2011 Annual Report (PDF 2.3MB)

2011 Annual Report (PDF 2.3MB)
2011
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A N N UA L R E PO RT
U N I V E R S I T Y O F TA S M A N I A
university of tasmania
The chancellor’s message
2011
A N N UA L R E PO RT
U N I V E R S I T Y O F TA S M A N I A
i
university of tasmania
The chancellor’s message
ii
university of tasmania
University of Tasmania
Annual Report 2011
The chancellor’s message
This is the report of the Council of the
University of Tasmania approved by
resolution at its meeting on 20 April, 2012.
To His Excellency
the Honourable Peter Underwood AC
Governor of Tasmania
May it please Your Excellency:
The Council of the University of Tasmania, in
conformity with the provisions of the University
of Tasmania Act 1992, has the honour to report,
for Your Excellency’s information, on the
proceedings of the University for 2011 and to
present the financial statements for that year.
Damian Bugg AM QC
Chancellor
June 2012
Vision and Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
The Chancellor’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3
The Vice-Chancellor’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2011 at a Glance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
Governance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
The Division of the Provost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
Learning andTeaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Research and ResearchTraining . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Faculties and Institutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Advancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Organisational Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
Financial Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
48
Alphabetical Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
87
How to contact us . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
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The University of Tasmania is the State’s
university. It is a generator of ideas and
knowledge and makes a significant
contribution to the economic, social
and
cultural
fabric
of
the
Tasmanian community. It has
a crucial role to play in the
State’s long-term prosperity.
mission
The University of Tasmania continues
a long tradition of excellence and
commitment to free inquiry in the
creation, preservation, communication
and application of knowledge, and to
scholarship that is global in scope,
distinctive in its specialisations and
that reflects our Tasmanian character.
The University will provide leadership
within its community, thereby
contributing to the cultural, economic
and social development of Tasmania.
vision
The University of Tasmania will be
ranked among the top echelon of
research-led universities in Australia.
The University will be a world
leader in its specialist, thematic
areas and will be recognised for its
contribution to state, national and
international development. UTAS will
be characterised by its high-quality
academic community, its unique
island setting and its distinctive
student experience. UTAS graduates
will be prepared for life and careers
in the globalised society of the
twenty-first century.
university of tasmania
The chancellor’s message
The University, the fourth oldest
in Australia, recorded its 121st
anniversary during the year. The
history of our university involves
periods of challenge, success,
disappointment and celebration.
Throughout that history the
endeavour of those governing
the University has been to
achieve the best outcome
for our students, Tasmania
specifically and the broader
Australian community generally.
The arrival of the new Vice-Chancellor, Professor Peter
Rathjen, in late March had a galvanising effect on staff,
the University as whole and I would venture, the Tasmanian
community. Professor Rathjen, previously the Deputy ViceChancellor (Research) at the University of Melbourne, has
brought a new energy and dynamism to the leadership of
the University as it moves forward with a council reformed
in size, structure and performance.
Under the direction of the previous Vice-Chancellor,
Professor Daryl Le Grew, UTAS achieved 60% growth in
student load and an increasing self-awareness. Our growth
has provided critical mass to enable us to achieve better
focus on the higher goals of a modern university.
With a largely new senior management team behind him,
Professor Rathjen immediately set about raising the national
and international profile of the University as a teaching and
research institution while building on the achievements of his
predecessor, Professor Le Grew. At this point I wish to record
my appreciation for the dedicated work of Professor David
Rich, Provost who, in addition to his other duties, undertook
the role of Acting Vice-Chancellor for the University during
the busy three months between Professor Le Grew’s
departure and Professor Rathjen taking over.
A modern university must be prepared to develop, to grow
and to anticipate and welcome change which will equip
the university to provide the best outcomes for its students
and community. What was best when we began in 1890
would not satisfy Tasmania’s demands of its university
today. Change must flow from the top and be driven by
the University’s governing body, the Council.
Top of Professor Rathjen’s to-do list was the development of
a new strategic plan and he set about that with great energy
and a determination to involve staff as much as possible in
its genesis and development. His efforts culminated in the
release of the Open to Talent discussion paper in August,
followed by the green paper that outlined a proposed vision
and the strategic priorities for UTAS over the next 10 years.
In 2011 the Council examined its own structure and
performance with a view to becoming more responsive
to the day-to-day needs of a university with five major
campus locations.
Building a future does also require bricks and mortar, and
infrastructure featured prominently throughout the year.
Thanks to our continuing excellent relationships with both
the Australian and State governments we were able to roll
out a series of major projects.
An external review, which also considered the size and
composition of the Council, was conducted early in the
year. The issues raised in the review were then carefully
considered by a working party from Council. The working
party recommended, among other things, a reduction
in size from 18 to a maximum 14, and changes to the
composition and processes of the Council.
The University is both an academic institution and a large
business – with a gross turnover exceeding $400 million
and a salary bill of about $250 million it is one of the largest
businesses in the State.
We are also responsible for the academic and pastoral
wellbeing of about 27,000 students both here and offshore.
We cannot deliver on that responsibility unless we have a
strong and efficient governance model.
The new model will see a Council comprising the Chancellor,
Vice-Chancellor and Chair of Academic Senate; one
elected member of academic staff, one elected member
of professional staff, one appointed student and four to
eight members appointed, variously, by the Council and the
Minister for Education and Skills, enabling the Council to
function with as few as 10 members and a maximum of 14.
During the year, two long-serving members of Council,
Mrs Yvonne Rundle (also Deputy Chancellor) and Mr Brian
Hartnett, retired. I wish to record the appreciation of the
University for the strong contribution made by Yvonne and
Brian during their terms on Council.
Council has overseen the University’s management of
construction of the second stage of the Medical Science
Precinct and demolition of the former PW2 shed at
Salamanca, to make way for the new home of the
Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies.
The State Government returned ownership of the historic
Domain House site to the University, a major step towards
the creation of a Domain campus in Hobart’s CBD. The
proposed development of new student accommodation in all
three regions of the State will also enhance the strength and
diversity of our student community.
While 2011 saw advancements in many areas, it was not
without its challenges. A weak investment market and
a lower than expected return in Commonwealth-funded
load contributed to a 60 per cent decrease in the operating
result, to $23.6 million.
Nevertheless, the University remains in a sound financial
position, and I am confident that the balance sheet
will rebound under the forward-looking stewardship of
Professor Rathjen and his senior management team.
Damian Bugg AM QC
Chancellor
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university of tasmania
the vice-chancellor’s message
Launceston’s Town and Gown procession.
Since joining the University of
Tasmania as Vice-Chancellor at
the end of March 2011, I have
been very appreciative of the
warm welcome that has been
extended to me as a newcomer
to this beautiful State. My first
year as Vice-Chancellor has
seen the University presented
with challenges as well as
opportunities. I would like to express my sincere thanks
to Professor David Rich for his capable stewardship of
the University as acting Vice-Chancellor for the first three
months of the year.
While 2011 was a difficult year for Australian universities
generally, it posed additional challenges for UTAS,
including an audit by the Tertiary Education and Quality
and Standards Agency (TEQSA), renewal of our strategic
plan, and establishment of a new Senior Executive.
In 2011 we articulated our first Statement of Values, a
description of our culture that will be aligned with the
global university mission through the University seeking
to become a signatory to the Magna Charta Universitatum
at Bologna. Our values provided foundation for a new
strategic plan, Open to Talent, which was the subject of
widespread consultation both within and outside the
University. This process was captured in a green paper
released for feedback in December 2011.
Leonard French’s enamel and mixed media artwork Three Towers
No 1, part of a multimillion-dollar donation to UTAS by alumnus
and philanthropist Geoffrey Tyler and his wife Frances.
Structured community engagement and a notable
strengthening of the professoriate in the north and northwest brought new vigour and fresh eyes to our regional
activities. Student numbers at the Cradle Coast campus
reached 1,000 for the first time, drawing national attention
to Burnie for providing opportunity for a significant cohort
of students who may not have traditionally considered
tertiary study.
Our teaching programs and scholars received welcome
recognition. Awards from the Australian Learning and
Teaching Council (ALTC) confirmed our place in the
top handful of teaching institutions. An ambitious new
Learning and Teaching Strategic Plan, which charts
a course for improvement of our teaching quality and
student experience, was approved by Academic Senate.
Student demand for University programs remained high,
with modest growth in numbers to 16,435 equivalent fulltime student load (EFTSL) by the end of 2011. In the face
of increasing international competition and constraints
imposed by a strong Australian dollar it was reassuring
to see that international students continued to see us
as a destination of choice, with increased demand for
2011 apparent. However, there are growing pressures on
demand for both domestic and international students,
which will see a high level of competition among the
sector and a need for strong market engagement by
UTAS for 2012 if it is to achieve its ambitious targets.
Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) results
distributed early in the year confirmed that the majority
of our research is world class, and some of it exceptional.
Our Analytical Chemistry, Horticultural Production,
Oceanography, and Visual and Performing Arts all
ranked among the nation’s finest. Major funding and
acknowledgement for environmental research, including
award of the Eureka Prize to a team led by Dr Menna
Jones and Associate Professor Greg Woods, confirmed
the breadth, quality and relevance of our endeavours.
Research Week, an initiative to profile our discoveries
and foster new ideas, was attended by 700 staff on
three campuses.
Transfer to the University of the title for Domain House
in December returned us to our historical origins and
will underpin the expansion into the Hobart central
business district through a consolidated Domain Precinct.
Refurbishment of the Electrical Engineering building
will see nursing students on the Domain site from 2012.
Construction of the Medical Science 2 building is well
under way and upon completion will provide an expanded
home for medical researchers and the Menzies Research
Institute Tasmania.
Student life on the Domain campus is likely to be enriched
by the provision of new housing as part of a $90 million
scheme to construct 770 student apartments across the
state. Construction work commenced on the Institute for
Marine and Antarctic Studies, which will be a world-class
facility that celebrates our research excellence, proximity
to the Southern Ocean and Antarctica, and close
partnership with colleagues at CSIRO and the Australian
Antarctic Division. The year also saw an agreement forged
in partnership with the Tasmania University Union for
a renewed focus on catering, accommodation and the
student experience, to ultimately enrich campus life.
Our close partnership with the State and community
of Tasmania remained a distinctive feature, and 2011
saw many points of engagement, beyond our teaching
and research activities, including concerts, exhibitions
and debates. The associated opportunities for us to
showcase our staff and students, and draw the Tasmanian
community into our activities, enriched us in many ways.
It was an exciting and successful year for the University
which would not have been possible without the
contribution of our committed and talented staff, including
the support of my Senior Executive. I would also like to
thank the Chancellor, Mr Damian Bugg, and acknowledge
the commitment of the members of the University Council.
I look forward to the challenges and opportunities that
2012 holds.
Peter Rathjen
Vice-Chancellor
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the vice-chancellor’s message
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university of tasmania
2011 at a glance
UTAS Council for 2011: (Back L-R) Mr Brian Hartnett, Professor John Williamson, Mr Rod Roberts, Mr Harvey Gibson, Mr Geoff Piggott, Ms Brenda
Richardson, Mr Harry Rolf, Professor Jim Reid and Dr Peter Davis. (Front) Professor Allan Canty, Dr Fiona Joske, Mr Paul Gregg, Mr Rhys Edwards,
Mr Damian Bugg, Professor Peter Rathjen, Mr Saleh Bintalib, Mrs Yvonne Rundle and Dr Sarah Jennings.
Campuses
Financial Performance
The southern campus of the University of Tasmania (UTAS)
is located in Sandy Bay. It is approximately 3km from the
centre of Tasmania’s capital city, Hobart.
During the year, the operating surplus for the University
of Tasmania and its controlled entities was $23.6 million,
less $10 million relating to the revaluation of assets (total
$13.5 million). The consolidated operating result includes
capital funding of $27 million and investment income of $5
million. Revenue from the Commonwealth Grant Scheme
(CGS), plus HECS, increased by $13 million to $148 million.
Revenue from international fee-paying students increased
to $45 million.
The Newnham campus (Launceston) includes the
Australian Maritime College, an institute of UTAS, while
Cradle Coast (Burnie) is a growing campus that represents
the north-west arm of the University.
Faculties and Institutes
Arts; Australian Maritime College; Business; Education;
Health Science; Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies;
Law; Menzies Research Institute Tasmania and Science,
Engineering and Technology.
Statistics at a Glance
Consolidated operating revenue
All students $478,762,000
27,191
The University has adopted long-term financial targets in
line with its strategic plan. On an annual basis, faculty and
divisional plans and budget submissions form key elements
of the overall planning process. The fiscal plan targets
included an overall benchmark operating result set at 6%
of total revenue. The result for 2011 (excluding past/future
year timing adjustments) was 5.9%.
The financial position of the University and its subsidiaries
is sound, with the ratio of current assets to current
liabilities at 1:5, and total cash and investment funds
held of $278 million.
Male11,503
Female15,688
Undergraduates20,920
Higher degree – research
1,191
Higher degree – coursework
5,080
Total student load (EFTSL)
16,435
FTE: All staff (including casuals)
2,622
Persons:
Academic (excluding casuals)
1,189
Professional (excluding casuals)
1,471
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
PRINCIPAL ACTIVITIES
The Council is the governing body of the University,
established under the University of Tasmania Act 1992.
Under that Act, the Council has responsibility for high-level
strategic direction, major financial planning, monitoring
management performance and compliance, staff
appointments and the allocation of funds.
During the year, the principal continuing activities of the
consolidated entity consisted of:
The Act was amended in 2001 to make the functions and
structure of the Council consistent with contemporary
governance practices. In 2004 a further amendment
enabled UTAS to comply with the National Governance
Protocols for Higher Education Institutions.
(d) activities incidental to undertaking (a) to (c).
(a) teaching and learning;
(b) research, knowledge transfer and research training;
(c) community engagement; and
While there were changes in the make-up and balance
of these activities, there were no significant changes in
the nature of the activities of the consolidated entity that
occurred during the year.
Council delegates broad powers to the Vice-Chancellor
(the managerial and academic leader) to manage the
operations of UTAS in conformity with agreed plans,
principles and policies. The Vice-Chancellor, in turn,
empowers other members of the Senior Management Team.
Council is advised by its committees (Audit, AMC
Integration, Built Environment, Ceremonial and
Honorary Degrees, Finance, Legislation, Nominations,
Remuneration), its working parties and (in relation to
academic matters) the Academic Senate.
REVIEW OF OPERATIONS
$ million
Consolidated
2011
University
2010 % Increase/
(decrease)
2011
2010 % Increase/
(decrease)
Total revenue from continuing operations*
478.76
486.49
-1.6
470.10
476.50
-1.3
Total expenses from continuing
operations
455.17
427.48
6.5
449.70
421.40
6.7
23.58
59.01
-60.0
20.40
55.09
-62.9
791.34
777.83
1.7
756.64
746.31
1.3
Operating result after income tax*
Total equity
* Total Revenue and the Operating Result included capital revenue of $55.8 million in 2010 and $27.2 million in 2011.
Revenue from operations increased by 5% in 2011 (excluding the impact of capital funds).
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university of tasmania
Annual Performance
Total student enrolments in 2011 increased to 16,435
equivalent full-time students (EFTS) – a 1.2% increase over
2010. In a challenging environment, the international onshore load component increased by 5.3%. However, while
achieving growth during the year, the level of growth in
domestic Commonwealth-supported places was below
the University target.
Key revenue receipts during 2011 included:
•$200 million ($185 million in 2010) revenue relating to
Commonwealth-supported student places (including
HECS) and related grants;
• $45 million ($40.9 million in 2010) fees from overseas
students; and
• $30.5 million ($30.8 million in 2010) was received in
support for research activities through the Research
Block Grants.
With lower than expected growth in Commonwealthfunded load during the year, the result from general
operations was $7 million below budget expectations.
Additionally, weak investment markets resulted in a poor
result from the University investment portfolio (-1% return).
The strategy adopted by UTAS plans for a negative return
on its investments on a one-year-in-seven basis, taking a
medium-term rather than short-term view.
During 2011 the University received $27.2 million
towards capital programs – $2.7 million from the Capital
Development Pool, $17.5 million from the Health and
Hospitals Fund, $3.5 million from the State Government,
$2 million from The Atlantic Philanthropies and $1.5 million
from the Rural Education Infrastructure Development Pool.
Significant progress was made during the year on major
capital projects – the $49 million Institute for Marine and
Antarctic Studies building, and Stage 2 of the $90 million
Medical Science Precinct.
Salary costs comprise 58% of total University expenditure.
During 2011 consolidated salary costs grew from $245.2
million to $263.7 million. Some salary expenditure is tied
to activities determined by funders (as in fixed-term
contracts associated with research grants, contracts and
consultancies, and its increase mirrors growth in income)
while some is in the strategic investment phase and is
aimed at improving research capacity to deliver future
growth. Some relates to the overall increase in operating
activity, and some flows from industrial instruments (staff
received a 4.0% increase in 2011).
The University Operating Result after income tax for
continuing operations for 2011 was a surplus of $23.5
million (consolidated), noting that this included $27.2
million of capital grants. There was also a reduction on
revaluation of building assets recorded ($10.0 million).
FINANCIAL POSITION
The main assets held are property, plant and equipment
(increased by $34.6 million [6.5%] to $569.6 million) and
cash and investments held (decreased by $11.1 million
[3.8%] to $277.7 million).
Consolidated net assets increased by $13.5 million to
$791.3 million (1.7% growth).
MATTERS SUBSEQUENT TO THE
END OF THE FINANCIAL YEAR
Nil.
AUDIT
INSURANCE OF OFFICERS
The Auditor-General, through the Tasmanian Audit Office,
conducts the annual statutory audit of the UTAS financial
statements.
During or since the financial period, UTAS has insured all
of the Council members listed against liability for costs
and expenses incurred by them in defending any legal
proceedings arising out of their conduct while acting
in their capacity as a Council member or director of a
controlled entity, other than conduct involving a wilful
breach of duty in relation to UTAS or a controlled entity.
UTAS Council, through its Audit and Risk Committee (and
with the support of the senior management), sets the fiveyear rolling Internal Audit Strategy and is informed through
reporting on its implementation.
In 2011 UTAS progressed its Internal Audit Strategy and
continued its focus on improving the quality of its internal
audit activities. Key elements included:
• step change improvements in the audits of Human
Resources, Work Health and Safety and Information
Technology Security;
• an incremental increase in the level of audit activities
to better meet UTAS needs while remaining at the lower
end of the audit resourcing spectrum in the sector;
PROCEEDINGS ON BEHALF OF UTAS
In 2011 Unimutual took legal action in the Magistrate’s
Court in UTAS’ name against the Tasmanian Government
Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) to
recover losses sustained as a result of loss of power to a
freezer in the Clinical School containing research samples.
The matter was eventually settled for $22,500.
•continued improvements in the planning and scoping
of internal audits and their alignment with key risks;
Also in 2011, UTAS’ motor vehicle insurer, Vero, became
involved in legal action arising from a crash involving
a UTAS vehicle on 16 March 2010. The other party’s
insurer lodged a claim against UTAS in the Magistrate’s
Court for $36,782. The matter had not been heard by
31 December 2011.
The University’s simplicity of approach and direct
commitment to risk management is distinctive. This
is typified by:
• improved skill match of audit teams drawing from a
wider team of providers including KPMG, Deloitte and
Assurance Pty Ltd;
INVESTMENT IN INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY
• a risk-aware culture;
•continued engagement of key stakeholders both in the
scoping process and through each individual audit; and
In recognition of the revolutionary nature of information
technology, UTAS refreshed its Information and
Communications Technology (ICT) Strategic Plan during
2011. The revised plan encapsulated UTAS’ vision of ICT
in support of core activities, and forecasts high-level ICT
initiatives that will underpin infrastructure and business
services over the period 2011–2014. The ICT Strategic Plan
is constructed to evolve and support the strategic agenda
as it is defined and refined into the future. In addition,
planning and consultation occurred over workplace change
that will reshape the major ICT support group to ensure
stronger contextual alignment and relevance with overall
UTAS directions.
RISK MANAGEMENT
The UTAS risk management agenda and its effectiveness
is overseen and supported by Council through its Audit
and Risk Committee.
• a recognition that universities have higher-level risks
that need to be managed;
• practicality of risk documentation requirements;
• ‘ownership’ of risks with those who control or mitigate
the risks;
• reinforcement of the risk agenda through the planning
and budgeting process;
• monitoring and review;
• independent evaluation and audit of the risk agenda; and
• separate focal points of leadership and support for work
health and safety, and critical incident management.
During 2011 the risk agenda at UTAS saw a consolidation
of a number of these risk management activities and
increased evidence of risk management maturity. The
recent establishment of a Legal Compliance System
further supports this agenda.
• improved coordination with other reviews and audits
across UTAS;
• improved strategies for ownership, implementation
and monitoring progress where recommendations
have been made.
UTAS continues to build on risk management and
compliance policies and procedures through the risk
management implementation program outlined above,
as well as the recently established Legal Compliance
System.
RIGHT TO INFORMATION
During the year UTAS processed three applications for
access to information under the provisions of the Right to
Information Act 2009.
PUBLIC INTEREST DISCLOSURES
UTAS was inadvertently omitted from the Public Interest
Disclosures Act 2002 as a result of amendments to the
definition of “public body” and “public officers”, which
came into effect on 1 October 2010. UTAS wrote to the
Secretary of the Department of Justice on 4 October 2010
requesting that UTAS remain bound by the Act. On 19
October 2011, UTAS was notified that the Act was to be
amended to once again include UTAS. The amendments
are yet to be made.
Progress on a range of strategic initiatives, both
infrastructure and business-service based, dominated
2011 investment in information technology. A major
upgrade to the Human Resource Management System
and an expansion of the self-service online kiosk capability
ensured more than 90% of staff had access to enhanced
electronic leave management capabilities.
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university of tasmania
Progress continued on the introduction of a new Student
Management System, currently scheduled for release in
2013, and, following extensive evaluation processes, UTAS
selected replacement Library and Learning Management
Systems. Preliminary activities were also undertaken to
enhance business intelligence capability via a series of
contemporary executive dashboards across a multitude
of information sources.
Key infrastructure improvements over 2011 included a
major upgrade to UTAS’ voice communication service,
and realisation of high-capacity communications capability
between the major Tasmanian campuses. This was the
result of several years of planning in collaboration with
other Tasmanian research organisations and the state
and Australian governments.
COMMERCIAL SERVICES AND
DEVELOPMENT
NRAS
UTAS successfully bid for funding under the Australian
Government National Rental Affordability Scheme (NRAS)
for construction of 770 student apartments across the
State. The Australian Government will contribute more
than $75 million over 10 years and the State Government
has committed in-kind support of $17.6 million.
The scheme provides for 45 of the apartments to be
reserved for economically disadvantaged students,
while a further 10% of the apartments will be designed to
accommodate students with a disability. Construction is
expected to start in 2012.
The Domain Site
Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies
(IMAS)
Throughout 2011 UTAS continued to act upon its
commitment to sustainable development. Significant
achievements included:
• completion of a five-year Sustainable Transport Strategy;
• reduced landfill and recycling across the three main
campuses;
• a solar and wind data collection station at Sandy Bay
Accommodation Services to determine the potential
resource for renewable energy installations;
The progression of the IMAS Waterfront Building Project raised the
IMAS profile locally, nationally and internationally. The building
site received many visits from Tasmanian and national politicians
throughout the year, including Prime Minister Julia Gillard.
The construction of a new, purpose-built facility for the
Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) is an
initiative of the Australian Government’s Nation BuildingEconomic Stimulus Plan. IMAS will be located on the
Hobart waterfront, on land provided by the Tasmanian
Government. The new facility will co-locate much of
Tasmania’s considerable strength in marine and Antarctic
studies, offering opportunities for collaborative research
of state, national and international significance.
The building design will be sympathetic to the historical
significance of the area and will include a publicly
accessible exhibition space and 60-seat auditorium.
Completion of the facility is expected early in 2014.
Medical Science Building 2 (MS2)
Title to the Domain site was granted to UTAS by the State
Government in December 2011, paving the way for the
creation of a Domain campus. This site, together with the
Medical Science Buildings 1 and 2, will provide a focus for
University activities in the Hobart CBD. It includes historic
Domain House, where UTAS began its existence in 1890 as
Australia’s fourth-oldest university.
Works on site have commenced to allow the relocation
of the School of Nursing and Midwifery. Future plans for
the site may include additional teaching and learning
activities, gallery and exhibition space, alumni activities
and accommodation.
Sustainability
• changes to the performance management and
development process including capturing completion
data and form re-design;
• presentation of academic study leave and
professional development leave;
• design of an enterprise bargaining framework;
• changes to the reimbursement and allowances
schedules;
• a proposal to reinvigorate the Indigenous Higher
Education Workforce Strategy; and
• capital work developments designed to attain Five Star
Green Star ratings;
• the development of behaviours that align with the
UTAS Statement of Values.
• more than 80 staff and students taking up roles as
sustainability representatives; and
Strategic HR has also supported change processes across
UTAS and is developing a UTAS change management
framework. In addition, Strategic HR has proposed a
structural design to provide more effective future support
to the University within the context of the re-design of the
HR Team.
• partnerships with Sustainable Living Tasmania, NRM
North, Greening Australia, Peak Oil Tasmania, Bookend
Trust and Monash Sustainability Institute to develop
and deliver community engagement and student
learning activities.
Tasmania University Union (TUU)
During 2011 agreement was reached with the Board of
Management of the Tasmania University Union (TUU) to
transfer its commercial operations to UTAS. The University
will manage catering, retail and housing services from
the beginning of 2012.The transfer will provide substantial
additional funding to the TUU and create opportunities for
the enhancement of campus services and facilities.
Unigym
Unigym Hobart was named Tasmanian Fitness Business
of the Year in 2011, thereby qualifying as a finalist in the
Fitness Australia national awards. Gym representatives
were presented with the award and prize money at a gala
award ceremony in Brisbane.
HUMAN RESOURCES
Strategic Human Resources
An artistic impression of the Medical Science 2 (MS2) building,
which is due to be completed by early 2013.
The appointment of a Manager, Strategic Human
Resources, in the latter part of 2011 has ensured
appropriate energy and investment in critical human
resources (HR) initiatives that will establish a platform
of success for UTAS for 2012 and beyond.
MS2 is the second stage of the Medical Science Precinct.
It is a joint project – to build an integrated health
research facility in Hobart – by the Menzies Research
Institute Tasmania, the Faculty of Health Science and the
Tasmanian Department of Health and Human Services.
As a result of a KPMG review, the following initiatives
have been commenced within the Strategic HR portfolio:
invigorating the performance management process; reprofiling the learning and development offering; and the
review and update of all HR policies.
The precinct will provide teaching facilities for more than
1,000 students as well as two lecture theatres, office and
laboratory accommodation, and a café. Completion of the
facility is expected in late 2013.
Strategic HR operates within the brief of the Strategic
HR Committee and the following initiatives have gained
support through this committee:
Leadership Programs
Leadership development programs such as Getting aHead,
Rising Stars Research Leadership and Mentoring Circles
extended the reach of leadership learning and networks
in cohorts of academic staff at similar career steps. The
Leadership Development for Women seminar allowed
academic and professional women to explore mentoring
and action learning, while enhancing their leadership
ability and connections. Meanwhile a diverse group of
50 academic and professional staff attended the Art of
Collaborative Leadership. They explored participative
methodologies and formed a Community of Practice.
Heads were supported in their individual and collective
leadership through a year-long program.
Workplace Health and Safety
The workplace health and safety (WHS) key risk areas –
including radiation, hazardous substances, biosafety, dive
and boating, and contractor – were successfully certified,
allowing UTAS research activities to continue and grow.
The focus on the reduction of substances and redundant
equipment at UTAS has ensured that hazardous storage
supplies and equipment have been reduced.
In preparation for the major legislative changes associated
with the harmonisation of WHS laws across Australia, a
number of key areas and processes were revitalised in 2011.
In terms of work health and safety data during 2011:
•there were 179 new hazards notified, increasing from
170 in 2010;
•there were 341 new incidents notified, increasing
from 261 in 2010;
•42 new workers’ compensation claims were lodged
with 15 resulting in lost time injuries (LTI). The overall
duration rate for LTI 2011 claims was 26.1, compared with
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51 in 2010 and 39.2 in 2009. The duration rate is calculated
by the total number of days lost divided by the number
of claims; and
•slips, trips and falls accounted for 67 of the notified
incidents in 2011 (37%) and 55 in 2010 (21%).
HR Statistics
FTE Continuing Appointments
2010
2011
Academic Continuing
500
524
Professional Continuing
655
729
TOTal fte continuing
1,1551,253
FTE FixedTerm Appointments
2010
2011
523
524
Academic Fixed Term
Professional Fixed Term
620
625
total fte fixed term
1,1431,149
total fte
2,2982,402
Age
20102011
Academic Average Age
47
47
Professional Average Age
43
44
average age
4545
Chair of Academic Senate (Ex Officio)
Three members elected by Academic Staff
Professor John Williamson
Professor Williamson has been a member of the University
Council since September 2001.
Professor Allan Canty
Professor Canty has been a member of the
University Council since 1 January 2011.
Professor Brian Yates
Professor Yates commenced as Acting Chair of Academic
Senate until 27 March 2011. During this time Professor
Williamson was acting as Provost.
Dr Sarah Jennings
Dr Sarah Jennings has been a member of the
University Council since 1 January 2011.
Four members appointed by
Minister for Education
Mr Rhys Edwards
Mr Edwards has been a member of the University Council
since 1 January 2007.
Mr Paul Gregg
Mr Gregg has been a member of the University Council
since 1 January 2009.
Dr Fiona Joske
Dr Joske was a member of the University Council from
1 January 2007 until 31 October 2011.
Mrs Yvonne Rundle
Mrs Rundle was a member of the University Council
from 8 April 2005 until 30 June 2011.
