Wireless & Spy | 16 Channel | Specifications | Wireless & Spy 16 Channel Specifications

Crestron Best Practices for Installation
and Setup of Crestron RF Products
Reference Guide
The specific patents that cover Crestron products are listed at patents.crestron.com.
Crestron, the Crestron logo, Cresnet, Crestron Toolbox, infiNET, and infiNET EX, are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Crestron
Electronics, Inc. in the United States and/or other countries. Bluetooth is either a trademark or registered trademark of Bluetooth SIG, Inc. in the
United States and/or other countries. iOS is either a trademark or registered trademark of Cisco Systems, Inc. in the United States and/or other
countries. Android is either a trademark or registered trademark of Google, Inc. in the United States and/or other countries. Other trademarks,
registered trademarks and trade names may be used in this document to refer to either the entities claiming the marks and names or their products.
Crestron disclaims any proprietary interest in the marks and names of others. Crestron is not responsible for errors in typography or photography.
This document was written by the Technical Publications department at Crestron.
©2014 Crestron Electronics, Inc.
Crestron Best Practices
RF Products
Contents
Best Practices for Installation and Setup of Crestron RF Products
1
Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 1
Wireless Characteristics .............................................................................................. 1
RF Channels ................................................................................................................ 3
RF Range ..................................................................................................................... 4
Crestron Toolbox InfiNetEx Diagnostic Tool ............................................................. 6
Installing RF Devices ................................................................................................................ 7
Creating a Network List .............................................................................................. 7
Conducting a Site Survey ............................................................................................ 7
Building a Channel Map ............................................................................................ 12
Installing and Configuring RF Gateways .................................................................. 15
Verifying Connectivity .............................................................................................. 16
Improving Wi-Fi Network Performance .................................................................................. 17
Increasing Reliability................................................................................................. 17
Improving Reconnection Time .................................................................................. 17
Troubleshooting RF Devices ................................................................................................... 18
Further Inquiries ...................................................................................................................... 19
Appendix: Channel Map Worksheet ........................................................................................ 20
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Contents • i
Crestron Best Practices
RF Products
Best Practices for
Installation and Setup
of Crestron RF Products
Introduction
This document outlines the Crestron® recommended practices for installing and
troubleshooting Crestron Radio Frequency (RF) devices. Explanations of Crestron
RF protocols and correct installation procedures are provided.
Unlike Cresnet® or Ethernet networks that use a physical medium of transmission,
ensuring connectivity and eliminating interference in a wireless network is much
more difficult. Wireless networks require a significant amount of planning compared
to hard-wired networks. Many additional factors affecting the strength and reliability
of RF signals must be taken into consideration, including walls, furniture, other
electronic equipment, and even people.
Many common household electronic devices emit electromagnetic energy, which can
severely degrade wireless network performance. It is therefore necessary to use
special test equipment to detect the level and locations of interference present in each
unique installation. The most common cause of interference problems is a direct
result of installing equipment that operates on the same frequency as a cordless
phone, baby monitor, or microwave oven. This document helps the user avoid those
problems.
Wireless Characteristics
Wireless signals are transmitted and received using waves in the RF spectrum, which
is a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The long radio wavelengths allow
signals to pass through solid objects such as walls. The limited range of wireless
signals in the RF spectrum allows networks in different buildings on the same street
to coexist. The following illustration shows the RF spectrum within the
electromagnetic spectrum.
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Electromagnetic Spectrum
As shown in the illustration above, the frequencies within the RF spectrum are
divided into smaller portions called bands. A band is a range of frequencies that is
broad enough to allow for one or more communication paths without affecting
adjacent bands. Only particular transmission bands are permitted without a special
license from the FCC.
Three bands are used by Crestron wireless products:
•
418-433 MHz
•
2.4 GHz
•
5.8 GHz
Crestron wireless products do not use the 900 MHz band.
Crestron wireless network types, associated bands, and related information are listed
in the following table.
