» Owner's Manual Super Air 210/230/G21/G23/G25

» Owner's Manual Super Air 210/230/G21/G23/G25
SUPER AIR NAUTIQUE 210 & 230
SUPER AIR NAUTIQUE G21, G23, G25
Dear Nautique Owner,
Welcome to the Nautique Family! For over 90 years, Nautique has
been dedicated to providing our customers and their families with
the finest inboard boats available. It’s our passion to create the best
performing boats in the industry. Boats that allow you to escape the
routine of everyday life. Our customers don’t just own a Nautique,
they live the Nautique life.
Your boat has been built with the best material and workmanship
available, a legacy handed down from our founder. Our wealth of
experience gives us the edge in innovation, quality and
performance. We have the most dedicated and loyal employees in
the industry. Hands down. Every day, our employees do more than
just punch a clock; they take personal pride in every boat that comes
down the line.
Review this Owner’s Manual for your boat. We have assembled this
manual to inform you about your Nautique and educate you further
on boating. Please pay particular attention to the safety statements
labeled as DANGER, WARNING, CAUTION and NOTICE. These
statements alert you to possible safety hazards to avoid so you can
have a safer boating experience. There are also many tips and tricks
on care and maintenance sprinkled throughout the manual. Boating
is very important to us and we would like you to enjoy many years of
boating in your Nautique.
By purchasing a Nautique, you have taken the first step in trading
your old lifestyle for a new one. Now that you own a Nautique, life as
you know it will never be the same.
Enjoy the Nautique Life.
The Nautique Team
Trust in the Lord with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own
understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct
thy paths.
Proverbs 3:5-6
P/N 160056
i
Record Important Information
In addition to this manual, your Nautique boat is supplied with component
manufacturer information such as instructions, warranties or other important
information. Read these materials carefully since improper operation and
maintenance can void the warranty and jeopardize personal safety.
Safeguard information about your Nautique boat by recording the Hull
Identification Number (HIN) and the model of your boat and the model
and serial numbers of your engine/transmission and trailer, if applicable.
Your HIN is located on the top right side of the transom, above the water
line. The U.S. Coast Guard requires that your HIN be permanently affixed
and remain on the top right side of the transom. The first two digits refer to
the country of manufacture (U.S.). The next three digits represent the
manufacturer, Nautique Boat Company, Inc. (CTC). The next five digits are
the boat’s serial number. The next digit is a letter from “A” where “A” =
January through “L” where “L” = December, designating the month the boat
was made.
The last three digits represent the last digit of the year the boat was built and
the final two digits of the boat model year. A boat built in July 2006 is
actually a 2007 model boat. Example: A boat with “607” as the last digits
indicates the boat was built in 2006, but it is a 2007 model boat.
Hull
HIN ___________________________________________________________
Date Purchased _________________________________________________
Dealer/Phone __________________________________________________
Ignition Key Number ____________________________________________
Registration Number/State _______________________________________
Engine
Model Number _________________________________________________
Serial Number __________________________________________________
Trailer
Model Number _________________________________________________
Serial Number __________________________________________________
Accessory
Model Number _________________________________________________
Serial Number __________________________________________________
The identification numbers are important! Keep a copy of these numbers
stored in a safe place off the boat. In case of theft, damage, etc., report
these numbers to the local authorities, your insurance agent and your
Nautique dealer.
ii
Boater’s Checklist
For improved safety and enjoyment, check each of these items:
Check Before You Launch Your Boat:
• Read both the engine and the boat operator manuals.
• Drain plug (Securely in place?)
• Propeller Condition (Prop nut tight and secured, no cracked
or bent blades, prop turns freely?)
• Steering System (Working smoothly and properly, self
locking nuts in place?)
• Battery (Fully charged, cable terminals clean and tight?)
• Capacity Plate (Are you overloaded?)
• Weather conditions (Safe to go out?)
• Fuel and Oil (Sufficient for trip, check bilge area for gas
odor, no leaks?)
• Hoses and Connectors (No leaks or damage?)
• Electrical Equipment (Lights, horn, pumps, etc.?)
• Safety Equipment (Fire extinguisher, bailer, paddle, anchor
and line, mooring lines, signaling device, tool kit, first aid
kit, first aid manual?)
• Personal Flotation Devices for all occupants
• Float Plan submitted to Responsible Person (Verbal or
written?)
Check Before You Start Your Engine:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fuel (Sufficient for trip, check bilge area for gas odor?)
Control Lever in Neutral
Capacity Plate (Are you overloaded?)
Personal Flotation Devices for all occupants
Seating (Everyone in proper place?)
Engine Stop Switch and Lanyard (Operational and securely
fastened?)
• No one in water near boat
• Keep firm and continuous grip on steering wheel
• Engine Cooling Water Valve open
iii
Restricted Areas
Before boating, check with Local, State and Federal authorities to
identify restricted areas. Because of the threat of terrorism, the U.S.
Coast Guard has and will continue to implement strict limits on
watercraft near U.S. Navy and Coast Guard ships and other
potential targets.
Proposition 65
A wide variety of components used on this vessel contain or emit chemicals known to the State
of California to cause cancer and birth defects and other reproductive harm.
EXAMPLES INCLUDE:
Engine and generator exhaust.
Engine and generator fuel, and other liquids such as coolants and oil, especially used motor oil.
Cooking fuels.
Cleaners, paints and substances used for vessel repair.
Waste materials that result from wear of vessel components.
Lead from battery terminals and from other sources such as ballast or fishing sinkers.
TO AVOID HARM:
Keep away from engine, generator and cooking fuel exhaust fumes.
Wash area thoroughly with soap and water after handling the substances above.
California Health & Safety Code 25249.5-.13
KC-0206-B
Emission Control Warranty
Information
The engine in your Nautique boat meets the
strict requirements set forth by the California
Air Resources Board (CARB). The engine has a
special environmental tag and the boat has this
label affixed to it. The tag and the label are
CORC013
required by the California Air Resources Board
(CARB). The label has 1, 2, 3 or 4 stars. The label MUST be affixed
to the boat, if the boat is operated in the state of California and/or
bordering waters.
iv
Boating Terminology
LENGTH OVERALL (LOA)
BEAM
PORT
SIDE
STARBOARD
SIDE
HELM
TRANSOM
AFT
STERN
GUNWALE
FORWARD
BOW
FREEBOARD
WATERLINE
DRAFT
CORC001
* An easy way to remember PORT side from STARBOARD side is
“PORT” and “LEFT” both have four letters.
Product Improvement
Because of our policy of continuous product improvement, the
illustrations used in this manual may not look the same as on your
boat and are intended only as representative reference views. Some
illustrations may also show optional accessories which may or may
not be available for your boat. Many optional accessories can only
be installed at the time the boat is manufactured and cannot be
installed by your dealer. Your dealer will be happy to provide details
on installing accessories.
v
Table of Contents
Welcome.....................................i
Record Important
Information...............................ii
Boater’s Checklist....................iii
Restricted Areas .......................iv
Proposition 65..........................iv
Emission Control Warranty
Information ..............................iv
Boating Terminology................v
Product Improvement..............v
Boating Safety ......................1-1
Introduction...........................1-1
About this Owner’s
Manual ................................1-2
Signal Words and Symbols
Used In This Manual .........1-3
Basic Safety Rules ..................1-4
Pre-operation Check
List – Before Leaving
the Dock..............................1-5
Precautions While
Underway ............................1-7
Safety While Maintaining
the Vessel ..........................1-10
Owner Responsibility and
Boating Education...............1-12
Important Safety
Information ......................1-12
Responsibilities of Boat
Owner and Operators......1-12
Registration.......................1-13
Insurance ..........................1-13
Boating Safety Education
Opportunities ...................1-14
Operation by Minors
and Licensing ...................1-15
vi
Safety and Required
Equipment ...........................1-15
Navigation Lights .............1-16
Emergency Safety
Lanyard .............................1-16
Personal Flotation
Devices...............................1-18
Fire Extinguisher..............1-20
Horn or Whistle ...............1-20
Bilge Pump(s)...................1-21
Visual Distress Signals ......1-21
Recommended Safety
Equipment ........................1-22
General Boating Safety
Topics ...................................1-23
Safe Speed.........................1-23
Passenger Safety ...............1-23
Carbon Monoxide
Safety .................................1-24
Proper Loading ................1-27
Weighting Your Boat
During Watersport
Activities ............................1-28
Visibility from the Helm...1-30
Boating Under the
Influence ...........................1-31
Product Misuse .................1-32
Reporting Accidents ........1-32
Rendering Assistance .......1-32
Hazardous Conditions .....1-33
Environmental
Concerns ...........................1-34
On Product Warning
Labels....................................1-37
Warning Labels &
Locations...........................1-37
Basic Rules of the Road ......1-50
Boating Regulations.........1-50
Encountering Another
Vessel .................................1-51
Aids to Navigation ............1-55
Night Running .................1-61
Watersports Safety ...............1-64
Hand Signals.....................1-66
Towed Person Safety
Responsibilities .................1-66
Additional Precautions
for Towed Skier/Rider ....1-68
Tow Line Guidelines........1-70
Fallen Skier or Rider........1-71
Develop WATER SENSE ..1-72
Emergency Procedures .......1-77
Explosion and Fire...........1-77
Swamping and Flooding..1-78
Capsizing...........................1-79
Staying Afloat....................1-79
Collisions...........................1-79
Grounding ........................1-80
Person Overboard ............1-80
Drowning ..........................1-81
Medical Emergency..........1-81
Operation Failure.............1-81
Towing...............................1-81
G21, G23, G25, 210 and
230 .......................................2-1
Specifications .........................2-1
G21 ......................................2-1
G23 ......................................2-1
G25 ......................................2-2
210 .......................................2-2
230 .......................................2-3
210, 230 Dash Pod and
Console...................................2-5
G21 Dash Pod and Console...2-7
G23 and G25 Dash Pod and
Console...................................2-9
Keypad ..................................2-10
Keys .......................................2-11
G21 Deck Layout .................2-12
G23 and G25 Deck
Layout ...................................2-14
210 Deck Layout..................2-16
230 Deck Layout..................2-18
210 Seating Area..................2-20
230 Seating Area..................2-21
G21 Seating Area.................2-22
G23 Seating Area.................2-23
G25 Seating Area.................2-24
Standard and Optional
Equipment ...........................2-25
Controls and Indicators .......3-1
Steering ..................................3-1
Hydro-Gate™ Control and
SportShift™ - 210, 230 ..........3-2
Shifter/Throttle.....................3-4
Emergency Stop Switch.........3-5
Smart Pod - Team..................3-7
Gauges .................................3-7
Control Switches.................3-8
12-Volt Port .......................3-10
Dash Pod ..............................3-11
Keypad ...............................3-11
Power Management Access
(PMA) Panel......................3-16
Standard Equipment...........3-17
Watersports Tow Point ....3-17
Tow Rope Attachment.....3-18
Bow Features of Your
Nautique ...........................3-19
Driver’s Seat Adjustment ..3-20
vii
Rearview Mirror
Adjustment .......................3-21
Observer’s Seat .................3-22
Storage Hatch...................3-22
Engine Cover Hatch ........3-23
Walk-Thru Windshield
Opening/Latching...........3-24
Coolers ..............................3-24
Boarding Platform ...........3-25
Surf Pipe (G21, G23,
G25)...................................3-26
Surf Pipe (210, 230).........3-26
Engine Cooling Water
Intake Valve ......................3-27
Fuel Tank ..........................3-29
Rudder Remote Lube ......3-29
Battery Selector Switch ....3-30
Nautique Electrical
System................................3-30
Ballast Function................3-30
Optional Equipment...........3-31
Folding Instructions for
Flight Control Tower®......3-31
Bimini Top........................3-34
Battery Charger ................3-36
Optional Accessories ...........3-37
Stereo Systems ..................3-37
Boat Systems ........................4-1
Fuel System ............................4-1
Fuel System - 210, 230........4-2
Fuel System - G21, G23,
G25 ......................................4-3
Ballast Tanks and Bilge
System .....................................4-4
Ballast Tank Valves - 210....4-5
Ballast Tank Valves - 230....4-5
Ballast Tank Valves - G21,
G23 and G25.......................4-6
viii
Belly Ballast Tank and
Bilge System - 210, 230 ......4-7
Belly Ballast Tank and
Bilge System - G21, G23,
G25 ......................................4-8
Port and Starboard Ballast
Tanks - 210, 230..................4-9
Port and Starboard Ballast
Tanks - G21, G23, G25.....4-10
12-Volt System - 210, 230 ....4-11
12-Volt System - G21, G23,
G25 Only ..............................4-12
Cockpit Heater System Optional ...............................4-13
Getting Underway ................5-1
Safety Checklist ......................5-1
Safety Equipment ..................5-2
Fueling....................................5-2
Gasoline Containing
Alcohol ................................5-3
When Fueling .....................5-4
After Fueling.......................5-5
Boarding.................................5-5
Boat Planing...........................5-5
Pre-Operation Checks...........5-6
Flooded Engine................5-11
Break In Procedure..........5-13
Propeller Selection...........5-13
Shifting .................................5-14
Steering ................................5-14
Stopping ...............................5-15
Docking ................................5-15
Running................................6-1
Maneuvering Techniques .....6-2
Tow Pattern............................6-3
Freezing Temperatures.........6-4
Anchoring ..............................6-4
Dropping Anchor...............6-5
Weighing (Pulling In)
Anchor.................................6-6
Performance Boating ............6-7
Propellers ...............................6-7
Care and Maintenance .........7-1
General Maintenance............7-1
Engine Intake Water
Strainer................................7-2
Bilge Pumps ...........................7-3
CE Bilge Discharge Filter......7-3
Cartridge Replacement......7-4
Ballast Filtration System
(optional)...............................7-5
Propeller.................................7-6
Removal...............................7-6
Installation ..........................7-7
Through-Hull Fittings ...........7-8
Quick Oil Drain System ........7-8
Salt Water Boating.................7-9
Freshwater Flushing Kit Optional .................................7-9
Proper Use of Freshwater
Flushing Kit.........................7-9
Coastal Edition.....................7-10
Battery Maintenance ...........7-11
Battery Cable Warning
Alarm.................................7-13
Gelcoat Maintenance ..........7-14
Care of Metal .......................7-15
Care of Glass ........................7-15
Adhesive-Backed Non-Skid...7-16
Vinyl Maintenance and
Cleaning ...............................7-16
Tunable Rudder ..................7-18
Rudder Remote Lube
Fitting ................................7-19
Checking Transmission
Fluid......................................7-19
Checking V-Drive Unit
Fluid......................................7-20
Troubleshooting...................8-1
Trouble Check Chart ............8-2
Performance .......................8-2
Electrical..............................8-3
Storage .................................9-1
Lifting Rings...........................9-1
Winterizing Your Boat...........9-3
Winterizing the Heater
System (in Closed-Cooled
Engine Only) ......................9-4
Check for Water in Your Fuel
System .....................................9-5
Winterizing Ballast Tanks
(if equipped)..........................9-6
Trailer/Trailering .................9-7
Hitch....................................9-7
Wiring..................................9-7
Security................................9-7
Towing Your Boat ..............9-8
Long Trips ..........................9-8
Glossary...............................G-1
Warranty .............................W-1
NAUTIQUE LIMITED
WARRANTY..........................W-1
Lifetime Limited
Warranty ............................W-1
Transferable Lifetime
Limited Warranty..............W-1
Boat Five (5) Year
Transferable Limited
Warranty ............................W-2
Gel Coat Three (3) Year
Transferable Limited
Warranty ............................W-2
ix
Engine/Power Train
Warranty ............................W-2
Exceptions .........................W-2
Procedure ..........................W-4
NAUTIQUE COASTAL
EDITION LIMITED
WARRANTY..........................W-5
Lifetime Limited
Warranty ............................W-5
Transferable Lifetime
Limited Warranty..............W-5
Boat Three (3) Year
Transferable Limited
Warranty ............................W-6
Gel Coat One (1) Year
Transferable Limited
Warranty ............................W-6
Engine/Power Train
Warranty ............................W-6
Exceptions .........................W-7
Procedure ..........................W-9
x
Section 1
Boating Safety
Introduction
Congratulations on your purchase of a new high-performance
recreational tow boat. Your Nautique boat has been constructed to
meet and/or exceed all U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and National
Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA) requirements
applicable at the time of its manufacture. However, it is still your
responsibility as the boat owner to ensure the boat is operated in a
safe manner and is properly maintained.
Before operating this vessel, please take the time to get acquainted
with the vessel and its various features and controls. We
recommend that you carefully read and familiarize yourself with
this Owner’s Manual and all on-product safety labels prior to
operating your new watercraft. This manual contains important
information on Boating Safety, Boating Rules, Proper Operation
and Maintenance of your boat. This manual provides a guideline
for proper operation and maintenance of your boat, and you
should consider it a permanent part of your vessel. In the event
that this boat is sold, this manual should be included along with the
boat to ensure that it will provide the same important information
to the next owner.
1-1
Section 1
About this Owner’s Manual
The recommended practices and warnings in this manual represent
sound advice for recreational boating and identify common risks
encountered by boaters engaging in towed watersport activities.
Read and understand the contents of this manual. Ask questions of
a boating professional if anything in this manual does not make
sense to you. The manual does not cover all instances of risk or
danger, so please use common sense and good judgment when
boating. If you follow the advice provided in this manual you will
significantly reduce risk to yourself, your passengers, towed
participants, and other boaters.
This manual is not intended to be a substitute for taking a course
on boating safety nor is it a substitute for boating experience. It is
recommended that if you are unfamiliar with the use and operation
of a boat you seek advice and training from a qualified individual
or organization. Check with your local marine law enforcement
agency or dealer for more information about boating safety classes
in your area.
The precautions listed in this manual and on the boat are not allinclusive. If a procedure or method is not specifically
recommended, YOU must be satisfied that it is safe for you and
your passengers, and that the boat will not be damaged or made
unsafe as a result of your decision. Remember - always use caution
and common sense when operating and maintaining your boat!
1-2
Boating Safety
Signal Words and Symbols Used In This Manual
Throughout this manual specific precautions and symbols identify
safety-related information. You will find DANGER, CAUTION,
WARNING, NOTICE and SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS symbols
which require special attention. Please read them carefully and
follow these precautions as indicated! They will explain how to
avoid hazards that may endanger you, your passengers, towed
participants, and other boaters. PLEASE REVIEW ALL SAFETY
INFORMATION.
DANGER indicates a hazardous situation
which, if not avoided, will result in death or serious
injury.
WARNING indicates a hazardous situation
which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious
injury.
CAUTION
CAUTION indicates a hazardous situation
which, if not avoided, could result in minor or moderate
injury.
NOTICE is used to address practices not related to physical injury.
SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS (or equivalent) signs indicate specific
safety-related instructions or procedures.
1-3
Section 1
Basic Safety Rules
Make sure you understand all of the operating instructions prior to
attempting to operate this boat. Boating-related accidents are
generally caused by the operator’s failure to follow basic safety rules
or written precautions. Most accidents can be avoided if the
operator is completely familiar with the boat and its operation,
follows recommended practices, and is able to recognize and avoid
potentially hazardous situations.
Failure to adhere to these warnings may
result in severe injury or death to you and/or others.
Past accident data shows that most FATALITIES involve
actions which cause falls or ejections overboard,
mishaps with towed persons, propeller strikes,
collisions, and carbon monoxide exposure.
Past accident data shows that most INJURIES are
associated with collisions, mishaps with towed persons,
falls or ejections overboard, being struck by the
propeller, and f res and explosions.
These incidents are mostly caused by operator
inattention, operator inexperience, reckless operation,
alcohol/drug use, excessive speed, passenger or towed
person behavior, and violation of navigation rules.
Failure to observe the safety recommendations contained in this
manual may result in severe personal injury or death to you or to
others. Use caution and common sense when operating your boat.
Don’t take unnecessary chances! Basic safety rules are outlined in
this section of the manual.
1-4
Boating Safety
Pre-operation Check List - Before Leaving the Dock
Failure to follow these precautions may
result in severe injury or death to you and/or others.
The operator shall:
• Check that weather conditions are safe for boating. It is the
driver’s responsibility to determine if weather or other
factors have created an unsafe boating environment. Boaters
must continuously be aware of weather conditions. Sudden
storms, wind, water conditions, lightning, etc., can
unexpectedly put boaters in grave danger. Always check the
local weather report before going boating.
• Check that drain plugs are securely in place.
• Check bilge pump, horn, lights, blower and other
equipment to verify they are operating properly.
• Verify that the emergency cutoff switch lanyard is in proper
operating condition and is properly affixed to the driver.
• Check the operation of the steering system. Verify that the
steering is operational before launching the boat. If the boat
is already in the water, verify proper steering wheel
operation at low speed. Turn the steering wheel full stop in
both directions and verify proper rudder movement. Ensure
that there is no binding or stiffness in the steering wheel
rotation. Binding and stiffness is an indication that the
steering cable needs replacement. Failure of the steering
cable will result in loss of control of the boat.
• Ensure that the load of persons, ballast, and equipment is
within the limits stated on the USCG Maximum Capacities
Plate and is properly distributed based on instructions in this
manual.
• Check that all safety equipment and life jackets, personal
flotation devices (PFDs), and throwable cushions are in good
condition and suitable for your boat and passenger load.
• Inform all passengers where safety equipment is located and
how to use it.
1-5
Section 1
• Have at least one other passenger who is capable of
operating the boat safely in case of an emergency.
Gasoline vapors can explode. Before
starting engine operate blower for 4 minutes and check
engine compartment bilge for gasoline vapors.
• It is very important to open the engine cover and check the
engine compartment and bilge for liquid gasoline and
gasoline vapors prior to each use of your boat and after
refueling. Failure to do so may result in fire or explosion as
well a serious injury or death to you and/or others.
• If you see liquid gasoline in the engine compartments/
bilge or smell gasoline vapors, DO NOT attempt to start the
engine. Liquid gasoline in the bilge is an extreme fire and
explosion hazard which may cause injury or death. Find and
fix the source of the leakage, remove the liquid gasoline
from the bilge. Then ventilate the engine
compartment/bilge and run the blower to remove all
gasoline vapors before starting the engine.
If gasoline vapors persist after running the blower, DO NOT
attempt to start the engine. Look for a cause and remedy
before starting the engine.
• Always operate blower below cruising speed and after
stopping the boat.
1-6
Boating Safety
Precautions While Underway
Failure to follow these precautions will
result in serious injury or death.
The operator shall:
• Check that the area behind the boat is all clear
before starting the engine to AVOID PROPELLER
INJURY to persons in the water behind the boat or
on the swim platform.
• Turn off the engine prior to anyone occupying the
swim platform or being in the water behind the
boat to AVOID PROPELLER INJURY. Being in
neutral gear is insufficient; the propeller may still
be turning, or engine may be inadvertently shifted
into gear.
• Not back the boat toward persons in the water
behind the boat to AVOID PROPELLER INJURY.
• Not allow people to be on or near the swim
platform or in the water near or around the swim
platform while the engine is running because
CARBON MONOXIDE will exist around the back of
the boat when the engine is running. Engine
exhaust contains carbon monoxide, which is a
deadly, odorless, colorless gas.
• Not operate the engine in a confined space or
while tethered to another vessel as CARBON
MONOXIDE will be around the boats.
• Not go under the boat cover with the engine
running or shortly after the engine has been
running because CARBON MONOXIDE may
remain under the cover. Remove cover to ventilate
the area.
Failure to follow these precautions may
result in severe injury or death to you and/or others.
1-7
Section 1
The operator shall:
• Follow safe operating practices, the “Rules of the Road”, and
the Watersports Responsibility Code.
• Not operate a boat if under the influence of alcohol or other
drugs.
• Attach the emergency cutoff switch lanyard to his person
when operating the boat.
• Maintain a proper course and safe speed at all times to avoid
collisions.
• Maintain a lookout for other boats, swimmers and
obstructions in the water.
• Operate slowly in congested areas such as marinas and
mooring areas.
• Keep a safe distance from other boats, swimmers, personal
watercraft, docks, and fixed objects.
• Look before you turn/maneuver the boat so as to avoid
potential collisions with oncoming or overtaking vessels.
• Be aware that this boat is a high-performance boat and is
capable of quick, tight turns and changes in direction.
Familiarize yourself with the handling characteristics of the
boat. It is the operator’s responsibility to operate the boat in
a manner that ensures the safety of all passengers. Abrupt
maneuvers may result in the ejection of unsecured,
unseated, or improperly positioned passengers. Verbally
warn passengers before making quick, tight turns so they
may have time to grasp a handrail, hand-hold, or portion of
the boat.
• Be aware that your boat will handle differently depending on
loading and on-board weight distribution.
• Ensure that all passengers are properly and securely seated
in appropriate seating locations to avoid falling or falling
overboard.
• Instruct and ensure that passengers remain properly seated
at all times while the boat is in motion above idle speed.
• Not allow passengers to sit on the transom, seat backs,
engine cover or sides of the boat while the engine is running
and the boat is in motion to avoid falling overboard.
• Not allow passengers to sit in a position that obstructs the
operator’s view.
1-8
Boating Safety
• NEVER leave children unattended and in the boat without
adult supervision.
• Have children riding in the bow of the boat be accompanied
by an adult in the bow and ensure that all remain seated
when the boat is in motion.
• Not let passengers occupy seats which may be in the path of
the tow line.
• Slow down when crossing waves or wakes in order to
minimize the impact on passengers and the boat. Crossing
waves or wakes at an angle (such as 45 degrees) rather than
perpendicularly will reduce the severity of the impact. Avoid
rough water, large waves and large wakes from other boats
when at high speed. Jumping waves/wakes or slamming the
bow will cause large vertical impacts which may cause injury
to occupants or cause ejections.
• For safe towing (waterskiing, tubing, wakeboarding, wake
surfing, knee boarding, etc.) be experienced and have an
observer [an observer or “spotter” is required by law in most
states]. A rear view mirror is helpful if you are allowed to tow
without an observer in your state.
• Avoid letting tow lines or mooring lines wrap around
anyone’s body parts/limbs. Doing so could allow body parts/
limbs to become entangled in the line and could cause
significant injury, such as amputations.
• Keep track of tow lines and dock lines so that they do not
become entangled in the propeller. A tow line will wrap
quickly around a spinning propeller and is capable of
immobilizing the boat and dragging a person entangled in
the tow line underwater or causing amputations. Shut off the
engine if a tow line has potential for wrapping in the
propeller.
• The tower is designed to pull a limited number of
individual(s), and in some cases only one (1) individual.
Please consult the remainder of this manual and warning
labels on the tower for details. DO NOT climb, sit on, stand
on or jump/dive off of the tower. Tow line may loop on
inverted tricks. DO NOT sit behind the pulling point of the
tower.
1-9
Section 1
• NEVER allow any type of spark or open flame near gasoline
or engine compartment.
• Avoid grounding the boat: be familiar with local conditions
and water depth. If you are uncertain, then proceed slowly
with caution. Sudden groundings from planing speeds may
cause rapid decelerations and cause occupants to impact the
boat and/or to be ejected from the boat. Boat damage may
also occur.
• Always watch for low obstacles such as tree limbs, bridges or
power lines, especially in boats with tow towers.
• Seek shelter from open water if there is threat of lightning
or severe weather.
• NEVER dive from the boat without being absolutely sure of
the depth of the water. Severe injury or death may occur
from striking the bottom or submerged objects. Striking the
bottom or a submerged object while diving head first can
cause paralysis, head injury or death.
• Provide assistance to other boaters in distress while ensuring
the safety of your own passengers.
• When you leave the boat, take the keys with you. This will
keep untrained and unauthorized persons from operating
the boat. (This may not be applicable on some keyless
ignition systems.)
Safety While Maintaining the Vessel
Failure to follow these precautions may
result in severe injury or death to you and/or others.
The operator shall:
• Visually inspect the engine compartment and ventilate after
refueling.
• Inspect fuel system regularly. Examine fuel tanks, hoses and
fittings for leaks or corrosion at least annually because
leaking fuel is a fire and explosion hazard.
1-10
Boating Safety
• Never remove or modify components of the fuel system in
any way except for maintenance by qualified personnel.
Tampering with fuel components may cause a hazardous
condition which could lead to a fire or explosion.
• Never override or modify the engine neutral starting safety
switch in any way. Your boat engine should not start in gear.
If it does, do not use the boat and have this safety feature
fixed by an authorized dealer.
• When charging some batteries, a small amount of hydrogen
gas is generated. Hydrogen gas is highly explosive. While
charging, it is a good idea to keep sparks, flames and
smoking away from the battery. Failure to follow instructions
when charging a battery may cause an explosion of the
battery.
• Keep the engine off whenever the engine box/cover/hatch
is open. The engine box/cover/hatch serves as a machinery
guard. Clothing or body parts can get caught in moving
parts, causing death or serious injury. Keep away from
moving parts.
• Not replace your boat’s marine parts with automotive parts
or parts that were not designed for your boat.
• Be aware that battery electrolyte fluid is dangerous. It
contains sulfuric acid, which is poisonous, corrosive and
caustic. If electrolyte fluid is spilled or placed on any part of
the human body, immediately flush the area with large
amounts of clean water and immediately seek medical
attention.
• Check the tightness of the tower bolts BEFORE each use. If a
tower collapses it may result in injury to boat occupants or
towed persons.
• Not modify the tow bar. The tow pylon/bar is not designed
for vertical extensions. Any modifications to the tow pylon/
bar or its mountings may result in damage to the boat and
injury to the user.
• Only lift the boat from approved lift points, which are
identified in later parts of the manual.
1-11
Section 1
Owner Responsibility and
Boating Education
Important Safety Information
Your safety, the safety of your passengers, and the safety of other
boaters is dependent on how you operate and maintain your boat.
As operator or owner of this boat, you are responsible for the safety
of those with and around you while boating.
Responsibilities of Boat Owner and Operators
It is the owner’s responsibility to ensure that the operator of the
boat has been properly instructed in the lawful and safe operation
of this vessel. Therefore, before operating the boat, thoroughly
read this owner/operator manual. Be sure you understand each
item before operating it. Improper operation or trailering of the
boat could lead to severe personal injury or death. Improper
operation or trailering of the boat may also damage the boat.
The operator and the boat owner assume all risks for themselves,
their guests and anyone in proximity to their boat and ensure that
all passengers understand the risks and responsibilities associated
with boating.
