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MANAGEMENT ANALYSIS - International Color Consortium
COLOUR
MANAGEMENT
WORKFLOW
ANALYSIS
THE GRAPHIC ARTS INSTITUTE OF DENMARK
The present report was created at
The Graphic Arts Institute of Denmark
Summer 2000
Written by Søren Winsløw
Designed by Niels Bøje Ziegler
Printed in Denmark 2000
2
Content
Foreword
4
Summary
5
Colour Management Workflow at
Aftonbladet, Stockholm
8
Associated Newspapers Ltd, London
Berlingske Tidende, Copenhagen
Børsen, Copenhagen
Politiken, Copenhagen
12
14
Dagens Nyheter, Stockholm
The New York Times
10
16
18
20
The Scotsman, Edinburgh
22
3
Foreword
The following report is the first part of the Danish Colour Management
project. The scope of this part is to document how different newspapers approach colour management. From this documentation, any newspaper
should be able to find inspiration in how to make colour management
work in their own surroundings.
The descriptions are made to pinpoint the CM issues, and thus you will
find that the descriptions are very brief with respect to the other aspects,
which could have been interesting to study. However, the model for this description was approved at a meeting at the Ifra Colour Management
Workgroup in Darmstadt on the 15 April 1999.
The newspapers described were chosen from a list generated at the
above-mentioned meeting. The final list of eight newspapers was chosen
by the Danish DDPFF/Kvalitetsgruppen.
The newspapers were:
Aftonbladet, Stockholm
Associated Newspapers, London
Berlingske Tidende, Copenhagen
Børsen, Copenhagen
Dagens Nyheter, Stockholm
The New York Times, New York
Politiken, Copenhagen
The Scotsman, Edinburgh
The work was carried out by, firstly, contacting the actual newspaper and
sending a model description, and also telling the newspaper what sort of
information would be of interest. Then, I met with a newspaper representative at the premises of each of the respective newspapers. Usually, I was
presented with material that supported the description, but not always. We
discussed production and I met with certain people who were responsible
for different parts of the workflow.
Back in Copenhagen, I made the description according to the model and
what had been described and told to me and from what could be seen in
other schemes and models. Not surprisingly, these three things did not always correspond. Thus, I then had to decide which to use to make the puzzle seem right. When the description was made, I sent a PDF (or fax) to my
contact person, who then corrected any mistakes I had made. Minor alterations were made and no further files were sent. If there were major differences between the first and second drafts, they were sent for approval.
Søren Winsløw
The Graphic Arts Institute of Denmark
Emdrupvej 72
DK-2400 Copenhagen NV
e-mail: sw@dgh.dk
4
Summary
Even though I have written the following descriptions to provide inspiration and to show how different implementations are made, it is obvious
that there seems to be some consensus about certain aspects of colour
management. In the following, I will try to emphasise these aspects.
One might feel tempted to say that a general feature is that they all
seem to be very different. When talking about the editorial workflows,
there are no two identical workflows among these descriptions. Yet when it
comes to advertising, they all seem to take a cautious approach. This means
that all newspapers only accept CMYK separated electronic advertisements,
due to issues concerning responsibility. However, in Sweden and in a few
other places, the newspapers supply the advertisers/repro houses with ICC
profiles for the newsprint. The experience gained from this has been, so far,
very positive.
The CM workflows described are basically editorial workflows, generally
concerning:
• RGB to CMYK conversion
There seem to be two different ways of dealing with this process: The fully
automated process, where images are treated in RGB and converted automatically later on in the process without any further quality control, and
the alternative approach, which is to use a CMYK soft proof of the file. This
can be done either by displaying an RGB file through a CMYK separation
table or an ICC profile in Photoshop, or by simply converting the RGB file to
CMYK and then displaying it through the actual colour settings in software
similar to Photoshop. The difference is in whether you want to verify the
final result (CMYK) at the image editing stage, or rely on the RGB representation of the image. As many people, even trained pre-press staff, react negatively to a CMYK soft proof of newsprint, one often finds that a more contrasty and saturated RGB image is preferred for quality control.
• RGB colour spaces
All newspapers in this survey scan and save images in an image library for
internal or external reuse. As the image will not necessarily be used again
for newsprint, the most convenient thing to do is to keep images in a colour
space that is more open for different usages. The colour spaces used are
first of all RGB, and in most of the cases the RGB colour space is one chosen
from the Adobe Photoshop colour workspace set-ups (RGB, ColourMatch
RGB, etc.). One interesting thing is that even though all newspapers receive
wire photos from major image agencies, there seems to be no common
colour space, or even profiles, that are embedded with wire photos. This
means that all wire images must be judged and edited before being sent
down for production, as one never knows what sort of quality they are
when presented on a local monitor.
5
• Scanner profiles
The story repeats itself when looking at scanner profiling. In most of the
colour shops found at the newspapers, profiling of scanners is not implemented. Scannings are made “raw” and edited, in many cases, by the photographer himself. The reason for this, I believe, is that negatives are commonly used as a scanning media and, as there are no ICC standard tools for
profiling negatives and as the photographer also often enhances the image
with the editing tools, the monitor itself becomes the original reference
point.
• Monitors as references
That the monitor becomes the reference implies that it is calibrated and
profiled and a well-defined colour space is used. It is generally so at all the
newspapers. Calibration is done with more or less advanced tools, from the
Knoll gamma software for Macintosh to the Barco Calibrator. Profiles are
generally generated by measuring the monitors with standard spectrophotometers/colorimeters such as X-Rie OptiCal or Gretag Spectrolino, and as a
general workspace we have already mentioned that colour spaces like
Colormatch RGB are popular. Typically, calibration is done as often as profiling. This varies from every fortnight to every third month. At The
Scotsman, calibration is done on a daily basis by the operator, a procedure
well known from many pre-press houses.
