Guft
HOST LINKS
GUFT
G&R
G&R
Unified
File
Transfer
http://www.gar.no/hostlinks/
TM
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Version 6.6
© Gallagher & Robertson as 1990-2013
All Rights Reserved
GALLAGHER & ROBERTSON AS, Kongens gate 23, N- 0153 Oslo, Norway
Tel: +47 23357800
www: http://www.gar.no/
e-mail: support@gar.no
Contents
Contents
Host Links GUFT ............................................................................... 1
Installation.................................................................................................................. 1
Host Links Product Overview .................................................................................... 1
Terminal environment..................................................................................... 1
Server environment ......................................................................................... 2
Scope of the product................................................................................................... 3
Run-time licenses ....................................................................................................... 4
UFT protocol services......................................................................... 5
Technical implementation.................................................................. 7
GUFT, the UNIX/Linux client/requester.................................................................... 7
Screen mode.................................................................................................... 7
Command mode .............................................................................................. 8
The Windows client/requester - GUFTw ................................................................... 8
Prerequisites .................................................................................................... 8
Screen mode.................................................................................................... 8
Command mode .............................................................................................. 9
The server - GUFTsrv ................................................................................................ 9
File types supported.......................................................................... 11
Local file types ......................................................................................................... 11
Remote file types...................................................................................................... 12
GUFT requester usage ..................................................................... 15
Using the UNIX/Linux GUFT requester .................................................................. 15
Parameters..................................................................................................... 15
GUFT start-up examples ............................................................................... 20
Running GUFT in screen mode .................................................................... 21
Running GUFT in command mode ............................................................... 27
Using the Windows GUFT requester ....................................................................... 29
Parameters..................................................................................................... 29
GUFTw start-up examples ............................................................................ 30
Running GUFTw in screen mode.................................................................. 30
Running GUFTw in command mode ............................................................ 40
GUFT requester filename history.................................................................. 41
GUFT server usage ........................................................................... 43
Starting GUFTsrv ..................................................................................................... 43
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Accepting incoming connections .................................................................. 44
Multiple incoming connections..................................................................... 44
Start on demand ............................................................................................ 45
Using mailbox pools for incoming connects ................................................. 46
Multiple DSA nodes...................................................................................... 47
Running GUFTsrv via a G&R Ggate gateway.............................................. 47
GUFTsrv – platform specific issues ......................................................................... 48
GUFTsrv for Windows ................................................................................. 48
GUFTsrv for UNIX/Linux ............................................................................ 48
GUFTsrv parameters ................................................................................................ 49
Command line examples ............................................................................... 51
The GUFTsrv logfile ................................................................................................ 52
GUFTsrv file system access control......................................................................... 52
GUFTsrv redirection ................................................................................................ 53
Starting the workstation redirector server program GUFTws ....................... 53
Redirection file name format......................................................................... 53
GUFTws parameters ..................................................................................... 54
Administration .................................................................................. 55
Gmanager ................................................................................................................. 55
Commands accepted from Gmanager ........................................................... 55
Log and accounting .................................................................................................. 56
GUFT and GUFTw logging .......................................................................... 56
GUFTsrv logging .......................................................................................... 56
Log file format .............................................................................................. 57
The accounting file........................................................................................ 57
Troubleshooting........................................................................................................ 58
GUFT Trace file............................................................................................ 58
Line handler trace file ................................................................................... 58
GUFT and line handler trace file examples................................................... 59
When connecting through Ggate................................................................... 59
UFT Server-specific information..................................................... 61
The GCOS8 UFT...................................................................................................... 61
The GCOS6 UFT...................................................................................................... 62
The GCOS7 UFT...................................................................................................... 62
The Bull UNIX UFT ................................................................................................ 63
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Appendix: Host Links Manuals....................................................... 65
Appendix: Host Links Server Administration ............................... 67
Appendix: Host Links DSA Utilities ............................................... 69
Gconame ....................................................................................................... 69
Gerror............................................................................................................ 70
Glnode........................................................................................................... 70
Gmacfix......................................................................................................... 70
Gping............................................................................................................. 70
Grnode........................................................................................................... 71
Gtrace............................................................................................................ 71
Gtsupd ........................................................................................................... 71
Appendix: Host Links Trace ........................................................... 73
Trace activation ........................................................................................................ 73
Trace types ............................................................................................................... 73
Structure ................................................................................................................... 74
Tracing Ggate ........................................................................................................... 75
Examples - G&R products........................................................................................ 75
CPI-C and Gweb trace files...................................................................................... 77
Appendix: Error Codes.................................................................... 79
OSI/DSA error codes................................................................................................ 79
Windows Sockets error Codes.................................................................................. 91
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GUFT
Host Links GUFT
Installation
The G&R emulations and gateways are independent programs, but part of the
G&R Host Links product set available on all major UNIX/Linux platforms.
Many of the products are also available for Windows servers. For details on
platforms supported, software delivery and installation refer to the Host Links
Installation and Configuration manual.
Host Links Product Overview
Terminal environment
Host links products that run on UNIX or Linux servers with a terminal driven
user interface include emulators and concentrators, as well as various utilities.
•
G3270
provides synchronous IBM3270 functionality. G3270 emulates
IBM LU type 2, including base and extended colour together with
extended highlighting.
•
Qsim
provides synchronous Questar terminal functionality. Qsim
simulates all Questar models, including the DKU7007, DKU7107,
DKU7105 and DKU7211 (Mono, four colour A/B and seven
colour modes are supported). It also simulates the VIP7760 and the
VIP7700.
•
V78sim
provides Bull VIP78xx (BDS) functionality. V78sim emulates all
models of the VIP7800 family; the actual reference is the BDS7.
All visual attributes including colour are supported.
•
Pthru
provides transparent VIP7800 visibility to Bull mainframes for
users with asynchronous VIP7800 terminals or emulators. The
terminals are used in text or forms mode.
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GUFT
Server environment
Host Links products that run on UNIX, Linux or Windows servers.
• Ggate
is a transparent gateway to the Bull native network. It avoids all
need for Front-ends (MainWay/Datanet) or other gateways. It can
be used to connect G&R/Glink (for Windows or Java) emulators
or any of the emulators, concentrators, network printer emulators
and file transfer clients/servers in the Host Links product set. It
also supports third party clients using the TNVIP, TN3270,
TN3270E and standard asynchronous Telnet protocols.
• Gweb
provides a web browser interface to any host application that is
otherwise accessible using the Host Links Qsim, V78sim, or
G3270 emulations.
• Gspool
is designed to run as an unattended process and accept transparent
print output from any type of host application (GCOS8, GCOS7,
GCOS6, IBM) that normally sends print data to network printers
(ROPs), or to a remote spooling system (DPF8-DS). On the
Gspool system the print may be directed to a physical printer or to
the local spooling system. Gspool operates in different modes,
Connect mode, Terminal Writer mode, DPF8 mode, SNM mode,
IBM mode, TN3270 mode and TN3270E mode.
• GUFT
is a G&R implementation of the Bull UFT file transfer protocols. It
enables transfer of data files between Host Links and GCOS systems
over a DSA network.
• Gproxy
is a network management program used for supervision,
management, load balancing and license sharing of G&R Host
Links applications. Gproxy can be set up as a freestanding
monitor program and/or report generator in a small network, or
play a bigger role in a larger network.
• Gsftp
is a transparent gateway between two different File Transfer protocols: FTP (RFC 959) and SFTP (the SSH File Transfer Protocol).
The purpose is to present a seamless integration between the two
protocols, with automatic conversion.
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GUFT
Scope of the product
GUFT is an implementation of the Bull UFT file transfer protocols. These protocols enable transfer of data files between heterogeneous systems. The systems must
be interconnected in a DSA/OSI network running over a private or public X25 network or over a local area network (LAN).
GUFT can be run on any UNIX/Linux or 32-bit Windows platform to which the
G&R Host Links line handlers have been ported. This includes the Bull UNIX
line as well as most other commercially available UNIX platforms and Windows
servers. The GUFTw client can be run on any supported Windows platform.
There is an implementation of UFT on all the Bull minicomputers and mainframe
systems.
UFT file transfers involve two DSA/OSI nodes. One of the nodes runs a UFT
client, called a requester, and the other node runs a UFT server. The requester initiates the various file transfer requests and the server responds and performs the
actions necessary to carry out the transfer.
The G&R UFT implementation includes both the requester and server protocol
enabling file transfer between:
• A G&R/GUFT client and a G&R/GUFT server (called GUFTsrv)
• A G&R/GUFT client and a Bull UNIX, GCOS6, GCOS7, or GCOS8
UFT server.
• A Bull UNIX, GCOS6, GCOS7, or GCOS8 UFT client and a
G&R/GUFT server.
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GUFT
Run-time licenses
In order to run the GUFT products, the following license keys must be present in
your /usr/gar/config/licenses file:
License key
Description
basic
For the base G&R run-time system. Mandatory for all
products.
gline
For the G&R line handlers
guft
For GUFT server, GUFTsrv
(On UNIX/Linux the client is included)
guftc
For GUFT client, i.e. guft, guftw and the workstation
redirector guftws
The licenses file identifies the G&R distributor, the owner of the license and the
licensed products. The license key for a product will normally state how many
users or simultaneous sessions the product is licensed for. If a limitation is
specified in the license, only the licensed number of users or sessions can be
active at any time.
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GUFT
UFT protocol services
The services that may be provided by a UFT client/server pair are as follows:
• basic communication services
-
connection to a remote system
disconnection from a remote system
interruption of a file transfer
• file management services
-
creation of a remote file
deletion of a remote file
request for information about a remote file
• file transfer services
-
transmission of a file to the remote system
reception of a file from the remote system
• extended services
-
restart of a file transfer
The mutual capabilities of a particular UFT client/server pair are negotiated after
a session has been established between them.
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GUFT
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Technical implementation
The UFT file transfer protocols are asymmetrical client/server rather than symmetrical peer to peer; i.e. the set of requests and responses available for exchange
over a UFT session are different for the UFT requester and the server. In the G&R
UFT implementation the requester and server are delivered as two separate
programs.
The GUFT programs communicate with the remote system using the DSA/ISO
protocols implemented in the Host Links line handlers (gl_dsa, gl_diws).
The line handlers are documented in a separate manual (G&R/Gline).
GUFT, the UNIX/Linux client/requester
Screen mode
In full screen mode GUFT uses the G&R/Gvideo interface to present you with a
user-friendly menu where the various UFT functions are offered. Additionally a lot
of general features are offered, including the possibility of navigating around in the
local file system, executing local commands and starting new UNIX/Linux shells.
You can have only a single session at a give time within a given context, but you
may execute several contexts using the G&R (or other) context manager to start
multiple simultaneous transfers. The UFT protocol allows transfer of only one file
at a time, but you can do multiple file transfers serially and have several sessions
with different UFT servers serially without terminating GUFT. All
communications related parameters can be preconfigured, leaving you to simply
select the local and remote file names and press the appropriate function key.
While a file transfer is in progress GUFT updates the screen with status
information (no. of bytes transferred, bytes per second and elapsed time).
Help is always available, and within the parameters menu the help is context sensitive to the parameter you are entering.
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GUFT
Command mode
In command mode you can initiate a single session to a single server. During this
session you can send or receive a single file. GUFT command mode is suitable for
unattended or background operation, and may be executed from a script.
In command mode a summary of the transfer is appended to a log and an
accounting file guft.log and guft.acc in the directory where GUFT is
started. See the section entitled Log and accounting in the Administration
chapter, on page 56.
The Windows client/requester - GUFTw
Prerequisites
GUFTw runs on Windows XP, Windows 7 and Windows 8. GUFTw normally
communicates with the UFT server on the mainframe through the G&R/Ggate
gateway, but can also use the G&R/LDSA communications stack running on the
workstation.
Screen mode
In screen mode, GUFTw presents you with a user-friendly menu where the
various UFT functions are offered. Additionally it offers an interface for navigating
through the local file system and selecting files.
You can have a theoretically unlimited number of sessions at a time within a given
instance of GUFTw. The UFT protocol allows transfer of only one file at a time,
but you can do multiple connections to the same UFT server and have several
transfers with different UFT servers running simultaneously. All communications
related parameters could be pre-configured, leaving you to simply select the local
and remote file names and press the appropriate toolbar button. While a file
transfer is in progress GUFTw updates the screen with status information (no. of
bytes transferred, bytes per second and elapsed time) and, when information on file
sizes is available, a progress bar.
On-line help is available, and within the configuration dialog boxes the help is
context sensitive to the parameter you are entering.
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GUFT
Command mode
Command mode for Windows workstations is available using a separate program,
GUFTwX.EXE. In command mode you can initiate a single session to a single
server. During this session you can send or receive a single file. GUFTw command
mode is suitable for unattended or background operation, and may be executed
from a script.
In command mode a summary of the transfer is appended to a log and an
accounting file guft.log and guft.acc in the directory where GUFTwX is
started. See the section entitled Log and accounting in the Administration
chapter, on page 56.
The server - GUFTsrv
GUFTsrv runs in the background and 'listens' for connections to the DSA node.
GUFTsrv accepts a single connection at a time but several GUFTsrv processes
can be started listening for connects to the same mailbox name on the same DSA
node. This requires use of the G&R DSA or DIWS listener. Please refer to the
Gline documentation for details. GUFTsrv accepts file management and
transfer requests issued by a remote UFT requestor. Files will be read from or
written to the GUFTsrv local file system unless redirected to a client workstation
by means of a special file name syntax in the requestor command. When a file
transfer session is terminated, either normally by the requester at the end of the
session, or forced by the server due to exceptions or protocol violations,
GUFTsrv either terminates and leaves it to the listener to start up a new
GUFTsrv instance when new connections come in, or, in the case where the
listener is not used to start up GUFTsrv ‘on demand’, issues a new 'accept' command and waits for a new connection. In the latter case the server will run until
you terminate it manually using the user/operator command or Gmanager.
