Rockwell Modem Designer's Guide

Rockwell Modem Designer's Guide
RCVDL56ACF/SVD,
RCV56ACF/SVD, and
RCV336ACF/SVD Modems
Designer's Guide
(Preliminary)
Order No. 1105
Rev. 1, March 6, 1997
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
NOTICE
Information furnished by Rockwell International Corporation is believed to be accurate and reliable. However, no
responsibility is assumed by Rockwell International for its use, nor any infringement of patents or other rights of third parties
which may result from its use. No license is granted by implication or otherwise under any patent rights of Rockwell
International other than for circuitry embodied in Rockwell products. Rockwell International reserves the right to change
circuitry at any time without notice. This document is subject to change without notice.
K56flex is a trademark of Lucent Technologies and Rockwell International.
MNP 10EC, DigiTalk, and ConfigurACE are trademarks of Rockwell International.
MNP is a trademark of Microcom Systems, Inc.
VoiceView is a registered trademark of Radish Communications, Inc.
Hayes is a trademark of Hayes Microcomputer Products, Inc.
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Table of Contents
1. INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................................................1-1
1.1 SUMMARY.................................................................................................................................................1-1
1.2 FEATURES ................................................................................................................................................1-5
1.3 TECHNICAL OVERVIEW ...........................................................................................................................1-6
1.3.1 General Description ..........................................................................................................................1-6
1.3.2 Data/Fax Modes ...............................................................................................................................1-6
1.3.3 AudioSpan Modes.............................................................................................................................1-8
1.3.4 DSVD Mode using RCDSVD SCP Device (/SCP Models Only) ..........................................................1-8
1.4 Host-Based DSVD (SCP and SP Models Only) ...........................................................................................1-8
1.5 Voice/Audio Mode (V Models Only).............................................................................................................1-8
1.5.1 Speakerphone Mode (SCP and SP Models Only)..............................................................................1-8
1.6 Synchronous Access Mode (SAM).............................................................................................. ................1-9
1.7 Modem Firmware .......................................................................................................................................1-9
1.8 Sleep Mode (RCV56 Models Only) .............................................................................................................1-9
1.8.1 Devices ............................................................................................................................................1-8
Modem............................................................................................................................................1-9
RCDSVD Speech Codec Processor (SCP) (Optional) ......................................................................1-9
1.8.2 Supported Interfaces ..................................................................................................... .................1-10
Parallel Host Bus Interface ............................................................................................................ 1-10
Serial DTE Interface and Indicator Outputs ....................................................................................1-10
NVRAM Interface ..........................................................................................................................1-10
ROM/Flash ROM and External SRAM and Interface ...................................................................... 1-10
Telephone Line/Telephone/Audio Interface .................................................................................... 1-10
1.8.3 Commands .....................................................................................................................................1-16
1.8.4 ConfigurACE II for Windows Utility Program ............................................................................... .....1-16
2. TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS ......................................................................................................................2-1
2.1 SERIAL DTE INTERFACE OPERATION.....................................................................................................2-1
2.1.1 Automatic Speed/Format Sensing .....................................................................................................2-1
2.2 PARALLEL HOST BUS INTERFACE OPERATION .....................................................................................2-1
2.3 ESTABLISHING DATA MODEM CONNECTIONS.......................................................................................2-1
Telephone Number Directory ...........................................................................................................2-1
Dialing.............................................................................................................................................2-1
Modem Handshaking Protocol .........................................................................................................2-1
Call Progress Tone Detection ..........................................................................................................2-1
Answer Tone Detection ...................................................................................................................2-2
Ring Detection.................................................................................................................................2-2
Billing Protection..............................................................................................................................2-2
Connection Speeds .........................................................................................................................2-2
Automode .......................................................................................................................................2-2
2.4 DATA MODE ..............................................................................................................................................2-2
Speed Buffering (Normal Mode) ......................................................................................................2-2
Flow Control ....................................................................................................................................2-2
Escape Sequence Detection............................................................................................................2-2
BREAK Detection ............................................................................................................................2-2
Telephone Line Monitoring ..............................................................................................................2-2
Send SPACE on Disconnect (V.22 bis and Below) ...........................................................................2-4
2.4.2 Fall Forward/Fallback (V.34/V.32 bis/V.32)........................................................................................2-4
Retrain ............................................................................................................................................2-4
Programmable Inactivity Timer ........................................................................................................2-4
DTE Signal Monitoring (Serial DTE Interface Only) ..........................................................................2-4
2.5 ERROR CORRECTION AND DATA COMPRESSION.................................................................................2-4
V.42 Error Correction .......................................................................................................... ............2-4
MNP 2-4 Error Correction ....................................................................................................... .........2-4
V.42 bis Data Compression .............................................................................................................2-4
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MNP 5 Data Compression ...............................................................................................................2-4
2.6 MNP 10 DATA THROUGHPUT ENHANCEMENT .......................................................................................2-5
2.7 MNP 10EC™ ENHANCED CELLULAR CONNECTION ...............................................................................2-5
2.8 AUTOSYNC ...............................................................................................................................................2-5
2.9 FAX CLASS 1 OPERATION .......................................................................................................................2-5
2.10 VOICE/AUDIO MODE .......................................................................................................... ....................2-5
2.10.1 Online Voice Command Mode.........................................................................................................2-5
2.10.2 Voice Receive Mode .......................................................................................................................2-5
2.10.3 Voice Transmit Mode ......................................................................................................................2-6
2.10.4 Audio Mode ....................................................................................................................................2-6
2.10.5 Tone Detectors .......................................................................................................... .....................2-6
2.10.6 Speakerphone Modes .....................................................................................................................2-6
2.10.7 Sound Card Support Modes ............................................................................................................2-6
2.11 SIMULTANEOUS AUDIO/VOICE AND DATA (AUDIOSPAN) ....................................................................2-7
2.11.1 Supported Data Speeds ..................................................................................................................2-7
2.11.2 AudioSpan Mode Selection .............................................................................................................2-8
2.11.3 AudioSpan Modulation Select and Enable/Disable AudioSpan Automatic Modulation
Selection .......................................................................................................................................2-9
2.11.4 ML144 Data Burst Option................................................................................................................2-9
2.11.5 AudioSpan Audio Interface..............................................................................................................2-9
2.11.6 Audio Quality Considerations. .........................................................................................................2-9
2.12 DSVD MODE..........................................................................................................................................2-10
2.12.1 DSVD Handset Mode.................................................................................................................... 2-10
2.12.2 DSVD Headset Mode.................................................................................................................... 2-10
2.12.3 DSVD Half-Duplex Speakerphone (HDSP) Mode........................................................................... 2-10
2.13 FULL-DUPLEX SPEAKERPHONE (FDSP) MODE .................................................................................. 2-10
2.14 VOICEVIEW ...........................................................................................................................................2-10
2.15 CALLER ID.............................................................................................................................................2-10
2.16 WORLD CLASS COUNTRY SUPPORT .................................................................................................. 2-11
2.16.1 Dialing ..........................................................................................................................................2-11
2.16.2 Carrier Transmit Level...................................................................................................................2-11
2.16.3 Calling Tone..................................................................................................................................2-11
2.16.4 Call Progress Tone Detection........................................................................................................ 2-11
2.16.5 Answer Tone Detection ................................................................................................................. 2-11
2.16.6 Blacklist Parameters .....................................................................................................................2-11
2.16.7 Relay Control................................................................................................................................2-11
2.17 DIAGNOSTICS.......................................................................................................................................2-11
2.17.1 Commanded Tests......................................................................................................... ...............2-11
2.17.2 Power On Reset Tests ..................................................................................................................2-12
3. HARDWARE INTERFACE............................................................................................................................... 3-1
3.1 HARDWARE SIGNALS............................................................................................................................... 3-1
3.2 INTERFACE TIMING AND WAVEFORMS ................................................................................................ 3-22
3.2.1 External Memory Bus Timing ............................................................................................... ...........3-22
3.2.2 Parallel Host Bus Timing ................................................................................................................. 3-24
4. PARALLEL HOST INTERFACE ......................................................................................................................4-1
4.1 OVERVIEW................................................................................................................................................4-1
4.2 REGISTER SIGNAL DEFINITIONS ............................................................................................................4-3
4.2.1 IER - Interrupt Enable Register (Addr = 1, DLAB = 0) ........................................................................4-3
4.2.2 FCR - FIFO Control Register (Addr = 2, Write Only) ....................................................................... ...4-4
4.2.3 IIR - Interrupt Identifier Register (Addr = 2) .......................................................................................4-5
4.2.4 LCR - Line Control Register (Addr = 3)..............................................................................................4-6
4.2.5 MCR - Modem Control Register (Addr = 4)........................................................................................4-7
4.2.6 LSR - Line Status Register (Addr = 5) ...............................................................................................4-8
4.2.7 MSR - Modem Status Register (Addr = 6) ................................................................................... ......4-9
4.2.8 RBR - RX Buffer (Receiver Buffer Register) (Addr = 0, DLAB = 0) .....................................................4-9
4.2.9 THR - TX Buffer (Transmitter Holding Register) (Addr = 0, DLAB = 0) ...............................................4-9
4.2.10 Divisor Registers (Addr = 0 and 1, DLAB = 1)............................................................................ ......4-9
4.2.11 SCR - Scratch Register (Addr = 7) ....................................................................................... ...........4-9
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4.3 RECEIVER FIFO INTERRUPT OPERATION ............................................................................................ 4-10
4.3.1 Receiver Data Available Interrupt .................................................................................................... 4-10
4.3.2 Receiver Character Timeout Interrupts............................................................................................4-10
4.4 TRANSMITTER FIFO INTERRUPT OPERATION ..................................................................................... 4-10
4.4.1 Transmitter Empty Interrupt ............................................................................................................4-10
5. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS ..........................................................................................................................5-1
5.1 PC BOARD LAYOUT GUIDELINES ............................................................................................................5-1
5.1.1 General Principles.............................................................................................................................5-1
5.1.2 Component Placement......................................................................................................................5-1
5.1.3 Signal Routing ..................................................................................................................................5-2
5.1.4 Power ...............................................................................................................................................5-6
5.1.5 Ground Planes..................................................................................................................................5-6
5.1.6 Crystal Circuit .......................................................................................................... .........................5-6
5.1.7 Standalone Modem Design with EIA/TIA-232 Interface......................................................................5-7
5.1.8 VC and VREF Circuit ........................................................................................................................5-7
5.1.9 Telephone and Local Handset Interface ............................................................................................5-7
5.1.10 Optional Configurations...................................................................................................................5-7
5.1.11 ISSI Memory Devices .....................................................................................................................5-8
5.2 CRYSTAL SPECIFICATIONS .....................................................................................................................5-9
5.3 SCHEMATICS ..........................................................................................................................................5-11
5.4 OTHER CONSIDERATIONS .................................................................................................................... 5-11
6. PACKAGE DIMENSIONS................................................................................................................................6-1
7. AT COMMANDS..............................................................................................................................................7-1
7.1 BASIC AT COMMANDS .............................................................................................................................7-1
7.2 ECC COMMANDS......................................................................................................................................7-4
7.3 MNP 10 COMMANDS ................................................................................................................................7-4
7.4 W-CLASS COMMANDS .............................................................................................................................7-4
7.5 CALLER ID COMMANDS ...........................................................................................................................7-4
7.6 FAX CLASS 1 COMMANDS .......................................................................................................................7-4
7.7 VOICE COMMANDS ..................................................................................................................................7-5
7.8 VOICEVIEW COMMANDS .........................................................................................................................7-5
7.9 AudioSpan COMMANDS ............................................................................................................................7-6
7.10 DSVD COMMANDS..................................................................................................................................7-6
7.11 SYNCHRONOUS ACCESS MODE COMMANDS......................................................................................7-6
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List of Figures
Figure 1-1. Block Diagram - Serial DTE Interface ...............................................................................................................1-7
Figure 1-2. Block Diagram - Parallel Host Interface ............................................................................................................1-7
Figure 1-3. 2-Relay Telephone Line/Telephone/Audio Signal Interface (U.S.) ................................................................... 1-12
Figure 1-4. 3-Relay Telephone Line/Telephone/Audio Signal Interface (U.S.) (84-Pin PLCC Only).................................... 1-13
Figure 3-1. Hardware Interface Signals - Serial DTE Interface............................................................................................3-2
Figure 3-2. Hardware Interface Signals - Parallel Host Interface.........................................................................................3-3
Figure 3-3. Modem Pin Signals - 68-Pin PLCC - Serial DTE Interface ................................................................................3-4
Figure 3-4. Modem Pin Signals- 68-Pin PLCC - Parallel Host Interface...............................................................................3-6
Figure 3-5. Modem Pin Signals - 84-Pin PLCC - Serial DTE Interface ................................................................................3-8
Figure 3-6. Modem Pin Signals- 84-Pin PLCC - Parallel Host Interface............................................................................. 3-10
Figure 3-7. RCDSVD SCP Pin Signals- 68-Pin PLCC ....................................................................................................... 3-12
Figure 3-8. Waveforms - External Memory Bus................................................................................................................ 3-23
Figure 3-9. Waveforms - Parallel Host Bus ...................................................................................................................... 3-25
Figure 5-1. Interface Schematic - Modem with Serial DTE Interface - 68-Pin PLCC..........................................................5-12
Figure 5-2. Interface Schematic - Modem with Parallel Host Interface - 68-Pin PLCC .......................................................5-13
Figure 5-3. Interface Schematic - Modem with Serial DTE Interface - 84-Pin PLCC..........................................................5-14
Figure 5-4. Interface Schematic - Modem with Parallel Host Interface - 84-Pin PLCC .......................................................5-15
Figure 5-5. Interface Schematic - RCDSVD SCP - 68-Pin PLCC ...................................................................................... 5-16
Figure 6-1. Package Dimensions - 68-Pin PLCC ................................................................................................................6-1
Figure 6-2. Package Dimensions - 84-Pin PLCC ................................................................................................................6-2
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List of Tables
Table 1-1. RCVDL56ACF/SVD Modem Models and Functions ...........................................................................................1-2
Table 1-2. RCV56ACF/SVD Modem Models and Functions................................................................................................1-3
Table 1-3. RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Models and Functions..............................................................................................1-4
Table 1-4. Modem Memory Options................................................................................................................................. 1-10
Table 1-5. Signal Routing - Voice Mode (#CLS=8) ........................................................................................................... 1-14
Table 1-6. Relay Positions - VoiceView Mode (+FCLASS=80) .......................................................................................... 1-15
Table 2-1. +MS Command Automode Connectivity ............................................................................................................2-3
Table 2-2. Command Connections.....................................................................................................................................2-3
Table 2-3. AudioSpan Data Speeds ...................................................................................................................................2-7
Table 3-1. Modem Pin Signals - 68-Pin PLCC - Serial DTE Interface..................................................................................3-5
Table 3-2. Modem Pin Signals- 68-Pin PLCC - Parallel Host Interface................................................................................3-7
Table 3-3. Modem Pin Signals - 84-Pin PLCC - Serial DTE Interface..................................................................................3-9
Table 3-4. Modem Pin Signals- 84-Pin PLCC - Parallel Host Interface.............................................................................. 3-11
Table 3-5. RCDSVD SCP Pin Signals - 68-Pin PLCC ....................................................................................................... 3-13
Table 3-6. Modem Pin Signal Definitions.......................................................................................................................... 3-14
Table 3-7. RCDSVD SCP Pin Signal Definitions ............................................................................................................... 3-17
Table 3-8. Digital Electrical Characteristics....................................................................................................................... 3-19
Table 3-9. Analog Electrical Characteristics ..................................................................................................................... 3-20
Table 3-10. Current and Power Requirements ................................................................................................................. 3-21
Table 3-11. Absolute Maximum Ratings........................................................................................................................... 3-21
Table 3-12. Timing - External Memory Bus ...................................................................................................................... 3-22
Table 3-13. Timing - Parallel Host Bus .............................................................................................................................3-24
Table 4-1. Parallel Interface Registers ............................................................................................................................... 4-2
Table 4-2. Interrupt Sources and Reset Control ................................................................................. ................................4-5
Table 4-3. Programmable Baud Rates .............................................................................................................................4-10
Table 5-1. Modem Pin Noise Characteristics......................................................................................................................5-4
Table 5-2. ISSI Memory Devices .......................................................................................................................................5-8
Table 5-3. Crystal Specifications - Surface Mount ..............................................................................................................5-9
Table 5-4. Crystal Specifications - Through Hole.............................................................................................................. 5-10
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1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 SUMMARY
The Rockwell RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Device Sets support high speed analog
data rates up to 33600 bps, high speed fax rates up to 144000 bps, AudioSpan V.61 mode, on-board and host DSVD
(option), speakerphone (option), telephone emulation (option), audio/voice/VoiceView (option), and world-class (option)
operation. The RCVDL56ACF/SVD and RCV56ACF/SVD modems additionally support K56flex modes with data receive
rates up to 56 kbps and data transmit speeds up to V.34 rates. The RCVDL56ACF/SVD downloadable architecture also
allows upgrading of modem data pump (MDP) code from the modem controller. RCV336ACF/SVD additionally supports
AudioSpan ML144 and ML288 modulation.
The modems are designed to operate with dial-up telephone lines in the U.S. and world-wide and are offered in several
device models. The modem models are listed in Table 1-1 (RCVDL56ACF/SVD family), Table 1-2 (RCV56ACF/SVD family),
and Table 1-3 RCV336ACF/SVD family). All descriptions in this document apply to the RCVDL56ACF/SVD,
RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD except as noted by phases such as RC336 only, RC56 only, and RCDL56 only.
K56flex technology in RCDL56 and RC56 models allows data to be received at speeds up to 56 kbps from a digitally
connected central site modem, also K56flex enabled, e.g., with a Rockwell RC56CSM modem. Taking advantage of the
PSTN, which is primarily digital except for the client modem to central office local loop, this modem is ideal for remote
access applications such as connecting to an Internet Service Provider (ISP), on-line service, or corporate site. Data can be
sent at speeds up to V.34 rates.
As a V.34 data modem, the modem operates at line speeds up to 33600 bps. Error correction (V.42/MNP 2-4) and data
compression (V.42 bis/MNP 5) maximize data transfer integrity and boost average data throughput up to 115.2 kbps. Nonerror-correcting mode is also supported.
AudioSpan (analog simultaneous audio/voice and data) operation supports data rates with audio of 4.8 kbps in V.61
modulation, 4.8 to 9.6 kbps in ML144 modulation (RC336 only), or 4.8 to 14.4 kbps in ML288 modulation (RC336 only).
SCP models, with the optional RCDSVD Speech Codec Processor (SCP), support V.70 DSVD (digital simultaneous voice
and data) with speech coding per ITU-T interoperable G.729 and G.729 Annex A with interoperable G.729 Annex B, and SIG
DigiTalk DSVD.
SCP and SP models support position independent, full-duplex speakerphone (FDSP), as well as host-supplied DSVD
operation without using the RCDSVD SCP.
The modem supports fax Group 3 send and receive rates up to 14400 bps and supports T.30 protocol.
V.80 and Rockwell Video Ready compatible synchronous access modes support host-based communication protocols, e. g.,
H.324 video conferencing.
In voice/audio mode, enhanced ADPCM coding and decoding supports efficient digital storage of voice/audio using 2-bit or
4-bit per sample compression and decompression with a 7200 Hz sample rate. This mode supports digital telephone
answering machine (DTAM), voice annotation, and audio recording and playback applications.
The modem and an optional RCDSVD Speech Codec Processor (SCP) device set allows design of a common PC board
providing modem, DSVD, AudioSpan, speakerphone, and audio/voice operation with handset, headset, or speakerphone
(microphone and speaker). On-board DSVD operation can be defeatured by not installing the RCDSVD SCP device.
AccelerATor kits and reference designs are available to minimize application design time and costs. PC-based
“ConfigurACE™ II for Windows” software allows MCU firmware to be customized to application and country requirements.
This designer's guide describes the modem hardware capabilities and identifies the supporting AT commands. AT
commands and S Registers are defined in the AT Command Reference Manual (Order No. 1048).
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RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
Table 1-1. RCVDL56ACF/SVD Modem Models and Functions
Supported Functions
K56flex,
V.34 Data/
V.17 Fax/
AudioSpan
On-board DSVD
using RCDSVD
SCP
(R6715)
Host DSVD
(Note 5)
Full-duplex
Speakerphone
(FDSP)
Telephone
Emulation
Voice/Audio/
VoiceView
RCVDL56ACF/SCP
Y
Y
Y
Y
–
Y
–
RCVDL56ACFW/SCP
Y
Y
Y
Y
–
Y
Y
RCVDL56ACF/SP
Y
–
Y
Y
–
Y
–
RCVDL56ACFW/SP
Y
–
Y
Y
–
Y
Y
RCVDL56ACF/V
Y
–
–
–
Y
Y
–
RCVDL56ACFW/V
Y
–
–
–
Y
Y
Y
RCDL56ACF
Y
–
–
–
–
–
–
RCDL56ACFW
Y
–
–
–
–
–
Y
Marketing
Model Number1
W-Class
and Hayes
AutoSync
Notes:
1.
The manufacturing part numbers are:
84-pin PLCC with parallel host interface:
R6761-XX.
84-pin PLCC with serial DTE interface:
R6762-XX.
2.
Legend:
Y = Function supported.
– = Function not supported.
3.
Model options:
SCP
On-board DSVD with RCDSVD SCP or Host DSVD, and Speakerphone.
SP
Speakerphone and Host DSVD.
V
Voice, audio, and VoiceView.
W
World-class (W-class).
4.
Supported functions (Y = Supported; – = Not supported):
FDSP
Full-duplex speakerphone.
DSVD
Digital simultaneous voice and data.
Voice/Audio
Voice and audio functions.
VoiceView
VoiceView alternating voice and data.
W-Class
World-class functions supporting multiple country requirements.
5.
Provides reduced DSVD performance and requires host computational resources.
1-2
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Table 1-2. RCV56ACF/SVD Modem Models and Functions
Supported Functions
K56flex,
V.34 Data/
V.17 Fax/
AudioSpan
On-board DSVD
using RCDSVD
SCP
(R6715)
Host DSVD
(Note 5)
Full-duplex
Speakerphone
(FDSP)
Telephone
Emulation
Voice/Audio/
VoiceView
RCV56ACF/SCP
Y
Y
Y
Y
–
Y
–
RCV56ACFW/SCP
Y
Y
Y
Y
–
Y
Y
RCV56ACF/SP
Y
–
Y
Y
–
Y
–
RCV56ACFW/SP
Y
–
Y
Y
–
Y
Y
RCV56ACF
Y
–
–
–
Y
Y
–
RCV56ACFW
Y
–
–
–
Y
Y
Y
RC56ACF
Y
–
–
–
–
–
–
RC56ACFW
Y
–
–
–
–
–
Y
Marketing
Model Number1
W-Class
and Hayes
AutoSync
Notes:
1.
The manufacturing part numbers are:
68-pin PLCC with parallel host interface:
R6779-XX.
68-pin PLCC with serial DTE interface:
R6780-XX.
84-pin PLCC with parallel host interface:
R6751-XX.
84-pin PLCC with serial DTE interface:
R6752-XX.
2.
Legend:
Y = Function supported.
– = Function not supported.
3.
Model options:
SCP
On-board DSVD with RCDSVD SCP or Host DSVD, and Speakerphone.
SP
Speakerphone and Host DSVD.
V
Voice, audio, and VoiceView.
W
World-class (W-class).
4.
Supported functions (Y = Supported; – = Not supported):
FDSP
Full-duplex speakerphone.
DSVD
Digital simultaneous voice and data.
Voice/Audio
Voice and audio functions.
VoiceView
VoiceView alternating voice and data.
W-Class
World-class functions supporting multiple country requirements.
5.
Provides reduced DSVD performance and requires host computational resources.
1105
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RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
Table 1-3. RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Models and Functions
Supported Functions
V.34 Data/
V.17 Fax/
AudioSpan
On-board DSVD
using RCDSVD
SCP
(R6715)
Host DSVD
(Note 5)
Full-duplex
Speakerphone
(FDSP)
Telephone
Emulation
Voice/Audio/
VoiceView
RCV336ACF/SCP
Y
Y
Y
Y
–
Y
–
RCV336ACFW/SCP
Y
Y
Y
Y
–
Y
Y
RCV336ACF/SP
Y
–
Y
Y
–
Y
–
RCV336ACFW/SP
Y
–
Y
Y
–
Y
Y
RCV336ACF
Y
–
–
–
Y
Y
–
RCV336ACFW
Y
–
–
–
Y
Y
Y
RC336ACF
Y
–
–
–
–
–
–
RC336ACFW
Y
–
–
–
–
–
Y
Marketing
Model Number1
W-Class
and Hayes
AutoSync
Notes:
1.
The manufacturing part numbers are:
68-pin PLCC with parallel host interface:
R6759-XX.
68-pin PLCC with serial DTE interface:
R6760-XX.
84-pin PLCC with parallel host interface:
R6741-XX.
84-pin PLCC with serial DTE interface:
R6742-XX.
2.
Legend:
Y = Function supported.
– = Function not supported.
3.
Model options:
SCP
On-board DSVD with RCDSVD SCP or Host DSVD, and Speakerphone.
SP
Speakerphone and Host DSVD.
V
Voice, audio, and VoiceView.
W
World-class (W-class).
4.
Supported functions (Y = Supported; – = Not supported):
FDSP
Full-duplex speakerphone.
DSVD
Digital simultaneous voice and data.
Voice/Audio
Voice and audio functions.
VoiceView
VoiceView alternating voice and data.
W-Class
World-class functions supporting multiple country requirements.
5.
Provides reduced DSVD performance and requires host computational resources.
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1.2 FEATURES
• Downloadable MDP code from the modem controller (RCDL56 only)
• Data modem
− K56flex (RC56 and RCDL56 only)
− 33.6 kbps, 31.2 kbps, V.34, V.32 bis, V.32, V.22 bis, V.22A/B, V.23, and V.21; Bell 212A and 103
− V.42 LAPM, MNP 2-4, and MNP 10 error correction
− V.42 bis and MNP 5 data compression
− MNP 10EC™ enhanced cellular performance
• Fax modem send and receive rates up to 14400 bps
− V.33, V.17, V.29, V.27 ter, and V.21 channel 2
• AudioSpan (simultaneous audio/voice and data)
− ITU-T V.61 modulation (4.8 kbps data plus audio)
− ML144 modulation (4.8 to 9.6 kbps data plus audio) (RC336 only)
− ML288 modulation (4.8 to 14.4 kbps data plus audio) (RC336 only)
− Audio/silence detection (ML144) and handset echo cancellation
− Handset, headset, or half-duplex speakerphone
• ITU-T V.70 DSVD using the RCDSVD SCP (option)
− ITU-T interoperable G.729 and G.729 Annex A with interoperable G.729 Annex B
− SIG (special interest group) DigiTalk
− Voice/silence detection and handset echo cancellation
− Robust DSVD timing recovery
− Handset, headset, or half-duplex speakerphone
• Supports host-supplied DSVD (option)
• Full-duplex speakerphone (FDSP) mode (option)
− Acoustic and line echo cancellation
− Microphone gain and muting
− Speaker volume control and muting
− Room monitor
• V.80 or Rockwell Video Ready Mode synchronous access mode (SAM) supports host-based communication protocols
(option)
• Voice/audio mode (option)
− Enhanced ADPCM compression/decompression
− Tone detection/generation and call discrimination
− Concurrent DTMF detection
− 8-bit monophonic audio data encoding at 11.025 kHz or 7200 Hz
• VoiceView alternating voice and data (option)
• World-class operation (option)
− Call progress, blacklisting, multiple country support
• Communication software compatible AT command sets
• NVRAM directory and stored profiles
• Support for flash memory
• Built-in parallel host/serial DTE interfaces
− Parallel 16550A UART-compatible interface
− Serial ITU-T V.24 (EIA/TIA-232-E)
• Supports Rockwell PnP ISA Bus Interface Device
• Supports Serial PnP interface per Plug and Play External COM Device Specification, Rev 1.00
• Flow control and speed buffering
• Automatic format/speed sensing
• Serial async data; parallel async data
• Auto dial and auto answer; tone and pulse dialing
• Caller ID and distinctive ring detect
• Packages:
− RCV56 and RC336 Modem: 68-pin or 84-Pin PLCC
− RCVDL56 Modem: 84-Pin PLCC
− RCDSVD SCP: 68-pin PLCC
• +5V operation
• Independent microcomputer crystal option for 84-pin PLCC
• Sleep Mode (RC56 and RCVDL56 only)
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1.3 TECHNICAL OVERVIEW
1.3.1 General Description
The device set provides the processing core for a complete system design featuring data/fax modem, on-board or hostbased DSVD, AudioSpan, speakerphone, voice/audio, and VoiceView support depending on specific model (Table 1-1, Table
1-2, and Table 1-3). Note: device set refers to the family of single device modem models, and, for SCP models, the optional
RCDSVD SCP device.
