MozillaBook
Mozilla: A Users Guide.
or
Using the Mozilla Application Suite
Kevin T. Neely
May 19, 2004
Version 0.2.2
Contents
1 Installation
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
15
Deciding which Mozilla to Run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
1.1.1
Platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
1.1.2
Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
15
Installing Mozilla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
1.2.1
Using an Installer Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
16
1.2.2
Manual Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
17
Upgrading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
1.3.1
Make a Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
1.3.2
Uninstall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
19
1.3.3
Install Mozilla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
1.3.4
Retrieve Missing Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20
Running Multiple versions of Mozilla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21
2 Getting Started and Mozilla Basics
23
2.1
Starting Mozilla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
2.2
Exiting Mozilla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
2.3
Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
3
CONTENTS
CONTENTS
2.3.1
Profile Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
2.3.2
QuickLaunch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
2.4
Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
2.5
Advanced Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24
2.5.1
prefs.js . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25
2.5.2
user.js . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25
2.5.3
userContent.css . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
26
2.6
Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27
2.7
Themes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27
2.8
Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27
2.8.1
SSL Certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
27
2.8.2
Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
28
Cookies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
28
2.9.1
Allowing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
2.9.2
Privacy Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
2.9.3
Cookie Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
29
2.10 Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34
2.10.1 Ctrl-U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
34
2.9
3 The Web Client
35
3.1
Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
3.2
Bookmarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
35
3.2.1
Importing from Another Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
3.2.2
Organizing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36
Toolbars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
3.3.1
37
3.3
Component Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
CONTENTS
3.4
CONTENTS
navigating to websites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
3.4.1
The Location Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
Navigating within Websites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
3.5.1
Finding Keywords in a Website . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
37
3.5.2
The Site Navigation Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
3.6
Tabbed Browsing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
3.7
Sidebar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
3.8
Page Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
3.9
Plugins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
3.10 Working Offline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39
3.11 Advanced Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
3.11.1 Non-Mozilla Mail interaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
40
3.5
4 E-mail and News
4.1
4.2
4.3
41
Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
41
4.1.1
Preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
42
4.1.2
Mail Account Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
45
4.1.3
Mail & Newsgroup Account Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
45
4.1.4
POP vs. IMAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
46
4.1.5
SMTP, or, Outgoing Mail Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
46
Migrating Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
4.2.1
Migrating Mail and Settings
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
4.2.2
Thunderbird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
47
4.2.3
Migrating Mail from Another Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
Starting the Mail client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
49
4.3.1
49
Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
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4.4
CONTENTS
Reading Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50
4.4.1
Attachments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
50
4.5
Replying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
51
4.6
Composing Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
52
4.6.1
Plain Text E-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
52
4.6.2
HTML E-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
53
Using Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
55
4.7.1
Setting up the Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56
4.8
Working Offline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56
4.9
News Client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
57
4.9.1
News Account Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
58
4.9.2
Reading Newsgroup Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
59
4.10 Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
65
4.11 Rules and Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
65
4.12 Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
65
4.13 Junk Mail Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
66
4.13.1 Setting up Junk Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
67
4.13.2 Training Mozilla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
69
4.14 Advanced Mail and News Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70
4.14.1 Advanced Appearance Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70
4.14.2 Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
4.14.3 News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
4.15 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
4.15.1 Messages Not Sending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
4.15.2 Mail Files are too Large . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
73
4.7
6
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5 Address Book
75
6 Composer
77
7 ChatZilla
79
8 Security
81
9 JabberZilla
83
10 Under the Hood
85
10.1 UserContent.css . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
85
A A Sample user.js file
87
B Default Directory Profile Locations
91
C Command-line Options
95
D Resources
99
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And the beast shall be made legion. Its numbers shall be increased a thousand thousand fold. The din of a million keyboards like unto a great storm shall cover the earth,
and the followers of Mammon shall tremble.
from The Book of Mozilla, 3:311
(Red Letter Edition)
1
also available from typing about:mozilla into the location bar
8
Introduction
Why create a user’s guide for Mozilla?
I have been using Mozilla as my primary web client since about release 0.8 or so, and
was always frustrated with the lack of documentation. Granted, I’ve never looked for or
required a book for Internet Explorer, but then again, the internal help for that product
is so good, and, primarily, it does not have the wide range of customization available to
Mozilla. The idea here is to get you up and running quickly with the basics, and then wow
you with features that are easy to configure or add.
Furthermore, this book should be able to be a guide for the Mozilla derivatives out
there. Web clients such as Netscape , K-meleonK-Meleon , Camino (formerly Chimera),
Phoenix, etc. could be served by the sections which pertain to web browsing. Mail clients
like ??????? should be pretty well covered by the Mail and News section. Also, if you
are a developer working on one of these projects, it is my hope that you can use this
documentation to help out your users. Mozilla could aptly be described as That-fromWhich-All-Other-Things-Come as there are so many great projects which have evolved
from the Mozilla Project. So, when I say Mozilla in this book, what I mean is Mozilla and
all other applications that come from the Moz. Project
Additionally, at the end of each section, subsection, subsubsubsection or whatever, I’m
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going to try to have an advanced section, or tip, or paragraph. The idea of this book is
to showcase Mozilla, what you can do with it, and why you want to use this application.
These should be pretty straightforward, and are for you to try out, as they really bring out
the power of this Internet client.
My Experience
I am by no means a developer of Mozilla. I am just a user, and I think that you should be
one too, which is why I am writing this. I have been using Mozilla for a few years now,
and have chosen it over other web clients since late 2001, overcoming incompatibilities as
they arose. I believe that Mozilla has really grown into itself and is a viable alternative for
anyone that wants to browse the web and use e-mail.
I was drawn to Mozilla not because it is faster, cooler, or open source (although it is at
least two of those, if not three), but because I can do things with this browser that cannot
be done with other web clients. This is the design of this book: an user’s guide for users,
and it is my aim to aid my fair reader through the differences of this web browser, and to
open possibilities for you.
Many of my examples and experience come from running Mozilla on a Windows platform.
Although I am not in any sort of minority, I realize that most of the people that run this
program are staunch haters of Microsoft. I am not, by any means; I just like the options
and convenience Mozilla provides me through its innovation and creativity.
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Audience
This is book for the everyday user of Mozilla. It is aimed toward the people that are
looking for an alternative to other web suites, like the idea of Mozilla, but need a leg-up
with starting to use this very complex and robust application.
What Should You Read?
If you’ve never used e-mail or the web before, I’d like to know what made you go out and
choose Mozilla. (wise decision, by the way!) Seriously, if you have no exisitinng e-mail,
addressbook, and/or bookmark data, I’d recommend that you just read through the book
with Mozilla in front of you, configuring the application as you read
If you do have, say, Outlook, runnning on your computer and want to migrate to
Mozilla, I’d recommend that you go through the setting up and basics chapters, ?? and
Chapter 2, and then the configuration and migration portions of the main components,
like bookmarks (??), mail (section 4.2), and addressbook (??). After importing as much
of your old settings and information as you can, then go back and look at the sections on
using the Mozilla suite of applications.
Conventions used in this Book
• I will list specific things like menu items in italics, and with arrows to separate a
menu item from its choices, and from further choices, if applicable. For example, if
you wanted to pull up a new browser window, which is an item under new, which is
under File, I would write it like this: File—New—New Navigator Window.
• If I want you to type something, I’ll put it in a fixed width font, like this: Now type
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alt-F4 to exit Mozilla. In that context, words like ‘ctrl,’ ‘alt,’ and ‘ins’ mean to type
that key, not those specific letters.
• Notes and Tech Notes: A Note is something everyone will want to read. A TechNote
will be something that explains the Technology underlying a feature and is probably
not interesting to the casual user.
Tools Used
This is also sort of a thank you section, as I don’t think this book would have been possible
without all the people making this great software that I used to create Mozilla: A User’s
Guide. Wherever possible, I used open source software. Obviously, I very much believe in
the Open Source movement and it is my hope that non-coders like myself (and hopefully
you) will support Open projects just by using them.
First and foremost, LATEXwas used for the look and layout. Information on TEXand
LATEXcan be found at . For an editor, I used good ’ole Emacs, for which a lot of people
give me crap, but I think is a perfectly good editor, as it does what I want it to. Thanks
also to —insert name here—’s color-themes for emacs, which made the screen prettier to
look at while I was slaving away at this book. I also used Microsoft’s Windows XP as
my Operating System. I do run Mozilla on UNIX platforms, but my primary platform
is Wingows-based. Though not Open Source, XP is a solid platform, and, really, I am
writing this for those of you that are running Windows (and–to a lesser extent–Mac users),
as Linux and UNIX users have already decided what they like and were not provided with
a default browser, but instead chose one on their own recognisance.
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License
This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. To
view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/1.0/ or send a
letter to Creative Commons,
559 Nathan Abbott Way,
Stanford, California 94305
USA.
Thanks and Acknowledgements
For now, thanks go to Caltrain and my commute for providing me with two and a half
hours per day of idle time, some of which I use to work on this book.
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14
Chapter 1
Installation
1.1
1.1.1
Deciding which Mozilla to Run
Platform
Before we can do anything, we need to think about what type of computer we are running.
First, are we running Windows or Linux?1
1.1.2
Version
One of the things that makes Mozilla great is its accelerated development rate. Unfortunately, this makes it a bit confusing for new users when deciding which version to dowload
and install, especially since the good folks at mozilla.org want you to try the very latest
version (regardless of stability) and place it right there on the top of the list.
When installing Mozilla for the first time, you should go for a stable release. These are
1
Mozilla will run on other platforms than these, OS/2 and Macintosh being two of them. At this time,
You are are your own for the installation, but all the other sections should apply to you.