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GUFT
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GUFT
File types supported
Local file types
The local UNIX/Linux file system does not have file types as such - the local file
is always a sequential type i.e. the data is composed of data records that can only
be accessed in their physical sequence. The ‘file type’ setting in GUFT mainly
determines the size of the record (or ‘access unit’). The file’s access unit is also
the transfer unit but the DSA session layer normally packs the records into
transfer blocks of up to 16K Bytes (negotiated between the 2 systems) for more
efficient transfer.
GUFT supports two types of sequential file access on the UNIX/Linux platforms:
• VAR
The access unit is a logical record of variable length separated by the
ASCII LF character (the LF itself is not transferred). Data code is
normally set to ASCII, but code translation is possible if the remote
system uses another code (e.g. EBCDIC). This type of file is sometimes
referred to as a text file.
• FIX
The access unit is a fixed, configurable size record. Data code will often
need to be set to BINARY (no code translation will take place and no
record separators will be inserted). This type of file is sometimes referred
to as a byte-stream or a blocked file. This type of file access is useful
when you want fast access and you do not want any logical record
handling to take place.
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GUFT
Remote file types
GUFT supports access settings of 4 different types of remote files. The remote
file type setting in GUFT is interpreted by the remote file system as follows:
• VAR - sequential text file, interpreted remotely as:
UNIX/Linux
GCOS6
GCOS7
GCOS8
same as for the local system
UFAS sequential file
UFAS sequential or source library files
GFRC ASCII (TSS format) file
• FIX - fixed record-size (blocked) file, interpreted remotely as:
UNIX/Linux
GCOS6
GCOS7
GCOS8
same as for the local system
UFAS sequential file with fixed record size
Binary library files
GFRC binary file with fixed record size
• UFS - sequential file, interpreted remotely as:
UNIX/Linux
GCOS6
GCOS7
GCOS8
UFAS is not applicable on remote UNIX
GCOS6 UFAS sequential (same as VAR)
GCOS7 UFAS sequential
GCOS8 UFAS sequential
• UFR - relative file, interpreted remotely as:
UNIX/Linux
GCOS6
GCOS7
GCOS8
UFAS is not applicable on remote UNIX
GCOS6 UFAS fixed relative (bound unit format)
Not Applicable
GCOS8 UFAS relative file
Exchange of other file types is not supported. In order to transfer unsupported
types, the file must be converted to one of the supported types at the remote
system before attempting the transfer.
Notes on problems related to usage of file types
If the user of the UFT requester gives the file type parameters incorrectly (e.g. in
the GCOS7 EFTR command), the resulting file on the target system will
normally not be accessible. For example, sending a text file in binary mode (i.e.
as a FIX type) to a GCOS host implies that any logical record separators (e.g.
LFs) in the file will be transferred and the resulting GCOS file cannot be
accessed as a sequential file. Likewise, if a GCOS file is sent in binary mode
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GUFT
from the GCOS requester to the Host Links system, any attempt to access the file
as a text file locally later (e.g. in a succeeding upload transfer request), will fail
due to lack of record separators in the file.
In general transferring files using the FIX type (i.e. in ‘binary mode’) is often
only meaningful between homogeneous systems.
In case of file transfers in VAR mode, the UFT server normally sets the maximum
length of a logical record. In the GUFTsrv case, the default maximum is 512
bytes but this can be changed by the –SZ parameter (see parameter sections
below). Some UFT implementations allow records larger than the negotiated
maximum length to be received but will not allow sending such records. In FIX
mode the negotiated record size is the (fixed) size of the access unit i.e. number
of bytes read and transferred as a single unit (‘record’).
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GUFT
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GUFT
GUFT requester usage
Using the UNIX/Linux GUFT requester
GUFT can be used in two different modes: 'screen mode' and 'command mode'.
The following documents the various parameters and commands used to control
the execution of the program.
Parameters
If you start GUFT without parameters it runs in screen mode with default
parameters picked up from the configuration file. GUFT gets its parameters from
3 different sources:
From the GUFT configuration file
The default configuration file is guft.cfg and its default location is under the
standard G&R system directory:
UNIX/Linux
/usr/gar/config/default/guft.cfg
Additionally you may have your own configuration file located at:
UNIX/Linux
/usr/gar/config/$LOGNAME/guft.cfg
If a file with name guft.cfg is found in a directory with your $LOGNAME it
will be used rather than the default configuration file.
From the command line
Command line parameters override configuration file parameters.
Interactively after you start GUFT
In screen mode you can set parameters at any time except during a file transfer.
The GUFT parameters
There are two types of parameters, GUFT parameters and line parameters.
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GUFT
The GUFT parameters are:
Parameter
Description
-LF localfilename
Name of the local file. The file name can be
relative (i.e. just file name in the current directory)
or absolute (i.e. include the file path).
-RF
remotefilename
Name of the remote file. The file name can be relative or absolute (i.e. include the file path). The file
path format is server dependent. If a relative name
is used, the actual location of the file is server
dependent.
e.g. a remote file named myfile residing in a
directory mydir belonging to user could have an
absolute path name:
GCOS6:
>udd>user>mydir>myfile
GCOS7:
my.sl..myfile
GCOS8:
user/mydir/myfile
UNIX/Linux:
/user/mydir/myfile
Windows:
c:\user\mydir\myfile
-CRF
remotefilename
Same as -RF (see above) except that the file does
not exist on the server. GUFT will explicitly
request the remote file to be created before the file
transmission request (-put) is attempted. This
parameter is applicable for 'command mode' only.
Please observe that remote file creation is a
negotiated facility.
-GET
Receive a file from the server using the given
filenames (-LF, -RF). This parameter is applicable
for 'command mode' only, and forces selection of
command mode.
-PUT
Transmit a file to the server using the given
filenames (-LF, -RF). This parameter is applicable
for 'command mode' only, and forces selection of
command mode.
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GUFT
Parameter
Description
-LFT var/fix
Local file type. You can choose to access the local
file in 'var' or 'fix' mode. The default type is '‘var’'.
In ‘var’ mode, the file is divided in logical records
of variable length separated by record separators
(e.g. ASCII LF). In fixed mode the file is divided
in fixed length access units. The size will default to
512 unless modified with the -SZ parameter.
-RFT
var/fix/ufs/ufr
Remote file type. Sets the type of file on the
remote system. Default type is var. Applicable file
types depend upon the type of remote system. See
the description of the –LFT parameter above and
the section File types supported by GUFT on page
11.
-SZ nnnn
Record size in bytes. In ‘var’ mode the size is the
maximum size of a logical record. In ‘fix’ mode
the size is the fixed number of bytes read and
transferred as a singe unit. The default size is 512
octets. The maximum size is server dependent.
-DC ASC/EBC/BIN
Data code used when transferring the file. Defaults
to ASCII for all other UFT systems than DPS7,
which uses EBCDIC. Can be set to BINary in order
to provide transparent access (no translation, no
record separator processing).
-DBG
Enables an internal trace.
-NL
No logging or accounting. In command mode a
short log of GUFT activity is appended to the
GUFT log and to the account file. The GUFT log is
located in the directory where you start GUFT and
is named guft.log. You use this parameter to
suppress logging and accounting.
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GUFT
Parameter
Description
-RS (crlf)
Force insertion of record separators also for FIX
file types. If no parameter value is given, the
record separator defaults to LF. CRLF can be given
as parameter value in which case both a CR and a
LF will be used to separate records. This might be
desirable for NFS mounted file systems that are
accessed by programs that need PC style
delimiters. When transmitting, the record
separators are not sent. Also, in the CRLF case, a
record containing a single CNTL Z (hex 1A)
character will be interpreted as an end of file
marker (the end of file marker itself is not
transmitted). Note; this parameter should not be
needed, and indicates some sort of protocol
incompatibility between the server and the
requester.
-APN
Open the local file in ‘append mode’ i.e. add new
records at the end of the existing file.
-CN
Auto-connect at start-up using the default
parameters (applicable to screen mode).
-XL xx
Transliterate between 7-bit national characters on
the remote system and the ISO/DO11 8 bit
equivalents on the local system.
The correct -XL (GB, GE, FR, SF, DE,
NO, SP, IT, JA) must be specified if you
communicate with a 7-bit national host.
-NC
Force no compression in the transmission request
to the UFT server.
-ATR on/off
Enable/disable file size attribute support. Defaults
to off.
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GUFT
Line parameters
You can set all line parameters in the command line. The line parameters must
follow the GUFT parameters and must be preceded by the -LI parameter. The
line parameters are described in the G&R/Gline documentation. A brief
explanation of the most relevant parameters follows:
Parameter
Description
-LI dsa/diws
Select native DSA or DIWS protocol (mandatory if
more line parameters are given).
-DN nodename
DSA/ISO default 'node' name of the remote system.
This node must be configured in the dsa.cfg
configuration file.
-HM hostmode
Specify the type of remote system (DPS8, DPS7,
DPS6 or UNIX) to which you connect. Defaults to
DPS8.
-DU username
The name of the local (GUFT) user. In order to
ensure correct access rights on the remote file system
this user name must in most cases be known to the
remote system. For instance, in order to access
GCOS8 a certain catalog structure must be set up
using this name (refer to the Server specific
information section on page 58). There is no default.
-DA
applicationname
Name of the UFT mailbox on the remote system.
Defaults to FILETRAN. The mailbox name of
GUFT will default to ‘GUFT’ but can be changed by
the -mn parameter.
-PW password
Specifies the password of the local user on the
remote system. Used mainly by GCOS7 servers
-DB billing
Specifies the 'billing' used on the remote system.
Used mainly by GCOS7 servers.
-DP project
Specifies the project name used on the remote
system. Used mainly by GCOS7 servers.
-S_
Enables 'session' interface trace, with details of line
module events and data.
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GUFT
Note that all outgoing connects use the default local node name to identify the
calling node to the server. The calling node name may be used for security in the
file access control logic on the server. If you also use GUFTsrv to accept
connects from other UFT systems, then you may want to reserve the default local
node name for GUFTsrv usage in order to minimize configuration of access
control files on the remote systems.
GUFT start-up examples
Given the following guft.cfg file:
Default
-li dsa
-hm dps8
-dn b6dd
-du jim
Start GUFT in screen mode with GUFT debug enabled. You will set file names
etc. later interactively:
guft -DBG
Start GUFT in command mode, and send a local (defaults to VAR type of) file to
the remote system where the file does not yet exist:
guft -lf myfile -crf >udd>jim>myfile -put
Start GUFT in screen mode overriding the file mode and size. Give the node
name and enable full 'session trace':
guft -lft fix -rft fix -dc bin -sz 256 -li dsa -dn en3c -s_
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GUFT
Running GUFT in screen mode
If you start GUFT without a -get or -put parameter on the command line, it
starts in screen mode. You can terminate GUFT at any time by pressing ESC
twice or by pressing LF followed by Q.
GUFT starts by analyzing the parameters on the guft.cfg configuration file (if
any) and from the command line. It then displays a screen that is divided into 3
sections:
• A ‘menu section’ that documents the command interface. You use
function keys to trigger most commands.
• A ‘parameter section’ showing the current parameter settings.
• A ‘file system section’ interface similar to the G&R file navigation
facility (G&R/Gdir).
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GUFT
The GUFT screen interface
F1 - Help
Help is available at any time. The help is implemented using the standard
G&R/Gmenu subsystem enabling you to modify or expand the content of the
help screens 'on the fly'. The help documents the command interface. If you press
F1 while editing GUFT parameters the help is context sensitive to the field you
are entering. You navigate in the help system using the cursor keys. You return
to the main GUFT screen by pressing the 'ENTER' key.
F3 - Edit parameters
Enables you to dynamically change the UFT file and line parameters during the
UFT session.
The 1st line of parameters holds user/identification parameters.
The 2nd line holds the server name, type and UFT application name.
The 3rd line holds information about the local file.
The 4th line holds information about the remote file.
The parameters are initialized with information from the configuration-file
and/or command line. You can edit some of the fields. Others have
preselected values (use cursor left/right to choose). You can use cursor
up/down and tab/back-tab to navigate between the fields. Function keys or
ESC take you out of edit mode. The field information is validated and if it is
inconsistent you will be positioned to the field for reentry. You may call context sensitive help by pressing F1 when positioned in a field.
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GUFT
Refer to the GUFT parameter section for a detailed description of the various
fields.
Field
Description
LocUser
The name of the local user
Gline parameter = -DU xxxxxx
The password of the local user
Gline parameter = -PW xxxx or -D? xxxx
Project, used for GCOS7 connections only
Gline parameter = -DP xxxx
Billing, used for GCOS7 connections only
Gline parameter = -DB xxxx
Specify name of the remote node
Gline parameter = -DN xxxx
Host type
Gline parameter = -HM DPS6/DPS7/DPS8/UNIX
The remote UFT application name (mailbox)
Gline parameter = -DA xxxxxxx
The local file name.
Relative or absolute path name. The 16 most recent
filenames is remembered and can be selected from a file
name menu which is enabled by the F2 key while positioned
in the parameter menus.
Type of the local file
VAR (text type) or FIX (binary type)
The remote file name.
name. Relative or absolute path name. The 16 most recent
filenames is remembered and can be selected from a file
name menu which is enabled by the SF2 key while
positioned in the parameter menus.