For modem/AudioSpan/speakerphone/voice/audio operation, only the modem device is needed. The OEM adds a crystal,
discrete components, and a telephone line/telephone/audio interface circuit to complete the system. The standard crystal
frequency is 56.448 MHz (RC336 models are also available for use with a 52.416 MHz crystal).
The single modem device is packaged in a 68-pin PLCC (RC336 and RC56 only) or an 84-pin PLCC.
The 84-pin PLCC model includes the TXA2 pin to support differential outputs TXA1/TXA2 thus eliminating the need for
external operational amplifiers in the transmit path and a Caller ID relay control output to allow use of the 3-relay DAA line
interface circuit. The standard one-crystal 84-pin PLCC also includes a dedicated ~MUTE relay control output. An optional
two-crystal model is also available to allow independent MCU crystal operation, however, ~MUTE relay control is not
supported.
The standard 1-crystal model also includes a ~WKRES output (RC56 and RCDL56 only) to wake-up the RCDSVD device
from Sleep Mode and a dedicated ~MUTE relay control output. An optional 2-crystal model is also available to allow
independent MCU crystal operation, however, the ~MUTE and ~WKRES outputs are not supported in this configuration.
The modem is the full-featured, self-contained data modem/fax modem/voice/audio/speakerphone solution shown in Figure
1-1 (serial DTE interface) and Figure 1-2 (parallel host interface). Dialing, call progress, telephone line interface, AudioSpan,
DSVD (with RCDSVD device), speakerphone, voice/audio, and VoiceView functions are supported and controlled through
the AT command set.
The RCDSVD Speech Codec Processor (SCP) is required for on-board DSVD operation.
Data/Fax Modes
In data modem K56flex mode (RC56 and RCDL56 only), the modem can receive data from a digital source using a
K56flex -compatible central site modem over the digital telephone network portion of the PSTN at line speeds up to 56
kbps. Asymmetrical data transmission supports sending data at speeds up to V.34 rates. This mode can fallback to fullduplex V.34 mode.
In V.34 data modem modes, the modem can operate in 2-wire, full-duplex, asynchronous modes at line rates up to 33600
bps. Data modem modes perform complete handshake and data rate negotiations. Using V.34 modulation to optimize
modem configuration for line conditions, the modem can connect at the highest data rate that the channel can support from
33600 bps to 300 bps with automatic fallback. Automode operation in V.34 is provided in accordance with PN3320 and in
V.32 bis in accordance with PN2330.
Data modem modes perform complete handshake and data rate negotiations. All tone and pattern detection functions
required by the applicable ITU or Bell standard are supported.
In fax modem modes, the modem fully supports Group 3 facsimile send and receive speeds of 14400, 12000, 9600, 7200,
4800, or 2400 bps. Fax modem modes support Group 3 fax requirements. Fax data transmission and reception performed
by the modem is controlled and monitored through the fax EIA-578 Class 1 command interface. Full HDLC formatting, zero
insertion/deletion, and CRC generation/checking is provided.
Both transmit and receive fax data are buffered within the modem. Data transfer to and from the DTE is flow controlled by
XON/XOFF and RTS/CTS.
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MODEM DEVICE SET
SERIAL
DTE/
INDICATOR
INTERFACE
256 x 8
SERIAL
NVRAM
(OPTIONAL)
RCVDL56ACF/SVD
[84-PIN PLCC: R6762]
OR
RCV56ACF/SVD
[68-PIN PLCC: R6780]
[84-PIN PLCC: R6752]
OR
RCV336ACF/SVD
[68-PIN PLCC: R6760]
[84-PIN PLCC: R6742]
MODEM
RCDSVD
SPEECH
CODEC
PROCESSOR
(SCP)
[R6715]
(68-PIN PLCC)
TELEPHONE
LINE/
TELEPHONE
HANDSET/
AUDIO
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
TELEPHONE
LINE
TEL HANDSET
HEADPHONE/
SPEAKER
MICROPHONE
32K x 8 or
128K x 8
SRAM*
128K x 8
ROM/FLASH ROM
*128K x 8 is required by RCDL56; 32K x 8 SRAM is required on other models, however,
128K x 8 SRAM interface/footprint provides board compatibility with 84-pin RCDL56 modem.
Also, 128 x 8 RAM for RC56 allows faster program execution from shadow RAM to improve modem performance.
1105F1-1 BD-Ser
Figure 1-1. Block Diagram - Serial DTE Interface
MODEM DEVICE SET
PARALLEL
HOST
BUS
INTERFACE
256 x 8
SERIAL
NVRAM
(OPTIONAL)
RCVDL56ACF/SVD
[84-PIN PLCC: R6761]
OR
RCV56ACF/SVD
[68-PIN PLCC: R6779]
[84-PIN PLCC: R6751]
OR
RCV336ACF/SVD
[68-PIN PLCC: R6759]
[84-PIN PLCC: R6741]
MODEM
RCDSVD
SPEECH
CODEC
PROCESSOR
(SCP)
[R6715]
(68-PIN PLCC)
TELEPHONE
LINE/
TELEPHONE
HANDSET/
AUDIO
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
TELEPHONE
LINE
TEL HANDSET
HEADPHONE/
SPEAKER
MICROPHONE
32K x 8 or
128K x 8
SRAM*
128K x 8
ROM/FLASH ROM
*128K x 8 is required by RCDL56; 32K x 8 SRAM is required on other models, however,
128K x 8 SRAM interface/footprint provides board compatibility with 84-pin RCDL56 modem.
Also, 128 x 8 RAM for RC56 allows faster program execution from shadow RAM to improve modem performance.
1105F1-1 BD-Ser
Figure 1-2. Block Diagram - Parallel Host Interface
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AudioSpan Modes
AudioSpan provides full-duplex analog simultaneous audio/voice and data over a single telephone line. AudioSpan can send
any type of audio waveform, including music. Data can be sent with or without error correction. The audio/voice interface can
be in the form of a headset, handset, or a microphone and speaker (half-duplex speakerphone).
V.61 Modulation. AudioSpan can operate in V.61 modulation at a data rate with audio of 4800 bps.
ML144 Modulation (RC336 Only). AudioSpan can operate in ML144 (V.32) modulation at a 4.8 to 9.6 kbps data rate with
audio where lower data rates provide higher audio quality.
ML288 Modulation (RC336 Only). AudioSpan can operate in ML288 (V.34 type) modulation at a 4.8 to 14.4 kbps data rate
with audio where lower data rates provide higher audio quality.
DSVD Mode using RCDSVD SCP Device (SCP Models)
The RCDSVD SCP (R6715), required for on-board DSVD operation, is packaged in a 68-pin PLCC. The crystal frequency is
56.448 MHz. Since the crystal frequency is the same as the modem, a crystal oscillator can be used to drive both devices.
DSVD provides full-duplex digital simultaneous voice and data over a single telephone line. DSVD uses any of three codecs
in the RCDVSD SCP to code (compress) analog speech signal on the RCDVSD LINEIN pin or MICIN pin and pass it to the
modem controller in digitized form, and to and decode (decompress) coded speech received from the modem controller and
routed to the RCDVSD LINEOUT pin or SPKP/SPKN pins.
ITU-T interoperable G.729 and G.729 Annex A with interoperable G.729 Annex B Operation. Voice activity detection
supports speech coding at average bit rate significantly lower than 8.0 kbps.
SIG DigiTalk. Speech coding is performed at 8.5 kbps.
DSVD decoder timing recovery algorithm compensates for clock skew, asynchronous host-to-decoder data transfer delay,
intervening variable length data block transmission delay, and loss of encoded speech data.
The voice interface can be in the form of a headset, handset or a microphone and speaker (half-duplex speakerphone).
Handset echo cancellation supports handset use through a hybrid.
In Handset Mode, the RCDSVD SCP interfaces to the telephone interface circuit using the Line Input (LINEIN) and Line Out
(LINEOUT) lines. In Headset or Speakerphone Mode, the RCDSVD SCP interfaces to the audio interface circuit using the
Microphone Input (MICIN) and Speaker out (SPKR) lines.
Host-Based DSVD (SCP and SP Models)
SCP and SP models support host-based DSVD. Note that host-based DSVD typically requires 40-50% of the available MIPS
on a Pentium 100 MHz class PC. A sound card is also required.
Voice/Audio Mode (V Models)
Voice/Audio Mode features include enhanced ADPCM compression/decompression, tone detection/generation and call
discrimination, concurrent DTMF detection, and 8-bit monophonic audio data encoding at 11.025 kHz or 7200 Hz.
Voice/Audio Mode is supported by three submodes:
1.
Online Voice Command Mode supports connection to the telephone line or a voice/audio I/O device (e.g., microphone,
speaker, or handset).
2.
Voice Receive Mode supports recording voice or audio data input at the RXA pin, typically from a microphone/handset
or the telephone line.
3.
Voice Transmit Mode supports playback of voice or audio data to the TXA1/TXA2 output, typically to a speaker/handset
or to the telephone line.
Speakerphone Mode (SCP and SP Models)
The speakerphone mode features an advanced proprietary speakerphone algorithm which supports full-duplex voice
conversation with both acoustic and line echo cancellation. Parameters are constantly adjusted to maintain stability with
automatic fallback from full-duplex to pseudo-duplex operation. The speakerphone algorithm allows position independent
placement of microphone and speaker.
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The speakerphone mode provides hands-free full-duplex telephone operation under host control. The host can separately
control volume, muting, and AGC in microphone and speaker channels.
Synchronous Access Mode (SAM)
V.80 or Rockwell Video Ready Mode synchronous-access mode (SAM) between the modem and the host/DTE is provided
for host-based communication protocols, e.g., H.324 video conferencing applications.
Rockwell Video Ready Mode can be enabled by the +H16 command and disabled by the +H0 or &Fn commands.
V.80 SAM is controlled by the +ES (Enable/Disable Synchronous Access Mode), +ESA (Configure Synchronous Access
Submode), and + ITF (Select Transmit Flow Control Thresholds) AT commands.
Voice-call-first (VCF) before switching to a videophone call is also supported.
Sleep Mode (RCV56 Only)
Sleep Mode is supported in the modem device and the RCDSVD SCP device.
In the 84-pin package, the standard 1-crystal model also includes a ~WKRES output to wake-up the RCDSVD device from
Sleep Mode. The optional 2-crystal model does not support the ~WKRES output to the RCDSVD device (the ~WKRES
signal is replaced by the CXTLO signal).
1.3.2 Devices
Modem
The modem is packaged in a 68-pin PLCC (RC336 and RC56 only) or an 84-pin PLCC.
The 68-pin PLCC model is pin-compatible for RC336 and RC56 models.
The 84-pin PLCC model is pin-compatible for RC336, RC56, and RCDL56 models. The 84-pin PLCC model also adds the
TXA2 pin to support differential outputs TXA1/TXA2 which eliminate the need for external operational amplifiers in the
transmit path.
The standard 84-pin PLCC model must be connected to a separate modem controller unit (MCU) crystal, allowing operation
of the modem in Sleep Mode and independent MCU crystal frequency operation. An optional 84-pin model not supporting
Sleep Mode is available for use with a single crystal.
In K56flex mode (RCDL56 and RC56), data can be received at speeds up to 56 kbps from a digitally connected central site
modem, also K56flex enabled. Data can be sent at speeds up to V.34 rates.
In V.34 data modem modes, the modem can operate in 2-wire, full-duplex, synchronous/asynchronous modes at line rates
up to 33600 bps. Using V.34 modulation to optimize modem configuration for line conditions, the modem can connect at the
highest data rate that the channel can support from 33600 bps to 300 bps with automatic fallback. Automode operation in
V.34 is provided in accordance with PN3320 and in V.32 bis in accordance with PN2330.
In fax modem modes, the modem fully supports Group 3 facsimile send and receive speeds of 14400, 12000, 9600, 7200,
4800, or 2400 bps.
ADPCM voice processing in the modem is supported in models supporting voice commands (Table 1-1, Table 1-2, and
Table 1-3).
The modem also performs the command processing and host interface functions. The modem connects to the host via a
V.24 (EIA/TIA-232-E) serial interface or a parallel microcomputer bus depending on installed MCU firmware.
The modem external bus connects to OEM-supplied RAM and ROM/flash ROM and to the optional RCDVSD device.
A 256-byte or 2048-byte NVRAM can optionally be connected to the modem over a dedicated serial interface.
RCDSVD Speech Codec Processor (SCP) (Optional)
The RCDSVD SCP (R6715), required for on-board DSVD operation, is packaged in a 68-pin PLCC. The crystal frequency is
56.448 MHz. Since the crystal frequency is the same as the modem, a crystal oscillator can be used to drive both devices.
In Handset Mode, the RCDSVD SCP interfaces to the telephone interface circuit using the Line Input (LINEIN) and Line Out
(LINEOUT) lines. In Headset or Speakerphone Mode, the RCDSVD SCP interfaces to the audio interface circuit using the
Microphone Input (MICIN) and Speaker out (SPKR) lines.
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1.3.3 Modem Firmware
Modem firmware performs processing of general modem control, command sets, fax Class 1, AudioSpan, DSVD,
speakerphone, voice/audio/TAM, error correction, data compression, and DTE/host interface functions (Table 1-1, Table 1-2,
and Table 1-3). Configurations of the modem firmware are provided to support parallel host bus interface operation or serial
DTE interface operation.
The modem firmware is provided in object code form for the OEM to program into external ROM or flash ROM. The modem
firmware may also be provided in source code form under a source code addendum license agreement.
1.3.4 Supported Interfaces
The major hardware signal interfaces of the modem device are illustrated in Figure 1-1 (serial DTE interface) and Figure 1-2
(parallel host interface).
Parallel Host Bus Interface
A 16550A UART-compatible parallel host bus interface is supported. The interface signals are: eight bidirectional data lines
(HD0-HD7), three address input lines (HA0-HA2), three control input lines (~HCS, ~HRD, and ~HWT), one status output line
(HINT), and a reset input line (-RESET).
Serial DTE Interface and Indicator Outputs
A V.24/EIA/TIA-232-E logic-compatible DTE serial interface is provided in the serial interface version. One serial transmit
data input line (~TXD), one serial receive data output line (~RXD), four control input lines (~DTR, ~RTS, ~RDL, and ~AL),
and six status output lines (~CTS, ~DSR, ~RLSD, ~TM, ~RI, and ~DRSOUT) are supported.
Three dedicated indicator output lines (~DTRIND, ~TMIND, and ~AAIND) are also provided.
NVRAM Interface
A two-line serial interface to an optional OEM-supplied non-volatile RAM (NVRAM) is provided. The interface signals are a
bidirectional data line (NVMDATA) and a clock output line (NVMCLK). Data stored in NVRAM can take precedence over the
factory default settings. A 256-byte NVRAM can store up to two user-selectable configurations and can store up to four 35digit dial strings.
ROM/Flash ROM and External SRAM Interface
This non-multiplexed external bus supports eight bidirectional data lines (D0-D7), 17 address output lines (A0-A16), two
read/write control output lines (~READ and ~WRITE), and three chip select output lines (~ROMSEL, ~RAMSEL, and
~SVDCS). The modem external bus connects to OEM-supplied 128-kbyte ROM/flash ROM and to 32-kbyte SRAM (RC336),
32-kbyte/128-kbyte SRAM (RC56), or to 128-kbyte SRAM (RCDL56). When 128-kbyte SRAM is available for the RC56, the
modem firmware executes out of the 128-kbyte SRAM (shadow RAM operation) in the same manner as the RCDL56 for
improved modem performance. The modem memory connect options are shown in Table 1-4.
Table 1-4. Modem Memory Options
Modem Family
ROM/Flash ROM Size
(Kbytes)
ROM/Flash ROM
Max. Access Time (ns)
SRAM Size
(Kbytes)
SRAM
Max. Access Time (ns)
RC336
128
45
32
45
RC56
128
45
32
45
RC56
128
90
128
15
RCDL56
128
90
128
15
Telephone Line/Telephone/Audio Interface
For U.S. operation, the modem can operate with a 2-relay DAA interface (Figure 1-3) or, in 84-pin PLCC only, a 3-relay DAA
interface (Figure 1-4).
Modem Device
Receive/Transmit Data. A receive analog input (RIN) and a transmit analog output (TXA1) are supported. The 84-pin PLCC
model also includes the TXA2 pin to support differential outputs TXA1/TXA2, which eliminate the need for external
operational amplifiers in the transmit path.
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Relay Controls. Relay control outputs to the line interface are supported:
• Off-hook (~RLY1)
• Voice (~VOICE)
• Caller ID (~CALLID) (84-pin PLCC only. The 2-relay design shown in Figure 1-3 supports the Caller ID function without
using the ~CALLID relay control output.)
• Mute (~MUTE) (Enabled by ConfigurACE II.)
Signal routing for Voice mode is shown in Table 1-5.
Relay positions for VoiceView are shown in Table 1-6.
Ring Detect. A ring detect (RINGD) input is supported.
Loop Current Sense. A loop current sense (LCS) input is supported.
Microphone Input and Speakerphone Output. Two microphone inputs are supported: one for voice input (MICV) and one
for sound input (MICM), e.g., music-on-hold.
The MICV and SPK lines connect to the handset and speaker to support functions such as AudioSpan headset and
speakerphone modes, FDSP, telephone emulation, microphone voice record, speaker voice playback, and call progress
monitor.
The MICM input can accept an external audio signal to support the music-on-hold function (selected by the #VLS=7
command) and routes it to the telephone line. In this case, the modem can be configured using ConfigurACE II to either
bandlimit the signal to satisfy FCC part 68 requirements or allow DTMF detection during the music-on-hold function. If musicon-hold function is not required, the microphone signal can be connected to the MICM input to support telephone emulation
mode (selected by the #VLS=5 command).
The speaker output (SPK) carries the normal speakerphone audio or reflects the received analog signals in the modem.
Telephone Input and Telephone Output. An input from the telephone microphone (TELIN) and an output to the telephone
speaker (TELOUT) are supported in AudioSpan modes. These lines connect voice record/playback and AudioSpan audio to
the local handset.
RCDSVD Speech Codec Processor (SCP)
Line Input and Line Output. The Line In (LINEIN) and Line Out (LINEOUT) lines connect DSVD audio to the local
telephone handset.
Microphone Input and Speakerphone Output. The microphone input (MICIN) and speaker output (SPKP) lines connect to
the microphone and speaker to support DSVD headset and speakerphone modes.
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LCS
RINGD
~VOICE
~OH
VC
TXA1
TXA2*
RIN
HYBRD
&
XFRMR
SSI &
BRDGE
TEL LINE
CUR
SRC
TELOUT
TELIN
SURG
PROT
OH RELAY
HANDSET
HYBRID
RNG
DET
MODEM
DEVICE
VOICE
RELAY
TEL HANDSET
LCS
TELEPHONE LINE/TELEPHONE HANDSET
INTERFACE CIRCUIT
MICM
MICV
SPK
MICROPHONE
BIAS
AMP/
SOUNDUCER
(OPTIONAL)
HEADPHONE
AUDIO/HEADPHONE
INTERFACE CIRCUIT
* 84-PIN PLCC MODELS ONLY.
MD163F3 AIF 2R-US
Figure 1-3. 2-Relay Telephone Line/Telephone/Audio Signal Interface (U.S.)
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LCS
RINGD
~VOICE
~OH
~CALLID
VC
TXA1
TXA2*
RIN
HYBRD
&
XFRMR
SSI
&
BRDGE
CALLID
RELAY
SURG
PROT
OH
RELAY
TELOUT
MODEM
DEVICE
TELIN
TEL LINE
CUR
SRC
HANDSET
HYBRID
TEL HANDSET
RNG
DET
VOICE
RELAY
LCS
TELEPHONE LINE/TELEPHONE HANDSET
INTERFACE CIRCUIT
MICM
MICV
SPK
BIAS
AMP/
SOUNDUCER
(OPTIONAL)
MICROPHONE
HEADPHONE
AUDIO/HEADPHONE
INTERFACE CIRCUIT
* 84-PIN PLCC MODELS ONLY.
MD163F4 AIF 3R-US
Figure 1-4. 3-Relay Telephone Line/Telephone/Audio Signal Interface (U.S.) (84-Pin PLCC Only)
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Table 1-5. Signal Routing - Voice Mode (#CLS=8)
2-Relay DAA
#VLS=
Mode Function
Input Selected
RXA
Output Selected
Off-Hook Relay
(~OH)
Activated
Voice Relay
(~VOICE)
Activated
Yes
No
Yes
0
Modem with modem speaker output
disabled
TXA
1
Record from or playback to handset
TELIN
TELOUT
No
2
Playback to modem speaker
RXA
TXA and SPK
No
No
3
Microphone input for local recording
MICV
TXA
No
Yes
4
Modem with modem speaker output
enabled
RXA
TXA and SPK
Yes
No
5
Reserved
6
Use speakerphone after dialing or
answering
RXA and MICV
TXA and SPK
Yes
No
7
Mute local handset; sound chips output
to telephone line (music on hold)
MICM
TXA and SPK
No1
Yes
8
Record conversation through sound
chips
RXA
SPK
No1
No
9
Record/playback from local handset
through sound chips
TELIN and MICV
(Not RXA and MICM)
TELOUT and SPK
No
Yes
3-Relay DAA
#VLS=
Mode Function
0
Modem with modem speaker output
disabled
1
Record from or playback to handset
2
Playback to modem speaker
Input Selected
RXA
Output Selected
Caller ID
Relay
(~CALLID)
Activated
Off-Hook
Relay
(~OH)
Activated
Voice
Relay
(~VOICE)
Activated
TXA
No
Yes
No
TELIN
TELOUT
Yes
No
Yes
RXA
TXA and SPK
Yes
No
No
3
Microphone input for local recording
MICV
TXA
Yes
No
Yes
4
Modem with modem speaker output
enabled
RXA
TXA and SPK
No
Yes
No
5
Reserved
6
Use speakerphone after dialing or
answering
RXA and MICV
TXA and SPK
No
Yes
No
7
Mute local handset; sound chips output
to telephone line (music on hold)
MICM
TXA and SPK
No
No1
Yes
8
Record conversation through sound
chips
RXA
SPK
Yes
No1
No
9
Record/playback from local handset
through sound chips
RXA and MICM
TELOUT and SPK
Yes
No
Yes
NOTES:
1. The offhook relay should be previously activated, e.g., by an ATA or ATD command.
2. SPK = SPK output enabled.
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Table 1-6. Relay Positions - VoiceView Mode (+FCLASS=80)
2-Relay DAA
Stage
Off-Hook Relay (~OH)
Activated
Voice Relay (~VOICE)
Activated
Function
1
On-hook
No
No
2a
Detected tone - on-hook
No
No
2b
Detected tone - off-hook for handset and speakerphone
Yes
No
3
Off-hook
Yes
Yes
3-Relay DAA
Stage
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Function
Caller ID Relay
(~CALLID)
Activated
Off-Hook Relay
(~OH)
Activated
Voice Relay
(~VOICE)
Activated
1
On-hook
No
No
No
2a
Detected tone - on-hook
Yes
No
No
2b
Detected tone - off-hook for handset and speakerphone
Yes
Yes
No
3
Off-hook
No
Yes
Yes
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1.3.5 Commands
The modem supports data modem, fax class 1 modem, voice/audio, full-duplex speakerphone (FDSP), MNP 10/MNP 10EC,
and VoiceView commands, and S Registers in accordance with modem model options (see Section 7).
Data Modem Operation. Data modem functions operate in response to the AT commands when +FCLASS=0. Default
parameters support US/Canada operation.
MNP 10 Operation. MNP 10 functions operate in response to MNP 10 commands.
MNP 10EC Operation. MNP 10EC is enabled by the -SEC=1 command.
AutoSync Operation. AutoSync operates in response to the &Q4 command.
Fax Modem Operation. Facsimile functions operate in response to fax class 1 commands when +FCLASS=1 or #CLS=1.
Voice Operation. Voice mode functions operate in response to voice/audio commands when #CLS=8, #VSR=7200 [default],
and either #VBS=2 or #VBS=4 is selected.
Audio Operation. Audio mode functions operate in response to voice/audio commands when #CLS=8, #VSR=7200 [default]
or #VSR=11025, and #VBS=8 is selected.
Speakerphone Operation. FDSP functions operate in response to speakerphone commands when #CLS=8 and #VLS=6 is
selected.
World Class (W-Class) Operation. Models supporting W-class functions operate in response to W-class AT commands.
VoiceView Operation. VoiceView functions operate in response to VoiceView commands when +FCLASS=80.
1.3.6 ConfigurACE II for Windows Utility Program
The PC-based ConfigurACE II for Windows utility program allows the OEM to customize the modem firmware to suit specific
application and country requirements. ConfigurACE II for Windows allows programming of functions such as:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Loading of multiple sets of country parameters
Loading of NVRAM factory profiles
Call progress and blacklisting parameters
Entry of S register maximum/minimum values
Limitation of transmit levels
Modification of factory default values
Customization of the ATI4 response
Customization of fax OEM messages
This program modifies the hex object code which can be programmed directly into the system EPROM. Lists of the
generated parameters can be displayed or printed.
Rockwell-provided country parameter files allow a complete set of country-specific call progress and blacklisting parameters
to be selected.
Refer to the ConfigurACE II for Windows software for a detailed description of capabilities and the operating procedure.
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2. TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
2.1 SERIAL DTE INTERFACE OPERATION
2.1.1 Automatic Speed/Format Sensing
Command Mode and Data Modem Mode. The modem can automatically determine the speed and format of the data sent
from the DTE. The modem can sense speeds of 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 7200, 9600, 12000, 14400, 16800, 19200,
21600, 24000, 26400, 28800, 38400, 57600, and 115200 bps and the following data formats:
Character
Length
Data Length
No. of
(No. of Bits)
Parity
(No. of Bits)
Stop Bits
None
7
2
10
Odd
7
1
10
Even
7
1
10
None
8
1
10
Odd
8
1
11*
Even
8
1
11*
* 11-bit characters are sensed, but the parity bits are stripped off
during data transmission in Normal and Error Correction modes.
The modem can speed sense data with mark or space parity and configures itself as follows:
DTE Configuration
7 mark
7 space
8 mark
8 space
Modem Configuration
7 none
8 none
8 none
8 even
Fax Modem Mode. The DTE to modem data rate is 19200 bps.
2.2 PARALLEL HOST BUS INTERFACE OPERATION
Command Mode and Data Modem Mode. The modem can operate at rates up to 115200 by programming the Divisor
Latch in the parallel interface registers.
Fax Modem Mode. The host to modem data rate is 19200 bps.
2.3 ESTABLISHING DATA MODEM CONNECTIONS
Telephone Number Directory
The modem supports four telephone number entries in a directory that can be saved in a serial NVRAM. Each telephone
number can be up to 35 characters in length. A telephone number can be saved using the &Zn=x command, and a saved
telephone number can be dialed using the DS=n command.
Dialing
DTMF Dialing. DTMF dialing using DTMF tone pairs is supported in accordance with ITU-T Q.23. The transmit tone level
complies with Bell Publication 47001.
