a major step towards a collaboration that will benefit students, maximise resources, and share expertise.

"By working together and jointly planning for the future, Te Wānanga o Aotearoa and

Massey University intend to transform the tertiary experience so that the best possible educational outcomes are within the reach of more Māori," Sir Mason says.

Mr Ohia says Te Wānanga o Aotearoa is focused on whānau transformation through education. “Māori have diverse educational requirements, from certificate to master's and

PhD level. The priority for this partnership is to provide pathways for each institution’s respective students to ensure they are able to reach their fullest educational potential.”

He says the priority for Te Wānanga o Aotearoa is to work with a range of quality tertiary providers to help lift the educational performance and opportunity of Māori – an outcome that benefits New Zealand.

Te Wānanga o Aotearoa is one of the country’s largest tertiary institutions, providing education to more than 35,000 students. It is a tertiary education provider for all New

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Zealanders, driven by Māori principles and values. The institution provides a comprehensive range of programmes from certificate to degree level in study options that includes teaching, social services, computers, te Reo Māori, trade training and small business. More than half of Te Wānanga o Aotearoa students are Māori. The institution works with a low to no-fee model across a range of delivery methods, including classroombased, noho marae, distance learning, and full and part-time study options.

Speaking at the powhiri prior to the signing of the agreement, Mr Maharey said it was about

"two great houses of learning" sharing aspirations. "Both of us want to change the world we live in. We want to change if fundamentally."

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Appendix IX

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?

Aotearoa Fisheries chief executive Jeremy Fleming (front left), chairman Whaimutu Dewes,

Massey Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey, College of Humanties and Social Sciences Pro

Vice-Chancellor Professor Susan Mumm, College of Sciences Pro Vice-Chancellor

Professor Robert Anderson (back left), Professor Sir Mason Durie, Te Wananga o Aotearoa board member Mana Forbes and Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research and Enterprise)

Professor Brigid Heywood.

Research partnership with Māori fishing business

Aotearoa Fisheries Ltd and Massey University have formed a partnership to drive development in fisheries through research and innovation.

Under the agreement the University and Aotearoa Fisheries will collaborate in research and seek to identify opportunities to enhance Māori fishing interests, and develop academic programmes to increase Maori capabilities in the seafood sector and future fisheries strategies.

University Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey, Aotearoa Fisheries chairman Whaimutu Dewes and chief executive Jeremy Fleming signed a memorandum of understanding at the

Manawatū campus on Monday.

The agreement strengthens ties between the University and Aotearoa Fisheries, the largest

Māori-owned seafood company in New Zealand, and will establish the Aotearoa Fisheries

Fellowship 2012 (Hao Moana Fellowship) to fund research into the seafood sector.

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Mr Maharey says the partnership would provide practical outcomes and take science out of the university and into the community.

Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Māori and Pasifika) Professor Sir

Mason Durie says the agreement marks a significant milestone for both Aotearoa Fisheries and the University. “It will bring the fishing industry and Massey University close together with the potential to create approaches and national benefits."

The relationship recognises Aotearoa Fisheries' interests to document and further develop

Māori fisheries and the advantages of university research. Massey University is a leader in food technology, nutrition and innovation and the agreement presents opportunities for mutually beneficial research.

Mr Dewes says the agreement is an important first step and the partnership has considerable potential. “It represents a desire on our part to use the University’s resources to bring the comprehensive cover that is required, and the rigor, to recording what’s happened and why, and then providing analysis from there of what our potential is.”

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Appendix X

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Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey and Mount Royal University President David Docherty sign the memorandum of understanding linking the universities.

Massey links with Canadian university

Dr Jim Zimmer and Professor Norm Vaughan from Mount Royal University present a workshop on student engagement and blended learning.

Massey University and Mount Royal University, Calgary, Canada have signed an agreement to work together on education excellence.

Massey Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey and Mount Royal President David Docherty signed the memorandum of understanding at the Manawatu campus on Friday.

The agreement encourages collaboration and has opportunities for staff and student exchanges.

Mr Maharey says the universities were compatible on many levels and could work together on areas as diverse as aviation, social work, indigenous leadership and blended learning, which combines face-to-face and online opportunities for learning.

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“One of the big issues we are confronting at Massey is how to take the long history of expertise, distance and blended learning into the 21st century, and we seem to have found a very good partner to discuss that with.”

Dr Docherty says Massey is an institution that focuses on quality undergraduate education.

“One of the goals is to create more opportunity for our students to have international exposure and Massey for us, provides this opportunity.”

A Mount Royal delegation including Professor Norman Vaughan and Dr Jim Zimmer led a workshop on student engagement and blended learning during their two-day visit to

Massey.

Presenting case students the education experts helped identify strategies and tools for engaging students at Massey.

Mount Royal University Provost and Vice-President Academic Affairs Dr Robin Fisher is a

Massey graduate and initiated the relationship believing it will “grow in a positive direction”.

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Appendix XI

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University of Missouri’s Professor Bryan Garton (left) University of Missouri Vice-Chancellor

Professor Thomas Payne (right) talk with Massey farm manager Byron Taylor at the No.4

Dairy farm.

Massey links with top US university

Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey signs the Memorandum of Understanding with University of

Missouri Vice-Chancellor Professor Thomas Payne.

Massey University has signed an agreement strengthening ties with one of the leading international agricultural universities in the United States, the University of Missouri.

Massey Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey and the University of Missouri’s Vice-Chancellor and Dean of the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, Professor Thomas

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Payne, signed the memorandum of understanding at the Manawatu campus on

Wednesday.

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Part I

The agreement will boost collaborative research and student exchanges between the two universities. Study abroad programmes and the exchange of existing faculty and staff are also included in the agreement.

Mr Maharey says the agreement will give Massey graduates a broader perspective on the industry. “The University of Missouri is known as a world leader in agriculture and engineering,” he says. “For Massey University to help New Zealand achieve, it must produce globally-informed graduates and this partnership will help do that. It will also provide our researchers the chance to not only learn from counterparts in Missouri but share their world-leading research with those in American agriculture’s heartland.”

While on campus, Professor Payne and his colleague Professor Bryan Garton visited the

No.4 Dairy farm, the Riddet Institute, the Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical

Sciences and the Hopkirk Research Institute. They also met with a range of Massey

University researchers who spoke about their current research activities.

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Part I

Connections and Responsibility: Advancing scholarship and contributing our knowledge and expertise

Advancing our goals of connections and responsibility, Massey University seeks to provide opportunities and platforms to connect our areas of strength with national and international experts and our wider communities of interest. With the added purpose of reinforcing strong strategic connections and taking the opportunity to advance scholarship and contribute our knowledge and expertise, the University promotes and hosts conferences, forums and other forms of participation.

The following are by way of example:

1. On February 24 the College of Creative Arts, in association with the Royal Society, hosted by a public lecture by Anna Wirz-Justice, Emeritus Professor of Neurobiology at the University of Basel medical School, titled “Adventures at the interface: When neurobiology meets arts, architecture and fashion”. The lecture was well attended, and a pre-lecture meeting facilitated some great networking opportunities for participating researchers as well as with the Ministry of Science and Innovation and the Te Manawa Art/Science project.

2.

3.

The opening of the second hanging of Professor Anne Noble, School of Fine Arts, Ruby's

Room

(full suite) feature within the Museum of New Zealand's Collecting Contemporary - recent acquisitions exhibition, was held on February 22.

Bitch in Slippers: Anne Noble, Lloyd Jones, Sarah Maxey

opened at City Gallery Wellington's

Hirschfeld Gallery on February 24 (running until April 6).

4.

5.

Maddie Leach and Simon Morris, School of Fine Arts, continued presence within Collecting

Contemporary at Te Papa. Maddie Leach's work and that of two recent Masters of Fine Arts graduates (and previous fixed-term staff members) Shane McGrath and Sian Torrington also feature prominently within The Obstinate Object: Contemporary New Zealand Sculpture at

City Gallery Wellington.

Associate Professor David Cross, School of Fine Arts, has a large interactive installation work Lean and a whole gallery of performance and video documentation within The

6.

7.

8.

Obstinate Object: Contemporary New Zealand Sculpture.

Sam Trubridge, Institute of Design for Industry and Environment, has curated The

Performance Arcade for the International Festival of the Arts. It is a line of nine shipping containers, creating a series of nine miniature performance spaces on the Wellington waterfront.

Max Schleser, Institute of Communication Design has been projecting “pop-up” public screenings of mobile visual works around the city for the Wellington Fringe Festival Festival

2012.

“Neue Types” is an exhibition of entries to the Goethe Institute's typeface competition last year, that opened March 5 for two weeks in the C floor west lobby (fashion), in partnership with the Goethe Institute. The exhibition is curated by Annette O'Sullivan, in collaboration with Fay McAlpine, both from Institute of Communication Design. The opening also doubled as an award ceremony for our successful student entrants to the International Society of

Typographic Designers (ISTD).

9. Oliver Neuland, Department of Three Dimensional Design, has been working with Paolo

Cuccagna, Design Manager of Honda’s Design Centre in Rome. A motorcycle design selected from honours student designs in a summer paper was selected by Cuccagna and is now being developed as a full scale model at the Auckland School of Design. Eight participants in the summer school design paper were selected to compete for Honda's international internship programme.

10. College of Creative Arts connections with industry are expanding with projects and research in development with companies and research centres both national and international, including: SCION, KiwiRail, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Mojo, Nike, Booker

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11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

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Spalding, Synlait, Formway, Finewood Furniture, CRONZ (Carpets and Rugs of New

Zealand).

The Mayor of Wellington, Celia Wade-Brown, visited the College twice in February, once to attend the opening of the Masters of Design and Fine Arts exhibition, and a week later with

Councillor Jo Coughlan and Teena Pennington (Director Strategy and Planning Wellington

City Council) to discuss opportunities for future collaboration between Massey and

Wellington City. The Mayor took a tour of the new creative arts building, and has already indicated that she will attend the building’s opening ceremonies.

The “Left Bank Lanes” project, developed by Head of the School of Fine Arts, Associate

Professor Heather Galbraith, for a series temporary art and design projects to take place over the next two-three years (involving staff and students) in and around the Left Bank

Arcade off Cuba Mall in Wellington was kicked off in late February. This is a partnership between Massey, the Wellington Company (Ian Cassalls) the Wellington Sculpture Trust and the Wellington City Council Arts team. The project aligns strategically with WCC Urban

Design objective of enlivening lane-ways through the city.

From November 2011 to February 2102 Amanda Yates, Institute of Design for Industry and

Environment, ran a project in urban Wellington of garden performances that drew attention to urban ecologies and sustainable food production. It was a series of mobile gardens that moved in a choreographed dance through the central city, greening urban space with fruiting plants and scented herbs. The project was part of the Wellington City Council's “Towards

2040: Smart Capital” strategy, which defines the key directions for Wellington's future.

Two innovative ecentre companies have received a $50,000 investment from the Ministry of

Science and Innovation (MSI) to develop their ideas into viable businesses. Transcribe Me, which transcribes speech to text, and The Story Mint, which connects writers and readers to create “e-publishable works”, received the R&D investment through a recent MSI initiative to assist hi-tech start-ups around the country.

The New Zealand Centre for Personal Finance Education, a joint venture between Massey

University and Westpac, is launching the New Zealand Retirement Expenditure Survey in conjunction with Workplace Savings New Zealand. The survey will look at the retirement spending patterns of 300 New Zealanders and will take into account different costs for metropolitan and provincial locations. It will establish guidelines for ‘modest’ and

‘comfortable’ retirement lifestyles. The survey was launched on March 13 at an event with

Finance Minister Bill English.

Professor Michael Bradbury has just returned from his first meeting as a member of the

International Financial Reporting Standards Advisory Council in London. He is the only New

Zealand-based member, and only one of two academics on the council. One of the main issues discussed was information overload, and whether there were too many standards being developed.

Head of School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing Professor Malcolm Wright has been appointed as a Chair Professor in the MLeague International Professor Workshop at the Communication University of China. CUC is one China's prestigious '211' Universities and home to the MLeague group of communication and media universities. Other members of the MLeague include UC-Berkeley, Purdue, UCLA, Emerson College, Aarhus University,

Uppsala University, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Baptist University of Hong

Kong, Nanyang Technological University, and a number of prestigious Chinese institutions.

He will visit Beijing later in the year.

The School of Health and Social Services co-hosted the Fourteenth International Mobility

Conference with the Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind, Vision Australia, and the

Kairanga Lions Club February 13-17. The conference focussed on the impacts of, and barriers to, independent mobility facing blind and visually impaired persons and solutions to overcome these barriers. Two-hundred and twenty participants attended from over 20 countries. One-hundred and ten presentations were made over the four-day event.

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22.

19.

20.

23.

24.

25.

26.

27.

28.

29.

30.

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Part I

Professor Glyn Harper, Centre for Defence and Security Studies, has been appointed to the

Editorial Board for the second edition of a five-volume Encyclopaedia of World War I.

Dr Christine Cheyne, School of People, Environment and Planning presented a paper titled

“Mainstreaming NZ’s Model Walking and Cycling Communities” at a plenary session attended by approximately 250 delegates at the New Zealand Walking and Cycling

Conference held February 22-24.

Professor Peter Lockhart, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, has been contracted by the

University of South Pacific, Fiji, to teach a course in Genetics.

Dr Stuart McLaren, Institute of Food Nutrition and Human Health, whose expertise is in the area of noise and its effect on people, has been consulting at the Mahinawa in Porirua specialist school looking at how to address the extremely poor acoustics of the main hall area after planned acoustic treatment was not installed due to budgetary cuts.

Professor Sir Mason Durie, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Maori and Pasifika, delivered a key note address at “Common Roots, Common Futures: Indigenous Pathways to Self

Determination” in Tucson, Arizona. The Forum was arranged by the Harvard Project on

American Indian Economic Development, the Australian National University (National Centre for Indigenous Studies), and the University of Arizona (Native Nations Institute). Participants included four representatives from each of Canada, United States, Australia, and New

Zealand. The Forum provided an opportunity for Massey University to join an indigenous network concerned with both social and economic development.

Professor Chris Cunningham, Centre for Maori Health and Development, was the keynote speaker at Moving Forward Together, Nuku Tahi - Hikoi Tahi Services for Older People

Conference, in late March.

Dr Adriane Rini, School of History, Philosophy and Politics, has been appointed by the Royal

Society of New Zealand to the Marsden Fund Humanities Panel for a three-year term.

The Joint Centre for Disaster Research and GNS Science presented The Economic Impacts

of the Canterbury Earthquakes

on March 30.

Associate Professor Peter Lineham, School of Social and Cultural Studies, delivered the

2012 W.H. Oliver lecture to a packed auditorium on the Albany campus on March 21. Entitled

The History and Geography of Atheism in New Zealand

the lecture drew on his years of scholarship in the field of New Zealand religious history and major new research based on census data.

Continuing development and communication between the Centre of Bits and Atoms at the

Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Institute of Design for Industry and

Environment has progressed through to advanced planning for a digital Fabrication

Laboratory or Fab Lab, providing access to a large international network of Fab Labs and expertise in digital fabrication and manufacture.

On March 26 the College of Creative Arts, in partnership with Auckland University of

Technology’s ST PAUL St gallery, and the Goethe-Institut, presented a lecture by Professor

Ute Meta Bauer, who is currently Director of the ACT Centre (for Advanced Research in Art,

Culture and Technology), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, and will, in

September, be taking up the position of Dean of Fine Arts, Royal College of Art, London. The public lecture was well attended. Associate Professor Heather Galbraith re-joined Professor

Meta Bauer in Auckland on March 29-30 where they both presented at the 2012 Curatorial

Symposium at ST PAUL St, AUT University.

On March 16 a temporary exhibition On balance: Melissa Irving (Master of Fine Arts student),

Olivia Webb (Bachelor of Fine Arts alumni) and Clinton Watkins, took place in the Left Bank arcade, Wellington. This is the first in a series of temporary art and design explorations of

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36.

37.

31.

32.

33.

34.

35.

38.

39.

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Part I

urban space. A partnership between Litmus Research Initiative, The Wellington Company and the Wellington Sculpture Trust. On balance was curated by Associate Professor Heather

Galbraith, School of Fine Arts.

School of Fine Arts staff member Associate Professor Wayne Barrar’s solo touring exhibition

An Expanding Subterra

is at Rotorua Museum.

School of Fine Arts staff members Professor Anne Noble, Associate Professor Wayne Barrar and Ann Shelton (together with recent Master of Fine Arts graduate Andrew Beck) all have work in the survey exhibition Now and Then: Enduring and developing themes in

contemporary New Zealand photography,

at Te Manawa Art Gallery, Palmerston North

Jenny Gillam, School of Fine Arts, in collaboration with Dieneke Jansen opened Ever Green, a collaborative photographic project for the Courtenay Place Light Boxes, running between

April-August 2012.

School of Fine Arts staff members Jenny Gillam and Eugene Hansen have been appointed as the New Zealand Film Archive, Wellington’s Curator’s at Large for 2012, which will see them curating four exhibitions during the year.

The NCEA Top Art exhibition was on display in the Tea Gardens in April. This annual touring exhibition is coordinated by the New Zealand Qualifications Authority and features the work of all the NCEA level 3 art and design students who achieved excellence in 2011. The

College of Creative Arts hosted its inaugural opening on April 3, prior to the exhibition splitting into sections to travel throughout the country.

Photography alumni Ben Cauchi has been awarded the 2012 Creative New Zealand Berlin

Visual Artists Residency at the Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin.

In March School of Fine Arts staff members Associate Professor Heather Galbraith and

Lecturer Bryce Galloway met with Dr Clementine Deliss, Director of Weltkulturen Museum,

Frankfurt, to progress planning for an exhibition on New Zealand zines and independent publishing to be part of the While You Were Sleeping New Zealand at the Frankfurt Book

Fair and associated cultural programme. In addition to the exhibition within the ‘Green Room’ exhibition spaces at the museum, Mr Galloway has been invited to be artist-in-residence at the museum for a four week period to make a new zine responding to the museum’s collection.

Associate Professor David Cross, School of Fine Arts, was External Scholar in Residence

South Australian School of Art, Adelaide, April 1-8.

At a recent gathering of leading Ngai Tahu contemporary visual artists and Ngai Tahu cultural advocates a group dedicated to promoting an Ngai Tahu contemporary visual arts kaupapa was established. As a senior Ngai Tahu artist Professor Ross Hemera, School of

Visual and Material Culture, was invited to take up the role of kaumatua for the group.

As part of a strategic partnership with the provocative art and design conference

SemiPermanent

(May 18-19), forty selected College of Creative Arts students will be spending the last Friday of the mid-semester April break developing a creative pitch for Dan

Gosling, director of the progressive and media savvy fashion label Stolen Girlfriends Club.

Students keen to explore the nexus of fashion, marketing and visual communication will respond to a thematic pitch, working in cross-disciplinary teams to present innovative directions for showcasing the label's garments through promotional communications.

Institute of Communication Design staff members Associate Professor Chris Bennewith, Nick

Kapica, Tim Parkin and Catherine Bagnall, Institute for Design, Industry and Environment. have combined forces across College of Creative Arts to leverage this opportunity to make connections with industry and provide a high-profile platform for enabling creative excellence.

Professor Tony Parker, Institute of Communication Design, was a guest presenter at the

Designer Institute of New Zealand, Designers Speak Series held in Auckland. Professor

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41.

42.

43.

44.

45.

46.

47.

48.

49.

50.

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Part I

Parker spoke on Design for Brand Renewal and Innovation, showcasing his latest award winning work with Gallagher Industries.

