Manual 12655118
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION
Academic Calendar ............................. 4
General Information ............................ 6
Admissions .........................................10
Registration, Tuition And Fees ..............12
Financial Aid ......................................15
Academic Policies and Standards .........19
Graduation and General Education .... 25
Student Rights and Responsibilities ...... 30
Student Services ................................ .35
Campus Police ....................................47
ACADEMIC SCHOOLS
School of Business ............................. 52
School of Education .............................57
School of General Academics...............59
School of Humanities, Arts and Social
Sciences .......................................... 65
School of Science and Health ..............69
School of Technology and Computing . 72
Interdisciplinary Programs ................... 77
School of Continuing and Adult
Education .......................................218
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS
Accounting ......................................... 80
Administrative Information
Management ...................................... 82
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
Technology....................................... 84
Apprenticeship.................................... 85
Art and Visual Communications ........... 88
Automotive Technology ........................91
Aviation Science ................................. 93
Behavioral Science...............................96
Biology............................................. 100
Building Construction and Construction
Management...................................103
Building Inspection Technology...........105
Business/Marketing Information..........106
Business Management....................... 108
Cabinetry & Architectural Woodwork .. 110
Chemistry.......................................... 112
College Success Studies ..................... 114
Collision Repair Technology................ 115
Committee on Interdisciplinary Studies 117
Communication .................................121
Community Health .............................124
Computer Science..............................127
Culinary Arts Institute .........................131
Dance ...............................................132
Dental Hygiene..................................135
Diesel Mechanics Technology .............137
Digital Media.....................................138
Earth Science.....................................140
Education, Elementary........................142
Education, Secondary ........................145
Electrical Automation and Robotics
Technology......................................146
Emergency Services ...........................148
Utah Valley State
Engineering Graphics and Design
Technology......................................151
English and Literature.........................153
English, Basic Composition.................156
English as a Second Language............157
Facilities Management .......................158
Finance and Economics......................159
General Academics ...........................160
Geography........................................ 161
History ..............................................162
Honors Program ................................164
Hospitality Management ....................165
Humanities ........................................167
Information Systems and Technology...168
Integrated Studies ..............................172
Internships & Cooperative Education...177
Languages.........................................178
Legal Studies .....................................181
Lineman Technology ..........................184
Marketing and International Business ..186
Mathematics......................................187
Mathematics, Developmental .............189
Music ................................................190
Nursing .............................................193
Philosophy.........................................195
Physical Education and Recreation ......197
Physics ..............................................201
Political Science ................................ 203
Pre-Engineering Science.................... 205
ROTC................................................207
Theatrical Arts for Stage and Screen .. 209
Technology Management ................... 211
Welding Technology...........................215
Continuing & Adult Education.............218
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS
Accessibility Services ................ 863-8747
Admissions ..............................863-8466
Assessment Center................... 863-8269
Athletics ..................................863-8653
Bookstore................................ 863-8641
Campus Connection (ID Desk) . 863-8797
Campus Police......................... 863-5555
Career Services and Student
Employment........................... 863-8395
Career/Academic Counseling
Center................................... 863-8425
Cashier ................................... 863-7200
College Relations.....................863-8206
College Times
(Student Newspaper)..............863-8688
Concurrent Enrollment ............. 863-8376
Continuing Education...............863-8450
GENERAL INFORMATION.......863-8000
Graduation .............................863-8438
High School Relations .............. 863-8811
Butler Institute for International
Understanding.........................863-8342
Institutional Advancement.........863-8205
Library..................................... 863-8265
McKay Events Center................ 863-8767
Multicultural Center ................. 863-8357
Parking Services....................... 863-8188
Ragan Theater ......................... 863-8799
Registration/Records ................863-8468
School of Business ................... 863-8260
School of Education .................863-8228
School of General Academics... 863-6312
School of Humanities, Arts and
Social Sciences ........................ 863-7435
School of Science and Health .. 863-6441
School of Technology and
Computing ........................... 863-8995
Student Center......................... 863-8612
Student Financial Assistance .....863-8442
Student Government ................ 863-8652
Student Health Services............ 863-8876
Transfer Credit.........................863-8438
Veteran’s Office ...................... 863-8212
Wasatch Campus..................... 863-6601
Weekend College/Evening
School ..................................863-8449
Women’s Resource Center ........863-8080
Alphabetical by prefix................ 226–404
WASATCH CAMPUS
Wasatch Campus.............................. 406
REFERENCE
Administration ................................. 408
Faculty ............................................. 411
Prefixes............................................. 425
Index.................................................426
Maps ............................................... 430
Catalog 2007–2008
This issue of the Utah Valley State College
Catalog contains information about every facet
of the institution as currently approved by the
governing boards. This catalog is not to be
considered a binding contract between Utah
Valley State College and any student or other
institution. The College reserves the right to
change its role, policies, or course offerings
from time to time.
The College offers programs at its several
campus sites including Orem campus, Provo
Airport campus, West campus, North Valley
Center, Wasatch campus. The UVSC semester
class schedule designates at which campus site
each class section is taught.
3
2007
Academic Calendar
2008
SUMMER TERM 2007
SPRING SEMESTER 2008
Summer Terms at UVSC are being reviewed and the number and
date ranges of the sessions listed below may be changed. Watch
http://www.uvsc.edu/acadsched/acadcal/index.html for any
updates. For questions on this or any academic calendar email
yatesta@uvsc.edu.
Faculty Return............................................................... January 2
Session I (5 weeks) ................................................ May 2 - June 4
Session II (7 1/2 weeks)....................................... May 2 - June 20
Session III (10 weeks) ..............................................May 2 - July 9
Session IV (15 weeks) ....................................... May 2 - August 10
Session V (10 weeks) ........................................ June 5 - August 10
Session VI (7 1/2 weeks)................................. June 21 - August 10
Weekend Classes Begin ................................................ January 5
Martin Luther King Jr. Day Holiday............................... January 21
President’s Day Holiday* ............................................ February 18
First Block Classes End ...............................................February 25
Second Block Classes Begin .......................................February 26
Spring Break Holidays*....................................... March 12, 13, 14
Weekend Classes Holiday* .............................................March 15
Classes End..................................................................... April 17
Summer Term Holidays
Memorial Day.................................................................. May 28
Independence Day.............................................................. July 4
Pioneer Day...................................................................... July 24
Study Day........................................................................ April 18
Weekend Classes Final Exams .......................................... April 19
Final Exams ................................................... April 21, 22, 23, 24
Spring Semester Ends....................................................... April 24
FALL SEMESTER 2007
Faculty Return............................................................... August 15
Classes Begin ...............................................................August 22
Weekend Classes Begin ................................................August 25
Labor Day Holiday .................................................... September 3
Fall Break Holidays*.............................................. October 11, 12
Weekend Classes Holiday*..........................................October 13
First Block Classes End ................................................October 15
Second Block Classes Begin ........................................October 16
Thanksgiving Holidays* ................................November 21, 22, 23
Weekend Classes Holiday*...................................... November 24
Classes End...............................................................December 6
Study Day..................................................................December 7
Final Exams ............................................December 10, 11, 12, 13
Fall Semester Ends ...................................................December 13
Grading Day ...........................................................December 14
Weekend Classes Final Exams ..................................December 15
Grading Day ................................................................... April 25
Commencement .............................................................. April 25
SUMMER TERM 2008
Session I (5 weeks) ..............................................April 30 - June 2
Session II (7 1/2 weeks)..................................... April 30 - June 18
Session III (10 weeks) ........................................... April 30 - July 7
Session IV (15 weeks) .......................................April 30 - August 8
Session V (10 weeks) ..........................................June 3 - August 8
Session VI (7 1/2 weeks)................................... June 19 - August 8
Summer Term Holidays
Memorial Day...................................................................May 26
Independence Day.............................................................. July 4
Pioneer Day...................................................................... July 24
FINANCIAL AID DEADLINES
Last Priority Spring ........................................................ January 1
First Priority Summer ....................................................February 1
New Student Scholarship (first priority) ..........................February 1
FINANCIAL AID DEADLINES
First Priority Fall ................................................................. May 1
First Priority Spring ....................................................... October 1
Last Priority Fall ........................................................ September 1
Last Priority Spring ........................................................ January 1
4
Classes Begin ............................................................... January 3
Continuing Student Scholarship (first priority).................... March 1
Year-end Final Deadline ................................................... June 15
*NO ACCESS to UVSC computing resources during the holiday,
INCLUDING Saturday and Sunday. For questions, contact Ray
Walker at walkerra@uvsc.edu.
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Academic Calendar
Dates marked in gray correlate to important information listed on the previous page.
MAY 2007
S
M
JUNE 2007
T
W
Th
F
S
1
2
3
4
5
S
M
T
W
JULY 2007
Th
F
S
S
M
T
W
Th
F
S
1
2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
27
28
29
30
31
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
29
30
31
AUGUST 2007
S
M
T
SEPTEMBER 2007
W
Th
F
S
1
2
3
4
S
M
T
W
OCTOBER 2007
Th
F
S
S
1
M
T
W
Th
F
S
1
2
3
4
5
6
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
26
27
28
29
30
31
23
30
24
25
26
27
28
29
28
29
30
31
NOVEMBER 2007
S
M
T
W
DECEMBER 2007
Th
F
S
1
2
3
S
M
T
W
JANUARY 2008
Th
F
S
S
M
1
T
W
Th
F
S
1
2
3
4
5
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
25
26
27
28
29
30
23
30
24
31
25
26
27
28
29
27
28
29
30
31
FEBRUARY 2008
S
M
T
W
Th
MARCH 2008
F
S
1
2
S
M
T
W
APRIL 2008
Th
F
S
S
M
1
T
W
Th
F
S
1
2
3
4
5
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
12
11
12
13
14
15
16
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
24
25
26
27
28
29
23
30
24
31
25
26
27
28
29
27
28
29
30
MAY 2008
S
M
T
W
JUNE 2008
JULY 2008
Th
F
S
S
M
T
W
Th
F
S
1
2
3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
S
M
T
W
Th
F
S
1
2
3
4
5
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
29
30
27
28
29
30
31
UTAH VALLEY STATE
Catalog 2007–2008
5
General Information
MISSION STATEMENT
General Information
Utah Valley State College is a state college comprised of two
interdependent divisions. The lower division embraces and
preserves the philosophy and mission of a comprehensive
community college, while the upper division consists of programs
leading to baccalaureate degrees in areas of high community
demand and interest.
Utah Valley State College is dedicated to providing a broad range
of quality academic, vocational, technical, cultural, and social
opportunities designed to encourage students in attaining their
goals and realizing their talents and potential, personally and
professionally. The College is committed to meeting student and
community lower division and upper division needs for occupational
training; providing developmental, general, and transfer education;
meeting the needs for continuing education for personal enrichment
and career enhancement; and providing diverse social, cultural,
and international opportunities, and student support services.
Our Student Community
Students are the major focus and first priority of UVSC. All
decisions are examined to determine whether the results assist
students in attaining their goals and maximizing their potential and
talents both personally and professionally.
Our Faculty and Staff Community
Our dedicated faculty is enthusiastic about the satisfactions of
teaching and giving generously of their time to students.
UVSC is committed to maintaining an atmosphere for faculty
and staff which encourages innovation, experimentation and
entrepreneurial investigation relative to college programs and
interests.
Our Diverse Community
UVSC strives to provide an environment which encourages a
diverse population to participate in a broad range of educational
opportunities, social enrichments and cultural experiences that
reflect the value of diverse voices and disparate opinions.
Our Industrial Community
Utah Valley State College is dedicated
to providing a broad range of quality
academic, vocational, technical, cultural,
and social opportunities designed to
encourage students in attaining their goals
and realizing their talents and potential,
personally and professionally.
The
College is committed to meeting student
and community lower division and upper
division needs for occupational training;
providing developmental, general, and
transfer education; meeting the needs
for continuing education for personal
enrichment and career enhancement;
and providing diverse social, cultural, and
international opportunities, and student
support services.
Success.
6
UVSC is committed to developing, broadening, and strengthening
mutually beneficial partnerships with business and industry to
provide an increasingly educated work force and to enhance
economic growth and development in the community.
Our Global Community
Global awareness, understanding, and responsibility on campus
and in the community are sought through internationalizing
curriculum, lectures, seminars, and international exchanges.
The term “Community” is defined not only as a region to be served
but also as a climate to be created.
HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT
Utah Valley State College was established as Central Utah
Vocational School in September 1941 with the primary function of
providing war production training.
Post-war training needs found the school offering programs
throughout the region and at the Utah County Fairgrounds. The
three school districts within Utah County combined efforts to
purchase a thirteen-acre site close to Provo High School.
In 1963, the name was changed to Utah Trade Technical Institute to
emphasize its growing role in technical training. The name change
to Utah Technical College at Provo in 1967 was accompanied by
Catalog 2006–2007
Utah Valley State
General Information
the authority to award the Associate in
Applied Science degree. The Associate in
Science degree was added in 1972.
•
The initial 185-acre Orem campus was
dedicated in 1977. In 1987, the name
was changed to Utah Valley Community
College and the Associate in Arts degree
was added by the Utah State Board of
Regents.
In 1993, the name was changed to
Utah Valley State College reflecting the
change in mission to offer high demand
baccalaureate degrees.
ACCREDITATION
•
•
•
•
•
•
UVSC is accredited by the Northwest
Commission on Colleges and Universities.
Accreditation was initially granted in 1969,
renewed in 1984, again in 1995, and
again in 2005. Vocational accreditation
was also granted UVSC in 1976 and
renewed in 1990 and 1995 by the Utah
State Office of Vocational Education,
a practice they discontinued. Other
accreditations include: Association to
Advance Collegiate Schools of Business
(AACSB), American Bar Association (ABA),
Accreditation Board for Engineering and
Technology, Inc. (ABET), American Culinary
Federation (ACF), Accreditation Standards
for Dental Hygiene Education Programs;
American Dental Association (ADA),
Automotive Service Excellence (ASE),
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),
National League for Nursing Accreditation
Commission (NLNAC), Teacher Education
Accreditation Council (TEAC), Commission
on Accreditation of Allied Health Education
Programs (CAAHEP), National Alliance
of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships
(NACEP), International Fire Service
Accreditation Congress (IFSAC), and
National Association for Developmental
Education Certification (NADE).
DEGREES
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Bachelor of Applied Technology (BAT)
Bachelor of Arts (BA)
Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA)
Bachelor of Science (BS)
Associate in Science (AS)
Associate in Pre-Engineering (APE)
Associate in Science in Business (ASB)
Associate in Science in Nursing (ASN)
Associate in Applied Science (AAS)
Diploma
Certificate
Bachelor of Applied Technology
Ă Community Health
Ă Information Technology
Bachelor of Arts
• ASL and Deaf Studies Education
• Art and Visual Communications
• Behavioral Science
Ă Anthropology
Utah Valley State
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Ă Psychology
Ă Social Work
Ă Sociology
Communication
Ă Communication Theory and Practice
Ă Journalism
Ă Public Relations
Deaf Studies
Ă General Deaf Studies
Ă Interpreting
Deaf Studies Education
English
Ă Creative Writing
Ă Literary Studies
English Education
History
Ă General History
Ă Public History
Integrated Studies
Ă Accounting
Ă American Sign Language
Ă Anthropology
Ă Ballet
Ă Ballroom Dance
Ă Biology
Ă Business Management
Ă Communication
» Analytic
» Applied
Ă Community Health
Ă Computer Networking
Ă Computer Science
Ă Digital Media
Ă Earth Science
Ă English
Ă Environmental Studies
Ă French
Ă History
Ă Hospitality Management
Ă Humanities
Ă Leadership
Ă Military Science
Ă Modern Dance
Ă Music
Ă Office Management
Ă Outdoor Leadership
Ă Philosophy
Ă Physical Education
Ă Psychology
Ă Religious Studies
Ă Social Sciences
Ă Sociology
Ă Spanish
Ă Technology Management
Music
Philosophy
Physical Education
Ă Exercise Science
Ă Outdoor Recreation Management
Political Science
Ă American Government
Ă International Relations
Ă Political Philosophy/Public Law
Spanish
Spanish Education
Theatre Arts
Bachelor of Fine Arts
• Art and Visual Communications
Ă Fine Arts
Ă Graphic Design
Ă Illustration
Ă Photography
• Dance
Catalog 2007–2008
Ă Ballet
Ă Modern Dance
Bachelor of Science
• Accounting
• Art and Visual Communications
• Aviation
Ă Aviation Administration
Ă Professional Pilot
• Behavioral Science
Ă Anthropology
Ă Psychology
Ă Social Work
Ă Sociology
• Biology
• Biology Education
• Business Management
Ă Entrepreneurship
Ă Finance and Banking
Ă General Business
Ă Hospitality Management
Ă International Business
Ă Marketing
• Business/Marketing Education
• Chemistry
Ă Forensic Chemistry
Ă Professional Chemistry
• Chemistry/Physics Education
• Communication
Ă Communication Theory and Practice
Ă Journalism
Ă Public Relations
• Community Health
Ă Community Health Education
Ă Health Services Administration
• Computer Science
Ă Computer Engineering
Ă Computer Networking
Ă Computer Science
Ă Database Engineering
• Criminal Justice
• Digital Media
• Early Childhood Education
• Earth Science
Ă Environmental Management
Ă Geology
• Earth Science Education
• Elementary Education
• English
Ă Creative Writing
Ă Literary Studies
• English Education
• Forensic Science
• History Education
• Hospitality Management
• Information Systems
• Information Technology
Ă Database Administration
Ă Enterprise Systems
Ă Network Administration and Security
• Integrated Studies
Ă (see BA for list of emphases)
• Mathematics
• Mathematics Education
• Movement Studies
Ă Ballroom Dance
• Music
• Music Education
• Nursing
• Paralegal Studies
• Philosophy
• Physical Education and Recreation
Ă Exercise Science
Ă Outdoor Recreation Management
7
General Information
• Physical Education Teacher Education
• Physics
• Political Science
Ă American Government
Ă International Relations
Ă Political Philosophy/Public Law
• Public Emergency Services Management
• School Health Education
• Software Engineering
• Technology Management
Ă Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
Technology
Ă Apprentice
» Carpenter Union (JATC)
» Electrical Construction
» Electrical Union (JATC)
» Heat, Ventilation & Air Conditioning
» Industrial Maintenance
» Lineman
» Lineman Meter
» Lineman Substation
» Plumber
» Sheet Metal
Ă Art and Visual Communications
Ă Automotive Technology
Ă Aviation Science
Ă Building Construction and Construction
Management
Ă Building Inspection Technology
Ă Cabinetry and Architectural Woodwork
Ă Collision Repair Technology
Ă Diesel Mechanics Technology
Ă Drafting Technology
Ă Electrical Automation and Robotics
Technology
Ă Facilities Management
Ă Fire Science
Ă Information Systems and Technology
Ă Lineman Technology
Ă Digital Media
Ă Welding Technology
Ă Others from regionally accredited
institutions offering an AAS degree
• Theatre Arts
• Theatre Arts Education
Minors
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
8
Accounting
American Indian Studies
American Studies
Biology
Business Education
Ă Basic Business Core
Ă Business Information Technology
Ă Marketing
Business Information Technology
Business Management
Chemistry
Community Health Education
Computer Science
Criminal Justice
Deaf Studies
Earth Science
English Creative Writing
English Education
English Literary Studies
Environmental Studies
Gender Studies
History
Humanities
Information Systems and Technology
Mathematics
Music
Paralegal Studies
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Peace and Justice Studies
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics
Political Science
Religious Studies
School Health Education
Spanish
Technical Communication
Technology Management
Theatre Arts
Baccalaureate Programs under
Development
•
•
•
•
Biotechnology
General Studies
Mild/Moderate Special Education
Secondary Education (Additional)
Associate in Arts/Science
The Associate in Arts and Associate in
Science are the general studies transfer
degrees which, when students complete,
are accepted throughout the system
as satisfying all general education
requirements. Students who have a premajor area and who have declared their
intent to transfer are advised carefully so
that courses are taken in their pre-major
area that also fulfill undergraduate course
requirements at transfer institutions.
The following pre-majors are available in
an Associate in Arts and/or an Associate in
Science degree:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Accounting
Administrative Information Management
Art and Visual Communications
Automotive Technology
Aviation Science
Behavioral Science
Biology
Building Construction and Construction
Management
Business
Cabinetry and Architectural Woodwork
Communication
Community Health
Computer Science
Criminal Justice
Dance
Drafting Technology
Early Childhood Education
Electrical Automation and Robotics
Technology
English
English
Ă Technical Communication
Fire Science
General Academics
History and Political Science
Hospitality Management
Humanities
Information Systems and Technology
Integrated Studies
Mathematics
Music
Paralegal Studies
Philosophy
Physical Education and Recreation
Ă Physical Education
Ă Recreation
Physical Science
Catalog 2007–2008
• Pre-Elementary Education
• Pre-Engineering
• Theatre Arts
Associate in Pre-Engineering
Associate in Science in Business
Associate in Science in Nursing
Associate in Applied Science
• Accounting
• Administrative Information Support
• Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
Technology
• Apprentice
Ă Aircraft Mechanics
Ă Carpenter Union (JATC)
Ă Diesel Mechanics
Ă Electrical Construction
Ă Electrical Union (JATC)
Ă Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning
Ă Industrial Maintenance
Ă Lineman
Ă Lineman Meter
Ă Lineman Substation
Ă Plumber
Ă Sheet Metal
• Art and Visual Communications
Ă Design/Illustration
Ă Graphic Design
Ă Photography
• Automotive Technology
• Aviation Science
• Building Construction and Construction
Management
• Building Inspection Technology
• Business Management
• Cabinetry and Architectural Woodwork
• Collision Repair Technology
Ă Collision Repair
Ă Street Rod
• Computer Science
Ă Computer Engineering
Ă Computing and Networking Sciences
• Culinary Arts
• Dental Hygiene
• Diesel Mechanics Technology
• Digital Communication Technology
• Drafting Technology
• Electrical Automation and Robotics
Technology
Ă Electrical Automation
Ă Semiconductor Instrumentation and
Maintenance
• Facilities Management
• Fire Science
Ă Fire Officer
Ă Firefighter/Paramedic
Ă Wildland Fire Management
• Hospitality Management
• Information Systems and Technology
• Lineman Technology
• Welding Technology
Diploma Programs
• Automotive Technology
• Cabinetry and Architectural Woodwork
• Collision Repair Technology
Ă Collision Repair
Ă Custom Street Rod
• Diesel Mechanics Technology
• Lineman Technology
• Welding Technology
2QH<HDU&HUWLÀFDWH3URJUDPV
• Accounting
Utah Valley State
General Information
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Administrative Support
Art and Visual Communications
Automotive Technology
Building Construction
Building Inspection Technology
Business Management
Cabinetry & Architectural Woodwork
Collision Repair Technology
Diesel Mechanics Technology
Early Care and Education
Firefighter Recruit Candidate Certificate
Network Administration
Paramedic
Programmer
Water and Wastewater Operations
All statements herein are believed
to be true and correct at time of
publication. Utah Valley State College
reserves the right to make necessary
changes, deletions, or revisions.
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
9
Admissions
ADMISSIONS OFFICE
Office: BA 106
Telephone: (801) 863-8466
Admissions Policy
Admissions
UTAH VALLEY STATE COLLEGE WILL MAINTAIN AN “OPEN DOOR” POLICY,
ADMITTING ALL APPLICANTS WHOSE QUALIFICATIONS INDICATE THEY MAY BENEFIT
FROM THE INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS OFFERED AND ARE GENERALLY BEYOND THE
AGE OF HIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENT.
Admissions Procedure
UVSC IS COMMITTED TO THE CONCEPT OF EQUAL OPPORTUNITY WITHOUT
REGARD TO RACE, COLOR, DISABILITY, RELIGION, AGE, SEX, NATIONAL ORIGIN, OR
OTHER LEGALLY IMPERMISSIBLE FACTORS.
Age Exception
Applicants under 18 years of age, whose age group will not have
graduated from high school prior to the enrollment period for
which admission is sought, need to submit a high school permission
form from the Center for High School Studies office with their
application. Applicants under 17 years of age must apply for
exception to policy through the office of the Director of Admissions.
Enrollment
Being admitted to a specific major does NOT ensure enrollment.
In majors with limited openings (or seats), enrollment is based on
a “first come, first served” procedure, assuming prerequisites have
been satisfied.
Some programs or majors of the College are accredited by
professional or technical organizations which may recommend
certain minimum standards for entrance into the program. Other
programs may require prerequisite skills or knowledge that are
specific to entry-level courses required for that major.
Admissions Steps
To be officially admitted to the College, an applicant must submit
the following to the Office of Admissions:
Utah Valley State College will maintain an
“open door” policy, admitting all applicants
whose qualifications indicate they may
benefit from the instructional programs
offered and are generally beyond the age
of high school enrollment.
1. Application for Admission. For immediate response apply online at: www.uvsc.edu/admissions/applynow or apply by paper
application.
2. Nonrefundable, one time only, $35 application fee accompanying
first Application for Admission. ($100 nonrefundable fee for
international applicants). Application deadline: Fall Semester, Aug.
15; Spring Semester, Dec. 20.
3. An ACT/SAT test score must be submitted prior to registration for
classes.
In addition the College requests official transcripts of all previous
college and high school work and if applicable, GED or other
certification of high school completion.
Acceptance and resident status will be determined by the
Admissions Office. A declaration of major is accomplished through
the Application for Admission. Students desiring to change their
majors after acceptance to the College are required to change their
major through their academic advisor.
Assessment
Success.
All first-time students are required to satisfy the College’s
assessment requirement prior to being classified as “matriculated”
(degree seeking) into any major of the College. Individual courses
(e.g. Mathematics, English) may require a passing score on one or
more subtests of the Assessment Battery as a course prerequisite for
enrollment.
5HVLGHQW&ODVVLÀFDWLRQ
Utah Valley State College will determine student residency in
10
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Admissions
accordance with Utah Law and the Policy of
the State Board of Regents.
Resident tuition applies to those permanent
residents of the State of Utah.
Nonresident students should note that
residency does not change automatically.
Proper documentation must be filed with
Admissions for review and approval before
residency status will be changed.
Applicants for residency classification
should allow two weeks for a review and
determination of his/her residency.
Applications for residency for any given
semester must be received before the end
of the first week of instruction. A change in
residency classification after the first week
of a given semester will not take effect until
the next term. Residency changes are not
retroactive.
Returning Students
Students returning to UVSC after a break of
one year or more are required to reapply
for admission. No admission fee will be
assessed to returning students.
Veterans
Veterans considering enrollment are
encouraged to contact the UVSC Veterans
Office (BA 114) during the admissions
process to receive assistance in planning
programs of study and applying for
educational benefits.
Senior Citizens
Utah residents, age 62 and over, may
enroll on an audit basis in any College
class offered (as space is available) by
completing an Application for Admission
and paying the one time application fee.
The Admissions Office will issue an audit
form to be signed by the instructor. A $20
registration fee, which covers all costs
except books and special lab and course
fees, is required each semester. This policy
does not apply to specialized workshops.
Senior citizens desiring credit for courses
taken should register according to regular
admissions policies and procedures.
International Students: F-1
immigration Student Status
The College is authorized under federal
law to enroll non immigrant alien
(international) students. An international
student is defined as an individual who is
legally domiciled in a country other than
the United States of America at the time
of application for admission to UVSC.
International students must be 18 years or
older for admittance.
I-20 Certificate of Eligibility
This document issued by the designated
Utah Valley State
international student admissions officer to
international students with non immigrant
status, is to be used to apply for an F-1 Visa
to the United States.
Only persons who do not intend to remain
permanently in the United States and who
have adequate financial resources are
eligible for such status.
Form I-94
The I-94 is issued to international students
at the port of entry to the United States.
Normally the form is stapled to each
individual’s passport. This card must be
presented prior to registration.
Educational Costs
An estimate of an academic school year
costs, as determined by UVSC, is stated
on the I-20 form prior to issuance to the
student. The American Consul uses this
information to determine the adequacy of
the applicant’s financial resources.
Affidavit of Support
UVSC requires international applicants
(with their sponsors) to submit an “Affidavit
of Support” for an International Student at
UVSC. The affidavit states that a sponsor
is legally bound to financially support the
applicant. Upon satisfactory completion of
other admission requirements, the affidavit
is returned to the prospective student with
the I-20, which may then be presented to
an American Consul or Embassy to gain an
F-1 Visa.
Transcript of Credits
This is an official copy of the permanent
academic record of the student’s high
school (12th grade equivalency) and/or
college grades. It is used by UVSC to
determine admission qualifications.
needed for admittance to the Intensive
English program.
Note: Assessment tests are administered
to all incoming students. The results of that
exam determine first semester classes.
Scholarship and Financial Aid
International students are not eligible
for scholarships or financial aid from the
United States Government.
Academic Load
An international student is required to carry
a minimum of 12 hours of credit that apply
toward a major each academic semester of
fall and spring. Summer is optional unless
it is the student’s first term at UVSC or the
student has attended school for more than
one year and uses a semester other than
summer as a vacation. The 12 credit-hour
requirement may not include repeated
classes or audit classes.
Hospitalization and Health Insurance
UVSC recommends that international
students acquire appropriate insurance
while in school. Information can be
obtained at the UVSC Student Health
Services Office.
Tuberculin Skin Test
Each international student must
independently acquire a Tuberculin Skin
Test after entering the United States. This
may be obtained at the Student Health
Services office on campus or the Utah
County Health Department. Written
results must be submitted to Student Health
Services prior to registering for classes.
An international student transferring from
another institution within the United States
may present written results from a previous
skin test.
TOEFL or Compass ESL
The TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign
Language) is a confidential examination
given through procedures designed to
protect its security before, during, and after
its administration. Scores over one-year
old are not acceptable. Information for
TOEFL may be obtained by writing:
Test of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL)
Box 899
Princeton, NJ 08541
U.S.A.
or by contacting the American Consul. A
minimum score of 500 written test, 173
computer based, or 61 for internet based
test for TOEFL or 90 for Compass ESL is
required for admittance to an associate
level program at UVSC. No scores are
Catalog 2007–2008
11
Registration, Tuition and Fees
REGISTR ATION OFFICE
Office: BA 106
Telephone: (801) 863-8468
REGISTR ATION PROCEDURES
Registration,
Tuition and Fees
A schedule of classes is published online every semester/term in
advance of each registration period, indicating courses offered,
times, instructors, and room assignments. Registration procedures
are available online at www.uvsc.edu/.
Special Notice to Students
It is the responsibility of the student to verify registration
accuracy and completeness.
Change of Registration (Add/Drops)
After initial registration, students may modify their schedules by
adding, dropping, or changing to audit. The semester student
timetable specifies the time period when changes may be made.
Beginning the first day of the semester/term students may add
open classes without a fee or approval. After the first week of
class students wishing to add a class must obtain instructor and
department approval on an Add Card and pay the corresponding
fee. Students may not attend classes for which they are not officially
enrolled.
The add fee may be waived for department-recommended
changes.
The Add Card may be obtained at One Stop. After obtaining the
instructor’s signature and department approval, the student returns
the card to One Stop to pay the fee and add the class(es). Full
semester classes may only be added through the first three weeks of
the semester.
A schedule of classes is published online
every semester/term in advance of each
registration period, indicating courses
offered, times, instructors, and room
assignments. Registration procedures are
available online at www.uvsc.edu/.
Students may withdraw from full semester classes up to the end of
the sixth week of the semester. Classes may be dropped and not
appear on the transcript through the third week of the semester.
After the third week, a grade of “W” will appear on the transcript
for all official withdrawals. Withdrawing from a course after the
sixth week may only be for extenuating circumstances and not solely
for academic difficulty, and requires the signature of the department
chair with a department approval stamp. Such changes to a
student’s schedule will adversely affect current and future financial
aid, scholarships and/or refunds. Students are cautioned to see a
financial aid advisor before attempting to completely withdraw from
school.
Block classes may be withdrawn through the third week of class.
The semester student timetable includes deadline dates for other
sessions.
Students who add classes must finalize the process through One
Stop or the Cashier to pay for any additional credit.
Administrative Drop
Students may be dropped from classes by the administration if they:
1. Register, but do not attend equipment-related courses within
the first three days of a semester, 2. Register for courses for which
they have not completed prerequisites, 3. Default on short-term
loans, or, 4. Neglect to pay tuition and fees for any given semester/
term by the end of the fourth week. Such changes to a student’s
schedule could affect financial aid, scholarships, and/or refunds.
Success.
12
Auditing
Students may choose to register for classes on an audit basis
(register for classes as a “listener” without receiving credit). Tuition,
registration times and add/drop criteria are the same as for regular
class registration. For an audit, the student must complete and
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Registration, Tuition and Fees
sign an “audit form” at One Stop. Audits
may only be requested through the third
week of the appropriate semester or block.
Students may not change from audit to
credit status.
2007-2008 TUITION & GENER AL FEE SCHEDULE
RESIDENT
Students may not challenge courses that
they have audited. An incomplete grade
may not be made up by repeating the class
for audit.
Noncredit Continuing Education
Unit (CEU)
The Division of Continuing Education offers
a variety of courses and programs for lifelong learning. Many of these programs
are offered under a noncredit option.
The Continuing Education Unit (CEU) is
a means for measuring and recording
noncredit study.
TUITION AND FEES POLICY
Tuition and student fees are established by
the Utah State Board of Regents. Tuition
and other charges as listed in the catalog
and other UVSC publications are subject
to change without notice. Students are
advised to consult current information at
www.uvsc.edu/. The College policy
regarding payment of tuition and fees
is that all tuition and fees are due
DQGSD\DEOHWRWKH2IÀFHRI%XVLQHVV
Affairs (Cashier) at the time of
registration. Checks for an amount larger
than the total tuition and fees due will not
be accepted.
This policy applies to Early Registration,
Open Registration, and Late Registration.
Early Registration not paid for or covered
by Financial Aid by the published payment
deadline date will be dropped.
Students who default on all or any portion
of their tuition and fees will be suspended
from further registration and records
activity at the College until their account is
paid in full.
The registration and records activity
suspension will be carried forward to
perpetuity until all past due tuition and fees
are paid in full.
Past due tuition accounts may be reported
to the Credit Bureau and/or turned over to
an outside collection agency for collection.
Utah Valley State
Tuition
Fees
Total
Hours
Tuition
Fees
Total
0.5
166.00
36.50
202.50
0.5
581.00
36.50
617.50
1.0
224.00
54.00
278.00
1.0
784.00
54.00
838.00
1.5
282.00
71.50
353.50
1.5
987.00
71.50
1058.50
2.0
340.00
89.00
429.00
2.0
1190.00
89.00
1279.00
2.5
398.00
106.50
504.50
2.5
1393.00
106.50
1499.50
3.0
456.00
124.00
580.00
3.0
1596.00
124.00
1720.00
3.5
514.00
141.50
655.50
3.5
1799.00
141.50
1940.50
4.0
572.00
159.00
731.00
4.0
2002.00
159.00
2161.00
4.5
630.00
176.50
806.50
4.5
2205.00
176.50
2381.50
2602.00
5.0
688.00
194.00
882.00
5.0
2408.00
194.00
5.5
746.00
211.50
957.50
5.5
2611.00
211.50
2822.50
6.0
804.00
229.00
1033.00
6.0
2814.00
229.00
3043.00
6.5
862.00
246.50
1108.50
6.5
3017.00
246.50
3263.50
7.0
920.00
264.00
1184.00
7.0
3220.00
264.00
3484.00
7.5
978.00
264.00
1242.00
7.5
3423.00
264.00
3687.00
8.0
1036.00
264.00
1300.00
8.0
3626.00
264.00
3890.00
8.5
1094.00
264.00
1358.00
8.5
3829.00
264.00
4093.00
9.0
1152.00
264.00
1416.00
9.0
4032.00
264.00
4296.00
9.5
1210.00
264.00
1474.00
9.5
4235.00
264.00
4499.00
10.0
1268.00
264.00
1532.00
10.0
4438.00
264.00
4702.00
10.5
1326.00
264.00
1590.00
10.5
4641.00
264.00
4905.00
11.0
1384.00
264.00
1648.00
11.0
4844.00
264.00
5108.00
11.5
1442.00
264.00
1706.00
11.5
5047.00
264.00
5311.00
12.0
1500.00
264.00
1764.00
12.0
5250.00
264.00
5514.00
12.5
1500.00
264.00
1764.00
12.5
5250.00
264.00
5514.00
13.0
1500.00
264.00
1764.00
13.0
5250.00
264.00
5514.00
13.5
1500.00
264.00
1764.00
13.5
5250.00
264.00
5514.00
14.0
1500.00
264.00
1764.00
14.0
5250.00
264.00
5514.00
14.5
1500.00
264.00
1764.00
14.5
5250.00
264.00
5514.00
15.0
1500.00
264.00
1764.00
15.5
1500.00
264.00
1764.00
16.0
1500.00
264.00
1764.00
16.5
1500.00
264.00
1764.00
17.0
1500.00
264.00
17.5
1500.00
Equal Tuition Payment
Classes appear as “AU” (audit) on the
official transcript. Since they are noncredit,
they do not count in the credit load for
foreign students, veterans, students
receiving financial aid, etc.; nor do they fill
graduation requirements.
NON-RESIDENT
Hours
15.0
5250.00
264.00
5514.00
15.5
5250.00
264.00
5514.00
16.0
5250.00
264.00
5514.00
16.5
5250.00
264.00
5514.00
1764.00
17.0
5250.00
264.00
5514.00
264.00
1764.00
17.5
5250.00
264.00
5514.00
18.0
1500.00
264.00
1764.00
18.0
5250.00
264.00
5514.00
18.5
1552.50
264.00
1816.50
18.5
5434.00
264.00
5698.00
19.0
1605.00
264.00
1869.00
19.0
5618.00
264.00
5882.00
19.5
1657.50
264.00
1921.50
19.5
5802.00
264.00
6066.00
20.0
1710.00
264.00
1974.00
20.0
5986.00
264.00
6250.00
20.5
1762.00
264.00
2026.50
20.5
6170.00
264.00
6434.00
21.0
1815.00
264.00
2079.00
21.0
6354.00
264.00
6618.00
21.5
1867.50
264.00
2131.50
21.5
6538.00
264.00
6802.00
6986.00
22.0
1920.00
264.00
2184.00
22.0
6722.00
264.00
22.5
1972.50
264.00
2236.50
22.5
6906.00
264.00
7170.00
23.0
2025.00
264.00
2289.00
23.0
7090.00
264.00
7354.00
7538.00
23.5
2077.50
264.00
2341.50
23.5
7274.00
264.00
24.0
2130.00
264.00
2394.00
24.0
7458.00
264.00
7722.00
24.5
2182.50
264.00
2446.50
24.5
7642.00
264.00
7906.00
25.0
2235.00
264.00
2499.00
25.0
7826.00
264.00
8090.00
For each credit hour over 25, $105 per credit hour will be assessed for residents and $368 per credit hour for non-residents
•
•
•
•
•
•
Application Fee .................................. $35
Late Application Fee ........................... $75
Foreign Student Admission Fee.......... $100
Graduation Fee.................................. $20
Late Graduation Fee........................... $25
Special Lab and
Course Fees...... (see online class schedule)
• Challenge Credit Fee ........... $5 per credit
• Challenge Credit Form ........................$15
Catalog 2007–2008
• Add Card Fee ...................................... $5
• For each credit hour over 25:...................
Ă Resident ........................................ $98
Ă Non-resident................................$344
• Baccalaureate Fee..............................$20
• Late Tuition Payment Fee................... $100
13
Registration, Tuition and Fees
Tuition Surcharge Policy
A student who takes course work in
excess of 135% of the credits required
for graduation may be charged for those
excessive credit hours at the same rate
as for nonresident students. For further
information on this policy, contact the
Graduation and Transfer Services Office.
The tuition refund policy is established
by the Board of Regents and amended
by each college/university to fit their
programs. Utah Valley State College
refunds for students who withdraw from
school or drop classes are calculated as
follows:
All unpaid account balances after the
deadline will be assessed a 20% late fee
(not to exceed $100).
Add Fee
An Add Card may be obtained at One
Stop. Beginning the second week of
instruction, after obtaining the instructor’s
signature and departmental approval, the
student pays a $5 fee at One Stop. Add
cards will be accepted through the third
week of the semester. Classes will not be
added after this time.
Semester
• Through third week of instruction .....100%
• Beginning fourth week of instruction.....0%
Thereafter, the refund periods for
instructional cycles other than the semester
are extrapolated from the above schedule.
A Petition to the Refund Policy Form can be
obtained from the office of the Registrar.
Check Cashing Procedures
The College will not accept two-party
checks. Checks written to UVSC must have
the writer’s social security number, local
address, and phone number on the face
of the check. Two forms of identification
are required at all campus check-cashing
locations.
Checks written that later have a “stop
payment” placed upon them will be
considered as “dishonored checks”.
Checks written up to $5 over the amount
of the purchase may be cashed at the
Bookstore. All other campus locations
accept checks for amount of purchase (or
payment) only.
A service charge will be assessed on each
dishonored check unless the student can
document that it was a bank error.
Students who have current dishonored
checks will not be allowed to receive
grades and/or transcripts, make changes
in registration, register for future semesters,
graduate, nor pick up checks that are
disbursed by UVSC, which may include but
are not limited to financial aid, guaranteed
student loans, tuition refunds, and payroll
checks.
Special Lab and Course Fees
Some classes require fees in addition to
standard tuition and fees. The online class
schedule indicates such lab and course
fees.
Late Tuition Payment
Tuition payment deadlines are published in
the Semester Student Timetable.
14
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Financial Aid
INTRODUCTION
Financial Aid
Important note: Content subject to change based on federal and
state regulations. Financial aid is designed to bridge the gap
between the costs of attending the College and what students
and their families are expected to pay. Estimated average costs
for the academic year (two semesters) are listed below. (Note: A
“commuter” is a student who resides with family; a “resident” is
a student who, for tuition purposes, is a resident of Utah; and a
“nonresident” is a student who comes from another state and pays
nonresident tuition.) Tools and lab fees vary with each program
and are not included in the costs listed below.
Commuter
Resident
Nonresident
Books & Supplies
1,532
1,532
1,532
Living Expenses
5,142
9,040
9,040
FINANCIAL AID APPLICATION PROCEDURE
To be considered for financial aid a student must meet the following
conditions:
1. Submit an Application for Admission and be admitted with a
high school diploma, or the recognized equivalent, or (if 18
years of age or older) have passed a test approved by the U.S.
Department of Education. For more information contact the
Admissions Office or the Assessment Center.
2. Complete the online UVSC Financial Aid Data Form at www.uvsc.
edu and submit it to the Financial Aid and Scholarship Office.
3. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA),
submit it to the Federal processor. Be certain the Financial Aid
and Scholarship Office has record of the FAFSA.
4. Check “UV Link” at www.uvsc.edu for status of application.
5. Submit to the Financial Aid and Scholarship Office all requested
verification information.
6. Meet all other eligibility requirements.
Note: 1st Priority deadline is May 1. To have financial aid to
pay registration costs before school begins, an applicant must
have an accurate application completed by this date. Additional
information and help are available through the Financial Aid &
Scholarship Office.
A varied and comprehensive program
of financial assistance is available to all
students at the College. The general
qualifications
include
acceptable
scholastic standing and financial need.
Citizens and permanent residents of the
United States may apply for assistance
under these programs regardless of race,
color, religion, age, sex, national origin,
pregnancy-related condition, handicap,
or status as a veteran.
APPLICATION DEADLINES
February 1
New and transfer student scholarship application
deadline for all UVSC and private scholarships.
March 1
Continuing student scholarship deadline for all UVSC
and private scholarships.
May 1
Federal/State financial aid for Fall Semester 1st
priority processing for registration.
December 1 Spring only scholarship deadline for new and transfer
students for academic scholarships only.
June 15
Federal/State financial aid final processing for end of
program year.
THE FINANCIAL AID AWARD
Success.
Utah Valley State
(see endnotes at the end of this section)
With the exception of most scholarships, financial aid is awarded on
the basis of “need.” Financial need is determined by analyzing the
Institutional Data Form and the needs analysis information reported
in the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). These
Catalog 2007–2008
15
Financial Aid
forms are available on the Financial Aid
web site at www.uvsc.edu/finaid.
If all necessary qualifications have been
met and financial need is demonstrated,
assistance from scholarships, grants, loans,
or part-time employment may be offered.
As long as money is available a “package”
of aid, funds from a combination of
different programs, is awarded. All
awards are granted for the academic year.
Application must be made each year.
Students will be notified about the
decisions regarding their application when
processing is complete. Notice of your
financial aid award will be sent to your
UVLink account.
TYPES OF FINANCIAL AID
Grants
FEDERAL PELL GRANTS (FPELL) provide
non-repayable aid for eligible students.
The awards range between approximately
$400 and $4,050 per year. The amount
of the award is based upon the family
contribution, the cost of attendance, and
a payment schedule issued by the U.S.
Department of Education.
FEDERAL ACADEMIC COMPETITIVENESS
GRANTS (ACG) are awarded to freshman
and sophomores who completed a rigorous
high school program.
NATIONAL SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
ACCESS TO RETAIN TALENT GRANTS
(SMART) are awarded to juniors and
seniors majoring in computer science, life
science, mathematics, physical science, or
technology.
FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL
OPPORTUNITY GRANTS (FSEOG) make
additional funds available to students
with unusual need. This grant is usually
combined with other forms of aid and is
also non-repayable.
LEVERAGING EDUCATIONAL
ASSISTANCE PARTNERSHIP GRANTS
(LEAP), available to Utah residents only, are
also awarded to students with substantial
financial need. This award is usually
combined with other forms of financial
assistance and is also non-repayable.
UTAH CENTENNIAL OPPORTUNITY
PROGRAM FOR EDUCATION (UCOPE)
GRANTS are limited to eligible Utah
residents only, and are usually combined
with other financial aid.
Loans
FEDERAL PERKINS LOANS (FPERK) are
excellent long-term loans. Although the
money must be repaid, no payments need
be made and no interest is charged until
nine months after the borrower ceases
16
to be enrolled at least half-time. When
interest begins to accrue, it is at the rate
of 5% per year (subject to change). A
minimum monthly payment of $40 (subject
to change) is required. Under special
circumstances payment may be deferred for
a time. Online loan counseling is required
of every student who receives a loan.
FEDERAL STAFFORD LOANS (SUBLN) are
the first of the Federal Family Education
Loan Program options which enable
students to borrow from a bank, credit
union or other participating lender. The
amount that may be borrowed depends
on the borrower’s need and year in
school. The interest rate on new loans
is variable but will not exceed 8.25% for
new borrowers. The minimum monthly
payment, which begins 6 months after
the borrower ceases to be enrolled at
least half-time, is $50 (subject to change).
Online loan counseling is required of every
student who receives a loan.
UNSUBSIDIZED FEDERAL STAFFORD
LOANS (UNSUB), another of the Federal
Family Education Loans, are available from
private lenders to any student who meets
the general eligibility criteria. Subject to
annual limits, the UNSUB may not exceed
the cost of education minus financial aid.
The variable interest rate for new loans,
which may not exceed 8.25%, is adjusted
each year. Interest accrues during inschool, grace, and deferment periods.
It may be paid monthly or quarterly, or
added to the principal amount of the loan.
FEDERAL PARENT LOANS FOR
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS (FPLUS)
are the third of the Federal Family
Education Loan Program alternatives.
Parents of dependent students enrolled at
least half-time may borrow from a bank
or credit union. The variable interest rate
for new loans is adjusted annually, with
the maximum being 9%. Not based on
need and subject to limits, the amount of
the FPLUS may never exceed the student’s
cost of attendance (as determined by the
College) minus the student’s financial
assistance. Repayment of principal (unless
deferred) and interest begins 60 days after
the loan is disbursed. The lender has more
information.
Student Loan Limits
Annual and aggregate limits are
prescribed within the Federal aggregate
limits below. The maximum aggregate
limit allowed by Federal law is $23,000
for an undergraduate program of study.
Following are the annual loan limits
for Federal Stafford (Subsidized and
Unsubsidized) Loans.
Student Loan Limits
Loan
Level
Credit
Hours
Stafford
Annual
Limit
Perkins
Annual
Limit
$3,000
1
0 - 29.9
$3,500
2
30 - 96
$4,500
$3,000
3*
60 - 192
$5,500
$3,000
$23,000
$20,000
Aggregate
Total
*Must be matriculated into a four-year
program. Loan offered up to 192 credits.
Students may request an “additional
unsubsidized” loan above the annual limits.
However, the total amount of Perkins
and/or Federal Stafford plus Additional
Unsubsidized loans cannot exceed the
student’s cost of attendance.
Work
FEDERAL WORK-STUDY (FWS) funds
provide opportunities for students who
can demonstrate need and want to work
part-time. Salaries are usually equal to
current minimum wage. The total amount
a student may earn is determined on the
basis of need.
UTAH CENTENNIAL OPPORTUNITY
PROGRAM FOR EDUCATION (UCOPE)
WORK-STUDY is for eligible Utah residents
and usually combined with other financial
aid.
HOURLY CAMPUS EMPLOYMENT is
available on a limited basis. At their own
expense some departments hire students
without regard to financial aid eligibility.
For more information check with Career
Services and Student Employment.
Scholarships
SHORT-TERM TUITION PAYMENT PLANS
allow an eligible student to defer a portion
or all of the tuition and fees. Instead of
interest, an application fee is charged. To
obtain the short-term tuition payment plan
a student must make a down payment of
1/3 of the total tuition and fee costs and/or
have the note secured by a credit worthy
co-signer. The remaining balance of the
charges must then be paid before the end
of the term for which the note was made.
Utah Valley State College offers a
comprehensive and varied scholarship
program. Scholarships are provided by
State and College funding, alumni, and
private donors and are awarded on the
basis of academic excellence and promise
of future achievement. Financial need is
a factor for some awards. Additionally,
students who have acquired skills may be
awarded for their talents.
There are additional facts to know about
scholarships. Utah residency is required
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Financial Aid
for all except exceptional performance and
privately funded programs. If a student is
offered more than one scholarship, it may
be necessary to indicate a preference.
Scholarships are offered to New, Transfer,
and Continuing students.
New UVSC Students, those students who
have never attended UVSC (including
transfers and high school concurrent
enrollment) will automatically be
considered for academic scholarships if
they are admitted to UVSC and they have
current official high school transcripts with
ACT scores or college transcripts on file
with the Scholarship Office by February
1st for Fall & Spring two-semester awards;
December 1 for Spring one-semester-only
awards. Please see “scholarships” at www.
uvsc.edu/finaid for more information.
Continuing UVSC Students, those who
have completed at least 12 total post-highschool UVSC credits since enrolling at the
College after high school graduation, may
also apply for scholarships. Applications
must be postmarked by: March 1 for Fall
& Spring two-semester awards. Please see
“scholarships” at www.uvsc.edu/finaid for
detailed information.
ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIPS are awarded to
students who are selected by the coaching
staff for specific athletic teams. Tryouts are
required. Contact Athletics Department
801-863-8998 for more information on
the different sports programs or for the
specific head coach(es).
PRIVATELY FUNDED SCHOLARSHIPS
are funded through generous donations
from individuals and organizations.
Recipients are selected through a joint
process between the UVSC Gifts and
Grants Committee and the individuals
and organizations. All awards are subject
to available funding and donor specified
criteria. Contact the Scholarship Office
Desk at 801-863-8443.
ROTC SCHOLARSHIPS are awarded
to new and continuing UVSC students
interested in pursuing a demanding,
exciting, and growth-oriented career with
the US Army through the Reserve Officer’s
Training Corps (ROTC); cadets continue
to serve as commissioned officers in the
active armed forces, National Guard, or
the Reserves. An interview is required.
Contact the Enrollment Officer at 801378-7725 or 801-863-8295.
UTAH CAREER TEACHING
SCHOLARSHIPS are offered to continuing
UVSC education-major students who are
planning to certify as teachers and to teach
in the State of Utah. The award covers
regular tuition and fees. To be considered
for this scholarship, applicants must: (1)
be a Utah resident; (2) have a minimum
Utah Valley State
cumulative UVSC GPA of 3.0; and (3)
have completed at least 25 UVSC credits
hours. Applications must be submitted no
later than March 1. Contact the Education
Department at 801-863-8527
SUMMARY OF SELECT
FINANCIAL AID POLICIES
Satisfactory Academic Progress
(see endnote at the end of this section)
To be eligible to receive or continue to
receive financial aid a student must be
enrolled in the College and be in good
standing. Being in good standing means
complying with accepted enrollment
and behavior standards and practices
of the College and the Financial Aid &
Scholarship Office.
Section 484 of the Federal Higher
Education Act requires that a student also
be making satisfactory academic progressqualitative and quantitative—to be eligible
to receive or continue to receive Title IV
financial assistance. “Neither the Secretary
of Education nor an institution has the
authority to waive this requirement for any
student or group of students.”
Because the required academic progress
standard is intended to measure
advancement toward a degree, diploma
or certificate objective, federal guidelines
state it “must be cumulative and it must
include any periods of enrollment”.
The standard must also be applied
consistently to everyone, recipient as
well as applicant. To be eligible, then, “a
student must be maintaining satisfactory
progress regardless of whether [he/she]
had previously received Title IV aid.” So all
terms of enrollment, not just those during
which financial aid was received, will be
considered when evaluating the academic
progress of any financial aid applicant.
The “quality” of academic progress is
measured by the Grade Point Average
(GPA). Required to measure the “quantity”
of progress is a maximum time frame—
divided into semester increments—in which
the student must complete the educational
objective, and after which he/she is no
longer making progress. The quantitative
measurement also requires a designation
of the minimum amount of work a student
must successfully complete by the end of
each increment of enrollment.
The same principles of academic progress
are applied to all forms of assistance.
However, the standards are higher for
scholarships.
Point Average (GPA) to receive and keep
financial aid;
• 9.0 earned credit hours, minimum,
completed each semester for full-time
financial aid (12+);
• 6.75 earned credit hours, minimum,
completed for each semester for three
quarter-time financial aid (9.0-11.5);
• 4.5 earned credit hours, minimum,
completed each semester for half-time
financial aid (6-8.5);
• A maximum eligibility time frame,
measured in attempted credit hours, of
150% of the program.
Financial aid will be denied or canceled
if a student’s records indicate failure or
inability to maintain good standing and/or
satisfactory academic progress. Students
are commonly found ineligible because
they have: (1) too low of a cumulative
GPA; (2) Audits, Drops, Failing “E”
Grades, Incompletes, Repeats, Challenge
Credits, Withdrawals or Unofficial
“UW” Withdrawals; (3) not completed
the required number of credit hours; (4)
not officially withdrawn from classes;
(5) completed more than the permitted
maximum hours; (6) failed to maintain
progress at a previous institution. A
repayment may also be owed.
If an aid recipient has the tuition and fee
account credited from financial assistance
before grades are available and it is
later determined that he/she is no longer
eligible, the Financial Aid & Scholarship
Office has the right to recover those aid
funds and to charge the student for the
tuition and fees due or to withdraw the
student from school.
A student who is not eligible or who loses
eligibility may still be able to (re)qualify. To
do so the individual must attend school,
at his/her own expense, and raise his/her
GPA to the required level and/or complete
the required number of credit hours.
Once the deficiencies are corrected, a
written appeal (forms available) must be
submitted to the Financial Aid Advisor(s)
for determination of eligibility status
and whether a new aid award can be
calculated. However, no payments and no
adjustments will be made to compensate
for aid lost during periods of ineligibility.
REFUNDS AND RETURNS
(see endnote at the end of this section)
Requirements for Federal and
State Aid
Students who officially withdraw from
school or drop classes no later than the
end of the refund period may be entitled
to a UVSC refund of tuition and fees. Time
schedules are published in the catalog
and/or class schedules.
• 2.0 (C) minimum cumulative Grade
If a refund is payable and the student
Catalog 2007–2008
17
Financial Aid
received any Federal, State or Institutional
scholarship or financial assistance funds
(except Federal Work-Study or UCOPE
Work) the entire amount of the UVSC
refund may be restored to the financial
aid programs. Federal regulations require
that funds be returned first to the Title IV
programs. The federal share is calculated
according to new federal guidelines.
Students who formally withdraw or
leave school unofficially (but for whom
attendance can be documented) may be
required to return all or part of the Title
IV funds disbursed. The amount of Title
IV assistance earned by the student must
be calculated for official and unofficial
withdrawals which occur through the
first 60% of the semester or term of
enrollment. Thereafter, no return of Title
IV funds is required. Important: Financial
aid recipients who completely withdraw
BEFORE ATTENDING 60% of the semester
will be required to repay financial aid.
If the amount of aid received by the student
exceeds the amount earned, according
to the percent of time the student was
enrolled, the excess must be returned to
the Title IV programs. The amount to be
returned is the “lesser of the unearned
amount of Title IV assistance or an amount
equal to the total institutional charges
the student incurs for the payment period
or period of enrollment for which the
assistance was awarded, multiplied by the
unearned percentage of awarded Title IV
grant and loan assistance.” (484B).
Students who do not officially withdraw
from school and who cannot document
their attendance are not considered to
have earned any financial assistance. Such
students will be responsible to return all
Title IV funds the College restores to the
Title IV accounts. In addition, all State
and Institutional funds received for noninstitutional costs must also be repaid.
Repayment of unearned funds is generally
due immediately. Students will be
notified of the repayment amount and
the repayment deadline for federal
funds. Institutional services such as grade
transcripts, enrollment for future terms,
and so on may be withheld until repayment
is received. Until Title IV funds are
returned, a student who owes repayment
will not receive aid at any other college
or university. Students who completely
withdraw for the semester after receiving
federal financial aid are not considered to
be making satisfactory academic progress.
VERIFICATION
Approximately one third of all applicants
are randomly selected by the Federal
Processor for a process called verification.
18
The UVSC Financial Aid & Scholarship
Office is required to verify the accuracy of
data in those selected files. There are three
reasons for doing so: (1) to reduce errors;
(2) to prevent mistakes that may result in
either the student or the Institution having
to repay Federal or State funds; (3) to
ensure that the limited dollars available for
financial assistance are offered to students
who are truly eligible for assistance.
If selected, you will be required to give
the Financial Aid & Scholarship Office
many forms and documents to help in the
verification process. The most common are
listed on the Document Checklist. Errors
cause considerable delay, so make sure to
report only accurate information.
Mountainland Advanced
Technology Center
personnel: Listed in the College Catalog.
Loan repayment: Information available
online at www.uheaa.org.
Prevention of drug and alcohol abuse:
Refer to the College Catalog or Class
Schedule.
Refund policy: Defined in the College
Catalog and Class Schedule.
Special facilities and services
available to disabled students: Contact
Accessibility Services.
Student Right-to-know and campus
security: Detailed reports listed in the
College Catalog and Class Schedule as
well as the UVSC web site.
Financial Aid may be available for some
programs through the MATC. Contact
them for further information.
ENDNOTES
STUDENT CONSUMER
INFORMATION
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Accreditation: Information regarding
the associations, agencies/and or
governmental bodies that accredit,
approve, or license the school and its
programs, can be found in the College
Catalog.
General institutional issues: Contact
the information desk or Student Service
Center.
Costs of attending UVSC: Outlined in
the College Catalog, Class Schedule, and
Admissions/Registration Office.
Degree programs, training, and
other education offered: Information
is available at Career and Academic
Counseling and in the College Catalog.
Details are available in the Financial Aid
and Scholarship Office for procedures and
requirements, including the following:
Budget and Resource
Awarding and Packaging
Satisfactory Academic Progress
Refunds and Returns
Verification and Documentation
Student Loan Limits
CONCLUSION
For additional information on financial
assistance or help completing forms,
please contact:
Financial Aid & Scholarship Office
Utah Valley State College
BA-105, Browning Administration
800 West University Parkway
Orem, Utah 84058-5999
Telephone: 801-863-8442
Fax: 801-863-8448
Equity in Athletics: Information on the
campus athletic programs including the
number and gender of participants that
compete as well as campus coach staff
information, can be found in the Athletic
Department.
GED program information: Available
on-line at www.uvsc.edu/testingservices/
ged.
Institution’s completion or graduation
rate and transfer-out rate: Contact
Career and Academic Counseling or
Graduation.
Instructional, laboratory, and other
physical plant facilities associated with
the academic programs: Refer to the
College Catalog or Class Schedule.
List of faculty and other instructional
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Academic Policies and Standards
ACADEMIC YEAR
The academic year consists of two semesters (Fall and Spring) of 15
weeks each. Additionally, classes may be taken during the Summer
term.
Academic Policies
and Standards
CLASS PERIODS/CREDITS
All credit hours are computed in semester hours. Three hours of
work per week are, on average, expected to earn one semester
credit hour; however, one credit hour may include any of the
following combinations of work:
a. One hour of lecture, plus a minimum of two hours of personal
work outside of class. (One hour of lecture is considered to be
50 minutes per week)
b. Three hours in a laboratory, with additional outside work in
preparation and documentation;
c. Any other combination appropriate to a particular course as
determined by the academic department.
All transfer courses taken on a quarter system will be converted to
semester hours using a three to two ratio. For example, a three
credit hour course from a quarter calendar institution transfers to
UVSC as two semester credits. A three semester credit course at
UVSC transfers to a college or university operating on the quarter
calendar as 4.5 quarter credits.
FULL-TIME STUDENT STATUS
UVSC considers students registered for 12 credits or more per
semester or summer to be full-time students. A 12 credit hour
minimum load is generally accepted by sponsoring agencies for
certifying full-time status. Financial aid recipients receiving full
benefits and students on scholarships are required to carry a
minimum of 12 credits per semester.
For students attending only the Fall and Spring semesters, 15 to
18 credits per semester is generally required to complete associate
degree programs within two academic years, assuming all
prerequisites are satisfied. (See individual major requirements for
exceptions.)
Credit Hour Loads in Excess of 20
Students who enroll in 21 or more credit hours Fall or Spring
semester or the equivalent hours for Summer term, must have
approval from Deans of appropriate schools.
GR ADING POLICIES
Success.
Grades are determined by instructors, based upon measures
determined by the instructor and department and may include:
evaluation of responses, written exercises and examinations,
performance exercises and examinations, classroom/laboratory
contributions, mastery of pertinent skills, etc. The letter grade “A”
is an exceptional grade indicating superior achievement; “B” is a
grade indicating commendable mastery; “C” indicates satisfactory
mastery and is considered an average grade; “D” indicates
substandard progress and insufficient evidence of ability to succeed
in sequential courses; “E” (failing) indicates inadequate mastery of
pertinent skills or repeated absences from class; “UW” indicates
unofficial withdrawal from class.
The following table indicates each grade variant and the equivalent
grade points for that variation.
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
19
Academic Policies and Standards
One Credit of:
Equals Grade Points:
A
4.0
A-
3.7
B+
3.4
B
3.0
B-
2.7
C+
2.4
C
2.0
C-
1.7
D+
1.4
D
1.0
D-
0.7
E
0.0
UW
0.0
The following grades are not computed
in the GPA:
W
I
AU
Official Withdrawal
Incomplete
Audit
CR
Credit Granted
NC
No Credit Granted
CEU
Noncredit—Continuing
Education Unit
and work to be completed must be signed
by the department chairperson, and turned
into the Registrar’s Office at the end of the
semester.
“I” grades should not be requested
nor given for lack of completion of
work because of procrastination or
dissatisfaction with the grade earned. As
a general rule, students should be passing
the course and lack less than 30% of the
course work in order to qualify for an
incomplete.
Specific arrangements to remove an “I”
grade must be made between the student
and the instructor. In most circumstances,
work to be completed should be finished
in the first two or three weeks following the
end of the semester/term in which the “I”
was given.
The incomplete work cannot be
completed by retaking the class. If
such an option is preferred, the student
should take the grade earned and then
retake the class for a better grade. The
grade for the later class will be calculated
in the GPA. In all cases, the “I” grade
must be made up within one year. If
it is not, the “I” grade will change to an
“E” on the transcript. “I” grades are not
computed in the GPA.
Repeating a Course
The GPA is determined by dividing the total
grade points earned (credit hours times
grade in points above) by the number of
semester hours attempted.
Students may view final grades
electronically on the UVLink system
after the end of the semester/term. All
ÀQDQFLDOREOLJDWLRQVWRWKH&ROOHJH
and “holds” on academic records
must be resolved before college
transcripts are issued.
Incomplete (I) Grades
Students are required to complete all
courses for which they are registered by the
end of the semester/term. In some cases,
a student may be unable to complete all
of the course work because of extenuating
circumstances. The term “extenuating
circumstances” includes: (1) incapacitating
illness which prevents a student from
attending classes (usually more than five
consecutive class days); (2) a death in
the immediate family; (3) change in work
schedule as required by employer; or (4)
other emergencies deemed acceptable by
the instructor.
If circumstances are deemed appropriate,
the student may petition the instructor for
time beyond the end of the semester/term
to finish the work. If the instructor agrees,
an “I” grade will be given. An Incomplete
Grade Form indicating work completed
20
No additional credit is allowed for
repeating a course in which the initial
grade was passing unless the course
number for the course ends in the
letter suffix “R,” (a course designed to
be repeatable for credit). For other
repeated courses, the most recent grade
will be used in the calculation of the
GPA. Upon successful completion of the
repeated course, the repeat is indicated
on the student’s transcript (E=Exclude,
I=Include). All work will remain on the
records, ensuring a true and accurate
academic history. (Note: Although not used
in computing the UVSC overall GPA for
UVSC purposes, many graduate programs,
such as law or dental school, include ALL
grades in calculating an overall GPA for
admissions criteria.)
Courses are not accepted from other
institutions for the purpose of posting a
repeat of a course already taken at UVSC.
Board of Regents policy requires that
tuition for repeating a course more than
once shall be charged at the full cost
of the instruction unless the institution
determines that the repetition is a result
of illness, accident or other cause beyond
the student’s control or unless the course
is prescribed by the student’s program of
study. This affects all courses beginning
January of 2003.
Catalog 2007–2008
Changing a Grade
POLICY
Any student who has reason to believe that
a grade assigned in a specific course was
not justified has the right to appeal that
grade.
PROCEDURE
Student Action—
Grades may be appealed within one
year of issuance in the following manner:
First - The student shall approach the
instructor of the course. He/she has
the right to discuss the merits of his/her
appeal in an informal and non-threatening
environment.
Second - After obtaining feedback from
the instructor regarding rationale for
assigning the original grade, and assuming
dissatisfaction still exists at the conclusion
of the first step, or if the original instructor
is no longer available, the student has
a right to submit an informal appeal to
the department head, either in writing or
verbally, in a consultation setting.
Finally - If a mutual understanding cannot
be reached in the second step, the student
has the right to submit a formal written
appeal through the Office of the Registrar
to the College Academic Standards
Committee, which exercises final authority
in adjudicating the appeal.
Faculty Action—
'XULQJWKHÀUVW\HDU after the issuance
of a grade, an instructor for a specific
class may submit a grade change form
with proper documentation directly to the
Records Office.
'XULQJWKHVHFRQGWKURXJKÀIWK
years, the grade change form must be
accompanied by an Academic Standards
Petition filled out by the student and
submitted by the course instructor or
department chair directly to the registrar.
If a grade change is requested and the
faculty member who gave the original
grade is no longer employed by UVSC, the
appropriate department chair may make
the change if it is warranted.
$IWHUÀYH\HDUV a grade change may
be considered only where evidence exists
to prove that an error occurred in the
recording of the original grade or extreme
extenuating circumstances existed. In the
latter case, an Academic Standards Petition
with appropriate documentation may be
submitted to the Office of the Registrar
for possible consideration by the College
Academic Standards Committee.
When the Records Office receives a
signed change of grade form from an
Utah Valley State
Academic Policies and Standards
instructor, the new grade(s) are entered
into the computer. An explanation of the
transaction is entered into the student’s
record, including what the old and new
grades are.
does so may receive a failing grade.
Reinstatement
WITHDR AWAL AND
REINSTATEMENT
Students who withdraw from the College
and then desire to be reinstated during the
same academic semester may do so by
obtaining clearance from the Registration
Office and by paying a $5 reinstatement
fee.
Withdrawal from Classes
Student Military Leave Procedure
For Fall and Spring Semesters, if a student
officially withdraws from a semester
class during the first three weeks of the
semester, no grade entry will appear on the
permanent record. For Summer term, and
block classes, no grade entry will appear
on the permanent record of students who
officially withdraw from classes through the
100% tuition refund date.
Students activated into military service
during an academic semester/term for
which they are currently enrolled have
the following options to choose from, in
addition to other alternatives provided by
existing policy and regulation. The student
is responsible to notify appropriate College
officials regarding the implementation of
the selected option.
For Fall and Spring Semesters, if a student
officially withdraws after the third week,
but prior to the last day to withdraw, the
withdrawal will appear on the permanent
record as a “W.” For Summer Terms
and block classes, if a student officially
withdraws after the 100% tuition refund
date, but prior to the last day to withdraw
classes, the withdrawal will appear on the
permanent record as a “W.”
A. A request to withdraw from school
will be honored with a full refund of
all tuition and fees paid. Nonpunitive
“W’s” will be recorded on the
transcript and the date of action
maintained on the student’s record.
If a student stops attending (but does not
officially withdraw) before the last day to
withdraw, he/she should receive a “UW.”
If a student stops attending (but does not
officially withdraw) beyond the last day
to withdraw, he/she may receive the
grade earned up to that point or an “E”, at
the instructor’s discretion.
“UW’s” are calculated into the grade point
average (GPA) as 0.00, the same as “E’s”
(failing grades).
Administrative Withdrawal
Students may be withdrawn from classes
by the administration if they: 1. Register,
but do not attend equipment or lab-related
courses within the first three days of a
semester, 2. Register for courses for which
they have not completed prerequisites,
3. Default on short-term loans, or 4.
Neglect to pay tuition and fees for any
given semester/term by the end of the
fourth week. Such changes to a student’s
schedule could affect financial aid,
scholarships and/or refunds.
B.
Incomplete grades may be negotiated
with individual faculty and/or
departments based on realistic means
of completing the required objectives
of the course(s). Where recommended
by the department (faculty), the
time limit for completing the “I”
may be extended. This option may
include “home study” as a means of
completing the required work with
faculty approval and where practical.
C. Current grades (grades earned at the
point of termination) may be issued
at the discretion of individual faculty.
This is also a negotiated option.
In all cases, the student activated
into military service is eligible for
readmission.
COLLEGE CREDIT
College credit at UVSC may be obtained
through the following methods: 1. UVSC
Credit (includes Cooperative Education),
2. Transfer Credit, 3. Challenge Credit,
4. Foreign Language Challenge Credit, 5.
Advanced Placement Credit, and 6. CLEP
(College Level Examination Program).
Withdrawal from the College
1. UVSC Credit
It is the responsibility of the student who
withdraws from school to complete an
Official Withdrawal Form and submit it
to One Stop. Complete withdrawal from
college may adversely affect financial aid
and/or Veterans’ benefits.
UVSC credit is obtained through
admittance to UVSC, registering for
classes, and satisfactorily completing all
required course work. Courses completed
through this method will receive a letter
grade which will be used in calculating
Grade Point Average (GPA).
Simply stopping attendance does not
qualify as a withdrawal, and a student who
Cooperative Education
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
Cooperative Education (Coop) offers
another avenue for students to obtain
UVSC college credit. Students enrolled
in cooperative education work as paid
employees of a business, agency, or
institution while enrolled at the College in
classes related to their career. Academic
credit for cooperative work experience is
granted according to the number of hours
a student works during the semester using
the following formula:
Credit Hours
Minimum Hours of Work
1
75
2
150
3
225
4
300
5
375
6
450
7
525
8
600
Coop credits are registered for at the same
time and in the same manner as UVSC
credits.
Courses completed through Cooperative
Education will receive a credit/nocredit grade which is not included in the
calculation of the GPA.
The maximum number of coop credits
that may be applied toward a certificate
is 8; a diploma is 14; an associate or
bachelor’s degree is 16 credit hours.
Departments define how coop credit is
applied to specific programs. Additional
coop credit may be taken (but not applied
toward graduation) with approval of the
cooperative education director and the
appropriate dean.
2. Transfer Credit
It is the student’s responsibility to have
official transcripts of any previous college
work completed elsewhere sent to the
UVSC Admissions Office. Transcripts
accepted as official by the UVSC
Admissions Office are automatically sent
to the Transfer Credit Office for evaluation
and posting. The Transfer Credit Office
may require the student to supply the
catalog, bulletin, or course outlines from
previous schools attended to assist in
determining the transferability of specific
courses. Transfer credit may or may not
apply to UVSC graduation requirements,
regardless of the number of credits
transferred. The Transfer Credit Office will
apply credit based on the appropriateness
to specific degree program requirements
and curricula.