Pulse Dialing. Pulse dialing is supported in accordance with EIA/TIA-496-A.
Blind Dialing. The modem can blind dial in the absence of a dial tone if enabled by the X0, X1, or X3 command.
Modem Handshaking Protocol
If a tone is not detected within the time specified in the S7 register after the last digit is dialed, the modem aborts the call
attempt.
Call Progress Tone Detection
Ringback, equipment busy, and progress tones can be detected in accordance with the applicable standard.
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Answer Tone Detection
Answer tone can be detected over the frequency range of 2100 ± 40 Hz in ITU-T modes and 2225 ± 40 Hz in Bell modes.
Ring Detection
A ring signal can be detected from a TTL-compatible 15.3 Hz to 68 Hz square wave input.
Billing Protection
When the modem goes off-hook to answer an incoming call, both transmission and reception of data are prevented for 2
seconds (data modem) or 4 seconds (fax adaptive answer) to allow transmission of the billing signal.
Connection Speeds
The modem functions as a data modem when the +FCLASS=0 or #CLS=0 command is active.
Line connection can be selected using the +MS command in accordance with the draft PN-3320 standard presented to the
TR30-4 committee (which is a candidate for the definition of V.25 ter at the ITU). The +MS command selects modulation,
enables/disables automode, and selects minimum and maximum line speeds (Table 2-1).
ATNn and S37=n commands are supported up to V.32 bis speeds (Table 2-2).
Automode
Automode detection can be enabled by the +MS command to allow the modem to connect to a remote modem in
accordance with draft PN-3320 for V.34 (Table 2-1).
Alternatively, N1 commands allow the modem to connect to a remote modem in accordance with EIA/TIA-PN2330 for V.32
bis speeds and lower (Table 2-2).
2.4 DATA MODE
Data mode exists when a telephone line connection has been established between modems and all handshaking has been
completed.
Speed Buffering (Normal Mode)
Speed buffering allows a DTE to send data to, and receive data from, a modem at a speed different than the line speed. The
modem supports speed buffering at all line speeds.
Flow Control
DTE-to-Modem Flow Control. If the modem-to-line speed is less than the DTE-to-modem speed, the modem supports
XOFF/XON or RTS/CTS flow control with the DTE to ensure data integrity.
Escape Sequence Detection
The “+++” escape sequence can be used to return control to the command mode from the data mode. Escape sequence
detection is disabled by an S2 Register value greater than 127.
BREAK Detection
The modem can detect a BREAK signal from either the DTE or the remote modem. The \Kn command determines the
modem response to a received BREAK signal.
Telephone Line Monitoring
GSTN Cleardown (V.34, V.32 bis, V.32). Upon receiving GSTN Cleardown from the remote modem in a non-error
correcting mode, the modem cleanly terminates the call.
Loss of Carrier (V.22 bis and Below). If carrier is lost for a time greater than specified by the S10 register, the modem
disconnects (except MNP 10).
Receive Space Disconnect (V.22 bis and Below). If selected by the Y1 command in non-error-correction mode, the
modem disconnects after receiving 1.6 ± 10% seconds of continuous SPACE.
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Table 2-1. +MS Command Automode Connectivity
<mod>
Modulation
Possible Rates (bps) 1
Notes
0
V.21
1
V.22
300
1200
2
V.22 bis
2400 or 1200
3
V.23
1200
9
V.32
9600 or 4800
10
V.32 bis
14400, 12000, 9600, 7200, or 4800
11
V.34
33600, 31200, 28800, 26400, 24000, 21600, 19200, 16800,
14400, 12000, 9600, 7200, or 4800
56
K56flex
56000, 54000, 52000, 50000, 48000, 46000, 44000, 42000,
40000, 38000, 36000, 34000, 32000
64
Bell 103
300
69
Bell 212
1200
See Note 2
Default
Notes:
1. See optional <automode>, <min_rate>, and <max_rate> subparameters for the +MS command.
2. For V.23, originating modes transmit at 75 bps and receive at 1200 bps; answering modes transmit at 1200 bps and receive
at 75 bps. The rate is always specified as 1200 bps.
3. If the DTE speed is set to less than the maximum supported DCE speed in automode, the maximum connection speed is
limited to the DTE speed.
Table 2-2. Command Connections
1,2
ATF Setting
1,2
ATN Setting
S37 Setting
ATB Setting
Speed Sensed
Connection
Note 3
0
0
0
300
V.21
Note 3
0
0
0
1200
V.22 1200
Note 3
0
0
X
2400
V.22 bis 2400
Note 3
0
0
X
4800
V.32 bis/V.32 4800
Note 3
0
0
X
7200
V.32 bis 7200
Note 3
0
0
X
9600
V.32 bis/V.32 9600
Note 3
0
0
X
12000
V.32 bis 12000
Note 3
0
0
X
Higher
V.32 bis 14400
Note 3
0
0
1
300
Note 3
0
0
1
1200
ATF1
0
1-3
0
X
V.21
ATF4
0
5
0
X
V.22 1200
ATF5
0
6
X
X
V.22 bis 2400
ATF1
0
1-3
1
X
Bell 103
ATF4
0
5
1
X
Bell 212A
ATF3
0
7
X
X
V.23
ATF6
0
8
X
X
V.32 bis/V.32 4800
ATF8
0
9
X
X
V.32 bis/V.32 9600
ATF7
0
12
X
X
V.32 bis 7200
ATF9
0
10
X
X
V.32 bis 12000
ATF10
0
11
X
X
V.32 bis 14400
ATF0
1
X
X
X
Automode
Bell 103
Bell 212A
Notes:
1. ATFn can be used in lieu of ATN0 and S37. ATFn (where n = valid number) sets ATN0 and S37 to the corresponding value.
2. ATF0 forces ATN1 and S37=0.
3. The connection speed is determined by DTE speed sensing (serial interface only). A subsequent ATFn command supersedes the AT N
and S37 settings.
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Send SPACE on Disconnect (V.22 bis and Below)
If selected by the Y1 command in non-error-correction mode, the modem sends 4 ± 10% seconds of continuous SPACE
when a locally commanded hang-up is issued by the &Dn or H command.
2.4.2 Fall Forward/Fallback (V.34/V.32 bis/V.32)
During initial handshake, the modem will fallback to the optimal line connection within V.34/V.32 bis/V.32 mode depending
upon signal quality if automode is enabled by the +MS or N1 command.
When connected in V.34/V.32 bis/V.32 mode, the modem will fall forward or fallback to the optimal line speed within the
current modulation depending upon signal quality if fall forward/fallback is enabled by the %E2 command.
Retrain
The modem may lose synchronization with the received line signal under poor line conditions. If this occurs, retraining may
be initiated to attempt recovery depending on the type of connection.
The modem initiates a retrain if line quality becomes unacceptable if enabled by the %E command. The modem continues to
retrain until an acceptable connection is achieved, or until 30 seconds elapse resulting in line disconnect.
Programmable Inactivity Timer
The modem disconnects from the line if data is not sent or received for a specified length of time. In normal or errorcorrection mode, this inactivity timer is reset when data is received from either the DTE or from the line. This timer can be
set to a value between 0 and 2550 seconds by using register S30. A value of 0 disables the inactivity timer.
DTE Signal Monitoring (Serial DTE Interface Only)
~DTR. When ~DTR is asserted, the modem responds in accordance with the &Dn and &Qn commands.
~RTS. ~RTS is used for flow control if enabled by the &K command in normal or error-correction mode.
~RDL. When ~RDL is asserted, the modem requests a remote digital loop if connected in non-error-correction mode.
~AL. When ~AL is asserted, the modem disconnects and enters analog loop.
2.5 ERROR CORRECTION AND DATA COMPRESSION
V.42 Error Correction
V.42 supports two methods of error correction: LAPM and, as a fallback, MNP 4. The modem provides a detection and
negotiation technique for determining and establishing the best method of error correction between two modems.
MNP 2-4 Error Correction
MNP 2-4 is a data link protocol that uses error correction algorithms to ensure data integrity. Supporting stream mode, the
modem sends data frames in varying lengths depending on the amount of time between characters coming from the DTE.
V.42 bis Data Compression
V.42 bis data compression mode, enabled by the %Cn command or S46 register, operates when a LAPM or MNP 10
connection is established.
The V.42 bis data compression employs a “string learning” algorithm in which a string of characters from the DTE is encoded
as a fixed length codeword. Two 2k-byte dictionaries are used to store the strings. These dictionaries are dynamically
updated during normal operation.
MNP 5 Data Compression
MNP 5 data compression mode, enabled by the %Cn command, operates during an MNP connection.
In MNP 5, the modem increases its throughput by compressing data into tokens before transmitting it to the remote modem,
and by decompressing encoded received data before sending it to the DTE.
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2.6 MNP 10 DATA THROUGHPUT ENHANCEMENT
MNP 10 protocol and MNP Extended Services enhance performance under adverse channel conditions such as those found
in rural, long distance, or cellular environments. An MNP 10 connection is established when an MNP 2-4 connection is
negotiated with a remote modem supporting MNP 10.
MNP Extended Services. The modem can quickly switch to MNP 10 operation when the remote modem supports MNP 10
and both modems are configured to operate in V.42.
V.42 bis/MNP 5 Support. V.42 bis/MNP 10 can operate with V.42 bis or MNP 5 data compression.
2.7 MNP 10EC™ ENHANCED CELLULAR CONNECTION
A traditional landline modem, when used for high-speed cellular data transmission, typically encounters frequent signal
interference and degradation in the connection due to the characteristics of the analog cellular network. In this case, cellularspecific network impairments, such as non-linear distortion, fading, hand-offs, and high signal-to-noise ratio, contribute to an
unreliable connection and lower data transfer performance. Implementations relying solely on protocol layer methods, such
as MNP 10, generally cannot compensate for the landline modem's degraded cellular channel performance.
The modem achieves higher cellular performance by implementing enhanced cellular connection techniques at both the
physical and protocol layers, depending on modem model. The modem enhances the physical layer within the modulation by
optimizing its responses to sudden changes in the cellular connection. The MNP 10EC protocol layer implemented in the
modem firmware improves data error identification/correction and maximizes data throughput by dynamically adjusting
speed and packet size based on signal quality and data error performance.
2.8 AUTOSYNC
Hayes AutoSync mode, when used with communications software incorporating the Hayes Synchronous Interface (HSI),
provides synchronous communication capabilities from an asynchronous data terminal. In AutoSync, the modem places the
call asynchronously then automatically switches to synchronous operation once the telephone connection has been
established. AutoSync allows communication from an asynchronous DTE (typically a personal computer) to synchronous
DTE (typically a mainframe computer or minicomputer).
2.9 FAX CLASS 1 OPERATION
Facsimile functions operate in response to fax class 1 commands when +FCLASS=1 or #CLS=1.
In the fax mode, the on-line behavior of the modem is different from the data (non-fax) mode. After dialing, modem operation
is controlled by fax commands. Some AT commands are still valid but may operate differently than in data modem mode.
Calling tone is generated in accordance with T.30.
2.10 VOICE/AUDIO MODE
Voice and audio functions are supported by the Voice Mode. Voice Mode includes three submodes: Online Voice Command
Mode, Voice Receive Mode, and Voice Transmit Mode.
2.10.1 Online Voice Command Mode
This mode results from the connection to the telephone line or a voice/audio I/O device (e.g., microphone, speaker, or
handset) through the use of the #CLS=8 and #VLS commands. After mode entry, AT commands can be entered without
aborting the connection.
2.10.2 Voice Receive Mode
This mode is entered when the #VRX command is active in order to record voice or audio data input at the RXA pin, typically
from a microphone/handset or the telephone line.
Received analog voice samples are converted to digital form and compressed for reading by the host. AT commands control
the codec bits-per-sample rate.
Received analog mono audio samples are converted to digital form and formatted into 8-bit unsigned linear PCM format for
reading by the host. AT commands control the bit length and sampling rate. Concurrent DTMF/tone detection is available at
the 7200 Hz sample rate.
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2.10.3 Voice Transmit Mode
This mode is entered when the #VTX command is active in order to playback voice or audio data to the TXA1 output,
typically to a speaker/handset or to the telephone line.
Digitized voice data is decompressed and converted to analog form at the original compression quantization sample-per-bits
rate then output to the TXA1 output.
Digitized audio data is converted to analog form then output to the TXA1 output.
2.10.4 Audio Mode
The audio mode enables the host to transmit and receive 8-bit audio signals. In this mode, the modem directly accesses the
internal analog-to-digital (A/D) converter (ADC) and the digital-to-analog (D/A) converter (DAC). Incoming analog audio
signals can then be converted to digital format and digital signals can be converted to analog audio output.
2.10.5 Tone Detectors
The tone detector signal path is separate from the main received signal path thus enabling tone detection to be independent
of the configuration status. In Tone Mode, all three tone detectors are operational.
2.10.6 Speakerphone Modes
Speakerphone modes are selected in voice mode with the following #VLS= commands:
Use Speakerphone After Dialing or Answering (#VLS=6). #VLS=6 selects speakerphone mode while in #CLS=8 mode.
Speakerphone operation is entered during Voice Online Command mode after completing dialing or answering.
Speakerphone Settings (#SPK = Parameters). The #SPK command can be used to control the microphone state (mute or
on), adjust the speaker volume, and microphone gain. The #SPK parameters are valid only after the modem has entered the
Voice Online mode while in the #VLS=6 setting. The command syntax is:
#SPK=<mute>,<spkr>,<mic> (See the AT Command Reference Manual for exact syntax.)
<mute> = Mute Mode Select (Range = 0-2)
0 = microphone mute
1 = microphone on (default)
2 = Room Monitor mode (microphone gain is maximum and speaker output is off)
<spkr> = Speaker Output Level Attenuation
Range = 0 to 15 (in 2 dB steps)
Default = 10 (20 dB)
Speaker mute = 16
<mic>=
Microphone Gain Value (Range = 0-3)
0 = 0 dB gain
1 = 10 dB gain
2 = 15 dB gain (default)
3 = 20 dB gain
Room Monitor Feature. The Room Monitor function allows an application where a remote caller calls the computer to
monitor sound in a room. For example, the #SPK=2,,, command selects a listen only mode where the microphone gain is set
to maximum and the speaker output is off.
2.10.7 Sound Card Support Modes
Sound card support modes are selected in voice mode with the following #VLS= commands:
Mute Handset; Route Sound Chips Output To Line (#VLS=7). #VLS=7 mutes the local handset and routes the sound chip
output (such as music or messages during telephone hold) by switching the handset out of the telephone line path if in
#VLS=0 or #VLS=4 mode (valid after the modem is offhook, e.g., from an ATA or ATD command).
Record Conversation through Sound Chips (#VLS=8). #VLS=8 engages the Caller ID relay to allow recording of
conversation through sound chips (valid after the modem is offhook, e.g., from an ATA or ATD command).
Recording/Playback from Local Handset through Sound Chips (#VLS=9). #VLS=9 routes the handset lines to the sound
chips to allow recording/playback of audio through the local handset.
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2.11 SIMULTANEOUS AUDIO/VOICE AND DATA (AUDIOSPAN)
The modem can operate in AudioSpan Mode if the remote modem is also configured for AudioSpan Mode operation.
AT commands are used to select the AudioSpan Mode (-SMS command), to enable automatic AudioSpan modulation
selection or select a specific AudioSpan modulation (-SQS command), and to enable AudioSpan data burst operation (-SMC
command).
ML288 Modulation (RC336 Only). ML288 (V.34 type) modulation supports 4.8 to 14.4 kbps data speeds with audio where
the lower data rates provide higher audio quality. The ML288 data speed with audio is six data speeds below the capability
supported by telephone line quality (up to 28800 bps). For example, a connection that can support V.34 28800 bps data
speed will cause a resulting AudioSpan ML288 data-only speed to be 28800 bps and the data speed with audio to be 14400
bps. A ML288 data speed with audio will upshift to its corresponding higher data-only speed when the handset is placed onhook.
ML144 Modulation (RC336 Only). ML144 (V.32 bis) modulation supports 4.8 to 9.6 kbps data speeds with audio where the
lower data rates provide higher audio quality. The ML144 data speed plus audio is at least two data speeds below the
capability supported by telephone line quality. For example, a connection that can support V.32 bis 14400 bps data speed
will cause a resulting AudioSpan data speed with audio to be between V.61/4800 and ML144/9600. A ML144 data speed
with audio will upshift to higher data-only speed when no audio/voice is detected.
V.61 Modulation. V.61 modulation supports 4800 bps data speed with audio, and a data-only speed of 4800 bps.
2.11.1 Supported Data Speeds
Table 2-3 lists the data speed when the handset is on-hook (ML288) or audio is not present (ML144), and the data speed
when audio is present, based upon the selected AudioSpan modulation.
Table 2-3. AudioSpan Data Speeds
AudioSpan
Modulation
Data Speed (bps) with Audio
[When Audio is Present]
Data Speed (bps)
[When the Handset is On-hook (ML288)
or Audio is Not Present (ML144)]
ML288
28800 (Note 2)
14400 (Note 2)
ML288
26400
12000 (Note 2)
ML288
24000
9600 (Note 2)
ML288
21600
7200 (Note 2)
ML288
19200 to 4800
4800 (Note 2)
ML144
14400
9600, 7200, or 4800
ML144
12000
7200 or 4800
ML144
9600 to 4800
4800
V.61
4800
4800
Notes:
1. Applicable when the handset is on-hook (#VLS=0) or during headset operation (AT#VLS=5) or speakerphone operation
(#VLS=6).
2. 28800 bps is the highest ML288 data-only speed supported.
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2.11.2 AudioSpan Mode Selection
AudioSpan Mode is selected with the -SMS=2 (AudioSpan Mode) or the -SMS=3 (Automatic DSVD/AudioSpan/Data Only
Mode Select) command. The local modem should be set to the AudioSpan Mode (-SMS=2) when sending, and to the
AudioSpan Mode (-SMS=2) or Automatic DSVD/AudioSpan/Data Only Mode Select (-SMS=3) when receiving. The -SMS
command definition is:
-SMS = x, y, z, t (Select AudioSpan/DSVD/Data Mode)
The x parameter selects Data, AudioSpan, or DSVD Mode, or enables automatic mode selection. The y, z, and t parameters
are optional and are required only if the user wishes to control connection speeds. For example, AT-SMS=2 selects
AudioSpan Mode.
x: Data/AudioSpan/DSVD mode select and automatic mode select enable
0=
Data Mode
(Default) (data-only mode, AudioSpan and DSVD are disabled)
1=
DSVD mode
(Note: AT-SMS=1 performs the same operation at AT-SSE=1)
2=
AudioSpan mode
3=
Automatic mode select
(Data/DSVD/AudioSpan)
y: Minimum data speed (bps) with audio for AudioSpan Mode (see y value in following table)
z: Maximum data speed (bps) with audio for AudioSpan Mode (see z value in following table)
Modulation Selected (See -SQS Command)
y or z Value
V.61
ML144
ML288
4800
S ( y and z Default)
S (y Default)
S (y Default)
7200
—
S
S
9600
—
S (z Default)
S
12000
—
—
S
14400
—
—
S (z Default)
S = Supported.
— = Not supported.
t: Symbol rate (ML288 modulation only)
0=
Auto Selection
1-6=
Reserved
(Default)
Examples
1.
AT -SMS=2 selects AudioSpan Mode (the y, z, and t parameters are not required).
2.
AT -SMS=2,4800,9600 selects AudioSpan Mode, specifies the minimum data speed with audio of 4800 bps, and
specifies the maximum data speed with audio of 9600 bps.
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2.11.3 AudioSpan Modulation Select and Enable/Disable AudioSpan Automatic Modulation Selection
The host can enable the modem to select the optimal modulation or select a specific modulation. The -SQS command
definition is:
-SQS = x, y (Select AudioSpan Modulation and Enable/Disable AudioSpan Automatic Modulation Selection)
x: Select AudioSpan modulation
0=
V.61
1=
ML144
2=
ML288
(Default)
y: Enable/disable AudioSpan automatic modulation (automodulation) selection
0=
Disable AudioSpan automodulation (Host selects AudioSpan modulation specified by the x parameter.
If the selected modulation is not supported by the modem,
ERROR is reported and the x parameter is not changed. If the
remote modem does not support the selected modulation, the
modem disconnects.)
1=
Enable AudioSpan automodulation (Default. The modem starts with the AudioSpan modulation
specified by the x parameter and falls back from ML288, to
ML144, to V.61, or to data mode (e.g., V.34 or V.32 bis)
depending on the selected x parameter, the remote modem
capability, and line conditions.)
The AT-SQS parameters should remain at default unless a particular modulation is preferred.
Examples
1.
AT -SQS=2,1 enables AudioSpan automodulation starting with ML288 modulation.
2.
AT -SQS=2,0 disables AudioSpan automodulation and selects ML288 modulation.
3.
AT -SQS=1,0 disables AudioSpan automodulation and selects ML144 modulation.
2.11.4 ML144 Data Burst Option
ML144 data burst can be enabled using the -SMC command in ML144 modulation. Data burst will keep the audio channel
open only when energy is detected on the handset or headset. When silence is detected in data burst mode, the connected
modems will upshift in speed for higher throughput. Disabling data burst mode will keep the audio channel open at all times
during the AudioSpan connection. The -SMC command definition is:
-SMC = x (Enable/Disable ML144 Data Burst)
0=
Disable data burst
1=
Enable data burst
(Default)
2.11.5 AudioSpan Audio Interface
The AudioSpan audio interface defaults to the local handset connected to the modem (AT#VLS=0) and can be configured to
interface through the modem microphone and speaker pins to support use of a headset (AT#VLS=5) or a speakerphone
(AT#VLS=6).
2.11.6 Audio Quality Considerations.
AudioSpan audio quality is dependent upon modulation mode, data rate and telephone line quality. Some guidelines are:
1.
Higher quality telephone lines provide better audio quality than impaired telephone lines.
2.
A lower data speed with audio provides better audio quality than higher data speed with audio. For example, a
ML288/9600 connection will be audibly superior to a ML288/14400 connection.
3.
For identical data speed with audio using different modulations (e.g., ML144 vs. ML288), the audio quality at ML288 will
be superior. For example, a ML288/9600 will be audibly superior to a ML144/9600 connection.
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2.12 ON-BOARD DSVD MODE
On-Board DSVD operation is enabled by the -SSE=1 and either the #CLS=0 or +FCLASS=0 commands.
In On-Board DSVD Mode, the RCDSVD SCP is connected to a MCU and to a handset or to a microphone/speaker
arrangement (e.g., in a speakerphone or a headset). The SCP converts analog speech input from a handset, microphone, or
headset to digital form, encodes the digital speech, and stores it in SCP interface memory for MCU access. The MCU reads
the data from SCP interface memory, multiplexes the encoded speech with other data and sends the combined data stream
to the MDP for modulation and transmission through telephone line interface circuitry over the telephone network to the
remote modem.
The received signal from the telephone line is demodulated by the local MDP and the data demultiplexed by the MCU into
data and encoded speech. The MCU then writes the demultiplexed encoded speech to the SCP interface memory. The SCP
decodes the encoded speech, converts it to analog form, and outputs it to a handset, speaker, or headset.
The MCU can switch between handset, half-duplex speakerphone, or headset use during a conversation.
The SCP performs voice encoding only after speech is detected to prevent encoding of background noise in order to
maximize data modem throughput during periods of voice silence.
2.12.1 DSVD Handset Mode
The modem supports DSVD handset operation when #VLS=0.
2.12.2 DSVD Headset Mode
The modem supports DSVD headset operation when #VLS=5.
2.12.3 DSVD Half-Duplex Speakerphone (HDSP) Mode
The modem supports DSVD HDSP operation when #VLS=6.
2.13 HOST-BASED DSVD MODE
Host-based DSVD operation is enabled by the +H17&K3 commands.
In Host-based DSVD Mode, the modem supports the transfer of data and voice occurs simultaneously during a data
connection. The data and voice are merged into the data stream by the host.
2.14 FULL-DUPLEX SPEAKERPHONE (FDSP) MODE
The modem operates in FDSP mode when #CLS=8 and #VLS=6 (see 2.10.6).
In FDSP Mode, speech from a microphone or handset is converted to digital form, shaped, and output to the telephone line
through the line interface circuit. Speech received from the telephone line is shaped, converted to analog form, and output to
the speaker or handset. Shaping includes both acoustic and line echo cancellation.
2.15 VOICEVIEW
Voice and data can be alternately sent and received in a time-multiplexed fashion over the telephone line whenever the
+FCLASS=80 command is active. This command and other VoiceView commands embedded in host communications
software control modem operation. Most VoiceView commands use an extended syntax starting with the characters "-S",
which signifies the capability to switch between voice and data.
2.16 CALLER ID
Caller ID can be enabled/disabled using the #CID command. When enabled, caller ID information (date, time, caller code,
and name) can be passed to the DTE in formatted or unformatted form. Inquiry support allows the current caller ID mode
and mode capabilities of the modem to be retrieved from the modem.
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2.17 WORLD CLASS COUNTRY SUPPORT
The W-class models include functions which support modem operation in multiple countries. The following capabilities are
provided in addition to the data modem functions previously described. Country-dependent parameters are all programmable
by ConfigurACE II for Windows.
2.17.1 Dialing
Dial Tone Detection. Dial tone detection levels and frequency ranges are programmable by ConfigurACE II for Windows.
DTMF Dialing. Transmit output level, DTMF signal duration, and DTMF interdigit interval parameters are programmable by
ConfigurACE II for Windows.
Pulse Dialing. Parameters such as make/break times, set/clear times, and dial codes are programmable by ConfigurACE II
for Windows.
Ring Detection. The frequency range is programmable by ConfigurACE II for Windows.
Blind Dialing. Blind dialing may be disabled by ConfigurACE II for Windows.
2.17.2 Carrier Transmit Level
The carrier transmit level can be programmed through S91 for data and S92 for fax. The maximum, minimum, and default
values can be defined by ConfigurACE II for Windows to match specific country and DAA requirements.
2.17.3 Calling Tone
Calling tone is generated in accordance with V.25. Calling tone may be toggled (enabled/disabled) by inclusion of a “^”
character in a dial string. It may also be disabled by programming a country specific parameter using ConfigurACE II for
Windows.
2.17.4 Call Progress Tone Detection
Frequency and cadence of tones for busy, ringback, congested, dial tone 1, and dial tone 2 are programmable by
ConfigurACE II for Windows.
2.17.5 Answer Tone Detection
The answer tone detection period is programmable by ConfigurACE II for Windows.
2.17.6 Blacklist Parameters
The modem can operate in accordance with requirements of individual countries to prevent misuse of the network by limiting
repeated calls to the same number when previous call attempts have failed. Call failure can be detected for reasons such as
no dial tone, number busy, no answer, no ringback detected, voice (rather than modem) detected, and key abort (dial
attempt aborted by user). Actions resulting from such failures can include specification of minimum inter-call delay, extended
delay between calls, and maximum numbers of retries before the number is permanently forbidden ("blacklisted"). Up to 40
such numbers may be tabulated. The blacklist parameters are established by ConfigurACE II for Windows.
2.17.7 Relay Control
On-hook/off-hook, make/break, and set/clear relay control parameters are programmable by ConfigurACE II for Windows.
The NVMDATA line can additionally be assigned as the ~MUTE relay control by ConfigurACE II for Windows.
2.18 DIAGNOSTICS
2.18.1 Commanded Tests
Diagnostics are performed in response to &T commands.
Analog Loopback (&T1 Command). Data from the local DTE is sent to the modem, which loops the data back to the local
DTE.
Analog Loopback with Self Test (&T8 Command). An internally generated test pattern of alternating 1s and 0s (reversals)
is sent to the modem. An error detector within the modem checks for errors in the string of reversals.
Remote Digital Loopback (RDL) (&T6 Command). Data from the local DTE is sent to the remote modem which loops the
data back to the local DTE.
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Remote Digital Loopback with Self Test (&T7 Command). An internally generated pattern is sent from the local modem
to the remote modem, which loops the data back to the local modem.
