Radio Shack | PRO-79 | Owner`s manual | Radio Shack PRO-79 Owner`s manual

20-314.fm Page 1 Monday, December 13, 1999 12:55 PM
Owner’s Manual
Cat. No. 20-314
PRO-79
200-Channel VHF/Air/UHF
Handheld Scanner
Please read before using this equipment.
(illus - show front of product)
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FEATURES
Your new RadioShack PRO-79 200 Channel VHF/Air/UHF
Handheld Scanner lets you scan conventional transmissions,
and is preprogrammed with search banks for convenience. By
pressing a single button, you can quickly search those frequencies most commonly used by public service and other agencies
without tedious and complicated programming.
This scanner gives you direct access to over 25,000 exciting frequencies, including those used by police and fire departments,
ambulance services, and amateur radio services, and you can
change your selection at any time.
Your scanner also has these special features:
Four Service Banks — let you search preset frequencies in separate ham radio, police/fire/emergency, aircraft, and marine
banks, to make it easy to locate specific types of calls.
Display Backlight — makes the scanner easy to read in lowlight situations.
Duplicate Channel Alert — warns you when the frequency you
are storing already exists in memory.
Lockout Function — lets you set your scanner to skip over
specified channels or frequencies when scanning or searching.
Memory Backup — keeps the channel frequencies stored in
memory for about an hour in the event of a power loss.
Ten Channel-Storage Banks — you can store 20 channels in
each bank (200 total channels), letting you group channels so
you can more easily identify calls.
20 Monitor Memories — let you temporarily save up to 20 frequencies you locate during a search, so you can move selected
frequencies to channel storage later.
Direct Search — lets you search for new and unlisted frequencies starting from a specified frequency.
© 1999 Tandy Corporation.
All Rights Reserved.
RadioShack and Adaptaplug are registered trademarks
used by Tandy Corporation.
HyperSearch and HyperScan are trademarks used by Tandy Corporation.
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Weather Alert — the scanner automatically sounds an alert
when it receives a weather emergency signal, providing more
complete information about weather conditions in your immediate area.
Weather Band Key — scans seven preprogrammed weather
frequencies to keep you informed about current weather conditions.
Wired Programming — you can connect your scanner to a personal computer and program frequencies into the scanner from
the computer using an optional cable and software.
Note: The necessary cable and software, and additional
information about using your personal computer to program
your scanner, are available at your local RadioShack store.
Scan Delay — delays scanning for about 2 seconds before
moving to another channel, so you can hear more replies that
are transmitted on the same channel.
Priority Channel — lets you program a channel as the priority
channel. As the scanner scans, it checks the priority channel every 2 seconds so you do not miss transmissions on that channel.
HyperSearch and HyperScan — let you set the scanner to
search at up to 50 steps per second (in frequency bands with 5
kHz steps) and scan at up to 25 channels per second, to help
you quickly find interesting broadcasts.
Manual Access — you can directly access any stored channel
by entering that channel’s number.
Key Lock — lets you lock the scanner’s keys to help prevent
accidentally changing the scanner’s programming.
Liquid-Crystal Display — makes it easy to view and change
programming information.
Supplied Flexible Antenna with BNC Connector — provides
good reception of strong local signals. You can connect an external antenna with a BNC connector to the scanner for improved reception of distant/weaker signals.
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Key Confirmation Tones — the scanner sounds a confirmation
tone when you perform an operation correctly, and an error tone
if you make an error.
Three Power Options — you can power the scanner from internal (rechargeable or non-rechargeable batteries) or external AC
or DC power (using an optional AC or DC adapter).
Your PRO-79 scanner can receive these bands:
Frequency
Range (MHz)
Types of Transmissions
29–54
10-Meter Ham Band, VHF Lo, 6-Meter Ham Band
108–136.9875
Aircraft
137–174
Military Land Mobile, 2-Meter Ham Band, VHF Hi
380–512
UHF Aircraft, Federal Government, 70-cm Ham
Band, UHF Standard Band, UHF “T” Band
Note: See “Specifications” on Page 49 for more information
about the scanner’s frequency steps.
FCC NOTICE
Your scanner might cause radio or TV interference even when it
is operating properly. To determine whether your scanner is
causing the interference, turn off your scanner. If the interference goes away, your scanner is causing it. Try the following
methods to eliminate the interference:
• Move your scanner away from the receiver.
• Connect your scanner to an outlet that is on a different electrical circuit from the receiver.
• Contact your local RadioShack store for help.
This equipment complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following conditions; (1) this device must
not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept
any interference received, including interference that may cause
undesired operation.
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Note: Mobile use of this scanner is unlawful or requires a permit
in some areas. Check the laws in your area.
SCANNING LEGALLY
Your scanner covers frequencies used by many different groups
including police and fire departments, ambulance services, government agencies, private companies, amateur radio services,
military operations, pager services, and wireline (telephone and
telegraph) service providers. It is legal to listen to almost every
transmission your scanner can receive. However, there are
some transmissions you should never intentionally listen to.
These include:
• telephone conversations (cellular, cordless, or other private
means of telephone signal transmission)
• pager transmissions
• any scrambled or encrypted transmissions
According to the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), you are subject to fines and possible imprisonment for intentionally listening to, using, or divulging the contents of such a
transmission unless you have the consent of a party to the communication (unless such activity is otherwise illegal).
This scanner is designed to prevent reception of illegal transmissions, in compliance with the law which requires that scanners be manufactured in such a way as to not be easily
modifiable to pick up those transmissions. Do not open your
scanner's case to make any modifications that could allow it to
pick up transmissions that it is not legal to listen to. Doing so
could subject you to legal penalties.
We encourage responsible, legal scanner use.
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CONTENTS
Preparation ............................................................................ 8
Installing Batteries ............................................................ 8
Using AC Power ................................................................ 9
Using Vehicle Battery Power ............................................. 9
Charging Rechargeable Batteries .................................. 10
Connecting an Antenna .................................................. 11
Connecting the Supplied Antenna .............................. 11
Connecting an Outdoor Antenna ................................ 12
Connecting an Earphone/Headphones .......................... 13
Listening Safely .......................................................... 13
Traffic Safety .............................................................. 14
Connecting an Extension Speaker ................................. 14
Understanding Your Scanner .............................................
A Look at the Keypad .....................................................
A Look at the Display ......................................................
Understanding Banks .....................................................
Channel Storage Banks ..............................................
Service Banks .............................................................
Monitor Memories ...........................................................
15
15
17
19
19
20
24
Operation .............................................................................
Turning On the Scanner/Setting Volume and Squelch ....
Resetting/Initializing the Scanner ...................................
Resetting the Scanner ................................................
Initializing the Scanner ...............................................
Storing Known Frequencies into Channels .....................
Finding and Storing Active Frequencies .........................
Searching the Service Banks ......................................
Using Direct Search ....................................................
Using Monitor Memory ...................................................
Listening to a Monitor Memory ...................................
Moving a Frequency from a Monitor Memory
to a Channel ...............................................................
Scanning the Stored Channels .......................................
Turning Channel-Storage Banks Off and On ..................
Monitoring a Stored Channel ..........................................
Clearing a Stored Channel .............................................
Listening to the Marine Bank ..........................................
Listening to the Weather Band .......................................
WX Alert .....................................................................
25
25
25
26
26
27
28
28
29
31
31
6
31
32
33
33
34
34
34
35
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Special Features ..................................................................
Delay ...............................................................................
Locking Out Channels or Frequencies ............................
Locking Out Channels .................................................
Locking Out Frequencies ............................................
Reviewing Locked-Out Frequencies ...........................
Removing Lockouts From All Frequencies ..................
Removing Lockouts From All Frequencies
in All Service Banks .....................................................
Using Priority ...................................................................
Using the Display Backlight .............................................
Turning the Key Tone On and Off ....................................