Gender
20102011
FTE Female
1,193 1,264
Four members appointed by Council
FTE Male
1,105 1,138
Length of Service – Current Position
2010
2011
Academic Average Length of Service
6.64
6.72
Dr Peter Davis
Dr Davis has been a member of the
University Council since 1 July 2005.
Professional Average Length of Service
6.57
6.62
COUNCIL MEMBERSHIP
Members
These people were members of University Council during
the whole of 2011 (unless otherwise indicated).
Chancellor (Ex Officio)
Mr Damian Bugg AM QC
Mr Bugg has been Chancellor since October 2006 and has
been a member of the University Council since 2001.
Vice-Chancellor and President (Ex Officio)
Professor David Rich
Professor Rich commenced as Acting Vice-Chancellor of
the University of Tasmania and member of the University
Council from 1 January 2011 until 27 March 2011.
Professor Peter Rathjen
Professor Rathjen commenced as Vice-Chancellor of the
University of Tasmania and member of the University
Council from 28 March 2011.
Mr Harvey Gibson
Mr Gibson has been a member of the
University Council since 1 January 2009.
Mr Brian Hartnett
Mr Hartnett was a member of the University Council
from 1 January 2007 until 30 June 2011.
Professor Jim Reid
Professor Reid has been a member of the University
Council since 1 January 2003. He was also a member of
Council from 1994 to 2001 as the Chair of Academic Senate.
One member elected by General Staff
Mr Geoff Piggott
Mr Piggott has been a member of the
University Council since 1 January 2011.
Two students appointed by the Council
Mr Saleh Bintalib
Mr Bintalib has been a member of the
University Council since 1 January 2011.
Mr Harry Rolf
Mr Rolf has been a member of the
University Council since 11 June 2010.
Secretary to Council
Ms Belinda Webster
COUNCIL COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP
1 January 2011 – 31 December 2011
The Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor are ex officio members
of every board, faculty and committee of the University,
but are listed here only for those committees normally
attended.
Mr Rod Roberts
Mr Roberts has been a member of the University Council
since 19 November 1999.
AMC Integration Committee
Chair
Shared Chairing
One member appointed by Council (Member with
International Experience)
Members
Mrs Yvonne Rundle (until 30 June 2011)
Dr Fiona Joske
Professor Peter Rathjen (from 28 March 2011)
Professor Geoff Wilson
Professor Malek Pourzanjani
Ms Brenda Richardson
Ms Richardson has been a member of the
University Council since 1 January 2005.
The AMC Integration Committee has responsibility for
reviewing and advising Council at least annually whether
the implementation of the integration is proceeding in
accordance with the Heads of Agreement; what action,
if any, is necessary to rectify implementation, where
implementation arrangements are inconsistent with
the Heads of Agreement; where such amendments
are considered to be of benefit to AMC and UTAS, to
recommend amendments to the Heads of Agreement;
and to commission through the Vice-Chancellor and the
Principal of AMC a substantial review during the fifth year
following integration to advise Council and the AMC Board
whether the vision and purpose of the integration of AMC
as an institute of UTAS are being achieved and, if not, what
action(s) should be taken to rectify this.
Audit and Risk Committee
Chair
Mr Harvey Gibson
MembersMr Rod Roberts (ex officio as Chair of
Finance Committee)
Ms Heather McDonald
Mrs Yvonne Rundle (until 30 June 2011)
Mr Glenn Appleyard
The Audit and Risk Committee has responsibility for the
Risk Management and Audit Assurance Charter, Internal
Audit Strategy and Plan, and oversees the outsourcing
of the internal audit function. It receives and reviews the
internal audit reports and management responses, and
reports to Council on both internal and external audit
matters. The committee also oversees risk management
monitoring and reporting.
Built Environment Committee
Chair
Dr Peter Davis
Members
Professor Roger Fay
Ms Susan Gough
Ms Brenda Richardson (from 28 October 2011)
Mr Leigh Woolley
The Built Environment Committee has responsibility
for considering, reviewing and advising Council on the
development, approval and implementation of campus
framework plans; priorities for major capital works;
strategic asset management planning; preventative
maintenance program; buildings and grounds plans; and
design standards for building works and landscaping.
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Ceremonial and Honorary Degrees Committee
Legislation Committee
Chair
Mr Damian Bugg AM QC
Chair Members
Mrs Yvonne Rundle (until 30 June 2011)
Mr Miles Hampton (Chair, UTAS Foundation)
Dr Fiona Joske (until 31 October 2011)
Professor Peter Rathjen (from 28 March 2011)
Mr Rod Roberts
Dr Ashley Townsend (UTAS Alumni association)
Professor John Williamson
Members Associate Professor Kate Crowley
Professor Jim Reid
The Ceremonial and Honorary Degrees Committee
makes recommendations to Council for recognition by the
University of individuals and organisations; the naming
of buildings or facilities; and the conferring of degrees
ceremonies, and other ceremonial matters.
Finance Committee
Chair
Mr Rod Roberts
Members
Professor Peter Rathjen (from 28 March 2011)
Mr Harvey Gibson
Mrs Yvonne Rundle (until 30 June 2011)
Professor John Williamson
Mr Paul Gregg
The Finance Committee monitors the financial activities
of the University and makes recommendations to Council
on financial matters, including: submitting the University’s
audited annual financial report; reviewing the University’s
triennial budget; overseeing the investment of University
funds; advising Council about levels of fees and charges
imposed by the University; and reviewing the University’s
financial plan.
The division of the provost
Mr Damian Bugg AM QC
The Legislation Committee drafts and recommends any
ordinances, rules and by-laws necessary to implement
the decisions of the Council.
This committee was wound up by Council on 3 June 2011
as Governance and Legal drafts the necessary legislation
for approval by Council.
Nominations Committee
Chair
Mr Damian Bugg AM QC
Members Dr Fiona Joske (until 31 October 2011)
Mr Rod Roberts
Mrs Yvonne Rundle (until 30 June 2011)
The Nominations Committee calls for nominations,
considers and makes recommendations on the filling
of all positions to which Council is required to make
appointments, including Council itself and its committees.
Remuneration Committee
Chair
Mr Damian Bugg AM QC
Members Mr Rod Roberts
Mrs Yvonne Rundle (until 30 June 2011)
The Remuneration Committee ensures the strategic
alignment of human resource management and industrial
negotiations with the University’s plan. It also determines
policy for senior executive remuneration and performance
appraisal, as well as the remuneration and the renewal
of contracts for senior executives. It considers reports
on remuneration of staff employed by entities created
by the University.
The UTAS Newnham campus was recognised as Launceston’s
export business of the year by the Launceston Chamber of
Commerce Business Excellence Awards.
A Year for Divisional Restructure
The Provost, Professor David Rich, is
senior deputy to the Vice-Chancellor
and has oversight of the University’s
six faculties and the campuses,
particularly those in Launceston and
Burnie. His responsibilities also include
community engagement, media and
communications, quality assurance
and strategic human resources.
2011 saw a title change as the Deputy Vice-Chancellor
(Academic) and Provost assumed the title of Provost.
The Division of the Provost was reconfigured to include
the Office of the Provost, the Cradle Coast campus,
Student Recruitment, Marketing and Communications
and Media. Also in the portfolio is the newly appointed
Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional Development), Professor
Janelle Allison. In addition, late 2011 saw Ms Alicia O’Grady
appointed to the new role of Executive Director Marketing
and Communications within the Division of the Provost, to
commence in March 2012.
Graduating students rated UTAS at or above sector average in terms
of teaching, generic skills and overall satisfaction.
Office of the Provost
2011 TEQSA Audit
During 2011 the Provost, with the support of the UTAS
Quality Committee, led UTAS’ preparations for an external
audit by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards
Agency (TEQSA). The audit concentrated on two themes
– Internationalisation and Learning Outcomes – both of
which fall within the remit of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor
(Students and Education). Following the submission of
the UTAS Performance Portfolio and a large volume of
supporting and supplementary materials, members of the
TEQSA UTAS Audit Panel conducted visits to selected
overseas and onshore UTAS sites in September and
October. In China, the Shanghai Ocean University (SOU)
and the Zheijang University of Technology (ZUT) were
visited by the Audit Chair and Director. The panel visited
UTAS’ three Tasmanian campuses from 3 to 6 October,
interviewing more than 280 UTAS staff, students and
stakeholders during this time. The confidential draft Audit
Report was received in December 2011 and the final Audit
Report is expected to be made public in April 2012.
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Implementing the Your Voice Action Plan
Following 2009’s Your Voice @ UTAS Survey, which sought to
better understand staff attitudes and levels of engagement
within the University (as well as issues of concern to staff),
the Provost led the process of identifying key issues for
improvement, developing a ‘Your Voice Action Plan’ and
overseeing its implementation. Key outcomes for 2011
include the introduction of a UTAS staff intranet and the
development of the UTAS Statement of Values (see more
below), alongside ongoing improvements to the UTAS
wireless network and IT support services.
Adoption of the UTAS Statement of Values
ensuring a robust, efficient and effective system for
the management and implementation of reviews. The
Reviews Policy applies to all organisational units, all
staff and all functions of the University. Implementation
of the Reviews Policy involves three key bodies working
in partnership: University Council, through its Audit
and Risk Committee (for internal audits); Academic
Senate (for academic activities); and the new Planning,
Performance and Review Committee (for administrative
and management activities), which was formed in March
2011 and is chaired by the Provost.
Academic Standards Framework
Development
UTAS is responding proactively to the increasing national
emphasis being placed on setting and meeting academic
standards with the introduction of an Academic Standards
Framework, which establishes quality indicators in
learning and teaching – against which performance can
be measured. The institution-wide Academic Standards
Framework project has been piloted at the Cradle Coast
campus and in the Faculty of Health Science.
Benchmarking
More than 350 UTAS staff shared their thoughts through
workshops to help develop the UTAS Statement of Values.
In July 2011, the UTAS Statement of Values was endorsed by
the University Council, which also endorsed the University
becoming a signatory to the Universitatum Magna Charta
– an internationally recognised statement of principles for
all universities. The Statement of Values sits alongside the
UTAS Mission and Vision, guiding UTAS’ new strategic
plan, the way the UTAS community works together, and
the things it works on. The UTAS Statement of Values is a
direct outcome of the Your Voice at UTAS process and was
developed from the contributions of UTAS staff through a
highly collaborative process, designed by a small team led
by Professor Margaret Otlowski, Dean of Law and Chair
of the Your Voice Culture and Communications Reference
Group. More than 350 UTAS staff contributed, by sharing
their thoughts through workshops, an online survey,
individual emails and interviews.
Implementing the Quality Management
Framework
The Provost oversees quality management at UTAS. In
2010, the UTAS Quality Management Framework (QMF)
was developed. A quality management framework in
a complex organisation such as UTAS describes an
integrated approach to strategic goal setting, planning,
budgeting and management across the whole institution.
2011 saw several major leaps in the implementation of
the QMF, such as the approval, in April 2011, of the UTAS
Reviews Policy which outlines the University’s approach to
UTAS has long engaged in benchmarking and regularly
participates in whole-of-institution performance
benchmarking against the sector and peer institutions.
It has also long engaged in the collection and monitoring
of activity and performance data in support areas such
as human resources (and especially through sectoral
industry associations). In 2011, of particular importance
were two academic benchmarking projects, undertaken
in partnership with the University of Wollongong and
Deakin University. One project concentrated on the
provision of higher degrees by research (HDR), while
the other compared assessment policies and processes.
The outcomes of these exercises are driving a variety of
improvement exercises. During 2011, the planning and
reporting of benchmarking activity was integrated into
the Faculty Planning and Budget process, signifying its
emerging strategic importance to the institution.
UTAS Visiting Fellows and Scholars
Program
The Visiting Fellows and Scholars Program offers Visiting
Fellowships and Visiting Scholarships to support short-term
visits to UTAS by academics, scholars and other eminent
individuals, normally from outside Tasmania. The program
is designed to benefit areas or activities of strategic
priority for UTAS by, for example: strengthening academic
networks to underpin ongoing scholarly activity; achieving
scholarly outcomes (e.g. publications) in key areas, through
research leadership and collaborative research; enhancing
the professional development of UTAS staff through
exposure to teaching and learning leaders; enhancing
educational programs through collaborative teaching
projects; and raising the scholarly and public profile of
UTAS. During 2011, 18 visitors from 11 countries were
supported by the program.
Community Engagement Grants
The University offers competitive Community Engagement
Grants to support staff-led interactions between UTAS
and external individuals, community groups, professional
bodies, business and industry, schools, government
agencies and non-government organisations at the local,
state, national and international levels. In 2011, a total pool
of $60,000 was made available, with up to $8,000 awarded
per project. Four projects were awarded grants in the 2011
round and provide significant opportunity for the University
to engage and interact with its varied communities. The
projects selected to receive support in the 2011 round were
as follows:
•The project ‘Identities, Disadvantage and Belonging’, led
by Dr Max Travers from the School of Sociology and Social
Work, will bring together researchers from the University
of Tasmania and residents of three public housing areas in
southern Tasmania, through their Neighbourhood Centres,
to pursue collaborative research.
•The ‘Lungs in Action Program UTAS Exercise Physiology
Clinic’, led by Dr Andrew Williams from the School
of Human Life Sciences, will engage with the local
community to provide a service to assist people with
respiratory disease to enhance their quality of life, and
support them to stay well, reducing hospital admissions.
•The project ‘Development and Delivery of a Pilot Health
Education Literacy Program for Older Tasmanians’, led
by Dr Jess Woodroffe from the University Department
of Rural Health, will develop and deliver a health literacy
improvement resource for people aged 55+ in Tasmania.
•The project ‘Engaging Families in Low SES Communities
in Hands-on Learning: Enabling Social Cohesion and
Inclusion through an Exciting Science Program’, led
by Dr Bernardo León de la Barra from the School of
Engineering, will see parents and children from eight
primary schools in four communities around the State
engage in research-based education, outreach, and
pathway planning program focused on interactive and
motivational Science, Technology, Engineering, and
Mathematics (STEM) content, which is linked to the
Australian Curriculum.
Newnham Campus Urban Design
Framework
University Council approved the Newnham campus Urban
Design Framework (UDF) in July 2011. Developed by MGS
Architects, under the direction of the Provost, the UDF
provides a framework through which all future works on
the Newnham campus can be developed and prioritised.
It seeks to prevent the haphazard and reactive works
that have occurred in the past by strategically planning
future development on the campus and ensuring that
each intervention contributes to UTAS objectives such as:
campus consolidation; sustainable campus development;
an improved library; establishment and strengthening
of disciplinary and service precincts; space and place
making; addressing future student accommodation news;
and relocating the aquaculture facility on campus.
The UDF emphasises the process required to arrive at a
more functional campus over time rather than focusing
on individual projects and provides a layered response to
issues rather than a single solution. It draws extensively
upon the Newnham campus master plan of 2007 but within
the context of realistic growth and budget projections,
presenting achievable development options which do not
compromise the master plan’s objectives.
Pro Vice-Chancellor
(Regional Development)
In September 2011, Professor Janelle Allison was appointed
to the new position of Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional
Development), continuing in the part-time role of Director,
Cradle Coast Campus. The Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional
Development) role has a specific focus on the Launceston
and Cradle Coast campuses and is responsible for
campus development, strengthening academic programs,
fostering partnerships and community engagement.
Professor Allison is supported by a team of senior
academics and administrative leaders with skills in
community engagement, campus development, business
and stakeholder relations, and communications and
media. Professor Allison has a background in geography
and regional planning and has worked extensively with
regional communities within Australia, as well as in Africa
and Indonesia. Her research focuses on regional and rural
areas and how best to position high-quality niche regional
enterprises in the global economy. In recent years she has
also focused on alternative participation strategies and
entry pathways to learning – a critical issue for Tasmania’s
regional areas.
Cradle Coast Campus
Governance, Administration and Marketing
In 2011, the Cradle Coast campus’ (CCC’s) strategic
planning processes coincided with preparation for the
TEQSA audit, providing the CCC and the North West
Advisory Board (NWAB) an opportunity to reflect on the
status of the CCC, its future and its governance model,
initiating the preparation and collation of important
strategic documents including a 2011 Strategic Plan and
Action Plan. These plans centre on the core theme of
Participation and also outline future prospects for CCC, a
transition plan for the CCC after the federal government’s
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Diversity and Structural Adjustment (DASA) funding
ends, an internal communications plan and an analysis
of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats
undertaken by an external consultancy firm. The CCC’s
third DASA Milestone report was submitted and a request
to roll-over funds until October 2012 was prepared and
accepted.
Following Professor Janelle Allison’s appointment as the
Pro Vice-Chancellor (Regional Development), Dr Robyn
Eversole was appointed the (Acting) Director of the Institute
for Regional Development (IRD) for a two-year period.
Following a survey across the north-west region, the twoyear ‘HERE’ marketing campaign was developed. Its key
message, delivered in advertising and promotional material
(including press, banners and websites), builds on the
CCC’s strengths, highlighting local opportunities for study
and research.
A major highlight for the CCC in 2011 was the very
successful Regional Universities Campus Heads
Conference held from 13-14 July. The federal Minister
for Tertiary Education, Senator Chris Evans, opened the
conference and used it as an opportunity to launch the
$500 million Education Investment Fund to transform
regional universities.
Research
2011 highlights include:
Cradle Coast Research Week 2011 showcased the diverse
range of research being undertaken across the region.
The week included postgraduate student presentations,
industry-led research forums, research workshops,
education forums and poster presentations. Seventeen
events were held with 30 presentations to an audience of
more than 300 people.
•Advanced Manufacturing: visit from Dan Swinney
In April the campus hosted a regional workshop with
the Executive Director of the Chicago Manufacturing
Renaissance Council, Dan Swinney. Mr Swinney has
spent the past 25 years spearheading collaborative and
innovative approaches to retaining industrial jobs in the
US and shared his vision with 70 industry and education
representatives at the forum, Manufacturing Regained –
New Prospects for North West Tasmania. The workshop
was a partnership with Enterprise Connect and the
University of Melbourne.
In 2011, the Institute for Regional Development (IRD)
had 10 PhD candidates with other research highlights
including: the granting of Cross-Boundary Research
Funds to three research projects; the Tasmanian Social
Enterprise Study; the IRD’s continued partnership with the
Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture Vegetable Centre on a
series of projects, including the Food Systems Flagship;
and a partnership with the Burnie City Council to provide
assistance in developing research proposals for the
federally funded ‘Better Futures, Local Solutions Project’.
Engagement in the North-West
•Food Production: Cate Gilpin, Artist-in-Residence
The campus’s first artist-in-residence, Queensland-based
curator and writer Cate Gilpin, documented the stories
of producers and providores across the region in an
exhibition Stories from the North West Food Bowl opened
by SBS food presenter Costa Georgiadis in February.
Courses and Course Development
In 2011, for the first time, CCC enrolled more than 1,000
students, with students enrolled in degrees offered by the
AMC and each of UTAS’ faculties.
The Graduate Certificate in Business was very successful
in 2011, with 67 students graduating and a further 48
expected to continue studying in 2012. As a direct result
of the success of the Graduate Certificate in Business,
the Faculty of Business approved the delivery of a new
postgraduate course at the CCC, the MBA (Regional
Innovation).
Participation Project
The CCC Participation Project continued throughout
2011. Relationships were established and strengthened
within the region to further enhance the participation
agenda, including relationships with Job Service Australia;
Centrelink; the Skills Institute (around Agriculture and
Engineering); Polytechnic campuses in Devonport and
Burnie; LINC Burnie and Devonport (to develop a model
for LINCs as ‘learning gateways’ and service points
for learning pathways /lifelong learning) and ongoing
engagement with industry stakeholders. In 2011, the
UniLink Program focused on Year 10, 11 and 12 students
on the North-West Coast of Tasmania (as well as their
parents), delivering presentations to more than 2,000
students as well as information evenings, newsletters
and the What’s Uni Really Like program.
•Community Wellbeing: Bridges Out of Poverty workshop
One hundred service providers working across the region
and State attended a two-day Bridges Out of Poverty
workshop in November to address intergenerational
poverty and disadvantage and its impacts on individuals,
families and communities. The workshop was presented
by Social Solutions’ Nairn Walker and prompted
participants to re-think attitudes and re-evaluate
approaches to clients affected by poverty, in all its forms.
Engagement in the North
Cradle Coast campus UniLink coordinator Carrie Smith is
pictured with some of the images from the exhibition Zamora.
The Cradle Coast campus hosted nine art exhibitions and floor
talks during the year.
The Cradle Coast campus’ community engagement
activities centre on a range of partnered initiatives
delivered through the Institute for Regional Development
as well as a program of public lectures, workshops and
events targeted to the region. These activities were
attended by more than 1,000 people in 2011 and delivered
in partnership with more than 30 external organisations.
Activities focused on the themes of: advanced
manufacturing; agri-food; tourism and the environment;
climate change and a carbon economy; and community,
culture and liveability – all areas pivotal to the north-west
region’s prosperity.
The campus also coordinated a vibrant campus-wide
cultural program with nine art exhibitions and floor
talks and an inaugural artist-in-residence program. The
exhibition program is designed to enhance the learning
and cultural experiences on the CCC. The principal focus
of the residency is engagement with the CCC and the
broader community, with reference to its industrial and
cultural landscape and regional identity.
UTAS continues to build and nurture relationships with the
organisations that drive the northern Tasmanian regions
and shape social, community and economic agendas.
UTAS has also been consulted and actively involved in the
development of regional strategies and initiatives that will
guide future retail, tourism, events, resource management,
and sustainability in the region, all of which have direct and
indirect implications, and opportunities, for UTAS and its
students and staff. Memorandum of understanding (MOU)
partnerships with the Launceston City Council and NRM
North pave the way for regular consultation on issues that
impact the environment in which UTAS operates and, in
many cases, provide linkages to communities that are often
difficult to access, in particular those with no family history
of higher education.
Through provision of access to UTAS facilities, events for
more than 30 external organisations were held, attracting
over 5,000 visitors to the Newnham campus and engaging
UTAS staff and students. This eclectic range of events
included African community days, history and education
conferences, veterans’ cycling championships, soccer
matches, orienteering, debates, lectures, youth justice and
public speaking events, science challenges and business
functions, including the Tasmanian Leaders Program.
The Human Interface Technology (HIT) Lab was a key
focus of development efforts, with HITLab presentations
made to more than 70 organisations and 180 individuals
with the potential to provide funds or become research
partners. Visitors included Premier Lara Giddings and many
federal, state and local government politicians and staff,
and relationships were formed with senior representatives
of NBN Co. International and domestic visitors hailed from
a range of industries and professions, including health
and disability services, IT, shipping, transport and ports,
engineering, tourism, marketing, property development,
training, mining and many sectors of the creative and
design industries.
Other key Launceston-based initiatives in 2011 included:
•Harmony Day, celebrating diversity within the UTAS and
broader communities
On 22 March 2011, the Launceston Engagement and
Development (LED) Office and the Tasmanian University
Union, supported by more than 20 internal and external
partners, hosted a day of multi-cultural entertainment,
sporting and education activities for the enjoyment
of over 400 school children and almost 1,000 students
and community members. In addition to creating links
between culturally diverse communities, Harmony Day
provides UTAS with access to communities that are
often difficult to reach.
•UTAS Film Society
To provide students and staff with a regular weekly
social activity, and to attract community to the campus,
the UTAS Film Society was established in 2011. In its first
three months, 90 members, representing an even mix of
staff, student and community, had signed up.
•2011 Debating Series
UTAS hosted two successful debates dealing with
controversial topics of relevance to the Tasmanian
community – euthanasia and gay marriage – attracting
full houses with more than 300 attendees.
Student Recruitment
and Marketing
Student Recruitment Programs
During 2011, UTAS continued to actively pursue its
extensive student recruitment programs. These programs
included Open Days, held on the Hobart, Launceston
and Burnie campuses and the ‘UTAS Futures’ program,
which was delivered in 23 senior secondary schools around
Tasmania, with an audience of 5,464 students from Years
11 and 12. The ‘Experience UTAS’ outreach program also
showcases a range of programs of study and involves
secondary students visiting UTAS campuses for activities,
tours and workshops. As part of regular recruitment
activities, UTAS courses were showcased at a number of
career expos and events in Brisbane, Adelaide, Sydney,
19
the division of the provost
the division of the provost
18
the division of the provost
20
university of tasmania
Melbourne and regional Victoria. UTAS facilitated the
annual Career Advisor Symposium, hosting 22 interstate
and 24 Tasmanian Career Counsellors at UTAS campuses
in Hobart and Launceston.
Marketing Activity
UTAS markets its products using a wide variety of
channels including press, publication, television, cinema,
radio, online and live events, as well as appearing in several
education directories, such as the Good Universities
Guide, Job Guide and various postgraduate guides. During
2011, UTAS began to develop a social media strategy and
enhanced digital marketing strategy. 2011 also saw the
development of Channel UTAS, a key landing page on the
University’s website, which provides a dynamic central
location for multi-media files such as videos and podcasts
to showcase our organisation.
Communications and Media
UTAS Communications
and Media strengthened
the profile and reputation
of the University and
its academics in 2011,
generating media
coverage with an
estimated value of
$9.5 million. Nearly 200
media releases were
issued during the year
encompassing the full
spectrum of university
activities, ranging from
A 250 million-year-old dicynodont
research grants and
fossil was unveiled in December.
projects to public lectures
and academic conferences to graduation ceremonies and
sod-turning events. Media highlights for 2011 included:
• The arrival of the new Vice-Chancellor in March;
•The Eureka Prize awarded to the Devils’ Advocates
research team;
•Philanthropist Graeme Wood’s $2 million donation to
stage two of the Medical Science Precinct;
•The Vice-Chancellor’s detailing of plans for a Domain
campus in Hobart’s CBD;
•The publication of research concluding that selective
culling would not save Tasmanian devils, produced in
partnership with a UK scientific journal;
•Graduation ceremonies across the State in August
and December; and
•The unveiling of a 250 million-year-old dicynodont fossil
in December.
Four issues of Research to Reality, 10 issues of the Unitas
newspaper and two issues of Alumni News were produced
during 2011. In the new-media sphere, our Twitter audience
grew steadily to reach nearly 1,200 followers by the year’s
end. A series of engaging videos – some related to Research
to Reality launches, others to Denison Debates, guest
lectures and major events – was produced for the UTAS
website. Late July saw the launch of a staff-only intranet
and late November the debut of a revamped [email protected] –
Weekly Bulletin, enhanced with the introduction of imagery
and a colourful layout. UTAS also became a financial
member of The Conversation website, an independent
source of information, analysis and commentary from the
university and research sector. This initiative has provided
our academics – and UTAS itself – with a new online
platform to reach a national and international audience.
21
learning and teaching
2012 Tasmanian Rhodes Scholar Edward Doddridge and his wife
Imogen have travelled to Oxford University (UK), where Edward
will put his applied mathematics degree to use in studying
physical oceanography.
As the only university in the State, UTAS has a
comprehensive course profile. UTAS seeks to capitalise
on its unique Tasmanian identity by providing distinctive
courses aligned with the University’s theme areas and
the State’s perceived educational needs. The University
Learning and Teaching Plan, which is reviewed and
updated annually, sets out initiatives that aim to contribute
to the University’s mission and goals in the area of
learning and teaching.
The University Learning and Teaching Committee
supports learning and teaching initiatives, develops
policy, and conducts quality assurance and progress
reviews. A progress report on the Learning and Teaching
Plan is presented annually to the Academic Senate and
Council. The key learning and teaching strategies that the
University aimed to progress in 2011 included:
•continued support for the university-wide
implementation of criterion-referenced assessment;
•implementation and evaluation of e-portfolio software
university-wide as a tool for students in the mapping
of generic attribute acquisition, and for staff in the
development of learning and teaching portfolios;
•development of an overarching learning and teaching
evaluation framework;
•review of recognition and reward systems to encourage
and celebrate excellence, through the Awards and
Grants Office;
•provision of improved access to the University with the
development of a UTAS College model with a focus on
transition support and individualised pathways planning;
•working with industry partners, provision of high-level
sectoral and institutional leadership to maximise credit
transfer between UTAS and VET institutions;
Harmony Day celebrations at Newnham campus included a traditional
South Pacific dance by Amelia Yarrow, Mata Down, Lalene Down and
Achalie Down.
•implementation and evaluation of a peer assisted study
session (PASS) program; and
•continued development and expansion of the Community
Friends and Network Program to integrate students
living away from home into the UTAS and broader
community.
A great deal of work was undertaken in 2011 to review and
refine the University’s strategic approach to learning and
teaching in order to develop a more integrated learning
and support structure that will underpin the provision of
a positive student experience in a more effective manner.
This involved both the development of a Strategic Plan for
Learning and Teaching for implementation from 2012, and
the restructure of the Division of Students and Education
to a structure that: reflects the fact that students are at
the centre of what we do, and that learning and teaching
at UTAS forms part of a whole organisational commitment
to the enhancement of the student experience; enables the
achievement of the strategic vision set out in the Learning
and Teaching Strategic Plan, which is aligned with the
University Strategic Plan and the federal government
agenda; and supports an increased focus on and new
approaches to academic standards, technology enhanced
learning, education for sustainable development, and open
educational resources. The new structure for the Division
was finalised at the end of 2011. It comprises six sections:
• Student Centre;
• Centre for University Pathways and Partnerships (CUPP);
• Tasmanian Institute of Learning and Teaching (TILT);
• Library;
• International Marketing and Recruitment; and
•Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Students &
Education).
university of tasmania
Course Development
The following new courses were approved during 2011
for introduction in 2011 or 2012:
• Master of Nursing Practitioner Studies;
leadership specialisation for the Graduate Certificate,
Graduate Diploma and Master of Clinical Leadership.
