Academic catalog 2014

Academic catalog 2014
ACADEMIC CATALOG
1
SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY
ACADEMIC CATALOG
2014/2015
Graduate Programs
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
SAINT MARTIN’S UNIVERSITY
GENERAL INFORMATION....... 3
About this Catalog.............................. 4
Accreditation....................................... 4
Mission Statement.............................. 5
Academic Calendar............................. 6
History................................................ 6
Saint Martin of Tours.......................... 7
Core Themes........................................ 7
Benedictine Values.............................. 8
Academic Values................................. 8
Location.............................................. 8
Campus Facilities................................ 9
Student Affairs.................................. 11
Student Conduct............................... 18
Graduate Admission......................... 19
Financial Aid..................................... 23
Expenses............................................ 29
Extended Learning Division............. 35
ACADEMIC INFORMATION... 39
Undergraduate Majors
and Areas of Study.......................... 40
Academic Information...................... 40
GRADUATE PROGRAMS........ 59
School of Business............................. 60
Accounting.................................... 60
Business Administration.............. 60
Master’s Program in Business........... 61
Master of Business Administration
(MBA)............................................... 61
Master of Business Administration/..... Finance and Accounting.................. 65
College of Education and Counseling .
Psychology....................................... 70
Academic Policy................................ 74
Waiver and Substitution Options..... 74
Washington State Competency-Based .
Endorsement Requirements............ 76
Master of Arts in Counseling
Psychology .(MAC)........................... 77
Master of Education (MED)............ 85
Master in Teaching (MIT)............... 95
Hal and Inge Marcus School of
Engineering.................................... 115
Master’s Programs in Engineering.... 116
Master of Civil Engineering
(MCE)........................................... 116
Master of Engineering Management
(MEM) .......................................... 126
Master of Mechanical Engineering
(MME).......................................... 133
DIRECTORY.............................. .145
Deans................................................. .146
Faculty............................................... .146
Faculty and Staff Emeriti.................. .152
Board of Trustees.............................. .153
Saint Martin’s Abbey......................... .154
University Administration............... .155
Administrative Offices...................... .155
Academic Offices............................... .157
Campus Map..................................... .158
Directions to Saint Martin’s.............. .160
Appendix A....................................... .161
Index.................................................. .163
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GENERAL INFORMATION
ACADEMIC CATALOG
GENERAL
INFORMATION
4
ABOUT THIS CATALOG / ACCREDITATION
ABOUT THIS CATALOG
The 2014/2015 edition of the Saint Martin’s University Graduate Academic Catalog
is divided into sections to assist you in planning your graduate education at the
University. Please refer to the table of contents to find main section headings.
The course listings, appearing under each program area heading, provide the following
information:
• Course number.
• C
ourse title followed, in parentheses, by the number of semester hours of
credit earned for completing the class.
• Synopsis of the course offering.
• Prerequisites required for admission to the class, if applicable.
ACCREDITATION
Saint Martin’s University is a comprehensive institution offering undergraduate and
graduate level programs. Established in 1895, Saint Martin’s is a Catholic university
and is the educational apostolate of St. Martin’s Abbey, a Benedictine monastery of the
Roman Catholic Church. Members of the Abbey pray, work and live together on the
University campus.
Saint Martin’s University is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and
Universities. The school is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant alien
students.
Its undergraduate civil engineering and mechanical engineering programs are accredited by ABET, Inc.
The teacher, school counseling, and school administration programs of the College of
Education and Counseling Psychology are approved by the Washington Professional
Educator Standards Board (PESB).
The residency teacher education program, which is designed to prepare teacher candidates to become outstanding P-12 professionals, was granted initial accreditation
by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) for a period of seven years
from October 2013 to October 2020. This accreditation certifies that the forenamed
professional education program has provided evidence that the program adheres to
TEAC’s quality principles.
The University is a member of the American Association of Colleges; Council for
Independent Colleges; Council for the Advancement and Support of Education; Independent Colleges of Washington; National Catholic Education Association; Northwest Association of Private Colleges and Universities; Washington Friends of Higher
Education; Service Members Opportunity Colleges; American Association of Benedictine Colleges and Universities; Western Association of Graduate Schools; and the
Carnegie Association for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.
MISSION STATEMENT
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Saint Martin’s University’s programs of study are approved by the Washington Student
Achievement Council (formerly the Higher Education Coordinating Board) for enrollment of people eligible to receive educational benefits under Title 38 and Title 10.
Saint Martin’s University reserves the right to make changes as it deems necessary to
procedures, policies, calendar, curriculum, overall academic programs or majors and
costs.
MISSION STATEMENT
Saint Martin’s University is a Catholic Benedictine institution of higher education that
empowers students to pursue a lifetime of learning and accomplishment in all arenas
of human endeavor.
Saint Martin’s students learn to make a positive difference in their own lives and in the
lives of others through the interaction of faith, reason and service.
The University honors both the sacredness of the individual and the significance of
community in the ongoing journey of becoming.
Context
Established in 1895, Saint Martin’s University is the educational mission of Saint Martin’s
Abbey, a Catholic Benedictine monastery, whose members pray, work and live together on
the University campus. The physical beauty of Saint Martin’s 300-acre campus reflects the
rich intellectual and spiritual nature of its presence in the Pacific Northwest.
Essential features of university life are animated by its Benedictine identity and its participation in the centuries-old traditions of Catholic intellectual thought and the search
for truth.
Thus, the University honors students and guides them toward achieving academic excellence. Superior teaching is the expected norm. Rooted in the long tradition of the liberal
arts, the University curriculum cultivates: creativity and the ability to communicate and
pursue ideas; critical thinking and independent inquiry; academic proficiency; the formation of sound ethical judgments; and service to humanity.
Reflecting the Benedictine virtue of hospitality, the University welcomes and, indeed, seeks
students not only from the Pacific Northwest, but also from other parts of the nation and
the world at its main campus and extended learning division. Saint Martin’s treasures persons of all ages, religions and nationalities as it encourages cognizance of diverse viewpoints and an appreciation of all cultures.
Saint Martin’s is an equal opportunity institution.
The principles of the Catholic Benedictine tradition, equal employment opportunity,
and nondiscrimination are fundamental to the mission, goals, and objectives of Saint
Martin’s University. The University does not discriminate in employment or in the
delivery or administration of its educational programs, policies, scholarship and loan
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ACADEMIC CALENDAR / HISTORY
programs, athletic or other University programs on the basis of sex, sexual orientation,
race, color, religion (except as a bona fide occupational qualification for certain select
positions), marital status, national or ethnic origin, military or veteran status, age, or
disability. Students or employees with concerns or complaints about discrimination
on the basis of sex in employment or an education program or activity, or any other
inquiries related to the University’s non-discrimination policy, may contact the Dean of
Students or the Director of Human Resources/Title IX Coordinator, 5000 Abbey Way
SE, Lacey WA 98503, 360-491-4700. Consistent with the requirements of Title IX of the
Education Amendments of 1972 and the regulations adopted under that law, the University has designated the above individual as the University’s Title IX Officer, responsible for coordinating the University’s Title IX compliance. Individuals may also contact
the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, 915 2nd Avenue, Room 3310
Seattle, WA 98174-1099, Telephone: (206) 220-7900, TDD: (206) 220-7907.
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2014–15
The Lacey campus operates on a semester calendar while the MBA program and most
extended learning division programs operate on an eight-week term calendar. The
academic calendar can be found on the Saint Martin’s University website.
HISTORY
Saint Martin’s University was established in 1895 by monks of the Roman Catholic
Order of Saint Benedict. The Order, the oldest in Western civilization, was founded by
Saint Benedict of Nursia in about 528.
From that early time to the present, Benedictines have worked in education. Their abbey schools nurtured and protected the legacy of the classics of Western civilization.
Monk scholars helped write the cultural and educational history of Europe and, in the
past century, that of the United States.
Benedictine history in the United States began in 1845 when Abbot Boniface Wimmer, O.S.B., established the first American abbey school, Saint Vincent College, near
Latrobe, Pennsylvania. From there, Benedictines founded high schools, colleges and
universities throughout the country. Saint Martin’s is one of 18 Benedictine colleges
and universities in the United States and Canada and the only one west of the Rockies.
The site of Saint Martin’s University and Abbey, on a wooded hillside in rural Lacey,
Washington, was selected in 1893 by Abbot Bernard Locnikar, O.S.B., of Minnesota’s
Saint John’s Abbey, Saint Martin’s motherhouse.
Saint Martin’s first enrolled boys and young men between the approximate ages of 10
to 20. The new school admitted its first student, Angus McDonald, on Sept. 11, 1895.
Both boarders and “day scholars” were accepted and taught from a curriculum of preparatory and high school classes, plus classical and commercial college courses.
SAINT MARTIN OF TOURS / CORE THEMES
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By 1897, 29 students were attending Saint Martin’s. College-level courses were added
in 1900 to provide the necessary education for candidates planning to enter the Benedictine priesthood.
Saint Martin’s University also has a long history of building global relationships. In
1920, Father Placidus Houtmeyers, O.S.B., was one of the first monks to take Catholic
education principles to Beijing. Saint Martin’s strong relationships with China and
Japan continue today. The University’s collaboration with Mukogawa Women’s University is more than 25 years old and its partnership with Pudong Business School of
the Shanghai Maritime University is over a decade old.
Saint Martin’s became a four-year, accredited, baccalaureate-granting institution in
1940. The University became coeducational in 1965. Graduate programs were added
in the early 1980’s with the first master’s degree awarded in 1984. It changed its name
from Saint Martin’s College to Saint Martin’s University in August 2005 to more clearly
define its existing nature and programs, strengthen the University’s outreach ability
and better fulfill its global mission.
SAINT MARTIN OF TOURS
Saint Martin of Tours, the patron saint of the University, figures prominently in the
development of Christianity in fourth-century Europe. During his lifetime, Martin
established about 3,500 churches.
Although his youth was spent as a cavalryman in the Roman army, he longed for
something more. He horrified his father, a tribune in the army, by studying to become
a Christian.
Legend has it that Martin, while still a soldier, chanced upon a shivering beggar
clutching his rags about him in the bitter cold. Martin cut his flowing cavalry cloak
in two and gave half to warm the beggar. Some time thereafter, Martin had a vision
in which that beggar revealed himself to be the Lord Jesus Christ. Soon after, Martin
obtained a discharge from the army.
As a free man, he began his commitment to Christianity in earnest, studying under
famous scholars and teachers of the era. Soon he was considered the holiest man in
France. Although he was sought as a bishop, he chose to remain a missionary until
371, when the people of Tours, France, prevailed upon him to become bishop. Saint
Martin’s Abbey and University take their name from this illustrious patron.
CORE THEMES
The core themes of Saint Martin’s University are faith, reason, service and
com¬munity. Please see the Appendix section of this catalog for objectives and outcomes associated with each core theme.
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BENEDICTINE VALUES / ACADEMIC VALUES / LOCATION
BENEDICTINE VALUES
Inspired by its Benedictine heritage, the Saint Martin’s University community embraces Benedictine values derived from The Rule of Benedict. Our Benedictine values include the following: awareness of God; community living; dignity of work; hospitality;
justice; listening; moderation; peace; respect for persons; stability; and stewardship.
ACADEMIC VALUES
Knowledge: We emphasize broad geographic and
historical perspectives, cultural and linguistic plurality and scientific and aesthetic understanding.
Spirituality: We provide and encourage the development of personal recognition of spiritual
values beyond the intellectual and physical.
Hospitality: We welcome and include in our
community people from diverse backgrounds
and locations. We encourage diverse viewpoints
and the appreciation of different cultures.
Service: We expect that our students will live exceptional lives dedicated to serving others in the
local and global community. We expect such service to mirror the Catholic Benedictine life and to nurture the family spirit among all who participate in the University.
Creativity: We expect our students to find joy in acts of creation and recognize artistic
expression as the bridge between interior and exterior spaces.
Communication: We provide opportunities for students to pursue ideas and communicate them in varied forms.
Inquiry: We work to develop thoughtful graduates who are able to engage in honest
and thorough analysis and critical and independent thinking, and who are prepared
to address the complex nature of our society.
Discovery: We believe that discovery, including self-discovery, is developed in the
context of learning, serving and valuing the worth of others.
Holistic education: We believe that intellect alone cannot sustain a meaningful life,
and thus we work to unfold the potential of the whole person.
LOCATION
Saint Martin’s University is located in Lacey, Washington, adjacent to Olympia, the
state capital. The population of the Lacey area is about 43,000, and that of Thurston
CAMPUS FACILITIES
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County — which includes the greater Olympia area of Lacey, Olympia and Tumwater
— is about 245,000.
The beauty of the 300-acre Saint Martin’s campus reflects the rich intellectual and
spiritual nature of its presence in the Pacific Northwest. The wooded areas of campus
are threaded with pleasant walking trails. Many species of wildlife roam the undeveloped acres on campus and the meadows below the main University buildings.
Located near the shores of South Puget Sound, Saint Martin’s is conveniently located
near Interstate-5, less than an hour from Seattle, two hours from Portland, Oregon,
and about 30 minutes from Tacoma. In nearby cities, students can take advantage of
events ranging from top-flight art shows, concerts and theater to professional sports.
With its proximity to metropolitan areas, the Greater Olympia area also attracts nationally recognized entertainers, artists and musicians, providing cultural opportunities to complement the University’s educational experience.
The University’s proximity to the state capital gives students an opportunity to watch
and take part in legislative and government-related activities. Valuable student internships and work experiences can be obtained through positions in government offices
and agencies.
For nature lovers, the area is exceptional. Swimming and other water activities are as
close as five minutes from campus on a wealth of nearby lakes, streams and ocean inlets. Pacific Ocean beaches, just 50 miles west, offer opportunities for clamming, kiteflying, deep-sea fishing and sailing. Less than an hour away, hikers, skiers, backpackers
and other outdoor enthusiasts can pursue their favorite pastimes in the mountains or
enjoy such spectacular Northwest attractions as Mount Rainier National Park, Mount
St. Helens, the Olympic Peninsula and the San Juan Islands.
CAMPUS FACILITIES
This partial list of campus facilities represents those buildings most frequently used by
graduate students. For a full listing please refer to the undergraduate catalog.
Abbey Church: The Abbey Church is the spiritual center of Saint Martin’s. A beautiful, modern structure adjacent to Saint Martin’s Abbey, its surrounding gardens and
serene atmosphere draw many people from on campus and the nearby community.
The church is used for daily services as well as for small concerts and other activities. A
bronze statue of the Benedictine Order’s patron saint, Saint Benedict of Nursia, stands
near the church entrance.
Cebula Hall: Cebula Hall, completed in 2012 and opened to students in 2013, is a
LEED-platinum state of the art building. It houses the Hal and Inge Marcus School of
Engineering. Cebula Hall contains classrooms and offices, an engineering computer
center and engineering laboratories. Its name honors Father Richard Cebula, O.S.B.
(1916-2004), who served as the engineering division chairman for many years.
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CAMPUS FACILITIES
Engineering Annex: The Engineering Annex houses the engineering industrial labs.
Charneski Recreation Center: Opened in the fall of 2009, this 36,000-square-foot facility houses three multi-purpose courts, a four-lane running track, a batting cage and
a fitness center equipped with weights, cardio equipment, a multi-purpose classroom
and an aerobics-dance studio.
Computer Resource and Copy Center: A wide variety of computer resources are
available to Saint Martin’s students. These include:
General purpose computers. Computers are available in the Computer Resource
Center in Old Main, O’Grady Library, Harned Hall, Trautman Student Union
Building, Parsons Hall and Cebula Hall. These computers are licensed with a variety of up-to-date software, including Microsoft Office Professional, programming
languages, library reference materials, statistical software and engineering applications.
Print, copy and scanning. Several locations are available for students to scan materials to data formats, and students have easy access to laser printers. Per-page print
and copy charges are modest and are partially subsidized by the University. In addition, students are given a $10 credit toward their printing each semester. Copies can
be made in the Computer Resource and Copy Center at $.05 for black-and-white
copies and $.25 for color copies; see the staff for assistance. Black-and-white or
color copies can also be made at the O’Grady Library and Harned Hall utilizing a
card- or coin-vending unit attached to the copiers.
Email, Internet and research tools. While on campus, students have easy access to
the University’s network and to the Internet. Email accounts and library database
information also can be accessed off-campus via the Internet. The residence halls
provide wired Ethernet connections for each resident. Wireless Internet access is
also provided in common areas and in many classrooms.
To access University computer resources, a student must first complete a one-time
computer/email account application. This includes the student agreeing to comply
with the University’s Acceptable Use Policy. Students who violate that policy will
quickly lose all access to University systems. Inappropriate uses such as pornography, copyright violations or piracy will result in immediate loss of privileges.
Harned Hall: Opened in 2008, Harned Hall is shared by students and faculty in every
division. This technology-rich building features eight general classrooms, four seminar rooms, a computer classroom, a small computer lab, an electrical lab, a faculty
room and a tiered lecture hall. Wireless access is available throughout the building.
O’Grady Library: Designed by internationally acclaimed architect Michael Graves,
O’Grady Library is now home not only to the library, but to the Center for Learning, Writing and Advising, the ITS Help Desk, and the Center for Scholarship and
Teaching. O’Grady Library supports student success by bringing together research
assistance, tutoring and technology help in one location. At O’Grady Library, stu-
STUDENT AFFAIRS
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dents also have access to a variety of learning spaces and resources: the Information
Commons, the Multimedia Center, the Curriculum Resource Center, five group study
rooms, three media rooms, two classrooms and the spacious Benedictine Reading
Room. Books, journals, reference materials, videos and music are available both in
the library and online, and students also can check out laptops, digital cameras, digital voice recorders, digital camcorders and other multimedia equipment. The library
extends its resources through participation in the Summitt, the shared catalog of the
Orbis Cascade Alliance, which makes available to Saint Martin’s students more than
nine million titles from 37 academic libraries in the Pacific Northwest, with courier
delivery to O’Grady Library.
Old Main: Old Main, the University’s primary academic building, contains most faculty and administrative offices, many classrooms and laboratories, the Computer Resource and Copy Center, the University bookstore, and the student and monastic dining rooms. The student dining area, St. Gertrude Dining Hall, recently was renovated
and expanded to accommodate seating for 250. Students can dine outside, weather
permitting, or remain inside and enjoy the view from the hill onto the lower campus.
Old Main’s south wing, the University’s oldest structure, was completed in 1913, and
the west wing in 1923. It was seismically updated in 2000.
St. Martin’s Abbey: The Abbey, home of Saint Martin’s Benedictine monks, is across
from Old Main, the University’s oldest building.
Trautman Student Union Building (TUB): Dedicated in 1965, the Student Union
Building is a center for student activities, student government and clubs. It offers
meeting and activity space for students, a game room, and a relaxing environment for
connecting with the community.
Zaverl Hall: Zaverl Hall, built in 2006, contains mechanical engineering labs and
maintenance and storage facilities.
Extended learning: Saint Martin’s University operates extended programs at nearby
Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Centralia College, Everett Community College and Tacoma Community College. The extended learning division programs provide educational undergraduate and graduate level programs to non-traditional students, including military personnel, their families and, on a space-available basis, area residents.
STUDENT AFFAIRS
The Office of Student Affairs works to retain students by maintaining and improving
the overall quality of campus life through programming based on Catholic Benedictine tradition, hallmarks of which are hospitality, respect for the individual, service
and development of the whole person. The department also works to meet the needs
of a diverse student population.
Collaboration among students, faculty and staff enhance each student’s overall growth
and development through coordinated programs, activities and services. Structured
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STUDENT AFFAIRS
experiences help students develop and refine leadership skills, make responsible
choices, celebrate common values, embrace diversity, respect the rights of others, resolve conflicts, explore and define personal goals, recognize civil and social responsibilities, and develop other characteristics expected of university graduates.
These experiences, and the services provided by the University, enrich Saint Martin’s
learning environment. They are key factors in preparing graduate students to pursue
their career choices and become educated citizens, involved community members and
future leaders.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
The Office of Campus Ministry provides a Christian environment in the Catholic
Benedictine tradition in which all students and employees, regardless of religious
persuasion, are assured respect and freedom to pursue personal spiritual growth.
Campus Ministry is greatly influenced by the centuries-old traditions, customs and
spirit of Benedictine monasticism. One of those traditions is hospitality. The Office
of Campus Ministry supports all students and reinforces their integration into their
spiritual community through liturgies, educational and social justice programs,
and activities such as volunteerism, retreats, prayer groups, discussions, and local,
national and international trips. These programs are intended to assist students in
blending their faith into their daily lives.
CAMPUS LIFE
Various campus organizations and activities contribute to the intellectual, moral and
social development of students. All students are urged to participate in out-of-class
and community activities as part of their University education. Saint Martin’s believes
co-curricular activities provide experience, enrichment, knowledge and opportunities
for personal growth not always available in the classroom. They also contribute to the
well-being of the University community and its neighbors.
Student activities are coordinated through the Office of Campus Life. Activities include social and educational excursions, the Benedictine Leaders Program, cultural
events, sporting events, lectures, dances and traditional activities such as Homecoming. Off-campus outdoor excursions are offered including ski/snowboard trips, rock
climbing, and hiking. Students interested in intramural sports can participate at the
team or individual level. Activities vary from year to year, but often include flag football, volleyball, basketball, table tennis, soccer, bowling, dodgeball and softball.
The University recognizes and supports the vital contributions made possible by students’ participation in student government, the Associated Students of Saint Martin’s
University (ASSMU). ASSMU represents the needs of the students to the faculty, administration and board of trustees. All currently enrolled undergraduate students are
members of ASSMU and can participate in the election of representatives and executive officers.
STUDENT AFFAIRS
13
Individual student clubs and organizations are officially recognized through ASSMU.
These organizations are typically formed around recreational interests, academic majors, social issues or personal development activities.
CAREER SERVICES
The Career Center helps students define their career goals and objectives as they relate
to future employment. Career planning begins when the student enters Saint Martin’s
and continues through graduation. The Center’s services are available to all students
and alumni at the University’s main campus and extended learning division. Those
services and programs include:
• Online database (Saints4Hire) for jobs, scholarships and alumni mentors.
• Resume, cover letter, interviewing, negotiating and other skill-building workshops.
• On-campus interviewing and recruiting.
• Career guidance testing.
• Career fairs.
• A career resource Library
• Assistance finding scholarship opportunities.
• Peer advisors.
• Facebook page
CENTER FOR LEARNING, WRITING AND ADVISING
The Center for Learning, Writing and Advising offers free academic support services
to all Saint Martin’s students. The Learning Center provides subject area tutoring
(science, business/accounting/economics, and world languages), extensive math
drop-in tutoring, personalized academic improvement plans, and learning and writing
strategy workshops. The staff at the center also works closely with the University’s
academic early warning system — a referral system that supports student success. At
the LWC, students meet with trained peer readers to discuss their academic, personal
and professional writing.
COUNSELING AND WELLNESS CENTER
The Counseling and Wellness Center provides free and confidential counseling services
to all enrolled students. Our professional staff of counselors is available to assist students
with a wide range of issues to promote a successful university experience. Students
can receive help for any social, emotional, educational or vocational issue, including
academic stress, stress, adjustments, depression, anxiety and relationship issues.
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STUDENT AFFAIRS
The substance abuse prevention program coordinator is available to provide
assessments, outreach and education on substance abuse prevention and awareness.
Other services that are provided to the campus community include consultation,
referrals, training and educational programs. To make an appointment, students can
call, email or stop by the Counseling and Wellness Center.
DISABILITY SUPPORT SERVICES
Saint Martin’s University is committed to providing a campus environment that is accessible to all students. The Office of Disability Support Services handles coordination
of services and academic accommodations for students with disabilities.
Students wishing to request appropriate accommodations are responsible for initiating contact with the office. The office will assess the individual needs of each student,
assist him or her in communicating those needs to faculty and staff, and help the
student obtain materials, services and the assistance necessary to successfully pursue
their higher education.
Procedures for course accommodations for students with documented disabilities are
available in the Office of Disability Support Services.
Students who need special housing accommodations on-campus due to a disability
also find assistance through the Office of Disability Support Services.
THE OFFICE OF INTERCULTURAL INITIATIVES
The Office of Intercultural Initiatives (OII) offers a variety of multicultural and social
justice programs for the entire campus community. Programs are designed to: support underrepresented and underserved students; sponsor programs that foster critical multicultural awareness among students, faculty and staff; and engage students in
social justice education that prepares them for a complex, global society. Specific programs include: an annual orientation program for entering first-year students of color;
faculty and staff development seminars and workshops on multicultural theory and
practice; general advising support for diverse student populations; an annual graduation dinner to celebrate the academic achievement of students of color; campus-wide
programs on multicultural issues and topics; and social justice education workshops
for service-learning experiences and leadership development.
OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS AND
DEVELOPMENT
The Office of International Programs and Development (OIPD) serves the Saint Martin’s community through a variety of international programs and services related to language, culture and academic exchange. The goal of OIPD is to enhance and support
international and cross-cultural education. The office supports this mission through
numerous programs designed to integrate our international and domestic communities.
STUDENT AFFAIRS
15
Specifically, programs and events offered by OIPD are: study abroad and study tour
opportunities; International Education Week; International Taste of Culture; the annual Saint Martin’s University Dragon Boat Festival; conversation partners; student
cultural ambassador program; summer cultural exchange programs, home-stay opportunities; and various volunteer opportunities. OIPD also offers student-led cultural activities that provide international students with a better understanding of
American culture and an opportunity to explore the Pacific Northwest.
Study abroad: Graduate students have select opportunities to study abroad through approved
study abroad and short-term faculty-led programs.
Graduate students can transfer in a total up to nine
pre-approved semester credit hours of coursework,
which can include study abroad. It is very important that graduate students discuss any plans to
study abroad with their advisors and obtain course
equivalencies and approvals before participating in
a program.
Participating in a study abroad experience is a
memorable and possibly life-changing event for a
student. Beyond developing new friendships and
taking in new sights, many other benefits exist, including the following:
• Overseas experience aids students to stand out in a competitive job market.
• Many study abroad programs offer unique opportunities such as internships
and volunteering in a field of interest.
• Study abroad enhances a student’s overall academic experience by providing an
alternative perspective to learning subject matter.
• Studying abroad helps build a greater sense of self-confidence, independence
and direction, which in turn, helps develop leadership skills.
PUBLICATIONS
The Belltower is a periodic newspaper written and edited by Saint Martin’s students. Its
purpose is to serve the communication needs of the student community and provide a
vehicle for communicating student, faculty and staff news and views on campus issues.
Insights, a periodic publication of the Office of Marketing and Communications, provides news about the University, Abbey and alumni to alumni, friends and supporters
of the University, and families of students.
Other communications concerning the University and its students include periodic
newsletters for parents and a variety of news and information that is carried on the
University’s website, www.stmartin.edu.
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STUDENT AFFAIRS
STUDENT HEALTH CENTER
Saint Martin’s Student Health Center, located in room 102 of Burton Hall, is dedicated
to the wellness of Saint Martin’s students. Staffed by a physician’s assistant and nurse,
the Student Health Center assists students in developing a commitment to healthy
lifestyles and becoming advocates for their own health care. Services include:
• Acute care for colds, flu and other medical concerns
• Writing of prescriptions
• Limited disease management for chronic health problems, such as asthma, diabetes and high blood pressure
• Referrals for services that extend beyond the scope of the center
Graduate students may utilize the Student Health Center for a fee paid at the time of
visit.
The Student Health Center is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday; staff are available on Tuesday to schedule appointments. Hours of operation are announced at the
beginning of each semester.
ATHLETIC AND RECREATIONAL PROGRAMS
Athletic and recreational activities are planned and supervised as an integral part of
educating the whole student. Students are encouraged to participate in individual and
group recreation.
The Hal and Inge Marcus Pavilion is the University’s indoor athletic facility.
Saint Martin’s outdoor track and field facility, which was dedicated in the spring of
2009, features an all-weather running track and an irrigated infield for field-event
competition. Students use the infield for soccer practice and intramural games.
In the fall of 2009, Saint Martin’s opened the 36,000-square-foot Charneski Recreation
Center. This facility includes three multi-purpose courts, a four-lane running track,
a batting cage and a 9,000-square-foot fitness center equipped with weights, cardio
equipment, a multi-purpose classroom and an aerobics-dance studio.
The University’s athletic fields and courts, as well as nearby public golf courses, lakes,
shores and mountains, offer opportunities for many sports and activities.
Saint Martin’s is a member of NCAA Division II Great Northwest Athletic Conference. University teams participate in men’s and women’s basketball, golf, soccer, cross
country, and outdoor and indoor track and field; women’s volleyball and softball; and
men’s baseball. Occasionally, graduate students with remaining eligibility participate
in intercollegiate athletics. The Saint Martin’s University Compliance Officer can respond to eligibility questions.
STUDENT AFFAIRS
17
CAMPUS DINING SERVICES
All food service at Saint Martin’s University is managed by Bon Appétit Management
Company, an award-winning company known for its standards of excellence and innovation in sustainable food service. Bon Appétit brings made-from-scratch restaurant-style dining to Saint Martin’s University. Breaking bread together helps to create a
sense of community and comfort. The Bon Appétit staff recognizes the important role
they fill and take great care to honor their position on the Saint Martin’s campus. Food
is purchased with high ethical standards and environmental impact in mind; eggs are
cage-free, beef is range-fed, fish adhere to Seafood Watch guidelines, and produce is
organic and grown locally whenever possible. Bon Appétit encourages feedback and
gladly works with individual students to meet special dietary needs.
For more information on Bon Appétit’s principles and standards, visit www.bamco.
com. To learn more about Bon Appétit’s food service at Saint Martin’s University, visit
www.cafebonappetit.com/saintmartin.
RESIDENCE LIFE
Serving students so that they may serve others, the Office of Housing and Residence
Life at Saint Martin’s University acts as a catalyst for the formation of a community in
which members support and encourage one another by sharing their gifts and challenge each other to recognize and fulfill their full potential. The residence halls are an
integral part of the University community and complement its educational programs.
The Office of Housing and Residence Life provides an environment that helps students
learn and grow. The halls are maintained by professional and paraprofessional staff
members specifically employed to assist students.
All single undergraduate students are required to live on campus while enrolled for
classes at Saint Martin’s University unless they have reached junior status (60 semester
or 90 quarter credits of approved university credit, which does not include Running
Start or AP credits) prior to registration for fall or spring semester classes; are 21 years
of age or older on or before the last official day of registration for the semester; are
residing at home within 30 miles of Saint Martin’s University with parent(s) or legal
guardian(s); are taking eight or fewer credit hours during the semester in question;
have attained an associate’s degree or completed two full years of education at the
college or university level (not including Running Start); or have lived in a university
residence hall for four or more complete semesters.
Regardless of class standing, single undergraduate international students, including
English-as-a-second language (ESL) students, are required to live on-campus for a
minimum of two semesters; however, they are granted the following exemptions: they
are living with a pre-arranged host family for the duration of their stay; have a letter
of permission from their country’s embassy; have lived in the United States for at least
one complete semester; will be 23 years of age or older on or before the last official day
of registration for the semester.
Procedures and policies for the residence halls are outlined in the Student Handbook
18
STUDENT CONDUCT
and the housing contract. Residents are responsible for familiarizing themselves with
this handbook and contract, and for complying with terms and conditions of each
document.
Additional information about the University’s residence halls is available from the Office of Admission or the Office of Housing and Residence Life. Housing and Residence
Life policies, procedures, forms, and facilities information is available at http://www.
stmartin.edu/residenceLife/.
A refundable $200 damage deposit must be on file with the Office of Student Financial
Services prior to the issuance of keys to the room. No portion of the $200 deposit will
be refunded if the application is canceled more than 30 days from the date it is submitted; after August 1, regardless of the date submitted; or if requested more than 30
days after officially checking out of the halls. After taking occupancy, if the applicant
stays the entire contract period and applies to return to the residence halls the following academic year, his/her damage deposit will automatically be carried over to the
following academic year.
Graduate students assigned to suites are required to select a meal plan, but unlike
underclassmen, they may choose the more affordable apartment plan. Apartment residents with kitchens, however, are not required to carry a meal plan. Housing charges
are assessed each semester and billed through the Office of Student Financial Services.
For more information on housing rates, amenities, options, and policies, visit www.
stmartin.edu/residencelife/.
STUDENT CONDUCT
Students Martin’s University believes in honoring the freedom of the individual and
respecting the rights of the group. A code of conduct in necessary to ensure this is
possible. As a Roman Catholic university, Saint Martin’s not only expects students,
staff, and faculty to follow appropriate civil laws, but also encourages each individual
to participate in building a positive and welcoming community.
Students at Saint Martin’s are expected to conduct themselves in a responsible manner that reflects favorably on themselves and the Saint Martin’s community. University policies, guidelines, and expectations are outlined in the Saint Martin’s University Student Handbook available at http://www.stmartin.edu/StudentServices/pdf/
StudentHandbook.pdf. While the University is not directly responsible for individual
students’ behavior, students will be held accountable for that which is detrimental to
the educational objectives of the University or inconsistent with its values or mission
through appropriate disciplinary action as outlined in the Student Handbook.
Policies may be amended from time to time, and students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the most up-to-date regulations as outlined in the online version of the Student Handbook. The University reserves the right to suspend, expel or
otherwise discipline a student whose conduct is inappropriate, disruptive, or dangerous to the University or members of the Saint Martin’s community.
GRADUATE ADMISSION
19
GRADUATE ADMISSION
Saint Martin’s University seeks to enroll students of all ages and backgrounds who
will benefit from the distinctive, personalized education provided by the University.
Graduate admission to Saint Martin’s University is competitive and is based on the
criteria below. Each graduate program also sets admissions requirements, which
may exceed the general requirements set by the Office of Graduate Studies. Applicants should carefully read the program admission requirements detailed under each
graduate program in this catalog. Please note that applicants who do not meet the
minimum admissions criteria may be admitted conditionally.
PRIORITY DEADLINES
All of the graduate programs have rolling admissions, which means interested applicants can apply at any time. However, for priority scholarship and admissions consideration applicants should submit their applications by the priority deadlines listed on
the program websites.
The minimum admission requirements for unconditional graduate admission to the
University include:
• An earned bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university.
• A minimum undergraduate cumulative GPA of 2.75.
• Proof of English proficiency for international students: A minimum score of
79 ibt / 213 cbt / 550 pbt on the TOEFL or an overall band score of 6.5 on the
academic version of the IELTS (test scores must be less than two years old at the
time of application) or a bachelor’s degree from a U.S. institution where English
is the language of instruction.
• Admission to a degree program or as a non-matriculated (non-degree seeking)
student.
Three decisions can be made about a candidate’s application:
• The student may be admitted unconditionally; or
• The student may be admitted conditionally with additional requirements specified that must be met within a set timeline; or
• The student may be denied admission.
There are different application procedures for admission depending on which program and which student type the applicant is pursuing.
• Graduate degree program admission
aster of Business Administration
M
Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology
Master in Teaching
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GRADUATE ADMISSION
aster of Education
M
Master of Civil Engineering
Master of Engineering Management
Master of Mechanical Engineering
• Graduate non-matriculated student admission
• Certification-only admission
• Readmission of former Saint Martin’s graduate students
A description of the application procedure for each one of these follows.
If it is found that an applicant has made a false or fraudulent statement or a deliberate
omission on the application for admission or any accompanying documents or statements, the applicant may be denied admission. If the student is already enrolled when
the fraud is discovered, the case will be adjudicated using the procedures specified for violations of the SMU Code of Conduct & Policies as contained in the Student Handbook.
GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM AND POSTMASTERS CERTIFICATION PROGRAM ADMISSION
Prospective students wishing to apply for one of our seven graduate degree programs
or two post-master’s certification programs should submit their application and supporting documentation to the Office of Graduate Studies.
The application and admissions requirements vary for each graduate program and are
described in detail in the graduate program section of this catalog. Details and forms
can also be found on the graduate studies website: www.stmartin.edu/gradstudies
• A graduate application.
• $50 application fee.
• Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended sent directly from
the institution to the Office of Graduate Studies.
Program-specific application materials listed on the program website or in the graduate program section of this catalog.
International students also must submit:
• Official TOEFL or IELTS score report sent directly to the Office of Graduate
Studies from the testing institution (Saint Martin’s Institution code is 4674).
• Official English translations of all transcripts (if language is other than English).
• Declaration of finances and proof of financial support (this is not required for
admission, but is required by USCIS for the issuance of the form I-20; submitting this form as part of the application process will speed the process of issuing
the I-20 if admitted).
International students also may be required to submit their transcripts to a credential
GRADUATE ADMISSION
21
evaluation service approved by Saint Martin’s University for evaluation. This is determined on a case-by-case basis.
GRADUATE NONMATRICULATED
STUDENT ADMISSION
Prospective students interested in taking graduate courses without enrolling in a degree program should submit the following:
• A graduate application with “nondegree seeking” selected as program.
• Official transcript showing proof of bachelor’s degree.
Enrollment in specific courses may require prior approval.
READMISSION OF FORMER SAINT MARTIN’S
UNIVERSITY GRADUATE STUDENTS
Students who have attended Saint Martin’s previously and left voluntarily (i.e., were
not suspended), should submit an Application for Re-Admission to the Office of
Graduate Studies if they have been away for more than one calendar year from the last
day of the semester or session last attended. This will require a $50 re-application fee.
Readmitted students will be subject to the degree requirements of the catalog that is
current at the time of their readmission.
Students who have attended another college or university during their absence from
Saint Martin’s University must submit official transcripts from each institution.
Students who have been away less than one year should contact the Office of Graduate Studies in order for their record to be reactivated so they may register for classes.