Using the Key Lock ..........................................................
Avoiding Image Frequencies ...........................................
36
36
36
36
37
37
37
A General Guide to Scanning .............................................
Guide to Frequencies ......................................................
National Weather Frequencies ....................................
Birdie Frequencies ......................................................
Guide to the Action Bands ..............................................
Typical Band Usage (MHz) .........................................
Primary Usage .............................................................
Band Allocation ...............................................................
Frequency Conversion ....................................................
41
41
41
41
42
42
42
43
46
38
38
39
39
39
40
Troubleshooting ................................................................... 47
Care and Maintenance ......................................................... 48
Specifications ...................................................................... 49
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PREPARATION
Note: If the scanner’s display locks up or does not work properly
after you connect a power source, you might need to reset or initialize the scanner.
Important: If you have problems, first try to reset the scanner
(see “Resetting the Scanner” on Page 26). If that does not work,
you can initialize the scanner (see “Initializing the Scanner” on
Page 26); however, this clears all information stored in your
scanner’s memory.
INSTALLING BATTERIES
You can power your scanner with four AA batteries (not supplied). For the best performance and longest life, we recommend RadioShack alkaline batteries. Or, you can use
rechargeable nickel-cadmium batteries and charge them either
inside or outside the scanner. Both types of batteries are available at your local RadioShack store.
Cautions:
• Use only fresh batteries of the required size and recommended type.
• Do not mix old and new batteries, different types of batteries
(standard, alkaline, or rechargeable), or rechargeable batteries of different capacities.
Follow these steps to install batteries.
1. Slide the battery compartment cover in the
direction of the arrow to remove it.
2. If you are using non-rechargeable batteries,
place them into the supplied black holder,
as indicated by the polarity symbols (+ and
–) marked on the holder. Or, if you are using
rechargeable batteries, place them into the
supplied yellow holder, as indicated by the
polarity symbols (+ and –) marked on the holder.
3. Place the battery holder (with batteries) into the battery
compartment.
4. Replace the cover.
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When B appears on the display and the scanner beeps continuously, or if the scanner stops operating properly, replace the batteries.
Warning: Dispose of old batteries promptly and properly. Do not
burn or bury them.
Caution: If you do not plan to use the scanner with batteries for
a month or more, remove the batteries. Batteries can leak chemicals that can destroy electronic parts.
USING AC POWER
You can power the scanner using a 9V, 300-mA AC adapter
(RadioShack Cat. No. 273-1767A) and a size C Adaptaplug®
adapter (neither supplied). Both are available at your local RadioShack store.
Cautions:
You must use a Class 2 power source that supplies
regulated 9V DC and delivers at least 300 mA. Its
center tip must be set to positive and its plug must
fit the scanner's PWR jack. Using an adapter that does not
meet these specifications could damage the scanner or the
adapter.
!
• Always connect the AC adapter to the scanner before you
connect it to AC power. When you finish, disconnect the
adapter from AC power before you disconnect it from the
scanner.
To power the scanner using an AC adapter, attach the Adaptaplug adapter to the AC adapter so the tip reads positive (+), then
insert the Adaptaplug adapter into the scanner’s PWR jack.
Then connect the other end of the adapter to a standard AC outlet.
USING VEHICLE BATTERY POWER
You can power the scanner from a vehicle’s 12V power source
(such as a cigarette-lighter socket) using a 9V, 300-mA DC
adapter and a size C Adaptaplug adapter (neither supplied).
Both are available at your local RadioShack store.
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Cautions:
You must use a power source that supplies 9V DC
and delivers at least 300 mA. Its center tip must be
set to positive and its plug must fit the scanner's
PWR jack. Using an adapter that does not meet these specifications could damage the scanner or the adapter.
!
• Always connect the DC adapter to the scanner before you
connect it to the power source. When you finish, disconnect
the adapter from the power source before you disconnect it
from the scanner.
To power the scanner using a DC adapter, attach the Adaptaplug adapter to the DC adapter so the tip reads positive (+) and
set the adapter’s voltage switch to 9V. Next, insert the Adaptaplug adapter into the scanner’s PWR jack, then plug the DC
adapter into your vehicle’s cigarette lighter socket.
Note: If you use a cigarette lighter power cable and your vehicle’s engine is running, you might hear electrical noise from the
engine while scanning. This is normal.
CHARGING RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES
Your scanner has a built-in charging circuit that lets you charge
Ni-Cd rechargeable batteries while they are in the scanner. To
charge rechargeable batteries, simply connect an AC adapter to
the scanner’s PWR jack.
Notes:
• You must have installed Ni-Cd rechargeable batteries in the
supplied yellow rechargeable battery holder in order to
charge them while they are in the scanner. If you use Ni-MH
or high-capacity Ni-Cd batteries in your scanner, you must
use an external charger to charge them.
• You cannot use a DC adapter to recharge rechargeable batteries in the scanner due to the limitations of the scanner’s
charging circuit.
It takes between 14 and 16 hours to recharge rechargeable batteries that are fully discharged. You can operate the scanner
while recharging the batteries, but charging takes longer.
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Note: Ni-Cd batteries last longer and deliver more power if you
occasionally let them fully discharge. To do this, simply use the
scanner until B appears on the display. Then fully charge the
batteries.
22
1-
Important: This radio can use Ni-Cd rechargeable batteries. At the end of a Ni-Cd battery's
useful life, it must be recycled or disposed of
properly. Contact your local, county, or state haz80
0-8 4 3-74
ardous waste management authorities for information on recycling or disposal programs in your
area or call 1-800-843-7422. Some options that might be available are: municipal curbside collection, drop-off boxes at retailers such as your local RadioShack store, recycling collection
centers, and mail-back programs.
CONNECTING AN ANTENNA
You must install an antenna before you can operate the scanner. You can use the supplied antenna, or you can connect an
external one (not supplied).
Connecting the Supplied Antenna
The supplied flexible antenna helps your scanner receive strong
local signals. Follow these steps to install the antenna.
1. Align the slots around the antenna’s
connector with the tabs on the
antenna jack.
2. Press the antenna down over the jack
and turn the antenna’s base clockwise until it locks into place.
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Connecting an Outdoor Antenna
Instead of the supplied antenna, you can connect an outdoor
base-station or mobile antenna (not supplied) to your scanner
using a BNC connector. Your local RadioShack store sells a variety of antennas. Choose the one that best meets your needs.
When deciding on a mobile or base-station antenna and its location, consider these points:
• The antenna should be as high as possible on the vehicle or
building.
• The antenna and its cable should be as far as possible from
sources of electrical noise, such as appliances or other
radios.
• The antenna should be vertical for the best performance.
Always use 50 Ohm coaxial cable, such as RG-58 or RG-8, to
connect the base-station or mobile antenna. For lengths over 50
feet, use RG-8 low-loss dielectric coaxial cable. If the antenna
cable’s connector does not fit in the scanner’s antenna jack, you
might also need a PL-259-to-BNC antenna plug adapter. Your
local RadioShack store carries a wide variety of coaxial antenna
cable and connectors.
If you choose another antenna, remove the supplied antenna
and follow the mounting instructions supplied with the new antenna. Route the antenna’s cable to the scanner, then connect
the cable to the scanner’s antenna jack.
Cautions:
• Do not run the cable over sharp edges or moving parts that
might damage it.
• Do not run the cable next to power cables or other antenna
cables.
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Warning: Use extreme caution when you install or remove an
outdoor antenna. If the antenna starts to fall, let it go! It could
contact overhead power lines. If the antenna touches a power
line, contact with the antenna, mast, cable, or guy wires can
cause electrocution and death. Call the power company to remove the antenna. DO NOT attempt to do so yourself.