This manual is not intended to provide complete training on all
aspects of boat operation. We strongly recommend that all
operators of this boat seek additional training on boat handling
and safety. Have all operators become familiar with the handling
characteristics, and proper steering and control system usage
before attempting high-speed operation.
At the time of delivery, the owner/operator is responsible for:
• Understanding the warranty terms and conditions of your
boat, your engine, and your trailer.
• Obtaining insurance.
• Examining the boat to ensure the proper operation of all
systems.
1-12
Boating Safety
Before operating the boat, the owner/operator is responsible for:
• Registering the boat as required in the jurisdiction where the
boat is being operated.
• Providing the proper (USCG) safety equipment, and
checking local, state and federal agencies as to laws and
regulations (USCG carriage requirements).
• Carefully reading and understanding safety information and
proper operating procedures within this manual.
• Obtaining other boating education if you lack operational
experience.
• Familiarizing yourself with the navigable waters where you
intend to operate the boat.
• Following the proper break-in procedure for the engine.
Registration
Federal Law requires that all motorboats be registered and that all
motorcraft not documented by the U.S. Coast Guard display
registration numbers. In nearly all states, this means registration
with the designated state agency. In a few jurisdictions, the Coast
Guard retains registration authority. Your dealer will either supply
registration forms or tell you where they may be obtained. The
agency will supply you with a certificate which must be carried with
you when the boat is in operation. International laws may vary as to
required registration.
Insurance
The boat owner may be legally responsible for damages or injuries
caused by both himself and the operator (if different than the
owner). Common sense dictates that you carry adequate personal
liability and property damage insurance on your boat, just as you
would on your automobile. Many states have laws detailing
minimum insurance needs. Your insurance agent or your dealer
may be able to supply you with more information. You should also
protect your boat from physical damage or theft.
1-13
Section 1
Boating Safety Education Opportunities
It is recommended that the boat owner/operator obtain boater
safety education. If you have never owned a boat before, you can
get an excellent introduction to boat handling from organizations
such as the U.S. Coast Guard, American Red Cross, United States
Coast Guard Auxiliary, or your local boating authority. Even if you
are a veteran boater, these courses will help sharpen your boating
skills as well as bring you up to date on current rules and
regulations. See your local boating agency or dealer for
information on classes in your area.
Some states require youths, 16 years of age and younger, to
complete a boating safety course before operating any watercraft.
Many others require operators under the age of 18 to be licensed
in small boat operation.
Boat smart from the start: take a boating safety course and get a free
vessel safety check annually for your boat. For more information,
contact: United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, www.cgaux.org;
United States Power Squadrons, 1-888-FOR-USPS, www.usps.org.
The following is a list of some other agencies and organizations that
offer Water Safety, First Aid and CPR courses or information. To
find boating safety courses in your area, call your state’s local
boating agency or the USCG boating safety course line at
1-800-336-2628 (1-800-245-2628 in Virginia).
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
USCG Office of Boating ( www.uscgboating.org )
American Red Cross ( www.redcross.org )
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary ( www.cgaux.org )
U.S. Power Squadrons ( www.usps.org )
State Boating Offices
Canadian Power and Sail Squadrons ( www.cps-ecp.ca )
Boat Owners Association of the United States
( www.boatus.com )
• National Safe Boating Council (www.safeboatingcouncil.org)
• Water Sports Industry Association ( www.wsia.net )
• European or international organizations
1-14
Boating Safety
Operation by Minors and Licensing
If your boat will be operated by a minor, remember to have an adult
present at all times. Many states have laws regarding minimum age
and licensing requirements for minors. Some states require boat
training courses, certification,or licensing for minors and/or
adults. Contact state and local authorities for requirements that
apply in your area.
Safety and Required
Equipment
Your boat and equipment must be in compliance with federal, state
and local safety equipment regulations. USCG regulations require
certain safety equipment be present on your boat during operation.
For a detailed description, obtain “Federal Requirements for
Recreational
Boats”
published
by
the
U.S.
Coast
Guard
and
available
online
at:
http://www.uscgboating.org/regulations/federal_requirements_
brochure.aspx.
In addition to the USCG regulations, other local and/or
international law enforcement agencies may have similar
requirements. You should check with your local marine law
enforcement agency regarding any such requirements before
boating.
Equipment requirements for coastal and inland waters differ.
Check with local authorities and/or the USCG for further
information about coastal water requirements.
The Federal Boat Safety Act of 1971 (FBSA/71) and the National
Recreation Boating Safety Program have established minimum
safety standards for boats and associated equipment, specified by
the USCG. In addition, the American Boat and Yacht Council
(ABYC) and the National Marine Manufacturers Association
(NMMA) work with boat builders to develop voluntary standards
that exceed the USCG requirements. The included safety
equipment on your boat meets or exceeds the standards of the
USCG, ABYC and the NMMA.
1-15
Section 1
Some required safety equipment, such as life jackets (PFDs), are
not included with your boat. Your dealer can help you choose the
appropriate equipment.
Many states’ equipment requirements go beyond USCG
requirements. Contact your state boating office for further
information.
Navigation Lights
Your boat is equipped with navigational lights. Recreational boats
are required to display navigational lights between sunset and
sunrise and other periods of reduced visibility (fog, rain, haze, etc.).
Navigation lights are provided to keep other boats informed of your
presence and course. It is up to you to make sure they are
operational, displayed correctly, and turned on when required.
Emergency Safety Lanyard
Your boat is equipped with an Emergency Safety Lanyard (cutoff
switch). We recommend that the lanyard be secured to the operator
and the lock plate attached to the emergency cutoff switch prior to
starting the engine and anytime the engine is operating. The
Emergency Safety Lanyard is designed to turn off the engine
whenever the operator moves far enough away from the helm to
activate the switch. The purpose is to stop the engine, propeller, and
boat in the event the operator leaves the helm location, falls
overboard, or is ejected from the boat. If the engine is stopped it will
prevent the boat from becoming a run-away, unmanned boat, which
may cause injury or death to boat occupants who have fallen
overboard or been ejected, or to other nearby people. If the engine
stops it will minimize the subsequent opportunity for propeller
contact with the operator or other persons in the water. If the
engine and boat stop it will afford opportunity for the operator or
other persons who have fallen overboard to safely re-board the boat.
1-16
Boating Safety
It is recommended that you use the
Emergency Safety Lanyard system as failure to do so
can cause death or serious injury.
DO NOT operate the boat if the Emergency Safety
Lanyard system does not function properly.
• Attach the Emergency Safety Lanyard to a secure place on
your clothing, your arm or your leg while operating.
• DO NOT attach the lanyard to clothing that could tear
loose.
• DO NOT route the lanyard where it could become
entangled, preventing it from functioning.
• Avoid accidentally pulling the lanyard during normal
operation.
• Loss of engine power means loss of most steering control.
• Without engine power, the boat will decelerate rapidly. This
could cause people in the boat to be thrown forward or
ejected overboard if they are not properly seated in the boat.
There are practical limitations to what the Emergency Safety
Lanyard can do. It can take several seconds for the engine and
propeller to stop turning. The boat can continue to coast for
several hundred feet depending on the boat speed at the time the
switch is activated. While the boat is coasting, it can cause injury to
anyone in its path. Accidental loss of power can be hazardous
particularly when docking or in heavy seas, strong current, or high
winds.
While at the dock or when the boat is not moving, periodically
disconnect/pull the Emergency Safety Lanyard out of the switch
while the engine is running to test for proper operation. The
engine should shut off when the lanyard is disconnected/pulled
from the switch. You should not be able to restart the engine until
the lanyard is back in place.
1-17
Section 1
Personal Flotation Devices
Federal law requires that you have at least one wearable Personal
Flotation Device (PFD) of the proper size (Type I, II, III or V), for
each person on board or being towed, and at least one throwable
PFD (Type IV) in the boat. PFDs must be Coast Guard approved, in
good and serviceable condition and the appropriate size for the
user. To meet requirements, each lifesaving device must have a
current, legible USCG approval stamp permanently affixed. At the
beginning of each season, inspect life jackets (PFDs) for damage
and test for proper flotation. Refer to the lifejacket (PFD)
manufacturer’s information.
REMEMBER - The best PFD is the one that is worn – that is, the one
that can save your life. PFDs are intended to save lives; it is highly
recommended that you and your passengers wear them while in the
boat. Learn how to use them and adjust as necessary for comfort. It
is especially important that children and non-swimmers wear a life
jacket (PFD) at all times. Make certain all passengers know where
life jackets are located, how to put on and properly adjust their life
jackets (PFDs), and that life jackets are readily accessible at all
times.
Your dealer can help you select appropriate life jackets (PFDs) and
throwable lifesaving devices for your area. Some PFDs are specially
made for use while waterskiing or wakeboarding and are not
U.S.C.G. approved. Please check local law with respect to their use.
Some states require children to wear a PFD at all times. There are
four types of wearable PFDs (Type I, II, III or V) and one throwable
type of PFD (Type IV) used for throwing in emergency situations.
Examples of these USCG approved PFDS are shown below:
Type I PFD – Offshore Lifejacket: This PFD is
designed for extended survival in rough, open
water. It usually will turn an unconscious person
face up and has over 22 pounds of buoyancy.
This is the best PFD to keep you afloat in remote
regions where rescue may be slow in coming.
1-18
Boating Safety
Type II PFD – Near Shore Buoyant Vest: This
“classic” PFD comes in several sizes for adults and
children and is for calm inland water where
there is chance of fast rescue. It is less bulky and
less expensive than a Type I, and many will turn
an unconscious person face-up in the water.
Type III PFD - Flotation Aid: These life jackets
are generally considered the most comfortable,
with styles for different boating activities and
sports. They are for use in calm water where
there is good chance of fast rescue since they will
generally not turn an unconscious person faceup. Flotation aids come in many sizes and styles.
Type IV Throwable Device: These are designed
to be thrown to a person in the water. Throwable
devices include boat cushions, ring buoys, and
horseshoe buoys. They are not designed to be
worn and must be supplemented by wearable
PFD. It is important to keep these devices
immediately available for emergencies.
Type V PFD - Special Use Device: Special use
PFDs include work vests, deck suits, and hybrids
for restricted use. Hybrid vests contain some
internal buoyancy and are inflatable to provide
additional flotation. These PFDs may be used
instead of a Type I, II, or III PFD with non-towed
participants if used in accordance with the
approval conditions on the label and if worn when the boat is
underway. Some Type V PFDs provide increased protection against
hypothermia.
1-19
Section 1
A Type V PFD must be worn to be counted toward the minimum
carriage requirements.
Special lifejackets are available for skiing and other water sports.
These non-Coast Guard approved lifejackets do not count as
PFDs.
Fire Extinguisher
A portable fire extinguisher is required if your boat has an inboard
engine, or when fuel is stored in closed stowage compartments.
Approved fire extinguishers are
classified by a letter symbol, either
B-I or B-II with the B designating
that the material will extinguish
flammable liquids such as
gasoline, oil, etc. B-I extinguishers
are required for boats less than 26 feet in length. Check
periodically to ensure that the extinguisher is in working condition
and fully charged. Check local, state and federal agencies as to laws
and regulations.
Horn or Whistle
All boats over 16 feet (4.8 meters) in length must be equipped with
an operable horn or whistle. Test the operation of the horn
periodically, so as to make sure it will sound when you actually need
to alert someone or another boat. The following are standard
signals when using a whistle or a horn:
•
•
•
•
•
1-20
One prolonged blast:
One short blast:
Two short blasts:
Three short blasts:
Five or more blasts:
Warning.
Pass on my port (left) side.
Pass on my starboard (right) side.
My engines are in reverse.
Danger!
Boating Safety
Bilge Pump(s)
Bilge pump(s) are installed in your boat to remove water that may
accumulate in the bilge. Know the location of the pump(s), where
they discharge, and where switches are located. Typically there are
manual switch and/or an automatic switch position(s). Periodically
test the operation of bilge pumps by activating the manual switch
and observing the water discharge. It is best to leave the bilge pump
switches in automatic mode, so as to not allow excess water to
unknowingly accumulate in the bilge of your boat. If your bilge
pump comes on too frequently or continuously, investigate the
source of leaking water (check for hull damage, hose or piping
leaks, missing drain plug, exhaust system or ballast system failures,
etc.), and/or return to shore. Excess water in the bilge of your boat
can cause loss of engine power, sinking, and/or capsizing.
Visual Distress Signals
All vessels used on coastal waters, the Great Lakes, territorial seas,
and those waters connected directly to them up to a point where a
body of water is greater than two miles wide, must be equipped with
USCG approved visual distress signals. Your dealer or local
authorities can help you select appropriate visual distress signals for
your area.
If you are required to carry distress signals, you must have three
USCG approved pyrotechnic devices. Be sure they are in
serviceable condition, not exceeding the expiration date and
stored in a cool, dry location in a red or orange waterproof
container.
Pyrotechnic signaling devices can cause
fire and/or explosion, death, serious injury, and property
damage if improperly handled. Follow the pyrotechnic
manufacturer’s directions.
1-21
Section 1
Recommended Safety Equipment
As a precaution, a prudent boater will avoid potential problems on
an outing by having additional equipment on board. Normally, this
equipment is dependent on the size and type of the body of water
and the length of the trip. Your dealer can assist you in acquiring
this additional equipment.
We recommend the following equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1-22
First aid kit and manual
Anchor with at least 75 feet (23 meters) of line
Mooring lines and fenders
Bailing device (bucket, hand pump)
Combination paddle/boat hook
Local charts and compass
Day/night distress signals
Waterproof flashlight and spare batteries
Cellular phone
Waterproof container for cell phone
GPS Global Positioning System
Binoculars
Portable AM/FM radio with weather band
A non-electric horn or whistle
Extra engine oil
Tool kit
Spare propeller and mounting hardware
Spare fuses
Spare keys
Sunglasses and sun block lotion
Boating Safety
General Boating Safety
Topics
Safe Speed
Navigation rules state that a boat be operated at a safe speed at all
times. Determination of a safe speed involves consideration of
many factors, such as, but not limited to:
• Boating activity (tubing, water skiing, wakeboarding, wake
surfing, etc.)
• Boat traffic congestion
• Water conditions
• Environmental conditions (shore line, docks, and depth of
water)
• Weather
• Visibility
The boat should not be driven at a rate of speed faster than will
allow it to be brought to a full stop within the operator’s field of
view given the environmental conditions at the time. Safe speed for
the conditions and driver attention (lookout) are important factors
in avoiding collisions which may cause injury or death. When in
doubt it is prudent to slow down within adequate time and distance
so as to be able to assess the conditions and paths of other boats.
It is important to know the Rules of the Road, although do not
assume that all boaters also know the rules or that they will abide by
them. Avoid collisions by constantly assessing the ever-changing
situation and be sure to make appropriate speed and course
changes early.
Passenger Safety
The operator of the boat is responsible for the safety of the
passengers, all skiers/riders, as well as his/her own safety. Ensure
that you and your passengers adhere to these safety
recommendations:
• Any time you take your boat out, make sure that there is at
least one other passenger aboard who is familiar with the
operation of your boat.
1-23
Section 1
• Ensure that all passengers are properly and securely seated
in appropriate seating locations to avoid falling or falling
overboard.
• While the engine is running, and while the boat
maneuvering, all occupants should be properly seated. DO
NOT stand while the boat is moving.
• DO NOT sit on the engine box, seat backs, transom seating,
sunpad, boarding platform or gunnels while the boat is
underway. You could fall overboard and be hit by the
propeller, or another boat.
• DO NOT allow objects, arms or legs, or any other body parts
to hang over the bow or gunnels. Stay within the boat.
• Passengers should not sit in locations that obstruct the
operator’s visibility.
• Persons and gear should be stowed in a way that distributes
weight appropriately and in a manner that trims the boat
properly (pitch angle). Excessive weight at either the bow or
the stern relative to one another can cause trim problems
leading to reduced driver visibility, erratic steering, loss of
control, or bow submergence and flooding/swamping.
• Passengers should be well aware of emergency equipment
and instructed in its use.
• Passengers should assist with lookout duties and notify the
operator of any approaching watercraft or potentially unsafe
conditions to provide assistance with collision avoidance.
Carbon Monoxide Safety
Carbon Monoxide (CO) is a deadly, colorless and odorless gas
produced by all engines and fuel burning appliances. Even with the
best boat design and construction, plus the utmost care in
inspection, operation and maintenance, hazardous levels of carbon
monoxide may be present in or near the boat under certain
conditions. Even catalyst equipped boats still generate carbon
monoxide. The boat owner, operator, as well as all boat occupants,
must understand the dangers of carbon monoxide and must
comply with all safety recommendations/requirements. For boats
with cabins, always ventilate the boat interior and avoid boating
situations which cause increased exposure.
1-24
Boating Safety
CARBON MONOXIDE (CO)
CAN CAUSE BRAIN DAMAGE
OR DEATH.
Engine exhaust contains
odorless
and
colorless
carbon monoxide gas.
Carbon monoxide will be around the back of the boat
when engines or generators are running.
MOVE TO FRESH AIR if you feel nausea, headache,
dizziness, or drowsiness.
• Do not allow people to be on or near the swim platform or in
the water near the swim platform while the engine is running.
Carbon monoxide will exist around the back of the boat when
engines are running.
• Do not operate the engine in a confined space or while the
boat is tethered to another vessel.
• Do not go under the boat cover while the engine is running or
shortly after the engine has been running. Carbon monoxide
may be trapped under the cover. It is important to remove the
cover and/or ventilate the area before going under the boat
cover.
• Do not drag behind the boat while holding onto swim
platform (sometimes referred to as “Teak surfing”). Carbon
monoxide will exist in high concentrations in the vicinity of
the swim platform near the water while the engine is running.
The USCG has deemed platform dragging as a dangerous and
hazardous activity which should be prohibited, as it can result
in injury or death.
• In the event that someone exhibits the symptoms of carbon
monoxide exposure (nausea, headache, dizziness, or
drowsiness), have them breathe fresh air and, if necessary,
immediately seek medical attention.
1-25
Section 1
Hazardous boating situations involving carbon monoxide include:
Blockage of boat exhaust by obstruction.
Exhaust traveling along obstruction.
Operating at slow speed or while dead
in the water.
Operating with high bow angle.
Exhausts from other vessels in confined areas.
Operating with canvas tops and side curtains in
place without ventilation.
For the most current information on carbon monoxide, you may
call, write or visit on-line any of the following:
United States Coast Guard
Office of Boating Safety (CG-5422)
2100 Second Street SW STOP 7581,
Washington, DC 20593-7581
1-800-368-5647 www.uscgboating.org
(www.uscgboating.org/recreational-boaters/carbon-monoxide.php)
NMMA
National Marine Manufacturers Association
231 S. LaSalle St., Suite 2050, Chicago, IL 60604
312-946-6200 www.nmma.org
1-26
Boating Safety
American Boat & Yacht Council, Inc.
613 Third St., Suite 10, Annapolis, MD 21403
410-956-4460 www.abycinc.org
Proper Loading
DO NOT overload your boat.
Overloading or uneven loading can cause loss of
control, capsizing, or swamping, which may lead to
death or serious injury.
Adhere to the load capacity plate restrictions, and
always account for persons, gear, and all non-factory
installed ballast or other equipment.
Your boat is equipped with a maximum load capacity plate
indicating the maximum acceptable load as determined by the
manufacturer following certain Federal guidelines. In addition to
following these weight guidelines, it is critical that you properly
distribute this weight throughout the boat. If too much weight is
placed in one area it can have serious impact on the boat’s
handling and control, which has the potential to lead to injury or
death.
The load capacity plate is used by boat manufacturers participating
in the National Marine Manufacturers Association certification
program. Your manufacturer has submitted your model for
inspection and compliance with their guidelines. The maximum
number of persons allowed on the boat has been determined by
the manufacturer and displayed on the capacity plate. This
information on the capacity plate applies under normal conditions
and special care must be used in any abnormal conditions. Check
the capacity plate on your boat and abide by these limits.
1-27
Section 1
The capacity plate has the following information permanently
printed on it:
• The total weight of persons, gear and other items which the
boat is capable of carrying under normal conditions. This
weight must include any added ballast above and beyond
boat manufacturer’s factory installed ballast system(s).
Any non-factory installed ballast must be
properly secured to prevent injury.
Do not fill the bilge area with water.
Excessive water in the bilge can cause changes in the
boat trim and reduce boat stability which may lead to
submergence or capsize.
Weighting Your Boat During Watersport Activities
Although water intrusion and waves spilling inside a boat is an
obvious boating hazard, this hazard can be increased when
weighting your boat for water sports such as wakeboarding or
wakesurfing. As wakeboarding has evolved, ballast systems have
been developed to add weight and increase the size of the wake.
The simplest ballast system on the market is the water ballast type,
such as the “FAT SAC.” The quest for the largest wake has caused
some boat operators to excessively overload their boats. It is not
uncommon to see operators use aftermarket ballast systems and
then put additional people and gear in their boat. Be advised that
this practice can lead to overloading your boat which may lead to
any of the following: changes in handling and performance;
capsizing, flooding, and sinking; boat occupants going overboard.
Do not overload your boat.
Always be aware of the load in your boat and do not load the boat
in excess of the listed capacity. Each boat has a maximum capacity
label displaying the maximum weight of people, gear and ballast
that can be placed in the boat. Always have your passengers in
designated occupant positions when underway.
1-28
Boating Safety
When loading your boat, give attention to the effect that the load
distribution has on the boat’s trim angle. Trim angle is the
technical term for the up or down pitch angle of your boat (also
known as the “bow up” or “bow down” angle). The fore and aft load
distribution of weight, passenger, and gear can affect the running
trim angle of the boat.
• Excessive weight placed in the stern of the boat can cause
the inability to get on plane, high bow up angles, and can
lead to steering difficulties. High bow up angles can be
dangerous due to the reduction in the operator’s forward
visibility which can lead to collisions and groundings. High
bow up angles cause longer transition times from
displacement mode (slow velocity, 0 to 5 mph) to planing
speeds (18 to 20 mph and above). During transition, it is
important that the boat operator pays attention so that they
are able to see forward and that the time in transition (or in
the “hump” speed region) is minimized.
• Excessive weight placed in the bow of the boat can lead to
very flat planing trim angles which may lead the boat to turn
aggressively, unpredictably, and without steer input. The
phenomenon of yaw instability is caused by heavy bow
weights and running very flat(bow down or flat trim angles).
This can occur with excessive weight in the bow compared to
weight in the stern of the boat. Another ill effect of too
much bow weight in comparison to stern weight is that with
extremely heavy bow loads, the boat’s bow may dive or
submerge when coming off plane (decelerating rapidly, or
encountering waves/wakes at slow speed). If the bow
submerges, then water will enter and flood your boat.
- When encountering conditions which may lead to bow
diving or bow submergence, it is recommended to
accelerate the boat before the wave/wake in order to help
raise the bow and get over the wave/wake.
- If the bow submerges, the recommended action is to
reduce throttle to stop forward speed, get passengers to
move aft, and turn on the bilge pump.
1-29
Section 1
It is the boat operator’s responsibility to tell passengers to move to
other seats on the boat, so as to not overload the stern or bow of the
boat, nor restrict the boat operator’s forward visibility. There is no
single recommended seating or load distribution for all conditions.
Experience with your boat will allow you to determine where to
properly allow passengers and gear to be placed.
Excess and improper loading of bow area
forward of windshield may cause water influx, operating
instability, and loss of control resulting in injury or
death.
Bow Capacity Limit – X persons or XXX lbs. person, gear
and ballast. This is posted separately on your boat but
still included in overall capacity.
Use good judgment when weighting your boat for any
towed water sports.
Visibility from the Helm
The operator of the boat is responsible, by law, to “maintain a
proper lookout by sight and hearing.” The operator must ensure
that he/she has appropriate visibility for safe operation. No
passengers or equipment should block the operator’s view,
including the view of other boats, skier(s), rider(s), swimmer(s), or
anyone or anything else in the water. Even momentary interference
can result in the driver’s inability to respond to a situation that
requires avoidance of another vessel or submerged or partiallysubmerged object(s).
Look carefully before turning, especially when you are turning
around to pick up a fallen skier/rider. Other boats in your vicinity
may not necessarily be following the “Rules of the Road.” Be alert
and keep a visual check for other boats in and around your
intended path. Do not turn or maneuver your boat without first
checking that it is clear to do so. Failure to look before turning can
result in an encounter with another boat where neither boat has
enough time to avoid a collision. This situation can develop very
quickly if you fail to look first and turn in front of another
oncoming boat.
1-30
Boating Safety
Obstructed visibility can cause death or
serious injury. The operator must maintain clear
visibility at all times while operating the boat.
Arrange passengers and equipment appropriately or
designate a passenger to assist when visibility is
limited.
Boating Under the Influence
Operating boat or boating under the
influence of alcohol and/or drugs can cause serious
injury or death.
Alcohol and drugs slow your reaction time and impair
your judgment.
Do not operate a boat or allow passengers to boat while
under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs.
Boating under the influence of alcohol or drugs can be deadly.
Alcohol and/or drug use is the leading contributing factor to all
recreational boating fatalities. Alcohol and drugs can increase your
reaction time and impair your judgment. Combined with the sun,
wind, waves, and noise of other watercraft, the effects of drugs and
alcohol can be increased and can significantly increase your
reaction time. As the owner/operator, you are responsible for the
alcohol/drug use and onboard behavior of your passengers.
Additionally, civil lawsuits in cases of property damage or
injury/death to others can result in significantly higher verdicts
when alcohol or drugs are allowed.
Impaired operation may result in severe
injury or death.
Federal and state laws prohibit operating a boat under
the influence of alcohol and other drugs.
If the operator’s blood alcohol content is above the legal
limit, violators are subject to fines and may go to jail.
Violators may also lose automobile driving privileges.
1-31
Section 1
Product Misuse
Misuse of the product or use of it in a manner for which it was never
intended can create dangerous situations. The boat operator and
passengers are responsible for using the product safely and as
intended. The driver must operate the boat in a manner that
ensures the safety of all passengers. If you or your passengers are
unsure about the proper use of the product, unsure about
performing certain boating maneuvers or are unsure about a
particular water activity, refer to this manual or contact a
knowledgeable source, such as your local dealer, the US Coast
Guard, or your local boating authority.
Reporting Accidents
Boat operators may be required by law to file a Boating Accident
report with their state boating law enforcement agency or local
authority, the USCG, or their country’s boating law enforcement
agency when their boat is involved in certain boating accidents. A
boating accident must be reported if there is a loss or probable loss
of life or a personal injury requiring medical attention beyond first
aid. In these situations, a formal report must generally be filed
within 48 hours of the accident. Also a boating accident must be
reported for accidents when damage exceeding $500 is incurred, or
there is a complete loss of the boat. In these situations, a formal
report must generally be filed within 10 days. If any of these events
occur, seek further assistance from local law enforcement
personnel. Please note that the submittal of a report is the
responsibility of the boat owner. This requirement is different than
laws associated with the reporting of automobile accidents.
Rendering Assistance
If you see a distress signal or suspect a boat is in trouble, you must
assume it is a real emergency and render assistance immediately.
By law, the operator in charge of the craft is obligated to provide
assistance to any individual in danger, presuming assistance can be
safely provided. Failure to render assistance can result in a fine
and/or imprisonment.
1-32
Boating Safety
The 1971 Boating Safety Act grants protection to a “Good
Samaritan” boater providing good faith assistance, and absolves a
boater from any civil liability arising from such assistance.
Hazardous Conditions
Every waterway poses hazards that should be avoided. You will be
best prepared to avoid these hazards if you are familiar with the
waterway where you are boating. Whenever possible familiarize
yourself with navigation charts, depth charts, and waterway maps
before you go boating. The following information outlines some of
the most common hazards which may be encountered:
Shallow Water Operation
Shallow water brings on obvious hazards such as sand bars,
stumps, rocks, etc. Know the area in which you will be operating
the boat. Grounding the vessel or striking submerged objects
can result in serious injury or death and can cause severe
damage to your watercraft. At high speed, this can cause rapid
deceleration or stop your boat abruptly, which may cause
occupants to impact the interior of the boat or be ejected. Stick
to deeper water whenever possible, and if you must travel in
shallow water, proceed at low speed and post a lookout.
Know the minimal depth your boat can safely travel.
Warning Markers
Learn to recognize the different buoys and day markers; they
are used as the signposts of the waterways identifying navigable
routes and water hazards. It is a good idea to ask local
authorities about hazard areas and if they are marked. Stay
within boundaries and clear of hazards.
Weeds
Weeds can generally be a threat to a boat’s engine and other
components on the boat. If weeds wrap around the propeller,
they can create vibration in the engine. They also can restrict
water intakes or clog the water filter causing the engine to
overheat. Learn to recognize the typical normal operating
temperature range for you engine. If temperature rises high
above normal, then check for blockage of the engine cooling
water system.
1-33
Section 1
Weeds can sometimes be removed by shifting to NEUTRAL,
pausing for a moment, then shifting to REVERSE to unwind the
weeds from the propeller.
Dam Spillways
The area around dam spillways is very hazardous and
conditions can change rapidly. Keep clear of the spillways and
areas below dams. Currents created by spillways can draw in
objects, including your boat.
Restricted Areas
Before boating, check with Local, State, and Federal authorities
to identify restricted areas. Because of the threat of terrorism,
the U.S. Coast Guard has and will continue to implement strict
limits on watercraft near U.S. Navy and Coast Guard ships and
other potential targets.
Weather/Seas
Learn and understand weather patterns and signs of change.
Bad weather can cause an uncomfortable and unsafe situation.
If a storm approaches, seek a safe harbor. Check forecasts
before getting underway and continue to monitor conditions
while on the water.
Environmental Concerns
As a boater, you already appreciate nature’s beauty and the peace
of the great outdoors. It is a boater’s responsibility to protect the
natural environment by keeping waterways clean.
Foreign Species
If you trailer your boat from lake to lake, you have the potential
of unknowingly introducing a foreign aquatic species from one
lake to the next. It is important to thoroughly clean the bottom
of the boat below the water line, remove all weeds and algae,
and drain the bilge, ballast, and livewells before launching the
boat in a new body of water. Check local, state, country agencies
as to laws and regulations.