Local Digital Loopback (&T3 Command). When local digital loop is requested by the local DTE, two data paths are set up
in the local modem. Data from the local DTE is looped back to the local DTE (path 1) and data received from the remote
modem is looped back to the remote modem (path 2).
2.18.2 Power On Reset Tests
Upon power on, the modem performs tests of the modem, internal and external RAM, and NVRAM. If the modem, internal
RAM, or external RAM test fails, the ~TMIND output is pulsed (serial interface version) or the DCD bit in the parallel interface
register is pulsed (parallel interface version) as follows:
Internal or external RAM test fails: One pulse cycle (pulse cycle = 0.5 sec. on, 0.5 sec. off) every 1.5 seconds.
Modem device test fails: Three pulse cycles every 1.5 seconds.
If the NVRAM test fails (due to NVRAM failure or if NVRAM is not installed), the test failure is reported by AT commands that
normally use the NVRAM, e.g., the &V command.
2.19 LOW POWER SLEEP MODE (RC56 AND RCVDL56 ONLY)
Sleep Mode Entry. The modem enters the low power sleep mode when no line connection exists and no host activity occurs
for the period of time specified in the S24 register. All modem circuits are turned off except the internal clock circuitry in
order to consume reduced power while being able to immediately wake up and resume normal operation.
Wake-up. Wakeup occurs when a ring is detected on the telephone line, the host writes to the modem (parallel interface
version), or the DTE sends a character to the modem (serial interface version).
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3. HARDWARE INTERFACE
3.1 HARDWARE SIGNALS
The modem hardware interface signals for the serial DTE interface configuration are shown in Figure 3-1.
The modem hardware interface signals for the parallel host interface configuration are shown in Figure 3-2.
The modem pin assignments for the 68-pin PLCC with serial DTE interface are shown in Figure 3-3 and are listed in Table 31.
The modem pin assignments for the 68-pin PLCC with parallel host interface are shown in Figure 3-4 and are listed in Table
3-2.
The RCDSVD SCP pin assignments for the 68-pin PLCC are shown in Figure 3-7 and are listed in Table 3-5 .
The modem hardware interface signals are defined in Table 3-6.
The RCDSVD SCP hardware interface signals are defined in Table 3-7.
The digital electrical characteristics for the hardware interface signals are listed in Table 3-8.
The analog electrical characteristics for the hardware interface signals are listed in Table 3-9.
The current and power requirements are listed in Table 3-10.
The absolute maximum ratings are listed in Table 3-11.
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~TXD
TELOUT
~RXD
TELIN
~CTS
LCS
~DSR
RINGD
~RLSD
~MUTE*
~TM
DTE
SERIAL/
INDICATOR
INTERFACE
~RI
~OH
~DTR
~VOICE
~RTS
TXA1
~RDL
RIN
~AL
~DRSOUT
VC
~AAIND
VREF
TELEPHONE
LINE/
TELEPHONE
HANDSET
AUDIO
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
~DTRIND
~TMIND
MICM
NVMDATA*
NVRAM
NVMCLK
XTLI
MODEM/MDP
CRYSTAL
CIRCUIT
MCU
CRYSTAL
CIRCUIT
VCC
XTLO
CXTLI**
CXTLO**
VDD
RCVDL56ACF/SVD
[84-PIN PLCC: R6762
OR
RCV56ACF/SVD
[68-PIN PLCC: R6780]
[84-PIN PLCC: R6752]
OR
RCV336ACF/SVD
[68-PIN PLCC: R6760]
[84-PIN PLCC: R6742]
MODEM
MICV
SPK
~SVDRES
~SVDCS
A0-A14
D0-D7
RCDSVD
SCP
(R6715)
~READ
SPKP
LINEIN
LINEOUT
~WRITE
A0-A16
GND, AGND
MICIN
SVDIRQ
A0-A14
D0-D7
D0-D7
~READ
~READ
~WRITE
~WRITE
~RAMSEL
~RAMSEL
32K-BYTE
OR
128K-BYTE
SRAM***
~ROMSEL
A0-A16
D0-D7
~READ
128K-BYTE
ROM/FLASH ROM
~ROMSEL
*
FOR 68-PIN PLCC, ~MUTE TIMESHARED WITH NVMDATA WHEN ENABLED BY CONFIGURACE II.
** OPTIONAL ON 84-PIN PLCC (CXTLI REPLACES ~MUTE AND CXTLO REPLACES ~SVDRES).
***128K x 8 IS REQUIRED BY RCDL56; 32K x 8 SRAM IS REQUIRED BY OTHER FAMILIES, HOWEVER,
128K X 8 SRAM INTERFACE/ FOOTPRINT PROVIDES BOARD COMPATIBILITY WITH 84-PIN RCDL56.
ALSO, 128K X 8 RAM FOR RC56 ALLOWS FASTER PROGRAM EXECUTION FROM SHADOW RAM TO IMPROVE MODEM PERFORMANACE.
1105F3-1 IF-Ser
Figure 3-1. Hardware Interface Signals - Serial DTE Interface
3-2
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RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
TELOUT
TELIN
LCS
RINGD
HD0-HD7
~MUTE*
HA0-HA2
HOST
COMPUTER
PARALLEL
BUS
INTERFACE
~OH
~HCS
~VOICE
~HWT
TXA1
~HRD
RIN
HINT
VC
~RES
TELEPHONE
LINE/
TELEPHONE
HANDSET
AUDIO
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
VREF
MICM
NVMDATA*
NVRAM
NVMCLK
XTLI
MODEM/MDP
CRYSTAL
CIRCUIT
MCU
CRYSTAL
CIRCUIT
VCC
XTLO
CXTLI**
CXTLO**
VDD
GND, AGND
RCVDL56ACF/SVD
[84-PIN PLCC: R6761
OR
RCV56ACF/SVD
[68-PIN PLCC: R6779]
[84-PIN PLCC: R6751]
OR
RCV336ACF/SVD
[68-PIN PLCC: R6759]
[84-PIN PLCC: R6741]
MODEM
MICV
SPK
~SVDRES
~SVDCS
MICIN
SVDIRQ
A0-A14
D0-D7
RCDSVD
SCP
(R6715)
~READ
SPKP
LINEIN
LINEOUT
~WRITE
A0-A16
A0-A14
D0-D7
D0-D7
~READ
~READ
~WRITE
~WRITE
~RAMSEL
~RAMSEL
32K-BYTE
OR
128K-BYTE
SRAM***
~ROMSEL
A0-A16
D0-D7
~READ
128K-BYTE
ROM/FLASH ROM
~ROMSEL
*
FOR 68-PIN PLCC, ~MUTE TIMESHARED WITH NVMDATA WHEN ENABLED BY CONFIGURACE II.
** OPTIONAL ON 84-PIN PLCC (CXTLI REPLACES ~MUTE AND CXTLO REPLACES ~SVDRES).
***128K x 8 IS REQUIRED BY RCDL56; 32K x 8 SRAM IS REQUIRED BY OTHER FAMILIES, HOWEVER,
128K X 8 SRAM INTERFACE/ FOOTPRINT PROVIDES BOARD COMPATIBILITY WITH 84-PIN RCDL56.
ALSO, 128K X 8 RAM FOR RC56 ALLOWS FASTER PROGRAM EXECUTION FROM SHADOW RAM TO IMPROVE MODEM PERFORMANACE.
1105F3-2 IF-Par
Figure 3-2. Hardware Interface Signals - Parallel Host Interface
1105
3-3
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
68
67
66
65
64
63
62
61
~ROMSEL
~VOICE
~OH
A16
A15
A14
A13
A12
A11
A10
A9
A8
A7
A6
A5
A4
A3
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59
58
57
56
55
54
53
52
51
50
49
48
47
46
45
44
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
A2
A1
A0
~DTR
~AL
~RTS
LCS
XTLO
XTLI
RINGD
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
MICV
MICM
SPK
RIN
VDD
TXA1
SVDIRQ
AGND
~RES
~SVDCS
GND
VDD
NVMDATA
~TXD
~RXD
NVMCLK
D0
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
~RAMSEL
~TMIND
~WRITE
~READ
~DSR
~CTS
~RLSD
~DRSOUT
~AAIND
~RI
~TM
~RDL
~DTRIND
TELOUT
VC
VREF
TELIN
MD163F06 PO-68L-Ser
Figure 3-3. Modem Pin Signals - 68-Pin PLCC - Serial DTE Interface
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Table 3-1. Modem Pin Signals - 68-Pin PLCC - Serial DTE Interface
Pin
1
Signal Label
A11
I/O Type
OA
Interface
EB: A11
Pin
35
Signal Label
~RES
I/O Type
IC
Interface
Reset Circuit
2
A12
OA
EB: A12
36
~SVDCS
OA
RCDSVD SCP: ~CS
3
A13
OA
EB: A13
37
GND
GND
GND
4
A14
OA
EB: A14
38
VDD
PWR
VCC and filter
5
A15
OA
EB: A15
39
NVMDATA/
~MUTE
IA/OA
OA
NVRAM: SDA (Note 3)/
DAA: ~MUTE (Note 5)
6
A16
OA
EB: A16
40
~TXD
IA
DTE: ~TXD
7
~OH
OA
DAA: ~OH
41
~RXD
OA
DTE: ~RXD
8
~VOICE
OA
DAA: ~VOICE
42
NVMCLK
OA
NVRAM: SCL
9
~ROMSEL
OA
ROM: ~CE
43
D0
IA/OA
EB: D0
10
~RAMSEL
OA
RAM: ~CS
44
D1
IA/OA
EB: D1
11
~TMIND
OA
Indicator Circuit
45
D2
IA/OA
EB: D2
12
~WRITE
OA
EB: ~WRITE
46
D3
IA/OA
EB: D3
13
~READ
OA
EB: ~READ
47
D4
IA/OA
EB: D4
14
~DSR
OB
DTE: ~DSR
48
D5
IA/OA
EB: D5
15
~CTS
OB
DTE: ~CTS
49
D6
IA/OA
EB: D6
16
~RLSD
OB
DTE: ~RLSD
50
D7
IA/OA
EB: D7
17
~DRSOUT
OB
DTE: ~DRSOUT
51
RINGD
IA
DAA: RINGD
18
~AAIND
OA
Indicator Circuit
52
XTLI
IE
XTLI
19
~RI
OB
DTE: ~RI
53
XTLO
OE
XTLO
20
~TM
OB
DTE: ~TM
54
LCS
IA
DAA: LCS
21
~RDL
IA
DTE: ~RDL
55
~RTS
IA
DTE: ~RTS
22
~DTRIND
OA
Indicator Circuit
56
~AL
IA
DTE: ~AL
23
TELOUT
O(DD)
Telephone Handset Interface
57
~DTR
IA
DTE: ~DTR
24
VC
DI
AGND through capacitors and
DAA
58
A0
OA
EB: A0
25
VREF
DI
VC through capacitors
59
A1
OA
EB: A1
26
TELIN
I(DA)
Telephone Handset Interface
60
A2
OA
EB: A2
27
MICV
I(DA)
Audio Interface
61
A3
OA
EB: A3
28
MICM
I(DA)
Audio Interface
62
A4
OA
EB: A4
29
SPK
O(DD)
Audio Interface
63
A5
OA
EB: A5
30
RIN
I(DA)
DAA: RXA
64
A6
OA
EB: A6
31
VDD
PWR
VCC and filter
65
A7
OA
EB: A7
32
TXA1
O(DD)
DAA: TXA1
66
A8
OA
EB: A8
33
SVDIRQ
IA
RCDSVD SCP: ~IRQ
67
A9
OA
EB: A9
34
AGND
GND
AGND
68
A10
OA
EB: A10
Notes:
1.
I/O types:
DI = Device interconnect.
IA, IC = Digital input; IE = Crystal input (see Table 3-8).
OA, OB, = Digital output; OE = Crystal output (see Table 3-8).
I(DA) = Analog input (see Table 3-9).
O(DD), O(DF) = Analog output (see Table 3-9).
2.
NC = No external connection allowed.
3.
Connect to VCC through 10K ohms.
4.
Connect to GND through 10K ohms.
5.
~MUTE use can be enabled by ConfigurACE II for Windows.
1105
3-5
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
68
67
66
65
64
63
62
61
~ROMSEL
~VOICE
~OH
A16
A15
A14
A13
A12
A11
A10
A9
A8
A7
A6
A5
A4
A3
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58
57
56
55
54
53
52
51
50
49
48
47
46
45
44
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
A2
A1
A0
~HCS
~HWT
~HRD
LCS
XTLO
XTLI
RINGD
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
MICV
MICM
SPK
RIN
VDD
TXA1
SVDIRQ
AGND
~RES
~SVDCS
GND
VDD
NVMDATA
HA2
HA1
NVMCLK
D0
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
~RAMSEL
HINT
~WRITE
~READ
HD0
HD1
HD2
HD3
HD4
HD5
HD6
HD7
HA0
TELOUT
VC
VREF
TELIN
MD163F05 PO-68L-Par
Figure 3-4. Modem Pin Signals- 68-Pin PLCC - Parallel Host Interface
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Table 3-2. Modem Pin Signals- 68-Pin PLCC - Parallel Host Interface
Pin
1
Signal Label
A11
I/O Type
OA
Interface
EB: A11
Pin
35
Signal Label
~RES
I/O Type
IC
Interface
HB: (Note 4)
2
A12
OA
EB: A12
36
~SVDCS
OA
RCDSVD SCP: ~CS
3
A13
OA
EB: A13
37
GND
GND
GND
4
A14
OA
EB: A14
38
VDD
PWR
VCC and filter
5
A15
OA
EB: A15
39
NVMDATA/
~MUTE
IA/OA
OA
NVRAM: SDA (Note 3)/
DAA: ~MUTE (Note 5)
6
A16
OA
EB: A16
40
HA2
IA
HB: HA2
7
OH
OA
DAA: ~OH
41
HA1
IA
HB: HA1
8
~VOICE
OA
DAA: ~VOICE
42
NVMCLK
OA
NVRAM: SCL
9
~ROMSEL
OA
ROM: ~CE
43
D0
IA/OA
EB: D0
10
~RAMSEL
OA
RAM: ~CS
44
D1
IA/OA
EB: D1
11
HINT
OA
HB: HINT
45
D2
IA/OA
EB: D2
12
~WRITE
OA
EB: ~WRITE
46
D3
IA/OA
EB: D3
13
~READ
OA
EB: ~READ
47
D4
IA/OA
EB: D4
14
HD0
IA/OB
HB: HD0
48
D5
IA/OA
EB: D5
15
HD1
IA/OB
HB: HD1
49
D6
IA/OA
EB: D6
16
HD2
IA/OB
HB: HD2
50
D7
IA/OA
EB: D7
17
HD3
IA/OB
HB: HD3
51
RINGD
IA
DAA: RINGD
18
HD4
IA/OB
HB: HD4
52
XTLI
IE
XTLI
19
HD5
IA/OB
HB: HD5
53
XTLO
OE
XTLO
20
HD6
IA/OB
HB: HD6
54
LCS
IA
DAA: LCS
21
HD7
IA/OB
HB: HD7
55
~HRD
IA
HB: ~RD
22
HA0
IA
HB: HA0
56
~HWT
IA
HB: ~WT
23
TELOUT
O(DD)
Telephone Handset Interface
57
~HCS
IA
HB: ~CS
24
VC
DI
AGND through capacitors and
DAA
58
A0
OA
EB: A0
25
VREF
DI
VC through capacitors
59
A1
OA
EB: A1
26
TELIN
I(DA)
Telephone Handset Interface
60
A2
OA
EB: A2
27
MICV
I(DA)
Audio Interface
61
A3
OA
EB: A3
28
MICM
I(DA)
Audio Interface
62
A4
OA
EB: A4
29
SPK
O(DD)
Audio Interface
63
A5
OA
EB: A5
30
RIN
I(DA)
DAA: RXA
64
A6
OA
EB: A6
31
VDD
PWR
VCC and filter
65
A7
OA
EB: A7
32
TXA1
O(DD)
DAA: TXA1
66
A8
OA
EB: A8
33
SVDIRQ
IA
RCDSVD SCP: ~IRQ
67
A9
OA
EB: A9
34
AGND
GND
AGND
68
A10
OA
EB: A10
Notes:
1.
I/O types:
DI = Device interconnect.
IA, IC = Digital input; IE = Crystal input (see Table 3-8).
OA, OB, = Digital output; OE = Crystal output (see Table 3-8).
I(DA) = Analog input (see Table 3-9).
O(DD), O(DF) = Analog output (see Table 3-9).
2.
NC = No external connection allowed.
3.
Connect to VCC through 10K ohms.
4.
Connect to GND through 10K ohms.
5.
~MUTE use can be enabled by ConfigurACE II for Windows.
1105
3-7
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
84
83
82
81
80
79
78
77
76
75
~RAMSEL
~ROMSEL
A16
~VOICE
~OH
A15
A14
A13
A12
~SVDRES*/CXTLO**
~MUTE*/CXTLI**
GND
VDD
GND/~SVDCS***
A11
A10
A9
A8
A7
A6
A5
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61
60
59
58
57
56
55
54
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
A4
A3
A2
A1
A0
PLLGND
PLLCAP
D7
D6
D5
XTLO
XTLI
GND/~SVDIRQ***
PLLVDD
D4
GND
D3
D2
GND
D1
D0
MICM
RIN
AGND
AVDD
VDD
~CALLID
AGND
GND
~AL
~RTS
~TXD
GND
~RES
~READ
~WRITE
LCS
NVMDATA
VDD
~RXD
NVMCLK
RINGD
~TMIND
~DSR
~CTS
~RLSD
~DRSOUT
~AAIND
~RI
~TM
~RDL
~DTRIND
~DTR
AVDD
AGND
TELIN
TELOUT
SPK
TXA1
TXA2
VREF
VC
MICV
* One crystal models only
** Two crystal models only.
*** SVD models only.
MD163F08 PO-84L-Ser
Figure 3-5. Modem Pin Signals - 84-Pin PLCC - Serial DTE Interface
3-8
1105
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
Table 3-3. Modem Pin Signals - 84-Pin PLCC - Serial DTE Interface
Pin
Signal Label
I/O Type
Interface
Pin
Signal Label
I/O Type
Interface
1
~MUTE/CXTLI (Note 5)
IE
DAA/~MUTE/MCU Crystal
43
~TXD
IA
DTE: ~TXD
2
~WKRES/CXTLO (Note 5)
OE
RCDSVD: ~IRQ/MCU Crystal
44
GND
GND
GND
3
A12
OA
EB: A12
45
~RES
IC
Reset Circuit
4
A13
OA
EB: A13
46
~READ
OA
EB: ~READ
5
A14
OA
EB: A14
47
~WRITE
OA
EB: ~WRITE
6
A15
OA
EB: A15
48
LCS
IA
DAA: LCS
7
~OH
OA
DAA: ~OH
49
NVMDATA
IA/OA
NVRAM: SDA (Note 3)
8
~VOICE
OA
DAA: ~VOICE
50
VDD
PWR
VCC and filter
9
A16
OA
EB: A16
51
~RXD
OA
DTE: ~RXD
10
~ROMSEL
OA
EB: ROM ~CE
52
NVMCLK
OA
NVRAM: SCL
11
~RAMSEL
OA
EB: RAM ~CS
53
RINGD
IA
DAA: RINGD
12
~TMIND
OA
Indicator Circuit
54
D0
IA/OA
EB: D0
13
~DSR
OB
DTE: ~DSR
55
D1
IA/OA
EB: D1
14
~CTS
OB
DTE: ~CTS
56
GND
GND
GND
15
~RLSD
OB
DTE: ~RLSD
57
D2
IA/OA
EB: D2
16
~DRSOUT
OB
DTE: ~DRSOUT
58
D3
IA/OA
EB: D3
17
~AAIND
OA
Indicator Circuit
59
GND
GND
GND
18
~RI
OB
DTE: ~RI
60
D4
IA/OA
EB: D4
19
~TM
OB
DTE: ~TM
61
PLLVDD
PLL
PLLGND through 0.1 µF
20
~RDL
IA
DTE: ~RDL
62
GND/~SVDIRQ (Note 6)
GND/IA
GND/RCDSVD: ~IRQ
21
~DTRIND
OA
Indicator Circuit
63
XTLI
IE
MDP Crystal
22
~DTR
IA
DTE: ~DTR
64
XTLO
OE
MDP Crystal
23
AVDD
PWR
VCC and filter
65
D5
IA/OA
EB: D5
24
AGND
GND
AGND
66
D6
IA/OA
EB: D6
25
TELIN
I(DA)
Telephone Handset Interface
67
D7
IA/OA
EB: D7
26
TELOUT
O(DD)
Telephone Handset Interface
68
PLLCAP
PLL
VDD (Note 7)
27
SPK
O(DD)
Audio Interface
69
PLLGND
PLL
PLLVDD through 0.1 µF
28
TXA1
O(DD)
DAA: TXA1
70
A0
OA
EB: A0
29
TXA2
O(DD)
DAA: TXA2
71
A1
OA
EB: A1
30
VREF
DI
VC through capacitors
72
A2
OA
EB: A2
31
VC
DI
AGND through capacitors and
DAA
73
A3
OA
EB: A3
32
MICV
I(DA)
Audio Interface
74
A4
OA
EB: A4
33
MICM
I(DA)
Audio Interface
75
A5
OA
EB: A5
34
RIN
I(DA)
DAA: RXA
76
A6
OA
EB: A6
35
AGND
GND
AGND
77
A7
OA
EB: A7
36
AVDD
PWR
VCC and filter
78
A8
OA
EB: A8
37
VDD
PWR
VCC and filter
79
A9
OA
EB: A9
38
~CALLID
OA
DAA: ~CALLID
80
A10
OA
EB: A10
39
AGND
GND
AGND
81
A11
OA
EB: A11
40
GND
GND
GND
82
GND/~SVDCS (Note 6)
GND/OA
GND/RCDSVD: ~SVDCS
41
~AL
IA
DTE: ~AL
83
VDD
PWR
VCC and filter
42
~RTS
IA
DTE: ~RTS
84
GND
GND
GND
Notes:
1.
I/O types:
DI = Device interconnect.
IA, IC = Digital input; IE = Crystal input (see Table 3-8).
OA, OB, = Digital output; OE = Crystal output (see Table 3-8).
I(DA) = Analog input (see Table 3-9).
O(DD), O(DF) = Analog output (see Table 3-9).
2.
NC = No external connection allowed.
3.
Connect to VCC through 10K ohms.
4.
Connect to GND through 10K ohms.
5.
~MUTE and ~WKRES are supported on 1-crystal models; CXTLI and CXTLO are supported on 2-crystal models.
6.
~SVDIRQ and ~SVDCS are supported on SCP models.
7.
The PLL circuit is not supported in the RC336 or RC56 devices. These pins may be connected as indicated or left NC externally.
1105
3-9
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
84
83
82
81
80
79
78
77
76
75
~RAMSEL
~ROMSEL
A16
~VOICE
~OH
A15
A14
A13
A12
~SVDRES*/CXTLO**
~MUTE*/CXTLI**
GND
VDD
GND/~SVDCS***
A11
A10
A9
A8
A7
A6
A5
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60
59
58
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56
55
54
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
A4
A3
A2
A1
A0
PLLGND
PLLCAP
D7
D6
D5
XTLO
XTLI
GND/~SVDIRQ***
PLLVDD
D4
GND
D3
D2
GND
D1
D0
MICM
RIN
AGND
AVDD
VDD
~CALLID
AGND
GND
~HWT
~HRD
HA2
GND
~RES
~READ
~WRITE
LCS
NVMDATA
VDD
HA1
NVMCLK
RINGD
HINT
HD0
HD1
HD2
HD3
HD4
HD5
HD6
HD7
HA0
~HCS
AVDD
AGND
TELIN
TELOUT
SPK
TXA1
TXA2
VREF
VC
MICV
* One crystal models only
** Two crystal models only.
*** SVD models only.
MD163F07 PO-84L-Par
Figure 3-6. Modem Pin Signals- 84-Pin PLCC - Parallel Host Interface
3-10
1105
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
Table 3-4. Modem Pin Signals- 84-Pin PLCC - Parallel Host Interface
Pin
1
Signal Label
~MUTE/CXTLI (Note 5)
I/O Type
IE
Interface
DAA/~MUTE/MCU Crystal
Pin
43
Signal Label
HA2
I/O Type
IA
Interface
HB: HA2
2
~WKRES/CXTLO (Note 5)
OE
RCDSVD: ~IRQ/MCU Crystal
44
GND
GND
GND
3
A12
OA
EB: A12
45
~RES
IC
HB: (Note 4)
4
A13
OA
EB: A13
46
~READ
OA
EB: ~READ
5
A14
OA
EB: A14
47
~WRITE
OA
EB: ~WRITE
6
A15
OA
EB: A15
48
LCS
IA
DAA: LCS
7
~OH
OA
DAA: ~OH
49
NVMDATA
IA/OA
NVRAM: SDA (Note 3)/DAA:
~MUTE (Note 5)
8
~VOICE
OA
DAA: ~VOICE
50
VDD
PWR
VCC and filter
9
A16
OA
EB: A16
51
HA1
IA
HB: HA1
10
~ROMSEL
OA
EB: ROM ~CE
52
NVMCLK
OA
NVRAM: SCL
11
~RAMSEL
OA
EB: RAM ~CS
53
RINGD
IA
DAA: RINGD
12
HINT
OA
HB: HINT
54
D0
IA/OA
EB: D0
13
HD0
IA/OB
HB: HD0
55
D1
IA/OA
EB: D1
14
HD1
IA/OB
HB: HD1
56
GND
GND
GND
15
HD2
IA/OB
HB: HD2
57
D2
IA/OA
EB: D2
16
HD3
IA/OB
HB: HD3
58
D3
IA/OA
EB: D3
17
HD4
IA/OB
HB: HD4
59
GND
GND
GND
18
HD5
IA/OB
HB: HD5
60
D4
IA/OA
EB: D4
19
HD6
IA/OB
HB: HD6
61
PLLVDD
PLL
PLLGND through 0.1 µF
20
HD7
IA/OB
HB: HD7
62
GND/~SVDIRQ (Note 6)
GND/IA
GND/RCDSVD: ~IRQ
21
HA0
IA
HB: HA0
63
XTLI
IE
MDP Crystal
22
~HCS
IA
HB: ~CS
64
XTLO
OE
MDP Crystal
23
AVDD
PWR
VCC and filter
65
D5
IA/OA
EB: D5
24
AGND
GND
AGND
66
D6
IA/OA
EB: D6
25
TELIN
I(DA)
Telephone Handset Interface
67
D7
IA/OA
EB: D7
26
TELOUT
O(DD)
Telephone Handset Interface
68
PLLCAP
PLL
VDD (Note 7)
27
SPK
O(DD)
Audio Interface
69
PLLGND
PLL
PLLVDD through 0.1 µF
28
TXA1
O(DD)
DAA: TXA1
70
A0
OA
EB: A0
29
TXA2
O(DD)
DAA: TXA2
71
A1
OA
EB: A1
30
VREF
DI
VC through capacitors
72
A2
OA
EB: A2
31
VC
DI
AGND through capacitors and
DAA
73
A3
OA
EB: A3
32
MICV
I(DA)
Audio Interface
74
A4
OA
EB: A4
33
MICM
I(DA)
Audio Interface
75
A5
OA
EB: A5
34
RIN
I(DA)
DAA: RXA
76
A6
OA
EB: A6
35
AGND
GND
AGND
77
A7
OA
EB: A7
36
AVDD
PWR
VCC and filter
78
A8
OA
EB: A8
37
VDD
PWR
VCC and filter
79
A9
OA
EB: A9
38
~CALLID
OA
DAA: ~CALLID
80
A10
OA
EB: A10
39
AGND
GND
AGND
81
A11
OA
EB: A11
40
GND
GND
GND
82
GND/~SVDCS (Note 6)
GND/OA
GND/RCDSVD: ~SVDCS
41
~HWT
IA
HB: ~WT
83
VDD
PWR
VCC and filter
42
~HRD
IA
HB: ~RD
84
GND
GND
GND
Notes:
1.