CONNECTING AN EARPHONE/
HEADPHONES
For private listening, you can connect an earphone or headphones with a 1/8-inch (3.5-mm) plug to the
jack on the top of
the scanner. (Your local RadioShack store carries a wide selection of earphones and headphones). Connecting an earphone
or headphones automatically disconnects the internal speaker.
Listening Safely
To protect your hearing, follow these guidelines when you use
an earphone or headphones.
• Set the volume to the lowest setting before you begin listening. After you begin listening, adjust the volume to a comfortable level.
• Do not listen at extremely high volume levels. Extended
high-volume listening can lead to permanent hearing loss.
• Once you set the volume, do not increase it. Over time, your
ears adapt to the volume level, so a volume level that does
not cause discomfort might still damage your hearing.
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Traffic Safety
• Do not use an earphone/headphones with your scanner
when operating a motor vehicle or riding a bicycle in or near
traffic. Doing so can create a traffic hazard and could be illegal in some areas.
• If you use an earphone/headphones with your scanner while
riding a bicycle, be very careful. Do not listen to a continuous transmission. Even though some earphones/headphones let you hear some outside sounds when listening at
normal volume levels, they still can present a traffic hazard.
CONNECTING AN EXTENSION SPEAKER
In a noisy area, an amplified extension speaker (available at
your local RadioShack store) positioned in the right place, might
provide more comfortable listening.
Plug the speaker cable’s 1/8-inch (3.5-mm) plug into your scanner’s
jack.
Note: Connecting an external speaker disconnects the scanner’s internal speaker.
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UNDERSTANDING YOUR SCANNER
Once you understand a few simple terms we use in this manual
and familiarize yourself with your scanner’s features, you can
put the scanner to work for you. You simply determine the type
of communications you want to receive, then set the scanner to
scan them.
A frequency is the tuning location of a station (expressed in
kHz or MHz). To find active frequencies, you can use the
search function.
You can also search the service-search banks, which are preset groups of frequencies categorized by type of service.
When you find a frequency, you can store it into a programmable memory location called a channel, which is grouped with
your other channels in a channel-storage bank. You can then
scan the channel-storage banks to see if there is activity on the
frequencies stored there. Each time the scanner finds an active
frequency, it stays on that channel until the transmission ends.
A LOOK AT THE KEYPAD
Your scanner’s keys might seem confusing at first, but this information should help you understand each key’s function.
Note: Some of the scanner’s keys perform more than one function and are marked with more than one label. The steps in this
Owner’s Manual show only the label on the key appropriate to
the action being performed.
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BAND
Lets you search the scanner’s preprogrammed
service-search banks.
PRI/ALERT
Turns the priority feature on and off; turns the
WX alert mode on and off.
WX
Scans the seven preprogrammed weather channels.
SCAN
Scans any preprogrammed channels.
MAN
Stops scanning and lets you directly enter a
channel number.
Number
Keys
▼/▲
Each key has single-digit (0 to 9) and a range of
numbers. Use the range of numbers above the key
(21–40 for example) to select the channel in a
channel-storage bank. See “Understanding Banks”
on Page 19.
Searches up or down for active frequencies or
selects the direction when scanning channels.
L/O RVW / L/O Reviews locked-out frequencies; lets you lock out
selected channels or frequencies.
MON/CL
Lets you store a frequency in one of the 20 monitor memories; clears an incorrect entry.
/ LIGHT Locks (and unlocks) the keypad to prevent acci-
dental entries; turns the backlight on and off.
PGM
Programs frequencies into channels.
DELAY/•
Programs a 2-second delay for the selected
channel; enters a decimal point.
ENT (enter)
Enters frequencies into channels.
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A LOOK AT THE DISPLAY
The display has indicators that show the scanner’s current operating status. This quick look at the display will help you understand how your scanner operates.
Appears when you lock the keypad.
▼ /▲
Indicates the search or scan direction.
AIR
Indicates that the scanner is searching the air
service bank.
ALErt
Appears when the weather alert is on.
-b-
Appears during a service bank frequency search.
B
Appears when the batteries are low.
BANK
Appears with numbers (1–10) to indicate the
scan bank. Bank numbers with a bar under them
show which banks are turned on for scanning
(see “Understanding Banks” on Page 19).
C-Err
Appears when the scanner receives a checksum
error during wired programming.
CH
Appears with digits (1–200) or P to show which
channel the scanner is tuned to.
Ch-FULL
Appears when you try to enter a frequency during a search when all channels are full.
-d-
Appears during a direct frequency search.
-dUPL-
Appears when you try to store a frequency that is
already stored in another channel.
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dEFAULt
Appears when you remove all the lock-outs from
the service bank frequencies.
D-Err
Appears when the scanner receives a data error
during wired programming.
DLY
Appears when you program a 2-second delay.
End
Appears when the scanner has finished wired
programming.
Error
Appears when you make an entry error.
FD/PD
Indicates that the scanner is searching the fire/
police service bank.
FLo ALL-CL Appears when you remove all the locked-out frequencies during a service bank or direct search.
FLo-FULL
Appears when you try to lock out a frequency
during a search while 50 frequencies are already
locked out.
F L-out
Appears when you start a direct search from a
locked-out frequency.
HAM
Indicates that the scanner is searching the amateur radio service bank.
L/O (lockout) Appears when you manually select a channel
that was previously locked out during scanning or
when you review a locked-out frequency.
L-r
Appears when you review the locked-out frequencies.
M
Flashes with a number (1–20) to show which
monitor memory you are listening to.
MAN
Appears when you manually select a channel.
MRN
Indicates that the scanner is searching the marine service bank.
oFF tonE
Appears when you turn the key tone off.
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on tonE
Appears when you turn the key tone on.
P
Appears when the scanner is tuned to the priority
channel.
PGM
Appears when you program frequencies into the
scanner’s channels.
PRI
Appears when the priority feature is turned on.
SCAN
Appears when the scanner scans channels.
SRCH
Appears during service bank and direct frequency searches.
StArt
Appears when the scanner starts wired programming.
WirEd
Appears when you set the scanner to its wired
programming mode to program frequencies into
it.
WX
Indicates that the scanner is searching the
weather channels.
UNDERSTANDING BANKS
Channel Storage Banks
To make it easier to identify and select the channels you want to
listen to, channels are divided into 10 banks of 20 channels
each. Use each channel-storage bank to group frequencies,
such as those used by the police department, fire department,
ambulance services, or aircraft (see “Guide to the Action Bands”
on Page 42).
For example, the police department might use four frequencies,
one for each side of town. You could program the police frequencies starting with Channel 1 (the first channel in bank 1)
and program the fire department frequencies starting with Channel 21 (the first channel in bank 2).
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Service Banks
The scanner is preprogrammed with the frequencies allocated
by fire/police, aircraft, ham radio, and marine services. This is
handy for quickly finding active frequencies instead of searching
through an entire band (see “Searching the Service Banks” on
Page 28).
Note: The frequencies in the scanner’s service banks are preset. You cannot change them.