1-34
Boating Safety
Fuel/Oil Spillage
The spilling of fuel or oil into our waterways contaminates the
environment and is dangerous to wildlife. DO NOT EVER
discharge or dispose of fuel, oil or other chemicals into the
water; it is prohibited and can result in fines. These are three
common, accidental types of discharge:
• During initial fueling of a nearly empty tank
• Overfilling the fuel tanks
• Pumping contaminated bilge water
Fumes from rags can collect in bilge and
pose an extremely hazardous fire and explosion risk,
which can result in injury or death.
Never store rags used to wipe up fuel or solvent spills in
the boat.
Dispense of rags properly ashore.
Discharge/Disposal of Waste
Waste means all forms of garbage, plastics, recyclables, food,
wood, detergents, sewerage and even fish parts in certain waters
– in short, nearly everything. We recommend you bring back
everything you take out with you for proper disposal ashore.
Excessive Noise
Noise means engine noise, radio noise, loud conversation, or
even yelling. Many bodies of water have adopted noise limits.
Noise can carry a considerable distance on water, especially at
night. Be sure to follow regulations and be courteous.
Speed/ Wake/Wash
Be alert for NO WAKE zones. You are responsible for any
damage or injury caused by your wake/wash. Prior to entering
a NO WAKE zone, reduce throttle, come off plane to the
slowest steerable speed. Use caution when operating around
smaller crafts, in channels and marinas, and in congested areas.
1-35
Section 1
Some states and boating areas have imposed speed limits for
the operation of boats, including, but not limited to, no-wake
zones. Check local, state, and federal agencies as to laws and
regulations. The U.S. Coast Guard and local boating authorities
are excellent sources for this information, which can include
penalties for failure to observe the requirements.
Exhaust Emissions
Increased exhaust (hydrocarbon) emissions pollute our water
and air. Keep your engine tuned and boat hull clean for peak
performance. Consult your Nautique dealer for information.
Paints
If your boat is kept in water where marine growth is a problem,
the use of anti-fouling paint may reduce the growth rate. Be
aware of environmental regulations that may govern your paint
choice. Contact your local boating authorities for information.
Cleaning Agents
Household cleaners should be used sparingly and not
discharged into waterways. Never mix cleaners and be sure to
use plenty of ventilation in enclosed areas while cleaning your
boat. DO NOT use products which contain phosphates,
chlorine, solvents, non-biodegradable or petroleum based
products. Refer to CARE AND MAINTENANCE in this manual
for more information.
MARPOL Treaty
The USCG enforces the International Convention for the
Prevention of Pollution from ships, commonly referred to as
the MARPOL Treaty (Marine Pollution). This treaty prohibits
the overboard dumping of all ship-generated plastics,
chemicals, garbage and oil.
1-36
Boating Safety
On Product Warning Labels
Warning Labels & Locations
Warning labels are placed at specific locations on your Nautique
boat at the time of manufacture to alert you to potential hazards
that may not be obvious. These labels also indicate how to avoid
these hazards. Warning labels should never be removed and must
remain legible. If you suspect a label is missing, or if a label
becomes damaged or becomes unreadable (damaged, faded, or
sun bleached), contact your dealer for replacement.
It is the responsibility of the boat owner and occupants of the boat
to understand and comply with all warning labels and safety
recommendations/requirements. The driver of the boat and the
boat owner are responsible for the proper operation of the boat
and the safety of the occupants of the boat. Failure to adhere to
and comply with the on-product warning labels and safety
statements labeled as dangers, warnings, and cautions that appear
in this manual can lead to serious injury, or death, as well as
property damage. READ AND ADHERE TO ALL WARNING
PLATES AND LABELS from bow to stern, including those that are
installed inside the engine compartment, lockers, and underneath
seating.
1-37
Section 1
210, 230 Safety Labels
1
2
14
13
3
12
11
4
5
5
10
4
4
6
9
7
4
8
1-38
CORC0625
Boating Safety
1. Warning Bow Max Capacity:
- 210 3 Persons or 450 LBS. (replacement part #160162)
- 230 4 Persons or 550 LBS. (replacement part #160163)
2. Caution Reverse Polarity:
- 210, 230 Single Battery (replacement part #140255)
- 210, 230 Dual Battery (replacement part #140256)
3. Warning Passenger Remain Properly Seated:
- 210 (replacement part #160182)
- 230 (replacement part #160181)
4. Warning Leaking Fuel (replacement part #80068)
5. Warning Tow Tower (replacement part #160166)
6. Caution Water Strainer (replacement part #8293)
7. Danger Carbon Monoxide (replacement part #160158)
8. Danger Carbon Monoxide/Spinning Propeller/Tow Point
Combo (replacement part #160176)
9. Danger Spinning Propeller (replacement part #160157)
10. Warning Tow Tower Only Use This Pylon (replacement part
#160195)
11. Max Capacity Label:
- 210 Upper (replacement part #140031)
- 210 Lower (replacement part #140029)
- 230 Upper (replacement part #140030)
- 230 Lower (replacement part #140028)
- CE 210 Upper (replacement part #140336)
- CE 210 Lower (replacement part #140337)
- CE 230 Upper (replacement part #140338)
- CE 230 Lower (replacement part #140339)
12. Danger Spinning Propeller (replacement part #160169)
13. Fire Extinguisher System (replacement part #70156) (optional)
14. Warning Avoid Personal Injury (replacement part # 160173)
1-39
Section 1
G21 Safety Labels
1
2
14
13
3
12
11
4
5
5
10
4
4
6
9
7
4
8
1-40
CORC0626
Boating Safety
1. Warning Bow Max Capacity (replacement part #160161)
2. Caution Dual Reverse Polarity (replacement part #140256)
3. Warning Passenger Remain Properly Seated (replacement
part #160180)
4. Warning Leaking Fuel (replacement part #80068)
5. Warning Tow Tower (replacement part #160166)
6. Caution Water Strainer (replacement part #8293)
7. Danger Carbon Monoxide (replacement part #160158)
8. Danger Carbon Monoxide/Spinning Propeller/Tow Point
Combo (replacement part #160176)
9. Danger Spinning Propeller (replacement part #160157)
10. Warning Tow Tower Only Use This Pylon (replacement part
#160195)
11. Max Capacity Label (replacement part #140407)
CE Max Capacity Label (replacement part #160342)
12. Danger Spinning Propeller (replacement part #160168)
13. Fire Extinguisher System (replacement part #130135)
(optional)
14. Warning Avoid Personal Injury (replacement part # 160172)
1-41
Section 1
G23, G25 Safety Labels
1
2
14
3
13
12
4
11
5
5
10
6
4
4
4
7
9
8
1-42
CORC0627
Boating Safety
1. Warning Bow Max Capacity:
- G23 (replacement part #160160)
- G25 (replacement part #160159)
2. Caution Dual Reverse Polarity (replacement part #140256)
3. Warning Passenger Remain Properly Seated:
- G23 (replacement part #160179)
- G25 (replacement part #160178)
4. Warning Leaking Fuel (replacement part #80068)
5. Warning Tow Tower (replacement part #160166)
6. Caution Water Strainer (replacement part #8293)
7. Danger Carbon Monoxide (replacement part #160158)
8. Danger Carbon Monoxide/Spinning Propeller/Tow Point
Combo (replacement part #160176)
9. Danger Spinning Propeller (replacement part #160157)
10. Warning Tow Tower Only Use This Pylon (replacement part
#160195)
11. Max Capacity Label:
- G23 (replacement part #130215)
- G25 (replacement part #130326)
- CE Max Capacity G23 (replacement part #140416)
- CE Max Capacity G25 (replacement part #140417)
12. Danger Spinning Propeller (replacement part #160167)
13. Fire Extinguisher System (replacement part #130135)
(optional)
14. Warning Avoid Personal Injury (replacement part # 160171)
1-43
Section 1
Maximum Capacity Labels
BOW MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
BOW MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
OR
450 LBS
3 PERSONS
3
205 kg
450 LBS., PERSONS, GEAR
0609
MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
CATEGORY
C
D
6
10
465 kg
MANUFACTURER:
MODEL:
12
1850
765 kg
PERSONS OR
1850 LBS
LBS., PERSONS, GEAR
DESIGN COMPLIANCE WITH NMMA REQUIREMENTS IS VERIFIED.
MANUFACTURER RESPONSIBLE FOR PRODUCTION CONTROL.
NATIONAL
MARINE
MANUFACTURERS
ASSN.
MANUFACTURER: Nautique Boat Co., INC.
CORRECT CRAFT, INC.
SUPER AIR NAUTIQUE 210
14700 AEROSPACE PKWY. ORLANDO, FL 32832
MODEL: SUPER AIR NAUTIQUE 210
THIS BOAT COMPLIES WITH U.S. COAST GUARD SAFETY
STANDARDS IN EFFECT ON THE DATE
OF CERTIFICATION
THIS BOAT COMPLIES WITH U.S. COAST GUARD SAFETY
STANDARDS IN EFFECT ON THE DATE
OF CERTIFICATION
CORC0639a
CORC0634a
Upper Label P/N 140336
Lower Label P/N 140337
Upper Label P/N 140031
Lower Label P/N 140029
BOW MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
OR
550 LBS
4 PERSONS
550 LBS., PERSONS, GEAR
15
2300
PERSONS OR
2300 LBS
LBS., PERSONS, GEAR
DESIGN COMPLIANCE WITH NMMA REQUIREMENTS IS VERIFIED.
MANUFACTURER RESPONSIBLE FOR PRODUCTION CONTROL.
NATIONAL
MARINE
MANUFACTURERS
ASSN.
MANUFACTURER: Nautique Boat Co., INC.
14700 AEROSPACE PKWY. ORLANDO, FL 32832
MODEL: SUPER AIR NAUTIQUE 230
THIS BOAT COMPLIES WITH U.S. COAST GUARD SAFETY
STANDARDS IN EFFECT ON THE DATE
OF CERTIFICATION
CORC0639b
Upper Label P/N 140338
Lower Label P/N 140339
1-44
Upper Label P/N 140030
Lower Label P/N 140028
Boating Safety
0609
NAUTIQUE BOAT CO. INC.
SUPER AIR NAUTIQUE G21
MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
CATEGORY
D
13
916 kg
BOW MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
BOW MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
C
12
CATEGORY
C&D
4
991 kg
250 kg
THIS BOAT COMPLIES WITH U.S. COAST GUARD SAFETY STANDARDS IN EFFECT ON THE DATE OF CERTIFICATION
14
2200
PERSONS OR
2200 LBS
LBS., PERSONS, GEAR
THIS BOAT COMPLIES WITH U.S. COAST
GUARD SAFETY STANDARDS IN EFFECT
ON THE DATE OF CERTIFICATION
4
550
PERSONS OR
550 LBS
LBS., PERSONS, GEAR
MANUFACTURER:
NAUTIQUE BOAT COMPANY, INC.
14700 AEROSPACE PKWY.
ORLANDO, FL 32832
MODEL:
SUPER AIR NAUTIQUE G21
CORC0635d
CORC0640a
P/N 160342
0609
P/N 140407
CORRECT CRAFT, INC.
SUPER AIR NAUTIQUE G23
BOW MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
CATEGORY
C
D
13
16
995kg
BOW MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
4
1220kg
318 kg
THIS BOAT COMPLIES WITH U.S. COAST GUARD SAFETY STANDARDS IN EFFECT ON THE DATE OF CERTIFICATION
16
2500
PERSONS OR
2500 LBS
LBS., PERSONS, GEAR
THIS BOAT COMPLIES WITH U.S. COAST
GUARD SAFETY STANDARDS IN EFFECT
ON THE DATE OF CERTIFICATION
4
700
PERSONS OR
700 LBS
LBS., PERSONS, GEAR
NATIONAL
MARINE
MANUFACTURERS
ASSN.
CORC0640b
P/N 140416
P/N 130215
CORRECT CRAFT, INC.
SUPER AIR NAUTIQUE G25
BOW MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
CATEGORY
MANUFACTURER:
Nautique Boat Co., INC.
14700 AEROSPACE PKWY.
ORLANDO, FL 32832
MODEL:
SUPER AIR NAUTIQUE G23
DESIGN COMPLIANCE WITH NMMA REQUIREMENTS IS VERIFIED.
MANUFACTURER RESPONSIBLE FOR PRODUCTION CONTROL.
CORC0635b
0609
NATIONAL
MARINE
MANUFACTURERS
ASSN.
DESIGN COMPLIANCE WITH NMMA REQUIREMENTS IS VERIFIED.
MANUFACTURER RESPONSIBLE FOR PRODUCTION CONTROL.
C
D
16
17
1226 kg
BOW MAXIMUM CAPACITIES
1301 kg
5
340 kg
THIS BOAT COMPLIES WITH U.S. COAST GUARD SAFETY STANDARDS IN EFFECT ON THE DATE OF CERTIFICATION
19
2800
PERSONS OR
2800 LBS
LBS., PERSONS, GEAR
THIS BOAT COMPLIES WITH U.S. COAST
GUARD SAFETY STANDARDS IN EFFECT
ON THE DATE OF CERTIFICATION
5
750
PERSONS OR
750 LBS
LBS., PERSONS, GEAR
SUPER AIR NAUTIQUE G25
DESIGN COMPLIANCE WITH NMMA REQUIREMENTS IS VERIFIED.
MANUFACTURER RESPONSIBLE FOR PRODUCTION CONTROL.
CORC0635c
P/N 140417
MANUFACTURER:
Nautique Boat Co., INC.
14700 AEROSPACE PKWY.
ORLANDO, FL 32832
MODEL:
NATIONAL
MARINE
MANUFACTURERS
ASSN.
CORC0640c
P/N 130326
1-45
Section 1
Bow Capacity Labels
WARNING
WARNING
Failure to follow these warnings could cause serious injury or death
Failure to follow these warnings could cause serious injury or death
REMAIN PROPERLY SEATED AND HOLD ON TO AVAILABLE
HANDRAILS while boat is moving to avoid falling overboard or
being ejected from the boat. Do not sit on gunwales or deck
edges.
DO NOT EXCEED THE BOW CAPACITY of 3 persons
or 450 pounds. Overloading the bow of the boat can
cause loss of control, swamping and/or capsizing.
DO NOT OBSTRUCT OPERATOR VISIBILITY.
Operators must have a clear view in front of
them to avoid collisions.
USCG APPROVED LIFE JACKETS
should be on board for all
passengers and all towed
participants.
REMAIN PROPERLY SEATED AND HOLD ON TO AVAILABLE
HANDRAILS while boat is moving to avoid falling overboard or
being ejected from the boat. Do not sit on gunwales or deck
edges.
DO NOT EXCEED THE BOW CAPACITY of 4 persons
or 550 pounds. Overloading the bow of the boat can
cause loss of control, swamping and/or capsizing.
DO NOT OBSTRUCT OPERATOR VISIBILITY.
Operators must have a clear view in front of
them to avoid collisions.
USCG APPROVED LIFE JACKETS
should be on board for all
passengers and all towed
participants.
CORC0665a
CORC0665b
P/N 160162
P/N 160163
WARNING
Failure to follow these warnings could cause serious injury or death
REMAIN PROPERLY SEATED AND HOLD ON TO AVAILABLE
HANDRAILS while boat is moving to avoid falling overboard or
being ejected from the boat. Do not sit on gunwales or deck edges.
DO NOT EXCEED THE BOW CAPACITY of 4 persons or 550
pounds. Overloading the bow of the boat can cause loss of control,
swamping and/or capsizing.
DO NOT OBSTRUCT OPERATOR VISIBILITY. Operators must
have a clear view in front of them to avoid collisions.
USCG APPROVED LIFE JACKETS should be on board for all
passengers and all towed participants.
WARNING
Failure to follow these warnings could cause serious injury or death
REMAIN PROPERLY SEATED AND HOLD ON TO AVAILABLE HANDRAILS while
boat is moving to avoid falling overboard or being ejected from the boat. Do not sit on
gunwales or deck edges.
DO NOT EXCEED THE BOW CAPACITY of 4 persons or 700 pounds. Overloading the
bow of the boat can cause loss of control, swamping and/or capsizing.
DO NOT OBSTRUCT OPERATOR VISIBILITY. Operators must have a clear view in
front of them to avoid collisions.
USCG APPROVED LIFE JACKETS should be on board for all passengers and all
towed participants.
CORC0665d
CORC0665c
P/N 160161
P/N 160160
WARNING
Failure to follow these warnings could cause serious injury or death
REMAIN PROPERLY SEATED AND HOLD ON TO AVAILABLE HANDRAILS while
boat is moving to avoid falling overboard or being ejected from the boat. Do not sit on
gunwales or deck edges.
DO NOT EXCEED THE BOW CAPACITY of 5 persons or 750 pounds. Overloading the
bow of the boat can cause loss of control, swamping and/or capsizing.
DO NOT OBSTRUCT OPERATOR VISIBILITY. Operators must have a clear view in
front of them to avoid collisions.
USCG APPROVED LIFE JACKETS should be on board for all passengers and all
towed participants.
CORC0665e
P/N 160159
1-46
Boating Safety
Helm Labels
CORC0636a
P/N 160173
CORC0642a
P/N 160169
CORC0642b
CORC0636b
P/N 160172
P/N 160168
CORC0636c
P/N 160171
CORC0642c
P/N 160167
1-47
Section 1
Passenger Compartment Labels
Refer to and obey your specific model's designated
occupant positions depicted in the Owner’s Manual.
Failure to follow these warnings could cause serious injury or death
KEEP LIMBS AND BODY CLEAR OF ALL TOW LINES at
all times to avoid entanglement and other types of injuries.
REMAIN PROPERLY SEATED AND HOLD ON to available handrails while boat is moving to
avoid falling overboard or being ejected from the boat. Do not sit on gunwales or deck edges.
USCG APPROVED LIFE JACKETS should be on board
for all passengers and all towed participants.
DO NOT OVERLOAD THE BOAT. Occupants and gear must be evenly distributed on both
sides of the boat to avoid poor handling, sudden loss of control, swamping and/or capsizing.
CORC0637a
P/N 160182
Refer to and obey your specific model's designated
occupant positions depicted in the Owner’s Manual.
Failure to follow these warnings could cause serious injury or death
KEEP LIMBS AND BODY CLEAR OF ALL TOW LINES at
all times to avoid entanglement and other types of injuries.
REMAIN PROPERLY SEATED AND HOLD ON to available handrails while boat is moving to
avoid falling overboard or being ejected from the boat. Do not sit on gunwales or deck edges.
DO NOT OVERLOAD THE BOAT. Occupants and gear must be evenly distributed on both
sides of the boat to avoid poor handling, sudden loss of control, swamping and/or capsizing.
USCG APPROVED LIFE JACKETS should be on board
for all passengers and all towed participants.
CORC0637b
P/N 160181
Refer to and obey your specific model's designated
occupant positions depicted in the Owner’s Manual.
Failure to follow these warnings could cause serious injury or death
KEEP LIMBS AND BODY CLEAR OF ALL TOW LINES at
all times to avoid entanglement and other types of injuries.
REMAIN PROPERLY SEATED AND HOLD ON to available handrails while boat is moving to
avoid falling overboard or being ejected from the boat. Do not sit on gunwales or deck edges.
DO NOT OVERLOAD THE BOAT. Occupants and gear must be evenly distributed on both
sides of the boat to avoid poor handling, sudden loss of control, swamping and/or capsizing.
USCG APPROVED LIFE JACKETS should be on board
for all passengers and all towed participants.
CORC0637c
P/N 160180
Refer to and obey your specific model's designated
occupant positions depicted in the Owner’s Manual.
Failure to follow these warnings could cause serious injury or death
KEEP LIMBS AND BODY CLEAR OF ALL TOW LINES at
all times to avoid entanglement and other types of injuries.
REMAIN PROPERLY SEATED AND HOLD ON to available handrails while boat is moving to
avoid falling overboard or being ejected from the boat. Do not sit on gunwales or deck edges.
DO NOT OVERLOAD THE BOAT. Occupants and gear must be evenly distributed on both
sides of the boat to avoid poor handling, sudden loss of control, swamping and/or capsizing.
USCG APPROVED LIFE JACKETS should be on board
for all passengers and all towed participants.
CORC0637d
P/N 160179
Failure to follow these warnings could cause serious injury or death
Refer to and obey your specific model's designated
occupant positions depicted in the Owner’s Manual.
REMAIN PROPERLY SEATED AND HOLD ON to available handrails while boat is moving to
avoid falling overboard or being ejected from the boat. Do not sit on gunwales or deck edges.
DO NOT OVERLOAD THE BOAT. Occupants and gear must be evenly distributed on both
sides of the boat to avoid poor handling, sudden loss of control, swamping and/or capsizing.
KEEP LIMBS AND BODY CLEAR OF ALL TOW LINES at
all times to avoid entanglement and other types of injuries.
USCG APPROVED LIFE JACKETS should be on board
for all passengers and all towed participants.
CORC0637e
P/N 160178
1-48
Boating Safety
Transom Labels
DANGER
DANGER
CONTACT WITH A SPINNING PROPELLER
WILL CAUSE INJURY OR DEATH.
Do not enter or exit the water when the
engine is running.
Do not get on the swim platform when the
engine is running.
Do not swim towards the back of the
boat if the engine is running.
CO
CO
CO
x
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) CAN CAUSE
BRAIN DAMAGE OR DEATH.
Engine exhaust contains odorless and colorless
carbon monoxide gas.
Carbon monoxide will be around the back of the
boat when engines or generators are running.
MOVE TO FRESH AIR, if you feel nausea,
headache, dizziness, or drowsiness.
CORC0643b
CORC0643a
P/N 160157
DANGER
CO
CO
CO
x
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CO
CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) CAN CAUSE
BRAIN DAMAGE OR DEATH.
Engine exhaust contains odorless and colorless
carbon monoxide gas.
Carbon monoxide will be around the back of the
boat when engines or generators are running.
MOVE TO FRESH AIR, if you feel nausea,
headache, dizziness, or drowsiness.
P/N 160158
WARNING
DANGER
CONTACT WITH A SPINNING PROPELLER
WILL CAUSE INJURY OR DEATH.
Do not enter or exit the water when the engine
is running.
Do not get on the swim platform when the
engine is running.
Do not swim towards the back of the
boat if the engine is running.
OVERLOADING WATER-SPORTS TOW POINT OR TRANSOM GRAB RAIL CAN CAUSE
PERSONAL INJURY AND/OR EQUIPMENT DAMAGE. THIS BOAT IS EQUIPPED WITH
A TOW POINT/GRAB RAIL COMBINATION. THE TOW POINT IS IN THE CENTER AND
SHOULD BE USED FOR NO MORE THAN ONE OR TWO PERSONS AT A TIME ON
SKIS, WAKEBOARDS, TUBES, OR OTHER SIMILAR DEVICES. DO NOT TOW HEAVY
LOADS SUCH AS KITES OR BOATS. AT NO TIME SHOULD TOW LOAD EXCEED 400
POUNDS (180 KG). DO NOT USE THE GRAB RAIL SIDES OF THE COMBO FOR ANY
TOWING. SEE OWNER’S MANUAL FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
CORC0643c
P/N 160176
Tow Tower Labels
WARNING
Failure to follow
these warnings could
cause serious injury
or death
Lock the tower in place and
secure all hardware before
and during use.
DO NOT TOW MORE THAN
2 PERSONS OR 500
POUNDS (227 kg) at one
time from this tow tower.
Only use this tow tower for
waterskiing, boarding, or
recreational towables.
WARNING
Do not use this tow tower for
parasailing, kite flying,
pyramids, group pulls, or
towing other boats.
Failure to follow these warnings could cause serious injury or death
ONLY USE THIS TOW PYLON FOR
WATERSKIING, BOARDING, OR
RECREATIONAL TOWABLES.
Do not climb on, sit on, stand
on, jump off of or dive off the
tow tower.
Do not use this tow pylon for parasailing, kite
flying, pyramids, group pulls, barefoot/teaching
booms, pylon extensions or towing other boats.
Do not add any attachments
that are not installed by
Nautique Boat Company.
Never allow loose towrope
ends to dangle. See Owner’s
Manual for additional
information.
DO NOT SIT IN THE PATH OF THE TOW LINE
when it is in use.
CORC0641b
CORC0641a
P/N 160166
P/N 160195
1-49
Section 1
Miscellaneous Labels
CORC0638b
CORC0638a
P/N 70156
P/N 130135
CORC0638d
CORC0638c
P/N 140255
P/N 140256
CORC0638f
CORC0638e
P/N 8293
1-50
P/N 80068
Boating Safety
Basic Rules of the Road
Boating Regulations
The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) is the governing authority of the
United States waterways and serves to help the boating public. State
boating regulations are enforced by local authorities. Owners and
users outside of the United States must be cognizant of that
country’s laws and regulations. You are subject to marine traffic
laws and “Rules of the Road” for both federal and state waterways;
you must stop if signaled to do so by enforcement officers, and
permit them to board if asked.
Review and understand all local, state, federal, and country boating
laws.
There are many USCG pamphlets available to you. These
pamphlets go beyond the contents of this manual and explain
“Rules of the Road,” signal lights, buoys, safety, international and
inland regulations. An example is the Ultimate Watersports
Handbook you should have received with your new boat, or which
can be ordered by contacting WSIA, go to: www.WSIA.net. For more
information, contact your local USCG Unit or visit
http://www.uscgboating.org.
You should be aware of these rules and follow them whenever you
encounter another vessel on the water. The rules presented in this
manual outline only the most basic of the nautical “Rules of the
Road” and have been provided as a convenience only. Consult your
local U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary (USCGA), Department of Motor
Vehicles (DMV) or local maritime authority for a complete set of
rules governing the waters in which you will be using your boat. If
you plan to travel—even for a short trip—you would be well served
to contact the regional USCGA or DMV in the area where you will
be boating.
1-51
Section 1
The nautical Rules of the Road must be followed to prevent
collisions between vessels. Like traffic laws for automobiles, the
operator is legally required to follow the rules.
Collisions between boats can cause death
or serious injury.
Keeping a proper lookout, safe speed, and follow the
nautical “Rules of the Road.”
Encountering Another Vessel
Any time two vessels on the water meet one another, one vessel has
the right-of-way. It is called the “stand-on” or “privileged vessel”. The
vessel which does NOT have the right-of-way is called the “give-way”
or “burdened vessel”. These rules determine which vessel has the
right-of-way, and accordingly, what each vessel should do.
Privileged Vessel
The privileged vessel has the right-of-way and has the duty to
continue its course and speed, except to avoid an immediate
collision. When you maintain your direction and speed, the other
vessel will be able to determine how best to avoid you.
In general, boats with less maneuverability have right of way over
more agile crafts.
You must stay clear of the vessel with right of way and pass to his
stern.
Sailboats and boats paddled or rowed have the right of way over
motor boats. Sailboats under power are considered motorboats.
Small pleasure craft must yield to large commercial boats in narrow
channels.
1-52
Boating Safety
Burdened Vessel
The burdened vessel does not have the right-of-way and has the
duty to take positive and timely action to stay out of the way of the
privileged vessel. Normally, the burdened vessel should not cross in
front of the privileged vessel. The burdened vessel should slow
down or change directions and pass behind the other vessel. The
burdened vessel operator should always move in such a way that the
privileged vessel operator can see what you are doing in ample time
to avoid a collision.
Crossing
In crossing situations, the boat to the right from the 12 o’clock to
the 4 o’clock position has the right-of-way, and it must hold course
and speed. The burdened boat passes behind the privileged boat.
Boats going up and down a river have the privilege over boats
crossing the river. The illustration below depicts a situation in
which you are the boat in the center and you are the privileged
vessel. You must hold course and speed. All vessels approaching
your vessel from the directions depicted by the red vessels must
yield to your boat.
1-53
Section 1
Conversely, the following illustration depicts a situation in which
you are the boat in the center and you are the burdened vessel. You
must give right-of-way to all vessels coming towards you from the
directions shown in green.
Meeting Head-On
When meeting head-on, neither vessel has the right of way. Both
boats should decrease speed, turn towards their right (starboard
side) and pass on their left sides (port-to-port). However, if both
boats are clearly on each other’s right (starboard) side then, each
vessel should sound two short blasts and pass on their right sides
(starboard-to-starboard).
Passing
Port-to-Port
1-54
Meeting
Head-to-Head
Passing
Starboard-to-Starboard
Boating Safety
Overtaking
The boat that is overtaking one ahead of it is the burdened boat
and must make any adjustments necessary to keep out of the way of
the privileged boat, until the burdened boat is well ahead and clear
of the vessel being overtaken.
Privileged (Stand-On) Vessel
Being Overtaken
Burdened (Give-Way) Vessel
Overtaking
The General Prudential Rule
The General Prudential Rule regarding right of way, is that if a
collision appears unavoidable, neither boat has right of way. As
prescribed in the “Rules of the Road”, both boats must act to avoid
collision.
Rule 2 in the International Rules says, “In construing and
complying with these Rules due regard shall be had to all dangers
of navigation and collision and to any special circumstances,
including the limitations of the vessels involved, which may make a
departure from these Rules necessary to avoid immediate danger.”
Other Rules of the Road
When navigating in narrow channels, you should keep to the right
when it is safe and practical to do so. If the operator of a powerdriven vessel is preparing to go around a bend that may obstruct
the view of other water vessels, the operator should sound a
prolonged blast on the whistle or horn—four to six seconds.
If another vessel is around the bend, it too should sound the whistle
or horn. Even if no reply is heard, however, the vessel should still
proceed around the bend with caution.
1-55
Section 1
If you navigate these type of waters, you should carry a portable air
horn, which are available from local marine supply stores.
Aids to Navigation
Learn to recognize the different buoys and day markers; they are
the signposts of the waterways. The United States Aids to Navigation
System (USATONS) is the primary marking system used on inland
water, coastal waters and rivers in the United States. This system is
maintained by the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG).
There are two primary marking systems in use in the U.S.: the
Uniform State Waterway Marking System (USWMS), used on
inland waters and maintained by each state, and the Federal
Waterway Marking System (FWMS), used on coastal waters and
rivers and maintained by the USCG. In addition, the FWMS has two
modified systems: the Western River Buoyage, and the Intercoastal
Waterway Buoyage. Be sure to check with local authorities on the
buoyage system in use in your boating region.
The type of hazard/warning buoys and markers depends on the
area of jurisdiction. Check with local boating authorities.
USWMS System
In the USWMS Lateral System, well-defined channels are marked
with red and black buoys, and the boat should pass between them.
