GX IEC Developer FX Training Manual Controller Software

GX IEC Developer FX Training Manual Controller Software
MITSUBISHI
ELECTRIC
FACTORY AUTOMATION
Programmable Logic Controllers
GX IEC Developer
About this Manual
The texts, illustrations and examples in this manual only
explain the installation, operation and use of the
GX IEC Developer programming package.
.
If you have questions about the programming and operation
of the programmable logic controllers mentioned in this manual
please contact your dealer or one of our distributors (see back cover).
Up-to-date information and answers to frequently-asked questions
can be found on the Mitsubishi website at
www.mitsubishi-automation.com.
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC EUROPE B.V. reserves the
right to make changes to this manual or the technical specifications
of its products at any time without notice.
ã 2007–2010
Training Manual
GX IEC Developer Programming Software Package
Art.-no.: 208661
Version
Changes / Additions / Corrections
A
06/2007
pdp
First edition
B
04/2010
pdp-dk Chapter 2 and appendix: Addition of the base units of the FX3G and FX3UC
series and of new modules for the FX3U series (FX3U-2HC, FX3U-4LC and
FX3U-3A-ADP).
Chapter 8 has been deleted. (The numbering of the following chapters has
been shifted accordingly.)
Corrections in the sections 3.2.1, 3.2.2, 3.4.1, 4.4.1, and 6.2
Changes in the chapters 5 (Program example) and 18 (Ethernet communications, former chapter 19) and in the sections 12.3.2 and 12.3.3 (Libraries). A
new section 12.3.1 has been defined.
Safety Information
For qualified staff only
This manual is only intended for use by properly trained and qualified electrical technicians who
are fully acquainted with automation technology safety standards. All work with the hardware
described, including system design, installation, setup, maintenance, service and testing, may
only be performed by trained electrical technicians with approved qualifications who are fully
acquainted with the applicable automation technology safety standards and regulations.
Proper use of equipment
The programmable logic controllers are only intended for the specific applications explicitly
described in this manual. Please take care to observe all the installation and operating parameters specified in the manual. All products are designed, manufactured, tested and
documentated in agreement with the safety regulations. Any modification of the hardware or
software or disregarding of the safety warnings given in this manual or printed on the product
can cause injury to persons or damage to equipment or other property. Only accessories and
peripherals specifically approved by MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC may be used. Any other use or
application of the products is deemed to be improper.
Relevant safety regulations
All safety and accident prevention regulations relevant to your specific application must be
observed in the system design, installation, setup, maintenance, servicing and testing of these
products. The regulations listed below are particularly important. This list does not claim to be
complete; however, you are responsible for knowing and applying the regulations applicable to
you.
쎲 VDE Standards
– VDE 0100
(Regulations for electrical installations with rated voltages up to 1,000V)
– VDE 0105
(Operation of electrical installations)
– VDE 0113
(Electrical systems with electronic equipment)
– VDE 0160
(Configuration of electrical systems and electrical equipment)
– VDE 0550/0551
(Regulations for transformers)
– VDE 0700
(Safety of electrical appliances for household use and similar applications)
– VDE 0860
(Safety regulations for mains-powered electronic appliances and their accessories for
household use and similar applications)
쎲 Fire prevention regulations
쎲 Accident prevention regulations
– VBG No. 4 (Electrical systems and equipment)
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
I
Safety warnings in this manual
In this manual special warnings that are important for the proper and safe use of the products are
clearly identified as follows:
II
P
DANGER:
Personnel health and injury warnings. Failure to observe the precautions described
here can result in serious health and injury hazards.
E
CAUTION:
Equipment and property damage warnings. Failure to observe the precautions
described here can result in serious damage to the equipment or other property.
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
General safety information and precautions
The following safety precautions are intended as a general guideline for using the PLC together
with other equipment. These precautions must always be observed in the design, installation
and operation of all control systems.
P
CAUTION:
쎲 Observe all safety and accident prevention regulations applicable to your
specific application. Installation, wiring and opening of the assemblies, components and devices may only be performed with all power supplies disconnected.
쎲 Assemblies, components and devices must always be installed in a shockproof
housing fitted with a proper cover and protective equipment.
쎲 Devices with a permanent connection to the mains power supply must be integrated in the building installations with an all-pole disconnection switch and a
suitable fuse.
쎲 Check power cables and lines connected to the equipment regularly for breaks
and insulation damage. If cable damage is found, immediately disconnect the
equipment and the cables from the power supply and replace the defective
cabling.
쎲 Before using the equipment for the first time check that the power supply rating
matches that of the local mains power.
쎲 Residual current protective devices pursuant to DIN VDE Standard 0641 Parts
1-3 are not adequate on their own as protection against indirect contact for
installations with positioning drive systems. Additional and/or other protection
facilities are essential for such installations.
쎲 EMERGENCY OFF facilities pursuant to EN 60204/IEC 204 VDE 0113 must
remain fully operative at all times and in all control system operating modes. The
EMERGENCY OFF facility reset function must be designed so that it cannot
cause an uncontrolled or undefined restart.
쎲 You must also implement hardware and software safety precautions to prevent
the possibility of undefined control system states caused by signal line cable or
core breaks.
쎲 All relevant electrical and physical specifications must be strictly observed
and maintained for all the modules in the installation.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
III
IV
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Table of Contents
1
Course Overview and Requirements
1.1
Modular PLC Training Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-1
2
The Hardware
2.1
General Introduction to PLCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-1
2.1.1
History & Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-1
2.1.2
The initial specification for the PLC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
2.1.3
Comparison of PLC and Relay Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
2.1.4
Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-2
2.1.5
Human Machine Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-2
2.2
What is a PLC? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3
2.3
How PLCs Process Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-4
2.4
The MELSEC FX Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-6
2.5
Selecting the Right Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-7
2.6
Controller Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-9
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.6.1
Input and output circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-9
2.6.2
Layout of the MELSEC FX1S base units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9
2.6.3
Layout of the MELSEC FX1N base units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
2.6.4
Layout of the MELSEC FX2N base units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-10
2.6.5
Layout of the MELSEC FX2NC base units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11
2.6.6
Layout of the MELSEC FX3G base units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-11
2.6.7
Layout of the MELSEC FX3U base units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12
2.6.8
Layout of the MELSEC FX3UC base units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12
Wiring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-13
2.7.1
Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-13
2.7.2
Wiring of Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-14
2.7.3
Wiring of Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-15
Extending the Range of Digital Inputs/Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17
2.8.1
Extension Boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-17
2.8.2
Compact Extension Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-17
2.8.3
Modular Extension Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-18
Extending for Special Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-19
2.9.1
Analog Modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-20
2.9.2
High-Speed Counter Modules and Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-23
2.9.3
Positioning Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-24
2.9.4
Network Modules for ETHERNET. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-25
2.9.5
Network Modules for Profibus/DP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-26
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
V
Table of Contents
2.9.6
Network Modules for CC-Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-28
2.9.7
Network Module for DeviceNet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-29
2.9.8
Network Module for CANopen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-29
2.9.9
Network Module for AS-Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-30
2.9.10
Interface Modules and Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-31
2.9.11
Communication Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-32
2.9.12
Setpoint Adapter Boards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-33
2.10 System Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-34
2.10.1
Connection of Special Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-36
2.10.2
Basic Rules for System Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-38
2.10.3
Quick Reference Matrixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-39
2.11 I/O Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-41
Concept of assigning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-41
2.11.2
Special function module address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-42
3
Programming
3.1
Concepts of the IEC61131-3 Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
3.2
Software Structure and Definition of Terms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
3.3
3.4
VI
2.11.1
3.2.1
Definition of Terms in IEC61131-3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
3.2.2
System Variables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-9
3.2.3
System Labels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-10
Programming Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-11
3.3.1
Text Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-11
3.3.2
Graphic Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-12
Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-15
3.4.1
Simple Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-15
3.4.2
Complex Data Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-15
3.4.3
MELSEC Timers and Counters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-20
4
Building a Project
4.1
Starting GX IEC Developer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-2
4.2
Application Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-4
4.2.1
Example: Carousel Indexer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-4
4.2.2
Creating a New Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-6
4.2.3
Creating a new “POU” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-8
4.2.4
Assigning the Global Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
4.2.5
Programming the POU Body. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14
4.2.6
Creating a new Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-29
4.2.7
Program Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-33
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Table of Contents
4.3
4.4
4.2.8
Checking and Building the Project Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-34
4.2.9
Illustration: Guided Ladder Entry Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-36
Project Download Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-37
4.3.1
Connection with Peripheral Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-37
4.3.2
Communications Port Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-37
4.3.3
Downloading the project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-41
Monitoring the Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-43
4.4.1
Split / Multi Window Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-44
4.4.2
Adjusting Monitor Visibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-46
4.5
Cross Reference List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-47
4.6
PLC Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-50
4.7
Project Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-51
5
Program Example
5.1
An Alarm System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-1
5.1.1
Method. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-2
5.1.2
Checking the Example Program "Alarm_System" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
6
Functions and Function Blocks
6.1
Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-1
6.1.1
Example: Creating a Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
6.1.2
Processing Real (Floating Point) Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10
6.2
Creating a Function Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-14
6.3
Execution Options of Function Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-21
6.3.1
Macrocode execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-21
6.3.2
Enable / EnableOutput (EN/ENO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-22
7
Advanced Monitoring Functions
7.1
Entry Data Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-1
7.1.1
Customising the EDM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-2
7.1.2
Monitor Limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-4
7.1.3
Toggling Boolean Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-5
7.2
Monitoring Headers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-6
7.3
Monitor Mode Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-7
7.4
Monitoring Mitsubishi “Transfer Form” Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-9
7.5
Modifying Variable Values from the POU Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10
7.6
Monitoring “Instances” of Function Blocks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
VII
Table of Contents
8
Device Edit
8
Device Edit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-1
9
Online Mode
9.1
Online Change Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-1
9.2
Online Program Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-3
10
Data Unit Types (DUT)
10.1 Example use of a DUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-2
10.2 Automatic Filling, Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-5
10.3 Assigning DUT Variables to Function Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-8
11
Arrays
11.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11-1
11.2 Array Example: Single Dimension Array . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3
12
Working with Libraries
12.1 User Defined Libraries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-1
12.1.1
Example – Creating a new Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1
12.1.2
Opening the Library. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-3
12.1.3
Moving a POU “Function Block” to an open Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-4
12.2 Special Note about Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-7
12.3 Importing Libraries into Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-8
13
12.3.1
Import of an User Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-8
12.3.2
Importing a Mitsubishi Library Function Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-11
12.3.3
Library Function Block Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-14
Security
13.1 Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13-1
VIII
13.1.1
Setting the Password. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13-1
13.1.2
Changing the Security Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-2
13.1.3
Modifying POU Password Access. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-3
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Table of Contents
14
Sequential Function Chart - SFC
14.1 What is SFC?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-1
14.2 SFC Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-2
14.2.1
SFC Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-2
14.2.2
Initial Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-2
14.2.3
Termination Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-2
14.3 SFC configuration examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-4
14.4 SFC Actions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-5
14.5 Complex Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-7
15
IEC Instruction List
15.1 Example of IEC Instruction List (IL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15-1
15.1.1
Some useful tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15-1
15.2 Mixing IEC IL and Melsec IL in POUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-2
16
IEC Structured Text
16.1 Structured Text Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-1
16.2 Structured Text Program Example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-2
17
PROFIBUS/DP Communication
17.1 Configuring the PROFIBUS/DP Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-1
18
Ethernet Communications
18.1 Configuring the PC on the Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-2
18.2 Configuring the FX3U-ENET by FX Configurator-EN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-3
18.3 Configuring GX IEC Developer to access the PLC on Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-7
18.4 Setting up a HMI of the GOT1000 Series (GT12, GT15 or GT16) . . . . . . . . . . 18-11
18.5 Setting up a HMI of the E1000 series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-14
18.6 Communication via MX Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-18
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
IX
Table of Contents
A
Appendix
A.1
Special Relays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-1
A.2
A.3
A.4
A.5
X
A.1.1
PLC Status Diagnostic Information (M8000 to M8009) . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
A.1.2
Clock Devices and Real Time Clock (M8011 to M8019) . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
A.1.3
PLC Operation Mode (M8030 to M8039) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
A.1.4
Error Detection (M8060 to M8069) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
A.1.5
Extension Boards (Dedicated to FX1S and FX1N) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4
A.1.6
Analog Special Adapter and Adapter Boards for FX3G
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5
Special Registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-6
A.2.1
PLC Status Diagnostic Information (D8000 to D8009) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6
A.2.2
Scan Information and Real Time Clock (D8010 to D8019) . . . . . . . . . . A-7
A.2.3
PLC Operation Mode (D8030 to D8039) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7
A.2.4
Error Codes (D8060 to D8069). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8
A.2.5
Extension Boards (Dedicated to FX1S and FX1N) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-8
A.2.6
Analog Special Adapter and Adapter Boards for FX3G . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9
Error Code List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-10
A.3.1
Error codes 6101 to 6409 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-10
A.3.2
Error codes 6501 to 6510 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-11
A.3.3
Error codes 6610 to 6632 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-12
A.3.4
Error codes 6701 to 6710 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-13
Number of Occupied Input/Output Points and Current Consumption. . . . . . . . . A-14
A.4.1
Interface Adapter Boards and Communication Adapter Boards . . . . . A-14
A.4.2
Special Adapters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-15
A.4.3
Extension Blocks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-15
A.4.4
Special Function Modules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-16
PLC Components Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A-17
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Course Overview and Requirements
1
Modular PLC Training Hardware
Course Overview and Requirements
This course has been specially produced as an introduction to Mitsubishi’s FX family utilising the
GX IEC Developer software package.
The course content has been selectively produced to provide an introduction into the functionality of the Mitsubishi range of FX PLC’s, together with the GX IEC Developer programming system. The second section deals with the PLC hardware configuration and operation, whilst the
remainder covers the use of Mitsubishi’s IEC61131-3 programming system, which is illustrated
using worked examples.
It is assumed that student will have a sound working knowledge of the Microsoft Windows operating environment.
1.1
Modular PLC Training Hardware
There are various models of training rigs for Mitsubishis FX family. Most exercises within this
training manual are based around use of the facilities offered in these training systems. The
examples used in these course notes assume the following configuration:
쎲 6 Digital input simulator switches: X0–X5
쎲 Variable clock input (1 to 100 Hz and 0.1 to10 kHz): X7
쎲 6 Digital output LED indicators: Y0–Y5
쎲 1 Special function block FX2N-5A with 4 analog inputs and 1 analog output
쎲 1 Temperature acquisition special adapter FX3U-4AD-PT-ADP
Thus, adjustments according to other training simulators may be accommodated with appropriate address alterations to the example code provided this training document.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
1-1
Modular PLC Training Hardware
1-2
Course Overview and Requirements
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
General Introduction to PLCs
2
The Hardware
2.1
General Introduction to PLCs
2.1.1
History & Development
Bedford Associates, founded by Richard Morley introduced the first Programmable Logic Controller in 1968. This PLC was known as the Modular Digital Controller from which the MODICON
Company derived its name.
Programmable Logic Controllers were developed to provide a replacement for large relay based
control panels. These systems were inflexible requiring major rewiring or replacement whenever the control sequence was to be changed.
The development of the Microprocessor from the mid 1970’s have allowed Programmable Logic
Controllers to take on more complex tasks and larger functions as the speed of the processor
increased. It is now common for PLC’s to provide the heart of the control functions within a system often integrated with SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition), HMI (Human
Machine Interfaces), Expert Systems and Graphical User Interfaces (GUI). The requirements of
the PLC have expanded to providing control, data processing and management functionality.
2.1.2
The initial specification for the PLC
쎲 Easily programmed and reprogrammed in plant to enable its sequence of operations, to be
altered.
쎲 Easily maintained and repaired – preferably using ‘plug-in’ cards or modules.
쎲 Able to withstand the rigorous Environmental, Mechanical and Electrical conditions, found
in plant environments.
쎲 Smaller than its relay and “discrete solid state” equivalents.
쎲 Cost effective in comparison with “discrete solid state” and relay based systems.
2.1.3
Comparison of PLC and Relay Systems
Characteristic
PLC
Relay
Price per function
Low
Low - If equivalent relay program uses more than 10 relays
Physical size
Very compact
Bulky
Operating speed
Fast
Slow
Electrical noise
immunity
Good
Excellent
Construction
Easy to program
Wiring - time consuming
Advanced instructions
Yes
No
Changing the control
sequence
Very simple
Very difficult – requires changes to wiring
Maintenance
Excellent
PLC’s rarely fail
Poor - relays require constant maintenance
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2-1
General Introduction to PLCs
2.1.4
The Hardware
Programming
Ladder Logic
PLC’s had to be maintainable by technicians and electrical personnel. To support this, the programming language of Ladder Logic was developed. Ladder Logic is based on the relay and
contact symbols technicians were used to through wiring diagrams of electrical control panels.
The documentation for early PLC Programs was either non existent or very poor, just providing
simple addressing or basic comments, making large programs difficult to follow. This has been
greatly improved with the development of PLC Programming packages such as Mitsubishi’s
Windows based, GX Developer.
Until recently there has been no formal programming standard for PLC’s. The introduction of the
IEC 61131-3 Standard in 1998 provides a more formal approach to coding. Mitsubishi Electric
has developed a programming package, “GX IEC Developer” (Covered in detail later in this
document.). This enables IEC compliant coding to be adopted.
2.1.5
Human Machine Interfaces
The early programmable logic controllers interfaced with the operator in much the same way as
the relay control panel, via push-buttons and switches for control and lamps for indication.
The introduction of the Personal Computer (PC) in the 1980’s allowed for the development of a
computer based interface to the operator, these where initially via simple Supervisory Control
And Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems and more recently via Dedicated Operator Control Panels, known as Human Machine Interfaces (HMI). It is now common place to see PLC’s heavily
integrated with these products to form user friendly control system solutions.
Mitsubishi offer a very wide range of HMI and SCADA products to suit a variety of operator Interface applications.
It is now commonplace to find HMI’s integrated into PLC based control systems, providing the operator interface functionality.
2-2
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
2.2
What is a PLC?
What is a PLC?
In contrast to conventional controllers with functions determined by their physical wiring the
functions of programmable logic controllers or PLCs are defined by a program. PLCs also have
to be connected to the outside world with cables, but the contents of their program memory can
be changed at any time to adapt their programs to different control tasks.
Programmable logic controllers input data, process it and then output the results. This process
is performed in three stages:
쎲 an input stage,
쎲 a processing stage
and
쎲 an output stage
Programmable Logic Controller
Output
Input
Switch
Contactors
Input Stage
Processing Stage
Output Stage
The input stage
The input stage passes control signals from switches, buttons or sensors on to the processing
stage.
The signals from these components are generated as part of the control process and are fed to
the inputs as logical states. The input stage passes them on to the processing stage in a pre-processed format.
The processing stage
In the processing stage the pre-processed signals from the input stage are processed and combined with the help of logical operations and other functions. The program memory of the processing stage is fully programmable. The processing sequence can be changed at any time by
modifying or replacing the stored program.
The output stage
The results of the processing of the input signals by the program are fed to the output stage
where they control connected switchable elements such as contactors, signal lamps, solenoid
valves and so on.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2-3
How PLCs Process Programs
2.3
The Hardware
How PLCs Process Programs
A PLC performs its tasks by executing a program that is usually developed outside the controller
and then transferred to the controller’s program memory. Before you start programming it is useful to have a basic understanding of how PLCs process these programs.
A PLC program consists of a sequence of instructions that control the functions of the controller.
The PLC executes these control instructions sequentially, i.e. one after another. The entire program sequence is cyclical, which means that it is repeated in a continuous loop. The time
required for one program repetition is referred to as the program cycle time or period.
Process image processing
The program in the PLC is not executed directly on the inputs and outputs, but on a “process
image” of the inputs and outputs:
Switch on PLC
Delete output memory
Input signals
Input terminals
Poll inputs and signal states
and save them in the process
image of the inputs
PLC program
Process image
of inputs
Process image
of outputs
Output terminals
Instruction 1
Instruction 2
Instruction 3
....
....
....
Instruction n
Transfer process image
to outputs
Output signals
Input process image
At the beginning of each program cycle the system polls the signal states of the inputs and stores
them in a buffer, creating a “process image” of the inputs.
2-4
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
How PLCs Process Programs
Program execution
After this the program is executed, during which the PLC accesses the stored states of the inputs
in the process image. This means that any subsequent changes in the input states will not be
registered until the next program cycle!
The program is executed from top to bottom, in the order in which the instructions were programmed. Results of individual programming steps are stored and can be used during the current program cycle.
Program execution
X000 X001
0
M0
Store result
M6
M1 M8013
4
Y000
Control output
M2
M0
Y001
9
Process stored result
Output process image
Results of logical operations that are relevant for the outputs are stored in an output buffer – the
output process image. The output process image is stored in the output buffer until the buffer is
rewritten. After the values have been written to the outputs the program cycle is repeated.
Differences between signal processing in the PLC and in hard-wired controllers
In hard-wired controllers the program is defined by the functional elements and their connections (the wiring). All control operations are performed simultaneously (parallel execution).
Every change in an input signal state causes an instantaneous change in the corresponding output signal state.
In a PLC it is not possible to respond to changes in input signal states until the next program
cycle after the change. Nowadays this disadvantage is largely compensated by very short program cycle periods. The duration of the program cycle period depends on the number and type
of instructions executed.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2-5
The MELSEC FX Family
2.4
The Hardware
The MELSEC FX Family
MELSEC means MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC SEQUENCER. The compact micro-controllers of the
MELSEC FX series provide the foundation for building economical solutions for small to
medium-sized control and positioning tasks requiring 10 to 256 integrated inputs and outputs in
applications in industry and building services.
With the exception of the FX1S all the controllers of the FX series can be expanded to keep pace
with the changes in the application and the user’s growing requirements.
Network connections are also supported. This makes it possible for the controllers of the FX
family to communicate with other PLCs and controller systems and HMIs (Human-Machine
Interfaces and control panels). The PLC systems can be integrated both in MITSUBISHI networks as local stations and as slave stations in open networks like PROFIBUS/DP.
In addition to this you can also build multi-drop and peer-to-peer networks with the controllers of
the MELSEC FX family.
The FX1N, FX2N, FX3G, FX3UC and FX3U have modular expansion capabilities, making them
the right choice for complex applications and tasks requiring special functions like analog-digital
and digital-analog conversion and network capabilities.
All the controllers in the series are part of the larger MELSEC FX family and are fully compatible
with one another.
Specifications
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
Max integrated I/O points
30
60
128
96
60
128
96
Expansion capability
(max. possible I/Os)
34
132
256
256
256
384
384
Program memory (steps)
2000
8000
16000
16000
32000
64000
64000
Cycle time per logical
instruction (ms)
0.55–0.7
0.55–0.7
0.08
0.08
0.21/0.42
0.065
0.065
No. of instructions
(standard / step ladder /
special function)
27 / 2 / 85
27 / 2 / 89 27 / 2 / 107 27 / 2 / 107 29 / 2 / 123 27 / 2 / 209 29 / 2 / 209
Max. special function
modules connectable
햲
햳
2-6
—
2
8
4
4햲 / 8 햳
10햲 / 8햳
6햲 / 8 햳
Connectable to the left side
Connectable to the right side
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
2.5
Selecting the Right Controller
Selecting the Right Controller
The base units of the MELSEC FX family are available in a number of different versions with different power supply options and output technologies. You can choose between units designed
for power supplies of 100–240 V AC, 24 V DC or 12–24 V DC, and between relay and transistor
outputs.
Series
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
I/Os
Type
No. of
inputs
No. of
outputs
10
FX1S-10 M쏔-쏔쏔
6
4
14
FX1S-14 M쏔-쏔쏔
8
6
20
FX1S-20 M쏔-쏔쏔
12
8
30
FX1S-30 M쏔-쏔쏔
16
14
14
FX1N-14 M쏔-쏔쏔
8
6
24
FX1N-24 M쏔-쏔쏔
14
10
40
FX1N-40 M쏔-쏔쏔
24
16
60
FX1N-60 M쏔-쏔쏔
36
24
16
FX2N-16 M쏔-쏔쏔
8
8
32
FX2N-32 M쏔-쏔쏔
16
16
48
FX2N-48 M쏔-쏔쏔
24
24
64
FX2N-64 M쏔-쏔쏔
32
32
80
FX2N-80 M쏔-쏔쏔
40
40
128
FX2N-128 M쏔-쏔쏔
64
64
16
FX2NC-16 M쏔-쏔쏔
8
8
32
FX2NC-32 M쏔-쏔쏔
16
16
64
FX2NC-64 M쏔-쏔쏔
32
32
96
FX2NC-96 M쏔-쏔쏔
48
48
14
FX3G-14M쏔/쏔쏔쏔
8
6
24
FX3G-24M쏔/쏔쏔쏔
14
10
40
FX3G-40M쏔/쏔쏔쏔
24
16
60
FX3G-60M쏔/쏔쏔쏔
36
24
16
FX3U-16 M쏔-쏔쏔
8
8
32
FX3U-32 M쏔-쏔쏔
16
16
48
FX3U-48 M쏔-쏔쏔
24
24
64
FX3U-64 M쏔-쏔쏔
32
32
80
FX3U-80 M쏔-쏔쏔
40
40
128
FX3U-128 M쏔-쏔쏔
64
64
16
FX3UC-16M쏔/쏔쏔쏔
8
8
32
FX3UC-32M쏔/쏔쏔쏔
16
16
64
FX3UC-64M쏔/쏔쏔쏔
32
32
96
FX3UC-96M쏔/쏔쏔쏔
48
48
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
Power supply
Output type
24 V DC
or
100–240 V AC
Transistor
or relay
12–24 V DC
or
100–240 V AC
Transistor
or relay
24 V DC
or
100–240 V AC
Transistor
or relay
24 V DC
Transistor
or relay
24 V DC
or
100–240 V AC
Transistor
or relay
24 V DC
or
100–240 V AC
Transistor
or relay
100–240 V AC
Transistor
or relay
24 V DC
Transistor
2-7
Selecting the Right Controller
The Hardware
Here are some considerations that should be taken into account when configuring a system:
쎲 Power supply requirements
Supply voltage: 24 V DC or 100–240 V AC
쎲 Input/Output requirements
– How many signals (external switch contacts, buttons and sensors) do you need to
input?
– What types of functions do you need to switch, and how many of them are there?
– How high are the loads that the outputs need to switch?
Choose relay outputs for switching high loads and transistor outputs for switching fast,
trigger-free switching operations.
쎲 Special Function Modules
– Number of modules in system
– External power supply requirements
2-8
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
Controller Design
Controller Design
2.6
All the controllers in the series have the same basic design. The main functional elements and
assemblies are described in the glossary in the appendix.
2.6.1
Input and output circuits
The input circuits use floating inputs. They are electrically isolated from the other circuits of the
PLC with optical couplers. The output circuits use either relay or transistor output technology.
The transistor outputs are also electrically isolated from the other PLC circuits with optical
couplers.
The switching voltage at all the digital inputs must have a certain value (e.g. 24 V DC). This voltage can be taken from the PLC’s integrated power supply unit. If the switching voltage at the
inputs is less than the rated value (e.g. <24 V DC) then the input will not be processed.
The maximum output currents are 2 A on 250 V three-phase AC and non-reactive loads with
relay outputs and 0.5 A on 24 V DC and non-reactive loads.