Transfer courses with grades below “C-”
will not be accepted at UVSC. Transfer
courses are not calculated in the GPA.
21
Academic Policies and Standards
Individual departments reserve the right
to impose limits on the age and grade
level of transfer credit. There is no limit to
the number of transfer credits which may
be accepted; however, UVSC graduation
requirements such as residence, total
credits, and GPA must still be met.
Transfer courses will not be accepted from
other institutions for the purpose of posting
a repeat on a course already taken at
UVSC.
General Education for Transfer Students
For transfer students from any Utah State
Higher Education institution, UVSC shall
accept at full value all General Education
course work approved by the sending
institution, provided it meets the minimum
C- letter grade requirement, in any
area specified by the Board of Regents
document R470. These areas include
Composition, Quantitative Literacy, Fine
Arts, Humanities, Social and Behavioral
Science, Biology and Physical Science.
UVSC shall require transfer students to
complete any additional coursework
needed to satisfy the unmet portions of the
UVSC General Education requirements.
Previously completed General Studies
course work shall be applied to assure
the best possible fit with UVSC’s General
Education requirements. As each transfer
student’s requirements may vary, see the
Graduation Office (BA 114) for specific
requirements.
An AA or an AS degree earned at any
USHE institution will meet the General
Education requirements of UVSC.
Upper Division Course Work
Under rare circumstances, and only if
subject content is equivalent, 1000 or
2000-level courses transferred from
other institutions may be substituted for
UVSC upper-division courses. However,
these courses will not satisfy upperdivision credit-hour requirements. The
baccalaureate degree requires a minimum
of 40 hours of upper-division (3000 and
4000-level) credit.
Institutions of Higher Education (NEASCCIHE)
• Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools/Commission on Colleges
(SACS-CC)
• Western Association of Schools and
Colleges/Accrediting Commission for
Community and Jr. Colleges (WASC-Jr.)
• Western Association of Schools and
Colleges/Accrediting Commission for Sr.
Colleges and Universities (WASC-Sr.)
Individual departments may choose to
make exceptions to this list on a course by
course basis.
Military courses are evaluated using the
ACE recommendations from the Guide to
the Evaluation of Education Experiences in
the Armed Services.
International and Foreign Institutions
The Graduation/Transfer Office, working
with department advisors, is authorized
to evaluate credit from foreign colleges,
universities, and/or International
Baccalaureate (IB) Diplomas after a student
has been admitted to UVSC. International
students requesting transfer of credit from
foreign institutions of higher education
must submit a transcript from an approved
Foreign Credentials evaluation Service.
See BA 114 for a list of these accepted
services.
Transfer courses from international and
foreign institutions are not calculated in the
GPA.
3. Experiential/Challenge Credit
(Equivalency Examination and/or
Documentation of Earned Competency)
Credit for any course that appears in
the current catalog may be awarded
to individuals who can prove through
appropriate assessment and/or
documentation that they have already
acquired the equivalent knowledge and/or
expertise required for successful completion
of that course.
To receive experiential/challenge credit for
a specific course, the student must
U.S. Institutions outside of Utah
For transfer credit to be accepted by UVSC,
the institution from which credit is to be
transferred must be accredited by one of
the following regional associations:
• Middle States Association of Colleges
and Schools (MSA)
• Northwest Association of Colleges and
Universities (NACU)
• North Central Association of Colleges
and Schools (NCA)
• New England Association of Schools
and Colleges, Inc./Commission on
22
a. be admitted to the College and
currently enrolled for at least three
semester hours of credit;
b. complete the semester in which the
challenge credit is awarded with at
least three earned semester hours of
credit, excluding the challenge credit;
c. obtain department chair approval
prior to step d;
d. pay in advance a nonrefundable
processing fee;
e. complete a comprehensive
examination (theoretical and/or
applied) with at least a “C-” grade
Catalog 2007–2008
and/or provide documentation of
practical experience to the satisfaction
of the department chairperson and
dean showing course objectives have
been met; OR complete an advanced
course with a grade of “C-” or higher
as a validation procedure (if deemed
necessary by the department);
f. pay a fee for each approved credit
hour.
Students may not challenge a class for
which they are/or have been enrolled.
No more than 25 percent of the credits
applied toward an associate degree,
diploma, or certificate may be awarded
through challenge credit. Regardless of the
certificate, diploma, or degree (to include
bachelor of science degrees), 16 credithours of challenge credit is the maximum
that may be applied.
A course may be challenged through prior
permission of the department chairperson
through enrollment in an advanced class
that typically would require previous course
work when there is valid evidence that the
student may have already achieved the
required competency. The competency
may have been attained through work
experience and/or private study. If the
student is successful in the advanced
class (grade “C-” or better), he/she may
apply for credit, through the offering
department’s chairperson, for classes taken
as a sequence up to the challenged class.
When a class is successfully challenged, a
fee is charged for each credit hour.
A specific course may be challenged only
once. Duplicate credit will not be awarded.
Credits achieved by the challenge
procedure outlined above are recorded as
“CR” on the official transcript and will be
posted to the transcript at the end of the
semester/term.
4. Language Challenge Credit
Students may obtain an Experiential
Language Credit Request Form in the
UVSC Language Department.
Students who have acquired proficiency in
languages offered at UVSC by means
other than college courses (high school,
foreign residency, etc.) may earn up to 18
credit hours. To qualify for these credits,
a student must complete a course in that
language at a higher level than the credits
for which he/she applies; the grade in that
course must be a “C-” or better.
To qualify for credit for language courses
not offered at UVSC, a student may
take the appropriate nationally normed
language test at an accredited four-year
college or university and provide UVSC
with the satisfactory (C-) test results. In this
circumstance, the student should meet with
Utah Valley State
Academic Policies and Standards
the language department chairperson to
ascertain the maximum language credits
that may be applied to any degree from
UVSC.
Proficiency tests to determine placement
(not credit) in advanced courses are
administered in the UVSC Assessment
Center prior to the beginning of each
semester. Students unsure of their
language skills should take the test or
receive permission from the course
instructor before registering for advanced
classes.
Students who qualify for credit under the
above provisions (for example, they register
for, and successfully complete, Spanish
2010 with at least a “C-” grade, thus
qualifying for the credits for the previous
courses—1010 and 1020) must petition
for those credits (application forms are
available in the Languages Department)
and pay a fee for each credit hour. No
additional tuition will be charged for
those credits. The credits will be listed on
transcripts as “CR” and are not calculated
in the GPA.
Additional information regarding language
challenge credit and other policies are
available from the Languages Department.
5. Advanced Placement Credit
In recognition of the Advanced Placement
Program sponsored by the College
Entrance Examination Board, students who
complete an Advanced Placement course
in high school and receive a grade of 3,
4, or 5 on the corresponding Advanced
Placement Examination may be granted
up to 10 credits in that subject. Credit
will be posted as a “CR” grade and will
not be calculated in the GPA. Students
having AP test scores of 3 or higher should
contact the Graduation/Transfer Office to
ensure posting of the results to their UVSC
transcripts.
If all residence, credit, and grade point
average requirements have been met,
there is no limit to the number of Advanced
Placement credits which may be accepted.
6. CLEP Credit (College Level
Examination Program)
Students may receive college credit for
CLEP exams as specified on the approved
list in the Graduation/Transfer Office.
Additionally, students intending to transfer
to another institution from UVSC should
articulate with their intended transfer
institution to gain advance information on
how that institution accepts CLEP credit.
CLEP credit will be posted as a “CR”
grade and will not be calculated in the
GPA.
The amount of credit given through CLEP
Utah Valley State
subject examinations is determined by the
appropriate departments. No more than
16 total CLEP hours maybe awarded.
will be on academic warning and will be
required to attend a short workshop before
the hold will be removed from his/her
student record.
COURSE NUMBER SYSTEM
Academic Probation
0000-0999 Remedial or preparatory
noncredit courses; may not be counted
toward a certificate, diploma, associate,
or bachelor’s degree. Technical,
nontransferable courses may count toward
a certificate.
1. A student with a cumulative GPA below
the 2.0 minimum will be on academic
probation.
2. A student will be removed from
academic probation when their
cumulative GPA and current GPA are 2.0
or above.
1000-2999 Lower division (freshman and
sophomore courses); courses designed as
transfer courses; count toward a certificate,
diploma, associate, and/or bachelor’s
degree.
3000-4990 Upper division (junior and
senior courses); courses designed to count
toward a bachelor’s degree, or any other
degree as required by department.
Learning Enrichment courses with 1000
level numbers do not satisfy General
Education requirements for the associate
or bachelor’s degrees. These classes may
count as electives for the Associate of Arts,
Associate of Science, and Bachelor of
Science degrees.
The letter suffix “R” indicates that a course
is repeatable for credit (example: PES
161R). Course descriptions indicate number
of “repeats” allowed.
Variable and partial credit is indicated
by letter suffixes of “A,” “B,” “C,” etc.
(example: ACC 201A = 4 credits and ACC
201B = 2 credits). Changing the hours
of credit for a variable-credit class after
registration may be done only through the
add/drop (class change) procedure. Such
changes must be made prior to completion
of that partial course.
“Honors” credit classes are identified
on the transcript by an “H” following the
course number (example: ENGL 225H).
ACADEMIC STANDARDS
Career and Academic Counseling
Center
Room: WB 147
Telephone: 863-8425
The mission of Academic Standards at
Utah Valley State College (UVSC) is to
help students succeed academically.
Students are considered to be succeeding
academically if they continue in good
standing (defined as earning at least a 2.0
GPA on a 4.0 scale), graduate, or leave
UVSC in good standing. To this end, the
following policies have been established:
Academic Warning
A student with a current GPA below 2.0
Catalog 2007–2008
Suspension
1. A student who fails to achieve both a
current and cumulative GPA of at least
2.0 after two semesters of probation will
be suspended from UVSC.
2. A student who has been suspended
must petition the Academic Appeals
Committee in order to register for a
subsequent semester.
3. If a student’s petition is granted, the
conditions and length of probation will
be determined by the Academic Appeals
Committee. When the student has
completed the terms of probation and
his/her grades are consistently above 2.0
for a least two semesters, the student will
be returned to good standing at UVSC.
Dismissal
When a student fails to comply with the
terms of probation, as determined by the
Academic Appeals Committee, the student
will be dismissed from UVSC. Such a
student has exhausted his/her opportunity
to study at UVSC in a degree-seeking
program until he avails himself of the
appeals process.
Re-Admission
Students who withdraw from UVSC with
a final semester GPA of less than 2.0 but
have a cumulative GPA higher than a 2.0,
will be readmitted on probation and must
meet with their advisor to establish an
academic plan.
Any student with a cumulative GPA below
2.0 who withdraws from UVSC must
petition the Academic Appeals Committee
in order to be readmitted.
Appeals From Suspension or
Dismissal Status
A student subject to suspension or
dismissal may petition the Academic
Appeals Committee for an exception to
the Academic Standards Policy. To do so,
he/she must submit a written appeal to
the Appeals Coordinator. In this petition
the student may request that he/she be
granted a hearing before the Academic
Appeals Committee. The petition should
set forth the extenuating circumstances that
would warrant the granting of a waiver of
the student suspension, or dismissal status.
Evidence should be presented which would
23
Academic Policies and Standards
indicate that the student has carefully
considered and reassessed educational
objectives and has eliminated those factors
which led to suspension, or dismissal status.
If a student is dissatisfied with the decision
of the Academic Appeals Committee, the
student has the right to present a written
appeal to the Vice President for Student
Services, within two weeks following
notification of the committee’s decision.
Following a review of the appeal, the Vice
President for Student Services will make the
final decision.
Academic Renewal
To facilitate graduation and future
academic pursuits for students who have
had a period of study that does not reflect
their academic potential, UVSC will allow
a student to petition the Registrar for
academic renewal once during his/her
enrollment at the college. This process
will allow the removal of some previous
academic work for computation of GPA
or from credit towards graduation. To be
eligible, the following conditions must be
met:
exceptions will be made to the aforesaid
conditions. Students should be aware that
this policy MAY NOT BE ACCEPTED at
transfer institutions. Academic renewal
may be requested only once during a
student’s academic career at UVSC.
Academic Distinction
The Dean’s list recognizes those who
have demonstrated outstanding academic
performance during a term or semester. To
be eligible:
1. The student must complete 12 semester
hours or more in any semester and a
commensurate number of hours in any
term.
2. The student must earn a semester GPA
of 3.6 or above.
1. The student must be currently enrolled at
UVSC.
2. At the time the petition is filed, a
minimum of two years must have elapsed
since the most recent course work to be
eliminated was completed.
3. Before the petition may be filed, the
student must have completed at least
30 semester hours of UVSC course work
within a minimum cumulative GPA of
2.50. This course work must have been
completed after the course work being
considered for elimination.
The student may have a maximum of two
semesters/terms of academic course work
disregarded in all calculations regarding
the computation of total credits and
cumulative GPA. The petition to be filed by
the student will specify the semesters/terms
to be disregarded.
If the petition qualifies under this policy,
the student’s permanent academic
record will be suitably annotated to
indicate that no work taken during the
disregarded semester(s) and/or term(s),
even if satisfactory, may apply toward the
computation of credits, GPA, academic
standing, and/or graduation requirements.
However, all work will remain on the
records, ensuring a true and accurate
academic history. The word “Academic
Renewal” and the affected semester(s)/
term(s) will be annotated on the student’s
transcript.
This policy will not be used for individual
courses, or for students already holding
associate or baccalaureate degrees. Since
this is already a policy of exception, no
24
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Graduation and General Education
GR ADUATION OFFICE
Room BA 114
801-863-8438
Graduation and
General Education
Utah Valley State College offers the following degrees: Bachelor
of Applied Technology; Bachelor of Arts; Bachelor of Fine Arts;
Bachelor of Science; Associate in Science; Associate in Arts;
Associate in Science in Business; Associate in Science in Nursing;
Associate in Applied Science; Associate in Pre-Engineering;
Diplomas, and Certificates are also offered.
GENER AL GR ADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Students are expected to familiarize themselves with the rules and
regulations of both the College and their specific majors. Detailed
information concerning graduation requirements is available in
this catalog as part of department descriptions. Responsibility
for satisfying all graduation requirements rests upon the student.
Utah Valley State College reserves the right to change graduation
requirements at any time.
The College confers degrees, diplomas or certificates upon students
who meet both the General Education requirements of the College
and the specific requirements of one of the academic departments.
Credit Requirement
A candidate for a Bachelor’s Degree must complete a minimum
of 120 semester hours, 40 of which must be upper-division credits
(level 3000 or above); an Associate Degree, a minimum of 60
semester hours; a diploma, a minimum of 50 semester hours;
and a one-year certificate, a minimum of 30 semester hours. In
addition to the appropriate number of credit hours, to be eligible
for graduation a candidate must show satisfactory completion of
appropriate program requirements.
Computer Literacy
It is recommended students complete a computer literacy course
before Graduation. The course should cover the areas of: Word
Processing Applications; Spreadsheet Applications; Presentations
Applications; and Database Applications. The recommended
course is DGM 2010. A course (DGM 1010) is available that
covers Basic Computer Concepts/Operating Systems and Basic
Internet/E-mail Applications. All School of Business Graduates
are required to satisfy computer proficiency requirements. See your
advisor for specific details.
Grade Point Average Requirement
A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C) is required
for graduation. In some programs specific course grades below
2.0 will not be accepted for graduation (see individual program
requirements).
Graduation Catalog Requirement
Success.
Utah Valley State
Candidates for graduation will be held to the requirements of the
catalog under which they were admitted. Students have a maximum
of 7 years to complete Bachelor Degree Programs and 5 years to
complete all others. In the case of Bachelor’s degree programs, the
seven year limit begins when a student is formally matriculated into
the program. When students take longer than the given years to
complete, they must choose from any one catalog published within
the accepted period prior to their graduation. Programs that are
no longer being offered may not be pursued by students who were
not admitted or formally matriculated in that program during the
accepted period of time. Students may not combine portions of
different catalogs to fulfill graduation requirements. Once a catalog
is selected, students must abide by all the graduation requirements
specified within that catalog. Minors can only be sought if offered
during that catalog year.
Catalog 2007–2008
25
Graduation and General Education
Global Intercultural Requirement
Beginning Fall of 2008, a new graduation
requirement, the Global Intercultural
Requirement, will be put in place for all
students graduating with a Bachelor’s
following 2008, or later, catalog
requirements. The purpose of the Global/
Intercultural requirement is to assist our
students to become better prepared to
understand and participate in the global
and diverse cultural interdependencies
that characterize our world. The Global/
Intercultural requirement is a
graduation requirement at the
bachelor degree level. Courses that
may be used to fulltfill this requirement will
be coded with a GI course attribute.
Residence Requirement
At least 30 credit hours in residence at
UVSC or satellite sites are required for a
Bachelor’s Degree, with 10 hours earned
during the last 45 earned hours. Twoyear degrees require at least 20 hours in
residence. One-year certificates require at
least 10 hours in residence.
Multiple Degrees
Individuals may earn either an AS or an
AA degree and may, in addition, earn
AAS degree(s) and bachelor degree(s). A
student having an AS/AA degree may not
earn another AS/AA degree at UVSC.
However, a student having an AAS degree
from another college may earn additional
AAS degree(s) and/or an AS/AA degree
at UVSC, as well as earning a bachelor’s
degree and multiple emphases.
Additional AAS degrees may be awarded
when all requirements for each degree are
satisfied. A second bachelor’s degree
may be awarded when all requirements for
both degrees are satisfied, along with the
following:
1. All UVSC general education
requirements must be satisfied.
2. Thirty semester hours beyond the
original degree must be completed.
3. Twenty semester hours of the thirty hours
in No. 2 above must be completed at
UVSC (resident hours).
4. Approval of a second bachelor’s by the
supervising dean.
Dual Majors
(One degree–two majors)
A degree with dual majors may be awarded
when students complete all requirements
for two approved degrees, but have not
met the required “Thirty semester hours
beyond the original degree” requirement
as listed above for a Second Bachelor’s
Degree. Students receive a single Bachelor
degree and diploma, but have two different
majors listed on their transcript and
26
diploma.
Multiple Emphases
Other information regarding the dual
major:
Additional emphases (not tracks or
specialties) under a specific bachelor’s
degree may be earned by completion
of the requirements for those emphases.
Additional emphases will appear on
transcripts, but no additional diplomas will
be awarded.
1. Students apply for graduation for one
degree, and only one degree type, such
as a Bachelor of Science, or a Bachelor
of Arts.
2. In order to be awarded a dual major,
both majors must be completed during
the semester when (or prior to) applying
for graduation.
3. Students may have no more than
3 substitutions from the two majors
combined.
4. Minors may not be obtained in either
major, but may be awarded from another
area if all requirements are met.
5. Credits may exceed the maximum 126
credit-hour limit.
6. Students may not apply for a dual major
if they have already graduated in one of
the majors.
7. Students may not apply for graduation
for one of the dual majors separately
after being awarded the dual major
degree.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Bachelor of Arts/Science Degree
Graduation requirements for the Bachelor
of Arts/Science Degrees are:
• Completion of a minimum of 120
semester credits, or more if specified by
program requirements:
• Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C)
or above. Departments may require a
higher GPA;
• Residency hours - minimum of 30 credit
hours through course attendance at
UVSC, with at least 10 hours earned in
the last 45 hours;
• At least 40 credit hours in upper division
courses;
• Completion of general education
requirements. See General Education
Section for specific courses required for
graduation;
• Completion of specific departmental
(major) requirements.
For a Bachelor of Arts degree in programs
offering the degree, students must
complete 18 credit hours of course work
from one language to include the 1010,
1020, 2010 and 2020 levels, or transferred
equivalents. Some ESL course work may
be used to fulfill this requirement. See the
ESL department for specific details.
NOTE: Academic Departments may
UHTXLUHVSHFLÀFJHQHUDOHGXFDWLRQ
courses in addition to major
requirements.
Catalog 2007–2008
Associate in Science/Arts Degree*
Graduation requirements for the Associate
in Science/Arts Degree are:
• Completion of a minimum of 60 or more
semester credits;
• Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C)
or above. Departments may require
higher GPA;
• Residency hours - minimum of 20 credit
hours earned through course attendance
at UVSC;
• Completion of general education
requirements. See General Education
Section for specific courses required for
graduation;
• Completion of specific department
(major) requirements.
NOTE: Academic departments may
UHTXLUHVSHFLÀFJHQHUDOHGXFDWLRQ
courses in addition to major
requirements.
*The Associate in Arts Degree differs from
the Associate in Science Degree in that a
minimum of 10 credits must be earned in
the same Foreign Language.
Language Proficiency
A second language is required to obtain
the Associate in Arts Degree. This
language must be different from the
student’s native language. Language
proficiency may be demonstrated by any
one of the following methods:
1. Ten credits of the same language taken
at UVSC or transferred from another
college; or
2. Application of foreign language
challenge credit as described in the
Foreign Language Challenge Procedures
(available from the Languages
Department Chair).
Language credit does not apply to the
General Education Humanities Distribution
area (except for any 2020 course) but
will apply as elective credit in the AS/AA
degree and as Humanities credit for the
AAS degree.
Associate in Applied Science
Graduation requirements for the Associate
in Applied Science Degree are:
• Completion of a minimum of 63
semester credits;
Utah Valley State
Graduation and General Education
• Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C)
or above;
• Residency hours - minimum of 20 credit
hours earned through course attendance
at UVSC;
• Completion of department general
education requirements;
• Completion of specific department major
requirements.
Diploma
Diplomas require a minimum of 50 credits
in a specialty area. Some programs
offering AAS degrees also offer diplomas.
Not all departments offer diplomas. See
specific department program listings for
details.
&HUWLÀFDWH
Certificates require a minimum of 30 credit
hours. Many departments offer one-year
certificates. Not all departments offer
a certificate. See specific department
program listings for details.
GENER AL GR ADUATION
INFORMATION
Application for Graduation
Graduation is not automatic. Prospective
graduates must complete an Application
for Graduation form (obtained from the
Graduation Office, BA 114 or online), fulfill
all requirements listed thereon, turn the
application in to the Graduation Office
by the deadline on the application. The
graduation fee must be paid to the cashier
prior to graduation.
APPLICATION DEADLINES ARE:
Fall Semester Deadline: First Friday in
October
Spring Semester Deadline: First Friday in
February
Summer Semester Deadline: First Friday
in June
Graduation applications are processed
each semester. Diplomas are mailed to
graduates after final grades are reviewed
and graduation requirements are verified
as completed. Students failing to complete
graduation requirements by the end of the
semester for which they have applied must
reapply for graduation and pay another
graduation fee.
COMMENCEMENT
Commencement exercises are held
once each year at the end of Spring
semester. Students who have completed
their graduation requirements during the
Summer, Fall or Spring of that academic
year are invited to participate. Attendance
is desirable, but not mandatory.
Utah Valley State
FINANCIAL HOLDS
Candidates for graduation who owe money
to Utah Valley State College will not receive
their diplomas until all debts are paid.
GR ADUATION WITH HONORS
Honors at graduation are available to
students who meet the following minimum
cumulative grade point averages: (Honors
designations are computed on hours
completed; 20 hours minimum for
Associate degrees; 30 hours minimum for
Bachelor’s degrees.)
Two-year Degrees
Associate in Science/Associate in Arts
Honors GPA 3.60
High Honors GPA 3.80
UVSC Honors Program
GPA 3.50
(Other criteria required by Honors
Department)
Phi Theta Kappa
GPA 3.50
(Other criteria required by Club)
Bachelor’s Degrees
Cum Laude GPA 3.60
Magna Cum Laude GPA 3.80
Summa Cum Laude GPA 3.90
Valedictorians
Each of the Schools of the College will
select a valedictorian from a list supplied
by the Graduation office of candidates
graduating with honors during the
academic year. Schools with bachelor’s
degrees will select a valedictorian for both
associate degree graduates and one for
bachelor’s degree graduates.
Approved guidelines will provide the
framework for the process of selecting
valedictorians.
GENER AL EDUCATION
INFORMATION
General Education assists students to
become independent, creative, and
productive learners. The knowledge and
skills gained from General Education
provide a broad educational background
that benefits students for a lifetime,
regardless of their career paths.
Completion of the Utah Valley State
College general education requirements
will fulfill the general education
requirements at all colleges and universities
within the Utah System of Higher
Catalog 2007–2008
Education. However, certain majors,
both at this institution and other Utah
institutions, may require VSHFLÀFgeneral
education courses. While UVSC has
not articulated these courses with higher
education institutions outside the State
of Utah, they will generally articulate to
other accredited colleges and universities
in the United States. It is the responsibility
of students to complete the appropriate
general education courses required by their
departments regardless of the generalized
list printed in this catalog.
NOTE: Students taking general education
courses without having declared a specific
major are advised in the Career and
Academic Counseling Center, WB 147,
Phone: 801-863-8425. Students who have
declared a specific major that is taught at
UVSC will be directed to the appropriate
advisor upon completion of new student
orientation and assessment activities.
Department Articulation
Agreements
In addition to general education courses,
many departments have articulated
specific courses that transfer to help fulfill
baccalaureate degree requirements.
Information concerning these courses
may be obtained from UVSC department
advisors or the Graduation and Transfer
Services Office, BA 114.
GENER AL EDUCATION CODE
SYSTEM
General Education course designator
codes aid students and transfer institutions
to identify how general education courses
meet graduation requirements.
The following list identifies general
education core and distribution courses as
they apply to the Associate in Science/Arts
Degrees and Bachelor of Science/Arts
Degrees:
AS - American Institutions
BB - Biology
CC - English Composition
FE - Fitness for Life
FF - Fine Arts
HH - Humanities
IH - Ethics and Values
LH - Foreign Language
MM - Mathematics
PP - Physical Science
SS - Social Science
TE - Personal Health
XF - Must be taken with another course
to equal FF (see department)
In addition to the courses listed above,
the courses listed below also fulfill
the minimum requirements in general
27
Graduation and General Education
education for the Associate in Applied
Science Degree:
GB - Biology
GC - English Composition
GE - Health or Physical Education
GF - Fine Arts
GH - Humanities
GM - Mathematics
GP - Physical Science
GS - Social Science
The “G” coding also identifies courses
which count as general education electives
for the Associate in Arts/Science Degrees
or Bachelor of Arts/Science Degrees.
HIST 1700 American Civilization
HIST 1740 US Economic History
POLS 1100 American National Government
Complete the following: ............................5 credits
PHIL 2050 Ethics and Values
HLTH 1100 Personal Health & Wellness
or
PES 1097 Fitness for Life
Distribution Requirements........................18 credits
A. SCIENCE
All Majors must complete One course of
Biology (BIOL 1010 or BIOL 1610 highly
recommended), One course of Physical
Science and One additional course from
either of those two areas for a minimum total
of 9 credits. One Lab Course is recommended.
Biology
GENER AL EDUCATION
REQUIREMENTS
Associate in Arts/Science Degree
Bachelor of Arts/Science Degree
These requirements satisfy the general
education requirements for both the
Associate in Science and the Associate
in Arts Degrees, as well as the Bachelor
of Arts/Science Degree at UVSC, taking
into account adjustments that may be
required by academic departments to fulfill
their specific needs. Honors courses with
the same prefix and number also satisfy
distribution requirements. Total core and
distribution is 35 credits.
Core Requirements
These courses provide basic skills in logic,
math, written and oral communications,
health, and fitness.
Complete the following: ...........................6 credits
ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
and
ENGL 2010 Intermediate Writing—Humanities/
Social Science
or
ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing—Science and
Technology
Complete one: ................................3 or 4 credits
MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning .....................
(recommended for Humanities or Arts majors)
or
MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science majors)
or
MATH 1050 College Algebra(recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions Majors*)
or
One course that requires MATH 1050 as a
prerequisite (excluding MATH 1060)
or
An Advanced Placement (AP) Mathematics Test with
a score of 3 or higher.
*All Other majors should check with their advisor
for the correct course.
American Institutions
Complete one of the following ...................3 credits
POLS 1000 American Heritage
HIST 2700 & 2710 US History to/since 1877
28
BIOL 1010 General Biology.............................. 3.0
BIOL 1070 Genetics......................................... 3.0
BIOL 1200 Prehistoric Life ................................ 3.0
BIOL 1500 Physical Anthropology..................... 3.0
BIOL 1610 College Biology I ............................ 5.0
BIOL 204R Natural History Excursion* .............. 3.0
BIOL 2500 Environmental Biology .................... 3.0
BOT 2050 Field Botany .................................... 3.0
BOT 2100 Flora of Utah .................................. 3.0
BOT 2400 Plant Kingdom ............................... 4.0
HLTH 3400 Human Diseases ........................... 3.0
MICR 2060 Microbiology for Health Professions 4.0
NUTR 2020 Nutrition Through Life Cycle ......... 3.0
ZOOL 1090 Introduction to Human Anatomy/
Physiology ..................................................... 3.0
ZOOL 2320 Human Anatomy ......................... 4.0
ZOOL 2400 Animal Kingdom ......................... 4.0
* May be used as the third science only
Physical Science
ASTR 1040 Elementary Astronomy……………… 3.0
CHEM 1010 Introduction to Chemistry.............. 3.0
CHEM 1110 Elementary Chemistry for the Health
Sciences ........................................................ 4.0
CHEM 1120 Elementary Organics
Bio-Chemistry ................................................ 4.0
CHEM 1210 Principles of Chemistry I................ 4.0
CHEM 1220 Principles of Chemistry II............... 4.0
GEO 1010 Introduction to Geology.................. 3.0
GEO 1020 Prehistoric Life................................ 3.0
GEO 1080 Introduction to Oceanography........ 3.0
GEO 1220 Historical Geology……………………3.0
GEO 204R Natural History Excursion* .............. 3.0
METO 1010 Introduction to Meteorology .......... 3.0
PHSC 1000 Survey of Physical Science.............. 3.0
PHYS 1010 Elementary Physics.......................... 3.0
PHYS 1040 Elementary Astronomy.................... 3.0
PHYS 1070 Cultural Astronomy......................... 3.0
PHYS 1080 Life in the Universe......................... 3.0
PHYS 2010 College Physics I ............................ 4.0
PHYS 2020 College Physics II ........................... 4.0
PHYS 2210 Physics for Scientists/Engineers I ..... 4.0
PHYS 2220 Physics for Scientists/Engineers II .... 4.0
*May be used as the third science only
B. HUMANITIES—One course minimum
AMST 2000 Introduction to American Studies ... 3.0
ASL 2020 Intermediate American Sign
Language II ................................................... 3.0
CHIN 2020 Intermediate Chinese II.................. 3.0
COMM 1020 Public Speaking.......................... 3.0
COMM 1050 Introduction to Speech
Communication ............................................. 3.0
COMM 1130 Writing for Mass Media ............... 3.0
COMM 1500 Introduction to Mass
Communications............................................ 3.0
COMM 2010 Mass Communication and Society3.0
ENGL 2030 Rhetoric of Persuasion ................... 3.0
ENGL 2130 Science Fiction .............................. 3.0
Catalog 2007–2008
ENGL 2200 Introduction to Literature ............... 3.0
ENGL 2210 Introduction to Folklore ................ 3.0
ENGL 2230 Myths/Legends in Literature ........... 3.0
ENGL 2250 Creative Procedure/Image Writing. 3.0
ENGL 2300 Shakespeare................................. 3.0
ENGL 2310 Technical Communication.............. 3.0
ENGL 2510 American Literature before 1865.... 3.0
ENGL 2520 American Literature after 1865 ...... 3.0
ENGL 2600 Critical Introduction to Literature ... 3.0
ENGL 2610 British Literature Before 1800......... 3.0
ENGL 2620 British Literature After 1800 ........... 3.0
ENGL 3760 World Literature ............................ 3.0
FREN 2020 Intermediate French II .................... 3.0
GER 2020 Intermediate German II ................... 3.0
HUM 1010 Humanities Through the Arts ........... 3.0
HUM 2010 Arts in Humanistic Traditions I ......... 3.0
HUM 2020 Arts in Humanistic Traditions II........ 3.0
IS 3000 Introduction to Integrated Studies ........ 3.0
JPNS 2020 Intermediate Japanese II................. 3.0
PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy ............... 3.0
PHIL 1250 Logical Thinking and Philososphical
Writing .......................................................... 3.0
PHIL 1610 Western Religions ............................ 3.0
PHIL 1620 Eastern Religions ............................. 3.0
PHIL 2110 Ancient Philosophy ........................... 3.0
PHIL 2130 Medieval Philosophy ........................ 3.0
PHIL 2150 Early Modern Philosophy.................. 3.0
PHIL 3400 Philosophy of Science ...................... 3.0
PHIL 3530 Environmental Ethics ....................... 3.0
PORT 2020 Intermediate Portuguese II ............. 3.0
RUS 2020 Intermediate Russian II ..................... 3.0
SPAN 2020 Intermediate Spanish II .................. 3.0
C. FINE ARTS—One course minimum
ART 1010 Introduction to Visual Arts ................. 3.0
ART 1050 Photography I................................... 3.0
ART 1110 Drawing I.......................................... 3.0
ART 1340 Sculpture I........................................ 3.0
ART 1350 Ceramics I ....................................... 3.0
ART 1630 Introduction to Landscape Prainting .. 3.0
ART 1650 Watermedia I ................................... 3.0
ART 1680 Fundamentals of Fiber Design........... 3.0
ART 1690 Glass Design and Construction......... 3.0
ART 1700 Process of Jewelry/ Metal Design ...... 3.0
ART 1720 Architectural Rendering..................... 3.0
ART 2110 Drawing I I ....................................... 3.0
ART 2630 Painting I ......................................... 3.0
ART 2710 Alternative Photography I ................. .3.0
ART 2720 Color Photography ........................... 3.0
ART 3400 Fundamentals of Art Education ......... 2.0
ARTH 2710 History of Art to the Renaissance..... 3.0
ARTH 2720 History of Art from the Renaissance 3.0
DANC 1010 Dance as an Art Form................... 3.0
DANC 2110 Orientation to Dance .................... 3.0
MUSC 1010 Introduction to Music .................... 3.0
MUSC 1100 Fundamentals of Music ................. 2.0
To Be Taken With One of the Following:
MUSC 120R A Cappella Choir.................. 2.0
MUSC 122R Chamber Choir......................1.0
MUSC 124R UVSC Concert Choir ............. 2.0
MUSC 126R Show Choir (Encore).............. 2.0
MUSC 130R Symphonic Band ................... 2.0
MUSC 132R Jazz Ensemble....................... 2.0
MUSC 170R Symphony Orchestra ............ 2.0
MUSC 172R Chamber Orchestra .............. 1.0
MUSC 3010 Music History/Literature I .............. 3.0
MUSC 3020 Music History /Literature II............ 3.0
THEA 1013 Introduction to Theater .................. 3.0
THEA 1023 Introduction to Film....................... 3.0
THEA 2313 Film History I.................................. 3.0
Complete 2 of the following to equal 1 Fine Arts
Distribution course*
DANC 3400 Dance in Elementary School*...... 2.0
MUSC 3400 Music in Elementary School*....... 2.0
THEA 3713 Child Theater Elementary School*. 2.0
D. SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE—One
course minimum
ANTH 1010 Social/Cult Anthropology............... 3.0
ANTH 1070 Multicultural Societies.................... 3.0
Utah Valley State
Graduation and General Education
ANTH 1500 Physical Anthropology ................... 3.0
ANTH 1800 Introduction to American Indian
Studies........................................................... 3.0
ANTH 3150 Culture/Ecology/Health................. 3.0
ARCH 1100 Introduction to Archaeology........... 3.0
CJ 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice ........... 3.0
COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communications .... 3.0
ECFS 1400 Marriage ....................................... 3.0
ECFS 2400 Family Relations ............................. 3.0
ECON 1010 Economics As Social Science ........ 3.0
ECON 2020 Macroeconomics ......................... 3.0
GEOG 1300 Survey of World Geography......... 3.0
GEOG 1400 Introductin to Human Geography. 3.0
GEOG 2100 Geography of U.S. ...................... 3.0
HIST 1100 History of Civilization I..................... 3.0
HIST 1110 History of Civilization II .................... 3.0
HIST 1700 American Civilization**.................... 3.0
HIST 1740 US Economic History ....................... 3.0
(If not used as Core Requirement)
HIST 1800 Introduction to American
Indian Studies ................................................ 3.0
HIST 2700 US History to 1877**....................... 3.0
HIST 2710 US History Since 1877** .................. 3.0
HIST 4320 History of Scientific Thought ............ 3.0
HIST 4330 Machines in the Making of History... 3.0
HLTH 2600 Drugs, Behavior and Society .......... 3.0
HLTH 2700 Health Concepts of Death/Dying.... 3.0
HLTH 2800 Human Sexuality............................ 3.0
HLTH 3150 Culture/Ecology/Health.................. 3.0
MGMT 1010 Introduction to Business ............... 3.0
MGMT 2110 Interpersonal Communications ..... 3.0
POLS 1000 American Heritage**...................... 3.0
POLS 1010 Introduction to Political Science ...... 3.0
POLS 1100 American National Government** .. 3.0
POLS 2100 Introduction to International
Relations........................................................ 3.0
POLS 2200 Introduction to Comparative
Politics........................................................... 3.0
PSY 1010 General Psychology .......................... 3.0
PSY 1100 Human Development: Life Span......... 3.0
PSY 2800 Human Sexuality .............................. 3.0
SOC 1010 Introduction to Sociology................. 3.0
SOC 1020 Modern Social Problems ................. 3.0
SOC 1200 Sociology of the Family ................... 3.0
TECH 2000 Technology and Human Life .......... 3.0
**If not used as Core Requirement
SCIENCE DEGREE
ADDITIONAL GUIDELINES FOR
COMPLETION OF THE ASSOCIATE IN
SCIENCE/ARTS DEGREE
F. PHYSICAL ED/HEALTH/SAFETY OR
ENVIRONMENT ........................................ 1 credit
Any approved Physical Education, Health, Safety or
Environment Course
The Associate in Science and the Associate
in Arts Degrees are designed to complete
General Education requirements and could
complete lower division pre-majors for
Baccalaureate Degrees at UVSC or other
colleges or universities.
The General Education courses shown
above constitute the majority of the credits
required for these degrees. In addition to
the general education requirements, these
degrees require 25 additional credit hours.
Associate in Arts degrees require 10
hours of these 25 hours to be from the
same recognized foreign language.
See your specific academic department
for further information on appropriate
course work to complete a pre-major or
the remaining 25 hours. The Career and
Academic Counseling Center (WB 147) has
some specific outlines available to transfer
to other institutions.
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED
Utah Valley State
This is a general outline. Refer to the
department or Graduation Office for
specific requirements. A total of 16 credit
hours is required. Students must have
a minimum of two credits in each area,
except “F” (PE/Safety/Environment/Health.)
A. ENGLISH .............................................2 credits
ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
ENGL 1060 Career Writing for Technology
or
ENGL 106A Career Writing for Technology - A
or
MGMT 2200 Business Communications
B. MATHEMATICS ....................................2 credits
MAT 1000 Integrated Beginning and Intermediate
Algebra
or
MAT 1010 Intermediate Algebra
or
Any Higher Mathematics course
or
Any approved Departmental Mathematics Course
C. HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS/FOREIGN
LANGUAGE ...........................................2 credits
PHIL 2050 Ethics & Values (Highly recommended)
or
Any approved Humanities, Fine Arts, or Foreign
Language Distribution Course
D. SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE...2 credits
MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior
or
Any approved Behavioral Science, Social or Political
Science Distribution Course
NOTE: Completion of an AA/AS
degree waives only General Education
Requirements. It does not waive the
necessary hours to graduate. A student
transferring to another institution should
check with that institution to see how their
credits have been accepted toward their
degree.
PRIVATE, PAROCHIAL, OR OUT-OF-STATE
COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
Since these schools are not bound by
Utah State Regents’ policies, colleges
and universities outside the Utah System
of Higher Education may have specific
requirements and may not accept all
courses available at UVSC.
BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY
Brigham Young University accepts the
Associate in Science/Arts Degree for
completion of its general education
requirements. Courses with grades of
“D+” or lower will not transfer. Some
departments at BYU have specific general
education course requirements that will
still need to be taken at BYU. Individual
departments at BYU should be consulted
for exceptions.
Note: BYU has a limit on the number
of transfer students admitted.
E. BIOLOGY OR PHYSICAL SCIENCE ......2 credits
EGDT 1810 Principles of Technology
or
Any approved Biology or Physical Science
Distribution Course
TR ANSFER INFORMATION
For Students Transferring to Four-year
Institutions Colleges and Universities in the
Utah System of Higher Education.
UVSC courses numbered 1000 or
above will transfer within the Utah
System of Higher Education. However,
the application of these courses toward
graduation is determined by academic
departments of receiving institutions.
For students transferring to colleges and
universities in the Utah System of Higher
Education before earning an Associate in
Science or Arts Degree, or a Bachelor of
Science Degree, a certified letter verifying
completion of the UVSC General Education
requirements may be requested from
the Graduation Office. This letter will
cause the gaining institution (run by the
State of Utah) to accept the completion of
UVSC general education requirements as
fulfilling all of the general education/liberal
education requirements of the gaining
institution.
Catalog 2007–2008
29
Student Rights and Responsibilites
POLICY STATEMENT
The educational environment is ideally conducted in an atmosphere
where respect for all individuals exists. Therefore, students enrolled
in the College accept the obligations to conduct themselves in an
appropriate manner acceptable at an institution of higher learning.
STUDENT
RIGHTS AND
RESPONSIBILITIES
The College has established written procedures outlined in this
Student Rights and Responsibility Code, which provide a clear set of
standard and fair treatments for its students.
STUDENT DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES
Members of the student body should exercise their freedoms with
personal responsibility. Should violations of the Student Code
occur, sanctions may be enforced for the protection of the campus
and its members.
Behavior which violates the Student Code should be reported
to the Office of Student Judicial Affairs at 801-863-8694 (nonemergency) or Campus Police at 801-863-5555 (emergency.)
GENER AL RIGHTS
A student, while properly enrolled at the College, will have the right
to the following college services, treatment, and information:
The primary purpose of the enactment of a
student rights and responsibilities code is to set
forth in a clear and concise manner the rules
and regulations of conduct expected of those
who join the college community. Students,
faculty, staff, and administration should
always exercise their freedom with personal
responsibility.
The College expects all students to obey the
law, to show respect for properly constituted
authority, to perform contracted obligations,
to maintain absolute integrity and high standards of individual honesty in academic work,
and to observe a high standard of conduct
for the academic environment. In short, a
student enrolled in the College accepts the
obligation to conduct himself/herself in an
adult manner acceptable at an institution of
higher education.
Success.
1. Free and open discussion, inquiry, expression, and assembly
subject to constitutional limitations regarding time, place, and
manner. (See college peaceful assembly policy)
2. Protection against the College’s improper disclosure of students’
records, work, views, beliefs, and political associations.
3. Procedural safeguard and personal privacy with respect to
testing for drugs and infectious diseases.
4. Timely and understandable information and respectful treatment
regarding policies, refunds, lab fees, course fees, library fines,
lab breakages and liability, etc.
5. Freedom from a discriminatory and offensive campus
environment directed toward another person.
6. Freedom from sexual harassment.
7. Full protection under the Constitution for freedom of the press,
including the Constitutional limitations on prior restraint and
censorship.
8. Due process of law recognized as being essential to the proper
enforcement of College rules.
9. Security for his/her person, papers, and personal effects against
unreasonable searches and seizures.
10. Freedom to inquire and to be informed regarding campus crime
statistics.
11. Freedom to form and to operate an organized student
association within the guidelines prescribed by the institution.
12. Access to the College Ombudsman for consultation in matters
of personal and school issues and concerns.
13. Student representation through ASUVSC on College
committees, councils, commissions, and other formally
constituted bodies that make general policy and procedure
decisions directly affecting students or that govern student
activities and conduct.
14. Access to all ASUVSC sponsored activities.
15. Accurate information in advertising, recruitment, and orientation
efforts.
16. When contractually agreed to, off-campus housing grievances
may be addressed under the student code of conduct.
ACADEMIC RIGHTS
1. A student will have the following rights in academic affairs,
30
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Student Rights and Responsibilites
services, and information when properly
enrolled as a student at Utah Valley
State College:
2. Performance based on a written
syllabus.
3. Appropriate and open discussion,
inquiry, and expression, both in the
classroom and in student/instructor
conferences.
4. Freedom to take exception to views
presented in a classroom setting and to
reserve judgment in matters of opinion.
5. Professional and ethical conduct from
all college personnel.
6. Competent and professional instruction.
7. Competent academic advisement.
8. Protection against an instructor’s
improper disclosure of a student’s
records, academic work, views, beliefs,
and political associations.
9. Information prior to registering
regarding the costs of tuition, activity
fees, lab fees, course fees, etc.
10. Scheduled access to and use of college
services, facilities, and programs.
11. Accurate information regarding course
offerings, programs, majors, transfer
policies, and institutional requirements
and expectations.
12. Accurate information regarding
changes in course programs or
institution requirements and reasonable
accommodations for those already
enrolled in a program or class.
13. The right to receive academic credit
and/or academic degrees when all
specified requirements and course work
have been satisfied.
14. The right to appeal regarding grade
change, withdrawals, etc.
GENER AL RESPONSIBILITIES
A student assumes the responsibility to
conduct himself/herself in an appropriate
manner. Categories of misconduct that
are not considered responsible behavior
include, but are not limited to, the
following:
1. Failure to respect the right of every
person to be secure and protected from
fear, threats, intimidation, harassment,
hazing, and/or physical harm caused by
the activities of groups or individuals.
2. Sexual assault, harassment, or any
other unwelcome verbal or physical
sexual activity, including the support or
assistance of such activities.
3. Unauthorized seizure or occupation of
any College building or facility.
4. Obstruction, disruption, or interference
with teaching, disciplinary proceedings,
College-sponsored activities, services,
or events.
5. Use or possession of any weapon,
explosive device, or fireworks or storage
Utah Valley State
of such on college property without
prior written approval from the Chief of
Campus Police.
6. Unlawful use, possession, distribution,
sale, manufacture, or possession for
purposes of distribution or sale of
controlled substance or illegal drug on
any property or in any building owned,
leased, or rented by the College or at
any activity sponsored by the College.
7. Initiation or circulation of any false
report, warning, or threat of fire,
bombs, or explosives on College
premises or during College-sponsored
events.
8. Violation of the Utah Indoor Clean Air
Act and/or the College no smoking
policy.
9. Sale, possession, manufacture,
distribution, or consumption of
alcoholic beverages on College
properties or during college sponsored
events on/off campus.
10. Unauthorized possession, forgery,
alteration, misuse, or mutilation
of College documents, records,
educational materials, identification,
(i.e. personal ID, parking decal) library
material or other College property.
11. Violation of city ordinances and/or state
statutes regarding gambling.
12. Delivery of false information to College
personnel.
13. Theft or malicious destruction, damage,
or misuse of College property or private
property of another person on the
College campus or when engaged in
activities sponsored or supervised by
the College off campus.
14. Intentional or reckless destroying,
defacing, vandalizing, damaging,
or misusing property, equipment,
materials, services, or data of the
College.
15. Unauthorized possession or use of a
key, or a combination to any College
facility or equipment.
16. Obscene or lewd conduct as defined by
College policy, city ordinances, and/or
state statutes, including but not limited
to, personal audio, video, film, and
computer generated material.
17. Failure to adhere to all laws and
regulations governing the duplication
and use of copyrighted materials
including, but not limited to, printed
and audio materials, video film, and/ or
computer generated material.
18. Unauthorized use of or charges to any
College telephone for long distance
calls.
19. Unauthorized off-campus fund raising
activities on behalf of the College.
All fund-raising must have prior
written approval from the College
Development Office.
20. Intent to defraud the College in any
Catalog 2007–2008
financial matter including, but not
limited to:
a. non-redemption of personal checks
refused by a bank;
b. sale/resale of supplies, books, or
equipment in violation of College
agreements;
c. falsifying College financial records;
and/or
d. nonpayment of tuition and fees as set
forth by College regulations.
21. Failure to adhere to all laws/College
Policies or to conduct oneself in a way
not to endanger the health and wellbeing of other students and college
personnel.
22.Unauthorized commercial ventures or
enterprises on College property.
23.Bringing animals on campus except
for those serving the disabled or those
used for educational purposes.
24. Allowing children in College classrooms
or laboratories (unless they are an
integral part of instruction) or leaving
children unattended in hallways, and
restrooms or at college-sponsored
events and functions.
Students are encouraged to report
violations of this policy to the office of
Student Life (SC 109) or College Police
(863-8187).
ACADEMIC RESPONSIBILITIES
1. Each student is expected to take an
active role in the learning process
by meeting course requirements as
specified in written syllabi.
2. Each student is expected to display
appropriate conduct in classroom
situations, which will enhance the
learning environment.
3. Faculty members have the right to set
classroom standards of behavior and
attendance requirements. Students will
be expected to meet these requirements
and make contact with faculty members
when unable to do so.
4. Each student is expected to maintain
academic ethics and avoid dishonesty
in all its forms, including but not
limited to, cheating and plagiarism, and
fabrication as defined hereafter:
a. Cheating is the act of using,
attempting to use, or providing
others with unauthorized information,
materials, or study aids in academic
work. Cheating includes, but is
not limited to, passing examination
answers to or taking examinations for
someone else or preparing or copying
another’s academic work.
b. Plagiarism is the act of appropriating
any other person’s or group’s ideas or
work (written, computerized, artistic,
etc.) or portions thereof and passing
31
Student Rights and Responsibilites
them off as the product of one’s own
work in any academic exercise or
activity.
c. Fabrication is the use of invented
information or the falsification of
research or other findings. Examples
include but are not limited to:
1. Citation of information not
taken from the source indicated.
This may include the incorrect
documentation of secondary
source materials.
2. Listing sources in a bibliography
not used in the academic
exercise.
3. Submission in a paper, thesis, lab
report or other academic exercise
of falsified, invented, or fictitious
data or evidence, or deliberate
and knowing concealment or
distortion of the true nature,
origin, or function of such data or
evidence.
4. Submitting as your own any
academic exercises, (e.g., written
work, printing, sculpture, etc.)
prepared totally or in part by
another.
SANCTIONS
The purpose of sanctions is to provide a
uniform method of dealing with infractions
of the Student Code at Utah Valley State
College. This process ensures that each
situation considered for action receives a
fair and impartial hearing. In preparing
the procedure, careful attention will be
given to the Student Code of Rights and
Responsibilities including the legal rights
provided citizens under the Constitution of
the United States and the State of Utah.
Sanctions are assigned in accordance with
two criteria:
1. The educational value for the person
penalized.
2. The consistency between the offense
and the penalty assigned.
INSTITUTIONAL SANCTIONS
The student found in violation of the
Student Code may be subject to one or
more of the following sanctions:
1. Warning: Verbal or written notice to
a student that his/her conduct may
be in violation of College rules and
regulations and that the continuation of
such conduct or actions may result in
further disciplinary action.
2. Reprimand: Issuance of a written
censure by the faculty member or
College official stating violations and
possible penalties sent to the student
and also kept on file.
3. Probation: A specified period of
32
observation and review of conduct
during which the student must
demonstrate compliance with College
rules and regulations. Counseling
or participation in specific courses
or workshops for a specified period
of time may be required. Terms of
probation and the probationary period
will be determined at the time the
sanction is imposed. Appropriate
College officials shall be notified of the
imposition of the sanction.
4. Suspension from Participation in a
Restricted Enrollment Program: The
opportunity to participate in a restricted
enrollment program may be denied or
suspended.
5. Suspension of Specific Privileges:
The opportunity to participate in
extracurricular activities; attend campus
activities; utilize campus facilities,
resources, and services; or other such
measures may be suspended for a
specific period of time, up to one year.
6. Suspension of Use of Specific College
Services: The right to access and
receive transcripts, to register, etc., may
be suspended for a specific period of
time or until specific conditions are met.
7. Separation of the Person from the
College: Separation of the person from
the college for a specified or indefinite
period of time. Temporary and/or
permanent suspension may appear on
the student’s transcript. Participation
in any college-sponsored activity or
the person’s physical presence on the
campus may be restricted.*
8. Expulsion: The student may be
permanently separated from the
College. A permanent indication of
expulsion will be made on the student’s
transcript. The person can also be
barred from the College campus or
campus activities.*
9. Readmission: Students separated
from the College may reapply with the
consent of the Campus Appeals Board
and the President of Utah Valley State
College.
*Sanctions 7 and 8 will be recommended
to the President of Utah Valley State
College for implementation.
MONETARY SANCTIONS
1. Forfeiture: Loss of tuition and/or
monies due to an individual or group
and/or other appropriate fees may
be imposed jointly with expulsion,
suspension, suspension of specific
privileges, or probation.
2. Restitution: Reimbursement for damage
to or misappropriation of property,
which may take the form of direct
financial compensation and/ or up to
20 hours per week of uncompensated
Catalog 2007–2008
work for the College, community, or
other forms of indirect compensation as
outlined in the official decision.
3. Fines: Payment of punitive fines may
be required. Fines may be imposed
separately or in conjunction with
any other individual sanction or
combination of sanctions. A portion
of the fine may be suspended pending
successful completion of other
sanctions. Failure to make required
payment may result in cancellation or
denial of academic registration or to
hold office in student organizations
(ASUVSC).
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
SANCTIONS
Requirements or recommendations for
counseling, enrollment in specific campus
courses, or workshops may be made. If
requirements are not met, probation and
further sanctions may result.
INDIVIDUAL /GROUP
SANCTIONS
Any single sanction or combination of sanctions listed in this Student Code, including
the loss of ASUVSC status, may be imposed
against an entire group, individual group
officers, or individual group members,
arising from their conduct in or leadership
of the group, pursuant to the provisions
for personal conduct outlined in this
Student Code. Notification of any sanction
imposed may be made to national affiliates
and officials.
TEMPOR ARY/INTERIM/
EMERGENCY SANCTIONS
In special circumstances, any sanction
listed below may be temporarily
implemented prior to a hearing and carried
out by official enforcement agencies or
officers.
1. Situations in which there is reasonable
cause to believe the continued presence
of either the student or a student group
on campus or at College events poses
an unreasonable risk of harm to the
health, safety, or welfare of the college
community or individuals in the college
community include:
a. Threatening or inflicting bodily harm
on oneself or others;
b. Inflicting serious emotional or mental
distress or fear on oneself or others;
c. Creating a substantial disruption of
normal campus functions, including
campus instruction;
d. Presenting a threat to the stability and
continuance of any normal College
function;
Utah Valley State
Student Rights and Responsibilites
e. Being arrested on misdemeanor or
felony charges.
2. Any student/student group receiving a
sanction on an interim basis shall be
given the opportunity for a review by
the College Appeals Board chair or
another appropriate authority before a
hearing committee within a reasonable
time period from the effective date of
the action.
3. If, after a review, the determination
is made that a student or registered
student organization did not violate
College policy or fall under the
provisions of this emergency section,
arrangements will be requested of
faculty members so that any missed
academic work may be made up.
4. As soon as possible, the chair of the
appropriate committee will schedule
a hearing to determine if temporary
sanctions should be extended or
become permanent.
PENDING CIVIL OR CRIMINAL
ACTIONS
Civil or criminal court actions may be
grounds for sanctions imposed by the
college before or after courts have
determined guilt or civil liability.
1. College actions, in addition to formal
civil or criminal legal action, may be
considered at the request of campus
police or other interested parties. Such
an issue must allow for due process
before further action is taken.
2. Temporary sanctions may be imposed,
based on guidelines outlined in this
Student Code.
3. Permanent sanctions may be imposed
only after a hearing committee decision
is reached.
4. The due process procedures and
guidelines outlined in this Student Code
must be followed where permanent
sanctions or additional College
sanctions may be imposed.
GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES
PROCEDURE
The appeals procedure outlined hereafter
applies to all student grievances.
Individuals who feel they have been unfairly
treated may make a written appeal through
the appropriate channels described herein.
1. The aggrieved student is encouraged
to first confer with the individual(s)
involved in the grievance in an attempt
to resolve the problem informally. This
could include assistance from the
Office of Student Life.
2. Unresolved grievances shall be filed
in written form, utilizing the Campus
Appeals Board appeal form, and
submitted to the respective chairperson
or his/her designee. The chairperson,
within 14 days from the date of the
grievance filing date, shall conduct
a formal hearing or inquiry and shall
attempt to resolve the matter impartially
as quickly as possible.
3. If the panel’s decision requires a
student’s separation or termination
from school, the recommendation for
dismissal will be forwarded with copies
of all documentation to the College
President or his/her designee who shall
accept the panel’s decision or provide
written exception after review of all
evidence presented. The decision of
the President or his/her designee shall
become the final institution decision.
The College President will provide the
hearing panel a written copy of his/her
final decision within 14 days.
At the step the grievance is resolved, a
written statement shall be prepared, signed,
dated, sent to appropriate parties and filed
with the appropriate corresponding office.
The primary purpose of this document is
to provide a set of procedures through
which a student may seek redress, or
be disciplined for violations of college
policies and practices that are relative
to provisions found in the Student Rights
and Responsibility Code. The grievance
procedure is not applicable for situations
deemed more appropriate for other appeal
and adjudication procedures provided by
the College.
TYPES OF COLLEGE APPEALS
Academic Grievances
For academic grievances, the channel of
appeal shall be through the Academic
Department regarding academic
dishonesty, plagiarisms, cheating, grade
change, withdrawals, etc. by contacting
the respective department coordinator or
chairperson.
Discrimination Grievances
For matters related to discrimination on
the basis of national origin, race, color,
sex, sexual harassment, marital or parental
status, religion, age, the channel of appeal
shall be through the Equity Officer by
contacting the office of Human Resources
or the office of Student Life.
General Student Grievances
For general student grievances in which
alleged violations of the Student Rights
and Responsibility Code are involved, an
individual may petition for a hearing by
contacting the Office of Student Life in SC
109.
FILING A GRIEVANCE
APPEALS
As with all issues, problems should be
resolved at the lowest possible level and
shall involve individuals closely aware of,
and involved in, the issue(s) before seeking
appeals.
In the case of appeal hearings, penalties
may not be assigned that are more severe
than those assigned by the lower body
unless additional evidence has been
presented justifying such an action.
Penalties may not be overthrown
until a review of written lower body
recommendations and evidence. (See
Grievance Procedures)
Utah Valley State
Individuals utilizing any grievance
procedure may do so by completing
and submitting the appropriate appeal
form to the responsible body. Appeals
subject to the Campus Appeals Board
should be submitted no later than 14 days
following the time of the alleged violation.
College personnel directly involved in or
knowledgeable about the student(s) issue
must also respond within 14 days, after
which the procedure will automatically
proceed to the next step as outlined in the
Campus Appeals Board procedure (steps
1-3) as listed below.
CAMPUS APPEALS BOARD
Catalog 2007–2008
HEARING COMMITTEE/
HEARING AND DECISIONS
The Campus Appeals Board shall constitute
the hearing panel, consisting of at least
two faculty (selected by the Faculty Senate
Executive Board), one staff member
(selected by the PACE Board), three student
representatives (selected by the student
body President). The hearing panel shall
serve three, two-, or one- year terms as
needed to provide continuity. The intent
of the Board will be to establish a hearing
panel that is unbiased. Therefore, all panel
members shall be impartial toward the case
before them. The Dean of Student Life will
appoint panel members as needed where
members are disqualified or unavailable for
the entire hearing. The panel will receive
legal advise in conducting such hearings.
Due process shall be accorded to all
parties involved in the grievance including
their right to notice of hearing, time and
date, a list of charges, the right to obtain
advice from counsel, the right to present
witnesses, and the right to present written
statements.
Should any of the parties by their choice
wish not to attend, the hearing will continue
to be conducted. No fewer than five
33
Student Rights and Responsibilites
committee members will hear grievances
put before the panel. Decisions by the
hearing panel will be by majority vote of
the members present at the meeting. At
the completion of the hearing, a decision
will be rendered and announced by the
panel chairperson.
A panel’s written decision will be made
available within 14 days following the
conclusion of the final hearing. Copies of
the written decision shall be provided to
appropriate parties and official officers.
WITHDR AWAL
CAMPUS APPEALS BOARD
GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES
Utah Valley State College
800 West University Parkway
Orem, UT 84058-5999
THE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF
UTAH VALLEY STATE COLLEGE
ALL STATEMENTS HEREIN ARE BELIEVED
TO BE TRUE AND CORRECT AT TIME
OF PUBLICATION. UTAH VALLEY
STATE COLLEGE RESERVES THE RIGHT
TO MAKE NECESSARY CHANGES,
DELETlONS, OR REVISIONS.
A grievance may be withdrawn by the
grievant at any time without prejudice.
REPRISALS
No reprisal of any kind shall be taken by or
against any party or legitimate participant
in the grievance procedure by reason of
such participation; however, individuals
furnishing false information and/or
documentation to the hearing panel are
subject to disciplinary action.
CONFIDENTIALITY
Appropriate confidentiality will be observed
in all grievance procedures and record
thereto.
INFORMAL RESOLUTION OF
GRIEVANCE ENCOUR AGED
Nothing contained herein shall be
construed so as to limit in any way the
ability of the grievant and the College
to resolve any grievance mutually and
informally.
APPROVAL AND AMENDMENT
1. Approval
Ă Approval of the Student Code becomes
effective immediately as per college
policy and procedure and approval of
the College Board of Trustees.
2. Amendment
Ă Any member of the UVSC community
may recommend amendment of
this procedure by submitting such
recommendation in writing to the Student
Rights and Responsibility Committee.
An amendment becomes effective
immediately as per College policy and
procedure and approval of the College
Board of Trustees.
34
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Student Services
ACADEMIC TUTORING
Student Services
Academic Tutoring is available at no charge to all UVSC students.
Qualified tutors provide one-on-one tutorials and help lead
group study sessions and workshops. Information about tutoring
or learning assistance programs may be obtained by contacting
coordinators of any of the following services.
Learning Assistance
Learning Strategist: Gary Sauter
Office: LA 221p
Telephone: 801-863-7418
E-mail: gary.sauter@uvsc.edu
The Learning Strategist provides many resources:
• Advisement in developing a personalized program of study
processes
• Support programs for transitional and provisionally admitted
students
• Student success workshops
• Referral to other services and agencies
Math Lab
Manager: Kathryn Van Wagoner
Office: Academic Tutoring, LA 201
Telephone: 801-863-8411
Online: http://www.uvsc.edu/mathlab
E-mail: kathryn.vanwagoner@uvsc.edu
The Math Lab offers free drop-in math tutoring for all UVSC
students in a relaxed, friendly atmosphere. Resources include
individual tutoring, group tutorials, a group study room, and live
Internet tutoring through Math Lab Online. Video-taped lectures
are available for use in the lab, as well as solution manuals.
Peer Tutoring
Drop In Lab: LA 201
Manager: Regie Holdaway
Office: LA 201
Telephone: 801-863-8356
Online: http://www.uvsc.edu/peertutoring
E-mail: regie.holdaway@uvsc.edu
Free tutoring assistance for all classes other than math or English
is available in the Peer Tutoring Center to all UVSC students.
Services include a drop-in tutoring lab, supplemental instruction,
and group study sessions. Solutions manuals for select courses can
be checked out for use in the lab, and other materials are available
for student use. Live, interactive tutoring is also available for some
classes on the Internet through Online Peer Tutoring.
Writing Center
Manager: Jennifer Abbot Paul
Office: Academic Tutoring, LA 201;
Library Extension, LC 424
Telephone: 801-863-8099
Online: http://www.uvsc.edu/owl
E-mail: jennifer.paul@uvsc.edu
Success.
Utah Valley State
The Writing Center provides free one-on-one tutoring to all UVSC
students. Students may bring writing assignments for any class and
can either make an appointment or drop in to meet with a tutor. In
addition, the Center offers writing workshops, handouts, practice
grammar tests, reference books, textbooks, writing manuals, ESL
Catalog 2007–2008
35
Student Services
materials, and the On-line Writing Lab
(OWL) http:/www.uvsc.edu/owl.
ACCESSIBILITY SERVICES
DEPARTMENT
(SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH
DISABILITIES)
Office: WB 146
Telephone: 801-863-8747
Provides accommodative services
necessary for the integration of students
with disabilities into all aspects of college
life in accordance with The Americans
with Disabilities Act and other applicable
legislation. UVSC will take all steps
necessary to ensure that no qualified
individual with a documented disability
is excluded from participation in or be
denied the benefits of services, programs,
or activities of UVSC for which he/she
would otherwise qualify to participate.
In addition, individuals with disabilities
will not be subjected to discrimination
by the college or its personnel. Services
are available to students who have
documentation substantiating a physical,
psychological, or learning disability.
Services include: sign language
interpreting, testing accommodations, text
on cd’s, note taking, adaptive equipment,
educational planning, and other
individualized services.
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
Office: AB 104
Telephone: 801-863-8179
The UVSC Alumni Association exists to
serve both present and former students,
and operates utilizing a “perpetual fund”
concept used by Utah’s pioneer ancestors.
Today’s students are the beneficiaries of
former students, who continue to give to
UVSC, and replenish the resources they
used while they attended school. Just as
yesterday’s students were the recipients
of gifts from a previous generation, the
students of today will be expected to
replenish those resources they have used to
obtain their education.
The UVSCAA provides benefits and
support for over 100,000 UVSC alumni,
and is responsible for many services, like
publishing SEQUEL Magazine, providing
benefits programs, the Alumni Classic Golf
Tournament, and other similar offerings. In
addition, the UVSCAA maintains its home
page, located on the internet at www.
uvsc.edu/alumni, where both students and
alumni can access various services of the
association through the on-line community.
The Alumni Association also sponsors
36
over 20 private scholarships using the
money raised at the Alumni Classic Golf
Tournament.
The UVSCAA also sponsors the Student
Alumni Association (SAA), which is involved
in hosting important events and activities
on campus, and at regional and national
conferences. In addition, SAA is involved
in service projects and fund-raisers for
various charitable causes. Membership
in SAA is open to all students, but an
application must be submitted to the
Alumni Office, located in the Advancement
Building in AB-104. For more information
about this and other Alumni related topics,
call 801-863-8179.
BOOKSTORE
UVSC Bookstore
Located: SC 102
Telephone: (801) 863-8641
Hours:
Mon-Thurs 7:45 am-7:00 pm
Fri 7:45 am-5:00 pm
Sat 9:00 am-1:00 pm (Fall
and Spring semesters only)
Mon & Fri 8:00 am-5:00 pm
(Summer semester only)
Tue, Wed, Thurs 8:00 am-6:00
pm (Summer semester only)
Closed Sunday and Campus
Holidays
The bookstore is open each weekday to
serve the students, faculty and staff of
UVSC. At the bookstore you will not only
find your required text books, but also
everything else you will need for your
college career: school supplies, computers,
I-pods, academically-priced software,
general reading material, reference
books, candy and sundry items, and UVSC
apparel.
INTERNATIONAL CENTER
Office: WB 100
Telephone: 801-863-8342
http://www.uvsc.edu/international
E-mail: (for international student
inquiries): international@uvsc.edu
E-mail: (for study abroad inquiries):
studyabroad@uvsc.edu
General Office Hours:
Mon-Fri 8:00 am-5:00 pm
International Student Advisement
Hours:
Mon-Fri 9:00 am-4:00 pm or by
appointment
Established more than a decade ago,
the Ross and Margie Butler Institute for
International Understanding coordinates
UVSC’s international student services and
educational activities. The International
Catalog 2007–2008
Student Services section of the Butler
Institute manages the federally mandated
Student and Exchange Visitor Information
System (SEVIS) on behalf of UVSC.
Professionally trained advisors work to
ensure that UVSC’s international students
maintain their legal status and successfully
adjust to their new living environment. In
addition to managing the college’s SEVIS
compliance, the Butler Institute’s director
oversees the coordination of UVSC’s
international sister-school relationships and
short-term training programs. In addition,
the Butler Institute staff assists with hosting
distinguished international visitors,
advising and supporting the International
Student Council, and promoting various
international educational and cultural
activities for the campus and Utah Valley
communities.
Directly related to UVSC’s mission to
provide “international opportunities” to
students, the Butler Institute’s International
Study Programs section provides support
for faculty and academic departments
regarding international faculty exchanges,
visiting scholars, Fulbright Program
opportunities, and faculty-directed study
abroad. The Institute’s associate director
collaborates with UVSC faculty and staff in
developing and coordinating the College’s
study abroad, international internship, and
overseas volunteer opportunities. Recently,
UVSC faculty led study abroad experiences
in China, England, France, Ghana, Italy,
Russia, and Spain. The Institute’s staff
works hard to maintain economically
feasible opportunities while providing
safe, high-quality international academic
experiences.
CAMPUS CONNECTION
Student Center
Telephone: 801-863-8797
Campus Connection provides information
on all student activities sponsored by or
held at the College Campus. Campus
Connection is open from 8:00 a.m. to
7:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Friday, and 9 a.m. to
1 p.m. on Saturdays. Holiday hours may
vary.
ID/Library Card/Activity Card/
Wolverine Debit Card (available at
Campus Connection)
The card will allow access to most student
activities, athletic events, library book
checkout, PE Issue Room, and athletic
facilities. Student fees entitle each student
to one ID/Activity Card for the duration
of his/her enrollment at UVSC. Students
should save their cards even if they skip
a semester or a year or two, because
Utah Valley State
Student Services
the card is automatically validated when
registration is paid. Replacement cards
(lost, stolen or name changes) are $10.
Your ID/Activity Card can also be a valid
UTA Bus Pass by taking your UVSC ID and
current semester tuition receipt to Campus
Connection to obtain a UTA bus pass. It
also offers entrance into selected different
community events, activities, and dances.
The Wolverine Debit Card is a debit
account made available for students to
deposit funds at Campus Connection or
online and then to use their card to make
purchases on campus for food, books, and
special event tickets. Students can also pay
for their tuition and fees at the Cashiers
office with their Wolverine Debit Card.
When the Wolverine Debit Card is used
in food services, students receive a 5%
discount. VISA, MasterCard, and Discover
cards are accepted to put money on the
Wolverine Debit Card.
Other Services
Lost and Found for the College Campus;
Box Office for various Campus and
community events; UTA Bus Passes; Faxing
domestic and international; off-campus
housing information; general information.
academic advising and counseling, career
assessment and counseling, academic
standards, college transfer information,
and advisor training.
Academic Advising and Counseling
Academic counselors are available to assist
students in determining and achieving their
educational goals. Advisors are qualified
to help students select majors, review prior
education, and plan educational programs.
Specific help is given to students in
understanding General Education
requirements for various degrees. Students
are referred to department advisors for
help in meeting department requirements.
Other services provided include assisting
students experiencing academic difficulties
and help with academic standards.
Individual assistance and workshops are
available to students experiencing these
academic difficulties.
Referrals are made to help students achieve
their educational goals. These include
referrals to personnel in the Accessibility
Services Center, Student Wellness Center,
Testing Services, General Academics, and
to academic department advisors.
Advisor Training
863RVW2IÀFH
Student Center
Telephone: 801-863-6067
The US Postal Service is also available
across the hall from Campus Connection.
Stamps (singles, books, and rolls),
Packaging Products, Express, Priority,
Media-Mail, Bound Printed Matter, Global
Priority, Global Express, Global Air Mail,
Global Economy, Registered, Certified,
Delivery Confirmation, and so forth, are
available. Mail pick-up is at 3:45pm
Monday-Friday and 12:45pm on Saturday.
Cash, Check, Credit and Debit Cards are
accepted. Sorry, no Wolverine Debit Card
use for the Post Office.
CAREER AND ACADEMIC
COUNSELING CENTER
Office: WB 147
Telephone: 801-863-8425
Hours:
Monday 8:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday 8:00 am - 6:00 pm
Wednesday 8:00 am - 6:00 pm
Thursday 8:00 am - 7:00 pm
Friday 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
The Career and Academic Counseling
Center provides comprehensive services
to students, alumni, and members of
the community. These services include
Utah Valley State
Advisor Training at UVSC is an evolving
campus-wide program based on the
standards outlined by the Council for
the Advancement of Standards (CAS) in
Higher Education. Training is initiated by
a computer-based Orientation program
to familiarize new advisors with many of
their advising duties and school resources.
An on-line Advisor Handbook provides
detailed information about school
policy and procedures. Advisors are
also encouraged to participate in oneon-one, small group, and Advisement
Forum training sessions. The goals of the
program include the following objectives:
Develop and improve training programs for
new academic advisors
• Disseminate current information and
resources.
• Model and facilitate best advising
practices to advisors.
