PN26005

PN26005
CONFIGURATION GUIDE
Data Visualization Software
53PW6000
Micro-PWC™ SYSTEM
PN26005, Rev. 0
MicroMod Automation, Inc.
The Company
MicroMod Automation is dedicated to improving customer efficiency by providing the most ost-effective, application-specific process
solutions available. We are a highly responsive, application-focused company with years of expertise in control systems design and
implementation.
We are committed to teamwork, high quality manufacturing, advanced technology and unrivaled service and support.
The quality, accuracy and performance of the Company's products result from over 100 years experience, combined with a continuous
program of innovative design and development to incorporate the latest technology.
Use of Instructions
∆ Warning. An instruction that draws
attention to the risk of injury or death.
✎Note. Clarification of an instruction
or additional information.
❢ Caution. an instruction that draws
attention to the risk of the product,
process, or surroundings.
i Information. Further reference for
more detailed information or
technical details.
Although Warning hazards are related to personal injury, and Caution hazards are associated with equipment or property damage, it
must be understood that operation of damaged equipment could, under certain operational conditions, result in degraded process
system performance leading to personal injury or death. Therefore, comply fully with all Warning and Caution notices.
Information in this manual is intended only to assist our customers in the efficient operation of our equipment. Use of this manual for
any other purpose is specifically prohibited and its contents are not to be reproduced in full or part without prior approval of MicroMod
Automation, Inc.
Licensing, Trademarks and Copyrights
Micro-DCI and MicroLink are trademarks of MicroMod Automation, Inc.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
© 2005 MicroMod Automation, Inc. (September 2005)
Health and Safety
To ensure that our products are safe and without risk to health, the following points must be noted.
The relevant sections of these instructions must be read carefully before proceeding.
1.
Warning Labels on containers and packages must be observed.
2.
Installation, operation, maintenance and servicing must only be carried out by suitably trained personnel and in
accordance with the information given or injury or death could result.
3.
Normal safety procedures must be taken to avoid the possibility of an accident occurring when operating in conditions
of high pressure and/or temperature.
4.
Chemicals must be stored away from heat, protected from temperature extremes and powders kept dry. Normal safe
handling procedures must be used.
5.
When disposing of chemicals, ensure that no two chemicals are mixed.
Safety advice concerning the use of the equipment described in this manual may be obtained from the Company address on the back
cover, together with servicing and spares information.
All software, including design, appearance, algorithms and
source codes, is copyrighted by MicroMod Automation, Inc.,
and is owned by MicroMod Automation or its suppliers.
Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
Table of Contents
1.0 - Introduction .......................................................................... 1
1.1 Overview........................................................................................................ 1
1.2 Intended Audience......................................................................................... 1
1.3 Functional Description ................................................................................... 1
1.3.1 User Interface................................................................................... 2
1.3.2 Micro-PWC System Management Features..................................... 2
1.3.3 Hierarchical Displays........................................................................ 2
1.3.4 Graphic Configuration ...................................................................... 2
1.3.5 Historical Database .......................................................................... 2
1.3.6 Logging............................................................................................. 3
1.3.7 Trending ........................................................................................... 3
1.3.8 System Status Display...................................................................... 3
1.3.9 Controller Configuration ................................................................... 3
1.3.10 Micro-PWC Utilities ........................................................................ 3
1.3.11 Historical Block Data Collection...................................................... 3
1.3.12 The @aGlance Applications Programming Interface ..................... 3
1.3.13 Excel Functions .............................................................................. 4
1.4 Document Conventions ................................................................................. 4
1.4.1 Display Item...................................................................................... 4
1.4.2 Button Face Text .............................................................................. 4
1.4.3 Prompts and Messages.................................................................... 4
1.4.4 Optional User Input .......................................................................... 4
1.4.5 Special Keys..................................................................................... 4
1.4.6 File Names ....................................................................................... 4
1.4.7 Revision Variable.............................................................................. 5
1.5 Reference Documents ................................................................................... 5
1.6 Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations............................................................ 5
2.0 - System Configuration.......................................................... 9
2.1 Introduction.................................................................................................... 9
2.2 Getting Started............................................................................................... 9
2.2.1 System Default State........................................................................ 9
2.2.2 Logging In......................................................................................... 9
2.2.3 Logging Out.................................................................................... 10
2.3 Archival Groups ........................................................................................... 11
2.3.1 Add an Archival Group ................................................................... 11
2.3.2 Edit an Archival Group ................................................................... 12
2.3.2.1 Group Name................................................................. 12
2.3.2.2 Period and Start Time .................................................. 12
2.3.2.3 Area.............................................................................. 12
2.3.3 Delete an Archival Group ............................................................... 13
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2.3.4 Delete All Archival Groups ............................................................. 13
2.3.5 List Tags in an Archival Group........................................................ 13
2.4 Message Configuration................................................................................ 14
2.4.1 Message Text ................................................................................. 14
2.4.2 Message Priority............................................................................. 14
2.4.3 Message Destination Area ............................................................. 14
2.4.4 Send the Operator Message .......................................................... 14
2.5 Alarm Group Configuration.......................................................................... 15
2.5.1 Accessing Alarm Group Configuration ........................................... 15
2.5.2 Add an Alarm Group....................................................................... 16
2.5.2.1 Group Name ................................................................ 16
2.5.2.2 The ON List .................................................................. 16
2.5.2.3 The OFF List ................................................................ 17
2.5.2.4 Configure Filtering of Message Classes and Types..... 17
2.5.2.5 Edit an Alarm Group .................................................... 18
2.5.2.6 Delete Alarm Group(s) ................................................. 19
2.6 Configuring Network Parameters ................................................................ 20
2.6.1 Alarm Setup.................................................................................... 20
2.6.1.1 System Title ................................................................. 21
2.6.1.2 Top Alarm Line Presentation ........................................ 21
2.6.1.3 Priority Colors .............................................................. 22
2.6.1.4 Audible Alarm Configuration ........................................ 23
2.6.1.5 Default Alarm Setup ..................................................... 25
2.6.1.6 Mini-Alarm Window Field Width ................................... 25
2.6.1.7 Exiting Alarm Setup ..................................................... 27
2.7 Summary - Alarm Setup ............................................................................. 28
2.8 Alarm Vectors .............................................................................................. 29
2.8.0.1 Configuring the Triggering tagname............................. 30
2.8.0.2 Specifying the Target Display ....................................... 30
2.8.0.3 Changing Existing Alarm Vectoring Assignments ........ 32
2.8.0.4 Configuring Multiple Alarm Vectoring Assignments ..... 32
2.8.0.5 Deleting Alarm Vectoring Assignments ........................ 32
2.8.0.6 Using the Vector Button ............................................... 32
2.8.1 Area Name Assignment ................................................................. 32
2.8.2 Event Bit Configuration.................................................................. 33
2.8.2.1 Edit Event Bit Name ..................................................... 34
2.8.2.2 Go To ........................................................................... 34
2.8.2.3 Find .............................................................................. 35
2.8.2.4 Delete All...................................................................... 35
2.8.3 Printer Assignment ......................................................................... 35
2.8.3.1 Adding a Device ........................................................... 35
2.8.3.2 Changing Device Characteristics ................................. 39
2.8.3.3 Device Sort .................................................................. 39
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2.8.3.4 Deleting a Device ......................................................... 40
2.8.3.5 Deleting all Devices...................................................... 40
2.8.4 Message Routing ........................................................................... 40
2.8.4.1 Message Type Filtering ................................................ 41
2.8.4.2 Message Color Definition ............................................. 42
2.8.4.3 Message Indentation Definition.................................... 42
2.8.5 Operator Window Parameters........................................................ 45
2.8.5.1 Operator Window Update Rates .................................. 46
2.8.5.2 Operator Window Memory Usage................................ 46
2.8.5.3 Initial Display in an Operator Window .......................... 47
2.8.5.4 Automatic Arrangement of Operator Windows............. 47
2.8.5.5 Return to Default Settings ............................................ 47
2.8.5.6 Apply Changes............................................................. 48
2.8.6 Configuring Multiple Screens ......................................................... 48
2.9 Display Colors ............................................................................................. 49
2.10 Security...................................................................................................... 50
2.10.1 Security Activation........................................................................ 51
2.10.2 Default Login ................................................................................ 51
2.10.2.1 Default Login Access Level........................................ 52
2.10.2.2 Default Login Message Filtering................................. 53
2.10.2.3 Area Access Assignment (Default Login)................... 53
2.10.2.4 Clear and Set Multiple Message Types...................... 53
2.10.2.5 Exiting Default Login Configuration............................ 54
2.10.3 Function Access ........................................................................... 54
2.10.4 Function Access Level Assignment Guidelines............................ 56
2.10.5 User Login .................................................................................... 57
2.10.5.1 Add a User Login ....................................................... 58
2.10.5.2 Copy........................................................................... 61
2.10.5.3 Edit a User Login........................................................ 62
2.10.5.4 Delete a Login ............................................................ 62
2.10.6 Change Password ........................................................................ 62
2.10.7 Auto-Login .................................................................................... 63
2.10.8 Summary - Security...................................................................... 65
3.0 - Hierarchical Displays......................................................... 67
3.1 Introduction.................................................................................................. 67
3.2 Hierarchical Display Descriptions ................................................................ 68
3.2.1 Plant Summary Display .................................................................. 68
3.2.2 Group Display................................................................................. 69
3.2.2.1 Point Tagnames ........................................................... 69
3.2.3 Point Display .................................................................................. 70
3.3 Hierarchical Display Configuration .............................................................. 71
3.3.1 Summary Configuration.................................................................. 71
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3.3.2 Group Configuration ....................................................................... 71
3.3.2.1 End Group Configuration ............................................. 74
3.3.3 Point Displays................................................................................. 75
3.4 Summary - Hierarchical Displays ................................................................ 75
4.0 - The Grafx Editor................................................................. 77
4.1 OVERVIEW ................................................................................................. 77
4.1.1 Accessing the Grafx Editor............................................................. 77
4.1.2 Exiting the Grafx Editor .................................................................. 77
4.2 CREATING MODELS .................................................................................. 79
4.2.1 Child Windows - The Model Creation Environment........................ 80
4.2.1.1 Opening a Child Window ............................................. 80
4.2.1.2 Multiple Child Windows ................................................ 80
4.2.1.3 Child Window Components.......................................... 80
4.2.1.4 Drawing Work Space (Working View) in a Child
Window ................................................................ 80
4.2.1.5 The Working View Grid ................................................ 81
4.2.1.6 Snap Mode................................................................... 81
4.2.1.7 Aligning Multiple Objects.............................................. 81
4.2.1.8 Select Mode ................................................................. 82
4.2.1.9 Redrawing the Working View ....................................... 82
4.2.1.10 Adjusting the View of a Model.................................... 82
4.2.2 The Toolbars................................................................................... 84
4.2.3 The Status Bar................................................................................ 84
4.2.4 The Shape Toolbar ......................................................................... 84
4.2.4.1 The Fill Mode Button .................................................... 85
4.2.4.2 Creating Straight Lines................................................. 85
4.2.4.3 Creating Rectangles..................................................... 86
4.2.4.4 Creating Circles ........................................................... 87
4.2.4.5 Creating Markers ......................................................... 88
4.2.4.6 Creating Polylines ........................................................ 89
4.2.4.7 Creating Splines........................................................... 90
4.2.4.8 Creating Closed Splines............................................... 91
4.2.4.9 Creating Arcs ............................................................... 92
4.2.4.10 Creating Polygons...................................................... 93
4.2.4.11 Creating Text Objects ................................................. 94
4.2.4.12 Creating Text Rectangles ........................................... 95
4.2.4.13 Creating Submodels .................................................. 96
4.2.5 Configuring the Graphic Attributes of Objects ................................ 98
4.2.5.1 The Settings Window .................................................. 98
4.2.5.2 The Properties Window.............................................. 103
4.2.6 Selecting and Manipulating Objects ............................................. 103
4.2.6.1 Selecting Individual Objects ....................................... 103
4.2.6.2 Selecting Multiple Objects.......................................... 103
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4.2.6.3 Grouping and Ungrouping Objects............................. 104
4.2.6.4 Depth and Grouped Objects ...................................... 104
4.2.6.5 The Extent of an Object ............................................. 104
4.2.6.6 Moving an Object ....................................................... 105
4.2.6.7 Copying an Object...................................................... 105
4.2.6.8 Scaling (Resizing) an Object...................................... 105
4.2.6.9 Rotating an Object ..................................................... 106
4.2.6.10 Changing the Drawing Order of Objects .................. 106
4.2.6.11 Reversing an Object................................................. 107
4.2.6.12 Deleting an Object.................................................... 108
4.2.7 Point Operations........................................................................... 108
4.2.7.1 Moving an Object in Point Mode ................................ 108
4.2.7.2 Changing a Point........................................................ 109
4.2.7.3 Adding a Point............................................................ 109
4.2.7.4 Deleting a Point.......................................................... 109
4.2.8 Object Placement Example .......................................................... 109
4.2.9 The Menu Bar............................................................................... 111
4.2.9.1 File Types: Installed and Off-line Graphic and
Submodel Files .................................................. 111
4.2.9.2 File Operations: The FILE Pull-down Menu ............... 112
4.2.9.3 The EDIT Pull-down Menu ......................................... 118
4.2.10 Using Model Variables................................................................ 119
4.2.11 Window Operations: The WINDOW Pull-down Menu................. 119
4.3 Dynamics................................................................................................... 120
4.3.1 Configuring Dynamic Attributes for Objects ................................. 120
4.3.1.1 Configuring the Expression - Operators and
Operands ........................................................... 121
4.3.1.2 Configuring the Dynamic Attribute Settings ............... 126
4.3.2 Configuring Submodels ................................................................ 131
4.3.3 Creating Custom Dynamics.......................................................... 133
4.3.3.1 Custom Dynamics ...................................................... 133
4.3.3.2 Declaring Variables .................................................... 134
4.3.4 Dynamic Configuration Examples ................................................ 139
4.3.4.1 Example 1 - Single Expression .................................. 139
4.3.4.2 Example 2 - Multiple Expressions .............................. 140
4.3.4.3 Example 3 - Using the TRUE Expression .................. 141
4.3.4.4 Example 4 - Creating a New Submodel with
Dynamics ........................................................... 141
4.3.4.5 Example 5 - Configuring Dynamic Submodels........... 142
4.3.4.6 Example 6 - Simulating Motion Using the Blink
Attribute ............................................................. 142
4.3.4.7 Example 7 - Using Text and Text Attributes to
Indicate Conditions ............................................ 144
4.4 Micro-DCI Submodels ............................................................................... 145
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4.4.1 Dynamic Values............................................................................ 145
4.4.1.1 FP_DYvalue ............................................................... 145
4.4.2 Bargraphs..................................................................................... 147
4.4.2.1 FP_DYbargraph ......................................................... 147
4.4.2.2 FP_DYbargraph_ec ................................................... 149
4.4.2.3 FP_DYHorizbar .......................................................... 151
4.4.2.4 FP_DYVertbar ............................................................ 153
4.4.2.5 FP_DYtank................................................................. 155
4.4.2.6 FP_DYtank_ec ........................................................... 157
4.4.3 Submodels for Control and Data Entry......................................... 159
4.4.3.1 FP_DYctrlpb............................................................... 159
4.4.3.2 FP_DYmpoppb .......................................................... 161
4.4.3.3 FP_DYentervaluepb ................................................... 164
4.4.3.4 FP_DYentertextpb...................................................... 166
4.4.3.5 FP_DYputpb............................................................... 168
4.4.3.6 FP_DYput1pb............................................................. 171
4.4.3.7 FP_DYputpbstat ......................................................... 172
4.4.3.8 FP_DYputpbstat2 ....................................................... 175
4.4.3.9 FP_DYstatpb.............................................................. 178
4.4.3.10 FP_DYhslider ........................................................... 179
4.4.3.11 FP_DYvslider............................................................ 180
4.4.3.12 FP_DYtoggle............................................................ 181
4.4.4 Display Vectoring.......................................................................... 183
4.4.4.1 FP_DYvectorpb .......................................................... 183
4.4.4.2 FP_DYtagpb............................................................... 185
4.4.5 Trends .......................................................................................... 187
4.4.5.1 FP_DYHoriztrend ....................................................... 187
4.4.5.2 FP_DYVerttrend ......................................................... 189
4.4.5.3 FP_DYtrendpb ........................................................... 191
4.4.5.4 FP_DYHisttrend ......................................................... 192
4.4.6 Hierarchical Displays.................................................................... 193
4.4.6.1 FP_DYgroupmod ....................................................... 193
4.4.6.2 FP_DYpointmod ......................................................... 195
4.4.7 Miscellaneous Displays ................................................................ 196
4.4.7.1 FP_DYdial .................................................................. 196
4.4.7.2 FP_DYmeter .............................................................. 198
4.4.8 Rotating Equipment Displays ....................................................... 200
4.4.8.1 FP_DYwheel .............................................................. 200
4.4.8.2 FP_DYpump_lf ........................................................... 202
4.4.8.3 FP_DYpump_rt........................................................... 204
4.4.9 Expressions as Submodel Variables ............................................ 206
4.5 Micro-PWC Symbols ................................................................................. 209
4.5.1 Symbol Illustrations ...................................................................... 214
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4.6 Micro-DCI SUBMODELS........................................................................... 219
4.7 Custom Models For Point and Group Displays ......................................... 220
4.7.1 Group Display Customization Techniques.................................... 220
5.0 - Historical Database.......................................................... 221
5.1 Introduction................................................................................................ 221
5.2 Edit Historical Database Item .................................................................... 221
5.2.1 Point Information .......................................................................... 222
5.2.1.1 Historical Database Tagname .................................... 222
5.2.1.2 Historical Database Point Legend.............................. 222
5.2.2 Collection Information................................................................... 222
5.2.2.1 Collection Rate........................................................... 223
5.2.2.2 Computations ............................................................. 226
5.2.2.3 Storage Rate .............................................................. 227
5.2.2.4 Collection Option........................................................ 227
5.2.2.5 Archive Group ............................................................ 228
5.2.2.6 Tag Atom .................................................................... 228
5.2.2.7 Event Bit..................................................................... 229
5.2.2.8 Active Value ............................................................... 229
5.2.2.9 Acknowledge Bit......................................................... 229
5.2.3 Storage Information ...................................................................... 229
5.2.3.1 Add............................................................................. 230
5.2.3.2 Edit Data Storage Definitions ..................................... 232
5.2.3.3 Delete Data Storage Definitions ................................. 232
5.2.4 Convenience Buttons ................................................................... 232
5.2.4.1 Replace ...................................................................... 232
5.2.4.2 Add............................................................................. 232
5.2.4.3 Prev/Next ................................................................... 232
5.2.4.4 Return to Default Settings .......................................... 233
5.2.5 Historical Database Configuration and Trend Compression ........ 233
5.2.6 Add Historical Database ............................................................... 234
5.2.7 Find Historical Database .............................................................. 234
5.2.8 Delete Historical Database ........................................................... 234
5.2.9 Delete All Historical Database ...................................................... 234
5.3 Summary - Historical Database ................................................................ 235
6.0 - Logs .................................................................................. 237
6.1 Introduction................................................................................................ 237
6.2 Accessing Log Configuration..................................................................... 237
6.3 Event Logs................................................................................................. 238
6.3.1 Add Event Logs ............................................................................ 238
6.3.1.1 Configure Event Log Name........................................ 238
6.3.1.2 Configure Message Classes and Types..................... 238
6.3.2 Edit Event Logs ............................................................................ 240
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6.3.3 Delete Event Logs ........................................................................ 240
6.3.4 Schedule Event Logs ................................................................... 241
6.3.4.1 Schedule Button......................................................... 241
6.3.4.2 The Scheduled Time Parameter ................................ 242
6.3.4.3 The Event Bit Name Parameter ................................. 242
6.3.4.4 The Device Parameter ............................................... 242
6.3.4.5 The Print Banner Parameter ...................................... 243
6.3.4.6 The Next Occurrence Indicator .................................. 243
6.3.5 Print Event Logs ........................................................................... 243
6.3.5.1 Event Log Start Time.................................................. 244
6.3.5.2 Event Log End Time................................................... 244
6.3.5.3 The Device Button ..................................................... 244
6.3.5.4 The Print Banner Option ............................................ 244
6.4 Spreadsheet Logs...................................................................................... 244
6.4.1 Adding Spreadsheet Logs ............................................................ 244
6.4.2 Edit Spreadsheet Logs ................................................................. 245
6.4.3 Delete Spreadsheet Logs ............................................................. 245
6.4.4 Schedule Spreadsheet Logs ........................................................ 245
6.4.4.1 Macro Required for Printing and Scheduling
Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Logs .................... 245
6.4.5 Printing Example .......................................................................... 246
6.4.6 Print Spreadsheet Logs ................................................................ 246
6.4.7 Clearing the Recovery Log Notify Window................................... 247
6.4.8 Spreadsheet Log Special Functions ............................................. 248
7.0 - Trending............................................................................ 249
7.1 Introduction................................................................................................ 249
7.2 Accessing Historical Trends ...................................................................... 249
7.3 Configuring Historical Trends .................................................................... 251
7.3.1 Trend Parameters: Title................................................................ 252
7.3.2 Trend Parameters: Scale Bar Limits............................................. 252
7.3.3 Trend Parameters: Segment Size ................................................ 253
7.3.4 Trace Configuration ...................................................................... 253
7.3.4.1 Historical Tag ............................................................. 254
7.3.4.2 Historical Block Database Block Names .................... 255
7.3.4.3 Collection Info ............................................................ 255
7.3.4.4 Trend Trace Limits: High and Low ............................. 255
7.3.4.5 Trace Default State: On or Off.................................... 255
7.3.4.6 Display Options .......................................................... 256
7.3.4.7 Description ................................................................. 256
7.3.5 Trend Parameters: Type............................................................... 256
7.4 Summary - Trends ..................................................................................... 257
8.0 - System Status Display .................................................... 259
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8.1 Introduction................................................................................................ 259
8.2 General Information for All Node Types .................................................... 260
8.2.1 Node Name .................................................................................. 260
8.2.2 Info Menu ..................................................................................... 260
8.2.2.1 Network Info ............................................................... 261
8.2.2.2 Show Available Services............................................ 261
8.3 The Utilities Menu...................................................................................... 262
8.3.1 The Device Status Menu Item ...................................................... 262
8.3.1.1 Printer Queue Control ................................................ 262
8.3.1.2 Printer Queue Information.......................................... 263
8.3.2 Console Groups Display............................................................... 264
9.0 - Utilities .............................................................................. 267
9.1 Introduction................................................................................................ 267
9.2 Database Maintenance.............................................................................. 268
9.2.1 Historical Database Maintenance................................................. 268
9.2.2 Locating Specific Historical Tags .................................................. 270
9.2.3 Historical Block Database Maintenance ....................................... 270
9.2.4 Archival Database Maintenance................................................... 270
9.2.4.1 Locating Specific Archival Tags.................................. 271
9.2.4.2 Deleting Archival Data................................................ 272
9.2.5 Archival Block Database Maintenance ......................................... 272
9.3 CRT Print ................................................................................................... 273
9.3.1 Selecting the Image Type............................................................. 273
9.3.2 The Auto Fit Option ...................................................................... 273
9.3.3 The Stretch Option ....................................................................... 273
9.3.4 Scale/Preserve Aspect Ratio........................................................ 273
9.3.5 Printing the Image ........................................................................ 273
9.4 Release All Configuration Locks................................................................ 275
9.5 Time Adjustment........................................................................................ 277
9.5.1 The Adjustment Option................................................................. 277
9.6 Other Applications ..................................................................................... 278
9.7 Micro-PWC Help........................................................................................ 279
9.8 User Help................................................................................................... 280
9.8.1 EDIT User Help Informaton .......................................................... 280
9.8.2 CLEAR User Help Information ..................................................... 281
9.8.3 IMPORT User Help Information ................................................... 281
9.8.3.1 The File Filter Text Entry and List Boxes.................... 281
9.8.3.2 The DIRECTORIES Text Entry and List Boxes.......... 282
9.8.3.3 The Selection Text Entry Box ..................................... 282
9.8.3.4 The FILTER Button .................................................... 282
9.8.4 Exiting the User Help Utility.......................................................... 282
9.9 Quick Keys ................................................................................................ 283
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9.9.1 Accessing the Quick Keys Feature .............................................. 283
9.9.2 Configuring Quick Keys................................................................ 284
9.9.3 Configuring Quick Keys 33 Through 64 ....................................... 285
9.9.4 Clearing Quick Key Assignments ................................................. 285
9.10 Summary - Quick Keys............................................................................ 285
9.11 CRT Context Keys ................................................................................... 286
9.11.1 Preparing the Context................................................................. 286
9.11.2 Initial Display Layout Login......................................................... 286
9.11.3 Accessing CRT Context Keys..................................................... 286
9.11.4 Configuring CRT Context Keys................................................... 287
9.11.5 Clearing CRT Context Keys........................................................ 287
9.12 Summary - CRT Context Keys ................................................................ 288
9.13 Console Groups Synchronization ............................................................ 289
9.13.1 Console Group Synchronization Overview................................. 289
9.13.2 Selecting a Console Node With Which to Synchronize.............. 290
9.13.3 Selecting Configuration Data for Synchronization...................... 292
9.13.3.1 String File Considerations ........................................ 293
9.13.3.2 Performing the Synchronization ............................... 294
10.0 - Historical Block Data Collection................................... 295
10.1 Introduction.............................................................................................. 295
10.2 Historical Block Database Configuration Window ................................... 296
10.3 Add Historical Block................................................................................. 296
10.3.1 Historical Block Name ................................................................ 296
10.3.2 Historical Block Legend.............................................................. 297
10.3.3 Period and Start Time................................................................. 297
10.3.4 Storage Node ............................................................................. 298
10.3.5 Number Retained ....................................................................... 298
10.3.6 Historical Block Collection Options............................................. 298
10.3.6.1 Raw Data ................................................................. 298
10.3.6.2 Pause ....................................................................... 298
10.3.6.3 Reset........................................................................ 299
10.3.7 Tag Atom Assignment ................................................................ 299
10.3.8 Historical Block Data Computations ........................................... 299
10.3.9 Configuring Multiple Historical Blocks ........................................ 300
10.4 Edit Historical Block................................................................................. 301
10.5 Copy an Historical Block.......................................................................... 301
10.6 Delete an Historical Block........................................................................ 301
10.6.1 Find an Historical Block.............................................................. 301
11.0 - The @aGlance/IT Server Interface................................ 303
11.1 Introduction .............................................................................................. 303
11.1.1 The @aGlance/IT API for Micro-DCI .......................................... 304
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11.1.2 Micro-DCI @aGlance/IT Server Requirements Micro-PWC Version................................................................ 304
11.2 @aGlance/IT Server Operation ............................................................... 305
11.2.1 Configuring the @aGlance/IT Server Internal Interface ............. 305
11.2.2 Registering Server Nodes .......................................................... 305
11.2.3 Registering Client Nodes ............................................................ 306
11.2.4 Starting a Server and Server Names .......................................... 306
11.2.4.1 Starting a Server with Non-Default Options.............. 306
11.2.5 Configuring the @aGlance/IT Server External Interface ............ 308
11.2.6 Configure @aGlance/IT Current Tagname ................................. 308
11.2.6.1 Add a New @aGlance Tagname .............................. 309
11.2.6.2 Edit the Configuration for an @aGlance
Current Tagname ............................................... 310
11.2.6.3 Find a Particular @aGlance Current Tagname ........ 310
11.2.6.4 Viewing @aGlance/IT Current Tagnames ................ 311
11.2.6.5 Configure @aGlance/IT History Tagnames.............. 311
11.2.6.6 Viewing @aGlance/IT Server Process Data ............ 312
11.2.7 Backup/Restore @aGlance/IT Configuration ............................. 313
11.3 Supported Features for Use with @aGlance/IT Clients ........................... 313
11.3.1 @aGlance/IT Methods Supported .............................................. 313
11.3.2 Default Attribute Names ............................................................. 314
11.3.3 Format of Time-Stamps .............................................................. 314
11.3.3.1 Server Specific Parameters for History-Related
Methods ............................................................. 315
11.3.3.2 Server Specific Status Information ........................... 316
11.4 Security for the @aGlance/IT Server....................................................... 317
11.4.1 Security for Access to the @aGlance/IT Server for
Micro-PWC............................................................................. 317
11.4.2 Security for Micro-PWC Database Access ................................. 317
11.5 Monitoring ................................................................................................ 318
11.5.1 Monitor Time Interval .................................................................. 318
11.5.2 Monitor Types ............................................................................. 318
11.5.2.1 Polled Monitoring...................................................... 319
11.5.2.2 Deadband-Absolute Monitoring................................ 319
11.5.2.3 Deadband-Percent Monitoring ................................. 319
11.5.3 Monitor Request Size ................................................................. 320
11.6 Supported @aGlance/IT Client Applications ........................................... 320
11.7 @aGlance/IT Add-In for Microsoft Excel ................................................. 320
A.1 Introduction ............................................................................................... 321
A.1 The fpget( ) Function ................................................................................. 322
A.1 The fpgetd( ) Function ............................................................................... 323
A.1 The fphget( ) Function ............................................................................... 324
A.1 The fphgetd( ) Function ............................................................................. 325
A.1 The fpsendmsg( ) Function ....................................................................... 326
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A.1 The fpput( ) Function................................................................................. 327
A.1 The fpputd( ) Function ............................................................................... 328
A.1 The fphput( ) Function............................................................................... 329
A.1 The fphputd( ) Function ............................................................................. 330
A.1 The fparchive( ) Function .......................................................................... 331
A.1 The fpverbose( ) Function ......................................................................... 332
A.1 The fpuprint( ) Function............................................................................. 333
A.1 The fpudevice( ) Function ......................................................................... 334
A.1 The fpblkarch( ) Function .......................................................................... 335
A.1 The fpblkclose( ) Function......................................................................... 336
A.1 The fpblkopen( ) Function ......................................................................... 337
A.1 The fpblksample( ) Function...................................................................... 338
A.1 The fpblkvald( ) Function........................................................................... 339
A.1 The fphxnumval( ) Function ...................................................................... 340
A.1 The fphxgetval( ) Function ........................................................................ 342
A.1 The fpxammts( ) Function ......................................................................... 344
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List of Figures
Figure 2-1. User Login Window ........................................................................ 10
Figure 2-1. User Login Window ........................................................................ 10
Figure 2-2. Archival Group Configuration Window ........................................... 11
Figure 2-3. Archival Group Scheduling Window ............................................... 12
Figure 2-4. Area Selection Window .................................................................. 13
Figure 2-5. Message Configuration Window .................................................... 14
Figure 2-6. Alarm Group Selection Window ..................................................... 15
Figure 2-7. Alarm Group Configuration Window ............................................... 16
Figure 2-8. Alarm Group Filtering Window ....................................................... 17
Figure 2-9. Alarm Setup Window ...................................................................... 21
Figure 2-10. External Alarm Silence Configuration Window ............................. 25
Figure 2-11. Mini-Alarm Format Window .......................................................... 26
Figure 2-12. Alarm Vector Configuration Window ............................................ 29
Figure 2-13. Select Graphic Window ................................................................ 31
Figure 2-14. Printer Selection Window ............................................................. 31
Figure 2-15. Area Setup Display ...................................................................... 33
Figure 2-16. Event Bit Configuration Window ................................................... 34
Figure 2-17. Printer Assignment Display .......................................................... 35
Figure 2-18. Device Characteristics ................................................................. 36
Figure 2-19. Sort Criteria Window .................................................................... 39
Figure 2-20. Message Routing Assignment Window ........................................ 41
Figure 2-21. Device Routing Assignment Window ........................................... 42
Figure 2-22. Message Color Selection Window ............................................... 42
Figure 2-23. Message Indentation Definition Window ...................................... 43
Figure 2-24. Operator Window Parameters Window ........................................ 46
Figure 2-25. Multiscreen Setup ........................................................................ 48
Figure 2-26. Display Colors Window ................................................................ 49
Figure 2-27. Security Activation/Deactivation Windows ................................... 51
Figure 2-28. Default Login Configuration Window ............................................ 52
Figure 2-29. Access Level Selection Window .................................................. 52
Figure 2-30. Function Access Configuration Window ....................................... 54
Figure 2-31. User Login Window ...................................................................... 57
Figure 2-32. User Login Window ...................................................................... 58
Figure 2-33. Access Level Selection Window .................................................. 60
Figure 2-34. Copy User Login Window ............................................................. 61
Figure 2-35. Change Password Window .......................................................... 63
Figure 3-1. Summary Display Example ............................................................ 68
Figure 3-2. Group Display Example ................................................................. 69
Figure 3-3. Point Display Example ................................................................... 70
Figure 3-4. Configure Summary Window ......................................................... 71
Figure 3-5. Configure Group Window ............................................................... 72
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Figure 3-6. Group Display, 8 Point Format ....................................................... 73
Figure 3-7. Graphic List Window ...................................................................... 74
Figure 4-1. Grafx Editor Display ...................................................................... 79
Figure 4-2. Submodel Selection Window ......................................................... 96
Figure 4-3. The Settings Window ..................................................................... 99
Figure 4-4. Edit Colors Window ...................................................................... 100
Figure 4-5. Object and Copy Reversed with Flip Left-to-Right Button ............ 107
Figure 4-6. Object and Copy Inverted with Flip Upside-Down Button ............ 108
Figure 4-7. Model of ISA Standard Actuator Valve Symbol ............................ 110
Figure 4-8. Actuator Valve Symbols, Initial Location and Corrected Location 110
Figure 4-9. Open Model Window .................................................................... 113
Figure 4-10. Uninstall Model Window ............................................................. 116
Figure 4-11. Expression Dynamics Window ................................................... 120
Figure 4-12. Expressions Window .................................................................. 126
Figure 4-13. Blink Window .............................................................................. 129
Figure 4-14. Spin Configuration Window ........................................................ 131
Figure 4-15. Submodel Configuration Window ............................................... 132
Figure 4-16. Edit Custom Dynamics Window ................................................. 133
Figure 4-17. Variables Window ....................................................................... 135
Figure 4-18. Declare Variables Window ......................................................... 136
Figure 4-19. Submodel Variable Configuration Window ................................. 142
Figure 4-20. Dynamic Value (FP_DYvalue) .................................................... 145
Figure 4-21. Dynamic Value Configuration Window ....................................... 145
Figure 4-22. Dynamic Bargraph (FP_DYbargraph) ........................................ 147
Figure 4-23. Dynamic Bargraph Configuration Window ................................. 147
Figure 4-24. Dynamic Bargraph with Configurable Erase Color
(FP_DYbargraph_ec) .................................................................. 149
Figure 4-25. Dynamic Bargraph_ec Configuration Window ........................... 149
Figure 4-26. Dynamic Horizontal Bar (FP_DYHorizbar) ................................. 151
Figure 4-27. Horizontal Bar Configuration Window ........................................ 151
Figure 4-28. Dynamic Vertical Bar (FP_DYVertbar) ....................................... 153
Figure 4-29. Dynamic Vertical Bar Configuration Window .............................. 153
Figure 4-30. Dynamic Tank Submodel (FP_DYtank) ...................................... 155
Figure 4-31. Dynamic Tank Submodel Configuration Window ....................... 155
Figure 4-32. Dynamic Tank Submodel with Configurable Erase Color
(FP_DYtank_ec) ......................................................................... 157
Figure 4-33. Dynamic Tank (with Erase Color) Submodel Configuration
Window ....................................................................................... 157
Figure 4-34. Control Pushbutton (FP_DYctrlpb) and Resulting Pop-up
Window ....................................................................................... 159
Figure 4-35. Control Pushbutton Configuration Window ................................ 160
Figure 4-36. Model Pop-up Pushbutton (FP_DYmpoppb) .............................. 161
Figure 4-37. Resulting Pop-up Model ............................................................ 161
Figure 4-38. Model Pop-up Pushbutton Configuration Window ..................... 162
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Figure 4-39. Enter Value Pushbutton (FP_DYentervaluepb) and Resulting
Pop-up Window .......................................................................... 164
Figure 4-40. Enter Value Pushbutton Configuration Window ......................... 164
Figure 4-41. Enter Text Pushbutton Submodel (FP_DYentertextpb) and
Resulting Pop-up Window .......................................................... 166
Figure 4-42. Enter Text Pushbutton Configuration Window ............................ 166
Figure 4-43. Put Pushbutton Submodel (FP_DYputpb) .................................. 168
Figure 4-44. Put Pushbutton Configuration Window, Part 1 ........................... 168
Figure 4-45. Put Pushbutton Configuration Window, Part 2 ........................... 169
Figure 4-46. Put1 Pushbutton Submodel (FP_DYput1pb) .............................. 171
Figure 4-47. Put1 Pushbutton Configuration Window .................................... 171
Figure 4-48. Putpbstat Submodel (FP_DYputpbstat) ..................................... 172
Figure 4-49. Putpbstat Submodel Configuration Window, Part 1 ................... 172
Figure 4-50. Putpbstat Submodel Configuration Window, Part 2 ................... 173
Figure 4-51. FP_DYputpbstat2 Submodel ...................................................... 175
Figure 4-52. FP_DYputpbstat2 Submodel Configuration Window, Part 1 ...... 175
Figure 4-53. FP_DYputpbstat2 Submodel Configuration Window, Part 2 ...... 176
Figure 4-54. FP_DYstatpb Submodel (FP_DYstatpb) .................................... 178
Figure 4-55. FP_DYstatpb Submodel Configuration Window ........................ 178
Figure 4-56. Horizontal Slider Submodel (FP_DYhslider) .............................. 179
Figure 4-57. Horizontal Slider Submodel Configuration Window ................... 179
Figure 4-58. Vertical Slider Submodel (FP_DYvslider) ................................... 180
Figure 4-59. Vertical Slider Configuration Window ......................................... 180
Figure 4-60. FP_DYtoggle Submodel ............................................................. 181
Figure 4-61. FP_DYtoggle Submodel Configuration Window ........................ 181
Figure 4-62. Vector Pushbutton Submodel (FP_DYvectorpb) ........................ 183
Figure 4-63. Vector Pushbutton Submodel Configuration Window ................ 183
Figure 4-64. Tagname Pushbutton (FP_DYtagpb) ......................................... 185
Figure 4-65. Tagname Pushbutton Configuration Window ............................. 185
Figure 4-66. Horizontal Trend Submodel (FP_DYHoriztrend) ........................ 187
Figure 4-67. Horizontal Trend Submodel Configuration Window ................... 187
Figure 4-68. Vertical Trend Model (FP_DYVerttrend) ..................................... 189
Figure 4-69. Vertical Trend Model Configuration Window .............................. 189
Figure 4-70. Historical Trend Pushbutton (FP_DYtrendpb) ............................ 191
Figure 4-71. Historical Trend Pushbutton Configuration Window ................... 191
Figure 4-72. Historical Trend Model (FP_DYHisttrend) .................................. 192
Figure 4-73. Historical Trend Model Configuration Window ........................... 192
Figure 4-74. Group Display Submodel (FP_DYgroupmod) ............................ 193
Figure 4-75. Group Display Submodel Configuration Window ....................... 194
Figure 4-76. Point Display Submodel (FP_DYpointmod) ................................ 195
Figure 4-77. Point Display Submodel Configuration Window ......................... 195
Figure 4-78. Dial Submodel (FP_DYdial) ....................................................... 196
Figure 4-79. Dial Submodel Configuration Window ........................................ 196
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Figure 4-80. Meter Submodel (FP_DYmeter) ................................................. 198
Figure 4-81. Meter Submodel Configuration Window ..................................... 198
Figure 4-82. Dynamic Wheel (FP_DYwheel) .................................................. 200
Figure 4-83. Dynamic Wheel Configuration Window ...................................... 200
Figure 4-84. Dynamic Pump - Left (FP_DYpump_lf) ...................................... 202
Figure 4-85. Dynamic Pump (Left) Configuration Window ............................. 202
Figure 4-86. Dynamic Pump - Right (FP_DYpump_rt) ................................... 204
Figure 4-87. Dynamic Pump (Right) Configuration Window ........................... 204
Figure 4-88. Micro-PWC Symbols .................................................................. 214
Figure 4-89. ISA Standard Symbols - Valves and Actuators ......................... 214
Figure 4-91. ISA Standard Symbols - Rotating and Reciprocating
Equipment ................................................................................... 215
Figure 4-90. ISA Standard Symbols - Containers and Vessels ..................... 215
Figure 4-92. ISA Standard Symbols - Mixing and Material Handling
Equipment ................................................................................... 216
Figure 4-93. ISA Standard Symbols - Electrical Equipment .......................... 217
Figure 4-94. ISA Standard Symbols - Filters, Scrubbers, Precipitators
and Separators ........................................................................... 217
Figure 4-95. ISA Standard Symbols - Heat Transfer Devices and
HVAC Equipment ........................................................................ 218
Figure 5-1. Historical Database Configuration Window .................................. 221
Figure 5-2. Historical Tag Configuration Window ........................................... 222
Figure 5-3. Collection Rate Window ............................................................... 223
Figure 5-4. Historical Tag Configuration for Manual Data Point
Configuration .............................................................................. 224
Figure 5-5. Data Type Window ....................................................................... 224
Figure 5-6. Custom Collection Rate Configuration ......................................... 225
Figure 5-7. Historical Tag Computations Window ........................................... 226
Figure 5-8. Storage Rate Window .................................................................. 227
Figure 5-9. Collection Options Window .......................................................... 228
Figure 5-10. Archive Group Window .............................................................. 228
Figure 5-11. Historical Collection Storage Options Window ........................... 230
Figure 5-12. Historical Tag Configuration Window with Default Settings ........ 233
Figure 6-1. Log Configuration Window ........................................................... 237
Figure 6-2. Event Log Configuration Window ................................................. 238
Figure 6-3. Event Log Scheduler Window ...................................................... 241
Figure 6-4. Event Log Scheduling Window .................................................... 242
Figure 6-5. Printer Selection Window ............................................................. 243
Figure 6-6. Print Event Log Window ............................................................... 243
Figure 6-7. Print Spreadsheet Log Window .................................................... 246
Figure 7-1. Trend Index Entry Window ........................................................... 249
Figure 7-2. Select Trend Window ................................................................... 250
Figure 7-3. Historical Trend Display (Template) ............................................. 251
Figure 7-4. Trend Configuration Window ........................................................ 252
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Figure 7-5. Trend Trace Configuration Window .............................................. 254
Figure 8-1. System Status Display ................................................................. 259
Figure 8-2. SSD Object for a Micro-PWC ....................................................... 259
Figure 8-3. Network Info Window Example .................................................... 261
Figure 8-4. Services Window Example ........................................................... 261
Figure 8-5. Device Status Window ................................................................. 262
Figure 8-6. Printer Queue Control Window .................................................... 263
Figure 8-7. Console Groups Display Window ................................................. 264
Figure 9-1. Historical Database Maintenance Window ................................... 268
Figure 9-2. Archival Database Maintenance Window ..................................... 271
Figure 9-3. CRT Print Setup Window ............................................................. 273
Figure 9-4. Configuration-in-Progress Warning Window ................................ 275
Figure 9-5. Configuration Lock Information Window ...................................... 275
Figure 9-6. Micro-PWC System Time Adjust Window .................................... 277
Figure 9-7. Help Icon ...................................................................................... 279
Figure 9-8. Operator Window Help Menu ....................................................... 279
Figure 9-9. Operator Window Help Menu ....................................................... 280
Figure 9-10. Display Information Window ....................................................... 280
Figure 9-11. Import File Window ..................................................................... 281
Figure 9-12. Default Quick Keys Keypad Display ........................................... 283
Figure 9-13. Quick Key Label Assignment Window ....................................... 284
Figure 9-14. Quick Key Keypad with Text String Assignment ......................... 284
Figure 9-15. CRT Context Keys Keypad ........................................................ 286
Figure 9-16. CRT Context Key Assignment Window ...................................... 287
Figure 9-17. Console Groups Display Window ............................................... 290
Figure 9-18. Console Group Synchronization Window ................................... 290
Figure 9-19. Console Node Selection Window ............................................... 291
Figure 9-20. Console Group Synchronization Selection Window ................... 291
Figure 9-21. Configuration Item Selection Window ........................................ 292
Figure 9-22. Find Window .............................................................................. 293
Figure 9-23. System Configuration Data Window ......................................... 293
Figure 10-1. Historical Block Database Configuration Window ...................... 296
Figure 10-2. Historical Block Configuration Window ...................................... 297
Figure 10-3. Storage Nodes Window .............................................................. 298
Figure 10-4. Historical Tag Computations Window ......................................... 300
Figure 10-5. Historical Block Find Window ..................................................... 301
Figure 11-1. @aGlance Configuration Window .............................................. 308
Figure 11-2. @aGlance Current Tagnames Window ...................................... 308
Figure 11-3. @aGlance Add Tagname Window ............................................. 309
Figure 11-4. @aGlance Edit Tagname Window .............................................. 310
Figure 11-5. @aGlance History Tagnames Window ....................................... 311
Figure 11-6. @aGlance Servers Window ....................................................... 312
Figure 11-7. @aGlance Server View Window ................................................ 312
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List of Tables
Table 1-1. Reference Documents ....................................................................... 5
Table 1-2. Terms and Abbreviations ................................................................... 5
Table 2-1. Priority Color Assignments .............................................................. 22
Table 2-2. Default Mini-Alarm Field Widths ...................................................... 26
Table 2-3. Default Device Characteristics......................................................... 39
Table 2-4. Default Function Access Level Assignment..................................... 54
Table 3-1. Group Status Conditions.................................................................. 69
Table 4-1. View Size Information ...................................................................... 83
Table 4-2. Micro-DCI Submodel Types........................................................... 113
Table 4-3. Operator Usage - Description And Examples................................ 122
Table 4-4. Operators in Order of Precedence................................................. 123
Table 4-5. Operator Aliases ............................................................................ 124
Table 4-6. Attribute Default Values ................................................................. 127
Table 4-7. Valves and Actuators ..................................................................... 209
Table 4-8. Containers and Vessels ................................................................. 210
Table 4-9. Rotating Equipment (Pumps and Blowers) .................................... 210
Table 4-10. Reciprocating Equipment............................................................. 210
Table 4-11. Mixing Equipment ........................................................................ 211
Table 4-12. Material Handling Equipment....................................................... 211
Table 4-13. Electrical Equipment .................................................................... 211
Table 4-14. Filters ........................................................................................... 212
Table 4-15. Scrubbers and Precipitators ........................................................ 212
Table 4-16. Separators ................................................................................... 212
Table 4-17. Heat Transfer Devices ................................................................. 212
Table 4-18. HVAC Equipment......................................................................... 213
Table 4-19. Miscellaneous .............................................................................. 213
Table 4-20. Micro-DCI Submodels for Controller Modules ............................. 219
Table 5-1. Historical Computation Atoms ....................................................... 226
Table 7-1. Historical Computation Atoms ....................................................... 254
Table 10-1. Historical Computation Atoms ..................................................... 299
Table 11-1. Options for Use When Starting a Server ...................................... 307
Table 11-2. Supported @aGlance/IT Methods ............................................... 313
Table 11-3. Default Attribute Name................................................................. 314
Table 11-4. AAG_StatusList Information ......................................................... 316
Table 11-5. Supported Monitor Type Identifier Strings.................................... 319
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1.0 Introduction
1.1 Overview
The Micro-PWC is an operator’s console designed for use with Micro-DCI and other compatible equipment. This Configuration Guide describes the operations required to configure the Micro-PWC. It is
designed to accomplish the following objectives:
•
Provide instructions on how to perform configuration tasks on the Micro-PWC.
•
Provide suggestions and examples for configuration activities.
•
Provide additional information as necessary.
1.2 Intended Audience
The Micro-PWC Configuration Guide is intended for use by personnel engaged in the configuration of the
Micro-PWC. The Micro-PWC communicates with the Micro-DCI control instruments. Familiarity with these
instruments is necessary to understand the functions of a Micro-PWC.
1.3 Functional Description
Micro-DCI is a distributed process control and information management system which provides the ability
to divide process functions among many system components to provide operating flexibility, system reliability, reduced system costs, and ease of implementation. Distribution combined with redundancy also
allows system control and operating functions to be divided among system elements to increase reliability
and flexibility and to reduce risk.
Console-type nodes (computers on which the Micro-PWC software is in use) which reside on the same
network can be organized into console groups of up to 10 console-type server nodes each. Many types of
data and configuration information are distributed automatically to (or synchronized between) all server
nodes in the same console group, and can be distributed on demand to other console groups via a utility
known as console group synchronization.
Automation of most processes requires more than control at the unit operations level. The system must
also include an inherent ability to provide process management functions such as scheduling and graphical presentation of plant process conditions, as well as reporting functions. The Micro-PWC, controllers,
field wiring interface terminal boards, and process control software form the basic building blocks of the
distributed control system. The Micro-PWC is the HSI (human system interface), providing the process
operator, process engineer, instrument engineer and maintenance personnel with global access to all process and system parameters required by each to perform their respective tasks.
The Micro-PWC provides the Process Operator with a window to the process. Using interactive process
graphics and hierarchical displays, the Process Operator can monitor and control all analog loops and digital devices interfaced to the network.
The Micro-PWC provides the Engineer with an interface through which to configure and change Graphic
and Hierarchical displays, database I/O, controller process control functions and sequences, Log (report)
formats, and security features (including Access Levels for operating personnel). Most changes are immediate, on-line, and distributed to all Micro-PWCs in the same console group, requiring no compilation time
before downloading, and therefore no interruption of the process.
The Micro-PWC provides Maintenance Personnel with the capability to globally monitor the operating status of any system component on the network, and to diagnose component failures from any Micro-PWC.
Introduction
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
1.3.1 User Interface
The Micro-PWC provides the Process Operator, Engineer, and Maintenance Technician with a windowbased interface to both the process and the Micro-PWC itself.
The Micro-PWC uses a Windows-based operating system from Microsoft. The user interface is described
in detail in the Micro-PWC Operator’s Manual.
1.3.2 Micro-PWC System Management Features
The Micro-PWC allows the user to configure many items which aid in managing the use of the system.
These include:
•
Security features
•
User logins
•
Network parameters
•
Archival groups
•
Messages
•
Message routing
These items are described in Section 2.
1.3.3 Hierarchical Displays
Hierarchical displays are a set of preconfigured, graphical representations emulating traditional instrument
displays, which are synchronized between all nodes in a console group. A three-tiered hierarchy of displays exists to provide the user with information about the process. This hierarchy consists of Summary,
Group, and Point displays.
A Summary Display provides an overview of 24 groups, arranged in six rows of four blocks. There are
1000 summary displays available.
A Group Display provides an operation overview of four, six, or eight points simultaneously. All process
control actions and alarm acknowledgment for points within a group can be performed from the Group
Display on a point-by-point basis.
A Point Display provides the most detailed information and operation functions about a single point in the
Hierarchical Display system. From this level the operator can perform regulatory changes. Hierarchical display configuration is discussed in Section 3.
1.3.4 Graphic Configuration
Up to 10,000 console graphic displays can be configured using the Micro-PWC. Graphic displays are synchronized between all console nodes in a console group. Because they are synchronized within a console
group, a graphic display can be configured on any Micro-PWC. A copy of the file containing the graphic is
then distributed to all Micro-PWCs in the console group whenever a graphic is saved or installed.
The graphic can then be viewed on any Micro-PWC in the console group. Graphics can also be distributed
to console-type nodes in other console groups, via console group synchronization (Section 9.13, Console
Groups Synchronization). Graphic Configuration is discussed in Section 4.
1.3.5 Historical Database
The Historical Database provides the means to collect data from the controller(s) and store it for use by
various other applications on the Micro-PWC, such as Logging, Trending, and Data Archiving. Historical
Database configuration is discussed in Section 5.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
1.3.6 Logging
Logs are used to collect and format data for use in reports and spreadsheet calculations. The two types of
logs available on the Micro-PWC include Event Logs and Spreadsheet Logs. Logs are synchronized within
a console group. Log configuration is discussed in Section 6.
1.3.7 Trending
Trending functions display the values of from 1 to 8 points in an analog trend format similar to that presented by a conventional strip chart recorder. Three types of trend recording are provided on the MicroPWC, including Current Trending, Historical Trending and Archival Trending. Trend displays are synchronized within a console group. Trend configuration is discussed in Section 7.
1.3.8 System Status Display
The System Status Display provides an overview of the nodes connected to the Ethernet network. The
System Status Display also provides access to controller configuration; see the appropriate controller documentation for information on controller configuration. The System Status Display is discussed in
Section 8.
1.3.9 Controller Configuration
The Micro-PWC can be used to configure a controller, and can also be used to oupload or download the
controller dtatbase and F-Tran program files.
1.3.10 Micro-PWC Utilities
A number of useful maintenance and information management functions are provided as Micro-PWC Utilities. Utilities discussed in this Configuration Guide include:
•
CRT Print
•
Release All Configuration Locks
•
Micro-PWC Help
•
User Help
•
Quick Keys
•
CRT Context Keys
These utilities are covered in Section 9.
1.3.11 Historical Block Data Collection
The Historical Block Database is designed for the efficient collection of data from a large number of controller tag.atoms. Like the data collected in the Historical Database, the Historical Block data is stored for
use by other applications, such as Logging, Trending, and Data Archiving. Historical block configuration is
discussed in Section 10.
1.3.12 The @aGlance Applications Programming Interface
The @aGlance/IT (AAG) Applications Programming Interface (API) is a client-server enabling technology
that provides "plug-and-play" interoperability between sources of process data, including data historians,
supervisory control systems, distributed control systems, real-time expert systems, and consumers of this
data, such as spreadsheets, human/machine interface software, and manufacturing execution systems
(MES). @aGlance/IT is designed to simplify the effort required of users by allowing them to use familiar
desktop applications to access and analyze process data.
Introduction
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
One Micro-DCI @aGlance/IT server interface license is included with each set of Micro-PWC software.
Additional licenses can be purchased. Optional @aGlance client "add-ins" (spreadsheet extensions) are
available. These add-ins allow users of spreadsheets to request data from an Micro-PWC running the
@aGlance server. This is done using the macro facilities of the spreadsheets. Add-ins are available for
Microsoft EXCEL for Windows and Lotus 1-2-3 for Windows, enabling these client applications to access
data from Micro-DCI.
The @aGlance/IT API is described in Section 11.
1.3.13 Excel Functions
There are several Excel functions available with the Micro-PWC software which provide an interface to the
Microsoft Excel spreadsheet package. For a description of all of these functions refer to Appendix A.
1.4 Document Conventions
This document uses standard text conventions to represent keys, display items, and user data inputs.
1.4.1 Display Item
Items displayed on a screen, such as window titles and labels, appear in italic text. For example:
Enter the tagname in the Tagname entry box on the Alarm Vector Configuration window.
1.4.2 Button Face Text
Text which is displayed on button faces appears in bold text. For example:
Click the OK button.
1.4.3 Prompts and Messages
System prompts and message text appear in monospaced Courier text. For example:
Are you sure?
1.4.4 Optional User Input
Square brackets ([ ]) indicate an optional parameter; text within the brackets follows the previously
described conventions. Example:
CUP [port] [baud] [file_name.CSP]
1.4.5 Special Keys
The SMALL CAPS font is used to identify special keys. A Special Key is a key that is not alphabetic, numeric
or punctuation. For example:
Press ENTER.
Press ESC V M. (Press and release each key in sequence.)
Press CTRL-ALT-SHIFT-DEL. (Press all keys in sequence without releasing any one key
until you have pressed them all.)
1.4.6 File Names
File and directory names appear in monospaced type. For example:
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
file1.exe
c:\new
1.4.7 Revision Variable
A ? indicates a value that may change, depending on the version of an item. Example:
Part number: 1234567?0
Part number: 1234567??
1.5 Reference Documents
This Configuration Guide provides information only for the configuration of the Micro-PWC. Table 1-1 lists
additional documents that relate to the operation of the Micro-PWC system.
Table 1-1. Reference Documents
System
General
Number
Document Title
PN26004
Micro-PWC Operator’s Manual
PN26001
Micro-PWC Introduction and Installation Guide
1.6 Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations
Table 1-2 contains those terms and abbreviations that are unique to the Micro-DCI environment or have a
definition that is different from standard industry usage. Where alternate usage is defined in the Glossary,
the first listed term is considered the preferred usage.
Table 1-2. Terms and Abbreviations
Term
Definition
Active Window
The active window is the window with keyboard focus, which receives all
keyboard input, regardless of pointer location. What is typed appears in the active
window. If there is no active window, what is typed is lost. There can be only one
active window at a time on a Micro-PWC.
Area
A functional partition of the process. A set of controller modules is assigned to an
Area. There can be several Areas assigned to a controller and/or several
controllers (or partial controllers) assigned to control an Area. Micro-PWC
functions can be assigned by Area.
Atom
A single data element in the global database. Atoms can exist in various forms,
including (but not limited to) a single bit (e.g., Auto/Manual), a floating point
number, a tagname, or a multi-character legend; there is no pre-defined limit to
the size of an atom. See also Module.
Banner
A header page which precedes a printout, which contains identifying information.
This is especially useful when the user initiating the printout is not in the
immediate vicinity of the printer.
Introduction
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
Table 1-2. Terms and Abbreviations (Continued)
Term
Definition
Bounding Box
A bounding box is a thin black outline which appears when the user moves a
window. The mouse is used to move the bounding box to the desired location,
then the mouse Select button is clicked. The window will then be moved to the
location indicated by the bounding box.
Cascading Menu
A submenu which provides selections that amplify the parent selection on a pulldown or pop-up menu.
Check Button
A type of graphic control button used to select settings which are not mutually
exclusive. The visual cue to indicate selection is that a selected button is filled in
or checked.
Control Key
The keyboard key labeled CONTROL or <CTRL> and used as a modifier key.
CRT (Cathode Ray The Micro-PWC monitor. The terms 'CRT' and "monitor" are sometimes used
Tube)
interchangeably in Micro-DCI documentation.
Data Dictionary
A table containing all the rules required to access and configure a data base. The
Data Dictionary resides in the node with the data base.
Digital I/O
Input/output data which is encoded in a digital format (as in serial or parallel bytes
or words). See also Discrete I/O.
Discrete I/O
Used to designate two state process input/output types. See also Digital I/O.
Display element
A digital element used in creating a process display; point display, annunciator,
trend, and deviation overview are display element examples.
GDBA (Global Data See Global DBA.
Base Access)
6
Global Data Base
The set of all data bases which are accessible by Micro-DCI products. A foreign
data base joins the Micro-DCI Global Data Base through the mechanisms of
Global DBA.
Global DBA
Global Data Base Access; alternate usage is GDBA. The Micro-DCI convention
for providing access to Micro-DCI data base atoms.
GMS
Graphical Modeling System. A Micro-DCI application program licensed from SL
Corporation. GMS is used to create Micro-PWC graphical displays. Each MicroPWC incorporates an RT (runtime) license to utilize GMS models.
Message Box
Message box is the generic name for any dialog box that provides information,
gives the current stde of a work in progress, asks a question, issues a warning, or
draws attention to an error.
Micro-PWC
The Micro-PWC is a Windows-based operating console which consists of the
53PW6000 software and a user-supplied Windows-based computer.
Mini-Alarm
Window
The Mini-Alarm Window is located to the right of the System Window on the
Micro-PWC CRT screen. The Mini-Alarm Window automatically appears upon
system start-up and is visible at ail times. The Mini-Alarm Window provides a title
bar, an alarm display area, an event display area, Alarm Acknowledge buttons to
acknowledge alarms and events, and a Filter button and More Alarms indicator.
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Table 1-2. Terms and Abbreviations (Continued)
Term
Definition
Modal Pop-up
Window
A pop-up window which requires input from the user. Until the user responds and
closes the modal pop-up window, the parent window will reject any user input.
Model
When used in the graphical context of SL-GMS, a model is an object or group of
objects. Models can be used as objects in other models.
Modifier Key
A key which, when pressed in conjunction with another key, changes the meaning
of the other key. <Ctr>, <Alt>, and <Shift> are modifier keys.
Module
An atom or group of atoms which are combined into a data base structure.
Module Set
A set of modules which can be loaded as a group into a controller. Allows a partial
controller load. There is a limit of 255 module sets in a controller. A module set is
a subset of an area.
Node
A node is a unit or system on the Ethernet network.
Object
When used in the graphical context of GMS, an entity such as a circle, rectangle,
or text field.
Operator
Window
Located on the Micro-PWC screen below the System Window and Mini-Alarm
Window, the Operator Window provides the operator interface to the process, and
displays program output from Operator Window applications such as Hierarchical
Displays,Ttrends, Graphics, Alarm Review, etc. The Operator Window is
composed of a title bar, a menu bar, and a display area. Up to four Operator
Windows may be present simultaneously on a Micro-PWC.
Option Menu
A list of items selectable via associated check or toggle buttons.
Quick Key
A menu button on the Micro-PWC screen which, when pressed, provides the
user with the ability to vector directly to one of 64 possible displays.
Radio Button
A graphic control button that simulates the buttons found on an actual car radio.
Each button represents a mutually exclusive selection. Radio buttons are typically
used to set states or modes.
System Window
A small window located at the top left corner of the Micro-PWC screen. It appears
automatically upon system startup, and is visible at all times. The System Window
provides a date/time indicator and a Menu button for access to other system
features and utilities.
Stippling
The technique of displaying items in a lighter shade (typically gray) to denote
some special characteristic. This method is employed in the Micro-PWC to
display items which reside on a particular menu, but which are not currently
available to the user (typically, because of Access Level considerations).
System Window
A small window located at the top left corner of the Micro-PWC CRT. It appears
automatically upon system start-up, and is visible at all times. The System
Window provides a date/time indicator and a Menu button for access to other
system features and utilities.
Introduction
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Introduction
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2.0 System Configuration
2.1 Introduction
Each Micro-PWC contains parameters which must be configured to achieve optimum performance locally
and to allow the unit to function effectively with the DCS system. This chapter provides basic information
required to get started using the system, then moves on to discuss System Configuration functions, including definition of Archival Groups, Message Configuration, Security, and Network Parameter Configuration.
Network parameters include the System Title, Alarm Setup, assignment of Area Names and Event Bit
Names, and Printer Configuration.