Type of the remote file
Valid selections: VAR, FIX, UFAS Seq or UFAS Rel
Defaults to VAR
Pswd
Proj
Bill
RemNode
Type
AName
LocFile
Type
Remfile
Type
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GUFT
F4 - Connect to server
Initiates a connection to the target UFT server using the current line parameter
settings. For the connection to be successful the underlying communications software must be correctly configured.
The result of the connection attempt is reported on the status line. A successful
connection results in a UFT application dialog that in turn will generate a transfer
id (Xfer Id). At this point the user can select, create or delete remote files and
initiate transfers.
F5 - Send file
Initiates a send file operation using the local and remote files that are selected. The
progress of the file transfer is indicated in the parameter area of the screen. You
may terminate the transfer at any time with the F8 key. An interrupted transfer
will leave the files in an undefined state. A successful transfer is indicated by a
'File successfully sent' message on the status line. If the session is not already
opened, a connect request will be launched automatically.
F6 - Receive file
Initiates a receive file operation using the local and remote files that are selected.
The progress of the file transfer is indicated in the parameter area of the screen.
You may terminate the transfer at any time with the F8 key. An interrupted
transfer will leave the files in an undefined state. A successful transfer is
indicated by a 'File successfully received' message on the status line. If the
session is not already opened, a connect request will be launched automatically.
F7 - Disconnect from server
Issues an orderly session disconnect command to the remote system. It will not
work during the 'Transfer' state. You must issue a disconnect request before you
attempt a new connect to a different (or the same) server. A successful
disconnection results in a 'Disconnected by user/application' message on the status
line.
F8 - Terminate transfer
You can interrupt a file transfer with the F8 key. Once a transfer is started the
sender normally continues to send data until the complete file is transferred. The
transfer can only be interrupted by sending a special 'expedited' message to the
sender against the flow of data. This will only work if the underlying transport
provider stack supports expedited data (i.e. the result is platform dependant).
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GUFT
F9 - File management
This is a selection of UFT file management functions that can be performed
locally or on the UFT server. If a session is established when F2 is pressed, you
will be prompted for local or remote management. Otherwise only local
functions are available.
File Creation
File creation on the local system is not necessary since local files that do not
exist, will be created automatically. The remote file must be explicitly created
on some servers. An initial file size must be given. The result of the creation
request is reported on the status line.
File deletion
For local deletion, the file you are positioned on will be suggested. You will
be asked to confirm. For remote deletion the current selected file, if any, will
be suggested. You will not be asked to confirm the delete. The result of the
deletion request is reported on the status line.
Attributes
You can request various attributes of a remote file. The availability of this
service is negotiated while establishing the session.
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GUFT
LF - Other commands
This is a selection of other, less frequently used commands activated by pressing
the command key followed by a single character:
E Execute a local (UNIX/Linux) command. After the command is executed
you will be asked to press ENTER to return to GUFT.
! Starts a UNIX/Linux shell. The 'exit' command takes you back to GUFT.
B Set transfer block size (= max. record size). Max. = 8192, default = 512
X Set transfer mode to Line (applicable to VAR file type ) or Block (for FIX
file type)
C Toggles data compression. Data compression can speed up the data transfer. The effect of the compression depends on the type of file and the file
content.
D Toggles Debug/trace on and off.
O Toggles open mode between new (default) and append.
A Toggles attribute support.
D Sets data code to ASCII, EBCDIC or BINARY
Q Quits/terminates the program.
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GUFT
File transfer status
When a file transfer starts, GUFT updates the screen with status information. The
'State line' contains information about the current state of the UFT session. The
following states will be indicated:
Idle
Not connected to server
Session
A session with an UFT server is established. A transfer ID is
generated
File
Files are selected
Open
Files are opened (a transit state between File and Transfer)
Transfer
A file transfer is in progress
In transfer state GUFT shows the amount of data transmitted, the transfer rate
(characters pr. second) and the elapsed time. While sending the number of transmitted characters shows what has been delivered to the underlying communication
layers, the data is not necessarily transmitted on the line. Generally this will show
an apparently high speed at first until the underlying communications layers have
filled all their buffers, and thereafter will steady down to the true rate of transfer
over the line. While receiving it shows the actual number of characters received
into GUFT. If compression is enabled the count is performed after decompression.
If file size attribute support is enabled by means off the -atr parameter or via
LF A, then the size of the target file will be indicated if given by the server. When
sending a file the size will be the same as the size of the ‘source’ file. When
receiving a file the server will ask for the size of the file in the servers file system
and report this to the requester. Please observe that this size is not always the exact
number of bytes in the file in that it can include file system overhead.
Running GUFT in command mode
You can start GUFT from the command line and run without the screen interface
i.e. unattended from a script. In command mode GUFT takes parameters from
the GUFT configuration file and from the command line. If you use the -get
or -put parameter in the command line GUFT starts in command mode, issues
the -get or -put request and terminates after the transfer. You must also
specify the local and remote file names (-LF -RF). A special format of
the -RF command -CRF allows you to create the remote file before a file
transmission (-put) request is issued.
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GUFT
In command mode a summary of the transfer is appended to a log and an
accounting file guft.log and guft.acc in the directory where GUFT is
started. See the section entitled Log and accounting in the Administration
chapter, on page 56.
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GUFT
Using the Windows GUFT requester
The Windows GUFT requester, called GUFTw, can be used in two different
modes: 'screen mode' and 'command mode'. The following documents the various
parameters and commands used to control the execution of this program.
Parameters
GUFTw gets its parameters from 2 different sources:
From the GUFTw configuration file
The default configuration file is guft.ini and its default location is under the
standard G&R configuration directory:
Windows
\gar\config\default\guft.ini
If this configuration file exists, it is only used on the first start-up of GUFTw to
load a default configuration. Thereafter your own configuration file is created in
a directory with your Windows login identity, and the first GUFTw configuration
you use is saved as the default configuration:
Windows
\gar\config\LOGIN\guft.ini
The G&R configuration directory may be shared with others if it is placed on the
file server, or the installation process may build it locally on your workstation.
Interactively after you start GUFTw
In screen mode you can set parameters at any time.
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GUFT
GUFTw start-up examples
Given the following guft.ini file:
[GUFT]
DefaultHostParams=-li dsa -hm dps6 -dn b7dd -du jim
Start GUFTw by double-clicking its icon in the Gallagher & Robertson program
group. You will set file names etc. later interactively.
Start GUFTw in command mode, and send a local VAR file to the remote system
where the file does not yet exist:
guftwx.exe -lf myfile -crf >udd>jim>myfile -put
Running GUFTw in screen mode
When you start GUFTw, it starts in screen (Windows GUI) mode. You can
terminate GUFTw at any time by selecting Exit from the File menu, clicking the
Exit button in the toolbar, or pressing Alt-F4.
GUFTw starts by analyzing the parameters on the guft.ini configuration file
(if any) and from the command line. It then displays a window divided into three
sections:
• A menu bar with menu options for each GUFT command.
• A toolbar with buttons for the most commonly used commands.
• A file system interface similar to the Windows Explorer.
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GUFT
The GUFTw screen interface
Sample of the main GUFTw window:
The main GUFTw window presents the local file system using a typical
Windows file tree format. This allows the user to navigate and select files using
the mouse and/or the keyboard. The following options are available from the
menu bar and the tool bar:
File
Menu entries for upload and download. These functions are also on the toolbar.
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GUFT
Upload
Initiates a send file operation. You will first be prompted for a local and remote file
name, by default set to the file currently selected in the file navigation window.
The 16 most recently used filenames are available from the drop down menu. You
can navigate in the local filesystem using the ‘browse’ option. You can go directly
to the ‘UFT option’ window if the current transmission mode is not correctly set.
When the ‘OK’ button is pressed, a new window will appear showing the progress
of the file transfer. You may terminate the transfer at any time with the ESC key, or
by clicking ‘Cancel.’ An interrupted transfer will leave the files in an undefined
state.
Download
Initiates a receive file operation. It uses the same window and options as described
for ‘Upload’ above. In this case, the size of the file to be received will only be
available in the transfer windows if ‘file attributes’ were negotiated with the UFT
server.
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GUFT
Settings
UFT settings
The UFT settings window:
Enables you to change the UFT transfer parameters. When you select this
command, or click the corresponding button on the toolbar, you will be presented
with a dialog box where you can change the transfer parameters. The parameters
are initialized with information from the configuration file. When you click
‘OK’, the field information is validated and if it is inconsistent you will be
positioned to the field for reentry. You may call context sensitive help by
pressing F1 when positioned in a field.
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GUFT
The available parameters are:
Field
Description
Transmission
mode
‘Line’ or ‘Block’. When set to ‘line’, automatically sets
filetypes to ‘var’ and datacode to ‘ascii’ or ‘ebcdic’
(depending on host type). When set to ‘block’,
automatically sets file types to ‘fix’ and datacode to
‘binary’. The automatic setting of the other fields can be
manually overridden.
Local file type
Default local file type. You can choose to access the local
file in variable or fixed size mode. The default type is
VAR. In VAR mode, the file is divided in logical records of
variable length separated by record separators (e.g. ASCII
LFs). In FIX mode the file is divided in fixed length
records. The access unit will default to 512 bytes unless
modified in the “Record size” field parameter.
Command mode parameter: -LFT VAR/FIX
Remote file type
Remote file type. Sets the type of file on the remote
system. Default type is VAR. Applicable file types depend
upon the type of remote system. See the description of the
-LT parameter above and the section File types supported
by GUFT on page 11.
Command mode parameter:
-RFT VAR/FIX/UFS/UFR
Record size
Record size in bytes. In ‘var’ mode the size is the
maximum size of a logical record. In ‘fix’ mode the size is
the fixed number of bytes read and transferred as a singe
unit. The default size is 512 octets. The maximum size is
server dependent.
Create remote file
GUFTw will explicitly create the file before the file
transmission request is attempted. Please observe that
remote file creation is a negotiated facility.
Command mode parameter: -CRF
Debug mode
Enables an internal trace of GUFT events.
Command mode parameter: -DBG
Suppress log file
Normally, a short log of GUFT activity is appended to the
GUFT log. The GUFT log is located in the directory
where you start GUFTw and is named guft.log.
Command mode parameter: -NL
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GUFT
Field
Description
Insert record
separators
Force insertion of record separators (LF) in the local file
(i.e. also in the case of a ‘fix’ type of transmission).
Command mode parameter: -RS
Save files in
append mode
When receiving, opens the local file in ‘append mode’
(adds new records at the end of the existing file).
Command mode parameter: -APN
Use ISO/DS11
transliteration
Transliterate between national 7-bit characters on the
remote system and the ISO/DO11 8 bit equivalents on the
Windows system.
Command mode parameter: -XL
Disable
compression
Force no compression in the transmission request to the
UFT server.
Command mode parameter: -NC
Enable file
attributes
By default, GUFTw does not attempt to negotiate file
attribute information with the host UFT server and
GUFTw will not be able to display detailed status information during downloads. When the 'Enable file
attributes' entry in the 'UFT settings' menu is checked,
GUFTw will attempt to negotiate file attribute information
with the host UFT server. If this is supported by the UFT
server, GUFTw will be able to obtain the file size from the
host and display a progress bar which shows how much of
the file has been transferred, and also estimate the total
duration of the transfer as shown here:
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GUFT
Line settings
The line settings window:
Enables the user to change the UFT line parameters. When this command is
selected, or the corresponding button on the toolbar is clicked, the user will be
presented with a dialog box where the communication line parameters can be
changed. The parameters are initialized with information from the configuration
file. When ‘OK’ is clicked, the field information is validated and if it is
inconsistent, the user will be positioned to the field for reentry. The user may call
context sensitive help by pressing F1 when positioned in a field.
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GUFT
The available parameters are:
Field
Description
Connection name
Allows you to load a previously defined (in the Host
Links system, ‘dsa.cfg’ file) set of line parameters.
Description
This field is not actually used by GUFTw, but can help
you remember differences between saved connection
names.
Line protocol
Allows you to select native DSA or DIWS protocol.
Gline parameter: -LI xxxx
Gateway address
This field must be entered. It contains the IP address or
host name of a server running Ggate. GUFTw uses Ggate
to establish a DSA connection with the UFT server.
Gline parameter: -LI DSA/DIWS:xxxx
Host application
mailbox
Name of the UFT application/mailbox on the remote
system. Defaults to FILETRAN.
Gline parameter: -DA xxxx
Host node
DSA/ISO default 'node' name of the remote system. It
must be known in the Ggate system
Gline parameter: -DN xxxx
Host type
Specify type of remote system (DPS8, DPS7, DPS6,
UNIX) to which you want to connect. Defaults to DPS8.
Gline parameter: -HM xxxx
User ID
The name of the local (GUFTw) user. In order to ensure
correct access rights on the remote file system this user
name must in most cases be known to the remote system.
For instance, in order to access GCOS8 a certain catalog
structure must be set up using this name (refer to the
Server specific information section on page 58). No
defaults.
Gline parameter: -DU xxxx
Password
Specifies the password of the local user on the remote
system. Used mainly by GCOS7 servers.
Gline parameter: -D? xxxx
Project
Specifies the project name used on the remote system.
Used mainly by GCOS7 hosts.
Gline parameter: -DP xxxx
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GUFT
Field
Description
Billing
Specifies the 'billing' used on the remote system. Used
mainly by GCOS7 servers.
Gline parameter: -DB xxxx
Additional
parameters
Any parameters entered in this field will be sent to Ggate
after all the others. A possible option here is -s_. This
will enable a 'session' interface trace. Session events and
line data will be written to a 'debug’ file on the Ggate
system.