The latest Home Affordability Report from the Real Estate Analysis Unit was produced and can be downloaded from: http://economicsfinance.massey.ac.nz//publications/property/HomeAffordabilityMarch2012.pdf. Report compiler Professor Bob Hargreaves, from the University’s School of Economics and Finance, says in view of the financial turmoil in Europe it is surprising that house prices are increasing in several regions, Auckland in particular.

Professor Fawzi Laswad, School of Accountancy, has been appointed deputy chair of the joint education board of the New Zealand and Australia institutes of chartered accountants.

Associate Professor Ben Marshall, School of Economics and Finance, has been invited to join the editorial boards of the Journal of Banking and Finance and Accounting and Finance.

The ecentre is teaming up with Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development

(ATEED) to run free business idea and business model workshops across Auckland in April and May. The business idea workshops give advice to those who either want to validate their idea before investing time and money. The business model workshops help those with a new business that isn’t taking off. Visit www.ecentre.org.nz for dates and details.

The ecentre is also sponsoring and hosting the next Auckland Startup Weekend at the end of

May. The Startup Weekend is an intense 54-hour event for aspiring entrepreneurs. It focuses on building a web or mobile application that could form the basis of a credible business, while getting lots of advice from experts along the way. See http://startupweekend.org/

The Massey chapter of Beta Alpha Psi is hosted the organisation’s 2012 Oceania Regional

Meeting on April 11-13. The programme included a community service day and presentations from key people at Westpac, KPMG, and Ernst and Young, among others.

Public relations lecturer Dr Elspeth Tilley, School of Communication, Journalism and

Marketing, has worked with Massey alumni Sandy Galland to create a student project that helped six Christchurch businesses get back on their feet after the earthquakes. Ms Galland, a Christchurch-based communications specialist, recruited the businesses and students created media releases, media plans, crisis communications templates, and public relations strategies for them.

Seventeen students and two staff from Naenae College spent a day discussing science and doing experiments related to Water: Importance for Survival and our Body with staff from the

Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health on the Wellington campus.

Professor Don Cleland, School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, was appointed to the MSI High Value Manufacturing Assessment Panel.

The 25th Annual Workshop held by the Fertilizer and Lime Research Centre (FLRC) was attended by 230 delegates from New Zealand and Australia representing universities, CRI’s, fertiliser industry, private consultancies, regional councils and national policy-makers. The organisers continued with the sustainable farming theme from the past several years, with the title of the workshop this year being Advanced Nutrient Management: Gains from the

Past - Goals for the Future

. There were eighty-two papers presented over the three day programme and two invited speakers delivering keynote addresses.

A three-year project was recently started by Professor Glenda Anthony, School of Curriculum and Pedagogy, on Learning the work of ambitious mathematics teaching (LAMT), a TLRI

(Teaching and Learning Research Initiative) funded project. The project basis is to focus more closely on how teachers manage and interpret complex forms of interaction in which students construct their own understanding and learn from one another.

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52.

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Part I

College of Education Pro Vice-Chancellor Professor James Chapman met with Normal

School Principals. This is a regular meeting to keep them informed and to continue to build the relationship between the University and Normal Schools.

A visit to Hawke's Bay on the 2nd May by the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research and

Enterprise) Professor Brigid Heywood and Manawatu Campus Registrar Dr Sandi Shillington will include conversations with Hawke’s Bay Regional Council. This also coincides with the alumni event at which Denis Oliver (recipient of the alumni award) will speak. Arrangements for a professorial lecture to coincide with the July alumni event will also be progressed.

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Part I

Massey University Chancellor Dr Russell Ballard, Hon Steven Joyce, Albany Students’

Association president Stephan van Heerden, MC Banu Pashutanizadeh and Vice-

Chancellor Steve Maharey.

Minister praises Student Central as campus heart

Student Central – officially opened at Massey University Albany today – provides a heart for the campus and vital place to “hang out,” according to guest speaker the Hon Steven Joyce.

As Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment, Mr Joyce told the gathering of staff, students, alumni and the campus founder Sir Neil Waters that the world is entering a skills race for tertiary-trained young people, and he anticipates an increase in the number of enrolments at New Zealand universities in the future.

“It’s a fantastic day today to see this facility in place. It’s going to help with what I call the pastoral care of students which I think is very important if you are going to have good results. And it’s part of the growing story that is the Massey University Albany campus.

“The new facility here will be the heart of the campus, because actually students need more than to learn. Students need space outside the lecture theatres where they can meet their friends, access services, have space to study, and as we used to say in the eighties, ‘just hang out’.

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“Excellent facilities can have a strong impact on student achievement,” he said, as students need places for “relating and discussing with others as part of learning”.

“Tertiary education is an important part in growing New Zealand’s economy. The students we are training today will go to drive the future of New Zealand, not just economically, but socially and culturally.”

He said the population of the North Shore was expected to increase by 30,000 to 40,000 over next 10 years, and its people were well-served by range of programmes at Albany.

He alluded to his connections to the campus, graduating on the North Shore in 2001, although he completed his undergraduate degree in zoology at Massey’s Manawatu campus in 1983. He also has a home in Albany when not residing in Wellington.

Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey paid tribute to Sir Neil Waters for his vision of building a campus at Albany when there was just a lone house in the area. He also congratulated the

Albany Students’ Association for working in partnership with the University to build the

$15m centre and “for being willing to put their money where their aspirations are”.

“What a remarkable effort. This project has gone from woe to go in a very short period of time, and it is under budget.”

Engineering student Banu Pashutanizadeh, who was MC as president of the Academic

Toastmasters Club at Massey, said the building “is very special to us, because it's a dedicated place for us to gather, here at the heart of Massey University Albany”.

Professor Sir Mason Durie explained the meaning the seven pou (Mäori carved steel poles), which form a circle in the outdoor plaza area of the centre, to represent the path taken by students on their learning journey.

The pou give the area a distinctive Mäori presence, in recognition of the University’s close relationship with tangata whenua. They were designed by Whakatane artist Arekatera

(Katz) Maihi to symbolise the University’s Mäori learning philosophy, Te Kunenga ki

Pürehuroa (From Inception to Infinity) – a principle relevant to all students. Each pou represents a stepping stone through the journey of learning, from the first seed of thought to ultimate academic achievement.

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The opening of the centre means students can now find coffee, food, a comfortable place to meet and make friends, talk to student union representatives, get a health check, see a counsellor, and take advantage of travel and retail facilities under one roof.

The building’s striking contemporary architecture (Warren and Mahoney) is designed to complement the campus’s iconic Opus Architecture-designed Mediterranean hilltop concept.

To reflect the University’s sustainability goals, Student Central has innovative features such as mechanically operated louvre windows that open and close in response to temperature, humidity, wind and rain sensors to keep the building at a comfortable temperature for as long as possible before air conditioning needs to be turned on. Occupancy movement sensors have been fitted throughout for increased energy efficiency, and daytime artificial lighting is reduced thanks to design features allowing in more natural light.

Outdoors, the graciously composed plaza area – constructed of 9,500 terrazzo pavers and adorned with 2,733 plants – has numerous places to sit and enjoy sunshine and fresh air, and ample space for student events.

Ms Pashutanizadeh said the building truly belongs to the current 7000 students enrolled at

Albany campus, and to all students – past and future – whose contribution towards funding, through a special levy, has helped to make this keenly anticipated project a reality.

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Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2012

4 May 2012

P

URPOSE

This report summarises the March 2012 YTD financial results for the University.

D

ISCUSSION

Income Statement (Appendix 1)

The University’s operating surplus to March is $6.3M ahead of budget mainly due to cost savings in the EFTS related activities.

EFTS Related Income

Year to date EFTS revenue is $0.4M below budget and year end revenue is presently forecast to be $2.1M below budget. Options for increasing both domestic and international student numbers are being considered.

EFTS Related Expenses

EFTS related costs are below the year to date budget by $6.8M. This saving appears to be timing related as forecasts of expenditure to year end estimate this to reduce to $2.2M.

Contract & Trading Contribution

Contract & Trading YTD contribution is $0.1M below budget. Income is $2.6M under budget, mostly offset by a reduction in expenses of $2.5M.

The C&T contribution arises across many reporting lines and includes teaching contracts with the World Bank and Singapore Polytechnic.

Balance Sheet (Appendix 2)

The University Balance Sheet remains strong with total assets of $1,166.2M, liabilities of

$206.1M and equity of $960.0M.

The working capital ratio shows the University has $1.29 current assets for every $1.00 of current liabilities. Debtors and other receivables are $6.1M favourable to budget due to timing of student fees in advance. This will reduce as the year continues.

Page 1 of 6

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Part I

The debtor turnover ratio of 26.86 days shows that we are currently collecting our debtors within normal commercial terms.

Cash Flow Statement (Appendix 3)

The cash and cash equivalents balance is $0.8M better than budget at the end of March.

Net operating cash flows are below budget by $6.2M mainly from increased payments to employees and suppliers. This is offset by a drop in the accounts payable balance on the balance sheet. Withdrawal of investments is $12.4M higher than budget and reflects the changes to timing of cash flows. This has increased the cash balance on the balance sheet.

Capital Expenditure (Appendix 4)

A summary of recurrent capital expenditure for the three months ending 31 March 2012 is included in the table below:

2012 Capital Programme Cash Flow Summary ($000)

2012 Budget 2012 Actual

$000 YTD $000

2012 Full Year

Forecast $000

Group 1 (Recurrent) 23,329 5,729 23,329

R

ECOMMENDATIONS

0

It is recommended that the Massey University Council:

1. Receive this financial report for the three months ending 31 March 2012.

Rose Anne MacLeod

Assistant Vice-Chancellor

(Finance, Strategy & Information Technology)

24 April 2012

Appendices

1. Income Statement

2. Balance Sheet

3. Statement of Cash Flows

4. Capex Report

Page 2 of 6

EFTS Related Income

Government Grant

EFTS Related Government Grants

TEOC Income

Total Government Grants

Student Fee Income

Domestic Student Fees

International Student Fees

Total Student Fees

Other Income

Interest Income

Trust Income

Total EFTS Income

Appendix 1

University Income Statement

For the Three Months Ending 31 March 2012

YTD

ACTUAL

$(,000's)

YTD

BUDGET

$(,000's)

YTD

VARIANCE

$(,000's)

2011 YTD

ACTUAL

$(,000's)

2011 FY

ACTUAL

$(,000's)

36,516

8,758

45,275

30,789

11,719

42,508

7,374

1,016

749

96,922

36,472

8,993

45,465

30,924

11,934

42,857

7,161

1,000

837

97,321

44

(234)

(191)

(135)

(215)

(349)

213

16

(88)

(399)

35,788

8,946

44,735

22,535

9,686

32,221

7,134

1,067

1,143

86,299

143,100

36,126

179,226

90,842

37,220

128,062

26,088

4,404

2,943

340,723

C12/36 – May

2012 FY

BUDGET

$(,000's)

145,890

35,971

181,861

99,129

47,881

147,010

24,596

4,000

2,462

359,929

Part I

2012 FY

FORECAST

$(,000's)

145,934

35,131

181,064

98,587

46,997

145,584

24,809

4,016

2,374

357,848

EFTS Related Costs

Salaries

Other Staff Related Costs

Asset Related Costs

Other Direct Costs

Depreciation

Interest

Trust Costs

Total EFTS Costs

EFTS Contribution

Contract & Trading Related Income

Research Income

Consultancy Income

Teaching & Conference Income

Trading & Other Income

Total Contract & Trading Income

47,451

3,883

5,022

12,561

10,492

365

254

80,027

16,895

8,064

2,441

2,920

5,375

18,800

48,215

4,588

6,413

15,943

10,815

392

471

86,838

10,483

12,093

1,848

2,962

4,472

21,375

764

706

1,392

3,383

323

27

218

6,811

6,413

(4,029)

592

(42)

904

(2,575)

44,774

4,715

4,872

10,023

10,303

357

565

75,609

10,690

12,991

618

2,453

2,749

18,811

190,705

18,421

27,502

53,698

42,569

1,500

1,792

336,187

4,536

59,290

4,741

10,347

11,570

85,948

195,591

17,652

27,954

58,364

46,064

1,554

1,870

349,048

10,880

53,548

4,268

8,271

14,282

80,369

195,526

16,946

27,262

57,982

45,741

1,550

1,802

346,810

11,037

49,519

4,860

8,229

15,185

77,794

Contract & Trading Related Costs

Staff Related Costs

Asset Related Costs

Other Direct Costs

Total Contract & Trading Costs

Contract & Trading Contribution

Total Trading Operating Surplus

7,411

714

8,466

16,591

2,209

19,104

7,610

631

10,845

19,086

2,289

12,772

199

(83)

2,379

2,495

(80)

6,333

7,609

621

9,389

17,619

1,192

11,882

34,405

2,720

45,681

82,806

3,142

7,678

29,980

2,419

49,849

82,248

(1,879)

9,001

29,781

2,502

47,470

79,753

(1,959)

9,078

Page 3 of 6

Appendix 2

University Balance Sheet

As at 31 March 2012

YTD

Actual

$(000's)

YTD

Budget

$(000's)

YTD

Variance

$(000's)

2011 YTD

Actual

$(000's)

C12/36 – May

2011FY

Actual

$(000's)

Part I

2012FY

Budget

$(000's)

ASSETS

Current Assets

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Prepayments

Trade and Other Receivables

Inventories

Biological Assets

Other Financial Assets

Non Current Assets Held for Sale

Total Current Assets

117,237

4,124

43,350

1,520

3,544

20,828

2,297

192,900

116,474

4,551

37,300

1,400

3,400

20,000

2,228

185,353

Non Current Assets

Trade and Other Receivables

Other Financial Assets

Biological Assets

Property, Plant & Equipment

Total Non Current Assets

Total Assets

LIABILITY AND EQUITY

Current Liabilities

Accounts Payable and Accruals

Borrowings

Provision for Employee Entitlement

Receipts in Advance

Total Current Liability

Non Current Liability

Borrowings

Provision for Employee Entitlements

Receipts in Advance

Total Non Current Liabilities

Total Liabilities

Public Equity

Capital & Reserves

Revaluations/ Other

Surplus/(Deficit)

Total University Equity

Total Liabilities and Public Equity

125

22,907

668

949,546

973,246

1,166,146

20,245

754

17,419

111,506

149,924

21,581

33,054

1,585

56,220

206,144

125

22,224

661

937,366

960,376

1,145,729

21,000

683

16,500

109,131

147,314

21,485

32,579

1,618

55,682

202,996

941,034

(136)

19,104

960,002

929,961

-

12,772

942,733

1,166,146 1,145,729

763

(427)

6,050

120

144

828

69

7,547

129,360

4,108

37,385

1,455

3,372

16,571

2,199

194,450

40,105

9,382

22,738

1,505

3,544

43,178

2,372

122,824

37,024

7,000

25,140

- 1,400

- 3,400

30,000

-

103,964

-

683

7

12,180

12,870

20,417

125

15,854

598

931,988

948,565

1,143,015

125

23,126

668

946,532

970,451

1,093,275

125

22,224

600

951,087

974,036

1,078,000

(755)

71

919

2,375

2,610

21,709

736

15,904

107,597

145,946

29,358

895

15,987

50,533

96,773

24,322

950

13,500

45,493

84,265

96

475

(33)

538

3,148

22,415

30,329

1,660

54,404

200,350

11,073

(136)

6,332

17,269

20,417

930,783

-

11,882

942,665

1,143,015

21,581

32,302

1,585

55,468

20,535

32,579

1,660

54,774

152,241 - 139,039

930,783

2,573

7,678

941,034

1,093,275

929,961

-

9,000

938,961

1,078,000

Page 4 of 6

Appendix 3

University Cash Flow Statement

For the Three Months Ending 31 March 2012

YTD

Actual

$(000's)

YTD

Budget

$(000's)

YTD

Variance

$(000's)

2011 YTD

Actual

$(000's)

Cash Flows from Operating Activities:

Cash was provided from:

Government Grants Receipts

Student Fees Receipts

Other Income Receipts

Interest

Trust Funds Receipts

45,401

88,414

33,590

854

190

168,449

Cash was applied to:

Payments to Employees and Suppliers

Interest Paid

97,163

370

97,533

Net Cash Flows From Operating Activities: 70,916

45,465

87,642

31,339

937

540

165,923

88,469

383

88,852

77,071

(64)

772

2,251

(83)

(350)

2,526

(8,694)

13

(8,681)

(6,155)

44,881

84,066

33,339

853

534

163,673

88,988

357

89,345

74,328

Cash Flows from Investing Activities:

Cash was provided from:

Withdrawal from Investments

Sale of Fixed Assets

22,350

65

22,415

10,000

-

10,000

12,350

65

12,415

16,651

13

16,664

Cash was applied to:

Purchase of Investments

Capital Expenditure

-

16,121

16,121

6,294

-

16,395

16,395

(6,395)

-

274

274

12,689

-

10,703

10,703

5,961 Net Cash Flows From Investing Activities:

Cash Flows from Financing Activities:

Cash was provided from:

Loans Repaid

Loans Raised

Capital Injection

Cash was applied to:

Loan/ Vested to Massey Subsidiary

Loans Repaid

63

-

-

63

-

141

141

-

-

-

-

-

240

240

63

-

-

63

-

99

99

63

-

-

63

162

249

411

C12/36 – May

2011 FY

Actual

$(000's)

Part I

2012 FY

Budget

$(000's)

180,063

124,706

125,349

2,933

1,952

435,003

368,513

1,498

370,011

64,992

181,860

143,131

104,654

3,987

2,160

435,792

378,987

1,539

380,526

55,266

33,413

170

33,583

30,000

2,228

32,228

51,479

55,486

106,965

(73,382)

30,000

65,585

95,585

(63,357)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

924

924

-

923

923

Net Cash Flows From Financing Activities:

NET INCREASE/(DECREASE) IN CASH

Cash Brought Forward

Ending Cash Carried Forward

(78)

77,132

40,105

(240)

70,436

46,038

117,237 116,474

162

6,696

(5,933)

763

(348)

79,941

49,419

129,360

(924)

(9,314)

49,419

(923)

(9,014)

46,038

40,105 37,024

Page 5 of 6

C12/36 – May

Part I

Appendix 4

Capital Expenditure Report

For the Three Months Ending 31 March 2012

Project Budget

Project Description as at 31 March 2012

Business

Case

Council

Approved

Budget $000

Actual

Expenditure to

Date $000

Forecast Final

Expenditure

$000

Approved

Annual

Budget

$000

Project Cashflow (2012 Financials)

Approved

Carry

Forward

Budget

Total

Approved

Budget

Actual

Expenditure

YTD

$000

Full Year

Forecast

$000

GROUP ONE PROJECTS (RECURRENT)

ICT Infrastructure Refresh

Capital Equipment - $2-20k

Capital Equipment - >$20k

Capital Equipment - Farms

Research Funded Equipment

Lab and Desktop Computer Replacement

Video Linked Teaching

Halls of Residence Refurbishment-Manawatu

Campus Infrastructure - Albany

- Manawatu

TBC 11/87

PN406

2,310

1,800

2,200

220

-

1,800

466

300

1,000

923

- Wellington 577

Building Capital Renewal/Refurb Programme (inclu Space consolidation)-Manawatu 1,720

WCADP/CSPP Projects-Wellington

Compliance Costs-Albany

VC Discretionary

Library

W502

A701

100

250

500

6,500

Minor Capital Works -Albany

- Manawatu

- Wellington

Aircraft Overhaul and Refurbishment

700

1,134

729

100

36

142

931

-

357

147

(114)

249

(13)

(40)

8

15

32

(47)

-

3,781

61

(14)

198

-

2,310

1,800

2,200

220

-

1,800

466

300

1,000

923

577

1,720

100

250

500

6,500

700

1,134

729

100

TOTAL GROUP ONE PROJECTS (Recurrent) SUB TOTAL 23,329 5,729 23,329

2,310

1,800

2,200

220

-

1,800

466

300

1,000

923

577

1,720

100

250

500

6,500

700

1,134

666

100

63

2,310

1,800

2,200

220

-

1,800

466

300

1,000

923

577

1,720

100

250

500

6,500

700

1,134

729

100

36

142

931

-

357

147

(114)

249

(13)

(40)

8

15

32

(47)

-

3,781

61

(14)

198

-

2,310

1,800

2,200

220

-

1,800

466

300

1,000

923

577

1,720

100

250

500

6,500

700

1,134

729

100

23,266 63 23,329 5,729 23,329

Page 6 of 6

C12/37 – May

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

RESEARCH STRATEGY 2012-2014

4 May 2012

Purpose

1. Massey University has placed research at the forefront of its agenda for 2020

1 and Research and Scholarship have been promoted as one of the six big goals through which this University will achieve major advances in building reputation, and increased revenue generation in the context of being the defining national University and a tertiary education provider with a ranked

2 international pedigree. The first Institutional Research Strategy is being developed to take forward. A draft document has been circulated to various groups

3

for discussion and development and is now presented to Council for final approval.