Course Reviews
Table 1: Successful 2011 Australian Learning and Teaching Council Grant Submissions
UTAS role Grant type
Project title
Lead
Discipline Networks
The Creative Arts Learning and Teaching Network (CAL TN)
Lead
Discipline Networks
Learning & Teaching Academic Standards in Creative & Performing Arts
Lead
Discipline Networks
Australian Learning & Teaching Discipline Scholars Network
Lead
Discipline Networks
Learning & Teaching Academic Standards in Science
Lead
Innovation & Development
Bridging The Gap: Teaching Adaptations Across the Disciplines and
Sharing Content for Curriculum Renewal
Partner
Extension Grant
Clinical Reasoning and Simulation
Partner
Innovation & Development
Enhancing Architectural Education in Australasia: Expanding and
Assessing Group Work
Partner
Innovation & Development
Experiential Learning in Planning Education: Resources and Tools for
Good Practice
Partner
Leadership for Excellence
Building Leadership with the Sessional Staff Standards Framework
•Graduate Diploma and Graduate Certificate in
Road Engineering Construction;
Faculties provide the University Learning and Teaching
Committee with annual course reports that summarise
strengths, weaknesses and plans for improvement.
Courses continue to be reviewed as required as per the
new Reviews Policy introduced in 2011. Quality assurance
reviews are also conducted on an annual basis for the
University’s Transnational Education programs, with
the following quality assurance reports submitted to
the University Learning and Teaching Committee and
Academic Senate in 2011:
•Graduate Certificate in Addiction Studies for
Health Professionals;
•Bachelor of Business, Hong Kong Universal Education
(HKUE), Hong Kong;
•Graduate Certificate in Flexible Learning and
Simulation for Health Professionals;
•Bachelor of Business and Bachelor of Engineering
Technology reports for Australian College of Kuwait
(ACK), Kuwait;
Partner
Leadership for Excellence
Fostering institutional and cultural change through the Australian Network
of University Science Educators
Partner
Discipline Networks
The Australian Biology Network for Learning & Teaching – ViBE
•Bachelor of Business and Bachelor of Information
Systems reports for Shanghai Ocean University
(SOU), China;
Partner
Promoting Excellence Network
PEN2 – State-Based Promoting Excellence Networks – Vic/Tas
• Master of E-health (Health Informatics);
• Master of Business Administration (Professional);
•Master and Graduate Diploma of Freight System
Management;
•Graduate Diploma and Graduate Certificate in
Games Technology;
• Graduate Certificate in Public Health;
• Bachelor of Education with Honours;
• Bachelor of Education (Early Childhood) with Honours;
• Bachelor of Education (Primary) with Honours;
• Bachelor of Environmental Design (Honours);
• Bachelor of Paramedic Practice (Honours);
•Bachelor of Nursing with Professional Honours
(Specialty);
•Bachelor of Nursing with Clinical Honours (Transition
to Practice);
• Bachelor of International Logistics;
•Associate Degree in Applied Science (Marine
Environment);
• Associate Degree in Maritime and Logistics;
• Associate Degree in Engineering (Mechanical);
•Bachelor of Computing report for Zhejiang University
of Technology (ZUT); and
•Faculty of Law report for Kolej Damansura Utama (KDU)
College, Malaysia.
Grants and Awards
UTAS successfully applied for 12 national grants via the
Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) in 2011:
five as lead institution and seven as a partner institution
(see Table 1). This is in addition to the successful projects
still under way from the 2010 and 2009 grant rounds.
UTAS submitted 14 award applications under the national ALTC Australian Awards for University Teaching Scheme in 2011,
the highest number since ALTC was introduced. Of these, seven were successful (see Table 2), all in the category of Citations
for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning. This success rate in the Citations category was exceeded by only three
other universities nationally.
Table 2: 2 011 UTAS Winners of Australian Learning and Teaching Council Citations for Outstanding
Contributions to Student Learning
Awardees
Citation
Dr Anna Carew
For scholarship and leadership in the mapping and teaching of
engineering-specific graduate attributes in undergraduate engineering
Dr Ashley Edwards
For innovative approaches to teaching and learning design, evaluation
and student support, and scholarly contributions which have
influenced the teaching of others
Dr Sharon Thomas
For sustained empowerment of both undergraduate and
postgraduate education students to enhance their own learning
and teaching practices
Mr John Vella
For the implementation of Group Centred Learning (GCL) strategies
across Fine Art studio contexts
Professor Craig Zimitat
Recognising two decades of curriculum development and innovation
in medical education
Unistart Team: Dr Andrea Adam, Ms Cathy
Hartigan, Mrs Peta Statham, Mr Stephen
Newman, Ms Sally Fuglsang, Mr Jeremy O’Reilly
For enhancing the first-year experience through a program nurturing
confidence, critical thinking and independent study skills in
commencing students
Bluefin Team: Associate Professor Giles Thomas,
Mr Paul Furness, Dr Troy Gaston, Mr Chris
Lambert, Mr Peter Schaeffer, Mr John Virieux
For the design and implementation of an innovative multi-disciplinary
program to foster students’ complex problem-solving skills through
practical activities at sea
• Diploma of University Studies; and
• Diploma of Marine Surveying.
Significant amendments to existing courses included:
the introduction of a criminology specialisation in the
Bachelor of Arts (Specialisation); a new creative writing
specialisation for the Graduate Certificate, Graduate
Diploma and Master of Arts (Specialisation); the
introduction of a general practice nursing stream for the
Graduate Certificate and Graduate Diploma of Nursing;
change of title of the Pharmacological Science stream
in the Bachelor of Biotechnology and Medical Research
to the Drug Science stream; the addition of majors in
Criminology and Geography & Environmental Studies and
minors in Aboriginal Studies, Criminology, Economics and
Geography & Environmental Studies in the Bachelor of
Social Science; reinstatement of the Art Theory major in
the Bachelor of Fine Arts; discontinuation of the Bachelor
of Visual Communication (Honours); and deletion of the
In 2011, the federal government made the decision to close the Australian Learning and Teaching Council, with a new Office
for Learning and Teaching within the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations to be established from
2012. National grant and award schemes will continue to be offered annually via the Office for Learning and Teaching. The
University of Tasmania will be well placed to participate in the setting of directions for the Office for Learning and Teaching,
with the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Students & Education), Professor David Sadler, accepting a place on the Strategic
Advisory Committee for the new office.
23
learning and teaching
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22
university of tasmania
The Centre for the Advancement of
Learning and Teaching (CALT)
In 2011, the Centre for the Advancement of Learning and
Teaching (CALT) continued to provide leadership and
support for the advancement of learning and teaching
at UTAS through:
•development of policy, standards and services, and
quality assurance;
• provision of workshops and programs;
• contribution to scholarship;
• management of University-level projects;
•exploration and evaluation of learning technologies
with staff; and
• collaboration with other providers.
CALT hosted the very successful Australasian Society for
Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (ASCILITE)
conference in December 2011, which brought more
than 350 delegates to Hobart. CALT also led a number
of initiatives to support student learning. The UniStart
program was offered face to face on all UTAS campuses
(and by distance) to provide an introduction to university
study for 1,500 students. The program was supplemented
by academic assistance from a team of CALT staff and
student learning mentors, who operated from dedicated
student learning spaces in Hobart and Launceston and
through email to Cradle Coast, Sydney and distance
students. A successful pilot of support for numeracy skills
was also undertaken and will be continued in 2012.
The Peer Assisted Study Session (PASS) program – a
non-remedial academic peer support program aimed at
increasing student academic outcomes and overall student
engagement and retention at UTAS – was expanded in
2011 to support 54 units, situated in 23 Schools. There were
48 high-achieving students employed as PASS Leaders,
with a further four students filling the senior PASS Mentor
roles. Student engagement with PASS was strong, with
1,546 students attending in Semester 1 and 1,203 in
Semester 2. Three UTAS PASS Leaders won National Peer
Leader Awards and the Academic Coordinator, Dr Jane
Skalicky, was invited to speak at Malaysia’s peer learning
symposium, hosted by UCSI University. The program ended
the year on a high, with experienced PASS Mentor Jarrod
Green presenting an inspiring keynote address at the 10th
annual Teaching Matters conference.
The implementation of criterion-referenced assessment
(CRA) across UTAS aims to improve student learning
by enhancing the assessment process. The three-year
implementation project has seen a total of 151 workshops
(1,033 attendees) and 438 individual consultations
facilitated by the CRA implementation team in CALT. A
comprehensive suite of resources has also been developed
to support the continued enhancement of assessment.
In 2011 the UTAS Unit Outline proforma was refined and
now requires unit coordinators to specify unit learning
outcomes and assessment criteria as per the CRA policy;
a peer review process was introduced to enable all unit
coordinators to evaluate their units against CRA principles,
and report this to Heads of School; a revised version of the
Guidelines for Good Assessment Practice was produced
and circulated to schools; and the website (www.teachinglearning.utas.edu.au/assessment) continued to be updated
showcasing examples of best practice across faculties.
appeal to a diverse range of ages, disciplines and cultural
backgrounds, and students viewed this as a strong element
of the program. VCLA was delivered concurrently on
Hobart and Launceston campuses, and consisted of three
program components: a series of six seminars, 40 hours
of volunteer work and a phased process of self-reflection.
From an application pool of 140, 52 students were selected
and completed the VCLA in 2011 (32 in Hobart and 20 in
Launceston), contributing 3,526 hours of volunteer work to
local, national and international communities.
Support and Equity Unit
Community Friends and Networks
Program
In 2011, Career Development and Employment partnered
with the Alumni Office to pilot the Career Mentor Program,
which matches UTAS alumni and current students on
the basis of discipline background. The program assists
students in building an understanding of the workplace and
confidence in their career direction. For alumni, it enhances
leadership and interpersonal skills and connection to their
discipline. Mentor participants in the program included
alumni from the Department of Premier and Cabinet and
the Tasmanian Electoral Commission, the Department
of Health and Human Services, Venarchie Contracting,
the Department of Economic Development, Tourism &
the Arts, Logica and the Tasmanian Ports Corporation.
End-of-year events were held in Hobart and Launceston
to acknowledge the contribution of the alumni mentors
and enable all participants to provide feedback for
improvements to the program in 2012.
The Support and Equity Unit has continued to offer
a mental health initiative during 2011, assisting both
students and staff in managing the impact of mental health
issues while at university. In addition to the provision
of traditional supports, the development of alternative
e-counselling mediums, which were trialled for the first
time in 2011, has resulted in greater access for all UTAS
students. Mental Health First Aid Training programs for
staff were offered across all campuses in Tasmania and
Sydney involving 404 UTAS staff. During 2011, specialist
UTAS staff also contributed to the development of the
National Guidelines for the Mental Health of Tertiary
Students, which will provide further guidance for
universities in relation to the policy and provision of
services to support the mental wellbeing of students.
The Vice-Chancellor’s Leadership Award
In 2011, the Vice-Chancellor’s Leadership Award (VCLA)
was in its second year, following a successful pilot in 2010.
The award is for students in final and penultimate years,
and aims to strengthen a student’s character, work ethic,
community awareness, leadership and employability. In
November 2011 the VCLA graduated its second cohort,
celebrating this with a presentation attended by the
Vice-Chancellor, Professor Peter Rathjen. The breakdown
of the student demographic indicated the program had
In 2011, the Community Friends and Networks Program
(CFNP) continued to make a strong contribution to UTAS’
ongoing commitment to recognising the importance of an
enhanced and internationalised student experience. CFNP
provides ‘new to town’ UTAS students with assistance
in accessing social, volunteer and community networks,
and provides opportunity for participation in their new
community. The program is enhanced through the support
of volunteers, including local staff and students at the
University, and individuals and families from the wider
Tasmanian community. In addition to assisting individual
students to connect with locals, CFNP drives a number of
projects to enhance opportunities for students to engage
with their community. In collaboration with Volunteering
Tasmania, CFNP established a Volunteering Program
for students from culturally and linguistically diverse
backgrounds, which supports students during the latter
part of their tertiary studies to use volunteering as a
pathway to both employment in the local community
and community connections. In addition, supported
by a Community Engagement Grant from the Provost,
CFNP established an initiative titled Conversations with
Community – Valuing Diversity. This initiative facilitated a
series of discussions on and off campus in which diverse
groups of UTAS students, staff and the broader community
were provided with the opportunity to engage in respectful
and inquisitive conversations about leadership, family,
culture and language.
Student and Academic Administration
In 2011, Student and Academic Administration implemented
a new Client and Student Services model to support a
statewide team providing quality service to students and
UTAS staff. The Ready for Uni model was also reviewed and
refined and is now embedded as a comprehensive UTASwide program, which can be tailored to fit a variety of needs,
with the following aims and objectives:
•To complement online offer and acceptance processes
by providing critical administrative information and
enrolment support in a timely manner to all commencing
UTAS students;
•To provide a simple, friendly and transparent process for
students in their first interaction with UTAS by delivering
information and support via on-campus workshops and/
or online resources; and
•To help to maximise retention and effective transition
by building familiarity and engaging new students with
UTAS processes and enrolment support.
Ready for Uni is delivered as a three-part, face-to-face
workshop for small groups, or online. The workshops are
available on all Tasmanian campuses throughout the offer
cycle and students (in nominated courses) are encouraged
to book into a workshop when they accept their offer.
Students are also given the option to undertake the online
Ready for Uni workshop, which is being further developed
to support the growing number of distance students.
Scholarships
The UTAS Scholarships Program continues to provide
students with significant financial and academic support
to study at the University. In 2011, there were approximately
600 scholarships offered, largely sponsored by individuals,
Tasmanian and Australian industry, business and
governments. These awards are offered in a wide range of
disciplines and selection is based on academic merit and/
or financial need. They are available to students studying at
undergraduate, honours and postgraduate coursework levels.
In 2011, the Scholarships team streamlined the Tasmanian
Year 12 and interstate Year 12 scholarship-offer process to
ensure an integrated package of course, scholarship and
accommodation offering. This joint activity, undertaken
with Accommodation Services, provides scholarship
recipients (who are required to relocate) with a guaranteed
accommodation place on acceptance of their course and
scholarship offer.
UTAS College
In 2011, UTAS College continued to grow partnerships
within the University and with the wider Tasmanian
education sector. Programs offered through UTAS
College included the University College Program, the
High Achievers Program, the University Preparation
Program, the pre-degree framework and the Diploma
of University Studies.
The University College Program (UCP) was consolidated
in 2011, with the Arts Faculty continuing to offer a range
of Visual and Performing Arts and Language units.
Business offered an Accounting unit statewide and
the Faculty of Education also piloted a unit. There were
665 students enrolled in 966 units of study, with 55% of
students achieving a credit or higher result. Of these,
289 UCP graduates articulated from the 2010 cohort into
undergraduate degrees at UTAS, an increase of 19%.
High Achiever Program (HAP) participation grew by
38% in 2011, although the numbers in the program are
25
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24
university of tasmania
still small (51). High distinctions dominate the results
table with 80% of students achieving a credit or above.
The recommendations of the HAP Review – led by UTAS
College, in collaboration with faculty, Student Centre and
secondary principal representatives – was accepted by
Academic Senate in 2011 and has led to the development of
High Achiever Policy and strategies to increase pathways
and opportunities for high-achieving students at UTAS.
The University Preparation Program (UPP) provides a
pathway by which mature-aged students may return
to study. UPP continued to grow during 2011, with 375
enrolments across the State, representing a growth in
student numbers of 92% (see Table 3).
Table 3: U
niversity Preparation Program
Enrolments 2011
Hobart Launceston
Cradle
Coast
Total
Semester 1
41
52
25
118
Semester 2
59
66
35
160
Winter School
12
8
10
30
Summer School
10
11
9
30
16
16
Spring School
MBA Start
Total
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375
UPP highlights for the year included the extension of the
Summer School UPP Intensive program across all UTAS
Tasmanian campuses, the introduction of the UPP Winter
School Intensive, which was also offered across the State,
and the introduction of the MBA Start pilot program in
conjunction with the Launceston Chamber of Commerce,
the Tasmanian Farmers and Graziers Association, The
Examiner, Natural Resources Management North,
the Launceston City Council and the Northern Young
Professionals Network.
A major focus in UTAS College in 2011 was the
development of a Pre-Degree Framework, which identifies
three categories of pre-degree pathway: the external
vocational pathway through vocational education and
training (VET); the specialist skill pathway within the
University; and, the general entry pathway for students
who do not meet general degree entry or who may choose
a more supported introduction to university study. The
general entry pre-degree pathway has been developed to
ensure the provision of high-quality preparatory programs
and a coherent pathway for students who do not currently
meet degree entry requirements. It seeks to ensure
university-wide understanding of the standards, levels,
outcomes and graduate attributes associated with three
levels: University Preparatory Program (UPP), Diploma
of University Studies and generalist associate degrees.
The Pre-Degree Framework aligns with the new Australian
Qualifications Framework.
The UTAS College conducted a major research study
into participation and articulation in 2011, which led to
the release of a research study report titled The Path Less
Travelled: VET Articulation in Tasmania. The study examined
more than seven years of enrolment data at UTAS and in
the Tasmanian VET sector to identify successful student
pathways from VET to university. The report was used as a
basis for the Tasmanian Interconnected Tertiary Education
Forum, held in November. This workshop was attended by
40 educational leaders from the State Government, the
Tasmanian Polytechnic, the Tasmanian Skills Institute
and the University of Tasmania. The workshop addressed
the issue of Tasmanian participation in higher vocational
education and training qualifications, diplomas and
advanced diplomas, which, like Tasmanian participation
in university study, is lower than the nation on average
and must be improved to meet the workforce needs of the
State. The report, arising from the forum deliberations, has
played a key role in the establishment of strategic priorities
for 2012.
University Library
Improving library support to UTAS researchers was a major
focus for 2011. A project to identify the library services that
are most useful to researchers (and the future directions
for research support) included a survey or more than 400
researchers, providing crucial data for further analysis.
The project also reviewed the Library’s teaching and
assessment in two units of the Graduate Certificate in
Research, which is mandatory for commencing higher
degree by research (HDR) candidates.
Client access to library services and resources was
improved in a number of ways during 2011. The Learning
Hub areas of levels two and three of the Morris Miller
Library became accessible 24/7, and students can now
study and access online resources whenever is most
convenient for them. Significant numbers of students have
been in the Library during the extra hours. Refurbishment
of staff working areas and some student spaces in the
Launceston Campus Library improved the quality of the
working and study environment. The collections, services
and staff of the Australian Maritime College (AMC) Library
were integrated into the Launceston Campus Library at the
beginning of 2011.
Students can now more easily access items on their
reading lists with the Reading Lists web-based service that
lists all items on a reading list in one place and provides
direct access to electronic books, articles, book chapters
and past exam papers. Library clients are now also
searching for information resources using a single search
box on the Library’s web page. Software called SummonTM
simultaneously searches across the Library’s print and
online collections (including content from the Library’s
digital repository) and links directly to the full text when
it is available. The Library’s digitised heritage and special
collections items are now easily discoverable from anywhere
in the world as the contents of the Library’s digital repository
are harvested by the National Library of Australia for the
Trove search engine. Clients can also still search the Library’s
catalogue, which was enriched in 2011 with additional data
elements such as book jacket images, tables of contents,
and summaries. Strategic funds in 2011 allowed the Library
to build the book collection in a number of subject areas
identified as priorities and in need of development.
During 2011 the Library began ‘tweeting’ on Twitter as an
informal way to update students and the UTAS community
on developments in the Library. QR codes (graphical
barcodes which are readable by applications on most
smartphones or mobile devices) were introduced in a
range of locations in the Morris Miller Library to provide
context-specific links – for example, from areas of the book
collections to the subject guide for that discipline. Clients
with mobile devices can now use a web page designed for
mobiles to access frequently used library services such as
SummonTM search, subject guides and databases.
The Library hosted a number of exhibitions that drew on
the resources of UTAS and other institutions. Fantastic
Plastic celebrated National Science Week and the
International Year of Chemistry with a display of the history
of plastics. An exhibition of Gyotku nature prints from the
collection of the Australian Antarctic Division, along with
rare books from the University of Melbourne and UTAS.
Marjorie Bligh – Housewife Superstar celebrated a newly
released biography by Dr Danielle Wood (School of English,
Journalism and European Languages). Gould’s Book of
Plants was part of a project funded by a UTAS Community
Engagement Grant and directed by Professor Adrian
Franklin (School of Sociology) and Associate Professor
Hamish Maxwell-Stewart (School of History and Classics).
Enrolment Performance
Overall enrolments were up by 198 EFTSL on 2010, an
increase of 1.2%. Operating Grant load increased by 0.9%
on 2010, with growth of 106 EFTSL.
The result in domestic research load represented a 4.3%
decline on 2010 performance.
Domestic fee-paying load also declined, down 3.1% on 2010.
Onshore international student load grew to 2,491 EFTSL – an
increase of 125 EFTSL or 5.3% on 2010 enrolments. Offshore
load was 1,468 EFTSL – the same level reached in 2010.
Table 4: 2011 Load Compared with Target and 2010 Load
2011
Target
RHD
(Domestic)
% Increase
2010
2011
2011–2010
Actual
Actual
Actual
(19/12/2011) (31/12/2010)
682
574
600
-4.3%
12,278
11,716
11,610
0.9%
250
187
193
-3.1%
FFPOS
Onshore
2,383
2,491
2,366
5.3%
FFPOS
Offshore
1,327
1,468
1,468
0.0%
16,920
16,435
16,237
1.2%
Operating
Grant
Domestic
Fee-Paying
Total
Student Load by Source of Funds
The overall growth in total enrolments over the past 10 years has been significant, as shown in the following table. Total operating
grant load has grown by 3,190 EFTSL (35.1%) since 2001, with overall load growing by 6,283 EFTSL (61.9%) over that period.
Table 5: Student Load by Source of Funds
Operating grant
(incl RHD)
Domestic
Fee-paying
FFPOS
onshore
FFPOS
offshore
Non-award
Total
2001
9,100
105
820
123
5
10,152
2002
9,639
250
929
111
3
10,931
2003
9,768
284
1,110
266
3
11,431
2004
10,019
324
1,285
793
6
12,427
2005
9,788
295
1,506
1,116
4
12,709
2006
10,145
240
1,730
1,184
0
13,300
2007
10,314
166
1,745
1,242
0
13,467
2008*
10,891
207
2,156
1,210
0
14,463
2009*
11,434
229
2,220
1,313
0
15,196
2010*
12,210
193
2,366
1,468
0
16,237
2011*
12,290
187
2,491
1,468
0
16,435
78.1%
203.8%
% increase 2011-2011
35.1%
* Includes AMC load – 728 EFTSL in 2008, 777 EFTSL in 2009, 861 EFTSL in 2010, 992 EFTSL in 2011.
1093.5%
61.9%
27
learning and teaching
learning and teaching
26
university of tasmania
Graduate Outcomes – Graduate
Destination Survey
Table 8: Faculty Performance Indicators Student load (EFTSL) by source of funds as at 19 December 2011
Student Satisfaction
Graduate outcomes have been sourced from the Graduate
Destination Survey (GDS) sent to all 2010 graduates.
The total number of respondents, including those
having completed a research higher degree, was 2,057,
corresponding to a response rate of 46.38%. The number
of graduates from undergraduate or taught-postgraduate
courses was 1,902, corresponding to a response rate
of 45.10%.
Table 6: D
estinations of 2010 University
of Tasmania graduates
The Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) complements
the Graduate Destination Survey by asking graduate
respondents to rate aspects of their course on a scale
from one (very negative) to five (very positive). Graduate
Careers Australia, on behalf of the Department of
Education, Employment and Workplace Relations,
produces indicators of responses in terms of satisfaction
on each of three scales: Good Teaching, Generic Skills
and Overall Satisfaction. The data can then be used for
benchmarking against national averages or selected
benchmark partners.
UG
PG
%
%
Full-time employment
40.24
52.29
Part-time employment
31.67
30.43
Seeking employment
12.00
7.53
Unavailable for work
16.08
9.75
Overall, UTAS results on the three scales are at or above
sector average, with UTAS students continuing to rate
the University favourably (see table below). Of particular
note is the continuing increase on all scales in 2010 in
comparison to the previous four years. The time series data
also indicates that there is no significant gender difference
in the reported experiences of UTAS students. Of the 1,872
graduates who responded to the CEQ, 1,527 (82%) rated
their overall satisfaction as four or five.
30.78
27.33
Table 7: Average score on key CEQ scales (on 1–5 range)
– for all respondents for the past five years
2010
Of the above:
Enrolled further study
Of undergraduate respondents who were available for
full-time employment in 2011:
• 65.5% were in full-time employment;
CEQ Scale Gender
Good
teaching
• a further 19% were in part-time employment;
• 15.5% were not working and were seeking employment;
•13.7% of all respondents were enrolled in further study,
with the majority in full-time study; and
•the median starting salary for UTAS respondents
employed full-time across Australia was $50,000, with
the same median salary for those employed in Tasmania.
Of postgraduate respondents who were available for
full-time employment in 2011:
• 79.2% were in full-time employment;
• 11.4% were in part-time employment;
• 19.4% were seeking employment;
•23.3% of respondents were enrolled in further study,
with the majority in part-time study; and
•the median starting salary for respondents employed
full-time across Australia was $71,000, compared with
$69,000 for those employed in Tasmania.
Generic
skills
2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
Females
3.5
3.6
3.5
3.7
3.7
Males
3.5
3.6
3.6
3.7
3.8
All students
3.5
3.6
3.5
3.7
3.7
Females
3.8
3.8
3.7
3.9
3.9
Males
3.7
3.8
3.8
3.9
4.0
All students
3.8
3.8
3.7
3.9
3.9
3.8
3.9
3.8
3.9
4.0
3.7
3.8
3.8
3.9
4.0
3.8
3.8
3.8
3.9
4.0
Overall
Females
satisfaction Males
All students
National Centre for Marine
Conservation & Resource Sustainability
National Centre for Ports & Shipping
National Centre for Maritime
Engineering & Hydrodynamics
AMC
Art – Hobart
Asian Languages & Studies
Conservatorium of Music
English, Journalism & European Lang.
Faculty of Arts
Government
History & Classics
Philosophy
Riawunna
Sociology & Social Work
Visual & Performing Arts
Arts
Accounting & Corporate Governance
Economics & Finance
Faculty of Business/AIRC
Management
Business
Education
Human Life Sciences
Medicine
Nursing & Midwifery
Pharmacy
Rural Health
Health Science
Centre for Legal Studies
Law
Law
Agricultural Science
Architecture & Design
Chemistry
Computing & Information Systems
Earth Sciences
Engineering
Faculty of SET
Geography & Environmental Studies
Mathematics & Physics
Plant Science
Psychology
Zoology
Science, Engineering &Technology
Board of Graduate Research
Centre for the Advancement
of Learning & Teaching
Enabling Courses
Institute for Marine & Antarctic Studies
Institute of Regional Development
Menzies Research Institute
Total
31 December 2010 (final)
31 December 2009 (final)
Improvement on December 2010
Non-research
Research Domestic
operating grant higher degrees fee-paying
FFPOS
onshore
FFPOS
offshore
Total
94
13
2
34
0
142
281
3
30
227
0
541
219
12
1
77
0
309
593
333
125
447
321
14
215
249
230
71
547
183
2,733
250
209
55
335
849
1,807
492
653
1,413
173
16
2,747
63
390
453
66
290
140
266
74
240
7
171
196
84
358
88
1,980
27
28
26
6
12
11
0
17
24
23
5
24
11
158
7
3
1
22
32
37
7
8
9
7
12
42
0
12
12
28
6
13
17
5
15
0
26
15
16
30
17
188
0
33
0
0
0
0
0
10
0
0
0
0
0
10
55
14
6
42
117
1
0
25
0
1
0
26
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
338
15
44
12
17
1
20
6
16
2
19
25
177
353
162
15
294
824
44
49
127
63
76
1
316
2
120
122
34
153
40
145
31
83
0
33
28
18
21
16
602
13
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
145
122
0
486
753
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
36
36
0
0
0
515
0
90
0
49
25
0
0
0
680
0
992
374
175
470
349
15
262
278
269
78
590
218
3,078
810
509
76
1,179
2,574
1,888
548
812
1,486
256
29
3,131
65
557
622
129
449
193
944
110
428
7
279
264
118
409
121
3,450
40
0
1
0
0
0
1
465
55
4
3
11,716
11,610
10,785
0
38
6
33
574
600
649
0
0
0
0
187
193
229
0
38
0
17
2,491
2,366
2,220
0
0
0
0
1,468
1,468
1,313
465
131
10
52
16,435
16,237
15,196
0.9%
-4.3%
-2.8%
5.3%
0.0%
1.2%
29
learning and teaching
learning and teaching
28
learning and teaching
30
university of tasmania
31
research and research training
International Education
The number of international students studying at a
campus in Tasmania grew to 3,366 in 2011, representing an
increase of 7.2% over 2010 (see Figure 1). When students
studying at off-shore locations are included, international
students represent 24% of the total student population. The
overall increase is pleasing, given the difficult and highlycompetitive international student market. In particular,
the relative strength of the Australian dollar, perceptions
about student safety in some parts of Australia and student
concerns about the difficulty in securing a student visa
had a negative effect on recruitment Australia-wide.
Tokyo Ainu elder Haruzo Urakawa conducted a traditional
thanksgiving ceremony as part of a cross-cultural mission
at the Newnham campus.
Figure 1: International students studying at a campus in Tasmania
3,366
3,500
2,834
3,000
2,284
2,483
3,140
1,500
1,672
1,205
1,960
1,424
1,000
500
0
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Source: AEI Student Data Pivot Tables, February 2011. The above figures include all on-campus education provision by UTAS for award programs,
and excludes exchange, study abroad, English Language, Foundation studies, study tours and short courses.
Asia continues to be the major source of international students and UTAS continues to focus on promoting growth from this
region, while developing markets in the Middle East and Latin America.