Crestron RF Network Table
WIRELESS NETWORK
BAND
TYPE
DEFAULT
CHANNEL
Wi-Fi (IEEE 802.11a/b/g/n)
2.4 GHz (802.11b/g/n)
5.8 GHz (802.11a/n)
Point to
point
IEEE 802.11
Channel 1
infiNET™
2.4 GHz
Mesh
IEEE 802.15.4
Channel 26
infiNET EX
2.4 GHz
Mesh
IEEE 802.15.4
Channel 15
Extended Range
2.4 GHz
Point to
point
IEEE 802.15.4
Channel 20
—
2.4 GHz
Point to
point
—
—
433 MHz
Point to
point
—
—
418 MHz
Point to
point
—
®
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Devices using the same RF band can interfere with one another’s communication.
As shown in the table on page 2, most of the current Crestron product offerings
transmit using the 2.4 GHz wireless communication band. Even though products on
different wireless networks cannot communicate with each other, they can create
interference that degrades performance or eliminates connectivity.
Most wireless networks use the 2.4 GHz band, and consequently most connectivity
issues are concentrated in that band. The 2.4 GHz band is therefore the focus of this
document.
RF Channels
Each RF network type divides the communication band into separate communication
channels. Crestron 2.4 GHz products use two different methods to divide the band:
1.
infiNET™, infiNET EX®, and Extended Range use 802.15.4 channel
mapping, which provides 16 channels numbered 11–26. Each channel is
non-overlapping, which ensures that a device communicating on one
channel cannot affect devices communicating on any other channels.
NOTE: When 802.15.4 channels are referred to in this document, the
reference relates to infiNET, infiNET EX, and Extended Range
technologies.
2.
802.11b and 802.11g and 802.11n use the same Wi-Fi channel map. Eleven
channels, numbered 1–11, can be used in the U.S., and more channels can
be used in other countries. Each channel overlaps three channels on each
side; for example, a device communicating on channel 6 causes interference
to any devices communicating on channels 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, and 9. As a result,
in this example, there are only three available non-overlapping Wi-Fi
channels: 1, 6, and 11.
NOTE: 802.11a uses the 5.8 GHz band and has a different RF channel
mapping than that of 802.11b, 802.11g, and 802.11n. While 802.11a does
not have a line-of-sight transmission distance as good as that of 802.11g or
802.11n, 802.11a often has much less interference. In a poor RF
environment, 802.11a can provide a more robust solution than 802.11g or
802.11n.
The following illustration shows the division of the 2.4 GHz band as it relates to
802.15.4 and 802.11 channels.
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2.4 GHz Wireless Network
The recommended group of three discrete 802.11 channels (1, 6, and 11) is shown in
orange. An 802.11 device on channel 1 may interfere with an 802.15.4 device
operating on channel 13 because the two channels overlap. The devices should still
operate but may see potential latency due to the overlapping channels. The use of
channels 1, 6, or 11 is strongly recommended.
As stated previously, not all 802.11 channels are available in all countries. The U.S.
supports 802.11 channels 1–11, while most European nations support the full range
of channels: 1–13. As a result, the non-overlapping channels of 1, 7, and 13 are the
recommended channels for use in Europe, Japan, and most countries excluding the
U.S., as shown in yellow in the preceding illustration. All 802.11 channels provide
the same operational range; however, Extended Range and infiNET EX channels on
the high and low end of the band have a reduced range.
RF Range
To maximize the range of each network, the gateway should be placed in a
centralized location within the home or building. In addition, obstructions reflect and
absorb RF signals. Therefore, maximizing the line of sight from devices to gateway
is recommended for optimal reception.
NOTE: Ranges are not guaranteed as every installation scenario is different.
Refer to the illustration on the following page for a comparison of the approximate
relative ranges of the several RF networks available. The representation is not to
scale and should only be used as a guide for relative ranges between networks within
a home. All specific range values are identified by the gateway or the product itself.
4 • Best Practices – RF Products
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Approximate Range of Each Network Type
Refer to the illustration below for an example of mesh networking, which can be
used to extend the range of infiNET EX devices. Note that leaf nodes are typically
battery powered devices and cannot act as routing nodes between devices. If a node
fails, the device automatically re-routes its path to the gateway through the closest
routing node, not a leaf node. Also note that the image shows the maximum of three
hops to the gateway.