• CM at the page layout stage
Generally speaking, no newspaper uses CM at the page layout stage. The
primary reason for this is that CM in QuarkXPress, in the versions used
when this survey was made, or in other page make-up programs, were either inadequate or completely lacking. But even if the CM module in the
page layout programs had a sufficient level, it has generally been said that
it will only be used if it is automatic and will not slow down any processes.
• Hard proofs
Hard proofs in the editorial workflow are used very differently. From only
black and white layout control to colour proofs, generated using ICC profiles and print simulation for press optimisation.
• Soft proofing
At three newspapers, a soft proof is made for final quality control of the
separated and bitmapped files (Tiff group4). At Politiken and The New York
Times, the soft proof is made using internal Parascan software but the
colour look-up tables are generated using ICC profiles and the soft proof is
displayed in colours. At The Scotsman, the soft proof is a control of each
separation. At Politiken, the soft proof is the reference in the printroom.
6
• Press profiles
With one exception, all newspapers generate their own press profiles. For
most of the newspapers, the situation is that the profiles are a kind of average profile of two or more printing presses or of several printruns. In
Sweden, the newspaper industry has decided to supply the advertisers with
a standard newspaper profile, which will produce a good result on all
Swedish presses if run with grey bar control.
• Profile generating tools
The measuring device for press profiles is definitely Gretag Spectrolino, and
Spectroscan is used by all newspapers that make their own press profiles.
With monitor profiles, more diversity is shown. X-rite’s OptiCal is popular
and Spectrolino is used as well as Sequel sensor and the Barco Calibrator.
The diversity continues when choosing the software for running the hardware devices: Gretag ProfileMaker, Heidelberg ColorOpen, ColorBlind, Agfa
ColourTune and others.
• Automation
Only a few of the newspapers rely on manual conversion processes (RGB to
RGB, or RGB to CMYK) except in special situations. This means that images
are generally converted automatically when sent to the picture desk, downloaded to print production servers or at the output stage. One company
stands out by having three different implementations of their products in
connection with other production software, and that is the Norwegian
Fotoware and their Fotostation image browser and the Color Factory colour
management server. However, other solutions can be seen at Politiken and
Børsen.
7
Colour Management Workflow at
Aftonbladet, Stockholm
Editorial site
1. Images are scanned on
calibrated scanners or shot
with digital cameras. All
images are scanned to the
same size (27 MB approx.)
in RGB. No conversion or
embedding of profiles
takes place.
2. The images are corrected according to the
photographer’s/scanner
operator’s wishes in
Photoshop.
2a. Images are displayed
on calibrated and profiled
monitors (gamma 1.8/wp
5000° K). Monitors are
Radius Pressview, which
are calibrated and profiled
on a monthly basis.
3. Wire photos are dropped
directly into a temporary
archive without corrections.
4. Two options are available when storing images
in a temporary archive.
The images are corrected
and downloaded, marked
with “ready for automated
repro”, or they are not corrected and marked “not
ready for automated
repro”. When images are
downloaded in the temporary archive they are available for the editorial department. Standard moni8
Aftonbladet - Colour Management Workflow
1. Scanning
2. Image edit
2a. Display
request
fileflow
3. Wire photos
4. Temporary
archive &
permanent
archive
5a. Display
7. Colour
Management
server
5. Editorial workstation with
page assembly
10. Gravure or coldset
proofing
6. Drag and drop image into
page
11. Page printed
to postscript file
9. OPI-server
12.Ripping of
postscript file
8. Image edit
13. Transmission
to printsite
8a. Display
tor profile is embedded
(ColorMatch RGB).
In the temporary
archive (OpenStore), a lowres JPEG image is created
for viewing at the editorial workstation.
5. At the editorial workstation, images can be
fetched from the temporary archive (with the
newly scanned images) or
from the permanent
image archive.
5a. No general calibration
or profiling is used in editorial departments.
6. Images are dragged and
dropped into QuarkXPress
(an OpenStore functionality). There is no CM func-
tionality at the editorial
workstation, even though
a few workstation monitors are calibrated.
7. When images are
placed, or when the page
is saved, an automatic
process starts. If images
are marked “ready for automated repro”, a request
is sent to the repro server
(FotoSync Color Factory),
which calls the high-res
image from the temporary
or the permanent archive.
Then the high-res image is
scaled, cropped, sharpened
and converted from RGB to
CMYK using Kodak CMS
and ICC profiles.
ColorMatch RGB for the
input and Aftonsbladet’s
own newsprint or gravure
14. Film setting
profile for the output. A
high-res image is sent on
to the OPI server.
8. If images are marked
“not ready for automated
repro”, the request goes
back to the repro department, where they evaluate
and correct the image according to the crop and
scale parameters, as well
as the wishes of the editor.
A CMYK preview is made
in Photoshop using the
relevant ICC profiles and
the Kodak CMM. When
ready, the image is passed
on to the repro server
(FotoStation Color
Factory), which converts
(as above) and downloads
the high-res image to the
OPI server.
Contact person:
Mattias Nyman
Aftonbladet
Arenavägen 63
105 18 Stockholm
e-mail: mattias.nyman@aftonbladet.se
8a. See 2a.
9. A high-res version is
now stored on the OPI
server and a low-res OPI
file is returned to the editorial station, where it replaces the low-res JPEG
file in the Quark document automatically.
10. The final page can be
proofed on a Canon
printer (700 or 900) with
an Edox RIP. The RIP allows CMYK to CMYK conversion using ICC profiles,
but only as a pre-setting,
not by reading embedded
profiles. Thus, one printer
is set up for ordinary
newsprint and the other
for Gravure print.
11. Pages are printed to
Postscript.
12. Final pages are gathered and ripped at the editorial site. All elements at
this stage are CMYK, and
therefore no CM is involved.
13. Bitmapped pages are
transmitted to the
printsite via the Parascan
Wydnet-system.