Overview

– Context for development of Research Strategy

2. Massey University receives ~ $38M per annum of income from TEC through the PBRF designated funding stream for excellence in research

4

, including a component linked to the volume of higher research degree completions (15%) and an element driven by external research income (ERI) (25%). These KPIs are typical of the majority of international benchmarks of publicly funded research. The University secures an additional ~$70 M per annum of ERI from competitive bidding for research funds secured through a diverse range of public and private sector procurers of research. A small but increasing revenue source is the income derived from the commercialization of Massey research and other enterprise activities linked to Massey expertise.

3. The goal is to maintain and improve our overall research performance. This will be evident when we secure improved national and international rankings as one of the academically elite New Zealand tertiary level institutions, (e.g.

1

Road to 2020: Strategy for Massey University

2

ARWU 2011, http://www.shanghairanking.com/ARWU2011.html

3

SLT July, September 2011, January 2012; Council September 2011; URC October 2011, February

2012; ARIC November 2011; ‘Open Forum’ Albany Wellington and Manawatu, September -October

2011.

4

E.g.NZ TEC PBRF 2006

Page 1 of 4

C12/37 – May

Part I

TEC PBRF, ARWU). It will also be visible through the development of an increased competitive capacity in key areas of proven knowledge and expertise, and the effective sharing and exploitation of our research outputs alongside demonstrable engagement with knowledge transfer both through the translation of research into the curriculum we offer, but also through closer working relationships with key partners both in New Zealand but also off-shore.

Background

4. Currently just over 50% of Massey academic staff can be classified as

‘research active’ in the conventional sense

5

. A higher proportion of academic staff engage in the scholarship for, and of teaching and learning, curriculum development and advancing the pedagogies associated with distance and online education. We support a growing volume of ‘institutional’ research which could be better promoted within and outside of the University.

5. For most research-lead, research intensive Universities, the percentage of

‘research active’ staff is likely to be higher – routinely nearer 85-90%. Other key benchmark indicators, (e.g. higher research degree enrolments and

completions and external research income (per capita income per annum

)) currently signal an institution with performance issues in terms of both research capability and capacity relative to our institutional age (~85 years) and pedigree, academic profile and strategic goals.

6. Thus, one of the key challenges for Massey is to secure an improvement in our overall research performance as institution by managing the appropriate cultural shift from a University hosting a number of research active staff to one which is defined by exemplars of proven research excellence and appropriately acknowledged for being research intensive in key relevant subject areas.

7. This does not mean that the individual researcher does not have a ‘voice’ within the shifting framework for managing research; rather the University expects all staff to align with, and deploy their expertise, knowledge and engagement with scholarship in ways which add to the overall agenda for research excellence. The diversity of the academic community will enrich this process and the quality of the outcomes.

8. The Research Strategy 2012-2014 (Appendix 1) recognizes the importance of articulating the current position of research across the institution, and then building the frameworks required to both engineer and manage the shift in both individual and institutional engagement with research as a strategic priority.

5

E.g. E. L. Boyer, 1992

Page 2 of 4

C12/37 – May

Part I

Framing of the Strategy

9. Given that Massey University is committed to being an elite, research-led institution where robust academic scholarship underpins and informs all of our strategic activities, then the effective framing of the 2012-2014 Research

Strategy requires recognition of, and an engagement with an agenda to build and invest to secure critical mass in key areas. The selection of these key areas must be informed in part by the outcomes of the 2012 PBRF as well as our own knowledge of the research which benefits to interests of the communities we engage with.

10.

World-class research activity involves the critical aggregation of leading scholars

6

, state-of-the-art research infrastructure and the application of effective workload models to ensure that talented people have sufficient time to pursue their research. The exact configuration and model varies with subject, discipline and problem to be addressed.

11. First, Massey must therefore address current issues around capacity by resolving research ‘depth’ and ‘breadth’ issues with innovative approaches to building capacity, and by adopting new models of resource allocation which focus on nurturing and sustaining research excellence.

12. Another important dimension of the 2012-2014 Research Strategy is the need to acknowledge that increasingly, world-class research is not sustainable without appropriately scaled collaborative partnerships, both domestically and internationally

7

. Massey must evolve a more strategic approach to fostering and managing key research partnerships with both other Universities, and importantly with other research-engaged institutions (both public and private sector(s)).

13. Finally, in the increasingly competitive global landscape of higher education,

Massey will only succeed in realising the six big goals of the Road to 2020 and delivering the objectives of the Research Strategy by openly adopting innovative research methodologies, and supporting diverse modes of research practice. Given the unique heritage and pedigree of Massey in a

New Zealand context, it will be important to focus more on the contributions to be drawn from professional practice, knowledge sharing and knowledge transfer, as well as other related forms of intellectual engagement with problem solving. The value to be drawn from open access publishing, digital scholarship

8

and other emerging modes of community engagement must also feature in our work.

6

For example, Kenna & Berche, Scientometrics 86 (2011)

7

For example, Adams et al., (2010) Global research report, http://researchanalytics.thomsonreuters.com/m/pdfs/globalresearchreport-anz.pdf

;Also, Hsu and Wang,

Scientometrics 86 (2011)

8

Weller et al., 2011

Page 3 of 4

C12/37 – May

Part I

14. At all levels, our research must also be informed by an active and rich dialogue, developed through new modes of working with those who can benefit most from the outcomes. The priority here must be the framing of

Massey University as an institution placed as a dynamic force working alongside, and serving the needs of both community and ‘publics’ through research which makes a meaningful contribution to the economic and social fabric of New Zealand

9

.

15. The University Research Strategy will be the primary instrument through which that engagement will be structured, and through which the institutional monitoring and strategic management of research will be addressed.

16. Following an early discussion at SLT the document has been circulated to

Colleges

10

for formal review through their agreed consultation processes

(Appendix 2). The initial feedback from Colleges alongside that drawn from the wider community through the Open Forum process has been reviewed by

SLT (December 2011, January 2012) and Council (December 2011), URC

(February 2012), Academic Board ( February 2012), March (2012).

17. Council is asked to approve the Research Strategy 2012-2014.

B R Heywood

Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research & Enterprise)

April 2012

Appendix 1

: Research Strategy 2012 – 2014.

9

Ronald Barnett has coined the term ‘ecological university’ for this model of working.

10

August 3 2008

Page 4 of 4

APPENDIX 1

C12/37 - May

Part I

Research Strategy 2012 – 2014

APPENDIX 1

C12/37 - May

Part I

RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP

We will promote the highest standards of research and scholarship and be a world leader in our areas of specialisation.

Te Rangahau me te Haepapa Matatautanga

Kia eke rawa te kounga o ngä ähuatanga rangahau ki te kömata taketake. Kia pürangiaho te märamatanga

Massey University

Road to 2020

APPENDIX 1

C12/37 - May

Part I

DRAFT Research Strategy 2012 – 2014

Massey University is positioned as New Zealand’s defining University with a distinctive pedigree established through academic leadership, research excellence and innovative teaching. Going forward the Research Strategy 2012– 2014 will support the Road to 2020 by focusing on the development of individual scholarship within the context of a new framework for research excellence, to ensure that this

University is recognised both locally, nationally and internationally for the value and impact of its research by the academy, and by a wider alliance of engaged partners and collaborators.

Context

1. Massey University has an established pedigree as the leading national university of

New Zealand and a major international provider of tertiary education which offers opportunity to individuals builds value in communities and enables the development of partnerships to address the big problems of society at a local level, and on a global scale.

2. Massey has secured for itself this position through the responsive and engaged provision of functional intellectual capital arising from the proven commitment of the university community to innovative, high quality academic scholarship. This approach has secured for Massey sector leadership in learning and teaching for higher education, a curriculum offer which attracts a diverse range of well qualified students from NZ and elsewhere who can benefit from research-led teaching, and a research portfolio which is an exemplar for excellence in many key fields of endeavour.

3. Going forward the challenge for Massey is to sustain and build upon these strong foundations in the face of increasing national and international competition, The changing domestic landscape requires Massey University to extend the reach and role of the institution to meet the changing demands of this country, and of communities further afield who draw advantage from an association with this institution, its students and its staff. Here we must sustain our ability to be adaptive,

liquid

and responsive to the needs of those who seek to use knowledge and intellectual capital for the greater good. It must also be acknowledged within our own community, and adopted as a call for action, that the genesis of knowledge as well as its application to the problems of the age is a key dynamic for any world-class university

1

.

4. Massey University already has proven capacity to excel in knowledge transfer and can build yet further upon its legacy as a community-oriented institution. At this juncture there is the opportunity for this national institution to reframe our modes of engagement with communities and publics both in New Zealand and beyond, and to be an elite representative of a university which is fully engaged with a widest possible

1

Barnett, R Being a University (2011) Mishra Press.

APPENDIX 1

C12/37 - May

Part I

range of institutional spaces from ‘publics

2

to corporate to whanau’

3

. Our research

will be acknowledged for the breadth and value of its contribution as expressed both through the academic endeavours of the staff and students as well as through a wider social and economic impact. The Roadto 2020

4

has framed both the vision and ambition of Massey University and provided a structure within which an emergent identity might be crafted.

5. Excellence in Research and Scholarship is foregrounded as one of the ‘six big goals’ wherein Massey has reaffirmed its commitment to the highest standards of academic scholarship, whilst also making clear its ambition to be a recognised world-leader for research in key subject areas. The University Research Strategy is, therefore, conceived as a framework which first and foremost aims to support individual scholars as they advance knowledge and discipline. The expectation is that all staff will engage with an agenda for excellence and actively seek to promote the outcomes of their research and scholarship in ways which advantage Massey.

6. The second key element of the Research Strategy focuses on the need to build partnerships, by drawing together the aggregate expertise of Massey researchers where that clustering promotes intellectual leadership in those areas of specialisation we elect to support and promote because we can evidence both excellence and relevance.

7. Also, given the emphasis we place on using the outcomes from research, the strategy will address the need to share, transfer and apply our knowledge into the curriculum, to inform the pedagogies we employ and share, and to the signature social, economic and cultural developments of New Zealand. The new Teaching and

Learning Framework will be key here as a one of the portals through which we can mature ideas and practices to enable a clear exposition of research-led teaching.

Other modalities of reciprocal knowledge flow will be assured if we nurture and support meaningful partnerships at all levels.

8. To meet these goals, the Research Strategy 2012-2014 must focus on the structures required sustain an environment which nurtures research

5

and academic scholarship

6

, where standards are constantly being enhanced, and all researchers are encouraged to reach their potential through being embedded within a community dedicated to producing work that makes a difference to New Zealand and the world.

The Framing of the Strategy

2

Newman & Clarke Publics, Politics and Power: Remaking the Public in Public Services, Sage 2009

3

4

Massey University, Maori Research Strategy,2011

Massey University Strategic Plan, Road to 2020;

(http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/fms/About%20Massey/Documents/Defining-road-to-2020.pdf).

5

6

Based on OECD Frascati definition

For example, Glassick, Boyer, Borgman, Weller et al.,

APPENDIX 1

C12/37 - May

Part I

9.

Massey University is committed to being a research-led institution where robust academic scholarship underpins and informs all of our strategic activities. For

Massey to succeed as a research-led institution then the academic community and those who engage to support it must commit to:

• Recognising that world-class research activity involves the critical aggregation of leading scholars, state-of-the-art research infrastructure and the application of effective workload models to ensure that talented people have sufficient time to pursue their research, alongside other academic activities which are necessary and valued in the 21 st

century

• Acknowledging that increasingly, world-class research and scholarship will be unsustainable in the absence of innovative collaborative partnerships, both domestically and internationally;

• Accepting that no single institution can afford to lead in all fields of research, and accordingly, Massey must become more discerning and selective in determining its investment priorities;

• Harnessing the unique positioning of Massey University to build a much stronger culture of innovation through alliance and collaboration within the institution, both across disciplines and geographical location;

• Fostering innovative research methodologies, and supporting diverse modes of research practice, including the contributions to be drawn from professional practice and related forms of intellectual engagement with problem solving which underpin genesis research and discovery.

10. In order to achieve these aspirations, the effective engagement of staff in research decision-making, alongside the development and embedding of appropriate research practices are crucial. The University Research Strategy is the primary mechanism through which support for research and researchers will be structured, and through which institutional investment in University research will be prioritized.

11. The Massey University Research Strategy 2011-2014 is therefore framed with a focus upon scholastic excellence, academic leadership and engagement to ensure that this institution is:

• recognised for the quality of its research, and researchers;

• linked formally with a range of key partners both nationally and globally;

• the host for multi-disciplinary Centres of Excellence in our defining areas of research specialisation;

• a leader in effective and innovative knowledge transfer, and for promoting entrepreneurial activities;

• recognised as a leading institution for the training and development of researchers;

• successful in securing resources to support the sustainable development of researchers and world class research infrastructures.

12. Delivery against these six objectives is the key to the development of a more responsive and adaptive institutional research portfolio which secures for Massey

University both the reputation and revenue necessary for the delivery of the long term strategic plan Road to 2020 and the attendant ambitions for this institution, and for

New Zealand.

APPENDIX 1

C12/37 - May

Part I

13. The shifts in behaviours and culture needed to advance the strategy are not insignificant especially given the competing priorities across teaching and learning, curriculum development, internationalization and other priority business activities.

Equally the benefits to be gained from linking across, and integrating research and teaching more strongly and exploring reciprocal intellectual spaces, from exploring institutional partnerships which contribute to both research and teaching, and evolving a community-oriented model of working are unambiguous and tangible. The shift in both focus and emphasis which are indicated in the Research Strategy can only be secured if research excellence and a robust engagement with academic scholarship are grounded in support for the individual but framed in the context of a contribution to research and research community and underpinned by appropriate recognition and reward in each context.

14. Finally, it must be acknowledged that many of the key building blocks for success are in place and the implementation of the 2012-2014 Research Strategy is perhaps best framed as a body of work which seeks to refine, refresh and reform the existing structures and practices underpinning research at Massey to build a distinctive and defining portfolio - Massey Research.

Rationale for six key objectives

1. Massey University is recognised for the quality of its research and researchers.

15. In the 21 st

century it is accepted that research excellence and the pedigree of researchers and research teams are determined through processes underpinned by an independent peer and expert review of the outputs and outcomes from qualityassured research activities. The impact and benefit of our research on the economy, and on social development should be a key measure of success.

16. Benchmarking exercises

7

are routinely deployed as part of effective research management with suitable discipline and subject weighted adjustments being used to inform assessment and manage resource allocations. A diverse menu of rewards and incentives are also a key part of the structural framework necessary for nurturing and sustaining world class research.

17. Massey needs to migrate from a culture which affirms the authority of its research to one which adopts an integrated approach to developmental research management wherein suitable structures and processes for supporting, monitoring and developing research excellence are embedded at all levels within the institution and are complementary to external reviews. As an extension of this there is also a need to develop a framework for academic scholarship

8

which accommodates intellectual

diversity and creativity whilst acknowledging that some fields of research will not be supported when evidence of excellence and sustainability are lacking. The opportunity to nurture new areas of research must not be lost as it is fundamental to the on-going strength and vitality of our institution.

7

E.g. PBRF (NZ), ERA (Australia), RAE (UK), OECD analyses of national research performance.

8

Reference for example, Boyer – Scholarship Revisited; Borgmann – Digital Scholarship.

APPENDIX 1

C12/37 - May

Part I

2. Massey University is linked formally with a range of key partners both nationally and globally.

18. The focusing of effort and resources around those disciplinary areas with a proven pedigree is a necessary part of affordable excellence in the current highly competitive research environment. By extension, the targeted aggregation of leading researchers around defining intellectual issues within an institution and the strengthening and development of capacity through alliances with others is essential if we are to build breadth and depth in our researcher community. Indeed, the intellectual creativity of a research community and its ability to make a defining contribution to the grand challenges of the age is increasingly dependent upon the exchange of key resources and blending of skills and expertise across multi-disciplinary interfaces. Moreover funders are increasingly minded to support and invest in research teams and consortia which offer a rich, multi-dimensional approach to problem solving around

‘big questions’. Institutions must therefore balance their support for, and investment in individual scholars and discipline-focused perspective to secure research excellence at the core of the overall framework for research.

19. It is clear that Massey has as yet unrealised capacity

9

to create larger thematic

research narratives around ‘big stories’ and aggregate researchers and research teams into larger cohesive units (both virtual and physical). No one model need be privileged but a common design principal would be a focus on contributing to, and addressing key societal problems. An essential measure of both individual and institutional effectiveness will be the demonstrable impact of our research on the various agencies which underpin (both directly and indirectly

10

) the social and

economic infrastructure(s) of New Zealand.

20. By placing the recruitment and training of postgraduates at the heart of these research clusters, and providing on-going support for research career development the advancement of knowledge is linked clearly to the sustainable provision of higher skills. This approach also provides a conduit for linking external partners both academically (e.g. co-supervision) and financially (e.g. shared funding) into projects, and into the University. For Massey University to succeed in achieving its ambitions for research, and by extension those of the Institution, it must establish a stronger competitive presence at scale in key strategic areas supported by proven disciplinary excellence and extended by tactical partnerships and alliances with other researchled institutions and organisations who share our commitment to excellence through innovation.

3. Massey University is the host for multi-disciplinary Centres of Excellence in our defining areas of research specialisation.

9

E.g. Research Income diversity index; number and value of research grants per researcher FTE; staff:student ratios at Masters and Doctoral Level, etc.

10

Gluckman,, 2012

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21. One proven model for developing research and strengthening the underlying research base is the formation of multi-disciplinary Centres of Excellence which bring together elite researchers with shared interests. These centres act as institutional loci for recruiting and developing next-generation researchers, and as the portals through which partners from industry, business and other collaborators can access and engage with the University, and foster links with individual academics. For New

Zealand, the formation of a cluster of multi-institutional Centres of Research

Excellence (COREs) was the key to securing a world-class research presence in areas of strategic importance to the nation

11

. The University currently hosts and is a

key partner in a number of the NZ-COREs. Through the Research Strategy 2011-

2014 Massey University commits to a continuing engagement with existing and future

NZ-COREs alongside developing new models for thematic multi-institutional, crossdisciplinary working.

4. Massey University will be a recognised leader in effective knowledge transfer, and for promoting entrepreneurial activities.

22.

The genesis of knowledge and its application to the problems of the age are a key dynamic for any world-class university. One primary mode of knowledge transfer is through the alignment of research and indeed co-development of academic scholarship with the curriculum offer and teaching of the institution and the production of graduates with skills relevant to work-force needs and to wider society.

