Drolet | PYROPAK E.P.A. WOOD STOVE | Specifications | Drolet PYROPAK E.P.A. WOOD STOVE Specifications

Installation and Operation Manual
Pyropak
US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
AGENCY PHASE II CERTIFIED
WOOD STOVE
Safety tested according to ULC S627, UL 737
and UL 1482 Standards
by Intertek Testing Services
www.drolet.ca
Stove Builder International Inc.
250, rue de Copenhague, St-Augustin-de-Desmaures
(Quebec) Canada G3A 2H3
Tel: (418) 878-3040 Fax: (418) 878-3001
This manual is available for free download on the manufacturer’s web site. It is a
copyrighted document. Re-sale is strictly prohibited. The manufacturer may update this
manual from time to time and cannot be responsible for problems, injuries, or damages
arising out of the use of information contained in any manual obtained from unauthorized
sources.
READ AND KEEP THIS MANUAL FOR REFERENCE
Printed in Canada
45397A
24-07-2014
Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
THANK YOU FOR CHOOSING THIS DROLET WOOD STOVE
As one of North America’s largest and most respected wood stove and fireplace
manufacturers, Stove Builder International takes pride in the quality and performance of all
its products. We want to help you get maximum satisfaction as you use this product.
In the pages that follow you will find general advice on wood heating, detailed instructions
for safe and effective installation, and guidance on how to get the best performance from
this stove as you build and maintain fires, and maintain your wood heating system.
We recommend that our wood burning hearth products be installed and serviced by
professionals who are certified in the United States by NFI (National Fireplace Institute®) or
in Canada by WETT (Wood Energy Technology Transfer) or in Quebec by APC
(Association des Professionnels du Chauffage).
Congratulations on making a wise purchase.
When this stove is not properly installed, a house fire may result. To reduce the risk
of fire, follow the installation instructions. Contact local building or fire officials
about restrictions and installation inspection requirements in your area.
Please read this entire manual before you install and use your new stove. Failure to
follow instructions may result in property damage, bodily injury, or even death. It is
important that you follow the installations guidelines exactly.
You may need to obtain a building permit for the installation of this stove and the
chimney that it is connected to. Consult your municipal building department or fire
department before installation to determine the need to obtain one. We recommend
that you also inform your home insurance company to find out if the installation will
affect your policy.
REGISTER YOUR WARRANTY ONLINE
To receive full warranty coverage, you will need to show
evidence of the date you purchased your stove. Keep your sales
invoice. We also recommend that you register your warranty
online at:
http://www.drolet.ca/en/service-support/warranty-registration
Registering your warranty online will help us to quickly track the
information we need about your stove.
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Table of content
PART A - OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE ...............................6
1
1.1
2
Safety Information ....................................................................6
Summary of Operation and Maintenance Cautions and Warnings ......................... 6
General Information ..................................................................7
2.1
Pyropak Specifications ........................................................................................... 7
2.2
Zone Heating and How to Make it Work for You .................................................... 9
2.3
The Benefits of Low Emissions and High Efficiency ............................................... 9
2.4
The SBI Commitment to You and the Environment .............................................. 10
2.4.1 What is Your New Stove Made Of? .................................................................. 10
3
Fuel ..........................................................................................11
3.1
Materials That Should Not be Burned .................................................................. 11
3.2
How to Prepare or Buy Good Firewood................................................................ 11
3.2.1 What is Good Firewood?................................................................................... 11
3.2.2 Tree Species ..................................................................................................... 11
3.2.3 Log Length ........................................................................................................ 12
3.2.4 Piece Size ......................................................................................................... 12
3.2.5 How to Dry Firewood......................................................................................... 13
3.2.6 Judging Firewood Moisture Content.................................................................. 14
3.3
Manufactured Logs............................................................................................... 14
4
Operating Your Stove .............................................................15
4.1
The use of a fire screen. ....................................................................................... 15
4.2
Your First Fires ..................................................................................................... 15
4.3
Lighting Fires ........................................................................................................ 15
4.3.1 Conventional Fire Starting................................................................................. 16
4.3.2 The Top Down Fire ........................................................................................... 16
4.3.3 Two Parallel Logs ............................................................................................. 17
4.3.4 Using Fire Starters ............................................................................................ 17
4.4
Maintaining Wood Fires........................................................................................ 17
4.4.1 General Advice ................................................................................................. 17
4.4.2 Ash Removal ..................................................................................................... 18
4.4.3 Raking Charcoal ............................................................................................... 18
4.4.4 Firing Each New Load Hot ................................................................................ 19
4.4.5 Turning Down the Air Supply ............................................................................ 19
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4.4.6
5
Building Different Fires for Different Needs ....................................................... 20
Maintaining Your Wood Heating System..............................23
5.1
Stove Maintenance............................................................................................... 23
5.1.1 Cleaning Door Glass ......................................................................................... 23
5.1.2 Door adjustment ................................................................................................ 24
5.1.3 Replacing the Door Gasket ............................................................................... 25
5.1.4 Replacing the Glass Gasket and/or the Glass .................................................. 25
5.1.5 Cleaning and Painting the Stove ....................................................................... 26
5.2
Chimney and Chimney Connector Maintenance .................................................. 26
5.2.1 Why Chimney Cleaning is Necessary ............................................................... 26
5.2.2 How Often Should You Clean the Chimney? .................................................... 26
5.2.3 Cleaning the Chimney ....................................................................................... 27
PART B - INSTALLATION .............................................................28
6
6.1
6.2
7
Safety Information ..................................................................28
Summary of Installation Cautions and Warnings .................................................. 28
Regulations Covering Stove Installation ............................................................... 29
Clearances to Combustible Material .....................................30
7.1
Location of the certification label .......................................................................... 30
7.2
Clearances to Walls and Ceiling .......................................................................... 30
7.3
Floor protector ...................................................................................................... 33
7.4
Reducing Wall and Ceiling Clearances Safely ..................................................... 34
7.4.1 Shield Construction Rules ................................................................................. 34
7.4.2 Table of Clearance Reduction Percentages...................................................... 35
8
The Venting System ...............................................................36
8.1
General ................................................................................................................ 36
8.2
Suitable Chimneys ............................................................................................... 36
8.2.1 Factory-built Metal Chimneys ............................................................................ 36
8.2.2 Masonry Chimneys ........................................................................................... 37
8.3
Minimum Chimney Height .................................................................................... 37
8.4
The Relationship Between the Chimney and the House ...................................... 38
8.4.1 Why inside chimneys are preferred ................................................................... 38
8.4.2 Why the chimney should penetrate the highest heated space .......................... 38
8.5
Supply of Combustion Air ..................................................................................... 39
8.5.1 Air Supply in Conventional Houses ................................................................... 39
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
8.6
Installing the Chimney Connector......................................................................... 40
8.6.1 Installation of Single Wall Chimney Connector ................................................. 40
Appendix 1: Installing the Fresh Air Intake Kit (AC01331) .......42
Appendix 2: Installation and Use of Optional Air Circulation
Fan and Thermodisc .....................................................................43
Appendix 3: Installing the Fire Screen (AC01318) .....................45
Appendix 4: Exploded Diagram and Parts List ..........................46
DROLET LIMITED LIFETIME WARRANTY ..................................48
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PART A - OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
Please see Part B for installation instructions.
1 Safety Information
1.1 Summary of Operation and Maintenance Cautions and Warnings
•
HOT WHILE IN OPERATION, KEEP CHILDREN, CLOTHING AND FURNITURE
AWAY. CONTACT MAY CAUSE SKIN BURNS. GLOVES MAY BE NEEDED FOR
STOVE OPERATION.
•
USING A STOVE WITH CRACKED OR BROKEN COMPONENTS, SUCH AS GLASS
OR FIREBRICKS OR BAFFLES MAY PRODUCE AN UNSAFE CONDITION AND
MAY DAMAGE THE STOVE.
•
OPEN THE AIR CONTROL FULLY BEFORE OPENING FIRING DOOR.