Advertisements
Display ads and full-page ads are received electronically as EPS files, CMYK
separated. Separation tables are available from the Aftonbladet homepage
(www.aftonbladet.se) as an ICC or Adobe Separation Table. Separations are
also accepted when using the standard profile for the Swedish newspaper
industry, available from Tidningsutgivernes homepage (www.tu.se).
Colour Management and profiling software used:
Scanner profiles:
None
Monitor profiles:
X-Rite monitor optimiser (OptiCal)
Output profiles:
Logo ProfileMaker and Gretag Spectrolino/scan
Profile editing tools:
Editing not allowed
Colour Management system:
ColorSync at Mac
FotoSync ColorFactory (Kodak CMS) at NT server
Kodak CMS at Edox RIPs
CMM in use:
Kodak CMM
Other applications and hardware in use:
Scanning:
Polaroid Sprintscan
Imacon Flextight Precision
Image editing:
Adobe Photoshop 5.02
Radius Pressview monitors (monitors are calibrated
and profiled on a monthly basis).
Page assembly:
Quark XPress 3.3x
Macintosh with standard Trinitron monitors. No CM at
this stage. Colours are chosen from the Swedish newspaper industry’s colour book.
Illustrations:
Adobe Illustrator 8. Colours are chosen from the
Swedish newspaper industry’s colour book. No CM at
this stage.
Image and repro servers:
The automatised image workflow is handled by software from the Swedish company Interbizz
(OpenStore). The colour conversion, scaling, cropping
and sharpening is handled by software from the
Norwegian company Fotostation (ColorFactory).
OPI:
Hyphen OPI and RIPs running on Sun Solaris
Output:
Canon printers for proofing with Edox RIPs handling
CMYK to CMYK conversion with ICC profiles.
RIPs at editorial site and image setters at the printsite.
No CM at this stage.
14. Pages are output linearised on image setters
or CTPs. No CM at this
stage.
9
Colour Management Workflow at
Associated Newspapers Ltd, London
Editorial department
The workflow in the editorial department is different on each newspaper
(Daily Mail, Evening
Standard, Mail On Sunday
and the Metro). The following description is the
workflow at the Metro,
the one considered to be
the workflow of the future.
1. Editorial photographers
are scanning their own
images in the editorial departments. Standard scanning set-up, no cropping,
standard sizing and no
conversion takes place. No
embedding of profiles.
2. In the colour shop department, images from
other sources are scanned
as above. No cropping,
standard sizing, and no
conversion takes place. No
embedding of profiles.
3. Wire photos are received as they are. No profiling or corrections.
4. Editorial photographers
make simple initial corrections using
FotoStation’s editing facility (brightness, contrast,
gamma,...).
4a. Monitors are calibrated and ICC profiled.
10
Associated Newspapers Ltd. - Colour Management Workflow
1. Scanning
(photographers)
4. Image edit
4a. Display
10a. Display
2. Scanning
(colourshop)
9. OPI-server
10. Page
assembly
3. Wire photos
11. Page proof
12. Page printed
to postscript file
5. Picture
desk
13. Pagepairing
6. Editorial image
selection
8. Colour
Management
Server
14. B&W proof
17. Proofing
15. Transmission
to printsite
16. CM & Ripping
18. Film/plate
setting
6a. Display
7. Image edit
(colour shop)
7a. Display
Images are judged on display quality. No newsprint
simulation is intended on
screen.
5. Files are saved as JPEG
RGB into the FotoWare
Picture desk and the
FastPhoto Library.
6. At the editorial workstations, images are chosen from the picture library for production.
Cropping and sizing instructions are carried out.
If the image is OK, it is
passed on to the
ColorFactory server (see 6).
If the image is not satisfactory, it is sent on to
colour shop department
(see 7).
7. In the colour shop, the
image is manually retouched, cropped, scaled,
sharpened and converted
into the Lab colour space.
The monitor is calibrated
and ICC profiled.
Photoshop is set up to a
user defined standard RGB
colour space (gamma 1.8,
white point 6500 K°).
8. At the ColorFactory
server, the image is
cropped, scaled and sharpened according to the instructions and then converted into Lab colour
space. The conversion
from RGB to Lab implies
an RGB profile which has
the same specifications as
the one in Photoshop (see
below). The Lab colour
space is 2°/D65.
9. From the ColorFactory
server, images are sent
down automatically to the
OPI server. A low resolution is generated and becomes available for the
page layout workstations.
10. The page layout program is QuarkXPress, but
no CM facilities are used
in
QuarkXPress at this time.
10a.Monitors are calibrated and profiled.
11. Final pages are proofed
locally on Canon colour
proofers. CM is used on a
standard basis, which
means that the internal
Canon colour calibration/
conversion is used, not the
Contact person:
Ian Withers
Imaging Services Manager
Associated Mediabase
Northcliffe House
2 Derry Street
Kensington
London W8 5TT, U.K.
e-mail: ian.withers@mediabase.co.uk
ICC colour management
with special generated
profiles.
12. Final pages are printed
to file (Postscript) and sent
on for page pairing.
Advertisements
Display ads and full-page ads are received electronically as EPS files, CMYK
separated. The ads are delivered by a licensed repro house, which guarantees the production quality. Ads are proofed on Iris proofers with Cascade
RIPs at the printsite.
Colour Management and profiling software used:
13. Page pairing at
Mediabase customised
page-pairing system.
14. Black and white proofing on Canon proofers
with RIPs identical with
the RIPs at the printing
site.
15. Transmission to printsite via mega stream line
(T2).
16. At the printsite, a
Cascade RIP is ripping the
data and using a Postscript CRD for converting
the Lab data into CMYK.
The PostScript CRD is generated in the same way as
the corresponding ICC
profile.
17. Pages are proofed on
Iris proofers. No simulation is intended, but a
standard conversion from
print CMYK to proof
CMYK using the Cascade
RIP software.
