078-0389-01B
FT 5000 EVB
Examples Guide
®
078-389-01B
Echelon, LON, LonWorks, Neuron, 3120, 3150, Digital Home,
i.LON, LNS, LonMaker, LonMark, LonPoint, LonTalk,
NodeBuilder, ShortStack, and the Echelon logo are
trademarks of Echelon Corporation registered in the United
States and other countries. FTXL, LonScanner, LonSupport,
OpenLDV, and LNS Powered by Echelon are trademarks of
Echelon Corporation.
Other brand and product names are trademarks or
registered trademarks of their respective holders.
Neuron Chips and other OEM Products were not designed for
use in equipment or systems which involve danger to human
health or safety or a risk of property damage and Echelon
assumes no responsibility or liability for use of the Neuron
Chips or LonPoint Modules in such applications.
Parts manufactured by vendors other than Echelon and
referenced in this document have been described for
illustrative purposes only, and may not have been tested by
Echelon. It is the responsibility of the customer to determine
the suitability of these parts for each application.
ECHELON MAKES NO REPRESENTATION, WARRANTY, OR
CONDITION OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS, IMPLIED, STATUTORY, OR
OTHERWISE OR IN ANY COMMUNICATION WITH YOU,
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY, SATISFACTORY QUALITY, FITNESS FOR ANY
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EQUIVALENTS.
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electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or
otherwise, without the prior written permission of Echelon
Corporation.
Printed in the United States of America.
Copyright ©1997–2009 by Echelon
Corporation.
Echelon Corporation
www.echelon.com
ii
Preface
Table of Contents
Preface ..................................................................................................... v Purpose .......................................................................................................... vi Audience......................................................................................................... vi System Requirements .................................................................................... vi Content ...........................................................................................................vii Related Manuals.............................................................................................vii For More Information and Technical Support................................................viii 1 Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples ................................................... 1 Introduction to the FT 5000 EVB Examples .................................................... 2 Using the LonMaker Tool to Load Example Applications ......................... 7 Using the Mini Kit to Load Example Applications ................................... 14 Creating Connections in Managed Mode ............................................... 18 Testing Switch and Lamp Devices ................................................... 18 Testing Light, Temperature, LCD, and Joystick Devices ................. 24 Creating Connections in ISI Mode .......................................................... 29 Getting Started with Developing Device Applications ................................... 31 Using the NodeBuilder Tool to Develop Device Applications ................. 31 Using the Mini Kit to Develop Device Applications ................................. 34 2 Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples ........................................... 35 Introduction to FT 5000 EVB Example Details .............................................. 36 NcSimpleExample Details ............................................................................. 36 Device Interface ...................................................................................... 36 Summary .......................................................................................... 36 Details............................................................................................... 37 Node Object Functional Block.................................................... 37 Switch Functional Block ............................................................. 37 Lamp Functional Block............................................................... 38 Device Application Summary .................................................................. 39 I/O Interaction.......................................................................................... 40 NcSimpleIsiExample Details.......................................................................... 41 Device Interface ...................................................................................... 41 Summary .......................................................................................... 41 Details............................................................................................... 41 Node Object Functional Block.................................................... 41 Switch Functional Blocks ........................................................... 42 Lamp Functional Blocks............................................................. 43 Device Application Summary .................................................................. 43 I/O Interaction.......................................................................................... 45 ISI Mode ........................................................................................... 45 Managed Mode................................................................................. 45 NcMultiSensorExample Details ..................................................................... 46 Device Interface ...................................................................................... 46 Summary .......................................................................................... 46 Details............................................................................................... 48 Node Object Functional Block.................................................... 48 Switch Functional Blocks ........................................................... 50 Lamp Functional Blocks............................................................. 50 Light Sensor Functional Block ................................................... 51 Temperature Sensor Functional Block ...................................... 51 Joystick Functional Block........................................................... 53 FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
iii
Device Application Summary .................................................................. 54 Using the Joystick and LCD.................................................................... 57 Welcome Panel ................................................................................ 57 Local Info Mode Panel...................................................................... 57 Remote Info Mode Panel.................................................................. 58 Alarm Config Mode Panel................................................................. 59 I/O Interaction.......................................................................................... 59 ISI Mode ........................................................................................... 60 Managed Mode................................................................................. 60 Appendix A: Glossary........................................................................... 63
iv
Preface
Preface
The NodeBuilder® FX/FT Development Tool and Mini FX/FT Evaluation Kit include
three Neuron C example applications that you can run on your FT 5000 EVBs. You
can use these examples to test the I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVBs, and create
simple managed and self-installed LONWORKS® networks. You can browse the
Neuron® C code used by these examples to learn how to develop your own device
applications.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
v
Purpose
This document describes how to run the Neuron C example applications included with the
NodeBuilder FX/FT Development Tool and Mini FX/FT Evaluation Kit on an FT 5000 EVB.
Audience
This guide is intended for device and system designers with an understanding of control networks.
System Requirements
Requirements for computers running the FT 5000 EVB examples are listed below:
vi
•
Microsoft® Windows Vista or Microsoft Windows XP. Echelon recommends that you install the
latest service pack available from Microsoft for your version of Windows.
•
Intel® Pentium® III 600MHz processor or faster, and meeting the minimum Windows
requirements for the selected version of Windows.
•
300 to 550 megabytes (MB) free hard-disk space, plus the minimum Windows requirements for
the selected version of Windows.
o
The NodeBuilder tool requires 100 MB of free space. The Mini kit requires 90 MB of free
space.
o
The LonMaker® Integration Tool, which is included with the NodeBuilder software and is
required to install the NodeBuilder tool, requires 172 MB of free space.
o
The LonScanner™ Protocol Analyzer, which is included with the NodeBuilder and Mini kit
software, requires 26 MB of free space.
o
Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 SP1, which is required to run the NodeBuilder tool, requires
30 MB of free space.
o
If you install Acrobat® Reader 9.1 from the NodeBuilder FX CD or Mini FX CD, you need an
additional 204 MB of free space.
•
512 MB RAM minimum.
•
CD-ROM drive.
•
1024x768 or higher-resolution display with at least 256 colors.
•
Mouse or compatible pointing device.
•
NodeBuilder FX tool or Mini FX kit. Running the FT 5000 EVB examples in managed mode
requires the LonMaker tool or other network tool. The LonMaker tool is included with the
NodeBuilder FX Development Tool.
•
LNS® network interface or IP-852 router. If an LNS network interface is used, it may be a local or
remote interface.
o
Compatible local network interfaces include the U10 USB network interface (included with
the NodeBuilder FX/FT Development Kit and Mini FX/FT Evaluation Kit); PCC-10,
PCLTA-20, or PCLTA-21 network interfaces; and the SLTA-10 Serial LonTalk Adapter.
o
Compatible remote network interfaces include the i.LON® SmartServer, i.LON 100 e3 plus
Internet Server, and i.LON 600 LONWORKS-IP Server.
o
Compatible IP-852 routers include the i.LON SmartServer with IP-852 routing, i.LON 100 e3
plus Internet Server with IP-852 routing, or an i.LON 600 LONWORKS-IP Server. If you are
Preface
using an IP-852 router, your computer must have an IP network interface such as an Ethernet
card or modem with PPP software. In addition, the i.LON software must be installed on your
computer, and the IP-852 channel must be configured using the LONWORKS-IP Configuration
Server application software.
The LonMaker tool, which is included with the NodeBuilder software, automatically installs
drivers for all local and remote network interfaces, except the SLTA-10 Serial LonTalk Adapter.
The LonMaker CD includes an option for installing the driver for the SLTA-10 Serial LonTalk
Adapter.
Note: You must run the NodeBuilder software on the same computer with the LNS Server which
is installed by the LonMaker installer. You cannot run the NodeBuilder tool as a remote client to
an LNS Server running on another computer.
Content
This guide includes the following content:
•
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples. Introduces the three Neuron C example applications that you
can run on an FT 5000 EVB. Describes how to use the LonMaker tool and Mini kit to load these
example applications on an FT 5000 EVB. Describes how to bind the example applications in a
self-installed or managed network. Explains how to browse the Neuron C code used by the
example applications so that you can begin developing your own device applications.
•
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples. Illustrates and details the device interfaces, device
applications, and I/O devices used by the FT 5000 EVB examples.
•
Glossary. Provides definitions for many terms commonly used with the FT 5000 EVB example
applications
Related Manuals
The documentation related to the NodeBuilder tool and Mini kit is provided as Adobe Acrobat PDF
files and online help files. The PDF files for the NodeBuilder tool are installed in the Echelon
NodeBuilder program folder when you install the NodeBuilder tool. The PDF files for the Mini kit
are installed in the Echelon Mini program folder when you install the Mini kit. You can download the
latest NodeBuilder and Mini FX documentation, including the latest version of this guide, from
Echelon’s Web site at www.echelon.com/docs.
FT 5000 EVB Hardware Guide
Describes how to connect the FT 5000 EVB boards, and
describes the Neuron core, I/O devices, service pin and reset
buttons and LEDs, and jumper settings on the FT 5000 EVB
hardware.
Introduction to the LONWORKS®
Platform
Provides a high-level introduction to LONWORKS networks and
the tools and components that are used for developing, installing,
operating, and maintaining them.
ISI Programmer’s Guide
Describes the ISI protocol, which provides for easy development
of devices that do not require installation tools. You can run the
NcSimpleIsiExample and NcMultiSensorExample examples
on the FT 5000 EVB in ISI mode.
LNS®Plug-in Programmer's Guide
Describes how to write plug-ins using .NET programming
languages such as C# and Visual Basic .NET
LonMaker® User’s Guide
Describes how to use the LonMaker Integration Tool to design,
commission, modify, and maintain LONWORKS networks.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
vii
LONMARK® SNVT and SCPT Guide
Documents the standard network variable types (SNVTs),
standard configuration property types (SCPTs), and standard
enumeration types that you can declare in your applications.
LONWORKS® USB Network Interface
User's Guide
Describes how to install and use the U10 USB Network
Interfaces, which is included with NodeBuilder FX/FT
Development Tool.
Mini FX User’s Guide
Describes how to use the Mini kit to develop a prototype or
production control system that requires networking, particularly
in the rapidly growing, price-sensitive mass markets of smart
light switches, thermostats, and other simple devices and sensors.
Neuron® C Programmer’s Guide
Describes how to write programs using the Neuron® C Version
2.2 language.
Neuron® C Reference Guide
Provides reference information for writing programs using the
Neuron C language.
Neuron® Tools Error Guide
Provides reference information for Neuron C errors.
NodeBuilder® FX User’s Guide
Describes how to use the NodeBuilder tool to develop
LONWORKS device applications and build and test prototype and
production LONWORKS devices
NodeBuilder® Resource Editor User’s
Guide
Describes how to use the NodeBuilder Resource Editor to create
and edit resource file sets and resources such as functional
profile templates, network variable types, and configuration
property types.
For More Information and Technical Support
The Mini FX ReadMe document provides descriptions of known problems, if any, and their
workarounds. To view the Mini FX ReadMe, click Start, point to Programs, point to Echelon Mini,
and then select Mini FX ReadMe First. You can also find additional information about the Mini kit
at the Mini FX Web page at www.echelon.com/mini.
If you have technical questions that are not answered by this document, the Mini FX online help, or the
Mini FX ReadMe file, you can contact technical support. Free e-mail support is available or you can
purchase phone support from Echelon or an Echelon support partner. See www.echelon.com/support
for more information on Echelon support and training services.
You can also view free online training or enroll in training classes at Echelon or an Echelon training
center to learn more about developing devices. You can find additional information about device
development training at www.echelon.com/training.
You can obtain technical support via phone, fax, or e-mail from your closest Echelon support center.
The contact information is as follows (check www.echelon.com/support for updates to this
information):
viii
Preface
Region
The Americas
Languages Supported
English
Japanese
Contact Information
Echelon Corporation
Attn. Customer Support
550 Meridian Avenue
San Jose, CA 95126
Phone (toll-free):
1-800-258-4LON (258-4566)
Phone: +1-408-938-5200
Fax: +1-408-790-3801
[email protected]
Europe
English
German
French
Italian
Echelon Europe Ltd.
Suite 12
Building 6
Croxley Green Business Park
Hatters Lane
Watford
Hertfordshire WD18 8YH
United Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0)1923 430200
Fax: +44 (0)1923 430300
[email protected]
Japan
Japanese
Echelon Japan
Holland Hills Mori Tower, 18F
5-11-2 Toranomon, Minato-ku
Tokyo 105-0001
Japan
Phone: +81-3-5733-3320
Fax: +81-3-5733-3321
[email protected]
China
Chinese
English
Echelon Greater China
Rm. 1007-1008, IBM Tower
Pacific Century Place
2A Gong Ti Bei Lu
Chaoyang District
Beijing 100027, China
Phone: +86-10-6539-3750
Fax: +86-10-6539-3754
[email protected]
Other Regions
English
Japanese
Phone: +1-408-938-5200
Fax: +1-408-328-3801
[email protected]
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
ix
x
Preface
1
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
This chapter introduces the three Neuron C example applications that you can run on
an FT 5000 EVB. It describes how to load these example applications on an FT 5000
EVB using the LonMaker Integration Tool, which is included with the NodeBuilder
FX Development Tool, or using the Mini FX Evaluation Kit. It describes how to bind
the example applications in a self-installed or managed network. It explains how to
browse the Neuron C code used by these examples so that you can begin developing
your own device applications.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
1
Introduction to the FT 5000 EVB Examples
The NodeBuilder FX/FT Development Tool and Mini FX/FT Evaluation Kit include three Neuron C
example applications that you can run on your FT 5000 EVBs: NcSimpleExample,
NcSimpleIsiExample, and NcMultiSensorExample. You can use these example applications to test the
I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVBs, and create simple managed and self-installed LONWORKS networks.
The NcMultiSensorExample application is pre-loaded on the FT 5000 EVBs and runs in Interoperable
Self-Installation (ISI) mode by default. This means that out-of-the-box, you can install and connect the
network variables of the NcMultiSensorExample application using the ISI protocol (see Creating
Connections in ISI Mode later in this chapter for more information). You can install and bind the
NcMultiSensorExample example in a managed network by commissioning it with the LonMaker tool or
other network tool (see Using the LonMaker Tool to Load Example Applications later in this chapter
for more information).
The FT 5000 EVB examples are stored in separate folders within the
LonWorks\NeuronC\Examples\FT5000 EVB directory (for example, the NcMultiSensorExample
application is stored in the LonWorks\NeuronC\Examples\FT5000 EVB\NcMultiSensorExample
folder). Note that the default LONWORKS folder on your computer is typically C:\LonWorks or
C:\Program Files\LonWorks.
Each example folder contains the following files and subfolders:
Source
This folder contains the example NodeBuilder project and all
source code files and header files used by the example.
Types
In the NcMultiSensorExample folder only, this folder contains
definitions for the user-defined functional profiles (UFPTs)
developed for the example.
LonMaker Network
Backup (.zip)
A LonMaker network backup file (.zip) that includes an LNS
database and LonMaker drawing containing the example device
and all the functional blocks and network variables in the
device’s external interface. You can restore this backup file with
the LonMaker tool.
After you restore the network, you can use the LonMaker tool to
download the example application to your FT 5000 EVBs. Each
example application includes a pre-built binary application
image file (.APB extension) that is stored in the
LonWorks\NeuronC\Examples\FT5000
EVB\ReleasedBinaries\ <Example> folder. This folder also
contains a pre-built text device interface file (.XIF extension)
that exposes the example application’s device interface so that
the LonMaker tool can manage the example application.
See Using the LonMaker Tool to Load Example Applications
2
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
later in this chapter for how to restore the LonMaker network
backup and download the example applications to the FT 5000
EVBs.
After you restore the backup and load the example application,
you can create a simple managed LONWORKS network (see
Creating Connections in Managed Mode later in this chapter for
how to do this).
NodeBuilder Project Files
(.NbOpt and .NbPrj)
ReadMe (.txt)
Each example includes a NodeBuilder project that you can open
with the NodeBuilder tool in order browse the example
applications and learn how to develop your own device
applications. The NodeBuilder project includes the following
files:
•
Options File (*.NbOpt). Contains the NodeBuilder project
options for a project. There is one options file per project.
•
Project File (*.NbPrj). Contains a project definition
including the project version and a list of the device
templates and the hardware templates for a project. There is
one project file per project.
A text file (.txt extension) summarizing the functionality of the
example application and the device interface and Neuron C code
used by it.