Students who have been suspended from Saint Martin’s University for poor academic
performance may appeal or seek reinstatement from the University’s Graduate Council. Details regarding the procedure to be followed are available in the Office of the
Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Students who have been dismissed from Saint Martin’s University for conduct or behavior may seek reinstatement from the Office of the Dean of Students. Details regarding the procedure to appeal for reinstatement after conduct-related dismissal are
available in the Office of the Dean of Students.
In all cases listed here, students are strongly advised to contact the Student Financial
Service Center at the same time and ask specifically what they need to do to reinstate
or reapply for financial aid.
EXTENDED LEARNING DIVISION ADMISSION
Applicants to graduate programs at the extended learning division apply following the
same procedures as main campus applicants. Counselors at the extended learning division generally can provide some assistance regarding graduate program admission;
however applicants can also contact the Office of Graduate Studies at the main campus.
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GRADUATE ADMISSION
The extended learning division at Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM) is primarily for
the benefit of active-duty service members and their families. Non-military-affiliated
students may attend Saint Martin’s JBLM campuses; however, program and course enrollment priority is always granted to the University’s military-affiliated students.
Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges Consortium: Saint Martin’s University is a
member of the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC) Consortium and the
SOC Degree Network System. The SOC Consortium consists of colleges and universities committed to expanding and improving voluntary postsecondary educational opportunities for servicemembers worldwide. SOC Consortium members subscribe to
principles and criteria to ensure that quality academic programs are available to activeduty military students, their family members, and veterans. A list of current SOC Consortium member institutions can be found on the SOC website at www.soc.aascu.org.
Yellow Ribbon Program: Saint Martin’s University is an approved institution for the
education and training of veterans. Saint Martin’s is a Yellow Ribbon Program school
and supporter of the Post 9/11 GI Bill. The University does not cap numbers of students
who can participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program. Yellow Ribbon benefits replace
other forms of Saint Martin’s financial assistance such as merit scholarships and grants.
Saint Martin’s also is a designated “Military Friendly School” and continues to be recognized every year for our service to the military community.
Students admitted to the University that are eligible to receive VA benefits must contact their respective veteran’s representative and submit the necessary paperwork for
certification. The student must submit a copy of their Certification of Eligibility sent by
the VA and must also complete and submit the Saint Martin’s Request for Certification
Form each term or semester to ensure continuous receipt of benefits prior to certification. Saint Martin’s University will not certify students in advance; students must be
registered with advisor approval. Saint Martin’s will not participate in accelerated pay
if the student is using Chapter 33. The VA pays directly to the school. Tuition and fees
should not be reported to the VA prior to bills being assessed to ensure accuracy of
costs. It is the students responsibility to promptly notify the VA representative of any
changes they make to their schedule including: withdrawals, adds and drops. Failure
to promptly report any changes to registration could lead to tan overpayment and the
student may be responsible for debt repayment.
Veterans Administration/Vocational rehabilitation: Applicants applying through
Veterans Administration or vocational rehabilitation programs should schedule an appointment with the program director or designated official of their degree program
and the veterans representative in the Office of the Registrar to complete all required
academic degree plans and necessary paperwork. Applicants to the University should
allow a minimum of two weeks from the time of their advising appointment for completion of transcript evaluation, academic degree program, financing documentation
and additional information.
FINANCIAL AID AND THE STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICE CENTER
23
FINANCIAL AID AND THE STUDENT
FINANCIAL SERVICE CENTER
Guided by the Benedictine values of hospitality and stewardship, the Student Financial
Service Center supports the University’s commitment to making Saint Martin’s financially accessible through a combination of reasonable tuition rates and generous financial aid. The University provides a comprehensive financial aid program that includes
scholarships, grants, employment and loans. Awards take into account a variety of circumstances — financial eligibility, academic performance, talent, or a combination of
these elements.
Since students and families have the primary responsibility to pay the cost of education,
financial aid exists to supplement the financial capability of the family. Saint Martin’s
University will partner with you every step of the way. Our role in this partnership,
guided by our Benedictine values, goes well beyond the scholarships and grants that may
be offered in your financial aid package.
APPLYING FOR FINANCIAL AID
The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is required to apply for financial
aid at Saint Martin’s University. The FAFSA application can be completed online at www.
fafsa.ed.gov after Jan. 1 of each year.
The Saint Martin’s University FAFSA code is 003794.
PRIORITY FAFSA APPLICATION DEADLINE:
• March 1st
TYPES OF AWARDS
Saint Martin’s University is part of the Federal Direct Loan Program. Students may apply for Federal Direct Loans to cover their educational expenses. Types of aid offered
include Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans and Graduate PLUS Loans.
For student loan assistance, the contribution toward college costs expected from the
student is calculated according to a federal mandated needs analysis system, which takes
into account many factors representing the student’s financial and family situation. Students must be enrolled half-time, a minimum of three (3) credit hours per semester in a
program leading to a degree or academic certificate to receive financial aid. Please note
that all Direct Loans are loan money and must be repaid.
Beginning July 1, 2012, graduate/professional students will only be eligible for Direct
Unsubsidized Stafford Loans. Direct Unsubsidized Loans are not based on financial
need and interest is charged during all periods. Students can borrow up to $20,500 in
Unsubsidized Stafford Loans each year.
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FINANCIAL AID AND THE STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICE CENTER
ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS
To be eligible to apply for and receive a student loan, a student must:
• Be a citizen of the United States or an eligible non-citizen.
• Be admitted to a regular degree program. Students classified as non-degree seeking are not eligible for federal student loans.
• Satisfy Selective Service requirements: see FAFSA for explanation.
• Not have defaulted student loans.
• File the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
• Enroll half-time with a minimum of three credit hours; cannot include credits
taken for enrichment or audit.
• Maintain satisfactory academic progress.
Students who do not maintain eligibility may be required to return all financial aid and
need to start the repayment process on any federal student loan they have received.
DIRECT UNSUBSIDIZED STAFFORD LOAN
Eligibility: Not need-based; must still file FAFSA
Amount: Cannot exceed $20,500 per academic year
Repayment: Begins six months after graduation or when student ceases to be enrolled
at least part-time. Borrowers are responsible for interest while enrolled and during the
repayment period. However, interest payments can be deferred while the student is enrolled and during their grace period.
GRADUATE PLUS LOANS
Eligibility: Not need-based; must still file FAFSA
Amount: Cannot exceed the cost of attendance
Repayment: The repayment period for a Grad PLUS borrower begins on the date of the
final disbursement of the loan, and the first payment is due within 60 days after the date
the loan is fully disbursed. Grad PLUS borrowers may receive a deferment while they
are enrolled on at least a half-time basis at an eligible school. Upon dropping to less than
half-time enrollment status, the borrower is not entitled to a grace period on his or her
Direct PLUS Loans.
Note: A Grad PLUS borrower must apply for an in-school deferment — deferment eligibility will not be determined automatically, as is possible with Federal Direct Subsidized Loans (Direct Subsidized Loans) and Direct Unsubsidized Loans. The Grad PLUS
borrower may apply for an in-school deferment by submitting an In-School Deferment
Request to the Direct Loan Servicing Center.
FINANCIAL AID AND THE STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICE CENTER
25
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCE APPEAL
If your family should experience one or more of the following situations, you may file a
special/unusual circumstance letter to update your information (those families who are
appealing will be required to submit a standard verification form):
• Loss of wages.
• Death of a parent or spouse.
• Divorce or separation.
• Retirement of a parent or spouse.
• Medical/dental that are exceptional or unexpected.
• K-12 private school tuition costs.
• Loss of child support.
• Support paid to extended family members.
• National or natural disaster.
Contact the Student Financial Services Office if you have questions about submitting a
special circumstance appeal.
Situations we cannot consider:
• Inability to liquidate assets.
• Consumer debt.
• Mortgage payment.
• Property taxes.
ZERO CREDITS EARNED
Students who earned zero credits (all grades of ‘XF’ or ‘W’) during a semester may be
subject to the return of all or a portion of their federal aid. If a formal date of withdrawal cannot be determined, the university will assume the student ceased participation in academic activities at the midpoint in the semester and will return 50 percent
of the student’s financial aid. The student will be responsible for any balance from the
loss of funding.
SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS
The Student Financial Service Center monitors Satisfactory Academic Progress
(SAP) for all students receiving federal, state and/or institutional financial aid. This
process is separate from the Academic Progress that is monitored by the Academic
Standards Committee.
26
FINANCIAL AID AND THE STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICE CENTER
When students accept financial aid, they also accept responsibility for making Satisfactory Academic Progress (note: the abbreviation SAP will be used interchangeably
throughout the document). This progress is based on the number of credits students
enroll in per semester, their term and cumulative grade point average(s) as well as the
length of enrollment at Saint Martin’s University in addition to any transfer courses
accepted by the University.
Please read all this information carefully. You are responsible for understanding
these requirements.
• Federal regulations stipulate that a student’s SAP is monitored even if they are not
receiving federal student aid.
• Students who are reinstated to the University are still required to submit an appeal and a copy of their reinstatement conditions to the Office of Student Financial Services.
If you have any questions or concerns regarding the requirements as described, contact
the Office of Student Financial Services.
What is SAP? Federal aand state financial aid regulations require that recipients of federal and state aid make Satisfactory Academic Progress toward the completion of a degree. Therefore, Saint Martin’s University student aid recipients, in addition to meeting
other financial aid eligibility criteria, must be in good academic standing and making
satisfactory progress in their degree program. The SAP policy must be as strict as, or
stricter, than the University’s academic progress policy. The SAP policy is reviewed on
an annual basis and if policy changes are made, they will then be updated and disseminated to the students.
Satisfactory Academic Progress is reviewed annually for all students at the conclusion of
spring semester. Students placed on probationary status for financial aid will have their
progress reviewed at the end of fall semester. Extension learning and MBA students are
reviewed on the same schedule: terms one and two comprising fall semester; and terms
three and four comprising spring semester.
Students will be evaluated on the following criteria:
1. Cumulative/term GPA: Graduate degree candidates are required to maintain a
term/cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0 or higher.
2. Number of credits student enrolls per semester: To be eligible for financial aid,
you must complete at least 67 percent of your overall attempted credits.
If you drop below the cumulative 67 percent completion rate you will be placed
on “warning” status and have one term to bring your completion rate above 67
percent before losing your eligibility for aid.
If you continue to maintain a completion rate below 67% rate, at the end of the
warning term your financial aid will be suspended. You may regain your eligibility
for aid if you successfully appeal or complete a term without receiving financial aid
and are no longer in suspension status. See example below.
FINANCIAL AID AND THE STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICE CENTER
Credits Attempted
Credits that must be completed
6 or More Credits (full-time)
Minimum of 6 Credits
3-5 Credits (half-time)
Minimum of 3 Credits
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3. Maximum Time Frame (length of enrollment at Saint Martin’s University):
• Maximum Time Frame restrictions placed on Graduate students outlined below
must be met to continue receiving financial aid.
• Maximum Time Frame restrictions are based upon the total credits attempted. All
terms, including summer, in which a student is enrolled count toward the maximum time frame, even if the student completely withdraws from the University.
• Terms of enrollment in which no aid is received will count towards the M
aximum
Time Frame limit. This includes transfer credit hours for which no aid was received.
Repeat courses — Courses count once in the calculation of attempted credit hours.
Therefore, a repeat of an ‘A,’ ‘B,’ ‘C,’ Pass, or ‘S’ will not count as additional credits unless
otherwise noted.
• Students repeating a course in which an ‘I’ or ‘XF’ was previously received will not
be funded.
• Students repeating courses in which a ‘C-’ or below was received can only repeat
the course once and be eligible for funding for that course.
• Students repeating previously withdrawn ‘W’ courses are only eligible for funding
one additional time for that course.
Audited courses — Audited courses do not count towards the release of a student’s
financial aid nor in the calculation of completed credit hours for SAP purposes.
Maximum time frame requirements for individual degree programs for receiving
aid are outlined below:
• Master of Business Administration (MBA): 54 attempted credit hours
• Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology (MAC): 72 attempted credit hours
• Master of Education (MED): 60 attempted credit hours
• Master in Teaching (MIT):
Elementary education: 92 attempted credit hours
Secondary education: 76 attempted credit hours
Special education: 110 attempted credit hours
• Master of Engineering Management (MEM): 45 attempted credit hours
• Master of Civil Engineering (MCE): 45 attempted credit hours
• Master of Mechanical Engineering (MME): 45 attempted credit hours
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FINANCIAL AID AND THE STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICE CENTER
TYPES OF FINANCIAL AID
Eligibility for financial aid at Saint Martin’s University is determined by a student’s academic record, financial eligibility determined by the FAFSA application, academic program, or a combination of these factors. Your award may include a combination of the
following:
Saint Martin’s assistantships, scholarships and grants:
• Athletic award – Offered to recruited athletes and at the discretion of the coaches.
• G
raduate assistantship – A limited number of graduate assistantships (GAs) are
available that provide partial tuition remission and/or a small stipend for graduate
students are awarded by the individual graduate programs and typically require
10 - 15 hours of work per week per semester.
• A
lumni Association scholarship – Competitive scholarship available for continuing undergraduate and graduate student awarded on the basis of academic
achievement, community service, leadership, and an essay. The applications is distributed by the Alumni Association in early spring semester and are due March 1
for awards for the following academic year.
• P
eter V. Vale MBA scholarship — Endowed scholarship for admitted or enrolled MBA students awarded on the basis of scholastic achievement, leadership,
character, citizenship and motivation. Applications are required and are available
from the MBA website or the School of Business administrative office and are due
March 1 for awards for the following academic year.
Federal grants:
• Federal TEACH Grant – A grant awarded to students who agree to teach for four
years as a highly-qualified teacher in a high-need field at a low-income school
after completing their degree. If the four-year service requirement is not met, the
funds must be repaid as an unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan.
Student loans:
• Unsubsidized Federal Direct Student Loan – Unsubsidized loans are available
to students regardless of financial need. At least half-time enrollment is required.
No payments are expected but interest will accrue while the student is enrolled.
OTHER MEANS FOR PAYING EDUCATIONAL COSTS
Other loans:
• Private or alternative loan – A non-need-based loan borrowed from a private
lender such as a bank or credit union.
• O
utside scholarships – Many scholarships are offered by businesses, foundations, and philanthropic organizations and we encourage you to apply for all
scholarships that might apply to you, even if they are small. Students are required
EXPENSES
29
to report any outside scholarships received. Saint Martin’s will not reduce University aid unless the amount falls under our Limit on Total Aid policy.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
For more information, please contact the Student Financial Service Center at 360-4384397 or [email protected] Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday,
with the exception of Wednesdays when the office is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The
Student Financial Service Center is located on Saint Martin’s Lacey campus, 5000 Abbey
Way SE, Lacey, Washington 98503.
EXPENSES
All fees are subject to change on 30 days’ notice.
GRADUATE TUITION RATES
Students should refer to the Office of Graduate Studies website for the most current
tuition information. Please note that tuition rates can vary according to program,
location, military status, course level and semester enrolled.
Final tuition charges are based on the student’s class schedule as recorded on the last day
for adding or changing classes, which is an official date listed in the academic calendar.
RESIDENCE CHARGES
1. Baran Hall Year/Semester
Double room charges:
(year $4,360 / semester $2,180)
Single room charges:
(year $4,910 / semester $2,455)
2. Spangler Hall Suites Double room charges:
Single room charges:
Super single charges:
(year $5,000 / semester $2,500)
(year $5,450 / semester $2,725)
(year $6,040 / semester $3,020)
3. Spangler Hall Apartments
Single room charges:
Single room charges (studio):
(year $6,540 / semester $3,270)
(year $6,840 / semester $3,420)
4. Burton Hall Apartments
Single room charges:
Double room charge:
(year $6,350/ semester $3,175)
(year $5,570 / semester $2,785)
5. Parsons Hall
Double room charges:
Single, shared bath, room charges:
Single, private bath, room charges:
Super single charges:
(year $5,000 / semester $2,500)
(year $5,750 / semester $2,875)
(year $6,250 / semester $3,125)
(year $4,320 / semester $2,160)
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EXPENSES
6. Board Charges
Gold Plan
Silver Plan
Bronze Plan
Commuter
(year $5,280 / semester $2,640)
(year $4,990 /semester $2,495)
(year $4,720 /semester $2,360)
(year $1,840 /semester $920)
For other housing options, contact the Office of Housing and Residence Life, 360-412-6163.
Residential programming fee: $10 per semester charged to all students residing on
campus in University residence halls
New residential student damage deposit/room reservation: $200.
Please see “Refund Policy” in this section of the academic catalog for a description of
refund policies for room damage deposits.
FEE SCHEDULE
All fees listed are 2014–2015 rates.
Student Services Fees
Student health insurance (nonrefundable): Estimated $2,220 per year for
student premium (family coverage is available provided the student is also
enrolled in the plan). Saint Martin’s University requires Lacey campus students who are enrolled at least half time to have health insurance coverage.
Students are encouraged to maintain any personal coverage they have. Those
who do not have personal coverage through a private insurer must purchase
health insurance through the University’s provider. Students who have
sufficient personal coverage may waive this fee by submitting a completed
online waiver form to the University’s insurance provider by the first day of
the semester. Waivers cannot be accepted after the deadline; if a student has
not submitted the form by the deadline, they will be responsible for the insurance charge. Details about completing the online waiver or about student
health insurance coverage can be found on the “Health Insurance” webpage
of Student Financial Services.
International student health insurance: International students are required
to have coverage while attending school in the U.S. and must contact the Office of International Programs and Development at 360-438-4504 for further
information.
Registration fees:
• Late validation fee (nonrefundable): $50 (charge effective after first day of class) if
payment or financial arrangements are not made prior to the beginning of the term
EXPENSES
31
Special fees:
•Matriculation Fee: $110 per semester. Some graduate programs require this fee
for non-enrolled students who are in the process of completing degree requirements.
•Continuing, non-enrolled student fee: This $50 fee per semester applies to nonregistered students completing degree requirements and wish to access O’Grady
Library, the Computer Resource Center and other University technology
services.
•Professional Development Certification fee: $300 – this fee is assessed to students who enroll in Student Teaching as required by the State of Washington
Payment
All fees are due and payable in full the week prior to the first day of the semester or
term.
Saint Martin’s University accepts the following methods of payment in person or
by mail: cash, check, money order or traveler’s check.
The following methods of payment are accepted online: VISA, MasterCard, Discover and American Express. A service fee of 2.5 percent is assessed at the time of
processing. Free electronic check (e-Check) payments are also accepted online. Credit
card payments are not accepted in person, by mail, phone, email or fax. For further
information, please contact the Student Financial Service Center, 360-438-4389.
Tuition payment plans. Monthly payment plans at Saint Martin’s are administered by
Tuition Management Systems (TMS). This plan has a small enrollment fee, but does
not charge interest. Students are encouraged to set up their plans early because the first
payment is often due in July or August before fall classes begin. Information is available from the Student Financial Service Center or online at www.afford.com/stmartin.
Questions? Please call the Student Financial Service Center at 360-438-4389 or email
[email protected] Center hours are Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday
from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The center is closed on
University observed holidays, and is located on Saint Martin’s Lacey campus, 5000
Abbey Way SE, Lacey, Washington 98503.
PROPERTY LOSS OR DAMAGE
Saint Martin’s University does not assume responsibility for loss of money, securities
or personal property held by students. Damage of school property is charged to the
responsible student or repaired at his or her expense.
32
EXPENSES
REFUND POLICY
General Information
Saint Martin’s University measures its classes in semester credits. The academic year on
the Lacey campus, the College of Education programs at Centralia College, and specific
Extended Learning Programs is divided into two semesters of 16 weeks each. Two sixweek summer terms also are offered, as well as eight and twelve-week terms, depending
on the program. The MBA program is offered through Saint Martin’s Extended Learning campuses at Joint Base Lewis-McChord and at the Lacey campus. This program is
scheduled in five eight-week terms. Refund procedures and calculations vary by campus
and by the term in which the student is enrolled. GoArmyEd students will follow the
8-week tuition refund policy regardless of where they are enrolled.
Action Required by Student
Students who wish to drop a class during the add/drop period must do so through their
Self Service account. Students wishing to withdraw from a class after the add/drop period
must do so through the Office of the Registrar.
Withdrawals from all classes after the add/drop date requires the completion of a Complete Withdrawal form available on the Office of the Registrar webpage.
Official Withdrawal — Date Determination
Date of drop is determined by the date the process is completed by the student through
Self Service. The course withdrawal date used is the date the Office of the Registrar receives the completed withdrawal form.
Complete withdrawal dates are determined by the date the Complete Withdrawal form
is received by the Office of the Registrar.
**Failure to attend class does not constitute an official withdrawal.**
Refund Calculations and Appeals
Refunds are based on total charges, not on amounts paid. Please note that if the student
is receiving financial aid, the Student Financial Service Center will determine whether
financial aid requires an adjustment. This is based on the Federal Return of Title IV
Funds Policy. Federal and state awards may have to be repaid before the student is eligible for a refund. The student is responsible for any balance remaining due to a withdrawal or aid adjustment.
Nonrefundable Fees
Some fees are nonrefundable and are listed in the FEE SCHEDULE section of the catalog.
Student health insurance is nonrefundable if the student withdraws after 45 days, as the
policy continues to provide coverage even though the student is no longer enrolled at the
University.
EXPENSES
33
Please see the “Room and Board” section of this academic catalog for descriptions of the
applicable refund policy.
Tuition Refunds
16-Week Full Term (GoArmyEd students: Please see 8-12 week refund schedule, below.)
Date of withdrawal
Percent of charges dropped
Prior to first day of term and from 1 to 10 calendar days........................................................................................100
From 11 to 17 calendar days..............................................................................................75
From 18 to 24 calendar days..............................................................................................50
From 25 to 31 calendar days..............................................................................................25
After 31 calendar days.......................................................................................................... 0
Eight- to 12-Week Term
(Includes enrollment in GoArmyEd 16 week term)
In compliance with the One Refund policy of GoArmyEd, Saint Martin’s University
has elected to use the eight-week refund schedule for all students enrolling through
GoArmyEd, regardless of course location or length of course. Therefore this policy
includes all Extended Learning sites and the Lacey campus for students enrolled through
GoArmyEd. The refund schedule is as follows:
Date of withdrawal
Percent of charges dropped
Prior to first day of term and from 1 to 8 calendar days..........................................................................................100
From 9 to 12 calendar days................................................................................................50
From 13 to 16 calendar days..............................................................................................25
After 16 calendar days.......................................................................................................... 0
Six-Week Term (Generally summer terms)
Date of withdrawal
Percent of charges dropped
Prior to and through the first class term ...................................................................... 100
Through 7 calendar days................................................................................................... 50
From 8 to 14 calendar days............................................................................................... 25
After 14 calendar days..........................................................................................................0
Refunds are paid within 30 days following the student’s official date of withdrawal,
expulsion or grant of a leave of absence, as documented by the University.
Room and Damage Deposit
Damage Deposit and Cancellation Fee
A refundable $200 damage deposit must be on file with the Student Financial Service
Center prior to the issuance of keys to the room.
34
EXPENSES
No portion of the $200 deposit will be refunded if:
• the contract is cancelled more than 30 days from the date it is signed or,
• the contract is cancelled after August 1, regardless of the date signed or,
• it is requested more than 30 days after officially checking out of the residence hall.
Reservations not claimed by noon of the fourth day of classes may be terminated by
the University. A resident who does not check out in accordance with the procedures
described in the Student Handbook will be subject to fines and/or forfeiture of all or
part of his/her deposit.
After taking occupancy, if the resident stays the entire contract period and applies to
return to the residence halls the following academic year, his/her damage deposit will
automatically be carried over to the following academic year.
A $300 cancellation fee is charged if the contract is terminated after the fall semester
add/drop deadline.
Board Refund
Meal plans may be selected and changed by written request before the add/drop date,
but no changes can be made thereafter. Fall meal plan balances carry over to spring
with the purchase of a traditional meal plan (Bronze, Silver or Gold). At the end of
the spring semester, all balances expire. If a student leaves housing or the University
before the end of the semester, board charges are prorated at a daily rate based on
the ratio of full days used (to and including the official withdrawal date) to total days
covered by the student’s board contract. Please refer to the Saint Martin’s University
dining services brochure or visit www.cafebonappetit.com/saintmartin for additional
meal plan policy information.
Room Refund
Room charges are prorated if a student officially withdraws from the University and
checks out according to contract by the 30th day of the semester. Room charges are
not refundable if a student is not leaving the University or if the student withdraws
after the 30th day of the semester. Additionally, a $300 cancellation fee is charged
if this contract is terminated after the University’s fall semester add/drop deadline.
The room damage deposit may be refunded only after written application to the Office of Housing and Residence Life. The application must be received no later than 30
days after a student officially stops living in the residence hall.
The deposit is refundable if:
a) The resident follows the check-out policy outlined in the Student Handbook.
b)Room keys are properly checked in with the Office of Housing and Residence Life.
c)No damages or excess cleaning charges are associated with the resident’s
room at check-out.
d)The resident does not have an outstanding balance on their student account.
EXTENDED LEARNING DIVISION
35
e)The student fulfills the Housing Contract Terms of Residence and does not
cancel his/her reservation more than 30 days from the date it is signed or
after August 1.
EXTENDED LEARNING DIVISION
Saint Martin’s University operates accelerated eight-week session extended learning
division at Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM), Centralia College, Everett Community
College and Tacoma Community College. The Centralia College extended learning
division (for education programs) operates on the same semester academic schedule
as the Lacey campus. Please see the Lacey campus schedule for academic start dates.
Undergraduate, graduate and teacher certification courses are taught at the JBLM extended learning division and are primarily for the benefit of armed forces personnel
and the affiliated military community.
Degree Options for Extended Learning Division
The following certificate and graduate degree options are offered at the Joint Base
Lewis-McChord extended learning division:
Elementary or secondary teacher residency certification: Note – a bachelor’s
degree is required prior to enrolling in this program.
Graduate degrees:
• Master of Business Administration (start date not final as of this publication)
• Master in Teaching (elementary, secondary, special education)
• Master of Education (special education, ELL)
The Centralia College extended learning division offers graduate-level coursework
that applies toward a Master in Teaching or Master of Education as well as courses in
endorsement areas.
Applications are accepted from military personnel, prior military personnel and
civilians. Applicants for graduate programs at the extended learning division follow
the same admissions procedures as students on the Lacey campus.
Registration for Extended Learning Division
The Saint Martin’s University extended learning division at Joint Base Lewis-McChord offers courses on an accelerated, five-session academic year (semester hours)
schedule. Sessions are eight weeks in length.
36
EXTENDED LEARNING DIVISION
Session Dates
2014 Fall 1
Fall 11 August 11 – October 6
October 20 – December 18
2015 Spring 1 Jan. 5 – March 4
Spring 11 March 16 – May 9
Summer May 18 – July 13
Registration dates can be found on the Registrar’s website.
Lacey Campus Students
Students enrolled in a degree program at the University’s Lacey campus will be permitted to take undergraduate courses at the extended campuses only with the approval of their respective student advisor, the dean of the student’s school or college,
and the dean of the academic unit that offers the course. Enrollment is on a spaceavailable basis only.
Class Loads for Extended Learning Division
For programs on an eight week term schedule, the maximum is nine (9) semester credits
in any session and a total of thirteen (13) credits for the semester. Any exception to this
requires explicit approval. A written request must be submitted including: a.) the specific
request, b.) a justification for why the exception is needed, and c.) a justification for why
the exception is realistic. The request requires the approval of the Program Director and
the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies.
For graduate program students using Veterans Administration benefits, enrollment in
three semester hours per session is considered full-time.
To be considered a full-time student for financial aid purposes, a graduate student must
be enrolled for a combined total of six semester hours in fall sessions one and two, and a
combined total of six semester hours in spring sessions one and two.
Withdrawal Policy for Extended Learning Division
A student may withdraw from a course by completing a withdrawal form at an extended
campus office. A “W” will be recorded on the student’s transcript. The last day to withdraw from a course is the last day of an academic term’s fifth week.
Tuition Refund Policy for Extended Learning Division
A percentage of tuition will be dropped if a student withdraws from a class. The refund
amount depends on when the withdrawal occurs, as indicated below. There are no
tuition refunds for distance learning courses after the start of classes.
EXTENDED LEARNING DIVISION
37
Eight-week term
Date of withdrawal
Percent of charges dropped
1 to 8 calendar days........................................................................................................... 100
9 to 12 calendar days........................................................................................................... 50
13 to 16 calendar days......................................................................................................... 25
After 16 calendar days...........................................................................................................0
GoARMYEd Student Refund Policy
The following refund schedule for GoArmyEd students was implemented following GoArmyEd regulations which do not allow universities to follow more than one
refund schedule. Saint Martin’s University is using the eight-week refund schedule
for all students enrolling through GoArmyEd, regardless of course location. Thus,
GoArmyEd students at all extension sites and the Lacey campus will follow the following refund schedule:
Date of withdrawal
Percent of charges dropped
1 to 8 calendar days........................................................................................................... 100
9 to 12 calendar days........................................................................................................... 50
13 to 16 calendar days......................................................................................................... 25
After 16 calendar days...........................................................................................................0
Sixteen-week session: Same as 16-week session on Lacey campus; see previous tuition
refund schedule.
39
ACADEMIC
INFORMATION
40
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS
AND AREAS OF STUDY
For undergraduate majors and areas of study, please see the undergraduate catalog.
Residency teaching certificate (certificate only programs):
• Elementary education
• Secondary education
• Special education
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Master in Teaching (MIT)
Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology (MAC)
Master of Business Administration (MBA)
Master of Civil Engineering (MCE)
Master of Education (MED)
Master of Engineering Management (MEM)
Master of Mechanical Engineering (MME)
Post-Master’s Certification – School Administration
Post Master’s Certification – ESA Guidance and Counseling
Semester system: A semester hour of credit is given for attending one class period a
week for at least 15 weeks or the equivalent in other time blocks. The standard for the
duration of a lecture class period is 50 minutes. Two to three hours of outside preparation is expected of the student for each lecture class period.
Course number classifications: The University gives credit for all courses numbered
100 through 699 in each academic department.
• Courses at the 100-200 level generally provide a foundation or overview of a
discipline. They are intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores.
• Courses at the 300-400 level frequently assume prior knowledge of the field
and a higher level of analysis and difficulty. They are intended primarily for
juniors or seniors.
• Courses at the 500-600 level are considered graduate courses. They generally
involve individual research projects, critical discussion of issues and oral
presentations.
Attendance: Students are expected to attend all classes for which they are registered.
Decisions regarding absences from class are left to the individual instructor.
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
41
The student must initiate withdrawal from a course. Work missed because of late registration, illness or any other reason must be completed. The student is responsible
for contacting the instructor to make arrangements.
Commencement: There is one commencement ceremony per year, at the end of
the spring semester. Those students who complete their graduation requirements in
August, December and May are welcome to participate.
The JBLM campus commencement ceremony for students serving in the military
takes place in May. JBLM students wishing to attend both the JBLM and Lacey campus ceremonies may choose to do so. Students enrolled through Centralia College,
Everett Community College or Tacoma Community College participate in the spring
ceremony on the Lacey campus.
In order to participate in commencement related exercises and to be considered for
degree conferral, students must apply for commencement by the deadline set by
the Office of the Registrar. An application fee of $50 is assessed each time a student
applies for commencement. It is non-refundable, and it must be paid along with any
other fees in order to graduate.
Graduate student advising: Academic advising is the responsibility of both faculty
members and the student. Faculty members are prepared to help students explore
various career choices, explain University requirements and provide guidance in
selecting classes.
Advisors are expected to provide accurate information to students and help them
make informed choices about programs and courses. Students, however, are responsible for keeping themselves informed about policies, policy revisions, academic and
graduation requirements and for seeking help from their advisor.
Student responsibility: Students are responsible for meeting academic regulations.
They also are expected to truthfully complete all documents pertaining to their University studies and activities. Failure to do so may constitute grounds for disciplinary
action.
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Registration: No student will receive credit for any course in which he or she is not
registered. After a student has registered for classes, changes in his or her courses or
class sections must be properly approved and recorded by the registrar.
Late validation: All students, no matter which campus they are enrolled at or if their
classes are online, must pay in full or have financial arrangements completed by the
first day of the semester/term. This includes students who are receiving financial aid
or sponsored assistance. Failure to complete this financial obligation will result in a
late validation fee of $50.
42
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Change of registration:
For classes on the semester schedule – Dates relating to the student’s ability to add,
drop or withdraw from courses can be found on the University’s Academic Calendar
and the registrar’s website. Individual graduate programs may have policies that
restrict the add/drop period further. Graduate students should check with their specific program for the policy for add/drop deadlines. Official withdrawal from courses
is permitted until one week after mid-semester.
For classes on the term schedule– Adding or dropping classes on the term schedule
may be done only from the first through the eighth calendar day of a term. Official
withdrawal from courses is permitted until the last day of the term’s fifth week.
Switching from undergraduate to graduate– Students enrolled in undergraduate
courses wishing to switch to the graduate level course must do so during the add/
drop period for the respective term.
Enrollment: All students are expected to report to campus on the date officially
listed in the Saint Martin’s University Academic Catalog. New students will not be
admitted unless they have received official notice of acceptance from the Office
of Graduate Studies. Individuals can be registered as either full-time or part-time
students. A full-time student is one carrying a minimum of six semester hours of
academic credits per semester.
Schedule Limitations: To be considered full-time, a student must be enrolled for six
(6) semester hours of credit with a maximum of thirteen (13) semester credits per
semester. For programs on an eight week term schedule, the maximum is nine (9)
semester credits in any session and a total of thirteen (13) credits for the semester.
Any exception to this requires explicit approval. A request to exceed maximum credits hours form must be submitted including: a.) the specific request, b.) a justification
for why the exception is needed, and c.) a justification for why the exception is realistic. The request requires the approval of the Program Director and the Associate
Dean of Graduate Studies.
Advancement to candidacy: The admission of a student to graduate study does
not imply admission to candidacy for an advanced degree. The major department
in which the student intends to become a candidate for a master’s degree must be
satisfied as to the student’s sound basic training and the ability to pursue studies at
the graduate level. In general, students complete a minimum of 12 to 18 semester
hours of coursework before review or application for admission to candidacy. Each
program determines the particular format for the admission to candidacy and/or the
particular time frame in which it is to occur.
Nonmatriculated graduate students: An individual may be admitted as a nonmatriculated graduate student. Examples would include individuals enrolled in another
institution wishing to take classes for transfer to their home institution; individuals
taking classes, but not a specific degree or certificate program for professional development; or those taking classes because of interest or for personal enrichment. Please
note, however, first enrollment priority will be given to degree-seeking students and
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
43
permission of the program director and the instructor are required.
Since no program admission is implied, admission as a nonmatriculated graduate
student will be processed by the Office of Graduate Studies following guidelines in
the basic requirements for admission. Nonmatriculated students will then be able to
register for classes pending the permission of the program director and instructor on a
space-available basis.
There is no limit to the total number of credits that may be taken by a nonmatriculated
graduate student. However, normally a maximum of nine semester credits taken as a
nonmatriculated graduate student may be applied to a Saint Martin’s University graduate program, should the student decide to apply for program admission. Limits for the
number of credits that may be taken in a semester or term are the same as for graduate
students enrolled in a degree or certificate program.
Nonmatriculated graduate students may take those graduate courses for which they
have met the prerequisite requirements. If a course is one for which program admission is required, authorization to enroll in that class requires the permission of the
appropriate program director.
Time to degree completion, continuity of enrollment, readmission: The amount
of time permitted to complete a graduate degree is seven (7) years from the registration in the first course to be included in the degree or certificate program. For this
purpose, enrollment in prerequisite courses that do not count toward the degree
does not trigger the timeline, for example 500 level courses for the MBA.
Students working toward a degree at Saint Martin’s University are expected to meet
the graduation requirements contained in the academic catalog in effect for the year
in which they begin coursework toward the degree. No student may use requirements in a catalog older than seven years prior to the date of his or her graduation.
When a student is admitted, the catalog in effect at the time of the initial enrollment
in courses counting for the degree will normally govern graduation requirements
as long as no break in attendance of greater than one year has occurred. If there is a
break in enrollment exceeding one year, the catalog in effect at the time of readmission will normally govern graduation requirements.
Graduate students with a break of more than one year in registration will be required
to apply for readmission. Students who do not have an approved Leave of Absence
on file will be subject to the application fee in effect at the time of application for
readmission. A student who was not in good academic standing (probation or suspension) must provide evidence to support the likelihood that readmission would be
expected to lead to successful program completion.
The candidate for readmission must submit official transcripts of any college-level
work completed since the last registration in Saint Martin’s as part of the readmission
process.
Enrollment at other colleges: Students enrolled full-time at Saint Martin’s University must gain prior approval before enrolling at another college, university or
44
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
institution of higher learning while attending Saint Martin’s.
Grades: Grades are issued at the end of the semester and at the end of summer session.
For courses on the term schedule, grades are issued at the end of the designated term.
Grades are awarded on the following basis:
Grade Value per Credit
A 4.00
A- 3.67
B+ 3.33
B 3.00
B- 2.67
C+ 2.33
C 2.00
C- 1.67
D+ 1.33
D 1.00
D- 0.67
F 0.00
‘W’ (withdrawal) not computed in grade point average (GPA)
‘AU’ (audit) not computed in GPA (students are enrolled in and are expected to complete all assignments unless other arrangements are made by
the instructor)
‘I’ (incomplete) not computed in GPA
‘IP’ (in progress) not computed in GPA; used only for master thesis or
internships
‘P’ (pass) not computed in GPA
IP (In Progress): The “IP” grade is used only for graduate thesis courses that, by
the nature of the requirements involved, cannot be completed or graded at the end
of a given term. Faculty members may assign “IP” to extend the time permitted for
the completion of research or course requirements. The student must be making
satisfactory progress in the course to receive a grade of “IP”. A student awarded an
“IP” grade must continuously re-enroll in a “Thesis/Practicum: In Progress” course.