Fire/Police
Group
Frequency Range (MHz)
Step
(kHz)
1
33.420–33.980
20
37.020–37.420
20
39.020–39.980
20
42.020–42.940
20
44.620–45.860
40
45.880
–
45.900
–
45.940–46.060
40
46.080–46.500
20
153.770–154.130
60
154.145–154.445
15
154.650–154.950
15
155.010–155.370
60
155.415–155.700
15
155.730–156.210
60
158.730–159.210
60
166.250
–
170.150
–
2
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Group
Frequency Range (MHz)
Step
(kHz)
3
453.0375–453.9625
12.5
458.0375–458.9625
12.5
460.0125–460.6375
12.5
465.0125–465.6375
12.5
Air
Frequency Range (MHz)
Step (kHz)
108.000–136.9875
12.5
Amateur Radio
Group
Frequency Range (MHz)
Step
(kHz)
1
29.000–29.700
5
2
50.000–54.000
5
3
144.000–148.000
5
4
420.000–450.000
12.5
Marine
Channel
Frequency (MHz)
06
156.3000
07
156.3500
08
156.4000
09
156.4500
10
156.5000
11
156.5500
12
156.6000
13
156.6500
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22
Channel
Frequency (MHz)
14
156.7000
15
156.7500
16
156.8000
17
156.8500
18
156.9000
19
156.9500
20
157.0000/161.6000
21
157.0500
22
157.1000
23
157.1500
24
157.2000/161.8000
25
157.2500/161.8500
26
157.3000/161.9000
27
157.3500/161.9500
28
157.4000/162.0000
64
156.2250
65
156.2750
66
156.3250
67
156.3750
68
156.4250
69
156.4750
70
156.5250
71
156.5750
72
156.6250
73
156.6750
74
156.7250
77
156.8750
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Channel
Frequency (MHz)
78
156.9250
79
156.9750
80
157.0250
81
157.0750
82
157.1250
83
157.1750
84
157.2250/161.8250
85
157.2750/161.8750
86
157.3250/161.9250
87
157.3750/161.9750
88
157.4250
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MONITOR MEMORIES
The scanner has 20 monitor memories that you can use to temporarily store frequencies while you decide whether to save
them into channels. This is handy for quickly storing an active
frequency when you are searching through an entire band. You
can store a frequency into a monitor memory during a service
bank, or direct search. See “Finding and Storing Active Frequencies” on Page 28.
You can select monitor memories manually, but you cannot
scan them. See “Listening to a Monitor Memory” on Page 31.
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OPERATION
TURNING ON THE SCANNER/SETTING
VOLUME AND SQUELCH
1. Turn SQUELCH fully counterclockwise (until the indicator
points to MIN) before you turn on the scanner.
2. To turn on the scanner, turn VOLUME clockwise until you
hear a hissing sound.
3. Turn SQUELCH clockwise, just until the hissing sound stops.
Notes:
• To listen to a weak or distant station, turn SQUELCH counterclockwise. If reception is poor, turn SQUELCH clockwise to cut out weak transmissions.
• If SQUELCH is adjusted so you always hear a hissing
sound, the scanner will not scan or search properly.
4. To turn off the scanner when you finish, turn VOLUME counterclockwise to OFF.
RESETTING/INITIALIZING THE SCANNER
If the scanner’s display locks up or does not work properly after
you connect a power source, you might need to reset or initialize
the scanner.
Important: If you have problems, first try to reset the scanner
(see “Resetting the Scanner” on Page 26). If that does not work,
you can initialize the scanner (see “Initializing the Scanner” on
Page 26); however, this clears all information stored in your
scanner’s memory.
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Resetting the Scanner
1. Turn off the scanner, then turn it on again.
2. Insert a pointed object, such as a straightened paper clip,
into the reset opening on the side of the scanner (as
shown). Then gently press the reset button inside the opening. Information disappears from the display as you press
the reset button.
Note: If the scanner still does not work properly, you might need
to initialize the scanner (see “Initializing the Scanner”).
Initializing the Scanner
Important: This procedure clears all information you stored in
the scanner’s memory. Initialize the scanner only when you are
sure the scanner is not working properly.
1. Turn off the scanner, then turn it on again.
2. Hold down MON/CL.
3. While holding down MON/CL, insert a pointed object (such
as a straightened paper clip) into the reset opening on the
side of the scanner, then gently press the reset button inside
the opening. Information disappears from the display as you
press the reset button.
4. Release MON/CL. The display turns on.
Note: You must release the reset button before releasing MON/
CL; otherwise the memory might not clear.
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STORING KNOWN FREQUENCIES INTO
CHANNELS
Good references for active frequencies are the RadioShack Police Call Guide including Fire and Emergency Services, Official
Aeronautical Frequency Directory, and Maritime Frequency Directory. We update these directories every year, so be sure to
get a current copy.
Follow these steps to store frequencies into channels.
1. Press MAN, enter the channel number (1–200) where you
want to store a frequency, then press PGM. The channel
number appears.
2. Use the number keys and • to enter the frequency (including
the decimal point) you want to store.
3. Press ENT to store the frequency into the channel.
Notes:
• If you made a mistake in Step 2, Error appears and the
scanner beeps when you press ENT. Simply start again
from Step 2.
• Your scanner automatically rounds the entered frequency
down to the closest valid frequency. For example, if you
enter a frequency of 151.473, your scanner accepts it as
151.470.
• If you entered a frequency that is already stored in
another channel, the scanner beeps three times and displays the lowest channel number where the frequency is
already stored, and –dUPL– then the frequency
flashes. If you want to store the frequency anyway, press
ENT again. Press MON/CL to clear the frequency.
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• Press DELAY if you want the scanner to pause 2 seconds
on this channel before it proceeds to the next channel
after a transmission ends (see “Delay” on Page 36). The
scanner also stores this setting in the channel.
4. To program the next channel in sequence, press PGM and
repeat Steps 2 and 3.
FINDING AND STORING ACTIVE
FREQUENCIES
Searching the Service Banks
Your scanner contains groups of preset frequencies called service banks. Each service bank is associated with a specific activity (see “Service Banks” on Page 20). You can search for fire/
police, air, ham, and marine transmissions even if you do not
know the specific frequencies that are used in your area. Then
you can store the frequencies you found into the scanner’s
channels or monitor memories.
Notes:
• You can use the scanner’s delay feature while searching the
service banks, see “Delay” on Page 36.
• To listen to the marine bank, see “Listening to the Marine
Bank” on Page 34.
1. Press BAND. The last selected band name (such as HAM ),
SRCH , -b-, frequency and the group number (if any)
appear.
2. To select a different band, repeatedly press BAND until the
desired band name appears on the display. After about 2
seconds, the scanner begins searching rapidly in that band
for an active frequency.
Notes:
• To reverse the search direction at any time, hold down ▲
or ▼ for about 1 second.
• To search up or down the band in small increments,
repeatedly press ▲ or ▼. (See “Service Banks” on
Page 20 for frequency steps).
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• To pause the search while receiving a signal, press ▲ or
▼. To resume searching, hold down ▲ or ▼.
• To quickly move up or down through the frequencies, hold
down ▲ or ▼. The scanner tunes through the frequencies
until you release ▲ or ▼.
• If necessary, you can select search groups using the
number keys.
3. When the scanner finds an active frequency, it stops
searching and displays the frequency’s number. To store the
displayed frequency in the lowest available channel, press
PGM then ENT. The channel and frequency flash twice, and
the scanner stores the displayed frequency. The scanner
then continues to search for frequencies.
Notes:
• If there is no empty channel, Ch-FULL appears after you
press PGM. To store more frequencies, you must clear
some channels. See “Clearing a Stored Channel” on
Page 34. To continue searching after Ch-FULL appears,
hold down ▲ or ▼.
• If you entered a frequency that is already stored in
another channel, -dUPL- (duplicate) and the lowestnumbered channel containing the duplicate frequency
flash for about 3 seconds. If you want to store the frequency anyway, press ENT again. You can then delete
the frequency later. See “Clearing a Stored Channel” on
Page 34.
4. To store the displayed frequency in a monitor memory,
press MON/CL. The monitor memory number, M, and the frequency flash twice.
5. To search for another active frequency in the selected band,
hold down ▲ or ▼ for about 1 second. To select a different
band and search for another active frequency, repeat Steps
2–4.
Using Direct Search
During a direct search, the scanner searches up or down, starting from a frequency you specify. Follow these steps to use direct search.
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Note: You can use the scanner’s delay feature while using direct search.
1. Press MAN then enter the frequency (including the decimal
point) you want to use as a starting point for the search.
Note: To start from a frequency already stored in one of
your scanner’s channels, press MAN and enter the desired
channel number, then press MAN again.