The USWMS Cardinal System is used when there is no well-defined
channel or where an obstruction may be approached from more
than one direction. With the cardinal system:
• Pass north or east of BLACK-TOPPED WHITE buoy.
• Pass south or west of RED-TOPPED WHITE buoy.
• RED and WHITE VERTICALLY STRIPED buoy indicates
boat should pass outside of the buoy (away from shore).
1-56
Boating Safety
FWMS System
The FWMS Lateral System is for use on navigable waters except
Western Rivers and Intercoastal Waterways. The markings on these
buoys are oriented from the perspective of being entered from
seaward (the boater is going toward the port). This means that red
buoys are passed on the starboard (right) side of the vessel when
proceeding from open water into port, and green buoys to the port
(left) side.
The right side (starboard) of the channel is marked with RED, even
numbered buoys. The left (port) side of the channel is marked with
GREEN, odd numbered buoys.
The middle of the channel is marked with RED and WHITE
vertically striped buoys; pass close to these buoys.
Spherical Safe Water Marker
Obstructions, channel junctions, etc. are marked with RED and
GREEN horizontally striped buoys.
A RED band at the top means the preferred channel is to the left
of the buoy; a GREEN top band means the preferred channel is to
the right of the buoy.
Day markers are colored and numbered the same as buoys. RED,
triangular day markers with even numbers mark the starboard side
of the channel. GREEN, square day markers with odd numbers
mark the port side of the channel.
1-57
Section 1
Lights, bells and horns are used on buoys for night or poor visibility
conditions. Buoys with unique light flashing characteristics are
identified on nautical charts with the specific flashing pattern.
Types of Buoys
There are several types and shapes of buoys. Buoys may be
unlighted, lighted, with sound or may have both an audible and a
visual signal. Lights, bells and horns are used on buoys for night or
poor visibility conditions. Different shapes of buoys are shown
below.
Unlighted Bell Buoy
Nun Buoy
Spar Buoy
Lighted Buoy
Can Buoy
FWMS Marking System
Buoys with unique light flashing characteristics are identified on
nautical charts with the specific flashing pattern.
1-58
Boating Safety
Mooring Buoys
The only buoys from which you are permitted to moor are mooring
buoys. Mooring buoys are white with a blue horizontal stripe.
Mooring to a navigation buoy, regulatory markers or lateral
markers is illegal.
Mooring Buoy – White with Blue Band
May Show White Reflector or Light
1-59
Section 1
Uniform State Regulatory Markers
Regulatory markers indicate dangerous or restricted controlled
areas. These markers are used to indicate speed zones, areas set
aside for particular use, general information and directions.
Regulatory markers are white with orange geometric shapes and
also have orange bands near the top and at the water line of the
buoy. You must obey regulatory markers.
CONTROLLED
AREA
DANGER
BOATS KEEP
OUT
INFORMATION
Uniform State Waterway Marking System (USWMS)
Divers Flag
1-60
Alpha Flag
USED BY
RECREATIONAL
DIVERS –
INDICATES
POSITION.
WORLDWIDE VESSELS
ENGAGED IN DIVING
OPERATIONS – DOES
NOT INDICATE
DIVER’S POSITION
Stay Far Away From Diver Flags
Someone is underwater in the vicinity
Stay Far Away From Diver Flags
Someone is underwater in the vicinity
Distress Flag
INDICATES
FELLOW
BOATER IS IN
NEED OF
ASSISTANCE
Boating Safety
Warning Markers
It is a good idea to ask local authorities if there are hazardous areas
and how they are marked. Boaters must also recognize the flag
designs, which indicate that skin divers are present and keep well
clear of the area. Divers underwater cannot be seen. Stay well away
from boats or floats displaying Diver Flags.
Skin Diver Warning Flag
Watch for swimmers. Swimming areas may not be marked. Steer
clear from the area and remain alert.
Swim Area Warning Buoy
Navigation markers serve as a means of identifying navigable
routes, and indicate water hazards. Boaters should become familiar
with navigation markers and stay within marked boundaries and
clear of hazards.
1-61
Section 1
Night Running
Boats operating between sunset and sunrise (hours vary by state)
must use navigational lights. Nighttime operation, especially during
bad weather or fog can be dangerous. All “Rules of the Road” apply
at night, but it is best to slow down and stay clear of all boats,
regardless of who has right of way. Protect your night vision by
avoiding bright lights and have a passenger, if possible, help keep
watch for other boats, water hazards and aids to navigation. It is best
to proceed slowly at night, as there is always the possibility of unlit
boats, floating objects, and fixed objects which will be very difficult
to see in time to avoid if you are at planning speeds or above.
There are many light patterns on different types of boats and for
boats performing various functions while underway or at anchor.
For most applications on recreational boats the following
navigation light patterns are applicable.
Motorboats less than 20 meters (65.62
feet) shall exhibit navigation lights as
shown in Figure 1.
Figure 1
(Note: Two masthead lights are
optional for boats under 50 meters.
Boats over 50 meters (164 feet) will
display two masthead lights.)
Motorboats of less than 12 meters (39
feet 4 inches) in length, may show the
lights in either Figure 1 or Figure 2.
Figure 2
1-62
Boats of less than 7 meters (23 feet)
whose maximum speed cannot exceed
7 knots may exhibit an all-around white
light, and if practicable sidelights
instead of the lights prescribed above,
in international waters only.
Boating Safety
Sailboats and Watercraft Under Oars
Sailboats less than 20 meters
(65.62 feet) may exhibit the navigation
lights shown in Figures 3 or 4.
Figure 3
Figure 4
Another option for sailboats is to use a
single combination lantern at the top
of the mast as shown in Figure 5.
Figure 5
1-63
Section 1
Sailboats less than 7 meters (22.96 feet)
may carry an electric torch or lighted
lantern showing a white light to be
displayed in sufficient time to prevent
collision (see Figure 6 - left picture).
Figure 6
If practicable, the lights prescribed for
sailboats less than 20 meters should be
displayed.
Watercraft under oars (such as a canoe) may display the lights
prescribed for sailboats, but if not, must have ready at hand an
electric torch or lighted lantern (flashlight) showing a white light
to be displayed in sufficient time to prevent collision (see Figure 6
- right picture).
Anchored Boats
Figure 7
Motorboats and sailboats at anchor
must display anchor lights. An anchor
light for a watercraft less than 50 meters
(164 feet) in length is an all-around
white light, visible for 2 miles exhibited
where it can best be seen (see Figure 7).
Sailboats operating under machinery, or under sail and machinery,
are considered power driven and must display the lights prescribed
for a power-driven boat.
1-64
Boating Safety
Watersports Safety
Skiers or riders are obligated to be aware of the same fundamental
safety rules as boat operators. If you are new to water skiing,
wakeboarding, wake surfing, and other towed watersports, seek
certified training before starting. You will find it especially helpful
to join a local ski club, World Wakeboard Association, and/or the
USA Water Ski, when possible.
Always remember that the majority of injuries occurring while
water skiing/wakeboarding and other towed watersports are the
result of impacts with other objects. Always look where you are
going and be aware of what is going on around you.
When participating in towing watersports, be safe and courteous
and follow these guidelines:
• Be considerate to fishermen and others who are sharing the
same body of water.
• DO NOT perform watersports in congested areas.
• Stay away from navigation markers.
• Stay away from other boats and watersports participants.
Contact with a spinning
propeller will cause injury or
death.
Do not enter or exit the water when the engine is
running.
Do not get on the swim platform when the engine is
running.
Do not swim towards the back of the boat if the engine
is running.
1-65
Section 1
Failure to adhere to these warnings may
result in severe injury or death to you and/or others.
• Every towed person must always wear a USCGapproved personal flotation device.
• Always have an experienced driver and a
designated observer in the boat while being
towed.
• Maintain a distance of at least 100 feet from all
other objects, including other boats, piers, rafts,
mooring and navigational buoys, pilings,
abutments, or any other items.
• Never waterski, wakeboard or participate in other
towed watersports in shallow water, close to
shore, or in water where you do not know the
depth or what is beneath the surface.
• Never put your arm, head, or any other part of
your body through the handle-bridle of the tow
line nor wrap the line around any part of the body
at any time.
• Never use different line lengths if towing more
than one person or towable. Each person or
towed device must be the same distance from the
boat.
• Do not participate in watersports while under the
influence of alcohol and/or drugs.
• Do not participate in watersports during inclement
weather or on rough water.
• Never waterski, wakeboard or participate in other
towed watersports directly in front of other boats
who may run you over if you fall.
• Never waterski, wakeboard or participate in other
towed watersports at night.
• Never jump from a boat that is moving at any
speed.
• Make sure that everyone knows and uses
approved towed watersports hand signals.
1-66
Boating Safety
Hand Signals
Make sure that everyone knows and uses approved towed
watersports hand signals, shown below.
Circle
Back to Dock
Cut Engine
Skier in Water
Skiers OK
Speed OK
STOP
Speed Faster
Speed Slower
Turn Left
Turn Right
Towed Person Safety Responsibilities
Most injuries and fatalities that occur on high-performance
recreational tow boats occur to the persons being towed (water
skiing, kneeboarding, wakeboarding, wake surfing, tubing, etc.). It
is the responsibility of the boat operator to pay attention to a
multitude of things while utilizing the boat for water tow sports.
The towed person has little or no control over their path nor do
they have much in the way of protection from impact with obstacles
or other boats. Therefore, it is recommended that boat operators,
observers, and towed persons communicate effectively and clearly
as to their intentions and their surroundings. The main
responsibilities for each participant are as follows:
1-67
Section 1
Operators should:
• Assign a passenger to be a designated observer.
• Turn the engine off whenever a person is on the swim
platform or in the water near the boat. This is especially
important for the area near the back of the boat to avoid
propeller injuries.
• Ensure that it is “all clear” behind the boat when starting the
engine. Ask for verbal confirmation or hand signals that it is
“all clear” behind the boat. Then, and only then, start the
engine.
• Keep their main focus on maneuvering the boat safely while
avoiding other boats, fixed objects, the shore, and shallow
water.
• Use rear view mirrors to allow the driver to glance at the
towed person, while still keeping their main attention on the
path of the boat and the surroundings.
• Return safely to pick up towed persons or persons in the
water. Keep the individual in view, approach slowly
(preferably on the driver’s side), and shut off the engine
when close to an individual in the water. Do not back up or
operate the boat in reverse to a person in the water.
Observers should:
• Confirm for the boat operator that it is “all clear” behind the
boat prior to starting the engine.
• Watch the towed person.
• Be responsible for communication of the signals and status
of the towed person to the boat driver.
• Notify the boat operator of status and changing conditions
with the towed person, and inform the boat driver of the
towed person’s readiness to start, their desire to go faster or
slower, or that they have fallen and are in need of retrieval.
• Deploy the fallen skier flag when the towed person falls, if
needed. In some states, it is required to raise the “fallen
skier” flag when the skier has fallen.
1-68
Boating Safety
• Monitor the tow line to ensure that it does not become
tangled, it does not become wrapped around anyone in the
boat, and it does not become wrapped around the towed
person. Also monitor the tow line so that it does not become
tangled in the propeller. Notify the boat operator if any of
these conditions are observed to avoid potential injury.
• Remind the boat operator to shut off the engine when
persons are on the swim platform or in the water near the
back of the boat.
Towed persons should:
• Wear a PFD.
• Not approach the back of the boat if the engine is running.
• Not become entangled in a tow line or wrap a tow line
around any body part.
• Know signals to communicate with the observer and boat
operator.
Additional Precautions for Towed Skier/Rider
• Wear wet suits or protective shorts when engaging in high
energy skiing/riding to prevent abrasions, hypothermia, and
injuries to orifices (rectal and vaginal) from impact with the
water surface.
• Inspect watersports equipment for wear, fraying, etc., before
use. DO NOT use if they show signs of wear or fraying.
Ropes or watersport equipment tow points may break during
use, causing you to coast into obstacles or fall with the risk of
being struck by another vessel.
• Inspect the boat tow points before use. If there is any
evidence of corrosion or other damage, do not use until it
has been inspected by your authorized boat dealer.
• NEVER attach ski/wakeboard rope to anything but approved
pylons and wakeboard towers. Make sure tow ropes are
properly attached to the boat tow points.
• The skier/rider should verbally indicate that s/he is safely
clear of the boat prior to operator starting the boat engine
or putting the boat into gear.
1-69
Section 1
• Slowly take up slack in tow lines before accelerating to
watersports speeds. Jerking the slack out of a tow line can
cause high forces on the rope and towing equipment. This
may cause the rope or equipment to break and the rope to
snap back at occupants of your boat and at the towed
person.
• Never put your arm, head or any other part of your body
through the handle/bridle of the ski or wakeboarding line,
nor wrap the line around any part of the body at any time.
If you fall, the line will tighten and forcefully constrict
around your body part and may result in amputation.
• DO NOT ski near swimming areas, beaches, personal
watercraft, or other vessels/boats.
• Never attempt land or dock starts. These activities will
increase your risk of injury or death.
• DO NOT jump from a boat that is moving at any speed, nor
enter or exit the water when the engine is running.
• DO NOT “back up” to anyone in the water, they will be in
danger of hitting the spinning propeller which can cause
severe injury or death.
• DO NOT follow directly behind another boat or skier/rider
without leaving an adequate safe distance in case that towed
person falls into the water. You will need ample time and
distance to maneuver your boat away from that person in the
water and to avoid their tow boat which will be circling back
to retrieve their downed person.
• DO NOT participate in towed watersports at night. It is
illegal and other boats will not be able to see you, nor will
they anticipate or expect your presence behind the towing
boat. Furthermore, once you fall they will not see you
swimming.
• DO NOT tow with multiple skier/riders with different length
ropes.
• DO NOT ski in limited visibility conditions.
1-70
Boating Safety
• Never climb, sit or stand on a wakeboard tower. The
wakeboard tower is intended for towing only as noted. It is
designed to pull a limited number of individual(s), and in
some cases only one (1) individual. Please consult the
remainder of this manual and warning labels on tower for
details. The wakeboard tower approved for use on your boat
should be used only for water skis, wakeboards or
recreational towables, and not for parasailing, kite flying or
towing other boats.
• Many states require the use of “skier down” flags. Check your
local lake and state requirements. Having the observer raise
a skier down flag when your towed watersport participant
falls down or off the towed device will alert boats around you
to the fact that someone is in the water nearby and that they
should avoid the area.
• Many lakes have recommended tow patterns. Other boats
may expect that you know the local customs and practices. It
is common that the tow pattern is counter-clockwise around
the lake, but there are exceptions. Check for local
recommendations or requirements.
• NEVER lift or trailer the boat with water in the bilge or in
ballast tanks. Lift or trailer per manufacturer’s instructions.
• Around marina docks where electrical current is present
(such as shore power connections) it is unsafe to swim as
stray electrical currents may exist which can cause you to
drown.
Tow Line Guidelines
Tow lines come in different lengths and strengths for different
activities. Make sure any line you are using is suited for skiing or
riding and that it is in good condition.
• Never use a tow line that is frayed, knotted, unraveling or
discolored from use or being left in the sun. If a line breaks
while in use it can recoil at the skier/rider being towed or
into the watercraft where it might strike passengers. Replace
tow lines with any sign of damage.
1-71
Section 1
• Never use a tow line with elastic or bungee material to pull
skiers or riders.
• Tow line should be attached to the watercraft in an
approved fashion with hardware designed for towing. Refer
to your watercraft manual for instructions on proper tow line
attachment.
• Always route tow lines away from the propeller, even when
idling. Shut off the engine if your boat starts to cross a
floating tow line.
• If a tow line should become entangled in a propeller, shut
off engine, remove the key and put it in your pocket before
retrieving the line.
• Tow lines should be neatly coiled and stowed in the boat
when not in use.
Fallen Skier or Rider
Falling and injuries are common in water skiing and other towed
watersports. Keep tow speeds in a comfortable range given the rules
of the activity and the skill level of participants.
• Display a red or orange skier/rider down flag to alert other
vessels that a skier/rider is down. In some states, it is
required to raise the “fallen skier” flag when the skier has
fallen.
• Turn the boat and slowly circle toward the person in the
water to return the tow line handle or towed device to that
person.
• Always keep the fallen skier/rider in view and preferably on
the operator’s side of the watercraft.
• Put the watercraft in neutral whenever you are near a fallen
skier/rider.
• Shut off the engine when retrieving someone from the water
or if the person in the water gets too close to the boat. Do
not trust neutral gear with an idling engine. Someone may
accidentally or prematurely shift the gear, or the linkages
may be out of adjustment and the propeller may still be
slowly spinning.
1-72
Boating Safety
Develop WATER SENSE
The Watersports Responsibility Code and the Watersports Safety
Code have been developed by WSIA and industry equipment
manufacturers. These Codes are reproduced here for your
reference.
Watersports Responsibility Code
Familiarize yourself with and follow The Watersports
Responsibility Code
1-73
Section 1
Watersports Safety Code
WATERSPORTS SAFETY CODE
Before you get in the water: Skiing or riding instruction is
recommended before use. Instruction will teach general safety
guidelines and proper skiing or riding techniques, which may
reduce your risk of injury. For more information on skiing or riding
schools, contact your dealer, Association, or local ski club.
• Know the federal, state and local laws that apply to your area.
• If you are not familiar with a waterway, ask someone who is
knowledgeable to tell you about any hidden dangers or
things to avoid.
• Whether you plan to be in a watercraft, or skiing/riding
behind one it is important you are wearing a properly fitted
life jacket (PFD) approved by your country’s agency, USCG
Type III, ISO, etc.
• Inspect all equipment prior to each use, check bindings, fins,
tube, attachment, tow rope and flotation device. Do not use
if damaged.
Watercraft Safety: A knowledgeable and responsible driver is the
most important safety device on any watercraft.
• Never operate a watercraft, ski or ride under the influence of
alcohol or drugs.
• Only use water ballast and people for additional weight.
• Never exceed the passenger or weight limitations of the
watercraft.
• Never allow passengers to hang outside the watercraft or
towed device or sit on the gunwales or anywhere outside of
the normal seating area.
• Never allow water to overflow the bow or gunwales of the
watercraft.
• Uneven weight distribution or additional weight may affect
the handling of the watercraft.
1-74
Boating Safety
Carbon Monoxide: The exhaust from the engine on a watercraft
contains Carbon Monoxide (CO) which is a colorless, odorless and
poisonous gas. Excessive exposure to CO can cause severe injury or
death. Follow this advice to avoid injury.
• Never “Platform Drag” by holding onto the boarding
platform or being dragged directly behind the watercraft.
This is where CO will be.
• Do not sit on the watercraft transom or boarding platform
while the engine is running.
• Make sure the engine is properly tuned and running well.
An improperly tuned engine produces excessive exhaust and
CO.
• If you smell engine exhaust do not stay in that position.
• Go to the United States Coast Guard’s website:
(www.uscgboating.org) for more information on how to help
protect yourself and others from the dangers of CO.
Tow Ropes: Tow ropes come in different lengths and strengths for
different activities. Make sure any rope you are using is suited for
that activity and that it is in good condition.
• Never use a rope that is frayed, knotted, unraveling or
discolored from use or being left in the sun. If a rope breaks
while in use it can recoil at the skier/rider being towed or
into the watercraft where it might strike passengers. Replace
tow ropes with any sign of damage.
• Never use a tow rope with elastic or bungee material to pull
skiers or riders.
• Rope should be attached to the watercraft in an approved
fashion with hardware designed for towing. Refer to your
watercraft manual for instructions on proper tow rope
attachment.
• Always keep people and tow ropes away from the propeller,
even when idling.
• If a tow rope should become entangled in a propeller, shut
off engine, remove the key and secure it in a safe location
before retrieving the rope.
• Tow ropes should be neatly stowed in the boat when not in
use.
1-75
Section 1
Preparing to ski or ride: Always have a person other than the driver
act as an observer to look out for the skier/rider.
• Be sure the driver is aware of the experience and ability of
the skier/rider.
• The driver, observer and skier/rider need to agree on hand
signals before skiing or riding. Signals should include
READY, STOP, SPEED UP, and SLOW DOWN.
• Start the engine only after making sure that no one in the
water is near the propeller.
• Turn the engine off when people are getting into or out of
the watercraft, or in the water near the watercraft.
• Always make sure the tow rope is not wrapped around
anyone’s hands, arms, legs, or other parts of the body.
• Start the watercraft and move slowly to remove slack until
the tow rope is tight.
• When the skier/rider signals READY and there is no traffic
ahead, take off in a straight line. Adjust the speed according
to the signals given by the skier/rider.
Skiing or Riding: The watercraft and skier/rider should always
maintain a sufficient distance from obstacles so a skier/rider falling
or coasting and/or watercraft will not encounter any obstacle.
• Do not use in shallow water or near shore, docks, pilings,
swimmers, other watercraft, or any other obstacles.
• Use only on water.
• Never attempt land or dock starts. This will increase your risk
of injury or death.
• Always wear a properly fitted life jacket (PFD) approved by
your country’s agency, USCG Type III, ISO, etc.
• The faster you ski or ride, the greater your risk of injury.
• Never make sharp turns that may cause a slingshot effect on
the skier/rider’s speed.
• The skier/rider should be towed at an appropriate speed for
his or her ability level.
1-76
Boating Safety
Fallen skier or rider: Falling and injuries are common in skiing or
riding.
• Circle a fallen skier/rider slowly to return the tow rope
handle or pick up the fallen skier/rider.
• Turn off the engine when near a fallen skier/rider.
• Always keep the fallen skier/rider in view and on the driver’s
side of the watercraft.
• Display a red or orange skier-down flag to alert other vessels
that a skier/rider is down if required by the state in which
you are operating.
The Warnings and practices in the Watersports Safety Code
represent common risks encountered by users. The code does not
cover all instances of risk or danger. Please use common sense
and good judgment.
1-77
Section 1
Emergency Procedures
In an emergency situation, you may have to resort to measures
which are not commonly practiced. Always assess the dangers of
being in harm’s way versus the protection of equipment. Keep a
sound mind during an emergency and always use common sense.
Explosion and Fire
Many boat fires and explosions involve flammable liquids such as
gas or oil, which are used in your boat’s propulsion engine(s) and
generator. Carefully follow all warning labels and safety precautions
while handling flammable substances. Many fires in inboard boats
start in the bilge area due to gasoline vapors. Gasoline vapors are
heavier than air and collect in the bilge of boats.
Explosion
• If explosion is imminent, put on PFDs, grab distress
signals and survival gear, and immediately abandon ship.
Fire
• Immediately turn off engines, generators, stoves and
blowers.
• Extinguish smoking materials.
• A fixed fire suppression system, if equipped, has heat
sensors that automatically flood the machinery space with
a fire extinguishant. Allow extinguishant to “soak” the
compartment for at least 15 minutes to cool the hot
metals or fuel before cautiously inspecting the fire area.
Have portable fire extinguishers ready. Do not breathe
fumes or vapors caused by the fire or extinguishant.
• If no fixed fire suppression system is installed and a fire is
in the engine compartment, discharge portable fire
extinguishers through the engine compartment access
plate, if equipped. DO NOT open the engine hatch as this
feeds oxygen to the fire.
• If you have access to the fire, direct the contents of the
fire extinguishers at the base of flames, not at the top.
1-78
Boating Safety
• Throw burning materials overboard if possible.
• Move anyone not needed for firefighting operations away
from the flames.
• Signal for help.
• Put on PFDs (Personal Flotation Devices), grab distress
signals and survival gear, and prepare to abandon ship.
Burn hazard from gasoline floating on
water which is ignited can cause death or serious injury.
Gasoline will float on top of water and can burn. If the
boat is abandoned, swim upwind, far enough to avoid
fuel that can spread over the surface of the water.
Swamping and Flooding
In the event that the vessel begins to take on water, turn on the
bilge pump to evacuate water and slow its accumulation, and try to
determine the source of the water. A collision with an underwater
object can cause the hull to develop a leak. A loose fitting hose
clamp on a piece of equipment can cause a leak. Try to repair the
leak if possible. If a leak is threatening the safety of you and your
passengers, call or signal for assistance.
•
•
•
•
Turn on bilge pump(s).
Access PFDs, pass them out to everyone, and put them on.
Identify source of leak and try to stop the leak and flooding.
STAY WITH THE BOAT! A boat will usually float even if
there is major hull damage. Rescuers can spot a boat much
easier than a head bobbing in the water.
• Signal or call for help.
• If others were on board, try to locate them, make sure that
they are conscious and that they can swim.
• Immersion in water speeds the loss of body heat and can
lead to hypothermia (the abnormal lowering of internal
body temperature).
1-79
Section 1
Capsizing
• If others were on board, try to locate them, make sure that
they are conscious and they can swim.
• If possible, access lifejackets (PFDs), pass them out to
everyone, and put them on.
• STAY WITH THE BOAT! A boat will usually float even if
there is major hull damage. Rescuers can spot a boat much
easier than a head bobbing in the water.
• Signal or call for help.
• Immersion in water speeds the loss of body heat and can
lead to hypothermia (the abnormal lowering of internal
body temperature).
Staying Afloat
• Remain calm. Do not thrash about or try to remove clothing
or footwear. This leads to exhaustion and increases the loss
of air that may keep you afloat.
• Keep your lifejacket (PFD) on.
• Keep your knees bent.
• Float on your back and paddle slowly to safety.
Collisions
• Immediately account for all passengers.
• Check for injuries.
• If any person is in the water make sure they have proper
flotation devices.
• Assess the hull for damage.
• Activate the bilge pump(s) to reduce any flooding.
• Try to operate the boat to keep the damaged area above
water.
• If necessary, call or signal for assistance.
• STAY WITH THE BOAT!
1-80
Boating Safety
Grounding
In the event you run aground, assess the situation before
proceeding. Your response to grounding will depend on how hard
the boat hits bottom and whether the boat remains stranded, the
extent of damage, and proximity to shore and help.
• If it is a simple touch, you may need only to inspect the hull.
• If you are aground, assess the situation before reacting. In
some cases, throwing the boat into reverse can cause more
damage.
• Check for leaks and immediately stop any water from
entering the boat.
• Inspect the hull, steering system and propulsion system for
damage.
• Maneuver the boat to safe water only if the hull and all
operating systems are in satisfactory operating condition.
Otherwise, call or signal for assistance.
Person Overboard
• Immediately react to a person who has fallen overboard by
sounding an alarm.
• Keep the victim constantly in your sight.
• If another passenger is on board, assign them to look at and
keep pointing at the person in the water. They are to do
nothing else but stay focused on the person in the water and
to point at them.
• Throw the person a life preserver even if they are wearing a
PFD. It will serve as a marker in the water and will provide
additional flotation.
• Immediately slow or stop the boat and safely circle toward
the victim as soon as possible.
• Keep the victim on the helm side of the vessel so as to keep
the victim constantly in your sight.
• When almost alongside, shut off the engine.
• Assist the person into the boat.
1-81
Section 1
Drowning
• Swim to rescue a drowning victim only as a last resort.
• Immediate resuscitation is critical! It may be possible to
revive a drowning victim who has been under water for some
time and shows no sign of life. Start CPR immediately and
get the victim to a hospital as quickly as possible.
• Keep the victim warm.
• Use care in handling. Spinal injury may exist if the victim fell
overboard.
• Call and signal for help.
Medical Emergency
In an emergency, you may be far from professional medical
assistance. Be prepared and know how to use your first aid kit. Be
aware of any special medical conditions of your passengers.
Operation Failure
If you experience a propulsion, electrical, steering or control
failure, immediately shut off the engine. If it is safe to do so and you
are qualified, then try to determine the cause of the failure and
repair. Otherwise, call or signal for assistance. Anchor the boat if
drifting will put you and others in danger.
Towing
Towing or being towed stresses the
boats, hardware and lines. Failure of any part can
seriously injure people or damage the boat.
1-82
Boating Safety
A recreational boat towing another should be a last resort due to
the potential for damaging one or both boats. The Coast Guard or
a private salvage company is better equipped for this activity. A
recreational boat may assist by standing by, and possibly by keeping
the disabled boat’s bow at a proper angle until help arrives. Only
when conditions are ideal—that is, waters are calm, disabled boat is
small, appropriate hardware is available, and one or both skippers
know the correct technique—should a recreational boat tow
another.
Towing Vessel
• Be sure your boat will not run aground too.
• Because you are maneuverable and the grounded boat is
not, you should pass the tow line to the grounded boat.
• Select an appropriately strong tow line. Use doublebraided or braid-on-braid line. Never use three-strand
twisted nylon; it has too much elasticity and can snap back
dangerously.
• Select an appropriate attachment point. If available fasten
the tow line to the forward tow pylon of the towing boat.
Otherwise fasten tow line to stern tow point. Fastening to
the stern tow point will restrict maneuverability of the
towing boat.
• If possible, use a bridle.
• Move slowly to prevent sudden strain on slack line.
• Proceed at slow speed.
• Avoid abrupt changes in throttle as that may cause the tow
line to slacken and jerk tight. Sudden strain or jerking the
line causes excessive tow line forces which may part the
line. Keep slack out of the tow line, but if it occurs
proceed slowly to again take up the strain on the line and
avoid sudden jerks in the line.
• Be ready to cast loose or cut the line if the towing
situation becomes hazardous.
1-83
Section 1
Vessel Being Towed
• Attach the tow line to the bow eye.
• If it is necessary to be towed after being freed, keep
someone at the wheel to steer.
Both Vessels
• If you attach the tow line to a fitting, be sure the fitting is
fastened with a through bolt and is reinforced on the
underside.
• Keep lines clear of propellers on both boats.
• Keep hands and feet clear of the other boat. Do not get
caught, or pinched between the two boats as severe injury
could occur.
• Never hold a tow line after it is pulled taut.
1-84
Section 2
G21, G23, G25, 210 and 230
Specifications
G21
Length Overall.........................................................21' 6" (6.55 m)
Length with Platform..............................................23' 9" (7.24 m)
Lifting Ring Spacing ..........................................20' 1.75" (6.14 m)
Beam...........................................................................102" (2.59 m)
Draft..............................................................................25" (0.64 m)
Approximate Dry Weight* .............................5,500 lbs (2,517 kg)
Fuel Capacity..................................................46.5 Gallons (176 L)
Maximum Capacity .........................14 People (2,200 lbs/998 kg)
Horsepower Range ............355, 450, 550 HP (265, 336, 410 kW)
Torque Rating.................405, 465, 545 lb-ft (549, 631, 739 N·m)
Gear Reduction Ratio...............................................................2.0:1
Maximum Factory Ballast Capacity................2,850 lbs (1,293 kg)
* Weights are estimates and can vary from options and equipment
added.