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1.2. INSTALLING MOZILLA
CHAPTER 1. INSTALLATION
available right off the http://www.mozilla.org/releases/ page. Look for a full, noninterim release. Keep scrolling down until you find a release that does not end in an ‘a’ or
‘b.’2 As of writing, the current official release is 1.0.2. The current stable release is 1.2.1,
and that’s the one I would recommend and will be using for most of my examples.
1.2
Installing Mozilla
“Okay,” you say, “I’ve got the numbering scheme worked out, but what the hell are all of
these options?” Well, Mozilla, in its ongoing efforts to provide as many choices as possible,
has created different install packages for you to choose from.
1.2.1
Using an Installer Package
Windows If you are a first-time user, you should go ahead and pick the Full Installer,
download it to your hard drive, and then double-click on that file.
This launches the familiar windows setup-type screen I’m sure you’ve seen time and
again. Here we go!
1. Click Next.
2. Here’s the Mozilla Public License, click Accept, unless you have something against
good, free software.
3. Now select your poison. The default install directory of c:\Program Files\mozilla.org\mozilla
should be fine, but you may want to change it a bit if you think you might install
multiple versions. See section 1.4 for details.
2
These letters denote interim test builds and should not be used for everyday web surfing, unless, of
course, danger is you middle name.
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CHAPTER 1. INSTALLATION
1.2. INSTALLING MOZILLA
4. If you went with the complete install (recommended) you can choose the quicklaunch
icon. This is useful if you are using a laptop or something where you launch mozilla
often. If you reboot often, but open Mozilla rarely, this may not be a good option
for you, since it will take a bit longer to log on to your machine. See subsection 2.3.2
for more information on this feature.
5. The Custom install allows you to choose the components you want. You most likely
do not need the Debugger or the Inspector, and maybe you do not want the feedback
agent. However, I highly recommned the feedback agent as it does not pose a risk
to your privacy, and will help to improve the product for you, since it will report on
problems you come across.
Net Installer Using this is just as the above, but it downloads the files as it installs,
rather than downloading the entire package at once. The only different option here is
whether you want to save the install files locally. This is handy if you want to re-run the
install in the future, or perform the install on multiple computers.
Linux
1.2.2
Manual Installation
Manually installing Mozilla is almost as easy as using the install package. You will want
to use this method for a few different scenarios:
• you like to have full control over the install process
• you are installing multiple versions on a single machine
• you are installing the same version on multiple machines
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1.2. INSTALLING MOZILLA
CHAPTER 1. INSTALLATION
• you want to install a nightly build
• you want to automate the installation of mozilla
To manually install Mozilla on win32, you merely need to download either the mozillawin32-x.x.zip or mozilla-win32-x.x-talkback.zip file from the mozilla.org site. Once you
have downloaded the file, use a program to unzip3 it to the directory of your choice. Once
it is there, double-click on the mozilla.exe file and you are up and running, it’s that easy!
For future convienience, you may want to drag the mozilla icon to either your desktop or
your quickstart bar.
One drawback from installing manually on Windows is that registry entries do not get
created. This will not affect the working of Mozilla, but it will make it more difficult to
install some plugins like Shockwave. To add these entries so the installer can find Mozilla’s
plugin directory, follow these few steps.
Tip: Before performing an upgrade, be smart like Poindexter and not dumb like Blutto;
perform a backup of your Mozilla installation!!
It’s easy, in Windows, simply go to your Mozilla directory, and hit ctrl-c and then ctrl-v
to quickly make a backup. If something goes wrong, simply delete the original and rename
the “Copy of Mozilla” folder to just “Mozilla”.
Under Linux, change to the directory under which Mozilla is installed (usually /usr/lib or
/usr/bin) and run cp -r mozilla/* /tmp. If something goes wrong, simply delete mozilla
rm -rf mozilla/ and copy the files back cp -r /tmp/mozilla/* ./.
3
This can be whatever program you want to use. A popular, although commercial, product is WinZip.
Another product that is free is 7-zip
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CHAPTER 1. INSTALLATION
1.3. UPGRADING
Macintosh OS X Installation on the Macintosh is simple. You need merely download
the file, and drop it in the proper folder, say, Applications.
1.3
Upgrading
Upgrading Mozilla is similar to doing an install. The key here is to keep as much of your
old configuration and data as possible. Luckily, Mozilla keeps all your configuration data
and data in your profile directory, so the risk of losing data is slim to none.
Before proceeding, make sure you have downloaded the new version to which you want
to upgrade and fully close Mozilla. If you use quicklaunch4 in Windows, then you need to
go to the taskbar, rt. click on the Mozilla icon, and choose Exit Mozilla.
1.3.1
Make a Backup
The profile directory is located in a different location, depending on your Operating System,
see Appendix B for the default location. The only thing an upgrade is going to touch are
the actual binary and libray files in the location you specified for Mozilla to originally be
installed. Navigate there and make a backup as on page 18 above.
1.3.2
Uninstall
If you are running Mozilla on Windows, and used an installer to install Mozilla, as in subsection 1.2.1, it is best that you uninstall before you perform another install. In Windows,
use the Add/Remove programs. If you did a manual install, then just continue, making
sure you made a backup of the binaries.
4
??
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1.3. UPGRADING
CHAPTER 1. INSTALLATION
It is also good to go and delete the XUL.mfl file from your profile directory. On Linux,
this file is called XUL.msfl
Tip: All your mail and news data is stored in subdirectories in your profile location. POP
and local mail are stored in Mail, mail retrieved via IMAP is stored in ImapMail, news is
stored in News, and address books are in .mab files. No matter where you ut Mozilla, (or
even if you accidentally delete Mozilla) it will be able to find this data for you.
1.3.3
Install Mozilla
Here, just install Mozilla using your favorite method from section 1.2.
1.3.4
Retrieve Missing Files
“Wait!” you scream, “didn’t Kevin just say that I wouldn’t lose any data? I just deleted
everything!!” Well, you have not lost any data at this point, but you are missing a couple
of files.
Plugins You should copy the contents of the plugins directory from your backup to the
new install. Don’t overwrite newer files, though. This way you will not have to reinstall
the Flash player so you can go straight to and see the newest Strong Bad e-mail.
Themes If your upgrade was incremental, say, from a beta version to the full release, or
a Mozilla update like 1.0 to 1.0.2, then your old themes should work with the new version
without a problem. Just copy your old Themes directory to the new one, again not copying
over newer files. See section 2.7 for more info and troubleshooting ideas on themes.
20
CHAPTER 1. INSTALLATION1.4. RUNNING MULTIPLE VERSIONS OF MOZILLA
1.4
Running Multiple versions of Mozilla
Using the Manual Install method makes it easy to run multiple versions of Mozilla on your
computer. Because Mozilla is being developed so quickly, you can use this to test a new
version while keeping your old, trusty version around in case something doesn’t jive in the
newer version. When running multiple versions, nearly all your settings will carry over
from one version to the next, as they are stored in a separate location5
Note: Remember that you can only run one instance of Mozilla at a time. If you try to
start a different version alongside your currently running Mozilla, it will bring up a new
browser window, but the same version. You need to fully exit whatever you are running,
and then launch the version of Mozilla you would like to run.
To install multiple versions of Mozilla that can run at the same time, simply go into
your mozilla directory and create a new directory named the same as the version number,
or whatever identifying mark is meaningful to you, and then proceed to the section for your
Operating System.
Windows Now, unzip the new version of Mozilla into its directory, just like in the manual
install in section 1.2.2. Don’t forget to create a new shortcut for the new executable. Go
into the directory and right-click drag the icon to your desktop, start menu, or quick launch
bar, and choose create shortcut here.
Linux The idea here is the same as in Windows, simply create a new directory whereever
you want, but for sanity’s sake, I recommend some logical structure near the other install.
5
See Appendix B on page 91 for more info about the profile directory.
21
1.4. RUNNING MULTIPLE VERSIONS OF MOZILLACHAPTER 1. INSTALLATION
22
Chapter 2
Getting Started and Mozilla Basics
2.1
Starting Mozilla
2.2
Exiting Mozilla
2.3
Profiles
2.3.1
Profile Manager
Use the Profile Manager to configure new and existing Mozilla Profiles.
2.3.2
QuickLaunch
QuickLaunch is a feature available only on Mozilla for Microsoft Windows platforms. What
it does is keep a portion of Mozilla in memory, even if you close all the windows. The
purpose is to speed up the launch time of Mozilla when you click on the icon. The key
thing to remember about QuickLaunch as you read through this and work with Mozilla is
23
2.4. PREFERENCES
CHAPTER 2. GETTING STARTED AND MOZILLA BASICS
that the only way to exit the application is to close all Mozilla windows, and then rightclick on the Mozilla icon in your system tray and choose “Exit Mozilla.” This is necessarry
anytime you install something like a theme. It is probably best to leave this off while you
configure Mozilla and install the components and themes you want to use. Once you have
it the way you like, you can find QuickLaunch at Edit—Preferences—Advanced and you
just check the “Enable QuickLaunch checkbox.
2.4
Preferences
Preferences are your personal settings and customizations in Mozilla. They are used to
tailor Mozilla to fit your needs and usage pattern. Because Mozilla has been created by an
active and vocal user community, there are many, many preferences, located in many, many
locations. First, we will look at the standard preferences offered in the GUI (or Graphical
User Interface) dialogues. Then,in section 2.5, we will take a look at some more advanced
and perhaps esoteric settings.
2.5
Advanced Settings
This section talks about where Mozilla stores its settings, as well as the more, ahhh, abstruse
settings. These settings are used for options that have not made it into the GUI, really
esoteric options that are not really meant for public consumption (but are fun to play with
anyway), and –in the case of alpha, beta, and nightly versions– options that are in the
codebase but still being worked on, so need a specific entry to activate them.