2. Hold down ▲ or ▼ for about 1 second to search up or down.
–d–, SRCH, and ▲ or ▼ appear.
Notes:
• To reverse the search direction at any time, hold down ▲
or ▼ for about 1 second.
• To search up or down the selected band in small increments (5, 12.5, or 25 kHz steps), repeatedly press ▲ or
▼.
• To pause the search, press ▲ or ▼. To resume searching, hold down ▲ or ▼.
• To quickly move up or down through the frequencies, hold
down ▲ or ▼. The scanner tunes through the frequencies
until you release ▲ or ▼.
3. When the scanner finds an active frequency, it stops
searching and displays the frequency’s number. To store the
displayed frequency in the lowest available channel, press
PGM then ENT. The channel and frequency flash twice, and
the scanner stores the displayed frequency. The scanner
continues to search for frequencies.
Notes:
• If there is no empty channel, Ch-FULL appears. To store
more frequencies, you must clear some channels. See
“Clearing a Stored Channel” on Page 34. To continue
searching after Ch-FULL appears, press and hold down
▲ or ▼.
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• If you entered a frequency that is already stored in
another channel, -dUPL- (duplicate) and the lowestnumbered channel containing the duplicate frequency
flash on the display for about 3 seconds. If you want to
store the frequency anyway, press ENT again.
4. To store the displayed frequency in a monitor memory,
press MON/CL. M, the monitor memory number, and the frequency flash twice.
5. To search for another active frequency, hold down ▲ or ▼
for about 1 second.
USING MONITOR MEMORY
Listening to a Monitor Memory
To recall a frequency stored in a monitor memory, press MAN
then MON/CL. M, the monitor memory number, and CH flash and
the stored frequency appears.
Note: See Step 4 under “Searching the Service Banks” on
Page 28 for more information about storing a frequency in a
monitor memory.
To select other monitor memories, enter the desired monitor
memory’s number (1—20), then press MON/CL again.
Moving a Frequency from a Monitor Memory to a
Channel
1. Press MAN, enter the channel number where you want to
store the frequency, then press PGM. PGM and the selected
channel number appear.
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2. Press MON/CL. M, a monitor memory number, and CH flash,
and the frequency in the selected monitor memory appears.
3. Enter the desired monitor memory’s number (1–20), then
press MON/CL again. The selected monitor memory’s frequency appears.
4. Press ENT. The scanner stores the frequency in the selected
channel.
5. To move another monitor memory frequency to the next
channel, press PGM and repeat Steps 2–4.
SCANNING THE STORED CHANNELS
To set the scanner to continuously scan through all channels
with stored frequencies, simply press SCAN. SCAN and ▲ appear, and the scanner begins to rapidly scan until it finds an active frequency.
When the scanner finds an active frequency, it stops and displays that channel and frequency number, then it automatically
begins scanning again when the transmission on that frequency
ends.
Notes:
• To reverse the scanning direction, press ▲ or ▼.
• To set the scanner to remain on the current channel for 2
seconds after the transmission ends, see “Delay” on
Page 36.
• To set the scanner to remain on the current channel, even
after the transmission stops, press MAN at any time during
the transmission so MAN appears and SCAN disappears
(see “Monitoring a Stored Channel” on Page 33).
• To lock out channels so the scanner does not stop for a
transmission on those channels, see “Locking Out Channels
or Frequencies” on Page 36.
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TURNING CHANNEL-STORAGE BANKS
OFF AND ON
Channel-storage banks (1–10) are on when they have a bar underneath them and off when no bar appears underneath them.
To turn off a channel-storage bank, press SCAN to see which
banks are currently on, then press the bank’s number key. The
bar under the bank’s number disappears.
Note: The scanner does not scan any of the channels within the
banks you have turned off.
To turn on a channel-storage bank (1–10) press SCAN, and then
press the bank’s number key. A bar appears under the bank’s
number.
Notes:
• You cannot turn off all banks. There must be at least one
active bank.
• You can manually select any channel in a bank, even if the
bank is turned off.
• When you turn on the bank during scanning, the scanner
moves to the selected bank’s channel and continues scanning.
MONITORING A STORED CHANNEL
You can continuously monitor a specific channel without scanning. This is useful if you hear an emergency broadcast on a
channel and do not want to miss any details — even though
there might be periods of silence — or if you simply want to
monitor that channel.
Follow these steps to manually select a channel.
1. Press MAN.
2. Enter the channel number (1–200).
3. Press MAN again.
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CLEARING A STORED CHANNEL
If you no longer want a frequency stored in a channel (and you
do not want to replace that frequency with a different one), follow these steps to clear the stored frequency.
1. Press MAN to stop scanning.
2. To select the desired channel number, use the number keys
to enter that channel number (1–200).
3. Press PGM. PGM appears.
4. Press 0 then ENT. The frequency number changes to
000.0000 to indicate the channel is cleared.
5. To clear another channel, use the number keys to enter that
channel number (1–200), then press PGM again. Or repeatedly press PGM until the desired channel number appears.
Then repeat Step 4.
LISTENING TO THE MARINE BANK
To listen to the marine bank, repeatedly press BAND until MRN
appears.
To change the channel manually, press ▲ or ▼.
To scan through the marine bank, hold down ▲ or ▼ for about 2
seconds. MAN disappears and SCAN appears. To change the
scanning direction, press ▲ or ▼.
To stop scanning the channels, hold down ▲ or ▼ for about 2
seconds.
You can select a marine channel directly. When the scanner
stops scanning the marine bank, use the number keys to enter
the two-digit channel number.
LISTENING TO THE WEATHER BAND
To hear your local forecast and regional weather information,
press WX. Your scanner begins to scan through the weather
band.
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Your scanner should stop within a few seconds on your local
weather broadcast. If the broadcast is weak, you can press WX
again to resume scanning.
Channel
Frequency
(MHz)
1
162.400
2
162.425
3
162.450
4
162.475
5
162.500
6
162.525
7
162.550
WX Alert
Your scanner’s WX alert warns you of serious weather conditions by sounding an alarm if a National Weather Service broadcaster in your area broadcasts a weather alert tone.
To set the scanner so it sounds an alarm when a weather alert
tone is broadcast, press PRI/ALERT while you are listening to
the WX channel. ALErt appears. If the scanner detects the
weather alert, it sounds an alarm. Press any key to turn off the
alarm. To cancel the weather alert operation, press PRI/ALERT
again.
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SPECIAL FEATURES
DELAY
Many agencies use a two-way radio system that has a period of
several seconds between a query and a reply. To avoid missing
a reply, you can program a 2-second delay into any channel or
set a delay for all frequencies. When your scanner stops on a
channel or frequency with a programmed delay, DLY appears
and the scanner continues to monitor that channel or frequency
for 2 seconds after the transmission stops before resuming
scanning or searching.
You can program a 2-second delay in any of these ways:
• If the scanner is scanning and stops on an active channel,
quickly press DELAY/• before it resumes scanning.
• If the desired channel is not selected, manually select the
channel, then press DELAY/•.
• If the scanner is searching, press DELAY/•. DLY appears
and the scanner automatically adds a 2-second delay to
every transmission it stops on in that band.
To turn off the 2-second delay in a channel or for all frequencies,
press DELAY/• while the scanner is monitoring that channel or
frequency. DLY disappears.
LOCKING OUT CHANNELS OR
FREQUENCIES
You can increase the effective scanning or search speed by
locking out individual channels or frequencies that have a continuous transmission, such as a weather channel (see “National
Weather Frequencies” on Page 41) or a birdie frequency (see
“Birdie Frequencies” on Page 41).
Locking Out Channels
To lock out a channel during scanning, press L/O / L/O RVW
when the scanner stops on the channel.
To manually lock out a channel, select the channel then hold
down L/O / L/O RVW until L/O appears.
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To remove the lockout from a channel, manually select that
channel again, then hold down L/O/L/O RVW until L/O disappears.
