Man Page Collection: Trigger Commands

Man Page Collection: Trigger Commands
Man Page Collection: Trigger
Commands
S–2387–50
© 2003 Cray Inc. All Rights Reserved. This manual or parts thereof may not be reproduced in any form unless permitted by contract or by
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Government is subject to the restrictions described in FAR 48 CFR 52.227-14 or DFARS 48 CFR 252.227-7013, as applicable.
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Record of Revision
Version
5.0
S–2387–50
Description
June 2003
Original release to support the Trigger 2.0 release.
i
Contents
Preface
v
Man Page Collections for System Administrators
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Man Page Collections for Cray X1 Application Programmers
Accessing Cray Documentation
Reader Comments
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vii
Typographical Conventions
Ordering Documentation
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User Commands
1
remps(1) — reports status of processes running on the Cray Programming Environment Server (CPES)
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Administrator Commands
11
intro_trigger(8) — introduces the trigger programs and trigger commands
trigexecd(8) — initiates the execution of trigger commands
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trigsnd(8) — calls trigexecd to initiate the execution of trigger commands
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Index
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S–2387–50
iii
Preface
This document is a collection of formatted Cray man pages that describe Trigger 2.0 commands. These man
pages support the Trigger 2.0 release running on Cray X1 systems.
This preface lists related man page collections and describes how to access Cray documentation, interpret our
typographical conventions, order Cray documentation, and contact us about this document.
Man Page Collections for System Administrators
Beginning with the UNICOS/mp 2.2 release, Cray produces the following man page collections for system
administrators of UNICOS/mp, the Cray X1 operating system:
•
Man Page Collection: UNICOS/mp User Commands
•
Man Page Collection: UNICOS/mp System Calls
•
Man Page Collection: UNICOS/mp Library Routines
•
Man Page Collection: UNICOS/mp File Formats and Special Files
•
Man Page Collection: UNICOS/mp Administrator Commands
•
Man Page Collection: Trigger Commands (this manual)
Note: This man page collection is included with the Cray Programming Environment release package,
not the UNICOS/mp release package.
Man Page Collections for Cray X1 Application Programmers
Cray produces the following man page collections for Cray X1 application programmers:
•
Man Page Collection: Programmer’s User Commands
•
Man Page Collection: Fortran Library Procedures
•
Man Page Collection: C/C++ Library Functions
•
Man Page Collection: Shared Memory Access (SHMEM)
•
Man Page Collection: Message Passing Interface (MPI)
•
Man Page Collection: Fortran and C/C++ Intrinsic Procedures
•
Man Page Collection: Scientific Library Routines
•
Man Page Collection: Fortran Application Programmer’s I/O
Accessing Cray Documentation
Each software release package includes the CrayDoc documentation system, a collection of open-source
software components that gives you fast, easy access to and the ability to search all Cray manuals, man pages,
and glossary in HTML and/or PDF format from a web browser at the following locations:
•
Locally, using the network path defined by your system administrator
•
On the Cray public web site at:
http://www.cray.com/craydoc/
All software release packages include a software release overview that provides information for users, user
services, and system administrators about that release. An installation guide is also provided with each software
S–2387–50
v
Preface
Man Page Collection: Trigger Commands
release package. Release overviews and installation guides are supplied in HTML and PDF formats as well as in
printed form. Most software release packages contain additional reference and task-oriented documentation,
like this document, in HTML and/or PDF formats.
Man pages provide system and programming reference information. Each man page is referred to by its name
followed by a number in parentheses:
manpagename(n)
where n is the man page section identifier:
1
User commands
2
System calls
3
Library routines
4
Devices (special files) and Protocols
5
File formats
7
Miscellaneous information
8
Administrator commands
Access man pages in any of these ways:
•
Enter the man command to view individual man pages in ASCII format; for example:
man ftn
To print individual man pages in ASCII format, enter, for example:
man ftn | col -b | lpr
•
Use a web browser with the CrayDoc system to view, search, and print individual man pages in HTML
format.
•
Use Adobe Acrobat Reader with the CrayDoc system to view, search, and print from collections of
formatted man pages provided in PDF format.