The “Thesis: In Progress” course is a zero credit course used to notate progress. The
final grade will be submitted by the faculty member at the end of the term in which
the work is completed. In the case of an “IP” grade for the thesis or internship, a
student who does not complete his/her thesis or internship during his/her period of
candidacy will have the “IP” grade changed to an F. A $110 matriculation fee will be
assessed each time a student registers for a “Thesis: In Progress” course.
Grade point average: GPA (grade point average) is computed by dividing the total
number of graduate level grade points by the total number of graduate level semester
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
45
hours attempted (excluding pass/fail credits). (If a program permits taking undergraduate courses for graduate credit, those courses will be included in the calculation.) The cumulative grade point average represents the student’s performance for
all graduate courses completed. The Saint Martin’s University transcript reflects Saint
Martin’s University grade point only and is so labeled.
Transfer “C” Grades: Transfer ‘C’ grades are not accepted for graduate level credit
or to satisfy Saint Martin’s University graduation requirements.
Pass/Fail grades: The pass/fail grade option may be allowed within the limits of the
following guidelines:
• A
grade of ‘P” (pass) may be given for specific courses. Normally, these will be workshops, independent studies, directed studies and internships/student teaching.
• U
nder special circumstances — and with approval of the student, instructor, advisor
and department chair — a course may be taken pass/fail.
• P
ass/fail courses may be taken only with prior knowledge and agreement of the
student and instructor.
• A
student wishing to take a course for graded credit when the course is designated
pass/fail must request the change of grade status at the time of registration and obtain
the instructor’s permission prior to the second class session.
• The equivalent of a ‘B-’ or better is required for a pass grade
Request for an incomplete grade: The grade of ‘I’ means incomplete and is given
for work which is of passing quality but which, because of circumstances beyond the
student’s control, is not complete. A student must request an incomplete grade in
writing prior to the last week of the semester. The request must be submitted on the
University ‘I’ Grade Request Form to the course instructor and must specify the reason for the request. The issuance of the grade of ‘I’ is at the discretion of the faculty
member teaching the course. The approved ‘I’ Grade Request Form must include
specific work required to remove the incomplete. If the instructor approves, the Office of the Registrar must receive a copy of the ‘I Grade Request Form.’
Removal of an incomplete grade: The removal of an “Incomplete” (‘I’) is the stu-
dent’s responsibility. All coursework must be completed by the end of the regular semester (fall or spring) following the semester in which the ‘I’ was granted. An ‘I’ will
remain on the student’s transcript for one regular semester (fall or spring) beyond
the semester in which the “Incomplete” was entered. At the conclusion of that one
semester, the grade of ‘I’ will be converted into a grade of ‘F’ unless the instructor has
submitted a grade change.
Change of grade: If a teacher discovers an error in the recording or calculation of
a student’s final grade, an amended grade report may be filed with the Office of the
Registrar. In all other cases, the respective academic unit dean and the vice president
for academic affairs must approve a “Change of Grade Request.”
46
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Process for filing a grievance about a course procedure or a grade: Academic
problems related to a course, a professor or a grade should be solved at the lowest
level possible. If the problem cannot be resolved directly between the student and the
faculty member involved or if the student is unable to confront the faculty member
involved, then the following steps may be taken.
It is the intent of the procedure that a student be given a fair hearing and provided with
a resolution process that protects the rights and recognizes the responsibilities of both
the affected student and the faculty member(s).
NOTE: For complaints or problems that include possible harassment and/or discrimination, please refer to the Student Conduct and Policies section of the current
Student Handbook.
For students at the Lacey campus:
1 . The student should address the issue directly with the faculty member or members
involved in a timely manner. For example, if the student is given a grade that he or she
thinks is unwarranted, he or she should ask the faculty member for clarification about
grading criteria and his or her evaluation of coursework immediately after receiving
the grade in question.
2. If the complaint remains unresolved, the student should take a written explanation of the situation and copies of relevant documents to the dean of the faculty
member’s academic unit or the director of the graduate program. A student can obtain the name and location of the dean directly from the Office of Academic Affairs
at the University’s main campus in Lacey (Old Main 269; telephone 360-438-4310).
The dean or director will read the written explanation and related documentation
and consult with the dean, director or department chair of the course in question.
The dean or chair will investigate the details of the complaint as necessary and appropriate. The dean, director or chair will then provide the student with a written
response and explanation regarding the findings in a timely manner. Copies of that
response will be filed with the academic unit dean, the instructor and the department chair of the course in question.
3. If the academic unit dean or graduate program director is the faculty member
involved in the complaint or if the complaint cannot be resolved with the dean or
graduate program director, then the student should take the complaint to the vice
president for academic affairs at the main campus in Lacey (Old Main 269; 360438-4310). The vice president for academic affairs will read the student’s written
explanation and related documentation. The vice president for academic affairs will
investigate the details of the complaint as necessary and appropriate.
The vice president will provide the student with a written response and explanation
regarding the findings in a timely manner. Copies of that response will be filed with
the academic unit dean, the instructor and the department chair of the course in
question. Decisions of the vice president for academic affairs are final.
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
47
Procedure for students at extended learning division:
1. The student should address the issue directly and in a timely manner with the faculty member involved. For example, if the student is given a grade that he or she
believes is unwarranted, the student should ask the faculty member for clarification
about grading criteria and his/her evaluation of the assignment immediately after receiving the grade in question.
2. If the complaint remains unresolved, the student should take a written explanation of the situation and copies of relevant documents to the University’s director of
extension programs (David L. Stone Education Center, Joint Base Lewis-McChord;
253-964-4688).
The director will read the student’s written explanation and related documentation
and will consult with the academic unit dean of the course in question. The director or
dean will investigate the details of the complaint as necessary and appropriate.
The director or dean then will give the student a written response and explanation
regarding the findings in a timely manner. Copies of that response will be filed with
the director of extension programs, the instructor and the academic unit dean of the
course in question.
3. Decisions can be appealed using the same process to the vice president for academic
affairs at the main campus (Old Main 269; 360-438-4310). Decisions of the vice president for academic affairs are final.
Student Right-to-Know Act: Saint Martin’s University adheres to the require-
ments of the Federal Student Right-to-Know Act in providing certain information
about the University. Information on the institution, academics, financial assistance,
graduation rates, institutional security policies and crime statistics, athletic program
participation rates and financial support data is available on the University website,
www.stmartin.edu. For questions or additional information, please contact the Office
of Admission, 360-438-4485.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act: Saint Martin’s University is in
compliance with the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of
1974. The University guarantees each student the right to inspect and review his or
her personal educational records. For more information, visit www2.ed.gov/policy/
gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html.
Notification of rights under Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act for Postsecondary Institutions
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) provides students certain
rights with respect to their Saint Martin’s University records. These rights include:
• The right to inspect and review his or her education records within 45 days of the day
the University receives a written request for access. A written request that identifies
the record(s) they wish to inspect can be submitted to the registrar, dean, head
48
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
of the academic department or other appropriate official. The University official
will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place
where the records can be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the
University official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise
the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
• The right to request amendment to education records the student believes to be
inaccurate. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by
the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the
student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment.
Additional information regarding hearing procedures will be provided to the
student when notified of their right to a hearing.
• The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained
in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes
disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without
consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A
school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research role or a support staff position (including law
enforcement unit personnel and health staff members); a person or company
with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor or collection agent); a person serving on the University’s board of trustees; or a student
serving on an official committee such as a disciplinary or grievance committee or
a student who is assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A
school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review
an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.
• The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning
alleged failures by Saint Martin’s University to comply with the requirements of
FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: Family
Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, D.C., 20202-4605.
Withdrawals
Withdrawal from Courses at Lacey Campus: A student may withdraw from a
course by securing a withdrawal form from the Office of the Registrar, obtaining the
signatures of his or her advisor and returning the com¬pleted form to the Office of
the Registrar. Withdrawal from a course will be reflected on the student’s transcript
as a “W.”
Each semester, the Office of the Registrar announces the date for the official last day
to withdraw from a course. This date can be found on the Academic Calendar and
the registrar’s website.
Withdrawal from Courses at Extended Campuses: A student may withdraw
from a course by completing a withdrawal form at an ex¬tended campus office. A
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
49
“W” will be recorded on the student’s transcript. The last day to withdraw from a
course is the last day of the term’s fifth week.
Complete Withdrawal from the University: Students wishing to completely
withdraw from the University must obtain a withdrawal form from the Office of the
Registrar, obtain the signatures of his or her advisor and then return the completed
form to the Office of the Registrar. Students requesting a complete withdrawal from
all of their courses must submit the Complete Withdrawal Request in addition to the
withdrawal form.
A student withdraws in good standing if he or she is not dismissed for scholarship
deficiencies and/or is not on academic probation at the time of withdrawal.
Leaves of Absence
Leaves of absence are types of withdrawals granted to students on the basis of extenuating personal situations.
mergency Leave Of Absence: Saint Martin’s University students are expected to
E
manage their academic schedules and withdraw from any courses they are unable to
complete by the deadlines provided in the normal academic schedule. The University
will, however, consider requests for an emergency leave of absence from a student
who experiences an urgent personal situation, such as a death or serious illness in
the immediate family, which requires the student to withdraw from all courses at the
University after the regular academic deadline for withdrawal. Documentation of the
serious nature of the emergency must be provided to the Dean of Students.
When an emergency leave of absence is granted, the course grade awarded is
normally a W (withdrawn) in all courses unless the student initiates and receives appropriate approval for an incomplete (I) grade in any course. If the student is granted
an incomplete (I) grade, he or she must complete the requirements of the courses
according to the guidelines specified by the instructor and policy outlined in the
academic catalog.
Voluntary Medical Leave Of Absence: Saint Martin’s University will consider
requests for a voluntary medical leave of absence from a student experiencing a
physical or mental health-related condition which impairs his or her ability to function safely or successfully as a student and requires the student’s withdrawal during
a semester or an absence of one or more semesters from the University. Voluntary
medical leaves of absence are coordinated through the Dean of Students. Students
granted medical leaves of absence are expected to use the time away from the University for treatment and recovery.
Applications for medical leave for the current semester must be submitted no later
than the last day of classes as published in the academic calendar. Students with
significant health issues that arise during the final exam period should contact their
academic dean’s office, and may also wish to apply for a medical leave for the following semester. Documentation of the serious nature of the health condition must be
50
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
provided by a certified medical or mental health professional. Requests for leave are
considered by the Dean of Students or designee, who may meet with the student and
consult with the Counseling and Wellness Center and other relevant professionals
and/or campus administrators as appropriate, before recommending or approving
the leave.
When a medical leave of absence is granted, the course grade awarded is normally
a W (withdrawn) in all courses unless the student initiates and receives appropriate approval for an incomplete (I) grade in any course. If the student is granted
an incomplete (I) grade, he or she must complete the requirements of the courses
according to the guidelines specified by the instructor and policy outlined in the
academic catalog
Students must move out of residence within seven days of approval of the medical
leave of absence. Students are not eligible to participate in student employment effective the date of approval of the medical leave of absence and for the duration of their
medical leave.
Students must contact the Dean of Students to request an application to return from
a medical leave of absence, with sufficient advance notice to complete the application and approval process before the beginning of the semester in which the student
wishes to return. The Dean of Students or designee considers the approval of return
from leave, and may consult with the Counseling and Wellness Center, other relevant
professionals and/or campus administrators, before recommending or approving the
leave. The student must receive approval to return from leave before registering for
courses or applying for on-campus residence for the semester.
The application to return must include supporting documentation from the student’s
treating medical or mental health professional, providing evidence that the health
condition has been addressed and that the student is capable of resuming study and
functioning safely as a member of the University community. Depending on the
individual circumstances of the medical leave, the student may be asked to provide
additional documentation concerning the nature and duration of treatment, recommendations for ongoing care once the student has returned from leave, or to provide
releases to the Counseling and Wellness Center to allow communication with treatment providers, the Dean of Students, and/or the Behavioral Intervention Team,
regarding the student’s safe return to campus.
Depending upon the individual circumstances of the medical leave, the student may
also be asked to provide a brief statement describing:
• The student’s experience away from the University, including the activities
undertaken while on leave;
• The student’s current understanding of the factors leading to the need for the
leave, and the insights the student has gained from treatment and time away; and
• How the student plans to ensure a successful return to the University.
If the return from leave is approved, the Dean of Students will contact the student to
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
51
request a check-in visit to review the student’s safety and review their plan for sustained health, including recommendations for ongoing treatment, on or off-campus.
Students with disabilities may be eligible for reasonable accommodations and/or
special services in accordance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans
with Disabilities Act. Students are responsible for communicating their requests for
academic accommodation to Disability Support Services.
If the Dean of Students determines, after considering the student’s application and
supporting documentation, that the student is not ready to return to the University,
the student will be advised of that decision in writing. The written response to the
student will also include recommendations to enhance the student’s chance of approval the next time the student’s request is considered. Involuntary Medical Leave Of Absence: In appropriate circumstances, Saint Martin’s University may take extraordinary actions to protect personal or community
safety.
Threats to Self or Others: In the event that the University is presented with a credible report that a student has: (a) threatened or attempted suicide; (b) engaged in
efforts to prepare to commit suicide; (c) expressed a preoccupation with suicide;
(d) threatened to inflict serious harm upon another; (e) engaged in efforts to obtain
weapons or other dangerous items in order to inflict serious harm upon another; (f)
expressed a preoccupation with harming others; or (g) engaged in other behavior
that poses a significant danger of causing substantial harm to the health or safety
of the student or others, the University may require the student to participate in
a professional assessment with a licensed counselor, psychiatrist, psychologist, or
physician. These sessions are designed to foster the students’ willingness and ability
to maintain a reasonable concern for their own welfare and the welfare of others.
Involuntary Leave: In addition to the above actions to prevent threats of harm,
the University may consider imposing an involuntary leave from the University’s
academic program, housing, or other aspect of the University’s services. Involuntary
leave is intended to be invoked only in extraordinary circumstances, when a student
is unable or unwilling to take a voluntary leave of absence. When the University considers imposing an involuntary leave, the Dean of Students will initiate the following
procedures:
1. The Dean of Students or designee will notify the student that an involuntary leave
is being considered; whether the leave being considered would require leave from
the academic program, housing, and/or other University services, and the reasons
that an involuntary leave is being considered. The student shall have the opportunity to respond with information that he/she believes should be considered.
2. The Dean of Students or designee will direct the student to this policy and will
encourage the student to agree to a voluntary leave of absence, thereby eliminating
the need to complete the process for an involuntary leave.
3. The Dean of Students or designee will confer with others as may be appropriate
52
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
to obtain information relevant to the University’s determination of whether an
involuntary leave is necessary.
4. The Dean of Students or designee will consider whether the student’s actions are
disruptive of the learning environment, pose a threat to the safety of others, and/
or pose a direct threat to the safety of the student himself/herself. They will also
consider accommodations that may be provided that would mitigate the need for
an involuntary leave. The consideration must be based upon the student’s conduct,
actions, and statements, and not merely upon speculation, a remote risk of harm,
or the knowledge or belief that the student is an individual with a disability.
5. The University may require the student to undergo a mental or physical examination if doing so is likely to facilitate a more informed decision. Additionally, in
order to assist with judging the risk of harm, the University may request authorization to consult with the healthcare professionals that are or have provided services
to the student.
6. Following these consultations and examinations (if any), the Dean of Student or
designee will make a decision regarding the involuntary leave of absence and will
provide written notice of the decision to the student.
If involuntary leave is imposed, the notice shall identify whether the student is being
withdrawn from the academic program, campus housing, and/or other University
services and the time when the student must depart from campus (if applicable),
and the steps that must be taken when the student wishes to re-enroll. While on
involuntary leave, the student may visit campus only as specified in the notice, or as
otherwise authorized in writing by the Dean of Students or designee.
If involuntary leave is not imposed, the University may impose conditions and/or
requirements under which the student is allowed to remain enrolled in the University’s programs.
The University reserves the right to notify a parent, guardian, or other person, of
the circumstances leading to the consideration of involuntary leave, if notification is
deemed appropriate. In addition, if leave is imposed, the parent, guardian, or other
person may be asked to make arrangements for the safe removal of the student from
campus.
After an involuntary leave, a formal request for reinstatement must be submitted to
the Dean of Students who will decide whether or not to approve the reinstatement.
The Dean of Student may condition reinstatement upon receipt of a certification
from one or more appropriate healthcare professional(s) providing evidence that
the behavior that precipitated the need for the involuntary leave has been ameliorated and that the student is able to participate in the University’s programs without
disruption of the learning environment and without posing a threat to personal or
community safety.
This involuntary medical leave policy is not intended to take the place of disciplinary
actions under Saint Martin’s University Student Code of Conduct, and does not pre-
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
53
clude sanctions, including the removal or dismissal of students from the University,
University residence halls, or other University facilities or services, for violations of
the Code of Conduct or other University policies
Transfer Credit
Up to nine semester hours of graduate work may be taken at another institution and
transferred for inclusion in a Saint Martin’s University graduate program. To be eligible for transfer, the credit must have been pre-approved in writing by the program
director and earned at a regionally accredited university (or the equivalent). Only
those classes for which a grade of ‘B’ or higher is earned may be accepted for transfer.
Transfer for credits earned prior to admission to Saint Martin’s University as a graduate student must be reviewed at the time of application to ensure full consideration.
Students enrolled in a Saint Martin’s University graduate program who wish to take
classes at another university must seek prior approval from his or her graduate program director and the Office of Graduate Studies in order for those credits to count
towards a Saint Martin’s University degree or certificate.
Individual programs may have additional expectations.
Repeating Courses
Only a course in which a grade of ‘C’ or lower was earned may be repeated. The highest grade received will be used in computing cumulative grade point average, and
credit will be allowed only once toward fulfilling graduation requirements.
Directed Study
Directed study is designed for students who wish to research and study a topic not
covered in a course offering or to explore a topic in greater depth.
The student, in consultation with an advisor and course instructor, initiates a directed
study. The instructor’s role is to aid the student in defining the topic, suggesting resource materials and evaluating student achievement. Together, they must complete
a detailed outline, “A Proposal of Directed Study,” before the student registers for the
directed study. Students taking a directed study must schedule regular meetings with
the faculty supervisor at the outset of the study.
Respective academic departments define how many hours of directed study will be
assigned and will approve topics and content.
Directed studies are not appropriate for regular catalog courses (see Independent
Study section).
Graduate students must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 to be eligible to
apply for directed study.
Additional requirements for Directed Study are provided on the Directed Study Request form.
54
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Independent Study
In unusual circumstances, an independent study enables a student to take a course
listed in the catalog on an individualized basis. Requirements are similar to those for
Directed Study and are provided on the Independent Study Request Form.
Transcripts
The official permanent academic records for all Saint Martin’s University students are
in the custody of the Office of the Registrar. A transcript is a copy of the student’s
permanent record. An official transcript is one bearing the University seal, the official
signature of the registrar and is either kept in a sealed envelope or electronically delivered to someone other than the student. An unofficial transcript bears little difference
in appearance but is not kept in a sealed envelope and can be delivered to the student.
Unofficial transcripts are not usually acceptable to other colleges or universities.
Transcripts are available upon request during the semester though the last day of class.
The printing of transcripts resumes once grades are made official for release.
Transcripts cannot be issued until the student or former student has settled all financial obligations to the University and has submitted all required transcripts from other
colleges attended.
Official and unofficial transcripts can be obtained only from the Office of the Registrar. Current or former students may request transcripts of their work via SCRIPSAFE, the University’s trusted agent for processing online transcript requests, at
https://iwantmytranscript.com/stmartin or in person. Transcripts ordered in person
are subject to a $15 expedited processing fee per copy of transcript requested.
Release of these records is protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy
Act (FERPA).
Application for Degrees
Candidates for degrees must file an application for a degree at the beginning of their
last academic semester. Applications are available via the registrar’s website: www.stmartin.edu/registrar.
In order to participate in the commencement ceremony and to be considered for degree conferral, students must apply for graduation during the semester in which they
intend to graduate and pay the $50 graduation fee. The fee is non-refundable, and is
assessed each time a student applies for graduation.
Veterans
The Veterans Affairs representative counsels and advises students about regulations
and rules set forth by the U.S. Veterans Administration and Saint Martin’s University. It
is the veteran’s responsibility to be fully informed of all academic regulations affecting
his or her satisfactory progress. The TT Minimum Standards of Progress are as follows:
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
55
• The administration’s regional office will be notified within 30 days of less-thansatisfactory progress or dismissal from the University; of the student’s withdrawal or non-attendance in courses that would result in a change of certification; or
of the student’s complete withdrawal from the University
• Attendance will be reported monthly to the Veterans Affairs representative.
• A veteran whose benefits have been terminated will not be certified for reenrollment unless a federal Veteran’s Administration counseling psychologist approves.
• In the case of illness or other extenuating circumstances, these standards will be
applied on an individual basis.
Internships
Internships, program-related work experience that primarily provides learning and
personal growth, are available for students in several disciplines. Students should
consult their advisor and graduate program director concerning requirements, procedures and availability.
Academic Probation
A graduate student will be placed on academic probation or suspended when his or
her cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0 or her or she earns more than one
grade of ‘C’ or lower in their course of studies. Please note that individual graduate
programs may have additional minimum standards by which students are evaluated.
If a student falls below these minimum standards, he or she will be placed on academic probation or suspended by the Office of Graduate Studies. If placed on probation,
the student will be subject to an academic contract with specific non-optional actions
designed to ensure student success through a letter of warning from the University. At
semester’s end, the student’s record will be reviewed to determine whether progress
toward meeting the minimum standards has been met. Even if academic progress was
made, the student may continue on probation for a second semester if their overall
grade point does not meet minimum standards.
The Office of Graduate Studies notifies students of other restrictions and requirements.
No student may remain on academic probation for more than two consecutive semesters without specific action of the Office of Graduate Studies. Failure to meet the
conditions of academic probation may result in suspension from the University. A
student may be permanently dismissed from the University for consistently failing to
maintain academic standards.
Academic Suspension
Students academically suspended from the University may appeal their suspension
if they wish to re-enroll the semester immediately following suspension. To appeal,
the student should contact the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs (Old
Main 269) immediately upon receiving notice of suspension. If no appeal is made, or
the appeal is denied, the reinstatement procedure should be followed if the student
wishes to apply for readmission.
56
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
The University has a defined procedure for any student who wishes to exercise his or
her right to petition for reinstatement. If a student wishes to petition for reinstatement to the University, she or he may petition the Office of Graduate Studies. This
procedure is used after the student has been away from the University for one or more
semesters after academic suspension. The petition must consist of the following:
•A written explanation that demonstrates the student’s understanding of the reasons for her or his academic difficulties;
•A realistic plan for addressing these difficulties. This plan must be developed in
consultation with the student’s academic advisor; and
•A letter of support from the student’s advisor and the Learning Center director
acknowledging that they have met with the student and that they are aware of
the student’s petition and approve of the student’s future academic plan.
The student must submit the petition complete with an explanation and a plan to the
The Office of Graduate Studies, in care of the vice president for academic affairs, by
March 15 for reinstatement consideration for fall semester; by Oct. 15 for reinstatement consideration for spring semester or summer. The student will be notified of her
or his status within three weeks of each of the above dates.
Academic Dishonesty
Academic dishonesty includes but is not limited to:
• Assisting another student on examinations, tests, quizzes or other assignments,
or receiving assistance from a student without permission of the instructor;
• Using unauthorized materials for assistance during examinations, tests, quizzes
or other assignment;
• Plagiarism. Plagiarism is the act of using the words and ideas of others without
giving proper credit. Common varieties of plagiarism include:
o Having another individual write a paper or take an examination for a student.
o Directly quoting material without using quotation marks or proper indentation.
o Not giving credit for another person’s original ideas and organization.
• Submitting forged or altered admissions materials including but not limited to
test score reports, letters of recommendation and credential evaluations.
Incidents of cheating and plagiarism and their appeal: The following steps are
followed for incidents of academic dishonesty, cheating and plagiarism and their appeal.
• The professor or university official encounters an incident that he or she judges
to be academic dishonesty, cheating or plagiarism. The professor or university
official prescribes a penalty in keeping with the seriousness of the offense. The
professor or university official files an incident report with the Dean, with a
copy to his/her Program Director and Provost within seven days of notifying the
student of the penalty. A copy of the incident report is provided to the student.
ACADEMIC INFORMATION
57
• The student either accepts the penalty or files a written appeal with the Program
Director of the professor’s department. The appeal must specify the grounds or
reasons for the appeal, whether the student is appealing the charge of academic
dishonesty/cheating/plagiarism, and/or the severity of the penalty prescribed.
• The Program Director renders a decision on the appeal within five business days
and informs the student in writing with a copy to the Dean and the Provost. The
student accepts the decision of the Director or writes to the Dean within five
business days seeking further review of the appeal. The student may not submit
additional documentation at this stage.
• The Dean reviews the appeal and informs the student of his/her decision within
five business days, with a copy to the Program Director and Provost. The Director
informs the professor. The student may accept the decision of the Dean or within
three business days, ask the Provost to additionally review his/her appeal.
• The Provost’s decision on the appeal, made within five business days of receiving a
written request for review of the appeal by the student, is final.
• The Program Director, Dean, or Provost may constitute ad hoc appeals
committee(s) to hear the case. This committee, if constituted, must include two
faculty members and the ASSMU President or his or her designee. The appeals
committee hears the case, investigates the circumstances surrounding it, and
based on the facts of the case, advises the Director, Dean, or Provost.
• The appeals committee may recommend reconsideration of a penalty to the
professor directly but must copy the Program Director, Dean, and Provost on
this recommendation. If the professor chooses to modify the penalty and this is
acceptable to the student, the case is settled. The student must formally acknowledge his or her acceptance of the penalty in writing. If the professor chooses not
to modify the penalty or if the student is not satisfied with the modification of
the penalty, the student has the right to appeal this decision in accordance with
procedures described above.
• In serious cases, the appeals committee or the Provost may recommend suspension or expulsion from the University. In these cases, the student retains the right
to pursue the standard appeals process as described above.
• If multiple cases of cheating or plagiarism are reported, or if a student charged
with academic dishonesty has faced similar charges previously that were either
accepted by the student once he/she was notified of the same by a professor or if
a professor’s charges were upheld through an appeals process, the Provost may
suspend or expel the student.
• In seeking to suspend or expel the student, the Provost must seek the recommendation of the Academic Standards Committee. The Provost’s decision constitutes
the final appeal in these cases.
59
UNDERGRADUATE
PROGRAMS
ACADEMIC CATALOG
GRADUATE
PROGRAMS
60
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Richard Beer, Dean
School School of Business offers a unified business program that integrates the separate functional areas of business. Customer satisfaction and the competitive need for
continuous quality improvement provide the major focus for this integration. Emphasis is also placed on the multicultural setting of business competition, both in national
and international markets, and on the political economy in which it operates.
The School of Business offers the following degree programs and options:
• Bachelor of arts in accounting
• Bachelor of arts in business administration
with concentrations in
- Accounting
- Economics
- Finance
- Management
- Marketing
• Minor in economics
• Master of business administration (MBA)
with an available concentration in Finance and accounting
Faculty Diane Bingaman, co-chair, accounting department
Don Conant, director, MBA Program
Denis DuBois
Heather Grob
Riley Moore
Paul Patterson
Don Stout
ACCOUNTING
Accounting is a descriptive/analytical discipline that provides quantitative information critical to management decision-making. A variety of courses are offered to
prepare graduates for responsible positions in private practice, corporate accounting
and government service. Because of the University’s liberal arts heritage, students are
trained to be well-rounded professionals rather than technicians.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Built on the General Education foundation informed by Saint Martin’s Catholic, Benedictine heritage and values, the School of Business offers a unified business program
MASTER’S PROGRAM IN BUSINESS
61
that integrates the separate functional areas of business. Acknowledging the technologic innovation, ever-changing global marketplace and challenged ecosystems currently shaping the world, the Business Administration Program offers students an
opportunity to learn and practice general management skills, discover the need for
ethical decision-making and acquire functional business area expertise.
Through practice and active learning, students also gain the ability to work cooperatively in diverse teams. They become effective writers and speakers, and they demonstrate sharpened critical thinking skills and professional judgment. Students graduate
with a broad perspective on the business world and its place in our culture. Saint
Martin’s graduates have the ability to work across business functions, adjust quickly
to new situations, accept change and ambiguity as a natural part of life, and become
enthusiastic lifelong learners.
MASTER’S PROGRAM IN BUSINESS
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MBA)
Saint Martin’s Master of Business Administration Program provides students with
decision-making tools and an understanding of the total administrative system. The
program develops a capacity for understanding managerial relationships and provides
specialized training and personal research in a functional field of management.
While the program can be completed in 18 months, most students are encouraged to
progress at a more measured pace. The program operates year-round. All classes are
offered at night to accommodate working professionals.
MBA ADMISSIONS
Admission requirements
Minimum requirements for unconditional admission: Applicants not meeting the
unconditional admission requirements but who otherwise demonstrate the potential
to benefit from graduate education may be admitted conditionally.
In order to be unconditionally admitted, applicants must meet all of the university
requirements for unconditional admission plus the following program specific requirements:
• Minimum 2.75 cumulative undergraduate GPA.
• Demonstration of strong analytic, problem solving and writing skills as evidenced by previous coursework, resume and admissions essay.
• Bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university, with sufficient coursework in accounting, finance, economics, marketing, and management to be successful in MBA coursework.
62
MASTER’S PROGRAM IN BUSINESS
Application procedure
Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. However, in order to receive priority consideration for admission and scholarships, applications should be submitted by the
priority deadline of the desired session.
Priority Deadlines
Fall I (August – October): July 1
Fall II (October – December): September 1
Spring I (January – March): December 1
Spring II (March – May): February 1
Summer (May – August): April 1
Application requirements: Applicants must submit all of the required materials for
university graduate admission (see the graduate admission section of the catalog) plus
the following program specific materials:
• Resume.
• A personal essay. Saint Martin’s University espouses the core values of faith,
reason, service, and community. Your personal essay should be written in the
context of these values. “Faith” expresses our confidence that our actions can
positively influence our experience. “Reason” encompasses our ability to learn
about ourselves, others, and our circumstances. “Service” describes our investment of ourselves in others. “Community” conveys the ways we connect and
remain connected to those around us.
e personal essay should be typed, double spaced and describe in detail
Th
(about 200 words per area) some special interest, significant experience, or achievement in each of the following areas:
aith – Describe a significant personal or professional challenge you faced
F
and the steps you took to address this challenge. Include whether you turned
to anyone in facing the challenge, the role that person played, and what you learned about yourself.
eason – Describe any of your special interests and how you have develR
oped knowledge in these areas. This may include examples of your creativity;
the ability to see alternatives; take diverse perspectives; come up with many,
varied, or original ideas; or a willingness to try new things.
S ervice – Describe what you have done to serve those around you. Give e x amples of specific programs, projects, or activities in which you have been involved.
ommunity – Describe the way or ways in which you engage your commuC
nity. This may include how you connect with colleagues, members of your community, members of your family, or other communities. Describe why this connection is important to you.
MASTER’S PROGRAM IN BUSINESS
63
Application forms and materials can be found on the Office of Graduate Studies website: www.stmartin.edu/gradstudies
All application materials should be sent directly to:
Office of Graduate Studies
Saint Martin’s University
5000 Abbey Way SE
Lacey, WA 98503-7500
[email protected]
After all materials are received, the applicant’s file will be reviewed. Possible outcomes
include unconditional admission, conditional admission, or nonacceptance. Once application materials are submitted, they become the property of the university, and
cannot be returned.
Class locations: Classes are offered on the main campus in Lacey and in a cohort
format (one class per term) at the JBLM campus.
Calendar: The MBA Program is offered in five eight-week terms per year, enabling
students to complete the required coursework (minus the research component and
assuming no prerequisites are required) in just over one year if they are taking two
classes per term. However, most students complete the degree in 18 to 24 months.
The terms are as follows:
Fall I
August–October
Fall II
October–December
Spring I
January–March
Spring II
March–May
SummerMay–July
Registration: Registration must be completed by the second class meeting of the
term. Students enrolled for three credit hours per eight-week term are classified as
full-time students. Foreign students must complete nine credit hours during 16 weeks
(two eight-week terms) to be considered full-time.
Additional information: For further information, contact: Director, MBA Program,
Saint Martin’s University, 5000 Abbey Way SE, Lacey, WA 98503-7500
Degree requirements: Candidates must complete 36 total semester hours (12 courses)to be awarded an MBA degree. This consists of 27 semester hours (nine courses) of
core work and nine semester hours (three courses) of elective work.
Comprehensive examinations are not required. Up to 9 credit hours of graduate work
from other institutions is permitted.
A grade point average of 3.0 (‘B’) is required in all work taken after admission to the
University. Grades of ‘C’ or below are not considered acceptable graduate-level work,
but will be counted when calculating grade point average. A student receiving a grade
of ‘C’ will be placed on academic probation. Students who receive a grade lower than
‘C’ or two grades of ‘C’ will be required to withdraw from the program.
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MASTER’S PROGRAM IN BUSINESS
Students who will not be registered for longer than a year must apply to the School
of Business for a leave of absence. Any student who is who does not register for one
full year and is not granted a leave of absence will be ex-matriculated and will need to
reapply to the program and re-pay the $50 application fee.
MBA 500 courses listed below are provided for applicants without a sufficient background in these areas. They do not count toward the MBA degree. However, MBA students must complete these courses or their equivalent undergraduate courses prior to
taking the core courses for which these courses are prerequisites. (See the core course
descriptions for prerequisite requirements.)
Prerequisite Courses
• MBA 500 Survey of Economics
• MBA 501 Survey of Accounting Systems
• MBA 502 Survey of Finance
• MBA 503 Survey of Management and Marketing
• MBA 504 Quantitative Methods for Management
Core courses (nine courses – 27 semester hours):
• MBA 601 Organization Theory and Behavior
• MBA 602 Financial Planning and Control
• MBA 603 Accounting for Managerial Decision Making
• MBA 605 Business Analytics
• MBA 620 Financial Institutions and Markets
• MBA 622 Marketing Management
• MBA 624 Human Resources Management
• MBA 650 Strategy and Policy Analysis
• MBA 661 Commercial Law
Elective courses (three courses – 9 semester hours):
• MBA 623 Management Information and Control Systems
• MBA 625 International Management
• MBA 626 Consumer Behavior
• MBA 627 Managerial Communications
• MBA 628 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management
• MBA 630 Entrepreneurship
• MBA 631 Operations Management
• MBA 635 Risk Management
• MBA 695 Special Topics
MASTER’S OF BUSINESS ADMIN / FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING
65
The MBA Program allows students to take nine elective credits at participating international partner universities in Europe and Asia. Participation in study abroad opportunities is limited and subject to a selection process.
Senior undergraduate students with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher may take up to
nine semester credits of graduate MBA courses as electives with permission of their
advisor and the MBA director. Any credits earned will count towards the 128 semester hours required for the undergraduate degree and can also be applied towards the
MBA degree requirements. The petition to take graduate level MBA classes as an undergraduate can be found on the website of the Office of the Registrar.
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION /
FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING
This program enables accounting students with an undergraduate accounting degree
to receive an MBA with an accounting and finance focus, so that they have sufficient
academic credit to sit for the Certified Public Account (CPA) examination. Applicants
must meet the existing MBA entry requirements and should have an undergraduate
accounting degree.
The accounting strand is composed of 36 semester hours.
Core courses: (nine courses – 27 semester hours)
• Identical to the regular MBA core.
Finance and accounting concentration (three courses – nine semester hours)
• MBA 628 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management
• MBA 663 Accounting Measurement and Disclosure
• MBA 664 Financial Statement Analysis for Decision Making and Valuation
Master of Business Administration Courses
MBA 500 Survey of Economics (3)
Introduction to the economic analysis of consumers, individual firms and their market
interaction, as well as analysis of key aggregate variables, including inflation and unemployment. Credit not applicable toward graduation requirement in fields of economics,
management or related majors. Course content duplicates ECN 101 or its equivalent.
MBA 501 Survey of Accounting Systems (3)
Introduction to the basic assumptions, principles and techniques that form the basis
for contemporary accounting practices. Credit not applicable toward any graduation
requirement in accounting, economics, management or related majors. Course content
duplicates ACC 201 and ACC 202 or equivalent.
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MASTER’S OF BUSINESS ADMIN / FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING
MBA 502 Survey of Finance (3)
Development and use of basic financial information for management analysis, decision-making, planning and control, along with exploration of contemporary financial
institutions and U.S. monetary system. Credit not applicable toward any graduation
requirement in fields of economics, management or related majors. Course content
duplicates BA 300 and BA 311 or equivalent.
MBA 503 Survey of Management and Marketing (3)
Analysis of the organizational activities of planning, production and control, as well as
of mutual interaction of people and organizations. Organizational marketing activities
also are covered. Credit not applicable toward any graduation requirement in management or related fields. Course content duplicates BA 335 and BA 330 or equivalent.
MBA 504 Quantitative Methods for Management (3)
Introduction to applied topics in algebraic functions, sets, statistics and linear programming used in management and related fields. Credit not applicable toward graduation requirement in management, mathematics or related fields. Course duplicates
MTH 201, BA 302 or equivalent.
MBA 601 Organization Theory and Behavior (3)
An analysis of historical and contemporary organizations and an examination of models for understanding human behavior within a complex social environment. Prerequisite: MBA 503 or equivalent.
MBA 602 Financial Planning and Control (3)
Analysis of operational financial policies. Intensive, critical investigation of evaluation process and resulting impact on firm investment, financing and dividend policies.