2.2 Getting Started
One of two states can exist on a Micro-PWC that is running:
•
the System Default state (no user logged in)
•
the User Logged In state
2.2.1 System Default State
The System Default state occurs after a Micro-PWC initial startup, after a user has logged out of a MicroPWC, or when a Micro-PWC is restarted and auto-login is not possible. When the System Default state
exists:
•
The security Access Level, Quick Keys and CRT Context Keys are those defined in the
Default Login setup.
•
The user name in the title bar of the Mini-Alarm Window is Default.
•
IThe displays contained in the Operator Windows are those defined in the initial login displays
of the Default Login setup. If no initial login displays are defined for the Default Login, a single
Operator Window is opened, which contains the System Status Display.
When the System Default state exists, the system responds as though a user named Default is logged in
on the system. Depending on the security level assigned to this Default user, various activities can be performed on the system, such as opening Operator Windows, viewing displays, or printing the contents of
the screen.
When the Micro-PWC is started initially and no security levels have yet been assigned, the Default user is
automatically assigned to the highest security level available (Supervisor level 3). This allows the user performing the initial system configuration to create user login accounts and assign to them appropriate
Access Levels. The Default user account can then be re-assigned to a lower Access Level. System security, including the concept of Access Levels, is discussed in Section 2.10, Security.
2.2.2 Logging In
The User Logged In state exists when a user (other than Default) has logged in. Users can be logged in
manually or automatically.
When the Micro-PWC software is started, the login name of the current Windows user is compared to the
user login names found in the Micro-PWC configuration (see Section 2.10.5, User Login). If a match is
found, that user will automatically be logged into the Micro-PWC.
To log in manually, from the System Window select Menu > User. The resulting menu displayed allows the
user to login to (or logout of) the Micro-PWC.
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✎
Note
The security system of Access Levels controls the user’s access to
controller areas and priorities as well as network and controller
functions. When security is active, the user’s access to these
parameters is defined by the System Default or by the user’s login
configuration. When the security system is inactive (a userselectable state, refer to Section 2.10.1, Security Activation), no
restrictions are placed on the user’s access abilities.
Select Log In from the menu. The Micro-PWC Login window appears (Figure 2-1). Enter the login name of
the user, using either the Micro-PWC keyboard or by clicking on the keys in the Login window. Press
RETURN (or click OK). Enter the password in the same manner.
Figure 2-1. User Login Window
✎
Note
If an incorrect login name or password is entered during a login
attempt, a System Event message will be generated and a pop-up
window containing an OK button and the following message will
appear: Login failure. Try again?
Click OK to close the pop-up window and return to the Micro-PWC
Login window.
The initial displays assigned in the user’s login configuration are placed on the screen of the Micro-PWC
used for the login operation. The Quick Keys and CRT Context Keys (see Section 9.9, Quick Keys and
Section 9.11, CRT Context Keys) assigned in the user’s login configuration are available to the user. The
user's name is displayed in the title bar of the Mini-Alarm Window.
A user can log in to a Micro-PWC which already has an active login on it. This action causes the previous
user to be logged out. If the new user has defined an initial CRT Context (i.e., CRT Login Context Key), the
screen will display this new environment. If no initial CRT Context has been defined, the displays on the
screen remain unchanged.
2.2.3 Logging Out
The following actions take place only on the Micro-PWC which the user is logging out of:
10
•
The security Access Level, Quick Keys and CRT Context Keys change to those defined for the
Default user.
•
The user name in the title bar of the Mini-Alarm Qindow changes to Default.
•
The Login Context changes to that of the Default user, and the login parameters will change to
those of the Default user. (In other words, when an actual user logs out, the Micro-PWC
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returns to the Default Login state; it is as if the Default user had logged in.)
The logout procedure is very similar to that used to login. To logout, select: Menu > User > Log Out.
2.3 Archival Groups
The Micro-PWC can be configured to collect data from the controller database and place it in the Historical
Database (see Section 5), which resides on the Micro-PWC. Eventually, the collected data is aged out of
the Historical Database and the disk space it occupied is overwritten by new data. Data collected in the
Historical Database can be preserved by placing it (archiving it) onto a removable storage device.
A set of data is configured to be archived by creating and scheduling an Archival Group through Archival
Group Configuration. Historical Database points are then assigned to a configured Archival Group through
Historical Database Point Configuration (see Section 5). At a user-configurable cyclic interval, a message
will be broadcast indicating that the data for an Archival Group is ready to be archived. The data associated with the Archival Group can be manually archived or restored through the System Window Archival
Utilities.
Access Archival Group Configuration by selecting: Menu > Configure > Archival Groups. The Archival
Group Configuration window (Figure 2-2) will be displayed.
TC00150A
Figure 2-2. Archival Group Configuration Window
The top portion of this window contains a scrollable list of all Archival Groups which have been configured.
Each entry in the list contains the Group Name, the time and date the group was last archived, and the
time and date that the group is next due to be archived. Below this list are buttons which are used to Add,
Edit, Delete, and Delete All the archival groups.
2.3.1 Add an Archival Group
To create a new archival group, click Add in the Archival Group Configuration window. Configure as
described in Section 2.3.2, Edit an Archival Group.
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2.3.2 Edit an Archival Group
To make changes to an existing Archival Group, click on the desired Archival Group name in the list box,
then click Edit. The Archival Group Scheduling window (Figure 2-3) will be displayed.
TC00904A
Figure 2-3. Archival Group Scheduling Window
This window allows the following parameters to be changed:
•
Group Name
•
Period and Start Time
•
Area
2.3.2.1 Group Name
In the Group Name entry box, enter the name which is to identify the Archival Group. This name can be up
to 15 characters in length.
2.3.2.2 Period and Start Time
The Period and Start Time allow for the scheduling of the data archive for the Archival Group. Both the
cyclic Archival Period (user-defined archive interval) and the Start Time (which defines the beginning of the
Period) are entered in the same entry box.
The Period is entered first. The words Daily, Weekly, and Monthly are valid entries to define the period.
Also, you can define a customized period by defining the number of days, hours, minutes, and seconds in
the period using the following format:
DD:HH:MM:SS
Enter a comma (,) after the Period to separate it from the Start Time. After the Period has been defined, the
Start Time (hours, minutes, seconds) and date (day, month, year) which marks the beginning of the interval, are entered in the following format:
HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY
The default period is daily (1:0:0:0) and the default Start Time is midnight of the current day (e.g., 00:00:00
30-May-05). Note that the 24 hour clock is used, and the month is identified by the first three letters of the
month name (in English).
An acknowledgable message will be broadcast at the scheduled time indicating that the Archival Group is
ready to be archived. This message is not repeated until the next scheduled data archive time for that
group.
2.3.2.3 Area
Each Archival Group can be associated with a specific plant Area. The Area assignment is used to route
the message (that the Archival Group is ready to be archived) to the devices (files, printers) which have
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been configured (via Message Routing configuration, see Section 2.8.4, Message Routing) to receive
messages associated with that area. The message will also be sent to all Micro-PWCs where users who
have access to that area are logged in. The message will be displayed in the Message line (bottom line) of
the Mini-Alarm Window on the Micro-PWCs. To assign the Operator Message to an Area, click Area. The
Area Selection window (Figure 2-4) will be displayed.
TC00152A
Figure 2-4. Area Selection Window
The Area Selection window contains a scrollable list of 255 areas. Click the desired area, then click OK.
The default is Area 1.
2.3.3 Delete an Archival Group
The Delete button is used to delete an archival group. In the list box, click the name of the group to be
deleted, then click Delete.
2.3.4 Delete All Archival Groups
To delete all Archival Groups, click Delete All. A confirmation box will appear. Click Yes if all Archival
Groups are to be deleted. Click No to exit without deleting archival groups.
2.3.5 List Tags in an Archival Group
To view a list of the tags in an Archival Group, first select the group in the list displayed in the Archival
Group Configuration window (Figure 2-2), then click the List Tags button at the bottom of that window. A
pop-up List Tags window will be displayed, which contains a list of all the tagnames in the selected Archival
Group. Click OK to close the List Tags window.
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2.4 Message Configuration
A method of communication between operators is available on the Micro-PWC, allowing text messages
known as operator messages to be sent from one plant Area to another. The Message Configuration feature provides this method of generating operator messages from a Micro-PWC.
To create an operator message, access Message Configuration by selecting the following sequence from
the System Window: Menu > Configure > Message Configuration. The Message Configuration window
(Figure 2-5) will be displayed. The window is used to configure the text, priority, and destination of the
operator message.
2.4.1 Message Text
To configure the text of the message, enter a message of up to 80 ASCII characters in the Message entry
box.
TC00032A
Figure 2-5. Message Configuration Window
2.4.2 Message Priority
Each message is associated with a Priority. Enter the number of the desired Priority (range of 1 to 16) in
the appropriate entry box.
2.4.3 Message Destination Area
Each message can be associated with a specific plant Area. The Area assignment is used to route the
message to the devices (files, printers) which have been configured (via Message Routing Configuration,
see Section 2.8.4, Message Routing ) to receive operator messages associated with that area. The message will also be sent to all Micro-PWCs where users who have access to the specified area are logged in.
On the Micro-PWCs, the message will be displayed in the Message line (bottom line) of the Mini-Alarm
Window. To assign the operator message to an area, click Area. An Area Selection window like that shown
in Figure 2-4 will be displayed.
The Area Selection window consists primarily of a scrollable list box which contains 255 areas. To select
the destination area for the operator message, click the area, then click OK. The default is Area 1.
2.4.4 Send the Operator Message
To send the operator message and exit Message Configuration, click Send.
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2.5 Alarm Group Configuration
Alarm Groups can be used to change the state of atoms in the controller, including changes which cause
momentary contacts to be energized for a predetermined cycle, such as an on/off switch which is controlled by a Discrete I/O module in the controller. Typically, these are used to trigger an audible or visual
alarm at an annunciator panel.
Alarm group operation is initiated when Process Alarms are detected. Alarm Group configuration provides
the ability to filter Process Alarms by Message Type and Class. All Process Alarms are evaluated against
the Filter configuration of the Alarm Group. If the message is filtered out, that group is ignored and the next
Alarm Group is checked. If the process alarm is not filtered out and the alarm is unacknowledged, the
Alarm Group is considered to be on. When this condition exists, the ON List (a list of tag.atoms and associated values) is downloaded to the controller. When all alarms for a particular group are acknowledged,
the group is considered to be off, and a different list of tag.atoms and values, known as the OFF List, is
processed.
2.5.1 Accessing Alarm Group Configuration
Alarm Group configuration is accessed from the System Window by selecting Menu > Configure > Alarm
Groups. The Alarm Group Selection window (Figure 2-6) is displayed.
TC00153A
Figure 2-6. Alarm Group Selection Window
In the top portion of this window is the Alarm Group Selection List. This list contains the name of each
Alarm Group which has been configured. At the bottom of the window are Add, Delete and Edit buttons,
as well as OK, Cancel and ? (Help) buttons.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
2.5.2 Add an Alarm Group
To create an Alarm Group, click Add. The Alarm Group Configuration window (Figure 2-7) will be displayed.
TC00154A
Figure 2-7. Alarm Group Configuration Window
2.5.2.1 Group Name
The first item to appear in the Alarm Group Configuration window is the Group Name entry box. Enter a
string of up to 32 alphanumeric characters to be used as the name of the Alarm Group. Once the configuration of the Alarm Group has been completed, this name will appear in the Alarm Group Selection List
found in the parent window (Figure 2-6).
2.5.2.2 The ON List
Below the Group Name entry box, the main area of the Alarm Group Configuration window is divided in
half vertically. The left side is used to configure and display the On List, while the right side is used to configure and display the Off List. The On List is a scrolled list of tagname.atoms and values. When a Process
Alarm passes through the filter, these are downloaded to the controller and are typically used to trigger the
contacts used on the alarm annuciator.
Two text entry fields appear beneath the On List. The first of these is labelled Tagname. Enter the tagname.atom which will be added to the On List. Click the second entry box, labelled Value, and enter the
value to be downloaded to the previously named tagname.atom in the controller, where they can be used
to change the state of the atoms that trigger the contacts that drive the annunciator panel.
Once the tagname.atom and value have both been entered, click Apply and they will be entered in the On
List.
To delete an entry from the On List, click that entry in the On List, then click Delete, and the item will be
removed immediately.
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2.5.2.3 The OFF List
Like the On List, the Off List is a scrolled list of tagname.atoms and values. When all Process Alarms capable of triggering the Alarm Group have been acknowledged, values in the Off List are downloaded to their
associated tagnames in the controller. This allows the contacts which drive the alarm annunciator to be
returned to their original state.
Configuration and deletion of items in the Off List is accomplished in the same manner as for the On List.
2.5.2.4 Configure Filtering of Message Classes and Types
The Filter button, located at the bottom of the Alarm Group Configuration window, is used to define the
ability of various MessageTypes and Classes to affect the Alarm Group which is being configured. Essentially, Message Types and Classes which should not trigger the alarm group can be filtered out.
To filter Message Types for the Alarm Group which is being configured, click Filter. The Alarm Group Filttering window (Figure 2-8) will be displayed.
TC00567A
Figure 2-8. Alarm Group Filtering Window
The left side of this window contains a button for each Message Class which can be filtered out for the
Alarm Group under configuration. These include:
•
Process Alarms
•
Priority
•
Area
Process Alarms is the default Message Class, which is shown in Figure 2-8. Click the button corresponding to the Message Class to be filtered. The name of the selected Message Class appears in the upper
right corner of the window. A list of Message Types for the selected Message Class appears in the Message Type display section on the right side of the window. Each of the Message Types is preceded by a
toggle button. Click on these toggle buttons to select which Message Types for each Message Class are to
be routed to a device. By default, all Message Types are not filtered (that is, all will trigger the alarm group).
This is indicated by the toggle button being in the out position, and gray in color. (When a toggle button is
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
pressed in to filter a Message Type on this display, its color also changes to yellow to make the selected
state more obvious.)
All Message Types for the currently selected Message Class can be set or cleared simultaneously by clicking Set or Clear.
All Message Types for all Message Classes can be set or cleared simultaneously by clicking Set All or
Clear All.
2.5.2.4.1 Message Class: Process Alarm Messages
Process Alarm messages are displayed in the top two lines of the Mini-Alarm Window, known as the alarm
display area, and also in the Alarm Review display.
Process alarms are displayed in the following format:
<Priority><Area><Time><Date><Tagname><AlarmCondition> <Legend>
Process Alarm messages are classified into the following types:
•
Bad Input/Output
•
High/Low Alarm
•
Deviation Alarm
•
Security Alarm
•
Process Alarm message
•
Discrete Alarm
•
Return to Normal
•
Alarm Acknowledged
✎
Note
The Alarm Acknowledged message class is not available for
selection from this window, and appears stippled out.
2.5.2.4.2 Message Filter Parameter: Priority
To filter messages by Priority, click the Priority Message Class button on the Alarm Group Filtering window
(Figure 2-8). The Message Type area will list all Priorities. Click each Priority for which routing is to be
changed, or use Clear or Set to clear or set the routing status of all Priorities.
2.5.2.4.3 Message Filter Parameter: Area
To filter messages by Area, click the Area Message Class button on the Alarm Group Filtering window
(Figure 2-8). The Message Type area of the window will list all Areas. Click each area for which routing is
to be changed, or use Clear or Set to clear or set the routing status of all Areas.
2.5.2.5 Edit an Alarm Group
Configuration of an existing Alarm Group can be modified using the Edit button, located at the bottom of
the Alarm Group Selection window. To do so, select the desired Alarm Group in the list box. Click Edit to
display the Alarm Group Configuration window for the selected Alarm Group. Configure new entries as
described in Section 2.5.2, Add an Alarm Group.
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2.5.2.6 Delete Alarm Group(s)
To delete an Alarm Group, click on the Group Name in the Alarm Group Selection List. Click Delete. A confirmation box will ask:
Delete selected items?
Click Yes to delete the item, or click No to exit without making deletions.
To delete a block of adjacent alarm groups, click on the first item to be deleted, press and hold the SHIFT
key, then click on the last item in the list to be deleted. Click Delete.
To delete multiple alarm groups which are randomly placed in the list, press and hold the CTRL key as each
entry is selected. Click Delete when all selections have been made.
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2.6 Configuring Network Parameters
To configure parameters which are global to the network, use the Network Parameters option. From the
System Window, select Menu > Configure > Network Parameters. This provides configuration access to
the following network parameters:
•
Alarm Setup
•
Alarm Vectors
•
Area Names
•
Event Bit Names
•
Printer Assignment
•
Message Routing
•
Operator Window Parameters
•
Display Colors
2.6.1 Alarm Setup
The parameters configured via Alarm Setup affect the System Title and the display of Alarm information,
both of which appear in the Mini-Alarm Window.
Select Menu > Configure > Network Parameters > Alarm Setup to configure the following parameters:
•
System Title (appears in title bar of the Mini-Alarm Window)
•
Alarm presentation on top line of Mini-Alarm Window (with all alarms acknowledged)
•
Alarm presentation on top line of Mini-Alarm Window (with unacknowledged alarms)
•
Audible Alarm configuration
•
Priority color assignments
•
Mini-Alarm Window field widths
Selecting the Alarm Setup option displays the Alarm Setup window (Figure 2-9).
•
20
The main work area of the Alarm Setup window is divided into several smaller areas, including
the System Title entry box, Top Alarm Line Presentation configuration, Audible Alarm
configuration, and a utility for configuring and assigning custom Priority Colors.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
T
Figure 2-9. Alarm Setup Window
✎
Note
Changes to these parameters take effect when the Micro-PWC is
restarted.
2.6.1.1 System Title
The first item which appears in the Alarm Setup window is System Title. Enter a text string of up to 32 characters which is to be used as the System Title. The System Title appears in the title bar of the Mini-Alarm
Window.
2.6.1.2 Top Alarm Line Presentation
The top two lines of the Mini-Alarm Window are used to display messages regarding process conditions
which are in alarm. The top alarm line can be configured to display either the newest or oldest alarm which
has the highest priority. (Priority 1 is the highest priority; Priority 16 is the lowest.) Furthermore, this may be
configured to behave differently, depending on whether unacknowledged alarms exist, or if all alarms have
been acknowledged. By default, the system will display the Newest High Priority alarm, whether or not
unacknowledged alarms exist.
In the portion of the window labelled Top Alarm Line Presentation are two pairs of radio buttons; the first
pair is labelled With All Alarms Acknowledged. To configure the Alarm Presentation in the top alarm line
with all alarms acknowledged, click on the appropriate radio button:
•
Newest high priority
•
Oldest high priority
For the change to take effect, the Mini-Alarm Window must be reopened; to do this, restart the MicroPWC’s computer, as described in the Micro-PWC installation and Setup Guide supplied with your system.
To configure the alarm presentation when unacknowledged alarms exist, perfomr the same operations
using the pair of radio buttons labelled With Unacknowledged Alarms.
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2.6.1.3 Priority Colors
There are 16 alarm priorities available on the Micro-PWC. Each of these priorities can be configured to display in a different color, to aid in rapid identification of the importance of the alarm. A palette of 16 Priority
Color Assignments is pre-configured on the Micro-PWC. The default palette uses the following colors:
Table 2-1. Priority Color Assignments
Level
Color
Priority 1
Red
Priority 2
Yellow
Priority 3
Green
Priority 4
SlateBlue
Priority 5
HotPink
Priority 6
Cyan
Priority 7
DarkOrange
Priority 8
Blue
Priority 9
Aquamarine
Priority 10
SeaGreen
Priority 11
Chocolate
Priority 12
Lavender
Priority 13
SandyBrown
Priority 14
Tomato
Priority 15
Turquoise4
Priority 16
DeepPink
Rank
(Highest priority)
(Lowest priority)
This color palette can be modified using the color palette and configuration utility in the Alarm Setup display.
To configure a color for a priority using pre-defined colors:
1. Click the Priority Color to be changed.
a. The name of the current color choice appears inside the selection entry box.
b. The current color is displayed in the color sample box located above the list box.
2. In the pre-defined list of colors, click the name of the color to be assigned to the selected
priority.
a. This color will replace the current color in the color sample box.
3. Click colors until a satisfactory color is found.
4. Click Assign Color to assign the newly chosen color to the selected priority
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
To manually specify a color for a priority:
1. Click the Priority Color to be changed.
2. Click the selection entry box and use BACKSPACE to remove the original color name.
3. Type in the name of the desired color using the keyboard.
4. Click Assign Color to assign the newly chosen color to the selected priority.
✎
Note
If this method of color selection is used, the newly selected color
will not appear in the color sample box.
Custom colors can also be defined, and specified for use with Priorities 1 through 16.
Each available color on the Micro-PWC is created using the three primary colors (red, green and blue) in
varying intensities; a value from 0 to 255 is used to define the intensity of each primary color. Three color
definition boxes in the primary colors red, green and blue appear on the right side of the Primary Colors
portion of the Alarm Setup window.
A color definition is composed of three values, and each color definition box contains a horizontal slider
with an entry box above it. The entry box contains a number from 0 to 255 (inclusive), which reflects the
location of the slider and the current value for that primary color's intensity.
For example:
A color definition with a value of 0 (zero) for all three color intensities produces the color black
(all sliders positioned at the extreme left).
A value of 255 for all three color intensities yields white
(all sliders positioned at the extreme right).
A color definition of Red = 255, Green = 255, BLUE = 0 produces yellow, and so on.
To specify a custom color for a priority:
1. Click the Priority Color to be changed.
2. Specify the desired custom color using the color definition entry boxes or sliders.
3. Click Assign Color to assign the newly chosen color to the selected priority.
✎
Note
Modifications to priority colors will take effect only in those Operator
Windows which are opened after the new priority color
configuration has been saved.
Similarly, where messages are displayed on two different MicroPWCs (CON1 and CON2), new priority colors defined on CON1 will
not be visible on CON2 until the Operator Windows have been
closed and re-opened on CON2. The new colors will be used in the
Mini-Alarm Window only after the Micro-PWC has been restarted.
2.6.1.4 Audible Alarm Configuration
Audible alarms are sounds produced by an annunciator. On the Micro-PWC, the annunciator is located
within the Micro-PWC computer. These sounds accompany incoming alarms to notify the operator of their
presence. The user can configure audible alarms to accompany System Events and Messages. Process
Alarms are always accompanied by audible alarms.
The types of messages (including Process Alarms, System Events, and Operator Messages) received by
a user are determined by the configuration of message filtering for that user's login account (described in
Section 2.8.4, Message Routing). This means that not all Micro-PWCs will necessarily receive the same
set of Alarms and Messages.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
When there are no unacknowledged Process Alarms, System Events, or Messages in the Mini-Alarm Window on a particular Micro-PWC, the audible alarm will be automatically turned off for that Micro-PWC until
the next unacknowledged alarm or message appears in the Mini-Alarm Window.
✎
Note
There can still be unacknowledged alarms on the system.
The Audible Alarm Configuration area of the Alarm Setup window is composed of the following
parameters:
•
Process alarms
•
System events
•
Messages
•
High audio priority
•
External silence
2.6.1.4.1 Process Alarms and Audible Alarm Configuration
The Process Alarms parameter appears solely for informational purposes. The face of the associated button displays the legend On, which is stippled out, indicating that it cannot be accessed. Process alarms are
always On; that is, incoming process alarms will always be announced by an audible alarm, unless:
•
the alarm has been disabled via the External Alarm Silence window (see Section 2.6.1.4.5,
External Alarm Silence)
•
the alarm has been manually turned off via a hardware control on the Micro-PWC computer
- or -
2.6.1.4.2 Audible Alarms for System Events
A toggle button labelled System Events allows the user to determine whether System Event messages will
be accompanied by an audible alarm. The face of the button reflects the currently selected state: On indicates that audible alarms will accompany system event messages; Off indicates that no audible alarm will
sound when a System Event message appears in the third line of the Mini-Alarm Window. Click the button
to toggle between the two states.
2.6.1.4.3 Audible Alarms for Messages
A toggle button labelled Messages allows the user to determine whether Operator Messages will be
accompanied by an audible alarm. The face of the button reflects the currently selected state: On indicates
that audible alarms will accompany Operator Messages; Off indicates that no audible alarm will sound
when an Operator Message appears in the fourth line of the Mini-Alarm Window. Click the button to toggle
between the two states.
2.6.1.4.4 Audible Alarm Priority Assignment
Two different audible alarm sounds are available on the Micro-PWC: a steady beep and a rapid beep. The
rapid beep is used with high priority alarms. The High Audio Priority parameter is used to configure which
priorities will be accompanied by which sound.
Click the text entry box for this parameter to gain focus, then enter the number of the priority at which the
sound characteristics of the audible alarm change. The alarm priority which corresponds to this number,
and all priorities higher (i.e., with lower priority numbers) will be accompanied by the rapid beep.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
For example, the default High Audio Priority setting is 4; this means that alarms and messages with priority
numbers 1 through 4 will be accompanied by a rapid beep, while alarms and messages with priority numbers 5 through 16 will receive the steady beep.
2.6.1.4.5 External Alarm Silence
The External Silence button opens a window (Figure 2-10) that allows the user to configure a tag that will
silence an external alarm from the Micro-PWC. Select the Enable External Alarm Silence option to enable
the text entry fields. Enter the tagname.atom that controls the output to an external alarm annunciator
(e.g., horn, siren, etc.). In the Value field enter a value for the selected tagname.atom (e.g., 1 or 0 for a
digital tag) that will silence the alarm. After these values have been configured, the associated annunciator
will automatically be silenced when the internal alarm is silenced by clicking the horn icon in the Mini-Alarm
Window or by using ALT-F11.
TC00603A
Figure 2-10. External Alarm Silence Configuration Window
2.6.1.5 Default Alarm Setup
Click the Default button (near the bottom left corner of the Alarm Setup window) to change Top Alarm Line
Presentation, Audible Alarm Configuration, and Priority Colors to their default state. A pop-up dialog
prompts:
Are You Sure?
Click Yes to confirm, or click No to remain with the currently assigned colors.
2.6.1.6 Mini-Alarm Window Field Width
The top two lines in the Mini-Alarm Window display information about process alarms. This information is
displayed in a number of fields. The ordering of the fields is the same order used in the Alarm Review display (discussed in the Micro-PWC Operator’s Manual). The width of each of these fields is user-configurable. To configure field widths, click Mini-Alarm Format at the bottom of the Alarm Setup window to
display the Mini-Alarm Format window (Figure 2-11).
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25
Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
TC00157A
Figure 2-11. Mini-Alarm Format Window
The default size of each field width is as shown in Table 2-2.
Table 2-2. Default Mini-Alarm Field Widths
Field Name
Default Field Width
Priority
2
Area
10
Time
8
Date
9
Tag
16
Status
16
Alarm Tag
34
Legend
48
The default sizes used reflect the maximum number of spaces required for each piece of information. The
default sizes total 131 characters. Not more than 85 characters can be displayed on the process alarm line
of the Mini-Alarm Window. If the default settings are used, a portion of the legend cannot be viewed in the
Mini-Alarm Window.
✎
Note
The spaces used to separate the fields are automatically supplied
by the Micro-PWC software.
Click Default to return all entries to their default settings.
✎
Note
Each Micro-PWC must be restarted to effect changes made via the
Mini-Alarm Format window.
The configuration of the Mini-Alarm field widths will be distributed to all members of the console group, so
that all Mini-Alarm lines on all Micro-PWCs on the network will have the same appearance. The configuration of the Mini-Alarm field widths has no effect on the Alarm Review display.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
2.6.1.7 Exiting Alarm Setup
To exit the Alarm Setup display, choose one of two options. To exit and save all changes to the configuration, click OK. Click Cancel to exit without saving any changes.
Changes to these parameters take effect when the Micro-PWC is restarted.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
2.7 Summary - Alarm Setup
Alarm Setup
An option on the Network Parameters menu which provides access to the configuration of the following items:
•
Alarm Presentation on the Top Line of the Mini-Alarm Window
when all alarms are acknowledged
•
Alarm Presentation on the Top Line of the Mini-Alarm Window
when unacknowledged alarms exist
•
System Title
•
Priority Color assignments
•
Audible Alarm Configuration
•
Mini-Alarm Window Field Widths
Audible Alarms
Audible Alarms are sounds produced by an annunciator. On the Micro-PWC,
the annunciator is located within the PC. These sounds accompany incoming
alarms to notify the operator of their presence. The user can configure audible
alarms to accompany System Events and Messages; Process Alarms are
always accompanied by audible alarms, unless they are deliberately turned off
via a hardware switch or the External Alarm Silence option.
Default Button
The Default button appears near the lower left corner of the Alarm Setup window. Click this button to return alarm priority color choices to the default color
palette. A pop-up window provides the opportunity to abort the operation.
Priority Color
Each of the 16 alarm priorities on the Micro-PWC can be assigned to display in
a different color, to aid in rapid assessment of the alarm's importance. A default
palette of 16 colors is preconfigured on the Micro-PWC. To quickly change a
color assignment, select the priority color button to be changed by clicking it,
then select the new color in the color list. Finally, click Assign Color to make
the assignment
System Title
The System Title is a string of up to 32 alphanumeric characters which appears
in the title bar of the Mini-Alarm Window. This string can be used to identify the
installation name. The System Title is configured via a text entry box at the top
of the Alarm Setup window. Click this box and enter the desired text string.
Top Alarm Line
Presentation
The top two lines in the Mini-Alarm Window are used to display messages
regarding process conditions which are in alarm. The top alarm line can be
configured to display either the newest or oldest alarm which has the highest
priority. This can be configured to behave differently, depending on whether:
•
unacknowledged alarms exist, or
•
all alarms have been acknowledged.
By default, the system will display the newest high priority alarm, whether or
not unacknowledged alarms exist.
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2.8 Alarm Vectors
From the System Window, select Menu > Configure > Network Parameters > Alarm Vectors to view the
Alarm Vector Configuration window (Figure 2-12). This window is used to assign specific displays to tagnames. If this assignment has been configured, and the associated point goes into alarm, the user need
TC00158A
Figure 2-12. Alarm Vector Configuration Window
only click on the Vector button on the point’s alarm line (in either the Mini-Alarm Window or Alarm Review
window) to call up the assigned display.
✎
Note
If Alarm Vectoring is not configured for a tagname, clicking the
Vector button will cause the point display for that tag to be
displayed by default (no configuration is necessary).
The Alarm Vector Configuration window is divided vertically into two sections. In the left section, the scrollable Tagname listbox contains a list of all tagnames which have been configured with Alarm Vectors.
The right section of the window is labelled Select Vector Display Type and contains a fixed list of display
types available for vectoring. These include:
•
Graphic
•
Summary
•
Group
•
Point
•
Trend
•
System Status
•
Alarm Review
•
Event Review
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
•
Message Review
•
Printer Review
•
Event History
Below the Display Type list box are two blank fields, Display Type and Index. Below these fields are two
text entry boxes. The first entry box is Tagname, the second appears to the right of, and is used in conjunction with, a Find button.
To assign an Alarm Vector to a tagname, first configure the tagname, then specify the target display. This
procedure is described below.
2.8.0.1 Configuring the Triggering tagname
When the Alarm Vector Configuration window appears, the Tagname entry box is automatically highlighted
and ready to accept input. Enter the tagname for which vectoring is being assigned.
When configuration of both the tagname and display type has been completed for the alarm vector, the
tagname will be inserted into the Tagnames list box, in alphabetical order. The list will shift within the list
box so that the newest entry is displayed at the top of the list box.
✎
Note
No warning will be given if the tagname does not exist; the string
will be accepted and entered into the Tagnames list box.
2.8.0.2 Specifying the Target Display
Once a tagname has been entered in the Tagname entry box or selected from the Tagnames list box,
select the display which will be used when that tagname is in alarm and the Vector button is clicked.
Vector buttons are located on the alarm lines in the Mini-Alarm Window and on each line of the Alarm
Review display.
Click on the desired type in the list box labelled Select Vector Display Type. The selection will be highlighted and will automatically be displayed in the field labelled Display Type.
2.8.0.2.1 Specifying Graphic, Summary, Group, Point, or Trend Displays
If Graphic, Summary, Group, Point, or Trend has been selected as the Display Type, more than one display is available for that type. A window will appear to aid the user in specifying the index of the desired
display. In the case of Graphic, Summary, Group, and Trend display types, the window which appears will
be similar to the example in Figure 2-13.
Use the scroll bar and the UP and DOWN ARROWS to view the list of available displays for the selected display
type. If all or part of the title is known, enter it in the Title entry box, then click Search. If found, the item will
be highlighted at the top of the list box. Similarly, if the index number is known, enter it in the Index entry
box, then click Search to locate it in the list, or click OK to make the selection.
To move quickly to the first item in the list box, click Top. When the desired display has been selected, click
OK.
2.8.0.2.2 Specifying a Point Display
If Point has been selected as the Display Type, a much simpler window will appear. The Point Selection
window consists of an Enter Tagname entry box, and OK, and Cancel buttons. Enter the tagname of the
point in the entry box, then click OK. If a tagname has been specified, use of the Vector button will cause
the point display associated with the specified tagname to appear. This allows the user to vector to a point
display other than that of the point which is in alarm.
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TC00172A
Figure 2-13. Select Graphic Window
2.8.0.2.3 Specifying a Printer Review Display
If Printer Review is selected as the display type, a Printer Selection window (Figure 2-14) will appear. This
window contains a list of devices configured on the network. Click the name of the device containing the
messages which are to be displayed. The device name will be highlighted. Click OK (or double-click the
device name) to complete the operation. If a device has been specified, use of the Vector button will cause
the Printer Review display for the selected device to appear.
TC00241A
Figure 2-14. Printer Selection Window
If only one display is available for the chosen display type (as is the case for System Status, Alarm Review,
Event Review, Message Review, and Event Historian displays), no index number is required. Click the
desired type in the Display Type list. The name of the type will be displayed in the Display Type field below
the list and the Index field will display a pair of dashes (--).
Target display selection is not saved until either the OK or Apply button in the Alarm Vector Configuration
window has been clicked.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
2.8.0.3 Changing Existing Alarm Vectoring Assignments
Once points have been configured for Alarm Vectoring, use the Find button to quickly locate and highlight
any entry in the Tagnames list box. To do so, enter the desired tagname (or any known portion thereof) in
the text entry box to the right of the Find button, then click Find. The first entry containing the desired
string will appear highlighted at the top of the Tagnames list box. Click Find again to find the next entry
which matches the entered text string.
2.8.0.4 Configuring Multiple Alarm Vectoring Assignments
Multiple Alarm Vectoring assignments can be configured without exiting the Alarm Vector Configuration
window by using the Apply button. To do so, first enter the tagname (or select it from the list in the
Tagnames list box) and specify the target display. Click Apply. The tagname will be entered in the
Tagnames list. Alarm Vectoring assignment will be completed. Repeat the information entry and use Apply
as often as necessary.
2.8.0.5 Deleting Alarm Vectoring Assignments
To delete an Alarm Vectoring assignment, highlight the desired tagname in the Tagnames list box, then
click Delete. A confirmation box will query:
Delete Selected Items?
Click Yes to complete the operation. Click No to exit the operation without making any changes.
If more than one item is to be deleted, all items to be deleted must occupy adjacent lines. Position the
pointer on the first item to be deleted, press and hold the left mouse button, and drag the pointer down to
the last item to be deleted. Click Delete. The confirmation box will appear. Proceed as described above.
2.8.0.6 Using the Vector Button
Vector buttons appear on each of the alarm lines in the Mini-Alarm Window (the top two lines), and on
each line used in the Alarm Review display. A V is displayed on the face of each Vector button.
If Alarm Vectoring has been configured for the point which is in alarm, clicking the Vector button on an
alarm line in the Mini-Alarm Window will cause the assigned display to appear (by default) in the Operator
Window with the lowest index number (e.g., Operator Window #1).
Clicking the Vector button on an alarm line in the Alarm Review display will cause the assigned display to
appear (by default) in the Operator Window which contains the Alarm Review display. In either case, the
display can optionally be made to appear in a different window by dragging and dropping the Vector button
to a location inside the frame of the alternate window.
2.8.1 Area Name Assignment
To use Micro-DCI features to the best advantage, it is important that Areas be planned before configuration
of a system. Areas can be used as the basis for numerous system refinements. For example:
32
•
An operator's permission to change values in the databases of the 53PW6000 controllers in
the system can be limited on the basis of area. In this context, areas are generally considered
to be process areas.
•
Messages associated with process alarms and events can be filtered for an operator on the
basis of area. Again, the implementation is usually on the basis of process area.
System Configuration
Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
From the System Window, select Menu > Configure > Network Parameters > Area Names to view the Area
Setup display, shown in Figure 2-15.
TC00159A
Figure 2-15. Area Setup Display
The Area Setup display is used to configure a 10-character name for each of the 255 process Areas. To do
so, click the text entry box and enter up to 10 characters.
These names are used network-wide for user reference; it is recommended that they be unique.
2.8.2 Event Bit Configuration
Event bits are a set of 4,096 group-wide event flags which can be set to indicate that an event has
occurred. Event bits are set (to 1) and reset (to 0).
Using Event Bit configuration, a name can be assigned to each event bit. Such a name can be mnemonic
and descriptive of the function of the event bit. Other features, such as the Historical Database, can then
be configured to reference the Event Bit by name.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
From the System Window, select Menu > Configure > Network Parameters > Event Bit Names to display
the Event Bit Configuration window (Figure 2-16).
TC00160A
Figure 2-16. Event Bit Configuration Window
By default, the top area of this window contains a list of the first 15 Event Bits and their names, which can
have a maximum of 15 characters. Below this list are Go To and Find buttons, used to access other Event
Bits. A Delete All button is also available for clearing the event bit name configuration. The functions of
these buttons are described below.
✎
Note
If a client is being run, the Event Bit configuration can be run only
from the node where the database resides. This node should be a
server node.
2.8.2.1 Edit Event Bit Name
To enter or change an event bit name, first click the text entry box and enter (or modify) an event bit name
of up to 15 characters.
To reference a particular Supervisor card SDT or 53MC5000B SDT event bit, configure the Event Bit name
to be the tagname of the SDT module, followed by a two-digit number specifying which bit in the SDT the
event refers to. For example, an Event Bit named PUMPSTAT03 would be triggered whenever bit 3 in an
SDT with tagname PUMPSTAT is triggered.
2.8.2.2 Go To
Use the Go To button to access an event bit by its index number. Click Go To; a window will be displayed.
Click the text entry box labelled Enter Event Bit Index and enter the index number of the desired event bit,
then click OK. A list of 15 event bits, starting at the requested event bit, will be displayed in the Event Bit
Configuration window.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
2.8.2.3 Find
Use the Find button to access an event bit by name. Click Find; a window will be displayed. Click the text
entry box labelled Enter Event Bit Name and enter the name of the desired event bit. Click OK. A list of 15
event bits, starting at the requested event bit, will be displayed in the Event Bit Configuration window.
2.8.2.4 Delete All
Use the Delete All button to delete all configured event bit names. Click this button; a confirmation box will
appear. Click Yes if all event bit names are to be deleted. Click No to exit without deleting the names.
2.8.3 Printer Assignment
A printer should be installed in the Windows operating system with the appropriate driver and settings
before assigning that printer to the Micro-PWC. Printers which are used for alarm printing or event logs
should have the printers processing data type TEXT selected from the WinPrint print processor. Note that
this print processing selection affects only the text printouts. It does not affect graphic printouts.
Printer Assignment is used to define the devices which will receive messages. These devices can be printers or files.
Selecting Menu > Configure > Network Parameters > Printer Assignment causes the Printer Assignment
display (Figure 2-17) to appear.
This display lists the currently configured devices, and allows the attributes of these devices to be added,
deleted, changed or sorted..
TC00568A
Figure 2-17. Printer Assignment Display
✎
Note
Printers used to print scheduled logs must support PostScript.
2.8.3.1 Adding a Device
To add a device to the list, click Add.
This action will cause a Device Characteristics display, similar to that shown in Figure 2-18, to appear. The
information contained in the data fields will vary, depending on the actual configuration of the system. If no
data has been configured for the device, default information will be displayed on the pushbuttons.
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35
Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
TC00569A
Figure 2-18. Device Characteristics
Device characteristics which can be configured include:
•
Device Name
•
Backup Device
•
Node Name
•
Device Type
•
Port Number
•
File Size (in lines)
•
Use ETX/ACK Protocol
•
Emulation
2.8.3.1.1 Device Name
The Device Name is an 11-character alphanumeric string used to identify the printer or file. To enter or
change the device name, click the Device Name entry box. Enter the name to be used for the device.
Spaces cannot be included in the device name. Each device name on the network must be unique in
order to avoid confusion; while it is possible to assign the same Device Name to more than one device, this
is not good practice.
✎
Note
The name of the printer configured for Micro-PWC must be exactly
the same as the name of the corresponding printer configured for
the Windows operating system, otherwise printing will not work, and
no diagnostic messages will be issued.
2.8.3.1.2 Backup Device
The Backup Device parameter is used to select an alternate device to which messages will be sent in the
event that the primary device fails. To assign a backup device, click the Backup Device button. A list of
available (previously configured) devices will appear. Click on the entry for the device which is to be used
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
as the backup to select it. Click OK to complete the selection process.
✎
Note
The Microsoft print manager does not support the ETX/ACK
protocol; therefore, automatic switchover to a backup printer is not
available on Micro-PWC printers controlled by the Microsoft print
manager.
2.8.3.1.3 Node Name
The Node Name is the name of the node to which the device is connected. The local node name appears
by default. To change to a different node name, click the button labelled Node Name. A window will appear
which contains a list of available nodes. Highlight the desired node. Click OK to complete the selection process. Each node name on the network must be unique in order to avoid confusion; while it is possible to
assign the same node name to more than one device, this is not good practice.
2.8.3.1.4 Device Type
The Device Type parameter describes the type of device to which messages will be sent. To change this
parameter, click on the Device Type button. A window will appear which contains a list of supported device
types, including:
•
File
•
Line Printer
•
Black & White PostScript Level I Laser Printer
•
Color or Black & White PostScript Level II Laser Printer
Highlight the device type desired by clicking on it using the mouse. Click on OK to make the selection, or
click on Cancel to exit without making changes.
The default Device Type is File.
2.8.3.1.5 Port Number
The Port Number to which printer output is sent is dependent upon which type of node and which Device
Type have been selected. When the selected Node Name is that of a printer server, this parameter can be
configured by the user. In the case of other node types, printer output is directed according to the rules
defined in this subsection.
When File has been selected as the device type, no port is required and the Port Number button is
stippled out.
When Line Printer is selected, and the selected Node Name is a Micro-PWC Computer (53PW6000),
printer output will automatically be sent to the second serial port on the Micro-PWC Computer. The Port
Number button will be stippled out.
When Line Printer is selected, and the selected Node Name is a console, printer output will automatically
be sent to either Serial Port 1 or 2, as configured in the console. The Port Number button will be stippled
out.
When Line Printer is selected, and the selected Node Name is a printer server, the Port Number button is
available. To change this parameter, click Port Number. A window titled Available Ports will be displayed,
which contains a list of available ports for the selected node name. Click on the entry for the port to be
used, then click OK to complete the selection process.
When either of the PostScript® printer options (Black & White PostScript Level I Laser Printer or Color or
Black and White Postscript Level II Laser Printer) is selected, and the selected Node Name is that of a
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
Micro-PWC, printer output will automatically be directed to the parallel port on that Micro-PWC. If the
selected Node Name is that of a printer server, the port number can be selected. To change this parameter,
click the Port Number button. A window titled Available Ports will be displayed, which contains a list of
available ports for the selected node name. Click on the entry for the port to be used, then click OK to complete the selection process.
2.8.3.1.6 File Size
All messages sent to a device are automatically stored in a file, which can be viewed by choosing Select >
Printer Review from the Operator Window menu bar. If you elect to define a file (instead of a printer) as the
device to which messages are sent, this is the file which is used. In either case, the default file size is 50
lines.
The File Size parameter is used to configure the number of lines to be stored in the file. To change this
parameter, click the File Size button. A window will appear which contains a list of supported sizes;
choices include 50, 100, 500, 1000, 5000, or 10,000 lines. Highlight the desired selection. Click OK to
complete the selection process.
2.8.3.1.7 Use ETX/ACK Protocol
✎
Note
The Micro-PWC software does not supportd the ETX/ACK protocol.
2.8.3.1.8 Emulation
A button labelled Emulation is used to configure this parameter. It is available for use when the Device
Type parameter is set to Line Printer. Click Emulation to toggle between Epson (the default) and IBM Proprinter emulation. Choose the emulation supported on your printer.
✎
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System Configuration
If a Device Type other than Line Printer is selected, this parameter
is stippled out, and the face of the button is blank.
Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
2.8.3.1.9 Default Device Characteristics
Default Device Characteristics are listed in Table 2-3.
Table 2-3. Default Device Characteristics
Characteristic
Default
Device Name
The entry box is empty.
Backup Device
(None)
Node Name
Defaults to the name of the local node.
Type
File
Port Number
Button face is blank by default when the Type characteristic is set to “File”; otherwise it defaults to 1.
File Size
50
Use ETX/ACK
Button face is blank initially; defaults to Yes when the
Type characteristic is set to Line Printer.
Emulation
Epson
To return all parameters to default settings, click Default.
2.8.3.2 Changing Device Characteristics
If a device has already been configured, the characteristics of the existing device can also be changed via
the Printer Assignment display. To do so, click on the desired device on the list of devices to select it, then
click Edit. This action will cause the Device Characteristics display for that device to appear. Device Characteristics can then be changed as described in Section 2.8.3.1, Adding a Device.
2.8.3.3 Device Sort
The list of configured devices can be sorted by Device Name or by Node Name. Sorting by Device Name
places the devices in alphanumeric order according to name, regardless of the node to which they are
attached. Sorting by Node Name sorts the devices primarily by node and then by device name.
To sort the list of devices, click Sort. The Sort Criteria window will appear, as shown in Figure 2-19.
TC00163A
Figure 2-19. Sort Criteria Window
Two options appear in the Sort Options window:
•
Device Name
•
Node Name, Device Name
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
Click on the method to be used for the sort, then click OK to complete the selection process. The results of
the sort operation will be seen immediately in the device list found in the Printer Assignment display.
2.8.3.4 Deleting a Device
To delete a device from the Printer Assignment device list, click on the item in the list which is to be
deleted, then click Delete. The item will be removed from the list immediately.
2.8.3.5 Deleting all Devices
To delete all devices in the Printer Assignment device list, click Delete All. A confirmation box appears,
which requests that you confirm the decision. Click Yes to delete all devices or No to exit the display without deleting any devices.
2.8.4 Message Routing
Information on various topics is provided by the system in the form of messages. Messages are divided
into categories called message classes. This enables the system to distinguish between different kinds of
messages and allows efficient message sorting.
Messages within each class are further distinguished by separation into message types. Definitions of
types within a Message Class enables the Micro-PWC to quickly process and sort messages within a
class.
Message Classes on the Micro-PWC include:
•
Process Alarms
•
System Events
•
Operator Messages
•
Device Failures
•
Operating Status Messages
•
Module Diagnostics
•
Status Changes
•
Operating Errors
•
Operator Actions
Process Alarms, System Events, and Operator Messages provide information which must be immediately
available to the operator. Messages from these three classes are displayed in the Mini-Alarm Window on
the Micro-PWC screen. The remaining Message Classes reflect status changes in the system rather than
alarm conditions. Messages belonging to these classes are not displayed in the Mini-Alarm Window. Logging of messages is configurable.
In addition to Message Classes, Message Routing also allows the filtering of messages based on the following parameters:
•
Priority
•
Area
Message Routing enables messages of any Message Class to be separately routed to any device which
has been configured through the Printer Assignment menu selection (see Section 2.8.3, Printer Assignment). Message Routing also allows the selection of which Message Types in each Message Class are to
be routed to any device, filtering out messages which are not important for the specific application.
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From the System Window, select Menu > Configure > Network Params > Message Routing to display a
window similar to that shown in Figure 2-20.
TC00242A
Figure 2-20. Message Routing Assignment Window
The Message Routing Assignment window contains a matrix of Devices and Message Classes. Only
Devices which have been configured through the Printer Assignment window (see Section 2.8.3, Printer
Assignment) will appear as part of the matrix.
Each Message Class has a button for each available device. To route messages to a device, click the button that corresponds to both the Message Class and device desired. An X will appear on the face of the
button. If no messages are being routed for a Device/Message Class combination, the button is blank.
Each Device has a Filter button, which provides access to message filtering functions. Each Message
Class in the matrix has a Color pushbutton, used to define the color of messages in that Message Class,
and a Space pushbutton, used to define the number of spaces that messages of that Message Class are
to be indented.
2.8.4.1 Message Type Filtering
If all Message Types for all Message Classes are being routed to a device, the face of the Filter button will
be blank. If any Message Types for any of the Message Classes have been filtered (not routed to a
device), the Filter button will display an F.
To filter Message Types for a particular device, click on the Filter button for the device which is to receive
filtered messages. The Device Routing Assignment window, shown in Figure 2-21, will be displayed. The
left side of the Device Routing Assignment window contains a button for each Message Class. Process
Alarms is the default Message Class, which is shown in Figure 2-21. Click on the button corresponding to
the Message Class to be filtered. The name of the selected Message Class appears in the upper right corner of the window. A list of MessageTypes for the selected Message Class appears in the Message Type
display section on the right side of the window. Each of the Message Types is preceded by a toggle button.
Click these toggle buttons to select which Message Types for each Message Class are to be routed to a
device. By default, all Message Types are routed (indicated by the toggle button in the “in” or “pressed”
position).
All Message Types for the currently selected Message Class can be set or cleared by clicking Set or Clear.
All Message Types for all Message Classes can be set or cleared simultaneously, by clicking Set All or
Clear All.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
TC00589A
Figure 2-21. Device Routing Assignment Window
2.8.4.2 Message Color Definition
By default, messages which are sent to a printer are printed in black, and messages which are sent to a file
appear as black characters on a white background.
To define a different color to be used when a message from a particular class is sent to a file (or to an
optional color printer), click on the Color Selection button located immediately below the Message Class
name. The window shown in Figure 2-22 appears.
TC00244A
Figure 2-22. Message Color Selection Window
Click on the desired color, then click OK to complete the selection process.
✎
Note
The message color defined here is used when the message is logged
to a device (file or printer); it is not the same as Alarm Priority color
(see Section 2.6.1.3, Priority Colors), and will not affect messages in
the Mini-Alarm Window or Alarm Review display.
2.8.4.3 Message Indentation Definition
The Space button, located below the Color button, is used to define the number of spaces of indentation
to be used for each Message Class. Where a number of different Message Classes are routed to the same
printer, setting a different indentation for each Message Class can assist you in finding messages of a particular class. The face of the Space button indicates the number of spaces each Message Class will be
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
indented. By default, printing of all Message Classes begins at position 0 (zero, the first position on the left
of the screen or printer), and the face of the Space button reflects this as #sp:n, where n represents the
number of spaces defined for indentation.
Click the Space button; the Indentation window (Figure 2-23) will appear. This window contains the possible choices for indenting messages, from the default of 0 to the maximum of 36 spaces. Click on the
desired indentation, then click OK to complete the selection process, or click Cancel to exit the operation
without making changes.
TC00245A
Figure 2-23. Message Indentation Definition Window
2.8.4.3.1 Message Class: Process Alarm Messages
Process Alarm messages are displayed in the top two lines of the Mini-Alarm Window, known as the alarm
display area.
Process alarms are displayed in the following format:
<Priority> <Area> <Time> <Date> <Tagname> <Alarm Condition> <Legend>
Process Alarm Messages are classified into the following Message Types:
•
Bad Input/Output
•
High/Low Alarm
•
Deviation Alarm
•
Security Alarm
•
Process Alarm Message
•
Discrete Alarm
•
Return to Normal
•
Alarm Acknowledged
Process Alarm Messages can be filtered by Message Type.
2.8.4.3.2 Message Class: System Event Messages
System Event messages are displayed in the third line of the Mini-Alarm Window, known as the event display area.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
System event messages are displayed in the format:
<Time> <Date> <Message>
System Event messages are classified into the following types:
•
Operator Station Events
•
Network Events
•
Return to Normal
•
Event Acknowledged
•
Node Down
•
Node Up
System events can be filtered by Message Type.
2.8.4.3.3 Message Class: Operator Messages
Operator Messages are messages sent by an operator to all operators in an area, and appear in the fourth
line of the Mini-Alarm Window.
Operator messages are displayed in the following format:
<Priority><Area><Time><Date><Message>
Operator Messages are classified into the following types:
•
Operator message
•
Operator call
•
Message acknowledged
•
Operator call acknowledge
Operator Calls are messages issued from a controller.
Operator Messages can be filtered by Message Type.
2.8.4.3.4 Message Class: Operating Errors
Operating Error messages are sent to a device designated via the Message Routing Assignment matrix.
This device can be a printer or a file.
Operating error messages are displayed in the following format:
<Time><Date><Device><Message>
Operating error messages are classified into the following type:
•
Operating message
Operating messages can be filtered.
2.8.4.3.5 Operator Actions
Operator Action messages are sent to a device designated via the Message Routing Assignment matrix.
This device can be a printer or a file.
Network Operator Action messages are displayed in the format:
<Area> <Time> <Date> <Username> <Terminal Name> <Message>
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
Micro-PWC Operator Action messages are displayed in following format:
<Time><Date><Username><Terminal Name><Message>
Operator action messages are classified into the following types:
•
Network operator action
•
Operator action
Operating messages can be filtered.
2.8.4.3.6 Message Class: Priority
To filter messages by Priority, click Priority Message Class on the Device Routing Assignment window
(Figure 2-21). The Message Type area of the window will list all priorities. Click each priority for which routing is to be changed, or use Clear or Set to clear or set the routing status of all priorities.
2.8.4.3.7 Message Class: Area
To filter messages by Area, click Area Message Class on the Device Routing Assignment window
(Figure 2-21). The Message Type area of the window will list all areas. Click each area for which routing is
to be changed, or use Clear or Set to clear or set the routing status of all areas.
2.8.5 Operator Window Parameters
The Operator Window Parameters menu item is used to access features which allow the user to:
•
Choose update rates for Operator Windows containing graphic, group, point, or trend displays.
The rate can further be set separately for windows both with and without keyboard focus.
•
Determine the maximum allowable memory size of Operator Windows; this is used to avoid
delays by triggering replacement of Operator Windows in memory.
•
Determine the initial contents of an Operator Window when it is opened.
•
Determine whether Operator Windows are arranged (tiled) automatically as they are opened
and closed, or arranged only on demand.
When this menu item is clicked on, the Operator Window Parameters window (Figure 2-24) will be displayed.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
TC00164A
Figure 2-24. Operator Window Parameters Window
2.8.5.1 Operator Window Update Rates
The top portion of the Operator Window Parameters window contains four pairs of sliders used to determine how fast a window containing a Graphic, Group, Point, or Trend display will be updated.
The first slider in each pair determines the update rate for windows containing the specified display type
which has keyboard focus. Update rates for windows with keyboard focus range from 1 (the default) to 5
seconds.
The second slider in each pair determines the update rate for windows containing the specified display
type, but which do not have keyboard focus. The minimum update rate for these windows is 2 seconds (the
default), and the maximum is 10 seconds.
For each display type, the update rate selected for the “without focus” state must be greater than or equal
to the rate selected for the “with focus” state; that is, the number of seconds chosen on the right slider must
be greater than or equal to the number of seconds selected on the left slider. If this rule is not followed,
using the Apply or OK buttons will result in the display of a pop-up window containing the following error
message:
Focus value > no focus value
Click OK to close the error message window, then adjust the slider settings.
Changes made to the Update Rate are distributed to all other console nodes in the console group, and will
have an immediate effect on all open Operator Windows in that console group which contain Graphic,
Group, Point, or Trend displays. It is not necessary to close and re-open Operator Windows to change the
rate at which the display is updated.
2.8.5.2 Operator Window Memory Usage
Each time a new display is called up in an Operator Window, the amount of memory used by that window
will increase. When very complex displays are used often in Operator Windows, a pop-up window containing the following message may be encountered when a new display is called up:
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
Please wait...
This happens when the amount of memory used by an Operator Window has grown large. The system
automatically replaces the Operator Window, in memory, with a new version using the minimum amount of
memory required for the display, reducing the amount of memory consumed.
The center section of the Operator Parameters Window contains a slider labelled Replace Size (MB). The
number of megabytes selected via this slider determines the amount of system memory which can be used
by Operator Windows before they are replaced. The default setting is the minimum, 4.5 MB, which is the
recommended setting. If few or no Please Wait messages are encountered, this setting should be left
untouched.
If the Please Wait message is encountered often, the amount of memory available to Operator Windows
can be increased by moving the Replace Size slider to the right. Replacement size can be increased to a
maximum of 5.5 MB, in increments of 0.1 MB.
Increasing the replacement size will reduce the incidence of Please Wait messages. It will, however,
increase the amount of system memory used by Operator Windows.
2.8.5.3 Initial Display in an Operator Window
When an Operator Window is opened, by default it contains the System Status Display. This can be
changed using the Initial Display portion of the Operator Window Parameters window. To change the initial
display to appear in Operator Windows, click on the desired entry in the Initial Display list box. The choices
include:
•
Graphic
•
Alarm Review
•
Summary
•
Event Review
•
Group
•
Message Review
•
Point
•
Printer Review
•
Trend
•
Event History
•
System Status
•
None
If Graphic, Summary, Group, Point, Trend or Printer Review has been selected, more than one display is
available for that display type. A pop-up window will appear to assist the user in specifying the index of the
desired display.
If None is selected, a new Operator Window will be left empty after it is opened. This avoids the delay in
calling up an initial, unwanted display.
2.8.5.4 Automatic Arrangement of Operator Windows
The Auto-Arrange Windows toggle button is selected by default. When this option is selected, Operator
Windows are arranged (tiled) automatically as they are opened and closed.
When this option is de-selected, Operator Windows are opened and closed without re-arranging other windows on the display. Operator Windows can still be arranged on demand. To do so, from the System Window, select the sequence: Menu > Windows > Arrange Windows.
2.8.5.5 Return to Default Settings
To return the settings on the Operator Windows Parameter window to the default settings, click Default,
then click OK or Apply.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
2.8.5.6 Apply Changes
Once changes have been made to the items in the Operator Window Parameters window, the changes
can be saved without exiting the window by clicking Apply. This is especially useful when configuring
update rates, as the user can watch the effect that changes to this feature produce on a display, and adjust
the rates without closing and re-opening the configuration window.
2.8.6 Configuring Multiple Screens
Multi-screen orientation must be configured. If not configured, the software will assume a single screen of
the maximum size.
TC00697A
Figure 2-25. Multiscreen Setup
To configure multiple screens, select Basic > Multiscreen Setup from the Micro-PWC maintenance program menu. Select the orientation and home screen by clicking on the appropriate check boxes. When
complete, click OK.
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2.9 Display Colors
From the System Window, select Menu > Configure > Network Params > Display Colors. The Display
Colors window (Figure 2-26) will be displayed.
TC00974A
Figure 2-26. Display Colors Window
The Display Colors window provides you with the ability to configure the colors to be used for the following
window parameters:
•
Window Text
•
Window Background
•
Text Entry Box Background
•
Text Entry Box Text
•
Button Text
•
Button Background
Click on the radio button associated with the parameter for which color is to be configured. Next, choose a
color for the selected item. With the exception of pre-configured color schemes, the color selection interface is the same as that used for configuring Priority Colors in the Alarm Setup window (see Section
2.6.1.3, Priority Colors).
Briefly, colors can be selected by one of the following methods:
•
clicking on an entry in the scrollable color list
•
using the sliders in the red, green and blue color definition boxes to mix a custom color; right
and left arrow buttons can be used to adjust a selected color by increasing or decreasing the
red, green and blue color values by 3 points each time one of these arrow buttons is clicked
•
entering a color name or identifying string (if known) in the window's text entry box.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
•
choosing a pre-configured color scheme from the Color Schemes drop-down combo box
which defines all display color parameters; available color schemes include:
•
Default (seashell4 background and white text for all parameters)
•
Grays
•
Browns
•
Blues
As selections are made, the portion of the window labelled Current Color Scheme will be updated dynamically to provide immediate feedback on the results of your choices.
When you are satisfied with your selections, click Apply to apply the color selections to all the consoletype nodes in the local console group. Click OK to apply the current selections and close the Display Colors window.
Displays with pre-defined colors (including Graphics, Trends, Point and Group displays, and Alarm, Event,
and Printer Review displays) are not affected by the choices made in the Display Colors window.
✎
Note
On Micro-PWC nodes, the colors configured from this window will
be used only if the Use Desktop Colors toggle button is deselected
during the installation of the PWC3200 software, or after installation
using the PWC Setup utility.
If the Use Desktop Colors option was selected, then the the PWC
will use the color settings configured via the Windows Desktop color
scheme. The Windows Desktop color scheme is configured from
the Control Panel window.
2.10 Security
The Micro-PWC security system:
•
provides accounts which are synchronized within console groups
•
defines user access to:
•
•
Micro-PWC functions
•
Process Control functions
•
Plant areas
Defines each user’s filtering of alarms and messages by:
•
Area
•
Priority
•
Message Class
•
Defines each user’s set of Quick Keys
•
Provides assignment of security parameters for:
•
•
Micro-PWC default condition (no user logged in)
•
Each individual user
Permits activation or deactivation of the security checking
At the initial system startup, the Micro-PWC security system is in the deactivated state (refer to Section
2.10.1, Security Activation), and the condition known as the Default Login (described in Section 2.10.2,
Default Login) exists. Until otherwise reconfigured, all functions are available directly from the Micro-PWC,
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as the Default Login is initially set at Supervisor Level 3 (the most powerful Access Level).
✎
Note
Read this chapter completely before reconfiguring the Default
Login. Also, be sure to create a new privileged login account with
an Access Level of Supervisor Level 3 before lowering the Access
Level of the Default Login.
To configure the Micro-PWC security system, from the System Window select Menu > Configure >
Security. The security menu provides the following options:
•
Security Activation
•
Default Login
•
Function Access
•
User Login
•
Change Password
2.10.1 Security Activation
Security on the Micro-PWC can be active or inactive. When Security is inactive, the Access Level is set to
that defined for the Default Login. (The Default Login, described in further detail in Section 2.10.2, Default
Login, is used at the initial Micro-PWC startup, and whenever there is no user logged in on the MicroPWC.) Message filtering is enabled for all logins when security is inactive.
Selecting Security Activation from the Security menu displays the Security Activation window shown in
Figure 2-27.