You can install, load, commission, and connect the network variables of all three example applications
using the LonMaker tool or other network tool. Each example application includes a LonMaker
network backup (LonMaker drawing and LNS network database) that you can restore to begin running
the example applications in a managed network. The LonMaker drawing backup includes a device
shape for the example application that you can commission, and functional block and network variable
shapes for the functional blocks and network variables defined in the device interface.
In addition, you can install and connect the network variables of the NcSimpleIsiExample and
NcMultiSensorExample applications using the Interoperable Self-Installation (ISI) protocol. ISI is an
application-layer protocol that lets you install and connect devices without using a separate network
management tool. For more information on ISI and developing an application using the Neuron ISI
library, see the ISI Protocol Specification and ISI Programmer’s Guide.
The NcSimpleIsiExample and NcMultiSensorExample applications start in ISI mode by default. You
can run these examples in managed mode by installing them with the LonMaker tool or other LNS
network management tool. To switch back to ISI mode, you can use the LonMaker tool to change the
SCPTnwkCnfg configuration property in the application’s Node Object functional block to
CFG_LOCAL (you can also do this using the nciNetConfig configuration property in the
application’s Virtual Functional Block). Alternatively, you can hold down the service pin on the FT
5000 EVB for approximately 10 seconds, which resets the applications to their factory default settings.
The following table summarizes the NcSimpleExample, NcSimpleIsiExample, and
NcMultiSensorExample applications:
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
3
Example
Application
Description
NcSimpleExample
Summary
Demonstrates how you can use switch devices to activate
lamp devices in a managed network. It uses one push
button (SW1) that represents a switch device, and one LED
(LED1) that represents a lamp device.
Device
Interface
Includes a Node Object functional block, and Switch and
Lamp functional blocks representing the push button and
LED I/O objects on the FT 5000 EVB. Both of the Switch
and Lamp functional blocks contain SNVT_switch input
and output network variables.
Installation
Mode
You must use the LonMaker tool or other network tool to
commission the SimpleExample device and to connect the
Switch and Lamp network variables so that pressing the
push button illuminates and extinguishes the LED.
Program ID
9F:FF:FF:05:01:04:04:10
Summary
Demonstrates how you can use switch devices to activate
lamp devices in a self-installed or managed network.
NcSimpleIsiExample
ISI Mode
In self-installed mode (ISI mode), this example uses one
push button (SW1) that represents a switch device, one
LED (LED1) that represents a lamp device, a push button
(SW2) to initiate and complete an ISI connection, and an
LED (LED2) that indicates the connection status.
Managed Mode
In managed mode, this example uses two push buttons
(SW1and SW2) that represent switch devices and two
LEDs (LED1 and LED2) that represent lamp devices.
Device
Interface
Includes a Node Object functional block, an array of two
Switch functional blocks representing the push button I/O
objects on the FT 5000 EVB, and an array of two Lamp
functional blocks representing the LED I/O objects on the
FT 5000 EVB.
The Node Object functional block contains a
SCPTnwrkCnfg configuration property that stores the
current network configuration mode (ISI or managed).
The Switch and Lamp functional blocks contain
SNVT_switch input and output network variables.
4
Installation
Mode
You can run the SimpleIsiExample in ISI or managed
mode. In managed mode, you must use the LonMaker tool
or other network tool to commission the
SimpleISIExample device and to connect the Switch and
Lamp network variables so that pressing the push buttons
illuminate and extinguish the LEDs.
Program ID
9F:FF:FF:05:01:04:04:20
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
Example
Application
Description
NcMultiSensorExample
Summary
Demonstrates how you can use switch devices to activate
lamp devices in a self-installed or managed network. For
managed networks, it also demonstrates how you can use
light-level sensor, temperature sensor, joystick, and LCD
devices to view the current temperature, light level (lux),
and alarm conditions of a local or remote device and set
light and temperature alarm conditions.
A local device refers to one FT 5000 EVB running the
NcMultiSensorExample application. A remote device
refers to another device containing SNVT_lux and/or
SNVT_temp_p output network variables that are
connected to the SNVT_lux and/or SNVT_temp_p input
network variables on the local device. A remote device
may be a second FT 5000 EVB running the
NcMultiSensorExample application. You can use a local
device to monitor the temperature, light level, and alarm
conditions of a remote device.
ISI Mode
In ISI mode, this example is identical to the
NcSimpleIsiExample application. It uses one push button
(SW1) that represents a switch device, one LED (LED1)
that represents a lamp device, a push button (SW2) to
initiate and complete an ISI connection, and an LED
(LED2) that indicates the connection status.
Managed Mode
In Managed mode, this example uses two push buttons
(SW1and SW2) that represent switch devices and two
LEDs (LED1 and LED2) that represent lamp devices, a
temperature sensor, a light level sensor, an LCD display,
and a joystick used to toggle the information displayed on
the LCD and to enter set points for light and temperature
alarms.
Device
Interface
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
Includes the following functional blocks:
•
A Node Object functional block that contains
SNVT_lux and SNVT_temp_p input network
variables storing the light and temperature values
received from the remote device, and SNVT_alarm_2
output network variables storing the alarm statuses of
the local and remote devices. The Node Object also
contains a SCPTnwrkCnfg configuration property
that stores the current network configuration mode
(ISI or managed).
•
An array of two Switch functional blocks representing
the push button I/O objects and an array of two Lamp
functional blocks representing the LED I/O objects on
the FT 5000 EVB. The Switch and Lamp functional
blocks contain SNVT_switch input and output
network variables.
5
Example
Application
Description
•
A LightSensor functional block representing the
light-level sensor I/O object on the FT 5000 EVB.
The LightSensor functional block includes a
SNVT_lux output network variable, and a
SCPTluxSetpoint configuration property that stores
the set point for the light alarm’s low limit.
•
A TempSensor functional block representing the
temperature sensor I/O object on the FT 5000 EVB.
The TempSensor functional block includes a
SNVT_temp_p output network variable, and a
SCPThighLimTemp configuration property that
stores the set point for the temperature alarm’s high
limit.
•
A Joystick functional block representing the joystick
I/O object on the FT 5000 EVB. The Joystick
functional block includes a SNVT_angle_deg output
network variable that you can change to a
SNVT_switch type, and a SCPTnvType
configuration property.
Note: The SCPTnwrkCnfg, SCPThighLimTemp,
SCPTluxSetpoint, and SCPTnvType configuration
properties are implemented as configuration network
variables (CPNVs). As a result, these network variables
appear with an “nci” prefix in a Virtual functional block—
instead of in their parent functional blocks—when you are
using the NcMultiSensorExample device in the LonMaker
tool or other network tool.
Installation
Mode
You can run the MultiSensorExample in ISI or managed
mode. In managed mode, you must use the LonMaker tool
or other network tool to commission the
MultiSensorExample device and to connect the network
variables so that the example application responds to the
I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVB.
Program ID
9F:FF:FF:05:01:84:04:30
You can download the example applications to the FT 5000 EVBs using the LonMaker tool, which is
included with the NodeBuilder tool, or using the Mini kit. After you download an example application
to the FT 5000 EVBs, you can install and connect the network variables of the example applications in
a self-installed or managed network. The following sections describe how to do the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
6
Download the example applications with the LonMaker tool.
Download the example applications with the Mini kit.
Create network variable connections in a managed network.
Create network variable connections in a self-installed network.
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
Using the LonMaker Tool to Load Example Applications
You can use the LonMaker tool to download the example applications to the FT 5000 EVBs and install
them in a LONWORKS network. To do this, you restore a LonMaker network backup that contains
device and functional block shapes for that example application, load the pre-built binary application
image file (.APB extension) for the example application to the device, and then commission the
example device following these steps:
1.
Verify that you have installed and activated the LonMaker tool following Chapter 2 of the
LonMaker User’s Guide.
2.
Connect your FT 5000 EVBs following Chapter 1 of the FT 5000 EVB Hardware Guide.
3.
Start the LonMaker tool. To do this, click Start on the taskbar, point to Programs, point to the
Echelon LonMaker folder, and then click LonMaker. The LonMaker Design Manager opens.
4.
Optionally, you can add the folder containing the LonMaker network backup files for the example
applications to the drawing base path. This speeds up the process of restoring the backup files for
the other example applications. To do this, click Add under Settings. The Browse for Folder
dialog opens. Browse to the LonWorks\NeuronC\Examples\FT5000 EVB folder, click any of the
three example folders, which start with “Nc”, and then click OK.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
7
8
5.
Click Restore. The Select Backup File dialog opens. Double-click the folder containing the
example application to be loaded, and then double-click the LonMaker backup file (.zip
extension).
6.
The Confirm Restore dialog opens.
7.
Click OK.
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
8.
By default, the LonMaker tool will prompt you to select whether to install any new files in the
Import folder (includes LONMARK® resource files) and then any new files in the Types folder
(includes XIF and application image files [.APB extension]). Click Yes to restore the files.
9.
A message appears informing you that the network restore operation has been completed, and
prompting you to select whether to open the LonMaker network in order to recommission devices
that have changed since the network was backed up. Click Yes.
•
A message may appear informing you that Visio must be launched and initialized so that it
can work with the LonMaker tool. Click OK.
•
A warning may appear asking you if you want to enable macros. You must enable macros for
the LonMaker tool to function.
10. The Network Wizard opens with the Network Interface window displayed.
11. Select the Network Attached check box. In the Network Interface Name property, select the
network interface to be used for communication between the LonMaker tool and the FT 5000
EVBs over the LONWORKS channel. Click Next.
You can use the U10 USB Network Interface included with your development platform, or you
can use another network interface such as a PCC-10, PCLTA-20, PCLTA-21, i.LON 10 Ethernet
Adaptor, i.LON server. If you are using the U10 USB Network Interface included with the FT
5000 EVBs and you have not installed any other network interfaces on your computer, select
LON1.
For more information on installing and configuring the U10 USB Network Interface, and on using
it to attach your computer to a network channel, see the LONWORKS USB Network Interface User’s
Guide.
12. The Management Mode window opens.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
9
13. Select OnNet to immediately propagate changes you make to the example device in the LonMaker
drawing to the physical device on the network. Click Finish.
14. A message appears recommending that you recommission devices that have changed since the
network was backed up. Click No.
15. The LonMaker drawing for the example application opens. The LonMaker drawing includes a
commissioned LNS Network Interface device shape, two uncommissioned device shapes, and
functional block and network variable shapes for all the functional blocks and network variables
defined in the device interface.
16. Download the example application to the FT 5000 EVBs following these steps:
a.
10
Hold down CTRL and click both yellow cross-hatched device shapes representing your
uncommissioned example devices (alternatively, you can click an empty space in the drawing
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
page and drag a selection net around the device shapes), right-click one of the selected
devices, point to Commissioning, and then click Commission on the shortcut menu.
b.
The Commission Device Wizard opens with the Application Image window displayed. Select
the Load Application Image check box. This specifies that you will download the pre-built
binary application image file (.APB extension) for the example application to the device. The
pre-built binary application image files for the example applications are stored in the
LonWorks\NeuronC\Examples\FT5000 EVB\ReleasedBinaries\<Example> folder.
c.
Click Finish. The Device Installation dialog opens.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
11
d.
Press the Service button on each FT 5000 EVB. The Service button on the FT 5000 EVB is a
black button that is located near the upper right-hand corner of the board and is labeled
“Service.”
e.
The Device Commission dialog opens. This dialog lists application image loading,
commissioning, and device state events in the order they occur.
f.
After both example devices have been commissioned, click OK to return to the LonMaker
drawing.
17. The device shapes are solid green, indicating that the devices have been commissioned and are
online, and the LCD on the FT 5000 EVBs display the name of the example application you
12
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
loaded. The device applications will not do anything until you test the devices or connect them to
other devices.
Note: Instead of running the same example application on both FT 5000 EVBs, you can create a
second device running a different FT 5000 EVB example application or your own device
application. In this case, see Chapters 4 and 5 of the LonMaker User’s Guide for how to create
application devices and functional blocks, and commission application devices.
18. Test the I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVBs using the sample network variable connections
provided in the LonMaker drawing and network variable connections that you can create. See
Creating Connections in Managed Mode later in this chapter for how to do this.
Note: If you loaded the NcSimpleIsiExample or NcMultiSensorExample application on your FT
5000 EVBs, you can switch to ISI mode and use the ISI protocol to connect the example
applications or connect them to other applications that are compatible with their ISI assemblies.
The NcSimpleIsiExample and NcMultiSensorExample applications are compatible with each other,
and other compatible applications include the MGSwitch, MGLight, and MGDemo applications
running on an FT 3150 EVB, and the MGSwitch or MGLight applications running on an FT 3120
EVB.
To switch to ISI mode, use the LonMaker Browser or a Data Point shape to change the value of
the SCPTnwkCnfg configuration property in the example device’s Node Object functional block
to CFG_LOCAL. Alternatively, you can use the nciNetConfig configuration property in the
example device’s Virtual Functional Block. The LonMaker tool immediately loses
communication with the example device. You can re-commission the example device to return
the example application to managed mode. For more information on using the LonMaker Browser
and the Data Point shape in the LonMaker tool, see Chapter 6 of the LonMaker User’s Guide.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
13
Alternatively, you switch to ISI mode by holding down the service pin on the FT 5000 EVB for
approximately 10 seconds. This resets the example applications to their factory default settings.
See Creating Connections in ISI Mode later in this chapter for more information on connecting the
example application running on your FT 5000 EVB via the ISI protocol.
Using the Mini Kit to Load Example Applications
You can use the Mini FX Application in the Mini kit to download the example applications to the FT
5000 EVB. To do this, follow these steps:
14
1.
Install the Mini FX software following Chapter 2 of the Mini FX User’s Guide.
2.
Connect your FT 5000 EVB boards following Chapter 1 of the FT 5000 EVB Hardware Guide.
3.
Start the Mini FX Application. To do this, click Start on the taskbar, point to Programs, point to
the Echelon Mini program folder, and then click Mini FX Application. The Mini FX
Application opens with the Application tab selected.
4.
Click the Device tab.
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
5.
In the Network Interface property, select a network interface to be used for communication
between the Mini FX Application and the FT 5000 EVB over the LONWORKS channel, and then
click Connect.
You can use the U10 USB Network Interface included with the FT 5000 EVB, or you can use
another network interface such as a PCC-10, PCLTA-20, PCLTA-21, i.LON 10 Ethernet Adaptor,
i.LON 100 Internet Server, or i.LON SmartServer. If you are using the U10 USB Network
Interface included with the FT 5000 EVB and you have not installed any other network interfaces
on your computer, select LON1.
For more information on installing and configuring the U10 USB Network Interface, and on using
it to attach your computer to a network channel, see the LONWORKS USB Network Interface User’s
Guide.
Notes:
•
Only one application can use a network interface at a time; therefore, if you connect the Mini
FX Application to a network interface, you cannot use that network interface with other
applications. You must exit the Mini FX Application to make a connected network interface
available to other applications. Multiple LNS applications can share a network interface, but
they cannot share a network interface with applications that are not based on the LNS network
operating system such as the Mini FX Application.
•
To use a PCC-10, PCLTA-20, or PCLTA-21 as the network interface, you must configure it
as a layer 5 interface. To do this, click Start on the taskbar, click Control Panel, and then
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
15
double-click LonWorks Plug ‘n Play. In the Device Selected box, select your network
interface. In the NI application box, select PCC10NSI if you are using a PCC-10, or select
NSIPCLTA if you are using a PCLTA-20 or a PCLTA-21. Click OK to save your changes
and close the LonWorks Plug ‘n Play application.
6.
Press the Service button on the FT 5000 EVB. The Service button on the FT 5000 EVB is a black
button that is located near the upper right-hand corner of the board and is labeled “Service.”
7.
The Service Pin Message dialog opens. The Neuron ID of the FT 5000 EVB appears in the
Neuron ID box and its program ID in the Program ID box.
The Neuron ID is a unique 48-bit (12-hex digit) identifier contained in every LONWORKS device.
The Mini FX Application uses the Neuron ID to communicate with your selected device. For
more information on Neuron IDs, see the Introduction to the LONWORKS Platform document in the
Echelon Mini program folder.
The Program ID is a unique, 16-hex digit ID that uniquely identifies the device application.
8.
Click Yes to register the device with the Mini FX Application.
9.
The FT 5000 EVB device is added to the Device list, which includes devices that you have added.
The device will remain in the Device list until you close the Mini FX Application, or connect to a
new network interface. You will need to add the device again when you restart the Mini FX
Application, or when you connect to a different network interface.
