21183

21183
ECE 358.01E Language Acquisition and Development in the Early Years
COURSE SYLLABUS: Spring 2015
Instructor: Donna E. McCrary Ph. D.
Office Location: Ed South
Office Hours: 7:30-9:30 am online Mondays 2-3 pm
Office Phone: 903-468-8627
Office Fax: 903 886 5581
University Email Address: donna.mccrary@tamuc.edu
COURSE INFORMATION
Goals of the Course: This course surveys the literature on language in relation to
children’s linguistic development in first and second language. Special emphasis will be
given to such topics as the nature and function of language, theories of language
acquisition, English Language Learners, language and cognition, and developmental stage
of language and learning to read.
Required Texts:
Morrow, Leslie Mandel (2012). Literacy Development in the Early Years: Helping Children
Learn to Read and Write (7th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon. ISBN: 013248482X
NAEYC & IRA. (1998) Learning to read and write: Developmentally appropriate practices
for young children.
www.naeyc.org/positionstatements/learning_readwrite
www.naeyc.org/files/naeyc/file/positions/PSREAD98.PDF
Texas Education Agency. (2009). English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS).
www.englishspanishteks.net/teachers/
Student Learner Outcomes
A. To explore theories of language acquisition about native English speakers, and English
Language Learners (TEA Competencies 1.5k cultural and socioeconomic differences
and the significance of these differences for instructional planning; 1.29k the benefits
of and strategies for promoting student self-assessment; 1.2s adapt lessons to address
students’ varied backgrounds, skills, interests, and learning needs, including the needs
of English language learners; 1.3s use effective approaches to address varied student
learning needs and preferences; 1.4s plan instruction that motivates students to want
to learn and achieve; 1.5s acknowledge and respect cultural and socioeconomic
differences among students when planning instruction)
B. To trace language development in young children (TEA Competencies 1.9k the
significance of the vertical alignment of content, including prerequisite knowledge and
skills; 1.1s plan lessons that reflect an understanding of students’ developmental
characteristics and needs; 2.21s respect students ’ rights and dignity)
C. To examine the research related to language and education (TEA Competency 1.11k
current research on best pedagogical practices)
D. To understand the rationale for ECE language arts (TEA Competency 1.7k the
importance of the state content and performance standards as outlined in the Texas
Essential Knowledge and Skills).
E. To identify the process of oracy and literacy development (TEA Competencies 3.1k the
importance of clear, accurate communication in the teaching and learning process; 3.2k
principles and strategies for communicating effectively in varied teaching and learning
contexts; 3.3k spoken and written language that is appropriate to students’ age,
interests, and background; 3.4k skills and strategies for engaging in skilled questioning
and leading effective student discussions; 3.5k criteria for selecting appropriate
instructional activities and assignments for students with varied characteristics and
needs; 3.6k how to present content to students in relevant and meaningful ways; 3.7k
the use of instructional materials, resources, and technologies that are appropriate and
engaging for students in varied learning situations; 3.8k the importance of promoting
students’ intellectual involvement with content and their active development of
understanding)
F. To demonstrate various materials and methodology for presentation of an integrated
language program (TEA Competencies 1.10s plan instruction that makes connections
within the discipline and across disciplines; 1.11s use a variety of pedagogical
techniques to convey information and teach skills; 2.4s communicate to all students the
importance of instructional content and the expectation of high-quality work; 3.14k
how to use constructive feedback to guide each student’s learning. 3.15k the
significance of teacher flexibility and responsiveness in the teaching/ learning process;
3.16k situations in which teacher flexibility can enhance student learning; 3.2s use
effective interpersonal skills (including both verbal and nonverbal skills) to reach
students and communicate the teacher’s commitment to students; 3.3s use spoken and
written language that is appropriate to students’ ages, interests, and backgrounds; 3.4s
use effective communication techniques, including questioning and discussion
techniques, to foster active student inquiry, higher-order thinking, problem solving, and
productive, supportive interactions; 3.5s use carefully framed questions to enable
students to reflect on their understanding of content and to consider new possibilities;
3.11s use flexible grouping to promote productive student interactions and enhance
learning; 3.13s engage students intellectually by teaching meaningful content in ways
that promote all students’ active and invested participation in the learning process; and
3.14s encourage students’ self-motivation and active engagement in learning; 3.15s use
appropriate language and formats to provide each student with timely feedback that is
accurate, constructive, substantive, and specific; 3.16s promote students’ ability to use
feedback to guide and enhance their learning; and 3.17s base feedback on high
expectations for student learning)
G. To develop a knowledge base of children’s literature
H. To assess techniques for integrating the language arts skills (TEA Competency 2.7s
organize and manage groups to ensure that students work together cooperatively and
productively)
TEA Standards I-IV. Domains I-IV. Competencies:
Standard I. Domain I. & Domain III. The teacher designs instruction appropriate for all
students that reflects an understanding of relevant content and is based on continuous
and appropriate assessment.