Preferences for Mozilla are stored in the user’s profile directory in files called prefs.js
and user.js. These files can be edited with any text editor. Just make sure that if you use
24
CHAPTER 2. GETTING STARTED AND MOZILLA BASICS
2.5. ADVANCED SETTINGS
the schizophrenic notepad provided by Micrsoft on the Windows platform that it does not
rename the file with a .txt extension.
When a change is made to one of these files, the modification will not take effect until
Mozilla has been completely shutdown and started back up again, so it can read in the new
setting.
2.5.1
prefs.js
This file contains all the settings changes you have made in Mozilla. Anything that is not
the default value will appear in this file. This file is automatically generated by Mozilla
when first run, or when creating a new profile. At the top of the file, it warns you that
it is a generated file which means that changes made to the file are in danger of being
overwritten. You should always completely exit Mozilla before modifying this file.
A great new feature, available since the beta versions of 1.3 is the ability to type in
about:config into the location bar in your browser. This will generate a list of all the
available settings for Mozilla. Ones that have been changed or modified somehow are shown
in bold. Any of these settings can be changed simply by double-clicking on the item and
entering the desired value in the popup box.
2.5.2
user.js
Because the prefs.js file is generated and can now be manipulated through the cool about:config
tool, settings you want to manually insert should be done through the user.js file. This
file is not created upon install or profile creation, however, the existence of this file in
the profile directory upon startup will be noticed by Mozilla and read into the preferences. Settings are read from user.js and placed in prefs.js, however, simply removing an entry from user.js and restarting Mozilla does not mean the entry will disappear
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2.5. ADVANCED SETTINGS
CHAPTER 2. GETTING STARTED AND MOZILLA BASICS
from prefs.js. It is best to reverse the setting (for example, changing the true setting in
user pref("dom.disable open during load", true); to false and restarting Mozilla
should reverse the bahavior of this particular popup window control, whereas merely removing it would have left the entry active in the prefs.js.
2.5.3
userContent.css
Mozilla has two major components for the user interface, XUL and CSS. XUL blah blah
blah. CSS, or Cascading Style Sheets, control the appearance of specific objects, say the
text of an e-mail. In fact, themes1 that you download are actually just a collection of style
sheets and images that define the new appearance. You can use the userContent.css file to
override the values in whatever theme you are using.
Like the user.js file, this file is not created in a default installation. To create one, simply
open up a text editor as in subsection 2.5.2 and create a file called userContent.js. Also,
there should be a userContent-example.css file that contains some commented-out examples
of what this file can do. You may want to simply rename this file and take out the ‘-example’
portion. You may even want to uncomment some of the examples to enable them.
The use of !important at the end of a setting, but before the semi-colon places this setting
at high importance and tells Mozilla to always use your setting, overriding what the author
intended you to see.
As with most configuration changes made directly in a file, you will need to fully restart
Mozilla for changes made in userContent.css to take effect. For hints on how to further
use this file and more examples, check out http://www.mozilla.org/unix/customizing.
html.
It is also important to remember that when you modify the display of objects through
1
section 2.7
26
CHAPTER 2. GETTING STARTED AND MOZILLA BASICS
2.6. PROFILES
userContent.css that you are not actually changing the code. If you want all backgrounds
to be hot pink, you can do it by using the !important flag, but that does not mean anyone
else will see it that way, not even if you copy the link in your browser and send it to a
friend.
2.6
Profiles
2.7
Themes
2.8
Security
2.8.1
SSL Certificates
Mozilla-based products store certificate information in key3.db, cert7.db, and cert8.db.
The key3.db file is the database for keys, and the cert*.db files contain client certificates.
The number is representative of the version of Network Security Services (NSS) used by
Mozilla. If you have been using Mozilla for quite some time and haven’t changed or purged
your profile, not only are you a very brave soul, but you are likely to find cert7.db in
there, along with cert8.db. Once cert8.db has been created –based on the contents of
cert7.db– Mozilla will no longer use that file. It is safe to delete these files while Mozilla
is not running; it will create them as needed when running. You will, however, need to
re-import any certificates you have previously added for either the navigator or the mail
portion of the program.
If you find the need to modify these files for any reason, but you do not want to outright
delete them, you can use the Certificate Database Tool2 which is a command-line utility
2
available at http://www.mozilla.org/projects/security/pki/nss/tools/certutil.html
27
2.9. COOKIES
CHAPTER 2. GETTING STARTED AND MOZILLA BASICS
which can manipulate Mozilla’s certificate-related files.
2.8.2
2.9
Passwords
Cookies
Although this is not about cookies and Sesame Street’s Cookie Monster would be sorely
disappointed with this next section, I am going to throw in as many cookie comparisons,
analogies, and references as I can. You might even find a cookie recipe herein, if you’re
lucky.
Cookies are small files that are placed on your computer’s hard drive in your profile
directory, in the file called cookies.txt (I bet you never would have guessed that!) By
themselves, they are pretty innocuous and can even be helpful, as they let your browser
remember certain tediious input like logon and shopping information. However, if you use a
workstation that is shared by many people and have no way to secure your profile, then you
may want to take some precautions. You may also not want certain websites to remember
information about you, and you can control the settings with the Cookie Manager.
When you visit a website, it may ask Mozilla to store some information about you
–based on the permissions you’ve allowed– and retrieve it the next time you visit the site
or some other section of the site.
The preference settings for cookies can be found at File—Preferences—Privacy &
Security—Cookies. In Firefox, the cookoie settings are Tools—Options—Privacy—Cookies.
See Figure 2.1 for the general idea.
Third Party Cookies Third party cookies are ones which are created and controlled by
a website you are not specifically visiting. The typical use for this is for banner ads that
28
CHAPTER 2. GETTING STARTED AND MOZILLA BASICS
2.9. COOKIES
appear on a page you are viewing but actually come from some other site. This way, that
other site can track the ads you have seen and, indeed, the ones that you follow and view
the products. It is rare that a site’s functionality will depend on third-party cookies, and
it is wise to blcok them. Besides, cookies from someone you do not know tend to not be
very tasty.
2.9.1
Allowing
If you’re anything like Limp Bizkit, then you will just set Mozilla to accept any and all
cookies. If you are a bit more discerning as to where your “cookies” come from, then you
will want to take a look at some of the settings available.
As of version 0.8, Firefox is missing the granular control available in the Mozilla Navigator via File—Preferences—Privacy & Security—Cookies—View. Other than that, Firefox
has the same options, but in a checkbox format rather than radio buttons, allowing for
increasing security the more boxes one checks. Of course, somewhat conversely, maximum
cookie security can be obtained (at the cost of web functionality, of course) by not checking any of he boxes such that Firefox would not allow any cookies whatsoever. This is, of
course, available in Navigator simply by choosing Disable cookies.
2.9.2
Privacy Settings
2.9.3
Cookie Manager
To start the Cookie Manager, you open File—Preferences—Privacy & Security—Cookies
and then click on the “Manage Stored Cookies” button. You will see a box like in Figure 2.2.
To reach the Cookie Manager in Firefox, the path is Tools—Options—Privacy—Cookies—
Stored Cookies... which will bring up an identical window as that displayed in Figure 2.2
29
2.9. COOKIES
CHAPTER 2. GETTING STARTED AND MOZILLA BASICS
Figure 2.1: Cookie Preferences in the Mozilla Navigator
30
CHAPTER 2. GETTING STARTED AND MOZILLA BASICS
2.9. COOKIES
with one exception. The Firefox version is missing the Cookie Sites tab. To explicitly block
or allow a specific site’s cookies in Firefox, you click on the Exceptions... button instead of
the Stored Cookies... under Tools—Options—Privacy—Cookies.
Make these settings changes, and get yourself some milk, because the sheer extent to
which cookies are used on the internet will have you saying “Got Milk?” in no time at all.
Figure 2.2: Cookie Manager in the Mozilla Navigator
Denying access to cookies As you can see from Figure 2.2, I have unwittingly visited
a number of sites that then linked to advertisement sites. These particular sites use cookies
31
2.9. COOKIES
CHAPTER 2. GETTING STARTED AND MOZILLA BASICS
to keep track of what ads you have seen and sometimes which ones you have clicked on.
As these are most likely the all organic, vegan, no sugar, no egg type of cookies that no
one really likes, just pretends to, I am going to select one and click the Remove Cookie
option while the “Don’t allow sites that set removed cookies to set future cookies” option
is checked.
As you can now see in Figure 2.4, this particular domain is now restricted from setting
cookies no matter what I set my policy settings. You should be very carfeful about having
the “Don’t allow...” option checked and clicking Remove All Cookies since there are times
when no matter how hard you are dieting, you need to have a cookie to get through the
day and keep your sanity.
Figure 2.3: Privacy Settings
32
CHAPTER 2. GETTING STARTED AND MOZILLA BASICS
Figure 2.4: Cookie Sites Tab
33
2.9. COOKIES
2.10. MISCELLANEOUS
CHAPTER 2. GETTING STARTED AND MOZILLA BASICS
2.10
Miscellaneous
2.10.1
Ctrl-U
The ctrl-u key combination is your friend! You can use this combination in either navigator or when viewing a message to give you the source of whatever your looking at. In
navigator, use of this will give you the sites HTML code so you can view it, learn HTML,
or just see what’s going on with a website. In mail&news, this will bring up the source of
the message, including full headers, which can be helpful in troubleshooting mail problems.
Don’t forget about ctrl-u, he’s your friend and he’s lonely!