Save
Saves the currently entered set of line parameters to the
guft.ini file under the name selected in the “Connection name” drop-down box. If the “Connect name” box
is empty, you will be prompted for a new name.
Save As
Saves the current set of line parameters to the guft.ini
file under a new name. You will be prompted for a connection name.
Delete
Deletes the parameter set selected in the “Connection
name” drop-down box from the guft.ini file.
Rename
Renames the set of parameters currently selected in the
“Connection name” drop-down box.
Exit
Terminates GUFTw.
Help
Help is available at any time. The help documents the command interface. If you
press F1 while editing GUFTw parameters the help is context sensitive to the
field you are entering.
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GUFT
Transfer status
When a file transfer starts, GUFTw creates a new window to show the progress of
the transfer. This window shows the amount of data transmitted, the transfer rate
(characters pr. second) and the elapsed time. If information on file sizes is
available, it will also display a “progress bar” showing the percentage of the
transfer which has been completed, and time estimates for how long the transfer
will take to complete.
While sending the number of transmitted characters shows what has been delivered
to the underlying communication layers; the data is not necessarily transmitted on
the line. Generally this will show an apparently high speed at first until the underlying communications layers have filled all their buffers, and thereafter will steady
down to the true rate of transfer over the line. While receiving it shows the actual
number of characters received. If compression is enabled the count is performed
after decompression.
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GUFT
Running GUFTw in command mode
You can start GUFTw from the command line and run without the screen
interface i.e. unattended from a script. To run GUFTw in command mode, you
must launch it as GUFTwX, instead of GUFTw. GUFTwX takes parameters
from the GUFT configuration file and from the command line. You must use the
-get or -put parameter in the command line to start GUFTwX in command
mode. GUFTwX issues the -get or -put request and terminates after the
transfer. You must also specify the local and remote file names (-LF -RF). A
special format of the -RF command -CRF allows you to create the remote file
before a file transmission (-put) request is issued.
If you are running GUFTwX in command mode from an unattended script the
default is to not display dialog boxes if an error occurs. If you will be present and
would like to see and OK any error messages you must set the -v parameter.
For more information on other available parameters, see the section on GUFTw
screen interface on page 31.
In command mode a summary of the transfer is appended to a log and an
accounting file guft.log and guft.acc in the directory where GUFTwX is
started. See the section entitled Log and accounting in the Administration
chapter, on page 56.
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GUFT
GUFT requester filename history
The GUFT requesters now remember the 16 most recently used local and remote
filenames that has been transferred. Every time a file transfer is successfully
executed, a filename history file is updated in the user configuration structure.
The file is called:
Windows
\gar\config\USERNAME\guft.hst
UNIX/Linux
/gar/config/USERNAME/guft.hst
and can, if necessary be manually edited. The file contains 32 logical records (16
local file entries and 16 remote file entries) and the format of the records is:
File type, 1 character
0 = text file, 1 = fixed file, 2 = UFAS sequential, 3= UFAS relative
File name, variable size (max 64) characters
The following shows a GUFT requester window with the filename history menu
activated:
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GUFT
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GUFT
GUFT server usage
Starting GUFTsrv
GUFTsrv accepts incoming sessions from a UFT requester. In the Windows case
and also on UNIX/Linux if the RFC1006 protocol (i.e. DSA session over TCP/IP
transport) is to be used, you must start the DSA listener first. Even though the
listener is not an absolute requirement in a DSA configuration on UNIX/Linux,
use of the listener is generally recommended because it allows several UFT
sessions to run simultaneously.
On Demand: On either platform the DSA listener can be configured to start
GUFTsrv on demand when a connect request is received for a local UFT
mailbox. See the section on Starting GUFTsrv on demand on page 45 for more
information. This is the recommended way of starting GUFTsrv. Note that ‘on
demand’ startup cannot be used if the GUFTsrv process is executing on some
remote Host Links system (i.e. accessed via Ggate).
UNIX/Linux: You can start GUFTsrv at boot time by including the GUFTsrv
command line in the /etc/inittab file. For more information see the
Installation & Configuration manual for Host Links on UNIX/Linux. GUFTsrv
can also be started as an operator command, usually for testing.
Windows: You can start GUFTsrv as a Windows service by including the
GUFTsrv startup command in the Gservice configuration file. For more
information on Gservice, see the Installation & Configuration manual for
Host Links on Windows. GUFTsrv can also be started using Gmanager to enter a
command line that will be passed to Gservice for launching, usually for testing.
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GUFT
Accepting incoming connections
The command lines that start copies of GUFTsrv should be configured in the
listener’s configuration file. The DSA listener will then start new instances of
GUFTsrv when it receives connect requests for the mailbox name specified in
the command line. See the section on Starting GUFTsrv on demand on page 45.
If start on demand is not used, GUFTsrv must be started manually before a
remote UFT requester command is launched.
The node name of the Host Links platform must be configured as a remote node
in the remote system (i.e. Bull Mainframe, Datanet, MainWay, GCOS6 or
another UNIX/Linux system) which will be issuing the connect request. The
mailbox name to which the application connects must be the one configured for
GUFTsrv (defaults to FILETRAN, can be changed by –MN parameter)
A 'connect accept' is registered with the listener if GUFTsrv is configured for
start on demand. The DSA listener forwards the incoming connection to
GUFTsrv when it arrives.
Multiple incoming connections
If multiple copies of GUFTsrv for UNIX are to be run simultaneously, or if
GUFTsrv is to coexist with other Host Links products that accept connect
requests, you must remember to start the Host Links listener program before
you start any of the GUFTsrv copies. On Windows and on UNIX/Linux if
RFC1006 is to be used, the listener must always be running, even if only one
GUFTsrv is to be started. The use of the listener is recommended in all cases.
The Host Links listener supports multiple incoming connections to the same
node and even the same mailbox. This daemon listener program must be started
before the programs accepting incoming connections. When the connect requests
arrive for the different mailboxes, the listener program forwards the connections
to the programs waiting for them, or starts the program configured for the
mailbox name in the listeners configuration file.
See the Gline manual for more information about the listener.
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GUFT
Start on demand
A configuration file controls the mapping from the DSA mailbox name (-mn)
and, optionally, extension (-mx) to the command line for the GUFTsrv to be
started. There is one file for each DSA node name (SCID) for which connections
are being accepted. It is placed in the servers directory:
Windows
UNIX/Linux
\gar\servers\<scid>.gli
/usr/gar/servers/<scid>.gli
The file is either config.dsa or config.diw depending on whether the
listener (nl_dsa) uses native DSA (-prot dsa) or DIWS (-prot diws).
Example file /usr/gar/servers/grdl.gli/config.dsa:
* UFT server
listen -mn filetran -cmd guftsrv
When a connect request arrives for mailbox name filetran on node grdl,
the configured GUFTsrv is started. The GUFTsrv command does not need to
include the –LN parameter or the -ID parameter, it is implicit. When GUFTsrv
is started this way, it will terminate after each complete File transfer session
Note that multiple simultaneous connects to the mailboxes are allowed, and
multiple instances of the GUFTsrv will be started unless this is disabled with
the -LIM parameter.
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GUFT
Using mailbox pools for incoming connects
If you use the Host Links listener you may start multiple instances of products
accepting connects to the same mailbox name on the same DSA node (SCID).
Each instance must use a different mailbox extension. The instances of the
product will be allowed to start execution, register the mailbox name and
extension for which they are accepting connects with the listener, and act as a
mailbox pool for applications connecting to the mailbox name.
An incoming connect to a mailbox without an extension will be passed to a
random instance of the product which is accepting connects to a mailbox with
the correct name, and that isn't currently busy handling a session. An incoming
connect with a mailbox and extension will only be connected to a product which
is accepting connects that match both.
Example:
GUFTsrv -id gu1 -li dsa -mn filetran -mx uft1
GUFTsrv -id gu2 -li dsa -mn filetran -mx uft2
GUFTsrv -id gu3 -li dsa -mn filetran -mx uft3
The three instances would start, all listening on mailbox filetran. Connects
to mailbox filetran would be given to one of these GUFTsrvs that was not
already busy.
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GUFT
Multiple DSA nodes
A single Host Links platform can accept calls from several different DSA nodes.
The DSA nodes must be configured in the remote system (Bull Mainframe,
Datanet, MainWay, GCOS6 or other UNIX system) that will be issuing the
connect request, as separate DSA nodes and transport stations, but using the
same network address.
GUFTsrv can use any of these local node names as an argument to the -LN
parameter to specify a specific node for which the GUFTsrv will accept
connects. These local node names used to accept incoming calls can be
configured in the DSA configuration of the Host links platform. This is generally
just for documentation, but some OSI-stacks require all local node names to be
configured. Please refer to the Host Links Gline manual for details.
Each GUFTsrv that is accepting incoming calls needs such a local node, and it
cannot be shared with other products that accept calls, unless a DSA listener is
running on behalf of the node.
Please note that this functionality is not available in Host Links for Windows, or
UNIX/Linux if using RFC1006.
Running GUFTsrv via a G&R Ggate gateway
GUFTsrv can be set up to run via a G&R/Ggate gateway connection. In this
case the local GUFTsrv system does not need to have DSA configured, but
communicates with the remote DSA host system via a Ggate process that
executes on some other Host Links node in the network (the Ggate dialog uses
TCP/IP transport protocol). Please note the following considerations for such
configurations:
‘On demand’ startup is not possible if GUFTsrv is executing over a Ggate
connection. This means that the GUFTsrv process must be pre-started at startup
time in order to register its mailbox with the remote Host Links system. This
‘registration’ involves connecting to the Ggate program and issuing the listen
request to the listener there. Please note that once a connection comes in from a
UFT requester and a session is established with the remote GUFTsrv program,
any other incoming connect for GUFTsrv will be rejected until the (only) active
GUFTsrv session has terminated (but the remote UFT requester will normally
retry the connection attempt later). This effectively limits such configurations to
one UFT session at a given time. Also note that if the GUFTsrv process should
‘hang’ for some reason (e.g. network problems on the TCP/IP connection), no
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new UFT sessions will be set up until the hanging GUFTsrv process is manually
terminated and restarted (but see the description of the ‘idle time ‘ and ‘keep
alive’ parameters in the parameter chapter).
GUFTsrv – platform specific issues
GUFTsrv for Windows
All copies of GUFTsrv must run as Windows services, and can only be
administered using the G&R/Gservice program (see a description of the
Gservice program in the ‘Installation and Configurations on Windows’
manual). For start on demand configurations the DSA listener launches GUFTsrv
programs via Gservice. Copies of GUFTsrv that are to be started at Windows
start-up time must be configured in Gservice’s configuration file. The
G&R/Gmanager utility can be used to monitor active GUFTsrv programs and a
command interface is available for stopping active copies of GUFTsrv, restarting
copies that have stopped, issuing GUFTsrv operator commands, examining the
log files and etc.
GUFTsrv for UNIX/Linux
Status information about the running GUFTsrv processes can be obtained using
the UNIX/Linux 'ps' command. Based on the process_id information from ps
GUFTsrv, daemons should be stopped using the normal UNIX/Linux kill
command. All network events are reported to the log in the standard Gline
format with a header identifying the line-handler, e.g. $$DSA from gl_dsa.
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GUFTsrv parameters
GUFTsrv takes its parameters from the command line only. The following parameters are supported:
Parameter
Description
-ID ext
Mode ID. GUFTsrv identifier and filename extension
for configuration file. Maximum 3 characters. When
running multiple copies of GUFTsrv each GUFTsrv
must be started with a unique identifier unless start on
demand is used. The default extension is .dsa or
.diw depending on the DSA protocol used.
-BIN
Forces file types to FIX if the requester sets BINARY
character set. Necessary with some older host
implementations.
-LN
This parameter is optional. It can be used to specify the
local DSA node name (SCID) to be used by GUFTsrv
when listening for incoming connects to its mailbox
name. If not set on the command line, this parameter
will be given automatically by GUFTsrv and signals
that the default local DSA node name will be used for
listening. In order to allow other Host Links
communications products that accept connect requests
(e.g. G&R/Gspool, G&R/Gmailer or other
GUFTsrv) to run on the same node, the listener (see
description in the Gline documentation) must be
used.
-DD data
directory
path-name
When the remote UFT requester uses a relative file
name, GUFTsrv will look for this file in the current
data directory. There is one data directory for each
DSA node name (SCID) for which connections are
being accepted.
Windows
\gar\servers\<scid>.uft
UNIX
Linux
/usr/gar/servers/<scid>.uft
If you want GUFTsrv to look for local files elsewhere,
the -DD parameter can be used to specify the path of
this data directory.
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Parameter
-DBG
Description
Enables an internal trace of GUFT events.
-IT n
Enable idle timer. Disconnect the session with the
requester if no UFT protocol message is received
within ‘n’ seconds.
-KI n
Enable ‘keep alive’ timer. Applicable when GUFTsrv
is running over a Ggate connection. The parameter
value (n) is in seconds. If no Ggate keep-alive packet is
received in ‘n’ seconds, GUFTsrv disconnects the
session with the requester.
-LK
Lock file on write. Do not allow other processes to
access the local file while GUFTsrv is writing to it.
-ALK
Abort lock. Leave the file abort locked if the transfer
request is not successfully completed
-NL
No logging or accounting. In server mode a log of the
performed actions is appended to the GUFTsrv log.
The log and account files are written in the standard
Host Links directory for server products. You can use
this parameter to suppress logging and accounting of
server activity.
-SS
Single session mode. Terminate after having executed
a single transfer request. Set automatically by 'start on
demand'.