If more than one topic appears on a page, the man page has one primary name (grep, for example) and one
or more secondary names (egrep, for example). Access the ASCII or HTML man page using either name;
for example:
•
Enter the command man grep or man egrep
•
Search in the CrayDoc system for grep or egrep
Typographical Conventions
The following conventions are used throughout this document:
vi
Convention
Meaning
command
This fixed-space font denotes literal items, such as file names, pathnames, man page names,
command names, and programming language elements.
variable
Italic typeface indicates an element that you will replace with a specific value. For instance,
you may replace filename with the name datafile in your program. It also denotes a
word or concept being defined.
user input
This bold, fixed-space font denotes literal items that the user enters in interactive sessions.
Output is shown in nonbold, fixed-space font.
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Man Page Collection: Trigger Commands
Preface
[]
Brackets enclose optional portions of a syntax representation for a command, library routine,
system call, and so on.
...
Ellipses indicate that a preceding element can be repeated.
Ordering Documentation
To order software documentation, contact the Cray Software Distribution Center in any of the following ways:
E-mail:
orderdsk@cray.com
Web:
http://www.cray.com/craydoc/
Click on the Cray Publications Order Form link.
Telephone (inside U.S., Canada):
1–800–284–2729 (BUG CRAY), then 605–9100
Telephone (outside U.S., Canada):
Contact your Cray representative, or call +1–651–605–9100
Fax:
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Mail:
Software Distribution Center
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1340 Mendota Heights Road
Mendota Heights, MN 55120–1128
USA
Reader Comments
Contact us with any comments that will help us to improve the accuracy and usability of this document. Be sure
to include the title and number of the document with your comments. We value your comments and will respond
to them promptly. Contact us in any of the following ways:
E-mail:
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Telephone (inside U.S., Canada):
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Telephone (outside U.S., Canada):
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Mail:
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1340 Mendota Heights Road
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USA
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vii
User Commands
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1
remps(1)
remps(1)
NAME
remps — reports status of processes running on the Cray Programming Environment Server (CPES)
SYNOPSIS
remps
[-aAcdefjlLPy]
[-g grplist]
[-n namelist]
[-o format]
[-p proclist]
[-s sidlist]
[-t term]
[-u uidlist]
[-U uidlist]
[-G gidlist]]
IMPLEMENTATION
UNICOS/mp
DESCRIPTION
This man page describes the remps command. The remps command prints information about active
processes. Without options, remps prints information about processes that have the same effective user ID
and the same controlling terminal as the invoker. This output contains only the process ID, terminal identifier,
cumulative execution time, and the command name. Otherwise, the information that is displayed is controlled
by the options.
Some options accept lists as arguments. Items in a list can be separated either by commas or else enclosed in
quotes and separated by commas or spaces. Values for proclist and grplist must be numeric.
Many of the options shown below are used to select processes to list. If any are specified, the default list will be
ignored and remps will select the processes represented by the inclusive OR of all the selection-criteria options.
remps accepts the following options:
-a
Lists information about all processes most frequently requested: all those except process
group leaders and processes not associated with a terminal.
-A
Lists information for all processes. Identical to -e below.
-c
Prints information in a format that reflects scheduler properties as described in priocntl.
The -c option affects the output of the -f and -l options, as described below.
-d
Lists information about all processes except session leaders.
-e
Lists information about every process now running.
-f
Generates a full listing. (See below for significance of columns in a full listing.)
-g grplist
Lists only process data whose group leader’s ID number(s) appears in grplist. (A group leader
is a process whose process ID number is identical to its process group ID number.)
-G gidlist
Lists information for processes whose real group ID numbers are given in gidlist. The gidlist
must be a single argument in the form of a blank- or comma-separated list.
-j
Prints session ID and process group ID.
-l
Generates a long listing. (See below.)
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Man Page Collection: Trigger Commands
remps(1)
-L
Prints information about each light weight process (lwp) in each selected process. (See
below.)
-n namelist
Specifies the name of an alternative system namelist file in place of the default. This option is
accepted for compatibility but is ignored.
-o format
Prints information according to the format specification given in format. This is fully
described in DISPLAY FORMATS. Multiple -o options can be specified; the format
specification will be interpreted as the space-character-separated concatenation of all the
format option-arguments.