With the promotion of an innovative new Teaching and Learning Framework, which centres around key academic platforms and defining specialisations, the opportunity to explore and strengthen the research-teaching nexus can be realised.

23.

Another main route is through the commercialization of research, the development of a commercial business-development function, and the fostering of partnerships with those which can benefit from, and are end-users of our research and the know-how and expertise of the researchers. For this to be effective the University must ensure that the research its supports and the specialisms we invest in are responsive and adaptive to the needs and challenges of a modern society. In this context we must also develop the capabilities of our researchers to engage in innovative, creative work which enhances connectivity.

24.

Massey has proven capacity to excel as a modern, relevant application-oriented and community-focused University and to be a world leader in research in several topical areas. For example, human food and nutrition, animal health, and welfare, agri-

technology, creative and sustainable design, postgraduate education and interpretations of 21st century citizenship

are key thematic areas where we can evidence a pedigree for world class research. We have not always been effective at communicating and/or exploiting these strengths and must develop the capability and capacity to do so in order to maintain our authority as a world-leading institution. The adoption of dissemination strategies which promote ‘open access’ to the research we promote will one key development. An integrated knowledge transfer and research

11 http://www.researchinnz.com/research_organisations_cores.html

; http://www.aka.fi/Tiedostot/Tiedostot/Julkaisut/Excellence.pdf

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communication strategy will be a central to the successful delivery of the Massey

University Research Strategy.

25. One pivotal element of the 2011-2014 Research Strategy will be the further development of innovations launched through Te Mata o te Tau, the Academy for

Māori

Research and Scholarship, and the nurturing of researcher and their development of research programmes of high relevance and of value to the postsettlement era. Reflecting our overall engagement with the need to focus on research excellence and develop capacity in key areas which benefit

Māori and Aoteorea then research in which whänau well-being is promoted and sustained through policies and programmes will be prioritised. Building stronger linkages with iwi and other external groups will be a key element of this work. One of the signature contributions of

Massey University to New Zealand will be our on-going commitment to advancing

Māori scholarship and research, and the nurturing of research which benefits Pacific and other indigenous peoples.

5. Massey University is recognised as a leading institution for the training and development of researchers

.

26. For Massey University to realise the vision and ambition of the Road to 2020 it must recruit and develop an academic community committed to scholastic excellence. The recruitment of graduate students for doctoral studies, the training and development of early career researchers and provision of developmental support for researchers’ as they progress along their career profile are all hallmarks of a vibrant successful research community

12

.

27. For the Research Strategy to be effective and successful, all researchers must be well-supported by infrastructures and processes which encourage them to reach their potential and reward then for mentoring colleagues. Researchers drawn from, and across an international pool and from a range of ‘places’ (e.g. academic, government, private sector) will enhance the connectedness of the academic community and enrich our engagement with those who benefit from research.

28. The wider importance of capacity building to research sustainability is also formally recognised by those who fund research with the targeting of resources linked to key measures of productivity

13

, for example doctoral completion rates. Going forward

Massey University needs to structure research support to ensure that all researchers are mentored and managed in order to realise their potential to make an effective contribution to the University Research Strategy. Of equal if not greater importance is the need to grow postgraduate numbers and enhance completion rates to align with international standards for research excellence.

12

E.g. 2009 European Concordat for Research and Researchers; http://www.researchconcordat.ac.uk/ ; http://www.vitae.ac.uk/

13

E.g. NZ –PBRF funding with weighting of 25% for the successful completion of research degrees; HEFCE PGR funding models for Research (add ref)

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6. Massey University is successful in securing resources to support the sustainable development of researchers and world class research infrastructures.

29. The University, which supports a diverse portfolio of activities, must consider carefully the investment it makes in research and researchers. Increasingly, the main resources required to underpin research are secured through the competitive bidding for funding from those seeking to procure research and know-how, and secure advantage and benefit from the resulting intellectual capital. In all cases the

University and the external funders and investors are seeking only to fund excellence. By extension those who receive financial support and recruit additional income benefit from the recognition and weighted esteem accorded to them by this proxy for excellence. For Massey, the current institutional data and benchmarking studies

14

show that we have substantial latent capacity to increase external research

grant income from both conventional contestable funds and from other sources.

Going forward we must develop both institutional and researcher capacity to secure research funding from a diverse range of external sources to progress the Research

Strategy.

Implementation Framework

30. As noted earlier, the 2011-2014 Research Strategy is framed to refine, refresh and

reform

existing structures and practices underpinning research to build a distinctive and defining portfolio of ‘ Massey Research’ which is

• acknowledged for being an exemplar of excellence for research and knowledge transfer, in New Zealand;

• recognised as world class in key fields of knowledge genesis and application;

• supported by, and of demonstrable benefit to a multi-faceted network of partners and collaborators;

• delivered by, and enabling of an integrated community of researchers.

31. The implementation of the strategy which requires intervention and action from many constituencies across the institution is best achieved through the adoption of a clearly structured framework (see Table 1). This mode of working will ensure that all parties work to a common goal – research excellence – whilst allowing for the necessary flexibility and variability in engagement across colleges, units and disciplines.

Other relevant strategies

32. The implementation of the 2011-2014 Research Strategy needs to be addressed in alignment with the:

• Teaching and Learning Framework,

• Internationalization Strategy,

• Long term Capital Investment Strategy ,

• External Communications Strategy

• IT Framework for IT infrastructure(s).

14

E.g. Per capita (PBRF eligible), per annum research grant income 2006-2010; Discipline weighted, institutional comparisons for NZ TEIs

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33. The Research Strategy will also have a bearing on College staff recruitment plans and the University Doctoral and Higher Research Degrees Scholarship investment plan. Due consideration must also be given to this strategy when developing alumni recruitment plans and fundraising activities.

Measures of Success

34. Massey secures a substantial proportion of its funding for research from external bodies (2010 $38M NZD for research through TEC-PBRF) and generates additional income through the competitive funding routes. The success of the Research

Strategy will in part be evidenced by the University maintaining these levels of funding in real terms.

35. Other proposed measures

15

include

• 2012 PBRF – overall improvement in institutional ranking, and aggregated ranking in key subjects areas and proportion of staff exercising significant influence on their discipline (ratio of A:B:C staff).

• increase against 2011 aggregated baseline data in income per capita, per annum for research active staff.

• increase against 2011 aggregated baseline data in year cohort numbers for research masters and doctoral students.

• increase in year cohort completion rates for all higher research degree students, and attainment of benchmarked completion rates across all groups.

• Improvement in key bibliometrics indices for key research fields in which

Massey elects to specialise.

15

Using standard OECD, QS, ACU, NZ-TEC and related benchmarks as appropriate.

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TABLE 1: Implementation Framework

OBJ1: Massey University is recognised for the quality of its research and researchers.

a) Complete a full institutional assessment of the research outcomes and outputs of each academic staff member. b) Benchmark the collated and aggregated data against suitable competitor institutions. c) Review and map the subject areas and disciplinary fields of excellence at Massey where we can evidence a critical mass of world-class research and researchers. d) Ensure clear research targets (e.g. publication profile, research income, doctoral supervision, disciplinary engagement etc.) of an appropriate nature are set and monitored annually for all academic staff at individual and unit level. e) On an annual basis review the investment of resources (e.g. MURF, Massey Scholarships) in research to ensure that support for, and investment in research aligns with the map for excellence. f) Review the criteria for the recruitment of staff, and for promotion and remuneration to ensure they are fully supportive of the Research

Strategy. g) Review the teaching/research nexus. h) Develop a strategic framework for 21 st

C academic scholarship at Massey.

OBJ 2: Link formally with a range of key partners both nationally and globally.

a) Confirm the key ‘grand challenges’ where Massey can make a signature contribution through research and teaching (see also 1(c), (g)). b) Review the key partnerships supporting research at Massey and evaluate the nature of their contribution in those areas where we evidence a critical mass of researchers with a proven pedigree for research excellence (see 1(b), (c)). c) Review ToRs for Massey Research Centres and confirm that they are compliant with the Research Strategy objectives. d) On the basis of an assessment of institutional research strengths, (see 1(a), (b), (c) and (g); 2(b)) develop a plan for the extending the type (e.g. local, national, international), nature (e.g. university, private sector, consortium etc.) and mode (e.g. PPP, CoE, Graduate

School

) of partnerships which advance the Research Strategy.

OBJ 3: Host multi-disciplinary Centres of Excellence in our defining areas of research specialisation.

a) Assess the progress and impact of all current CORes (where the University makes a contribution) to Massey Research and review models of ‘good practice’ b) Review potential for new University centres of excellence and establish suitable investment plans (see also 2(c), (d)).

OBJ 4: Be a recognised leader in effective knowledge transfer, and for promoting entrepreneurial activities.

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a) Develop a Research Communication Strategy (see also (2(a) and (d)). b) Review and advance those cyber-infrastructures which support and promote engagement with, and the dissemination of research (e.g.

MUIR, expertise data base). c) Build targeted working partnerships with business and industry, the public sector, sector advocates, third sector champions (see also

2(d)) to advance Massey Research, (e.g. co-sponsored doctoral projects, R&D support, shared facilities investment, reach-in, reach out internships). d) Build capacity to support the engagement of Maori with advanced scholarship. e) Bring forward a Business Development Strategy to support the Research Strategy with a view to embedding ‘collaborative working’ with key external bodies (see also 2(d) and 4(c)) into the training and development of all researchers.

OBJ 5: Massey University is recognised as a leading institution for the training and development of researchers

. a) Audit the current provision of research training and development and benchmark against ‘good practice’ models

16

. b) Review use of research career development resources (e.g. short/long leave, ECD-MURF, promotion etc.) and where required restructure to ensure their application aligns with the Research Strategy ( see also 1(f)). c) Asses the (International) Visiting Scholars programme and as required develop it to ensure that it serves the needs of the Research

Strategy (see also (1(e), 1(f), (2(d), 3(a), 4(c), and 4(d)) d) Review and restructure doctoral training provision to ensure Massey model secures effective and appropriate outcomes (e.g.

completion rates which norm with international benchmarks; strategic alignment of, and placement of student candidates within research groups

) (see also 1(d), 2(a) and 4(c)).

OBJ 6: Massey University is successful in securing resources to support the sustainable development of researchers and world class research

infrastructures.

a) Build capacity to increase research income and funding for research (see also 1(c), (e), 2(a), (b), (d) (4(c),(d) and,(e)). b) Set targets for research income at level of individual, unit and college (see also 1(d)). c) Develop appropriate revenue sharing structures (see also 1(f), 4(e))

16

EU Concordat for Research and Researchers 2009; VITAE Researcher Development Framework 2010

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Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

STUDENT FEES SETTING PROCESS AND PRINCIPLES

4 May 2011

Purpose

This paper outlines the process and timeline for setting next year’s domestic and international fees and seeks Council’s agreement on the principles for setting of fees for 2013.

Background

The process for setting 2013 fees for domestic and international students will follow a similar path to previous years, namely:

Principles for setting fees to be agreed by Council at the May meeting (4/5/2012).

International fees decision paper to the Senior Leadership Team (SLT) in May and considered by Council at the July meeting (6/7/2012).

Domestic fees decision paper to SLT in August and considered by Council at the

September meeting (7/9/2012).

Students will be engaged with throughout the process via the University’s Student

Advisory Committee which is chaired by the Assistant Vice-Chancellor Academic and International.

Principles

It is recommended that fee setting for 2013 be guided by the same principles as last year, namely: a) Fees set are aligned with the advancement of University strategy as outlined in

Massey University Defining – the Road to 2020; b) The areas that will be funded by, and benefits gained from, increases in fees will be made clear; c) The University’s market position, i.e. relativity of fees with other universities, will be considered in setting fees, which for domestic fees may require consideration of

AMFM exemption application for some programmes;

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d) Fees set are consistent with the budget priorities and fiscal projects as outlined in the University’s 2012 Budget Policy Statement and designed to ensure the

University’s financial sustainability; e) The Students’ Associations, on behalf of all students, will continue to be consulted in the process leading up to the recommendation by Management to Council of stated fees for the ensuing year; f) Fees set will consider the impact of fees on student affordability; g) Fees will be set in accordance with current Government policy; h) The rationale for the fees set will be transparent and will endeavour to demonstrate value for learners; i) The process of fee setting will recognise that there are differential costs and potential benefits to the individual and the University of study for different types of course; and j) The structure of the University’s fees will be consistent with the goals of the Fee

Strategy Review i.e. that fees structures be administratively straight forward and practical.

Recommendations

It is recommended that Council:

1. Note the process and timeline for setting international and domestic fees for 2013; and

2. Approve the principles for setting of fees for 2013 as outlined in a – j above.

Stuart Morriss

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar

24 April 2012

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MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL GRADUATION STATUTE,

PROCEDURES AND GUIDELINES

6 May 2012

Purpose

To approve the revised Massey University Council Graduation Statute, Massey University Council

Graduation Procedures and Massey University Council Graduation Guidelines.

Background

Massey University’s Council Graduation Statute: Policy, Principles and Protocols for Massey

University Graduations (Appendix 1) was approved by Council in December 2009 following a review resulting in the development of this Council Statute. With the ‘one University’ approach now being applied to graduations it was deemed appropriate to take the opportunity to ensure the this approach was reflected in the Statute and related documents. It also provided the opportunity to include ‘in

Council’ graduations and Celebrations to Honour Graduates, both in New Zealand and overseas.

Discussion

The Council Graduation Statute: Policy, Principles and Protocols for Massey University Graduations has been fully reviewed by a group of staff who represented those involved in graduations and related events. The group comprised Campus Registrars, Marshals, Events Management, Student Management

Services, Maori and Pasifika and the Executive Secretary (Council). Other staff were consulted as required.

It became clear that the existing Statute would better serve the University if the Statute itself was separated from the Procedures and Guidelines enabling the Statute to be the permanent policy, leaving the Procedures and Guidelines able to be reviewed and improved after each season of graduations.

The Statute and related documents have been extended to include the other graduation process - ‘in

Council’ graduations. It also covers Celebrations to Honour Graduates, both in New Zealand and overseas. While these are not graduation ceremonies they have become an integral part of graduation celebrations.

In 2011 many of the changes proposed in the Procedures were trialled and are now in place across the three regions. While there are regional variations these are minimal and do not detract from the ‘one

University’ graduation look and feel.

The Guidelines provide a clearer view of the roles and responsibilities of those involved in graduations.

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Tracked changes have not been applied to the existing Statute as the changes could not be easily reflected using this process. In summary these current Statute has been changed as follows:

Exiting Statute

Page 1 of 4 – Sections

1-4

Sections 5, 6 and 7.4 –

7.7

Sections 7.1 – 7.3

Revised documents

Now the Council Graduation Statute

Appropriate template used

Broad definition of Massey graduations

Also includes ‘in Council’ graduations

Now the Council Graduation Procedures

Appropriate template used

Reviewed and updated content from existing Statute

Added Procedures and Responsibilities for: o

Academic Services, Student Management o

External Relations o

Graduation Callers

Now the Council Graduation Guidelines

Reviewed and updated content from existing Statute – sections 7.1 to

7.3

Added Guidelines for: o

Graduation Marshals and Assistant Marshals o

Graduation Callers o

Graduation Orators o

Graduation Academic Dress o

Graduation Speaker Chaperone o

Graduation Ushers o

Events Management Team o

Office of Assistant Vice-Chancellor Maori and Pasifika o

Massey University ‘In Council’ Graduation

Consultation

During the review of the Graduation Statute the Graduation Group consulted widely with those who could advise. Once in its final draft the Council Graduation Statute, Council Graduation Procedures and Council Graduation Guidelines were distributed to members of the Senior Leadership Team who are involved in graduation – Pro Vice-Chancellors and appropriate Assistant Vice Chancellors.

Feedback was positive and minor changes were made. Prior to being tabled at the Senor leadership

Team meeting, Council members had a three weeks to provide feedback of which there was none after which it went to the University Services Committee for consideration. Some feedback was received and this has been included in the current documentation. It has since been approved by the Senior

Leadership Team for forwarding to Council.

The final draft documents are attached as follows:

Massey University Council Graduation Statute (Appendix 2)

Massey University Council Graduation Procedures (Appendix 3)

Massey University Council Graduation Guidelines (Appendix 4)

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Financial implications and Treasury Comment

Financial Implications  No

Treaty of Waitangi Implications

There are no Treaty of Waitangi issues.

Equity and Ethnic Implications

Cultural Implications (Maori/Pasifika/New Migrant/Other)

Ethnic Implications

Gender Implications

Disability Implications

Other

Yes 

No 

No 

No 

No 

There has been consultation with the Assistant Vice-Chancellor Maori and Pasifika on relevant matters related to graduation and celebrations to honour Maori and Pasifika graduates and his feedback has been incorporated into the documents.

Publicity & Communications

When approved staff will be made aware of the revised Council Graduation Statute, Council

Graduation Procedures and Council Graduation Guidelines through the [email protected], the weekly staff newsletter. It will also be placed on the University Policy Guide.

Recommendations

It is recommended that Council approve the attached Massey University Council Graduation Statute,

Massey University Council Graduation Procedures and Massey University Council Graduation

Guidelines

Stuart Morriss

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar

18 April 2012

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APPENDIX 1

Council Graduation Statute

Policy Principles and Protocols for Massey University Graduation

1. Preamble

Massey University’s commitment to excellence in research and learning is publicly acknowledged and celebrated at its graduation ceremonies. Compliance with the principles of sound corporate governance ensures the integrity of the graduation processes, procedures and protocols.

2. Purpose

The purpose of this policy is to:

2.1 provide directives regarding the organisational and logistical issues pertaining to the graduation ceremony;

2.2 establish a clear set of directives, guidelines and procedures that address ceremonial protocols.

2.3 identify the responsibility, role and function of role-players.

2.4 integrate, align and coordinate relevant regulations and processes across the three campuses

3. Scope

This policy is applicable to all graduation ceremonies. It is also applicable to all participants and associated service providers involved in any particular graduation function or allied event.

4. General Policy Principles

This policy reflects the tenets of risk management regarding the integrity of the graduation process and includes the following:

4.1 generally accepted principles of good governance;

4.2 uniformity of processes and usage across all campuses responsible for the management of the graduation process;

4.3 explicit identification of responsible divisions and role-players;

4.4 accountability.

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5.

The Vice-Chancellor’s Office – through the University Registrar & AVC and

Council Secretary

5.1 Responsible for all international and national protocols, policies and regulations, pertaining to Graduation.

5.2 Provides the ceremonial dress for the positions of Chancellor, Pro-Chancellor, Vice-

Chancellor, University Registrar, Regional Chief Executive, Regional Registrar and members of Council.

5.3 Responsible for approval and standardization of academic dress and accoutrements across the Campuses.

5.4 Liaises with University Council.

5.5 Advises the relevant Regional Chief Executive office of the names and contact details of any honorary awards and Massey medal recipients.

5.6

Appoints an Orator for an Honorary Doctorate on an “as needs and most appropriate” basis (for the particular recipient).

5.7 Initiates the process for the production of the parchments (and/or medal) for Honorary

Doctorates and Medals recipients.

5.8 Ensures that the parchments for Honorary Doctorates and Medals recipients and

Medals if required are safely delivered to the graduation venue.

6.

Regional Chief Executives’ Offices

6.1. Responsible for the overall planning, delivery and review of all regional graduation ceremonies and procedures (e.g. the inclusion of musical items).

6.2 Hosts regional graduation activities, including the graduation luncheon or graduation dinner.

6.3 Entrusted by the Vice-Chancellor with responsibility for the selection and engagement of speakers for ceremonies within their respective regions (subject to advice from the

VC) and all arrangements specific to the graduation speakers (travel, accommodation, chaperones/hosting arrangements). Liaison with and arrangements for honorary doctorate recipients who elect to give the graduation address will continue through the

University Registrar's Office.