• Cultivate professional relationships
among administrators, departmental
advisors, central advisors and other
academic/student support services.
• Provide continuing professional
development through the campus
Advisement Forum.
Career Assessment and Counseling
Our counselors provide a full range of
vocational evaluation and counseling
services to students, faculty and the
community. Assessment and evaluation
services are available in the following
Catalog 2007–2008
areas:
• academic achievement
• vocational interests
• personality preferences
• work values
• learning styles
Counselors guide students through
individual counseling sessions, group
workshops, career library resources, and
computerized career information systems.
Counseling services include:
• test interpretation
• labor market information
• occupation information
• computer-assisted testing
• career exploration
• written vocational evaluations
Academic Standards
Under the direction of the CACC Director,
the academic standards office administers
the academic standards policy, oversees
the suspension petition process, trains
faculty and staff in student support methods
and policies, and counsels and assists
at-risk students on warning, probation,
and suspension. For more information
regarding the academic standards policy,
see page 18.
College Transfer Information
Detailed information and counseling
regarding transferring into UVSC and
out to other colleges and universities is
available, including:
• Articulation agreements between
UVSC and other state colleges and
universities including degree transfer (AA
and AS), course preferences, and GPA
requirements.
• Application procedures and deadlines.
• Information about graduate schools and
admission requirements.
CAREER SERVICES AND
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
Office: BA 113
Telephone: 801-863-8395
E-Mail: csse@uvsc.edu
http://www.uvsc.edu/csse
Hours: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm M, T, R, F
8:00 am - 6:00 pm W
Our mission is to provide comprehensive
employment related services to
students and alumni, and to foster
professional relationships with faculty,
staff and administrators. We seek
career employment opportunities by
developing valued relationships with
37
Student Services
premier employers. We help students
and alumni develop job search skills
leading to meaningful career and student
employment, and service to society. Our
services include access to:
• UV Job Board at www.uvsc.edu/csse
for students and employers (on-line job
posting, job search, submitting resumes,
scheduling interviews, etc.)
• Off-campus full-time, part-time, summer
and temporary job openings
• On-campus student employment
• Federally-funded work study jobs
863-8707
The Center for High School Studies offers
services to all UVSC students who begin
their college studies before they have
earned a high school diploma. The
purpose of the Center is to help students
convert college credits into credits that
apply toward high school diplomas. Any
UVSC student can participate regardless of
age, school district boundaries, or resident
status. Services for the Center include
counseling for high school completion,
high school level classes, and GED testing
information and preparation.
• Internship and Cooperative Education
positions
• Counseling on career employment
planning and preparations
• Training and workshops on writing
resumes, interviewing and networking
• Labor market, salary and career
employment information
• Career and Student Employment Fairs
• Local, national and international
employers recruiting on campus
• Group and class presentations on career
employment related topics
THE CENTER FOR THE
ADVANCEMENT OF
LEADERSHIP
Director: Bruce Jackson
Office: WB 236b
Telephone: 801-863-6136
E-mail: jacksobr@uvsc.edu
Fax: 801-863-7431
THE CENTER FOR SERVICE AND
LEARNING
Office: SC 101
Telephone: 801-863-8786
The Center for Service and Learning is
dedicated to providing service and servicelearning opportunities for the students,
faculty, and staff of UVSC. Through
programs and projects in the classroom,
the community, and the world, the Center
works to increase social and cultural
awareness, build a sense of community
commitment, and extend meaningful
educational opportunities that increase
knowledge and enhance academic
skill. These goals are realized through
community outreach, classroom-based
service-learning, service expeditions
and leadership development programs.
Students, faculty, and staff are encouraged
to get involved.
/HDGHUVKLS&HUWLÀFDWLRQ3URJUDP
The Center for the Advancement of
Leadership (CAL) has designed an extracurricular Leadership Certification Program
for any and all students on the UVSC
Campus. Whether you are majoring in
business, engineering, law, fire science,
biology, aviation, or any other degree or
program, this Leadership Certification
Program is designed for students who wish
to advance their personal, interpersonal,
and leadership skills while pursuing their
degrees and programs-making them more
productive and marketable to their future
employers and/or graduate schools.
All students are invited to preview the
program by visiting our website at www.
uvsc.edu/leadership, or requesting a DVD
from the Director, Dr. Bruce H. Jackson
(863-7431).
THE CENTER FOR HIGH
SCHOOL STUDIES
Office: 243 East 2320 North,
Provo or SA 306
Telephone: 801-374-4840 or
38
THE CENTER FOR STUDENT
COMPUTING
Office: SC 116
Telephone: 801-863-8390
http://csc.uvsc.edu
The Center for Student Computing has
been established to provide computing
resources and technical support services
that enhance the educational experience
of the students of UVSC. These services
include: The Open Student Computer
Labs, Campus Kiosks, student account
management, UVlink portal.
The Open Student Computer Labs are
available to all currently registered UVSC
students on a first-come, first-serve basis.
No charge is required for the use of the
computers. Lab Assistants are available
to provide support and to help keep the
equipment running. These labs contain
110 computers and have Internet access
and E-mail as well as popular application
software to assist students with their class
Catalog 2007–2008
work.
The “Computer Loft” is located in SC215
on the second floor of the Student Center
across from the Ragan Theater. With 55
workstations this is the largest open lab on
campus. The hours in this lab are 7:00 am
to 11:00 pm Monday through Thursday,
7:00 am to 7:00 pm Friday, and 9:00
am to 5:00 pm on Saturday. Check with
lab assistant for holiday hours. The lab’s
telephone number is 801-863-6081.
The “Fishbowl” lab is located in SC116 at
the north end of the Student Center. The
hours in this lab are 8:00 am to 6:00
pm Monday through Friday. The lab’s
telephone number is 801-863-8390.
The “Greenhouse” lab is located in PS101
at the junction of the Student Center,
Science Building, and Activity Center. The
hours are 8:00 am to 6:00 pm Monday
through Friday. The lab’s telephone
number is 801-863-7147.
UV Link provides access to class
registration, student information, WebCT
and many other online services. To use
this system you must be accepted for
admissions and have a PIN number that is
assigned at the time you were admitted.
CENTER FOR STUDENT
SUCCESS
Academic Director: Michael A. Jensen
Office: LC 210
Telephone: 801-863-7090
E-mail: jensenmi@uvsc.edu
Assistant Director, UV Mentors:
Marinda Ashman
Office: LC
Telephone: 801-863-7227
E-mail: ashmanma@uvsc.edu
The Center for Student Success, in
partnership with Student Life and Student
Services, is focused on preparing students
for their college experience. The Center
is committed to student retention efforts
and is regularly involved in campus-wide
initiatives. The Student Success course
(CLSS 1000), taught through the College
Success Studies Department, is the
recommended starting point for first-year
students. The objectives in the Student
Success course include:
• Critical thinking
• Study strategies
• Self-awareness
• Connecting to the campus community
The Center for Student Success is also
home to the UV Mentors! Our UV Mentors
are dedicated students who are trained to
assist instructors in each Student Success
Utah Valley State
Student Services
section. The primary goal for the UV
Mentors is to connect personally to the
students in the class-by both modeling
the skills being taught and by mentoring
them through their first college experience.
UV Mentors begin by taking the CLSS
1000 course, followed by a Leadership
Mentoring I class (CLSS 2200) and then
application to the program. Selected UV
Mentors are awarded scholarships for their
service and mentoring to the students in
Student Success classes and the program.
CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS
Office: LC 101
Telephone: 801-863-8820
Clubs and Organizations, also known as
UV Clubs, connects students to UVSC in
a unique way that reflects each student’s
individual interests and academic desires.
UV Clubs, a branch of ASUVSC, works
with over 70 active clubs facilitating club
success on campus. Many clubs are very
active on campus and have received local,
state, and national recognitions.
By getting involved in a club or
organization students have the opportunity
to increase leadership, citizenship, and
service skills that enhance UVSC and the
community. Students meet new people,
and most of all, have fun. For information
on existing clubs and/or procedures for
chartering a new club, look on the web
www.uvsc.edu/clubs, or contact the UV
Clubs Office in LC 101.
DAVID O. MCK AY EVENTS
CENTER
Office: MC 012
Telephone: 801-863-8767
The David O. McKay Events Center is a
multipurpose facility serving the College
and the community. The Events Center
hosts a variety of local and special
performances, sports events, educational
seminars, concerts, conventions, trade
shows, lectures and other community
gatherings.
Some events that are hosted here include
basketball and volleyball games; ballet,
symphony, and circus performances;
rodeos, business trade shows and expos
as well as various types of concerts. The
events center is an excellent choice for
hosting any kind of event.
Athletics
The mission of UVSC Athletics is to provide
a wide range of athletic programs that
are highly competitive and nationally
Utah Valley State
recognized on a consistent basis. The
department seeks to provide the individual
athlete with the opportunity to improve
athletic skills and abilities while obtaining
an exceptional quality education with the
best facilities and coaching staff available,
to benefit the athlete in future academic,
athletic, and vocational endeavors. Each
student-athlete is required to be in good
standing academically and making
progress toward an associate degree.
Financial Aid is available in all sports,
with awards ranging from “Full-Ride”
scholarships to partial scholarships for
tuition, fees, or books.
The Wolverines compete in the National
Junior College Athletic Associations Region
18, Scenic West Athletic Conference, in
the following sports: Baseball, Men’s and
Women’s Basketball, Men’s and Women’s
Cross Country, Men’s and Women’s Indoor
and Outdoor Track and Field, Women’s
Volleyball, Men’s Golf, and fast pitch
Softball.
Club sports associated with the athletic
department are Men’s and Women’s
Soccer, Men’s Volleyball, Lacrosse, Men’s
and Women’s Tennis, and Rodeo.
For more specific information regarding
any sport or team, please call our Athletic
Department Office at (801) 863-8653, or
look us up on the internet at: http://www.
uvsc.edu/depts/athletic.
Cheerleaders and “THE
WOLVERINE”
The UVSC Cheerleaders are a large part of
promoting fan involvement and enthusiasm
at UVSC athletic events. The squad
consists of highly talented young men and
women who perform stunting and tumbling
routines.
The WOLVERINE is the school mascot
who is also involved in crowd interaction
and may be seen hanging from the rafters
or dropping through the middle of the
basketball hoop to excite fans.
Tryouts for these positions are held each
spring, and specific information about
tryouts may be obtained by calling Student
Leadership and Activities at 801-8638150.
Dance Team
The UVSC Dance Team is comprised of 1216 skilled dancers who perform regularly at
UVSC Athletic Events. The Team employs
a wide range of styles and utilizes Jazz,
Funk, and Lyrical Dance numbers, all
choreographed by the team members and
director. Tryouts are held each spring,
and more information may be obtained by
calling Student Leadership and Activities at
801-863-8150.
Catalog 2007–2008
DINING SERVICES
Office: SC 201
Telephone: 801-863-8664
The Dining Services Department is
operated by and under the direction of
Auxiliary Services in the Sorensen Student
Center. The mission of the department
is centered to students and their dining
enjoyment and benefit.
The Centre Courte main food court is
located on the main floor of the Sorensen
Student Center. With the recent expansion
of the Student Center, food service options
are plentiful. The “CENTRE COURTE”
has a large variety of retail food options:
Wolverine Wok, Courte Side Grille, Fresh
Wrapz, Freshetta’s Italian Café, Wolverine
Cuisine Corner, Hogi-Yogi, Teriyaki Stix,
and La Esquina Fresh Mexican Food
complete the food court list. Areas of the
Food Court will open at 10:00 a.m. and
close at 7:30 p.m.
Located directly above the Food Court is
an additional dining facility. Named for its
exquisite view of the Utah Valley, the Valley
View Room offers a more relaxed and
unique atmosphere for students, faculty
and staff. Its hours of operation are 7:00
a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
The Sorensen Student Center and Catering
Services is recognized in the community as
the area’s finest catering services. It has
earned a reputation in outstanding dining
service quality for over 20 years. Clientele
range from students, administrators, staff
personnel, conference groups, weddings,
class reunions and local community
groups. The Dining Services Department
provides an excellent source of employment
opportunities for UVSC students.
DISABILITIES SERVICES
Accessibility Services Department, ASD
Office: WB 146
Telephone: 801-863-8747
See Accessibility Services Department in
this section.
EXTR AMUR AL /INTR AMUR AL
SPORTS
Office: SC 108
Telephone: 801-863-6163
The Extramural/Intramural Sports
Department offers a variety of different
competitive activities for UVSC students.
Intramural activities include team sports
such as basketball, flag football, volleyball,
and ultimate frisbee, as well as individual
and dual sports including racquetball,
39
Student Services
tennis, chess, and many others.
Competitive opportunities are available
for men, women, and co-ed participation.
Most activities have a minimal fee. In
addition to Intramural sports (teams within
UVSC competing against one another),
we also have Extramural Sports (teams
from UVSC that compete against other
campuses). Extramural activities include
teams sports such as Men’s Soccer, Men’s
Volleyball, Men’s Lacrosse, Men’s Rugby,
Men’s Golf, and Rodeo Team.
LIBR ARY
936 South 400 West, Orem
(Next to Parking Services)
Hours: Mon - Fri, 7:00 am to 5:00 pm
Telephone: (801) 863-8130
Lockers are available for student use in the
Gunther Trades Building and are rented
through the Facilities/Physical Plant Office.
Locker rentals are $5 per semester or
$13 per year. This fee is non-refundable.
Renewal of lockers needs to be completed
before the end of the semester to avoid
locker changes and clearance of contents.
The renter is responsible for any damages
to the locker(s).
Losee Center (3rd & 4th Floor)
Telephone: 801-863-8265
Fax: 801-863-7065
http://www.uvsc.edu/library
Director: Michael J. Freeman
Office: LC 403
Telephone: 801-863-8751
MATH LAB
Kathryn Van Wagoner, MPA, Manager
LA 201
Telephone: 801-863-8310
http://www.uvsc.edu/mathlab
See Academic Tutoring in this section.
Assistant Director: Kimberly Rollins
Office: LC 312e
Telephone: 801-863-8752
Hours:
7 am - 11 pm MondayThursday
7 am - 7 pm Friday
8 am - 7 pm Saturday
Advisory Committee: Cindy Clark, Chair;
Jeff Kahn; Gene Nelson; Joel Sybrowsky
The library houses over 210,000 volumes,
14,000 videos, and over 28,000
periodicals in print or electronic format.
Reference service is available to assist
students doing research; formal classroom
instruction is also available. The library
network provides electronic access to
123 indexes and databases, six full-text
newspaper databases, and library catalogs
throughout Utah, the United States, and
around the world. Full Internet access is
provided. Through the Utah Academic
Library Consortium, UVSC student
cards are good at all public and private
academic libraries in the state. Web-based
Interlibrary Loan moves materials quickly
between consortium members. The library
contains reserve materials (including
electronic reserve) for instructors, a teacher
education resource center, specialized
hardware and software for students with
disabilities, and hosts a series of art exhibits
throughout the year.
LOCKERS
Physical Plant Office
40
MULTICULTUR AL CENTER
Office: WB 146s
Telephone: 801-863-8357
The Multicultural Center provides a
full range of support services targeting
American minorities, but not excluding
others. Our mission is to promote
educational opportunities and intercultural
enrichment for diverse heritage students
and the college community of UVSC. We
believe in nurturing student achievement
and developing relationships that will
support student success, academic growth,
retention, and completion of educational
programs.
Services include:
• recruitment and retention programs
Telephone: 801-863-8659
http://www.uvsc.edu/housing
E-mail: burgesda@uvsc.edu
The off-Campus Housing Office provides
a variety of housing services. Information
concerning local housing is available at the
Housing Office, on our website: www.uvsc.
edu/housing, or it can be mailed to you.
The UVSC campus does not provide
dormitories, but they work with local
landlords to provide accurate and up-todate information on all housing listed by
the Housing Office.
Should disputes between a Landlord
and a UVSC Student Tenant arise, a free
mediation service is available through
the office of Judicial Affairs & Dispute
Resolution located in SC-107, 801-8638694.
THE OFFICE OF PROSPECTIVE
STUDENT SERVICES
BA 115, BA 100a
800 West University Parkway
Telephone: 801-863-8811
Fax: 801-863-7305
The Office of Prospective Student Services
provides information to prospective
UVSC Students, promotes UVSC, and
establishes positive relationships with high
school and junior college counselors and
administrators. Utah Valley State College
is also promoted by attendance at college,
and education fairs
The Office of Prospective Student Services
also provides Campus Tours. To schedule
an individual or group tour call us at 801863-8811. For more prospective student
information visit our website, http://www.
uvsc.edu/prospective.html or call an
Orientation Leader at 801-863-7445.
• educational and cultural programs
• academic and financial aid advising
• tutoring and counseling
• scholarship information
OMBUDS
Office: SC 107
Telephone: 801-863-8665
• computer/study area access
• social gatherings
• connection to ethnic clubs
• leadership opportunities
• cultural talent opportunities
• registration assistance
• opportunity to make connections with
students of diverse heritage
OFF- CAMPUS HOUSING
Office: SC 103
Hours: Mon - Fri, 8:00 am - 4:00 pm
Catalog 2007–2008
Within the UVSC community
misunderstandings and disagreements
needing resolution occur. The UVSC
Ombuds is a mediator who is familiar
with campus policies, student’s rights and
responsibilities, and can help find useful
options within these guidelines. In order
to serve as a mediator, as opposed to
an advocate, the Ombuds neutrally and
objectively listens to all problems and
works with the parties involved to find a
solution. We hope you use this person as
a resource for help in a variety of difficult
Utah Valley State
Student Services
situations. The Ombuds provides the
following services:
• Academic Complaints and conflicts
• Housing/Landlord disagreements
ADVENTURE RESOURCE
CENTER
Office: SC 103h
Telephone: 801-863-7052
Hours: Mon-Fri, 9am - 5pm
• Discrimination
• Grading procedure disputes
• School policy and procedures
• Interpersonal conflicts
• Sexual Harassment
• Others
All services are offered to UVSC students
free of charge.
ONE STOP STUDENT SERVICES
Office: BA 106
Liz Childs, Director
Office: BA 112
Telephone: 801-863-8460
The mission of One Stop is to provide
quality professional services in the areas
of Enrollment, Financial Aid, Parking and
Payments, in support of students’ academic
objectives. UVSC One Stop affirms that
the student is the heart of the educational
enterprise.
One Stop Advisors provide assistance to
prospective and current students in the
following areas:
• Admissions
• Registration
• Parking
• Payments
• Financial Aid
The ARC has something for everyone.
Located in the heart of the Student Center
we offer rentals and resources to get you
out for your favorite activities. Come in
today to plan your next adventure. For
a list of rental prices visit www.uvsc.edu/
outdoored.
OUTDOOR EDUCATION
Office: SC 108g
Telephone: 801-863-6545
Hours: Mon-Fri, 9am - 5pm
The Outdoor Education department
provides students, staff, and faculty an
opportunity to learn from the vast outdoor
classroom. We offer students a chance
to experience nature while also learning
how to protect and preserve the natural
environment. Opportunities range from
clinics, adventure outings and free Friday
afternoon activities. Stop by and take
advantage of this great resource, located
in the Student Center SC 108g or visit our
website at www.uvsc.edu/outdoored.
Utah Valley State
PEER TUTORING
Regie Holdaway, Manager
Drop In Lab: LA 201
Telephone: 801-863-8310
http://www.uvsc.edu/peertutoring
See Academic Tutoring in this section.
PARKING
Parking Services: 936 South 400
West, Orem
Telephone: 801-863-8188
Adequate student parking is available on
campus. Restricted parking zones, which
are clearly posted, are provided for faculty,
staff visitors, and others. Students, faculty,
and staff are required to obtain parking
permits for each vehicle parked on the
College campus. Parking permits may be
purchased at the Campus/Parking Services
Office located at the northeast corner
of the campus on 936 South 400 West
in Orem or at our satellite office in the
Student Center.
Parking for People with Disabilities
Only those vehicles carrying distinctive
(logo) license plates for people with
disabilities or temporary permits obtained
from the Utah State Division of Motor
Vehicles at 150 East Center in Provo plus
a valid UVSC handicapped parking permit
shall be allowed to park in stalls for the
disabled.
Student and Employee Parking
Each of these processes are also available
through UVSC on-line services.
allow visitors to park in any student or
employee area on campus. Visitors may
also park in the metered areas or in Lots
L, or D, which are pay lots. Visitors using
these pay areas are required to pay the
fees for these areas.
Students and employees operating vehicles
on College properties must adhere to all
state, local, and college traffic/parking
regulations. To park on campus, students
and employees must obtain a valid parking
permit from Parking Services. Before a
permit can be issued to a vehicle, proof of
registration and current emissions must be
shown.
Parking Services also provides a campus
map and a copy of campus parking
regulations.
Visitor Parking
Visitors operating vehicles on College
properties must adhere to all state, local,
and college traffic/parking regulations.
Free parking is provided for visitors in Lot
U, or free day passes may be obtained at
the Parking Services Office at 936 South
400 West in Orem. The free passes will
Catalog 2007–2008
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
SERVICES
Physical Education Building
Telephone: 801-863-8374
The Physical Education building serves
as the home for many Physical Education
classes, the Exercise Physiology
Department, Intercollegiate Women’s
Volleyball, Men’s Wrestling and the
Intramural/Extramural Program.
Facilities included are men’s/women’s
locker rooms, one main basketball floor,
and a multipurpose area and track, one
aerobic/dance area, a martial arts room,
a motor learn lab, and various faculty/staff
offices.
Issue uniforms are required of students
using the Physical Education Building.
Students with current activity cards are
encouraged to use the facilities during
open hours.
PRINTING SERVICES
Printing
GT 533
Telephone: 801-863-8415
Copy Center
SC 101g
Telephone: 801-863-8355
Printing Services provides copying, offset
printing, and graphic design services for
UVSC faculty and staff. However, students
only have access to copying services.
These services can be acquired at either
of two copy center locations. The main
copying production center is located in
the Gunther Trades Building room 516D.
A smaller facility is located in the Student
Center near the bookstore. Students may
request black & white copies, color copies,
transparencies, laminating services, coil
binding and other related services.
41
Student Services
SORENSEN STUDENT CENTER
Office: SC 103
Telephone: 801-863-8612
Located in the heart of the Orem campus,
the Wilson W. Sorensen Student Center
represents the center for campus life.
The Center provides students, faculty,
staff, and guests a setting for informal
associations, special events, banquet and
workshop facilities, social and cultural
activities, and the everyday amenities such
as food, books, and supplies. Services
and activities provided by the Student
Center include the following: Office of
Student Affairs (801-863-6158), (SC
109); Student Center Administration and
Scheduling (801-863-8612), (SC 103);
UVSC Dining and Catering Services (801863-8664), (SC 201); Centre Courte
(food court), (SC 111); Valley View Room
(cafeteria and dining services), (SC 203);
Scoops Ice Cream Shop (SC 103f); Centre
Stage (dining, banquet, and multi-purpose
services), (SC 108); Campus Bookstore
(801-863-8641), (SC 102); Judicial Affairs
and Dispute Resolution (801-863-8694),
(SC 107); Ombuds (801-863-8665), (SC
107); Student Leadership and Activities
(801-863-8150), (SC105); College Times
and NetX News Services (801-863-8688),
(SC220); Center for Service and Learning
(801-863-8786), (SC101); Outdoor
Adventure Excursion (801-863-6545), (SC
108g); Adventure Resource Center (rentals
and sales) (801-863-7052) (SC 103h);
Campus Intramurals (801-863-6163), (SC
108h); Student Wellness Center (medical
and mental health services) (801-8638876), (SC 221); Wellness Education (801863-8127), (SC 222); Campus Connection
(student and department I.D.’s, proximity
cards, debit card services, information
services, ticket and box office services,
and campus lost and found services (801863-8797), (SC 106); U.S. Postal Services
(801-863-6067), (SC104); Ragan Theater
(400 seating for multipurpose events and
programming) (801-863-8799), (SC 216);
Copy Center (801-863-8355), (SC 101f);
Utah Community Credit Union (801-8638188), (SC 101E); Off-Campus Housing
Services (801-863-8659),(SC 106); and
Conference Room Facilities (the Grande
Ballroom, the Commons, SC 206, SC 213,
SC 214 and Centre Stage).
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
(Associated Students of UVSC)
Office: SC 105
Telephone: 801-863-8652
Activities Hotline: 801-863-LIFE
Student government offers a variety of
elected and appointed offices through
42
which students can influence and enhance
the social and academic climate of the
College. All students are encouraged
to support and participate in the student
association. Elections to fill positions in
student government are held each March,
appointed student council positions are
filled in April and any vacancies at the
beginning of each semester. All students
are members of the Associated Students of
Utah Valley State College (ASUVSC) and
are welcome to apply for committees at any
time during the year.
Information on involvement opportunities in
student government can be obtained from
the Student Government Office (SC 105).
STUDENT WELLNESS CENTER
Office: SC 221
Telephone: 801-863-8876
The Student Wellness Center is designed
to assist students, faculty, and staff with a
variety of wellness issues. Our purpose
is to provide patrons with opportunities
to improve their well-being through basic
medical care and Therapeutic services
(counseling) and Wellness services and
education. We promote healthy lifestyles,
through educational programs that teach
effective life skills and behaviors. Our
focus is on promoting wellness in the
form of a healthy body, healthy mind, and
healthy lifestyle.
Student Wellness Programs
Student Wellness programs provide
services that will enhance personal wellness
and the ability to be successful in the
five areas of health which are Physical,
Academic, Emotional, Social, and Spiritual.
This is done through services which
include: behavior modification programs,
educational campaigns, classroom
presentations, wellness workshops, and
fitness opportunities.
Therapy Services
Personal Counseling, Emotional
Support and Referral
Wellness is promoted through short-term
counseling to assist students through
stressful and crisis situations affecting
their performance in school as well as
personal relationships. Self-help and
educational materials are available in
areas of assertiveness training, ADHD
assessment, stress management, alcohol
and drug abuse, motivation, and selfesteem. Counseling is available for
pre-marital issues, conflict management,
eating disorders, abuse, depression/
anxiety, and LD testing. Persons aware
of problems with friends, roommates, or
family members enrolled at or employed by
Catalog 2007–2008
UVSC are encouraged to act responsibly by
consulting with one of UVSC’s counselors
as soon as possible. The College supports
the premise that students and employees
will help one another to cooperatively solve
problems as they occur.
The Therapists are experienced
professionals who offer support in an
atmosphere of understanding and
confidentiality. Programs offer both
individual assessment and referral to
campus and community resources.
Psychiatric help is available for medications
with referral from a Therapist.
Medical Services
Medical Services of UVSC is located
in the Student Wellness Center (SC
221). A nominal fee is charged for each
visit. Insurance coverage is not needed
to receive medical services. Additional
fees may be charged for lab work. We
are staffed by medical doctors, nurse
practitioners and medical assistants.
Students enrolled at UVSC or any of its
satellite campus locations are eligible for
medical care on campus. We treat a
variety of acute and chronic illnesses and
injuries. We are able to write prescriptions,
do lab work, physical exams, suture and
treat many other medical conditions.
STUDENT MEDIA AND
PUBLICATIONS
Office: SC 220
Telephone: 801-863-6498
Student Media and Publications is UVSC’s
home of The College Times and UVX
News. This is the place students interested
in producing news; including writing,
photography, graphic design, advertising
sales, video broadcast content, and web
page content and design should come for
practical experience and learning. These
nationally award winning student media are
produced year around. If you’re interested
in producing news media, this is the place.
Students are encouraged to enroll in
communications and production classes.
We are located on the second floor of the
Student Center, next to the theater.
TESTING SERVICES
Office: Wolverine Service Center–
North Entrance
Testing Services assists both students and
staff. It is divided into three branches: the
Assessment Center, the Classroom Testing
Center, and the Proctored Exam Center.
Utah Valley State
Student Services
Assessment Center
801-863-8269, WS 101
The primary responsibility of the
Assessment Center is to assist all new
students in developing a first-year
educational plan. In addition to orientation
and advisement, all students must meet the
College’s assessment requirements. This
information is used to place students into
appropriate Math and English courses,
which will in turn, help to ensure student
success. Testing sessions for new students
are conducted throughout the day, no
appointment necessary.
New students must meet one of following
assessment requirements:
1. ACT Scores
English: Not older than 3 years AND
students with scores below 19 will be
required to take the COMPASS English test
and Reading test.
Math: Not older than 2 years AND
students with scores below 19 will be
required to take the COMPASS Math test.
2. COMPASS Test
Required for UVSC students for assessment
purposes. Administered in the Assessment
Center. There are 3 sections: The DRP
(reading exam), COMPASS Writing and
COMPASS Math sections. Fees may apply.
For more details and information, call the
Testing Services department at (801) 8638269 or visit our web pages: http://www.
uvsc.edu/testingservices/
can obtain information on tests in the office
and hours of operation by calling 801863-8269 or by visiting the web page at:
http://www.uvsc.edu/testingservices/.
• cultural events
Classroom Testing Center
801-863-7461, WS 112
To be eligible to receive TRiO SSS services,
a student must meet all of the following
requirements:
The Classroom Testing Center (CTC)
is located in the Wolverine Service
Center (WS 112). The CTC provides
testing services enabling students to
take participating instructors’ exams in
the center on a flexible schedule. The
CTC is generally open six days a week
Monday - Saturday. Students can obtain
test schedules and scores by logging into
uvlink, click on Student tab and under
Student Registration & Information Services
click on CTC Student Exam Scores and
Schedules. Students can also call 8637461 or visit the Testing Services home
page on the web at http://www.uvsc.edu/
testingservices/.
Proctored Exam Center (PEC)
801-863-8544, WS 111
The Proctored Exam Center (PEC)
provides testing accommodations to
UVSC students with disabilities as well as
services for distance education students
who need to have a test proctored from
another university or college. Students
with disabilities requiring assistance MUST
obtain a letter from the Accessibility
Services Department before being eligible
to use the PEC. Scheduling an individual
appointment for testing is required for both
parties. For scheduling information and
further assistance, call 801-863-8544.
3. SAT
Not older than 3 years. Scores of 500 in
English and/or Math are required. Math
scores are good for 2 years.
4. Transfer Credit
Completed English Composition and
Algebra at another college/university, with
a C or higher (verified by official college
transcripts mailed directly from your
previous institution to UVSC Admissions)
Another function of Testing Services is
to administer screening instruments,
standardized tests, and other assessment
instruments required by College programs
and departments. Some of these include
the Ability to Benefit, GED, CLEP, SAT,
ACT, EMT and POST tests. Pre-enrollment
English proficiency assessment for foreign
students is also a service provided in
Testing Services. The department is an
established site for residual ACT testing.
Certification testing for different programs
offered by UVSC and the surrounding
community is also available. Technical
assistance is also provided in the
interpretation and use of tests. Students
Utah Valley State
TRiO STUDENT SUPPORT
SERVICES
Office: WB 145a
Telephone: 801-863-8541
TRiO Student Support Services (SSS) is a
federally funded program. The purpose of
TRiO SSS is to:
a. Increase the retention and graduation
rates of eligible students
b. Increase the transfer rate of eligible
students from two-year to four-year
institutions
c. Foster an institutional climate
supportive of the success of lowincome and first generation college
students and individuals with
disabilities through a variety of
services such as:
• needs assessment testing
• individual education planning
• academic, career, and transfer
counseling
• tutoring
Catalog 2007–2008
• study skills and personal development
classes
• workshops and guest presentations
a. Is a citizen or national of the U.S. or
meets the residency requirement for
Federal student financial assistance
b. Is enrolled at UVSC or accepted
for enrollment in the next academic
semester
c. Has a need for academic support,
as determined by UVSC, in order to
pursue successfully a post-secondary
educational program
d. Meets at least one of the following
criteria:
• Low income
• First generation college student
• Has a disablility which inhibits the
learning process.
Eligible students are selected into UVSC’s
TRiO SSS program based upon their
academic need and upon their ability to
benefit from the services offered. Space
is limited, so students are advised to apply
early.
UVSC INSTANT INFO/
COMMUNICATION CENTER
Desks and Computer Kiosks Located
at:
Administration Building BA100
Business Building Level 1
Gunther Trades Level 6 Entry
Computer Science Building Level 4
Science Building Level 1
Liberal Arts Building Level 1 entry
Computer Kiosks Located at:
Business Building Level 4
Automotive Trades Level 3
Student Center/Learning Center Level
1
Telephone: 801-863-INFO (4636),
801-863-7439
E-mail: instinfo@uvsc.edu,
information@uvsc.edu, instantinfo@
uvsc.edu - Answer within 24 hours
Instant Info provides comprehensive
assistance to new, continuing, and
transferring students as well as parents,
staff, faculty, and the general public
regarding all aspects of student services.
Trained peer advisors field all walk-in or
inquiries made by telephone and assist
patrons in resolving issues. Should a
referral be required, patrons are directed
43
Student Services
to an individual/department or contact
information is provided. Instant Info
personnel are trained to assist patrons with
the following:
• Electronic admissions applications immediate response
• WEB START
• Registration - UV Link
• Personalized textbook lists - BookMatch
• Degree and program requirements
• Degree evaluations - academic record of
completed, in progress, and remaining
classes
• On-line credit card payments
• Electronic financial aid applicationsFAFSA (award amount possible in 72
hours)
• Electronic loan counseling
• Accessing instructors and on-line
assignments -WebCT
• Class schedules and catalogs
• Campus activities and events
• On-line parking services assistance
• Locations and directions
• PIN numbers/change of address
Communication Center
• Answer all incoming Student Service
calls
• Assist with adding and dropping classes,
and checking financial aid
• Assist callers with all other on-line
services
VETER ANS’ SERVICE OFFICE
Office: BA 114
Telephone: 801-863-8212
E-mail: veterans@uvsc.edu,
veteransaviation@uvsc.edu
of “UW” (unofficial withdrawal) or “W”
(withdrawal) will have to reimburse the
VA for any difference in pay retroactive to
the beginning of the semester unless they
can report mitigating circumstances to the
Department of Veterans Affairs. Benefits
will not be paid for a course that is audited
(AU).
New Veterans
New students applying for VA educational
benefits may be requested to submit to
the UVSC Veterans’ Service Officer either
original or certified copies of the following
documents: (1) DD Form 214 (students
may be eligible for a minimum of four
semester hours of transfer credit), (2) DD2384 (Notice of Basic Eligibility), and (3)
VA claim (c) number, if applicable. This
information is needed as soon as possible
to ensure timely and accurate processing
of benefits. UVSC forms can be found on
line at http://www.uvsc.edu/grad_tran/
veterans/forms.html
Official transcripts from all previously
attended colleges or universities are
required. The VA will not pay for any
course the student has previously taken and
successfully completed.
One month’s advance pay may be
requested by contacting the UVSC
Veterans’ Services Office at least six weeks
prior to the first day of classes. In addition,
the student requesting the Advance
Payment may not have been already
receiving VA Educational Benefits within
30 days prior to the start of the semester.
This payment does not automatically pay
a student’s tuition. (Contact Veterans’
Services Office for further information).
Continuing and Returning Veterans
Veterans eligible for VA Education Benefits
may obtain assistance at the Veterans’
Services Office located in the Graduation
and Transfer Services Department.
All continuing and returning veterans must
come to UVSC Veterans’ Service Office
promptly after registering for the semester.
A Veterans’ Class Schedule Form must be
completed for each semester attended.
This form with the student’s signature,
indicates that the student wants to receive
educational benefits for that semester.
Guideline for Enrollment and
Progress
WELLNESS CENTER
According to VA standards of progress,
educational benefits will be paid for
courses required for graduation in the
student’s declared educational objective.
Eligible persons will be required to
maintain a 2.0 cumulative GPA or higher
and to actively and consistently pursue their
declared educational objective. To receive
Veterans Educational Benefits, students are
required to attend class. Benefits will be
terminated for non-attendance. This may
cause an over-payment to the student.
Veterans and dependents receiving grades
44
See Academic Tutoring in this section.
See Student Wellness Center in this section.
WELLNESS EDUCATION
See Student Wellness Center in this section.
WRITING CENTER
Jennifer Abbot Paul, Manager
Drop In Lab: LA 201
Telephone: 801-863-8310
http://www.uvsc.edu/owl
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Student Services
OTHER IMPORTANT
STUDENT
INFORMATION
ALCOHOL , TOBACCO AND
DRUGS
Utah Valley State College, historically
and at present, seeks to encourage and
sustain an academic environment that
promotes the health, safety, and welfare of
all members of its community. In keeping
with these objectives, alcoholic beverages,
unlawful drugs, or other illegal substances
shall not be consumed, used, carried,
sold, or unlawfully manufactured on any
property or in any building owned, leased,
or rented by UVSC, or at any activity
sponsored by the College. (UVSC Policy
A-7.2)
Any individual known to be in violation will
be subject to College disciplinary action
and to substantial legal sanctions pursuant
to Local, County, State and Federal laws.
Smoking is prohibited in all college
buildings and concourses. (UVSC Policy
A-7.1)
All students can access a copy of the
College Drug Policy in class schedules
each semester. It is also available
through the UVSC web site, http://www.
uvsc.edu/info/policy/admin/a-7_2. It is
explained therein what the policy is and
legal sanctions that may follow as a result
of inappropriate drug and or alcohol use
and the known health risks associated with
inappropriate use.
data and may initiate action leading to a
hearing, if necessary, to correct or expunge
information he or she considers inaccurate
or misleading.
Faculty and administrative officers who
have a legitimate need to use student
disciplinary records will be allowed access
to such records, as needed without prior
permission from the student. A request
from an educational institution to which
the student has applied for admission, or
from an institution or agency, from which
the student is seeking financial assistance
will be granted with written permission
of the student. Similarly, data will be
furnished to university accrediting bodies
and governmental officials with written
permission of the student.
No student information other than
directory information will be given to
any third party (except those mentioned
above) without written consent of the
student, and then only those records
accessible to the student. The term party is
construed to include parents, employers,
government agencies, or any other people
or organizations. Parents or guardians
may have access to grade reports of a
student’s activity if the parents establish to
the satisfaction of the College that they are
providing one-half or more of the student’s
support. Court orders and subpoenas for
records will be referred to and acted upon
according to the directions of the Registrar.
The institution will make a reasonable
effort to notify the student prior to release
of information in response to subpoenas or
court orders prior to actual submission of
the material.
Directory information will be released to
news media and to others upon request.
CONFIDENTIALITY OF
RECORDS POLICY
Utah Valley State College is concerned
for the confidentiality of student academic
records, and a reasonable balance
between the obligation of the institution for
the instruction and welfare of the student
and its responsibility to society. The
College will make every effort to maintain
student academic records in confidence
by keeping information from individuals
who are not authorized to receive it or
who might use it for illegitimate purposes.
The policy also reflects the efforts of the
College to comply with the provisions of the
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
of 1974.
Upon presentation of appropriate
identification and under circumstances
which preclude alteration or mutilation of
records, students will be able to inspect all
records relating to themselves which are
not considered by the College to be private
records of College Personnel. A student is
entitled to an explanation of any recorded
Utah Valley State
Directory information is defined as follows:
1. Name of student
2. Telephone number of student
3. Hometown city and state of student
4. Verification of current enrollment
5. Dates of enrollment
6. Degrees conferred, dates, major field of
concentration and honors received
Students may request, at any time, through
the Admissions and Records Office of the
College, that Directory information be
withheld by submitting a Request to Prevent
Disclosure of Directory Information form.
DISCRIMINATION
Discrimination shall not be tolerated
against any student or applicant for
admission because of race, color, religion,
age, sex, national origin, pregnancyrelated condition, disability, status as a
disabled veteran or veteran of the Vietnam
era. Such discrimination or harassment
Catalog 2007–2008
will not be tolerated in any program or
instructional area of the College.
Policy
Students who believe that they have been
discriminated against or harassed should
contact the Director of Judicial Affairs, SC
107.
Note: Employees or students bringing a
grievance against an employee who believe
that they have been discriminated against
or harassed should contact the Director of
Human Resources Services/College Equity
Officer.
Students should also consult the Student’s
Rights and Responsibilities Handbook,
which is printed in this catalog. See
Student Rights and Responsibilities Section.
Procedure
1. Purpose
The primary purpose of this procedure is
to provide a remedy through which to seek
redress for alleged acts of discrimination
or harassment on the basis of race,
color, religion, age, sex, national origin,
pregnancy-related condition, disability, or
veteran status. This grievance procedure
is not applicable for situations for which
other appeal and adjudication procedures
are provided in State law or in which the
College is without authority to act.
2. Stages of Redress
a. Students grieving against another
student or an employee who is grieving
against a student must present the
grievance in written form to the Office of
Student Affairs within 14 days (two calendar
weeks) of the violation.
b. If not satisfied with the response the
grievant may appeal within 14 days (two
calendar weeks) of receipt of the response
to the Dean of Students.
3. Hearing and Decisions
At each of the levels noted above, the
grievant shall be given the opportunity to
be present and to be heard. Due process
shall be accorded to all parties involved
in the grievance, such as written notice of
hearing dates and charge, right to counsel,
right to present witnesses, and to present
written statements. However, formal rules
of evidence and trial procedure required
in a court of law will not be applicable to
such hearings. Decisions by the Campus
Appeals Board shall be by a majority of
the members present at the meeting. If an
appeal is sent to the President, it must be
accompanied by all documentation related
to the prior hearings. The President’s
decision is final.
4. Withdrawal
45
Student Services
A grievance may be withdrawn by the
grievant at any level without prejudice or
record.
5. Reprisal
No reprisal of any kind shall be taken by or
against any party or legitimate participant
in the grievance procedure by reason of
such participation.
6. Confidentiality
Appropriate confidentiality will be observed
in all grievance procedures.
7. Informal Resolution of Grievance
Nothing contained herein shall be
construed so as to limit in any way the
ability of the grievant and the College
to resolve any grievance, mutually and
informally.
PEACEFUL ASSEMBLY
Policy
Free expression and peaceful assembly
are rights guaranteed by the Constitution,
subject to time, place and manner
regulations. The College acknowledges
this right for its students to assemble and
express their views peacefully. However,
to protect the health and safety of both
participants and bystanders, peaceful
assembly procedures follow.
Preparation Strategies
1. Plan your peaceful assemblies through
the Office of Judicial Affairs
2. Reserve an appropriate location from the
list below
3. Schedule appropriate amplification, if
necessary
4. Contact College Police for traffic and
crowd control, if necessary
5. Post fliers and/or cardboard signs
according to the College Poster Policy
6. Pay rental charges, if required
7. Commit to obey local, state and federal
laws and College policies
8. Agree not to disrupt the educational
process of the College
upon official request by a College
administrator or Law Enforcement
personnel
7. Use of objects that might injure
participants or bystanders; examples are
wires, ropes, sticks and chains
or physics laboratories when using caustic,
explosive, or hot chemicals, liquids, or
solids.
Penalties
Prohibited acts are grounds for suspension
or dismissal. Utah law provides that a
student may be barred from campus for up
to 14 days following an incident where the
student violates College policy or state law.
Refusal to vacate premises upon official
request warrants immediate temporary
suspension and arrest under the law.
Locations Appropriate For Peaceful
Assembly
Locations are subject to availability; some
locations may not be available at all times
due to previously scheduled engagements.
Large assemblies (more than 50 people):
Sorensen Student Center: Courtyard Lawn,
North Parking Lot, Ballroom, Theater,
or meeting rooms; Athletic fields/Lawn
areas; McKay Events Center: Arena, or
Presidential Level.
Small assemblies (fewer than 50 people):
Student Lounges or Student Center Meeting
Rooms.
Resources
Reservations:
1. Sorensen Student Center Scheduling
Office, SC 103, 801-863-8612
2. McKay Events Center Scheduling, MC
Concourse, 801-863-8767
3. All other Campus Scheduling, Planning
Center, 801-863-8883
Amplification for the Sorensen Student
Center and outdoor areas can occur
between 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday. Saturday hours
are flexible. Adequate and effective
amplification will be provided within limits
necessary to protect the neighboring
community. Amplification for small
peaceful assembly sites is rarely needed.
Contact: College Media Services, LC
300, 801-863-8888 or Sorensen Student
Center, SC 103, 801-863-8612.
Prohibitions
1. Interference with the rights of others.
Examples are harassment, intimidation
and discrimination
2. Disruption of normal functions of the
College
3. Damage to College property
4. Endangerment of the health or safety of
self or others
5. Use of classrooms during academic
hours
6. Refusal to vacate the premises
46
UTAH SAFETY LAW
In 1965 the Utah State Legislature passed
a law requiring every student, teacher,
and visitor in any public or private school
to wear industrial quality eye protection
devices while participating in or observing
the following: industrial educational
activities involving hot or molten metals;
operation of machinery or equipment that
may throw particles of foreign matter into
the eyes; heating, treating, tempering, or
kiln firing of industrial materials; chemistry
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Campus Police
CRIME AWARENESS AND CAMPUS POLICE
The safety and well-being of our students, faculty, and staff are a
high priority at Utah Valley State College.
CAMPUS POLICE
Although the UVSC campus is a relatively safe place, we are not
immune to those problems that beset all urban citizens, including
problems related to public safety and law enforcement.
The Utah Valley State College Police Department (UVSCPD),
a police force fully accredited by the State of Utah, is charged
with protecting your safety and property on our campuses. The
following outlines the services, policies, and programs which help
us to meet that challenge.
The full support and cooperation of the entire College community is
required to allow for the pursuit of knowledge in a safe and secure
environment.
Utah Valley State College provides several important services to
a diverse College community consisting of approximately 28,500
students and supporting faculty and staff by providing 24 houra-day police patrol and security protection for the benefit of all
College properties, employees, students and visitors on campus.
Utah Valley State College police officers have the same full
police powers and responsibilities as do officers in other Utah law
enforcement agencies.
All UVSCPD police officers are trained at the Utah State Police
Academy and each year receive a minimum of forty (40) hours
of in-service and specialized training in crime prevention and
awareness, first aid, firearms, defensive tactics, legal updates,
evidence gathering, traffic control and traffic accident investigation,
follow-up on criminal and civil investigations, etc.
Several patrol methods are used to secure and patrol College
properties, including uniformed and plain clothes, vehicle, foot, and
bike patrol.
Utah Valley State College provides several
important services to a diverse College
community consisting of approximately
28,500 students and supporting faculty
and staff by providing 24 hour a day
police patrol and security protection
for the benefit of all College properties,
employees, students and visitors on
campus.
College police officers are also responsible for providing a full
range of public safety services to the College community, including
the handling of all crime reports, investigations, traffic accidents,
enforcement of laws regulating underage drinking, the use of
controlled substances, weapons violations, and enforcement of all
applicable State, County and local laws, and all other incidents
such as medical and fire emergencies which require police
assistance.
College police officers prepare and submit reports of incidents
brought to their attention. As a courtesy, they share information on
arrests and serious crimes with any law enforcement agency having
a legitimate need to know.
The serial numbers of all vehicles, office equipment, and personal
property stolen from our College campuses are reported
nationwide through the National Crime Information Center (NCIC).
UVSCPD encourages the prompt and accurate reporting of crimes
to our office by victims, witnesses or any other persons having
knowledge that a crime has been committed on our campus.
The UVSC Dispatch office is staffed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week,
365 days a year and can be reached by calling 801-863-5555.
The College Police office is located in Gunther Trades 331.
Success.
Utah Valley State
There are emergency telephones located in each Orem campus
elevator and various locations on campus. When activated these
phones will automatically put you in direct contact with a College
police dispatcher.
Catalog 2007–2008
47
Campus Police
CRIME AWARENESS/CRIME
PREVENTION
An important function of UVSCPD is
making our campus users aware of how to
prevent becoming a victim of crime.
If requested, one of our College police
officers will talk to groups regarding Crime
Awareness/Crime Prevention.
The UVSC police department sponsors
Rape Aggression Defense, a self-defense
class for Women only, held several times
a year. Interested parties contact (801)
863-8014.
CAMPUS SAFETY AWARENESS
PROGR AMS
The Chief of Police/Director of Public
Safety, the College Fire Marshall and other
staff members are involved in a College
Safety Committee which makes periodic
security and safety surveys of campus
facilities.
2IÀFHU)ULHQGO\3URJUDP
Several times throughout the school year
our College police officers will make an
Officer Friendly presentation to the College
Child Care Center emphasizing “police are
our friends”. Child safety is stressed.
7UDIÀF6FKRRO
Utah Valley State College police offer
traffic school for persons cited for moving
violations. Attendance will give licensed
drivers an opportunity to improve their
knowledge and keep a clean driving
record. Upon completion of the class
the citation will be dismissed and will not
appear on your driving record with the
Utah Driver’s License Division. Traffic
school is allowed for one citation per
calendar year.
GROUNDS AND BUILDING
SAFETY
The College Facilities and Planning/Plant
Operations Departments maintain college
buildings and grounds with a concern for
safety and security. These facilities are
inspected regularly; plant staff attempt
to make prompt repairs and respond 24
hours-a-day to reports of potential safety
and security hazards, such as broken
windows and locks. The College Police
Department assists maintenance personnel
by reporting potential safety and security
hazards. Students, as well as employees,
are encouraged to call Facilities Planning
and Maintenance (801-863-8130) to
report any hazard.
Representatives from College Police/
Department of Public Safety and
Facilities Planning routinely inspect the
48
entire campus to review lighting and
environmental safety concerns.
Police statistics page http://www.uvsc.edu/
police/statistics.html
CRIME STATISTICS FOR THE
COLLEGE COMMUNITY
ON CAMPUS HOUSING
The College Police Department submits
a monthly Uniform Crime Report to the
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
through the Utah Bureau of Criminal
Identification. UCR data is available online
through BCI at
http://bci.utah.gov/Stats/StatsHome.html
UVSC also submits crime data to the
Department of Education. The following
statistics show the aggregate number of
occurrences and arrests for on campus,
non-campus, and public property. For a
more detailed breakdown, see
http://www.uvsc.edu/police/statistics.html
Number of Occurrences for
Selected Crimes
Criminal
Offense
2003
2004
2005
2006
Murder/Nonnegligent
Manslaughter
0
0
0
0
Forcible sex
offenses
0
3
0
0
Non-forcible
sex offenses
0
0
2
2
Robbery
0
0
0
0
Aggravated
Assault
1
0
3
2
Burglary
6
0
0
0
Motor Vehicle
Theft
1
0
0
0
Arson
0
0
0
0
Negligent
manslaughter
0
0
0
0
Total
8
3
5
4
Number of Arrests for Liquor/Drug
and Weapons Offenses
Arrests
2003
2004
2005
2006
Liquor Law
Violations
14
5
5
11
Drug Law
Violations
9
0
3
6
Illegal
Weapons
Possessions
1
0
2
2
Total
24
5
10
19
No hate crimes were reported during this
period.
A glossary of offenses is available at http://
ope.ed.gov/security/Search.asp
At the present time, UVSC does not have
any on campus housing.
OFF- CAMPUS STUDENT
RESIDENCES
There are numerous privately owned rental
units off-campus in which students reside.
The College encourages students to locate
and investigate off-campus living units
whose owners have agreed to exercise
reasonable efforts to maintain rental
facilities in good repair including properly
functioning locks on doors and windows.
Some of the large apartment complexes
provide their own night security watch.
THE COLLEGE CANNOT AND DOES
NOT GUARANTEE OR REPRESENT THAT
OWNERS AND MANAGERS ALWAYS
MEET OUR SUGGESTED PHYSICAL
CRITERIA. Thus, students are individually
responsible to carefully choose a safe and
secure off-campus apartment.
Crime prevention and crime awareness
programs emphasizing security and what
students and employees can do to help
themselves from becoming a victim are
provided free, upon request, by contacting
local police agencies or the College Police
Department, telephone 801-863-5555.
The College Police Department is
responsible for policing the Utah Valley
State College campuses. The respective
city police departments are responsible to
police the surrounding areas where our
students may choose to live.
The College Police Department has
a mutual working relationship with all
Local, County, Federal and any other
State law enforcement agencies in Utah
County (Utah Valley region), providing
each department as requested or as
becomes necessary with patrol assistance,
information exchange, and back up.
SK ATEBOARDS, ROLLER
BL ADES, ROLLER SK ATES,
BICYCLES, AND MOTORCYCLES
Skateboards, roller blades, roller skates,
and bicycles are allowed on campus for
transportation only. NO stunts or tricks
are allowed. Motorcycles and like devices
shall not be operated on sidewalks or paths
under any circumstances.
Sanctions
Updated campus crime data is posted
by October 1 of each year on the UVSC
Catalog 2007–2008
Violations of this policy may be enforced
against students, employees and visitors
Utah Valley State
Campus Police
of Utah Valley State College by notices
or citations which may be processed and
settled through the police office.
OTHER FACILITIES UTILIZED BY
UVSC
UVSC has satellite offices located in several
communities throughout Utah such as:
American Fork, and Heber City. College
Police provide law enforcement and crime
prevention services for these areas as
needed. Routine patrol coverage is by
the appropriate local law enforcement
agencies.
Please feel free to direct any comments
and or questions that you may feel have
not been answered in this document to the
office of the Director of Public Safety.
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
49
School of Business
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
School of Business
The School of Business aspires to be the premier undergraduate
business school in the intermountain states recognized for its upto-date curriculum, quality faculty, and graduates who continue to
learn and achieve in the world of business.
DEAN: STANLEY EARL JENNE , PH.D.
Office: WB 128b
Telephone: 801-863-8239
E-mail: jennest@uvsc.edu
Fax: 801-863-7314
Associate Dean: Janice Gygi
Office: WB 219
Telephone: 801-863-8863
E-mail: gygija@uvsc.edu
Fax: 801-863-7314
Assistant Dean: Mikki O’Connor
Office: WB 129
Telephone: 801-863-8850
E-mail: oconnomi@uvsc.edu
Fax: 801-863-7314
Assistant Dean External Relations: David A. Brewer
Office: WB 203d
Telephone: 801-863-8458
E-mail: brewerda@uvsc.edu
Fax: 801-863-7314
Advisory Council
The School of Business aspires to be the
premier undergraduate business school
in the intermountain states recognized for
its up-to-date curriculum, quality faculty,
and graduates who continue to learn and
achieve in the world of business.
Edward F. Allebest, Law Office of Allebest and Associates; Steve
Beck, COBE Real Estate Development; Sue Bingham, Branch
Manager, Les Olson Company; John Blatter, Goldman Sachs
(retired); Michael Colemere, Consultant; Mary Crafts, Owner,
Culinary Crafts Catering; James Croft, Mortgage Asset Research
Institute; Martin Frey, Consultant; Reed Halladay, Managing
Director Bel Air Investments; Randy Harris, Director, LDS Worldwide
Church Education System; Chris Horton, Sr. VP, Business
Development Engage Thoughtware; Dan Howells, CEO, Nature’s
Sunshine Products, Inc.(retired); Amy Lewis, MediConnect Global,
Inc; Christopher Liechty, Meyer & Liechty, Inc.; Kenneth Macey,
President/CEO Macey’s Food Stores (retired); Tim Martin, Nuclear
Management Consultant; Carla Meine, Owner, O’Currance
Teleservices; Dan Reeve, Current Council Chair, Managing
Director, Horsley Bridge Partners; Mark Rogers, Council Chair
Elect, VP Sales, Intel Corporation; Steve Sessions, President &
CEO Fuller, Western Real Estate; Bill Siddoway, Consultant, UVSC
Institutional Advancement; Kevin L. Simister, Partner, Hawkins,
Cloward & Simister; Greg Warnock, Managing Director, Fund
I, vSpring Capital; John Whetten, President & CEO, Challenge
Dairy; W. Richards (Rick) Woodbury, Past Council Chair, President,
Woodbury Corporation.
Law Enforcement Academy
Success.
52
Director: Steve DeMille
Office: WB 254
Telephone: 801-863-8062 or 863-6156
Fax: 801-863-7327
E-mail: demillst@uvsc.edu
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
School of Business
Professorships
Reed and Christine Halladay Executive Lecture Professor: Douglas
G. Miller, Professor of Management
Miles and Mary Morris Professor of Entrepreneurship: Peter
Robinson, Professor of Management
Office: WB 257d
Telephone: 801-863-8749
E-mail: nicolmi@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Polly Clauson
Office: WB 257e
Telephone: 801-863-6482
E-mail: clausopa@uvsc.edu
School of Business Alumni Board
Jeri Allphin, UVSC; David Brewer, UVSC; Louise Bridge, UVSC;
Mike Brown, US Synthetic; Blake Christensen, Nature’s Sunshine
Products, Inc.; Paul Gifford, Associated Food Stores; Eric Graves,
SweetLiving; Tami Jensen, UVSC; Robynn Kirkham, UVSC; Linda
Makin, UVSC; Matt L. Merrell, Daniels Capital, LLC; Ryan Teeter,
UVSC; Mary Tilson, UVSC; Brian Wall, President, Nature’s Sunshine
Products, Inc.; Jason Wright, Nature’s Sunshine Products
Vision Statement
As a teaching institution, we aspire to be the premier
Business School in our region and a vital catalyst for
economic development, entrepreneurship, global
awareness, and application of knowledge.
Mission
The UVSC School of Business through its close-knit culture provides
an education that is built upon
-high academic quality in instruction and preparation of
students;
-innovative solutions to student needs for work/life/
educational balance and lifelong learning;
-integration and application of knowledge;
-faculty and student scholarship;
-social, ethical, cultural, and global awareness;
-leadership, community outreach, and service learning.
Accreditation
The School of Business received AACSB Accreditation in Fall 2007.
AACSB International Business accreditation is an achievement
earned only by programs of the highest caliber. Institutions
that earn accreditation confirm their commitment to quality and
continuous improvement through a rigorous and comprehensive
peer review.
Advising
The School of Business Advising Advisement Center provides oneon-one advising throughout a student’s program. Information
regarding scholarships, and transfer programs is readily available
by contacting departmental advisors in WB 257 of the Woodbury
Business Building. Privately funded scholarships, as well as tuition
waivers, are awarded by the School of Business. Each student
should make an appointment to see a School of Business advisor
early in his/her first semester on campus.
Advisor: Diana Johnsen
Office: WB 257f
Telephone: 801-863-8832
E-mail: johnsedi@uvsc.edu
Internships
The School of Business encourages students to enroll in internship
courses once they have advanced standing. Completing between
two and six credits of internship is required of many degrees
in the School of Business. An internship combines classroom
theory with related, practical job experience. While enrolled at
the college, students select a work environment related to their
major. Internship experience serves as a resume builder and
assists students in launching their careers following graduation.
It is recommended that students complete MGMT 3890 Career
Preparation before registering for internship credit.
A coordinator works closely with students and employers to ensure
that the internship is a successful career education experience. The
School of Business managers of career and corporate development
are:
Peggy Adams-Williams
Office: WB 257c
Telephone: 801-863-8379
E-mail: adamspe@uvsc.edu
John Wilson
Office: WB 257a
Telephone: 801-863-6307
E-mail: wilsonjo@uvsc.edu
ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Students choosing to pursue majors in the School of Business
should decide early, plan their schedules carefully, be aware of
all the requirements, and stay informed about any changes by
checking often with advisors in the School of Business Advisement
Center.
Each student must submit a completed School of Business
Admission Form to the School of Business Admissions Office in WB
257 or by mail to:
School of Business Admissions Office
Utah Valley State College, MS 207
800 West University Parkway
Orem, UT 84508
Accessibility to the School of Business Courses
All 1000- and 2000-level business courses are open to all UVSC
students along with selected 3000- and 4000-level courses. Some
courses have prerequisites, which must be satisfied. No more than
15 credits of upper-division courses can be taken before a student
has been formally matriculated into the UVSC School of Business
with advanced standing.
Repeating Failed Foundation Core Courses
Advisor: Terry Acord
Office: WB 257b
Telephone: 801-863-8314
E-mail: acordte@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Mignon Nicol
Utah Valley State
Each School of Business major has foundation core courses. A
student will be allowed to repeat a failed foundation core course
only twice. If the foundation core course is not passed with a
minimum grade of “C-” after the second retake, the student will not
be allowed to apply for advanced standing (matriculation) toward a
degree in one of the School of Business majors.
Catalog 2007–2008
53
School of Business
Application Requirements for Advanced Standing
(Matriculation)
Credit Policy
To be considered for admission to advanced standing in a School
of Business four-year program, a student must do the following:
1. Obsolete Credit: UVSC School of Business credit or business
transfer credit earned more than ten years earlier than the
proposed date of graduation (five years for business computer
proficiency) may not be accepted toward requirements for
graduation unless validated through taking a challenge
examination, completing the next course in a related sequence
with a grade of “C” or better, or receiving department chair and
assistant dean approval.
2.Waiver/substitution Requests: Any deviations from the printed
UVSC School of Business graduation requirements must be
approved by the appropriate department chair and the assistant
dean prior to waiving, substituting, or taking the course(s) in
question.
3.Challenge/Experiential Credit: Credit for any course that
appears in the current catalog may be awarded to individuals
who can prove through appropriate assessment and/or
documentation that they have already acquired the equivalent
knowledge and/or expertise required for successful completion
of that course. See your School of Business advisor for details on
how to receive experiential/challenge credit for a specific course.
Students may not challenge a class for which they are or have
been enrolled. No more than 16 credit hours of challenge credit
may be applied to a bachelor degree in the School of Business.
4.Coop/Internship Credits: Academic credit for cooperative
work experience and/or internship may be granted in bachelor
degrees. Check with your School of Business advisor for the
maximum number of coop/internship credits that can be applied
to your specific program. Additional coop/internship credits may
be taken (but not applied toward graduation) with the approval
of the manager of career and corporate development and the
assistant dean.
5.Transfer Credits: Students transferring from other colleges or
universities within the Utah System of Higher Education (USHE)
should consult their School of Business advisor to determine
which credits will be accepted by UVSC. Students wishing to
transfer School of Business credits from colleges or universities
outside the state not covered by the USHE Transfer Credit Guide
may need to submit further documentation which allows the
Transfer Office, School of Business advisor, department chair,
and/or School of Business assistant dean to assess the content
of courses taken. In the majority of cases, courses taken at
institutions accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate
Schools of Business (AACSB) International will be accepted.
Only courses with a grade of “C-” or higher are eligible for
credit. Classes taken more than 10 years ago may not be
accepted but will be evaluated individually.
• Complete the foundation core courses listed for their major
with at least a “C-” grade; Paralegal Studies majors must have
a grade of “C+” or higher. A student will be limited in taking
upper-division coursework (3000 level or higher) until these
foundation courses are completed.
• Achieve a grade point average (GPA) in business courses of at
least a 2.5 and an overall GPA of 2.0.
• Make formal application to advanced standing (matriculation)
through the School of Business advisor by completing the
appropriate form.
The student will be required to complete the program that is in
effect at the time advanced standing (matriculation) is granted.
Exceptions will be handled on a case-by-case basis.
Major Specialization of Courses
After admittance to advanced standing, the student will be required
to complete the courses required in their major specialization. See
your School of Business advisor or the appropriate section of the
current catalog for requirements for each major specialization.
Maintenance of Advanced Standing
Once admitted to advanced standing in the School of Business,
the student must maintain the 2.5 business GPA to remain in the
School of Business. A student falling below the minimum GPA will
be placed on probation for one semester. If the business GPA
remains below 2.5 for a second semester, advanced standing will
be revoked. A student who wishes to continue in the School of
Business major will be required to retake some classes to bring up
the business GPA to at least 2.5 and will be required to apply for
reinstatement of advanced standing.
A student will be allowed to repeat a failed major specialization
course only twice. If the course is not passed with a minimum of
“C-” after the second retake (“C+” for Paralegal Studies majors),
the student will be dropped from the School of Business program.
Graduation Requirements
A Bachelor of Science degree in a School of Business major may be
earned upon the completion of four years of full-time (16 credits per
semester) college work. The bachelor degree consists of 120-126
semester credit hours with a minimum of 40 hours upper-division
credits. At least 30 of the credit hours earned in the degree must
be in School of Business courses taken at UVSC; 10 of these
credit hours must be within the last 45 credit hours earned toward
completion of the degree. The student pursuing a bachelor degree
must also complete the general education requirements listed for
the Associate in Science degree. The student must have a minimum
2.5 GPA in all School of Business courses and a minimum 2.0 GPA
overall for graduation.
The School of Business reserves the right to change, at any time, the
requirements for graduation and every candidate not yet accepted
into advanced standing for a degree will be required to comply with
such changes as far as the uncompleted portion of his/her degree
is affected. Any exceptions must be approved by the Dean. In
addition courses within degrees may change at any time. Students
will be required to complete the revised course requirements even if
the changes add credit hours to the original degree.
Whether or not a course is accepted toward degree requirements
is determined by the date it was taken and the grade received. For
details contact your UVSC School of Business Advisor or the School
of Business Assistant Dean.
54
DEGREE OFFERINGS
The School of Business offers courses leading to the following
degrees.
Bachelor of Science (BS)
Accounting
Business Management with a specialization in:
Entrepreneurship
Finance and Banking
General Business
Hospitality Management
International Business
Marketing
Criminal Justice with a specialization in:
Corrections
Criminal Law
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
School of Business
Law Enforcement
Forensic Science
Hospitality Management
Paralegal Studies
The business computer proficiency exam consists of six modules:
Windows/computer concepts/ethics, Internet/e-mail, word
processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and database software
applications. These tests may be taken individually, but all tests
must be completed within the same semester.
Minors
For more information on or to obtain a review sheet for the business
computer proficiency exam, see the business advisors in WB 257. A
fee will be charged for taking the exam.
Accounting
Business Management
Criminal Justice
Paralegal Studies
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
See the individual departmental sections in the catalog that follow
this School of Business section for specific requirements on each
degree offered by the individual departments.
Associate in Arts (AA)
Criminal Justice
The Associate in Science School of Business transfer degree is
available for students planning to transfer to another college or
university in Utah, or it can be completed by students seeking a BS
degree at UVSC.
Associate in Science (AS)
Accounting
Business Management
Criminal Justice
Hospitality Management
Paralegal Studies
School of Business—transfer degree
Associate in Applied Science (AAS)
Accounting
Business Management
Hospitality Management
&HUWLÀFDWH
Accounting
Business Management
/DZ(QIRUFHPHQW$FDGHP\&HUWLÀFDWLRQ
Prior to applying for the Utah Valley State College Law Enforcement
Academy (UVSC-LEA), the student must pass the National Police
Officer Selection Test. Call 863-8269 for an appointment to take
the test.
Module 1, SFO Block, is offered twice each year beginning the
first week of June and the first week of September. Module 2, PO
Block, is offered twice each per year beginning in January and
March. Contact Steve DeMille at 801-863-8062 or stop by the
Legal Studies Department in WB 242. All information can be found
at www.uvsc.edu/legl
Associate in Business
61 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
36 Credits
•
ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
•
ENGL 2010 Intermediate Writing—Humanities/Social Sciences
or
ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
•
MATH 1050 College Algebra
or
An Advanced Placement (AP) Mathematics Test with a score of 3 or higher
Complete one of the following:
•
HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
•
HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
•
HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
•
POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
•
POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
•
PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
•
HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or
PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
•
Biology
•
Physical Science
•
Additional Biology or Physical Science
•
Behavioral/Social Science Distribution
•
Humanities Distribution
•
Fine Arts Distribution
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
•
ACC 2020
Managerial Accounting
•
MATH 1100 Introduction to Calculus
•
MGMT 2200 Business Communications
•
ECON 2020 Macroeconomics
•
ECON 2010 Microeconomics
•
LEGL 3000 Business Law
•
MGMT 2340 Business Statistics I
or
MATH 2040 Principles of Statistics (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
•
Business Computer Proficiency Exam*
or
DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency (3.0)
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
25 Credits
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
The UVSC School of Business and Utah State University College of
Business have formed a partnership to offer the Master of Business
Administration (MBA) degree on the Orem Campus. Students
interested in pursuing this MBA degree should contact Diana
Johnsen at 863-8832 for information.
Completion of a minimum of 61 semester credits.
Overall grade point average of 2.0 or above with 2.5 GPA or above in Business
courses. No grade below C- in business courses.
3
Residency hours: Minimum of 20 credit hours through course attendance at UVSC
with at least 12 credits of School of Business courses.
4
Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completing all prerequisite courses.
Notes: See information on the back of the program card for additional specialized general
education/major requirements for individual transfer schools (some requirements for other
schools cannot be taken at UVSC.
%XVLQHVV&RPSXWHU3URÀFLHQF\([DP
Footnotes:
Master of Business Administration Degree Partnership
Most of the degrees offered in the School of Business require the
student to demonstrate business computer proficiency. Students
pursuing most bachelor degrees must complete this proficiency
requirement before they can be accepted into advanced standing.
This proficiency can be completed by passing the hands-on
production exam modules with a score of 80 percent or higher
on each module or by completing the AIM 1050 class or the AIM
105A-F modules as needed and passing the tests given at the end
of each module at 80 percent or higher.
1
2
*
Students will be required to complete the Business Computer Proficiency exam with
a score of 80 percent or higher on each module or complete the DGM 2010 course
or DGM 201A-D modules as necessary with a score of 80 percent or highter on
each module.
DEPARTMENTS
ACCOUNTING
Chair: Steve Johnson
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
55
School of Business
Office: WB 136b
Telephone: 801-863-7186
E-mail: johnsosd@uvsc.edu
The mission of the Accounting Department is to build a strong
learning and growth environment for students to prepare for
successful careers in industry, government, and public accounting.
We maintain a teaching-focused environment where students can
master the fundamental and technical competencies required of
professional accountants.
Through our partnering with the business community, students
will have opportunities of interactive learning in and out of the
classroom. The Accounting Department is committed to assessing
current accounting trends and developing specialties within the
curriculum to prepare students for careers in those growth fields.
Upon completion of an Accounting degree, students should have
a combination of skills and abilities including but not limited to
leadership, teamwork, communication, analytical reasoning, and
lifelong learning.
HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
Chair: Douglas Miller
Office: WB 203e
Telephone: 801-863-8859
E-mail: millerdo@uvsc.edu
The Hospitality Management program prepares graduates for
employment in one of the fastest growing segments of the nation’s
economy. Students are marketable in a wide range of hospitality
and tourism areas such as hotel, resort, and motel management;
restaurant and institutional food service; event planning; cruise ship
management; convention and visitor facilities; and gaming facilities.
For students interested in management positions in the hospitality
industry, the Hospitality Management program offers a Bachelor of
Science in Hospitality Management with a track in Hotel/Restaurant
Management. The demand for management staff in this industry
is tremendous particularly for those with specialized hospitality
management skills.
The track in Food and Beverage Management is for students
interested in food production management. This track is ideal
for those training to be executive chefs, restaurant production
managers, institutional food service, or restaurant managers. The
demand for management staff in the restaurant industry is high,
particularly for those with culinary skills.
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Chair: Douglas Miller
Office: WB 203e
Telephone: 801-863-8859
E-mail: millerdo@uvsc.edu
Students graduating from the Business Management Department
have many opportunities in private industry, government, and
entrepreneurship fields. Bachelor of Science degrees are offered
with emphases in entrepreneurship, hospitality, international
business, marketing, and general business. An Associate in Science
degree and an Associate in Applied Science degree are also
available.
Faculty in the Business Management Department have real-world
expertise that they bring to the classroom. During their program
of study students serve an internship in business where they receive
actual work experience during their training. Graduates of the
UVSC business management program are well prepared to work in
business and industry or to go on to graduate school for additional
education.
FINANCE AND ECONOMICS
Chair: Lowell M. Glenn
Office: WB 215
Telephone: 801-863-8385
E-mail: glennlo@uvsc.edu
The business world is more competitive today than in past
generations. Decision makers understand the increasing
importance of getting things right the first time using business
models and measurement methods in making those policy
decisions. The classes taught in the Department of Finance and
Economics are designed to give students the background to make
professional business decisions.
Experienced faculty work with students in the development theory
and learning to apply the principles of finance management,
economics, statistics, and operations management critical to their
professional development. Finally, students are taught to integrate
these disciplines within a strategic management curriculum during
the final semester as they prepare to move into the professional
business environment.
LEGAL STUDIES
Chair: Curtis Fillmore
Office: WB 243
Telephone: 801-863-8857
E-mail: fillmocu@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Bobbi Gren
Office: WB 247
Telephone: 801-863-8489
E-mail: grenbo@uvsc.edu
The mission of the Department of Legal Studies is to provide
educational opportunities that emphasize skills and knowledge that
will allow the student to adjust through a lifetime of social change.
We recognize that education is vital in developing skills needed
for a productive society and essential in promoting the individual’s
sense of worth, values, and high ethical standards.
Recognizing the need to increase and improve access to the legal
system, the Department of Legal Studies promotes quality paralegal
education, develops educational standards, and encourages
professional growth in order to prepare graduates to perform a
significant role in the delivery of legal services.