Scanner profiles:
None
Monitor profiles:
XRite DTP92 and ColorBlind
Output profiles:
Gretag Spectrolino/Spectroscan and ColorBlind
Profile editing tools:
ColorBlind (for editing output profiles)
Colour Management system:
ColorSync at Mac workstations
Cascade CEPS RIPs with especially generated CRDs at
printsite
FotoSync at the ColorFactory server
CMM in use:
Kodak CMM at Mac stations
Cascade generated system in RIP
Kodak CMM in ColorFactory
Other applications and hardware in use:
Scanning:
Scitex Smartscanner 342
Kodak 2035
Agfa Horizon
Image editing:
Adobe Photoshop 5.0x
Eizo monitors
Page assembly:
QuarkXPress 3.xx
Illustrations:
Adobe Illustrator 8.x. No CM at this stage.
Image server:
The “Management of Image Production System” is a
rather complex system, one that is based around a
Cascade PhotoTrak software running on a Sun 4000.
Incorporated in the concept is the FotoStation as an
imagebrowser and a simple acquire tool/editor and
the ColorFactory as a colour conversion server.
OPI:
IPT Canopy
Output:
Editorial proofs are made on Canon 700.
Advertising proofs are at the print site on an Iris
proofer.
RIPs at the editorial site are Canon RIPs. RIPs at pagepair proofer, IRIS proofers and image setters are
Cascade (Adobe CEPS).
18. Pages are imaged on
Optronics 4000 image setters.
11
Colour Management Workflow at
Berlingske Tidende, Copenhagen
CM workflow in the
advertising, image
bureau and editorial
departments
Workflow
in the advertising
department
1. Internally produced ads
are scanned on Agfa scanners. The Agfa FotoLook
software is set up to convert from the scanner RGB
into ColorMatch RGB
using the ICC profiles for
the specific scanner and
the ColorMatch colour
space
2. Image editing is done in
Photoshop 5.5. The separation set-up is ICC, workspace ColorMatch RGB
and separation profile is
one of three print profiles.
3. The monitors (Apple
Studio Displays) are calibrated to gamma 1.8 and
white point 5000° K using
the internal ColorSync
software. Monitors are
calibrated and profiled
every three months.
4. Ads are composed in
QuarkXPress without any
CM set-up.
5. Hard proofs are made
on a Lexmark printer
without any CM.
12
Berlingske Tidende - Colour Management Workflow
14. Selecting
images from
the picture
desk
8. Wire photos
9. Negative
scanning
15. Editorial
scanning
16. Image
editing
19. Page
assembly
20. Automatic assembly of editorial and
advertising
information
21. Ripping
17. Editorial
monitors
10. Image editing
and saving
22. Transmission
to printsite
11. Monitors
12. Colour
proofing
13. Picture desk
18. OPI-server
1. Advertisingscanning
4. Ad assembly
2. Image editing
3. Monitors
6. Save as EPS
23. Film/plate
setting
5. Hard proof
24. Page
approval
7. Ad server
6. Final ads are printed as
Postscript files to the OPI
server.
7. At the OPI server a lowres file is generated for
placement in the Atex IAS
system.
10. Images are edited in
Photoshop as RGB. The
image is saved into the
image server as JPEG RGB
with ColorMatch RGB profile embedded. Photoshop
is set up accordingly.
11. See 3.
Workflow
in the image bureau
(Nordfoto)
8. Wire photos are received and archived untouched as RGB. All images are assumed
ColorMatch RGB.
9. Images are scanned internally with Leaf T35 or
ScanMate F8. No scanner
profiles are used.
12. For quality control, images can be output on a
Sienna RGB printer (exposing photo paper). The
print sequence and conversion are done by
Fotostation/Color Factory
and profiles are chosen in
that set-up. Profiles are
ColorMatch RGB and a
specially generated ICC
profile (RGB output!).
13. The MIPS picture desk
is a self-constructed
image bank. It is a Unix
based system with an
Apache server.
Workflow
in editorial
14. Images are chosen
from the image base.
15. Internally scanned or
digitally captured images
are input into Photoshop
without conversion,
ColorMatch RGB assumed.
16. Images are separated
using the ICC profile, set
up with ColorMatch RGB
as source and the average
print profile as destination. Images are sent to
Contact person:
Birger Jelbo
Quality Assurance Manager
Berlingske A/S
Pilestræde 34
DK-1147 Copenhagen K
e-mail: bje@berlingske.dk
OPI server after editing,
cropping, sharpening and
scaling.
17. See 3 and 11.
18. From the OPI, low-res
images are generated for
placement in the Atex
EdPage.
19. Pages are assembled in
the EdPage program.
Externally produced advertisements
Advertisements are received fully electronically as CMYK separated EPS
files via the ADS (advertisement delivery system). They can be accompanied by proofs. Advertisements can also be delivered as films. They will be
scanned on a copy dot scanning system to be integrated into the workflow.
The separations are made according to Danish standards for newsprint
(www.kankanikke.dk).
As a special service for customers, Berlingske offers to set up the colour
management system for their clients. This includes profiling of input
equipment, setting up Photoshop and the installation of the averaged output profile. This has been successful, especially for the property market.
Colour Management and profiling software used:
20. Final page elements
are gathered for output.
21. Pages are ripped on the
auto logic RIPs and saved
as TIFF/ITg4.
22. Pages are transmitted
to printsites via Parascan
PageLink.
Scanner profiles:
Linotype ScanOpen
Monitor profiles:
Linotype ViewOpen and Spectrolino
Output profiles:
Linotype PrintOpen and Gretag
Spectrolino/Spectroscan
Profile editing tools:
Kodak Custom Color Profile Editor (Photoshop Plug in)
Colour Management system:
ColorSync on Macs
CMM in use:
Apple ColorSync default
Other applications and hardware in use:
Scanning:
Agfa Horizon
Agfa T2000
Agfa T5000
Leaf T35
Scanview F8+
Digital cameras:
Kodak DCS 520 (Canon)
Image editing:
Adobe Photoshop 5.5
23. Pages are exposed on
Agfa CTPs.