10. In the Application Image property, click Add, browse to the
LonWorks\NeuronC\Examples\FT5000 EVB\ReleasedBinaries\<Example> folder, and then select
the desired Neuron C application image file (.ndl extension). The application image is added to
the list of those recently added and it will remain there even after you close the Mini FX
Application.
16
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
Note: An FT 5000 EVB running the NcSimpleExample must be installed using the LonMaker tool
or other network tool. If you do not have a network tool installed on your development computer,
do not select the NcSimpleExample.ndl file. You can install an FT 5000 EVB running the
NcSimpleIsiExample and NcMultiSensorExample with the Interoperable Self-Installation (ISI)
protocol or with a network tool.
11. Click Load to load the selected Neuron application image into the FT 5000 EVB. The Status box
informs you when the application image has been successfully loaded into the device, and also
informs you of any load errors.
12. When the application image has been downloaded to the FT 5000 EVB, the LCD on the board
displays the name of the example application you loaded and the installation mode (ISI Mode).
Echelon Multi Sensor
Neuron C Application
(ISI mode)
13. If you have a second FT 5000 EVB, repeat steps 6–12 to download an application image to the
board.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
17
14. If you downloaded the NcSimpleIsiExample or NcMultiSensorExample applications to your FT
5000 EVB, you can use the ISI protocol to connect the switch and LED I/O devices on your FT
5000 EVB, and you can connect the example application on your FT 5000 EVB to a compatible
application running on an FT 5000, FT 3150, and FT 3120 EVB, or another application that is
compatible with the ISI assembly used by these examples. See Creating Connections in ISI Mode
later in this chapter for more information.
If you loaded any of the three example applications, you can use the LonMaker tool or other
network tool to install your example device (see Using the LonMaker Tool to Load Example
Applications earlier in this chapter for more information). After you install the example device,
you can create network variable connections with other devices, including another FT 5000 EVB
running an example application (see the next section, Creating Connections in Managed Mode, for
more information).
Note that the LonMaker tool is not included with the Mini FX Evaluation Kit. For more
information about ordering the LonMaker tool, contact your Echelon sales representative or
request it online.
Creating Connections in Managed Mode
You can use the LonMaker tool or other network tool to bind your example device and verify its
operation within a network. For example, you can bind the switch and lamp devices on the FT 5000
EVBs so that pressing the push buttons turns the LEDs on and off. If you are using the
NcMultiSensorExample application, you can bind the temperature sensor and light-level sensor devices
on one FT EVB 5000 device to the LCD display on a second FT 5000 EVB. This lets you can
monitor the temperature, light level, and alarm conditions of the first 5000 FT EVB from the second
one.
To bind devices, you connect the network variables within the device’s functional blocks in the
LonMaker drawing, and verify that the network variable values are updated appropriately when you
use the I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVB.
You can connect an output network variable on one example device to compatible input network
variables on the second example device. You can also create connections between compatible network
variables in the same example device, and between an example device and your own device
application or another LONWORKS device. Once you create a connection, the input network variables
will receive all updates from the output network variables in the connection.
The LonMaker drawing includes one or more sample network variable connections for your example
application. You can use these sample network variable connections and then create your own.
Note: Using a network tool lets you create more complex network variable connections that generally
perform better compared to connections created with the ISI protocol. In addition, using a network
tool lets you design network variable connections offsite without having to access the physical
network.
The following sections describe how to use network variable connections to test the switch and lamp
devices if you are running any of the three example applications, and how to test the temperature
sensor, light-level sensor, LCD, and joystick devices if you are running the NcMultiSensorExample.
Testing Switch and Lamp Devices
To test the network variable connections between the switch and lamp devices on the FT 5000 EVBs,
follow these steps:
1.
18
Verify that you have downloaded the desired example application to the FT 5000 EVBs following
the steps described in Using the LonMaker Tool to Load Example Applications earlier in this
chapter.
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
2.
Press the SW1 button on the FT 5000 EVB corresponding to Multi Sensor Device 1 to turn on
LED1 on the FT 5000 EVB corresponding to Multi Sensor Device 2, and then press the SW1
button again to turn off LED1.
3.
Click the Echelon LonMaker/Visio Taskbar button in the Taskbar to switch to the LonMaker tool,
if necessary. Observe that the drawing includes a sample network variable connection between
the nvoSwitch output network variable in the Switch[0] functional block on the Multi Sensor
Device 1 device (Multi Sensor Device 1.Switch[0].nvoSwitch) and the nviLamp input network
variable in the Lamp[0] functional block on the Multi Sensor Device 2 device (Multi Sensor
Device 2.Lamp[0].nviLamp). This connection enables LED1 on the Multi Sensor Device 2
device to be updated when the SW1 button on the Multi Sensor Device 1 device is pressed.
4.
Monitor the values of the Multi Sensor Device 1.Switch[0].nvoSwitch and Multi Sensor Device
2.Lamp[0].nviLamp network variables. To do this, follow these steps:
a.
Right-click an empty space in the LonMaker drawing, and then select Enable Monitoring on
the shortcut menu.
b.
Right-click the sample Connector shape and select Monitor Input Value to display the
current value of the Multi Sensor Device 1.Switch[0].nvoSwitch output network variable.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
19
20
c.
Right-click the Connector shape and select Monitor Output Value to display the current
value of the Multi Sensor Device 2.Lamp[0].nviLamp input network variable.
d.
Press the SW1 button on Multi Sensor Device 1 multiple times. Observe that LED1 on
Multi Sensor Device 2 turns on and off each time you press the SW1 button. In addition, the
current values of the output and input network variable on the Connector shape toggle
between 100.0 1 and 0.0 0 each time you press the button.
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
If you are running the NcSimpleExample application, you are done. See Getting Started with
Developing Device Applications in this chapter for more information about the next steps to take
to create your own device application, and see NcSimpleExample Details in Chapter 2 for more
detailed information about the device interface, Neuron C code, and I/O devices used by the
NcSimpleExample application.
5.
If you are running the NcSimpleIsiExample or NcMultiSensorExample, connect the Multi Sensor
Device 1.Switch[1].nvoSwitch network variable to the Multi Sensor Device
2.Lamp[0].nviLamp network variable. To do this follow these steps:
a.
Drag the Connector shape from the NodeBuilder Basic Shapes 4.00 stencil to the drawing.
Position the left end of the shape over the tip of the Multi Sensor Device
1.Switch[1].nvoSwitch output network variable before releasing the mouse button. A red
box appears around the end of the Connector shape when you have positioned it correctly
over the Network Variable shape.
Note: To simplify the LonMaker drawing in this example, only the subject functional blocks
are further displayed.
b.
Drag the other end of the Connector shape to the Multi Sensor Device 2.Lamp[0].nviLamp
input network variable until it snaps into place and a square box appears around the end of the
Connector shape. There is a brief pause as the LonMaker tool updates the example devices
over the network.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
21
Note: You can also create connections using the Connector tool ( ) on the Visio Standard
toolbar or the Network Variable Connection dialog box. See Chapter 4 of the LonMaker
User’s Guide for more information on creating connection using these methods.
22
6.
Follow step 4 to monitor the values of the Multi Sensor Device 1.Switch[1].nvoSwitch and
Multi Sensor Device 2.Lamp[0].nviLamp network variables on the connection you just created.
7.
If LED1 on Multi Sensor Device 2 is off, press the SW1 button on Multi Sensor Device 1 to turn
it on.
8.
Press the SW2 button on Multi Sensor Device 1. Observe that LED1 on Multi Sensor Device 2
does not turns off, and observe that the Multi Sensor Device 2.Lamp[0].nviLamp network
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
variable is not updated in the LonMaker drawing. This is because the Multi Sensor Device
1.Switch[1].nvoSwitch network variable does not know the current state of LED1—it is sending
an ON value while LED1 is already on.
Proceed to step 9 to create feedback connections that enable the nvoSwitch network variables to
get the current state of LED1 so that pressing either the SW1 or SW2 buttons places LED1 in the
expected condition. Feedback connections are useful for synchronizing devices such as in this
example.
9.
Create the following two feedback connections. These feedback connections lets the switches
know whether the LED1 is actually turned on or off so that pressing the SW1 or SW2 buttons
turns LED1 on and off.
•
Create a connection between the Multi Sensor Device 2.Lamp[0].nvoLampFB output
network variable and the Multi Sensor Device 1.Switch[0].nviSwitchFB input network
variable.
•
Create a connection between the Multi Sensor Device 2.Lamp[0].nvoLampFB output
network variable and the Multi Sensor Device 1.Switch[1].nviSwitchFB input network
variable.
10. Press the SW1 and SW2 buttons on Multi Sensor Device 1. Observe that LED1 on Multi
Sensor Device 2 turns on and off each time you press either button. Also, observe that the
nvoSwitch network variables are updated simultaneously.
If you are running the NcSimpleIsiExample application, you are done. See Getting Started with
Developing Device Applications in this chapter for more information about the next steps to take
to create your own device application, and see NcSimpleIsiExample Details in Chapter 2 for more
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
23
detailed information about the device interface, Neuron C code, and I/O devices used by the
NcSimpleIsiExample application.
If you are running the NcMultiSensorExample application, proceed to the next section, to monitor
the temperature, light level (lux), and alarm conditions, and set alarm limits for the temperature
and light levels.
Testing Light, Temperature, LCD, and Joystick Devices
You can use the light-level sensor, temperature sensor, LCD, and joystick devices on the FT 5000
EVBs to monitor the light level (lux), temperature, and alarm conditions and to set alarm limits for the
light level and temperature of an FT5000 EVB running the NcMultiSensorExample application.
You can also create connections between the network variables in the LightSensor and TempSensor
functional blocks of Multi Sensor Device 1 to the network variables in the Node Object functional
block of Multi Sensor Device 2, and vice versa. This enables you to view the light, temperature, and
alarm conditions of one FT EVB 5000 from the LCD of the other FT EVB 5000.
The LonMaker drawing includes one set of sample network variable connections between the network
variables in the LightSensor and TempSensor functional blocks of Multi Sensor Device 1 to the
network variables in the Node Object functional block of Multi Sensor Device 2. You can create
your own network variable connections between the LightSensor and TempSensor functional blocks
of Multi Sensor Device 2 to the network variables in the Node Object functional block of Multi
Sensor Device 1.
To test the light-level sensor, temperature sensor, and LCD devices on the FT 5000 EVBs, follow these
steps:
1.
Use the LCD on the FT 5000 EVB corresponding to Multi Sensor Device 1 and the LonMaker
drawing to monitor the light level and temperature of the board, set alarm limits for the light level
and temperature, and observe the affects of changing the light level and light alarm limits. To do
this, follow these steps:
a.
Drag a Data Point shape from the NodeBuilder Basic Shapes 4.00 stencil to the drawing.
The Data Point shape lets you monitor and control a single network variable or configuration
property value from the current drawing page. It is ideal for testing smaller device interfaces
with few network variables and configuration properties. For more information on using the
Data Point shape in the LonMaker tool, see Chapter 6 of the LonMaker User’s Guide.
You can place the Data Point shape anywhere, but a good place is directly above or below the
functional block containing the data point to be monitored and controlled. The Data Point
Shape dialog opens.
24
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
Expand Subsystem 1, expand Multi Sensor Device 1, expand the LightSensor functional
block, and then select the nvoLightLevel output network variable; select the Enable
Monitoring check box; and then click OK.
The Data Point shape is added to your LonMaker drawing.
b.
Repeat step a for the following data points:
•
the Multi Sensor Device 1.TempSensor.nvoTemperature output network variable.
•
the Multi Sensor Device 1.Virtual Functional Block.nciHighTempAlarm and Multi
Sensor Device 1.Virtual Functional Block.nciLowLightAlarm configuration
properties. When you add these configuration properties, select the Enable Value
Updates check box in the Data Point Shape dialog. This enables you to write values to
these configuration properties.
•
the Multi Sensor Device 1.NodeObject.nvoAlarm output network variable. When you
add this network variable, click More, and then select alarm_type in the Field Name
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
25
property in the Data Point Shape dialog. This enables you to view whether the
temperature or light level has exceeded their respective alarm settings.
Note: To simplify the LonMaker drawing in this example, only the subject functional
blocks are further displayed.
c.
Toggle the joystick on the FT 5000 EVB corresponding to Multi Sensor Device 1 down once
to display the Local Info Mode on the board’s LCD (the joystick is located in the bottom
center of the board between the SW1 and SW2 buttons). Observe that the Light: and Temp:
properties in the LCD reflect the current lux and temperature, and the Alarms: property in the
LCD displays “None”.
Local Info Mode
Light :
Temp :
Alarms:
370
Lux
30.0 C
Light
This means the following:
•
26
The current lux is more than the lower limit defined in the Multi Sensor Device
1.Virtual Functional Block.nciLowLightAlarm configuration property, which is 40 lux
by default.
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
•
The current temperature is less than the upper limit defined in the Multi Sensor Device
1.Virtual Functional Block.nciHighTempAlarm configuration property, which is
35.0°C by default.
Note: You can display the current temperature in Fahrenheit by toggling the joystick
sideways. You can change it back to Celsius by toggling the joystick sideways again.
Changing the temperature format in the Local Info Mode panel also changes the format used
for the high temperature alarm setpoint in the Alarm Config Mode panel.
d.
On the FT 5000 EVB corresponding to Multi Sensor Device 1, cover the light senor I/O
device on the bottom right side of the board. Observe that the Light: property in the LCD
reflects the decreased lux, and the Alarms: property in the LCD displays “Light”.
Local Info Mode
Light :
Temp :
Alarms:
12
Lux
30.0 C
Light
This means that the current lux (12 in this example) is less than the lower limit defined in the
Multi Sensor Device 1.Virtual Functional Block.nciLowLightAlarm configuration
property (40 lux by default).
e.
In the LonMaker drawing, double-click the Data Point shape for the Multi Sensor Device
1.Virtual Functional Block.nciLowLightAlarm configuration property, enter 0, and then
click anywhere outside the Data Point shape. Cover the light senor I/O device again on the
FT 5000 EVB corresponding to Multi Sensor Device 1.
Observe that the Alarms: property in the LCD now displays “None”. This is because the
current lux is now higher than the lower limit defined in the Multi Sensor Device 1.Virtual
Functional Block.nciLowLightAlarm configuration property.
Local Info Mode
Light :
Temp :
Alarms:
f.
12
30.0
None
Lux
C
Toggle the joystick down two more times on the FT 5000 EVB corresponding to Multi
Sensor Device 1 to display the Alarm Config Mode on the board’s LCD. Toggle the
joystick up two times to move the pointer to the Light: alarm property. Toggle the joystick
right eight times to increase the light alarm level from 0 to 40 (returning to its default level),
toggle the joystick down two times to point to the Ok option, and then press the joystick
center button to save the new light alarm level.
Alarm Config Mode
Light :
Temp :
40
Lux
30.0 C
Cancel Ok<-
Note: When you set the light alarm level, toggling the joystick left decreases the lux by 5,
and toggling the joystick right increases the lux by 5. When you set the temperature alarm
level, toggling the joystick left decreases the temperature by 0.5°C, and toggling the joystick
right increases the temperature by 0.5°C.
g.
2.
In the LonMaker drawing, observe that the value in the data point shape for the Multi Sensor
Device 1.Virtual Functional Block.nciLowLightAlarm configuration property has been
updated to reflect the current light alarm level.
Use the sample network variable connections in the LonMaker drawing to monitor the light level,
temperature, and alarm conditions of the FT 5000 EVB corresponding to Multi Sensor Device 1
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
27
from the Remote Info Mode panel on the LCD of the FT 5000 EVB corresponding to Multi
Sensor Device 2.
Note: If you only have one FT 5000 EVB, you can still observe the application behavior described
in this step by connecting the light level and temperature output network variables in the
LightSensor and TempSensor functional blocks to the remote light level and temperature input
network variables in the NodeObject functional block on the same device.
To use the sample network variable connections in the LonMaker drawing to monitor the light
level, temperature, and alarm conditions, follow these steps:
a.
Toggle the joystick down on the FT 5000 EVB corresponding to Multi Sensor Device 2 (the
local device) two times to display the Remote Info Mode on the board’s LCD. This mode
displays the current temperature, lux, and alarm conditions of the FT 5000 EVB
corresponding to Multi Sensor Device 1 (the remote device).
Remote Info Mode
Light :
Temp :
Alarms:
501
85.1
None
Lux
F
Note: You can display the temperature measured by the remote device in Fahrenheit by
toggling the joystick sideways. You can change it back to Celsius by toggling the joystick
sideways again.
b.