Transnational Education (TNE)
Student Mobility
Transnational Education (TNE) programs allow students
to study a UTAS degree in their home country. In 2011
UTAS delivered seven TNE programs in partnership with
universities/colleges in China, Kuwait, Malaysia and Hong
Kong. However, UTAS has decided in agreement with the
relevant partners not to renew three agreements at the
conclusion of their current terms: the Bachelor of Business
and Bachelor of Engineering Technology at the Australian
College of Kuwait, and the Bachelor of Computing
at Zhejiang University of Technology. Transitional
arrangements are in place to support current students.
UTAS has more than 70 formal exchange arrangements
across 30 countries. These exchange agreements provide
opportunities for students to experience an international
perspective in their studies and to return to UTAS with
a broadened world view. As well as the formal exchange
agreements in place, and actively providing opportunities
for inbound and outbound students, the University is
currently engaged in two European Union exchange
grants: the Global Environmental Journalism Initiative
and the Global Environmental Sustainability Project.
Such exchange agreements also provide for international
students from a wide range of countries to study at
UTAS and thereby provide opportunities for a more
internationalised experience for all students. UTAS is
continuing to develop cotutelle agreements with a number
of countries including France, Chile, Korea and the UK.
The nature of TNE arrangements will change in 2012.
A greater emphasis will be placed on those relationships
with the potential for joint research collaboration and those
with a greater possibility for transfer of students onshore
for a significant proportion of their studies.
Dr Nenagh Kemp from the School of Psychology found a strong link
between children’s use of text abbreviations and improved literacy skills.
(Photo by Peter Mathew)
2,622
2,500
2,000
Mr Caillin Eastwood-Sutherland is working on a masters project in
the School of Engineering to help prosthetic arms to move like real
limbs. During 2011, there were 30 masters projects completed at
UTAS. (Photo by Matthew Newton)
In 2011, UTAS offered a Student Mobility scholarship to
45 students to undertake one or two semesters at a partner
institution. Travel scholarships were also available for any
student travelling overseas.
The Research Culture
Collaborative Projects
The draft Strategic Research Plan (2011–2015) developed
in 2011 reaffirms our commitment to rank in the top
10 universities in Australia for research performance.
This new plan takes account of the current position of
UTAS within the sector, articulates our aspirations for
future achievements, and puts this alongside the driving
imperatives of the federal government’s higher education
strategies, the Excellence in Research for Australia
initiative (ERA) and national funding bodies. It takes
account of UTAS’ unique position as the ‘state university’,
alongside the need to engage in high-quality research
internationally and nationally in order to maintain and build
our reputation. The plan identifies the need to engage with
end users of research in meaningful ways, and responds
to the drive towards research concentrations that harness
scale, and focus and deliver significant high-quality
research outcomes. It builds on those existing strategies
that have been demonstrably successful and puts forward
new strategies to address areas of concern.
Our record of success in managing projects of national
significance continues to expand. In 2011, UTAS was lead
agent for several major national projects.
The University of Tasmania is home to research
concentrations of exceptional standing. These include:
• Menzies Research Institute Tasmania (MRIT);
• Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS);
• Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA);
• ARC Centre of Excellence in Ore Deposits (CODES);
•Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science
(ACROSS);
• Centre for the Environment;
• Australian Innovation Research Centre (AIRC);
• Centre for Law and Genetics; and
• Centre for Colonialism and its Aftermath.
UTAS has led the nationally significant Integrated Marine
Observing System (IMOS) since 2007, when it was awarded
$50 million from the National Collaborative Research
Infrastructure Strategy. In January 2011 the Department
of Industry, Innovation, Science and Research (DIISR)
announced further funding of $52 million from the Super
Science Initiative, extending the IMOS contract until 2013.
This new funding enables IMOS to continue its work to
deliver a fully integrated national system for collecting
marine data (physical, chemical and biological). IMOS
works with 10 different institutions across Australia
to collect marine data, and makes these data streams
available through its Ocean Portal – some in near-real time
– and all as delayed-mode, quality-controlled data.
UTAS makes an exceptional contribution to the National
Environment Research Program (NERP). This is a federally
funded initiative supporting environmental research
to improve our capacity to understand, manage and
conserve Australia’s unique biodiversity and ecosystems.
UTAS was awarded two of the five Hubs funded in 2011:
the Landscapes and Policy Hub under the leadership of
Professor Ted Lefroy and the Marine Biodiversity Hub
under the leadership of Professor Nic Bax. Together these
programs will receive funding of $17 million over five years.
Cooperative research centres bring together investment
from governments, industry, business and universities.
UTAS is the lead institution and host for the Antarctic
Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre
(ACE CRC), which is the longest-running CRC. In 2011,
UTAS was also a partner institute with the Forestry CRC,
Bushfire CRC, Seafood CRC, ORE CRC and Sheep CRC.
university of tasmania
Fellowships
UTAS researchers continued their record of success
in recent years, with 10 new prestigious research
fellowships in 2011. Australian Research Council (ARC)
fellowships went to: Associate Professor C. Ding (Menzies
Research Institute Tasmania), Dr P. Edmonds (Riawunna),
Dr M. King (Medicine) and Dr E. Wapstra (Zoology).
National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)
fellowships were awarded to six UTAS researchers at the
Menzies Research Institute Tasmania: Associate Professor
C Blizzard, Dr T. Winzenberg, Dr C. Magnussen, Dr S. Gall,
Professor G. Jones and Professor E. Walters.
Research Highlights
Eureka Prize: A team of researchers based at the
University of Tasmania was awarded the $10,000 Sherman
Eureka Prize for Environmental Research for its work in
trying to save the Tasmanian devil from extinction. The
team is co-led by Dr Menna Jones of the School of Zoology
and Associate Professor Greg Woods from Menzies
Research Institute Tasmania.
Genome Sequence for Tasmanian devil: Associate
Professor Greg Woods, Dr Alex Kreiss (Menzies) and
Dr Menna Jones (Zoology) collaborated with US-based
researchers to sequence the genome of the Tasmanian
devil, a development that could have a significant impact
on conservation management of this threatened species.
The work was published in the Proceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences. The research was led by professors
Webb Miller and Stephan Schuster of Pennsylvania and
Vanessa Hayes of the Children’s Cancer Research
Institute Australia.
NHMRC 10 Best: Dr Kristy Sanderson of Menzies
Research Institute Tasmania heads a research team
looking into depression and anxiety in the workplace, a
project that is featured in the NHMRC’s publication Ten
of the Best Research Projects 2011. Her project was chosen
from among the thousands of NHMRC-funded medical
research projects under way in Australia today. Projects
were picked on the basis of the strength of the science
and significance of outcomes.
Maritime Engineering: Professor Neil Bose (Australian
Maritime College) is leading a research team in the
development of the next generation of Incat multihull
vessels. The Hobart-based shipbuilder is renowned
internationally as a pioneer of wave-piercing technology,
with its high-speed vessels operating in more than 20
countries. Now a new fleet is on the drawing board, one in
which the need for speed will be of secondary importance
to improved fuel efficiency. With $260,200 in funding from
the Australian Research Council Linkage projects scheme
– and additional funding from Incat and a Dutch
manufacturer – the AMC and School of Engineering
researchers (and their research partners) have begun
work on a new Incat prototype.
UTAS collaborates on European Space Agency’s
‘Ice Mission’
UTAS and the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) have
a long and successful history of collaboration in the field
of Antarctic and marine science and innovation. In 2011,
the two institutions signed a new Collaboration Deed
that formalises current and future scientific interactions,
including joint appointments, the new AAD-UTAS PhD
Program in Quantitative Antarctic Science (QAS) and
the inaugural international project office of the Southern
Ocean Observing System (SOOS). The QAS PhD program
will see students work on quantitative projects of direct
relevance to the Australian Antarctic Science strategy.
Scientists from the University of Tasmania have led a
remarkable international collaboration in Antarctica to
help validate data from the European Space Agency’s
(ESA) ‘Ice Mission’ satellite CryoSat-2. Working in one of
the ‘hot spots’ in East Antarctica, the team of scientists
completed a logistical feat that included near-simultaneous
observations of the ice sheet from field camps and skidoos,
as well as from aircraft and the CryoSat-2 satellite orbiting
above. The collaboration, which featured the University of
Tasmania, the Australian Antarctic Division and the Alfred
Wegener Institute in Germany, collected a unique dataset
that will contribute to the ongoing validation of the CryoSat-2
mission. The mission seeks to accurately quantify changes
in polar ice and contributions to sea level rise.
Radioastronomy
Research Training
UTAS and Australian Antarctic Division
cement collaboration
Snapshot:
Cherry research
•At the end of 2011 there were 952 registered supervisors
working with UTAS HDR candidates, 143 of whom were
external to the University;
Micro-continents the size of Tasmania discovered
off WA coast
Dr Jacqueline Halpin, a marine geologist from the Centre
of Excellence in Ore Deposits (CODES), was one of
the primary investigators who discovered two ‘microcontinents’ covering an area almost the size of Tasmania in
the Indian Ocean, west of Perth. The two sunken plateaus
(Batavia Knoll and Gulden Draak Ridge) were once part of
the supercontinent Gondwana. Dr Halpin teamed up with
scientists from the University of Sydney and Macquarie
University to map the seafloor of the Perth Abyssal Plain.
•International commencements of HDR students
increased by 20% in 2011.
The number of commencing candidates peaked in
2005 and, by 2008, had declined by 30%. A recruitment
campaign commenced in mid-2009 and changes to funding
arrangements for supporting HDR were brought in for 2010
and 2011. A substantial effort to manage a ‘tail-end’ of
overdue completions resulted in an increase in the number
of HDR candidates completing in 2010. This increase of 46%
from 2008 to 2010 is well above trend, and the drop to 180 in
2011 from 218 in 2010 is an artefact of the move from fixed
starting dates to all-year enrolment.
Research Commercialisation
In 2011 a total of 40 new UTAS commercialisation
prospects were identified for investigation by our
UniQuest partners, with two new patent applications
and 14 confidentiality agreements signed.
UTAS has long had significant research strength in
radioastronomy, which has developed in part because
of the geographical advantages of Tasmania, the low
interference from artificial sources and the thin ionosphere
allow lower frequency celestial radiation to reach the
Earth. In October 2011, UTAS hosted celebrations for 25
years of radioastronomy in Tasmania and 100 years of
Grote Reber (father of radioastronomy). Celebrations
included a community market day, with tours of the Mt
Pleasant Radio Telescope Observatory in Cambridge,
optical viewings and 3D movies.
Cherries are an important Tasmanian crop, but are
vulnerable to adverse weather. Late-season rains can
cause cracks in the fruit, which make them unsaleable.
For some growers the labour costs of picking and sorting
the cherries after a rain can be so high (and the returns
so low) they simply walk away. Research Fellow Penny
Measham of the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture (TIA)
Perennial Horticulture Centre is undertaking research to
increase fruit yields and maintain quality. Early results
have demonstrated reduced cracking without losing sugar
content, size or firmness.
•At 31 December 2011, UTAS had 1,021 candidates
enrolled, including 558 full-time, 274 part-time, 46
suspended and 143 with thesis submitted; and
•During 2011 there were 180 higher degree by research
(HDR) completions, comprising 149 PhDs, 30 masters
and one professional doctorate;
Higher Education Research Data Collection
(HERDC) Return
•The average completion time for a research PhD
completed in 2011 was 3.99 years;
The University reports to the federal government annually
on research activity for the previous year, with 2010 data
reported in 2011. The time series data are shown in Table 9.
•The average completion time for a research masters
completed in 2011 was 3.4 years;
•A total of 240 HDR candidates commenced in 2011,
including 163 domestic and 77 international;
Table 9: UTAS Research Outputs 2001–2010
Research Income
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
NCG / ACG (Cat 1)
$24,003,743
$26,605,296
$28,981,099
$33,549,701
$26,400,322
$27,342,389
OPSF (Cat 2)
$10,761,780
$12,857,264
$16,889,565
$17,139,359
$18,834,064
$20,482,618
$6,325,060
$16,836,318
$11,223,520
$13,022,675
$15,625,006
$19,126,791
I&O (Cat 3)
CRC (Cat 4)
$4,653,659
$5,733,412
$6,624,607
$6,897,498
$6,988,697
$8,482,014
$45,744,242
$60,532,290
$63,718,790
$70,609,233
$67,848,090
$75,433,811
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
Journal Articles
482.82
483.56
555.08
588.09
602.61
575.11
Conference
155.85
166.39
137.59
136.45
128.65
118.6
59.34
84.19
102.68
76.1
92.41
68.82
8.5
10
12.08
18.42
10.03
10.83
706.51
744.14
807.43
819.06
833.7
773.36
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
803
856
815
816
786
738
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
148
159
129
140
192
217
Total
Research Publications
Chapters
Books
Total
HDR Load
Total
HDR Completions
Total
33
Research and Research training
Research and Research training
32
university of tasmania
faculties and institutes
Other highlights for the Faculty of Arts in 2011 included:
•The successful ARC Future Fellowship grant ($590, 205)
application that brought Dr Penny Edmunds to UTAS
from the University of Melbourne;
•A UTAS and Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra (TSO)
memorandum of understanding was signed, providing
significant opportunities for collaboration in teaching,
research and performance;
•Associate Professor Stefan Petrow and Professor
Marie Sierra were awarded ARC Linkage Infrastructure,
Equipment and Facilities grants as part of multiinstitutional collaborations;
•The launch of the Tasmania Creative Arts Summer
School, hosted by the Creative and Performing Arts
schools;
The Arts Student Central development made a significant
contribution to improving the student experience at Sandy Bay.
Dr Alexis Wadsley, President of the Economics Society of Australia
(Tas Branch), presented Amy Churchill with an award for outstanding
achievement at the Faculty of Business Student Awards Night.
FACULTY OF ARTS
The Faculty of Arts is an intellectually diverse faculty,
bringing together more than 20 disciplines in the creative
arts, humanities and social sciences. Research and study
in the Faculty explores the human condition through the
concepts, issues, modes of expression and approaches
of these disciplines and study areas. Each disciplinary
approach brings into focus critical aspects of the
phenomenon or issue being studied.
Arts students study at all three of the University’s main
campuses: Sandy Bay, Newnham and the Cradle Coast.
Arts programs are also present at city sites in Hobart (the
Conservatorium of Music in Salamanca and the Tasmanian
School of Art on the Hobart waterfront) and the School of
Visual and Performing Arts at the Academy of the Arts in
the Inveresk precinct in Launceston.
Arts academics are recognised for providing a rewarding
and critically informed learning experience. In 2011 Arts
academics secured two UTAS teaching development
grants and two external Australian Learning and Teaching
Council (ALTC) grants to develop innovative teaching
approaches. Researchers in the Faculty contribute to
local and international debates in their areas of expertise,
serve on state and Commonwealth committees, and draw
on that knowledge and experience in their teaching. In
2011 Arts researchers contributed to multi-institutional
Australian Research Council (ARC) grant successes
in history, philosophy and creative arts. The Faculty also
engages the Tasmanian community through public lectures,
performances, exhibitions and community-based research.
The Faculty has a commitment to internationalisation
of the curriculum through a range of activities including
in-country language and culture programs for our students
in Japan, China and Indonesia. In addition to this, many
of our students participate in the UTAS study-abroad
exchange program (or by coming to Tasmania from a
partner university).
The Faculty actively supports innovative curricula and
research of international standing. In 2011 the Faculty
secured $150,000 in strategic funds to assist with
improving its research strengths and capacity through the
development of four key research groups, which function
under the broad banners of Arts and Environment;
Colonialism and its Aftermath; Criminology, Law and
Policing; and Governance and Implementation.
In 2011 the Faculty commenced a process to benchmark
its course and unit materials with institutions across
Australia. This exercise was undertaken to ensure that
the standard of our programs continues to be high quality
and achieves the best learning outcomes for students.
The Arts Student Central development made a significant
contribution to improving the student experience and
level of student interaction at Sandy Bay in 2011. The
Faculty also began a review of the School and professional
support structure in late 2011. The aim is to enhance and
sustain academic teaching and research excellence,
supported by a professional administrative structure.
The Faculty of Arts has placed itself in a stronger position
to meet future challenges and to take advantage of the
opportunities presented throughout 2012.
•Professor Sandy Taylor was awarded a Health Work
Force Australia grant of $444,285 to support the Social
Work program;
•Alumnus Rohan Wilson won the prestigious The
Australian/Vogel’s Literary Award for his first novel,
The Roving Party (Allen & Unwin 2011), and has since
joined 2002 Vogel Award winner Dr Danielle Wood in
teaching creative writing in Hobart and Launceston;
•The Academy Gallery hosted Sidney Nolan’s Gallipoli
series, toured by the Australian War Memorial;
•Associate Professor Hamish Maxwell-Stewart was
appointed to the Keith Cameron Chair in Australian
History at University College Dublin for 2012; and
•ALTC grant success included Professor Jonathan
Holmes, who received a $100,000 ALTC Discipline
Learning and Teaching Network Grant for ‘The Creative
Arts Learning and Teaching Network (CALTN)’ and
Professor Imelda Whelehan (with Professor David
Sadler and Dr Lisa Fletcher), who received a $160,000
ALTC Innovation and Development Grant for ‘Bridging
the gap: teaching adaptations across the disciplines
and sharing content for curriculum renewal’.
FACULTY OF BUSINESS
The Faculty of Business enjoyed a successful year
in 2011 and continued its commitment to excellence
in research, teaching and community engagement.
It continues to provide high-quality courses and units
across all three Tasmanian campuses and in Sydney,
as well as in China, Kuwait and Hong Kong. For the first
time a number of majors in the undergraduate Bachelor of
Business program were made available online, while the
Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of
Business program was offered to students studying on
the North-West Coast. The UTAS College program, which
enables Year 12 students to study concurrently at UTAS,
was successfully expanded. It is now offered statewide,
with more than 60 college students having the opportunity
to participate in higher education in accounting.
A new MBA program was created in response to industry
and business needs. This program combines management
skills and qualifications with those in specific fields of
practice, including Agricultural Innovation; Corporate
Governance; Environmental Management and Planning;
Heritage Management; Human Resource Management;
Information Systems; Policy Management; Regional
Innovation; and Tourism Management. The new degree
garnered immediate interest, with the first cohort of 16
students enrolled in the MBA Agricultural Innovation
to begin in 2012. Similarly, another of the Faculty’s
innovative industry-inspired degrees, the Doctor of
Business Administration (DBA) – with a focus on health
management – had its first intake in Sydney, with students
due to complete in 2012. Overall the Faculty continued
to grow in many areas of student enrolment, defying a
number of nationwide trends in enrolments (particularly
in its postgraduate programs, both domestically and
internationally).
The Faculty continued to improve its profile in research
excellence, attracting two ‘New Star’ professors as part
of UTAS’ strategic recruitment initiative: Professor Morgan
Miles in Enterprise Development from Georgia University,
(US); and Professor Aron O’Cass in Marketing from the
University of Newcastle. Both of these professors bring
a wealth of knowledge and expertise, and have contributed
greatly to the research capabilities of the Faculty.
The Australian Innovation Research Centre (AIRC)
continued to focus on important Tasmanian issues and
commenced two major projects that will continue into
2012. A survey of small businesses in Tasmania (those
with up to 50 workers) has been undertaken to collect
information on internet usage and the cost of complying
with government regulations. Survey results will lead to
the development of a data set that can assist researchers
and policy makers to improve understanding of small
business and inform the design of better forms of policy
support. The second major project undertaken by the
AIRC stems from the Intergovernmental Agreement
between the Australian and Tasmanian governments to
help the forest industry adapt to market changes while
protecting the communities and families that rely on the
sector to survive. The AIRC has commenced work on a
detailed socio-economic study to develop a framework for
a location-based approach to economic diversification in
Tasmania and to inform the Government’s decisions on
how funding will be distributed and invested.
The School of Economics and Finance established
an Experimental Economics Laboratory that enables
researchers to design and evaluate the theory and
application of economics to environmental and resource
issues such as fishery management; market designs for
water quantity and quality; and ecosystem services.
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The laboratory is now one of the leading exemplars of
experimental economics in Australia and was a highlight
for Tasmanian college students during the Annual Wrest
Point Economics Challenge. Hosted by the School of
Economics and Finance, guest speakers took part in a
mock experiment in which students played the role of
a company producing a commodity and, as a result,
carbon emissions.
Professor Colquhoun previously held the position of Chair
in Urban Learning in the Centre for Educational Studies
at the University of Hull (UK). He was also the Director
of Research within the Faculty of Education at the same
university. Professor Colquhoun’s academic areas of
interest include health-promoting schools, social capital
and community connectedness, action and participatory
research, and education research methodology.
Other highlights for the Faculty of Business in 2011
included:
Meanwhile the Faculty achieved well above the national
Australian standards in its core area of responsibility
of curriculum and pedagogy. The 2011 national analysis
of Australian university research reported that the
Faculty had achieved a rating of world standard for
its research in curriculum and pedagogy. Additionally,
across all Excellence in Research for Australia research
benchmarks, the Faculty had achieved at or above the
national research standards.
•The Faculty’s interest and research in business and
environmental issues was further demonstrated with
the School of Accounting and Corporate Governance
hosting the Annual Australasian Conference on Social
and Environmental Accounting Research (CSEAR) in
Launceston. The conference attracted more than 100
national and international delegates who presented
a diverse range of papers covering the full spectrum
of CSEAR interests and linked around the theme of
‘Sustainable Futures: Earth, Wind, Fire and Water’;
•Stephen Mayne, founder of Crikey.com, spoke about
corporate governance as part of the Faculty’s very
successful input to the UTAS Open Days;
•At the annual Giblin Lecture, organised by the School
of Economics and Finance, Dr Ken Henry gave his
last public talk in his role as the Secretary to the
Commonwealth Treasury;
•The School of Economics and Finance hosted the
Australasian Macroeconomics Workshop, with papers
presented by distinguished scholars Professors Veredas,
Heijdra and Kapetanios from Brussels, Groningen and
London respectively;
•The School of Management held a vibrant seminar
series that included public lectures by Professor Chris
Goddard on the management of child protection, Greg
Bambe on industrial relations in the airline industry and
Professor Per Davidsson on how to be a player in global
knowledge development; and
•Many students in the Faculty performed exceptionally
well academically and were honoured at the Faculty
of Business Student Awards Night. Held in both
Launceston and Hobart, the awards honour outstanding
performances and achievement in undergraduate and
postgraduate business units and degrees. Fifty-nine
awards were presented by representatives from 23
organisations. It is a perfect demonstration of the close
relationships the Faculty and the Tasmanian business
community have formed.
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
In 2011 Professor Derek Colquhoun accepted the
appointment as Head of the School of Education
and commenced at the University on 1 September.
In 2011 the Faculty of Education was successful in
securing an ARC Linkage Grant to the value of $264,000
over four years. The project, titled ‘Student retention
beyond the compulsory schooling years in rural, regional
and disadvantaged communities’, will undertake research
in the important area of student retention with the
aim that research outcomes will identify best-practice
educational strategies to enhance retention in such
communities across Australia. The team for this project
comprises Professor Ian Hay, Associate Professor Kim
Beswick, Professor Neil Cranston, Professor Jane Watson
and Dr Jeanne Allen, who will work in partnership with the
Tasmanian Department of Education.
Also successful were Professor Lyn English (Queensland
University of Technology) and Professor Emeritus Jane
Watson, who received $468,000 over three years for their
ARC Discovery Project, ‘Statistical Literacy in the Primary
School: Beginning Inference’.
Meanwhile the Faculty had 21 research higher degree
(RHD) completions in 2011, with six PhD completions,
one masters completion and 14 honours graduates, five of
whom gained first-class honours. Faculty staff produced
43 refereed journal articles, 18 refereed conference papers,
21 research book chapters and two books.
In September, Dr Angela Thomas held the New Literacies,
Digital Media and Classroom Teaching Conference,
which attracted much positive media coverage. This
international conference highlighted the fact that
technology is now firmly imbedded in mainstream
curriculums, not just nationally but also internationally.
And finally, the Faculty of Education is honoured to be
part of an education scholarship program established
as a tribute to the late Bass Liberal MP Sue Napier. The
Sue Napier Scholarship in Education program is aimed at
helping Tasmanians become teachers. There will be two
scholarships allocated annually – one undergraduate and
one postgraduate – to assist students with their studies
in the Faculty of Education.
Other highlights for the Faculty of Education in 2011
included:
•The approval and commencement of a new
undergraduate program, the Bachelor of Education
(Applied Learning), with more than 100 students enrolled
in the first unit;
•The appointment of Associate Professor Kim Bestwick
to the position of President Elect of the Australian
Association of Mathematics Teachers (AAMT);
•The selection of Associate Professor Ruth FieldingBarnsley to sit on the School Viability Reference Group
(SVRG), which was formed to investigate an acceptable
process for announcing school closures;
•The involvement by the Faculty in the Bushfire
Cooperative Research Centre under the direction
of Dr Christine Owen;
•The running of the inaugural Postgraduate Conference,
aimed at providing a forum in which RHD students
could showcase their work to peers, staff and the wider
university and education communities;
•The $3,000 prize won by education student Damon
Thomas, in a collaborative project with Computing
and Information Systems student James Riggall, for
the Tasmanian round of the Trailblazers competition
in the student category;
•The Faculty’s annual book launch, which officially
celebrated six books authored and/or edited by faculty
academics during 2010/11; and
•The inaugural ‘Research Summer’ program, which
provided activities to facilitate the development of
networks among students and academics, facilitate
supervisor/student interaction and joint publication, and
to provide a range of research workshops for both staff
and students.
FACULTY OF HEALTH SCIENCE
There have been many significant changes in the senior
management of the Faculty of Health Science over the
past year including a new Dean, Professor Raymond
Playford, and Deputy Dean Professor Denise Fassett.
Professor Playford graduated from St Bartholomew’s
Medical School with a medical degree (MB,BS) and
he is an academic clinician with a special interest in
gastroenterology. He actively researches in the area
of the role of growth factors in repair processes.
Professor Fassett has been Head of the School of Nursing
and Midwifery (SNM) since 1996 and brings with her a
wealth of knowledge of both the Tasmanian and national
health sector. Professor Isabelle Ellis has taken up the role
of Acting Head SNM.
The Faculty’s vision of success includes the dissemination
of knowledge through evidence-based research to improve
health outcomes, and to strengthen partnerships with
health professional bodies and the health sector through
mechanisms such as Partners in Health.
There are a number of exciting capital work developments
that are occurring across Tasmania, including the opening
of the Launceston Integrated Care Centre (which includes
new facilities for the Launceston Clinical School) and
completion of the Medical Science 2 building. The Domain
site, adjacent to Medical Science 1, which housed the
original home of UTAS, is being renovated to form, among
other things, a health hub. It will house the SNM and other
health services programs.
The School of Medicine (SoM) has now fully implemented
the Bachelor of Paramedic Practice in both Hobart and
the Rozelle campus in Sydney. An honours program has
also been introduced. The School of Human Life Sciences
(SHLS) had the first intake into physiotherapy through
a strategic partnership with the University of South
Australia, and new pathways to radiation therapy and
dietetics were established. New postgraduate courses
have also been developed within the SNM, including
Graduate Certificates in Addiction Studies for Health
Professionals, Flexible Learning and Simulation and a
General Practice stream, as well as Professional Clinical
Honours streams. The Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of
Surgery and the Bachelor of Pharmacy were successfully
reaccredited until 2016.
Other highlights for the Faculty of Health Science
included:
•Dr Stuart Ferguson, from the School of Pharmacy (SoP),
was named the 2011 Cancer Council Tasmania Research
Fellow;
•A $250,000 bequest administered through the Royal
Hobart Hospital Research Foundation was awarded to
Professors Andrew Robinson and Mary Fitzgerald to
enable the establishment of the North West Regional
Node of Practice Development: Acute Care – Supporting
Regional Health Professionals of the Future;
•Two grants were awarded by the Department of Health
and Ageing to develop and test an innovative combined
health service and independent practice model for aged
care nurse practitioners, led by Dr Chris Stirling;
•The SHLS and the Rural Clinical School (RCS) were
awarded seven grants from the Clifford Craig Medical
Research Trust for research projects in the north of
the State;
•Associate Professor Erica Bell, from the University
Department of Rural Health (UDRH), was the sole
author of a feature-length publication in the American
Journal of Public Health;
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•The SoM established an internationalisation program
with new partnerships in the South-East Asia–Pacific
region, while the SoP has developed a memorandum
of understanding with Manipal University (India)
to enhance the School’s research and teaching
collaborations globally. In addition, a delegation from
the SNM visited partners in Scandinavia and Finland in
May. An agreement has now been signed with Central
Ostrobothnia University, Finland, for student and staff
exchange;
•The SoP won a four-year tender to deliver the Medicines
Australia Continuing Education Program (CEP) from
2012–2015;
•Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre
transferred into the Faculty and has received $3 million
from the JO & JR Wicking Trust to support it until 2017;
•The University Department of Rural Health received
an ALTC grant to investigate and support the transition
of rural students who move from home to study health
professional courses at university; and
•The SoP launched and awarded the first Judith Liauw
Memorial Scholarship in memory of Judith Liauw’s
significant contribution to modern community
pharmacy in Australia.
Finally, on a sadder note, the Faculty wishes to express
its sadness at the passing away of Professor Allan
Carmichael. Professor Carmichael had a long association
with the University of Tasmania, and was appointed as
Dean of the Faculty of Health Science in 1997.
FACULTY OF LAW
2011 was another busy and successful year for the Law
Faculty, which maintained its commitment to excellence
in teaching and research. The Faculty welcomed Professor
Jan McDonald, who is recognised internationally as an
expert in climate change law, as well as Susan Bartie, who
will be teaching alongside her PhD studies.