Notes:
• Your scanner automatically locks out empty channels.
• You can still manually select locked-out channels.
Locking Out Frequencies
To lock out a frequency during a service bank or direct search,
press L/O/L/O RVW when the scanner stops on that frequency.
The scanner locks out the frequency then continues searching.
You can lock out frequencies in both direct search and service
bank searches.
Note: You can lock out as many as 50 frequencies during a
search. If you try to lock out more, FLo -FULL appears (see
“Reviewing Locked-Out Frequencies” and “Removing Lockouts
From All Frequencies”).
Reviewing Locked-Out Frequencies
To review the frequencies you locked out, hold down L/O / L/O
RVW for about 2 seconds during a search, then repeatedly press
▲ or ▼. L-r appears and the scanner displays all locked out
frequencies as you press ▲ or ▼. When you reach the highest
locked-out frequency, the scanner beeps twice and returns to
the lowest locked-out frequency.
Removing Lockouts From All Frequencies
1. Hold down L/O/L/O RVW for about 2 seconds during a service bank or direct search. L-r appears.
2. While holding down MON/CL, hold down L/O / L/O RVW. Flo
ALL-CL appears.
3. Press ENT. L-r 000.000 appears. The scanner clears
any lockouts from all frequencies. Or, if you do not want to
clear the lockouts, press MON/CL.
4. To continue searching, press BAND.
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Removing Lockouts From All Frequencies in All
Service Banks
Notes:
• These steps do not clear any lockouts in the marine service
bank.
• If you locked out frequencies which are within the range of
any of the service banks during direct search, the scanner
also removes those locked-out frequencies when you use
these steps. For example, if you lockout 29.000 MHz during
direct search, the scanner removes it since 29.000 MHz is
one of the frequencies in the ham radio service bank.
1. Hold down L/O / L/O RVW for about 2 seconds during a service bank or direct search. L-r appears.
2. While holding down MON/CL, press BAND. dEFAULt
appears.
3. Press ENT. The scanner clears any lockouts from all frequencies in all service banks. Or, if you do not want to clear
the lockouts, press MON/CL.
USING PRIORITY
The priority feature lets you scan through channels and still not
miss important or interesting calls on a frequency you select.
You can program one frequency into the priority channel. As the
scanner scans, if the priority feature is turned on, the scanner
checks the priority channel for activity every 2 seconds.
1. Press PGM, then press PRI/ALERT.
2. Enter the frequency you want to enter into the priority channel, then press ENT.
To turn on the priority feature, press PRI/ALERT during scanning.
PRI appears. The scanner checks the priority channel every 2
seconds and stays on the channel if there is activity. PCH and
the frequency appear whenever the scanner is set to the priority
channel.
To turn off the priority feature, press PRI/ALERT. PRI disappears.
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Note: If you program a weather frequency into the priority channel and the scanner detects a WX alert tone on that frequency
(see “WX Alert” on Page 35), the scanner sounds the alert tone
and ALErt flashes. Press any key to turn off the alarm.
USING THE DISPLAY BACKLIGHT
You can turn on the display’s backlight for easy viewing in the
dark. Press LIGHT to turn on the light for 5 seconds. To turn off
the light sooner, press LIGHT again.
TURNING THE KEY TONE ON AND OFF
The scanner is preset to sound a tone each time you press one
of its keys (except LIGHT). You can turn the key tone off or back
on.
1. If the scanner is on, turn VOLUME counterclockwise until it
clicks to turn the scanner off.
2. While you hold down 2 and ENT, turn on the scanner.
3. When oFF tonE or on tonE appear, release 2 and ENT.
USING THE KEY LOCK
Once you program your scanner, you can protect it from accidental program changes by turning on the keylock feature.
When the keypad is locked, the only controls that operate are
SCAN, MANUAL, LIGHT, VOLUME, and SQUELCH.
Note: The keylock does not prevent the scanner from scanning
channels or monitoring a single channel, whichever feature you
last selected.
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To turn on the keylock, hold down
for about 3 seconds until the scanner beeps three times and
appears. To turn it
off, hold down
for about 3 seconds until the scanner beeps
three times and
disappears.
AVOIDING IMAGE FREQUENCIES
You might discover one of your regular stations on another frequency that is not listed. It might be what is known as an image
frequency. For example, you might find a service that regularly
uses a frequency of 453.275 also on 474.675 MHz.
To see if it is an image, do a little math.
Note the new frequency
474.675
Double the intermediate frequency of 10.7 MHz
(21.400)
and subtract it from the new frequency
–21.400
If the answer is the regular frequency
453.275
then you have tuned to an image.
Occasionally, you might get interference on a weak or distant
channel from a strong transmission 21.4 MHz above or below
the tuned frequency. This is rare, and the image signal is usually
cleared whenever there is a transmission on the actual frequency.
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A GENERAL GUIDE TO SCANNING
Reception of the frequencies covered by your scanner is mainly
“line-of-sight.” That means you usually cannot hear stations that
are beyond the horizon.
GUIDE TO FREQUENCIES
National Weather Frequencies
162.400
162.500
162.425
162.525
162.450
162.550
162.475
Birdie Frequencies
Every scanner has birdie frequencies. Birdies are signals created inside the scanner’s receiver. These operating frequencies
might interfere with transmissions on the same frequencies. If
you program one of these frequencies, you hear only noise on
that frequency. If the interference is not severe, you might be
able to turn SQUELCH clockwise to cut out the birdie. This scanner’s birdie frequencies (in MHz) are:
30.075
30.735
38.400
40.000
40.980
48.025
51.200
51.225
112.675
128.575
136.725
140.800
144.655
152.995
160.965
166.400
169.010
386.375
399.375
402.475
416.0375
426.625
434.675
442.100
447.425
456.075
458.175
464.3625
466.225
474.3125
480.575
490.3375
504.625
506.4125
To find the birdies in your individual scanner, begin by disconnecting the antenna and moving it away from the scanner. Make
sure that no other nearby radio or TV sets are turned on near
the scanner. Use the search function and search every frequency range from its lowest frequency to the highest. Occasionally,
the searching will stop as if it had found a signal, often without
any sound. That is a birdie. Make a list of all the birdies in your
scanner for future reference.
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GUIDE TO THE ACTION BANDS
Typical Band Usage (MHz)
VHF Band
Low Range
6-Meter Amateur
Aircraft
U.S. Government
2-Meter Amateur
High Range
29.00–50.00
50.00–54.00
108.00–136.00
137.00–144.00
144.00–148.00
148.00–174.00
UHF Band
Military Aircraft
U.S. Government
70-Centimeter Amateur
Low Range
FM-TV Audio Broadcast, Wide Band
311.00–384.00
406.00–420.00
420.00–450.00
450.00–470.00
470.00–512.00
Primary Usage
As a general rule, most of the radio activity is concentrated on
the following frequencies:
VHF Band
Activities
2-Meter Amateur Band
Government, Police, and Fire
Emergency Services
Railroad
Frequencies (MHz)
144.000–148.000
153.785–155.980
158.730–159.460
160.000–161.900
UHF Band
Activities
70-Centimeter Amateur Band
FM Repeaters
Land-Mobile “Paired” Frequencies
Base Stations
Mobile Units
Repeater Units
Control Stations
42
Frequencies (MHz)
420.000–450.000
450.000–470.000
451.025–454.950
456.025–459.950
460.025–464.975
465.025–469.975
20-314.fm Page 43 Monday, December 13, 1999 12:55 PM
Note: Remote control stations and mobile units operate at 5
MHz higher than their associated base stations and relay repeater units.
BAND ALLOCATION
To help decide which frequency ranges to scan, use the following listing of the typical services that use the frequencies your
scanner receives. These frequencies are subject to change, and
might vary from area to area. For a more complete listing, refer
to the Police Call Radio Guide including Fire and Emergency
Services, available at your local RadioShack store.