TC00165A
Figure 2-27. Security Activation/Deactivation Windows
If security has not been activated, the window prompts the user to Activate Security; if security has already
been activated, the window prompts the user to Deactivate Security.
Yes is automatically highlighted; click it, or press RETURN to take the action indicated by the prompt. This
change takes place when the user exits the Security Activation window. To exit without making a change,
click No.
2.10.2 Default Login
Two security conditions exist on the Micro-PWC:
•
No user logged in
•
User logged in
When no user is logged in (a state which occurs at system startup when auto-login is not possible, or after
a user logs out), some actions can still be performed on the Micro-PWC. This state is known as the Default
Login, and is denoted by the word Default in the Mini-Alarm Window menu bar, where the user name is
normally displayed. The scope of actions permitted to the Default Login depends on the configuration of
the Micro-PWC Default.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
Selecting Default Login from the Security menu displays the Default Login Configuration window
(Figure 2-28).
TC00570A
Figure 2-28. Default Login Configuration Window
2.10.2.1 Default Login Access Level
At the top of the Default Login Configuration window is a button which displays the current Access Level on
the button face. Access Levels are assigned to both login accounts (including the Default Login account)
and functions. To access a function, the Access Level of a user’s login account must be equal to or higher
than the Access Level assigned to the function. Function Access Levels are configured using the Function
Access option on the Security menu (see Section 2.10.3, Function Access). User login accounts are
assigned an Access Level using User Login Configuration (refer to Section 2.10.5, User Login).
To change the Access Level of the Default Login account, click the button labelled Access Level. The
Access Level Selection window (Figure 2-29) will appear on the screen.
TC00167A
Figure 2-29. Access Level Selection Window
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The Access Level Selection window displays the nine Access Levels available on the Micro-PWC.
Operator Level 1 is the lowest Access Level; normally users with this Access Level have the least permission to access Micro-PWC functions. The highest available Access Level, Supervisor Level 3, should provide maximum access to functions.
The current Access Level of the Default Login account is highlighted when the Access Level Selection window appears. To select a different Access Level, position the pointer on the desired level and click it. Click
OK to effect the change and exit the window.
When the Micro-PWC is started up initially, the Default Login is set to Supervisor Level 3. (The initial
screen setup to be displayed, as defined by the CRT Context Keys for the Default Login, consists of one
Operator Window containing the System Status Display.)
2.10.2.2 Default Login Message Filtering
The bottom portion of the Default Login Configuration window (Figure 2-28) is used to configure message
filtering for the Default Login account.
On the left is a set of buttons, each representing a Message Class or other message filtering parameter,
including:
•
Process Alarms
•
System Events
•
Operator Messages
•
Priority
•
Area
Click one of these buttons to select the Message Class (or parameter) for which message filtering is to be
configured. This selection will appear at the top of the right side of the window. The list of Message Types
for that Message Class will be displayed in the right side of the window. Message Classes and Message
Types are discussed in Section 2.8.4, Message Routing.
The Message Type list is used to include or exclude (filter) Message Types in the Mini-Alarm and Alarm
Review for the Default Login. Each Message Type has a toggle button associated with it. Click on the toggle button to reverse the status of the Message Type; if the button appears to be pressed in, messages of
that type are accessible to the Default Login. If the button appears to be raised or out, no access is available to that Message Type. Sample buttons labelled Access and No Access appear above the Message
Type list. Access and No Access are included only to provide a visual example of how the toggle button
appears in each state, and have no other function.
By default, all Message Types in all Message Classes are accessible to the Default Login.
2.10.2.3 Area Access Assignment (Default Login)
The Area filter parameter serves a dual purpose. This item allows you to determine not only which areas
the Default Login can receive messages from, but also which areas can be accessed by the Default Login.
2.10.2.4 Clear and Set Multiple Message Types
It is possible to clear or set multiple Message Types simultaneously, eliminating the need to click numerous
toggle buttons. Click Set or Clear to set or clear all Message Types in the selected Message Class. Click
Set All or Clear All to set or clear all Message Types in all Message Classes available via the Default
Login on the Micro-PWC.
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
2.10.2.5 Exiting Default Login Configuration
To exit the Default Login Configuration window and save changes, click OK. Click Cancel to exit without
making changes.
All parameter changes take effect when the user logs out of the Micro-PWC or when the Micro-PWC is
restarted.
2.10.3 Function Access
Use the Function Access window to assign Access Levels to Micro-PWC and network functions. Select
Security > Function Access to display the Function Access Configuration window (Figure 2-30).
TC00168A
Figure 2-30. Function Access Configuration Window
This scrollable window contains a list of all function names available via the menus on the Micro-PWC.
Each function name has an associated button which displays the Access Level (for example, Engineer
Level 3) assigned to the function. A default set of Function Access Levels is configured on the Micro-PWC.
Table 2-4 shows the default Access Level assignments.
Table 2-4. Default Function Access Level Assignment
Function
54
Default Access Level
Alarm Groups Utility
Engineer Level 3
Alarm Vector Assignment
Engineer Level 3
Archival Block DB Maintenance
Engineer Level 3
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Table 2-4. Default Function Access Level Assignment (Continued)
Function
Default Access Level
Archival DB Maintenance
Engineer Level 3
Archive Block Data
Engineer Level 3
Archive Historical Data
Engineer Level 3
Arrange Windows
Operator Level 1
Audible Alarms
Engineer Level 3
Backup/Restore
Engineer Level 3
CRT Context Keys
Operator Level 1
CRT Print
Operator Level 1
Change Password
Operator Level 3
Configure @aGlance
Engineer Level 3
Configure Alarm Groups
Engineer Level 3
Configure Alarm Setup
Supervisor Level 1
Configure Archival Groups
Engineer Level 3
Configure Area Names
Supervisor Level 1
Configure Configuration Reports
Supervisor Level 3
Configure Display Center Colors
Supervisor Level 1
Configure Display Center Default
Supervisor Level 1
Configure Event Bit Names
Supervisor Level 1
Configure Function Access
Supervisor Level 1
Configure Graphic
Engineer Level 3
Configure Historical Blocks
Engineer Level 3
Configure Historical DB
Engineer Level 3
Configure Historical Trend
Engineer Level 3
Configure Logs
Engineer Level 3
Configure Message Routing
Supervisor Level 1
Configure Messages
Engineer Level 3
Configure Operator Window Params
Supervisor Level 1
Configure Spreadsheet Displays
Engineer Level 3
Configure Summary
Engineer Level 3
Configure User Login
Supervisor Level 1
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Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
Table 2-4. Default Function Access Level Assignment (Continued)
Function
Default Access Level
DCT Users
Engineer Level 3
Display Configuration Reports
Operator Level 3
Edit User Help
Operator Level 3
Filter Alarms in Mini-Alarm
Operator Level 1
Historical Block DB Maintenance
Engineer Level 3
Historical DB Maintenance
Engineer Level 3
List Block File
Engineer Level 3
Manual Data Entry
Engineer Level 3
Network Level Shutdown
Supervisor Level 3
Network Time Adjustment
Supervisor Level 3
Open New Window
Operator Level 1
Other Applications
Engineer Level 3
Print Log
Engineer Level 3
Printer Assignment
Supervisor Level 1
Program Configuration
Supervisor Level 1
Program Scheduling
Supervisor Level 1
Release Configuration Locks
Operator Level 3
Restore Block Data
Engineer Level 3
Restore Historical Data
Engineer Level 3
Security Activation
Supervisor Level 3
Spreadsheet Displays
Engineer Level 3
To change the Access Level of a function, click the button next to that function. The Access Level Selection
window (Figure 2-29) will appear. (This is the same window which appears when configuring message filtering for the Default Login and user accounts.)
Click on the new Access Level to be assigned to the function; the selection will be highlighted. Click OK to
make the assignment.
Changes take place when the user exits from Function Access configuration. A function currently in use
will not be affected until the next time it is accessed.
2.10.4 Function Access Level Assignment Guidelines
When assigning function Access Levels, it is important to take care to maintain an adequate level of security by selecting the appropriate Function Access Level for a function. The following guidelines were used
to make the default Function Access Level assignments:
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Supervisor Level:
•
Security functions (except changing password)
•
Functions used in configuration of Network-wide parameters
Engineer Level:
•
Functions used in configuration and maintenance of process displays.
•
Functions used in configuration and maintenance of logs.
•
Functions used in configuration and maintenance of historical database.
Operator Level:
•
Access to displays
•
Configuration of User Help text
•
Changing of password
2.10.5 User Login
Unique user login names can be configured on the Micro-PWC for use on all Micro-PWC nodes on the network. These names can be up to 20 characters in length and must be unique on the network, as they are
contained in a table which is distributed to all console-type notes in the local console group. Login names
cannot include spaces. There is no fixed limit to the number of login names which can be configured.
To configure a user login, select Security > User Login. The User Login Configuration window (Figure 2-31)
appears.
TC00707A
Figure 2-31. User Login Window
The User Login Configuration window contains a list box and a number of buttons. If any logins have
already been configured, the user names of the logins appear in the list box.
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2.10.5.1 Add a User Login
To create a user login, click Add. The User Login window (Figure 2-32) will be displayed.
TC00571A
Figure 2-32. User Login Window
The top portion of the User Login window contains several text entry boxes and push buttons.
2.10.5.1.1 User Name
The entry box in the top left corner is labelled Username. Enter the name (to a maximum of 20 characters)
for the new user. The Username can be the name of a person (Cheryl, Clifford, Bob, etc.), or it can be a
descriptive term such as Operator, Supervisor, Sr_Engineer, and so on. User names can be entered in
either upper or lower case, depending on the user's preference. User names cannot contain spaces.
✎
Notes
1. Remember that the Micro-PWC is case sensitive, and
the manner in which the user name is configured is the
way it must be entered each time the user logs in. It
may be more convenient to use all upper or all lower
case characters, rather than a mixture of the two.
2.
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While the Micro-PWC software is case sensitive, the
Windows software is not. To avoid confusion when the
auto-login feature (described in Section 2.10.7, AutoLogin in this Configuration Guide) runs, do not
configure multiple Micro-PWC user login names that
differ only in the case of the letters used.
Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
2.10.5.1.2 User Password
The Password text entry box follows the Username text entry box. The password can have a maximum of
seven ASCII characters, and defaults to the first seven characters of the username. To change the password, click the associated entry box, use BACKSPACE to erase the default password, and enter the desired
ASCII string. The password cannot contain spaces.
Unsuccessful user login attempts will cause a System Event message to be generated. This message will
be displayed in the System Event display area of the Mini-Alarm Window and stored in the Event Historian.
The message will include the time and date, the node name, and a message in the following format:
User <current user login name> Invalid Login Attempt on Terminal
<Micro-PWC Name> <attempted user login name>
where:
<current user login name> is the name of the user currently logged in,
<Micro-PWC Name> is the identity of the Micro-PWC on which the attempt is made, and
<attempted user login name> is the login name of the unsuccessful user.
For example, if the user fred attempted to log in using an incorrect password at a Micro-PWC where the
Default Login state existed, the following message would appear:
16:42:43 10-JUL-05 CON1 User Default Invalid Login Attempt on
Terminal CON1:0 fred
These messages are Micro-PWC Event messages and can be filtered using the Message Filter Parameter, as described in Section 2.8.4, Message Routing.
2.10.5.1.3 User Access Level
Access Levels (previously discussed in Section 2.10.2.1, Default Login Access Level) are assigned to both
login accounts (including the Default Login account) and functions. To access a function, the Access Level
of a user’s login account must be equal to or higher than the Access Level assigned to the function. Function Access Levels are configured using the Function Access option (refer to Section 2.10.3, Function
Access) on the security menu.
New logins default to Operator Level 1, the lowest of the nine Access Levels on the Micro-PWC. The button labelled Access Level, located below the Password entry box on the User Login window, displays the
current Access Level on the button’s face.
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To change the Access Level of a login, click on the Access Level button. The Access Level Selection window (Figure 2-33) will appear. Note that this is the same window as that used when configuring Function
Acces, and the Default Login Access Level.
TC00167A
Figure 2-33. Access Level Selection Window
The Access Level Selection window displays the nine Access Levels available on the Micro-PWC. Operator Level 1 is the lowest Access Level. Normally users with this Access Level have the least permission to
access Micro-PWC functions. The highest available Access Level, Supervisor Level 3, should provide
maximum access to functions. The current Access Level of the login account is highlighted when the
Access Level Selection window appears. To select a different Access Level, position the pointer on the
desired level and click it to highlight it. Click OK to make the change and exit the window.
2.10.5.1.4 User Message Filtering
The portion of the User Login window (Figure 2-32) below the Access Level button is used to configure
message filtering for the login account.
The display is the same as that used to configure Message Filtering for the Default Login account (see
Section 2.10.2, Default Login). On the left is a set of buttons, each representing a Message Class or other
message filtering parameter, including:
•
Process Alarms
•
System Events
•
Operator Messages
•
Priority
•
Area
Click one of these buttons to select the Message Class (or parameter) for which Message Filtering is to be
configured. This selection will appear to the right of the Message Types For Class label. The list of Message Types for that Message Class will be displayed in the right side of the window. Message Classes and
Message Types are discussed in Section 2.8.4, Message Routing. The Message Type list is used to
include or exclude (filter) Message Types out of the Mini-Alarm and Alarm Review for the Login. Note that
each Message Type has a toggle button associated with it. Click this toggle button to reverse the status of
the Message Type; if the button appears to be pressed in, messages of that Message Type are accessible
to the logged-on user. If the button appears to be raised or out, no access is available to that Message
Type. Sample buttons labelled Access and No Access appear above the Message Type list. Access and
No Access are included only to provide a visual example of how the toggle button appears in each state,
and have no other function.
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By default, all Message Types in all Message Classes are initially set to the Access state when the user
account is created.
2.10.5.1.5 Area Access Assignment
The Area filter parameter serves multiple purposes:
•
The controller uses the areas specified here when determining who is permitted to change
values in the controller database using Operator Windows.
•
Messages displayed on the Mini-Alarm and in the Alarm Review are filtered on the basis of
areas specified for the User Login.
2.10.5.1.6 Clear and Set Multiple Message Types
It is possible to clear or set multiple Message Types simultaneously, eliminating the need to click numerous
toggle buttons. Click Set or Clear to set or clear all Message Types in the selected Message Class. Click
Set All or Clear All to set or clear all Message Types in all Message Classes on the Micro-PWC.
2.10.5.2 Copy
Once a login has been configured, it is possible to assign some or all of the same parameters to another
login. The Copy button on the User Login window provides this ability.
For example, a account with the user name user_1 has been created. If a new login with the same permissions and the user name User_2 is needed, from the System Window, select Menu > Configure > Security
> User Login to call up the User Login Configuration window (Figure 2-31). Click Add. In the resulting User
Login window, enter the name of the new user in the Username entry box (i.e., User_2), then click the
Copy button. The Copy User Login window (Figure 2-34) appears.
TC00705A
Figure 2-34. Copy User Login Window
A list box in the Copy User Login window contains all the usernames of logins currently configured on the
Micro-PWC. This list box is labelled Copy From. Locate the user name to serve as the source for the Copy
operation, and select it.
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Above the list box is a set of choices; each choice has a toggle button associated with it. The toggle buttons allow the user to select which parameters are to be copied to the new login. Parameter options which
can be selected include:
•
All Parameters
•
Access Level
•
Message Class
•
CRT Context Keys
•
Quick Keys
Click the toggle button for each type of parameter to be copied from the source login. Click OK to complete
the operation.
✎
Note
On the Micro-PWC system, the toggle labelled Display Center
Terminals may be ignored.
2.10.5.3 Edit a User Login
To revise an existing user login, from the System Window select Menu > Configure > Security > User Login
to call up the User Login Configuration window (Figure 2-31). Locate the desired user name in the list box,
using the scroll bar if necessary. Select the user name, then click Edit. The User Login window
(Figure 2-32) will appear, containing the configuration for the selected username. Make changes to the
existing parameters as described in the paragraphs above.
Changes take effect the next time the user logs into the Micro-PWC.
2.10.5.4 Delete a Login
To delete an existing login, from the System Window,select Menu > Configure > Security > User Login to
call up the User Login Configuration window. Select the user name in the list box, then click Delete. A confirmation box will ask:
Delete selected items?
Click Yes to delete the selected login, or click No to exit without deleting.
2.10.6 Change Password
When a login is initially configured, the password for the login defaults to the first seven characters of the
username entered for the login. One of a new user’s first actions should be to change this password, to
prevent unauthorized persons from using the account.
A good password is an essential component of system security. Use the following guidelines when choosing a password:
•
Avoid the obvious choices, such as names, social security numbers, words that appear in a
dictionary, license plate numbers, etc.
•
Make it complex - use a mixture of upper and lower case letters, as well as numbers, in the
password.
•
Use all seven characters - a password that is too short is easy to guess.
While the user is not prevented from using a single character or spouse’s name as a password, this is not
good practice.
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To change a password, login on the system and from the System Window, select Menu > Configure >
Security > Change Password. The Change Password window (Figure 2-35) appears.
TC00030A
Figure 2-35. Change Password Window
1. Enter a valid user name in the Login entry box, then press RETURN.
2. Enter the password in the Password entry box, then press RETURN. Note that the password will
not be displayed on the screen, for security reasons. For most users, this is their own user
name and password, although it is possible for a user with a higher Access Level to change
the password of a user with a lower Access Level. Note that the user is forced to prove
possession of the original password before it can be changed.
3. Enter the New Password in the appropriate text entry box, then press RETURN.
4. Enter the new password in the Verify Password entry box. Because the passwords do not
appear on the screen, this step is essential to make sure that there were no typing mistakes
when the new password was entered. After the new password is typed in Verify Password,
press RETURN to complete the operation.
If the new password and the verification entry match, the new password is accepted and the
Change Password window is removed from the screen. If they do not match, a window
advises the user to try again.
2.10.7 Auto-Login
The Micro-PWC software provides an auto-login feature which eliminates the need to login to the Windows
software and the Micro-PWC software separately.
When the Micro-PWC software is started, the login name of the current Windows user is compared to the
user login names found in the Micro-PWC configuration. If a match is found, that user will automatically be
logged into the Micro-PWC. All of the Function Access Levels and other parameters (e.g., login context)
configured for that user will be applied, just as if the user had logged in manually.
To take advantage of this feature, configure a Micro-PWC user login with a user name (see Section
2.10.5.1.1, User Name) identical to a Windows user name.
✎
Note
While the Micro-PWC software is case sensitive, the Windows
software is not. To avoid unpredictable and undesirable results
when the auto-login feature runs, do not configure multiple
Micro-PWC user login names that differ only in the case of the
letters used. For example, if a user named “Bob” exists, do not
configure another user named “bob”.
For information on how to configure user login accounts on the Windows operating system, see the Windows documentation provided with the system.
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Windows login accounts that will be used with the auto-login feature on Micro-PWC servers or Micro-PWC
client extenders (that is, Micro-PWC servers without tag servers) must include Windows administrator privileges. Login accounts that will be used only on Micro-PWC routed or direct clients need not have administrator privileges.
❢
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Caution
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Advanced users should not attempt to change permissions or
security attributes on Micro-PWC files; doing so may cause
unpredictable or undesirable results for Micro-PWC users who do
not have administrative privileges.
Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
2.10.8 Summary - Security
Security
The Micro-PWC Security system includes the mechanisms for activating/
deactivating security checking, creating group wide user login accounts,
defining Access Levels of Micro-PWC functions, process control functions and
plant areas, defining each user’s set of Quick Keys, and defining security
parameters for both the Micro-PWC Default condition and for each individual
user.
Access Level
Access Levels are parameters used to control the ability of users to access
Micro-PWC functions. Nine Access Levels are available on the Micro-PWC,
and are configured for user login accounts, the Default Login account, and for
all Micro-PWC functions (by selecting Security > Function Access). The lowest
Access Level (least permission) is Operator Level 1; the highest (all functions
accessible) is Supervisor Level 3. The Access Level of a user must be equal to
or higher than the Access Level of the function in order for the user to access
the function.
Add Button
The Add button appears at the bottom of a number of configuration windows.
Click this button to enable creation of additional entries of the type defined in
the window, e.g., user logins.
Clear Button
The Clear button appears on both the Default Login Configuration and User
Login Configuration windows. Click this button to remove access to all
Message Types for the selected Message Class.
Clear All Button The Clear All button appears on both the Default Login Configuration and
User Login Configuration windows. Click this button to remove access to all
Message Types for all Message Classes.
Default Login
The Default Login item on the Security menu calls up the Default Login
Configuration window. This allows the user to define the Access Level,
Message Classes, and Message Types available when the Default Login
condition exists. (The Default Login condition exists when the system starts up
or when no user is logged in on the Micro-PWC.) Section 2.10.2, Default Login
provides additional details on this item.
Edit Button
The Edit button appears at the bottom of a number of configuration windows.
Click this button to edit entries of the type defined in the window, e.g., user
logins.
Function Access The Access Levels of Micro-PWC and network functions are configured using
the Function Access Configuration window. This window contains a list of all
function names available via the menus on the Micro-PWC. Next to each
function name is a button which displays the current Access Level of the
function. To change the Access Level of a function, click this button. Next, click
the new Access Level in the resulting Access Level Selection window. Click
OK to complete the assignment.
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Password
A password is a string of up to seven ASCII characters which must be supplied
by a user attempting to log on the Micro-PWC. A user’s password should be
kept confidential. To help maintain this confidentiality, the Micro-PWC does not
echo the password on the screen while it is typed.
When a user account is configured, the password for that account defaults to
the first seven characters in the user name. To change a password, select
Security > Change Password. Enter the user name and current password
(press RETURN after each) in the resulting Change Password window. Type the
new password in response to the New Password prompt, and again in
response to the Verify Password prompt. Since the password is not echoed on
the screen, this verification step insures that an accidental typing error will not
prevent the user from gaining access via the new password.
NOTE: The Micro-PWC is case sensitive; upper and lower case letters are not
interchangeable.
Set Button
The Set button appears on both the Default Login Configuration and User
Login Configuration windows. Click this button to permit access to all Message
Types for the selected Message Class.
Set All Button
The Set All button appears on both the Default Login Configuration and User
Login Configuration windows. Click this button to permit access to all Message
Types for all Message Classes.
User Login
A user login (often referred to simply as a login)is an individualized set of
parameters configured for each user (or type of user) on the system. The use
of user logins enhances the security of a system. Select Security > User Login
to configure login accounts. Section 2.10.5, User Login provides additional
details.
Username
The username is a string of up to 20 characters which will be used to log in to
the Micro-PWC. This can be the name of a person (Smith, joe, etc.) or it can be
a descriptive term such as Operator, Sr. Engineer, and so on. User names are
entered in the Username Selection entry box on the Login Configuration
window, which is available via Security > User Login. The Micro-PWC is case
sensitive, so the username must be entered exactly as it has been configured.
Once the user has logged in, the username will appear on the title bar of the
Mini-Alarm Window.
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3.0 Hierarchical Displays
3.1 Introduction
A number of displays and functions are accessed by clicking the Select item on the Operator Window
menu bar. These include:
•
Graphic Displays
•
Summary Displays
•
Group Displays
•
Point Displays
•
Quick Keys
•
Trend Displays
•
System Status Display (includes database options)
•
Alarm Review
•
Event Review
•
Message Review
•
Event Historian
•
Printer Review
Graphic, Summary, Group and Point displays provide access to screens which can include any addressable point (module) in any controller database. A distinction is made in this Configuration Guide between
graphic displays and hierarchical displays.
Graphic displays are completely configurable by the user. These displays can include objects and submodels such as line segments, equipment symbols, and bargraphs; they can include process database
parameters such as tagnames and process values. Graphic displays can contain plant process diagrams,
complete with dynamically updated data, colors, and other display attributes. Graphic display configuration
is accessed from the System Window, by selecting Menu > Configure > Graphic, and is discussed in
Section 4.0.
Hierarchical displays are pre-formatted displays provided by the Micro-PWC software, and organized into
a hierarchy; the format of hierarchical displays cannot be modified1. The following displays are considered
hierarchical displays:
•
Summary displays (1,000 maximum)
•
Group displays (24 per Summary display, 24,000 maximum)
•
Point displays are available for each tag in each controller (60,000 per group)
You can assign points to these displays and specify legends for each display using the methods described
in this section.
In order to configure hierarchical displays, an Operator Window must be opened and must have keyboard
focus. Click the Select option in the Operator Window menu bar, then click one of the hierarchical display
items (Summary, Group or Point).
1.
The graphical objects used to create the group and point displays are stored on the Micro-PWC as
submodels, making it possible for the user to create graphic displays composed of the same objects
which make up the hierarchical displays. This allows you to create graphics which have the appearance
of modified group or point displays. Refer to Section 4.0 for details on Graphic Configuration.
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3.2 Hierarchical Display Descriptions
The purpose of this section is to describe how the user can organize the hierarchy of process point displays, which are an enhancement of conventional panel instrument displays.
With the pre-formatted hierarchical displays available on the Micro-PWC, you can oversee a process or an
area of responsibility, as well as focus on a single point. The Micro-PWC display hierarchy ranges from a
Summary Display that presents the status of the points in 24 groups, to a single Point Display for detailed
examination and manipulation of process variables.
3.2.1 Plant Summary Display
A Summary Display provides an overview of 24 groups and is arranged in six rows of four blocks, each
representing a group (Figure 3-1). A legend for the 24 groups is displayed at the top of the screen. There is
no restriction on the number of characters in the legend; however, the legend, which is centered, can
extend beyond both edges of the display if it is longer than 45 to 50 characters.
TC00175A
Figure 3-1. Summary Display Example
A pushbutton is located in each block on the Summary Display. The pushbutton contains the number of the
group represented by the block (1 through 24). The status of the group is indicated by the color of the
pushbutton and the text which appears to the right of the pushbutton. The most serious status which exists
within the group of points is the status which will be displayed. (Table 3-1 lists status conditions in order of
decreasing severity, with the most serious condition at the top.)
Click one of the pushbuttons to display the Group Info window, which displays the status of each point in
the group and provides access to the Group Display or to individual Point Displays. Refer to the
Micro-PWC Operator’s Manual for a discussion of the Group Info window.
There are 1,000 Summary Displays available.
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Table 3-1. Group Status Conditions
Color
Text
Status
Red
Unack.
alarms
At least one point in the group is in an alarm state, and the alarm is
unacknowledged.
Yellow
(Unack.). At least one point in the group was previously in alarm, and, although the
point in alarm has returned to normal, the alarm has not been acknowledged.
Yellow
Alarms
At least one point in the group is in an alarm state, and the alarm has been
acknowledged.
Cyan
???
The status of at least one point in the group is unknown because the point
cannot be accessed by DBA.
Green
[No text] All points in the group are accessible by DBA, are in normal state or alarm
inhibit state, and no alarms need acknowledgment.
Gray
[No text] If the group has not been configured, the pushbutton appears in gray.
3.2.2 Group Display
A Group Display provides an overview of four, six or eight points (Figure 3-2). The top line displays a legend for the group. (There is no restriction on the number of characters in the legend. However, the legend,
which is centered, can extend beyond both edges of the display if it is longer than 45 to 50 characters.)
The display is divided into four, six or eight blocks; the information within each block relates to one point.
3.2.2.1 Point Tagnames
At the top of each point’s block on the Group Display is a button which contains the first 12 characters of
the point’s tagname. If the tagname is longer than 12 characters, the last (12th) character displayed in the
tagname is a tilde (~). Click this button to call up the Point Display for that tagname in the Operator
Window.
TC00045A
Figure 3-2. Group Display Example
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3.2.3 Point Display
The Point Display provides a more detailed display of one particular point from the group display.
Figure 3-3 provides an example of a Point Display.
TC00051A
Figure 3-3. Point Display Example
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3.3 Hierarchical Display Configuration
Configuration of Summary and Group displays is accomplished via the Configure option on the Summary
Display menu bar. Click this option to access the Configure menu. The Configure menu provides access to
Summary and Group configuration.
3.3.1 Summary Configuration
Select Configure > Summary to display the Configure Summary window (Figure 3-4).
TC00176A
Figure 3-4. Configure Summary Window
This window contains an entry box labelled Description and a Delete button, in addition to OK and Cancel.
In the Description entry box, enter a text string of up to 48 characters. This text will be used as the legend
which appears next to the Index number of the Summary at the top of the Summary display. Click OK to
complete the operation.
To remove the current Summary and all Groups configured on it, click Delete. A confirmation box will ask:
Delete this summary and all its groups?
Click Yes to delete the Summary and associated groups, or click No to return to the Configure Summary
window.
3.3.2 Group Configuration
To configure a Group, from the Summary window menu bar select Configure > Group. A message appears
below the menu bar, prompting:
Select group to configure...
This message will remain, and the Operator Window will remain in Group Configuration mode until you
select Configure > End Configuration from the Summary display menu bar.
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Once Group Configuration mode has been enabled, click the pushbutton containing the number of the
group to be configured. The Configure Group window (Figure 3-5) will be displayed.
TC00177A
Figure 3-5. Configure Group Window
The top half of the Configure Group window contains eight entry boxes in which to enter the tagnames of
up to eight controller tagnames which are to be included in the group.
✎
Note
Tagnames are assigned to controller points using the Configure
controller option, which is accessed via the System Status Display;
consult the controller Configuration Guide and Section 9.0 of this
guide for details on controller configuration.
The text entry cursor automatically appears in the entry box for the first tagname. Enter a tagname; if a tagname already exists, click a different entry box. Previously entered tagnames can be deleted using the
DELETE key on the keyboard; the BACKSPACE key can be used to delete text to the left of the cursor.
✎
Note
Enter tagnames with care; tagnames which do not exist in any
controller on the network can be entered without error.
The Description entry box is located below the Tagname entry area. In the Description entry box, enter a
text string of up to 48 characters. This string will be used as both the Group Legend (at the top of the
Group Display) and as the label of the group’s block on the Summary display.
A group of radio buttons, labelled Model Type, is located below the Description entry box. These buttons
are labelled as follows:
•
4 point
•
6 point
•
8 point
•
Other
Click on one of the first three selections to choose a standard 4, 6 or 8 point group display format. The
space allowed for each point on the group display varies, depending on the maximum number of points in
the format. For example, a group display formatted for 4 points (Figure 3-2) provides twice as much room
per point on the display than a group display formatted for 8 points (Figure 3-6).
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Figure 3-6. Group Display, 8 Point Format
It is also possible to assign a user-configured graphic model to be used as the template for the Group Display. Select the radio button labelled Other; an entry box appears to the left of this selection. Enter the
name of the model to be used as the template for the Group Display.
Two entry boxes, one for a Graphic Index number and one for a Trend Index number, are located below the
Model Type selection area. The configuration procedure is identical for both parameters. Entering an index
number in the entry box enables the corresponding button (Graphic or Trend) on the Group Info window
to vector directly to a specific Graphic or Trend display. (The Group Info window provides the operator with
access to group and point displays and can be called up by clicking on the Group pushbutton on the
Summary Display. This window is described in the Micro-PWC Operator’s Manual.)
To view a list of available displays, click List located to the right of the entry box. A window containing a list
of all available displays will appear. Figure 3-7provides an example of the Graphic List window.
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TC00255A
Figure 3-7. Graphic List Window
A display can be selected from the List window in one of two ways:
1. Click the desired display in the Graphic List window,
- or 2. Enter the index number of the desired display in the Index entry box.
If only part of a display’s title is known, enter that portion of the title in the Title entry box, then click Search.
The list will shift so that the first title encountered which contains that string will appear at the top of the list
box, highlighted. Click Top to move to the top of the Graphic List.
Once a display has been selected, click OK to complete the operation and enter that display’s index number in the appropriate Index entry box on the Configure Group window.
3.3.2.1 End Group Configuration
Once Group Configuration mode has been entered (see Section 3.3.2, Group Configuration), the Operator
Window will remain in that mode and the message:
Select group to configure...
will remain below the menu bar, allowing the configuration of one group after another from that Summary
Display, until End Configuration is selected in the Configure menu.
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3.3.3 Point Displays
Point Displays are the most specialized hierarchical displays. Each Point Display provides detailed information about a single point (module) in a controller. (An example is provided in Figure 3-3). Pre-configured
Point Display templates for the various controller module types are provided on the Micro-PWC. Tagnames
are assigned to controller modules using the controller Database Options, which are accessed from the
System Status Display. The type of the module automatically determines which template will be used to
display information about that point.
Point configuration can be accessed directly from the Point Display by clicking on the Configure item on
the Point Display menu bar. The controller Module Configuration window for the current point will be displayed.
Information on the display and function of point displays is provided in the Micro-PWC Operator’s Manual.
3.4 Summary - Hierarchical Displays
Hierarchical
Displays
Hierarchical Displays are pre-programmed displays provided by the
Micro-PWC, and organized into a hierarchy. The following displays are
considered hierarchical displays:
•
Summary displays
•
Group displays
•
Point displays
End
Configuration
The End Config item is available from the Configure menu, which appears on
the Operator Window menu bar when a Summary is displayed in the Operator
Window. Click this item to end group configuration.
Group Display
A Group Display provides an overview of four, six or eight points. The top line
displays a group legend of up to 48 characters. The display is divided into
four, six or eight blocks; the information within each block relates to one point.
There are 24,000 group displays available.
List Button
Two List buttons are found on the Configure Group window, one to aid in
selection of a Graphic Index number, and one to aid in selection of a Trend
Index number. Click one of the List buttons to display a window containing a
list of all configured displays for the associated type (Trends or Graphics).
Select a display to be associated with the Group.
Entering an index number in the entry box enables the corresponding button
(Graphic or Trend) on the Group Info window to vector directly to a specific
Graphic or Trend display. (The Group Info window provides the operator with
access to Group and Point displays and can be called up by clicking the
Group pushbutton on the Summary display. This window is described in the
Micro-PWC Operator’s Manual.)
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Point Displays
Point Displays are the most specialized hierarchical displays. Each Point
Display provides detailed information about a single point (module) in a
controller. (An example is provided in Figure 3-3.) Pre-configured Point
Display templates for the various controller module types are provided on the
Micro-PWC. Tagnames are assigned to controller modules using the
Database Options which are accessed from the System Status Display. The
type of the module automatically determines which template will be used to
display information about that point. Therefore there is no need to configure
Point Displays.
Search Button
If only a part of the display’s title is known, enter that portion of the title in the
Title entry box, then click Search. The list in the List box will shift so that the
first title encountered which contains that string will appear at the top of the list
box, highlighted. Click Top to move to the top of the graphic list.
Summary Display A Summary Display provides an overview of 24 groups and is arranged in six
rows of four blocks, each representing a group. At the top of the screen a
legend for the 24 groups is displayed. The legend can consist of up to 48
characters.
A pushbutton is located in each block on the Summary Display; the
pushbutton contains the number (1 through 24) of the group represented by
the block. The color of the pushbutton provides information regarding the
status of the group (Table 3-1).
Click this pushbutton to display the Group Info window, which provides
access to the Group Display or to individual Point Displays. Refer to the
Micro-PWC Operator’s Manual for details on use of the Group Info window.
The Config option appears on the Operator Window menu bar when a
Summary is displayed in the window. Section 3.3, Hierarchical Display
Configuration, provides details.
Top Button
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Click Top to move to the top of the Graphic List or Trend List in the
appropriate List window.
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4.0 The Grafx Editor
4.1 OVERVIEW
Process graphic displays provide the user with both a graphical interface to the process, and a convenient,
efficient way to access process data and perform control operations. On the Micro-PWC, up to 10,000
graphic displays can be configured, which are distributed automatically to the other Micro-PWCs in the
same console group. Using the Console Group Synchronization utility, graphics can also be distributed to
Micro-PWCs in other console groups as well.
Graphic displays, including animated process graphics, can be configured using the Grafx editor, an
object-oriented graphic modeling system. The Grafx editor is used for interactive creation of static background, dynamic display points, control points and display vectoring.
Graphics are configured in a two-step process: first, static objects such as circles, lines, rectangles and
text strings are placed on the display, creating a model. The objects used to create the model are sometimes referred to as the parts of the model. Various dynamic attributes, such as visibility, fill color, and edge
color, can then be assigned to any object (or combination of objects) on the graphic. These dynamic
attributes can be linked to atoms configured in the Micro-DCI Global database. A change in the status of
an atom can then trigger a visible change in the graphical object.
A model can be saved as either a graphic or a submodel; submodels can be used and re-used as objects
within other models.
Both the placement of graphic objects and assignment of dynamic attributes are accomplished using the
Grafx editor. This application maintains visual and functional consistency with other Windows-based applications currently available. The Windows user will find that many familiar commands and shortcuts are
available with the Grafx editor.
4.1.1 Accessing the Grafx Editor
The Grafx editor is accessed by using the pull-down menus available from the System Window Menu button. Position the pointer on the Menu button, and select the following sequence of items:
Menu > Configure > Graphic > Grafx Editor. The Grafx editor (Figure 4-1) will be displayed.
Only one Grafx editor session can be opened per Micro-DCI workstation.
If the Grafx editor is not visible, it may be necessary to lower (or close) Operator Windows in order to
locate it, or click on the related button on the task bar.
✎
Note
You can also open the Grafx editor using its entry in the Micro-PWC
program group. When started in this manner, more than one Grafx
editor session can be opened per Micro-DCI workstation.
4.1.2 Exiting the Grafx Editor
To exit the Grafx Editor, select File > Exit from the Grafx editor menu bar. If no changes have been made to
the current model, the display will be exited immediately. If changes have been made, a small pop-up window queries:
Save changes to Graphic <graphic name>?
or
Save changes to Submodel <submodel name>?
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Click on Yes to save changes, click on No to abandon changes. If multiple child windows are open in the
Grafx editor, a prompt will be displayed for each unsaved model before the utility is exited. The Grafx editor
is then removed from the screen.
To cancel the exit operation and remain in the Grafx editor, click on Cancel.
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4.2 CREATING MODELS
The Grafx editor is a Multiple Document Interface (MDI) application. This means that once the Grafx window is opened, multiple "child windows" or "model windows" can be opened within the Grafx window. This
allows multiple models to be edited simultaneously.
The Grafx window contains a number of discrete parts which, used together, enable the user to create
objects, models, submodels and graphics on the Micro-DCI console. These parts include:
•
the Menu Bar
•
the Main Toolbar
•
the Shape Toolbar
•
the View Toolbar
•
the Status Bar
Menu Bar
Main Toolbar
View Toolbar
Shape Toolbar
Child Window
Status Bar
Figure 4-1. Grafx Editor Display
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4.2.1 Child Windows - The Model Creation Environment
Each child window in the Grafx window is a graphic drawing area, where objects are placed during configuration. When the Grafx window is first opened, a single child window is opened. Additional child windows
can be opened, allowing multiple models to be edited simultaneously. Objects can be copied from one
child window to another.
4.2.1.1 Opening a Child Window
To open a new, empty, unnamed child window, select the option sequence File > New from the Grafx
window menu bar, or click on the corresponding icon (
) on the Main toolbar.
To open an existing model for configuration, select the File > Open sequence from the menu bar, or click
on the corresponding icon
from the Main toolbar. A selection dialog box will open. Select a model
from this dialog box to display it in a new child window.
4.2.1.2 Multiple Child Windows
No restriction is placed on the number of child windows that can be opened. Each child window consumes
computer resources. To conserve resources, it is a good idea to close a model window when it is no longer
required. If the editor is typically used with a child window maximized, it is easy to forget that there may be
a number of other child windows hidden behind the active window.
✎
Note
You cannot open the same model in two different child windows
using File > Open; attempting to do so will cause the original child
window containing the model to the top level and become active.
4.2.1.3 Child Window Components
Each child window has its own border and title bar; the title bar contains Maximize, Iconify and Close buttons. The child windows can be resized, moved and iconified within the lower portion of the Grafx Editor
window. The child windows cannot be moved outside of the Grafx window.
The title bar of each child window identifies the type of the item being configured (i.e., graphic or submodel), and the name of the item being configured. An asterisk (*) at the end of the string in the title bar
indicates that unsaved changes have been made in that child window. The title bar of the child window that
is selected or "active" differs in color from the title bars of inactive child windows.
The Window Menu button on a child window can be used to Move, Size, Minimize, Maximize, Close or
move to the Next child window.
When a child window is maximized, it loses its individual border and title bar and fills the Grafx window.
The Window Menu button, Minimize, Maximize/Restore and Exit buttons for that child window are displayed on the menu bar of the Grafx window.
The main purpose of the child window is to create graphic displays, and the largest component of the child
window is the Working View in which the graphic will be created.
4.2.1.4 Drawing Work Space (Working View) in a Child Window
The drawing space in a child window is called the Working View. It uses coordinates from (0,0) to (100,75)
by default; these coordinates can be changed via the Zoom and Pan operations (see the appropriate Subsections on these features for details). Note that this is a relative coordinate system for placement of
objects in the child window, rather than a set of absolute screen coordinates. When a model is first loaded
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in the child window, a Zoom To Fit operation is automatically performed so that the entire graphic is displayed; once Zoom and Pan operations have been performed by the user, the child window may contain
only a portion of the entire model.
✎
Note
The Grafx Editor maintains an Aspect Ratio 4 wide by 3 high, to
maintain correct proportions of models during scaling operations.
4.2.1.5 The Working View Grid
The grid used in the Working View area of a child window aids in the construction of models. Use the grid
as you would a piece of graph paper, as a guide in designing objects. The grid size, line style (lines, dots,
hidden) and grid color can all be configured using the Grid tab on the Settings window. See the section
titled Section 4.2.5.1.8, Setting the Grid Attributes, for details.
Although the grid is useful by itself, it is much more powerful when Snap mode is set to the grid selection.
4.2.1.6 Snap Mode
Snap mode is a valuable tool which aids in the selecting of points and aligning objects. Snapping helps
select the same or similar points while building objects. Snap mode can have one of three possible values,
selected by clicking on the appropriate Main toolbar button: Snap Off
Snap To Gravity
, Snap To Grid
, or
. By default, snap mode is set to Snap To Grid.
These options are also accessible from the Grafx menus by selecting the menu sequence View > Snap.
In Snap To Grid mode, every point that is selected is adjusted to the nearest grid intersection, whether the
grid is visible or not, and always works with the current grid size. This is useful when creating horizontal or
vertical lines, arrays of buttons, or other symmetric displays.
Objects created using the Grafx editor and submodels provided by MicroMod Automation contain predefined points. Pre-defined points can be used to rotate, scale, and make connections to the object. For
Polylines, Lines, and Splines, the pre-defined points are those used when these objects were created. Circles have pre-defined points at the 12, 3, 6 and 9 o'clock positions. Rectangles have pre-defined points at
all four corners, and at the midpoint of each side. Arcs have pre-defined points at the center and ends of
the arc.
Selecting Snap To Gravity causes the point selection to snap to the closest pre-defined point of an object;
that is, clicking a point on or very near an object causes the nearest pre-defined point in the object to be
selected. For example, if a point near the corner of an existing rectangle is picked while the user is creating
a new object, the pre-defined point at the corner of the rectangle will be used in the new object. Snap To
Gravity helps pick points to connect objects together.
Snap To Gravity can be used in conjunction with the reference point of an object to aid in the placement
and interconnection of objects and submodels on a graphic. See the sub-sections Section 4.2.6.8.1,
Changing an Object's Reference Point and Section 4.2.8, Object Placement Example for more information
on reference points.
4.2.1.7 Aligning Multiple Objects
The alignment buttons become available when more than one object is selected. (Press and hold the SHIFT
key while clicking on the objects to select multiple objects.) The last object selected is the one with which
all of the selected objects will be aligned. There are four alignment options
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available: Align Left
✎
, Align Right
Note
, Align Top
, and Align Bottom
.
The alignment options can also be accessed via the Grafx menus,
by selecting the sequence Edit > Align.
4.2.1.8 Select Mode
The Select Objects button
is used to change to select mode. You can also enter select mode by
clicking the right mouse button on an empty space in a child window. In this mode, the pointer changes to
an arrow shape, and can be used to select one or more objects which have been placed on a submodel or
graphic. This is useful when you want to configure attributes for an object, for grouping objects together,
and so on.
Most of the objects provided in the Shape toolbar require that a series of points be chosen in the Working
View. These points define the object, such as a center point and a point on the radius for making circles.
The prompts for the necessary actions are displayed in the status bar. The cursor becomes a plus sign (+)
when the Grafx editor expects a point to be selected.
The creation of any type of object is terminated by clicking on the Select Objects button, on another toolbar button, or by clicking the right mouse button when the pointer is in the Working View of a child window.
4.2.1.9 Redrawing the Working View
Click on the Redraw button
to redraw the working view of the active child window.
4.2.1.10 Adjusting the View of a Model
The following options are available to change the contents of the Working View:
•
Scroll bars in the child window frame allow you to control the portion of the graphic which is
visible in the Working View area of the active child window. This operation is referred to as
panning.
•
Zoom option buttons on the View toolbar allow you to control the amount of coordinate space
which can be visible in the Working View, known as the view size
The view size always has an Aspect Ratio 4 (wide) by 3 (high), to maintain correct proportions of models
during scaling operations. The default view size is 100 x 75 units. The maximum view size is 400 units by
300 units; thus, the available area for a graphic is actually 16 times the size of the default view size. The
user can maintain the same view size and use the scroll bars to see additional areas of the coordinate
space, or use the zoom options to increase/decrease the view size in the Working View.
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Table 4-1. View Size Information
NUMBER of
UNITS
LOWER LEFT
COORDINATE
UPPER RIGHT
COORDINATE
Default
100 x 75
0, 0
100, 75
Maximum
400 x 300
-150, -112.5
250, 187.5
Minimum
20 x 15
VIEW SIZE
Can be located anywhere within the Maximum
view size coordinates.
Coordinates for the minimum, maximum and default view sizes are shown in Table 4-1.
✎
Note
The use of Grid Mode (Section 4.2.5.1.8, Setting the Grid
Attributes) is unaffected by Zoom and Pan operations.
4.2.1.10.1 The Zoom Operations - In, Out, Fit, Pick
The Zoom operations change the view size of the Working View portion of a child window, but do not
change the model which is being edited. These operations are performed using the
following buttons found on the View toolbar: Zoom In
Zoom To Fit
, Zoom Out
, Zoom Pick
, and
.
These options can also be accessed via the Grafx menus by selecting the menu seqence View > Zoom.
Each time the Zoom In
button is clicked, the view size is reduced by 62%. The center of the view
remains unchanged. Objects in the model which are visible appear correspondingly larger, but are not
actually modified; remember that this operation merely magnifies a portion of the graphic for the convenience of the configurer. If the view has been fully zoomed in, no further change occurs to the view size.
Each time the Zoom Out
button is clicked, the view size is enlarged by 62%. The center of the view
remains unchanged. Objects in the model which are visible appear correspondingly smaller, but are not
actually modified; this operation simply allows the entire graphic to be displayed in the Working View for
the convenience of the configurer. If the view has been fully zoomed out, no further change occurs to the
view size.
Click on the Zoom To Fit
button to adjust the view size by automatically "zooming out" or "zooming
in" so that the entire model is visible and fills the Working View. If there are no objects outside the default
view size (100 units by 75 units), the view size will not change (i.e., the view will not "zoom in" in order to
make the objects present fill the Working View). When a model is initially loaded into the Working View, a
Zoom To Fit operation is automatically performed. (This is also done when an installed graphic is displayed in an Operator Window.)
The dimensions of the default view size are enclosed in a rectangle composed of solid lines. When zooming or panning outside the default view dimensions, this rectangle or portions thereof may be visible within
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the Working View. This rectangle is for reference only; it is not part of the model and will not be visible
when the graphic is displayed in an Operator Window.
The Zoom Pick
button allows the user to select the diagonal corners (e.g., lower left and upper right
corners) of a box representing the desired view size. The rectangle resulting from these selections is called
the zoom box. If a zoom box smaller than the minimum view size is selected, the minimum view size is
used, with the same center as the selected zoom box.
✎
Note
The contents of the Working View after a Zoom Pick operation
may not reflect exactly the contents of the zoom box used to make
the selection. This is because the Working View is restricted to an
Aspect Ratio of 4 (wide) by 3 (high), while the zoom box is not. In
order to reconcile the two, the 4 x 3 Aspect Ratio is applied to the
largest dimension of the zoom box selected by the user.
4.2.2 The Toolbars
Three toolbars are provided with the Grafx editor: the Shape toolbar, the Main toolbar and the View toolbar.
These movable docking toolbars are typically deployed as shown in Figure 4-1.
To detach a toolbar from the frame of the Grafx editor window:
1. Position the tip of the pointer in open space on the toolbar.
2. Press and hold the left mouse button while dragging the toolbar to the desired location.
When detached from the window frame, a toolbar has its own title bar and exit button. It can be reshaped
by dragging on the edges of the toolbar window.
The View menu can be used to control the visibility of toolbars. A check mark next to the toolbar name indicates the item is visible. Click on menu items to toggle them on and off.
4.2.3 The Status Bar
The status bar is located at the bottom of the Grafx window. Information about operations in the active child
window is displayed in the left portion of the status bar.
The Select, Depth, and Cursor information fields are also located in the status bar. The Select field reflects
the number of objects on the screen which the user has selected (clicked on), and which will consequently
be affected by any configuration action. The Depth field indicates how deep within Groups an object can be
selected. The Cursor field provides the coordinates of the pointer in the active child window.
The View menu can be used to control the visibility of the status bar. A check mark next to the Status Bar
option on the View menu indicates that it is visible. Click on this menu item to toggle between the On and
Off states for the status bar.
4.2.4 The Shape Toolbar
The Shape toolbar provides tools to create objects, select existing objects, and set the Fill Mode for filled
objects.
When a button is selected, it appears pressed in, and remains so until another button is selected, or until
the right mouse button is clicked while the pointer is in the Working View of a child window.
To create a new object, first select the type of object from the Shape toolbar. In a child window, position the
cursor at a starting point, press and hold the left mouse button, and drag the pointer to define the points of
the object. You can continue to add objects of the selected type until you choose a different toolbar button,
or enter Select mode (e.g., by clicking the right mouse button).
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The following sections provide more detail about Shape toolbar buttons, and how to create objects using
them.
✎
Note
The tools provided on the Shape toolbar can also be accessed via
menus. Select the menu sequence Menu > Shapes to access these
tools via the menu.
4.2.4.1 The Fill Mode Button
The manner in which some Shape toolbar buttons work is affected by the state of the the
Fill Mode
button, which is found at the bottom of the Shape toolbar. Buttons representing closed
objects such as circles, rectangles, polygons and closed splines can be created as filled or unfilled objects.
When this button appears pressed in, fill mode is set to ON, and any closed objects created will be filled in.
The fill color used depends on what Fill color is currently selected in the Settings/Properties windows. This
button appears raised when fill mode is OFF, and any closed objects created in this mode will not be filled.
4.2.4.2 Creating Straight Lines
To create straight lines, select the Line button
. Straight Lines have only two points. If a third point is
picked (clicked on), it is the beginning point of the next Line.
EXAMPLE:
a
b
1. Click the Line button.
2. Position the pointer where the line is to begin, point (a).
3. Press and hold the left mouse button while dragging the pointer.
4. Release the left mouse button at point (b), the end of the line. (The line appears on the
screen.)
5. Repeat Steps 2 through 4 to create more lines if necessary, or terminate the procedure.
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4.2.4.3 Creating Rectangles
Rectangles are created using the Rectangle button
rectangle.
and choosing two opposing corners for each
EXAMPLE:
a
b
1. Click the Rectangle button.
2. Position the pointer where the first corner of the rectangle is to be placed (a).
3. Press and hold the left mouse button while dragging the pointer to the second (opposite)
corner of the rectangle (b).
4. Release the left mouse button. (The rectangle appears on the screen.)
5. Repeat steps 2 through 4 to create more rectangles if necessary, or terminate the procedure.
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4.2.4.4 Creating Circles
Circles are created using on the Circle button
picking the center and a point on the edge.
. The location and size of the Circle are indicated by
EXAMPLE:
a
b
1. Click the Circle button.
2. Position the pointer over the point chosen to be the center of the circle (a).
3. Press and hold the left mouse button, while dragging the pointer to the location for the edge of
the circle (b). Release the left mouse button. (A circle appears on the screen.)
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 to create more circles if necessary, or terminate the procedure.
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4.2.4.5 Creating Markers
Markers are created using the Marker button
. Markers are small characters used to indicate positions of single points. Markers are used while constructing objects to help in placement. They are created
by picking (clicking on) points in the Working View.
EXAMPLE:
c
d
a
b
1. Click the Marker button.
2. Position the pointer over the location for the marker (a), then click the left mouse button.
(A marker appears on the screen.)
3. Repeat step 2 to create more markers (b,c,d) if necessary, or terminate the procedure.
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4.2.4.6 Creating Polylines
Polylines add straight lines to a model. Polylines differ from lines in that lines have only two points, while
polylines can have more than two points connected by straight lines. Polylines are created using the
Polyline button
then choosing a starting point, then as many additional points as needed. A straight
line is displayed between each pair of points chosen.
EXAMPLE:
b
a
c
d
1. Click the Polyline button.
2. Click on the first point (a), followed by the second (b), third (c) and fourth (d) points, (and so
on).
3. Terminate the procedure by choosing the Select Objects button, a different toolbar button, or
by clicking the right mouse button.
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4.2.4.7 Creating Splines
Splines are created using the Spline button
. The Grafx editor uses the points picked to make the
smoothest appearing curved Line (the Spline) which passes through these points. Points are connected by
a Polyline as they are selected. When the procedure is ended (by clicking on the Select Objects button,
another object button, or clicking the right mouse button), the Polyline is redrawn as a Spline.
EXAMPLE:
1. Click the Spline button.
2. Click on the first point (a), then click on the second point (b), third point (c), and so on.
3. Terminate the procedure by choosing the Select Objects button, a different toolbar button, or
by clicking the right mouse button. The polyline connecting the chosen points is replaced by a
spline.
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4.2.4.8 Creating Closed Splines
Closed splines are created using the Closed Spline button
. The Grafx editor connects the points
with a polyline until another button is selected, or until the right mouse button is clicked while the pointer is
in the Working View of a child window. This signals the editor to close (connect the end points) the polyline
and convert it to a closed spline.
EXAMPLE:
1. Click on the Closed Spline button.
2. Click on the first point (a), then click on the second (b), third (c), and fourth (d) points, and so
on.
3. Terminate the procedure by choosing the Select Objects button, a different toolbar button, or
by clicking the right mouse button. The Polyline connecting the chosen points is replaced by a
Closed Spline.
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4.2.4.9 Creating Arcs
An arc is created using the Arc button
. Arcs are portions of a circle and are constructed by picking
the two endpoints of the arc, then picking a point along the edge of the arc.
EXAMPLE:
1. Click on the Arc button.
2. Click on the first endpoint of the arc (a).
3. Click on the second endpoint of the arc (b).
4. Click on a point along the edge of the arc (c). An arc will appear on the screen.
5. Repeat steps 2, 3 and 4 to construct additional arcs if necessary, or terminate the procedure.
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4.2.4.10 Creating Polygons
Polygons are created using the Polygon button
. Polygons are many-edged objects which can be
added to a model. Polygons can appear as triangles, trapezoids, or any shape composed of straight
edges. The Grafx editor automatically connects the first point chosen with the last point.
EXAMPLE:
B
C
A
D
E
TP81044A
1. Click the Polygon button.
2. Click on the first point (a).
3. Click on the second point (b).
4. Click on the third point (c), and so on.
5. Terminate the procedure by choosing the Select Objects button, a different toolbar button, or
by clicking the right mouse button. The first and last points are automatically connected, and
the polyline connecting the chosen points is replaced by a polygon.
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4.2.4.11 Creating Text Objects
There are two selections on the Shape toolbar for creating Text objects, the Text and Text Rectangle buttons. Text-only objects are added using
the Text button
. Text is any printable character entered from the keyboard. A text object is created
by clicking on a point in the Working View where the text is to be positioned. Next, enter characters using
the keyboard.
EXAMPLE:
This text is center justified.
1. Click the Text button.
2. Pick the point to position the text.
3. Enter the characters (type them in via the keyboard, then press the ENTER key).
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 to enter additional text objects.
5. Terminate the procedure by choosing a different toolbar button, or by clicking the right mouse
button.
Modifications to the text attributes can be made using the Settings and Properties windows, which are
described in Section 4.2.5, Configuring the Graphic Attributes of Objects. To modify the content of a text
object after it has been created, double-click on the text object, then make the changes in the text entry
box which appears in the status bar. Use the Expand Entry button on the status bar for editing text with
multiple lines.
✎
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Note
You can also use the General tab on the Properties window to enter
multi-line text objects. See Section 4.2.5.2, The Properties Window,
for information on this feature.
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4.2.4.12 Creating Text Rectangles
Text Rectangles are created using the Text Rectangle button
with text written on top of them.
. Text Rectangles are filled rectangles
Text Rectangles are created by picking the two opposing corners for the rectangle and entering text followed by RETURN. To change Text attributes, use the TEXT tab in the Settings window or the Properties window before the corners of the Rectangle are picked, or after text is entered.
✎
Note
Text is not prevented from appearing outside of a Text Rectangle.
Text appearing outside the filled Rectangle is not erased when Text
inside the Rectangle is changed. It is important that a large enough
Text Rectangle be used. Use the Properties window to enter
multi-line text, or click on the Expand Entry button
status bar.
in the
EXAMPLE:
TEXT
1. Click the Text Rectangle button.
2. Modify text attributes, if necessary (see Section 4.2.5.2, The Properties Window and Section
4.2.5.1, The Settings Window).
3. Position the pointer where you want the first corner of the rectangle.
4. Press and hold the left mouse button, then drag the pointer to the location of the second,
opposite corner; release the mouse button to complete the rectangle. A filled rectangle
appears on the screen.
5. Enter characters. (Text appears positioned within the rectangle.)
6. Repeat steps 2 through 5 to configure additional text rectangles.
7. Terminate the procedure by choosing a different toolbar button, or by clicking the right mouse
button.
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4.2.4.13 Creating Submodels
Graphics can be composed of objects (such as rectangles, lines and circles), and Submodels (such as
valves and pumps). A submodel is a Model (collection of objects) which has been saved using the Model
Type "submodel". (The Model Type can be defined using the Edit > Model Type sequence from the Grafx
window menu bar.) Including a submodel in a graphic is referred to as making an instance of the submodel. There can be many instances of the same submodel in a graphic.
Submodels have their own attributes (such as fill color and edge color). These attributes can be dynamic.
The submodels created with the Grafx editor are external submodels; when the submodel itself is altered,
all models containing instances of that submodel will reflect the change. Submodels cannot be altered
directly from the Settings or Properties windows; instead, both static and dynamic attributes of submodels
are altered using selections from the Dynamics menu. (See Section 4.3, Dynamics, for further information
on this topic.)
Submodels are accessed using the Submodel button
in the Shape toolbar. Selecting this button
causes the Select Submodel window to appear. An example window, with a submodel selected, is shown
in Figure 4-2).
Figure 4-2. Submodel Selection Window
A drop-down combo box allows you to select from the following model types: Offline Submodels, Installed
Submodels and Micro-DCI Submodels. When a model type is selected, a list of submodels available for
that model type will appear in the list box area of the window.
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Model types include the following:
Off-Line
Submodels
Off-Line Submodels include all user-configured, uninstalled submodels
available on the system. (See the sub-section Section 4.2.9.1, File Types:
Installed and Off-line Graphic and Submodel Files, for a discussion of these
types of submodels.)
Installed
Submodels
Installed Submodels include all user-configured submodels which have
been installed on the system, via the INSTALL option (available from the
File option on the menu bar of the Grafx window). Only installed submodels
can be used in installed graphics. (For a discussion of these types of
submodels, see the sub-section titled Section 4.2.9.1, File Types: Installed
and Off-line Graphic and Submodel Files.)
Micro-DCI
Submodels
Micro-DCI Submodels are submodels which have been supplied with the
Micro-DCI software. Several different types of Micro-DCI Submodels are
provided; the prefix of the submodel name indicates the type of the
submodel.
Dynamic Micro-DCI Submodels contain pre-configured dynamic attributes. The names of these submodels
are prefixed by the string FP_DY. Dynamic submodels are used:
•
to display dynamic data from the controller database, using various forms such as valves and
bargraphs,
•
for the control of controller modules, and
•
for the assignment of display vectoring.
The assignment of controller database points to the dynamic attributes is accomplished through the Configure Submodel menu. (See the sub-section titled Section 4.3, Dynamics for further information on this
menu.)
The section of this chapter titled Section 4.4, Micro-DCI Submodels includes a complete list of these submodels.
Symbol submodels are standard static submodels, pre-configured and supplied with the Micro-DCI software. Symbols are objects which represent standard items such as vessels, tanks and storage bins. Symbols which correspond to those defined by the Instrument Society of America (ISA) have the prefix ISA_.
Non-ISA symbols contain the prefix FP_ST. The sub-section Section 4.5, Micro-PWC Symbols includes a
complete list of these submodels. Dynamic attributes can be assigned to these submodels via the Dynamic
Attributes menu item. (See the sub-section titled Section 4.3, Dynamics for further information on this
menu.)
Micro-DCI submodels provide the user with access to the same submodels used to create point and group
(hierarchical) displays on the Micro-PWC The names of these submodels are prefixed by the string uFP_.
Section 4.6, Micro-DCI SUBMODELS,includes a complete list of these submodels.
Internal submodels are models used for purposes internal to Micro-DCI console displays, and are prefixed
with the string FP_IN.
4.2.4.13.1 Locating Submodels via the FILTER Option
The Filter option allows the user to search for a particular string of alphanumeric characters occurring in file
names, or for a particular file. The search operation is not case sensitive; lower case letters can be substituted for upper case, and vice versa. Click directly on the Filter entry box. Type in the string or file name for
which to search, then press the ENTER key. Asterisks will automatically be placed at the beginning and end
of the string. The list box will display the names of all files containing the string. For example, searching the
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Micro-DCI Submodels category for the string "*AGIT*" will yield "ISA_AGIT" and "ISA_AGIT_MOTR" in the
list box.
4.2.4.13.2 Creating Submodel Instances
When you create an instance of a submodel (or instantiate a submodel), you select a submodel and place
a version of it in a particular graphic (or another submodel).
✎
Note
If the Preview box is checked, selecting a submodel name causes
that submodel to be displayed in the preview box.
Perform the following operations to create one or more instances of a submodel.