24. Page approval is based
on grey bar control.
Page assembly:
Atex EdPage and Atex IAS
Illustrations:
Adobe Illustrator
Image server:
MIPS (self-constructed image library)
OPI:
Helios Ethershare
Output:
Autologic RIPs
Lexmark 1200
Sienna colour printer
Agfa Polaris 100 CTPs
13
Colour Management Workflow at
Børsen, Copenhagen
B¿rsen - Colour Management Workflow
Editorial department
1. Images at Børsen are
primarily wire photos
from news agencies and
freelance photographers.
Wire photos are not given
any special treatment.
2. Colour originals are
scanned on Imacon flex
tight scanners. In the
scanning process the files
are converted from scanner RGB to monitor RGB
using profiles supplied by
the scanner supplier.
Image correction is done
using the scanner software.
3. Monitors are calibrated
via the Knoll gamma software on a daily basis. The
target is gamma 1.8/ 5000°
K. No colour management
or profiling is used.
4. Images are saved into
the Saxotech Picture Desk
as JPEG RGB.
5. In the editorial department, images are selected
from the picture desk
browser and initially
cropped and scaled after
standard specifications.
Information about cropping and scaling is passed
on to the image preparation server.
14
1. Wire photos
4. Picture desk
(general)
2. Scanning
3. Monitor
5. Editorial image
selection
6. Image
preparation
server
13. Ripping
10. Monitor.
9. Editorial image
positioning
11. B&W
proofing
14. Transmission
to Printsite
15. Film/plate
setting
8. Picture desk
(productionl)
12. Output
management
7. OPI-server
6. The image preparation
server activates the
PhotoRace colour conversion software, which
crops, scales and converts
the images from RGB to
CMYK. The conversion is
done using proprietary
profiles, which can be altered by simple means, although not by using ICC
profiles even though it is
possible.
7. A high-res CMYK file is
passed on to the OPI
server.
8. A low-res is generated
and returned to the picture desk (production portion) for editorial placement in the page layout
program.
9. The image is positioned
in QuarkXPress and if necessary the high-res version is called via the
Saxotech QX extension for
further simple image corrections. The corrections
are carried out by the editors.
agement department and
printed to Postscript files.
10. CM facilities in QX are
not in use and monitors
are not calibrated against
any specific standard or
profiled at the editorial
site.
15. Files are imaged on
image setters with no
proofing.
11. Final pages are proofed
on black and white printers.
12. Final pages are gathered at the output man-
13. The Postscript files are
ripped in an AutoLogic
softPIP to Tiff/ITg4 format.
14. The Tiff files are transmitted to the printsite
Contact person:
Erwin Christensen/Peter Jacobsen
Børsen
Møntergade 19
DK-1140 Copenhagen K
e-mail: peter.jacobsen@borsen.dk
Advertisements
Display ads and full-page ads are received electronically as EPS files, CMYK
separated. Separations are made according to standards specified by DDPFF
(www.ddpff.dk/web/home.nsf/HTDocs/kvalgrp3.html).
Advertisements produced in-house are scanned on Agfa Horizon or
T5000 scanners. The images are directly converted into CMYK by the
FotoLook/FotoTune software using ICC scanner profiles and a newsprint
profile created specifically for Børsen (which is printed on pinkish
newsprint). The monitors are Radius Precision Color Display calibrated to
D50/1.8 gamma. Calibration and profiling is intended to take place every
three months. Photoshop 4.0 is used for image editing, set up with ICC generated profile as PS-table.. The image is then placed in a QuarkXPress 4.0x
document.
Colour Management and profiling software used:
Scanner profiles:
Agfa ColorTune
Monitor profiles:
Gretag ProfileMaker 2.3.5
Output profiles:
Gretag ProfileMaker 2.3.5 and
Gretag Spectrolino/Spectroscan
Profile editing tools:
No profile editing of ICC profiles. PhotoRace tables are
edited with PhotoRace software.
Colour Management system:
ColorTune at internal advertising scanning
ColorSync at editorial scanning
PhotoRace at editorial separation
CMM in use:
ColorTune CMM, ColorSync (default) and PhotoRace
Other applications and hardware in use:
Scanning:
Imacon Flextight Precision
Agfa Horizon Ultra
Agfa T5000
Image editing:
Adobe Photoshop 4.0
Radius Precision Color Display
Page assembly:
QuarkXPress 4.0x
Illustrations:
Adobe Illustrator 8
Image server:
Saxotech image base
OPI:
Auto logic
Output:
Auto logic SoftPIP
Image setters are at an external print house
15
Colour Management Workflow at
Dagens Nyheter, Stockholm
Editorial department
1. Images are scanned on
negative scanners. All images are scanned to the
same
size in RGB. No conversion
or embedding of profiles
takes place.
2. Images from sources
other than the photographers are scanned by the
repro department, much
in the same way as the
photographers do it.
3. Initial corrections are
made by the photographers or repro department, but no cropping or
scaling takes place.
Dagens Nyheter - Colour Management Workflow
1. Scanning
(photographers)
2. Scanning
(repro dep.)
3a. Display
3. Image edit
4. Wire photos
10. Page
assembly
11. Page proof
5. Picture
desk
6. Editorial image
selection
12. Page printed
to postscript file
6a. Display
7. Image edit
(repro dep.)
7a. Display
3a. Images are displayed
on calibrated and profiled
Macintosh based monitors. Calibration and profiling made by X-Rite
OptiCal (spec. 1.8/5500° K).
Calibration and profiling
takes place on a monthly
basis.
6. At the editorial workstation, images are
fetched from the archives
via the FotoStation software. Images are marked
with cropping and scaling
parameters. Specific
wishes about the image
editing are typed in an
electronic job sheet for the
photo-department if necessary.