•
THIS STOVE HAS BEEN TESTED FOR USE WITH AN OPEN DOOR IN
CONJUNCTION WITH A FIRE SCREEN (AC01318), SOLD SEPARATELY). THE
DOOR MAY BE OPEN OR FIRE SCREEN REMOVED ONLY DURING LIGHTING
PROCEDURES OR RELOADING. ALWAYS CLOSE THE DOOR OR PUT BACK
THE FIRE SCREEN AFTER IGNITION. DO NOT LEAVE THE STOVE UNATTENDED
WHEN THE DOOR IS OPENED WITH OR WITHOUT FIRE SCREEN.
•
NEVER USE GASOLINE, GASOLINE-TYPE LANTERN FUEL (NAPHTHA), FUEL
OIL, MOTOR OIL, KEROSENE, CHARCOAL LIGHTER FLUID, OR SIMILAR
LIQUIDS OR AEROSOLS TO START OR ‘FRESHEN UP’ A FIRE IN THIS STOVE.
KEEP ALL SUCH LIQUIDS OR AEROSOLS WELL AWAY FROM THE STOVE
WHILE IT IS IN USE.
•
DO NOT STORE FUEL WITHIN HEATER MINIMUM INSTALLATION CLEARANCES.
•
BURN ONLY SEASONED NATURAL FIREWOOD.
•
DO NOT BURN:
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
GARBAGE OF ANY KIND,
COAL OR CHARCOAL,
TREATED, PAINTED OR COATED WOOD,
PLYWOOD OR PARTICLE BOARD,
FINE PAPER, COLORED PAPER OR CARDBOARD,
SALT WATER DRIFTWOOD, OR
RAILROAD TIES.
•
DO NOT ELEVATE THE FIRE BY USING A GRATE IN THIS STOVE.
•
THIS APPLIANCE SHOULD BE MAINTAINED AND OPERATED AT ALL TIMES IN
ACCORDANCE WITH THESE INSTRUCTIONS.
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2
General Information
2.1 Pyropak Specifications
Fuel Type
Cordwood
Test Standards (safety)
ULC S627, UL 737 and UL 1482
Test Standard (emissions)
EPA Method 28 (40 CFR Part 60)
Heating capacity range*
250 to 1000 sq. ft. (23,2 to 92,9 m2)
Maximum heat output**
(EPA test fuel)
21 800 BTU/h (6,4 kW/h)
Maximum heat output**
(natural hardwood fuel)
40 000 BTU/h (11,7 kW/h)
Optimum efficiency
78,2 %
Test Standard (efficiency)
CSA B415.1
Approximate Burn Time
3 to 5 hours
Shipping Weight
246 lb (112 kg)
Firebox Volume
1,3 cu.ft. (0,037 m3)
Maximum Log Length
17" east-west***
Flue Outlet Diameter:
6" (150 mm) diameter (vertical)
Baffle Material
Stainless steel and firebrick
* Burn time and heating capacity may vary subject to location in home, chimney draft,
chimney diameter, locality, heat loss factors, climate, fuels and other variables.
** The EPA test fuel is dimensional Douglas fir pieces stapled together into cribs with air
spaces between. We also test using the same procedure except using split hardwood
firewood to reflect real-world heat output. This stove is not intended to operate at its peak
heat output continuously.
*** East-west: through the door you see the sides of the logs; north-south: through the door
you see the ends of the logs
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2.2 Zone Heating and How to Make it Work for You
Your new Pyropak wood stove is a space heater, which means it is intended to heat the
area it is installed in, as well as spaces that connect to that area, although to a lower
temperature. This is called zone heating and it is an increasingly popular way to heat
homes or spaces within homes.
Zone heating can be used to supplement another heating system by heating a particular
space within a home, such as a basement family room or an addition that lacks another
heat source.
Although the stove may be able to heat the main living areas of your house to an adequate
temperature, we strongly recommend that you also have a conventional oil, gas or electric
heating system to provide back up heating.
Your success with zone heating will depend on several factors, including the correct sizing
and location of the stove, the size, layout and age of your home and your climate zone.
Three-season vacation homes can usually be heated with smaller stoves than houses that
are heated all winter.
2.3 The Benefits of Low Emissions and High Efficiency
The low smoke emissions produced by the special features inside the Pyropak firebox
mean that your household will release up to 90 percent less smoke into the outside
environment than if you used an older conventional stove. But there is more to the
emission control technologies than protecting the environment.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
The smoke released from wood when it is heated contains about half of the energy content
of the fuel. By burning the wood completely, your stove releases all the heat energy from
the wood instead of wasting it as smoke up the chimney. Also, the features inside the
firebox allow you to reduce the air supply to control heat output, while maintaining clean
and efficient flaming combustion, which boosts the efficient delivery of heat to your home.
The emission control and advanced combustion features of your stove can only work
properly if your fuel is in the correct moisture content range of 15 to 20 percent. See
Section A3.0 of this manual for suggestions on preparing fuelwood and judging its
moisture.
2.4 The SBI Commitment to You and the Environment
The SBI team are committed to protecting the environment, so we do everything we can to
use only materials in our products that will have no lasting negative impact on the
environment.
2.4.1 What is Your New Stove Made Of?
The body of your stove, which is most of its weight, is carbon steel. Should it ever become
necessary many years in the future, almost the entire stove can be recycled into new
products, thus eliminating the need to mine new materials.
The paint coat on your stove is very thin. Its VOC content (Volatile Organic Components)
is very low. VOCs can be responsible for smog, so all the paint used during the
manufacturing process meets the latest air quality requirements with regards to VOC
reduction or elimination.
Lightweight firebrick is made of pumice and cement. Pumice is in fact volcanic rock, a
naturally green product found in the Northwest United States. Disposal at a landfill is
recommended.
The door and glass gaskets are fibreglass which is spun from melted sand. Black gaskets
have been dipped into a solvent-free solution. Disposal at a landfill is recommended.
The door glass is a 5 mm thick ceramic material that contains no toxic chemicals. It is
basically made of raw earth materials such as sand and quartz that are combined in such
a way to form a glass at high temperatures. Ceramic glass will not re-melt in the same
way as normal glass, so it should not be recycled with your regular household products.
Disposal at a landfill is recommended.
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3 Fuel
3.1 Materials That Should Not be Burned
•
GARBAGE OF ANY KIND,
•
COAL OR CHARCOAL,
•
TREATED, PAINTED OR COATED WOOD,
•
PLYWOOD OR PARTICLE BOARD,
•
FINE PAPER, COLORED PAPER OR CARDBOARD,
•
SALT WATER DRIFTWOOD
•
MANUFACTURED LOGS CONTAINING WAX OR CHEMICAL ADDITIVES
•
RAILROAD TIES
•
LIQUIDS SUCH AS KEROSCENE OR DIESEL FUEL TO START A FIRE
3.2 How to Prepare or Buy Good Firewood
3.2.1 What is Good Firewood?
Good firewood has been cut to the correct length for the stove, split to a range of sizes and
stacked in the open until its moisture content is reduced to 15 to 20 per cent.
3.2.2 Tree Species
The tree species the firewood is produced from is less important than its moisture content.
The main difference in firewood from various tree species is the density of the wood.
Hardwoods are denser than softwoods. People who live in the coldest regions of North
America usually have only spruce, birch and poplar, other low-density species to burn and
yet they can heat their homes successfully.
Homeowners with access to both hardwood and softwood fuel sometimes use both types
for different purposes. For example, softer woods make good fuel for relatively mild
weather in spring and fall because they light quickly and produce less heat Softwoods are
not as dense as hardwoods so a given volume of wood contains less energy. Using
softwoods avoids overheating the house, which can be a common problem with wood
heating in moderate weather. Harder woods are best for colder winter weather when more
heat and longer burn cycles are desirable.
Note that hardwood trees like oak, maple, ash and beech are slower growing and longer
lived than softer woods like poplar and birch. That makes hardwood trees more valuable.
The advice that only hardwoods are good to burn is outdated. Old, leaky cast iron stoves
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
wouldn’t hold a fire overnight unless they were fed large pieces of hardwood. That is no
longer true. You can successfully heat your home by using the less desirable tree species
and give the forest a break at the same time.
3.2.3 Log Length
Logs should be cut about 1” (25 mm) shorter than the firebox so they fit in easily. Pieces
that are even slightly too long make loading the stove very difficult. The most common
standard length of firewood is 16” (400 mm).
The pieces should be a consistent length, with a maximum of 1” (25 mm) variation from
piece to piece.