Example of Mesh Networking
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Crestron Toolbox InfiNetEx Diagnostic Tool
A helpful resource when installing infiNET EX devices is the Crestron Toolbox™
InfiNetEx Diagnostic Tool. This tool allows users to view, configure, and
troubleshoot all devices on an infiNET EX network. In addition, users can acquire
devices, set the network ID, view the amount of hops the device takes and its link
quality, and even change the RF channel.
Additional help for using this tool can be found in Help | Crestron Toolbox Help |
Tools | InfiNetEx Diagnostic Tool.
NOTE: Five hops from device to gateway in the infiNET EX network protocol is
the maximum allowable limit. For the best results, Crestron recommends three hops
from device to gateway in any installation.
Crestron Toolbox “InfiNetEx Diagnostic Tool” Screen
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Installing RF Devices
When installing RF devices, it is recommended that the following steps be performed
in the order listed below:
1.
Create a network list.
2.
Conduct a site survey.
3.
Build a channel map.
4.
Install and configure RF gateways.
5.
Verify connectivity.
Creating a Network List
It is important to know which wireless networks are to be installed. To do so,
separate all the wireless devices to be installed into individual networks based on the
following guidelines:
1.
Do not install more than 30 infiNET devices on a single MNET gateway
(infiNET network) or more than 100 infiNET EX devices on a single RF
gateway (infiNET EX network).
NOTE: Although 100 infiNET EX devices are allowed on a single
network, Crestron recommends installing a maximum of 50 infiNET EX
devices on a single network to ensure optimal range and operation.
2.
To reduce the distances between gateways and devices, group the devices
based on their location rather than on their function. For example, instead of
creating separate lighting and HVAC infiNET or infiNET EX networks,
mix and match devices based on their location.
3.
Place 802.11b devices and 802.11g/n devices on different networks.
4.
When installing mesh networks such as infiNET and infiNET EX,
remember that battery-operated devices do not act as extenders and
therefore do not extend the network coverage.
5.
To account for unexpected interference, do not exceed 75 % of the typical
indoor network range between devices or between a device and a gateway.
One gateway is required for each individual network in the installation. The channel
of each network is dictated by the gateway; therefore, all client devices communicate
on the same channel as the gateway.
Keep in mind that some networks have the option of using either 2.4 or 5.8 GHz
bands (802.11n). Those networks should be treated separately from networks that
must use a 2.4 GHz band (802.11b/g).
Once the list of networks is obtained, a site survey can be conducted.
Conducting a Site Survey
A wireless site survey consists of detecting the level and distribution of outside
interference. A site survey often provides early detection of any issues that might be
encountered in the installation and, to a large extent, dictates which wireless
channels can be used in the installation. The goal of a site survey is to discover the
worst-case interference scenario.
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Site Survey Tools
The following tools (provided by others) are recommended for performing a site
survey:
Wi-Spy, Chanalyzer, and
InSSIDer
•
Wi-Spy, Chanalyzer, and InSSIDer (http://www.metageek.net)
•
Wi-Fi Analyzer (Android™ OS phone app)
•
WiPry (iOS® phone app)
Wi-Spy is an RF spectrum analyzer built into a small USB dongle that plugs into a
PC. It detects the amount of interference across the 2.4 and 5.8 GHz band. Four
versions are available: Wi-Spy2.4x and Wi-Spy 2.4x Pro are for the 2.4 GHz band.
The 2.4x Pro version provides better signal resolution for improved detection, finds
unknown devices, and creates reports based upon its findings. Wi-Spy DBX and
DBX Pro monitor the 2.4 and 5.8 GHz band; the pro version provides the same
enhanced features as the 2.4x Pro device.
Wi-Spy*
Wi-Spy 2.4x*
Wi-Spy devices use the Chanalyzer or InSSIDer software to report RF signals. The
software can detect other wireless networks as well as 2.4 GHz cordless phones,
baby monitors, and microwaves.
NOTE: Due to the large amount of interference that can come from 2.4 GHz
cordless phones, baby monitors, and microwaves, it is recommended that a Wi-Spy
device be used to perform wireless site surveys.
Wi-Fi Analyzer
Wi-Fi Analyzer is an Android OS app capable of analyzing local Wi-Fi networks for
a complete channel diagnosis. Refer to the image on the following page for an
example.