1. Click on the model name in the list box to select it, then click on the Instantiate button (or
double click on the model name in the list).
A model can also be selected by clicking on the Model Name text entry box, typing in the
model name via the keyboard, and pressing ENTER.
2. Move the pointer to the appropriate child window; extent indicators appear to aid in placement
of the submodel.
3. Move the submodel extent indicators to the desired location.
4. Click on the desired location.
5. If multiple instances of the same submodel are desired on the Graphic, repeat steps 3 and 4.
6. Double-click on a submodel instance to open the Submodel Configuration window. See the
section Section 4.3.2, Configuring Submodels for detailed information on this topic.
4.2.5 Configuring the Graphic Attributes of Objects
The graphic attributes of an object can be configured by the user. Examples of such properties are fill color,
line color, line width, font style, text size, and text alignment. The type of attributes available for an object
depend on the type of the object.
Object attributes are controlled via the settings configured in the Settings and Properties windows. The
Settings window is primarily intended to configure attributes that will be used when a new object is created;
it does not necessarily reflect the graphic attributes of selected objects. If objects are selected when
changes to the settings are made, however, the changes will also affect the selected objects. The Properties window is used to display or change the attributes of a single, selected object.
The Settings window is non-modal; it can be left open indefinitely. It can be closed quickly by double-clicking anywhere in the window. If the Settings window is open when the Properties window is opened, it will
be closed automatically.
The Properties window is modal. It can be closed quickly by double-clicking anywhere in the window.
4.2.5.1 The Settings Window
The Settings window is opened by clicking on the Fill Settings
Text Settings
, BG Color
or Grid Style
niently grouped together on the Main toolbar.
, Line Settings
,
buttons. Note that these buttons are conve-
The Settings window can also be opened using Grafx menu options. Select the sequence View > Settings,
then choose one of the following options: Fill, Line, Text, Background or Grid.
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The Settings window (Figure 4-3) contains a tab for each of these attributes; each tab display contains all
the available settings for the selected attribute. Which toolbar button used to open the Settings window
determines which tab is selected when the Settings window opens. In Figure 4-3, for example, the Settings
window was opened by clicking on the Fill button on the Main toolbar. You can use the tab buttons to move
between attribute setting displays without closing the Settings window.
Figure 4-3. The Settings Window
4.2.5.1.1 Setting the Fill Attributes
If Fill Mode is on when a closed object (e.g., circles, rectangles, and so on) is created, it will be filled. (The
Fill Mode button is found on the Shape toolbar, as described previously.) The Fill Color and Pattern used
to fill closed objects are determined by the selections made using the Fill display on the Settings window.
4.2.5.1.2 Fill Pattern Selection
An assortment of fill patterns, including None and Solid, is provided on the Fill display of the Settings window. This feature allows you to specify the fill pattern for selected and/or subsequent objects.
Examples of available Fill Patterns are displayed in rectangles, each accompanied by an indicator box.
The Fill Pattern is changed by clicking on either the rectangle containing the desired Fill Pattern, or on the
indicator box next to it. The indicator box of the selected Fill Pattern is filled in, and any selected objects
will reflect the change. The Fill Pattern remains in effect for all objects created subsequently, until a different selection is made.
4.2.5.1.3 Fill Color Selection
Two hundred fifty-six colors are available, numbered 0 through 255. These are contained on eight pages of
32 colors each, which are displayed one page at a time. To move between the pages of color buttons, use
the arrow buttons
found in the Fill Color settings display. Click on a color button; all selected objects
will be changed to the selected color. The selected color remains in effect for all closed objects created
subsequently, until a different color selection is made.
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Colors 32 through 255 appear in black by default. Definitions for colors 32 through 95 can be altered by the
user via the Edit Colors button
. (For further information on colors, see the sub-section Section
4.2.9.2.10, Color File, which discusses use of the Color File option on the File menu.)
4.2.5.1.4 Creating Custom Color Definitions
The Edit Colors button is used to view and modify the color definitions for colors with index numbers 32
through 95. Click on one of these color buttons, then click on the Edit Colors button to display the Edit
Colors window (Figure 4-4).
Figure 4-4. Edit Colors Window
The upper left corner of the Edit Colors window contains the index number of the color to be defined.
Each available color is created using the three primary colors (red, green and blue) in varying intensities. A
value from 0 to 255 is used to define the intensity of each primary color. Three color definition boxes in the
primary colors red, green and blue appear on the right side of the main display portion of the Edit Colors
window. Each color definition box contains a horizontal slider with an entry box above it. The entry box
contains a number from 0 to 255 (inclusive), which reflects the location of the slider and the current value
for that primary color's intensity.
Thus, a color definition is composed of three values. For example, a color definition with a value of 0 (zero)
for all three color intensities produces the color black (all sliders positioned at the extreme left); a value of
255 for all three color intensities yields white (all sliders positioned at the extreme right); a color definition
of RED = 255, GREEN = 255, BLUE = 0 produces yellow, and so on.
A sample color box is located at the bottom left of the main display portion of the Edit Colors window. Initially this sample color box reflects the color of the selected object (if any), or the last color to be defined.
The sample color box changes color as the color definitions are adjusted, providing immediate feedback
regarding the result of the color mix. The name of the color (or an identifying string) will appear in the text
entry box to the right of the sample color block. Alternatively, in the text entry box type the name of the
color or the identifier of the color (if known), followed by ENTER to change to that color.
With the Edit Colors window displayed, select a color index number by clicking on a color button (from colors 32 through 255) in the Color Attribute Panel. The current color definition for that color button is dis-
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played. To modify the color, use the mouse to drag the sliders in one or more of the three color definition
boxes, or change the value in the color definition entry box(es). Alternatively, click on the left or right arrow
buttons
found below the sliders to decrement or increment the values for each of the three
primary colors by 3 with each click, until the minimum or maximum value has been reached for all colors.
The result of each change is reflected in the color sample box. Objects previously drawn with the selected
color index can be redrawn using the new color by clicking on the OK or Apply button, and then clicking on
Redraw. Use of the Apply button allows the user to define colors for additional color indexes without leaving the Edit Colors window. Modifications to color indexes 32 through 95 can be saved permanently by
clicking the Save button.
Alternatively, pre-defined colors can be selected from the listbox which occupies the left side of the main
display portion of the Edit Colors window. Use the scrollbar on the list box to view available colors and their
names; click on the desired entry to select it.
✎
Note
Modifications to colors 32 through 95 will take effect only in those
Operator Windows which are opened after the new color
configuration has been saved.
4.2.5.1.5 Setting the Line Attributes
When the Lines tab in the Settings window lets you set the desired width and style of a line or the edge of
an object. This display is used to select from six widths and five styles. To select a style for a line or edge
of an object, click on the example or on the indicator box next to the example. The indicator box next to the
selected style or width is filled in, and the selected line(s) or edge of the selected object(s) will reflect the
change. Only one edge style and one edge width can be in effect at any one time. These attributes will
remain in effect for all subsequent objects, until a different selection is made.
4.2.5.1.6 Setting the Text Attributes
The Text tab of the Settings window lets you control the following characteristics (attributes) of the text
objects: size, font, direction, alignment and text color.
Text Size is changed by moving the Size slider. Move it to the right to increase the font size, or move it left
to decrease the font size.
Text Font is changed using the Font drop-down combo box. Click on the drop-down arrow to display a
drop-down menu of available fonts. Click on a font name in the list to select it. The selected name will be
displayed in the text box portion of the combo box.
Text Direction (Vertical or Horizontal) is changed by clicking on the appropriate direction arrow (right arrow
or down arrow) labelled dir. The arrows indicate in which direction the selected text is to be displayed.
The Text Alignment setting determines the offset of the Text object, relative to the point chosen for positioning the Text object in the model or graphic. By default, a text object is left aligned; that is, when text is
entered, the point selected to position the object is the starting point for the text and as text is entered, it
flows to the right. A grid of nine position points allows you specify where the original positioning point will
remain, relative to the text object. The selected alignment setting remains in effect for all text objects created subsequently, until a different selection is made.
To edit the content of existing text, double-click on the text object, then make the changes in the text entry
box which appears in the status bar.
Use the Expand Entry button
on the status bar for editing text with multiple lines.
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4.2.5.1.7 Setting the Background Color
Black is the default background color for graphic displays and models. This may not be the ideal choice in
all circumstances; for example, you may wish to use the background color of a graphic to identify the plant
area to which the graphic applies.
The BG tab of the Settings window is used to change the background color of the graphic being configured. To change the background color of the graphic in the active child window, click on the button representing the desired color from the palette. The background of the graphic will change to that color. (For
more detailed information on use of the color palette, see the sub-section Section 4.2.5.1.3, Fill Color
Selection.)
The background color is assigned during configuration. If the user decides to change the background
color, the graphic must be reconfigured and installed again; that is, the background color cannot be
changed while the graphic is on display in an Operator Window. Note that when configuring dynamic submodels, background color is configurable as the erase color, the color used to replace portions of the drawings when they are removed from the submodel. When a color is assigned to a submodel via the BG tab
on the Settings window, the following message will be displayed in the status bar:
erase color = n
where n is the number of the color selected from the color palette. When an instance of a submodel is
made on a graphic, the instance assumes the background color of the graphic. When portions of the submodel are erased, the background color assigned during submodel configuration is displayed in place of
the original color used. A good example of this is a dynamic submodel such as a tank when used in a
larger graphic display. As the level decreases in the tank, the color representing the ingredients is replaced
by the background color selected for the tank, instead of the background color of the graphic.
✎
Note
This feature is for use only on graphic displays, and does not allow
the user to change the background color of other display types
(such as Point, Group, Trend and Summary displays, and so on).
The background colors of these display types were chosen to
provide the best contrast with other colors used in these displays.
4.2.5.1.8 Setting the Grid Attributes
The grid used in the Working View area of a child window aids in the construction of models. Use the grid
as you would a piece of graph paper, as a guide in designing objects. The grid size, line style (lines, dots,
hidden) and grid color can all be configured using the Grid tab on the Settings window.
Configurable attributes for the grid are style, size, and color. The grid style is selected from a drop-down
combo box. The choices are Lines, Dots and Hidden.
Grid size choices are 1x1, 2x2 and NxN. The numbers represent Working View units; the default Working
View is 100 units wide by 75 units high, regardless of the size of the window or the display screen. The 1x1
option will cause the grid to reflect this and divide the Working View into 100 units by 75 units. The 2x2
option provides a grid with a line drawn every two units. To make the selection, click on either the description or the associated indicator box.
The choice NxN allows you to specify the size of the units which compose the grid. When this option is
selected, the text entry box associated with it becomes available. Enter a value from 0.2 to 10 in this text
entry box. The grid size will be adjusted accordingly. If a value outside these limits is entered, the grid will
be resized using the closest available size. For example, if 500 is entered, the 10x10 grid size will be used.
To change the color of the grid in the active child window, choose a button from the Grid Color palette. The
grid lines will change to the selected color. Two hundred fifty-six colors are available, numbered 0 through
255. These are contained on eight pages of 32 colors each, which are displayed one page at a time. To
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move between the pages of color buttons, use the arrow buttons
found in the Grid Color settings
display. The selected color remains in effect for all child windows opened subsequently, until a different
color selection is made.
Although the grid is useful by itself, it is much more powerful when Snap mode is set to the Grid selection.
(Snap mode is a valuable tool which aids in selecting points and aligning objects. Snapping helps select
the same or similar points while building objects. For more detailed information on use of the color palette,
see Section 4.2.1.6, Snap Mode.)
4.2.5.2 The Properties Window
The Properties window is used to display or change the attributes of a single, selected object. To open the
Properties window, position the pointer over a single object, click the right mouse button, then select the
Properties option from the resulting pop-up menu. If some properties do not apply to the selected object,
(for example, text attributes do not apply to a line object), the corresponding tab in the Properties window
cannot be selected.
✎
Note
The Properties window can also be accessed via the Grafx menus.
To do so, select the menu sequence Edit > Object > Properties.
Fill, Line and Text properties for a selected object are configured as described above for the corresponding
features in the Settings window.
A set of attributes unique to the Properties window is accessed via the General tab. Items included on this
tab display include the Type, Text and Name for the selected object.
The object Type is not configurable; it simply reports the type of object which has been selected.
The Text entry box is used to modify the text content, and is only available when a Text or Text Rectangle
object is selected.
The Name text entry box is used to assign a name to the individual object for purposes of identification.
The object Name is also used with the Select By Name option on the Edit menu, described below in Section 4.2.9.3, The EDIT Pull-down Menu.
4.2.6 Selecting and Manipulating Objects
The Grafx editor allows you to select and manipulate objects, typically via operations similar to those used
by other Windows-based applications. Such Grafx editor operations include moving, copying, resizing,
deleting objects, and selecting multiple objects.
The selection and manipulation of graphic objects is performed with the Grafx editor in Select mode. (The
arrow button on the Shape toolbar appears to be pressed in.)
4.2.6.1 Selecting Individual Objects
To select an individual object, position the pointer over it, then click the left mouse button.
Alternatively, from the menu bar select the sequence Edit > Select By Name. Enter the object's name in
the resulting pop-up window, then click OK.
4.2.6.2 Selecting Multiple Objects
To select multiple objects, press and hold the SHIFT key, then click on each object you want to add to the list
of selected objects (sometimes referred to as the Select List). The number of objects which have been
selected is shown by the Sel indicator in the status bar.
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If an object has been selected, clicking on it a second time (while holding down the SHIFT key) will remove it
from the Select List).
Objects can also be selected by extent. To select objects by this method, click on a starting location, then
press and hold the left mouse button until the resulting box encloses all of the objects to be selected. When
the mouse button is released, all the objects totally within the extent of the box are selected.
To deselect all objects, click on the Select arrow button in the Shape toolbar, or position the pointer on an
empty area of the Working View and click the right mouse button.
4.2.6.3 Grouping and Ungrouping Objects
A group of objects and/or submodels can be configured so that they are all affected by the same operations (e.g., Move, Delete) or expressions1. (Grouping should be done prior to selecting the Dynamic
Attributes item, described in Section 4.3, Dynamics sub-section.) Holding the SHIFT key down, click on all
objects that are to be grouped; the number of objects which have been selected is shown by the Sel indicator in the status bar. When all objects to be grouped have been selected, click on the
Group button
on the View toolbar.
A group can be changed back to a collection of individual objects. Click on the group to select it, then click
on the Ungroup button
on the View toolbar to remove all objects from the group. Any dynamics
attached to the group via the Dynamic Attributes entry will be deleted.
✎
Note
The Group and UnGroup features can also be accessed via the
Grafx menus, by selecting the sequence Edit > Grouping.
4.2.6.4 Depth and Grouped Objects
A collection of objects can be saved as a group. This group in turn can become part of another group, and
so on. The use of groups within groups gives rise to the concept of depth.
The Select Deeper button
on the View toolbar permits selection of objects within a Group. Each
time this button is clicked on, the Depth= indicator in the status bar is incremented by one. This number
indicates how deep within Groups an object can be selected. The default level is 0. A level of 1 permits
selecting objects within Groups, a level of 2 allows selecting an object which is inside of a Group which is
inside of another Group, and so on.
To reset the depth to the default of 0, click on the Select arrow button in the Shape toolbar, or position the
pointer on an empty area of the Working View and click the right mouse button.
4.2.6.5 The Extent of an Object
The extent of an object, also known as an extent rectangle, is the smallest rectangle, with a horizontal
base, which completely encloses all parts of an object. The extent of an object is used to determine the
location of the object's center; thus the center of any object is also the center of the object's extent.
1. Expressions are useful if an object's attributes should change under one or more conditions. Expressions are discussed in
Section 4.3, Dynamics subsection.
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4.2.6.6 Moving an Object
Position the pointer over an object; the pointer will change to a compass (NSEW) or four-headed arrow
shape. Press and hold the left mouse button while dragging the object to the new location, then release the
left mouse button.
Alternatively, you can position the pointer over the object to be moved, then press and hold the right mouse
button while dragging the extent indicators to the new location. Release the right mouse button. Select
Move Here from the resulting pop-up menu.
The operations move an object by its extent. It is also possible to choose a specific point in an object and
move it to a specific location. See Section 4.2.7, Point Operations, for further information.
4.2.6.7 Copying an Object
Any of the following methods can be used to copy an object.
Method 1
1. Click on an object to select it; click on the Copy button, then the Paste button
from the
Main toolbar. Four extent indicators appear around the pointer. The indicators represent the
extent of the object(s) to be copied, while the pointer represents the reference point or center
of the object's extent.
2. Place the pointer on the location which is to be the new center of the object and release the
mouse button. A copy of the object is displayed in the new location.
3. Click Paste and repeat the positioning operation for each additional copy of the object
needed. This operation will also work if the Cut button
on the Main toolbar is used
instead of the Copy button, if the original object is to be deleted.
Method 2
1. Position the pointer over the object to be moved, then press and hold the right mouse button
while dragging the extent indicators to the new location.
2. Release the right mouse button.
3. Select Copy Here from the resulting pop-up menu.
Method 3
1. Hold down the CTRL key while dragging an object to a new location.
2. A copy of the object will be made in the new location.
When the pointer is moved to the Working View area, four extent indicators appear. The indicators represent the extent of the object(s) to be copied, with the pointer positioned to represent the center or reference point of the extent.
4.2.6.8 Scaling (Resizing) an Object
Scaling (or resizing) is the action of making objects larger or smaller. To resize an object, position the
pointer over the object, then click the left mouse button to select it. A box appears around the object to indicate that it is selected. Resize handles, displayed as small squares, appear at each corner and at the midpoint of each side of the box. Click on one of the resize handles shown on the selected item, and drag it to
a new position. When a handle is being dragged, the opposite handle is used as an anchor point.
By default, scaling is unequal; that is, objects can be distorted as they are scaled. For example, if a circle is
scaled unequally, an ellipse is created.
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When scaled equally, objects are increased or decreased in height or width by the same proportion. To
scale an object equally in both the X and Y dimensions, press and hold the SHIFT key prior to selecting a
handle.
To scale an object relative to its center, press and hold the CTRL key prior to selecting the resize handle. To
scale an object equally around its center, press and hold both the SHIFT and CTRL keys while dragging one of
the object's resize handles.
4.2.6.8.1 Changing an Object's Reference Point
Each object has one reference point. By default, the reference point of an object is defined as the center of
the object's extent. The Rotate option (described in the following sub-section) makes use of an object's reference point.
To change the reference point of a selected object, position the pointer on the object and click the right
mouse button. From the resulting pop-up menus, select the sequence Points > Change Ref then click on a
point other than the center of the object. If a single object is on the Select List when the Change Ref function is invoked, this change in reference point remains in effect permanently for the instance of that submodel in the graphic. If more than one object has been selected, however, the change in reference point is
in effect only while the objects are selected.
Use the Reset Ref option on the Points pop-up menu to set the reference point of each object on the
Select List back to its default, the center of the object's extent.
The reference point can be used in conjunction with Point Snap mode to aid in the placement and interconnection of objects and submodels on a graphic. See Section 4.2.8, Object Placement Example.
4.2.6.9 Rotating an Object
The Rotate feature rotates selected objects. An object rotates around its reference point, which by default
is the center of the object's extent. Position the pointer on the object to be rotated, then click the right
mouse button. Choose Rotate from the resulting pop-up menu.
A dashed reference line appears, with the left end of this line at the object's reference point. The reference
line is an aid for choosing the angle of rotation. The angle to rotate the selected object(s) is chosen by
clicking a point relative to the reference point and reference line. The number of degrees between the reference line and the selected point, calculated counterclockwise, determines the angle of rotation.
✎
Note
The Rotate feature can also be accessed using the Grafx menus by
selecting the menu sequence Edit > Object > Rotate.
4.2.6.10 Changing the Drawing Order of Objects
The Raise button
on the VIEW toolbar is used to modify the order in which objects are drawn on the
screen. Objects are normally drawn in the order in which the user created them. If two objects overlap, the
object which was created more recently is drawn later, and therefore appears on top of (and obscuring) the
older object.
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Use the Raise button to put the currently selected object(s) at the end of the drawing order; they will then
be drawn last, and will appear "on top" of all other objects which overlap.
✎
Note
The above discussion of the Raise button applies to the drawing
order of static objects. However, when a model is displayed in an
Operator Window, and the attributes of an object in the model are
modified according to the dynamics defined for that object (for
example, the object's fill color is changed in response to some
change in a tagname.atom), the object must be redrawn, which
places it on top of other objects. For this reason, it is recommended
that no objects be placed on "top" of dynamic objects. If it is
necessary to do so, dynamics must be also configured for the
objects "on top", so that all objects involved are redrawn when a
dynamic change occurs.
The Lower button
on the VIEW toolbar performs in a manner opposite to that of the Raise button.
Use the Lower button to put the currently selected object(s) at the beginning of the drawing order; they will
then be drawn first, and will appear "beneath" all other objects which overlap.
✎
Note
The Raise and Lower features can also be accessed via the Grafx
menus, by selecting the menu sequence Edit > Order.
4.2.6.11 Reversing an Object
An object (or set of objects that have been grouped together) can be reversed horizontally or vertically. To
reverse an object horizontally, select the item, then click on the Flip Left-To-Right button
on the
View toolbar. The item will be converted to a mirror image of the original. For example, Figure 4-5 shows a
polygon (on the left) and a copy (on the right) which was reversed using the Flip Left-To-Right button.
Figure 4-5. Object and Copy Reversed with Flip Left-to-Right Button
Objects (or a set of grouped objects) can also reversed vertically, using the Flip Upside-Down button
from the View toolbar. When an object is selected and this button is clicked, the object will be
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inverted, top to bottom. Figure 4-6 illustrates an arc (at left) and a copy (at right) which was inverted using
the Flip Upside-Down button.
Figure 4-6. Object and Copy Inverted with Flip Upside-Down Button
In both cases, the object or group is reversed about the center of its extent, so that the extent box of the
selected object or group is the same, both before and after flipping.
✎
Note
Using either of these buttons with a text object that:
•
uses any font other than VECTOR1
•
is not center aligned
and
can produce unexpected and undesirable results. (For example,
repeatedly reversing such an object will cause it to eventually
migrate across the Working View.)
Both Flip features can be accessed from the Grafx menus by selecting the sequence Edit > Flip.
4.2.6.12 Deleting an Object
To delete an object, click on it to select it, then press the DELETE key on the keyboard. Alternatively, click on
an object to select it, then click the right mouse button. Click on the Delete option on the resulting pop-up
menu.
4.2.7 Point Operations
Individual points in an object can be used to position the object. It is also possible to move points within an
object, add points to an object and delete points from an object. To access point operations, place the
pointer over an object and click the right mouse button. The operations are available from the resulting
pop-up menu. (This menu can also be accessed via the Grafx menus, using the selection sequence Edit >
Object.)
✎
Note
If an operation is not available for an object, the menu entry for it is
stippled out. For example, points cannot be added to a rectangle.
Therefore, when you click the right mouse button with the pointer
over a rectangle, then select the Points option on the pop-up menu,
the Add Point menu option is stippled out on the resulting cascading
menu.
4.2.7.1 Moving an Object in Point Mode
When an object is moved as described in Section 4.2.6.6, Moving an Object, it is moved by extent, relative
to the pointer's location when the object was selected (that is, when the left mouse button was clicked). An
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object can also be moved in point mode. In this mode, a specific gravity point in an object, or a point in an
object's extent can be positioned in a specific location.
To move an object in this mode, place the pointer over the object, then click the right mouse button. From
the resulting pop-up menu, select one of the following:
•
Move (By Grav Pnts)
•
Move (By Extent Box)
Selecting Move (By Grav Pnts) causes handles to be drawn on each of the gravity points and the reference point (if defined), in the selected object. Note that the handles will be drawn as circles, rather than
squares, to distinguish them from the resize handles that are normally drawn when an object is selected.
With the Snap To Grid button on the Main toolbar selected, you can then select a gravity point in the
object and move it to a new location. This method is useful when you want to realign a specific point in an
object with the grid. You can also double-click on a point to open a pop-up window that allows you to enter
the coordinates of a new location for the point using the keyboard.
If Move (By Extent Box) is selected, handles will be drawn at each corner of an object's extent box, at the
midpoints of each side of the extent box, at the center of the object's extent, and (if it is not at the center) at
the reference point of the object. You can then select one of these points and move the object relative to it.
Use the Snap To Grid or Snap To Gravity buttons from the Main toolbar to align the selected object with
the grid or with a gravity point of another object.
Note that these operations will move the selected object without changing its shape. To redefine individual
points in an object, see Section 4.2.7.2, Changing a Point.
4.2.7.2 Changing a Point
The points used to define an object can be moved to change the size and shape of the object. To move
such a point in an object, place the pointer over the object, then click the right mouse button. From the
resulting pop-up menus, select the sequence Points > Change Points. Circular handles drawn over the
points that define the object denote that the object is in point mode. The points can then be dragged to new
locations. This method is useful when you want to align points in an object with specific locations on the
grid.
Double-click on a point to open a pop-up window that allows you to enter the coordinates of a new location
for the point using the keyboard.
4.2.7.3 Adding a Point
To add a point to an object, place the pointer over the object, then click the right mouse button. From the
resulting pop-up menus, select the sequence Points > Add Point. Position the pointer over the location for
the new point and click the left mouse button. The shape of the object will change to include the new point.
4.2.7.4 Deleting a Point
To delete a specific point in an object, place the pointer over (or near) the object, then click the right mouse
button. From the resulting pop-up menus, select the sequence Points > Delete Point. Place the pointer
over (or near) the point to be deleted, and click the left mouse button. the point will be deleted and the
shape of the object changed accordingly.
4.2.8 Object Placement Example
A number of features are available to assist with the arrangement of objects in a submodel or on a graphic.
These include the grid in the Working View of a child window, the Snap To Grid and Snap To Grav buttons, and gravity points in an object and on an object's extent.
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The following example illustrates the steps required to create a submodel instance (Figure 4-7) and align a
specific gravity point (on the center left side of the valve body) of the submodel with the grid.
1. Create an instance of ISA_VLVE_ACTR (Figure 4-7) in a Grafx editor child window. When
created, an object may not be positioned exactly as desired. For example, if Snap Off is
selected when the object is instantiated, or if the object is scaled, it may not be aligned with the
grid; or the wrong gravity point may be aligned with the grid.
Figure 4-7. Model of ISA Standard Actuator Valve Symbol
2. Move the valve to a different position, if necessary.
3. To get a closer view of the object, use the Zoom Pick feature, if necessary.
4. Be sure the grid is displayed; use the Grid tab on the Settings window if necessary.
5. Select the Snap To Grid button on the Main toolbar.
6. With the pointer over the object, click the right mouse button and select Move (By Grav Pnts)
from the resulting pop-up menu. This allows you to see the gravity points of the object.
7. Place the pointer over the gravity point on the center of the left side of the valve body, press
and hold the left mouse button while dragging the gravity point to the desired grid intersection.
Figure 4-8. Actuator Valve Symbols, Initial Location and Corrected Location
This reference point change allows for lines to be easily connected to the sides of the valve body.
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4.2.9 The Menu Bar
The menu bar of the Grafx editor window provides access to numerous Grafx editor features. The pulldown menus are used to perform file operations, editing functions, and adjustments to the Grafx editor
user interface.
4.2.9.1 File Types: Installed and Off-line Graphic and Submodel Files
Two types of graphics and submodels are available on the Micro-DCI console: installed versions and offline versions. Installed graphics and submodels are operational; that is, they are in use on the system.
Having off-line versions of these graphics and submodels permits the user to modify them without affecting
the operational versions.
Once created, a graphic or submodel is saved as a file on the Micro-DCI console. If either the Save or
Save As option is used to store a graphic, for example, the file containing the graphic will be stored as an
off-line graphic in a location on the Micro-DCI hard disk reserved for offline graphics.
Graphics are installed via the installation pop-up window in the Grafx editor (accessed via the sequence
File > Install). An installed graphic is assigned an index number from 1 to 9999 (inclusive) and the installation process moves the file containing the graphic from the off-line disk location (known as a directory) to a
disk location which contains only installed graphics. More than one index number can be assigned to the
same graphic. This index number is used when calling up a graphic for display in an Operator Window.
Only installed submodels can be used in installed graphics. An installed submodel is one which has been
installed via the installation pop-up window in the Grafx editor. The installation process moves the file containing the submodel to the disk location (or directory) which contains only installed submodels. When a
graphic is installed, and contains references to an off-line submodel, the user will be asked if those submodels should also be installed.
All models (whether installed, off-line, graphic or submodel) are distributed to all nodes in the same console group, and the effects of save, install, uninstall and delete operations are evident on all Micro-DCI
consoles in the console group.
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4.2.9.1.1 Graphic and Submodel Type Descriptions
Off-Line
Graphics
Off-Line Graphics include all user-configured, uninstalled graphics available
on the system.
Off-Line
Submodels
Off-Line Submodels include all user-configured, uninstalled submodels
available on the system.
Installed
Graphics
Installed Graphics include all user-configured graphics which have been
installed on the system, via the INSTALL option (available from the File
option on the menu bar of the Grafx editor window).
Installed
Submodels
Installed Submodels include all user-configured submodels which have been
installed on the system, via the INSTALL option (available from the File
option on the menu bar of the Grafx editor window). Only installed
submodels can be used in installed graphics.
Micro-DCI
Submodels
Micro-DCI Submodels are submodels which have been supplied by
MicroMod Automation and contain pre-configured dynamic attributes. These
submodels are used:
•
to display dynamic data from the controller database, using various
forms such as valves and bargraphs,
•
for the control of controller modules, and
•
for the assignment of display vectoring.
The assignment of controller database points to these dynamics is accomplished through the Configure
Submodel menu.
The names of these submodels are prefixed by the string FP_DY. For a complete description of each
Micro-DCI Submodel, see Section 4.4, Micro-DCI Submodels.
Some Micro-PWC Submodels are Symbols, standard static submodels pre-configured and supplied by
MicroMod Automation. These symbols are objects which represent standard items such as vessels, tanks
and storage bins. Symbols which correspond to those defined by the Instrument Society of America (ISA)
have the prefix ISA_. Non-ISA symbols created by MicroMod Automation contain the prefix FP_ST. For a
complete list of Symbols, see Section 4.5, Micro-PWC Symbols. Dynamic attributes can be assigned to
these submodels via the Dynamic Attributes menu item.
Micro-DCI submodels provide the user with access to the same submodels used to create point and group
(hierarchical) displays on the Micro-PWC. The names of these submodels are prefixed by the string uFP_.
For a complete list of Micro-DCI submodels, see Section 4.6, Micro-DCI SUBMODELS.
4.2.9.2 File Operations: The File Pull-down Menu
Click the File option on the menu bar of the Grafx editor window to view the File pull-down menu. The
choices on this menu are used to perform various file operations.
4.2.9.2.1 Opening Files: New and Open
To open a new, empty, unnamed child window, select the option sequence File > New from the Grafx
window menu bar, or click on the corresponding icon on the Main toolbar.
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Click on Open to open an existing graphic or submodel for further configuration. A pop-up window will
appear (Figure 4-9), which prompts in the title bar: Open Model.
Figure 4-9. Open Model Window
Like the Submodel Selection window which it closely resembles, this window is used to specify the type of
model to be opened, and provides a scrollable list box containing the names of all available models of the
chosen model type. The letters at the beginning of names of models supplied by MicroMod Automation
reflect the type of the model, as shown in Table 4-2 below.
Table 4-2. Micro-DCI Submodel Types
MODEL NAME PREFIX
MODEL TYPE
FP_DY_
Dynamic Submodels
FP_ST_
Static Submodels
ISA_
ISA Standard Symbols
FP_IN_
Submodels for internal use
uFP_
Submodels for use with Micro-DCI instruments
It is recommended that user-created submodels be given names different from Micro-DCI Submodels. If
models created by the user are given the same names as those supplied by MicroMod Automation, and
then the user-created models are installed, the user-created models will be used by the Micro-DCI console, and the MicroMod-supplied versions will be ignored. This can create problems in the Hierarchical Displays, other graphics, and submodels which have already been created and which reference the
MicroMod-supplied versions.
To select a model, double-click on the desired filename in the list box, or click on the desired filename to
select it, then click on Open. A model can be selected by clicking on the Model Name field, then typing in
the model name via the keyboard. The Filter edit box can also be used to locate filenames containing a
specific string.
If the Preview check box is selected, an image of the selected submodel appears in the preview box when
a submodel's name is selected.
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4.2.9.2.2 Closing a Child Window
To close the currently active child window, select File > Close. If no changes have been made to the current model, or if the child window is empty, the display will be closed immediately. If changes have been
made, a small pop-up window queries:
Save changes to Graphic?
Click on Yes to save changes, click on No to abandon changes
To cancel the close operation and leave the currently selected child window open, click on Cancel.
4.2.9.2.3 Saving Files - Save and Save As
When changes have been made to the current working graphic or submodel, and have not yet been
saved, an asterisk (*) will be displayed after the filename of the graphic or submodel in the title bar of the
window in which it resides. To save the current working graphic or submodel, click on the Save option on
the File pull-down menu. To rename and save the current working graphic or submodel, click on the Save
As option on the File pull-down menu.
The Save and Save As options will save the graphic or submodel currently in the selected Working View as
an "offline" version; the installed version, if any, will not be modified.
✎
Note
When the Install option is selected, the Save operation is performed
automatically as part of the installation process.
4.2.9.2.4 Installation Operations
Once a model has been configured, it can be installed for use, to be accessed via an Operator Window.
Click on the Install item from the File pull-down menu.
✎
Note
If the model has not yet been saved, a Save As window will be
displayed next. Assign a name to the model using this window. If
the model has already been saved, this step will be omitted.
If submodel has been chosen as the model type, it is installed immediately, and a message in the status
bar advises:
Submodel <name> installed.
If the model to be installed is a graphic, it must be assigned a graphic index number, and the Install
Graphic window is displayed. This window contains the name of the model and text entry boxes used to
enter the graphic index number and title of the model. Click on the desired entry box, then enter information via the keyboard. (To quickly review the list of currently installed graphics, click on the List button.)
✎
Note
If a previously assigned Graphic Index Number is entered, a pop-up
window appears to warn of the conflict, displaying the following
message:
Another graphic is using this index. Replace it?
Click on Yes to replace the existing graphic, or click on No to return
to the Install Graphic pop-up window and enter a different Graphic
Index Number.
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4.2.9.2.5 Applying Submodel Changes - RELOAD and RELOAD ALL
The Reload option on the File pull-down menu is used to reload a currently displayed graphic or submodel
in the Working View of the selected child window, applying any changes that have been made to the submodels referenced by it.
For example, assume that two child windows are open within the Grafx editor window. In child window 1 is
a graphic called BUTTON_PAD which contains 10 pushbuttons, all created using a submodel named
toggle_pb. To change the face color of all buttons which reference this submodel, it is necessary only to
change the configuration of the submodel. To do so, select child window 2 and load the submodel
toggle_pb. Next, change the face color definition via Submodel Configuration (as described in the sub-section Section 4.3.2, Configuring Submodels) and save the changes to the submodel. Note that the
instances of the submodel in the graphic BUTTON_PAD in child window 1 still reflect the original button
face color. Select child window 1, then click on Reload in the File menu. The face color will be changed on
all pushbuttons which reference the submodel toggle_pb.
✎
Note
A graphic or submodel must have a name (i.e., it must have been
saved) before the Reload operation can be performed successfully
on it.
If several child windows are open which reference the same submodel, it is necessary to use the Reload
All menu option to update the multiple windows.
4.2.9.2.6 Listing Component Models - CROSS REF
Click on the sequence File > Cross Ref to display a cross reference list of all MicroMod and user-defined
models which:
•
are used as components of the current model
•
which use the current model as a component
The Cross Reference window displays the model name and, if it is an installed graphic, the index number
under which it is installed. The list of submodels which are components of the current model are found in a
list box labelled References To. The list of models which use the current submodel as a component are
found in a list box labelled Referenced By.
Clicking on the name of a referenced model opens a new child window containing that model.
Click on Close to remove this pop-up window from the screen.
4.2.9.2.7 Deleting Models - DELETE
To delete a model (off-line or installed, graphic or submodel), click on the Delete option from the File menu.
The Delete Model window is displayed.
Select the model category (Offline Submodel, Installed Submodel, and so on). In the list box, click on the
item to be deleted. (If the Preview check box is selected, an image of the selected submodel appears in
the preview box.) Click the DELETE button. A pop-up window will appear which states:
Looking for references to submodel.
If Cancel is clicked, the search will be terminated. If Cancel is not clicked, the operation will continue. If no
references to the installed submodel(s) are found, the window will close and the submodel(s) will be
deleted. If references are found, the Cancel pop-up window will close and a WARNING pop-up window will
appear with text similar to the following:
WARNING! <submodel name> is referenced by:
graphics: <reference_1>, <reference_2>, <reference_3>
submodels: <reference_1>, <reference_2>, <reference_3>
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Delete <submodel name>?
Click on No to exit without deleting the submodel, or click on Yes to delete it.
✎
Note
Once the submodel is deleted, it will no longer be available for use
by other submodels and graphics which reference it.
To delete multiple models, press and hold the CTRL key while clicking on each item to be deleted. Alternatively, to delete a range of models, press and hold the SHIFT key while selecting the first and last items in the
range. If multiple installed submodels have been selected for deletion, this sequence of "looking for references" and listing any references found will be repeated for each installed submodel.
4.2.9.2.8 Uninstalling a Model - UNINSTALL
The Uninstall option is used to remove a graphic from operational use. To do so, select the sequence File
> Uninstall. The Uninstall Model window (Figure 4-10) will be displayed.
Figure 4-10. Uninstall Model Window
Select the type of model to be uninstalled from the Look In drop-down combo box. (The choices are
Installed Graphic and Installed Submodel.)
A list of models (of the selected model type) appears in the list box. Highlight the name of the model to be
uninstalled. (To select multiple items, hold down the SHIFT key to select a range of adjacent entries, or hold
down the CTRL key and click on multiple individual model names to be uninstalled.) Note that if the Preview
check box is selected, and a model name in the list box is clicked on, an image of the selected model
appears in the preview box. (If multiple items are selected, the window is empty.) Double-click on the
model name or click the Uninstall button. A pop-up window asks:
Uninstall selected models?
Click on Yes to continue uninstalling the model (or click on No to exit the operation without uninstalling
anything). If Yes is selected, the model will be moved to the appropriate list of uninstalled submodels or
graphics.
When a submodel is to be uninstalled, the Micro-DCI software first determines whether it is used by any
other graphic or submodel. A pop-up window appears during this search, which states:
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Looking for references to submodel.
If references are found, a confirmation box is displayed, which indicates which models reference the submodel:
Warning! <selected submodel name> is referenced by
<submodel name>
<graphic name>
.
.
.
Uninstall <selected submodel name>?
Click on the Yes button to delete the selected submodel, or click on No to abandon the uninstall operation.
✎
Note
Once the submodel is uninstalled, it will no longer be visible in
installed graphics viewed in an Operator window. It will still be
visible in other submodels and graphics which reference it when
they are viewed in the Grafx editor.
4.2.9.2.9 Favorites
Select the sequence File > Favorites to display a pre-configured model containing a number of frequently
used submodels. Drag submodels from this model and drop them into a new model to save configuration
time. You can also customize this display by adding to it any submodels that are frequently used at your
site.
If you add to the Favorites display, you will be prompted to save it as a graphic or a submodel. To return to
the original set of favorite submodels, just delete the Favorites graphic or submodel version you created
(installed or offline). The next time you select File > Favorites, the original version will be displayed.
4.2.9.2.10 Color File
On the Micro-DCI console, the standard color file used assigns colors to all color index numbers 0 through
255. Color files from previous versions of the Micro-DCI software only had color index numbers from 0
through 95. Of these, colors 0 through 31 were pre-assigned by the system, and colors 32 through 95
could be customized by the user.
When User Models are backed up, a standard color file (colordef.dat) is included in the backup. When
User Models are restored, the color file is also restored. If you have restored User Models created with a
software release prior to SR2.0 to your Micro-DCI console, you have restored an older version of the color
file as well. The Color File option on the File menu provides access to options for resolving color file differences. Select this item to open the Update GMS Color File window. The choices available in this window
are:
•
Merge
•
Replace
Select the Merge feature if you want to include the custom colors created using a previous version of the
Classic editor. Colors 32 through 95 will be merged from the old version of the color file into the current
color file. All other colors will be assigned by the system.
Select the Replace feature to ensure that standard color definitions for all colors will be obtained from the
standard color file. Any customized colors in the 32 to 95 index number range will be lost.
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If you do not use either of these options, and have restored a color file created with earlier software, colors
96 through 255 will be assigned the color black (0).
✎
Note
The Color File option is valid on networks which are limited to
Micro-DCI nodes only.
4.2.9.2.11 Exiting the Grafx Editor
To exit from the Grafx editor, select File > Exit. If no changes have been made to the current model, the
display will be closed immediately. If changes have been made, a small pop-up window queries:
Save changes to <model name>?
Click on Yes to save changes, click on No to abandon changes. If multiple child windows are open in the
Grafx editor window, a prompt will be displayed for each unsaved model before the utility is exited. The
Grafx editor is then removed from the screen.
To cancel the exit operation and remain in the Grafx editor, click on Cancel.
4.2.9.3 The EDIT Pull-down Menu
On the Grafx window menu bar click the Edit option to view the Edit pull-down menu.
4.2.9.3.1 15.2.10.3.1 Undoing and Re-doing Previous Actions
The first item found on the Edit menu, the Undo option is used to undo up to 20 previous actions. It is functionally equivalent to the Undo button
found on the Main toolbar. For example, if an object is accidentally deleted from the display, select the sequence Edit > Undo (or click on the Undo button) to retrieve
the object.
The Redo option on the Edit menu complements the Undo option. Use the Redo option to re-perform up to
20 previous actions that were undone.The Redo button
to the Redo option.
on the main toolbar is functionally equivalent
4.2.9.3.2 Selecting Objects
Select By Name: If a name has been configured for an object (via the General tab in the Properties window for the object), you can select the object by name. Select the sequence Edit > Select By Name. In the
resulting pop-up window, enter the name of the object to be selected, then click OK. A dotted white line
with resize handles will appear around the selected object.
Select All: This option selects all objects in the current model.
4.2.9.3.3 Specifying the Model Type
Model Type: Select Graphic or Submodel; items stored as submodels are stored in a different location
than items stored as graphics. Items stored as submodels can be used as objects in other graphics, with
different data.
After a model has been created and saved as a graphic, it may later be used as a submodel. To convert a
model from a graphic to a submodel, do the following:
1. Load the graphic into the Grafx editor, as described previously in this chapter.
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2. Select the sequence Edit > Model Type from the Grafx editor menu bar. In the resulting pop-up
window, select the option Submodel.
3. Select the sequence File > Save As from the Grafx editor menu bar. In the resulting window,
enter a name which is different from the name which was used to load the graphic, and click
OK or press the ENTER key. The model will be saved as a submodel with this name.
(It is important to use a new name for the submodel during the Save As operation. If the name of the original graphic is used, a graphic and a submodel with the same name will exist, which can cause confusion.)
4.2.10 Using Model Variables
The Model Variables menu item, found on the Edit menu, provides a way to incorporate dynamic data from
the global database into graphic displays. Model Variables works in conjunction with the Custom Dynamics
menu item. See Section 4.3.3.2, Declaring Variables, for details on use of this item.
4.2.11 Window Operations: The WINDOW Pull-down Menu
The Window option on the Grafx window menu bar provides features which allow you to control the number and arrangement of child windows. Click on Window to view the Window menu.
New Window: To open another child window containing the same contents (e.g., the same model) as the
currently selected child window, select the option sequence Window > New Window from the Grafx window menu bar.
The windows opened in this way are multiple views of the same graphic, and an identifying number is
appended to the file name in the title bar to differentiate the views; for example: agitator:1, agitator:2, and
agitator:3. These views are interdependent; changes made to the graphic in one view will be reflected in
any other open views of the graphic.
Cascade: The Cascade and Tile options are used to rearrange child windows so that all are visible in the
Grafx editor window. The Cascade option causes the child windows to overlap so that each title bar is visible.
Tile: Click on the Tile option to arrange the open child windows in smaller sizes to fit next to each other in
the Grafx editor window.
Arrange Icons: If child windows have been iconified, use the Arrange Icons menu item to arrange the
icons neatly within the Grafx editor window.
Child Window List: The bottom portion of the Window pull-down menu contains a list of child windows
which are currently open in the Graphics Configuration window. The number of the child window, the name
of the submodel or graphic it contains, and the Model Type (Graphic or Submodel) are included in the list.
If unsaved changes have been made in the child window, an asterisk (*) will be displayed following the
Model Type. When one of the entries in the list is clicked on, the associated child window will be selected;
it will also be raised, if necessary.
To close an individual child window, click on the Window Menu Button found at the left end of the child window's title bar, then click on the Close option on the resulting pull-down menu. A confirmation box will be
displayed, which provides the option of saving changes, discarding changes, or abandoning the Close
operation to leave the child window intact.
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4.3 Dynamics
Dynamics are specifications for changes in graphic objects. These changes can be in response to changes
in variables such as atoms in a controller. For example, when a controller atom changes state or value, this
can be translated into a graphical change in a screen object, such as a change in color of a filled rectangle.
Dynamics can also specify non-graphic actions, to be performed in response to user actions, such as vectoring to a different display or changing the setpoint of a Control Module.
Dynamics can be configured by several methods, all of which are accessed from the pop-up menu available via the right mouse button. To access this menu, position the pointer over the object for which
dynamic attributes are to be configured, then click the right mouse button. The following options are used
in configuring dynamic attributes.
1. Configure Submodel. Dynamics defined in a submodel can be configured (customized) for an
instance of that submodel, via the CONFIGURE SUBMODEL item.
2. Dynamic Attributes. Dynamics which affect a limited set of graphic attributes of an object or
submodel, based on the value of a user-defined expression, can be configured through the
Dynamic Attributes item.
3. Custom Dynamics. Custom dynamics can be created, using the GML language, via the
Custom Dynamics menu item.
4.3.1 Configuring Dynamic Attributes for Objects
To configure dynamic attributes for an object (including submodels), the object must exist in the Working
View. Position the pointer over the object and click the right mouse button. Select the Dynamic Attributes
item on the resulting pop-up menu. The Expression Dynamics window (Figure 4-11) will be displayed.
✎
Note
The Expression Dynamics window can also be displayed by
selecting the Grafx menu sequence Edit > Object > Dynamic
Attributes.
Figure 4-11. Expression Dynamics Window
The Expression entry box on the Expression Dynamics window allows you to enter mathematical operators, parentheses, variables and data values in a syntax like that of the C programming language, to create
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an expression which can be true (1) or false (0). Below the Expression entry box are two sets of attributes
with associated toggle buttons and entry boxes. The first set of attributes is labelled True; the second set is
labelled False. This allows the dynamic attributes of an object to be configured separately for both true and
false conditions, after the expression has been configured. Dynamic attributes which can be configured via
the Expression Dynamics window include:
•
visibility
•
text
•
text color
•
fill
•
fill color
•
fill pattern
•
line color
•
line style
•
line width
•
blink
•
spin
Examples are provided in Section 4.3.4, Dynamic Configuration Examples.
✎
Note
Configuring an expression (or set of expressions) which exceeds
3500 bytes for a given object will cause an error message to be
displayed.
4.3.1.1 Configuring the Expression - Operators and Operands
Operators are symbols used in expressions to represent arithmetic, logical, or relational operations. An
expression consists of operators and operands, or values. Operands used in these expressions can be of
the following types:
1. A controller database point (in the form tagname.atom) - the current value of the atom is used
in the expression.
2. A numeric constant; for example, 3.14.
3. A variable name, such as LENGTH, can be used if the model loaded in the Grafx editor is a
submodel. For example, in the entry for the "less than" operator (<) in Table 4-3, the example
could be written LENGTH < 100, instead of tcon01.PV < 100.
In the following examples, several database points are used as operands. Assume that atoms PV, SP and
OUT have numeric values, while atoms PA and AIH have logical values, i.e., 0 (false) or 1 (true).
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Table 4-3. Operator Usage - Description And Examples
OPERATOR
122
DESCRIPTION
USAGE
EXAMPLE
<
less than
Evaluates two expressions and is
true if the one on the left is less
than the one on the right.
tcon01.PV < 100
<=
less than or
equal to
Evaluates two expressions and is
true if the one on the left is less
than or equal to the one on the
right.
tcon01.PV <= 100.7
>
greater than
Evaluates two expressions and is tcon01.PV > tcon01.SP
true if the one on the left is greater
than the one on the right.
>=
greater than or
equal to
Evaluates two expressions and is tcon01.PV >= 0.25
true if the one on the left is greater
than or equal to the one on the
right.
==
equal
Evaluates two expressions and is
true if the one on the left is equal
to the one on the right.
ani01.AIH == 0
!=
not equal
Evaluates two expressions
and is true if they are not
equal.
ani01.PA != 0
+
add
The addition operator causes
the two values on either side
of it to be added together
yielding the sum of the two
values.
tcon01.PV + tcon01.SP > 500
-
subtract
The number after the - sign is
subtracted from the number
before the sign.
ani01.OUT - tcon01.SP == 0
*
multiply
The multiplication operator
multiplies the values on either
side of it, yielding the product
of the two values.
tcon01.PV * 0.5 < 4658.0
/
divide
The value to the left of the / is
divided by the value to the
right.
(tcon01.PV + 500) / 2 >
ani01.OUT
-
minus
The minus sign is used to indi- ani10.OUT > -50
cate or change the algebraic
sign of a value. This is a unary
operator which takes just one
operand.
!
logical "not"
Evaluates the expression on
the right and is true if that
expression is false, and vice
versa.
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Table 4-3. Operator Usage - Description And Examples (Continued)
OPERATOR
&&
||
DESCRIPTION
USAGE
EXAMPLE
logical "and"
Evaluates two expressions
and is true if and only if both
are true.
ani01.PA && !ani01.AIH
logical "or"
Evaluates two expressions
tcon01.PV - tcon01.SP < 0.5 ||
and is true if either one or both tcon01.SP - tcon01.PV < 0.5
are true.
(The example for the logical "OR" is True if the values of the PV and SP atoms of controller point "tcon01"
are within 0.5 of each other.)
✎
Note
A single tagname.atom, with no operators, is also a valid
expression; this is useful with bit-type atoms which can have a
value of 1 or 0.
Because expressions can be complex, and often include multiple operators and operands, a set of rules
exists to determine which operators get performed first, which get performed second, third, and so on. This
order is known as precedence. Some operators, such as * (multiply) and / (divide) have equal precedence.
If operators of equal precedence are used in an expression, they are performed according to the order in
which they appear in the expression, left-to-right. (The unary operators ! (logical not) and - (minus) are
exceptions to this rule and are evaluated right-to-left; unary operators act on just one operand. All other
operators which can be used in a Dynamics expression are binary operators, and act on two operands.)
Precedence is an important concept to remember, as its effects on the evaluation of an expression can
confuse the unwary. For example, consider the following expression:
2+3*4
The resulting value of this expression is 14, not 20. Because the* (multiplication) operand has a higher precedence than the + (addition) operand, the multiplication portion of the expression (3k4) is performed first.
If the expression were written:
(2 + 3) * 4
the value of the expression would be 20, because expressions contained within parentheses are evaluated
first.
Table 4-4 contains a list of the operators which can be used in a Dynamics expression on the Micro-DCI
system; in this table, the operators with equal precedence are grouped together. Operator groups with
higher precedence are located higher in the table.
Table 4-4. Operators in Order of Precedence
SYMBOL
()
DESCRIPTION
parentheses
!
logical not (unary)
-
minus (unary)
*
multiply
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Table 4-4. Operators in Order of Precedence (Continued)
SYMBOL
DESCRIPTION
/
divide
+
add
-
subtract
<
less than
<=
less than or equal
>
greater than
>=
greater than or equal
==
equal
!=
not equal
&&
logical AND
||
logical OR
In addition to the symbols listed in Table 4-4, aliases exist for some operators. These aliases, listed in
Table 4-5, are provided as an aid to the user. They can only be used when creating an expression. Once
the expression has been saved, the aliases will be replaced by the standard operator symbols. Aliases
must be entered in upper case letters, and must be separated from adjacent operands by spaces.
Table 4-5. Operator Aliases
ALIAS
STANDARD SYMBOL
GT
>
GE
>=
LT
<
LE
<=
EQ
==
=
==
NE
!=
OR
||
AND
&&
NOT
!
4.3.1.1.1 The Expression TRUE
Entering a single tagname.atom or mathematical expression, as described above, allows the user to configure dynamic attributes for selected objects. Type the word True (upper case, lower case, or capitalized)
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in the Expression entry box. Change the attributes of the submodel by entering values in the row of
attribute setting boxes labelled True (see Section 4.3.1.2, Configuring the Dynamic Attribute Settings).
It is also possible to configure the static attributes of submodels via the Expression Dynamics window. This
is not recommended, however, as this method is time consuming and inefficient when compared with
object configuration performed directly from the Settings and Properties windows described earlier in this
chapter.
4.3.1.1.2 Grouped Objects and Expressions
A group of objects and/or submodels can be configured so that they are all affected by the same expression. Items should be grouped prior to selecting the Dynamic Attributes item. (To group objects together,
hold the SHIFT key down and click on all objects to be in the group, then click on the Group button on the
View toolbar.
Once a set of objects has been placed in a group, any operations (e.g., Move, Delete) will be performed on
all objects in the group.
The Ungroup item on the view toolbar will remove all objects from the group. Any dynamics attached to the
group via the Dynamic Attributes entry will be deleted.
4.3.1.1.3 Multiple Expressions
More than one expression can be configured for an object. This is useful if the object's attributes should
change under more than one condition. For example, a filled rectangle can be configured to be:
•
green when the value of a controller database point is less than 50,
•
yellow when the value is between 50 and 100 (inclusive), and
•
red when the value is above 100.
To add another expression, click on the New button in the Expression Dynamics window (located below
the FALSE attribute section). The label above the Expression entry box will change to:
Expression(n of m)
where m is the total number of expressions for this object, and n is the expression currently displayed. Use
the Prev and Next buttons to move between configured expressions).
To delete the expression currently on display, click on the Clear button.
To make permanent any changes to the Expression Dynamics window, click on the OK or Apply button. To
exit without making changes, click on the Cancel button.
To view a list which summarizes all the expressions and associated attribute settings which have been
configured for an object, click on the LIST button. The Expressions window (Figure 4-12) will be displayed.
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Click on an expression in the list to cause that expression to be displayed in the Expression Dynamics window. To close the Expressions window, click on the OK button.
Figure 4-12. Expressions Window
✎
Note
It is not necessary to configure both True and False attribute
settings for an expression.
An expression is considered "active" when it evaluates to true and has settings for True, or when it evaluates to false and has settings for False. While expressions can be configured so that only one expression
is active at a time, it is also possible to configure expressions so that this is not the case; for example:
1. An object has more than one "active" expression. The expressions are evaluated, and their
settings applied, in the order in which they were defined by the user. This means that the
effects of an expression with a low number (e.g., 1) may be overridden by an expression with
a higher number (e.g., 10).
2. An object has no "active" expressions. If none of the expressions with True settings are true,
and none of the expressions with False settings are false, then the object is not changed.
4.3.1.2 Configuring the Dynamic Attribute Settings
Below the Expression entry box are two rows of attribute setting boxes. The first row is labelled True; a text
description and toggle button are located at the top of each attribute setting box. Assignments configured
here control the appearance of the selected object or submodel when the expression in the Expression
entry box evaluates to True (1).
Below this section of the Expression Dynamics window is a second row of attribute setting boxes, identical
to the first, except these are labelled False. These assignments control the appearance of the selected
item when the expression in the Expression entry box evaluates to False (0).
A value or variable can be entered in each of the attribute setting boxes which contains a text entry box. If
a variable is entered in such an attribute setting box, and the object is saved as a submodel, that variable
can later be used via the Configure Submodel pop-up menu item to assign the attribute independently, for
each instance of the submodel. This is particularly useful when a submodel is instanced more than once
when creating a new submodel. For example, if a submodel called FP_DYbargraph contains a variable
called TagAtom, and FP_DYbargraph is instanced twice on a new submodel, this variable could be
assigned the variable name TagAtom1 in the first instance, and TagAtom2 in the second instance.
Some attribute setting boxes contain a button instead of a text entry box. Click on this button to configure
the attribute setting; in some attribute setting boxes, the button toggles between two states (e.g., Yes and
No), while in others the button provides access to additional configuration windows.
Click in the text/toggle button portion or in the button/text entry portion of the attribute setting box to select
the attribute for configuration; the toggle button will turn yellow, indicating that the attribute has been
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selected. If the attribute has a text entry box, a blinking cursor will appear in that entry box and the desired
value, expression, or variable can be entered. If neither portion of the attribute setting box is clicked on, the
attribute will remain unaffected. If the attribute is selected but no entry is made in the entry box, the
attribute definition will use the attribute's default value.
Each attribute has a default value, and (except for the Text attribute, and some Blink and Spin attribute
parameters) a minimum and maximum permitted value. The default value is used when the attribute's
entry box has been clicked on but no entry is made, or when the value entered is outside the range of the
permitted values (less than the minimum or greater than the maximum). Default values for the attributes
are as follows.
✎
Note
It is possible to configure dynamic attributes which are unnecessary
for an object; configuration of such items will have no effect on the
object. For example, if the object is a straight line, and the Filled
attribute is configured, it will have no effect on the appearance of
the line.
Table 4-6. Attribute Default Values
ATTRIBUTE
DEFAULT
MINIMUM
MAXIMUM
none
none
Text
Empty string ("")
Visible
1 (visible)
0
1
Filled
1 (filled)
0
1
Fill Color
0 (black)
0
95
Line Color
0 (black)
0
95
Text Color
0 (black)
0
95
Line Style
1 (solid line)
0
4
Line Width
1 (narrow)
1
4
Pattern
1 (solid fill)
1
4
Blink Period
5 (tenths of a second)
1
none
Blink Phase
0 (Blink Periods)
0
none
Blink Color 1
1 (white)
0
95
Blink Duration 1
1 (Blink Periods)
1
none
Blink Color 2
0 (black)
0
95
Blink Duration 2
1 (Blink Periods)
1
none
Steady Color
7 (white)
0
95
Spin Period
5 (tenths of a second)
3
none
Spin Angle
20 (degrees)
-180
+180
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4.3.1.2.1 The TEXT Attribute
The Text attribute is used to change the text string in a text object or filled text rectangle; it does not change
text size or font, and it cannot be used to change text in a previously configured submodel. If the attribute
box is selected and nothing is entered, the string defaults to an empty string ("").
4.3.1.2.2 The VISIBLE Attribute
The Visible attribute is used to configure the selected object to be visible, invisible, or redrawn when the
expression evaluates to true or false. If the toggle button for the attribute is selected, the face of the selection button will display the word Yes (visible, the default), Redraw, or No (invisible). Clicking on the selection button will cause it to cycle through these three states. The visible/invisible attributes are useful, for
example, if an object containing a warning message is to be visible only under certain conditions. The
Redraw attribute is equivalent to the Yes attribute, but with the additional feature that the object will be
redrawn each time the value of the expression (or any tagname or variable used in the expression) which
governs it changes. This is useful for objects which overlap and must remain "on top" of some dynamic
object.
4.3.1.2.3 The Filled Attribute
Use the Filled attribute to configure the selected object to be filled or unfilled when the expression evaluates to true or false. If the toggle button for the attribute is selected, the face of the selection button will display the word Yes (the default) or No. Clicking on the selection button will cause it to toggle back and forth
between Yes (filled) and No (unfilled).
4.3.1.2.4 The FILL COLOR Attribute
Use the Fill Color attribute to configure the fill color of the selected object. With the toggle button for the
attribute selected, open the Settings or Properties window and make sure the Fill tab is selected.
Click on the desired color in the color palette. The number of the selected color (from 0 to 255, displayed
on the face of each color button) will appear in the entry box portion of the Fill Color attribute setting box.
Alternatively, the number of the desired color can also be entered via the keyboard by typing the number in
the Fill Color entry box. If this attribute is selected and no entry is made in this entry box, the attribute will
default to 0 (black).
4.3.1.2.5 The LINE COLOR Attribute
The Line Color attribute affects both lines and edges of objects in the selected object. With the toggle button for the attribute selected, open the Settings or Properties window and make sure the Lines tab is
selected.
Click on the desired color in the color palette. The number of the selected color (from 0 to 255, displayed
on the face of each color button) will appear in the entry box portion of the Line Color attribute setting box.
Alternatively, the number of the desired color can also be entered via the keyboard by typing the number in
the Line Color entry box. If this attribute is selected and no entry is made in this entry box, the attribute will
default to 0 (black).
4.3.1.2.6 The Text Color Attribute
The Text Color attribute affects text in the selected object. With the toggle button for the attribute selected,
open the Settings window and make sure the Text tab is selected.
Click on the desired color in the color palette. The number of the selected color (from 0 to 255, displayed
on the face of each color button) will appear in the entry box portion of the Text Color attribute setting box.
Alternatively, the number of the desired color can also be entered via the keyboard by typing the number in
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the Text Color entry box. If this attribute is selected and no entry is made in this entry box, the attribute will
default to 0 (black).
4.3.1.2.7 The Line Style Attribute
The Line Style attribute affects edges and lines in the selected object. The Lines tab on both the Settings
and Properties windows contains examples of the 5 different line/edge styles, which are labelled from 0 to
4, and also contains an indicator for each style. Enter the number of the desired style in the Line Style entry
box, either by clicking on the appropriate indicator in the Settings or Properties window, or by entering the
number via the keyboard. If this attribute is selected and no entry is made in this entry box, the attribute will
default to 1 (solid line).
4.3.1.2.8 The LINE WIDTH Attribute
Like the Line Style attribute, the Line Width attribute affects edges and lines in the selected object. The
Lines tab on the Settings and Properties windows contains a drop-down combo box which allows you to
specify a line/edge width by selecting a number from 1 (the narrowest) to 6 (the widest). Enter the number
of the desired width in the Line Width entry box, either by clicking on the appropriate indicator in the Settings or Properties window, or by entering the number via the keyboard. If this attribute is selected and no
entry is made in this entry box, the attribute will default to 1 (narrow).