2.6.2
Layout of the MELSEC FX1S base units
Protective cover
Terminal cover
Mounting hole
Power supply
connection
Interface for expansion
adapter boards
Cutout for adapters or
control panel
Terminals for
digital inputs
100-240
VAC
L
N
X7
X5
X3
X1
S/S
X6
X4
X2
X0
0 1 2 3
4 5 6 7
IN
RUN/STOP switch
2 analog potentiometers
POWER
RUN
ERROR
Connection for
programming units
Connection for the
service power supply
LEDs for indicating
the input status
FX1S-14MR
OUT
0 1 2 3
4 5
Y4
Y2
Y1
Y0
0V
Y5
COM2 Y3
24V COM0 COM1
14MR
-ES/UL
MITSUBISHI
LEDs for indicating
the operating status
LEDs for indicating
the output status
Protective cover
Terminals for
digital outputs
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2-9
Controller Design
2.6.3
The Hardware
Layout of the MELSEC FX1N base units
Protective cover
Terminal cover
Terminals for
digital inputs
Mounting hole
Connection of the
power supply
Extension bus
RUN/STOP switch
Slot for memory cassettes,
adapters and displays
2 analog
potentiometers
Connection for
programming units
Connection for the
service power supply
100-240
VAC
L
X15
X7 X11 X13
X5
X3
X1
X14
S/S
X6 X10 X12
X4
X2
X0
N
0 1 2 3
4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15
IN
POWER
RUN
ERROR
LEDs for indicating
the operating status
FX1N-24MR
OUT
0 1 2 3
4 5 6 7
10 11
Y6 Y10
Y5
Y3
Y2
Y1
Y11
Y0
0V
COM4 Y7
COM2 COM3 Y4
24+ COM0 COM1
LEDs for indicating
the input status
24MR
-ES/UL
MITSUBISHI
Terminals for
digital outputs
LEDs for indicating
the output status
Housing cover
Lid
Protective cover
2.6.4
Layout of the MELSEC FX2N base units
Connection for the
service power supply
Terminal cover
Mounting hole
Connection for
expansion adapter boards
Memory battery
Connection for
programming units
RUN/STOP switch
Removable terminal
strip for digital outputs
Slot for memory
cassettes
Terminals for
digital inputs
LEDs for indicating
the input status
LEDs for indicating
the operating status
Connection for
extensions
Protective cover for
expansion bus
LEDs for indicating
the output status
Protective cover
Housing cover
2 - 10
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
2.6.5
Controller Design
Layout of the MELSEC FX2NC base units
Protective cover
Memory battery
Battery
compartment
Extension bus
(on side)
RUN/STOP switch
MITSUBISHI
POWER
RUN
BATT
ERROR
RUN
X0
STOP
5
6
X1
3
5
6
7
X4
•
•
COM
LEDs for indicating
the output status
2
LEDs for indicating
the input status
Connector for
terminal strips
COM
Memory cassette slot
X7
X6
X5
Memory cassette
(optional)
X3
X2
Cover
X0
7
1
Y4
Y0
X4
Protective cover
for expansion bus
Y0
Y1
3
Y2
2
COM1 Y3
1
2nd interface
for CNV adapter
MELSEC
FX2NC-16MR-T-DS
Y4
Operating status LEDs
Terminals for
digital inputs
Terminals for
digital outputs
2.6.6
Layout of the MELSEC FX3G base units
Terminal cover
Protective cover
Connectors für memory
cassette, display module,
and expansion board
Input terminals
Input indicator LEDs
2 analog potentiometers
RUN/STOP switch
Option battery holder
Programming port: RS-422
Programming port: USB
Operation status
indicator LEDs
Expansion bus
connector cover
LEDs for indicating
the output status
Input terminals
Protective cover
Terminal cover
Flip cover for programming
port, potentiometer and
Run/Stop switch
Cover for the right expansion
connector and the optional
battery
Cover for the left expansion
connector
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 11
Controller Design
2.6.7
The Hardware
Layout of the MELSEC FX3U base units
Battery cover
Protective cover
Terminal cover
Terminals for
digital inputs
Memory battery
Installation place for the
FX3U-7DM display
Blind cover for
expansion board
RUN/STOP switch
Connection for
programming unit
Top cover
(used if FX3U-7DM
is not installed)
2.6.8
LEDs for indicating
the input status
LEDs for indicating
the operating status
Protective cover for
expansion bus
LEDs for indicating
the output status
Output terminals
Terminal cover
Protective cover
Layout of the MELSEC FX3UC base units
RUN/STOP switch
LEDs for indicating
the operating status
Installation place for
memory cassette
Memory cassette
(optional)
LEDs for indicating
the input status
LEDs for indicating
the output status
Protective cover for
expansion bus
Expansion bus (lateral)
Special adapter
connector
2 - 12
Connection for
programming unit
Battery
Connectors for
digital outputs
Battery cover
Connectors for
digital inputs
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
Wiring
2.7
Wiring
2.7.1
Power Supply
Power Supply Specifications
Specification
Units for DC Power Supply
Units for AC Power Supply
Rated voltage
12 to 24 V DC
24 V DC
100 to 240 V AC
Voltage range
10.2 to 26.4 V DC
20.4 to 26.4 V DC
85 to 264 V AC
Allowable momentary
power failure time
5 ms
20 ms
Connection of units with DC power supply
Connection of units with AC power supply
FX base unit
FX base unit
+
L
100 to 240 V AC
50/60 Hz
24 V DC
N
–
Grounding
The PLC should be grounded.
쎲 The grounding resistance should be 100 액 or less.
쎲 The grounding point should be close to the PLC. Keep the grounding wires as short as
possible.
쎲 Independent grounding should be performed for best results. When independent grounding is not performed, perform "shared grounding" of the following figure.
PLC
Another
equipment
Independent grounding
Best condition
PLC
Another
equipment
Shared grounding
Good condition
PLC
Another
equipment
Common grounding
Not allowed
쎲 The ground wire size should be at least 2 mm2.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 13
Wiring
2.7.2
The Hardware
Wiring of Inputs
Connecting sink or source devices
The base units of the FX family series can be used with sink or source switching devices. The
decision is made by the different connections of the "S/S" terminal.
FX base unit
L
N
24V
0V
S/S
X
FX base unit
L
N
24V
0V
S/S
X
In the case of the sink input type, the S/S
terminal is connected to the 24V terminal of
the service power supply or, when a DC powered base unit is used, to the positive pole of
the power supply.
Sink input means that a contact wired to the
input (X) or a sensor with NPN open collector
transistor output connects the input of the
PLC with the negative pole of a power
supply.
In the case of the source input type, the S/S
terminal is connected to the 0V terminal of the
service power supply or, when a DC powered
base unit is used, to the negative pole of the
power supply.
Source input means that a contact wired to
the input (X) or a sensor with PNP open collector transistor output connects the input of
the PLC with the positive pole of a power
supply.
All inputs of a base unit or an extension unit can be either used as sink or source inputs, but it is
not possible to mix sink and source inputs in one unit. Separate units in one PLC however can be
set as sink or source inputs types, since the base unit and input/output powered extension units
are individually set to sink or source input mode.
Examples for input types
AC powered base units
Source
Sink
2 - 14
L
L
N
N
S/S
0V
24V
S/S
0V
24V
X000
X001
X002
X003
X000
X001
X002
X003
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
Wiring
DC powered base units
Source
Sink
24 V DC
2.7.3
24 V DC
S/S
(0V)
(24V)
S/S
(0V)
(24V)
X000
X001
X002
X003
X000
X001
X002
X003
Wiring of Outputs
In case of base units with only few outputs (e. g. FX3G-14M첸 or FX3U-16M쏔) each output can
be connected separately. In case of the base units with more outputs, the outputs are pooled into
groups of 2, 3, 4, 8 or 16 outputs. Each group has a common contact for the load voltage. These
terminals are marked "COM쏔" for base units with relays outputs or transistor outputs of the sink
type and "+V첸" for base units with source transistor outputs. "첸" stands for the number of the
output group e. g. "COM1".
Because the outputs groups are isolated against each other, one base unit can switch several
voltages with different potentials. base units with relay outputs can even switch AC and DC
voltages.
FX3U base unit with relay outputs
The first group of outputs is used to switch a DC voltage.
The second group of relays controls AC powered loads.
The selection of sink and source output type is done by the selection of a correspondent base
unit. Both types are available with DC or AC power supply. The output type is given in the model
designation code: base units with the code "MT/첸S" provide transistor sink type outputs (e. g.
FX3U-16MT/ES) while base units with the code "MT/첸SS" provide transistor source type outputs (e. g. FX3U-16MT/ESS).
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 15
Wiring
The Hardware
Examples of output wiring
Relay output
Load
Y
Fuse
COM
PLC
Transistor output (sink)
Load
Y
Fuse
COM
PLC
Transistor output (source)
Load
Y
Fuse
+V
PLC
2 - 16
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
2.8
Extending the Range of Digital Inputs/Outputs
Extending the Range of Digital Inputs/Outputs
For the MELSEC FX family of PLCs several ways and means are available to provide a base unit
with additional inputs and outputs.
2.8.1
Extension Boards
For a small number of I/O (2 to 4) an extension adapter board can be installed directly in
a FX1S or FX1N base unit. Extension boards
therefore do not require any additional installation space.
The state of the additional input and outputs
is reflected in special relays in the PLC (see
section A.1.5). In the program these relays
are used instead of X and Y devices.
•
FX1N-2EYT-BD
with two digital
outputs
BY0+ BY0- BY1+ BY1-
FX1N-2EYT-BD
Connector side
Number of I/O
Designation
Total
Output
No. of No. of type
inputs outputs
FX1N-4EX-BD
4
4
—
—
FX1N-2EYT-BD
2
—
2
Transistor
Power
supply
From base
unit
FX1S FX1N
쎲
쎲
FX2N
FX3U
FX3G
FX2NC
FX3UC
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲 : The extension board can be used with a base unit of this series.
쑗 : The extension board cannot be used with this series.
2.8.2
Compact Extension Units
The powered compact input/output extension
units have their own power supply. The integrated service power supply (24 V DC) of AC
powered extension units can be used for the
supply of external devices.
It is possible to choose between relay and
transistor (source) output type.
Compact Extension Units of the FX0N Series
Number of I/O
Designation
Total
Output
No. of No. of type
inputs outputs
FX0N-40ER/ES-UL
40
24
16
Relay
FX0N-40ER/DS
40
24
16
Relay
FX0N-40ET/DSS
40
24
16
Transistor
Power
supply
FX1S FX1N
FX2N
FX3U
FX3G
FX2NC
FX3UC
100–240 V
AC
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
24 V DC
쎲 : The extension unit can be used with a base unit of this series.
쑗 : The extension unit cannot be used with this series.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 17
Extending the Range of Digital Inputs/Outputs
The Hardware
Compact Extension Units of the FX2N Series
Number of I/O
Designation
Output
No. of No. of type
inputs outputs
Total
FX2N-32ER-ES/UL
32
16
16
Relay
FX2N-32ET-ESS/UL
32
16
16
Transistor
FX2N-48ER-ES/UL
48
16
16
Relay
FX2N-48ET-ESS/UL
48
24
24
Transistor
FX2N-48ER-DS
48
24
24
Relay
FX2N-48ET-DSS
48
24
24
Transistor
Power
supply
FX1S FX1N
FX2N
FX3U
FX3U
FX2NC
FX3UC
100–240 V
AC
쑗
쎲
쎲*
쎲
쎲*
24 V DC
쎲 : The extension unit can be used with a base unit of this series.
쑗 : The extension unit cannot be used with this series.
*
2.8.3
These extension units cannot be connected to a base unit of the FX2NC or FX3UC series.
Modular Extension Blocks
Modular extension blocks have no build-in
power supply but very compact dimensions.
The FX2N series modular extension blocks
are available with 8 or 16 input/output points.
It is possible to choose between relay and
transistor (source) output type.
2
The FX2NC series extension blocks are available with 16 or 32 integrated I/O with
selectable relay or transistor 16-output models (source type).
IN
Number of I/O
Designation
FX2N-8ER-ES/UL
16햲
Output
No. of No. of type
inputs outputs
4
4
FX2N-8EX-ES/UL
8
8
—
—
16
16
—
—
FX2N-8EYR-ES/UL
8
—
8
Relay
FX2N-8EYT-ESS/UL
8
—
8
Transistor
FX2N-16EYR-ES/UL
16
—
16
Relay
FX2N-16EYT-ESS/UL
16
—
16
Transistor
FX2NC-16EX-DS
16
16
—
—
FX2NC-16EX-T-DS
16
16
—
—
FX2NC-32EX-DS
32
32
—
—
FX2NC-16EYT-DSS
16
—
16
Transistor
FX2NC-16EYR-T-DS
16
—
16
Relay
FX2NC-32EYT-DSS
32
—
32
Transistor
햳
Power
supply
FX1S FX1N
FX2N
FX3U
FX3G
FX2NC
FX3UC
Relay
FX2N-16EX-ES/UL
햲
2 - 18
Total
100–240 V
AC
쑗
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쎲햳
쎲
24 V DC
From base
unit
쑗
쎲햳
From base
unit
The extension block FX2N-8ER-ES/UL occupies 16 input/output points of the PLC. Four inputs and four outputs
are occupied but cannot be used.
The FX2NC series extension blocks can only be connected to a base unit of the FX2NC or FX3UC series.
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
2.9
Extending for Special Functions
Extending for Special Functions
A variety of hardware for special functions are available for the MELSEC FX family.
Adapter Boards
Adapter boards are small circuit boards that are installed directly in the FX1S, FX1N or FX3G controllers, which means that they don’t take up any extra space in the switchgear cabinet.
•
In the case of analog adapter boards, the digital values
generated from the signals coming from the analog input
adapter’s two input channels are written directly to special
registers, which makes it particularly easy to process
them.
The output value for the analog output adapter is written by
the program also to a special register and then converted
by the adapter and sent to the output.
BY0+ BY0- BY1+ BY1-
FX1N-2AD
Special Adapter
Special adapters can only be connected on the left side of a base unit of the MELSEC FX3G,
FX3U andr FX3UC series.
You can install one analog special adapter to a FX3G base
unit with 14 or 24 inputs and outputs. Up to two analog special adapter can be mounted to a FX3G base unit with 40 or
60 inputs and outputs. To a FX3U or FX3UC base unit up to
four analog special adapters can be connected.
Special adapters do not use any input or output points in
the base unit. They communicate directly with the base
unit via special relays and registers. Because of this, no
instructions for communication with special function modules are needed in the program.
Special function modules
Up to eight special function modules can be connected on the right side of a single base unit of
the MELSEC FX family.
In addition to analog modules the available special function modules include communication modules, positioning
modules and other types. Each special function module
occupies eight input points and eight output points in the
base unit.
Communication between the special function module and
the PLC base unit is carried out via the memory buffer of
the special function module with the help of FROM and TO
instructions.
FX2N -4AD-TC
A/D
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 19
Extending for Special Functions
2.9.1
The Hardware
Analog Modules
Without additional modules the base units of the MELSEC FX family can only process digital
input and output signals (i.e. ON/OFF data). Additional analog modules are thus required for
inputting and outputting analog signals.
Modul Type
Designation
No. of
channels
FX1N-2AD-BD
2
Adapter
Board
FX3G-2AD-BD
Analog Input Modules
Special
Adapter
FX3U-4AD-ADP
FX2N-2AD
FX2N-4AD
2
4
2
4
Special
Function
Modules
FX2N-8AD햲
FX3U-4AD
FX3UC-4AD
Analog Output Modules
FX1N-1DA-BD
4
1
Adapter
Board
FX3G-1DA-BD
Special
Adapter
Special
Function
Modules
FX3U-4DA-ADP
FX2N-2DA
햲
햳
2 - 20
8
1
4
2
Range
Resolution
Voltage:
0 V to 10 V DC
2.5 mV (12 Bit)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
8 µA (11 Bit)
Voltage:
0 V to 10 V DC
2.5 mV (12 Bit)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
8 µA (11 Bit)
Voltage:
0 V to 10 V DC
2.5 mV (12 Bit)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
10 µA (11 Bit)
Voltage:
0 V to 5 V DC
0 V to 10 V DC
2.5 mV (12 Bit)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
4 µA (12 Bit)
Voltage:
-10 V to 10 V DC
5 mV
(with sign, 12 bits)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
-20 mA to 20 mA DC
10 µA
(with sign, 11 bits)
Voltage:
-10 V to 10 V DC
0.63 mV
(with sign, 15 bits)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
-20 mA to 20 mA DC
2.50 µA
(with sign, 14 bits)
Voltage:
-10 V to 10 V DC
0.32 mV
(with sign, 16 bits)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
-20 mA to 20 mA DC
1.25 µA
(with sign, 15 bits)
Voltage:
0 V to 10 V DC
2,5 mV (12 Bit)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
8 µA (11 Bit)
Voltage:
0 V to 10 V DC
2,5 mV (12 Bit)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
8 µA (11 Bit)
Voltage:
0 V to 10 V DC
2,5 mV (12 Bit)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
4 µA (12 Bit)
Voltage:
0 V to 5 V DC
0 V to 10 V DC
2.5 mV (12 Bit)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
4 µA (12 Bit)
FX1S FX1N
FX2N
FX3U
FX3G
FX2NC
FX3UC
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲햳
쎲햳
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
The special function block FX2N-8AD is able to measure voltage, current and temperature.
The FX3UC-4AD can be connected to base units of the FX3UC series only.
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
Analog Output Modules
Modul Type
Extending for Special Functions
Designation
No. of
channels
FX2N-4DA
4
Special
Function
Modules
FX3U-4DA
4
2 inputs
Combined Analog Input & Output Modules
FX0N-3A
1 output
Special
Function
Modules
4 inputs
FX2N-5A
1 output
2 inputs
Special
Adapter
FX3U-3A-ADP
Temperature Acquisition Modules
1 output
Special
Adapter
Range
Resolution
Voltage:
-10 V to 10 V DC
5 mV
(with sign, 12 bits)
Current:
0 mA to 20 mA DC
4 mA to 20 mA DC
20 µA (10 Bit)
Voltage:
-10 V to 10 V DC
0.32 mV
(with sign, 16 bits)
Current:
0 mA to 20 mA DC
4 mA to 20 mA DC
0.63 µA (15 Bit)
Voltage:
0 V to 5 V DC
0 V to 10 V DC
40 mV (8 Bit)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
64 µA (8 Bit)
Voltage:
0 V to 5 V DC
0 V to 10 V DC
40 mV (8 Bit)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
64 µA (8 Bit)
Voltage:
-100 mV to 100 mV DC
-10 V to 10 V DC
50 µV
(with sign, 12 bits)
0.312 mV
(with sign, 16 bits)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
-20 mA to 20 mA DC
10 µA/1,25 µA
(with sign, 15 bits)
Voltage:
-10 V to 10 V DC
5 mV
(with sign, 12 bits)
Current:
0 mA to 20 mA DC
20 µA (10 Bit)
Voltage:
0 V to 10 V DC
2,5 mV (12 Bit)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
5 µA (12 Bit)
Voltage:
0 V to 10 V DC
2.5 mV (12 Bit)
Current:
4 mA to 20 mA DC
4 µA (12 Bit)
FX1S FX1N
FX2N
FX3U
FX3G
FX2NC
FX3UC
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
쑗
쎲
쎲
쑗
쎲햲
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
FX3U-4AD-PT-ADP
4
Pt100 resistance
thermometer:
-50 쎷C to 250 쎷C
0.1 쎷C
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
FX3U-4AD-PTW-ADP
4
Pt100 resistance
thermometer:
-100 쎷C to 600 쎷C
0.2 쎷C to 0.3 쎷C
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
Pt100 resistance
thermometer:
-50 쎷C to 250 쎷C
0.1 쎷C
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
Ni1000 resistance
thermometer:
-40 쎷C to110 쎷C
0.1 쎷C
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
Thermocouple type K:
-100 쎷C to 1000 쎷C
0.4 쎷C
Thermocouple type J:
-100 쎷C to 600 쎷C
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
0.3 쎷C
FX3U-4AD-PNK-ADP
FX3U-4AD-TC-ADP
햲
4
4
A FX0N-3A can not be connected to base units of the FX3UC series.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 21
Extending for Special Functions
Temperature Acquisition Modules
Modul Type
Designation
FX2N-8AD햲
Special
Function
Modules
Temperature
Control
Modules
(Special Function Modules)
FX2N-4AD-PT
FX2N-4AD-TC
FX2N-2LC
FX3U-4LC
*
The Hardware
No. of
channels
8
4
4
2
4
Range
Resolution
Thermocouple type K:
-100 쎷C to 1200 쎷C
0.1 쎷C
Thermocouple type J:
-100 쎷C to 600 쎷C
0.1 쎷C
Thermocouple type T:
-100 쎷C to 350 쎷C
0.1 쎷C
Pt100 resistance
thermometer:
-100 쎷C to 600 쎷C
0.2 쎷C to 0.3 쎷C
Thermocouple type K:
-100 쎷C to 1200 쎷C
0.4 쎷C
Thermocouple type J:
-100 쎷C to 600 쎷C
0.3 쎷C
For example with a
thermocouple type K:
-100 쎷C to 1300 쎷C
Pt100 resistance
thermometer:
-200 쎷C to 600 쎷C
0.1 쎷C or 1 쎷C
(depends on
temperature probe
used)
FX1S FX1N
FX2N
FX3U
FX3G
FX2NC
FX3UC
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
The special function block FX2N-8AD is able to measure voltage, current and temperature.
쎲 The adapter board, special adapter or special function module can be used with a base unit or expansion unit of this series.
쑗 The adapter board, special adapter or special function module cannot be used with this series.
2 - 22
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
2.9.2
Extending for Special Functions
High-Speed Counter Modules and Adapters
FX2N-1HC, FX2NC-1HC and FX3U-2HC
In addition to the internal high-speed MELSEC FX counters, the high-speed counter modules
FX2N-1HC, FX2NC-1HC and FX3U-2HC provide the user with an external counter. They count 1or 2-phase pulses up to a frequency of 50 kHz resp. 200 kHz for the FX3U-2HC. The counting
range covers either 16 or 32 bit.
The two integrated transistor outputs can be switched
independently of one another by means of internal comparison functions. Hence, simple positioning tasks can also
be realized economically. In addition, the high-speed counter modules can be used as ring counters.
FX2N -1HC
FX3U-4HSX-ADP and FX3U-2HSY-ADP
These adapter modules allow direct processing of positioning application data.
FX3U -2HSY-ADP
FX3U-2HSX-ADP
POWER
POWER
X0/3 X2/5
Y0/2 Y1/3
X1/4 X6/7
Y4/6 Y5/7
FP.RP
CAUTION:
When connecting these special adapters,
same input resp. output numbers are allocated
to the base unit and the special adapter. Wire
either one of the input or output terminals
SGB
SG SG
-
- Y5/7 +
X6/7
+
-
- Y1/3 +
X2/5
+
SGA
-
X1/4
+
-Y4/6 +
-
X0/3
+
-Y0/2 +
PLS DIR
The FX3U-4HSX-ADP (far left) provides four
high speed counter inputs up to 200 kHz while
the FX3U-2HSY-ADP (left) delivers two channels of pulse train outputs up to 200 kHz.
Overview of High-Speed Counter Modules/Adapters
Module type
Special function
module
Designation
Description
FX2N-1HC
1-ch high speed
counter
FX2NC-1HC
FX3U-2HC
2-ch high speed
counter
FX3U-4HSX-ADP
Differential line driver
input (high-speed
counter)
FX3U-2HSY-ADP
Differential line driver
input (positioning
output)
Special adapter
FX1S FX1N FX2N FX2NC FX3G
FX3U FX3UC
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
쑗
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쎲 The special adapter or special function module can be used with a base unit or expansion unit of this
series.
쑗 The special adapter or special function module cannot be used with this series.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 23
Extending for Special Functions
2.9.3
The Hardware
Positioning Modules
FX2N-1PG-E, FX2N-10PG
The positioning modules FX2N-1PG-E and FX2N-10PG are extremely efficient single-axis positioning modules for controlling either step drives or servo drives (by external regulator) with a
pulse chain.
POWER
ERROR
FX 2N -10PG
START
DOG
X0
X1
øA
øB
PGO
FP
RP
CLR
They are very suitable for achieving accurate positioning
in combination with the MELSEC FX series. The configuration and allocation of the position data are carried out
directly via the PLC program.
The FX2N-1PG-E provides an 100 kHz open collector output while the FX2N-10PG is equipped with a 1 MHz
differential line driver output.
A very wide range of manual and automatic functions are
available to the user.
FX3U-20SSC-H
The SSCNET* module FX3U-20SSC-H can be used in combination with a FX3U or FX3UC programmable controller to achieve a cost effective solution for high precision, high speed positioning. The plug-and-play fiber optic SSCNET cabling reduces setup time and increases control
distance for positioning operations in a wide range of applications.
INT 0
INT 1
A
B
Servo parameters and positioning information for the
FX3U-20SSC-H are easily set up with an FX3U or FX3UC
base unit and a personal computer. For parameter setting,
monitoring and testing the easy programming software FX
Configurator-FP is available.
X READY
Y READY
X ERROR
Y ERROR
START
DOG
INT 0
INT 1
A
B
POWER
FX2CU-20SSC-H
*
SSCNET: Servo System Controller Network
Overview of Positioning Modules
Module type
Description
FX2N-1PG-E
Pulse output for independent 1-axis control
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쎲
Simultaneous 2-axis
(independent 2-axis)
control (Applicable to
SSCNET III)
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
FX2N-10PG
Special function modules
FX3U-20SSC-H
FX1S FX1N
FX2N
FX3U
FX3G
FX2NC
FX3UC
Designation
쎲 The special function module can be used with a base unit or expansion unit of this series.
쑗 The special function module cannot be used with this series.
2 - 24
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
2.9.4
Extending for Special Functions
Network Modules for ETHERNET
ETHERNET is the most widespread network for connection of information processors such as
personal computers and work stations. By loading an ETHERNET interface into the PLC, production-related management information can be transmitted rapidly to personal computers or
work stations. ETHERNET is a platform for a very wide range of data communications protocols.
The combination of ETHERNET and the extremely widespread TCP/IP protocol enables
high-speed data communications between process supervision systems and the MELSEC PLC
series. TCP/IP provides logical point-to-point links between two ETHERNET stations.
The programming software GX IEC Developer provides function blocks or setup routines for the
PLCs, making the configuration of one or more TCP/IP links a quick and easy process.
FX2NC-ENET-ADP
The FX2NC-ENET-ADP communications adapter is an Ethernet interface with 10BASE-T specifications for the FX1S, FX1N, FX2NC and FX2N series*.
PCs with GX IEC Developer or MX Component and the virtual COM port driver installed are enabled for program
upload/download through this module.
FX2NC-ENET-ADP
POWER
LINK
ACT
SD
RD
*
When connecting this special adapter to a FX1S or FX1N PLC the communications adapter FX1N-CNV-BD is
required. When connecting this adapter to a FX2N PLC the communications adapter FX2N-CNV-BD is required.
FX3U-ENET
RUN
INIT.
100M
SD
RD
ERR.
COM.ERR.
POWER
FX3U-ENET
10BASE-T/100BASE-TX
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
C7
C8
The FX3U-ENET communications module provides the
FX3G, FX3U or FX3UC with a direct connection to an
Ethernet network.
The FX 3U -ENET enables 8 ports of simultaneous
Ethernet communication with features such as peer-topeer communication, extensive e-mail send/receive
options, and program upload/download. The FX3U-ENET
is also used to communicate with GOTs via the Ethernet.
Easy communication parameter setup and module troubleshooting is also possible using the dedicated software,
FX Configurator-EN.
Overview of Network Modules for ETHERNET
Module type
Special function modules
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
Designation
Description
FX2NC-ENET-ADP
ETHERNET network
modules
FX3U-ENET
FX1S FX1N
FX2N
FX3U
FX3G
FX2NC
FX3UC
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
2 - 25
Extending for Special Functions
2.9.5
The Hardware
Network Modules for Profibus/DP
The Profibus/DP network enables communication between a master module and decentralised
slave modules, with data transfer rates of up to 12 Mbps. With a MELSEC PLC as master,
PROFIBUS/DP allows quick and simple connection of sensors and actuators, even from different manufacturers.
A MELSEC PLC, serving as slave in a PROFIBUS/DP network, can execute decentralised control tasks and simultaneously exchange data with the PROFIBUS/DP master.
To help reduce costs PROFIBUS/DP uses RS485 technology with shielded 2-wire cabling.
FX0N-32NT-DP
FX 0N -32NT-DP
POWER
DC
BF
DIA
The FX0N-32NT-DP PROFIBUS DP slave module enables
the attached FX base unit to be a slave station on a
PROFIBUS DP network. Transfer of up to 40 bytes of data
per cycle is supported at up to 12 Mbps.
RUN
FX3U-32DP
RUN
TOKEN
L i ke t h e F X 0 N - 3 2 N T- D P, t h e F X 3 U - 3 2 D P i s a
PROFIBUS/DP slave module. It allows the integration of a
FX 3G , FX 3U, or FX 3UC PLC into a PROFIBUS/DP
network.
FROM/TO
DIA
POWER
FX3U-32DP
2 - 26
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
Extending for Special Functions
FX3U-64DP-M
The FX3U-64DP-M PROFIBUS DP master module is
available for the FX3U and FX3UC base units and enables
the attached FX base unit to be a master station on a
PROFIBUS DP-V1 network. PROFIBUS DP allows for the
implementation of decentralized control with comprehensive data and alarm processing capabilities.
RUN
TOKEN
FROM/TO
ERROR
POWER
Easy setup is available by using the GX Configurator-DP
software package.
FX 3U -64DP-M
FX2N-32DP-IF
The remote I/O station FX2N-32DP-IF forms an extremely compact communication unit and
provides a connection of I/O modules with up to 256 I/O points and/or up to 8 special function
modules as an alternative.
It is not necessary to install an FX base unit to a remote I/O
station. The FX2N-32DP-IF connects the connected I/O
modules or special function modules to the master station
of a PROFIBUS/DP network.
RUN
STOP
L
COM
N
24 +
MITSUBISHI
POWER
RUN
Used in combination with a FX3U or FX3UC base unit and a
FX3U-64DP-M master station, the creation of a high performance remote I/O system, consisting entirely of
MELSEC FX modules, is possible.
BF
DIA
64
32
16
8
4
2
1
FX2N-32DP-IF
ON
OFF
PROFIBUS data such as the baud rate or I/O data can be
monitored directly with the programming software or on
the hand-held programming unit FX-20P-E. This facilitates
an easy error diagnosis directly on the remote I/O station.
Overview of Profibus/DP modules
Module type
Designation
FX0N-32NT-DP
Special function
modules
FX3U-32DP
FX3U-64DP-M
FX2N-32DP-IF
—
FX2N-32DP-IF-D
Description
FX1S FX1N
PROFIBUS/DP slave
PROFIBUS/DP master
Power supply:
100–240 V AC
PROFIBUS/DP
remote I/O station Power supply:
24 V DC
FX2N
FX3U
FX3G
FX2NC
FX3UC
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
Compatible with PROFIBUS/DP
masters
쎲 The special function module can be used with a base unit or expansion unit of this series.
쑗 The special function module cannot be used with this series.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 27
Extending for Special Functions
2.9.6
The Hardware
Network Modules for CC-Link
CC-Link Master Module FX2N-16CCL-M
The CC-Link network enables the controlling and monitoring of decentralized I/O modules at the
machine.
The CC-Link master module FX2N-16CCL-M is a special extension block which assigns an FX
series PLC as the master station of the CC-Link system.
The setting of all modules within the network
is handled directly via the master module.
RUN
ERR.
MST
TEST 1
TEST 2
Up to 15 remote stations (7 remote I/O stations and up to 8 remote device stations) can
be connected to the master station. Two master modules can be connected to one base
unit.
L RUN
L ERR.
CC-LINK
FX2n-16CCL-M
The maximum communications distance is
1200 m without repeater.
SW
M/S
PRM
TIME
LINE
SD
RD
CC-Link Communication Modules FX2N-32CCL and FX3U-64CCL
The communication modules FX2N-32CCL and FX3U-64CCL enable the user to connect to the
CC-Link network with a superior PLC system as master CPU. This gives him access to the network of all MELSEC PLC systems and frequency inverters and to additional products from other
suppliers.
Thus the network is expandable via the digital
inputs/outputs of the FX modules to a maximum of 256 I/Os.