The Law Faculty hosted visits from many eminent people,
including Professor Ed Larson, a Pulitzer Prize-winner
and current Hugh and Hazel Darling Chair in Law at
Pepperdine University (US); Julian Burnside AO QC;
former Chief Justice of the High Court, Sir Anthony Mason
AC KBE QC; and Adjunct Professor Michael Kirby AC
CMG. Other visitors contributed to the Faculty’s vibrant
Summer School program: Professor Albin Eser from
the University of Freiburg and Max Planck Institute for
Foreign and International Criminal Law (Germany) taught
Comparative and Transnational Criminal Law and Adjunct
Professor Tim McCormack taught International Criminal
Law. Over the summer, the Faculty also hosted students
from Hamline University (US) as part of their study-abroad
program. Quite a number of the Faculty’s academic staff
presented at international conferences and workshops in
2011, often as invited and funded speakers. In December
the Faculty’s Centre for Law and Genetics hosted the
Innovation Pool Expert Workshop involving international
experts in the fields of law, social science and economics.
This workshop was funded through one of Professor
Dianne Nicol’s Australian Research Council grants.
Law Faculty staff continued with high levels of community
engagement. They contributed to law reform and policy
debate in Tasmania, as well as across the nation and
abroad. Many staff serve on external committees,
statutory bodies, statutory councils, commissions,
foundations, tribunals and boards, and make public
submissions.
The Tasmanian Law Reform Institute, led by Professor
Kate Warner, continued to help shape legal policy in
Tasmania through the release of a number of reports,
including one on racial vilification. A number of further
reports were finalised for release in 2012 and three new
references were accepted.
2011 was also a great year for our students. The UTAS
Jessup International Law Moot team – Bridget Dunne,
Jesse Murphy, Simon McKenzie, Emily Woodgate
and Daniel Teoh – won first prize for the respondent
written memorial, and second overall for the combined
applicant/respondent memorials. In the oral presentation
component, the team reached the quarter finals (ranking
UTAS seventh nationally in that section). Bridget Dunne
and Jesse Murphy had further success in the International
Humanitarian Law Moot Competition at the Australian
Law Students’ Association Conference in Sydney.
They reached the finals, judged by officers from the
International Committee from the Red Cross in Geneva,
and were runners-up to a team from the University
of Melbourne.
2011 saw strong uptake of study abroad opportunities
with many students going on international exchange to
one of our many partner institutions, including Masaryk
University (Czech Republic), the University of Copenhagen
(Denmark), the University of Hull (UK), the University
of Lucerne (Switzerland) and the University of Ottawa
(Canada). The Law Faculty also hosted students from
Denmark, Germany and Switzerland.
Other highlights for the Law Faculty in 2011 included:
•Professor Jan McDonald was the lead researcher on a
research grant on climate adaptation planning from the
National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility’s
Research Grants Program;
•Distinguished Professor Don Chalmers was appointed
Chair of the International Cancer Genome Consortium
Data Access Committee;
•Professors Otlowski and Nicol gave talks on legal issues at
the International Congress on Human Genetics in Montreal
and attended an invitation-only pre-conference workshop;
•In December the Faculty hosted a launch of eight books
authored by the Faculty’s staff in 2011;
•Law Faculty graduate Anita George was awarded the
General Sir John Monash Award – the first Tasmanian to
gain this honour;
•Professor Gary Meyers was awarded the 2011
Distinguished Environmental Graduate Award from the
Northwestern School of Lewis and Clark College, USA;
•Adjunct Professor Tim McCormack was appointed by
the Government of Israel as one of two international
observers for Phase 2 of the Turkel Commission of
Enquiry;
•Associate Professor Rick Snell was chosen by the
Commonwealth Secretariat to undertake a consultancy
for the Kingdom of Tonga on freedom of information;
•Dr Gail Lugten was appointed for three years by the
United Nations to the critical role of Fisheries Liaison
Officer in Rome. This will see Dr Lugten coordinating
fisheries regulation throughout member countries of
the UN; and
•Michael Kirby AC CMG gave the inaugural Sandy
Duncanson Social Justice Lecture.
FACULTY OF SCIENCE, ENGINEERING
& TECHNOLOGY
Professor Paul Haddad (left) from the School of Chemistry/
ACROSS was the first-ever Australian to receive the Marcel Golay
Award, which recognises lifetime achievements in the field of
capillary chromatography. Meanwhile Associate Professor Greg
Dicinoski, also from the School of Chemistry/ACROSS, received
a Vice-Chancellor’s Citation for Outstanding Contribution to
Student Learning.
The Faculty of Science, Engineering & Technology (SET)
celebrated a number of achievements and milestones
in 2011.
SET staff and their colleagues were successful in the
extremely competitive ARC Discovery Projects Scheme,
receiving six out of the 10 grants awarded to UTAS for
projects to commence in 2012. Congratulations to the
recipients: Dr Jim Weller, Dr Tim Brodribb, Dr Greg Jordan
and Associate Professor Joseph Bailey (Plant Science),
and Professor Allan Canty and Dr David McGuinness
(Chemistry). Two of the four ARC Future Fellowships
awarded to UTAS were also received by SET researchers:
Dr Erik Wapstra (Zoology) and Dr Matthew King (a UTAS
alumnus, based in the UK, commencing soon in the
School of Geography & Environmental Studies). Dr Mark
Hinder (Psychology) received one of the two new ARC
Discovery Early Career Researcher Awards (DECRA).
The ARC awards, combined, contributed more than $3.8
million in research funding to UTAS.
A team of UTAS researchers, led by Dr Menna Jones
(Zoology), won the $10,000 Sherman Eureka Prize for
Environmental Research for their research and innovation
in trying to save the Tasmanian devil from extinction.
Finalists in this year’s Eureka Prizes also included
Professor Paul Haddad and Associate Professor Michael
Breadmore (Chemistry/ACROSS).
The contributions of staff from the schools of Chemistry
and Zoology were recognised in this year’s ViceChancellor’s Awards. Distinguished Professor Allan
Canty (Chemistry) received the VC’s Distinguished
Service Medal for his scholarship, leadership and
unreserved contribution to the advancement of UTAS.
Vice-Chancellor’s Citations for Outstanding Contribution
to Student Learning were received by Associate Professor
Greg Dicinoski and Professor Brian Yates (Chemistry) and
Dr Ashley Edwards and Dr Wapstra (Zoology). Dr Edwards
also received a 2011 Australian Learning and Teaching
Council (ALTC) Citation for her innovative approaches
to teaching and learning design, evaluation and student
support, and scholarly contributions that have influenced
the teaching of others.
The School of Chemistry celebrated its 50th anniversary
in 2011. The School opened on 1 July 1961, after the
completion of its new home on the Sandy Bay campus.
The School has produced some of Australia’s most
distinguished chemists, including Professor David Mellor
(Head of the School of Chemistry at UNSW from 1956
to 1968) and Dr David Wadsley, one of Australia’s most
outstanding crystallographers. Today, under the leadership
of Associate Professor Dicinoski, the School is home to
more than 800 undergraduate students, five honours and
30 PhD candidates. To celebrate its golden anniversary the
School of Chemistry hosted a symposium in September
and unveiled a commissioned Educational Periodic Table
of Elements.
The Faculty played a significant role again this year in
National Science Week with our involvement raising the
profile of SET in the Tasmanian community, increasing
awareness of SET career opportunities, stimulating
interest in SET disciplines and encouraging younger
people to continue their studies in science at a tertiary
level. The Faculty hosted national guests and organised
a number of events, including the Young Tassie Scientist
(YTS) program, which is funded by a national grant.
National Science Week in Tasmania is coordinated by
the Tasmanian National Science Week coordinating
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committee, chaired by Jeannie-Marie LeRoi (Marketing &
Communication Officer, Faculty of SET).
prestigious award recognises significant contributions
to the quality of student learning.
Other highlights from the Faculty of Science, Engineering
& Technology (and our research centres) included:
AUSTRALIAN MARITIME COLLEGE
•Agricultural Science/Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
(TIA) – The new Food Innovation Centre was launched.
The Centre is a partnership between UTAS, the CSIRO
and the Defence, Science and Technology Organisation,
and is supported by an $18.7 million redevelopment
of the Australian Defence Force’s nutrition research
facility in Scottsdale;
The Australian Maritime College (AMC) continues to
position itself to be ready for the growth and benefits
associated with the national maritime reform agenda
announced in 2011. To meet the expected growth in
demand for skilled workers and the massively-growing
offshore oil and gas industry, AMC has developed
strategic partnerships interstate.
•Architecture & Design – MArch(Hons) graduate Sam
Bresnehan won the prestigious BlueScope Steel Glenn
Murcutt Student Prize at the Australian Achievement in
Architecture Awards ceremony in March 2011;
In April, AMC announced a collaborative agreement with
Edith Cowan University (WA) to meet the specialist skills
demands of the maritime engineering industry. Later in
the year, partnerships were developed in South Australia,
including a three-year memorandum of understanding
with Le Fevre High School to further develop the State’s
maritime high school curriculum, and a heads of
agreement with the Australian Maritime and Fisheries
Academy to facilitate an expansion of international
and coastal seafaring study opportunities.
•Chemistry/ACROSS – Professor Paul Haddad received
the Marcel Golay Award, a major international award
that recognises lifetime achievements in the field of
capillary chromatography. Professor Haddad is the first
Australian recipient of this award in its 22-year history;
•Computing & Information Systems – Completion of a
Research Project for Australian Commission on Safety
& Quality in Health Care on Practice Level Indicators of
Safety & Quality in Primary Health Care;
•Earth Science/CODES – Professor Ross Large was
presented with the Society of Economic Geologists’
Silver Medal Award. Professor Large is only the third
Australian to receive this prestigious honour, which is
awarded for demonstrated excellence in original work in
the geology of mineral deposits;
•Engineering – Bachelor of Engineering (Geotechnical)
was fully accredited by Engineers Australia. This is the
only geotechnical engineering undergraduate course
available in Australia;
•Geography & Environmental Studies – PhD student
Stephen Harwin was accepted into the Stanford
Entrepreneurship Program and received a fellowship
to the value of $8,000;
•Maths & Physics – Dr Stanislav Shabala was awarded
the top honour of Premier’s Young Achiever of the Year
award and was winner of the TEMCO Science and
Technology category;
•Plant Science – PhD student Vinodan Rajandran
received a prestigious 2011 Postgraduate Prime
Minister’s Australia Asia Award under the Endeavour
Awards scheme;
•Psychology – Professor Jeff Summers was awarded
a 2011 Vice-Chancellor’s Excellence Award for
Internationally Recognised Research; and
•Zoology – Dr Ashley Edwards was awarded an
Australian Learning & Teaching Council (ALTC) Citation
for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning. This
AMC’s capacity to provide quality distance education
through online and part-time study options continued
to expand in 2011, along with the range of courses and
training programs to meet industry needs.
The National Centre for Maritime Engineering and
Hydrodynamics (NCMEH) introduced the Cooperative
Engineering Program, which gives students the
opportunity to extend their degrees by one year to include
periods of paid work experience with industry employers.
In the postgraduate field, the NCMEH launched a Master
of Maritime Engineering with specialisations in Technology
Management and Naval Engineering. Meanwhile, the
National Centre for Ports and Shipping (NCPS) unveiled
its Master of Maritime Studies.
An exciting development within the NCPS is the migration
of courses linked to the professional certificates of
competency from advanced diploma to bachelor status.
The program changes are a result of a dedicated course
review process in 2011 with considerable industry
consultation and input from maritime employers and
regulators. The new course structure is expected to be
implemented in 2013.
AMC’s world-class facilities continue to be in demand.
In August, AMC celebrated 10 years of cutting-edge
hydrodynamic research at the Model Test Basin. This
state-of-the-art facility is used by engineering students,
industry and national research organisations to conduct
hydrodynamic experiments that simulate maritime
operations within shallow water environments (such as
ports, harbours, rivers and coastal regions). The Model
Test Basin has been used for several major research
projects, including partnerships with government agencies
and private corporations (such as the Defence Science
and Technology Organisation (DSTO), OceanLinx, Incat,
Rio Tinto, Austal Ships and the Newcastle
Port Corporation).
INSTITUTE FOR MARINE AND
ANTARCTIC STUDIES
The joint partnership with the Newcastle Port Corporation
is one of many conducted through AMC’s commercial
arm, AMC Search, which celebrated two prestigious
international awards in 2011 for their Dynamic Positioning
units in Launceston and Perth, WA, including the ‘DP
Training Centre of the Year’. In addition, the work of former
AMC Search CEO John Foster, who passed away in
June, was recognised at the 16th annual Lloyd’s List DCN
Shipping and Maritime Industry awards in November.
Other highlights for AMC in 2011 included:
•AMC secured its first ever US Navy’s Office of Naval
Research grant;
•A record number of 18 AusAID students commenced
study at AMC;
•Accreditation was granted by the Institute of Marine
Engineering, Science & Technology for AMC’s Marine
Environment courses;
•The Australian Maritime Safety Authority’s annual audit
recognised developments in seafarer programs;
•AMC maritime engineering educators were recognised
for creating a unique program of teaching and learning
voyages on the Bluefin training vessel;
•The 30-year anniversary of the launch of the 35m
Bluefin was marked with a major refit;
•The Centre for Maritime Simulation was utilised to
trial and test two of the world’s biggest cruise ships,
the Queen Mary II and Queen Elizabeth, ahead of their
arrival into Sydney Harbour in April;
•A Global Maritime Distress and Safety System was
added to the suite of simulators;
•In conjunction with the UTAS Alumni office, AMC
carried out a major push to reconnect with its global
alumni network in 53+ countries and introduced a new
newsletter, Above Board, which was sent to 10,000 alumni
and industry worldwide; and
•An ARC Linkage Project grant of more than $300,000
was awarded to assist with the performance and
design optimisation of an oscillating water column
with industry partner OceanLinx, looking at wave
energy conversion.
The progression of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies
(IMAS) Waterfront Building Project raised the IMAS profile locally,
nationally and internationally.
2011 was a year of significant change, consolidation
and momentum building for the Institute for Marine and
Antarctic Studies (IMAS). In January Interim Director
Professor Michael Stoddart handed the leadership baton
to Professor Mike Coffin, who commenced his tenure at
IMAS as the inaugural Executive Director on 31 January.
On 18 March, University Council approved the 10-year
Sustainable Marine Research Collaboration Agreement
between the Crown in Right of Tasmania and UTAS.
The Crown is contributing more than $2.6 million each
financial year to the collaboration, which demonstrates
our strong commitment to maintaining excellent working
relationships between the University and industry, which
were established through the Tasmanian Aquaculture and
Fisheries Institute (TAFI) Joint Venture Agreement.
The progression of the IMAS Waterfront Building
Project raised the IMAS profile locally, nationally and
internationally. The building site received many visits from
Tasmanian and national politicians and other dignitaries
throughout the year, including Prime Minister Julia Gillard.
Completion is anticipated in late 2013.
Planning was a prominent focus for IMAS in 2011 as
we began to develop goals and strategies to achieve
our mandate to become an internationally recognised
flagship for the University, delivering excellence in pure
and applied marine and Antarctic research and research
training. The first IMAS Business Plan was submitted to
the UTAS Executive in August. Three strategic planning
workshops also provided input for the first IMAS Strategic
Plan, which will be presented to UTAS Council in
2012. Key strategies for IMAS are the addition of highquality research staff to build on existing expertise and
research capacity in three research themes – Climate
& Oceans, Fisheries & Aquaculture, and Marine Ecology
& Biodiversity – underpinned by temperate/polar ocean
simulation and an experimental aquaculture research
infrastructure.
41
faculties and institutes
faculties and institutes
40
university of tasmania
Consulting & Implementation Services of Melbourne were
engaged to review IMAS professional staff and services.
The objective of the review is to align structure and key
roles with IMAS strategic and operational priorities.
Implementation of the review is planned for early 2012.
IMAS began hosting the inaugural international project
office of the Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS),
which will coordinate an integrated multi-disciplinary
observing system for the Southern Ocean. SOOS will
routinely monitor the behaviour of the ocean and this will
involve measurements of temperature, salinity and ocean
currents. These measurements aim to inform decisionmakers confronted with the challenges of climate change,
sea-level rise, ocean acidification and the sustainable
management of marine resources.
During 2011 IMAS received $13.273 million in external
research grants and other contracts, including $7.17
million from Australian Government research grants
and $1.165 million for the Australian National Network
in Marine Science (ANNiMS).
Professor Graham Edgar and colleagues received $1.1
million funding from the ARC’s Linkage Projects scheme
to conduct a five-year, multi-state collaborative ecology
review to improve management of coastal biodiversity of
temperate Australian marine protected area networks.
Dr Delphine Lannuzel was awarded an ARC Discovery
Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA). She will
investigate the role of Antarctic sea ice as a natural ocean
fertiliser. Dr Lannuzel’s project is one of two DECRAs
awarded in Tasmania from 32 applications. The overall
national success rate was 12.8%.
2011 saw the ANNiMS project draw to a close. ANNiMS
fostered collaboration between its three lead institutions
(James Cook University, the University of Tasmania and
the University of Western Australia) in marine science
and drove a strong agenda of collaboration in research,
innovation and teaching.
Fisheries Sciences, both focus areas for IMAS, in the
Australian Research Council’s (ARC) 2010 Excellence
in Research for Australia (ERA) initiative;
•UTAS/IMAS and the Australian Antarctic Division
(AAD) signed a new collaboration deed formalising
our current and future scientific interactions;
•The master plan for development of the IMAS Taroona
site was approved;
•Plans for an experimental aquaculture facility
at the IMAS Taroona site are being developed;
•Professor Keith Sainsbury was awarded the
Kungsfenan Swedish Seafood Award in the Sustainable
Fisheries, jointly with Dr Tony Smith (CSIRO);
•Professor Graham Edgar was awarded the Australian
Marine Sciences Association Silver Jubilee Award
for excellence in marine research in Australia;
•Dr Delphine Lannuzel was awarded the ViceChancellor’s Award for Research Excellence,
recognising her outstanding performance as
an early career researcher;
•The Range Extension Database and Mapping Project
Team – Dr Gretta Pecl, Ms Fiona Brodribb, Associate
Professor Stewart Frusher, Dr John Keane and Mr Peter
Walsh – was awarded the Vice-Chancellor’s Team Award
for Outstanding Community Engagement;
•Associate Professor Caleb Gardner was awarded the
Tasmanian Seafood Industry Council Research and
Development Award; and
•Dr Jennifer Lavers was named Young Tall Poppy
(Tasmania) Scientist of the Year.
MENZIES RESEARCH INSTITUTE
TASMANIA
IMAS spearheaded UTAS membership in three major
international bodies devoted to advancing marine and
Antarctic studies: Consortium for Ocean Leadership,
Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Management
International and Partnership for Observation of the
Global Oceans. IMAS became the first academic
institution to join the Australian Government Ocean
Policy Science Advisory Group.
IMAS continued its commitment to community, industry
and the arts in 2011 by participating at the Bellerive
seafarers’ festival, sponsoring the Tasmanian Seafood
Industry Awards Dinner, hosting artist-in-residence
Nigel Helyer, and hosting Bookend Trust staff.
Other highlights for IMAS in 2011 included:
•UTAS scored well above world standard in the discipline
area of Oceanography and above world standard in
project, Medical Science 2 (MS2). The Institute was
delighted to receive a $2 million gift from philanthropist
Mr Graeme Wood and a further $500,000 from the
Tasmanian-based Select Foundation. MS2 is due for
completion in early 2013 and will cater for Menzies’
planned growth over the next five years.
In 2011 Menzies was successful in securing more than
$13.5 million in research funding, including competitive
grant income of $11.5 million. The Institute was awarded
funding for its first National Health and Medical Research
Council (NHMRC) Centre for Research Excellence,
securing $2.5 million to address chronic respiratory
disease and lung ageing (Breathe Well CRE). The
Institute’s researchers also had substantial success
in being awarded six highly-competitive national
research fellowships.
Menzies actively participated in the successful national
‘Discoveries Need Dollars’ campaign against a possible
20% per annum cut to the NHMRC budget. Overwhelming
community support for medical research was clearly
evident in Tasmania.
Major research highlights included Menzies’ involvement
in a leading international collaborative study on multiple
sclerosis (MS) published in Nature that confirmed the
importance of up to 578 MS genes. It points to a pivotal
role for T cells – ‘the orchestra leaders’ of the immune
system – and makes it clear that MS is primarily an
immunologic disease.
An additional Menzies’ MS study published in Annals
of Neurology showed for the first time that higher levels
of Vitamin D are associated with a lower relapse risk in
people with MS.
A recent finding from the Tasmanian Familial
Haematological Malignancies Study found that for
some families, where there is an increased incidence
of blood cancer, diagnosis with a blood cancer appears
to be occurring at a younger age for each successive
generation. These findings were recently published in
the prestigious journal Blood.
Research conducted by Menzies and the Murdoch
Childrens Research Institute, in collaboration with a
number of international institutes, showed that childhood
obesity does not permanently increase cardiovascular risk
if obesity in adulthood is avoided. The results of the study
were published in The New England Journal of Medicine.
In 2011 Menzies Research Institute Tasmania was successful in
securing more than $13.5 million in research funding, including
competitive grant income of $11.5 million.
The past year has been one of significant achievements
for the Menzies Research Institute Tasmania.
Early in 2011 Menzies launched a capital campaign to
raise the outstanding $5 million required in philanthropic
support to complete the $90 million Stage II building
A further research highlight was Menzies’ involvement
in a new genetic discovery for prostate cancer. Menzies’
researchers worked closely with an international team of
researchers to find seven new regions across the human
genome that increase the chances of developing prostate
cancer. The paper was published in Nature Genetics.
PhD students continued to play a key role in the Institute’s
research activity in 2011 with enrolments reaching
a record high of 58 students, and 11 PhD students
graduating during the year.
In December we were honoured by a visit from the
Governor-General, Ms Quentin Bryce AC CVO, and Mr
Michael Bryce AM AE. The Governor-General and Mr Bryce
toured Menzies’ state-of the-art research facilities and
enjoyed an informal morning tea with staff and students.
The end of 2011 marked the departure of the Director,
Professor Simon Foote, to take up the position of
foundation Dean of the Australian School of Advanced
Medicine at Macquarie University. Professor Foote made
an extraordinary contribution to the Institute over the
past six and a half years and, through his leadership, the
Institute flourished to become more nationally prominent
and successful. An international search for a new Director
will be executed under the leadership of the Menzies Board.
Other highlights for Menzies Research Institute Tasmania
in 2011 included:
•Dr Kristy Sanderson’s research was selected to appear
in the NHMRC’s Ten of the Best Research Projects 2011;
•Menzies Associate Professor Greg Woods and Dr
Menna Jones (UTAS School of Zoology) won the 2011
Sherman Eureka Prize for Environmental Research for
their work on the Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease
(DFTD);
•A Menzies study highlighted the direct link between
obesity in children and diagnosed depression in later life;
•Menzies researchers discovered that lack of genetic
diversity does not fully explain how DFTD is spread
among Tasmanian devils;
•A world-first study conducted by Menzies identified the
risk factors for falls by licensed thoroughbred jumps
racing jockeys in Australia;
•PhD student Clare Smith was selected out of 20,000
worldwide applicants to attend the 61st Nobel Laureate
Meeting in Lindau, Germany;
•Dr Verity Cleland was selected as one of three finalists
for the Young Tall Poppy of the Year (Tasmania) Award;
•Menzies hosted top biomedical experts from China and
Australia as part of the third Australia-China Biomedical
Research Conference;
•Associate Professor Greg Woods was admitted as a Fellow
of the Royal Australasian College of Pathologists; and
•Dr Tania Winzenberg was selected to undertake the
International Primary Care Research Leadership
Program at Oxford University (UK).
43
faculties and institutes
faculties and institutes
42
university of tasmania
advancement
Vice-Chancellor’s Circle 12
Patrons 55
Corporate Patrons 92
Benefactors 6
Corporate Benefactors 32
Fellows 80
Corporate Fellows 115
Members 251
Corporate Members 137
Total 780
The Bequests Program
VIP guests at the 2011 Foundation Awards dinner included Distinguished Professor Ross Large (left),
Professor David Rich (UTAS Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) and Provost), the Honourable Lara Giddings,
Damian Bugg AM QC (UTAS Chancellor), and Reverend Professor Michael Tate.
UNIVERSITY OF TASMANIA
FOUNDATION
The Foundation was able to continue to improve its
distribution of funds for supporting University programs
from $3.84 million in 2010 to $5.16 million (a 34% increase).
The University of Tasmania Foundation is the
fundraising arm of the University, managed by the UTAS
Advancement Office. The Foundation’s activities help to
ensure UTAS remains a vibrant institution - a leader in
education that produces quality graduates and research
connected to the businesses and industries not only of
Tasmania, but across Australia and the world.
The sustained increase in performance over a number
of years reflects the ongoing support of the University
through a dedicated Advancement Office that focuses on
fundraising and alumni relations.
The Foundation assists the University to achieve its
mission and strategic objectives by working with our
alumni and friends to receive, manage and allocate gifts.
The Foundation is governed by an independent board of
directors, and the Director of Advancement provides the
role of CEO to the Foundation in managing the day-to-day
operations.
The UTAS Foundation enjoys Australian Taxation Office
endorsement as an income tax-exempt charity and a
deductible gift recipient.
The Foundation’s fundraising priorities during 2011 were:
• scholarships through the UTAS Scholarships Program;
• the Annual Appeal;
• the Menzies Research Institute Stage II Campaign;
• the Save the Tasmanian Devil Appeal; and
• a number of smaller specific appeals.
In 2011 the Foundation enjoyed a continued increase
in support for the University, due to the very generous
support of our donors. The financial performance for the
year was pleasing, with donation and bequest income
increasing on the 2010 performance of $5.81 million by
$1.78 million to $7.59 million (a 31% increase).
Annual Awards Dinner
The Foundation Awards Dinner is one of the major events
of its kind in Tasmania and one of the University’s premier
public occasions. The 2011 dinner, held at Hobart’s Wrest
Point in March, welcomed new scholarship students,
acknowledged the support of donors, and celebrated
excellence, innovation and participation at UTAS.
Acknowledgement of a generous gift by Geoffrey and
Frances Tyler, which included a significant art collection,
highlighted the celebration. More than 520 guests
recognised the outstanding achievements of UTAS alumni
with the awarding of the UTAS Foundation Graduate
Award to Premier Lara Giddings, and the Distinguished
Alumni Award to joint recipients Reverend Professor
Michael Tate and Distinguished Professor Ross Large.
Membership Program
In 2011 the levels of financial membership for new
members were adjusted and the Vice-Chancellor’s
Circle was introduced for significant individual donors
who are advocates of the University. Support of the
Vice-Chancellor’s Circle grew during 2011 to 12 donors.
Meanwhile total financial membership increased over
the year by 22, or 3%, from 758 members in 2009 to
780 members, comprising:
The Bequests Program is a vital activity that provides
significant support to the University over the long term.
Ongoing efforts and resources put into managing the
program are an investment that will manifest benefits
to the University as bequests are realised, often many
years into the future. During 2011 the Bequest Program
continued to work with friends of the University who are
considering a gift and there are now more than 50 pledges
recorded. In 2011, $435,000 was received from bequests to
the University through the Foundation.
Appeals Program
The Foundation is responsible for endorsing and
facilitating all official fundraising activities of the
University. A number of ongoing and new appeals
were managed in 2011.
Annual Appeal This is our annual fundraising request
to our alumni and friends to support the University. The
appeal aims to establish a long-term culture of giving
within the UTAS community of graduates and friends.
The 2011 appeal was launched in May and by the end
of December had raised $74,000 towards the target of
$115,000. The number of donors to the appeal in 2011
increased to 263, compared with 206 in 2010. Fundraising
for the current appeal continues until April 2012.
federal government and UTAS, the Foundation has been
coordinating the appeal since 2004. At the end of 2011,
$1.56 million had been raised to support DFTD research
and management programs. In 2011, $440,000 was
raised through the appeal, which is the largest annual
fundraising total.
Support for Scholarships and Research
A vital part of the Foundation’s function is securing and
managing support for scholarships and research at the
University. In 2011 the Foundation distributed $3.16 million
for these activities, and a further $2 million towards the
Menzies Research Institute Stage II Campaign. This is a 34%
increase compared with 2010, during which the Foundation
distributed $3.84 million to support UTAS programs.
Directors
The Directors of the University of Tasmania Foundation
Board at 31 December 2011 were:
Mr Miles Hampton (Chair), Dr Meghan Cavanagh-Russell,
Mr Stuart Clues, Mr David Clerk, Mr Brian Hartnett,
Mr Colin Jackson OAM, Dr Christine Mucha and
Ms Elizabeth Thomas.
Three non-voting members also served on the Board
– Professor Peter Rathjen (UTAS Vice-Chancellor),
Mr Gerald Loughran (President of UTAS Foundation
Governors) and Professor Robert Menary OAM
(representing University Council).
Table 10: Summary of key performance areas
The following schedule is a summary of key financial
performance areas for the Foundation over the past
two years.
Performance Area
2010
2011
Donations and bequests
$5.81 million
$7.59 million
UTAS contributions
$0.50 million
$1.63 million
-
$0.11 million
Income
Franking credits
Menzies Research Institute Stage II Campaign This
campaign seeks to raise support to complete the Stage II
facility of the Menzies Research Institute Tasmania. The
remaining $20 million of the $90 million project is in the form
of a Challenge Grant whereby The Atlantic Philanthropies
has pledged $10 million and will assist the University in
raising $5 million in Australian philanthropy. The State
Government has pledged another $5 million on a dollar-fordollar raised basis. At the end of 2011, $2.51 million had
been raised towards the $5 million target.