The Department of Legal Studies provides students with an
understanding of how the criminal justice system functions in
theory and in practice. The criminal justice program addresses the
functions and organization of the criminal justice system integrating
critical thinking, reasoning, research, writing, and technology skills.
Many of our students assume professional roles within the criminal
justice system or matriculate to the study of law or other graduate
degrees.
The UVSC Legal Studies Department has the only ABA (American
Bar Association) approved paralegal program in Utah.
Economics training provides an excellent preparation for graduate
work in law, business, or other professions.
56
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
School of Education
DEAN: BRIANT J. FARNSWORTH
Office: EB 117B
Telephone: 801-863-8006
School of Education
DEGREES OFFERED
Bachelor of Science
Early Childhood Education/Dual
Elementary Education
Secondary Education
ASL and Deaf Studies Education
Biology Education
Business/Marketing Education
Chemistry/Physics Education
Dance Education
Earth Science Education
English Education
History Education
Math Education
Music Education
Physical Education Teacher Education
Theatre Arts Education
School Health Education
Spanish Education
Associate of Arts/Science Emphases
Early Childhood Education
Pre-Elementary Education
Minors
English Education
Business Education
Basic Business
Business Information Technology
Marketing
School Health Education
The mission of the Utah Valley State College
School of Education is empowering the
students through ethics, knowledge, and
preparation.
&HUWLÀFDWH
Early Care and Education
DEPARTMENTS
Department of Elementary Education
Department Chair: Susan Simmerman
Office: EB 116A
Telephone: 801-863-5097
Department Office Manager: Cathy Schumann
Office: EB 116
Telephone: 801-863-8228
Field Director: Richard Allred
Office: EB 112B
Telephone: 801-863-6580
Success.
Advisor: Leslie Hudson
Office: EB 114B
Telephone: 801-863-8527
Advisor: Shaunna Requilman
Office: EB 114A
Telephone: 863-6555
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
57
School of Education
Children’s Center
Office: EB 134 & 135
Telephone: 801-863-8146
Elementary Education Partner Schools:
Alpine School District - Elementary Schools: Aspen, Barrett,
Cedar Ridge, Deerfield, Foothill, Greenwood, Legacy, Lehi, Mt.
Mahogany, Orem, Saratoga Shores, Scera Park, Sego Lily, Valley
View, Vineyard, Westfield
Granite School District - Elementary Schools: Frost, Oakwood.
Jordan School District - Elementary Schools: Herriman, Ridgecrest,
Foothill.
Nebo School District - Elementary Schools: Brockbank, Grant,
Rees, Salem, Parkview.
Provo School District - Elementary Schools: Amelia Earhart,
Canyon Crest, Provost, Wasatch.
Department of Secondary Education
Department Chair: Roger Wise
Office: EB 116B
Telephone: 801-863-8499
Department Office Manager: Cathy Schumann
Office: EB 116
Telephone: 801-863-8228
Field Director: Susan Stone
Office: EB 112N
Telephone: 801-863-8587
Advisor: Lexi Powell
Office: EB 114B
Telephone: 863-8217
College Secondary Education Committee:
School of Technology and Computing - Kelly Baird, Ernest Carey,
Bonnie Cook, Diane Hartman, Jan Bentley.
School of Education - Numsiri Kunakemakorn, Axel Ramirez, Roger
Wise.
School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences - Douglas
Anderson, Dawn Chase, William Cobb, Fred Silvia, Kay Smith, Kim
Strunk, Hannah Thomson, Sandy Vogel, David Wilson
School of Science and Health - Dennis Allison, Calvin Bond, Vance
Hillman, Daniel Horns, Christine Merrin, Dee Oyler, Shaunna
McGhie, Sam Rushforth, Paul Tayler, Richard Tolman.
Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs - Karl Worthington
Vice President of Academic Affairs - Elizabeth J. Hitch
58
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
School of General Academics
School of General
Academics
The School of General Academics fosters educational opportunities
and collaborations by providing specialized academic experiences;
meeting individual student needs; facilitating the achievement of
educational goals; supporting exceptional and diverse students;
engaging students and faculty in learning and scholarship; creating
and strengthening interdisciplinary partnerships; encouraging
exploration, curiosity and self-discovery; and challenging students
with new expectations and ideas.
DEAN: BONNIE G. HENRIE
Office: LA 210c
Telephone: 801-863-8311
Fax: 801-863-7060
E-mail: bonnie.henrie@uvsc.edu
Associate Dean: K.D. Taylor
Office: LA 210e
Telephone: 801-863-8949
E-mail: kd.taylor@uvsc.edu
Assistant Dean: Lisa Lambert
Office: LA 210d
Telephone: 801-863-8741
E-mail: lisa.lambert@uvsc.edu
Administrative Assistant: Frankie Jensen
Office: LA 210
Telephone: 801-863-6312
E-mail: frankie.jensen@uvsc.edu
DEGREES OFFERED
Bachelor of Arts
Integrated Studies
Bachelor of Science
Integrated Studies
The School of General Academics,
through
the
complementary
and
collaborative missions of its components,
focuses on assisting students exploring
the directions of their academic careers,
seeking flexibility in degree choices,
and undertaking enhanced college
experiences. The interdisciplinary nature of
General Academics exemplifies, promotes
and supports academic excellence of
Utah Valley State College.
Success.
Utah Valley State
Associate in Arts
General Academics
Integrated Studies
Associate in Science
General Academics
Integrated Studies
Minor
American Indian Studies
American Studies
Deaf Studies
Environmental Studies
Gender Studies
Peace and Justice Studies
Religious Studies
INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS
COMMITTEE ON INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
Committee Chair: Jans B. Wager
Office: LA 114j
Telephone: 801-863-8340
Fax: 801-863-6255
E-mail: wagerja@uvsc.edu
Catalog 2007–2008
59
School of General Academics
Indian tribes and organizations. Graduates will have received the
basic knowledge and analytical skills to enable them to pursue
graduate degrees in fields related to American Indian Studies.
The American Indian Studies minor will emphasize the traditional
acquisition of knowledge and skills that apply to American Indian
communities, a vital sense of service to these communities, and an
enthusiastic pursuit of what these communities can contribute to the
academy in knowledge, methods, and ethics.
Interdisciplinary Studies Faculty Committee:
Professor
Scott Abbott
Kathie Debenham
Associate Professor
Brian Birch
Robert Cousins
Bryan Eldredge
Philip Gordon
David Keller
David Knowlton
Jans B. Wager
Assistant Professor
John Goshert
Michael Minch
Shannon Mussett
Michael Shaw
Jeff Torlina
David Wilson
Honors Program Director
Joy Ross
AMERICAN STUDIES
Committee Chair: Robert Cousins
Office: LA 114n
Telephone: 801-863-8571
Faculty Committee:
The Committee on Interdisciplinary Studies provides a framework
for supporting innovative, boundary-crossing inquiry among
students and faculty across campus. To this end the Committee
coordinates the efforts of existing multidisciplinary programs and
provides guidance and support as new programs are envisioned
and established.
The boundaries between disciplines form a fertile ground for
creative and innovative research. New knowledge grows in these
developing and interstitial fields that often does not fit easily into
the standard demarcations of academic departments. While
the disciplines have their role to play, future scholarship will
depend in part on shifting configurations of resources. This type
of scholarship asks questions that draw on established bodies of
thought while reworking certain connections and concerns in order
to explore vibrant and valuable new areas.
Professor
Robert Robbins
Associate Professor
Lyn Bennett
Robert Cousins
Philip Gordon
Christa Albrecht-Crane
American Studies is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of
American cultures. Through examination of historical, religious,
and literary texts, political institutions, popular culture, film, art, and
the physical landscape, students will explore how Americans create
meaning in their lives and make sense of the world in which they
live. By encouraging students to approach the knowledge and skills
they are mastering as part of their major from the perspective of
other disciplines, American Studies courses will foster deeper critical
thinking and broader contextualization. Thus an American Studies
minor will offer students a strong complement to a wide variety of
majors-an additional course of study that will help them to balance
the focus of a traditional discipline with the fresh insights and
breadth of interdisciplinary approaches.
DEAF STUDIES
AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES
Committee Chair: Bryan Eldredge
Committee Chair: David R. Wilson
Office: LA 003j
Telephone: 801-863-8529 voice/videophone
Office: LA 012t
Telephone: 801-863-6916
Email: wilsondr@uvsc.edu
Committee Member:
Associate Professor
Minnie Mae Wilding-Diaz
Faculty Committee:
Professor
Laurelyn Whitt
Associate Professors
David Knowlton
Jan Wellington
Assistant Professor
David R. Wilson
Lecturer
Ken Sekaquaptewa
The American Indian Studies minor will provide students with
academic experiences, skills, and strategies to understand the
scope of American indigenous communities within scholarly and
applied contexts. After completion of the minor, graduates will
have received an academic background that will prepare them
for relevant employment in tribal governments and other Indian
organizations, state or federal agencies which serve Indian tribes
and organizations, and private sector enterprises that work with
60
Deaf Studies is an interdisciplinary field that draws on work from
a variety of academic disciplines including anthropology, history,
linguistics, interpretation and translation, education, psychology,
sociology, public administration, political science, social work,
philosophy, ethics, art, literature, and American Sign Language
(ASL) instruction. Students will examine elements of what culturallyDeaf people in America have traditionally called “the Deaf-World”
with special attention to the framework of meaning from within
which culturally-Deaf people interpret what it means to be Deaf.
The interdisciplinary nature of Deaf Studies courses challenges
students to approach cultural descriptions critically. The Deaf
Studies minor offers students a strong complement to a wide
variety of majors. Students who earn this minor will find increased
employability in a range of professions.
The minor in Deaf Studies provides students with a historical,
cultural, and linguistic foundation. From this foundation the minor
prepares students to become certified interpreters, to become
ASL and Deaf studies teachers, to pursue graduate work in deaf
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
School of General Academics
education and a variety of other disciplines, and to engage in any
number of professional fields related to deafness.
GENDER STUDIES
Committee Chair: Shannon Mussett
Office: LA 121v
Telephone: 801-863-6264
Email: shannon.mussett@uvsc.edu
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
Committee Chair: David R. Keller
Office: LA 109b
Telephone: 801-863-6363
Web site: www.environmentalstudies.cc
E-mail: enst.studies@uvsc.edu
Faculty Committee:
Associate Professor
Lyn Bennett
Bryan Eldredge
Laura Hamblin
Bonnie Kyburz
Karen Mizell
Jans Wager
Jan Wellington
Christine Weigel
Assistant Professor
John Goshert
Numsiri Kunakemakorn
Shannon Mussett
Joylin Namie
Michael Shaw
Ryan Simmons
Faculty Committee:
Professor
Elaine Englehardt
Lowell Glenn
Larry Harper
Jim Harris
Paul Tayler
Associate Professor
Lyn Bennett
Eddy Cadet
Kathryn French
Laura Hamblin
Daniel Horns
Faridul Islam
David R. Keller
Jan Wellington
Assistant Professor
Joel Bradford
Bill Dinklage
Phil Gordon
Scott Hatch
Michael Minch
Jon Moore
Daniel A. Stephen
Joylin Namie
Jeff Torlina
The Gender Studies minor allows students to study the extent
to which gender and gender relations are socially influenced.
Students will examine the ways in which conceptions of masculinity
and femininity directly impact social and political institutions and
practices, cultural expressions (such as art, communication, media,
literature, music, and film), law, education, business, scientific
inquiry, interpersonal relations, sexuality and family. As an
interdisciplinary program, the Gender Studies minor encourages
students to examine gender from multiple academic perspectives.
As such, the minor broadens students’ understanding of their
chosen major and career path while facilitating the recognition of
gender dynamics in their own lives.
Environmental Studies is premised on the idea that nature and
culture are inextricably linked. Nature provides the context in which
“culture” is constructed, and culture acts as a lens through which
humans define “nature.”
Environmental Studies challenges students to examine both the
ecological and social underpinnings of environmental issues and
the complex interplay between natural and social systems, from
local to global scales. Since humans are integral parts of ecological
systems, an understanding of the biosphere must include studies
in both the humanities and natural science. Knowledge of the
structure and function of natural systems is crucial, as well as an
understanding of the ways culture affects the way we perceive
nature. In this way, Environmental Studies is built upon the liberal
arts.
A Minor in Environmental Studies is useful for students seeking
academic or professional paths in public policy on the environment.
Hundreds of thousands of environmental professionals work for
government agencies at local, state, and federal levels. Tens of
thousands of jobs become annually available in both the public and
private sectors.
An emphasis in Environmental Studies is also available. See
Integrated Studies for details.
PEACE AND JUSTICE STUDIES
Committee Chair: Michael Minch
Office: LA 121J
Telephone: 801-863-7482
Faculty Committee:
Dean
William Cobb, School of Humanities, Arts and Social
Sciences
Professor
Robert Robbins
Associate Professor
Lyn Bennett
Kathryn French
Laura Hamblin
Jill Jasperson
Assistant Professor
Stephen Gibson
Michael Minch
Jeff Torlina
Adjunct Faculty
Barbara Hammond
Robert Norton
Grant Skabelund
Peace and Justice Studies at UVSC takes an interdisciplinary
approach to the study of phenomena empirically and theoretically
associated with violence/nonviolence and injustice/justice. Four
areas of concentration are offered: 1) Peace, 2) Justice, 3)
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
61
School of General Academics
Mediation and Conflict Resolution, 4) Philosophy and Religion.
Although organized into concentrations, the curricula must also
be approached in a way that disallows the student from studying
within one concentration only (note the accent on interdisciplinary).
Peace and nonviolence are investigated at multiple levels from
the realm of the personal and familial, to international structures,
conventions, institutions, and history. Likewise, justice and injustice
are interrogated across the same range of inquiry. Because matters
of peace and justice are of perennial- and perhaps growingconcern, students who earn a Peace and Justice Studies minor will
place themselves in a multi-faceted market of career opportunities
including law, social work, counseling, mediation and conflict
resolution, development, diplomacy, nonprofit management,
education, various forms of government employment, and more.
The newly expanded Program will also offer cultural and social
events, workshops for graduate school preparation, and service and
leadership opportunities integrated into the curriculum. At UVSC,
an Honors Student Advisory Group takes the lead in design and
planning of these events, collaborating with faculty and Program
administration. Honors students will enjoy access to an on-campus
Study Commons and a residential option to live with other Honors
students close to campus. Honors collaborates with the Student
Organization for Academic Research (SOAR), and Honors students
receive mentoring by Honors professors on building careers,
designing and conducting original projects, and doing cutting-edge
work in the studio, lab, and field.
The Honors Program seeks to build a diverse community open to
students from a wide cross-section of academic majors. Its goal is
to enhance the educational experience of students, including the
student body at large, and to connect what students learn with their
professions, their communities, and the wider world.
RELIGIOUS STUDIES:
Committee Chair: Brian Birch
Office: LA 121
Telephone: 801-863-8759
INTEGRATED STUDIES
Director: Scott Abbott
Office: LA 109c
Telephone: 801-863-8537
E-mail: scott.abbott@uvsc.edu
Faculty Committee:
Professor
Jen Wahlquist
Associate Professor
Brian Birch
Philip Gordon
David Knowlton
Assistant Professor
Grace Chou
Michael Minch
R. Dennis Potter
Lecturer
Boyd Peterson
Alex Stecker
Advisor: Lynne Hetzel
Office: LA 109f
Telephone: 801-863-8455
E-mail: lynne.hetzel@uvsc.edu
Faculty:
The Religious Studies Program is an interdisciplinary approach to
the academic study of religion. Due to its influential role at the
local, national, and international level, religion requires careful
study utilizing academic methods employed in the examination of
other cultural institutions. This includes the study of the history,
theology, literature, folklore, etc. of various religions in an effort
to study religion as a cultural phenomenon. The program is
intended to serve our students and community by deepening our
understanding of religious beliefs and practices in a spirit of open
inquiry. Its aim is neither to endorse nor to undermine the claims
of religion, but to create an environment in which various issues
can be engaged from a variety of perspectives and methodologies.
A Religious Studies minor will complement a variety of majors and
contribute to a well-rounded educational experience by exposing
students to multiple disciplines.
HONORS
Director: Joy Ross
Office: LC 203
Telephone: 801-863-6262
Fax: 801-863-7060
E-mail: joy.ross@uvsc.edu
Professor
Scott Abbott
Mark Jeffreys
Laurie Whitt
Associate Professor
Alan Clarke
Assistant Professor
Nancy Rushforth
The Program in Integrated Studies serves students with interests
and capabilities in more than one scholarly discipline. The degree
trades disciplinary depth for breadth and for cross-disciplinary
research and writing that culminate in a senior thesis. The Program
encourages and supports interdisciplinary study across campus.
LIBR ARY
Losee Building - 3rd & 4th Floors
Telephone: 801-863-8265
Fax: 801-863-7065
http://www.uvsc.edu/library
Hours:
7 a.m. - 11 p.m. Monday -Thursday
7 a.m. - 7 p.m. Friday
8 a.m. - 7 p.m. Saturday
The Honors Program is a community of engaged scholars — both
students and faculty — devoted to learning, and to the wider
world. Courses offer an enriched educational experience beyond
the expectations of regular students, with outstanding faculty and
innovative classroom approaches. They also stress critical thinking
and analysis through intensive reading, writing, and discussion.
Beginning Fall 2006, the new Honors Program will offer upperdivision courses suitable for entering freshmen, transfer, and
62
continuing UVSC students interested in graduating with Honors.
Director: Michael J. Freeman
Office: LC 403
Telephone: 801-863-8751
E-mail: michael.freeman@uvsc.edu
Assistant Director: Kimberly Rollins
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
School of General Academics
Office: LC 312e
Telephone: 801-863-8752
E-mail: kim.rollins@uvsc.edu
The Utah Valley State College Library supports the College mission
of teaching, learning and scholarship by providing access to quality
information resources, offering exceptional services, utilizing current
technology to enhance research, promoting information literacy,
and ensuring intellectual freedom.
Library Advisory Board: Cindy Clark, Chair; Gene Nelson; Chris
Pope; Joel Sybrowsky.
The Library houses 210,000 volumes, 14,000 videos, and nearly
28,000 periodicals in print or electronic format. Reference service
is available daily to help students doing research; formal classroom
instruction is also provided. The library network provides electronic
access to over 123 indexes and databases, six full-text newspaper
databases, 6500 e-books, and library book catalogs throughout
Utah, the United States and the world. Full Internet access is
available. Through the Utah Academic Library Consortium, UVSC
student cards are valid at all public and private academic libraries
in Utah. Web-based Interlibrary Loan moves materials quickly
between consortium members.
The Library contains reserve materials (including electronic reserve)
for instructors, a teacher education resource center, group study
rooms, a specialized equipment lab with research equipment
for students with disabilities, and hosts a series of art exhibits
throughout the year.
DEPARTMENTS
The School of General Academics values student-centered
learning and focuses on assisting students exploring the direction
of their academic careers, seeking flexibility in degree choices, or
undertaking an enhanced college experience. General Academics’
interdisciplinary composition supports all areas in increasing the
academic excellence of Utah Valley State College
COLLEGE SUCCESS STUDIES
Department Chair: Denise Hodgkin
Office: LA 208
Telephone: 801-863-8277
E-mail: denise.hodgkin@uvsc.edu
Assistant: Marni Sanft
Office: LC 211
Telephone: 801-863-6183
Email: marni.sanft@uvsc.edu
Academic Director of Center for Student Success:
Michael Jensen
Office: LC 210
Telephone: 801-863-7090
E-mail: mike.jensen@uvsc.edu
Assistant Director, UV Mentors: Marinda Ashman
Office: LC (TBA)
Telephone: 801-863-7227
Email: marinda.ashman@uvsc.edu
The department mission is to help students acquire the knowledge,
skills and abilities needed to meet the challenges of college.
Students may choose from a variety of College Success and
Critical Thinking and Reading Strategies courses which best fit their
academic needs. The College Success courses better prepare
students for the demands of college life, the selection and pursuit of
major and career paths to graduation, developing effective ways to
manage time, learning, and stress, library research techniques, and
the development of other essential life skills. The Critical Thinking
and Reading Strategies courses teach students to effectively
process, reduce, and remember the essentials from college courses
and texts. Also presented are test taking and memory skills, speed
reading techniques, and other learning strategies which help
students increase their academic confidence and success.
DEVELOPMENTAL MATHEMATICS
BASIC COMPOSITION/ENGLISH AS A SECOND
LANGUAGE
Department Chair: Forrest G. Williams
Office: LA 234e
Telephone: 801-863-8494
E-mail: forrest.williams@uvsc.edu
Assistant Chair: Keith White
Office: LA 217c
Telephone: 801-863-7261
E-mail: keith.white@uvsc.edu
ESL Program Director: Kevin Eyraud
Office: LA 234f
Telephone: 801-863-7091
E-mail: kevin.eyraud@uvsc.edu
The Basic Composition/ESL Department is dedicated to assisting
students and community members who wish to improve their
writing skills in preparation for taking college courses or for selfimprovement. Both the Basic Composition and ESL programs
include emphasis on accuracy and clarity in language use, critical
thinking, current events, organizational skills in speech and writing,
comprehending and responding to written texts, and using logic
and support to present oral and/or written arguments. The Basic
Composition/ESL Department strives to accomplish its mission by
providing a learner-centered environment which allows students to
develop self-confidence along with the skills necessary to succeed
in their academic or occupational endeavors. The Department
uses a variety of instructional formats including traditional
classroom settings, computerized instruction, collaborative learning
exercises, peer and individualized tutorials, and individualized
instruction to meet student needs.
Utah Valley State
Department Chair: Carole Sullivan
Office: LA 217b
Telephone: 801-863-7318
E-mail: carole.sullivan@uvsc.edu
Evening Coordinator: Clayton Brown
Office: LA 221n
Telephone: 801-863-6446
E-mail: clayton.brown@uvsc.edu
The courses offered by the Department of Developmental
Mathematics are designed to provide a foundation in preparatory
mathematics that is required for higher level mathematics courses
and that support our students in many disciplines. The courses
also provide for the development of critical thinking skills that are
applicable to all aspects of academic life.
The Department of Developmental Mathematics offers MAT 1000
and MAT 1010, Intermediate Algebra as transferable, college credit
classes, and as prerequisites for MATH 1030, MATH 1040, and
MATH 1050. The Department of Developmental Mathematics also
offers preparatory, non-transferable courses for students who need
to strengthen mathematics skills before entering MAT 1010.
Catalog 2007–2008
63
School of General Academics
Internet tutoring through Math Lab Online. Video-taped lectures
are available for use in the lab, as well as solution manuals.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
Program Director: Kevin Eyraud
Office: LA 234f
Telephone: 801-863-7091
E-mail: kevin.eyraud@uvsc.edu
Peer Tutoring Center
Drop In Lab: LA 201
Department Chair: Forrest Williams
Office: LA 234e
Telephone: 801-863-8494
E-mail: forrest.williams@uvsc.edu
Manager: Regie Holdaway
Office: LA 201
Telephone: 801-863-8356
Online: http://www.uvsc.edu/peertutoring
E-mail: regie.holdaway@uvsc.edu
The English as a Second Language program has three goals:
Ă To assist international students in becoming proficient in English
communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Ă To prepare international students to succeed either in college or in
the job market.
Ă To familiarize international students with the American culture.
All students are required to take a placement examination prior
to registration for any courses. Placement/promotion testing is
done at the beginning and end of each semester. All students who
successfully complete the advanced level courses and meet the
ESL program exit criteria are admitted into the college for regular
academic studies.
CAMPUS SUPPORT SERVICES
ACADEMIC TUTORING
Academic Tutoring
Academic Tutoring is available at no charge to all UVSC students.
Qualified tutors provide one-on-one tutorials and help lead
group study sessions and workshops. Information about tutoring
or learning assistance programs may be obtained by contacting
coordinators of any of the following services.
Free tutoring assistance for all classes other than math or English
is available in the Peer Tutoring Center to all UVSC students.
Services include a drop-in tutoring lab, supplemental instruction,
and group study sessions. Solutions manuals for select courses can
be checked out for use in the lab, and other materials are available
for student use. Live, interactive tutoring is also available for some
classes on the Internet through Online Peer Tutoring.
Writing Center
Manager: Jennifer Abbot Paul
Office: Academic Tutoring, LA 201; Library Extension, LC 424
Telephone: 801-863-8099
Online: http://www.uvsc.edu/owl
E-mail: jennifer.paul@uvsc.edu
The Writing Center provides free one-on-one tutoring to all UVSC
students. Students may bring writing assignments for any class and
can either make an appointment or drop in to meet with a tutor. In
addition, the Center offers writing workshops, handouts, practice
grammar tests, reference books, textbooks, writing manuals, ESL
materials, and the On-line Writing Lab (OWL) http:/www.uvsc.
edu/owl.
Learning Assistance
Learning Strategist: Gary Sauter
Office: Academic Tutoring, LA 221p
Telephone: 801-863-7418
E-mail: gary.sauter@uvsc.edu
The Learning Strategist provides many resources for students:
Ă Advisement in developing a personalized program of study
processes
Ă Support programs for transitional and provisionally admitted
students
Ă Student success workshops
Ă Referral to other services and agencies
Math Tutoring
Manager: Kathryn Van Wagoner
Office: Academic Tutoring, LA 201
Telephone: 801-863-8411
Online: http://www.uvsc.edu/mathlab
E-mail: kathryn.vanwagoner@uvsc.edu
The Math Lab offers free drop-in math tutoring for all UVSC
students in a relaxed, friendly atmosphere. Resources include
individual tutoring, group tutorials, a group study room, and live
64
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences
DEAN: WILLIAM W. COBB, JR .
Office: LA 209d
Telephone: 801-863-7435
School of
Humanities, Arts
and Social Sciences
Associate Dean for Academics: Kathie Debenham
Office: LA 209b
Telephone: 801-863-7129
Assistant Dean for Administration: William W. Bridges
Office: LA 209c
Telephone: 801-863-8094
Assistant Dean for External Relations: Barbara G.
Hammond
Office: LA 209f
Telephone: 801-863-6246
DEGREES OFFERED
Bachelor of Fine Arts
Art and Visual Communications
Fine Arts Emphasis
Graphic Design
Illustration Emphasis
Photography Emphasis
Dance
Ballet Emphasis
Modern Dance Emphasis
Bachelor of Arts/Science
The School of Humanities, Arts and Social
Sciences offers degree programs and courses
of study in numerous disciplines. Through
interaction with exceptional faculty members
in and outside the classroom, students and
graduates of the School acquire many of the
intellectual and practical skills necessary for
the workplace, for further professional and
graduate study, and for participation as citizens
of the community and the nation.
In the challenging yet nurturing environment
of the classroom, and through undergraduate
scholarship, research, internships, creative
work, and service-learning projects, our students
have the opportunity to reach their academic
and employment goals. Many of the School’s
graduates move right into the workforce, and
many others continue their education in fields
such as law, business, medicine, government,
teaching, the social sciences, the humanities,
and the fine and performing arts.
Success.
Utah Valley State
ASL and Deaf Studies Education
Art and Visual Communications
Behavioral Science
Anthropology
Psychology
Sociology
Social Work
Communication
Communication Theory & Practice
Journalism
Public Relations
Dance
Movement Studies—Ballroom Dance
Deaf Studies
General Deaf Studies
Interpreting
English
Creative Writing
Literary Studies
History
General History
Public History
Music
Philosophy
Political Science
American Government
International Relations
Political Philosophy/Public Law
Spanish
Secondary Education
ASL and Deaf Studies
Dance
Catalog 2007–2008
65
School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences
English
History
Music
Spanish
Theatre Arts
Theatre Arts
Visual Communications; they may also apply toward our Integrated
Studies emphasis or Technology Management pre-majors.
Associate in Arts/Science Emphases
The mission of the Department of Behavioral Science is to prepare
students for careers in the fields of psychology, sociology, social
work, anthropology and other related professions. Finding
solutions to human problems involves the ability to apply academic
theories to the real world. Behavioral Science students learn
academic rigor in writing, critical thinking and analysis and
integration of current scientific research. A multicultural perspective
and respect for the range of individual differences are central to
the department’s mission. Insight, skill acquisition and personal
application are also important collateral aspects of a student’s
exposure to the behavioral sciences. Classes are frequently
taught using experiential methods and collaborative assignments.
Students are challenged to be curious about those they don’t
understand, kind to those they love and gentle with those younger
and older than themselves.
Department of Behavioral Science
Chair: David Yells
Office: LA 012b
Telephone: 801-863-8083/863-8585
Art and Visual Communications
Behavioral Science
Communication
Dance
English
English: Technical Communication Specialization
History/Political Science
Humanities
Music
Philosophy
Theatre Arts
Associate in Applied Science
Art and Visual Communications
Design/Illustration Specialization
Graphic Design Specialization
Photography Specialization
Department of Communication
Minor
The mission of the Department of Communication is to help
students prepare for careers that demand skills in oral, written
and visual communication in interpersonal, organizational,
print and electronic contexts. Virtually every modern field of
endeavor has increasing demand for specialists with training in
the field of communication. Traditional areas of employment for
communication students include: print and electronic journalism;
print and electronic entertainment; public relations (public affairs,
media relations, customer relations, press agentry, marketing,
etc.); advertising; various sorts of writing, reviewing, and editing;
training; sales and management. Today, new media technologies
are expanding the need for communication specialists, as well
as their range of skills, which now include multimedia literacy.
Communication also provides excellent preparation for graduate
study in the fields of business, education, law, psychology, and, of
course, communication.
Chair: Philip Gordon
Office: FA 727
Telephone: 801-863-8186/863-8452
English Creative Writing
English Education
English Literary Studies
History
Humanities
Music
Philosophy
Political Science
Spanish
Technical Communication
Theatre Arts
&HUWLÀFDWH
Art and Visual Communications
The department offers programs of study leading to the following
degrees: BA/BS with a concentration in Journalism, Public
Relations, or Communication Theory & Practice, AA/AS, and is
available as a BA/BS emphasis in Integrated Studies. Programs
of study in Communication at UVSC offer a balance of analytic
and applied approaches to study in the field. Encouraging student
internships, and working closely with Student Media and other units
on campus, the curriculum balances traditional, academic-style
learning with applied, practical approaches to study in the field, as
exemplified in our broadcast journalism courses, which culminate in
a student-produced, locally-broadcast television news show.
Other
Technical Communication Certification
DEPARTMENTS
Department of Art and Visual Communications
Chair: Steve Bule
Office: GT 535a
Telephone: 801-863-7378
The Department of Art and Visual Communications provides
technical and aesthetic training in fine art, design, illustration
and both traditional and computer-based graphics production
processes. Courses offering both hands-on and theoretical
experiences are designed to prepare the graduate for entry-level
employment in the exciting and highly diversified field of visual
communications. In addition to career training, the Department
provides opportunities for students who wish to explore drawing,
painting, sculpture, ceramics, photography and crafts. Many
courses in the Department fill general education requirements
in the fine arts distribution area. Upper division courses may be
applied toward the AAS, AA/AS, BA/BS, or BFA degrees in Art and
66
Encouraging student internships, and working closely with Student
Media and other units on campus, the curriculum balances
traditional, academic-style learning with applied, practical
approaches to study in the field, as exemplified in our broadcast
journalism courses, which culminate in a student-produced, locallybroadcast television news show.
Department of Dance
Chair: Kim Strunk
Office: LA 111g
Telephone: 801-863-7225
The mission of Utah Valley State College Department of Dance
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences
is to foster academic and artistic excellence through an intensive
technical and reflective study of dance. Anchored in a common
core curriculum with several areas of emphasis, our program
provides a rich and stimulating environment where students
cultivate their technical, aesthetic, creative, and scholarly potential.
We value superior teaching which promotes dance as an artistic
and cultural expression that has the power to enrich and transform
the individual, community, and society.
Students interested in pursuing a degree in dance can chose from
the following degree paths: AS Pre Major in Dance, BFA in Dance
with an emphasis in Ballet or Modern dance, BS in Movement
Studies with an emphasis in Ballroom dance, and BS in Dance
Education. A variety of student, pre-professional and professional
companies within the department provide excellent local, national
and international performing opportunities for students in formal
and informal as well as, adjudicated settings. Membership in
companies is by audition only.
Those trained in dance find careers as public and private school
teachers, college and university educators (requires graduate
degree), performers, choreographers, dance historians and critics,
administrators, dance therapists and professionals in the field of
somatics, private studio owners, health and fitness consultants,
researchers, notators and movement analysts.
Department of English and Literature
Chair: Robert Cousins
Office: LA 126e
Telephone: 801-863-8571
Chair: Keith Snedegar
Office: LA 030e
Telephone: 801-863-8847
The Department of History and Political Science embraces
the disciplines of archaeology, geography, history, economics
and political science. We are dedicated to providing students
with a broad range of opportunities in general education and
discipline-specific courses. Our classes lie at the heart of the
collegiate experience. In our classes, we explore the dynamics
of the human condition through historical, spatial, economic and
political perspectives. We endeavor to teach in ways that foster
independent thinking, the analysis of human issues through reading
and discussion and the development of writing skills. Students who
complete our programs will be well equipped for successful careers
in public service and private enterprise, in addition to becoming
informed citizens. Many courses in the department fill general
education requirements in the social science distribution area.
The degrees we offer include the BA in History, BS in History
Education, and BA and BS in Political Science.
Department of Music
Chair: Bryce Rytting
Office: GT 336a
Telephone: 801-863-6480
Musicians work as teachers, performers, composers, music
librarians, administrators, music therapists and so forth. In addition
to providing personal enrichment, music courses may also satisfy
general education requirements. Students are welcome to audition
for membership in the performing groups whether or not they intend
to major in music.
Assistant Chair: Christa Albrecht-Crane
Office: LA 126f
Telephone: 801-863-6286
The Department of English and Literature provides an innovative
and stimulating learning environment to help students broaden
their cultural experiences, deepen and refine their abilities in
critical thinking, and improve their skills in written and verbal
communication. By offering courses, programs and activities in
literature, creative writing, college-level composition, and technical
communication, the department aims to foster an invigorating and
diverse learning community that changes the ways students envision
themselves and the world, thus making them more thoughtful and
productive contributors to their communities. Students pursuing
English studies gain invaluable workplace skills: they think more
critically and creatively; they communicate clearly and logically;
they comprehend the ways language defines and affects behavior,
and they come to understand the complexity of human relations in
various cultural and historical contexts.
Department of Languages
Chair: Douglas Jensen
Office: LA 003a
Telephone: 801-863-7162
The Department of Languages promotes global awareness,
intercultural understanding and international insights by providing
instruction in eight languages (American Sign Language, Chinese,
German, French, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish). The
lower division courses (1000-2000 level) fulfill Associate in Arts
and Bachelor of Arts program requirements; the upper division
courses (3000-4000 level) apply to degree program requirements,
including the Spanish and Spanish Education degrees, the
Integrated Studies degree (emphasis in Spanish, French, or ASL), the
Deaf Studies minor, and the Spanish minor. Language instruction
is enhanced by excellent, caring instructors who are supported by a
multimedia language lab focused on cutting-edge technology in the
delivery of instruction.
Utah Valley State
Department of History and Political Science
Department of Philosophy and Humanities
Chair: Christine Weigel
Office: LA 121
Telephone: 801-863-6191
Associate Chair: Shannon Mussett
Office: LA 121
Telephone: 801-863-6264
Humanities Section Head: Nancy Rushforth
Office: LA 121
Telephone: 801-863-7110
The Department of Philosophy and Humanities provides critical
study of the creative and intellectual underpinnings of the liberal
arts curriculum that connects students to the past, present and
future. Students will understand and be able to apply foundational
philosophical concepts in all major disciplines, including concepts
from multicultural, historical, artistic and values-conscious belief
systems. The department is dedicated to enhancing critical thinking
and writing skills to support student occupational and academic
endeavors.
Department of Theatrical Arts for Stage and Screen
Chair: Terry Petrie
Office: FA 709
Telephone: 801-863-7222
The Department of Theatrical Arts for Stage and Screen offers
programs of study leading to the Associate in Science degree and
to three baccalaureate degrees – Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of
Science, and Bachelor of Science in Theatre Arts Education. The
Department provides cultural experiences and undergraduate
instruction in theatre and film for the individual theatre major, the
UVSC student community, and the community at large, preparing
Catalog 2007–2008
67
School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences
students not only for continued education and employment, but
also for lifelong learning, personal fulfillment, and culturally active
citizenship.
The Department mounts six to ten productions per year
encompassing a rich variety of genres and time periods. Students
work side-by-side with faculty whose combined professional
theatre experience and academic credentials enrich coursework in
performance, script analysis, script writing, directing, theatre history
and literature, theatre management, and in design for lighting,
sound, scenery, costumes, and makeup. Productions are often
selected for showcasing in the Kennedy Center American College
Theatre Festival, where students also compete for scholarships and
professional employment.
Smaller student cohorts make it possible for the vast majority of
student performers to be on stage in any given school year and for
aspiring technicians and designers to be involved in the production
process early in their college careers. The annual Short AttentionSpan Theatre Festival features student-written, -directed, -designed,
and –performed productions.
Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemoration Advisory
Board
Coordinator: Kathy French
Office: LA 012C
Telephone: 801-863-8892
The Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemoration is an interdisciplinary
conference dedicated to researching and promoting human rights
through the memory and commitment of the college to the dream
of Dr. King. This annual event provides a forum for students and
faculty alike, to discuss ideas, raise questions and attempt to
understand the significance of civil rights issues past, present, and
future. The Advisory Board oversees the organization, planning
and evaluation of the Commemoration.
School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences
Advisory Board
Chair: Mary Robinson (current), Adam Robertson (past)
The Advisory Board of the School of Humanities, Arts, and
Social Sciences is an active partner in defining the vision
and accomplishing the goals of the School. Chosen for their
demonstrated leadership and accomplishments in the arts, business
and/or community service, Board members provide valuable
counsel and assistance in the areas of creative and scholarly
activity, development, fund raising, and increasing awareness
among stake-holders and the community. Success in these focus
areas contributes significantly to the dynamic environment of Utah
Valley State College.
68
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
School of Science and Health
DEAN: SAM RUSHFORTH
School of Science
and Health
Office: PS 201a
Telephone: 801-863-8980
E-mail: sam.rushforth@uvsc.edu
Assistant to Dean: Kerri Howlett
Office: PS 201b
Telephone: 801-863-8980
E-mail: howletke@uvsc.edu
Associate Dean: Bill Evenson
Office: PS 201e
Telephone: 801-863-6440
E-mail: bill.evenson@uvsc.edu
Assistant Dean: Lori Barber
Office: BA 205c
Telephone: 801-863-8380
E-mail: barberlo@uvsc.edu
Assistant Dean: Louise Illes
Office: PS 201d
Telephone: 801-863-6040
E-mail: illeslo@uvsc.edu
Assistant Dean: David Jordan
Office: PS 201c
Telephone: 801-863-7160
E-mail: jordanda@uvsc.edu
Academic Advisor, Pre-Health Professions: James Holmes
Office: PS 202b
Telephone: 801-863-7207
E-mail: holmesja@uvsc.edu
The School of Science and Health is
committed to providing courses and
programs to meet community needs for
professional education, general education,
skills development and personal and career
enhancement. The faculty of the School is
committed to providing an atmosphere in
which students can actively participate in
learning, questioning and developing a
scholarly approach to the sciences. All
programs in the School emphasize critical
thinking and lifelong learning.
Administrative Assistant: Cathy Marshall
Office: PS 201
Telephone: 801-863-6441
E-mail: marshaca@uvsc.edu
Environmental Seminar Coordinator: Lasca Wood
Office: EN 101
Telephone: 801-863-8677
E-mail: woodla@uvsc.edu
Advisory Council: Bill Pope, Chair; Clyde Davis; Ron Hansen;
Jeffery Taylor; Carl Black; Carol Walker; Alene Harrison
The faculty of the School of Science and Health is committed to:
Success.
Utah Valley State
1. Developing courses and programs which will provide students
with the knowledge to succeed in their chosen profession.
2. Delivering high quality courses and programs using teaching
methodologies which stimulate learning.
3. Maintaining and improving faculty expertise in specific
disciplines and education/pedagogy.
4. Identifying and advising students who are “at risk.”
5. Using classroom assessments to determine student progress and
Catalog 2007–2008
69
School of Science and Health
course/program evaluation.
6. Providing students with a clear explanation of course prerequisites
and requirements for successful completion of courses.
DEGREES OFFERED
Bachelor of Science
Biology
Biology Education
Chemistry
Forensic Chemistry
Professional Chemistry
Community Health
Community Health Education
Health Services Administration
Composite Chemistry and Physics Education
Earth Science
Environmental Management
Geology
Earth Science Education
Mathematics
Mathematics Education
Nursing
Physical Education
Exercise Science
Outdoor Recreation Management
Physical Education Teacher Education
Physics
School Health Education
Associate in Arts/Science
Biology
Community Health
Mathematics
Nursing
Physical Education and Recreation
Physical Education
Recreation
Physical Science
Associate in Applied Science
Dental Hygiene
Minors
Biology
Chemistry
Community Health Education
Earth Science
Mathematics
Physical Education
Physics
School Health Education
DEPARTMENTS
Department of Biology
Administrative Assistant: Alana Korstanje
Office: PS 212
Telephone: 801-863-8511
E-mail: korstaal@uvsc.edu
70
Chair: Mark Bracken
Office: PS 230
Telephone: 801-863-8739
E-mail: brackerma@uvsc.edu
Associate Chair: Lawrence Gray
Office: PS 225
Telephone: 801-863-8558
E-mail: graylag@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Kimberly Frandsen
Office: PS 212a
Telephone: 801-863-6208
E-mail: frandski@uvsc.edu
Advisor, Secondary Education: Richard Tolman
Office: PS 224
Telephone: 801-863-6229
E-mail: tolmanri@uvsc.edu
Advisor, Pre-Health Professions: James Holmes
Office: PS 202b
Telephone: 801-863-7207
E-mail: holmesja@uvsc.edu
Department of Chemistry
Administrative Assistant: Kellie Hancock
Office: PS Reception
Telephone: 801-863-6295
E-mail: hancocke@uvsc.edu
Chair: Dee Oyler
Office: PS 221
Telephone: 801-863-8638
E-mail: oylerde@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Karli Grover
Office: PS 212a
Telephone: 801-863-8616
E-mail: groverka@uvsc.edu
Department of Community Health
Administrative Assistant: Kristie Dockstader
Office: PE 147
Telephone: 801-863-8651
E-mail: dockstkr@uvsc.edu
Chair: Robert O. Walsh
Office: PE 147b
Telephone: 801-863-6193
E-mail: walshro@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Please contact Kristie Dockstader or Robert Walsh to meet
with an advisor.
Department of Dental Hygiene
Administrative Assistant: Joyce Henderson
Office: BA 203
Telephone: 801-863-7536
E-mail:
Chair: George Veit
Office: BA 203d
Telephone: 801-863-7536
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
School of Science and Health
E-mail: veitge@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Lynnae Marsing
Office: BA 205f
Telephone: 801-863-6317
E-mail: marsinly@uvsc.edu
Advisor: George Veit
Department of Earth Science
Administrative Assistant: Kellie Hancock
Office: PS Reception
Telephone: 801-863-6295
E-mail: hancocke@uvsc.edu
Department of Physical Education and Recreation
Administrative Assistant: Shauna Roberts
Office: PE 147
Telephone: 801-863-6318
E-mail: robertsh@uvsc.edu
Chair: Daniel Horns
Office: EN 115b
Telephone: 801-863-8582
E-mail: hornsda@uvsc.edu
Chair: Tom Perkins
Office: PE 147j
Telephone: 801-863-8676
E-mail: perkinto@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Karli Grover
Office: PS 212a
Telephone: 801-863-8616
E-mail: groverka@uvsc.edu
Program Director, Environmental Management: Jim Callison
Office: EN 101
Telephone: 801-863-8679
E-mail: callisji@uvsc.edu
Advisor, Environmental Management: Jim Callison
Department of Mathematics
Administrative Assistant: Kristine Farnsworth
Office: LA 022
Telephone: 801-863-8650
E-mail: farnswkr@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Mercedes Kelsey
Office: PE 147h
Telephone: 801-863-7456
E-mail: kelseyme@uvsc.edu
Advisor, PE: Jason Slack
Office: PE 147l
Telephone: 801-863-7488
E-mail: slackja@uvsc.edu
Advisor, PETE: Shaunna McGhie
Office: PE 147m
Telephone: 801-863-8663
E-mail: mcghiesh@uvsc.edu
Department of Physics
Department Chair: Carolyn Hamilton
Office: LA 022h
Telephone: 801-863-8801
E-mail: hamiltca@uvsc.edu
Administrative Assistant: Kellie Hancock
Office: PS Reception
Telephone: 801-863-6295
E-mail: hancocke@uvsc.edu
Associate Chair: Kathy Andrist
Office: LA 022r
Telephone: 801-863-6309
E-mail: andriska@uvsc.edu
Chair: Brent Bargeron
Office: PS 207
Telephone: 801-863-6205
E-mail: bargerbr@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Kathy Andrist
Office: LA 022r
Telephone: 801-863-6309
E-mail: andriska@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Karli Grover
Office: PS 212a
Telephone: 801-863-8616
E-mail: groverka@uvsc
Advisor: Lynn Turnquist
Office: LA 022p
Telephone: 801-863-8803
E-mail: turnquly@uvsc.edu
Department of Nursing
Administrative Assistant: Victoria Martinez
Office: BA 205
Telephone: 801-863-8211
E-mail: martinvi@uvsc.edu
Department Chair: Gary Measom
Office: BA 205c
Telephone: 801-863-8192
E-mail: measomga@uvsc.edu
Associate Chair: Mina Wayman
Office: BA 205j
Telephone: 801-863-8193
E-mail: waymanmi@uvsc.edu
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
71
School of Technology and Computing
INTERIM DEAN: ERNEST CAREY
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
School of
Technology and
Computing
Administrative Assistant to Dean: Jamie Winn
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
E-mail: winnja@uvsc.edu
Assistant to Dean & Director of Finance: Jennifer Clegg
Office: GT 605b
Telephone: 801-863-8771
E-mail: cleggje@uvsc.edu
Associate Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: GT 605a
Telephone: 801-863-8237
E-mail: careyer@uvsc.edu
Assistant Dean: Diane Hartman
Office: CS 720c
Telephone: 801-863-8238
E-mail: hartmadi@uvsc.edu
Assistant to Dean: Gordon Stokes
Office: CS 720a
Telephone: 801-863-8284
E-mail: stokesgo@uvsc.edu
Administrative Assistant to Associate Dean: Sallie
Dodge
Office: GT 605
Telephone: 801-863-8556
E-mail: dodgesa@uvsc.edu
Recruitment Coordinator/Rodeo Coach: Lewis Feild
The School of Technology and Computing
at Utah Valley State College is committed
to educate and train students for careers.
Our programs teach students the skills
needed to obtain employment in business
and industry, and incorporate up-todate technologies. Our classes focus on
the delivery of pertinent subject-matter
materials and provide individual student
attention. Our instructors/professors are
competent (with industry experience),
dedicated, caring, and will do everything
possible to assure students a satisfying
and
beneficial
educational/training
experience.
Success.
Office: GT 622a
Telephone: 801-863-7074
E-mail: feildle@uvsc.edu
Advisement Center
Advisement Center for School of Technology and Computing
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-8648
Advisor: Bonnie Cook
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-8403
E-mail: cookbo@uvsc.edu
» Administrative Information Management
» Business/Marketing Secondary Education
» Multimedia Communication Technology
Advisor: Patti Miner
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-8408
E-mail: minerpa@uvsc.edu
» Computing Science
» Information Systems and Technology
Advisor: Fred Orchard
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-6238
E-mail: orcharfr@uvsc.edu
» School Internship and Cooperative Education Manager
72
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
School of Technology and Computing
» Computer Sciences
» Pre-Engineering
Public Emergency Services Management
Software Engineering
Technology Management
Technical specialties: (See Advisor for Applicable AAS Degree)
Advisor: Amy Ostler
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-8138
E-mail: ostleram@uvsc.edu
»
»
»
»
»
»
Associate in Science/Arts
ACRT Technology
Building Construction and Construction Management
Building Inspection Technology
Cabinetry and Architectural Woodwork
Facilities Management
Welding Technology
Advisor: Carrie Peterson
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-7454
E-mail: petersonca@uvsc.edu
»
»
»
»
Automotive Technology
Collision Repair Technology
Diesel Mechanics Technology
Technology Management
Associate in Applied Science
Advisor: Jessie Stewart
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-6597
E-mail: stewarje@uvsc.edu
Engineering Graphics and Design Technology
Electrical Automation and Robotics Technology
Institute for Emergency Services and Homeland
Security
Telephone: 801-863-7700
The Institute of Emergency Services and Homeland Security
focuses on Fire and Emergency Services personnel development,
Homeland Security education and training, and Emergency Services
management education and training. The Institute can collaborate
with other institutions of higher education, as well as local, regional,
national agencies, and private sector interests, in order to reach
all target audiences identified by the Department of Homeland
Security, as well as fill a much needed niche in higher education.
Collaboration will allow us to work with other dimensions of a
broader Homeland Security framework to plan for, create and
implement local, regional and possibly national educational and
training programs designed to prepare people with responsibilities
for prevention, initial response, mitigation, and recovery of local,
regional, and/or national security incidents.
DEGREES OFFERED
Bachelor of Science
Aviation Professional Pilot
Business/Marketing Education
Computer Science
Computer Engineering
Computer Networking
Computer Science
Digital Media
Information Systems
Information Technology
Database Administration
Enterprise Systems
Network Administration and Security
Utah Valley State
Administrative Information Management
Automotive Technology
Aviation Science
Building Construction and Construction Management
Cabinetry and Architectural Woodwork
Computer Science
Drafting Technology
Electrical Automation and Robotics Technology
Fire Science
Information Systems and Technology
Pre-Engineering
Administrative Information Support
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology
Apprentice
Aircraft Mechanics Technology (AMT)
Carpenter Union (JATC)
Diesel Mechanics
Electrical Construction
Electrical Union (JATC)
Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning
Industrial Maintenance
Lineman
Lineman Meter
Lineman Substation
Plumber
Sheet Metal
Automotive Technology
Aviation Science
Building Construction and Construction Management
Building Inspection Technology
Cabinetry and Architectural Woodwork
Collision Repair Technology
Collision Repair
Street Rod
Computer Science
Computer Engineering
Computing and Networking Science
Culinary Arts
Diesel Mechanics Technology
Digital Communication Technology
Drafting Technology
Electrical Automation and Robotics Technology
Electrical Automation
Semiconductor Instrumentation and Maintenance
Facilities Management
Fire Science (with specialization in)
Fire Officer
Firefighter/Paramedic
Wildland Management
Information Systems and Technology
Lineman Technology
Welding Technology
Catalog 2007–2008
73
School of Technology and Computing
E-mail: lamphde@uvsc.edu
Associate in Pre-engineering
Automotive Technology
Biological and Chemical Engineering
Civil and Mechanical Engineering
Computer and Electrical Engineering
Chair: Don Wilson
Office: SA 327A
Telephone: 801-863-8124
E-mail: wilsondo@uvsc.edu
Minor
Business Information Technology
Business Education
Basic Business Core
Business Information Technology
Marketing
Computer Science
Information Systems and Technology
Office Manager: Katreena Davis
Office: SA 306
Telephone: 801-863-7022
E-mail: daviska@uvsc.edu
Aviation Science
Department Chair: Larry Marsing
Office: Provo Municipal Airport
Telephone: 801-863-7810
E-mail: marsinla@uvsc.edu
Diploma
Automotive Technology
Cabinetry and Architectural Woodwork
Collision Repair Technology
Collision Repair
Street Rod
Diesel Mechanics Technology
Lineman Technology
Welding Technology
Associate Chair: Rick Vincent
Office : Provo Municipal Airport
Telephone: 801-863-7755
E-mail: vincenri@uvsc.edu
Associate Chair for Academic Support: Rich Crandall
Office: Provo Municipal Airport
Telephone: 801-863-7784 or 801-863-7836
E-mail: crandari@uvsc.edu
2QH<HDU&HUWLÀFDWH
Associate Chair for Flight Training: Steve Smith
Office: Provo Municipal Airport
Telephone: 801-863-7791
E-mail: smithst@uvsc.edu
Administrative Support (Receptionist)
Automotive Technology
Building Construction
Building Inspection Technology
Cabinetry and Architectural Woodwork
Collision Repair Technology
Diesel Mechanics Technology
Firefighter Recruit Candidate
Network Administration
Paramedic
Programmer
Associate Chair for Flight Ops: Mario Markides
Office: Provo Municipal Airport
Telephone: 801-863-7785
E-mail: markidma@uvsc.edu
Assistant to the Chair: Claire Downing
Office: Provo Municipal Airport
Telephone: 801-863-7816
E-mail: downincl@uvsc.edu
PROGR AMS
Building Construction and Construction Management
For program descriptions, see individual departmental sections in
this catalog or on the department webpage.
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology
Chair: Steve Fordham
Office: GT 601
Telephone: 801-863-8167
E-mail: fordhast@uvsc.edu
Office Manager: Sandra Ozuna
Office: GT 613e
Telephone: 801-863-7405
E-mail: ozunasa@uvsc.edu
Apprenticeship
Director: Steve Fordham
Office: GT 601
Telephone: 801-863-8167
E-mail: fordhast@uvsc.edu
Administrative Support: Deann Lamph
Office: Geneva Building (GB 104)
Telephone: 801-863-7950
74
Chair: Steve Fordham
Office: GT 601
Telephone: 801-863-8167
E-mail: fordhast@uvsc.edu
Office Manager: Sandra Ozuna
Office: GT 613e
Telephone: 801-863-7405
E-mail: ozunasa@uvsc.edu
Building Inspection Technology
Chair: Steve Fordham
Office: GT 601
Telephone: 801-863-8167
E-mail: fordhast@uvsc.edu
Office Manager: Sandra Ozuna
Office: GT 613e
Telephone: 801-863-7405
E-mail: ozunasa@uvsc.edu
Cabinetry and Architectural Woodwork
Chair: Steve Fordham
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
School of Technology and Computing
Office: GT 601
Telephone: 801-863-8167
E-mail: fordhast@uvsc.edu
Office Manager: Sandra Ozuna
Office: GT 613e
Telephone: 801-863-7405
E-mail: ozunasa@uvsc.edu
Collision Repair Technology
Chair: Don Wilson
Office: SA 327A
Telephone: 801-863-8124
E-mail: wilsondo@uvsc.edu
Office Manager: Katreena Davis
Office: SA 306
Telephone: 801-863-7022
E-mail: daviska@uvsc.edu
Electrical Automation and Robotics Technology
Chair: David Manning
Office: CS 704e
Telephone: 801-863-8085
E-mail: manninda@uvsc.edu
Office Manager: Christine Bigelow
Office: CS 704
Telephone: 801-863-8363
E-mail: bigelocha@uvsc.edu
Emergency Services/Utah Fire & Rescue Academy
Department Chair: Jeff Maxfield
Office: Provo Airport (PA 205)
Telephone 801-863-7736 or 1-888-548-7816
E-mail: maxfieje@uvsc.edu
Associate Department Chair: Gary Noll
Office: Provo Airport
Culinary Arts Institute
Director: Greg Forte
Office: MC 007e
Telephone: 801-863-8087
E-mail: fortegr@uvsc.edu
Office Manager: Susie King
Office: FS205
Telephone: 801-863-7701
E-mail: kingsu@uvsc.edu
Office Manager/Advisor: Julie Slocum
Office: MC 007e
Telephone: 801-863-8914
E-mail: slocumju@uvsc.edu
Academic Advisor: Yudi Lewis
Office: Provo Airport (PA 205)
Telephone: 801-863-7753
E-mail: lewisyu@uvsc.edu
Computer Science and Pre-Engineering
Engineering Graphics and Design Technology
Chair: Abraham Teng
Office: CS 520j
Telephone: 801-863-6201
E-mail: tengab@uvsc.edu
Chair: David Manning
Office: CS 704e
Telephone: 801-863-8085
E-mail: manninda@uvsc.edu
Office Manager: Carol Robinson
Office: CS 520h
Telephone: 801-863-8218
E-mail: robinsca@uvsc.edu
Office Manager: Christine Bigelow
Office: CS 704
Telephone: 801-863-8363
E-mail: bigelocha@uvsc.edu
Diesel Mechanics Technology
Facilities Management
Chair: Don Wilson
Office: SA 327A
Telephone: 801-863-8124
E-mail: wilsondo@uvsc.edu
Chair: Steve Fordham
Office: GT 601
Telephone: 801-863-8167
E-mail: fordhast@uvsc.edu
Office Manager: Katreena Davis
Office: SA 306
Telephone: 801-863-7022
E-mail: daviska@uvsc.edu
Office Manager: Sandra Ozuna
Office: GT 613e
Telephone: 801-863-7405
E-mail: ozunasa@uvsc.edu
Digital Media
Information Systems and Technology
Co-Department Chair: Rodayne Esmay
Office: CS 526C
Telephone: 801-863-7050
E-mail: esmayro@uvsc.edu
Chair: Christopher G. Jones
Office: CS 601g
Telephone: 801-863-8308
E-mail: jonescg@uvsc.edu
Co-Department Chair: Jan Bentley
Office: CS 526g
Telephone: 801-863-6362
E-mail: bentleja@uvsc.edu
Office Manager: Fiona Judd
Office: CS 601
Telephone: 801-863-8182
E-mail: juddfi@uvsc.edu
Office Manager: Katrina Van Cott
Office: CS 526
Telephone: 801-863-6217
E-mail: vancotka@uvsc.edu
Utah Valley State
Lineman Technology
Chair: Steve Fordham
Office: GT 601
Catalog 2007–2008
75
School of Technology and Computing
Telephone: 801-863-8167
E-mail: fordhast@uvsc.edu
Office Manager/Advisor: Jenny Hoover
Office: Geneva Building (GB 200)
Telephone: 801-863-7980
E-mail: hooverje@uvsc.edu
Technology Management
Department Chair: David Johnson
Office: GT 616c
Telephone: 801-863-6152
E-mail: johnsoda@uvsc.edu
Office Manager:
Office: GT 616
Telephone: 801-863-8137
E-mail:
Welding Technology
Chair: Steve Fordham
Office: GT 601
Telephone: 801-863-8167
E-mail: fordhast@uvsc.edu
Office Manager: Sandra Ozuna
Office: GT 613e
Telephone: 801-863-7405
E-mail: ozunasa@uvsc.edu
76
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Interdisciplinary Programs
INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGR AMS
Interdisciplinary
Programs
Occasionally academic programs span all or several of the
Schools of the College. These programs, which operate
within more than one School or across more than one School
often have an interdisciplinary aspect to them. These special
programs are enhancements to and enrichments of other existing
programs explained within the Schools and departments in other
descriptions in this catalog.
Students are invited and encouraged to take advantage of
the opportunities to learn while on the job through Internships
and Cooperative Education Program* and courses; to learn at
a more rigorous pace and/or depth and breadth of material
through the classes in the Honors Program*; and/or learn in more
diverse areas than one School or department offers and obtain
a Bachelor of Science or Arts Degree in the Integrated Studies
Program*.
Vice President for Academic Affairs: Elizabeth J.
Hitch
Office: BA 218
Telephone: 801-863-8951
Interdisciplinary or cross-discipline programs and opportunities
are presented below:
The Center for the Study of Ethics
Director: David Keller
Office: LA 109
Telephone: 801-863-8455
The Center for the Study of Ethics enhances awareness of ethical
issues through a variety of approaches to foundational, applied,
and professional ethical dilemmas. The Center promotes the
study of ethics throughout the curriculum. The community benefits
from the Center through lectures, workshops, publications, and
informal discussions.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MINORS**
American Indian Studies
American Studies
Deaf Studies
Environmental Studies
Gender Studies
Peace and Justice Studies
Religious Studies
*For more information please see the individual department
pages.
**For more information please see the Committee on
Interdisciplinary Studies Department pages.
The Center for the Advancement of Leadership
Success.
Director: Bruce Jackson
Office: WB 236b
Telephone: 801-863-6136
E-mail: jacksobr@uvsc.edu
Fax: 801-863-7431
Leadership Certification Program
The Center for the Advancement of Leadership (CAL) has
designed an extra-curricular Leadership Certification Program
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
77
Interdisciplinary Programs
for any and all students on the UVSC Campus. Whether you are
majoring in business, engineering, law, fire science, biology,
aviation, or any other degree or program, this Leadership
Certification Program is designed for students who wish to advance
their personal, interpersonal, and leadership skills while pursuing
their degrees and programs-making them more productive and
marketable to their future employers and/or graduate schools.
All students are invited to preview the program by visiting our
website at www.uvsc.edu/leadership, or requesting a DVD from the
Director, Dr. Bruce H. Jackson (863-7431).
Leadership Certification Structure
There are three certification options that are available through the
CAL. Each certification denotes a different level of rigor. Students
can choose between: Leadership Certification (approximately
1 year to complete); Leadership Certification with Distinction
(approximately 1 ½ - 2 years to complete) and Leadership
Certification with High Distinction (approximately 2-2 ½ years
to complete). Each leadership certification program has been
customized for every academic degree on campus. The basic steps
of each leadership certification program are as follows:
1. Application and interview
2. Peer and self leadership assessment (360° Feedback)
3. Participate in a group mentoring program
4. Begin personal journal of reflection on leadership development
5. Begin your academic core courses (3, 4, or 5 courses based on
certificate level goal)
6. Choose among a variety of leadership development
workshops/seminars (15, 30, or 45 hours based on certificate
level goal)
7. Participate in leadership experience projects (30, 45, or 60
hours based on certificate level goal)
8. Interview leaders in your chosen field (1, 3, or 5 interviews based on
certificate level goal)
9. Portfolio review and certification
10. Use the CAL to write a letter of recommendation and generally
promote you to your employer.
1RWH,QDGGLWLRQWRWKHVWHS/HDGHUVKLS&HUWLÀFDWLRQ
3URJUDPDGGLWLRQDOOHDGHUVKLSFHUWLÀFDWLRQRSWLRQVDUH
available. Please contact the CAL for more information.
For students interested in developing their leadership potential
without the desire to complete the full Leadership Certification
Programs, other options for leadership training, experiences,
and recognition are available. Students interested in any type
of leadership training or experiences should make contact with
the center (863-6466) to review their options. In many cases
students involved in on- or off-campus leadership may apply
their experiences to leadership certification. Students interested
in leadership are also invited to attend our monthly MasterMind
Sessions and social events.
Advisory Board includes:
Christopher Barden, Clinical Psychologist & Trial Attorney; Stephen
R. Covey, Vice Chair of FranklinCovey Company; Stephen M.R.
Covey; Rondo Fehlberg, past Board Chair; Tom Macdonald,
CEO of Canyon Park Management and Board Past Chair; Kerry
Patterson, author and principal of Vital Smarts; Hyrum Smith, Vice
Chair, FranklinCovey Company; Margaret Wheatley, Berkana
Institute; and Jack Zenger, CEO of Zenger Folkman. See www.
uvsc.edu/business/leadership for more detail.
78
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Accounting
Accounting
Department Chair: Steve Johnson
Office: WB 136B
Telephone: 801-863-7186
credit analysis, auditing, taxation,
budgeting, cost analysis, controllership,
treasurer, and chief financial officer.
Opportunities are available in education,
government, and industry.
•
or
•
•
•
DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
Business Computer Proficiency Exam *
DGM 2360 Spreadsheet Applications
MGMT 1010 Introduction to Business
MGMT 2250 Job Application and Advancement
Skills
or MGMT 3890 Career Preparation (2.0)
• MGMT 295R Executive Lecture Series
or MGMT 495R Executive Lecture Series (1.0)
Elective Requirements:
COOPER ATIVE EDUCATION/
INTERNSHIP
Faculty:
Professor
Ben Bean
Sheldon Smith
Michael Stemkoski
Steve Teeter
Associate Professor
John Balden
Kathy Black
Richard Henage
Steve Johnson
Assistant Professor
Bunney Schmidt
Advisory Committee: Shane Edwards,
CPA, (Chair), Partner, Squire & Company,
CPA’s; Layne Peterson, CPA, owner,
Layne R. Peterson’s; Dr. Clifford Skousen,
CPA, Senior Associate Dean, College of
Business, USU; Dr. Robert Gardner, CPA,
Professor, Department of Accounting &
Information Systems, BYU; Glen Twede,
Controller, DHI Computing.
Assistant Dean: Mikki O’Connor
Office: WB 129
Telephone: 801-863-8850
According to the Department of Labor the
employment of accountants and auditors
is expected to grow about as fast as the
average for all occupations through the
year 2008. As the economy grows, the
number of business establishments will
increase, requiring more accountants
and auditors to set up books, prepare
taxes, and provide management advice.
Although computers and accounting
software will decrease the clerical need
for accountants, there will be an ever
increasing demand for accountants to
provide management and consulting
services.
Employment areas are numerous for
accounting graduates. They include
general accounting, payroll, bookkeeping,
80
16 Credits
Graduation Requirements:
PROGR AMS
AS Pre Major
in Accounting
61 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
36 Credits
Students in accounting may receive either
a One-year Certificate, an Associate in
Applied Science Degree, an Associate in
Science Degree, or a Bachelor of Science
Degree in Accounting. A Master of
Business Administration Degree with an
Accounting Emphasis, sponsored by Utah
State University, is also available through
the University Center.
Certificate
in Accounting
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
29.5 C REDITS
22.5 Credits
ACC 1150
ACC 2010
ACC 2020
ACC 2610
DGM 2010
MGMT 1010
ENGL 1010
MGMT 2250
Fundamentals of Business Math
Financial Accounting
Managerial Accounting
Accounting Systems Applications
Business Computer Proficiency
Introduction to Business
Introduction to Writing
Job Application and Advancement
Skills
or MGMT 3890 Career Preparation (2.0)
• MGMT 295R Executive Lecture Series
or MGMT 495R Executive Lecture Series (1.0)
Elective Requirements:
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
0.5
A Cooperative Education or Internship
course is highly recommended for majors.
College credit is granted for paid work
experience through the Coop/Internship
Program. The department provides
lower division Coop and upper division
internship courses. Contact the Accounting
Career and Corporate Manager, John
Wilson 863-6307, for further information
regarding Cooperative Education/
Internship opportunities.
Discipline Core Requirements:
Associate Dean: Janice Gygi
Office: WB 219
Telephone: 801-863-8863
3.0
3.0
1.0
• Complete any coursework from the following
16.0
prefixes: ACC, DGM, BMED,CJ, HM, INFO, LEGL,
MGMT, ECON
School of Business
Dean: Stanley Earl Jenne, Ph.D.
Office: WB 128b
Telephone: 801-863-8239
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
0.5
7 Credits
• School of Business courses (ACC, DGM, BMED,
CJ, HM, INFO, LEGL prefixes)
7.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Minimum of 29.5 credits required for a Certificate.
2 Overall GPA of 2.0 required for graduation with no
grade lower than a “C-” in School of Business classes.
AAS in Accounting
63.5 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
16 Credits
•
•
•
•
or
MGMT 2200 Business Communications
3.0
ACC 1150
Fundamentals of Business Math
3.0
ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
3.0
MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior
3.0
Any approved Behavioral, Social, or Political Science
Distribution Course
• Any approved Biology or Physical Science Distribu- 3.0
tion Course
• Any approved Physical Education, Health, Safety,
1.0
or Environment Course
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ACC 2010
ACC 2020
ACC 2100
ACC 2610
ACC 3010
ACC 3020
ACC 3400
31.5 Credits
Financial Accounting
Managerial Accounting
Payroll Accounting
Accounting Systems Applications
Intermediate Accounting I
Intermediate Accounting II
Individual Income Tax
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1 Completion of a minimum of 63.5 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 or above with a 2.5
GPA in Business courses and a grade of “C-” or higher
in all business courses.
3 Residency hours: minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC with at least 12 credits of
School of Business courses.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completeing all
prerequisite courses.
Footnotes:
* Students will be required to complete the Business
Computer Proficiency exam with a score of 80 percent
or higher on each module or complete the DGM 2010
course or DGM 201A-D modules as necessary with a
score of 80 percent or highter on each module.
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
3.0
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences (3.0)
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
3.0
Technology
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended
4.0
for Business, Education, Science,
and Health Professions majors)
or An Advanced Placement (AP) Mathematics Test with a
score of 3 or higher
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
3.0
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
2.0
Distribution Courses
• Biology
3.0
• Physical Science
3.0
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
3.0
• Humanities Distribution- HUM 1010 recom3.0
mended
• Fine Arts Distribution
3.0
• Social/Behavioral Science
3.0
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
or
25 Credits
ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
ACC 2020
Managerial Accounting
MATH 1100 Introduction to Calculus
ECON 2020 Macroeconomics
ECON 2010 Microeconomics
LEGL 3000 Business Law
MGMT 2340 Business Statistics I
DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
Business Computer Proficiency Exam *
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 61 semester credits.
2 Overall GPA of 2.0 or above with 2.5 GPA or above
in Business courses. No grade below “C-” in Business
courses.
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC with at least 12 credits of
School of Business courses.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completing all
prerequisite courses.
Footnotes:
* Students will be required to complete the Business
Computer Proficiency exam with a score of 80 percent
or higher on each module or complete the DGM 2010
course or DGM 201A-D modules as necessary with a
score of 80 percent or highter on each module.
Utah Valley State
Accounting
BS in Accounting
General Education Requirements:
120 C REDITS
36 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
3.0
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences (3.0)
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
3.0
Technology
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
4.0
or An Advanced Placement (AP) Mathematics Test with a
score of 3 or higher
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
3.0
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
2.0
Distribution Courses
• Biology
3.0
• Physical Science
3.0
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
3.0
• Humanities Distribution
3.0
• Fine Arts Distribution
3.0
• Social/Behavioral Science
3.0
Discipline Core Requirements:
60 Credits
Business Foundation Courses:
• ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
• ACC 2020
Managerial Accounting
• DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
or Business Computer Proficiency Exam**
• MATH 1100 Introduction to Calculus
• ECON 2010 Microeconomics
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications
• MGMT 2340 Business Statistics I
Business Core Courses:
• LEGL 3000 Business Law
• MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior (3.0)
or MGMT 3010 Principles of Management *
• MGMT 3100 Principles of Finance
• MGMT 3300 Survey of International Business
• MGMT 3450 Operations Management *
• MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing
• MGMT 4800 Strategic Management
• MGMT 4830 Strategic Management Capstone
Simulation
• MGMT 495R Executive Lecture Series
or MGMT 493R Entrepreneurship Lecture
Series (1.0)
Accounting Core Courses:
• ACC 3010
Intermediate Accounting I
• ACC 3020
Intermediate Accounting II
• ACC 3300
Cost Accounting
• ACC 3400
Individual Income Tax
• ACC 3510
Accounting Information Systems
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
24 Credits
• Complete at least 9 credits from the following
9.0
courses:
• ACC 4020
Advanced Financial Accounting (3.0)
• ACC 4030
Governmental and Not-For-Profit
Accounting* (3.0)
• ACC 4110
Auditing* (3.0)
• ACC 4350
Management Control* (3.0)
• ACC 4400
Taxation of Corporations/Partnerships/Estates and Trusts (3.0)
or ACC 4420
Corporate Tax (3.0)
and ACC 4440
Partnership Tax (3.0)
• ACC 4510
Advanced Accounting Information
Systems* (3.0)
• Complete 15 hours of elective credits at any level- 15.0
- not more than 7 credit hours can be from the
following prefixes: HM, CJ, LEGL, and/or MGMT,
ECON. The only ACC course that may be counted
toward this requirement is ACC 341R.
** Students will be required to complete the Business
Computer Proficiency exam with a score of 80 percent
or higher on each module or complete the DGM 2010
course or DGM 201A-D modules as necessary with a
score of 80 percent or highter on each module.
* Courses with an asterisk (*) cannot be taken until
student is matriculated.
Minor in Accounting
24 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
ACC 2010
ACC 2020
ACC 3010
ACC 3020
12 Credits
Financial Accounting
Managerial Accounting
Intermediate Accounting I
Intermediate Accounting II
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
12 Credits
12.0
Choose 12 credits from the following:
• ACC 3300
Cost Management (3.0)
• ACC 3400
Individual Income Tax (3.0)
• ACC 3510
Accounting Information Systems (3.0)
• ACC 4110
Auditing* (3.0)
• ACC 4400
Taxation of Corporations/Partnerships/
Estates and Trusts* (3.0)
Graduation Requirements:
1 Overall grade point average of 2.5 GPA in all School
of Business courses and no grade lower than a C- in
business courses.