34
Chapter 3
The Web Client
Here we are, the main event. Although Mozilla has many features, you are certainly here
in part or because of the Web Browser1
3.1
Preferences
3.2
Bookmarks
It is possible that you may know the names and addresses of all the sites you care about.
Plus, once you have visited or typed in a site’s name, Mozilla remembers it and requires
you to only type a few characters before it can guess where you want to go. So why use
bookmarks at all, except for a direct link to that picture of you and your girlfriend on New
Year’s Eve, or of your Ex throwing up at the toilet?
Well, give bookmarks a chance, because they add some powerful functionality to Mozilla
1
The Component is really called Navigator, but that gets confusing with the old Netscape versions, so
I will use web client or browser instead
35
3.2. BOOKMARKS
CHAPTER 3. THE WEB CLIENT
and just may have a feature for which you are in desperate need (I’m talking something
you can’t live without here, folks, so read on).
3.2.1
Importing from Another Browser
3.2.2
Organizing
Properties: If you right-click on a bookmark while in the Bookmark Manager, you can
choose to view its properties. Herein lies the real power of Mozilla’s bookmarks.
Info Here we have the basics. The name is what you see in either the bookmarks dropdown menu, or the sidebar. Location is -surprisingly- the actual web location of the site.
Keyword is like a shortcut so you can type it in, only shorter. Hence, shortcut.2
Schedule Here’s where we get really fancy. You can schedule Mozilla to look at a
site every so often for you and notify you when it changes. This way, you don’t have to
continually go to your best friend Sinbad changes his Weblog concerning the newest Barbie
and Ken news only to find out that he still hadn’t updated the site since the announcement
of the new Matrix line of Barbies; Mozilla can tell you when it has been updated.
Notify Here you can decide what action to take when Sinbad’s Barbie blog has been
updated with the new Prada line of Barbie clothing.
2
This is not to be confused with my mother’s infamous “cut-shorts” in which she takes a detour in an
effort to get to her destination more quickly, only to find herself no closer an hour later
36
CHAPTER 3. THE WEB CLIENT
3.3
3.3.1
3.4
3.4.1
3.3. TOOLBARS
Toolbars
Component Bar
navigating to websites
The Location Bar
The location bar at the top of the browser
Location Bar History The Location Bar has its own history. The settings are in Edit—
Preferences—Navigator—History and here you can set the number of days it remembers,
as well as clear it outright, so http://elmoismyhero.com doesn’t come up and embarass
you when your friend uses your computer to look up the schedule at the Elbo Room and
starts typing in elbo.com. You know you don’t wanna be punk’d like dat!
Location Bar Shortcut To quickly access the location bar, hit alt+d or click the mouse
cursor in the text field near the top of the browser
3.5
Navigating within Websites
3.5.1
Finding Keywords in a Website
Search engines have become supremely adept at taking you to pages with the sought after
information on them. Sometimes, however, you are taken to a page that is –in essence–
40+ pages in length, maintained, obviously, by some nutjob who thinks the internet itself
should be nothing but one long page with a hundred million line table of contents.
37
3.5. NAVIGATING WITHIN WEBSITES
CHAPTER 3. THE WEB CLIENT
You don’t want to read through this entire site, hell, you don’t even want to skim
through the site, am I right? Have no fear, for with Mozilla, you can do one of two things.
If what you are looking for is a link to something else, you can simply start typing on your
keyboard, and Mozilla will automatically find the first string that matches what you type
in. If what you are searching for is plain text, then you can do the same thing, but you
need to preface your typing with a slash (’/’) before you type.
So, say you are searching for a radio formerly owned by J.D. Rockefeller, and your
search engine takes you to a site that has all kinds of vintage and modern electronics. You
know what you want is on there, but it’s not easy to find. Simply type /rockefeller and
you should be taken right there. Well, at least to the first instance of ’rockefeller’ on the
page. If you need to find more, then type ctrl+g or choose Edit—Find Again from the
menu which will take you to the next instance of rockefeller.
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CHAPTER 3. THE WEB CLIENT
3.5.2
The Site Navigation Bar
3.6
Tabbed Browsing
3.7
Sidebar
3.8
Page Information
3.9
Plugins
3.10
3.6. TABBED BROWSING
Working Offline
To go offline, you can either click on the connection-state icon in the lower right hand
corner, as in Figure 3.1, or you can click on File—WorkOffline. This will immediately
place you in offline mode, and you will not be able to access the internet.
Figure 3.1: Online/Offline icon
Note:There is no way to take just one component offline, so when any one piece of Mozilla
goes offline, the entire application assumes that it cannot reach the internet or local network.
You can tell at a glance whether or not you are offline by checking the status of the online
status icon in the lower right hand corner, as in Figure 3.1
39
3.11. ADVANCED PREFERENCES
3.11
CHAPTER 3. THE WEB CLIENT
Advanced Preferences
These are options not found in the standard preferences dialogs.
3.11.1
Non-Mozilla Mail interaction
There are other mail clients out there and you may be just craz enough to use one or two
of them from time to time. Hopefully, this section can make the interaction of those clients
and the Mozilla browser component more amenable.
Outlook Express
Clicking Links in OE While reading mail with Outlook Ex-
press, you may receive a message that has a web link in it. If you want clicking
on that link to open a new Mozilla browser, you need two things
1. Mozilla needs to be your default browser
2. You should put the following setting in your prefs.js file:
user pref("advanced.system.supportDDEExec", false);
40
Chapter 4
E-mail and News
So, that fancy ISP you’ve purchased not only gives you access to view the latest
juice on the next Jason horror movie, but it also gives you an e-mail address to
write to your little sister Eve, –who, even though she resists new technology–
cannot be pulled away from her e-mail and Instant Messaging.
Well, one thing at a time. First, let’s get e-mail up and running, then later
we can look at using Mozilla as an Instant Messaging client.1
4.1
Setup
There are two different locations to configure the Mail components. The first is
in the same place you are already familiar with, the Preferences option under
the Edit menu item. These are the global options for mail, and will propagate
to all your individual accounts, unless you specifically override them. Let’s go
1
Yeah, this ain’t your grandmother’s web browser, you can use either the IRC portion of the
client(Chapter 7), or the JabberZilla project (Chapter 9).
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4.1. SETUP
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
ahead and take a look at these first.
4.1.1
Preferences
There are some pretty standard options here. As in the other preferences we’ve
looked at, make sure you actually click on the Mail & Newsgroups line, as there
are some important options here. Most things you can leave default, but I am
going to touch on a couple things, pretty much in the order you would come
across them, if you started at the top of the options and looked at them in a
downward fashion.
• Windows: This determines the layout of your Mail & News window. If
you change this, you will need to restart2 Mozilla. The cute little examples
Mozilla provides ought to give you a pretty decent idea what this setting
does; see ?? for the skinny on this more-useful-than-you-might-imagine
option.
• Notifications: You can have Mozilla play any kind of sound you want, but
the better feature is the alert or toast option. This displays a small pop-up
window in the lower right-hand corner saying you have new messages. You
can click on this to take you directly to the inbox that has received the
new mail.
• Composition: Some of the defaults here might be a little different from
what you are accustomed to. You may like the newer options, or you may
want to change them to what I think are more “natural” settings.
2
??
42
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
4.1. SETUP
1. Forward messages inline allows you to immediately see and edit what
you are forwarding. Otherwise, the forward is an attachment that
your recipients must open seperately.
2. Replying makes the most sense when you start the reply above the
text, and that the reply is quoted. This way, your reply makes sense
to the original sender in case he has forgotten what you sent.
• Addressing: Mozilla makes for easy address collection. Whenever you
respond to an e-mail, Mozill can add addresses automatically, if you have
selected “Automatic Address Collection,” and then you can select to which
address book you would like them added.
If you or your company has an LDAP directory (this is likely if your
company uses exchange servers) you can setup Mozilla to query that server
for address lookups. You may need to contact your administrator for
some of the parameters. You will need to know the name of a server
and your Base DN. It is likely that the servername is the same as your
mail server –if you are using Exchange– and the DN very well by your
domainname, so you would enter dc=mycompany;dc=com if your e-mail were
joeblow@mycompany.com. The port number for LDAP lookups is usually
389.
Much more on addressing can be found in the chapter on the Address
Book component, Chapter 5.
• Offline & Disk Space:
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4.1. SETUP
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
Offline
At the bottom of the preferences list, you will find this oft-
overlooked option. Here, you can specify some Offline/Online options,
and how much of your hard disk space Mozilla uses. If compsing mail
while offline (probably if you travel with a laptop), you will want Mozilla
to send mail automatically when you go online. If you have a reason to
put Mozillin its online state when not connected to the network, you will
want Mozilla to prompt you or not send unsent messages at all. If you
choose this option, you need to remember to manually send the mail by
chossing File—Offline—Download/Sync now and checking the option to send
unsent messages. You can also control Mozilla’s behavior when you choose
to go offline.
Disk Space
Check this box if you want Mozilla to automatically handle
compaction of your folders. Compaction is the process by which Mozilla
purges deleted messages. No matter what you choose in Server Settings
in subsection 4.1.3, Mozilla will not actually delete your mail when you
tell it to. Instead, it hides the mail from you. During compaction, Mozilla
will completely remove, or expunge, the messages marked for death.
Tech Note: Your mail that is stored in the “Local Folders” account, downloaded via POP, or set for offline use in IMAP is stored in files in your profile3
directory. These files are in a folder named after the account, and then in files
named for the mail folder. All the messages in one mail folder are contained in
a single file.
3
see Appendix B for the location
44
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
4.1.2
4.1. SETUP
Mail Account Setup
Starting mail for the first time4 or choosing to add an account5 in Mail & Newsgroup Account Settings will bring up the account wizard. It is important to note
that if you do not have an e-mail account, this will not create one for you.