6.4 Makes Recommendations and nominations to the Honorary Awards Committee for honorary awards.

6.5 Responsible for all non-ceremonial front-of-house matters including, graduation academic clearance and the region the graduand wishes to be capped (in collaboration with NSATS), venue bookings, invitations to staff, invitations to official guests, publicity, programmes, flowers, parking.

6.6 Responsible for all graduation programme infrastructure, including musical items (see

6.1 above). Note: NSATS will provide the list of graduands for the graduation booklets required at the regional ceremonies.

6.7 Responsible for the coordination of the academic procession and street processions.

6.8 Responsible for all other regional graduation related activities, including after graduation hospitality, ceremonies to honour Maori and Pacific graduates, town and gown events.

6.9 Responsible for the appointment and training of Regional Marshal and Assistant

Marshals.

6.10 Nominates a Chair (usually the Regional Registrar) for the regional graduation coordinating committee.

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7. Protocols

7.1 Duration of ceremonies

7.1.1 Every attempt must be made to keep a ceremony to a maximum length of less than 2 hours. If an honorary award is to be made, a musical item may not be required if time does not permit. Read PhD citation summaries must be succinct (a maximum of up to 150 words) and written in non-technical language.

7.2 Conduct of ceremonies

7.2.1 Chancellor, Pro-Chancellor or nominee to officiate.

7.2.2 Regional Chief Executive to deputize for Vice-Chancellor as required. The Chancellor will give the welcome address which should be no longer than 5 minutes and will include suitable reference to Tangata Whenua. A graduation speaker’s address should be no more than 10 minutes.

7.2.3 Pro Vice-Chancellor or his/her nominee(s) will read graduand’s name.

7.2.4 Graduation Chair (usually Regional Registrar) to hand out scrolls to graduates and to recipients of awards.

7.2.5 Regional Marshal and Assistant Regional Marshal to share responsibility for:

- Leading the street procession, carrying mace and leading official procession.

- Leading and seating the academic procession on to the stage.

- Allocating front row seating. (Note: Subject to the number of honorary awards, the relevant Pro Vice-Chancellor and any additional name readers that may be required will be seated in the front row on the right hand side of the stage).

- Checking students against names in graduation book as they are about to be presented to the Chancellor.

- Deciding whether there is sufficient space on the Stage to accommodate PhD recipients at any particular ceremony. All efforts should be made to accommodate PhD recipients on stage, providing space permits.

7.2.6 The academic procession precedes the official procession onto the stage to commence each ceremony, but the official procession leaves the stage first at the conclusion of each ceremony.

7.2.7 The University mace and ceremonial banners must be used at all ceremonies.

7.2.8 The University Mace and ceremonial banners are not to be used at the Ceremonies to

Honour Pacific and Maori graduates/graduands.

7.2.9 An Orator will be specifically appointed on an “as needs and on most appropriate” basis (in terms of knowledge of the candidate concerned) to deliver oration for honorary awardees. This appointment will be undertaken by the University Registrar’s

Office.

7.3 Regalia

7.3.1 Black gowns will be standard for all Massey graduates.

7.3.2 The colour and tones of hoods are standardised for each College.

7.3.3 A Massey University stole will be used for diplomates. If diplomates already have a degree they may choose to wear either the appropriate hood and trencher or the stole and trencher.

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7.3.4 All people seated on the stage must wear academic regalia. Non graduates will be required to wear a plain black gown.

7.4 Graduation Committees

7.4.1 The Regional Co-ordinating Committee, (see also 6.10 above) which has an operational focus, will be responsible for organising and ensuring the smooth delivery of all graduation events at the relevant campus.

7.4.2 A Graduation Chairs’ Committee, chaired by one of the Regional Graduation Chairs shall be convened for developing and monitoring policy (subject to approval by the

University Registrar’s Office on behalf of the VC) and ensuring good practice across all graduation ceremonies. It should meet bi-annually (or more often if required). The

Regional Marshals will also assist with the development and monitoring of policy by mutual contact between the three Regional Marshals, reporting through to the Chairs of the Regional Graduation Committees.

7.5 Role of Regional Marshals

7.5.1 Each Regional Marshal will have oversight of all ceremonial aspects and protocols of

Massey’s graduation for their respective region, and ensure that agreed protocols are complied with through mutual contact and through the Graduation Chairs Committee.

Regional Marshals will assist in ensuring that the agreed protocols are consistent across the University. They will also ensure that all Regional and Assistant Regional

Marshals are trained for their roles.

7.5.2 Regional Marshals must liaise with guest speakers and honorary award recipients about the conduct of the ceremony and the speaker/award recipient role in order to ensure that these key features of the ceremony occur smoothly.

7.6 Role of Orators

7.6.1 An Orator will be assigned to a particular awardee and will be responsible for researching and presenting the oration for recipients of honorary awards. This appointment will be made by the University Registrar’s Office on behalf of the VC.

7.7 Ceremonies to honour Maori or Pacific Graduands/ Graduates.

7.7.1 The Ceremony to Honour Maori Graduands/Graduates and the Ceremony to Honour

Pacific Graduands/Graduates will usually follow after the Graduation Ceremonies have been completed, (so that the Ceremony Honours Maori or Pacific Graduates).

However, if there are valid logistical reasons why this cannot occur on any campus, then the ceremony would honour graduands and/or graduates.

7.7.2 Each Regional Office will appoint a convenor for each of the ceremonies. This would usually be the Kaiwawao or the Kaiwhakahaere for the Wellington and Albany campuses. The Manawatu campus would make similar suitable arrangements.

7.7.3 Each Regional Office will appoint a suitable Pasifika staff member to convene the

Ceremony to honour Pasifika Graduates/Graduands.

7.7.4 Advice and support around protocol and policy will be requested as needed from the

Office of the AVC Maori or the Director Pasifika.

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APPENDIX 2

Massey University Policy Guide

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL GRADUATION STATUTE

Section

Contact

Council

Office of AVC & University Registrar

Last Review

Dec 2009

Next Review

Dec 2011

Approval

Council

Purpose:

Massey University’s commitment to excellence in research and learning is publicly acknowledged and celebrated at its graduation ceremonies and through publication of its graduates on the Massey

University website. Compliance with the principles of sound corporate governance ensures the integrity of the graduation processes.

Statute:

The Council of Massey University is empowered through the Education Act 1989 to make awards. The

Council confers degrees and awards diplomas and certificates at graduation ceremonies or ‘in

Council’.

At a graduation ceremony, the Chancellor, Pro Chancellor, or nominee has the delegated authority of

Council to confer degrees and award diplomas and certificates on those to be presented in person or listed as ‘in absentia’ in each Graduation Programme.

‘In Council’ graduations take place at Academic Board meetings, where the Academic Board, under the delegated authority of Council, confers degrees and awards diplomas and certificates to those so listed. Council itself also confers degrees and awards diplomas and certificates to those so listed as and when required.

The Massey University Council Graduation Statute, and its Procedures and Guidelines reflect the tenets of risk management regarding the integrity of the graduation processes, including generally accepted principles of good governance; uniformity of processes across all campuses responsible for the management of the graduation processes; accountability; and attestation processes confirming the identity and eligibility of those graduating.

Massey University graduation ceremonies follow traditional university graduation processes. These traditional processes take place within a ceremony which reflects a New Zealand and Massey

University context.

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Scope of the Massey University Council Graduation Statute, and its Procedures and Guidelines

The Massey University Council Graduation Statute, and its Procedures and Guidelines are applicable to all graduation ceremonies and ‘in Council’ graduations.

Graduations take place in New Zealand only. Participants taking part in Celebrations to Honour

Graduates, including off-shore ceremonies, will have previously graduated.

The Massey University Council Graduation Statute, and its Procedures and Guidelines are also applicable to all participants and associated service providers involved in any particular graduation function or allied event.

Definitions:

‘In Council’ graduation: where the graduate has chosen to graduate at a time other than a graduation ceremony. The dates are declared by the University and will be the dates of the Academic Board meetings, and Council meetings as required.

‘In absentia’ graduation: where a graduate chooses to be listed in a graduation ceremony programme but not attend the ceremony. The graduate is listed as ‘in absentia’.

Audience:

This Statute is applicable to all staff and graduating students within the university community.

Relevant legislation:

Education Act 1989 Section 193 (2(a))

Legal compliance:

-

Related procedures / documents:

Massey University Graduation Procedures

Massey University Graduation Guidelines

Document Management Control:

Prepared by: Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar

Authorised by: Council

Approved by: Council 04/12/09

Date issued: 04/12/09

Last review: December 2009

Next review: March 2012

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APPENDIX 3

Massey University Policy Guide

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL GRADUATION PROCEDURES

Section

Contact

Council

Office of AVC & University Registrar

Last Review

Dec 2009

Next Review

Dec 2011

Approval

Council

Purpose:

The purpose of the Massey University Graduation Procedures is to:

1.1 Provide directives regarding the organisational and logistical issues pertaining to the graduation ceremony;

1.2 Establish a clear set of directives and procedures that address ceremonial processes;

1.3 Identify the responsibility, role and function of role-players;

1.4 Integrate, align and coordinate relevant graduation processes across the University;

1.5 Identify the responsibility and processes for graduation ‘in Council’; and

1.6 Identify the responsibility for Celebrations to Honour Graduates

Definitions:

‘In Council’ graduation: where the graduate has chosen to graduate at a time other than a graduation ceremony. The dates are declared by the University and will be the dates of the Academic Board meetings, and Council meetings as required.

Celebration to Honour Graduates: a ceremony to celebrate the graduation of Māori or Pasifika graduates or off-shore cohorts. Not a graduation ceremony.

Audience:

All staff involved in graduation ceremonies, ‘in Council’ graduations and celebrations to honour graduates.

Procedures and Responsibilities:

1.0 The Vice-

Chancellor’s Office – through the Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University

Registrar

’s Office

1.1 Responsible for all international and national statutes, procedures and guidelines, pertaining to graduation.

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1.2

1.3

1.4

Liaises with and makes arrangements for Council members.

Academic Dress:

1.3.1 Provides the ceremonial regalia for the positions of Chancellor, Pro-

Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, University Registrar, Campus Registrar and members of Council;

1.3.2 Responsible for approval and standardisation of academic dress and accoutrements across the campuses;

1.3.3 Provides Honorary Doctorate regalia. Should the Honorary Doctorate recipient wish to keep the Honorary Doctorate regalia Council will gift it. If not Council will provide it on request; and

1.3.4 In the case of a posthumous award the Council will gift the hood and trencher/bonnet to the family of the graduate. This may be at a graduation ceremony or at another time.

Honorary Awards:

1.4.1 Advises the relevant Campus Registrar’s Office, Events Management

Team, External Relations, Academic Services: Student Management and

Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori and Pasifika as appropriate, of any Honorary Award recipients as soon as possible after the award has been confirmed;

1.4.2 Liaises with and coordinates arrangements for Honorary Doctorate and

Massey University Medal recipients;

1.4.3 Appoints the orator for Honorary Doctorates and Massey University Medal awards on an ‘as needs and most appropriate’ basis for the particular recipient (in terms of knowledge of the candidate concerned) to prepare and deliver the citation for the honorary awardee;

1.4.4 Initiates the process for the production of the scroll or medal for Honorary

Doctorates and Massey University Medal recipients and ensures they are safely delivered to the graduation venue; and

1.4.5 Initiates and organises the ceremony for the conferring an Honorary

Doctorate or awarding of a Massey University Medal that is not taking place at a scheduled graduation ceremony.

Liaises with Council members and Honorary Award recipients at the graduation 1.5

1.6 venue/s prior to and following the graduation ceremony.

‘In Council’ graduations:

1.6.1 Provides Academic Services: Student Management with Academic Board meeting dates for publication in the University Calendar for ‘in Council’ graduations; and

1.6.2 Liaises with Academic Services: Student Management to ensure ‘in Council’ graduation lists are supplied, with the accompanying attestation confirming the identity and eligibility to graduate of those listed, for the appropriate

Academic Board or Council meeting.

2.0

Campus Registrars’ Offices

The Campus Registrar, as Graduation Committee chair, takes a leadership role in the operational management of graduation ceremonies in their location and for collaborating with other Campus

Registrars/Graduation Committee chairs to promote a ‘one university approach’ to graduation. The

Campus Registrars Offices:

2.1

2.2

2.3

Are responsible for the overall planning and delivery of graduation ceremonies relevant to their location.

Liaise with Academic Services, Student Management and Colleges to produce the ceremonial splits cognisant of achieving a critical mass at the ceremonies.

Are entrusted by the Vice-Chancellor with responsibility for the selection and engagement of ceremony speakers taking into consideration Massey Hero’s and

Honorary Doctorate / Massey Medal recipients and subject to advice from the Vice-

Chancellor, and all specific arrangements (travel, accommodation, chaperones) for each speaker.

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2.4

2.5

2.6

Are responsible for all non-ceremonial front-of-house matters including venue bookings, invitations to staff, invitations to official guests, publicity, programmes, flowers, parking, thank-you letters.

Liaise with External Relations and Information Technology Services to provide ‘on demand’ recording of graduation ceremonies for YouTube and capture for video recording.

Are responsible for the coordination of the academic procession and street

2.7

2.8 processions.

Assist the Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar to host graduation activities, including any graduation luncheons and dinners.

Are responsible for all other graduation related activities, including after graduation hospitality, Celebrations to Honour Pasifika Graduates and town and gown events.

2.9 Work with the Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori and Pasifika as required on the Celebrations to Honour Māori Graduates.

2.10 Are responsible for the appointment and training of Marshals and Assistant Marshals.

2.11 Chair (Campus Registrar) the Campus Graduation Committee.

2.12 Review of all graduation ceremonies and procedures.

3.0 Academic Services, Student Management

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

3.5

3.6

3.7

Liaise with Chair of the appropriate Campus Graduation Committee and Colleges to produce the ceremonial splits.

Liaise and manage graduation information on the Massey University Graduation web page.

Manage applications to graduate, including withdrawals, deferrals and changes, and verify ceremony allocation.

Provide academic clearance for graduands and attest to their identity and eligibility to graduate.

Order and deliver all scrolls.

Update official information in the graduation programmes including the lists of officers and Honorary Awards.

Coordinate the production of the graduation programmes and provide printed programmes to Campus Registrar’s Office (Events Management).

3.8

3.9

Provide media ready lists of graduands to External Relations.

Provide academic qualification information to the gown hire suppliers.

3.10 Manage Doctoral graduands edited citations.

3.11 Coordinate the production of programmes (to include scholarship winners) for the celebrations to honour Māori and Pasifika graduates.

3.12 Provide Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori and Pasifika with programmes and Certificates of Attendance for graduates for celebration the Honour Māori

Graduates.

3.13 Provide Campus Registrar’s Office (Events Management) with programmes and

Certificates of Attendance for graduates for the Celebrations to Honour Pasifika

Graduates.

3.14 Liaise with organisers of off-shore Celebrations to Honour Graduates managing academic clearances, graduation ‘in Council’ and production and delivery of scrolls and programmes.

3.15 Provide the ‘in Council’ graduates for publication on the Massey University Website.

4.0 External Relations

4.1

4.2

4.3

4.4

4.5

4.6

Liaise with Events Management Team to compile the graduation information handbooks.

Provide a template regarding design aspects of the graduation programmes.

Ensure brand consistency.

Provision of photographs for printed graduation material.

Supply and arrange advertising of graduations in the media.

Provide publicity and media releases on graduates, Honorary Doctorates and Massey

University Medal recipients (including photographs).

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4.7

4.8

4.9

Liaise with Campus Registrars Offices and Information Technology Services to provide

‘on demand’ recording of graduation ceremonies for YouTube and capture for video recording,

Organise Alumni related activities including the Alumni Memorabilia Stall and Alumni functions.

Provide support in external functions relating to graduation.

5.0 Graduation Marshals

5.1

5.2

5.3

Has oversight of all ceremonial aspects and processes of Massey University’s graduations relevant to their location, and ensures that agreed processes are complied with through mutual contact and the Graduation Chairs Committee.

Assist in ensuring that the agreed processes are consistent across the University.

Assist with the development and monitoring of policy by mutual contact between the three Marshals, reporting through to the Chairs of the Campus Graduation

Committees.

6.0 Graduation Callers

6.1

6.2

6.3

Each College is responsible for providing appropriate callers.

Each graduand is to have the name correctly pronounced by callers.

An appropriate caller is a staff member who is able to speak publically, who has sufficient time to seek advice on correct pronunciation of graduands names and pronounce the names correctly.

7.0 Graduation Committees

7.1

7.2

7.3

7.4

Each campus will have a Campus Graduation Committee and a Graduation Chairs

Committee.

Campus Graduation Committee:

7.2.1 The Campus Graduation Committee is chaired by the relevant Campus

Registrar; and

7.2.2 The Campus Graduation Committee has an operational focus and will be responsible for organising and ensuring the smooth delivery of all graduation events at the relevant location.

Graduation Chairs Committee:

7.3.1 The Graduation Chairs Committee, chaired by one of the Campus

Graduation Committee chairs will develop and monitor policy, subject to approval by the Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar’s Office on behalf of the Vice-Chancellor, and ensure best practice across all graduation ceremonies; and

7.3.2 Meet biannually and more often as required.

Decisions regarding the ceremonial split will be made by the chair of the appropriate

Campus Graduation Committee in conjunction with Academic Services, Student

Management and the relevant Colleges.

8.0 Celebrations to Honour Graduates

8.1 Celebration to Honour Māori Graduates: Procedures and Responsibilities

8.1.1 The Celebration to Honour Māori Graduates will take place after the graduation ceremonies in the relevant location have been completed.

However, if there are valid logistical reasons why this cannot occur, then the ceremony would honour graduands and/or graduates.

8.1.2 The Office of Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori and Pasifika will appoint a convenor for the celebrations and organise the event. The appropriate

Campus Registrar’s office will provide support as required.

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8.1.3 Guest speakers for the Māori celebrations to be approved by the Vice-

Chancellor. In the first instance these speakers would be approved by

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori and Pasifika.

8.1.4 All graduates receive a standardised Certificate of Attendance at the

Celebration to Honour Māori Graduates. Those graduates who choose to graduate ‘in absentia’ and attend only the Celebration to Honour Māori

Graduates will receive their scroll through the post.

8.1.5 The University Mace and ceremonial banners are not required at the

Celebration to Honour Māori Graduates.

8.2 Celebration to Honour Pasifika Graduates: Procedures and Responsibilities

8.2.1 The Celebration to Honour Pasifika Graduates will take place after the graduation ceremonies in the relevant location have been completed,

However if there are valid logistical reasons why this cannot occur, then the ceremony would honour graduands and/or graduates.

8.2.2 The relevant Campus Registrar’s Office will organise the Celebration to

Honour Pasifika Graduates.

8.2.3 The Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori and Pasifika will appoint a suitable liaison Pasifika staff member to work with the Campus Registrars

Offices.

8.2.4 Advice and support around protocol and policy will be requested as needed from the Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori and Pasifika.

8.2.5 Guest speakers for the Pasifika celebrations to be approved by the Vice-

Chancellor. In the first instance these speakers would be approved by

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori and Pasifika.

8.2.6 All graduates receive a standardised Certificate of Attendance at the

Celebration to Honour Pasifika Graduates. Those graduates who choose to graduate ‘in absentia’ and attend only the Celebration to Honour Pasifika

Graduates will receive their scroll through the post.

8.2.7 The University Mace and ceremonial banners are not required at the

Celebration to Honour Pasifika Graduates.