Other income
$0.03 million
$0.09 million
Investment income/(loss)
$1.39 million
($0.33 million)
$3.84 million
$3.16 million
-
$2.0 million
Save the Tasmanian Devil Appeal As the official
fundraising arm of the Save the Tasmanian Devil
Program, the appeal is vital in raising funds to assist in
the response to Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease
(DFTD). As a partnership between State Government,
Other expenses
$0.48 million
$1.07 million
Net Operating Result
$3.41 million
$2.86 million
Total funds managed
by Foundation at EOY
$30.9 million
$33.8 million
Expenditure
Funding support UTAS
programs (including
scholarships, research,
teaching and facilities)
Menzies Stage II
Building Campaign
45
advancement
44
university of tasmania
Integrated Marine
Observing System
University Farm (UBE)
TIA
Launceston
Engagement &
Development
TILES = Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies
Centre for the
Environment
Cradle Coast
Campus
TAFI = Tasmanian Aquaculture & Fisheries Institute (now part of IMAS)
TIA = Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
Strategic
Partnerships
Web Presence
Zoology
Psychology
CODES = ARC Centre of Excellence in Ore Deposits
IASOS = Institute of Antarctic & Southern Ocean Studies (now part of IMAS)
Visual &
Performing Arts
Tasmanian
School of Art
Sociology &
Social Work
Philosophy
History & Classics
Riawunna
Menzies Research Institute
Tasmania
The University of Tasmania
is a member of these cooperative
research centres (CRCs):
• Antarctic Climate and
Ecosystems CRC
• Optimising Ore Extraction CRC
• CRC for Forestry
• Australian Seafood CRC
• Bushfire CRC
Rural Health
Rural Clinical
School
Institute for Marine &
Antarctic Studies
Government
Including TILES
Australian
Innovation
Research Centre
(AIRC)
Management
Economics
& Finance
English, Journalism
& European
Languages
Conservatorium
of Music
AMC Search
Central Science
Laboratory
Tasmanian Institute of
Learning and Teaching
(TILT)
- Awards, Grants and
Fellowships Office
International
Research
Collaboration
National Student
Recruitment
Plant Science
Mathematics & Physics
Risk Management &
Audit Assurance
Service Delivery
Student Centre
Library
Higher Degrees by
Research
Media &
Communications
Marketing
Geography &
Environmental Studies
Engineering
Strategic
Human
Resources
Intellectual
Property &
Commercialisation
Earth Sciences
inc CODES
Community
Engagement
Computing &
Information Systems
Centre for Legal
Practice
Pharmacy
Nursing &
Midwifery
Medicine
Centre for Law
& Genetics
Including:TLRI
Law
Asian Languages
& Studies
Accounting
& Corporate
Governance
Education
Human Life
Sciences
International Marketing
and Recruitment Office
Commercial Services
& Development
- Property Services
- Campus Services
- Residential Services
Human Resources
Events & Protocol
Governance & Legal
Centre for University
Pathways and
Partnerships (CUPP)
- English Language
Centre
Research
Management
- Research Grants
- Research Ethics
& Compliance
- Consultancies
Quality
Chemistry
Architecture & Design
Agricultural Science
Science, Engineering
& Technology
Law
Health Science
Education
Business
Arts
CEOs
University Institutes
Pro Vice-Chancellor
(Regional Development)
Provost
Campus
Development
Planning Unit
Development
& Alumni
Information
Technology
Resources
Financial Services
Office of the Deputy
Vice-Chancellor
(Students and Education)
- Student Evaluation,
Review & Reporting Unit
Research
Strategy &
Performance
Academic &
Strategic
Planning
& Performance
DVC
(Research)
DVC
(Students & Education)
Chief Operating
Officer
Executive Director
(Strategy)
Dean Graduate Research
Deputy Vice-Chancellor
(Research)
Provost
Senior Management Team
Chief Finance Officer
Senior Executive
Executive Director
(Strategy)
Chief Operating Officer
Council Secretariat
Nominations & Remuneration Committee
Finance Committee
Built Environment Committee
Ceremonial & Honorary Degrees Committee
Office of the
Vice-Chancellor
Vice-Chancellor
Deputy Vice-Chancellor
(Students & Education)
Deans
Australian Maritime College
A major upgrade to the University’s Raiser’s Edge
database – the home of 55,000 active alumni records –
was made, resulting in improved speed and functionality.
Chair: Academic Senate
Communications with alumni continued to be an
important pillar of our engagement activities. The monthly
e-newsletter was sent out from February to December
and not only served to notify alumni about events and
postgraduate courses, but also stimulated considerable
correspondence from alumni far and wide. Our flagship
magazine, Alumni News, was again mailed in June
and December, and featured Rhodes scholars and our
Antarctic connections respectively. More than 16,000 visits
were made to the Alumni & Friends website during 2011,
and the number of homepage hits rose by 28% across the
two halves of the year. LinkedIn group and Facebook page
membership rose to 25% to more than 1,000 each.
COUNCIL
Twenty-five varied events attracted more than 2,000
alumni and friends. In Canberra, alumni gathered for a
dinner at the Boat House by Lake Burley Griffin. In Hobart,
graduates competed good-naturedly in a beer-pulling
competition at Cascade Brewery and then, in November,
70 graduates attended the popular Alumni 50+ Lunch,
which is held for those who graduated at least 50 years
before. In Launceston and Melbourne, debates and panels
focused on euthanasia, same-sex marriage, the readiness
of Tasmania for its own AFL team, and on war crimes
and reconciliation. Some of these events were open to
the public and raised the profile of the Alumni and the
University, leading to media attention and many letters to
the editor. Overseas, alumni enjoyed a cocktail function
in the salubrious environs of the Royal Thames Yacht Club
in London’s Piccadilly with the Chancellor in attendance.
There were also two informal gatherings of Singaporean
alumni which attracted more than 30 graduates to each,
including several from the Australian Maritime College.
And the Alumni paid its first visit in a while to Hong Kong,
where the Vice-Chancellor hosted a dinner.
Audit & Risk Committee
UTAS Alumni consolidated its busy program of functions
and communications during 2011.
Finally, UTAS Alumni joined with UTAS Career
Development & Employment staff to pilot a Career
Mentor Program between 20 ‘pairs’ of alumni and
students. Mentors assisted the transition from university
to the world of work by imparting practical advice and
guidance to their student mentees, and plans were made
to expand the program in 2012.
organisational chart
Policy Advice
Rosemary Hardwick (left), Margaret Ranson and Kay Evans
enjoyed the Alumni 50+ Club Lunch in Hobart.
Two recipients were jointly awarded the Distinguished
Alumni Award at the Foundation Awards Dinner in Hobart:
Professor Ross Large, Director of UTAS ore research
centre CODES, and former federal Minister for Justice,
Reverend Professor Michael Tate AO. Tasmanian Premier
Lara Giddings received the Foundation Graduate Award.
Another high point on the 2011 calendar was the award
of two particular honorary degrees: Malaysian Senator
Tunku Aziz was awarded an honorary degree in law by the
University, for his relentless campaign against corruption,
and Dr Peter Smith of the University’s Department of
Chemistry was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science.
AMC Integration Committee
ALUMNI
Management
Accountability
advancement
46
47
2011
$’000
2010
%
$’000
2009
%
$’000
2008
%
$’000
2007
%
$’000
%
INCOME
Australian Government assistance
Australian Government grants
166,617
35.4
183,432
38.5
152,386
34.5
144,093
38.1
107,958
30.9
HECS-HELP & FEE-HELP
51,480
11.0
50,092
10.5
49,714
11.3
43,111
11.4
38,162
10.9
Scholarships and research
119,747
25.5
107,854
22.6
102,706
23.3
97,030
25.7
102,337
29.3
17,578
3.7
12,946
2.7
17,881
4.1
19,512
5.2
17,901
5.1
9,263
2.0
9,176
1.9
8,563
1.9
6,433
1.7
5,702
1.6
60,132
12.8
54,578
11.5
53,013
12.0
49,304
13.0
38,630
11.0
6,310
1.3
13,429
2.8
24,013
5.4
(21,702)
-5.7
12,347
3.5
23,291
5.0
27,756
5.8
20,884
4.7
18,599
4.9
14,354
4.1
State Government grants
HECS-HELP student payments
Fees and charges
Investment income
Consultancy and contract research
Other revenue
15,690
3.3
17,239
3.6
11,975
2.7
21,751
5.8
12,381
3.5
470,108
100.0
476,502
100.0
441,135
100.0
378,131
100.0
349,772
100.0
Academic salary costs
144,882
32.2
135,208
32.1
118,719
30.6
115,460
31.4
93,889
31.2
Non-academic salary costs
116,530
25.9
107,527
25.5
99,811
25.7
94,117
25.6
80,032
26.6
Depreciation and amortisation
20,084
4.5
19,703
4.7
17,703
4.6
16,732
4.5
14,844
4.9
Repairs and maintenance
16,362
3.6
14,417
3.4
18,006
4.6
16,509
4.5
13,849
4.6
73
0.0
124
0.0
(39)
0.0
(27)
0.0
202
0.1
Other expenses
151,770
33.7
144,426
34.3
133,967
34.5
124,979
34.0
98,456
32.7
TOTAL EXPENDITURE
449,701
100.0
421,405
100.0
388,167
100.0
367,770
100.0
301,272
100.0
OPERATING RESULT
20,407
55,097
52,968
10,361
48,500
1.3
1.7
1.5
1.5
5.0
TOTAL INCOME
EXPENDITURE
Bad and doubtful debts
KEY RATIOS
1. Financial stability and liquidity
– Current ratio
– Net cash balances
– Net assets
69,289
70,322
59,177
56,984
19,197
756,643
746,318
651,273
597,732
519,512
206,642
190,068
195,663
187,644
149,822
2.Revenue
2011
F I N A N C I A L S TAT E M E N T S
U N I V E R S I T Y O F TA S M A N I A
– Australian Government grants
including HECS
– Australian Government capital grants
20,718
52,632
15,000
5,993
2,000
– Scholarships and research
119,747
107,854
102,706
97,030
102,337
– Other University income
123,001
125,948
127,766
87,464
95,613
TOTAL UNIVERSITY INCOME
470,108
476,502
441,135
378,131
349,772
44%
40%
44%
50%
43%
Commonwealth funded students
(full-time equivalents)*
11,716
11,623
10,785
10,215
9,585
Average Commonwealth recurrent grant
17,638
16,353
18,142
18,369
15,631
Australian Government operating grants
including HECS as a % of total income
* Source: UTAS Statistics – DEEWR Operating Grant Load (excluding research higher degree students)
49
university of tasmania
Five-year summary
ended 31 december 2011 – university
university of tasmania
2011
$’000
2010
%
$’000
2009
%
$’000
2008
%
$’000
Statement of comprehensive income
for the year ended 31 december 2011
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
2007
%
$’000
%
Notes
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
Australian Government grants
2.1
286,364
291,286
286,364
291,286
HECS-HELP – Australian Government payments
2.1
50,483
48,823
50,483
48,823
INCOME
Australian Government assistance
Australian Government grants
REVENUE FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS
166,617
34.8
183,432
37.7
152,386
33.7
144,093
37.7
107,958
30.4
HECS-HELP & FEE-HELP
51,480
10.8
50,092
10.3
49,714
11.0
43,111
11.3
38,162
10.8
Scholarships and research
119,747
25.0
107,854
22.2
102,706
22.7
97,030
25.4
102,337
28.8
17,578
3.7
12,946
2.7
17,881
4.0
19,512
5.1
17,901
5.0
9,263
1.9
9,176
1.9
8,563
1.9
6,433
1.7
5,702
1.6
60,132
12.6
54,168
11.1
53,380
11.8
49,513
13.0
38,743
10.9
5,335
1.1
14,335
2.9
27,654
6.1
(24,298)
-6.4
14,117
4.0
Consultancy and contract research
24,673
5.2
27,066
5.6
20,760
4.6
18,266
4.8
14,965
4.2
Other revenue
23,937
5.0
27,427
5.6
19,624
4.3
28,465
7.4
15,058
4.2
478,762
100.0
486,496
100.0
452,668
100.0
382,125
100.0
354,943
100.0
State Government grants
HECS-HELP student payments
Fees and charges
Investment income
TOTAL INCOME
Parent Entity
(University)
EXPENDITURE
Australian Government financial assistance
FEE-HELP
Tasmanian Government financial assistance
2.1
997
1,269
997
1,269
2.2
17,578
12,946
17,578
12,946
9,263
9,176
9,263
9,176
2.3
60,132
54,168
60,132
54,578
HECS-HELP – student payments
Fees and charges
Investment revenue and income
2.4
5,335
14,335
6,310
13,429
Contract research
2.5
24,673
27,066
23,291
27,756
Other revenue and income
2.6
24,293
27,337
16,046
17,149
479,118
486,406
470,464
476,412
(356)
90
(356)
90
478,762
486,496
470,108
476,502
Deferred government superannuation contributions
3.1, 21(b)
Academic salary costs
145,594
32.0
135,856
31.8
119,363
30.3
116,139
31.0
93,889
30.9
Non-academic salary costs
118,127
26.0
109,227
25.6
101,557
25.7
96,365
25.7
80,701
26.5
Depreciation and amortisation
20,256
4.5
19,828
4.6
17,777
4.5
16,810
4.5
14,846
4.9
Repairs and maintenance
16,393
3.6
14,431
3.4
18,010
4.6
16,592
4.4
13,937
4.6
Employee related expenses
3.1
263,721
245,083
261,412
242,735
73
0.0
124
0.0
(39)
0.0
(21)
0.0
202
0.1
Depreciation and amortisation
3.2
20,256
19,828
20,084
19,703
Repairs and maintenance
3.3
16,393
14,431
16,362
14,417
3.4
73
124
73
124
3.1, 21(b)
(356)
90
(356)
90
Bad and doubtful debts
Other expenses
154,731
34.0
148,017
34.6
137,837
34.9
128,933
34.4
100,413
33.0
TOTAL EXPENDITURE
455,174
100.0
427,483
100.0
394,505
100.0
374,818
100.0
303,988
100.0
Total revenue from continuing operations
EXPENSES FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS
Impairment of assets
Deferred superannuation expense
OPERATING RESULT
23,588
59,013
58,163
7,307
50,955
Other expenses
3.5
155,087
147,925
152,126
144,336
455,174
427,481
449,701
421,405
455,174
427,481
449,701
421,405
23,588
59,015
20,407
55,097
–
2
–
–
23,588
59,013
20,407
55,097
KEY RATIOS
1. Financial stability and liquidity
– Current ratio
– Net cash balances
– Net assets
Total expenses from continuing operations
1.5
1.8
1.7
1.7
5.4
78,825
77,569
68,478
67,175
23,259
791,342
777,836
678,875
620,712
545,546
Result before income tax
14
Income tax expense/(benefit)
Economic Entity – Consolidated Income and Expenditure 2011
Investment income 1%
Repairs and maintenance 4%
Consultancy and
contract research 5%
Depreciation and
amortisation 4%
State Government
grants 4%
Other
revenue 5%
Other
expenses 34%
Australian Government
grants including research 59%
Gain/(loss) on revaluation of land and buildings
14
(10,082)
39,191
(10,082)
39,191
Gain/(loss) on revaluation of works of art
14
–
757
–
757
13,506
98,961
10,325
95,045
Total comprehensive income attributable
to the University ofTasmania
This statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
Fees and
charges 13%
HECS-HELP and
FEE-HELP including
student payments 13%
Result after income tax
Non-academic
salary costs 26%
Academic salary costs 32%
51
university of tasmania
Five-year summary
ended 31 december 2011 – consolidated
50
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Notes
2011
$’000
Parent Entity
(University)
2010
$’000
2011
$’000
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
2010
$’000
CURRENT ASSETS
Notes
Total equity at the beginning of the year
Parent Entity
(University)
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
777,836
678,875
746,318
651,273
Cash and cash equivalents
4
78,825
77,569
69,289
70,322
Result after income tax
14
23,588
59,013
20,407
55,097
Receivables
5
18,881
12,834
17,925
11,380
Revaluation of property, plant and equipment
14
(10,082)
39,948
(10,082)
39,948
Inventories
6
967
737
967
737
Investments
7
–
(63)
–
(63)
791,342
777,836
756,643
746,318
Other non-financial assets
8
9,947
10,577
9,928
10,565
108,620
101,654
98,109
92,941
Total current assets
NON-CURRENT ASSETS
Receivables
5
8,521
10,426
8,521
10,426
Investments
7
198,868
211,371
174,715
188,154
Property, plant and equipment
9
558,691
530,174
557,511
528,932
Intangible assets
18,902
9,194
18,902
9,194
Total non-current assets
10
784,982
761,165
759,649
736,706
Total assets
893,602
862,819
857,758
829,647
CURRENT LIABILITIES
Payables
11
20,127
13,273
19,775
12,258
Provisions
12
36,423
29,835
36,126
29,550
Other liabilities
13
18,021
14,510
17,549
14,174
74,571
57,618
73,450
55,982
27,689
27,365
27,665
27,347
27,689
27,365
27,665
27,347
Total liabilities
102,260
84,983
101,115
83,329
Net assets
791,342
777,836
756,643
746,318
Total current liabilities
NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES
Provisions
12
Total non-current liabilities
EQUITY
Reserves
14
269,395
279,477
269,261
279,343
Retained surpluses
14
521,947
498,359
487,382
466,975
791,342
777,836
756,643
746,318
Total equity
This statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
Total equity at the end of the year
This statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
53
university of tasmania
university of tasmania
statement of changes in equity
for the year ended 31 december 2011
statement of financial position
as at 31 december 2011
52
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Notes
2011
$’000
Inflows
(Outflows)
Parent Entity
(University)
2010
$’000
Inflows
(Outflows)
2011
$’000
Inflows
(Outflows)
2010
$’000
Inflows
(Outflows)
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Australian Government grants
310,642
285,546
310,642
285,546
OS-HELP (net)
(181)
90
(181)
90
Superannuation supplementation
739
724
739
724
19,336
14,241
19,336
14,241
9,263
9,176
9,263
9,176
59,729
51,723
59,050
52,816
1,011
222
1,914
222
Tasmanian Government
HECS-HELP – student payments
Fees and charges
Dividends received
Interest received
Other revenue
Payments to suppliers and employees (inclusive of GST)
Net cash inflow (outflow) from operating activities
18(b)
Payments for property, plant and equipment
3,098
291
1,705
54,552
59,211
• the University of Tasmania Act 1992;
(438,764)
(423,784)
(432,813)
(418,763)
• Australian Accounting Standards;
26,461
9,846
22,793
4,968
27,202
55,832
27,202
55,832
649
1,425
649
1,428
(59,488)
(39,771)
(59,378)
(38,993)
(9,708)
(1,306)
(9,708)
(1,306)
Proceeds on disposal of investments
(31,590)
(52,610)
(77,466)
(46,947)
Dividends received
23,164
23,579
69,976
23,579
Interest received
16,338
9,219
16,338
9,860
Sundry loans advanced
6,165
1,656
6,498
1,503
Movement in bonds held
1,500
200
1,500
200
4
172
4
172
559
849
559
849
Net cash inflow (outflow) from investing activities
(25,205)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
(755)
(23,826)
–
Net increase/(decrease) in cash held
1,256
9,091
(1,033)
11,145
Cash at beginning of reporting period
77,569
68,478
70,322
59,177
78,825
77,569
69,289
70,322
18(a)
This statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
–
6,177
–
Cash at end of reporting period
This financial report is a general purpose financial
report that has been prepared on an accrual basis in
accordance with:
68,810
Payments for intangibles
Payments from subsidiaries
(a) Basis of preparation
552
Payments for investments
Movement in monies held on behalf of CRCs
The principal accounting policies adopted in the
preparation of the financial report are set out below.
These policies have been consistently applied to all the
years presented, unless otherwise stated. The financial
report includes separate financial statements for the
University of Tasmania (University) as an individual
entity and the consolidated entity consisting of the
University and its subsidiaries.
64,134
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment
1.SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT
ACCOUNTING POLICIES
–
•Interpretations adopted by the Australian
Accounting Standards Board; and
•The 2011 Financial Statement Guidelines for
Australian Higher Education Providers issued by
the Department of Education, Employment and
Workplace Relations (DEEWR).
Compliance with the Australian Accounting Standards
(AAS) may not result in compliance with International
Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), as the AAS
include requirements and options available to not-forprofit organisations that are inconsistent with IFRS.
The University is considered to be not-for-profit and
has adopted some accounting policies under AAS that
do not comply with IFRS.
Historical cost convention
The financial statements are prepared under the
historical cost convention, as modified by the
revaluation of financial assets and liabilities (including
derivative instruments) at fair value through profit
or loss, and revaluations of land, buildings, leasehold
improvements and works of art and cultural collections.
(b) Principles of consolidation
The consolidated financial statements incorporate
the assets and liabilities of all controlled entities of
the University (parent entity) as at 31 December 2011
and the results of all controlled entities for the year
then ended. The University and its controlled entities
together are referred to in this financial report as the
Group or consolidated entity.
A controlled entity is any entity controlled by the
University of Tasmania. Control exists where the
University has the capacity to control decision making
in relation to the financial and operating policies of
another entity so that the other entity operates with
the University to achieve University objectives. A list
of controlled entities is contained in Note 17 to the
financial statements.
The purchase method of accounting is used to
account for the acquisition of controlled entities
(refer to Note 1(f)).
The financial statements for the consolidated
entity include all controlled entities, with all intercompany balances and transactions eliminated
on consolidation.
(c) Revenue recognition
Australian Government operating grants received
under the Higher Education Funding Act 1988, and
revenues received from other government sources, are
recognised as revenue at the time of receipt.
A liability is recognised where unspent monies are
required to be refunded to the funding body.
Interest revenue is recognised on a proportional basis
taking into account the interest rates applicable to the
financial assets.
Dividend revenue is recognised when the right to
receive a dividend has been established.
Donations and bequests are recognised when the right
to receive the funds has been established.
Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised upon the
delivery of goods to customers.
Revenue from the rendering of a service is recognised
upon the delivery of the service to the customers.
All revenue is stated net of the amount of goods and
services tax (GST).
(d) Foreign currency translation
Functional and presentation currency
Items included in the financial statements are
measured using the currency of the primary economic
environment in which the entity operates (‘the
functional currency’). The consolidated financial
statements are presented in Australian dollars, which
is the University’s functional and presentation currency.
Transactions and balances
Transactions made using foreign currency are
converted into Australian currency at market exchange
rates applicable at the date of the transactions.
Amounts payable or receivable in foreign currencies
at balance date are converted into Australian currency
at market exchange rates at balance date. Currency
conversion gains and losses are included in the
operating result for the year.
55
university of tasmania
university of tasmania
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
statement of cash flows
for the year ended 31 december 2011
54
(e) Tax status
Income tax
The University entity does not provide for Australian
income tax as it is exempt from income tax in
accordance with the provisions of Division 50
of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997.
Fringe benefits tax
The University is liable to pay fringe benefits tax, and
this is included in the statement of comprehensive
income.
Goods and services tax (GST)
Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net
of the amount of GST, except where the amount of
GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian
Tax Office (ATO). In these circumstances the GST
is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the
asset or as part of the expense.
Receivables and payables are stated with the amount
of GST included.
The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable
to, the ATO is included as a current asset or liability in
the statement of financial position.
Cash flows are included in the statement of cash
flows on a gross basis. The GST components of cash
flows arising from investing and financing activities
which are recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO are
classified as operating cash flows.
(f) Acquisitions of assets
The purchase method of accounting is used to
account for all acquisitions of assets (including
business combinations) regardless of whether equity
instruments or other assets are acquired. Cost is
measured as the fair value of the assets given, shares
issued or liabilities incurred or assumed at the date
of exchange, plus costs directly attributable to the
acquisition.
(g) Impairment of assets
Assets that have an indefinite useful life are not
subject to amortisation or depreciation and are
tested annually for impairment. Assets that are
subject to amortisation or depreciation are reviewed
for impairment whenever events or changes in
circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may
not be recoverable. An impairment loss is recognised
for the amount by which the asset’s carrying amount
exceeds its recoverable amount. The recoverable
amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs
to sell, and value in use.
(h) Cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand,
deposits held at call with financial institutions, and
other short-term highly liquid investments with
maturities of three months or less that are readily
convertible to known amounts of cash and which are
subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value.
(i)Receivables
All receivables are recognised initially at fair value
and subsequently measured at amortised cost, less
provision for impairment. Receivables are typically due
for settlement no more than 30 days from the date of
recognition.
The collection of receivables is reviewed on an ongoing
basis. Debts known to be uncollectible are written off.
A provision for impaired receivables is established
where there is evidence the University will not be able
to collect all amounts due according to the original
terms of the receivable. The amount of any movement
in the provision is recognised in the statement of
comprehensive income, with the balance of the
provision recognised in the statement of financial
position.
(j)Inventories
Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or net
realisable value. Cost is assigned on a weighted
average basis. Stocks are valued on a first-in
first-out basis.
(k) Investments and other financial assets
The University’s investments are measured at either
fair value through profit or loss, where changes in fair
value are taken to the statement of comprehensive
income, or at cost.
The University currently classifies its financial
assets in the following two categories – investments
(comprising financial assets at fair value through
profit or loss, or financial assets at cost), derivative
financial instruments, and loans and receivables.
The classification depends on the purpose for which
the financial assets were acquired. Management
determines the classification of its investments at
initial recognition and re-evaluates this designation
at each reporting date.
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss
This category relates to those assets designated at
fair value through profit or loss on initial recognition.
The policy of management is to designate a financial
asset in this category if there exists the possibility it
will be sold in the short term or the asset is subject to
frequent changes in fair value.
These assets comprise:
•Investment and trust funds – the University’s
investments are managed as pooled funds by a
number of independent portfolio managers. Funds
are invested in cash deposits, Australian equities,
overseas equities, fixed interest securities and
property trusts under an approved investment policy.
The majority of specific-purpose endowments
received by the University to fund research
activities, scholarships and prizes are also managed
in this pooled investment fund.
•Investment properties – these are properties owned
by the University and held in order to earn income.
Income received and movements in fair value are
brought to account as revenue in the statement of
comprehensive income.
Investments are initially recognised at cost, and
subsequently carried at fair value.
(m)Property, plant and equipment
Land and buildings are shown at fair value based on
periodic valuations by external independent valuers,
less subsequent depreciation for buildings. Any
accumulated depreciation at the date of revaluation
is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the
asset and the net amount is restated to the revalued
amount of the asset. Other classes of property, plant
and equipment are stated at cost or fair value less
depreciation. The valuation methodology adopted for
asset classes is as follows:
Asset Class
Valuation
basis
Detail
Property (land,
buildings and
leasehold
improvements)
Fair Value
Freehold land,
buildings and
leasehold
improvements were
revalued on 31
December 2010 by
independent valuers
Messrs Jim Parmeter,
Bernard Smith and
Tim Fleming from
Herron Todd White.
Plant and
equipment
Cost
All plant and
equipment items
with a cost equal to
or exceeding $10,000
have been capitalised.
Library
Cost
Works of art
Fair Value
Financial assets at cost
Investment in subsidiaries, and unlisted shares are
carried at cost, and reviewed annually for impairment.
Derivative financial instruments
The University enters into derivative financial
instruments, namely forward exchange contracts,
from time to time to hedge its foreign currency
risk exposures. Derivatives are recognised initially
at fair value and attributable transaction costs
are recognised in the profit or loss when incurred.
Subsequent to initial recognition, forward exchange
contracts are measured at fair value.
Hedge accounting is not applied, and changes in fair
value are recognised in the profit or loss as part of
foreign currency gains and losses.
The fair value of forward exchange contracts is based
on measuring the difference between the contractual
forward price and the current forward price.
Loans and receivables
Loans and receivables are non-derivative financial
assets with fixed or determinable payments that
are not quoted in an active market. They arise when
the University provides money, goods or services
directly to a debtor with no intention of selling the
receivable. They are included in current assets,
except for those with maturities greater than 12
months after the statement of financial position date
which are classified as non-current assets. Loans
and receivables are included in receivables in the
statement of financial position.
The University assesses at each balance date
whether there is objective evidence that a financial
asset is impaired.
(l) Capital works in progress
Capital works in progress represents the cost
associated with the construction of buildings and
other projects of a capital nature, which have not
reached their date of practical completion.
A valuation of the
works of art was
undertaken in 2010
by independent valuer
Ms Rosanna Cameron.
Revaluations are made with sufficient regularity to
ensure that the carrying amount of land, buildings, and
works of art does not differ materially from their fair
value at reporting date.
The depreciable amount of all property, plant and
equipment including buildings, but excluding freehold
land and works of art and cultural collections, is
depreciated on a straight-line basis over their useful
lives to the Group commencing from the time the asset
is held ready for use.
Depreciation rates applicable during 2011 are as follows:
Asset Class
Buildings and leasehold improvements
2.5%
Plant and equipment
10% –
33%
Library collections
5%
57
university of tasmania
university of tasmania
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
56
Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the
shorter of either the unexpired period of the lease or
the estimated useful lives of the improvements.
Useful lives of assets are reviewed on an annual basis.
Where land, buildings, leasehold improvements or
works of art and cultural collections are subject to
revaluation, any increment or decrement is taken to
the asset revaluation reserve.
Gains and losses on disposals are determined by
comparing proceeds with carrying amount. These are
included in the statement of comprehensive income.
(n) Intangible assets
Intangible assets that are acquired by the Group are
stated at cost less accumulated amortisation and
impairment losses.
Subsequent expenditure on capitalised intangible
assets is capitalised only when it increases the future
economic benefits embodied in the specific asset to
which it relates. All other expenditure is expensed
as incurred.
Where intangible assets have a definite useful
life, amortisation is charged to the statement of
comprehensive income on a straight-line basis over
the estimated useful life. Amortisation commences
from the date they are available for use. The estimated
useful lives are as follows:
Right of use
(Australian Academic Research
Network)
15 years
Core Business Systems Software
(for example, the Financial and Student
Management Systems)
10 years
Other minor software applications
3 years
(o)Payables
These amounts represent liabilities for goods and
services provided to the Group prior to the end of the
year which are unpaid. The amounts are unsecured,
are recognised at cost and are normally settled within
30 days.