-SZ
Maximum record size in VAR mode.
Fixed record size in FIX mode. Default 512.
-XL
Transliterate between 7-bit national characters on the
remote system and the ISO/DO11 8 bit equivalents on
the local system.
-UV
Enable user validation. If this option is set, GUFTsrv
will operate on the user ID of the UFT requester user
when accessing local files rather than the user ID of the
GUFTsrv user.
-CMD cmdline
Execute ‘command line’ after a transfer request
completes. The name of the local file can be inserted
into the command line at a point marked by a %
character.
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Parameter
Description
-ECMD
cmdline
Execute ‘command line’ after a transfer request
completes. GUFTsrv appends the local filename, status
(0 good, 1 error), direction (S sender, R receiver) and
node names (local then remote) as space separated
parameters.
-TCMD
cmdline
Execute ‘command line’ when GUFTsrv terminates.
-SATTR
Force space attribute information even if the host
requester does not ask for it (necessary for some
GCOS7 UFT implementations when operating on
upper case file names)
Additionally any valid line parameter can be specified as long as
it is preceded by:
-LI diws/dsa
See the description of line parameters in the Line
parameter section above.
Command line examples
guftsrv.exe -cmd "c:\Auft\uftcmd.bat %" -li DSA
This command can be pre-started or started on-demand. At the termination of
each file transfer the command "c:\Auft\uftcmd.bat %" is executed, and
the local file name is inserted in the command at the point where the % character
is placed. Note that the command must be in quotes.
guftsrv.exe -ecmd c:\Auft\uftecmd.bat -li DSA
In the same way, the command c:\Auft\uftecmd.bat would be executed,
but in this case the local filename, status (0 good, 1 error), direction (S sender, R
receiver) and node names (local then remote) are appended to the command as
space separated parameters.
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The GUFTsrv logfile
You can check the results of GUFTsrv activity by looking in the log file.
For every session, the important session parameters and any file transfers are
recorded in the log file. The information includes date and time stamp, the calling
user mailbox name, the calling node name, the request ID, the local files received
or transmitted and the number of bytes transferred. The file can be examined using
G&R/Gmanager or manually with Glist or any other file list program. An
example of a logfile entry follows:
[1998/11/20 15:32:21] G&R/Guftsrv 5.2.0b Oct 14 1998 started
[1998/11/20 15:32:21] Connection from: IS2C, user , mbx GUFT
[1998/11/20 15:32:21] Data transfer request, xfer id = 5662015
[1998/11/20 15:32:21] Received 27 chars to local file
/share/mail/gmail/servers/a1
[1998/11/20 15:32:23] Disconnected
For more info about logging and accounting see the section entitled Log and
accounting in the Administration chapter, on page 56.
GUFTsrv file system access control
GUFTsrv by default runs on behalf of the local user i.e. the user who started the
GUFTsrv process. This implies that any file system access carried out as a result
of an incoming request from a remote UFT requester, is performed using the
local user’s permissions rather than the ones belonging to the remote UFT user.
If it is desirable to run on behalf of the remote user rather than the local user, a
run time parameter is available (see parameters above) and causes GUFTsrv to
validate and use the identity given in the UFT request before any file system
activities are performed. Please note that in order for GUFTsrv to be able to
change identity, the local user must have administrator (e.g. ‘root’) types of
privileges and this is checked at GUFTsrv startup time.
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GUFTsrv redirection
When GUFTsrv receives a file transfer request it checks the local file name
given by the requester for redirection format (see a description of the format
below). If redirection format is found, GUFTsrv assumes that the file is to be
redirected to a client workstation. GUFTsrv then picks up the network address
suffix from the file name and opens a socket connection to the GUFTsrv
workstation server, GUFTws, which will receive or transmit the requested file.
GUFTsrv acts as a gateway moving data between the host requester session and
the client workstation.
Starting the workstation redirector server program
GUFTws
The workstation redirector server program is delivered as part of the G&R UFT
requester package that must be installed on the client workstation. It is started
using the command:
c:\gar\bin32\guftws.exe
The program operates in the background waiting for transfer requests (using
TCP/IP port 30865) from GUFTsrv executing on some Host Links system.
The GUFTws program identifies itself in the system tray on the user’s
workstation. Once a session is established with a GUFTsrv process and a transfer
request is received, the icon will change color and rotates to indicate that a file
transfer is in progress and the direction of the transfer (upload/download).
Redirection file name format
A simple private extension of the file name format given in the requester
command signals GUFTsrv that the file in question is not a local file, but rather a
file located on a remote client workstation. The real file name is suffixed by the
network address of the client workstation preceded by a semicolon.
The following is an example of using the GCOS7 requester to issue a transfer of a
GCOS7 file called ‘myfile’ to a file called ‘myWsFile’ on a workstation with the
network address 188.99.77.123 via GUFTsrv on DSA address EN01:
eftr my.lib..myfile $EN01:’myWsFile;188.99.77.123’
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GUFTws parameters
Parameter
Description
-DD data
directory
path-name
GUFTws will read and write files located in
subdirectory My Received Files in directory
My Documents. If you want GUFTws to access
local files relative to some other directory, the -DD
parameter can be used to specify the path of this data
directory.
-DBG
Enables an internal trace of GUFTws events. The
trace file will be called guftws.dbg and will be
located in the gar\debug\USER directory.
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Administration
Gmanager
As with all other Host Links server programs, all active GUFTsrv programs for
UNIX/Linux or Windows report their current status to the Gmanager database.
This can be viewed using Gmanager for UNIX/Linux or Gmanager for
Windows. All that is necessary is that the Gmanager that is started has access to
the G&R system directory. If the same G&R system directory on a file server is
shared by several Host Links platforms, Gmanager will show the status of all
Host Links servers on all the Host Links platforms sharing the G&R system
directory. Gmanager’s server list will show you the most recent status message
from all active GUFTsrv programs sharing the G&R system directory, and you
can view their log files, see below, at the touch of a key or a mouse. You can
also issue commands to GUFT interactively from Gmanager. All active
GUFTsrv programs must for this reason have a unique ID (-ID).
Commands accepted from Gmanager
Standard commands
The commands that are accepted by all servers are:
¾ DOWN - terminates the server
¾ STATUS - reports server-specific status information to the log file
¾ PARAM - brings up a dialog box that allows the operator to give a command
line parameter to the server. Note that some parameters do not work when
given interactively i.e. they can only be handled at server startup time
¾ DEBUG ON/OFF - toggles on and off tracing interactively
GUFT accepts only the standard commands.
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Log and accounting
For every session, the important session parameters and any file transfers are
recorded in the log file. The information includes date and time stamp, the calling
user name, the calling node name, the files received or transmitted, the number of
bytes and the throughput rate. The file can be examined using Gmanager or
manually with Glist or any other file list program. Additionally GUFT in both
server and command modes writes an accounting file that may be used for billing
purposes.
GUFT and GUFTw logging
In command mode a summary of the transfer is appended to a log guft.log
and an accounting file guft.acc in the directory where GUFT or GUFTw is
started. The format is as described below.
GUFTsrv logging
As with all other Host Links server programs, all active GUFTsrv instances now
write an event log in a product specific directory under the servers directory
in the G&R system directory. There is one GUFTsrv directory for each DSA
node name <SCID> for which connections are being accepted. The default
GUFTsrv directory where the log file is found is:
Windows
UNIX/Linux
\gar\servers\<scid>.uft
/usr/gar/servers/<scid>.uft
The log file name is _logfile.<id> where the ID is by default dsa or
diw depending on the DSA protocol used, and which must be made unique if
multiple GUFTsrvs are used, by setting the -id parameter. When start on
demand is used the IDs are generated as _00, _01, _02 etc.
The event logs are 64k long, and we keep the last three generations for reference.
Directory : K:\GMAIL\SERVERS\IS2B.UFT
file.._LOGFILE.DSA
file _LOG_001.DEF
file _LOG_002.DEF
file _LOG_003.DEF
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Log file format
Example of the content of the log file:
File: K:\GMAIL\SERVERS\IS2B.UFT\_LOGFILE.DSA
[1997/03/06 09:49:00] G&R/Guftsrv UFT server
started
[1997/03/06 09:49:47] Connection from: EN3D,
[1997/03/06 09:49:47] Data transfer request,
[1997/03/06 09:49:51] Received 5823 chars to
/local/home/arild/6kb
[1997/03/06 09:50:07] Disconnected
5.0.0 Mar
6 1997
user ARILD, mbx GUFT
xfer id = 3287514605
local file
The accounting file
In addition to the log file an account file is also produced. This file will be
located in the same directory as the log file (system directory for GUFTsrv or
start-up directory for GUFT and GUFTw command modes) and contain much of
the same information but in a format more suitable for programmatic treatment.
The file is _account for GUFTsrv or guft.acc for command mode. The
record contains the following fields separated by tabs (hex 09) and the file can
even be read direct into Excel:
Date
Time
r/t
local file name
remote file name
remote node name
remote mailbox name
remote user name
transmission ID
# of chars sent/received
elapsed time in seconds
yyyymmdd
hhmmss
receive or transmit
only known to GUFT clients
The tabs are shown below as semicolons for illustration. Note that the remote file
name is not known so the field present, but empty:
File:
K:\GMAIL\SERVERS\IS2B.UFT\_ACCOUNT
19970306;094948;r;/local/home/arild/tst;;EN3D;GUFT;ARILD;3287514605
;5823;1
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Troubleshooting
If you are experiencing any kind of problem when using GUFT to transfer files,
the GUFT trace file and/or the line handler trace file will provide useful
documentation of the problem, either for your own use, for the G&R distributor
or for G&R if it turns out to be caused by an error in the program itself. See the
appendix Host Links Trace for a full discussion of how to generate G&R/Host
Links trace files.
GUFT Trace file
This trace file contains details about GUFT processing of host input. To enable
this tracing, add the –DBG option to the GUFT startup command or to the
relevant section of the GUFT configuration file:
-USER
-DBG ON
Line handler trace file
This trace file contains details about line handler operation. To enable line handler
tracing, add one or both of the –D_ and –S_ options to the GUFT start-up command
or to the relevant section of the GUFT configuration file:
-LI YYY
-S_ ON
-D_ ON
(YYY =line handler identification, i.e. DSA, DIWS)
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GUFT and line handler trace file examples
Examples of directory and file-names
/usr/gar/debug/mike
guf.dbg
guf-gli.dbg
/usr/gar/debug/en01
guf.def
guf-gli.def
Debug directory for user ‘mike’
GUFT client debug file
GUFT client host line trace
(-dbg)
(-li
dsa -s_)
debug directory for DSA node ‘en01’
(-dbg)
GUFT server debug file
(-li dsa -s_)
GUFT server host line
trace
When connecting through Ggate
UNIX/Linux
Windows
/usr/gar/debug/ZZZZ/ggaNN-PPPP.dbg
C:\gar\debug\ZZZZ\ggaNN-PPPP.dbg
(ZZZZ = DSA node name, e.g. EN06 or PH13)
(NN =Instance number, starting at 01)
(PPPP =IP-address of the client system, running Gspool in this case)
When GUFT or any other G&R or customer applications based on GlAPI connect
through Ggate to another application, the line handler trace will be generated on the
Ggate system, with the name and location shown in the table above. In this case the
GUFT start-up command or GUFT configuration file would look like this:
-LI YYY:PPPP
-S_ ON
-D_ ON
(YYY =line handler identification, i.e. DSA or DIWS)
(PPPP =IP-address of the system running Ggate)
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UFT Server-specific
information
The GCOS8 UFT
The UFT program under GCOS8 is named DSAS. It has a requester mode and a
server mode. The User Master Catalog (UMC) used by DSAS must have read,
write and create permission on the UMCs accessed by the GUFT user.
The UMCs accessed must have a catalog under the root named DSAS_SEC.
Directly under this catalog you need a catalog named identically to the DSA
node name from which GUFT will connect. This catalog must again have
catalogs with names identical to the user names (-DU parameters) to be used by
GUFT users. An example: From a GUFT user called JIM on a DSA node called
IS52 you want to access a UMC called MYUMC. You need the following
structure:
MYUMC/DSAS_SEC
MYUMC/DSAS_SEC/IS52
MYUMC/DSAS_SEC/IS52/JIM
File types that can be created by GUFT under GCOS8 are:
VAR
FIX
UFAS sequential
UFAS relative
GFRC ASCII (TSS format)
GFRC ASCII with fixed length
The GCOS8 UFT server will usually not implicitly create a file that you send to it.
You must create it using GUFT directives prior to the transmission request. When
using the GCOS8 UFT requester, a typical transfer command (after having
launched the DSAS program) is:
tran -rn xxxx -lf myumc/txtfile -rf ‘/usr/txtfile’ -s -moni -r
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This command will result in a connect to GUFTsrv on the node xxxx, a send (-s)
of the GCOS8 file myumc/txtfile, to the Host Links file system replacing (r) any already existing file by that name. The file transmissions progress will be
shown (-moni).
The GCOS6 UFT
The GCOS6 UFT facility runs under the MOD 400 operating system in a separate
task group with identifier $X. It has a server and requester mode. It is available in
two versions; basic and extended. The basic version is sufficient for
communication between heterogeneous systems.
Access to files is controlled by means of standard GCOS6 ACLs and CACLs.
Creating VAR or UFAS Seq. type of files results in standard UFAS ASCII files
with variable record length. FIX files result in UFAS ASCII files with fixed record
length (length equal to the selected block length). UFAS Relative files result in
UFAS Fixed Relative (bound unit format) files.
The GCOS6 UFT will not implicitly create a file you send to it. You must create it
using GUFT directives prior to the transmission request.