-ps proclist
Lists only process data whose process ID numbers are given in proclist.
-P
Prints the number of the processor to which the process or lwp is bound, if any, under an
additional column header, PSR.
-s sidlist
Lists information on all session leaders whose IDs appear in sidlist.
-t term
Lists only process data associated with term. Terminal identifiers are specified as a device file
name, and an identifier. For example, term/a, or pts/0.
-u uidlist
Lists only process data whose effective user ID number or login name is given in uidlist. In
the listing, the numerical user ID will be printed unless you give the -f option, which prints
the login name.
-U uidlist
Lists information for processes whose real user ID numbers or login names are given in
uidlist. The uidlist must be a single argument in the form of a blank- or comma-separated list.
-y
Under a long listing (-l), omits the obsolete F and ADDR columns and includes an RSS
column to report the resident set size of the process. Under the -y option, both RSS and SZ
(see below) will be reported in units of kilobytes instead of pages.
Many of the options shown are used to select processes to list. If any are specified, the default list will be
ignored and remps will select the processes represented by the inclusive OR of all the selection-criteria options.
DISPLAY FORMATS
Under the -f option, remps tries to determine the command name and arguments given when the process was
created by examining the user block. Failing this, the command name is printed, as it would have appeared
without the -f option, in square brackets.
The column headings and the meaning of the columns in a remps listing are given below; the letters f and
l indicate the option (full or long, respectively) that causes the corresponding heading to appear; all means
that the heading always appears. Note: These two options determine only what information is provided for a
process; they do not determine which processes will be listed.
F (l)
Flags (hexadecimal and additive) associated with the process. These flags are available for
historical purposes; no meaning should be currently ascribed to them.
S (l)
The state of the process:
UID (f,l)
4
O
Process is running on a processor.
S
Sleeping: process is waiting for an event to complete.
R
Runnable: process is on run queue.
Z
Zombie state: process terminated and parent not waiting.
T
Process is stopped, either by a job control signal or because it is being
traced.
The effective user ID number of the process (the login name is printed under the -f option).
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User Commands
remps(1)
PID (all)
The process ID of the process (this datum is necessary in order to kill a process).
PPID (f,l)
The process ID of the parent process.
C (f,l)
Processor utilization for scheduling (obsolete). Not printed when the -c option is used.
CLS (f,l)
Scheduling class. Printed only when the -c option is used.
PRI (l)
The priority of the process. Without the -c option, higher numbers mean lower priority. With
the -c option, higher numbers mean higher priority.
NI (l)
Nice value, used in priority computation. Not printed when the -c option is used. Only
processes in the certain scheduling classes have a nice value.
ADDR (l)
The memory address of the process.
SZ (l)
The total size of the process in virtual memory, including all mapped files and devices,
in pages. See pagesize(1).
WCHAN (l)
The address of an event for which the process is sleeping (if blank, the process is running).
STIME (f)
The starting time of the process, given in hours, minutes, and seconds. (A process begun more
than twenty-four hours before the remps inquiry is executed is given in months and days.)
TTY (all)
The controlling terminal for the process (the message, ?, is printed when there is no
controlling terminal)
TIME (all)
The cumulative execution time for the process.
CMD (all)
The command name (the full command name and its arguments, up to a limit of 80 characters,
are printed under the -f option).
The following two additional columns are printed when the -j option is specified:
PGID
The process ID of the process group leader.
SID
The process ID of the session leader.
The following two additional columns are printed when the -L option is specified:
LWP
The lwp ID of the lwp being reported.
NLWP
The number of lwps in the process (if -f is also specified).
Under the -L option, one line is printed for each lwp in the process and the time-reporting fields STIME and
TIME show the values for the lwp, not the process. A traditional single-threaded process contains only one lwp.
A process that has exited and has a parent, but has not yet been waited for by the parent, is marked <defunct>.
-o format
The -o option allows the output format to be specified under user control.