(p) Employee benefits and on costs
Wages and salaries, and sick leave
Liabilities for wages and salaries are recognised as
payables in respect of employees’ services up to the
reporting date. Sick leave entitlements provided to
the employees of the Group are non-vesting and are
based on a cumulative sick leave system. Liabilities for
non-accumulating sick leave are recognised when the
leave is taken.
Annual leave
Liabilities for annual leave for all employees are
recognised and measured as the amount unpaid at
the reporting date at current pay rates in respect of
employees’ service up to that date. Related on-costs
are included in the provision.
Long service leave
The liability for long service leave for all employees
is measured as the present value of the estimated
future payments to be made in respect of services
provided up to the reporting date. Consideration is
given to future increases in salary levels, experience of
employee departures and periods of service. Related
on-costs are included in the provision. Expected future
payments are discounted using market yields on
government bonds at the reporting date.
Superannuation
Employee contributory superannuation funds exist
to provide benefits for the Group’s employees and
their dependants on retirement, disability or death of
the employee. The contributions made to these funds
by the University are recorded as an expense in the
statement of comprehensive income. Further details
are provided in Note 21.
(q)Leases
Leases of property, plant and equipment where
the Group, as lessee, has substantially all the risks
and rewards of ownership are classified as finance
leases. Finance leases are capitalised at the lease’s
inception at the lower of the fair value of the leased
property and the present value of the minimum lease
payments. Lease payments for operating leases, where
substantially all the risks and benefits remain with the
lessor, are charged to the statement of comprehensive
income on a straight-line basis over the period of
the lease.
(r) Joint venture and collaborative agreements
The University participates in six cooperative research
centres. The University interests are not considered
material, and expenditure incurred by the University
as a result of its participation is expensed.
(s) Rounding of amounts
Amounts in the financial statements are rounded to
the nearest $1,000.
(t) Judgements and assumptions
In the application of the accounting policies
disclosed in this note, management is required to
make judgements, estimates and assumptions about
carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not
readily apparent from other sources. The estimates
and associated assumptions are based on historical
experience and various other factors that are believed
to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results
of which form the basis of making the judgements.
Actual results may differ from these estimates. The
estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on
an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates
are recognised in the period in which the estimate is
revised if the revision affects only that period, or in the
period of the revision and future periods if the revision
affects both current and future periods.
There were no significant judgements, estimates or
assumptions that have a material impact on the 2011
reported result.
(u)Changes in accounting policies and impacts
of new accounting standards
In 2011 the University changed the accounting
treatment for the valuation and depreciation of
buildings. Previously the gross method was used
whereby buildings were carried at cost or fair
value less any accumulated depreciation and were
depreciated at a rate of 1.33%. The net approach is now
used whereby any accumulated depreciation at the
date of the revaluation of the buildings is eliminated
against the gross carrying amount and the net amount
is restated to the revalued amount of the buildings and
depreciated at a rate of 2.5%.
There were no other material changes in accounting
policies for the year ended 31 December 2011.
The following standards, amendments to standards
and interpretations were available for early adoption
but have not been applied in preparing this financial
report.
AASB 9 Financial Instruments includes requirements
for the classification and measurement of financial
assets and will become mandatory for the Group at
31 December 2013. Due to the review and change in
accounting policy of the University’s investments
during 2010, AASB 9 is not expected to have a
significant impact on the Group’s financial statements.
AASB 1053 Application of Tiers of Australian
Accounting Standards establishes two tiers of
reporting requirements. Tier 2 comprises the
recognition, measurement and presentation of the
Australian Accounting Standards (Tier 1) and reduced
disclosures corresponding to those requirements.
AASB 1053 will become mandatory for the Group’s
31 December 2013 financial statements and is not
expected to have a significant impact on the Group’s
financial statements.
59
university of tasmania
university of tasmania
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
58
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Notes
2011
$’000
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Parent Entity
(University)
2010
$’000
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
2.1 Australian Government financial assistance
including HECS-HELP and other Australian
Government loan programmes
(e)
19.6
18,000
38,000
18,000
38,000
19.6
–
10,534
–
10,534
18,000
48,534
18,000
48,534
19.1
133,010
121,408
133,010
121,408
19.1
989
985
989
985
Partnership and Participation Programme
19.1
3,314
1,842
3,314
1,842
Disability Support Programme
19.1
182
144
182
144
National Institutes
19.1
4,919
4,842
4,919
4,842
Total Discovery
Capital Development Pool
19.1
2,718
4,098
2,718
4,098
(ii) Linkages
Diversity and Structural Adjustment Fund
19.1
3,298
1,243
3,298
1,243
Infrastructure
Transitional Cost Programme
19.1
187
336
187
336
International
148,617
134,898
148,617
134,898
Projects
50,483
48,823
50,483
48,823
(f)
Australian Research Council
(i) Discovery
Project
19.7
4,397
3,751
4,397
3,751
Fellowships
19.7
2,888
1,164
2,888
1,164
7,285
4,915
7,285
4,915
19.7
515
600
515
600
19.7
–
(9)
–
(9)
19.7
2,564
2,177
2,564
2,177
3,079
2,768
3,079
2,768
2,856
3,097
2,856
3,097
2,856
3,097
2,856
3,097
Total Linkages
Higher Education Loan Programmes
HECS-HELP
19.2
FEE-HELP
19.2
997
1,269
997
1,269
51,480
50,092
51,480
50,092
(iii) Centres
Centres
7,089
6,766
7,089
6,766
22,811
16,922
22,811
16,922
1,088
Health and Hospitals Fund
17,500
11,200
17,500
11,200
Australian Government (non-research)
18,920
23,231
18,920
23,231
19.3
4,539
3,678
4,539
3,678
International Postgraduate Research Scholarships
19.3
461
417
461
417
Commonwealth Education Costs Scholarships
19.3
1,212
1,088
1,212
Commonwealth Accommodation Scholarships
19.3
3,188
2,609
3,188
2,609
Indigenous Access Scholarships
19.3
35
85
35
85
7,877
9,435
Other Australian Government financial assistance
Australian Government research (non-ARC)
Australian Postgraduate Awards
9,435
19.7
Total Centres
(g)
Scholarships
National Health and Medical Research Council
Other Australian Government income
214
213
214
213
66,534
58,332
66,534
58,332
337,844
341,378
337,844
341,378
286,364
291,286
286,364
291,286
50,483
48,823
50,483
48,823
997
1,269
997
1,269
337,844
341,378
337,844
341,378
148,617
134,898
148,617
134,898
51,480
50,092
51,480
50,092
9,435
7,877
9,435
7,877
DIISR research
30,558
30,865
30,558
30,865
Other capital funding
18,000
48,534
18,000
48,534
ARC grants – Discovery
7,285
4,915
7,285
4,915
ARC grants – Linkages
3,079
2,768
3,079
2,768
ARC grants – Centres
2,856
3,097
2,856
3,097
Total other Australian Government financial assistance
7,877
Total Australian Government financial assistance
DIISR Research
Joint Research Engagement Programme
19.4
8,091
8,383
8,091
8,383
Sustainable Research Excellence in Universities
19.4
2,664
2,115
2,664
2,115
Research Training Scheme
19.4
14,249
14,153
14,249
14,153
Research Infrastructure Block Grants
19.4
5,554
6,154
5,554
6,154
Implementation Assistance Programme
19.4
–
55
–
55
Commercialisation Training Scheme
19.4
Total DIISR research grants
2010
$’000
Teaching and Learning Capital Fund
Indigenous Support Programme
Total scholarships
(d)
2011
$’000
Education Investment Fund
Commonwealth Grant Scheme
Total Higher Education Loan Programmes
(c)
2010
$’000
Other capital funding
Total other capital funding
Commonwealth Grant Scheme and other grants
Total Commonwealth Grant Scheme and other grants
(b)
2011
$’000
2. REVENUE FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS (continued)
2. REVENUE FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS
(a)
Notes
Parent Entity
(University)
–
5
–
5
30,558
30,865
30,558
30,865
Reconciliation
Australian Government grants
HECS-HELP payments
FEE-HELP payments
Total Australian Government financial assistance
(h)
Australian Government grants received – cash basis
CGS and other DEEWR grants
Higher Education Loan Programmes
Scholarships
Other Australian Government grants
Total Australian Government grants received – cash basis
66,534
58,332
66,534
58,332
337,844
341,378
337,844
341,378
OS-HELP (Net)
19.8
(181)
90
(181)
90
Superannuation supplementation
19.9
739
724
739
724
338,402
342,192
338,402
342,192
Total Australian Government funding received – cash basis
61
university of tasmania
university of tasmania
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
60
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Notes
2011
$’000
Parent Entity
(University)
2010
$’000
2011
$’000
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
2010
$’000
2. REVENUE FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS (continued)
Notes
4,736
3,540
4,736
3,540
Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture
5,561
5,722
5,561
5,722
Salaries
962
1,057
962
1,057
Contribution to superannuation and pension schemes:
Domain House Heritage Maintenance and Management Plan*
3,500
–
3,500
–
Other State Government income
2,819
2,627
2,819
2,627
17,578
12,946
17,578
12,946
110,691
Emerging costs
Funded
Provisions for future emerging costs
1,270
723
1,270
16,722
14,825
275
390
271
2,978
3,698
2,978
Annual leave
2,429
4,923
2,429
4,923
3,486
3,309
3,486
3,309
145,594
135,856
144,882
135,208
92,525
88,614
91,321
87,283
471
786
471
786
13,057
11,903
12,905
11,749
Non-academic
40,914
1,359
1,267
1,359
1,267
46,374
42,181
46,374
42,181
Accommodation charges
8,632
7,938
8,632
8,348
Other
5,126
4,049
5,126
4,049
Total other fees and charges
13,758
11,987
13,758
12,397
Workers' compensation
Total fees and charges
60,132
54,168
60,132
54,578
Long service leave expense
Annual leave
1,985
Salaries
Contribution to superannuation and pension schemes:
Emerging costs
Funded
7,331
4,820
7,403
3,274
Provisions for future emerging costs
Other expenses
Dividends
18,870
9,441
19,773
10,081
Realised gains/(losses)
(10,566)
(10,151)
(10,566)
(10,151)
Total employee benefits and on-costs
Unrealised gains/(losses)
(10,300)
10,225
(10,300)
10,225
Deferred superannuation expense
5,335
14,335
6,310
13,429
Total employee related expenses, including deferred
government employee benefits for superannuation
2.5 Contract research
Industry and other research
Research consultancies
Research donations and bequests
Industry support to Linkage projects
Industry support to other Commonwealth research
Industry support to research centres
Total contract research
(314)
Payroll tax
Total non-academic
Total investment revenue and income
(381)
7,060
393
45,015
Interest
(383)
7,733
3,698
40,914
2.4 Investment revenue and income
(381)
7,084
Long service leave expense
Other expenses
Other fees and charges
100,953
14,893
45,015
Total course fees and charges
110,084
723
(383)
Total academic
Course fees and charges
101,505
16,798
7,759
Workers' compensation
2.3 Fees and charges
Fee-paying domestic postgraduate students
2010
$’000
Academic
Payroll tax
* During the year there were a number of property transactions between the
University and the State Government.This included the purchase of Domain
House by the University – the State Government provided $3.5m towards
maintenance and heritage works.
Fee-paying overseas students
2011
$’000
3.1 Employee related expenses
Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies
TotalTasmanian Government financial assistance
2010
$’000
3. EXPENSES FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS
2.2 Tasmanian Government financial assistance
Menzies Research Institute
2011
$’000
Parent Entity
(University)
21(b)
(314)
6,309
5,986
299
2,849
(314)
(314)
6,258
5,934
361
292
353
994
2,791
971
(243)
1,860
(368)
946
1,140
946
1,133
118,127
109,227
116,530
107,527
263,721
245,083
261,412
242,735
(356)
90
(356)
90
263,365
245,173
261,056
242,825
3.2 Depreciation and amortisation
14,461
16,267
14,461
16,246
832
1,439
832
1,439
4,249
–
2,867
711
Buildings
9
8,347
8,134
8,347
8,134
604
959
604
959
Plant and equipment
9
7,403
7,322
7,231
7,197
4,185
7,842
4,185
7,842
Library collections
9
2,999
3,011
2,999
3,011
9
795
943
795
943
342
559
342
559
24,673
27,066
23,291
27,756
Depreciation
Amortisation
Leasehold improvements
Intangibles
2.6 Other revenue and income
Total depreciation and amortisation
10
712
418
712
418
20,256
19,828
20,084
19,703
Donations and bequests
6,276
6,815
3,966
2,766
Scholarships and prizes
407
397
407
397
Contract revenue (other than consultancy and contract research)
7,335
10,594
4,424
6,842
Repairs and maintenance
16,393
14,431
16,362
14,417
Sale of goods
2,812
2,242
2,812
2,242
Total repairs and maintenance
16,393
14,431
16,362
14,417
Miscellaneous income
Total other revenue and income
7,463
7,289
4,437
4,902
24,293
27,337
16,046
17,149
3.3 Repairs and maintenance
63
university of tasmania
university of tasmania
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
62
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Notes
2011
$’000
Parent Entity
(University)
2010
$’000
2011
$’000
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
2010
$’000
3. EXPENSES FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS (continued)
73
124
73
124
Total impairment of assets
73
124
73
124
20,671
21,467
20,402
20,372
Non-capitalised equipment
9,979
7,173
9,918
7,153
Public relations and marketing
7,443
7,680
7,235
7,428
Telecommunications
4,944
2,071
4,907
2,053
Travel and staff development
15,878
14,987
15,546
14,639
Consumables
10,354
7,949
10,092
7,644
(16)
662
(16)
4,367
4,284
4,256
4,184
Information technology operating costs
4,032
5,436
4,004
5,436
156
15
156
15
Consultancy and advisory services
15,401
13,508
14,417
12,468
Research sub-contractors
27,378
29,341
27,378
29,341
Conjoints, secondments and employment agency costs
3,365
4,135
3,365
4,135
Books, serials and online subscriptions
3,701
3,031
3,701
3,021
Electricity and heating fuel
5,982
5,533
5,924
5,479
Cleaning
5,035
4,184
4,967
4,127
Security
2,219
2,102
2,219
2,102
Property and building operating costs
1,320
1,241
1,320
1,241
Council and director fees
454
353
453
353
Audit fees – external
223
169
212
151
Audit fees – internal
394
378
394
378
Operating lease payments
2,662
1,934
2,662
1,934
Insurance
1,895
1,603
1,860
1,567
New appointment expenses
1,306
1,443
1,304
1,440
–
4,040
–
4,040
5,944
3,206
5,450
2,976
155,087
147,925
152,126
144,336
Other
Total other expenses
(a)
2010
$’000
10,278
6,567
3,997
2,030
Short-term deposits and bills
68,547
71,002
65,292
68,292
78,825
77,569
69,289
70,322
Balances as above
78,825
77,569
69,289
70,322
Balance per cash flow statements
78,825
77,569
69,289
70,322
14,134
10,609
13,185
9,143
Reconciliation to cash at the end of the year
The above figures are reconciled to cash at the end of the year
as shown in the cash flow statements as follows:
(b)
Cash at bank and on hand
Cash on hand is non-interest bearing.
659
Office administration
One-off payment for AARNET
2011
$’000
Cash at bank and on hand
Total cash and cash equivalents
3.5 Other expenses
Loss/(gain) from foreign exchange transactions
2010
$’000
Current
Debtors
Loss/(gain) on sale of property, plant and equipment
2011
$’000
4. CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
3.4 Impairment of assets
Scholarships and prizes
Notes
Parent Entity
(University)
Cash at bank accounts are bearing floating interest rates
between 3.75% and 4.60% (2010: 3.75% and 4.75%).
(c)
Short-term deposits and bills
The deposits are bearing floating interest rates between
4.75% and 6.20% (2010: 4.50% and 5.87%).
These deposits have an average maturity of 90 days.
5. RECEIVABLES
Current
Debtors
Less provision for impaired receivables
Deferred government contribution for superannuation
(176)
21(b)
(178)
(176)
(178)
13,958
10,431
13,009
8,965
742
693
742
693
Accrued revenue
2,361
475
2,354
442
GST
1,820
1,235
1,820
1,280
18,881
12,834
17,925
11,380
8,221
8,626
8,221
8,626
300
1,800
300
1,800
8,521
10,426
8,521
10,426
27,402
23,260
26,446
21,806
Current
967
737
967
737
Total inventories
967
737
967
737
Non-current
Deferred government contribution for superannuation
Sundry loans and advances
Total receivables
21(b)
6. INVENTORIES
65
university of tasmania
university of tasmania
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
64
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Notes
2011
$’000
Parent Entity
(University)
2010
$’000
2011
$’000
(a) Economic Entity (Consolidated) – $’000
2010
$’000
7. INVESTMENTS
Current
Notes
Land
Buildings
Capital
WIP
Leasehold
Improve- Plant &
ments Equipment
Library
Works
of Art
Total
9. PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
At 1 January 2010
At fair value through profit and loss:
At cost
Investment funds
–
(63)
–
(63)
(63)
At valuation
(63)
Accumulated depreciation
Non-current
Net book amount
At fair value through profit and loss:
Investment funds *
Investment properties
760
760
760
760
198,107
210,610
170,420
183,859
–
–
–
–
1
1
1
1
–
–
3,534
3,534
198,868
211,371
174,715
188,154
198,868
211,308
174,715
188,091
At cost:
Shares – unlisted
17
Total investments
* Investment funds are held predominantly in a managed
portfolio and cash management accounts.
50,492
54,390
42,136
46,556
Overseas equities
39,150
45,601
32,671
39,033
Direct property
17,219
16,512
14,370
14,134
Listed property
Opening net book amount
58,716
–
208,194
–
–
6,799
686,204
–
(316,335)
–
(40,144)
(41,905)
(20,924)
–
(419,308)
56,124
238,632
76,564
28,170
31,009
37,792
6,799
475,090
238,632
76,564
28,170
31,009
37,792
6,799
475,090
–
82
25,882
–
7,006
1,657
3
34,630
Add: transfers from capital works in progress
–
60,325
(70,296)
2,597
7,374
–
–
–
Add: transfers from investment properties
1,155
903
–
–
Add: revaluation increment/(decrement)
4,673
33,826
–
692
–
–
–
–
–
2,058
757
39,948
Less: disposals
(1,190)
(291)
–
–
(527)
(133)
–
(2,141)
Balance 31 December
60,762
333,477
32,150
31,459
44,862
39,316
7,559
549,585
Less: depreciation charge
3.2
At cost
At valuation
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
6,874
9,346
5,736
8,000
21,319
25,941
17,791
22,205
Overseas fixed interest
32,246
21,821
26,909
18,678
Opening net book amount
Cash and cash equivalents
30,807
24,880
30,807
24,880
Add: additions
–
12,119
–
10,373
Alternative strategies
Total investment funds
198,107
210,610
170,420
183,859
–
(8,134)
–
(943)
(7,323)
(3,011)
–
(19,411)
60,762
325,343
32,150
30,516
37,539
36,305
7,559
530,174
–
–
32,150
–
83,941
60,240
–
176,331
60,762
325,343
–
30,516
–
–
7,559
424,180
Opening balance
9
–
2,058
–
2,058
–
(2,058)
–
(2,058)
–
–
–
–
8. OTHER NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS
–
–
–
–
(46,402)
(23,935)
–
(70,337)
60,762
325,343
32,150
30,516
37,539
36,305
7,559
530,174
60,762
325,343
32,150
30,516
37,539
36,305
7,559
530,174
7,983
2,996
33,342
–
10,355
1,225
43
55,944
Year ended 31 December 2011
Add: transfers from capital works in progress
Add: revaluation increment/(decrement)
14
Less: disposals
Reconciliation – investment properties
Less: impairments
Balance 31 December
Less: depreciation charge
Closing net book amount
3.2
–
17,950
(18,967)
462
555
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
(468)
(136)
–
(604)
–
–
–
(7,280)
–
–
–
(7,280)
68,745
346,289
46,525
23,698
47,981
37,394
7,602
578,234
–
(8,346)
–
(795)
(7,403)
(2,999)
–
(19,543)
68,745
337,943
46,525
22,903
40,578
34,395
7,602
558,691
–
–
46,525
–
90,762
61,329
–
198,616
68,745
346,289
–
30,978
–
–
7,602
453,614
At 31 December 2011
Current
Total other non-financial assets
72,914
68,314
56,124
Australian fixed interest
Prepayments
–
–
At 31 December 2010
Australian equities
Closing balance
76,564
Add: additions
Closing net book amount
The funds comprise:
Less: transfers to land and buildings
–
554,967
Year ended 31 December 2010
Trust investments
Investment in subsidiaries (AMC Search Limited)
–
56,124
At cost
9,947
10,577
9,928
10,565
At valuation
9,947
10,577
9,928
10,565
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
–
(8,346)
–
(8,075)
(50,184)
(26,934)
–
(93,539)
68,745
337,943
46,525
22,903
40,578
34,395
7,602
558,691
67
university of tasmania
university of tasmania
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
66
(b) Parent Entity (University) – $’000
Notes
Land
Buildings
Capital
WIP
Leasehold
Improve- Plant &
ments Equipment
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Library
Works
of Art
At valuation
Accumulated depreciation
–
–
76,564
–
71,998
58,716
–
207,278
56,124
554,967
–
68,314
–
–
6,799
686,204
(316,335)
–
(40,144)
(41,578)
(20,924)
–
Net book amount
–
(418,981)
56,124
238,632
76,564
28,170
30,420
37,792
6,799
474,501
56,124
238,632
76,564
28,170
30,420
37,792
6,799
474,501
Add: additions
–
82
25,882
–
6,228
1,657
3
33,852
Add: transfers from capital works in progress
–
60,325
2,597
7,374
–
–
–
Year ended 31 December 2010
Opening net book amount
(70,296)
7
1,155
903
–
–
–
–
–
2,058
14
4,673
33,826
–
692
–
–
757
39,948
Less: disposals
(1,190)
Balance 31 December
60,762
Less: depreciation charge
3.2
Closing net book amount
–
60,762
(291)
333,477
(8,134)
325,343
–
–
32,150
31,459
–
32,150
(943)
30,516
(527)
(133)
43,495
39,316
(7,198)
(3,011)
36,297
36,305
–
7,559
–
7,559
(2,141)
548,218
At cost
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
Opening net book amount
Add: additions
Add: transfers from capital works in progress
–
–
32,150
–
82,247
58,950
–
173,347
60,762
325,343
–
30,516
–
–
7,559
424,180
–
–
–
–
60,762
325,343
32,150
30,516
(45,950)
(22,645)
36,297
36,305
–
7,559
(68,595)
528,932
60,762
325,343
32,150
30,516
36,297
36,305
7,559
528,932
7,983
2,996
33,342
–
10,264
1,225
43
55,853
(18,967)
17,950
462
555
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Less: disposals
–
–
–
–
Less: impairments
–
–
–
68,745
346,289
46,525
14
Balance 31 December
3.2
–
68,745
(8,346)
337,943
–
46,525
(7,280)
23,698
(795)
22,903
(487)
(136)
–
(623)
(7,280)
–
–
–
46,629
37,394
7,602
(7,231)
(2,999)
39,398
34,395
–
7,602
576,882
(19,371)
557,511
Accumulated depreciation
3,110
4,297
1,724
Additions to intangibles work in progress
6,123
4,778
6,123
4,778
Amortisation charge
(712)
Closing net book amount
(418)
(712)
(418)
18,902
9,194
18,902
9,194
9,531
5,278
9,531
5,278
At 31 December 2011
Cost
Accumulated amortisation and impairment
(1,530)
Intangibles work in progress
10,901
4,778
(862)
10,901
(1,530)
4,778
(862)
Net book amount
18,902
9,194
18,902
9,194
20,072
13,037
19,720
12,022
55
236
55
236
20,127
13,273
19,775
12,258
4,947
10,642
14,775
10,486
19,471
17,194
19,346
17,065
2,005
1,999
2,005
1,999
36,423
29,835
36,126
29,550
10,167
8,783
10,143
8,765
17,522
18,582
17,522
18,582
27,689
27,365
27,665
27,347
64,112
57,200
63,791
56,897
942
701
929
690
2,041
1,849
2,030
1,838
11,126
8,178
10,654
7,842
11. PAYABLES
Current
12.PROVISIONS
Current
Annual leave
Long service leave
Defined benefit obligation
21(b)
Non-current
Long service leave
Defined benefit obligation
21(b)
Total provisions
(1) Annual leave liabilities above include the following non-employee on-costs
(2) Long service leave liabilities above include the following non-employee on-costs
13.OTHER LIABILITIES
At 31 December 2010
Net book amount
9,194
1,724
OS-HELP liability to Australian Government
–
At cost
3,110
4,297
Creditors and accruals
–
At valuation
9,194
Additions
528,932
Year ended 31 December 2011
Closing net book amount
Opening net book amount
Total payables
At valuation
Less: depreciation charge
2010
$’000
(19,286)
At 31 December 2010
Add: revaluation increment/(decrement)
2011
$’000
Year ended 31 December 2010
At cost
Add: transfers from investment properties
2010
$’000
Notes
10.I NTANGIBLE ASSETS
At 1 January 2010
Add: revaluation increment/(decrement)
2011
$’000
Total
9. PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
(continued)
Parent Entity
(University)
–
–
46,525
–
89,131
58,239
–
193,895
68,745
346,289
–
30,978
–
–
7,602
453,614
Revenue in advance
(89,998)
Bonds and deposits held
557,511
Monies held on behalf of cooperative research centres (CRCs)
–
68,745
(8,346)
337,943
–
46,525
(8,075)
(49,733)
(23,844)
22,903
39,398
34,395
–
7,602
(c)Valuations of land, buildings and leasehold improvements
An independent valuation of the University’s land, buildings and leasehold improvements was performed by Messrs Jim Parmeter, Bernard Smith
and Tim Fleming of Herron Todd White during 2010. The valuation was performed to determine fair value in accordance with AASB 116 Property,
Plant and Equipment.
The fair value of campus properties was determined by employing the depreciated replacement cost approach.
Non-campus properties have been valued using the Active and Liquid market approach.
An independent valuation of the University’s works of art was performed by Ms Rosanna Cameron during 2010.
Works of art were valued by comparing selling prices of present pieces by the same artist.
On 9 December 2011, the University signed a deed agreeing to surrender the lease of the Clinical School Building to the Minister administering
the Crown Lands Act 1976 (Tas) with no compensation payable by the Crown. The leasehold improvement impairment was taken to the Asset
Revaluation Reserve. Also included above is the addition of Domain House land and buildings (fair value $1m) and the addition of land at Princes
Wharf 2 (fair value $4.5m).
Current
Total other liabilities
655
651
655
651
6,240
5,681
6,240
5,681
18,021
14,510
17,549
14,174
69
university of tasmania
university of tasmania
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
68
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Notes
2011
$’000
Parent Entity
(University)
2010
$’000
2011
$’000
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
14.EQUITY
Contracted but not provided for and payable not later than one year
Balance at end of previous year
279,477
–
239,529
4,673
279,343
–
239,395
Add: revaluation increment (decrement) on land
9
Add: revaluation increment (decrement) on buildings
9
(2,802)
33,826
(2,802)
33,826
Add: revaluation increment (decrement) on leasehold improvements
9
(7,280)
692
(7,280)
692
Add: revaluation increment (decrement) on works of art
9
4,673
–
757
–
757
269,395
279,477
269,261
279,343
Restricted funds
The statement of comprehensice income combines a number of
funds which, under granting conditions, cannot be utilised for
general purpose expenditure.
Balance at end of previous year as previously reported
99,870
102,171
67,782
73,493
Reclassifications*
17,560
14,822
18,710
15,972
117,430
116,993
86,492
89,465
5,602
437
2,743
(2,973)
123,032
117,430
89,235
86,492
Result
498,359
439,346
466,975
411,878
23,588
59,013
20,407
55,097
521,947
498,359
487,382
466,975
901
1,253
901
1,253
Later than one year but not later than five years
2,827
3,120
2,827
3,120
Later than five years
4,286
4,721
4,286
4,721
8,014
9,094
8,014
9,094
Capital expenditure commitments includes $49.4m of contracts for Menzies Stage 2,
$4.2m for Nursing and Midwifery at the Domain and $2.8m for Creative Arts.
Lease commitments
Operating leases
Commitments in relation to property and equipment leases
contracted for at the reporting date but not recognised as
liabilities, payable:
16.CONTINGENT LIABILITIES
The consolidated entity had no contingent liabilities at 31 December 2011.
Ownership Interest
17. SUBSIDIARIES
2011
%
2010
%
100
100
100
100
–
–
The University Foundation is an incorporated association that raises money
to endow scholarships, support research and build resources, while developing
links between the University, industry and the community.
AMC Search Limited
AMC Search is a company limited by guarantee, which provides maritime training
and consulting services.
The following reconciliation highlights some key components
of the University result.
Movements in contracts excluding interest and capital
6,885
University of Tasmania Foundation Inc.
Key components of the result
Result from general operations
6,885
58,644
The University is the parent entity or ultimate parent entity of the following entities
which are all incorporated in Australia.
Retained surplus
Total retained surplus
58,644
6,885
Consolidated Entities
* During the year, the University has undertaken significant
changes to internal budgeting and reporting structures. As a
result, a number of funding classifications have changed resulting
in additional funds classified as restricted.
Balance at end of previous year
6,885
58,644
Total lease commitments
Other restricted funds – specific research grants, consultancies
and other contract funds.
Restricted funds balance (included in retained surplus)
2010
$’000
58,644
Total capital expenditure commitments
Within one year
Trust funds – donations for endowments and specified purposes
such as prizes and scholarships.