8.3 Celebrations to Honour Off-Shore Graduates: Procedures and Responsibilities

8.3.1 Celebrations to Honour Off-Shore Graduates will be organised and funded by the College undertaking the off-shore education and the host institute.

8.3.2 Graduates will have graduated ‘in Council’ prior to the ceremony.

8.3.3 Ceremonial gowns for University officials only will be supplied by Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar.

Relevant legislation:

Education Act 1989 Section 193 (2(a))

Legal compliance:

-

Related procedures / documents:

Massey University Graduation Statute

Massey University Graduation Guidelines

Page 14 of 21

Document Management Control:

Prepared by: Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar

Authorised by: Council

Approved by: Formed part of the Graduation Statute approved 4 December 2009

Date issued: Dec 2099

Last review: December 2009

Next review: March 2012

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APPENDIX 4

Massey University Policy Guide

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL GRADUATION GUIDELINES

Section

Contact

Council

Office of AVC & University Registrar

Last Review

Dec 2009

Next Review

Dec 2011

Approval

Council

Purpose:

The purpose of the Massey University Graduation Guidelines is to outline a framework to assist and guide those involved in preparations for and running graduations to achieve tasks using a recommended course of action.

Graduation Ceremony Guidelines

1.0 Duration of Graduation Ceremony Guidelines

1.1

1.2

1.6

Every attempt must be made to keep a ceremony to a maximum length of less than two (2) hours.

The Chancellor welcome address should be no longer than five to seven (5-7) minutes.

A graduation speaker’s address should be no more than ten (10) minutes.

An orator’s citation should be no more that five to seven (5-7) minutes long.

If an Honorary Award is to be made, a musical item may not be required if time does not permit.

Read PhD citation summaries must be succinct (a maximum of up to 150 words) and written in non-technical language.

1.3

1.4

1.5

2.0 Conduct of Graduation Ceremony Guidelines

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

2.5

2.6

Chancellor, Pro-Chancellor or nominee to officiate.

Deputy Vice-Chancellor to deputise for Vice-Chancellor as required.

A putatara and karanga will be performed by a senior staff member or community member.

The Chancellor will give the welcome address which will include suitable reference to

Tangata Whenua.

Pro Vice-Chancellor or nominee(s) will read graduands names.

Campus Graduation Committee Chair (Campus Registrar) to hand out scrolls to graduates and to recipients of awards. Graduates and recipients receiving two (2) or more scrolls will receive them when being presented for the highest award.

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2.7 Marshal and/or Assistant Marshal will lead and seat the academic procession on to the stage; organise stage seating; ensure correct students are to be presented to the

Chancellor; decide whether there is sufficient space on the stage to accommodate

PhD recipients (all efforts should be made to accommodate PhD recipients on stage); liaise with guest speakers and honorary award recipients about the conduct of the ceremony and the speaker/award recipient role in order to ensure that these key features of the ceremony occur smoothly; and lead the street procession, carrying

2.8

2.9 mace and heading official procession.

There shall be a musical interlude if there is sufficient time in the ceremony. All endeavours will be made to showcase New Zealand School of Music graduates or students, or appropriate students or entertainers who have links to the University.

The same recording of the National Anthem is to be used in all ceremonies. The

National Anthem may be led by a singer/s.

2.10 Recorded processional music is available or live processional music may be used.

2.11 The academic procession precedes the official procession onto the stage at the commencement of each ceremony. The official procession leaves the stage first at the conclusion of each ceremony.

2.12 The University mace and ceremonial banners must be used at all ceremonies.

3.0 Graduation Marshals and Assistant Marshals Guidelines

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

The Marshal should arrive at least 90 minutes prior to the commencement of the ceremony.

The Marshal and Assistant Marshal(s) will work collaboratively with the Events

Management Team and the Chair of the relevant Campus Graduation Committee.

The Marshal and the Assistant Marshal(s) will organise the stage seating, using a system (e.g. whiteboard) which is visible to all attendees, and which can be altered and amended easily. Guidelines for allocation of the first two rows of seating are:

3.3.1 The front row at all ceremonies will consist of the eleven ceremonial chairs only;

3.3.2 The front row will have (left to right facing the stage) the Vice-Chancellor,

Chancellor and Pro Chancellor on the raised stage. If the Pro Chancellor is not present the Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar will take that place on the raised stage;

3.3.3 On the left-hand side (facing the stage) of the raised stage will be the Pro

Vice-Chancellor of the appropriate College, Campus Registrar and the

Marshal and one other member of the Senior Leadership Team if a seat is available;

3.3.4 On the right hand side will be the University Registrar if the Pro Chancellor is present, the graduation speaker, two further members of the Senior

Leadership Team, and the Assistant Marshal;

3.3.5 Where there is an Honorary Doctorate or Massey University Medal being awarded, the two Senior Leadership Team members on the right hand side will move to the second row to accommodate the Honorary Doctorate/

Massey University Medal recipient and orator;

3.3.6 The front row will always have Senior Leadership Team or senior academics from the College in the seats not allocated to graduation officials. If there is no room they will sit with Council members in the second row;

3.3.7 It is culturally appropriate that the senior member presenting the Putatara and Karanga be seated in the front row at the left edge;

3.3.8 Subject to the number of honorary awards, the relevant Pro Vice-

Chancellor and any additional graduation callers that may be required will be seated in the front row on the right hand side of the stage; and

3.3.9 Second Row: Depending on front row allocations the second row will comprise Council members and Senior Leadership Team members. Where vacant seats remain these will be allocated to senior staff of the College associated with that graduation e.g. graduation callers.

Once the seating plan is relatively settled the Marshal and the Assistant Marshal(s) will put the place names on the first two rows of seats.

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3.5

3.6

3.7

As the official party arrive they are marked off on the seating plan and ensure each person knows where they are sitting.

With the graduation speaker’s chaperone greet the speaker and introduce him/her to the Vice-Chancellor and the Chancellor.

With the Executive Secretary (Council) greet Honorary Doctorate or Massey University

Medal recipients, introduce them to the Vice-Chancellor and the Chancellor and ensure they have the correct academic regalia.

3.8

3.9

Liaise with graduation callers, ensure they have checked for withdrawals, and understand the protocols for no-shows and ‘in absentia’.

Twenty (20) minutes prior to the commencement of the ceremony begin lining up the academic procession, checking academic regalia and counting staff to ensure there is adequate seating on stage.

3.10 Ten (10) minutes prior to the commencement of the ceremony do a final check of numbers. Deal with staff arriving late. As a rule the ten (10) minute call is final and no-one can join either the procession after this time.

3.11 Five (5) minutes prior to the commencement of the ceremony the academic procession should be at the Theatre/Auditorium door ready to proceed.

3.12 The Assistant Marshal leads the academic procession.

3.13 The Marshal carries the Mace and leads the official procession.

4.0 Graduation Callers Guidelines

4.1

4.2

4.3

4.4

4.5

Sufficient time must be allowed to establish correct pronunciation of graduands names.

Pronunciation advice may be sought from the Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor

Māori and Pasifika for Māori and Pasifika names and linguistic staff within the

University for other languages.

A phonetic system may be used.

Check own ceremonial procedures against the most up-to-date version supplied by the

Events Management Team. These will be found in the staff gowning area prior to the official procession moving out for the ceremony.

Remain aware of last minute changes to graduands coming onto the stage using the established system for that graduation.

5.0 Graduation Orators Guidelines

5.1

5.2

5.3

5.4

The Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar will liaise with the orator.

The orator will be responsible for researching and presenting the oration for recipients of honorary awards.

The citation will be no longer than five to seven (5-7) minutes.

The Vice-Chancellor will approve the citation prior to the Executive Secretary (Council) printing it on citation parchment for presentation to the awardee.

6.0 Graduation Academic Dress Guidelines

6.1

6.2

6.3

6.4

6.5

Black gowns are standard for all Massey graduates, except Honorary Doctorate gowns which are ‘post office red’.

The colour and tones of hoods are standardised for each qualification.

A Massey University stole will be used for diplomats who do not hold a degree. For those graduates who hold a degree the appropriate gown, hood and trencher/bonnet is to be worn. Should the degree regalia not be available a gown, stole and trencher is to be worn.

All people seated on the stage must wear academic regalia. Non-graduates will be required to wear a black bachelor gown.

Staff are required to be appropriately attired in academic regalia and that they should be wearing formal dress. Marshals have the authority to require staff to adapt dress accordingly to meet formal dress requirements.

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7.0 Graduation Speaker Chaperone Guidelines

7.1

7.2

7.3

7.4

7.5

7.6

7.7

The graduation speaker’s chaperone is organised through the Campus Registrars

Offices.

Organise and return the speaker’s academic regalia as required.

Meet the speaker and his/her guests at the commencement of the parade or graduation venue.

Arrange for the guests to be seated in the auditorium.

Introduce the speaker to the Marshal, Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor.

Meet the speaker after the ceremony and return academic regalia as required.

If College activities have been organised for the speaker assist as appropriate.

8.0 Graduation Ushers Guidelines

8.1 Events Management Team to coordinate and/or collaborate with the Contact Centre to ensure twenty to thirty (20-30) staff required each day dependent on the size of the ceremony. Ushers are sourced from Massey Contact staff, other University

8.2 departments and casual staff.

Usher duties may vary in each region. The following list of ushers activities is indicative:

8.2.1 Chief ushers appointed to manage ushers and health and safety requirements;

8.2.2 Two ushers double check that scrolls are filed in correct order prior to commencement of ceremony;

8.2.3 During the ceremony hand scrolls to Campus Registrar to hand to graduates;

8.2.4 Staffing of help desk for any enquiries regarding the ceremony e.g. for late request of additional tickets and guests/students;

8.2.5 Sell programmes using EFTPOS machine as required;

8.2.6 Fit academic dress as required in staff and student gowning rooms;

8.2.7 Check academic regalia and order of graduands as they prepare to cross the stage;

8.2.8 Advise graduation callers using the established process if a graduand is not present to cross the stage;

8.2.9 Man auditorium/theatre doors to give general direction to where student/guest seats are and refer on to aisle ushers;

8.2.10 Assist students/guests with disabilities e.g. take to their allocated spaces and advise of process at end of ceremony. Graduands who need assistance will be advised of process specific to their needs;

8.2.11 Fill balloons with helium and at conclusion of ceremony hand these to graduates;

8.2.12 Hold University banners at the start of the procession; and

8.2.13 Procession assistants to walk alongside the procession to the destination and ensure safety of procession.

9.0 Events Management Team Guidelines

9.1 The Events Management Teams plan the organisational logistics for graduations.

Events Management Team duties may vary and the following list of activities is indicative. It includes organising:

9.1.1 Graduation venues e.g. booking of all venues, venue layout, venue catering, coordination of deliveries, emergency plan;

9.1.2 Street parades e.g. event permit, traffic management, book parade band, book parade cancellation notice with radio station, during graduation and in consultation with the Chair of the Campus Graduation Committee make the wet weather call to cancel parade;

9.1.3 Signage/street banners/hoardings e.g. booking of strategic street banners, arrange for banners to be installed;

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9.1.4 Delivery of graduation furniture by Security/Regional Facilities Management e.g. organise/confirm delivery date/times of graduation furniture;

9.1.5 Ticketing e.g. graduand/guest ticket allocation, manage late ticket allocations/returns, manage reserved/VIP seating;

9.1.6 Preparation and delivery of information booklets in collaboration with

External Relations e.g. revise and update graduation information for website and information booklet;

9.1.7 Graduation information packs e.g. order requirements for packs, liaise with

Marketing re inclusions, arrange date/time to process graduation pack mailout;

9.1.8 Ordering and distribution of the graduation programme e.g. in consultation with Academic Services: Student Management check all relevant ceremonial information in programme, order the required quantity of programmes and confirm delivery date, distribute and deliver programmes;

9.1.9 Putting scrolls into envelopes for the ceremony;

9.1.10 Preparation of gowning rooms and staff procession rooms;

9.1.11 Preparation and distribution of ceremonial instructions to Executive

Secretary (Council) for Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor, Campus Registrars and graduation callers;

9.1.12 Assisting with rehearsals and running of the graduation ceremony e.g. music;

9.1.13 Assisting with related graduation functions;

9.1.14 Managing graduation parking;

9.1.15 Coordinating and/or collaborating with Contact Centre to ensure sufficient ushers; and

9.1.16 Assisting with commercial stall set up as appropriate e.g. photographers, framers.

10.0 Office of Assistant Vice-

Chancellor Māori and Pasifika Guidelines

10.1 Assist the Chancellor to include Māori or Pasifika as part of his/her graduation ceremony address.

10.2 Assist Executive Secretary (Council) at the graduation ceremony in hosting Māori and

Pasifika Honorary Awardees, their whānau, and groups who wish to support them.

10.3 If appropriate organise, host and fund an appropriate event such as a lunch or dinner, for Māori or Pasifika Honorary Awardees to conclude the graduation formalities in a culturally appropriate manner.

10.4 Recommend inclusion of cultural aspects as part of the Order of Ceremony if deemed to be necessary.

10.5 Appoint a convenor and organise each of the Celebrations to Honour Māori

Graduates.

10.6 Appoint a liaison person to assist the Campus Registrar’s Office to organise each of the Celebrations to Honour Pasifika Graduates.

Massey University ‘In Council’ Graduation Guidelines

1.1

1.2

1.3

Executive Secretary (Council) to provide Academic Services: Student Management with Academic Board and Council meeting dates as soon as they are available.

Academic Services: Student Management to place Academic Board dates on the graduation webpage. These become the dates for ‘in Council’ graduations.

Academic Services: Student Management to provide Executive Secretary (Council) with a schedule of graduands who have applied to have their degree conferred or certificate or diploma awarded at an ‘in Council’ graduation in time to be included in the relevant Academic Board meeting papers and a statement from the Manager,

Enrolment and Academic Services attesting that all graduands presented on the schedule had been subjected to the necessary procedures to confirm their identity and

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1.4

1.5

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their eligibility to graduate and that the procedures had been conducted by appropriately authorised staff of the University.

Executive Secretary (Council) to provide Academic Services: Student Management with the minute approving the degrees had been conferred and certificates and diplomas awarded.

Academic Services: Student Management manage the printing of the scrolls, dated as at the Academic Board meeting at which the degrees had been conferred and certificates and diplomas awarded and send to the graduate.

Relevant legislation:

Education Act 1989 Section 193 (2(a))

Legal compliance:

-

Related procedures / documents:

Massey University Graduation Statute

Massey University Graduation Procedures

Document Management Control:

Prepared by: Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar

Authorised by: Council

Approved by: Formed part of the Graduation Statute approved 4 December 2009

Date issued: new

Last review: new

Next review: new

Page 21 of 21

C12/40 – May

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

DELEGATION STATUTE 2012

4 May 2012

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is for Council to consider and approve the Massey University

Council Delegation Statute 2012 as attached (Appendix 1).

Discussion

The Massey University Council Delegation Statute 2011 was the University’s first

Delegation Statue and was approved by Council at the 6 May 2011 Council meeting.

Since this time there have been changes to the Education Act 1989 and these are reflected in the proposed Delegation Statute 2012. Additionally further changes have been made upon consideration of and advice taken on the existing Statute, including advice from the

University’s lawyer.

While the changes made to the Delegation Statute 2011 are not extensive they became difficult to read on the tracked changes document. Instead of providing such a document a commentary of the changes has been provided below. This can be read alongside the ‘clean copy’ of the proposed Delegation Statute 2012 (Appendix 1). No changes have been suggested beyond Schedule B.

The following changes are proposed.

Massey University Delegation Statute 2012 (Pages 3 of 26 to 5 of 26)

The following sections have been added:

1.2: To enable the existing statute to no longer be in force once a new one is approved.

This will updated for each new approval of the Statute; and

5.6: Addition of the second and third sentences clarifies the positions of delegations to the

Academic Board and its committees, and the consent of Council that theses bodies can delegate to staff.

Page 1 of 4

C12/40 – May

Part I

The following section has been amended:

7.0 Interpretation: Definition of Academic Board: simplified the definition while retaining the meaning and corrected the Section number.

Permitted Delegations: Schedule A (paged 6-11) & Schedule B (Pages 12- 26)

These permitted delegations on the Delegation Statute 2012 have been renumbered because of additions and deletions to the Schedules. The numbers on Schedule A and Schedule B correspond. Using the proposed Delegation Statute 2012 the changes were as follows:

1-10: These powers and functions in respect to plans and funding had been added and relate to Section 159Y and 159Z and have been included in the Statute for the sake of completeness. All were considered to be delegable to the Vice-Chancellor and further delegable to staff except for the following which it is suggested are delegated to the

Vice-Chancellor only:

No 4: Require review of the Tertiary Education Commission powers to suspend or revoke funding. (Section 159YJ); and

No 10: Require review of the Tertiary Education Commission to suspend or revoke funding. (Section 159ZH)

12: Affixing the common seal had not been included previously and it inclusion will enable the affixing of the seal to be carried out without requiring a general delegation to be given from time to time by Council to enable this regular activity. The delegation is with any two of the following: Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor and

University Registrar.

15: It is suggested that while the preparation of the plan remain delegated to the Vice-

Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor could further delegate the submission of the plan to staff.

20: This power and delegation has added because if something is not prohibited and not characteristic, the University needs to decide it can do it and in doing so must satisfy this test. As it is a common application it is suggested that it be delegated to the Vice-

Chancellor and further delegated to staff.

24: It is suggested that the nature of Student Association loans could be very small so that this be delegated to the Vice-Chancellor and further delegated to staff.

32: It is suggested that Council delegate this power to both the Vice-Chancellor and

Academic Board and that they both have the authority to further delegate to staff to assist in the provision of advice to Council.

33: It is suggested that Council delegate this power to the Vice-Chancellor and to its committees, except the Performance Review Committee, to enable the better functioning of the committees.

Page 2 of 4

C12/40 – May

Part I

34: It is suggested that this power be widened to incorporate the academic regulations, also called statutes. Therefore the power would need to be delegated to the Vice-

Chancellor, Academic Board and Academic Committee and be further delegable to staff.

36: It is suggested that this power be delegated to the Vice-Chancellor and the Audit and

Risk Committee as a risk management measure.

38 & 39: It is suggested that these powers be delegated to the Vice-Chancellor because of the nature of these powers and the complexities of the outcomes.

50-59 These powers and delegations relate to Section 224 – training schemes and programmes. Amendments were made to the Education Act 1989 in 30 August 2011 and as a result some of the powers have changed. These changes are:

‘international’ has replaced ‘foreign’, ‘programme or training scheme’ has replaced ‘course’.

Power to enrol assisted students at Massey University by agreement with the

Vice-Chancellor of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (Section

224(11)) has been removed; and

57: Not permit the enrolment of an international student for all or part of a programme or training scheme unless the programme or training scheme approved and Massey University is accredited or the programme or training scheme is exempt. (Section 224(7) and (8)) has had the qualifier of a course not less than 3 months removed.

The delegations remain the same except for No 50 and No 59

50: It is suggested that this be delegated to the Vice-Chancellor as well as the Academic Board and make it further delegable to staff given the complexities of carrying out the power.

59: This is already delegated to the Vice-Chancellor, who can further delegate to staff and to the Academic Board. It is suggested that the

Academic Board be authorised to further delegate this to staff because of the complexity of carrying out the power.

61: This power has been added to the Statute and it is suggested that it be delegated to the

Vice-Chancellor and be further delegable to staff because of its administrative nature, and the possibility of a quick response required to something that may be of a short term nature.

65: It is suggested that Council delegate this power to a Committee of the Chancellor and

Vice-Chancellor as a standing delegation. Council currently delegate this power to them jointly on an annual basis at the time the international fees are set.