The GCOS7 UFT
The GCOS7 requester is GTP (Generalized Transfer Protocol) and is started
interactively (from IOF) by means of the EFTR command. It can also be started by
the EJR command with JCL containing a FILTFR activity.
The server, GSP (Generalized Server Protocol), is started upon request from a
remote UFT requester (i.e. GUFT).
The remote systems must have been defined with an RSYS/RSC pair of directives
in the GCOS7 network generation. Additionally they must of course be configured
in the system generation if a FEP (DN/MainWay) is used.
The files accessed can be cataloged or non-cataloged. From GUFT the user can
send text files (VAR or UFAS seq.), binary files (FIX) and UFAS relative files.
If running a GCOS7 UFT prior to V6, file creation and deletion is not available.
Any file accessed must be created ('allocated') before it is accessed. Library
members will be created automatically though.
A typical GCOS7 UFT requestor command could be:
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eftr my.lib..txt $xxxx:’/usr/mydir/txt’
This will result in a connect from the GCOS7 UFT requester to GUFTsrv on
node xxxx and the GCOS7 file (member) my.lib..txt will be sent to
/usr/mydir/txt on the Host Links system. The position of the filename on
the command line, sets the file transfer direction (the first filename given is the
‘source’ and the second is the ‘target’).
The Bull UNIX UFT
The DPX UFT requester is simply called UFT and the server is called UFTS.
The requester is started with the UFT command. It will take commands
interactively or from a command input file.
The remote systems must have been defined in the /etc/isohosts file and
the 'node-name' directive must include the service names (i.e., 'NODE' UFTP:
0x10 UFTS: 0x10).
When answering the 'remote machine type' question from the DPX UFT
requester, choose type '5' (other).
The files processed by the DPX UFT are 'byte stream files' (also called 'binary')
and sequential files i.e. with variable length records separated by LFs. 'Block
mode' is the fastest transfer mode and should be chosen whenever possible.
When connecting to a DPX UFT system, the user name and password used by
GUFT/GUFTsrv will be validated. If the user is not known to the DPX system,
the connection will be rejected.
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Appendix: Host Links
Manuals
Below you find a complete list of all available Host Links manuals:
Installation
Host Links Servers
Installation and Configuration on UNIX/Linux
Host Links Emulators
Installation and Configuration on UNIX/Linux
Host Links
Installation and Configuration on Windows
Line handling
Gline
Line Handler and DSA/OSI Configuration
Ggate
Transparent Gateway
Gproxy
Network Manager & SNMP Proxy Agent
G&R SSL
Using SSL for security in G&R products
GlAPI
Application Programming Interfaces
Gsftp
Gateway between FTP and SFTP
Emulations
Gspool
Network Printer Emulation
GUFT
Unified File Transfer
G3270
Emulating IBM 3270 Terminals
G5250
Emulating IBM 5250 Terminals
Pthru
Gateway to the Bull Primary Network
Qsim
Emulating Questar DKU7107-7211 & VIP7700-7760
V78sim
Emulating VIP7801 & VIP7814
Gweb
Web Browser Front-end for DKU, VIP7700-7760,
VIP7800, IBM3270 and IBM5250 Emulations
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Appendix: Host Links Server
Administration
Gmanager is the Host Links administration tool. It can be used to control, configure
and monitor all the G&R Host Links server programs.
The dialog and interaction between the server programs and Gmanager is based on
information located in a database file _active.srv that is located in the Host
Links servers directory. The first time a Host Links server program starts up it
registers itself in this ‘active’ file. Thereafter the server program updates this
database with status information whenever the server is active.
The Gmanager program is available in 2 different versions – a Windows GUI based
version gmanw.exe and a character based subset gman (UNIX/Linux binary) or
gman.exe (PC console application).
The basic functionality of the two versions is the same, but the Windows version
interfaces directly to other Windows-only Host Links administrative tools
(Gconfig, Gservice), and can also start the browser directly to view HTML
reports produced by Gproxy, if enabled, or to view the HTML pages associated with
a Gweb or Glink for Java installation.
The Gproxy reports, Gweb and Glink for Java web pages are of course
available to administrators of UNIX/Linux Host Links systems, and can be viewed
by starting a browser manually, and connecting to the appropriate URLs:
http://mysite.mydomain.com/Gproxy
http://mysite.mydomain.com/Gweb
http://mysite.mydomain.com/GlinkJ
Gmanager can be used to perform the most common Host Links administrative
tasks. A summary of the available functions follows. The Windows-only functions
are marked.
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¾ View the last reported status information from the servers
¾ Stop or restart all servers, start a new server, stop, restart or delete a server
¾ Send a command to a server
¾ Load the DSA configuration into an editor, compile the DSA configuration
¾ Start the server configuration program or the configuration wizard (Windows)
¾ Load the Gservice configuration into an editor (Windows)
¾ Edit the product specific configuration files
¾ View a server log file, a server trace file or the server configuration file
¾ View program version numbers, program link information (Windows)
¾ View license info and license usage (Windows)
¾ View Host Links environment information, the ‘VMAP’ (Windows)
¾ Start Gdir directory administrator, Ggate monitor, Gspool monitor
¾ Gather all traces and logs for trouble-shooting by support
¾ Gping a DSA node to check the connection, use Gerror to explain error code
¾ Set a transport route state (down, enbl, lock, used)
¾ Check if a printer is on-line, request a list of bins
¾ Connect directly to the Gproxy, Gweb, GlinkJ HTML pages(Windows)
The commands that are accepted by all servers are:
¾ DOWN - terminates the server
¾ STATUS - reports server-specific status information to the log file
¾ PARAM - allows the operator to give a command line parameter to the server.
Note that some parameters do not work when given interactively i.e. they can
only be handled at server startup time
¾ DEBUG ON/OFF - toggles on and off tracing interactively
Additionally, the server in question might support other interactive commands.
For a description of the supported commands, check the server-specific
documentation.
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Appendix: Host Links DSA
Utilities
The Gline package includes a set of Gline communication utilities. These are
used when testing and debugging connection problems. The utilities are delivered
as part of the Gline package and can be used without any additional configuration. The nodes to be tested must of course be configured in the dsa.cfg file.
Gconame
Lists the parameters generated from a given CONAME. The utility works for
both CONAME and RESOURCE e.g.:
gconame tnviptm
Checking 'dsa.cfg' for coname 'tnviptm'
Coname: tnviptm, type TM, parameters:
-DA misfld
-S_
-D_
-CODE 0000
-CODE 1000
-CODE 1800
-TEXT Remote SCID?:
-CODE 4700
-TEXT Remote application?:
-CODE 1400
-CODE 1600
-TEXT Password?:
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Gerror
Shows the text message associated with a DSA reason code. Only the most
common codes are supported i.e. the ones related to network, transport and session communication layers. Errors generated by the OSI-stack on the Host Links
platform are not covered by this utility; please refer to the documentation from
the vendor of the stack e.g.:
gerror 0109
Reporting component: Session control (01) 0109, Dialog
protocol error or negotiation failed (wrong logical record).
For a detailed description of all reason codes, please consult the Bull manual
OSI/DSA Network System Messages and Return codes (39A2 26DM).
Glnode
List and verify the communications parameters of the local node e.g.:
glnode
Local node name : GRDL
Local session control id : GRDL
DSA200 address (area:tsm): 54:60 (36:3C)
Gmacfix
When you connect to FCP cards on Bull mainframes via an Ethernet port on the
LAN-Extender the mainframe address is given in Ethernet (LLC) format. If you
connect to an FDDI adapter you must convert the MAC address to SMT. e.g.:
gmacfix 080038000fab
MAC address 080038000fab = 10001c00f0d5
Gping
Connects to a remote system using the Gline parameters set on the command line.
If successful it returns ‘connected to application’, otherwise it shows the error
code returned e.g.:
gping -li dsa -dn b7dl -da iof -du jim -pw mydogsname
Gping - $$DSA: Connected to application
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Grnode
Return the parameters (in dsa.cfg) and the state of a remote node e.g.:
grnode b6dl
Checking ‘dsa.cfg’ for node ‘b6dl’
Session control id : B6DL
DSA200 address (area:tsm) : 1:5 (1:5)
Inactivity interval : 0
Route 0
Load balance percentage : 0
TP class : 2
TP expedited : 0
TPDU size : 0
Network address : 130405
Gtrace
Same as gping but writes the DSA communication trace on the user’s terminal
(applicable to UNIX versions) e.g.:
gtrace -li dsa -dn ln40 -da snm151
D6:Application event @ 14:17:17.6003. tokenitem = 00
D6:Application event @ 14:17:17.6082. tokenitem = 00
D6:Connect request called, node = LN40
D6:OurBufferSizes. ApplMaxXmit = 511, ApplMaxRecv = 500
Rec:4000 0002 s:2
Rec:506B 0010 s:16
etc etc
Gtrace - line trace ending.
Gtrace - $$DSA: Connected to application.
Gtsupd
Update the state of a transport route. Transport routes can be set automatically in
a disabled state if a backup route is configured. When such a state change occurs
the route will be set back to the enabled state after a configurable timer has
expired. The default is 15 minutes. You can reset the state of such a route with
gtsupd ts-name enbl/used/down/locked e.g.:
gtsupd gars_rfc enbl
TS-entry ‘gars_rfc’, new state = enbl
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Appendix: Host Links Trace
If you experience any kind of problem when using a Host Links application, the
application trace file and/or the line handler trace file will provide useful
documentation of the problem.
Trace activation
The Host Links products automatically create sub-directories in the debug
directory when debug is activated: at product level using the -dbg parameter, or
at line level using the -d_ or -s_ parameters to the line module.
Windows
server
gspool -id gs1 –dbg –ps \\SERVER\LEXMARK
-li dsa -da tptst -d_ on
UNIX
Linux
gspool -id gs1 -dbg-pc lp -li dsa
-da tptst -d_ on
Most G&R products include a facility for setting product or line parameters
dynamically. It is therefore generally possible to turn on debug or trace without
modifying the command line or configuration of a production system.
Trace types
All Host Links products accept a parameter –dbg, which starts an application
level trace of internal events. This is useful when investigating malfunctions or
looking closely at product behaviour.
All Gline line handlers accept a parameter -d_ to turn on a data trace. It records
data and enclosure level being exchanged with the line handler. It is useful when
documenting product malfunction e.g. an emulation error, because it records
exactly what the host sends and what the G&R application replies. It can be used
to simulate a customer situation, reproduce a problem and to verify that a
correction fixes the documented problem.
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All Gline line handlers accept a parameter -s_ to turn on a session trace. It
records the raw data being exchanged between the line module and the underlying transport layer (e.g. OSI Transport, or TCP socket), as well as internal
events and protocol states. It is useful when investigating protocol failures such
as unsuccessful connect attempts or abnormal disconnections.
Structure
The Host Links file structure includes a debug directory to collect the trace and
debug files in one location where the permissions can be adjusted as required for
security. By default only the Host Links administrator can access the directory.
The debug directory is created by the initialization procedure and located (by
default) in:
Windows
server
\gar\debug
UNIX
Linux
/usr/gar/debug
If the application is a client type of application, a debug sub-directory with the
same name as the user (UNIX username or PC login name) is created and all
debug files are located there. This includes the line level trace except in the
special case where the client application connects via Ggate and the line level
trace is written on the Ggate system using the Ggate DSA node name as a debug
sub-directory.
If the application is a server type of application, then a sub-directory will be
created using the DSA node name on behalf of which the server application is
executing. If the server does not use DSA the default local session control name
is still used if there is a dsa.cfg file. If there is no dsa.cfg file then the
system’s UNIX or Windows communications node name is used. You can find
this name using the command uname –n on UNIX systems, or the Network
section of the control panel on Windows systems. This covers situations where
several instances of a server are executing on the same system and accepting
incoming calls to different DSA node names, or where several Host Links
systems using the same server product share a file system.
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Tracing Ggate
When Glink, a Host Links client or a customer application based on GlAPI
connects through Ggate to the application, the line handler trace is generated on
the Ggate system, with the name and location shown in the table:
Windows
server
UNIX
Linux
\gar\debug\NODE\ggaNN-PPPP.dbg
/usr/gar/debug/NODE/ggaNN-PPPP.dbg
NODE is the local DSA node name used by the Ggate system.
The trace file name consists of the prefix ggaNN- followed by the IP-address of
the client, suffixed by .dbg for a terminal session or –dbp for a printer session.
The following is a trace file name for Ggate session sequence number 5
executing on Host Links system GRDL initiated from a Glink client on IPaddress jim.gar.no:
gga05-jim.gar.no.dbg
This file, and possibly also a Glink debug file and a Glink communication trace
file activated by the /J command line parameter will be needed by the support
engineer investigating any problem.