Abbreviations
Services
AIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Aircraft
BIFC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Boise (ID) Interagency Fire Cache
BUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business
CAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Civil Air Patrol
CB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Citizens Band
CCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Common Carrier
CSB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conventional Systems
CTSB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conventional/Trunked Systems
FIRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fire Department
HAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Amateur (Ham) Radio
GOVT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Federal Government
GMR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Mobile Radio
GTR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . General Trunked
IND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Industrial Services
(Manufacturing, Construction, Farming, Forest Products)
MAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Military Amateur Radio
MARI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maritime Limited Coast
(Coast Guard, Marine Telephone,
Shipboard Radio, Private Stations)
MARS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Military Affiliate Radio System
MED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Emergency/Medical Services
MIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U.S. Military
MOV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Motion Picture/Video Industry
NEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Mobile Narrow
NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Relay Press (Newspaper Reporters)
OIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil/Petroleum Industry
POL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Police Department
PUB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public Services
(Public Safety, Local Government, Forestry Conservation)
PSB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public Safety
PTR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Private Trunked
ROAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Road & Highway Maintenance
RTV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Radio/TV Remote Broadcast Pickup
TAXI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taxi Services
TELB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mobile Telephone
(Aircraft, Radio Common Carrier, Landline Companies)
TELC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cordless Phones
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20-314.fm Page 44 Monday, December 13, 1999 12:55 PM
TELM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Telephone Maintenance
TOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tow Trucks
TRAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transportation Services
(Trucks, Tow Trucks, Buses, Railroad, Other)
TSB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trunked Systems
TVn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FM-TV Audio Broadcast
USXX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Government Classified
UTIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power & Water Utilities
WTHR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Weather
HIGH FREQUENCY (HF)
— (3 MHz–30 MHz)
10-Meter Amateur Band (28.0–29.7 MHz)
29.000–29.700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HAM
VERY HIGH FREQUENCY (VHF)
— (30 MHz–300 MHz)
VHF Low Band (29.7–50 MHz—in 5 kHz steps)
29.700–29.790 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND
29.900–30.550 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
30.580–31.980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, PUB
32.000–32.990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
33.020–33.980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUS, IND, PUB
34.010–34.990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
35.020–35.980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUS, PUB, IND, TELM
36.000–36.230 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
36.230–36.990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil Spill Cleanup, GOVT, MIL
37.020–37.980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PUB, IND
38.000–39.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
39.020–39.980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PUB
40.000–42.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL, MARI
42.020–42.940 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . POL
42.960–43.180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND
43.220–43.680 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TELM, IND, PUB
43.700–44.600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRAN
44.620–46.580 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . POL, PUB
46.600–46.990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, TELC
47.020–47.400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PUB
47.420 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . American Red Cross
47.440–49.580 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, PUB
49.610–49.990 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MIL, TELC
6-Meter Amateur Band (50–54 MHz)
50.00–54.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HAM
Aircraft Band (108–136 MHz)
108.000–121.490 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AIR
121.500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AIR Emergency
121.510–136.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AIR
U.S. Government Band (137–144 MHz)
137.000–144.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
2-Meter Amateur Band (144–148 MHz)
144.000–148.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HAM
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20-314.fm Page 45 Monday, December 13, 1999 12:55 PM
VHF High Band (148–174 MHz)
148.050–150.345 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CAP, MAR, MIL
150.775–150.790 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED
150.815–150.980 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOW, Oil Spill Cleanup
150.995–151.475 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ROAD, POL
151.490–151.955 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, BUS
151.985 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TELM
152.0075 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED
152.030–152.240 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TELB
152.270–152.480 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, TAXI, BUS
152.510–152.840 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TELB
152.870–153.020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, MOV
153.035–153.725 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, OIL, UTIL
153.740–154.445 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PUB, FIRE
154.490–154.570 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, BUS
154.585 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Oil Spill Cleanup
154.600–154.625 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUS
154.655–156.240 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED, ROAD, POL, PUB
156.255–157.425 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OIL, MARI
157.450 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED
157.470–157.515 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOW
157.530–157.725 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, TAXI
157.740 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUS
157.770–158.100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TELB
158.130–158.460 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUS, IND, OIL, TELM, UTIL
158.490–158.700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TELB
158.730–159.465 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . POL, PUB, ROAD
159.480 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OIL
159.495–161.565 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TRAN
161.580–162.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OIL, MARI, RTV
162.0125–162.35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL, USXX
162.400–162.550 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WTHR
162.5625–162.6375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL, USXX
162.6625 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED
162.6875–163.225 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL, USXX
163.250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED
163.275–166.225 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL, USXX
166.250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, RTV, FIRE
166.275–169.400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, BIFC
169.445–169.505 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wireless Mikes, GOVT
169.55–169.9875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL, USXX
170.000–170.150 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BIFC, GOVT, RTV, FIRE
170.175–170.225 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT
170.245–170.305 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wireless Mikes
170.350–170.400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, MIL
170.425–170.450 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BIFC
170.475 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PUB
170.4875–173.175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, PUB, Wireless Mikes
173.225–173.5375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MOV, NEWS, UTIL, MIL
173.5625–173.5875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MIL Medical/Crash Crews
173.60–173.9875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT
ULTRA HIGH FREQUENCY (UHF)
— (300 MHz–3 GHz)
U. S. Government Band (406–420 MHz)
406.125–419.975 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GOVT, USXX
70-Centimeter Amateur Band (420–450 MHz)
420.000–450.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . HAM
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20-314.fm Page 46 Monday, December 13, 1999 12:55 PM
Low Band (450–470 MHz)
450.050–450.925 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RTV
451.025–452.025 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, OIL, TELM, UTIL
452.0375–453.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, TAXI, TRAN TOW, NEWS
453.0125–454.000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PUB, OIL
454.025–454.975 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TELB
455.050–455.925 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RTV
457.525–457.600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUS
458.025–458.175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED
460.0125–460.6375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FIRE, POL, PUB
460.650–462.175 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUS
462.1875–462.450 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUS, IND
462.4625–462.525 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IND, OIL, TELM, UTIL
462.550–462.925 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GMR, BUS
462.9375–463.1875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MED
463.200–467.925 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BUS
FM-TV Audio Broadcast, UHF Wide Band (470–512 MHz)
(Channels 14 through 20 in 6 MHz steps)
475.750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
481.750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
487.750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
493.750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
499.750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
505.750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
511.750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Channel 14
Channel 15
Channel 16
Channel 17
Channel 18
Channel 19
Channel 20
Note: Some cities use the 470–512 MHz band for land/mobile
service.
FREQUENCY CONVERSION
The tuning location of a station can be expressed in frequency
(kHz or MHz) or in wavelength (meters). The following information can help you make the necessary conversions.
1 MHz (million) = 1,000 kHz (thousand)
• To convert MHz to kHz, multiply the number of megahertz
by 1,000:
30.62 (MHz) × 1000 = 30,620 kHz
• To convert from kHz to MHz, divide the number of kilohertz
by 1,000:
127,800 (kHz) ÷ 1000 = 127.8 MHz
• To convert MHz to meters, divide 300 by the number of
megahertz:
300 ÷ 50 MHz = 6 meters
46
20-314.fm Page 47 Monday, December 13, 1999 12:55 PM
TROUBLESHOOTING
If your scanner is not working as it should, these suggestions
might help you eliminate the problem. If the scanner still does
not operate properly, take it to your local RadioShack store for
assistance.
PROBLEM
POSSIBLE CAUSE
REMEDY
Scanner is
totally inoperative.
The AC or DC
adapter is not connected.
Be sure the adapter’s barrel
plug is fully inserted into the
PWR jack.
The batteries are
dead.
Replace the batteries with
fresh ones, or recharge the
rechargeable batteries.