This wizard is to configure Mozilla to read mail from a pre-existing account.
Usually, your ISP will provide you with an account. They should have some
sort of rudimentary documentation with the answers to some of the questions.
1. Your Name: something like Snoop-kateer would be good here. Your usual
name would work, as well.
2. Email Address: the e-mail address you are configuring
3. POP or IMAP: most locations will offer both here. This is an important
distinction, as POP will download the mail to your computer, deleting
the mail from the server, whereas IMAP will work off of the server, see
subsection 4.1.4 for more details.
4.1.3
Mail & Newsgroup Account Settings
Mail Account Settings
4
5
Once you have a mail account setup,
see section 4.3 about starting the mail client
You cannot use Mozilla to directly check web-only mail accounts like Yahoo! or Hotmail. However,
there are some projects out there like YahooPOPs http://yahoopops.sourceforge.net that can be used
to check these accounts from within Mozilla.
45
4.1. SETUP
4.1.4
POP
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
POP vs. IMAP
With POP, the so-called Post Office Protocol, your computer, or –more
specifically– your mail client, opens a session with your mail server, downloads
all your mail, closes the session and then allows you to read the mail which is
locally stored.
Pro
Con
Do not need to be connected for the
mail on workstation is the only copy
duration of reading e-mail
IMAP
IMAP, or the Internet Mail Access Protocol is a more advanced pro-
tocol. With IMAP, the mail and data stays on the server. The client first
downloads the header information (date, subject, sender, and so forth) and
then downloads the message body when you request it.
Pro
Con
Faster initial access for mail
Must be online
Mail is stored on server
4.1.5
SMTP, or, Outgoing Mail Settings
SMTP, or the Simple Mail Transport Protocol, is used to transfer the mail
you compose6 to your recipient’s mail system. Basically, POP and IMAP in
subsection 4.1.4 are used to retrieve mail, and SMTP is used to send it.
Because of how SMTP is used and implemented today and limitations you
may run into while using Mozilla (or any other mail client, for that matter), I
am going to attempt a brief description of how it works. This could especially
6
See section 4.6.
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CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
4.2. MIGRATING MAIL
be useful if you use a laptop and send mail from multiple locations (office,
home, friends’ homes, airports, open wireless points, etc.)
Configuring SMTP
The configuration screens for SMTP are located at Edit—
Mail & Newsgroup Account Settings
4.2
4.2.1
Migrating Mail
Migrating Mail and Settings
Mozilla keeps its mail and mail settings in your Profile, discussed in Appendix B. Basied on the knowledge, you will see that the settings are kept
in a completely arbitrary and random folder, the arbitrariness and randomness
to make even Monty Python proud. As this is the case, you cannot simply copy
the settings and mail files over from one profile to another, because the settings
may reference montypyt.slt and you have moved them to kidsnhall.slt7
If you want to migrate your mail settings between different profiles (on the
same or disparate machines) or perhaps you want to move to a different Mozillabased e-mail application such as Thunderbird, follow these simple steps.
4.2.2
Thunderbird
Note: If you use a custom theme, it is best to set Mozilla to the default theme
before performing the following procedure. If you fail to do this, Thunderbird
7
hey, the generation of the profile “salt” directories is completely random, so it could happen!
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4.2. MIGRATING MAIL
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
may start up a bit strangely, due to incompatibilities between the theme you
copy from your Mozilla profile to your Thunderbird profile. If this happens,
go into Tools—Options and choose the themes settings page; uninstall the theme
that is not working, and Thunderbird should revert to its original theme.
1. Use either the Profile Manger (subsection 2.3.1) or start up the new version of Thunderbird and let it create a default Thunderbird profile for you.
When the Account Manager comes up click cancel and exit the application.
2. Find the Mozilla profile you are interested in migrating (...\Application
Data\Mozilla\Profiles\XXXXXXXX.slt). Find the location of your new
default Thunderbird profile folder. Now copy all the contents of the first
directory into the second including the mail folders and their indexes.
3. You aren’t done yet because Mozilla uses absolute directory paths in
prefs.js. Use a text editor 8 to open up the prefs.js file located in the Thun-
derbird directory. Search and replace all strings containing: ...\Mozilla\Profiles\XXXX.slt
with ...\Thunderbird\Profiles\XXXX.slt.
4. Save the file and start up Thunderbird.
8
If you are on windows, it is best to use something other than notepad. Notepad can insert unwanted
characters in the prefs file, so make sure you save the file as ‘all files’ and ‘ANSI’.
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4.2.3
4.3
4.3. STARTING THE MAIL CLIENT
Migrating Mail from Another Client
Starting the Mail client
With Mozilla started, you can enter the mail portion in a number of ways. At
the bottom of your client9 you can click on the little icon that looks like an
envelope to start up the E-mail and News client. If you have an aversion to
the component bar, you can start it from the “Window” menu. The shortcut
is ctrl+2.
At this point, you will either be looking at your mail homepage, or you will
be directed to setup your first account. Account setup is detailed in subsection 4.1.2.
4.3.1
Layout
The mail window is laid out in three distinct window panes. Depending on
what you chose in the setup portion10 , you will have your folder pane on either
the entire left-hand side (good for those of you who are anal about organizing
your mail) or it will be relegated to the upper-left of the window (good if you
like to maximize your reading space).
9
10
this assumes you have not hidden the Component Bar, see subsection 3.3.1
??
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4.4. READING MAIL
4.4
4.4.1
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
Reading Mail
Attachments
Attachments are additional file that are sent along with the e-mail message
itself. Think of them as being like a Remora Fish that attaches itself to a shark,
just riding along with the shark whereever it goes. Okay, maybe thinking about
attachments that way is not totally productive, but it sure is fun!
In any case, attachments are widely used to send pictures of one’s children,
or, perhaps one’s dog (usually whichever one is the more attractive) to friends
and relatives that probably do not really want to see the picture and would
rather have a nice letter instead. Well, these poor saps in your extended family
are now at your mercy, since there is almost nothing they can do to stop you
from sending them pictures of your new goldfish or audio clips of your new
garage folk band as often as you please.
Tech Note: In Mozilla, when you send or receive an attachment, the attachment itself is stored in an encoded form in the actual file that holds all your
mail. So, you should be judicious about the use of attachments as larger files
means slower access time to your mail.
Reading Attachments:
Attach
Sending Attachments:
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4.5
4.5. REPLYING
Replying
To reply to the message you are reading, just hit the reply button on your
toolbar or type ctrl+R. This will bring up a compose window with the recipient
filled in, and the text of the original message quoted as per your settings in
Preferences.11
Tech Note: When replying, you can further customize the look of the quoted
text. In your Chrome directory (located in Path to mozilla
chrome, create a file called userContent.css with the following contents.
blockquote[type=cite] {
border-width: thin ! important;
font-family: comic sans ms ! important;
background-color: ivory !important;
font-size: 11pt ! important;
}
blockquote[type=cite] {
color: navy ! important;
}
blockquote[type=cite] blockquote {
color: maroon ! important;
}
blockquote[type=cite] blockquote blockquote {
color: green ! important;
}
blockquote[type=cite] blockquote blockquote blockquote {
color: purple ! important;
}
blockquote[type=cite] blockquote blockquote blockquote blockquote {
color:redl ! important;
}
blockquote[type=cite] blockquote blockquote blockquote blockquote
blockquote {
color:orange ! important;
11
??
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4.6. COMPOSING MAIL
4.6
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
Composing Mail
Ready to impress that hot geeky guy who lives down the hall from you? Well,
let’s send him a little piece of mail from Mozilla. There are two formats for
mail: plain text and HTML. Plain text is just that; content without a lot of
fluff getting in the way of your deepest thoughts. HTML allows you to add
formatting to your message so you can display your creative side as well as
your intellectual one. If you are trying to impress the guy down the hall that
knows more than just how to turn on his computer, I’d advise starting with
plain text, and then inserting HTML in there later, when you really need to.
Note that it is possible to do some limited formatting in plain text, and we’ll
cover that in the plain text section.
4.6.1
Plain Text E-mail
There’s not too much to composing messages in plain text, so in this section,
we’re going to cover the few plain text attributes, as well as the basics of composing a message. In subsection 4.6.2, we’ll look at the things you can do with
HTML in your messages.
There are a few settings that affect plain text mail. In Edit—Preferences—Mail &
Newsgroups—Composition, there is a setting to wrap your messages at a certain
length. This is to insure that the recipient sees the mail in an easy to read
fashion, and that all the lines are not of different length, or that your paragraph is on one long line and the reader has to scroll horizontally rather than
vertically. This is a good setting, and you should choose anything between 72
to 76 characters in length to have mozilla wrap your text. This is a global
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setting and will take effect for all messages you compose in plain text
Next, an important setting to remember is the composition format. If you
solely or almost always compose mail in plain text, you will want to leave the
setting Compose messages in HTML format located in Edit—Mail & Newsgroup Account
Settings—¡account name¿ blank. This is a per-account setting, and needs to be
configured the way you want it for each account. The default is for messages
to be composed in HTML format.
Starting a Message
To compose mail, click either the toolbar button “Com-
pose Mail,” the menu option Message—New Message, or using the ctrl + m hotkey.
This will bring up a new window for you to compose e-mail.
Tech Note: The Mail Composer is the same code that Composer in Chapter 6
runs on, so they have the same feel to them.
The first thing you need to do is address it.