3.2.4 Piece Size
Firewood dries more quickly when it is split. Large unsplit rounds can take years to dry
enough to burn. Even when dried, unsplit logs are difficult to ignite because they don’t
have the sharp edges where the flames first catch. Logs as small as 3” (75 mm) should be
split to encourage drying.
Wood should be split to a range of sizes, from about 3” to 6” (75 mm to 150 mm) in cross
section. Having a range of sizes makes starting and rekindling fires much easier. Often,
the firewood purchased from commercial suppliers is not split finely enough for convenient
stoking. It is sometimes advisable to resplit the wood before stacking to dry.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
3.2.5 How to Dry Firewood
Firewood that is not dry enough to burn is the cause of most complaints about wood
stoves. The complaints usually involve a lack of heat and dirty door glass.
Here are some things to consider in estimating drying time:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
firewood takes a long time to dry
firewood bought from a dealer is rarely dry enough to burn, so it is advisable to buy the
wood in spring and dry it yourself
drying happens faster in dry weather than in damp, maritime climates
drying happens faster in warm summer weather than in winter weather
small pieces dry more quickly than large pieces
split pieces dry more quickly than unsplit rounds
softwoods take less time to dry than hardwoods
softwoods like pine, spruce, and poplar/aspen can be dry enough to burn after being
stacked in the open for only the summer months
hardwoods like oak, maple and ash can take one, or even two years to dry fully,
especially if the pieces are big
firewood dries more quickly when stacked in the open where it is exposed to sun and
wind; it takes much longer to dry when stacked in a wood shed
firewood that is ready to burn has a moisture content between15 and 20% by weight
and will allow your stove to produce its highest possible efficiency
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
3.2.6 Judging Firewood Moisture Content
You can find out if some firewood is dry enough to burn by using these guidelines:
•
•
•
•
•
•
cracks form at the ends of logs as they dry
as it dries in the sun, the wood turns from white or cream coloured to grey or yellow,
bang two pieces of wood together; seasoned wood sounds hollow and wet wood
sounds dull,
dry wood is much lighter in weight than wet wood,
split a piece, and if the fresh face feels warm and dry it is dry enough to burn; if it feels
damp, it is too wet,
burn a piece; wet wood hisses and sizzles in the fire and dry wood does not.
You could buy a wood moisture meter to test your
firewood.
3.3 Manufactured Logs
Do not burn manufactured logs made of wax impregnated sawdust or logs with any
chemical additives. Manufactured logs made of 100% compressed sawdust can be
burned, but use caution in the number of these logs burned at one time. Start with one
manufactured log and see how the stove reacts. You can increase the number of logs
burned at a time to making sure the temperature never rises higher than 475 °F (246 °C)
on a magnetic thermometer for installation on single wall stove pipes or 900 °F (482 °C) on
a probe thermometer for installation on double wall stove pipe. The thermometer should
be placed about 18” (457 mm) above the stove. Higher temperatures can lead to overheat
and damage your stove.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
4 Operating Your Stove
4.1 The use of a fire screen.
This stove has been tested for use with an open door in conjunction with a fire screen
(AC01318, sold separately). Make sure the fire screen is properly secured on the stove to
avoid any risk of fire. When the fire screen is used, it is important not to leave the stove
unattended to respond promptly in the event of smoke spillage into the room. Potential
causes of smoke spillage are described in section eight of this manual. See Appendix 3:
Installing the Fire Screen (AC01318) for installation instructions.
4.2 Your First Fires
Two things will happen as you burn your first few fires; the paint cures and the internal
components of the stove are conditioned.
As the paint cures, some of the chemicals vaporize. The vapors are not poisonous, but
they do smell bad. Fresh paint fumes can also cause false alarms in smoke detectors. So,
when you first light your stove, be prepared by opening doors and/or windows to ventilate
the house. As you burn hotter and hotter fires, more of the painted surfaces reach the
curing temperature of the paint. The smell of curing paint does not disappear until you
have burned one or two very hot fires.
Burn one or two small fires to begin the curing and conditioning process. Then build bigger
and hotter fires until there is no longer any paint smell from the stove. Once the paint smell
disappears, your stove is ready for serious heating.
4.3 Lighting Fires
Each person who heats with wood develops their own favorite way to light fires. Whatever
method you choose, your goal should be to get a hot fire burning quickly. A fire that starts
fast produces less smoke and deposits less creosote in the chimney. Here are three
popular and effective ways to start wood fires.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
4.3.1 Conventional Fire Starting
The conventional way to build a wood
fire is to bunch up 5 to 10 sheets of
plain newspaper and place them in the
firebox. Next, place 10 or so pieces of
fine kindling on the newspaper. This
kindling should be very thin; less than
1” (25 mm). Next, place some larger
kindling pieces on the fine kindling.
Open the air control fully and light the
newspaper. If you have a tall, straight
venting system you should be able to
close the door immediately and the fire
will ignite. If your venting system has
elbows or an outside chimney, you may
need to leave the door closed but
unlatched for a few minutes as the
newspaper ignites and heat in the
chimney produces some draft. Once
the fire has ignited, close the door and
leave the air control fully open.
A conventional kindling fire with paper under
finely split wood.
DO NOT LEAVE THE STOVE UNATTENDED WHEN THE DOOR IS SLIGHTLY
OPENED DURING IGNITION. ALWAYS CLOSE THE DOOR AFTER IGNITION.
After the kindling fire has mostly burned, you can add standard firewood pieces until you
have a fire of the right size for the conditions.
4.3.2 The Top Down Fire
The top down fire starting method solves two problems with the conventional method: first,
it does not collapse and smother itself as it burns; and second, it is not necessary to build
up the fire gradually because the firebox is loaded before the fire is lit. A top down fire can
provide up to two hours of heating or more. The top down method only works properly if
the wood is well-seasoned.
Start by placing three or four full-sized split pieces of dry firewood in the firebox. Next,
place 4 or 5 more finely split pieces of firewood (2” to 3” [50 mm to 75 mm] in dia.) on the
base logs at right angles (log cabin style). Now place about 10 pieces of finely split kindling
on the second layer at right angles.
The fire is topped with about 5 sheets of newspaper. You can just bunch them up and stuff
them in between the kindling and the underside of the baffle. Or you can make newspaper
knots by rolling up single sheets corner to corner and tying a knot in them. The advantage
of knots is that they don’t roll off the fire as they burn. Light the newspaper and watch as
the fire burns from top to bottom.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
4.3.3 Two Parallel Logs
Place two spit logs in the firebox. Place a few sheets of twisted newspaper between the
logs. Now place some fine kindling across the two logs and some larger kindling across
those, log cabin style. Light the newspaper.
4.3.4 Using Fire Starters
Many people like to use commercial fire starters instead of newspaper. Some of these
starters are made of sawdust and wax and others are specialized flammable solid
chemicals. Follow the package directions for use.
Gel starter may be used but only if there are no hot embers present. Use only in a cold
firebox to start a fire.
DO NOT USE FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS SUCH AS GASOLINE, NAPHTHA, FUEL OIL,
MOTOR OIL, OR AEROSOLS TO START OR REKINDLE THE FIRE.
4.4 Maintaining Wood Fires
4.4.1 General Advice
Wood heating with a space heater is very different than other forms of heating. There will
be variations in the temperature in different parts of the house and there will be variations
in temperature throughout the day and night. This is normal, and for experienced wood
burners these are advantages of zone heating with wood.
Do not expect steady heat output from your stove. It is normal for its surface temperature
to rise after a new load of wood is ignited and for its temperature to gradually decline as
the fire progresses. This rising and falling of temperature can be matched to your
household routines. For example, the area temperature can be cooler when you are active,
such as when doing housework or cooking, and it can be warmer when you are inactive,
such as when reading or watching television.
Wood burns best in cycles. A cycle starts when a new load of wood is ignited by hot coals
and ends when that load has been consumed down to a bed of charcoal about the same
size as it was when the wood was loaded. Do not attempt to produce a steady heat output
by placing a single log on the fire at regular intervals. Always place at least three, and
preferably more, pieces on the fire at a time so that the heat radiated from one piece helps
to ignite the pieces next to it. Each load of wood should provide several hours of heating.