4.3.1.2.9 The PATTERN Attribute
The Pattern attribute allows the user to specify a fill pattern to be used in filled objects. Examples of available fill patterns are displayed on the Fill tab of the Settings and Properties windows. The patterns are
labelled from 0 to 5. Enter the number of the desired pattern in the Pattern entry box, either by clicking on
the appropriate indicator in the Fill tab of the Settings or Properties window, or by entering the pattern number via the keyboard. If this attribute is selected and no entry is made in this entry box, the attribute will
default to 1 (solid fill).
✎
Note
To observe changes to submodel dynamics on a graphic in an
Operator Window, the graphic must be saved and re-installed.
4.3.1.2.10 The BLINK Attribute
The multi-phase Blink attribute (available only on objects in graphic displays) is used to cause an object to
alternate between two colors when the expression is true, or to be displayed steadily in a third color when
the expression is false.
Click within the Blink attribute setting box to select the attribute; the Blink window (Figure 4-13) will appear.
Figure 4-13. Blink Window
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Use the entry boxes in the Blink window to enter values for the following parameters:
•
Period
•
Blink Color 2
•
Phase
•
Duration 2
•
Blink Color 1
•
Steady Color
•
Duration 1
•
Fill Only
The Period is the blink period, which is measured in tenths of a second. The number entered here defines
how many tenths of a second are in the blink period for this object. The minimum value for the period is 1
(one tenth of a second); the default value for the period is 5 (1/2 second).
The Phase is the initial delay time (in blink periods) which elapses before blinking starts after the expression becomes true. By using different phase values for different objects, motion can be simulated. The
phase value is multiplied by the period to determine how long (in tenths of a second) to delay the start of
blinking. Both the minimum and default value for this parameter is 0 (zero).
Blink Color 1 is the first of the two blink colors between which the object will alternate. Enter this value by
clicking on the desired color in the color palette on any tab display in the Settings or Properties windows, or
by typing it in via the keyboard.
The value entered for Duration 1 is multiplied by the Period to determine how long (how many tenths of a
second) the object will be displayed in Blink Color 1. Both the minimum value and default value for this
parameter are 1 (1 blink period).
Blink Color 2 is the second of the two blink colors between which the object will alternate. Again, enter this
value by clicking on the desired color in the color palette on any tab display in the Settings or Properties
windows, or by typing it in via the keyboard.
The value entered for Duration 2 is multiplied by the Period to determine how long (how many tenths of a
second) the object will be displayed in Blink Color 2. Both the minimum value and default value for this
parameter are 1 (1 blink period).
The Steady Color parameter is used to define the non-blinking color in which the object will be displayed
when the expression is false. Like Blink Colors 1 and 2, this value can be entered either by clicking on the
desired color in the color palette on any tab display in the Settings or Properties windows, or by typing it in
via the keyboard. As discussed in the sub-section Section 4.3.4.2, Example 2 - Multiple Expressions, multiple expressions can be configured for an object or group of objects. Expressions are evaluated in the
order that they were defined. This means that the effects of Expression 1 may be overwritten by a subsequent expression (Expression 10, for example). When multiple color-controlling expressions have been
defined for an object, assigning the value -1 (minus 1) to the Steady Color parameter causes the object to
be displayed in the last color used (when the expression controlling the Blink attribute evaluates to False).
The default setting for the Steady Color parameter is -1.
The Fill Only parameter is designed for use with objects that belong to the same group. (To group several
items, hold the SHIFT key down while clicking on all items to be included in the group, then click on the
Group option on the View toolbar.) If the Fill Only parameter is set to false (0), then all portions of all
objects in the group (i.e., the fill color, line color and text color [if any]) will change color when either Blink or
Steady Color parameters are in effect. If the Fill Only attribute is set to true (1), then only the fill color of
objects in the group will be changed, while other attributes of objects (e.g., line color, text color) remain
unaffected. The Fill Only parameter is visible on the Blink Configuration window only when a group of
objects is being configured. The default setting for the Fill Only parameter is 1 (true).
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4.3.1.2.11 The SPIN Attribute
The Spin attribute causes an object to be rotated about its reference point in periodic increments, for as
long as the expression is true. Click within the Spin attribute box to select the attribute. The Spin Configuration window (Figure 4-14) will appear.
Figure 4-14. Spin Configuration Window
Use the Spin Configuration window to enter values for the following parameters:
•
Period
•
Angle
As in the Blink attribute, the Period parameter for the Spin attribute is measured in tenths of a second. The
number entered for this parameter defines the length of time it will take (in tenths of a second) for the
object to be moved the number of degrees specified in the Angle parameter. The minimum value for the
Spin Period is 3 (tenths of a second), the default is 5 (one half second).
The number entered in the Angle parameter entry box specifies the number of degrees the object will turn
per period. A positive number results in counterclockwise movement, while a negative number causes
clockwise movement. When the expression is false, the object returns to its original position.
✎
Note
The spin feature is already incorporated in the dynamic submodels
FP_DYwheel, FP_DYpump_rt and FP_DYpump_lf, which are
supplied by MicroMod Automation.
4.3.1.2.12 Combining Attributes
Note that when either the Blink or Spin attribute is selected, all other attributes are stippled out and made
unavailable. It is possible to combine the Blink and Spin attributes with the other dynamic attributes and
with each other by using multiple expressions, and creating a separate expression each for the Blink
attribute, the Spin attribute and all other attributes. Avoid configuring two different sets of Blink (or Spin)
dynamics (for the same object) which could be true simultaneously, as this can cause unpredictable
results.
4.3.2 Configuring Submodels
A submodel may already contain internal dynamics, configured by MicroMod Automation or by the user
during an earlier configuration session. (This can be done via the Expression Dynamics window discussed
above, by either creating a variable name in the Expression entry box, or if a variable was entered in an
attribute setting box, instead of a value. See Example 3 in Section 4.3.4, Dynamic Configuration Examples.)
The Submodel Configuration window (an example is shown in Figure 4-15) is used to assign values (which
can be in the form of controller database points) to dynamic variables.
Use one of the following methods to display this window:
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•
Double-click on the desired submodel, or
•
Click on the submodel to select it, click the right mouse button, then select Configure
Submodel from the resulting pop-up menu, or
•
Select the menu sequence Edit > Object > Configure Submodel.
The selected submodel will be highlighted by a surrounding rectangle.
Figure 4-15. Submodel Configuration Window
On the Submodel Configuration window, all variable names in the submodel's dynamics are listed on the
left. Next to each variable is a text entry box, which contains any value which has been assigned to the
variable during configuration. If no value has been assigned to a variable, the entry box is blank.
The value which can be assigned to a variable can be one of the following types:
•
a numeric constant
•
a string constant
•
a controller database point (in the form tagname.atom)
•
a different variable type (if the current Model Type is defined as Submodel)
•
an expression
Following each text entry box is an Expand Entry button
. To view a part of the text string or expression that is not visible in the text entry box, click on this button. A pop-up window will be displayed. This
window contains an enlarged, scrollable version of the associated text entry box, allowing more of the variable value to be visible. The variable value can be edited in this pop-up window, and can be up to 128
characters in length. Click on OK to exit and save any changes, or click on Cancel to exit without modifying the variable's value.
Example 4 in Section 4.3.4, Dynamic Configuration Examples, which shows the configuration of a usercreated submodel. The list of dynamic MicroMod Submodels and their variables can be found in Section
4.4, Micro-DCI Submodels.
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4.3.3 Creating Custom Dynamics
As described above, it is possible to configure complex dynamic properties for an object using the
Dynamic Attributes menu item. The dynamics which can be configured using this method may not be adequate for all applications, however. An item on the right mouse button pop-up menu, Custom Dynamics,
allows configuration of additional dynamic properties.
4.3.3.1 Custom Dynamics
Custom dynamic properties can be configured using DynProps to give an object dynamic properties which
are not available using the methods described earlier. Configuration using DynProps, however, is also
more complex. DynProps are text statements containing descriptions of dynamic behavior, written using
the syntax of the GML language. The capabilities and syntax of DynProps are discussed in Chapter 4 of
the SL-GMS Reference Manual.
4.3.3.1.1 Configuring DynProps
Position the pointer over an object and click the right mouse button. Select Custom Dynamics from the
resulting pop-up menu. If a DynProp is attached to the currently selected object, its text will be displayed in
the Edit Custom Dynamics window (Figure 4-16).
✎
Note
The Edit Custom Dynamics window can also be opened by
selecting the menu sequence Edit > Object > Custom Dynamics.
Figure 4-16. Edit Custom Dynamics Window
Modify the DynProp by adding or deleting text, then click on OK. If the syntax of the DynProp is correct, the
Edit Custom Dynamics window will close. If the syntax is incorrect, an error message will appear and the
window will remain on display. Click on the Format button to automatically indent the DynProp text according to convention; the content of the DynProp will not be changed.
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An explanation of the capabilities and the syntax of DynProps is beyond the scope of this manual. Refer to
the SL-GMS Reference Manual for details.
4.3.3.1.2 DynProp Variables
A DynProp will contain references to variables. For example, the fill color of an object in a submodel can be
changed using the following DynProp:
( * (fcolor bar_color))
In this example, bar_color is a variable. The DynProp is then saved by clicking on OK and exiting the Edit
Custom Dynamics window, and the submodel must be saved (using the Save, Save As or Install items
from the File pull-down menu).
When an instance of this submodel is placed on a graphic, selected and the Configure Submodel menu
item clicked on, bar_color and an associated text entry box will appear in the list of variables in the resulting Submodel Configuration window. Enter a color index number between 0 and 255 in the entry box to
assign that number as the value of the variable.
In other cases, it may be desirable to have the value of a variable retrieved from the global database when
the graphic is displayed in the Operator Window. In such cases the Model Variables menu item must be
used.
4.3.3.2 Declaring Variables
4.3.3.2.1 Declaring Variables in Graphics
The Model Variables menu item, found on the Edit menu, provides a way to incorporate dynamic data from
the global database into graphic displays. Model Variables works in conjunction with the Custom Dynamics
menu item. For example, a text object can be configured to display the value of a setpoint (SP) atom in the
global database on a graphic display. (This could also be done using the FP_DYvalue submodel,
described in Section 4.4, Micro-DCI Submodels.)
To do so, first configure the DynProp for the text object as follows:
( * ( stext _psetpoint "%.1f"))
For the purposes of this example, the tagname used for the point in the global database is CON1.
Next, the value of the variable _psetpoint must be tied to the value of the desired tag.atom in the global
database (for the purposes of this example, we will use CON1.SP). To do so, click on the Model Variables
menu item. The Variables window (Figure 4-17) will be displayed.
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Figure 4-17. Variables Window
The Variables window contains a list box. Once a variable has been configured, it will occupy a line in the
list box, with the Private name of the variable on the left side of the entry, and the corresponding Public
name on the right. The private name of a variable is the name used in the DynProp, (e.g., _psetpoint in this
example). The public name of a variable defines the global database point which supplies the value for the
variable (e.g., CON1.SP in this example).
Below the list box are a number of buttons, including Edit, Add, Delete, References, OK and Cancel.
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To create a new variable, click on the Add button. The Declare Variables window (Figure 4-18) appears.
Figure 4-18. Declare Variables Window
The top of this window contains two text entry boxes labelled Private Name and Public Name. Enter the
private name in the first entry box; the private name must begin with the prefix _p. If this prefix is not
entered by the user, it will be prepended automatically.
Enter the public name in the second entry box. If the model being configured is a graphic, the public name
is automatically enclosed in quotation marks.
The Declare Variables window is also used to specify how the value should be collected from the global
database, once the configured graphic is on display in the Operator Window. A set of 3 radio buttons,
labelled Type, is used to specify the type of value to be collected. The available types include:
•
Float (for floating point numbers)
•
Integer (for integers)
•
Text String (for tagnames, legends, and so on)
Use the type Float (the default) if the variable type is numeric but could be either floating point or integer.
For the purposes of this example, the SP atom has a floating point value, so type Float would be selected.
Below the Type selection area is an entry box labelled Size, which is used to specify array variables. Entering a value greater than 1 declares an array the size of the value entered. If the size is 1 (the default), then
the variable is not an array. For the purposes of this example, a size of 1 would be used.
Below the Size entry box is the Collection definition area. The selections available here include:
•
Normal
•
One Shot
These choices, each of which is accompanied by a radio button, are used to specify how often the value is
to be collected from the global database. A normal collection is performed once each second (or every two
seconds if the model is in an Operator Window which does not have keyboard focus). A one shot collection
is performed only once, when the graphic is first called up in an Operator Window. In this example, the
value of CON1.SP is to be updated, so the Normal collection would be chosen.
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Click on OK to complete the variable declaration and exit the window; click on Apply to complete the variable declaration but leave the window open to declare additional variables. (In the parent Variables window
[Figure 4-17], click on Add or select an existing variable and click Edit; either of these actions will reset the
Declare Variables window and allow configuration of a new or existing variable.)
Once a variable is declared, it will appear in the list box in the Variables window (Figure 4-17). To change a
variable declaration, select the desired item on this list, then click on the Edit button. The Declare Variables window containing that declaration's parameters will be displayed.
To see how many objects in a model have DynProps that reference a variable, select the variable by clicking on it in the list box, then click on the References button. The References window will appear, displaying the count of such objects.
To delete a variable, click on the appropriate entry in the list box to select it, then click on the Delete button.
A variable can be deleted only if it is not referenced by any object in the model; otherwise an error message will appear.
4.3.3.2.2 Declaring Variables in Submodels
When declaring a variable in a graphic (described above), the public name of the variable must be the
name of a point in the global database (i.e., a tag.atom). This is not necessary when declaring a variable in
a submodel. Here, the public name can be a generic name. This allows the public name to be assigned to
a tag.atom or a constant each time an instance of the submodel is configured on a graphic.
✎
Note
Quotation marks should not be placed around the public name if the
model being configured is a submodel unless it is the name of a
tag.atom. When configuring dynamic objects on a submodel, the
type Submodel should be specified via the Model Type option on
the Edit menu before attempting to use the Model Variables menu
item. If this order is not followed, quotation marks will automatically
be placed around the public name and will cause an error.
No change is required to the DynProp; the following version remains a valid example:
( * ( stext _psetpoint "%.1f"))
The name _psetpoint would remain the private name for the variable, but the public name would now be
configured as some generic name such as setpoint instead of CON1.SP.
When an instance of this submodel is configured on a graphic (using the Configure Submodel item), setpoint will appear in the list of variables for the submodel. The user will assign the name of a tag.atom, or a
numeric constant, to the variable.
4.3.3.2.3 Naming Variables
The following naming conventions apply to variable names:
•
A variable name can be up to 60 characters in length.
•
The first character of a variable's name must be a letter.
Subsequent characters can be letters, numbers, or the underscore character. With few exceptions
(described below), no other characters should be used. The dash (-) is especially to be avoided, since that
character is interpreted as the subtraction operator.
Exceptions to the above naming conventions are:
•
The private name of a variable must begin with "_p".
•
Pairs of dollar sign ($) characters can be used in the public name of a variable in a submodel,
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as part of the string substitution feature described below.
When an instance of a submodel is configured on a graphic, the user supplies values for the submodel's
variables, as described in Section 4.3.2, Configuring Submodels above. A string substitution feature is
available which allows the user to configure multiple variables which share a characteristic, such as the
same tagname, or the same atom type.
This makes it easy to configure a submodel that will display several different atoms from the same tagname, such as the PV, SP and OUT atoms. If the atom names are known, the string substitution feature
can be used to declare variables for the submodel in such a way that only the tagname must be supplied
when an instance of the submodel is configured.
To use this feature, the part of the variable name that will assume the same value in all cases must be
enclosed between '$' characters. In Example 1 below, the following variable names could be configured for
a submodel, using the Declare Variables window:
Example 1:
$tag$PV
$tag$SP
$tag$OUT
Save the submodel, then place an instance of it on a graphic and select the instance. Click on the Configure Submodel item from the right mouse button pop-up menu. When the Submodel Configuration window
is displayed, only the string tag will appear as a variable that needs to be configured, rather than a separate entry for each atom. The user would enter the tagname followed by a period (.), e.g., "CON1.". In the
submodel, this will result in the replacement of the string "tag" with the string "CON1." in each of the three
variables, as follows:
$tag$PV = CON1.PV
$tag$SP = CON1.SP
$tag$OUT = CON1.OUT
Note that all three variables were configured in the submodel by supplying one value, namely the value of
the string for tag.
The user must supply the period (.) after the tagname, otherwise erroneous values such as CON1PV
would result. While the period (.) alone cannot be included in the variable name (i.e., $tag.$PV is not a
legal variable name), it can, however, be used when preceded by a backslash character (e.g., "\."). Alternatively, the sequence "#d" can be used in the variable name to represent a period. Both of these methods
are shown in Example 2.
Example 2:
$tag$\.PV or
$tag$\.SP or
$tag$\.OUT or
$tag$#dPV
$tag$#dSP
$tag$#dOUT
If these variable names are used, only the tagname (e.g., "CON1") has to be supplied by the user when
configuring the submodel.
A submodel could be designed to show the value of the same atom from 10 different tagnames. Since the
atom name is the same in all 10 cases, string substitution could be used in naming the variables, as follows:
$tag1$#d$atom$
$tag2$#d$atom$
$tag3$#d$atom$
.
.
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.
$tag10$#d$atom$
When an instance of this submodel is configured, the Submodel Configuration window will contain 11 variables to configure, one named atom and the ten tagn variables. If the #d sequence is not used, the period
(.) should be supplied as part of the atom name.
✎
Note
It is necessary to enclose both the atom and tagn portions of the
variable names between '$' characters, so that both portions of the
variable name can be configured.
It may be necessary to include an array index number in a variable name. Like the period, the square
brackets ([ ]) cannot be included directly in variables; they can, however, be used when each is preceded
by a backslash character. For example, "\[n\]" can the used to represent an array index, where n represents the index number. Alternatively, "#n" can also be used to represent the array index. The following
examples shown two possible alternatives to represent the same item:
$tag$\.PV\[3\] or $tag$#dPV#3
The array index number represented by n must be an integer.
✎
Note
The index number can, like the tagname, be assigned as a variable;
for example:
$tag$\.PV\[$INDEX$\] or $tag$#dPV#$INDEX$
In this case, both TAG and INDEX can be assigned values by the
user when configuring an instance of the submodel which uses this
variable.
It is important to remember that string substitution in variable names, as described in this sub-section,
occurs at the time an instance of a submodel is configured on a graphic. If the submodel itself is later
changed to use additional variables containing the same or other substitute strings, then all instances of
that submodel will need to be reconfigured on graphics which use the submodel. (If the only change made
to the submodel was to add variable names using the same substitute string (e.g., $tag$) as used previously in the submodel, then for each graphic the user needs only to select each instance of the submodel,
click on the Configure Submodel option on the right mouse button pop-up menu, click on OK in the Submodel Configuration window, then install the graphic.)
4.3.4 Dynamic Configuration Examples
The following sub-sections provide the user with practical examples of configuring dynamics for submodels.
4.3.4.1 Example 1 - Single Expression
Process Conditions:
A valve has 1 limit switch (tagname VLV101). VLV101 is closed (VLV101.OUT=1) when the valve is open
and is open (VLV101.OUT=0) when the valve is closed.
Objective:
Assign dynamics to an instance of submodel ISA_VLVE_ACTR on a graphic so that the submodel
instance is filled in white when the valve is open and is unfilled (i.e., filled with black) when the valve is
closed.
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Procedure:
1. Make an instance of the Micro-DCI Submodel ISA_VLVE_ACTR on a graphic.
2. With the Submodel still selected, click the right mouse button and select the Dynamic
Attributes item from the resulting pop-up menu. The Expression Dynamics window will appear.
3. Configure the expression and settings from the table below:
EXPRESSION
TRUE SETTINGS
VLV101.OUT
fill color = 7
FALSE SETTINGS
fill color = 0
4.3.4.2 Example 2 - Multiple Expressions
Process Conditions:
A valve has two limit switches (TAGS VLV101 and VLV102). VLV101 is closed (VLV101.OUT=1) when the
valve is open and VLV102 is closed (VLV102.OUT=1) when the valve is closed.
Objective:
Assign dynamics to an instance of the submodel ISA_VLVE_ACTR on a graphic so that the submodel
instance is filled in white when the valve is open, unfilled when the valve is closed, and filled in yellow when
the state is unknown (i.e., both limit switches open or closed).
Procedure:
1. Make an instance of the Micro-DCI Submodel ISA_VLVE_ACTR on a graphic.
2. With the submodel still selected, click the right mouse button and select the Dynamic
Attributes item from the resulting pop-up menu. The Expression Dynamics window will appear.
3. Configure the expressions and settings from the table below:
NUMBER
140
EXPRESSION
TRUE
SETTINGS
FALSE
SETTINGS
1
VLV101.OUT=1 && VLV102.OUT=0
fill color = 7
None
2
VLV102.OUT=1 && VLV101.OUT=0
fill color = 0
None
3
VLV101.OUT=0 && VLV102.OUT=0
fill color = 3
None
4
VLV101.OUT=1 && VLV102.OUT=1
fill color = 3
None
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4.3.4.3 Example 3 - Using the TRUE Expression
Process Conditions:
None.
Objective:
Make a static instance of the submodel ISA_VLVE_ACTR. Set the color of the valve to cyan.
Procedure:
1. Make an instance of submodel ISA_VLVE_ACTR on a Graphic.
2. With the submodel still selected, click the right mouse button and select the Dynamic
Attributes item from the resulting pop-up menu. The Expression Dynamics window will appear.
3. Configure the expression and settings from the table below.
EXPRESSION
TRUE SETTING
TRUE
fill color = 6
FALSE SETTING
none
4.3.4.4 Example 4 - Creating a New Submodel with Dynamics
Objective:
Create a new submodel (DynamicValve) with the same dynamics as the submodel instance shown in
Dynamic Configuration Example 2. Use variable names in place of controller database points so that
instances of Dynamic Value can be configured for different controller database points.
Procedure:
1. From the File pull-down menu in the Grafx editor menu bar, open the Micro-DCI Submodel
ISA_VLVE_ACTR. Notice that the Model Type changes to Submodel.
2. Choose Edit > Select All from the Grafx editor menu bar.
3. Click the Group button from the View toolbar.
4. With the pointer over the group of objects, click the right mouse button. Select Dynamic
Attributes from the resulting pop-up menu. In the resulting Expression Dynamics window,
configure the expressions and settings from the table below:
NUMBER
EXPRESSION
1
open_switch=1
2
&& closed_switch=0
TRUE
SETTINGS
FALSE
SETTINGS
fill color=7
None
closed_switch=1 && open_switch=0
fill color=0
None
3
open_switch=0
&& closed_switch=0
fill color=3
None
4
open_switch=1
&& closed_switch=1
fill color=3
None
5. Select Save As from the File pull-down menu and enter the name "DynamicValve" when
prompted for the model name. The new submodel is now placed in the disk location dedicated
to storage of off-line user-created submodels (i.e., the off-line submodel directory).
6. Select File > Install.
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✎
Note
The Submodel must be installed before it can be used in an
installed Graphic.
See Example 5 for the use of this new submodel.
4.3.4.5 Example 5 - Configuring Dynamic Submodels
Process Conditions:
Same as Example 2
Objective:
Configure an instance of the submodel DynamicValve that was built in Example 4.
Procedure:
1. Make an instance of DynamicValve on a graphic (from the list of Installed Submodels).
2. With the submodel still selected, click the right mouse button. Select Configure Submodel from
the resulting pop-up menu. The Submodel Configuration window will appear. Configure the
variables as shown in Figure 4-19.
Figure 4-19. Submodel Variable Configuration Window
4.3.4.6 Example 6 - Simulating Motion Using the Blink Attribute
Process Conditions:
None; True is used in all expressions in this example.
Objective:
Simulate motion in a particular direction.
Procedure:
1. Create a new Graphic model; select File > New; if necessary, select the sequence Edit >
Model Type and specify the model type Graphic in the resulting pop-up window.
2. Create instances of the items which will be used to emulate motion; for the purposes of this
example, create 6 short, consecutive lines. Select the Snap To Grid option on the Main
toolbar to aid in keeping them neatly in line.
3. Position the pointer over the first object and click the right mouse button. Select Dynamic
Attributes from the resulting pull-down menu. The Expression Dynamics window will appear.
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4. Configure the Expression in the Expression Dynamics window. For purposes of this example,
enter True. The same expression should be used for all objects in the group simulating motion.
5. Select the Blink option from the Settings When True area. The Blink Configuration window will
appear. Configure the settings for each of the objects using settings listed in the table below,
repeating steps 3 and 4 as necessary.
LINE
SEGMENT
NUMBER
EXPRESSION
PERIOD
PHASE
BLINK
COLOR 1
DURATION1
BLINK
COLOR2
DURATION 2
STEADY
COLOR
1
TRUE
1
0
4
1
15
5
15
2
TRUE
1
1
4
1
15
5
15
3
TRUE
1
2
4
1
15
5
15
4
TRUE
1
3
4
1
15
5
15
5
TRUE
1
4
4
1
15
5
15
6
TRUE
1
5
4
1
15
5
15
6. Select File > Save and enter a name such as "DynamicLine" when prompted for the model
name. The new graphic is now placed in the disk location dedicated to storage of off-line
graphics (i.e., the off-line graphics directory).
7. Select File > Install Current to install the model as a Graphic Display.
8. When the graphic installed in Step 7 is displayed in an Operator Window, it will appear as a
gray line with a blue pulse along it.
Note that the only setting which differs between the 6 objects is the Phase setting; each segment is
assigned a consecutively higher Phase number, which means that the blink cycle for that object will begin
a tenth of a second after that of its predecessor. Also, the values entered for Duration 1 and Duration 2
added together equal the number of segments in the line. This allows the first pulse to end just before the
next begins.
VARIATIONS:
1. To make the blue pulse appear to move more slowly, increase the length of the Period for all 6
segments, i.e., change the value entered for this parameter from 1 to a higher number.
2. To have two blue pulses move along the line in this example, decrease the value of Duration 2
by changing the value entered from 5 to 2 or 3.
✎
Note
As the user becomes more familiar with the Grafx editor, the
number of steps necessary to create a graphic such as this one can
be decreased. For example, to create the original line with a color
pulse, the user might create just the first line segment and configure
its dynamics from scratch, then copy it to create the additional 5
segments of the line. It is then only necessary to change the values
configured in the Phase parameter for each segment.
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4.3.4.7 Example 7 - Using Text and Text Attributes to Indicate Conditions
Process Conditions:
Switches on a tank indicating High Level (LI101HL.OUT) and High High Level (LI101HHL.OUT) are used
to indicate alarm conditions.
Objective:
Display a text message on a graphic to indicate the condition of these switches, using the parameters in
the following table:
Input Condition
Text
Color
LI101HL.OUT = 0 and LI101HHL.OUT = 0
Normal
Green
LI101HL.OUT = 1 and LI101HHL.OUT = 0
Hi Level
Yellow
LI101HL.OUT = 1 and LI101HHL.OUT = 1
Hi Hi Level
Red
LI101HL.OUT = 0 and LI101HHL.OUT = 1
Unknown
White Flash
Procedure:
1. Put a text object on a Graphic.
2. Position the pointer over the object, then click the right mouse button. Select the Dynamic
Attributes item from the resulting pop-up menu. The Expression Dynamics window will appear.
3. Configure the expression and settings from the two tables below.
NUMBER
EXPRESSION
TRUE SETTINGS
FALSE
SETTINGS
1
LI101HL.OUT == 0 && LI101HHL.OUT == 1
Blink (See Below)
None
2
LI101HL.OUT == 0 && LI101HHL.OUT == 0
text = Normal
text color = 2
None
3
LI101HL.OUT == 1 && LI101HHL.OUT == 0
text = Hi Level
text color = 3
None
4
LI101HL.OUT == 1 && LI101HHL.OUT == 1
text = Hi Hi Level
text color = 1
None
5
LI101HL.OUT == 0 && LI101HHL.OUT == 1
text = Unknown
text color = 7
None
Blink Configuration (For Expression 1)
144
PERIOD
PHASE
BLINK
COLOR 1
DURATION 1
BLINK
COLOR 2
DURATION 2
STEADY
COLOR
2
1
7
1
0
1
0
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4.4 Micro-DCI Submodels
Micro-DCI Submodels are submodels which have been supplied with the Micro-DCI software and contain
pre-configured dynamic attributes. These submodels are used:
•
to display dynamic data from the controller database, using various forms such as valves and
bargraphs,
•
for the control of controller modules, and for the assignment of display vectoring (i.e., the
ability to call up a specific display directly from another display).
The assignment of controller database points to these dynamics is accomplished through the Submodel
Configuration windows. To access the Submodel Configuration windows, position the pointer on the submodel, click the right mouse button, and select Configure Submodel from the resulting pop-up menu.
✎
Note
If a dynamic submodel is copied from one child window to another
within the Grafx editor window, the configuration for the submodel is
copied as well.
4.4.1 Dynamic Values
4.4.1.1 FP_DYvalue
The submodel FP_DYvalue (Figure 4-20) is used for the dynamic display of data from a controller database point. It is used for both numeric and ASCII data types.
Figure 4-20. Dynamic Value (FP_DYvalue)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button. Click on the Configure Submodel
item on the resulting pop-up menu, or double-click on the submodel. The Submodel Configuration window
(Figure 4-21) will appear.
Figure 4-21. Dynamic Value Configuration Window
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VARIABLES
TagAtom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point (or a constant value) to be
displayed (e.g., tcPID.pv).
Note: User must define variable.
Type
Click on the desired format:
•
Native - Displays the data in the format configured in the controller
module (based on the FMT atom for floating point values). This format is
always used to display text data.
•
Value - Allows for user configurable format. (See the description of the
Decimal places variable.)
Default: Native
Decimal
Places
Click on the slider to select the desired number of digits to the right of the
decimal place. Used only when Value is selected as the Type; otherwise this
item is not displayed.
Default: 2
Color
Enter the number of the desired color. (See any color palette in the Settings or
Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 7 (White)
Font
Enter the number of the desired font. (Available fonts and font numbers can
be viewed using the Font drop-down combo box on the Text tab of the
Settings and Properties windows.)
Default: 7 (Arial Bold)
Size
Click on the slider to select the desired size of the displayed data; 4.0 is the
largest size and 1.0 is the smallest.
Default: 2.0
Align
Click on the desired alignment as follows:
•
Left - The first (leftmost) digit of the dynamic value will be aligned with
the starting location (left border) of the box which defines this submodel
for positioning on the Grafx editor display.
•
Center - The dynamic value will be centered on the starting location (left
border) of the box which defines this submodel for positioning on the
Grafx editor display.
•
Right - The last (rightmost) digit of the dynamic value will be aligned with
the starting location (left border) of the box which defines this submodel
for positioning on the Grafx editor display.
Default: Left
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4.4.2 Bargraphs
4.4.2.1 FP_DYbargraph
The Submodel FP_DYbargraph (Figure 4-22) represents the value of a dynamic process variable in the
form of a rectangular bar.
Figure 4-22. Dynamic Bargraph (FP_DYbargraph)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on Configure Submodel in
the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-23. Dynamic Bargraph Configuration Window
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Variables
TagAtom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point (or a constant value) that
is used to determine the length of the bar (e.g., tcPID.pv).
(User must define variable.)
edge_color
Enter the number of the desired outline color of the bar. (See any color palette
in the Settings or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 7 (White)
edge_width Enter the number of the desired thickness of the outline of the bar (Enter
Range 0 - 3).
Default: 1
fill_color
Enter the number of the desired fill color of the bar. (See any color palette in
the Settings or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 0 (Black)
fill_dir
Enter the number from the table below representing the direction that the bar
fills as the value of Tag.atom increases from lower_limit to upper_limit.
DIRECTION
fill_dir
up
0
right
1
down
2
left
3
Default: 0
lower_limit* Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the lower limit of the bar (e.g., tcPID.ilr).
Default: None
upper_limit* Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the upper limit of the bar (e.g., tcPID.iur).
Default: None
✎
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Note
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The bargraph model is sized as a 10 x 10 unit rectangle. To change
its size, change its reference point to one of its corners using the
Change Ref pop-up menu item and then scale it to fit in the desired
area.
Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
4.4.2.2 FP_DYbargraph_ec
Like FP_DYbargraph, the submodel FP_DYbargraph_ec (Figure 4-24) represents the value of a dynamic
process variable in the form of a rectangular bar, with one additional feature. As portions of the bargraph
are erased due to changes in the process variable which controls the level of the fill color, the color defined
as the "erase color" will replace the fill color. (For FP_DYbargraph, the erase color is the background color
of the graphic on which it appears.)
Figure 4-24. Dynamic Bargraph with Configurable Erase Color (FP_DYbargraph_ec)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-25. Dynamic Bargraph_ec Configuration Window
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Variables
TagAtom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point (or a constant value) that
is used to determine the length of the bar (e.g., tcPID.pv).
(User must define variable.)
edge_color
Enter the number of the desired outline color of the bar. (See any color palette
in the Settings or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 7 (White)
edge_width Enter the number of the desired thickness of the outline of the bar
(Enter Range 0 - 3).
Default: 1
erase_color Enter the number of the color to be used in portions of the bar where the
fill_color is erased.
fill_color
Enter the number of the desired fill color of the bar.
Default: 0 (Black)
fill_dir
Enter the number from the table below representing the direction that the bar
fills as the value of Tag.atom increases from lower_limit to upper_limit.
DIRECTION
fill_dir
up
0
right
1
down
2
left
3
Default: 0
lower_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the lower limit of the bar (e.g., tcPID.ilr).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
upper_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the upper limit of the bar (e.g., tcPID.iur).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
✎
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Note
Grafx Editor
The bargraph model is sized as a 10 x 10 unit rectangle. To change
its size, change its reference point to one of its corners using the
Change Ref pop-up menu item and then scale it to fit in the desired
area.
Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
4.4.2.3 FP_DYHorizbar
The submodel FP_DYHorizbar (Figure 4-26) represents the value of a dynamic process variable in the
form of a horizontal bargraph with a scale.
Figure 4-26. Dynamic Horizontal Bar (FP_DYHorizbar)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-27. Horizontal Bar Configuration Window
Variables
TagAtom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point (or a constant value) that
is used to determine the length of the bar (e.g., tcPID.pv).
(User must define variable.)
axis_color
Enter the number of the desired color of the x-axis. (See any color palette in
the Settings or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 0 (Black)
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bar_color
Enter the number of the desired fill color of the bar.
Default: 7 (White)
direction
Enter the number from the table below representing the direction that the bar
fills as the value of Tag.atom increases from lower_limit to upper_limit.
DIRECTION
DIRECTION VALUE
right
1
left
0
Default: 1
label_color
Enter the number of the desired color of the x-axis labels.
Default: 0 (Black)
lower_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the lower limit of the bar (e.g., tcPID.ilr).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
upper_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the upper limit of the bar (e.g., tcPID.iur).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
x_ticks
Enter the number of tick marks to be displayed on the scale.
Default: 0
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4.4.2.4 FP_DYVertbar
The submodel FP_DYVertbar (Figure 4-28) represents the value of a dynamic process variable in the form
of a vertical bargraph with a scale.
Figure 4-28. Dynamic Vertical Bar (FP_DYVertbar)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-29. Dynamic Vertical Bar Configuration Window
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Variables
TagAtom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point (or a constant value) that
is used to determine the length of the bar (e.g., tcPID.pv).
(User must define variable.)
bar_color
Enter the number of the desired fill color of the bar. (See any color palette in
the Settings or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 7 (White)
axis_color
Enter the number of the desired color of the y-axis.
Default: 0 (Black)
direction
Enter the number from the table below representing the direction that the bar
fills as the value of Tag.atom increases from lower_limit to upper_limit.
DIRECTION
DIRECTION VALUE
up
1
down
0
Default: 1
label_color
Enter the number of the desired color of the y-axis labels.
Default: 0 (Black)
lower_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the lower limit of the bar (e.g., 0).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
upper_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the upper limit of the bar (e.g., 100).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
y_ticks
Enter the number of tick marks to be displayed on the y axis.
Default: 0
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4.4.2.5 FP_DYtank
The submodel FP_DYtank (Figure 4-30) is a tank with a rounded bottom and top. The fill in both the
rounded bottom and the rectangular vessel body is based on the value of a dynamic process variable.
Figure 4-30. Dynamic Tank Submodel (FP_DYtank)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-31. Dynamic Tank Submodel Configuration Window
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Variables
TagAtom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point (or a constant value) that
is used to determine the height of the tank fill (e.g., tcPID.pv).
(User must define variable.)
fill_color
Enter the number of the desired fill color of the tank. (See any color palette in
the Settings or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 0 (Black)
lower_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the lower limit of the rectangular area (e.g., tcPID.ilr).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
upper_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the upper limit of the rectangular area (e.g., tcPID.iur).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
low level
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the value above which the rounded bottom is filled (e.g., 0).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
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4.4.2.6 FP_DYtank_ec
Like FP_DYtank, the submodel FP_DYtank_ec (Figure 4-32) is a tank with a rounded bottom and top. The
fill in both the rounded bottom and the rectangular vessel body is based on the value of a dynamic process
variable. An additional feature, erase color, allows configuration of a color to be used in portions of the submodel where the fill_color is erased. (For FP_DYtank, the erase color is the background color of the
graphic on which it appears.)
Figure 4-32. Dynamic Tank Submodel with Configurable Erase Color (FP_DYtank_ec)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure
Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-33. Dynamic Tank (with Erase Color) Submodel Configuration Window
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Variables
TagAtom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point (or a constant value) that
is used to determine the height of the tank fill (e.g., tcPID.pv).
(User must define variable.)
fill_color
Enter the number of the desired fill color of the tank. (See any color palette in
the Settings or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 0 (Black)
lower_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the lower limit of the rectangular area (e.g., tcPID.ilr).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
upper_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the upper limit of the rectangular area (e.g., tcPID.iur).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
low level
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the value above which the rounded bottom is filled (e.g., 0).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
erase_color Enter the number of the color to be used in portions of the bar where the
fill_color is erased.
Default: 0 (Black)
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4.4.3 Submodels for Control and Data Entry
✎
Note
Some Control and Data Entry Submodels use the variables
low_color, up_color, and face_color as shading colors to give the
button a 3 dimensional appearance. If these variables are not
configured, the default colors listed with the variable description will
be used. As a general rule, up_color should be lighter than
face_color, which in turn should be lighter than low_color.
4.4.3.1 FP_DYctrlpb
The submodel FP_DYctrlpb (Figure 4-34) is a model of a pushbutton which, when pressed, displays (in a
pop-up window) the appropriate group display model for the configured controller database point, allowing
for control of that point from a graphic.
Figure 4-34. Control Pushbutton (FP_DYctrlpb) and Resulting Pop-up Window
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Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-35. Control Pushbutton Configuration Window
Variables
TagName
Enter the Tagname of the controller database point to be displayed when the
button is pressed.
(User must define variable.)
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4.4.3.2 FP_DYmpoppb
The submodel FP_DYmpoppb (Figure 4-36) is a pushbutton which, when pressed, displays a model, chosen by the user, in a pop-up window.
Figure 4-36. Model Pop-up Pushbutton (FP_DYmpoppb)
Figure 4-37. Resulting Pop-up Model
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
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Figure 4-38. Model Pop-up Pushbutton Configuration Window
Variables
button_label
Enter the label to be displayed on the button.
Default: None
face_color
Enter the number of the desired face color of the button. (See any color palette in the Settings or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 26 (NOTE: Also used for FP_DYctrlpb.)
low_color
Enter the number of the desired lower edge color of the button.
Default: 29 (NOTE: Also used for FP_DYctrlpb.)
model
Enter the name of the model that will appear in the pop-up window when the
button is "pressed". (The model name should be that of an installed (on-line)
graphic or submodel.)
(User must define variable.)
scroll_flag
Enter a 1 if a narrow pop-up window is desired; Enter a 0 if a wide pop-up window is desired.
Default: 0
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tag
Enter the Tagname of any variable in the "model" that uses the variable
$TAG$. (See Section 4.3.3.2.2, Declaring Variables in Submodels and Section 4.3.3.2.3, Naming Variables, for a discussion on declaring variables in
submodels.)
txt_color
Enter the number of the desired text color of the button label.
Default: 4 (NOTE: Also used for FP_DYctrlpb.)
up_color
Enter the number of the desired upper edge color of the button.
Default: 23 (NOTE: Also used for FP_DYctrlpb.)
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4.4.3.3 FP_DYentervaluepb
The submodel FP_DYentervaluepb (Figure 4-39) is a pushbutton which, when pressed, displays in a popup window a means of entering a floating point value into a controller tag.atom.
Figure 4-39. Enter Value Pushbutton (FP_DYentervaluepb) and Resulting Pop-up Window
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-40. Enter Value Pushbutton Configuration Window
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Variables
TagAtom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data will be
written (e.g., tcPID.sp).
(User must define variable.)
button_label
Enter the label to be displayed on the button (e.g., SP).
Default: None
face_color
Enter the number of the desired face color of the button. (See any color
palette in the Settings or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 26
low_color
Enter the number of the desired lower edge color of the button.
Default: 29
txt_color
Enter the number of the desired text color of the button label.
Default: 4
up_color
Enter the number of the desired upper edge color of the button label (e.g., 23
used for FP_DYctrlpb).
Default: 23
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4.4.3.4 FP_DYentertextpb
The submodel FP_DYentertextpb (Figure 4-41) is a pushbutton that, when pressed, displays in a pop-up
window a means of entering an ASCII string into a controller Tag.atom.
Figure 4-41. Enter Text Pushbutton Submodel (FP_DYentertextpb) and
Resulting Pop-up Window
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure
Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-42. Enter Text Pushbutton Configuration Window
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Variables
TagAtom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data will be
written (e.g., REACTOR-01A.DB1).
Title
Enter the label to be displayed in the title bar of the pop-up window. (e.g.,
Enter the text:).
Default: None
button_label
Enter the label to be displayed on the button (e.g., SP).
Default: None
face_color
Enter the number of the desired face color of the button. (See any color palette in the Settings or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 26 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
low_color
Enter the number of the desired lower edge color of the button.
Default: 29 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
txt_color
Enter the number of the desired text color of the button label.
Default: 4 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
up_color
Enter the number of the desired upper edge color of the button label.
Default: 23 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
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4.4.3.5 FP_DYputpb
The submodel FP_DYputpb (Figure 4-43) is a pushbutton which, when pressed, writes numeric values
and/or ASCII text into up to 4 controller database points. The following example shows an instance of
FP_DYputpb configured to start the motor MCV-R01A01 (DCD module) when the button is "pressed"
(clicked on).
Figure 4-43. Put Pushbutton Submodel (FP_DYputpb)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The Submodel Configuration window for the PUT Pushbutton
Submodel will appear will appear. Notice that this window (Figure 4-44) is scrollable and contains more
variables than those which appear in the display area. Use the scrollbar to access the additional variables
(Figure 4-45).
Figure 4-44. Put Pushbutton Configuration Window, Part 1
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Figure 4-45. Put Pushbutton Configuration Window, Part 2
Variables
button_label
Enter the label to be displayed on the button (e.g., Start).
Default: None
face_color
Enter the number of the desired face color of the button. (See any color palette in the Settings or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 26 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
low_color
Enter the number of the desired lower edge color of the button.
Default: 29 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
put_tagatom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data configured in put_value will be written (e.g., MCV-R01A01.INB).
Default: None
put_tagatom2 Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data configured in put_value2 will be written.
Default: None
put_tagatom3 Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data configured in put_value3 will be written.
Default: None
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put_tagatom4 Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data configured in put_value4 will be written.
Default: None
put_value
Enter the value that will be written to the controller database point configured
in put_tagatom (e.g., 1).
Default: None
put_value2
Enter the value that will be written to the controller database point configured
in put_tagatom2.
Default: None
put_value3
Enter the value that will be written to the controller database point configured
in put_tagatom3.
Default: None
put_value4
Enter the value that will be written to the controller database point configured
in put_tagatom4.
Default: None
txt_color
Enter the number of the desired text color of the button label.
Default: 4 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
up_color
Enter the number of the desired upper edge color of the button label.
Default: 23 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
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4.4.3.6 FP_DYput1pb
The submodel FP_DYput1pb (Figure 4-46) is a pushbutton which, when pressed, writes a numeric value
or ASCII character into one controller database point. The following example shows an instance of
FP_DYput1pb configured to start the motor MCV-R01A01 (DCD module) when the button is "pressed"
(clicked on).
✎
Note
FP_DYput1pb is basically a simpler version of FP_DYputpb, and
can be used in cases where one value is to be written to one
controller database point. (FP_DYputpb allows up to four values to
be written to as many as four controller database points.)
Figure 4-46. Put1 Pushbutton Submodel (FP_DYput1pb)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The Submodel Configuration window for the PUT1 Pushbutton
Submodel will appear will appear (Figure 4-47).
Figure 4-47. Put1 Pushbutton Configuration Window
Variables
button_label
Enter the label to be displayed on the button (e.g., Start).
Default: None
put_tagatom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data
configured in put_value will be written (e.g., MCV-R01A01.INB).
Default: None
put_value
Enter the value that will be written to the controller database point configured
in put_tagatom (e.g., 1).
Default: None
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4.4.3.7 FP_DYputpbstat
The submodel FP_DYputpbstat (Figure 4-48) is a pushbutton which, when pressed, writes values into up
to 4 controller database points and shows a red status "light" when the value of a controller database
tag.atom is set to a configurable value. The following example shows an instance of FP_DYputpbstat configured to put the CON module tcPID into AUTO mode when the button is "pressed" (clicked on). Additionally, when the AUT atom of the controller is set, the status light appears in red.
Figure 4-48. Putpbstat Submodel (FP_DYputpbstat)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The Submodel Configuration window for the PUTPBSTAT Pushbutton Submodel will appear. Notice that this window (Figure 4-49) is scrollable and contains more
variables than those which appear in the display area. Use the scrollbar to access the additional variables
(Figure 4-50)
Figure 4-49. Putpbstat Submodel Configuration Window, Part 1
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Figure 4-50. Putpbstat Submodel Configuration Window, Part 2
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Variables
button_label
Enter the label to be displayed on the button (e.g., A).
Default: None
on_value
Enter the value of the controller database tag.atom configured in the variable
statatom that will set the status "light" on. The comparison applies only for
integer-type values.
Default: 0
put_tagatom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data
configured in put_value will be written (e.g., tcPID.AUT).
Default: None
put_tagatom2 Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data
configured in put_value2 will be written.
Default: None
put_tagatom3 Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data
configured in put_value3 will be written.
Default: None
put_tagatom4 Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data
configured in put_value4 will be written.
Default: None
put_value
Enter the value that will be written to the controller database point configured
in put_tagatom (e.g., 1).
Default: None
put_value2
Enter the value that will be written to the controller database point configured
in put_tagatom2.
Default: None
put_value3
Enter the value that will be written to the controller database point configured
in put_tagatom3.
Default: None
put_value4
Enter the value that will be written to the controller database point configured
in put_tagatom4.
Default: None
statatom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point that sets the status "light"
on when its value is equal to on_value (e.g., tcPID.AUT).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
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4.4.3.8 FP_DYputpbstat2
The submodel FP_DYputpbstat2 (Figure 4-51) is a pushbutton that, when pressed, writes values into up
to 4 controller database points. The button label changes color and an asterisk is displayed based on the
value of a controller database point. The following example shows an instance of FP_DYputpbstat2 configured to put the CON module tcPID into AUTO mode when the button is "pressed" (clicked on). Additionally,
when the AUT atom of the controller is set, an asterisk (k) is displayed to the right of the label, and the label
"Auto" appears in red.
Figure 4-51. FP_DYputpbstat2 Submodel
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The Submodel Configuration window for the PUTPBSTAT2
Pushbutton Submodel will appear. Notice that this window (Figure 4-52) is scrollable and contains more
variables than those which appear in the display area. Use the scrollbar to access the additional variables
(Figure 4-53).
Figure 4-52. FP_DYputpbstat2 Submodel Configuration Window, Part 1
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Figure 4-53. FP_DYputpbstat2 Submodel Configuration Window, Part 2
Variables
button_label
Enter the label to be displayed on the button (e.g., Auto).
Default: None
face_color
Enter the number of the desired face color of the button. (See any color
palette in the Settings or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 26 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
low_color
Enter the number of the desired lower edge color of the button.
Default: 29 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
off_color
Enter the number of the desired color of the button label when the controller
database point configured in statatom is not equal to the value configured in
on_value.
Default: 0 (Black)
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on_color
Enter the number of the desired color of the button label when the controller
database point configured in statatom is equal to the value configured in
on_value.
Default: 0 (Black)
on_value
Enter the value of the controller database point configured in the variable
statatom that will cause an asterisk to be displayed on the button face and
cause the button label to be displayed in the color configured in on_color.
Default: 0
put_tagatom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data
configured in put_value will be written (e.g., tcPID.AUT).
Default: None
put_tagatom2 Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data
configured in put_value2 will be written.
Default: None
put_tagatom3 Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data
configured in put_value3 will be written.
Default: None
put_tagatom4 Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data
configured in put_value4 will be written.
Default: None
put_value
Enter the value that will be written to the controller database point configured
in put_tagatom (e.g., 1).
Default: None
put_value2
Enter the value that will be written to the controller database point configured
in put_tagatom2.
Default : None
put_value3
Enter the value that will be written to the controller database point configured
in put_tagatom3.
Default: None
put_value4
Enter the value that will be written to the controller database point configured
in put_tagatom4.
Default: None
statatom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point that is sets the status
"light" on when its value is equal to on_value (e.g., tcPID.AUT).
Default: None
up_color
Enter the number of the desired upper edge color of the button label.
Default: 23 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
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4.4.3.9 FP_DYstatpb
The submodel FP_DYstatpb (Figure 4-54) is a pushbutton which, when pressed, writes a value into a single controller database point and shows a red status "light" when the status of a controller database point
is set to put_value. The following example shows an instance of FP_DYstatpb configured to put the CON
module tcPID into AUTO mode when the button is "pressed" (clicked on). Additionally, when the AUT atom
of the controller is set, the status light appears in red.
✎
Note
FP_DYstatpb is basically a simpler version of FP_DYputpbstat, and
can be used in cases where a value is to be written to only one
controller database point. (FP_DYputpbstat allows up to four values
to be written to as many as four controller database points.)
Figure 4-54. FP_DYstatpb Submodel (FP_DYstatpb)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The Submodel Configuration window for the STATPB Pushbutton Submodel will appear (Figure 4-55).
Figure 4-55. FP_DYstatpb Submodel Configuration Window
Variables
button_label
Enter the label to be displayed on the button (e.g., A).
Default: None
put_tagatom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to which the data configured in put_value will be written (e.g., tcPID.AUT). This tag.atom also sets the
status "light" on when its value is equal to put_value (e.g., tcPID.AUT).
Default: None
put_value
Enter the value that will be written to the controller database point configured
in put_tagatom (e.g., 1); this is also the value used by put_tagatom to set the
status "light" on.
Default: None
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4.4.3.10 FP_DYhslider
The submodel FP_DYhslider (Figure 4-56) provides a horizontal slider for control of controller database
points. The following example changes the output of a Controller module.
Figure 4-56. Horizontal Slider Submodel (FP_DYhslider)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-57. Horizontal Slider Submodel Configuration Window
Variables
display_atom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point represented by the position of
the solid arrow (e.g., tcPID.OUT).
(User must define variable.)
lower_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the lower limit of the slider (e.g., tcPID.ilr).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
target_atom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to be changed when the slider
is released. The value is represented by the position of the hollow arrow (e.g.,
tcPID.TOUT).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
upper_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the upper limit of the slider (e.g., tcPID.iur).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
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4.4.3.11 FP_DYvslider
The submodel FP_DYvslider (Figure 4-58) provides a vertical slider for control of controller database
points. The following example changes the setpoint of a Controller module.
Figure 4-58. Vertical Slider Submodel (FP_DYvslider)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-59. Vertical Slider Configuration Window
Variables
display_atom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point represented by the position of
the solid arrow (e.g., tcPID.CSP).
(User must define variable.)
lower_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the lower limit of the slider (e.g., tcPID.ilr).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
target_atom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point to be written to when the
slider is released. The value is represented by the position of the hollow arrow
(e.g., tcPID.SP).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
upper_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that
represents the upper limit of the slider. (e.g., tcPID.iur).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
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4.4.3.12 FP_DYtoggle
The submodel FP_DYtoggle (Figure 4-60) is a pushbutton that, when pressed, toggles the value of a controller database point between 1 and 0. The color and text of the button label changes based on the value
of a controller database point. The following example shows an instance of FP_DYtoggle configured to
toggle the state of a DCD module's INB bit when the button is clicked on.
Figure 4-60. FP_DYtoggle Submodel
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The Submodel Configuration window for the FP_DYtoggle
Pushbutton Submodel will appear.
Figure 4-61. FP_DYtoggle Submodel Configuration Window
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Variables
TagAtom
Enter the tag.atom of the controller database point that is to be toggled between 1
and 0.
(User must define variable.)
face_color
Enter the number of the desired face color of the button. (See any color palette in
the Settings or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 26 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
low_color
Enter the number of the desired lower edge color of the button.
Default: 29 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
off_color
Enter the number of the desired color of the button label when the controller database point configured in TagAtom is not equal to the value configured in on_value.
Default: 0 (Black)
off_label
Enter the desired text to appear on the button face when the controller database
point configured in TagAtom is not equal to the value configured in on_value.
Default: None.
on_color
Enter the number of the desired color of the button label when the controller database point configured in TagAtom is equal to the value configured in on_value.
Default: 0 (Black)
on_label
Enter the desired text to appear on the button face when the controller database
point configured in TagAtom is equal to the value configured in on_value.
Default: None.
on_value
Enter the value of the controller database point configured in the variable TagAtom
that will change the button label to the text defined in the variable on_label.
Default: 0
up_color
Enter the number of the desired upper edge color of the button label.
Default: 23 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
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4.4.4 Display Vectoring
4.4.4.1 FP_DYvectorpb
The submodel FP_DYvectorpb (Figure 4-62) is a pushbutton which, when clicked, causes the display in
an Operator Window to change to a new display, specified by the user via configuration. By default, this
change occurs in the window in which the VECTOR pushbutton is located; to cause the new display to
appear in a different Operator Window, use the "drag and drop" mode of operation; i.e., instead of clicking
on the VECTOR pushbutton, position the pointer on it and press the left mouse button. Continue to hold
down the mouse button and drag the pointer until it is completely inside the frame of the Operator Window
in which the new display is to be "dropped". Release the mouse button, and the new display will be
dropped into the window.
Figure 4-62. Vector Pushbutton Submodel (FP_DYvectorpb)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-63. Vector Pushbutton Submodel Configuration Window
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Variables
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Display type
Select the type of display to vector to.
(User must define variable.)
Index
Select the index of the desired display type or the Tagname from the pop-up
window that appears following the selection of the display type.
(User must define variable.)
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4.4.4.2 FP_DYtagpb
The submodel FP_DYtagpb (Figure 4-64) is a pushbutton containing the tagname of a controller database
point which, when pressed, changes the display in the Operator Window to the point display for the tagname.
Figure 4-64. Tagname Pushbutton (FP_DYtagpb)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure
Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-65. Tagname Pushbutton Configuration Window
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Variables
TagName
Enter the Tag (TagName.tag) of the controller database point to be displayed
when the button is pressed.
(User must define variable.)
face_color
Enter the number of the desired face color of the button. (See any color palette in
the Settings or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 26 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
(User must define variable.)
low_color
Enter the number of the desired lower edge color of the button.
Default: 29 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
txt_color
Enter the number of the desired text color of the button label.
Default: 4 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
up_color
Enter the number of the desired upper edge color of the button label.
Default: 23 (used for FP_DYctrlpb)
tagnum
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For use by Summary Display only. User input not required.
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4.4.5 Trends
4.4.5.1 FP_DYHoriztrend
The submodel FP_DYHoriztrend (Figure 4-66) displays a current trend for a controller database point.
The trace is drawn from the right of the submodel. The data is scanned once every second and is not
stored historically. The data is plotted on the y-axis and the number of samples is plotted on the x-axis.
Figure 4-66. Horizontal Trend Submodel (FP_DYHoriztrend)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pull-down menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-67. Horizontal Trend Submodel Configuration Window
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Variables
TagName
Enter the Tag (TagName.tag) of the controller database point that is to be trended
(e.g., tcPID.pv).
(User must define variable.)
num_points
Enter the number of samples displayed on the trend.
(User must define variable.)
axis_color
Enter the number of the desired axis color. (See any color palette in the Settings
or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 0 (Black)
label_color
Enter the number of the desired label color.
Default: 0 (Black)
trace_color
Enter the number of the desired trace color.
Default: 7 (White)
x_ticks
Enter the number of tickmarks on the X axis
Default: 0
y_ticks
Enter the number of tickmarks on the Y axis
Default: 0
lower_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that represents the lower limit of the trace (e.g., tcPID.ilr).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
upper_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that represents the upper limit of the trace (e.g., tcPID.iur).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
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4.4.5.2 FP_DYVerttrend
The submodel FP_DYVerttrend (Figure 4-68) displays a current trend for a controller database point. The
trace is drawn from the top of the submodel. The data is scanned once every second and is not stored historically. The data is plotted on the x-axis and the number of samples is plotted on the y-axis.
Figure 4-68. Vertical Trend Model (FP_DYVerttrend)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pull-down menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-69. Vertical Trend Model Configuration Window
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Variables
FP_DYtrendpb
TagName
Enter the Tag (TagName.tag) of the controller database point that is to be trended
(e.g., tcPID.pv).
(User must define variable.)
num_points
Enter the number of samples displayed on the trend.
(User must define variable.)
axis_color
Enter the number of the desired axis color. (See any color palette in the Settings
or Properties windows for color numbers.)
Default: 0 (Black)
label_color
Enter the number of the desired label color.
Default: 0 (Black)
trace_color
Enter the number of the desired trace color.
Default: 7 (White)
x_ticks
Enter the number of tickmarks on the X axis.
Default: 0
y_ticks
Enter the number of tickmarks on the Y axis.
Default: 0
lower_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that represents the lower limit of the trace (e.g., tcPID.ilr).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
upper_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that represents the upper limit of the trace (e.g., tcPID.iur).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
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4.4.5.3 FP_DYtrendpb
The submodel FP_DYtrendpb (Figure 4-70) is a pushbutton which, when clicked on, displays (in a pop-up
window) the Historical Trend with which it has been configured.
Figure 4-70. Historical Trend Pushbutton (FP_DYtrendpb)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure
Submodel item on the resulting pull-down menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will
appear.
Figure 4-71. Historical Trend Pushbutton Configuration Window
Variables
trend_index
Enter the index number of the Historical Trend to be displayed when the button is
clicked.
(User must define variable.)
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4.4.5.4 FP_DYHisttrend
In the Grafx editor, FP_DYHisttrend appears simply as an unfilled rectangle which covers the extent of the
submodel. Once the graphic containing this submodel has been installed, a properly configured instance of
FP_DYHisttrend appears as shown in Figure 4-72. The submodel FP_DYHisttrend is an Historical Trend
display.
Figure 4-72. Historical Trend Model (FP_DYHisttrend)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pull-down menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-73. Historical Trend Model Configuration Window
Variables
trend_index
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Enter the index number of the Historical Trend to be displayed when the button is
clicked.
(User must define variable.)
Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
4.4.6 Hierarchical Displays
4.4.6.1 FP_DYgroupmod
The submodel FP_DYgroupmod is used to display the model of a controller database point as used on a
Group Display. In the Grafx editor, FP_DYgroupmod appears simply as an unfilled rectangle which covers
the extent of the submodel. Once the graphic containing this submodel has been installed, a properly configured instance of FP_DYgroupmod appears as shown in Figure 4-74.
Figure 4-74. Group Display Submodel (FP_DYgroupmod)
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Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pull-down menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-75. Group Display Submodel Configuration Window
Variables
tag
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Enter the Tagname of the controller database point that is to be displayed when
the button is clicked.
(User must define variable.)
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4.4.6.2 FP_DYpointmod
The submodel FP_DYpointmod (Figure 4-76) displays the point display of a controller database point. In
the Grafx editor, FP_DYpointmod appears simply as an unfilled rectangle which covers the extent of the
submodel. Once the graphic containing this submodel has been installed, a properly configured instance of
FP_DYpointmod appears as shown in Figure 4-76.
Figure 4-76. Point Display Submodel (FP_DYpointmod)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pull-down menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-77. Point Display Submodel Configuration Window
Variables
tag
Enter the Tagname of the controller database point that is to be displayed when
the button is clicked.
(User must define variable.)
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4.4.7 Miscellaneous Displays
4.4.7.1 FP_DYdial
The submodel FP_DYdial (Figure 4-78) represents the value of a controller database point in the form of a
dial. The white dial hand represents the process variable, while the red hand represents a setpoint.
Figure 4-78. Dial Submodel (FP_DYdial)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pull-down menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-79. Dial Submodel Configuration Window
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Variables
TagAtom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point (or a constant value) that is to
be displayed (e.g., tcPID.pv).
(User must define variable.)
lower_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that represents the lower limit of the dial (e.g., tcPID.ilr).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
setpoint
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point (or a constant value) that represents the setpoint of the dial (e.g., tcPID.csp).
Default: None
units
Enter the ASCII string describing the Engineering Units (e.g., DEG C).
Default: eun
upper_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that represents the upper limit of the dial (e.g., tcPID.iur).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
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4.4.7.2 FP_DYmeter
The submodel FP_DYmeter (Figure 4-80) displays an analog meter representation of the value of a controller database point.
Figure 4-80. Meter Submodel (FP_DYmeter)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pull-down menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-81. Meter Submodel Configuration Window
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Variables
TagAtom
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point (or a constant value) that is to
be displayed (e.g., tcPID.pv).
(User must define variable.)
lower_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that represents the lower limit of the meter (e.g., tcPID.ilr).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
units
Enter the ASCII string describing the Engineering Units (e.g., DEG C).
Default: eun
upper_limit
Enter the Tag.atom of the controller database point or the constant value that represents the upper limit of the meter (e.g., tcPID.iur).
Default: None
(User must define variable.)
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4.4.8 Rotating Equipment Displays
4.4.8.1 FP_DYwheel
The submodel FP_DYwheel (Figure 4-82) is an animated wheel that can be configured so that it appears
to spin.
Figure 4-82. Dynamic Wheel (FP_DYwheel)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-83. Dynamic Wheel Configuration Window
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Variables
dir
Enter the tagname.atom of a point in the controller database, or enter the value
representing the direction in which the wheel will "spin" (see table below)
(User must define variable.)