G23
Length Overall .............................................................23' (7.01 m)
Length with Platform..............................................25' 3" (7.70 m)
Lifting Ring Spacing ..........................................21' 6.25" (6.56 m)
Beam...........................................................................102" (2.59 m)
Draft..............................................................................25" (0.64 m)
Approximate Dry Weight* .............................5,900 lbs (2,676 kg)
Fuel Capacity..................................................65 Gallons (246.1 L)
Maximum Capacity ......................16 People (2,500 lbs/1,134 kg)
Horsepower Range ............355, 450, 550 HP (265, 336, 410 kW)
Torque Rating.................405, 465, 545 lb-ft (549, 631, 739 N·m)
Gear Reduction Ratio...............................................................2.0:1
Maximum Factory Ballast Capacity................2,850 lbs (1,293 kg)
* Weights are estimates and can vary from options and equipment
added.
2-1
Section 2
G25
Length Overall .............................................................25' (7.62 m)
Length with Platform..............................................27' 3" (8.30 m)
Lifting Ring Spacing ..........................................23' 6.25" (7.24 m)
Beam...........................................................................102" (2.59 m)
Draft..............................................................................25" (0.64 m)
Approximate Dry Weight* .............................6,400 lbs (2,903 kg)
Fuel Capacity..................................................83 Gallons (314.2 L)
Maximum Capacity ......................19 People (2,800 lbs/1,270 kg)
Horsepower Range.............................450, 550 HP (336, 410 kW)
Torque Range..................................465, 545 lb-ft (630, 739 N·m)
Gear Reduction Ratio...............................................................2.0:1
Maximum Factory Ballast Capacity................2,850 lbs (1,293 kg)
* Weights are estimates and can vary from options and equipment
added.
210
Length Overall.........................................................21' 0" (6.40 m)
Length with Platform...........................................23' 3.5" (7.10 m)
Lifting Ring Spacing ...............................................19' 5" (5.92 m)
Beam.............................................................................98" (2.49 m)
Draft..............................................................................28" (0.71 m)
Approximate Dry Weight* .............................4,200 lbs (1,905 kg)
Fuel Capacity..................................................37 Gallons (140.1 L)
Maximum Capacity .........................12 People (1,850 lbs/839 kg)
Horsepower Range ............343, 355, 450 HP (256, 265, 336 kW)
Torque Range .................370, 405, 465 lb-ft (502, 549, 631 N·m)
Gear Reduction Ratio.............................................................1.48:1
Maximum Factory Ballast Capacity...................1,750 lbs (794 kg)
* Weights are estimates and can vary from options and equipment
added.
2-2
G21, G23, G25, 210 and 230
230
Length Overall......................................................23' 1.5" (7.05 m)
Length with Platform...........................................25' 4.5" (7.73 m)
Lifting Ring Spacing ...............................................21' 5" (6.53 m)
Beam........................................................................100.5" (2.55 m)
Draft..............................................................................29" (0.74 m)
Approximate Dry Weight* .............................4,650 lbs (2,109 kg)
Fuel Capacity..................................................47 Gallons (177.9 L)
Maximum Capacity ......................15 People (2,300 lbs/1,043 kg)
Horsepower Range ............343, 355, 450 HP (256, 265, 336 kW)
Torque Range .................370, 405, 465 lb-ft (502, 549, 631 N·m)
Gear Reduction Ratio.............................................................1.48:1
Maximum Factory Ballast Capacity...................2,100 lbs (953 kg)
* Weights are estimates and can vary from options and equipment
added.
2-3
Section 2
Accessory Indicator Light
Ignition Indicator Light
2
1
3
4
5
6
7
11
12
10
9
2-4
8
CORC0572
G21, G23, G25, 210 and 230
210, 230 Dash Pod and
Console
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Nautique LINC System
Keypad
USB Port*
Fire Extinguisher System – optional
12-V Port
Auxiliary Input
SportShift™ Hydro-Gate™ Control Handle
Emergency Stop Switch
Shift Override Button
Shift Safety Lock-out Umbrella
Shift/Throttle Control Handle
Steering Wheel Tilt Lever
*
This USB port communicates directly to the LINC and allows you to install
LINC updates. It is not intended for use with MP3 players or other
audio/video devices.
A full description of the gauges and switches and their functions is
discussed in Section 3.
2-5
Section 2
Ignition Indicator Light
Accessory Indicator Light
2
1
3
4
12
5
6
7
8
11
9
10
CORC0573
2-6
G21, G23, G25, 210 and 230
G21 Dash Pod and Console
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Nautique LINC System
Keypad
Fire Extinguisher System – optional
Shift/Throttle Control Handle
Shift Safety Lock-out Umbrella
Shift Override Button
Emergency Stop Switch
12-V Port
Battery Maintenance Plug
Auxiliary Input
Steering Wheel Tilt Lever
Helm Control
2-7
Section 2
Accessory Indicator Light
Ignition Indicator Light
3
1
10
9
2
4
5
13
6
12
7
8
9
10 11
CORC0574
2-8
G21, G23, G25, 210 and 230
G23 and G25 Dash Pod and
Console
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Driver’s Side Glove Box
Nautique LINC System
Keypad
Fire Extinguisher System – optional
Shift/Throttle Control Handle
Shift Safety Lock-out Umbrella
Shift Override Button
Emergency Stop Switch
12-V Port
Auxiliary Input
Battery Maintenance Plug
Steering Wheel Tilt Lever
Helm Control
2-9
Section 2
2
1
4
3
5
6
7
8
9
10
10
10
11
10
12
13
10
CORC0321
Keypad
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
2-10
Stop Function
Blower Indicator
Blower Function
Navigation Light Indicator
Navigation Light/Anchor Light/Underwater Light/Courtesy Light
Function
Anchor Light Indicator
Bilge Function
Bilge Indicator
Horn Function
Code Buttons
Ignition Indicator
Start/Unlock Function
Accessory Indicator
G21, G23, G25, 210 and 230
Keys
CORC0618
Hatch Latch Key
CORC0621
Transom Cooler Key
2-11
Section 2
G21 Deck Layout
G21 Deck Layout
22
1
2
3
4
30
55
29
29
28
28
6
27
27
31
26
26
7
88
9
25
25
10
24
24
23
23
22
22
11
12
13
13
13
14
15
15
16
15
15
21
17
17
16
16
18
18
18
18
20
2-12
19
G21, G23, G25, 210 and 230
G21
Description
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
Bow Lifting Ring
Bow Navigation/Docking Light
12V Port
Belly Ballast Tank Vent
Battery Selector Switch/Power Management Access (PMA)/12V Port
Dash Pod and Console
Battery Maintenance Plug
T-Handle Drain Plug
Engine Cooling Water Intake Shutoff Valve
Engine Cooling Water Intake Strainer
Starboard Ballast Tank Vent
Forward Bilge Pump Outlet
Fuel Tank Fill
Fuel Tank Vent
Trunk Storage Access
CE Bilge Pump Filters (International Only)
CE Fire Suppressor
Stern Lifting Ring
Transom Watersports Tow Point
Boarding Platform
Rudder Port Remote Lube Fitting
Rear Bilge Pump Outlet
Port Ballast Tank Vent
Removable Cooler
Flight Control Tower Watersports Tow Point
Seacock Access (shut-off valves, ballast intake/drain)
Batteries*
Observer’s Seat/Storage Access
Glove Box/Stereo/Auxiliary Input/12V Port
Waste Basket
Observer’s Seat Heater On/Off Button (optional)
* The primary battery is on the port side and the optional secondary battery is on
the starboard side. The battery selector switch is located in the PMA box under
the helm.
2-13
Section 2
G23 and G25 Deck Layout
1
2
2
3
4
32
5
6
31
7
30
33
8
29
9
10
11
28
27
26
12
13
25
24
14
14
15
16
17
16
17
18
18
19
23
22
21
20
CORC0576
2-14
G21, G23, G25, 210 and 230
G23 and G25
Description
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
Bow Lifting Ring
Bow Navigation/Docking Light
12V Port
Belly Ballast Tank Vent
Battery Selector Switch/Power Management Access (PMA)/12V Port
Driver’s Glove Box/12V/Tower Cam DVR (Opt)/USM-LINC/Aux
Input
Dash Pod and Console
Battery Maintenance Plug
T-Handle Drain Plug
Engine Cooling Water Intake Shutoff Valve
Engine Cooling Water Intake Strainer
Starboard Ballast Tank Vent
Forward Bilge Pump Outlet
Fuel Tank Fill
Fuel Tank Vent
Trunk Storage Access
CE Bilge Pump Filters (International Only)
Stern Lifting Ring
Boarding Platform
CE Fire Suppressor
Transom Watersports Tow Point
Aft Cooler
Rudder Port Remote Lube Fitting
Rear Bilge Pump Outlet
Port Ballast Tank Vent
Flight Control Tower Watersports Tow Point
T-Handle Drain/Seacock Access (shut-off valves, ballast
intake/drain)
Batteries*
Removable Cooler
Observer’s Seat/Storage Access
Glove Box/Stereo/Auxiliary Input/12V Port
Waste Basket
Observer’s Seat Heater On/Off Button (optional)
* The primary battery is on the port side and the optional secondary battery is on
the starboard side. The battery selector switch is located in the PMA box under
the helm.
2-15
Section 2
210 Deck Layout
1
2
30
30
3
4
5
29
6
28
7
8
27
31
9
26
10
11
25
13
12
13
14
24
23
22
15
16
17
17
21
18
20
19
CORC0577
2-16
G21, G23, G25, 210 and 230
210
Description
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
Bow Navigation/Docking Light
12V Port
Horn
Belly Ballast Tank Vent
Bilge Pump Outlet
Battery Selector Switch/Power Management Access (PMA)/12V Port
Dash Pod and Console
12V Port
SportShift™ Hydro-Gate™ Control Handle
Removable Cooler
Engine Cooling Water Intake Shutoff Valve
Engine Cooling Water Intake Strainer
Fuel Tank Fill
Starboard Ballast Tank Vent
Fuel Tank Vent
Trunk Storage Access
CE Bilge Pump Filters (international only)
Stern Lifting Ring
Boarding Platform
Transom Grab Rail/Watersports Tow Point
CE Fire Suppressor
Rudder Port Remote Lube Fitting
Port Ballast Tank Vent
Rear Bilge Pump Outlet
T-Handle Drain/Seacock Access (shut-off valves, ballast
intake/drain)
Flight Control Tower Watersports Tow Point
Observer’s Seat/Storage Access/Batteries*
Glove Box/Stereo/Auxiliary Input/12V Port
Waste Basket
Docking Light
Observer’s Seat Heater On/Off Button (optional)
* The dual batteries are installed under the observer’s seat. The one closest to
centerline of the boat is the primary battery. The battery selector switch is located
in the PMA box under the helm.
2-17
Section 2
230 Deck Layout
1
30
2
30
3
4
5
29
6
7
28
27
31
26
8
9
25
10
24
11
12
12
23
22
13
21
16
14
15
16
20
17
19
18
CORC0578
2-18
G21, G23, G25, 210 and 230
230
Description
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
Bow Navigation Light/Docking Light
12V Port
Horn
Belly Ballast Tank Vent
Bilge Pump Outlet
Battery Selector Switch/Power Management Access (PMA)/12V Port
Dash Pod and Console
12V Port
SportShift™ Hydro-Gate™ Control Handle
Engine Cooling Water Intake Shutoff Valve
Engine Cooling Water Intake Strainer
Fuel Tank Fill
Starboard Ballast Tank Vent
Fuel Tank Vent
Trunk Storage Access
CE Bilge Pump Filters (international only)
Stern Lifting Ring
Boarding Platform
Transom Grab Rail/Watersports Tow Point
CE Fire Suppressor
Rudder Port Remote Lube Fitting
Port Ballast Tank Vent
Rear Bilge Pump Outlet
T-Handle Drain/Seacock Access (shut-off valves, ballast
intake/drain)
Flight Control Tower Watersports Tow Point
Removable Cooler
Observer’s Seat/Storage Access/Batteries*
Glove Box/Stereo/Auxiliary Input/12V Port
Waste Basket
Docking Light
Observer’s Seat Heater On/Off Button (optional)
* The dual batteries are installed under the observer’s seat. The one closest to
centerline of the boat is the primary battery. The battery selector switch is located
in the PMA box under the helm.
2-19
Section 2
210 Seating Area
12
Designated
Occupant
Positions
CORC0612
2-20
G21, G23, G25, 210 and 230
230 Seating Area
15
Designated
Occupant
Positions
CORC0613
2-21
Section 2
G21 Seating Area
14
Designated
Occupant
Positions
CORC0614
2-22
G21, G23, G25, 210 and 230
G23 Seating Area
16
Designated
Occupant
Positions
CORC0615
2-23
Section 2
G25 Seating Area
19
Designated
Occupant
Positions
CORC0616
2-24
G21, G23, G25, 210 and 230
Standard and Optional
Equipment
Nautique boats are equipped with only the finest standard and
optional equipment available. Your boat’s equipment will vary,
based on how your boat was built. Many options can only be
installed during the manufacturing of the boat and cannot be retrofitted to boats in the field.
Not all of the standard or optional equipment’s use, safety and
maintenance information can be covered in this manual. You will
find most of the standard and optional equipment in this manual
in the section pertaining to its use and function in Section 3. Make
sure you read and understand this manual and all the other
manufacturers’ literature provided in your Skipper’s Kit to
maximize the benefits and uses this equipment has to offer.
If you have any questions regarding the use of any equipment on
your Nautique boat, contact your Nautique dealer.
2-25
Section 2
NOTES
2-26
Section 3
Controls and Indicators
Knowing the systems, controls and indicators on your boat is
essential for safe and proper operation.
Improperly maintained controls are
hazardous and may cause sudden loss of control. Make
sure all steering and shift / throttle hardware, cables and
fluid levels are regularly inspected and maintained.
Improper maintenance may result in a loss of control,
possibly causing serious injury or death.
Steering
The steering system in your Nautique boat provides excellent
maneuvering performance for pleasure boating or during
watersports. Boat steering is not self-centering. Always keep a
secure grip on the steering wheel to maintain full boat control. The
steering wheel is equipped with a tilt lever to adjust the wheel angle
to a comfortable operating position when the boat is not moving.
RELEASE
LEVER
CORC133
3-1
Section 3
The helm transfers rotary motion of the steering wheel to linear
motion in the cable which pushes or pulls the rudder. Nautique
rudders are equipped with an adjustable trim tab under license
from Z-Marine (U.S. patent 5,746,147) to compensate for the
torque generated by the propeller.
Maintenance for the steering system is minimal because there are
few serviceable parts. The rack and pinion for the system is
lubricated and sealed during manufacturing. It is the responsibility
of the owner/operator to inspect the steering system frequently.
If you experience difficulty in steering, refer to Section 7 - Care and
Maintenance.
Hazard from improper maintenance of the
controls can cause death or serious injury from sudden
loss of control. DO NOT operate your boat if you
suspect the steering system or control are
malfunctioning.
Hydro-Gate™ Control and
SportShift™- 210, 230
The Hydro-Gate is engaged by moving the SportShift Hydro-Gate
control handle located at the helm’s starboard side fore and
disengaged by moving the lever aft. When the control handle is
pushed forward, the Hydro-Gate is engaged, creating maximum lift
for a wake with a well-defined crest and shallower ramp. When the
control handle is pushed aft, the Hydro-Gate is disengaged
(raised), allowing your boat to sit deeper in the water, creating the
maximum wake with a steep ramp. The control handle can be
placed in any position to create your ultimate wake. When used in
conjunction with the Launch Control System, the SportShift and
the Hydro-Gate can be used to create a wide variety of wakes to
meet your style and need. The SportShift and Hydro-Gate can be
used at any speed or at rest.
3-2
Controls and Indicators
M
SL A
LO
CORC142B
CORC143
3-3
Section 3
Shifter/Throttle
Hazard from replacing your shift/ throttle
control without a start-in-gear protection system can
cause death or serious injury. DOɱNOT replace the
control with a control that does not have this feature.
Your Nautique boat is equipped with a Shifter/Throttle Control
Handle which features a start-in-gear protection to prevent the boat
from moving when started.
A single-lever control with a safety lock-out umbrella operates as
both a gear shifter and a throttle control. To engage the throttle
only without shifting into gear, depress the Shift Override button.
When the throttle lever is vertical, it is locked in the NEUTRAL
position for safety. Be sure the control is in NEUTRAL before
attempting to start the engine. Lifting the safety lock-out umbrella
and moving the throttle lever forward will engage FORWARD gear
in the transmission and increase the engine RPM. Moving the
throttle lever backward will engage REVERSE gear in the
transmission and also increase the engine RPM.
FORWARD SHIFT NEUTRAL REVERSE SHIFT RANGE
RANGE
IDLE
IDLE
FORWARD
REVERSE
THROTTLE
THROTTLE
RANGE
RANGE
FULL
THROTTLE
CAUTION
SAFETY LOCK-OUT
UMBRELLA
FULL
THROTTLE
SHIFT
OVERRIDE
CORC0579
DO NOT shift too quickly from FORWARD
to REVERSE. Stay in NEUTRAL, or idle position until the
boat has lost most of its headway before completing the
shift to REVERSE or engine / transmission damage may
occur.
3-4
Controls and Indicators
Emergency Stop Switch
The emergency stop switch will stop the engine when the lanyard is
pulled far enough to disengage it from the switch. Attach the
lanyard to the boat operator whenever the engine is running but be
aware there will be a loss of engine power if the switch is activated.
If the operator is thrown from the seat, or moves too far from the
helm, the lanyard will become disconnected from the switch,
shutting off the engine. Refer to Section 1 for more information.
CAUTION
DO NOT allow your boat to be operated
without the proper use of the emergency stop switch
and lanyard.
EMERGENCY STOP SWITCH
CLIP
LANYARD
HOOK
CORC0224
To attach a lanyard, connect the clip to the emergency stop switch
and the hook to a strong piece of clothing on the operator, such as
a belt loop.
The engine will not start unless the emergency stop switch is
attached.
3-5
Section 3
Hazard from improper use of the
emergency stop switch can cause death or serious
injury. The emergency stop switch is designed to stop
the engine if the operator is accidentally thrown from the
helm. Attach the lanyard to the operator before starting
the engine.
The emergency stop switch can only be effective when it is in good
working condition.
Observe the following:
• DO NOT remove or modify an emergency stop switch
and/or its lanyard.
• The lanyard must be free from obstructions that could
interfere with its operation.
Once a month: Check the emergency stop switch for proper
operation. With the engine running, pull lanyard. If the engine
does not stop, see your Nautique dealer for service of the switch.
3-6
Controls and Indicators
Smart Pod – Team
Gauges
Gauge information is displayed in the Nautique LINC System.
Refer to the separate Nautique LINC Manual to learn how to access
the gauge displays.
• Volts - Indicates the condition of the engine’s cranking battery
in volts DC. With the ignition switch on and the engine not
running, a reading above 12.5 volts indicates a fully charged
battery. With the engine running at idle, the gauge should
read between 12.5 and 13 volts. With the engine running at
cruising speeds and above, it should show 13 to 14.5 volts.
Have your Nautique dealer check the charging system if the
voltmeter reads outside these normal ranges.
• Temp - Indicates the engine coolant temperature. Refer to
the engine manual for normal operating temperature. After
starting the engine, check your temperature gauge for
abnormally high readings. If the reading is outside the
manufacturer’s operating range, immediately turn off the
engine. An abnormally high temperature indicates a cooling
system problem. Consult your Nautique dealer when
experiencing a high engine temperature reading.
• Fuel - Indicates the approximate fuel level in the fuel tank.
The accuracy of the fuel guage may vary as the attitude of
the boat changes; the reading is only an approximation. As a
general guideline, always use the “one-third” rule. Use one
third of the fuel to reach your destination, one third to
return and one third as reserve fuel.
• Oil Pressure - Measures the pressure of the engine’s
lubricating oil. Refer to the engine manual for normal
operating pressure. Many serious engine problems are
reflected on oil pressure gauge readings. If the pressure is
lower than the manufacturer’s specification, immediately
turn off the engine. Contact your Nautique dealer to correct
the problem before operating the engine.
3-7
Section 3
• Tachometer/Hour Meter - Registers engine speed in
revolutions per minute (RPM). Use the tachometer to keep
the engine within the proper operating range. Consult the
engine manual for the proper RPM operating range of your
engine. The hour meter LCD display registers accumulated
engine operating time. Time will not be logged unless the
ignition switch is on and the engine is running. Use the hour
meter to keep accurate logs for scheduled maintenance.
• Speedometer - Your Nautique is equipped with a precision
speedometer by Faria. This gauge registers forward speed in
miles per hour (optional kilometers per hour). The
speedometer is equipped with an adjustment knob to
calibrate speedometer accuracy. You can also use this gauge
to monitor fuel consumption and propeller performance.
• Engine Warning Light - Indicates high engine temperature. If
light illuminates, stop engine and investigate for cause.
• V-Drive Warning Light - Indicates low oil pressure in V-Drive.
If light illuminates when the engine is in gear and above
1200 rpm, stop engine and check V-Drive oil level.
Control Switches
Each electrical circuit on your boat is equipped with a control
switch. The switches have an indicator light for easy ON/OFF
identification. All switches are protected by circuit breakers.
If a short is detected, the associated LED will flash on the
buttonpad. To reset the circuit, turn off the offending load, stop
the engine, then hold the STOP button for a couple of seconds
until the flashing stops. For PDM-driven loads, or loads like the
HORN that do not have a dedicated LED, the backlights flash
instead.
Belly, Port, Starboard Ballast
These buttons fill and drain the ballast tank designated to the
switch. Ballast tanks are an option on most Nautique boats. A full
description of how these buttons function is discussed in Section 3,
Ballast Function.
3-8
Controls and Indicators
Engine Compartment/Bilge Area Blower
The blower switch activates the engine compartment ventilation
blower to remove explosive fumes from the area. The blower is
turned on or off by pressing and releasing the button. The blower
must be operated for a minimum of four minutes each time before
starting the engines or generator. In addition, the blower should be
operated continuously when at idle or running at slow speeds.
Explosion and fire hazard from gasoline
vapors can cause death or serious injury from failure to
check for fumes in the engine compartment or operating
the blower. Before engine start-up, check engine
compartment for gasoline vapors, then operate blower
for at least four minutes. Operate blower whenever
below planing speed.
Navigation/Anchor Light
A quick press and release of this button turns on the navigation
lights, and the indicator light for this button will illuminate. A press
and slight hold will only turn on the anchor light and cause the
indicator light to flash. A press and release of the key turns off both
of the lights.
Blocking navigation lights can cause
death or serious injury. DOɱNOT block the navigation
lights.
3-9
Section 3
Bilge Pump
The bilge switch turns on the bilge pump to remove excess water
from the bottom of the boat. The pump turns on or off by pressing
and releasing the button. There is a bilge pump near the rudder
and one in the front. When you turn the switch on, the pump(s)
will operate and run for several moments to “sense” if there is water
in the bilge. If there is water in the bilge, the pump(s) remains on
until the water is pumped out. If there is no water in the bilge, the
pump(s) will turn off. If you want immediate pump action, turn the
switch off and then back on again. The pump(s) will turn on
periodically to determine if there is water in the bilge. If so, they will
remain on until the water is pumped out.
The bilge switch must be turned on for this feature to operate. This
will not drain significant power from the battery unless the bilge
pump(s) is required to run frequently because of a leak or excessive
rainwater. This pumping system should not be relied on over an
extended period of time. Frequently inspect your boat for evidence
of excessive water in the bilge area. Consult your Nautique dealer if
you have any questions.
Trash in bilge area can damage the bilge pumps.
Horn
The horn button is a momentary switch. The horn will operate
whenever the button is pressed and will stop when the button is
released.
12-Volt Port
This receptacle can be used to power and charge cellular phones,
MP3 players, video cameras or other electronics. These receptacles
are powered through a 10 amp breaker.
3-10
Controls and Indicators
Dash Pod
Keypad
CORC0325
Keyless Ignition
The ignition switch system is keyless and has three modes of
operation.
CAUTION
The keypad and switch control box will be
damaged beyond repair if the boat's battery cables, the
main switch control box power leads or battery charger
leads are reversed. DO NOT reverse these connections.
Locked Mode
When the boat’s battery is first connected, the unit is in locked
mode. In this mode, only the horn, bilge pump, bilge blower and
code keys operate.
3-11
Section 3
Unlocked Mode
Unlocked mode is entered after the user successfully enters the user
code, presses and releases the start key. When the code keys are
pressed, the system indicator light will turn ON while the key is
pressed. This indicates the key has actually been pressed. When the
system is unlocked, power is supplied to the boat and the system
indicator light will turn ON. At this point all keypad keys will operate
and actuating these keys will control the corresponding boat
functions. To put the unit back in Locked Mode, the user must
successfully enter the user code, then press the STOP key. This will
turn off the system indicator light and shut off power to all of the
accessories except the horn, bilge pump, bilge blower and code keys.
Run Mode
Enter the Unlocked Mode.
Pressing and releasing the START key quickly will put the unit in
Run Mode. Power is supplied to the engine ignition, but the engine
will not crank and the ignition indicator light is turned ON. If the
start key is not pressed again within 15 minutes, the unit will exit
Run Mode by shutting off power to the ignition and re-enter the
Unlocked Mode. If the user presses the START key, power is
supplied to the ignition and starter until the engine starts or for a
maximum of 5 seconds if the engine does not start. All accessory
keys will operate in this mode. Pressing the STOP key will shut off
the engine and the unit is then put back in the Unlocked Mode.
After the engine starts, release the START key.
CAUTION
DO NOT hold the START key for more
than 30 seconds. The starter motor can be damaged.
Automatic Return to Locked Mode
If no keypad activity takes place for 10 hours after unlocking, the
system will automatically return to the Locked Mode to help
prevent battery drain.
3-12
Controls and Indicators
Automatic Back-lighting
Pressing any keypad key will automatically turn the keypad backlighting on for 10 seconds. This feature is useful for finding the
keypad at night.
Multiple Keyless Ignition Codes
The keyless ignition system has provisions for three different
ignition codes. Any of the three codes may be used to unlock or
lock the system.
The “Master Embedded Code” is programmed into the system at
Nautique Boat Company, Inc. It is not changeable and remains
with the boat for its life. This code can be used to unlock the system,
to lock the system and to erase the two user codes.
The “Primary User Code” is programmed into the system by the
owner with the Nautique dealer’s help at the time of boat delivery.
This code is used to unlock the system, to lock the system and to
add or change the “Secondary User Code.”
The “Secondary User Code” is programmed into the system by the
owner when necessary. This code is only used to unlock or lock the
system. The “Secondary User Code” is ideal to limit access to the
boat.
To help prevent battery drain, make sure you STOP the engine
and LOCK the ignition system (two steps) when you are finished
using the boat.
The Power Indicator Light is on the left side of the START button
on the keypad and the Accessories Indicator Light is on the right
side.
3-13
Section 3
Programming the Primary User Code
Until a Primary User Code is set, the keyless ignition does not
require the entry of a code to unlock the system or start the engine.
The system operates as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Press START to unlock the system.
Press it a second time to start the engine.
Press STOP to turn off the engine.
Press it a second time to lock the system. The system indicator
light should be OFF.
To program the Primary User Code, make sure the system indicator
light is off, then press and release the 1/2 key and the 7/8 key at
the same time to put the system in the Code Programming Mode.
The system indicator light will flash.
Enter a code from two to eight characters and press START. For
verification, re-enter the code and press START again. The system
indicator light should stop flashing and stay ON. If the light does
not stop flashing, press STOP and begin again.
To lock the system, re-enter either the Primary User Code or the
Master Embedded Code and press STOP.
3-14
Controls and Indicators
Changing the Primary User Code
The current primary code must be used to change to another
primary code.
Make sure the system indicator light is OFF.
1. Enter the Primary User Code, then press and release the 1/2
key and the 7/8 key at the same time to put the system in the
code programming mode. The system indicator light will flash.
2. Enter a code from two to eight characters and press START. For
verification, re-enter the code and press START again. The
system indicator light should stop flashing and stay ON. If the
light does not stop flashing, press STOP and begin again.
To lock the system, re-enter either the new Primary User Code or
the Master Embedded Code and press STOP.
Changing the Primary User Code will erase the Secondary User
Code.
Programming or Changing the Secondary User Code
The Secondary User Code will only lock or unlock the system and
can not be used for any reprogramming.
Make sure the system indicator light is OFF.
1. Enter the Primary User Code, press and release the 1/2 key and
the 5/6 key at the same time to put the system in Code
Programming Mode. The system indicator light will flash.
2. Enter a code from two to eight characters and press START. For
verification, re-enter the code and press START again. The
system indicator light should stop flashing and stay ON. If the
light does not stop flashing, press STOP and begin again.
3-15
Section 3
To lock the system, re-enter any of the three codes and press STOP.
Erasing the User Codes
Make sure the system indicator light is OFF.
Enter the Master Embedded Code, press and release the 1/2 key
and the 7/8 key at the same time to erase the system user codes.
The keyless ignition will now act as if there are no codes in memory.
Pressing the START key will unlock the system and pressing the
STOP key will lock it without entering a code. Follow the steps in
“Programming the Primary User Code” in this section.
Power Management Access (PMA) Panel
CORC0324
Your Nautique is equipped with a PMA panel to manage other
components of the electrical system. It includes breakers, switches
and a 12-volt port.
3-16
Controls and Indicators
Standard Equipment
Watersports Tow Point
The watersports tow point (pylon) is manufactured from highstrength metals. If the pylon becomes loose, stop using the pylon
and take the boat to your Nautique dealer for service.
Misuse of the tow-point can cause death
or serious injury. The pylon was designed for water
skiing only. DO NOT use for parasailing, kite flying,
towing other boats and/or using pylon extensions, sit
behind (aft) the pylon when towing skiers.
CAUTION
Although pylon extensions and barefoot
booms have become popular additions to many
tournament inboards, Nautique Boat Company strongly
objects and opposes the use of any pylon extension,
whether up or to the side of any of its products. The use
of pylon extensions can alter the handling
characteristics of the boat, possibly resulting in
dangerous instability, which could then lead to loss of
control, a situation which could cause serious or fatal
injury to the boat driver, passengers, skiers and anyone
else who might be in the vicinity of such a mishap.