The format specification must be a list of names presented as a single argument, blank- or
comma-separated. Each variable has a default header. The default header can be overridden
by appending an equals sign and the new text of the header. The rest of the characters in
the argument will be used as the header text. The fields specified will be written in the
order specified on the command line, and should be arranged in columns in the output. The
field widths will be selected by the system to be at least as wide as the header text (default
or overridden value). If the header text is null, such as -o user=, the field width will
be at least as wide as the default header text. If all header text fields are null, no header
line will be written.
The following names are recognized in the POSIX locale:
user
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The effective user ID of the process. This will be the textual user ID, if it can be obtained and
the field width permits, or a decimal representation otherwise.
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Man Page Collection: Trigger Commands
remps(1)
ruser
The real user ID of the process. This will be the textual user ID, if it can be obtained and the
field width permits, or a decimal representation otherwise.
group
The effective group ID of the process. This will be the textual group ID, if it can be obtained
and the field width permits, or a decimal representation otherwise.
rgroup
The real group ID of the process. This will be the textual group ID, if it can be obtained and
the field width permits, or a decimal representation otherwise.
pid
The decimal value of the process ID.
ppid
The decimal value of the parent process ID.
pgid
The decimal value of the process group ID.
pcpu
The ratio of CPU time used recently to CPU time available in the same period, expressed as a
percentage. The meaning of ‘‘recently’’ in this context is unspecified. The CPU time available
is determined in an unspecified manner.
vsz
The total size of the process in virtual memory, in kilobytes.
nice
The decimal value of the system scheduling priority of the process. See nice(1).
etime
In the POSIX locale, the elapsed time since the process was started, in the form:
[[dd-]hh:]mm:ss
where
dd
is the number of days
hh
is the number of hours
mm
is the number of minutes
ss
is the number of seconds
The dd field will be a decimal integer. The hh, mm and ss fields will be two-digit decimal
integers padded on the left with zeros.
time
In the POSIX locale, the cumulative CPU time of the process in the form:
[dd-]hh:mm:ss
The dd, hh, mm, and ss fields will be as described in the etime specifier.
tty
The name of the controlling terminal of the process (if any) in the same format used by
the who(1) command.
comm
The name of the command being executed (argv[0] value) as a string.
args
The command with all its arguments as a string. The implementation may truncate this value
to the field width; it is implementation-dependent whether any further truncation occurs. It is
unspecified whether the string represented is a version of the argument list as it was passed
to the command when it started, or is a version of the arguments as they may have been
modified by the application. Applications cannot depend on being able to modify their
argument list and having that modification be reflected in the output of remps. The Solaris
implementation limits the string to 80 bytes; the string is the version of the argument list as it
was passed to the command when it started.
The following names are recognized in the Solaris implementation:
6
f
Flags (hexadecimal and additive) associated with the process.
s
The state of the process.
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User Commands
remps(1)
c
Processor utilization for scheduling (obsolete).
uid
The effective user ID number of the process as a decimal integer.
ruid
The real user ID number of the process as a decimal integer.
gid
The effective group ID number of the process as a decimal integer.
rgid
The real group ID number of the process as a decimal integer.
projid
The project ID number of the process as a decimal integer.
project
The project ID of the process as a textual value if that value can be obtained; otherwise as
a decimal integer.
sid
The process ID of the session leader.
taskid
The task ID of the process.
class
The scheduling class of the process.
pri
The priority of the process. Higher numbers mean higher priority.
opri
The obsolete priority of the process. Lower numbers mean higher priority.
lwp
The decimal value of the lwp ID. Requesting this formatting option causes one line to be
printed for each lwp in the process.
nlwp
The number of lwps in the process.
psr
The number of the processor to which the process or lwp is bound.
addr
The memory address of the process.
osz
The total size of the process in virtual memory, in pages.
wchan
The address of an event for which the process is sleeping (if -, the process is running).
stime
The starting time or date of the process, printed with no blanks.
rss
The resident set size of the process, in kilobytes.
pmem
The ratio of the process’s resident set size to the physical memory on the machine, expressed
as a percentage.
fname
The first 8 bytes of the base name of the process’s executable file.
Only comm and args are allowed to contain blank characters; all others, including the Solaris implementation
variables, are not.