*
8 • Best Practices – RF Products
Image source: www.metageek.net
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“Wi-Fi Analyzer” Screen1
WiPry
WiPry is an iOS phone app capable of analyzing the 2.4 GHz spectrum and acting as
a power meter for the 100 MHz – 2.7 GHz spectrum. A required plug-on meter
(which is available from www.oscium.com) is needed to fully access the analyze
tool.
WiPry iOS App2
Site Survey Tasks
NOTE: Wi-Spy 2.4x is used as the site survey tool for the examples in this section.
A site survey on the 2.4 GHz band is demonstrated because it contains the majority
of products communicating over RF. If a tool supports 5.8 GHz, it can perform the
same site survey tasks as performed on the 2.4 GHz band.
Perform a site survey:
1.
Shut down all Crestron RF devices to prevent them from being detected and
interpreted as outside interference.
2.
Place the detecting equipment in a location where the wireless equipment is
to be used.
3. Take a reading that is at least 5 minutes long to capture enough data. During
the reading, turn on all electrical equipment in the vicinity, including TVs,
computers, Bluetooth® devices, and any microwave ovens (make sure to put
something in the microwave oven first). Also, if there are cordless phones
present, call the lines and pick up the phones to activate them. Most
cordless interference is seen on the 1.9 GHz band and is created when the
1. Image source: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.farproc.Wi-Fi.analyzer&hl=en
2. Image source: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/wipry/id442143525?mt=8
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phones ring and the lines are active; there may also be interference on the
2.4 GHz.
NOTE: As long as Bluetooth does not consist of the majority of RF
devices in the system, any Bluetooth device kept beyond a meter from any
access point does not pose much interference in the 802.15.4 network.
4.
If the wireless equipment is to be used in a room greater than 1,000 square
feet, repeat steps 2 and 3 in various locations within the room.
5.
If the wireless equipment is to be used in multiple rooms, repeat steps
1 through 4 in each room.
When the reading is complete, Chanalyzer shows the results in a clean and
easy-to-read view of the signal over the entire 2.4 GHz band as shown in the
following example.
Sample Chanalyzer Capture of Total RF Interference
In the graph above, the range of wireless signals is roughly -110 dBm up to -20 dBm
(-20 dBm indicates a very strong signal).
NOTE A good rule to follow is that if almost the entire signal is below -80 dBm, the
channel is good.
Wi-Fi channels 1, 6, and 11 are highlighted in the sample site survey above. The
sample shows that Wi-Fi networks are operating on channel 1 and channel 11, and
that the channel 11 network is farther away. By visual inspection of the graph, note
that channel 6 is the most free, followed by channel 11. Wi-Fi channel 1 has some
minor signals above -80 dBm, which may be fine, but may cause reliability issues for
any Wi-Fi devices using that channel or any 802.15.4 devices using channels 11–14.
The following sections provide examples of various types of interference.
Cordless Phone Interference
The following is an example of 2.4 GHz cordless phone interference. There are very
high peaks of interference at levels of -40 dBm and above. This level of interference
affects all three non-overlapping Wi-Fi channels significantly and causes
interference issues with any equipment installed in the 2.4 GHz range. In this
scenario, the offending device should be removed or should be replaced with a
comparable device that operates in a different band (900 MHz or 5.8 GHz) to
provide a reliable installation. Wireless performance in the 2.4 GHz range cannot be
guaranteed with outside devices that create such a large amount of interference.
10 • Best Practices – RF Products
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Chanalyzer Capture of a Poor RF Environment Created by Cordless Phones
Microwave Oven Interference
The following is an example of interference emitted from a microwave oven.
A microwave oven does not have the high peaks of interference that the 2.4 GHz
cordless phone has; however, the radiation of a microwave oven affects most
channels. Although the radiation usually does not cause major issues, it can
periodically reduce performance and cause instability.
Chanalyzer Capture of a Microwave Oven’s RF Interference
802.11g Network Interference
The following is an example of a very strong Wi-Fi 802.11g network operating on
channel 6 (the channel 6 boundaries are highlighted). A network this strong causes a
great amount of interference with any Crestron devices operating in the channel or in
the overlapping 802.15.4 channels (16–19). As a result, 802.11 channel 6 and
802.15.4 channels 16–19 must be avoided when selecting operating channels for
Crestron gateways. The level of interference drops off sharply outside the
highlighted area; therefore, devices can be installed in the same environment as long
as they use other channels for communication.