Contemporary theory and controversies of financial policy and structure. Prerequisites: MBA 500, MBA 502 and MBA 504 or equivalents.
MBA 603 Managerial Accounting (3)
Study and application of accounting concepts and techniques used by management for
planning and controlling organizational activities. Equivalent to MEM 603. Prerequisites: MBA 500, MBA 501, MBA 502 and MBA 504 or equivalents.
MBA 605 Business Analytics (3)
Concepts of statistical decision theory, sampling, forecasting, linear programming and
other stochastic and deterministic models applied to managerial problems. Prerequisite: MBA 504 or equivalent.
MBA 606 Marketing Concepts and Theory (3)
Provides an understanding of societal, managerial and strategic underpinning of marketing theory and practice. A study of the basic concepts and tools necessary in analysis
of markets and marketing opportunities, as well as designing tactical marketing strategies. Prerequisite: MBA 503 or equivalent.
MASTER’S OF BUSINESS ADMIN / FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING
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MBA 610 Seminar in Research Methods (3)
Selection of research projects, design of experimental procedures, observation methods, analysis of data and reporting of findings. Seminar will culminate in the design of
a research proposal. Approval of the proposal leads to initiation of a research project or
thesis that will be completed in MBA 611 or MBA 612. Prerequisite: MBA 605.
MBA 611 Research Project (3)
Student will research a topic of interest approved by his or her faculty sponsor. The
project is designed not as original research, but instead as a survey of literature with
respect to the topic selected. Quantitative analysis will be encouraged, but not required.
A student selecting the research project alternative will be required to take one additional elective course. Candidate may select MBA 611 upon completion of MBA 610
during any term.
MBA 612 Graduate Thesis (6)
Student will develop a proposition to be maintained against argument. The result will
be a monograph embodying original research. The student will begin with an idea,
develop a hypothesis, create a research design, create a survey instrument if necessary,
carry out research design, analyze data, state a conclusion and document the process
and conclusions. Candidate may select MBA 612 upon completion of MBA 610 during
any term.
MBA 613 Accounting Internship (3)
The internship is designed to be a cooperative learning experience between student,
faculty and employer. Employer performance evaluations are required. The student is
required to give oral presentations and written reports on the internship and have prior
approval from faculty and the internship director.
MBA 620 Financial Institutions and Markets (3)
Analysis of central role of money, finance and financial institutions in capitalistic economic systems. The relationship between financial institutions and economic growth
and instability are covered through study of the development of the banking industry,
central banking and financial sophistication. Prerequisite: MBA 602.
MBA 622 Marketing Management (3)
Examination of the marketing system, its operations and mechanism for coordinating
these operations. Market research, advertising and consumer psychology to assist marketing managers in major marketing decisions will be explored. Emphasis on development of integrated marketing program.
MBA 623 Management Information and Control Systems (3)
Evaluation of organizational information needs and the ability of computer technology
to meet those needs in an economical way. Emphasis is on identification, specification
and installation of appropriate computer technology and the subsequent need for direction, control and overall management of the information function.
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MASTER’S OF BUSINESS ADMIN / FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING
MBA 624 Human Resources Management (3)
Analysis and discussion of problems/opportunities administering personnel systems
and policies. Coverage includes retention, recruitment, employment, appraisal, training and compensation. Prerequisite: MBA 601. Equivalent to MEM 624.
MBA 625 International Management (3)
Discussion and analysis of the scope of international business within a framework that
identifies the specific role of the multinational corporation and provides an orientation
into every aspect of the functional intricacies of these firms. Prerequisites: MBA 601
and MBA 602.
MBA 626 Consumer Behavior (3)
Course studies purchase decisions for individual consumers and industrial buyers; examines various models of purchasing behavior while exploring motivations, influences,
roles played and situational factors influencing the purchase of products and services.
MBA 627 Managerial Communications (3)
An examination of current theories of interpersonal and organizational communications. Special emphasis is placed on identifying barriers to effective communication
and developing a prescription to solve those problems. Prerequisite: MBA 601.
MBA 628 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management (3)
Comprehensive coverage of descriptive and quantitative areas of portfolio analysis design /management. Prerequisites: MBA 602.
MBA 630 Entrepreneurship (3)
Course provides framework for understanding human and organizational issues underlying creative and entrepreneurial success. Major topics covered include managing
creativity, the entrepreneur, managing the evolving organization and entrepreneurship
and creativity in the established firm.
MBA 631 Operations Management (3)
This course is an intensive study of strategies employed in the design and operation
of all processes required for the production of goods and delivery of services. Since
operations management spans almost all the real value-added activities of an organization, this course looks at a breadth of topics including product and process design,
facility layout, job design, customer order fulfillment, production scheduling, material
requirements planning and supply chain, inventory and quality management. Quantitative decision-modeling techniques also are explored for planning, scheduling, control
and analysis of operations.
MBA 635 Risk Management (3)
This course provides a framework to understand risk management and its purpose and
benefit in organizations. The course is intended to assist the student in identifying and
analyzing all types of risk and in managing that risk. This course looks at the myriad of
potential losses facing business and individuals, together with the general risk management process and the many alternative risk management tools, including loss control,
risk retention, and risk transfer.
MASTER’S OF BUSINESS ADMIN / FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING
69
MBA 650 Strategy and Policy Analysis (3)
This capstone course will explore the process of strategic planning and policy development, and engage in a critical analysis of historical and contemporary organizations in
terms of their strategy, policy decision-making, and execution. Students will discuss
concepts of building important and ethical internal and external business relationships.
The course provides a managerial context for operating an organization effectively and
ethically in a competitive global market. Students will develop tools for identifying, analyzing, and resolving complex management, policy and operational problems through
the use of lectures, discussion, student analysis and activities, and case studies of various kinds of organizations. A final project will culminate the MBA experience, drawing
from other MBA courses.
MBA 661 Commercial Law (3)
Advanced law course including topics in contracts, bankruptcy, uniform commercial
code, property, business organizations and government regulations. Prerequisite: Completion of undergraduate business law course.
MBA 663 Accounting Measurement and Disclosure (3)
Comprehensive accounting and auditing research course, including recent pronouncements concerning generally accepted accounting principles and generally accepted auditing standards. Emphases on electronic research techniques and the theoretical structure of accounting and auditing. Prerequisite: Undergraduate accounting and auditing.
MBA 664 Financial Statement Analysis for Decision Making
and Valuation (3)
Course includes analysis of the balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement,
and note disclosures for foreign and domestic companies. Emphasis on management
decision-making and business valuation techniques. Case studies and projects related
to actual company financial statements will be used.
MBA 665 Business Ethics and Society (3)
This course examines the foundations of moral reasoning and analysis of ethical issues
that arise in a wide range of contemporary business practices, both domestically and
globally. This course is designed to inform and stimulate thinking on ethical issues, corporate social responsibility, conscious capitalism, and professional challenges encountered in business. The course material should enable students to recognize and manage
ethical issues and to formulate their own standards of integrity and professionalism.
MBA 695 Special Topics (3)
Course covers topics announced by faculty.
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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND
COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
Joyce Westgard, Dean
Mission statement: In a culture inspired by the interaction of faith, reason, and service, our mission is to prepare a community of reflective practitioners who use their
knowledge, skills, and dispositions to transform the lives of those they serve.
Saint Martin’s University’s education programs are approved by the Washington Professional Educator Standards Board. Students completing the elementary, secondary
or special education options are eligible for certification by the state of Washington.
Certification requirements are subject to changes enacted by the state’s Professional
Educator Standards Board, which take precedence over requirements outlined in the
University’s catalog.
TEAC Accreditation: Saint Martin’s University’s Residency Teacher Education Program, which is designed to prepare teacher candidates to become outstanding P-12
professionals, is granted accreditation by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) for a period of seven years from October 2013 to October 2020. This accreditation certifies that the forenamed professional education program has provided
evidence that the program adheres to TEAC’s quality principles.
Title II 2012-2013 Institutional Report Card Information: The pass rate of the
WEST-E for traditional program completers is 100 percent and for alternative route
program completers is 100 percent. A total of 239 candidates were enrolled during
2012-2013; 52 traditional program and 20 alternate route program candidates were
enrolled in supervised internships during the 2012-2013 academic year. Candidates
in the traditional program typically participate in 16 weeks of full-time supervised
internship (560 hours); candidates in the alternate route program typically participate
in a yearlong full-time supervised internship (1150 hours). Complete Title II Reports
are available on the University website.
Through pre-program requirements, the University’s education programs ensure that
all candidates have knowledge in the liberal arts. During the professional sequence,
students gain essential knowledge and skills and participate in varied field experiences
in P-12 schools. University faculty, as well as local school district teachers, counselors and administrators, participate in the program and contribute to its quality and
relevance.
The goal of Saint Martin’s University education programs is to select and prepare
teacher, counselor, and administrator candidates to become outstanding P-12 professionals. To the general University emphasis on basic strength in academic areas of
study for all graduates, the College of Education and Counseling Psychology adds
strong professional teacher, counselor and administrator programs that comply with
specific state requirements.
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
71
The programs also are shaped by practitioners who serve on professional education
advisory boards (PEABs). True to its Roman Catholic Benedictine heritage, the education programs share the University’s strong emphasis on moral and ethical values.
A teacher/counselor/administrator education candidate at Saint Martin’s will enter his
or her first school prepared not only with knowledge, but also with strong values, an
educational philosophy centered on meeting the needs of the individual child, and a
base of practical experience on which to build.
Education and Counseling Psychology Programs: The education programs include
bachelor’s and master’s degree options as well as certificates of advanced study options:
The Residency Teacher Certification Program (first-level certification):
The program can be completed as part of a bachelor’s degree, independently after
the baccalaureate is completed (Certificate of Advance Study), or as part of the
Master in Teaching degree.
The Residency School Counselor Program:
The program can be completed as a Certificate of Advanced Study (education
staff associate) or as part of a Master of Education strand.
The Residency School Administrator Program:
The program can be completed as Certificate of Advanced Study for principal
and/or program administrator as part of a Master of Education degree strand.
Candidates may be withdrawn from education programs at the discretion of the College of Education and Counseling Psychology as a result of the Staffing Level II/Intervention Level II process. Saint Martin’s University makes no guarantees for candidates
to be recommended for Washington state teacher/counselor/administrator certification based on course and field experience completion alone.
College of Education and Counseling Psychology
Conceptual Framework
Mission Statement: When an education professional leaves the Saint Martin’s education programs, they will take with them a core set of human, spiritual, and democratic
values. They are ready to promote hospitality, scholarship, and education within the
community of the school. The pluralistic and ever-changing world of diverse students
and knowledge will always be welcomed by our graduates. Such is our mission.
As a community of educators, we see the values of hard work, flexibility, compassion,
and camaraderie reflected in our commitment to bridging and connecting the classrooms at Saint Martin’s with the schools of the community. We see it in ourselves as
we mutually support each other with personal encouragement and academic integrity.
We value our heritage and our mission continues.
Vision statement: Saint Martin’s University strives to focus our education programs
upon the development of professionals who value tradition, and concurrently, subscribe to a progressive spirit.
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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
Philosophy statement: The education programs at Saint Martin’s University have
been constructed to allow for the confluence of 1,500 years of Benedictine traditions
of scholarship, education, hospitality, and community with current thoughts and
practices of today. We feel that the blending of tradition and modernity allows us
to develop education professionals with curiosity, who promote stimulating environments for increasingly diverse students, and who value the dynamics of pluralism,
change and individuality.
Purpose statement: The purpose of the Saint Martin’s University education programs
is to provide a distinctive professional educational experience in our education programs. In partnership with our students and P-12 professional educators, we strive
to realize potential, think critically, love learning, and grow in spiritual and ethical
character with the goal of promoting the better education and welfare of children.
Commitment to excellence
We are committed to assuring that candidates will be provided an intellectual and
professional learning environment that is rigorous, relevant and realistic. Academic
courses and program experiences are purposefully designed for candidates to probe
deeper, reach further and to encourage creative and resourceful exploration of alternative pathways to address presented issues and tasks.
Our programs are developed and conducted with high expectations that candidates
will be personally engaged in their learning, stimulated in their thinking and genuinely challenged to expand the knowledge, skills, and dispositions within their chosen
field. Candidates are intentionally guided, coached and supported in their enhancement of relevant and meaningful teaching, counseling, and administrative skills. Candidates will demonstrate their abilities to meet professional standards through effective oral and written communications, completion of realistic analysis, and critical
thinking and problem solving tasks. Candidates are held accountable to demonstrate
professional dispositions and organize and simultaneously manage multiple projects
within established timelines.
Our learning community instills excellence in thought and service while nurturing
a candidate’s sense of personal and professional development. Therefore, candidates
completing our academic and certification programs will be agents of change and
educational leaders who are resilient, reflective practitioners meeting the needs of an
evolving world.
Core Values
Our programs, therefore, involve the recognition of change, the constructivist approach to knowledge and skills formulation, multi-age grouping practices, technological utilization, and significant themes of inquiry integrating both the practical and
the theoretical aspects of knowledge.
Our curriculum engages students in basic skills development through inquiry-oriented, critical, reflective, creative and imaginative thinking, and ethical decision making.
Our programs support the use of case studies, field experiences, performance and
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
73
reflective assessment, a strong background in academic content areas, and the need
for students to be active agents in their education.
Students who complete our program(s) are able to function as future educators in a
pluralistic, consensual, democratic society and recognize the need for instruction in
both social (group) and personal (individual) realms.
Guiding principles: The goal of Saint Martin’s University College of Education and
Counseling Psychology is to select and prepare candidates to become outstanding
P-12 professionals. To the general University emphasis on basic strength in academic
areas of study for all graduates, the College of Education and Counseling Psychology
adds strong professional training programs which comply with specific state requirements. The programs are also shaped by practitioners who serve on its Professional
Education Advisory Boards (PEAB). True to its Catholic Benedictine heritage, the
College of Education and Counseling Psychology shares the University’s strong emphasis on moral and ethical values and development of the whole person — intellectually, physically, and spiritually. A teacher/counselor/administrator educated at Saint
Martin’s will enter his/her first school prepared not only with knowledge, but also
with strong values, an educational philosophy centered on meeting the needs of the
individual child, and a base of experience upon which to build.
Program design: Spiral/integrated program design: Programs have been designed
to integrate knowledge/skills throughout courses and various learning and field experience opportunities. Knowledge/skills are introduced, developed, practiced, and
mastered as students proceed through the program from the introductory courses/
opportunities to the core foundation courses/opportunities, to methods courses/opportunities, and, finally, to the student teaching/internship. Full program design statements are available in the Education Student Handbook and on the website, www.
stmartin.edu/education.
Goals: The following three goals, therefore, lead us to the core of the College of Education and Counseling Psychology Conceptual Framework:
1.Curriculum (subject matter knowledge)
The College of Education and Counseling Psychology is dedicated to developing competent professional educators who have strong knowledge in subject
matter. Individuals completing our programs will utilize/communicate with
technology as it relates to teaching; creatively participate in free and open
inquiry; and problem-solve and construct/discover new learning opportunities
for themselves, P-12 students and staff.
2.Pedagogy (pedagogical knowledge and skills)
Individuals will develop and utilize pedagogical strategies and skills necessary to
their program. Education programs will provide a community for P-12 and SMU
collaboration, thus enriching pre-service through the professional p erformance
continuum. Individuals completing our programs will have participated in a variety of leadership and service opportunities and multiple P-12 field experiences,
including placements with school districts with diverse student populations.
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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
3.Caring Community (professional dispositions)
The Education programs are dedicated to developing a caring community
of teacher/ counselor / administrator colleagues with strong ethical character, professional leadership, collaborative skill, openness to innovation, and
personal integrity. Individuals completing our programs will reflect democratic
traditions – including acceptance (hospitality) of all individuals and sensitivity
for cultural diversity.
With these goals in mind, the College of Education and Counseling Psychology’s programs were designed to supply its students with: an excellent background in academic
and pedagogical theory and knowledge; the ability to apply that theory and knowledge
in practical, daily situations, technological and teaching techniques for successfully
transmitting that knowledge and application skill; a caring, nurturing attitude toward
children and colleagues; skill, confidence and sensitivity in classroom leadership; and,
the ability to gain employment.
ALL EDUCATION PROGRAMS: ACADEMIC POLICY
Candidates should review prerequisites for all courses required for their teacher certification program. Candidates who preregister will be processed on the assumption
that they will satisfactorily complete all coursework presently being taken.
Candidates must earn a grade of ‘C’ (2.00) or better in each program course. Candidates who receive a ‘C-’ in any course required by their program are required to retake
the course. Candidates who receive two grades of ‘C-’ or lower in any program or endorsement course, or whose overall grade point average falls below 3.0 (a ‘B’ average),
will be automatically withdrawn from the teacher certification program.
Candidates may reapply to the program when grade discrepancies have been rectified.
Education candidates must meet the professional education requirements in effect
when they are accepted to an education program within the College, not those in effect when they were admitted to the University. Ordinarily, courses in basic certification and/or endorsements completed more than seven years before admission or readmission to the teacher certification program do not meet professional requirements.
Candidates may need to repeat all or part of those courses before student teaching as
per advisor recommendation.
ALL EDUCATION PROGRAMS:
WAIVER AND SUBSTITUTION OPTIONS
Waiver and substitution options are available for courses based on approved documentation of equivalent knowledge and skills. Contact the Education office (360438-4333) for additional details.
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
75
Residency Teacher Post-baccalaureate
Certificate of Advanced Study option
An individual with a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree from an accredited institution may be admitted to a Certificate of Advanced Study option leading
to program verification for a Residency Teaching Certificate. To be accepted to this
option, he or she must have demonstrated academic ability, broad liberal arts preparation, a major field acceptable for public school teaching and realistic career plans.
Individuals interested in the University’s Certificate of Advanced Study option should
contact the College of Education and Counseling Psychology office.
Non-degree students seeking certification can only be verified in an area that meets
state endorsement requirements and in fields for which they meet state requirements
for added endorsements. These can be earned at Saint Martin’s or in earlier college or
university experience.
Requirements for the Certificate of Advanced Study option are the same as those described for elementary and secondary degree certification options, except that:
• Candidates who are not to be recommended for a bachelor’s degree at Saint
Martin’s need not meet the University’s General Education requirements.
• Graduate-level courses may be substituted for some courses leading to certification. (See the graduate programs section of this catalog for a description of the Master of Education and Master in Teaching degree programs.)
Certificate of Advanced Study in Education (CASE):
Residency Teacher
Post-baccalaureate level Certificates of Advanced Study in Education program includes
an option in the following areas: The Residency Teacher Certification. This option is
normally completed by taking undergraduate level classes. All options are non-degree
bearing. The description of this program and requirements are included in the Undergraduate Catalog.
Graduate degree options
The University’s College of Education and Counseling Psychology offers programs
leading to a Master of Education, Master in Teaching and a Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology degree. Program information is available from the Office of Graduate
Studies or the College of Education and Counseling Psychology. Graduate degrees can
be earned in conjunction with residency certification. All options are offered at the
Lacey campus. The MIT and the MED Special Education and ELL strands are offered
at the University’s Joint Base Lewis-McChord extended learning division. (Please see
the MED, MIT and MAC programs sections of this catalog for complete program
descriptions.)
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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
Certificate of Advanced Studies in Education (CASE)
Post-master’s-level Certificates of Advanced Study in Education program options are
offered in the following areas for those already with graduate degrees. All options are
non-degree bearing.
• Residency ESA School Counselor Certification;
• Residency School Principal or School Administrator Certification
Added endorsement options
Added endorsement options for current teachers are available for all endorsements
authorized for Saint Martin’s University (refer to the list under “endorsements” in this
section). Requirements vary depending on the current endorsement and the desired
endorsement.
Requirements can be met by a combination of coursework, life and/or work experience, observation, appropriate methods knowledge/skills, WEST-E tests and/or Performance-based Pedagogy Assessment evaluation. Contact the College of Education
and Counseling Psychology office for further information or application materials.
WASHINGTON STATE COMPETENCY-BASED
ENDORSEMENT REQUIREMENTS
(Graduate-level ccourses may be substituted for lower-level requirements.) For a competency-based endorsement, the student must have completed each of the following requirements:
• College of Education and Counseling Psychology requirements for
Washington State Residency Teacher Certification in elementary education, s econdary education, and/or special education.
• The knowledge/skills equivalent to a “major” (i.e., 30-45-plus semester credits) in the endorsement area and related areas and/or approved
waiver documentation.
• Appropriate methods courses
The student also must have:
• Passed the WEST-E test in the appropriate endorsement areas.
• Been observed teaching.
• Met all areas on the Washington State Teacher Assessment Evaluation.
Complete information about endorsement requirements is available at the College of Education and Counseling Psychology office. Endorsements may require additional methods courses specified on the endorsement forms available in the College of Education and
counseling Psychology office and on the website, www.stmartin.edu/cepp.
Endorsements Offered: Bilingual Education, Biology, Chemistry, Choral Music, Drama,
Early Childhood, Early Childhood Special Education, Elementary Education, English
MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
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Language Arts, English Language Learner, French, General Music, Health/Fitness, History, Instrumental Music, Japanese, Mathematics, Middle Level Humanities, Middle Level
Math, Middle Level Science, Reading/Literacy, Science, Social Studies, Spanish, Special
Education.
NOTE: A candidate may be eligible for a pre-endorsement waiver from the Washington
State Special Education Office if he or she is hired to teach a special education classroom
and has completed the first seven courses (21 special education credits) listed above. The
waiver involves allowing the teacher an additional three years after certification to complete the remaining nine semester hours in ED 424/MED 524 or ED426/MED526, ED
477/MED 577 and SED 445/MED 545. The waiver in this case does not indicate waiver
of knowledge/skills, but a three-year approval to teach in special education while completing the remaining requirements for the endorsement. Please contact the University’s
Department of Special Education for additional information.
MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
Faculty
Godfrey J. Ellis, director
Leticia Nieto
Peggy Zorn
Mission statement
The Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology program trains students in the theoretical foundations and clinical skills necessary for advanced positions in the counseling
profession. Built on a philosophy of therapeutic service, intellectual hunger, fundamental respect, and a focus on the person of the therapist, the MAC program strives to
embody spirit, intellect, and wisdom. At the same time that the program provides students with opportunities to acquire and increase excellence in the areas of diagnosis,
assessment, and therapy, it strives to be personally and professionally transformative,
liberating and enriching.
The 48-credit MAC program provides students with opportunities to acquire or increase competence in the areas of diagnosis, assessment and therapy. This is accomplished through completion of a common core of courses. In addition, a series of electives provides students with an opportunity to study specialized modalities and/or the
psychological issues and therapy needs of special populations.
Teaching methods include lecture and discussion formats as well as supervised role
playing, psychodrama and introspective exercises. A required 600-hour internship
complements coursework by providing students with a supervised, in-depth opportunity to work in a variety of community-based counseling programs.
All courses are offered once a week in the afternoons or evenings. Most required
courses are offered at least once a year during evenings. Internship classes are on Saturdays.
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MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
All courses are offered once a week in the afternoons or evenings. Most required courses are offered at least once a year during evenings. Internship classes are on Saturdays.
Admission
Minimum requirements for unconditional admission: Students not meeting the unconditional admission requirements but who otherwise demonstrate the potential to
benefit from graduate education may be admitted conditionally.
In order to be unconditionally admitted, applicants must meet all of the University
requirements for unconditional admission (see the graduate admission section of this
catalog) plus the following program specific requirements:
• An undergraduate major in psychology is highly desirable but not essential.
A minor in psychology is usually expected as a minimum academic background. Some clinical experience in a reputable counseling facility, either
voluntary or in a paid position, generally is expected as a requirement for admission into the program. Other experiences may be considered. These could
include: 1) an undergraduate internship, 2) counseling experience connected
to commercial services or products and/ or 3) personal therapy.
•Students are expected to have professional goals that match the orientation
of the program and to have adequate professional preparation for graduate
study in counseling psychology.
A final expectation is what might be called the “person of the therapist,” including the
student’s suitability for the field of counseling and such characteristics as:
• Ability to work with abstractions and applications of theory.
• Ability (or potential) to move fluidly between theory and practice.
• Capacity for compassion and ability to be warm, enthusiastic and nurturing.
• Acceptance of others, appropriate social skills and excellent “people skills.”
• A tendency toward, and desire for, personal growth and enrichment.
• Psychological self-awareness and emotional “groundedness.”
• Clarity of purpose and ability to be self-directed and self-motivated.
• Non-discriminatory and non-ethnocentric attitudes and behavior.
• Emotional maturity and readiness (this is not the same as “age”).
• A
bility to resolve personal issues rather than projecting those issues onto clients,
students, or faculty.
More information is available on the University’s MAC program webpage. Prospective
students should carefully review the information posted there.
Application procedure
To receive priority consideration for financial aid, application to the Master of Arts
in Counseling Psychology program should be made by the priority deadline of the
MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
79
desired semester. Note that exceptions to the following deadline dates may be made at
the discretion of the program director.
Deadlines
Summer semester (May-July)
Fall semester (late August-December
Spring semester (January-May)
April 1
July 1
November 1
NOTE: The financial aid application priority deadlines are different. Those interested
in financial aid should consult the appropriate section of the catalog.
Application requirements
Applicants must submit all of the required materials for university graduate admission (see the graduate admission section of the catalog) plus the following program
specific materials:
• MAC ssupplemental application.
• A
minimum of two letters of recommendation sent directly from the letter writerto the university, preferably one from a previous teacher and another from a
clinical, workplace, or volunteer position supervisor.
• A
written statement of three to five pages (typed/double spaced) in which the
applicant describes his or her preparation for the program, reasons for desiring
entrance into the program, and career objectives.
Application forms and materials can be found on the MAC website:
www.stmartin.edu/gradstudies/mac/
All application materials should be sent directly to:
Office of Graduate Studies
Saint Martin’s University
5000 Abbey Way SE
Lacey, WA 98503-7500
[email protected]
After all materials are received, the applicant’s file will be reviewed. Students whose
backgrounds closely match program objectives will be called for a prospective student
interview. Possible outcomes include unconditional admission, conditional admission, or nonacceptance. Once application materials are submitted, they become the
property of the university, and cannot be returned.
PROGRAM FORMAT
Transfer Credit
Generally, a maximum of nine semester hours of graduate work may be considered for
transfer credit. Requests for transfer credit should be made at the time of application.
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MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
Courses considered for transfer credit must be graduate-level courses consistent with
the educational goals of the MAC Program and must have been completed at another
regionally accredited college or university. The courses must have been taken in the
last six years and prior to admission to the program. Grades lower than ‘B‘ cannot be
considered for transfer credit.
Initial Coursework
All students must successfully complete a minimum of 18 semester hours of graduate
coursework consisting of MAC 502, 503, 512, 514, 521 and 522 before applying for
advancement to candidacy. Admission to the graduate program does not guarantee
advancement to candidacy status.
Candidacy status
On completion of initial coursework, and therapy requirement, students may apply
for advancement to candidacy. Advancement to candidacy is necessary to begin an
internship. Advancement to candidacy is not automatic. Advancement to candidacy
will be based on:
• Grade point average in graduate courses.
• Completion of an essay of 200-300 words.
• A
letter of recommendation from a current student who has been in the
MAC program at least as long as the applicant or an alumnus.
• R
ecommendation of graduate instructors, who evaluate academic preparation and personal suitability of the student for a career in counseling.
Additional information
Further information may be obtained by contacting:
Administrative Assistant
MAC Program
Saint Martin’s University
5000 Abbey Way SE
Lacey, WA 98503-7500
Telephone: 360-438-4560
Degree requirements
Degree candidates must complete the approved course of graduate study listed in the
program requirements. A total of 48 credits are required for completion of the MAC
program. The candidates may plan their own course of study or may consult with the
program advisor.
MAC students are expected to maintain a grade point average of 3.0 (‘B‘ or better) in
their coursework and to receive a grade of at least a ‘C+’ in any MAC course. Students
whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0, or who receive a grade of ‘C‘ in
MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
81
any single class, will be placed on immediate academic probation and their standing
reviewed by the core MAC faculty. A student who: 1. fails to return the GPA to a 3.0
by the end of the next semester; 2. receives two grades of ‘C; or 3. receives any grade
lower than ‘C‘ in any class, normally will be withdrawn from the MAC program and
from Saint Martin’s University.
The time limit for completing degree requirements is seven years. Students who fail
to take courses for more than one academic year will be required to reapply to the
program and re-enter under requirements current at the time the new application is
submitted.
Program Requirements
Core Requirements (27 semester hours)
• MAC 502 Group Therapy
• MAC 503 Individual Therapy
• MAC 512 Family Systems Therapy
• MAC 514 Developmental Theory and Psychotherapy
• MAC 521 Gender and Ethnicity
• MAC 522 Treatment of Abusive Relationships
• MAC 601 Psychopathology
• MAC 602 Assessment and Treatment Planning
• M
AC 620 Ethical Practice in Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and
Family Therapy
Electives (15 semester hours from the courses listed below)
• MAC 560 Therapy with Children
• MAC 570 Counseling for Career Development
• MAC 580 Faith-Based Counseling
• MAC 585 Neurobiology and Mindfulness
• MAC 595/695 Special Topics
• MAC 651 Treatment of Substance Abuse
• MAC 661 Marriage and Family Therapy Practicum
• MAC 670 Statistics and Research for Counselors
• MAC 671 Expressive Therapies in Family Therapy
• MAC 675 Advanced Clinical Skills
• MAC 681 Sex Therapy
Internship* (six semester hours)
• MAC 691 Counseling Internship I
• MAC 692 Counseling Internship II
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MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
* Only degree candidates are eligible for internships. In addition, students are required
to have completed MAC 601 and MAC 602 (for a total of 24 hours of coursework)
prior to beginning an internship.
Personal Therapy Requirement
All MAC students are required to complete a minimum of 10 sessions of individual,
group or family therapy while in the program. This is true even for those students
who have received some kind of therapy before entering Saint Martin’s University or
those who intend to seek counseling after they have finished the MAC program. This
therapy is expected to take place during the first two semesters of the program. It must
definitely take place before application for degree candidate status (see the University’s
MAC web page for more detailed information).
Therapy must be conducted by a licensed mental health counselor, a licensed marriage
and family therapist, a licensed clinical social worker, a licensed clinical psychologist,
an MD psychiatrist, or a mental health therapist of equivalent status. The therapist
must be approved prior to beginning therapy. Forms are available on the University’s
MAC web page.
Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology Courses
MAC 502 Group Therapy (3)
Experiential course that provides both group membership and co-leadership roles.
Focus on group theory and practice, stages of group development and change factors
in group therapy. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MAC 503
Individual Therapy (3)
Study of major techniques and theories of individual counseling. Emphasis on developing counseling skills through role-playing. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MAC 512
Family Systems Therapy (3)
Introduction to systemic perspective and major schools of family therapy (structural,
experiential, strategic, paradoxical, multigenerational, solution-oriented, narrative,
and marital). Includes student’s family of origin work.
MAC 514
Developmental Theory and Psychotherapy (3)
Review of selected theories and models of human development, with emphasis on
how developmental issues impact the counseling of clients.
MAC 521
Gender and Ethnicity in Psychotherapy (3)
Exploration of the mental health issues of men and women, and the impact of ethnocultural roots on both therapist and client. Prerequisite: MAC 514.
MAC 522 Treatment of Abusive Relationships (3)
Psychosocial explanations for physical and sexual abuse. Personality and relationship
issues in individual and family treatment. Includes treatment considerations.
MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
83
MAC 560 Therapy with Children (3)
Discusses developmental stages of childhood and adolescence. Covers clinical techniques such as play therapy, art therapy and sandtray therapy.
MAC 570 Counseling for Career Development (3)
Provides in-depth inquiry into the process of career development. Includes mythopoetic approaches, career counseling theories and tools, exam preparation and intensive
career self-exploration.
MAC 580 Faith-Based Counseling (3)
Designed to integrate traditional psychotherapy and the basic theories and techniques
of faith-based counseling. The course is intended for those students in mental health
counseling and marriage and family therapy who recognize the role of spirituality in
their clients’ lives and wish to be conversant in the language and metaphors of their
clients of faith. The class does not promote any single approach to faith-based counseling; not does it consider doctrine or dogma. It explores how to ethically and effectively
provide faith-based counseling for clients who: wish to have standard counseling issues (such as marital problem, parenting issues, depression, or addiction) discussed
from a Christian perspective or might be struggling directly with spiritual issues, such
as loss of faith, the meaning of adversity/suffering, or handling guilt.
MAC 585 Neurobiology and Mindfulness (3)
Introduces students to modern and ancient approaches to the science of neurobiology
in clinical practice. These include mindfulness techniques, somatic or body-centered
therapies, cognitive psychoeducational tools, and the role of psychopharmacology. Will
discuss the layered intricacy of human beings and the importance of a multi-modal
approach that acknowledges that complexity. The physiology of stress, basic neurobiology, and the implications of recent research findings will be explored as they apply
to treatment approaches and our concept of clinical territory. Prerequisite: MAC 503.
MAC 595/695
Special Topics (3)
Course devoted to selected topics relevant to counseling psychology.
MAC 601
Psychopathology (3)
Overview of the range of mental and personality disorders. Familiarization with current diagnostic conventions and constructs (DSM). Includes practice in the diagnosis
and differentiation of various psychopathologies using case examples. Prerequisite:
MAC 503.
MAC 602 Assessment and Treatment Planning (3)
Conducting mental status exams, test interpretation, contracting for treatment and
treatment planning. Prerequisite: Psychopathology. Prerequisite: MAC 601.
MAC 620 Ethical Practice in Mental Health Counseling and Marriage and
Family Therapy (3)
Presents the knowledge necessary to provide counseling in an ethical and responsible manner and to operate within the ethical standards that guide practitioners in
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MASTER OF ARTS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY
the fields of mental health counseling and marriage and family therapy. Prerequisite:
MAC 503, MAC 512, MAC 601.
MAC 651 Treatment of Substance Abuse (3)
Advanced treatment planning and counseling methods in working with substance
abuse clients. Includes psychopharmacology of alcohol and drugs.
MAC 661 Marriage and Family Therapy Practicum (3)
In-depth coverage of advanced systems theories and supervised practice with clinical
marriage and family therapy techniques. Prerequisite: MAC 512.
MAC 670 Statistics and Research for Counselors (3)
Reviews both qualitative and quantitative methods. Emphasizes the consumption of
research and an overview of statistics for counselors and clinicians.
MAC 671 Expressive Therapies in Family Therapy (3)
Considers various innovative theories and expressive arts techniques. Prerequisite:
MAC 503, MAC 512.
MAC 675 Advanced Clinical Skills (3)
Course offers techniques in advanced clinical skills. Explores common therapeutic issues such as bereavement, eating disorders and transference. Therapist Interventions
and the therapist as a person are considered. Prerequisites: MAC 503, MAC 512 and
MAC 522.
MAC 681 Sex Therapy (3)
Major theoretical perspectives on sexual dynamics and dysfunctions, as well as standard clinical approaches to the treatment of sexual disorders. Prerequisite: MAC 512.
MAC 691 Counseling Internship I (3)
Provides academic and clinical structure and supervision of an off-campus internship
experience. Emphasis also placed on values and ethical issues of counseling.
MAC 692 Counseling Internship II (3)
Continues the academic and clinical structure and supervision of an off-campus internship experience. Emphasis placed on counseling ethics and facilitating transition
from structured classroom to the unsupervised world of the professional workplace.
MASTER OF EDUCATION (MED)
85
MASTER OF EDUCATION (MED)
Faculty
Linda Maier, director
Kathleen Allen
Huabin Chen
Fumie Hashimoto
Belinda Hill
Cynthia Petersen
Eileen Reilich
Mina Ringenbach
Maureen Siera
Steve Siera
Lou Therrell
Dan Windisch
The Master of Education degree provides teachers and future school counselors or
administrators the opportunity to gain advanced professional skills in the areas of
advanced teaching and learning; English as a Second Language (teaching English
Language Learners), guidance and counseling; reading literacy; principal or program
administrator; and special education.
The MED is a 32-41 semester-hour degree offered during summers, evenings and
weekends. The program has three components: core, strands and electives. The number of semester hours varies with the strand a student chooses to follow (please see
description below).
NOTE: The Master in Teaching (MIT) degree is an option for individuals seeking residency teacher certification leading to a master’s degree. If you are seeking residency
certification, see the MIT section.
All MED degree candidates are required to take 11 semester hours of general courses
called a “core.” In addition to the core requirement, students choose from either a thesis option or a non-thesis option, the latter requiring one to two additional graduatelevel courses (three to six credits) beyond the requirements for the thesis option.
Elective courses are selected to complete required credit hours. These courses must be
acceptable for graduate credit and typically are taken from courses offered in education. However, they may include undergraduate (with prior approval only) or graduate courses from other departments.
NOTE: Rules, regulations, policies and procedures determined by state and national
policymakers may take precedence over the contents of this catalog for certification/
endorsements.
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MASTER OF EDUCATION (MED)
Strand areas
The Master of Education degree has six strand options (areas of emphasis, partial endorsements, and/or certification). A strand requires between four and nine courses
(16 to 29 semester hours).
• Advanced teaching and learning
• English as a Second Language (teaching English Language Learners – may include endorsement)
• Guidance and counseling (includes Educational Staff Associate – ESA –
certification)
• Principal/program administrator (includes administration-principal or
program administrator certification)
• Reading literacy (may include endorsement)
• Special education (may include endorsement)
Admission Requirements
Applicants, except for those applying to the guidance and counseling strand, normally
have had at least one year of relevant work experience in the field of education, usually
under contract in a state-accredited school. Other work experience involving students
is considered on an individual basis.