4. Wire photos are without initial control or correction.
6a. No calibration or profiling at editorial workstations.
5. Images are stored as
JPEG RGB in a FotoStation
archive. Images are now
available for the editorial
department via the
FotoStation software.
7. The image shows up in a
“to-do” folder at the repro
department, and an
image-note, explaining
the task, is attached.
7a. See 3a.
16
10a. Display
9. OPI-server
8. Colour
Management
server
13.Ripping the
postscript file
14. Transmission
to printsite
8. The ready RGB image is
passed on to the colour
management server
where it is automatically
cropped, scaled, sharpened and converted to
CMYK. Profiles engaged
are standard RGB
(ColorFactory default) and
a specific CMYK profile for
Dagens Nyheter (based on
an average of their best
presses).
9. At the Helios OPI
server, a low-res is generated and becomes available for placing in the
Quark document in the
editorial department.
10. The images are placed
in the page layout. No CM
is used in QuarkXPress.
15. Film/plate
setting
10a. See 6a.
11. Final pages are proofed
in the editorial department on a Tektronix 780.
No simulation at this
stage, apart from using
paper which is similar to
newsprint.
12. Final pages are printed
to Postscript files.
13. The Postscript files are
ripped at the editorial site.
At this stage, all elements
are CMYK and therefore
no CM is involved. The resulting file is a Tiff group4
bitmap file.
14. Bitmapped pages are
transmitted to the
printsites.
Contact person:
Daniel Lindén
Dagens Nyheter
Annonsavdelingen
Gjöwellsgatan 30
105 15 Stockholm
e-mail: daniel.linden@dn.se
15. Pages are output linearised on image setters.
No CM at this stage.
Advertisements
Display ads and full-page ads are received electronically as EPS files, CMYK
separated. Separations are made according to standards specified by
Tidningsutgiverne. ICC profile is available from Tidningsutgiverne’s homepage (www.tu.se) or directly from Dagens Nyheter.
Advertisements produced in-house are scanned on Heidelberg Topaz or
Heidelberg Saphir and via the LinoColor software converted directly to
CMYK.
Colour Management and profiling software used:
Scanner profiles:
None
Monitor profiles:
X-Rite monitor optimiser (OptiCal)
Output profiles:
Logo ProfileMaker and Gretag Spectrolino/Scan
Profile editing tools:
Editing not allowed
Colour Management system:
ColorSync at Mac
FotoSync ColorFactory (Kodak CMS) at NT server
CMM in use:
Kodak CMM at NT server and Adobe built-in in
Photoshop (Mac)
Other applications and hardware in use:
Scanning:
Polaroid Sprintscan
Nikon Coolscan
Image editing:
Adobe Photoshop 5.5
SONY Trinitron Multiscan 300 (monitors are calibrated
and profiled on a monthly basis).
Page assembly:
Quark XPress 3.32
Macintosh with standard Trinitron monitors. No CM at
this stage. Colours are chosen from the Swedish newspaper industry’s colour book.
Illustrations:
Adobe Illustrator 8. Colours are chosen from the
Swedish newspaper industry’s colour book. No CM at
this stage.
Image and repro servers:
Colour conversion, scaling, cropping and sharpening
using software from the Norwegian company
Interfoto (ColorFactory, FotoStation).
OPI:
Helios
Output:
Editorial proofs are made on Tektronix 780
RIPs at editorial site are Autologic Soft-Pip.
Image setters at printsite are Hell recorders.
17
Colour Management Workflow at
The New York Times
The New York Times - Colour Management Workflow
Editorial department
1. Wire photos and digital
camera images are loaded
directly into an image
server as RGB JPEG. No
profiles are embedded. No
corrections are made.
2. The photo department
scans negatives in
RGB/JPEG format. No retouching or colour management takes place at
this time.
3. Editors choose images
from the asset management system.
4. Designer decides crop
and size and passes it on
for production.
5. The RGB images are
opened in Monaco CM
software, which is set up
with a monitor and output profile. Image corrections are made based on
the visual impression.
After corrections, the
image (still RGB) is saved
in Photoshop and via the
Photoshop separation
table is converted into
CMYK. The separation
table and monitor profile
is based on the ICC profiles used in the Monaco
software. Images are
saved as EPS.
18
2. Photo department scans negativ film
3. Editor chooses from
image base
1. Wire photos
and digital
camera
Intermediate server
4. Designer decides crop and
size and passes it on
for production
Picture desk
(general)
14. Parascan
5. Correction and Separation
7. Proof
15. Colour
proofing
16.
Soft proofing
18.
Film/platesetting
6. Monitor
17. Monitor
8. OPI server
19. Print
approval
9. Editorial image
positioning
10. B&W proof
11. Composing
room/RIP
13. Transmission
to printsite
12. Sep. proofing
6. The monitor is a Macbased Barco Calibrator.
The monitor is calibrated
and profiled every 14 days
to 5000° K and gamma 1.8,
using the built-in Barco
measuring tool and hardware adjustment.
7. Individual images can
be proofed on a Xerox
Splash. No ICC simulation
is intended, only Xerox internal conversion, but a
“newsprint” tint is printed
on the page to simulate
authentic newsprint.
8. Separated files are sent
to OPI server. Self-composing software checks if the
files are CMYK. If not, they
are rejected.
9. The editorial department places the low-res
images in the Pagination
software Ed-Page using
Atex.
10. Black and white proofs
are made to check the
composition, image placement and type for the editors.
11. Approved pages are
sent to the composing
room where the final
pages are ripped into
TIFF/G4 file format.
12. A black and white
proof is made of each separation on an HP LaserJet
5000.
13. Pages are transmitted
to printsites.
14. Files are loaded into
the Parascan for three reasons. For presetting inkkeys, for making a soft
proof and finally for making digital hardcopies.