On the FT 5000 EVB corresponding to Multi Sensor Device 1, cover the light senor I/O
device on the bottom right side of the board.
c.
On the LCD of the FT 5000 EVB corresponding to Multi Sensor Device 2, observe that the
Light: property in the Remote Info Mode panel reflects the decreased lux of the remote
device and the Alarms: property displays “Light”. This means that that current lux is less
than the lower limit defined in the Light property in the Alarm Config Mode panel on the
remote device.
Remote Info Mode
Light :
Temp :
Alarms:
d.
3.
18
85.1
Light
Lux
F
In the LonMaker drawing, observe that the value in the data point shape for the Multi Sensor
Device 2. Node Object. nvoAlarmRemote output network variable is now
AL_ALM_CONDITION.
Optionally, you can use the LonMaker tool to create network variable connections between the
LightSensor and TempSensor functional blocks of Multi Sensor Device 2 to the network
variables in the Node Object functional block of Multi Sensor Device 1. This is simply the
opposite of the sample network variable connections used in step 2.
You can then monitor the light level, temperature, and alarm conditions of the FT 5000 EVB
corresponding to Multi Sensor Device 2 from the Remote Info Mode panel on the LCD of the FT
5000 EVB corresponding to Multi Sensor Device 1.
28
a.
Connect the Multi Sensor Device 2.LightSensor. nvoLightLevel output network variable to
the Multi Sensor Device 1.NodeObject.nviLightRemote input network variable.
b.
Connect the Multi Sensor Device 2.LightSensor.nvoTemperature output network variable
to the Multi Sensor Device 1. NodeObject.nviTempRemote input network variable.
c.
Create a Data Point shape for the alarm_type field in the Multi Sensor Device
1.NodeObject.nvoAlarmRemote output network variable.
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
4.
See Getting Started with Developing Device Applications in this chapter for more information
about the next steps to take to create your own device application, and see NcMultiSensorExample
Details in Chapter 2 for more detailed information about the device interface, Neuron C code, and
I/O devices used by the NcMultiSensorExample application.
Creating Connections in ISI Mode
You can use the ISI protocol to create and maintain network variable connections without using a
network management tool. To create network variable connections with the ISI protocol, the devices
require some input that indicates to which devices to connect. One method is for the user to press
Connect buttons on the devices to initiate, accept, and confirm the connection, and use Connect lights
to indicate the connection status. For the FT 5000 EVB, the Connect button is the SW2 button on the
right side of the board, and the Connect light is LED2, which is located directly above the SW2
button.
If you downloaded the NcSimpleIsiExample or NcMultiSensorExample application to your FT 5000
EVB, you can use the ISI protocol to connect the switch and LED I/O devices on your FT 5000 EVB
to another device running an application that is compatible with the ISI assembly used by these
examples. Applications that have compatible Light and Switch assemblies are the
NcSimpleIsiExample and NcMultiSensorExample applications running on another FT 5000 EVB, the
MGSwitch, MGLight, and MGDemo applications running on an FT 3150 EVB, and the MGSwitch or
MGLight applications running on an FT 3120 EVB.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
29
To create connections between the NcSimpleIsiExample or NcMultiSensorExample application running
on your FT 5000 EVB to a compatible application running on another FT 5000, FT 3150, or FT 3120
EVB, follow these steps:
1.
Verify that one or both of the FT 5000 EVBs are running the NcSimpleIsiExample or
NcMultiSensorExample application, and verify that the applications are in ISI mode. The name of
the application is displayed at the top of the LCD on the board.
Note: The NcSimpleExample does not support ISI connections. Download the
NcSimpleIsiExample or NcMultiSensorExample application to the board with the NodeBuilder
tool or Mini kit. See Using the LonMaker Tool to Load Example Applications or Using the Mini
Kit to Load Example Applications for more information on how to do this.
2.
If you are connecting an FT 5000 EVB to an FT 3150 EVB or FT 3120 EVB, verify that the FT
3150 EVB or FT 3120 EVB is running the appropriate example application.
•
An FT 3150 EVB must be running the MGSwitch, MGLight, or MGDemo application, or
another application that is compatible with the ISI assembly used by the NcSimpleIsiExample
and NcMultiSensorExample applications. These example applications are included with the
Mini EVK Evaluation Kit. For more information on these examples, see the Mini EVK
User’s Guide.
•
An FT 3120 EVB must be running the MGSwitch or MGLight application, or another
application that is compatible with the ISI assembly used by the NcSimpleIsiExample and
NcMultiSensorExample applications.
3.
Press the Connect button on one evaluation board (this is the connection host). The Connect
button on an FT 5000 EVB running the NcSimpleIsiExample or NcMultiSensorExample
application is the SW2 button on the right side of the board. The Connect buttons on the
MiniGizmo board, which is attached to an FT 3150 or FT 3120 EVB board, are SW5, SW6, SW7,
or SW8 if running the MGDemo application, or SW8 if running the MGSwitch or MGLight
application. This step is called opening enrollment or initiating the connection.
4.
The Connect lights on the other evaluation boards that can join the connection and the Connect
light on the connection host start blinking. The Connect light on an FT 5000 EVB running the
NcSimpleIsiExample or NcMultiSensorExample application is LED2, which is located directly
above the SW2 button. The Connect lights on the MiniGizmo board are LED5, LED6, LED7, or
LED8 if running the MGDemo application, or LED8 if running the MGSwitch or MGLight
application. The LEDs are located directly above their respectively numbered buttons.
5.
Press the Connect button on another evaluation board (the connection member) to add that device
to the connection. The Connect lights on both the device and the connection host will illuminate
without flashing, indicating they are ready to join the connection. This step is called accepting the
connection invitation.
6.
Press the Connect button used in step 4 on the connection host to complete the connection. The
Connect lights on both the connection host and the device will extinguish, indicating that the
devices are connected. This step is called confirming the connection.
7.
Press the I/O button on either evaluation board to illuminate the I/O LEDs in the connection.
Press the I/O button on either evaluation board to extinguish the I/O LEDs in the connection.
•
For an FT 5000 EVB, the I/O button and LED in an ISI connection are SW1 and LED1,
respectively.
•
For the MGSwitch, MGLight, or MGDemo applications running on a FT 3150 or 3120 EVB,
the I/O button and LED in an ISI connection depends on the application and the connect
button used. See Chapter 3 of the Mini EVK User’s Guide for more information.
Note: You can remove the device from the ISI connection by pressing and holding the Connect button
on the connection member (not the connection host) for approximately 8 seconds. This step is called
cancelling the connection. You can confirm that the device has left the connection by pressing its I/O
30
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
button and observing that the I/O LED of the connection host does not illuminate. You can delete an
ISI connection to all connection members by pressing and holding the Connect button on the
Connection host for approximately 8 seconds.
See Chapter 2 for more information on how the FT 5000 EVBs exchange data in ISI mode.
Getting Started with Developing Device Applications
The FT 5000 EVB example applications were developed using Neuron C (Version 2.2), which is a
programming language based on ANSI C that you can use to develop applications for Neuron Chips
and Smart Transceivers. It includes network communication, I/O, and event-handling extensions to
ANSI C, which make it a powerful tool for the development of LONWORKS device applications. For
more information on the Neuron C programming language, see the Neuron C Programmer’s Guide
and the Neuron C Reference Guide.
You can view the Neuron C code used by the FT 5000 EVB example applications to learn how to
develop your own device applications (see the Device Application Summary sections in Chapter 2 for
descriptions of the Neuron C code used by the example applications). NodeBuilder users can view the
Neuron C source files (.nc extension) of an example application by opening the example’s
NodeBuilder project, as described in the next section, Using the NodeBuilder Tool to Develop Device
Applications. Mini kit users, as well as NodeBuilder users, can view the Neuron C source files by
browsing to the C:\LonWorks\NeuronC\Examples\FT5000 EVB\<example>\Source folder, and
then opening the file with a text editor such as Notepad. Alternatively, Mini kit users and
NodeBuilder users can access an example application’s source file by clicking Start, pointing to
Programs, pointing to Echelon NodeBuilder FX or Echelon Mini, pointing to Examples, pointing to
FT 5000 EVB, clicking the desired Example Source Code folder, and then clicking the Source
folder.
After you view the Neuron C code in the example applications, you can create a new device
application by modifying the existing example applications or by developing the device application
from scratch. You can then use the NodeBuilder tool or Mini kit to build the device applications and
download them to an FT 5000 EVB or other LONWORKS device based on a Neuron 5000 Processor or
FT 5000 Smart Transceiver. You can create a simple device application from scratch by following the
quick-start exercise in Chapter 3 of your development tool’s user’s guide (NodeBuilder FX User’s
Guide or Mini FX User’s Guide).
The following sections describe how to view the Neuron C source files in the FT 5000 EVB example
applications based on whether you are using the NodeBuilder tool or the Mini kit, and they describe
the next steps for developing a device with your development tool.
Using the NodeBuilder Tool to Develop Device Applications
If you are using the NodeBuilder tool, you can open the pre-built NodeBuilder projects created for
each example application and then view the Neuron C source (.nc) files and header (.h) files that
comprise the device application. See the Device Application Summary sections in Chapter 2 for
descriptions of the functionality provided by these files. After you view the Neuron C code in the
example applications, you can create a new device application, or modify the existing example
applications.
To open the NodeBuilder project for an example application and the view the Neuron C source files
with NodeBuilder tool, follow these steps:
1.
Restore the LonMaker backup for the example application as described by steps 1–15 in Using the
LonMaker Tool to Load Example Applications earlier in this chapter.
2.
In the LonMaker drawing, click LonMaker and then click NodeBuilder. The NodeBuilder
Project Manager starts. If you have not previously created a NodeBuilder project for this network,
the New Project wizard automatically starts with the NodeBuilder Project dialog displayed.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
31
32
3.
In the NodeBuilder Project dialog, select the Open an Existing NodeBuilder Project option and
then click Next.
4.
The Select Project File dialog opens. Click the button to the right of the Project File property,
browse to the LonWorks\NeuronC\Examples\FT5000 EVB\<Example> folder, and then select the
project file (.NbPrj extension) in the project folder.
5.
Click Finish. The NodeBuilder Project Manager opens.
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
6.
In the Project pane on the left side of the NodeBuilder Project Manager, expand the Device
Templates folder under the Project folder, expand the Device Template ( ), and then expand the
Source Files folder ( ). The Neuron C source files (.nc) and header files (.h) in the device
application are displayed.
7.
Double-click the Neuron C source files (.nc) and header files (.h) to view them in the Edit pane on
the right side of the NodeBuilder Project Manager.
8.
Read the example application’s Device Application Summary section in Chapter 2 for a summary
of the functionality provided by each Neuron C source (.nc) file and header (.h) file in the device
application.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
33
9.
After you view the Neuron C code in the example applications, you can create a new device
application by modifying the existing example applications or by creating the device from scratch.
After you create the device, you can use the NodeBuilder tool to build the device application and
download it to an FT 5000 EVB or other LONWORKS device based on a Neuron 5000 Processor
and FT 5000 Smart Transceiver. For more information on creating a device with the NodeBuilder
tool, see the NodeBuilder FX User’s Guide.
You can develop a simple device application by following the quick-start exercise in Chapter 3 of
the NodeBuilder FX User’s Guide. In the quick-start exercise, you will develop a device with one
sensor and one actuator. The sensor is a simple sensor that monitors a push button on the FT 5000
EVB and toggles a network variable output each time the button is pressed. The actuator drives
the state of an LED on the FT 5000 EVB based on the state of a network variable input. The
quick-start guides you through all the steps of creating a device with the NodeBuilder tool,
including creating the NodeBuilder project, the device template, the device interface, and the
Neuron C code that implements your device interface; implementing device functionality in the
Neuron C code; building and downloading the device application; testing the device in a
LONWORKS network; and debugging the device application.
Note: You can also open a NodeBuilder project directly from the NodeBuilder Project Manager. To
do this, see Opening a NodeBuilder Project from the NodeBuilder Project Manager in Chapter 4 of the
NodeBuilder FX User’s Guide.
Using the Mini Kit to Develop Device Applications
If you are using the Mini kit, you can browse to the LonWorks\NeuronC\Examples\FT50000
EVB\<Example>\Source folder on your computer and open the Neuron C source files with a text editor
such as Notepad. Alternatively, you can access an example application’s source files by clicking
Start, pointing to Programs, pointing to Echelon Mini, pointing to Examples, pointing to FT5000
EVB, clicking the desired Example Source Code folder, and then clicking the Source folder.
You can read the example application’s Device Application Summary section in Chapter 2 for a
summary of the functionality provided by each Neuron C source (.nc) file and header (.h) file in the
device application.
You can then create a new device application by modifying the existing example applications or by
writing the Neuron C code from scratch. After you create the device application, you can use the Mini
kit to build the device application and download it to an FT 5000 EVB or other LONWORKS device
based on a Neuron 5000 Processor or FT 5000 Smart Transceiver (see Chapter 4 of the Mini FX User’s
Guide for more information on how to do this).
You can develop a simple device application by following the quick-start exercise in Chapter 3 of the
Mini FX User’s Guide. In the quick-start exercise, you will develop a non-interoperable device
application with one sensor and one actuator. The sensor is a simple sensor that monitors the push
button on the FT 5000 EVB. The actuator drives the state of an LED on the FT 5000 EVB based on
the state of the push button. The quick-start guides you through all the steps of developing a device
with the Mini kit, including creating, writing, compiling and building, and downloading the Neuron C
device application.
After completing the quick-start exercise, you can view the programming samples included in Chapter
5 of the Mini FX User’s Guide to learn Neuron C concepts such as input/output, timers, network
variables, configuration properties, functional blocks, and interoperable self-installation (ISI). You can
create and build the programming samples, and then download them to your FT 5000 EVB.
Note: The FT 5000 EVB example applications contain multiple Neuron C source and header files,
which are all referenced by the main.nc file. If you modify any of these files and you want to build
the modified device application with the Mini FX Application, re-build the main.nc file in the
example’s LonWorks\NeuronC\Examples\FT50000 EVB\<Example>\Source folder.
34
Using the FT 5000 EVB Examples
2
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
This chapter illustrates and details the device interfaces, device applications, and I/O
devices used by the FT 5000 EVB examples.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
35
Introduction to FT 5000 EVB Example Details
The FT 5000 EVB examples demonstrate three major components of a LONWORKS device: the device
interface, the device application, and the I/O devices on the device hardware.
The device interface includes all the functional blocks, network variables, and configuration properties
defined for the example application. This chapter summarizes the device interfaces used by the FT
5000 EVB example applications, and it details the functional blocks, network variables, and
configuration properties in the device interfaces.
The device application consists of Neuron C code that implements the external interface of the
example device and handles interaction between the device interface and the I/O devices on the FT
5000 EVB. For example, the Neuron C source file for the Switch functional block used by all the
three examples (Switch.nc) includes code that toggles the value of the nvoSwitch network variable
when you press a push button on the on the FT 5000 EVB. In addition, the Neuron C source file for
the Lamp functional block used by all the three examples (Lamp.nc) includes code that sets the state
of an LED on the FT 5000 EVB when the nviLamp network variable is updated. This chapter
summarizes the functionality of the Neuron C source (.nc) files and header (.h) files that comprise the
example device applications. See Getting Started with Developing Device Applications in Chapter 1
for more information about using the NodeBuilder tool and Mini kit to view the Neuron C source and
header files.
The FT 5000 EVB includes the following I/O devices: two push buttons, two LEDs, a temperature
sensor, a light-level sensor, an LCD display, and a 5-way joystick. The example applications use some
to all of the I/O devices. This chapter lists the I/O pins used by each example application for the I/O
devices on the FT 5000 EVB and illustrates the interaction between the I/O devices and the device
interface used for each example. An I/O pin is used to connect a Neuron Chip or Smart Transceiver to
one or more physical I/O devices. The Neuron firmware implements numerous I/O objects that
manage the interface to these devices for a Neuron C application. In your Neuron C code, you will
declare the I/O objects that monitor and control the Neuron 5000 Processor or FT 5000 Smart
Transceiver I/O pins. For more information on using and declaring I/O objects, see Chapter 2 of the
Neuron C Programmer’s Guide and Chapter 8 of the Neuron C Reference Guide.
NcSimpleExample Details
The NcSimpleExample application demonstrates how you can use switch devices to activate lamp
devices in a managed network. It uses one push button (SW1) that represents a switch device, and one
LED (LED1) that represents a lamp device.
Device Interface
The following section summarizes and then details the NcSimpleExample application.