I/O types:
DI = Device interconnect.
IA, IC = Digital input; IE = Crystal input (see Table 3-8).
OA, OB, = Digital output; OE = Crystal output (see Table 3-8).
I(DA) = Analog input (see Table 3-9).
O(DD), O(DF) = Analog output (see Table 3-9).
2.
NC = No external connection allowed.
3.
Connect to VCC through 10K ohms.
4.
Connect to GND through 10K ohms.
5.
~MUTE and ~WKRES are supported on 1-crystal models; CXTLI and CXTLO are supported on 2-crystal models.
6.
~SVDIRQ and ~SVDCS are supported on SCP models.
7.
The PLL circuit is not supported in the RC336 or RC56 devices. These pins may be connected as indicated or left NC externally.
1105
3-11
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
68
67
66
65
64
63
62
61
VSS
~WRITE
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
RS0
RS1
RS2
RS3
RS4
VSS
NC
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
60
59
58
57
56
55
54
53
52
51
50
49
48
47
46
45
44
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
NC
~EN85
NC
SR4OUT
SR1IO
SA1CLK
IA1CLK
VREF
VC
ADVSS
CTRLSIN
SOUT
SIN
ADVDD
ADVSS
MCLK
~IARESET
VDD
SR3IN
VSS
RBIAS
MICIN
AVSS
LINEIN
AVDD
LINEOUT
SPKN
NC
SPKP
FSYNC
ICLK
NC
NC
REFCNTL
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
IACLK
~CS
~READ
VDD
NC
GPO7
GPO6
GPO5
GPO4
NC
VSS
~IRQ
~SLEEPO
~RESET
XTLI
XTLO
VSS
1087F2-2 RCDSVD-L68
Figure 3-7. RCDSVD SCP Pin Signals- 68-Pin PLCC
3-12
1105
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
Table 3-5. RCDSVD SCP Pin Signals - 68-Pin PLCC
Pin
Signal Label
1
D6
2
3
I/O Type
Interface
Pin
Signal Label
I/O Type
Interface
IA/OB
EB: D6
35
LINEOUT
O(DD)
L/A IF: TELOUT
D5
IA/OB
EB: D5
36
SPKN
O(DF)
D4
IA/OB
EB: D4
37
NC
4
D3
IA/OB
EB: D3
38
SPKP
O(DF)
L/A IF: SPK
5
D2
IA/OB
EB: D2
39
FSYNC
DI
SA1CLK (55)
6
D1
IA/OB
EB: D1
40
ICLK
DI
7
D0
IA/OB
EB: D0
41
NC
8
~WRITE
IA
EB: ~WRITE
42
NC
9
VSS
GND
DGND
43
REFCNTL
IA
DGND
10
IACLK
DI
MCLK (45)
44
~IARESET
IA
~SLEEPO (22) and to GND
through 10 kΩ
11
~CS
IA
Modem: ~SVDCS
45
MCLK
DI
IACLK (10)
12
~READ
IA
EB: ~READ
46
ADVSS
GND
DGND
13
VDD
PWR
14
NC
15
GPO7
OA
NC
16
GPO6
OA
NC
17
GPO5
OA
NC
18
GPO4
OA
19
NC
20
VSS
21
NC
NC
IA1CLK (54)
NC
NC
VCC
47
ADVDD
PWR
VCC
NC
48
SIN
DI
SR4OUT (57)
49
SOUT
DI
SR3IN (28)
50
CTRLSIN
DI
SR1IO (56)
51
ADVSS
GND
DGND
NC
52
VC
DI
AGND through capacitors
NC
53
VREF
DI
VC through capacitors
GND
DGND
54
IA1CLK
DI
ICLK (40)
~IRQ
OA
Modem: SVDIRQ
55
SA1CLK
DI
FSYNC (39)
22
~SLEEPO
OA
~IARESET (44)
56
SR1IO
DI
CTRLSIN (50)
23
~RESET
IA
Modem: ~RES
57
SR4OUT
DI
SIN (48)
24
XTLI
I
Crystal/Clock Circuit
58
NC
25
XTLO
O
Crystal/Clock Circuit
59
~EN85
26
VSS
GND
DGND
60
NC
27
VDD
PWR
VCC
61
NC
28
SR3IN
DI
SOUT (49)
62
VSS
GND
29
VSS
GND
DGND
63
RS4
IA
EB: A4
30
RBIAS
REF
AGND through 120 KΩ
64
RS3
IA
EB: A3
31
MICIN
I(DA)
L/A IF: MICV
65
RS2
IA
EB: A2
32
AVSS
GND
AGND
66
RS1
IA
EB: A1
33
LINEIN
I(DA)
L/A IF: TELIN
67
RS0
IA
EB: A0
34
AVDD
PWR
VCC through filter
68
D7
IA/OB
EB: D7
NC
IA
DGND through 20 KΩ
NC
NC
DGND
Notes:
1.
I/O types:
DI = Device interconnect.
IA, IC = Digital input; IE = Crystal input (see Table 3-8).
OA, OB, = Digital output; OE = Crystal output (see Table 3-8).
I(DA) = Analog input (see Table 3-9).
O(DD), O(DF) = Analog output (see Table 3-9).
2.
NC = No external connection allowed.
1105
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RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
Table 3-6. Modem Pin Signal Definitions
Label
I/O Type
Signal Name/Description
GENERAL
XTLI, XTLO
IE, OE
Modem Crystal/Clock In and Crystal Out. Connect to an external crystal circuit consisting of a crystal
and passive components. The standard crystal frequency is 56.448 MHz (RC336ACF/SCP, manufacturing
numbers R6759 and R6760, are optionally available for use with 52.416 MHz).
CXTLI, CXTLO
IE, OE
Microcontroller Crystal/Clock In and Crystal Out (Optional Model). The standard 84-pin model
connects to a single crystal using the XTLI and XTLO pins. Internally, the modem data pump (MDP)
generates a secondary clock (SYCLK) at one-half the XTLI frequency (28.224 MHz for 56.448 MHz
crystal) which is input to the microcontroller unit (MCU) crystal/clock lines. A optional 84-pin modem model
connects the MCU crystal/clock lines to external CXTLI pins instead of the MDP allowing the MCU
frequency to be independently controlled. In the case, the CXLI function replaces the ~MUTE function on
pin 1 and the CXTLO function replaces the ~WKRES function on pin 2.
~RES
IC
Modem Reset. The active low ~RES input resets the modem logic, and restores the saved configuration
from NVRAM or returns the modem to the factory default values if NVRAM is not present. ~RES low holds
the modem in the reset state; ~RES going high releases the modem from the reset state. After application
of +5V, ~RES must be held low for at least 15 ms after the +5V power reaches operating range. The
modem device set is ready to use 25 ms after the low-to-high transition of ~RES.
For serial Interface, the ~RES input is typically connected to a reset switch circuit. For parallel Interface,
the ~RES input is typically connected to the host bus RESET line through an inverter.
~WKRES
OA
Wakeup Reset. This active low signal, available on the standard 1-crystal model, is used to wake-up the
RCDSVD device from Sleep Mode. In the optional 2-crystal model, which allows independent MCU crystal
operation, this pin is used for the CXTLO function.
VDD
PWR
+ 5V Supply Voltage. Connect to VCC.
GND
GND
Digital Ground. Connect to digital ground.
AGND
GND
Analog Ground. Connect to analog ground.
PLLCAP
PLL
PLLCAP. Connect to VDD. PLL circuit is not supported on RC336 and RC56. This pin may be connected
as indicated for RCDL56 plug-in upgrade or may be left open.
PLLVDD
PLL
PLLVDD. Connect to PLLGND through 0.1 µF. PLL circuit is not supported on RC336 and RC56. This pin
may be connected as indicated for RCDL56 plug-in upgrade or may be left open.
PLLGND
PLL
PLLGND. Connect to PLLVDD through 0.1 µF. PLL circuit is not supported on RC336 and RC56. This pin
may be connected as indicated for RCDL56 plug-in upgrade or may be left open.
NVMCLK
OA
NVRAM Clock. NVMCLK output high enables the NVRAM.
NVMDATA
IA/OA
NVRAM Data. The NVMDATA pin supplies a serial data interface to the NVRAM. This line can also be
timeshared with ~PULSE output as enabled by ConfigurACE II for Windows.
A0-A16
OA
Address Lines 0-16. A0-A16 are the external memory bus address output lines.
D0-D7
IA/OA
Data Line 0-7. D0-D7 are the external memory bus bidirectional data lines.
~READ
OA
Read Enable. ~READ output low enables data transfer from the selected device to the D0-D7 lines.
~WRITE
OA
Write Enable. ~WRITE output low enables data transfer from the D0-D7 lines to the selected device.
~RAMSEL
OA
RAM Select. ~RAMSEL output low selects the external RAM.
~ROMSEL
OA
ROM Select. ~ROMSEL output low selects an external ROM or flash ROM.
NVRAM INTERFACE
EXTERNAL MEMORY BUS INTERFACE
3-14
1105
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
Table 3-4. Modem Pin Signal Definitions (Cont'd)
Label
I/O Type
Signal Name/Description
TELEPHONE LINE INTERFACE
TXA1
O(DF)
Transmit Analog 1. The TXA1 output is single-ended output.
RIN
I(DA)
Receive Analog. RIN is a single-ended receive data input from the telephone line/audio interface.
~OH
OA
Off-Hook Relay Control. The active low ~OH output is used to control the normally open off-hook relay.
The ~PULSE function is also provided on this line for single ~OH/~PULSE relay application.
LCS
IA
Loop Current Sense. LCS is an active high input that indicates a handset off-hook status.
RINGD
IA
Ring Frequency. A rising edge on the RINGD input initiates an internal ring frequency measurement. The
RINGD input is typically connected to the output of an optoisolator or equivalent. The idle state (no ringing)
output of the ring detect circuit should be low.
VC
MI
Centerpoint Voltage. Connect to analog ground through 10 µF (polarized, + terminal to VC) and 0.1 µF
(ceramic) capacitors in parallel and a ferrite bead in series with the capacitors (see Section 5).
VREF
MI
Voltage Reference. Connect to VC through 10 µF (polarized, + terminal to VREF) and 0.1 µF (ceramic) in
parallel.
~VOICE
OA
Voice Relay Control. The ~VOICE output is connected to the Voice relay (DPDT). In voice mode, the
modem asserts the this output to switch the handset from the telephone line to a current source to power
the handset so it can be used as a microphone and speaker interface to the modem. This relay output is
used in conjunction with the ~CALLID and ~OH relay outputs to configure the telephone
line/telephone/audio interface circuit (see Table 1-5).
~CALLID
OA
Caller ID Relay Control (84-Pin PLCC Only). The ~CALLID output is connected to the normally open
Caller ID relay. When the modem detects a Calling Number Delivery (CND) message, the ~CALLID output
is asserted to close the Caller ID relay in order to AC couple the CND information to the modem RIN input
(without closing the off-hook relay and allowing loop current flow which would indicate an off-hook
condition).
~MUTE
OA
Mute Relay Control. The active low ~MUTE output can be used to control the normally open mute relay.
84-pin models: The ~MUTE output is supported on the standard single crystal modem models.
68-pin models: When enabled by ConfigurACE II for Windows, the NVMDATA line can be assigned to the
~MUTE output.
TELEPHONE HANDSET INTERFACE
TELIN
I(DA)
Telephone Handset Input. TELIN is the input from the telephone handset microphone interface circuit.
TELOUT
O(DF)
Telephone Handset Output. TELOUT is the output to the telephone handset speaker interface circuit.
MICM
I(DA)
Microphone Modem Input. MICM is a single-ended microphone input from the analog switch circuit. The
input impedance is > 70k ohms.
MICV
I(DA)
Microphone Voice Input. MICV is a single-ended microphone input from the analog switch circuit. The
input impedance is > 70k ohms.
SPK
O(DF)
Speaker Output. Speakerphone speaker out is a single ended output.
AUDIO/HEADSET INTERFACE
PARALLEL HOST INTERFACE (PARALLEL INTERFACE VERSION)
The parallel interface emulates a 16550A UART-compatible interface.
HA0-HA2
IA
Host Bus Address Lines 0-2. During a host read or write operation with ~HCS low, HA0-HA2 select an
internal 16550A-compatible register.
HD0-HD7
IA/OB
Host Bus Data Lines 0-7. HD0-HD7 are comprised of eight three-state input/output lines providing
bidirectional communication between the host and the modem. Data, control words, and status information
are transferred over HD0-HD7.
~HCS
IA
Host Bus Chip Select. ~HCS input low enables the modem host bus interface.
~HRD
IA
Host Bus Read. ~HRD is an active low, read control input. When ~HCS is low, ~HRD low allows the host
to read status information or data from a selected modem register.
~HWT
IA
Host Bus Write. ~HWT is an active low, write control input. When ~HCS is low, ~HWT low allows the host
to write data or control words into a selected modem register.
HINT
OA
Host Bus Interrupt. HINT output is set high when the receiver error flag, received data available,
transmitter holding register empty, or modem status interrupt is asserted. HINT is reset low upon the
appropriate interrupt service or master reset operation.
1105
3-15
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
Table 3-4. Modem Pin Signal Definitions (Cont'd)
Label
I/O Type
Signal Name/Description
V.24 (EIA/TIA-232-E) DTE SERIAL INTERFACE AND INDICATOR (SERIAL INTERFACE VERSION)
The serial interface signals correspond to logically inverted V.24 / EIA/TIA-232-E signals with TTL voltage levels.
~TXD
IA
Transmitted Data (EIA BA/ITU-T CT103). The DTE uses the ~TXD line to send data to the modem for
transmission over the telephone line or to transmit commands to the modem.
~RXD
OA
Received Data (EIA BB/ITU-T CT 104). The modem uses the ~RXD line to send data received from the
telephone line to the DTE and to send modem responses to the DTE. During command mode, ~RXD data
represents the modem responses to the DTE.
~CTS
OB
Clear To Send (EIA CB/ITU-T CT106). ~CTS output ON (low) indicates that the modem is ready to accept
data from the DTE. In asynchronous operation, in error correction or normal mode, ~CTS is always ON
(low) unless RTS/CTS flow control is selected by the &Kn command.
~DSR
OB
Data Set Ready (EIA CC/ITU-T CT107). ~DSR indicates modem status to the DTE. ~DSR OFF (high)
indicates that the DTE is to disregard all signals appearing on the interchange circuits except Ring
Indicator (~RI). ~DSR output is controlled by the AT&Sn command.
~RLSD
OB
Received Line Signal Detector (EIA CF/ITU-T CT109). When AT&C0 command is not in effect, ~RLSD
output is ON when a carrier is detected on the telephone line or OFF when carrier is not detected.
~TM
OB
Test Mode Indicate (EIA TM/ITU-T CT142). The ~TM output indicates the modem is in test mode (low) or
in any other mode (high).
~RI
OB
Ring Indicator (EIA CE/ITU-T CT125). ~RI output ON (low) indicates the presence of an ON segment of a
ring signal on the telephone line.
~DRSOUT
OB
Data Signaling Rate Indicator (EIA CI/ITU-T CT112). ~DRSOUT is ON (low) when the modem desires or
is engaged in the high speed (2400 bps or higher) mode. ~DRSOUT is OFF (high) otherwise.
~DTR
IA
Data Terminal Ready (EIA CD/ITU-T CT108). The ~DTR input is turned ON (low) by the DTE when the
DTE is ready to transmit or receive data. ~DTR ON prepares the modem to be connected to the telephone
line, and maintains the connection established by the DTE (manual answering) or internally (automatic
answering). ~DTR OFF places the modem in the disconnect state under control of the &Dn and &Qn
commands.
~RTS
IA
Request To Send (EIA CA/ITU-T CT105). ~RTS input ON (low) indicates that the DTE is ready to accept
data from the modem. In the command state, the modem ignores ~RTS.
In asynchronous operation, the modem ignores ~RTS unless RTS/CTS flow control is selected by the &Kn
command.
~RDL
IA
Remote Digital Loop Select (EIA RL/ITU-T CT140). ~RDL input low activates remote digital loop request.
The loop is executed at the speed for which the modem is currently configured.
~AL
IA
Analog Loop (EIA LL/ITU-T CT141). ~AL input low causes the modem to operate in the analog loop test
mode.
~AAIND
OA
Auto Answer Indicator. ~AAIND output ON (low) corresponds to the indicator on. ~AAIND output is
active when the modem is configured to answer the ring automatically (ATSO command ≠0).
~TMIND
OA
Test Mode Indicator. ~TMIND output ON (low) corresponds to the indicator on. ~TMIND output pulses
(indicator flashes) when the modem is in test mode and if an error is detected.
~DTRIND
OA
DTR Indicator. ~DTRIND output ON (low) corresponds to the indicator on. The ~DTRIND state reflects
the ~DTR output state except when the &D0 command is active, in which case ~DTRIND is low.
Notes:
1.
2.
3-16
I/O types:
DI = Device interconnect.
IA, IC = Digital input; IE = Crystal input (see Table 3-8).
OA, OB, = Digital output; OE = Crystal output (see Table 3-8).
I(DA) = Analog input (see Table 3-9).
O(DD), O(DF) = Analog output (see Table 3-9).
NC = No external connection allowed.
1105
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
Table 3-7. RCDSVD SCP Pin Signal Definitions
Label
I/O Type
Signal/Definition
SYSTEM SIGNALS
XTLI, XTLO
R, R
Crystal In and Crystal Out. Crystal In and Crystal Out. Connect to an external 56.448 MHz fundamental or
third overtone crystal circuit or oscillator circuit.
~RESET
ID
Reset. After application of +5V power, ~RESET must be held low for at least 15 ms after the +5V power
reaches operating range. The SCP is ready to use 25 ms after the low-to-high transition of ~RESET. The
reset sequence initializes the SCP interface memory to default values. Connect to the modem ~RES pin.
~IARESET
IA
IA Reset. Connect to the SCP ~SLEEPO pin and to GND through 10 kΩ.
~SLEEPO
OA
Sleep Out. Connect to the SCP ~IARESET pin.
~EN85
IA
Enable 85 Bus. Connect to GND through 20 kΩ.
VDD
PWR
+ 5V Digital Supply Voltage for Digital Circuits. Connect to VCC.
ADVDD
PWR
+ 5V Digital Supply Voltage for Analog Circuit. Connect to VCC.
AVDD
PWR
+ 5V Analog Supply Voltage for Analog Circuit. Connect to VCC through decoupling circuit.
VSS
GND
Digital Ground. Connect to digital ground.
ADVSS
GND
Digital Ground for Analog Circuit . Connect to digital ground.
AVSS
GND
Analog Ground. Connect to analog ground.
MODEM INTERFACE
D0–D7
IA/OB
Data Lines. Connect to the modem external bus D0-D7 lines, respectively.
RS0–RS4
IA
Register Select Lines. Connect to the modem external bus A0–A4 lines, respectively.
~CS
IA
Chip Select. Connect to the modem ~SVDCS line.
~READ
IA
Read Enable. Connect to the modem external bus ~READ line.
~WRITE
IA
Write Enable. Connect to the modem external bus ~WRITE line.
IRQ
IA
Interrupt Request. Connect to the modem IRQ line.
MICIN
I(DA)
Microphone In. MICIN is a single-ended input from the audio interface circuit for routing from microphone
input.
SPKP
O(DF)
Speaker Out Positive. The SPKP is a single-ended output to the audio interface circuit for routing to
speaker. The output can drive a 300 Ωload.
LINEIN
I(DA)
Line In Analog Input. LINEIN is a single-ended input from the audio interface circuit for routing from the
telephone line through the hybrid circuit.
LINEOUT
O(DF)
Line Out Analog Output. LINEOUT is a single-ended output to the audio interface circuit for routing to the
telephone line through the hybrid circuit. The output can drive a 300 Ωload.
TELEPHONE LINE/AUDIO INTERFACE
REFERENCE SIGNALS
VREF
REF
High Voltage Reference. Connect to VC through 10 µF (polarized, + terminal to VREF) and 0.1 µF (ceramic)
in parallel.
VC
REF
Low Voltage Reference. Connect to analog ground through 10 µF (polarized, + terminal to VC) and 0.1 µF
(ceramic) in parallel.
RBIAS
REF
Reference Bias. Connect to analog ground through 120 kΩ.
1105
3-17
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
Table 3-5. RCDSVD SCP Pin Signal Definitions (Cont’d)
Label
I/O Type
Signal/Definition
DEVICE INTERCONNECT AND MISCELLANEOUS
SR1IO
DI
Connect to SCP: CTRLSIN.
CTRLSIN
DI
Connect to SCP: SR1IO.
SR3IN
DI
Connect to SCP: SOUT.
SOUT
DI
Connect to SCP: SR3IN.
SR4OUT
DI
Connect to SCP: SIN.
SIN
DI
Connect to SCP: SR4OUT.
IACLK
DI
Connect to SCP: MCLK.
MCLK
DI
Connect to SCP: IACLK.
IA1CLK
DI
Connect to SCP: ICLK
ICLK
DI
Connect to SCP: IA1CLK.
SA1CLK
DI
Connect to SCP: FSYNC.
FSYNC
DI
Connect to SCP: SA1CLK.
REFCNTL
REF
Connect to GND.
Notes:
1. I/O types:
DI = Device interconnect.
IA, IC, ID = Digital input (see Table 3-8).
OA, OB = Digital output (see Table 3-8).
I(DA) = Analog input (see Table 3-9).
O(DD), O(DF) = Analog output (see Table 3-9).
3-18
1105
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
Table 3-8. Digital Electrical Characteristics
Parameter
Input High Voltage
Symbol
V
Type IB
Type IC
Input Low Voltage
Type IA, IB, ID
Type IC
Type IE
Input Low Current
Type IB and IC
Input Leakage Current
Typ.
Max.
2.0
0.7 V
CC
–
–
–
VCC + 0.3
VCC + 0.3
4.0
–
I
IH
µA
–
–
–
–
40
2.5
–0.3
–0.3
–
–
–
1.0
0.8
0.8
–
V
IL
I
IL
µA
–
–
15
–
100
–
–
±10
Type OA
2.4
–
–
Type OB
2.4
–
–
Type OD
–
–
V
CC
V
–
–
0.4
Type OB
–
–
0.4
–
–
0.75
Output Leakage Current
Types OA and OB
Capacitive Load
Types IA and ID
Type IB
Capacitive Drive
Types OA, OB, and OC
Circuit Type
Type IA
Type IB
Type IC
Type ID
Types OA and OB
Type OC
Type OD
I
TSI
I
LO
±10
µADC
±10
µADC
C
L
C
I
= – 100 µA
LOAD
I
= – 6 mA
LOAD
I
= 0 mA
LOAD
Note 3.
VDC
OL
Type OD
V = 0 to 0 V
IN
V = 0 to V
IN
CC
VDC
OH
Type OA
Three-State (Off) Current
Note 2.
VCC = 5.25 V
µADC
XTLI
Type OE
Output Low Voltage
Note 2.
VCC = 5.25 V, VIN= 5.25 V
-400
I
IN
V
Test Conditions1
VDC
Types IA and ID
Output High Voltage
Units
VDC
IH
Type IA and IB
Type IC and ID
Type IE
Input High Current
Min.
I
= 1.6 mA
LOAD
I
= 6 mA
LOAD
I
= 15 mA
LOAD
V = 0 V to V
IN
CC
VIN = 0.4 to VCC-1
pF
–
–
10
20
–
10
pF
D
TTL
TTL with pull-up
CMOS with pull-up
~RES
TTL with 3-state
Open drain
Relay driver
Notes:
1. Test Conditions:
VCC = ±5%, TA = 0°C to 70°C, (unless otherwise stated).
Output loads: Data bus (D0-D7), address bus (A0-A15), chip selects,
~READ, and ~WRITE loads = 70 pF + one TTL load.
Other = 50 pF + one TTL load.
2. Type IE inputs are centered approximately 2.5 V and swing 1.5 V
in each direction.
PEAK
3. Type OE outputs provide oscillator feedback when operating with an external crystal.
1105
3-19
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
Table 3-9. Analog Electrical Characteristics
Name
Type
Characteristic
Value
Modem
RIN,
TELIN
I (DA)
Input Impedance
AC Input Voltage Range
Reference Voltage
> 70K Ω
1.1 VP-P**
+2.5 VDC
TXA1,
TELOUT
O (DD)
Minimum Load
Maximum Capacitive Load
Output Impedance
AC Output Voltage Range
Reference Voltage
DC Offset Voltage
300 Ω
0 µF
10 Ω
2.2 VP-P
+2.5 VDC
± 200 mV
SPK
O (DF)
Minimum Load
Maximum Capacitive Load
Output Impedance
AC Output Voltage Range
Reference Voltage
DC Offset Voltage
300 Ω
0.01 µF
10 Ω
1.1 VP-P
+2.5 VDC
± 20 mV
MICM,
MICV
I (DA)
Input Impedance
Maximum AC Input Voltage
Reference Voltage*
Maximum AC Output Voltage
> 70K Ω
1.7 VP-P
+2.5 VDC
2.7 VP-P
LINEIN
I (DA)
Input Impedance
AC Input Voltage Range
Reference Voltage
> 38K Ω
2.0 VP-P Single-ended
+2.5 VDC
LINEOUT
O (DD)
Minimum Load
Maximum Capacitive Load
Output Impedance
AC Output Voltage Range
Reference Voltage
DC Offset Voltage
350 Ω
0.12 µF
10 Ω
2.2 VP-P Single-ended
+2.5 VDC
± 200 mV
SPKP and
SPKN
O (DF)
Minimum Load
300 Ω
Maximum Capacitive Load
Output Impedance
AC Output Voltage Range
Reference Voltage
DC Offset Voltage
0.1 µF
10 Ω
4.0 VP-P Differential
+2.5 VDC
± 20 mV
Input Impedance
Maximum AC Input Voltage
Reference Voltage*
> 38K Ω
2.0 VP-P Single-ended
+2.5 VDC
RCDSVD SCP
MICIN
I (DA)
* Reference Voltage provided internal to the device.
3-20
1105
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
Table 3-10. Current and Power Requirements
Current
Typical
Current (mA)
Mode
Power
Maximum
Current (mA)
Typical
Power (mW)
Maximum
Power (mW)
Modem Device
Notes
fIN = 56.448 MHz
Operating
Sleep (RCVDL56 Only)
170
205
850
1075
4
—
20
—
110
120
550
625
10
—
50
—
RCDSVD SCP
Operating
Sleep
fIN = 56.448 MHz
Notes:
Test conditions: VCC = 5.0 VDC for typical values; VCC = 5.25 VDC for maximum values.
Table 3-11. Absolute Maximum Ratings
Parameter
Supply Voltage
Input Voltage
Operating Temperature Range
Storage Temperature Range
Analog Inputs
Voltage Applied to Outputs in High Impedance (Off) State
DC Input Clamp Current
DC Output Clamp Current
Static Discharge Voltage (25°C)
Latch-up Current (25°C)
1105
Symbol
Limits
Units
V
DD
V
IN
T
A
T
STG
V
IN
V
HZ
I
IK
I
OK
V
ESD
I
TRIG
-0.5 to +7.0
V
-0.5 to (+5VD +0.5)
V
-0 to +70
°C
-55 to +125
°C
-0.3 to (+5VA + 0.3)
V
-0.5 to (+5VD + 0.5)
V
±20
mA
±20
mA
±2500
V
±200
mA
3-21
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
3.2 INTERFACE TIMING AND WAVEFORMS
3.2.1 External Memory Bus Timing
The external memory bus timing is listed in Table 3-12 and is illustrated in Figure 3-8.
Table 3-12. Timing - External Memory Bus
Symbol
Parameter
Min
Typ.