The following table specifies the default header to be used in the POSIX locale corresponding to each format
specifier.
Format Specifier
Default Header
Format Specifier
Default Header
args
COMMAND
ppid
PPID
comm
COMMAND
rgroup
RGROUP
etime
ELAPSED
ruser
RUSER
group
GROUP
time
TIME
nice
NI
tty
TT
pcpu
%CPU
user
USER
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Man Page Collection: Trigger Commands
remps(1)
Format Specifier
Default Header
Format Specifier
Default Header
pgid
PGID
vsz
VSZ
pid
PID
The following table lists the Solaris implementation format specifiers and the default header used with each.
Format Specifier
Default Header
Format Specifier
Default Header
addr
ADDR
projid
PROJID
c
C
project
PROJECT
class
CLS
psr
PSR
f
F
rgid
RGID
fname
COMMAND
rss
RSS
gid
GID
ruid
RUID
lwp
LWP
s
S
nlwp
NLWP
sid
SID
opri
PRI
stime
STIME
osz
SZ
taskid
TASKID
pmem
%MEM
uid
UID
pri
PRI
wchan
WCHAN
EXAMPLES
Example 1 An example of the remps command
The command:
example% remps -o user,pid,ppid=MOM -o args
writes the following in the POSIX locale:
USER
PID
MOM
COMMAND
helene
34
12
remps -o uid,pid,ppid=MOM -o args
The contents of the COMMAND field need not be the same due to possible truncation.
ENVIRONMENT VARIABLES
See environ(5) for descriptions of the following environment variables that affect the execution of remps:
LC_CTYPE, LC_MESSAGES, LC_TIME, and NLSPATH.
COLUMNS
Override the system-selected horizontal screen size, used to determine the number of text
columns to display.
EXIT STATUS
The following exit values are returned:
0
Successful completion
>0
An error occurred
FILES
/dev/pts/*
8
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User Commands
remps(1)
/dev/term/* terminal (‘‘tty’’) names searcher files
/etc/passwd UID information supplier
/proc/*
process control files
/tmp/ps_datainternal data structure
ATTRIBUTES
See attributes(5) for descriptions of the following attributes:
ATTRIBUTE TYPE
ATTRIBUTE VALUE
Availability
SUNWcsu
CSI
Enabled (see NOTES)
SEE ALSO
kill(1), nice(1), pagesize(1), pgrep(1), priocntl(1), who(1), getty(1M),
proc(4), ttysrch(4), attributes(5), environ(5)
NOTES
Things can change while remps is running; the snapshot it gives is true only for a split second, and it may not
be accurate by the time you see it. Some data printed for defunct processes is irrelevant.
If no options to select processes are specified, remps will report all processes associated with the controlling
terminal. If there is no controlling terminal, there will be no report other than the header.
remps -ef or remps -o stime may not report the actual start of a tty login session, but rather an earlier
time, when a getty was last respawned on the tty line.
remps is CSI-enabled except for login names (usernames).
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Administrator Commands
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intro_trigger(8)
intro_trigger(8)
NAME
intro_trigger — introduces the trigger programs and trigger commands
IMPLEMENTATION
UNICOS/mp
DESCRIPTION
When a user logs into a Cray X1 mainframe and enters the name and options of a trigger command (such as
ftn), the trigsnd trigger program executes on the Cray X1 mainframe, setting up an environment for the
CPES-hosted trigger program. trigsnd passes the command line information to trigexecd executing on
the CPES. trigexecd initiates the execution of the application (such as the Cray Fortran Compiler).
The user interacts with the system as if all elements of the Programming Environment are hosted on the Cray X1
mainframe. Examples of trigger commands are ftn, cc, CC, ld, and pat_report. For further information
on trigger commands, see the Cray Fortran Compiler Commands and Directives Reference Manual or the Cray
C and C++ Reference Manual.
The trigger programs that enable this process are:
•
trigsnd — executes on the Cray X1 System; calls trigexecd to initiate the execution of trigger
commands
•
trigexecd – executes on the CPES; initiates the execution of the trigger command’s application
EXAMPLES
The user logs into a Cray X1 system and enters:
%ftn abc123.f
The trigsnd program executes on the Cray X1 mainframe; it passes the command line to trigexecd.
trigexecd executes on the CPES; it invokes the Cray Fortran Compiler.