Summary
The NcSimpleExample application includes a Node Object functional block, and Switch and Lamp
functional blocks representing the push button and LED I/O objects on the FT 5000 EVB. Both of the
Switch and Lamp functional blocks contain SNVT_switch input and output network variables.
The following diagram displays the functional blocks and network variables in the device interface
used by the NcSimpleExample application.
36
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
Details
The following sections detail the Node Object, Switch, and Lamp functional blocks in the
NcSimpleExample device interface and their network variables.
Node Object Functional Block
The NodeObject functional block returns invalid request for all requests that are not implemented. It
returns an invalid ID for all IDs that are not implemented.
FB/NV Name
Type
Direction
NodeObject
SFPTnodeObject
nviRequest
SNVT_obj_request
Input
nvoStatus
SNVT_obj_status
Output
Description
Lets you monitor the functional blocks within
a device.
Lets you place a functional block in the
device interface in a specific state. Handles
RQ_NORMAL, RQ_UPDATE_STATUS,
RQ_REPORT_MASK and RQ_ENABLE
requests.
Reports the status of a functional block in the
device interface.
Switch Functional Block
The Switch functional block represents the SW1 push button on the FT 5000 EVB. The Switch
functional block contains SNVT_switch input and output network variables.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
37
FB/NV Name
Type
Direction
Description
Switch
SFPTclosedLoopSensor
nvoSwitch
SNVT_switch
Output
Transmits the value and state of the
SW1 button on the FT 5000 EVB.
nviSwitchFb
SNVT_switch
Input
Lets you create a feedback
connection between the SW1 button
and LED1.
Represents the SW1 push button on
the FT 5000 EVB.
Lamp Functional Block
The Lamp functional block represents LED1 on the FT 5000 EVB. The Lamp functional block
contains SNVT_switch input and output network variables.
38
FB/NV Name
Type
Direction
Description
Lamp
SFPTopenLoopActuator
nviLamp
SNVT_switch
Output
Receives the value and state of a
SNVT_switch network variable and
updates LED1 on the FT 5000 EVB
accordingly.
nviSwitchFb
SNVT_switch
Input
Lets you send the current value and
state of LED1 to the Switch
functional block.
Represents LED1 on the FT 5000
EVB.
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
Device Application Summary
The following table summarizes the functionality provided by the Neuron C source (.nc) files and
header (.h) files that comprise the NcSimpleExample application. See Getting Started with
Developing Device Applications in Chapter 1 for more information about using the NodeBuilder tool
and Mini kit to view these Neuron C source and header files.
Main.nc
This source file includes a when-task that resets the FT 5000 EVB, and a
when-task that user a timer to check the state of the switches on the FT
5000 EVB every millisecond.
when(reset)
Power cycles the LCD on the FT 5000 EVB.
This function also outputs debugging information that you can view
on your computer. All instances in the example application where
debugging information is output to your computer are indicated with
EvalBoardPrintDebug(string) functions.
To view this debugging output, connect your FT 5000 EVB to your
computer via the RS-232 or USB interface on the board and then use
a terminal emulation program on your computer. For more
information on connecting the FT 5000 EVB to a computer for
debugging purposes, see the FT 5000 EVB Hardware Guide.
when(timer_expires(tTick))
This when-task uses a timer to check the state of the switches and
joystick on the FT 5000 EVB every millisecond, and to check the
state of the temperature sensor and light-level sensor every second.
Note: Instead of using a timer to evaluate changes or updates to
hardware I/O, you could use the when (io_changes) or when
(io_update_occurs) when-clauses or an interrupt-task. See Chapter
2 of the Neuron C Programmer’s Guide for more information on
these when-clauses and Chapter 7 for more information on
interrupt-tasks.
FT5000EvalBoard.h
This header file includes the I/O object and function declarations for the
I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVB.
FT5000EvalBoard.nc
This source file includes the following functions that get and set values
for the I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVB:
void EvalBoardSetLed(Leds whichLed, boolean bOn)
Sets the state of a specific LED.
boolean EvalBoardGetSwitch(Switches whichSwitch)
Determines which switch has been updated.
Note: This file also includes functions for getting values from the
light-level sensor, temperature sensor, and joystick on the FT 5000 EVB;
however, the SimpleIsiExample application does not use these functions.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
39
Lamp.nc
This source file implements the Lamp functional block. It contains a
single when-task that illuminates or extinguishes an LED on the FT 5000
EVB when the nviLamp network variable in the Lamp functional block
is updated.
This when-task also copies the updated value to the nvoLampFb
network variable in the Lamp functional block. This value can then be
passed to any SNVT_switch network variables bound to the
nvoLampFb network variable in a feedback connection. See Testing
Switch and Lamp Devices in Chapter 1 for more information on creating
and using feedback connections.
NodeObject.nc
This source file implements the NodeObject functional block. It
includes a when-task for processing requests received from the
nviRequest network variable. This function routes RQ_NORMAL,
RQ_REPORT_MASK, RQ_UPDATE_STATUS, RQ_DISABLED,
and RQ_ENABLE requests to the subject functional block or functional
blocks in the device application.
Note: You must implement the RQ_NORMAL,
RQ_REPORT_MASK, RQ_UPDATE_STATUS requests in your
device application. The RQ_DISABLED and RQ_ENABLE requests
are optional.
Switch.nc
This source file implements the Switch functional block. It includes
ProcessSwitch1() and ProcessSwitch2() functions that get the current
state of their respective switches, evaluate whether the state has changed,
and if the state of the switch has changed, toggles the value and state of
the nvoSwitch network variable and copies the updated value and state to
the nviSwitchFb network variable.
I/O Interaction
The following table lists the I/O pins used for the SW1 button and LED1 on the FT 5000 EVB.
I/O
Pin Used
I/O Model
LED1
IO2
Bit I/O
SW1
IO9
Bit I/O
The following graphic illustrates the interaction between the I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVB and the
device interface used by the NcSimpleExample application.
40
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
NcSimpleIsiExample Details
The NcSimpleIsiExample application demonstrates how you can use switch devices to activate lamp
devices in a self-installed or managed network.
In ISI mode, this example uses one push button (SW1) that represents a switch device, one LED
(LED1) that represents a lamp device, a push button (SW2) to initiate and complete an ISI connection,
and an LED (LED2) that indicates the connection status.
In managed mode, this example uses two push buttons (SW1and SW2) that represent switch devices
and two LEDs (LED1 and LED2) that represent lamp devices.
Device Interface
The following section summarizes and then details the NcSimpleIsiExample application.
Summary
The NcSimpleIsiExample application includes a Node Object functional block, an array of two Switch
functional blocks representing the push button I/O objects on the FT 5000 EVB, and an array of two
Lamp functional blocks representing the LED I/O objects on the FT 5000 EVB.
The Node Object functional block contains a SCPTnwrkCnfg configuration property that stores the
current network configuration mode (ISI or managed). This configuration property is implemented as
a configuration network variable (CPNV), and it is declared as a non-const device-specific
configuration property (a configuration property that can be changed using the device hardware or an
LNS network management tool such as the LonMaker tool). The Switch and Lamp functional blocks
contain SNVT_switch input and output network variables.
The following diagram displays the functional blocks and network variables in the device interface
used by the NcSimpleIsiExample application
Details
The following sections detail the Node Object, Switch, and Lamp functional blocks in the
NcSimpleIsiExample device interface and their network variables and configuration properties.
Node Object Functional Block
The NodeObject functional block returns invalid request for all requests that are not implemented,
returns an invalid ID for all IDs that are not implemented, and indicates the current network
configuration mode (ISI or managed).
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
41
FB/NV/CP
Name
Type
Direction
NodeObject
SFPTnodeObject
nviRequest
SNVT_obj_request
Input
nvoStatus
SNVT_obj_status
Output
nciNetConfig
SCPTnwrkCnfg
Input
Description
Lets you monitor the functional blocks within
a device.
Lets you place a functional block in the
device interface in a specific state. Handles
RQ_NORMAL, RQ_UPDATE_STATUS,
RQ_REPORT_MASK and RQ_ENABLE
requests.
Reports the status of a functional block in the
device interface.
Stores the current network configuration
mode (ISI or managed).
Switch Functional Blocks
The Switch functional blocks represent the SW1 and SW2 push buttons on the FT 5000 EVB. They
contain SNVT_switch input and output network variables.
42
FB/NV Name
Type
Switch[2]
SFPTclosedLoopSensor
nvoSwitch
SNVT_switch
Direction
Description
Represents the SW1 and SW2 push
button on the FT 5000 EVB.
Output
Transmits the values and states of
the SW1 and SW2 buttons on the FT
5000 EVB.
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
nviSwitchFb
SNVT_switch
Input
Lets you create feedback
connections between the SW1 and
SW2 push buttons and
SNVT_switch network variables.
Lamp Functional Blocks
The Lamp functional blocks represent LED1 and LED2 on the FT 5000 EVB. They contain
SNVT_switch input and output network variables.
FB/NV Name
Type
Direction
Description
Lamp[2]
SFPTopenLoopActuator
nviLamp
SNVT_switch
Output
Receives the value and state of
SNVT_switch network variables
and updates LED1 and LED2 on the
FT 5000 EVB accordingly.
nviLampFb
SNVT_switch
Input
Lets you send the current value and
state of LED1 and LED2 to
SNVT_switch network variables in
feedback connections.
Represents LED1 and LED2 on the
FT 5000 EVB.
Device Application Summary
The following table summarizes the functionality provided by the Neuron C source (.nc) files and
header (.h) files that comprise the NcSimpleIsiExample application. See Getting Started with
Developing Device Applications in Chapter 1 for more information about using the NodeBuilder tool
and Mini kit to view these Neuron C source and header files.
Main.nc
This source file includes a when-task that resets the FT 5000 EVB, and a
when-task that user a timer to check the state of the switches on the FT
5000 EVB every millisecond.
when(reset)
Power cycles the LCD on the FT 5000 EVB, and puts the example
application into ISI mode if the NodeObject.nciNetConfig
configuration property is set to CFG_LOCAL or CFG_NUL (it is set
to CFG_NUL the first time the example application is reset so that
the example application initially starts in ISI mode).
This function also outputs debugging information that you can view
on your computer. All instances in the example application where
debugging information is output to your computer are indicated with
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
43
EvalBoardPrintDebug(string) functions.
To view this debugging output, connect your FT 5000 EVB to your
computer via the RS-232 or USB interface on the board and then use
a terminal emulation program on your computer. For more
information on connecting the FT 5000 EVB to a computer for
debugging purposes, see the FT 5000 EVB Hardware Guide.
when(timer_expires(tTick))
This when-task uses a timer to check the state of the switches and
joystick on the FT 5000 EVB every millisecond, and to check the
state of the temperature sensor and light-level sensor every second.
Note: Instead of using a timer to evaluate changes or updates to
hardware I/O, you could use the when (io_changes) or when
(io_update_occurs) when-clauses or an interrupt-task. See Chapter
2 of the Neuron C Programmer’s Guide for more information on
these when-clauses and Chapter 7 for more information on
interrupt-tasks.
FT5000EvalBoard.h
This header file includes the I/O object and function declarations for the
I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVB.
FT5000EvalBoard.nc
This source file includes the following functions that get and set values
for the I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVB:
void EvalBoardSetLed(Leds whichLed, boolean bOn)
Sets the state of a specific LED.
boolean EvalBoardGetSwitch(Switches whichSwitch)
Determines which switch has been updated.
Note: This file also includes functions for getting values from the
light-level sensor, temperature sensor, and joystick on the FT 5000 EVB;
however, the SimpleIsiExample application does not use these functions.
IsiImplementation.nc
This source file contains the device application’s implementation of the
ISI protocol. See the ISI Protocol Specification and ISI Programmer’s
Guide for more information on ISI and developing an application using
the Neuron ISI library.
Lamp.nc
This source file implements the Lamp functional block. It contains a
single when-task that illuminates or extinguishes an LED on the FT 5000
EVB when the nviLamp network variable in the Lamp functional block
is updated.
This when-task also copies the updated value to the nvoLampFb
network variable in the Lamp functional block. This value can then be
passed to any SNVT_switch network variables bound to the
nvoLampFb network variable in a feedback connection. See Testing
Switch and Lamp Devices in Chapter 1 for more information on creating
and using feedback connections.
NodeObject.nc
This source file implements the NodeObject functional block. It
includes a when-task for processing requests received from the
nviRequest network variable. This function routes RQ_NORMAL,
RQ_REPORT_MASK, RQ_UPDATE_STATUS, RQ_DISABLED,
and RQ_ENABLE requests to the subject functional block or functional
blocks in the device application.
Note: You must implement the RQ_NORMAL,
44
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
RQ_REPORT_MASK, RQ_UPDATE_STATUS requests in your
device application. The RQ_DISABLED and RQ_ENABLE requests
are optional.
Switch.nc
This source file implements the Switch functional block. It contains a
when-task that handles the switch-light connections if the
NcSimpleIsiExample is running in ISI mode.
It includes ProcessSwitch1() and ProcessSwitch2() functions that get
the current state of their respective switches, evaluate whether the state
has changed, and if the state of the switch has changed, toggles the value
and state of the nvoSwitch network variable and copies the updated value
and state to the nviSwitchFb network variable.
I/O Interaction
The following table lists the I/O pins used for the SW1 button, SW2 button, LED1, and LED2 on the
FT 5000 EVB.
I/O
Pin Used
I/O Model
LED1
IO2
Bit I/O
LED2
IO3
Bit I/O
SW1
IO9
Bit I/O
SW2
IO4, IO5, IO6
Bitshift I/O. These pins are also used for input from the
Joystick on the FT 5000 EVB.
ISI Mode
The following graphic illustrates the interaction between the I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVB and the
device interface used by the NcSimpleIsiExample application in ISI mode.
Managed Mode
The following graphic illustrates the interaction between the I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVB and the
device interface used by the NcSimpleIsiExample application in managed mode.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
45
NcMultiSensorExample Details
The NcMultiSensorExample application demonstrates how you can use switch devices to activate lamp
devices in a self-installed or managed network. For managed networks, it also demonstrates how you
can use light-level sensor, temperature sensor, joystick, and display devices to view the current
temperature, light level (lux), and alarm conditions and set light and temperature alarm conditions for a
local or remote device. The FT 5000 EVB ships with the NcMultiSensorExample application loaded on
it.
In ISI mode, this example is identical to the NcSimpleIsiExample application. It uses one push button
(SW1) that represents a switch device, one LED (LED1) that represents a lamp device, a push button
(SW2) to initiate and complete an ISI connection, and an LED (LED2) that indicates the connection
status.
In Managed mode, this example uses two push buttons (SW1 and SW2) that represent switch devices
and two LEDs (LED1 and LED2) that represent lamp devices, a temperature sensor, a light level
sensor, an LCD display, and a joystick used to toggle the information displayed on the LCD and to
enter set points for light and temperature alarms.
Device Interface
The following section summarizes and then details the NcMultiSensorExample application.
Summary
The NcMultiSensorExample application includes the following functional blocks:
•
46
A Node Object functional block that contains SNVT_lux and SNVT_temp_p input network
variables storing the light and temperature values received from a remote device, and
SNVT_alarm_2 output network variables storing the alarm statuses of the local and remote
devices. The Node Object functional block also contains a SCPTnwrkCnfg configuration
property that stores the current network configuration mode (ISI or managed). This configuration
property is implemented as a configuration network variable (CPNV), and it is declared as a
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
non-const device-specific configuration property (a configuration property that can be changed
using the device hardware or an LNS network management tool such as the LonMaker tool).
•
An array of two Switch functional blocks representing the push button I/O objects and an array of
two Lamp functional blocks representing the LED I/O objects on the FT 5000 EVB. The Switch
and Lamp functional blocks contain SNVT_switch input and output network variables.
•
A LightSensor functional block representing the light-level sensor I/O object on the FT 5000
EVB. The LightSensor functional block includes a SNVT_lux output network variable, and a
SCPTluxSetpoint configuration property that stores the set point for the light alarm’s low limit.
•
A TempSensor functional block representing the temperature sensor I/O object on the FT 5000
EVB. The TempSensor functional block includes a SNVT_temp_p output network variable, and
a SCPThighLimTemp configuration property that stores the set point for the temperature alarm’s
high limit.
•
A Joystick functional block representing the joystick I/O object (SW3) on the FT 5000 EVB. The
Joystick functional block includes a SNVT_angle_deg (or SNVT_switch) output network
variable and a SCPTnvType configuration network variable.