Max
Units
External Crystal Frequency = 56.448 MHz
t
FI
t
CYC
Internal Operating Frequency
28.224
MHz
Internal Operating Clock Cycle
35.43
ns
t
AS
t
ES
t
RW
t
RDS
t
RDH
~READ High to Address Valid
–
11.2
12.5
ns
~READ High to ES Valid
–
12.2
13.5
ns
–
ns
–
ns
–
ns
t
AS
t
ES
t
WW
t
WTD
t
WTH
~WRITE High to Address Valid
ns
Read
~READ Pulse Width
53.1
Read Data Valid to ~READ High
6.3
~READ High to Read Data Hold
0
5.7
Write
~WRITE High to ES Valid
–
11.2
12.5
–
12.2
13.5
ns
–
ns
8
ns
–
ns
~WRITE to ~WRITE Pulse Width
53.1
~WRITE Low to Write Data Valid
–
~WRITE High to Write Data Hold
5.0
7.1
External Crystal Frequency = 52.216 MHz
t
FI
t
CYC
Internal Operating Frequency
26.208
MHz
Internal Operating Cycle
38.16
ns
t
AS
t
ES
t
RW
t
RDS
t
RDH
~READ High to Address Valid
t
AS
t
ES
t
WW
t
WTD
t
WTH
~WRITE High to Address Valid
–
~WRITE High to ES Valid
–
Read
~READ High to ES Valid
–
17
20
ns
–
18
21
ns
~READ Pulse Width
57.2
–
ns
Read Data Valid to ~READ High
8.7
–
ns
~READ High to Read Data Hold
0
–
ns
16
19.5
ns
18
21
ns
–
ns
15
ns
–
ns
Write
~WRITE to ~WRITE Pulse Width
57.2
~WRITE Low to Write Data Valid
–
~WRITE High to Write Data Hold
5.0
13
Notes:
1. VDD = 5.0 VDC ± 5%, TA = 0°C - 70°C.
2. ES = ~RAMSEL, ~ROMSEL, or ~SVDCS.
3. t
,t
= 1.5 t
for Extended Cycle Timing (Extended Cycle Timing is not used @28.442 MHz).
RW WW
CYC
4. Chip Enable to Output Delay Timing: tCE = 2 t
-t
-t
CYC ES RDS
@28.442 MHz: tAA = 70.86 - 13.5 - 6.3 = 51.06 ns
5.
3-22
@26.208 MHz: tAA = 76.32 - 21.0 - 8.7 = 46.62 ns
Output Enable to Output Delay Timing: t
=t
-t
OE RW RDS
@28.442 MHz: t
= 53.1 - 6.3 = 46.8 ns
OE
@26.208 MHz: t
= 57.2 - 8.7 = 48.5 ns.
OE
1105
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
t
CYC
C2*
t
AS
A0 - A16
t
ES
~ES**
t
RW
~READ
t
RDS
t
D0-D7
RDH
* C2 = Internal Phase 2 clock.
** ~ES = ~RAMSEL, ~ROMSEL, or ~SVDCS.
Read Timing
t
CYC
C2*
t
AS
A0 - A16
t
ES
~ES**
t
WW
~WRITE
t
t
WTD
WTH
D0-D7
* C2 = Internal Phase 2 clock.
** ~ES = ~RAMSEL, ~ROMSEL, or ~SVDCS.
Write Timing
1105F3-8 EB WF
Figure 3-8. Waveforms - External Memory Bus
1105
3-23
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
3.2.2 Parallel Host Bus Timing
The parallel host bus timing is listed in Table 3-13 and illustrated in Figure 3-11.
Table 3-13. Timing - Parallel Host Bus
Symbol
Parameter
Min
Max
Units
READ (See Notes 1,2, and 3)
t
AS
Address Setup
7
–
ns
t
AH
Address Hold
10
–
ns
t
CS
Chip Select Setup
0
–
ns
t
CH
Chip Select Hold
10
–
ns
t
RD
~HRD Strobe Width
51
–
ns
t
DD
Read Data Delay
–
45
ns
t
DRH
Read Data Hold
10
–
ns
WRITE (See Notes 1,2, and 3)
t
AS
Address Setup
7
–
ns
t
AH
Address Hold
10
–
ns
t
CS
Chip Select Setup
0
–
ns
t
CH
Chip Select Hold
10
–
ns
t
WT
~HWT Strobe Width
51
–
ns
t
DS
Write Data Setup
5
–
ns
t
DWH
Write Data Hold
5
–
ns
Notes:
1. When the host executes consecutive Rx FIFO reads, a minimum delay of 2 times the internal CPU clock cycle plus 15
ns (85.86 ns at 28.224 MHz) is required from the falling edge of ~HRD to the falling edge of the next Host Rx FIFO
~HRD clock.
2. When the Host executes consecutive Tx FIFO writes, a minimum delay of 2 times the internal CPU clock cycle plus 15
ns (85.86 ns at 28.224 MHz) is required from the falling edge of ~HWT to the falling edge of the next Host Tx FIFO
~HWT clock.
3. t , t
= t
+ 12 ns
RD WT
CYC
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HA0-HA2
tAS
tAH
~HCS
tCH
tCS
~HRD
tRD
~HWT
tDF
HD0-HD7
tDD
tDRH
a. Host Read
HA0-HA2
tAS
tAH
~HCS
tCH
tCS
~HRD
tWT
~HWT
tDS
HD0-HD7
tDWH
b. Host Write
876F3-8 HB WF
Figure 3-9. Waveforms - Parallel Host Bus
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This page is intentionally blank.
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4. PARALLEL HOST INTERFACE
The modem supports a 16550A interface in parallel interface versions. The 16550A interface can operate in FIFO mode or
non-FIFO mode. Non-FIFO mode is the same as 16450 interface operation. FIFO mode unique operations are identified.
4.1 OVERVIEW
Table 4-1 shows the parallel interface registers and the corresponding bit assignments.
The modem emulates the 16450/16550A interface and includes both a 16-byte receiver data first-in first-out buffer (RX
FIFO) and a 16-byte transmit data first-in first-out buffer (TX FIFO). When FIFO mode is selected in the FIFO Control
Register (FCR0 = 1), both FIFOs are operative. Furthermore, when FIFO mode is selected, DMA operation of the FIFO can
also be selected (FCR3 = 1). When FIFO mode is not selected, operation is restricted to 16450 interface operation.
The received data is read by the host from the Receiver Buffer (RX Buffer). The RX Buffer corresponds to the Receiver
Buffer Register in a 16550A device. In FIFO mode, the RX FIFO operates transparently behind the RX Buffer. Interface
operation is described with reference to the RX Buffer in both FIFO and non-FIFO modes.
The transmit data is loaded by the host into the Transmit Buffer (TX Buffer). The TX Buffer corresponds to the Transmit
Holding Register in a 16550A device. In FIFO mode, the TX FIFO operates transparently behind the TX Buffer. Interface
operation is described with reference to the TX Buffer in both FIFO and non-FIFO modes.
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Table 4-1. Parallel Interface Registers
Register
Register
Bit No.
No.
Name
7
Scratch Register (SCR)
6
Modem Status Register
(MSR)
Data Carrier
Detect
(DCD)
5
Line Status Register (LSR)
RX FIFO
Error
4
Modem Control Register
(MCR)
0
0
3
Line Control Register (LCR)
Divisor
Latch
Access Bit
(DLAB)
Set Break
2
Interrupt Identify Register
(IIR) (Read Only)
FIFOs
Enabled
FIFOs
Enabled
2
FIFO Control Register
(FCR) (Write Only)
1
(DLAB = 0)
Interrupt Enable Register
(IER)
0
Transmitter Buffer Register
(DLAB = 0)
(THR)
0
(DLAB = 0)
Receiver Buffer Register
(RBR)
7
6
5
4
3
Ring
Indicator
(RI)
Clear to
Send
(CTS)
Break
Transmitter Transmitter
Interrupt (BI)
Buffer
Empty
Register
(TEMT)
Empty
(THRE)
Receiver
Receiver
Trigger MSB Trigger
LSB
0
Data Set
Ready
(DSR)
1
0
0
0
Local
Loopback
Stick Parity Even Parity
Select (EPS)
Delta Data Delta Clear
Trailing
Delta Data
to Send
Carrier Edge of Ring Set Ready
(DCTS)
(DDSR)
Indicator
Detect
(TERI)
(DDCD)
Framing
Error
(FE)
Parity
Error
(PE)
Overrun
Error
(OE)
Receiver
Data Ready
(DR)
Out 2
Out 1
Request to
Send
(RTS)
Data
Terminal
Ready
(DTR)
Parity
Enable
(PEN)
Number of Word LengthWord Length
Stop Bits Select Bit 1 Select Bit 0
(WLS0)
(WLS1)
(STB)
Pending
Pending
Pending
Interrupt ID Interrupt ID Interrupt ID
Bit 0
Bit 1
Bit 2
0
0
Reserved
Reserved
DMA Mode
Select
0
0
Enable
Modem
Status
Interrupt
(EDSSI)
TX FIFO
Reset
“0" if
Interrupt
Pending
RX FIFO FIFO Enable
Reset
Enable
Enable
Receiver Transmitter
Holding
Line Status
Register
Interrupt
Empty
(ELSI)
Interrupt
(ETBEI)
Enable
Received
Data
Available
Interrupt
(ERBFI)
Transmitter FIFO Buffer Register (Write Only)
Receiver FIFO Buffer Register (Read Only)
1
Divisor Latch MSB Register
(DLAB = 1)
(DLM)
Divisor Latch MSB
0
Divisor Latch LSB Register
(DLAB = 1)
(DLL)
Divisor Latch LSB
4-2
2
Scratch Register
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4.2 REGISTER SIGNAL DEFINITIONS
4.2.1 IER - Interrupt Enable Register (Addr = 1, DLAB = 0)
The IER enables five types of interrupts that can separately assert the HINT output signal (Table 4-2). A selected interrupt
can be enabled by setting the corresponding enable bit to a 1, or disabled by setting the corresponding enable bit to a 0.
Disabling an interrupt in the IER prohibits setting the corresponding indication in the IIR and assertion of HINT. Disabling all
interrupts (resetting IER0 - IER3 to a 0) inhibits setting of any Interrupt Identifier Register (IIR) bits and inhibits assertion of
the HINT output. All other system functions operate normally, including the setting of the Line Status Register (LSR) and the
Modem Status Register (MSR).
Bits 7-4
Not used.
Always 0.
Bit 3
Enable Modem Status Interrupt (EDSSI).
This bit, when a 1, enables assertion of the HINT output whenever the Delta CTS (MSR0), Delta DSR
(MSR1), Delta TER (MSR2), or Delta DCD (MSR3) bit in the Modem Status Register (MSR) is a 1. This bit,
when a 0, disables assertion of HINT due to setting of any of these four MSR bits.
Bit 2
Enable Receiver Line Status Interrupt (ELSI).
This bit, when a 1, enables assertion of the HINT output whenever the Overrun Error (LSR1), Parity Error
(LSR2), Framing Error (LSR3), or Break Interrupt (LSR4) receiver status bit in the Line Status Register (LSR)
changes state. This bit, when a 0, disables assertion of HINT due to change of the receiver LSR bits 1-4.
Bit 1
Enable Transmitter Holding Register Empty Interrupt (ETBEI).
This bit, when a 1, enables assertion of the HINT output when the Transmitter Empty bit in the Line Status
Register (LSR5) is a 1. This bit, when a 0, disables assertion of HINT due to LSR5.
Bit 0
Enable Receiver Data Available Interrupt (ERBFI) and Character Timeout in FIFO Mode.
This bit, when a 1, enables assertion of the HINT output when the Receiver Data Ready bit in the Line Status
Register (LSR0) is a1 or character timeout occurs in the FIFO mode. This bit, when a 0, disables assertion of
HINT due to the LSR0 or character timeout.
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4.2.2 FCR - FIFO Control Register (Addr = 2, Write Only)
The FCR is a write-only register used to enable FIFO mode, clear the RX FIFO and TX FIFO, enable DMA mode, and set
the RX FIFO trigger level.
Bits 7-6
RX FIFO Trigger Level.
FCR7 and FCR6 set the trigger level for the RX FIFO (Receiver Data Available) interrupt.
FCR7
0
0
1
1
Bits 5-4
Not used.
Bit 3
DMA Mode Select.
FCR6
0
1
0
1
RX FIFO Trigger Level (Bytes)
01
04
08
14
When FIFO mode is selected (FCR0 = 1), FCR3 selects non-DMA operation (FCR3 = 0) or DMA operation
(FCR3 = 1). When FIFO mode is not selected (FCR0 = 0), this bit is not used (the modem operates in nonDMA mode in 16450 operation).
DMA operation in FIFO mode.
RXRDY will be asserted when the number of characters in the RX FIFO is equal to or greater than the value
in the RX FIFO Trigger Level (IIR0-IIR3 = 4h) or the received character timeout (IIR0-IIR3 = Ch) has
occurred. RXRDY will go inactive when there are no more characters in the RX FIFO.
TXRDY will be asserted when there are one or more empty (unfilled) locations in the TX FIFO. TXRDY will go
inactive when the TX FIFO is completely full.
Non-DMA operation in FIFO mode.
RXRDY will be asserted when there are one or more characters in the RX FIFO. RXRDY will go inactive
when there are no more characters in the RX FIFO.
TXRDY will be asserted when there are no characters in the TX FIFO. TXRDY will go inactive when the first
character is loaded into the TX FIFO Buffer.
Bit 2
TX FIFO Reset.
When FCR2 is a 1, all bytes in the TX FIFO are cleared. This bit is cleared automatically by the modem.
Bit 1
RX FIFO Reset.
When FCR1 is a 1, all bytes in the RX FIFO are cleared. This bit is cleared automatically by the modem.
Bit 0
FIFO Enable.
When FCR0 is a 0, 16450 mode is selected and all bits are cleared in both FIFOs. When FCR0 is a 1, FIFO
mode (16550A mode) is selected and both FIFOs are enabled. FCR0 must be a 1 when other bits in the FCR
are written or they will not be acted upon.
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4.2.3
IIR - Interrupt Identifier Register (Addr = 2)
The Interrupt Identifier Register (IIR) identifies the existence and type of up to five prioritized pending interrupts. Four priority
levels are set to assist interrupt processing in the host. The four levels, in order of decreasing priority, are: Highest: Receiver
Line Status, 2: Receiver Data Available or Receiver Character Timeout, 3: TX Buffer Empty, and 4: Modem Status.
When the IIR is accessed, the modem freezes all interrupts and indicates the highest priority interrupt pending to the host.
Any change occurring in interrupt conditions are not indicated until this access is complete.
Bits 7-6
FIFO Mode.
These two bits copy FCR0.
Bits 5-4
Not Used.
Always 0.
Bits 3-1
Highest Priority Pending Interrupt.
These three bits identify the highest priority pending interrupt (Table 4-2). Bit 3 is applicable only when FIFO
mode is selected, otherwise bit 3 is a 0.
Bit 0
Interrupt Pending.
When this bit is a 0, an interrupt is pending; IIR bits 1-3 can be used to determine the source of the interrupt.
When this bit is a1, an interrupt is not pending.
Table 4-2. Interrupt Sources and Reset Control
Interrupt Identification Register
Interrupt Set and Reset Functions
Bit 3
(Note 1)
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Priority
Level
Interrupt Type
0
0
0
1
—
None
None
—
0
1
1
0
Highest
Receiver Line
Status
Overrun Error OE (LSR1),
Parity Error (PE) (LSR2),
Framing Error (FE) (LSR3),
or Break Interrupt (BI) (LSR4)
Reading the LSR
0
1
0
0
2
Received Data
Available
Received Data Available (LSR0) or RX
FIFO Trigger Level (FCR6-FCR7)
1
Reached
Reading the RX Buffer or the
RX FIFO drops below the
Trigger Level
1
1
0
0
2
Character
Time-out
The RX FIFO contains at least 1 character
and no characters have been removed
from or input to the RX FIFO during the last
4 character times.
Reading the RX Buffer
Indication
1
Interrupt Source
Interrupt Reset Control
0
0
1
0
3
TX Buffer
Empty
TX Buffer Empty
Reading the IIR or writing to
the TX Buffer
0
0
0
0
4
Modem Status
Delta CTS (DCTS) (MSR0),
Delta DSR (DDSR) (MSR1),
Trailing Edge Ring Indicator (TERI)
(MSR3), or Delta DCD (DCD) (MSR4)
Reading the MSR
Notes:
1. FIFO Mode only.
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4.2.4 LCR - Line Control Register (Addr = 3)
The Line Control Register (LCR) specifies the format of the asynchronous data communications exchange.
Bit 7
Divisor Latch Access Bit (DLAB).
This bit must be set to a 1 to access the Divisor latch registers during a read or write operation. It must be
reset to a 0 to access the Receiver Buffer, the Transmitter Buffer, or the Interrupt Enable Register.
Bit 6
Set Break.
When bit 6 is a 1, the transmit data is forced to the break condition, i.e., space (0) is sent. When bit 6 is a 0,
break is not sent. The Set Break bit acts only on the transmit data and has no effect on the serial in logic.
Bit 5
Stick Parity.
When parity is enabled (LCR3 = 1) and stick parity is selected (LCR5 = 1), the parity bit is transmitted and
checked by the receiver as a 0 if even parity is selected (LCR4 = 1) or as a 1 if odd parity is selected (LCR4
= 0). When stick parity is not selected (LCR3 = 0), parity is transmit and checked as determined by the LCR3
and LCR4 bits.
Bit 4
Even Parity Select (EPS).
When parity is enabled (LCR3 = 1) and stick parity is not selected (LCR5 = 0), the number of 1s transmitted
or checked by the receiver in the data word bits and parity bit is either even (LCR4 = 1) or odd (LCR4 = 0).
Bit 3
Enable Parity (PEN).
When bit 3 is a 1, a parity bit is generated in the serial out (transmit) data stream and checked in the serial in
(receive) data stream as determined by the LCR 4 and LCR5 bits. The parity bit is located between the last
data bit and the first stop bit.
Bit 2
Number of Stop Bits (STB).
This bit specifies the number of stop bits in each serial out character. If bit 2 is a 0, one stop bit is generated
regardless of word length. If bit 2 is a 1 and 5-bit word length is selected, one and one-half stop bits are
generated. If bit 2 is a 1 and a 6-, 7-, or 8-bit word length is selected, two stop bits are generated. The serial
in logic checks the first stop bit only, regardless of the number of stop bits selected.
Bits 1-0
Word Length Select (WLS0 and WLS1).
These two bits specify the number of bits in each serial in or serial out character. The encoding of bits 0 and
1 is:
Bit 1
0
0
1
1
4-6
Bit 0
0
1
0
1
Word Length
5 Bits (Not supported)
6 Bits (Not supported)
7 Bits
8 Bits
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4.2.5 MCR - Modem Control Register (Addr = 4)
The Modem Control Register (MCR) controls the interface with the modem or data set.
Bit 7-5
Not used.
Always 0.
Bit 4
Local Loopback.
When this bit is set to a 1, the diagnostic mode is selected and the following occurs:
Bit 3
1.
Data written to the Transmit Buffer is looped back to the Receiver Buffer.
2.
The DTS (MCR0), RTS (MCR1), Out1 (MCR2), and Out2 (MCR3) modem control register bits are
internally connected to the DSR (MSR5), CTS (MSR4), RI (MSR6), and DCD (MSR7) modem status
register bits, respectively.
Output 2.
When this bit is a 1, HINT is enabled. When this bit is a 0, HINT is in the high impedance state.
Bit 2
Output 1.
This bit is used in local loopback (see MCR4).
Bit 1
Request to Send (RTS).
This bit controls the Request to Send (RTS) function. When this bit is a 1, RTS is on. When this bit is a 0,
RTS is off.
Bit 0
Data Terminal Ready (DTR).
This bit controls the Data Terminal Ready (DTR) function. When this bit is a 1, DTR is on. When this bit is a
0, DTR is off.
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4.2.6 LSR - Line Status Register (Addr = 5)
This 8-bit register provides status information to the host concerning data transfer.
Bit 7
RX FIFO Error.
In the 16450 mode, this bit is not used and is always 0.
In the FIFO mode, this bit is set if there are one or more characters in the RX FIFO with a parity error,
framing error, or break indication detected. This bit is reset to a 0 when the host reads the LSR and none of
the above conditions exist in the RX FIFO.
Bit 6
Transmitter Empty (TEMT).
This bit is set to a 1 whenever the TX Buffer (THR) and equivalent of the Transmitter Shift Register (TSR) are
both empty. It is reset to a 0 whenever either the THR or the equivalent of the TSR contains a character.
In the FIFO mode, this bit is set to a 1 when ever the TX FIFO and the equivalent of the TSR are both empty.
Bit 5
Transmitter Holding Register Empty (THRE) [TX Buffer Empty].
This bit, when set, indicates that the TX Buffer is empty and the modem can accept a new character for
transmission. In addition, this bit causes the modem to issue an interrupt to the host when the Transmit
Holding Register Empty Interrupt Enable bit (IIR1) is set to 1. The THRE bit is set to a 1 when a character is
transferred from the TX Buffer. The bit is reset to 0 when a byte is written into the TX Buffer by the host.
In the FIFO mode, this bit is set when the TX FIFO is empty; it is cleared when at least one byte is in the TX
FIFO.
Bit 4
Break Interrupt (BI).
This bit is set to a 1 whenever the received data input is a space (logic 0) for longer than two full word
lengths plus 3 bits. The BI bit is reset when the host reads the LSR.
Bit 3
Framing Error (FE).
This bit indicates that the received character did not have a valid stop bit. The FE bit is set to a 1 whenever
the stop bit following the last data bit or parity bit is detected as a logic o (space). The FE bit is reset to a 0
when the host reads the LSR.
In the FIFO mode, the error indication is associated with the particular character in the FIFO it applies to; the
FE bit is set to a 1 when this character is loaded into the RX Buffer.
Bit 2
Parity Error (PE).
This bit indicates that the received data character in the RX Buffer does not have the correct even or odd
parity, as selected by the Even Parity Select bit (LCR4) and the Stick Parity bit (LCR5). The PE bit is reset to
a 0 when the host reads the LSR.
In the FIFO mode, the error indication is associated with the particular character in the it applies to; the PE
bit is set to a 1 when this character is loaded into the RX Buffer.
Bit 1
Overrun Error (OE).
This bit is set to a 1 whenever received data is loaded into the RX Buffer before the host has read the
previous data from the RX Buffer. The OE bit is reset to a 0 when the host reads the LSR.
In the FIFO mode, if data continues to fill beyond the trigger level, an overrun condition will occur only if the
RX FIFO is full and the next character has been completely received.
Bit 0
Receiver Data Ready (DR).
This bit is set to a 1 whenever a complete incoming character has been received and has been transferred
into the RX Buffer. The DR bit is reset to a 0 when the host reads the RX Buffer.
In the FIFO mode, the DR bit is set when the number of received data bytes in the RX FIFO equals or
exceeds the trigger level specified in FCR0-FCR1.
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4.2.7 MSR - Modem Status Register (Addr = 6)
The Modem Status Register (MSR) reports current state and change information of the modem. Bits 4-7 supply current state
and bits 0-3 supply change information. The change bits are set to a 1 whenever a control input from the modem changes
state from the last MSR read by the host. Bits 0-3 are reset to 0 when the host reads the MSR or upon reset.
Whenever Bits 0, 1, 2, or 3 are set to a 1, a Modem Status Interrupt (IIR0-IIR3 = 0) is generated.
Bit 7
Data Carrier Detect (DCD).
This bit indicates the logic state of the ~DCD (~RLSD) output. If Loopback is selected (MCR4 = 1), this bit
reflects the state of the Out2 bit in the MCR (MCR3).
Bit 6
Ring Indicator (RI).
This bit indicates the logic state of the ~RI output. If Loopback is selected (MCR4 = 1), this bit reflects the
state of the Out1 bit in the MCR (MCR2).
Bit 5
Data Set Ready (DSR).
This bit indicates the logic state of the ~DSR output. If Loopback is selected (MCR4 = 1), this bit reflects the
state of the DTR bit in the MCR (MCR0).
Bit 4
Clear to Send (CTS).
This bit indicates the logic state of the ~CTS output. If Loopback is selected (MCR4 = 1), this bit reflects the
state of the RTS bit in the MCR (MCR1).
Bit 3
Delta Data Carrier Detect (DDCD).
This bit is set to a 1 when the DCD bit changes state since the MSR was last read by the host.
Bit 2
Trailing Edge of Ring Indicator (TERI).
This bit is set to a 1 when the RI bit changes from a 1 to a 0 state since the MSR was last read by the host.
Bit 1
Delta Data Set Ready (DDSR).
This bit is set to a 1 when the DSR bit has changed since the MSR was last read by the host.
Bit 0
Delta Clear to Send (DCTS).
This bit is set to a 1 when the CTS bit has changed since the MSR was last read by the host.
4.2.8 RBR - RX Buffer (Receiver Buffer Register) (Addr = 0, DLAB = 0)
The RX Buffer (RBR) is a read-only register at location 0 (with DLAB = 0). Bit 0 is the least significant bit of the data, and is
the first bit received.
4.2.9 THR - TX Buffer (Transmitter Holding Register) (Addr = 0, DLAB = 0)
The TX Buffer (THR) is a write-only register at address 0 when DLAB = 0. Bit 0 is the least significant bit and the first bit
sent.
4.2.10 Divisor Registers (Addr = 0 and 1, DLAB = 1)
The Divisor Latch LS (least significant byte) and Divisor Latch MS (most significant byte) are two read-write registers at
locations 0 and 1 when DLAB = 1, respectively.
The baud rate is selected by loading each divisor latch with the appropriate hex value.
Programmable values corresponding to the desired baud rate are listed in Table 4-3.
4.2.11 SCR - Scratch Register (Addr = 7)
The Scratchpad Register is a read-write register at location 7. This register is not used by the modem and can be used by
the host for temporary storage.
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Table 4-3. Programmable Baud Rates
Divisor Latch (Hex)
MS
LS
Divisor (Decimal)
06
00
1536
Baud Rate
75
04
17
1047
110
03
00
768
150
01
80
384
300
00
C0
192
600
00
60
96
1200
00
30
48
2400
00
18
24
4800
00
0C
12
9600
00
06
6
19200
00
04
4
28800
00
03
3
38400
00
02
2
57600
00
01
1
115200
Note: Values correspond to a UART input frequency of
1.8432 MHz.
4.3 RECEIVER FIFO INTERRUPT OPERATION
4.3.1 Receiver Data Available Interrupt
When the FIFO mode is enabled (FCR0 = 1) and receiver interrupt (RX Data Available) is enabled (IER0 = 1), receiver
interrupt operation is as follows:
1.
The Receiver Data Available Flag (LSR0) is set as soon as a received data character is available in the RX FIFO. LSR0
is cleared when the RX FIFO is empty.
2.
The Receiver Data Available interrupt code (IIR0-IIR4 = 4h) is set whenever the number of received data bytes in the
RX FIFO reaches the trigger level specified by FCR6-FCR7 bits; it is cleared whenever the number of received data
bytes in the RX FIFO drops below the trigger level specified by FCR6-FCR7 bits.
3.
The HINT interrupt is asserted whenever the number of received data bytes in the RX FIFO reaches the trigger level
specified by FCR6-FCR7 bits. HINT interrupt is de-asserted when the number of received data bytes in the RX FIFO
drops below the trigger level specified by FCR6-FCR7 bits.
4.3.2 Receiver Character Timeout Interrupts
When the FIFO mode is enabled (FCR0 = 1) and receiver interrupt (Receiver Data Available) is enabled (IER0 = 1), receiver
character timeout interrupt operation is as follows:
1.
A Receiver character timeout interrupt code (IIR0-IIR3 = Ch) is set if at least one received character is in the RX FIFO,
the most recent received serial character was longer than four continuous character times ago (if 2 stop bits are
specified, the second stop bit is included in this time period), and the most recent host read of the RX FIFO was longer
than four continuous character times ago.
4.4 TRANSMITTER FIFO INTERRUPT OPERATION
4.4.1 Transmitter Empty Interrupt
When the FIFO mode is enabled (FCR0 = 1) and transmitter interrupt (TX Buffer Empty) is enabled (IER0 = 1), transmitter
interrupt operation is as follows:
1.