SEE ALSO
trigsnd(8)
trigexecd(8)
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13
trigexecd(8)
trigexecd(8)
NAME
trigexecd — initiates the execution of trigger commands
SYNOPSIS
trigexecd
IMPLEMENTATION
UNICOS/mp
DESCRIPTION
The trigexecd program executes on the CPES. It is included in the inittab file and is automatically
spawned. There is no trigexecd command line entry. When a driver for a trigger command (such as ftn) is
executed, the driver calls trigsnd executing on the Cray X1. trigexecd reads the trigexecd.cfg file
(in the same directory as trigexecd) and listens on the port supplied in the configuration file for a connection
from the Cray X1 system. Upon receiving a connection to trigsnd, trigexecd initiates execution of the
trigger command’s application (such as the Cray Fortran Compiler).
The path name to the binary on the CPES for the driver is set in the trigexecd.cfg configuration file. See
the definition of the trigexecd.cfg file format below.
FILES
A template trigexecd.cfg file is provided with the release, which the administrator should edit.
trigexecd.cfg contains five lines:
PORT=port_number
PASS=password
CLIENT=X1_machine_name,X1_machine_name, ...
LIMIT=max_concurrent_connections
STACK_LIMIT=stack_size_limit
Set PORT to the port number on which trigexecd will listen for connections.
Set PASS to a password that will be shared between the CPES and X1 trigger commands. This password should
be difficult to guess and can be up to MAXENVSIZE (currently 4096) in length. It should not contain newlines,
and if it contains special characters such as = or # or white space, then those characters should be contained
within quotes, or individually preceded by a backslash (\) character.
Set CLIENT to be a comma-delimited set of machine names of the X1s that may be connecting to this
CPES for trigger support. The machine name must match the name returned by getpeername() when a
connection is made from the X1 to the CPES. Because this is controlled by DNS lookups and therefore can
change, you should verify the name by making a telnet connection from the X1 to the CPES and then running
the finger command to see what hostname is shown for your connection. Another way to verify the name
is to try to connect via a trigger command, such as trigsnd -v. If the name of the X1 is not found in the
comma-delimited list of CLIENT names configured for trigexecd, the error message returned to the user
will display the name that failed to find a match. This is the name returned by getpeername() and can be
put in the comma-delimited list. trigexecd will allow connections only from this host list and from the
local host (the CPES).
Set LIMIT to the maximum number of concurrent connections from the X1 to the CPES. If a new connection
request via a trigger command is attempted and if processing that connection would exceed the maximum
allowed limit, that connection will then be closed. A value of 0 means unlimited concurrent connections. The
value the administrator specifies is site dependent.
Set STACK_LIMIT to the process stack size limit for a given trigger command. A value of 0 means unlimited
stack size. The value the administrator specifies is site dependent. See setrlimit (in the getrlimit(2)
man page) for more information.
S–2387–50
14
Administrator Commands
trigexecd(8)
A sample trigexec.cfg file is shown below:
PORT=9933
PASS=Work2Day
CLIENT=snow
LIMIT=0
STACK_LIMIT=0
EXIT STATUS
The return code is the return code of the trigger command.
SEE ALSO
intro_trigger(8)
trigsnd(8)
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15
trigsnd(8)
trigsnd(8)
NAME
trigsnd — calls trigexecd to initiate the execution of trigger commands
SYNOPSIS
trigsnd [-v]
IMPLEMENTATION
UNICOS/mp
DESCRIPTION
The trigsnd program executes on the Cray X1 system. It can be invoked in two ways: indirectly as a
symbolically linked command and directly via a command line entry:
trigsnd as a Symbolically Linked Command
All trigger commands (ftn, cc, etc.) entered by an administrator logged into a Cray X1 system initiate the
execution of a driver (ftn.driver, cc.driver, etc.) on the Cray X1 system. Each driver is symbolically
linked to trigsnd.