Notes:
•
The SCPTnwrkCnfg, SCPThighLimTemp, SCPTluxSetpoint, and SCPTnvType configuration
properties are implemented as configuration network variables (CPNVs). As a result, these
network variables appear with an “nci” prefix in a Virtual functional block—instead of in their
parent functional blocks—when you are using the NcMultiSensorExample device in the LonMaker
tool or other network tool.
•
The Node Object, LightSensor, TempSensor and Joystick functional blocks implement
user-defined functional profile templates (UFPTs) that inherit from standard functional profile
templates (SFPTs).
UFPTs are used for the Node Object, LightSensor, TempSensor functional blocks because no
SFPT includes the configuration properties required by the example application for setting alarm
limits and viewing alarm conditions. A UFPT is used for the Joystick functional block because it
uses a changeable-type network variable that is not used by the SFPT from which it inherits.
Using UFPTs that inherit from SFPTs—as opposed to using implementation-specific network
variables and configuration properties—enables the device application to comply with
interoperability guidelines version 3.4 (or better) and pass LONMARK certification. A device
application that includes implementation-specific network variables does not comply with
interoperability guidelines version 3.4 (or better) and therefore cannot be certified by LONMARK.
The following diagram displays the functional blocks and network variables in the device interface
used by the NcMultiSensorExample application.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
47
nviRequest
nviLightRemote
mviTempRemote
nviSwitchFb
nviLamp
Node
Object
Switch[2]
Lamp[2]
Light
Sensor
Temp
Sensor
Joystick
nvoStatus
nvoAlarm
nvoFileDirectory
nviAlarmRemote
nvoSwitch
nvoLampFb
nvoLightLevel
nvoLightLevel
nvoTemperature
nvoJoystick
Details
The following sections detail the Node Object, Switch, Lamp, LightSensor, TempSensor, and
Joystick functional blocks in the NcMultiSensorExample device interface and their network variables
and configuration properties.
Node Object Functional Block
The NodeObject functional block returns invalid request for all requests that are not implemented,
returns an invalid ID for all IDs that are not implemented, and indicates the current network
configuration mode (ISI or managed).
The NodeObject functional block contains SNVT_lux and SNVT_temp_p input network variables.
These network variables store the light and temperature values received from a remote device. A
remote device is another device containing SNVT_lux and/or SNVT_temp_p output network
variables. Remote devices include a second FT 5000 EVB running the NcMultiSensorExample
application.
The NodeObject functional block also contains SNVT_alarm_2 output network variables storing the
alarm statuses of a local device (an FT 5000 EVB running the NcMultiSensorExample application) and
a remote device. You can monitor the light level, temperature, and alarm conditions of local and
remote devices from the LCD of the local device.
48
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
FB/NV/CP Name
Type
NodeObject
UFPTnodeObject
nviRequest
SNVT_obj_request
Input
nvoStatus
SNVT_obj_status
Output
nvoAlarm
SNVT_alarm_2
Output
Stores the alarm status of the local
device.
nvoFileDirectory
SNVT_address
Output
Address for file directory
containing descriptors for
configuration parameter files.
nviLightRemote
SNVT_lux
Input
Stores the light value received from
a remote device.
nviTempRemote
SNVT_temp_p
Input
Stores the temperature value
received from a remote device.
nvoAlarmRemote
SNVT_alarm_2
Output
Stores the alarm status of a remote
device.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
Direction
Description
Lets you monitor the functional
blocks within a device.
Lets you place a functional block in
the device interface in a specific
state. Handles RQ_NORMAL,
RQ_UPDATE_STATUS,
RQ_REPORT_MASK and
RQ_ENABLE requests.
Reports the status of a functional
block in the device interface.
49
nciNetConfig
SCPTnwrkCnfg
Input
Stores the current network
configuration mode (ISI or
managed).
nciDevMajVer
SCPTdevMajVer
Input
Sets the major version number for
the example application.
nciDevMinVer
SCPTdevMinVer
Input
Sets the minor version number for
the example application.
Switch Functional Blocks
The Switch functional blocks represent the SW1 and SW2 push buttons on the FT 5000 EVB. They
contain SNVT_switch input and output network variables.
FB/NV Name
Type
Direction
Description
Switch[2]
SFPTclosedLoopSensor
nvoSwitch
SNVT_switch
Output
Transmits the values and states of
the SW1 and SW2 buttons on the FT
5000 EVB.
nviSwitchFb
SNVT_switch
Input
Lets you create feedback
connections between the SW1 and
SW2 push buttons and
SNVT_switch network variables.
Represents the SW1 and SW2 push
buttons on the FT 5000 EVB.
Lamp Functional Blocks
The Lamp functional blocks represent LED1 and LED2 on the FT 5000 EVB. They contain
SNVT_switch input and output network variables.
50
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
FB/NV Name
Type
Direction
Description
Lamp[2]
SFPTopenLoopActuator
nviLamp
SNVT_switch
Output
Receives the value and state of
SNVT_switch network variables
and updates LED1 and LED2 on the
FT 5000 EVB accordingly.
nvoLampFb
SNVT_switch
Input
Lets you send the current value and
state of LED1 and LED2 to
SNVT_switch network variables in
feedback connections.
Represents LED1 and LED2 on the
FT 5000 EVB.
Light Sensor Functional Block
The LightSensor functional block represents the light-level sensor I/O object on the FT 5000 EVB. It
includes a SNVT_lux output network variable, and a mandatory SCPTluxSetpoint configuration
property that stores the set point for the light alarm’s low limit.
FB/NV/CP Name
Type
Direction
Description
LightSensor
UFPTlightSensor
nvoLightLevel
SNVT_lux
Output
Transmits the light level (lux)
measured by the light-level sensor
on the FT 5000 EVB.
nciLowLightAlarm
SCPTluxSetPoint
Input
Stores the set point for the light
alarm’s low limit.
Implemented as a configuration
network variable (CPNV) with a
default value of 40 lux.
Represents the light-level sensor
I/O object (LIGHT) on the right
side of the FT 5000 EVB.
Temperature Sensor Functional Block
The TempSensor functional block represents the temperature sensor I/O object on the FT 5000 EVB.
It includes a SNVT_temp_p output network variable, and a mandatory SCPThighLimTemp
configuration property that stores the set point for the temperature alarm’s high limit.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
51
FB/NV/CP Name
Type
Direction
Description
TempSensor
UFPThvacTempSensor
nvoTemperature
SNVT_temp_p
Output
Transmits the temperature (in
degrees Celsius) measured by the
temperature sensor on the FT 5000
EVB.
nciHighTempAlarm
SCPThighLimTemp
Input
Stores the set point for the
temperature alarm’s high limit.
Implemented as a configuration
network variable (CPNV) with a
default value of 35º C.
nciMaxSendTime
(heartbeat)
SCPTmaxSendTime
File CP
The maximum period of time that
can elapse without an update to
nvoTemperature being
transmitted.
Represents the temperature sensor
I/O object (TEMP) on the left side
of the FT 5000 EVB.
Implemented as a file
configuration property with a
default value of 60s.
nciMinSendTime
(throttle)
SCPTminSendTime
File CP
The minimum period of time that
must elapse before updates to
nvoTemperature are transmitted.
Implemented as a file
configuration property with a
default value of 1s.
nciMinDelta
SCPTminDeltaTemp
File CP
The minimum change to the value
of nvoTemperature required to
transmit an update.
Implemented as a file
configuration property with a
default value of 0.5º C.
Applies to the nvoTemperature
network variable.
52
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
Joystick Functional Block
The Joystick functional block represents the 5-way joystick I/O object (SW3) on the FT 5000 EVB.
The Joystick functional block includes an output network variable with a changeable type
(SNVT_angle_deg or SNVT_switch) that stores the value of the last button pressed on the joystick. It
has a SCPTnvType configuration network variable that stores the network variable type used by the
joystick output network variable.
FB/NV/CP Name
Type
Joystick
UFPTopenLoopSensor
nvoJoystick
SNVT_angle_deg
(default) or
SNVT_switch
Direction
Description
Represents the joystick I/O object on the
bottom center of the FT 5000 EVB.
Output
Stores the value of the last button pressed on
the joystick.
Has a changeable network variable type. By
default, it uses a SNVT_angle_deg type, but
you can change it to a SNVT_switch type.
The possible values for nvoJoystick are as
follows:
SNVT_angle_deg SNVT_switch
Center
0
0.0, 1
Up
90
1.0, 1
Left
180
2.0, 1
Down
270
3.0, 1
Right
360
4.0, 1
-1
0.0, 0
Nothing
nciNvType
SCPTnvType
Input
Stores the current data type used by
nvoJoystick (SNVT_angle_deg or
SNVT_switch.
Implemented as a configuration network
variable. Applies to the nvoJoystick
network variable.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
53
Device Application Summary
The following table summarizes the functionality provided by the Neuron C source (.nc) files and
header (.h) files that comprise the NcMultiSensorExample application. See Getting Started with
Developing Device Applications in Chapter 1 for more information about using the NodeBuilder tool
and Mini kit to view these Neuron C source and header files.
Main.nc
This source file includes a when-task that resets the FT 5000 EVB, and
functions that check the current length of the nvoJoystick network
variable and check the state of the I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVB:
when(reset)
Power cycles the LCD on the FT 5000 EVB, starts the light-level
sensor on the FT 5000 EVB, and puts the example application into
ISI mode if the NodeObject.nciNetConfig configuration property is
set to CFG_LOCAL or CFG_NUL (it is set to CFG_NUL the first
time the example application is reset so that the example application
initially starts in ISI mode).
This function also outputs debugging information that you can view
on your computer. All instances in the example application where
debugging information is output to your computer are indicated with
EvalBoardPrintDebug(string) functions.
To view this debugging output, connect your FT 5000 EVB to your
computer via the RS-232 or USB interface on the board and then use
a terminal emulation program on your computer. For more
information on connecting the FT 5000 EVB to a computer for
debugging purposes, see the FT 5000 EVB Hardware Guide.
unsigned get_nv_length_override(unsigned nvIndex)
Returns the length of the nvoJoystick changeable-type network
variable in the Joystick functional block. This function is required
to define the device application behavior when a request to change
the network variable type is received.
when(timer_expires(tTick))
This when-task uses a timer to check the state of the switches and
joystick on the FT 5000 EVB every millisecond, and to check the
state of the temperature sensor and light-level sensor every second.
Note: Instead of using a timer to evaluate changes or updates to
hardware I/O, you could use the when (io_changes) or when
(io_update_occurs) clauses or an interrupt-task. See Chapter 2 of
the Neuron C Programmer’s Guide for more information on these
when-clauses and Chapter 7 for more information on interrupt-tasks.
void CheckForLocalAlarms(void)
Checks whether the temperature sensor or alarm sensor on the FT
5000 EVB are in an alarm condition, and reports any alarms to the
Local Info Mode panel on the LCD of the local FT 5000 EVB.
void CheckForRemoteAlarms(void)
Checks whether the SNVT_temp_p or SNVT_lux network variables
on a device bound to the FT 5000 EVB (a remote device) are in an
alarm condition, and reports any alarms to the Remote Info Mode
panel on the LCD of the FT 5000 EVB (the local device).
54
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
FT5000EvalBoard.h
This header file includes the I/O object and function declarations for the
I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVB.
FT5000EvalBoard.nc
This source file includes the following functions that get and set values
for the I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVB:
void EvalBoardSetLed(Leds whichLed, boolean bOn)
Sets the state of a specific LED.
boolean EvalBoardGetSwitch(Switches whichSwitch)
Determines which switch has been updated.
unsigned long EvalBoardGetTemperature(void)
Gets the current temperature from the temperature sensor on the FT
5000 EVB and scales the raw value to the resolution required by
SNVT_temp_p.
unsigned long EvalBoardGetLightLevel(void)
Gets the current light level from the light-level sensor on the FT
5000 EVB and passes the value to the CalculateLux() function in
the lux.nc file. The CalculateLux() function converts the light level
from a raw value to lux.
JoystickDirection EvalBoardGetJoystick(void)
Determines in which direction the joystick on the FT 5000 EVB was
last pressed.
filesys.h
This header file contains information and function declarations for
configuration properties that have been implemented as configuration
files.
The TempSensor functional block includes SCPTminDeltaTemp,
SCPTminSendTime, SCPTmaxSendTime configuration properties that
are implemented as configuration files.
IsiImplementation.nc
This source file contains the device application’s implementation of the
ISI protocol. See the ISI Protocol Specification and ISI Programmer’s
Guide for more information on ISI and developing an application using
the Neuron ISI library.
Joystick.nc
This source file implements the Joystick functional block, and it includes
the following functions that process type changes to the nvoJoystick
network variable and process changes in the direction of the joystick on
the FT 5000 EVB.
when (nv_update_occurs(nciNvType))
Calls the ProcessTypeChange() function if the Joystick functional
block is enabled. The ProcessTypeChange() function is used to
change the type of the nvoJoystick changeable-type network
variable. The nvoJoystick network variable uses a
SNVT_angle_deg type by default, but it can be changed to a
SNVT_switch type.
void ProcessJoystick(void)
Stores the current direction of the joystick.
void ProcessTypeChange(void)
Changes the type of the nvoJoystick network variable to a
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
55
SNVT_angle_deg or SNVT_switch type. This function first checks
whether the type of the nvoJoystick network variable is legal
processes the change if it is or disables the Joystick functional block
if it is not, and then calls a function to propagate the appropriate
value to the nvoJoystick network variable.
LCD.h
This header file contains the declarations required for and associated with
the implementation of the LCD. It includes definitions for the modes
used on the LCD, the states used in the Alarm Config Mode, the types of
data displayed on the LCD, and various helper functions.
LCD.nc
This source file contains the functions required for using the LCD. It
includes functions that drive the LCD through various modes and display
the light, temperature, and alarm condition values on the LCD.
Lamp.nc
This source file implements the Lamp functional block. It contains a
single when-task that illuminates or extinguishes an LED on the FT 5000
EVB when the nviLamp network variable in the Lamp functional block
is updated.
This when-task also copies the updated value to the nvoLampFb
network variable in the Lamp functional block. This value can then be
passed to any SNVT_switch network variables bound to the
nvoLampFb network variable in a feedback connection. See Testing
Switch and Lamp Devices in Chapter 1 for more information on creating
and using feedback connections.
LightSensor.nc
This source file implements the LightSensor functional block. It
contains a single when-task that sets the value of the nvoLightLevel
network variable, passes the value to a function in the LCD.nc file for
display on the LCD, and evaluates light level alarm conditions.
Lux.nc
This source file contains a single CalculateLux() function that converts
the light level from a raw value to lux. The raw value is received from
the EvalBoardGetLightLevel() function in the FT5000EvalBoard.nc
file.
NodeObject.nc
This source file implements the NodeObject functional block. It
includes a when-task for processing requests received from the
nviRequest network variable, and when-tasks for processing updates to
light level and temperature input network variables values received from
a remote device.
when (nv_update_occurs(nviRequest))
This function routes RQ_NORMAL, RQ_REPORT_MASK,
RQ_UPDATE_STATUS, RQ_DISABLED, and RQ_ENABLE
requests to the subject functional block or functional blocks in the
device application.
Note: You must implement the RQ_NORMAL,
RQ_REPORT_MASK, RQ_UPDATE_STATUS requests in your
device application. The RQ_DISABLED and RQ_ENABLE
requests are optional.
when (nv_update_occurs(nviTempRemote))
Outputs updates to the NodeObject.nviTempRemote input network
variable to the LCD on the FT 5000 EVB, and checks the alarm
condition of the nviTempRemote network variable and outputs it to
the LCD.
56
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
when (nv_update_occurs(nviLightRemote))
Outputs updates to the NodeObject. nviLightRemote input
network variable to the LCD on the FT 5000 EVB, and checks the
alarm condition of the nviTempRemote network variable and
outputs it to the LCD.
when (nv_update_occurs(nciNetConfig))
Puts the example application in ISI or managed mode when the value
of the NodeObject. nciNetConfig input network variable changes.
Switch.nc
This source file implements the Switch functional block. It contains a
when-task that handles the switch-light connections if the
MultiSensorExample is running in ISI mode.
It includes ProcessSwitch1() and ProcessSwitch2() functions that get
the current state of their respective switches, evaluate whether the state
has changed, and if the state of the switch has changed, toggles the value
and state of the nvoSwitch network variable and copies the updated value
and state to the nviSwitchFb network variable.
TempSensor.nc
This source file implements the TempSensor functional block. It
contains a ProcessTemperatureSensor() that gets the current
temperature, evaluates whether the temperature change is greater than the
value defined in the nciMinDelta configuration property, which is 0.5°C,
and if so sets the nvoTemperature network variable to the current
temperature.