FX2N-32CCL
LRUN • LERR • RD • SD
Overview of Network Modules for CC-Link
Module type
Special function modules
Designation
Description
FX2N-16CCL-M
Master for CC-Link
FX2N-32CCL
Remote device station
for CC-Link
FX3U-64CCL
FX1S FX1N
FX2N
FX3U
FX3G
FX2NC
FX3UC
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲 The special function module can be used with a base unit or expansion unit of this series.
쑗 The special function module cannot be used with this series.
2 - 28
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
2.9.7
Extending for Special Functions
Network Module for DeviceNet
DeviceNet represents a cost-effective solution for the network integration of low-level terminal
equipment. Up to 64 devices including a master can be integrated in one network. For the data
exchange a cable with two shielded twisted-pair cables is used.
The DeviceNet slave module FX2N-64DNET can be used
to connect FX2N, FX2NC and FX3U programmable controllers to a DeviceNet network.
The FX2N-64DNET can communicate to the master by
the master/slave communication (using the master/slave
I/O connection), and to other nodes supporting the UCMM
connection by client/server communication.
POWER
FX 2N -64DNET
The communication between the programmable controller and the internal buffer memory of the FX2N-64DNET is
handled by FROM/TO instructions.
/TO
MS
NS
Module type
Designation
Description
Special function module
FX2N-64DNET
DeviceNet slave
module
FX1S FX1N
쑗
쑗
FX2N
FX3G FX3U FX3UC
FX2NC
쎲
쑗
쎲
쑗
쎲 The special function module can be used with a base unit or expansion unit of this series.
쑗 The special function module cannot be used with this series.
2.9.8
Network Module for CANopen
CANopen is an “open” implementation of the Controller Area Network (CAN), which is defined in
the EN50325-4 standard. CANopen offers cost effective network communications with
fault-resistant network structure where components of different manufacturers can be integrated quickly and easily. CANopen networks are used for connecting sensors, actuators and
controllers in a variety of applications. The bus uses inexpensive twisted-pair cabling.
The FX2N-32CAN communications module makes it possible to connect an FX2N, FX3G, FX3U or FX3UC PLC to an
existing CANopen network.
RUN
FROM/TO
In addition to real-time capabilities and high-speed data
transfer at rates of up to 1 Mbps the CANopen module also
shines with high transfer reliability and simple network
configuration. Up to 120 words of data can be sent and
received as process data objects (30 PDOs).
Tx/Rx
ERROR
POWER
FX2N -32CAN
Communication with the module’s memory buffer is performed with simple FROM/TO instructions
Module type
Designation
Description
Special function module
FX2N-32CAN
CANopen
module
FX1S FX1N FX2N FX2NC FX3G
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쎲
FX3U
FX3UC
쎲
쎲 The special function module can be used with a base unit or expansion unit of this series.
쑗 The special function module cannot be used with this series.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 29
Extending for Special Functions
2.9.9
The Hardware
Network Module for AS-Interface
The Actuator Sensor interface (AS interface or ASi) is an international standard for the lowest
field bus level. The network suits versatile demands, is very flexible and particularly easy to
install. The ASi is suitable for controlling sensors, actuators and I/O units.
U ASI
ASI ACTIVE
POWER
ADRESS/ERROR
The FX2N-32ASI-M serves as master module for the connection of the FX1N/FX2N and FX3U/FX3UC PLC to the
AS-Interface system. Up to 31 slave units with up to 4
inputs and 4 outputs can be controlled.
For status and diagnosis messages a 7-segment display
is integrated.
FX2N -32ASI-M
PRJ MODE
PRG ENABLE
FROM/TO
CONFIG ERR
Module type
Special function module
Designation
Description
FX2N-32ASI-M
Master for
AS-i system
FX1S FX1N FX2N FX2NC FX3G
쑗
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
FX3U
쎲
쎲 The special function module can be used with a base unit or expansion unit of this series.
쑗 The special function module cannot be used with this series.
2 - 30
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
2.9.10
Extending for Special Functions
Interface Modules and Adapters
For serial data communication a large range of interface modules/adapters is available. Shown
below are only some examples, but the following table covers all available interfaces.
RS232C interface adapter board FX2N-232-BD
Communication special adapter
FX3U-232ADP (RS232C interface)
FX3U -232ADP
POWER
RD
SD
FX2N-232-BD
JY331B89001C
Interface Module FX2N-232IF
The interface module FX2N-232IF provides an RS232C
interface for serial data communications with the
MELSEC FX2N, FX2NC, FX3U and FX3UC.
Communication with PCs, printers, modems, barcode
readers etc. is handled by the PLC program. The send
and receive data are stored in the FX2N-232IF’s own
buffer memory.
Overview of Interface Modules and Adapters
Module type
Adapter boards
Designation
Special function module
Adapter boards
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
FX2N-232-BD
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
FX3G-232-BD
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
RS232C interfaces
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
FX2NC-232ADP*
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
FX3U-232ADP-MB
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
FX2N-232IF
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쎲
쎲
FX1N-422-BD
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
FX2N-422-BD
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
FX3G-422-BD
RS422 interfaces
Adapter board
*
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
FX1N-485-BD
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
FX2N-485-BD
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
FX3G-485-BD
FX3U-485-BD
Special adapter
FX2N
FX3G FX3U FX3UC
FX2NC
쎲
FX3U-422-BD
Adapter boards
FX1S FX1N
FX1N-232-BD
FX3U-232-BD
Special adapter
Description
RS485 interfaces
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
FX2NC-485ADP*
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
FX3U-485ADP-MB
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
FX3U-USB-BD
USB interface
The FX2NC-232ADP and the FX2NC-485ADP require a FX2N-CNV-BD or FX1N-CNV-BD interface adapter when
connecting to a FX1S, FX1N or FX2N base unit.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 31
Extending for Special Functions
2.9.11
The Hardware
Communication Adapters
Communication adapters boards
Communication adapters boards (product code FX첸첸-CNV-첸첸) are are installed directly in a base
unit. They are needed to connect special adapters (FX첸첸-첸첸첸ADP) to the left-hand side of base
units of the FX1N, FX2N, FX3G or FX3U series.
FX2N-CNV-BD
FX3G-CNV-ADP
FX3G -CNV
-ADP
FX2N-CNV-BD
JY331B89201B
Connector side
FX2N-CNV-IF
The FX2N-CNV-IF interface allows special function modules of the old FX series to be connected to the base units
of the FX family.
MITSUBISHI
FX2N -CNV-IF
Overview of Communication Adapters
Module type
Designation
Description
FX1S FX1N FX2N FX2NC FX3G FX3U FX3UC
FX1N-CNV-BD
FX2N-CNV-BD
Adapter boards
FX2NC-CNV-IF
FX3G-CNV-ADP
Communication
adapters for connection of special
adapters
FX3U-CNV-BD
Adapter
FX2N-CNV-IF
Communication
adapter for connection of FX
series modules
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쎲 The adapter can be used with a base unit of this series.
쑗 The adapter cannot be used with this series.
2 - 32
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
2.9.12
Extending for Special Functions
Setpoint Adapter Boards
These analog setpoint adapters enable the user to set 8 analog setpoint values. The analog values (0 to 255) of the potentiometers are read into the controller and used as default setpoint values for timers, counters and data registers by the user’s PLC programs.
Each potentiometer value can also be read as an 11 position rotary switch (positions 0 to 10).
Setpoint value polling is performed in the PLC program using the dedicated instruction VRRD.
The position of an rotary switch is read using the VRSC instruction.
The analog setpoint adapters are installed in the expansion slot of the base unit. No additional
power supply is required for operation.
FX2N-8AV-BD
Potentiometer
FX3G-8AV-BD
JY331B88801B
Module type
Connector side
Designation
Potentiometer
Description
FX1N-8AV-BD
Adapter boards
FX2N-8AV-BD
FX3G-8AV-BD
Analog setpoint adapters
FX1S FX1N FX2N FX2NC FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쑗
쎲
쑗
쎲 The adapter board can be used with a base unit or expansion unit of this series.
쑗 The adapter board cannot be used with this series.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 33
System Configuration
2.10
The Hardware
System Configuration
A basic FX PLC system can consist of a stand alone base unit, with the functionality and I/O
range increased by adding extension I/O and special function modules. An overview of available
options is given in sections 2.8 and 2.9.
Base Units
Base units are available with different I/O configurations from 10 to 128 points but can be
expanded to 384 points depending upon the FX range selected.
Extension Boards
Extension adapter boards can be installed directly into the base unit and therefore do not require
any additional installation space. For a small number of I/O (2 to 4) an extension adapter boards
can be installed directly into the FX1S or FX1N controller. Interface adapter boards can also provide the FX PLC with additional RS232 or RS485 interfaces.
Extension I/O Modules
With the exception of the FX1S series, unpowered modular extension blocks and powered compact extension units modules can be added to all base units of the FX family. For modular extension blocks powered by the base unit, the power consumption has to be calculated as the 5 V DC
bus can only support a limited number of expansion I/O.
Special Function Modules / Special Adapters
A wide variety of special function modules are available for all FX PLCs, again the exception is
the FX1S. They cover networking functionality, analog control, pulse train outputs and temperature inputs (for further details please refer to section 2.9).
2424+
0
STATION
ON LINE
6
5
4
3
1 2
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
7
F
FX 0N -3A
POWER
ERR
IN
ERROR STATION
OFF
ON
FX base unit
2 - 34
0
1 2 3
FX2N-16LNK-M
DG RUNB
A RUNA
MOD
Special function modules
Compact extension unit
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
System Configuration
Expansion Options
PLC
Number of modules on the
left side of base unit
Number of boards in expansion board port of base unit
—
FX1S
The modules FX0N-485ADP and
FX0N-232ADP can be mounted
in combination with a communication adapter FX1N-CNV-BD.
1
(product code FX첸첸-첸첸첸-BD)
FX2NC
The modules FX0N-485ADP and
FX0N-232ADP can be mounted
on the left side directly. An
adapter is not required.
—
FX3G
Up to 4 special adapters of the
FX3U series can be mounted on
the left side of the base unit in
combination with an adapter
board FX3G-CNV-BD.
Up to 2
(dependent on the type
of base unit)
(product code FX3G-첸첸첸-BD)
FX3U
Up to 10 special adapters of the
FX3U series can be mounted on
the left side of the base unit
directly or in combination with
an interface/communication
adapter FX3U-첸첸첸-BD.
1
(product code FX3U-첸첸첸-BD)
FX3UC
Up to 6 special adapters of the
FX3U series can be directly
mounted on the left side of the
base unit.
—
FX1N
FX2N
Number of modules on the
right side of base unit
Up to 2 special function modules of the FX2N series.
Up to 8 special function modules of the FX2N series.
Up to 4 special function modules of the FX2N series.
Up to 8 special function modules of the FX2N or FX3U series.
The difference between a base unit, extension unit and extension block is described as follows:
쎲 A base unit is made up of 4 components i.e. power supply (for base units with AC power
supply only), inputs, outputs and CPU.
쎲 An extension unit is made up of 3 components i.e. power supply, inputs and outputs.
쎲 An extension block is made up of 1or 2 components i.e. inputs and/or outputs.
It can be seen that the extension block does not have a power supply. It therefore obtains its
power requirement from either the base unit or extension unit.
Hence it is necessary to determine how many of these unpowered units can be connected
before the "On Board" power supply capacity is exceeded.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 35
System Configuration
2.10.1
The Hardware
Connection of Special Adapters
Special adapters of the FX3U series can be mounted on the left side of the base unit of the FX3G,
FX3U, and FX3UC series.
NOTE
The following rules apply to FX3U base units. For the rules of system configuration for the
FX3G or FX3UC series, please refer to the appropriate manual.
High-speed input/output special adapters
Up to two high-speed input special adapters FX3U-4HSX-ADP and up to two high-speed output
special adapters FX3U-2HSY-ADP can be connected to a base unit.
Connect all high-speed I/O special adapters before connecting other special adapters when
they are used in combination. A high-speed I/O special adapter can not be mounted on the left
side of a communication or analog special adapter.
When only high-speed input/output special adapters are connected, the adapters can be used
without a communication or interface adapter board installed in the base unit.
Possible
configuration
High-speed I/O
special adapter
High-speed I/O
special adapter
High-speed I/O
special adapter
Possible
configuration
High-speed I/O
special adapter
High-speed I/O
special adapter
High-speed I/O
special adapter
Communication or
interface adapter
board
Base unit
Base unit
No communication adapter board
or interface adapter board
Combination of analog and communication special adapters
Analog and communication special adapters must be used with a communication adapter board
or an interface adapter board installed in the base unit.
Possible
configuration
Illegal
configuration
Communication
special adapter
Analog
special adapter
Communication
special adapter
Analog
special adapter
These adapters do not function.
2 - 36
Communication or
interface adapter
board
Base unit
Base unit
No communication adapter board
or interface adapter board
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
System Configuration
Combination of communication special adapters and an interface adapter board
When instead of a communication adapter board FX3U-CNV-BD an interface adapter board
FX3U-232-BD, FX3U-422-BD, FX3U-485-BD, or FX3U-USB-BD is mounted, one communication
special adapter FX3U-232ADP or FX3U-485ADP may be used.
Possible
configuration
Communication
special adapter
Communication
special adapter
Communication
adapter board
FX3U-CNV-BD
Base unit
Illegal
configuration
Communication
special adapter
Communication
special adapter
interface adapter
board
Base unit
FX3U-232-BD, FX3U-422-BD, FX3U-485-BD or
FX3U-USB-BD
This adapter does not work.
Combination of high-speed input/output, analog and communication special adapters
When these adapters are used, connect the high-speed input/output special adapters on the left
side of the base unit. The high-speed input/output special adapters cannot be connected on the
downstream side of any communication/analog special adapter.
Possible
configuration
Communication
special adapter
Analog
special adapter
High-speed input
special adapter
High-speed
output special
adapter
Base unit
Interchangeable
Illegal
configuration
Analog
special adapter
High-speed input
special adapter
High-speed
output special
adapter
Communication
special adapter
Base unit
The adapters cannot be connected in this order.
Summary
Mounted communication adapter board or
interface adapter board
No adapter board
installed
Number of connectable special adapters
Communication
special adapter
Analog
special adapter
These special adapters cannot connected.
High-speed input
special adapter
High-speed output
special adapter
2
2
FX3U-CNV-BD
2
4
2
2
FX3U-232-BD
FX3U-422-BD
FX3U-485-BD
FX3U-USB-BD
1
4
2
2
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 37
System Configuration
2.10.2
The Hardware
Basic Rules for System Configuration
The following considerations should be taken into account when configuring a system with
extension units or special function modules:
쎲 Current consumption from 5 V DC backplane bus
쎲 24 V DC current consumption
쎲 The total number of inputs and outputs point must be smaller than the number of max. I/Os.
The following figure shows the distribution of the power supply in case of an FX3U.
�
쐇
FX3U
base unit
Power supply from
base unit
�
Compact
extension
unit
Power supply from
base unit
Extension
power
supply
�
Power supply from
compact extension
unit
�
Power supply from
extension power
supply unit*
쐃: Special adapter
�: Communication board or interface board
�: Modular extension block or special function module
*
When connecting an input extension block on the downstream side of an extension power supply unit, this input
extension block is supplied from the base unit or from an input/output powered extension unit which is mounted
between base unit and extension power supply unit.
Calculation of current consumption
The power is supplied to each connected device from the built-in power supply of the base unit,
the input/output powered extension unit or – for FX3U and FX3UC only– the extension power supply unit.
There are three types of built-in power supplies
–
5V DC
–
24V DC (for internal use)
–
24V DC service power supply (only in AC powered base units).
The following table shows the capacities of the built-in power supplies:
5 V DC built-in power supply
24 V DC built-in power supply
(internal / service power supply
FX1N
Suitable to power all connected
modules
400 mA
FX2N
290 mA
250 mA (FX2N-16M첸, FX2N-32M첸)
460 mA (all other base units)
FX3G
Sufficient for 2 special function modules or 32 additional I/O
—
FX3U
500 mA
400 mA (FX3U-16M첸, FX3U-32M첸)
600 mA (all other base units)
FX3UC
400 / 480 / 560/ 600 mA
—
FX2N
690 mA
Model
Base units
Compact extension unit
250 mA (FX2N-32E첸)
460 mA (FX2N-48E첸)
When only input/output extension blocks are added, a quick reference matrix can be used.
When also special function modules are added, calculate the current consumption to ensure
that the total current to be consumed by the additional modules can be supplied by the built-in
power supply. For details of the power consumption please refer to the appendix (section A.4).
2 - 38
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
2.10.3
System Configuration
Quick Reference Matrixes
When only input/output extension blocks without a built-in power supply are added to a base
unit, a quick reference matrix can be used. The following examples are valid for base units of the
FX3U series.
AC powered base units
In the following quick reference matrixes, the value at the intersection of the number of input
points to be added (horizontal axis) with the number of output points to be added (vertical axis)
indicates the remaining power supply capacity.
For FX3U-16MR/ES, FX3U-16MT/ES, FX3U-16MT/ESS, FX3U-32MR/ES, FX3U-32MT/ES or
FX3U-32MT/ESS:
see example
40
25
32 100
Number of additional
outputs
50
0
24 175 125
75
Not allowed to add
25
16 250 200 150 100
50
0
8 325 275 225 175 125
75
25
0 400 350 300 250 200 150 100
0
8
16
24
32
40
48
50
56
0
64
Number of additional inputs
쎲 Example
When a 16-input and a 16-output point extension block are connected to a base unit
FX3U-16M첸 or FX3U-32M첸, the residual current of the 24V DC service power supply is
150 mA.
For FX3U-48MR/ES, FX3U-48MT/ES, FX3U-48MT/ESS, FX3U-64MR/ES, FX3U-64MT/ES,
FX3U-64MT/ESS, FX3U-80MR/ES, FX3U-80MT/ES, FX3U-80MT/ESS, FX3U-128MR/ES,
FX3U-128MT/ES or FX3U-128MT/ESS:
Output
64
0
56
75
Number of additional
outputs
see example
25
48 150 100
50
0
40 225 175 125
75
25
32 300 250 200 150 100
50
0
24 375 325 275 225 175 125
75
25
16 450 400 350 300 250 200 150 100
50
0
8 525 475 425 375 325 275 225 175 125
75
25
0 600 550 500 450 400 350 300 250 200 150 100
0
8
16
24
32
40
48
56
64
72
80
50
88
0
96
Number of additional inputs
쎲 Example
When a 32-input and a 16-output point extension block are connected to an AC powered
base unit with 48, 64, 80 or 128 I/Os, the 24 V DC service power supply can still deliver a
maximum current of 250 mA to other devices.
Confirm the current capacity of 24 V DC service power supply from the value shown in the quick
reference matrix. This remaining power supply capacity (current) can be used as a power supply
to external loads (sensors or the like) by the user. When special function modules are connected, it is necessary to consider whether they can be powered by the remaining power supply
capacity.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 39
System Configuration
The Hardware
DC powered base units
The DC power type base units have restrictions in expandable I/O points since they lack a
built-in service power supply.
The following matrixes show the expandable units up to the 쑗 mark, where the desired inputs
(horizontal axis) and outputs (vertical axis) intersect. System are expandable up to the 쎲 mark
when the supply voltage is 16.8 V to 19.2 V.
For FX3U-16MR/DS, FX3U-16MT/DS, FX3U-16MT/DSS, FX3U-32MR/DS, FX3U-32MT/DS or
FX3U-32MT/DSS:
see example
40 쑗
Number of additional
outputs
Not allowed to add
32 쎲
쑗
쑗
24 쎲
16 쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
8 쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
0
-
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
0
8
16
24
32
40
48
56
64
쑗
Number of additional inputs
쎲 Example
When adding 16 inputs to a DC powered base unit with 16 or 32 I/O, a maximum of 32 outputs are expandable. When adding 16 inputs under the supply voltage 16.8 V to 19.2 V, a
maximum of 16 outputs are expandable.
For FX3U-48MR/DS, FX3U-48MT/DS, FX3U-48MT/DSS, FX3U-64MR/DS, FX3U-64MT/DS,
FX3U-64MT/DSS, FX3U-80MR/DS, FX3U-80MT/DS or FX3U-80MT/DSS:
64 쑗
Number of additional
outputs
56 쑗
쑗
48 쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
40 쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
32 쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
24 쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
16 쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
8 쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
0
-
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쎲
쑗
쑗
쑗
0
8
16
24
32
40
48
56
64
72
80
88
96
see example
Not allowed to add
쑗
Number of additional inputs
쎲 Example
When adding 32 inputs to a DC powered base unit with 48, 64, or 80 I/Os, a maximum of 40
outputs are expandable. But when adding 32 inputs under the supply voltage 16.8 V to
19.2 V, a maximum of 24 outputs are expandable.
2 - 40
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
The Hardware
2.11
I/O Assignment
I/O Assignment
The assignment of the inputs and outputs in a PLC of the MELSEC FX family is fixed and can not
be altered.
When power is turned on after input/output powered extension units/blocks have been connected, the base unit automatically assigns the input/output numbers (X/Y) to the units/blocks.
Therefore, it is unnecessary to specify the input/output numbers with parameters.
Input/output numbers are not assigned to special function units/blocks.
2.11.1
Concept of assigning
Input/output numbers (X/Y) are octal
The inputs and outputs of a PLC of the MELSEC FX family are counted in the octal numeral system. This is a base-8 number system and uses the digits 0 to 7.
The following table shows a comparison between some decimal and some octal numbers:
Decimal
Octal
0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
10
9
11
10
12
11
13
12
14
13
15
14
16
15
17
16
20
:
:
Octal numbers are assigned as input/output numbers (X/Y) as shown below.
–
X000 to X007, X010 to X017, X020 to X027......, X070 to X077, X100 to X107...
–
Y000 to Y007, Y010 to Y017, Y020 to Y027......, Y070 to Y077, Y100 to Y107...
Numbers for added input/output unit/block
To an added input/output powered extension unit/block, input numbers and output numbers following the input numbers and output numbers given to the preceding device are assigned.
The last digit of the assigned numbers must begin with 0.
For example, when the last number on the preceding device is Y43, the output numbers are
assigned to the next device starting from Y50.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
2 - 41
I/O Assignment
The Hardware
X000 to X017
X020 to X037
X040 to X043*
FX3U-32MR/ES
Input extension block
Input/output
extension block
Input extension block
Base unit
X050 to X057
FX2N-16EX-ES/UL
FX2N-8EX-ES/UL
FX2N-8ER-ES/UL
(16 inputs)
(8 inputs)
(4 inputs / 4 outputs)
Y020 to Y023*
Y000 to Y017
*
2.11.2
The inputs from X044 to X047 and the outputs from Y024 to Y027 are occupied by the FX2N-8ER-ES/UL, but they
can not used.
Special function module address
Since you can attach multiple special function modules to a single base unit each module needs
to have a unique identifier so that you can address it to transfer data to and from it. Each module
is automatically assigned a numerical ID in the range from 0 – 7 (you can connect a maximum of
8 special function modules). The numbers are assigned consecutively, in the order in which the
modules are connected to the PLC.
24- SLD
24+
24-
24+
L-
I+
VI-
VI-
V+
V+
L+
24-
24+
I+
L+
SLD
L-
I+
SLD
I+
VI-
VI-
V+
V+
FG
V+
FG
L+
V+
FX2N -4AD-PT
SLD
L+
I+
VI-
VI-
V+
L-
V+
FG
I+
FX2N-4AD-TC
L-
I+
FX2N-4DA
I+
VI-
VI-
FX2N -4DA
D/A
Special function Special function
module 0
module 1
Special function
module 2
Special function module addresses are not assigned to the following products:
2 - 42
–
Input/output powered extension units (e. g. FX2N-32ER-ES/UL or FX2N-48ET-ESS/UL)
–
Input/output extension blocks (e. g. FX2N-16EX-ES/UL or FX2N-16EYR-ES/UL)
–
Communication adapter (e.g. FX3U-CNV-BD)
–
Interface adapter (e. g. FX3U-232-BD
–
Special adapter (e. g. FX3U-232ADP)
–
Extension power supply unit FX3U-1PSU-5V
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Programming
Concepts of the IEC61131-3 Standard
3
Programming
3.1
Concepts of the IEC61131-3 Standard
IEC 61131-3 is the international standard for PLC programs, defined by the International Electromechanical Commission (IEC). It defines the programming languages and structuring elements used for writing PLC programs.
This system enables structured programs to be created using a high degree of modularisation.
This provides increased efficiency, where tested programs and routines may be reused with a
reduction of the number of programming errors.
Through use of structured programming techniques, IEC1131-3 eases fault finding procedures
as individual operational program elements may be examined independently.
One important advantage of IEC61131-3 is that at assists in project management and quality
control procedures. In particular, the structured methods encompassed within IEC61131-3 aid
the Validation of processes incorporating PLC’s. In fact, in some industries it is now considered
mandatory to adopt this approach of structured programming. This is commonplace in the Pharmaceutical and Petrochemical industries where some processes can be considered safety critical.
It is considered, in some quarters that the IEC method of programming requires excessive work
to create the final code. However, it is generally accepted that the advantages a structured
approach has to offer over “un-structured” and “open” programming techniques makes
IEC61131-3 a worthwhile advantage.
PLCopen
PLCopen is an independent vendor and product organisation that has been established in order to further the use of IEC61131-3 throughout users of Industrial Control Systems. This organisation has defined 3 levels of compliancy for the design
and implementation of systems to IEC61131-3.
PLCopen has established:
쎲 an accreditation procedure
쎲 accredited test institutes
쎲 development test software, shared amongst members
쎲 a defined certification procedure
쎲 members with certified products
This assures compliancy now, and in the future.
PLCopen Certification
61131-3
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
Mitsubishi’s GX IEC Developer is fully compliant with PLCopen to “Base Level IL” (Instruction List) and “Base Level ST” (Structured
Text) and has been fully certified to these
standards.
3-1
Software Structure and Definition of Terms
3.2
Programming
Software Structure and Definition of Terms
In the following section, the primary terms used within GX IEC Developer will be defined:
쎲 POU’s
쎲 GLOBAL VARIABLES
쎲 LOCAL VARIABLES
쎲 USER DEFINED FUNCTIONS & FUNCTION BLOCKS
쎲 TASK POOL
쎲 PROGRAM EDITORS:
– Instruction List
– Ladder Diagram
– Function Block Diagram
– Sequential Function Chart
– Structured Text
– MELSEC Instruction List
3.2.1
Definition of Terms in IEC61131-3
Projects
A Project contains the programs, documentation and parameters needed for an application.
POU - Program Organisation unit
The structured programming approach replaces the former unwieldy collection of individual
instructions with a clear arrangement of the program into program modules. These modules are
referred to as Program Organisation Units (POU’s), which form the basis of the new approach to
programming PLC systems.
Program organisation units (POU’s) are
used to implement all programming tasks.
3-2
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Programming
Software Structure and Definition of Terms
There are three different classes of POU’s, classified on the basis of their functionality:
쎲 Programs
쎲 Functions
쎲 Function Blocks
POU’s declared as Function Blocks can be considered as programming instructions in their
own right and they can be used as such in every module of your programs.
The final program is compiled from the POU’s that you define as programs. This process is handled by the task management, in the Task Pool. Program POU’s are put together in groups
referred to as “Tasks”.
Tasks
The Program POU’s are grouped together
in tasks
In turn, all the tasks are grouped
together to form the actual PLC
program.
Most PLC programs consist of areas of code which perform specific tasks.They may form part of
one large program, or be written in sub-routines, with program control instructions to select the
current routine i. e. CALL, CJ etc.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
3-3
Software Structure and Definition of Terms
Programming
Typical PLC program event sequence
In the above program, GX IEC Developer considers that each program routine which carries out
a specific task to be a POU or program organisation unit.
Each POU can be written using any of the supported editors i.e. LD, IL, FBD, SFC, ST as shown
below:
Overall Project Configuration illustrating POU integration using SFC, FBD, IL, LD and MELSEC
IL and ST format programs.
POU Pool
A Project will consist of many POU’s, each providing a dedicated control function and held in a
POU Pool. Each POU could be written in any of the IEC editors. Therefore in any given project,
the best language for the required function can be chosen. The compiler will assemble the project into code the PLC can understand but the user interface remains as written.
In this way, perhaps complicated interlocking routines, could be written in a ladder POU, whilst
complex calculations or algorithms, might be better suited to one of the textual, or FDB editors.
It is the choice of the designer/user but this environment allows flexibility.
3-4
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Programming
Software Structure and Definition of Terms
Above an example of the GX-Developer display is shown illustrating an example POU Pool.
Composition of a POU
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
3-5
Software Structure and Definition of Terms
Programming
Definition of Variables – GLOBAL and LOCAL
쎲 Variables
Before a program can be constructed, it must be decided what variables are going to be required in each particular program module. Each POU has a list of Local Variables, which
are defined and declared for use only for use within a particular POU. Global Variables can
be used by all the POU’s in the program and are declared in a separate list.
쎲 Local Variables
When program elements are declared as Local Variables, GX IEC Developer, automatically, uses some of its System Variables, as appropriate storage devices within a specific
POU. These variables are exclusive to each POU and are not available to any other routine
within a project.
쎲 Global Variables
Global Variables can be regarded as “shared” variables and are the interface to physical
PLC devices. They are made available to all POU’s and reference an actual physical PLC
I/O or named internal devices within the PLC. External HMI and SCADA devices may interface with the user program using Global Variables.
IEC61131-3 Verses MELSEC Variables
GX IEC Developer supports program creation, using either symbolic declarations (tag names),
or absolute Mitsubishi addresses (X0, M0 etc), assigned to the program elements.
The use of symbolic declarations complies with IEC 61131.3.
If symbolic declarations are used, then the tag names must be cross referenced to real PLC
addresses.
Local Variable List
For a particular POU to access a Global Variable, it must be declared in its Local Variable List
(LVL), in the POU Header.
The LVL can be made up of both Global Variables and Local Variables.