68: This power has been added to the Statute and it is suggested that this be delegated to the Vice-Chancellor and further delegated to staff for practical reasons.

69-71: These powers relate to the membership of associations of tertiary students. This

Section of the Education Act 1989 was amended on 1 January 2012. No 69-71 have replaced 56-60 in the Delegation Statute May 2011. No 69 and 70 are not new powers. No 71 has been added and it is suggested that it be delegated to the Vice-

Page 3 of 4

C12/40 – May

Part I

Chancellor and further delegated to staff because of the practical requirements of the power.

Recommendation

It is recommended that Council approve the Massey University Council Delegation Statute

2012.

Stuart Morriss

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar

24 April 2012

Page 4 of 4

Massey University Council

Delegation Statute

2012

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Delegation Statute pursuant to section 194 of the Education Act 1989

Pursuant to section 194(1) of the Education Act 1989 the Council hereby resolves to adopt the attached Delegation Statute.

Signatures

…………………………… Date ………………………………

(Chancellor, Massey University Council)

…………………………… Date ………………………………

(Pro Chancellor, Massey University Council)

…………………………… Date ………………………………

(Vice-Chancellor, Massey University)

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 2 of 25

MASSEY UNIVERSITY DELEGATION STATUTE 2012

1.1 By resolution of Council and pursuant to Section 194(1)(a) of the Education Act 1989

(“Act”), the Council adopts this Statute as the Delegation Statute 2012.

1.2 Immediately upon this Delegation Statute coming into force, the Delegation Statute 2011 is repealed.

2. Title and Commencement

2.1 This Statute shall be known as the Massey University Delegation Statute 2012.

2.2 This Statute comes into force on the date that Council resolves to adopt it and two

3.

Council members have signed it.

Objectives

3.1 The objectives of this Statute are to:

(a)

State which of Council’s functions, and powers may be delegated pursuant to

Section 222 of the Act.

(b) Identify the procedure for delegations.

(c) Generally record new delegations.

4.

Savings

4.1 Except as stated in section 1.2, nothing in this Statute repeals any delegations already given by Council, or by its Committees, or by the Vice-Chancellor (including Vice-

Chancellor delegates). Delegations existing at the date of adoption of this Statute until revoked continue in force according to their tenor.

4.2 As each of the Education Act, the State Sector Act, the Crown Entities Act and the

Health and Safety in Employment Act are amended then the Schedules to this Statute are deemed to be amended to the extent required so that this Statute is consistent with the enacted amendment.

5.

Procedure for Delegations by Council

5.1 Except as stated in Section 5.2, at any time after there has been a resolution passed,

Council may, by writing signed by two members of Council, delegate to the Vice-

Chancellor or to a Committee appointed by Council any of Council’s functions or powers.

5.2 Council shall not delegate its power to appoint a Vice-Chancellor or Acting Vice-

Chancellor.

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 3 of 25

5.3 Each delegation must record whether or not the Vice-Chancellor or the Committee may further delegate the function or power so delegated by Council.

5.4 If further delegation is permitted that further delegation by the Vice-Chancellor or by the

Committee must be in writing signed by the Vice-Chancellor or two members of the

Committee and may only be to the staff of Massey University.

5.5 If any special directions or conditions are imposed by Council then those special directions or conditions must be recorded in writing on the delegation.

5.6 Any delegation made to a Committee shall be deemed to be a delegation to the persons from time to time constituting the Committee. For the avoidance of doubt, any

Committee constituted by the Academic Board is deemed to be a Committee constituted by Council pursuant to Section 193(3) of the Act. For the avoidance of doubt, the

Council consents to delegation by the Academic Board and by its Committees to staff of

Massey University.

5.7 Any delegation to staff may be made to specified person(s) or holder of specified office(s).

5.8 Even after a function or power is delegated the Council is responsible for acts of the person(s) acting under delegation.

5.9 Even after Council has delegated any Council function or power Council may still perform the function or exercise the powers.

5.10 Any delegation by Council may be revoked in writing signed by two members of

Council after a resolution by Council at any time. Any further delegations by a

Committee may be revoked in writing signed by two Committee members after resolution by the Committee. Any further delegations by the Vice-Chancellor may be revoked in writing signed by the Vice-Chancellor.

6.

Council Delegations

6.1 The Council may delegate those Council functions and powers under the Education Act set out as Schedule A.

6.2 Without derogating from Section 6.3 the Council delegates and/or hereby continues to delegate those functions and powers as set out in Schedule B.

6.3

For the avoidance of doubt, in respect of the Education Act all of Council’s functions and the exercise of its powers have previously and continue to be delegated to the Vice-

Chancellor excepting the appointment of the Vice-Chancellor, performance reviews of the Vice-Chancellor, terms and conditions of employment of the Vice-Chancellor.

6.4 The Council has those functions and powers under the State Sector Act as set out in Part

A in Schedule C.

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 4 of 25

6.5 Council has those functions and powers under the Crown Entities Act as set out in

Schedule D.

6.6 In respect of the Vice-Chancellor only, Council has those functions and powers of the

Employer under the Health and Safety in Employment Act as set out in Schedule E, Part

A.

6.7 To the extent that Council or staff members are in control of premises then the Council and staff members have those functions and powers set out in Schedule E, Part B.

6.8 Each Massey University staff member has the responsibility which cannot be delegated as set out in Schedule F.

7. Interpretation

In this Statute the following definitions apply:-

“Academic Board” means the Academic Board of Massey University established pursuant to Section 193(3) of the Act and includes its delegates.

“Act” means the Education Act 1989 and includes any Amendment Acts or Acts passed in substitution for the Education Act 1989.

“Chair” means a position with that title as established by the Vice-Chancellor.

“Vice-Chancellor” means the Vice-Chancellor of Massey University and includes their duly authorised delegates.

“Council” means the Council of Massey University.

“Colleges” or “Departments” or “Centres” or “Schools” or “Campuses” are operational units as directed in writing from time by the Vice-Chancellor.

“Statute” means Delegation Statute.

“Student” means a student formally enrolled in any course(s) at Massey University.

“Massey University” means the Institution, which is a University, constituted under the

Massey University Act 1963, and the Education Act 1989 as Massey University.

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 5 of 25

Schedule A

Education Act

Permitted Delegations

(1) Massey University submissions to Tertiary Education Commission on the proposed Tertiary Education Commission decisions pertaining to plan (Section

159YA).

(2) Supply information to the Tertiary Education Commission and the Ministry as required (Section 159YC).

(3) Make submissions to the Tertiary Education Commission when the Tertiary

Education Commission proposes to suspend or revoke funding (Section 159YG).

(4) Require review of the Tertiary Education Commission powers to suspend or revoke funding (Section 159YJ).

(5) Ask the Tertiary Education Commission to approve significant amendment of plan (Section 159YK).

(6) Collaborate with the Tertiary Education Commission and make submissions on significant amendments to plan proposed by the Tertiary Education Commission

(Section 159YM).

(7) Provide summary of plan (Section 159YO).

(8) Supply information to the Tertiary Education Commission and the Ministry under Section 159ZD.

(9) Make submissions on the Tertiary Education Commission decision to suspend or revoke funding given under Section 159ZC (Section 159ZF).

(10) Require review of the Tertiary Education Commission to suspend or revoke funding (Section 159ZH).

(11) Authorise any Council member or any Massey University staff member to execute documents, or documents of a specified class or description, or specified documents, on behalf of Massey University (Section 167(1)).

(12) Affix the Common seal (Section 167 (3-7))

(13) Recommend to the Minister that the Massey University Constitution be amended

(Section 170(1)).

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 6 of 25

(14) Fix in accordance with the fees framework (as determined by the Government) fees to be paid to Council members, other than the Vice-Chancellor (Section 179

(1)).

(15) Prepare and submit a proposed plan in accordance with requirements of Section

159P each three years or more frequently if directed by the Tertiary Education

Commission (Section 180(1)(b), Section 159T and Section 159V).

(16) Ensure that Massey University is managed in accordance with the plan and determine policies to implement that plan (Section 180(1)(c)).

(17) Determine (subject to the State Sector Act) the policies of Massey University in relation to the management of its affairs (Section 180(1)(d)).

(18)

Undertake planning relating to Massey University’s long-term strategic direction

(Section 180(1)(e).

(19) Establish an Academic Board consisting of the Vice-Chancellor and members of the staff and students of the University (Section 182(2)).

(20) Undertake functions of a kind that in the opinion of the Council: (i) may conveniently be undertaken in association with characteristic functions without disadvantage to characteristic functions and (ii) are appropriate for universities

(Section 192(2)(b)(i) and (ii))

(21) Grant nationally recognised awards (Section 192(8)(a)).

(22) Provide courses, admit students and grant awards (Section 193(2)(a)).

(23) Grant fellowships, bursaries, scholarships or prizes (Section 193(2)(b)).

(24) Authorise the making of grants or loans to the Vice-Chancellor, Massey

University staff or students, or to any association of staff or students (Section

193(2)(c)).

(25) Guarantee loans made by other persons to the Vice-Chancellor or members of the staff for housing purposes (Section 193(2)(c)).

(26) Accept gifts, devises and bequests made to Massey University (Section

193(2)(d)).

(27) Agree to disestablishment of Massey University or the incorporation of another institution into Massey University (Section 193(2)(e)).

(28) Agree to the incorporation in Massey University of another institution (Section

193(2)(ea)).

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 7 of 25

(29) Arrange for manufacture of and distribute (whether by way of sale or otherwise) any article or thing bearing a mark, symbol or writing that is associated with

Massey University (Section 193(2)(f)).

(30) Arrange for the provision of goods and services to Massey University staff or students or other persons using, or otherwise attending Massey University

(Section 193(2)(g)).

(31) Prescribe fees payable by students at Massey University or any of them (Section

193(2)(h)).

(32) Establish boards or other bodies within Massey University to give advice to the

Council (Section 193(2)(i)).

(33) Appoint committees consisting of such persons as the Council determines to exercise such powers as are delegated to them and such powers as are conferred on them by statutes made by the Council, and to alter, discharge and reconstitute committees so appointed (Section 193(3)).

(34) Make Statutes (Section 194(1)).

(35) Review the imposition and quantum of any penalties imposed by statute upon students or staff (Section 194(2)).

(36) Consult with the Secretary when the Secretary sets criteria for assessing the level of risk to the operation and long-term viability of institutions (Section

195A(1)(a).

(37) Supply information or reports to the Tertiary Education Commission (Section

195B).

(38) Consult and comment to the Minister on any proposed appointment of a Crown observer (Section 195C).

(39) Consult with the Minister over the possible need to dissolve Council and appoint a Commissioner and respond to preliminary decision of Minister to dissolve

Council (Section 195D(4)(a) and (c)).

(40) Establish, maintain and operate bank accounts as permitted under Section 158 of the Crown Entities Act 2004. Pay any money received by the Council into any

Massey University bank accounts (Section 200(2)).

(41) Authorise withdrawals from bank accounts (Section 200(3)).

(42) Keep proper accounts as per Section 168(1) and (2) of the Crown Entities 2004

(Section 201).

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 8 of 25

(43) Apply Massey University income and capital doing whatever Council believes will accomplish outcomes in the Massey University plan and to enable Massey

University to carry on the functions characteristic of universities (subject to law and subject to trust deeds) (Section 201A).

(44) Accept or disclaim gifts in accordance with Section 167 of the Crown Entities

Act 2004 (Section 201B(1)).

(45) Invest money as per Section 65I(1) and (2) of the Public Finance Act 1989

(Section 203(4)).

(46) Provide annual report to the Minister in compliance with requirements of Section

220 and Sections 154 to 157 of the Crown Entities Act 2004 (Section 220).

(47) Sign a statement of responsibility prepared in accordance with Section 155 of the

Crown Entities Act 2004 (Section 220(2AA)(a)).

(48)

Ensure that copies of Massey University’s Annual Report are available for inspection without charge by any person (Section 221).

(49) Determine programmes of study and training at Massey University subject to

NZVCC (Universities New Zealand (UNZ)) requirements and subject to

Ministerial direction (Section 223).

(50) Determine minimum entry criteria for students under 20 years old or where student numbers are capped (Section 224(2)(b) and Section 224(6)).

(51) Consent to enrolment of a person that is not a domestic or exempt student

(Section 224(2)(a)(ii)).

(52) Determine the minimum age for enrolment at Massey University (Section

224(2)(c)(i)).

(53) Determine the minimum age for enrolment in the programme or training scheme

(Section 224(2)(c)(ii)).

(54) Consent to enrolment of a person who has not attained the minimum age for entry to Massey University or the person does not have the minimum entry requirements for applicants under 20 (Section 224(3)(b).

(55) Determine maximum number of persons that may be enrolled at Massey

University in a particular Massey University programme or training scheme in a particular year (Section 224(5)).

(56) Give preference to certain students where applicants exceed number of places available (Section 224(6)).

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 9 of 25

(57) Not permit the enrolment of an international student for all or part of a programme or training scheme unless the programme or training scheme approved and Massey University is accredited or the programme or training scheme is exempt (Section 224(7) and (8)).

(58) Establish vacancies for international students subject to fees paid by those foreign students (Section 224(11)).

(59) Refuse to permit or cancel enrolment at Massey University or in a particular programme or training scheme on basis person not of good character, guilty of misconduct, person enrolled full-time at another institution or at school, person made insufficient progress after a reasonable trial (Section 224(12)).

(60) Fix, or specify a means by which there may be calculated or ascertained, a tuition fee for any course of study or training but must not fix any fee that exceeds any maximum fee specified in a condition imposed under Section

159ZD(2) of the Education Act (Section 227(1A)).

(61) Fix a fee for the provision of student services provided by Massey University or on its behalf but not exceeding the maximum set by the Minister’s direction and only in categories determined by the Minister (Section 227(1B) and (1C)).

(62) Before procedures for enrolling a student are complete, Council must take all reasonable steps to ensure each student gives written notice of the circumstances in which students may get a refund (Section 227(4)).

(63) Grant any student a refund outside Massey University policy (Section 227(5)).

(64) Take all reasonable steps to ensure that no person is enrolled at Massey

University until it has been established whether the person is a domestic or international student. (Section 228(1))

(65) Fix fees for international students (Section 228(2)(a), (b) and (c)).

(66) Agree subsidises for international students (Section 228(2A).

(67) Provide details on international students to the Secretary (Section 228(7)).

(68) Establish refund policy for international students and inform them (Section 228)

(69) Collect student association membership fees if asked by the student association

(Section 229CA(4)).

(70) Charge Massey University student associations for actual and reasonable costs incurred in the collection of student association fees (Section 229CA(8)).

(71) Hear and determine complaints in respect of undue influence allegations in breach of Section 229B by prospective students and students (Section 229C).

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 10 of 25

Power

Schedule B

Who Has Power

Council

Standing

Delegation

Further Delegable

Vice-Chancellor Staff (1) Massey University submissions to

Tertiary Education Commission on the proposed Tertiary Education

Commission decisions pertaining to

The University’s plan.

(Section 159YA)

(2) Supply information to the Tertiary

Education Commission and the

Ministry as required.

(Section 159YC)

(3) Make submissions to the Tertiary

Education Commission when the

Tertiary Education Commission proposes to suspend or revoke funding.

(Section 159YG)

(4) Require review of the Tertiary

Education Commission powers to suspend or revoke funding.

(Section 159YJ)

(5) Ask the Tertiary Education

Commission to approve significant amendment of plan.

(Section 159YK)

(6) Collaborate with the Tertiary

Education Commission and make submissions on significant amendments to plan proposed by the

Tertiary Education Commission.

(Section 159YM)

(7) Provide summary of plan.

(Section 159YO)

(8) Supply information to the Tertiary

Education Commission and the

Ministry under Section 159ZD.

(Section 159ZD)

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor No

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 11 of 25

Power Who Has Power

Council

Standing

Delegation

Further Delegable

Vice-Chancellor Staff (9) Make submissions on the Tertiary

Education Commission decision to suspend or revoke funding given under Section 159ZC.

(Section 159ZF)

(10) Require review of the Tertiary

Education Commission to suspend or revoke funding.

(Section 159ZH)

(11) Authorise any Council or staff member to execute documents on behalf of Massey University.

(Section 167(1))

(12) Affixing of the Common seal

(Section 167(3-7))

Council

Council

Council

Vice-Chancellor

Vice-Chancellor

No

Staff

Any two:

Chancellor

Vice-Chancellor

AVC &University

Registrar

(Committee)

No

No

(13) Recommend to the Minister that

Massey University Constitution be amended.

(Section 170(1))

(14) Fix, in accordance with the fees framework, fees to be paid to Council members, other than the Vice-

Chancellor.

(Section 179(1))

(15) Prepare and submit a proposed plan in accordance with requirements of

Section 159P each three years or more frequently if directed by the

Tertiary Education Commission.

(Section 180(1)(b), Section 159T and

Section 159V)

(16) Ensure that Massey University is managed in accordance with the plan and determine policies to implement the plan.

(Section 180(1)(c))

Council

Council

Council

Council

No

Vice-Chancellor

Vice-Chancellor

Staff

Staff

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 12 of 25

Power

(17) Determine policies in relation to the management of Massey University’s affairs subject to the State Sector Act

1988.

(Section 180(1)(d))

(18) Undertake planning relating to

Massey University’s long-term strategic direction.

(Section 180(1)(e))

(19) Establish an Academic Board consisting of the Vice-Chancellor and members of the staff and students of the University.

(Section 182(2))

(20) Undertake functions of a kind that in the opinion of the Council: (i) may conveniently be undertaken in association with characteristic functions without disadvantage to characteristic functions and (ii) are appropriate for universities.

(Section 192(2)(b)(i) and (ii))

(21) Grant nationally recognised awards.

(Section 192(8)(a))

Who Has Power

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Standing

Delegation

Vice-Chancellor,

Academic Board,

Audit and Risk

Committee

Vice-Chancellor

No

Vice-Chancellor

Further Delegable

Staff

Staff

Staff

Staff

Staff

(22) Provide courses of study (1),

admit students (2)

and grant awards (3)-

(i) degrees

(ii) diplomas

(iii) certificates

(Section 193(2)(a))

(23) Grant fellowships,

scholarships, bursaries or prizes.

(Section 193(2)(b))

Council

Council

Vice-Chancellor and Chancellor

(Committee)

(1) Vice-

Chancellor

(2)Vice-

Chancellor, on appeal Academic

Board

(3)(i) Vice-

Chancellor

(3)(ii) Vice-

Chancellor

(3)(iii) Vice-

Chancellor

Vice-Chancellor

Academic Board

Scholarships

Committee

No

(1) Staff

(2) Staff

(3)(i) No

(3)(ii) Staff

(3)(iii) Staff

Staff

Staff

Staff

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 13 of 25

Power

(24) Authorise the making of grants or loans to:

- Vice-Chancellor

- Staff and staff associations

- Students (grants)

- student associations (loans).

(Section 193(2)(c))

(25) Guarantee loans made to the Vice-

Chancellor or members of Massey

University staff for housing purposes

- Vice-Chancellor

- Staff.

(Section 193(2)(c))

(26) Accept gifts, devises, and bequests made to Massey University, whether on trust or otherwise.

(Section 193(2)(d))

(27) Agree to disestablishment of Massey

University and its incorporation in another institution.

(Section 193(2)(e))

(28) Agree to the incorporation in Massey

University of another institution.

(Section 193(2)(ea))

(29) Arrange for manufacture of, and distribute (whether by way of sale or otherwise), any article or thing bearing a mark, symbol or writing that is associated with Massey

University.

(Section 193(2)(f))

(30) Arrange for the provision of goods and services to Massey University staff or students or other persons using, or otherwise attending Massey

University.