2 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
NOTE: Students are responsible for completing all prerequisite courses.
Footnotes:
* Courses with an asterisk (*) cannot be taken until student is matriculated into a bachelor degree program.
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Accounting
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
18 Credits
• ACC 3010
Intermediate Accounting I
3.0
• ACC 3020
Intermediate Accounting II
3.0
Choose 12 credits from the following:
12.0
• ACC 3300
Cost Management (3.0)
• ACC 3400
Individual Income Tax (3.0)
• ACC 3510
Accounting Information Systems (3.0)
• ACC 4110
Auditing (3.0)
• ACC 4400
Taxation of Corporations/Partnerships/Estates and Trusts (3.0)
NOTE: A minimum of 2.5 GPA in all School of Business
courses, and no grade lower than a C-, required for graduation.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă ACC, Accounting
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 120 semester credits; a
minimum of 40 credits must be upper division.
2 Overall grade point average 2.0 or above with a
minimum of 2.5 GPA in all School of Business courses.
No grade lower than a “C-” in core and specialization
courses.
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 30 credit hours of business courses through course attendance at UVSC, with
at least 10 hours earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completing all
prerequisite courses.
Footnotes:
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
81
Administrative Information Management
• DGM 2230
Administrative
Information
Management
Department Chair: Rodayne Esmay
Office: CS 526C
Telephone: 801-863-7050
Exploring Digital Communication
Tools
• DGM 2300 Records and Information Management
• DGM 2350 Word Processing
• DGM 2360 Spreadsheet Applications
• DGM 2370 Database Applications
• ACC 1150
Fundamentals of Business Math
• ACC 1750
Applied Accounting (4.0)
or ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications
• MGMT 2250 Job Application and Advancement
Skills *
or MGMT 3890 Career Preparation (2.0) *
Elective Requirements:~
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Professor
Cynthia Krebs
Associate Professor
Diane Hartman
Assistant Professor
Jan Bentley
3 Credits
Graduation Requirements:
1 Overall GPA of 2.0 or higher with a minimum grade
of “C-.”
2 A minimum keyboarding skill of 40 net words per minute
is required for graduation.
3 Students are responsible for completing all prerequisite
courses.
Footnotes:
* Take near end of program
Administrative Support: Katrina Van
Cott
Office: CS 526
Telephone: 801-863-6217
Advisor: Bonnie Cook
Telephone: 801-863-8403
Administrative Information
Management Advisory Committee:
Joyce Bell, CPS, Office Manager,
Western Engineering, (IAAP); Janeen
Jones, Administrative Assistant, Provo
City Community Development, (IAAP);
Carolyn Kuehne, former Training Instructor,
Franklin Covey; Annette Skewes, Office
Manager, Horrocks Engineering, (IAAP);
Toni Sullivan, Owner, A Plus Home Care;
Katrina Van Cott, Administrative Office
Manager, Utah Valley State College.
AAS in Administrative
Information Support
64 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
16 Credits
ENGLISH
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications
3.0
MATHEMATICS
• ACC 1150
Fundamentals of Business Math
3.0
or MAT 1010
Intermediate Algebra (4.0)
or MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS/FOREIGN LANGUAGE
• ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
3.0
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics
3.0
or MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior (3.0)
or PSY 1010
General Psychology (3.0)
BIOLOGY OR PHYSICAL SCIENCE
• Any approved Biology or Physical Science Distribu- 3.0
tion
PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH/SAFETY OR ENVIRONMENT
• Any approvedPhysical Education, Health, Safety or 1.0
Environment Course
Discipline Core Requirements:
• DGM 1060
3.0
•
•
3.0
2.0
•
School of Technology & Computing
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
or
•
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
PROGR AMS
The one-year certificate provides
software application, written business
communication, and basic accounting
skills for entry-level positions in business,
industry, and government.
33 Credits
or
Introduction to Computer Security
and Programming
DGM 2120 Web Essentials
DGM 2230 Exploring Digital Communication
Tools (3.0)
DGM 2300 Records and Information Management
DGM 2350 Word Processing
DGM 2360 Spreadsheet Applications
DGM 2370 Database Applications
DGM 2380 Integrated Software Projects *
DGM 3820 Presentation Applications
DGM 3850 Desktop Publishing Skills
ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
ACC 1750
Applied Accounting (4.0)
MGMT 2250 Job Application and Advancement
Skills *
MGMT 3890 Career Preparation (2.0) *
Elective Requirements:
The two-year AAS and AS degrees provide
training for students to be employed in
such areas as administrative information
managers, office managers, executive
assistants, project managers, and other
administrative support positions in
business, industry, and government.
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
15 Credits
Choose a minimum of 15 credits from the following:
• DGM 296R Seminar (1.0)
• DGM 3870 Web Graphics Applications (3.0)
• DGM 281R Internship (1.0)
• LEGL 3000 Business Law (3.0)
• MGMT 2390 Effective Business Presentations
(3.0)
• MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior (if not
counted as Social Science credit)
(3.0)
• MGMT 3430 Human Resource Management
(3.0)
• Other pre-approved electives; see advisor for
details
15.0
Graduation Requirements:
1
Certificate in
Administrative Support
30 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
27 Credits
• DGM 1010
82
Basic Computer Applications
2.0
2
Overall grade point average of 2.0 or above with a
minimum 2.5 GPA in all discipline core and elective
courses with no grade lower than a C-.
A minimum keyboarding skill of 40 net words per minute
is required for graduation.
Catalog 2007–2008
Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completing all
prerequisite courses.
Note: Potential 4-year students need to take ACC 2010 (or
3000), MATH 1050, ECON 2020, and MGMT 3890.
Footnotes:
*
3.0
3.0
1.0
Complete 3 credits from the following:
3.0
• DGM 1060 Introduction to Computer Security
and Programming (3.0)
• DGM 2120 Web Essentials (3.0)
• DGM 210R Special Topics in Digital Media (1.0)
Faculty:
3
Take near end of program
AS Pre Major in
Administrative Information
Management
63 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
36 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences (3.0)
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics (fulfills Social/Behavioral Science)
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
or
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
19 Credits
DGM 2350
DGM 2360
DGM 2370
DGM 3820
ACC 2010
ACC 3000
Word Processing
Spreadsheet Applications
Database Applications
Presentation Applications
Financial Accounting
Financial Managerial and Cost
Accounting Concepts (4.0)
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications
• MGMT 2250 Job Application and Advancement
Skills *
or MGMT 3890 Career Preparation (2.0) *
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
8 Credits
Complete 8 credits from the following:
• DGM 1060 Introduction to Computer Security
and Programming (3.0)
• DGM 2120 Web Essentials (3.0) **
• DGM 2230 Exploring Digital Communication
Tools (3.0) **
• DGM 2300 Records and Information Management (3.0) **
• DGM 3870 Web Graphics Applications (3.0) **
• DGM 3850 Desktop Publishing Skills (3.0) **
8.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 63 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 or above with a
minimum 2.5 GPA in all discipline and elective courses
with no grade lower than a C-.
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completing all
prerequisite courses.
Footnotes:
* Take near end of program.
** Potential 4-year students need to take the eight elective
credits from the following: DGM 2120, DGM 2230,
DGM 2300, DGM 3850, DGM 3870.
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in
Office Management
19 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
• DGM 2350 Word Processing (3.0)
Prerequisites (can fulfill elective requirements):
• DGM 2360 Spreadsheet Applications (3.0)
Utah Valley State
Administrative Information Management
• DGM 2370 Database Applications (3.0)
• DGM 3820 Presentation Applications (3.0)
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications (3.0)
Complete the following required courses:
• DGM 2120 Web Essentials
3.0
• DGM 2230 Exploring Digital Communication
2.0
Tools (3.0)
• DGM 4350 Information Workflow Management 3.0
• DGM 3220 Digital Media Project Management 3.0
8.0
Complete 8 or more credits from the following:
• ACC 3000
Financial Managerial and Cost
Accounting Concepts (4.0)
• DGM 3870 Web Graphics Applications (3.0)
• LEGL 3000 Business Law (3.0)
• MGMT 2390 Effective Business Presentations
(3.0)
• MGMT 3430 Human Resource Management
(3.0)
• MGMT 3890 Career Preparation (2.0)
NOTE: A minimum of 2.5 GPA in all discipline core courses
with no grade lower than a C- required for graduation.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă BMED, Business/Marketing Education
Ă DGM, Digital Media
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
83
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology
Air
Conditioning
and Refrigeration
Technology
Department of Construction
Technologies
Department Chair: Steve Fordham
APPR Program Coordinator: Dale
M. Olson
Office: GT 601
Telephone: 801-863-8167
Faculty:
that you find food or people you will find a
need for heating, ventilation, refrigeration
and air conditioning.
EPA laws and the increased use of
computers have significantly increased
the demand for highly trained technicians.
This increased demand has resulted in
significant wage increases in the past few
years. The rapidly expanding industry with
its new technologies provides many new job
opportunities as well as opportunities for
advancement within specific organizations.
The industry encourages personal
development. Entry-level technicians may
move into other areas of the industry such
as installation, service, sales, estimating,
design or wholesale operations for varioussized firms.
Many ACRT personnel eventually open
their own businesses. Refrigeration and air
conditioning personnel are necessary in
almost any place people reside or work.
Associate Professor
Steve Fordham
Dale Olson
PROGR AMS
Office Manager: Sandra Ozuna
Office: GT 613e
Telephone: 801-863-7405
Students may receive an Associate in
Applied Science degree or a Bachelor
of Science degree in Technology
Management.
Advisor: Amy Ostler
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-8138
Advisory Committee: Dean Gunther,
Gunther’s Comfort Air; Gary Wadsworth,
RSD Total Control; Scott Woffinden,
Cobalt Refrigeration; Dan Dearden, Trane
Company; Harvey Liston, Canyon Park
Management Company; Keith Sabin, UVSC
Central Plant.
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
Students who earn a degree in Air
Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology
(ACRT) may choose from a wide variety of
work applications. Throughout the country,
the industry as a whole is facing a shortage
of qualified service personnel. A graduate
may do specialty work in areas such as
supermarket refrigeration, manufacturing
process cooling, industrial air conditioning,
transport refrigeration, building
maintenance, controls, or installation and
repair of residential air conditioning and
heating equipment. Virtually anywhere
84
Emphasis Requirements:
47 Credits
Complete the following:
• ACRT 1110
Refrigeration I
10.0
• ACRT 1210 Refrigeration II
9.0
• ACRT 1220 Basic Electricity and Motor Controls 5.0
• ACRT 2320 Motors--Controls and Wiring
5.0
Diagrams
• ACRT 2340 Commercial Refrigeration Theory
4.0
• ACRT 234L Commercial Refrigeration Lab
5.0
• ACRT 2440 Commercial Refrigeration Heating
4.0
and Air Conditioning Theory
• ACRT 244L
Commercial Refrigeration Heating
5.0
and Air Conditioning Lab
Due to the technical nature of the material
in ACRT courses, additional reading and
math instruction may be required. More
information will be given during advisement.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă ACRT, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
Technology
Ă BCCM, Building Construction and
Construction Management
Ă BIT, Building Inspection Technology
Ă CAW, Cabinetry and Architectural
Woodworking
Ă FAC, Facilities Management
Ă LINE, Lineman Technology
Ă WELD, Welding Technology
Reminder: an overall grade point average
of 2.0 “C” or above is required for
graduation.
AAS in Air Conditioning and
Refrigeration Technology 69 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
•
•
or
•
•
•
•
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
16 Credits
ACRT 1120 Special Refrigeration Mathematics
ENGL 1060 Career Writing for Technology
ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing (3.0)
Biology/Physical Science
Health/PE/Safety/Environment
Humanities/Fine Arts/Foreign Language
Social/Behavioral Science
ACRT 1110
ACRT 1210
ACRT 1220
ACRT 2320
• ACRT 2330
• ACRT 2420
• ACRT 2340
• ACRT 234L
• ACRT 2440
• ACRT 244L
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Specialization in Air Conditioning
and Refrigeration Technology 47 Credits
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
53 Credits
Refrigeration I
10.0
Refrigeration II
9.0
Basic Electricity and Motor Controls 5.0
Motors--Controls and Wiring
5.0
Diagrams
Sheet Metal Layout
1.0
Heating and Air Conditioning
5.0
Controls
Commercial Refrigeration Theory
4.0
Commercial Refrigeration Lab
5.0
Commercial Refrigeration Heating
4.0
and Air Conditioning Theory
Commercial Refrigeration Heating
5.0
and Air Conditioning Lab
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 69 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credits hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
5 Complete all Technical Specialty courses with a minimum grade of “C-” or better.
BS in Technology
Management
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the Technology Management section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Apprenticeship
Apprenticeship
Director: Steve Fordham
Office: GT 601
Telephone: 801-863-8167
E-mail: fordhast@uvsc.edu
Coordinator: Deann Lamph
Office: Geneva Building (GB 104)
1410 West 1250 South (Business Park
Drive)
Telephone: 801-863-7950
2.Complete new Student Assessment Test
with scores as follows:
Ă DPR Score of 61 or better
Ă Numerical Skill Score of 39 or better
and/or Compass Pre-Algebra Score
of 41 or better (Electricians need an
algebra score of 58 or better)
or
Ă Complete the APPR 1300
(Apprenticeship Math) with a “C” grade
or higher.
or
Ă Complete college level mathematics
class with a grade of C or better within
the last three years.
or
The Apprenticeship Programs
administrative offices are located in the
Geneva Building, 1410 West 1250 South
Business Park Dr., Orem, Utah
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
Utah Valley State College, through the
School of Technology and Computing,
provides apprentices related theoretical
instruction in structured classes.
Apprenticeship programs are composed of
two parts: (1) on-the-job training and (2)
classroom instruction. On-the-job training
is provided by a sponsor who exposes the
apprentice to practical applications in all
phases of a particular craft. The classroom
related instruction is an organized and
systematic form of instruction designed to
provide the apprentice with knowledge of
the theoretical and technical aspects of
his or her craft. Total completion of an
apprenticeship program will take from two
to five years, depending upon the craft.
The College neither provides on-the-job
training nor acts as program sponsor for
apprentices. Individuals must locate their
own program sponsors.
New apprenticeship classes, with a
minimum of 15 students, can be offered
on request from the community, business,
and industry. For additional information
on apprenticeship classes, contact the
Apprenticeship Office.
Apprentice classes cannot be taken for
audit without departmental approval.
REGISTR ATION REQUIREMENTS
New Apprentices:
1. Submit Application for Admission to
College Admissions Office (check APPR
as your declared major).
Utah Valley State
Ă Complete ACT test with a score of 19
or better in mathematics within the last
three years.
3.Verify commitment to attend all class
sessions, complete all homework
assignments, complete all quizzes, and
pass a comprehensive final examination
for each class.
4.Commitment by the employer to allow
class attendance.
The above will need to be completed by
new apprentices before approval will be
granted to register for any apprenticeship
class. It is strongly advised that these
matters are taken care of well in advance
of the start of class.
If above requirements are met, contact
the Apprenticeship office to schedule an
appointment prior to registration.
PROGR AMS
Most apprenticeship programs may lead
to an Associate in Applied Science Degree
in the related area. A Bachelor of Science
in Technology Management degree is
available for most apprenticeship programs
as well.
It is recommended that all students take
the ACT, SAT or the COMPASS testing
and meet minimum score requirements.
It is required that all students seeking an
AAS or BSTM degree complete one of the
prescribed tests. Students who choose to
earn an AAS or BSTM degree are required
to complete their indentured apprenticeship
programs. Electricians and plumbers are
also required to demonstrate that they
have passed the state of Utah Journeyman
Exam. In addition to this, all students must
complete applicable General Education
classes.
Reminder: an overall grade point average
of 2.0 (C) or above is required for
graduation.
AAS in Apprentice
64 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
Catalog 2007–2008
ENGLISH
2.0
• ENGL 1060 Career Writing for Technology (3.0)
• Any higher English course
2.0
MATHEMATICS
• MAT 1010
Intermediate Algebra (4.0)
• Any higher Mathematics Course
• Any approved Departmental Mathematics Course
2.0
HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS/FOREIGN LANGUAGE
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values (3.0)
• Any approved Humanities, Fine Arts, or Foreign
Language Distribution Course
2.0
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
• MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior (3.0)
• Any approved Behavioral Science, Social, or
Political Science Distribution Course
2.0
BIOLOGY OR PHYSICAL SCIENCE
• EGDT 1810 Principles of Technology (2.0)
• Any approved Biology or Physical Science
Distribution Course
PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH/SAFETY OR ENVI1.0
RONMENT
• Any approved Physical Education, Health, Safety or
Environment Course
5.0
ADDITIONAL CREDITS FROM ANY OF THE ABOVE
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Aircraft Mechanic
48.0
• Carpenter Union Apprentice (JATC)
48.0
• Diesel Mechanics Apprentice
48.5
• Electrical Construction Apprentice
48.0
• Electrical Union Apprentice (JATC)
50.0
• HVAC Apprentice
48.0
• Industrial Maintenance Apprentice
48.0
• Lineman Apprentice
48.0
• Lineman Meter Apprentice
48.0
• Lineman Substation Apprentice
48.0
• Plumber Apprentice
48.0
• Sheet Metal
48.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 64-66 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
Emphasis in Aircraft Mechanics 48 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
48 Credits
AVSC 1310
AVSC 1320
AVSC 1330
AVSC 1340
AVSC 2210
AVSC 2220
AVSC 2230
AVSC 2240
AVSC 281R
AMT Procedures and Practices A
5.0
AMT General Knowledge A
5.0
AMT Airframe Phase I B
5.0
AMT Powerplant Phase I B
5.0
AMT Airframe Phase II C
5.0
AMT Airframe Phase III D
5.0
AMT Powerplant Phase II C
5.0
AMT Powerplant Phase III D
5.0
Cooperative Work Experience
7.0
(Must be repeated 7 times) (1.0)
• AVSC 285R Cooperative Related Class
1.0
NOTES: The Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) Aircraft
Mechanic program is a 3-year apprenticeship program with
formal course work offered by the UVSC Aviation Science
program in coordination with Apprenticeship services.
Apprentices need to be employed by an airline, fixed base
operator (FABO), or the military in a related occupation
which offers aircraft mechanic experience on the job. Formal
classroom training to Federal Aviation Agency Standards is
offered by the Aviation program via distance learning.
Emphasis in Carpenter Union
Apprentice (JATC)
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
48 Credits
48 Credits
APPR 1800
APPR 1810
APPR 1820
APPR 1830
APPR 1840
APPR 1850
APPR 1860
APPR 1870
BCCM 281R
Carpenter Apprentice 1A
Carpenter Apprentice 1B
Carpenter Apprentice 2A
Carpenter Apprentice 2B
Carpenter Apprentice 3A
Carpenter Apprentice 3B
Carpenter Apprentice 4A
Carpenter Apprentice 4B
Cooperative Work Experience
(Must be repeated 7 times) (1.0)
• BCCM 285R Cooperative Correlated Class
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
7.0
1.0
Emphasis in Diesel Mechanics
Apprentice
48.5 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
• DMT 1010
• DMT 1020
48.5 Credits
Diesel Apprentice Electrical 1A
Diesel Apprentice Engine Overhaul
1B
5.0
5.0
16 Credits
85
Apprenticeship
• DMT 1030
Diesel Apprentice Governor Systems 3.5
2A
• DMT 1040
Diesel Apprentice Engine Controls
3.5
2B
• DMT 1050
Diesel Apprentice Engine
3.5
Diagnostics and Air
Conditioning 2C
• DMT 1060
Diesel Apprentice Fluid Power 3A
5.0
• DMT 1070
Diesel Apprentice Power
5.0
Transmission 3B
• DMT 1080
Diesel Apprentice Chassis 4A
5.0
• DMT 1090
Diesel Apprentice Power Trains 4B
5.0
• APPR 281R
Cooperative Work Experience
7.0
(Must be repeated 7 times) (7.0)
• APPR 285R
Cooperative Correlated Class
1.0
NOTES: The Diesel Mechanic Technology program is a
4-year apprenticeship with formal course work offered by
UVSC Diesel Technology program (see Diesel Mechanics
Technology for details on specific classes.)
Diesel Apprentices need to be employed in a related
occupation which offers on-the-job training on engines,
automatic transmissions, drive trains, electrical systems,
suspension and steering, hydraulics, and air systems. Such
work may be on heavy equipment, farm equipment, and
on-highway trucks. Apprentices receive formal training in all
of the above, which prepares them to diagnose, repair, weld,
and fine-tune the working parts of buses, trucks, construction machinery, and generators.
Please call the Apprentice office for details on class
scheduling.
Emphasis in Electrical Construction
Apprentice
48 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
48 Credits
• APPR 281R
Cooperative Work Experience (Must 7.0
be repeated 7 times) (1.0)
• APPR 285R
Cooperative Correlated Class
1.0
• EART 1110
Electrical Apprentice 1A
5.0
• EART 1120
Electrical Apprentice 1B
5.0
• EART 1210
Electrical Apprentice 2A
5.0
• EART 1220
Electrical Apprentice 2B
5.0
• EART 2310
Electrical Apprentice 3A
5.0
• EART 2320 Electrical Apprentice 3B
5.0
• EART 2410
Electrical Apprentice 4A
5.0
• EART 2420
Electrical Apprentice 4B
5.0
NOTES: The Construction Electrician is a compulsory
licensed craftsman who plans, lays out and installs, alters
or repairs electrical wiring, fixtures, apparatus and controls.
Educational suggestions for high school subjects include
basic mathematics, geometry, algebra, physics, welding,
wood shop, blue print reading, and mechanical drawing.
Emphasis in Electrical Union
Apprentice (JATC)
Emphasis Requirements:
50 Credits
50 Credits
• EART 1300 Electrical Union Apprentice 1A
5.0
• EART 1310
Electrical Union Apprentice 1B
5.0
• EART 1320
Electrical Union Apprentice 2A
5.0
• EART 1330
Electrical Union Apprentice 2B
5.0
• EART 2330 Electrical Union Apprentice 3A
5.0
• EART 2340 Electrical Union Apprentice 3B
5.0
• EART 2350 Electrical Union Apprentice 4A
5.0
• EART 2360 Electrical Union Apprentice 4B
5.0
• EART 2370
Electrical Union Apprentice 5A
5.0
• EART 2380 Electrical Union Apprentice 5B
5.0
NOTE: The Electrical Union Apprenticeship program is a
four-year program which is offered through the Electrical
JATC. Classes are conducted at UVSC.
Emphasis in HVAC Apprentice
Emphasis Requirements:
48 Credits
48 Credits
• APPR 281R
Cooperative Work Experience
7.0
(Must be repeated 7 times) (1.0)
• APPR 285R
Cooperative Correlated Class
1.0
• HVAC 1200 HVAC 1A
5.0
• HVAC 1130 HVAC 1B
5.0
• HVAC 1220 HVAC 2A
5.0
• HVAC 1150 HVAC 2B
5.0
• HVAC 2200 HVAC 3A
5.0
• HVAC 1170 HVAC 3B
5.0
• HVAC 2220 HVAC 4A
5.0
• HVAC 1190 HVAC 4B
5.0
NOTE: The Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning
(HVAC) apprenticeship program is a four-year program
that combines on-the-job work experience with class room
instruction to prepare HVAC technicians for working in the
field at the Journeyman level. Apprentices are given training
in service, installation, safety and code requirements.
Emphasis in Industrial
Maintenance Apprentice
86
Emphasis Requirements:
48 Credits
Complete the following:
• APPR 281R
Cooperative Work Experience (1.0) 7.0
• APPR 285R
Cooperative Correlated Class (1.0) 1.0
• DMT 1400
Industrial Maintenance 1A
5.0
• DMT 1410
Industrial Maintenance 1B
5.0
• DMT 1430
Industrial Maintenance 2B
5.0
• EART 1010
Industrial Maintenance 2A
5.0
Complete 10 credits from the following:
10.0
• DMT 1440
Industrial Maintenance 3B (5.0)
• MET 1400
Industrial Maintenance 3A (5.0)
• WELD 1300 Industrial Maintenance 3C (5.0)
• WELD 1350 Industrial Maintenance 3D (5.0)
Complete 10 credits from the following:
10.0
• EART 1020
Industrial Maintenance 4A (5.0)
• HVAC 1110 Industrial Maintenance 4D (5.0)
• WELD 1310 Industrial Maintenance 4B (5.0)
• WELD 1320 Industrial Maintenance 4C (5.0)
NOTE: The Industrial Maintenance apprenticeship program
is a four-year program that combines on-the-job work experience with classroom instruction to prepare the Industrial
Maintenance apprentices for working in the field at the
Journeyman level.
Emphasis in Lineman
Apprentice
Emphasis Requirements:
48 Credits
48 Credits
• LINE 1010
Lineman Apprentice 1A
6.0
• LINE 1020
Lineman Apprentice 1B
6.0
• LINE 1030
Lineman Apprentice 2A
6.0
• LINE 1040
Lineman Apprentice 2B
6.0
• LINE 2010
Lineman Apprentice 3A
6.0
• LINE 2020
Lineman Apprentice 3B
6.0
• LINE 2030
Lineman Apprentice 4A
6.0
• LINE 2040
Lineman Apprentice 4B
6.0
The lineman apprentice courses are offered for lineman apprentices to complete the Federal Bureau of Apprentice and
Training related instruction requirements. The lineman apprentice courses may substitute for a portion of the Lineman
Technology program requirements for an AAS degree.
Emphasis in Lineman Meter
Apprentice
Emphasis Requirements:
48 Credits
48 Credits
• LINE 1600
Meter Apprentice 1A
• LINE 1610
Meter Apprentice 1B
• LINE 1620
Meter Apprentice 2A
• LINE 1630
Meter Apprentice 2B
• LINE 2600
Meter Apprentice 3A
• LINE 2610
Meter Apprentice 3B
• LINE 2620
Meter Apprentice 4A
• LINE 2630
Meter Apprentice 4B
NOTE: Courses offered for lineman meter apprentice to
complete the Federal Bureau of Apprenticeship Related
instruction requirement.
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
NOTE: Plumbing is a compulsory licensed trade where the
plumber performs any mechanical work in the installation,
maintenance, repair, removal and replacement of water
supply and water/liquid waste removal. Plumbers do both
interior and exterior work in greatly varying job conditions.
Education suggestions for high school subjects include basic
mathematics, geometry, algebra, physics, welding, wood
shop, blueprint reading, and mechanical drawing.
The Independent Plumbing program requires 576 hours of
related training and 8,000 hours of on-the-job training.
Upon completion of these requirements students will be
eligible to sit for the Utah State Plumbers Journeyman
Examination.
Emphasis in Sheet Metal
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
APPR 1110
APPR 1120
APPR 1210
APPR 1220
APPR 2310
APPR 2320
APPR 2410
APPR 2420
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
APPR 1410
APPR 1420
APPR 1430
APPR 1440
APPR 1450
APPR 1460
APPR 1470
APPR 1480
APPR 281R
48 Credits
• APPR 285R
48 Credits
48 Credits
Plumbing Independent 1A
Plumbing Independent 1B
Plumbing Independent 2A
Plumbing Independent 2B
Plumbing Independent 3A
Plumbing Independent 3B
Plumbing Independent 4A
Plumbing Independent 4B
Cooperative Work Experience
(Must be repeated 7 times) (1.0)
Cooperative Correlated Class
Specialization in Carpenter Union
45 Credits
Apprentice (JATC)
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Catalog 2007–2008
45 Credits
APPR 1800
APPR 1810
APPR 1820
APPR 1830
APPR 1840
APPR 1850
APPR 1860
APPR 1870
BCCM 281R
Carpenter Apprentice 1A
Carpenter Apprentice 1B
Carpenter Apprentice 2A
Carpenter Apprentice 2B
Carpenter Apprentice 3A
Carpenter Apprentice 3B
Carpenter Apprentice 4A
Carpenter Apprentice 4B
Cooperative Work Experience
(Must be repeated 4 times) (1.0)
• BCCM 285R Cooperative Correlated Class
BS in Technology
Management
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
4.0
1.0
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the
Technology Management section of this catalog for
complete degree requirement listings.)
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
7.0
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
APPR 285R
EART 1110
EART 1120
EART 1210
EART 1220
EART 2310
EART 2320
EART 2410
EART 2420
45 Credits
Cooperative Work Experience
(Must be repeated 4 times) (1.0)
Cooperative Correlated Class
Electrical Apprentice 1A
Electrical Apprentice 1B
Electrical Apprentice 2A
Electrical Apprentice 2B
Electrical Apprentice 3A
Electrical Apprentice 3B
Electrical Apprentice 4A
Electrical Apprentice 4B
BS in Technology
Management
4.0
1.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the
Technology Management section of this catalog for
complete degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in Electrical Union
Apprentice (JATC)
45 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
EART 1300
EART 1310
EART 1320
EART 1330
EART 2330
EART 2340
EART 2350
EART 2360
EART 2370
45 Credits
Electrical Union Apprentice 1A
Electrical Union Apprentice 1B
Electrical Union Apprentice 2A
Electrical Union Apprentice 2B
Electrical Union Apprentice 3A
Electrical Union Apprentice 3B
Electrical Union Apprentice 4A
Electrical Union Apprentice 4B
Electrical Union Apprentice 5A
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
1.0
BS in Technology
Management
48 Credits
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the
Technology Management section of this catalog for
complete degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis Requirements:
• LINE 1500
Lineman Substation Apprentice 1A
6.0
• LINE 1510
Lineman Substation Apprentice 1B
6.0
• LINE 1520
Lineman Substation Apprentice 2A
6.0
• LINE 1530
Lineman Substation Apprentice 2B
6.0
• LINE 2500
Lineman Substation Apprentice 3A
6.0
• LINE 2510
Lineman Substation Apprentice 3B
6.0
• LINE 2520
Lineman Substation Apprentice 4A
6.0
• LINE 2530
Lineman Substation Apprentice 4B
6.0
NOTE: The lineman substation apprentice courses are
offered for lineman substation apprentices to complete the
Federal Bureau of Apprentice and Training related instruction requirements.
Emphasis Requirements:
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
Specialization in Electrical Construction
Apprentice
45 Credits
Emphasis in Lineman Substation
48 Credits
Apprentice
Emphasis in Plumber
Apprentice
Sheet Metal 1A
Sheet Metal 1B
Sheet Metal 2A
Sheet Metal 2B
Sheet Metal 3A
Sheet Metal 3B
Sheet Metal 4A
Sheet Metal 4B
BS in Technology
Management
• APPR 281R
Emphasis Requirements:
48 Credits
48 Credits
124 C REDITS
Utah Valley State
Apprenticeship
Specialization in
Lineman Substation Apprentice 48 Credits
The following Technical Area is available (see the
Technology Management section of this catalog for
complete degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in
HVAC Apprentice
Emphasis Requirements:
• ACRT 281R
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ACRT 285R
HVAC 1130
HVAC 1150
HVAC 1170
HVAC 1190
HVAC 1200
HVAC 1220
HVAC 2200
HVAC 2220
Cooperative Work Experience
(Must be repeated 4 times) (1.0)
Cooperative Correlated Class
HVAC 1B
HVAC 2B
HVAC 3B
HVAC 4B
HVAC 1A
HVAC 2A
HVAC 3A
HVAC 4A
BS in Technology
Management
Emphasis Requirements:
45 Credits
45 Credits
4.0
1.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the
Technology Management section of this catalog for
complete degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in Industrial
Maintenance Apprentice
Emphasis Requirements:
45 Credits
45 Credits
• APPR 281R
Cooperative Work Experience
(Must be repeated 4 times) (1.0)
• APPR 285R
Cooperative Correlated Class
• DMT 1400
Industrial Maintenance 1A
• DMT 1410
Industrial Maintenance 1B
• DMT 1430
Industrial Maintenance 2B
• EART 1010
Industrial Maintenance 2A
Complete 10 credits from the following:
• DMT 1440
Industrial Maintenance 3B (5.0)
• MET 1400
Industrial Maintenance 3A (5.0)
• WELD 1300 Industrial Maintenance 3C (5.0)
• WELD 1350 Industrial Maintenance 3D (5.0)
Complete 10 credits from the following:
• EART 1020
Industrial Maintenance 4A (5.0)
• HVAC 1110 Industrial Maintenance 4D (5.0)
• WELD 1310 Industrial Maintenance 4B (5.0)
• WELD 1320 Industrial Maintenance 4C (5.0)
BS in Technology
Management
4.0
1.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
10.0
10.0
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
LINE 1010
LINE 1020
LINE 1030
LINE 1040
LINE 2010
LINE 2020
LINE 2030
LINE 2040
48 Credits
48 Credits
BS in Technology
Management
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
BS in Technology
Management
Specialization in
Plumber Apprentice
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BS in Technology
Management
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
APPR 1110
APPR 1120
APPR 1210
APPR 1220
APPR 2310
APPR 2320
APPR 2410
APPR 2420
BS in Technology
Management
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
1.0
124 C REDITS
48 Credits
48 Credits
Sheet Metal 1A
Sheet Metal 1B
Sheet Metal 2A
Sheet Metal 2B
Sheet Metal 3A
Sheet Metal 3B
Sheet Metal 4A
Sheet Metal 4B
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
124 C REDITS
Meter Apprentice 1A
Meter Apprentice 1B
Meter Apprentice 2A
Meter Apprentice 2B
Meter Apprentice 3A
Meter Apprentice 3B
Meter Apprentice 4A
Meter Apprentice 4B
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
4.0
The following Technical Area is available (see the
Technology Management section of this catalog for
complete degree requirement listings.)
Ă
Ă
LINE 1600
LINE 1610
LINE 1620
LINE 1630
LINE 2600
LINE 2610
LINE 2620
LINE 2630
45 Credits
45 Credits
Plumbing Independent 1A
Plumbing Independent 1B
Plumbing Independent 2A
Plumbing Independent 2B
Plumbing Independent 3A
Plumbing Independent 3B
Plumbing Independent 4A
Plumbing Independent 4B
Cooperative Work Experience
(Must be repeated 4 times) (1.0)
• BCCM 285R Cooperative Correlated Class
Specialization in
Line Meter Apprentice
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
124 C REDITS
APPR 1410
APPR 1420
APPR 1430
APPR 1440
APPR 1450
APPR 1460
APPR 1470
APPR 1480
BCCM 281R
Ă
Emphasis Requirements:
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0
The following Technical Area is available (see the
Technology Management section of this catalog for
complete degree requirement listings.)
The following Technical Area is available (see the
Technology Management section of this catalog for
complete degree requirement listings.)
48 Credits
48 Credits
48 Credits
Lineman Substation Apprentice 1A
Lineman Substation Apprentice 1B
Lineman Substation Apprentice 2A
Lineman Substation Apprentice 2B
Lineman Substation Apprentice 3A
Lineman Substation Apprentice 3B
Lineman Substation Apprentice 4A
Lineman Substation Apprentice 4B
Emphasis Requirements:
124 C REDITS
Lineman Apprentice 1A
Lineman Apprentice 1B
Lineman Apprentice 2A
Lineman Apprentice 2B
Lineman Apprentice 3A
Lineman Apprentice 3B
Lineman Apprentice 4A
Lineman Apprentice 4B
LINE 1500
LINE 1510
LINE 1520
LINE 1530
LINE 2500
LINE 2510
LINE 2520
LINE 2530
Specialization in
Sheet Metal Apprentice
The following Technical Area is available (see the
Technology Management section of this catalog for
complete degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in
Lineman Apprentice
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Ă
Ă
APPR, Apprectice
AUT, Automotive Technology
AVSC, Aviation Science
DMT, Diesel Mechanics Technology
EART, Electrical Automation and
Robotics Technology
HVAC, Heating, Ventilation, Air
Conditioning
LINE, Lineman Technology
MET, Manufacturing Engineering
Technology
MTT, Machine Tool Technology
WELD, Welding Technology
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the
Technology Management section of this catalog for
complete degree requirement listings.)
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
87
Art and Visual Communications
Ar t and Visual
Communications
and Visual Communications Department
provides opportunities to explore the
possibilities of drawing, painting, sculpture,
ceramics, or photography as elective credit
or as a foundation for a career in fine art.
Department Chair: Steve Bule
Office: GT 535a
Telephone: 801-863-7378
Faculty:
Professor
Douglas D. Anderson
Steve Bule
Bob deWitt
Catherine Downing
Jon Turner
Associate Professor
Susan Parkinson
Perry Stewart
Assistant Professor
Simon Blundell
Jim Godfrey
Hyunmee Lee
Mark Talbert
Advisor: Jennifer Lynch
Office: FA 726
Telephone: 801-863-6412
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Career opportunities are many and varied.
Modern communication systems have an
ever-increasing need for signs, symbols,
books, brochures, labels, and innumerable
other visual messages and documents.
Companies employ people in such areas
as screen printing, computer imaging,
photography, pre-press composition
and layout, design, and illustration. The
graduate is qualified to seek employment
with such organizations as advertising
agencies, business or industrial graphics
departments, news agencies, and other
desktop publishing and computer graphics
workplaces. Most larger companies also
have in-house art/design departments
requiring people with various artistic and
technical skills.
PROGR AMS
Office Manager: Staci Owens
Office: GT 535
Telephone: 801-863-8341
School of Humanities, Arts, and
Social Sciences
Dean: William W. Cobb, Jr.
Office: LA 209d
Telephone: 801-863-7435
Advisory Committee: Stephen Hales,
Stephen Hales Creative, Inc.; David
Canaan, SBG Partners; Jeff Bell, Springville
High School.
PROGR AM DESCRIPTION
The Art and Visual Communications
Department provides both technical and
aesthetic training in the fine art, design,
and illustration areas as well as traditional
and computer-based graphics production
processes.
The art and visual communications
industries have always offered challenging
and rewarding careers to artistically
talented individuals. This trend will only
continue in the future, but now these
professions are demanding workers
with both artistic as well as technical
skills. Students will receive hands-on and
theoretical training needed for entry-level
employment in this highly exciting and
diversified field.
In addition to career training, the Art
88
Six options are available: a One-year
Certificate, the Associate in Applied
Science Degree, the Associate in Science
or Arts Degree, the Bachelor of Science
or Arts Degree, the Bachelor of Fine Arts
Degree, and the Bachelor of Science in
Technology Management Degree.
Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA)
Requirements:
In order to apply to the BFA, students
must first meet the requirements of the
AS or AA degree in the Art and Visual
Communications Department and submit
a portfolio for the annual BFA review held
in March. If the student has an AA or
AS degree in an area of study other than
art, the student will need to complete the
27 credits of the AVC core classes that
have not already been completed before
applying to the BFA. Students are accepted
into the BFA based on the portfolio review
and a minimum GPA of a 3.2 in the AVC
Program as well as maintaining a minimum
overall GPA of 2.7. Students must maintain
this GPA throughout the BFA degree in
order to remain in the degree. For more
information contact the Academic Advisor.
of Fine Arts Requirements.
BFA Requirements for Students with an
AAS Degree:
For students that have received an
AAS degree from the Art and Visual
Communications Department, they will
then be placed in the AA or AS degree
in the Art & Visual Communications
Department to complete the remaining
General Education Requirements before
applying to the BFA. If a student has an
AAS degree from a different field other
than art, they must finish the remaining
requirements of the AA or AS in the Art
and Visual Communications Department
before applying to the BFA. For additional
requirements, please refer to the Bachelor
of Fine Arts Requirements.
Certificate in Art and Visual
Communications
30 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
ART 1120
ART 1400
ART 1110
ART 1050
ARTH 2710
or ARTH 2720
• ART 1130
18 Credits
2D Design
Graphic Computer Applications
Drawing I
Photography I
History of Art to the Renaissance
(3.0)
History of Art from the Renaissance
3 D Design
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
12 Credits
• Any ART course not already taken (See Department 12.0
Advisor).
AAS in Art and Visual
Communications
64 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
16 Credits
•
•
or
•
•
•
•
ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
MAT 1010
Intermediate Algebra* (4.0)
ACC 1150
Fundamentals of Business Math*
Social or Behavioral Science
Biology or Physical Science
P.E. or Health
ARTH 2710 History of Art to the Renaissance
(3.0)
or ARTH 2720 History of Art from the Renaissance
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
15 Credits
• ART 1120
2D Design
• ART 1400
Graphic Computer Applications
• ART 1110
Drawing I
• ART 1050
Photography I
• ART 1130
3 D Design
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Design/Illustration
• Graphic Design
• Photography
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
33.0
33.0
33.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 64 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
Footnotes:
* See AVC advisor
BFA Requirements for Transfer Students:
Emphasis in Design/Illustration 33 Credits
Transfer students can apply to the BFA
if they have an AA, AS, BA or BS art
degree from another school. If the
student is transferring without a degree,
the student must complete the remaining
requirements for the AA or AS in the Art
and Visual Communications Department
before applying to the BFA. For additional
requirements, please refer to the Bachelor
Emphasis Requirements:
Catalog 2007–2008
•
•
•
•
•
or
•
or
•
ART 2210
ART 2230
ART 2240
ART 2460
ART 2630
ART 1650
ART 2640
ART 2650
ART 200R
• ART 2590
21 Credits
Drawing for Illustration
Illustrative Media and Techniques I
Illustrative Media and Techniques II
Interactive Design I
Painting I
Watermedia I
Painting II
Watermedia II
Art and Visual Communications
Lectures (1.0)
Portfolio
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
12 Credits
Utah Valley State
Art and Visual Communications
Complete 12 credits of any ART/ARTH courses not
previously used. Students are STRONGLY ADVISED
to fulfill part of this requirement with the following
courses:
• ART 3210
Illustration I (3.0)
• ART 3220
Illustration II (3.0)
• ART 361R
Figure Drawing I (3.0)
• ART 3290
Rendering the Human Head (3.0)
Emphasis in Graphic
Design
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ART 1430
ART 1410
ART 2410
ART 2430
ART 2450
ART 2590
ART 200R
• ART 2460
Emphasis in Photography
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ART 2450
ART 2710
ART 2720
ART 2700
ART 2730
ARTH 2790
ART 200R
• ART 2590
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
12.0
33 Credits
21 Credits
Digital Imaging
Alternative Photography I
Color Photography
Photography II
Photographic Lighting
The History of Photography
Art and Visual Communications
Lectures (1.0)
Portfolio
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
12 Credits
Complete 12 credits of any ART/ARTH courses not
previously used. Students are STRONGLY ADVISED
to fulfill part of this requirement with the following
courses:
• ART 1410
Typography and Layout I (3.0)
• ART 2460
Interactive Design I (3.0)
• ART 3750
Digital Imaging II (3.0)
• ART 471R
Photographic Illustration (3.0)
12.0
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• ARTH 2710
History of Art to the Renaissance
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
or
•
•
ART 1120
ART 1400
ART 1110
ART 1050
ARTH 2720
ART 1130
Utah Valley State
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1 Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours-- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
5 For the AA degree, completion of 10 credit hours of
course work from one language.
AS Pre Major in Art and Visual
Communications
62 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• ARTH 2710
History of Art to the Renaissance
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
ART 1120
ART 1400
ART 1110
ART 1050
ARTH 2720
ART 1130
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
9 Credits
Complete a minimum of 9 credits from any ART/ARTH
Course not already required. Courses relative to the
type of Bachelors Degree you plan to pursue are
recommended. (See department advisor for appropriate courses.)
9.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 62 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours-- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
BA in Art and Visual
Communications
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• 2020 of chosen foreign language (Humanities
Distribution)
• ARTH 2710 History of Art to the Renaissance
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
35 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
63 Credits
ART 1120
ART 1400
ART 1110
ART 1050
ARTH 2720
ART 1130
ART 4890
ART 4991
ART 200R
2D Design
3.0
Graphic Computer Applications
3.0
Drawing I
3.0
Photography I
3.0
History of Art from the Renaissance 3.0
3 D Design
3.0
Senior Seminar
3.0
BFA Project
3.0
Art and Visual Communications
3.0
Lectures (1.0)
Complete an additional 36 ART/ARTH upper division 36.0
credits not already taken.
Elective Requirements:
24 Credits
• One Foreign Language
• Complete any courses 1000 level or higher
15.0
9.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 122 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours- minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours in
the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
5 For the BA degree, completion of 18 credit hours of
course work from one language to include the 1010,
1020, 2010, and 2020 levels or transferred equivalents.
BS in Art and Visual
Communications
General Education Requirements:
122 C REDITS
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Course
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• ARTH 2710 History of Art to the Renaissance
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
122 C REDITS
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
18 Credits
2D Design
Graphic Computer Applications
Drawing I
Photography I
History of Art from the Renaissance
3 D Design
General Education Requirements:
15 Credits
2D Design
Graphic Computer Applications
Drawing I
Photography I (3.0)
History of Art from the Renaissance
3 D Design
10.0
Elective Requirements:
AA Pre Major in Art and Visual
Communications
63 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
10 Credits
Graduation Requirements:
12 Credits
Complete 12 credits of any ART/ARTH courses not
previously used. Students are STRONGLY ADVISED
to fulfill part of this requirement with the following
courses:
• ARTH 3010 History of Design and Visual Arts
(3.0)
• ART 3460
Interactive Design II (3.0)
• ART 3410
Advanced Layout (3.0)
• ART 3430
Graphic Design II (3.0)
Elective Requirements:
• Complete 10 credits of the same Foreign
Language
33 Credits
21 Credits
Digital Prepress
Typography and Layout I
Typography and Layout II
Graphic Design I
Digital Imaging
Portfolio
Art and Visual Communications
Lectures (1.0)
Interactive Design I
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
12.0
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
72 Credits
ART 1120
ART 1400
ART 1110
ART 1050
ARTH 2720
ART 1130
ART 4890
ART 4990
ART 200R
2D Design
3.0
Graphic Computer Applications
3.0
Drawing I
3.0
Photography I
3.0
History of Art from the Renaissance 3.0
3 D Design
3.0
Senior Seminar
3.0
Senior Studio
3.0
Art and Visual Communications
3.0
Lectures (1.0)
• Complete 45 credits from any ART/ARTH courses 45.0
not already taken, of which 36 credits must be
upper division.
Elective Requirements:
15 Credits
• Complete any courses 1000 level or higher
15.0
Graduation Requirements:
3.0
2.0
1 Completion of a minimum of 122 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours- minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
3.0
89
Art and Visual Communications
BFA in Art and Visual
Communications
125 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 AA, AS, or AAS Degree or equivalent in Art and Visual
Communication or advisor approval
2 Portfolio Review
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (recommended for Humanities or Arts
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (recommended for Social Science majors)
(3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• ARTH 2710 History of Art to the Renaissance
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
ART 4890
Senior Seminar (3.0)
ART 4990
Senior Studio (3.0)
ART 4991
BFA Project (3.0)
ART 361R
Figure Drawing I (3.0)
ART/ARTH Upper Division Electives (18 credit
hours)
Sculpture/Ceramics
• ARTH 3020 Classical Art and Architecture
History (3.0)
or ARTH 3050 Baroque Art and Architecture History (3.0)
• ARTH 3040 Renaissance Art History (3.0)
• ART 3340
Sculpture III (3.0)
• ART 3350
Ceramics III (3.0)
• ART 4360
Mold Making and Casting (3.0)
or ART 4370
Hand Building Ceramics (3.0)
• ART 4890
Senior Seminar (3.0)
• ART 4990
Senior Studio (3.0)
• ART 4991
BFA Project (3.0)
• ART 361R
Figure Drawing I (3.0)
• ART/ARTH Upper Division Electives (15 credit
hours)
Emphasis in Graphic Design
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
18 Credits
• ART 1120
2D Design
• ART 1400
Graphic Computer Applications
• ART 1110
Drawing I
• ART 1050
Photography I
• ARTH 2720 History of Art from the Renaissance
• ART 1130
3 D Design
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Fine Arts
• Graphic Design
• Illustration
• Photography
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
•
•
•
•
•
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
63.0
63.0
63.0
63.0
9 Credits
• Complete any ART/ARTH courses not already used. 9.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 125 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours--minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ART 1410
ART 1430
ART 2410
ART 2430
ART 2450
ART 2460
ART 200R
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ART 3410
ART 3430
ART 3460
ART 3470
ART 443R
ART 446R
ART 449R
ART 4890
ART 4990
ART 4991
ARTH 3010
or ARTH 3070
Typography and Layout I
Digital Prepress
Typography and Layout II
Graphic Design I
Digital Imaging
Interactive Design I
Art and Visual Communications
Lectures (must be repeated)
Advanced Layout
Graphic Design II
Interactive Design II
Digital Painting
Special Topics in Graphic Design
Advanced Interactive Design
Advanced Graphic Design Studio
Senior Seminar
Senior Studio
BFA Project
History of Design and Visual Arts
(3.0)
Twentieth Century Art and Architectural History
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
Emphasis in Illustration
Emphasis Requirements:
• ARTH 3010
or ARTH 3070
•
•
•
•
•
•
ART 2210
ART 2230
ART 2240
ART 2460
ART 361R
ART 200R
Emphasis Requirements:
Complete the following:
•
•
•
•
•
or
or
or
•
•
ART 1340
ART 1350
ART 1650
ART 2110
ART 2350
ART 2340
ART 2640
ART 2650
ART 2630
ART 200R
63 Credits
21 Credits
Sculpture I
Ceramics I
Watermedia I
Drawing II
Ceramics II (3.0)
Sculpture II (3.0)
Painting II (3.0)
Watermedia II
Painting I
Art and Visual Communications
Lectures
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
42 Credits
Choose 1 of the following 2 Options. Each option is
42 credits.
Drawing/Painting
• ARTH 3020 Classical Art and Architecture
History (3.0)
or ARTH 3050 Baroque Art and Architecture History (3.0)
• ARTH 3040 Renaissance Art History (3.0)
• ART 363R
Painting III (3.0)
• ART 365R
Watermedia III (3.0)
or ART 311R
Drawing III (3.0)
90
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
42.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
9 Credits
• Complete any upper-division ART or ARTH course
not already completed or any advisor approved
courses
9.0
63 Credits
21 Credits
History of Design and Visual Arts
(3.0)
Twentieth Century Art and Architectural History
Drawing for Illustration
Illustrative Media and Techniques I
Illustrative Media and Techniques II
Interactive Design I
Figure Drawing I
Art and Visual Communications
Lectures
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
Emphasis in Fine Arts
63 Credits
54 Credits
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
42 Credits
Choose 1 of the following 3 Options. Each Option is
42 credit hours.
Traditional
• ART 2630
Painting I (3.0)
or ART 1650
Watermedia I (3.0)
• ART 2640
Painting II (3.0)
or ART 2650
Watermedia II (3.0)
• ART 3210
Illustration I (3.0)
• ART 3220
Illustration II (3.0)
• ART 370R
Figure Structure (3.0)
or ART 370R
Figure Structure (3.0)
• ART 412R
Advanced Illustration (3.0)
• ART 4890
Senior Seminar (3.0)
• ART 4990
Senior Studio (3.0)
• ART 4991
BFA Project (3.0)
• ART 3290
Rendering the Human Head (3.0)
• ART/ARTH Upper Division Electives (12 credit
hours)
Digital
• ART 1410
Typography and Layout I (3.0)
• ART 2730
Photographic Lighting (3.0)
• ART 3230
3-D Computer Modeling (3.0)
or ART 3470
Digital Painting (3.0)
• ART 412R
Advanced Illustration (3.0)
or ART 3750
Digital Imaging II (3.0)
• ART 3210
Illustration I (3.0)
• ART 3220
Illustration II (3.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
42.0
• ART 370R
Figure Structure (3.0)
or ART 370R
Figure Structure (3.0)
• ART 412R
Advanced Illustration (3.0)
• ART 4890
Senior Seminar (3.0)
• ART 4990
Senior Studio (3.0)
• ART 4991
BFA Project (3.0)
• ART 3290
Rendering the Human Head (3.0)
• ART/ARTH Upper Division Electives (6 credit hours)
Animation
• ART 3230
3-D Computer Modeling (3.0)
• ART 4230
Advanced 3D Computer Modeling
(3.0)
• ART 370R
Figure Structure (3.0)
• DGM 2620 Principles of Animation I (3.0)
• ART 470R
Interpretive Drawing (3.0)
• DGM 3630 Character Modeling (3.0)
• DGM 2210 3D Modeling and Animation
Essentials (4.0)
• DGM 3620 Principles of Animation II (3.0)
• DGM 3130 Digital Storyboarding (3.0)
• DGM 3640 SFX and Compositing (4.0)
• DGM 3680 Animation Project (3.0)
• ART 4990
Senior Studio (3.0)
• ART 3290
Rendering the Human Head (3.0)
• ART Upper Division Electives (6 credit hours)
Emphasis in Photography
Emphasis Requirements:
63 Credits
21 Credits
Complete the following:
• ART 200R
Art and Visual Communications
Lectures (1.0)
• ART 2710
Alternative Photography I
• ART 2720
Color Photography
• ART 2730
Photographic Lighting
• ART 2700
Photography II
• ART 2450
Digital Imaging
• ARTH 2790 The History of Photography
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
42 Credits
• ARTH 3010
or
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
History of Design and Visual Arts
(3.0)
ARTH 3070 Twentieth Century Art and
Architectural History
ART 371R
Alternative Photography II (Must be
repeated once for credit)
ART 3750
Digital Imaging II
ART 474R
Advanced Photo Studies (Must be
repeated twice for credit)
ART 4890
Senior Seminar
ART 4990
Senior Studio
ART 4991
BFA Project
ART 471R
Photographic Illustration (Must be
repeated once for credit)
ART/ARTH Upper Division Electives
BS in
Technology Managemet
3.0
6.0
3.0
9.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
6.0
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the
Technology Management section of this catalog for
complete degree requirement listings.)
Art and Visual Communications 45 Credits
Specialty Requirements:
45 Credits
•
•
•
•
ART 1120
2 D Design
3.0
ART 1400
Graphic Computer Applications
3.0
ART 1000
Color Theory
3.0
Complete an additional 36 credits from the AVC 36.0
courses.
Notes:
No upper division Technology Management (i.e. Technology
Management or Business Management) course work older
than six years can be counted toward graduation.
If student chooses HIST 2700 and HIST 2710, the additional
three hours may be used towards a social science distribution requirement.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă ART, Art
Ă ARTH, Art History
Utah Valley State
Automotive Technology
Automotive
Technology
Department Chair: Don Wilson
Office: SA 325
Telephone: 801-863-8124
Program Coordinator: Orrin Nelson
Office: SA 320
Telephone: 801-863-6433
or 801-863-8349
Faculty:
Associate Professor
Paul Bean
Robert Campbell
Todd Low
Orrin Nelson
Lecturer
Dennis Tolman
PROGR AMS
Four options are available: One-Year
Certificate, Diploma, Associate in Applied
Science Degree, Associate in Science, and
the Bachelor of Science in Technology
Management degree.
Office Manager: Katreena Davis
Office: SA 325
Telephone: 801-863-8349
Advisory Committee: Gil Gonzales, MPI;
John Pagnaelli, MPI; Dave Johnson, DJ
Auto; David Read, Saturn of Orem; Mel
Fergerson, LKQ.
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Recognizing that a successful career in
automotive technology involves much more
than mechanical ability to replace parts,
Utah Valley State College has designed
this curriculum for the individual who has
ability and aptitude to become a skilled
automotive technician. Opportunities
are available for specialists in: general
automotive repair, front end, tune-up,
cooling system and air conditioning,
brakes, laser wheel alignment, engine
rebuilding, automatic and standard
transmissions, computerized electronic
ignition and fuel injection, and emission
controls.
64 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
Certificate in Automotive
Technology
31 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
31 Credits
3.0
MATHEMATICS
• AUT 1260
Tech Math for Mechanics (3.0)
• Any higher Mathematics Course
2.0
HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS/FOREIGN LANGUAGE
• Any approved Humanities, Fine Arts, or Foreign Language Distribution Course
2.0
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
• Any approved Behavioral Science, Social, or Political
Science Distribution Course
2.0
BIOLOGY OR PHYSICAL SCIENCE
• Any approved Biology or Physical Science Distribution
Course
PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH/SAFETY OR ENVI1.0
RONMENT
• Any approved Physical Education, Health, Safety, or
Environment Course
4.0
ADDITIONAL CREDITS FROM ANY OF THE ABOVE
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
or
•
AUT 1110
AUT 111L
AUT 1120
AUT 112L
AUT 1130
AUT 113L
AUT 1160
AUT 116L
AUT 1170
AUT 117L
AUT 1210
AUT 121L
Brake Systems
Brake Systems Lab
Manual Power Trains
Manual Power Trains Lab
Engine Repair
Engine Repair Lab
Automotive Electrical Systems
Automotive Electrical Systems Lab
Engine Electrical Systems
Engine Electrical Systems Lab
Suspension and Steering Systems
Suspension and Steering Systems
Lab
AUT 1220
Automatic Transmissions and
Transaxles
AUT 122L
Automatic Transmissions and
Transaxles Lab
AUT 1230
Engine Performance
AUT 123L
Engine Performance Lab
AUT 1260
Tech Math for Mechanics
CLSS 1000 Student Success (3.0)
ENGL 106A Career Writing for Technology--A
Any approved Behavioral Science, Social, or Political Science Distribution course
ENGLISH
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 1060
• ENGL 106A
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 31 semester credits
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Completion of specified departmental requirements
Diploma in Automotive
Technology
55 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
55 Credits
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
or
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
or
•
•
AUT 1110
AUT 111L
AUT 1120
AUT 112L
AUT 1130
AUT 113L
AUT 1160
AUT 116L
AUT 1170
AUT 117L
AUT 1210
AUT 121L
Brake Systems
Brake Systems Lab
Manual Power Trains
Manual Power Trains Lab
Engine Repair
Engine Repair Lab
Automotive Electrical Systems
Automotive Electrical Systems Lab
Engine Electrical Systems
Engine Electrical Systems Lab
Suspension and Steering Systems
Suspension and Steering Systems
Lab
AUT 1220
Automatic Transmissions and
Transaxles
AUT 122L
Automatic Transmissions and
Transaxles Lab
AUT 1230
Engine Performance
AUT 123L
Engine Performance Lab
AUT 2110
Advanced Steering Suspension and
Alignment
AUT 2120
Advanced Engine Performance
AUT 201R
Automotive Service Practicum
AUT 281R
Cooperative Work Experience (1.0)
AUT 2130
Advanced Emission Control Systems
AUT 2140
Chassis Electrical and Electronics
Systems
AUT 2210
Advanced Braking and Control
Systems
AUT 2220
Automatic Transmissions and
Electronic Controls
AUT 2250
AElectronic Fuel Management
Systems
AUT 2240
Automotive HVACR
CLSS 1000 Student Success (3.0)
ENGL 106A Career Writing for Technology--A
Any approved Behavioral Science, Social, or Political Science Distribution Course
AUT 1260
Tech Math for Mechanics
Graduation Requirements:
Utah Valley State
AAS in Automotive
Technology
Reminder: an overall grade point average
of 2.0 “C” or above is required for
graduation.
•
Advisor: Carrie Peterson
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-7454
1 Completion of a minimum of 55 semester hours.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Completion of specified departmental requirements.
Catalog 2007–2008
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
Introduction to Writing (3.0)
Career Writing for Technology (3.0)
Career Writing for Technology-A (2.0)
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
16 Credits
48 Credits
AUT 1110
AUT 111L
AUT 1120
AUT 112L
AUT 1130
AUT 113L
AUT 1160
AUT 116L
AUT 1170
AUT 117L
AUT 1210
AUT 121L
Brake Systems
Brake Systems Lab
Manual Power Trains
Manual Power Trains Lab
Engine Repair
Engine Repair Lab
Automotive Electrical Systems
Automotive Electrical Systems Lab
Engine Electrical Systems
Engine Electrical Systems Lab
Suspension and Steering Systems
Suspension and Steering Systems
Lab
• AUT 1220
Automatic Transmissions and
Transaxles
• AUT 122L
Automatic Transmissions and
Transaxles Lab
• AUT 1230
Engine Performance
• AUT 123L
Engine Performance Lab
• AUT 2110
Advanced Steering Suspension and
Alignment
• AUT 2120
Advanced Engine Performance
• AUT 2130
Advanced Emission Control Systems
• AUT 2210
Advanced Braking and Control
Systems
• AUT 2220
Automatic Transmissions and
Electronic Controls
• AUT 2250
Electronic Fuel Management
Systems
• AUT 2240
Automotive HVACR
Complete 8 credits from the following:
• AUT 201R
Automotive Service Practicum (2.0)
• AUT 281R
Cooperative Work Experience (1.0)
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
8.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 64 semester credits
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements
2.0
8.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
AS Pre Major in Automotive
Technology
60 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2020
35 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
91
Automotive Technology
US Economic History (3.0)
American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Ă AUT, Automotive Technology
Ă CRT, Collision Repair Technology
Ă DMT, Diesel Mechanics Technology
• HIST 1740
• POLS 1100
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
16 Credits
• Choose from AUT or related 1000 level of higher
courses
Elective Requirements:
16.0
9 Credits
• Choose electives from 1000 level or higher
courses
9.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BS in Technology
Management
124 C REDITS
The following technical area is available (see the Technology
Management section of this catalog for complete degree
requirement listings).
Specialization in
Automotive Technology
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
45 Credits
45 Credits
AUT 1110
AUT 111L
AUT 1120
AUT 112L
AUT 1130
AUT 113L
AUT 1160
AUT 116L
AUT 1170
AUT 117L
AUT 1210
AUT 121L
Brake Systems
Brake Systems Lab
Manual Power Trains
Manual Power Trains Lab
Engine Repair
Engine Repair Lab
Automotive Electrical Systems
Automotive Electrical Systems Lab
Engine Electrical Systems
Engine Electrical Systems Lab
Suspension and Steering Systems
Suspension and Steering Systems
Lab
• AUT 1220
Automatic Transmissions and
Transaxles
• AUT 122L
Automatic Transmissions and
Transaxles Lab
• AUT 1230
Engine Performance
• AUT 123L
Engine Performance Lab
• AUT 2110
Advanced Steering Suspension and
Alignment
• AUT 2120
Advanced Engine Performance
• AUT 2130
Advanced Emission Control Systems
• AUT 2140
Chassis Electrical and Electronics
Systems
• AUT 2210
Advanced Braking and Control
Systems
• AUT 2220
Automatic Transmissions and
Electronic Controls
• AUT 2240
Automotive HVACR
• AUT 2250
Electronic Fuel Management
Systems
Complete 5 credits from the following:
• AUT 201R
Automotive Service Practicum (2.0)
• AUT 281R
Cooperative Work Experience (1.0)
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
5.0
Recommended Automotive Courses
The following course is recommended for students who
would like to learn more about the operation and maintenance of their vehicle.
• AUT 1000
Survey of Automotive Technology
2.0
The following course is recommended for the aggressive
students with automotive engine experience wanting additional learning of increased horspower or for the street
rod enthusiast.
• AUT 2410
High Performance Engine Class
3.0
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
92
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Aviation Science
Aviation
Science
Department Chair: Larry Marsing
Telephone: 801-863-7810 or 801863-8165
Office: Provo Municipal Airport and
UVSC Campus
Associate Department Chair for
Academics:
Rick Vincent, Assistant Professor
Telephone: 801-863-7755
Office: Provo Municipal Airport
Associate Department Chair for
Flight Training:
Steve Smith, Associate Professor and
Chief Pilot
Telephone: 801-863-7791 or 801863-7777
Office: Provo Municipal Airport
Associate Department Chair for
Academic Support:
Rich Crandall, Flight/Ground Instructor
Telephone: 801-863-7784 or 801863-7777
Office: Provo Municipal Airport
Associate Department Chair for
Flight Operations:
Mario Markides, Flight Operations
Manager
Telephone: 801-863-7785 or 801863-7777
Office: Provo Municipal Airport
Assistant Department Chair for
Online Services:
Ryan Tanner
Telephone: 801-863-7840
Chief Flight Instructors:
Adam Clegg
Telephone: 801-863-7852
Brian Bastin
Telephone: 801-863-7864
Michelle Koerner
Telephone: 801-863-7854
Nathan Skene
Telephone: 801-863-7853
Academic Support:
Office Manager/Advisor Flight
Training:
Liz Butler
Telephone: 801-863-7836
Gloria Schneider
Telephone: 801-863-7851
Financial Aid (Aviation):
Telephone: 801-863-7860 or
877-336-8872
Flight Dispatch:
Telephone: 801-863-7777
Online Call Center Advisors:
Telephone: 801-863-7830 or
888-901-7192
Advisory Committee: Chair, Captain Mario
Jimenez, Federal Express; Captain Steve
Morrison, United Airlines; Captain Kory
Morgan, Southwest Airlines; Captain James
Healy, SkyWest Airlines; Captain Jayson
Esplin, Jet Blue Airlines; Dr. Lee Suidzinski,
Experimental Aircraft Association; Dr.
Sherwood Williams, CAVU Aviation
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
FLIGHT PREREQUISITE
Assistant Department Chair for
Student Support:
Claire Downing
Telephone: 801-863-7816
Faculty:
Associate Professor
Steve Smith, Chief Pilot
Telephone: 801-863-7791
Assistant Professor
Rick Vincent
Telephone: 801-863-7755
Brice Williams
Telephone: 801-863-7818
Lecturer
Todd Deshler
Dustin Berlin
Utah Valley State
An aviation placement exam and oral
interview with an aviation advisor is
required. A class II or a class III Medical/
Student Certificate with an FAA designated
Medical Examiner is required. These items
must be completed prior to entering the
flight phase of the program so that student
qualifications and special needs can be
determined.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Currently there is a record demand
for college-trained professional pilots
for commuter, regional and major air
carrier employment. This demand should
continue through 2015. Pilots and
aviation/aerospace personnel work in
highly technical and practical scientific
Catalog 2007-2008
environments on a daily basis; pilots have
responsibility for operating single engine,
multi-engine, turbo-prop, and jet aircraft
in all weather conditions both day and
night. Examples of jobs in the aviation field
are: Charter and Air Taxi Pilot, University
Flight Instructor, aerial photography and
surveying, Military, Bush Pilot/remote resupply, medical evacuation, fire fighting
and spotting, Federal Government
positions, Drug Enforcement, FAA Safety
Inspectors, pipeline and transmission
line patrol, recreation/sight-seeing pilot,
police and traffic control, research and
development, test flight, airplane sales/
demonstration and generic commercial
airline pilot. Graduates of the Associate in
Applied Science or Associate in Science are
qualified to become a commercial pilot or
certified flight instructor and should qualify
for entry into a four-year degree program
for upper division course work. Graduates
of the Bachelor of Science in Aviation
Professional Pilot are qualified to be hired
by a major airline after obtaining adequate
flight hours and experience. Graduates
are also qualified to be corporate and
military pilots. Individuals who complete
the Associate in Aviation Science constitute
the majority of program employed flight
instructors.
Students must complete a minimum of a
commercial pilot certificate, issued by the
Federal Aviation Administration to obtain
the Bachelor of Science Professional
Pilot or Tech Management, Associate in
Science Aviation or Associate of Applied
Science Aviation. The Bachelor of Science
Aviation Administration does not require
the commercial certificate.
PROGR AMS
Students graduating with an AAS or AS
in Aviation may transfer to the Bachelor
of Science in Aviation Professional
Pilot, or Bachelor of Science in Aviation
Administration, or the Bachelor of
Science in Technology Management
with an emphasis in Aviation Science, for
completion of a four-year degree.
Note: an overall grade point average of 2.0
(C) or above is required for graduation.
AAS in Aviation Science
65 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
18 Credits
•
•
•
or
•
or
or
•
ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
MAT 1010
Intermediate Algebra
PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
Any other Humanities
POLS 1000 American Heritage
HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
Any other Social Science
Any approved Biology or Physical Science
Distribution Course
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (recommended)
Discipline Core Requirements:
• AVSC 1010
• AVSC 1100
• AVSC 1110
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
47 Credits
Survey of Aviation Science
Ground Private Pilot
Flight Private Pilot Certification
2.0
4.0
3.0
93
Aviation Science
• AVSC 1220 Ground Commercial Pilot--Phase I
• AVSC 1230 Flight Commercial Pilot--Phase I
• AVSC 1240 Ground Instrument Pilot
• AVSC 1250 Flight Instrument Pilot Rating
• AVSC 2150 Air Transportation Management
• AVSC 2160 Aviation Law
• AVSC 2300 Ground Commercial Pilot--Phase II
• AVSC 2310 Flight Commercial Pilot--Phase II
• AVSC 2440 Ground Multi-Engine
• AVSC 2450 Flight Multi-Engine
• AVSC 281R Cooperative Work Experience* (1.0)
• AVSC 285R Cooperative Related Class (1.0)
Complete one of the following sets of courses:
Certified Flight Instructor
• AVSC 2330 Theory of Instruction (1.0)
• AVSC 2400 Ground Certified Flight Instructor (3.0)
• AVSC 2410 Flight Certified Flight Instructor (1.0)
• AVSC 2420 Ground CFI Instrument (1.0)
• AVSC 2430 Flight CFI Instrument (1.0)
• AVSC 2500 Ground Multi-Engine Instructor (1.0)
• AVSC 2510 Flight Multi-Engine Instructor (1.0)
First Officer
• AVSC 3300 Jet Transport Systems (3.0)
• AVSC 3600 Crew Resource Management/Human Factors (3.0)
• AVSC 4200 Ground Turbine Transition (3.0)
Aviation Management (Choose 9 credits)
• AVSC 2860 SkillsUSA (1.0)
• AVSC 3020 Aviation Insurance and Risk Management (3.0)
• AVSC 3100 Corporate Aviation Management (3.0)
• AVSC 3120 Airport Management (3.0)
• AVSC 3140 Fixed Base Operations Management (3.0)
Air Traffic Control
• AVSC 3030 Air Traffic Control (3.0)
• AVSC 3040 Air Traffic Control II (3.0)
• AVSC 3600 Crew Resource Management/Human Factors (3.0)
1.0
3.0
4.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
5.0
1.0
9.0
AVSC 1010
AVSC 1100
AVSC 1110
AVSC 1220
AVSC 1230
AVSC 1240
AVSC 1250
AVSC 2300
AVSC 2310
Survey of Aviation Science
2.0
Ground Private Pilot
4.0
Flight Private Pilot Certification
3.0
Ground Commercial Pilot--Phase I
1.0
Flight Commercial Pilot--Phase I
3.0
Ground Instrument Pilot
4.0
Flight Instrument Pilot Rating
2.0
Ground Commercial Pilot--Phase II 2.0
Flight Commercial Pilot--Phase II
3.0
Elective Requirements:
2 Credits
2.0
Complete two credits from the following:
• AVSC 1020 Aircraft Identification (1.0)
• AVSC 2150 Air Transportation Management (3.0)
• AVSC 2160 Aviation Law (3.0)
• AVSC 2330 Theory of Instruction (1.0)
• AVSC 2400 Ground Certified Flight Instructor (3.0)
• AVSC 2410 Flight Certified Flight Instructor (1.0)
• AVSC 2420 Ground CFI Instrument (1.0)
• AVSC 2430 Flight CFI Instrument (1.0)
• AVSC 2440 Ground Multi-Engine (1.0)
• AVSC 2450 Flight Multi-Engine (1.0)
BS in Aviation
120 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Medical Requirement: Class 1 FAA medical exam.
2 Completion of 25 aviation credits and a 2.5 GPA.
General Education Requirements:
Footnotes:
* One credit from AVSC 1020 Aircraft Identification may
be substituted for one of cooperative work experience.
AS Pre Major in
Aviation Science
61 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
94
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1 Completion of a minimum of 61 or more semester
credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
5 Completion of Commercial Pilot Certificate.
1 Completion of a minimum of 65 or more semester
credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above. C- or
above required for all aviation major classes.
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements
5 Completion of Commercial Pilot Certificate.
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (recommended for Humanities
or Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (recommended for Social
Science majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
3.0
24 Credits
Graduation Requirements:
Graduation Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (recommended for Humanities
or Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (recommended for Social
Science majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science (PHYS 1010 recommended)
• Additional Biology or Physical Science (METO
1010 recommended)
• Humanities Distribution (COMM 1020 recommended)
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science (PSY 1010 recommended)
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2020
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
30 Credits
AVSC 1010
AVSC 2150
AVSC 2160
AVSC 281R
AVSC 285R
AVSC 3010
AVSC 3200
AVSC 3600
Survey of Aviation Science
Air Transportation Management
Aviation Law
Cooperative Work Experience (1.0)
Cooperative Related Class
Flight Environment
Flight Physiology
Crew Resource Management/Human Factors
• AVSC 485R Cooperative Related Class
Complete 8 credits from the following:
• AVSC 481R Cooperative Work Experience (minimum of 2 credits) (1.0)
• AVSC 490R Safety and Professional Seminars
(2.0)
• AVSC 491R Undergraduate Research Project (minimum of 3 credits) (3.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
8.0
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Aviation Administration
• Professional Pilot
55.0
55.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 120 or more semester
credits, with a minimum of 40 upper division semester
credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above. Aviation courses require a C- or above. (Departments may
require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours--minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of Commercial Pilot Certificate for the
Professional Pilot emphasis.