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Chanalyzer Capture of an 802.11g Wi-Fi Network
Building a Channel Map
After completion of a site survey, the next step is to build a channel map by selecting
the channels for the networks. Use the following channel map worksheet to select the
most appropriate channels for the networks.
NOTE: For convenience, the channel map worksheet is repeated in the appendix on
page 20. A checklist of the steps required to complete the worksheet is also provided.
Channel Map Worksheet
CHANNEL NUMBERS
NETWORK
802.15.4
CHANNELS
11
Wi-Fi 802.11
CHANNELS
1
12
2
13
3
14
4
15
16
5
6
17
7
18
8
19
9
20
21
10
11
22
23
24
25
26
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Entering a network into the NETWORK column of the channel map worksheet
reserves the associated channel for that device and ensures that two devices are not
accidentally communicating on the same channel. Note the large size of Wi-Fi
802.11 networks compared to 802.15.4 networks. The Wi-Fi network occupies four
rows in the network list.
To build a channel map, refer to “Channel Map Guidelines” below.
Channel Map Guidelines
Enter wireless networks into the channel map as follows:
1.
Eliminate the channels that were found to have too much interference
during the site survey.
2.
Enter the 802.11b/g-only networks.
3.
Enter the 802.11a/b/g/n networks.
4.
Enter the Extended Range networks.
5.
Enter the infiNET networks. Note that in most systems the infiNET network
should be set in Fixed mode to remain on the selected channel. For smaller
systems with only one or two infiNET gateways and minimal interference
detected in the system sweep, it is recommended that the gateway be set to
select the operating channel automatically.
6.
Enter the infiNET EX networks. Note that infiNET EX networks are always
in Fixed mode and default to channel 15 first.
NOTE: If there is not enough free space to enter all networks on the channel
map worksheet using the steps above, select 802.11a channels for some or all
802.11a/b/g/n networks, and then repeat steps 4–6.
The following example of a channel map is based on the sample site survey on
page 10.
Channel Map Example
CHANNEL NUMBERS
NETWORK
802.15.4 CHANNELS
Eliminated due to
interference
MLX-3
TPMC-8X-GA
TST-600
Personal
Computer
Lighting
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11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Wi-Fi 802.11 CHANNELS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
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In the channel map example, wireless networks, shown in italics on the channel map
worksheet, are entered as follows:
1.
Too much interference exists on Wi-Fi channel 1 and on 802.15.4 channels
11–14; therefore, those channels are eliminated.
2.
Wi-Fi channel 6 is the channel that is most free from interference; therefore,
a TPMC-8X-GA network uses that channel. 802.15.4 channels 16–19 are
then unavailable to any other devices.
3.
Channel 11 is the only free Wi-Fi channel remaining for a personal
computer Wi-Fi network. 802.15.4 channels 21–24 are then unavailable to
any other devices.
4.
There are no more free Wi-Fi channels remaining for devices that
communicate in the 802.11 network; therefore, 802.11a (5.8 GHz) channels
are selected for any remaining Wi-Fi devices.
5.
802.15.4 channel 20 is free; therefore, the TST-600 network is set to that
channel.
6.
802.15.4 channel 15 is free; therefore, the MLX-3 network is set to that
channel.
7.
802.15.4 channels 25 and 26 are free; therefore, the Lighting network is set
to channel 26. Channel 26 is the channel most removed from Wi-Fi
networks and therefore should be the least susceptible to interference from
Wi-Fi networks. Channel 26, however, also has the shortest range in most
Crestron products and therefore may be less reliable than other channels.
Careful examination of the site survey is necessary to determine the most
appropriate channel assignment.
As a result of careful testing and planning, each network is positioned so that it does
not interfere with the other networks or receive large amounts of outside
interference.