Minimum requirements for unconditional admission: Applicants not meeting the
unconditional admission requirements but who otherwise demonstrate the potential
to benefit from graduate education may be admitted conditionally.
In order to be unconditionally admitted, applicants must meet all of the university requirements for unconditional admission plus the following program specific requirements:
• A completed teacher certification program acceptable to the state of Washington, or an intention to complete the school counselor ESA certificate. NOTE:
The ESA school counseling certificate does not require teacher certification in
the state of Washington.
• At least a 3.0 GPA for undergraduate work.
• Graduate Record Exam (GRE) combined score of 291 (new version) 850 (previous version) on the verbal plus quantitative sections or Miller Analogies Test
(MAT) score of at least 386.Test scores may not be older than five years.
Application procedure
Applicants are accepted on a rolling basis. However, in order to receive priority consideration for admission and scholarships, applications should be submitted by the
priority deadline of the desired semester or session.
MASTER OF EDUCATION (MED)
87
Priority Deadlines
Lacey campus
Summer semester (May - July)
Fall semester (late August - December)
Spring semester (January - May)
April 1
July 1
November 1
JBLM campus
Summer session (May - July)
Fall session I (August - October)
Fall session II (October - December)
Spring session I (January - March)
Spring session II (March - May)
April 1
July 1
September 1
November 1
February 1
Application requirements
Applicants must submit all of the required materials for university graduate admission (see the graduate admission section of the catalog) plus the following program
specific materials:
• Test scores (GRE or MAT) sent directly from the testing agency.
• Th
ree letters of recommendation. Have each recommender send their signed
form directly to the Saint Martin’s University Office of Graduate Studies.
Letter writers are encouraged to attach a letter further detailing qualifications
• Curriculum vitae outlining your professional or work experience details
• Proof of fingerprinting and clearance through OSPI
•• Acknowledgement of fingerprint background check form
•• D
etailed information on fingerprinting procedures and payments can
be found through the Graduate Programs in Education Resource page
at http://www.stmartin.edu/GradStudies/images/pdfs/EDUAdmissionResources_small.pdf
• Character and Fitness Form
• Program advising appointment
• O
n-site essay. Applicants must come to the College of Education to write
a brief personal statement of approximately 300-400 words. To schedule
your appointment, please email the College of Education and Professional
Psychology: [email protected] Out of area applicants may request
alternate completion options.
Once admitted, students will be required to submit the following pre-enrollment
materials.
• Pre-program observation form
• Proof of CPR/First Aid registration
• Photo (can be electronic)
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MASTER OF EDUCATION (MED)
All application materials should be sent directly to:
Office of Graduate Studies
Saint Martin’s University
5000 Abbey Way SE
Lacey, WA 98503-7500
[email protected]
After all materials are received, the applicant’s file will be reviewed. Possible outcomes
include unconditional admission, conditional admission, or nonacceptance. Once application materials are submitted, they become the property of the university, and
cannot be returned.
Master of Education Degree Requirements
A student working toward a Master of Education degree leading to additional certification must complete all certification and endorsement requirements, in addition to
selected master’s degree courses.
Courses of study are planned in consultation with a program advisor and may not be
changed without prior approval. Degree candidates are expected to receive a grade
of at least a ‘B’ in all courses. Candidates who receive a grade of ‘C’ will be placed on
academic probation and their candidacy reviewed by the Graduate Program Advisory
Committee.
A candidate working toward a Master of Education degree must be accepted as a degree candidate. To be a degree candidate, the student must:
• Have completed 15 semester hours of graduate study.
• Be in good standing.
• Have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0.
• H
ave completed MED 601 (or be enrolled in MED 601 during the semester
in which the application is submitted).
• Formed a supervisory committee.
Degree candidates must complete an approved course of 32-41 semester hours to secure their degree.
A candidate who receives a grade lower than ‘C‘ or two grades of ‘C‘ will be withdrawn from the program. The student may apply for reinstatement. The time limit for
completion of degree requirements is seven years.
Nine semester hours of graduate work may be taken at another institution and transferred, provided the work fits the program plan; is recommended by the program
advisor; is approved by the director of master’s programs in education; and carries a
grade of ‘B‘ or better. Students applying for program admission must request to have
prior graduate study considered for transfer into the program prior to admission. Students already enrolled in the master’s program must receive the appropriate approvals
MASTER OF EDUCATION (MED)
89
for transfer credit prior to enrolling in the courses to be transferred.
Candidates having an initial or residency certificate may coordinate the MED degree
with requirements for continuing certification. Graduate students pursuing the professional teacher certificate should discuss their program with their advisor.
MED Requirements
Core Requirements (11 hours required)
• MED 601 Educational Research Methods I (3)
• MED 607 Foundations for Educational Practice (3)
• MED 605 Diversity and Social Context (3)
• MED 559 Introduction to Exceptionality (2) -or• MED 561 Instructional Strategies for the Exceptional Learner (2)
Exit options
• Thesis option
•• MED 699 Final Project/Thesis (3) -or• Non-thesis option
•• MED 690 Integrating Seminar (1)
•• One or two additional graduate-level elective courses in education (3-6)
•• Satisfactory completion of comprehensive examinations
Specialization strands (one strand required)
A. Advanced teaching and learning strand
(32-36 total semester hours, including 18 hours in the strand)
• MED 506 Curriculum and Instruction (2) -or• MED 635 Inquiry Development (2)
• MED 630 Creative Thinking and Problem-solving (3)
• MED 631 Curriculum Theory and Development (3)
• MED 633 Models of Teaching (3)
• MED 538 Literature for Children and Young Adults (2)
• Approved electives (5)
B. English as a Second Language/English Language Learner strand
(32-36 total semester hours, including 18 hours in the strand)
• MED 525 Issues & Trends in ELL & BE (3)
• MED 526 Language Acquisition Methods (3)
• MED 527 Social Linguistics and People: Theory and Practice (3)
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MASTER OF EDUCATION (MED)
• MED 528 Reading Instruction for English Language Learners (3)
• MED 566 Assessment in Special Education (3)
• MED 597 Directed Practicum: ESL/BE Internship (3)
C. Guidance and counseling strand
(40-41 total semester hours, including 26 semester hours in the strand)
• MAC 502 Group Counseling (3) -or• MED 642 Group Processes (3)
• MAC 503 Individual Counseling (3) -or• MED 641 Individual Counseling (3)
• MED 640 Guidance and Counseling (3)
• MED 644 High School and Career Counseling (3)
• MED 545 School Drug Prevention and Counseling (3)
• MED 646 Assessment and Current Issues in School Counseling (3)
• MED 648 Elementary and Middle School Counseling (3)
• MED 649 Internship in School Counseling (5)
D. Principal/program administrator strand
(35-41 total semester hours, including 21 hours in the strand)
• MED 631 Curriculum Theory and Development (3) optional – see advisor
• MED 650 Professional Development Evaluation and Supervision (3)
• MED 653 Principles of Leadership (3)
• MED 654 Principal as Leader of Learning Community (3)
• MED 655 School and Community Relations (2)
• MED 656 Educational Finance (2)
• MED 657 School Law for Educational Administrators (2)
• M
ED 659 Principal/Administrative Leadership Internship
(six – normally three credits in two semesters)
E. Reading literacy strand
(32-36 total semester hours, 18 semester hours in the strand)
• MED 671 Philosophy of Reading (2)
• M
ED 672 Writing, Spelling, and Phonics Instruction:
From Theory to Practice (3)
• MED 673 Strategies for Reading Improvement K-12 (3)
• MED 674 Literature Across the Curriculum (3)
• MED 675 Literacy Assessment and Evaluation (3)
MASTER OF EDUCATION (MED)
91
• MED 678 Literacy Leadership (2)
• Elective (2)
F . Special education strand
(36 total semester hours, including 12 semester hours in strand and six hours
of electives approved by the director of special education)
• MED 563 Management Strategies for Exceptional Learners (3)
• MED 565 Transitions to Adulthood for Special Populations (3)
• MED 566 Assessment in Special Education (3)
• MED 567 Legal Issues and the IEP (3)
• MED 569 Practicum in Special Education (3)
• MED 577 Reading Diagnosis (4)
• MED 526 Lang Acquisition Methods (3)
• MED 524 Early Childhood Education (3) (for elementary)
• MED 545 School Drug Prevention and Counseling (3) (for secondary)
• Approved electives (6)
Electives
(Select from choices below, with permission of advisor and instructor)
• MED courses listed in any strand, or
• MED 511 Methods of Teaching Math (may not duplicate ED 411)
• MED 515 Methods of Teaching Science (may not duplicate ED 415)
• MED 518 Methods of Teaching Social Studies (may not duplicate ED 418)
• MED 519 Methods of Teaching Language Arts (may not duplicate ED 419)
• MED 571 Educational Law (may not duplicate ED 371)
• MED 580 Readings in Education
• MED 584 Secondary Methods (may not duplicate ED 484)
• MED 586 Living and Learning – Middle School (may not duplicate ED 486)
• MED 595 Directed Study
• MED 597 Directed Practicum
• MED 623 The Gifted Child
• MED 643 Assessment and Appraisal
Internship (guidance and counseling and principal administrator only)
A 400 hour internship and comprehensive examination are required for the guidance
and counseling strand/ESA certificate. A 540 hour internship over two semesters is
required for the principal and program administrator strand/certificate.
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MASTER OF EDUCATION (MED)
Thesis Option – MED Programs
The MED and MIT thesis options require a thesis or field project as part of the degree.
The thesis/field project must be developed in consultation with the candidate’s advisor
and the student’s graduate committee. It will be characterized in the following way:
• The nature of the thesis/project will demonstrate advanced competency
related to the area of specialization.
• The development of the thesis/project will show significant effort above and
beyond normal employment expectations of an employer.
• The thesis/project will result in a usable, well-researched product (e.g., a
written document, a curriculum guide, a movie, a case study) and will be
accompanied by a quality research study and thesis.
• The thesis/project should make a significant contribution to the candidate
and/or his or her immediate professional position, as well as a more general
contribution to the field.
• The thesis/project cannot be approved on an ex-post-facto basis.
Once the final thesis/project is completed and approved, the candidate will
present the thesis/project at a public seminar. This oral defense is a sharing of
information, materials and/or procedures having potential usefulness to the
educational community as well as to answer questions related to the thesis.
Non-Thesis Option – MED Programs
The MED and MIT non-thesis options require one to two additional graduate-level
courses (three to six credits) beyond the requirements for the thesis option. These
elective courses may be from any strand area but may not include MED 580, MED
590, MED 595, MED 597. The courses must be acceptable for graduate credit and
typically are taken from courses offered in education. However, they may include undergraduate (with prior approval only) or graduate courses from other departments.
The non-thesis option also requires six hours of written comprehensive exams (three
hours for the core and three hours for the specialty area) and two hours of an oral
comprehensive exam. The comprehensive exam required for the guidance and counseling/ESA certification substitutes for three specialty hours of the non-thesis written
exam.
Certificates of Advanced Study in Education (CASE)
Certificate program options are offered in two areas for those who already possess
graduate degrees. All options are nondegree bearing and two are offered at the graduate level.
MASTER OF EDUCATION (MED)
93
Options for Graduate Level
1. Residency ESA School Counselor Certification;
2. Residency School Principal or School Administrator Certification
Other Requirements
• Passed state mandated tests/exams for each of the options, earn the grade/
GPA requirements specified in the undergraduate and graduate sections of
the catalog.
• Meet other state requirements for certification or added endorsements.
Admission Requirements
Minimum requirements for unconditional admission: Applicants not meeting the
unconditional admission requirements but who otherwise demonstrate the potential
to benefit from graduate education may be admitted conditionally.
In order to be unconditionally admitted, applicants must meet all of the university requirements for unconditional admission plus the following program specific requirements:
• A master’s degree from an accredited institution.
• 3.0 GPA on undergraduate work.
• A completed teacher certification program acceptable to the state of Washington (e.g. added endorsement option), an intention to complete
the school counselor ESA (e.g. school counselor option), or a completed
teacher certification program or Educational Staff Associate program and
intention to complete the school administrator option (e.g. school administrator option).
Application Requirements
Applicants must submit all of the required materials for university graduate admission (see the graduate admission section of the catalog) plus the following program
specific materials.
• Three letters of recommendation. Have each recommender send their signed
form directly to the Saint Martin’s University Office of Graduate Studies. Letter writers are encouraged to attach a letter further detailing qualifications
• Curriculum vitae outlining your professional or work experience details
• Proof of fingerprinting and clearance through OSPI
o Acknowledgement of fingerprint background check form
oDetailed information on fingerprinting procedures and payments
can be found through the Graduate Programs in Education Resource
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MASTER OF EDUCATION (MED)
page at http://www.stmartin.edu/GradStudies/images/pdfs/
EDUAdmissionResources_small.pdf
• Character and Fitness Form
• Program advising appointment
•On-site essay. Applicants must come to the College of Education to write a
brief personal statement of approximately 300-400 words. To schedule your
appointment, please email the College of Education and Counseling Psychology: [email protected]
Once admitted, students will be required to submit the following pre-enrollment
materials.
• Pre-program observation form
• Proof of CPR / First Aid registration
• Photo (can be electronic)
All application forms, letters of recommendation, and fees should be mailed to: Office of Graduate Studies, Saint Martin’s University, 5000 Abbey Way SE, Lacey, WA
98503-7500.
Certificates of Advanced Study in Education (CASE) –
Two Graduate Options
1. Residency ESA school guidance and counseling certification
(31 semester graduate level credits)
• MAC502 Group Counseling (3) or MED642 Group Processes (3)
• MAC503 Individual Counseling (3) or MED641 Individual Counseling (3)
• MED640 Guidance and Counseling (3)
• MED644 High School and Career Counseling (3)
• MED545 School Drug Prevention and Counseling (3)
• MED648 Elementary and Middle School Counseling (3)
• MED649 Internship in School Counseling (5)
• MED605 Diversity in the Classroom (3)
2. Residency school principal and/or program administrator certification
(21 semester graduate level credits)
Courses typically required:
• MED650 Professional Development Evaluation and Supervision (3)
• MED653 Principles of Leadership (3)
• MED654 Principal as Leader of Learning Community (3)
• MED655 School and Community Relations (2)
MASTER IN TEACHING (MIT)
95
• MED656 Educational Finance (2)
• MED657 School Law for Educational Administrators (2)
• MED659 Principal/Administrative Leadership Internship (6)
MASTER IN TEACHING (MIT)
Faculty
Steve Siera, director
Kathleen Allen
Huabin Chen
Fumie Hashimoto
Belinda Hill
Linda Maier
Cynthia Petersen
Eileen Reilich
Mina Ringenbach
Maureen Siera
Lou Therrell
Dan Windisch
The Master in Teaching (MIT) degree is approved by the Washington State Professional Educator Standards Board. The residency teacher education program (including the
MIT), which is designed to prepare teacher candidates to become outstanding P-12
professionals, was granted initial accreditation by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) for a period of seven years from October 2013 to October 2020.
This accreditation certifies that the forenamed professional education program has
provided evidence that the program adheres to TEAC’s quality principles.
Students completing the elementary, secondary or special education programs are
eligible for state certification. To ensure eligibility, it is sometimes necessary to make
program revisions if the Washington State Board of Education makes changes in
certificate requirements. Any changed state requirements may take precedence over
requirements outlined in this catalog. The Master in Teaching degree provides the
opportunity for simultaneously earning residency teacher certification and a master’s
degree.
Residency certification can be obtained in the areas of:
• Elementary education
• Secondary education
and/or
• Special education
During the professional sequence, students gain knowledge and skills essential to effective teaching and participate in varied field experiences in school classrooms. University faculty and local school district teachers and administrators participate in the
program and contribute to its quality and relevance.
96
MASTER IN TEACHING (MIT)
The Master in Teaching option is a 45-73 semester hour degree offered during days,
evenings, summers and weekends. The number of semester hours varies with the specific endorsement: elementary education is 60-63 semester hours in length; secondary
education is 48-50 semester hours; and special education, 64-73 semester hours. In
addition to these total required hours, the student may need to complete pre-requirements and/ or endorsement courses.
The College of Education and Counseling Psychology also offers the post baccalaureate Certificate of Advanced Study (Residency Teacher Certification) option for those
who already have a baccalaureate degree. Please see the Certificates of Advanced
Study in Education (Residency Teacher Certification) section.
Competency-Based Endorsements
All candidates are required to complete two competency-based endorsements of 30
or more semester hours each. Course requirements may be satisfied by coursework
completed at a regionally accredited, state-approved college or university with a grade
of ‘C‘ or better; approved waiver documentation for previous life and/or work experience; and/or successfully passing the appropriate WEST-E exams and Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA).
To receive an endorsement in elementary education, middle-level or special education, a student must complete all the required courses and be recommended for a
residency teaching certificate with an endorsement in elementary education (kindergarten-8); middle-level (grades 4-9); or special education (kindergarten-12). In addition to an endorsement in elementary, middle-level and/or special education, each
student is required to have at least one additional endorsement earned either at Saint
Martin’s or elsewhere. While this requirement is usually satisfied with the student’s
baccalaureate major, additional coursework may be required.
Candidates for a secondary endorsement (grades 5-12) are required to have an academic major or equivalent (30 semester-hour minimum) in the area in which they
intend to be endorsed. Students seeking MIT certification can be recommended only
in the field of their major and in fields for which they meet state requirements for
added endorsements.
Authorized endorsements
Saint Martin’s has been authorized by the Washington State Board of Education to
offer teacher certificate competency-based endorsements in the following fields: biology, lingual education, chemistry, drama, early childhood education, early childhood
special education, elementary education, English language arts, English Language
Learner, French, health/fitness, history, Japanese, mathematics, middle-level humanities, middle-level math, middle-level science, choral music, instrumental music, general music, reading, science, social studies, Spanish and special education. Contact an
education advisor for assistance in developing an approved endorsement program.
MASTER IN TEACHING (MIT)
97
Endorsement requirements
For Washington State teacher education endorsements, please refer to the requirements as outlined in the College of Education and Professional Psychology section
of this catalog.
Admission requirements
Minimum requirements for unconditional admission: Applicants not meeting the
unconditional admission requirements but who otherwise demonstrate the potential
to benefit from graduate education may be admitted conditionally.
In order to be unconditionally admitted, applicants must meet all of the university requirements for unconditional admission plus the following program specific requirements:
• An overall grade point average of 3.0 (‘B‘)
• A score of 291 (850 if taken before September 2011) on the verbal plus quantitative sections of the GRE or 386 on the MAT
• A grade of at least ‘C‘ (2.00) in each of the required pre-professional courses
• Demonstrated competency in basic skill areas (oral and written expression
mathematics)
• Scores that meet state requirements on standardized tests.
• Students should visit the MIT website or contact the Office of Graduate Studies to obtain application materials Students should review prerequisites of all
courses required for admission to the MIT Students who preregister will be processed on the assumption that they will satisfactorily complete all coursework
currently being taken.
Application procedure
Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. However, in order to receive priority consideration for admission and scholarships, applications should be submitted by the
priority deadline of the desired semester or session.
Priority Deadlines
Lacey campus
Summer semester (May - July)
Fall semester (late August - December)
Spring semester (January - May)
April 1
July 1
November 1
JBLM campus
Summer session (May - July)
Fall session I (August - October)
Fall session II (October - December)
Spring session I (January - March)
Spring session II (March - May)
April 1
July 1
September 1
November 1
February 1
98
MASTER IN TEACHING (MIT)
Application requirements
Applicants must submit all of the required materials for university graduate admission (see the graduate admission section of the catalog) plus the following program
specific materials:
• Test scores (GRE or MAT) sent directly from the testing agency.
• Three letters of recommendation. Have each recommender send their signed
form directly to the Saint Martin’s University Office of Graduate Studies. Letter
writers are encouraged to attach a letter further detailing qualifications
• Curriculum vitae outlining your professional or work experience details
• Proof of fingerprinting and clearance through OSPI
o Acknowledgement of fingerprint background check form
o Detailed information on fingerprinting procedures and payments can
be found through the Graduate Programs in Education Resource page at
http://www.stmartin.edu/GradStudies/images/pdfs/EDUAdmissionResources_small.pdf
• Character and Fitness Form
• Program advising appointment
• International students must also submit an official TOEFL or IELTS score report
and a completed declaration of finances form along with financial documentation.
• On-site essay. Applicants must come to the College of Education to write a brief
personal statement of approximately 300-400 words. To schedule your appointment, please email the College of Education and Counseling Psychology: [email protected] Out of area applicants may request alternate completion
option.
Once admitted, students will be required to submit the following pre-enrollment materials. Applicants are encouraged to get these materials in as soon as possible (even
during the application process) as they are needed before students can register.
• Pre-program observation form
• Proof of CPR / First Aid registration
• Photo (can be electronic)
All application materials should be sent directly to:
Office of Graduate Studies
Saint Martin’s University
5000 Abbey Way SE
Lacey, WA 98503-7500
[email protected]
After all materials are received, the applicant’s file will be reviewed. Possible outcomes
include unconditional admission, conditional admission, or nonacceptance. Once application materials are submitted, they become the property of the university, and
cannot be returned.
MASTER IN TEACHING (MIT)
99
Master in Teaching Degree Requirements
Courses of study are planned in consultation with a program advisor and may not be
changed without prior approval. Degree candidates are expected to receive a grade
of at least a ‘B‘ in all courses. Candidates who receive a grade of ‘C‘ will be placed on
academic probation and their candidacy reviewed by the graduate program advisory
committee. A student who receives a grade lower than ‘C‘ or two grades of ‘C‘ or
whose overall grade point average falls below 3.0 will be automatically withdrawn
from the MIT program. The student may apply for reinstatement. The time limit for
completion of degree requirements is seven years.
A student working toward a Master in Teaching degree must advance to candidacy. To
advance to candidacy, the student must:
• Have completed 15 semester hours of graduate study.
• Be in good standing.
• Have earned a cumulative GPA of 3.0.
• Have completed MED 601 (or be enrolled in MED 601 during the semester in
which the application is submitted).
• Have formed a supervisory committee.
Degree candidates must complete an approved course of 48-66 graduate-level semester hours to secure their degree.
Elementary education: 60-61 semester hours (includes certification and an elementary endorsement)
Secondary education: 48-49 semester hours (includes certification and a secondary
content area endorsement)
Special education: 65-66 semester hours (includes certification and a SED endorsement)
Nine semester hours of graduate work may be taken at another institution and transferred, provided the work fits the program plan; is recommended by the program
advisor; is approved by the director of master’s programs in education; and carries a
grade of ‘B‘ or better. Students applying for program admission must request to have
prior graduate study considered for transfer into the program prior to admission. Students already enrolled in the master’s program must receive the appropriate approvals
for transfer credit prior to enrolling in the courses to be transferred.
Ordinarily, courses in professional education completed more than seven years before
admission or readmission do not meet professional requirements. Students may need
to repeat all or part of these courses or document current knowledge/skills before
student teaching.
100 MASTER IN TEACHING (MIT)
MIT Requirements
Pre-professional courses (required before formal admission)
• ENG 101 College Writing I
• ENG 102 College Writing II
• SPH 106 Public Address -or- THR 211 Acting I
• PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
• Mathematics course above MTH 101
• CSC 160 Computer Applications and Issues
• Natural science, with laboratory (elementary)
• U.S. History (elementary)
• World History (elementary)
Core courses for elementary, secondary or special education options
(11 semester hours; must be taken at the graduate level)
• MED 601 Educational Research Methods I (3)
• MED 607 Foundations for Educational Practice (3)
• MED 605 Diversity and Social Context (3)
• MED 559 Introduction to Exceptionality (2) -or• MED 561 Instructional Strategies for the Exceptional Learner (2)
(Unless taken prior to admission, MED 559 (2) Introduction to Exceptionality
is included in certification core requirements)
Exit Options
• Thesis option
•• MED 699 Final Project/Thesis (3) -or• Non-thesis option
•• MED 690 Integrating Seminar (1)
•• One or two graduate-level elective courses in education (3-6)
•• Satisfactory completion of Comprehensive Examinations
Basic Certification Core Courses for Elementary, Secondary or Special Education
Options (28 semester hours; must be taken at the graduate level)
• MED 506 Curriculum and Instruction (2)
• MED 512 Technology for the Classroom (2)
• MED 526 Methods of Teaching Language Acquisition (3)
• MED 560 Classroom Management (2)
• MED 559 Introduction to Exceptionality (2)
• MED 570 Classroom Assessment (2)
• MED 571 Educational Law (1)
MASTER IN TEACHING (MIT) 101
• MED 583 Issues of Abuse/Teacher as Counselor (1)
• MED 593 and/or 594 and/or 596 Internship (12)
• MED 598 Internship Seminar (1)
Elementary Methods Courses (20 semester hours – required in addition to the
basic and core courses listed above; courses previously taken at the undergraduate
level may apply)
• MED 511 Methods of Teaching Math (3)
• MED 515 Methods of Teaching Science (3)
• MED 518 Methods of Teaching Social Studies (2)
• MED 519 Methods of Teaching Language Arts (2)
• MED 529 Arts and Movement (4)
• MED 538 Child and Adolescent Literature (2)
• MED 574 Primary Reading/Writing (1)
• MED 576 Reading Content Area for Elementary Teachers (1)
• MED 592 Elementary Education Practicum (2)
Secondary Methods Courses (eight to nine semester hours – required in ad-
dition to the basic and core courses listed above; courses previously taken at the
undergraduate level may apply; additional methods may be required for individual
endorsements)
• MED 582 Reading Assessment and Intervention for Secondary Teachers (1)
• MED 584 General Secondary Methods with Practicum (4)
• MED 585 Content Area Reading for Secondary Teachers (1)
• Subject specific methods class MED 511, 515, 518 or 519
Special Education Methods Courses (25 semester hours – required in addition to
the basic and core courses listed above; courses previously taken at the undergraduate level may apply)
• MED 563 Management Strategies for Exceptional Learners (3)
• MED 565 Transitions to Adulthood for Special Populations (3)
• MED 566 Assessment in Special Education (3)
• MED 567 Legal Issues and the IEP (3)
• M
ED 524 Issues and Trends in ECE (3)
-or- MED 526 Methods of Language Acquisition (ESL) (3)
• MED 577 Reading Diagnosis (4)
• MED 545 School Drug Prevention and Counseling (3)
• MED 569 Practicum in Special Education (3)
102 SPECIAL EDUCATION ENDORSEMENT
SPECIAL EDUCATION ENDORSEMENT
(GRADES PRESCHOOL-12)
The University’s Special Education endorsement prepares teachers to work with mildly or moderately handicapped students in an inclusionary classroom, a resource room
or a self-contained special education class. Completion of the required courses for
the endorsement will lead to an institutional recommendation that the student be
endorsed in special education.
NOTE: Completion of the special education MIT and/or endorsement leads to a special education endorsement. That endorsement does not allow the certificate holder to
teach in a regular elementary or secondary classroom. Therefore, students also must
complete the required elementary or secondary sequence, including at least eight
weeks of internship in a regular classroom. The section concerning endorsements applies to the special education program as well as the elementary program. To ensure
proper sequencing of courses, students planning to enter the Master in Teaching program must consult an advisor from the College of Education and Professional Psychology prior to taking courses at the University.
Thesis option
The MIT thesis option requires a thesis or field project as part of the degree. The thesis/field project must be developed in consultation with the student’s advisor and the
student’s graduate committee. It will be characterized in the following way:
• Th
e nature of the thesis/project will demonstrate advanced competency
related to the area of specialization.
• Th
e development of the thesis/project will show significant effort above and
beyond the normal workload of the candidate
• Th
e thesis/project will result in a usable, well-researched product (such as a
written document, a curriculum guide, a movie, a case study) and be accompanied by a quality research study and thesis.
• Th
e thesis/project should make a significant contribution to the candidate
and/or his or her immediate professional position, and a more general contribution to the field.
Once the final thesis/project is completed and approved, the student will present the
thesis/project at a public seminar. This oral defense is a sharing of information, materials and/or procedures having potential usefulness to the educational community as
well as to answer questions related to the thesis.
Non-thesis option
The MIT non-thesis option requires one to two additional graduate-level courses
(three to six credits) beyond the requirements for the thesis option. These elective
courses can be from any strand area but may not include MED 580, 590, 595, 597. The
MASTER’S DEGREES IN EDUCATION COURSES 103
course must be acceptable for graduate credit and typically are taken from courses
offered in education. However, they may include undergraduate (with prior approval
only) or graduate courses from other departments.
The non-thesis option also requires six hours of written comprehensive exams (three
hours for the core and three hours for the specialty area) and two hours of an oral
comprehensive exam.
Internship
All teacher certification programs require supervised student teaching/internship.
Each student is expected to complete all required professional courses and be advanced to candidacy before applying for the internship.
To facilitate placement, application for supervised internship must be made by the
deadline for the internship (contact the College of Education and Professional Psychology office for specific deadline dates). Candidates are asked to convey special
placement requests at that time. University supervisors will discuss individual placement problems with students, but the University ultimately makes the internship assignments in cooperation with school district personnel. Students may not be placed
in the same school in which a spouse or family member is employed. Students may
not make special arrangements on their own. To do so may jeopardize placement at
that school and/or district and may result in termination of any/all field experience
placements in that district for the student.
Completion of an application for intern teaching and assignment to a school or classroom are tentative and are based on successful completion of coursework in progress.
Students may be withdrawn from intern teaching at the discretion of the College of
Education and Professional Psychology faculty or of the administrators of the P-12
school. Saint Martin’s College of Education and Professional Psychology placement offices make no guarantees for student teaching placement in a particular school district
or school building, with a particular cooperating teacher or University supervisor, or
during a particular semester. Education programs staff will work diligently to obtain
a placement for student teaching, but final acceptance of a student teacher is the prerogative of the school district.
All internship assignments are considered full-time work, normally requiring seven
hours a day in the school plus additional time for class preparation and seminars.
MASTER’S DEGREES IN EDUCATION COURSES
Split-Level Course Requirements
Many courses offered in the Master of Education and Master in Teaching programs
have an undergraduate level offered concurrently with the graduate level course.
Graduate core split level courses (e.g., ED 306/MED 506) are typically one credit less
than the undergraduate section. The “equal work but less credit” split-level courses
104 MASTER’S DEGREES IN EDUCATION COURSES
therefore adjust for graduate credit earned. Graduate students also will be required
to analyze or perform research or accept greater leadership in the course content.
In split-level courses for which undergraduate and graduate students earn the same
credit, graduate students will be expected to complete additional requirements. Splitlevel courses are numbered at the 500 level. Courses at the 600 level are designed to be
offered for graduate credit only.
MED 504
Practicum Level 1 (1-3)
Independent practicum related to strand/endorsement/area of interest. Includes 30
hour practicum plus 5 hours written assignments per credit enrolled. Prerequisite:
Graduate status. Restricted enrollment.
MED 506 Curriculum and Instruction (2)
Multiple approaches to curriculum and instruction emphasizing becoming a reflective teacher. Principles of organizing, sequencing, delivering, evaluating instruction.
Emphasis on development of a thematic unit with lesson design based on state and
national standards. Exploration of teaching methods such as cooperative learning,
concept development and inquiry learning. Prerequisite: Acceptance as a teacher certification candidate.
MED 508 Practicum Level 2 (1-3)
Independent practicum related to strand/endorsement/area of interest. Includes 30
hour practicum plus 5 hours written assignments per credit enrolled. Prerequisite:
Graduate status. Restricted enrollment.
MED 511 Methods of Teaching Math (3)
Objectives, materials, methods and curriculum for teaching preschool-grade 8 mathematics. Emphasis on theory, teaching strategies and integrated knowledge and skills
of mathematics for elementary teachers, Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements and Grade Level Expectations. Includes a 10-hour observation and
instruction practicum in primary-grade 8 mathematics. Prerequisite: MED 506.
MED 512
Technology for the Classroom (2)
Emphasis on how to integrate computers and other technologies into classroom teaching, rather than computer skills themselves. Class discussions will focus on teaching
philosophies, issues and trends in an information age. Students will develop curriculum and classroom materials using e-mail, internet and selected software. Emphasis
on development of electronic portfolio.
MED 513 Multimedia Production for Educators (3)
Classroom applications of multimedia hardware and peripherals such as CD-ROMs,
laserdiscs, scanner, digital cameras and video cameras. Ways to incorporate these
techniques into the classroom will be explored. Book production, models, animation,
cartoons, photography and posters, along with other multimedia models/techniques,
are used to creatively express a view of the world. Students will create an advanced integrated multimedia project. Prerequisite: MED 512 or equivalent. Offered on demand.
MASTER’S DEGREES IN EDUCATION COURSES 105
MED 514 Network Systems for Educators (3)
Exploration of management information systems development, and network systems
as they pertain to the preschool-grade 12 school environment. Students will create
home pages for themselves and participate in the creation of pages for the Saint Martin’s website. Course content will incorporate the objectives and functions of a school’s
technology center, techniques and administrative procedures, including budget preparation, space use, selection and organization of materials and equipment. Prerequisite: MED 512. Offered on demand.
MED 515 Methods of Teaching Science (3)
Objectives, materials, methods and curriculum for teaching preschool-grade 8 science. Emphasis on theory, teaching strategies and integrated knowledge and skills of
science for elementary teachers, Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements. Prerequisite: MED 506.
MED 518 Methods of Teaching Social Studies (2)
Introduces specific methods used in preschool-grade 8 to teach social studies. Emphasis on integrated thematic unit planning, map-globe interpretation and content specified in the Washington State Essential Academic Learning Requirements for grades
primary-12. Includes a 10-hour observation and instruction practicum in primarygrade 12 social studies. Prerequisite: MED 506.
MED 519 Methods of Teaching Language Arts (2)
Objectives, materials, methods and curriculum for teaching listening, speaking, writing and reading in grades kindergarten-8. Emphasis on theory, teaching strategies and
integrated knowledge and skills of language arts for elementary teachers, Washington
State Essential Academic Learning Requirements and Grade Level Expectations. Includes a 10 hour instructional practicum in primary-grade 8 language arts. Prerequisite: MED 506.
MED 524 Early Childhood Education (3)
Important issues related to teaching preschool-3 will be emphasized. Methods, curriculum and assessment specific to early childhood education will be reviewed, as
will the relationship of family and community to the student, classroom environment
and promotion of social competence. Prerequisite: MED 506; MED 559 or concurrent
enrollment.
MED 525
Issues and Trends in English Language Learners and Bilingual
Education (3)
Examination of the educational theories, practice and research related to the education of English Language Learners (ELL) and bilingual education. This course presents issues pertaining to educating English Language Learners, including program
models, school community, assessment, and politics involving ELL and bilingual
education. Involvement of parents, mainstream teachers and others who do not have
ESOL or bilingual training in educating English Language Learners will be included.
Additionally, discussions will include evaluating the historical, political, social/cultural, and linguistic issues involved in meeting the needs of students who are speakers
106 MASTER’S DEGREES IN EDUCATION COURSES
of languages other than English. Resources for continuing professional development
in the fields of second language instruction and bilingual education will be provided.
Prerequisites: MED 506; MED 526.
MED 526 Language Acquisition Methods (3)
Course focuses on developing student’s proficiency-oriented teaching style, exploring
various methodologies, theories and history of language acquisition. Students will be
able to apply language acquisition theories and develop personal teaching styles. Uses
English-as-a-Second-Language, English Language Learner, bilingual education and
foreign language strategies. Includes a 10-hour practicum in an ELL setting. Prerequisite: MED 506.
MED 527 Social Linguistics and People: Theory and Practice (3)
The course concerns the nature of human language, what the study of language tells
us about the human mind and the relation of language to its cultural and educational
context. The scope of the course is interdisciplinary and the topics explored reach
beyond the boundaries of linguistics to other scientific disciplines that constitute the
field of cognitive science: psycholinguistics, philosophy of language and the mind, anthropology and artificial intelligence. Examination of the educational theories, practice and research related to the education of diverse populations. The impact of social
context factors such as race, ethnicity, culture, gender and economic status on social
linguistics, knowledge bases, learning styles, socialization patterns and educational
opportunity will be studied. Development of appropriate and diverse classrooms and
curriculum will be emphasized. Prerequisite: MED 506.
MED 528 Reading Instruction of English Language Learners (3)
The course provides knowledge of various methods of instruction for ELL/bilingual
education students with emphasis on techniques for effective instruction and assessment of oral language development, reading and writing. Students develop multicultural curriculum to support language learning, using ELL/bilingual education strategies. Prequisites: MED 506, MED 526.
MED 529 Arts and Movement (4)
This course explores the elements, principles and pedagogy of visual art, drama, music
and creative movement for the elementary classroom. Students will create and participate in arts experiences for the class and others. Prerequisite: MED 506.
MED 538 Literature for Children and Young Adults (2)
Nature, history and sources of children’s books. Required for elementary certification,
special education, reading, English and English/language arts endorsements. Prerequisite: MED 506.
MED 545 School Drug Prevention and Counseling (3)
Examines pharmacology, counseling approaches and school programs related to the
school counselors’ role in prevention, counseling and referral of students with drug
and alcohol problems. Prerequisite: MED 640 (concurrent enrollment allowed).
MASTER’S DEGREES IN EDUCATION COURSES 107
MED 559 Introduction to Exceptionality (2)
Introduction to philosophical, historical, legal and social implications of the exceptional student from an integrated, strategy-based pedagogical perspective. Includes 10
hours of classroom experience as a part of the course.
MED 560 Classroom Management (2)
Through an understanding of current theories and practices in classroom management, students begin to create personal philosophy of management. Includes, but is
not limited to, strategies for individual and group behavior and instruction developed
through systematic application of specific models. Includes a 10-hour practicum. Prerequisite: MED 506 or concurrent enrollment.