5 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements including successful completion of the Class 1
FAA medical exam.
NOTE: If student chooses HIST 2700 and 2710, the
additional hours may be used towards a social science
distribution requirement.
Emphasis in
Aviation Administration
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
AVSC 1020
AVSC 1030
AVSC 1040
AVSC 2050
AVSC 2180
AVSC 2190
• AVSC 2200
• AVSC 3020
• AVSC 3050
•
•
•
•
•
AVSC 3060
AVSC 3070
AVSC 3100
AVSC 3120
AVSC 3140
55 Credits
40 Credits
Aircraft Identification
Aviation Customer Service
In-flight Service
Introduction to Aviation Security
Airline Computer Applications
Introduction to Dispatch and
Scheduling
Aviation Marketing
Aviation Insurance and Risk
Management
Aviation Human Resource
Management
Regional Airline Management
Aviation Cargo Operations
Corporate Aviation Management
Airport Management
Fixed Base Operations
Management
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
• Must complete 15 credits from the following elec- 15.0
tive courses:
• AVSC 1100 Ground Private Pilot (4.0)
• AVSC 1110
Flight Private Pilot Certification
(3.0)
• AVSC 1220 Ground Commercial Pilot--Phase
I (1.0)
• AVSC 1230 Flight Commercial Pilot--Phase
I (3.0)
• AVSC 1240 Ground Instrument Pilot (4.0)
• AVSC 1250 Flight Instrument Pilot Rating (2.0)
• AVSC 2300 Ground Commercial Pilot--Phase
II (2.0)
• AVSC 2310 Flight Commercial Pilot--Phase
II (3.0)
• AVSC 2330 Theory of Instruction (1.0)
• AVSC 2400 Ground Certified Flight Instructor
(3.0)
• AVSC 2410 Flight Certified Flight Instructor (1.0)
• AVSC 2860 SkillsUSA (1.0)
• AVSC 3030 Air Traffic Control (3.0)
• AVSC 3040 Air Traffic Control II (3.0)
• AVSC 3210 Aircraft Crash and Emergency
Management (3.0)
• AVSC 3610 Aviation Safety and Security (3.0)
• AVSC 475R Current Topics in Aviation (1.0)
Emphasis in
Professional Pilot
55 Credits
36 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
AVSC 1100
AVSC 1110
AVSC 1220
AVSC 1230
AVSC 1240
AVSC 1250
AVSC 2300
AVSC 2310
AVSC 2440
AVSC 2450
AVSC 3030
AVSC 3400
• AVSC 3530
• AVSC 3300
Ground Private Pilot
Flight Private Pilot Certification
Ground Commercial Pilot--Phase I
Flight Commercial Pilot--Phase I
Ground Instrument Pilot
Flight Instrument Pilot Rating
Ground Commercial Pilot--Phase II
Flight Commercial Pilot--Phase II
Ground Multi-Engine
Flight Multi-Engine
Air Traffic Control
High Altitude Navigation/International Flight Operations
Advanced Aerodynamics
Jet Transport Systems
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
4.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
19 Credits
• Must complete 19 credits from the following
courses, including 10 hours of upper division.
• AVSC 1020 Aircraft Identification (1.0)
• AVSC 1120 Basic Aircraft Systems (1.0)
19.0
Utah Valley State
Aviation Science
•
•
•
•
AVSC 1130
AVSC 1150
AVSC 1160
AVSC 1260
• AVSC 2170
• AVSC 2330
• AVSC 235R
• AVSC 2400
•
•
•
•
AVSC 2410
AVSC 2420
AVSC 2430
AVSC 2500
• AVSC 2510
• AVSC 2860
• AVSC 3020
• AVSC 3040
• AVSC 3100
• AVSC 3120
• AVSC 3140
• AVSC 4200
• AVSC 4210
• AVSC 4300
• AVSC 4310
• AVSC 475R
Glider Rating (1.0)
Mountain and Desert Flying (1.0)
Seaplane Rating (1.0)
21st Century Avionics and Instrumentation (1.0)
Airline Interview Preparation (1.0)
Theory of Instruction (1.0)
Unusual Attitude Safety Training
(1.0)
Ground Certified Flight Instructor
(3.0)
Flight Certified Flight Instructor (1.0)
Ground CFI Instrument (1.0)
Flight CFI Instrument (1.0)
Ground Multi-Engine Instructor
(1.0)
Flight Multi-Engine Instructor (1.0)
SkillsUSA (1.0)
Aviation Insurance and Risk Management (3.0)
Air Traffic Control II (3.0)
Corporate Aviation Management
(3.0)
Airport Management (3.0)
Fixed Base Operations Management (3.0)
Ground Turbine Transition (3.0)
Flight Turbine Transition (1.0)
Ground Airline Transport Pilot/Aircraft Dispatcher (3.0)
Flight Airline Transport Pilot (1.0)
Current Topics in Aviation (1.0)
BS in Technology
Management
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the Technology Management section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in
Aviation Science
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
AVSC 1010
AVSC 1100
AVSC 1110
AVSC 1220
AVSC 1230
AVSC 1240
AVSC 1250
AVSC 2150
AVSC 2160
AVSC 2300
AVSC 2310
AVSC 2440
AVSC 2450
AVSC 281R
• AVSC 285R
• METO 1010
45 Credits
39 Credits
Survey of Aviation Science
Ground Private Pilot
Flight Private Pilot Certification
Ground Commercial Pilot--Phase I
Flight Commercial Pilot--Phase I
Ground Instrument Pilot
Flight Instrument Pilot Rating
Air Transportation Management
Aviation Law
Ground Commercial Pilot--Phase II
Flight Commercial Pilot--Phase II
Ground Multi-Engine
Flight Multi-Engine
Cooperative Work Experience (Must
repeat 3 times) (1.0)
Cooperative Related Class
Introduction to Meteorology
Elective Requirements:
2.0
4.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
4.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
6 Credits
Complete 6 credits from the following:
6.0
• AVSC 1020 Aircraft Identification (1.0)
• AVSC 2330 Theory of Instruction (1.0)
• AVSC 2400 Ground Certified Flight
Instructor (3.0)
• AVSC 2410 Flight Certified Flight Instructor (1.0)
• AVSC 2420 Ground CFI Instrument (1.0)
• AVSC 2430 Flight CFI Instrument (1.0)
• AVSC 2500 Ground Multi-Engine
Instructor (1.0)
• AVSC 2510 Flight Multi-Engine Instructor (1.0)
• AVSC 3020 Aviation Insurance and Risk
Management (3.0)
• AVSC 3100 Corporate Aviation
Management (3.0)
• AVSC 3120 Airport Management (3.0)
• AVSC 3140 Fixed Base Operations
Management (3.0)
• AVSC 2860 SkillsUSA (1.0)
• AVSC 475R Current Topics in Aviation (1.0)
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă AVSC, Aviation Science
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007-2008
95
Behavioral Science
Behavioral
Science
Department Chair: David Yells
Office: LA 012b
Telephone: 801-863-8083 or 801863-8585
Faculty:
Professor
Mark Jeffreys
Kathy French
Norma Gould
Ron Hammond
Grant Richards
Associate Professor
Steven Clark
Cameron John
David Knowlton
Anton Tolman
David Yells
Assistant Professor
Grace Chou
Susan Middleton
Joylin Namie
Barton Poulson
Jeffrey Torlina
Department Advisor: McKenna Rees
Office: LA 012e
Telephone: 801-863-8120
School of Humanities, Arts, and
Social Sciences
Dean: William W. Cobb, Jr.
Office: LA 209d
Telephone: 801-863-7435
PROGR AMS
Please see department advisor for
explanation of all program requirements,
a list of recommended classes, and for
assistance with creating an academic plan
for graduation.
AA/AS Pre Major in
Behavioral Science
61 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (recommended) (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• PSY 1010
General Psychology (Social/
Behavioral Science)
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
14 Credits
Complete two of the following:
• ANTH 1010 Social/Cultural Anthropology (3.0)
• SOC 1010
Introduction to Sociology (3.0)
• SW 1010
Introduction to Social Work and
Social Welfare (3.0)
Complete 3 courses of approved Behavioral Science
electives. Please see Behavioral Science advisor for a
list of approved electives.
Elective Requirements:
6.0
8.0
12 Credits
• FOR AS DEGREE: Any 1000-level course or higher 12.0
or FOR AA DEGREE: Any 1000-level course or higher 2.0
and Same Foreign Language
10.0
Graduation Requirements:
The UVSC Behavioral Science Department
offers classes that fulfill the social science
distribution requirements for graduation,
the Behavioral Science pre major for the
associate degree, and the Behavioral
Science major for the bachelor degree (with
an emphasis in Anthropology, Psychology,
Social Work or Sociology). Students
enrolled in the Integrated Studies bachelor
degree may also select Anthropology,
Psychology, or Sociology as an emphasis.
See the Integrated Studies section in this
catalog for more information related to the
Integrated Studies bachelor degree.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Courses in these areas of study lead
to possible careers in mental health,
counseling, family services, education, law
enforcement, research, marketing, human
resources, management, rehabilitation,
anthropology, psychology, sociology, social
work, and other human services.
96
1 Completion of a minimum of 61 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA).
3 Residency hours-- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and Specified departmental requirements, all major course work taken to meet Behavioral
Science requirements must be completed with a grade
of C- or better.
5 For the AA degree, completion of 10 credit hours of
course work from one language.
BA in
Behavioral Science
126 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Must have a minimum overall GPA of 2.0 (at the time a
student applies to the program)
2 Must complete 28 credits* of matriculation requirements with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the 16 credits* of
Behavioral Science courses. If a student has completed
an associate degree through another institution, the
required general education matriculation courses may
be waived.
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing*
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology* (recommended) (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics*
(recommended) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
• Complete one of the following:
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
• POLS 1000
• HIST 2700
and HIST 2710
• HIST 1700
• HIST 1740
• POLS 1100
American Heritage (3.0)
US History to 1877 (3.0)
US History since 1877 (3.0)
American Civilization (3.0)
US Economic History (3.0)
American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values*
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• PSY 1010
General Psychology* (Social/Behavioral Science)
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
16 Credits
These courses must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.
Choose 3 of the following; must complete the 1010
9.0
course that corresponds to their emphasis:
• ANTH 1010 Social/Cultural Anthropology* (3.0)
• PSY 1010
General Psychology* (completed
with GE requirements) (3.0)
• SOC 1010
Introduction to Sociology* (3.0)
• SW 1010
Introduction to Social Work and
Social Welfare* (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
4.0
• PSY 3010
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences* (4.0)
or SOC 3010
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences* (4.0)
• Complete emphasis specific matriculation course for
3 credits (see Specialty Core Requirements); it must be
completed before completing other Discipline Core
requirements.
Diversity Requirement - Choose one course (1 course
3.0
/ 3 credits)
• ANTH 3100 Anthropology of Gender and
Sexuality (3.0)
• ANTH 3300 Development and Rural Societies
(3.0)
• ANTH 360R People and Cultures of the World
(3.0)
• PSY 3100
Psychology of Gender (3.0)
• SOC 3200
Race and Minority Relations (3.0)
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Anthropology
51.0
• Psychology
51.0
• Social Work
51.0
• Sociology
51.0
Elective Requirements:
24 Credits
• Language Requirement (18 credits in the same
18.0
foreign language, includes ASL).
• Any course numbered 1000 or higher
6.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 126 credits, 40 of which
must be 3000 level or higher.
2 Minimum UVSC GPA of 2.0 upon graduation.
3 Residency hours--minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements, all major course work taken to meet Behavioral
Science requirements must be completed with a grade
of C- or better.
5 For the BA degree, completion of 18 credit hours of
course work from one language to include the 1010,
1020, 2010, 2020 levels or transferred equivalents.
Note: Please see department advisor for explanation of
all program requirements, a list of recommended classes,
and for assistance with creating an academic plan for
graduation.
Footnotes:
* Course must be completed before a student can
matriculate.
Emphasis in Anthropology
Emphasis Requirements:
51 Credits
39 Credits
Matriculation Requirement - (1 course / 3 credits) Must complete all matriculation requirements (see Discipline Core)
before taking any upper-division required courses.
• ANTH 1020 Biological Anthropology*
3.0
Lower Division Anthropology Requirement - (1 course /
3credits)
Complete one of the following:
3.0
• ANTH 1030 World Prehistory (3.0)
• ANTH 1070 Multicultural Societies (3.0)
• ANTH 1800 Introduction to American Indian
Studies (3.0)
• ANTH 2030 Ancient Anthropology (3.0)
Utah Valley State
Behavioral Science
• ANTH 275R Survey of Current Topics (3.0)
Anthropology Core Requirements (4 courses / 12
credits)
• ANTH 4150 Contemporary Theory and Debates 3.0
• ANTH 4160 History of Anthropological Thought 3.0
Complete two 360R courses, must be two different
cultures:
• ANTH 360R People and Cultures of the World
3.0
• ANTH 360R People and Cultures of the World
3.0
Upper Division Anthropology Requirement - (4 courses
/ 12 credits)
• Choose four upper-division (3000 or higher), 3
12.0
credit ANTH courses (4 courses / 12 credits)
Allied Credit Requirement - (2 courses / 6 credits).
6.0
Choose courses totaling 6 credits. All must be 3000
level or above. All must be in Behavioral Science,
Psychology, Sociology, and/or Social Work (BESC/PSY/
SOC/SW). Only 3 credits may be used from BESC/
PSY/SOC/SW 490R: Independent Studies.
Advanced Research Requirement - (1 course / 3 credits)
• ANTH 4850 Ethnographic Project
3.0
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
12 Credits
Behavioral Science Electives (4 courses / 12 credits).
In addition to the requirements listed above, students
must complete 12 credits of approved Behavioral
Science electives. Please see the Behavioral Science
advisor for a list of approved courses.
12.0
Footnotes:
* Course must be completed before a student can
matriculate
Emphasis in Psychology
Emphasis Requirements:
51 Credits
36 Credits
Matriculation Requirement - (1 course / 3 credits) Must complete all matriculation requirements (see Discipline Core)
before taking any upper- division courses.
Complete one of the following*:
3.0
• PSY 3400
Abnormal Psychology (3.0)
• PSY 3460
Personality Theory (3.0)
• PSY 3500
Social Psychology (3.0)
Lower Division Psychology Requirement - (2 courses /
6 credits)
Complete one of the following:
3.0
• PSY 1100
Human Development Life Span
(3.0)
• PSY 1150
Marriage/Relationship Skills (3.0)
• PSY 275R
Survey of Current Topics (3.0)
• PSY 2800
Human Sexuality (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
3.0
• PSY 2250
Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships (3.0)
• PSY 2400
Psychology of Personal Effectiveness
(3.0)
Upper Division Psychology Requirement - (5 courses /
15 credits)
Content Area (1 course/ 3 credits). Complete one of
3.0
the following:
• PSY 3420
Learning Memory and Cognition
(3.0)
• PSY 3430
Psychopharmacology (3.0)
• PSY 3450
Physiological Psychology (3.0)
• PSY 4150
Tests and Measurements (3.0)
• PSY 4500
History and Systems of Psychology (3.0)
Development / Counseling Area (1 course / 3 credits). 3.0
Complete one of the following:
• PSY 3200
Infancy and Childhood Development (3.0)
• PSY 3210
Adolescent Development (3.0)
• PSY 3220
Adult Development (3.0)
• PSY 4300
Introduction to Counseling and
Psychotherapy (3.0)
• PSY 4400
Introduction to Group Psychotherapy (3.0)
Choose three upper division (3000 or higher), 3 credit 9.0
Psychology courses (3 courses / 9 credits)
Allied Credit Requirement - (2 courses / 6 credits).
6.0
Choose courses totaling 6 credits. All must be
3000 level or above. They must be in Anthropology,
Behavioral Science, Social Work, and/or Sociology
(ANTH/BESC/SW/SOC). Only 3 credits may be used
from ANTH/SW/SOC 490R: Independent Studies. SW
4800 not allowed.
Research Requirement- (2 courses / 6 credits)
• PSY 3020
Research Methods for the
3.0
Behavioral Sciences (3.0)
Complete one of the following (1 course / 3 credits):
3.0
• PSY 4010
Experimental Psychology (3.0)
• PSY 4020
Survey Research Design (3.0)
• PSY 4030
Introduction to Program Evaluation
and Grant Writing (3.0)
• PSY 4040
Applied Psychology (3.0)
• PSY 4050
Clinical Research (3.0)
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
Utah Valley State
Behavioral Science electives (5 courses / 15 credits).
In addition to the requirements listed above, students
must complete 15 credits of approved Behavioral
Science electives, 3 hours must be upper-division.
Please see the Behavioral Science advisor for a list of
approved courses.
15.0
Footnotes:
Behavioral Science Electives (6 courses / 18 credits).
In addition to the requirements listed above, students
must complete 18 credits of approved Behavioral
Science electives, 6 hours must be upper-division.
Please see the Behavioral Science advisor for a list of
approved courses.
18.0
Footnotes:
* Course must be completed before a student can
matriculate.
Emphasis in Social Work
Emphasis Requirements:
* Course must be completed before a student can
matriculate.
51 Credits
39 Credits
Matriculation Requirement - (1 course / 3 credits) Must
complete all matriculation requirements (see Discipline
Core) before taking any upper-division required courses.
• SW 1010
Introduction to Social Work and
3.0
Social Welfare*
Social Work Core Requirements (7 courses / 21 credits)
3.0
• PSY 1100
Human Development Life Span
(3.0)
• PSY 3400
Abnormal Psychology (3.0)
3.0
• BESC 3100 Career Preparation for Behavioral
2.0
Science Majors (2.0)
• SW 3500
Social Welfare Policies and Services 3.0
(3.0)
• SW 3800
Clinical Interviewing Skills (4.0)
4.0
• SW 4300
Introduction to Counseling and
3.0
Psychotherapy (3.0)
• SW 4400
Introduction to Group Psycho3.0
therapy (3.0)
Allied Credit Requirement - (2 courses / 6 credits).
6.0
• Choose courses totaling 6 credits. All must be
3000 level or above. They must be in Anthropology, Behavioral Science, Psychology, and/or
Sociology (ANTH/BESC/PSY/SOC). Only 3
credits may be used from ANTH/PSY/SOC 490R:
Independent Studies.
Research Requirement - (2 courses / 6 credits)
• PSY 3020
Research Methods for the Behav3.0
ioral Sciences (3.0)
Complete one of the following (1 course / 3 credits)
3.0
• PSY 4020
Survey Research Design (3.0)
• PSY 4030
Introduction to Program Evaluation
and Grant Writing (3.0)
• PSY 4050
Clinical Research (3.0)
Senior Capstone Requirement- (1 course / 3 credits)
• SW 4800
Practicum (3.0)
3.0
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
12 Credits
Behavioral science electives (4 courses / 12 credits).
In addition to the requirements listed above, students
must complete 12 credits of approved Behavioral
Science electives. Please see the Behavioral Science
advisor for a list of approved courses.
12.0
Footnotes:
* Course must be completed before a student can
matriculate.
Emphasis in Sociology
Emphasis Requirements:
51 Credits
33 Credits
Matriculation Requirement- (1 course / 3 credits) Must complete all matriculation requirements (see Discipline Core)
before taking any upper-division courses.
• SOC 3000 Contemporary Social Theory*
3.0
Lower Division Sociology Requirement - (2 courses /
6 credits)
Complete two of the following:
6.0
• SOC 1020
Modern Social Problems (3.0)
• SOC 1150
Marriage/Relationship Skills (3.0)
• SOC 1200
Sociology of the Family (3.0)
• SOC 2370
Gender Roles (3.0)
• SOC 275R
Survey of Current Topics (3.0)
Upper Division Sociology Requirement- (4 courses /
12.0
12 credits)
Choose four upper division (3000 or higher), 3 credit
SOC courses (4 courses/ 12 credits)
Allied Credit Requirement - (2 courses / 6 credits).
6.0
Choose courses totaling 6 credits. All must be
3000 level or above. They must be in Anthropology,
Behavioral Science, Psychology, and/or Social Work
(ANTH/BESC/PSY/SW). Only 3 credits may be used
from ANTH/PSY/SW 490R: Independent Studies.
Research Requirement- (2 courses / 6 credits)
• SOC 3020
Research Methods for the
3.0
Behavioral Sciences (3.0)
Complete one of the following (1 course / 3 credits)
3.0
• SOC 4020
Survey Research Design (3.0)
• SOC 4030
Introduction to Program Evaluation
and Grant Writing (3.0)
• SOC 4040
Applied Sociology (3.0)
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
18 Credits
BS in
Behavioral Science
126 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Must have a minimum overall GPA of 2.0 (at the time a
student applies to the program).
2 Must complete 28 credits* of matriculation requirements with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the 16 credits* of
Behavioral Science courses. If a student has completed
an associate degree through another institution, the
required general education matriculation courses may
be waived.
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing*
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology* (recommended) (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics*
(recommended) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2700
US History Since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values*
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• PSY 1010
General Psychology* (Social
/Behavioral Science)
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
16 Credits
Matriculation requirement - (5 courses / 16 credits). These
courses must have a cumulative GPA or 3.0 or better:
Complete 3 of the following; must complete the 1010
9.0
course that corresponds to their emphasis:
• ANTH 1010 Social/Cultural Anthropology* (3.0)
• PSY 1010
General Psychology (completed with
GE requirements) (3.0)
• SOC 1010
Introduction to Sociology* (3.0)
• SW 1010
Introduction to Social Work and
Social Welfare* (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PSY 3010
Statistics for the Behavioral
4.0
Sciences*
or SOC 3010
Statistics for the Behavioral
Sciences* (4.0)
• Complete emphasis specific matriculation course
for 3 credits (see Specialty Core Requirements);
it must be completed before completing other
Discipline Core requirements.
Diversity Requirement - Choose One Course (1 course 3.0
/ 3 credits)
• ANTH 3100 Anthropology of Gender and
Sexuality (3.0)
• ANTH 3300 Development and Rural Societies
(3.0)
• ANTH 360R People and Cultures of the World
(3.0)
• PSY 3100
Psychology of Gender (3.0)
• SOC 3200
Race and Minority Relations (3.0)
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Anthropology
51.0
• Psychology
51.0
• Social Work
51.0
• Sociology
51.0
Elective Requirements:
24 Credits
• Elective Requirement (approximately 24 elective
credits)
15 Credits
3.0
3.0
24.0
Graduation Requirements:
Catalog 2007–2008
97
Behavioral Science
1 Completion of a minimum of 126 credits, 40 of which
must be 3000 level or higher.
2 Minimum UVSC GPA of 2.0 upon graduation.
3 Residency hours--minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements, all major course work taken to meet Behavioral
Science requirements must be completed with a grade
of C- or better.
Note: Please see department advisor for explanation of
all program requirements, a list of recommended classes,
and for assistance with creating an academic plan for
graduation.
Footnotes:
* Course must be completed before a student can
matriculate.
Emphasis in Anthropology
Emphasis Requirements:
51 Credits
39 Credits
Matriculation Requirement - (1 course / 3 credits) Must complete all matriculation requirements (see Discipline Core)
before taking any upper-division required courses.
• ANTH 1020 Biological Anthropology* (3.0)
3.0
Lower Division Anthropology Requirement - (1 course
/ 3 credits)
Complete one of the following:
3.0
• ANTH 1030 World Prehistory (3.0)
• ANTH 1070 Multicultural Societies (3.0)
• ANTH 1800 Introduction to American Indian
Studies (3.0)
• ANTH 2030 Ancient Anthrolopology (3.0)
• ANTH 275R Survey of Current Topics (3.0)
Anthropology Core Requirements (4 courses / 12
credits)
• ANTH 4150 Contemporary Theory and Debates 3.0
(3.0)
• ANTH 4160 History of Anthropological Thought 3.0
(3.0)
Complete two 360R courses, must be two different
cultures:
• ANTH 360R People and Cultures of the World
3.0
(3.0)
• ANTH 360R People and Cultures of the World
3.0
(3.0)
• Upper Division Anthropology Requirement - (4
courses / 12 credits)
Choose four upper division (3000 or higher), 3 credit 12.0
ANTH courses (4 courses / 12 credits)
Allied Credit Requirement - (2 courses / 6 credits).
6.0
Choose courses totaling 6 credits. All must be 3000
level or above. All must be in Behavioral Science,
Psychology, Sociology, and/or Social Work (BESC/PSY/
SOC/SW). Only 3 credits may be used from BESC/
PSY/SOC/SW 490R: Independent Studies.
Advanced Research Requirement - (1 course / 3 credits)
• ANTH 4850 Ethnographic Project (3.0)
3.0
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
12 Credits
Behavioral Science Electives (4 courses / 12 credits).
In addition to the requirements listed above, students
must complete 12 credits of approved Behavioral
Science electives. Please see the Behavioral Science
advisor for a list of approved courses.
12.0
Footnotes:
* Course must be completed before a student can
matriculate.
Emphasis in Psychology
Emphasis Requirements:
51 Credits
36 Credits
Matriculation Requirement - (1 course / 3 credits) Must complete all matriculation requirements (see Discipline Core)
before taking any upper-division required courses.
Complete one of the following*:
3.0
• PSY 3400
Abnormal Psychology (3.0)
• PSY 3460
Personality Theory (3.0)
• PSY 3500
Social Psychology (3.0)
Lower Division Psychology Requirement - (2 courses /
6 credits)
Complete one of the following:
3.0
• PSY 1100
Human Development Life Span
(3.0)
• PSY 1150
Marriage/Relationship Skills (3.0)
• PSY 275R
Survey of Current Topics (3.0)
• PSY 2800
Human Sexuality (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
3.0
• PSY 2250
Psychology of Interpersonal
Relationships (3.0)
• PSY 2400
Psychology of Personal Effectiveness
(3.0)
Upper Division Psychology Requirement - (5 courses / 15
credits)
Content Area (1 course/3 credits). Complete one of
3.0
the following:
98
• PSY 3420
Learning Memory and Cognition
(3.0)
• PSY 3430
Psychopharmacology (3.0)
• PSY 3450
Physiological Psychology (3.0)
• PSY 4150
Tests and Measurements (3.0)
• PSY 4500
History and Systems of Psychology (3.0)
Development / Counseling Area (1 course / 3 credits).
Complete one of the following:
• PSY 3200
Infancy and Childhood Development (3.0)
• PSY 3210
Adolescent Development (3.0)
• PSY 3220
Adult Development (3.0)
• PSY 4300
Introduction to Counseling and
Psychotherapy (3.0)
• PSY 4400
Introduction to Group Psychotherapy (3.0)
Choose three upper division (3000 or higher), 3 credit
Psychology courses (3 courses / 9 credits)
Allied Credit Requirement - (2 courses / 6 credits).
Choose courses totaling 6 credits. All must be
3000 level or above. They must be in Anthropology,
Behavioral Science, Social Work, and/or Sociology
(ANTH/BESC/SW/SOC). Only 3 credits may be used
from ANTH/SW/SOC 490R: Independent Studies. SW
4800 not allowed.
Research Requirement - (2 courses / 6 credits)
• PSY 3020
Research Methods for the
Behavioral Sciences (3.0)
Complete one of the following (1 course / 3 credits):
• PSY 4010
Experimental Psychology (3.0)
• PSY 4020
Survey Research Design (3.0)
• PSY 4030
Introduction to Program Evaluation
and Grant Writing (3.0)
• PSY 4040
Applied Psychology (3.0)
• PSY 4050
Clinical Research (3.0)
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
9.0
6.0
3.0
3.0
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
15 Credits
Behavioral Science Electives (5 courses / 15 credits).
In addition to the requirements listed above, students
must complete 15 credits of approved Behavioral
Science electives, 3 hours must be upper-division.
Please see the Behavioral Science advisor for a list of
approved courses.
15.0
Footnotes:
* Course must be completed before a student can
matriculate.
Emphasis in Social Work
Emphasis Requirements:
51 Credits
39 Credits
Matriculation Requirement - (1 course / 3 credits) Must
complete all matriculation requirements (see Discipline
Core) before taking any upper-division required courses.
• SW 1010
Introduction to Social Work and
3.0
Social Welfare*
Social Work Core Requirements (7 courses / 21 credits)
• PSY 1100
Human Development Life Span
3.0
• PSY 3400
Abnormal Psychology
3.0
• BESC 3100 Career Preparation for Behavioral
2.0
Science Majors
• SW 3500
Social Welfare Policies and Services 3.0
• SW 3800
Clinical Interviewing Skills
4.0
• SW 4300
Introduction to Counseling and
3.0
Psychotherapy
• SW 4400
Introduction to Group
3.0
Psychotherapy
Allied Credit Requirement - (2 courses / 6 credits).
6.0
• Choose courses totaling 6 credits. All must be
3000 level or above. They must be in Anthropology, Behavioral Science, Psychology, and/or
Sociology (ANTH/BESC/PSY/SOC). Only 3
credits may be used from ANTH/PSY/SOC 490R:
Independent Studies.
Research Requirement - (2 courses / 6 credits)
• PSY 3020
Research Methods for the
3.0
Behavioral Sciences
Complete one of the following (1 course / 3 credits):
3.0
• PSY 4020
Survey Research Design (3.0)
• SW 4030
Introduction to Program Evaluation
and Grant Writing (3.0)
• SW 4050
Clinical Research (3.0)
Senior Capstone Requirement - (1 course / 3 credits)
• SW 4800
Practicum
3.0
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
12 Credits
Behavioral Science electives (4 courses/12 credits).
12.0
In addition to the requirements listed above, students must
complete 12 credits of approved Behavioral Science electives. Please see the Behavioral Science advisor for a list of
approved courses.
Footnotes:
* Course must be completed before a student can
matriculate.
Emphasis in Sociology
51 Credits
Catalog 2007–2008
33 Credits
Matriculation Requirement- (1 course / 3 credits) Must
complete all matriculation requirements (see Discipline core)
before taking upper-division required courses.
• SOC 3000 Contemporary Social Theory* (3.0) 3.0
Lower Division Sociology Requirement - (2 courses /
6 credits)
Complete two of the following:
6.0
• SOC 1020
Modern Social Problems (3.0)
• SOC 1150
Marriage/Relationship Skills (3.0)
• SOC 1200
Sociology of the Family (3.0)
• SOC 2370
Gender Roles (3.0)
• SOC 275R
Survey of Current Topics (3.0)
Upper Division Sociology Requirement - (4 courses /
12 credits)
Choose four upper division (3000 or higher), 3 credit 12.0
SOC courses (4 courses / 12 credits)
Allied Credit Requirement- (2 courses / 6 credits).
6.0
Choose courses totaling 6 credits. All must be
3000 level or above. They must be in Anthropology,
Behavioral Science, Psychology, and/or Social Work
(ANTH/BESC/PSY/SW). Only 3 credits may be used
from ANTH/PSY/SW 490R: Independent Studies.
Research Requirement - (2 courses / 6 credits)
• SOC 3020
Research Methods for the
3.0
Behavioral Sciences (3.0)
Complete one of the following (1 course /3 credits)
3.0
• SOC 4020
Survey Research Design (3.0)
• SOC 4030
Introduction to Program Evaluation
and Grant Writing (3.0)
• SOC 4040
Applied Sociology (3.0)
18 Credits
Behavioral Science electives (6 courses / 18 credits).
In addition to the requirements listed above, students
must complete 18 credits of approved Behavioral
Science electives, 6 hours must be upper-division.
Please see the Behavioral Science advisor for a list of
approved courses.
18.0
Footnotes:
* Course must be completed before a student can
matriculate
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in
Anthropology
19 Credits
19 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
Prerequisites:
• ANTH 1010
Social/Cultural Anthropology**
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• ANTH 1020 Biological Anthropology (3.0)
• SOC 3010
Statistics for the Behavioral
Sciences (4.0)
• ANTH 4150 Contemporary Theory and Debates
(3.0)
or ANTH 4160 History of Anthropological Thought
(3.0)
• ANTH 4850 Ethnographic Methods (3.0)
Complete 6 additional credits in Anthropology. Three
credits must be upper division.
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
Footnotes:
** ANTH/PSY/SOC 1010 are introductory courses and
pre-requisites which may not be used in the 19 hours
required for these Integrated Studies Emphases.
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Psychology
Emphasis Requirements:
19 Credits
19 Credits
Prerequisites:
• PSY 1010
General Psychology** (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PSY 2250
Psychology of Interpersonal
Relationships (3.0)
or PSY 2400
Psychology of Personal
Effectiveness
• PSY 3010
Statistics for the Behavioral
Sciences*
• PSY 3020
Research Methods for the
Behavioral Sciences
• Advanced Research (complete one of the following):
• PSY 4010
Experimental Psychology (3.0)
or PSY 4020
Survey Research Design (3.0)
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
Utah Valley State
Behavioral Science
or PSY 4030
Introduction to Practice Evaluation
and Grant Writing (3.0)
or PSY 4040
Applied Psychology (3.0)
or PSY 4050
Clinical Research (3.0)
• Complete 6 additional credits in Psychology (PSY).
Three credits must be upper division.
6.0
Footnotes:
** ANTH/PSY/SOC 1010 are introductory courses and
pre-requisites which may not be used in the 19 hours
required for these Integrated Studies Emphases.
* If students take ECON 3340 as part of their other
emphasis, they are not required to take PSY/SOC 3010.
They may substitute an upper division PSY course in
its place.
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Sociology
Emphasis Requirements:
19 Credits
19 Credits
Prerequisites:
• SOC 1010
Introduction to Sociology** (3.0)
Complete the following:
• SOC 3000
Contemporary Social Theory
• SOC 3010
Statistics for the Behavioral
Sciences*
• SOC 3020
Research Methods for the
Behavioral Sciences
Advanced Research (complete one of the following):
• SOC 4020
Survey Research Design (3.0)
• SOC 4030
Introduction to Practice Evaluation
and Grant Writing (3.0)
• SOC 4040
Applied Sociology (3.0)
• Complete 6 additional credits in Sociology (SOC).
Credits may be lower or upper division.
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
Footnotes:
** ANTH/PSY/SOC 1010 are introductory courses and
pre-requisites which may not be used in the 19 hours
required for these Integrated Studies Emphases.
* If students take ECON 3340 as part of their other
emphasis, they are not required to take PSY/SOC 3010.
They may substitute an upper division ANTH, PSY, SOC,
or SW course in its place.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
ANTH, Anthropology
BESC, Behavioral Science
PSY, Psychology
SOC, Sociology
SW, Social Work
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
99
Biology
Biology
Department Chair: Mark Bracken
Office: PS 230
Telephone: 801-863-8739
E-mail: brackema@uvsc.edu
Advisor, Biology: Kimberly Sulz
Office: PS 212a
Telephone: 801-863-6208
E-mail: frandski@uvsc.edu
Advisor, Secondary Education: Richard
Tolman
Office: PS 224
Telephone: 801-863-6229
E-mail: tolmanri@uvsc.edu
Advisor, Pre-Health Professions: James
Holmes
Office: PS 202c
Telephone: 801-863-7207
E-mail: holmesja@uvsc.edu
Faculty:
Professor
Paul Bybee
Lawrence J. Gray
James Harris
Bruce Parker
James V. Price
Robert Robbins
Sam Rushforth
Mike Shively
Richard Tolman
Renee Van Buren
Wayne Whaley
Associate Professor
Mark Bracken
Jorma Kirsi
Heather Wilson-Ashworth
Assistant Professor
Virginia Bayer
Olga Kopp
Ruhul H. Kuddus
Catherine Stephen
Emeritus Associate Professor
Merlin Smith
Botany Scholar in Residence
Kimball T. Harper
School of Science and Health
Dean: Sam Rushforth
Office: PS 201a
Telephone: 801-863-8980
Associate Dean: Bill Evenson
Office: PS 201e
Telephone: 801-863-6440
Assistant Dean: Lori Barber
Office: BA 205c
Telephone: 801-863-8380
Assistant Dean: Louise Illes
Office: PS 201d
Telephone: 801-863-6040
Assistant Dean: David Jordan
Office: PS 201c
Telephone: 801-863-7160
The UVSC Biology program offers a
variety of courses that investigate the
living world, including courses in biology,
botany, ecology, genetics, human anatomy,
human physiology, conservation biology,
microbiology, zoology and others. A
course of study may be designed to provide
breadth in the life sciences or to prepare
students for a specific area of biology.
Many courses in these programs fill
general education requirements in the
biology distribution area (see Graduation
Requirements section of the UVSC catalog).
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Majors in Biology prepare for a wide
variety of occupations in education,
government, medicine, and research.
Students majoring in a UVSC Bachelor’s
program should meet with the Biology
Department advisor early in their program.
100
Students interested in a career in biology or
a related field are encouraged to earn at
least a baccalaureate degree (BS). Many
professions (e.g. pharmacy, medicine)
require additional post-baccalaureate
education. The UVSC AS/AA degree is
intended for students who plan to use it
as a first step toward a baccalaureate
degree. The AS degree may be granted
to those who do not continue in a
bachelor’s program and meet the minimum
requirements. The Bachelor of Science
in Biology Degree may be used for entry
into a career or in preparation for postbaccalaureate (for masters and doctoral
degrees) or professional (e.g. medical,
dental) education. A Bachelor of Science
Degree in Integrated Studies, Biology
emphasis is available. Please see Biology
advisor for more information.
PROGRAMS
AA Pre Major in Biology
62 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
42 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• BIOL 1610
College Biology I
and BIOL 1615
College Biology I Laboratory
• CHEM 1210 Principles of Chemistry I
and CHEM 1215 Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory
• CHEM 1220 Principles of Chemistry II
and CHEM 1225 Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
JOB OUTLOOK
Discipline Core Requirements:
Graduates with degrees in Biology are
especially in demand in the secondary
education, health, natural resource
management, and biotechnology areas.
Complete the following:
• BIOL 1620
College Biology II
and BIOL 1625
College Biology II Laboratory
• Minimum of 2 additional biology courses (BIOL,
BOT, MICR, or ZOOL prefixes). BIOL 1010
and BIOL 1050 cannot be used to meet this
requirement. See Biology Advisor.
Elective Requirements:
Staff:
Administrative Assistant
Alana Korstanje
Anatomy and Physiology Lab Manager
Don Homan
Assistant Herbarium Curator
Donna Barnes
Biology Lab Manager
April Samson
Botany Lab Manager
Allison Bench
Microbiology Lab Manager
Ken Slater
consult with Biology Secondary Education
Advisor.
PROGR AMS
Four options are available: Associate
in Science Degree with a pre-major in
Biology; Bachelor of Science Degree in
Integrated Studies with a Biology emphasis,
Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology, and
Bachelor of Science in Biology Education.
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
10 Credits
3.0
1.0
6.0
10 Credits
• Same Foreign Language.
10.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 62 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
5 For the AA degree, completion of 10 credit hours of
course work from one language.
All AS/AA and BS Biology majors must
consult with the Biology Department
advisor prior to their first semester of
enrollment at UVSC to formulate a plan
of study. BS in Biology Education majors
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Biology
AS Pre Major in Biology
60 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
42 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• BIOL 1610
College Biology I
and BIOL 1615
College Biology I Laboratory
• CHEM 1210 Principles of Chemistry I
and CHEM 1215 Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory
• CHEM 1220 Principles of Chemistry II
and CHEM 1225 Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
Elective Requirements:
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
8.0
6.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
BS in Biology
General Education Requirements:
122 C REDITS
39 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2020
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• BIOL 1610
College Biology I
• CHEM 1210 Principles of Chemistry I
• CHEM 1220 Principles of Chemistry II
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
• BIOL 1615
• BIOL 1620
• BIOL 1625
• BIOL 3400
• BIOL 3500
• BIOL 3600
• BIOL 3700
• BIOL 4500
• BIOL 494R
• MATH 2040
or MATH 1060
and MATH 1210
• PHYS 2010
• PHYS 2015
• PHYS 2020
• PHYS 2025
Utah Valley State
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
36 Credits
• Choose 4 credits from any MICR electives.
4.0
• Choose 3 credits from any BOT electives.
3.0
• Choose 3 credits from any ZOOL electives (except 3.0
ZOOL 1090).
• Additional credits to meet credit and upper-division 26.0
requirements.
1 Complete the required minimum credit hours.
2 If an AA or AS degree has been earned, a maximum of
64 of these credits may apply toward the BS.
3 At least 30 credit hours in residence at UVSC or satellite
sites are required, with 10 hours earned during the last
45 hours.
4 A minimum of 40 credits must be upper-division
(numbered 3000 or above).
5 A minimum of 30 credits must be in the major (BIOL,
BOT, MICR, or ZOOL prefixes), 20 of which must be
upper-division. A minimum of nine Biology credits must
be taken at UVSC.
6 Complete Biology core courses with a grade of “C-” or
higher in each course.
7 Achieve a minimum overall GPA of 2.0 with a minimum
GPA of 2.25 in biology courses.
8 Complete the appropriate application for graduation
form.
BS in Biology Education
3.0
2.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
4.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
123 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Admission to Professional Education status is a
requirement for enrollment in professional studies level
courses.
General Education Requirements:
39 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2020
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100
Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• BIOL 1610
College Biology I
• CHEM 1110 Elementary Chemistry for the Health
Sciences
• CHEM 1120 Elementary Organic Bio-Chemistry
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• HIST 4320
History of Scientific Thought
(Social/Behavioral Science)
Discipline Core Requirements:
47 Credits
College Biology I Laboratory
College Biology II
College Biology II Laboratory
Cell Biology
Genetics
Biological Chemistry
General Ecology
Principles of Evolution
Seminar
Principles of Statistics
Trigonometry (3.0)
Calculus I (5.0)
College Physics I
College Physics I Lab
College Physics II
College Physics II Lab
Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory
Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
Graduation Requirements:
6 Credits
• Complete any course 1000 or higher. See Biology
Advisor.
CHEM 1215
CHEM 1225
CHEM 2310
CHEM 2315
CHEM 2320
CHEM 2325
Elective Requirements:
12 Credits
Complete the following:
• BIOL 1620
College Biology II
and BIOL 1625
College Biology II Laboratory
• Minimum of 3 additional biology courses (BIOL,
BOT, MICR, or ZOOL prefixes). BIOL 1010
and BIOL 1050 cannot be used to meet this
requirement. See Biology Advisor.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
or
•
•
•
•
•
•
or
or
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BIOL 1615
BIOL 1620
BIOL 1625
MICR 2060
MICR 3450
BIOL 3500
BIOL 3700
BIOL 4200
BIOL 4500
BIOL 494R
BOT 2050
BOT 2100
BOT 4300
BOT 3340
ZOOL 2320
ZOOL 2420
ZOOL 3100
ZOOL 3200
CHEM 1115
CHEM 1125
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
Education Courses
• EDSC 2540 Development of the Adolescent
Student
• EDSC 3000 Educational Psychology
• EDSC 3050 Foundations of American Education
• EDSC 3250 Instructional Media
• EDSC 4200 Classroom Management I
• EDSC 4250 Classroom Management II
Catalog 2007–2008
•
•
•
•
•
EDSC 4850
EDSP 3400
GEO 1010
GEO 1015
PHYS 1010
Content Area Reading and Writing
Multicultural Instruction/ESL
Secondary Curriculum Instruction
and Assessment
Student Teaching--Secondary (4.0)
Exceptional Students
Introduction to Geology
Introduction to Geology Laboratory
Elementary Physics
3.0
2.0
4.0
8.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Complete the required minimum credit hours.
2 If an AA or AS degree has been earned, a maximum of
64 of these credits may apply toward the BS.
3 At least 30 credit hours in residence at UVSC or satellite
sites are required, with 10 hours earned during the last
45 hours.
4 A minimum of 40 credits must be upper-division
(numbered 3000 or above).
5 A minimum of 30 credits must be in the major (BIOL,
BOT, MICR, or ZOOL prefixes), courses as follows:
minimum of 9 Biology credits must be taken at
UVSC and a minimum of 20 Biology credits must be
upper-division.
6 Complete the appropriate application for graduation
form.
Minor in Biology
21 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
21 Credits
Complete the following with a grade of C- or better:
• BIOL 1610
College Biology I
• BIOL 1615
College Biology I Laboratory
• BIOL 1620
College Biology II
• BIOL 1625
College Biology II Laboratory
• Complete 12 upper-division credits from any BIOL,
BOT, MICR, or ZOOL courses with a grade of Cor higher in each. BIOL 495R, BIOL 499R, ZOOL
3080, or ZOOL 4080 cannot be used to meet this
requirement.
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
4.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
12.0
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Biology
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
2.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
84 Credits
College Biology I Laboratory
College Biology II
College Biology II Laboratory
Microbiology for Health Professions
General Microbiology (4.0)
Genetics
General Ecology
Teaching Methods in Science
Principles of Evolution
Seminar
Field Botany
Flora of Utah (3.0)
Wildland Shrubs (3.0)
Plant Biology
Human Anatomy
Human Physiology
Vertebrate Zoology
Invertebrate Zoology
Elementary Chemistry Laboratory
Elementary Organic Bio-Chemistry
Laboratory
• EDSC 4440
• EDSC 4450
• EDSC 4550
1.0
3.0
1.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
18 Credits
18 Credits
Biology Emphasis
Prerequisites (see Advisor):
• BIOL 1610
College Biology I (4.0)
• BIOL 1615
College Biology I Laboratory (1.0)
• CHEM 1110 Elementary Chemistry for the Health
Sciences (recommended) (4.0)
Complete the following:
• BIOL 1620
College Biology II
• BIOL 1625
College Biology II Laboratory
• BIOL 4500
Principles of Evolution
• Complete 11 credits (minimum of 9 credits must
be upper-division) from any BIOL, BOT, MICR, or
ZOOL courses except BIOL 1010, ZOOL 1090,
BIOL 494R, BIOL 495R, or BIOL 499R.
3.0
1.0
3.0
11.0
USU/UVSC HORTICULTURE
PROGR AM
Coordinator: Michael S. Caron
Office: CE 105
Telephone: 801-863-8042
E-mail: caronmi@uvsc.edu
Website: http://www.uvsc.edu/
conted/horticulture/
The USU/UVSC Horticulture Program is a
partnership between Utah State University
and Utah Valley State College. Currently
USU offers classes at UVSC for a 1-year
certificate and an Associate in Applied
Science degree (AAS) in Horticulture
(the degrees are awarded by Utah State
University). For full program description,
see Continuing and Adult Education (p.
206).
101
Biology
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
102
BIOL, Biology
BOT, Botany
MICR, Microbiology
ZOOL, Zoology
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Building Construction And Construction Management
Building
Construction and
Construction
Management
experience.
AS Pre Major in Building
Construction and Construction
Management
63 C REDITS
PROGR AMS
General Education Requirements:
Students may earn a One-Year Certificate,
an Associate in Applied Science degree,
or an Associate in Science degree, or a
Bachelor of Science Degree in Technology
Management.
Department of Construction
Technologies
Reminder: an overall grade point average
of 2.0 (C) or above is required for
graduation.
Department Chair: Steve Fordham
Certificate in Building
Construction
31 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
31 Credits
Office: GT 601
Telephone: 801-863-8167
Program Coordinator: Bob Dunn
Office: GT 613a
Telephone: 801-863-8249
Faculty:
Professor
Bob Dunn
Associate Professor
Fred Davis
DeWayne Erdmann
Eric Linfield
Office Manager: Sandra Ozuna
Office: GT 613e
Telephone: 801-863-7405
Advisor: Amy Ostler
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-8138
Advisory Committee: Robert Hansen,
Financial Fusion Inc.; Scott Kendal, Scott
Kendal Construction; Steve Metler, Metler
Brother’s Construction; Shawn Reeves,
Industrial Supply; Monte Mecham, Monte
Mecham Construction; Ray Peterson,
Anderson Lumber; Eugene Metler, Metler
Brother’s Construction; Jim Baird, BMC
West Building Materials.
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates from the Building Construction
program (one-year certificate) are prepared
to read architectural drawings; lay-out
framing; frame walls, roofs, and stairs;
shingle roofs; apply siding; install doors,
windows, and interior trim.
Graduates of the two-year Building
Construction and Construction
Management program are prepared for
employment as construction foremen, job
superintendents, project managers, or
one year applies to contractor’s license
Utah Valley State
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
or
•
or
BCCM 1110
BCCM 1120
BCCM 1130
BCCM 1160
BCCM 1190
BCCM 1210
BCCM 1220
BCCM 1230
BCCM 1240
BCCM 1250
BIT 1010
BIT 1020
CAW 2310
EGDT 1600
Principles of Residential Framing
Blueprint Reading
Concrete and Masonry
Stair Design and Construction
Framing and Concrete Lab
Principles of Finish Carpentry
Finishing Lab
Construction Estimating
Roof Framing
Utah Contractors License Regulation and Procedure
Building Codes
Residential Codes (3.0)
Cabinetry Math
Technical Math--Algebra** (3.0)
3.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
5.0
3.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum or 31 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
3 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
4 Complete all Technical Specialty courses with a minimum grade of “C-” or better.
5 Residency hours--minimum of 10 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
Note: **Take EGDT 1600 if planning to complete AAS
degree.
AAS in Building Construction
and Construction
Management
65 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
16 Credits
BCCM 1150 Building Construction Safety
EGDT 1600 Technical Math--Algebra
ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
Biology/Physical Science
Humanities/Fine Arts
Social Science
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
49 Credits
BCCM 1110
BCCM 1120
BCCM 1130
BCCM 1160
BCCM 1190
BCCM 1210
BCCM 1220
BCCM 1230
BCCM 1240
BCCM 1250
Principles of Residential Framing
Blueprint Reading
Concrete and Masonry
Stair Design and Construction
Framing and Concrete Lab
Principles of Finish Carpentry
Finishing Lab
Construction Estimating
Roof Framing
Utah Contractors License
Regulation and Procedure
• BCCM 1260 Computer Estimating
• BCCM 1270 Construction Scheduling
• ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
• BIT 1010
Building Codes
or BIT 1020
Residential Codes (3.0)
• EGDT 1040 Computer Aided Drafting-AutoCAD
• EGDT 1090 Introduction to Architecture Drafting
• EGDT 1400 Surveying
• MGMT 3170 Entrepreneurship
3.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
5.0
3.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (recommended for Humanities or Arts
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
16 Credits
• Choose from BCCM 1000 level or higher
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
16.0
12 Credits
• Electives (1000 level or higher)
12.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum or 63 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BS in Technology
Management
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the Technology Management section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in Building
Construction and Construction
Management
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
45 Credits
45 Credits
BCCM 1110
BCCM 1120
BCCM 1130
BCCM 1150
BCCM 1160
BCCM 1190
BCCM 1210
BCCM 1220
BCCM 1230
BCCM 1240
BCCM 1250
Principles of Residential Framing
Blueprint Reading
Concrete and Masonry
Building Construction Safety
Stair Design and Construction
Framing and Concrete Lab
Principles of Finish Carpentry
Finishing Lab
Construction Estimating
Roof Framing
Utah Contractors License Regulation and Procedure
• BCCM 1260 Computer Estimating
• BCCM 1270 Construction Scheduling
• BCCM 299R VICA
• BIT 1010
Building Codes
or BIT 1020
Residential Codes (3.0)
• EGDT 1040 Computer Aided Drafting-AutoCAD
• EGDT 1090 Introduction to Architecture Drafting
• EGDT 1400 Surveying
3.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
5.0
3.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 65 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
5 Complete all Technical Specialty courses with a minimum grade of “C-” or better.
Catalog 2006–2007
Due to the technical nature of the material
in BCCM courses, additional reading and
math instruction may be required. More
information will be given during advisement.
See Course Descriptions section
103
Building Construction And Construction Management
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă ACRT, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
Technology
Ă BCCM, Building Construction and
Construction Management
Ă BIT, Building Inspection Technology
Ă CAW, Cabinetry and Architectural
Woodworking
Ă FAC, Facilities Management
Ă LINE, Lineman Technology
Ă WELD, Welding Technology
104
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Building Inspection Technology
Building
Inspection
Technology
Department of Construction
Technologies
Department Chairperson: Steve
Fordham
Office: GT 601
Telephone: 801-863-8167
Program Coordinator: Fred Davis
Office: GT 615
Telephone: 801-863-8861
Faculty:
Professor
Bob Dunn
Associate Professor
Fred Davis
DeWayne Erdmann
Eric Linfield
Office Manager: Sandra Ozuna
Office: GT 613e
Telephone: 801-863-7405
Advisor: Amy Ostler
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-8138
Advisory Committee: Chuck Hugo, Provo
City Building Official; Bill Bell, Building
Safety Division Manager; Donna Jackson,
Midvale City Building Official; Gilbert
Gonzales, Murray City Assistant Building
Official; Dave Johnson, Public Works
Director/Building Official.
PROGR AMS
Students may earn a One-Year Certificate,
an Associate in Applied Science Degree,
or a Bachelor of Science Degree in
Technology Management.
Reminder: an overall grade point average
of 2.0 (C) or above is required for
graduation.
Certificate in Building Inspection
Technology
30 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
COMM 2110
BIT 1010
BIT 1170
BIT 1240
BIT 1330
BIT 1340
BIT 1380
BCCM 1110
BCCM 1120
BCCM 1130
BCCM 1150
BCCM 1160
BCCM 1240
FSO 2030
30 Credits
Interpersonal Communication
Building Codes
Field Lab--Building Codes
Plumbing Codes
Mechanical Codes
Electrical Codes
Ride-Along Lab
Principles of Residential Framing
Blueprint Reading
Concrete and Masonry
Building Construction Safety
Stair Design and Construction
Roof Framing
Fire Inspector I
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
AAS in Building Inspection
Technology
63 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
•
•
•
•
or
•
•
•
•
•
•
BCCM 1160
BCCM 1190
BCCM 1240
EGDT 1040
• EGDT 1400
• EGDT 1600
• FSO 2030
Stair Design and Construction
Framing and Concrete Lab
Roof Framing
Computer Aided Drafting--AutoCAD
Surveying
Technical Math--Algebra
Fire Inspector I
1.0
5.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
Due to the technical nature of the material
in the BIT courses, additional reading and
math instruction may be required. More
information will be given during advisement.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă ACRT, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
Technology
Ă BCCM, Building Construction and
Construction Management
Ă BIT, Building Inspection Technology
Ă CAW, Cabinetry and Architectural
Woodworking
Ă FAC, Facilities Management
Ă LINE, Lineman Technology
Ă WELD, Welding Technology
16 Credits
BCCM 1150 Building Construction Safety
COMM 1020 Public Speaking
COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communication
EGDT 1600 Technical Math--Algebra
MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
Biology/Physical Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
47 Credits
BIT 1010
BIT 1170
BIT 1230
BIT 1240
BIT 1330
BIT 1340
BIT 1380
BCCM 1110
BCCM 1120
BCCM 1130
BCCM 1160
BCCM 1190
BCCM 1240
EGDT 1040
Building Codes
Field Lab--Building Codes
Plan Review
Plumbing Codes
Mechanical Codes
Electrical Codes
Ride-Along Lab
Principles of Residential Framing
Blueprint Reading
Concrete and Masonry
Stair Design and Construction
Framing and Concrete Lab
Roof Framing
Computer Aided Drafting--AutoCAD
EGDT 1400 Surveying
FSO 2030
Fire Inspector I
DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
MGMT 1250 Principles of Leadership
3.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
5.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates of this program will be better
equipped to find employment in building
inspection, building construction, and
construction supervision. In addition,
this curriculum will provide supporting
instruction for those students in the
construction trades as well as architectural
and engineering drafting programs.
Utah Valley State
1 Completion of a minimum of 63 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BS in Technology
Management
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the Technology Management section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in Building
Inspection Technology
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BIT 1010
BIT 1170
BIT 1230
BIT 1240
BIT 1330
BIT 1340
BIT 1380
BCCM 1110
BCCM 1120
BCCM 1130
BCCM 1150
45 Credits
45.0
Building Codes
Field Lab--Building Codes
Plan Review
Plumbing Codes
Mechanical Codes
Electrical Codes
Ride-Along Lab
Principles of Residential Framing
Blueprint Reading
Concrete and Masonry
Building Construction Safety
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
105
Business/Marketing Education
or ENGL 2020
Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics (fulfills Social/Behavioral Science)
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
Business/
Marketing
Education
Business Education Director: Jan
Bentley
Office: CS 526g
Telephone: 801-863-6362
Email: bentleja@uvsc.edu
Faculty:
Professor
Cynthia Krebs
Colleen Vawdrey
Associate Professor
Diane Hartman
Emeritus Professor
Kathleen Richards
Emeritus Instructor
Karla Steere
Discipline Core Requirements:
• EDSC 2540
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
• EDSC 4850
Administrative Support: Katrina Van
Cott
Office: CS 526
Telephone: 801-863-6217
E-mail: vancotka@uvsc.edu
• BMED 3700
• BMED 4200
• BMED 4250
• BMED 4900
Advisor: Bonnie Cook
Office: CS 526b
Telephone: 801-863-8403
E-mail: cookbo@uvsc.edu
• DGM 1010
• DGM 2120
• DGM 2230
School of Technology & Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
PROGR AMS
Students interested in teaching can
pursue a Bachelor of Science in Business/
Marketing Education and a secondary
teaching license through a joint program
offered by the Digital Media Department
and the School of Education. The
Business/Marketing Education curriculum
prepares students to teach information
technology, multimedia, business, and
marketing courses in the secondary
schools. Secondary education teaching
minors are also available in business
information technology, basic business,
and marketing.
BS in Business/Marketing
Education
124 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1
2
3
4
Minimum ACT scores.
GPA of 2.75 or higher.
A CAPP written exam.
An interview directed by the Secondary Teacher Education Selection and Retention Committee.
General Education Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
36 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
EDSC 3000
EDSC 3050
EDSP 3400
EDSC 4200
EDSC 4250
EDSC 4440
EDSC 4450
EDSC 4550
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
DGM 2360
DGM 2370
DGM 3870
DGM 3820
DGM 3850
ACC 2010
ACC 2020
LEGL 3000
MGMT 2200
ECON 2010
MGMT 3010
MGMT 3600
4.0
3.0
Elective Requirements:
Minimum ACT scores.
GPA of 2.75 or higher.
A CAPP written exam.
An interview directed by the Secondary Teacher Education Selection and Retention Committee.
5 Must be accepted into a Secondary Education major
program.
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
4.0
8.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of the 124 semester credit hours required in
the degree with at least 40 credit hours in upper-division courses.
2 Overall grade point average 2.75 or above with no
grade lower than a “B-” in discipline core and elective
courses.
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completing all
prerequisite courses.
NOTE: Students must pass a criminal background check at
the beginning of the junior year.
NOTE: Participation in PBL or DEX is highly recommended
for at least one semester since students will be involved with
these student organizations during their teaching career.
Footnotes:
* Courses requiring field experience.
** Students should teach at least one marketing course,
one business computer course, and one non-computer
business course during the student teaching experience.
3.0
3.0
Discipline Core Requirements:
• BMED 3700
3 Credits
Principles of Business/Marketing
Education*
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Basic Business Core
• Business Information Technology
• Marketing
3.0
21.0
20.0
18.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Overall grade point average 2.75 or above with no
grade lower than a B- in all discipline and specialty
core courses.
2 Students are responsible for completing all prerequisite
courses.
3 Fifty percent of the credits for the minor must be upperdivision courses.
Notes:
• Students must pass a criminal background check at the
beginning of the junior year.
• Participation in Phi Beta Lambda (PBL) or Delta Epsilon
Chi (DEX) is recommended for one semester.
• Students will teach at least one business (or marketing if
completing the Marketing emphasis) course during the
student teaching experience.
Footnotes:
*
3.0
6 Credits
Complete at least 6 credits from the following:
• MGMT 1060 Personal Finance (3.0)
• MGMT 3170 Entrepreneurship (3.0)
• MGMT 3660 Internet Marketing (3.0)
• MGMT 3650 Selling and Sales Management
(3.0)
21-24 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1
2
3
4
82 Credits
Development of the Adolescent
Student
Educational Psychology
Foundations of American Education
Exceptional Students *
Classroom Management I *
Classroom Management II
Content Area Reading and Writing
Multicultural Instruction/ESL *
Secondary Curriculum Instruction
and Assessment *
Student Teaching--Secondary
(4.0) *, **
Principles of Business/Marketing
Education *
Methods of Teaching Digital
Technology *
Methods of Teaching Business and
Marketing *
Business/Marketing Student Teaching Seminar
Basic Computer Applications
Web Essentials
Exploring Digital Communication
Tools (3.0)
Spreadsheet Applications
Database Applications
Web Graphics Applications
Presentation Applications
Desktop Publishing Skills
Financial Accounting
Managerial Accounting
Business Law
Business Communications
Microeconomics
Principles of Management
Principles of Marketing
Minor in
Business Education
Courses requiring field experience
Emphasis in
Basic Business Core
21 Credits
21 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
• BMED 4250
Methods of Teaching Business and
Marketing *
• ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
• LEGL 3000 Business Law
• Complete at least 12 credits from the following
courses
• ECON 2010 Microeconomics (3.0)
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics (3.0)
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications (3.0)
• MGMT 3010 Principles of Management (3.0)
• MGMT 3100 Principles of Finance (3.0)
• MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing (3.0)
3.0
3.0
3.0
12.0
Footnotes:
* Courses requiring field experience
Emphasis in Business
Information Technology
Emphasis Requirements:
• BMED 4200
• DGM 2120
• DGM 2230
•
•
•
•
DGM 2360
DGM 2370
DGM 3820
DGM 3850
20 Credits
20Credits
Methods of Teaching Digital
Technology *
Web Essentials
Exploring Digital Communication
Tools
Spreadsheet Applications
Database Applications
Presentation Applications
Desktop Publishing Skills
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Footnotes:
* Courses requiring field experience
Emphasis in Marketing
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
12 Credits
• BMED 4250
Methods of Teaching Business and
Marketing
• MGMT 3650 Selling and Sales Management
• MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing
• MGMT 3660 Internet Marketing
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6 Credits
Complete 6 credits from the following courses:
• MGMT 3170 Entrepreneurship (3.0)
• MGMT 3220 Retail Management (3.0)
• MGMT 3350 International Marketing (3.0)
• MGMT 3620 Consumer Behavior (3.0)
• MGMT 3670 Advertising and Promotion (3.0)
• HM 1010
Introduction to Hospitality Industry
(3.0)
• HM 3710
Marketing of Hospitality Services
(3.0)
For Economics Endorsement:
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics (3.0)
and ECON 2010 Microeconomics (3.0)
6.0
Footnotes:
* Courses requiring field experience
106
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Business/Marketing Education
Minor in Business
Information Technology
23 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
• DGM 2120
• DGM 2230
•
•
•
•
DGM 2360
DGM 2370
DGM 3820
DGM 3850
17 Credits
Web Essentials
Exploring Digital Communication
Tools (3.0)
Spreadsheet Applications
Database Applications
Presentation Applications
Desktop Publishing Skills
Elective Requirements:
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6 Credits
Select 6 credits from the following:
6.0
• DGM 3220 Digital Media Project Management (3.0)
• DGM 3870 Web Graphics Applications (3.0)
• DGM 4350 Information Workflow Management (3.0)
Graduation Requirements:
1 Overall grade point average of 2.5 GPA in all discipline
core and elective courses with no grade lower than a
C-.
2 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completing all
prerequisite courses.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă BMED, Business/Marketing Education
Ă DGM, Digital Media
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
107
Business Management
Business
Management
Department Chair: Douglas G.
Miller
Office: WB 203e
Telephone: 863-8859
Faculty:
Professor
Janice Gygi
Nolan Lickey
Douglas Miller
Duane Miller
Peter B. Robinson
Colleen Vawdrey
Associate Professor
Deborah Baird
Greg Berry
Charles Cozzens
Scott Hammond
Larry Hartman
Susan Madsen
Troy Nielson
Eugene Seeley
Karen Whelan-Berry
Assistant Professor
David N. McArthur
Harry Taute
Ramendra Thakur
Letty Workman
Lecturers
Dianne Powell
Marty Val Hill
School of Business
Dean: Stanley Earl Jenne, Ph.D.
Office: WB 128b
Telephone: 801-863-8239
Associate Dean: Janice Gygi
Office: WB 219
Telephone: 801-863-8863
Assistant Dean: Mikki O’Connor
Office: WB 129
Telephone: 801-863-8850
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
For those trained in business management
areas, many opportunities exist in private
industry, government, and entrepreneurship
fields. Possible occupational areas may
include: human resource supervision,
industrial management, communications,
marketing, and international business.
JOB OUTLOOK
Job demand is high, particularly in larger
metropolitan areas; and the employment
outlook is excellent.
108
PROGR AMS
Students majoring in business management
may receive a Certificate, an Associate in
Applied Science in Business Management,
an Associate in Science with a pre-major in
Business, or a Bachelor of Science Degree
with a specialization in one of the following
six areas: Entrepreneurship, Finance and
Banking, General Business, Hospitality
Management, International Business, or
Marketing. An Associate in Science School
of Business transfer degree is available for
students planning to transfer to another
college or university in Utah. (See the
School of Business section of the catalog
for details on the AS degree.)
Certificate in
Business Management
30 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
MGMT 1010
MGMT 1060
MGMT 2200
MGMT 2390
ACC 1150
ACC 2010
DGM 2010
ECON 1010
24 Credits
Introduction to Business
Personal Finance
Business Communications
Effective Business Presentations
Fundamentals of Business Math
Financial Accounting
Business Computer Proficiency*
Economics as a Social Science
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6 Credits
• Choose six credits of business electives from the
MGMT, ECON, ACC, DGM, BMED, HM, INFO,
or LEGL prefixes. A maximum of 3 credits may be
cooperative work experience.
6.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 30 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 or above with 2.5
GPA or above in Business courses. No grade below
“C-” in business courses.
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 10 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC with at least 12 credits of
School of Business courses.
Footnotes:
•
•
•
•
ECON 2020
MGMT 2200
MGMT 2390
MGMT 3010
Macroeconomics (3.0)
Business Communications (3.0)
Effective Business Presentations (3.0)
Principles of Management (3.0)
Elective Requirements:
9 Credits
• Complete any 9 credits numbered 1000 or higher
1 Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 or above with 2.5
GPA in Business courses. No grade below “C-” in
Business courses.
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC with at least 12 credits of
School of Business courses.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements. Students are responsible for completing
all prerequisite courses.
Footnotes:
* Students will be required to complete the Business
Computer Proficiency exam with a score of 80 percent
or higher on each module or complete the DGM 2010
course or DGM 201A-D modules as necessary with a
score of 80 percent or highter on each module.
AAS in Business
Management
65 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
AS Pre Major
in Business
General Education Requirements:
60 C REDITS
36 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
3.0
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
3.0
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
4.0
or An Advanced Placement (AP) Mathematics Test with a
score of 3 or higher
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
3.0
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
2.0
Distribution Courses
• Biology
3.0
• Physical Science
3.0
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
3.0
• Humanities Distribution
3.0
• Fine Arts Distribution
3.0
• Social/Behavioral Science (ECON 2020 will fulfill 3.0
this requirement)
Discipline Core Requirements:
15 Credits
Choose 15 credits from the following list:
• ACC 2010
Financial Accounting (3.0)
• DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
(3.0) *
• LEGL 3000 Business Law (3.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
15.0
17 Credits
• ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
• MAT 1010
Intermediate Algebra
• Any approved Humanities, Fine Arts, or Foreign
Language
• ECON 1010 Economics as a Social Science
• Any approved Biology of Physical Science course
• Any approved Physical Education, Health, Safety or
Environment course
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
or
•
•
•
•
•
•
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
30 Credits
ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
ACC 2020
Managerial Accounting
MGMT 1010 Introduction to Business
DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
Business Computer Proficiency Exam *
MGMT 1060 Personal Finance
MGMT 2200 Business Communications
MGMT 2390 Effective Business Presentations
MGMT 3010 Principles of Management
MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing
LEGL 3000 Business Law
Elective Requirements:
• Students will be required to complete the Business
Computer Proficiency exam with a score of 80 percent
or higher on each module or complete the DGM 2010
course or DGM 201A-D modules as necessary with a
score of 80 percent or highter on each module.
9.0
Graduation Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
18 Credits
• Any ACC, DGM, CJ, HM, INFO, MGMT, ECON
or LEGL course 1000 level or higher **
• General Education Electives (select from
Distribution List):
9.0
9.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 65 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above with
2.5 required for all School of Business courses. No
grade below C- in required courses.
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC with at least 12 credits of
School of Business courses.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
Footnotes:
* Students will be required to complete the Business
Computer Proficiency exam with a score of 80 percent
or higher on each module or complete the DGM 2010
course or DGM 201A-D modules as necessary with a
score of 80 percent or highter on each module.
** No more than three credits of MGMT 281R Cooperative
Work Experience will be allowed as business elective;
see advisor for further recommendations.
BS in Business
Management
123-124 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
36 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
3.0
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
3.0
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
4.0
or An Advanced Placement (AP) Mathematics Test with a
score of 3 or higher
Complete one of the following:
3.0
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
Utah Valley State
Business Management
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
• PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics* (fulfills Social/
Behavioral Science credit)
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
50 Credits
Business Foundation Courses:
• ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
• ACC 2020
Managerial Accounting
• Business Computer Proficiency Exam **
or DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
• MATH 1100 Introduction to Calculus
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications *
• ECON 2010 Microeconomics
• MGMT 2340 Business Statistics I
• MGMT 2390 Effective Business Presentations
Business Core Courses:
• INFO 3120 Principles of Information Systems--A
Managerial Approach
• LEGL 3000 Business Law
• MGMT 3010 Principles of Management
• MGMT 3100 Principles of Finance*
• MGMT 3450 Operations Management*
• MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing
• MGMT 3890 Career Preparation
• MGMT 4800 Strategic Management*
• MGMT 4830 Strategic Management Capstone
Simulation
• MGMT 493R Entrepreneurship Lecture Series (1.0)
or MGMT 495R Executive Lecture Series
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Entrepreneurship
• Finance and Banking
• General Business
• Hospitality Management
• International Business
• Marketing
Elective Requirements:
27.0
27.0
27.0
28.0
27.0
27.0
10 Credits
Select 10 credits of General Education courses
10.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 123 semester credits
required in the BS degree; at least 40 credit hours must
be upper-division courses.
2 Overall grade point average 2.0 or above with a
minimum of 2.5 GPA in all School of Business courses.
No grade lower than a “C-” in core and specialization
courses.
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 30 credit hours of
business courses through course attendance at UVSC,
with at least 10 hours earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements. Students are responsible for completing
all prerequisite courses.
NOTE: Students will be limited to 15 hours of upper-division
credit until MATRICULATION is completed.
Footnotes:
** Students will be required to complete the Business
Computer Proficiency exam with a score of 80 percent
or higher on each module or complete the DGM 2010
course or DGM 201A-D modules as necessary with a
score of 80 percent or higher on each module.
* Courses with an asterisk (*) cannot be taken until
student is matriculated.
Emphasis in
Entrepreneurship
Emphasis Requirements:
27 Credits
9 Credits
• MGMT 3170 Entrepreneurship
• MGMT 4300 Entrepreneurship Business Planning
• MGMT 4450 Entrepreneurship Enterprise
Formation
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
18 Credits
Complete 18 credits from the following courses:
• MGMT 3150 Financial Management
• MGMT 3430 Human Resource Management
• MGMT 3650 Selling and Sales Management
• MGMT 3670 Advertising and Promotion
• MGMT 4200 Opportunity Identification in
Entrepreneurship
• MGMT 4210 Entrepreneurship Personal
Development
• MGMT 4400 New Venture Financing
Emphasis in
Finance and Banking
Emphasis Requirements:
Utah Valley State
3.0
3.0
3.0
18.0
27 Credits
15 Credits
•
•
•
•
MGMT 3300
MGMT 3150
MGMT 3400
MGMT 4100
Survey of International Business
Financial Management
Investment Management
Management of Financial
Institutions
• ECON 3020 Intermediate Microeconomics
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
12 Credits
Select 12 credits from the following list:
12.0
• ECON 4150 Public Finance
• MGMT 4180 International Finance Management
• MGMT 4400 New Venture Financing
• Any Accounting Course Numbered 3010 or higher
Emphasis in General Business
Emphasis Requirements:
27 Credits
27 Credits
• MGMT 3300 Survey of International Business
• MGMT 3430 Human Resource Management
• Complete 21 credits of pre-approved upperdivision courses. See advisor for list of courses.