Large RF Network Installations
If a large number of RF networks are being installed in a single installation, it may
not be possible to give each network its own channel. In large environments,
networks can be placed on the same channels as long as devices are far enough apart
to ensure that the RF signals do not overlap for similar channels. The following
illustration shows how Wi-Fi 802.11b/g networks can be spaced by channel so that
they do not interfere with each other (as viewed from overhead).
14 • Best Practices – RF Products
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Wi-Fi Channel Allocation Map
By physically separating the networks, the amount of interference among networks
on the same channel is reduced. A standard channel map cannot be created for these
installations because multiple networks reside on each channel. Channels 1, 6, and
11 are usually chosen for Wi-Fi networks because they are the only three
non-overlapping Wi-Fi channels. 802.15.4 channels 15, 20, 25, and 26 do not
overlap with Wi-Fi channels 1, 6, and 11; therefore, channels 15, 20, 25, and 26 can
be used on 802.15.4 networks in conjunction with this scheme. For this scheme to
function well, however, there must be low interference across the entire 2.4 GHz
band.
Installing and Configuring RF Gateways
The physical location of the RF gateway in relation to the connected wireless devices
must be considered for successful installation. When installing an RF gateway,
adhere to the following guidelines for optimum performance.
Location
Place the gateway in a location as follows:
•
On the same floor as the wireless devices
NOTE: For Wi-Fi networks, there should be no more than one wall
between the gateway and wireless devices. Both the thickness and material
in the obstruction determines how much signal can pass.
•
Above the height of most furniture
•
Away from large metal objects (such as an AV rack and televisions)
NOTE: Plasma technology also produces RF interference.
•
At least 12 feet from all other gateways on adjacent channels
NOTE: 802.11 channels can be adjacent to 802.15.4 channels as shown in
the channel map worksheet on page 12.
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•
At least 3 feet apart for 802.15.4 gateways on non-adjacent channels
•
At least 6 feet apart for 802.11 gateways on non-adjacent channels
Best Practices – RF Products • 15
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Antenna
Set the antenna vertically as shown in either of the following illustrations (applicable
to most applications). The wireless network is stronger in a perpendicular direction
from the antenna.
Vertical Orientation
If the gateway is positioned parallel to a metal surface (for example, when mounted
to a metal wall), orient the antenna horizontally (perpendicular to the metal surface)
as shown in the following illustration.
NOTE: Positioning the gateway near a metal surface does not provide optimal
results and should be avoided whenever possible. In addition, the gateway should not
be placed on the ground.
Horizontal Orientation
Channel
After installing the RF gateways, set the channel on each gateway according to the
channel map. For Crestron and third-party gateways, refer to the manual supplied
with the gateway to find the channel map and specified ranges.
Verifying Connectivity
After the gateways are installed and the wireless devices are associated with the
gateways, move each mobile wireless device (for example, a touch screen) to the
extent of the intended usage area to verify connectivity to the gateway. If the
connection fails in the usage area, move the gateway to a different location.
If necessary, install a second gateway to cover part of the area.
NOTE: Crestron products do not support roaming between access points. The
devices are restricted to a single gateway.
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Improving Wi-Fi Network Performance
Extra communication parameters can be configured on Wi-Fi networks to improve
the performance of the network. If a Crestron access point is being used, those
parameters are configured for the network using the wizard.
Increasing Reliability
The following are some tips beyond the channel selection discussed in previous
sections that can help improve the reliability of touch screens on a Wi-Fi network:
•
Do not hide the SSID (service set identifier). Hiding the SSID can be
troublesome for touch screens.
•
WPA and WPA2 authentication can be problematic; therefore, using WEP
may be a useful alternative.
NOTE: Using WEP or disabling security can be risky in certain
environments. If using WEP, it is recommended that MAC address filtering
also be used. Disable security only if the site is safe from security threats.
•
Do not attempt a roaming configuration with a touch screen as they do not
perform the hand-off between access points well.
Improving Reconnection Time
Several parameters can be set to improve Wi-Fi reconnection time:
•
For a secure network without reconnect delays, use an open key static WEP
encryption in combination with MAC address filtering.
NOTE: Encryption provides a more secure network but it can also increase
the reconnection time. WEP shared authentication and WPA and WPA2
increase the reconnect time for touch screens.