To symbolically link the C compiler driver, the administrator would enter:
#cd /trigsnd/bin
#ln -s trigsnd cc.driver
When the driver is executed, it calls trigsnd. trigsnd locates the trigsnd.cfg file, which is a text
file containing the configuration parameters for trigsnd. Using trigsnd.cfg information, trigsnd
connects to trigexecd running on the CPES. trigexecd executes the driver command. The path name to
the binary on the CPES for the driver is set in the configuration file. (See the definition of the trigsnd.cfg
file format below.)
trigsnd as a Command Line Entry
The administrator can enter the trigsnd command at the command line:
#trigsnd –v
Displays the version number of trigsnd and trigexecd
–v
EXAMPLES
An example of the trigsnd command entered at the command line. The command:
#./trigsnd -v
produces output in this format:
trigsnd: @(#)20/trigsnd.c
20.14
03/31/2003 14:15:58
trigexecd: @(#)20/trigexecd.c 20.13
03/31/2003 14:15:58
FILES
trigsnd.cfg
A template trigsnd.cfg file is provided with the release, which the administrator should edit. The
trigsnd.cfg file contains three sections.
•
The first section contains required settings. These lines are in NAME=VALUE form and specify the values
for TRIGROOT, RCVHOST, PORT, PASS, TRIGDIR and TMPDIR.
•
The second section contains one XP_ line and a CP_ line for each command that will be supported by
the trigger mechanism (ftn, cc, CC, etc.). These lines are in NAME=VALUE or NAME form. All names
begin with an XP_ and CP_.
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16
Administrator Commands
•
trigsnd(8)
The third section contains a line for each environment variable that is to be set for the supported commands.
These lines are in NAME=VALUE or NAME format.
All of the lines in NAME=VALUE format should not have quotation marks in them, except perhaps the PASS
field. Quotation marks will not be stripped off, so single and double quotes will be included as a literal part of
the value. However, white space and comment characters (#) are preserved when inside quotes.
The format of trigsnd.cfg is shown below:
# Section 1
TRIGROOT=CPES_X1_filesystem_path
RCVHOST=CPES_host_name
PORT=port_number_for_trigexecd
PASS=password
TRIGDIR=trigdir_path
TMPDIR=tmpdir_path
# Section 2
XP_X1_command_binary=path_to_X1_command_binary
CP_CPES_command_binary=path_to_CPES_command_binary
. . .
# Section 3
HOME=home_directory
HZ=?
MANPATH=path_to_manpages
LD_LIBRARY_PATH=load_library_path
A sample trigsnd.cfg file is shown below:
TRIGROOT=/x1
RCVHOST=snow
PORT=9933
PASS=Work2Day
TRIGDIR=/x1/opt/ctl/trigger/trigger/bin
TMPDIR=/opt/ctl/tmp
XP_trigcat=/bin/cat
CP_cc.driver=/opt/ctl/CC/011220/bin/driver.cc
. . .
HOME=/trig
HZ=?
MANPATH=/pubs/man
LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/lib:/lib/cmplrs/cc
TRIGROOT should be set to the directory on the CPES that contains the X1 file system. It should NOT end in
a slash (/).
RCVHOST should be set to the CPES hostname.
PORT should be set to the port number on which the trigexecd daemon is listening. This is the same port
number as specified in the trigexec.cfg file on the CPES.
PASS should be set to the same password as specified in the trigexec.cfg file on the CPES.
Each XP_ and CP_ line specifies a path name of the binary that should be run for each command linked to
trigsnd. If the path is not provided in the trigsnd.cfg file, the environment is checked to see if the path
is provided there. Note that the path name does not include the leading /x1 as used in the TRIGROOT path
because the path name will be used within a chroot environment.
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17
trigsnd(8)
Man Page Collection: Trigger Commands
Comments begin with a pound sign (#). Anything from the right of the # to the end of the line is not considered
to be part of the configuration. Blank lines and lines with just comments are also ignored but may be added to
aid in legibility.
SEE ALSO
intro_trigger(8), trigexecd(8)
18
S–2387–50
Index
I
intro_trigger(8), 13
R
remps(1),
3
configuration file, 14
trigexecd(8), 14
trigsnd
configuration file, 16
trigsnd(8), 16
T
trigexecd
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19
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