Emphasis in
Hospitality Management
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
MGMT 3300
MGMT 3200
HM 3020
HM 3390
HM 3640
HM 3710
HM 4550
HM 482R
28 Credits
28 Credits
Survey of International Business
Global Tourism
Hospitality Managerial Accounting
Hotel Operations II
Food and Beverage Controls
Marketing of Hospitality Services
Hospitality Industry Management
Internship
Emphasis in
International Business
Emphasis Requirements:
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
27 Credits
27 Credits
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
15.0
23 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
20 Credits
Business Core Courses:
• ACC 3000
Financial Managerial and Cost
Accounting Concepts
• INFO 3120 Principles of Information Systems--A
Managerial Approach
• LEGL 3000 Business Law
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics
• MGMT 3010 Principles of Management
• MGMT 495R Executive Lecture Series
or MGMT 493R Entrepreneurship Lecture Series (1.0)
Elective Requirements:
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Leadership
18 Credits
18 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
Leadership (Upper Division) Emphasis
Prerequisites:
• ACC 3000
Financial Managerial and Cost
Accounting Concepts (4.0)
or ACC 2010
Financial Accounting (3.0)
and ACC 2020
Managerial Accounting (3.0)
Complete the following:
• INFO 3120 Principles of Information Systems--A
Managerial Approach
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics
• MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior
• MGMT 3010 Principles of Management
• MGMT 3500 Leadership Process
• MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing
Note: A minimum of 2.5 GPA in all School of Business
course, and no grade lower than a C-, required for
graduation.
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in
Business Management
Emphasis Requirements:
15.0
• MGMT 3300 Survey of International Business
• MGMT 3350 International Marketing
• MGMT 4600 Marketing Research
• MGMT 4650 Strategic Marketing
Choose 15 credits from the following list:
• MGMT 3220 Retail Management
• MGMT 3620 Consumer Behavior
• MGMT 3630 Services Marketing
• MGMT 3650 Selling and Sales Management
• MGMT 3660 Internet Marketing
• MGMT 3670 Advertising and Promotion
• MGMT 481R Internship (Limit of 6 credits)
Minor in Business
Management
3.0
15 Credits
Complete 15 pre-approved elective credits. See
advisor for list of specific courses.
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
27 Credits
12 Credits
• MGMT 3320 Cross-Cultural Communications for
International Business
• MGMT 3350 International Marketing
• MGMT 4180 International Finance Management
• MGMT 4870 International Management
Emphasis in Marketing
3.0
3.0
21.0
* Courses with an asterisk (*) cannot be taken until
student is matriculated into a bachelor degree program.
18 Credits
18 Credits
Business Management Emphasis
Prerequisites:
• ACC 3000
Financial Managerial and Cost
Accounting Concepts (4.0)
or ACC 2010
Financial Accounting (3.0)
and ACC 2020
Managerial Accounting (3.0)
• DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
(3.0)
or Business Computer Proficiency Exam *
Complete the following:
• INFO 3120 Principles of Information Systems--A
Managerial Approach
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics
• MGMT 3010 Principles of Management
• MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing
Complete 6 credits from the following:
• LEGL 3000 Business Law (3.0)
• ECON 2010 Microeconomics (3.0)
• MGMT 3100 Principles of Finance (3.0)
• MGMT 3300 Survey of International Busness (3.0)
• MGMT 3430 Human Resource Management (3.0)
Note: A minimum of 2.5 GPA in all School of Business
courses, and no grade lower than a C-, required for
graduation.
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
Footnotes:
* Students will be required to complete the Business
Computer Proficiency exam with a score of 80 percent
or higher on each module or complete the DGM 2010
course or DGM 201A-D modules as necessary with a
score of 80 percent or highter on each module.
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3 Credits
Choose one of the following:
3.0
• MGMT 3100 Principles of Finance* (3.0)
• MGMT 3300 Survey of International Business (3.0)
• MGMT 3430 Human Resource Management (3.0)
• MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing (3.0)
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă HM, Hospitality Management
Ă MGMT, Business Management
Graduation Requirements:
1 Overall grade point average of 2.5 in all School of
Business courses and no grade lower than a C- in
business courses.
2 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
Note: Students are responsible for completing all
prerequisite courses. Not available to Business Management
majors.
Footnote:
Catalog 2007–2008
109
Cabinetry and Architectural Woodwork
Cabinetry and
Architectural
Woodwork
Department of Construction
Technologies
Applied Science degree, an Associate in
Science degree, or a Bachelor of Science
Degree in Technology Management.
•
•
•
•
Reminder: an overall grade point average
of 2.0 (C) or above is required for
graduation.
• CAW 1240
• CAW 1250
Certificate in Cabinetry and
Architectural Woodwork 29 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
Department Chair: Steve Fordham
Office: GT 601
Telephone: 801-863-8167
Program Coordinator: Kelly Baird
Office: GT 629
Telephone: 801-863-8860
Shop: GT 625
Faculty:
Associate Professor
Kelly Baird
Eldon Greenhalgh
Office Manager: Sandra Ozuna
Office: GT 613e
Telephone: 801-863-7405
Advisor: Amy Ostler
Telephone: 801-863-8138
Advisory Committee: Eric Fetzer, Fetzer’s,
Inc.; Jon Fondell, Fondell Woodworks; Ross
Ford, Highland Woodworks; Lon Purcell,
Cottonwood Mill & Cabinet; Duane Lundel,
American Stores Properties Mill; Russell
Ross, Riverhouse Design.
•
•
•
•
•
•
ACC 1150
CAW 1130
CAW 1140
CAW 1150
CAW 1170
CAW 1210
•
•
•
•
CAW 1240
CAW 2310
CAW 299R
EGDT 1040
29 Credits
Fundamentals of Business Math
Residential Cabinetry
Millworking and Safety Shop I
Design Drafting and Billing
Finish Technology
Cabinetmaking Materials and
Hardware
Millworking Shop II
Cabinetry Math
Skills USA
Computer Aided Drafting--AutoCAD
3.0
4.0
5.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
5.0
2.0
1.0
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 29 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 10 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Complete all courses with a minum grade of “C-” or
better.
Diploma in Cabinetry and
Architectural Woodwork 51 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
51 Credits
CAW 1130
CAW 1140
CAW 1150
CAW 1170
CAW 1210
Residential Cabinetry
Millworking and Safety Shop I
Design Drafting and Billing
Finish Technology
Cabinetmaking Materials and
Hardware
• CAW 1240
Millworking Shop II
• CAW 1250
Drafting and Computer Applications
for Cabinetmakers
• CAW 2300 Counter-top Technology
• CAW 2310
Cabinetry Math
• CAW 2340 Millworking Shop III
• CAW 2430 Commercial Cabinetry Technology
• CAW 2440 Millworking Shop IV
• CAW 2450
Machine Maintenance and Upkeep
• COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communication
• EGDT 1040 Computer Aided Drafting--AutoCAD
The following course is recommended, but optional:
• CAW 299R Skills USA (1.0)
4.0
5.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
5.0
4.0
5.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The highly skilled craftsperson in the
cabinetmaking field may find work in
factory production, set-up, milling,
assembling, and installing highlycustomized cabinetry in residences, banks,
department stores, and restaurants. Other
jobs may be found in furniture work, and
specialized facets of the industry. Selfemployment often follows short-term trade
experience.
PROGR AMS
Students may receive a One-Year
Certificate, a Diploma, an Associate in
1 Completion of a minimum of 51 or more semester
credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Complete all Technical Specialty courses with a minimum grade of “C-” or better.
AAS in Cabinetry and
Architectural Woodwork
110
66 C REDITS
16 Credits
3.0
Fundamentals of Business Math
3.0
Financial Managerial and Cost
Accounting Concepts (4.0)
HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS/FOREIGN LANGUAGE
• Any approved Humanities, Fine Arts, or Foreign
3.0
Language Distribution Course
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
• Any approved Social or Behavioral Science Distri- 3.0
bution course
BIOLOGY OR PHYSICAL SCIENCE
• Any approved Biology or Physical Science Distribu- 3.0
tion Course
PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH/SAFETY OR ENVIRONMENT
• Any approved Physical Education, Health, Safety or 1.0
Environment Course
• CAW 1130
• EGDT 1040
50 Credits
Residential Cabinetry
Catalog 2007–2008
4.0
5.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
5.0
4.0
5.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 66 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
5 Complete all core requirements with a minimum grade
of “C-” or better.
AS Pre Major in
Cabinetry and Architectural
Woodwork
63 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (recommended for Humanities
or Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (recommended for Social
Science majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
16 Credits
• Choose from CAW courses 1000 level or higher
Introduction to Writing
Career Writing for Technology (3.0)
Discipline Core Requirements:
CAW 2300
CAW 2310
CAW 2340
CAW 2430
CAW 2440
CAW 2450
CAW 299R
Millworking and Safety Shop I
Design Drafting and Billing
Finish Technology
Cabinetmaking Materials and
Hardware
Millworking Shop II
Drafting and Computer Applications
for Cabinetmakers
Counter-top Technology
Cabinetry Math
Millworking Shop III
Commercial Cabinetry Technology
Millworking Shop IV
Machine Maintenance and Upkeep
Skills USA (1 credit, repeat 2
times) (1.0)
Computer Aided Drafting--AutoCAD
Discipline Core Requirements:
General Education Requirements:
ENGLISH
• ENGL 1010
or ENGL 1060
MATHEMATICS
• ACC 1150
or ACC 3000
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CAW 1140
CAW 1150
CAW 1170
CAW 1210
Elective Requirements:
16.0
12 Credits
• Choose from courses 1000 level or higher
12.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 63 semester credits
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BS in Technology
Management
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the Technology Management section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in Cabinetry and
Architectural Woodwork
45 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
45 Credits
Complete 45 credits from the following:
45.0
• CAW 1130
Residential Cabinetry (4.0)
• CAW 1140
Millworking and Safety Shop I (5.0)
• CAW 1150
Design Drafting and Billing (3.0)
Utah Valley State
Cabinetry and Architectural Woodwork
• CAW 1170
• CAW 1210
• CAW 1240
• CAW 1250
•
•
•
•
•
CAW 2300
CAW 2310
CAW 2340
CAW 2440
CAW 2450
• CAW 2430
• CAW 299R
• EGDT 1040
Finish Technology (2.0)
Cabinetmaking Materials and
Hardware (1.0)
Millworking Shop II (5.0)
Drafting and Computer Applications
for Cabinetmakers (4.0)
Counter-top Technology (3.0)
Cabinetry Math (2.0)
Millworking Shop III (5.0)
Millworking Shop IV (5.0)
Machine Maintenance and Upkeep (2.0)
Commercial Cabinetry Technology (4.0)
Skills USA (1.0)
Computer Aided Drafting--AutoCAD (3.0)
Due to the technical nature of the material
in the CAW courses, additional reading and
math instruction may be required. More
information will be given during advisement.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă ACRT, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
Technology
Ă BCCM, Building Construction and
Construction Management
Ă BIT, Building Inspection Technology
Ă CAW, Cabinetry and Architectural
Woodworking
Ă FAC, Facilities Management
Ă LINE, Lineman Technology
Ă WELD, Welding Technology
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
111
Chemistry
Chemistry
Department Chair: Dee E. Oyler
Office: PS 221
Telephone: 801-863-8638
E-mail: oylerde@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Karli Grover
Office: PS 212a
Telephone: 801-863-8616
E-mail: groverka@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Calvin Bond
Office: PS 219
Telephone: 801-863-7137
E-mail: bondca@uvsc.edu
Advisor, Pre-Health Professions: James
Holmes
Office: PS 202b
Telephone: 801-863-7207
E-mail: holmesja@uvsc.edu
Faculty:
Professor
Dee E. Oyler
Associate Professor
Gamini Gunawardena
Assistant Professor
Calvin Bond
Fern Caka
Matthew Horn
Craig Thulin
Bruce Wilson
Staff:
Administrative Assistant
Kellie D. Hancock
Lab Facilities Manager
Tom Strangfeld
Lab Manager/Instructor
Bill Vorkink
Organic Lab Manager
Fran Billington
School of Science and Health
Dean: Sam Rushforth
Office: PS 201a
Telephone: 801-863-8980
Associate Dean: Bill Evenson
Office: PS 201e
Telephone: 801-863-6440
Assistant Dean: Lori Barber
Office: BA 205c
Telephone: 801-863-8380
Assistant Dean: Louise Illes
Office: PS 201d
Telephone: 801-863-6040
Assistant Dean: David Jordan
Office: PS 201c
112
Telephone: 801-863-7160
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates with a bachelor degree in
chemistry will be prepared to work in
industry or pursue a graduate degree
in chemistry. Current employment
opportunities for graduates in Chemistry
programs are good.
CHEM 2310
CHEM 2315
CHEM 2320
CHEM 2325
CHEM 3000
CHEM 3100
CHEM 3600
CHEM 3605
CHEM 4000
CHEM 4005
MATH 1220
PHYS 2210
• PHYS 2220
Graduates with a bachelor degree in
Chemistry and Physics Education will
be prepared to teach chemistry and
physics in junior and senior high. Current
employment opportunities for graduates
from Chemistry and Physics Education
programs are excellent.
PROGR AMS
Students may receive:
• Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with an
Emphasis in Forensic Chemistry
• Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with an
Emphasis in Professional Chemistry
• Bachelor of Science in Chemistry and
Physics Education
• PHYS 2215
• PHYS 2225
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
Analytical Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry
Biological Chemistry
Biochemistry Laboratory
Instrumental Analysis
Instrumental Analysis Laboratory
Calculus II
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
I
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
II
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
I Lab
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
II Lab
Complete one of the following:
• Forensic Chemistry
• Professional Chemistry
PROGR AMS
BS in Chemistry
123-124 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2020
41 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
• MATH 1210 Calculus I
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses:
• Biology
or BIOL 1610
College Biology I (Required for
Forensic Chemistry) (4.0)
• CHEM 1210 Principles of Chemistry I
• CHEM 1215 Principles of Chemistry I
Laboratory
• CHEM 1220 Principles of Chemistry II
• CHEM 1225 Principles of Chemistry II
Laboratory
• Fine Arts
Complete one of the following sets of distribution
courses, dependant on your choice of emphasis:
For the Professional Chemistry Emphasis:
• Humanities
• Social/Behavioral Science
For the Forensic Chemistry Emphasis:
• COMM
Public Speaking (3.0)
1020
• CJ 1010
Introduction to Criminal Justice
(3.0)
Discipline Core Requirements:
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
5.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
3.0
6.0
1.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 123 semester credits with
a minimum of 40 upper-division credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above with a
minimum of 2.25 in Major.
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
5 A minimum of 54 credit hours must be in the major with
a minimum of 20 credits taken at UVSC. A minimum of
28 chemistry credits must be upper-division.
6 Complete all chemistry and physics courses with a
minimum grade of “C-” or better.
41 Credits
32 Credits
• BIOL 1615
College Biology I Laboratory
• CHEM 3090 Physical Chemistry Applications in
Biology
• CHEM 3700 Forensic Chemistry
• MATH 2040 Principles of Statistics
Forensic Requirements:
• CHEM 482R Chemistry Internship
• CJ 1330
Criminal Law
• CJ 1340
Criminal Investigations
• CJ 1350
Introduction to Forensic Science
• CJ 135L
Introduction to Forensic Science
Laboratory
• CJ 2350
Laws of Evidence
• CJ 3880
Professional Practices for the
Forensic Scientist
Complete one of the following:
• BIOL 2500 Environmental Biology (3.0)
• BIOL 3650
Biotechnology (2.0)
• MICR 2060 Microbiology for Health Professions
(4.0)
• ZOOL 2320 Human Anatomy (4.0)
• ZOOL 2420 Human Physiology (4.0)
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
1.0
41.0
42.0
Emphasis Requirements:
A student who wants to pursue a chemistry
major should meet with the department
chair or chemistry advisor for advisement.
4.0
Emphasis:
Emphasis in Forensic
Chemistry
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
4.0
3.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
5.0
4.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
9 Credits
Complete 9 credits from the following:
9.0
• BIOL 3400 Cell Biology (3.0)
• BIOL 3500 Genetics (3.0)
• BIOL 3550
Molecular Biology (3.0)
• BIOL 4450
Immunology (3.0)
• MICR 3450 General Microbiology (4.0)
• GEO 3400 Forensic Geology (4.0)
• CJ 3500
Footwear Impression Evidence (3.0)
• CJ 3520
Tire Imprint Evidence (3.0)
• CJ 3540
Forensic Trace Analysis I (3.0)
• CJ 3550
Forensic Trace Analysis II (3.0)
• CJ 3700
Fingerprint Examination I (3.0)
• CJ 3720
Fingerprint Examination II (3.0)
• CJ 3740
Fingerprint Examination III (3.0)
• CJ 3780
Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (3.0)
• CJ 3800
Computer Forensics and Cyber
Crime (3.0)
• CJ 3820
Crime Scene Investigation
Techniques I (3.0)
• CJ 382L
Crime Scene Investigation
Techniques Laboratory I (1.0)
• CJ 3850
Marijuana Identification Certificate
(3.0)
• CJ 3860
Forensic Microscopy (3.0)
• CJ 4400
Forensic Chemist (3.0)
• Or other Courses in consultation with the Department
Academic Advisor
41 Credits
Utah Valley State
Chemistry
Emphasis in Professional
Chemistry
Emphasis Requirements:
42 Credits
33 Credits
• CHEM 3060 Physical Chemistry I
4.0
• CHEM 3070 Physical Chemistry II
4.0
• CHEM 3115 Physical and Inorganic Chemistry
1.0
Laboratory
• MATH 2210 Calculus III
3.0
• MATH 2270 Linear Algebra
3.0
• MATH 2280 Ordinary Differential Equations
3.0
• MATH 3400 Partial Differential Equations
3.0
Complete 12 credits of upper-division CHEM courses 12.0
not previously taken, with the exception of CHEM
3090. With departmental approval, up to 6 credits of
upper-division courses in BIOL, GEO, MATH, or PHYS
may be substituted.
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
9 Credits
• Any courses 1000 or higher
BS in Chemistry/Physics
Education
• CHEM 3060
• CHEM 3100
• PHYS 3050
PHYSICS:
• PHYS 3210
Introduction to Experimental Physics
I (2.0)
• PHYS 490R Seminar* (0.5)
Complete 9 credits from the following:
• PHYS 3050 Astrophysics (3.0)
• PHYS 3230 Principles of Electronics for the
Physical Sciences (3.0)
• PHYS 3300 Mathematical Physics (3.0)
• PHYS 3400 Classical Mechanics (3.0)
• PHYS 3500 Thermodynamics (3.0)
• PHYS 3800 Energy use on Earth (3.0)
• PHYS 4700 Acoustics (3.0)
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 124 semester credits with
a minimum of 40 upper-division credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above with a
minimum of 2.25 in Major.
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
5 A minimum of 52 credit hours must be in the major with
a minimum of 20 credits taken at UVSC. A minimum of
24 chemistry and physics credits must be upper-division.
6 Complete all chemistry and physics courses with a
minimum grade of “C-” or better.
9.0
124 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Students are admitted directly to the Baccalaureate
degree program in Chemistry and Physics Education
upon acceptance to the Secondary Education Program.
2 Students must obtain the departmental Advisor’s
signature on an approved program plan prior to
enrollment in their second semester of study.
3 Students must select between chemistry and physics
emphases upon matriculation.
General Education Requirements:
41 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2020
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
• MATH 1210 Calculus I
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government 3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses:
• Biology
• CHEM 1210 Principles of Chemistry I
• CHEM 1215 Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory
• CHEM 1220 Principles of Chemistry II
• CHEM 1225 Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory
• Humanities
• Fine Arts
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CHEM 2310
CHEM 2320
CHEM 2315
CHEM 2325
CHEM 3000
CHEM 4200
HIST 4320
MATH 1220
MATH 2210
PHYS 2210
PHYS 2215
5.0
3.0
Footnotes:
*
Must be repeated two times.
Minor in Chemistry
27 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
83 Credits
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
Analytical Chemistry
Teaching Methods in Science
History of Scientific Thought
Calculus II
Calculus III
Physics for Scientists and Engineers I
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
I Lab
• PHYS 2220 Physics for Scientists and Engineers
II
• PHYS 2225 Physics for Scientists and Engineers
II Lab
• PHYS 3010 Physics Experiments for Secondary
Education
• PHYS 3740
Modern Physics
Education Courses:
• EDSC 2540 Development of the Adolescent
Student
• EDSC 3000 Educational Psychology
• EDSC 3050 Foundations of American Education
• EDSC 3250 Instructional Media
• EDSC 4200 Classroom Management I
• EDSC 4250 Classroom Management II
• EDSC 4440 Content Area Reading and Writing
• EDSC 4450 Multicultural Instruction/ESL
• EDSC 4550 Secondary Curriculum Instruction
and Assessment
• EDSC 4850 Student Teaching--Secondary (4.0)
• EDSP 3400 Exceptional Students
Complete one of the following sets:
CHEMISTRY:
Utah Valley State
3.0
3.0
Physical Chemistry I (4.0)
Inorganic Chemistry (4.0)
Astrophysics (3.0)
4.0
4.0
1.0
1.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
5.0
3.0
4.0
1.0
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CHEM 1210
CHEM 1220
CHEM 1215
CHEM 1225
CHEM 2310
CHEM 2320
CHEM 2315
CHEM 2325
CHEM 3000
24 Credits
Principles of Chemistry I
Principles of Chemistry II
Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory
Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
Analytical Chemistry
Elective Requirements:
4.0
4.0
1.0
1.0
4.0
4.0
1.0
1.0
4.0
3 Credits
• Any upper-division chemistry class numbered
above 3000 with a minimum of 3 credit hours
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Complete all courses with a minimum grade of “C-”
or better.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă CHEM, Chemistry
4.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
4.0
8.0
2.0
11.0
Catalog 2007–2008
113
College Success Studies
College
Success Studies
Department of College Success
Studies
Department Chair: Denise Hodgkin
Office: LC 208
Telephone: 801-863-8277
Assistant Chair: Marni Sanft
Office: LC 211
Telephone: 801-863-6183
Academic Director, Center for
Student Success: Michael A. Jensen
Office: LC 210
Telephone: 801-863-7090
Assistant Director, UV Mentors:
Marinda Ashman
Office: TBA
Telephone: 801-863-7227
Faculty:
Professor
Elaine C. Carter
Associate Professor
Eldon L. McMurray
Stacy D. Waddoups
Assistant Professor
Marinda Ashman
Michael A. Jensen
Denise Hodgkin
Marni Sanft
Advisor, Career and Academic
Counseling Office:
Office: WB 147
Telephone: 801-863-8425
Department Assistant:
Cindy Behunin
Office: LA 207a
Telephone: 801-863-8834
ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES
The department mission is to guide
students to increase self-awareness,
develop confidence in their ability to think
and read critically, and study effectively. In
partnership with Student Life and Student
Services, the department provides support
to students during their transition into the
UVSC community and assists students in
their discovery of a major and a career
path for their college experience and
beyond. Students may choose from a
variety of College Success and Critical
Thinking and Reading Strategies courses
which best fit their academic needs. The
College Success courses better prepare
students for the demands of college life,
the selection and pursuit of major and
career paths to graduation, development
of effective ways to manage time, learning,
and stress, library research techniques,
and the development of other essential life
skills. The Critical Thinking and Reading
Strategies courses teach students to
effectively process, reduce, and remember
the essentials from college courses and
texts. Also presented are test taking and
memory skills, speed reading techniques,
and other learning strategies which
help students increase their academic
confidence and success.
OTHER SERVICES
Learning Strategist: Gary Sauter
Office: LA 221p
Telephone: 801-863-7418
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă CLSS, College Success Studies
School of General Academics
Dean: Bonnie G. Henrie
Office: LA 210c
Telephone: 801-863-8311
Associate Dean: K.D. Taylor
Office: LA 210e
Telephone: 801-863-8949
Assistant Dean: Lisa Lambert
Office: LA 210d
Telephone: 801-863-8741
Administrative Assistant: Frankie
Jensen
Office: LA 210
Telephone: 801-863-6312
114
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Collision Repair Technology
Collision
Repair
Technology
Department Chair: Don Wilson
Office: SA 325
Telephone: 801-863-8124
Faculty:
Associate Professor
Don Wilson
Cris Boggess
Assistant Professor
Vern Hiatt
Advisor: Carrie Peterson
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-7454
Office Manager: Katreena Davis
Office: SA 325
Telephone: 801-863-8349
Advisory Committee: Dave Adams, David
Adams Classic Auto Repair; Russel Nichols,
Cascade Collision; Sergio Martin, Martins
Collision Repair; Kevin Payne, State Farm;
Steve Young, PPG Representative.
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The collision repair industry offers a wide
variety of career paths. The industry
offers positions in auto body repair, PBE
(paint, body, and equipment) sales and
training, manufacturer representation,
insurance businesses, jobber sales, and
instructor training. Graduates may choose
a career emphasis in: refinishing, surface
preparation, estimating, management,
quality control, production, structural
repair, damage analysis, glass installation,
panel fabrication, customization,
nonstructural repair, sales, and instruction.
Reminder: An overall grade point average
of 2.0 (C) or above is required for
graduation.
Discipline Core Requirements:
Certificate in Collision
Repair Technology
30 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
30 Credits
Complete the following:
• AUT 1260
Tech Math for Mechanics
• CLSS 1000 Student Success (3.0)
or ENGL 106A Career Writing for Technology--A
• CRT 1110
Surface Preparation
• CRT 1120
Nonstructural Repair
• CRT 1130
Overall Refinishing and Problem
Solving
• CRT 1210
Blending Tinting and Detailing
• CRT 1220
Panel Replacement and Adjustment
• CRT 1230
Welding and Cutting
• Social/Behavioral Science
Four options are available: a One-Year
Certificate, a Diploma, the Associate in
Applied Science Degree, and the Bachelor
of Science in Technology Management
Degree. See graduation requirements in
the catalog for further definitions.
Utah Valley State
3.0
2.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
1.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
Note: Cooperative Education courses may be used in place
of some of the laboratory or shop classes for completion of
diploma requirements.
Diploma in Collision
Repair Technology
54 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
30 Credits
Complete the following:
• AUT 1260
Tech Math for Mechanics
3.0
• CLSS 1000 Student Success (3.0)
or ENGL 106A Career Writing for Technology--A
2.0
• CRT 1110
Surface Preparation
4.0
• CRT 1120
Nonstructural Repair
4.0
4.0
• CRT 1130
Overall Refinishing and Problem
Solving
• CRT 1210
Blending Tinting and Detailing
4.0
• CRT 1220
Panel Replacement and Adjustment 4.0
• CRT 1230
Welding and Cutting
4.0
• Social/Behavioral Science
1.0
• CRT 281R
Cooperative Work Experience* (1.0)
• CRT 285R
Cooperative Correlated Class* (1.0)
• CRT 299R
VICA (optional) (1.0)
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Collision Repair
24.0
• Street Rod
24.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
NOTE: *Cooperative Education courses may be used in
place of some of the laboratory or shop classes for completion of diploma requirements. Approval of the program
coordinator must be secured before class enrollment.
Emphasis in Collision Repair
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
CRT 2310
CRT 2320
CRT 2330
CRT 2410
CRT 2420
CRT 2430
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
CRT 2510
CRT 2520
CRT 2530
CRT 2610
24 Credits
24 Credits
Collision Damage Reporting
Structural Damage Analysis
Structural Repair
Full and Partial Panel Replacement
Plastic Repair
Mechanical and Electrical Repair
Emphasis in Street Rod
• CRT 2620
• CRT 2630
PROGR AMS
• Any approved Biology or Physical Science Distribu- 3.0
tion Course
• Any approved Physical Education, Health, Safety or 1.0
Environment Course
24 Credits
24 Credits
Custom Welding
Customizing
Panel Fabrication
Top Chopping Sectioning and
Channeling
Frames
Detailing and Custom Painting
AAS in Collision
Repair Technology
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
• ENGL 1060
16 Credits
Career Writing for Technology (or
higher)
• AUT 1260
Tech Math for Mechanics
• Any approved Humanities, Fine Arts, or Foreign
Language Distribution Course
• Any approved Behavioral Science, Social, or Political Science Distribution Course
Catalog 2007–2008
Graduation Requirements
1 Completion of a minimum of 64 semester credits
2 Overall gradepoint average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA).
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specifeid departmental requirements.
Footnotes:
* Cooperative Education courses may be used in place of
some of the laboratory or shop classes for completion
of AAS requirements. Approval of the program coordinator must be secured before class enrollment.
Emphasis in Collision Repair
24 Credits
24 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
CRT 2310
CRT 2320
CRT 2330
CRT 2410
CRT 2420
CRT 2430
Collision Damage Reporting
Structural Damage Analysis
Structural Repair
Full and Partial Panel Replacement
Plastic Repair
Mechanical and Electrical Repair
Emphasis in Street Rod
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
24 Credits
24 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
Complete the following:
• CRT 2510
Custom Welding
• CRT 2520
Customizing
• CRT 2530
Panel Fabrication
• CRT 2610
Top Chopping Sectioning and
Channeling
• CRT 2620
Frames
• CRT 2630
Detailing and Custom Painting
BS in Technology
Management
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the Technology Management section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in
Collision Repair Technology
Emphasis Requirements:
• CRT 1120
• CRT 1130
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CRT 1210
CRT 1220
CRT 1230
CRT 2310
CRT 2320
CRT 2330
CRT 2410
CRT 2420
CRT 2430
CRT 299R
45 Credits
45 Credits
Nonstructural Repair
Overall Refinishing and Problem
Solving
Blending Tinting and Detailing
Panel Replacement and Adjustment
Welding and Cutting
Collision Damage Reporting
Structural Damage Analysis
Structural Repair
Full and Partial Panel Replacement
Plastic Repair
Mechanical and Electrical Repair
VICA
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
4.0
64 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
24 Credits
Complete the following:
• CRT 1110
Surface Preparation
4.0
• CRT 1120
Nonstructural Repair
4.0
• CRT 1130
Overall Refinishing and Problem
4.0
Solving
• CRT 1210
Blending Tinting and Detailing
4.0
• CRT 1220
Panel Replacement and Adjustment 4.0
• CRT 1230
Welding and Cutting
4.0
• CRT 281R
Cooperative Work Experience* (1.0)
• CRT 285R
Cooperative Correlated Class* (1.0)
• CRT 299R
VICA (optional) (1.0)
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Collision Repair
24.0
• Street Rod
24.0
Due to the technical nature of the material
in the CRT courses, additional reading and
math instruction may be required. More
information will be given during advisement.
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Recommended Collision Repair Course
The following course is recommended for students who
would like to learn basic skills in the collision industry, while
working on their own vehicle.
• CRT 100R
Paint Your Own Car
2.0
115
Collision Repair Technology
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă AUT, Automotive Technology
Ă CRT, Collision Repair Technology
Ă DMT, Diesel Mechanics Technology
116
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Committee on Interdisciplinary Studies
Committee on
Interdisciplinary
Studies
Committee Chair: Jans. B. Wager
Office: LA 114j
Telephone: 801-863-8340
E-mail: wagerja@uvsc.edu
Faculty Committee:
Professor
Scott Abbott
Kathie Debenham
Associate Professor
Brian Birch
Robert Cousins
Bryan Eldredge
Philip Gordon
David R. Keller
David Knowlton
Jans B. Wager
Assistant Professor
John Goshert
Michael Minch
Shannon Mussett
Michael Shaw
Jeff Torlina
David Wilson
Honors Program Director
Joy Ross
School of General Academics
Dean: Bonnie Henrie
Office: LA 210
Telephone: 801-863-8311
The Committee on Interdisciplinary Studies
provides a framework for supporting
innovative, boundary-crossing inquiry
among students and faculty across campus.
To this end the Committee coordinates
the efforts of existing multidisciplinary
programs and provides guidance and
support as new programs are envisioned
and established.
The boundaries between disciplines form
a fertile ground for creative and innovative
research. New knowledge grows in these
developing and interstitial fields that
often does not fit easily into the standard
demarcations of academic departments.
While the disciplines have their role to play,
future scholarship will depend in part on
shifting configurations of resources. This
type of scholarship asks questions that
draw on established bodies of thought
while reworking certain connections and
concerns in order to explore vibrant and
valuable new areas.
Utah Valley State
AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES
Committee Chair: David R. Wilson
Office: LA 012t
Telephone: 801-863-6916
Email: wilsondr@uvsc.edu
Faculty Committee:
Professor
Laurelyn Whitt
Associate Professor
David Knowlton
Jan Wellington
Assistant Professor
David R. Wilson
Lecturer
Ken Sekaquaptewa
Minor in American Indian
Studies
18 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
18 Credits
Complete four of the following:
12.0
• ANTH 1800 Introduction to American Indian
Studies (3.0)
or HIST 1800
Introduction to American Indian
Studies (3.0)
• ANTH 360R People and Cultures of the World
(American Indians) (3.0)
• ENGL 373R Literature of Cultures and Places
(Native American) (3.0)
• HIST 3810
American Indians to 1815 (3.0)
• HIST 3830
The Contest for Territory—American
Indians and the US 1815-1891 (3.0)
• HIST 3850
The Struggle for Self-determination
—American Indians 1891-present (3.0)
• HIST 4600
Contemporary American Indian
Political and Social Issues (3.0)
• HIST 420R
Issues and Topics in Global History (European First Contacts with
Indigenous Peoples) (3.0)
• POLS 3590
American Indian Law and Tribal
Government (3.0)
6.0
Complete two of the following:
• ANTH 3100 Anthropology of Gender and
Sexuality (3.0)
• ANTH 3130 Gender and Biomedicine (3.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
ANTH 3150
HLTH 3150
ANTH 3300
ANTH 3400
ANTH 3550
ANTH 3450
•
or
•
•
or
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ANTH 3700
PSY 3700
ANTH 3720
ANTH 4010
SOC 4010
ANTH 4150
ANTH 4160
ANTH 4180
ANTH 475R
ARCH 1100
HLTH 2600
HLTH 3200
HLTH 4150
• HLTH 4600
The American Indian Studies minor
will provide students with academic
experiences, skills, and strategies to
understand the scope of American
indigenous communities within scholarly
and applied contexts. After completion
of the minor, graduates will have
received an academic background
that will prepare them for relevant
employment in tribal governments and
other Indian organizations, state or
federal agencies which serve Indian
tribes and organizations, and private
sector enterprises that work with Indian
tribes and organizations. Graduates will
have received the basic knowledge and
analytical skills to enable them to pursue
graduate degrees in fields related to
American Indian Studies. The American
Indian Studies minor will emphasize the
traditional acquisition of knowledge
and skills that apply to American Indian
communities, a vital sense of service to
these communities, and an enthusiastic
pursuit of what these communities can
contribute to the academy in knowledge,
methods, and ethics.
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
or
•
•
•
•
•
•
or
•
SOC 3000
SOC 3010
PSY 3010
SOC 3020
or PSY 3020
• SOC 3100
•
•
•
or
•
SOC 3200
SOC 3700
SOC 4020
PSY 4020
SOC 4030
or PSY 4030
Culture Ecology and Health (3.0)
Culture Ecology and Health (3.0)
Development and Rural Societies (3.0)
Myth Magic and Religion (3.0)
Memory and History (3.0)
Shamanism and Indigenous Religion
(3.0)
Psychological Anthropology (3.0)
Psychological Anthropology (3.0)
Applied Anthropology (3.0)
Qualitative Research Design (3.0)
Qualitative Research Design (3.0)
Contemporary Theory and Debates (3.0)
History of Anthropological Thought (3.0)
Power Economy and People (3.0)
Current Topics in Anthropology (3.0)
Introduction to Archaeology (3.0)
Drugs Behavior and Society (3.0)
Principles of Community Health (3.0)
Community Health Program Development and Evaluation (3.0)
Research Methods for Community
Health (3.0)
Contemporary Social Theory (3.0)
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (4.0)
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (4.0)
Research Methods for the Behavioral
Sciences (3.0)
Research Methods for the Behavioral
Sciences (3.0)
Population Society and Demography
(3.0)
Race and Minority Relations (3.0)
Social Inequality (3.0)
Survey Research Design (3.0)
Survey Research Design (3.0)
Introduction to Program Evaluation
and Grant Writing (3.0)
Introduction to Program Evaluation
and Grant Writing (3.0)
Graduation Requirements:
1 Overall GPA of 2.0 or above.
2 Residency hours--minimum of 12 credits counting
towards the minor through attendance at UVSC.
AMERICAN STUDIES
Committee Chair: Robert Cousins
Office: LA 126e
Telephone: 801-863-8571
Faculty Committee:
Professor
Robert Robbins
Associate Professor
Lyn Bennett
Robert Cousins
Philip Gordon
Christa Albrecht-Crane
American Studies is an interdisciplinary
approach to the study of American cultures.
Through examination of historical,
religious, and literary texts, political
institutions, popular culture, film, art,
and the physical landscape, students will
explore how Americans create meaning in
their lives and make sense of the world in
which they live. By encouraging students to
approach the knowledge and skills they are
mastering as part of their major from the
perspective of other disciplines, American
Studies courses will foster deeper critical
thinking and broader contextualization.
Thus an American Studies minor will offer
students a strong complement to a wide
variety of majors—an additional course
of study that will help them to balance
the focus of a traditional discipline
117
Committee on Interdisciplinary Studies
with the fresh insights and breadth of
interdisciplinary approaches.
Minor in American
Studies
Minor in Deaf Studies 21 Credits
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Declaration of a major in a bachelor degree program
at UVSC
2 Completion of ASL 2020 or equivalent
21 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Completion of 30 hours of credit.
2 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
• AMST 2000
• AMST 300R
• INST 4900
12 Credits
Introduction to American Studies
Topics in American Studies (3
credits, must be repeated) (3.0)
Interdisciplinary Studies Capstone
Elective Requirements:
3.0
6.0
3.0
9 Credits
• Complete nine hours of advisor-approved
electives. Elective courses should reflect a specific
topical or thematic focus and must be approved by
an American Studies advisor.
9.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Overall GPA of 2.0 or above.
2 Residency hours--minimum of 12 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
21 Credits
Complete the following:
9.0
• ASL 3050
Advanced American Sign Language (3.0)
and ASL 3530
Deaf Culture from 1970 (3.0)
and ASL 3610
ASL Literature (3.0)
3.0
Complete 3 credits from the following:
• ASL 3510
Deaf Culture to 1817 (3.0)
or ASL 3520
Deaf Culture 1817 to 1970 (3.0)
or ASL 4410
ASL Linguistics (3.0)
9.0
Complete 9 credits from the following:
• ASL 3310
Interpreting I (3.0)
• ASL 3330
Cross-Cultural Communication and
Interpreting (3.0)
• ASL 3350
Consecutive Interpreting (3.0)
• ASL 3360
Simultaneous Interpreting (3.0)
• ASL 3510
Deaf Culture to 1817 (3.0)
• ASL 3520
Deaf Culture 1817 to 1970 (3.0)
• ASL 3800
ASL Deaf Culture Studies (3.0)
• ASL 4410
ASL Linguistics (3.0)
• LANG 3000 Language and Culture (3.0)
or ANTH 3000 Language and Culture (3.0)
Graduation Requirements:
DEAF STUDIES
Committee Chair: Bryan Eldredge
Office: LA 003j
Telephone: 801-863-8529 voice/
videophone
1 Overall GPA of 2.0 or above.
2 Residency hours--minimum of 12 credits counting
towards the minor through attendance at UVSC.
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
Committee Chair: David R. Keller
Committee Member:
Associate Professor
Minnie Mae Wilding-Diaz
Office: LA 109b
Telephone: 801-863-6363
Website: www.environmentalstudies.cc
Email: enst@uvsc.edu
and the complex interplay between natural
and social systems, from local to global
scales. Since humans are integral parts
of ecological systems, an understanding
of the biosphere must include studies in
both the humanities and natural science.
Knowledge of the structure and function
of natural systems is crucial, as well as an
understanding of the ways culture affects
the way we perceive nature. In this way,
Environmental Studies is built upon the
liberal arts.
A Minor in Environmental Studies is
useful for students seeking academic or
professional paths in public policy on
the environment. Hundreds of thousands
of environmental professionals work for
government agencies at local, state, and
federal levels. Tens of thousands of jobs
become annually available in both the
public and private sectors.
An emphasis in Environmental Studies is
also available. See Integrated Studies for
details.
Minor in
Environmental Studies
18 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Completion of 30 hours of credit
2 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
9 Credits
• ENST 3000
Deaf Studies is an interdisciplinary field that
draws on work from a variety of academic
disciplines including anthropology, history,
linguistics, interpretation and translation,
education, psychology, sociology, public
administration, political science, social
work, philosophy, ethics, art, literature, and
American Sign Language (ASL) instruction.
Students will examine elements of what
culturally-Deaf people in America have
traditionally called “the Deaf-World”
with special attention to the framework
of meaning from within which culturallyDeaf people interpret what it means to
be Deaf. The interdisciplinary nature of
Deaf Studies courses challenges students
to approach cultural descriptions critically.
The Deaf Studies minor offers students a
strong complement to a wide variety of
majors. Students who earn this minor will
find increased employability in a range of
professions.
The minor in Deaf Studies provides
students with a historical, cultural, and
linguistic foundation. From this foundation
the minor prepares students to become
certified interpreters, to become ASL and
Deaf studies teachers, to pursue graduate
work in deaf education and a variety of
other disciplines, and to engage in any
number of professional fields related to
deafness.
Faculty Committee:
Professor
Elaine Englehardt
Lowell Glenn
Larry Harper
Jim Harris
Paul Tayler
Associate Professor
Lyn Bennett
Eddy Cadet
Kathryn French
Phil Gordon
Laura Hamblin
Daniel Horns
Faridul Islam
David R. Keller
Jan Wellington
Assistant Professor
Joel Bradford
Bill Dinklage
Scott Hatch
Michael Minch
Jon Moore
Daniel A. Stephen
Jeff Torlina
Environmental Studies is premised on the
idea that nature and culture are inextricably
linked. Nature provides the context in which
“culture” is constructed, and culture acts
as a lens through which humans define
“nature.”
Elective Requirements:
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
3.0
9 Credits
Complete 3 of the following courses of 3 different
prefixes. Not all 3 courses may come from the same
School:
School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences
• COMM 3130 The Culture of Nature and Technology (3.0)
• GEOG 3010 Economic Geography (3.0)
• HIST 3260
History of Utah (3.0)
• HIST 3420
History of Technology (3.0)
• HIST 3800
Environmental History of the United
States (3.0)
or GEOG 3800 Environmental History of the United
States (3.0)
• PHIL 3530
Environmental Ethics (3.0)
• POLS 1800 Our Global Community (3.0)
• SOC 3450
Environmental Sociology (3.0)
• Any other advisor approved courses
School of Science and Health
• BIOL 1010
General Biology (3.0)
• BIOL 2500 Environmental Biology (3.0)
• BIOL 3800 Conservation Biology (3.0)
• BIOL 4500
Principles of Evolution (3.0)
• ENVT 3280 Environmental Law (3.0)
• ENVT 3850 Environmental Policy (3.0)
• GEO 3210
Environmental Geology (4.0)
• Any other advisor approved courses
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
9.0
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in
Environmental Studies
•
or
•
or
ANTH 3150
PHIL 3530
METO 1010
BIOL 2500
18 Credits
Culture Ecology and Health
Environmental Ethics (3.0)
Introduction to Meteorology
Environmental Biology (3.0)
Elective Requirements:
Environmental Studies challenges students
to examine both the ecological and social
underpinnings of environmental issues
118
Introduction to Environmental
Studies
• ANTH 3150 Culture Ecology and Health
or HLTH 3150 Culture Ecology and Health (3.0)
• METO 3100 Earth Systems
3.0
3.0
9 Credits
Complete 3 of the following courses of 3 different pre- 9.0
fixes for a total of 9 credit hours of different prefixes.
Not all 3 courses may come from the same School, and
at least 3-credits must be upper-division.
Utah Valley State
Committee on Interdisciplinary Studies
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BIOL 1010
BIOL 2500
BIOL 3800
BIOL 3700
COMM 3130
General Biology (3.0)
Environmental Biology (3.0)
Conservation Biology (3.0)
General Ecology (3.0)
The Culture of Nature and Technology (3.0)
ENVT 3280 Environmental Law (3.0)
ENVT 3850 Environmental Policy (3.0)
GEOG 3010 Economic Geography (3.0)
GEO 3210
Environmental Geology (4.0)
HIST 4330
Machines in the Making of History
(3.0)
HIST 3800
Environmental History of the United
States (3.0)
PHIL 3530
Environmental Ethics (3.0)
POLS 1800 Our Global Community (3.0)
SOC 3450
Environmental Sociology (3.0)
HIST 3260
History of Utah (3.0)
Any other advisor-approved courses.
In addition to the 9 core requirements, students
9.0
must complete an additional 9 hours of electives.
The following list of courses has been approved for
the Gender Studies Minor. If a course that is not
represented on the following list has sufficient gender
related content, the student may seek approval from
the Gender Studies Coordinator to have the course
count toward the minor.
• ANTH 3100 Anthropology of Gender and
Sexuality (3.0)
• ANTH 3130 Gender and Biomedicine (3.0)
• ANTH 475R Current Topics in Anthropology*
(3.0)
• ECFS 3320 Gender Perspectives in Education
(3.0)
• ENGL 3710 Literature by Women (3.0)
• ENGL 486R Topics in Literature** (3.0)
• HIST 3200
Women in American History to
1870 (3.0)
• HIST 3210
Women in American History since
1870 (3.0)
• HLTH 2800 Human Sexuality (3.0)
• HLTH 3240 Womens Health Issues (3.0)
• LEGL 3320 Family Law (3.0)
• PES 1405
Women’s Safety Awareness and
Self-Defense (1.0)
• PHIL 3150
Philosophical Issues in Feminism
(3.0)
• PHIL 3450
Philosophy of Childhood (3.0)
• PHIL 400R
Great Philosophers*** (3.0)
• PSY 2800
Human Sexuality (3.0)
• PSY 3100
Psychology of Gender (3.0)
• SOC 2370
Gender Roles (3.0)
• THEA 2333 Race Class and Gender in Film (3.0)
GENDER STUDIES
Committee Chair: Shannon
Mussett
Office: LA 121v
Telephone: 801-863-6264
Email: shannon.mussett@uvsc.edu
Faculty Committee:
Associate Professor
Lyn Bennett
Bryan Eldredge
Laura Hamblin
Karen Mizell
Jans Wager
Jan Wellington
Christine Weigel
Assistant Professor
John Goshert
Numsiri Kunakemakorn
Shannon Mussett
Joylin Namie
Michael Shaw
Ryan Simmons
Graduation Requirements:
1 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
2 Residency hours--minimum of 12 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
Footnotes:
* Contingent upon the approval of the Gender Studies
Coordinator. Must have sufficient gender related content--for example, “Women, Food and the Body.”
** Contingent upon the approval of the Gender Studies
Coordinator. Must have sufficient gender related
content--for example, “Queer Studies.”
*** Contingent upon the approval of the Gender Studies
Coordinator. Must have sufficient gender related
content--for example, “Michel Foucault.”
PEACE AND JUSTICE STUDIES
Committee Chair: Michael Minch
The Gender Studies minor allows
students to study the extent to which
gender and gender relations are socially
influenced. Students will examine the
ways in which conceptions of masculinity
and femininity directly impact social and
political institutions and practices, cultural
expressions (such as art, communication,
media, literature, music, and film), law,
education, business, scientific inquiry,
interpersonal relations, sexuality and
family. As an interdisciplinary program, the
Gender Studies minor encourages students
to examine gender from multiple academic
perspectives. As such, the minor broadens
students’ understanding of their chosen
major and career path while facilitating
the recognition of gender dynamics in their
own lives.
Minor in
Gender Studies
18 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Completion of 30 hours of credit
2 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
• ENGL 2730
• ENGL 473R
• INST 4900
9 Credits
Introduction to Gender Studies
Topics in Gender Studies
Interdisciplinary Studies Capstone
Elective Requirements:
Utah Valley State
3.0
3.0
3.0
9 Credits
Office: LA 121J
Telephone: 801-863-7482
Faculty Committee:
Dean
William Cobb, School of
Humanities, Arts and Social
Sciences
Professor
Robert Robbins
Associate Professor
Lyn Bennett
Kathryn French
Laura Hamblin
Jill Jasperson
Assistant Professor
Stephen Gibson
Michael Minch
Jeff Torlina
Adjunct Faculty
Barbara Hammond
Robert Norton
Grant Skabelund
Peace and Justice Studies at UVSC takes
an interdisciplinary approach to the study
of phenomena empirically and theoretically
associated with violence/nonviolence
and injustice/justice. Four areas of
Catalog 2007–2008
concentration are offered: 1) Peace,
2) Justice, 3) Mediation and Conflict
Resolution, 4) Philosophy and Religion.
Although organized into concentrations,
the curricula must also be approached
in a way that disallows the student from
studying within one concentration only
(note the accent on interdisciplinary).
Peace and nonviolence are investigated
at multiple levels from the realm of the
personal and familial, to international
structures, conventions, institutions, and
history. Likewise, justice and injustice are
interrogated across the same range of
inquiry. Because matters of peace and
justice are of perennial- and perhaps
growing-concern, students who earn a
Peace and Justice Studies minor will place
themselves in a multi-faceted market of
career opportunities including law, social
work, counseling, mediation and conflict
resolution, development, diplomacy,
nonprofit management, education, various
forms of government employment, and
more.
Minor in Peace and Justice
Studies
21 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC
Discipline Core Requirements:
• INST 4900
• PJST 3000
6 Credits
Interdisciplinary Studies Capstone
Introduction to Peace and Justice
Studies
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
Complete 15 credits, at least one course from each of 15.0
the following areas(additional courses may be substituted upon advisor approval):
Peace, War, and Conflict:
• PJST 3020
The Ethics of War and Peace (3.0)
• HIST 4300
Violence and Social Conflict in Latin
America (3.0)
• HIST 3850
The Struggle for Self-determination-American Indians 1891-present
(3.0)
• HIST 4130
Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust
(3.0)
• HIST 3520
The United States and Vietnam-1945 to Present (3.0)
• HIST 3540
History of South Africa (3.0)
• HIST 3430
Middle East History--1914-Present (3.0)
• HIST 4140
Genocide in the Twentieth Century
(3.0)
• POLS 3100 Survey of International Terrorism
(3.0)
Justice:
• PHIL 3720
Theories of Justice (3.0)
• ANTH 4180 Power Economy and People (3.0)
• CJ 4160
Constitutional Rights and Responsibilities (3.0)
• CJ 4200
Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice
(3.0)
• CJ 4700
Comparative Criminal Justice
Systems (3.0)
• HIST 3800
Environmental History of the United
States (3.0)
• HIST 4600
Contemporary American Indian
Political and Social Issues (3.0)
• POLS 3500 International Relations of the Middle
East (3.0)
• POLS 3600 International Relations of East Asia
(3.0)
• POLS 3590 American Indian Law and Tribal
Government (3.0)
• PSY 3750
Child Abuse/Neglect and Domestic
Violence (3.0)
• SOC 3450
Environmental Sociology (3.0)
• SOC 3200
Race and Minority Relations (3.0)
• SOC 3460
Political Sociology (3.0)
• SOC 3700
Social Inequality (3.0)
Mediation/Conflict Resolution:
• ANTH 3620 Intercultural Relations (3.0)
119
Committee on Interdisciplinary Studies
• LEGL 3410
Fundamentals of Mediation and
Negotiation (3.0)
• LEGL 4100
Advanced Mediation and Negotiation (3.0)
• LEGL 3150
Survey of Dispute Resolution (3.0)
• LEGL 4200 Domestic Mediation (3.0)
Philosophy and Religion:
• PHIL 3530
Environmental Ethics (3.0)
• PHIL 3540
Christian Ethics (3.0)
• PHIL 3700
Social and Political Philosophy (3.0)
• PHIL 3150
Philosophical Issues in Feminism
(3.0)
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
Committee Chair: Brian Birch
Office: LA 121
Telephone: 801-863-8759
Faculty Committee:
• PHIL 3600
3.0
9 Credits
Complete 9 credits of electives from the list below or as 9.0
approved by advisor.
• ANTH 3400 Myth Magic and Religion (3.0)
• ANTH 3450 Shamanism and Indigenous Religion (3.0)
• ANTH 3460 Anthropology of Mormonism (3.0)
• COMM 3780 Mormon Cultural Studies (3.0)
• ENGL 3740 Literature of the Sacred (3.0)
• ENGL 3780 Mormon Literature (3.0)
• HIST 4100
Jewish History (3.0)
• PHIL 3540
Christian Ethics (3.0)
• PHIL 3610
Introduction to Christian Theology (3.0)
• SOC 3400
Sociology of Religion (3.0)
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Professor
Jen Wahlquist
Associate Professor
Brian Birch
Philip Gordon
David Knowlton
Assistant Professor
Grace Chou
Michael Minch
R. Dennis Potter
Lecturer
Boyd Peterson
Alex Stecker
Philosophy of Religion
Elective Requirements:
AMST, American Studies
ENST, Environmental Studies
INST, Interdisciplinary Studies
PJST, Peace and Justice Studies
The Religious Studies Program is an
interdisciplinary approach to the academic
study of religion. Due to its influential role
at the local, national, and international
level, religion requires careful study
utilizing academic methods employed
in the examination of other cultural
institutions. This includes the study of
the history, theology, literature, folklore,
etc. of various religions in an effort to
study religion as a cultural phenomenon.
The program is intended to serve our
students and community by deepening
our understanding of religious beliefs and
practices in a spirit of open inquiry. Its
aim is neither to endorse nor to undermine
the claims of religion, but to create an
environment in which various issues can be
engaged from a variety of perspectives and
methodologies. A Religious Studies minor
will complement a variety of majors and
contribute to a well-rounded educational
experience by exposing students to multiple
disciplines.
Minor in Religious
Studies
21 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Completion of 30 hours of credit.
2 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
• PHIL 1610
or PHIL 1620
or ANTH 3450
• RLST 3650
• RLST 366R
120
12 Credits
Introduction to Western Religions
(3.0)
Introduction to Eastern Religions
(3.0)
Shamanism and Indigenous Religion 3.0
Approaches to Religious Studies
3.0
Issues in Religious Studies
3.0
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Communication
Communication
Department of Communication
Office: FA 725
Telephone: 801-863-8452
Department Chair: Philip Gordon
Office: FA 727
Telephone: 801-863-8186
Communication Administrative
Assistant:
Erin Donahoe-Rankin
Office: FA 725
Telephone: 801-863-8452
Faculty:
Professor
David Litchford
Associate Professor
Philip Gordon
Jingdong Liang
Assistant Professor
Roger Gunn
School of Humanities, Arts, and
Social Sciences
Dean: William W. Cobb, Jr.
Office: LA 209d
Telephone: 801-863-7435
PROGR AM DESCRIPTION
The mission of the Department of
Communication is to help students prepare
for careers that demand skills in oral,
written, and visual communication in
interpersonal, organizational, print, and
electronic contexts. The department offers
programs of study leading to Associate in
Arts/Science and Bachelor of Arts/Science
degrees with concentrations in Journalism,
Public Relations, or Communication Theory
and Practice. Communication is also
available as an emphasis for a B.A. or B.S.
in Integrated Studies.
Programs of study in Communication at
UVSC offer a balance of analytic and
applied approaches to study in the field.
The department offers an expanding
menu of beginning and advanced
courses in interpersonal communication,
intercultural communication, international
communication, organizational
communication, mass communication,
public relations, media studies,
argumentation and debate, and print, radio
and television journalism.
Encouraging student internships, and
working closely with Student Media and
Utah Valley State
other units on campus, the curriculum
balances traditional, academic-style
learning with applied, practical approaches
to study in the field, as exemplified in
our broadcast journalism courses, which
culminate in a student-produced, locallybroadcast television news show.
Note: Communication students in the
journalism emphasis are required to have
laptop computers.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Virtually every modern field of endeavor
has increasing demand for specialists with
training in the field of communication.
Traditional areas of employment for
communication students include: print and
electronic journalism; print and electronic
entertainment; public relations (public
affairs, media relations, customer relations,
press agentry, marketing, etc.); advertising;
various sorts of writing, reviewing, and
editing; training; sales; and management.
Today, new media technologies are
expanding the need for communication
specialists, as well as their range of skills.
Communication also provides excellent
preparation for graduate study in the fields
of business, education, law, psychology,
and of course, communication.
PROGR AMS
AA Pre Major
in Communication
60 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
• COMM 1020 Public Speaking
• COMM 1050 Introduction to Speech
Communication
• COMM 1130 Writing for the Mass Media
• COMM 1500 Introduction to Mass
Communication
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Complete one of the following:
3.0
• COMM 2010 Mass Communication and
Society (3.0)
• COMM 2100 The News Editing Process (3.0)
• COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communication (3.0)
• COMM 2120 Small Group Communication and
Decision Making (3.0)
• COMM 2130 Television News Writing and
Reporting (3.0)
• COMM 2270 Argumentation (3.0)
• COMM 2280 Oral Interpretation (3.0)
• COMM 2300 Public Relations (3.0)
• COMM 2400 Organizational
Communication (3.0)
• COMM 2560 Radio Production (3.0)
• COMM 2200 Broadcast Journalism Anchoring
and Producing (3.0)
• COMM 2790 Magazine Writing (3.0)
• THEA 2313 Film History I (3.0)
• THEA 2323 Film History II (3.0)
• THEA 2333 Race Class and Gender in Film (3.0)
Elective Requirements:
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
5 For the AA degree, completion of 10 credit hours of
course work from one language.
AS Pre Major
in Communication
60 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
10 Credits
• Complete 10 credit hours of one foreign language. 10.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
24 Credits
• COMM 1020 Public Speaking
• COMM 1050 Introduction to Speech
Communication
• COMM 1130 Writing for the Mass Media
• COMM 1500 Introduction to Mass
Communication
Complete two of the following:
• COMM 2010 Mass Communication and Society
(3.0)
• COMM 2100 The News Editing Process (3.0)
• COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communication (3.0)
• COMM 2130 Television News Writing and
Reporting (3.0)
• COMM 2270 Argumentation (3.0)
• COMM 2280 Oral Interpretation (3.0)
• COMM 2300 Public Relations (3.0)
• COMM 2400 Organizational Communication (3.0)
• COMM 2560 Radio Production (3.0)
• COMM 2200 Broadcast Journalism Anchoring
and Producing (3.0)
• COMM 2790 Magazine Writing (3.0)
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
121
Communication
• THEA 2313 Film History I (3.0)
• THEA 2323 Film History II (3.0)
• THEA 2333 Race Class and Gender in Film (3.0)
6.0
Complete six credits from the following:
• COMM 120R Communication Forum (1.0)
• COMM 1610 Reporting for the Mass Media (3.0)
• COMM 2010 Mass Communication and
Society (3.0)
• COMM 2100 The News Editing Process (3.0)
• COMM 2120 Small Group Communication and
Decision Making (3.0)
• COMM 2130 Television News Writing and
Reporting (3.0)
• COMM 2270 Argumentation (3.0)
• COMM 2280 Oral Interpretation (3.0)
• COMM 2300 Public Relations (3.0)
• COMM 2400 Organizational
Communication (3.0)
• COMM 2560 Radio Production (3.0)
• COMM 2200 Broadcast Journalism Anchoring
and Producing (3.0)
• COMM 2790 Magazine Writing (3.0)
• COMM 282R Internship (2.0)
• COMM 350R Special Topics in Mass
Communication (3.0)
• COMM 3520 Case Studies in Public
Relations (3.0)
• COMM 3600 Mass Media Ethics and Law (3.0)
• COMM 3790 Case Studies in Journalism (3.0)
• AMST 2000 Introduction to American
Studies (3.0)
• ART 1050
Photography I (3.0)
• ART 2460
Interactive Design I (3.0)
• ART 449R
Advanced Graphic Design
Studio (3.0)
• ENGL 1060 Career Writing for Technology (3.0)
• ENGL 106A Career Writing for Technology-A (2.0)
• ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• ENGL 2030 Rhetoric of Persuasion (3.0)
• MCT 1110
Multimedia Essentials I (4.0)
• MCT 1210
Multimedia Essentials II (4.0)
• MCT 2110
Digital Cinema Essentials (3.0)
• MCT 2220
Marketing for Multimedia (3.0)
• THEA 1023 Introduction to Film (3.0)
• THEA 1113
Voice and Diction (3.0)
• THEA 2313 Film History I (3.0)
• THEA 2323 Film History II (3.0)
• THEA 2333 Race Class and Gender in Film (3.0)
Elective Requirements:
1 Credit
• Complete any course 1000 or higher
1.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BA in
Communication
General Education Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
125 C REDITS
35 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences (3.0)
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (recommended for Humanities or Arts
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (recommended for Social Science majors)
(3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses:
• Biology
• Physical Science
122
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
•
•
•
•
Additional Biology or Physical Science
Humanities ( Any Foreign Language 2020 course)
Fine Arts
Social/Behavioral Science ( COMM 2110: Interpersonal Communication, highly recommended )
Discipline Core Requirements:
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
15.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 125 or more semester
credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above
(departments may require a higher GPA).
3 Residency hours: minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
5 Completion of 18 credit hours of course work from one
language to include the 1010, 1020, 2010, and 2020
levels or transferred equivalents.
Emphasis in Communication Theory and
Practice
30.0 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
12 Credits
Choose 12 credits from the following:
• COMM 128R Forensics (3.0)
• COMM 2120 Small Group Communication and
Decision Making (3.0)
• COMM 2270 Argumentation (3.0)
• COMM 2280 Oral Interpretation (3.0)
• COMM 2400 Organizational Communication
(3.0)
• COMM 2560 Radio Production (3.0)
• AMST 2000 Introduction to American Studies
(3.0)
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
12.0
18 Credits
Choose 18 credits from the following:
18.0
• COMM 3130 The Culture of Nature and Technology (3.0)
• COMM 3320 Cross-Cultural Communications for
International Business (3.0)
• COMM 3400 Film Theory (3.0)
• COMM 3410 Fundamentals of Mediation and
Negotiation (3.0)
• COMM 350R Special Topics in Mass Communication (3.0)
• COMM 3520 Case Studies in Public Relations
(3.0)
• COMM 3780 Mormon Cultural Studies (3.0)
• COMM 4100 Advanced Mediation and Negotiation (3.0)
• AMST 300R Topics in American Studies (3.0)
• ENGL 3890 Contemporary Critical Approaches
to Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 4010 Studies in Language (3.0)
• PHIL 3150
Philosophical Issues in Feminism
(3.0)
• PHIL 3700
Social and Political Philosophy (3.0)
• PHIL 3750
Marxist Philosophy (3.0)
• PHIL 3810
Existentialism and Phenomenology (3.0)
• PHIL 4150
History of Continental Philosophy
(3.0)
• PHIL 4480
Philosophy of Language (3.0)
30.0 Credits
27 Credits
• COMM 1610 Reporting for the Mass Media
• COMM 2130 Television News Writing and
Reporting
• COMM 2200 Broadcast Journalism Anchoring
and Producing
• COMM 350R Special Topics in Mass Communication
• COMM 3520 Case Studies in Public Relations
Catalog 2007–2008
• COMM 3620 International Communication
• COMM 413R Advanced Television News Writing
and Reporting
• COMM 470R On-Air Broadcast Journalism
• COMM 479R Journalism Workshop
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
Complete 3 credits from the following:
• COMM 2100 The News Editing Process (3.0)
• COMM 2560 Radio Production (3.0)
• COMM 2790 Magazine Writing (3.0)
3.0
Emphasis in Public Relations 30.0 Credits
30 Credits
• COMM 1610 Reporting for the Mass Media
• COMM 2300 Public Relations
• COMM 2120 Small Group Communication and
Decision Making (3.0)
or COMM 2400 Organizational Communication
• COMM 2790 Magazine Writing
• COMM 3320 Cross-Cultural Communications for
International Business
• COMM 3410 Fundamentals of Mediation and
Negotiation
• COMM 3520 Case Studies in Public Relations
• COMM 3530 Public Relations Writing
• COMM 3620 International Communication
• COMM 4100 Advanced Mediation and Negotiation
BS in
Communication
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
122 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences (3.0)
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (recommended for Humanities or Arts
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (recommended for Social Science majors)
(3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700 US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses:
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• COMM 1020 Public Speaking (Humanities)
• Fine Arts
• Social/Behavioral Science ( COMM 2110: Interpersonal Communication, highly recommended )
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Discipline Core Requirements:42 Credits
• DGM 2110 Digital Cinema Essentials
• COMM 1050 Introduction to Speech Communication
• COMM 1130 Writing for the Mass Media
• COMM 1500 Introduction to Mass Communication
• COMM 2010 Mass Communication and Society
• COMM 281R Internship (1.0)
• COMM 3010 History of Mass Communication
• COMM 3050 Theories of Communication and
Culture
• COMM 3600 Mass Media Ethics and Law
• COMM 3700 Free Expression in a Democratic
Society
• COMM 3790 Case Studies in Journalism
• COMM 380R Long-Format Video Journalism
• COMM 481R Internship (1.0)
• COMM 4930 Communication Capstone
3.0
3.0
Elective Requirements:
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
• Complete 15 credits from one foreign language.
Emphasis Requirements:
2.0
45 Credits
• DGM 2110
Digital Cinema Essentials
• COMM 1020 Public Speaking
• COMM 1050 Introduction to Speech Communication
• COMM 1130 Writing for the Mass Media
• COMM 1500 Introduction to Mass Communication
• COMM 2010 Mass Communication and Society
• COMM 281R Internship (1.0)
• COMM 3010 History of Mass Communication
• COMM 3050 Theories of Communication and
Culture
• COMM 3600 Mass Media Ethics and Law
• COMM 3700 Free Expression in a Democratic
Society
• COMM 3790 Case Studies in Journalism
• COMM 380R Long-Format Video Journalism
• COMM 481R Internship (1.0)
• COMM 4930 Communication Capstone
Emphasis in Journalism
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
• Complete 15 credits of electives 1000 level or
higher
15.0
1 Completion of a minimum of 120 or more semester
credits.
3.0
Utah Valley State
Communication
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above
(departments may require a higher GPA).
3 Residency hours: minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
Emphasis in Communication
Theory and Practice
Emphasis Requirements:
30.0 Credits
12 Credits
18 Credits
Choose 18 credits from the following:
• COMM 3130 The Culture of Nature and Technology (3.0)
• COMM 3320 Cross-Cultural Communications for
International Business (3.0)
• COMM 3400 Film Theory (3.0)
• COMM 3410 Fundamentals of Mediation and
Negotiation (3.0)
• COMM 350R Special Topics in Mass Communication (3.0)
• COMM 3520 Case Studies in Public Relations
(3.0)
• COMM 3780 Mormon Cultural Studies (3.0)
• COMM 4100 Advanced Mediation and Negotiation (3.0)
• AMST 300R Topics in American Studies (3.0)
• ENGL 3890 Contemporary Critical Approaches
to Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 4010 Studies in Language (3.0)
• PHIL 3150
Philosophical Issues in Feminism
(3.0)
• PHIL 3700
Social and Political Philosophy (3.0)
• PHIL 3750
Marxist Philosophy (3.0)
• PHIL 3810
Existentialism and Phenomenology (3.0)
• PHIL 4150
History of Continental Philosophy
(3.0)
• PHIL 4480
Philosophy of Language (3.0)
Emphasis in Journalism
Emphasis Requirements:
30.0 Credits
27 Credits
• COMM 1610 Reporting for the Mass Media
• COMM 2130 Television News Writing and
Reporting
• COMM 2200 Broadcast Journalism Anchoring
and Producing
• COMM 350R Special Topics in Mass Communication
• COMM 3520 Case Studies in Public Relations
• COMM 3620 International Communication
• COMM 413R Advanced Television News Writing
and Reporting
• COMM 470R On-Air Broadcast Journalism
• COMM 479R Journalism Workshop
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
30.0 Credits
30 Credits
• COMM 1610 Reporting for the Mass Media
• COMM 2300 Public Relations
• COMM 2120 Small Group Communication and
Decision Making (3.0)
or COMM 2400 Organizational Communication
• COMM 2790 Magazine Writing
• COMM 3320 Cross-Cultural Communications for
International Business
• COMM 3410 Fundamentals of Mediation and
Negotiation
• COMM 3520 Case Studies in Public Relations
• COMM 3530 Public Relations Writing
• COMM 3620 International Communication
• COMM 4100 Advanced Mediation and Negotiation
Utah Valley State
3.0
3.0
3 Credits
Complete 3 credits from the following:
• COMM 2100 The News Editing Process (3.0)
• COMM 2560 Radio Production (3.0)
• COMM 2790 Magazine Writing (3.0)
Emphasis in
Public Relations
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Communication
Emphasis Requirements:
Choose 12 credits from the following:
• COMM 128R Forensics (3.0)
• COMM 2120 Small Group Communication and
Decision Making (3.0)
• COMM 2270 Argumentation (3.0)
• COMM 2280 Oral Interpretation (3.0)
• COMM 2400 Organizational Communication
(3.0)
• COMM 2560 Radio Production (3.0)
• AMST 2000 Introduction to American Studies
(3.0)
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
18 Credits
18 Credits
Complete one of the following tracks:
18.0
TRACK ONE: ANALYTIC
Complete six credits from the following:
• COMM 2010 Mass Communication and
Society (3.0)
• COMM 2270 Argumentation (3.0)
• COMM 2300 Public Relations (3.0)
• COMM 2400 Organizational
Communication (3.0)
• THEA 2313 Film History I (3.0)
• THEA 2323 Film History II (3.0)
• THEA 2333 Race Class and Gender in Film (3.0)
Complete twelve credits from the following:
• ANTH 3500 Discourse Semiotics and
Representation (3.0)
• COMM 3010 History of Mass
Communication (3.0)
• COMM 3050 Theories of Communication and
Culture (3.0)
• COMM 3320 Cross-Cultural Communications for
International Business (3.0)
• COMM 3400 Film Theory (3.0)
• COMM 3410 Fundamentals of Mediation and
Negotiation (3.0)
• COMM 350R Special Topics in Mass
Communication (3.0)
• COMM 3520 Case Studies in Public
Relations (3.0)
• COMM 3600 Mass Media Ethics and Law (3.0)
• COMM 3620 International Communication (3.0)
• COMM 3700 Free Expression in a Democratic
Society (3.0)
• COMM 3780 Mormon Cultural Studies (3.0)
• COMM 3790 Case Studies in Journalism (3.0)
• COMM 380R Long-Format Video Journalism (3.0)
• COMM 4100 Advanced Mediation and
Negotiation (3.0)
TRACK TWO: APPLIED
Complete all of the following:
• COMM 2130 Television News Writing and
Reporting (3.0)
• COMM 2200 Broadcast Journalism Anchoring
and Producing (3.0)
• COMM 3600 Mass Media Ethics and Law (3.0)
Complete one of the following four classes:
• COMM 2010 Mass Communication and
Society (3.0)
• COMM 2300 Public Relations (3.0)
• COMM 2560 Radio Production (3.0)
• COMM 2790 Magazine Writing (3.0)
Complete one of the following two classes:
• COMM 413R Advanced Television News Writing
and Reporting (3.0)
• COMM 470R On-Air Broadcast Journalism (3.0)
Complete two of the following eight classes:
• COMM 3010 History of Mass
Communication (3.0)
• COMM 3050 Theories of Communication and
Culture (3.0)
• COMM 3520 Case Studies in Public
Relations (3.0)
• COMM 3700 Free Expression in a Democratic
Society (3.0)
• COMM 3790 Case Studies in Journalism (3.0)
• COMM 380R Long-Format Video Journalism (3.0)
• COMM 413R Advanced Television News Writing
and Reporting (3.0)
• COMM 470R On-Air Broadcast Journalism (3.0)
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă COMM, Communication
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Catalog 2007–2008
123
Community Health
Community
Health
Department Chair: Robert Walsh
Office: PE 147b
Telephone: 801-863-6193
E-mail: walshro@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Please contact Kristie
Dockstader at 863-8651or Robert
Walsh at 863-6193 to meet with an
Advisor.