The size of each load can be matched to the amount of heat needed.
When you burn in cycles, you rarely need to open the stove’s loading door while the wood
is flaming. This is an advantage because there is more chance that smoke will leak from
the stove when the door is opened as a full fire is burning. This is especially true if the
chimney connector has 90 degree elbows and if the chimney runs up the outside wall of
the house.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
IF YOU MUST OPEN THE DOOR WHILE THE FUEL IS FLAMING, OPEN THE AIR
CONTROL FULLY FOR A FEW MINUTES, THEN UNLATCH AND OPEN THE DOOR
SLOWLY.
4.4.2 Ash Removal
Ash should be removed from the firebox every two or three days of full time heating. Do
not let the ash build up in the firebox because it will interfere with proper fire management.
The best time to remove ash is after an overnight fire when the stove is relatively cool, but
there is still some chimney draft to draw the ash dust into the stove and prevent it from
coming into the room.
After ashes have been removed from the stove and placed in a tightly covered metal
container, they should be taken outside immediately. The closed container of ashes should
be placed on a non-combustible floor or on the ground well away from all combustible
materials pending final disposal. Ashes normally contain some live charcoal that can stay
hot for several days. If the ashes are disposed of by burial in soil or otherwise locally
dispersed, they should be retained in the closed container until all cinders have thoroughly
cooled. Other waste shall not be placed in this container.
NEVER STORE ASHES INDOORS OR IN A NON-METALIC CONTAINER OR ON A
WOODEN DECK.
4.4.3 Raking Charcoal
Rekindle the fire when you notice that the room temperature has fallen. You will find most
of the remaining charcoal at the back of the firebox, furthest from the door. Rake these
coals towards the door before loading. There are two reasons for this raking of the coals.
First, it concentrates them near where most of the combustion air enters the firebox and
where they can ignite the new load quickly, and second, the charcoal will not be smothered
by the new load of wood. If you were to simply spread the charcoal out, the new load will
smoulder for a long time before igniting.
Remove ash first, and then rake charcoal towards the front of the firebox before loading so
that it will ignite the new load.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
4.4.4 Firing Each New Load Hot
Place the new load of wood on and behind the charcoal. Close the door and open the air
control fully. Leave the air control fully open until the firebox is full of flames, the wood has
charred to black and its edges are glowing red. Firing each load of wood hot accomplishes
a few things:
•
•
•
•
drives the surface moisture from the wood,
creates a layer of char on the wood, which slows down its release of smoke,
heats the firebox components so they reflect heat back to the fire, and
heats the chimney so it can produce strong, steady draft for the rest of the cycle.
Although it is important to fire each new load hot to prepare for a clean burn, do not allow
the fire to burn at full intensity for more than a few minutes.
DO NOT LEAVE THE STOVE UNATTENDED WHILE A NEW LOAD IS BEING FIRED
HOT.
When you burn a new load of wood hot to heat up the wood, the stove and the chimney,
the result will be a surge of heat from the stove. This heat surge is welcome when the
room temperature is a little lower than desirable, but not welcome if the space is already
warm. Therefore, allow each load of wood to burn down so that the space begins to cool
off a little before loading. Letting the space cool before loading is one of the secrets to
clean burning and effective zone heating.
4.4.5 Turning Down the Air Supply
Once the firewood, firebox and chimney are hot, you can begin to reduce the air supply for
a steady burn.
As you reduce the air supply to the fire, two important things happen. First, the firing rate
slows down to spread the heat energy in the fuel over a longer period of time. Second, the
flow rate of exhaust through the stove and flue pipe slows down, which gives more time for
the transfer of heat from the exhaust. You will notice that as you reduce the air setting, the
flames slow down. This is your indication that the stove is burning at its peak efficiency.
If the flames get small and almost disappear when you turn down the air, you have turned
down the air too early, or your firewood is wetter than it should be. With good fuel and
correct air control use, the flames should slow down, but should stay large and steady,
even as the air supply is reduced.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
4.4.6 Building Different Fires for Different Needs
Using the air control is not the only way to match the stove’s heat output to the heat
demand. Your house will need far less heat in October than in January to be kept at a
comfortable temperature. If you fill the firebox full in fall weather, you will either overheat
the space or turn the stove down so much that the fire will be smoky and inefficient. Here
are some suggestions for building fires to match different heat demand.
4.4.6.1 Small Fires to Take the Chill Off the House
To build a small fire that will produce a low heat output, use small pieces of firewood and
load them crisscross in the firebox. The pieces should be only 3” to 4” in diameter. After
raking the coals, you can lay two pieces parallel to each other corner to corner in the
firebox and lay two more across them in the other direction. Open the air control fully and
only reduce the air after the wood is fully flaming. This kind of fire is good for mild weather
when you are around to tend the stove and should provide enough heat for four hours or
more. Small fires like this are a good time to use softer wood species so there will be less
chance of overheating the house.
4.4.6.2 Long Lasting Low Output Fires
Sometimes you will want to build a fire to last up to eight hours, but don’t need intense
heat. In this case use soft wood species and place the logs compactly in the firebox so the
pieces are packed tightly together. You will need to fire the load hot for long enough to fully
char the log surfaces before you can turn the air down. Make sure the fire is flaming
brightly before leaving the fire to burn.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
4.4.6.3 High Output Fires for Cold Weather
When the heat demand is high during cold weather, you’ll need a fire that burns steadily
and brightly. This is the time to use your biggest pieces of hardwood fuel if you have it. Put
the biggest pieces at the back of the firebox and place the rest of the pieces compactly. A
densely built fire like this will produce the longest burn your stove is capable of.
You will need to be cautious when building fires like this because if the air is turned down
too much, the fire could smoulder. Make sure the wood is flaming brightly before leaving
the fire to burn.
4.4.6.4 Maximum Burn Cycle Times
The burn cycle time is the period between loading wood on a coal bed and the
consumption of that wood back to a coal bed of the same size. The flaming phase of the
fire lasts for roughly the first half of the burn cycle and the second half is the coal bed
phase during which there is little or no flame. The length of burn you can expect from your
stove, including both the flaming and coal bed phases, will be affected by a number of
things, such as:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
firebox size,
the amount of wood loaded,
the species of wood you burn,
the wood moisture content,
the size of the space to be heated,
the climate zone you live in, and
the time of year.
The table below provides a very general indication of the maximum burn cycle times you
are likely to experience, based on firebox volume.
<1.5 cubic feet
MAXIMUM
BURN TIME
3 to 5 hours
1.5 c.f. to 2.0 c.f
5 to 6 hours
2.0 c.f. to 2.5 c.f.
6 to 8 hours
2.5 c.f. to 3.0 c.f.
8 to 9 hours
>3.0 c.f.
9 to 10 hours
FIREBOX VOLUME
Long burn times are not necessarily an indication of efficient stove operation. When you
are home during the day and able to tend the fire, it is preferable to build a smaller fire that
might provide three or four hours of heating than to fully load the firebox for a much longer
burn. Shorter burn cycles make it easier to match the heat output of the stove to the heat
demand of the space.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
4.4.6.5 North-South Fires Versus East-West Fires
In fireboxes that are roughly square, wood can be loaded so that looking through the glass
door you see the ends of the logs (north-south) or the sides of the logs (east-west).
East-west loads that are built compactly break down slowly when heated, but the amount
of wood you can load is limited because if you put in too many pieces, one may fall against
the glass. East-west loads are excellent for long, low output fires for relatively mild
weather.
North-south loads break down more quickly, but much more wood can be loaded at a time.
This makes north-south loading good for high output, long lasting fires for cold weather.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
5 Maintaining Your Wood Heating System
5.1 Stove Maintenance
Your new stove will give many years of reliable service if you use and maintain it correctly.
Some of the internal components of the firebox, such as firebricks, baffles and air tubes,
will wear over time under intense heat. You should always replace defective parts with
original parts (see Appendix 4: Exploded Diagram and Parts List). For firing each load
hot to begin a cycle as described above will not cause premature deterioration of the
stove. However, letting the stove run with the air control fully open for entire cycles can
cause damage over time. The hotter you run the stove throughout burn cycles, the more
quickly its components will deteriorate. For that reason, never leave the stove
unattended while a new load is being fired hot.