Addressing and Body
Sending
Formatting Plain Text Mail
4.6.2
HTML E-mail
E-mail has been around for a long time, but about 2 seconds after HTML was
introduced to the world, someone created an e-mail client that could handle
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4.6. COMPOSING MAIL
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
Figure 4.1: Composing New Mail
54
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4.7. USING TEMPLATES
viewing and sending HTML formatted e-mail. Well, maybe it was a bit longer
than that, but HTML formatted e-mail can be used in just about every GUIbased e-mail client out there, Mozilla included.
Just under Edit—Preferences—Mail & Newsgroups—Composition, there is a preference called Send Format. I know you won’t believe me when I tell you, but this
actually has to do with how your messages are sent to people. In here, you
can choose what to do when Mozilla knows that a recipient should not receive
HTML mail.12 The bottom section allows you to specify entire domains that
should either received HTML formatted e-mail or plain text formatted e-mail.
These settings only take effect if you are composing HTML formatted messages. If you are composing in plain text, it will send in plain text, no matter
what these settings are. However, if you usually send in plain text but want to
compose a particular e-mail in HTML, you can hold down the shift key when
you click on compose or reply, and that will place the composer window in
HTML format.
4.7
Using Templates
Templates, as in other programs, allow you to create pre-made doocuments so
you can easily and quickly compose messages which follow a similar pattern to
ones you have sent and will send again.
For example, let us say your boss wants you to send him a TPC report once
per week and that it basically says the same thing each week. Normally, you
just forward the message you sent the week before, making a minor edit here
12
As desribed in ??
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4.8. WORKING OFFLINE
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
or there. Unfortunately, a couple times you forgot to get rid of the ‘Fwd:’ in
the subject line, or the dashed line which demarcates the forwarded message.
Well, by using templates, you will never need to face this problem again.
4.7.1
Setting up the Templates
There should be a folder named (surprisingly enough) ‘Templates’ nestled
among the other folders. Mozilla should recognize it as a special folder with
distinct properties and it tells you this
4.8
Working Offline
If you are a road warrior, have dial-up internet access, like to take long walks
and check your mail in the park, or just a pack-rat at heart, you are going
to want to have your mail available when your computer is not connected to
the internet. If you chose to use POP when setting up your mail client in
section 4.1, then you are pretty much all setup. Just read the next paragraph,
and you are all set. If you chose IMAP and want to have your mail offline, the
entire section is for you!.
Basics
or, “What is ‘Offline’ and why would I want to use it?”
To move to offline mode in mail and news is the same as getting there in
the web browser. See section 3.10
Note:There is no way to take just one component offline, so when any one piece
of Mozilla goes offline, the entire application assumes that it cannot reach the
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4.9. NEWS CLIENT
internet or local network. You can tell at a glance whether or not you are
offline by checking the status of the online status icon in the lower right hand
corner, as in Figure 3.1
However, if you
Figure 4.2: Download and Synchronize Mail and News
4.9
News Client
E-mail’s not the only thing this bad-boy can do; the client can connect to and
read USENET messages via the NNTP protocol. “Woah!” you say, “what the
hell is that?” Well, before Google.com, yea, even before the World Wide Web.
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4.9. NEWS CLIENT
4.9.1
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
News Account Settings
News accounts are very similar to e-mail accounts. Basically, a newsgroup is
like a big, shared mailbox that concerns a common topic. Nearly all institutions
of learning and most ISPs, you very likely have some sort of newsgroup account,
whether you know it or not. These newsgroups run over NNTP, or, the Network
News Transfer Protocol.
Even if your ISP does not provide you with newsgroups, there are public ones
available out there. There are at least two such public services for Mozilla itself.
One is for users and the other is for developers. In actuality, however, both
provide good help and tips for your average Joe Schmoe users like you and me. I
am going to guide you through connecting to the Mozilla news service, and then
you’ll be ready to apply this knowledge to connecting to your own news service,
so you can read newsgroups like alt.gi-joe and alt.sex.fetish.plushies, since
you are curious why your boyfriend has such a strange attachment to that
kangaroo his mother gave him for Valentine’s Day when he was 14.
Connecting to Mozilla News
First, start up the mail and news client, as in
section 4.3.
1. From the menu, choose Edit—Mail&Newsgroup Account Settings.
2. With the settings screen up, click on Add Account.
3. Choose “Newsgroup Account” and click Next.
4. Enter your name and primary e-mail address13 and click Next.
13
many people put a bogus e-mail address here to help ward off spammers. A popular technique is to use
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4.9. NEWS CLIENT
5. The news server in this instance should be news.mozilla.org.
6. Accept the default account or make it more aesthetically pleasing. and
click Next.
7. Verify your settings and click Finish.
Wasn’t that easy?
Now you are all setup to read messages in the mozilla
newsgroup. Let’s continue, shall we?
4.9.2
Reading Newsgroup Messages
Subscribing to Newsgroups
Now that we have the news account setup, it’s
time to take a look at the knowledge (or egregious bluster) contained within.
First, we need to subscribe14 to one or more groups.
You can get to the subscribe dialogues by either choosing File—Subscribe as in
Figure Figure 4.3 or by right-clicking on your news account entry and selecting
Subscribe from the pop-up menu. From this box, you can “subscribe” to any
folder or group from any of your configured accounts, so you need to make sure
you are looking at the correct one, See Figure 4.4 The first time you do this,
you are going to need to download the names of all the newsgroups. Get some
popcorn, as this can be over 20,000 different groups if you are contacting a
your real e-mail address so people can find you, but to add words in the middle of it to fool the programs
that farm e-mail addresses. For example, if your e-mail is superkitten@yahoo.com, you might change it
to DONT.SPAM.superkitten@yahoo.com so that a human would know to remove the words, but a robot
would not.
14
You may be familiar with subscribing to mailing lists, but this is not the same thing. Subscribing to
newsgroups is really just a way of easily getting to the groups in which you are interested. It would be
better to think of it as creating shortcuts or a bookmark list of groups you frequent.
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4.9. NEWS CLIENT
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
new ISP news server. (You never knew there was so much time wasted on the
internet, did you?) From here, you need only click on the box to the right of a
group to check it. Now you are subscribed to the newsgroup.
Figure 4.3: Subscribe Menu Option
Downloading Headers
Now that we have some newsgroups listed in our folder
pane, let’s see what content is available therein. In your folder pane on the left,
you should see a listing of the groups to which you have subscribed under the
name of the newsgroup account. When you click on one of these groups, Mozilla
will ask the server how many active messages there are in the group. If it is
more than specified in the Server Settings portion, then it will ask you how many
headers you want to get. (See Figure 4.5 Notice, in the example that the group
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CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
4.9. NEWS CLIENT
Figure 4.4: Folder Subscribe Box
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4.9. NEWS CLIENT
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
Figure 4.5: Downloading News Headers
contains over 3000 postings, but I have opted for the default of 500 so I am
not waiting forever to retrieve message headers I will probably never read. By
specifying a limited number headers, Mozilla will go and get the most recent
postings on the group.
In a few seconds (or longer, if the server is tired or you connection is running
at turtle speed), you should see the newspost headers in your right-hand pane.
Like IMAP15 , the message body will be retrieved when you click on its subject
line.
If using a View16 , the messages will not appear threaded. At this time, you
will need to be viewing all messages for threading to work. If the messages are
not threaded, and you are not using a view, click on the Thread Select icon in
the upper left-hand corner of the header pane. See Figure 4.6 for the location.
It’s just above the big red dot.
After you have selected the threaded view, your messages should look some15
16
4.1.4
see section 4.10
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4.9. NEWS CLIENT
Figure 4.6: Selecting threaded news messages
thing like Figure 4.7. Notice “How to stop automatic filecompression” by Gerhard Silbermann has been expanded, and there is a tree-like (not to say the
discussion was wooden) view of the follow-up messages.
This threaded view is quite helpful, especially when coming to a newsgroup
for the first time.
Reading Messages
Now, if you have the preview pane opened, a simple click
on any one of these exciting messages will bring up the message text. Once you
select a message for reading, Mozilla will contact the news server and attempt
to retrieve the message. This should take only a couple seconds, even if you
are using a dial-up connection.
Tech Note: Newsgroup clients use a special file to keep track of the messages
you have read. In older (and especially UNIX-based clients) they use a hidden
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4.9. NEWS CLIENT
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
Figure 4.7: Threaded news messages
file called .newsrc. SLRN uses a similar file called .slrnrc. Mozilla uses an rc
file per newsgroup account. You will find it in the News subdirectory of your
profile, and it will be called servername.rc. For example, if you have configured
Mozilla to talk to the general user newsgroups, you will find a file called secnews.netscape.com.rc.
Therein, you might discover a line like the following:
netscape.mozilla.user.win32:
1-13372,14582,14774-14779
which shows that you have marked the first 13372 messages as read, and then
a few others after that. Everything else in that newsgroup would appear as
unread when you next you view it.
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CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
4.10
4.10. VIEWS
Views
Do not skip over this section lightly!!
Message views are one of the most
powerful and underused tools in any e-mail client, Mozilla included.
Hopefully, I’ve got your attention now. Well, the fact is that most people
simply read their mail as it comes in. One may create a few folders to store
mail special to them (auto-responses from one’s Congressional representatives,
perhaps) With views, however, you can filter the messages in the current folder
to a subset of what is contained therein.
4.11
Rules and Filters
Your rules, stored in the rules.dat file in your profile, are used to automate
organization of your mail.
4.12
Security
Disable receiving HTML messages:
Disable Images in e-mail:
Since Mozilla 1.3, it is possible to disallow e-mail
to load external images. This is handy because a common trick that nasty ole
spammers use to find you is to send you an empty e-mail with a link to an image
on their server. When you open the mail, the HTML-enabled mail client goes
out and grabs the image (which is usually so small that you do not even see
it), which then lets the spammer know that you have received the e-mail and
opened it, even if all you did was click the delete key!