MED 561 Instructional Methods of Exceptional Learners (2)
Principles of organizing, sequencing, delivering and evaluating instruction for exceptional learners. Effective methods for teaching content-area material such as reading,
math or science. Selecting and adapting curriculum. Prerequisites: MED 506; MED
559.
MED 563 Management Strategies for Exceptional Learners (3)
Strategies for individual and group behavior/instructional management. Various
competencies developed in systematic application of specific models for exceptional
learners. Strategies for organization, administration and participation with families
and other significant parties are included. Prerequisites: MED 506; MED 559.
MED 565 Transitions to Adulthood for Special Populations (3)
Examines the educational transition from school-based special education programs
to independent living or agency-supported living for differently abled people through
presentation and discussion of current literature, field-based participatory research,
on-site visits and other appropriate formats. Prerequisite: MED 559.
MED 566 Assessment in Special Education (3)
Study of professional practice in special education assessment, including ecological,
classroom and curriculum-based assessment; norm-and criterion-referenced testing;
diagnostic instruments and procedures; and alternative assessment strategies. Observation of school-based assessment techniques and practical application of learned
techniques is required. Prerequisite: MED 570, MED 559.
MED 567 Legal Issues and the IEP (3)
Comprehensive study of federal and state regulations on populations. Communicative ethics and collaborative strategies joining families, school personnel and outside
agencies are emphasized. Prerequisite: MED 566 and MED 559.
MED 569 Practicum in Special Education (3)
Observation, small group instruction and assessment of exceptional learners in public
and private sectors. Includes a 90-hour practicum and 15-hour seminar. Prerequisite:
Minimum of 3.33 grade point average in three prior special education courses.
108 MASTER’S DEGREES IN EDUCATION COURSES
MED 570 Classroom Assessment (2)
Students learn how to construct and evaluate classroom assessments to assess student
learning. Also covered are state and national trends in assessment and testing, educational statistics, norm- and criterion-referenced tests, standardized tests, alternative
assessments, grading, assessment management technology and conferencing skills.
Prerequisite: MED 506, or concurrent enrollment.
MED 571 Educational Law (1)
Fulfills new Washington State requirements for understanding educational law and
its relationship to contemporary school issues and problems. State agencies and local school boards, university issues and law, teachers’ employment, tenure, academic
freedom and student issues of compulsory education.
MED 572 Integrated Approach to Phonics and Spelling (2)
An in-depth exploration of the theoretical rationale and research base for the learning and teaching of the reading skills, content and strategies of phonemic awareness,
phonics and spelling as they are integrated into the reading program in elementary
school. Prerequisites: MED 519, MED 574 and MED 576.
MED 574 Primary Reading/Writing Instruction (1)
This course explores the reading and writing process as it pertains to the teaching of
beginning reading. The five components of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics,
fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) are applied to the teaching of beginning
reading. Includes a 10-hour practicum. Prerequisite: MED 519.
MED 575 Reader-Writer Workshop (3)
The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of the reader-writer workshop approach to teaching reading and writing as an integrated process for K-8 students. Prerequisites: MED 519, MED 574 and MED 576.
MED 576 Content-area Reading for Elementary Teachers (1)
This course is planned to facilitate the application of specific reading and writing strategies to assist comprehension of printed materials in all subject areas by students at all
levels of reading. Major components of reading (fluency, vocabulary and comprehension) are used in planning strategy lessons for use with students. Prerequisites: MED
519 or permission of instructor.
MED 577 Reading Diagnosis (4)
Explores the area of reading disabilities. Students learn when and how to use various
assessments and instructional strategies to help struggling readers. Reading behavior
is analyzed using informal reading inventories, miscue analysis and other assessment
tools. Includes a 10 hour practicum in a weekly tutoring experience, diagnosing children, planning and implementing instruction. Prerequisites: MED 519, MED 574 and
MED 576.
MED 579 Reading Practicum (3)
The purpose of this course is to apply theoretical knowledge learned in the reading
program. Includes a 90 hour practicum and a 15 hour seminar that serves as an op-
MASTER’S DEGREES IN EDUCATION COURSES 109
portunity to observe and practice instructional activities in reading in an extended
field experience. Prerequisite: MED 519, MED 574, MED 576.
MED 580 Readings in Education (1-2)
An independent readings course for students with special needs. Reading list to be developed by student and advisor. Prerequisite: Graduate status. Restricted enrollment.
MED 581 Issues and Trends in Literacy Instruction (3)
This course is designed as a student-centered forum in which students take a leadership role in the study and discussion of current reading topics and current research in
literacy education. Prerequisites: MED 519, MED 574, and MED 576.
MED 582 Reading Assessment and Intervention for Secondary Teachers (1)
This course focuses on the reading behaviors of secondary students. Students will
acquire the necessary knowledge and skills to support secondary students in reading complex materials. Students will explore the reading process and examine their
own reading behaviors. Assessment strategies are studied and applied to the content
areas taught in secondary schools. Students are required to participate in a secondary school, either working in a reading program and/or tutoring a struggling student.
Includes a 10-hour practicum. Prerequisites: MED 506, and MED 585 or concurrent
enrollment.
MED 583 Issues of Abuse/Teacher as Counselor (1)
Course addresses the teacher’s role in identifying, reporting and working with children who have been victims of child abuse. Also includes the role of the classroom
teacher as a counselor. Prerequisites: MED 506.
MED 584 Secondary Methods/Practicum (4)
Methods component: students learn varied instructional methods via performance
and observation of peer teaching. Also covered are advanced instructional planning
and forming more effective relationships with students. Practicum component includes a 90 hour practicum in a structured observation and teaching experience in a
high school plus 15 hour practicum seminar. Prerequisite: MED 506.
MED 585 Content-area Reading for Secondary Teachers (1)
This course explores the reading process as it is applied to content areas taught in the
secondary school. This course facilitates the application of specific reading and writing strategies to assist comprehension of expository materials in all subject areas by
students at all levels of reading. Major components of reading (fluency, vocabulary
and comprehension) are used in planning strategy lessons for use with students. Prerequisite: MED 506.
MED 586 Living and Learning in the Middle School (3)
Intertwines specific needs of preadolescents (ages 10-14 years old) with middle school
philosophy, organization and specific middle school teaching methods. Includes a 30hour practicum designed to integrate observation and teaching at the middle-school
level. Prerequisites: MED 506.
110 MASTER’S DEGREES IN EDUCATION COURSES
MED 591 Added Endorsement Practicum (3)
Includes 90 hours of structured observation, teaching preparation, teaching experience, and reflection in a P-12 setting in the added endorsement field plus 15 hours
research/lesson plans/final paperwork. Includes a minimum of two observations by a
University supervisor using the Washington State Performance based Pedagogy Assessment. Prerequisite: Acceptance to added endorsement program; permission of
instructor.
MED 592 Elementary Education Practicum (2)
The purpose of this course is to apply theoretical knowledge learned in the elementary
education program to the classroom setting. This seminar and specialty practicum
serves as an opportunity to practice instructional activities in an extended field experience. Includes a 90 hour practicum in an elementary classroom plus a 15 hour seminar. Course may be substituted with MED569 or MED579. Prerequisite: Last semester
of coursework before student teaching.
MED 593 Internship, Special Education (12)
Supervised full-time internship with a split assignment. Special education students
will split their internship between special education and either an elementary or a
secondary school, depending on their endorsements. Prerequisites: Completion of all
required coursework and endorsements leading to recommendation for certification.
Course fees apply.
MED 594 Internship, Elementary Education (12)
Supervised full-time internship in an elementary school for one semester. Prerequisite: Completion of all required coursework and endorsements leading to recommendation for certification. Course fees apply.
MED 595 Directed Study (1-3)
Independent study on topics of special interest. Restricted enrollment.
MED 596 Internship, Secondary Education (12)
Supervised full-time internship in a middle school, junior high, or high school setting
for one semester. Prerequisite: Completion of all required coursework and endorsements leading to recommendation for certification. Course fees apply.
MED 598 Internship Teaching Seminar (1)
Weekly seminar for student or intern teachers. Must be taken concurrently with internship. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MED 590.
MED 601
Educational Research Methods I (3)
An introduction to traditional and alternative forms of understanding and communicating about the teaching profession. A variety of techniques related to understanding
and writing, including library research, field research, narrative, metaphoric and personal reflection will be studied. This course is a prerequisite for the research course,
MED 609, and the thesis course, MED 699. To be taken prior to admission to candidacy. Prerequisites: Admission to graduate program.
MASTER’S DEGREES IN EDUCATION COURSES 111
MED 605 Diversity and Social Context in the Classroom:
Theory and Practice (3)
Examination of the educational theories, practice and research related to the education of diverse populations. The impact of social context factors such as race, ethnicity,
culture, gender and economic status on knowledge bases, learning styles, socialization
patterns and educational opportunity will be studied. Development of appropriate
and diverse classrooms and curriculums will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program; relevant professional experience.
MED 607 Foundations for Educational Practice (3)
This is a course designed to provide a graduate student the basic knowledge and skills
in educational philosophy and educational psychology. Graduate students will be
asked to think critically and creatively about concepts involved with the control of
education, educational philosophy and psychology. The course will include how these
philosophies or theories affect best practice; and how best practice affects these theories. Focus will be on those basic concepts central to the certification requirements as
well as refinement and extension of those concepts.
MED 630 Creative Thinking and Problem-solving (3)
Examination of basic theoretical concepts involved with creativity and problemsolving. Attention to development of creative thinking and problem-solving abilities.
Development of ideas and design of activities aimed at enhancing the capabilities of
others.
MED 631 Curriculum Theory and Development (3)
Design, development and evaluation of instructional material. Emphasis on construction of educational sequences for various types of learning tasks. Selection, sequencing, teaching procedures and assessment are discussed. Prerequisite: MED 506.
MED 633 Models of Teaching (3)
Comprehensive review of various instructional strategies frequently used in classroom settings. Emphasis on strategies amenable to analytical review and evaluation.
Prerequisite: MED 506.
MED 635 Inquiry Development (2)
Development of questioning techniques that enable teachers to increase the verbal
skills of students and make students more autonomous, productive learners.
MED 636
Individualized Instruction (2)
Rationale and principles of individualized instruction, with special attention to programs, methods and materials now available, as well as development of new programs.
MED 637 The Gifted Child (2)
Investigation of the gifted student, emphasizing definition, attributes, identification
and implications for the educator.
112 MASTER’S DEGREES IN EDUCATION COURSES
MED 640 Guidance and Counseling (3)
Consideration of major principles and practices of guidance and counseling. Roles of
the teacher and school counselor in the guidance and counseling process. Includes 10
hour practicum in a P-12 setting.
MED 641
Individual Counseling (3)
Consideration of major principles and practices of individual counseling for school
counselors. Either MED 641 or MAC 501 can be taken to meet the individual counseling requirement for the guidance and counseling strand. Prerequisite MED 640.
MED 642 Group Processes (3)
Consideration of major principles and practices of group counseling for school counselors. Either MED 642 or MAC 502 can be taken to meet the group counseling requirement for the guidance and counseling strand. Prerequisite: MED 640
MED 643 Assessment and Appraisal (3)
Introduction to major techniques of assessing strengths and weaknesses of individuals
in academic, psychological and social domains.
MED 644 High School and Career Counseling (3)
The course combines two topics: 1) topics and skills needed for high school counselors, and 2) career counseling topics and skills needed for K-12 school counselors.
Prerequisite: MED 640
MED 646 Assessment and Current Issues in School Counseling (3)
Covers research on current issues of interest to school counselors; consulting and
training design roles of school counselors; and testing and assessment competencies
needed by school counselors. Prerequisite: MED 640.
MED 647 Education Foundations for ESA Certification (1)
Focuses on problems of school and society, human growth development, learning and
American school law for ESA school counseling candidates without prior coursework
in the above topics.
MED 648 Elementary and Middle School Counseling (3)
Covers topics and skills needed for elementary and middle school counselors. Emphasis on pragmatic, developmentally appropriate, counseling skills for working with
K-8 students. Topics include community resources, testing and measurement, working with parents, visitations to K-8 schools, the varying roles of K-8 school counselors,
prevention programs and the role of school counselor as staff trainer and consultant.
Includes a 10 hour practicum. Prerequisite: MED 640.
MED 649 Internship in School Counseling (3)
An accumulation of 400 hours of supervised and school based internship in a P-12
school setting and a one-hour weekly seminar. Must be repeated each semester that
a student is working on the internship. Each student must take a total of five credits.
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
MASTER’S DEGREES IN EDUCATION COURSES 113
MED 650 Professional Development Evaluation and Supervision (3)
The study and development of knowledge/skills and techniques/strategies essential to
personnel evaluation, supervision and development. Focus will be on three related areas: assessment of person’s competency and performance; design of relevant didactic
and practicum staff development experiences; and education as a “profession.”
MED 653 Principles of Leadership (3)
This course examines the basic principles of school leadership. Using research, theory
from education and the social sciences, and knowledge based on effective practices,
students will examine various aspects of the daily work of principals, the characteristics of effective schools, and the value of leading school change and improvement.
Special attention will be given to how principals lead, manage programs and shape
school culture. Theories, concepts, and models will be applied to the realities of successful, productive leadership.
MED 654 Principal as Leader of Learning Community (3)
An introduction to the information and competencies necessary to prepare administrators capable of facilitating the development, articulation, implementation and
stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community; who are advocating, nurturing and sustaining a school culture and instructional
program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth; who are capable
of ensuring management of the organization, operations and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment; and who will act with integrity, fairness
and in an ethical manner.
MED 655 School and Community Relations (2)
A course designed to provide a thorough examination of the school and its interaction
with the community. Internal and external communities and the relationship between
and among these entities and the school will be examined, including the role of communications in school-community relations. The overall goal is to produce leaders
who can take action to promote organizational growth and productivity.
MED 656 Educational Finance (2)
An overview of financial support for schools including legal and historical basis of
school funding, sources of funding for schools, basics of funding mechanisms, budgeting procedures, and building level financial management. Emphasis will be placed
on legal foundations and requirements for practice.
MED 657 School Law for Educational Administrators (2)
Provides an overview of federal and state law that principals and school administrators are responsible to know and administer, including student rights and protections
under special education and privacy requirements. This course satisfies the following
requirements of WAC 181-27-(2): principal and program administrator candidates,
in order to support student achievement of the state learning goals and essential academic learning requirements, will complete a well-planned sequence of courses and/
or experiences in an approved preparation program which shall include: (B) Information Collection… (C) Problem analysis… (D) Judgment… (P) Oral expression… (Q)
114 MASTER’S DEGREES IN EDUCATION COURSES
Written expression… (R) Philosophical and cultural values… (S) Legal and regulatory applications. Prerequisite: Admission to the school administration program or
permission of instructor.
MED 659
Principal/Program Administrator Internship (6)normally three
credits in two semesters
An accumulation of 540 hours of school-based, supervised, internship in a kindergarten through grade 12 school setting and a weekly one hour seminar. (A minimum of
270 of the hours must be accumulated during the regular school day.) Repeated each
semester that a student is working on the internship. Each student must take a total
of six credits.
MED 671 Philosophy of Reading Instruction (2)
Explores theoretical and historical base of teaching of reading and writing in grades
kindergarten-8. Also offers an overview of the body of knowledge associated with the
field of reading instruction. Prerequisites: MED 519, MED 574 and MED 576.
MED 672 Writing, Spelling, and Phonics Instruction: From Theory to Practice (3)
This course is designed for the serious student of literacy education to study and evaluate the trends and issues in the field of education that have lead to the professionally
accepted best practices in the areas of writing, spelling, and phonics instruction in
America’s schools. Prerequisites: Admission to the MED graduate program.
MED 673 Strategies for Reading Improvement K-12 (3)
Students learn how to create a learning environment that fosters reading improvement at the K-12 level. This course focuses on those cognitive strategies needed for the
instruction of reading comprehension and effective study methods. Students assess
the effectiveness of the school/class reading curriculum and learn how to supplement
that curriculum for diverse learners. Prerequisites: Admission to the MED graduate
program.
MED 674 Literature Across the Curriculum (3)
Literature is part of a balanced-literacy program. In this course, students will build
their knowledge of quality children’s and young adult literature and develop practical
teaching methods using literature. Using a literacy curriculum framework, students
will explore ways to effectively use literature to supplement, extend, and enhance student learning. Prerequisites: Admission to the MED graduate program.
MED 675 Literacy Assessment and Evaluation (3)
The study of reading development and the analysis of reading behavior using a variety
of assessment tools, including Running Records, Informal Reading Inventories and
Miscue Analysis. Students work with children individually and in small groups to
diagnose, plan, and implement effective instruction. Prerequisites: Admission to the
MED graduate program.
MED 678 Literacy Leadership (2)
This course is designed to aid the master teacher in the development of leadership
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 115
skills in preparation for filling the role of reading specialist in schools. It is further
planned to facilitate the preparation of teachers to be effective reading coaches in their
schools. Prerequisites: Must be taken in the last 12 hours of the graduate program.
MED 685 School Counselor Peer Review (1)
This is a Washington state required OSPI course for continued School Counselor
Certification (WAC 181-79A-221). Students will share, examine, and receive and provide peer review on their approaches for having a positive impact on their student’s
academic learning and lives. Prerequisite: previously earned ESA School Counselor
Certificate.
MED 690 Integrating Seminar (1)
Required for non-thesis option students. Provides practice in integrative writing similar to that required for comprehensive examinations and practice in questions comparable to oral examinations. Designed to be taken during the last semester of the
candidate’s program. Prerequisites: All graduate core courses completed and Graduate
Committee formed.
MED 699 Final Project/Thesis Research Component (3)
Designed for the student to complete the thesis/final project (thesis option).
HAL AND INGE MARCUS
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING
Zella Kahn-Jetter, Dean
The mission of the Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering is to provide Saint
Martin’s University engineering graduates with an education that will prepare them
for successful careers in engineering practice and to prepare students for advanced
graduate studies, and lifelong learning.
The mission complements and reinforces the University’s mission:
Saint Martin’s University is a Catholic Benedictine institution of higher education that
empowers students to pursue a lifetime of learning and accomplishment in all arenas
of human endeavor.
Saint Martin’s students learn to make a positive difference in their lives and in the lives
of others through the interaction of faith, reason and service.
The University honors both the sacredness of the individual and the significance of
community in the ongoing journey of becoming.
The guiding philosophy is to provide both a strong fundamental liberal education
and a strong engineering education. The liberal arts portion of the program for undergraduate students emphasizes ethical values, problem-solving skills and service to
116 MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING (MCE)
society and is administered in a supportive environment. The professional portion of
the program is student-engineer centered: recognizing, supporting and developing
the unique strengths and capabilities of each individual. Additionally, the engineer’s
role in the team, in the company and in society is a common thread that lends cohesion to the programs.
The Engineering Advisory Board is a voluntary group of practicing professionals who
help guide Saint Martin’s School of Engineering in setting program goals and evaluating graduates.
With the Catholic, Benedictine tradition as the guiding principle, the University accomplishes its mission by recognizing the spiritual and ethical dimensions of all human activity and by celebrating the uniqueness and worth of each human being. The
goal is to provide a living and learning environment that prepares students for active,
responsible, and productive lives in their professions and as members of the local and
global community.
In keeping with our Benedictine heritage, we provide an environment where spirituality, hospitality, service, and creativity can flourish. We nurture the student-engineer’s
spirit of inquiry and discovery, including self-discovery, and provide opportunities for
them to develop their skills in varied forms of communication.
MASTER’S PROGRAMS IN ENGINEERING
Saint Martin’s University School of Engineering offers graduate studies leading to
Master of Civil Engineering, Master of Mechanical Engineering and Master of Engineering Management degrees.
MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING (MCE)
Faculty
Chun Kyung Seong, director
Kevin Almer
Pius Igharo
David Jansen
Bijan Khaleghi
Jir-Jong Lee
Dintie Mahamah
Don Stout
Jill Walsh
The Master of Civil Engineering Program is designed to provide engineering and
sci¬ence graduates with specialized technical knowledge oriented toward professional
engineering practice in their field of interest within civil engineering. The program
includes advanced courses in structural engineering, transportation engineering, environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering and construction management.
The curriculum is adaptable to both recent graduates and engineers with professional
experience. The student will emerge with enhanced engineering analysis and design
MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING (MCE) 117
skills tailored to his or her professional objectives. All courses are offered in the late
af¬ternoon or evening to accommodate working students who are professionals.
Classes are generally scheduled to allow a student to complete the program in a two to
three year period by taking two classes per semester.
Admission Requirements
Minimum requirements for unconditional admission: Applicants not meeting the
unconditional admission requirements but who otherwise demonstrate the potential
to benefit from graduate education may be admitted conditionally.
In order to be considered for unconditional admission, applicants must meet all of
the university requirements for unconditional admission plus the following program
specific requirements:
1. A bachelor of science degree in civil engineering with:
• A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.80 for all undergraduate work, or
• A 3.00 for all upper-division engineering courses, or
• A passing score on the nationally conducted Fundamentals of Engineering (FE)
Examination.
2. A bachelor of science degree in another engineering field or the sciences and:
• A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.80 for all undergraduate work.
• Completion of calculus (one year), differential equations, physics (one year),
chemistry (one-half year), statics, mechanics of materials and dynamics.
3. A bachelor of science degree in any field, plus current registration as a Professional
Engineer (PE).
Application procedure
Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. However, in order to receive priority consideration for admission and scholarships, applications should be submitted by the
priority deadline of the desired semester.
Priority Deadlines
Summer semester (May - July)
April 1
Fall semester (late August - December) July 1
Spring semester (January - May)November 1
Application Requirments
Applicants must submit all of the required materials for university graduate admission (see the graduate admission section of the catalog) plus the following program
specific materials:
• Two letters of recommendation, preferably from professors, registered engineers
or supervisors
• Statement of purpose.
118 MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING (MCE)
Application forms and materials can be found on the Office of Graduate Studies website: www.stmartin.edu/gradstudies
All application materials should be sent directly to:
Office of Graduate Studies
Saint Martin’s University
5000 Abbey Way SE
Lacey, WA 98503-7500
[email protected]
After all materials are received, the applicant’s file will be reviewed. Possible outcomes
include unconditional admission, conditional admission, or nonacceptance. Once application materials are submitted, they become the property of the university, and
cannot be returned.
Program Preparation and Continuation
Within the first semester following admission, the student shall, in consultation with
his/her advisor, prepare a program of study to present to the program director for approval. Students must meet the prerequisites listed for all program courses taken. In
some cas¬es, this may require the student to take additional preparatory undergraduate courses that may not count toward the MCE degree. The maximum course load
per semester is 12 semester hours unless approval for a larger course load approved in
writing by the MCE program director.
Degree Requirements
Candidates for the Master of Civil Engineering degree must satisfactorily complete 30
semester hours of approved coursework, including three semester hours of Advanced
Design Project (MCE 502) or six semester hours of thesis (MCE 503). A maximum of
four hours of independent study (MCE 501) is allowed. All courses must be from the
approved MCE courses list or must be pre-approved in writing by the program director. Coursework must be completed with a minimum grade point average of 3.00 (‘B‘).
Students must complete all work within seven years from the start of the program.
A maximum of nine semester hours of equivalent coursework from other institutions
may be transferred into the program if approved by the program director.
Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering / Master of Civil
Engineering Combined Degree Program
A student enters the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering (BSCE)/Master of Civil
Engineering (MCE) combined degree program by applying for admission during his
or her senior year at Saint Martin’s University. If accepted, up to six credit hours of
approved courses (MCE ###) may be applied toward both the bachelor’s and master’s
degrees. MCE courses, taken while an undergraduate, would fulfill undergraduate
civil engineering elective requirements. An additional six credits of MCE program
coursework may be taken as an undergraduate student and reserved for application
to the master’s degree. Thus, both the undergraduate and graduate degrees in civil
MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING (MCE) 119
engineering could be earned in five academic years.
In order for undergraduate students to register for MCE courses, students need to fulfill required prerequisites, and have a 3.0 grade point average or above, or be approved
by their advisor, the chairperson and course instructor. The petition for undergraduate engineering students to enroll in graduate level courses is available from the Office
of the Registrar.
Master of Civil Engineering /Master of Engineering
Management Dual Degrees
A dual degree allows a student to pursue two degrees simultaneously.
• The student needs to be accepted into both programs.
• Up to 12 credits of cross-listed or approved courses may be applied to both degrees.
• Each degree will be conferred separately upon completion of all requirements
for that specific program.
Approved MCE Courses
All courses applied toward the MCE degree must be taken from the following list unless specifically preapproved by the program director. The number of semester hours
earned by the student for each course is listed after the course name.
• MCE 501 Independent Study (1-4)
• MCE 502 Advanced Design Projects/Advanced Special Projects (3)
• MCE 503 Thesis (1-3)
• MCE 505 Insitu Soil Testing (3)
• MCE 518 Seismic Evaluation (3)
• MCE 525 Advanced Transportation Engineering (4)
• MCE 533 Prestressed Concrete Design (3)
• MCE 535 Pavement Design (3)
• MCE 540 Steel Design (3)
• MCE 541 Advanced Steel Design (3)
• MCE 552 Masonry Design (3)
• MCE 553 Matrix Structural Analysis (3)
• MCE 555 Advanced Foundation Design (3)
• MCE 560 Structural Systems Design (3)
• MCE 563 Dynamics of Structures (3)
• MCE 565 Traffic Capacity Analysis (3)
• MCE 570 Solid Waste Engineering (3)
• MCE 571 Transportation Planning Applications (3)
120 MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING (MCE)
• MCE 573 Earthquake Engineering (3)
• MCE 575 Bridge Engineering and Design (3)
• MCE 580 Environmental Laboratory Processes (3)
• MCE 583 Water Resources Engineering (3)
• MCE 585 Wastewater Systems Engineering (3)
• MCE 595 Special Topics (2-3)
• MCE 596 Industrial Waste Engineering (3)
• MCE/MEM 612 Project Management— A Holistic Approach (3)
• MCE/MEM 660 Construction and Consultant Estimating (3)
• MCE/MEM 680 Environmental Management (3)
• MCE/MEM 691 Construction Management (3)
Suggested Programs of Study
Many program arrangements meeting the requirements for the Master of Civil Engineering degree are possible. Students are free to take any of the approved courses
for which they meet the prerequisites. The following are three examples of non-thesis
programs with disciplinary emphases.
Structures and Foundations Emphasis
• MCE 502 Advanced Design Projects/Advanced Special Projects (3)
• MCE 505 Insitu Soil Testing (3)
• MCE 518 Seismic Evaluation (3)
• MCE 533 Prestressed Concrete Design (3)
• MCE 540 Steel Design (3)
• MCE 541 Advanced Steel Design (3)
• MCE 552 Masonry Design (3)
• MCE 553 Matrix Structural Analysis (3)
• MCE 555 Advanced Foundation Design (3)
• MCE 560 Structural Systems Design (3)
• MCE 563 Dynamics of Structures (3)
• MCE 565 Traffic Capacity Analysis (3)
• MCE 573 Earthquake Engineering (3)
• MCE 575 Bridge Engineering and Design (3)
• MCE/MEM 612 Project Management (3)
• MCE/MEM 660 Construction Estimating (3)
• MCE/MEM 691 Construction Management (3)
MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING (MCE) 121
Transportation and Project Management Emphasis
• MCE 501 Independent Study (3)
• MCE 502 Advanced Design Projects/Advanced Special Projects (3)
• MCE 505 Insitu Soil Testing (3)
• MCE 525 Advanced Transportation Engineering (4)
• MCE 535 Pavement Design (3)
• MCE 565 Traffic Capacity Analysis (3)
• MCE 570 Solid Waste Engineering (3)
• MCE 571 Transportation Planning Applications (3)
• MCE/MEM 612 Project Management (3)
• MCE/MEM660 Construction Estimating (3)
• MCE/MEM 680 Environmental Management (3)
• MCE/MEM 691 Construction Management (3)
Environmental Engineering Emphasis
• MCE 501 Independent Study (3)
• MCE 502 Advanced Design Projects/Advanced Special Projects (3)
• MCE 525 Advanced Transportation Engineering (4)
• MCE 535 Pavement Design (3)
• MCE 570 Solid Waste Management (3)
• MCE 580 Environmental Laboratory Processes (3)
• MCE 583 Water Resources Engineering (3)
• MCE 585 Wastewater Systems Engineering (3)
• MCE 596 Industrial Waste Engineering
• MCE/MEM 612 Project Management (3)
• MCE/MEM 660 Construction Estimating (3)
• MCE/MEM 680 Environmental Management (3)
• MCE/MEM 691 Construction Management (3)
Master of Civil Engineering Courses
Courses in the MCE program are scheduled in accord with enrollment numbers and
demand. Students may not take both the undergraduate and graduate versions of a
class for credit. For example, CE 480 and MCE 580 may not both be taken for credit.
MCE 501
Independent Study (1-4)
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and approval of program director.
122 MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING (MCE)
MCE 502 Advanced Design Project / Advanced Special Projects(3)
Course is required of all students not writing a thesis. An independent or small teambased comprehensive graduate-level design project in the student’s discipline interest
area, in consultation with faculty. A formal written, graphical and oral presentation of
the completed project is required. Prerequisites: Completion of 18 semester hours in
the MCE program and consent of instructor.
MCE 503 Thesis (1-3)
Independent research in the student’s area of interest, under supervision of faculty.
Successful completion of a final oral examination and successful defense of the thesis
before a faculty panel is required. Students may register for a maximum of three hours
per semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
MCE 505 Insitu Soil Testing (3)
Introduction to site investigation procedures and institute testing techniques to characterize field behavior of soils related to engineering properties. Field exercises in
the use and interpretation of the standard penetration test, cone penetration test and
pressure meter test. Exercises in reducing field data and deriving soil properties for
application to foundation design problems. Course provides a connection between
introductory soil mechanics and foundation design and introduces both current practice as well as state-of-art site investigation techniques. Independent research report
or design project required for graduate credit. Credit not allowed for students who
have taken CE 405. Prerequisites: CE 321, CE 322.
MCE 518 Seismic Evaluation (3)
Fundamentals of seismology and geotechnical earthquake engineering, in accordance
with the NEHRP and USGS procedures, with correlation to the Uniform Building
Code and International Building Code. Topics covered include plate tectonics, earthquake faults, seismic magnitude and intensity, ground motion, seismic wave attenuation, development of response spectra, seismic hazard analysis, ground motion amplification, liquefaction analysis, dynamic slope stability, seismic design of retaining
walls and mitigation of hazardous sites. Prerequisites: CE 321, CE 350, CE 360.
MCE 525 Advanced Transportation Engineering (4)
Selected topics in advanced transportation planning techniques, signalization design, airport planning and design and transportation economics. Course is designed
to equip students with practical design-oriented knowledge of land-use impacts on
transportation, travel demand forecasting, models of trip distribution and traffic assignment on the road network. Independent research report or design project required for graduate credit. Course credit cannot be given to students who have taken
CE 425. Prerequisites: CE 323, CE 359.
MCE 533 Prestressed Concrete Design (3)
Analysis and design of components of prestressed concrete structures, in accordance
with applicable national and international building code requirements. Prerequisite:
CE 360.
MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING (MCE) 123
MCE 535 Pavement Design (3)
Asphalt and concrete pavement design for highways and airfields. Covers wheel loads
and design factors; stresses in flexible and rigid pavements; vehicle and traffic considerations; soil classification and characteristics; subgrade, bases and subbases; and design methods. Combines soil mechanics theory and traffic requirements for an understanding of the fundamental behavior of pavements under traffic loads, with design of
material and thickness to satisfy strength and serviceability performance objectives.
Independent research report or design project required for graduate credit. Course
credit cannot be given to students who have taken CE 435. Prerequisite: CE 321.
MCE 540 Structural Steel Design (3)
Analysis and design of structural steel members, connections and systems in accordance with current AISC Specification. Topics include steel properties, load combinations, design specifications, design of tension members, columns, beams, beam-columns, trusses, welded and bolted connections and structural systems to resist vertical
and lateral loads. Senior CE undergraduate as well as MCE graduate students will
learn how to apply the principles of mechanics of materials and structural analysis
to the design of steel structures in conformance with current codes. Independent research report or design project is required for graduate credit. Course credit cannot be
given to students who have taken CE440. Prerequisite: CE350.
MCE 541 Advanced Steel Design (3)
Analysis and design of steel structures, including special connections, plate girders,
composite steel-concrete members, structural systems and bracing for lateral load
resistance. Coursework based on load and resistance factor design methods, in accordance with applicable national and international building code requirements. Prerequisite: CE 440 or MCE 540.
MCE 552 Masonry Design (3)
Analysis and design of masonry structures per current building code requirements
with focus on reinforced masonry. Topics include general types and applications of masonry construction systems, basic masonry and reinforcing steel properties, introduction to fundamental unreinforced and reinforced masonry behavior and design philosophy, development of simple loads and load paths, load combinations, construction
specifications and basic building applications. Design/analysis elements include wall,
lintel and beam sections over a full range of behavior, including ultimate strength, serviceability and basic detailing; integration of masonry components into simple building systems. Introduces basic concepts of lateral bracing, diaphragm action, fire safety,
architectural features and rehabilitation of older masonry buildings. Students apply
mechanics of materials, structural analysis principles and methods first developed in
reinforced concrete to the design of masonry components. Prerequisites CE 360.
MCE 553 Matrix Structural Analysis (3)
Development and application of matrix methods as the basis for modern computer
based structural analysis. Topics covered include matrix algebra; basic concepts of
force and displacement methods of structural analysis; member and structural stiffness matrices; the Gaussian elimination algorithm; and exercises in solving indetermi-
124 MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING (MCE)
nate trusses, beams and frames. Students learn to extend classical structural analysis
to the advanced analytical techniques used in professional practice. Introduction of
commercial software currently used by structural engineers. Independent research
report or design project required for graduate credit. Course credit cannot be given to
students who have taken CE 453. Prerequisite: CE 350.
MCE 555 Advanced Foundation Design (3)
Advanced topics in settlement and bearing capacity analysis of shallow and deep foundations, including application of insitu testing and numerical schemes to foundation
design. Prerequisite: CE 430.
MCE 560 Structural Systems Design (3)
Current professional practice in the design of structural systems for buildings. Multiple material types are used in creating structural systems designed to resist dead,
live, wind and earthquake loads in accordance with Uniform Building Code criteria.
Economical arrangements of components to achieve material compatibility, strength,
serviceability and constructability are emphasized. The impacts of different professional disciplines’ responsibilities comprising a typical project team are examined.
MCE 563 Dynamics of Structures (3)
Introduction of free and forced vibration of structures; equations of motion for single
and multi degree-of-freedom structural system, response to harmonic, arbitrary or
step excitations, analytical and numerical methods of finding natural frequency of
vibration, linear and nonlinear system, undamped, damped and resonant behavior of
structures. These general concepts on the dynamic behavior of buildings and bridges
are related to the structural response under earthquake-induced motion. Structural
design and analysis against earthquake-loading will be introduced. Prerequisites:
CE453 or MCE553 or Instructor permission
MCE 565 Traffic Capacity Analysis (3)
Analyzes and evaluates capacity and level of service of highway facilities using methodology of the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM). Covers operational, design and
planning applications. Specific focus on the application of the HCM methodology to
two-lane rural highways, freeways and multilane highways, ramps and weaving segments, urban streets and signalized intersections. Use of HCS software emphasized.
MCE 570 Solid Waste Engineering (3)
Engineering management and principles as applied to the collection, transport, reuse
and disposal of solid wastes. Emphasis is on municipal wastes. Prerequisite: CE 385 or
instructor permission.
MCE 571 Transportation Planning Applications (3)
Techniques of transportation planning applied in urban areas and for resource transportation; calibration, testing and application of traffic estimation models; evaluation
of alternate plans. Prerequisite: CE 435 or MCE 535.
MASTER OF CIVIL ENGINEERING (MCE) 125
MCE 573 Earthquake Engineering (3)
Structural design for earthquake forces in accordance with the UBC and the IBC.
Fundamentals of earthquake ground motion: tectonics, seismic waves, intensity,
magnitude, seismic maps, soil effects, structural dynamics and response spectra. A
detailed study of the IBC static force provisions, including seismic use groups, spectral maps, site coefficients, base shear, force distribution, torsion and reliability factor;
comparison to the UBC provisions. Detailed analysis and design of diaphragm and
shear-wall systems in wood, masonry and concrete. Analysis of steel moment frames,
braced frames and eccentrically braced frames. Overview of foundation design considerations, seismic isolation and seismic retrofit. Course credit cannot be given to
students who have taken CE473. Prerequisites: CE 321, CE 360.
MCE 575
Bridge Engineering and Design (3)
Analysis and design of bridge structures based on load resistance factor design in
accordance with AASHTO and WADOT bridge design specifications. Topics on new
load-resistant factors and parameters; new live-load system and application; flexural
analysis and design; modified compression field theory in shear and torsion design,
strut and tie analysis and design for disturbed region, fatigue and fracture problems
in steel bridge and substructure design. Focus on reinforced concrete deck and prestressed girder composite bridge structures. Design of steel girder bridge also introduced. Students will design and prepare structural drawings of a bridge. Course credit
cannot be given to students who have taken CE475. Prerequisites CE 360, CE 440 or
MCE 540.
MCE 580 Environmental Laboratory Processes (3)
Laboratory analysis for water and wastewater evaluation, including solids, dissolved
oxygen, coliform counts, BOD and microbial examinations. Independent research report or design project required for graduate credit. Graduate credit not allowed for
students who have taken CE 480. Prerequisite: CE 385.
MCE 583 Water Resources Engineering (3)
Application of principles of hydrology and hydraulic engineering to water supply systems design. Collection and distribution, treatment plant design, storage sizing, pump
stations, water quality and economic considerations. Prerequisites: CE 330, CE 370.