1.5k cultural and socioeconomic differences and the significance of these differences for
instructional planning; and
1.7k the importance of the state content and performance standards as outlined in the
Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS);
1.29k the benefits of and strategies for promoting student self-assessment;
1.2s adapt lessons to address students’ varied backgrounds, skills, interests, and learning
needs, including the needs of English language learners;
1.3s use effective approaches to address varied student learning needs and preferences
1.4s plan instruction that motivates students to want to learn and achieve; and
1.5s acknowledge and respect cultural and socioeconomic differences among students
when planning instruction
1.10s plan instruction that makes connections within the discipline and across disciplines;
and
1.11s use a variety of pedagogical techniques to convey information and teach skills.
Standard II. Domain II. The teacher creates a classroom environment of respect and
rapport that fosters a positive climate for learning, equity, and excellence.
2.4s communicate to all students the importance of instructional content and the
expectation of high-quality work; and
2.7s organize and manage groups to ensure that students work together cooperatively and
productively;
2.21s respect students’ rights and dignity.
Standard III. Domain III. The teacher promotes student learning by providing responsive
instruction that makes use of effective communication techniques, instructional
strategies that actively engage students in the learning process, and timely, high-quality
feedback.
3.1k the importance of clear, accurate communication in the teaching and learning process;
3.2k principles and strategies for communicating effectively in varied teaching and
learning contexts;
3.3k spoken and written language that is appropriate to students’ age, interests, and
background; and
3.4k skills and strategies for engaging in skilled questioning and leading effective student
discussions
3.5k criteria for selecting appropriate instructional activities and assignments for students
with varied characteristics and needs;
3.6k how to present content to students in relevant and meaningful ways
3.7k the use of instructional materials, resources, and technologies that are appropriate
and engaging for students in varied learning situations;
3.8k the importance of promoting students’ intellectual involvement with content and
their active development of understanding;
3.9k strategies and techniques for using instructional groupings to promote student
learning;
3.10k different types of motivation, factors affecting student motivation, and effective
motivational strategies in varied learning contexts; and
3.11k techniques for structuring and pacing lessons in ways that promote student
engagement and learning.
3.14k how to use constructive feedback to guide each student’s learning.
3.15k the significance of teacher flexibility and responsiveness in the teaching/ learning
process; and
3.16k situations in which teacher flexibility can enhance student learning.
3.2s use effective interpersonal skills (including both verbal and nonverbal skills) to reach
students and communicate the teacher’s commitment to students;
3.3s use spoken and written language that is appropriate to students’ ages, interests, and
backgrounds;
3.4s use effective communication techniques, including questioning and discussion
techniques, to foster active student inquiry, higher-order thinking, problem solving, and
productive, supportive interactions;
3.5s use carefully framed questions to enable students to reflect on their understanding of
content and to consider new possibilities; and
3.11s use flexible grouping to promote productive student interactions and enhance
learning;
3.13s engage students intellectually by teaching meaningful content in ways that promote
all students’ active and invested participation in the learning process; and
3.14s encourage students’ self-motivation and active engagement in learning.