3-17
Section 3
Tow Rope Attachment
Nautique recommends the following technique for attaching your
tow rope to the tow pylon.
1. Locate the end of the
wakeboard rope.
CORC0652
2. Pass a small section of the
rope through the loop at
the end as shown, creating
another loop.
CORC0653
3. Slide the new loop onto
the pylon or tower.
CORC0654
4. Tighten by pulling on the
tail of the rope that leads to
the skier.
CORC0655
3-18
Controls and Indicators
CAUTION
Nautique Boat Company DOES NOT
approve of any structural changes, additions or
modifications to our products. Any time a dealer or
consumer makes a change to our product, they do so at
their own risk and sole liability. Nautique Boat Company,
Inc. will not be held liable for unauthorized changes,
whether deletions or additions, to the original
equipment/product manufactured and sold by Nautique
Boat Company, Inc., even if such changes and additions
are made by an “authorized” Nautique dealer, customer,
promotional representative or any other person, known
or unknown to Nautique Boat Company, Inc.
Bow Features of Your Nautique
The open bow section of your boat has been equipped with either
removable or hinged cushions to allow access to storage. The
center section may be equipped with an optional cushion which
can be removed and stored in the trunk or under the observer’s
seat.
3-19
Section 3
Driver’s Seat Adjustment
The driver’s seat can be adjusted fore and aft and rotates side-toside.
To slide seat, pull the lever (A) forward, slide into position, and
release the lever to secure in locked position.
To rotate seat, push down on the lever (B) and rotate seat to the
desired position. Release lever to lock the seat in position.
A seat or seats which are not locked in
position can cause death or serious injury. Lock the
seat(s) in position (fore and aft) before operating the
boat.
A
B
CORC0440
210, 230, G21, G23 and G25
3-20
Controls and Indicators
Rearview Mirror Adjustment
The rearview mirror can be positioned on the windshield to
observe a skier and traffic behind you. The mirror should be
lowered when trailering or when using a mooring cover. To
reposition the mirror bracket on the windshield frame, loosen the
three socket head screws and reposition and tighten the screws in
the new location. The center screw (A) should be tightened two
turns, followed by the two outside screws (B) being tightened two
turns. Follow this sequence until all three screws are tight.
The mirror is installed onto the bracket with a friction clamp (C) to
allow mirror adjustment. The friction is controlled by tightening or
loosening the friction clamp bolt and manually positioning the
mirror to the desired view.
C
CORC0253
FRICTION CLAMP
A
B
CORC0254
SOCKET HEAD SCREWS
3-21
Section 3
Observer’s Seat
Lift up on the bottom of the observer’s seat cushion to access
storage under the bow area. You can leave the seat in the “UP”
position to help dry the carpet.
Storage Hatch
To open the aft storage hatches, lift the latch in the center of each
hatch. The gas shocks will help raise the hatch. To close and latch
the hatch, pull down on the hatch and allow the hatch to close
firmly. Make sure there are no hands, fingers or any other
obstructions in the way of the hatch when you close it.
CORC0502
3-22
Controls and Indicators
Engine Cover Hatch
The two aft storage hatches must be open before the engine hatch
can be opened. To open the engine cover hatch, lift the latch at the
front of the hatch. The gas shocks will help raise the hatch. To close
the hatch, pull down on the hatch and allow the hatch to close
firmly. Make sure there are no hands, fingers or any other
obstructions in the way of the hatch when you close it.
CORC0503
An engine guard which is not in place or
contact with any moving parts can cause death or
serious injury. The engine box cover is a machinery
guard. DOɱNOT operate your boat without the cover
closed and in place unless you are performing a check
or maintenance. Keep your hands, clothing, hair and
any other body parts away from any moving parts.
3-23
Section 3
Walk-Thru Windshield Opening/Latching
There are two latches on the inside starboard side of the walk-thru
windshield. Rotate both of the window locks (A) to secure or
unlock the window. Always have window closed and secured when
trailering the boat.
A
A
CORC0580
An open window can cause death or
serious injury. Make sure both window locks are secure
when vessel is in motion.
Coolers
The floor coolers can be used to store miscellaneous items or
drinks. There is a drain installed in the coolers. DO NOT depend
on the coolers to keep valuables or electronics dry. Keep these
items in a specialized dry bag.
3-24
Controls and Indicators
Boarding Platform
The boarding platform of your boat is a convenient feature to
enhance the watersports experience. There are serious safety
concerns regarding the use of the platform. Nautique Boat
Company, Inc. has placed warning labels at the driver’s position, on
the deck at the rear of the occupant area and on the transom. Refer
to Section 1, Boating Safety, for more information.
To remove the boarding platform, pull the pins (A) located in the
mounting brackets, under the platform, and lift the platform
vertically.
A
CORC226
210, 230, G21, G23 and G25
CAUTION
The maximum load on the boarding
platform is 500 lbs (227 kg).
3-25
Section 3
Surf Pipe (G21, G23, G25)
The Nautique Surf System includes the Surf Pipe, which redirects
the exhaust into the propeller stream for a quiet, smoke-free surf
experience.
CORC0581
G Series
Surf Pipe (210, 230)
CORC0608
210, 230
3-26
Controls and Indicators
Engine Cooling Water Intake Valve
Your Nautique is equipped with a valve (seacock) on the engine
cooling water intake. The handle has a slide mechanism to prevent
the valve from being shut off inadvertently. The valve is used to shut
off the water supply in the event a hose failure or water leakage
occurs. The valve is open when the red handle is in-line with the
valve body and the valve is closed when the handle is perpendicular
to the valve body. Leave the valve open at all times unless an
emergency condition requires you to close the valve to stop a leak
or the possibility of a leak.
The valve is located fore of the engine compartment. If your boat is
equipped with a ballast system, the engine cooling valve (A) will be
the larger valve with a red locking handle. The valve can be
accessed through openings under the aft cockpit seat.
210
T-HANDLE
A
CORC0504
3-27
Section 3
230
A
T-HANDLE
CORC0505
G21, G23 and G25
T-HANDLE
A
CORC0450
3-28
Controls and Indicators
Fuel Tank
There is a fuel tank fill cap on the port and starboard side for added
convenience. Press and release the black button on the bottom of
the cap to open. Use caution when fueling your boat.
Avoid overfilling of the tank by monitoring the fuel level gauge
while fueling. Turn on the ignition without starting the engine and
monitor the gauge. Stop fueling as the gauge approaches the ‘full’
level and turn off the ignition when finished. Fuel spillage on our
waterways will pollute our environment.
The fuel tank is located beneath the cockpit deck, in the center of
the boat. To inspect the hose connections, raise the access panel.
Your Nautiques dealer should perform all fuel tank service.
Explosion or fire can occur under certain
conditions, causing death or serious injury:
• Turn the engine OFF.
• DO NOT smoke or allow open flame or sparks within
50 feet (15 meters) of the refueling area.
• DO NOT refuel unattended, avoid contact and spilling.
• DO NOT refuel indoors.
• DO NOT use a plastic funnel.
• DO NOT allow any spilled fuel to remain on your boat’s
finish.
• DO NOT allow a fuel system problem to go unchecked.
• Always maintain contact with the fuel nozzle and the
fuel tank to prevent electrostatic spark.
Rudder Remote Lube
The service allows for easy access to lubricating the rudder. The
remote lube fitting is located in the engine compartment. Use a
quality marine grease and gun. Connect the grease gun to the
fitting and apply a light pressure to the gun until slight resistance
is felt.
3-29
Section 3
Battery Selector Switch
The battery selector switch allows you to isolate the boat from the
batteries, and switch from one battery to the other, or even operate
on both batteries. The identification of each battery as well as the
position allowing both to be used may differ depending on the
switch manufacturer, however, with any switch it should be easy to
determine how to select the desired configuration.
Under normal conditions, the switch should be set to one battery
or the other and almost never to the position for both batteries.
This will keep one battery in reserve should the other fail. Battery
selection should be done when the engine is off. Alternate batteries
daily. The switch can also be set to a position that turns off both
batteries isolating the boat from the batteries.
Nautique Electrical System
To ensure proper electrical system boot up when using the battery
switch, please wait at least 30 seconds after turning the switch on
before entering the user code and starting the boat. Failure to do
this can disrupt the Accessory circuit causing the LINC display,
Stereo, Zero Off, and various electrical components not to turn on.
If the operator accidentally disrupts the Accessory circuit, press and
hold “Stop” for 2 seconds; then restart the system to regain
functionality of the Accessory circuit and the components
dependent upon it.
Avoid the possibility of personal injury or
death from an explosion and/or fire. Never operate the
boat with only one battery installed and the Battery
Selector Switch set to the position for both batteries.
The positive battery cable end of the missing battery will
be at full battery voltage and could short out against
metal components possibly causing an explosion
and/or fire.
Ballast Function
The Ballast Function is controlled through the LINC system. User
profiles and Back-To-Dock settings can be programmed. Refer to
the “Nautique LINC” manual for information.
3-30
Controls and Indicators
Optional Equipment
Folding Instructions for Flight Control Tower®
Crush hazard. The Flight Control Tower is
heavy. Use care to fold or unfold the tower.
210, 230, G21, G23 and G25 - Flight Control Tower®
Folding the Tower Down
1. If the tower is equipped with a bimini top, the top may have to
be released to allow it to fold or be removed completely in
order to fold the tower.
2. Pull handles out.
3. Unlock the latch by pulling the handle up. Ensure that the
handle is rotated the entire way as this will reset the latch.
4. Push the top of the tower forward to begin folding. Use caution;
as the tower begins to fold there will be some weight the user
has to hold. The gas springs assist, but do not make the tower
completely weightless.
NOTE: There are different weights of the gas shocks
required for different tower accessory loads. Please see your
dealer to upgrade the gas shocks if you add any tower
accessories.
3-31
Section 3
Folding Tower Up
1. Use caution when folding the tower into the upright position;
there are pinch hazards where the upper section of the tower
folds into the lower section of the feet.
2. Lift from the center of the tower and stand the tower to the
upright position.
3. Make sure that the handles are rotated all the way to the open
position to reset the latch.
4. Rotate the handles until the latch pulls down the rear of the
tower feet and latches. There should be an over-center feel
when the handle reaches its final position.
5. Push the handles in to lock them in place.
NOTE: Nautique installs gas springs into each tower to
control the weight of the tower while folding based on the
anticipated optional accessories. Please contact your dealer for
assistance if the accessory package is changed.
3-32
Controls and Indicators
1
2
3
4
5
CORC0439
3-33
Section 3
Bimini Top
Your Nautique may be equipped with a bimini top which can be
used for securing lighter watersports equipment. The top can be
tilted by removing the aft pins (A) and allowing the top to tilt, to
load the equipment. Make sure the equipment is secured before
getting underway. DO NOT exceed 90 lbs. (40.8 kg) or trailer with
equipment on top.
A
COR0237
3-34
Controls and Indicators
COR0238
3-35
Section 3
Battery Charger
Nautique offers battery charging systems for single- and dualbattery applications. The exact battery charger model required for
your boat will depend on the number of batteries your boat is
equipped with and the specific electrical requirements from the
country in which your boat will be operating. Because of the wide
variance in electrical plug configurations used in each country, all
boats built for use outside the United States will require your
Nautique dealer to install the proper electrical plug on the battery
charger AC supply cord. Your Skippers Kit will contain a manual
from the battery charger manufacturer that explains the proper
wiring requirements for each system as well as instructions for safe
operation of the charger.
3-36
Controls and Indicators
Optional Accessories
Stereo Systems
All Nautique boats have been built stereo ready with power wires
for head unit and cockpit speakers. Tower speakers can be
purchased as an option. Digital remote controls can be mounted
on the transoms of all boats and on the lower left side of the dash
pod in boats that do not have Nautique LINC Systems. The digital
remote control displays all necessary control functions at your
fingertip. See your Nautique dealer for the stereo configuration for
your boat.
The audio speakers of your Nautique boat are designed to deliver
maximum fidelity in a marine environment. The speakers can be
damaged if struck by a sharp object or if the moving elements are
restricted from movement. Do not store or place any sharp objects
near the speakers, or restrict element movement.
Optional accessories are available from your Nautique dealer. Your
dealer may have a wide range of other accessories available to
enhance your watersports or pleasure boating experience. Contact
your Nautique dealer for more information. Here are just two of
the fine accessories Nautique has to offer:
• Pull-out Cleats
CORC042
3-37
Section 3
• Phender Socket
Collapse ring to
engage or remove
socket from deck
CORC0619
3-38
Section 4
Boat Systems
Knowing the systems, controls and indicators on your boat is
essential for safe and proper operation.
Systems which are not inspected
regularly or maintained can cause death, serious
injury or damage to product. Inspect and maintain all
systems to prevent unexpected hazards associated
with worn or faulty components.
When replacement parts are required, use marine grade parts with
equivalent characteristics, including type, strength and material.
Marine grade parts are designed specifically for the conditions and
environment they are exposed to. Using substandard parts could
result in injury and product failure.
Fuel System
The fuel system consists of a built-in fuel tank, a port fuel fill, a
starboard fuel fill, a fuel tank vent, an in-line filter and a sending
unit to measure fuel level.
Your Nautique boat’s fuel system complies with current EPA and
CARB requirements including low permeation fuel tanks.
The fuel tank is located under the cockpit floor. To inspect, lift aft
seat base and removable section of the cockpit floor.
4-1
Section 4
Fuel System - 210, 230
FUEL FEED
FUEL RETURN
FUEL TANK
VENT
FUEL FILL
FUEL FILL
FUEL FILTER
CORC0506
4-2
Boat Systems
Fuel System - G21, G23, G25
4-3
Section 4
Ballast Tanks and Bilge
System
The Federal Water Pollution Control Act prohibits the discharge of
oil or oily waste into the water. Violators can be fined $5,000.00.
Do not allow water to accumulate in the bilge area of your
boat. When the boat is in use, make sure the bilge pump is
turned on. The bilge pump is an automatic pump that tests
for the presence of water every two to three minutes and
pumps until the water is removed. If the pump is in
between detection cycles, the detection mode can be
bypassed to operate immediately by turning the switch off
and then back on. Remember, the engine and other parts
of the drive system could be damaged and there is also a
risk of personal injury as increasing water level will
adversely affect the handling and maneuverability of the
boat.
CAUTION
The risk of personal injury from excess
water in the bilge area will adversely affect the handling
and maneuverability of the boat. Also, damage to the
engine and other parts of the drive system can occur
from the additional water. DO NOT allow the bilge pump
to operate after all the water has been cleared from the
bilge area, damage to the pump will occur.
European market boats include filters in the bilge drain hoses.
These filters are designed to reduce the amount of contaminated
bilge water being drained into waterways. The filters are installed in
the bilge pump drain hoses. Refer to Section 2, Deck Layouts for
model-specific locations. Follow the filter manufacturer’s
recommendations on when they must be replaced.
See page 7-3 in Care and Maintenance for more information
regarding bilge filters.
4-4
Boat Systems
Ballast Tank Valves - 210
T-HANDLE
STARBOARD
TANK
INTAKE/DRAIN
VALVE
BELLY TANK
INTAKE/DRAIN
VALVE
ENGINE
COOLING
VALVE
PORT TANK
INTAKE/DRAIN
VALVE
CORC0507
Ballast Tank Valves - 230
STARBOARD
TANK INTAKE/DRAIN
VALVE
T-HANDLE
BELLY TANK
ENGINE
INTAKE/DRAIN
COOLING
VALVE
PORT TANK
VALVE
INTAKE/DRAIN
VALVE
CORC0508
4-5
Section 4
Ballast Tank Valves - G21, G23, G25
STARBOARD TANK
INTAKE/DRAIN
VALVE
T-HANDLE
BELLY TANK
INTAKE/DRAIN
VALVE
ENGINE
COOLING
VALVE
PORT TANK
INTAKE/DRAIN
VALVE
CORC0452
4-6
Boat Systems
Belly Ballast Tank and Bilge System - 210, 230
BELLY TANK
BELLY TANK
VENT
FORWARD
BILGE PUMP
FORWARD
BILGE
OUTLET
BELLY TANK
INTAKE/DRAIN
VALVE
AFT BILGE
OUTLET
BELLY TANK
PUMP
AFT BILGE
PUMP
CORC0661
4-7
Section 4
Belly Ballast Tank and Bilge System - G21, G23, G25
4-8
Boat Systems
Port and Starboard Ballast Tanks - 210, 230
PORT
INTAKE/DRAIN
VALVE
PORT TANK
PUMP
PORT TANK
VENT
STARBOARD
INTAKE/DRAIN
VALVE
STARBOARD
TANK PUMP
STARBOARD
TANK VENT
CORC0662
4-9
Section 4
Port and Starboard Ballast Tanks - G21, G23, G25
4-10
Boat Systems
12-Volt System – 210, 230
POWER
MANAGEMENT ACCESS/
CIRCUIT BREAKERS/
BATTERY SWITCH/
BREAKER PANEL
BATTERY
WARNING
BUZZER
NEGATIVE STUD
ON MOTOR
ENGINE
STARTER
CORC0658
4-11
Section 4
12-Volt System – G21, G23,
G25 Only
POWER
MANAGEMENT ACCESS/
CIRCUIT BREAKERS/
BATTERY SWITCH/
BREAKER PANEL
BATTERY
WARNING
BUZZER
BATTERY
NEGATIVE STUD
ON MOTOR
ENGINE
STARTER
CORC0659
4-12
Boat Systems
Cockpit Heater System Optional
HEATER
INTAKE
GRILLE
HEATER
HEATER
DUCTS
ENGINE
CORC0231
4-13
Section 4
The heater system has a heating core, ducts, diffusers and a highspeed fan to deliver heat to the cockpit and windshield. The duct
diffuser at the windshield can be closed and rotated to direct air
flow. The floor ducts can also be closed to control air flow. The aft
duct and diffuser can be pulled out of its socket to direct flow in
other locations of the cockpit. The heating unit is located under
the driver’s dash pod.
4-14
Section 5
Getting Underway
There are many things to consider to make your boating trip safe
and enjoyable. You are responsible for the safety of all passengers,
the boat and any damage the boat or its wake may cause. Keep
passengers from blocking your view so that you do not run into
other boats, swimmers, water skiers, personal water vehicles or aids
to navigation.
Safety Checklist
Operating the boat if any problem is found
during this inspection can cause death or serious injury.
DO NOT operate the boat if any problem is found during
this inspection.
Problems found during this inspection should be handled by your
Nautique dealer.
The following checks are essential to safe boating and must be
performed before starting the engine.
• Check the weather report, wind and water conditions.
• Check that required safety equipment and PFDs are
on-board and in proper operating condition.
• Check that the fire extinguisher is fully charged.
• Be sure the boat is not overloaded.
• Be sure the operator’s visibility is not obstructed.
• Check that all maintenance has been performed.
• Raise the engine cover and smell for the presence of fuel
vapors. If fuel vapors are detected, DO NOT OPERATE
BOAT until the source of the vapors has been identified and
corrected by a qualified Nautique Dealer service technician.
5-1
Section 5
Safety Equipment
Federal and local laws require certain safety equipment to be onboard at all times. In addition, responsible boaters carry other
equipment in case of emergency. Check with local boating
authorities for any additional requirements over and above the
federal requirements.
Fueling
Explosion or fire hazard. Gasoline is
extremely flammable and highly explosive under certain
conditions. Turn the engine OFFand DO NOT smoke or
allow open flames or sparks within 50 feet (15 meters) of
the fueling area. Check your boat for fuel leaks and
fumes before, during and after each use. Maintain
contact between the fuel nozzle and the fuel tank to
prevent electrostatic spark. DO NOT use a plastic
funnel.
CAUTION
To prevent engine damage not covered by
warranty, refer to your engine operation and
maintenance manual for recommended fuel type and
octane rating.
Take care not to spill gasoline. If gasoline is accidentally spilled,
wipe up all traces of it with dry rags and immediately dispose of the
rags properly ashore. Spilled fuel may “yellow” the gelcoat finish
and damage gunwale trim.
5-2
Getting Underway
Gasoline Containing Alcohol
CAUTION
DONOT use any gasoline that contains
METHANOL. This fuel is very corrosive and will create
unsafe operating conditions to the boat’s fuel system
and serious damage to the engine. Any engine damage
caused by the use of methanol will not be covered by
the engine’s warranty.
The implementation of ethanol-based fuel is spreading rapidly
throughout the United States. As such, PCM Engines and Nautique
provide the following information regarding the use of this fuel.
This information addresses the use of ethanol fuels in PCM Engines
and Nautique boats.
CAUTION
Use of ethanol blended fuel rated E10 or
less is acceptable. DONOT use fuels rated higher than
E10. Ethanol fuels rated higher than E10 could
potentially damage the engine and/or present an unsafe
boat fuel system. Damage to the engine resulting from
the use of ethanol fuel rated higher than E10 ISNOT
covered by the engine’s warranty.
If ethanol blended fuel rated E10 or less is used, or if the presence
of alcohol is uncertain, inspections and service of the complete fuel
system are required more frequently. Any sign of fuel leakage or
deterioration must be repaired immediately before further engine
operation. It is also important to know that ethanol blended fuel
will act as a solvent and will attract and hold moisture.
Fuel system or engine damage caused by contamination from
water, foreign particles, sludge, or gums entering or forming in the
fuel system is not covered by the engine’s limited warranty.
5-3
Section 5
Without proper fuel filtration or fuel stabilization, ethanol blended
fuel may cause the following:
• Excessive moisture (water) can cause lean operation, hard
starting, and operating difficulties such as vapor lock and low
speed stalling, and can reduce fuel shelf life.
• Ethanol blended fuels acting as solvents can cause gum,
sediment, sludge and other particles to be loosened and
carried through the fuel system to the engine.
Fuel Stabilizer Recommendations for Ethanol Blended Fuels
The use of a commercially available fuel stabilizer, such as
STA-BIL®, is recommended when storing ethanol blended fuel for
more than two weeks.
When Fueling:
1. Avoid fueling at night, except under well-lighted conditions.
Also avoid overfilling of the tank by monitoring the fuel level
gauge while fueling. Turn on the ignition without starting the
engine and monitor the gauge. Stop fueling as the gauge
approaches the ‘full’ level and turn off the ignition when
finished. Fuel spillage on our waterways will pollute our
environment.
2. Moor your boat securely to the dock. Know the location of the
fire extinguisher in case of emergency.
3. Close all doors, hatches, windows and other compartments.
4. Extinguish cigarettes, pipes, and all other flame producing
items.
5. Make sure all power is OFF, and DO NOT operate any
electrical switches.
6. Add fuel in accordance with the engine operator’s manual. DO
NOT overfill, and allow enough room for fuel expansion.
7. Refer to engine operator’s manual for correct octane level
recommendations for your vessel’s engine type.
5-4
Getting Underway
After Fueling:
1. Tighten the fuel filler cap. Wipe up any spilled fuel.
2. Check all fuel lines, hoses and connections for leaks and
deterioration.
Each time you refuel, inspect all fuel lines, hoses and connections
for leaks and deterioration.
Boarding
When boarding the boat, always step in. DO NOT jump. Avoid
stepping on fiberglass or other potentially slippery surfaces. Board
one person at a time.
DO NOT board the boat while carrying gear. Set the gear on the
dock, board the boat and then pick up the gear.
Use the boarding platform to board from the water. To prevent
injury, make sure the engine is OFF when swimmers, divers and
skiers are boarding or even near the platform.
Boat Planing
The performance of your Nautique boat depends on load weight
and distribution. DISTRIBUTE WEIGHT EVENLY, from bow to
stern, and also from port to starboard.
Overloading of passengers, personal
equipment and supplies could result in an accident,
especially in rough waters.
If your boat is equipped with a ballast tank or loaded, loss of
horizon may occur when you begin to plane your boat. Get on
plane immediately to restore the vision of your path. DO NOT
operate your boat if the loss of horizon prevents you from
operating it safely.
5-5
Section 5
Pre-Operation Checks
It is the owner’s responsibility to check all of the items listed below
to be certain all preparation steps are completed before you use
your boat. Checking these items periodically will soon become a
habit. If leaks or other abnormal conditions are found, stop using
the boat and contact your Nautique dealer to have the problem
corrected.
Get into the habit of performing these checks in the same order
each time so that it becomes routine.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
5-6
Make sure to check all safety items.
Check that drain plug is properly installed.
Check condition of propeller.
Check that all batteries are fully charged and at the proper
level.
Verify the amount of fuel in the fuel tanks.
Be sure the lights, horn, bilge pumps and other electrical
equipment are in operating condition.
Check that steering system operates properly.
Make sure your float plan is submitted to a responsible
person.
Refer to your engine operation and maintenance manual for
additional pre-operation checks.
Getting Underway
The following instructions are very important:
• Raise the engine hatch all the way up. Check to see if all the
engine drain plugs are in place. Make sure the hull drain
plug (T-handle) in the bilge area is installed.
• Look at all the hoses to make sure they are installed and the
hose clamps are tight. Close the engine hatch and turn on
the engine compartment blower. Run the blower at least
four minutes to remove fuel vapors that might be in the
bilge area and engine compartment before starting engine.
Remember, if you have detected the presence of fuel vapors,
do not start the engine until the source has been
determined, problems corrected and vapors removed.
• Check all gasoline line connections. Connections are located
at the fuel tank, the fuel control cell and the fuel injection
system. All Nautique boats are equipped with anti-siphon
valves on the outlet fittings of the fuel tanks to reduce the
chance of fuel siphoning from the fuel tank if a fuel hose
leaks or is severed.
• Fill the fuel tank and check for leaks. Check again for leaks
after the engine has run for a few minutes.
5-7
Section 5
Checklist before starting boat:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Engine oil level - boat must be level.
Transmission oil level - boat must be level.
Shifting linkage and detent in forward, neutral and reverse.
Leaks (water, fuel and oil).
Coolant level (closed cooling system).
Operation of the throttle and transmission shift control.
Battery condition.
Visually inspect for any loose mounting fasteners.
Verify the emergency stop switch located by the throttle is fully
functional and the lanyard is not frayed or damaged. Clip the
safety lanyard securely to your body. Keep it attached at all
times while you are driving.
10. Check that engine cooling water (raw water) valve is open and
raw water strainer is clean.
CORC015
• Once the boat is in the water, visually check for water leaking
at the stuffing box. There should be no leakage from the
“dripless stuffing box.” If the “dripless stuffing box” is
leaking, pull the boat out of the water and have your
Nautique dealer service the stuffing box.
5-8
Getting Underway
• Make sure there are no ropes, gear bags, arms/legs near the
belts and pulleys of the engine. Severe injury can result by
becoming entangled in the belts of the engine while it is
running. Make sure the boat is deep enough in the water to
supply the water intake with water to cool the engine. Move
the throttle into the NEUTRAL "straight up" position.
Fire or explosion hazard from fumes
accumulating in bilge area. Ventilate the engine
compartment by running the blower for four minutes,
especially after repairing or refueling and check for fuel
spills or leaks.
• Close the engine cover.
An engine guard which is not in place or
contact with any moving parts can cause death or
serious injury. The engine box cover is a machinery
guard. DO NOT operate your boat without the cover
closed and in place unless you are performing a check
or maintenance. Keep your hands, clothing, hair and
any other body parts away from any moving parts.
• Start the engine.
CAUTION
DO NOT continue to operate the starter
for more than 30 seconds without pausing to allow the
starter motor to cool off for five minutes. This allows the
battery to recover between starting attempts.
5-9
Section 5
In order to prevent personal injury to you or others, the engine
cover must be closed whenever the engine is running.
• DO NOT operate the engine with the engine cover open or
while someone is in the area of an open engine cover.
• DO NOT open the engine cover unless the engine is turned
OFF and rotating parts are stationary and remain in a
stationary position.
IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT ALL WORK ON THE ENGINE BE
DONE BY TRAINED AND QUALIFIED SERVICE PERSONNEL.
During the warm up period, check the gauges for correct and
normal operation of all the systems:
•
•
•
•
•
Oil pressure 35-80 psi, approximately at 2000 rpm
Cooling water flow and water temperature 140-170°
Cooling water temperature for fresh water systems: 170-210°
Volts should rise to around 13-14V or higher
Idle rpm (600-700) in gear
CAUTION
DO NOT operate at high rpms in
NEUTRAL.
DO NOT shift into forward or reverse at engine speeds
above idle rpms.
DO NOT operate the engine without a cooling water
supply.
Damage to the water pump impeller and engine can
occur. If the engine does not start, refer to Section 8,
Troubleshooting.
5-10
Getting Underway
If the engine does not start:
• If the fuel filter has been changed or if the fuel system was
run dry, it will be necessary to cycle the ignition start button
from the STOP position to the START position several times
until the fuel pumps build adequate pressure. The cycling of
the ignition is necessary because the fuel pumps will run
only one to two seconds when the ignition is turned on,
unless the engine starts. Keep the shifter/throttle control in
NEUTRAL when starting the engine. If the throttle is
advanced, the computer will think the engine is flooded and
initiate a “clear flood” condition which will shut off fuel to
the engine and not allow it to start. The idle speed increase
is normally on hot or cold starts. This is programmed into
the computer. When the engine starts, the idle speed will
jump to approximately 1,500 rpm and quickly decrease to
between 750 and 900 rpm.
• Check for gasoline and cooling water leaks on the engine.
• Check for cooling water circulation (look at the raw water
strainer at the rear port side of the engine for water
movement).
Flooded Engine
If your engine does become flooded, use caution when attempting
to start the engine. Push in the transmission disengagement button
at the bottom of the shifter/throttle control handle and advance
the throttle to the FULL THROTTLE position. By pushing the
button in, the shift linkage is disengaged and the transmission
remains in NEUTRAL during the starting procedure. Use the start
key as described in Section 3 “Run Mode.” DO NOT operate the
start switch for more than 30 seconds. Allow the starter to cool.
We suggest you bring your boat back to your Nautique dealer after
25 hours of operation for an inspection of the shaft alignment,
stuffing boxes adjustment, and the fuel system checked for leaks.
This is not a free service. Follow Pleasure Craft Marine’s (PCM)
recommendations in the maintenance section for additional
service to the engine. Consult your Nautique dealer to determine
what charges will apply.