5.1.1 Cleaning Door Glass
Under normal conditions, your door glass should stay relatively clear. If your firewood is
dry enough and you follow the operating instructions in this manual, a whitish, dusty
deposit will form on the inside of the glass after a week or so of use. This is normal and
can be easily removed when the stove is cool by wiping with a damp cloth or paper towel
and then drying. Never try to clean the glass when the stove is hot.
In spring and fall when the stove is run at lower temperatures, you may see some light
brown stains forming, especially at the lower corners of the glass. This indicates that the
fire has been smoky and some of the smoke has condensed on the glass. When the
weather is mild, you may find that letting the fire go out is better than trying to maintain a
continuous fire. Use the technique described above for building a fire to take the chill off
the house.
If you do get brown stains on the glass you can remove them with special cleaners for
wood stove glass doors. Do not use abrasives to clean your stove’s door glass.
The deposits that form on the glass are the best indication of the quality of your fuel and
how well you are doing in operating the stove. Your goal should be clear glass with no
brown stains. If you continue to see brown stains on the glass, something about your fuel
and operating procedure needs to be changed. Stains on the glass indicate incomplete
combustion of the wood, which also means more smoke emissions and faster formation of
creosote in the chimney.
If you see brown streaks coming from the edge of the glass, it is time to replace the gasket
around the glass. Visit your stove retailer to get the self-adhesive glass gasket and follow
the instructions below for installation.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
5.1.2 Door adjustment
In order for your stove to burn at its best efficiency, the door must provide a perfect seal
with the firebox. Therefore, the gasket should be inspected periodically making sure to
obtain an air tight fit. Airtightness can be improved with a simple latch mechanism
adjustment. To adjust:
1. Remove the lock pin (spring pin) by pulling and turning it using pliers.
2. Turn the handle counter clock wise one turn to increase pressure.
3. Re-install the lock pin (spring pin) with a small hammer.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
5.1.3 Replacing the Door Gasket
It is important to maintain the gasket in good condition. After a year or more of use, the
door gasket will compress and become hard, which may allow air to leak past it. You can
test the condition of the door gasket by closing and latching the door on a strip of paper.
Test all around the door. If the paper slips out easily anywhere, it is time to replace the
gasket.
Use the correct replacement gasket that you can purchase from your retailer. The diameter
and density of the gasket is important to getting a good seal.
Place the door face-down on something soft like a cushion of rags or piece of carpet.
Remove the old gasket from the door by pulling and prying it out with an old screw driver.
Then use the screwdriver to scrape the old gasket adhesive from the door. Now run a 1/4”
(6 mm) bead of high temperature silicone in the door gasket groove. Starting from the
middle of the hinge side, press the gasket into the groove. Do not stretch the gasket as
you place it. Leave the gasket about 1/2” long when you cut it and press the end into the
groove. Tuck any loose fibres under the gasket and into the silicone. Close the door and
do not use the stove for 24 hours.
5.1.4 Replacing the Glass Gasket and/or the Glass
It is a good idea to replace the glass gasket when the door gasket is replaced. The gasket
is flat, adhesive-backed, woven fibreglass. Remove the glass retaining screws and clips.
Lift out the glass and pull off the old gasket. This is a good time to clean the glass
thoroughly.
The gasket must be centred on the edge of the glass. To do this easily, peel back a
section of the paper covering the adhesive and place the gasket on a table with the
adhesive side up. Stick the end of the gasket to the middle of one edge, then press the
edge of the glass down onto the gasket, taking care that it is perfectly centred on the
gasket. Peel off more of the backing and rotate the glass and press the next section onto
the gasket. Do not stretch the gasket as you place it. Continue until you get to the start and
trim the gasket to length. Now pinch the gasket to the glass in a U shape, all around the
glass. Reinstall the glass, being careful to centre the glass carefully in the door. Do not
over-tighten the screws. Note that the two main causes of broken door glass are uneven
placement in the door and over-tightening of retaining screws.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
Do not abuse the glass door by striking or slamming shut. Do not use the stove if the glass
is broken. To change the glass, perform the same operation described above.
5.1.5 Cleaning and Painting the Stove
Do not attempt to clean or paint the stove when the unit is hot. Painted surfaces can
be wiped down with a damp cloth. Plated surfaces may be scratched by abrasive cleaners.
To maintain the finish at its original brilliance, use only a damp soft cloth to clean plated
surfaces.
If the paint becomes scratched or damaged, you can give your wood stove a brand new
look by repainting it with heat-resistant paint. Before painting, roughen the surface with fine
sand paper, wipe it down to remove dust, and apply two thin coats of paint. For best
results, use the same paint that was originally used on the stove, which is available in
spray cans. See your dealer for details.
5.2 Chimney and Chimney Connector Maintenance
5.2.1 Why Chimney Cleaning is Necessary
Wood smoke can condense inside the chimney connector and chimney, forming a
combustible deposit called creosote. If creosote is allowed to build up in the venting
system it can ignite when a hot fire is burned in the stove and a very hot fire can progress
to the top of the chimney. Severe chimney fires can damage even the best chimneys.
Smouldering, smoky fires can quickly cause a thick layer of creosote to form. When you
avoid smouldering so the exhaust from the chimney is mostly clear, creosote builds up
more slowly. Your new stove has the right characteristics to help you to burn clean fires
with little or no smoke, resulting in less creosote in the chimney.
5.2.2 How Often Should You Clean the Chimney?
It is not possible to predict how much or how quickly creosote will form in your chimney. It
is important, therefore, to check the build-up in your chimney monthly when getting used to
the new stove until you determine the rate of creosote formation. Even if creosote forms
slowly in your system, the chimney should be cleaned and inspected at least once each
year.
Contact your local municipal or provincial fire authority for information on how to handle a
chimney fire. Have a clearly understood plan to handle a chimney fire.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
5.2.3 Cleaning the Chimney
Chimney cleaning can be a difficult and
dangerous job. If you don’t have
experience cleaning chimneys, you
might want to hire a professional
chimney sweep to clean and inspect
the system for the first time. After
having seen the cleaning process, you
can decide if it is a job you would like to
take on.
The most common equipment used are
fibreglass rods with threaded fittings
and stiff plastic brushes. The brush is
forced up and down inside the chimney
flue to scrub off the creosote.
The chimney connector assembly
should always be cleaned at the same
time the chimney is cleaned.
CAUTION: Operation of your stove without the baffle may cause unsafe and hazardous
temperature conditions and will void the warranty. NOTE: Before installing the firebrick,
check to ensure that none are broken or damaged in any way. If so, have the damaged
ones replaced. Check the firebrick for damage at least annually and replace any broken or
damaged ones with new ones. Inspection and cleaning of the chimney is facilitated by the
removable baffle.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
PART B - INSTALLATION
6 Safety Information
6.1 Summary of Installation Cautions and Warnings
•
THE INFORMATION GIVEN ON THE CERTIFICATION LABEL AFFIXED TO THE
APPLIANCE ALWAYS OVERRIDES THE INFORMATION PUBLISHED, IN ANY
OTHER MEDIA (OWNER’S MANUAL, CATALOGUES, FLYERS, MAGAZINES
AND/OR WEB SITES).
•
MIXING OF APPLIANCE COMPONENTS FROM DIFFERENT SOURCES OR
MODIFYING COMPONENTS MAY RESULT IN HAZARDOUS CONDTIONS. WHERE
ANY SUCH CHANGES ARE PLANNED, STOVE BUILDER INTERNATIONAL INC.
SHOULD BE CONTACTED IN ADVANCE.
•
ANY MODIFICATION OF THE APPLIANCE THAT HAS NOT BEEN APPROVED IN
WRITING BY THE TESTING AUTHORITY VIOLATES CSA B365 (CANADA), AND
ANSI NFPA 211 (USA).
•
CONNECT THIS STOVE ONLY TO A LISTED FACTORY-BUILT CHIMNEY FOR
USE WITH SOLID FUEL OR TO A LINED MASONRY CHIMNEY CONFORMING TO
NATIONAL AND LOCAL BUILDING CODES.
•
IF REQUIRED, A SUPPLY OF COMBUSTION AIR SHALL BE PROVIDED TO THE
ROOM OR SPACE.