The TX Buffer Empty interrupt code (IIR0-IIR3 = 2h) will occur when the TX Buffer is empty; it is cleared when the TX
Buffer is written to (1 to 16 characters)or the IIR is read.
2.
The TX Buffer Empty indications will be delayed 1 character time minus the last stop bit time whenever the following
occur: THRE = 1 and there have not been at least two bytes at the same time in the TX FIFO Buffer since the last
setting of THRE was set. The first transmitter interrupt after setting FCR0 will be immediate.
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RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
5. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
Good engineering practices must be followed when designing a printed circuit board (PCB) containing the modem device.
This is especially important considering the high data bit rate, high fax rate, record/play of analog speech and music audio,
and full-duplex speakerphone operation. Suppression of noise is essential to the proper operation and performance of the
modem and interfacing audio and DAA circuits.
Two aspects of noise in an OEM board design containing the modem device set must be considered: on-board/off-board
generated noise that can affect analog signal levels and analog-to-digital conversion (ADC)/digital-to-analog conversion
(DAC), and on-board generated noise that can radiate off-board. Both on-board and off-board generated noise that is
coupled on-board can affect interfacing signal levels and quality, especially in low level analog signals. Of particular concern
is noise in frequency ranges affecting modem and audio circuit performance.
On-board generated electromagnetic interference (EMI) noise that can be radiated or conducted off-board is a separate, but
equally important, concern. This noise can affect the operation of surrounding equipment. Most local governing agencies
have stringent certification requirements that must be met for use in specific environments. In order to minimize the
contribution of the circuit design and PCB layout to EMI, the designer must understand the major sources of EMI and how to
reduce them to acceptable levels.
Proper PC board layout (component placement and orientation, signal routing, trace thickness and geometry, etc.),
component selection (composition, value, and tolerance), interface connections, and shielding are required for the board
design to achieve desired modem performance and to attain EMI certification.
All the aspects of proper engineering practices are beyond the scope of this designer's guide. The designer should consult
noise suppression techniques described in technical publications and journals, electronics and electrical engineering text
books, and component supplier application notes. Seminars addressing noise suppression techniques are often offered by
technical and professional associations as well as component suppliers.
The following guidelines are offered to specifically help achieve stated modem performance, minimize audible noise for audio
circuit use, and to minimize EMI generation.
5.1 PC BOARD LAYOUT GUIDELINES
5.1.1 General Principles
1.
Provide separate digital, analog, and DAA sections on the board.
2.
Keep digital and analog components and their corresponding traces as separate as possible and confined to defined
sections.
3.
Keep high speed digital traces as short as possible.
4.
Keep sensitive analog traces as short as possible.
5.
Provide proper power supply distribution, grounding, and decoupling.
6.
Provide separate digital ground, analog ground, and chassis ground (if appropriate) planes.
7.
Provide wide traces for power and critical signals.
8.
Position digital circuits near the host bus or serial DTE connection and position the DAA circuits near the telephone line
connections.
5.1.2 Component Placement
1.
2.
From the system circuit schematic,
a)
Identify the digital, analog, and DAA circuits and their components, as well as external signal and power
connections.
b)
Identify the digital, analog, mixed digital/analog components within their respective circuits.
c)
Note the location of power and signals pins for each device (IC).
Roughly position digital, analog, and DAA circuits on separate sections of the board. Keep the digital and analog
components and their corresponding traces as separate as possible and confined to their respective sections on the
board. Typically, the digital circuits will cover one-half of the board, analog circuits will cover one-fourth of the board, and
the DAA will cover one-fourth of the board. NOTE: While the DAA is primarily analog in nature, it also has many control
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and status signals routed through it. A DAA section is also governed by local government regulations covering subjects
such as component spacing, high voltage suppression, and current limiting.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Once sections have been roughly defined, place the components starting with the connectors and jacks.
a)
Allow sufficient clearance around connectors and jacks for mating connectors and plugs.
b)
Allow sufficient clearance around components for power and ground traces.
c)
Allow sufficient clearance around sockets to allow the use of component extractors.
First, place the mixed analog/digital components (e.g., modem device, A/D converter, and D/A converter).
a)
Orient the components so pins carrying digital signals extend onto the digital section and pins carrying analog
signals extend onto the analog section as much as possible.
b)
Position the components to straddle the border between analog and digital sections.
Place all analog components.
a)
Place the analog circuitry, including the DAA, on the same area of the PCB.
b)
Place the analog components close to and on the side of board containing the TXA1, RIN, VC, and VREF signals.
c)
Avoid placing noisy components and traces near TXA1, RIN, VC, and VREF lines.
d)
RBIAS is extremely sensitive to noise; ensure that leads are short and are separated from noise sources, especially
digital signals.
e)
For serial DTE models, place receivers and drivers for DTE EIA/TIA-232-E serial interface signals close to the
connectors and away from traces carrying high frequency clocks in order to avoid/minimize the addition of noise
suppression components (i.e., chokes and capacitors) for each line.
Place active digital components/circuits and decoupling capacitors.
a)
Place digital components close together in order to minimize signal trace length.
b)
Place 0.1 µF decoupling (bypass) capacitors close to the pins (usually power and ground) of the IC they are
decoupling. Make the smallest loop area possible between the capacitor and power/ground pins to reduce EMI.
c)
For parallel host bus models, place host bus interface components close to the edge connector in accordance with
the applicable bus interface standard, e.g., use a 2.5-in maximum trace length for ISA bus.
d)
For serial DTE models, place serial DTE interface components near the DTE connector.
e)
Place crystal circuits as close as possible to the devices they drive.
Provide a “connector” component, usually a zero ohm resistor or a ferrite bead at one or more points on the PCB to
connect one section’s ground to another.
5.1.3 Signal Routing
1.
Route the modem signals to provide maximum isolation between noise sources and noise sensitive inputs. When layout
requirements necessitate routing these signals together, they should be separated by neutral signals. The modem noise
source, neutral, and noise sensitive pins are listed in Table 5-1.
2.
Keep digital signals within the digital section and analog signals within the analog section. (Previous placement of
isolation traces should prevent these traces from straying outside their respective sections.) Route the digital traces
perpendicular to the analog traces to minimize signal cross coupling.
3.
Provide isolation traces (usually ground traces) to ensure that analog signals are confined to the analog section and
digital traces remain out of the analog section. A trace may have to be narrowed to route it though a mixed analog/digital
IC, but try to keep the trace continuous.
4.
5-2
a)
Route an analog isolation ground trace, at least 50 mil to 100 mil wide, around the border of the analog section; put
on both sides of the PCB.
b)
Route a digital isolation ground trace, at least 50 mil to 100 mil wide, and 200 mil wide on one side of the PCB
edge, around the border of the digital section.
Keep host interface signals (e.g., ~HCS, ~HRD, ~HWT, and ~RESET) traces at least 10 mil thick (preferably 12 - 15
mil).
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5.
Keep analog signal (e.g., MICM, MICV, SPK, VC, VREF, TXA1, RXA, TELIN, and TELOUT) traces at least 10 mil thick
(preferably 12 - 15 mil).
6.
Keep all other signal traces as wide as possible, at least 5 mil (preferably 10 mil). Route the signals between
components by the shortest possible path (the components should have been previously placed to allow this).
7.
Route the traces between bypass capacitors to IC pins, at least 25 mil wide; avoid vias if possible.
8.
Gather signals that pass between sections (typically low speed control and status signals) together and route them
between sections through a path in the isolation ground traces at one (preferred) or two points only. If the path is made
on one side only, then the isolation trace can be kept contiguous by briefly passing it to the other side of the PCB to
jump over the signal traces.
9.
Avoid right angle (90 degree) turns on high frequency traces. Use smoothed radiuses or 45 degree corners.
10. Minimize the number of through-hole connections (feedthroughs/vias) on traces carrying high frequency signals.
11. Keep all signal traces away from crystal circuits.
12. Distribute high frequency signals continuously on a single trace rather than several traces radiating from one point.
13. Provide adequate clearance (e.g., 60 mil minimum) around feedthroughs in any internal planes in the DAA circuit.
14. Eliminate ground loops, which are unexpected current return paths to the power source.
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Table 5-1. Modem Pin Noise Characteristics
Device
Function
Noise Source
Neutral
Noise Sensitive
Modem Device - 68-Pin PLCC
Serial
Interface
Parallel
Interface
VDD
GND, AGND
Crystal
Reset Control
External Memory Bus
NVRAM
Telephone Line Interface
RCDSVD SCP Interface
Audio Interface
Serial DTE/Indicator
Interface
VDD
GND, AGND
Crystal
Reset Control
External Memory Bus
NVRAM
Telephone Line Interface
RCDSVD SCP Interface
Audio Interface
Parallel Host Bus Interface
31, 38
34, 37
52-53
35
1-6, 9-10, 12-13, 43-50, 5868
39, 42
7-8, 24-25, 51, 54
33, 36
23, 26
11, 14-22, 55-57
40-41
30, 32
27-29
31, 38
34, 37
52-53
35
1-6, 9-10, 12-13, 43-50, 5868
39, 42
7-8, 24-25, 51, 54
33, 36
23, 26
30, 32
27-29
11, 14-22, 40-41, 55-57
Modem Device --84-Pin PLCC
VDD, AVDD
GND, AGND
Serial
Interface
Parallel
Interface
Crystal
Reset Control
External Memory Bus
NVRAM
Telephone Line Interface
RCDSVD SCP Interface
Audio Interface
Serial DTE/Indicator
Interface
VDD
GND, AGND
Crystal
Reset Control
External Memory Bus
NVRAM
Telephone Line Interface
RCDSVD SCP Interface
Audio Interface
Parallel Host Bus Interface
23, 36-37, 50, 83, 61, 68
24, 35, 39, 40, 44, 56, 59, 62, 69, 82,
84,
1-2 (Note 1), 63-64
45
3-6, 9, 10-11, 46-47, 54-55,
57-58, 60, 65-67, 70-81
43, 51
49, 52
7-8, 30-31, 38, 48, 53
62 (Note 3), 82 (Note 3)
25-26
12-22, 41-42
28-29, 34
27, 32-33
23, 36-37, 50, 83, 61, 68
24, 35, 39, 40, 44, 56, 59, 62, 69, 82,
84,
1-2 (Note 1), 63-64
45
3-6, 9, 10-11, 46-47, 54-55,
57-58, 60, 65-67, 70-81
49, 52
7-8, 30-31, 38, 48, 53
62 (Note 3), 82 (Note 3)
25-26
12-22, 41-43, 51
28-29, 34
27, 32-33
NOTES:
1. 2-crystal models.
2. 1-crystal models.
3. SCP models.
5-4
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Table 5-1. Modem Pin Noise Characteristics (Cont’d)
Device
Function
Noise Source
Package
Function
Noise Source
Neutral
Noise Sensitive
Neutral
Noise Sensitive
RCDSVD SCP (R6715) Device
68-Pin
PLCC
1105
VDD, AVDD, ADVDD
VSS, AVSS, ADVSS
Crystal
Control
Host Bus
Audio Interface
Device Interconnect
GPIO
No Connection (NC)
13, 27, 34, 47
9, 20, 26, 29, 32, 46, 51, 62
24, 25
23, 43, 59
1-8, 11-12, 21, 63-68
30-31, 33, 35, 38, 52-53
10, 22, 28, 39-40, 44-45, 48-50, 54-57
15-18
14, 19, 36-37, 41-42, 58, 60-61
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RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
5.1.4 Power
1.
Identify power supply (VDD) connections.
2.
Place a 10 µF electrolytic or tantalum capacitor in parallel with a ceramic 0.1 µF capacitor between power and ground at
one or more points in the digital section. Place one set nearest to where power enters the PCB (edge connector or
power connector) and place another set at the furthest distance from where power enters the PCB. These capacitors
help to supply current surge demands by the digital circuits and prevent those surges from generating noise on the
power lines that may affect other circuits.
3.
For 2-layer boards, route a 200-mil wide power trace on two edges of the same side of the PCB around the border of
the circuits using the power. (Note that a digital ground trace should likewise be routed on the other side of the board.)
4.
Generally, route all power traces before signal traces.
5.1.5 Ground Planes
1.
In a 2-layer design, provide digital and analog ground plane areas in all unused space around and under digital and
analog circuit components (exclusive of the DAA), respective, on both sides of the board, and connect them such a
manner as to avoid small islands. Connect each ground plane area to like ground plane areas on the same side at
several points and to like ground plane areas on the opposite side through the board at several points. Connect all
modem DGND pins to the digital ground plane area and AGND pins to the analog ground plane area. Typically,
separate the collective digital ground plane area from the collective analog ground plane area by a fairly straight gap.
There should be no inroads of digital ground plane area extending into the analog ground plane area or visa versa.
2.
In a 4-layer design, provide separate digital and analog ground planes covering the corresponding digital and analog
circuits (exclusive of the DAA), respectively. Connect all modem DGND pins to the digital ground plane and AGND pins
to the analog ground plane. Typically, separate the digital ground plane from the analog ground plane by a fairly straight
gap.
3.
In a design which needs EMI filtering, define an additional “chassis” section adjacent to the bracket end of a plug-in
card. Most EMI components (usually ferrite beads/capacitor combinations) can be positioned in this section. Fill the
unused space with a chassis ground plane, and connect it to the metal card bracket and any connector shields/grounds.
4.
Keep the current paths of separate board functions isolated, thereby reducing the current's travel distance. Separate
board functions are: host interface, display, digital (SRAM, EPROM, modem), and DAA. Power and ground for each of
these functions should be separate islands connected together at the power and ground source points only.
5.
For serial DTE models, decouple the power cord at the power cord interface with decoupling capacitors. Methods to
decouple power lines are similar to decoupling telephone lines.
6.
Connect grounds together at only one point, if possible, using a ferrite bead. Allow other points for grounds to be
connected together if necessary for EMI suppression. For ISA bus board design, include a zero ohm resistor between
digital ground and the PC mounting bracket to allow connecting digital ground to the bracket if needed.
7.
Keep all ground traces as wide as possible, at least 25 mil to 50 mil.
8.
Keep the traces connecting all decoupling capacitors to power and ground at their respective ICs as short and as direct
(i.e., not going through vias) as possible.
5.1.6 Crystal Circuit
1.
Keep all traces and component leads connected to crystal input and output pins (i.e., XTLI and XTLO) short in order to
reduce induced noise levels and minimize any stray capacitance that could affect the crystal oscillator. Keep the XTLO
trace extremely short with no bends greater than 45 degrees and containing no vias since the XTLO pin is connected to
a fast rise time, high current driver.
2.
Where a ground plane is not available, such as in a 2-layer design, tie the crystal capacitors ground paths using
separate short traces (as wide as possible) with minimum angles and vias directly to the corresponding device digital
ground pin nearest the crystal pins.
3.
Connect crystal cases(s) to ground (if applicable).
4.
Place a 100-ohm (typical) resistor between the XTLO pin and the crystal/capacitor node.
5.
Connect crystal capacitor ground connections directly to GND pin on the modem device. Do not use common ground
plane or ground trace to route the capacitor GND pin to the corresponding modem GND pin.
5-6
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5.1.7 Standalone Modem Design with EIA/TIA-232 Interface
1.
Use a metal enclosure. If a plastic enclosure is required, line the internal enclosure with metal foil or apply conductive
spray to the top and bottom covers to reduce emissions.
2.
Place a common mode choke in series with each power supply line.
3.
Place components close to each other and close to the EIA/TIA-232 interface cable connector.
4.
Connect power and ground for all EIA/TIA-232 components to the power and ground source points via separate power
and ground traces that are not connected to the digital power and ground “except” at these source points. Power and
ground source points are the board input pins or a regulator output if used.
5.
Connect the EIA/TIA-232 cable signal ground wire to digital ground.
6.
Terminate the EIA/TIA-232 cable shield at the modem enclosure in one of the following manners as needed to minimize
RF emissions: leave open, connect to digital ground through a ferrite bead, or connect directly to digital ground and
provide a ferrite toroid around the EIA/TIA-232 cable close to the modem enclosure.
5.1.8 VC and VREF Circuit
1.
Provide extremely short, independent paths for VC and VREF capacitor connections.
a)
Route the connection from the plus terminal of the 10 µF VC capacitor and one terminal of the 0.1 µF VC capacitor
to the modem device VC pin (pin 24) using a single trace isolated from the trace to the VC pin from the VREF
capacitors (see step d).
b)
Route the connection from the negative terminal of the 10 µF VC capacitor and the other terminal of a the 0.1 µF
VC capacitor to a ferrite bead. The bead should typically have characteristics such as: impedance = 70 Ω at a
frequency of 100 MHz , rated current = 200 mA, and maximum resistance = 0.5 Ω. Connect the other bead terminal
to the AGND pin (pin 34) with a single trace.
c)
Route the connection from the plus terminal of the 10 µF VREF capacitor and one terminal of the 0.1 µF VREF
capacitor to the modem device VREF pin (pin 25) with a single trace.
d)
Route the connection from the negative terminal of 10 µF VREF capacitor and the other terminal of the 0.1 µF
VREF capacitor to the modem device VC pin (pin 24) with a single trace isolated from the trace to the VC pin from
the VC capacitors (see step a).
5.1.9 Telephone and Local Handset Interface
1.
Place common mode chokes in series with Tip and Ring for each connector.
2.
Decouple the telephone line cables at the telephone line jacks. Typically, use a combination of series inductors, common
mode chokes, and shunt capacitors. Methods to decouple telephone lines are similar to decoupling power lines,
however, telephone line decoupling may be more difficult and deserves additional attention. A commonly used design
aid is to place footprints for these components and populate as necessary during performance/EMI testing and
certification.
3.
Place high voltage filter capacitors (.001 µF @1KV) from Tip and Ring to digital ground.
5.1.10 Optional Configurations
Because fixed requirements of a design may alter EMI performance, guidelines that work in one case may deliver little or no
performance enhancement in another. Initial board design should, therefore, include flexibility to allow evaluation of optional
configurations. These optional configurations may include:
1.
Chokes in Tip and Ring lines replaced with jumper wires as a cost reduction if the design has sufficient EMI margin.
2.
Various grounding areas connected by tie points (these tie points can be short jumper wires, solder bridges between
close traces, etc.).
3.
EIA/TIA-232 cable ground wire or cable shielding connected on the board or floated.
4.
Develop two designs in parallel; one based on a 2-layer board and the other based on a 4-layer board. During the
evaluation phase, better performance of one design over another may result in quicker time to market.
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RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
5.1.11 ISSI Memory Devices
ISSI memory devices are available with Rockwell part numbers corresponding to memory devices shipped in Rockwell
RCV56ACF/SVD Accelelerator Kits. ISSI has a toll free number to answer any questions relating to the various memory
bundle kits. That number is 1-800-379-4774 and can be used for ordering the various kits or for technical issues. The ISSI
memory devices are described in Table 5-2.
Table 5-2. ISSI Memory Devices
Memory Type
Package
Part Number
128K x 8
32 pin PLCC
5494R32-005
FLASH ROM
128K x 8
32 pin PLCC
5494R66-001
128K x 8
32 pin TSOP
5494R66-002
32K x 8
28 pin SOJ
5493R36-002
32K x 8
28 pin TSOP
5493R36-003
128K x 8
32 pin SOJ
5493R45-001
128K x8
32 pin TSOP
5493R45-002
SRAM
5-8
Size
EPROM
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5.2 CRYSTAL SPECIFICATIONS
Recommended surface-mount crystal specifications are listed in Table 5-3.
Recommended through-hole crystal specifications are listed in Table 5-4.
Table 5-3. Crystal Specifications - Surface Mount
Characteristic
Rockwell Part No.
Electrical
Frequency
Frequency Tolerance
Frequency Stability
vs. Temperature
vs. Aging
Oscillation Mode
Calibration Mode
Load Capacitance, C
L
Shunt Capacitance, C
O
Series Resistance, R
1
Drive Level
Operating Temperature
Storage Temperature
Mechanical
Dimensions (L x W x H)
Mounting
Holder Type
Value
Value
Value
5333R02-020
5333R04-013
5333R02-017
28.224 MHz nom.
±50 ppm (C = 16.5 and 19.5 pF)
L
52.416 MHz nom.
±50 ppm (C = 16.5 and 19.5 pF)
L
56.448 MHz nom.
±50 ppm (C = 16.5 and 19.5 pF)
L
±35 ppm (0°C to 70°C)
±15 ppm/4 years
Fundamental
Parallel resonant
18 pF nom.
±35 ppm (0°C to 70°C)
±15 ppm/4 years
Third overtone
Parallel resonant
18 pF nom.
±35 ppm (0°C to 70°C)
±15 ppm/4 years
Third overtone
Parallel resonant
18 pF nom.
7 pF max.
7 pF max.
7 pF max.
60 Ω max. @20 nW drive level
80 Ω max. @20 nW drive level
80 Ω max. @20 nW drive level
100µW correlation; 300µW max.
0°C to 70°C
–40°C to 85°C
100µW correlation; 300µW max.
0°C to 70°C
–30°C to 80°C
100µW correlation; 300µW max.
0°C to 70°C
–40°C to 85°C
7.5 x 5.2 x 1.3 mm max.
SMT
None
7.5 x 5.2 x 1.3 mm max.
SMT
None
7.5 x 5.2 x 1.3 mm max.
SMT
None
KDS America
ILSI America
Vectron Technologies, Inc.
KDS America
Hy-Q International (USA), Inc.
Vectron Technologies, Inc.
KDS America
ILSI America
Vectron Technologies, Inc.
Suggested Suppliers
Notes
1. Characteristics @ 25°C unless otherwise noted.
2. Supplier Information:
KDS America
Fountain Valley, CA 92626
(714) 557-7833
ILSI America
Kirkland, WA 98033
(206) 828 - 4886
Vectron Technologies, Inc.
Lowell, NH 03051
(603) 598-0074
Hy-Q International (USA), Inc.
Enlanger, KY
(606) 283-5000
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Table 5-4. Crystal Specifications - Through Hole
Characteristic
Rockwell Part No.
Electrical
Frequency
Frequency Tolerance
Frequency Stability
vs. Temperature
vs. Aging
Oscillation Mode
Calibration Mode
Load Capacitance, C
L
Shunt Capacitance, C
O
Series Resistance, R
1
Drive Level
Operating Temperature
Storage Temperature
Mechanical
Dimensions (L x W x H)
Mounting
Holder Type
Value
Value
Value
333R44-011
333R45-008
333R45-011
28.224 MHz nom.
±50 ppm (C = 16.5 and 19.5 pF)
L
52.416 MHz nom.
±40 ppm (C = 16.5 and 19.5 pF)
L
56.448 MHz nom.
±40 ppm (C = 16.5 and 19.5 pF)
L
±30 ppm (0°C to 70°C)
±20 ppm/5 years
Fundamental
Parallel resonant
18 pF nom.
±45 ppm (0°C to 70°C)
±15 ppm/5 years
Third overtone
Parallel resonant
18 pF nom.
±45 ppm (0°C to 70°C)
±15 ppm/5 years
Third overtone
Parallel resonant
18 pF nom.
7 pF max.
6 pF max.
7 pF max.
35 Ω max. @20 nW drive level
35 Ω max. @20 nW drive level
35 Ω max. @20 nW drive level
100µW correlation; 500µW max.
0°C to 70°C
–40°C to 85°C
100µW correlation; 500µW max.
0°C to 70°C
–40°C to 85°C
100µW correlation; 500µW max.
0°C to 70°C
–40°C to 85°C
11.05 x 4.65 x 13.46 mm max.
Through Hole
HC-49/U
11.05 x 4.65 x 13.46 mm
Through Hole
HC-49/U
11.05 x 4.65 x 13.46 mm max.
Through Hole
HC-49/U
KDS America
ILSI America
Vectron Technologies, Inc.
KDS America
Toyocom U.S.A., Inc.
Hy-Q International (USA), Inc.
Vectron Technologies, Inc.
KDS America
ILSI America
Vectron Technologies, Inc.
Suggested Suppliers
Notes
1. Characteristics @ 25°C unless otherwise noted.
2. Supplier Information:
KDS America
Fountain Valley, CA 92626
(714) 557-7833
ILSI America
Kirkland, WA 98033
(206) 828 - 4886
Vectron Technologies, Inc.
Lowell, NH 03051
(603) 598-0074
Toyocom U.S.A., Inc.
Costa Mesa, CA
(714) 668-9081
Hy-Q International (USA), Inc.
Enlanger, KY
(606) 283-5000
5-10
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5.3 SCHEMATICS
A typical application schematic for the modem with serial DTE interface packaged in a 68-pin PLCC is shown in Figure 5-1.
A typical interface schematic for the modem with parallel host interface packaged in a 68-pin PLCC is shown in Figure 5-2.
A typical application schematic for the modem with serial DTE interface packaged in a 84-pin PLCC is shown in Figure 5-3.
A typical interface schematic for the modem with parallel host interface packaged in a 84-pin PLCC is shown in Figure 5-4.
A typical interface schematic for the RCDSVD packaged in a 68-pin PLCC is shown in Figure 5-5.
Consult AccelerATor Kits or reference designs for full schematics of typical applications. A complete schematic for a parallel
host application is supplied with the RCV336ACF/SVD AccelerATor Kit (AK28-D520).
5.4 OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
The DAA design described in this designer's guide is a wet DAA, i.e., it requires line current to be present to pass the signal.
Therefore, if the modem is to be connected back-to-back by cable directly to another modem, the modems will not be able to
connect. The DAAs must be modified to operate dry, i.e., without line current, when used in this environment.
1105
5-11
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
XTLI
Crystal Circuit Components
Y1
52.416 MHz
56.448 MHz
C1
18 pF
15 pF
4.7 µH
10%
52
10pF
5%
Y1
XTLO
53
100
11
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
40
41
55
56
57
DTE
SERIAL/
INDICATOR
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
~TMIND
~DSR
~CTS
~RLSD
~DRSOUT
~AAIND
~RI
~TM
~RDL
~DTRIND
~TXD
~RXD
~RTS
~AL
~DTR
TELOUT
TELIN
LCS
RINGD
~OH
~VOICE
TXA1
RIN
VREF
VC
C1
5%
23
26
54
51
7
8
32
30
10pF
5%
~MUTE
TELEPHONE
LINE
/TELEPHONE
HANDSET
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
25
10
0.1 CER
10
0.1 CER
FERRITE BEAD
24
VCC
10K
35
~RES
0.1
~MUTE*
MUTE
FILTER
VCC
10K
39
NVMDATA*
42
NVMCLK
NVRAM
CIRCUIT
31
VDD
38
VDD
VCC
0.1
10
37
GND
34
AGND
*~MUTE USE IS ENABLED BY CONFIGURACE II.
MICM
MICV
SPK
28
27
29
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14
A15
A16
~READ
~WRITE
~RAMSEL
~ROMSEL
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
1
2
3
4
5
6
13
12
10
9
~SVDCS
SVDIRQ
36
33
AUDIO
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
EXTERNAL
MEMORY
CIRCUIT
(RAM
AND ROM)
RCDSVD
(R6715)
NOTES:
1. TOLERANCES AND RATINGS (UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED):
RESISTOR VALUES IN OHMS; 5%, 1/8W
CAPACITOR VALUES IN MICROFARADS; 10%, 20V
2.
DENOTES ANALOG GROUND.
3.
DENOTES DIGITAL GROUND.
1105F5-1 SC-Ser
Figure 5-1. Interface Schematic - Modem with Serial DTE Interface - 68-Pin PLCC
5-12
1105
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
XTLI
Crystal Circuit Components
Y1
52.416 MHz
56.448 MHz
XTLO
11
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
41
40
55
56
57
35
HINT
HD0
HD1
HD2
HD3
HD4
HD5
HD6
HD7
HA0
HA1
HA2
~HRD
~HWT
~HCS
~RES
TELOUT
TELIN
LCS
RINGD
~OH
~VOICE
TXA1
RIN
VREF
VC
VCC
10K
39
NVMDATA*
42
NVMCLK
NVRAM
CIRCUIT
31
VDD
38
VDD
VCC
10
37
GND
34
AGND
*~MUTE USE IS ENABLED BY CONFIGURACE II.