5-11
Section 5
When the engine starts, move the throttle lever back until the
engine is running about 2,500 rpm or less. Check the gauges for
normal readings and let the engine run for a minute to burn the
excess fuel. If the gauge readings are abnormal, stop the engine
and contact your Nautique dealer. When the engine runs normally,
check the engine for fuel, water and exhaust leaks. If there are
leaks, stop the engine and correct them before you continue.
After your initial run:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Check the engine oil level
Check the transmission oil level
Check the V-Drive oil level
Check for leaks (water, fuel and oil)
Check that engine frame bolts and mounts are tight
Check that throttle and shift control operates correctly
If the engine backfires when you try to start it, the problem may be
more serious than flooding.
•
DO NOT CONTINUE TRYING TO START THE
ENGINE.
•
CONTACT YOUR NAUTIQUE DEALER OR A
QUALIFIED TECHNICIAN TO CORRECT THE
PROBLEM.
DO NOT keep trying to start the engine under these conditions.
Engine damage or personal injury can result.
5-12
Getting Underway
Break In Procedure
Make sure all your passengers are properly seated before starting
the break in procedure. After the engine is thoroughly warmed up
and you have driven the boat into a large open area, advance the
throttle to wide open until the maximum rpms are reached. DO
NOT exceed 5,000 rpm. Reduce the throttle to 2,800-3,000 rpms
and cruise at or below this speed for 30 minutes. Reduce the speed
to idle, advance the throttle to wide open and operate at that speed
for one minute; reduce to the previous cruising speed for a few
minutes and repeat. Accelerating from idle speed to wide open
assists in seating the piston rings. This cycle can be repeated from
time to time during the first five hours of operation. DO NOT
operate engine at full throttle for longer than one to two minutes.
CAUTION
Follow these procedures only when
conditions are such that you can drive the boat safely.
DO NOT attempt to break in an engine by letting it idle at
the dock.
Propeller Selection
The maximum rpm of the engine at full throttle under normal load
conditions can be controlled by propeller pitch, diameter and
design. It is essential the propeller does not underload or overload
the engine.
Propeller Overloading, results in low rpms at wide open throttle
will give poor performance, poor fuel economy and eventually
result in engine damage.
Propeller Underloading, if operated with a propeller that has too
little pitch or diameter, poor performance will result.
5-13
Section 5
Running your boat in shallow water can cause propeller shaft,
strut, propeller and rudder damage and sand and silt to be pulled
into the cooling system. This will cause excessive water pump wear
and can clog the water passages in the engine. Heavy weed growth
in the water can plug the raw water strainer and oil coolers and
cause engine damage. There is a raw water strainer located near
the rear of the engine to strain the water before it goes into the
transmission cooler and then the engine. Check this every time you
use your boat to make sure it is not clogged.
Refer to Section 1, Hazardous Conditions, Boating Safety.
If the engine fails to start or is not operating properly, contact your
Nautique dealer for assistance.
Shifting
Boat movement without making sure your
path is clear can cause death or serious injury. Make
sure there are no swimmers or obstacles in the water
near you.
Keep the control lever clean and clear of obstructions. Refer to
your engine operator and maintenance manual for shifting
information.
Always pause in NEUTRAL before shifting from reverse to forward
and from forward to reverse.
Steering
Practice steering your boat. Make sure the steering system is
working correctly and is properly maintained.
The steering system must be in good
operating condition for safe boating. Frequent
inspection, lubrication and adjustment by your Nautique
dealer is recommended.
5-14
Getting Underway
Stopping
Stopping the engine immediately after operating at high speed is
not recommended. Allow the engine a two to three minute cooldown period at idle or low speed.
Refer to your engine operator and maintenance manual for
stopping information.
Docking
There is a crushing hazard between the
boat and other objects that could cause death or serious
injury. DO NOT use your hands, arms or another part of
your body to attempt to keep the boat from hitting other
objects, especially a dock.
Approach a dock slowly and use caution. Plan your maneuvers
ahead of time. Allow wind and current movement to help
maneuver your boat.
Come to a stop a short distance from the dock, then proceed slowly.
• Have your fenders and mooring lines ready.
• Observe how the wind and current are moving your boat.
Approach the dock with the boat pointed into the wind, if
possible.
• If possible, throw a line to a person on the dock and have
that person secure a bow line. If no one is on the dock,
maneuver as close as you can, then secure any line to a
piling or dock cleat.
Before tying up your boat, be sure to use enough fenders to protect
the boat from damage. If possible, tie up the bow toward the waves
with a good quality double-braided nylon line. Tie up only to the
lifting rings, tie down eyes or cleats; DO NOT use the handrails or
windshield frame. If the boat is to be moored for a long period of
time, use chafing protectors on the lines to protect the gelcoat
finish. Leave a little slack in the lines to allow for some wave
movement or tidal action as applicable.
When departing, cast off the bow line and move away. If the wind
or current is pushing away from the dock, cast off all lines and allow
to drift until you are clear.
5-15
Section 5
NOTES
5-16
Section 6
Running
Nautique urges you and all others operating your boat to seek
certified instruction from the local boating authorities.
This section is designed to present the most basic operational
principles. It is NOT intended to cover all conditions encountered
during operation. Therefore, the principles in this manual are
limited to the facts related directly to the operation of your boat,
while the responsibility for the proper application of these
principles belongs to you.
6-1
Section 6
Maneuvering Techniques
Steering response depends on three factors: rudder position,
motion and throttle.
Maneuvering in congested areas and advanced courses requires
mastering and good “Rules of the Road” ethics. Your Nautique boat
is designed to be responsive and agile enough to meet the
challenge of these conditions.
STERN
CIRCLE
BOW
CIRCLE
CORC135
Maneuvering
Learning to maneuver a boat safely takes practice. A boat will
respond differently at lower speeds than it will at higher speeds.
Learn these maneuvering techniques in an open water area before
attempting maneuvers near docks and other objects.
When making tight maneuvers, it is important to understand the
effects of turning. Since both thrust and steering are at the stern of
the boat, the stern will push away from the direction of the turn.
The bow follows a smaller turning circle than the stern.
Quick maneuvers can cause people and
objects in the boat to be thrown about resulting in death
or serious injury. DO NOT make quick or high-speed
maneuvers when you or your passengers are not
prepared.
6-2
Running
The effects of unequal propeller thrust, wind and current must also
be kept in mind. While wind and current may not always be
present, experienced boaters will use them to their advantage.
Unequal thrust is an aspect shared by all single-engine propellerdriven watercrafts.
All Nautique V-Drives have a counterclockwise (left-hand) rotation
propeller. Propeller rotation has a direct effect on steering,
especially when operating your boat in reverse. The operator
should familiarize themselves with the handling characteristics of
the boat in an open area before attempting to dock or perform
other close maneuvers.
Stopping (checking headway) is a technique that must be
developed. Reverse thrust is used to slow and stop the boat. The
momentum of the boat will vary according to the load as well as the
speed. Make it a practice to slow to idle (no-wake) speed before
shifting into reverse.
It is best to learn maneuvering skills in open water away from traffic.
Adequate practice is the only way to develop your boating skills.
Tow Pattern
A large loop pattern is preferred for beginners. This pattern does
not require the skier to cross the wake. As the skier’s skills improve,
a looped end or dumb bell pattern may be used. The dumb bell
pattern provides a long straight course which allows the wake to
disperse, leaving the skier with a smooth water surface. The dumb
bell pattern is popular with ski tournaments and clinics.
KCB-011
Dumb Bell Ski Pattern
6-3
Section 6
Freezing Temperatures
When the boat is removed from the water, drain the cooling and
heater system (as equipped) completely. Refer to Section 9 –
Winterizing Your Boat.
Anchoring
There are many types of anchors available on the market. The
choice of one anchor over another depends on many factors. An
anchor will usually hold best in a mixture of mud and clay or in
hard sand. A Danforth anchor is recommended for general
boating. For more information on anchors, contact your Nautique
dealer.
Improper use of an anchor can pull a boat
underwater causing death or serious injury. Anchor
from the bow, NOT from the stern.
6-4
Running
KC-1571C
Danforth Anchor
Dropping Anchor
• Make sure the line is tied to the anchor and tie the other
end to the forward cleat or bow eye.
• Head the boat into the wind or current over the spot where
you want to lower the anchor. Spot the boat before lowering
the anchor.
• When the anchor hits bottom, slowly back up the boat,
keeping tension on the line. Let out an anchor line that is
six to seven times the depth of the water. For example, if you
are in 10 feet (3 m) of water, let out 60 to 70 feet (18 to 21
meters) of line.
6-5
Section 6
LINE SIX TO SEVEN
TIMES DEPTH OF WATER
CORC136
Anchoring
• Pull on the line to make sure the anchor is holding.
• Occasionally check your position against the shoreline. If the
anchor is dragging and you are drifting, reset the anchor.
Weighing (Pulling In) Anchor
Start the engine and move forward until the anchor line is straight
up and down. Pull hard to lift the anchor from the bottom material.
If the anchor is caught on the bottom, attach a line to the bow cleat
so that it is taut. The up and down motion of the bow from wave
action may lift the anchor from the bottom. If the anchor remains
caught, let out a few more feet of line and attach it to the bow cleat.
Slowly maneuver the boat around the anchor until the anchor pulls
loose. Be sure to keep the line tight during this procedure.
6-6
Running
Performance Boating
Failure to maintain control can result in
death or serious injury. Always keep one hand on the
steering wheel and the other on the control lever. If the
boat begins to operate in an unsafe way, adjust speed
and course as necessary to regain control.
Your Nautique boat is a high performance boat. DO NOT be
tempted to push your boat to its limits until you are completely
familiar with its operating characteristics.
Nautique boats are the ones of choice of the better professional and
amateur ski shows and tournaments. You may have seen drivers put
their Nautique through extreme maneuvers. These drivers are paid
professionals on a closed course with hundreds of hours of
experience. DO NOT attempt extreme maneuvers without proper
training.
We recommend that you never operate the boat without first having
an initial orientation and familiarization/demonstration ride with
your dealer or an operator experienced with the boat/engine
combination. All boats perform differently.
The operator should have at least ten hours of experience with the
boat before any full throttle operation. DO NOT operate your boat
until you are completely experienced with its handling
characteristics.
Propellers
Your Nautique boat is equipped with a propeller best matched to its
engine and boat combination. If you feel you are experiencing poor
performance, contact your Nautique dealer. Care and selection of
your propeller is very important to proper boat operation.
6-7
Section 6
NOTES
6-8
Section 7
Care and Maintenance
This section describes how to care and maintain your Nautique
boat. Periodic inspection and maintenance of items listed in this
section is absolutely necessary.
Winterization and some engine maintenance functions are best
performed by your Nautique dealer. Some maintenance items that
can be done by you or your dealer are listed below. We suggest that
you familiarize yourself with these even if you have your dealer
service your boat.
General Maintenance
1. Read engine operator and maintenance manual very carefully.
2. Check for fuel line leaks every time you use the boat.
3. DO NOT start your engine if gasoline odor is present. Gasoline
fumes are highly explosive. Before starting your engine, open
the engine cover, inspect the engine compartment for gasoline
fumes and operate the blower for at least four minutes. Run
your blower when operating at slow speeds. If fuel vapors are
present, do not start the engine. Check all hoses and fittings to
determine the source of the vapor. Make the necessary
adjustments or take the boat to your local dealer to eliminate
the fuel vapor.
Fumes accumulating in bilge area present
a fire or explosion hazard which could cause death or
severe injury. Ventilate the engine compartment by
running the blower for four minutes, especially after
repairing or refueling and check for fuel spills or leaks.
If you smell gasoline vapor or see liquid gasoline, DO
NOT start the engine.
7-1
Section 7
4. When servicing the ignition switch or any wiring, always
disconnect the battery cables from the battery.
5. Check for water circulation when the engine is running.
Exhaust should contain steady flow of water. In closed cooling
systems, make sure the coolant in the cooling system is at the
proper level.
Engine Intake Water Strainer
Visually inspect the engine intake water strainer for debris before
each use. To clean the strainer, close the engine intake water valve
and unscrew the strainer bowl (A). DO NOT lose the rubber O-ring
(B) that seals the bowl to the cap. Carefully remove the screen (C).
RAW WATER
STRAINER
CORC0232
C
B
A
CORC078
Clean debris from the bowl and screen and rinse parts in fresh
water. Insert the screen, place the O-ring in the groove of the bowl
and screw the bowl on hand tight. Be sure to open the water valve
before starting the engine.
7-2
Care and Maintenance
Some engines are equipped with a closed cooling system with a selfcontained reservoir for engine coolant. Self-contained systems are
equipped with a heat exchanger which uses raw water to cool the
coolant. All raw water systems are equipped with a valve and
strainer.
Bilge Pumps
Check your bilge pumps often to make sure they are operating
efficiently. There are two bilge pumps: one is at the rear of the boat
near the rudder and under the floor by the forward bulkhead
located next to the fuel tank. To keep the pumps from getting
clogged, remove any debris you find in the bilge. Wash the bilge
with a good biodegradable household detergent or a bilge cleaner
available at your Nautique dealer or a marine supply store. Rinse
with water with your bilge pumps running. If your pumps seem to
lag, remove the top of the pump from the base and check the
impeller to make sure there is no debris inside. See your dealer if
there is still a problem with the pumps.
CE Bilge Discharge Filter
Your boat may be equipped with a CE-compliant bilge discharge
filter system that is designed to prevent oil-contaminated bilge from
being discharged into the environment. One CE bilge filter is
required for each bilge pump. The CE bilge filter is located below
the deck, connected to the bilge discharge hose just before the
hose connection to the deck outlet fitting.
CE bilge discharge filter cartridge XOil™ replacement should be
part of a regular maintenance program to prevent oily,
contaminated bilge from passing through the deck outlet fitting
into the environment. The period between cartridge replacements
will depend on the condition of the bilge. Always replace the
cartridge immediately after there has been a great amount of oil or
other contaminants spilled into the bilge.
7-3
Section 7
Cartridge Replacement
1. Turn off power to the bilge pump.
2. Unscrew the filter bowl (A) by turning counterclockwise and
pour any excess bilge water remaining in the bowl back into the
bilge.
3. Remove the used cartridge (B) and dispose of in a suitable
container.
4. Inspect the O-ring (C) located on top of the bowl and replace
if worn.
5. Be sure that the seals located on the top and bottom of new
cartridge are in place and correctly aligned.
6. Place the new cartridge into the bowl and reattach the bowl to
the filter housing (D) by turning clockwise.
7. Turn on power to the bilge pump.
8. Turn on the bilge pump and inspect all connections for leaks.
9. Bleed any air trapped in the housing by using the bleed button
(F) or, if so equipped, the bleed screw (E). Both are located on
top of the filter housing.
E
F
D
B
C
A
CORC0241
7-4
Care and Maintenance
Ballast Filtration System
(optional)
Some local lake authorities require the ballast system to be decontaminated before launch. Nautique offers Aquatic Invasive
Species filters integrated directly into the ballast fill hoses that may
allow you to speed up your inspection. The filters are sealed and
date tagged at the time of manufacture and function automatically
when the ballast pump is turned on.
Ballast filtration elements must be replaced by an authorized
dealer only.
Ballast filtration elements
should be changed at least
every 6 months by an
authorized dealer. Depending
on the water quality where
your boat operates, ballast
filtration elements may need to
be changed more frequently. If
you experience longer than
normal ballast fill times, it is
likely time to replace the
ballast filtration elements. This
should be performed only by
an authorized dealer so that
CORC0647
the filter units are re-sealed
with genuine Mussel Mast’R™
“Tamper Evident Seals” and “Date Tags” are re-applied. This must
be done in order to be recognized and accepted at invasive species
inspection stations. See your Nautique dealer as needed for
replacement of filter cartridges.
7-5
Section 7
Propeller
CAUTION
• A propeller can be very sharp. Be careful when you
handle it. Wear a pair of protective gloves when
handling any propeller.
• Remove your key from the ignition and remove the
Emergency Stop Switch clip from the switch to
prevent accidental starting of the engine.
• DO NOT reuse the nylon locknut or the cotter pin.
• DO NOT use a damaged propeller. A damaged
propeller can damage your engine and boat.
Removal
1. Remove the cotter pin from the propeller shaft and discard.
2. Wedge a piece of 1" x 4" wood between the propeller blade and
the starboard side of the strut and rudder.
3. Remove the nylon locknut and discard.
7-6
Care and Maintenance
Use a propeller puller to remove the propeller, then remove the
key from the keyway. Inspect the keyways and key for any damage.
A
C
B
CORC269
Installation
Before placing the propeller on the shaft, look at the keyway on the
shaft and in the propeller. Make sure the key slides freely in the
shaft keyway and the propeller keyway. DO NOT use the propeller
nut to advance the prop onto shaft.
If the key has burrs, remove them by filing the flat sides or replace
the key. DO NOT file the key beyond its normal shape or size.
1. Rotate the shaft until the keyway is “up.”
2. Place the key in the shaft keyway. The propeller will only slip on
in one direction. Rotate the propeller so the keyway in the
propeller is aligned with the keyway on the shaft. Once it is
aligned, push the propeller onto the shaft. You’ll hear a solid
“thunk” or feel it, as the propeller is seated.
3. Wedge a piece of 1" x 4" wood (A) between the propeller blade
and the port side of the strut and rudder.
4. Install a new nylon locknut (B) and torque the nut to maximum
of 30 ft-lbs (40.7 N•m).
5. Install new cotter pin (C). Bend the retaining ends of the cotter
pin in the opposite directions.
7-7
Section 7
Through-Hull Fittings
All fittings that actually pass through the hull on the wetted surface
are caulked in. These are not serviceable and must not be tampered
with.
Quick Oil Drain System
Change the engine oil after the first 25 hours of operation, then
after every 50 hours. The boat must be removed from the water to
use the quick oil drain system. There is a drain hose attached to the
bottom of the oil pan with a small plug screwed into the loose end
of the hose. Remove the drain plug (T-handle) (A), located in the
bilge area, and put the end of the drain hose through the drain
hole.
Make sure there are no kinks or sharp bends in the hose. Remove
the plug at the end of the hose and drain the oil into a container
under the boat. The engine will drain most efficiently when the oil
is warm. Allow several minutes for the oil to settle and drain.
Dispose of used oil in an environmentally safe manner.
Be sure the engine is off when you are draining your oil.
Prolonged or repeated contact with used
engine oil can cause death or serious injury. Wash
affected area immediately with soap and water.
7-8
Care and Maintenance
Salt Water Boating
If you use your boat in salt water or other unusual water
conditions, fresh water flush your engine and cooling system with
freshwater.
Nautique offers an optional freshwater flush kit. This is the only
system we recommend if you use your boat in salt water or unusual
water conditions. Flushing the system by running the boat in fresh
water is another good way to flush the engine, but it must be done
immediately.
Freshwater Flushing Kit Optional
The optional freshwater flushing kit allows you to flush the water
system after your boat is operated in salt water, brackish water or
unusual water conditions.
We recommend using this system if you use your boat in salt water
or unusual water conditions. Flushing the system by running the
boat in fresh water is another good way to flush the engine, but it
must be done immediately.
DO NOT connect the flushing kit to a water source which exceeds
normal municipality water pressure.
Proper Use of Freshwater Flushing Kit
1. Open the ball valve located between the system’s deck fitting
and main engine cooling water supply hose.
2. Make sure that the ball valve located in the main cooling system
supply hose is open. This valve is located near the hull inlet
fitting.
3. Open the cap of the system deck fitting and properly connect a
water supply hose, making sure the connection is secure.
4. Turn on the hose and start the engine.
5. Close the ball valve of step 2 unless the boat is on a trailer or
lifted up in the air, in which case it should be left open.
7-9
Section 7
6. Run the engine for several minutes after it has reached the
normal operating temperature to ensure proper flushing.
7. Reduce the engine speed to idle, shut off the engine and
immediately shut off the water supply hose. Please note, failure
to shut off the water supply hose immediately could possibly
result in engine damage.
8. If the ball valve of step 5 was closed, open it now and close the
step 1 ball valve.
9. Remove the water supply hose and reinstall the deck fitting cap
securely.
Coastal Edition
Nautique boats with the Coastal Edition are equipped to effectively
resist saltwater corrosion while maintaining premium performance
capabilities. Follow these procedures to help keep your Nautique
boat operating efficiently.
1. Wash down the boat after each use. Wash the boat at least once
a week even during periods of non-use. Use biodegradable
soap. Include vinyl components (existing cleaners). Raise the
cushions in the open position to improve drying. Ensure that
the boat is fully dry before installing the mooring cover.
2. Wax metal parts every 6 months including anodized, aluminum
and stainless steel components (stainless steel will rust without
care). More frequent applications may be necessary depending
on exposure. Use a polish that is recommended for metal.
3. Zinc anodes combat the effect of electrolytic corrosion on
metal components. Nautique Boat Company, the manufacturer
of Nautique boats, installs zinc anodes on the Hydro-Gate plate,
the prop shaft and the rudder. Replace zinc anodes after they
have worn to 50% of their original size (not tied to time).
Anodes may have a red or blue wear indicator to help
determine when replacement is necessary. Each time new
anodes are installed, apply a marine grade waterproof grease to
the fastening bolt.
7-10
Care and Maintenance
4. Flush the engine with fresh water after each use. See Freshwater
Flushing Kit - Optional on page 7-8 for more information.
5. Nautique Boat Company, the manufacturer of Nautique boats,
applies dielectric grease to the battery connections at the
factory. Reapply if these connections are serviced.
6. The steering tube is equipped with a grease fitting. Lubricate
the tube with a marine grade, waterproof grease every 100
hours of use or once a year, whichever comes first. Do not overgrease the steering tube. Over-greasing can cause damage to
the wiper seal and allow the excess grease to leak and expose
the steering rod to moisture and corrosion.
7. Wax the hull at least once a year with a UV wax. Rotate the boat
during outside storage every 6 months for even color blending.
8. Apply a rust corrosion protection spray such as Boeshield T-9®
to the engine and bilge components (electrical connections,
pumps, etc.) once a month or more frequently depending on
exposure. Turn the engine off and ensure that the engine and
all components are cool and dry before application. Follow all
manufacturer’s instructions when applying the product.
Battery Maintenance
Explosion or fire hazard from vented
fumes can cause death or serious injury.
• Wear eye protection and rubber gloves when working
on or around batteries.
• DO NOT charge or use a battery booster to start your
engine.
• DO NOT smoke or bring a flame near a battery at any
time.
• DO NOT have your head directly above a battery when
making or breaking electrical connections.
• DO NOT use a metal object to spark between battery
posts to check if the battery is charged.
7-11
Section 7
Take care when connecting or disconnecting a battery charger. Be
sure the charger is turned OFF and unplugged from power source
when you clip ON/OFF the connecting clamps.
Make sure you have a solid connection with the charging clamps.
Poor connections are common causes of electrical arcs and engine
problems. Follow instructions.
DO NOT make or break electrical circuits at the battery terminals;
a spark will occur when a live circuit is opened or made. Turn off
all components.
Use a voltmeter or hydrometer to check the battery charge
condition.
The battery cables should be removed from the battery when the
boat is placed in storage, on display or in transit. This will eliminate
the possibility of the engine accidentally starting without a supply of
cooling water and may damage the engine.
A
CORC212
+ = red positive (A)
- = black negative (not shown)
7-12
Care and Maintenance
To clean your battery, remove and wash down the battery case with
a diluted ammonia or baking soda/water solution to neutralize the
acid, then flush with fresh water. Keep the fill/vent caps tight so the
neutralizing solution does not get into the battery cells.
The electrolyte level should be checked every 30 days. Add only
distilled water to maintain the level between the top of the plates
and the bottom of the fill/vent cap. DO NOT overfill. Remember
batteries contain sulfuric acid which can cause severe burns.
Battery Cable Warning Alarm
Nautique has included a Warning Alarm into the battery cable
system that sounds an audible alarm if the positive or negative
battery cables touch the opposite connecting post on the battery
(reverse polarity situation). The alarm will sound even if the
battery selector switch is in the OFF position. If this situation occurs
and the alarm is activated, inspect all electrical systems for possible
damage before attempting to reconnect the battery cables.
CAUTION
Avoid equipment damage caused by
reversed polarity. Alarm sounds if battery leads are
reversed.
CAUTION
Avoid equipment damage caused
by reversed polarity. Alarm sounds
if battery leads are reversed.
BATTERY 1
BATTERY 2
CORC0474
7-13
Section 7
Gelcoat Maintenance
Your Skipper’s Kit included samples of quality boat care products
recommended by Nautique. Nautique is proud of its heritage and
wants you to feel this pride every time you use your boat.
Regular maintenance is the key to keeping your hull and deck
surfaces in good condition. Sun exposure, residue from trees and
minerals in the water affect your boat’s finish.
To help maintain the shine of your boat, wash the hull with a mild
bio-degradable detergent after each use. This will help to remove
any debris and waterborne materials that are on the hull. Use a soft
sponge or towel and dry with a chamois cloth to prevent water
spots.
Wax the hull sides and deck regularly with a high quality wax.
Waxes and polishes are available at your Nautique dealer and
marine supply stores. Always follow the directions on these
products carefully before you use them.
The hull bottom is an especially important area to keep clean since
any buildup of water scum and algae will create drag and reduce
the boat’s efficiency. If you must leave your boat in the water, there
are compounds to remove algae buildup on your hull. Some of
these can be caustic. Pay special attention to the cautions on the
label of these coatings. Ask your Nautique dealer for advice on
which work best in your area.
If your boat’s gelcoat develops a chalky look over a period of time
due to exposure to sun, there are gelcoat buffing and polishing
compounds available at your Nautique dealer and marine supply
stores. DO NOT use common household scouring pads or
powders.
If you will be keeping your boat in the water for ANY period of time,
we suggest that the wetted surface of the hull be painted with an
epoxy paint formulated for blister protection.
7-14
Care and Maintenance
Sudden changes in temperature can affect gelcoat. If you move
your boat from outdoors to a heated area, allow the temperature
change to be gradual. Heat the area after the boat is moved to allow
the boat to warm up slowly as the area is heated. Also, if you move
your boat from a warmer area to a colder one, wait for the outside
temperature to be closer to the warmer area’s temperature or allow
the area and the boat to cool down first.
Care of Metal
• Aluminum care
• Stainless care
• Chrome
Keep all metal work rinsed and wiped dry. Periodically polish it with
a quality commercially available metal polish to remove substances
such as air-borne pollution and natural body oils from your hands.
Do not use citrus cleaners on stainless steel. For best results on the
towers, use cleaners and waxes suitable for clear coat finishes.
Care of Glass
Your windshield, mirrors and gauge faces all deserve the same
attention as the other parts of your boat. Clean them often with
quality commercially available glass cleaners.
7-15
Section 7
Adhesive-Backed Non-Skid
All adhesive-backed non-skid surfaces can be cleaned by using a
medium-to-stiff brush and warm, soapy water. Make brushing
strokes in the direction of the non-skid grain. Rinse with clean
water and let the non-skid air-dry.
Vinyl Maintenance and
Cleaning
Nautique has selected the finest marine grade vinyl for your
Nautique. It is important to keep it clean at all times. There are
some substances that will stain the vinyl if you leave them on for
even a short period of time. Remove any contaminant and clean
the area immediately. DO NOT use Formula 409® Cleaner,
Fantastik® or any silicone-based products. Certain household
cleaners, powdered abrasives, steel wool, industrial cleaners, dry
cleaning fluids and lacquer solvents can cause damage and
discoloration. DO NOT use these cleaners.
7-16
Care and Maintenance
Common stains and steps to treat:
Chewing gum
Eye shadow
Engine oil
Spray paint
Mildew or wet leaves *
Shoe polish *
Yellow mustard
Oil based paint (fresh)
Oil based paint (dried)
Suntan lotion *
Tar/Asphalt
Lipstick
Latex paint
Crayon
Ketchup
Grease
Ball-point ink *
Permanent marker *
Coffee, tea, chocolate
Step #1
Step #2
Step #3
D
E
B
C
D
A
D
D
A
D
A
A
A
D
A
D
E
E
B
A
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
D then A
E then B
B
B
A
Use the chart above to clean common stains:
A. Medium-soft brush, warm, soapy water/rinse/dry
B. Meguiar’s Vinyl & Rubber Cleaner/Conditioner #57
C. One(1) tablespoon ammonia, 1/4 cup hydrogen peroxide, 3/4
cup water rinse/dry
D. Wipe or scrape off excess (chill gum with ice)
E. Denatured Alcohol/rinse/dry
After all cleaning methods, rinse well with water.
*Suntan lotion, shoe polish, wet leaves and some other products
contain dyes that stain permanently.
7-17
Section 7
Tunable Rudder
The Tunable Rudder* is designed to
offer easy steering adjustment. This
system uses a composite tuning foil
which is located at the upper aft
corner of the rudder blade. Use a
Phillips head screwdriver to adjust the
foil. Loosen the two screws in the
relief slots of the tuning foil.
CORC045
If the boat is pulling port (A), rotate the foil to port (B) and tighten
screws. If the boat is pulling starboard (C), rotate the foil to
starboard (D) and tighten screws. Always remember that movement
of the trailing edge of the foil to one side will cause the steering to
pull to the opposite side.
After each adjustment, test run and adjust again if necessary.
A
B
C
D
CORC162
*Manufactured under license from National Products, Inc. U.S. patent 5,746,147.
7-18
Care and Maintenance
Rudder Remote Lube Fitting
The remote lube fitting allows for easy access to lubricating the
rudder. The remote lube fitting is located at the stern of the engine
compartment. Use a quality marine grease and gun. Connect the
grease gun to the fitting and apply a light pressure to the gun until
you feel a slight resistance.
Checking Transmission Fluid
1. The fluid level must be checked in one of the following
conditions:
A. Engine/Transmission is cold;
B. Engine/Transmission has been shut off for at least 2
minutes to allow fluid to drain back.
2. Remove the dipstick by turning the T-handle counterclockwise.
Wipe the dipstick off using a clean cloth.
3. Re-insert the dipstick to the threads (DO NOT screw the dipstick
in) and remove. Observe the fluid level.
4. The fluid level should be at the “FULL” mark. If low, add the
specified fluid in small increments through the dipstick hole in
the transmission. Repeat the checking procedures until the
fluid level is at the “FULL” mark.