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4.13. JUNK MAIL CONTROLS
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To disable loading remote images, change the following setting: Edit—
Preferences...—Privacy & Security—Images—Do not load remote images in
Mail & Newsgroup messages.
By disabling the loading of remote images, you can still view HTML-formatted
e-mail, and even HTML-formatted e-mail that has an image embedded in it,
but this little spammer trick will no longer work. Unfortunately, some legitamate e-mail uses this method. Someone might send you a message like this
with a link to an external image to cut down on the size of the e-mail he sends.
Or, you might get your daily comics from somewhere like http://ucomics.com
which uses this method to display the image.
Only you can decide whether or not these features are something you want
to use.
4.13
Junk Mail Controls
With the release of Mozilla 1.3, the mail client in Mozilla has a built-in junk
mail filter. This filter dynamically “learns” which mail is junk and which is
valid based on user input. When you first start using Mozilla Mail, it is like a
baby that doesn’t know what types of food it likes, and has no idea what mail
is valid and what is spam. You, the parent, can train this little bouncing baby
by spoon-feeeding it spam, and telling it where to spit the junk mail.
At the far right of your header pane, there is a column with a strangelooking trash icon. When Mozilla is young and does not know anything about
your mail, this trash icon has a question mark on it, as in Figure 4.6. Clicking
on the trash icon once or highlighting the message and clicking on your junk
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4.13. JUNK MAIL CONTROLS
button on the toolbar will change this icon to a trashcan or junk bin, which
denotes that this mail is junk. Clicking again will clear the icon, denoting that
the message is valid and one that you expect or want to receive.
4.13.1
Setting up Junk Mail
Before Mozilla will filter your junk mail for you, they need to be enabled to run.
Note that you need to set them up for each account you have configured and
want Mozilla to filter for spam. Open up the options screen from the Tools—Junk
Mail Controls... menu item, and you will see a screen like in Figure 4.8.
Figure 4.8: Junk Mail Controls Settings Screen
Junk Mail Controls Settings Screen:
The setup screen is pretty self-explanatory.
Make sure to choose the account you want to configure in the upper left, and
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4.13. JUNK MAIL CONTROLS
CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
then check “Enable junk mail controls.” Assuming you do not have spammers
and junk mail senders in you r address book, you can automatically whitelist
those people by checking the next box, “Do not mark messages...” and then
choose the address book you want Mozilla to look at. This setting will allow
all mail from senders whose e-mail addresses are in the chosen addressbook, no
matter how spammy the message looks.
The next two checkboxes control what Mozilla does with mail it determines
to be Junk. The first configures in which folder Mozilla should place mail it
determines to be junk. By default, Mozilla will create a special folder called
Junk when junk mail is first configured to run, and the default is to place it
there. If you are already putting junk mail somewhere else, you may want
to point Mozilla to that folder. The next and final option is to have Mozilla
automatically delete messages after they have been around for a while. This
is a good idea, as it will minimize the used disk space on the server and your
workstation, if you use IMAP, or just your workstation if you use POP.
Junk Mail Controls Logging:
On the upper right of the Junk Mail Controls
settings, there is a button to configure the logging. This isn’t really necessary,
but can be interesting to look at, or for reference if you think Mozilla is misidentifying good mail as spam, and you have set it to automatically delete.
Figure 4.9 is an example of the log file. The log file is saved in an HTMLformatted file called junklog.html in each accounts’ folder under your profile. See
section 2.6 for more information about the profile directory and its contents.
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4.13. JUNK MAIL CONTROLS
Figure 4.9: Junk Mail Log Settings Screen
4.13.2
Training Mozilla
assuming you have quite a bit of mail in your inbox but are just starting to use
Mozilla, here are some steps to quickly train the mail client to identify spam.
1. Highlight any spam and junk mail you have in your Inbox. Use the ctrl
key and the mouse to highlight all the junk messages at once.
2. Click on the Junk button on the toolbar to tell Mozilla that they are junk.
3. Select Tools—Run Junk Mail Controls on Selected Messages... from the menu.
4. Delete the messages or move them to your Junk folder
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5. Now, in your Inbox, type ctrl-a to select all the messages
6. Mark the messages as not Junk
7. Select Tools—Run Junk Mail Controls on Selected Messages... from the menu.
If you are working against a mailbox that does not currently have any junk
mail or spam in it, then simply skip the first couple steps, select a message
and hit ctrl-a to select all the messages, mark them as not spam, and the run
junk mail controls. When you “train” Mozilla, the application keeps a record
of what you have done in a file called training.dat which is stored in the root
of your profile directory, and is used for all your e-mail accounts, so you should
not have to train each individually.
4.14
Advanced Mail and News Settings
Sometimes there are things you just cannot find in either the General Preferences or the Mail and News Account Settings.
4.14.1
Advanced Appearance Settings
Example 1: Changing the Display Colour of Quoted Text
This example will
show you how to use the userContent.css file as described in ?? to highlight
quoted replies.
The idea is to very obviously differentiate between differ-
ent authors’ comments when reading a long and heavily replied-to e-mail or
newsgroup message. You will see that the attribute we are modifying is the
blockquote[type=cite] attribute which is the name of the quoted text when you
reply to an e-mail or newsgroup message.
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CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS4.14. ADVANCED MAIL AND NEWS SETTINGS
blockquote[type=cite] {
border-width: thin ! important;
#font-family: comic sans ms ! important;
font-family: times new roman;
#background-color: ivory !important;
font-size: 11pt ! important;
}
blockquote[type=cite] {
color: navy ! important;
}
blockquote[type=cite] blockquote {
color: maroon ! important;
}
blockquote[type=cite] blockquote blockquote {
color: green ! important;
}
First we define the general attributes for all the quoted text. Then, we define
the color of the first citation to be navy. Then, if we are quoting someone who
quoted someone else (or is replying to us) we then make that a different color:
maroon. If there are further levels, you can continue to add additional entries
with more instances of blockquote in them, choosing a different color each time.
Example 2: Changing the Appearance of the Thread Pane
treechildren:-moz-tree-cell-text(news) {
color: red !important;
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4.14. ADVANCED MAIL AND NEWS SETTINGSCHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
font-weight: bold !important;
font-style: italic !important;
font-family: courier !important;
}
Example 3: Changing the Reply Header
When you reply to a mail or news
message and quote the original text, the text is preceeded by a header that
signifies the original author. This text can be customized to make your own
mail a bit more unique. Because, really, how can one be truly original if one’s
e-mail looks just like everyone else’s? And, while we’re at it, we may as well
compliment the other person while replying to them. Try putting the following
two statements into your prefs.js
‘‘mailnews.reply header authorwrote’’, ‘‘The eloquent %s wrote’’);
‘‘user pref(mainews.reply header colon’’, ‘‘...’’);
The %s is a variable for sender, and is replaced by the name of the person to
whom you are replying. Thus, if you have made these changes and restarted
Mozilla, responding to Sally Mae will look like this:
The eloquent Sally Mae wrote...
instead of
Sally Mae wrote:
Now, isn’t that much, much nicer? I’ll leave it up to you to come up with your
own witty reply header.
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4.15. TROUBLESHOOTING
Example 4: Changing the Date Format
To change the date format, you want
to look at the following settings in your prefs.js file or by using about:config.
user pref(”mail.ui.display.dateformat.default”, 2);
user pref(”mail.ui.display.dateformat.thisweek”, 4);
user pref(”mail.ui.display.dateformat.today”, 0);
Look at this: http://lxr.mozilla.org/mozilla/source/intl/locale/idl/nsIScriptableDateForma
idl\hyper@hash45
4.14.2
Mail
Using an External Mail Client
Perhaps you want to use Mozilla but do not
want to use it as your default mail client in Windows-based Operating Systems.
If you would like to do this, well, I guess there’s no accounting for taste, so all
we need to do is put the following statement in our prefs.js file:
user pref("network.protocol-handler.external.mailto", true);
4.14.3
News
4.15
Troubleshooting
4.15.1
Messages Not Sending
4.15.2
Mail Files are too Large
See the and the item 12 for compaction
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CHAPTER 4. E-MAIL AND NEWS
74
Chapter 5
Address Book
Address converter: http://www.joshie.com/projects/dawn/features.html
75
CHAPTER 5. ADDRESS BOOK
76
Chapter 6
Composer
The Third main element of Mozilla is the Composer. This tool is used primarily to create web pages for publishing on the internet. This tool provides a
WYSIWIG (What You See Is What You Get) interface for creating documents
so that you do not need to know HTML to create simple documents for publishing on the web. If you are familiar with HTML, you can place Composer
into Source mode so you can see and create the source manually. Additionally, composer is invoked each time you compose an e-mail message, so don’t
be surprised if composing e-mail with HTML formatting looks very similar to
creating web pages.
77
CHAPTER 6. COMPOSER
78
Chapter 7
ChatZilla
79
CHAPTER 7. CHATZILLA
80
Chapter 8
Security
81
CHAPTER 8. SECURITY
82
Chapter 9
JabberZilla
This may be in a section, not sure yet
83
CHAPTER 9. JABBERZILLA
84
Chapter 10
Under the Hood
This chapter, just a placeholder for now, will attempt to describe a little bit
more about the mechanics and underlying technologies for Mozilla. Still not
really for the super-technically minded, it will mostly help to explain things
that are referenced or alluded to in the previous sections of the book.
(Content will likely be all over the place and change with every release)
10.1
UserContent.css
: Allows for customization of Mozilla’s appearance in output windows (i.e.
what is displayed by browser, mail, etc.)