To enable a line handler trace through Ggate the product’s start-up command or
configuration file would look like this:
-LI YYY:ZZZZ -S_ -D_
(YYY =line handler identification, i.e. DSA or DIWS)
(ZZZZ =IP-address of the system running Ggate)
Examples - G&R products
Examples of directory and file names in the debug structure are:
/usr/gar/debug/jim
Debug directory for user ‘jim’
qsm.dbg
Qsim emulator debug file
-dbg
qsm-gli.dbg
Qsim host line trace
-li dsa -s_
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pth-glit.dbg
Pthru terminal line trace
-term -s_
pth-glih.dbg
Pthru -host line trace
-li dsa -s_
g32.dbg
G3270 emulator debug file
-dbg
g32-gli.dbg
G3270 host line trace
-s_
/usr/gar/debug/mike
Debug directory for user ‘mike’
v78.dbg
V78sim emulator debug file
-dbg
v78-gli.dbg
V78sim host line trace
-li dsa -s_
guf.dbg
GUFT client debug file
-dbg
guf-gli.dbg
GUFT client host line trace
-li dsa -s_
/usr/gar/debug/en01
Debug directory for node ‘en01’
guf.def
GUFT server debug file
-dbg
guf-gli.def
GUFT server host line trace
-li dsa -s_
gli-gli.dsa
DSA listener host line trace
-s_
gli-gli.diw
DIWS listener host line trace
-s_
gsp.def
Gspool (default -id) debug
file
-dbg
gsp-gli.def
Gspool (default -id) host
trace
-li dsa -s_
gga01-mike.gar.no.dbg
Ggate line trace, first Glink
-s_
gga02-mike.gar.no.dbg
Ggate line trace second
Glink
-s_
/usr/gar/debug/en02
Debug directory for node ‘en02’
gsp.abc
Gspool (-id abc) debug
file
-dbg
gsp-gli.abc
Gspool (-id abc) host
trace
-li dsa -s_
gspc-gli.def
Gspool DPF8 command
trace
-li tcp -s_
gspd-gli.def
Gspool DPS8 data trace
-li tcp -s_
gsp._00
Gspool started on demand
-dbg
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debug
gsp-gli._00
Gspool started on demand
trace
-li dsa -s_
CPI-C and Gweb trace files
Gweb uses the CPI-C libraries so the Gweb debug structure is exactly the same
as for CPI-C, except that Gweb inserts its own product identifier into the file
name structure. CPI-C applications use the ‘client’ style of debug and create a
debug directory with the UNIX username or PC login name used by the process
that started them.
The application level debug (-dbg) and line trace (-s_ and -d_) are set in the
cpic.cfg file. The line trace goes to the debug directory, with the name built
up as follows:
<product_id><session_id>-<process_id>.<debug_type>
product_id
Value
Comment
cpi
CPI-C API
cp3
CPI-C 3270
cp7
CPI-C 7800
cpd
CPI-C DKU
gw3
Gweb3270
gw7
Gweb7800
gwd
Gwebdku
session_id
(nn)
If multi-session application, 1-63
process_id
n (n n n...)
Varies by platform
debug_type
dgb
Application level debug
gli
Line trace
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Example:
\gar\debug\system
debug directory for user "system"
cpi-16.dbg
CPI-C single session debug
-dbg
cpi-16.gli
CPI-C single session line trace
-li dsa -s_
cpi2-123.dbg
CPI-C session 2 application
debug
-dbg
gw7-20172.gli
Gweb7800 host line trace
-li dsa -s_
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Appendix: Error Codes
OSI/DSA error codes
Below is a list of OSI/DSA error codes and the corresponding description. These
are the same descriptions that the G&R/Gerror utility will display when given
the DSA code as a parameter.
code Description
00xx General Errors
0001
0002
0003
0004
0005
0006
0007
0008
0009
000A
000B
000C
000D
000E
000F
0010
0011
0012
0013
Open Failure in LC - Reject for unknown reason
Open Failure in LC - Acceptor customer node inoperable
Open Failure in LC - Acceptor customer node saturated.
Open Failure in LC - Acceptor mailbox unknown.
Open Failure in LC - Acceptor mailbox inoperable.
Open Failure in LC - Acceptor mailbox saturated.
Open Failure in LC - Acceptor application program saturated
Connection refused. Transport protocol error or negotiation failed.
Open Failure in LC - Dialog protocol error or negotiation failed
Open Failure in LC - Presentation protocol error or negotiation failed
Open Failure in LC / Connection refused lack of system resources
Open Failure in LC / Connection refused from GCOS7 duplicate
user
Open Failure in LC, Duplicate implicit LID / Q class not started
Open Failure in LC, Duplicate GRTS Id / lack of memory resources
Open Failure in LC, No Logical line declared for DACQ / 7
connection refused
Open Failure in LC, GCOS 8 GW Missing translation / Incorrect
device length in ILCRL.
Open Failure in LC, DAC connection not initialized / Too many jobs
executing
Open Failure in LC, No binary transfer / impossible to start the IOF
job
Open Failure in LC, connection is not negotiated in FD mode /
impossible to start the IOF job
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0014
0016
0017
0018
0019
001A
001B
001C
001D
001F
0020
0021
0022
0023
0024
0030
0031
0033
0039
003C
003E
003F
0040
0041
0042
0044
0045
0047
004F
0050
0051
0052
0053
0054
0055
0056
0057
Disconnection - Timeout resulting from absence of traffic.
Option missing for an RBF mailbox.
Connection refused - Incorrect access right for MB.
Connection refused - Incorrect access rights for the application.
Connection refused - Unknown pre-negotiated message path
Connection refused - Security validation failed.
Connection refused - Unknown acceptor mailbox extension.
Connection refused - Inoperable acceptor mailbox extension.
Connection refused - Invalid Message group number.
Disconnection - no more memory space.
Connection refused - Unknown node.
Connection refused - inaccessible node or Host down.
Connection refused - saturated site.
Connection refused - inoperable mailbox.
(X.25) Packet too long. Problem with packet size. / Connection
block already used.
Syntax Error - option not known (received on close VC).
(X.25) No response to call request packet - timer expired.
(X.25) Timer expired for reset or clear indication.
Disconnection - transport protocol error (MUX).
Presentation Control Protocol Error
The application has not the turn
Message group closed
(X.25) Facility code not allowed. / Connection refused - unknown
node
Connection refused - path not available.
Connection refused - Duplicate USER ID / Facility parameter not
allowed
(X.25) Invalid calling address.
(X.25) Invalid facility length.
(X.25) No logical channel available.
DNSC: (X.25) Invalid call packet length.
Normal disconnection (GCOS3/8)
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW.
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW. TCall
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW. DIA in LOCK State
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW. DIA error
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW. GW has no known
explanation.
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW. Reject mailbox permanent
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0058
0059
005A
005B
005C
005D
005E
005F
0060
0061
0062
0064
0065
0066
0067
0068
0069
006A
006B
006C
006D
0078
0079
007F
0081
0082
0083
0085
0086
0087
0090
0092
0093
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW. No more input lines in
DACQ
Time-out on GCOS 3/8 gateway.
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW. Disconnect from terminal
without reason
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW. Wrong letter or wrong record
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW. Forbidden letter received
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW. Forbidden letter received
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW. No buffer for secondary letter
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW. No buffer for fragmented
letter
Error or Event on LC initiated by GW. Disconnect on end of phase
record
Error or event on LC initiated by GW. No buffer for control letter.
Error or event on LC initiated by GW. Mailbox in closing phase
Error or event on LC initiated by GW. Flow control error.
Error or event on LC initiated by GW. CH locked by operator.
Error or event on LC initiated by GW. Disconnect with a normal
TMG F2 exchange.
Error or event on LC initiated by GW. Teletel rerouting error from
DACQ
Error or event on LC initiated by GW. Teletel routing error from
DACQ
Error or event on LC initiated by GW. Teletel rerouting error from
TM
Error or event on LC initiated by GW. Teletel rerouting error from
TM
Syntax error - text too long.
Syntax error - illegal object in a GA command.
Syntax error - unknown node Id.
Syntax error - illegal command for this object.
Syntax error - illegal date.
(X.25) No route available for X.25 switching.
No more network routes available for switching.
(X.25) Hop count reached for X.25 switching.
(X.25) Flow control negotiation error.
(X.25) Frame level disconnection.
(X.25) Frame level connection.
(X.25) Frame level reset.
Frame level not set.
(X.25) X.25 Echo service in use.
(X.25) Incorrect password for PAD connection.
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0094
0096
009C
009D
009E
009F
00B2
00B6
00C0
00D7
00DE
00E1
00E6
(X.25) No more PAD connections allowed.
(X.25) TS SX25 or NU X25 objects locked.
(X.25) Invalid packet header. X.25 protocol error.
(X.25) Incompatible header. X.25 protocol error.
(X.25) Logical Channel Number too high.
(X.25) Incorrect packet type.
Use of invalid password through PAD
Unknown mailbox selection for PAD connection using the PAD
password.
(X.25) Normal disconnection.
(X.25) TS image (of type DSA or DIWS) in LOCK state.
(X.25) NS RMT or NR SW in LOCK state.
Connection refused. Mailbox is not in ENBL state.
QOS not available permanently.
01xx Session Control
0100
0101
0102
0103
0104
0105
0106
0107
0108
0109
010A
010B
010C
010D
010E
010F
0110
0111
0112
0113
0115
0117
0118
0119
011A
011E
Logical connection accepted or normal termination
Rejection for unknown reason or abnormal termination
Acceptor node inoperable.
Acceptor node saturated. When a node has no available resources
Acceptor mailbox unknown.
Acceptor mailbox inoperable.
DNS: Acceptor mailbox saturated.
DNS: Acceptor application program saturated.
Transport protocol error or negotiation failed (DSA 200 only).
Dialog protocol error or negotiation failed. (Wrong logical record).
Time-out on session initiation / unknown LID
Acceptor mailbox extension unknown.
Acceptor mailbox extension inoperable.
Invalid Session Number.
Unknown node.
System error. System generation error or insufficient memory space
Application abnormal termination. Subsequent to an abnormal
occurrence in the dialogue
Normal terminate rejected.
Protocol not supported.
Session control service purged by user.
Disconnection Time-out on message group initiation.
Incorrect Access Right for MB
Incorrect Access Right for the Application
Pre-negotiated Message Path Descriptor unknown
Security validation failed
Incorrect object status
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011F
0120
0121
0122
0123
0124
0125
0126
0127
0128
0129
012B
012C
012D
012E
012F
0130
0131
0132
0133
0134
013C
013E
013F
0140
0151
0152
0153
0154
0156
0157
0158
0159
015A
015B
015C
015D
0160
0161
Not enough memory space available.
Node unknown.
The channel object (CH) is in LOCK state
Saturation - no plug available
Object status = LOCK
Connection block (TSCNX) already used
Disconnection already running
The connection block (TSCNX) is disconnected (or not connected)
Change Credit value < 0
Ineffective Change Credit ( delta = 0 )
No more deferred letters
"Reinitialization" Request
"Reinitialization" in progress
"Reinitialization" in progress, letters are dropped
Close virtual circuit. Either no mapping exists between PA/NR or
CL and VC/NS
Null connection object index.
Undefined function at Sysgen time.
Letter too large with respect to the negotiated size.
The received letter is longer than the size which was
Disconnection of the session control user
Interface error on EOR (End-Of-Record) processing.
Presentation control protocol error.
You do not have the turn.
Message group closed.
Session is closed.
Request refused, no system buffers available.
Incorrect addressing record.
No presentation record in the ILCAL or ILCRL
Negotiation failed on session mode
Negotiation failed on resynchronization.
Negotiation failed on END to END ACK
No presentation record in the connection letter
Negotiation failed on session mode
Negotiation failed on letter size (in the Logical Connection record).
Negotiation failed on resynchronization (in the Logical Connection
record).
Negotiation failed on end-to-end ACK (Logical Connection record).
No support of the "letter" interface because Multirecord is not
negotiated.
Incorrect TSPACNX table.
Protocol error on letter reception.
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0162
0163
0164
0165
0166
0167
0168
0169
016A
016B
016C
016D
016E
016F
0170
0171
0172
0173
0174
0175
0176
0177
0178
0179
017A
017B
017C
017D
017E
017F
0180
0181
0182
0190
0191
0192
0193
0194
0195
0196
0197
0198
Negotiation failure.
Record header length error.
Protocol error.
Protocol error reception of control letter.
Type or length error on interrupt letter.
Protocol error on reception of data letter.
Dialog protocol error.
Unknown event.
Protocol error on data transfer.
Invalid status for a disconnection request.
Invalid status for a recover
Invalid status for a suspend/resume request.
Negotiation failure.
Unknown command.
Error in presentation protocol
Letter header length error in
ILCAL is not DSA 200 protocol.
Error in session record.
Normal disconnection, without complementary reason code.
Letter is not in ASCII or EBCD.
Connection protocol letter header
Letter header protocol error.
Record header protocol error.
Record header length error.
Mbx record header length error.
Error on buffer transfer.
DSA 200 record header protocol
DSA 300 record header protocol
Unsupported connection options.
Character error in ASCII string.
No segmented record size.
Invalid mailbox object index.
Mapping error for a remote connection.
No more buffers.
Byte count is greater than GP.
Byte count is greater than GP.
Byte count is greater than GP.
Byte count is greater than GP.
Byte count is greater than GP.
Byte count is greater than GP.
Byte count is greater than GP.
No more buffers.
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0199
019A
019B
019C
019D
019E
019F
01A0
01A1
01A2
01A3
01A4
01A5
01A6
01A7
01A8
01A9
01AA
01AB
01AC
01C0
01C1
01C2
01C3
01E0
01E1
01E2
01E3
01E4
01E8
01E9
01EA
01EB
01EC
Byte count is greater than GP.
Byte count is greater than GP.
Byte count is greater than GP.
Byte count is greater than GP.
Byte count is greater than GP.
Byte count is greater than GP.
Byte count is greater than GP.
Invalid transfer state.
Suspend protocol running.
Suspend protocol running.
Recover protocol running.
Forbidden function in write request. ($WRITE)
Conflicting parameters for segmented record. (SWBREC)
Protocol conflict - suspend/recover.
Protocol not supported - letter/end-to-end ACK. (SWBLET)
Multi-record letter in progress.
Interrupt request forbidden.