•
DO NOT CONNECT TO OR USE IN CONJUNCTION WITH ANY AIR DISTRIBUTION
DUCTWORK UNLESS SPECIFICALLY APPROVED FOR SUCH INSTALLATION.
•
DO NOT CONNECT THIS UNIT TO A CHIMNEY FLUE SERVING ANOTHER
APPLIANCE.
•
DO NOT INSTALL IN A MOBILE HOME
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
6.2 Regulations Covering Stove Installation
When installed and operated as described in these instructions, the Pyropak wood stove is
suitable for use as a freestanding heater in residential installations. The Pyropak wood
stove is not recommended for installation in a sleeping room.
In Canada, the CSA B365 Installation Code for Solid Fuel Burning Appliances and
Equipment and the CSA C22.1 Canadian National Electrical Code are to be followed in the
absence of local code requirements. In the USA, the ANSI NFPA 211 Standard for
Chimneys, Fireplaces, Vents and Solid Fuel-Burning Appliances and the ANSI NFPA 70
National Electrical Code are to be followed in the absence of local code requirements.
This stove must be connected to a chimney complying with the requirements for Type HT
chimneys in the Standard for Factory-Built Chimneys for Residential Type and Building
Heating Appliances, UL 103 and ULC S629 or to a code-approved masonry chimney with
a flue liner.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
7 Clearances to Combustible Material
The clearances shown in this section have been determined by test according to
procedures set out in safety standards ULC S627 (Canada), UL1482 (U.S.A.) and UL737
(U.S.A.). When the stove is installed so that its surfaces are at or beyond the minimum
clearances specified, combustible surfaces will not overheat under normal and even
abnormal operating conditions.
No part of the stove or flue pipe may be located closer to combustibles than the
minimum clearance figures given.
7.1 Location of the certification label
Since the information given on the certification label affixed to the appliance always
overrides the information published, in any other media (owner’s manual, catalogues,
flyers, magazines and/or web sites) it is important to refer to it in order to have a safe and
compliant installation. In addition, you will find information about your stove (model, serial
number, etc.). You can find the certification label on the back of the stove.
7.2 Clearances to Walls and Ceiling
The clearances to combustible walls may be slightly different in Canada and the U.S.A.
and may also differ depending on whether you use single or double wall flue pipe. Please
be sure to choose the correct clearance for your location and type of flue pipe. See figure
Clearances to combustible materials and floor protection to match each letter to a
clearance.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
CLEARANCES (SINGLE WALL PIPE)
A
B
C
D
E
F
K
L
CANADA
15½" (394 mm)
18" (457 mm)
10" (254 mm)*
18" (457 mm)
26½" (673 mm)
18" (457 mm)
48" (1220 mm)
84" (213 cm)
USA
15" (381 mm)
18" (457 mm)
10" (254 mm)*
17¾" (451 mm)
26½" (673 mm)
18" (457 mm)
48" (1220 mm)
84" (213 cm)
Note: These clearances are also valid for an alcove installation.
*If ceiling height (L) is between 68’’ and 84’’, clearance (C) changes to 12’’ (305 mm).
CLEARANCES (DOUBLE WALL PIPE)
A
B
C
D
E
F
K
L
CANADA
10" (254 mm)*
18" (457 mm)
10" (254 mm)
12¾" (324 mm)
26½" (673 mm)
18" (457 mm)
48" (1220 mm)
84" (213 cm)
USA
10" (254 mm)*
18" (457 mm)
10" (254 mm)
12¾" (324 mm)
26½" (673 mm)
18" (457 mm)
48" (1220 mm)
84" (213 cm)
*If ceiling height (L) is between to 68’’ to 84’’, clearance (A) changes to 12’’ (305 mm).
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
Clearances to combustible materials and floor protection
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
7.3 Floor protector
If the stove is to be installed on top of a combustible floor, it must be guarded by a non
combustible material as shown on figure 1.3 (see the dotted line area).
FLOOR PROTECTOR*
G
H
I
J
M
N
CANADA
USA
8’’ (203 mm) – Note 1
8’’ (203 mm)
18’’ (457 mm)
From door opening
N/A (USA only)
8’’ (203 mm)
N/A (USA only)
N/A (Canada only)
N/A (Canada only)
16’’ (406 mm)
From door opening
8’’ (203 mm)
N/A (Canada only)
Note 2
*Steel with a minimum thickness of 0.015’’ (0.38 mm) or ceramic tiles sealed together
with grout. No protection is required if the unit is installed on a non-combustible floor
(ex: concrete).
Note 1: The floor protection at the back of the stove is limited to the stove’s required
clearance if such clearance is smaller than 8 inches (203 mm).
Note 2: Only required under the horizontal section of the connector. Must exceed each
side of the connector by at least 2 inches (51 mm).
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
7.4 Reducing Wall and Ceiling Clearances Safely
It is often desirable to reduce
the
minimum
installation
clearances by placing the stove
closer to walls so the installation
takes up less floor space. You
can safely reduce the minimum
clearances
by
permanently
installing a shield between the
stove and combustible material.
The rules for safe shields can be
complicated, so read them
carefully and follow them
exactly. Note that there may be
minor regional differences in
clearance reduction rules so be
sure to check with your building
or
fire
inspector
before
proceeding.
7.4.1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Shield Construction Rules
Minimum space behind shield: 25 mm (1 in.). In Canada 21 mm (7/8 in).
Minimum clearance along the bottom of shield: 25 mm (1 in.).
Maximum clearance along the bottom of shield: 75 mm (3 in.).
Minimum clearance along the top of shield at ceiling: 75 mm (3 in.).
Shield extension beyond each side of appliance: 450 mm (18 in.).
Shield extension above appliance: 500 mm (20 in.).
Edge clearance for ceiling shields: 75 mm (3 in.).
Adhesives used in shield construction must not ignite or lose adhesive qualities at
temperatures likely to be encountered.
9. Mounting hardware must allow full vertical ventilation.
10. Mounting hardware must not be located closer than 200 mm (8 in.) from the vertical
centre line of the appliance.
11. Mounting hardware which extends from the shield surface into combustibles may be
used only at the edges of the shield.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
7.4.2 Table of Clearance Reduction Percentages
Clearances may be
reduced by these
percentages
Type of shield
Sides
and rear %
Top %
(ceiling)
67
50
Ceramic tiles, or equivalent noncombustible material, on noncombustible board spaced out at
least 25 mm (1 in)* by noncombustible spacers
50
33
Ceramic tiles, or equivalent noncombustible material, on noncombustible
board,
with
a
minimum of 24 gauge (0.61 mm)
sheet metal backing spaced out at
least 25 mm (1 in)* by noncombustible spacers
67
50
50
N/A
67
N/A
Sheet metal, a minimum of 24
gauge (0.61 mm) in thickness ,
spaced out at least 25 mm (1 in)*
by non-combustible spacers
Brick, spaced out at least 25 mm
(1 in)* by non-combustible spacers
Brick, with a minimum of 24 gauge
(0.61 mm) sheet metal backing,
spaced out at least 25 mm (1 in)*
by non-combustible spacers
* In Canada this space can be 21 mm (7/8 in)
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
8 The Venting System
8.1 General
The venting system, made up of the chimney and the connecting pipe between the stove
and the chimney, acts as the engine that drives your wood heating system. Even the best
stove will not function safely and efficiently as intended if it is not connected to a suitable
chimney.
The heat in the flue gases that pass from the stove and chimney connector into the
chimney is not waste heat. This heat is what the chimney uses to make the draft that
draws in combustion air, keeps smoke inside the stove and safely vents exhaust to
outside. You can think of heat in the flue gas as the fuel the chimney uses to make draft.
8.2 Suitable Chimneys
Your wood stove will provide optimum efficiency and performance when connected to a 6inch diameter chimney flue system. The connection to a chimney having a diameter of at
least 5 inches (Canada only) or no more than 7 inches is permitted, if it allows the proper
venting of combustion gases and that such application is verified and authorized by a
qualified installer. Otherwise, the diameter of the flue should be 6 inches.
To be suitable, a factory-built metal
chimney must comply with UL 103
(U.S.A.) or ULC S629 (Canada).
8.2.1 Factory-built Metal Chimneys
These are sometimes referred to as
‘high temp’ chimneys because they
have the special characteristics to
withstand the temperatures that can be
created by wood burning stoves.