DIRECTION
VALUE
clockwise
1
counterclockwise
0
on_tagatom
Enter the tagname.atom of a point in the controller database (i.e., DCD_0.OUT1;
the value of this point is used by the variable on_value (described below) to
activate the "spin" dynamic attribute of the submodel.
(User must define variable.)
on_value
Enter a value; the value entered here will be compared with the value of the
controller database point configured in the variable on_tagatom. When the value
of the tag.atom matches the value configured here for on_value, the wheel will
appear to "spin".
(User must define variable.)
period
Enter the frequency at which the wheel spokes will appear to change position.
The period is measured in tenths of a second; the number entered here defines
how many tenths of a second are in the period (e.g., a "5" entered here means
the period would be .5 seconds in duration). NOTE: The higher the number used
to define the period, the slower the object will appear to "spin".
Default: 1 (One tenth of a second.)
spoke_color
Enter the index number of the color to be used for the wheel spokes.
Default: 0 (Black)
wheel_color
Enter the number of the color to be used for of the wheel interior.
Default: 0 (Black)
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4.4.8.2 FP_DYpump_lf
The submodel FP_DYpump_lf (Figure 4-84) is a pump with an outlet on the left. The submodel can be
configured to change fill color dynamically, and also contains a wheel which can be animated so that it
appears to spin in a counter-clockwise direction.
Figure 4-84. Dynamic Pump - Left (FP_DYpump_lf)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-85. Dynamic Pump (Left) Configuration Window
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Variables
on_tagatom
Enter the tagname.atom of a controller database point (i.e., DCD_0.OUT1);
the value of this point will be used by the variable on_value (described below)
to initiate the "spin" dynamic and change the fill color in the submodel.
(User must define variable.)
on_value
The value entered here will be compared with the value of the controller
database point configured in the variable on_tagatom. When the value of the
tagname.atom matches the value configured here for on_value, the color of
the pump will change to that defined in the variable pump_on_color and the
wheel portion of the submodel will appear to spin.
(User must define variable.)
period
Enter the frequency at which the wheel spokes will appear to change position.
The period is measured in tenths of a second; the number entered here
defines how many tenths of a second are in the period (e.g., a "5" entered
here means the period would be 0.5 seconds in duration).
Default: 1 (One tenth of a second.)
pump_off_color
Enter the number of the fill color to be used for the pump submodel when the
controller database point configured in the variable on_tagatom is not equal to
the value configured in the variable on_value.
Default: 0 (Black)
pump_on_color
Enter the index number of the fill color to be used for the pump submodel
when the controller database point configured in the variable on_tagatom is
equal to the value configured in on_value.
Default: 0 (Black)
spoke_color
Enter the index number of the color to be used for the spokes of the wheel
portion of the submodel.
Default: 0 (Black)
wheel_color
Enter the index number of the color to be used for the interior of the wheel portion of the submodel.
Default: 0 (Black)
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4.4.8.3 FP_DYpump_rt
The submodel FP_DYpump_rt (Figure 4-86) is a pump with an outlet on the right. The submodel can be
configured to change fill color dynamically and contains a wheel which can be animated so that it appears
to spin in a clockwise direction.
Figure 4-86. Dynamic Pump - Right (FP_DYpump_rt)
Position the pointer on the submodel and click the right mouse button, then click on the Configure Submodel item on the resulting pop-up menu. The following Submodel Configuration window will appear.
Figure 4-87. Dynamic Pump (Right) Configuration Window
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Variables
on_tagatom
Enter the tagname.atom of a controller database point (i.e., DCD_0.OUT1);
the value of this point will be used by the variable on_value (described below)
to initiate the "spin" dynamic and change the fill color in the submodel.
(User must define variable.)
on_value
The value entered here will be compared with the value of the controller
database point configured in the variable on_tagatom. When the value of the
tagname.atom matches the value configured here for on_value, the color of
the pump will change to that defined in the variable pump_on_color and the
wheel portion of the submodel will appear to spin.
(User must define variable.)
period
Enter the frequency at which the wheel spokes appear to change position.
The period is measured in tenths of a second; the number entered here
defines how many tenths of a second are in the period (e.g., a "5" entered
here means the period would be 0.5 seconds in duration).
Default: 1
pump_off_color
Enter the number of the fill color to be used for the pump submodel when the
controller database point configured in the variable on_tagatom is not equal to
the value configured in the variable on_value.
Default: 0 (Black)
pump_on_color
Enter the index number of the fill color to be used for the pump submodel
when the controller database point configured in the variable on_tagatom is
equal to the value configured in on_value.
Default: 0 (Black)
spoke_color
Enter the index number of the color to be used for the spokes of the wheel
portion of the submodel.
Default: 0 (Black)
wheel_color
Enter the index number of the color to be used for the interior of the wheel portion of the submodel.
Default: 0 (Black)
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4.4.9 Expressions as Submodel Variables
As shown in preceding portions of this chapter, values are assigned to a submodel's variables when a
graphic is configured. The values assigned are of two types: static and dynamic. In the Micro-DCI Submodels used here as examples, variables which can be assigned a tagname (e.g., TagAtom, TagName,
TAG) are dynamic variables. All other variables which can be assigned for the Micro-DCI Submodel, such
as font, face_color, etc., are static variables.
✎
Note
In the case of non-Micro-DCI Submodels, dynamic variables are
those which have been declared so that they can be assigned
tagnames. See the sub-section Section 4.3.3, Creating Custom
Dynamics for information on creating custom dynamics and
declaring variables.
The value assigned to a static variable must be a numeric or string constant. For example, the pushbutton
submodel FP_DYputpb (see Section 4.4.3.5) has a static variable named button_label. This variable must
be assigned a string constant, such as Press Here.
The value assigned to a dynamic variable can be a numeric or string constant, but can also be the name of
a controller tag.atom. For example, the submodel FP_DYvalue has a dynamic variable named TagAtom. If
the name of a controller tag.atom such as CON1.SP is assigned to this variable, then the value of
CON1.SP will appear on the graphic when it is displayed in an Operator Window.
Additionally, an expression can be configured as the value of a dynamic variable. The expression can
include:
•
constants
•
controller tag.atom names
•
arithmetic operators
•
logical operators
For example, the following expression could be assigned to the TagAtom dynamic variable of the
FP_DYvalue submodel. The expression would cause the value of CON1.SP to be converted from degrees
Centigrade to Fahrenheit before it is displayed on a graphic:
9/5 * CON1.SP + 32
The following rules govern the use of expressions assigned to submodel dynamic variables.
1. An expression can include controller tag.atoms, constants, arithmetic and logical operators,
and parentheses.
2. The arithmetic operators are:
206
+
addition
-
subtraction
*
multiplication
/
division
^
exponentiation
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3. The logical operators are:
!
NOT
&&
AND
||
OR
==
EQUAL
!=
NOT EQUAL
4. Operators should be surrounded by spaces. For example, the following expression is invalid:
CON1.SP+10
The expression should be written as follows:
CON1.SP + 10
5. The set of rules which determines which operators are performed first is known as
precedence, and is described in Section 4.3.1.1, Configuring the Expression - Operators and
Operands. Precedence can be controlled using parentheses. Operator precedence used here
follows the precedence used in the C Language (with the exception of the exponentiation
operator (^), which is not available in C). For convenience, the operators available for use in
expressions assigned to submodel variables are listed here. Operators grouped together have
equal precedence. Higher precedence operator groups are located higher in the list.
SYMBOL
()
DESCRIPTION
Parentheses
!
Logical not
^
Exponentiate
*
Multiply
/
Divide
+
Add
-
Subtract
==
Equal
!=
Not equal
&&
Logical and
||
Logical or
6. Expressions are limited to 120 alphanumeric characters. For example, the following
expression contains 14 characters: (CON1.SP + 10)
7. Syntax errors in expressions are not detected by the Graphics Editor; they are detected when
the graphic is displayed in an Operator Window.
8. Expressions must be enclosed in quotes. This is done automatically if the model being edited
is a graphic, but must be done by the user when a submodel is being edited.
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9. Submodel variables cannot be included in expressions. For example, the following expression
is invalid:
_px + 10
✎
Note
This section describes the assignment of expressions to submodel
dynamic variables. This should not be confused with the Dynamic
Attributes feature of the Grafx editor.
The Dynamic Attributes feature allows you to use another form of
expression to configure dynamics which affect a limited set of
graphic attributes of an object or submodel. The expression used in
the Dynamic Attributes feature is governed by a different set of
rules. Examples of the form of expression used with the Dynamic
Attributes feature are provided in Section 4.3.4, Dynamic
Configuration Examples.
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4.5 Micro-PWC Symbols
Micro-PWC Symbols are standard, static submodels, pre-configured and supplied by MicroMod. Symbols
are objects which represent standard items such as vessels, tanks and storage bins. Symbols which correspond to those defined by the Instrument Society of America (ISA) have the prefix ISA_. Non-ISA symbols
created by MicroMod contain the prefix FP_ST. (Dynamic attributes can be assigned to these submodels
via the Dynamic Attributes menu item.)
The following sections contain tables which list the available ISA and Micro-PWC Symbols by category.
Each table lists the name of the symbol, followed by a brief description.
Table 4-7. Valves and Actuators
SYMBOL NAME
DESCRIPTION
ILLUSTRATION
FP_STvlv3
3 Way Valve Body
Figure 4-88, Item A
FP_STvlv3actr
3 Way Valve with On-Off Actuator
Figure 4-88, Item B
FP_STvlv3matr
3 Way Valve with Manual Actuator
Figure 4-88, Item C
FP_STvlv3tact
3 Way valve with throttling Actuator
Figure 4-88, Item D
ISA_ACTR
On-Off Actuator
Figure 4-89, Item A
ISA_BVLV
Butterfly Valve
Figure 4-89, Item H
ISA_CVLV
Check Valve
Figure 4-89, Item F
ISA_MATR
Manual Actuator
Figure 4-89, Item B
ISA_RVLV
Relief Valve
Figure 4-89 Item E
ISA_TACT
Throttling Actuator
Figure 4-89, Item C
ISA_VLV3
3 Way Valve Body
Figure 4-89, Item G
ISA_VLV3_ACTR
3 Way Valve with On-Off Actuator
Figure 4-89, Item M
ISA_VLV3_MATR
3 Way Valve with Manual Actuator
Figure 4-89, Item L
ISA_VLVE
Valve Body
Figure 4-89, Item D
ISA_VLVE_ACTR
Valve with On-Off Actuator
Figure 4-89, Item I
ISA_VLVE_MATR
Valve with Manual Actuator
Figure 4-89, Item K
ISA_VLVE_TACT
Valve with Throttling Actuator
Figure 4-89, Item J
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Table 4-8. Containers and Vessels
SYMBOL NAME
DESCRIPTION
ILLUSTRATION
FP_STcyltank
Cylindrical Tank
Figure 4-88, Item G
ISA_ATNK
Atmospheric Tank
Figure 4-90, Item E
ISA_BINN
Storage Bin
Figure 4-90, Item F
ISA_DTWR
Distillation Tower
Figure 4-90, Item A
ISA_FTNK
Floating Roof Tank
Figure 4-90, Item G
ISA_GHDR
Gas Holder
Figure 4-90, Item H
ISA_JVSL
Jacketed Vessel
Figure 4-90, Item D
ISA_PVSL
Pressure Storage Vessel
Figure 4-90, Item I
ISA_RCTR
Reactor
Figure 4-90, Item B
ISA_VSSL
Vessel
Figure 4-90, Item C
ISA_WHPR
Weigh Hopper
Figure 4-90, Item J
Table 4-9. Rotating Equipment (Pumps and Blowers)
SYMBOL NAME
DESCRIPTION
ILLUSTRATION
ISA_BLWR_LF
Blower - Outlet on Left
Figure 4-91, Item B
ISA_BLWR_RT
Blower - Outlet on Right
Figure 4-91, Item A
ISA_CMPR
Compressor
Figure 4-91, Item F
ISA_PUMP_LF
Pump - Outlet on Left
Figure 4-91, Item C
ISA_PUMP_RT
Pump - Outlet on Right
Figure 4-91, Item D
ISA_TURB
Turbine
Figure 4-91, Item E
Table 4-10. Reciprocating Equipment
SYMBOL NAME
ISA_RECP
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DESCRIPTION
Reciprocating Compressor
ILLUSTRATION
Figure 4-91 Item G
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Table 4-11. Mixing Equipment
SYMBOL NAME
DESCRIPTION
ILLUSTRATION
ISA_AGIT
Agitator
Figure 4-92, Item E
ISA_AGIT_MOTR
Agitator with Motor
Figure 4-92, Item F
ISA_IMIX
Inline Mixer
Figure 4-92, Item G
Table 4-12. Material Handling Equipment
SYMBOL NAME
DESCRIPTION
ILLUSTRATION
ISA_CNVR
Conveyor
Figure 4-92, Item A
ISA_MILL
Mill
Figure 4-92, Item D
ISA_RFDR
Rotary Feeder
Figure 4-92, Item B
ISA_RSTD
Roll Stand
Figure 4-92, Item C
ISA_SCNV
Screw Conveyor
Figure 4-92, Item H
Table 4-13. Electrical Equipment
SYMBOL NAME
DESCRIPTION
ILLUSTRATION
ISA_CBRK
Circuit Breaker
Figure 4-93, Item A
ISA_DLTA
Delta Connection
Figure 4-93, Item B
ISA_FUSE
Fuse
Figure 4-93, Item C
ISA_MCTR
Manual Contactor
Figure 4-93, Item D
ISA_MOTR
Motor
Figure 4-93, Item E
ISA_MOTR_BASE
Motor with Base
Figure 4-93, Item F
ISA_STAT
State Indicator
Figure 4-93, Item G
ISA_WYEC
WYE Connection
Figure 4-93, Item I
ISA_XFMR
Transformer
Figure 4-93, Item H
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Table 4-14. Filters
SYMBOL NAME
DESCRIPTION
ILLUSTRATION
ISA_LFLT
Liquid Filter
Figure 4-94, Item A
ISA_VFLT
Vacuum Filter
Figure 4-94, Item D
Table 4-15. Scrubbers and Precipitators
SYMBOL NAME
DESCRIPTION
ILLUSTRATION
ISA_EPCP
Electrostatic Precipitator
Figure 4-94, Item B
ISA_SCBR
Scrubber
Figure 4-94, Item C
Table 4-16. Separators
SYMBOL NAME
DESCRIPTION
ILLUSTRATION
ISA_CSEP
Cyclone Separator
Figure 4-94, Item E
ISA_RSEP
Rotary Separator
Figure 4-94, Item F
ISA_SDRY
Spray Dryer
Figure 4-94, Item G
Table 4-17. Heat Transfer Devices
SYMBOL NAME
212
DESCRIPTION
ILLUSTRATION
ISA_FAXR
Forced Air Exchanger
Figure 4-95, Item D
ISA_FURN
Furnace
Figure 4-95, Item C
ISA_KILN
Rotary Kiln
Figure 4-95, Item E
ISA_XCHG1
Exchanger
Figure 4-95, Item A
ISA_XCHG2
Exchanger
Figure 4-95, Item B
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Table 4-18. HVAC Equipment
SYMBOL NAME
DESCRIPTION
ILLUSTRATION
ISA_CTWR
Cooling Tower
Figure 4-95, Item F
ISA_EVPR
Evaporator
Figure 4-95, Item G
ISA_FNXR
Finned Exchanger
Figure 4-95, Item H
Table 4-19. Miscellaneous
SYMBOL NAME
DESCRIPTION
ILLUSTRATION
FP_STfillarrow
Filled Arrowhead
Not Shown
FP_STrtarrow
Right Arrow
Not Shown
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4.5.1 Symbol Illustrations
The illustrations in this section provide examples of the pre-configured Micro-PWC and ISA symbols
described in the preceding sub-section.
A. FP_STvlv3
B. FP_STvlv3actr
C. FP_STvlv3matr
D. FP_STvlv3tact
E. FP_STcyltank
TP81070A
Figure 4-88. Micro-PWC Symbols
A. ISA_ACTR
E. ISA_RVLV
J. ISA_VLVE_TACT
B. ISA_MATR
F. ISA_CVLV
C. ISA_TACT
G. ISA_VLV3
K. ISA_VLVE_MATR
D. ISA_VLVE
H. ISA_BVLV
I. ISA_VLVE_ACTR
L. ISA_VLV3_MATR
M. ISA_VLV3_ACTR
TP81063A
Figure 4-89. ISA Standard Symbols - Valves and Actuators
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Figure 4-90. ISA Standard Symbols - Containers and Vessels
A. ISA_BLWR_RT
E. ISA_TURB
B. ISA_BLWR_LF
C. ISA_PUMP_LF
F. ISA_CMPR
D. ISA_PUMP_RT
G. ISA_RECP
TP81065A
Figure 4-91. ISA Standard Symbols - Rotating and Reciprocating Equipment
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A. ISA_CNVR
B. ISA_RFDR
C. ISA_RSTD
D. ISA_MILL
E. ISA_AGIT
F. ISA_AGIT_MOTR
G. ISA_IMIX
H. ISA_SCNV
TP81066A
Figure 4-92. ISA Standard Symbols - Mixing and Material Handling Equipment
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Figure 4-93. ISA Standard Symbols - Electrical Equipment
A. ISA_LFLT
E. ISA_CSEP
B. ISA_EPCP
C. ISA_SCBR
F. ISA_RSEP
D. ISA_VFLT
G. ISA_SDRY
TP81068A
Figure 4-94. ISA Standard Symbols - Filters, Scrubbers, Precipitators and Separators
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A. ISA_XCHG1
E. ISA_KILN
H. ISA_FNXR
B. ISA_XCHG2
C. ISA_FURN
F. ISA_CTWR
D. ISA_FAXR
G. ISA_EVPR
TP81069A
Figure 4-95. ISA Standard Symbols - Heat Transfer Devices and HVAC Equipment
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4.6 Micro-DCI SUBMODELS
Micro-DCI Submodels are submodels supplied by MicroMod Automation which provide the user with
access to the same submodels used to create point and group (Hierarchical) displays on the Micro-PWC
console. The filenames of submodels for use with controller modules are prefixed by the string uFP_. The
Module Type and (in some cases) the mode of the controller module to be displayed determine which submodel will be used in a Hierarchical display. Table 4-20 lists the top level submodels that are used in the
point and group displays.
Table 4-20. Micro-DCI Submodels for Controller Modules
MODULE TYPE
INSTRUMENT
MODE/FIX
ANI
SL6, MC5
---
uFP_pINai0
uFP_gINai0
ANO
SL6, MC5
---
uFP_pINao0
uFP_gINai0
CON
SL6, MC5
0
uFP_pINcn0
uFP_gINcn0
1
uFP_pINcn1
uFP_gINcn1
2
uFP_pINcn2
uFP_gINcn2
3
uFP_pINcn3
uFP_gINcn3
4
uFP_pINcn4
uFP_gINcn4
5
uFP_pINcn5
uFP_gINcn5
0
uFP_pSUcn0
uFP_gSUcn0
1
uFP_pSUcn1
uFP_gSUcn1
2
uFP_pSUcn2
uFP_gSUcn2
SU5
MODEL FOR POINT
MODEL FOR GROUP
DI
SL6, MC5
---
uFP_pINdi0
uFP_gINdi0
DO
SL6, MC5
---
uFP_pINdo0
uFP_gINdo0
PAR
MC5
---
uFP_pINpr0
uFP_gINpr0
SU5
---
uFP_pSUpr0
uFP_gSUpr0
PLC
SU5
---
uFP_pSUpl0
uFP_gSUpl0
SDT
MC5
---
uFP_pINsd0
uFP_gINsd0
SU5
---
uFP_pSUsd0
uFP_gSUsd0
MC5
---
uFP_pINto0
uFP_gINto0
DK3
---
uFP_pDK3
uFP_gDK3
KM2
---
uFP_pKM2
uFP_gKM2
MC1
---
uFP_pMC1
uFP_gMC1
MC2
---
uFP_pMC2
uFP_gMC2
MC5
---
uFP_pMC5
uFP_gMC5
MM1
---
uFP_pMM1
uFP_gMM1
2345
---
uFP_p2345
uFP_g2345
SL6
---
uFP_pSL6
uFP_gSL6
SU1
---
uFP_pSU1
uFP_gSU1
SU5
---
uFP_pSU5
uFP_gSU5N
TOT
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4.7 Custom Models For Point and Group Displays
The user can create custom models for use as Point and Group displays. To do this, simply open the
model you wish to change, and edit it as required.
This sub-section presents guidelines which should be followed when editing custom models intended for
use as Point or Group Displays.
•
Configure the model as a submodel, using the instructions and data provided in the preceding
sections of this chapter.
•
Use a generic name for the public name when declaring a variable for the tagname to be used
in the submodel. This allows the public name to be assigned to a tagname each time an
instance of the submodel is configured on a graphic. See the Section 4.3.3.2.2, Declaring
Variables in Submodels, and Section 4.3.3.2.3, Naming Variables for details on declaring and
naming variables in submodels. Note that when naming the generic tagname variable, the
string $TAG$ should be used, and upper case letters should be used.
•
Install the model as a submodel. Installation of graphics and submodels is described in the
Section 4.2.9.2.4, Installation Operations sub-section of this chapter.
•
Remember that group models should be configured in the appropriate shape, so that they fit
correctly on a group display which also contains models for other points.
Micro-DCI Submodels, supplied with the Micro-DCI software, can be used as examples by users who wish
to create their own Point and Group displays. Table 4-20 in Section 4.6, Micro-DCI SUBMODELS, provides
lists of model names of these submodels for use as Point and Group displays; these model names use the
prefix uFP_.
4.7.1 Group Display Customization Techniques
Techniques which exist for customizing Group Displays on the Micro-PWC include the following:
1. Use the Grafx Editor to modify a copy of a MicroMod-supplied group model and install it as a
user submodel with the same name. The Micro-DCI software checks the disk location which
contains the user submodels before it checks the location which contains the Micro-DCI
Submodels. Therefore, if both a user submodel and an Micro-DCI Submodel with the same
name exist, the user submodel will be found first and will be used on Micro-DCI group
displays.
2. Use the Grafx editor to modify copies of one or more of the submodels which compose a
MicroMod group model. Each group model is composed of several submodels. For example,
the model uFP_gINcn0 uses the submodel FP_DYvslider as the slider used to change the
setpoint on a controller module Group Display. The submodel FP_DYvslider could be loaded
into the Grafx editor, then modified, then installed as a user submodel with the same name.
The modified version would then be used for all CON modules and all other modules which
have Group and Point Display models that incorporate FP_DYvslider.
This technique allows a Group Display to be customized without making modifications directly to a copy of
the model for the Group Display.
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5.0 Historical Database
5.1 Introduction
Any Micro-PWC server or client in a group can be configured to collect information from a Micro-PWC
server and store it for use by various applications such as logging, trending and data archiving. This collected data is stored in the historical database.
Historical database configuration is used to create and edit historical database tagnames. Each historical
database tagname is assigned to a point in a Micro-PWC server real-time tag database. Parameters such
as collection rate, storage rate and retention span time are also defined via historical database configuration. Up to 2,000 historical database points can be collected per server node in a console group.
Access historical database configuration using Menu > Configure > Historical Database. The Historical
Database Configuration window (Figure 5-1) will be displayed.
TC00247A
Figure 5-1. Historical Database Configuration Window
The top area of this window contains a scrollable list of all the points which have been configured in the
historical database. Below this list are buttons which are used to add, locate, edit and delete points in the
historical database.
5.2 Edit Historical Database Item
To make changes to an existing point in the historical database, first click the desired point, and then click
Edit. The Historical Tag Configuration window (Figure 5-2) will appear, containing the current parameters
configured for the tag. The window is divided into three main categories:
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.
TC00577A
Figure 5-2. Historical Tag Configuration Window
5.2.1 Point Information
The portion of the display devoted to point information contains two entry boxes, labelled Tagname and
Legend.
5.2.1.1 Historical Database Tagname
Click the Tagname entry box to enter the tagname which is used to identify the point in the historical database. This tagname can be up to 37 characters in length, and cannot contain spaces. The historical database tagname must also be unique on the network.
✎
Note
The historical database tagname is separate and different from the
Micro-PWC tagname. If data is to be gathered from several different
atoms belonging to the same Micro-PWC tag, a separate historical
database tagname must be configured for each one.
If no entry is made in the Tagname entry box, the historical database tagname will default to the tag.atom
entered in the Collection Information portion of the Historical Tag Configuration window (described in
Section 5.2.2.4, Collection Option).
5.2.1.2 Historical Database Point Legend
Click the Legend entry box to enter the string which is used as the legend for the historical database point
under configuration. This legend can be up to 63 characters in length and is used in the Trend Info window
(which is accessed via the Info button on a trend display). If no legend is configured in the historical database for a point, the string configured in the tag description atom will be used instead.
5.2.2 Collection Information
The portion of the Historical Tag Configuration window devoted to collection information is used to configure the parameters required to collect and store data gathered from a point in a tag database.
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5.2.2.1 Collection Rate
The collection rate determines the interval between collections, the frequency with which data is gathered
from an associated point in the Micro-PWC server real-time tag database. The default collection rate is
1 minute. Click the button which displays the collection rate; the Collection Rates window (Figure 5-3) will
appear. Valid collection rates are shown in Figure 5-3 and range from 1 second to 1 day, plus three additional options: None, Manual, and Custom. Use the scrollbar or resize the window to view collection rates
which are not immediately visible in the list box portion of the window.
TC00198A
Figure 5-3. Collection Rate Window
Select the desired collection rate (or option) by positioning the pointer on it and clicking the left mouse button. The selected item will be highlighted. Click OK to complete the operation.
5.2.2.1.1 None
Use the None option when configuring a Historical Database tag for a point which is to be collected based
on an event or state, rather than a fixed time interval.
5.2.2.1.2 Manual
Use the Manual option when configuring Historical Database points which are to contain manually entered
data, such as laboratory data. If the Manual option is selected, the label Manual will appear on the face of
the Collection Rate button, and the collection information section of the Historical Tag Configuration window will be revised (Figure 5-4) so that only the Collection Rate and Archive Group buttons from the origi-
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nal display remain available, and a new button labelled Data Type replaces the Storage Rate and
Collection Option buttons.
TC00578A
Figure 5-4. Historical Tag Configuration for Manual Data Point Configuration
The data type is set to Numerical by default, and the label Numerical appears on the face of the Data Type
button. Click this button to display the Data Type window (Figure 5-5); a list box in this window contains a
list of the available data types.
TC00200A
Figure 5-5. Data Type Window
Available data types are:
•
Numerical
•
Alphanumerical (32 characters)
•
Alphanumerical (64 characters)
•
Alphanumerical (128 characters)
•
Alphanumerical (256 characters)
•
Alphanumerical (512 characters)
Click the desired data type in the list box. Click OK to complete the operation.
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5.2.2.1.3 Custom
The Custom collection rate is used when a user-configured collection rate is desired.
When Custom is selected, the label (Custom) will appear on the face of the Collection Rate button, and the
collection information portion of the Historical Tag Configuration window will be revised (Figure 5-6) so that
the entry box in which the period and start time are defined is available.
TC00579A
Figure 5-6. Custom Collection Rate Configuration
Both the period (user-defined collection interval) and the start time (which defines the beginning of the
period) are entered in the same entry box. The period is entered first; the words daily, weekly and monthly
are valid entries to define the period. Alternatively, the user can define a customized period by defining the
number of days, hours, minutes and seconds in the period using the following format:
DD:HH:MM:SS
Enter a comma (,) after the period to separate it from the starting time.
After the period has been defined, the starting time (hours, minutes, seconds) and date (day, month, year)
which marks the beginning of the interval, is entered in the following format:
HH:MM:SS DD:MMM:YY
The default Period is hourly (0:1:0:0) and the default Start Time is midnight of the current day (e.g.,
00:00:00 30-JUN-07).
✎
Note
the 24 hour clock is used, and the month is identified by the first
three letters of the month name (in English).
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5.2.2.2 Computations
The Micro-PWC can be configured to perform calculations on historical data as it is collected. Available
calculations are:
•
Average
•
Minimum
•
Maximum
•
Standard deviation
Computations can be performed hourly, daily, monthly or yearly. The computed values are stored in Historical Computation atoms. The computed values stored in these atoms can be used by other applications,
such as trending. Atoms are also provided for two additional values, minimum time and maximum time.
These atoms are used to store the timestamp of the first instance of the minimum and maximum collection
values. The atom names are shown in Table 5-1.
Table 5-1. Historical Computation Atoms
Period
Average Minimum
Minimum
Maximum
Time
Maximum
Time
Standard
Deviation
Hourly
.HAV
.HMN
.HTMN
.HMX
.HTMX
.HSD
Daily
.DAV
.DMN
.DTMN
.DMX
.DTMX
.DSD
Monthly
.MAV
.MMN
.MTMN
.MMX
.MTMX
.MSD
Yearly
.YAV
.YMN
.YTMN
.YMX
.YTMX
.YSD
Click the Computations button to display the Historical Tag Computations window (Figure 5-7).
TC00202A
Figure 5-7. Historical Tag Computations Window
The Historical Tag Computations window is composed of a matrix of toggle buttons which allows selection
of combinations of computation rate and computation type. Each row in the matrix represents a computation rate; each column represents a computation type. By default, all buttons are deselected and displayed
in gray and appear raised. Click the toggle button which corresponds to the desired computation rate and
computation type.
Use the Number Retained text entry box at the end of each row to define the number of values to be
retained for each computation type selected for that computation rate. Once the retention limit has been
reached, the value obtained by each new computation will replace the oldest value. Because the retention
limit is defined on a per computation rate basis, it is not possible to set the Number Retained to a different
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value for different computation types with the same computation rate. For example, it is not possible to set
a different Number Retained for the hourly/average and hourly/minimum values. However, it is possible to
configure different retention limits for hourly/average and daily/average values. Enter inf (infinity) in the
Number Retained text entry box to retain all values collected; otherwise, enter a numeric value (zero is not
a valid numeric value). To retain no data for a particular computation type, all toggle buttons for the computation type must be deselected.
✎
Note
No checks are performed to validate collection rate vs. computation
rate. The user must consider the collection rate of the data and take
care to configure appropriate computation rates; i.e., while it is
technically feasible to perform hourly computations on data which is
collected once a day (daily), such a configuration would result in
many unnecessary and non-productive computations.
5.2.2.3 Storage Rate
Storage rate is used to define the number of collections which will occur before a value is actually stored in
the historical database; it is a multiple of the collection rate. For example, if a point has a collection rate of
one second and a storage rate of 10, then only data for every tenth collection would actually be stored in
the historical database.
The default storage rate is one; to change the storage rate, click the button which displays the value of the
storage rate. The Storage Rate window (Figure 5-8)will appear.
TC00203A
Figure 5-8. Storage Rate Window
Valid storage rates are one, two, five, six, 10, 20, 30, 60 and 120. Select the desired storage rate by clicking on it. The selected item will be highlighted. Click OK to complete the operation.
5.2.2.4 Collection Option
The Collection Option parameter on the Historical Tag Configuration window is used to define the form in
which collected values are stored. Available options include AVeraGe, MINimum, MAXimum and INSTantaneous. The default collection option is AVG; to change this, click the button which displays the current
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collection option. The Collection Options window will appear (Figure 5-9).The range of data points over
TC00204A
Figure 5-9. Collection Options Window
which the collection options operate is determined by the collection rate and storage rate. For example, if
the collection rate equals one and the storage rate equals 10, then the collection options MIN, MAX, and
AVG will operate using the last 10 data samples that have been collected since the last storage time. If the
INST collection option has been specified, the last value collected at storage time will be used.
Select the desired collection option by clicking it. The selected item will be highlighted. Click OK to complete the operation.
5.2.2.5 Archive Group
An archive group is a set of data which is scheduled for archiving at a specified time. The name and scheduling information for archive groups is configured using the Archival Groups item on the configure menu
available from the System Window Menu button; refer to Section 2.3, Archival Groups, for details.
The button to the right of the Archive Group label displays the name of the currently assigned archive
group. If no archive group has been assigned to the point, it displays the legend None. To assign the historical database point to an archive group, click this button. The Archive Group window (Figure 5-10) is displayed.
TC00205A
Figure 5-10. Archive Group Window
Click the name of the desired archive group. It will be highlighted. Click OK to complete the selection operation. The default selection is None.
5.2.2.6 Tag Atom
Each point in the historical database is assigned to a tag.atom in the Micro-PWC server. In the entry box
labelled Tag Atom enter the tagname and atom of a point in a Micro-PWC server which is to be scanned.
To do so, click the entry box and enter the tagname and atom, separated by a period (.).
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5.2.2.7 Event Bit
The information collected into the historical database is gathered based on one of the following:
•
Collection rate (refer to Section 5.2.2.1, Collection Rate).
•
Event bit condition.
•
Collection rate during the duration of an event bit condition.
Event bits are a set of 4,096 group wide event flags which can be set to indicate that an event has
occurred. Event bits are set and reset via blockware program commands. Names can be assigned to event
bits in the same manner as they are assigned to plant areas; this assignment is performed from the Network Parameters menu discussed in Section 2.6, Configuring Network Parameters.
The assignment of an event bit to a point in the historical database allows the collection of data when the
condition indicated by the event bit occurs. If the collection rate is set to None, then the data will be collected only on transition of the event bit to the active value (refer to Section 5.2.2.8, Active Value). If a collection rate other than None has been selected, data will be collected at that rate as long as the event bit is
set to the active value.
To assign an event bit to trigger data collection for the historical database point, click the Event Bit entry
box to gain focus on it, then enter the event bit number (one to 4,096) or the event bit name (as defined
using submenus of the Network Parameters menu).
5.2.2.8 Active Value
The active value is relevant only when the event bit is used. Use the active value to define the state of the
event bit (zero or one) which triggers the collection; the Active Value button displays the value which currently defines whether an event bit of one or zero will trigger collection of data for the historical database
point. Click the button to toggle between the two values.
5.2.2.9 Acknowledge Bit
The acknowledge bit is an event bit. It is used to confirm that a collection operation has been completed.
Click the Acknowledge Bit entry box and enter the name or number of the event bit to be used as the
acknowledge bit. When the event bit is set, it is toggled from its current state to the alternate state (i.e.,
from 1 to 0 or from 0 to 1).
A change to the state of the acknowledge bit can be used to trigger another collection.
5.2.3 Storage Information
The portion of the historical tag configuration display devoted to storage information provides the ability to
configure the length of time data will be retained, to determine the number of collections to be retained, and
to specify which Micro-PWC nodes will be used to store the data collected for the point.
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5.2.3.1 Add
To configure a new set of storage options, click Add below the list box in the storage information portion of
the Historical Tag Configuration window. The Historical Collection Storage Options window (Figure 5-11)
will be displayed.
TC00580A
Figure 5-11. Historical Collection Storage Options Window
The Historical Collection Storage Options window is divided vertically into four list boxes containing entries
for the following:
•
Retention time
•
Number retained
•
Configured nodes
•
Available nodes
5.2.3.1.1 Retention Time Option
The retention time is the length of time collected data is retained on a Micro-PWC.
The following retention times are available from the Retention Time list box:
230
•
Infinity
•
1 hour
•
2 hours
•
4 hours
•
8 hours
•
16 hours
•
1 day
•
2 days
•
5 days
•
1 week
•
2 weeks
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•
4 weeks
•
8 weeks
•
16 weeks
Click the desired entry to select it; it will be highlighted. If a retention time other than Infinity is selected, the
data is stored in a circular buffer. If Infinity is selected, data will be retained until the Number Retained
specification is exceeded. When the time interval exceeds that which has been configured, the oldest data
will be overwritten by new data. The amount of available disk space and the number, frequency and retention rate of other collections on the system should be considered carefully when configuring the retention
time. The default time interval is eight hours.
✎
Note
If both a time interval and a number of samples (refer to Section
5.2.3.1.2, Number Retained Option) are configured, the first one to
be completed will be used as the retention limit. For example, if
both a time interval of one hour and 100 samples are configured for
a retention span, and only 60 samples per hour are collected, then
the 61st sample will overwrite the oldest sample stored.
5.2.3.1.2 Number Retained Option
To configure the number of collections to be retained for the selected historical tag, use the Number
Retained list box, which contains the available options:
•
Infinity
•
10
•
50
•
100
•
500
•
1,000
•
5,000
•
10,000
•
50,000
•
100,000
•
500,000
•
1,000,000
Click the desired choice to select it. The default selection is Infinity, in which case data will be retained until
the Retention Time is exceeded. The amount of available disk space and the number, frequency and
retention rate of other collections on the system should be considered carefully when configuring the number of collections to be retained.
✎
Note
If both a time interval ( sec ) and a number of samples are
configured, the first one to be completed will be used as the
retention limit. For example, if both a time interval of 1 hour and 100
samples are configured for a retention span, and only 60 samples
per hour are collected, then the 61st sample will overwrite the
oldest sample in the circular buffer.
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5.2.3.2 Edit Data Storage Definitions
To change an existing data storage definition, click the desired entry in the list box on the Historical Tag
Configuration window (Figure 5-2), then click Edit below the list box. The Historical Collections Storage
Options window (Figure 5-11) will be displayed. Configuration is performed in the same manner as that for
adding data storage definitions, described in Section 5.2.3.1, Add.
5.2.3.3 Delete Data Storage Definitions
To delete a data storage definition, click the desired entry in the list box on the Historical Tag Configuration
window (Figure 5-2), then click Delete. The entry will be removed from the list box. At least one storage
node must be specified; attempts to remove the last entry from the list box will result in an error message.
5.2.4 Convenience Buttons
In addition to the usual OK and Cancel, five other buttons appear at the bottom of the Historical Tag Configuration window (Figure 5-2). These include Replace, Add, Prev, Next and Default. These buttons provide a convenient way to configure multiple historical database points without exiting the Historical Tag
Configuration window.
5.2.4.1 Replace
If the configuration of an existing historical database point has been changed, click Replace. The existing
configuration on the system for that historical database point will be replaced by the revised configuration.
5.2.4.2 Add
To create a new historical database point from the Historical Tag Configuration window, using the current
parameter configuration, click Add. The Historical Tag Configuration window is ready to receive new input.
Alternatively, if an existing historical database point has already been configured, select it for Edit, change
the tagname and any other characteristics as desired, then click Add. The new point will be created. This
feature allows creation of a group of historical database points with the same characteristics, without having to reconfigure the same parameters for every point, and without leaving the Historical Tag Configuration window.
5.2.4.3 Prev/Next
Use the Prev and Next buttons to move to configuration displays for the historical database points which
are adjacent to the one currently on display. Historical tagnames are listed in alphanumeric order; the
actual order of the points is that shown in the list box of the Historical Database Configuration window
(Figure 5-1).
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5.2.4.4 Return to Default Settings
Click Default to change all parameters to their default settings. Default settings are illustrated in
Figure 5-12.
TC00590A
Figure 5-12. Historical Tag Configuration Window with Default Settings
5.2.5 Historical Database Configuration and Trend Compression
When configuring historical database points which will later be viewed in compressed form on a trend display, it is important to remember that the primary factor associated with the length of time it takes to display
a compressed trend is the amount of data which must be processed. When the Micro-PWC that is controlling the Operator Window which contains the trend display is different from the Micro-PWC on which the
data is stored, then data must be transferred across the system network, which increases the length of
time needed to compress the trend display. It can take over twice as long to compress a large trend under
these circumstances; thus, transferring less data across the network becomes even more important under
these circumstances.
✎
Note
Compression of trend displays is discussed in detail in the
Micro-PWC Operator’s Manual.
The periodic collection rate, collection option and storage rate of historical database points can be configured so that data compression can be performed in the historical database as a background task, rather
than as a function of the trend display. This can reduce the length of time required to display the compressed data.
For instance, an initial compression ratio of 10 to one can be achieved within the historical database by
storing a value that is the average of 10 collection samples (collected at one second), and displayed on a
trend display so that one value is displayed for each point on the plot. Subsequent compression of the
trend display using a compression ratio of 50:1 will be much faster, and will yield exactly the same trace as
that displayed when averaging of all collection samples (10 at a time, using the Seconds and Points
parameters) and compression (using a 50:1 compression ratio) are performed via the trend display. By
storing a value that is the average of 10 samples, the total amount of data extracted from the historical
database and averaged is one tenth of what would be required if every sample were stored and averaged
on the trend display.
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5.2.6 Add Historical Database
To create a new historical database point, click Add on the Historical Database Configuration window. The
Historical Tag Configuration window will be displayed with default values (Figure 5-12).
Configure as described in Section 5.2, Edit Historical Database Item.
5.2.7 Find Historical Database
The Find button is located in the lower left corner of the Historical Database Configuration window
(Figure 5-2), and can be used to ascertain the presence of a given point in the historical database. If the
point does exist, the Find button quickly locates it on the Historical Tagname list and highlights it. Once
located, the point configuration can be viewed, edited or deleted as desired.
To use this feature, click Find. A window appears. Click the entry box and enter the desired historical database tagname. If only a portion of the tagname is entered, the first entry where the first letters of the tagname matches the entered string will be chosen. For example, if the string HR is entered, and the first
tagname to begin with these characters is HRANO1, then this is the tagname that would be highlighted in
the Historical Tagname list.
Click Apply to locate the first instance of the string; the Find window will remain open; click Apply again to
locate the next instance of the string, or enter a new string to be located. Click OK to perform the Find
operation and close the Find window.
5.2.8 Delete Historical Database
The Delete button is used to delete a point or group of adjacent points in the historical database. Click the
tagname of the point to be deleted; it will be highlighted. If more than one point is to be deleted, position the
pointer on the first tagname to be deleted, then press the left mouse button and drag the pointer until all the
points to be deleted are highlighted. Click Delete. A confirmation box will ask:
Delete Selected Items?
Click Yes to delete all highlighted points, or click No to exit the operation without deleting anything.
5.2.9 Delete All Historical Database
To delete all points in the historical database, click Delete All. A confirmation box will appear. Click Yes if
all points in the database are to be deleted; click No to exit without deleting points.
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5.3 Summary - Historical Database
Historical
Database
Used to store data collected from the Micro-PWC server real-time tag
database; this data is used by various applications such as logging, trending
and data archiving.
Acknowledge
Bit
Event bit used to confirm that a collection operation has been completed in the
historical database. When this bit is set, it is toggled from its current state to the
alternate state (i.e., from 1 to 0 or from 0 to 1).
Active Value
Defines the state of the event bit (zero or one) which triggers a collection; the
face of the active value button displays the selected value. This parameter is
relevant only when the event bit is used.
Archive Group
Set of data which is scheduled for archiving at a specified time. (The name and
scheduling information for archive groups is configured using Menu > Configure > Archival Groups; refer to Section 2.3, Archival Groups, for details.)
The face of the archive group button displays the name of the currently
assigned archive group. If no archive group has been assigned, it displays the
legend None. To assign the currently selected historical database point to an
archive group, click this button, then select the name of the desired archive
group in the resulting window. The default selection is None.
Collection
Option
Defines the form in which collected values are stored. Available collection
options are average, minimum, maximum and instantaneous. The default
option is AVG; to change the option, click the button which displays the current
collection option; a new collection option can be selected from the resulting
window.
Collection Rate
Interval between collections, the frequency with which data is gathered from an
associated point in the Micro-PWC server. The default collection rate is one
minute. Valid collection rates range from one second to one day, plus three
additional options: None, Manual, and Custom.
None is used when collection is based on an event condition, rather than a
time interval. Manual is used when data is to be entered manually, such as lab
data. Custom allows the user to define a custom time interval other than the
standard intervals supplied.
Computations
The Micro-PWC can be configured to perform computations on data as it is collected. Available calculations are: average, minimum, maximum and standard
deviation. Computations can be performed hourly, daily, weekly or yearly. The
computed values are stored in Historical Computation atoms, which can be
accessed by other applications, such as trending. Atoms are also available to
store the timestamp of the first instance of the minimum and maximum collection values.
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Data Type
236
When manual data points are configured, the user can define a data type for
the manually entered data. Available data types include:
•
Numerical
•
Alphanumerical (32 characters)
•
Alphanumerical (64 characters)
•
Alphanumerical (128 characters)
•
Alphanumerical (256 characters)
•
Alphanumerical (512 characters)
Event Bit
Event bits are a set of 4,096 group wide event flags which can be set to indicate that an event has occurred. Event bits can be addressed by name (refer
to Section 2.8.2, Event Bit Configuration, for details on event bit name assignment) or number. Assignment of an event bit in the historical database allows
the data to be collected when the condition indicated by the event bit occurs.
Historical
Database
Tagname
Tagname used to identify the point in the historical database. It can be up to 37
characters in length, cannot contain spaces, and must be unique on the network. If no historical database tagname is configured, it will default to the tagname of the associated server database point.
Storage Rate
Defines the number of collections which will occur before a value is actually
stored in the historical database; it is a multiple of the collection rate, i.e., if a
point has a collection rate of one second and a storage rate of 10, then only
data for every tenth collection would actually be stored in the historical database. The default storage rate is 1.
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6.0 Logs
6.1 Introduction
A log is used to collect and format data for use in reports and spreadsheet calculations. Two types of logs
are available on the Micro-PWC:
•
Event Logs
•
Spreadsheet Logs
Event Logs are used to examine the Historical Database and create lists of all events which occurred
within a specific time span.
Spreadsheet Logs are used to obtain data from, change, and put data into the Global database, and to
load the data into spreadsheets, allowing the user to format, store, and perform calculations using live process data. Spreadsheet logs are synchronized within the local console group. This means a spreadsheet
log can be configured or changed on on any node in the same console group. The resulting changes are
reflected on all other nodes in the console group. On the Micro-PWC, Spreadsheet Log configuration is
performed using Microsoft EXCEL.
✎
Notes
1. Logs are sent to a printer device when generated. If a printer
has been configured with the Device Type of “File”, logs configured
to print to that printer device will be sent to that file, rather than to an
actual hard copy printer. (See Device Type in Section 2.8.3.1.4 , for
additional information.)
2. Printers used to print scheduled logs must support PostScript.
6.2 Accessing Log Configuration
Log configuration is accessed by using the pull-down menus available from the System Window Menu button. Select the sequence Menu > Configure > Logs. The Log Configuration window (Figure 6-1) will
appear.
TC00207A
Figure 6-1. Log Configuration Window
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Radio buttons, each representing a different log type (Event, Spreadsheet), are located at the top of the
Log Configuration window. By default, Event Logs is selected. To change the type of log to be configured
click the radio button associated with the desired log type.
A list box appears below the log type buttons. The log name of each log configured for the selected log
type appears in the list box.
At the bottom of the window, in addition to the usual Close and Help buttons, are buttons used to configure, schedule, and print logs. These are the Add, Delete, Edit, Schedule, and Print buttons.
6.3 Event Logs
Event Log configuration is used to create logs which obtain information about events which occurred in the
Historical Database within a specified time span. To configure Event Logs, click the Event Logs toggle button, which is located at the top of the Log Configuration window.
6.3.1 Add Event Logs
To create an Event Log, click Add at the bottom of the Log Configuration window. The Event Log Configuration window (Figure 6-2) will be displayed.
TC00581A
Figure 6-2. Event Log Configuration Window
6.3.1.1 Configure Event Log Name
The first item to appear in the Event Log Configuration window is a text entry box labelled Log Name. Enter
a string of up to 50 alphanumeric characters to be used as the name of the log. The Log Name entered
here is used in the Event Logs list box on the Log Configuration window.
6.3.1.2 Configure Message Classes and Types
The events contained in an Event Log can be limited or filtered by Message Class and Message Type, by
a method similar to that used when configuring filtering for Message Routing (Section 2.8.4). The main display area of the Event Log Configuration window (Figure 6-2) is divided into two portions: the left side is
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labelled Message Class, and contains buttons which display the available Message Class names. The
right side of the main display area contains a list box, which in turn contains a scrollable list of all the
Message Types available for the selected Message Class. Click the desired Message Class button to
select it. Message Classes include:
•
Process Alarms
•
System Events
•
Operator Messages
•
Operating Errors
•
Operator Actions
•
Priority
•
Area
The list of message types displayed in the list box reflects the message types available for the currently
selected Message Class. Each message type has a button associated with it; click this button to select or
de-select the message type. If a message type is selected it will appear pressed in, while a de-selected
item appears to be raised. Samples of the selected and de-selected states appear above the Message
Type list box; the selected state is labelled Printed, while the de-selected state is labelled Not Printed.
✎
Note
The Printed and Not Printed labels are stippled out, indicating that
they are not available for actual use.
6.3.1.2.1 The Process Alarms Message Class
Process Alarm messages are classified into the following Message Types:
•
Bad Input/Output
•
High/Low Alarm
•
Deviation Alarm
•
Security Alarm
•
Process Alarm Message
•
Discrete Alarm
•
Return to Normal
•
Alarm Acknowledged
6.3.1.2.2 The System Events Message Class
System Event messages are classified into the following message types:
•
Micro-PWC Events
•
Network Events
•
Return to Normal
•
Event Acknowledged
•
Node Down
•
Node Up
•
I/O switch over
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6.3.1.2.3 The Operator Messages Message Class
Operator Messages are messages sent by an operator to all operators in an area, and appear in the fourth
line of the Mini-Alarm Window. Operator messages are classified into the following message types:
•
Operator Message
•
Operator Call
•
Message Acknowledged
•
Operator Call Acknowledged
6.3.1.2.4 The Operating Errors Message Class
Operating error messages are classified into the following message type:
•
Operating Message
6.3.1.2.5 The Operator Actions Message Class
Operator actions are classified into the following message types:
•
Network Operator Actions
•
Micro-PWC Operator Actions
6.3.1.2.6 The Priority Message Class
When the Priority Message Class is selected, the list box contains a scrollable list of the 16 available
Priorities. By default, all Priorities are selected. If a Priority has been selected, event messages regarding
Historical Database points with that priority will be included when the Event Log is generated.
6.3.1.2.7 The Area Message Class
When the Area Message Class is selected, the list box contains a scrollable list of the 255 available Areas.
By default, all Areas are selected. If an Area has been selected, event messages from Historical Database
points in that Area will be included when an Event Log is generated.
6.3.1.2.8 Clearing And Setting Event Log Message Types
It is possible to clear or set multiple Message Types simultaneously, eliminating the need to click numerous
toggle buttons. Click Set or Clear to set or clear all message types in the selected Message Class. Click
Set All or Clear All to set or clear all message types in all Event Log Message Classes on the Micro-PWC.
6.3.2 Edit Event Logs
If an Event Log has already been configured, the configuration can be revised using the Edit button,
located at the bottom of the Log Configuration window. To do so, first click the desired Log Name in the list
box to select it, then click Edit. The Event Log Configuration window (Figure 6-2) will be displayed, containing the parameters configured for that Event Log. Changes can be made to these parameters as
described in Add Event Logs (Section 6.3.1).
6.3.3 Delete Event Logs
To delete an Event Log, click on the Log Name in the list box which appears in the Log Configuration window (Figure 6-1), then click Delete. A confirmation box will query:
Delete selected items?
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Click Yes to delete the event log, or click No to exit the operation without deleting the log.
6.3.4 Schedule Event Logs
Event Logs can be scheduled to print on a regular basis. Click the log to be scheduled to select it, then
click Schedule at the bottom of the Log Configuration window (Figure 6-1). The Log Scheduler window
(Figure 6-3) will appear.
TC00209A
Figure 6-3. Event Log Scheduler Window
✎
Note
Printers used to print scheduled logs must support PostScript.
6.3.4.1 Schedule Button
The first item in the Log Scheduler window is a toggle button labelled Schedule By. Click this button to toggle between the available choices, which are:
•
Not Scheduled
•
Time
•
Event
•
Time and Event
The currently selected state appears on the face of the button. If Time is selected, the Event Log will print
at the scheduled time. If Event is selected, the Event Log will print when the specified Event Bit (if any) is
set. If Time and Event is selected, the log will print at both the specified time and whenever the specified
Event Bit is set. If Not Scheduled is selected, the other scheduling parameters can be configured, but the
log will not be printed.
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6.3.4.2 The Scheduled Time Parameter
The period (user-defined interval) at which the Event Log will be printed and the starting time of that period
appear on the face of the button labelled Scheduled Time. To configure these parameters, click on this button. A pop-up window (Figure 6-4) will appear.
Figure 6-4. Event Log Scheduling Window
The period is defined first; the words DAILY, WEEKLY, and MONTHLY are valid entries to define the
period. Alternatively, you can define a customized period by defining the number of days, hours, minutes,
and seconds in the period using the following format:
DD:HH:MM:SS
The period must be followed by a comma. After the period has been defined, the starting time
(hours/minutes/seconds and day/month/year) is entered in the following format:
HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY
The default period is one hour (0:1:0:0), and the default starting time is midnight of the current day
(e.g., 00:00:00 19-APR-06).
✎
Note
The 24 hour clock is used, and the month is identified by the first
three letters of the month name (in English).
6.3.4.3 The Event Bit Name Parameter
If the Log is to be triggered by an Event Bit, click on the text entry box labelled Event Bit Name to gain
focus, then enter the number or name of the Event Bit to be used to trigger the log.
6.3.4.4 The Device Parameter
A button labelled Device is located below the Event Bit Name entry box. If a device has been selected, the
device name will appear to the right of the Device button. If no device has been selected, the space to the
right of the Device button will be empty. (A device can be a printer or a file; see Printer Assignment (Section 2.8.3) for information on how to configure print devices.) To select or change the Printer Device, click
this button. The Printer Selection window (Figure 6-5) will be displayed.
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TC00241A
Figure 6-5. Printer Selection Window
A list box in the Printer Selection window contains the names of line and laser printers configured on the
network. Click on the desired printer name in the list box to select it. Click OK to complete the operation.
6.3.4.5 The Print Banner Parameter
A banner is a page bearing information such as Log Name and the time and date of the log, which is
printed immediately prior to the log itself. A button labelled Print Banner is located below the Printer Device
button. The face of the Print Banner button displays Yes if a banner page is to be printed, or No if the
banner is to be omitted. Click the button to toggle from one state to the other.
6.3.4.6 The Next Occurrence Indicator
The last item in the Log Scheduler window, labelled Next Time Due, provides the time and date of the next
scheduled log.
6.3.5 Print Event Logs
The Print button on the Log Configuration window allows the user to print logs on demand. Click this button to display the Print Event Log window (Figure 6-6).
TC00210A
Figure 6-6. Print Event Log Window
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6.3.5.1 Event Log Start Time
The first item on the Print Event Log window is a pushbutton labelled Start Time. The time and date displayed on the face of this button indicate the earliest time and date to be used for messages included in the
Event Log. The default Start Time is 19:00:00 31-DEC-69; to change this, click the button. A pop-up window appears, containing an entry box and the prompt:
Enter Start Time (HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY):
Enter the desired starting time in the indicated format.
✎
Note
The 24 hour clock is used, and the month is identified by the first
three letters of the month name (in English).
Click OK to complete the operation.
6.3.5.2 Event Log End Time
The second item on the Print Event Log window is a pushbutton labelled End Time. The time and date displayed on the face of this button indicate the latest time and date allowed on messages to be included in
the Event Log. The default End Time is the current time and date.
6.3.5.3 The Device Button
The third item on the Print Event Log window is a button labelled Device, and is used to identify the print
device to which the log is to be sent. The face of the button displays the print device name, or a question
mark (?) if no print device has been selected. Click this button to configure the print device to which the log
is to be printed. The Printer Selection window (Figure 6-5) will be displayed. Highlight the desired printer by
clicking it, then click OK to complete the selection operation.
6.3.5.4 The Print Banner Option
The fourth item on the Print Event Log window is a pushbutton labelled Print Banner. The face of the associated button displays Yes if a banner is to be printed, or No if the banner is to be omitted. Click this button
to toggle from one state to the other. Click OK to complete the log printing operation.
6.4 Spreadsheet Logs
Spreadsheet logs are used to obtain data from, change, and put data into the Micro-PWC Global database.
The data is loaded into spreadsheets, allowing the user to format, store, and perform calculations on live
process data. The spreadsheet logs are accessed by clicking on the radio button labelled Spreadsheet
Logs, located on the Log Configuration window (Figure 6-1). The list box in the Log Configuration window
will list all spreadsheet logs which have been configured on the network.
Before a spreadsheet can access data from the Micro-PWC Global database, the Microsoft Excel program
must be on the Micro-PWC and the Micro-PWC Add-in for Excel must be installed. For details on requirements for use of Excel with the Micro-PWC software, see the Micro-PWC Installation and Setup Guide.
6.4.1 Adding Spreadsheet Logs
To create a spreadsheet log, click Add at the bottom of the Log Configuration window. A blank Microsoft
Excel spreadsheet is opened. For information on the operation of Excel, refer to the documentation provided with the Excel software. After a spreadsheet has been created and saved, it will appear in the Edit
list.
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6.4.2 Edit Spreadsheet Logs
If a spreadsheet log has already been configured, the configuration can be accessed for revision by using
the Edit button, located at the bottom of the Log Configuration window. First click the desired log name in
the list box to highlight it, then click Edit.
6.4.3 Delete Spreadsheet Logs
To delete a spreadsheet log, click the log name in the list box which appears in the Log Configuration window (Figure 6-1), then click Delete. A confirmation box will query:
Delete selected items?
Click Yes to delete the summary log, or click No to exit the operation without deleting the log.
6.4.4 Schedule Spreadsheet Logs
Spreadsheet logs can be scheduled to print on a regular basis, in the same manner as Event Logs. Click
the file name of the log to be scheduled to select it, then click Schedule at the bottom of the Log
Configuration window (Figure 6-1). The Log Scheduler window (Figure 6-3) will appear.
Spreadsheet Log scheduling configuration is identical to that for Event Logs, described in Schedule Event
Logs (Section 6.3.4).
6.4.4.1 Macro Required for Printing and Scheduling Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Logs
To schedule and print a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, you must first create a subroutine called
AUTO_OPEN, which checks to see if the Excel spreadsheet was opened for configuration or for printing,
as the result of use of the fpuprint function call. This subroutine must be called AUTO_OPEN. The
AUTO_OPEN subroutine will be executed each time a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is opened.
If the spreadsheet was opened for printing, it obtains the printer device using the fpudevice function call
and initiates the printout. The subroutine then exits Excel.
If the spreadsheet was opened for configuration, the subroutine returns.
‘
‘Auto_Open Macro
‘
Sub Auto_Open()
Dim Flag As String
Application.DisplayAlerts = False
‘Flag = fpuprint()
If IsError (Flag) = False And Flag = “1” Then
Application.Calculation =x1Manual
‘Application.ActivePrinter = fpxactiveprinter()
Worksheets(“Sheet1”).Activate
ActiveSheet.UsedRange.Calculate
ActiveWindow.SelectedSheets.PrintOut Copies:=1
Application.Quit
End If
End Sub
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6.4.5 Printing Example
In C:\MicroPWC (or the corresponding directory), find the file \lib\exlogs\example3.xls. This file
contains an example of an AUTO_OPEN macro.
Open the spreadsheet. The spreadsheet contains an instruction sheet (stating that module one and module three contain further instructions). Choose Tools > Macro > Macros... from the menu, and choose
AUTO_OPEN in the resulting macro dialog. Click Edit to view the AUTO_OPEN macro.
The AUTO_OPEN macro contains instructions regarding the use of the example. Follow these instructions
to obtain a working AUTO_OPEN macro.
Once the spreadsheet has been modified as instructed, use the following procedure to test it.
1. Make sure that sheet one of example3.xls is not empty (otherwise, printing will fail).
2. Close the spreadsheet if it is not already closed.
3. From the Micro-PWC System Window, choose Menu > Configure > Logs.
4. Select Spreadsheet Logs in the Log Configuration dialog.
5. Highlight the example3.xls spreadsheet and select Print. Choose a configured printer in
the resulting dialog.
The same spreadsheet also contains macros named fppos and suggestions. These macros give more
helpful hints which can be used to format printed logs.
6.4.6 Print Spreadsheet Logs
The Print button on the Log Configuration window allows the user to print logs on demand. Click this button to display the Print Log window.
Figure 6-7. Print Spreadsheet Log Window
The first item on this window is the log name. Below the log name is a button labelled Device. This button
is used to identify the print device to which the log is to be sent. If a device has been selected, the device
name will appear to the right of the Device button. If no device has been selected, this space will be empty.
Click this button to display the Printer Selection window (Figure 6-5). Highlight the desired printer by clicking on it, then click OK.
See Macro Required for Printing and Scheduling Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet Logs in Section 6.4.4.1 for
information on macros needed for printing spreadsheet logs.
The second item in the Print Log window is a pushbutton labelled Print Banner. The face of the associated
button displays Yes if a banner is to be printed, or No if the banner is to be omitted. Click this button to toggle from one state to the other.
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6.4.7 Clearing the Recovery Log Notify Window
A Recovery Log Notify window appears when a user attempts to edit or print a spreadsheet log, if the log
was previously open for edit or was printing when Excel was terminated abnormally. Attempting to edit the
spreadsheet log will also cause the Recovery Log Notify window to appear.
To prevent this window from appearing every time an attempt is made to print or edit the log:
1. Select the file name of the log to load it.
2. Select the Remove Recovery File option in the window.
3. Click OK.
4. After the spreadsheet is loaded, save the spreadsheet.
✎
Note
If the spreadsheet is not saved, the Recovery Log Notify window
will continue to appear each time an attempt is made to print or load
the spreadsheet.
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6.4.8 Spreadsheet Log Special Functions
A number of special functions are supplied for use with the Excel spreadsheet package. These include:
•
fpget
•
fparchive
•
fpgetd
•
fpverbose
•
fphget
•
fpuprint
•
fphgetd
•
fpudevice
•
fpsendmsg
•
fpblkarch
•
fpput
•
fpblkclose
•
fpputd
•
fpblkopen
•
fphput
•
fpblksample
•
fphputd
•
fpblkvald
•
fphxnumval
•
fpxammts
•
fphxgetval
These functions are the only valid user functions available for the Micro-PWC. Any other function listed in
the software is for system use only and is not valid for use in configuring a spreadsheet.
For an explanation of these functions, refer to Appendix A.
✎
Note
Before any of these special functions (also known as add-ins, can
be used from Microsoft Excel, they must be added to the database.