The function propagates the value of the nvoTemperature network
variable on the network as long as the nciMaxSendTime (heartbeat)
configuration property is greater than the nciSendTime (throttle)
configuration property. These configuration properties control how often
updates to the nvoTemperature network variable are propagated.
The ProcessTemperatureSensor() function also passes the temperature
to a function in the LCD.nc file for display on the LCD, and evaluates
temperature alarm conditions.
Using the Joystick and LCD
When you run the NcMultiSensorExample application in managed mode, the Joystick lets you navigate
the panels in the LCD and set the light and temperature alarm levels. The following sections describe
how to use the joystick and LCD on the FT 5000 EVB.
Welcome Panel
When you start the NcMultiSensorExample application, the LCD displays the Welcome Mode panel.
Echelon Multi Sensor
Neuron C Application
Please use joystick
for other modes.
You can toggle the joystick down or press the center button to display the Local Info Mode panel.
Local Info Mode Panel
The Local Info Mode panel displays the current temperature, light level, and alarm conditions of the
local FT 5000 EVB running the NcMultiSensorExample application.
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
57
Local
Light :
Temp :
Alarms:
Info Mode
400
Lux
25.0
C
None
If the current light level or temperature reaches or exceeds their limits set in the Alarm Config Mode
panel, that alarm will appear in the Alarms property. For example, if both the light level and
temperature exceed their alarm set points, the Alarms property in the Local Info Mode panel would
appear as follows:
Local
Light :
Temp :
Alarms:
Info Mode
12
Lux
36.5
C
Light & Temp
You can display the current temperature in Fahrenheit by toggling the joystick sideways. You can
change it back to Celsius by toggling the joystick sideways again. Changing the temperature format in
the Local Info Mode panel also changes the format used for the high temperature alarm setpoint in the
Alarm Config Mode panel.
Local
Light :
Temp :
Alarms:
Info Mode
400
Lux
97.7
F
Temp
You can toggle the joystick down or press the center button to display the Remote Info Mode panel.
You can toggle the joystick up to return to the Welcome Mode panel.
Remote Info Mode Panel
The Remote Info Mode panel displays the current temperature, light level, and alarm conditions of a
remote device that you have connected to an FT 5000 EVB running the NcMultiSensorExample
application in managed mode. A remote device may be any device containing SNVT_lux and/or
SNVT_temp_p output network variables, including a second FT 5000 EVB running the
NcMultiSensorExample application.
You can connect the network variables of two FT 5000 EVBs running the NcMultiSensorExample
application in managed mode using the LonMaker tool or other network tool. For more information
how to do this, see Creating Connections in Managed Mode in Chapter 1.
Remote
Light :
Temp :
Alarms:
Info Mode
420
Lux
27.0
C
None
You can display the current temperature of the remote device in Fahrenheit by toggling the joystick
sideways. You can change it back to Celsius by toggling the joystick sideways again.
If you have not connected your FT 5000 EVB to a remote device, “Disconnected” appears in the Light
and Temp properties.
Remote
Light :
Temp :
Alarms:
Info Mode
Disconnected
Disconnected
None
You can toggle the joystick down or press the center button to display the Alarm Config Mode panel.
You can toggle the joystick up to return to the Local Info Mode panel.
58
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
Alarm Config Mode Panel
This panel displays the set points for the light and temperature alarm conditions and lets you change
them.
The Light property displays the lower alarm limit for the lux of the local device. If the current lux is
less than or equal to this value, an alarm condition for the light will be displayed in the Local Info
Mode panel. The default light lower alarm limit is 40 lux. This alarm setpoint is stored in the
nciLowLightAlarm configuration property in the LightSensor functional block.
The Temp property displays the upper alarm limit for the temperature of the local device. If the
current temperature is greater than or equal to this value, an alarm condition for the light will be
displayed in the Local Info Mode panel. The default temperature upper alarm limit is 35.0°C
(95.0°F). This alarm setpoint is stored in the nciHighTempAlarm configuration property in the
TempSensor functional block.
Alarm Config Mode
Light :
40
Lux
Temp :
35.0
C
Cancel<- Ok
To change the light and temperature alarm conditions, follow these steps:
1.
Toggle the joystick up once to change the setpoint for the temperature alarm. Press the joystick
left button to decrease the temperature 0.5°C, and press the joystick right button to increase the
temperature 0.5°C.
2.
Toggle the joystick up again to change the setpoint for the light alarm. Press the joystick left
button to decrease the lux by 5, and press the joystick right button to increase the lux by 5.
3.
To save your changes and return to the Welcome Mode panel, Toggle the joystick down once or
twice to point to Ok (once if the pointer is at the Temp property, and twice if the pointer is at the
Light property), and then press the center button on the joystick.
To cancel all changes and return to the Welcome Mode panel, Toggle the joystick down once or
twice (once if the pointer is at the Temp property, and twice if the pointer is at the Light
property), press the joystick left button to point to Cancel, and then press the center button on the
joystick.
I/O Interaction
The following table lists the I/O pins used for the SW1 button, SW2 button, LED1, LED2, the
LIGHT level sensor, the TEMP sensor, and joystick (SW3) on the FT 5000 EVB.
I/O
Pin Used
I/O Model
LED1
IO2
Bit I/O
LED2
IO3
Bit I/O
SW1
IO9
Bit I/O
SW2
IO4, IO5, IO6
Bitshift I/O. These pins are also used for input from the
Joystick on the FT 5000 EVB.
TEMP
IO7
Touch I/O. The temperature sensor uses a 1-Wire
Dallas DS18S20 digital thermometer device.
LIGHT
IO0, IO1
I2C. The I2C address for the light level sensor is 0x39.
SW3 (Joystick)
IO4, IO5, IO6
Bitshift I/O. These pins are also used for input from the
SW2 button. A total of 6 bits are used in each shift
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
59
I/O
Pin Used
I/O Model
operation (5 joystick inputs and 1 switch input).
LCD
IO0, IO1
I2C. The I2C address for the LCD is 0x28.
ISI Mode
The following graphic illustrates the interaction between the I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVB and the
device interface used by the NcMultiSensorExample application in ISI mode. This is the same as the
NcSimpleIsiExample.
Managed Mode
The following graphic illustrates the interaction between the I/O devices on the FT 5000 EVB and the
device interface used by the NcMultiSensorExample application in managed mode.
60
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
nvoSwitch[0]
SW1
nviLamp[0]
LED
1
nvoSwitch[1]
SW2
nviLamp[1]
LED
2
lux
nvoLightLevel
LIGHT
temperature
nvoTemperature
LCD
TEMP
lux setpoint
nvoAlarm
nciLowAlarmLight
nciHighAlarmTemp
temp setpoint
LCD
Up
LCD Control
nvoJoystick
C
Down
Joystick (SW3)
lux
nviLightRemote
LCD
nviTempRemote
temperature
nvoAlarmRemote
Remote Device
LonMaker Tool
FT 5000 EVB Examples Guide
61
62
Details of the FT 5000 EVB Examples
Appendix A
Glossary
This appendix provides definitions for many terms commonly used with the FT 5000
EVB example applications.
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Application Device
A LONWORKS device that runs an ISO/IEC 14908-1 application (OSI Layer 7). The application may
run on a Neuron Chip or Smart Transceiver, in which case the device is called a “Neuron hosted”
device.
Application Image
Device firmware that consists of the object code generated by the Neuron C compiler from the user’s
application program and other application-specific parameters, including the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Network variable fixed and self-identification data
Network variable device interface data
Program ID string
Optional self-identification and self-documentation data
Number of address table entries
Number of domain table entries
Number and size of network buffers
Number and size of application buffers
Number of receive transaction records
Input clock speed of target Neuron Chip or Smart Transceiver
Transceiver type and bit rate
Application Program
The software code in a LONWORKS device that defines how it functions. The application program,
also referred to as the application, may be in the device when you purchase it, or you may load it into
the device from application image files (.APB, .NDL, and .NXE extensions) using the LonMaker tool
or other network management tool. The application program interfaces with the ISO/IEC 14908-1
firmware to communicate over the network. It may reside completely in the Neuron Chip or Smart
Transceiver, or it may reside on an attached host processor (in a host-based device).
Binding
Process of connecting network variables. Binding creates logical connections (virtual wires) between
LONWORKS devices. Connections define the data that devices share with one another. Tables
containing binding information are stored in the device’s non-volatile memory, and may be updated by
the LonMaker tool or the ISI protocol.
Changeable-Type Network Variable
A network variable that has a type and length that can be changed to that of another network variable
type of equal or smaller size. You can use changeable-type network variables to implement generic
functional blocks that work with different types of inputs and outputs.
Channel
The physical media between devices upon which the devices communicate. The ISO/IEC 14908-1
protocol is media independent; therefore, numerous types of media can be used for channels: twisted
pair, power line, fiber optics, IP, and RF, and other types.
Commissioning
The process in which the LonMaker tool or other network management tool downloads network and
application configuration data into a physical device. For devices whose application programs are not
contained in ROM, the network management tool also downloads the application program into
non-volatile RAM in the device. Devices are usually either commissioned and tested one at a time, or
commissioned and then brought online and tested incrementally.
Configuration Properties (CPs)
Configuration properties are data values that define the behavior of an application device by
determining the manner in which device application data is manipulated and when device application
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Appendix A – Glossary
data is transmitted. Configuration properties can be applied to the device, functional block, or network
variable level. Configuration properties can determine the functions to be performed on the values
stored in network variables. For example, a configuration property may specify a minimum change
that must occur on a physical input to a device before the corresponding output network variable is
updated.
Configured
A device state where the device has both an application image and a configured network image. This
indicates that the device is ready for network operation.
Connection
The implicit addressing established during binding. A connection links one or more logical outputs
(network variables or message tags) to one or more logical inputs. A connection may be represented
with a connector shape or a reference connection.
Connect Button
A button on an ISI device that the user can press to create a connection. The Connect button on an FT
5000 EVB running the NcSimpleIsiExample or NcMultiSensorExample application is the SW2 button
on the right side of the board.
Connect Light
An LED on an ISI device that provides feedback related to the status of an ISI connection. The
Connect light on an FT 5000 EVB running the NcSimpleIsiExample or NcMultiSensorExample
application is LED2, which is located directly above the SW2 button.
Connection Host
A device that initiates the enrollment process by sending a connection invitation specifying a
connection assembly.
Connection Member
A device that has joined an ISI connection, but is not the connection host.
Connector Shape
A single connector used to connect a pair of network variables within the same subsystem.
Control Network Protocol (CNP)
The ISO/IEC 14908-1 Control Network Protocol. The CNP is a complete seven-layer communications
protocol, with each layer optimized to the needs of control applications. The seven layers follow the
reference model for open systems interconnection (OSI) developed by the International Standard
Organization (ISO).
Data Point
A network variable, configuration property, or functional block state (enabled or in override) that the
LonMaker tool can monitor and/or control.
Data Point Shape
A shape in the LonMaker Basic Stencil of the LonMaker tool that you can use to monitor and control
the values of network variables and configuration properties, and the states of functional blocks
(enabled or in override).
Device
A device that communicates on a LONWORKS network using CNP. A device may be an application
device, network service device, or a router. Devices are sometimes referred to as nodes in LONWORKS
documentation.
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Device Interface
The logical interface to a device, abbreviated as XIF. A device’s interface specifies the number and
types of functional blocks; number, types, directions, and connection attributes of network variables;
and the number of message tags. The program ID for a device is used as the key to identify each
device interface. Each program ID uniquely defines the static portion of the interface. However, two
devices with identical static portions may differ if dynamic network variables are added or removed, or
if the types of changeable network variables are changed. Thus it is possible to have devices with the
same program ID but different device interfaces.
Device Interface File (XIF)
A file that documents a device’s interface with a network. The file can be a text file (.XIF extension),
or it can be a binary file (.XFB extension).
Device-Specific Configuration Property
A configuration property that has values that can be modified independent of the network database.
Changes made to a device-specific configuration property are not updated in the network database.
Device Template
A device template contains all the attributes of a given device type, such as its functional blocks,
network variables, and configuration properties. You can create a device template by importing a
device interface (XIF) file supplied by the device manufacturer, or by uploading the device interface
definition from the physical device. A device template is identified by its name and its program ID.
Both must be unique within a network—you cannot have two device templates with the same name or
the same program ID in a single network.
Download
An installation process in which data, such as the application program, network configuration, and/or
application configuration, is transferred over the network into a device.
Free Topology
A connection scheme for the communication bus that eases traditional transmission line restrictions of
trunks and drops of specified lengths and at specified distances, and terminations at both ends. Free
topology allows wire to be strung from any point to any other, in bus, daisy chained, star, ring, or loop
topologies, or combinations thereof. It only requires one termination anywhere in the network. This
can reduce the cost of wiring significantly.
FT 5000 EVB
A LONWORKS evaluation board that uses Echelon’s FT 5000 Smart Transceiver. It features a compact
design that includes the following I/O devices that you can use to develop prototype devices and run
the FT 5000 EVB examples: 4 x 20 character LCD display, 4-way joystick with center push button, 2
push-button inputs, 2 LED outputs, light-level sensor, and temperature sensor.
FT 5000 Smart Transceiver
A chip that integrates a high-performance Neuron 5000 processor core and a TP/FT-10 transceiver.
The FT 5000 Smart Transceiver, combined with an FT-X3 Communications Transformer and
inexpensive serial memories, provides a lower-cost, higher-performance alternative to the previous
generation LONWORKS TP/FT-10 solution. See Neuron 5000 Processor for more information about
the key features of the Neuron 5000 processor.
FT 3150 EVB
A LONWORKS evaluation board that uses Echelon’s FT 3150 Smart Transceiver. It is connected to a
MiniGizmo board that includes eight push buttons, eight LEDs, a temperature sensor, and a piezo
buzzer. In a managed network, you can bind compatible network variables in applications running on
the FT 3150 EVB and FT 5000 EVBs. In a self-installed network, you can use the ISI protocol to
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Appendix A – Glossary
connect the FT 3150 EVB running the MGSwitch, MGLight, or MGDemo applications to an FT 5000
EVB running the NcSimpleIsiExample or NcMultiSensorExample applications.
FT 3120 EVB
A LONWORKS evaluation board that uses Echelon’s FT 3120 Smart Transceiver. It is connected to a
MiniGizmo board that includes eight push buttons, eight LEDs, a temperature sensor, and a piezo
buzzer. In a managed network, you can bind compatible network variables in applications running on
the FT 3120 EVB and FT 5000 EVBs. In a self-installed network, you can use the ISI protocol to
connect the FT 3120 EVB running the MGSwitch or MGLight applications to an FT 5000 EVB running
the NcSimpleIsiExample or NcMultiSensorExample applications.
Functional Block (FB)
A collection of network variables, configuration properties, and associated behavior that defines a
specific system functionality. Functional blocks define standard formats and semantics for how
information is exchanged between devices on a network. Each functional block implements a
functional profile.
Functional Block Array
A set of identical functional blocks. A functional block array is useful if your device contains two or
more identical switches, lights, dials, controllers, or other I/O devices that will each have an identical
external interface. In addition, a functional block array saves code space and reduces the number of
when-tasks in your code.
Functional Profile
A template for a functional block that enables equipment specifiers to select the functionality they need
for a system. Each functional profile defines mandatory and optional network variable and
configuration property members along with their intended usage. A number of generic standard
functional profiles are available for generic devices such as simple sensor and actuators. Many
industry-specific standard functional profiles are available for industry-specific applications.
Industry-specific standard profiles are developed through a review and approval process, including a
cross-functional review to ensure the profile will interoperate within an individual subsystem and also
provide interoperability with other subsystems in the network.
User-defined functional profiles can be created if no appropriate standard profiles are available.
I/O Object
An instantiation of an I/O model. An I/O objects consists of a specific I/O model, and its pin
assignment, modifiers, and name.
i.LON IP-852 Router
An i.LON IP-852 router forwards ISO/IEC 14908-2 packets enveloped in ISO/IEC 14908-4 packets
over an IP-852 channel. i.LON IP-852 routers include the i.LON SmartServer with IP-852 routing,
i.LON 100 e3 plus Internet Server with IP-852 routing, and the i.LON 600 LONWORKS-IP Server.