MCE 585 Wastewater Systems Engineering (3)
Advanced wastewater systems design, including treatment plant design, biosolids management, pump station and collection system design. Prerequisites: CE 370, CE 385.
MCE 595 Special Topics (2-3)
Selected topics in civil engineering. Offered on demand. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
MCE 596
Industrial Waste Engineering (3)
Problems of waste pollution from industries such as pulp and paper, cannery, beverage, metal plating, petroleum, chemical, tannery, etc. Modern methods of management
including treatment, waste minimization, reduction, recovery, recycling and reuse are
126 MASTER OF ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT (MEM)
covered. Independent research report or design project required for graduate credit.
Graduate credit not allowed for students who have taken CE 496. Prerequisite: CE 385.
MCE 612 Project Management – A Holistic Approach (3)
Intensive coverage of management in industrial applications from concept through
operations. Planning, scheduling, controlling, economic analysis, quality control and
customer satisfaction are stressed. Course credit cannot be given to students who have
taken MEM 612.
MCE 660 Construction and Consultant Estimating (3)
Cost estimation for construction projects, with emphasis on materials, labor, financing, administration and associated costs. Estimation techniques to evaluate professional technological costs of research and development, planning, design and construction. Course credit cannot be given to students who have taken MEM 660.
MCE 680 Environmental Management (3)
Engineering and administrative function in the control of environmental factors affecting human health and survival. Focuses on the challenges of managing engineering approaches, such as meeting environmental assessment, environmental impact
statements and other legal requirements. Course credit cannot be given to students
who have taken MEM 680.
MCE 691
Construction Management (3)
This class stresses the development of management skills to be applied during the
construction phase of a project. Work to include cost-estimating, change management
and control of the project to include budget development and management. Topics
including protection of client needs, engineering specifications, value engineering,
quality control and assurance and trades integration. Course credit cannot be given to
students who have taken MEM 691.
MASTER OF ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT (MEM)
FacultyBill Phillips, director
Bob Raymond
Stephen Bao
Bob Bergquist
David Jensen
Don Stout
Sonya Phillips
The Master of Engineering Management (MEM) Program prepares engineering and
science graduates for management careers in the field of engineering program and
project management.
The program emphasizes the continuity of management and engineering-related efforts from planning through design to execution. The program stresses the inter-relationship of these phases and focuses on the role of the project manager in managing
MASTER OF ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT (MEM) 127
and controlling all aspects of the project. Students will emerge with management and
business skills to allow effective performance in directing engineering organizations
and in assessing client needs from a business and engineering standpoint.
Minimum requirements for unconditional admission: Applicants not meeting the unconditional admission requirements but who otherwise demonstrate the potential to
benefit from graduate education may be admitted conditionally.
In order to be considered for unconditional admission, applicants must meet all of
the university requirements for unconditional admission plus the following program
specific requirements:
• A
bachelor’s degree in science or engineering with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.80 and/or acceptance by the program director; or
• S uccessful completion of the engineering license examination and/or acceptance by the program director; or
• I n special cases, initial acceptance by the program director, with final acceptance into the program by the admissions committee.
• D
emonstration of strong analytic, problem solving and leadership skills as evidenced by previous coursework, resume and letters of recommendation.
Application Procedure
Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. However, in order to receive priority consideration for admission and scholarships, applications should be submitted by the
priority deadline of the desired semester.
Priority Deadlines
Summer semester (May - July)
Fall semester (late August - December)
Spring semester (January - May)
April 1
July 1
November 1
Additional Information
All must submit all of the required materials for university graduate admission (see
the graduate admission section of the catalog) plus the following program specific
materials:
• Two letters of recommendation, sent directly from the letter writers. Letters should preferably be from professors, registered engineers or supervisors.
• A current curriculum resume.
Application forms and materials can be found on the Office of Graduate Studies website: www.stmartin.edu/gradstudies
All application materials should be sent directly to:
128 MASTER OF ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT (MEM)
Office of Graduate Studies
Saint Martin’s University
5000 Abbey Way SE
Lacey, WA 98503-7500
[email protected]
After all materials are received, the applicant’s file will be reviewed. Possible outcomes
include unconditional admission, conditional admission, or nonacceptance. Once application materials are submitted, they become the property of the university, and
cannot be returned.
Application requirements
Applicants must submit all of the required materials for university graduate admission (see the graduate admission section of the catalog) plus the following program
specific materials:
• T
wo letters of recommendation, preferably from professors, registered
engineers or supervisors
• A current curriculum vite.
Application forms and materials can be found on the Office of Graduate Studies website: www.stmartin.edu/gradstudies
All application materials should be sent directly to:
Office of Graduate Studies
Saint Martin’s University
5000 Abbey Way SE
Lacey, WA 98503-7500
[email protected]
After all materials are received, the applicant’s file will be reviewed. Possible outcomes
include unconditional admission, conditional admission, or nonacceptance. Once application materials are submitted, they become the property of the university, and
cannot be returned.
Degree requirements
Degree candidates must satisfactorily complete 33 semester hours of designated
coursework and a comprehensive examination, or 24 semester hours of designated
coursework plus a six semester-hour thesis. All work must be completed by the candidate within seven years of starting the program.
Each student’s performance record is reviewed upon completion of 12 semester hours
to ensure that satisfactory progress is being made.
Coursework must be completed with a minimum cumulative grade point average of
3.00. Once the student starts a thesis, continuous enrollment is required. The department has set a maximum course load of 12 semester hours per semester unless approval for a larger course load is obtained in writing via an overload petition from the
program director.
MASTER OF ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT (MEM) 129
Graduate level classes taken while an undergraduate
Undergraduate engineering students with senior standing may petition to enroll in
graduate level courses. This petition will be reviewed by the student’s undergraduate
advisor, the master’s program faculty director, the office of graduate studies, and by
the dean of the college (if there is an exception to policy). If approved, up to twelve
hours of graduate level coursework may be taken as an undergraduate. Six out of the
possible twelve hours of course work may be applied toward both the bachelor’s and
master’s degrees.
In order for the petition to be considered, the student must**:
• Have a minimum of a 3.0 cumulative GPA
• Have senior standing during the semester they wish to enroll in graduate level
classes
• Not be enrolled in more than 18 credit hours of combined UG/Grad coursework for the semester
• Must not exceed the limit of 12 credit hours of total graduate coursework allowed as an undergraduate
• Meet the course pre-requisites
Students must submit the petition form to the Office of Graduate Studies no later than
the last day to add/drop for the semester and no sooner than the first day of registration. The form will be reviewed and if approved, the student will be administratively
added to the graduate level courses by the registrar’s office.
In order for the possible coursework to count towards the graduate degree students must:
• Earn a minimum grade of “B” in all graduate-level coursework,
• Apply for and be admitted to the graduate program
Permission to enroll in graduate course work is not a guarantee of graduate program
admission. Students retain their undergraduate student status until they graduate with
their Bachelor’s degree, apply for, and are admitted to a graduate degree program.
Master of Civil Engineering / Master of Engineering
Management dual degrees
A dual degree allows a student to pursue two graduate degrees simultaneously. The
student needs to be accepted in both programs. Up to 12 credits of cross-listed or
approved courses may be applied to both degrees with the written approval of the
program directors. Each degree will be conferred separately upon completion of all
requirements for that specific program.
Program Requirements
Core requirements (18 semester hours)
• MEM 502 Survey of Finance
130 MASTER OF ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT (MEM)
• MEM 603 Accounting for Managerial Decision-making
• MEM 610 Systems Engineering Management – Planning
• MEM 611 Systems Engineering Management – Design
• MEM 612 Project Management
• MEM 620 Engineering Law Electives
Students must take 15 semester hours of approved electives in the MEM, MCE or
MBA program. Elective classes must be numbered at the 500 level and above. Electives
taken other than MEM must be first approved by the program director.
Master of Engineering Management Courses
Courses in the MEM program are scheduled in accord with enrollment numbers and
demand.
MEM 502
Survey of Finance (3)
Development and use of basic financial information for management analysis, decision-making, planning and control, along with exploration of contemporary financial
institutions and U.S. monetary system. Credit not applicable toward any graduation
requirement in fields of economics, management or related majors. Course content
duplicates BA 300 and BA 311 or equivalent. Equivalent to MBA 502
MEM 582 Industrial Engineering (3)
This course is designed for MEM students who have not previously majored in industrial engineering. The objectives are for the students to understand the scope of industrial engineering and the basic concepts of industrial engineering. Topics include
manufacturing systems analysis, methods analysis and work measurement, motion
economy, work place layout, line balancing, work sampling and compensation management and labor relations. Concepts of lean manufacturing and concurrent engineering will be introduced as well. Topics related project work will be conducted to
give the students an opportunity to apply the theatrical content.
MEM 585
Biomechanical and Instrumentation in Ergonomics (3)
This course covers occupational biomechanical calculations of forces and torques developed in a worker’s body while performing occupational activities, strength limitations of various worker groups that can guide the engineers in job and product
designs, muscle activities related to various work activities and different task scheduling. It also provides the students exposure to some instrumentation methods such as
measurements of hand forces in performing job activities, hand-arm vibration when
using power tools, reactions times related to different display designs, measurement of
workload and product usability evaluations.
MEM 603
Accounting for Managerial Decision-making (3)
Study and application of accounting concepts and techniques used by management
for planning and controlling organizational activities. Equivalent to MBA 603.
MASTER OF ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT (MEM) 131
MEM 610
Systems Engineering Management – Planning (3)
Covers approaches to planning, including strategies, forecasting and modeling. Emphasizes techniques useful in scope planning, managing feasibility studies, concept
analysis, EA/EIS, public meetings and workshops, city planning, zoning ordinances.
Also covered are human behavior approaches to problem-solving and scheduling.
MEM 611
Systems Engineering Management – Design (3)
Stresses development of management skills to be applied in scope definition, costestimating and design of engineering projects. Includes study of various methods of
decision analysis. Topics include criteria development, conversion of client needs to
engineering specifications, value engineering, quality control and assurance, trades
integration and computer software applications for design management.
MEM 612
Project Management – A Holistic Approach (3)
Intensive coverage of management in a wide range of project applications from concept through operations. Planning, scheduling, controlling, economic analysis, quality
control and customer satisfaction are stressed in this course. Course credit cannot be
given to students who have taken MCE 612.
MEM 615
Managerial and Engineering Economy (3)
Economic evaluation of engineering alternatives geared to maximize investment potentials.
MEM 620
Engineering Law (3)
Practical legal considerations, including engineering ethics, contract law and practice,
patents, copyrights, general and special considerations, specifications, scope of work,
liabilities, labor law, property rights and a focus on contract administration.
MEM 630
Ergonomics (3)
This is an introduction course to ergonomics and human factors, which includes
systematic approaches to facility planning, design, construction and operation by
considering the human operators. This course includes interface of machines/equipment with people to promote speed, efficiency and accuracy in safety and comfort. It
considers human sensory capabilities, mobility, muscle strength, intellect, common
skills and capacity for learning new skills, capacity for team or group effort and body
dimensions.
MEM 623
Seminar in Management Information and Control Systems (3)
Evaluation of organizational information needs and the ability of computer technology to meet those needs in an economical fashion. Emphasis on identification, specification and installation of appropriate computer technology and subsequent need for
direction, control and overall management of the information function. Equivalent
to MBA 623.
MEM 624
Human Resource Management (3)
The management of human resources informal organizations, organizational design
and structure, human resource planning and recruitment, job analysis/evaluation and
132 MASTER OF ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT (MEM)
compensation, management development, labor relations and training. Course uses
case studies. Equivalent to MBA 624.
MEM 640
Marketing for Engineers (3)
Market information, forecasts, qualitative and quantitative analysis and trends. Marketing methods, proposal preparation, joint venture strategy, customer relations, performance evaluation, formal presentations, use of visual aids, job cost determinations,
methodology portrayal, phase selection and marketing cost factors.
MEM 650
Quality Control (3)
Use of various methods and recent developments of quality control (such as QA/QC,
six sigma, ISO 9000 and TQM) are covered in detail. Quality in design and planning
is stressed as equally important to quality in the completed project and quality in
production of goods and services.
MEM 660
Construction and Consultant Estimating (3)
Cost estimation for construction projects, with emphasis on materials, labor, financing, administration and associated costs. Estimation techniques to evaluate professional technological costs of research and development, planning, design and construction.
MEM 680
Environmental Management (3)
Engineering and administrative functions in the control of environmental factors affecting human health and survival. Focuses on challenges of managing engineering
approaches such as meeting environmental assessments, environmental impact statements and other legal requirements. Course credit cannot be given to students who
have taken MCE 680.
MEM 690
Thesis (3)
Independent research in the student’s area of interest, under the supervision of faculty.
Successful completion of a final oral examination and successful defense of the thesis
before a faculty panel is required. Students may register for a maximum of three hours
per semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
MEM 691
Construction Management (3)
This class stresses the development of management skills to be applied during the
construction phase of a project. Work to include cost-estimating, change management
and control of the project to include budget development and management. Topics
including protection of client needs, engineering specifications, value engineering,
quality control and assurance and trades integration.
MEM 692
Construction Contract Management (3)
The class will emphasize the management of construction contracts. The instructor
will provide students an in depth and detailed examination of various types of construction contracts. The course incorporates a combination of text readings, class discussions, practical problems for discussion in class and lectures provided to augment
and lead weekly discussions.
MASTER OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (MME) 133
MEM 695
Special Topics (3)
Course devoted to selected topics relevant to engineering management studies.
MASTER OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (MME)
FacultyPaul Slaboch, director
Peter Bishay
Jerry Budelman
Shawn Duan
Isaac Jung
Rico Picone
Frank Washko
Jim Witsmeer
The Master of Mechanical Engineering Program is designed to provide engineering
and science graduates with specialized technical knowledge in the thermal and mechanics areas of mechanical engineering.
The curriculum is adaptable to both recent graduates and engineers with professional
experience. The student will emerge with enhanced engineering analysis and design
skills tailored to his or her professional objectives. All courses are offered in the late afternoon or evening to accommodate working students who are professionals. Classes
are generally scheduled to allow a student to complete the program in a two to three
year period by taking two classes per semester.
Admission Requirements
Minimum requirements for unconditional admission: Applicants not meeting the
unconditional admission requirements but who otherwise demonstrate the potential
to benefit from graduate education may be admitted conditionally.
In order to be considered for unconditional admission, applicants must meet all of
the university requirements for unconditional admission plus the following program
specific requirements:
1. A bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering with:
• A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.80 for all undergraduate work; or
• A 3.00 average for upper-division engineering courses; or
• A passing score on the national Fundamentals of Engineering (FE).
2. A Bachelor of Science degree in another engineering field or the sciences and:
• A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.80 for all undergraduate work.
• Completion of calculus (one year), multivariable calculus, differential equations,
physics (one year), chemistry (one-half year), statics, mechanics of materials,
dynamics, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Some remedial
undergraduate classes may be required.
134 MASTER OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (MME)
3. A bachelor of science degree in any field, plus current registration as a professional
engineer (PE) in mechanical engineering.
Application procedure
Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. However, in order to receive priority consideration for admission and scholarships, applications should be submitted by the
priority deadline of the desired semester
Priority Deadlines
Summer semester (May - July)
Fall semester (late August - December)
Spring semester (January - May)
April 1
July 1
November 1
Application requirements
Applicants must submit all of the required materials for university graduate admission (see the graduate admission section of the catalog) plus the following program
specific materials:
• A current resume or CV.
• A brief (1 page) personal statement discussing your immediate educational
and long-range career objectives in relation to your chosen field.
• Contact information, including name, phone number and email address, for 3 professional references that can speak to your preparedness for graduate school.
Application forms and materials can be found on the Office of Graduate Studies website: www.stmartin.edu/gradstudies
All application materials should be sent directly to:
Office of Graduate Studies
Saint Martin’s University
5000 Abbey Way SE
Lacey, WA 98503-7500
[email protected]
After all materials are received, the applicant’s file will be reviewed. Possible outcomes
include unconditional admission, conditional admission, or nonacceptance. Once application materials are submitted, they become the property of the university, and
cannot be returned.
Program Preparation and Continuation
Within the first semester following admission, the student shall, in consultation with his/
her advisor, prepare a program of study to present to the program director for approval.
Students must meet all course prerequisites. In some cases this may require the student to
take additional preparatory undergraduate course(s).
MASTER OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (MME) 135
The maximum course load per semester is 12 semester hours unless approval for a larger
course load is obtained from the MME program director.
Degree Requirements
Candidates for the Master of Mechanical Engineering degree must satisfactorily complete 30 semester hours of approved coursework. While not required, a student may
opt to complete a research thesis. Up to six semester hours of Thesis (MME 599) is allowed to complete the thesis project. A maximum of three hours of independent study
(MME 595) is allowed. All courses must be from the approved MME courses list or
must be preapproved by the program director.
Coursework must be completed with a minimum grade point average of 3.00 (‘B’).
Students must complete all work within seven years from the start of the program.
A maximum of nine semester hours of equivalent coursework from other institutions
may be transferred into the program if approved by the program director. In addition,
a maximum of nine credit hours of approved courses may be taken from Master of
Civil Engineering (MCE) and/or Master of Engineering Management (MEM) programs at Saint Martin’s University.
Graduate level classes taken while an undergraduate
Undergraduate engineering students with senior standing may petition to enroll in
graduate level courses. This petition will be reviewed by the student’s undergraduate
advisor, the master’s program faculty director, the office of graduate studies, and by
the dean of the college (if there is an exception to policy). If approved, up to twelve
hours of graduate level coursework may be taken as an undergraduate. Six out of the
possible twelve hours of course work may be applied toward both the bachelor’s and
master’s degrees.
In order for the petition to be considered, the student must**:
• Have a minimum of a 3.0 cumulative GPA
• H
ave senior standing during the semester they wish to enroll in graduate
level classes
• N
ot be enrolled in more than 18 credit hours of combined UG/Grad coursework for the semester
• M
ust not exceed the limit of 12 credit hours of total graduate coursework
allowed as an undergraduate
• Meet the course pre-requisutes
Students must submit the petition form to the Office of Graduate Studies no later than
the last day to add/drop for the semester and no sooner than the first day of registration. The form will be reviewed and if approved, the student will be administratively
added to the graduate level courses by the registrar’s office.
In order for the possible coursework to count towards the graduate degree students must:
136 MASTER OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (MME)
• Earn a minimum grade of “B” in all graduate-level coursework,
• Apply for and be admitted to the graduate program
Permission to enroll in graduate course work is not a guarantee of graduate program
admission. Students retain their undergraduate student status until they graduate with
their Bachelor’s degree, apply for, and are admitted to a graduate degree program.
Approved MME Courses
A student can choose courses from a MME specific area of emphasis or any combinations of MME courses:
• MME courses (minimum 21 credit hours)
• MCE/MEM courses (maximum of nine credits combined)
Programs of Study
Many program arrangements meeting the requirements for the Master of Mechanical
Engineering degree are possible. The following are listings for courses in the thermal/
fluids area, the mechanics area, and controls area.
Thermal/fluids emphasis
• MME 520 Gas Turbine Power (3)
• MME 525 Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (3)
• MME 534 Solar Thermal Energy (3)
• MME 535 Energy Systems (3)
• MME 536 Thermal Design of Heat Exchangers (3)
• MME 537 Computational Heat Transfer (3)
• MME 547 Heat Transfer in Electronics (3)
• MME 548 Advanced Convective Heat Transfer (3)
• MME 560 Gas Dynamics (3)
• MME 564 Flight Mechanics (3)
• MME 580 Advanced Engineering Mathematics (3)
• MME 590 Independent Study (1-3)
• MME 595 Special Topics (3)
• MME 598 Advanced Design/Research Project (3) or
• MME 599 Thesis (6
Mechanics emphasis
• MME 505 Structural Composites (3)
• MME 506 Applied Elasticity and Advanced Mechanics of Solids (3)
• MME 507 Structural Optimization (3)
MASTER OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (MME) 137
• MME 508 Principles of Fracture Mechanics (3)
• MME 509 Advanced Strength of Materials (3)
• MME 510 Vibration Theory (3)
• MME 550 Computer-Aided Design (3)
• MME 554 Robotics and Automation (3)
• MME 580 Advanced Engineering Mathematics (3)
• MME 590 Independent Study (1-3)
• MME 595 Special Topics (3)
• MME 598 Advanced Design/Research Project (3) or
• MME 599 Thesis (6)
Controls emphasis
• MME 570 Advanced Systems (3)
• MME 571 Aerospace Systems (3)
• MME 572 Digital Control (3)
• MME 573 Non-linear Control Systems (3)
• MME 574 Introduction to Random Processes (3)
• MME 575 Estimation and Identification (3)
• MME 595 Special Topics (3)
• MME 598 Advanced Design/Research Project (3) or
• MME 599 Thesis (6)
Master of Mechanical Engineering Courses
Courses in the MME program are scheduled in accordance with enrollment numbers
and demand. Students may not take both the undergraduate and graduate versions of a
class for credit. For example, ME 420 and MME 520 may not both be taken for credit.
MME 505 Structural Composites (3)
Macro-behavior of a lamina. Stress transfer of short fiber composites. Classical lamination theory, static analysis of laminated plates, free-edge effect, failure modes. Prerequisites: ME 300 and ME 360, or equivalent courses.
MME 506 Applied Elasticity and Advanced Mechanics of Solids (3)
Bars, beams, thin-walled structures, and simple continua in the elastic and inelastic
range. Virtual work approaches, elastic energy principles, plastic limit theorems, and
creep deformation procedures. Introduction to instability and fracture mechanics. Design applications. Prerequisites: GE 206 and ME 360, or equivalent courses.
MME 507 Structural Optimization (3)
Structural optimization via calculus of variations. Applying techniques of numerical
138 MASTER OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (MME)
optimization to design trusses, frames, and composite laminates. Calculating the sensitivity of structural response. Approximation and fast reanalysis techniques. Optimality
criteria methods. Prerequisites: GE 206 and ME 360, or equivalent courses.
MME 508 Principles of Fracture Mechanics (3)
Introduction to the mechanics of fracture of brittle and ductile materials. Linear elastic fracture mechanics, elastic-plastic fracture, fracture testing, numerical methods,
composite materials, creep and fatigue fracture. Prerequisites: GE 206 and ME 360, or
equivalent courses.
MME 509 Advanced Strength of Materials (3)
Theories of stress and strain, stress-strain relations, inelastic material, symmetrical and
unsymmetrical bending, energy methods, shear center, curved beams, beams on elastic
foundations, beam columns, torsion of noncircular sections, thick walled cylinders,
general and symmetric bending of straight bars, curved beams, applications from several engineering disciplines. Prerequisite: Undergraduate solid mechanics course.
MME 510 Vibration Theory (3)
Course deals with some limitations imposed on the design of dynamic systems due
to vibrations. Course covers single and multiple degree of freedom systems, free and
forced vibrations, spectral analysis of forcing functions and system response, vibration
resonance and damping, wheel and rotor balancing, vehicle suspension system design,
protection of delicate and sensitive instruments from environmental vibrations, design
concepts in seismometers and accelerometers. Students conduct a paper design of an
instrument employing the principles of vibration theory, or resolve an actual vibration
problem in a machine or equipment. This course covers the same topics as ME 410,
however a higher level of academic rigor, expectations and standards will be required.
These course credits will not count for students who have taken ME 410. Prerequisite:
ME 370, or equivalent.
MME 520 Gas Turbine Power (3)
Course uses the fundamentals of fluid and gas dynamics, mechanics and thermodynamics of turbo-machinery for ground power plant and aircraft propulsion engine
design. Engine cycles employing regenerative systems, dual cycles, and propulsion
engines with multiple shafts and by-pass engines are studied for optimizing thermodynamic cycles for specified applications. Engine compressors, turbines, ducts and
nozzles are sized to provide to obtain selected engine thermodynamic cycles. Axial and
radial compressors and turbine design methods are covered. Methods of determining
engine off-design performance are covered for selected engine design point parameters. This course covers the same topics as ME 420, however, a higher level of academic
rigor, expectations and standard, will be required. This course will not count for students who took ME 420. Prerequisites: MTH 322 and ME 341, or equivalent courses.
MME 525 Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (3)
Specific course goals are to demonstrate the basic application of the principles of thermodynamics and heat transfer to air conditioning systems. Introduction of the theoretical basis for the design of air conditioning systems. Topics include indoor air qual-
MASTER OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (MME) 139
ity, heat transmission in buildings, solar radiation, space heating and cooling loads,
energy calculations, and pumping. A project will be assigned. This course covers the
same topics as ME 425, however, a higher level of academic rigor, expectations and
standards will be required. This course will not count for students who took ME 425.
Prerequisites: ME 341 and ME 347, or equivalent courses.
MME 534 Solar Thermal Energy (3)
Solar radiation distribution, radiation characteristics of opaque surfaces, transmission
through glazing, thermal analysis of flat plate and concentrating solar collectors, solar energy storage, solar water-heating, photovoltaic systems. This course covers the
same topics as ME 434, however, a higher level of academic rigor, expectations, and
standards will be required. This course will not count for students who took ME 434.
Prerequisites: ME 341 and ME 347, or equivalent courses.
MME 535 Energy Systems (3)
Focus is on energy systems associated with electric power generation. Specific goals
are to expose the student to the various sources of energy, including renewable energy
sources (solar and wind), nuclear, geothermal, biomass, and fuel cells. Students will develop an understanding of basic energy economics, environmental impact, and industrial risks. Relate the principles of thermodynamics and heat transfer to the application
of available energy resources and promote the concept of energy conservation through
proper system design. This course covers the same topics as ME 435, however, a higher
level of academic rigor, expectations and standards will be required. This course will
not count for students who took ME 435. Prerequisites: ME 341 and ME 347, or equivalent courses.
MME 536 Thermal Design Of Heat Exchangers (3)
Classification of heat exchangers, design methods, single-phase convection correlations and two phase-correlations, pressure drop calculations, fouling of heat exchangers. Study of various types of heat exchangers: double pipe heat exchangers, shell-andtube heat exchanger, compact heat exchangers, plate heat exchangers, condensers, and
evaporators. This course covers the same topics as ME 436, however, a higher level of
academic rigor, expectations and standards will be required. This course will not count
for students who took ME 436. Prerequisite: ME 347 or equivalent.
MME 537 Computational Heat Transfer and Thermal Modeling (3)
Application of finite difference numerical methods to heat transfer from steady two dimensional heat transfer to transient three dimensional (explicit and implicit methods).
Computations and characterization for designs of thermal systems using commercial
thermal software. Learn to build finite element models: geometric modeling, elements
and meshing, fields, materials and element properties, thermal/fluid boundary conditions, groups, viewing, display. Learn to evaluate the models analysis set up, results
and plots. Applications to thermal engineering problems. Thermal engineering design
projects assigned will be modeled thermally using commercial thermal software. This
course covers the same topics as ME 437, however, a higher level of academic rigor,
expectations and standard, will be required. This course will not count for students who
took ME 437. Prerequisite: ME 347, or equivalent.
140 MASTER OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (MME)
MME 547 Heat Transfer In Electronics And Electronic Packaging (3)
Background on the materials used in the electronics manufacturing and their thermal
properties. Failures in electronics due to thermal reasons, contact resistance, and miniature heat pipes will be covered. Projects will be assigned. This course covers the same
topics as ME 447, however, a higher level of academic rigor, expectations and standards
will be required. This course will not count for students who took ME 447. Prerequisite:
ME 347 or equivalent.
MME 548 Advanced Convective Heat Transfer (3)
Advanced convective heat transfer in laminar and turbulent flows over external surfaces and in internal flows. Influence of temperature dependent fluid properties. Prerequisite: ME 347 or equivalent.
MME 550 Computer-Aided Design (3)
After a brief introduction to the theory of finite element methods, students will learn
how to use the various modeling and simulation (finite element) tasks using FEA software. Selected problems in mechanical engineering will be modeled and analyzed with
solutions compared to those obtained from alternate methods. Problems such as stress
concentrations, bending of plates, curved beams, torsion of noncircular cross sections,
buckling, optimization, and vibration analysis will be studied. Prerequisite: enrollment
in MME Program.
MME 554 Robotics and Automation (3)
Course will focus on digital control of the dynamics and kinematics of robots, robotic
arms, remotely piloted ground, undersea and airborne vehicles, six-degree of freedom
simulation, Euler angles, quaternions and Jacobian mechanics. Course will include applications of linear matrix theory and design case studies. This course covers the same
topics as ME 454, however a higher level of academic rigor, expectations and standards
will be required. These course credits will not count for students who have taken ME
454. Prerequisite: ME 470 or equivalent.
MME 560 Gas Dynamics (3)
Course covers compressible fluid dynamics employing continuity, momentum, and
work and energy principles together with the applications of the first and second laws
of thermodynamics. These principles are used to develop the Rayleigh and Fanno
Flows Equations, and Subsonic and Sonic flows through variable-area ducts including
normal shock phenomenon. Two-dimensional oblique shock waves are studied including multiple shock systems in gas turbine engine inlet ducts, diffusers and nozzles. The
Prandtl-Meyer expansion principles are studied in external flows. This course covers
the same topics as ME 460, however, a higher level of academic rigor, expectations and
standards will be required. This course will not count for students who took ME 460.
Prerequisites: MTH 322 and ME 340, or equivalent courses.
MME 564 Flight Mechanics (3)
Application of fluid mechanics and dynamics to flight. Aircraft lift, drag, propulsion,
range, endurance, rate of climb, takeoff, landing, stability and control are discussed.
Students learn to apply principles of dynamics and fluid mechanics to traditional flight
MASTER OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (MME) 141
problems of aircraft, such as its range, rate of climb, stability and controllability. Emphasis will be on developing methods for use in design. Students will demonstrate
their ability to use these methods through team design problems. Safety of the flight
is emphasized. Application to aircraft design. This covers the same topics as ME 464,
however, a higher level of academic rigor, expectations and standards will be required.
This course will not count for students who took ME 464. Prerequisites: GE 206 and
ME 308, or equivalent courses.
MME 570 Advanced Control (3)
Advanced course in control system design and analysis. Students will design a control system using computer software, analytical tools and graphic methods such as the
Bode diagram, Nichols plot, Nyquist plot or root locus technique. Students will be able
to analyze their design in time domain, frequency domain, s domain or z domain, if
necessary. Introduction of control laws such as PI, PID control, as well as compensation methods. Introduction to digital control systems. Transfer functions, root locus
method, analogous simulation of hydraulic, pneumatic and electrical systems are covered, as are applications to design of mechanical systems. This course covers the same
topics as ME 470, however, a higher level of academic rigor, expectations and standards
will be required. This course will not count for students who took ME 470. Prerequisite:
ME 370, or equivalent.
MME 571 Aerospace Systems (3)
This course will familiarize the student with the analysis and design of aerospace systems including the following subjects: guidance, control and navigation of aerospace
vehicles, orbital and interplanetary kinematics, inertial instruments, gyro dynamics,
rocket propulsion, hypersonic vehicle design, global positioning system. Prerequisite:
ME 470 or equivalent.
MME 572 Digital Control (3)
This course will include the study of control sampled-data systems and z-transforms,
frequency domain properties, sampling D/A and A/D conversion, controller design via
discrete time equivalents, direct methods, state feedback, and observers, quantization
effects, LQR control and introduction to LQG optimal control. Prerequisite: ME 470
or equivalent.
MME 573 Non-linear Control Systems (3)
This course will include a study of the calculus of variations for dynamical systems,
definition of the dynamic optimization problem, constraints and Lagrange multipliers,
the Pontryagin principle, necessary conditions for optimization, the Hamilton-JacobiBellman equation. Graphical and computational analysis techniques will be applied.
Prerequisite: ME 470 or equivalent.
MME 574 Introduction to Random Processes (3)
This course will include the study of probability and random variables, ensemble averaging, probability density function, auto-.and cross-correlation functions, Brownian
motion, Poisson process, ergodicity, frequency domain analysis, auto- and cross-spectrum, transfer function. Fundamentals of digital spectral analysis will be examined.
142 SAINT
MASTER
MARTIN’S
OF MECHANICAL
UNIVERSITY
ENGINEERING (MME)
Design applications in fluid mechanics, acoustics and vibrations will be assigned. Prerequisites: ME 470 and MTH 357, or equivalent courses.
MME 575 Estimation and Identification (3)
This course will provide introduction to MIMO systems and fuzzy control theory, the
fundamentals of state estimation, probability and stochastic system theory, models
with noise, Kalman-Bucy filters, extended Kalman filters, and recursive estimation will
be simulated digitally and evaluated. Prerequisites: ME 470 and MTH 353, or equivalent courses.
MME 580 Advanced Engineering Mathematics (3)
Ordinary differential equations including analytical, operational, and numerical methods of solutions and with special functions generated as solutions of such equations.
Also, boundary value problems, vector analysis and partial differential equations are
discussed. Prerequisites: MTH 271 and MTH 322, or equivalent courses
MME 585 Advanced Biomechanical Engineering (3)
Course makes students aware of the various ways in which engineers can contribute in
the field of medicine. Students are introduced to the mechanics of the human body’s
physical movements and are given an overview of physiology and anatomy as applicable to mechanics and kinematics of joints. Focus is on sensory organs, mechanics
of load-bearing, dynamics of human motion and the causes and effects of the failures
of joints. A major component is the design of engineering artifacts to assist in motion
and/or replace limbs. In addition, students design measurement techniques for assessing the performance of sensory organs. This course covers the same topics as ME 385,
however, a higher level of academic rigor, expectations and standards will be required.
This course will not count for students who took ME 385. Prerequisite: enrollment in
MME Program.
MME 590 Independent Study (1-3)
Prerequisites: Enrollment in MME Program, consent of instructor and approval of program director.
MME 595 Special Topics (3)
Selected topics in mechanical engineering. Offered on demand. Prerequisites: enrollment in MME Program, consent of instructor and approval of program director.
MME 598 Advanced Design/Research Project (3)
Course is required of all students not writing a thesis. An independent or small team
based comprehensive graduate-level design/research project in the student’s discipline
of interest area, in consultation with faculty. A formal written report and oral presentation of the completed project is required. Prerequisites: Completion of 18 semester
hours in the MME Program, consent of instructor and approval of program director.
MME 599 Thesis (1-3)
Independent research in the student’s area of interest under supervision of faculty. Successful completion of a final oral examination and successful defense of the thesis be-
MASTER OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (MME) 143
fore a faculty panel is required. Students may register for a maximum of three hours
per semester. (A total of six semester hours are required.) Prerequisites: enrollment in
MME Program, consent of instructor and approval of program director.
DIRECTORY
146
146 SAINT
DEANSMARTIN’S
/ FACULTYUNIVERSITY
ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION AND DEANS
Year following name indicates when dean joined Saint Martin’s University
Eric C. Apfelstadt (2010)
Dean, College of Arts and Sciences.
B.A. (1972), Indiana State University;
M.F.A. (1979), Princeton University;
Ph.D. (1987) Princeton University.
Richard Beer (2010)
Dean, School of Business.
B.S. (1976), Technische Fachhochschule
Berlin; M.A. (1980), Wake Forest
University; M.S. (1983), University of
Minnesota; Dr.-Eng. (1987),
Technische Fachhochschule Berlin.
Zella Kahn-Jetter (2011)
Dean, School of Engineering.
B.M.E. (1981), The Cooper Union;
M.S.M.E. (1983), Massachusetts
Institute of Technology; Ph.D. (1988),
Polytechnic University.
Joyce V. S. Westgard (1988)
Dean, College of Education and
Counseling Psychology.
B.S. (1973), Montana State University;
M.S. (1981), Montana State University;
Ed.D. (1988), Montana State University.
FACULTY
Year following name indicates when faculty member joined Saint Martin’s University
Kathleen Allen (2004) Associate professor, education. B.S. (1985), Oregon State
University; M.S. (1996), Portland State
University; Ed.D. (2004), George Fox
University.
Tiffany Artime (2013) Assistant Professor, psychology. B.A. (2005), Seattle
Pacific University; M.A. (2010), University of Missouri-St. Louis; Ph.D. (2013),
University of Missouri-St. Louis.
Bonnie Amende (2007) Associate professor, mathematics. B.S. (1994), University
of Wyoming; M.S. (1997), University of
Utah; Ph.D. (2005), University of Oregon.
Darrell D. Axtell (1988) Associate
professor, chemistry. B.A. (1967), Linfield
College; Ph.D. (1973), Oregon State
University.
Olivia Archibald (2000) Professor,
English. B.A. (1971), Marshall University;
M.A. (1973), Marshall University; Ph.D.
(1998), University of Iowa.
Gina Armer (2014) Visiting Assistant
Professor. B.A. (1978), University of Puget
Sound; M.B.A. (1988) Pacific Lutheran
University; B.S. (2001) Central Washington University; Ph.D. (2009) University of
Idaho-Moscow.
Brian Barnes (2008) Assistant professor, history. B.A. (2000), University of
California, Santa Barbara; M.Ed. (2001),
University of California, Santa Barbara;
M.A. (2003), University of Washington;
Ph.D. (2008), University of Washington.
Todd Barosky (2012) Assistant Professor,
English. B.A. (2003), The College of the
Holy Cross; Ph.D. (2010), The Graduate Center of the City University of New
York.
FACULTY 147
Jeff Birkenstein (2004) Associate professor, English. B.A. (1994), University of
California, Los Angeles; M.A. (1996),
California State University Long Beach;
M.A., (2002), University of Kentucky;
Ph.D. (2003), University of Kentucky.
Peter Bishay (2014) Assistant professor,
mechanical engineering. B.S. (2007),
Cairo University; M.S. (2010), Cairo
University; Ph.D. (2014), University of
California in Irvine.