85
10.1. USERCONTENT.CSS
CHAPTER 10. UNDER THE HOOD
86
Appendix A
A Sample user.js file
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Turning off annoyances
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Image animation mode: normal, once, none.
// user_pref("image.animation_mode", "once");
// Show pref UI to block images that don’t come from the current server
// user_pref("imageblocker.enable", true);
// Turn that annoying autocomplete popup REALLY off:
// (This actually has a UI but it’s buried.)
// user_pref("browser.urlbar.autocomplete.enabled", false);
// user_pref("browser.urlbar.showPopup", false);
user_pref("browser.urlbar.showSearch", false);
87
APPENDIX A. A SAMPLE USER.JS FILE
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// UI look-and-feel issues
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Don’t ever show me a font smaller than this
user_pref("font.minimum-size.x-western", 12);
// Set the submenu delay
user_pref("ui.submenuDelay", 300);
// Set select background for text widgets:
user_pref("ui.textSelectBackground", "midnightblue");
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Control of popup windows
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Use configurable security policies to override popups, see
// http://www.mozilla.org/projects/security/components/configPolicy.html
// Turn window.open off for particular sites:
// user_pref("capability.policy.popupsites.sites", "http://www.annoyingsite1.com http://ww
// user_pref("capability.policy.popupsites.Window.open","noAccess");
88
APPENDIX A. A SAMPLE USER.JS FILE
// Or turn it off everywhere:
// user_pref("capability.policy.default.Window.open","noAccess");
// More important, disable JS windows popping up a new window on load
// (as lots of porn and spam sites do):
user_pref("dom.disable_open_during_load", true);
// Override popping up new windows on targe// Use configurable security policies to overrid
// http://www.mozilla.org/projects/security/components/configPolicy.html
// Turn window.open off for particular sites:
// user_pref("capability.policy.popupsites.sites", "http://www.annoyingsite1.com http://www
// user_pref("capability.policy.popupsites.Window.open","noAccess");
// Or turn it off everywhere:
// user_pref("capability.policy.default.Window.open","noAccess");
// More important, disable JS windows popping up a new window on load
// (as lots of porn and spam sites do):
user_pref("dom.disable_open_during_load", true);
// Override popping up new windows on target=anything
// user_pref("browser.target_new_blocked", true);
89
APPENDIX A. A SAMPLE USER.JS FILE
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Miscellaneous stuff
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// Turn on gathering of favicon.ico icons
user_pref("browser.chrome.favicons",true);
90
Appendix B
Default Directory Profile Locations
The following are the default locations where Mozilla places its profile directory. For Thunderbird, replace Mozilla with Thunderbird, and for Firefox, replace
Mozilla with Phoenix.
Windows 95/98/ME No Logon:
C:\Windows\Application Data\Mozilla\Profiles\default\xxxxxxxx.slt\1
Windows 95/98/Me Family with Logon:
C:\Windows\Profiles\PROFILE NAME\Application Data\Mozilla\Profiles\default\xxxxxxxx.slt\
Windows NT 4.0:
C:\Winnt\Profiles\NT-User\Application Data\Mozilla\Profiles\default\xxxxxxxx.slt\
Windows 2000/XP:
C:\Documents and Settings\User\Application Data\Mozilla\Profiles\default\xxxxxxxx.slt\2
1
2
where xxxxxxxx is a random alpha-numeric string
In Windows 2000/XP, ”Application Data” is a hidden system folder, that means, it’s hidden ”twice”,
make sure you enabled both viewing hidden and system-protected files and folders, otherwise you will not
91
APPENDIX B. DEFAULT DIRECTORY PROFILE LOCATIONS
Linux:
~/Mozilla/xxxxxxxx.slt/
Mac OS 9:
Documents:Mozilla:User:xxxxxxxx.slt:
Mac OS X:
~/Library/Application\ Support/org.mozilla.Mozilla/Profiles/profile name/xxxxxxxx.slt/
The following table lists items stored in the profile directory as well as the
file’s function.
be able to see it.
92
APPENDIX B. DEFAULT DIRECTORY PROFILE LOCATIONS
12345678.s
Password file, random 8-digit string.
12345678.w
saved forms entries.
abook.mab
address book
bookmarks.html
Bookmarks. Compatible with NC 4 (rename to bookmark.htm)
cert7.db
certificate file
cert8.db
certificate file
cookies.txt
stores cookies. Compatible with NC 4.
custom.dic
customized dictionary.
downloads.rdf
download manager data (Mozilla 0.99+)
history.dat
History
histoy.mab
Collected Addresses address book.
ley3.db
Key database
localstore.rdf
Cache for the interface (layout and so forth)
mimetypes.rdf
stores information about MIME types.
panacea.dat
Cache for the mail folders (structure, UI)
panels.rdf
stores which panels are available in the sidebar
search.rdf
stores Search configuration
secmod.db
Security module
prefs.js
main configuration file
URL.tbl
stores site info where no forms data should be saved.
user.js
configuration file, supersedes all entries in prefs.js
XUL.mfl
XUL (user interface) cache
\Cache\
Cache folder
\NewCache\
old Netscape 6.1 Cache folder
\chrome\
customization files3
\ImapMail\
IMAP Mail folders
\Mail\
POP3 mail folders
\News\
News server folder
93
Table B.1: Profile Directory Contents
APPENDIX B. DEFAULT DIRECTORY PROFILE LOCATIONS
94
Appendix C
Command-line Options
The following table of options can be used to start Mozilla in a specific way.
Perhaps in Preferences—Appearance you have it set to always start with your mail
client, but you want to setup a shortcut to start with the Composer so you can
quickly edit your homepage. With the command-line options, you can specify
exactly how you want to start Mozilla for a specific instance.
To use the command-line options, you need to open up a command prompt
(a DOS prompt in windows, an X-terminal or equivalent in UNIX) and navigate
to where the mozilla executable is. Then, simply enter the executable with the
command option.
For example:
C:\ mozilla -mail
to start the the Mozilla Mail application in Windows, or
$./mozilla -ProfileManager
to start the Mozilla ProfileManager and select a specific Profile in a UNIX
environment.
95
APPENDIX C. COMMAND-LINE OPTIONS
Obviously, you do not type in the C:\ or the $
96
APPENDIX C. COMMAND-LINE OPTIONS
Command Line Option
Value
-height <value>
Set height of startup window to <value>
-h or -help
Prints this list
-installer
Start with 4.x migration window
-width <value>
Set width of startup window to <value>
-v or -version
Print netscp.exe version
-CreateProfile <profile>
Create <profile>
-P <profile>
Start with <profile>
-ProfileWizard
Start with profile wizard
-ProfileManager
Start with profile manager
-SelectProfile
Start with profile selection dialog
-UILocale <locale>
Start with <locale> resources as UI Locale
-contentLocale <locale>
Start with <locale> resources as content Locale
-console
Start Mozilla with a debugging console
-nosplash
Disable splash screen
-quiet
Disable splash screen
-addressbook
Start with the addressbook
-mail
Start with mail
-news
Start with news
-aim
Start with Instant Messenger
-edit <url>
Start with editor
-compose <url>
Start with messenger compose
-jsconsole
Start with Javascript Console
-chrome <url>
Load the specified chrome
-calendar
Starts the Calendar1
Table C.1: Command Line Options
97
APPENDIX C. COMMAND-LINE OPTIONS
98
Appendix D
Resources
This is a listing of some external resources to help you when you are in trouble,
or just to keep up with what’s going on in the Mozilla Community.
Mozilla.org’s list of Community Sites
http://www.mozilla.org/community
Mozilla Tips: A frequently updated source for tips on using Mozilla-based
products
http://www.mozillatips.com
99
Index
manual, 15
LATEX, 10
multiple versions, 19
address book, 61
advanced settings, 22
k-meleon, 7
bookmarks, 27
linux
importing, 28
installing under, 19
properties, 28
mail
broswer
account setup, 34
preferences, 27
addressing, 40
browser
attachments
offline, 29
reading, 37
preferences
body, 40
advanced, 30
composing, 38
camino, 7
HTML mail, 41
chimera, 7
plain text, 39
command line options, 79
composition, 32
disk space, 34
installation, 13
installer, 14
download, 42
linux, 15
IMAP, 35, 36
windows, 14
junk, 52, 53
100
INDEX
INDEX
customize, 57
log, 54
options, 52
views, 50
training, 55
windows, 32
mail and news
training.dat, 55
file locations, 18
layout, 37
mozilla
migrating mail, 36
non-Mozilla mail client, 58
backup, 16
notification, 32
exiting, 21
offline, 30, 33, 41
installing, 13
plain text, 39
offline, 29, 30
start options, 79
formatting, 40
POP, 35
starting, 21
preferences, 32
uninstall, 17
upgrading, 17
reading, 37
versions, 13
reply header, 57
mozilla.org
replying, 37
newsgroups, 44
rules, 50
sending, 40
navigator
settings, 35
offline, 29
advanced, 58
netscape, 7
setup, 31
news, 42
spam, 52
download, 42
starting, 36
headers, 46
sync, 42
reading, 45
thread pane
reading messages, 49
101
INDEX
INDEX
userContent.css, 24, 56
settings, 44
subscribing, 45, 46
windows
sync, 42
installing under, 19
threading, 48
XUL, 24
views, 50
YahooPOPs, 34
outlook express, 30
phoenix, 7
preferences, 22
mail and news, 35
profile, 22, 75
profiles, 25
quicklaunch, 15, 21
settings
mail, 35
news, 44
prefs.js, 23
user.js, 23
seurity, 25
spam, 52
themes, 25
training.dat, 55
uninstall mozilla, 17
upgrading mozilla, 17
102
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