Current year movements
2011
$’000
Capital expenditure commitments
Asset Revaluation Reserve
Revised opening balances
2010
$’000
15.COMMITMENTS FOR EXPENDITURE
Reserves
Balance at end of year
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
Parent Entity
(University)
(5,518)
(814)
2,841
(5,711)
Investment income (interest and dividends)
27,176
13,356
Capital income
27,202
55,832
2010 and estimated 2012 CGS and HECS adjustments
(4,231)
(6,372)
Realised gains/(losses) on investments
(10,566)
(10,151)
Unrealised gains/(losses) on investments
(10,300)
10,225
2010 leave provision adjustments
(2,542)
(4,923)
Result as per statement of comprehensive income
20,407
55,097
UTASAT Pty Ltd
UTASAT Pty Ltd is a trustee company acting as trustee for UTAS Asset Trust,
a fixed trust that distributes all net income derived from the commercialisation
of the University's intellectual property to the University as sole beneficiary.
The University consolidates UTASAT Pty Ltd as it owns more than half of the
voting power of the company and therefore satisfies the definition of control
in AASB 127 Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements.
71
university of tasmania
university of tasmania
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
70
(Profit)/loss on sale of property, plant and equipment
(Increase)/decrease in receivables
(Decrease)/increase in provision for impaired receivables
(Increase)/decrease in inventories
(Increase)/decrease in accrued revenue
(Increase)/decrease in prepayments
(Decrease)/increase in payables
6,854
155
7,517
(Decrease)/increase in employee entitlements
6,912
6,434
6,894
(Decrease)/increase in revenue in advance
2,948
Net cash provided or used by operating activities
26,461
9,846
22,793
4,968
8,000
7,000
8,000
7,000
Total facility
Utilised at reporting date
Not utilised at reporting date
(16)
(230)
(2)
(1,886)
630
Change in assets and liabilities
Movement in realised/unrealised (gains)/losses on investments
20,866
662
Dividends and Interest classified as part of investing activities
(22,503)
(10,875)
(22,836)
(11,363)
(3,754)
(1,560)
(4,226)
(773)
(74)
91
(7,327)
(375)
20,866
(16)
(155)
(230)
(2)
(139)
(1,912)
2,812
659
(74)
(159)
91
637
(7,331)
(276)
(710)
6,379
(443)
Financing arrangements
The consolidated and parent entities have access to the following
lines of credit:
Mastercard facility
–
–
–
–
8,000
7,000
8,000
7,000
–
(50,483)
Less expenses including accrued expenses
–
50,483
–
50,483
50,483
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
–
–
(48,823)
48,823
–
48,823
–
48,823
–
(4,842)
4,842
–
4,842
–
4,842
HECS-HELP
–
Funds available for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Revenue for the period
Net accrual adjustments
Financial assistance received in cash during reporting period
19.2 Higher Education Loan Programmes
(excluding OS-HELP)
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
4,919
(4,919)
Less expenses including accrued expenses
–
4,919
–
4,919
Funds available for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Revenue for the period
Net accrual adjustments
Financial assistance received in cash during reporting period
121,408
(121,408)
777
985
(212)
(1,197)
–
(997)
997
–
997
–
997
–
(1,269)
1,269
–
1,269
–
1,269
409
(3,689)
4,098
–
4,098
–
4,098
FEE-HELP
3,085
(42)
3,127
409
2,718
–
2,718
Capital
Development
Pool
(93)
(870)
$’000
–
(51,480)
51,480
–
51,480
–
51,480
50,092
–
50,092
–
50,092
3,923
(3,032)
6,955
5,712
1,243
–
1,243
–
(50,092)
Total
1,724
(5,497)
7,221
3,923
3,298
–
3,298
–
(1,842)
1,842
–
1,842
–
1,842
Diversity
and Structural
Adjustment
–
(3,314)
3,314
–
3,314
–
3,314
Partnership and
Participation
Programme
$’000
$’000
(8)
(152)
144
–
144
–
144
–
(755)
755
755
–
–
–
43
(36)
79
79
–
–
–
(187)
187
–
187
–
187
–
(336)
336
–
336
–
336
Transitional Cost
Programme
–
(43)
43
43
–
–
–
–
$’000
Workplace
Productivity
Programme
$’000
2010
$’000
2010
4,720
(148,085)
152,805
4,188
148,617
–
148,617
33
(72)
105
105
–
–
–
4,188
(137,361)
141,549
6,651
134,898
–
134,898
Total
6
(27)
33
33
–
–
–
Learning
&Teaching
Performance Fund
$’000
2011
university of tasmania
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Improving
the Practical
Component of
Teacher Education
Initiative
(2)
(176)
174
(8)
182
–
182
Disability
Support
Programme
$’000
2011
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
National Institutes
–
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
133,010
(133,010)
Funds available for the period
–
985
19,703
989
20,084
(212)
19,828
–
20,256
121,408
Depreciation
–
(55,832)
133,010
(27,202)
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
(55,832)
Revenue for the period
(27,202)
–
Capital grants
–
55,097
–
20,407
–
59,013
Net accrual adjustments
23,588
985
Result
Reconciliation of net cash used in operating activities to result
989
70,322
121,408
68,292
69,289
133,010
65,292
77,569
Financial assistance received in cash during reporting period
71,002
78,825
19.1 DEEWR – CGS and other DEEWR grants
68,547
Indigenous
Support
Programme
Short-term deposits and bills
Commonwealth
Grant Scheme
2,030
$’000
3,997
$’000
6,567
$’000
10,278
$’000
Cash at bank and on hand
2010
For the purposes of the statement of cash flows, the University
considers cash to include cash on hand, short-term deposits
at call and investments in money market instruments, net of
outstanding bank overdrafts. Cash at the end of the reporting
period, as shown in the statement of cash flows, is reconciled to
the related items in the statement of financial position as follows:
2011
Reconciliation of cash
2010
18.NOTES TO THE STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
2011
2010
$’000
2010
2011
$’000
2011
(b)
2010
$’000
2010
(a)
Parent Entity
(University)
2011
2011
$’000
UNIVERSITY ONLY
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
19.ACQUITTAL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
university of tasmania
72
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
73
686
2,403
5
9,638
(8,952)
(7,718)
10,121
5
–
1,761
686
5
7,877
–
–
23
159
(34,937)
(30,618)
(18)
159
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
VSU
Transition Fund
Support
for Small
Businesses
–
–
–
Total
–
–
–
Net accrual adjustments
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
–
143
–
63
–
206
Funds available for the period
–
143
–
63
–
206
Less expenses including accrued expenses
–
(143)
–
(63)
–
(206)
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
–
–
–
–
–
–
19.6 Other capital funding
Financial assistance received in cash
during reporting period
Net accrual adjustments
–
(2)
(60)
219
34,960
3,953
23
30,777
232
237
219
219
(5)
2
31,007
142
196
30,754
5
–
–
–
7
7
2011
Revenue for the period
Education Investment Fund
Teaching
and Learning
Capital Fund
Total
18,000
38,000
–
10,534
18,000
48,534
2,417
2,045
–
–
2,417
2,045
Revenue for the period
20,417
40,045
–
10,534
20,417
50,579
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
52,640
20,076
6,067
–
58,707
20,076
Funds available for the period
73,057
60,121
6,067
10,534
79,124
70,655
Less expenses including accrued expenses
(14,044)
(7,481)
(1,150)
(4,467)
(15,194)
(11,948)
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
59,013
52,640
4,917
6,067
63,930
58,707
19.7 Australian Research Council grants
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Financial assistance received in cash
during reporting period
Projects
Fellowships
Total
(72)
–
–
–
17
72
–
–
–
55
–
–
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Funds available for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
3,751
2,888
1,164
7,285
4,915
373
124
41
5
414
129
4,770
3,875
2,929
1,169
7,699
5,044
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
1,794
2,392
682
380
2,476
2,772
Funds available for the period
6,564
6,267
3,611
1,549
10,175
7,816
Less expenses including accrued expenses
(4,466)
(4,473)
(2,113)
(867)
(6,579)
(5,340)
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
2,098
1,794
1,498
682
3,596
2,476
(b) Linkages
Infrastructure
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
4,397
Revenue for the period
Financial assistance received in cash
during reporting period
Net accrual adjustments
55
Net accrual adjustments
–
Total
30,558
–
–
UNIVERSITY ONLY
(a) Discovery
Financial assistance received in cash during reporting period
CommercialisationTraining
Scheme
Australian
Scheme for
Higher Education
Repositories
Implementation
Assistance
Programme
5
30,865
–
–
–
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
–
–
–
–
–
–
(196)
6,154
(6,154)
5,554
(5,554)
3,844
(4,040)
–
–
14,153
(14,153)
14,249
(14,249)
2,115
(2,115)
2,664
(2,664)
(8,383)
8,383
8,091
(8,091)
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Funds available for the period
–
–
3,709
(196)
–
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
–
–
–
–
–
6,154
–
–
5,554
135
135
196
196
14,153
–
–
14,249
2,115
–
–
2,664
8,383
–
–
8,091
Revenue for the period
Net accrual adjustments
6,154
5,554
–
14,153
14,249
2,115
2,664
8,383
8,091
Financial assistance received in cash during reporting period
19.4 DIISR research
Joint Research
Engagement
Programme
Sustainable
Research
Excellence
Programme
Research
Training
Scheme
Systemic
Infrastructure
Initiative
–
Research
Infrastructure
Block Grant
5
–
1,296
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
558
672
(4)
(51)
548
30
(8)
38
5
–
(77)
115
73
(73)
3,306
(3,314)
3,180
(1,884)
1,415
(694)
(1,385)
1,242
456
(507)
410
(414)
(3,669)
4,341
5,211
(4,653)
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Funds available for the period
5
30
38
697
(8)
327
30
39
(51)
663
672
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
–
–
85
–
–
35
2,609
–
–
3,188
1,088
–
–
1,212
417
–
–
461
3,678
–
–
–
85
35
2,609
3,188
1,088
1,212
417
461
3,678
4,539
4,539
Revenue for the period
Net accrual adjustments
Total
9,435
–
–
19.5 Voluntary student unionism
Financial assistance received in cash
during reporting period
Financial assistance received in cash during reporting period
19.3 Scholarships
Australian
Postgraduate
Awards
International
Postgraduate
Research
Scholarships
Commonwealth
Education Costs
Scholarships
Commonwealth
Accommodation
Scholarships
Indigenous
Access
Scholarships
Indigenous
Staff
Scholarships
–
9,435
7,877
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
19.ACQUITTAL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE (continued)
UNIVERSITY ONLY
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
university of tasmania
19.ACQUITTAL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE (continued)
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Funds available for the period
International
515
600
839
189
1
1,354
789
1
(13)
(1)
776
–
(235)
1,119
Less expenses including accrued expenses
(584)
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
535
–
Projects
(9)
Total
2,564
2,177
3,079
2,768
(1)
570
1,322
1,410
1,510
(10)
3,134
3,499
4,489
4,278
13
3,484
3,218
3,248
3,218
3
6,618
6,717
7,737
7,496
(1,011)
–
(4)
(3,906)
(3,233)
(4,490)
(4,248)
(235)
–
(1)
2,712
3,484
3,247
3,248
75
university of tasmania
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
74
19.ACQUITTAL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE (continued)
19.7 Australian Research Council grants (continued)
(c) Centres
Financial assistance received in cash during reporting period
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Funds available for the period
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
20.F INANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT (continued)
UNIVERSITY ONLY
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Centres of Excellence
Non interestbearing
Total
2,856
3,097
2,856
3,097
35
277
35
277
2,891
3,374
2,891
3,374
716
3,607
(3,165)
442
(193)
3,181
(2,465)
716
716
3,607
(3,165)
(193)
3,181
(2,465)
442
716
$'000
Cash and cash equivalents
Receivables
Investments
Total financial assets
(760)
(701)
(19)
2
20.financial risk management
The Group’s activities exposes it to a variety of financial risks, as follows:
Credit risk
The maximum exposure to credit risk on financial assets of the consolidated entity, excluding investments, relates to
receivables which are exposed to the risk of financial loss due to the other party to the contract failing to discharge
a financial obligation. The maximum credit risk exposure in relation to receivables is the carrying amount less the
provision for doubtful debts. The consolidated entity is not materially exposed to any individual or group. Accounts
receivable credit terms are 30 days.
Foreign currency risk
The University does not hold any foreign currency bank accounts. Amounts payable or receivable in foreign currencies
at balance date are converted into Australian currency at market exchange rates at balance date. Currency conversion
gains and losses are included in the operating result for the year.
Liquidity risk
Liquidity risk is the risk that the University will not be able to meet its financial obligations as they fall due. The
University’s approach to managing liquidity is to ensure that it will always have sufficient liquidity to meet its liabilities
when they fall due.
Interest rate risk
The consolidated entity’s exposure to interest rate risk is set out in the following table. The table also details the fair
values of financial assets and liabilities. Exposures arise predominantly from assets and liabilities bearing variable
interest rates as the consolidated entity intends to hold fixed rate assets and liabilities to maturity.
–
53,565
–
198,868
198,868
68,547
53,565
300
305,095
305,095
20,127
–
–
–
–
20,127
20,127
18,021
–
6,567
71,002
–
–
77,569
77,569
21,460
–
–
–
1,800
23,260
23,260
Financial assets 2010
Investments
Cash surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
145,302
155,580
38,148
Total financial assets
Contributions to specified defined benefit funds
1
27,103
18,021
Receivables
703
27,402
38,148
236
741
78,825
27,402
-
55
Cash available for the reporting period
78,825
300
–
Cash and cash equivalents
(21)
–
–
–
146
2
–
–
–
236
Cash surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
68,547
–
–
90
724
10,278
–
(181)
739
–
27,102
–
Net cash received
Cash available
$'000
–
(296)
724
$'000
18,021
(450)
739
$'000
38,148
Cash spent during the reporting period
Cash received during the reporting period
$'000
Fair value
Other liabilities
386
19.9 Superannuation supplementation
$'000
More than
5 years
Total financial liabilities
269
Cash surplus/(deficit) for the reporting period
$'000
Over 1 year
to 5 years
Financial liabilities 2011
Cash received during the reporting period
Cash surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
1 year or less
Financial assets 2011
Payables
19.8 OS-HELP
Floating
Carrying
amount as
per statement
of financial
position
1
163,545
–
47,762
–
211,308
211,308
21,461
170,112
71,002
47,762
1,800
312,137
312,137
13,273
–
–
–
–
13,273
13,273
Financial liabilities 2010
Payables
Other liabilities
14,510
–
–
–
–
14,510
14,510
Total financial liabilities
27,783
–
–
–
–
27,783
27,783
Market risk
Investments mainly comprise investments in managed investment funds. The investment fund has a prudent longerterm investment strategy with a growth-style portfolio including equities. It is acknowledged there may be short-term
fluctuations in asset values from time to time with such a strategy. The possibility of a negative return is approximately
one year in seven. Historical trends for such a strategy indicate that, with reasonable probability, unrealised losses will
be recovered in the short to medium term.
The managers place a great deal of emphases on risk management and constantly examine the risk and return profiles
of the portfolios in terms of both asset allocation and the active management of each asset class within the portfolio.
This ensures a well-diversified portfolio of assets, which has proven successful in adding value in an environment of risk
aversion and falling equity markets.
The University’s investment policy has established benchmarks for the portfolio. During 2011 the following benchmarks
applied: Australian equities 25.0% (actual at 31 December 2011: 24.7%); overseas equities 19.5% (19.2%); direct property
9.0% (8.4%); listed property 4.0% (3.4%); Australian fixed interest 10.0% (10.4%); overseas fixed interest 15.0% (15.8%);
cash and cash equivalents 10.0% (18.1%) and alternative strategies 7.5% (0.0%).
77
university of tasmania
university of tasmania
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
76
20.F INANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT (continued)
20.F INANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT (continued)
Summarised sensitivity analysis
$’000
Net fair values of financial assets and liabilities
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
Interest Rate Risk
-1.5%
31 December 2011
$’000
$'000
The fair values disclosed below are all level 1 in the fair value hierarchy under AASB 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures as they are
calculated using quoted prices in active markets. There are no level 2 or level 3 financial assets or liabilities.
Other Price Risk
+1.5%
-10%
+10%
2011
Carrying Impact
Impact
Impact
Impact
Impact
Impact
Impact
Impact
Amount on Result on Equity on Result on Equity on Result on Equity on Result on Equity
Investments
2010
$’000
$’000
198,867
211,307
Financial assets
Cash and cash equivalents
78,825
(1,182)
(1,182)
1,182
1,182
n/a
n/a
21.SUPERANNUATION COMMITMENTS
(a)Schemes operational and open to membership
27,402
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Investments
198,868
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
(19,887)
(19,887)
19,887
19,887
Total financial assets
305,095
1,182
1,182
(19,887)
(19,887)
19,887
19,887
(1,182)
n/a
n/a
Receivables
(1,182)
n/a
n/a
i) UniSuper Limited
The majority of University staff are members of schemes and plans administered and managed by UniSuper Limited.
UniSuper offers eligible members the choice of two schemes known as the Defined Benefit Division (DBD) and Accumulation Super.
Financial liabilities
Payables
20,127
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Other liabilities
18,021
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Total financial liabilities
38,148
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
The UniSuper Defined Benefit Division (DBD) is a defined benefit plan under Superannuation Law but, as a result of amendments to
Clause 34 of the UniSuper Trust Deed, a defined contribution plan under Accounting Standard AASB 119 Employee Benefits.
Accumulation Super is a cash accumulation productivity scheme.
(b)Schemes closed to future membership
Interest Rate Risk
-1.5%
31 December 2010
Other Price Risk
+3%
-15%
he University of Tasmania Staff Superannuation and Additional Benefits Scheme was closed on 31 December 1982 and wound up.
T
Two aspects of the scheme remain, the lump sum compensation benefits scheme and the supplementary pension scheme.
+15%
Carrying Impact
Impact
Impact
Impact
Impact
Impact
Impact
Impact
Amount on Result on Equity on Result on Equity on Result on Equity on Result on Equity
Financial assets
Cash and cash equivalents
77,569
(1,164)
(1,164)
2,327
2,327
n/a
n/a
23,260
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Investments
211,308
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
(31,696)
(31,696)
31,696
31,696
Total financial assets
312,137
2,327
2,327
(31,696)
(31,696)
31,696
31,696
(1,164)
n/a
n/a
Receivables
(1,164)
n/a
n/a
i) Lump Sum Compensation Benefits
As part of the winding up of the University of Tasmania Staff Superannuation and Additional Benefits Scheme it was agreed with
members that staff transferring contributions to SSAU would be compensated at retirement. The calculation of compensation is
formula based and consistent with terms determined by Council in 1982. Compensation is adjusted in line with movements in the
Consumer Price Index. It is financed on an emerging cost basis and charged against operating funds.
Liabilities recognised in the statement of financial position
Total liability – current
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
25
24
Financial liabilities
Payables
13,273
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
ii) Supplementary Pension Scheme Liability
Other liabilities
14,510
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Total financial liabilities
27,783
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
The University has a liability in respect of pensions paid, being supplementary pensions being paid and reversionary pensions which
may become payable to spouses in the future. This is a closed scheme.
Method and underlying assumptions of the sensitivity analysis:
1. The variation in interest rate risk takes into account interest rate movements during 2011 and future expectations.
2. A variation range of +/- 10% is estimated for other price risk based on investment returns over the past three years and recent
volatility in financial markets.
3. The University’s foreign exchange risk is considered minimal.
An update of the 31 December 2008 actuarial report and historical information was obtained at 31 December 2009 to reflect the changes
in discount rates. The updated report prepared by Geoff Morley of Bendzulla Actuarial Pty Ltd states the University’s liability as:
2011
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
Cash and cash equivalents
78,825
77,569
Loans and receivables
27,402
23,260
198,867
211,307
1
1
305,095
312,137
Financial liabilities at amortised cost
38,148
27,783
Total
38,148
27,783
Categories of financial assets and liabilities
Available-for-sale financial assets
Total
Financial liabilities
2009
2008
2007
Liabilities recognised in the statement of financial position
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Total liability
10,539
11,237
11,935
14,147
12,984
Current
1,238
1,282
1,318
1,347
1,372
Non-current
9,301
9,955
10,617
12,800
11,612
10,539
11,237
11,935
14,147
12,984
%
%
Financial assets
Financial assets at fair value through profit and loss
2010
Principal actuarial assumptions
Discount rate
5.50
5.50
Inflation (pensions)
4.00
4.00
79
university of tasmania
university of tasmania
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
78
21.SUPERANNUATION COMMITMENTS (continued)
21.SUPERANNUATION COMMITMENTS (continued)
(b)Schemes closed to future membership (continued)
(b)Schemes closed to future membership (continued)
iii)Retirement Benefits Fund
The University has a liability in respect of a small number of staff who transferred from the Tasmanian College of Advanced Education
and who are members of the State Government scheme, the Retirement Benefits Fund.
An arrangement exists between the Australian Government and the State Government to meet the unfunded liability for the University’s
beneficiaries of the Retirement Benefits Fund on an emerging cost basis. Accordingly the unfunded liability of $8.963m (2010: $9.319m)
is recognised in the statement of financial position and the right to re-imbursement from the Commonwealth is recorded as an asset.
The RBF is a defined benefit fund which pays lump sum and pension benefits to members upon retirement (most of which are
calculated as a multiple of the member’s final average salary).
In an actuarial report prepared by David Knox of Mercer, the University’s liability (as at 30 June 2011) is stated as:
Liabilities recognised in the statement of financial position
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
Defined benefit obligations
10,868
13,287
Fair value of plan assets
(1,905)
(3,968)
Net liability
8,963
9,319
742
693
Non-current
8,221
8,626
Movement for the year $90,000 per note 3.1
8,963
9,319
Current
Movements in the net liability for defined benefit obligations
recognised in the statement of financial position
9,319
9,229
Contributions received
Net liability for defined benefit obligations
(722)
(701)
Expense/(gain) recognised in the income statement
366
791
8,963
9,319
38
38
Interest cost
675
724
Expected return on plan assets
Expense recognised in the income statement
Employer service cost
(254)
(267)
Recognised actuarial losses/(gains)
(93)
296
Expense/(gain) recognised
366
791
Principal actuarial assumptions
%
%
Discount rate
5.50
5.35
Expected return on plan assets
7.50
7.00
Expected salary increse rate
4.50
4.50
Expected rate of increase compulsory preserved amounts
4.50
4.50
Expected pension increase rate
2.50
2.50
Australian equities
25
26
Overseas equities
22
22
The expected return on plan assets (net of tax) has been based on the
expected long-term returns for each of the major asset classes in which
the plan invests.
Plan assets
Fixed income
13
12
Property
19
20
Alternatives/other
18
14
3
6
100
100
Cash
Historical information
Present value of defined benefit obligation
Fair value of plan assets
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
10,868
13,287
13,265
13,344
14,038
1,905
3,968
4,036
4,529
5,120
(Surplus)/deficit in plan
8,963
9,319
9,229
8,815
8,918
Experience adjustments (gain)/loss – plan assets
1,620
(77)
471
587
(614)
Experience adjustments (gain)/loss – plan liabilities
(1,572)
(160)
551
(490)
421
Funded status of defined benefit obligations
The entire defined benefit obligation arises from the RBF, which is a partly funded defined benefit scheme.
The above information represents the material disclosures required by AASB 119. After considering materiality, further detailed reconciliations
have not been included because their inclusion does not enhance the information already reported.
81
university of tasmania
university of tasmania
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
80
22.KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL AND RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES
22.KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL AND RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURES (continued)
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Other transactions with key management personnel
Parent Entity
(University)
2011
No.
2010
No.
2011
No.
2010
No.
$0 to $9,999
1
6
1
6
$10,000 to $19,999
5
3
5
3
$20,000 to $29,999
3
3
3
3
Remuneration of Council members
The Council is the governing body of the University. The number of Council and
Committee members where remuneration (including salary, superannuation and
other benefits) for the reporting period was paid within bands of $10,000 were:
$30,000 to $39,999
$40,000 to $49,999
1
$50,000 to $59,999
$60,000 to $69,999
Aggregate remuneration of Council members
1
-
-
1
1
-
-
-
1
1
1
1
11
14
11
14
$256,842
$251,000
$256,842
$251,000
1
$210,000 to $219,999
1
-
1
-
2
$230,000 to $239,999
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
2011
$’000
2010
$’000
1
1
-
1
-
2
3
-
Fees paid to the Tasmanian Audit Office for the audit of financial reports
120
119
109
101
1
Total remuneration for audit services
120
119
109
101
1
Assurance services
1
Fees paid to other audit firms:
3
Internal audit services
394
378
394
378
Audit of grant monies
22
50
22
50
3
1
3
1
$250,000 to $259,000
1
1
1
1
$260,000 to $269,999
-
-
1
$290,000 to $299,999
-
-
1
$360,000 to $369,999
1
-
1
-
$370,000 to $379,000
1
-
1
-
$410,000 to $419,999
1
-
1
-
$520,000 to $529,999
-
1
-
1
12
12
12
12
$3,387,262
$3,210,084
$3,387,262
$3,210,084
“Executives” are defined as including the Vice-Chancellor, Provost, Deputy Vice-Chancellors, Pro Vice-Chancellors, Deans and the
Chief Operating Officer.
Total remuneration for assurance services
1
1
1
Other assurance services
-
1
-
-
-
1
1
$350,000 to $359,999
Aggregate remuneration of executives
Parent Entity
(University)
1
$240,000 to $249,999
$310,000 to $319,999
23.REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS
Audit services
$190,000 to $199,999
$270,000 to $279,999
The Tasmanian University Union Incorporated is the affiliate student organisation of the University – 2011 $7.4m (2010: $1.2m).
The $7.4m in 2011 includes the purchase of accommodation properties ($5.48m), trading operations ($1.6m), the return of capital
contribution ($1m) offset by the repayment of the loan held by the University ($1.64m).
During the year the following fees were paid for services provided
to the University by the auditor and non-related audit firms:
The number of executive positions where the total remuneration (including
salary, superannuation and other benefits) for the reporting period exceeded
$170,000 within bands of $10,000 were:
$220,000 to $229,999
The following activity occurred during 2011:
Mr Damian Bugg AM QC is Chair of the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens Board – 2011: $6,252 (2010: N/A)
Dr Peter Davis is Chief Executive Officer of Aurora Energy Pty Ltd – 2011: $7.6m (2010: $5.3m)
Mr Rhys Edwards is Secretary of the Department of Premier & Cabinet – 2011: $92,446 (2010: $12,640)
Mr Harvey Gibson is a partner with Wise, Lord & Ferguson – 2011: $34,021 (2010: $24,581)
Mr Rod Roberts is a Director of Webster Limited and Tassal Group Limited – 2011: $360 (2010: $1,571)
Economic Entity
(Consolidated)
Remuneration of executive officers
$200,000 to $209,999
All transactions with members of Council or their related entities are conducted at arm’s length: at normal market prices and on normal
commercial terms.
24.E VENTS OCCURRING AFTER THE BALANCE SHEET DATE
No significant events have occurred.
–
–
81
–
416
428
497
428
83
university of tasmania
university of tasmania
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
Notes to the financial statements
for the year ended 31 december 2011
82
university of tasmania
84
management certificate
for the year ended 31 december 2011
university of tasmania
alphabetical index
Alumni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Arts, Faculty of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-35
Australian Maritime College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Business, Faculty of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35-36
Community Engagement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 19
Cradle Coast Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-19
Chancellor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Council Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Council Committees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-14
Education, Faculty of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36-37
Enrolment Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Faculty Performance Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
Financial Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
Financial Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8
Financial Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
Foundation (UTAS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44-45
Governance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6
Graduate outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Health Science, Faculty of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37-38
Infrastructure Investment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies . . . . . . . . . 41-42
International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Law, Faculty of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38-39
Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Media Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Menzies Research InstituteTasmania . . . . . . . . . . . . 42-43
Organisational Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Principal Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Provost, the Division of the . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31-33
Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Science, Engineering andTechnology, Faculty of . . . . . . . 39-40
Student Satisfaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Transnational Education (TNE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Vice-Chancellor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
87
university of tasmania
how to contact us
General enquiries
Inveresk Campus
Telephone: (03) 6226 2999
Launceston Campus
International: +61 3 6226 2999
University of Tasmania
Fax: (03) 6226 2018
Locked Bag 1362
Postal Address
Launceston TAS 7250
University of Tasmania
Telephone: (03) 6324 4400
Private Bag 51
Launceston Clinical School
Hobart TAS 7001
School of Medicine
World Wide Web Access
Level 2, Launceston General Hospital
www.utas.edu.au
Charles Street
Main Campuses
Launceston TAS 7250
Hobart
Churchill Avenue, Sandy Bay
Hobart TAS 7005
Private Bag 51, Hobart TAS 7001
Telephone: (03) 6226 2999
Telephone: (03) 6348 8792
North West Rural Clinical School
PO Box 3513
Burnie TAS 7320
Telephone: (03) 6430 4550
Launceston
Southern Tasmania
Newnham Drive, Newnham
Centre for the Arts
Launceston TAS 7250
University of Tasmania
Locked Bag 1351, Launceston TAS 7250
Private Bag 57
Telephone: (03) 6324 3999
Hobart TAS 7001
Cradle Coast
Telephone: (03) 6226 4300
16-20 Mooreville Road
Clinical School
Burnie TAS 7320
University of Tasmania
PO Box 3502, Burnie TAS 7320
Private Bag 68
Telephone: (03) 6430 4999
Hobart TAS 7001
Campuses, Institutes
and Clinical Schools
Telephone: (03) 6226 4757
Northern and North-West Tasmania
Private Bag 63
Anne O’Byrne Centre – Rural Health
Hobart TAS 7001
Locked Bag 1372
Telephone: (03) 6226 7314
Launceston TAS 7250
Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies
Telephone: (03) 6324 4000
University of Tasmania
Australian Maritime College
Private Bag 129
Locked Bag 1399
Hobart TAS 7001
Launceston TAS 7250
Telephone: (03) 6226 6379
Telephone: (03) 6335 4711
Menzies Research Institute Tasmania
Conservatorium of Music
University of Tasmania
Medical Science 1
University of Tasmania
Private Bag 23
Hobart TAS 7001
Telephone: (03) 6226 7700
88
3132
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