A Local Variable can be thought of as an intermediate result, i.e. if the program performs a five
stage calculation, using three values and ending with one result, traditionally, the programmer
would construct software, which produced several intermediate results, held in data registers
before ending with the final register result.
It is likely that these intermediate results, serve no purpose other than for storage and only the
final result is used elsewhere.
With GX IEC Developer, the intermediate results can be declared, as Local Variables and in this
case, only the original three numbers and the result, declared as Global Variables.
The Global Variable List
The Global Variable List (GVL) provides the interface for all names, which relate to real PLC
addresses, i.e. I/O data registers etc.
The GVL is available and can be read by all POU’s created in the project.
3-6
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Programming
Software Structure and Definition of Terms
Task Pool and Task Manager
If we now think of our routines as POU’s written for each function and given names, we can create a Task for each of our assigned POU’s.
Each Task can have different operating conditions, or events.
쎲 Task #1 only runs when a tag named, ‘Man_On’ is true.
쎲 Task #2 only runs when a tag, named, ‘Auto_On’ is true.
쎲 Task #3 runs all the time (event = True denotes this)
These tag names would be declared as Global Variables and assigned to PLC bit devices (they
could be addresses i.e. X0).
Consider our original control program. Conditional Jump (CJ) instructions could be used to isolate, either routines #1 or #2, when not in use. The Heating control routine is always required to
run.
If these routines are considered as tasks, then routines #1 & #2, are driven by event, i.e. when
either auto or manual is selected, whereas, routine #3 is always on.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
3-7
Software Structure and Definition of Terms
Programming
When GX IEC Developer compiles the project, it automatically inserts, program branching
instructions, into the program, in line with event driven tasks.
A Task can have more than one POU assigned to it, typically, a task where Event = True, would
contain all POU’s which needed to operate every scan of the PLC. A POU of a particular name
cannot be assigned to more than one task in any one project.
NOTE
Any POU’s not assigned to Tasks, ARE NOT SENT TO THE PLC during program transfer.
Don’t forget – this applies to the default download. Tasks can be prioritised, either on a time
or interrupt basis.
The Task Pool contains all the assigned tasks in the project.
The Task Pool allows the user to efficiently manage the PLC scan, ensuring that only the routines that require scanning are executed. It also provides an easy method of allocating specific
routines to events and timed or priority interrupts.
3-8
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Programming
Software Structure and Definition of Terms
The software engineer need only be concerned about the program content, not whether the
branch instructions are correct and obey the rules.
Machines/processes, consisting of standard parts, can have individual POU’s written for each
part. The full machine may consist of many POU’s.
For each variant of the machine, the supplier can choose to assign to the Task Manager, only
the relevant POU’s, for that machine, as only POU’s assigned will be transferred to the PLC on
download.
3.2.2
System Variables
The device ranges that GX IEC Developer allocated to system variables can be edited here.
This feature is displayed using the Options command under the Extras menu:
Systen variable ranges for the actual project.
쎲 Word range
D: D devices are used as word system variables.
R: R devices are used as word system variables.
W: W devices are used as word system variables.
From/to: PLC type dependant, as defined in the parameters.
쎲 Timers
Standard (T) – From/to: PLC type dependant, as defined in the parameters.
Retentive (ST) – From/to: PLC type dependant, as defined in the parameters.
쎲 Counters (C)
From/to: PLC type dependant, as defined in the parameters.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
3-9
Software Structure and Definition of Terms
Programming
쎲 Bit range
M: M devices are used as bit system variables.
From/to: PLC type dependant, as defined in the parameters.
쎲 Labels (P)
From/to: PLC type dependant, as defined in the adequate CNF file
쎲 Step flags (S)
From/to: PLC type dependant, as defined in the adequate TYP file
쎲 Display program size
A summary of the used program size is displayed on a separate dialogue box.
If the program is not compiled the dialogue shows a "?" character instead of the program size. If SFC or SUB programs are not
available for this CPU, the correspondent line will be grayed.
쎲 Display used ranges
A summary of the used system variables
ranges is displayed on a separate dialogue box.
3.2.3
System Labels
System Labels, shown in the system variable list in chapter 3.2.2 are used by GX IEC Developer
for internal management of the project. GX IEC Developer allocates system labels for the
following:
쎲 Network Labels
쎲 Event Driven Task (not EVENT = TRUE)
쎲 User Defined Function blocks (one per function block – unless macro code)
쎲 System Timers (These are used by the Task Manager, for interval triggered tasks and local
Timers.)
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Programming
3.3
Programming Languages
Programming Languages
GX IEC Developer provides separate editors for all the following programming languages,
which can be used to program the bodies of your programs:
Text Editors
쎲 Instruction List (IEC and MELSEC)
쎲 Structured Text
Graphic Editors
쎲 Ladder Diagram
쎲 Function Block Diagram
쎲 Sequential Function Chart
With the exception of the Sequential Function Chart language, all the editors divide PLC programs into sections, referred to as "Networks". These Networks can be given names (labels),
which can consist of up to a maximum of 8 characters terminated with a colon (:). These networks are numbered consecutively and can be used as destinations for branching commands.
3.3.1
Text Editors
Instruction List (IL)
The Instruction List (IL) work area is a simple text editor with which the instructions are entered
directly.
An Instruction List consists of a sequence of statements or instructions. Each instruction must
contain an operator (function) and one or more operands. Each instruction must begin in a new
line. You can also add optional Labels, Modifiers and comments to each instruction.
Two different types of Instruction List are used:
쎲 IEC Instruction List
IEC Instruction Lists are entered and edited in exactly the same way as MELSEC Instruction Lists. The following programming differences need to be observed, however:
– MELSEC networks in IEC IL
You can include MELSEC networks in IEC Instruction Lists, thus providing access to
the MELSEC system instructions.
– The accumulator
The accumulator is a result management system familiar from high-level languages.
The result of every operation is stored in the bit accumulator directly after execution of
the instruction. The accumulator always contains the operation result of the last instruction executed. You do not need to program any input conditions (execution conditions)
for the operations; execution always depends on the content of the accumulator.
For more information about IEC Instruction List, please refer to chapter 15.
쎲 MELSEC Instruction List
MELSEC Instruction Lists are entered and edited in exactly the same way as IEC Instruction Lists. However, you can only use the MELSEC instruction set; IEC standard programming is not possible.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
3 - 11
Programming Languages
Programming
Example of a MELSEC Network
Structured Text
Structured Text is a helpful tool. Especially programmers coming from the PC world will enjoy
this tool. If they program carefully and think about the way of working by PLC, they will be glad
with this editor.
The Structured Text editor is compatible to the IEC 61131-3, all requirements are fulfilled.
Example for Structured Text
An example of Structured Text programming is given in chapter 16.
3.3.2
Graphic Editors
Ladder Diagram
A Ladder Diagram consists of input contacts (makers and breakers), output coils, function
blocks and functions. These elements are connected with horizontal and vertical lines to create
circuits. The circuits always begins at the bus bar (power bar) on the left.
Functions and function blocks are displayed as blocks in the diagram. In addition to the normal
input and output parameters, some blocks also have a Boolean input (EN = ENable) and output
(ENO = ENable Out). The status at the input always corresponds to that at the output.
Example for Ladder diagram
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Programming
Programming Languages
Function Block Diagram
All instructions are implemented using blocks, which are connected with one another with horizontal and vertical connecting elements. There are no power bars.
In addition to the normal input and output parameters, some blocks also have a Boolean input
(EN = ENable) and output (ENO = ENable Out). The status of the input always corresponds to
the output status.
Example for Function Block Diagram:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
3 - 13
Programming Languages
Programming
Sequential Function Chart
Sequential Function Chart is one of the graphical languages. It can be regarded as a structuring
tool with which the sequential execution of processes can be represented clearly and comprehensible.
The only possible program organisation unit in SFC is the program.
Sequential Function Chart has two basic elements, Steps and Transitions. A sequence consists
of a series of steps, each step separated from the next by a transition. Only one step in the
sequence can be active at any one time. The next step is not activated before the previous step
has been completed and the transition is satisfied.
Example for Sequential Function Chart
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Programming
3.4
Data Types
Data Types
GX IEC Developer supports the following data types.
3.4.1
Simple Types
Data type
Boolean
INT
Integer
DINT
WORD
DWORD
3.4.2
Value range
BOOL
Bit Device
Double Integer
Bit String
Size
Applicable Devices / PLCs
0 (False), 1 (True)
1 bit
X, Y, M, B
-32768 to +32767
16 bit
Register
-2,147,483.648 to
2,147,483,647
32 bit
K4M0
0 to 65,535
16 bit
K8M0
0 to 4,294,967,295
32 bit
D, W, R
X, Y, M. B
REAL
Floating point value
7 digits
32 bit
FX2N, FX3U
STRING
Character String
20 Characters (default)
32 bit
FX3U
TIME
Time value
-T#24d0h31m23s64800ms to
T#24d20h31m23s64700 ms
32 bit
FX3U only
Complex Data Types
ARRAYS
An array is a field or matrix of variables of a particular type.
For example, an ARRAY [0..2] OF INT is a one dimensional array of three integer elements
(0,1,2). If the start address of the array is D0, then the array consists of D0, D1 and D2.
Identifier
Address
Type
Length
Motor_Volts
D0
ARRAY
[0...2] OF INT
In software, program elements can use: Motor_Volts[1] and Motor_Volts[2], as declarations,
which in this example mean that D1 and D2 are addressed.
Arrays can have up to three dimensions, for example: ARRAY [0...2, 0...4] has three elements in
the first dimension and five in the second.
Arrays can provide a convenient way of "indexing" tag names, i.e. one declaration in the Local or
Global Variable Table can access many elements.
The following diagrams illustrate graphical representation of the three array types.
Single Dimensional Array
Identifier
Motor_Speed
Type
ARRAY [0..3] OF INT
= Motor_Speed [3]
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
3 - 15
Data Types
Programming
Two Dimensional Array
Identifier
Motor_Volt
Type
ARRAY [0..3, 0...3] OF INT
= Motor_Volt [2, 3]
Three Dimensional Array
Identifier
Motor_Current
Type
ARRAY [0..3, 0...2, 0..2] OF INT
= Motor_Current [1, 2, 1]
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Programming
Data Types
Data Unit Types (DUT)
User defined Data Unit Types (DUT), can be created. This can be useful for programs which
contain common parts, for example; the control of six identical silos. Therefore a data unit type,
called ‘Silo’ can be created, composing patterns of different elements, i.e. INT, BOOL etc.
When completing a global variable list, identifiers of type Silo can be used. This means that the
predefined group called ‘Silo’ can be used with the elements defined as required for each silo,
thus reducing design time and allowing re-use of the DUT.
Example use of a DUT
The following example shows the creation of a data type called Silo. The variable collection of
Silo contains two variables of the INT and one variable of the type BOOL.
How to declare the DUT
Double-click on Global_Vars in the Project Navigator window and enter the following lines in the
global variables declaration table.
The variables are stored in the Global Variable List. The structure of both variables, Silo_1 and
Silo_2, is identical, so to reference the individual variable of each DUT you only need to prefix
their names with the name of the respective global variable.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
3 - 17
Data Types
Programming
In this example a function block of the type “Monitoring” has been programmed for assigning the
register value and the Boolean input to the elements of the DUTs. Two separate instances
(Silo_01 and Silo_02 ) of this function blocks were then created for two silos.
The GVL has been extended to define addresses for all elements of data unit types. Not defined
addresses are handled by the system.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Programming
Data Types
To view all definitions at once (if more than one definition is available), DUT entries in the GVL
can be expanded by double-clicking the row number field.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
3 - 19
Data Types
3.4.3
Programming
MELSEC Timers and Counters
When programming standard Timers/Counters, an IEC convention must be observed:
Timer/Counter Coil is programmed:
TCn / CCn
Timer/Counter Contact is programmed:
TSn / CSn
Timer/Counter Value is programmed:
TNn / CNn
In the following example T0 becomes TC0 and TS0. In this case Mitsubishi addresses have
been used, it is therefore vital to check the System Variable default T/C usage:
In the following example, the counter has been programmed using identifiers which would have
to be declared in the Global and Local Variable tables:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
4
Building a Project
In the next section, we will build our first project, initially using the Ladder Diagram editor.
Topics covered
쎲 Using the Project Navigator
쎲 Using the GVL with identifiers
쎲 Declaring variables in the Program Header
쎲 Creating programs with the IEC ladder editor
쎲 Programming IEC Timers/Counters
쎲 Commenting and Documentation
쎲 Downloading and Monitoring
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4-1
Starting GX IEC Developer
4.1
Building a Project
Starting GX IEC Developer
After starting GX IEC Developer from Windows, the following window will be displayed:
�
1
2
�
�
3
�
4
�
5
�
6
쐃 Application Title Bar
The Application title bar gives you the name of the open project.
쐇 Menu Bar
The Menu Bar provides access to all the menus and commands used to control GX IEC
Developer. When you select one of the entries in the bar by clicking with the mouse, a menu
of options drops down. Options marked with an arrow contain submenus, which are displayed with additional options when you click on them. Selecting commands normally
opens a dialog or entry box.
GX IEC Developer’ menu structure is context-sensitive, changing depending on what you
are currently doing in the program. Commands displayed in light grey are currently unavailable.
쐋 Tool Bar
The Tool Bar icons give you direct access to the most-used commands with a single mouse
click. The Tool Bar is context-sensitive, displaying a different collection of icons depending
on what you are currently doing in the program.
쐏 Project Navigator Window
The Project Navigator is the control centre of GX IEC Developer. The Project Navigator
window is not displayed until you open an existing project or create a new one.
쐄 Editor (Body)
In this area the POUs can be edited. Each POU consists out of a Header and a Body.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Starting GX IEC Developer
– Header
A header is an integral part of a program organisation unit (POU). It is the place where
the variables to be used in the POU must be declared.
– Body
A body is an integral part of a program organisation unit (POU). It contains the code elements and syntax of the actual program, function block or function.
쐂 Status Bar
This bar displayed at the bottom of the screen gives you useful information on the current
status of your project. Status Bar display can be enabled or disabled, and you can also configure the individual display options to suit your needs.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4-3
Application Program
Building a Project
4.2
Application Program
4.2.1
Example: Carousel Indexer
The following application program will be used to illustrate the creation of a simple program
using the tools of GX IEC Developer.
Operational Sequence
햲 Momentarily operate foot switch to index carousel.
햳 Carousel rotates – ‘In-Position’ sensor turns OFF as carousel begins rotating.
햴 ‘In-Position’ sensor turns ON when carousel reaches index position.
햵 Assemble product
햶 Repeat process (Go back to 햲.)
Drive Motor
Motor
Drive
Y10
Y0
Proximity Switch
Proximity
Switch
“InPosition"
Position”
"In
X1
X1
M
Foot
Switch
Foot
Switch
“Index
"Index Carousel"
Carousel”
X0X0
MELSEC
PLC
List:
MELSEC
PLC
I/OI/O
List:
X0:
Foot Switch
X1:
In Position
Y0:
Motor Drive
Product
Product
Assembly
Assembly
Station
Station
There are a number of issues that must be addressed when designing a PLC program for the
above application. Using a standard Start / Stop circuit is not possible without modification due
to the following difficulties:
쎲 The foot switch may be operated at random. Once activated, it may be possible for the
operator to forget to release the switch which may cause the table to continue to rotate past
its index position.
쎲 Once “In-Position” X1 operates, it remains on, thus the table is prevented from re-indexing.
The design must therefore contain interlocks to prevent miss-operation as described above. An
alternative approach to the design would suggest the use of ‘Pulse Transition Logic’ by means of
the IEC or MELSEC “Edge Triggered” configurations.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Application Program
The most appropriate command to use in this application is the MELSEC ‘PLS’ (Rising edge
Pulse). It has been adopted here instead of the IEC instruction R_TRIG (Rising edge Trigger)
instruction, which would also be suitable.
The following diagram illustrates the order of sequencing of the carousel control. Note that the
rising edge of the foot switch triggers the motor ON, irrespective of the “In Position” sensor being
ON.
When the table begins rotating, the “In position” sensor turns OFF a little later. The motor continues to drive the carousel conveyer until the rising edge of the “In Position” sensor is detected;
this turns the motor OFF. Note that the foot switch continues to be held on.
The Motor can only start rotation when the foot switch is released and subsequently reactivated.
Hence the motor starts again on the rising edge of the Foot Switch being operated.
Timing Diagram of Carousel Control Logic:
Foot Switch
Foot switch
Motor
Motor
In Position
In position
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4-5
Application Program
4.2.2
Building a Project
Creating a New Project
햲 From the Project menu, select New.
햳 Choose the appropriate PLC type from the selection:
햴 Provide a name for the project in the project path field. In this case use “\GXIEC
DATA\CAROUSEL” and click on Create – as in the following illustration:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Application Program
The Wizard
The Project Startup Wizard will be displayed:
The Wizard provides a quick way to begin projects. It will thus create the basic starting structures
for simple projects.
Select the Option, Empty Project and click OK.
This effectively inhibits the Wizard from creating any project elements. Of course, the Wizard
may be used if desired, but in order to fully explore the primary functions of GX IEC Developer,
for training purposes we will use manual operations to create a program.
The project display screen is shown as illustrated below:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4-7
Application Program
Building a Project
This is the primary display of the project.
The project navigation window on the left hand side of the screen enables the user to rapidly
access any portion of the project by double clicking on the selection.
4.2.3
Creating a new “POU”
햲 Click on the “New POU” button
(or “Right Click” on POU Pool) on the tool bar. The new
POU specifications are to be entered as follows:
The name of the POU will be ‘MAIN’ and it should be specified as a Ladder Diagram of type
PRG (Program).
햳 Click OK and note the addition to the POU Pool in the ‘Project navigation window’:
햴 Double click on MAIN program icon or click the symbol on the POU Pool in order to expand
the directory branch and display the Header and Body entries:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
4.2.4
Application Program
Assigning the Global Variables
Before any program code can be created, it is necessary to specify and assign all pre-allocated
physical PLC inputs and outputs including any shared variables that are to be used in the project.
Double Click the mouse pointer on Global_Vars to open the Editor for the Global Variables. This
is called the Global Variable List - GVL.
Global Variables are the link to the physical PLC devices.
As discussed previously, if IEC conventions are to be applied, then symbolic identifiers (names)
must be used instead of discreet addresses in our program. These addresses must therefore be
declared in the Global Variable List (GVL). The identifier must be filled in, using its’ PLC address
(either using Mitsubishi or IEC notation) and its’ type, for example; whether it is a ‘bit’ or ‘word’
device. Once completed, this list can be used by all of the POU’s that will be created.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4-9
Application Program
Building a Project
Declaring Variables
As can be seen from the GVL field list, each variable has a set of elements as follows:
쎲 Class
The class keyboard assigns the variable a specific property that defines how it is to be
used in the project
쎲 Identifier
Each variable is given a symbolic address, i.e. a name. This is referred to as the identifier. It
consists of a string of alphanumeric characters and ‘underscore’ characters. The identifier
must always begin with a letter or an underscore character. Spaces and mathematical operator characters (e.g. +,-,*) are not permitted.
쎲 MIT-Addr
This is the absolute address referenced in the PLC.
쎲 IEC-Addr
The IEC syntax of the address.
쎲 Type
Referrers to the data type, i.e. BOOL, INT, REAL, WORD etc.
쎲 Initial
The initial values are set automatically by the system and cannot be changed by the user.
쎲 Comment
Comments up to 64 characters may be added for each variable
If symbolic identifiers are not to be used in the program but only Mitsubishi addresses, then there
is no need to fill out the Global Variable List (GVL). However the program will no longer be truly
IEC61131-3 compliant.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Application Program
Fill out the table as shown in the following illustration. The variable “Type Selection” is automatically recognised and placed by GX IEC Developer upon entry of the ‘Address’ but can be input
manually or modified by clicking on the type select arrow in the Type field area. When the
Mitsubishi address is entered, the system automatically converts and enters the IEC equivalent.
These are the Global Variables specified for the project.
Find unused variables
By using the function Extra -> Find Unused Variables
you can find and delete all unused global and local variables that are declared but not used in a project. Unused
global and local variables will be detected in the whole
project, excluding the user libraries.
NOTE
Finding unused variables can only be performed if the project has been built and was not
changed since then. Otherwise a warning message will be displayed.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 11
Application Program
NOTES
Building a Project
The Global Variable List incorporates an “Increment new declarations” feature. If the GVL
contains entries i.e. for a number of valves, ‘Valve_1’ to ‘Valve_n’ then if the first entry is
made for Valve_1 and new rows are declared either via the tool bar icons or “Shift+Enter”
then both the identifier and address fields are incremented. This feature is enabled by
default. If this is not required it can disabled via the Extras menu ( Extras\Options\Editing),
to be described later. All or selected POU’s can be selected and all or selected variables can
be deleted. When invoked, all unused Global Variables in POU’s are deleted. This feature
will be explored later when appropriate.
For all FX2N, FX3G, FX3U, FX3UC, System Q and AnA(S) type CPU’s IEC Type REAL (Floating Point) values are fully supported.
When the data entry in the GVL has been completed, click the ‘Check’ button
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as shown:
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Application Program
Opening the POU Header
From the Project Navigation window, double click on the Header on the POU MAIN.
The following screen will be displayed:
Close this POU Header display.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 13
Application Program
4.2.5
Building a Project
Programming the POU Body
햲 To open the Ladder diagram editor, double click on the Body selection under the POU pool
in the project navigation window:
The following window is displayed:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Application Program
햳 With the pointer over the window boundary, click and drag downwards to increase the vertical size of the network:
Using the Toolbar Ladder Symbol Selection
햴 With the editor in “Selection Mode”, select the ‘Normally Open’ contact from the toolbar:
햵 Move the mouse pointer over the work area and click to fix the drop position on the window:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 15
Application Program
Building a Project
Selecting variables from the POU Header
햲 Press the “F2” button on the keyboard or click on the
button on the tool bar to call up
the variables selection window and the display will be as shown below:
Note that the current ‘Header’ should be selected under the Scope dialogue area.
햳 Click “Foot_Switch” to highlight that variable and click the Apply button. Then close the
Variable Selection box.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Application Program
Alternative Variable Specification Method: Editing in Split Screen
Split screen viewing of POU Ladder diagram and Header is possible by opening both the header
and the ladder and selecting “Tile Horizontally.”
Continue editing Project ‘Carousel’
Enter the normally open contact of the “In_Position_Sensor" in the position shown on the current
screen in the same manner, as shown below:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 17
Application Program
Building a Project
Entering a Function Block command into the Ladder program
Before continuing, it is recommended for the remainder of this course, that the Automatic
input/output variables facility be “Disabled” by de-selecting this option. This facility is found
under the Extras menu using the Options selection and selecting Editing, as shown below:
The MELSEC Function Block command, ‘PLS_M’ will be added to the program as the output
function.
햲 Click on the Function / Function block
selection button on the tool bar. On the Operator type click Functions and type "PLS_M" into the Operators prompt box thus:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Application Program
Assigning a Variable to an Instruction
햳 Click on the output variable prompt from the toolbar. Click on the ‘d’ destination, output
function from the PLS_M to drop the variable prompt field.
햴 Enter the variable name Ft_Sw_Trig into the empty ‘?’ box.
The following prompt is displayed if the variable does not exist in the Local Variable List ‘LVL’
(Local Header) or the Global Variable List ‘GVL’:
햵 Click on Define Local to define a new Local Variable ‘LVL’. The Variable Selection window is displayed, prompting a new variable to be defined:
햶 Click Define to enter the new variable into the LVL (Local Header).
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 19
Application Program
NOTE
Building a Project
To confirm the above operation, check the local header!!
The display should be as follows:
Finally, the ladder network must be finalised by connecting up the elements as follows.
햷 Right click the mouse anywhere in the edit window
area and de-select the Auto connect function.
햸 In the same manner, click to select Interconnect
Mode.
Note that the Pointer now changes to a small pencil icon.
햹 On the Ladder diagram click on the left point on the ladder diagram and “Click – Drag”
across the diagram and release on the ‘EN’ input on the ‘PLS_M’ function as shown below:
The circuit is now complete.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Application Program
Changing the cursor mode
Before continuing with the worked example, it is necessary to understand the operation of the
cursor control and the various edit modes that are available.
The following text is for illustration purposes only:
While in the ladder edit screen, Right clicking the mouse button pops up a small selection window as shown below. Clicking on Auto Connect toggles this feature on/off; it is also the method
for switching between pen and arrow, other than via toolbar icons.
Precautions when using the Ladder Editor
As can be seen from the screen below, because Auto Connect connects between two points,
for a row of contacts the line tries to connect as shown. With Auto Connect on, the only way to
connect these contacts is to connect between each individual pair:
The pen can then strike through all contacts, from the bus bar, to the coil. In the Ladder Editor the
suggestion is to invoke the Auto Connect feature when dropping elements onto the POU body
or connecting parallel elements. It should however be disabled when connecting a row of contacts as shown in the following screen, or inserting a contact into an existing network.
When using multi-legged or ‘pinned’ functions such as MUL, the number of input parameter
legs, can be incremented/decremented by using the special toolbar, icons shown. This can also
be achieved by placing the cursor at the bottom edge of the function, holding down the left hand
mouse button and then dragging away as shown below:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 21
Application Program
Building a Project
Creating a new Program Network
햲 To create a network below the current one, click the ‘insert after’
work space will appear:
button. A blank net-
햳 Enter the second network in the same format as previously described with the following
attributes:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Application Program
햴 Finally, enter the following network as shown:
Checking the entered Program
When the three networks have been entered, complete click the Check
well, the following dialogue is displayed:
button and if all is
Adding new POU’s – Counters and Timers
Continuing with the Carousel example; Additional routines will now be added to illustrate the use
of timing and counting functions.
–
Counting number of operations (Product Batch Counter)
–
Create an additional POU to provide a batch counting function.
Task:
An additional POU will now be added to the project in order to count the number of times the
motor is activated, i.e. product batch counter.
When ten products have been counted, the PLC will flash an output at a 1 Second ‘time-base’
until a button is operated to reset the batch counter.
Enter the following POU ladder routine, using the ‘free-form’ editors as shown:
햲 Create a new POU by clicking on the
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
button.
4 - 23
Application Program
Building a Project
햳 Select the Body of the new POU by opening
the newly created entry in the Project Navigation Window.
As discussed previously, the ladder network may be re-sized by moving the mouse pointer to
the lower boundary of the network header and ‘click-hold’ dragging downward to increase the
vertical size:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Application Program
Counting function
Using the editor in “select” mode, enter the instruction CTU (Count Up) into the ladder network:
Drop the IEC Function Block onto the empty Ladder network:
Instances of Function Blocks
Function Blocks can only be called as “Instances.” The process of “Instancing,” or making a
copy of a function block, is performed in the header of the POU in which the instance is to be
used. In this header the function block will be declared as a variable and the resulting instance is
given a name. It is possible to declare multiple instances with different names from one and the
same function block within the same POU. The instances are then called in the body of the POU
and the ‘Actual’ parameters are passed to the ‘Formal’ parameters. Each instance can be used
more than once.
Entering IEC Function Block CTU
햲 To create a new name for this instance of the CTU Function Block in this POU, click on the
variable name Instance above the CTU function block. And press F2 to bring up the Variable selection dialogue. Fill in the resulting window as shown on the next page.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 25
Application Program
Building a Project
햳 Click on Apply, then Update and the variable name will change as
shown on the left.
햴 Continue to enter the program as previously described so that the following display is
achieved:
When entering the PV and CV values, use the variable
buttons respectively.
Adding entries to the GVL
Note, in particular: “Reset_In” (Global) - is a new Input mapped from the MELSEC boolean
address X02 or IEC %IX2. This requires a new entry into the GVL as follows:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
When all new entries are complete, click the check
to check and assemble the project.
Application Program
button then the ‘Rebuild All’
button
Timing Function
Create the following Ladder Networks below the batch counting routine in the Batch_Count
POU as shown:
When the editing task has been completed, the GVL should appear thus:
The header (LVL) for the above program “Batch_Count” should now appear as shown:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 27
Application Program
When all new entries are complete, click the check
to check and assemble the project.
Building a Project
button then the ‘Rebuild All’
button
For the POU, “Batch_Count” header
For the POU, “MAIN” header:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
4.2.6
Application Program
Creating a new Task
In order for the POUs “MAIN” and "Batch_Count" to be assembled and executed in the PLC,
they must be specified as valid tasks in the Task Pool.
햲 Click once to highlight the TASK_Pool icon in the Project
Navigation area.
햳 Then click on the Task button
on the Toolbar. Alternatively, ‘Right Click’ the task pool
icon in the Project navigation window and select the New Task option from the menu.
햴 Enter the name of the new task ("Control1") in the prompt window.
햵 Click OK and the Project Navigation window now shows the newly created task called
“Control1”:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 29
Application Program
Building a Project
Assigning the POU to Task
The newly created task “Control1” must now reference a POU.
햲 Double click the Control1 Task icon in the Project Navigation Window; the ‘task event list’
window will be displayed:
햳 Click on the centre ‘choice browse’ ellipsis as shown above. The following prompt dialogue
is displayed:
햴 Choose MAIN and click OK to complete the assignment operation.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Application Program
Task Properties
The properties for the task can be displayed by right clicking the mouse on the required task pool
entry (i.e. Control1) and selecting Properties from the menu. The following task settings window is displayed:
쎲 Task Attributes
– Event = TRUE: Always execute
– Interval = 0: Set to zero because Event is always true.
– Priority = 31: 31 is lowest priority i.e. is scanned last.
Before continuing, it is a good idea to “SAVE” the project; click on the Save
Button.
Creation of a new task for the POU "Batch-Count"
The POU "Batch-Count" needs also to be referenced (called) by a task in the ‘Task Pool’.