C1
5%
53
100
23
26
54
51
7
8
32
30
10pF
5%
~MUTE
TELEPHONE
LINE
/TELEPHONE
HANDSET
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
25
10
0.1 CER
10
0.1 CER
FERRITE BEAD
24
MICM
MICV
SPK
28
27
29
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14
A15
A16
~READ
~WRITE
~RAMSEL
~ROMSEL
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
1
2
3
4
5
6
13
12
10
9
~SVDCS
SVDIRQ
36
33
MUTE
FILTER
0.1
10pF
5%
Y1
C1
18 pF
15 pF
PARALLEL
HOST
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
~MUTE*
4.7 µH
10%
52
AUDIO
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
EXTERNAL
MEMORY
CIRCUIT
(RAM
AND ROM)
RCDSVD
(R6715)
NOTES:
1. TOLERANCES AND RATINGS (UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED):
RESISTOR VALUES IN OHMS; 5%, 1/8W
CAPACITOR VALUES IN MICROFARADS; 10%, 20V
2.
DENOTES ANALOG GROUND.
3.
DENOTES DIGITAL GROUND.
1105F5-2 SC-Par
Figure 5-2. Interface Schematic - Modem with Parallel Host Interface - 68-Pin PLCC
1105
5-13
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
1
18 pF
CXTLI/NC*
XTLI
28.224 MHz
2
CXTLO/NC*
XTLO
100
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
43
51
42
41
22
DTE
SERIAL/
INDICATOR
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
~TMIND
~DSR
~CTS
~RLSD
~DRSOUT
~AAIND
~RI
~TM
~RDL
~DTRIND
~TXD
~RXD
~RTS
~AL
~DTR
TELOUT
TELIN
LCS
RINGD
~OH
~VOICE
~CALLID
TXA1
TXA2
RIN
VREF
VC
10pF
5%
56.448 MHz
64
100
18 pF
4.7 µH
10%
63
26
25
48
53
7
8
38
28
29
34
15 pF
5%
10pF
5%
~MUTE**
TELEPHONE
LINE
/TELEPHONE
HANDSET
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
30
10
0.1 CER
10
0.1 CER
FERRITE BEAD
31
VCC
10K
45
~RES
0.1
~MUTE**
MICM
MICV
SPK
33
32
27
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14
A15
A16
~READ
~WRITE
~RAMSEL
~ROMSEL
54
55
57
58
60
65
66
67
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
3
4
5
6
9
46
47
11
10
AUDIO
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
MUTE
FILTER
VCC
10K
49
NVMDATA*
52
NVMCLK
NVRAM
CIRCUIT
68
VDD
61
0.1
69
VCC
0.1
10
23
36
37
50
83
40
44
56
59
62
82
84
24
35
39
PLLCAP (Note 4)
PLLVDD (Note 4)
PLLGND (Note 4)
AVDD
AVDD
VDD
VDD
VDD
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND****/~SVDIRQ
GND****/~SVDCS
GND
AGND
AGND
AGND
~SVDIRQ***
~SVDCS***
*
NC IF MCU CRYSTAL IS NOT USED.
** ~MUTE USE IS ENABLED BY CONFIGURACE II.
*** SCP MODELS ONLY.
**** NON-SCP MODELS ONLY.
62
82
EXTERNAL
MEMORY
CIRCUIT
(RAM
AND ROM)
RCDSVD
(R6715)
NOTES:
1. TOLERANCES AND RATINGS (UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED):
RESISTOR VALUES IN OHMS; 5%, 1/8W
CAPACITOR VALUES IN MICROFARADS; 10%, 20V
2.
DENOTES ANALOG GROUND.
3.
DENOTES DIGITAL GROUND.
4. THE PLL CIRCUIT IS NOT SUPPORTED IN THE
RC336 AND RC56P DEVICES. FOR THOSE DEVICES,
THESE PINS MAY BE CONNECTED AS SHOWN FOR
RCDL56 PLUG-IN UPGRADE, OR MAY BE LEFT OPEN EXTERNALLY
1105F5-3 SC-Ser
Figure 5-3. Interface Schematic - Modem with Serial DTE Interface - 84-Pin PLCC
5-14
1105
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
1
18 pF
XTLI
28.224 MHz
2
CXTLO/NC*
XTLO
PARALLEL
HOST
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
HINT
HD0
HD1
HD2
HD3
HD4
HD5
HD6
HD7
HA0
HA1
HA2
~HRD
~HWT
~HCS
~RES
MUTE
FILTER
TELOUT
TELIN
LCS
RINGD
~OH
~VOICE
~CALLID
TXA1
TXA2
RIN
VREF
VC
10K
49
NVMDATA*
52
NVMCLK
68
VDD
61
0.1
69
VCC
0.1
10
23
36
37
50
83
40
44
56
59
62
82
84
24
35
39
PLLCAP (Note 4)
PLLVDD (Note 4)
PLLGND (Note 4)
AVDD
AVDD
VDD
VDD
VDD
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND****/~SVDIRQ
GND****/~SVDCS
GND
AGND
AGND
AGND
15 pF
5%
10pF
5%
~MUTE**
TELEPHONE
LINE
/TELEPHONE
HANDSET
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
30
10
0.1 CER
10
0.1 CER
FERRITE BEAD
31
33
32
27
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14
A15
A16
~READ
~WRITE
~RAMSEL
~ROMSEL
54
55
57
58
60
65
66
67
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
3
4
5
6
9
46
47
11
10
~SVDIRQ***
~SVDCS***
*
NC IF MCU CRYSTAL IS NOT USED.
** ~MUTE USE IS ENABLED BY CONFIGURACE II.
*** SCP MODELS ONLY.
**** NON-SCP MODELS ONLY.
26
25
48
53
7
8
38
28
29
34
MICM
MICV
SPK
VCC
10pF
5%
56.448 MHz
64
100
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
51
43
42
41
22
45
NVRAM
CIRCUIT
4.7 µH
10%
63
100
18 pF
~MUTE**
CXTLI/NC*
62
82
AUDIO
INTERFACE
CIRCUIT
EXTERNAL
MEMORY
CIRCUIT
(RAM
AND ROM)
RCDSVD
(R6715)
NOTES:
1. TOLERANCES AND RATINGS (UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED):
RESISTOR VALUES IN OHMS; 5%, 1/8W
CAPACITOR VALUES IN MICROFARADS; 10%, 20V
2.
DENOTES ANALOG GROUND.
3.
DENOTES DIGITAL GROUND.
4. THE PLL CIRCUIT IS NOT SUPPORTED IN THE
RC336 AND RC56P DEVICES. FOR THOSE DEVICES,
THESE PINS MAY BE CONNECTED AS SHOWN FOR
RCDL56 PLUG-IN UPGRADE OR MAY BE LEFT OPEN EXTERNALLY.
1105F5-4 SC-Par
Figure 5-4. Interface Schematic - Modem with Parallel Host Interface - 84-Pin PLCC
1105
5-15
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
+5V
0.1
0.1
0.1
6
58
77
46
10
21
43
66
80
81
97
16
30
+5V
VDD
VDD
VDD
ADVDD
XTLI
XTLO
4.7µH 10%
73
100
VSS
VSS
VSS
VSS
VSS
VSS
ADVSS
ADVSS
SPKN
SPKP
MICIN
LINEOUT
LINEIN
10pF
5%
56.448 MHz
74
33
34
24
32
26
15pF
5%
10pF
5%
NC
SPKP
MICV
TELOUT
TELIN
TELEPHONE/
AUDIO
INTERFACE
10µH
27 AVDD
VREF
20
10
0.1
25
AVSS
VC
RBIAS
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
5
4
3
2
1
53
15
MCU:
EXTERNAL
BUS
52
68
MODEM: ~SVDCS
MODEM: ~SVDIRQ
MODEM: ~RESET
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
RS0
RS1
RS2
RS3
RS4
~READ
~WRITE
~CS
~IRQ
72
~RESET
44
~IARESET
71
~SLEEPO
40
REFCNTL
10
0.1
CER
10
0.1
CER
19
23
120K
SR4OUT
SIN
SR3IN
SOUT
IACLK
MCLK
IA1CLK
ICLK
SA1CLK
FSYNC
SR1IO
CTRLSIN
GPO4
GPO5
GPO6
GPO7
90
47
79
48
50
45
86
37
87
36
88
49
64
63
62
61
NC
NC
NC
NC
10K
94
20K
~EN85
NOTES:
1. TOLERANCES AND RATINGS (UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED):
RESISTOR VALUES IN OHMS; 5%, 1/8W
CAPACITOR VALUES IN MICROFARADS; 10%, 20V
2.
DENOTES ANALOG GROUND.
3.
DENOTES DIGITAL GROUND.
4. NO EXTERNAL CONNECTION (NC) PINS: 17-18, 22, 28-29, 31, 33
35, 38-39, 41-42, 51, 54-57, 59-60, 61-65, 67, 69-70, 75-76, 78, 82-85, 89,
91-93, 95-96, 98-100.
1105F5-5 SC SCP 100PQFP
Figure 5-5. Interface Schematic - RCDSVD SCP - 68-Pin PLCC
5-16
1105
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
6. PACKAGE DIMENSIONS
The package dimensions are shown in Figure 6-1 (68-pin PLCC) and Figure 6-2 (84-pin PLCC).
D
SEATING
PLANE
D1
INDEX
CORNER
D2
α
PIN 1
REF
D D1 D2
Dim.
A
A1
SIDE VIEW
TOP VIEW
CHAM.
h x 45 DEG.
3 PLCS
A1
A
A
0.165
0.180
0.020 REF
b
0.017
0.021
D
25.02
0.985
0.995
25.27
D1
24.18 REF
D2
20.32 REF
23.11
23.62
0.952 REF
0.800 REF
0.910
0.930
e
1.27 BSC
0.050 BSC
h
0.254 TYP
0.010 TYP
J
1.15 TYP
0.045 TYP
α
45° TYP
Coplanarity
A
Inches
Max.
Min.
0.508 REF
0.432
0.533
D3
D3
Millimeters
Max.
Min.
4.19
4.72
0.10 MAX
45° TYP
0.004 MAX
Ref: 68-PIN PLCC (GP00-D164)
TYP. FOR EACH AXIS
(EXCEPT FOR BEVELED EDGE)
CHAM.
J x 45 DEG.
e
b
SECTION A-A
BOTTOM VIEW
PD-PLCC-68 (040695)
Figure 6-1. Package Dimensions - 68-Pin PLCC
1105
6-1
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
D
SEATING
PLANE
D1
INDEX
CORNER
D2
α
PIN 1
REF
D D1 D2
Dim.
A
A1
SIDE VIEW
TOP VIEW
CHAM.
h x 45 DEG.
3 PLCS
A
A
A
0.180
0.020 REF
b
0.017
0.021
D
30.10
1.185
1.195
30.35
D1
29.41 REF
D2
20.32 REF
23.11
23.62
1.158 REF
1.000 REF
1.110
1.130
e
1.27 BSC
0.050 BSC
h
0.254 TYP
0.010 TYP
J
1.15 TYP
0.045 TYP
α
45° TYP
Coplanarity
A1
0.165
0.508 REF
0.432
0.533
D3
D3
Inches
Max.
Min.
Millimeters
Max.
Min.
4.19
4.72
45° TYP
0.004 MAX
0.10 MAX
Ref: 84-PIN PLCC (GP00-D205)
TYP. FOR EACH AXIS
(EXCEPT FOR BEVELED EDGE)
CHAM.
J x 45 DEG.
e
b
BOTTOM VIEW
SECTION A-A
PD-PLCC-84 (040695)
Figure 6-2. Package Dimensions - 84-Pin PLCC
6-2
1105
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
7. AT COMMANDS
7.1 BASIC AT COMMANDS
A/
A
B0
B1
C1
Dn
E0
E1
H0
H1
I0
I1
I2
I3
I4
I5
I6
I7
L0
L1
L2
L3
M0
M1
M2
M3
N0
N1
O0
O1
P
Q0
Q1
Sn
Sn?
=v
?
T
V0
V1
W0
W1
W2
1105
Re-execute command.
Go off-hook and attempt to answer a call.
Select V.22 connection at 1200 bps.
Select Bell 212A connection at 1200 bps.
Return OK message.
Dial modifier.
Turn off command echo.
Turn on command echo.
Initiate a hang-up sequence.
If on-hook, go off-hook and enter command mode.
Report product code.
Compute and report checksum.
Compute checksum and report result of comparison to pressured checksum.
Report firmware revision, model, and interface type.
Report response programmed by an OEM.
Report the country code parameter.
Report modem data pump model and code revision.
Reports the DAA code (world-class models only).
Set low speaker volume.
Set low speaker volume.
Set medium speaker volume.
Set high speaker volume.
Turn speaker off.
Turn speaker on during handshaking and turn speaker off while receiving carrier.
Turn speaker on during handshaking and while receiving carrier.
Turn speaker off during dialing and receiving carrier and turn speaker on during answering.
Turn off automode detection.
Turn on automode detection.
Go on-line.
Go on-line and initiate a retrain sequence.
Force pulse dialing.
Allow result codes to DTE.
Inhibit result codes to DTE.
Select S-Register as default.
Return the value of S-Register n.
Set default S-Register to value v.
Return the value of default S-Register.
Force DTMF dialing.
Report short form (terse) result codes.
Report long form (verbose) result codes.
Report DTE speed in EC mode.
Report line speed, EC protocol and DTE speed.
Report DCE speed in EC mode.
7-1
RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
X0
X1
X2
X3
X4
Y0
Y1
Z0
Z1
&C0
&C1
&D0
&D1
&D2
&D3
&F0
&F1
&G0
&G1
&G2
&J0
&J1
&K0
&K3
&K4
&K5
&K6
&L0
&M0
&P0
&P1
&P2
&P3
&Q0
&Q4
&Q5
&Q6
&R0
&R1
7-2
Report basic call progress result codes, i.e., OK, CONNECT, RING, NO CARRIER (also, for busy, if
enabled, and dial tone not detected), NO ANSWER and ERROR.
Report basic call progress result codes and connections speeds (OK, CONNECT, RING, NO
CARRIER (also, for busy, if enabled, and dial tone not detected), NO ANSWER, CONNECT XXXX,
and ERROR.
Report basic call progress result codes and connections speeds, i.e., OK, CONNECT, RING, NO
CARRIER (also, for busy, if enabled, and dial tone not detected), NO ANSWER, CONNECT XXXX,
and ERROR.
Report basic call progress result codes and connection rate, i.e., OK, CONNECT, RING, NO
CARRIER, NO ANSWER, CONNECT XXXX, BUSY, and ERROR.
Report all call progress result codes and connection rate, i.e., OK, CONNECT, RING, NO CARRIER,
NO ANSWER, CONNECT XXXX, BUSY, NO DIAL TONE and ERROR.
Disable long space disconnect before on-hook.
Enable long space disconnect before on-hook.
Restore stored profile 0 after warm reset.
Restore stored profile 1 after warm reset.
Force RLSD active regardless of the carrier state.
Allow RLSD to follow the carrier state.
Interpret DTR ON-to-OFF transition per &Qn:
&Q0, &Q5, &Q6
The modem ignores DTR.
&Q1, &Q4
The modem hangs up.
&Q2, &Q3
The modem hangs up.
Interpret DTR ON-to-OFF transition per &Qn:
&Q0, &Q1, &Q4, &Q5, &Q6
Asynchronous escape.
&Q2, &Q3
The modem hangs up.
Interpret DTR ON-to-OFF transition per &Qn:
&Q0 thru &Q6
The modem hangs up.
Interpret DTR ON-to-OFF transition per &Qn:.
&Q0, &Q1, &Q4, &Q5, &Q6
The modem performs soft reset.
&Q2, &Q3
The modem hangs up.
Restore factory configuration 0.
Restore factory configuration 1.
Disable guard tone.
Disable guard tone.
Enable 1800 Hz guard tone.
Set S-Register response only for compatibility.
Set S-Register response only for compatibility.
Disable DTE/DCE flow control.
Enable RTS/CTS DTE/DCE flow control.
Enable XON/XOFF DTE/DCE flow control.
Enable transparent XON/XOFF flow control.
Enable both RTS/CTS and XON/XOFF flow control.
Select dial up line operation.
Select direct asynchronous mode.
Set 10 pps pulse dial with 39%/61% make/break.
Set 10 pps pulse dial with 33%/67% make/break.
Set 20 pps pulse dial with 39%/61% make/break.
Set 20 pps pulse dial with 33%/67% make/break.
Select direct asynchronous mode.
Select Hayes AutoSync mode.
Modem negotiates an error corrected link.
Select asynchronous operation in normal mode.
CTS tracks RTS (async) or acts per V.25 (sync).
CTS is always active.
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RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
&S0
&S1
&T0
&T1
&T2
&T3
&T4
&T5
&T6
&T7
&T8
&V
&V1
&W0
&W1
&Y0
&Y1
&Zn=x
DSR is always active.
DSR acts per V.25.
Terminate any test in progress.
Initiate local analog loopback.
Returns ERROR result code.
Initiate local digital loopback.
Allow remote digital loopback.
Disallow remote digital loopback request.
Request an RDL without self-test.
Request an RDL with self-test.
Initiate local analog loop with self-test.
Display current configurations.
Display connection statistics
Store the active profile in NVRAM profile 0.
Store the active profile in NVRAM profile 1.
Recall stored profile 0 upon power up.
Recall stored profile 1 upon power up.
Store dial string x (to 34) to location n (0 to 3).
%E0
%E1
%E2
%L
%Q
%7
%8
Disable line quality monitor and auto retrain.
Enable line quality monitor and auto retrain.
Enable line quality monitor and fallback/fall forward.
Return received line signal level.
Report the line signal quality.
Plug and Play serial number.
Plug and Play vendor ID and product number.
\Kn
Controls break handling during three states:
When modem receives a break from the DTE:
\K0,2,4
Enter on-line command mode, no break sent to the remote modem.
\K1
Clear buffers and send break to remote modem.
\K3
Send break to remote modem immediately.
\K5
Send break to remote modem in sequence with transmitted data.
When modem receives \B in on-line command state:
\K0,1
Clear buffers and send break to remote modem.
\K2,3
Send break to remote modem immediately.
\K4,5
Send break to remote modem in sequence with transmitted data.
When modem receives break from the remote modem:
\K0,1
Clear data buffers and send break to DTE.
\K2,3
Send a break immediately to DTE.
\K4,5
Send a break with received data to the DTE.
\N0
Select normal speed buffered mode.
\N2
Select reliable link mode.
\N3
Select auto reliable mode.
\N4
Force LAPM mode.
\N5
Force MNP mode.
\V0
Disable single line connect message.
\V1
Enable single line connect message.
+MS
+Hn
Select modulation
Enable/disable protocol interface and video ready mode
**0
**1
**2
Download to flash memory at last sensed speed.
Download to flash memory at 38.4 kbps.
Download to flash memory at 57.6 kbps.
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RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
-SDR=0
-SDR=1
-SDR=2
-SDR=3
-SDR=4
-SDR=5
-SDR=6
-SDR=7
Disable Distinctive Ring.
Enable Distinctive Ring Type 1.
Enable Distinctive Ring Type 2.
Enable Distinctive Ring Type 1 and 2.
Enable Distinctive Ring Type 3.
Enable Distinctive Ring Type 1 and 3.
Enable Distinctive Ring Type 2 and 3.
Enable Distinctive Ring Type 1, 2, and 3.
7.2 ECC COMMANDS
%C0
%C1
%C2
%C3
Disable data compression.
Enable MNP 5 data compression.
Enable V.42 bis data compression.
Enable both V.42 bis and MNP 5 compression.
\A0
\A1
\A2
\A3
\Bn
Set maximum block size in MNP to 64.
Set maximum block size in MNP to 128.
Set maximum block size in MNP to 192.
Set maximum block size in MNP to 256.
Send break of n x 100 ms.
7.3 MNP 10 COMMANDS
-K0
-K1
-K2
-SEC=0
-SEC=1,[<tx level>]
Disable MNP 10 extended services.
Enable MNP 10 extended services.
Enable MNP 10 extended services detection only.
Disable MNP 10EC.
Enable MNP 10EC and set transmit level <tx level> 0 to 30 (0 dBm to -30 dBm).
7.4 W-CLASS COMMANDS
*B
*D
*NCnn
Display list of permanently blacklisted numbers.
Display list of delayed numbers.
Change country to one of eight in NVRAM.
7.5 CALLER ID COMMANDS
#CID=0
#CID=1
#CID=2
Disable Caller ID.
Enable Caller ID with formatted presentation.
Enable Caller ID with unformatted presentation.
7.6 FAX CLASS 1 COMMANDS
+FCLASS=n
+FAE=n
+FRH=n
+FRM=n
+FRS=n
+FTH=n
+FTM=n
+FTS=n
7-4
Service class.
Data/fax auto answer
Receive data with HDLC framing.
Receive data.
Receive silence.
Transmit data with HDLC framing.
Transmit data.
Stop transmission and wait.
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RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
7.7 VOICE COMMANDS
#BDR
#CLS
#MDL?
#MFR?
#REV?
#TL
#VBQ?
#VBS
#VBT
#VCI?
#VGT
#VLS
#VRA
#VRN
#VRX
#VSD
#VSK
#VSP
#VSR
#VSS
#VTD
#VTM
#VTS
#VTX
Select baud rate (turn off autobaud).
Select data, fax, or voice.
Identify model.
Identify manufacturer.
Identify revision level.
Audio output transmit level.
Query buffer size.
Bits per sample.
Beep tone timer.
Identify compression method.
Set playback volume in the command state.
Voice line select.
Ringback goes away timer (originate).
Ringback never came timer (originate).
Voice receive mode.
Enable silence deletion (no function; command response only).
Buffer skid setting.
Silence detection period (voice receive).
Sampling rate selection.
Silence detection tuner (voice receive).
DTMF/tone reporting.
Enable timing mark placement.
Generate tone signals.
Voice transmit mode.
7.8 VOICEVIEW COMMANDS
+FCLASS=n
-SVV
-SAC
-SIP
-SIC
-SSQ
-SDA
-SFX
-SMT
-SDS
-SQR
-SCD
-SER?
-SCP
-SSR
+FLO
+FPR
-SSV
-SFA
-SMD
-SRA
-SRQ
-SRC:
-STO
1105
Service class
Originate VoiceView data mode
Accept data mode request
Initialize VoiceView parameters
Reset capabilities data to default setting
Initiate capabilities query
Originate modem data mode
Originate FAX data mode
Mute telephone
Disable switchhook status monitoring
Capabilities query response control
Capabilities data
Error status (read only)
VoiceView transmission speed
Start sequence response control
Flow control select
Serial port rate control
VoiceView data mode start sequence event
Facsimile data node start sequence event
Modem data mode start sequence event
Receive ADSI response event
Receive capabilities query event
Receive capabilities information event
Talk-off event
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RCVDL56ACF/SVD, RCV56ACF/SVD, and RCV336ACF/SVD Modem Designer’s Guide
7.9 AudioSpan COMMANDS
-SMS=x,y,z,t
-SQS=x,y
Select AudioSpan/DSVD mode
Select AudioSpan modulation
7.10 DSVD COMMANDS
-SMS=x,y,z,t
-SSE=x
Select AudioSpan/DSVD mode
Enable/Disable DSVD
7.11 SYNCHRONOUS ACCESS MODE COMMANDS
+ES
+ESA
+ITF
Enable/disable Synchronous Access Mode
Configure Synchronous Access Submode
Select transmit flow control thresholds
* Serial interface operation only.
7-6
1105
INSIDE BACK COVER NOTES
REGIONAL SALES OFFICES
Headquarters
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
4311 Jamboree Road,
P.O. Box C
Newport Beach, CA 92658-8902
Phone: (714) 221-4600
Fax:
(714) 221-6375
European Headquarters
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
S.A.R.L.
Les Taissounieres B1
Route des Dolines
Sophia Antipolis Cedex
06905 Valbonne
France
Phone: (33) 93 00 33 35
Fax:
(33) 93 00 33 03
For more information:
Call 1-800-854-8099
International information:
Call 1-714-833-6996
URL Address:
http://www.nb.rockwell.com
E-Mail Address:
[email protected]
US Southwest Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
5000 Birch Street
Suite 400
Newport Beach, CA 92660
Phone: (714) 222-9119
Fax:
(714) 222-0620
US Southwest Satellite Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
1000 Business Center Circle
Suite 215
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
Phone: (805) 376-0559
Fax:
(805) 376-8180
US South Central Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
2001 North Collins Blvd
Suite 103
Richardson, TX 75080
Phone: (214) 379-9310
Fax:
(214) 479-9317
US Southeast Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
900 Ashwood Parkway
Suite 400
Atlanta, GA 30338
Phone: (770) 393-1830
Fax:
(770) 395-1419
US Southeast Satellite Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Arbor Shoreline Office Park
19345 US 19 N.
Suite 108
Clearwater, FL 34624-3156
Phone: (813) 538-8837
Fax:
(813) 531-3031
©1997, Rockwell International Corporation
Printed in U.S.A.
All Rights Reserved
US Northwest Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
US Northwest Office
3600 Pruneridge Avenue
Suite 100
Santa Clara, CA 95051
Phone: (408) 249-9696
Fax:
(408) 249-7113
US North Central Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Two Pierce Place
Chancellory Park
Suite 810
Itasca, IL 60143
Phone: (708) 773-3454
Fax:
(708) 773-3907
US Northeast Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
239 Littleton Road
Suite 4A
Westford, MA 01886
Phone: (508) 692-7660
Fax:
(508) 692-8185
Australia
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Rockwell Australia Limited
3 Thomas Holt Drive
P.O. Box 165
North Ryde, NSW 2113
Australia
Phone: (61-2) 805 5555
Fax:
(61-2) 805 5599
Europe Mediterranean
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
c/o Rockwell Automation S.r.l.
Via Di Vittorio, 1
20017 Mazzo Di Rho (MI)
Italy
Phone: (39 2) 93179911
Fax
(39 2) 93179913
Europe North
Japan
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems, Ltd. Rockwell Int'l Japan Co., Ltd.
Berkshire Court
Shimomoto Bldg
Western Road
1-46-3 Hatsudai, Shibuya-ku
Bracknell
Tokyo, 151
Berkshire RG12 1RE
Japan
England
Phone: (81-3) 5371 1520
Phone: +44 1344 486 444
Fax:
(81-3) 5371 1501
Fax:
+44 1344 486 555
Korea
Rockwell-Collins Int'l, Inc.
Europe South
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Room No. 1508
S.A.R.L.
Korea Textile Centre Building
Tour GAN
944-31, Daechi-3dong
Cedex 13
Kangnam P.O. Box 2037
92082 Paris La Defense 2
Kangnam-ku
France
Seoul
Phone: (33-1) 49-06-3980
Korea
Fax:
(33-1) 49-06-3990
Phone: (82-2) 565-2880
Fax:
(82-2) 565-1440
Germany
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Singapore
Rockwell Int'l GmbH Germany
Rockwell-Collins Int'l, Inc.
Paul-Gerhardt-Allee 50 a
230 Orchard Road #10-230/232
81245 Munchen
Faber House
Germany
Singapore 0923
Phone: (49-89) 829-1320
Phone: (65) 732-2292
Fax:
(49-89) 834-2734
Fax:
(65) 733-0835
Hong Kong
Rockwell Int'l (Asia Pacific) Ltd.
13th Floor, Suites 8-10,
Harbour Centre
25 Harbour Road
Wanchai,
Hong Kong
Phone:
(852) 2 827-0181
Fax:
(852) 2 827-6488
Taiwan
Rockwell Int'l Taiwan Company, Ltd.
Room 2808 International Trade Bldg.
333, Keelung Road, Section I
Taipei,
Taiwan
10548 ROC
Phone: (886-2) 720-0282
Fax:
(886-2) 757-6760
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