3.15s use appropriate language and formats to provide each student with timely feedback
that is accurate, constructive, substantive, and specific;
3.16s promote students’ ability to use feedback to guide and enhance their learning; and
3.17s base feedback on high expectations for student learning.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
1. Chapter Quizzes
2. Chapter Application Exercises
3. Class Discussions
All quizzes, application exercises and discussions are in included on ecollege.
Quizzes are designed as a study guide for each chapter. Quizzes may be retaken to achieve
the grade desired by the students.
Application exercises are designed to as ways to apply the information that has been
mastered in the quizzes. Students are encouraged to review the application exercises at the
beginning of the semester. Several exercises require observations in the community.
Class Discussions will be used to summarize major units of study. Students must respond to
the discussion and to others in the discussion group. The class participation grade will be based
on the amount and level of discussion. Voice Thread assignments are also included in the class
discussion grade.
Grading
A = 90 - 100 %
B = 80 – 89 %
C = 70 – 79 %
D = 60 – 69 %
F = below 60
Grading Criteria
The following holistic scoring format will be adapted for each course requirement:
100-90=Highly impressive-well above average in thought, organization, and professional
choices. Evidences significant control of own decision-making and learning processes.
89-80=Commendable—in command of thought, organization, and professional choices.
Evidences acceptable control of own decision-making and learning processes.
79-70=Developing-probably functional in terms of thought, organization, and professional
choices. Responsible, but in need of instruction. Evidences some control of own decisionmaking and learning processes.
69-60=Minimal-somewhat lacking in thought, organization, and responsibility. Lack of
awareness of professional choices. Evidences minimal control of own decision-making and
learning processes.
TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS
The following information has been provided to assist you in preparing to use technology in
your web-enhanced course.
The following technology is required to be successful in this course.
Internet connection – high speed recommended (not dial‐up)
Word Processor (Microsoft Office Word – 2003 or 2007)
Access to University Library site
Access to an Email
Additionally, the following hardware and software are necessary to use eCollege:
Our campus is optimized to work in a Microsoft Windows environment. This means our
courses work best if you are using a Windows operating system (XP or newer) and a recent
version of Microsoft Internet Explorer (6.0, 7.0, or 8.0).
Courses will also work with Macintosh OS X along with a recent version of Safari 2.0 or
better. Along with Internet Explorer and Safari, eCollege also supports the Firefox
browser (3.0) on both Windows and Mac operating systems.
It is strongly recommended that you perform a “Browser Test” prior to the start of your
course. To launch a browser test, login in to eCollege, click on the ‘myCourses’ tab, and
then select the “Browser Test” link under Support Services.
ACCESS AND NAVIGATION
Access and Long in Information
This course will be utilizing eCollege to enhance the learning experience, eCollege is the
Learning Management System used by Texas A & M University-Commerce. To get started
with the course, go to Https://leo.tamu-commerce.edu/login.aspx.
You will need your CWID and password to log in to the course. If you do not know your
CWID or have forgottenyour password, contact Technology services at 903.468.6000 or
helpdesk @tamu-commerce.edu
COMMUNICATION AND SUPPORT
Texas A & M University-Commerce provides students technical support in the use of
eCollege. The student help desk may be reached by the following means 24 hours a day,
seven days a week. If you experience issues while taking your exams or at any other point,
feel free to contact the support desk.
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Chat support: Click on ‘Live Support’ on the tool bar within your course to chat with
an eCollege Representative.
Phone: 1-866-656-5511 (Toll Free) to speak with eCollege Technical Support
Representative.
Email: helpdesk@online.tamuc.org to initiate a support request with eCollege
Technical Support Representative.