15. At the printsite, the
pages are proofed on an
HP DesignJet 1050C 1 on
printing stock in rolls (reel
stub) or on IRIS Realist FX
proofers simulating printing stock. The bitmap images are re-sampled from
1-8 bit at a lower resolution and transfer curves
are added, taking dot gain
and max ink into account.
Contact person:
Sanat Hazra,
Quality Assurance Manager
New York Times
1 New York Times Plaza
Flushing, NY 11354
U.S.A.
e-mail: hazras@nytimes.com
16. Pages are soft proofed
on Parascan using
Colorman CLUT tables.
The tables can have the
colour of the stock paper
added for simulation.
Advertisements
Ads are received fully electronically as EPS files. They are accompanied by
proofs. The separations are made according to SNAP standards for
newsprint.
Colour Management and profiling software used:
17. Monitors at the
printsite are Mitsubishi
SpectraView/1000. They
are calibrated by an integral measuring device to
5000° K/gamma 1.8.
Scanner profiles:
18. Film/plate setting on
Triple I filmsetters at
College Point and Edison
printsite.
19. First prints are checked
against proofs and approved once they match.
No profiles
Monitor profiles:
Barco Calibrator and Mitsubishi Spectraview 1000
Output profiles:
So far, profiles for the press have been provided by
R.I.T. using Kodak ColorFlow, but in the near future The
NYT expects to produce its own profiles using Gretag
equipment and Kodak software.
The editorial department uses MonacoColor and
Gretag equipment.
Profile editing tools:
No ICC profile editing takes place. Parascan/Silicon
Graphic profiles are adjusted to simulate the press.
Colour Management system:
MonacoColor engine at editorial for simulation on
monitor.
Photoshop internal separation.
Parascan’s Colormanager for proofing at printsite.
CMM in use:
Monaco CMM for soft proofing at editorial.
Other applications and hardware in use:
1. The DesignJets are not
being used in production
at the time of writing this
report, but they are expected to enter production
in the foreseeable future.
Scanning:
Agfa Arcus II scanners
Kodak RFS scanners
Image editing:
Adobe Photoshop 4.0x and Monaco
Page assembly:
EdPage by Atex
Illustrations:
Adobe Illustrator
Image server:
Canto’s Cumulus
T/One’s Merlin
OPI:
Sun MGS
Output:
Monotype RIPs
Scitex Brisque RIPs
Triple I image setters
HP DesignJet Proofers 1050
RIS Realist FX
Xerox Splash
HP LaserJet 5000
19
Colour Management Workflow at
Politiken, Copenhagen
Politiken - Colour Management Workflow
Editorial department
1. Wire photos are loaded
directly into an image
server as RGB JPEG. No
profiles are embedded. No
corrections take place.
ColorMatch RGB is the assumed colour space.
2. Digital photographs are
loaded into server as RGB
JPEG (with ColorMatch
RGB profile embedded).
ColorMatch RGB is chosen
as it seems to be the de
facto standard in the
graphic arts industry and
general implementation
is of major importance for
a newspaper.
3. Scanning is done with
specific scanner profiles
and converts the images
into the ColorMatch RGB.
Images are saved as RGB
JPEG with ColorMatch
RGB profile embedded.
Scanner profiles are generated every three
months.
4. Monitors are all calibrated to 5000° K/gamma
1.8 using the internal
monitor procedure.
Calibration is intended to
take place daily. It is the
intention to use the same
monitor at all colour
workstations. The monitor
chosen is the Sony
Multiscan G500. Monitor
20
2. Digital
photographs
4. Monitors
1. Wire photos
Intermediate server
3. Scanning
13. Transmission
to printsite
12. Editorial softproof
AGT image server
11. Final pages are
printed and ripped
into bitmap
14. Presetting
press
15. Filmsetting
5. Editorial image
selection and
correction
16. Print approval
6. Repro department takes care of
conversion and
final correction
9. Page layout
8. CCI
News Desk
10. B/W hard proof
7. Repro server
takes care of automatic conversion
profiles are generated on
a monthly basis.
5. The editorial department selects the images
from the AGT image
server for use in production. They apply cropping,
sizing, unsharp masking,
simple corrections (brightness, darkness, etc.) and
retouch using the AGT
image tools. From the editorial department, the
image can go in two directions for separation: to the
editorial repro department or for automatic
conversion in the AGT
server.
6. If the image is large or
shall be used in a specific
graphic context, the
cropped, scaled and corrected image is sent on for
separation in the editorial
repro department, where
they separate and make
further corrections according to output result.
Separations are made in
Photoshop with ICC profiles (ColorMatch RGB to
ICC Press Profile) and final
corrections made by soft
proofing the CMYK file.
7. All other images are
sent on for automatic conversion (ColorMatch RGB
to ICC Press Profile) in the
AGT image server.
8. The separated CMYK
TIFF images are passed on
to the CCI system for positioning.
9. Images are positioned
in the CCI system.
10. Final pages are hard
proofed for text and layout control.
11. Final pages are printed
to server and ripped into
Tiff/G4 files on Harlequin
RIPs.
12. On the Parascan system, the Tiff/G4 files are
soft proofed via a
Parascan look-up-table.
The Parascan look-uptable is generated by converting a Parascan CMYK
calibration file to RGB, in
Photoshop using the
above-mentioned profiles.
Afterwards, the file is
saved as a BMP file from
Contact person:
Lasse Stålung
Prepress Manager
Politiken A/S
Rådhuspladsen
DK-1785 Copenhagen V
e-mail: lasse.staalung@pol.dk
which the Parascan renders a Parascan look-uptable for soft proofing. The
soft proof can be viewed
both in the editorial department and at the
printsites.
Advertisements
Ads are received fully electronically as CMYK separated EPS files via the
ADS (advertisement delivery system). They can be accompanied by proofs.