5. Replace the dipstick and tighten securely.
3008559001
FULL
ADD
CORC0617
7-19
Section 7
Checking V-Drive Unit Fluid
Burn hazard from hot V-Drive unit fluid
can cause serious injury. Do not remove the V-Drive unit
drain/fill plug while the engine is running or while the
V-Drive unit is hot.
Allow the V-Drive unit to cool and check with the boat level.
1. Remove the drain/fill plug from the V-Drive unit.
2. Verify the fluid level; the fluid level should be at the bottom of
the threaded hole. If low, add the specified fluid through the
threaded hole to the proper level.
The V-Drive unit fluid is a very high viscosity. To make adding
fluid easier, remove both fill plugs.
3. Replace the drain/fill plug and tighten securely.
Oil Fill/Drain
Plug
PLEASURECRAFT
ENGINEGROUP
POWER PLUS
1.48
RATIO
Oil Fill/Drain
Plug
MADE IN USA
Raw Water
Drain Plug
CORC210
7-20
Section 8
Troubleshooting
The following chart will assist you in finding and correcting minor
problems with your Nautique boat. Refer to your engine operation
and maintenance manual for more detailed information for any
problem concerning the starting, shifting or operation of the
engine.
Some problems may require the skills of a trained technician and
special service tools. Please contact your Nautique dealer for
assistance.
8-1
Section 8
Trouble Check Chart
Performance
Symptom
Possible Cause
Starter motor will not operate
• Shift handle not in NEUTRAL
• Battery Selector switch OFF
• Battery and electrical connection
loose or corroded
• Emergency stop switch not in
place
• Starting procedure not followed
• Fuel tank empty
• Contaminated fuel
• Clogged fuel filter
• Uneven load distribution
• Improper propeller selection
• Marine growth on hull
• Engine problem
• Marine growth on hull
• Engine problem
• Damaged or fouled propeller
• Misaligned propeller shaft
coupling
• Bent propeller shaft
• Engine problem
• Fouled or damaged propeller
• Engine problem
Engine will not start
Poor boat performance
Poor gas mileage
Excessive vibration
Engine runs but boat
makes little or no
progress
Steering problem
Throttle problems
8-2
• Corroded steering cable
• Rudder worn
• Throttle wire harness loose or
unplugged. Check the wiring
harness at throttle and engine.
• Defective throttle return spring
Troubleshooting
Electrical
Symptom
Possible Cause
Shifting problems
• Low transmission fluid level
• Sticking transmission shift lever
• Bad wire connection in shifting
harness
• Open circuit breaker or blown
fuse
• Loose wiring connection
• Defective switch or gauge
• Open circuit breaker tripped or
in OFF position
• Battery discharged
Electrical problem
Dim or no lights
8-3
Section 8
NOTES
8-4
Section 9
Storage
Lifting Rings
Nautique G21, G23 and G25 are equipped with bow and stern
lifting rings. Nautique 210 and 230 are equipped with a stern lifting
ring and a bow lifting eye. These are designed to lift your boat in a
steady and secure manner. The winch, hooks and other
components of the lifting mechanism must have sufficient capacity
sufficient for your boat. Refer to Section 2, Specifications. The
weights listed in the specifications are dry weight. You must add the
weight of the battery, fuel and gear to the dry weight.
CORC0510
CAUTION
Drain the bilge and / or launch control
system and/or aftermarket water bladder(s) to eliminate
excess water before you lift the boat.
9-1
Section 9
Only use a hook that will pass easily through the lifting ring
without binding. A hook that is too large or off-center could break
the lifting ring. DO NOT use a sling to lift the boat. Damage to
your boat can occur.
If your boat is equipped with a retractable lifting ring, it can be used
for lifting your boat.
CORC055
9-2
Storage
Winterizing Your Boat
Winter storage procedures vary depending on climate, type of
storage and length of storage. Check with your dealer/storage
facility manager for their advice on what works best in your climate.
Winterization functions are best performed by your Nautique
dealer. Refer to your engine operation and maintenance manual
for more information.
When storing your boat up on a rack system, it is important that the
racks adequately support the hull bottom.
If you do not have a trailer, support the boat like a Nautique dealer
recommended trailer. It is important to have an even weight
distribution.
If you use a mooring cover, DO NOT put it on when the interior of
the boat is wet and/or hot. It will trap moisture and lead to mildew
on the carpet and/or vinyl. Make sure your mooring cover allows
air to circulate, even if you have to leave a portion of the cover off.
RAW WATER
STRAINER
OFF
ON
WATER
VALVE
CORC067
9-3
Section 9
C
B
A
CORC078
The raw water strainer bowl (A) remains full of water even after the
rest of the engine cooling water system is drained. To properly
winterize your boat, the strainer bowl must be removed and
emptied. DO NOT lose the rubber O-ring (B) that seals the bowl to
the cap. Clean screen (C) if required. If the water is not removed,
the bowl can be damaged. A damaged strainer can cause
overheating problems during the next season.
Winterizing the Heater System (in Closed-Cooled
Engines Only)
1. Disconnect the hose connections at the engine (2 each).
2. Place one hose end into a small bucket and introduce 50 PSI
(or less) of air into the other hose end. This will force all fluid
out of the hoses and the heater core.
3. Reconnect the hoses to the engine.
9-4
Storage
Check for Water in Your Fuel
System
A small amount of water left in the fuel system for several months
can result in damage to the fuel system and engine. If you are
storing your boat for the winter, it is a good practice to remove any
water in the fuel system.
The Fuel Control Cell can be drained by removing the drain plug
at the bottom of the canister.
1. Loosen the return fuel hose to provide an incoming air source.
2. Clamp the return fuel line some way to minimize the amount
of fuel that may drain.
3. Once the canister is drained, coat the threads of the drain plug
with a fuel resistant pipe thread sealer, then replace and tighten
the plug.
4. Reconnect the fuel hose, and tighten the hose clamp. The
threads must be sealed properly to avoid a possible fuel leak.
Check your Fuel Control Cell once each year for signs of water in
the canister. If it appears there is water buildup in the canister, see
your Nautique dealer for service.
An empty fuel tank can accumulate water inside by changing
temperature and repeated cycles of condensation on the inner
surfaces of the tank. If the fuel tank is kept at about 3/4 full during
storage, less water can condense, limiting the buildup of water in
the fuel tank.
Fill the tank to 3/4 full maximum during storage to eliminate the
possibility of fuel expansion problems caused by temperature
changes. This minimizes overflow of fuel from the fuel vent. Not
only can this overflow be hazardous, but it will also adversely affect
decals and pin striping on the boat.
9-5
Section 9
Add a good quality fuel stabilizer to the fuel prior to winterizing to
slow down the rate of fuel decomposition. You can purchase a fuel
stabilizer at your servicing dealer, most marinas or an auto supply
store. Add the stabilizer to the tank.
If you did not add the stabilizer previously, run the engine to
circulate fuel throughout the system. Remember, always follow the
fuel stabilizer manufacturer’s recommendations for proper mixing.
Gasoline expands when the temperature increases. Never store your
boat with more than 3/4 of a tank.
Refer to the engine’s owner’s manual for winterization of the
engine.
Winterizing Ballast Tanks
(if equipped)
It is extremely important to protect the Flight Control System
during freezing temperatures and during long periods of non-use.
When following this procedure, remember to protect our natural
resources by using environmentally friendly products; and to
always discard in an environmentally friendly manner.
1. Make sure your boat is out of the water, the tanks are
completely drained and the tank water intake/drain valves are
open.
2. Use a 50/50 mixture of an environmentally friendly antifreeze
and fresh water.
3. Pour an even amount, approximately 1 gallon (3.8 liters) of the
antifreeze mixture into each tank’s vent.
4. Place a container under the intake/drain of the tank you are
winterizing to catch any spilled mixture.
5. Operate the pump in the drain mode for two seconds and shut
off. Repeat procedure for other tank(s).
6. Close the tank’s water intake/drain valves.
When returning your boat back to service, drain the remainder of
the mixture before getting onto the water.
9-6
Storage
Trailer/Trailering
Hitch
If you do not already have a trailer hitch installed on your vehicle,
go to a reputable hitch company to have the proper size hitch
installed. Always use a hitch rated with the appropriate capacity to
match the trailer and boat’s gross weight.
Loss of control can cause death or
serious injury. DO NOT attempt to tow more than one
trailer at a time behind your vehicle. Attempting to tow
an additional trailer will adversely affect the trailer
tongue weight.
CAUTION
DO NOT use a bumper mounted hitch on
your vehicle. Use a hitch that is attached to the frame of
your vehicle only. DO NOT compromise your equipment,
your safety or the safety of others.
Wiring
The trailer requires wiring from your vehicle to the trailer lights.
This can usually be done by the hitch company.
Security
There are several locking devices available at marine supply stores
to aid in securing your boat whether or not it is attached to your
vehicle.
9-7
Section 9
Towing Your Boat
Read this checklist prior to trailering your boat.
• Check wheel lug nuts for tightness.
• Be sure the trailer tongue is securely on the hitch and the
safety chains from the trailer are secured to the vehicle.
• If your boat is equipped with a trailer bow winch, make sure
the boat is properly located on the trailer and the winch
strap/cable is tight.
• Be sure a cable or strap secures the bow eye of the boat to
the trailer. Make sure this is tightly secured.
• Be sure the trailer electrical connector is plugged in. Allow
sufficient slack for cornering. Check brake lights, turn
signals, emergency flasher and running lights.
• Be sure your gear inside the boat and seat cushions cannot
shift or fly out of the boat during trailering.
• Be sure the walk-thru door of the windshield is closed and
latched while the boat is being trailered.
• If you are using any sort of water "ballast" system to add
weight to the boat, be sure it is drained before you put the
boat on the trailer. These systems can adversely affect the
tongue weight of the trailer. Your boat is not designed to
carry exceptionally heavy loads. This can adversely affect the
proper balance of the boat/trailer combination and cause
tire failure and/or loss of control.
• Make sure the platform bracket pins are in place before
trailering.
• Remove bilge drain plug(s).
Long Trips
DO NOT use your boat and trailer to haul excessive gear.
Each time you stop on a long trip, check the following:
• Make sure the wheel lug nuts are tight and the bearings are
lubricated.
• Make sure the boat is still positioned snugly against the bow
stops and has not shifted.
9-8
Storage
• Examine the hitch connection to be sure it is firmly attached
and the safety pin and chains are securely fastened.
• Make sure all trailer lights are still functioning properly.
• Re-examine the contents of your boat to ensure that no
items such as life jackets or other gear have shifted and will
not fly out while you are on the road.
9-9
Section 9
NOTES
9-10
Glossary
ABYC – American Boat and Yacht Council, Inc.
AFLOAT – On the water.
AFT – Toward the rear or stern of the boat.
AGROUND – Touching bottom.
AMIDSHIP – Center or middle of the boat.
ANCHOR – (1) An iron casting shaped to grip the lake bottom to
hold the boat. (2) The act of setting the anchor.
ANODE – An electrode carrying a positive charge.
ASHORE – On the shore.
ASTERN – Toward the stern.
BAIL – To remove water from the bottom of the boat with a pump,
bucket, sponge, etc.
BALLAST – Any solid or liquid weight placed in a boat to increase
the draft, to change the trim.
BEAM – The widest point on the boat.
BEARING – Relative position or direction of an object from the boat.
BILGE – The lowest interior section of the boat hull.
BOARDING – To enter the boat.
BOUNDARY WATERS – A body of water between two areas of
jurisdiction; i.e., a river between two states.
BOW – The forward end of the boat.
BULKHEAD – Vertical partition (wall) in a boat.
BUNKS – Carpeted trailer hull supports.
BURDENED BOAT – Term for the boat that must "give-way" to boats
with the right-of-way.
CAPACITY PLATE – A plate that provides maximum weight capacity
and engine horsepower rating information. It is located in full view
of the helm.
CAPSIZE – To turn over.
G-1
CAST-OFF – To unfasten mooring lines in preparation for
departure.
CATHODE – An electrode carrying a negative charge.
CAVITATION – A phenomenon in which low pressure within a
liquid allows vapor bubbles to form.
CENTER LINE – A lengthwise imaginary line which runs fore and aft
with the boat’s keel.
CHINE – The point on a boat where the side intersects (meets) the
bottom.
CLEAT – A deck fitting with ears to which lines are fastened.
CONSOLE – Also called helm. The steering wheel area of the boat.
CRANKING BATTERY – The main battery used for engine starting
and electrical circuits.
CURRENT – Water moving in a horizontal direction.
DEADRISE – Transverse angle of the bottom of the hull.
DECK – The open surface on the boat where the passengers walk.
DRAFT – The depth of the boat below the water line, measured
vertically to the lowest part of the hull.
ELECTROLYSIS – The break-up of metals due to the effects of
galvanic corrosion.
FENDER – Devices built into or hung over the sides of a boat to
prevent the boat from rubbing or chafing against other boats or
piers.
FORE – Toward the front or bow of the boat. Opposite of aft.
FREEBOARD –The distance from the waterline to the upper surface
of the side of the deck.
FUEL SENDING UNIT – The electrical device that is mounted on
the outside of a built-in fuel tank and controls the dashboard fuel
gauge.
GIVE-WAY BOAT – (1) Term for the boat that must take whatever
action necessary to keep well clear of the boat with the right-of-way in
meeting or crossing situations. (2) The burdened boat.
GUNWALE – The rail or upper edge of a boat’s side.
HEAD – A marine toilet.
HELM – The steering wheel or command area.
HULL – The structural body of a boat below the deck.
G-2
Glossary
HYPOTHERMIA – A physical condition where the body loses heat
faster than it can produce it.
IN-LINE FUSE – A type of protective fuse located in the power wire
of a direct current (DC) circuit usually near the battery.
KEEL – The lowest portion of the boat; extends fore and aft along
the boat’s bottom.
LINE – All rope in a boat or on the dock is referred to as “line.”
LIST – Leaning or tilt of a boat toward the side.
MAKING WAY – Making progress through the water.
MARINE CHART – Seagoing maps showing depths, buoys,
navigation aids, etc.
MID SHIP (AMIDSHIP) – In the vicinity of the mid-length of a boat,
technically the exact half way between the bow and the stern.
MOORING – An anchor, chain, or similar device that holds a boat in
one location.
NAVIGATION AID – Recognizable objects on land or sea such as
buoys, towers or lights which are used to fix position to identify safe
and unsafe waters.
NMMA – National Marine Manufacturer’s Association
NO-WAKE SPEED – The speed at which a boat travels to produce an
imperceptible wake.
PFD – Personal flotation device.
PITOT TUBE – See SPEEDOMETER PICKUP TUBE.
PLANING HULL – A hull designed to lift, thereby reducing friction
and increasing efficiency.
PORPOISE – A condition in which the bow bounces up and down
caused by trimming the engine too far out.
PORT – (1) The left side of a boat when facing the bow. (2) A
destination or harbor.
PRIVILEGED BOAT – Term used for the boat with the right-of-way.
PROPELLER PITCH – Theoretical linear distance the propeller
would move ahead during one complete revolution of it were turning
with zero slippage.
RIGHT-OF-WAY – Term for the boat that has priority in meeting or
crossing situations. The stand on or privileged boat.
RUB RAIL – The rubber extrusion that is fastened over the hull and
deck joint.
G-3
RUDDER – A vertical metal device used to steer the boat
RULES OF THE ROAD – Regulations for preventing collisions on
the water.
SACRIFICIAL ANODE – Metal parts fitted to the hull of boat to
provide a transfer of ions to the cathodic part of an electrolytic
coupling and so protect other parts of the boat that would otherwise
waste away through electrolysis
SLIP – The linear distance between the pitch (or advance) and the
actual distance the propeller moves straight ahead through the water.
SPEEDOMETER PICKUP TUBE – Also called pitot tube. The plastic
device that extends below the bottom of the boat. It connects to the
speedometer with plastic flexible tubing.
SPRING LINE – A mooring rope oriented at a small angle to the
boats centerline, usually attached to the boat mid ship.
STAND ON BOAT – Term for the boat that must maintain course
and speed in meeting or crossing situations. The privileged boat.
STARBOARD – The right side of the boat when looking towards the
bow.
STERN – The aft end of a boat.
STOW –To put away. To store cargo in a storage locker.
STRINGER – Members under the floor that stiffen the hull bottom.
SURGE BRAKES – A type of trailer braking system designed to
automatically actuate when the tow vehicle’s brakes are applied.
TRANSDUCER – The unit that sends/receives signals for the depth
sounder.
TRANSOM – The transverse beam across the stern.
TRIM – Fore to aft and side to side balance of the boat when loaded.
UNDERWAY – Boat in motion; i.e., not moored or anchored.
USCG – United States Coast Guard
VISUAL DISTRESS SIGNAL – A device used to signal the need for
assistance such as flags, lights and flares.
WAKE – The waves that a boat leaves behind when moving through
the water.
WATERLINE – The line of the water’s edge when the boat is afloat.
WATERWAY – A navigable body of water.
WETTED SURFACE – The area of the immersed hull plus
underwater gear.
G-4
Warranty
NAUTIQUE LIMITED
WARRANTY
(Nautique Boats as Originally Manufactured by Nautique Boat
Company)
The Nautique warranty is backed by a tradition of boat building
experience since 1925.
Lifetime Limited Warranty:
Nautique Boat Company, Inc., exclusive manufacturer of Nautique,
and also referred to as Nautique herein, warrants to the original
user or purchaser, whoever comes first, of each new Nautique boat,
that the deck, hull, and stringer system, as originally manufactured
by Nautique, shall, under normal authorized use, remain free from
structural defect in material and workmanship. For purposes of this
warranty, the terms “Nautique Boat Company” and its Trademark
“Nautique” are used interchangeably to refer to Nautique Boat
Company, Inc., exclusive manufacturer of Nautique brand boats.
Transferable Lifetime Limited Warranty:
In addition, Nautique offers a Transferable Lifetime Limited
Warranty against structural defect of the deck, hull and stringer
system as detailed in the Lifetime Limited Warranty above. This
policy may be transferred for a nominal fee to the second (2nd)
purchaser during a period of five (5) years or five hundred (500)
hours (whichever occurs first), from the date of delivery to the
original user or purchaser. See owner’s manual for proper form.
Exceptions: The “Lifetime” and “Transferable” warranties do not
cover the gelcoat, nor any other components fastened or applied to
the hull or deck. Gel coat discoloration, blisters, or bubbles and
cracks are not considered structural defects.
W-1
Boat Five (5) Year Transferable Limited Warranty:
Nautique warrants to the original user or purchaser, whichever
comes first, that each new Nautique boat, as originally
manufactured by Nautique, shall, under normal authorized use, be
free of defect in material and workmanship for a period of five (5)
years or five hundred (500) hours (whichever occurs first), from
the date of delivery. This coverage applies to factory-installed
components including boat parts, options, or other components
not manufactured by Nautique Boat Company. The remaining
portion of this warranty may be transferred for a nominal fee to the
second (2nd) purchaser during a period of five (5) years or five
hundred (500) hours (whichever occurs first), from the date of
delivery. See owner’s manual for proper form.
Gel Coat Three (3) Year Transferable Limited Warranty:
Nautique warrants to the original user or purchaser, whichever
comes first, of each new Nautique boat that the gel coat, under
normal authorized use, shall remain free from defect in material
and workmanship (including: cracks not caused by negligence,
impact or collision) for a period of three (3) years or three (300)
hours (whichever occurs first), from date of delivery. See owner’s
manual for owner’s gel coat maintenance responsibilities.
Engine/Power Train Warranty:
Five (5) years or five hundred (500) hours (whichever occurs first).
For details see Pleasurecraft Marine Engine Co., owner’s manual.
Exceptions:
This Nautique Limited Warranty shall not apply to:
• Normal maintenance of boat, or any component thereof,
including but not limited to, vinyl care, alignment,
adjustments, connectors, saltwater/brackish water corrosion,
and wear items including, but not limited to, non-skid
material, battery, bushings, packing material, bulbs, seals,
gaskets, impellers, carpet backing.
• Gelcoat finish or colorfastness of gelcoat finish, blisters,
chrome plated, anodized or aluminum finish or
colorfastness or fading of finish, on carpet or vinyl.
W-2
Warranty
• Damage or malfunction of a boat, or any component
thereof, resulting from owner use, lack of maintenance,
improper maintenance, impact, misuse, negligence,
collision, delay of repair (unless specifically and directly
authorized by the Nautique warranty department in writing),
trailer or trailer design, improper or inadequate trailering or
cradling of the boat.
• Any addition, modification or repair of the boat, or any
component thereof, caused by, resulting from or in
connection with any party other than Nautique or any defect
or product failure caused by, resulting from or in connection
with any such addition, modification or repair.
• Any Nautique boat which has been repossessed or sold
through an auction house, third party, or unauthorized
dealer.
• Any and all consequential damages including, but not
limited to, costs incurred for haul-out, launching, towing,
and storage charges, telephone or rental charges of any type,
inconveniences, or loss of time or income.
All warranty repairs must be performed in the country of purchase
(warranty will not be honored in cross-international-border
purchases).
Any defect or damage covered by this warranty shall, at the
discretion of Nautique, be repaired free of charge at an authorized
dealership or service facility. Repairs will be warranted only for the
remainder of the original warranty period. Transportation and/or
labor to and from the point of repair will be the responsibility of the
owner.
W-3
THERE ARE NO WARRANTIES WHICH EXTEND BEYOND THE
DESCRIPTION OF THE FACE HEREOF. THIS LIMITED
WARRANTY IS EXPRESSLY MADE IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER
EXPRESSED WARRANTIES. DURATION OF ANY IMPLIED
WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR OTHERWISE, SHALL BE LIMITED
TO AND COINCIDENT TO THE DURATION OF THESE
EXPRESSED WARRANTIES. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES
SHALL NAUTIQUE, INC. BE LIABLE TO THE PURCHASER OR
ANY THIRD PARTY FOR LOSS OF PROFITS OR OTHER DIRECT
OR INDIRECT COSTS, LOSSES OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES
ARISING OUT OF OR AS A RESULT OF DEFECTS IN PRODUCTS
HEREIN ABOVE WARRANTED.
Some states do not allow limitations on how long an implied
warranty lasts. Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation
of incidental or consequential damages. This warranty gives you
specific legal rights, and you also have other rights which may vary
from state to state. To the extent that your state does not allow any
exclusion or limitation expressed herein, such exclusion or
limitation will not apply to you. All other allowable limitations or
exclusions shall apply to you.
Note: This warranty is expressly conditioned upon the completion
of the electronic registration to Nautique. Although not obligated
to and without creating such an obligation, this will enable
Nautique to notify owners of any necessary performance or safety
modifications to your boat, and to verify ownership in case a
warranty claim is filed on the boat.
Procedure:
In the event your Nautique boat has a claim covered by this
warranty, the following procedure shall be allowed to secure
performance of warranty obligations:
• Notify the selling dealer, in writing, within thirty (30) days of
the discovery of any claimed defect.
• You may be required to transport the boat, at your expense,
to an authorized dealership or service facility for their
inspection and/or repair.
W-4
Warranty
• Nautique reserves the right to require further evaluation
and/or information regarding a warranty claim against a
boat prior to its repair as well as designate the place of
repair.
Nautique reserves the right to make changes in prices, color,
specifications, equipment, options, materials, hull, decks, and/or
discontinue models at any time (without notice), and shall be
under no obligation to equip or modify boats built prior to such
changes.
Nautique Customer Care, 14700 Aerospace Parkway, Orlando,
Florida
32832.
(407)855-4141,
FAX
(407)851-7844,
email: info@nautique.com. Effective 2016 model boats.
NAUTIQUE COASTAL EDITION
LIMITED WARRANTY
(Nautique Boats as Originally Manufactured by Nautique Boat
Company, Inc.)
The Nautique warranty is backed by a tradition of boat building
experience since 1925.
Lifetime Limited Warranty:
Nautique Boat Company, Inc., exclusive manufacturer of Nautique,
and also referred to as Nautique herein, warrants to the original
user or purchaser, whoever comes first, of each new Nautique boat,
that the deck, hull, and stringer system, as originally manufactured
by Nautique, shall, under normal authorized use, remain free from
structural defect in material and workmanship. For purposes of this
warranty, the terms “Nautique Boat Company” and its Trademark
“Nautique” are used interchangeably to refer to Nautique Boat
Company, Inc., exclusive manufacturer of Nautique brand boats.
Transferable Lifetime Limited Warranty:
In addition, Nautique offers a Transferable Lifetime Limited
Warranty against structural defect of the deck, hull and stringer
system as detailed in the Lifetime Limited Warranty above. This
policy may be transferred for a nominal fee to the second (2nd)
purchaser during a period of three (3) years or three hundred
W-5
(300) hours (whichever occurs first), from the date of delivery to
the original user or purchaser. See owner’s manual for proper
form.
Exception: The “Lifetime” and “Transferable” warranties do not
cover the gel coat, nor any other components fastened or applied
to the hull or deck. Gel coat discoloration, blisters, or bubbles and
cracks are not considered structural defects.
Boat Three (3) Year Transferable Limited Warranty:
Nautique warrants to the original user or purchaser, whichever
comes first, that each new Nautique boat, as originally
manufactured by Nautique, shall under normal authorized use be
free of defect in material and workmanship for a period of three
(3) years or three hundred (300) hours (whichever occurs first),
from the date of delivery. This coverage applies to factory-installed
components including, boat parts, options, or other components
not manufactured by Nautique Boat Company. The remaining
portion of this warranty may be transferred for a nominal fee to the
second (2nd) purchaser during a period of three (3) years or three
hundred (300) hours (whichever occurs first), from the date of
delivery. See owner’s manual for proper form.
Exposure to a salt or brackish water environment can cause
corrosion or damage. Failure to rinse thoroughly after each use and
apply a protective coating will void warranty.
Gel Coat One (1) Year Transferable Limited Warranty:
Nautique warrants to the original user or purchaser, whichever
comes first, of each new Nautique boat that the gel coat, under
normal authorized use, shall remain free from defect in material
and workmanship (including cracks not caused by negligence,
impact or collision) for a period of three (3) years or three
hundred (300) hours (whichever occurs first), from date of
delivery. See owner’s manual for owner’s gel coat maintenance
responsibilities.
Engine/Power Train Warranty:
Three (3) years or three hundred (300) hours (whichever occurs
first), for details see Pleasurecraft Marine Engine Co. owner’s
manual.
W-6
Warranty
Exceptions:
This Nautique Coastal Edition Limited Warranty shall not apply to:
• Normal maintenance of boat, or any component thereof,
including but not limited to alignment, adjustments,
connectors, saltwater/brackish water corrosion, and wear
items including, but not limited to, non-skid material,
battery, bushings, packing material, bulbs, seals, gaskets,
impellers, carpet backing.
• Gel coat finish or colorfastness of gel coat finish, blisters,
chrome plated, anodized or aluminum finish or
colorfastness of finish.
• Damage or malfunction of a boat, or any component
thereof, resulting from owner use, lack of maintenance,
improper maintenance, impact, misuse, negligence,
collision, delay of repair (unless specifically and directly
authorized by the Nautique warranty department in writing),
trailer or trailer design, improper or inadequate trailering or
cradling of the boat.
• Any addition, modification or repair of the boat, or any
component thereof, caused by, resulting from or in
connection with any party other than Nautique, or any
defect or product failure caused by, resulting from or in
connection with any such addition, modification or repair.
• Any Nautique boat which has been repossessed or sold
through an auction house, third party or unauthorized
Nautique dealer.
• Any and all consequential damages including, but not
limited to, costs incurred for haul-out, launching, towing,
and storage charges, telephone or rental charges of any type,
inconveniences, or loss of time or income.
All warranty repairs must be performed in the country of purchase
(warranty will not be honored in cross-international-border
purchases).
Any defect or damage covered by this warranty shall, at the
discretion of Nautique, be repaired free of charge at an authorized
dealership or service facility. Repairs will be warranted only for the
remainder of the original warranty period. Transportation and/or
labor to and from the point of repair will be the responsibility of the
owner.
W-7
THERE ARE NO WARRANTIES WHICH EXTEND BEYOND THE
DESCRIPTION OF THE FACE HEREOF. THIS LIMITED
WARRANTY IS EXPRESSLY MADE IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER
EXPRESSED WARRANTIES. DURATION OF ANY IMPLIED
WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR OTHERWISE, SHALL BE LIMITED
TO AND COINCIDENT TO THE DURATION OF THESE
EXPRESSED WARRANTIES. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES
SHALL NAUTIQUE, INC. BE LIABLE TO THE PURCHASER OR
ANY THIRD PARTY FOR LOSS OF PROFITS OR OTHER
DIRECT OR INDIRECT COSTS, LOSSES OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF OR AS A RESULT OF DEFECTS IN
PRODUCTS HEREIN ABOVE WARRANTED.
Some states do not allow limitations on how long an implied
warranty lasts. Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation
of incidental or consequential damages. This warranty gives you
specific legal rights, and you also have other rights which may vary
from state to state. To the extent that your state does not allow any
exclusion or limitation expressed herein, such exclusion or
limitation will not apply to you. All other allowable limitations or
exclusions shall apply to you.
Note: This warranty is expressly conditioned upon the completion
of the electronic registration to Nautique. Although not obligated
to and without creating such an obligation, this will enable
Nautique to notify owners of any necessary performance or safety
modifications to your boat, and to verify ownership in case a
warranty claim is filed on the boat.
W-8
Warranty
Procedure:
In the event your Nautique boat has a claim covered by this
warranty, the following procedure shall be allowed to secure
performance of warranty obligations:
• Notify the selling dealer, in writing, within thirty (30) days of
the discovery of any claimed defect.
• You may be required to transport the boat, at your expense,
to an authorized dealership or service facility for their
inspection and/or repair.
• Nautique reserves the right to require further evaluation
and/or information regarding a warranty claim against a
boat prior to its repair as well as designate the place of
repair.
Nautique reserves the right to make changes in prices, color,
specifications, equipment, options, materials, hull, decks, and/or
discontinue models at any time (without notice), and shall be
under no obligation to equip or modify boats built prior to such
changes.
Nautique Customer Care, 14700 Aerospace Parkway, Orlando,
Florida
32832.
(407)855-4141,
FAX
(407)851-7844,
email: info@nautique.com. Effective 2016 Coastal Edition model
boats.
W-9
W-10
Warranty
W-11
NOTES
W-12
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