To do so, the following operations must be performed one time:
1. Start Microsoft Excel.
2. Select Tools > Add-Ins. The Add-Ins window is
displayed.
3. Click Browse in the Add-Ins window.
4. Locate and select the file \PWC\bin\fpexcel.xla.
5. Click OK.
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7.0 Trending
7.1 Introduction
Types of trend recording available on the Micro-PWC include:
•
Current trending
•
Historical trending
•
Archival trending
The current, historical, and archival trending functions display the values of one or more points in an
analog trend format similar to that presented by a conventional strip chart recorder.
A current trend for each point appears as a part of the point display; current trends are not configurable,
and are not stored. Current trending for a point exists only when the point is on display. Long term trending
is handled separately and is available in two forms:
•
Up to 9,999 console group-wide Historical Trends (each of which can be configured to display
up to 8 traces) are available on the Micro-PWC. The configuration of these trends can be
performed on any Micro-PWC, and is then distributed to all other Micro-PWCs in the same
console group. The storage location of the actual trend data can be configured by the user via
the Historical or Historical Block database options, available from the Configure option on the
System Window menu.
•
Archival Trending permits Historical Trends to be transferred to a removable tape cartridge,
creating a permanent record which can be retrieved and displayed at a later date.
Any non-text (i.e., non-ASCII) point which exists in the Historical database or Historica Block database can
be trended.
See the Micro-PWC Operator’s Manual for details on use of the various features of the Historical Trend
display.
7.2 Accessing Historical Trends
Historical trend configuration is performed in the Operator Window. The pointer must first be in an Operator
Window which has keyboard focus.
To enter trend configuration using the menus, from the menu bar choose Select > Trend. A pop-up window
(Figure 7-1) appears , containing an entry box and numeric keypad.
TC00211A
Figure 7-1. Trend Index Entry Window
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To enter the index number of the trend to be configured, click on the displayed keypad numbers to enter
the trend index number, or click in the entry box and then enter the trend index number via the keyboard.
The left arrow (←) on the keypad corresponds to BACKSPACE on the keyboard.
Trends can also be accessed using the List button on the Trend Index Entry window. Click List to display
the Select Trend window (Figure 7-2), which contains the number and (if assigned) the legend for all configured trends.
TC00212A
Figure 7-2. Select Trend Window
The Select Trend window displays a list box containing the index number and title of all trends which have
been configured. UP and DOWN arrow buttons to the right of the list box provide access to additional pages
of the list, while a scroll bar below the list box can be used to read trend titles which are too long to be displayed in their entirety.
Below the list box, entry boxes are provided for entry of the trend index number and trend title. Enter the
trend index number in the Index entry box and click Search to locate a trend via its index number. Alternatively, enter a trend title or portion thereof in the Title entry box, then click Search to locate the next
instance of the specified text.
Click Top to return to the first part (top) of the list.
To complete the trend selection operation, click OK. The chosen trend will be displayed in the Operator
Window (Figure 7-3).
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7.3 Configuring Historical Trends
Historical Trending permits the assignment of any non-text (i.e., non-ASCII) point in the Historical database
or Historical Block database to a multi-point trend display, whether or not the point is included in a hierarchical display. A maximum of 8 points can be trended on a multi-point display. All points on a multi-point
trend display need not have the same data collection rate.
Once a trend has been chosen, the trend display for that index number appears in the Operator Window. If
no parameters have yet been configured for the trend, a template of the historical trend display appears.
This contains all the basic parts of an historical trend display, but has no legend, no trace assignments, and
default scale bar limits of 0.00 and 100.00. Scale bar limits have a default precision of two decimal places
to the right of the decimal point.
TC00250A
Figure 7-3. Historical Trend Display (Template)
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To configure trend parameters and assign tagnames to traces, click the Configure item in the menu bar of
the Trend display. A window entitled Trend Configuration appears (Figure 7-4).
TC00213A
Figure 7-4. Trend Configuration Window
The following parameters are configured in the Trend Configuration window:
•
Title
•
High and Low Scale Bar Limits
•
Trend Type (Historical, Archival)
•
Segment size (seconds and points)
•
Traces (to a maximum of 8 per trend display)
•
Trace range for each trace
•
Default trace state (On or Off)
•
Display options (display as MIN, MAX, AVG or INST)
7.3.1 Trend Parameters: Title
The Title parameter is used to configure a trend display title of up to 48 characters in length. Once configured, the trend title appears at the top of the trend display. To configure this item, click the entry box which
follows the word Title; use the keyboard to enter the desired alphanumeric text string.
7.3.2 Trend Parameters: Scale Bar Limits
The Scale Bar Limits, High and Low, are used to configure the lowest and highest scale numbers on the
vertical axis of the trend display. These limits become the default limits which appear, in white, each time
the display is called up or reset via the Reset button (which appears at the bottom of the display). If no
limits are specified, the High limit defaults to 100.00 and the Low limit to 0.00.
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7.3.3 Trend Parameters: Segment Size
The horizontal axis of the trend is divided into 5 segments; the end of each segment is marked by a long
tick mark and a time and date stamp. Two parameters determine the size of a segment: Seconds and
Points.
The Seconds parameter is used to assign the number of seconds in a segment. By default, this parameter
is set to 60 seconds.
The Points parameter determines the maximum number of trend points which can be plotted in a segment.
By default, a maximum of 60 points can be plotted per segment. The number of points determines the
resolution of the trace. Do not assign more than 600 points to a segment.
To obtain a normal (non-compressed) display, the number of Points assigned per segment should not
exceed the number of Seconds per segment.
To position points on the trend graph, the Micro-PWC uses an internal algorithm that divides the number of
seconds in the segment by the number of points in the segment, yielding the number of time intervals in
the segment:
number of seconds / number of points
The default settings of 60 points and 60 seconds per segment thus yield the equivalent of a 1:1 compression ratio. It is possible to imitate the effects of data compression by varying these settings. For example,
setting Seconds to 120, with Points set to 60, creates a trend trace which appears to have a compression
ratio of 2:1.
✎ Note
The tick marks which divide the segments on the time axis (x axis)
of the trend graph are for visual reference only, and do not
necessarily reflect the actual number of time intervals used by this
algorithm.
The Micro-PWC locates the points which lie within each time interval. If one point is found, the value of the
point is used to plot it on the trend display. If more than one point exists within the interval, the assigned
Display Option (MINimum, MAXimum, AVeraGe or INSTantaneous) is used to calculate one value from all
points which exist in the interval. This value is then plotted on the trend display. (If the INSTantaneous display option is used, the last value found will be used to plot the point on the trend display.) The resulting
value is used to plot the point on the trend display. If no points are found in an interval, no point is plotted
for that interval.
This method of plotting trends permits greater flexibility in trend configuration. For example, points with different collection rates can be plotted on the same trend graph, and non-periodic data can also be trended.
7.3.4 Trace Configuration
Up to 8 traces can be configured on each Trend display. Each trace appears in a different color; the color
for each trace is indicated on the colored button which appears to the left of the tagname, above the trend
graph.
To configure a trend trace, click the desired Trace Number button on the Trend Configuration window. A
window entitled Trend Trace Configuration will appear. Trend trace parameters which can be configured via
this window include:
•
Historical Tagname
•
High and Low limits for the trace
•
Default Trace State (On or Off)
•
Display Options (Min, Max, Avg, Inst)
•
Description
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TC00214A
Figure 7-5. Trend Trace Configuration Window
7.3.4.1 Historical Tag
The Historical Tag entry box allows entry of the tagname of a point in the Historical database, an Historical
Computation point, or a point in the Historical Block database. The item entered will be assigned to the
trend trace. The tagname can be typed in directly by clicking on the entry box and entering the information
via the keyboard.
7.3.4.1.1 Historical Database Tagnames
If the tagname of a point in the Historical database is not immediately known, this information can be
located via the Find button, located immediately to the right of the Historical Tag entry box. Enter the
known portion of the Historical database tagname in the Historical Tag entry box, then click Find. The
Historical Tags window will be displayed, with the first instance containing that string displayed in a list box,
and highlighted.
Clicking on Find with no entry in the Historical Tag entry box causes the Historical Tags window to be displayed. This window contains a list of all tagnames that are configured in the Historical database.
7.3.4.1.2 Historical Computation Tagnames
Historical Computation points are computed points in the Historical database, and are specified in the
format:
<htag>.<comptype>
where htag is the tagname of a point in the Historical database and comptype is the atom for the computation type. Atom names for each computation type and computation rate are shown in Table 7-1.
Table 7-1. Historical Computation Atoms
Average
Minimum
Minimum
Time
Maximum
Maximum
Time
Standard
Deviation
Hourly
.HAV
.HMN
.HTMN
.HMX
.HTMX
.HSD
Daily
.DAV
.DMN
.DTMN
.DMX
.DTMX
.DSD
Monthly
.MAV
.MMN
.MTMN
.MMX
.MTMX
.MSD
Yearly
.YAV
.YMN
.YTMN
.YMX
.YTMX
.YSD
Period
For example, RAND1.HAV contains the hourly average for the Historical database point named RAND1.
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7.3.4.2 Historical Block Database Block Names
The Historical Block database is designed for the efficient collection of data from a large number of
Micro-PWC tag.atoms. Each Block Name in the Historical Block database can represent data from multiple
tag.atoms in the controller, which is collected and stored as a single entity called an Historical Block. All
controller points associated with an Historical Block are assigned the same parameter values for Collection
Rate, Storage Node, and Computation Options.
To reference data in an Historical Block, use the following format:
<block name>..<tagname>.atom.comptype
where block name is the name of the Historical Block, tagname is the tagname of the point in the controller
database, atom is the controller atom of the point, and comptype is the computation type atom. For example:
CALBLK1..CT2_LI01.OUT.HMX
represents the hourly maximum for the OUT atom of the point CT2_LI01, stored in the Historical Block
named CALBLK1, while
CALBLK1..CT2_LI01.OUT
represents the raw data for the OUT atom of the point CT2_LI01, stored in the Historical Block named
CALBLK1.
7.3.4.3 Collection Info
The Collection Info field provides the user with information on how the tagname has been configured in the
Historical database, including the tagname.atom, the collection rate, the storage rate, and the storage
option. The storage option determines the form in which the data is stored: minimum, maximum, average
or instantaneous value. These parameters cannot be configured via Trend Configuration, but must be configured using the Historical Database item available via the System Window Configure pull-down menu.
7.3.4.4 Trend Trace Limits: High and Low
Because each trace on the trend can represent data collected at a different (even non-periodic) collection
rate, individual high and low trend trace limits can be configured for each trace. To set the Low limit for the
trace, click in the Low entry box, then enter the value for the low limit. To set the High limit for the trace,
click in the High entry box and enter the value for the high limit.
The trend graph is initially presented with a default set of scale bar limits, which are configured on the
Trend Configuration window (see Section 7.3.2, Trend Parameters: Scale Bar Limits); these can be
replaced by the individual limits for a particular trend trace by clicking the colored button associated with
the trace. The individual trend trace limits will then be displayed as the scale bar limits, in the same color as
the trend trace. To return to the default scale bar limits, click the Reset button located at the bottom center
of the display.
7.3.4.5 Trace Default State: On or Off
Each trace can be configured to be visible (On) or invisible (Off), by default, whenever the trend display is
called up. To change the default configuration, clickon the Trace toggle button. The default state of the
trace will be displayed on the face of the button. When the trend is visible (On), a red dot appears next to
the trace number on the trace display button, which appears above the trend graph on the display. On the
trend display, the user can toggle between the On and Off states by clicking this button.
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7.3.4.6 Display Options
The DIS (display option) drop-down list box allows you to select the option which determines the form in
which the data is to be presented on the trend display. Click on the drop-down arrow button to the right of
the DIS box to view a list of choices, which include AVG (average, the default), MINimum, MAXimum, and
INSTantaneous. Click the desired choice in the drop-down list. The DIS box will reflect the selected Display
Option.
7.3.4.7 Description
Click in the Description entry field to enter a text string of up to 31 characters. This string appears at the
upper left hand corner of the trend graph whenever the colored button associated with the trace is clicked.
7.3.5 Trend Parameters: Type
The Type parameter is used to select the type of trend to be configured. Available trend types are historical
and archival. The type of trend selected determines which database will be used to provide the data for the
trend. To make the selection, click on the drop-down arrow to the right of the Type box to view a list of
choices (HIST, ARCH). Click the desired choice in the list. The Type box will reflect the selected database.
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7.4 Summary - Trends
Archival Trends
Archival Trending permits Historical Trends to be transferred to a removable
tape cartridge, creating a permanent record which can be retrieved and
displayed at a later date.
Collection Info
Collection Info is a field in the Trend Configuration window which provides
information on how the tagname has been configured in the Historical
database, including the tagname.atom, the collection rate, the storage rate,
and the storage option.
Current Trends
A current trend for each point appears as part of the point display; current
trends are not configurable, and are not stored. Current trending for a point
exists only when the point is on display.
Display Option (DIS)
The DIS (Display Option) drop-down list box is a feature which determines the
form in which the data is to be presented on the trend display - as a MINimum,
MAXimum, AVeraGe, or INSTantaneous value.
Historical Database
The Historical Database is a set of points in the Micro-PWC which collects
and stores data gathered from one or more controllers.
Historical Block
Database
The Historical Block Database is a set of points in the Micro-PWC designed
for the efficient collection and storage of data from a large number of
controller tag.atoms, which can reside in one or more controllers.
Historical Tag
A Historical Tag is the tagname assigned to a point in the Historical database.
The Historical database is configured using the Historical Database selection
on the Configure menu available from the System Window Menu button.
Historical Trends
Up to 9,999 network-wide Historical Trend displays are available on the
Micro-PWC (each of which can be configured to display up to 8 traces). The
configuration of these trends can be performed on any Micro-PWC, and is
then distributed to all other Micro-PWC nodes on the network. (The storage
location of the actual trend data can be configured by the user via the
Historical Database option, available from the Configure option available from
the System Window Menu button.)
List Button
The List button appears on the Trend Index Entry window. Click this button to
display the Select Trend window, which contains the number and (if assigned)
the legend for all configured trends.
Scale Bar Limits
The Scale Bar Limits, High and Low, are used to configure the default lowest
and highest scale numbers on the vertical axis of the trend display. These
limits become the default limits which appear, in white, each time the display
is called up or reset via the Reset button (which appears at the bottom of the
display). If no limits are specified, the High limit defaults to 100.00 and the
Low limit to 0.00.
Search Button
The Search button is located on the Select Trend window, which is accessed
by clicking on the List button on the Trend Index Entry window. Enter a trend
index number in the Index Entry box, or an alphanumeric text string in the
Title Entry box, then click Search. The trend with that index number or first
instance of a trend containing that string in its title will be displayed and
highlighted at the top of the list box.
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258
Segment
The horizontal axis of the trend graph is divided into five segments, each of
which is denoted by a long tick mark and a time and date stamp.
Segment Size
The actual segment size is determined by two parameters: Seconds and
Points. The Seconds parameter is used to assign the number of seconds in a
segment. By default, this parameter is set to 60 seconds. The Points
parameter determines the maximum number of trend points which can be
plotted in a segment. By default, a maximum of 60 points can be plotted per
segment. To position points on the trend graph, the Micro-PWC uses an
internal algorithm which divides the number of seconds in the segment by the
number of points in the segment, yielding the number of time intervals in the
segment. The default settings of 60 points and 60 seconds per segment thus
yield the equivalent of a 1:1 compression ratio.
Trace
A trace is a record of the collected data for an Historical Database point,
presented in visual form on a trend display. Up to eight traces can be
configured on each Trend Display, and each trace is displayed in a different
color.
Trace Default State
The Trace Default State is used to determine the default condition of the trace.
A trace can be visible (ON) or invisible (OFF) by default, whenever the trend
display is called up.
Trend Trace Limits
Trend Trace Limits are the limits defined for each individual trend trace. They
replace the default Scale Bar Limits when the colored button associated with
the trend trace is clicked.
Trend Title
The Title parameter is used to configure a trend display title of up to 48
characters in length. Once configured, the trend title appears at the top of the
trend display. To configure this item, click the entry box labelled Title and enter
the desired alphanumeric text string.
Trend Type
The Type parameter is used to determine which database (Historical,
Archival) will be used to supply the data for the trend.
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8.0 System Status Display
8.1 Introduction
The System Status Display (SSD), an example of which is shown in Figure 8-1, provides information about
each node connected to the Ethernet network. A node can be a Micro-PWC console application or a MicroDCI communications program. Micro-PWCs on the network are labelled as Con.
Figure 8-1. System Status Display
Each node on the network is depicted by a pictorial representation known as an SSD object.
An SSD object is composed of a schematic illustration of the node above a button containing the name of
the node and information on the state of the node and its connections to the network. The appearance of
the SSD object varies, depending on the type and state of the node. Click the button to access a menu for
the node represented by the SSD object. Like the appearance of the SSD object, the entries on the menu
vary with the type of node represented. Figure 8-2 provides an example of the SSD object for a
Micro-PWC.
TC00535A
Figure 8-2. SSD Object for a Micro-PWC
The System Status Display is organized into rows of nodes, using the following rules:
1. A row contains nodes of only one type of device (e.g., Micro-PWC consoles).
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2. The rows of device types are ordered as follows, from top to bottom:
•
Micro-PWC consoles
•
Micro-PWC communications programs
✎
Note
If no nodes of a particular device type exist, subsequent rows of
other devices are moved up in the SSD (i.e., no blank rows are
created).
3. A row can contain up to eight nodes. If more than eight nodes of one type exist on the network,
they are displayed on multiple, consecutive rows.
4. Within a row, nodes are ordered left-to-right according to device number; e.g., CON1 appears
left of CON2, and so on.
8.2 General Information for All Node Types
All SSD objects, regardless of node type, share certain features, including:
•
Node Name
•
Network Connection Information
•
Info Menu
These features are discussed in the following paragraphs.
8.2.1 Node Name
The Node Name is displayed on the face of the button which is located below the schematic illustration of
the node (the Node Icon). The Node Name is composed of a three-character descriptor which indicates the
device type, followed by the device number (e.g., CON2). The color of the node name indicates the network status of the node, as follows:
Cyan
Indicates that the node is the “local” Micro-PWC node. The Node Icon of the
local Micro-PWC node is also displayed in cyan.
The local node is also indicated by an asterisk (∗) following the node name.
White
Indicates the node is on the network. The node can be accessed by the local
Micro-PWC.
Black (Text and Node
Icon) on
Red (Button Color)
Indicates that the node is not currently on the network. The node can no
longer be accessed from the local Micro-PWC. (However, the node was
accessible at some point in time following the most recent restart of the local
Micro-PWC. If the node is still inaccessible at the time of the next local
Micro-PWC restart, it will be removed entirely from the SSD.) The pull-down
menu of the node cannot be used in this state. The Node Icon and the Node
Name are displayed in black.
In this case the Node Name is also enclosed in parentheses.
8.2.2 Info Menu
Click on the button containing the Node Name to display the menu for a node. The pull-down menu for
each node contains a button labelled Info. Click this button to access a menu titled Info Menu. This Info
Menu contains, at the minimum, the following two entries:
•
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•
Show Available Services
8.2.2.1 Network Info
Selecting Info > Network Info will cause a Network Info window (similar to the example in Figure 8-3) to be
displayed.
TC00536A
Figure 8-3. Network Info Window Example
This window contains read-only information about the node selected from the System Status Display. The
information will include the Internet (IP) address, the host name (if any), and the number of the Group to
which the node belongs.
8.2.2.2 Show Available Services
Clicking on the second item in the Info menu, Show Available Services, will cause a Services window (similar to the example in Figure 8-4) to be displayed.
TC00537A
Figure 8-4. Services Window Example
This window contains a read-only list of the services available on the node selected from the System Status Display. This information is used by Technical Support personnel during trouble-shooting. If a node
function does not work as expected, check this list to find out if the service is actually available on the
node. Note that each data transaction on the network is preceded by a code number identifying the service
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associated with the transaction. These code numbers are shown in brackets preceding each item on the
list of available services.
8.3 The Utilities Menu
The Utilities option, located on the System Status Display menu bar, provides access to a subset of the
Micro-PWC configuration utilities, which are discussed in Section 9 of this Guide, and to Printer Device status information and printer control utilities. To access these functions, click on the Utilities option. A pulldown menu containing the following options will appear:
•
Device Status
•
Console Groups Display
8.3.1 The Device Status Menu Item
From the System Status Display menu bar, select Utilities > Device Status. The Device Status window
(Figure 8-5) will be displayed.
TC00538A
Figure 8-5. Device Status Window
This window provides information about items being printed and access to job and printer control. The following information is provided for each device:
•
Device Name
•
Device Status
•
Node
•
Active Backup Unit Name (Assign)
•
Queue Size
•
Number of Queue Entries
•
Size of Current Job
•
Percent of Current Job Printed
8.3.1.1 Printer Queue Control
The column labelled Device Name contains a button for each device which has been configured via the
Printer Assignment window (see Section 2.8.3, Printer Assignment). The name of the device appears on
the face of the button. The color of the button indicates the status of the device:
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Green indicates the device is operating normally.
•
Red indicates the device has failed.
•
Yellow indicates the device has been placed in suspend mode.
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✎
Note
When the button color changes to indicate the device status, the
text on the button also changes color so that it remains visible. The
text color has no other significance.
In addition to button color, the Device Status field to the right of each Device Name button provides status
indication in text form, i.e., it will display the word Normal, Failed or Suspended.
When the Device Name button is clicked, the Printer Queue Control window (Figure 8-6) will be displayed.
TC00039A
Figure 8-6. Printer Queue Control Window
The first item in the Printer Queue Control window is the name of the device. Below this identifier the window is divided into two main sections. The first of these is labelled Cancel and contains two buttons:
•
Current Item
•
All Items
Click Current Item to terminate the job which is active in the device. Click All Items to terminate the active
job and delete all other entries from the queue for that device.
Cancelling a job removes its entry from the print queue; however, any portion of the job which has already
been loaded into buffer space (in any relevant device, such as the printer, the Micro-PWC, and so on) will
be printed. Therefore, it is not unusual for a few pages of a job to print out after the job has been cancelled.
The next portion of the window is labelled Control, and also contains two buttons:
•
Suspend
•
Normal
Click Suspend to suspend operation of the device (Suspend mode). When this action is performed, processing of any jobs in the queue will be completed, but no new jobs will be accepted in the queue. Click
Normal to return to normal operation.
8.3.1.2 Printer Queue Information
The Node field on the Device Status window displays the name of the node which is currently serving the
print device.
When a device is operating normally, nothing is displayed in the Assign field. When a device fails, the
Assign field will display the device name of the backup unit which is actually servicing the queue for the
failed device. Backup device assignments are configured via Printer Assignment (Section 2.8.3).
The Queue Size field displays the number of bytes in all jobs in the device’s print queue, while the Queue
Entries field indicates the number of jobs in the queue. The Current Item Size indicates the size, in bytes,
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of the job which is currently active. The % Printed field indicates what portion of the currently active job has
been completed.
8.3.2 Console Groups Display
The Micro-PWC is a console-type node on the Ethernet network, from which the Process Operator can
monitor and control the process. To help control the synchronization of configuration data, these nodes are
assigned to console groups. Nodes within a console group synchronize configuration data only with those
nodes within the same console group. Note that console group assignment has no effect on the ability to
view collected data in the various Micro-DCI databases, including the controller, Historical, Archival, Historical Block, Archival Block and Event Bit Databases.
Assignment to a console group is made during the installation of the Micro-PWC software. The default console group number provided during the installation procedure is 1. A node cannot be in more than one console group. Up to 10 console nodes can exist in each group. Console groups can be assigned to numbers
from 1 to 50; this provides flexibility when assigning numbers.
The System Status Display provides information about each node connected to the Ethernet network. To
see how the console nodes on the network are grouped, from the System Status Display menu bar select
Utilities > Console Groups Display. The Console Groups Display window (Figure 8-7) will appear.
Figure 8-7. Console Groups Display Window
The Console Groups Display window is divided horizontally into a section for each console group. The
group number is displayed, followed by a group of icons with node numbers, representing the console
nodes in that group. The console group which includes the local node is enclosed within a cyan box. MicroPWC Client nodes are console-type nodes, but they do not synchronize configuration data with any MicroPWC on the Ethernet network. They are by default members of the console group of their server. This is
represented visually on the Console Groups display, where Micro-PWC Client icons are grouped together
in boxes following their server node; a black line indicates the relationship between the server node and its
client nodes.
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Click on the Update button to refresh the window and incorporate any changes to the console group
assignments made since the window was opened. Click on Close to close this window.
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9.0 Utilities
9.1 Introduction
Micro-PWC utilities provide a variety of useful maintenance and information management functions,
including:
•
Backup and Restore functions
•
Archiving Historical and Historical Block data
•
Restoring Archival and Archival Block data
•
Database Maintenance
•
Manual Data Entry
•
Micro-PWC screen (CRT) printouts
•
Release of Configuration Locks
•
Scientific calculator
•
Other applications access
•
Console Group Synchronization
•
Time Adjustment
The Micro-PWC utilities are accessed via the System Window Menu button. To do so, select
Menu > Utilities. The Utilities menu will then be displayed.
Most of these utilities do not relate to configuration operations and are discussed in the Micro-PWC
Operator’s Manual. Several items which may be of use to the configurer, Database Maintenance, CRT
Print, Release All Config. Locks, Configuration Reporter, and Time Adjustment are discussed below.
The on-screen scientific calculator works like a pocket scientific calculator; instructions for its use are outside the scope of the Micro-PWC documentation. Consult the Windows documentation supplied with your
system for details.
A number of utility-type features of the Micro-PWC are also described here, although they are not
accessed via the Utilities menu. These include:
•
Quick Keys
•
CRT Context Keys
•
Micro-PWC Help
•
Process Help
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9.2 Database Maintenance
The database maintenance menu item provides access to the following utilities:
•
Historical Manual Entry (which is described in the Micro-PWC Operator’s Manual)
•
Historical database maintenance
•
Historical Block database maintenance
•
Archival database maintenance
•
Archival Block database maintenance
9.2.1 Historical Database Maintenance
This feature displays read-only information about Historical Database disk usage. This information can be
of value when assessing whether the collection rate configured for a point is causing the point to use an
undesirable amount of disk space.
To access Historical Database Maintenance, select Menu > Utilities > Database Maintenance from the
System Window. The resulting sub-menu contains the following options:
•
Historical Manual Entry (used to perform manual data entry as described in the Micro-PWC
Operator’s Manual)
•
Historical
•
Historical Block
•
Archival
•
Archival Block
Click on Historical to display the Historical Database Maintenance window is shown in Figure 9-1.
TC00588A
Figure 9-1. Historical Database Maintenance Window
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At the top of the window is a list box which contains entries describing database usage on each node in the
local console group. Each entry includes:
•
the node name
•
the size of the disk space allocated for the database in KB
•
the number of KB of the allocated space actually used (and the percentage)
•
the total number of KB available on thenode’s hard drives
Note that as the Historical Database expands, additional disk space will be allocated for the database.
However, once allocated, space is never removed from the Historical Database’s allocation.
Data which is collected and stored in databases on the Micro-PWC is keyed (internally) for identification
within a database by either a time or a string. This key is assigned automatically by the Micro-PWC software application which is performing the collection operation; it cannot be specified by the user. For example, Historical Data and Archival Data are keyed by time, while Historical Block data and Archival Block
data are keyed by strings. Other applications can use both types of key to store data.
While the distinction between time keyed data and string keyed data is generally invisible to the user, the
Historical Database Maintenance window uses this feature. Information is displayed in the tagname list box
in the lower part of the window based on the type of key which is selected.
Use the radio buttons located above the tagname list box to select the key type to be used. When Time
Section (the default) is selected, all the tags which are keyed by time will be listed; select String Section to
list all the tags (if any) which are keyed by strings.
✎
Note
The tagname list box lists historical database points in every
historical database on the Micro-PWC network (not just the local
node).
The data contained in the list box at the top of the Historical Database Maintenance window provides an
overview of the system usage by the Historical Database on each node. The tagname list box in the lower
part of the window provides information on system usage by individual tags. Data displayed here includes:
•
the tagname (preceded by an S)
•
the node or nodes where the point is part of the Historical Database
•
the percentage of the node’s Historical Database used to store that point
This information can be used to fine-tune the data collection process to make the most efficient use of
resources. For example, you can view which collection items are using the most disk space, on which systems those collections are being stored, and where potential configuration changes could be made to balance the storage of data.
Following the list of standard time-based tagnames (preceded by S) the list contains an entry
b.eventhistory. This represents the Event Historian information which is also stored in the Historical Database on the hard disk of each Micro-PWC on the system.
Following the b.eventhistory entry the window contains another alphabetical list of the tagnames in the
Historical Database on the system. These tagnames are preceded by the tilde character (~). The percentage displayed for a ~tagname represents the space used to store special information used by the system
software to synchronize the Historical Database when the system comes back up after a shutdown.
The Event Historian information is stored in a circular file; the size of the file is pre-set by the system software. Therefore, no user actions can reduce the space allocated for the Event Historian information. However, the information about disk usage for each Historical Database Point can be used by configurers when
considering whether they can afford to store points at various collection rates.
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9.2.2 Locating Specific Historical Tags
If more Historical Database points have been configured than can appear in the Historical Tag list box, the
Prev and Next buttons become available. Click Next to display the historical tags which follow those currently on display in the list box. Click Prev to display the historical tags which precede those currently on
display in the list box.
The Find button, located at the bottom of the Historical Database Maintenance window is used to determine the presence of a given point in the Historical Database. If the point does exist, Find quickly locates it
in the Historical Tag list box and highlights it.
To use this feature, click Find. In the resulting pop-up window, click the entry box and enter the desired
Historical Tagname. If only a portion of the tagname is entered, the first entry where the first letters of the
tagname match the entered string will be chosen. For example, if the string HR is entered, and the first tagname to begin with these characters is HRANO1, then this is the tagname that would be highlighted in the
Historical Tag list box.
Click Apply to locate the first instance of the string; the Find window will remain open; click Apply again to
locate the next instance of the string, or enter a new string to be located. Click OK to perform the Find
operation and close the Find window.
9.2.3 Historical Block Database Maintenance
The Historical Block Database provides for efficient collection of data from a large number of controller
tag.atoms. Historical Block Data collection is discussed in Section 10.0, Historical Block Data Collection.
The Historical Block Database Maintenance window is used to display read-only information about Historical Block Database disk usage. This information can be of value when assessing whether the block collection configuration is causing the block to use an undesirable amount of disk space.
To access Historical Block Database Maintenance, select Menu > Utilities > Database Maintenance > Historical Block. The features in the resulting window are used as described in Section 9.2.1, Historical Database Maintenance.
9.2.4 Archival Database Maintenance
The Archival Database is the storage location for Historical Database information restored to the system
from archival tapes. The Archival Database Maintenance utility is used to display information about Archival Database disk usage, and to delete information from the Archival Database.
✎
Note
This is the only way that information is ever removed from the
archival database.
It is recommended that the Archival Database be assessed periodically to determine whether information
in the Archival Database is still needed; if not, delete it. This will avoid wasting disk space.
As the Archival Database expands, additional disk space will be allocated for the database. However, once
allocated, space is never removed from theArchival Database allocation unless the Clear Database button
is used as described below.
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To use the utility, select Menu > Utilities > Database Maintenance > Archival. The Archival Database Maintenance window (Figure 9-2) will be displayed.
TS00566A
Figure 9-2. Archival Database Maintenance Window
The list box at the top of the window includes the following information:
•
the node name
•
the size of the disk space allocated for the database in KB
•
Number of KB of the allocated space actually used (and the percentage)
•
Total number of KB available on the node's hard drives
Archival data is keyed (internally) by time within the Archival Database, so Time Section radio button
(below the list box containing disk usage information) should be selected. (See Section 9.2.1, Historical
Database Maintenance for a more detailed discussion of the Time Section and String Section buttons.).
This will cause the tagname of every Archival Database point in every Archival Database on the system
(not just the local node) to be listed alphabetically in the tagname list box. The information displayed
includes:
•
the tagname preceded by an s.
•
the node or nodes where the point is part of the archival database
•
the percentage of the node’s Archival Database used to store that point.
The Archival Database Maintenance window also contains the following buttons: OK, Delete, Find, Prev,
Next, and Clear Database.
9.2.4.1 Locating Specific Archival Tags
If more Archival Database points have been configured than can appear in the Archival Tag list box, the
Prev and Next buttons will become available. Click Next to display the Archival tags which follow those
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currently on display in the list box. Click Prev to display the Archival tags which precede those currently on
display in the list box.
The Find button, located at the bottom of the Archival Database Maintenance window, is used to determine the presence of a given point in the Archival Database. If the point does exist, Find quickly locates it
in the Archival tag list box and highlights it.
To use this feature, click Find. In the resulting pop-up window, click the entry box and enter the desired
Archival Tagname. If only a portion of the tagname is entered, the first entry where the first letters of the
tagname match the entered string will be chosen. For example, if the string HR is entered, and the first tagname to begin with these characters is HRANO1, then this is the tagname that would be highlighted in the
Archival Tag list box.
Click Apply to locate the first instance of the string; the Find window will remain open. Click Apply again to
locate the next instance of the string, or enter a new string to be located. Click OK to perform the Find
operation and close the Find window.
9.2.4.2 Deleting Archival Data
To delete all data for a point from the Archival Database on the local node, click the tagname to select it,
then click Delete. All data for that point in the local node’s Archival Database will be deleted. The space
allocated for the point will not be released.
To delete all data from the Archival Database on all nodes and release the space allocated for it, click the
Clear Database button. A confirmation window will open containing the message:
Database will be cleared.
Are you sure?
To abort the operation click No in the confirmation window. To delete all the Archival data stored on all
nodes, click Yes in the confirmation window. The data will be deleted and the window will close.
9.2.5 Archival Block Database Maintenance
The Archival Block Database is the storage location for Historical Block Database information restored to
the system from archival tapes. The Archival Block Database Maintenance utility displays information
about Archival Block Database disk usage. This information can be of value when assessing whether the
block collection configuration is causing the block to use an undesirable amount of disk space.
To access Archival Block Database Maintenance, click Archival Block in the Database Maintenance menu.
The features in the resulting window are used as described in Section 9.2.4, Archival Database Maintenance.
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9.3 CRT Print
The CRT Print selection on the Utilities menu is used to print the screen content (or portions thereof) of the
Micro-PWC. Click this item to display the CRT Print Setup window (Figure 9-3).
Figure 9-3. CRT Print Setup Window
9.3.1 Selecting the Image Type
The first area of the CRT Print Setup window is labelled Print. This label is followed by three choices:
Window, Region, and Screen. Each choice is preceded by a radio button, as only one of these items can
be selected at a time.
Click Window if the image is to be defined by the borders of a selected window. Click Region if the image
is to be a portion of the screen defined by the user. Click Screen if the image is to contain the entire contents of the screen.
The option of printing an inverted image is provided. Checking the Invert Image box will force the target
image to be processed by Windows functions for inverting the image prior to printing. If the printer is
PostScript level I, the image will produce a gray scale printed output. If the printer is a PostScript level II
printer, the image will be a color inversion. If a color printer is used, the image is difficult to predict. However, the image will have all broad areas of black inverted.
9.3.2 The Auto Fit Option
9.3.3 The Stretch Option
9.3.4 Scale/Preserve Aspect Ratio
9.3.5 Printing the Image
After the image type and other options are set to the desired values, click OK. The CRT Print Setup window will close.
If Screen was selected, no further action is necessary.
If Window was selected, the pointer changes to a cross hair shape. Move the pointer to any location within
the window to be printed, then click the left mouse button.
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If Region was selected, the pointer changes to an upper left corner shape. Move the pointer to the screen
location which corresponds to the upper left corner of the region to be printed, then press and hold the left
mouse button. The pointer changes to a lower right corner shape. Drag the pointer to the lower right corner
of the region and release the mouse button.
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9.4 Release All Configuration Locks
When certain configuration operations are in progress, software locks are set to warn other users who may
attempt configuration of the same item simultaneously (e.g., User 2 attempts to configure Summary 10
when User 1 has already begun configuring Summary 10). This applies to the following configuration operations:
•
Graphics (locked by model name)
•
Summaries (locked by index number)1
•
Trends (locked by index number)
•
Security functions, including:
•
Function access
•
Default configuration
•
User login
•
Security activation
Normally a message, similar to that shown in Figure 9-4, is displayed warning the second user that configuration of the item is already in progress by another, and providing an option to override the configuration
lock.
Figure 9-4. Configuration-in-Progress Warning Window
Click Yes to proceed and override the lock, or click No to exit without attempting to configure the item.
Click the Info button to exit the warning window and open a window (similar to Figure 9-5) which lists the
other user(s) currently engaged in configuration of the item. The information provided about these users
includes the node they are logged in on, the Micro-PWC and time they commenced configuration.
Figure 9-5. Configuration Lock Information Window
If more than one user has an item open for configuration, the only changes which will take effect will be the
set of changes made by the last user to save the item.
If an abnormal condition arises while a configuration operation is in progress (a Micro-PWC shutdown as
the result of a power failure, for example), the configuration lock will remain set when the system is recov1.
All groups in a Summary are locked when any one group iu that Summary is being configured.
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ered. The last item on the Utilities menu, Release All Config. Locks, is used to clear all such “lost” configuration locks. Click this menu item to clear all locks which have been imposed on Configuration on the
network. Under normal conditions, use of this utility should not be necessary.
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9.5 Time Adjustment
A System Time Adjust window (Figure 9-6) can be launched from the Utilities menu. This utlity allows you
to adjust system time to a maximum of plus or minus five minutes. To access this utility, select Menu >
Utilities > Time Adjustment.
Figure 9-6. Micro-PWC System Time Adjust Window
9.5.1 The Adjustment Option
The Time Adjustment window provides information about the current state of the system time service.
The following elements provide information the user needs when issuing a new time adjustment to the
system:
•
The Current Time field provides the current system time. This field is adjusted every half
second.
•
The Target Time field provides the target time of the new adjustment operation. This field is
adjusted every half second.
•
The Adjustment entry box is used to enter a time adjustment, in seconds, into the system.
Entering a value in this box results in the Target Time field being updated to indicate the effect
of the proposed change prior to committing it. The entry in this entry box will be limited to plus
or minus 300 seconds. The time adjustment rate is two seconds of adjustment per minute.
The buttons provided at the bottom of the Time Adjustment window are OK and Cancel.
Enter the number of seconds to adjust the system time. The application issues a request to the Micro-PWC
time server to adjust the time to the new settings. The application then issues a notification to each MicroPWC server to indicate the start of a time adjustment. This includes all servers in all sub-domains.
Click OK to perform the operation and close the dialog. This button is dimmed and inactive if the current
user does not have database configuration access.
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9.6 Other Applications
The Other Applications option on the Utilities menu is used to access and run standard and (if available)
custom application programs. Selecting the Other Applications option causes the Windows Explorer to be
displayed. Consult the Windows online help for more information on the Windows Explorer.
To access this item, selectMenu > Utilities > Other Applications. The Windows Explorer window will be displayed.
To exit the Other Applications option press Start > Shut Down, press ALT-CTRL-SHIFT, then click No.
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9.7 Micro-PWC Help
The Micro-PWC Help utilitly provides information about the Micro-PWC in a context-sensitive manner. A
Help icon (Figure 9-7) can be found on the System Window, the Mini-Alarm Window, on the menu bar of
each Operator Window, and in the lower right corner of many pop-up windows.
Figure 9-7. Help Icon
To access the System Help utility, click on the Help icon. If the Help icon is located on an Operator Windw
menu bar, a two-item menu (Figure 9-8) will appear.
Figure 9-8. Operator Window Help Menu
Click on the System Help selection from this menu to access Micro-PWC Help. User Help refers to information which can be created by the configurer or by an operator to provide site-specific information to others at the installation. User Help is discussed in Section 9.8.
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9.8 User Help
In addition to the System Help utility (discussed in Section 9.7), a utility known as User Help is also available on the Micro-PWC. User Help provides the ability to create, for each process display which can be
displayed in an Operator Window, a text window unique to that process display. For example, each Trend
Display, Group Display and Graphic Display can have its own individual User Help display.
To access the User Help utility, click on the Help icon on the Operator Window menu bar. Clicking on the
Help icon on an Operator Window causes a two-item menu to appear (Figure 9-9).
Figure 9-9. Operator Window Help Menu
Click on the User Help option on this menu. The Display Information window (Figure 9-10) will be displayed.
Figure 9-10. Display Information Window
At the bottom of this window are buttons labelled Ok, Edit, Clear, Import and Cancel.
9.8.1 EDIT User Help Informaton
To enter text to be used as a user help display, click on the Edit button, then click on the entry box; type in
the desired text to create an entry, or edit existing text. There is a limit of 20,000 characters of text for each
User Help entry; remember also that the total amount of text used in all User Help entries may be further
constrained by the total amount of available free disk space on the Micro-PWC.
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9.8.2 CLEAR User Help Information
To clear the current text from the text entry box, click on the Clear key. The display is automatically placed
in Edit mode; click on the entry box to begin entering text.
9.8.3 IMPORT User Help Information
Text which has already been entered in a file can be incorporated into a User Help entry using the Import
button. Click on the Import button to display the Import File window (Figure 9-11).
Figure 9-11. Import File Window
The Import File window contains options which assist in file selection, using the directory structure of the
operating system which underlies the Micro-DCI software. This manual assumes that the user:
•
has had training and/or experience with and an understanding of the operating system used
on the node, and commands used with it
•
has an understanding of the directory and file structure used by the node's operating system
•
knows the location of the files to be imported, which can vary from system to system
A discussion of these topics is beyond the scope of this document; if you need assistance in this area,
please consult your System Administrator.
9.8.3.1 The File Filter Text Entry and List Boxes
The first item in the Import File window is a text entry box labelled File Filter. Below this item is a list box
which contains, by default, the names of all the files in the current working directory. It may be necessary to
use the scroll bars to view some of the file names.
To change the file specification, position the pointer on the desired name in the list box, then click the left
mouse button. Alternatively, place the cursor in the text entry box and click on it to gain focus, then use the
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keyboard to enter the filename.
✎
Note
Once a filename has been selected, clicking on the Filter button at
this point will remove the filename from the Selection text entry box.
If only a portion of the filename is known, enter the known string in the File Filter text entry box and click on
the Filter button (located at the bottom of the Import File window) to update the contents of the File Filter
list box and the Selection text entry box, based on the new file specification. The list will then include all
files in the current working directory which meet the file specification in the File Filter text entry box.
Changes to the contents of the Directory text entry box (described below) will also be reflected when the
Filter button is clicked.
9.8.3.2 The DIRECTORIES Text Entry and List Boxes
To the right of the File Filter text entry box is a text entry box labelled Directory, which contains the name of
the current working directory. This defaults to /FandP/usr/fpuser on the Micro-PWC.
On Micro-PWC nodes, the directory name depends on the directory name specified during the installation
of the Micro-PWC software.
The list box below the Directory entry box lists the directories which are reachable from the current working
directory. This list box can be used to navigate the directory hierarchy.
Text which is not visible in the list box can be viewed using the vertical and horizontal scroll bars. To
change directories, double click on the desired entry in the list box. The contents of the Directory and File
Filter list boxes and the Selected File text entry boxes will be updated to reflect the change in directory
selection.
9.8.3.3 The Selection Text Entry Box
The contents of the Selection text entry box reflect the choices made in the Directories and Files list boxes.
When a change has been made to the currently selected directory or file, the contents of the Selection text
entry box will be updated when the Filter button is clicked.
9.8.3.4 The FILTER Button
The Filter button is located below the Selected File text entry box. Click on this button to update the contents of the Directory and File Filter list boxes and the text entry boxes in the window, based on changes
made in the selection of the current directory or file specifications.
9.8.4 Exiting the User Help Utility
When the entry has been completed, click on OK to complete the operation, or click on Cancel to exit without making changes or writing the entry.
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9.9 Quick Keys
The Micro-PWC Quick Keys feature provides each user with a personalized, pop-up keypad containing
from 32 to 64 keys for each Operator Window. Each of these keys can be configured to call up a different
display within an Operator Window. Because the set of Quick Keys is unique for every user, it can be customized to fit each user’s individual needs.
Quick Keys operate within Operator Windows, allowing the user to call up a specific, pre-configured display by clicking on a single button. This can save a significant number of keystrokes, and is ideal for use
with frequently-viewed displays. By default, the parent Operator Window is the recipient of the new display,
although drag-and-drop operation can be used to cause the display to appear in a different Operator Window. Alternatively, the same Quick Keys keypad can be displayed simultaneously in all Operator Windows
on the screen. The Quick Keys keypads can remain on display indefinitely, and can be used as often as
desired to view the various displays available via Quick Key assignments. The keypads can be moved and
resized to suit the needs of the user and the size of the parent window.
9.9.1 Accessing the Quick Keys Feature
To access the Quick Keys feature, the user must be in an Operator Window with keyboard focus. The
Quick Keys keypad can be summoned using either the mouse or the PC keyboard. Using the mouse,
choose Select > Quick from the menu bar of the window. The window shown in Figure 9-12 appears.
TC00087A
Figure 9-12. Default Quick Keys Keypad Display
If Quick Keys have been configured, click on the desired Quick Key. The display assigned to that Quick
Key will be displayed by default in the Operator Window which is the parent to the Quick Key keypad. To
have the display appear in an Operator Window other than the parent window click on and hold down the
desired Quick Key, and drag it to the desired Operator Window, and then release the mouse button to
“drop” the display into that Operator Window.
✎
Note
A minimum of 32 Quick Keys are displayed. If more than 32 Quick
Keys have been configured, the Quick Key with the highest number
is the last Quick Key on the display. Unconfigured Quick Keys
between one and the highest number Quick Key are unavailable for
use at this time, and will appear with stippled identifying numbers.
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Quick keys can also be selected via the keyboard. The Quick Key window must have keyboard focus. A
Quick Key can then be selected by using the arrow keys to highlight the desired key. When the key has
been selected, press RETURN on the keyboards to complete the selection.
9.9.2 Configuring Quick Keys
To configure Quick Keys, you must be using an Operator Window with keyboard focus. In this window, call
up the display which is to be assigned to a Quick Key. Click Set; stippling now appears on previously
assigned Quick Keys, protecting them from accidental re-assignment. All other Quick Keys are available
for assignment. The pointer assumes the shape of a plus sign (+). Click the Quick Key to be used to call up
the display which appears in the Operator Window. A new window is displayed, as shown in Figure 9-13.
TC00088A
Figure 9-13. Quick Key Label Assignment Window
This window allows you to enter a text string of up to six characters in length. This text will appear on the
Quick Key. The default text string is the number of the Quick Key (1 to 64); the user can choose to discard
this numeric identifier. By using mnemonic identifiers and identifying the Quick Keys in this manner, the
user can see at a glance how keys are assigned. For an example, see Figure 9-14.
TC00089A
Figure 9-14. Quick Key Keypad with Text String Assignment
To exit Set mode without making an assignment, press the Set button a second time; the Quick Keys keypad will remain on display, allowing the user to use or make further changes to the Quick Keys.
Once a Quick Key assignment has been made, the user need only access the Quick Keys keypad display
and press the assigned Quick Key to call up that display in any Operator Window with keyboard focus.
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9.9.3 Configuring Quick Keys 33 Through 64
The basic Quick Key keypad contains a minimum of 32 buttons by default. Once all 32 buttons have been
assigned, an additional 32 buttons can be configured, one at a time, for a total of 64 Quick Keys. When
Quick Keys which will appear outside the current Quick Key window (e.g., Quick Key 33) are configured,
scroll bars appear on the Quick Key window. Use the scroll bars to view the newly created Quick Keys.
After the Quick Key window has been closed, then reopened, all configured Quick Keys will be included in
the display. The size and shape of the Quick Keys window can be changed using the resize handles on the
window frame.
If more than 32 Quick Keys have been configured, and any of them have been cleared, no new Quick Keys
will be created until assignments for all the existing ones have been configured. For example, if 40 Quick
Keys are assigned, then Quick Keys 25 through 30 are cleared, all 40 will remain on display, but new
assignments must be configured for Quick Keys 25 through 30 before Quick Key 41 becomes available.
9.9.4 Clearing Quick Key Assignments
Once a Quick Key has been assigned to a display, it cannot be reassigned to a different display until it has
been cleared. To clear a Quick Key, click Clear, then click the Quick Key which is to be cleared. The
cleared Quick Key will then be available for assignment to a different display. To exit Clear mode without
clearing a Quick Key, click Clear again; the Quick Keys keypad will remain on display, allowing the user to
use or make further changes to the Quick Keys.
9.10 Summary - Quick Keys
Quick Keys
The Quick Keys option offers each user a personalized set of 32 to 64 keys,
each of which can be assigned to call up a different display in the active
Operator Window. This saves time and keystrokes, and is ideal for accessing
frequently-viewed displays.
Close
Use the Close button to remove the keypad display from view.
Clear
Use the Clear button to clear Quick Key assignments. To do so, first click
Clear. The pointer changes shape. Next, click the Quick Key to be cleared.
The previous display assigned to the key will be cleared, and the key is then
available for re-assignment.
Help
The Help icon on the Quick Keys keypad provides a description of the Quick
Keys feature.
Set
The Set button is used to make unused Quick Keys available for assignment.
To do so, click Set. Quick keys which have already been assigned are
unavailable, and are stippled out. Click the desired Quick Key, then enter a
label, if desired, in the resulting window. Click OK or press RETURN to complete
the operation. The chosen Quick Key is then assigned to call up the display
currently in the Operator Window.
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9.11 CRT Context Keys
Each user can set up a personalized working environment or context, which can include multiple Operator
Windows and their contents, as well as the size and position of Quick Key keypads associated with the
Operator Windows. Different users have different contexts, depending on their area and responsibilities,
and each user may have a number of different contexts which are used repeatedly. Using CRT Context
Keys saves time and effort by bypassing the numerous keystrokes necessary to open multiple Operator
Windows and call up the appropriate displays.
9.11.1 Preparing the Context
The size, location and contents of each Operator Window on a screen can be stored and assigned to a
CRT Context Key. In order to assign this information, the user must first set up the working environment on
a Micro-PWC. For example, a user might have two windows open on a screen: one in which a Sequence is
being controlled and one containing an associated graphic. By assigning this set of displays to a CRT
Context Key, the user can return to this screen environment with ease by selecting the appropriate CRT
Context Key.
9.11.2 Initial Display Layout Login
The Login Context Key is assigned to the user’s initial display layout, which appears automatically each
time the user logs in. If a user has no context assigned to the Login Context Key, the previous contents of
the screen remain after the user logs in. In the case of the Default User state (no user logged in), the initial
display layout consists of one Operator Window containing the System Status Display. The user can
change the contents of this window and/or increase the number of windows in the Default User initial layout. Clearing this layout will always cause it to return to the single Operator Window/System Status Display
combination.
9.11.3 Accessing CRT Context Keys
CRT Context Keys allow each user to save up to 17 working contexts (the Login Context Key plus 16 additional keys) and assign each context to one individual key which appears on the screen. To access the
CRT Context Keys option, from the System Window select Menu > Windows > CRT Context Keys. A window known as the CRT Context Keys keypad will be displayed. This window contains the set of CRT
Context Keys available in the current user’s login configuration (Figure 9-15).
TC00090A
Figure 9-15. CRT Context Keys Keypad
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9.11.4 Configuring CRT Context Keys
When the CRT Context Keys keypad is first called up, any CRT Context Keys which have not been
assigned appear stippled, as they are not yet available to the user. Normal alphanumeric text appears on
any CRT Context Keys which have been assigned a context.
The Set button is used to assign the displays that are currently on the screen to any one of the CRT Context Keys. (Any pop-up windows which are present are ignored.)
Cliclk on Set. CRT Context Keys which have already been assigned now appear stippled, and unassigned
keys are available. Click on the key to be assigned. A window is displayed, as shown in Figure 9-16.
.
✎ Note
To exit Set mode without making an assignment, click Set a second
time.
TC00091A
Figure 9-16. CRT Context Key Assignment Window
A text string of up to eight alphanumeric characters can be entered, which will appear on the key. The key
number is the default string, and can be changed by the user. Click OK to complete the selection procedure.
9.11.5 Clearing CRT Context Keys
CRT Context Keys must be cleared before reassignments are made. To clear a CRT Context Key, click
Clear. The cursor changes shape. Next, click the CRT Context Key which is to be cleared. All CRT Context
assignments associated with that key will be destroyed and the key is available for a new assignment.
✎
Note
To exit Clear mode without making an assignment, click Clear a
second time.
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9.12 Summary - CRT Context Keys
CRT Context Key A CRT Context Key is one of the 16 pushbuttons on the CRT Context Keys
keypad used to recall a pre-configured screen environment. The CRT Context
Keys keypad is displayed by selecting Menu > Windows > CRT Context Keys.
288
Clear button
The Clear button on the CRT Context Keys keypad is used to clear a CRT
Context Key of previous assignments. Click Clear; the the cursor changes
shape. Next, click the CRT Context Key to be cleared. The context assigned
to the key will be cleared.
Context
A user’s context is the user’s working environment on the PC terminal. This
includes the preferred size, shape, location, number and contents of Operator
Windows on the user screen, as well as the size and position of any quick key
keypads associated with the Operator Windows.
CRT
CRT refers to the PC screen.
Login Layout
button
The Login Layout button is located at the top of the CRT Context Key
keypad, above the CRT Context Keys and below the title bar. The displays
assigned to this button will appear automatically when the user logs in.
Set button
The Set button on the CRT Context Keys keypad is used to assign the
displays currently on the screen to any one of the CRT Context Keys on the
keypad. (Any pop-up windows present will be ignored.) To do so, first make
sure that the size, location and contents of the Operator Windows present are
as desired. Next, click Set. Keys which have already been assigned are
unavailable and will be stippled out. Click the CRT Context Key to be set to
call up the current displays. Enter the key label in the resulting window, and
click Close or press RETURN to complete the operation.
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9.13 Console Groups Synchronization
9.13.1 Console Group Synchronization Overview
A console node is assigned to a console group when the Micro-PWC software is installed.
Advantages to using console groups include:
•
Dividing nodes into console groups reduces the load on large systems when synchronization
occurs.
•
Separate configurations can be maintained on the console nodes in each group.
Console nodes in all console groups can perform all functions with all controllers.
Node Up and Node Down messages continue to be distributed network-wide.
Node names must be unique on the Ethernet network; that is, there cannot be two nodes named PWC1 on
the same network, even if assigned to different console groups.
Historical Database tagnames must be unique; console nodes in all console groups can access historical
data from all nodes. For example, a console node in Console Group 2 can trend historical data that is collected and stored on a console node in Console Group 1. However, the historical DB configuration (i.e., the
definition of what tag.atom to collect, what rate to collect it at, how long to retain the information, and so on)
is synchronized only between nodes in the same console group.
Synchronization of configuration data within a console group is performed automatically each time a node
is introduced (or re-introduced) on the Ethernet network. It is also performed automatically each time a
configuration change is made. The Console Group Synchronization utility provides the ability to obtain one
or more types of configuration information from another system in a different console group and copy that
data onto the local system (at which you are working). This operation is similar to the Backup/Restore utility (described in the Micro-PWC Operator's Manual), but requires no tapes, diskettes, or other physical
media.
A graphical overview of the console groups on the Ethernet network is available from the System Status
Display (discussed in Section 8.0 of this Guide). To view it, go to the System Status Display and , from the
window’s menu bar, select Utilities > Console Groups . The Console Groups Display window (Figure 9-17)
appears. Use this display to determine to which other console group the local node belongs, and to determine what other console groups are available, what their numbers are, and what console nodes belong to
them.
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Figure 9-17. Console Groups Display Window
9.13.2 Selecting a Console Node With Which to Synchronize
To synchronize a configuration type or item on your local system with that in another console group, from
the System Window, select Menu > Utilities > Console Group Sync. The Console Group Sychronization
window (Figure 9-18) will be displayed.
Figure 9-18. Console Group Synchronization Window
The Console Group Synchronization window provides the number of the local group, plus a list box listing
the other available console groups. For each console group, the Node Name of each console type node in
the group is shown.
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The node name is the machine name of the node's computer, and appears on the icon for the node in the
System Status Display (e.g., PWC1, PWC10, and so on).
If you know the node name of the console node with which you want to synchronize the local configuration
item, but do not know which console group it is in, you can locate it quickly in the list by clicking the FIND
GROUP button. A pop-up window will appear, which prompts:
Enter Node Name
Enter the node name in the text entry box, then click OK. The entry for the group containing this node will
be selected. Note that this item is case-sensitive; you must enter the node name in the proper case. If the
wrong case is used, the node name will not be found, and an error pop-up will appear.
Click on the entry for the console group from which you want to obtain configuration data.
Once a console group has been selected, click the SYNC button on the Console Group Synchronization
window. If there are multiple nodes in the console group, the Console Node Selection window (Figure 919) will be displayed. (If there is only one node in the console group, this window is skipped and the Console Group Synchronization Selection window (Figure 9-20) will be displayed.)
Figure 9-19. Console Node Selection Window
Figure 9-20. Console Group Synchronization Selection Window
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9.13.3 Selecting Configuration Data for Synchronization
The Console Group Synchronization Selection window (Figure 9-20) allows you to specify the configuration data items with which the local node will synchronize. Types of configuration data which can be
selected for synchronization include:
•
User Models
•
Spreadsheet Logs
•
Configuration Report Options
•
String Files1
•
System Configuration
This can be all configuration data for a type (e.g., all graphics), or just selected items (e.g., a single
graphic). By default, the All radio button is selected for all items except System Confirguration (which does
not have an All button).
To synchronize with specific configuration items only, click on the Selected radio button for the configuration type. If User Models, controller Databases, Spreadsheet Logs, Configuration Report Options or String
Files are selected, a window similar to that in Figure 9-21 will be displayed.
✎
Note
The Console Group Synchronization Selection window is very
similar in appearance and operation to the Backup and Restore
windows which are part of the Backup/Restore utility described in
the Micro-PWC Operator's Manual.
Figure 9-21. Configuration Item Selection Window
Each Configuration Item Selection window contains two list boxes. The list box on the left, labelled Not
Selected for Restore, initially lists all the files for the selected information type. Click on an item in the list to
select it, then click on the ADD-> button below the list box. The selected item will then be moved to the list
box on the right, labelled Selected for Restore.
To remove an item from the Selected for Restore list box, click on the item to select it, then click on the
<-DELETE button. The selected item will then be returned to the Not Selected for Restore list box.
1.
String Files are the files containing the text which appears in the windows, button faces, etc., on the
Micro-PWC displays. These files are typically used by system integrators when converting Micro-PWC
displays to a language other than English.
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If only a portion of the pathname for a file is known, click on the Find button. A Find window (Figure 9-22)
will be displayed.
Figure 9-22. Find Window
Select the list to be searched (Not Selected for Restore or Selected for Restore), and enter the known portion of the pathname in the text entry box labelled Substring. Click on Apply; all items in the selected list
which contain that string will be highlighted. (Use the scrollbars to view the portions of the list which extend
beyond the viewing area of the selected list box; note that entries containing the known string are not necessarily adjacent.)
When the Selected button for System Configuration Data is clicked on, the System Configuration Data
window (Figure 9-23) will be displayed.
Figure 9-23. System Configuration Data Window
This window allows selection of individual configuration Micro-PWC system configuration types for synchronization. Click on the Set All button to quickly select all Micro-PWC configuration data for backup;
click Clear All to quickly deselect multiple items. When the Default button is clicked, the current selections
will be cleared, and the software will automatically select a pre-determined set of items to synchronize.
Items which are omitted from the default set are those with the potential for causing obvious problems
such as replacement of user login accounts, conflicting requests for the printout of scheduled logs, and so
on.
9.13.3.1 String File Considerations
String Files are the files which contain the text which appears in the windows and on button faces, etc., on
the Micro-PWC displays. These files are typically used by system integrators when converting Micro-PWC
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displays to a language other than English. Files in different languages are kept in separate directories. To
save space, unused string files can be deleted from the system.
Using the String Files option on the Console Group Synchronization Selection window will cause the string
files on the local node to be synchronized with those on the remote node. Synchronization will only occur
if the corresponding string file directory exists on the local node. Existing string files in that directory will be
overwritten if they share the same file name with string files on the remote node. (If no corresponding
directory exists, it will not automatically be created.)
9.13.3.2 Performing the Synchronization
When all items (for which configuration data is to be obtained) have been selected, click on the Restore
button at the bottom of the Console Group Synchronization Selection window. A status window will appear
during the synchronization process which displays the name of each item as synchronization occurs for it.
When the synchronization is complete, a pop-up window will advise:
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10.0 Historical Block Data Collection
10.1 Introduction
The Historical Block Database is designed for the efficient collection of data from a large number of
tag.atoms. Like the data collected in the Historical Database, the Historical Block Data is stored for use by
other applications, such as Logging, Trending and Data Archiving.
Historical Block configuration is used to create and edit Historical Blocks. Each Historical Block is a single
entity which contains data collected from multiple points in the controller database. All tags which are
named in the configuration of the Historical Block share the same settings for Collection Rate, Storage
Node, Computations, Pause and Raw Data.
The following guidelines should be observed when configuring Historical Block Data Collection.
•
For optimum performance, each Historical Block should contain from 50 to 500 controller
tag.atoms.
•
The recommended collection period is 30 seconds or longer.
•
No more than 500 tags should be collected per instance in time from the same controller (i.e.,
no more than 500 tags should share the same Start Time). If more than 500 tags are being
collected, offset the time interval. For example, collect each set of tags every 30 seconds with
a start time deviation of 15 seconds.
•
Up to 5,000 points can be collected per Micro-PWC server using Historical Block Data
Collection.
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10.2 Historical Block Database Configuration Window
Access Historical Block Configuration by using from the System Window by selecting Menu > Configure >
Historical Blocks. The Historical Block Database Configuration window (Figure 10-1) will be displayed. The
main portion of this display is a list box which contains the Block Name and Legend for all the Historical
Blocks which have been configured in the Historical Block Database. Below this list are buttons which are
used to add, copy, locate, edit and delete blocks in the Historical Block Database.