Ads can also be delivered as films. They will be scanned on a copy dot scanning system to be integrated into the workflow. The separations are made
according to Danish standards for newsprint (www.kankanikke.dk).
13. Bitmapped pages are
transferred to printsites
by Parascan BitLink.
Colour Management and profiling software used:
14. Presses are pre-set
using the Parascan software.
15. Films are exposed on
linearised Hell LS210
image setters.
16. Print is approved
(under standard viewing
conditions) by comparison
with a Parascan soft proof.
Scanner profiles:
Linotype ScanOpen
Monitor profiles:
Linotype ViewOpen and the Sequel Sensor or
Spectrolino
Output profiles:
Linotype PrintOpen and Gretag
Spectrolino/Spektroscan
Profile editing tools:
No ICC profile editing takes place.
Colour Management system:
ColorSync on Macs
ICM on Windows and NTs
CMM in use:
Kodak CMM on Macs, PCs and NTs
Parascan’s internal (non ICC)
Other applications and hardware in use:
Scanning:
Agfa Arcus II scanners
Kodak RFS scanners
Digital cameras:
Nikon DC620
Canon DC580
Image editing:
Adobe Photoshop 5.5 and AGT (Applied Graphic
Technology)
Page assembly:
CCI
Illustrations:
Adobe Illustrator
Image server:
AGT
OPI:
None
Output:
Harlquin RIPs
Hewlett Packard b&w printers (Editorial hard proofs)
Seiko Color Point 835PS (hard proofs for advertisements)
21
Colour Management Workflow at
The Scotsman, Edinburgh
The Scotsman - Colour Management Workflow
Editorial department
1. Images are scanned as
RGB on EskoScan 2540 or
Itek 320-1. No embedding
of profiles takes place.
2. Wire photos are not
given special treatment.
They come without any
indication of origin.
1. Scanning
3. Picture desk
2. Wire photos
4. Editorial image
selection
12. Soft proofing
5a. Display
5. Image edit
(colour shop)
9. Intermediate
Postscript files
library
13. Transmission
to printsite
10. Ripping
11. Page-pairing
14. Film/plate
setting
3. Images are saved in the
Picture desk Photogrid as
JPEG RGB.
7. Page
assembly
7a. Display
6. OPI-server
4. When images are chosen for editorial use via
Photogrid, an electronic
request is sent to the repro
department. In Photogrid,
they can see the requested
sizing and cropping.
5. At the repro department
they crop, scale, re-res and
convert (RGB to CMYK). All
this is done in Photoshop
5.05. RGB workspace is
BruceRGB (gamma 2.2,
6500° K). The separation
table is a modified
newsprint Adobe
Separation Table.
5a. The monitor is a calibrated Radius Pressview
21SR. The calibration tool
is the Knoll gamma software and is done by the
operator on daily basis.
Monitors are calibrated
towards gamma 2.2 and
white point 6500° K.
22
8. Proofing
6. Files (CMYK) ready for
production are downloaded to Hydra OPI
server.
7. Low-res images can be
fetched by the editorial
department for positioning in the “Good news”
page make-up system by
Tera.
7a. Monitors in editorial
are not calibrated or profiled.
8. Final pages can be
printed on a Canon 700
with a Fiery RIP. Basic calibration to ensure good
colour, but no simulation
is done. No ICC colour
management at this
stage.
9. Postscript files (DCS 2.0)
are generated from “Good
news”, and are then
passed on to page production.
10. The PS pages are ripped
(ECRM RIPs) to TIFF/g4
files.
11. Bitmap files are paired
in a page-pairing system.
12. Pages are soft proofed
on a Harland Simon soft
proofing system, where
ink settings are taken into
account. The page production staff approves pages
before sending.
13. Pages are transmitted
to the printsite
14. Pages are exposed in
pairs at ECRM KnockOut
image setters.
Contact person:
Drew King
IT Production Manager
The Scotsman
20 North Bridge
Edinburgh EH1 1YT
e-mail: dking@scotsman.com
Advertisements
Display ads and full-page ads are received electronically as EPS files, CMYK
separated. Separations are made according to standards specified by The
Scotsman. EPS files are checked by AZUR, an Imation software for colour,
fonts, etc.
Advertisements produced in-house are scanned on Agfa Horizon or
T2000 scanners. Separation tables are the internal Agfa tables (ICC based),
generated especially for each scanner and with a standard output profile
(or was it an RGB scan which is separated in Photoshop?). The image is then
placed in a QuarkXPress 3.32 document. The final ad is then proofed on a
Tektronix Phaser 780 which uses ICC profiles. A standard profile for the
proofer and a standard newsprint profile, which is squeezed to match the
printed output visually. The proofer also prints on newsprint-like paper.
Colour Management and profiling software used:
Scanner profiles:
Agfa ColorTune for internally produced ads
Monitor profiles:
None
Output profiles:
None (standard, delivered by vendors)
Profile editing tools:
Profile at Tektronix printer has an editable transfer
curve.
Colour Management system:
Photoshop separation table at Mac
Tektronix CMS at printer
CMM in use:
Tektronix CMM
Photoshop built-in (not ICC)
Other applications and hardware in use:
Scanning:
Itek 320-1
Eskoscan 2450
Agfa Horizon
Agfa T2000
Image editing:
Adobe Photoshop 5.05
Radius Pressview monitors (monitors are calibrated
on a daily basis by using a Knoll Gamma Tool).
Page assembly:
Good News by Tera.
Advertisements are generated in QuarkXPress 3.32
and integrated in Good News as EPS files.
Illustrations:
Adobe Illustrator 8. No CM at this stage.
Image server:
Editorial image base is Photogrid by SCC
OPI:
Hydra
Output:
Editorial proofs are made on Canon 700
Advertising proofs are made on Tektronix Phaser 780
RIPs at editorial site are ECRM. Image setters at the
printsite are ECRM Knockout.
Soft proofing
Harland Simon software running on Windows NT.
23
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