Factory-built chimneys are tested as a
system with all the necessary
components for installation. The
instructions provided with the chimney
by its manufacturer are the only reliable
source of installation guidelines. To be
safe and effective, the chimney must
be installed exactly in accordance with
the manufacturer’s instructions. Use
only components intended for the
brand and model of chimney you are
using. Never substitute parts from
other chimney brands or fabricate
your own components. The chimney
must be a type suitable for solid
fuel.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
8.2.2 Masonry Chimneys
The stove may also be connected to a
masonry chimney,
provided the
chimney complies with the construction
rules found in the building code
enforced locally. The chimney must
have either a clay liner or a suitably
listed stainless steel liner. If the
masonry chimney has a square or
rectangular liner that is larger in cross
sectional area than a round 6” flue, it
should be relined with a suitably listed
6” stainless steel liner. Do not
downsize the flue to less than 6” unless
the venting system is straight and
exceeds 25 feet in height. When
passing through a combustible wall, the
use of an insulated listed thimble is
required.
8.3 Minimum Chimney Height
The top of the chimney should be
tall enough to be above the air
turbulence caused when wind
blows against the house and its
roof. The chimney must extend at
least 1 m (3 ft.) above the highest
point of contact with the roof, and
at least 60 cm (2 ft.) higher than
any roof line or obstacle within a
horizontal distance of 3 m (10 ft.).
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
8.4 The Relationship Between the Chimney and the House
Because the venting system is the engine that drives the wood heating system, it must
have the right characteristics. The signs of bad system design are cold backdrafting when
there is no fire in the stove, slow kindling of new fires, and smoke roll-out when the door is
opened for loading. There are two guidelines to follow. First, the chimney should be
installed up through the heated space of the house, not out and up an outside wall.
Second, the chimney should penetrate the top of the building at or near the highest heated
space.
8.4.1 Why inside chimneys are preferred
Venting systems that rise straight up from the stove flue collar provide the best
performance. Chimneys that rise inside the warm space of the house tend to provide a
small amount of draft even when there is no fire burning. This means that when you light a
fire, the initial smoke goes up the chimney and strong draft builds quickly as the chimney
flue warms up. Although they are common in North America, chimneys that exit a house
wall and run up outside can cause problems.
Good System Design
Inside chimneys are preferred because even
when no fire is burning, there is normally
upward flow in the system.
Inferior System Design
Outside chimneys are a problem
because when no fire burns they will go
into cold backdraft if the stove is
installed low in the house.
8.4.2 Why the chimney should penetrate the highest heated space
When it is cold outside, the warm air in the house is buoyant so it tends to rise. This
tendency of warm air to rise creates a slight pressure difference in the house. Called ‘stack
effect’, it produces a slightly negative pressure low in the house (relative to outside) and a
slightly positive pressure zone high in the house. If there is no fire burning in a heater
connected to a chimney that is shorter than the warm space inside the house, the slight
negative pressure low in the house will compete against the desired upward flow in the
chimney.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
There are two reasons why the
chimney in the house at right will
cold backdraft when it is cold
outside and there is no fire burning
in the stove. First, the chimney runs
up the outside of the house, so the
air in it is colder and denser than
the warm air in the house. And
second, the chimney is shorter than
the heated space of the house,
meaning the negative pressure low
in the house will pull outside air
down the chimney, through the
stove and into the room. Even the
finest stove will not work well when
connected to this chimney.
8.5 Supply of Combustion Air
In Canada, wood stoves are not required to have a supply of combustion air from outdoors
(except in mobile homes) because research has shown that these supplies do not give
protection against house depressurization and may fail to supply combustion air during
windy weather. However, to protect against the risk of smoke spillage due to house
depressurization, a carbon monoxide (CO) detector/alarm is required in the room in
which the stove is installed. The CO detector will provide warning if for any reason the
wood stove fails to function correctly.
8.5.1 Air Supply in Conventional Houses
The safest and most reliable supply of combustion air for your wood stove is from the room
in which it is installed. Room air is already preheated so it will not chill the fire, and its
availability is not affected by wind pressures on the house. Contrary to commonly
expressed concerns, almost all tightly-sealed new houses have enough natural leakage to
provide the small amount of air needed by the stove. The only case in which the wood
stove may not have adequate access to combustion air is if the operation of a powerful
exhaust device (such as a kitchen range exhaust) causes the pressure in the house to
become negative relative to outdoors.
Some jurisdictions in the United States require that wood stoves have a supply of
combustion air from outdoors. If you do install an air supply through the wall of the house,
be aware that its pressure can be affected during windy weather. If you notice changes in
wood stove performance in windy weather, and in particular if smoke puffs from the stove,
you should disconnect the outdoor air duct from the stove and remove the duct. In some
windy conditions, negative pressure at the duct weatherhood outside the house wall may
draw hot exhaust gases from the stove backwards through the duct to outdoors. Check the
outdoor air duct for soot deposits when the full system is cleaned and inspected at least
once each year.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
8.6 Installing the Chimney Connector
The chimney connector is the single or double wall pipe installed between the stove flue
collar and the chimney breech. Single wall pipe components are available from most
hardware and building supply stores. These components are not usually tested to a
particular standard and certified as compliant. Therefore, a list of rules found in solid fuel
installation codes apply to the installation of single wall pipe.
Double wall chimney connectors are tested and certified. The rules for double wall pipe are
found in the manufacturer’s installation instructions. These rules will be very different than
those for single wall.
8.6.1 Installation of Single Wall Chimney Connector
The chimney connector assembly has been called ‘the weak link’ in the safety of wood
heating systems because failure to install the connector properly (which has been common
in the past) can result in house fires.
The best flue pipe assembly is one that rises straight up from the stove to the base of the
chimney with no elbows. Straight assemblies are less likely to cause problems like smoke
roll-out when the door is opened for loading. They are also more stable and easier to
maintain than assemblies with elbows. Horizontal runs of flue pipe should be avoided
where possible because they reduce chimney draft.
Use 45 degree elbows where possible, instead of 90 degree elbows.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
The rules below are based on those found in the CSA B365 installation code. Please
carefully follow these installation instruction rules, or those enforced where you live.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Maximum overall length of straight pipe: 3 m (10 ft.) including elbows.
Minimum clearance from combustible material: 450 mm (18 in.). The minimum
clearance may be reduced by 50 percent to 225 mm (9 in.) if suitable shielding is
installed either on the pipe or on the combustible surface.
The assembly should be as short and direct as possible between the stove and
chimney. The use of two 45 degree elbows is often preferable to a single 90 degree
elbow because less turbulence is created in the exhaust flow and they result in less
horizontal run.
Maximum number of 90-degree elbows: 2.
Maximum unsupported horizontal length: 1 m (3 feet).
Galvanized flue pipes must not be used because the coatings vaporize at high
temperatures and release dangerous gases. Use black painted flue pipes.
Flue pipes must be at least 24 gauge in thickness.
Flue pipe joints should overlap 30 mm (1 1/4 in.)
Each joint in the assembly must be fastened with at least three screws.
The assembly must have allowance for expansion: elbows in assemblies allow for
expansion; straight assemblies should include an inspection wrap with one end
unfastened, or a telescopic section.
Minimum upward slope towards the chimney: 20 mm/m (1/4 in/ft.).
One end of the assembly must be securely fastened to the flue collar with 3 sheet
metal screws and the other end securely fastened to the chimney.
There must be provision for cleaning of the pipes, either through a clean out or by
removal of the pipe assembly. Removal of the assembly should not require that the
stove be moved.
The male ends of the sections must be oriented towards the appliance so that falling
dust and condensation stay inside the pipe.
A flue pipe must never pass through a combustible floor or ceiling or through an attic,
roof space, closet or concealed space.
Where passage through a wall or partition of combustible construction is desired, the
installation shall conform to CAN/CSA-B365, Installation Code for Solid-Fuel-Burning
Appliances and Equipment.
The ideal flue pipe assembly is one that rises straight up from the appliance flue collar and
directly into the chimney with no elbows. A straight up connector assembly needs either a
telescopic length or an inspection wrap (pipe coupler) to allow it to be assembled and
disassembled without moving the stove.