Reference Guide – DOC. 6689E
•
Use a static IP address on the touch screen so that it does not have to wait to
receive a DHCP address before communicating with the control system.
•
Configure only one access point in each touch screen. By doing this, the
touch screen only scans for one network and does not attempt to look for
other networks.
•
Since the wireless radio does not shut down until the power down timeout is
reached, performance can be improved and battery life can be maintained
by setting the standby and power down timeouts for the customer. It is
recommended that the standby timeout be set to a minimum time (1–2
minutes) to turn off the screen backlight but keep the Wi-Fi radio running
and connected to the system. The power down timeout can then be set to a
longer time based on the user’s preference (15–30 minutes is
recommended).
Best Practices – RF Products • 17
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Troubleshooting RF Devices
If an installation is having wireless communication issues, some of the following
quick fixes can help in certain situations:
18 • Best Practices – RF Products
•
If the network is 802.11a capable and is transmitting using 802.11g, move
the network to 802.11a to escape potential interference. Note that this may
slightly reduce the network’s range. If supported by the wireless access
point, then place the same SSID on both 802.11a and 802.11g networks at
the same time to saturate the area.
•
If the Wi-Fi network is using encryption, remove the encryption. If security
is a concern, enable MAC address filtering and disable the SSID broadcast
to prevent connection from unauthorized users.
•
Check the vicinity of the gateway for any other electronic devices that could
be interfering with its wireless transmission. In addition, ensure that the
path between the gateway and wireless device is not obstructed by metal
objects.
•
Open the Crestron Toolbox InfiNetEx Diagnostics Tool and check the
communication strength of all wireless products. Also, ensure that no more
than five hops are occurring between devices to reach the router.
Reference Guide – DOC. 6689E
Crestron Best Practices
RF Products
Further Inquiries
To locate specific information or resolve questions after reviewing this guide,
contact Crestron's True Blue Support at 1-888-CRESTRON [1-888-273-7876] or, for
assistance within a particular geographic region, refer to the listing of Crestron
worldwide offices at www.crestron.com/offices.
To post a question about Crestron products, log onto Crestron’s Online Help at
www.crestron.com/onlinehelp. First-time users must establish a user account to fully
benefit from all available features.
Reference Guide – DOC. 6689E
Best Practices – RF Products • 19
RF Products
Crestron Best Practices
Appendix: Channel Map Worksheet
For convenience, this appendix provides a blank channel map worksheet followed by
a checklist of the steps necessary to complete the channel map. If a site survey is
being conducted, it is suggested that this page be printed and included with the items
taken to the site location.
Channel Map Worksheet
CHANNEL NUMBERS
NETWORK
802.15.4
CHANNELS
11
Wi-Fi 802.11
CHANNELS
1
12
2
13
3
14
4
15
16
5
6
17
7
18
8
19
9
20
21
10
11
22
23
24
25
26
Complete the channel map according to the following checklist.

Step 1: Eliminate the channels that were found to have too much
interference during the site survey.

Step 2: Enter the 802.11b/g-only networks.

Step 3: Enter the 802.11a/b/g/n networks.

Step 4: Enter the Extended Range networks.

Step 5: Enter the infiNET networks. Note that, in most systems, the
infiNET network should be set in Fixed mode to remain on the selected
channel. For smaller systems with only one or two infiNET gateways and
minimal interference detected in the system sweep, it is recommended
that the gateway be set to select the operating channel automatically.

Step 6: Enter the infiNET EX networks. Note that infiNET EX
networks are always in Fixed mode and default to channel 15 first.
NOTE: If there is not enough free space to enter all networks on the
channel map worksheet using the steps above, select 802.11a channels
for some or all 802.11a/b/g/n networks, and then repeat steps 4–6.
20 • Best Practices – RF Products
Reference Guide – DOC. 6689E
Crestron Best Practices
RF Products
This page is intentionally left blank.
Reference Guide – DOC. 6689E
Best Practices – RF Products • 21
Crestron Electronics, Inc.
15 Volvo Drive Rockleigh, NJ 07647
Tel: 888.CRESTRON
Fax: 201.767.7576
www.crestron.com
Reference Guide – DOC. 6689E
(2021003)
05.14
Specifications subject to
change without notice.
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