햲 To create a new task, Right Click on the ‘Task_Pool’ icon on the Project Navigation Window
(PNW) and select New Task from the presented menu. Alternatively, follow the previous
procedure, clicking once on the Task_PooI Icon to highlight it on the PNW and click the
‘New Task’
icon on the toolbar.
햳 Enter the name "Count1" into the prompt window as illustrated:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 31
Application Program
Building a Project
The new task will appear under the previous Task “Control1” in the task Pool:
햴 Double click on the new task icon, ‘Count1’ in the PNW.
햵 Assign the remaining POU to this task:
When complete, click the check
assemble the project.
Save the project using the save
transferred to the PLC.
4 - 32
button then the ‘Rebuild All’
button to check and
button. The project is now complete and must therefore be
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
4.2.7
Application Program
Program Documentation
Network Header
Titling the network header is optional and provides a means to identify the program network with
a descriptive title of up to 22 characters. This can assist handling projects where large numbers
of networks are present.
햲 With Network 1 selected, click the Network Header button
or double click the mouse
pointer over the network header area and enter the following data into the Title field ONLY
– leave the Label field Blank as this has another function:
햳 Click OK and the network header will be displayed on the left hand side of the screen:
Note that the title may require pre-formatting (Padding with spaces), depending on the screen
resolution set, to read correctly as the text auto wraps to fit into the horizontal space available (22
characters max).
Network Comments
Comments enable virtually freehand text descriptors to be added anywhere inside the ladder
network area. This is vital to provide descriptions of the operation of the program.
햲 To create a comment, press the ‘Comment Button’
on the toolbar.
햳 The mouse pointer changes to
, click the left mouse button wherever the comment is
to be placed and type the required text and press <Enter>:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 33
Building a Project
Application Program
Continue to complete the program documentation as follows:
Moving the position of a comment
With the cursor in ‘Select Mode’, it is possible to grab and move the comments around the ladder
network area. To achieve this, click and hold on the left part of the comment dialogue area. Drag
the comment anywhere on the screen and release the mouse button.
Deleting a comment
Click once on the comment to highlight and press the <Delete> key on the keyboard.
Cutting / Copying a comment
Duplication of comments is achieved by clicking on the left hand end of the source comment to
highlight it. Use windows cut/copy – paste procedure and click the mouse once again to set position of destination comment in another network.
4.2.8
Checking and Building the Project Code
햲 When the Ladder Diagram is complete and task has been specified in the Task Pool, once
again press the “Check”
button on the tool bar to check the program for errors; the following dialogue should be displayed:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
햳 Click either the ‘Build’
button or the ‘Rebuild All’
well, the following compiler messages are reported:
Application Program
button on the toolbar and if all is
햴 Click Close to exit this display.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 35
Building a Project
4.2.9
Application Program
Illustration: Guided Ladder Entry Mode
In addition to the freehand ladder entry methods, GX IEC Developer Version 6 onward features
a Guided Ladder Entry Monitor method which may be used to aid Ladder program entry. This
entry method may prove to be helpful to those wishing to make the transition to GX-IEC Developer who have had previous familiarity with Mitsubishi’s MEDOC package and GX-Developer.
햲 Enter the Guided Entry Monitor mode by pressing the
following matrix is placed into the edit area:
button on the tool bar. The
햳 Use the following buttons on the toolbar to select the ladder symbols. The corresponding
number may be pressed to select the appropriate symbol from the keyboard, thus eliminating the need to use the mouse:
햴 Select the ‘Normally Open’ Contact symbol “1” and the following will be displayed:
The program may continue to be entered using the “F2” button on the keyboard or click on the
button
4 - 36
on the tool bar to call up the variables selection window as previously described.
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Project Download Procedures
4.3
Project Download Procedures
4.3.1
Connection with Peripheral Devices
The following notes describe how the project is downloaded to a FX PLC. To connect a controller
of the FX family and a PC, the SC 09 converter is used to convert the RS232 common mode
serial signals ‘to and from’ the computer to the RS 422 serial-differential format required by the
PLC.
SC 09 cable
4.3.2
Communications Port Setup
Before the project can be downloaded into the PLC CPU for the first time, the communication
and download settings must be configured.
햲 From the Online menu, select Transfer Setup and then Ports:
The Connection Setup window shown on the next page will be displayed.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 37
Project Download Procedures
Building a Project
햳 Double click the mouse on the yellow PC side I/F – Serial button and the following dialogue window is displayed:
햴 Select RS232C as shown above and click OK.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Project Download Procedures
햵 Click on the Connection Test button to check PC-PLC communications are ok:
햶 The following message should be displayed:
햷 Click OK to close this message.
If an error message is displayed, check connections and settings with the PLC.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 39
Project Download Procedures
Building a Project
Connection Setup Route
햲 To obtain a pictorial view of the Connection setup route, select the System Image button
햳 Click OK to clear the display.
NOTE
When using a standard RS232 Serial Port to communicate with the PLC, if another device is
already connected to the selected COM (n) interface, for example a serial mouse; Select
another free serial port.
햴 Select OK to close the System image display and return to the Connection setup display. Than click the OK button to close the Connection Setup window. If you leave the
Connection Setup window using the Close button, the settings are not saved.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
4.3.3
Project Download Procedures
Downloading the project
햲 Once the setting up procedures is complete, click on the “Download Project”
the toolbar.
icon on
Transfer Setup
햳 Click the Configure button to setup the “Transfer parameters” for the project.
햳 Click on PLC-Parameter and Program
햴 Click on OK to confirm the selection.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 41
Project Download Procedures
Building a Project
햵 To send the project to the PLC, click the OK button to execute the transfer.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
4.4
Monitoring the Project
Monitoring the Project
Ensure that the PLC is switched to RUN and no errors are present.
Display the body of the MAIN ladder program.
Click on the Monitor Mode Icon
NOTE
on the toolbar and observe the ladder display:
Depending on the colour attributes set, monitored variables will be displayed with a coloured
surround (Default: Yellow). Values of any analogue variable will be displayed on the monitored networks as appropriate.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 43
Monitoring the Project
4.4.1
Building a Project
Split / Multi Window Monitoring
To monitor both of the project’ POU’s simultaneously, open both POU bodies and select Tile
Horizontally from the Window menu.
NOTE
Important: It should be noted that when initially entering monitor mode with
, only the
screen in focus will be monitored. This is to avoid unneeded communication traffic occurring
from other screens that have been opened but are not necessarily in the focus (i.e. opened
but behind).
To begin monitoring the content of additional windows, click inside that window and select Start
Monitoring from the Online Menu:
NOTE
4 - 44
Due to the serial communications handshake, be prepared to wait a few seconds for the
monitor information to be registered between GX IEC Developer and the PLC.
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Monitoring the Project
The rate of communication polling from GX IEC Developer to the PLC may be increased by
adjusting the poll rate setting. Select Monitor Mode from the Extras/Options menu and enter a
new value for the Poll rate.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 45
Monitoring the Project
4.4.2
Building a Project
Adjusting Monitor Visibility
To adjust the visibility of the monitor mode, select ‘Extras/Options/Monitor Indication’ and a
flashing message can be enabled, to appear where chosen. The blink rate of the “Monitoring”
banner can be set by the User:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
4.5
Cross Reference List
Cross Reference List
To generate a Cross Reference List:
햲 Open the Extras/Options Menu and select Cross Reference
햳 Check both options shown and re-compile the project.
햴 Then select Make Cross Reference from the
Project Menu and the list is generated.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 47
Cross Reference List
Building a Project
햵 Open the Browser, either from the Project
menu, or via the toolbar icon
.
햶 Click on the Search button and the full list will be displayed.
Specific variables etc. can be searched by using the query selection boxes. Individual details of
the highlighted entry are then shown on the right hand side of the window.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Cross Reference List
The Show in Editor button opens the header of the highlighted right hand list element, for
example:
or
Object highlighted
The Cross Reference List may be printed out, using the print facility within GX IEC Developer.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 49
PLC Diagnostics
4.6
Building a Project
PLC Diagnostics
In GX IEC Developer various diagnostic functions are available.The functions in the Debug
menu allow to perform precise troubleshooting and error analysis of your application.
Click on PLC Diagnostics to open the window shown below.
Clear Text Error Message
The error data registers of the PLC are evaluated with clear text and respective help texts.
The most important hardware errors such as “Fuse blown” are displayed in a window and evaluated.
User errors can be determined. These user errors are stored with a self-created text file
(USER_ERR.TXT) and allow a quick error correction. The last eight user errors are stored into a
FIFO register and only be removed when they no longer occur.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
4.7
Project Documentation
Project Documentation
Project documentation can be set up using the Print Option facility from the Project Menu:
The “Change Configuration” dialogue box can then be seen. Previous project profiles can be
retrieved here, or work with the default profile. Either select the Project Tree for all elements, or
Selected Items for specific highlighted items, open Properties:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 51
Project Documentation
Building a Project
The Document Configuration folder is shown below. Select the tabs to configure the document as required. In this example, only the COUNTER_FB_CE will be printed, as the Selected
Items option was chosen:
User defined logos and information can be assigned, in the Cover Page tab, for the front sheet
and for the frame from the Frame Logos tab:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Building a Project
Project Documentation
Detailed information can be assigned, to the left and right footers. The field labels in the Left
Footer dialogue can be renamed, by clicking on the name buttons, as required:
Specification for POU appearance and general project specifications are available from the
POUs and General/Project Tree tabs.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
4 - 53
Project Documentation
Building a Project
Specification for SFC appearance and cross reference specifications, are available from the
SFC and Cross Reference tabs:
The configured profile can be saved, by simply naming the Current Profile field and then clicking the Save button. It can then be recalled at any time using the selection box:
4 - 54
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Program Example
An Alarm System
5
Program Example
5.1
An Alarm System
Task description
The objective is to create an alarm system with several alarm circuits and a delay function for
arming and disarming the system.
–
The system will be armed after a delay between turning the switch and activation. This provides time for the user to leave the house without tripping the alarm.
–
An n alarm is activated after a delay to make it possible to disarm the system after entering
the house.
–
The siren will only be sounded for 30 seconds, but the alarm lamp will remain activated until the system is disarmed.
Operation and function of the alarm system
–
The system will be armed with a key switch, with a 20-second delay.
–
When an alarm is triggered a siren and a blinking alarm lamp are activated after a delay of
10 seconds.
–
The key-operated switch will also be used to deactivate the alarm system.
I/O List
The following table contains an overview of the used inputs, outputs, and timer.The inputs
are used to read the status of the alarm circuits. The siren and a blinking alarm lamp are
connected to outputs. The timer are used for the required delays.
Function
Input
Output
Timer
Adress
Arm system
X1
Alarm circuit 1
X2
Alarm circuit 2
X3
Alarm circuit 3
X4
Display “system armed”
Y0
Remarks
Make contact (key-operated switch)
Break contacts (an alarm is triggered when the input
has the signal state “0”)
Acoustic alarm (siren)
Y1
Optical alarm (rotating beacon)
Y2
Alarm circuit 1 display
Y3
Alarm circuit 2 display
Y4
Alarm circuit 3 display
Y5
Arming delay
T0
Time: 20 seconds
Alarm triggering delay
T1
Time: 10 seconds
Siren activation duration
T2
Time: 30 seconds
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
The outputs functions are activated when the corresponding outputs are switched on (set). For example, if Y1 is set the acoustic alarm will sound.
5-1
An Alarm System
5.1.1
Program Example
Method
햲 Create a new project and name it “Alarm_System”.
햳 Enter the following data into the Global Variables List:
햴 Create a new POU of Class PRG (Program Type) and Language Ladder Diagram.
햵 Enter the following code into the POU.
To be continued on the next page
5-2
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Program Example
An Alarm System
The finalised header of the “Main_PRG_LD” POU should read as follows
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
5-3
An Alarm System
5.1.2
Program Example
Checking the Example Program "Alarm_System"
햲 Enter and comment the project. Check the program using the function provided in the tool
bar. Build and save the project.
햳 Download the project to the FX series PLC.
햴 Activate the monitor mode to observe the function of the program.
햵 Ensure the project is working correctly by monitoring the operation while operating the
inputs according to the I/O list shown at the start of this section.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Functions and Function Blocks
6
Functions
Functions and Function Blocks
Below is a table illustrating the comparison between ‘Functions’ and ‘Function Blocks’:
Item
Function Block
Function
Internal variable storage
Storage
No storage
Instancing
Required
Not required
Outputs
앥 No output
앥 One output
앥 Multiple outputs
One output
Repeated execution with same input Does not always deliver the same
values
output value.
Always delivers the same output
value.
쎲 Functions are part of the instruction set.
쎲 Functions are included in the standard and manufacturers libraries. i.e. TIMER_M is a
function, as is MOV_M, PLUS_M etc. from the Mitsubishi Instruction Set in the Manufacturers Library.
쎲 User defined functions can easily be created out of tested program parts.
This means that functions can be created i.e. for system/process calculations, and can be
stored in libraries and reused many times, with different variable declarations. This would
be in the same way that i.e. a MOV instruction would be used but with the advantage of being user specific.
6.1
Functions
Most control programs have some form of maths within them, i.e. for analogue signal conditioning, displaying engineering units etc. These are frequently reused within the program structure.
By using user defined functions, program design time can be dramatically reduced.
6.1.1
Example: Creating a Function
Objective:
Build a Function to change Fahrenheit to Centigrade.
Formula is:
Centigrade =
(Fahrenheit - 32) ´ 5
9
The Function will be named “Centigrade” and the input variable will be named “Fahrenheit”.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
6-1
Functions
Functions and Function Blocks
Procedure
햲 Select a new POU and name it Centigrade.
This time click the “FUN” option, instead of “PRG.”
Select Function Block Diagram as the editor.
The Result Type of FUN should be left as INT
(Integer type).
Centigrade will now have appeared on the POU tree:
햳 Double click on the FBD body icon, to open the body network:
6-2
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Functions and Function Blocks
Functions
Selecting the Function:
햲 Select the function block icon
from the toolbar and select SUB from the operators list:
햳 Using Apply or double clicking on the selection object, place it on the screen:
햴 Repeat the above process so that the following is visible:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
6-3
Functions
Functions and Function Blocks
Declaring the Variables
There are a variety of methods available to declare variables. The following procedure illustrates how to declare variables from the body of the FBD:
햲 Place input and output variables by right clicking the mouse in the work area. From the following popup menu, select and place input and output variable tags onto the FBD as
shown below:
Alternatively, click on the toolbar button
.
햳 Declare the variable “Fahrenheit” by simply typing it into
the variable area:
Because this variable name has not yet been
defined in the header (LVL), a prompt dialogue
will be presented to choose Global or Local variable, click Define Local.
햴 Fill out the properties of the variable thus: Class: VAR_INPUT, Type: INT, as shown below:
6-4
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Functions and Function Blocks
NOTES
Functions
The Class VAR_INPUT is required as this variable enables values to be input into the function when it is connected as part of a program. It will produce a left hand pointing input connection point on the function symbol.
Notice also that the variable CENTIGRADE is automatically listed. This is because the “output variable name” must be the same as the “Function name”.
햵 Click ‘Define’ and the variable will be written to the header of the Function ‘CENTIGRADE’.
You can check it by opening the header.
Declaring Constants
햲 Declare constant “32” by simply typing the number into the variable box:
햳 Complete the circuit of the Function CENTIGRADE as follows:
Hint: When entering the CENTIGRADE variable, it is not
necessary to type it, simply right click on the variable box
(or press F2).
햴 In the Variable Selection window, ‘Double click’ on CENTIGRADE or click to select and
press Apply.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
6-5
Functions
Functions and Function Blocks
CENTIGRADE is automatically placed in the header variable list as it is the name of the function,
it must therefore also be specified as the output argument.
If desired, to clarify correct check the Header of the Function ‘CENTIGRADE’; it should appear
as follows:
NOTE
Alternatively, the Variable “Fahrenheit” may be entered directly into the Header (as above)
and selected (F2 or right click on variable box) at point of entry in the body.
Checking Network Integrity
햲 Check the Network; you should have no errors and no warnings!
햳 Close down all work windows and any dialogues that may be open.
Creating a New Program POU
햲 Create a new POU called “Process” of Class “PRG” with a language of Function Block
Diagram “FBD”:
6-6
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Functions and Function Blocks
Functions
햳 Open up (Double Click) the body of Ladder POU “Process” in
the project POU pool.
Placing a user Function
햲 Click on the Function Block icon
again, but this time select Functions and select the
Project Library. Notice the newly created function “Centigrade” is now filtered down into
the operators list:
햳 Select CENTIGRADE and click ‘Apply’.
NOTE
Depending on preference, it is possible to minimise the Function Block selection window
following Apply by ticking the selection box as above.
The following will be displayed:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
6-7
Functions
Functions and Function Blocks
Assigning the Global Variables
Once the function is placed on the new network assign variables to it.
햲 Assign Variable names in the Global Variable List as shown:
The Body of the POU “Process" should read:
햳 Create a new task in the Task Pool named
“Main”.
햴 Bind the POU “Process” to the Task “Main”:
Compiling the Program
Compile the project using the Rebuild All operation from the tool bar:
6-8
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Functions and Function Blocks
Functions
Following compilation the following should be displayed:
If there are errors, click on the error detail and resolve the problem(s).
Monitoring the program
햲 Transfer the project to the PLC and monitor this network using the Monitor button
the toolbar:
on
햳 Using the on screen variable forcing feature, input numbers into the ‘Deg_F’ variable as follows:
‘Double Click’ on the input variable and enter a value into the Modify variable value dialogue as shown:
For reference, 100 deg F = 37 deg C (actual 37.7 deg C)
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
6-9
Functions and Function Blocks
6.1.2
Functions
Processing Real (Floating Point) Numbers
The existing CENTIGRADE function currently can only process 16 Bit Integer Whole Number
(-32768 to +32767) values which is the numeric system default when creating Functions. The
following example will utilise the Function ‘CENTIGRADE’, modifying it to process “REAL”
floating point values*.
*
Only valid on base units supporting this feature.
Duplicating a Function
Make a duplicate copy of the function ‘CENTIGRADE’ and rename it ‘CENTIGRADE1’ as follows:
햲 Right Click on the CENTIGRADE Icon in the POU Pool of the project and select Copy.
햳 Right Click on the POU pool icon of the project and select Paste.
The system will automatically paste a duplicate copy of ‘CENTIGRADE’ and rename it to
‘CENTIGRADE1’:
6 - 10
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Functions
Functions and Function Blocks
Changing the Result type of a Function
햲 Right click on the newly created Function ‘CENTIGRADE1’ and click on Properties.
햳 On displaying the Function Information window, set the result type to REAL.
The type should now displayed as Real in the Project Navigation Window:
햴 Modify the Header of CENTIGRADE1 so that the Fahrenheit variable is of type ‘REAL’:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
6 - 11
Function and Function Blocks
Functions
Modifying Constants to type ‘REAL’
햲 Open the Body of CENTIGRADE1 and modify the constants to ‘Floating Point’ types (i.e.
32.0) and the output variable name to read as follows:
NB: Remember to alter CENTIGRADE to CENTIGRADE1.
햳 Close editors and save all changes.
Placing the “REAL”number Function ‘CENTIGRADE1’onto the working POU “Process”
햲 In the GVL editor, create two new variables thus:
햳 Open the Body of POU “Process” and place the Function CENTIGRADE1 into it as shown
below:
NOTE
6 - 12
REAL numbers use 2 consecutive Registers (32 Bits) and are stored in a special portable
IEE format, hence the allocation in the above GVL example.
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Functions
Functions and Function Blocks
햴 Complete the POU “Process” to read as follows:
Save the Project, Close all open dialogues and rebuild the project.
Transfer the project to the PLC and monitor this network using the Monitor button
toolbar:
on the
Modify the value of the input variable “Deg_F_Real” and observe the output result on the display. Note the 7 Digit floating point accuracy.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
6 - 13
Functions and Function Blocks
6.2
Creating a Function Block
Creating a Function Block
Objective:
Build a Function Block to act as a Star/Delta Starter. Declare the following variables:
–
Start Pushbutton:
START
–
Stop Pushbutton:
STOP
–
Overload Contact:
OVERLOAD
–
Switchover Time:
TIMEBASE
–
Time Register:
TIME_COIL
–
Star Contactor Output:
STAR_COIL
–
Delta Contactor Output:
DELTA_COIL
Name the Function Block STAR_DELTA.
Procedure:
햲 Start a new “Empty” project in GX IEC Developer called “Motor Control” with no POU’s.
named “STAR_DELTA”
햳 Create a new POU
of Class "Function Block" (FB) with a language
Body type Ladder Diagram.
STAR_DELTA will now have appeared on the POU tree.
햴 Click once to open the Header and Body branches.
햵 Double click, to open the Header.
Declaring Local Variables
햲 Declare variables as shown below.
햳 Check, save and then close the Header window.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Creating a Function Block
Functions and Function Blocks
햴 Open the body and build the ladder networks as shown below:
햵 Check the Body, there should be no errors and no warnings!
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
6 - 15
Functions and Function Blocks
Creating a Function Block
Creating New Program POU “Motor Control”
햲 Close down all work windows and any dialogues that may be open.
햳 Create a new POU “MOTOR_CONTROL” of Class
PRG and FBD (Function Block Diagram) as the
language of the body.
Creating new Global Variables List
Open the GVL and enter the following I/O details:
Assigning Instance Names
햲 Open the Body of MOTOR_CONTROL and enter create two networks. Place a Instance of
the Function Block STAR_DELTA into each network as shown in the following figure:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Creating a Function Block
Functions and Function Blocks
햳 Assign ‘instance names’ to both
i n s t a n c e s o f t h e F u n c t i o n B l o ck ,
STAR_DELTA by typing MCC1 and
MCC2 into the Instance names above
each Instance of the FB. At the system
prompt, click Define Local.
햴 Create entries for the instance names in the header for MCC1 and MCC2 as follows:
An Instance is the copy of the function block for this POU. For this example simply type MCC1
and MCC2. Notice that once entered, the instances are listed in the variable selection window as
+MCC1 and +MCC2 as Type: STAR_DELTA.
The Instances must be declared in the POU Header. As can be seen from the previous figures,
Instance names are added in the same way as adding any other new variable from the POU
body.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
6 - 17
Functions and Function Blocks
Creating a Function Block
Assigning Variables to a Function Block
Now complete the POU by assigning variables to your Function Blocks as shown below:
NOTES
Mitsubishi addresses or symbolic declarations may be used. However, if Mitsubishi
‘MELSEC’ direct addresses are used then the program will no longer adhere to the IEC conventions.
Designating the variable “TRUE” as above, automatically assigns a ‘normally on’ contact
(Special relay M8000 in MELSEC FX series) which is neater and conforms to IEC
conventions.
The STAR_DELTA FB can be used many times in the project and must use different Instance
names.
Creating a New Task:
햲 Create a new Task “MAIN” in the task pool:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Creating a Function Block
Functions and Function Blocks
햳 Double click on the task and bind the POU “MOTOR_CONTROL” to the task “MAIN”:
햴 Save the Program, close all windows and dialogues.
Find unused Variables
By using the function Extras ® Find unused Variables
you can find and delete all unused global and local variables that are declared but not used in a project.
Unused global and local variables will be detected in the
whole project, excluding the user libraries.
NOTE
Finding unused variables can only be performed if the project has been build and was not
changed since them. Otherwise a warning message will be displayed.
Each unused variable is listed under the container of its declaration: the Global Variable List for
global variables, or the corresponding POU for local variables. Only those containers are listed
where unused variables exist. For example, if there is no global variable, the Global Variable List
location will not be enlisted. Containers are written in bold text and appear at a higher level than
their contained items.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
6 - 19
Functions and Function Blocks
NOTE
Creating a Function Block
This can produce large reductions in the size of the source
code. This is important particularly if the option to send all
Symbolic (Source) Code to the PLC has been selected for
download:
Compile the program in the normal manner, using the “Rebuild All”
Open the MOTOR_CONTROL POU and monitor
6 - 20
button on the toolbar:
the program for correct operation.
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Execution Options of Function Blocks
6.3
Functions and Function Blocks
Execution Options of Function Blocks
Function blocks can be executed in different ways:
쎲 Macrocode execution
쎲 MC – MCR execution
쎲 Use with EN/ENO
The execution mode is selected in the Function Information dialogue box:
How to set the execution option:
햲 Select the function block in the Project Navigator window.
햳 Display the Function Information dialogue box by right clicking and select Properties.
햴 Activate the check box. The use of MC-MCR option can only be activated when the other
two options have already been activated.
This does not make any changes to instantiation and the programming of instances in the various programming languages.
6.3.1
Macrocode execution
쎲
Standard execution: The function block is called via a system label.
쎲
Macrocode execution: The function block is expanded internally.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
6 - 21
Functions and Function Blocks
6.3.2
Execution Options of Function Blocks
Enable / EnableOutput (EN/ENO)
쎲 The EN input makes the function (or FB, see later), conditional (Switch On/Off)
쎲 The ENO reflects the status of the EN line.
쎲 Only instructions with or without EN should be used in a network, do not mix both types.
쎲 The EN/ENO chain should have all its pre-conditions at the beginning:
Function Definitions
쎲 All devices suffixed “_E” have EN / ENO lines, otherwise they do not.
쎲 All devices suffixed “_M” are manufacturers instructions, i.e. in this case from the relevant
Mitsubishi instruction set.
Exercise (Gated Operation)
Edit the Function Block STAR_DELTA to have an EN/ENO input/output feature. Drive the EN
(enable) input with external MELSEC X07 contact:
6 - 22
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Advanced Monitoring Functions
7
Entry Data Monitoring
Advanced Monitoring Functions
The following diagrams are used for illustration purposes only; use the STAR_DELTA project
and its relevant devices with the following procedures.
7.1
Entry Data Monitoring
햲 Whilst in Monitor Mode, select Entry Data Monitor from the
Online Menu:
The following table will be displayed:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
7-1
Entry Data Monitoring
Advanced Monitoring Functions
햳 Click in the Mitsubishi Address left hand column and type in the required device, any identifier name will be automatically shown together with the current value. Column widths can
be altered. In the head of the table, move the cursor over the left border of the column you
want to alter. Then press the left mouse button and move the border to the left or right.
Release the left mouse button at the desired position.
7.1.1
Customising the EDM
햲 Right Clicking the mouse button, displays the following window. Select Setup.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Advanced Monitoring Functions
Entry Data Monitoring
The Setup window allows the EDM to be user
configurable; clicking the right mouse button, displays the configurator window. In this procedure
Columns will be added to the EDM table for IEC
Address and Hex Value Monitor.
햳 Highlight or right click on the Name field and
select Insert Row as shown.
A second window appears, showing options for this
row, select Value (hex), Value (bin). Repeat for
Address (IEC) and Type.
햴 Double click on the empty field or press F2 and
select Address (IEC) from the list as shown.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
7-3
Entry Data Monitoring
Advanced Monitoring Functions
햵 Click OK and the item will be added to the EDM
layout. Add Value (hex) to the Pos 5 field in the
table.
햶 Click to close the setup box and observe altered EDM layout:
In this way, the EDM table can be used to display multiple data on one table.
Try adjusting the column widths and the zoom facility from the View menu, to display complete
picture. The display size is much dependent on the screen resolution set on the computer being
used.
From here values can be entered to any object displayed, i.e. the value of D100 may be altered
by entering a number into the respective field.
7.1.2
NOTE
7-4
Monitor Limitations
Remember, the behaviour of the monitor facility is dependant on the code being run in the
PLC; if the PLC code is writing a constant to this address, the value entered will be overwritten by the program. This situation is prevalent here as the values of D0 and D1 are being continuously written to by the PLC code.
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Advanced Monitoring Functions
7.1.3
Entry Data Monitoring
Toggling Boolean Variables
Providing the physical input to the PLC is not active, it is possible to toggle the input image in the
CPU on and off by double clicking on the value field for that Boolean addresses as shown:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
7-5
Monitoring Headers
7.2
Advanced Monitoring Functions
Monitoring Headers
Another facility available, whilst in Monitor Mode and with
the POU body highlighted, is the Monitor Header function
in the Online menu. It is also available from the Online
Toolbar
All elements of the Header identifiers of the highlighted POU are now displayed and monitored:
Note that the Boolean variables in the EDM are shown highlighted, when monitoring.
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Advanced Monitoring Functions
7.3
Monitor Mode Essentials
Monitor Mode Essentials
Multiple Windows may be monitored simultaneously by first opening them separately and using
‘Tile Windows’ feature in the Window Menu. It is important to realise when first entering Monitor
mode,
only the target window in view will be monitored.
Further windows may be monitored by first bringing them
into the target view and clicking individually on the Start
Monitoring (Ctrl+F8) selection from the Online menu:
NOTE
This monitor initialisation method is to prevent all open windows from being monitored simultaneously even if they are open but not in view. This would have the effect of potentially significantly increasing the communications traffic between the PLC and the Computer. This
would ultimately result in very slow monitor response times on the GX IEC Developer displays, particularly on FX PLC’s.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
7-7
Monitor Mode Essentials
Advanced Monitoring Functions
Simultaneous Monitoring of Header and Body
Here is an example of Monitoring a POU and its header simultaneously:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Advanced Monitoring Functions
7.4
Monitoring Mitsubishi “Transfer Form” Objects
Monitoring Mitsubishi “Transfer Form” Objects
It is also possible to monitor using the Mitsubishi Kn (Official – ‘Transfer Form’) notation for
Boolean objects. For example K1X0 monitors X0 - X3 as shown in the following example:
Setup Options
Don’t Search Variables in GVL - if a direct Mitsubishi address is entered into the Entry Data
Monitor (EDM), for example M0 the system automatically searches the GVL for the identifier.
This can take a long time in large projects. By checking the box as shown, this automatic search
is disabled.