IP-852 Channel
Also known as an ISO/IEC 14908-4 channel or an ANSI/CEA-852 LONWORKS/IP channel, an IP-852
channel carries ISO/IEC 14908-1 packets enveloped in ISO/IEC 14908-4 packets. An IP-852 channel
is a LONWORKS channel that uses a shared IP network to connect IP-852 devices and is defined by a
group of IP addresses. These IP addresses form virtual wires that connect IP-852 devices so they can
communicate with each other. IP-852 devices include the LNS Server computers, LNS client
computers, LonMaker computers, and i.LON IP-852 routers. An IP-852 channel enables a client
computer to connect directly to a LONWORKS network and perform monitoring and control tasks.
IP-852 Network Interface
An IP-852 network interface enables IP-852 devices such as LNS Server computers, LNS client
computers, LonMaker computers, and i.LON IP-852 routers to be attached to IP-852 channels. An
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IP-852 network interface requires that the LONWORKS-IP Configuration Server be configured before
trying to communicate with remote devices or remote computers.
Interoperable Self-Installation (ISI) Protocol
The standard protocol for performing self-installation in LONWORKS networks. ISI is an
application-layer protocol that lets you install and connect devices without using a separate network
management tool. It is typically used in home networks, and may be used in any network with less
than 200 devices with simple connection and configuration requirements.
ISI Mode
An installation scenario in which the ISI protocol is used (instead of the LonMaker tool or other
network tool) to install devices and create network variables connections.
LNS
A network operating system that provides services for interoperable LONWORKS installation,
maintenance, monitoring, and control tools such as the LonMaker tool. Using the services provided by
the LNS client/server architecture, tools from multiple vendors can work together to install, maintain,
monitor, and control LONWORKS networks. The LNS architecture consists of the following elements:
1.
LNS client applications, which can be used to develop, monitor and control LONWORKS networks.
2.
The LNS Object Server ActiveX Control, which is a language-independent programming interface
for LNS client applications to access the LONWORKS network.
3.
The LNS Server, which manages the network and maintains a database containing the network
configuration.
LNS Network Database
Each LONWORKS network has its own LNS network database (also referred to as the network
database) that is managed and maintained by an LNS Server. The network database includes the
network and device configuration data for that network. The network database also contains extension
records, which are user-defined records for storing application data.
LNS Server Computer
A computer running the LNS Server software. The LNS Server computer contains the LNS global
database, which includes the group of LONWORKS networks being managed by the LNS Server, plus a
network database for each network managed by the server.
Local Client
An LNS application running on the same computer as the LNS Server.
Local Device
An FT 5000 EVB board running the NcMultiSensorExample application that receives SNVT_lux
and/or SNVT_temp_p output network variable updates from another device (a remote device). The
local device displays the temperature and light level values received from the remote device in the
Remote Info Mode panel on its LCD. A remote device may be another FT 5000 EVB board running
the NcMultiSensorExample application.
LonMaker Browser
An LNS plug-in that provides a table view of the network variables and configuration properties of
selected devices and/or functional blocks. The LonMaker Brower can be used to monitor and control
the network variables and configuration properties in a network.
LonMaker Drawing
A LonMaker drawing contains the graphical representation of a LONWORKS network.
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Appendix A – Glossary
LonMaker Integration Tool
An LNS network tool that uses Visio as its graphical user interface. The LonMaker tool is used to
design, commission, maintain, and document distributed control networks comprised of both
LONMARK and other LONWORKS devices.
LonMaker Network Design
A LonMaker network design consists of an LNS network database and a LonMaker drawing.
LonMaker Shape
A reusable drawing object related specifically to a LONWORKS device.
LonMark
A distinctive logo applied to LONWORKS devices that have been certified to the interoperability
standards of the LONMARK Interoperability International.
LonTalk Protocol
Echelon’s implementation of the ISO/IEC 14908-1 Control Network Protocol (CNP). The LonTalk
protocol provides a standard method for devices on a LONWORKS network to exchange data. The
LonTalk protocol defines the format of the messages being transmitted between devices, and it defines
the actions expected when one device sends a message to another. The protocol normally takes the
form of embedded software or firmware code in each device on the network.
LONWORKS 2.0 Platform
The next generation of LONWORKS products designed to both increase the power and capability of
LONWORKS devices, and to decrease the costs of device development and devices.
LONWORKS Network
A network of intelligent devices (such as sensors, actuators, and controllers) that communicate with
each other using a common protocol over one or more communications channels.
LONWORKS Technology
The technology that allows for the creation of open, interoperable control networks that communicate
with the ISO/IEC 14908-1 Control Network Protocol. LONWORKS technology consists of the tools
and components required to build intelligent device and to install them in control networks.
Managed Network
A network where a shared network management server, such as LNS, is used to perform network
installation.
Mandatory Network Variable/Configuration Property
A network variable/configuration property that must be implemented by the functional block, as
specified by the functional profile that the functional block is instantiating.
Mini Kit
A tool for evaluating the development of control network applications with the ISO/IEC 14908
standard. You can use the Mini kit to develop a prototype or production control system that requires
networking, particularly in the rapidly growing, price-sensitive mass markets of smart light switches,
thermostats, and other simple devices and sensors. You can also use the Mini kit to evaluate the
development of applications for such control networks using the LONWORKS platform.
Monitored Connection
A network variable connection in which the current values are being monitored, typically by an HMI.
The connector shape and reference connection in a LonMaker drawing demonstrate monitored
connections.
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Network Interface
A LONWORKS device that provides a layer 2 or layer 5 LonTalk interface to an external host computer
such as a computer or a handheld maintenance tool. Network interfaces include IP-852 interfaces
(i.LON SmartServer with IP-852 routing, i.LON 100 e3 plus Internet Server with IP-852 routing, and
the i.LON 600 LONWORKS-IP Server); the U10 USB network interface; and PCC-10 and PCLTA-10,
20, and 21 PCI network interfaces
Network Variable (NV)
Network variables allow a device to send and receive data over the network to and from other devices.
Network variables are data items (such as temperature, the state of a switch, or actuator position
setting) that a particular device application program expects to receive from other devices on the
network (an input network variable) or expects to make available to other devices on the network (an
output network variable).
Network Variable/Configuration Property Types
A network variable or configuration property type defines the structure and contents of the data object.
A network variable type can be either a standard network variable type (SNVT) or a user-defined
network variable type (UNVT). A configuration property type can be a standard configuration
property type (SCPT) or a user-defined configuration property type (UCPT)
Neuron 5000 Processor
Echelon’s next-generation Neuron chip designed for the LONWORKS 2.0 platform. The Neuron 5000
processor is faster, smaller, and cheaper that previous-generation Neuron chips. The Neuron 5000
processor includes a fourth processor for interrupt service routine (ISR) processing.
The Neuron 5000 processor supports an internal system clock speed of 5 MHz to 80 MHz (using a 10
MHz external crystal). The Neuron 5000 processor includes 16KB of on-chip ROM to store the
Neuron firmware image and 64 KB on-chip RAM (44 KB is user-accessible). The Neuron 5000
processor requires at least 2KB of off-chip EEPROM to store configuration data, and you can use a
larger capacity EEPROM device or an additional flash device (up to 64KB) to store your application
code, configuration data, and an upgradable Neuron firmware image. The Neuron 5000 processor
supports the mapping of external non-volatile memory from 0x4000 to 0xDFFF in the Neuron address
space (a maximum of 42KB).
Neuron C
A programming language based on ANSI C that you can use to develop applications for Neuron Chips
and Smart Transceivers. It includes network communication, I/O, interrupt-handling, and
event-handling extensions to ANSI C, which make it a powerful tool for the development of
LONWORKS device applications.
Neuron Chip
A semiconductor component specifically designed for providing intelligence and networking
capabilities to low-cost control devices. The Neuron Chip includes a communication port for
connections to various network types.
Neuron Core
The Neuron core includes up to four processors that provide both communication and application
processing capabilities. Two processors execute the layer 2 through 6 implementation of the ISO/IEC
14908-1 Control Network Protocol and the third executes layer 7 and the application code. Series
5000 chips include a fourth processor for interrupt service routine (ISR) processing.
Neuron Firmware
A complete operating system including an implementation of the ISO/IEC 14908-1 protocol used by a
Neuron Chip or Smart Transceiver. The Neuron firmware is a program that is inserted into memory of
a Neuron Chip or Smart Transceiver.
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Appendix A – Glossary
Neuron ID
A 48-bit number assigned to each Neuron core at manufacture time. Each Neuron Chip has a unique
Neuron ID, making it like a serial number.
Node Object
A functional block that monitors the status of all functional blocks in a device and makes the status
information available for monitoring by the LonMaker tool. A LONMARK-compliant device that has
more than one functional block must have a node object.
NodeBuilder Tool
A hardware and software platform that is used to develop applications for Neuron Chips and Echelon
Smart Transceivers. The NodeBuilder tool provides complete support for creating, debugging,
testing, and maintaining LONWORKS devices. You can use the NodeBuilder tool all to create many
types of devices, including VAV controllers, thermostats, washing machines, card-access readers,
refrigerators, lighting ballasts, blinds, and pumps. You can use these devices in a variety of systems
including building controls, factory automation, and transportation.
Non-const Device-specific Configuration Property
A configuration property that can be changed by the device application, an LNS network tool such as
the LonMaker tool, or another tool not based on LNS. An example of a non-const device-specific
configuration property is the SCPTnwrkCnfg configuration property in the Node Object functional
block of the NcMultiSensorExample and NcSimpleIsiExample applications. This configuration
property stores the current network configuration mode (ISI or managed) of the example application.
OffNet
A management mode in which network configuration changes are stored in the network database, but
not propagated to the devices on the network. To send the changes to the devices, you place the
LonMaker tool OnNet. If the LonMaker tool is OffNet and attached to the network, you can still
perform read operations on the network.
OnNet
A management mode in which network configuration changes are propagated immediately to the
devices on the network.
Optional Network Variable/Configuration Property
A network variable or configuration property listed as an optional component in a functional profile.
Functional blocks can elect not to implement optional network variables or configuration properties
specified by the functional profile that the functional block is instantiating.
PCC-10
A type II PC (formerly PCMCIA) card network interface that includes an integral TP/FT-10
transceiver. Other transceiver types can be connected to the PCC-10 via external transceiver “pods”.
PCLTA-20/21
A ½ size ISA card network interface.
Peer-To-Peer
A control strategy in which independent intelligent devices share information directly with each other
and make their own control decisions without the need or delay of using an intermediate, central, or
master controller. Because of the enhanced system reliability introduced by eliminating the master (a
single point of failure) and the reduced installation and configuration cost inherent in peer-to-peer
designs, LONWORKS technology is intended to implement a peer-to-peer control strategy.
Program ID
A unique, 16-hex digit ID that uniquely identifies the device application.
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Remote Client
An LNS application that communicates with the LNS Server (running on a separate computer) over a
LonWorks channel (an IP-852 or TP/XF-1250 channel) or over an LNS/IP interface. The NodeBuilder
tool cannot be run on a remote client, but the LonMaker tool and other LNS client software can.
Remote Device
A device that sends SNVT_lux and/or SNVT_temp_p output network variables updates to an FT 5000
EVB running the NcMultiSensorExample application (the local device). The temperature and light
level values are displayed in the Remote Info Mode panel on the LCD of the local device. A remote
device may be another FT 5000 EVB running the NcMultiSensorExample application.
Remote Network Interface (RNI)
A network interface that enables you to connect an LNS or OpenLDV-based application to a
LONWORKS network via a TCP/IP connection. RNIs include the i.LON SmartServer, i.LON 100 e3
plus Internet Server, and i.LON 600 LONWORKS-IP Server.
Resource File
A file included with a LONWORKS device that defines the components of the device interface to be
used by integration and development tools. Defined components include network variable types,
configuration property types, and functional profiles implemented by the device application. Resource
files hold definitions of standard and user-defined resources, including network variable and
configuration property types, functional profiles, enumerations, and formatting rules to display
network variable and configuration properties in a readable form. Resource files are used during
device development, installation and management. Standard resource files are distributed by
LONMARK International. User-defined resource files are created and managed during device
development.
SLTA-10
A serial network interface with built-in twisted pair transceiver that connects to any host with an
EIA-232 (formerly RS232) port. It can also connect to the host remotely using a modem.
The SLTA-10 network interface is supported, but not recommended unless dial-up operation through a
modem and a serial connection is required. You should use a PCC-10 or U10 USB network interface
instead. For accessing remote networks, you can use an RNI such as the i.LON SmartServer, i.LON
100 e3 plus Internet Server, or i.LON 600 LONWORKS-IP Server.
Self-Installed Network
A network that has network addresses and connections created without the use of a network
management tool. In a self-installed network, each device contains code (the Neuron C ISI library,
which implements the ISI protocol) that replaces parts of the network management server’s
functionality, resulting in a network that no longer requires a special tool or server to establish network
communication or to change the configuration of the network.
Service Button
A push button or other actuator on a LONWORKS device that is used during installation to acquire the
device’s Neuron ID. For a Neuron hosted device, the button is connected to the service pin of the
Neuron Chip or Smart Transceiver. When this pin is activated, the Neuron core sends a broadcast
message containing its Neuron ID and program ID, which is called service pin message or packet. The
method used to implement the Service button varies from device to device. Examples of mechanical
methods include grounding via a push button or using a magnetic reed switch. By attaching one of the
device’s I/O pins to the service pin, the service pin can also be put under software control as long as
the application code is being executed. For example, the device can ground the pin when the device is
moved or when a predefined series of I/O occurs. The service pin can also be used to drive an LED
that indicates the device’s state. The service LED is solid on when the device is applicationless, blinks
slowly when the device has an application and is unconfigured, is off when the device has an
application and is configured. Some applications also implement additional service pin blink patterns.
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Appendix A – Glossary
Standard Configuration Property Type (SCPT)
A standard configuration property type defined by LONMARK International to facilitate
interoperability. SCPTs are defined for a wide range of configuration properties used in many kinds of
functional profiles, such as hysteresis bands, default values, minimum and maximum limits, gain
settings, and delay times. SCPTs should be used in a LONWORKS network wherever applicable. In
situations where there is not an appropriate SCPT available, manufacturers may define UCPTs for
configuring their devices.
In addition to standard or user-defined network variable types, which define the data type, formatting
rules, limits and units, SCPT also define semantics. For example, the SNVT_time_sec standard
network variable type defines a data type for exchanging durations of time, in seconds. The
SCPTmaxSentTime standard configuration property type references SNVT_time_sec, but adds
semantics by clarifying that this configuration property defines the maximum period of time between
consecutive transmissions of the current value. See types.lonmark.org for a current list and
documentation.
Standard Functional Profile
A standard set of functional profiles defined by LONMARK International. See types.lonmark.org for a
current list and documentation. See Functional Profile for more information about functional profiles.
Standard Network Variable Type (SNVT)
A standard set of network variable types defined by LONMARK International to facilitate
interoperability by providing a well-defined interface for communication between devices made by
different manufacturers. See types.lonmark.org for a current list and documentation.
Stencil
A collection of master shapes that can be reused in Visio.
TP/FT-10
The free topology twisted pair LONWORKS channel type, 78Kbps bit rate.
U10 USB Network Interface.
A low-cost, high-performance LONWORKS network interface with a built-in TP/FT-10 transceiver
that can be used with USB-enabled computers and controllers.
User-defined Configuration Property Type (UCPT)
A non-standard data structure used for configuration of the application program in a LONMARK device.
UCPTs should be used only when there is no appropriate standard configuration property type (SCPT)
defined. LONMARK-certified devices must have UCPTs documented in resource files according to a
standard format, in order to allow the devices to be configured without the need for proprietary
configuration tools. See Standard Configuration Property Type (SCPT) for more information on
configuration property types.
User-defined Functional Profile
A non-standard functional profile defined by a device manufacturer. A user-defined functional profile
should be used only when there is no appropriate standard functional profile defined. See Functional
Profile for more information about functional profile templates.
The NcMulitSensor example uses four UFPTs that inherit from existing SFPTs. Three of the UFPTs
are required because no SFPT includes the configuration properties required by the example
application for setting alarm limits and viewing alarm conditions. Another UFPT is required because it
uses a changeable-type network variable that is not used by the SFPT from which it inherits.
User-defined Network Variable Type (UNVT)
A non-standard network variable type defined by the manufacturer of a device. UNVTs should be
used only when there is no appropriate standard network variable type (SNVT) defined.
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LONMARK-certified devices must have UNVTs documented in resource files according to a standard
format, in order to allow the devices to be interoperable.
Virtual Functional Block
A static functional block that that contains the network inputs and outputs for a device that are not part
of other functional blocks on the device.
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Appendix A – Glossary
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