Robert Bode (2014) Assistant professor,
biology. B.S. (2005), Hope College; Ph.D.
(2011), Cornell University.
Darrell Born (2003) Associate professor, music. B.M. (1997), Biola University;
M.M. (1999), Wichita State University.
Michael P. Butler (2008) Associate
professor, psychology. B.S. (1996), University of Illinois–Champaign Urbana;
M.A. (1999), American University;
M.A. (2001), Fordham University; Ph.D.
(2006), Fordham University.
Rex J. Casillas (1987) Associate professor,
history. B.A. (1975), Western Washington University; M.A. (1977), Western
Washington University; Ph.D. (1983),
University of Utah.
Julia McCord Chavez (2011) Assistant
professor, English. B.A. (1992), DePauw
University; J.D. (1995), Indiana University
School of Law-Bloomington; M.A. (2001),
University of Wisconsin- Madison; Ph.D.
(2008), University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Huabin Chen (1994) Professor, education. B.Ed. (1981), Shanghai Teachers’
University; M.Ed. (1989), Idaho State
University; Ph.D. (1994), Indiana University.
Aaron J. Coby (2007) Associate professor,
biology. B.S. (1995), Saint Xavier University; M.S.E.S. (2000), Indiana University;
M.P.A. (2000), Indiana University; Ph.D.
(2005), Indiana University.
Tam Dinh (2012) Assistant professor,
social work. B.A. (1997) University of
Washington; M.S.W. (1998), University of
Washington; Ph.D. (2008), University of
Southern California.
Denis DuBois (2009) Assistant professor,
finance. B.S. (1961), Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.S. (1967), Naval
Post Graduate School; M.B.A. (1981),
University of Southern California.
Shawn Duan (2014) Full Professor, mechanical engineering. B.S. (1982), Kunmig
University of Science and Technology;
M.S. (1988), Tianjin University; Ph.D.
(1999), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
Rebecca Edwards (2010) Visiting professor, music. B.A. (1975), Occidental College; M.F.A. (1979), Princeton University;
Ph.D. (1990), Princeton University.
Godfrey J. Ellis (1988) Professor, counseling psychology. B.A. (1973), Brigham
Young University; M.S. (1975), Brigham
Young University; Ph.D. (1979), Washington State University.
Samuel Fox (2014) Assistant Professor,
mechanical engineering. B.S. (1997),
Oregon State University; M.S. (2006),
University of Central Florida; Ph.D.
(2011), Oregon State University.
Irina Gendelman (2007) Associate
professor, communication. B.A. (1991),
University of Michigan; M.A. (2002),
University of Washington; Ph.D. (2008),
University of Washington.
Aaron Goings (2012) Assistant professor,
history. B.A. (2002), Saint Martin’s University; M.A. (2005), Central Washington
University; Ph.D. (2011), Simon Fraser
University.
Heather Grob (2005) Associate professor, business. B.A. (1990), University of
Denver; Ph.D. (1998), University of Notre
Dame.
148 FACULTY
Scot Harrison (2001) Associate professor, library. B.A. (1986), University of
Massachusetts at Amherst; M.A. (1991),
University of Texas at Austin; M.L.I.S.
(2001), University of Washington.
Mary Jo Hartman (2005) Associate
professor, biology. B.S. (1986), University
of Iowa; M.S.(1994), Western Washington
University; Ph.D. (2003), University of
South Carolina.
Fumie Hashimoto (2000) Professor,
education. B.A. (1992), Eastern Oregon
State College; M.Ed. (1993), Heritage
College; Ph.D. (1997), Washington State
University.
Robert Hauhart (2006) Professor, criminal justice. B.S. (1972), Southern Illinois
University;A.M. (1973), Washington
University; J.D. (1981), University of
Baltimore School of Law; Ph.D. (1982),
University of Virginia.
Tim Healy (1996) Assistant professor, education, physical education. B.A.
(1978), Washington State University;
M.A. (1982), Washington State University.
Belinda Hill (1996) Associate professor,
education. B.S. (1977), Clemson University; M.Ed., (1986), Saint Martin’s College;
Ph.D. (1999), University of Washington.
David A. Hlavsa (1989) Professor, theatre
arts. B.A. (1984), Princeton University;
M.F.A. (1986), University of Washington.
Pius Igharo (1996) Associate professor,
civil engineering. B.S. (1963), Swarthmore College; M.S. (1965), Columbia
University; Ph.D. (1971), University of
Pittsburgh.
Han Soo Jung (1991) Associate professor,
mechanical engineering. B.S. (1974),
Seoul National University; M.S. (1984),
University of Florida; Ph.D. (1991), University of Florida.
FACULTY
Kaj Kayij-Wint (2014) Visiting assistant
professor, psychology. B.A. (2005), Providence College; M.A. (2011), Saint Martin’s
University.
Louise Kaplan (2012) Associate professor,
nursing. B.A. (1974), Simmons College;
M.N. (1981), University of Washington;
Ph.D. (1992), Brandeis University.
Kathy Kinderman (2014) Visiting assistant pofessor, nursing. A.A. (1983),
Spokane Community College; B.S. (1999),
Saint Martin’s University; Master of Nursing (2004), Washington State University;
Ph.D. (2012), Capella University.
Father Gerard Kirsch, O.S.B. (1970)
Assistant professor, history. B.A. (1965),
Saint Martin’s College; M.A. (1970), University of Illinois.
Victor M. Kogan (1990) Professor,
criminal justice, sociology. M.A. (1959),
Kazakh StateUniversity; M.A. (1963),
Kazakh State University; Ph.D. (1985),
Institute of State and Law of the USSR
Academy of Sciences.
Nathalie Kuroiwa-Lewis (2007) Associate professor, English. B.A. (1992), College of St. Scholastica; M.A. (1995), State
University of New York at Albany; M.A.
(1998), St. Cloud State University; Ph.D.
(2007), University of Arizona.
Richard L. Langill (1986) Professor,
political science. B.A. (1960), California State University, Long Beach; M.A.
(1965), California State University, Long
Beach; Ph.D. (1976), The American University.rican University.
Brother Boniface V. Lazzari, O.S.B.
(1975) Associate professor, Spanish.
B.A. (1967), Saint Martin’s College; M.A.
(1973), Universidad Nacional Autónoma
de México; S.T.B. (1987), Universidad
Pontificia Comillas.
FACULTY 149
Kyu Lee (2003) Professor, computer science. B.S. (1960), Seoul National University; Ph.D. (1970), Indiana University.
Dintie S. Mahamah (1984) Professor,
civil engineering. B.S. (1977), University
of Science and Technology; M.S. (1980),
Washington State University; Ph.D.
(1984), Washington State University.
Linda Maier (2013) Assistant professor,
education. B.A. (1977), Calvin College; M.A. (1981), Western Washington
University; Ph.D. (2011), University of
Washington.
Joseph M. Mailhot (1986) Associate professor, mathematics. B.A. (1984), Western
Washington University; M.S. (1986),
Western Washington University.
Father Kilian J. Malvey, O.S.B. (1961)
Professor, religious studies and English.
B.A. (1964), Saint Martin’s College; M.A.
(1970), Marquette University; D.Min.
(1980), University of California, Berkeley; M.T.S. (1984), Boston Theological
Institute.
Kathleen McKain (1993) Associate
professor, French. B.A. (1985), Pacific Lutheran University; M.A. (1988),
Middlebury College.
Stephen X. Mead (1986) Professor, English. B.A. (1978), S.U.N.Y., Purchase; M.A.
(1981), Indiana University; M.A. (1983),
Indiana University; Ph.D. (1986), Indiana
University.
Gregory Milligan (2002) Associate professor, chemistry. B.S. (1983), University
of Oregon; Ph.D. (1990), University of
Washington.
Riley Moore (2001) Associate professor,
economics. B.S. (1987), University of
Washington; M.B.A. (1989), Mississippi
State University; Ph.D. (1993), Mississippi
State University.
Paul Nelson (2014) Visiting assistant professor, education. B.S. (1959), Northern
Illinois University; M.A. (1963), Northwestern University; Ed.D. (1968), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Jeremy W. Newton (2011) Assistant professor, psychology. B.S. (2000), University
of Georgia; Ph.D. (2010), University of
California, Davis.
Leticia Nieto (1992) Professor, counseling psychology. B.A. (1981), George Fox
College; M.A. (1983), Azuza Pacific University; Psy.D. (1987), Ryokan College.
Margaret A. Olney (2005) Associate
professor, biology. B.A. (1992), Swarthmore College; Ph.D. (1999), Stanford
University.
Jamie Olson (2008) Associate professor,
English. B.A. (2002), The College of Saint
Scholastica; M.A. (2004), University of
Michigan; Ph.D. (2008), University of
Michigan.
Carol Overdeep (2005) Associate professor, mathematics. B.S. (1984), University
of Puget Sound; M.A. (1987), California
State University-Fullerton; M.B.A. (1999),
University of Rhode Island; Ph.D. (2003),
University of Rhode Island.
Stephen Parker (2009) Assistant professor, physics. B.A. (1991), Lawrence
University; M.S. (1993), University of
Washington; Ph.D. (2001), University of
Washington.
Paul Patterson (2000) Associate professor, marketing. B.A. (1965), University of
Washington; M.B.A. (1971), University of
Washington.
Cynthia Petersen (1993) Professor,
education. B.A. (1977), Pacific Lutheran
University; M.A. (1984), Pacific Lutheran
University; Ed.D. (1989), University of
San Francisco.
150 FACULTY
Rico Picone (2014) Assistant Professor,
mechanical engineering. B.S. (2008),
University of Nevada in Las Vegas; M.S.
(2010), University of Washington; Ph.D.
(2014), University of Washington.
Chun Kyung Seong (1995) Professor,
civil engineering. B.S. (1970), Seoul
National University; M.S. (1975), Seoul
National University; Ph.D. (1983), Lehigh
University.
Katherine Porter (2000) Associate professor, mathematics, B.S. (1983), Montana
College of Mineral Science and Technology; M.S. (1987), University of Delaware;
M.S. (1998), University of Alabama in
Huntsville; Ph.D. (1999), University of
Alabama in Huntsville.
Ekaterina “Katya” Shkurkin (1999) Professor, community services, social work,
and sociology. B.A. (1977), University
of California; M.S.W. (1979), Columbia
University; Ph.D. (2005), California Coast
University.
Father David E. Pratt (2008) Assistant
professor, philosophy. B.A. (1983), Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology; M.Div. (1990), St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Seminary; M.A. (1995), Dominican
School of Philosophy and Theology; STL
(2002), Jesuit School of Theology; Ph.D./
STD (2013), Katholieke University.
Michael Shohan (1988) Instructor, ESL
Program B.A. (1983), The Evergreen State
College.
Maureen Siera (2000) Associate professor, education. B.A. (1972), Maryville
College; M.S. (1974), The University of
Tennessee, Knoxville; Ed.D. (1989), Oklahoma State University, Stillwater.
David Price (1994) Professor, sociology,
and cultural anthropology. B.A. (1983),
The Evergreen State College; M.A. (1985),
University of Chicago; Ph.D. (1993),
University of Florida.
Steve Siera (2003) Associate professor,
education. B.S. (1970), Maryville College;
M.S. (1974), University of Tennessee,
Knoxville; Ph.D. (1984), New Mexico
State University.
Eileen Reilich (1997) Associate professor, education. B.S. (1980), University of
Idaho; M.Ed. (1986), Washington State
University; Ph.D. (1999), Washington
State University.
Paul Slaboch (2012) Assistant professor, mechanical engineering. B.S. (2004),
University of Notre Dame; M.S. (2008),
University of Notre Dame; Ph.D. (2009),
University of Notre Dame.
Mina Ringenbach (2004) Assistant professor, education. B.A. (1987), The Evergreen
State College; M.A. (1990), Saint Martin’s
College; E.S.A. Certification (1991).
Arwyn Smalley (2008) Associate professor, chemistry. B.S. (1998), Western Washington University; M.S. (2001), University
of Oregon; Ph.D. (2005), University of
Oregon.
Julia Schiavone Camacho (2014) Visiting
assistant professor, history and political
science. B.A. (1997), University of Arizona; M.A. (2003), University of Texas;
Ph.D. (2006), University of Texas.
Father George J. Seidel, O.S.B. (1961)
Professor, philosophy. B.A. (1955), Saint
Martin’s College; M.A. (1960), University
of Toronto; Ph.D. (1962), University of
Toronto.
Roger Snider (1982) Associate professor,
history, and political science. B.A. (1967),
The College of Idaho; M.A. (1969), University of Idaho; Ph.D. (1975), University
of Idaho.
Blaine A. Snow (2000) Instructor, ESL
program. B.A. (1988), The Evergreen State
College.
FACULTY 151
Sheila M. Steiner (2008) Professor, psychology. B.A. (1988), Central Washington
University; M.S. (1990), Central Washington University; M.A. (1993), University of
California, Davis; Ph.D. (1998), University
of California, Davis.
Donald E. Stout, Jr. (1999) Associate
professor, business. B.C.E. (1976), Auburn
University; M.E.M. (1997), Saint Martin’s
College.
David W. Suter (1984) Professor, religious
studies. B.A. (1964), Davidson College;
B.D. (1967), University of Chicago; M.A.
(1970), University of Chicago; Ph.D.
(1977), University of Chicago.
Lou Therrell (1989) Associate professor, education. B.A. (1960), Florida State
University; M.A. (1969), Appalachian
State University; Ed.S. (1971), University
of Georgia.
Father Peter Tynan, O.S.B. (2005) Library archivist. B.S. (1992), University of
Nebraska-Lincoln; M.A. (1999), Gonzaga
University; M.L.I.S. (2001), University
of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; M.A., M.Div.
(2011), Mount Angel Seminary.
Frank Washko (2014) Assistant Professor,
mechanical engineering. B.S. (1994), M.S.
(1995), M.B.A. (2001), and Ph.D. (2003),
Wayne State University; J.D. (2007),
Georgetown University.
John Weiss (2013) Assistant professor,
physics. B.A. (1999), Carleton College;
M.S. (2001), University of Colorado;
Ph.D. (2005), University of Colorado.
Ian Werrett (2006) Associate professor,
religious studies. B.A. (1996), Saint Martin’s College; M.A. (2000), Trinity Western
University; Ph.D. (2006), University of St.
Andrews.
Dan Windisch (1989) Professor, education. B.A. (1970), Western Washington
University; M.S. (1974), Old Dominion
University; Ed.D. (1983), Washington
State University.
Teresa Winstead (2007) Visiting assistant
professor, sociology and cultural anthropology. B.A. (1994), Augustana College;
M.A. (2005), Indiana University; Ph.D.
(2013), Indiana University.
Thomas Woodruff (2010) Visiting assistant professor, psychology. B.A. (1979),
Trinity University; M.A. (1991), University of Northern Colorado; Ph.D. (2002),
University of Kansas.
Peggy Zorn (1995) Associate professor,
counseling psychology. B.A. (1978), San
Diego State University; M.A. (1985), Human Relations Institute.
152 FACULTY AND STAFF EMERITI
FACULTY AND STAFF EMERITI
Chris Allaire
Associate professor emeritus, civil
engineering. B.S. (1956), U.S. Military
Academy; M.S. (1961), Texas A & M
University;
James Harmon
Associate professor emeritus, civil engineering. B.S. (1961), U.S. Military Academy; M.S. (1964), Princeton University.
Robert Harvie
Professor emeritus, criminal justice. B.S.
(1962), Washington State University; M.A.
(1973), University of Illinois; J.D. (1972),
University of Oregon.
Carl A. Manning
Professor emeritus, physics, mathematics.
B.S. (1966), University of Illinois; M.S.
(1969), University of Washington.
Gloria Martin
Professor emeritus, English. B.S. (1964),
Edinboro State College; M.A. (1966), Purdue University; Ph.D. (1982), University of
Wisconsin, Madison.
Mary Lou Peltier
Professor emeritus, biology. B.A. (1965),
Immaculate Heart College, Los Angeles;
M.A(1969), Immaculate Heart College,
Los Angeles.
Mary Conley Law
Registrar emeritus, registrar (1975), B.A.
(1964)Culver-Stockton College; M.S.
(1971) Illinois State University – Normal.
Anthony de Sam Lazaro
Professor emeritus, engineering. B.S.
(1963), University of Madras, India; M.S.
(1973), University of Moscow, Russia;
M.Sc. (1978), University of Madras; Ph.D.
(1989), University of Wales, Cardiff,
United Kingdom.
Norma Shelan
Professor emeritus, community services,
sociology. B.A. (1970), University of
Texas; M.S.W. (1978), University of
Washington.
David R. Spangler
President emeritus. B.S. (1962), U.S. Military Academy; M.S. (1966), University
of Illinois; Ph.D. (1977), University of
Illinois.
Haldon Wilson
Professor emeritus, business. B.A. (1966),
The Citadel; M.P.A. (1978), University of
Puget Sound; M.B.A. (1980), University of
Puget Sound.
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2014/2015 153
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2014/2015
Pat Rants
Chair
President / Co-CEO, The Rants Group
Olympia, Washington
Jim Guerci ’91
Semi-Retired Owner/Operator
Guerci Construction Management
Seattle, Washington
A. Richard Panowicz
Vice-chair
Retired
Olympia, Washington
Phillip Hall, CPA, CMA, ’91
Strader Hallett & Co., P.S.
Lacey, Washington
Abbot Neal G. Roth, O.S.B., ’65,
Chancellor Abbot, St. Martin’s Abbey
Lacey, Washington
Roy F. Heynderickx, Ph.D., President
President, Saint Martin’s University Lacey,
Washington
Joseph Alongi HS ’62, ’64
Alongi Contracting
Olympia, Washington
Armandino A. Batali ’59
President/Owner, Armandino’s Salumi
Restaurant & Salumi Artisan Cured Meats
Seattle, Washington
Brian S. Charneski
President, L & E Bottling Company, Inc.
Olympia, Washington
Father Bede Classick, O.S.B.
St. Martin’s Abbey
Lacey, Washington
Waite Dalrymple, PE, ’65
CEO, Parametrix (Retired)
Sumner, Washington
Lori G. Drummond
CEO, Olympia Federal Savings
Olympia, Washington
Daniel Dugaw, DO, HS ’68
Physician
Olympia, Washington
Gerry Gallagher ’83
Vice President of Sales & Marketing
GM Nameplate
Seattle, Washington
Father Alfred J. Hulscher, O.S.B., ’51
St. Martin’s Abbey
Lacey, Washington
Francis Iwasawa ’60
President, Asahi Iwasawa and Associates
Hong Kong, China
Steve Leahy
Washington State Director, America’s
Edge
Sammamish, Washington
Kathy Lombardo
Consultant
Olympia, Washington
Father Kilian Malvey, O.S.B. HS ’55, ’64
St. Martin’s Abbey
Lacey, Washington
Matthew Marcus ’94
Marcus Real Estate Services
Olympia, Washington
Father Justin McCreedy, O.S.B.
St. Martin’s Abbey
Lacey, Washington
Terence R. Monaghan, PE, CEng., ’62
President, VECO Engineering Group
(Retired)
Palm Desert, California
Olympia, Washington
Kathleen C. O’Grady
President and Trustee
the O’Grady Foundation
New York, NY
John O’Halloran
Rainier Investment Management (Retired) Seattle, Washington
154 SAINT MARTIN’S ABBEY
Katie Opitz
Lieutenant Colonel Army Nursing Corp
(Retired), The Wave Car Wash (owner)
Lacey, WA
Richard A. Roney
Owner, Northwest Tax & Financial
Services
Centralia, Washington
Rev. Stephen C. Rowan, Ph.D.
Superintendent of Catholic Schools
Archdiocese
Seattle, Washington
Jay C. Rudd
Ophthalmologist, Clarus Eye Center
Lacey, Washington
Philip S. Weigand
Realtor (Retired) / Lt. Col., USMC (Retired)
Olympia, Washington
Joseph S. Williams
Williams Group, LLC
Yelm, Washington
Br. Aelred Woodard, O.S.B.
St. Martin’s Abbey
Lacey, Washington
Cynthia S. Worth
Attorney at Law, LL.M.
Tumwater, Washington
SAINT MARTIN’S ABBEY
Right Reverend Neal Roth, O.S.B.
Abbot
Father Alfred Hulscher, O.S.B.
Prior; treasurer and director of fiscal affairs
Brother Ramon Newell, O.S.B.
Subprior
UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION / ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 155
UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION
Abbot Neal Roth, O.S.B.
Chancellor
Susan Heltsley
Vice president of finance
Roy F. Heynderickx, Ph.D.
President
Father Alfred Hulscher, O.S.B.
Secretary of Corporation
Molly E. Smith, Ph.D.
Provost and vice president
for academic affairs
Katie Wojke
Interim–Vice president for institutional
advancement
Father Bede Classick, O.S.B.
Treasurer
Melanie R. Richardson
Dean of students
Genevieve Canceko Chan
Vice president for marketing
and communications
Josephine Yung
Vice president for international
programs and development
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES
University General Information
360-491-4700
FAX: 360-459-4124
Academic Affairs, Office of
Molly E. Smith, Ph.D., provost and vice
president for academic affairs
360-438-4310
Admissions, Office of
Sarah Weiss, director of admissions
800-368-8803 / 360-438-4311
[email protected]
Alumni Relations, Office of
800-220-7722 / 360-486-8885
Arts and Sciences, College of
Eric C. Apfelstadt, Ph.D., dean
360-438-4564
[email protected]
Athletics Department
Bob Grisham, athletic director
360-438-4305
[email protected]
Business, School of
Richard Beer, Ph.D., dean
360-438-4512
[email protected]
Campus Life, Office of
Laurel Dube, director
360-438-4577
[email protected]
Campus Ministry, Office of
Jon Dwyer, director
360-412-6152
[email protected]
Career Center
Ann Adams, associate dean
360-486-8842
[email protected]
Centralia College Extended Campus
156 ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES
Carol Jacobs, program manager
360-736-9391 ext. 414
[email protected]
Counseling and Wellness, Office of
Jan Berney, director
360-438-4371
[email protected]
Disability Support Services, Office of
Geoff Brown, coordinator
360-438-4580 TTY: 360-438-4556
[email protected]
Education and Counseling Psychology,
College of
Joyce V. S. Westgard, Ed.D., dean
360-438-4333
[email protected]
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES
Graduate Studies, Office of
Steve Siera, Ph.D. associate dean
360-412-6142
[email protected]
Housing and Residence Life, Office of
Timothy McClain, director
360-412-6163
[email protected]
Human Resources, Office of
Cynthia Johnson, director
360-486-8131
[email protected]
Institutional Advancement, Office of
Katie Wojke, interim-vice president
360-438-4586
[email protected]
Engineering, School of
Zella Kahn-Jetter, Ph.D., P.E., dean
360-438-4320
[email protected]
Integrated Technology Services, Office of
Greg Davis, associate vice president
360-438-8772
[email protected]
Extended Campus-McChord Field
Mercedes Garrido, campus manager
253-584-3533
[email protected]
Intercultural Initiatives, Office of
John Hopkins, associate dean
360-486-8847
[email protected]
Extended Learning Division (Joint Base
Lewis-McChord, Centralia College, Tacoma Community College and University
Center of North Puget Sound in Everett)
Radana Dvorak, Ph.D., dean
360-412-6141
[email protected]
International Programs and Development, Office of
Josephine Yung, vice president
360-438-4375
[email protected]
Finance Office
Susan Heltsley, vice president
360-438-4390
Financial Aid, Office of (Student Financial Service Center)
Isabelle Mora, director
360-438-4463
[email protected]
Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM)
Campus
Cruz Arroyo, division director
253-964-4688
[email protected]
Learning and Writing Center
Deborah Debow, director
360-438-8880
[email protected]
ACADEMIC OFFICES 157
Marketing and Communications,
Office of
Genevieve Canceko Chan, vice president 360-438-4332
[email protected]
O’Grady Library
Scot Harrison, dean
360-486-8808
[email protected]
President, Office of the
Roy F. Heynderickx Ph.D., president
360-438-4307
[email protected]
Public Safety, Office of
Howard Thronson, director
360-486-8876
[email protected]
Student Financial Service Center
Debbie Long, assistant dean
360-438-4389
[email protected]
Student Affairs, Office of
Melanie Richardson, dean of students
360-438-4367
[email protected]
Veteran’s Benefit Certification Official
Ronda Vandergriff, assistant registrar
360-438-4356
[email protected]
Website / www.stmartin.edu
Carl Lew, web manager
360-438-4461
[email protected]
Registrar, Office of the
Alex Arceneaux, registrar
360-438-4356
[email protected]
ACADEMIC OFFICES
Arts and Sciences
360-438-4564
Master of Civil Engineering Program
Business and Economics
Master of Engineering Management
Program
360-438-4512
Education and Professional Psychology
360-438-4333
Engineering
360-438-4320
International Education
360-438-4375
Master of Business Administration
Program
360-438-4512
Master of Arts in Counseling
Psychology Program
360-438-4560
360-438-4320
360-438-4320
Master of Education/Master in Teaching
Programs
360-438-4333
Spiritual Life Institute
360-438-4564
Summer Session
360-438-4564
For additional information about Saint
Martin’s University programs and policies, please visit the University website
at www.stmartin.edu
158 CAMPUS MAP
CAMPUS MAP
CAMPUS MAP – LEGEND 159
LEGEND
Buildings
1. Old Main (Bookstore on 2nd floor)
2. Monastery
3. Abbey Church
4. Lynch Center (Abbey Guest House)
5. Zaverl Hall (Maintenance Building)
6. Harned Hall (Academic Building)
7. Trautman Student Union Building (TUB)
8. Hal and Inge Marcus Pavilion
9. Norman Worthington Conference Center
10. Baran Hall (Residence)
11. Burton Hall (Residence)
12. Charneski Recreation Center
13. Kreielsheimer Hall (Arts Education)
14. O’Grady Library
15. Spangler Hall (Residence)
16. Parsons Hall (Residence)
17. ‘NEW’ Cebula Hall (Engineering)
Parking
A. University and Abbey visitor lot
B. Lynch employee lot–permit required
C. Lynch private guest lot
D. O’Grady Library lot–handicapped parking only
E. Reserved employee lot–permit required
F. Parsons Hall (resident student lot) permit required
G. Baran/Spangler Hall (resident student lot) permit required
H. Burton Hall (resident student lot) permit required
I. Softball (resident student/student lot) permit required
J. Employee lot–permit required
K. NE Pavilion lot–open parking
L. SE Pavilion lot–open parking
M. South Pavilion lot–open parking
N. Overflow lot
O. Grand Staircase student lot–permit required
160 DIRECTIONS TO SAINT MARTIN’S
DIRECTIONS TO SAINT MARTIN’S
From Interstate-5 Northbound:
Take College St. exit #108.
Turn right onto College Street.
From Interstate-5 Southbound:
Take Martin Way exit #109.
Turn right onto Martin Way.
Turn left onto College Street.
From College Street to Old Main Classroom and Administration Building:
Proceed to 6th Avenue. Turn left on 6th Avenue. Follow signs to Old Main and
visitor parking.
From College Street to the Hal and Inge Marcus Pavilion and Norman
Worthington Conference Center:
Proceed to Lacey Boulevard; turn left. Proceed to Franz Street; turn left. Proceed
to Pacific Avenue; cross to the University entrance at Father Meinrad Gaul Drive.
Follow signs to Pavilion and Conference Center.
APPENDIX A 161
APPENDIX A
Saint Martin’s core themes and associated objectives
and outcomes (as of July 2012)
Faith
Objectives and Outcomes
F1 Recognizes the role of faith as a basis for many actions/choices
a. Explains how choices and actions are made as a result of faith
b. Identifies the role of faith in personal life
F2 Understands that faith is the basis of the search for truth that incorporates
interaction of value commitments and reason
a. Recognizes spirituality as a personal value
b. Articulates the role of faith in the search for truth
c. Examines personal views based on the interaction of faith and reason
Reason
Objectives and Outcomes
R1 Comprehends central concepts and principles in respective academic majors
and supporting areas
a. Explains the central concepts and principles in the discipline
b. Gives examples of specific instances illustrating concepts in the discipline
c. Generalizes the concepts in the discipline across specific situations
Service
Objectives and Outcomes
S1 Responds to student needs and concerns
a. Expresses satisfaction with service through positive ratings
S2 Performs activities to assist organizations to serve the local and at-large
communities
a. Chooses to participate in events, activities, or organizations
S3 Helping others becomes a personal life commitment
a. Demonstrates commitment to a career of service (professionally or
avocationally)
APPENDIX A
R2 Judges the adequacy with which conclusions are supported by data
a. Discerns the elements of rational argumentation in the discipline
b. Discriminates between supported and unsupported statements in the
discipline
162 APPENDIX A
Community
Objectives and Outcomes
C1 Shows concern with welfare of all constituencies
a. Participates in activities that meet needs and solve problems
b. Initiates activities to meet needs and solve problems
C2 Understands the essential interdependence of human beings in an environment.
a. Explains impacts of own or others’ actions on other members of the
community
C3 Demonstrates appreciation for human diversity
a. Engages in competent practice in relating with diverse individuals
C4 Balances working independently with working collaboratively
a. Discriminates appropriate participation (independent versus collaborative)
b. Engages in effective task performance in appropriate modes
INDEX 163
INDEX
-AAbbey Church, 9
Abbey, Saint Martin’s, 5, 7, 9, 154
Academic calendar, 6
Academic dishonesty, 56
Academic information, 39-57
Academic offices, 157
Academic probation, 55
Academic suspension, 55-56
Academic values, 8
Accounting, 60
Accreditation, 4-5
Admission, 19-22
Application for, 19
Application for readmission, 21
Extended Learning Division, 21-22
Graduate, 19
International students, 20-21
MAC, 79
MBA, 61
MCE, 117
MED, 86
MEM, 127
MIT, 97
MME, 133
Administration, University, 155
Administrative offices, 155-157
Advising, 13
Application for admission, 19
Applicants with military experience, 22
Application for degree, 54
Application for transfer admission, 42
Attendance, 40-41
-BBelltower, The, 15
Benedict of Nursia, 6
Benedictine Values, 8
Baran Hall, 29, 159
Burton Hall, 29, 159
Board of trustees, 153-154
Board refund, 34
Bon Appetit, 17
Bookstore, 11
Business, School of, 60-69
Accounting, 60
Business Administration, 60-61
Master of Business Administration
(MBA) program, 61
-C“C” grades, transfer of, 45
Campus facilities, 9-11
Campus map, 158
Campus ministry, 12
Campus dining services, 17
Career services, 13
Cebula Hall, 9, 10, 159
Center for Learning, Writing
and Advising, 13
Change of grade, 45
Change of registration, 42
Cheating, 56-57
Civil Engineering, Master of, 116-126
Conduct, 18
Commencement, 41
Competency-based endorsements, 96
Computer Resource Center, 10
Core Themes, 7
Counseling and Wellness Center, 13-14
Counseling Psychology, Master of Arts (MAC) program, 77-84
Course number classifications, 40
CPA exam, preparation for, 65
Curriculum Resource Center, 11
-DDegree requirements,
MAC, 80-81
MBA, 63-65
MCE, 118
MED, 88-91
164 INDEX
MEM, 128
MIT, 99-101
MME, 135
School of Engineering, 118
Dining hall, 11
Dining services, 17
Directed study, 53
Directions to campus, 160
Directory, 145-157
Academic offices, 157
Administrative offices, 155-157
Board of trustees, 153-154
Deans, 146
Faculty, 146-151
Faculty and staff emeriti, 152
Saint Martin’s Abbey, 154
Disability Support Services, Office, 14
-EEducation and Professional
Psychology, College of, 70-84
Academic Policy, 74
Accreditation, 70
Added endorsement options, 76
Admission to, 78
Application to, 78-79
Competency-based endorsements, 76-77
Conceptual framework, 71-72
Graduate degree options, 75
Post-baccalaureate Certification-only
option, 75
Program requirements, 81-82
Student teaching/internship, 73
Waiver and substitution option, 74
Endorsements, Washington State
competency-based requirements, 76-77
Endorsements offered, 76-77
Emeriti, faculty and staff, 152
Engineering, Hal and Inge Marcus
School of, 115-143
Master of Civil Engineering (MCE),
116-126
Master of Engineering Management
(MEM), 126-133
Master of Mechanical Engineering
(MME), 133-143
English as a Second Language (ESL), 86, 89
Equal opportunity statement, 5
Expenses, 29-34
Extended Learning Division, 35-37
Admission to, 21-22
Class loads, 36
Degree options, 35
Lacey campus students, 36
Registration, 35
Session dates, 36
Tuition refund policy, 36-37
Withdrawal policy, 36
-F-
Facilities (campus), 9-11
Faculty, 146-151
Faculty and staff emeriti, 152
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), 47
Notification of rights, 47-48
Fee schedule, 30
Payment, 31
Registration fees, 30
Special fees, 31
Student services fees, 30
Filing a grievance about a grade, 46-47
Financial aid, 23-29
Applying for, 23
Eligibility requirements for, 24
Other means, 28-29
Satisfactory Academic Progress, 25
Student loans, 28
Types of, 23, 28-29
Food service, 17
-GGoArmyEd, 33
Grade point average, 44-45
Grades, 44
Grants (gift aid), 28
Grievance, process for filing, 46
Guiding principles, 73
INDEX 165
-HHal and Inge Marcus Pavilion, 16, 159
Hal and Inge Marcus School of
Engineering, 115-143
Harned Hall, 10, 159
Health Center, 16
Health insurance, 30
History of Saint Martin’s, 6-7
-IIncomplete, 44-45
Request for, 45
Removal of, 45
Independent study, 54
International students, 15, 19, 20
Application, 19, 20, 98
Health insurance for, 30
International Programs and
Development, Office of, 14
Internships, 55
Insights, 15
-JJoint Base Lewis-McChord, 22, 35, 63,
87, 97
-KKreielsheimer Hall, 159
-LLacey campus students (extension
students), 36
Late validation, 41
Loans, student, 28
Location of Saint Martin’s, 8-9, 160
-MMajors and areas of study,
undergraduate, 40
Martin of Tours, 7
Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology (MAC) program, 77-84
Admission to, 78
Application to, 78-79
Courses, 82-84
Degree requirements, 80-81
Faculty, 77
Program requirements, 81-82
Master of Business Administration (MBA) program, 61-69
Accounting, 65
Admission to, 61
Application to, 62
Calendar, 63
Class locations, 63
Courses, 65-69
Degree requirements, 63-65
Registration, 63
Master of Education (MED), 85-115
Admission to, 86
Application to, 86
Courses, 103-115
Degree requirements, 88-91
Faculty, 85
Strand areas, 86
Thesis option, 92
Master in Teaching (MIT), 95-115
Admission to, 97
Application to, 97-98
Competency-based endorsements, 96
Courses, 103-115
Degree requirements, 99-101
Faculty, 95
Internship, 103
Non-thesis option, 102-103
Special Education Endorsement, 102
Thesis option, 102
Master of Civil Engineering (MCE)
program, 116-126
Admission to, 117
Application to, 117
Combined degree (BSCE/MCE)
program, 118
Courses, 121-126
Degree requirements, 118
Dual degrees (MCE/MEM), 119
166 INDEX
Faculty, 116
Program preparation and
continuation, 118
Suggested programs of study, 120
Master of Engineering Management (MEM) program, 126-133
Admission to, 127
Application to, 127, 128
Courses, 130-133
Degree requirements, 128
Dual degrees (MCE/MEM), 129
Faculty, 126
Program requirements, 129-130
Master of Mechanical Engineering
(MME), 133-143
Admission to, 133
Application to, 134
Courses, 137-143
Degree requirements, 135
Faculty, 133
Program Preparation and
continuation, 134
Programs of study, 136-137
Military applicants, 22
Mission statement, 5-6
Mukogawa Women’s University, 7
Multimedia Center, 11
-NNorman Worthington Conference
Center, 159-160
-OO’Grady Library, 10-11, 159
Old Main, 11, 159
-PParsons Hall, 10, 29, 159
Pass/fail grades, 45
Payment of fees, 31
Plagiarism, 56-57
Policies and procedures, 41
Post 9/11 GI Bill, 22 Property loss or damage, 31
Publications, 15
-RReadmission, returning students, 21
Refund policy, 32-35
Action required, 32
Board refund, 34
Calculations and appeals, 32
Non-refundable payments, 32
Room and Damage Deposit, 33
Room refund, 34
Tuition, 33
Withdrawal dates, 33
Registration, 41
Removal of incomplete grade, 45
Repeating courses, 53
Request for an incomplete grade, 45
Residence charges, 29-30
Residence life, 17-18
-SSaint Benedict of Nursia, 6
Saint Martin of Tours, 7
Saint Martin’s Abbey, 5, 7, 9, 154
Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP), 25-26
Scholarships, 28-29
Semester system, 40
Secondary education, 40, 95, 99
Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges
(SOC) Consortium, 22
Spangler Hall, 29, 159
Special fees, 31
Split-level course requirements, 103
St. Gertrude Dining Hall, 11
Student affairs, 11-18
Student conduct, 18
Student Health Center, 16
Student health insurance, 30
Student loans, 28
Student responsibility, 41
Student Right to Know Act, 47
INDEX 167
Student services fees, 30
Student teaching, 103
Suspension, 55-56
-TTrack and field facility, 16
Transcripts, 54
Transfer “C” grades, 45
Transfer credit, 53
Trautman Student Union Building, 11, 157
Tuition rates, 29
Tuition refunds, 33
-UUndergraduate majors and areas
of study, 40
-VVeterans, 54
Veterans Administration, vocational
rehabilitation applicants, 22
-WWashington State competency-based
endorsement requirements, 76
Withdrawal, 48-49
-Y-
Yellow Ribbon Program, 22
-ZZaverl Hall, 11, 159
168
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