Monitor only Visible Objects in Window - generally all elements in the EDM are monitored,
even if they are not visible. By checking the box as shown, only objects in the active window are
monitored. This speeds up response for large headers.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
7-9
Modifying Variable Values from the POU Body
7.5
Advanced Monitoring Functions
Modifying Variable Values from the POU Body
It is possible to change the value of a variable from the POU body, in Monitor Mode. This can be
a toggle of a Boolean or writing a value to an Integer/Real value etc. To invoke this, double click
on the variable label, i.e. ENABLE. This dialogue will appear, click OK to toggle on, click OK
again to toggle off. If there is PLC code writing to this variable, then this will overwrite this action.
The dialogue box can be disabled, so that operation is simply by the mouse.
For Integer/Real variables, use the same procedure, i.e. double click on the variable name,
whilst in monitor mode. The new value can be entered either as decimal or as a hexadecimal
value.
Again, if there is PLC code writing to this variable, then this will overwrite this action.
NOTE
Both operations also operate on direct MELSEC addresses (For further illustrations, see
previous section: “Functions”).
IMPORTANT TIP
When using the Ladder editor, hold down the CTRL key and double click on the variable name.
The actual address of the selected GV will then be displayed, as shown below. Repeating the
operation will toggle back to the identifier.
If Monitor Mode is stopped, then started again, identifiers are displayed.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Advanced Monitoring Functions
7.6
Monitoring “Instances” of Function Blocks
Monitoring “Instances” of Function Blocks
Individual “Instances” of Function Blocks may be monitored independently.
햲 To monitor an instance of the POU FB STAR_DELTA in the current project, open the POU
Body and click on the Monitor mode
be displayed:
button. The following dialogue choice window will
햳 Select the instance of the Function Block MOTOR_CONTROL.MCC1 and observe the
monitored page:
In this manner every instance of any Function Block may be monitored autonomously.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
7 - 11
Monitoring “Instances” of Function Blocks
7 - 12
Advanced Monitoring Functions
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Device Edit
8
Device Edit
The Device Edit function is used to edit batch devices.
햲 Select Device Edit from the Debug menu.
햳 Highlight the cell in the top left hand corner. Click the right mouse button and then select
Insert Devices:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
8-1
Device Edit
햴 Select a device type, from the Device
selection box. If you want all devices of this
type, then just click OK. It’s more likely
though; you will want to enter a range by
clicking on the address field and entering
your range, then click OK.
The device table can be configured as you wish and can be stored, as a file or written to the PLC.
Information can also be uploaded from the PLC and displayed as below.
The right mouse button supports many editing functions, find and replace, copy / paste, etc.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Device Edit
햵 Highlight a row by clicking on the left hand box, i.e. “D0” Select Display Mode:
This window allows the display format to be changed - try HEX.
It should be noticed that the selected row now displays values in hexadecimal, the other values
remain unchanged. In fact, individual cells can have different display formats, making this feature extremely flexible.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
8-3
Device Edit
8-4
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Online Mode
9
Online Change Mode
Online Mode
There are two methods for evoking online editing; via the online menu or the toolbar icon. Use
Save as in the Project menu to create a copy of the current project. Rename the Copy to
“Motor_Control_Mod”. The following operations will apply to this modified program.
Rebuild the project and download it to the PLC.
9.1
Online Change Mode
햲 Open the body of the ‘MOTOR_CONTROL’ POU and select Online change mode:
햳 Add an additional network as shown below:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
9-1
Online Change Mode
Online Mode
햴 Then with the mouse, click away from this network or click on the check button and the
changes are compiled and sent to the PLC automatically following a prompt to carry out or
abort the action:
NOTE
Online editing is only allowed if the code is identical in the resident project and PLC.
햵 Enter Monitor mode and observe the operation of the modified block:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Online Mode
9.2
Online Program Change
Online Program Change
Where complete networks are to be added or removed, the “Online Program Change” operation
must be used. This method is the preferred method of making changes to the program whilst
on-line. For example: If the recently added counter network is to be removed from the program,
carry out the following procedure (Remember the PLC and GX IEC Developer programs must
be identical before proceeding).
햲 Highlight network 3 on the POU body “MOTOR_CONTROL” and press "Delete" on the keyboard.
햳 Invoke the Online Program Change feature from the Project
Menu. GX IEC Developer will compile and write the online change
automatically.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
9-3
Online Program Change
Online Mode
The system will prompt to continue or abort the process at this point.
햴 Click Yes and wait for the download synchronisation process to complete:
햵 Confirm correct operation by entering Monitor mode in the active POU.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Data Unit Types (DUT)
10
Data Unit Types (DUT)
The following example illustrates the operation of DUT (Data Unit Types).
The previous “Motor Control” example will be used to illustrate the procedures for creating and
using DUT’s.
User defined Data Unit Types (DUT), can be created. This can be useful for programs which
contain common parts, for example; the control of a number of identical ‘Star Delta’ motor starters. Therefore a Data Unit Type, called ‘SD’ can be created, composing patterns of different elements, i.e. INT, BOOL etc.
When completing a global variable list, identifiers of type SD can be used. This means that the
predefined group called ‘SD’ can be used with the elements defined as required for each Motor
Control, thus reducing design time and allowing re-use of the DUT together with Function
Blocks.
If an element called START exists in type “SD,” then it can be reused for each ‘Star Delta’ Motor
Control instance when declared in the GVL; STAR_DELTA1.START, STAR_DELTA2.START
etc.
This means for one declaration, many derivatives can be used. One particular use for this procedure is in the interface to Tag Groups in SCADA systems. This can keep communication cycles
fast and efficient by utilising shorter and sequential data transactions, instead of multiple fragmented data requests to and from the PLC.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
10 - 1
Example use of a DUT
10.1
Data Unit Types (DUT)
Example use of a DUT
The following example illustrates the use of a DUT.
햲 Create a new project called “Motor Control DUT”:
햳 Ceate a new Program POU called MOTOR_CONTROL
햴 Create a new Task in the task pool called MAIN and bind the Program MOTOR_CONTROL
to it.
햵 Create a new Function Block “STAR_DELTA” and re-enter the following program code.
Alternatively, ‘Copy-Paste’ the original function block, ‘Body and Header’, from the project
“Motor Control” as follows:
Body: STAR_DELTA
Header: STAR_DELTA
The Header contains the definitions (Mask) of the data types that will be used when creating the
DUT “SD”.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Data Unit Types (DUT)
Example use of a DUT
햶 Create a new DUT by right clicking on the DUT Pool icon in
the Program navigation window
or from the DUT icon
on the toolbar.
햷 Enter the new DUT name as SD at the prompt.
The new DUT will now be displayed under the DUT Pool in
the project.
햸 Open the DUT by clicking on the Icon and the following will be displayed:
햹 Enter the following data into the DUT “SD”.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
10 - 3
Example use of a DUT
Data Unit Types (DUT)
햺 Close the DUT and save the program.
햻 Open the GVL and create 2 new entries STAR_DELTA1 and STAR_DELTA2.
햽 Click the ‘ellipsis’
to specify the Type as “Data Unit Types” SD for both entries:
햾 Next, click on the MIT-Addr. cell for STAR_DELTA1 to enter the variable data for the
selected DUT entry:
Click to select
Resulting window:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Data Unit Types (DUT)
10.2
Automatic Filling, Variables
Automatic Filling, Variables
햲 Deselect All types as this operation is illegal when using mixed variable types.
햳 Enter Y00 in the MIT-Addr. position for the variable: ‘DELTA’:
The system will try to sequentially ‘Auto Fill’ the variables of type BOOL. Although in many situations this is recommended, in this case it is only partially successful.
햴 Therefore overtype “START and STOP” variables with X00 and X01 thus:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
10 - 5
Automatic Filling, Variables
Data Unit Types (DUT)
햵 Finally, enter the two remaining Integer Variables TB and TV using MELSEC addresses
D0 and D1 using the “Auto Fill” feature:
햶 Click OK to save the current configuration.
햷 Repeat this series of operations for “STAR_DELTA2” entering the next sequential head
address for each variable “TYPE”:
햸 Examine the GVL, it should read as follows:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Data Unit Types (DUT)
Automatic Filling, Variables
Open the MOTOR_CONTROL program POU and place 2 instances of the user created Function Block STAR_DELTA as shown:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
10 - 7
Assigning DUT Variables to Function Blocks
10.3
Data Unit Types (DUT)
Assigning DUT Variables to Function Blocks
To assign variables to the Function blocks...
햲 ...right Click on a variable (or F2). The following variable selection window appears:
햳 Set the Scope to Header, Type Class to Data Unit Types and Type to ANY_DUT.
햴 Double Click on +STAR_DELTA1 and the following expanded DUT variable list appears:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Data Unit Types (DUT)
Assigning DUT Variables to Function Blocks
햵 Pick and assign the variables to the two STAR_DELTA Function Blocks on the
MOTOR_CONTROL Program POU as shown:
Save the project and Rebuild All to compile the code:
Download and monitor the project. Before the Function Blocks can operate, it is necessary to
write values into the TIMEBASE inputs: STAR_DELTA1.TB and STAR_DELTA2.TB. This is
carried out by using the online variable modification technique described in an earlier section.
Simulate the operation of both Function Blocks as shown on the next page in order to confirm
that everything functions as expected:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
10 - 9
Assigning DUT Variables to Function Blocks
10 - 10
Data Unit Types (DUT)
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Arrays
Overview
11
Arrays
11.1
Overview
An array is a field or matrix of variables, of a particular type.
For example, an ARRAY [0..2] OF INT, is a one dimensional array of three integer elements
(0,1,2). If the start address of the array is D0, then the array consists of D0, D1 and D2.
Identifier
Address
Type
Length
Motor_Volts
D0
ARRAY
[0...2] OF INT
In software, program elements can use: Motor_Volts[1] and Motor_Volts[2], as declarations,
which in this example mean that D1 and D2 are addressed.
Arrays can have up to three dimensions, for example: ARRAY [0...2, 0...4] has three elements in
the first dimension and five in the second. Arrays can provide a convenient way of ‘indexing’ tag
names, i.e. one declaration in the Local or Global Variable Table can access many elements.
The following diagrams illustrate graphical representation of the three array types.
Single Dimensional Array
Two Dimensional Array
Identifier
Motor_Volt
Type
ARRAY [0..3, 0...3] OF INT
= Motor_Volt [2, 3]
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
11 - 1
Overview
Arrays
Three Dimensional Array
Identifier
Motor_Current
Type
ARRAY [0..3, 0...2, 0..2] OF INT
= Motor_Current [1, 2, 1]
11 - 2
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Arrays
11.2
Array Example: Single Dimension Array
Array Example: Single Dimension Array
The following example is used to illustrate a single dimension array. The array is 10 words long
and uses Global MELSEC addresses D100 to D109. This example uses only “Standard IEC”
Operators, Functions and Function Blocks.
햲 Create a new project and define one new POU of class “Program” using a body of language FBD and named “Data_Lookup1”
햳 Create a new Task in the task pool named “Main” and bind the program POU
“Data_Lookup1” to it:
햴 Open the Global Variables list and create the following entries:
NOTE
The variable type “Array” in entered as follows:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
11 - 3
Array Example: Single Dimension Array
Arrays
Note that when the array entry first appears, it will be dimensioned to the default value of ARRAY
[0..3] OF INT. It is necessary to re dimension it to [0..9] of INT for this example, as shown below:
햵 Open the Program POU “Data_Lookup1” and enter the following Function Block Diagram:
NOTE
Define the ‘R_Trig’ Function block with instance name “Trigger”.
햶 Check the Header reads as shown below:
햷 Save the program and use Rebuild All to compile the program.
햸 Transfer the program to the PLC.
햹 Monitor the POU body (see next page).
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Arrays
Array Example: Single Dimension Array
Before the program is able to function as intended it is necessary to input data into the physical
MELSEC addresses occupied by the array variables. There are two ways in which this may be
achieved:
쎲 Use the Device Edit feature from the Debug menu as previously described, using Insert
Devices in the range D100 to D109, and enter any 10 random integer values between
-32768 to +32767 and write them to the PLC.
쎲 Open the Entry Data Monitor feature from the Online menu.
– Right Click on the Address or Name column headers and select Insert Objects from
the menu list as shown:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
11 - 5
Array Example: Single Dimension Array
Arrays
– From the resulting window select the Data_Store variable name and click Add:
– Because the variable name “Data_Store” is an array, the system presents the entry with
a “+“ prefix. Clicking on the variable name expands the array details into the table as
shown:
– Clicking on the “-“ Prefix collapses the array details.
– While monitoring the variable values, enter any 10 random integer values between
-32768 to +32767 as shown below:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Arrays
Array Example: Single Dimension Array
– Switch back to monitor the body of the POU “Data_Lookup1” and observe the operation
of the program, noting how the value alters on the output variable “Data_Lookup” as the
data pointer increases:
쎲 The program is designed to reset the pointer to zero on the 10th element and thus will
repeat scan the table with an upward increment (Index 0-9).
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
11 - 7
Array Example: Single Dimension Array
11 - 8
Arrays
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Working with Libraries
12
Working with Libraries
12.1
User Defined Libraries
User Defined Libraries
All Functions and Function Blocks, created so far, have been resident in the current project and
only available to that project.
User defined libraries, allow the creation of libraries containing user created POU’s, Functions,
Function Blocks etc. These libraries are available globally, i.e. can be accessed by other projects.
Therefore, engineers working with separate projects can have access to common libraries of
standard circuit parts.
As already seen, when called program functions, the Standard Library contains IEC functions.
The Manufacturer Library contains Mitsubishi functions (denoted by *_M) – M meaning manufacturer, not Mitsubishi!
Any user defined libraries will also appear on this list.
12.1.1
Example – Creating a new Library
햲 Assign the function block STAR_DELTA to a new library.
햳 Right Click the Library Pool, in the Project Navigator window and from the displayed menu
select User Library and Install/Create Library.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
12 - 1
User Defined Libraries
Working with Libraries
햴 Click on Browse Lib and enter a file name “MCC_Programs” into the window below. The
directory path can be changed if desired. In this case it is suggested that the default path is
used. This being: “C:\MELSEC\GX IEC DEVELOPER 7.00\Userlib”.
햵 Click Open when done:
Notice the new Library “MCC_Programs” that is now present in the project Library Pool.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Working with Libraries
12.1.2
User Defined Libraries
Opening the Library
햲 Open the Library by right clicking on the icon ‘MCC_Programs’ and click on Open from the
menu:
The Library is now open and may be accessed and edited:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
12 - 3
User Defined Libraries
12.1.3
Working with Libraries
Moving a POU “Function Block” to an open Library
The Function Block STAR_DELTA will now be moved into the Library ‘MCC_Programs’.
햲 Right click on the STAR_DELTA icon in the Project
navigation window and click on Cut:
The following dialogue will be displayed:
햳 Select Yes
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Working with Libraries
User Defined Libraries
햴 Right Click on the User Library icon and select Paste from the menu:
햵 Click on the ‘+’ on the new entry in the Library POU Pool to expand the ‘STAR_DELTA’
Function Block:
The Function Block POU, “STAR_DELTA” is now present in the Library “MCC_Programs” and
no longer in the Project POU Pool.
Any POU, Function, Function Block, PRG or DUT can be added to the library in this way.
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12 - 5
User Defined Libraries
Working with Libraries
햶 When editing of the library is complete, click
Update Library. This will update and close the
library.
The following message will be displayed:
햷 Click Yes and the library will be updated, saved and closed.
The library is now stored in the default location of “C:\MELSEC\GX IEC DEVELOPER
7.00\Userlib” as set when creating the library.
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Working with Libraries
12.2
Special Note about Libraries
Special Note about Libraries
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
12 - 7
Importing Libraries into Projects
12.3
Working with Libraries
Importing Libraries into Projects
Once ‘User Libraries’ have been created, it is possible to re-use routines by importing them into
other applications. Mitsubishi Electric has produced many Libraries of commonly used routines.
For example, ‘Intelligent Module’ interfaces such as A/D and D/A Function Blocks containing all
the code to facilitate a working interface for these and many more modules. These Function
Blocks are available free on many of the Mitsubishi web sites and some are provided on the
GX IEC Developer Master Disk.
The following two examples describe the methods used to import libraries into working applications.
12.3.1
Import of an User Library
The previously saved library “MCC_Programs” will be imported into the current project and the
Function Block contained therein will be re-used.
햲 Create a new empty project with no POU’s called “Library Import”.
햳 Enter the following details into the prompt:
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Working with Libraries
Importing Libraries into Projects
햴 Next click OK to accept the entries.
NOTE
The help path is used for user help files that can be created in order to describe the operation
of routines held in the library. These files can be created in MS-Word, for example in HTML
format and manually saved with the reserved extension *.CHM. These files can be bound to
the library by clicking Browse Help in the same manner as the Library Name selection illustrated above.
The new imported library is now installed into the application and can now be used within the
project as shown:
Items stored in libraries can be easily recalled and selected into a project, as shown in the following illustrations:
햲 Create a new POU, type: FBD and named “Test”:
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12 - 9
Importing Libraries into Projects
Working with Libraries
햳 Open the new POU and select the Function Block as shown:
As can be seen the new library appears in the domain and may be selected as shown:
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Working with Libraries
12.3.2
Importing Libraries into Projects
Importing a Mitsubishi Library Function Block
The following illustrations demonstrate the procedures required to import a Mitsubishi function
block for analogue input using a module FX3U-4AD.
This function block is provided by Mitsubishi. In order for the following example to function correctly, it is necessary to install the library "AnalogFX" into the project. The library is to be found on
the Mitsubishi website (www.mitsubishi-automation.com). After the installation the library can
be accessed from the “Userlib” directory.
햲 Create a new empty project with no POU’s called “Analogue_Demo”.
햳 Create a new POU (Type: FBD, Class: PRG) and name it “Analogue_Input”
햴 Right click on the Library_Pool icon and then on Install/Create User Library. This opens
a new dialogue window. Select Browse Lib. Select the AnalogFX_V310.SUL library file
and click Open.
You may also select the accompanying library help file by clicking on Browse Help.
햵 Click OK on the Install/Create User Library prompt:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
12 - 11
Importing Libraries into Projects
Working with Libraries
Note the new “AnalogFX_V310” library in the Project Navigation Window.
햶 Create a new task in the task pool: “MAIN” and bind the POU “Analogue_Input” to it.
햷 Place the FX3U_4AD_ADP function block into the POU as shown below:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Working with Libraries
Importing Libraries into Projects
The function block will appear thus:
햸 Define all variables as below:
햹 The outputs were registered as Global Variables.
햺 The instance name "ReadAverageValues" was assigned and defined as local variable.
햻 Compile and download the program to the PLC.
햽 Monitor and test for correct operation. Observe the behaviour of the analogue outputs due
to the “average settings”.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
12 - 13
Importing Libraries into Projects
12.3.3
Working with Libraries
Library Function Block Help
Providing the accompanying Library Help file has been imported, for a full explanation with
examples of all function blocks, click to highlight the function block and press the “F1” key.
For example, the help screen for the FX3U_4AD_ADP function block looks as follows:
The help files cover every aspect from the setup of the FX family analogue hardware modules to
use of the library function blocks.
12 - 14
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Security
Password
13
Security
13.1
Password
You can protect all or parts of the program with a password. You can protect against editing of
program parts and also protect circuits from being viewed by others. This is particularly relevant
for user defined function blocks. In addition, the PLC password (Keyword) is also available.
13.1.1
Setting the Password
Passwords can be entered and security levels can be
changed, using these windows, via the Project menu.
To illustrate the operation of passwords, select Security
Level 7 and enter a new password for this level (For
simplicity here, press 7). Re-enter the password and
click Change.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
13 - 1
Password
13.1.2
Security
Changing the Security Level
햲 Select Change Security Level from the Project menu:
햳 Enter the password for ‘Level 7’ and if accepted, the user will be logged on at this level.
Once logged on, the security attributes for many items may be altered. For example one of the
most common security options is to change access to POU’s, i.e. User Functions and Function
Blocks.
13 - 2
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Security
13.1.3
Password
Modifying POU Password Access
In order to protect the content or control access to User POU’s the security attributes may be
adjusted, whilst being logged into the security current level, as follows:
Setting Security Level
햲 Open the project “Motor Control” and open the header of the Function Block
“STAR_DELTA”:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
13 - 3
Password
Security
햳 Adjust the Security to Level ‘7’ and click Allow Read Access for lower Levels. This will
allow subordinate users “Read access” only to the Header and body of the function Block:
햴 Change the security level to Level ‘0’ and access the header and body of the Function
Block “STAR_DELTA”. Read access will be allowed for monitoring purposes but any alteration to the code is not possible.
햵 Log in again to Level 7 and alter the security attributes of the Function Block
“STAR_DELTA” so that read access is NOT allowed for lower levels.
햶 Change the security level to ‘0’ and try to access the body of the Function Block
“STAR_DELTA”. The Header and Body of the POU will be greyed out with access to the
POU completely blocked:
Access attributes for any individual object or complete folder in the ‘Project Navigation Window’
above can be individually set, allowing higher degrees of flexibility in the program security
settings.
13 - 4
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Sequential Function Chart - SFC
What is SFC?
14
Sequential Function Chart - SFC
14.1
What is SFC?
쎲 The “Sequential Function Chart” editor is a guided editor.
쎲 Graphical Flowchart representation.
쎲 Based on the French Grafcet (IEC 848)
쎲 SFC is a structural language which divides the process into steps and transitions.
쎲 The steps “hide” actions ( no POUs ) and / or directly switched bit operands.
쎲 Transitions always contain one link/network which activates the progression instruction
(name of the transition).
(It is also possible to use a discrete address instead of a name.)
쎲 Actions can be created in every editor, except SFC.
쎲 Transitions can be created in every editor, except SFC.
쎲 The SFC code resides in the Micro-computer area of the plc, so allocate memory space in
PLC Parameters (A series only).
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
14 - 1
SFC Elements
Sequential Function Chart - SFC
14.2
SFC Elements
14.2.1
SFC Transitions
쎲 Transitions represent a link which starts progression.
쎲 They can be created in every IEC editor.
쎲 Except in SFC.
쎲 It is also possible to use a bit directly instead of the name READY.
14.2.2
Initial Step
SFC programs begin with an Initial Step function which indicates the start of a sequence:
14.2.3
Termination Step
All Sequences finish with a Termination Step:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Sequential Function Chart - SFC
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
SFC Elements
14 - 3
SFC configuration examples
14.3
14 - 4
Sequential Function Chart - SFC
SFC configuration examples
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Sequential Function Chart - SFC
14.4
SFC Actions
SFC Actions
Each step has associated actions. An action is simply a program, as for a POU. Each action has
associated logic written in either, IEC LD, IL, FBD or ST:
New Actions are created by clicking on the ACT button on the toolbar. Select the required editor,
as for POUs:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
14 - 5
SFC Actions
Sequential Function Chart - SFC
Actions can be programs within their own right. Action_1 may be a complete ladder interlocking
routine, consisting of many networks
Each Transition can be a simple device i.e. Mitsubishi address X0, or an identifier name, or more
complex, as a single network program written in either IEC, IL, LD, Structured Text or FBD:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Sequential Function Chart - SFC
14.5
Complex Transitions
Complex Transitions
To program a complex transition, input a Transition name and hit the enter key. Choose the
required editor, as for Actions:
The transition could be a complex expression but it only consists of one network:
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
14 - 7
Complex Transitions
Sequential Function Chart - SFC
For A(ns) Series PLC’s, SFC’s reside in the micro computer area of the memory cassette. This
area must be allocated from PLC Parameters / Memory, as shown below:
This is not the case for Q series, as the MELSEC System Q supports SFC’s in the program area.
Also for FX range, SFC’s actually compile to STL code in the program area.
One popular feature of SFC’s, is that in monitor mode, the current step is highlighted. This
means for fault finding purposes, engineers can see exactly how far the sequence has progressed and can investigate accordingly:
14 - 8
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
IEC Instruction List
15
Example of IEC Instruction List (IL)
IEC Instruction List
쎲 The “Instruction List” editor is a free text editor.
쎲 No line addresses are released.
쎲 Functions and function blocks can be called.
쎲 In addition to the IEC networks MELSEC networks can be included.
쎲 Comments can be included within (* *)
쎲 By means of the Windows functionality a program can be written for example in WinWord
and then be copied via the clip board into GX IEC Developer.
15.1
15.1.1
Example of IEC Instruction List (IL)
LD
X4
(* Interrogation X4 *)
ANDN
M5
(* ANDN M5 *)
ST
Y20
(* Assignment OUT to Y20 *)
LD
TEST
(* Load TEST into accu *)
BCD_TO_INT
(* Convert accu *)
ST
(* Write accu to RESULT *)
RESULT
Some useful tips
To Perform : “ + D0
LD
D0
ADD
D1
ST
D2
To Perform : “ + D0
LD
D0
ADD
D1,D2,50
ST
D3
D1
D2 ” in IEC IL, becomes:
D1
D2 ” and then “ + D2
K50 D3 ” becomes:
Use of an “_E” function can simplify still further. To Perform : “ + D0 D1 D2 ” and then “ + D2
K50 D3 ” from a conditional input X0 becomes:
LD
X0
ADD_E D0,D1,D2,50,D3
This is because the ADD_E function has an Enable Output (ENO) feature.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
15 - 1
Mixing IEC IL and Melsec IL in POUs
15.2
IEC Instruction List
Mixing IEC IL and Melsec IL in POUs
Both IEC IL and Melsec IL networks can be incorporated into the same POU. This is achieved,
by highlighting the current network, selecting from the Edit Menu, New Network then Melsec
Before from the Options list:
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
IEC Structured Text
16
Structured Text Operators
IEC Structured Text
ST is a high level textual editor, which has the appearance of PASCAL but is a dedicated language for industrial control applications.
POUs, Functions and Function Blocks can be created using ST.
IEC Structured Text example:
IF …..THEN ….. ELSE conditions
CASE ...ELSE .... END_CASE structures
REPEAT
RETURN
Expression Evaluation
Variable Declaration etc
Complex mathematical expressions can be realised using these operators, in a few lines of text.
16.1
Structured Text Operators
Operator
Description
Precedence
(….)
Function(….)
**
NOT
*
/
MOD
+
<,>,<=,>=
=
<>
AND, &
XOR
OR
Parenthesised expression
Parameter list of a function, function evaluation
Exponentiation, ie raising to a power
Negation
Boolean compliment
Multiplication
Division
Modulus operation
Addition
Subtraction
Comparison operators
Equality
Non equality
Boolean AND
Boolean exclusive OR
Boolean OR
Highest
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
Lowest
16 - 1
Structured Text Program Example
16.2
IEC Structured Text
Structured Text Program Example
A new Function Block will be constructed to perform a simple “Centigrade to Fahrenheit” conversion similar to that used in a previous example, in order to illustrate the use of the ‘Structured
Text’ language editor.
The formula used is as follows:
Fahrenheit =
Celsius ´ 9
+ 32
5
The input and result variables will be in Floating Point (REAL) format.
NOTE
For the FX range of PLCs, floating point calculation is only possible with the main units of the
FX2N, FX2NC, FX3G, FX3U, and FX3UC series.
햲 Create a new project called "Structured_Text".
햳 Create a new POU named "Fahrenheit", of Class: FUN, Result Type: REAL, with a language of “ST” (Structured Text):
햴 Create an entry in the header (LVL) of the Function “Fahrenheit”:
햵 Open the Body of the Function “Fahrenheit” and enter the following simple ST program:
Fahrenheit := (Centigrade*9.0/5.0+32.0);
햶 Create a new POU with a name “Temp_Conv”,
Class: PRG, Language: Function Block Diagram
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
IEC Structured Text
Structured Text Program Example
햷 Open the body of the program POU “Temp_Conv” and enter the following program
example:
햸 Edit the LVL (Header) of the POU “Temp_Conv” to include 2 local variables as shown
below:
햹 Close all open editors, compile the project using “Rebuild All”. Save and download to the
PLC.
햺 Monitor the program body of “Temp_Conv” and observe the values on screen.
햻 Force new values into the input variable “DegC” of the equation by double clicking on the
variable Tag Name.
NOTE
In this example, Local Variables are used to directly enter values via the GX IEC Developer
programming / monitoring interface; normally values are entered via Global Variables.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
16 - 3
Structured Text Program Example
16 - 4
IEC Structured Text
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
PROFIBUS/DP Communication
17
Configuring the PROFIBUS/DP Network
PROFIBUS/DP Communication
The open PROFIBUS/DP network enables extremely fast data exchange with a very wide variety of slave devices, including remote digital I/Os, remote analog I/Os, frequency inverters and a
range of other devices from third-party manufacturers. Of course, PROFIBUS/DP slaves from
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC can also be connected to master devices from other manufacturers.
The installation of remote digital or analog I/Os helps to reduce costs for wiring.
Structure
The maximum coverage of a bus segment is 1200 m (at a maximum of 93.75 kbit/s). Up to 3
repeaters are allowed. Thus the maximum distance between 2 stations is calculated with
4800 m.
Cable types
To help reduce costs PROFIBUS/DP uses RS 485 technology with shielded 2-wire cabling.
17.1
Configuring the PROFIBUS/DP Network
In combination with the software GX Configurator DP the FX3U-64DP-M master unit as well as
master modules from the A series or the MELSEC System Q give you user-friendly
plug-and-play technology. The configuration software is self-explanatory, using a graphical
model for setting up the network. You simply select the slave unit, assign the station numbers
and specify where the information is stored in the master station.
In this chapter the configuration of a PROFIBUS/ DP master module FX3U-64DP-M installed in a
FX3U base unit is shown. Connected to the master module is a slave station consisting of digital
and analog modules of the MELSEC ST series. For more information of the ST series please
refer to the Technical Catalogue Networks, art.-no. 136730.
햲 Start GX Configurator DP and open a new project.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
17 - 1
Configuring the PROFIBUS/DP Network
PROFIBUS/DP Communication
햳 In the dialog Network Setup select FX. As MELSEC Device FX3U-64DP-M is automatically entered.
햴 Insert DP-Slave in empty project.