Help: Click on the “Help” button on the toolbar for information regarding working
with eCollege (i.e. How to submit to dropbox, How to post to discussions, etc…)
COURSE AND UNIVERSITY PROCEDURES/POLICIES
Course Specific Policies:
If you decide not to take the course, you are responsible for dropping the course. Failure to
do so will result in an F in the course.
1. Assignment Due Dates
All assignments are due by the date listed on the course outline.
A 30 point deduction will be applied for each class day that an assignment is turned in
past the assignment due date.
2. Class Absence
Attendance at all class meetings is required. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of
class. Each student is allowed two absences during the semester and two tardies. Absences
and tardies in excess of two will result in a deduction from the class participation grade.
3. Use Of Technology in Class
From time to time personal electronic devices may be used in class to complete class
assignments. However, personal use of technology should be limited in class. Fifty extra
points will be awarded on the class participation grade for those who agree to NOT text in
class.
4. Written Assignments
All assignments must be typed in legible (preferably Times Roman) 12 pt font. College
level writing is expected. If you feel insecure about your writing abilities you may want to
seek assistance from the writing lab in the department of literature and languages. They
will not assist with spelling. Please make sure someone proofs your paper. Excessive
grammar, spelling and vocabulary errors will result in a lower grade. You should
demonstrate mastery of organizing, structure and editing.
5. Plagiarism of writings
Plagiarism will result in a grade of F for the assignment and possibly the course. Further
infractions could result in dismissal from the teacher education program. Plagiarism
consists of copying directly from a source without properly citing the source. It is also
using someone else’s work and claiming it as your own. Please cite your references in APA
format. See handout for examples.
If you are unsure what constitutes plagiarism and how to avoid it you may visit the
following websites:
http://www.plagiarism.org/
http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/plagiarism.html
http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/plagiarism.shtml
6. Professionalism component
You are expected to demonstrate a professional attitude at all times. This includes
respecting the thoughts of your peers as well as your instructor. Also included is the
following: participating in small and large group discussions, being on time, staying the
entire time, accepting constructive criticism, listening, turning in high quality work, and
understanding that this is a growth experience. Students who come into class expecting an
A need to rethink their reason for being here. If you want an A, then you will work to earn
the A. The Professional Behavioral Standards Evaluation Form will be used at such a
time as it is warranted due to non-compliance with these expectations. “All students
enrolled at the university shall follow the tenets of common decency and acceptable
behavior conducive to a positive learning environment.” (see Student’s Guide Handbook,
Policies and Procedures, Conduct).
4. Withdrawal policy
Every student has the right to drop the course without penalty until the drop-date. Students
dropping the course during this period will be given a DP (drop while passing). A grade of
DP is GPA neutral, but a grade of DF counts as an F on your transcript.
If you choose to stop attending class, you may be dropped from the course due to excessive
absences. If you are not satisfied with your grade in the course and wish to drop, it is
YOUR responsibility to drop the course. Once a grade of DP or DF has been registered; I
will not be able to change it.
A student may drop a course by logging into their myLEO account and clicking on the
hyperlink labeled “DROP a class” from among the choices found under the myLEO section
of the WEB page.
University Specific Policies:
ADA Statement
The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal anti-discrimination statute that
provides comprehensive civil rights protection for persons with disabilities. Among other
things, this legislation requires that all students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning
environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. If you have
a disability requiring an accommodation, please contact:
Office of Student Disability Resources and Services
Texas A&M University-Commerce
Gee Library 132
Phone (903) 886-5150 or (903) 886-5835
Fax (903) 468-8148
StudentDisabilityServices@tamu-commerce.edu
Student Disability Resources & Services
Student Conduct
All students enrolled at the University shall follow the tenets of common decency and
acceptable behavior conducive to a positive learning environment. (See Code of Student
Conduct from Student Guide Handbook).
A&M-Commerce will comply in the classroom, and in online courses, with all federal and state
laws prohibiting discrimination and related retaliation on the basis of race, color, religion, sex,
national origin, disability, age, genetic information or veteran status. Further, an environment
free from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression
will be maintained.
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