(Section 193(2)(g))

(31) Prescribe fees payable by students at

Massey University or any of them.

(Section 193(2)(h))

Who Has Power

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Standing

Delegation

No

Vice-Chancellor

Vice-Chancellor

Vice-Chancellor

No

Vice-Chancellor

Vice-Chancellor

No

No

Vice-Chancellor

Vice-Chancellor

Chancellor and

Vice-Chancellor jointly

(Committee)

Further Delegable

Staff

Staff

Staff

No

Staff

Staff

Staff

No

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 14 of 25

Power

(32) Establish boards or other bodies within Massey University to give advice to Council.

(Section 193(2)(i))

(33) Appoint committees consisting of such persons as the Council determines, and to alter, discharge and reconstitute committees so appointed.

(Section 193(3))

(34) Make statutes.

(Section 194(1))

Who Has Power

Council

Council

Council

Standing

Delegation

Vice-Chancellor

Academic Board

Vice-Chancellor

Committees:

Audit and Risk

Honorary Awards

Governance

Further Delegable

Staff

Staff

Staff

Staff

Staff

Staff

Vice-Chancellor

Academic Board

Academic

Committee

Staff

Staff

Staff

Vice-Chancellor Staff (35) Review the imposition and quantum of any penalties imposed by statute upon students or staff.

(Section 194(2))

(36) Consult with the Secretary when the

Secretary sets criteria for assessing the level of risk to the operation and long-term viability of institutions.

(Section 195A(1)(a))

(37) Supply information or reports to the

Tertiary Education Commission.

(Section 195B)

(38) Consult and comment to the Minister on any proposed appointment of a

Crown observer.

(Section 195C)

(39) Consult with the Minister over possible need to dissolve Council and appoint a Commissioner and respond to preliminary decision of Minister to dissolve Council.

(Section 195D(4)(a) and (c)).

(40) Establish, maintain and operate bank accounts as permitted under Section

158 of the Crown Entities Act 2004 in Massey University’s name at any registered bank.

(Section 200(2))

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Vice-Chancellor

Audit and Risk

Committee

Staff

No

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor No

Vice-Chancellor No

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Page 15 of 25

Power Who Has Power

Standing

Delegation

Further Delegable

Vice-Chancellor Staff (41) Authorise withdrawals and payments of money from any of Massey

University‘s bank accounts.

(Section 200(3))

(42) Keep proper accounts as per Section

168(1) and (2) of the Crown Entities

Act 2004.

(Section 201)

(43) Apply Massey University‘s income and capital doing whatever Council believes will accomplish outcomes in the Massey University plan and to enable Massey University to carry on the functions characteristic of polytechnics (subject to law and subject to trust deeds).

(Section 201A)

(44) Accept or disclaim gifts in accordance with Section 167 of the

Crown Entities Act 2004.

(Section 201B(1))

(45) Invest money as per Section 65I(1) and (2) of the Public Finance Act

1989.

(Section 203(4))

(46) Provide annual report to the

Minister in compliance with requirements of Section 220 and

Sections 154 to 157 of the Crown

Entities Act 2004.

(Section 220)

(47) Sign a statement of responsibility prepared in accordance with Section

155 of the Crown Entities Act 2004.

(Section 220(2AA)(a))

(48) Ensure that copies of Massey

University‘s Annual Report are available for inspection without charge by any person.

(Section 221)

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor No

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor No

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Page 16 of 25

Power Who Has Power

Standing

Delegation

Further Delegable

Vice-Chancellor Staff (49) Determine programmes of study and training at Massey University subject to NZVCC (Universities New

Zealand (UNZ)) requirements and subject to Ministerial direction.

(Section 223)

(50) Determine entry criteria for students under 20 years old or where student numbers are capped.

(Section 224(2)(b) and Section 224(6))

(51) Consent to enrolment of a person that is not a domestic or exempt student.

(Section 224(2)(a)(ii))

(52) Determine the minimum age for enrolment at Massey University.

(Section 224(2)(c)(i))

(53) Determine the minimum age for enrolment in the programme or training scheme.

(Section 224(2)(c)(ii))

(54) Consent to enrolment of a person who has not attained the minimum age for entry to Massey University or the person does not have the minimum entry requirements for applicants under 20.

(Section 224(3)(b))

(55) Determine the maximum number of persons that may be enrolled in a particular Massey University programme or training scheme in a particular year.

(Section 224(5))

(56) Give preference to students, or a class of students to participate in a course where the number of persons who apply for enrolment in that course, exceeds the maximum number of students who may undertake that course.

(Section 224(6))

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Vice-Chancellor

Academic Board

Staff

Staff

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Academic Board No

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Page 17 of 25

Power Who Has Power

Standing

Delegation

Further Delegable

Vice-Chancellor Staff (57) Not permit the enrolment of an international student for all or part of a programme or training scheme unless the programme or training scheme approved and Massey

University is accredited or the programme or training scheme is exempt.

(Section 224(7) and (8))

(58) Establish vacancies for international students subject to fees paid by those international students.

(Section 224(11))

(59) Refuse to permit or cancel the enrolment of a person as a student at

Massey University or in a particular programme or scheme.

(Section 224(12))

(60) Fix a tuition fee for any course of study or training for domestic students but not fix, in relation to domestic students, any fee that exceeds the maximum.

(Section 227(1A))

(61) Fix a fee for the provision of student services provided by Massey

University or on its behalf but not exceeding the maximum set by the

Minister’s direction and only in categories determined by the

Minister.

(Section 227(1B) and (1C))

(62) Before procedures for enrolling a student are complete, Council must take all reasonable steps to ensure each student is given written notice of the circumstances in which students may get a refund.

(Section 227(4))

(63) Refund a student all or any part of any fees.

(Section 227(5))

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor

Academic Board

Chancellor and

Vice-Chancellor jointly

(Committee)

Vice-Chancellor

Staff

Staff

No

Staff

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Page 18 of 25

Power

(64) Take all reasonable steps to ensure that no person is enrolled at Massey

University until it has been established whether the person is a domestic or international student.

(Section 228(1))

(65) Fix fees for international students.

(Section 228(2)(a), (b) and (c))

Who Has Power

Council

Standing

Delegation

Further Delegable

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Council Chancellor and

Vice-Chancellor jointly

(Committee)

Vice-Chancellor

No

Staff (66) Agree subsidises for international students.

(Section 228(2A)

(67) Provide details on international students to the Secretary.

(Section 228(7))

(68) Establish refund policy for international students and inform them.

(Section 228)

(69) If asked by Massey University student associations, collect the student association membership fees.

(Section 229CA(4))

(70) Charge Massey University student associations for actual and reasonable costs incurred in the collection of student association fees.

(Section 229CA(8))

(71) Hear and determine complaints in respect of undue influence allegations in breach of Section 229B by prospective students and students.

(Section 229C)

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Council

Vice-Chancellor

Vice-Chancellor Staff

Vice-Chancellor

Vice-Chancellor

Vice-Chancellor

Staff

Staff

Staff

Staff

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 19 of 25

Schedule C

State Sector Act 1988

PART A

(i) Notify a vacancy or impending vacancy for the position of Vice-Chancellor (Section

77IB(2)).

(ii) Examine applicants for the position of Vice-Chancellor (Section 77IB(3)(a)).

(iii) Seek advice from such sources relevant to the appointment of a Vice-Chancellor as the

Council considers relevant (Section 77IB(3)(b)).

(iv) Invite such persons as the Council thinks fit to assist it to decide on the person to be appointed Vice-Chancellor and to take part in examination of Vice-Chancellor (Section

77IB(4)).

(v) Obtain the written concurrence of the [State Services Commissioner]] to the conditions of employment of the Vice-Chancellor (Section 77ID(3)).

(vi) Remove the Vice-Chancellor from Office for just cause or excuse (Section 77IE).

(vii) Determine the conditions of employment that are to apply to any person directed to exercise and perform any of the functions, powers and duties of a Vice-Chancellor

(Section 77IF(3)).

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 20 of 25

Schedule D

Crown Entities Act 2004 (CEA)

Council must:

(i) Cause accounting records to be kept that-

(a) Correctly record and explain the transactions of Massey University; and

(b) Will at any time enable the financial position of Massey University to be determined with reasonable accuracy; and

(c) Will enable Massey University to ensure that the financial statements comply with Section 154 of the CEA; and

(d) Will enable the financial statements of Massey University to be readily and properly audited.

(Section 168).

(ii) Include a statement of responsibility dated and signed by two Council members in accordance with Section 155 in financial statements.

(iii) Sign Annual Report containing information required by Section 151 (Section 151(2)).

(iv) Forward to the Auditor-General its annual financial statements, statements of service performance, and any other information that the Auditor-General has agreed, or is required, to audit (Section 156).

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 21 of 25

Schedule E

Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992

PART A

Council Duties as Employer of the Vice-Chancellor of Massey University

(i) Take all practicable steps to ensure the safety of employees while at work (Section 6).

(ii) Ensure that there are in place effective methods for-

(a) Systematically identifying existing hazards to employees at work; and

(b) Systematically identifying (if possible before, and otherwise as, they arise) new hazards to employees at work; and

(c) Regularly assessing each hazard identified, and determining whether or not it is a significant hazard.

(Section 7(1)(a) to (c)).

(iii) Take all practicable steps to ensure all accidents are investigated to determine their cause

(Section 7(2)).

(iv) Take all practicable steps to eliminate significant hazards from employees at work

(Section 8).

(v) Take all practicable steps to isolate significant hazards to employees where the significant hazard cannot be eliminated (Section 9).

(vi) Take all practicable steps to minimise the likelihood that a significant hazard will be a cause or source of harm to employees (Section 10(2)(a)).

(vii) Provide, make accessible to, and ensure the use by employees of suitable clothing and equipment to protect them from harm that may be caused from hazard(s) (Section

10(2)(b)).

(viii) Monitor the exposure of employees to hazards (Section 10(2)(c)).

(ix) Take all practicable steps to obtain employees’ consent to the monitoring of their health in relation to hazards (Section 10(2)(d)).

(x) To monitor the health of employees, with their informed consent, in relation to exposure to hazards (Section 10(2)(e)).

(xi) Ensure that every employee is given the results of any monitoring of conditions in the employee’s place of work, and/or the health and safety of employees in the place of work (Section 11(2) (a) and (b)).

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 22 of 25

(xii) Ensure that every employee is advised of their place of employment’s emergency protocols, hazards, and hazard reduction/elimination policies in respect of the work undertaken (Section 12(1)(a), (b), (c), (d)).

(xiii) Provide all health and safety representatives access to sufficient information about health and safety systems and health and safety issues in the place of work to enable the representatives to perform their functions effectively (Section 12(2)).

(xiv) Take all practicable steps to ensure every employee is supervised by an appropriately skilled/experienced person to ensure that employees are not likely to cause harm to the employee or other people (Section 13).

(xv) Take all practicable steps to ensure that no action or inaction of any employee while at work harms any other person (Section 15).

(xvi) Take all practicable steps to warn all other persons of significant hazards (Section 16(3)).

(xvii) Provide reasonable opportunities for employee(s) to participate effectively in ongoing processes for improvement of health and safety in the employee(s) place of work

(Section 19B(1)).

(xviii) Provide ongoing processes for improvement of health and safety (Section 19B(2)).

(xix) Cooperate with all employees who wish to be involved, or any union or unions representing any of the employees, in the participation of employees in processes relating to health and safety in the place of work (Section 19C(2)).

(xx) Allow health and safety representatives two days paid leave each year to attend health and safety training approved by the Minister of Labour (Section 19E(1)).

(xxi) Maintain a register of accidents and serious harm and record in the register particulars relating to-

(a) Every accident that harmed (or, as the case may be, might have harmed)-

(i) Any employee at work; or

(ii) Any person in a place of work controlled by Massey University.

(Section 25(1)(a)).

(xxii) Notify the Secretary of Labour of the occurrence of any serious harm or accident as soon as possible after the occurrence of the serious harm or accident (Section 25(3)(a)).

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 23 of 25

Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992

PART B

(i) Take all practicable steps to ensure that no hazard that is or arises in the place of work harms any person in the vicinity or any person lawfully at work (Section 16(1)(a) to (b)).

(ii) Take all practicable steps to ensure that no hazard that is or arises in the place of work harms people-

(a) Who are in the place with the express or implied consent of Massey University; and

(b) Who-

(i) have paid Massey University (directly or indirectly) to be there or to undertake an activity there; or

(ii) are there to undertake activities that include buying or inspecting goods

(Section 16(2)). from whose sale Massey University derives or would derive (directly or indirectly) any gain or reward.

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 24 of 25

Schedule F

Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992

Duties of Employees:

(i) Take all practicable steps to ensure-

(a)

The employee’s safety while at work (including by using suitable protective clothing and suitable protective equipment provided by the employer or, if section 10(4) applies, suitable protective clothing provided by the employee himself or herself); and

(b) That no action or inaction of the employee while at work causes harm to any other person.

(Section 19).

Approved by Council: 6 May 2011

Reviewed and amendments proposed: April 2012

Page 25 of 25

C12/41 – May

Part I

The Chancellor

Massey University Council

Dear Chancellor,

Report from the Academic Board Meeting (Part 1): 21 March 2012

At the Academic Board meeting held on Wednesday 21 March 2012 the following items are referred to Council for information.

1. Advice on Matters of Academic Policy

Policy on Delivery Modes and Study Resources

It was noted that this was an interim policy and that the final policy was expected to be tabled in 2013. Feedback was provided by the Board and the revised document was to be tabled at the next Teaching and Learning Committee meeting for consideration and that it come back to the Academic Board at a later meeting.

Equivalence Policy

Considerable discussion took place and it was agreed that the Board’s feedback be taken to the Teaching and Learning Committee for consideration and then tabled at the 20 June 2012 Academic Board meeting for approval.

Assessment Policy and Procedures

The Board approved the Assessment Policy and Procedures.

2. Information to Council with Respect to Major Academic Directions

Academic Reform Final Report

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Academic and International Professor Day noted the extensive engagement that had taken place in the development of the academic reform proposals and the considerable work of the Teaching and Learning Committee,

College Boards, the three campus Academic Leadership Forums and other fora that had underpinned the Academic Reform Final Report. There was no discussion which was taken as a reflection of the quality of and support for the document.

The Board noted the following:

1. The substantial work undertaken to renew the academic portfolio and the outcomes in terms of a more streamlined range of qualifications and papers, and new and expanded areas of teaching and learning;

2. The changes that have been made to teaching and learning structures as a result of the Academic Reform Project;

3. The changes being made to the University’s policies and procedures in the areas of assessment, study modes, materials & delivery, and quality assurance which

Page 1 of 3

6.

5.

4.

3.

C12/41 – May

Part I

have been informed by substantive discussion within the Colleges and across the

University;

4. The changes to the online learning environment which have occurred during the academic reform;

5. The teaching & learning framework as a key outcome of the Academic Reform

Project which articulates the University’s signature platforms and defining specialisations, and the Massey model of teaching & learning; and

6. The preparation of full proposals for change for the establishment of a College of

Health at Massey University, and an Institute of Education within the College of

Humanities and Social Sciences.

Report of Academic Approvals Made Under Delegation

There was nothing to report.

Sub-Committee Matters

University Research Committee

The University Research Committee Annual Report 2011 was tabled for receipt by the Board. University Research Committee chair Professor Heywood noted the training opportunities that had taken place across the three campuses. She also acknowledged the distinguished and notable contributions made by Professor Barry

Scott and Professor Anne Noble who were stepping down from the University

Research Committee.

Items of Early Notice

Proposed Review of Academic Board Terms of Reference

With the reviews of the Academic Board committees’ Terms of Reference complete changes are required in the Academic Board Terms of Reference. It was suggested that minor amendments to the membership would be brought to the 26 April 2012

Academic Board meeting for approval and that the wider review of the Terms of

Reference would take place later in the year. Since the meeting the new Chair of the

Board, Professor Tony Signal has decided to hold any interim decisions on membership over to the full review.

For Information

Chair of Academic Board

Nominations to stand in the election for the position of chair of Academic Board were called for on 6 March 2012. The casual vacancy was created on the retirement of the

Chair of the Board Professor Margaret Tennant and the term of office ends on 12

August 2013. Two nominations were received. One nominee withdrew and the remaining nominee, Professor Tony Signal agreed to take up the position without an election.

Page 2 of 3

C12/41 – May

Part I

Doctoral Research Committee

The nomination and election process for one academic staff member on the Doctoral

Research resulted in Dr Stephen Neville being elected unopposed to the Doctoral

Research Committee for a three year term of office ending on 14 March 2015.

Conferring of Degrees and awarding of Diplomas and Certificates

Degrees were conferred and diplomas and certificates awarded under the delegated authority of Council.

Professor Ingrid Day

Interim Chair, Academic Board

Page 3 of 3

C12/42 – May

Part I

The Chancellor

Massey University Council

Dear Chancellor,

Report from the Academic Board Meeting (Part 1): 26 April 2012

At the Academic Board meeting held on Thursday 26 April 2012 the following items are referred to Council for information.

1. Advice on Matters of Academic Policy

There are no matters of academic policy to report in Part I.

2. Information to Council with Respect to Major Academic Directions

3.

The Academic Board endorsed both the Proposal for a Massey University College of

Health and the College of Education Proposal for Change. These proposals both arose from the Academic Reform project. The discussions on both of these proposals took place in Part II of the meeting with the decisions being moved into Part I.

Report of Academic Approvals Made Under Delegation

There are no academic approvals made under delegation in Part I.

4. Sub-Committee Matters

Academic Committee Annual Report 2011

The Academic Committee Annual Report 2011 was tabled however the period the report covered was not the calendar year as had been expected and a new Annual

Report covering the 2011 calendar year is to be tabled at the 20 June 2012 Academic

Board meeting.

College of Education College Board Annual Report 2011

Chair of the College of Education College Board Professor Chapman tabled the

College Board Annual Report 2011. This is available to Council members upon request.

Page 1 of 2

C12/42 – May

Part I

5. Items of Early Notice

Proposed Review of Academic Board Terms of Reference

With the reviews of the Academic Board committees’ Terms of Reference complete, changes are required in the Academic Board Terms of Reference. It had been suggested that minor amendments to the membership would be brought to the 26

April 2012 Academic Board meeting for approval and that the wider review of the

Terms of Reference would take place later in the year. I decided to hold this over and discuss the timing of the full review with the Academic Board Agenda Committee when it meets on 8 May 2012.

Conferring of Degrees and awarding of Diplomas and Certificates

Degrees were conferred and diplomas and certificates awarded under the delegated authority of Council.

6. For Information

There were no items for information in Part I

Professor Tony Signal

Chair, Academic Board

Page 2 of 2

C12/43 – May

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

APPROVAL OF ANNUAL ACCOUNTS 2011:

REPORTING ON DELEGATION TO AUDIT AND RISK COMMITTEE

4 May 2012

The responsibility for approving the Annual Accounts lies with the Council. Timelines for the approval of the Annual Accounts 2011 were such that they are not able to be tabled at the

2 March 2012 Council meeting and Council delegated the authority to approve the annual accounts to the Audit and Risk Committee at that meeting.

All Council members received the Annual Accounts 2011 ahead of the Audit and Risk

Committee meeting and had the opportunity to raise any issues with the Chair of the Audit and Risk Committee, Ms Kura Denness prior to the meeting.

This is to report that the Audit and Risk Committee met on 16 April 2012 and exercised the delegation below.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL DELEGATE THE AUTHORITY TO THE AUDIT AND

RISK COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL TO APPROVE THE ANNUAL ACCOUNTS FOR

2011

Paddy Nicol

Executive Secretary (Council)

24 April 2012

Page 1 of 1

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