Send control record request forbidden. (SCTROL)
Forbidden for TWA session - turn is here. (SREAD)
Termination forbidden - suspend or recover in progress. (STERM)
No space available for downstream connection request. (SMECNX)
No space available for upstream connection request. (SMUCNX)
No space available for upstream SCF connection. (SMRCNX)
No space available for session context. ($SCTX)
Enclosure or data length error for a write request. ($WRITE)
Enclosure or data length error for a write segment record request.
(SWBREC)
Enclosure error for 'give turn' request. (SGVTRN)
Interrupt request is not demand turn, attention/data attention, or
purge record.
Input status for a send control letter is not permitted.
Write request without turn.
Write segmented record request without turn.
Write segmented letter request without turn.
Send control letter request without turn.
Disconnection request without turn.
02xx Presentation Control
0201
0202
0203
0204
Protocol level not supported
Application designation protocol error.
Character encoding error. TM cannot support the proposed encoding.
Character set error. TM cannot support the proposed character set.
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0205
0206
0207
0230
0231
0232
0233
0234
0235
0236
0237
Character subset error. TM cannot support the proposed character
subset.
Incorrect record encoding.
Incorrect parameter encoding.
Data presentation control error. The presentation control proposed
for this session cannot be used
Device type is incompatible with the configuration.
TM control protocol is incorrect.
Device-sharing attributes are invalid.
Initiator or acceptor configuration is not correct.
Logical device index error.
Number of logical devices is incompatible with the configuration.
TM protocol record not supported.
03xx Terminal Management
0300
0301
0302
0303
0304
0305
0306
0307
030A
0310
031E
0320
0321
0322
0323
0324
0325
0326
0327
0328
0329
032A
032B
032C
Sysgen error WARNING. There is no mapped object; some objects
will be spare.
Operator requested session abort or logged.
Idle time run out after secondary network failure.
Idle time run out for no traffic.
Form not found.
Operator requested suspension.
Destructive attention send on the session.
Unknown TX addressed in this session. TM is unable to a the
session.
Protocol error. A record was received which did not comply with
current standards
Insufficient resources. The receiver cannot act on the request
because of a temporary
Incorrect value for Retry or Wait parameters on UP LL command.
Function not supported.
Parameter error. This can result
Resource not available. The
Intervention required (on principal device).
Request not executable.
EOI required.
Presentation space altered, request executed.
Presentation space altered, request not executed.
Presentation space integrity lost.
Device busy. The device is busy and cannot execute the request.
Device disconnected.
Resource not configured.
Symbol set not loaded.
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032D
032E
0330
0331
0332
0340
0341
0342
0343
0344
0345
0346
0347
0348
0349
034A
0350
0360
0361
0362
0370
0371
0372
0373
0374
0375
0376
0380
0381
0382
0383
0384
038C
0390
0391
0392
03C0
Read partition state error.
Page overflow.
Subsidiary device temporarily not available.
Intervention required at subsidiary device.
Request not executable because of subsidiary device.
TM cannot accept a new connection.
Object status incorrect.
The TM configuration is not correct.
Unknown TX addressed on this session.
Data presentation protocol error.
Device type is incompatible with the configuration, or is not
supported.
TM control protocol incorrect.
Device shareability attributes are invalid.
Initiator or acceptor configuration is not correct.
Logical device index error.
Number of logical devices incompatible with the configuration.
Disconnection of TM after reinitialization of the network.
File not found. (Welcome and Broadcast Messages)
Site not found. (Welcome and Broadcast Messages)
NASF error. (Welcome and Broadcast Messages)
No-session timeout. Device disconnected.
No-input timeout. Device disconnected.
No-output timeout. Device disconnected.
Timeout due to no backup session being initiated.
Timeout due to no backup session being established.
Connection refused because of late activation of back up session.
Disconnection of current session to switch to backup session.
AUTOCN parameter not declared.
Mixed ETB in data sent by VIP screen and cassette
Data header sent by the terminal incorrect.
Desynchronization in the exchange of data.
KDS block count error.
Remote terminal is not connected
Unknown mailbox.
No call packet to return.
No "Possibility" command to return Protocol error
Slave device disconnection.
17xx Network Layer
1701
1702
PAD connection refused.
Flow control error.
Gallagher & Robertson
Ggate
87
GUFT
1706
1707
1708
1709
1710
1711
1712
1713
1714
1717
1718
1719
171A
171B
171C
171E
171F
1721
1723
1724
1725
1726
1727
1729
1731
1732
1733
1740
1741
1742
1744
1745
1747
1749
174F
1755
Logical channel number not zero in restart packet.
Illegal packet length or use of D-bit forbidden.
Illegal header.
Illegal Logical Channel Number.
Invalid packet type for the automaton state. Protocol error
Incorrect packet type.
Inconsistent network parameters in the generation file.
No more space.
DSAC network layer object not usable.
USED/ENBL transition. Transport station is locked.
USED/ENBL transition. This is a back-up NR.
USED/ENBL transition. Dynamic close due to load.
USED/ENBL transition. Transfer time-out has elapsed.
USED/ENBL transition. This is a back-up NR.
USED/ENBL transition. Transport station is idle.
USED/ENBL transition. NR object is locked.
ENBL/LOCK transition. NR HDLC has no more memory space.
Remote station is inaccessible via the configured network. Check
Incorrect PAD password.
Virtual circuit already in use. LCN (Logical Channel Number) too
high.
Invalid virtual circuit.
Packet too short. Protocol error for the equipment directly connected
to the Bull Datanet.
Incompatibility between the generation parameters of two
communicating systems on window or packet size.
Packet size in communicating systems not the same.
Timer runs out while waiting for call confirmation.
Timer runs out while waiting for clear confirmation.
Timer has run out while waiting a reset confirm.
Call setup or call clearing problem.
Open failure on virtual circuit. No flow control on this NS.
Incorrect facility. Protocol error for the equipment directly
connected to the Bull Datanet.
Unknown subscriber.
End of time-out on reset confirm. Invalid facility length. Protocol
error for the equipment directly
No logical channel available.
End of time-out on call confirm.
Incorrect packet length. Protocol error for the equipment directly
connected to the Bull Datanet.
Flow control, window, packet size or reset error.
Gallagher & Robertson
Ggate
88
GUFT
1760
1770
1771
1781
1782
1783
1785
1786
1787
1790
1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
179B
179D
179E
179F
17A0
17B0
17B1
17B2
17B3
17B4
17B5
17B6
17B8
17B9
17CB
17CC
17CE
17CF
17D0
17D4
17D7
17DD
17DE
17DF
17E0
17E1
17E2
Frame disconnection.
Frame connection.
Frame reset.
No more network routes available for X.25 switching.
Maximum of 15 switches have been used,
Flow control negotiation error.
Frame level disconnection.
Frame level connection.
Frame level reset.
Frame level not established.
No more logical paths available for the PAD.
Echo service busy.
Incorrect PAD password.
All the PAD virtual circuits are used
X.25 initialization not possible.
LCN not null in restart packet
Incompatible header (receive error: all VC of concerned NS
LCN greater than NBVC in NS directive
Incorrect packet type
Invalid facility.
Normal disconnection.
X.25 Echo in use.
No more logical channels available.
No more PAD connections allowed.
TS SX25 or NU X25 object locked.
Buffer capacity overflow.
Normal disconnection.
Unknown calling SNPA (Sub-Network Point of Attachment).
Internet problem.
Call collision on VC
Incompatible generations (NR object without mapping).
Invalid status NR locked.
Lack of space.
Unknown subscriber.
TSCNX already used for another connection. SCF internal error.
Transport station locked.
Proper NS locked.
Invalid status NR locked.
Lack of space.
Forbidden parameter or invalid value.
Invalid transition.
Upward-mapped object (TS) not locked.
Gallagher & Robertson
Ggate
89
GUFT
17E3
17E4
17E5
17E6
17E7
17E9
17EB
17EE
17FF
No object mapped above.
NR not locked (MP NR -ADD/-SUB) or virtual circuit already open.
NR is last in list and the TS is not locked.
No object mapped above (UP NR -PRIO). NR not mapped on TS.
Upward mapped object not locked
Mix of datagram and connection network
Class inconsistent with NR.
Incompatible generations. NR object without mapping.
Wrong parameter in administrative CALL
18xx Transport Layer
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
180A
180B
180C
1817
181F
1821
1824
182E
182F
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
183A
183C
1840
Normal disconnection initiated by the correspondent
Local saturation at connection request time.
Failed negotiation at connection time.
Duplicate connection. Two or more requests have been issued for the
same connection.
Redundant request.
Retransmission Time-out at transport level.
Survey time-out at transport level.
Transport protocol error.
Session Control specified is not available (inaccessible).
Requested Session Control Id unknown by remote transport.
Termination because of disconnection by administration.
Session Control/Transport interface error.
Connection request on non-sharable VC in case of ISO Transport.
ISO: header or parameter length is invalid.
Station in shut-down state.
No memory space at connection time.
Session Control inaccessible by configured session routes. ISO:
Session entity not attached to TSAP.
Collision between Close NC and Open TC.
Remote station not configured.
Resource saturation.
ISO: No route for the called NSAP.
ISO: Received NSAP addresses are wrong.
Segmentation violation.
ISO:QOS priority not available temporarily, due to a local condition
(for example, lack of resources).
ISO:QOS priority permanently unavailable locally (for example, due
to an error in the system generation).
ISO: Remote reason not specified.
ISO: Remote transport entity congestion at connect request time.
Server in terminating state. TC has been re-assigned on another NC.
Gallagher & Robertson
Ggate
90
GUFT
18A1
18B0
18EF
An additional NC has been assigned to a TC.
NC has been re-assigned on another VC.
Disconnection at Transport level caused by reception of RESTART
DSA during the transfer phase.
Windows Sockets error Codes
Below is a list of Windows Sockets return codes and the corresponding
description.
Hex
code
2714
Windows Sockets Access
Error name
WSAEINTR
2719
271E
WSAEBADF
WSAEFAULT
2726
WSAEINVAL
2728
WSAEMFILE
2733
WSAEWOULDBLOCK
2734
WSAEINPROGRESS
2735
WSAEALREADY
2736
2737
2738
WSAENOTSOCK
WSAEDESTADDRREQ
WSAEMSGSIZE
2739
WSAEPROTOTYPE
273A
WSAENOPROTOOPT
273B
WSAEPROTONOSUPPORT
Gallagher & Robertson
Description
Ggate
The (blocking) call was cancelled
via WSACancelBlockingCall()
The socket descriptor is not valid.
An invalid argument was supplied
to the Windows Sockets API.
An invalid call was made to the
Windows Sockets API.
No more file descriptors are
available.
The socket is marked as nonblocking and no connections are
present to be accepted.
A blocking Windows Sockets call
is in progress.
The asynchronous routine being
cancelled has already completed.
The descriptor is not a socket.
A destination address is required.
The datagram was too large to fit
into the specified buffer and was
truncated.
The specified protocol is the wrong
type for this socket.
The option is unknown or
unsupported.
The specified protocol is not
supported.
91
GUFT
273C
WSAESOCKTNOSUPPORT
273D
WSAEOPNOTSUPP
273E
273F
WSAEPFNOSUPPORT
WSAEAFNOSUPPORT
2740
WSAEADDRINUSE
2741
WSAEADDRNOTAVAIL
2742
WSAENETDOWN
2743
WSAENETUNREACH
2744
WSAENETRESET
2745
2746
2747
WSAECONNABORTED
WSAECONNRESET
WSAENOBUFS
2748
2749
274A
274B
274C
WSAEISCONN
WSAENOTCONN
WSAESHUTDOWN
WSAETOOMANYREFS
WSAETIMEDOUT
274D
WSAECONNREFUSED
274E
WSAELOOP
274F
2750
2751
WSAENAMETOOLONG
WSAEHOSTDOWN
WSAEHOSTUNREACH
Gallagher & Robertson
The specified socket type is not
supported in this address family.
The referenced socket is not a type
that supports connection-oriented
service.
The specified address family is not
supported by this protocol.
The specified address is already in
use.
The specified address is not
available from the local machine.
The Windows Sockets
implementation has detected that
the network subsystem has failed.
The network address can't be
reached from this host. There is
probably a problem in the way you
have set up TCP/IP routing for your
PC (most likely you have not
defined a default router).
The connection must be reset
because the Windows Sockets
implementation dropped it.
The connection has been closed.
Not enough buffers available, or
too many connections.
The socket is already connected.
The socket is not connected.
The socket has been shutdown.
Attempt to connect timed out
without establishing a connection.
The attempt to connect was
forcefully rejected. The service on
the other side is not available.
Too many symbolic links were
encountered in translating the path
name.
The host machine is out of service.
The host machine is unreachable.
Ggate
92
GUFT
2752
2753
2754
2755
2756
2757
276B
WSAENOTEMPTY
WSAEPROCLIM
WSAEUSERS
WSAEDQUOT
WSAESTALE
WSAEREMOTE
WSASYSNOTREADY
276C
WSAVERNOTSUPPORTED
276D
WSANOTINITIALISED
2AF9
WSAHOST_NOT_FOUND
2AFA
WSATRY_AGAIN
2AFB
WSANO_RECOVERY
2AFC
WSANO_DATA
Gallagher & Robertson
Ggate
Indicates that the underlying
network subsystem is not ready for
network communication.
The version of Windows Sockets
API support requested is not
provided by this particular
Windows Sockets implementation.
A successful WSAStartup() must
occur before using this API.
Authoritative answer host not
found.
Non-authoritative answer host not
found, or SERVERFAIL.
Non-recoverable errors,
FORMERR, REFUSED, NOTIMP.
Valid name, no data record of
requested type.
93
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