A straight flue pipe assembly offers the least restriction to gas flow and results in stronger
draft. Straight assemblies also need less maintenance because there are no corners to
collect creosote.
The chimney connector must be in good condition.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
Appendix 1: Installing the Fresh Air Intake Kit (AC01331)
The installation instructions are provided with the Fresh Air Intake Kit (AC01331), sold
separately.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
Appendix 2: Installation and Use of Optional Air Circulation
Fan and Thermodisc
An optional fan can be installed on the back of the stove to increase the flow of air past
heat exchange surfaces and to help circulate warm air in the room. When used regularly,
the fan can provide a small increase in efficiency, up to 2 percent. However, the use of a
fan should not be used as a way to gain more output from a stove that is undersized for
the space it is intended to heat. You can purchase this option through your Drolet dealer.
Make sure to specify this part number AC02050.
Installation instructions are provided with the optional air circulation fan.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
When using the optional fan, allow the stove to reach operating temperature
(approximately one hour), before turning it on. The increased airflow from the fan cools the
firebox and could affect the start-up combustion efficiency if the fan is turned on too early.
You can also install a thermodisc to enable the blower to start or stop automatically when
the stove is hot or too cold. The thermodisc part number is AC05530 for a basic model and
ACO2055 for a quick connect model.
Installation instructions are provided with the thermodisc (detail A).
CAUTION: ENSURE THAT THE FAN’S POWER CORD IS NOT IN CONTACT WITH
ANY SURFACE OF THE STOVE TO PREVENT ELECTRICAL SHOCK OR FIRE
DAMAGE. DO NOT RUN THE POWER CORD BENEATH THE STOVE.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
Appendix 3: Installing the Fire Screen (AC01318)
Open the door.
Hold the fire screen by the two handles
and bring it close to the door opening.
Lean the upper part of the fire screen
against the top door opening making
sure to insert the top fire screen
brackets behind the primary air deflector
as in (Detail A).
Lift the fire screen upwards and push
the bottom part towards the stove then
let the fire screen rest on the bottom of
the door opening.
Warning: Never leave the stove unattended while in use with the fire screen.
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
Appendix 4: Exploded Diagram and Parts List
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Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
#
Item #
1
2
3
AC01318
30569
AC07867
4
SE24112
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
AC09155
AC09185
AC06200
30055
30169
30101
SE63002
AC06400
PL54583
PL53585
30124
PL63249
17
30060
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
99999
AC01331
99999
AC07863
30125
PL63324
30094
30428
SE63017
SE45397
28
AC02050
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
37
38
39
40
41
60013
44073
44080
44087
44085
AC05530
44046
29015
PL36055
29010
21386
PL63339
Description
FIRE SCREEN
ROUND WOODEN HANDLE BLACK
1/2 " CHROME PLATED COIL HANDLE
REPLACEMENT DOOR WITH GASKET AND HANDLE WITHOUT
GLASS
HANDLE AND LATCH KIT
DOOR LATCH KIT
BLACK GASKET AND SILICONE KIT 1/4'' X 1/2'' X11'
HINGE PIN RETAINING RING 5/16" ID X 0.512" OD
DOOR HINGE PIN 5/16'' DIA. X 1 3/4" LONG
SPRING TENSION PIN 5/32" DIA X 1 1/2" LONG
REPLACEMENT GLASS WITH GASKET 8 3/4'' X 14 3/4''
BLACK SELF-ADHESIVE GLASS GASKET KIT (6')
GLASS RETAINER FRAME
GLASS RETAINER 3/4" X 7/8"
SCREW #8 - 32 X 5/16'' TRUSS QUADREX ZINC
ASH LIP
THREAD-CUTTING SCREW 1/4-20 x 1/2" F HEX STEEL SLOT
WASHER C102 ZINC
BUILD TO ORDER
FRESH AIR INTAKE KIT
BUILD TO ORDER
1/4 " CHROME PLATED LONG COIL HANDLE
MECHANICAL SCREW #8 X 1 1/4" QUADREX ZINC
AIR CONTROL COVER
HEX SCREW WASHER HEAD 1/4-20 X 3/4" F ZINC TYPE
BUSHING
AIR CONTROL DAMPER
PYROPAK INSTRUCTION MANUAL KIT
ULTRA-QUIET 100 CFM BLOWER WITH VARIABLE SPEED
CONTROL
POWER CORD 96" X 18-3
CROSSFLOW BLOWER 115V-60Hz-39W 100 CFM (P)
RHEOSTAT WITH NUT
RHEOSTAT NUT
RHEOSTAT KNOB
THERMODISC KIT
THERMODISC F110-20F
4'' x 9'' x 1 1/4'' REFRACTORY BRICK
4 1/2" X 9" X 7/8" X 5'' REFRACTORY BRICK
4 1/2" X 9" X 1 1/4" REFRACTORY BRICK
BAFFLE INSULATION
BAFFLE INSULATION WEIGHT
Qty/
Unit
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
10
10
1
7
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
2
8
1
1
47
Pyropak Installation and Operation Manual
DROLET LIMITED LIFETIME WARRANTY
The warranty of the manufacturer extends only to the original consumer purchaser and is not transferable. This
warranty covers brand new products only, which have not been altered, modified nor repaired since shipment from
factory. Proof of purchase (dated bill of sale), model name and serial number must be supplied when making any
warranty claim to your DROLET dealer.
This warranty applies to normal residential use only. Damages caused by misuse, abuse, improper installation,
lack of maintenance, over firing, negligence or accident during transportation, power failures, downdrafts, or
venting problems are not covered by this warranty.
This warranty does not cover any scratch, corrosion, distortion, or discoloration. Any defect or damage caused by the
use of unauthorized parts or others than original parts void this warranty. An authorized qualified technician must
perform the installation in accordance with the instructions supplied with this product and all local and national building
codes. Any service call related to an improper installation is not covered by this warranty.
The manufacturer may require that defective products be returned or that digital pictures be provided to support the
claim. Returned products are to be shipped prepaid to the manufacturer for investigation. If a product is found to be
defective, the manufacturer will repair or replace such defect. Transportation fees to ship the product back to the
purchaser will be paid by the manufacturer. Repair work covered by the warranty, executed at the purchaser’s domicile
by an authorized qualified technician requires the prior approval of the manufacturer. Labour cost and repair work to the
account of the manufacturer are based on predetermined rate schedule and must not exceed the wholesale price of the
replacement part. All parts and labour costs covered by this warranty are limited according to the table below.
The manufacturer at its discretion may decide to repair or replace any part or unit after inspection and investigation of
the defect. The manufacturer may, at its discretion, fully discharge all obligations with respect to this warranty by
refunding the wholesale price of any warranted but defective parts. The manufacturer shall in no event be responsible
for any special, indirect, consequential damages of any nature, which are in excess of the original purchase price of the
product. A one-time replacement limit applies to all parts benefiting from a lifetime coverage. This warranty applies to
products purchased after October 1st, 2011.
WARRANTY APPLICATION
DESCRIPTION
Combustion chamber (welds only) and castings.
Stainless steel firebox components, secondary air tubes*, surrounds and heat
shields, ash drawer, steel legs, pedestal, trims (aluminum extrusions),
plating* (defective manufacture), and convector air-mate.
Carbon steel firebox components, glass retainers, handle assembly, C-Cast
baffle*, and vermiculite baffle*.
Standard blowers, heat sensors, switches, rheostat, wiring, and other controls.
Optional blowers, ceramic glass (thermal breakage only*), paint (peeling),
gaskets, insulation, and ceramic fibre blankets.
Firebrick
*Pictures required
PARTS
LABOUR
Lifetime
3 years
5 years
3 years
3 years
1 year
2 years
1 year
1 year
n/a
n/a
n/a
Shall your unit or a components be defective, contact immediately your DROLET dealer. Prior to your call make sure
you have the following information necessary to your warranty claim treatment:
•
•
Your name, address and telephone number;
Bill of sale and dealer’s name;
•
•
Serial number and model name as indicated on the
nameplate fixed to the back of your unit;
Nature of the defect and any relevant information.
Before shipping your unit or defective component to our plant, you must obtain from your DROLET dealer an
Authorization Number. Any merchandise shipped to our plant without authorization will be refused
automatically and returned to sender.
48
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