TC00215A
Figure 10-1. Historical Block Database Configuration Window
10.3 Add Historical Block
To create a block in the Historical Block Database, click Add in the Historical Block Database Configuration
window. The Historical Block Configuration window (Figure 10-2) will appear. The window is divided into
two main portions:
•
Collection and storage parameter configuration
•
Controller tag.atom specifications
10.3.1 Historical Block Name
Click in the Block Name entry box to enter the string to be used to identify the block in the Historical Block
Database. This name can be up to 37 characters in length, cannot contain spaces, and must begin with an
alphabetic character. The block name must also be unique on the network.
✎
296
Note
A block name must be specified; if no entry is made in the Block
Name entry box, an error message will be displayed.
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TC00582A
Figure 10-2. Historical Block Configuration Window
10.3.2 Historical Block Legend
Click in the Legend entry box to enter the string which is to be used as the legend for the Historical Database Point under configuration. This legend can be up to 63 characters in length.
10.3.3 Period and Start Time
Both the Period (user-defined collection interval) and the Start Time (which defines the beginning of the
Period) are entered in the same entry box. The Period is entered first; the words daily, weekly and
monthly are valid entries to define the Period. Alternatively, the user can define a customized Period by
defining the number of days, hours, minutes and seconds in the Period using the following format (leading
zeros are required with single digit entries):
DD:HH:MM:SS
(The minimum recommended period is 30 seconds.) Enter a comma (,) after the Period to separate it from
the starting time. After the period has been defined, the starting time (hours, minutes, seconds) and date
(day, month, year) which mark the beginning of the interval, are entered in the format:
HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY
The default Period is hourly (00:01:00:00) and the default Start Time is midnight of the current day (e.g.,
00:00:00 30-JUN-07).
✎
Note
The 24 hour clock is used, and the month is identified by the first
three letters of the month name (in English).
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10.3.4 Storage Node
The Node on which the Historical Block is stored can be specified. The face of the Node button will display
the name of the node selected to store data collected for the Historical Block. By default, this is the name
of the local node. Click the Node button; the Storage Nodes window (Figure 10-3) is displayed.
TC00583A
Figure 10-3. Storage Nodes Window
The Storage Nodes window contains a list of available nodes. Click the node to be used to store the Historical Block data; it will be highlighted. Click OK to complete the operation.
10.3.5 Number Retained
Text entry box labelled Number Retained is used to specify the number of collections to be retained for
each tag.atom in the Historical Block under configuration. Once the retention limit has been reached, each
new collection will replace the oldest collection. Enter inf (infinity) in Number Retained entry box to retain
all values collected. Otherwise, enter a numeric value (zero is not a valid numeric value). To retain no data
for the tags in the Historical Block, deselect the Raw Data button described below.
✎
Note
The amount of available disk space and the number, frequency and
retention rate of other collections on the system should be
considered carefully when configuring the retention time.
10.3.6 Historical Block Collection Options
Three additional features are provided via toggle buttons:
•
Raw data
•
Pause
•
Reset
By default, these buttons are deselected (displayed in gray, and appear raised). When selected, they
appear pressed in and are displayed in yellow.
10.3.6.1 Raw Data
When the Raw Data toggle is selected, raw data collected from the controller will be retained in the Historical Block in addition to any computations which have been selected.
10.3.6.2 Pause
When the Pause toggle is selected, data collection will be stopped. To restart the collection, deselect the
Pause button. Click Apply or OK on the Historical Block Configuration window to make changes to the
Pause toggle button take effect.
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10.3.6.3 Reset
When the Reset toggle is selected, all previously collected data values stored for the Historical Block will
be deleted, and any portions of the database reserved for tags which have been deleted from the block’s
configuration will be compressed. This does not affect the configuration of the Historical Block. All parameters and tags for the block will still be defined.
10.3.7 Tag Atom Assignment
The Tag Atom assignments portion of the Historical Block Configuration window is used to specify the
tag.atoms in the controller database from which data will be collected for the Historical Block. This portion
of the Historical Block Configuration window is composed of a list box, a text entry box, an Add button and
a Delete button. In the text entry box, enter the name of a valid tag.atom in the controller database. Click
Add to assign it to the current Historical Block. The name will be placed in the list box. As additional items
are configured, they will also be added to the list box.
To delete one or more tag.atoms from the Historical Block, click the item to be deleted in the list box, then
click Delete. The entry (or entries) will be removed from the Historical Block configuration and from the list
box.
10.3.8 Historical Block Data Computations
The Micro-PWC can be configured to perform calculations on Historical Block data as it is collected. Available calculations are:
•
Average
•
Minimum
•
Maximum
•
Standard deviation
Computations can be performed hourly, daily, weekly or yearly. The computed values are stored in Historical Computation atoms. The computed values stored in these atoms can be used by other applications,
such as trending. Atoms are also provided for two additional values, Minimum Time and Maximum Time.
These atoms are used to store the time-stamp of the first instance of the minimum and maximum collection
values. The atom names are shown in Table 10-1.
Table 10-1. Historical Computation Atoms
Average
Minimum
Minimum
Time
Maximum
Maximum
Time
Standard
Deviation
Hourly
.HAV
.HMN
.HTMN
.HMX
.HTMX
.HSD
Daily
.DAV
.DMN
.DTMN
.DMX
.DTMX
.DSD
Monthly
.MAV
.MMN
.MTMN
.MMX
.MTMX
.MSD
Yearly
.YAV
.YMN
.YTMN
.YMX
.YTMX
.YSD
Period
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Click on the Computations button. The Historical Tag Computations window (Figure 10-4) will be displayed.
TS00218A
Figure 10-4. Historical Tag Computations Window
The Historical Tag Computations window is composed of a matrix of toggle buttons which allow the user to
select individually the desired combinations of computation rate and computation type. Each row in the
matrix represents a computation rate; each column represents a computation type. By default, all buttons
are deselected and displayed in gray and appear raised. Click the toggle button which corresponds to the
desired computation rate and computation type. Selected buttons are displayed in yellow, and appear
pushed in.
Use the Number Retained text entry box at the end of each row to define the number of values to be
retained for each computation type selected for that computation rate. Once the retention limit has been
reached, the value obtained by each new computation will replace the oldest value. Because the retention
limit is defined on a per computation rate basis, it is not possible to set the Number Retained to a different
value for different computation types with the same computation rate. For example, it is not possible to set
a different Number Retained for the hourly/average and hourly/minimum values. However, it is possible to
configure different retention limits for hourly/average and daily/average values. Enter inf (infinity) in the
Number Retained text entry box to retain all values collected; otherwise, enter a numeric value (zero is not
a valid numeric value). To retain no data for a particular computation type, all toggle buttons for the computation type must be deselected.
✎
Notes
1. No checks are performed to validate collection rate vs. computation rate. The
user must consider the collection rate of the data and take care to configure
appropriate computation rates; i.e., while it is technically feasible to perform hourly
computations on data which is collected once a day (daily), such a configuration
would result in many unnecessary and non-productive computations.
2. The amount of available disk space and the number, frequency and retention
rate of other collections on the system should be considered carefully when
configuring the retention time.
10.3.9 Configuring Multiple Historical Blocks
Once the configuration of an Historical Block is complete, click Apply. The current configuration session
will be saved, and the Historical Block Configuration window will remain open so that additional Historical
Blocks can be configured.
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10.4 Edit Historical Block
To make changes to an existing Historical Block, first click the desired block name in the Historical Block
Database Configuration window (Figure 10-1), then click Edit. The Historical Block Configuration window
(Figure 10-2) will be displayed, containing the values currently configured for that block.
✎
Note
The Block Name cannot be changed when an existing Historical
Block is edited; use the Copy button to copy the configuration of an
existing Historical Block to a new Block Name.
Configure as described in Section 10.3, Add Historical Block.
10.5 Copy an Historical Block
To copy the configuration of an existing Historical Block to a new Block Name, use the Copy button. Click
on the desired block name in the Historical Block Database Configuration window (Figure 10-1), then click
Copy. The Historical Block Configuration window (Figure 10-2) will be displayed, containing the values
currently configured for that block, except for the Block Name and Legend text entry boxes, which are
blank.
Configure as described in Section 10.3, Add Historical Block.
10.6 Delete an Historical Block
The Delete button is used to delete a block in the Historical Block Database. Click on the name of the
block to be deleted; it will be highlighted. Click Delete to delete the highlighted block. A confirmation window will appear, which asks if the block is to be deleted, and which contains two buttons labelled Yes and
No. Click Yes to delete the block, or click No to exit the operation without deleting the selected blocks.
10.6.1 Find an Historical Block
The Find button is located in the lower left corner of the Historical Block Database Configuration window
(Figure 10-1). It is used to locate a given Historical Block in the Historical Block database. If the block does
exist, Find quickly locates it on the Block Name list and highlights it. Once located, the configuration of the
block can be viewed, edited or deleted as desired.
To use this feature, click Find. In the resulting pop-up window (), click the entry box and enter the desired
Block Name. If only a portion of the name is entered, the first entry that contains the entered string will be
chosen. For example, if the string HR is entered, and the first Block Name to begin with these characters is
HRANO1, then this is the block that would be highlighted in the Block Name list. The Find feature can only
be used to locate strings in block names; it is not applicable to Block Legends.
Figure 10-5. Historical Block Find Window
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Click Apply to locate the first instance of the string. The Find window will remain open. Click Apply again
to locate the next instance of the string, or enter a new string to be located. Click OK to perform the Find
operation and close the Find window.
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11.0 The @aGlance/IT Server Interface
11.1 Introduction
The @aGlance/IT server interface is an optional utility which provides a live data link between the MicroPWC and a variety of software applications resident on other distributed control systems, supervisory control systems, personal computers, and so on. Easy access to this plant data assists those involved in problem analysis and resolution, product improvement, process improvement and resource optimization.
Obtaining process data directly from the process control system eliminates the possibility of error introduced by manual data entry. @aGlance/IT provides a clean, standardized interface which allows data to
be transferred between different hardware platforms while retaining its meaning, despite inherent differences in the way data is formatted on different systems (e.g., byte order, floating point formatting, and so
on).
Tools into which you may to import live process data include a broad range of applications, such as relational databases, expert systems, spreadsheets, simulation tools, report generators, visualization tools,
statistical analysis packages, planning tools, charting tools and graphic tools. Each class of tools( e.g.,
spreadsheets, statistical packages, and so on) has a different way of interacting with users.
In order for the exchange of data to take place, @aGlance/IT is required for each participating network
partner.
The architecture of the @aGlance/IT software is based on a client/server model. A process known as an
@aGlance/IT server typically runs on the system which “owns” the process control data (e.g., a MicroPWC). A process known as an @aGlance/IT client typically runs on the system which will be a “consumer”
of that data (e.g., a Micro-PWC, a PC, or a supervisory control computer). A system can run both client and
server applications simultaneously. Client software must be provided by the user.
✎
Note
The information about the Micro-DCI @aGlance Server Interface
contained in this chapter, while complete, does not include all
information required to use @aGlance client functions with the
Micro-DCI Server. Complete information about @aGlance/IT is
provided by Axeda Systems Inc.
For details on using @aGlance Client software provided by Axeda
Systems Incorporated, refer to the @aGlance/IT User's Guide.
Refer to the @aGlance/IT System Manual for information about
developing custom client software solutions.
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11.1.1 The @aGlance/IT API for Micro-DCI
Any @aGlance/IT client can connect to any @aGlance/IT server, assuming the minimum requirements for
network transport are met to access the server running on the Micro-PWC.
The @aGlance/IT Application Programming Interface (API) on a Micro-PWC consists of:
•
An @aGlance/IT server which can provide data to @aGlance/IT clients.
•
Support for @aGlance/IT methods (functions) used by:
•
commercially available @aGlance/IT client applications
(e.g., the @aGlance/IT Add-In for Excel)
•
users engaged in creating custom @aGlance/IT client applications
Also provided is a window-based interface for:
•
Identifying data structures in the Micro-DCI databases (by tagname and atom).
•
Defining translations for the Micro-DCI atoms to other terminologies, such as the Instrument
Society of America’s SP72 standard.
•
Viewing information about servers and server activity.
The implementation of @aGlance/IT on Micro-DCI permits the access of up to 500 points per second from
either the client or server side.
11.1.2 Micro-DCI @aGlance/IT Server Requirements - Micro-PWC Version
The following requirements must be met in order to successfully run the @aGlance/IT API server on the
Micro-PWC:
•
TCP/IP must be installed on the node on which the @aGlance/IT server is to run.
On the Micro-PWC, if a single channel Ethernet board is present and detected by the
Windows software during installation, the necessary TCP/IP software will be loaded
automatically. If the Ethernet board is not detected, the TCP/IP software should be installed
when it is prompted for during installation of the Windows software.
•
A properly installed license for the @aGlance/IT API for Micro-DCI must be present. One
Micro-DCI @aGlance/IT Server Interface license is included with each set of Micro-PWC
software. Additional licenses can be purchased.
On the Micro-PWC, the user is prompted to enter license keys during the initial startup of the
system, as described in the Micro-PWC Installation and Setup Guide. After the initial startup,
installation of license keys is performed using the License Administration menu, described in
the Micro-PWC Installation and Setup Guide.
✎
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Note
A single client license is installed as standard. A multiple client
license is optionally available.
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11.2 @aGlance/IT Server Operation
The @aGlance/IT API for the Micro-DCI translates between the @aGlance/IT methods and data structures, and those of the Micro-DCI Global database.
There are two aspects to @aGlance/IT server configuration: external interface configuration and internal
interface configuration. The @aGlance/IT internal interface configuration is used to identify the nodes on
which @aGlance/IT servers will run, and is described in Section 11.2.1, Configuring the @aGlance/IT
Server Internal Interface. The @aGlance/IT external interface configuration is used to identify tagnames
and attributes (atoms) in the Micro-DCI Global database, and is described in Section 11.2.5, Configuring
the @aGlance/IT Server External Interface.
✎
Note
Configuration of the @aGlance/IT internal interface on the MicroPWC is performed using utilities provided by the makers of
@aGlance/IT. It is assumed that the user has had Windows training
and/or experience, and has an understanding of the Windows
environment.
It is further assumed that users creating custom @aGlance/IT
clients are familiar with @aGlance/IT development software and the
documentation (including on-line help) supplied by the makers of
@aGlance/IT.
11.2.1 Configuring the @aGlance/IT Server Internal Interface
The @aGlance/IT internal interface configuration is used to identify the nodes on which @aGlance/IT servers will run. Servers identify themselves to @aGlance/IT at run time, and client applications specify, at run
time, the names of the servers with which they wish to communicate. Internal interface configuration is
required so that the nodes can be recognized by @aGlance/IT clients. When a client issues a request to
communicate with a server application, @aGlance/IT will look for it on servers which have been identified
using the @aGlance/IT Administration (aag_admin) tool.
After an @aGlance/IT server has been defined, the @aGlance/IT item available from the System Window
Menu button provides access to the external interface. The external interface provides the ability to identify
the set of tagnames and their associated attributes (atoms) which will be recognized by the @aGlance/IT
servers. It also allows you to configure the translations of the attribute (atom) names, to make them recognizable to applications on other platforms.
11.2.2 Registering Server Nodes
To access the @aGlance/IT Administration Tool, go to the Program Manager or equivalent and doubleclick on the Micro-PWC icon. In the resulting window, click on the @aGlance/IT Administration icon. The
@aGlance/IT Administration Tool will be displayed. The main options on this window are:
•
Server Hosts (server host registration)
•
Proxies (client registration)
•
Permissions (permission configuration)
Use the Server Hosts option to register all potential server node names in the @aGlance/IT configuration
database for the local node. Server registration identifies and characterizes nodes which contain a server
that clilent applications will access. When the Server Hosts option is selected, the user interface provides a
text entry box labelled Server Host. To register a server node, enter the Internet host name of the server in
this text entry box.
Server registration is only necessary on nodes where a client application (e.g., Microsoft Excel) exists. All
nodes containing client applications have to register the name of the Micro-PWC which contains the
@aGlance/IT server, in order to find and communicate with the server.
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The Micro-DCI @aGlance/IT Server communicates using TCP//IP. If you have questions about TCP/IP or
about Internet host names in use at your site, see your system administrator. If you have questions about
the options on or configuration via this display, see the on-line help text available from the Help button.
Information about client nodes and client users is configured using the Proxies option, which is described
in Section 11.4, Security for the @aGlance/IT Server.
11.2.3 Registering Client Nodes
Use the @aGlance/IT aag_admin utility to register all potential client nodes in each Micro-PWC
@aGlance/IT server network database. This function identifies and characterizes nodes from which clients
will access the server. Because the Micro-PWC @aGlance/IT server communicates using TCP/IP, the
aag_admin utility will prompt the user to enter an Internet host name. (If you have questions about Internet
host names in use at your site, contact your system administrator.)
The @aGlance/IT administration menu will be displayed. Server Setup is used to tell @aGlance/IT what
clients are permitted to access the local node and servers on that system. Enter H at the menu prompt to
access the @aGlance/IT online Help system for information on how to use the @aGlance/IT administration menu to add and delete client nodes to and from the network database of the @aGlance/IT server for
a Micro-PWC network.
11.2.4 Starting a Server and Server Names
Typically, the maximum number of @aGlance/IT servers for which the node is licensed are started when
the system is started. A server started automatically by the system will be assigned a default name in the
format:
EBi<node name>
where the i is an index number used to identify the server, and the <node name> is the name of the MicroPWC node on which the server is running. For example, if the node named CON4 is licensed for two servers, two servers will be started automatically. The servers will be named EB1CON4 and EB2CON4.
A maximum of two @aGlance/IT servers can run simultaneously on a Micro-PWC, and each of these servers can have up to 10 simultaneous client connections.
11.2.4.1 Starting a Server with Non-Default Options
It is possible to customize parameters such as server name and interval for the servers which are started
automatically on system start up. To do so, you must create a file named aagServ.dat in the directory
\Micro-PWC\data. Each line in this file is an entry that includes the options which define one server. For
example, to define two servers (named spock and tuvok), each with a monitor interval of 3 seconds, the
aagServ.dat file would consist of the following lines:
-s spock -m -i 3
-s tuvok -m -i 3
Available server start-up options are described in Table 11-1.
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Table 11-1. Options for Use When Starting a Server
Option and <Argument>
Description
-server <server name>
<server name> is the name to be used for the @aGlance/IT
server. It can have a maximum of 20 characters. If this option is
omitted, default server name aagServer will be used. On a system
licensed for the @aGlance/IT server for Micro-DCI, the number of
servers for which the system is licensed will be started
automatically when the system is booted. (The maximum number
of servers per node is 2).
-nsessions <number>
<number> determines the maximum number of sessions allowed
for the @aGlance server. The maximum number of sessions
allowed per server is 5, which is the default used if the -nsessions
option is not specified. If an argument with a value less than 1 is
supplied with this option, the number of sessions will be set to 1. If
an argument with a value greater than 5 is supplied, the number of
sessions will be set to 5.
-interval <seconds>
<seconds> defines the number of seconds in the poll interval. This
argument is an integer. The minimum number of seconds that can
be specified is 1.
-monitor
When this option is used, the monitor feature is enabled.
Monitoring provides the means whereby an @aGlance/IT client is
advised (at a default or specified poll interval) regarding the
values contained in specified data points.
-daemon
When this option is used, the server will run as a background
process.
-clientshutdown
When this option is used, a client which requests a server
shutdown using the AAG_Shutdown method will be able to shut
down the server, provided that the session which is requesting the
shutdown is the only session running.
-evtmessage
Each time a client starts or ends a session, a message is
displayed in the system event display area of the Mini-Alarm
Window, the Event Review display, and is also entered into the
Event Historian. The message contains the following data in the
order shown:
<Time><Date><Node Name><@aGlance Server Name>
(<Micro-DCI login name>:<Remote Host name>:
<Remote User account identification>)<session ID>
When the -evtmessage option is used, these messages will be
suppressed.
-current
When this option is used, the AAG_GetTags method returns only
tags belonging to the Current Tagnames Name space.
-history
When this option is used, the AAG_GetTags method returns only
tags belonging to the History Tagnames Name space.
NOTE: Clients do not need to be aware of which node the server is running on.
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11.2.5 Configuring the @aGlance/IT Server External Interface
The @aGlance/IT external interface configuration is used to identify tagnames and attributes (atoms) in
the Micro-PWC server database. Access @aGlance/IT external interface configuration by using the menu
available from the System Window Menu button.
Select Menu > Configure > @aGlance/IT. The @aGlance Configuration window (Figure 11-1) will be displayed.
TC00219A
Figure 11-1. @aGlance Configuration Window
The @aGlance Configuration window is used to access configuration of current and historical data in the
Micro-DCI Global database. It also provides access to information on the @aGlance/IT servers resident on
the ethernet network.
11.2.6 Configure @aGlance/IT Current Tagname
Click Current Tagnames to open the @aGlance Current Tagnames window (Figure 11-2).
TC00220A
Figure 11-2. @aGlance Current Tagnames Window
The @aGlance Current Tagnames window contains a scrollable list of all the tagnames in the Micro-PWC
server database which have been configured for @aGlance/IT to recognize.
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11.2.6.1 Add a New @aGlance Tagname
To add a new tagname to the list, click Add. The @aGlance Add Tagname window (Figure 11-3) will be
displayed.
TC00584A
Figure 11-3. @aGlance Add Tagname Window
Text entry boxes Tagname, Attribute, and Translation appear in the top of the window. In the Tagname
entry box, enter a tagname from the Micro-PWC server database. In the Attribute entry box, enter the text
string to be used to represent the attribute when it is accessed by an @aGlance/IT client application. (If no
attribute name is entered it will default to out.) The type of name entered for the Attribute depends on the
format needed by the client application. The text string entered can be a Micro-PWC server atom name, or
it can be an SP72 name or other conventional name for a piece of data. It is the responsibility of the user to
know the data naming conventions and requirements of the client application.
✎
Note
In general @aGlance/IT database access conforms to the ISASP72 tag/attribute model. This is equivalent to the tagname.atom
model used in Micro-PWC server database access.
In the Translation entry box enter an atom name from the Micro-PWC server database. The atom will then
be represented by the attribute with which it is now associated when it is accessed by an @aGlance/IT client application. Associating an atom name and an attribute in this manner effectively translates the MicroPWC server system atom into the terminology of the client application.
Once the attribute and translation have been entered, click Apply to cause these items to be added to the
list of attributes configured for the tagname. The tagname remains in the Tagname entry box and the
Attribute and Translation entry boxes will be emptied allowing additional attributes to be configured for the
same tagname.
Note that after at least one attribute has been applied, Edit, Add and Delete on the @aGlance Add Tagname window become available. After entering input for the additional attributes, click Add to add the additional items to the configuration.
To change the configuration of an item, click that item in the list, then click Edit; the entries will appear in
the appropriate text entry boxes available for revision.
To delete an attribute/translation click the item in the list then click Delete; the entry will be removed from
the list.
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Clicking OK will close the @aGlance Add Tagname window. Changes which have been applied during the
configuration session will be retained. Items placed in the text entry box but not applied will be discarded.
11.2.6.2 Edit the Configuration for an @aGlance Current Tagname
To edit the configuration for an item in the list in the @aGlance Current Tagnames window (Figure 11-2)
click the entry then click Edit at the bottom of the window. The @aGlance Edit Tagnames window
(Figure 11-4) will be displayed.
The Apply button is unavailable in this window. Use Edit, Add, Delete, and Cancel as described for the
window described in the preceding subsection.
Note that tagnames themselves cannot be edited. To change a tagname, delete the entry for it and add a
new one.
TC00585A
Figure 11-4. @aGlance Edit Tagname Window
11.2.6.3 Find a Particular @aGlance Current Tagname
If many current tagnames have been configured, use the Find button in the @aGlance Current Tagnames
window to quickly locate a particular tagname. Click Find. The Find Tagname window will be displayed.
Click the entry box and enter the desired tagname. If only a portion of the tagname is entered, the first
entry where the first letters of the tagname match the entered string will be chosen. For example if the
string HR is entered and the first tagname to begin with these characters is HRANO1 then this is the tagname that would be highlighted in the @aGlance Current Tagnames list.
Click Apply to locate the first instance of the string; the window will remain open. Click Apply again to
locate the next instance of the string or enter a new string to be located. Click OK to perform the Find operation and close the @aGlance Find Tagname window.
✎
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Note
The Find operation is case sensitive.
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11.2.6.4 Viewing @aGlance/IT Current Tagnames
If the number of current tagnames which have been configured exceeds the number which can be displayed in the @aGlance Current Tagnames window, click Next to view the next portion of the Current Tagnames list. Click Prev to move to a preceding portion of the list.
11.2.6.5 Configure @aGlance/IT History Tagnames
The @aGlance/IT interface can be configured to access data in the historical, archival, historical block and
archival block databases. Click History Tagnames to open the @aGlance History Tagnames window
(Figure 11-5).
TC00223A
Figure 11-5. @aGlance History Tagnames Window
Configuration of @aGlance history tagnames is accomplished in the same manner as configuration of
@aGlance/IT current tagnames. Follow the procedures described for using tagnames configured in the
historical, archival, historical block and archival block databases.
File name syntax plays a role in determining which database will be accessed for data. Each historical
database tagname must be unique on the Micro-PWC network and represent a Micro-PWC server tagname.atom combination. To make a permanent record of the data, it can be archived to tape. Archived
data can be restored for later viewing and use.
The restored data is known as the archival database. Data from the historical and archival databases is
requested in the format:
<tagname>.<atom>
A historical block is a single entity which contains data collected from multiple points in a Micro-PWC
server. All the tagnames configured for collection by a historical block share the same collection parameters (i.e., collection rate). Like historical data, historical block data can be archived to tape to create a permanent record. This archived data can be restored later for viewing and use. The restored data is the
archival block data. Data from the historical and archival databases is requested in the format:
<blockname>..<tagname>.<atom>
✎
Note
If no attribute name is entered when performing configuration using
a tagname from the historical database, archival database,
historical block database or archival block database then the
attribute name will default to HST. If the attribute name ARC is
specified only the archival database or archival block database will
be accessed.
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11.2.6.6 Viewing @aGlance/IT Server Process Data
By default, the maximum number of @aGlance/IT server processes for which the Micro-PWC is licensed
will be started when the system is booted. (A maximum of two @aGlance/IT servers can run simultaneously on a Micro-PWC which is resident on the Pentium hardware platform, and each of these servers
can have up to five simultaneous client connections.)
To display a list of servers which are running on the Micro-PWC network, click Statistics on the @aGlance
Configuration window. The window (Figure 11-6) will be displayed.
TC00586A
Figure 11-6. @aGlance Servers Window
The name of the server node and the server name for each server process will appear in the list box which
occupies the main portion of the window. To view more detailed information for a particular server process,
click the entry for that process in the list box to select it then click View at the bottom of the @aGlance
Servers window. The @aGlance Server View window (Figure 11-7) will be displayed.
TC00587A
Figure 11-7. @aGlance Server View Window
The @aGlance Server View window displays the following information about the selected server.
•
Server name.
•
Available sessions - the number of sessions which can be started by @aGlance/IT clients on
the selected server.
•
Active sessions - the number of client-initiated sessions currently active on the selected
server.
A list box contains an entry for each active session on the server. Each entry provides the following information about the session:
312
•
Session ID (the session ID is incremented by one each time a session is started)
•
Login name of the local user
•
Login name of the remote user
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•
Host name of the remote host (the host on which the @aGlance/IT client which started this
session resides)
•
Start time; i.e., the time the client session was initiated in the format HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY
Additional information is available about each active session. To view information about a session, click the
desired entry in the list box then click the View button found at the bottom of the @aGlance Server View
window. An @aGlance Session Detail View window will be displayed.
This window provides information about the requests initiated by the server during the selected active session. An @aGlance/IT client requests data using features known a methods. Corresponding call backs
exist in the server. When an @aGlance/IT client issues a call to an @aGlance/IT method, the corresponding callback in the server provides the information to the client. The @aGlance Session Detail View window lists the available callbacks for the active session, the number of transactions performed per callback,
the number of tags and the number of atoms requested per callback. This information is cumulative over
the life of the session and is lost when the session ends.
✎
Note
For entries in this table for which data can be supplied by
@aGlance, the applicable value or a zero will appear. If there is no
data provided for an item the entry box will be blank.
11.2.7 Backup/Restore @aGlance/IT Configuration
Use Utilities > Backup/Restore to back up @aGlance/IT configuration data. @aGlance/IT configuration
data is backed up as part of the Micro-PWC configuration, and is present as a selectable option on the
Micro-PWC Configuration Data window. Refer to the Micro-PWC Operator’s Manual for details on how to
use the utility.
11.3 Supported Features for Use with @aGlance/IT Clients
11.3.1 @aGlance/IT Methods Supported
When an @aGlance/IT client application requests information from another system running an aGlance/IT
server, a set of parameters is passed from the client application to the @aGlance/IT client software. The
@aGlance/IT client software locates the system on which the desired server is running and connects to the
server. The @aGlance/IT client instructs the server which function (known as a method), to execute, and
passes on the parameters from the client application. The method specified by the @aGlance/IT client
software corresponds to a callback function in the server. A call_back list in the @aGlance/IT server software registers the available callback functions. (If there is no corresponding callback function in the server
the request will fail.)
The Micro-PWC @aGlance/IT server supports the methods listed in Table 11-2.
Table 11-2. Supported @aGlance/IT Methods
Method
Description
AAG_GetList
Get a list of data point values.
AAG_GetTable
Get a table of data point
values.
AAG_PutList
Put a list of data point values.
AAG_PutTable
Put a table of data point
values.
Use
Access data in the current
database. The default attribute
name used with these methods is
OUT.
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Table 11-2. Supported @aGlance/IT Methods (Continued)
Method
Description
AAG_GetHistory
Use
Get a table of historical values. Access data in the historical,
historical block, archival and
Put a table of historical values.
archival block databases. The
default attribute name used is HST.
Get compressed historical
The ARC attribute name can be
data
used to specify access limited to the
Get statistical values from a
archival database.
server
AAG_PutHistory
AAG_GetHistEvent
AAG_GetHisStat
AAG_GetTags
Get a list of tagnames.
Obtain information on the names
used to identify data.
AAG_GetAttrs
Get a list of attribute names.
AAG_Monitor
Register a monitor request.
AAG_CancelMonitor
Cancel a monitor request.
AAG_Command
Execute a server-specific
request
Obtain batch data.
AAG_Shutdown
Terminate the server.
Maintenance-related method.
Start and cancel monitor mode.
11.3.2 Default Attribute Names
If no attribute name is entered when tag configuration is performed to access data in the current database
of a Micro-PWC system, a default attribute name will be provided. Default attribute names are shown in
Table 11-3.
Table 11-3. Default Attribute Name
Micro-PWC Database
Name
Current database
OUT
Historical/archival database
HST
Historical/archival block database
HST
11.3.3 Format of Time-Stamps
In the historical, historical block, archival and archival block databases, a time stamp is stored with collected data. The time and date, in the format described above, are typically used to define the time period
for which data is to be retrieved.
Time and date stamps recognized and returned by the @aGlance/IT server for the Micro-PWC server are
in the format:
HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY
where HH is the number of hours since midnight, MM is the number of minutes, and SS is the number of
seconds. The time is followed by the date (day/month/year). Note that the 24 hour clock is used, and the
month is identified by the first three letters of the month name, in English (i.e., JAN, FEB, MAR, APR, MAY,
JUN, JUL, AUG, SEP, OCT, NOV, DEC).
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11.3.3.1 Server Specific Parameters for History Related Methods
The @aGlance/IT methods used to access the historical, historical block, archival and archival block database include AAG_GetHistory, AAG_GetHistEvent, AAG_GetHistStat and AAG_PutHistory. Each of these
methods passes parameters to the @aGlance/IT server for the Micro-PWC. Some of the parameters
passed must be in a format specific to the server.
11.3.3.1.1 Server Specific AAG_GetHistory Method Parameters
The AAG_GetHistory method returns the historical values for a specified list of tag and attribute names.
The time range is defined by a start time, an interval time, and a number of intervals. For each time interval, a value is returned for each of the tag/attribute pairs.
When this method is used by an @aGlance/IT client during a session with an @aGlance/IT server for the
Micro-PWC, the start, interval and time_list parameters of this method require that a server specific format
be used for time specification.
The start parameter is a pointer to a character string which contains the start time. The start time must be
in the format:
HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY.
The interval is a pointer to a character string containing the time interval. The following format is used to
specify the interval by defining the number of days, hours, minutes and seconds in the interval using the
following format:
DD:HH:MM:SS
The time_list parameter of the GetHistory method is a list of times associated with each historical record.
(The time_list parameter is of the AAGTime data type.) This list is filled in by the server. The number of
entries in the list is determined by the number of requested time intervals specified in the GetHistory count
parameter.
11.3.3.1.2 Server Specific AAG_GetHistEvent Method Parameters
The AAG_GetHistEvent allows clients to retrieve compressed historical data from a server. No time interval
is specified for receiving interpolated data. Instead, a start time and end time are specified by the client,
and the server returns historical values as stored in the historical, archival, historical block or archival block
database compressed and without interpolation.
The start parameter is a pointer to a character string which contains the start time. The start time must be
in the format:
HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY.
The end parameter is a pointer to a character string which contains the end time. The end time must be in
the format:
HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY.
The time_list parameter is a list of time stamps returned by the server, which specifies the times at which
samples were recorded. Time stamps are in the format:
HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY
11.3.3.1.3 Server Specific AAG_GetHistStat Method Parameters
The GetHistStat method is used by a client to retrieve statistical data from a server. Statistical values
returned include the maximum, minimum, average, and standard deviation over a time period.
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The start parameter is a pointer to a character string which contains the start time. The start time must be
in the format:
HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY.
The end parameter is a pointer to a character string which contains the end time. The end time must be in
the format:
HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY.
The type_list is a list of character string pointers containing the statistical types for the @aGlance/IT server
for the Micro-PWC. The following standard @aGlance types should be used: AAG_HIST_MIN,
AAG_HIST_MAX, AAG_HIST_AVG, AAG_HIST_STDDEV.
11.3.3.1.4 Server Specific AAG_PutHistory Method Parameters
The AAG_PutHistory method allows a client to write data into the historical, archival, historical block or
archival block database via the @aGlance/IT server for the Micro-PWC. For example, this could be used to
record laboratory data and process data.
The time_list parameter is a list of times associated with the values being sent to the server. These must
be in the format:
HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY.
This list must contain the same number of entries as the list of tagnames.
11.3.3.2 Server Specific Status Information
AAG_StatusList is an @aGlance/IT data type used to report information regarding the success or failure of
a request to an @aGlance/IT server. The data type contains three elements:
•
Value indicating success or failure.
•
Text.
•
Value representing a severity code.
The value and text elements are server dependent; the severity codes are defined by the @aGlance/IT
software. The contents of these elements are shown in Table 11-4.
Table 11-4. AAG_StatusList Information
Element
Access Succeeds
Access Fails
Value
D_SUCCESS (always zero)
Micro-PWC system DBA error code (sign inverted)
Text
(Null)
Micro-PWC system DBA error status description
Severity AAG_SUCCESS_SEVERITY
AAG_ERROR_SEVERITY
This AAG_StatusList data type is used with the following methods supported by the @aGlance/IT server
for the Micro-PWC: AAG_GetList, AAG_GetTable, AAG_PutList, AAG_PutTable, AAG_GetHistory,
AAG_PutHistory, AAG_GetHistEvent, AAG_GetHistStat, and AAG_Monitor.
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11.4 Security for the @aGlance/IT Server
The two aspects to security for the @aGlance/IT API for the Micro-PWC are:
•
Client access to the @aGlance/IT server for Micro-PWC
•
Access to the Micro-PWC server database
11.4.1 Security for Access to the @aGlance/IT Server for Micro-PWC
Client proxy definition is used to specify which clients are permitted to access the server applications on
the local node. A client proxy account is a mapping from a remote host name and user ID to a local ID. Client proxies are configured on the node in which the @aGlance/IT server for Micro-PWC is installed. Client
proxy definition is performed using the @aGlance/IT aag_admin utility. (Access to the aag_admin utility is
described in Section 11.2.3, Registering Client Nodes in this section.) There are three types of client proxy
accounts:
•
Separate proxy account for a user on a remote node
•
Single proxy account for all users on a remote node
•
Single proxy account for all users on all remote nodes
The simplest procedure is to set up a single account for all users on all remote nodes. The default proxy is
called AAG. To use this default proxy, configure a Micro-PWC user named AAG, using user login configuration. The desired Access Level and area permissions should be configured for the user named AAG.
Client proxy definition is a function of the aag_admin utility provided by Axeda Systems Incorporated; it
does not contain provisions for passwords on client proxy accounts. Security is based on the @aGlance/IT
server for Micro-PWC matching the remote node and user names with the local proxy configuration at run
time.
See subsection Section 11.2.3, Registering Client Nodes for details on how to access the aag_admin utility. See the @aGlance/IT online help subsystem for information on client proxies and how to configure
them.
11.4.2 Security for Micro-PWC Database Access
Database access security for the @aGlance/IT server for the Micro-PWCs is based on the Access Level
and area permissions configured on the remote node for the user running the @aGlance/IT client software.
The Access Level and area permissions correspond to the local user name specified in the @aGlance/IT
proxy account. Each session can be associated with a different proxy account.
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11.5 Monitoring
Monitoring provides a means whereby an @aGlance/IT client is advised regarding the values contained in
specified data points. The @aGlance/IT server supported on the Micro-PWC is based on polled interval
data collection. That is, the data points specified by the client are polled at specific time intervals and the
values in the data points are returned to the client.
The request for monitoring is made by the @aGlance/IT client. A typical client is the Excel spreadsheet,
with the @aGlance/IT Add-in for Excel installed. This manual assumes that the user is familiar with Excel
and @aGlance/IT for Excel. It is beyond the scope of this manual to document the use of these products.
Consult the product documentation for details.
11.5.1 Monitor Time Interval
The time interval at which the data points are polled is referred to as the poll interval. The default poll interval used by the @aGlance/IT server supported on the Micro-PWC is five seconds. This means that an
@aGlance/IT client that has requested the monitor feature would be updated every five seconds. To
change the default time interval, edit the aag_start shell script (discussed in Section 11.2.4.1, Starting a
Server with Non-Default Options). Revise the desired entry (or entries) in the aag_start shell script to
include the -i (interval) flag and an integer argument specifying the number of seconds in the interval. (The
minimum number of seconds is one and the maximum is 86,399, the number of seconds in one day, minus
one second.)
Refer to Section 11.2.4.1, Starting a Server with Non-Default Options for more information on starting a
server with nondefault options.
A client can specify a different time interval using an optional server command line argument to override
the default. To do so, the client must supply an ASCII text string to the interval parameter of the
AAG_monitor facility. The string, which will ultimately be passed to the Micro-PWC software, must be in the
following format:
DD:HH:MM:SS | DAILY | WEEKLY | MONTHLY, HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY
The poll interval is defined first; the words daily, weekly and monthly are valid entries to define the poll
interval. A customized poll interval is created by defining the number of days, hours, minutes and seconds
in the poll interval using the following format:
DD:HH:MM:SS
The poll interval can be followed by a comma (,) or a space and an optional starting time. The default poll
interval of five seconds would appear as 00:00:00:05. After the poll interval has been defined, the starting
time (hours/minutes/seconds and day/month/year) is entered in the following format:
HH:MM:SS DD-MMM-YY
The 24 hour clock is used, and the default starting time is midnight of the current day (e.g., 00:00:00 08JUN-07). Note that the month is identified by the first three letters of the month name, in English (i.e., JAN,
FEB, MAR, APR, MAY, JUN, JUL, AUG, SEP, OCT, NOV, DEC).
If the time specifying string cannot be processed, the default monitor time interval will be used.
11.5.2 Monitor Types
Three types of monitoring are supported. These are:
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•
Polled monitoring
•
Deadband-absolute monitoring
•
Deadband-percent monitoring
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The argument monitor_type is a server-specific argument to the aag_monitor method; the argument is
supplied by the @aGlance/IT client software. Identifying strings defined in the @aGlance/IT server for
Micro-PWC are shown in Table 11-5.
Table 11-5. Supported Monitor Type Identifier Strings
Monitor Type
Identifying String
Polled
MON_POLL (default)
Deadband-absolute
MON_DEAD_ABS
Deadband-percent
MON_DEAD_PCT
If the monitor_type argument is specified by a client and is not one of the strings defined in Table 11-5, the
request will fail. Errors are returned to the client via the AAG_INVARG status.
11.5.2.1 Polled Monitoring
Polled monitoring updates the client application at the poll interval. This is the default monitor type, and is
performed if no argument is supplied for the monitor_type argument.
11.5.2.2 Deadband-Absolute Monitoring
Deadband-absolute monitoring used when the client is to be updated only when certain conditions exist.
This type of monitoring uses the monitor_args array, a server specific argument list. Each floating point or
integer value represented by a tag.attribute combination is associated with a deadband value (D), based
on the last value updated (U). A current value (C) is within the deadband if the following inequalities are
true:
((C>=(U-D))&&(C<=(U+D)))
The client application will be updated if:
•
For floating point and integer values, any value falls outside the deadband
- or -
•
For string and Boolean values, if any value does not compare exactly to the update value
- or -
•
If any status change occurred
The argument list of the monitor_args array must contain at least one element or the client request will fail.
Errors are returned to the client via the AAG_INVCOUNT status.
11.5.2.3 Deadband-Percent Monitoring
Deadband-percent monitoring differs from deadband-absolute monitoring only in that the deadband value
is a percentage of the magnitude of the last stored value. The percentage is expressed as a floating point
value with the range 0<=D<=1.
The deadband condition in this case is:
((C>=U-(U*D))&&(C<=U+(U*D)))
The argument list of the monitor_args array must contain at least one element or the client request will fail.
Errors are returned to the client via the AAG_INVCOUNT status.
Alternatively, the deadband condition can be stated as:
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((C<(U-(U*D))) || (C>(U+(U*D))))
If this evaluates to TRUE, then an update will be sent. If the equation evaluates to FALSE, no update will
be sent.
11.5.3 Monitor Request Size
A maximum of 100 tag.attribute pairs are allowed per monitor request. Larger requests will fail. Errors are
returned to the client via the AAG_INVCOUNT status.
11.6 Supported @aGlance/IT Client Applications
Add-Ins are software packages which provide client applications with an @aGlance/IT client interface, thus
providing the application with the ability to interface with systems which include an @aGlance/IT server.
Clients and servers can have totally different hardware architectures; the differences in underlying network
protocols are resolved by the @aGlance/IT software.
11.7 @aGlance/IT Add-In for Microsoft Excel
The @aGlance/IT Add-In for Excel is supported on the Micro-PWCs. The user is responsible for loading
and configuring both Excel and the @aGlance/IT Add-In for Excel. Consult the vendor documentation supplied with the products for information on installing and configuring them.
The @aGlance/IT Add-In for Excel supports polled monitoring.
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Appendix A Excel Functions
A.1 Introduction
This section describes the functions available with the Micro-PWC software which provide an interface to
the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet package. These functions are for use with Excel only. Experience and/or
training with Excel is assumed; it is beyond the scope of this Guide to document the use of Excel.
In Excel, a function is invoked by writing an = sign, followed by the function name; for example:
=fpudevice()
In Excel, the parentheses must be included, whether or not the call has parameters.
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The fpget( ) Function
Function Name
fpget( ) - get a value from the current database (ASCII)
Synopsis
char fpget(char *tag)
Description
The fpget() function is used in the spreadsheet as a formula. This function gets the value of a
specified tagname.atom from the current database. The function fpget() returns the value in ASCII
format.
Inputs
Parameter
tag
Description
The tagname and atom for which the value will be obtained
from the current database.
Outputs
None.
Returns
The value of the specified tagname.atom, or an error message.
Example
This example gets the value for FIC101.OUT from the current database, for the current time.
In Microsoft Excel:
=fpget(“FIC101.OUT”)
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The fpgetd( ) Function
Function Name
fpgetd( ) - get a value from the current database (double precision)
Synopsis
double fpgetd(char *tag)
Description
The fpgetd() function is used in the spreadsheet as a formula. This function gets the value of a
specified tagname.atom from the current database. The function fpgetd() returns the value as a
double precision data type.
Inputs
Parameter
tag
Description
The tagname and atom for which the value will be obtained
from the current database.
Returns
Value of the specified tagname.atom, or an error message.
Example
This example gets the value for FIC101.OUT from the current database, for the current time.
In Microsoft Excel:
=fpgetd(“FIC101.OUT”)
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The fphget( ) Function
Function Name
fphget( ) - get a value from the Historical database (ASCII)
Synopsis
char fphget(char *tag, double time)
Description
The fphget() function is used in the spreadsheet as a formula. This function gets the value of a
specified tagname from the Historical database. The function fphget() returns the value in ASCII
format.
Inputs
Parameter
Description
tag
Tagname for which the value will be obtained from the
Historical database.
time
Time and date in spreadsheet format (refer to the
Microsoft Excel manual for information on spreadsheet format).
Outputs
None.
Returns
Value of the specified tagname, or an error message.
Example
This example gets the value for FIC101 from the Historical database, for noon on 12 January
2006.
In Microsoft Excel:
=fphget("FIC101", DATEVALUE("12-JAN-06") + TIMEVALUE("12:00:00"))
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The fphgetd( ) Function
Function Name
fphgetd( ) - get a value fromthe Historical database (double precision)
Synopsis
double fphgetd(char *tag, double time)
Description
The fphgetd() function is used in the spreadsheet as a formula. This function gets the value of a
specified tagname from the Historical database. The function fphgetd() returns the value as a
double precision data type.
Inputs
Parameter
Description
tag
Tagname for which the value will be obtained from the
Historical database.
time
Time and Date in spreadsheet format (refer to the
Microsoft Excel manual for information on spreadsheet format).
Outputs
None.
Returns
The value of the specified tagname, or an error message.
Example
This example gets the value for FIC101 from the Historical database, for noon on 12 January
2006.
In Microsoft Excel:
=fphgetd("FIC101", DATEVALUE("12-JAN-06") + TIMEVALUE("12:00:00"))
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The fpsendmsg( ) Function
Function Name
fpsendmsg() - generate a message to be displayed in the Mini-Alarm Window
Synopsis
char fpsendmsg(char *message, double priority, double area)
Description
The fpsendmsg() function is used to generate a message that will be displayed in the fourth line
of the Mini-Alarm Window.
Inputs
Parameter
Description
message
The character string which will be used as the message. Only
the first 80 characters entered will be used; any additional
input will be truncated.
priority
The Priority (1 to 16) to be assigned to the message.
area
The number of the area to be assigned to the message. The
message will be broadcast to all areas; however, it will be
displayed only on Micro-PWCs where the currently logged in
user has access to the area assigned to the message and
where the Operator Messages Message Class has not been
filtered out.
Outputs
None.
Returns
The message itself.
Example
This example sends the message with a priority of 1 and an area of 3.
In Microsoft Excel:
=fpsendmsg("The average pH level is unacceptable",1,3)
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The fpput( ) Function
Function Name
fpput( ) - put a value from the spreadsheet into the current database (ASCII)
Synopsis
char fpput(char *tag, char *val)
Description
The fpput() function is used to put a value from the spreadsheet into the current database using
the tagname and atom specified. The function fpput() takes and places the value in ASCII format.
Inputs
Parameter
Description
tag
The tagname and atom in the current database into which
the value will be placed.
val
The ASCII value to be stored in the current database.
Outputs
None.
Returns
The value put into the current database, or an error message.
Example
This example puts the value 12.34 into the current database, in ASCII format, for the tagname
FIC101.OUT.
In Microsoft Excel:
=fpput("FIC101.OUT", "12.34")
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The fpputd( ) Function
Function Name
fpputd( ) - put a value from the spreadsheet into the current database (double precision)
Synopsis
double fpputd(char *tag, double val)
Description
The fpputd() function is used to put a value into the current database using the tagname and atom
specified. The function fpputd() takes and places the value in double precision.
Inputs
Parameter
Description
tag
The tagname and atom in the current database into which the
value will be placed.
val
The double precision value to be stored in the current database.
Outputs
None.
Returns
The value put into the current database, or an error message.
Example
This example puts the value 12.34 in the current database, in double precision format, for the
tagname FIC101.OUT.
In Microsoft Excel:
=fpputd("FIC101.OUT", 12.34)
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The fphput( ) Function
Function Name
fphput( ) - put a value from the spreadsheet into the Historical database (ASCII)
Synopsis
char fphput(char *tag, char *time, char *val)
Description
The fphput() function is used to put a value from the spreadsheet into the Historical database,
using the tagname specified. The function fphput() takes and places the value in ASCII format.
Inputs
Parameter
Description
tag
The tagname of the point in the Historical database into which
the value will be placed.
time
Time and Date in spreadsheet format (refer to the Microsoft
Excel manual for information on spreadsheet format).
val
The ASCII value to be stored in the historical database.
Outputs
None.
Returns
The value put into the Historical database, or an error message.
Example
This example puts the value for 12.34 (in ASCII format) into the tagname FIC101 in the Historical
database, for the current time.
In Microsoft Excel:
=fphput("FIC101", DATEVALUE("22-SEP-05") + TIMEVALUE("14:10:00"), "12.34")
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The fphputd( ) Function
Function Name
fphputd( ) - put a value from the spreadsheet into the Historical database (double precision)
Synopsis
double fphputd(char *tag, char *time, double val)
Description
The fphputd() function is used to put a value from the spreadsheet into the Historical database,
using the tagname specified. The function fphputd() takes and places the value in double
precision format.
Inputs
Parameter
Description
tag
The tagname of the point in the Historical database into which
the value will be placed.
time
Time and Date in spreadsheet format (refer to the Microsoft
Excel manual for information on spreadsheet format).
val
The double precision value to be stored in the Historical database.
Outputs
None.
Returns
The value put into the Historical database, or an error message.
Example
This example puts the value for 12.34 into the tagname FIC101 in the historical database, for the
current time.
In Microsoft Excel:
=fphputd("FIC101", DATEVALUE("22-SEP-95") + TIMEVALUE("14:10:00"), 12.34)
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The fparchive( ) Function
Function Name
fparchive( ) - switch data retrieval from the Historical database to the Archival database
Synopsis
double fparchive (double flag)
Description
The fparchive() function is used in a spreadsheet to switch between the Archival and the
Historical database to retrieve values. The same function calls used on the Historical database are
used on the Archival database to retrieve data.
Inputs
Parameter
flag
Description
Use 1 to select the Archival database for data retrieval or
use 0 to select the Historical database.
Outputs
None.
Returns
The current value of the archival flag.
Example
In Microsoft Excel:
=fparchive(1)
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The fpverbose( ) Function
Function Name
fpverbose( ) - turn on descriptive error message
Synopsis
double fpverbose (double flag )
Description
The fpverbose() function is used to turn on and off messages to the Micro-PWC console device.
The message provides more detailed information about an error that has occurred in a
spreadsheet cell.
Inputs
Parameter
flag
Description
Use 1 to turn on messages,
use 0 to turn off messages.
Outputs
None.
Returns
The current value of the verbose flag.
Example
This example turns on descriptive error messages.
In Microsoft Excel:
=fpverbose(1)
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The fpuprint( ) Function
Function Name
fpuprint( ) - return the mode of the spreadsheet to the operator
Synopsis
char fpuprint( )
Description
The fpuprint() function is used to indicate the mode in which the Excel spreadsheet was entered.
If a 0 is returned, it indicates that the spreadsheet is in configuration mode, which was entered by
selecting Menu > Configuration. If a 1 is returned, the spreadsheet is in print mode, which was
entered by selecting Menu > Print Log.
Inputs
None.
Outputs
None.
Returns
The mode of the current Excel spreadsheet (1 or 0).
Example
This example returns a 0 if the spreadsheet was entered via the Configuration option, or a 1 if it
was entered via the Print Log option.
In Microsoft Excel:
=fpuprint()
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The fpudevice( ) Function
Function Name
fpudevice( ) - return the selected printing device
Synopsis
char fpudevice()
Description
The fpudevice() function is used to return the Device Name of the device selected by the user to
which the spreadsheet is to be sent for printing.
Inputs
None.
Outputs
None.
Returns
The device name.
Example
This example returns the Device Name of the selected printer (or file).
In Microsoft Excel:
=fpudevice()
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The fpblkarch( ) Function
Function Name
fpblkarch( ) - switch data retrieval from the Historical Block database to the Historical Block
Archival database
Synopsis
double *fpblkarch(double flag)
Description
The fpblkarch() function is used in a spreadsheet to switch between the Historical Block Archival
database and the Historical Block database. The same function calls used on the Historical Block
database are used on the Historical Block Archival database to retrieve data.
Inputs
Parameter
flag
Description
Use 1 to select the Historical Block Archival database for
data retrieval, or use 0 to select the Historical Block database.
Outputs
None.
Returns
The current value of the archival flag.
Example
This example selects the Historical Block Archival database as the source for data retrieval.
In Microsoft Excel:
=fpblkarch(1)
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The fpblkclose( ) Function
Function Name
fpblkclose( ) - close descriptor for the specified Historical Block
Synopsis
char *fpblkclose(char *blockname)
Description
The fpblkclose() function is used to close the descriptor for the named Historical Block. Typically
this function is called after opening an Historical Block and retrieving all required data.
Inputs
Parameter
blockname
Outputs
None.
Returns
Name of the block.
Example
In Microsoft Excel:
=fpblkclose("CALBLK1")
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Description
The name of the block to be closed.
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The fpblkopen( ) Function
Function Name
fpblkopen( ) - open a descriptor for the specified Historical Block
Synopsis
char *fpblkopen(char *blockname)
Description
The fpblkopen() function is used to open a descriptor for the named Historical Block. This
function must be called (once) prior to retrieving any data contained in the block.
Inputs
Parameter
blockname
Description
The name of the block to be opened.
Outputs
None.
Returns
The name of the block.
Example
In Microsoft Excel:
=fpblkopen("CALBLK1")
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The fpblksample( ) Function
Function Name
fpblksample( ) - get Historical Block data for specified block, sample type, and time interval
Synopsis
double *fpblksample(char *blockname, char *type, double stime, double etime)
Description
The fpblksample() function is used to obtain Historical Block data for the block name, sample
type, and time interval specified. Each data value can then be retrieved using the fpblkvald
function with the appropriate single tag, time specification. This function must be preceded by a
function call to fpblkopen( ).
Inputs
Parameter
Description
blockname
The name of block to be opened.
type
The sample type indicator (atom); null for raw data.
stime
Start Time and Date in spreadsheet format.
etime
End Time and Date in spreadsheet format.
Sample Type Atoms
Period
Average
Min.
Min. Time
Max.
Max. Time
Standard Deviation
Hourly
.HAV
.HMN
.HTMN
.HMX
.HTMX
.HSD
Daily
.DAV
.DMN
.DTMN
.DMX
.DTMX
.DSD
Monthly
.MAV
.MMN
.MTMN
.MMX
.MTMX
.MSD
Yearly
.YAV
.YMN
.YTMN
.YMX
.YTMX
.YSD
Outputs
None.
Returns
The number of block samples found for time interval between stime and etime.
Example
This example gets all Hourly Average samples which were collected for the last 24 hours.
In Microsoft Excel:
=fpblkopen(“CALBLK1”)
=fpblksample("CALBLK1",".HAV", datevalue("12-JAN-06") + timevalue("12:00:00"),
datevalue("12-JAN-06") + timevalue("13:00:00"))
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The fpblkvald( ) Function
Function Name
fpblkvald( ) - get a value from the Historical Block database
Synopsis
double *fpblkvald(char *blockname, char *tag, char *type, double time)
Description
The fpblkvald() function gets the value from the Historical Block database which is associated
with the specified block name, tagname.atom, sample type, and time-stamp.This function must be
preceded by function calls to fpblkopen( ) and fpblksample( ).
Inputs
Parameter
Description
blockname
The name of the block.
tag
The tagname and atom for which the value will be retrieved.
type
The sample type indicator (see The fpblksample( ) Function).
time
Time and Date in spreadsheet format.
Outputs
None.
Returns
The value of the specified tagname.atom, or an error message.
Example
This example gets the Hourly Standard Deviation value for CAL_0.OUT from the Historical Block
named CALBLK1 for 4:00 PM on 10 January 2004.
In Microsoft Excel:
=fpblkopen(“CALBLK1”)
=fpblksample(“CALBLK1”, “.HAV”, datevalue(“12-JAN-04”) + timevalue(“12:00:00”),
datevalue(“12-JAN-04”) + timevalue(“13:00:00”))
=fpblkvald("CALBLK1", "CAL_0.OUT", ".HSD", datevalue("10-JAN-04") +
timevalue("16:00:00”))
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The fphxnumval( ) Function
Function Name
fphxnumval( ) - get values from the Historical database (integer)
Synopsis:
int fphxnumvals(tag, stime, etime, n_vals)
Description
The fphxnumvals() function is used in the spreadsheet as a formula. The user can specify the
number of values to be obtained from the Historical database (for a specified tag) using the n_vals
argument. A starting and ending time further define the data to be obtained. For the specified
tagname, this function will return the specified number of values, or (if fewer values exist for the
specified time period in the Historical database) the maximum number of values available.
The actual number of values obtained for the time period specified is returned. Once data has
been obtained using the fphxnumval function, the fphxgetd function (refer to The fphxgetval( )
Function) can be used to return the actual data values to the spreadsheet.
Inputs
Parameter
Description
tag
The tagname for which the values will be obtained from the
Historical database.
stime
The Starting Time and Date in spreadsheet format (refer to
the Microsoft Excel manual for information on spreadsheet format).
etime
The Ending Time and Date in spreadsheet format.
n_vals
The number of values to be obtained from the Historical database. If a positive number (n) is used, the first n values
between the specified start time (stime) and end time (etime)
will be obtained; if a negative number (-n) is used, the last n
values between stime and etime will be obtained. A number
must be specified for the n_vals argument; there is no
default.
Outputs
None.
Returns
Number of values retrieved from the historical database.
Example
The following example gets the first 30 values (or as many as are available if less than 30 values
exist) for the tagname FIC101 from the Historical database, for the last 24 hours. Cell A3 contains
the Time/Date of the previous day.
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Assignments to support the example are shown in the table below. Note that the contents of
Cell A1 are subtracted from the contents of Cell A2 (A2-A1) and the result is displayed in Cell A3.
Cell Address
Cell Contents
CELL A1
1
CELL A2
=now()
CELL A3
+A2-A1
The actual example is shown below:
=fphxnumval("FIC101",A3,A2,30)
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The fphxgetval( ) Function
Function Name
fphxgetval() - get a single value from the Historical database
Synopsis
fphxgetval(index, type)
Description
The fphxgetval() function is used in a spreadsheet formula in conjunction with the function
fphxnumval. The user must configure the spreadsheet to first call the fphxnumval() function,
which retrieves all the values from the Historical database during a specified time period, and
returns the number of values retrieved for the time period specified.
The individual values can be placed in cells using the fphxgetval function. The user supplies an
index number from 1 to n (where n is the number of values returned by the fphxnumval()
function), and the type of data to be retrieved (a string value, a double value, or the time the value
was collected).
Inputs
Parameter
Description
index
The index is a number from 1 to n (where n is the number of
values returned by the fphxnumval function).
type
The type argument specifies the type of the data to be
returned. The type is represented by a letter:
d - return a double precision value.
s - return a string value.
t - return the time the value was collected.
Outputs
None.
Returns
The type of data requested.
Example
The following example gets the first 30 values (or as many as are available if less than 30 values
exist) for the tagname FIC101 from the Historical database, for the last 24 hours. The second
function call will return the third of these values as a double precision value. Cell A3 contains the
Time/Date of the previous day.
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Assignments to support the example are shown in the table below. Note that the contents of Cell
A1 are subtracted from the contents of Cell A2 (A2-A1) and the result is displayed in Cell A3.
Cell Address
Cell Contents
CELL A1
1
CELL A2
=now()
CELL A3
+A2-A1
The actual example is shown below:
=fphxnumval("FIC101",A3,A2,30)
=fphxgetval (3, "d")
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The fpxammts( ) Function
Function Name
fpxammts( ) - get a range of values for a tag from the Historical Database during a specified time
period (double precision)
Synopsis
double fpxammts(tag, stime, etime, totfac, type)
Description
The fpxammts() function is used to get a range of values from the Historical database, using the
tagname specified. The function fpxammts() computes the minimum, maximum, average, total
and standard deviation of the values obtained. It also gets the times that the minimum and
maximum values occurred. Using the type field, the user can retrieve any of these values. If
multiple calls are made successively using the same tag, stime, etime and totfac, the values are
cached, resulting in one DBA transaction.
Inputs
Parameter
Description
tag
The tagname of the point in the Historical database for which
values from the database will be obtained.
stime
The time in the Historical database at which to start retrieving
values (i.e., start time).
etime
The time in the Historical database at which to stop retrieving
values (i.e., end time).
totfac
Totalization factor, used when computing the total so that the
value used in the log reflects the type of units desired by the
user. For example, if the value stored in the Historical database reflects gallons per minute, that value is multiplied by the
value in totfac so that the resulting value reflects gallons per
day instead of gallons per minute.
type
The type of data requested. Data types which can be
requested and the syntax used to request them are as shown
in the next table.
Data Type
Specifier
344
Description
imin
Minimum value
imax
Maximum value
iavg
Average value
itot
Total value
istd
Standard deviation
tmin
Time of minimum value
tmax
Time of maximum value
Appendix A - Excel Functions
Micro-PWC CONFIGURATION GUIDE
Outputs
None.
Returns
Value of the type requested.
Example
Assignments to support the example are shown in the following table. Note that the contents of
Cell A1 are subtracted from the contents of Cell A2 (A2-A1) and the result is displayed in Cell A3.
Cell Address
Cell Contents
CELL A1
1
CELL A2
=now()
CELL A3
+A2-A1
The actual example is shown below:
=fpxammts("HIST1",A3,A2,.02,"imin")
=fpxammts("HIST1",A3,A2,.02,"tmin")
This example gets the data for the last 24 hours for the tag "HIST1" from the Historical database.
The first call returns the minimum value and the second call returns the time the minimum value
was collected.
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The Company’s policy is one of continuous product improvement and the
right is reserved to modify the information contained herein without notice, or
to make engineering refinements that may not be reflected in this bulletin.
Micromod Automation assumes no responsibility for errors that may appear
in this manual.
© 2005 MicroMod Automation, Inc.
MicroMod Automation, Inc.
75 Town Centre Drive
Rochester, NY USA 14623
Tel. 585-321-9200
Fax 585-321-9291
www.micromodautomation.com
Printed in USA
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