Right mouse click
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
PROFIBUS/DP Communication
Configuring the PROFIBUS/DP Network
햵 Define the head address of the master module.
Enter the head address of the
PROFIBUS/DP master module in this field.
In this example the module is the 2nd
special function module.
Therefore it has the adress "1".
햶 Configure the slave station. In this example it is a head module of the MELSEC ST series
(ST1H-PB).
First select the PROFIBUS
address of the slave station
Then select the mounted modules
of the ST system (see next page).
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
17 - 3
Configuring the PROFIBUS/DP Network
PROFIBUS/DP Communication
햷 Select modules
햸 Make PLC settings for input and output devices.
Select Slave Specific Transfer
17 - 4
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
PROFIBUS/DP Communication
Configuring the PROFIBUS/DP Network
햹 Slave Specific Transfer
햺 I/O mapping
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
17 - 5
Configuring the PROFIBUS/DP Network
PROFIBUS/DP Communication
햻 Before download please select Transfer Setup
햽 Transfer configuration to PROFIBUS/DP master module.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
PROFIBUS/DP Communication
Configuring the PROFIBUS/DP Network
햾 POU for GX IEC Developer
The created POU can be exported to the GX IEC Developer project. This POU will initialize
the PROFIBUS/DP master module in the PLC program.
햿 Import of the POU in the GX IEC Developer project.
(A new project with the correct CPU has already been created and saved.)
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
17 - 7
Configuring the PROFIBUS/DP Network
PROFIBUS/DP Communication
The POUs Copy_Pou and
Profibus_init were generated
automatically.
헀 Rebuild the GX IEC Developer project and transfer it to the FX3U. After restarting the PLC
the PROFIBUS communication will start.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Ethernet Communications
18
Ethernet Communications
This section provides a step-by-step guide to setting up a Ethernet module FX3U-ENET using
FX Configurator-EN.
As an example, this section will show how to set up a module for allowing TCP/IP communications between a FX3U, a SCADA PC and a GT15 HMI*. Also shown is how the programming
software can be configured to communicate with the FX3U via Ethernet once the settings have
been made.
The diagram below shows the layout of the example Ethernet network. Proposed IP addresses
are shown next to the Ethernet nodes.
Please note that more attention is given to the set up of the PLC than the PC or HMI, as the user
may require more specific settings than this section covers.
PC with SCADA software GT SoftGOT1000
and PLC programming software
(Connected via MX components or direct
Ethernet driver)
GT1575 HMI with optional Ethernet interface
GT15-J71E71-100
POWER
IP address: 192.168.1.2
IP address: 192.168.1.1
IP address: 192.168.1.101
USB/RS232 ->RS422
FX3U
FX3U-ENET
PC with PLC programming software,
FX Configurator-EN (for configuration of
the Ethernet module) and GT Designer2
(for configuration of the GOT)
*
For the case that a HMI of the E1000 series is used instead of a GOT, the settings in the software E-Designer are
shown in section 18.5.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
18 - 1
Configuring the PC on the Ethernet
18.1
Ethernet Communications
Configuring the PC on the Ethernet
Open the Network properties of Windows, and assign an IP address and subnet mask in the
TCP/IP properties dialogue for the Ethernet network adapter to be used in the PC.
Please note that after changing IP address, the PC may require a restart.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Ethernet Communications
18.2
Configuring the FX3U-ENET by FX Configurator-EN
Configuring the FX3U-ENET by FX Configurator-EN
햲 Open the FX Configurator-EN and start the setting of the ETHERNET module FX3U-ENET.
햳 Now select the special function module address of the FX3U-ENET. Special function modules connected to the right side of the base unit are counted from left to right. If the
FX3U-ENET is the first special function module select Module 0.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
18 - 3
Configuring the FX3U-ENET by FX Configurator-EN
Ethernet Communications
햴 Open the Operational Settings and take over the settings shown below in red frames. The
IP address 192.168.1.101 of the FX3U-ENET corresponds to the requirements of your network if your network IP is 192.168.1.1.
햵 Next, open the Open Settings and take over the following settings.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Ethernet Communications
Configuring the FX3U-ENET by FX Configurator-EN
햶 In the Ethernet Module settings, click on Transfer Setup and take over the settings
shown below in the red frame.
햷 Click on Write in the Ethernet Module settings. As you see, the transfer speed for COM1
is set to 115.2 Kbps.
In the dialogue window Write to Ethernet Module click on Write and transfer your settings
to the PLC. Confirm displayed messages with YES resp. OK.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
18 - 5
Configuring the FX3U-ENET by FX Configurator-EN
Ethernet Communications
Now you can confirm the completion of the initial processing by issuing a PING command to the
FX3U-ENET. The ping command is provided by Microsoft쏐 Windows. Shown below is an example for normal completion.
C:\>ping 192.0.1.254…Remark: Execute the ping command
Pinging 192.168.1.101 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 192.168.1.101: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=250
Reply from 192.168.1.101: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=250
Reply from 192.168.1.101: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=250
Reply from 192.168.1.101: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=250
Ping statistics for 192.168.1.101:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss)
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 1ms, Maximum = 1ms, Average = 1ms
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Ethernet Communications
18.3
Configuring GX IEC Developer to access the PLC on Ethernet
Configuring GX IEC Developer to access the PLC
on Ethernet
Please make the following settings in order to access the PLC via an Ethernet network and an
Ethernet interface module.
햲 From the Online menu, select Transfer Setup and then Ports:
햳 The default connection is for the PC Side I/F to use serial connection to the PLC CPU module. Change the PC Side I/F to Ethernet board by clicking on it as shown above, and saying Yes to the question about present setting will be lost (i.e. the setting of serial to CPU).
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
18 - 7
Configuring GX IEC Developer to access the PLC on Ethernet
Ethernet Communications
햴 Next, double click on Ethernet module under PLC side I/F as shown above. This will open
up the dialogue to allow the settings for the Ethernet interface module used.
NOTE
There is no need to specify a port number, as the programming software will use a
MELSOFT Protocol dedicated port by default.
햵 Click OK when done.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Ethernet Communications
Configuring GX IEC Developer to access the PLC on Ethernet
This will complete the setting, making the dialogue look as shown below.
햶 Click Connection test to confirm the settings are correct. Then click OK when finished.
NOTE
The IP address can be entered also in hexadecimal format. This option is shown in the following two figures.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
18 - 9
Configuring GX IEC Developer to access the PLC on Ethernet
18 - 10
Ethernet Communications
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Ethernet Communications
18.4
Setting up a HMI of the GOT1000 Series (GT12, GT15 or GT16)
Setting up a HMI of the GOT1000 Series (GT12,
GT15 or GT16)
햲 Please start GT-Designer2 and open a new project. In the Project Navigator window, double click on System Settings and make the settings shown below.
햳 In the System Enviroment, double click on Communication Settings and make the settings shown below.
햴 Then, in the Communication Settings window, click on Detail Setting.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
18 - 11
Setting up a HMI of the GOT1000 Series (GT12, GT15 or GT16)
Ethernet Communications
햵 As shown on the right,
enter the details of the network in use and the IP
address of the GOT.
햶 In the Project Navigator, select:
Common Settings -> Ethernet
to set up the connected PLC and the associated IP address.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Ethernet Communications
Setting up a HMI of the GOT1000 Series (GT12, GT15 or GT16)
햷 The following dialogue window will be displayed. Click on Add.
햸 Click on the Type column and select the type of PLC.
햹 When selecting the PLC, certain settings (e.g. the Port No.) are taken over as defaults.
Please make the remaining settings.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
18 - 13
Setting up a HMI of the E1000 series
18.5
Ethernet Communications
Setting up a HMI of the E1000 series
The settings shown in this section are only necessary when a HMI of the E1000 series is connected to the network instead of a GOT series HMI.
햲 Please open a new E-Designer project.
햳 Next, a dialogue window allowing the settings for the HMI used and the connected PLC is
opened.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Ethernet Communications
Setting up a HMI of the E1000 series
햴 Select the operator terminal.
햵 Select the PLC
햶 Click OK to confirm the selection.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
18 - 15
Setting up a HMI of the E1000 series
Ethernet Communications
햷 Open the properties of the peripherals. (Right click on peripherals, than click on
properties.)
햸 Open the properties of the TCP/IP connection.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Ethernet Communications
Setting up a HMI of the E1000 series
햹 Please enter a name for the connection and
the IP address of the FX3U-ENET used for
the connection.
When a HMI of the E1000 series is connected to the network, the following setting is required for
the FX3U-ENET (refer to section 18.2, step 햵):
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
18 - 17
Communication via MX Component
18.6
Ethernet Communications
Communication via MX Component
MX Component is a tool designed to implement communication from a Personal Computer to
the PLC without any knowledge of communication protocols and modules. MX Component is a
powerful, user-friendly tools that make it very easy to connect your Mitsubishi PLC with the PC
world.
MX Component supports serial CPU port connection, serial computer links (RS232C, RS422)
and networks (Ethernet, CC-Link, MELSEC).
The following figures show the easy way for creating of communication between a PC and a PLC
via MX Component.
햲 Start the Communication Setting Utility and select the Wizard.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Ethernet Communications
Communication via MX Component
햳 First you must define the Logical station number.
햴 Next, configure the Communication Settings on the PC side. (Select the Ethernet
board.)
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
18 - 19
Communication via MX Component
Ethernet Communications
햵 Select the FX-ENET(-ADP).
햶 Enter the IP address of the Ethernet interface module.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Ethernet Communications
Communication via MX Component
햷 Select the correct CPU type.
햸 For the conclusion of the configuration define a name and press the Finish button.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
18 - 21
Communication via MX Component
Ethernet Communications
Now the definition of communication is finished. Under the folder Connection test the connection can be examined.
The message Communication test is successful indicates that your configuration is correct.
After configuring the communication paths you can access all controller devices (read/write)
with Microsoft programming languages like MS Visual Basic, MS C++ etc.
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MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Appendix
Special Relays
A
Appendix
A.1
Special Relays
In addition to the relays that you can switch on and off with the PLC program there is also another
class of relays known as special or diagnostic relays. These relays use the address range starting with M8000. Some contain information on system status and others can be used to influence
program execution. Special relays cannot be used like other internal relays in a sequence program. However, some of them can be set ON or OFF in order to control the CPU. Represented
here are some of the most commonly used devices.
Special relays can be divided in two groups:
–
Special relays whose signal state can only be read by the program (for instance using a LD
or LDI instruction).
–
Special relays whose signal state can be read and written (set or reset) by the program.
The following tables feature a "Read" and a "Write" column. If the symbol "쎲" is shown in one of
these columns, the corresponding action is possible. The symbol "—" means that the corresponding action is not allowed.
There are also special registers for word information in a FX CPU. They are descriped in the next
section.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
A-1
Special Relays
A.1.1
Appendix
PLC Status Diagnostic Information (M8000 to M8009)
Special Relay
Read
Write
M8000
쏹
—
CPU
Function
RUN state
RUN monitor
(NO contact)
M8004
M8001
M8002
쏹
쏹
—
—
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
RUN monitor
(NC contact)
Initial pulse
(NO contact)
M8000
M8001
M8002
M8003
M8003
쏹
—
M8005
쏹
—
M8006
쏹
—
M8007
쏹
—
M8008
쏹
—
A-2
쏹
Initial pulse
(NC contact)
—
M8004
M8009
A.1.2
쏹
—
1 scan time
Error occurrence
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
Battery voltage low (ON when battery voltage is below the
value set in D8006)
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3U
FX3UC
Momentary power failure
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
Battery error latch (M8006 is set when battery voltage low is
detected)
Power failure detected
24V DC down (service power supply)
Clock Devices and Real Time Clock (M8011 to M8019)
Special Relay
Read
Write
CPU
Function
M8010
—
—
—
Not used
M8011
쏹
—
10 ms clock pulse
ON and OFF in 10 ms cycle (ON: 5 ms, OFF: 5 ms)
M8012
쏹
—
100 ms clock pulse
ON and OFF in 100 ms cycle (ON: 50 ms, OFF: 50 ms)
M8013
쏹
—
1 s clock pulse
ON and OFF in 1 s cycle (ON: 500 ms, OFF: 500 ms)
M8014
쏹
—
M8015
쏹
쏹
M8016
쏹
—
M8017
쏹
쏹
±30 seconds correction (For real time clock)
M8018
쏹
—
Real time clock installation detection (Always ON)
For an FX2NC a memory card with integrated RTC must be
installed.
M8019
쏹
—
Real time clock (RTC) setting error
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
1 min clock pulse
ON and OFF in 1 min cycle (ON: 30 s, OFF: 30 s)
Clock stop and preset (For real time clock)
Time read display is stopped (For real time clock)
The contents of D8013 to D8019 is frozen, but the clock is
still running.
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Appendix
A.1.3
Special Relays
PLC Operation Mode (M8030 to M8039)
Special relay
Read
Write
CPU
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
Function
Battery LED OFF
When M8030 set to ON, LED on PLC is not lit even if battery
voltage low is detected.
M8030
쏹
—
M8031
쏹
쏹
Non-latch memory
all clear
M8032
쏹
쏹
Latch memory all
clear
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N
FX2NC,
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
Memory hold STOP
When PLC is switched from RUN to STOP, image memory
and data memory are retained.
M8033
쏹
쏹
M8034
쏹
쏹
M8035
쏹
쏹
Forced RUN mode
M8036
쏹
쏹
Forced RUN signal
M8037
쏹
쏹
M8038
M8039
—
쏹
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
If this special auxiliary relays are activated, the ON/OFF image memory of Y,
M, S, T, and C, and present values of T,
C, D, special data registers and R are
cleared to zero. However, file registers
(D) in program memory, and extension
file registers (ER) in the memory cassette are not cleared.
All outputs disable
All external output contacts of the PLC are turned OFF. The
program however is still executed.
Forced STOP signal
쏹
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N (V2.0
or later)
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
쏹
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G,
FX3U
FX3UC
Communication parameter setting flag
(for N:N network setting)
Constant scan mode
When M8039 is ON, PLC waits until scan time specified in
D8039 and then executes cyclic operation.
A-3
Special Relays
A.1.4
Appendix
Error Detection (M8060 to M8069)
Special relay
M8060
햳
햴
A.1.5
쏹
Write
CPU
—
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
I/O configuration error
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
PLC hardware error
FX2N
FX2NC
PLC/Programming device communication error
FX3G
Serial communication error [ch0]
M8061
쏹
—
M8062
쏹
—
M8063 햲
쏹
—
M8064
쏹
—
M8065
쏹
—
M8066
쏹
—
M8067 햳
쏹
—
M8068
—
쏹
M8069
햲
Read
—
쏹
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
Function
Serial communication error 1 [ch1]
Parameter error
Syntax error
Ladder error
Operation error
Operation error latch
I/O bus check 햴
The operation varies according to a PLC: Cleared in an FX1S, FX1N, FX2N, FX1NC, or FX2NC when PLC switches
from STOP to RUN. Cleared in an FX3G, FX3U, and FX3UC PLC when the power supply is switched on
Serial communication error 2 [ch2] in FX3G, FX3U, and FX3UC PLCs is detected by M8438.
Cleared when PLC switches from STOP to RUN.
When M8069 is ON, I/O bus check is executed.If an error is detected, the error code 6130 is written to special register D8069 and the special relay M8061 is set.
Extension Boards (Dedicated to FX1S and FX1N)
Special relay
Read
Write
CPU
Function
Extension board FX1N-4EX-BD: Input BX0
M8112
쏹
쏹
Extension board FX1N-2AD-BD: ch1 input mode change
Extension board FX1N-1DA-BD: output mode change
A-4
Extension board FX1N-4EX-BD: Input BX1
M8113
쏹
쏹
M8114
쏹
쏹
M8115
쏹
쏹
Extension board FX1N-4EX-BD: Input BX3
M8116
쏹
쏹
Extension board FX1N-2EYT-BD: Output BY0
M8117
쏹
쏹
Extension board FX1N-2EYT-BD: Output BY1
FX1S
FX1N
Extension board FX1N-2AD-BD: ch2 input mode change
Extension board FX1N-4EX-BD: Input BX2
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Appendix
A.1.6
Special Relays
Analog Special Adapter and Adapter Boards for FX3G
Special relay
M8260 to M8269
M8270 to M8279
M8280 to M8289
Read
Write
CPU
쏹
—
FX3U
FX3UC햵
Special relays for the 1st analog special adapter 햲
쏹
—
FX3G햶
Special relays for the 1st analog adapter board 햳
쏹
—
쏹
—
FX3G햶
Special relays for the 2nd analog adapter board 햴
쏹
—
FX3U
FX3UC햵
Special relays for the 3rd analog special adapter 햲
쏹
—
FX3G
쏹
—
FX3U,
FX3UC햵
쏹
—
FX3G
M8290 to M8299
햲
햳
햴
햵
햶
FX3U
FX3UC
햵
Function
Special relays for the 2nd analog special adapter 햲
Special relays for the 1st analog special adapter
Special relays for the 4th analog special adapter 햲
Special relays for the 2nd analog special adapter
(FX3G-40M첸/첸 and FX3G-60M첸/첸) only
The unit number of the analog special adapter is counted from the base units side.
Mounted to the expansion board connector of the base units FX3G-14M첸/첸 or FX3G-24M첸/첸 or to the left expansion board connector (BD1) of the base units FX3G-40첸/첸 or FX3G-60M첸/첸.
Mounted to the right expansion board connector (BD2) of the base units FX3G-40첸/첸 or FX3G-60M첸/첸.
Available in Version 2.00 or later
Available in Version 1.10 or later
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
A-5
Special Registers
A.2
Appendix
Special Registers
Just like the special relays (section A.1) starting at address M8000 the FX controllers also have
special or diagnostic registers, whose addresses start at D8000. Often there is also a direct connection between the special relays and special registers. For example, special relay M8005
shows that the voltage of the PLC’s battery is too low, and the corresponding voltage value is
stored in special register D8005. The following tables shows a small selection of the available
special registers as examples.
Special registers can be divided in two groups:
–
Special registers whose value can only be read by the program
–
Special relays whose value can be read and written by the program.
The following tables feature a "Read" and a "Write" column. If the symbol "쎲" is shown in a one of
these columns, the corresponding action is possible. The symbol "—" means that the corresponding action is not allowed.
A.2.1
PLC Status Diagnostic Information (D8000 to D8009)
Special Register
D8000
D8001
D8002
A-6
Read
쏹
쏹
쏹
Write
CPU
Function
쏹
Watchdog timer setting (in 1ms steps). (Writes from system
ROM at power ON) Value overwritten by program is valid
after END or WDT instruction execution. The setting must be
larger than the maximum scan time (stored in D8012).
Default value is 200 ms.
—
PLC type and system version
FX1S: 22VVV
FX1N/FX3G: 26VVV
FX2N/FX2NC/FX3U/FX3UC: 24VVV
(e. g. FX1N Version 1.00 ® 26100)
—
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
Memory capacity
0002 ® 2k steps (FX1S only)
0004 ® 4k steps (FX2N/FX2NC only)
0008 ® 8k steps or more (not for FX1S)
If 16K steps or more "K8" is written to D8002 and "16", "32"
or "64" is written to D8102.
D8003
쏹
—
Memory typ:
00H® RAM (Memory cassette)
01H® EPROM (Memory cassette)
02H® EEPROM (Memory cassette or flash memory)
0AH® EEPROM (Memory cassette or flash memory,
write-protected)
10H® Built-in memory in PLC
D8004
쏹
—
Error number (M)
If D8004 contains e.g. the value 8060, special relay M8060 is
set.
D8005
—
—
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
Battery voltage (Example: "36" -> 3.6 V)
Low battery voltage detection level.
Default settings:
FX2N/FX2NC: 3.0 V ("30")
FX3G/FX3U/FX3UC: 2.7 V ("27")
D8006
—
—
D8007
—
—
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3U
FX3UC
Momentary power failure count
Operation frequency of M8007 is stored. Cleared at
power-off.
Power failure detection
Default settings:
FX2N/FX3U: 10 ms (AC power supply)
FX2NC/FX3UC: 5 ms (DC power supply)
D8008
—
—
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3U
FX3UC
D8009
—
—
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G FX3U
FX3UC
24V DC failed device
Minimum input device number of extension units and extension power units in which 24V DC has failed.
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Appendix
A.2.2
Special Registers
Scan Information and Real Time Clock (D8010 to D8019)
Special Register
Read
Write
CPU
D8010
쏹
—
D8011
쏹
—
D8012
쏹
—
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
D8013
쏹
쏹
D8014
쏹
쏹
*
A.2.3
Function
Present scan time (in units of 0.1 ms)
Minimum value of scan time (in units of 0.1 ms)
Maximum value of scan time (in units of 0.1 ms)
Real time clock: Seconds (0 to 59)
Real time clock: Minutes (0 to 59)
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N
FX2NC*
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
D8015
쏹
쏹
D8016
쏹
쏹
D8017
쏹
쏹
D8018
쏹
쏹
Real time clock: Date (Year, 0 to 99)
D8019
쏹
쏹
Real time clock: Day of the week (0 (Sunday) to 6 (Saturday))
Real time clock: Hours (0 to 23)
Real time clock: Date (Day, 1 to 31)
Real time clock: Date (Month, 1 to 12)
For an FX2NC a memory card with integrated RTC must be installed.
PLC Operation Mode (D8030 to D8039)
Special Register
Read
Write
CPU
Function
D8030
쏹
—
Value of analog volume VR1 (Integer from 0 to 255)
D8031
쏹
—
FX1S
FX1N
FX3G
D8032 – D8038
—
—
—
쏹
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
D8039
—
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
Value of analog volume VR2 (Integer from 0 to 255)
Not used
Constant scan duration
Default: 0 ms (in 1 ms steps)
(Writes from system ROM at power ON)
Can be overwritten by program
A-7
Special Registers
A.2.4
Appendix
Error Codes (D8060 to D8069)
Special Register
D8060
D8061
D8062
*
A.2.5
A-8
Read
쏹
쏹
쏹
Write
CPU
—
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
—
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
Error code for PLC hardware error
FX2N,
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
Error code for PLC/PP communication error
FX3G
Error code for serial communication error [ch0]
—
Function
If the unit or block corresponding to a programmed I/O number
is not actually loaded, M8060 is set to ON and the first device
number of the erroneous block is written to D8060
Meaning of the four digit code:
1st digit: 0 = Output, 1 = Input
2nd to 4th digit: First device number of the erroneous block
D8063
쏹
—
Error code for serial communication error 1 [ch1]
D8064
쏹
—
Error code for parameter error
D8065
쏹
—
D8066
쏹
—
D8067
쏹
—
D8068*
—
쏹
D8069*
쏹
—
FX1S
FX1N
FX2N
FX2NC
FX3G
FX3U
FX3UC
Error code for syntax error
Error code for ladder error
Error code for operation error
Operation error step number latched
In case of 32K steps or more, the step number is stored in
[D8313, D8312].
Error step number of M8065 to M8067
In case of 32K steps or more, the step number is stored in
[D8315, D8314].
Cleared when PLC switches from STOP to RUN.
Extension Boards (Dedicated to FX1S and FX1N)
Special Register
Read
Write
D8112
쏹
—
D8113
쏹
—
D8114
쏹
쏹
CPU
Function
Adapter FX1N-2AD-BD: Digital input value ch.1
FX1S
FX1N
Adapter FX1N-2AD-BD: Digital input value ch.2
Adapter FX1N-1DA-BD: Digital output value ch.1
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Appendix
A.2.6
Special Registers
Analog Special Adapter and Adapter Boards for FX3G
Special Register
D8260 to D8269
D8270 to D8279
D8280 to D8289
Read
Write
CPU
쏹
—
FX3U
FX3UC햵
Special registers for the 1st analog special adapter 햲
쏹
—
FX3G햶
Special registers for the 1st analog adapter board 햳
쏹
—
쏹
—
FX3G햶
Special registers for the 2nd analog adapter board 햴
쏹
—
FX3U
FX3UC햵
Special registers for the 3rd analog special adapter 햲
쏹
—
FX3G
쏹
—
FX3U,
FX3UC햵
쏹
—
FX3G
D8290 to D8299
햲
햳
햴
햵
햶
FX3U
FX3UC
햵
Function
Special registers for the 2nd analog special adapter 햲
Special registers for the 1st analog special adapter
Special registers for the 4th analog special adapter 햲
Special registers for the 2nd analog special adapter
(FX3G-40M첸/첸 and FX3G-60M첸/첸) only
The unit number of the analog special adapter is counted from the base units side.
Mounted to the expansion board connector of the base units FX3G-14M첸/첸 or FX3G-24M첸/첸 or to the left expansion board connector (BD1) of the base units FX3G-40첸/첸 or FX3G-60M첸/첸.
Mounted to the right expansion board connector (BD2) of the base units FX3G-40첸/첸 or FX3G-60M첸/첸.
Available in Version 2.00 or later
Available in Version 1.10 or later
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
A-9
Error Code List
A.3
Appendix
Error Code List
When an error has been detected in the PLC, the error code is stored in special registers D8060
to D8067 and D8438. The following actions should be followed for diagnostic errors.
Represented here are some of the most common error codes.
A.3.1
Error codes 6101 to 6409
Error
PLC
hardware error
Communication
error between
PLC and programming device
(FX2N and FX2NC
only)
Serial
communication
error
A - 10
Special
Register
Error
Code
Description
0000
No error
6101
RAM error
6102
Operation circuit error
6103
I/O bus error (M8069 = ON)
6104
Powered extension unit 24 V failure
(M8069 = ON)
6105
Watchdog timer error
Check user program. The
scan time exceeds the value
stored in D8000.
6106
I/O table creation error (CPU error)
When turning the power ON to the
baseunit, a 24V power failure occurs in
a powered extension unit. (The error
occurs if the 24V power is not supplied
for 10 seconds or more after main
power turn ON.)
Check the power supply for
the powered extension
units.
6107
System configuration error
Check the number of the
connected special function
units/blocks. A few special
function units/blocks are limited the number to connect.
0000
No error
—
Check the cable connection
between the programming
device and the PLC. This
error may occur when a
cable is disconnected and
reconnected during PLC
monitoring.
D8061
D8062
D8063
Corrective Action
—
Check for the correct connection of extension cables.
6201
Parity, overrun or framing error
6202
Communication character error
6203
Communication data sum check error
6204
Data format error
6205
Command error
0000
No error
—
6301
Parity, overrun or framing error
쎲 Inverter communication,
6302
Communication character error
6303
Communication data sum check error
6304
Communication data format error
6305
Command error
6306
Communication time-out detected
6307
Modem initialization error
6308
N:N network parameter error
6312
Parallel link character error
6313
Parallel link sum error
6314
Parallel link format error
6320
Inverter communication error
computer link and programming: Ensure the
communication parameters are correctly set according to their applications.
쎲 N:N network, parallel
link, etc.: Check programs according to
applications.
쎲 Remote maintenance:
Ensure modem power is
ON and check the settings
of
the
AT
commands.
쎲 Wiring: Check the communication cables for
correct wiring.
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Appendix
Error Code List
Error
Parameter error
A.3.2
Special
Register
D8064
Error
Code
Description
Corrective Action
0000
No error
—
6401
Program sum check error
6402
Memory capacity setting error
6403
Latched device area setting error
6404
Comment area setting error
6405
File register area setting error
6406
Special unit (BFM) initial value setting,
positioning instruction setting sum
check error
6407
Special unit (BFM) initial value setting,
positioning instruction setting error
6409
Other setting error
STOP the PLC, and correctly set the parameters.
Error codes 6501 to 6510
Error
Syntax error
Special
Register
D8065
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
Error
Code
Description
0000
Kein Fehler
6501
Incorrect combination of instruction,
device symbol and device number
6502
No OUT T or OUT C before setting
value
6503
앥 No OUT T or OUT C before setting
value
앥 Insufficient number of operands for
an applied instruction
6504
앥 Same label number is used more
than once.
앥 Same interrupt input or high speed
counter input is used more than
once.
6505
Device number is out of allowable
range.
6506
Invalid instruction
6507
Invalid label number [P]
6508
Invalid interrupt input [I]
6509
Other error
6510
MC nesting number error
Corrective Action
During programming, each
instruction is checked. If a
syntax error is detected,
modify the instruction
correctly.
A - 11
Error Code List
A.3.3
Appendix
Error codes 6610 to 6632
Error
Circuit error
Special
Register
D8066
Error
Code
Description
Corrective Action
0000
No error
—
6610
LD, LDI is continuously used 9 times or
more.
6611
More ANB/ORB instructions than
LD/LDI instructions
6612
Less ANB/ORB instructions than
LD/LDI instructions
6613
MPS is continuously used 12 times or
more.
6614
No MPS instruction
6615
No MPP instruction
6616
No coil between MPS, MRD and MPP,
or incorrect combination
6617
Instruction below is not connected to
bus line: STL, RET, MCR, P, I, DI, EI,
FOR, NEXT, SRET, IRET, FEND or
END
6618
STL, MC or MCR can be used only in
main program, but it is used elsewhere
(e.g. in interrupt routine or subroutine).
6622
This error occurs when a
combination of instructions
is incorrect in the entire cirInvalid instruction is used in
FOR-NEXT loop: STL, RET, MC, MCR, cuit block or when the relationship between a pair of
I (interrupt pointer) or IRET.
instructions is incorrect.
FOR-NEXT instruction nesting level
Modify the instructions in
exceeded
the program mode so that
Numbers of FOR and NEXT instructheir mutual relationship
tions do not match.
becomes correct.
No NEXT instruction
6623
No MC instruction
6624
No MCR instruction
6625
STL instruction is continuously used 9
times or more.
6626
Invalid instruction is programmed
within STL-RET loop: MC, MCR, I
(interrupt pointer), SRET or IRET.