An antenna is not
connected or is
connected incorrectly.
Make sure an antenna is
properly connected to the
scanner.
Programmed frequencies are the
same as “birdie”
frequencies.
Avoid programming frequencies listed under
“Birdie Frequencies” on
Page 41 or only listen to
them manually.
Keylock is turned
on.
Turn off the keylock.
The scanner might
need to be reset or
initialized.
Turn the scanner off then on
again, or reset/initialize the
scanner (see “Resetting/Initializing the Scanner” on
Page 25.
Scanner is on
but will not
scan.
SQUELCH is not
correctly adjusted.
Adjust SQUELCH clockwise.
Only one channel is
(or no channels
are) stored.
Store frequencies into more
than one channel.
During scanning, the scanner locks on
frequencies
that have an
unclear transmission.
Programmed frequencies are the
same as “birdie”
frequencies.
Avoid programming frequencies listed under
“Birdie Frequencies” on
Page 41, or only listen to
them manually.
Poor or no
reception
Keypad does
not work.
47
20-314.fm Page 48 Monday, December 13, 1999 12:55 PM
CARE AND MAINTENANCE
Your RadioShack PRO-79 200 Channel VHF/Air/UHF Handheld Scanner is an example of superior design and craftsmanship. The following suggestions will help you care for your
scanner so you can enjoy it for years.
Keep the scanner dry. If it gets wet, wipe it dry immediately. Liquids might contain minerals that can corrode
the electronic circuits.
Use and store the scanner only in normal temperature
environments. Temperature extremes can shorten the
life of electronic devices and distort or melt plastic
parts.
Keep the scanner away from dust and dirt, which can
cause premature wear of parts.
Handle the scanner gently and carefully. Dropping it
can damage circuit boards and cases and can cause
the scanner to work improperly.
Wipe the scanner with a damp cloth occasionally to
keep it looking new. Do not use harsh chemicals,
cleaning solvents, or strong detergents to clean the
scanner.
Modifying or tampering with the scanner’s internal components
can cause a malfunction and might invalidate its warranty and
void your FCC authorization to operate it. If your scanner is not
performing as it should, take it to your local RadioShack store
for assistance.
48
20-314.fm Page 49 Monday, December 13, 1999 12:55 PM
SPECIFICATIONS
Frequency Coverage (MHz):
10 Meter Amateur Radio ..................... 29–30 (in 5 kHz steps)
VHF Lo ................................................ 30–50 (in 5 kHz steps)
6 Meter Amateur Radio ....................... 50–54 (in 5 kHz steps)
Aircraft ............................... 108–136.9875 (in 12.5 kHz steps)
Government ..................................... 137–144 (in 5 kHz steps)
2 Meter Amateur Radio ................... 144–148 (in 5 kHz steps)
VHF Hi ............................................. 148–174 (in 5 kHz steps)
Amateur Radio/Government ....... 380–450 (in 12.5 kHz steps)
UHF Standard ............................. 450–470 (in 12.5 kHz steps)
UHF “T” ....................................... 470–512 (in 12.5 kHz steps)
Channels of Operation ....... 200 channels/20 monitor memories
Sensitivity (20 dB S/N):
29–54 MHz ...................................................................
108–136.9875 MHz ......................................................
137–174 MHz ...............................................................
380–512 MHz ...............................................................
0.5 µV
1.0 µV
0.5 µV
0.7 µV
Spurious Rejection (FM @154 MHz) ............................... 50 dB
Selectivity:
±10 kHz ......................................................................... –6 dB
±18 kHz ....................................................................... –50 dB
Search Speed ..............................................Up to 50 Steps/Sec
Scan Speed .......................................... Up to 25 Channels/Sec
Delay Time ................................................................ 2 Seconds
IF Frequencies:
1st IF ........................................................................ 10.7 MHz
2nd IF .......................................................................... 455 kHz
IF Interference Ratio (10.7 MHz) .................. 70 dB at 150 MHz
Squelch Sensitivity:
Threshold ...................................................... Less than 0.5 µV
Tight (FM) ...................................................... (S + N)/N 25 dB
Tight (AM) ...................................................... (S + N)/N 20 dB
Antenna Impedance ................................................... 50 Ohms
Audio Output Power (10% THD) .................... 180 mW Nominal
Built-In Speaker ........................... 13/8 Inches (36 mm), 8 Ohms
Operating Temperature ........................................... 14° to 140°F
(–10° to 60°C)
49
20-314.fm Page 50 Monday, December 13, 1999 12:55 PM
Power Requirements ...................... 6 Volts DC, 4 AA Batteries
AC Adapter (Optional)
DC Adapter (Optional)
Current Drain (Squelched) .............................................. 45 mA
Dimensions (HWD) .............................. 511/16 × 23/8 × 13/8 Inches
(145 × 62 × 34 mm)
Weight (without antenna and batteries) ........................... 7.9 oz
(224 g)
Supplied Accessories ......................... Antenna, Battery Holder,
Rechargeable Battery Holder
Specifications are typical; individual units might vary. Specifications are subject to change and improvement without notice.
50
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NOTES
51
20-314.fm Page 52 Monday, December 13, 1999 12:55 PM
Limited One-Year Warranty
This product is warranted by RadioShack against manufacturing defects in material
and workmanship under normal use for one (1) year from the date of purchase from
RadioShack company-owned stores and authorized RadioShack franchisees and dealers. EXCEPT AS PROVIDED HEREIN, RadioShack MAKES NO EXPRESS WARRANTIES AND ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING THOSE OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, ARE LIMITED
IN DURATION TO THE DURATION OF THE WRITTEN LIMITED WARRANTIES CONTAINED HEREIN. EXCEPT AS PROVIDED HEREIN, RadioShack SHALL HAVE NO
LIABILITY OR RESPONSIBILITY TO CUSTOMER OR ANY OTHER PERSON OR
ENTITY WITH RESPECT TO ANY LIABILITY, LOSS OR DAMAGE CAUSED DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY BY USE OR PERFORMANCE OF THE PRODUCT OR
ARISING OUT OF ANY BREACH OF THIS WARRANTY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY DAMAGES RESULTING FROM INCONVENIENCE, LOSS OF TIME,
DATA, PROPERTY, REVENUE, OR PROFIT OR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, EVEN IF RadioShack HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
Some states do not allow the limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts or the
exclusion of incidental or consequential damages, so the above limitations or exclusions may not apply to you.
In the event of a product defect during the warranty period, take the product and the
RadioShack sales receipt as proof of purchase date to any RadioShack store. RadioShack will, at its option, unless otherwise provided by law: (a) correct the defect by
product repair without charge for parts and labor; (b) replace the product with one of the
same or similar design; or (c) refund the purchase price. All replaced parts and products, and products on which a refund is made, become the property of RadioShack.
New or reconditioned parts and products may be used in the performance of warranty
service. Repaired or replaced parts and products are warranted for the remainder of
the original warranty period. You will be charged for repair or replacement of the product made after the expiration of the warranty period.
This warranty does not cover: (a) damage or failure caused by or attributable to acts of
God, abuse, accident, misuse, improper or abnormal usage, failure to follow instructions, improper installation or maintenance, alteration, lightning or other incidence of
excess voltage or current; (b) any repairs other than those provided by a RadioShack
Authorized Service Facility; (c) consumables such as fuses or batteries; (d) cosmetic
damage; (e) transportation, shipping or insurance costs; or (f) costs of product removal,
installation, set-up service adjustment or reinstallation.
This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which
vary from state to state.
RadioShack Customer Relations, 200 Taylor Street, 6th Floor, Fort Worth, TX 76102
We Service What We Sell
04/99
RadioShack
A Division of Tandy Corporation
Fort Worth, Texas 76102
12A99
GE-99D-3426
Printed in Hong Kong
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