6627
No RET instruction
6628
Invalid instruction is used in main program: I (interrupt pointer), SRET or
IRET
6629
No P or I (interrupt pointer)
6630
No SRET or IRET instruction
6631
SRET programmed in invalid location
6632
FEND programmed in invalid location
6619
6620
6621
A - 12
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Appendix
A.3.4
Error Code List
Error codes 6701 to 6710
Error
Special
Register
Error
Code
Description
Corrective Action
0000
No error
—
6701
앥 No jump destination (pointer) for CJ
or CALL instruction
앥 Label is undefined or out of P0 to
P4095 due to indexing
앥 Label P63 is executed in CALL
instruction; cannot be used in CALL
instruction as P63 is for jumping to
END instruction.
6702
6703
6704
Operation error
D8067
6705
Operand of applied instruction is inapplicable device.
6706
Device number range or data value for
operand of applied instruction exceeds
limit.
6707
File register is accessed without parameter setting of file register.
6708
6709
6710
*
CALL instruction nesting level is 6 or This error occurs in the exemore
cution of operation. Review
the program, or check the
Interrupt nesting level is 3 or more
contents of the operands
FOR-NEXT instruction nesting level is 6 used in the applied
instructions.*
or more.
FROM/TO instruction error
This error occurs in the execution of operation. Review
the program, or check the
contents of the operands
used in the applied instructions. Check whether the
specified buffer memories
exist in the equipment.
Check whether the extension
cables are correctly
connected.
Other (e.g. improper branching)
This error occurs in the execution of operation. Review
the program, or check the
contents of the operands
used in the applied
instructions.*
Mismatch among parameters
This error occurs when the
same device is used within
the source and destination in
a shift instruction, etc.
Even if the syntax or circuit design is correct, an operation error may still occur. For example: "T200Z" itself is not an
error. But if Z had a value of 400, the timer T600 would be attempted to be accessed. This would cause an operation
error since there is no T600 device available.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
A - 13
Number of Occupied Input/Output Points and Current Consumption
A.4
Appendix
Number of Occupied Input/Output Points and
Current Consumption
The following tables show how many input/output points are occupied in a base unit by a certain
unit, along with the power supply type and current consumption values needed for selecting a
product.
The current consumption is determined differently in the following cases.
5V DC and internal 24V DC are supplied to the products through an extension cable, and the
current consumption must be calculated
Subtract the current consumption at the internal 24V DC as follows.
A.4.1
–
For the AC power type base unit, subtract the current consumption at the internal 24V DC
from the 24V DC service power supply.
–
For the DC power type base unit, subtract the current consumption at the internal 24V DC
from the power supply for the internal 24V DC.
–
Some special function modules need "external 24 V DC". Include this current in the calculation of current consumption when the current is supplied by the 24V DC service power
supply. When the current is supplied by an external power supply, the current is not included in the calculation of current consumption.
Interface Adapter Boards and Communication Adapter Boards
Type
Number of occupied
I/O points
Current consumption [mA]
5 V DC
FX1N-232-BD
—
FX2N-232-BD
—
FX3G-232-BD
—
—
20
24 V DC (internal)
24 V DC (external)
—
—
—
—
—
—
20
FX3U-232-BD
—
FX1N-422-BD
—
FX2N-422-BD
—
FX3G-422-BD
—
—
20*
60*
FX3U-422-BD
—
FX1N-485-BD
—
FX2N-485-BD
—
FX3G-485-BD
—
—
FX3U-485-BD
—
40
FX3U-USB-BD
—
15
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
60
FX1N-CNV-BD
FX2N-CNV-BD
FX3G-CNV-BD
FX3U-CNV-BD
FX3G-2AD-BD
FX3G-1DA-BD
FX3G-8AV-BD
*
A - 14
When a programming tool or GOT is connected, add the current consumed by this unit (see next page)
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Appendix
Number of Occupied Input/Output Points and Current Consumption
Programming Tool, Interface Converter, Display Module and GOT
5 V DC
24 V DC (internal)
24 V DC (external)
FX-20P(-E)
—
150
—
—
FX-232AWC-H
—
120
—
—
FX-USB-AW
—
15
—
—
FX3U-7DM
A.4.2
20
FX10DM-E
—
220
—
—
F920GOT-BBD5-K-E
—
220
—
—
Special Adapters
Type
*
A.4.3
Current consumption [mA]
Number of occupied
I/O points
Type
Number of
occupied
I/O points
Current consumption [mA]
5 V DC
24 V DC (internal) 24 V DC (external)
At start up
FX3U-4HSX-ADP
—
30
30
0
30*
FX3U-2HSY-ADP
—
30
60
0
120*
FX3U-4AD-ADP
—
15
0
40
—
FX3U-4DA-ADP
—
15
0
150
—
FX3U-4AD-PNK-ADP
—
15
0
50
—
FX3U-4AD-PT-ADP
—
15
0
50
—
FX3U-4AD-PTW-ADP
—
15
0
50
—
FX3U-4AD-TC-ADP
—
15
0
45
—
FX3U-3A-ADP
—
20
0
90
—
FX2NC-232ADP
—
100
0
0
—
FX3U-232ADP
—
30
0
0
—
FX3U-485ADP
—
20
0
0
—
The current consumption at start up must be considered when connected to a DC powered base unit.
Extension Blocks
Current consumption [mA]
Number of occupied
I/O points
5 V DC
24 V DC (internal)
24 V DC (external)
FX2N-8ER-ES/UL
16
–
125
0
FX2N-8EX-ES/UL
8
––
50
0
FX2N-16EX-ES/UL
16
––
100
0
FX2N-8EYR-ES/UL
8
––
75
0
Type
FX2N-8EYT-ESS/UL
8
––
75
0
FX2N-16EYR-ES/UL
16
––
150
0
FX2N-16EYT-ESS/UL
16
––
150
0
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
A - 15
Number of Occupied Input/Output Points and Current Consumption
A.4.4
Special Function Modules
Type
Current consumption [mA]
5 V DC
24 V DC (internal) 24 V DC (external)
At start up
FX3U-2HC
8
245
0
0
—
8
110
0
90
—
FX3U-4DA
8
120
0
160
—
FX3U-4LC
8
160
0
50
—
FX3U-20SSC-H
8
100
0
220
—
0
170
0
190
�
FX2N-2AD
8
20
50
FX2N-2DA
8
30
85 �
FX2N-4AD
8
30
0
55
—
FX2N-4DA
8
30
0
200
—
FX2N-4AD-TC
8
30
0
50
—
FX2N-4AD-PT
8
30
0
50
—
FX2N-8AD
8
50
0
80
—
FX2N-5A
8
70
0
90
—
FX2N-2LC
8
70
0
55
—
FX2N-1HC
8
90
0
0
—
FX2N-1PG-E
8
55
0
40
햳
70
—
FX2N-10PG
8
120
0
FX2N-232IF
8
40
0
80
—
—
FX2N-16CCL-M
8햴
0
0
150
—
FX2N-32CCL-M
8
130
0
50
—
150
0
70
—
8
햵
FX0N-3A
8
30
0
165
8
—
—
5
—
FX2N-20GM
8
—
—
10
—
햳
햴
햵
90
�
FX2N-10GM
햲
A - 16
Number of
occupied
I/O points
FX3U-4AD
FX2N-32ASI-M
NOTE
Appendix
When analog special function blocks (FX0N-3A, FX2N-2AD and FX2N-2DA) are connected to an input/ output powered extension unit (FX2N-32E첸 or FX2N-48E첸 ), the following limitation must be taken into consideration.
(When the blocks are connected to the base unit, this limitation is not applied.)
The total current consumption of the analog special function blocks (FX0N-3A, FX2N-2AD and FX2N-2DA) should
be less than the following current values.
- When connected to FX2N-32E첸: 190 mA or less
- When connected to FX2N-48E첸: 300 mA or less.
When the voltage of the external DC power supply is 5 V DC, the current is 100 mA.
A FX2N-16CCL-M cannot be used together with a FX2N-32ASI-M. The following number of points is added according to the products connected to the network: (Number of remote I/O stations) x 32 points.
A FX2N-32ASI-M cannot be used together with a FX2N-16CCL-M. Only one unit can be added to the whole system. The following number of points is added according to the products connected to the network:
(Number of active slaves) x 8 points.
When applying a DC power type base unit, calculate the current consumption at startup.
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Appendix
A.5
PLC Components Glossary
PLC Components Glossary
The following table describes the meaning and functionality of the single components und parts
of a Mitsubishi PLC.
Component
Description
Connection for
expansion
adapter boards
Optional expansion adapter boards can be connected to this interface. A variety of different adapters are available for all FX lines (except the FX2NC). These adapters extend the
capabilities of the controllers with additional functions or communications interfaces. The
adapter boards are plugged directly into the slot.
Connection for programming units
This connection can be used for connecting the FX-20P-E hand-held programming unit or
an external PC or notebook with a programming software package (e.g. GX Developer).
EEPROM
Read/write memory in which the PLC program can be stored and read with the programming software. This solid-state memory retains its contents without power, even in the
event of a power failure, and does not need a battery.
Memory cassette slot
Slot for optional memory cassettes. Inserting a memory cassette disables the controller’s
internal memory – the controller will then only execute the program stored in the cassette.
Extension bus
Both additional I/O expansion modules and special function modules that add additional
capabilities to the PLC system can be connected here. See Chapter 6 for an overview of
the available modules.
Analog
potentiometers
The analog potentiometers are used for setting analog setpoint values. The setting can be
polled by the PLC program and used for timers, pulse outputs and other functions.
Service power supply
The service power supply (not for FX2NC ans FX3UC) provides a regulated 24V DC power
supply source for the input signals and the sensors. The capacity of this power supply
depends on the controller model (e.g. FX1S, FX1N and FX3G: 400mA; FX2N-16M쏔-쏔쏔
through FX2N-32M쏔-쏔쏔: 250 mA, FX2N-48M쏔-쏔쏔 through FX2N-64M쏔-쏔쏔: 460 mA)
Digital inputs
The digital inputs are used for inputting control signals from the connected switches, buttons or sensors. These inputs can read the values ON (power signal on) and OFF (no
power signal).
Digital outputs
You can connect a variety of different actuators and other devices to these outputs,
depending on the nature of your application and the output type.
LEDs for indicating
the input status
These LEDs show which inputs are currently connected to a power signal, i.e. a defined
voltage. When a signal is applied to an input the corresponding LED lights up, indicating
that the state of the input is ON.
LEDs for indicating
the output status
These LEDs show the current ON/OFF states of the digital outputs. These outputs can
switch a variety of different voltages and currents depending on the model and output
type.
LEDs for indicating
the operating status
The LEDs RUN, POWER and ERROR show the current status of the controller. POWER
shows that the power is switched on, RUN lights up when the PLC program is being executed and ERROR lights up when an error or malfunction is registered.
Memory battery
The battery protects the contents of the MELSEC PLC’s volatile RAM memory in the
event of a power failure (FX2N, FX2NC and FX3U only). It protects the latched ranges for
timers, counters and relays. In addition to this it also provides power for the integrated
real-time clock when the PLC’s power supply is switched off.
RUN/STOP switch
MELSEC PLCs have two operating modes, RUN and STOP.
The RUN/STOP switch allows you to switch between these two modes manually. In RUN
mode the PLC executes the program stored in its memory. In STOP mode program execution is stopped and it is possible to program the controller.
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
A - 17
PLC Components Glossary
A - 18
Appendix
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Index
Index
A
AS interface· · ·
Adapter boards ·
Analog modules
Arrays
Overview · ·
programming
Auto connect · ·
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 30
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 19
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 20
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 15
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 11 - 1
· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 20
B
Base unit
FX1N · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 10
FX1S · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 9
FX2N · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 10
FX2NC · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 11
FX3G · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 11
FX3U · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 12
FX3UC · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 12
Overview · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 6
Power supply · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 13
S/S terminal · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 14
C
CANopen
Network module · · · ·
CC-Link
Network modules · · ·
Comment
copying · · · · · · · ·
deleting · · · · · · · ·
for program networks ·
Communication adapters ·
Connection Setup · · · ·
Connection Test · · · · ·
Counter
Device addresses · · ·
programming · · · · ·
Counter modules · · · · ·
Cross Reference · · · · ·
· · · · · · · · · · 2 - 29
· · · · · · · · · · 2 - 28
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
· 4 - 34
· 4 - 34
· 4 - 33
· 2 - 32
· 4 - 37
· 4 - 39
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
· 3 - 20
· 4 - 25
· 2 - 23
· 4 - 47
D
DUT · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 17
Data Unit Types
Description · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 17
Example · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 10 - 1
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
Data types · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 15
Debug Menu
Device Edit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 8 - 1
Device Edit (function in Debug menu) · · · · · 8 - 1
DeviceNet
Network modules · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 29
Display Mode · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 8 - 3
Documentation
Network Comments · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 33
Network Header · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 33
Print options · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 51
Download of programs · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 41
E
E-Designer · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 18 - 14
EEPROM · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 17
EN-Input · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6 - 22
ENO-Output · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6 - 22
ETHERNET
Configuration · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 18 - 1
FX Configurator-EN · · · · · · · · · · · · 18 - 3
Network modules · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 25
Entry Data Monitor
customising · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7 - 2
selection · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7 - 1
Error codes · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 10
Extension
blocks · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 18
boards · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 17
units · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 17
F
FX Configurator-EN · · · · · · · · · · · · · 18 - 3
FX family
Current consumption · · · · · · · · · · · A - 14
Overview · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 6
Power supply · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 13
occupied I/O points · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 14
FX0N-32NT-DP· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 26
FX1N-8AV-BD · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 33
FX1N-CNV-BD · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 32
FX2N-10PG· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 24
FX2N-16CCL-M · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 28
FX2N-1HC · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 23
FX2N-1PG-E · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 24
I
Index
FX2N-232IF· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 31
FX2N-32ASI-M · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 30
FX2N-32CAN · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 29
FX2N-32CCL · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 28
FX2N-32DP-IF · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 27
FX2N-64DNET · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 29
FX2N-8AV-BD · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 33
FX2N-CNV-BD · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 32
FX2N-CNV-IF· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 32
FX2NC-1HC · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 23
FX2NC-CNV-IF · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 32
FX2NC-ENET-ADP · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 25
FX3G-8AV-BD · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 33
FX3G-CNV-ADP · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 32
FX3U-20SSC-H · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 24
FX3U-2HC · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 23
FX3U-2HSY-ADP· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 23
FX3U-32DP· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 26
FX3U-4HSX-ADP· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 23
FX3U-64CCL · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 28
FX3U-64DP-M · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 27
FX3U-CNV-BD · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 32
FX3U-ENET · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 25
Configuration · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 18 - 3
Floating point values
see REAL Numbers
Function
Result type · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6 - 11
comparison with Function Blocks · · · · · 6 - 1
creation · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6 - 2
duplicating· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6 - 10
Function Block
Instances · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 25
assigning instance names · · · · · · · · 6 - 16
assigning of DUT variables · · · · · · · · 10 - 8
assigning variables · · · · · · · · · · · · 6 - 18
comparison with Funktion · · · · · · · · · 6 - 1
creation · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6 - 14
entering into Ladder program · · · · · · · 4 - 18
execution options · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6 - 21
monitoring instances · · · · · · · · · · · 7 - 11
Function Block Diagram · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 13
II
G
GT-Designer2 · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 18 - 11
GVL
see Global Variable List
GX Configurator DP · · · · · · · · · · · · · 17 - 1
Global Variables
Definition · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 6
List · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 6
assigning · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 9
Global Variables List
adding entries · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 26
assigning of variables · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 9
checking · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 12
Glossary · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 17
Grounding · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 13
Guided Ladder Entry Mode· · · · · · · · · · 4 - 36
H
HMI
Ethernet communication · · · · · · · · · 18 - 1
Overview · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 2
I
IEC61131-3 · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 1
Inputs
Assignment · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 41
wiring · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 14
Instance (for function blocks) · · · · · · · · · 6 - 16
Instruction List · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 11
Interconnect Mode · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 20
Interface
adapters · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 31
modules · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 31
L
LVL
see Local Variable List
Labels· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 10
Ladder Diagram
Guided Ladder Entry Mode · · · · · · · · 4 - 36
Overview · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 12
Precautions · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 21
entering a Function Block · · · · · · · · · 4 - 18
programming · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 14
Local Variables
Definition · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 6
List · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 6
define new · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 19
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
Index
M
MELSEC · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 6
Macrocode execution· · · · · · · · · · · · · 6 - 21
Memory battery· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 17
Monitor headers (function in Monitor Mode) · · 7 - 6
N
Network Comments
Network Header · ·
Network modules
AS interface · · ·
CANopen · · · ·
CC-Link · · · · ·
DeviceNet · · · ·
ETHERNET · · ·
PROFIBUS · · ·
· · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 33
· · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 33
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
· 2 - 30
· 2 - 29
· 2 - 28
· 2 - 29
· 2 - 25
· 2 - 26
O
Online Menu
Entry Data Monitor · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7 - 1
Monitor Header · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7 - 6
Start Monitoring· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7 - 7
Online Program Change (function in Project Menu) 9 3
Online menu
Transfer Setup · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 37
Optical couplers · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 9
Outputs
Assignment · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 41
wiring · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 15
P
PLC
Diagnostics · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 50
History · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 1
comparison with relay systems· · · · · · · 2 - 1
PLCopen · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 1
POU
Definition · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 2
Header · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 13
assigning to Task · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 30
creation of new · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 8
programming · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 14
POU Pool
Definition · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 4
PROFIBUS/DP
Network module · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 26
configuration · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 17 - 1
Training Manual GX IEC Developer
Positioning modules · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 24
Process image processing· · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 4
Program
check · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 23
cross reference · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 47
download to PLC · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 37
monitoring · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 44
Programmable Logic Controller
see PLC
Project
I/O Assignment · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 41
Project Menu
Change Passwords · · · · · · · · · · · · 13 - 1
Change Security Level · · · · · · · · · · 13 - 2
Online Programm Change · · · · · · · · · 9 - 3
Properties (of a Task) · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 31
R
RUN/STOP switch · · · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 17
Real variables
modifying in monitor mode · · · · · · · · 7 - 10
Relay
comparison with PLC systems · · · · · · · 2 - 1
Result type
for function · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6 - 11
S
SCADA· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 2
SFC
Initial step · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 14 - 2
Overview · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 14
Termination step · · · · · · · · · · · · · 14 - 2
Transitions · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 14 - 2
Sequential Function Chart
Overview · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 14
Service power supply · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 17
Sink
inputs · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 14
outputs · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 16
Source
inputs · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 14
outputs · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 16
Special Register
Diagnostic information · · · · · · · · · · · A - 7
Error codes · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 8
PLC operation mode · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 7
Real time clock · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 7
descriped · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 6
III
Index
Special Relays
Diagnostic information · · · · · · · · · · · A - 2
Error detection · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 4
PLC operation mode · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 3
Real time clock · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 2
descriped · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 1
Special adapter
connection· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 36
descriped · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 19
Special function modules
address · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 42
descriped · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 19
Start Monitoring (function in Online menu) · · · 7 - 7
Structured Text · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 12
System Image · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 40
V
Variables
Global (Definition) · · · · ·
see also Global Variables
Local (Definition) · · · · · ·
see also Local Variables
assigning to a instruction · ·
selection from POU Header·
· · · · · · · ·3-6
· · · · · · · ·3-6
· · · · · · · 4 - 19
· · · · · · · 4 - 16
T
Task
Attributes · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 31
Definition · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 3
Pool · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 7
Properties · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 31
assigning a POU · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 30
create new · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 29
Task Pool
Definition · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 7
Temperature
acquisition modules · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 21
control modules · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 - 22
Timer
Device addresses · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3 - 20
programming · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 4 - 27
Trouble shooting
Error codes · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 10
Special registers · · · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 8
Special relays · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · A - 4
IV
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
HEADQUARTERS
EUROPEAN REPRESENTATIVES
EUROPEAN REPRESENTATIVES
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC EUROPE B.V.
EUROPE
German Branch
Gothaer Straße 8
D-40880 Ratingen
Phone: +49 (0)2102 / 486-0
Fax: +49 (0)2102 / 486-1120
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC EUROPE B.V. CZECH REPUBLIC
Czech Branch
Avenir Business Park, Radlická 714/113a
CZ-158 00 Praha 5
Phone: +420 - 251 551 470
Fax: +420 - 251-551-471
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC EUROPE B.V.
FRANCE
French Branch
25, Boulevard des Bouvets
F-92741 Nanterre Cedex
Phone: +33 (0)1 / 55 68 55 68
Fax: +33 (0)1 / 55 68 57 57
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC EUROPE B.V.
IRELAND
Irish Branch
Westgate Business Park, Ballymount
IRL-Dublin 24
Phone: +353 (0)1 4198800
Fax: +353 (0)1 4198890
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC EUROPE B.V.
ITALY
Italian Branch
Viale Colleoni 7
I-20041 Agrate Brianza (MB)
Phone: +39 039 / 60 53 1
Fax: +39 039 / 60 53 312
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC EUROPE B.V.
POLAND
Poland Branch
Krakowska 50
PL-32-083 Balice
Phone: +48 (0)12 / 630 47 00
Fax: +48 (0)12 / 630 47 01
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC EUROPE B.V.
SPAIN
Spanish Branch
Carretera de Rubí 76-80
E-08190 Sant Cugat del Vallés (Barcelona)
Phone: 902 131121 // +34 935653131
Fax: +34 935891579
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC EUROPE B.V.
UK
UK Branch
Travellers Lane
UK-Hatfield, Herts. AL10 8XB
Phone: +44 (0)1707 / 27 61 00
Fax: +44 (0)1707 / 27 86 95
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC CORPORATION
JAPAN
Office Tower “Z” 14 F
8-12,1 chome, Harumi Chuo-Ku
Tokyo 104-6212
Phone: +81 3 622 160 60
Fax: +81 3 622 160 75
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC AUTOMATION, Inc.
USA
500 Corporate Woods Parkway
Vernon Hills, IL 60061
Phone: +1 847 478 21 00
Fax: +1 847 478 22 53
GEVA
AUSTRIA
Wiener Straße 89
AT-2500 Baden
Phone: +43 (0)2252 / 85 55 20
Fax: +43 (0)2252 / 488 60
TEHNIKON
BELARUS
Oktyabrskaya 16/5, Off. 703-711
BY-220030 Minsk
Phone: +375 (0)17 / 210 46 26
Fax: +375 (0)17 / 210 46 26
ESCO DRIVES & AUTOMATION
BELGIUM
Culliganlaan 3
BE-1831 Diegem
Phone: +32 (0)2 / 717 64 30
Fax: +32 (0)2 / 717 64 31
Koning & Hartman b.v.
BELGIUM
Woluwelaan 31
BE-1800 Vilvoorde
Phone: +32 (0)2 / 257 02 40
Fax: +32 (0)2 / 257 02 49
INEA BH d.o.o.
BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA
Aleja Lipa 56
BA-71000 Sarajevo
Phone: +387 (0)33 / 921 164
Fax: +387 (0)33/ 524 539
AKHNATON
BULGARIA
4 Andrej Ljapchev Blvd. Pb 21
BG-1756 Sofia
Phone: +359 (0)2 / 817 6004
Fax: +359 (0)2 / 97 44 06 1
INEA CR d.o.o.
CROATIA
Losinjska 4 a
HR-10000 Zagreb
Phone: +385 (0)1 / 36 940 - 01/ -02/ -03
Fax: +385 (0)1 / 36 940 - 03
AutoCont C.S. s.r.o.
CZECH REPUBLIC
Technologická 374/6
CZ-708 00 Ostrava-Pustkovec
Phone: +420 595 691 150
Fax: +420 595 691 199
B:ELECTRIC, s.r.o.
CZECH REPUBLIC
Mladoboleslavská 812
CZ-197 00 Praha 19 - Kbely
Phone: +420 286 850 848, +420 724 317 975
Fax: +420 286 850 850
Beijer Electronics A/S
DENMARK
Lykkegårdsvej 17, 1.
DK-4000 Roskilde
Phone: +45 (0)46/ 75 76 66
Fax: +45 (0)46 / 75 56 26
Beijer Electronics Eesti OÜ
ESTONIA
Pärnu mnt.160i
EE-11317 Tallinn
Phone: +372 (0)6 / 51 81 40
Fax: +372 (0)6 / 51 81 49
Beijer Electronics OY
FINLAND
Jaakonkatu 2
FIN-01620 Vantaa
Phone: +358 (0)207 / 463 500
Fax: +358 (0)207 / 463 501
UTECO A.B.E.E.
GREECE
5, Mavrogenous Str.
GR-18542 Piraeus
Phone: +30 211 / 1206 900
Fax: +30 211 / 1206 999
MELTRADE Ltd.
HUNGARY
Fertő utca 14.
HU-1107 Budapest
Phone: +36 (0)1 / 431-9726
Fax: +36 (0)1 / 431-9727
Beijer Electronics SIA
LATVIA
Vestienas iela 2
LV-1035 Riga
Phone: +371 (0)784 / 2280
Fax: +371 (0)784 / 2281
Beijer Electronics UAB
LITHUANIA
Savanoriu Pr. 187
LT-02300 Vilnius
Phone: +370 (0)5 / 232 3101
Fax: +370 (0)5 / 232 2980
ALFATRADE Ltd.
MALTA
99, Paola Hill
Malta- Paola PLA 1702
Phone: +356 (0)21 / 697 816
Fax: +356 (0)21 / 697 817
INTEHSIS srl
MOLDOVA
bld. Traian 23/1
MD-2060 Kishinev
Phone: +373 (0)22 / 66 4242
Fax: +373 (0)22 / 66 4280
HIFLEX AUTOM.TECHNIEK B.V.
NETHERLANDS
Wolweverstraat 22
NL-2984 CD Ridderkerk
Phone: +31 (0)180 – 46 60 04
Fax: +31 (0)180 – 44 23 55
Koning & Hartman b.v.
NETHERLANDS
Haarlerbergweg 21-23
NL-1101 CH Amsterdam
Phone: +31 (0)20 / 587 76 00
Fax: +31 (0)20 / 587 76 05
Beijer Electronics AS
NORWAY
Postboks 487
NO-3002 Drammen
Phone: +47 (0)32 / 24 30 00
Fax: +47 (0)32 / 84 85 77
Sirius Trading & Services srl
ROMANIA
Aleea Lacul Morii Nr. 3
RO-060841 Bucuresti, Sector 6
Phone: +40 (0)21 / 430 40 06
Fax: +40 (0)21 / 430 40 02
Craft Con. & Engineering d.o.o.
SERBIA
Bulevar Svetog Cara Konstantina 80-86
SER-18106 Nis
Phone:+381 (0)18 / 292-24-4/5
Fax: +381 (0)18 / 292-24-4/5
INEA SR d.o.o.
SERBIA
Izletnicka 10
SER-113000 Smederevo
Phone: +381 (0)26 / 617 163
Fax: +381 (0)26 / 617 163
AutoCont Control s.r.o.
SLOVAKIA
Radlinského 47
SK-02601 Dolny Kubin
Phone: +421 (0)43 / 5868210
Fax: +421 (0)43 / 5868210
CS MTrade Slovensko, s.r.o.
SLOVAKIA
Vajanskeho 58
SK-92101 Piestany
Phone: +421 (0)33 / 7742 760
Fax: +421 (0)33 / 7735 144
INEA d.o.o.
SLOVENIA
Stegne 11
SI-1000 Ljubljana
Phone: +386 (0)1 / 513 8100
Fax: +386 (0)1 / 513 8170
Beijer Electronics AB
SWEDEN
Box 426
SE-20124 Malmö
Phone: +46 (0)40 / 35 86 00
Fax: +46 (0)40 / 35 86 02
Omni Ray AG
SWITZERLAND
Im Schörli 5
CH-8600 Dübendorf
Phone: +41 (0)44 / 802 28 80
Fax: +41 (0)44 / 802 28 28
GTS
TURKEY
Bayraktar Bulvari Nutuk Sok. No:5
TR-34775 Yukari Dudullu-Umraniye-ISTANBUL
Phone: +90 (0)216 526 39 90
Fax: +90 (0)216 526 3995
CSC Automation Ltd.
UKRAINE
4-B, M. Raskovoyi St.
UA-02660 Kiev
Phone: +380 (0)44 / 494 33 55
Fax: +380 (0)44 / 494-33-66
MITSUBISHI
ELECTRIC
FACTORY AUTOMATION
EURASIAN REPRESENTATIVES
Kazpromautomatics Ltd.
Mustafina Str. 7/2
KAZ-470046 Karaganda
Phone: +7 7212 / 50 11 50
Fax: +7 7212 / 50 11 50
KAZAKHSTAN
MIDDLE EAST REPRESENTATIVES
TEXEL ELECTRONICS Ltd.
ISRAEL
2 Ha´umanut, P.O.B. 6272
IL-42160 Netanya
Phone: +972 (0)9 / 863 39 80
Fax: +972 (0)9 / 885 24 30
CEG INTERNATIONAL
LEBANON
Cebaco Center/Block A Autostrade DORA
Lebanon - Beirut
Phone: +961 (0)1 / 240 430
Fax: +961 (0)1 / 240 438
AFRICAN REPRESENTATIVE
CBI Ltd.
Private Bag 2016
ZA-1600 Isando
Phone: + 27 (0)11 / 977 0770
Fax: + 27 (0)11 / 977 0761
SOUTH AFRICA
Mitsubishi Electric Europe B.V. /// FA - European Business Group /// Gothaer Straße 8 /// D-40880 Ratingen /// Germany
Tel.: +49(0)2102-4860 /// Fax: +49(0)2102-4861120 /// [email protected] /// www.mitsubishi-automation.com
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