Faculty:
Professor
Vance G. Hillman
Reba Keele
Associate Professor
Brian Barthel
Lori Richards
Robert Walsh
Assistant Professor
Hala N. Madanat
Lynley Rowan
Lecturer
Mary Brown
Staff:
Administrative Assistant
Kristie Dockstader
School of Science and Health
Dean: Sam Rushforth
Office: PS 201a
Telephone: 801-863-8980
Associate Dean: Bill Evenson
Office: PS 201e
Telephone: 801-863-6440
Assistant Dean: Lori Barber
Office: BA 205c
Telephone: 801-863-8380
Assistant Dean: Louise Illes
Office: PS 201d
Telephone: 801-863-6040
Assistant Dean: David Jordan
Office: PS 201c
Telephone: 801-863-7160
Students in the Department of Community
Health may receive an Associate in Science
or Arts with an emphasis in Community
Health; an Integrated Studies Bachelors
of Science or Arts with a Community
Health Emphasis; a Bachelor of Science in
Community Health in one of the following
areas: Community Health Emphasis,
School Health Education Emphasis, Health
Services Administration; or a Health Minor
with an emphasis in Community Health
Education or School Health Education.
The Community Health program at UVSC
124
provides support courses for General
Education, the Elementary Education
program, and the Integrated Studies
program. The department is committed
to provide course work that will enable
students to complete an Associate in
Science or Associate in Arts Degree with a
pre-major in Community Health, and that
can be transferred to other institutions.
Courses in the Community Health area of
study lead to possible careers in community
health education and promotion, school
health, health care management, and
other community health and human service
administration.
PROGR AMS
AA Pre Major in Community
Health
62 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
10.0
1 Completion of a minimum of 62 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours-- minimum of 20 credit hours though
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
5 For the AA degree, completion of 10 credit hours of
course work from one language.
AS Pre Major in Community
Health
62 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
35 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
17 Credits
• NUTR 1020 Foundations of Human Nutrition
• HLTH 1200 First Aid
• HLTH 2400 Concepts of Stress Management
• HLTH 2800 Human Sexuality
• HLTH 2600 Drugs Behavior and Society
Complete 3 credits from the following:
• COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communication (3.0)
• ENVT 1110
Introduction to Environmental
Management (3.0)
• ENVT 1200 Environmental Worker Safety (3.0)
• ENVT 2560 Environmental Health (3.0)
• HLTH 1300 Medical Terminology I (2.0)
• NUTR 2020 Nutrition Through the Life
Cycle (3.0)
• HLTH 2300 Medical Terminology II (2.0)
• HLTH 2200 Introduction to Health
Professions (2.0)
• HLTH 3000 Health Concepts of Death and
Dying (3.0)
• HLTH 281R
Cooperative Work Experience (2.0)
• MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior (3.0)
• HLTH 3240 Womens Health Issues (3.0)
• PES 2700
Foundations of Physical Education
and Recreation (3.0)
• PSY 1100
Human Development Life Span (3.0)
• PSY 2250
Psychology of Interpersonal
Relationships (3.0)
• SOC 3650
Sociology of Aging (3.0)
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
• Same Foreign Language (1010 and 1020)
Graduation Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
27 Credits
Complete the following:
• NUTR 1020 Foundations of Human Nutrition
3.0
• HLTH 1200 First Aid
2.0
• HLTH 2400 Concepts of Stress Management
3.0
• HLTH 2800 Human Sexuality
3.0
• HLTH 2600 Drugs Behavior and Society
3.0
13.0
Complete 13 credits from the following:
• COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communication (3.0)
• ENVT 1110
Introduction to Environmental
Management (3.0)
• ENVT 1200 Environmental Worker Safety (3.0)
• ENVT 2560 Environmental Health (3.0)
• HLTH 1300 Medical Terminology I (2.0)
• NUTR 2020 Nutrition Through the Life
Cycle (3.0)
• HLTH 2200 Introduction to Health
Professions (2.0)
• HLTH 2300 Medical Terminology II (2.0)
• HLTH 3000 Health Concepts of Death and
Dying (3.0)
• HLTH 281R
Cooperative Work Experience (2.0)
• HLTH 3240 Womens Health Issues (3.0)
• MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior (3.0)
• PES 2700
Foundations of Physical Education
and Recreation (3.0)
• PSY 1100
Human Development Life Span (3.0)
• PSY 2250
Psychology of Interpersonal
Relationships (3.0)
• SOC 3650
Sociology of Aging (3.0)
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 62 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours-- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
BS in Community Health 120 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
Introduction to Writing
35 Credits
3.0
10 Credits
Utah Valley State
Community Health
• ENGL 2010
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
3.0
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or Arts
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and Health
Professions majors) (4.0)
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
andHIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
3.0
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
2.0
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
3.0
• Physical Science
3.0
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
3.0
• Humanities Distribution
3.0
• Fine Arts Distribution
3.0
• Social/Behavioral Science (HLTH 2800
3.0
recommended)
Discipline Core Requirements:
20 Credits
• ZOOL 1090 Introduction to Human Anatomy
and Physiology
• ENVT 2560 Environmental Health
• HLTH 3200 Principles of Community Health
• HLTH 3250 Consumer Health
• HLTH 3260 Modifying Health Behavior
• HLTH 3400 Human Diseases
• HLTH 4050 Foundations of Health Education
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
65.0
65.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 120 semester credits with
a minimum of 40 upper-division credits. A minimum of
at least 10 hours earned in the last 45 hours must be
earned at UVSC.
2 A minimum of 34 credit hours must be in the major with
minimum of 20 credits taken at UVSC. A minimum of 20
Health credits must be upper-division.
3 Complete the following courses with a minimum grade
of C- or better: HLTH 3200, HLTH 4050, and all
Emphasis Courses.
4 Overall grade point average of 2.25 or above with a
minimum GPA of 2.5 in Major and Minor courses.
5 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
Emphasis in Community Health
Education
65 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
NUTR 1020
HLTH 1200
HLTH 2400
HLTH 2800
HLTH 2600
HLTH 3800
HLTH 4150
• HLTH 4300
• HLTH 4600
• HLTH 482R
or HLTH 483R
32 Credits
Foundations of Human Nutrition
First Aid
Concepts of Stress Management
Human Sexuality
Drugs Behavior and Society
Epidemiology
Community Health Program
Development and Evaluation
Community Health Ethics
Research Methods for Community
Health
Community Health Internship (2.0)
International Health Education
Internship
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
33 Credits
Complete 8 credits from the following:
8.0
• HLTH 3150 Culture Ecology and Health (3.0)
• HLTH 3240 Womens Health Issues (3.0)
• HLTH 3300 Health Promotion for Older Adults
(3.0)
• HLTH 4250 Health Services Organization and
Policy (3.0)
• HLTH 490R Special Topics in Community Health
(1.0)
• DGM 3820 Presentation Applications (3.0)
• MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing (3.0)
• SOC 3200
Race and Minority Relations (3.0)
Utah Valley State
25.0
• EDSC 4850
• EDSP 3400
Student Teaching--Secondary (4.0)
Exceptional Students
Elective Requirements:
8.0
2.0
18 Credits
• Complete a Secondary Education approved Minor 18.0
Emphasis in Health Services
Administration
Emphasis Requirements:
• HLTH 3300
• HLTH 3800
• HLTH 4150
• HLTH 4250
• HLTH 4300
• HLTH 4500
• HLTH 4600
• HLTH 482R
or HLTH 483R
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ECON 2020
MGMT 2200
MGMT 2240
MGMT 2390
MGMT 3010
MGMT 3430
MGMT 3600
ACC 2010
ACC 2020
INFO 3120
• LEGL 3160
Graduation Requirements:
65 Credits
60 Credits
Health Promotion for Older Adults
Epidemiology
Community Health Program
Development and Evaluation
Health Services Organization and
Policy
Community Health Ethics
Public Health Administration
Research Methods for Community
Health
Community Health Internship (2.0)
International Health Education
Internship (2.0)
Macroeconomics
Business Communications
Foundations of Business Statistics
Effective Business Presentations
Principles of Management
Human Resource Management
Principles of Marketing
Financial Accounting
Managerial Accounting
Principles of Information Systems--A
Managerial Approach
Health Care Law
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
5 Credits
• Complete any courses 1000 or higher.
5.0
3.0
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Community Health Education
or Health Services Administration
Complete 25 credits of any courses 1000 or higher
(minor).
BS in School
Health Education
General Education Requirements:
124 C REDITS
36 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
Minor in Community
Health Education
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
4.0
20 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
NUTR 1020
HLTH 2600
HLTH 2800
HLTH 3200
HLTH 3260
HLTH 4050
17 Credits
Foundations of Human Nutrition
Drugs Behavior and Society
Human Sexuality
Principles of Community Health
Modifying Health Behavior
Foundations of Health Education
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3 Credits
Any upper-division HLTH course not used in Discipline
Core
Minor in School
Health Education
3.0
20 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Must be accepted into a Secondary Education major
program.
Discipline Core Requirements:
4.0
3.0
70 Credits
• ZOOL 1090 Introduction to Human Anatomy
and Physiology
• ENVT 2560 Environmental Health
• HLTH 3200 Principles of Community Health
• HLTH 3250 Consumer Health
• HLTH 3260 Modifying Health Behavior
• HLTH 3400 Human Diseases
• HLTH 4050 Foundations of Health Education
• NUTR 1020 Foundations of Human Nutrition
• HLTH 1200 First Aid
• HLTH 2400 Concepts of Stress Management
• HLTH 2800 Human Sexuality
• HLTH 2600 Drugs Behavior and Society
• HLTH 4100 Health Education Curriculum for
Secondary Teachers
• HLTH 4200 Health Education Teaching Methods
Secondary Education Courses:
• EDSC 2540 Development of the Adolescent
Student
• EDSC 3000 Educational Psychology
• EDSC 3050 Foundations of American Education
• EDSC 3250 Instructional Media
• EDSC 4200 Classroom Management I
• EDSC 4250 Classroom Management II
• EDSC 4440 Content Area Reading and Writing
• EDSC 4450 Multicultural Instruction/ESL
• EDSC 4550 Secondary Curriculum Instruction
and Assessment
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
1 Completion of a minimum of 124 semester credits with
a minimum of 40 upper-division credits. A minimum of
at least 10 hours earned in the last 45 hours must be
earned at UVSC.
2 A minimum of 34 credit hours must be in the major with
minimum of 20 credits taken at UVSC. A minimum of 20
Health credits must be upper-division.
3 Complete the following courses with a minimum grade
of C- or better: HLTH 3200, HLTH 4050, and all
Emphasis Courses.
4 Overall grade point average of 2.25 or above with a
minimum GPA of 2.5 in Major and Minor courses.
5 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
NUTR 1020
HLTH 2600
HLTH 2800
HLTH 3200
HLTH 3260
HLTH 4050
HLTH 4100
20 Credits
Foundations of Human Nutrition
Drugs Behavior and Society
Human Sexuality
Principles of Community Health
Modifying Health Behavior
Foundations of Health Education
Health Education Curriculum for
Secondary Teachers
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Community Health 18 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
Complete the following:
• HLTH 3200 Principles of Community Health
• HLTH 4050 Foundations of Health Education
• HLTH 3400 Human Diseases
or HLTH 3800 Epidemiology (3.0)
• HLTH 4300 Community Health Ethics (3.0)
or HLTH 4600 Research Methods for Community
Health
Choose 6 credits from the following:
• NUTR 1020 Foundations of Human
Nutrition (3.0)
• NUTR 2020 Nutrition Through the Life
Cycle (3.0)
• HLTH 2400 Concepts of Stress
Management (3.0)
• HLTH 2800 Human Sexuality (3.0)
• HLTH 2600 Drugs Behavior and Society (3.0)
• HLTH 3000 Health Concepts of Death and
Dying (3.0)
• HLTH 3150 Culture Ecology and Health (3.0)
• HLTH 3240 Womens Health Issues (3.0)
• HLTH 3250 Consumer Health (3.0)
• HLTH 3260 Modifying Health Behavior (2.0)
• HLTH 3300 Health Promotion for Older
Adults (3.0)
• HLTH 4150
Community Health Program
Development and Evaluation (3.0)
• HLTH 4250 Health Services Organization and
Policy (3.0)
• HLTH 490R Special Topics in Community Health
(1.0)
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
125
Community Health
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă HLTH, Community Health
Ă NUTR, Nutrition
126
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Computer Science
Computer
Science
Department of Computer Science
and Pre-Engineering
PROGR AMS
Students majoring in Computer Science
(CS) may receive either a two-year AS
or AAS degree or a four-year bachelor
degree. A certificate program is available
for those seeking short-term specialized
training.
• CS 1410
• CS 2300
• CS 2420
• CS 2600
• CS 2810
• INFO 1510
• ENGL 1010
Department Chair: Abraham Teng
Office: CS 520j
Telephone: 801-863-6201
Administrative Support III:
Carol Robinson
Office: CS 520h
Telephone: 801-863-8218
Faculty:
Professor
Dennis Fairclough
David Heldenbrand
Keith Olson
Associate Professor
Charles Allison
Roger deBry
Brian Durney
Todd Peterson
Reza Sanati
Assistant Professor
Neil Harrison
Kirk Love
Curtis Welborn
Advisor:
Patti Miner
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-8408
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
There are many opportunities for those
educated in computer science, networking,
computer engineering, and software
engineering. Possible occupational areas
include software engineering, software
development, programming, network
programming, systems analysis and
design, consulting, customer support,
maintaining software or networks or media
systems, manufacturer’s representative,
client services, software testing, database
administration, web programming, web
design, network management, and network
engineering.
Job demand is very high in the fields of
computer science, computer engineering,
software engineering, and networking
occupations. The employment outlook is
excellent.
Utah Valley State
The Associate in Science Degree in
Computer Science (AS-CS) is a transfer
degree and is available for those wishing
to transfer to a bachelor degree program.
The Associate in Applied Science Degree
in Computer Science (AAS-CS) provides
job-ready skills and includes areas of
specialization in: Computer Engineering,
and Computer Science.
Note: Students may earn only one AAS
Degree in Computer Science. Additional
degrees will not be awarded for completing
subsequent AAS-CS areas of specialization.
Object-Oriented Programming
Discrete Structures I
Introduction to Algorithms and Data
Structures
Fundamentals of Data Communications
Computer Organization and
Architecture
Introduction to System Administration--Linux/UNIX
Introduction to Writing
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6 Credits
Choose 6 credits from the following courses (Must be
6.0
approved by CNS Department. See CNS advisor):
• CS 2220
Visual Basic Programming (3.0)
or CS 3220
Visual Basic Software Development (3.0)
• CS 2250
Java Programming (3.0)
or CS 3250
Java Software Development (3.0)
• CS 2370
C-plus-plus Programming (3.0)
or CS 3370
C-plus-plus Software Development (3.0)
• CS 2550
Internet Programming (3.0)
or CS 3550
Internet Software Development (3.0)
• CS 239R
Current Topics in Computer Science
(1.0)
• CS 3060
Operating Systems Theory (3.0)
• CS 3260
CsharpNET Software Development (3.0)
• CS 3520
Database Theory (3.0)
Graduation Requirements:
A four-year bachelor degree, accredited by
the Computing Accreditation Commission
of the Accreditation Board for Engineering
and Technology (CAC of ABET, 111 Market
Pl., Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202,
www.abet.org), is offered in Computer
Science (BS-CS). There are five possible
areas of specialization: Computer
Engineering, Computer Networking,
Computer Science, Software Engineering,
and Database.
The Computer Science areas of
specialization conform to the Association
of Computing Machinery (ACM) model
curriculum. Students completing the
Computer Science degree should be
prepared to take professional programming
and networking certification exams.
Note: Students may earn only one BS
Degree in Computer Science. Additional
degrees will not be awarded for completing
subsequent BS-CS areas of specialization.
In addition to regular programs, the
Department also offers a variety of
courses to provide skill upgrades, network
administration education, short-term
intensive training, and other services for the
community.
Classroom instruction is supported by wellequipped computer laboratories with over
180 computers interconnected through a
series of Microsoft and Linux networks and
servers.
Certificate in
Programmer
1
2
3
4
Completion of a minimum of 30 semester credits.
Minimum grade of C- required in all courses.
Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
Residency hours -- minimum of 10 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
AAS in
Computer Science
General Education Requirements:
Discipline Core Requirements:
This program is designed to prepare students for careers
requiring knowledge and skills in computer programming
and software maintenance. Students are prepared to pass
programming certification examinations. The student
is responsible for registering for and taking the required
certification examinations.
Discipline Core Requirements:
24 Credits
Complete the following:
• CS 1400
Fundamentals of Programming
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
13 Credits
9 Credits
Complete the following:
• CS 1400
Fundamentals of Programming *
3.0
• CS 2600
Fundamentals of Data Communica- 3.0
tions *
• CS 2810
Computer Organization and
3.0
Architecture *
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Computer Engineering
42.0
• Computing and Networking Sciences
42.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 64 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
Footnotes:
* Minimum grade of C- required
Emphasis in
Computer Engineering
42 Credits
This program is designed to prepare students for careers in
the many areas of computer science requiring a knowledge
of computer systems hardware, software, device drivers,
and peripheral devices. Computer Science Engineers have
strong technical skills and an understanding of and ability
to work with both computer hardware and software that are
scientific and technical in nature.
Emphasis Requirements:
30 C REDITS
64 C REDITS
A minimum of 16 credits of General Education requirements
are required for graduation. Not all GE requirements are
listed in this section (see Specialty Core requirements for
more details).
• ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
3.0
• HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS/FOREIGN LANGUAGE 3.0
(COMM 1020 recommended)
• COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communication *
3.0
• BIOLOGY
3.0
or PHYS 2210 Physics for Scientists and Engineers
I (4.0) *
• PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH/SAFETY OR
1.0
ENVIRONMENT
22 Credits
Complete the following (minimum grade of C- required):
• CS 1030
Foundations of Computer Science
3.0
• EENG 2270 Circuit Theory
3.0
• EENG 2275 Circuit Theory Lab
1.0
• EENG 2700 Digital Design I
3.0
• EENG 2705 Digital Design I Lab
1.0
• EENG 3740 Digital Design II
3.0
• INFO 1510 Introduction to System Administra3.0
tion--Linux/UNIX
• MATH 1210 Calculus I (fulfills GE requirement)
5.0
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
20 Credits
127
Computer Science
Complete 20 credits from the following courses (mini- 20.0
mum grade of C- required). (Must be approved by CNS
Department. See CNS Advisor):
• CS 1410
Object-Oriented Programming
(3.0)
• CS 2300
Discrete Structures I (3.0)
• CS 2420
Introduction to Algorithms and Data
Structures (3.0)
• CS 2450
Software Engineering (3.0)
• CS 2550
Internet Programming (3.0)
or CS 3550
Internet Software Development (3.0)
• CS 3060
Operating Systems Theory (3.0)
• CS 3520
Database Theory (3.0)
• EENG 3750 Engineering Analysis (3.0)
• EENG 3770 Signals and Systems (3.0)
• EENG 4730 Embedded Systems (3.0)
• EENG 4750 Digital Signal Processing (3.0)
• EENG 4760 Electronic Systems (3.0)
• EENG 4765 Electronics Systems Lab (1.0)
• MATH 1220 Calculus II (5.0)
• PHYS 2215 Physics for Scientists and Engineers
I Lab (1.0)
Emphasis in Computing and
Networking Sciences
42 Credits
This program is designed to prepare students for careers
in the many areas of computer science and networking
requiring a knowledge of both computer software and
computer networking. The Computer Networking program
is a comprehensive curriculum which covers the range
of networking and data communications technologies.
Students in this program are provided instruction in analysis,
installation, maintenance and management of localand
wide area networks, and world wide web servers.
Emphasis Requirements:
24 Credits
Complete the following:
• CS 1410
Object-Oriented Programming*
• CS 2300
Discrete Structures I*
• CS 2420
Introduction to Algorithms and Data
Structures*
• CS 3060
Operating Systems Theory*
• CS 3220
Visual Basic Software Development*
or CS 3250
Java Software Development (3.0)*
or CS 3260
CsharpNET Software Development
(3.0)*
• CS 3520
Database Theory*
• CS 3690
Advanced Topics in Data Communications*
• MATH 1060 Trigonometry (fulfills GE requirement)*
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
18 Credits
Complete 18 credits from the following courses (mini- 18.0
mum grade of C- required). (Must be approved by CNS
Department. See CNS Advisor):
• CS 1030
Foundations of Computer Science
(3.0)
• CS 2220
Visual Basic Programming (3.0)
or CS 3220
Visual Basic Software Development (3.0)
• CS 2250
Java Programming (3.0)
or CS 3250
Java Software Development (3.0)
• CS 2370
C-plus-plus Programming (3.0)
or CS 3370
C-plus-plus Software Development (3.0)
• CS 2450
Software Engineering (3.0)
• CS 2550
Internet Programming (3.0)
or CS 3550
Internet Software Development (3.0)
• CS 281R
Internship (3.0 credits max.) (1.0)
• CS 3260
CsharpNET Software Development (3.0)
• CS 3660
Web Server Administration and
Programming (3.0)
• CS 3670
Network Programming (3.0)
• CS 4410
Human Factors in Software Engineering (3.0)
• CS 4470
Artificial Intelligence (3.0)
• CS 4600
Enterprise Architecture (3.0)
• CS 4610
TCP/IP Internet Architecture (3.0)
• EENG 2700 Digital Design I (3.0)
• EENG 2705 Digital Design I Lab (1.0)
• EENG 3750 Engineering Analysis (3.0)
• INFO 1510 Introduction to System Administration--Linux/UNIX (3.0)
• INFO 3510 Advanced System Administration-Linux/UNIX (3.0)
• MATH 1210 Calculus I (5.0)
• MATH 1220 Calculus II (5.0)
• PHYS 2215 Physics for Scientists and Engineers
I Lab (1.0)
Footnotes:
* Minimum grade of C- required.
128
• PHYS 2210
AS Pre Major in
Computer Science
64 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
39 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2020
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
Humanities:
• COMM 1020 Public Speaking (recommended)
Social Science:
• COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communication
(recommended)
Physical Science:
• PHYS 2210 Physics for Scientists and Engineers
I*
• PHYS 2215 Physics for Scientists and Engineers
I Lab*
Additional Physical Science:
• PHYS 2220 Physics for Scientists and Engineers
II*
• PHYS 2225 Physics for Scientists and Engineers
II Lab*
Additional Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Fine Arts Distribution
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
CS 1400
CS 1410
CS 2300
CS 2420
• CS 2810
• MATH 1210
• MATH 1220
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
5.0
5.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 64 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above with no
grade lower than a C- in Discipline Core courses.
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
Footnotes:
* Minimum grade of C- required.
BS in Computer Science
123 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2020
41 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
• MATH 1210 Calculus I
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses:
• COMM 1020 Public Speaking*
• COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communication*
• Fine Arts Distribution (choose from list)
• Biology (choose from list)
Catalog 2007–2008
• PHYS 2220
• PHYS 2225
Discipline Core Requirements:
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
40 Credits
Minimum grade of C- required in these courses with a
combined GPA of 2.5 or higher.
• CS 1400
Fundamentals of Programming
3.0
• CS 1410
Object-Oriented Programming
3.0
• CS 2300
Discrete Structures I
3.0
• CS 2420
Introduction to Algorithms and Data 3.0
Structures
• CS 2600
Fundamentals of Data Communi3.0
cations
• CS 2810
Computer Organization and
3.0
Architecture
• CS 301R
Invited Speaker Series
1.0
• CS 3050
Computer Ethics
3.0
• CS 3060
Operating Systems Theory
3.0
• CS 3240
Introduction to Computational
3.0
Theory
• CS 3690
Advanced Topics in Data Com3.0
munications
• MATH 1220 Calculus II
5.0
• MATH 2040 Principles of Statistics
4.0
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Computer Engineering
42.0
• Computer Networking
42.0
• Computer Science
42.0
• Database Engineering
42.0
Graduation Requirements:
4.0
25 Credits
Fundamentals of Programming*
Object-Oriented Programming*
Discrete Structures I*
Introduction to Algorithms and Data
Structures*
Computer Organization and
Architecture*
Calculus I*
Calculus II*
• PHYS 2215
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
I*
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
I Lab*
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
II*
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
II Lab*
3.0
3.0
5.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1 Completion of a minimum of 123 semester credits, with
a minimum of 40 upper-division credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.5 or above. Must have
a minimum grade of C- in all core courses.
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC. 10 of these hours must be
within the last 45 hours earned. At least 12 of the credit
hours earned in residence must be in approved CNS
Department courses.
4 All transfer credit must be approved in writing by UVSC.
5 No more than 80 semester hours and no more than
20 hours in CNS type courses of transfer credit from a
two-year college.
6 No more than 30 semester hours may be earned
through independent study and/or extension classes.
Footnotes:
* Minimum grade of C- required in these courses with a
combined GPA of 2.5 or higher.
Emphasis in
Computer Engineering
42 Credits
This program is designed to prepare students for careers
in the many areas of computer science requiring a knowledge of computer systems hardware, software, device
drivers, and peripheral devices. Computer Engineers
have strong technical skills and an understanding of and
ability to work with both computer hardware and software
that are scientific and techincal in nature. The degree is
designed to prepare students for employment opportunities in the computer industry. Areas of employment
include: computer hardware design, systems design,
device driver programming, software rapid application
development, and software/hardware maintenance.
Students are prepared to take industry standard programming certification examinations. The student is reponsible
for registering for and taking the require certification
examinations.
Emphasis Requirements:
26 Credits
Minimum grade of C- required in these courses with a
combined GPA of 2.5 or higher.
• CS 4260
Digital System Simulation
• CS 4380
Advanced/High-Performance
Computer Architecture
• CS 489R
Undergraduate Research Project
(2.0)
• EENG 2270 Circuit Theory
• EENG 2275 Circuit Theory Lab
• EENG 2700 Digital Design I
• EENG 2705 Digital Design I Lab
• EENG 3740 Digital Design II
• EENG 3750 Engineering Analysis
• EENG 3770 Signals and Systems
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
16 Credits
Utah Valley State
Computer Science
Complete 16 credits from the following or any CS
16.0
3000 or 4000 level course not already required. (Minimum of 6 credits must be EENG; minimum of 3 credits
must be CS). (Minimum grade of C- required in these
courses with a combined GPA of 2.5 or higher.):
• CS 2450
Software Engineering (3.0)
• EENG 4730 Embedded Systems (3.0)
• EENG 4750 Digital Signal Processing (3.0)
• EENG 4760 Electronic Systems (3.0)
• EENG 4765 Electronics Systems Lab (1.0)
• INFO 1510 Introduction to System Administration--Linux/UNIX (3.0)
Emphasis in
Computer Networking
42 Credits
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
42 Credits
The Computer Science area of specialization is designed to
prepare students for employment opportunities in the fields
of complex algorithms involved in designing and developing application programs or systems programs, software
engineering, rapid application development, and software
maintenance. Students are prepared to take industry standard programming certification examinations. The student
is reponsible for registering for and taking the required
certification examinations.
Emphasis Requirements:
27 Credits
Minimum grade of C- required in these courses with a
combined GPA of 2.5 or higher.
• CS 2450
Software Engineering
• CS 3220
Visual Basic Software Development
or CS 3250
Java Software Development (3.0)
or CS 3260
CsharpNET Software Development (3.0)
• CS 3310
Introduction to Algorithms
or CS 3320
Numerical Software Engineering
(3.0)
• CS 3520
Database Theory
• CS 4380
Advanced/High-Performance
Computer Architecture
• CS 4450
Analysis of Programming Languages
• CS 4470
Artificial Intelligence
• CS 4490
Compiler Construction
• CS 4510
Operating Systems Design and
Simulation
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
Complete 15 credits from the following or any CS
15.0
3000 or 4000 level course not already required. Minimum of 6 credits must be upper division. (Minimum
grade of C- required in these courses with a combined
GPA of 2.5 or higher.):
• EENG 3750 Engineering Analysis (3.0)
Utah Valley State
42 Credits
The Software Engineering area of specialization is designed
to prepare students for employment opportunities in the
fields of systems analysis, design and implementation, applications programming, and software maintenance. Students
are prepared to take industry standard programming certification examinations. The student is responsible to register
for and take the required certification examinations.
•
•
or
or
CS 2450
CS 3220
CS 3250
CS 3260
or CS 3370
• INFO 3410
• CS 3520
• CS 4410
• CS 4100
Complete 15 credits from the following or any CS
15.0
3000 or 4000 level course not already required.
(minimum of six credits must be 3000 or 4000 level).
(Minimum grade of C- required in these courses with a
combined GPA of 2.5 or higher.):
• EENG 2700 Digital Design I (3.0)
• EENG 2705 Digital Design I Lab (1.0)
• INFO 2640 Router Management (3.0)
• INFO 2650 Voice and Data Cabling Fundamentals (3.0)
• INFO 3630 Advanced System Administration-Windows Server (3.0)
• INFO 2660 Information Security--Fundamentals (3.0)
• INFO 3660 Information Security--Network
Defense and Countermeasures (3.0)
• INFO 4660 Computer Forensics (3.0)
Emphasis in
Computer Science
Emphasis in
Database Engineering
27 Credits
Minimum grade of C- required in these courses with a
combined GPA of 2.5 or higher.
• CS 3250
Java Software Development
• CS 3520
Database Theory
• CS 3550
Internet Software Development
• CS 3670
Network Programming
• CS 4610
TCP/IP Internet Architecture
• CS 4650
Directory-Based Networks
• CS 4670
Undergraduate Research Project-Networking Specialization
• INFO 1510 Introduction to System Administration--Linux/UNIX
• INFO 3510 Advanced System Administration-Linux/UNIX
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
Introduction to System Administration--Linux/UNIX (3.0)
Emphasis Requirements:
This program is designed to prepare students for employment opportunities in the fields of local area networks, Internet networking, Intranet networking, data communications,
groupware, network management, world wide web servers,
network customer support, and network maintenance.
Students are prepared to take industry standard networking
certification examinations. The student is responsible to
register for and take the required certification examinations.
Emphasis Requirements:
• INFO 1510
• INFO 4410
• CS 4500
• CS 4600
• CS 2600
3.0
•
•
•
•
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
•
•
or
or
27 Credits
Software Engineering
Visual Basic Software Development
Java Software Development (3.0)
CsharpNET Software Development (3.0)
C-plus-plus Software Development (3.0)
Database Systems
Database Theory
Human Factors in Software
Engineering
Database Management System
Construction
Database Administration
Advanced Topics in Database
Enterprise Architecture
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
•
•
•
•
3.0
3.0
3.0
•
•
•
•
Fundamentals of Data Communications
CS 301R
Invited Speaker Series
CS 3050
Computer Ethics
CS 3060
Operating Systems Theory
CS 3240
Introduction to Computational
Theory
CS 3690
Advanced Topics in Data Communications
CS 3220
Visual Basic Software Development
CS 3250
Java Software Development (3.0)
CS 3260
CsharpNET Software Development (3.0)
CS 3520
Database Theory
CS 4230
Software Testing and Quality
Engineering
CS 4400
Software Engineering II
CS 4410
Human Factors in Software
Engineering
CS 4450
Analysis of Programming Languages
CS 4550
Software Engineering III
MATH 1220 Calculus II
MATH 2040 Principles of Statistics
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
Complete 15 credits from the following:
15.0
• CS 3220
Visual Basic Software Development (3.0)
• CS 3250
Java Software Development (3.0)
• CS 3260
CsharpNET Software Development (3.0)
• CS 3370
C-plus-plus Software Development (3.0)
• CS 3540
Game Programming (3.0)
• CS 3550
Internet Software Development (3.0)
• CS 3660
Web Server Administration and
Programming (3.0)
• CS 3670
Network Programming (3.0)
• CS 4230
Software Testing and Quality
Engineering (3.0)
• CS 4400
Software Engineering II (3.0)
• CS 4470
Artificial Intelligence (3.0)
• CS 4510
Operating Systems Design and
Simulation (3.0)
• CS 481R
Internship (1.0)
69 C REDITS
41 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2020
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
• MATH 1210 Calculus I
American Institutions, complete one of the following:
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Requirements:
• PHYS 2210 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I
• PHYS 2215 Physics for Scientists and Engineers
I Lab
• PHYS 2220 Physics for Scientists and Engineers
II
• PHYS 2225 Physics for Scientists and Engineers
II Lab
• Biology distri- 3.0
bution
• Fine Arts
3.0
Distribution
• COMM 1020 Public Speaking
• COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communication
Discipline Core Requirements:
• CS 1400
• CS 1410
• CS 2810
• CS 2300
• CS 2420
• CS 2450
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
5.0
4.0
18 Credits
1 Completion of a minimum of 123 semester credits, with
a minimum of 40 upper-division credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.5 or above, with a
minimum grade of C- in all discipline core and elective
requirements.
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC. Ten of these hours must be
within the last 45 hours earned. At least 12 of the credit
hours earned in residence must be in approved CNS
Department courses.
4 No more than 80 semester hours and no more than 20
hours of transfer credit from a two-year college may be
applied to the core or elective courses.
5 No more than 6 semester hours may be earned through
independent study.
Minor in
Computer Science
• CS 1410
• CS 2420
18 C REDITS
9 Credits
Fundamentals of Programming (CS 3.0
1030 recommended)
Object-Oriented Programming
3.0
Introduction to Algorithms and Data 3.0
Structures
3.0
3.0
Elective Requirements:
5.0
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
9 Credits
• Complete at least three CS courses numbered
3060 or above
9.0
• To fill the requirements for a computer science minor
students must have no course grade lower than C- in
any of the CS courses required for the computer science
minor.
3.0
2.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
64 Credits
Fundamentals of Programming
Object-Oriented Programming
Computer Organization and
Architecture
Discrete Structures I
Introduction to Algorithms and Data
Structures
Software Engineering
3.0
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
• CS 1400
General Education Requirements:
3.0
Complete 18 credits from the following:
18.0
• EENG 3750 Engineering Analysis (3.0)
• INFO 1510 Introduction to System Administration--Linux/UNIX (3.0)
• Any CS course numbered 3000 or higher not
already required.
Discipline Core Requirements:
BS in
Software Engineering
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Computer Science 18 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
Computer Science Emphasis
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• CS 3250
Java Software Development (3.0)
• CS 3370
C-plus-plus Software Development (3.0)
Choose 15 credits from the following:
15.0
• CS 3240
Introduction to Computational
Theory (3.0)
• CS 3250
Java Software Development (3.0)
• CS 3330
Windows Programming (3.0)
• CS 3370
C-plus-plus Software Development (3.0)
• CS 2450
Software Engineering (3.0)
• CS 4380
Advanced/High-Performance
Computer Architecture (3.0)
• CS 4450
Analysis of Programming Languages
(3.0)
• CS 4490
Compiler Construction (3.0)
NOTE: A minimum GPA of 2.5 in all Specialty Core courses
with no grade lower than a C- required for graduation.
129
Computer Science
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă CS, Computer Science
130
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Culinary Arts
Culinary Ar ts
Director: Greg Forte
Office: MC 007f
Telephone: 801-863-8087
Faculty:
Associate Professor
Diana Fallis
Greg Forte
Assistant Professor
Troy Wilson
Catering Manager
Connie Bullock
Advisor: Julie Slocum
Office: MC 007e
Telephone: 801-863-8914
Advisory Committee: Kent Anderson,
Chef/Owner, Chef’s Table; Rob Morgan,
Head Chef, Skyroom Restaurant, BYU;
Brian Peterson, Owner, Bryson Bakery;
Jane Becker, Manager, Smith’s Food and
Drug; Raymond Alexander, Executive Chef,
Provo Marriott; Peter Villano, Executive
Chef, Riverside Country Club; Don Heidel,
Executive Chef, The Homestead Resort;
Melva Sien, Utah Restaurant Association;
Laura Heald Watson, Food and Nutrition
Services Director, Utah Valley Regional
Medical Center; Brad Burton, Nicholas and
Company; Chantelle Kukahiko-Hughey,
Former Student; Guy Whitely-Ross, Chef,
Chili’s; Carla Leis, Former Student; Franz
Kubak, Executive Chef, Hilton SLC Center.
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The Culinary Arts Institute at UVSC offers
premier training in culinary arts for those
students interested in cooking or creating
foods in many areas such as full-service
restaurants; hotels; private catering;
airlines; institutional facilities such as
schools, hospitals, and care facilities; as
well as fast foods.
The graduates of the Institute are in high
demand and are recruited by owners
and managers of well-known facilities
throughout the country.
in Culinary Arts is offered. A Bachelor of
Science Degree in Hospitality Management
with a Food and Beverage specialization
is also available for students seeking a
four-year degree. See the Hospitality
Management section of the UVSC catalog
for required courses and details. (See
Graduation Requirements in catalog for
definitions.) Enrollment in the Culinary Arts
Institute is limited. Permission is required to
enroll in cooking classes.
AAS in Culinary Arts
68 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Completion of the following courses with a grade of
C- or better. CA 1480 (including ServSafe certification);
HM 1010; MAT 0990; ENGH 0990; CTRS 0990.
2 Complete 600 documented hours work in the industry;
acceptance into the Culinary Arts Institute by completion of application process (see Advisor for specific
details).
3 Overall GPA: 2.0 or better.
General Education Requirements:
17 Credits
ENGLISH
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications
3.0
MATHEMATICS
• ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
3.0
HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS/FOREIGN LANGUAGE
• ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
3.0
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
• MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior
3.0
BIOLOGY OR PHYSICAL SCIENCE
• CA 1150
Nutrition and Food Service
3.0
PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH/SAFETY OR ENVIRONMENT
• PES 1097
Fitness for Life
2.0
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
or
•
or
•
•
•
or
51 Credits
HM 1010
CA 1480
CA 1120
CA 1130
CA 1310
Introduction to Hospitality Industry
Sanitation and Table Service
Cooking Skills Development
Baking Skills Development
Purchasing and Storeroom Management
CA 1230
Professional Kitchen I--Cooking
CA 1240
Professional Kitchen I--Baking/
Pastry
CA 2120
Professional Kitchen II (9.0)
CA 282R
Culinary Arts Internship* (3.0)
CA 2320
Professional Kitchen III
CA 282R
Culinary Arts Internship (3.0)
CA 2430
Menu/Facilities Design and Beverage Management
HM 3640
Food and Beverage Controls
MGMT 2250 Job Application and Advancement
Skills
MGMT 3890 Career Preparation (2.0)
3.0
3.0
4.5
4.5
3.0
4.5
4.5
8.0
9.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 68 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above with no
grade below a “C-” in culinary arts or other discipline
core courses.
3 Residency hours- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
Note: Students are responsible for completing all prerequisite courses.
Footnotes:
* CA 282R, internship, can be taken one time only.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă CA, Culinary Arts
PROGR AMS
An Associate in Applied Science Degree
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
131
Dance
Dance
Department Chair: Kim Strunk
Office: LA 111g
Telephone: 801-863-7225
Department Office: LA 111j
Administrative Assistant: Elaine Miner
Telephone: 801-863-8610
Faculty:
Professor
Kathie Debenham
Assistant Professor
Angela Banchero-Kelleher
Amy Markgraf-Jacobson
Nichole Ortega
Kim Strunk
Doris Trujillo
Lecturer
Jacqueline Colledge
Artist in Residence
Scott Asbell
School of Humanities, Arts, and
Social Sciences
Dean: William W. Cobb, Jr.
Office: LA 209d
Telephone: 801-863-7435
MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of Utah Valley State College
Department of Dance is to foster academic
and artistic excellence through an intensive
technical and reflective study of dance.
Anchored in a common core curriculum
with several areas of emphasis, our
program provides a rich and stimulating
environment where students cultivate their
technical, aesthetic, creative, and scholarly
potential. We value superior teaching
which promotes dance as an artistic and
cultural expression that has the power
to enrich and transform the individual,
community, and society.
PROGR AMS
Students interested in pursuing a degree
in dance can choose from the following
degree paths: AS Pre Major in Dance,
BFA in Dance with an emphasis in Ballet
or Modern dance, BS in Movement Studies
with an emphasis in Ballroom dance, and
BS in Dance Education. The Department
also offers a Ballet, Ballroom or Modern
dance emphasis in Integrated Studies. In
addition to career training, the Department
of Dance provides opportunities for all
interested students to explore the many
forms of dance as elective and/or general
education credit. The study of dance
offers personal and cultural enrichment for
majors and non-majors alike and allows
132
students to augment their physical skill as
they study dance in relationship to the self,
society, and other arts and disciplines.
PERFORMING OPPORTUNITIES
A variety of student, pre-professional
and professional companies within the
department provide excellent local,
national and international performing
opportunities for dance majors. Concerts
are presented in formal and informal as
well as, adjudicated settings. Membership
in companies is by audition only.
CAREER OPTIONS
Those trained in dance find careers as
public and private school teachers, college
and university educators (requires graduate
degree), professional performers and
choreographers, dance historians and
critics, administrators, dance therapists,
professionals in the field of somatics,
researchers, notators, movement analysts
private studio owners, and health and
fitness consultants.
AS Pre Major in Dance
62 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology (BIOL 1010 recommended)
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science (ZOOL
2010 recommended)
• Humanities Distribution
• DANC 2110 Orientation to Dance
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
• DANC 1160
• DANC 127R
• DANC 1330
• DANC 143R
• DANC 144R
•
•
•
•
•
•
DANC 1510
DANC 1610
DANC 2330
DANC 2340
DANC 265R
DANC 2670
3.0
3.0
3.0
Elective Requirements:
Complete 4 credits from the following:
• DANC 1520 Folk Dance I (1.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
DANC 1530
DANC 1540
DANC 1560
DANC 1570
DANC 1580
DANC 1700
DANC 1710
DANC 1720
DANC 1780
DANC 1790
DANC 221R
DANC 2250
DANC 2260
DANC 227R
DANC 243R
Folk Dance II (1.0)
Clogging I (1.0)
African Dance I (1.0)
African Dance II (2.0)
Tap Dance I (1.0)
American Social Dance I (1.0)
International Ballroom Dance I (1.0)
Latin Ballroom Dance I (1.0)
Country Western Dance I (1.0)
Country Western Dance II (1.0)
Pointe II (1.0)
Character Dance I (1.0)
Character Dance II (1.0)
Ballet Technique II (3.0)
Modern Dance Technique and
Theory II (3.0)
• DANC 244R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory II (3.0)
• DANC 247R Repertory (1.0)
• DANC 250R Advanced Jazz Dance (2.0)
• DANC 2700 American Social Dance II (1.0)
• DANC 2710 International Ballroom Dance
II (1.0)
• DANC 2720 Latin Ballroom Dance II (1.0)
• DANC 276R Ballroom Dance Company Back-Up
Team (1.0)
• DANC 327R Ballet Technique III (3.0)
• DANC 346R Modern Dance Performance (2.0)
• DANC 370R American Social Dance III (1.0)
• DANC 371R International Ballroom Dance
III (1.0)
• DANC 372R Latin Ballroom Dance III (1.0)
• DANC 376R Ballroom Dance Company Reserve
Tour Team (2.0)
• DANC 429R Utah Regional Ballet Repertory (2.0)
• DANC 476R Ballroom Dance Company Tour
Team (2.0)
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 62 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BS in Dance Education
126 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Complete the following courses with a grade of B or
higher: DANC 1160, DANC 143R, DANC 144R, DANC
1510 OR DANC 250R, DANC 1610, AND DANC
2330.
2 Passing audition and interview with Dance Education
faculty.
3 Overall GPA of 2.75.
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
23 Credits
Music for Dancers
Ballet Technique I (2 semesters)
(3.0)
Studio Workshop--Creative Process
in Dance
Modern Dance Technique and
Theory I
Modern Dance Technique and
Theory I
Intermediate Jazz Dance
Dance Conditioning
Improvisation
Composition
Fundamentals of Movement
Introduction to Laban Studies
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1.0
6.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4 Credits
4.0
General Education Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
35 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences (3.0)
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
(recommended for Business,
Education, Science, and Health
Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses:
• BIOL 1010
General Biology (Strongly
recommended)
• Physical Science
• ZOOL 2320 Human Anatomy (Strongly
recommended for additional Biology or Physical Science) (4.0)
• Humanities
• DANC 2110 Orientation to Dance (Fine Arts)
• Social/Behavioral Science
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Utah Valley State
Dance
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
or
•
91 Credits
DANC 1160
DANC 127R
DANC 227R
DANC 143R
Music for Dancers
Ballet Technique I (3.0)
Ballet Technique II
Modern Dance Technique and
Theory I
• DANC 144R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory I
• DANC 1510 Intermediate Jazz Dance
or DANC 250R Advanced Jazz Dance (2.0)
• DANC 1610 Dance Conditioning
• DANC 2330 Improvisation
• DANC 2340 Composition
• DANC 243R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory II
• DANC 244R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory II
• DANC 265R Fundamentals of Movement
• DANC 2670 Introduction to Laban Studies
• DANC 2700 American Social Dance II
• DANC 3140 Dance Production and Lighting
• DANC 3160 Dance Accompaniment
• DANC 3330 Modern Dance Workshop
• DANC 3350 Choreography
• DANC 3400 Dance in the Elementary School
• DANC 341R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory III
• DANC 342R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory III
• DANC 3450 Modern Dance Teaching Methods
• DANC 3560 World Dance Forms
• DANC 3630 Dance History
• DANC 3680 Dance Kinesiology
• DANC 4360 Senior Capstone II
• DANC 4430 Dance Teaching Practicum
• DANC 4880 Current Issues in Dance
Education Courses:
• EDSC 2540 Development of the Adolescent
Student
• EDSC 3000 Educational Psychology
• EDSP 3400 Exceptional Students
• EDSC 3050 Foundations of American Education
• EDSC 3250 Instructional Media
• EDSC 4440 Content Area Reading and Writing
• EDSC 4450 Multicultural Instruction/ESL
• EDSC 4250 Classroom Management II
• EDSC 4550 Secondary Curriculum Instruction
and Assessment
• EDSC 4850 Student Teaching--Secondary (4.0)
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
•
•
•
•
Humanities Distribution
Social/Behavioral Science
DANC 2110 Orientation to Dance (Fine Arts)
BIOL 1010
General Biology (strongly
recommended for Biology
Distribution course)
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science (ZOOL
2320 Human Anatomy strongly recommended)
Discipline Core Requirements:
1.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
•
•
or
•
3.0
• DANC 143R
2.0
2.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
• DANC 144R
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
•
or
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
DANC 1160
DANC 127R
DANC 227R
DANC 1330
DANC 1510
DANC 250R
DANC 1610
DANC 2330
DANC 2340
DANC 265R
DANC 2670
DANC 3140
DANC 3680
DANC 4350
DANC 4360
DANC 4880
DANC 4920
DANC 3630
•
•
•
•
DANC 2700
DANC 370R
DANC 2710
DANC 371R
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
4.0
• DANC 471R
8.0
• DANC 4740
• DANC 2720
• DANC 372R
• DANC 472R
• DANC 3730
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 126 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.75 (B-) or above
(departments may require a higher GPA).
3 Residency hours: minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BS in Movement Studies
with an Emphasis in
Ballroom Dance
120 C REDITS
1 By application and audition after completing at least 30
semester hours of college credit at UVSC
2 Completion of DANC 2700, DANC 2710, and DANC
2720 with a grade of B- or better.
3 Completion of DANC 2110, DANC 2330, and DANC
1330 with a grade of B- or better.
4 Cumulative G.P.A. of 3.0
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
35 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Choose one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Choose one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
Utah Valley State
• DANC 376R
or DANC 476R
• DANC 3610
• MGMT 1010
• PES 2300
Matriculation Requirements:
General Education Requirements:
or DANC 4750
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
• DANC 3740
• DANC 3750
• DANC 3670
3.0
3.0
41 Credits
Music for Dancers
Ballet Technique I (3.0)
Ballet Technique II (3.0)
Studio Workshop--Creative Process
in Dance
Modern Dance Technique and
Theory I
Modern Dance Technique and
Theory I
Intermediate Jazz Dance
Advanced Jazz Dance (2.0)
Dance Conditioning
Improvisation
Composition
Fundamentals of Movement
Introduction to Laban Studies
Dance Production and Lighting
Dance Kinesiology
Senior Capstone I
Senior Capstone II
Current Issues in Dance
Dance as Cultural Practice
Dance History
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
6.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
39 Credits
American Social Dance II
American Social Dance III
International Ballroom Dance II
International Ballroom Dance III (2
semesters required) (2.0)
International Ballroom Dance IV (2
semesters required) (4.0)
Latin Ballroom Dance II
Latin Ballroom Dance III (2
semesters required) (2.0)
Latin Ballroom Dance IV (2
semesters required) (4.0)
American Social Dance Teaching
Methods
International Ballroom Dance
Teaching Methods
Latin Ballroom Dance Teaching
Methods
Ballroom Dance Company Reserve
Tour Team (4.0)
Ballroom Dance Company Tour
Team
Intermediate Dance Conditioning
and Injury Prevention
Introduction to Business
Introduction to Fundamentals of
Athletic Coaching
Ballroom Dance Choreography
Studies in Ballroom Dance Styles
Movement Analysis
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
4.0
1.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
5 Credits
Choose 5 hours from the following:
• DANC 1580 Tap Dance I (1.0)
• MGMT 1600 Fundamentals of Marketing (3.0)
• DANC 365R Advanced Fundamentals of
Movement (2.0)
• DANC 376R Ballroom Dance Company Reserve
Tour Team (2.0)
or DANC 476R Ballroom Dance Company Tour
Team (2.0)
• DANC 4740 International Ballroom Dance
Teaching Methods (3.0)
or DANC 4750 Latin Ballroom Dance Teaching
Methods (3.0)
• PES 1010
Aerobics I (1.0)
• PES 1085
Weight Training I (1.0)
• DANC 1780 Country Western Dance I (1.0)
• PES 3700
Exercise Physiology (4.0)
• THEA 4213 Costume Design I (3.0)
5.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 120 semester credits; a
minimum of 40 credits must be upper division.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.7 (B-) or above with
no grade lower than a B- in required courses.
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 30 credit hours of business courses through course attendance at UVSC, with
at least 10 hours earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
Catalog 2007–2008
BFA in Dance
120 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 By application and audition after completing at least 30
semester hours of college credit at UVSC.
2 Completion of (DANC 143R and DANC 144R) or (2
semester of DANC 227R); DANC 1330; DANC 2110;
and DANC 2330 with no grade lower than a B-.
3 Cumulative G.P.A. of 2.75
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Choose one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Choose one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Humanities Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
• DANC 2110 Orientation to Dance (Fine Arts)
• BIOL 1010
General Biology (strongly recommended for Biology distribution)
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
or
•
DANC 1160
DANC 127R
DANC 227R
DANC 1330
• DANC 143R
• DANC 144R
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
41 Credits
Music for Dancers
Ballet Technique I (3.0)
Ballet Technique II (3.0)
Studio Workshop--Creative Process
in Dance
Modern Dance Technique and
Theory I
Modern Dance Technique and
Theory I
Intermediate Jazz Dance
Advanced Jazz Dance (2.0)
Dance Conditioning
Improvisation
Composition
Fundamentals of Movement
Introduction to Laban Studies
Dance Production and Lighting
Dance Kinesiology
Senior Capstone I
Senior Capstone II
Current Issues in Dance
Dance as Cultural Practice
Dance History
• DANC 1510
or DANC 250R
• DANC 1610
• DANC 2330
• DANC 2340
• DANC 265R
• DANC 2670
• DANC 3140
• DANC 3680
• DANC 4350
• DANC 4360
• DANC 4880
• DANC 4920
• DANC 3630
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Ballet Emphasis
• Modern Dance Emphasis
1.0
6.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
46.0
44.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 120 semester credits; a
minimum of 40 credits must be upper division.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.75 (B-) or above with
no grade lower than a B- in required courses.
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 30 credit hours of
business courses through course attendance at UVSC,
with at least 10 hours earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
Emphasis in Ballet
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
DANC 221R
DANC 2250
DANC 2260
DANC 3150
DANC 321R
46 Credits
34 Credits
Pointe II (2 semesters required) (1.0)
Character Dance I
Character Dance II
Music for Ballet Dancers
Pointe III (2 semesters required)
(1.0)
• DANC 327R Ballet Technique III (2 semesters
required) (3.0)
• DANC 421R Pointe IV (2 semesters required)
(1.0)
or DANC 423R Pointe V (2 semesters required)
(1.0)
• DANC 424R Pas de deux (2 semesters required)
(1.0)
2.0
1.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
6.0
2.0
2.0
133
Dance
• DANC 425R Repertory Ensemble (4 semesters
required total) (2.0)
or DANC 429R Utah Regional Ballet Repertory (4
semesters required total) (2.0)
• DANC 3340 Ballet Choreography
• DANC 427R Ballet Technique IV (2 semesters
required total) (3.0)
or DANC 428R Ballet Technique V (2 semesters
required total) (3.0)
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
8.0
Emphasis Requirements:
2.0
6.0
12 Credits
Choose 12 hours from the following:
12.0
• DANC 1700 American Social Dance I (1.0)
• DANC 1710 International Ballroom Dance I (1.0)
• DANC 3610 Intermediate Dance Conditioning
and Injury Prevention (2.0)
• DANC 365R Advanced Fundamentals of
Movement (2.0)
• DANC 3670 Movement Analysis (3.0)
• DANC 429R Utah Regional Ballet Repertory (2.0)
• THEA 1033 Fundamentals of Acting I (3.0)
• Any DANC course not previously taken.
Emphasis in Modern Dance
Emphasis Requirements:
44 Credits
32 Credits
• DANC 243R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory II
• DANC 244R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory II
• DANC 3160 Dance Accompaniment
• DANC 3330 Modern Dance Workshop
• DANC 3350 Choreography
• DANC 3400 Dance in the Elementary School
• DANC 341R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory III
• DANC 342R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory III
• DANC 3450 Modern Dance Teaching Methods
• DANC 346R Modern Dance Performance
• DANC 3560 World Dance Forms
• DANC 365R Advanced Fundamentals of Movement
or DANC 3670 Movement Analysis (3.0)
• DANC 441R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory IV
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
12 Credits
Choose 12 credits from the following list:
12.0
• DANC 1580 Tap Dance I (1.0)
• DANC 1700 American Social Dance I (1.0)
• DANC 1710 International Ballroom Dance I (1.0)
• DANC 1720 Latin Ballroom Dance I (1.0)
• DANC 327R Ballet Technique III (3.0)
• DANC 3610 Intermediate Dance Conditioning
and Injury Prevention (2.0)
• DANC 365R Advanced Fundamentals of Movement (2.0)
• DANC 3670 Movement Analysis (3.0)
• DANC 442R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory IV (3.0)
• Any DANC course not previously taken
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Ballet
Emphasis Requirements:
20 Credits
20 Credits
Prerequisites:
• DANC 1330 Studio Workshop--Creative Process
in Dance (1.0)
• DANC 2110 Orientation to Dance (3.0)
• DANC 2670 Introduction to Laban Studies (2.0)
• DANC 3560 World Dance Forms (2.0)
Complete the following:
• DANC 2340 Composition
• DANC 3630 Dance History
• DANC 3670 Movement Analysis
• DANC 4880 Current Issues in Dance
• DANC 4920 Dance as Cultural Practice
Complete 6 credits from the following classes:
• DANC 227R Ballet Technique II (3.0)
• DANC 327R Ballet Technique III (3.0)
• DANC 427R Ballet Technique IV (3.0)
• DANC 428R Ballet Technique V (3.0)
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
Emphasis in Ballroom Dance
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
20 Credits
20 Credits
Prerequisites:
• DANC 1330 Studio Workshop--Creative Process
in Dance (1.0)
• DANC 2110 Orientation to Dance (3.0)
• DANC 2670 Introduction to Laban Studies (2.0)
• DANC 3560 World Dance Forms (2.0)
Complete the following:
• DANC 2340 Composition
• DANC 3630 Dance History
• DANC 3670 Movement Analysis
• DANC 4880 Current Issues in Dance
• DANC 4920 Dance as Cultural Practice
Complete 6 credits from the following classes:
• DANC 1700 American Social Dance I (3.0)
• DANC 1710 International Ballroom
Dance I (1.0)
• DANC 1720 Latin Ballroom Dance I (1.0)
• DANC 2700 American Social Dance II (1.0)
• DANC 2710 International Ballroom
Dance II (1.0)
• DANC 2720 Latin Ballroom Dance II (1.0)
• DANC 370R American Social Dance III (1.0)
• DANC 371R International Ballroom
Dance III (1.0)
• DANC 372R Latin Ballroom Dance III (1.0)
• DANC 3730 American Social Dance Teaching
Methods (2.0)
• DANC 376R Ballroom Dance Company Reserve
Tour Team (2.0)
• DANC 4740 International Ballroom Dance
Teaching Methods (3.0)
• DANC 4750 Latin Ballroom Dance Teaching
Methods (3.0)
• DANC 476R Ballroom Dance Company Tour
Team (2.0)
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Modern Dance
Emphasis Requirements:
20 Credits
20 Credits
Prerequisites:
• DANC 1330 Studio Workshop--Creative Process
in Dance (1.0)
• DANC 2110 Orientation to Dance (3.0)
• DANC 2670 Introduction to Laban Studies (2.0)
• DANC 3560 World Dance Forms (2.0)
Complete the following:
• DANC 2340 Composition
• DANC 3630 Dance History
• DANC 3670 Movement Analysis
• DANC 4880 Current Issues in Dance
• DANC 4920 Dance as Cultural Practice
Complete 6 credits from the following classes:
• DANC 143R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory I (3.0)
• DANC 144R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory I (3.0)
• DANC 243R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory II (3.0)
• DANC 244R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory II (3.0)
• DANC 341R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory III (3.0)
• DANC 342R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory III (3.0)
• DANC 441R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory IV (3.0)
• DANC 442R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory IV (3.0)
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă DANC, Dance
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
134
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Dental Hygiene
Dental Hygiene
Department Chair: George Veit
Office: BA 203d
Telephone: 801-863-7536
E-mail: veitge@uvsc.edu
procedures. Dental hygienists work in
private dental practices as well as in school
systems, public health agencies, Federal
and State agencies, hospitals, nursing
homes, the World Health Organization,
and foreign governments.
PROGR AM OVERVIEW
Advisor: George Veit
Faculty:
Associate Professor
Christina Veit
Assistant Professor
Kristen Kinateder
George Veit
Staff:
Administrative Assistant
Joyce Henderson
Clinic Manager
Linda Anderson
Advisory Committee: Melinda Tate RDH,
Karen Preston RDH, Christina Veit RDH,
Alexander Larsen DDS, Gary Weist DDS,
George Veit DDS MS, Kristen Kinateder
BS, Kelli Deardon - student, Sam Rushforth,
Ph.D
School of Science and Health
Dean: Sam Rushforth
Office: PS 201a
Telephone: 801-863-8980
Associate Dean: Bill Evenson
Office: PS 201e
Telephone:801-863-6440
Assistant Dean: Lori Barber
Office: BA 205c
Telephone: 801-863-8380
Assistant Dean: Louise Illes
Office: PS 201d
Telephone: 801-863-6040
Assistant Dean: David Jordan
Office: PS 201c
Telephone: 801-863-7160
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Dental hygienists, under the supervision
of licensed dentists, provide preventive
dental care to patients such as dental
prophylaxis, topical fluoride applications,
pit and fissure sealants, administration
of local anesthetics, dental radiographs
and teaching patients plaque control
Utah Valley State
Admission to UVSC does not
constitute admission to the Dental
Hygiene Program. Admission to the
Dental Hygiene Program requires a
separate and competitive admission
process.
The Dental Hygiene program is a twoyear program leading to an Associate in
Applied Science degree. Upon successful
completion of the program, graduates
must pass the national, regional and
state board examinations to apply for
Licensure. Applicants for Licensure in
Utah must “produce satisfactory evidence
of good moral character as it relates to
the practice of...dental hygiene;” (State of
Utah Dentists and Dental Hygienists Act
Title 58 Chapter 7-7.1). This act includes
conviction of a felony or violating the Utah
Controlled Substance Act as unprofessional
conduct. Applicants to the program who
have questions regarding their potential
for Licensure should contact the Utah
Division of Occupational and Professional
Licensure.
Utah Valley State College has been
granted accreditation status of “approval
without reporting requirements” by The
Commission on Dental Accreditation of the
American Dental Association, (211 East
Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL 60611, (312)
440-4653).
PROGR AM INFORMATION
Students are required to follow
departmental infection control policies
and procedures that are based on OSHA
regulations and CDC recommendations.
They must meet the health and safety
requirements participating facilities require
of their employees. These requirements
must be met prior to enrollment in Dental
Hygiene 1010:
1. Documentation of current immunization
for Tetanus, Measles, Mumps, Rubella,
and Hepatitis B. Students may refuse any
immunization by signing a waiver and
release from liability. Immunization may
also be waived with documentation of
acceptable titer or written documentation
from a physician of immunization risk.
2. Negative Mantoux for tuberculosis;
negative chest x-ray if Mantoux is contra
indicated/positive.
3. Current CPR certification (American
Catalog 2007–2008
Heart Association CPR for Health Care
Providers, American Red Cross Health
Care Provider, or National Safety
Council); certification must remain
current throughout academic program.
Students will have professional liability
insurance through UVSC’s comprehensive
liability insurance policy. This liability
insurance is in effect when students are
performing within the scope of their
assigned clinical/laboratory activities and
under the supervision of Department of
Dental Hygiene faculty and supervising
dentists.
The Department of Dental Hygiene
adheres to UVSC policy allowing students,
staff or faculty with AIDS, ARC, or HIV to
participate in all phases of College life
within established College policies. The
Department will respect the confidentiality
of individuals with AIDS, ARC, or HIV
insofar as the safety of others is not in
question. College policy is not to test
students, faculty or staff for the AIDS virus.
See Policy A-9.1 for full college policy.
State Licensure requirements may consider
health status. Applicants with questions
regarding Licensure policies should contact
the licensing division of the state(s) in which
they intend to seek Licensure following
graduation.
Costs for the Dental Hygiene program
include a $2,675 program fee per semester
for 4 semesters, in addition to UVSC
tuition and laboratory fees (these costs are
subject to change). Students are required
to purchase their own dental instruments,
some clinical supplies, and uniforms.
Students are responsible for transportation
to the MATC clinic and other clinical sites,
as well as other field experiences and any
state, regional or national boards and
licensing.
The dental hygiene program is challenging
academically and in the amount of
time involved on campus and at clinical
experiences. Students should plan for
some evening and weekend clinical
experiences in dental hygiene courses.
Students will provide patient care in a
clinical setting. While volunteer patients
come to the clinic for treatment, students
may have to seek patients for some clinical
experiences, and are ultimately responsible
for obtaining their clinical patients.
Students will be informed of additional
departmental policies following admission
to the program.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
Admission to UVSC does not
constitute admission to the Dental
Hygiene Program. Admission to the
Dental Hygiene Program requires a
135
Dental Hygiene
separate and competitive admission
process.
For specific admission criteria, please
contact the Department of Dental Hygiene
at 801-863-7536 or e-mail request for
information to henderjo@uvsc.edu or
see our departmental website www.uvsc.
edu/dent/.
All applicants will be notified by mail of
their admission status. No telephone or
in-person requests for admission status will
be answered. Students not admitted for the
semester of application must reapply for
the next application period and compete
with the new pool for admission. There is
no waiting list for this program.
Transfer of Credits
For information regarding the transfer
of credits from other institutions of
higher learning for general education
and required courses other than Dental
Hygiene, please contact the Graduation
and Transfer Services office (AD 114,
telephone 863-8438). For Dental Hygiene
courses, contact the Department of Dental
Hygiene after you have been notified of
acceptance into the program.
•
•
•
•
•
•
DENT 1050
DENT 1060
DENT 2040
DENT 2050
DENT 2060
CHEM 1110
Clinical Dental Radiography
General and Oral Pathology
Dental Hygiene IV
Dental Hygiene Seminar
Community Dental Hygiene
Elementary Chemistry for the Health
Sciences
• COMM 1050 Introduction to Speech Communication
or COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communication (3.0)
• PSY 1010
General Psychology
• ZOOL 2320 Human Anatomy
• ZOOL 2420 Human Physiology
2.0
3.0
6.0
1.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
4.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 81 semester credits
2 Overall grade point average of 2.5 or above. All
courses must have “C-” or higher.
3 Residency hours: minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă DENT, Dental Hygiene
DEGREE
The Department of Dental Hygiene reserves
the right to modify the curriculum as
needed to meet accreditation requirements
and changes in the profession.
The following degree requirements
are valid only for students accepted
into the Dental Hygiene program
Fall 2007. Contact the Dental Hygiene
department advisor for Fall 2008
requirements.
PROGR AM
AAS in Dental Hygiene
81 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Complete MATH 1050, ENGL 1010, CHEM 1110,
ZOOL 2320 and ZOOL 2420
General Education Requirements:
20 Credits
ENGLISH
• ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
3.0
MATHEMATICS
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
4.0
HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS/FOREIGN LANGUAGE
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
3.0
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
• SOC 1010
Introduction to Sociology
3.0
or SOC 1020
Modern Social Problems (3.0)
BIOLOGY OR PHYSICAL SCIENCE
• MICR 2060 Microbiology for Health Professions 4.0
PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH/SAFETY OR ENVIRONMENT
• NUTR 1020 Foundations of Human Nutrition
3.0
Discipline Core Requirements:
61 Credits
Complete the following:
• DENT 1010 Dental Hygiene I
• DENT 1020 Oral Anatomy and Physiology
• DENT 2010 Dental Hygiene III
• DENT 2020 Dental Pharmacology
• DENT 2030 Periodontology
• DENT 1030 Dental Materials
• DENT 1040 Dental Hygiene II
136
4.0
4.0
6.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
6.0
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Diesel Mechanics Technology
Diesel
Mechanics
Technology
Department Chair: Don Wilson
Office: SA 325
Telephone: 801-863-8124
Program Coordinator: Don Ray Nelson
Office: SA 317c
Telephone: 801-863-6320 or
801-863-8349
Applied Science Degree, and the Bachelor
of Science in Technology Management
Degree.
Discipline Core Requirements:
Reminder: An overall grade point average
of 2.0 (C) or above is required for
graduation.
Certificate in Diesel
Mechanics Technology
31 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
31 Credits
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Faculty:
Associate Professor
Dean Bohl
Don Ray Nelson
Instructor
Kelvyn Blackhurst
Advisor: Carrie Peterson
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-7454
Office Manager: Katreena Davis
Office: SA 325
Telephone: 801-863-8349
Advisory Committee: Jeff Lyons, Lake
City International; Brian Brundage,
Lake City International; Jeffery Scott,
Scott Machinery; Terry Pollock, Wheeler
Machinery; John D. Hawkins, Geneva
Rocks Products; Jim French, Cummins
Rocky Mountain.
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Diesel Mechanics may be hired as
mechanics working on engines, automatic
transmissions, drive trains, electrical
systems, suspension and steering,
hydraulics, and air systems. They work
on heavy equipment, farm equipment,
and on-highway trucks. Diesel mechanics
diagnose, repair, weld, and fine-tune the
working parts of buses, trucks, construction
machinery, and generators.
PROGR AMS
Four options are available: One-year
Certificate, Diploma, and Associate in
Utah Valley State
• Any approved Biology or Physical Science Distribu- 3.0
tion Course
• Any approved Physical Education, Health, Safety or 1.0
Environment Course
•
or
•
or
or
•
DMT 1110
DMT 111L
DMT 1120
DMT 112L
Diesel Engine Overhaul
Diesel Engine Overhaul Lab
Diesel Engine Operation/Tune Up
Diesel Engine Operation/Tune
Up Lab
DMT 1510
Electrical Systems Theory
DMT 151L
Electrical Systems Lab
DMT 1520
Engine Electronics and Diagnostics
Theory
DMT 152L
Engine Electronics and Diagnostics
Lab
CLSS 1000 Student Success (3.0)
ENGL 106A Career Writing for Technology--A
AUT 1260
Tech Math for Mechanics
MAT 1000
Integrated Beginning and Intermediate Algebra (5.0)
Any higher MAT or MATH course
Any approved Behavioral Science, Social, or Political Science Distribution Course
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 31 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Completion of specified departmental requirements.
4 Residency hours -- minimum of 10 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
55 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
55 Credits
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
or
•
•
DMT 1110
DMT 111L
DMT 1120
DMT 112L
• DMT 1510
• DMT 151L
• DMT 1520
• DMT 152L
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
DMT 2230
DMT 223L
DMT 2310
DMT 231L
DMT 2320
DMT 232L
DMT 2410
DMT 241L
DMT 2420
DMT 242L
DMT 1110
DMT 111L
DMT 1120
DMT 112L
Diesel Engine Overhaul
Diesel Engine Overhaul Lab
Diesel Engine Operation/Tune Up
Diesel Engine Operation/Tune
Up Lab
DMT 1510
Electrical Systems Theory
DMT 151L
Electrical Systems Lab
DMT 1520
Engine Electronics and Diagnostics
Theory
DMT 152L
Engine Electronics and Diagnostics
Lab
DMT 2230
Climate Control Theory
DMT 223L
Climate Control Lab
DMT 2310
Fluid Power Theory
DMT 231L
Fluid Power Lab
DMT 2320
Fluid Power Transmission Theory
DMT 232L
Fluid Power Transmission Lab
DMT 2410
Chassis Theory
DMT 241L
Chassis Lab
DMT 2420
Power Trains Theory
DMT 242L
Power Trains Lab
CLSS 1000 Student Success (3.0)
ENGL 106A Career Writing for Technology--A
AUT 1260
Tech Math for Mechanics
Any approved Behavioral Science, Social, or Political Science Distribution Course
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 55 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Completion of specified departmental requirements.
4 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
AAS in Diesel
Mechanics Technology
64 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
16 Credits
• ENGL 1060
• AUT 1260
or MAT 1000
Career Writing for Technology
Tech Math for Mechanics
Integrated Beginning and Intermediate Algebra (5.0)
or Any higher MAT or MATH course
• Any approved Humanities, Fine Arts, or Foreign
Language Distribution Course
• Any approved Behavioral Science, Social, or Political Science Distribution Course
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
1 Completion of a minimum of 64 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BS in Technology
Management:
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the Technology Management section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
DMT 1110
DMT 111L
DMT 1120
DMT 112L
• DMT 1510
• DMT 151L
• DMT 1520
• DMT 152L
2.0
3.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
Graduation Requirements:
2.0
2.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
48 Credits
Diesel Engine Overhaul
Diesel Engine Overhaul Lab
Diesel Engine Operation/Tune Up
Diesel Engine Operation/Tune
Up Lab
Electrical Systems Theory
Electrical Systems Lab
Engine Electronics and Diagnostics
Theory
Engine Electronics and Diagnostics
Lab
Climate Control Theory
Climate Control Lab
Fluid Power Theory
Fluid Power Lab
Fluid Power Transmission Theory
Fluid Power Transmission Lab
Chassis Theory
Chassis Lab
Power Trains Theory
Power Trains Lab
Specialization in
Diesel Mechanics Technology
Diploma in Diesel
Mechanics Technology
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
DMT 2230
DMT 223L
DMT 2310
DMT 231L
DMT 2320
DMT 232L
DMT 2410
DMT 241L
DMT 2420
DMT 242L
48 Credits
48 Credits
Diesel Engine Overhaul
Diesel Engine Overhaul Lab
Diesel Engine Operation/Tune Up
Diesel Engine Operation/Tune
Up Lab
Electrical Systems Theory
Electrical Systems Lab
Engine Electronics and Diagnostics
Theory
Engine Electronics and Diagnostics
Lab
Climate Control Theory
Climate Control Lab
Fluid Power Theory
Fluid Power Lab
Fluid Power Transmission Theory
Fluid Power Transmission Lab
Chassis Theory
Chassis Lab
Power Trains Theory
Power Trains Lab
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.0
Due to the technical nature of the material
in DMT courses, additional reading and
math instruction may be required. More
information will be given during advisement.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă AUT, Automotive Technology
Ă CRT, Collision Repair Technology
Ă DMT, Diesel Mechanics Technology
3.0
3.0
137
Digital Media
Digital Media
Department Chair: Rodayne Esmay
Office: CS 526C
Telephone: 801-863-7050
Business Education Director: Jan
Bentley
Office: CS526g
Telephone: 801-863-6362
Department Office: CS 526
Department Telephone: 801-863MCT3
Department e-mail: MCT @uvsc.edu
Instruction is organized to offer a balance
between:
• conceptualizing projects based on sound
analysis, design and evaluation; and
• fostering skills of creativity and teamwork
to develop and deliver products.
Administrative Information management
provides training for students to be
employed in such areas as administrative
information managers, office managers,
executive assistants, project managers, and
other administrative support positions in
business, industry, and government.
Students in Digital Media may earn either
an Associate degree or a Bachelor degree.
Areas of focus include:
• Administrative Information Management
Faculty:
Professor
Cynthia Krebs
Associate Professor
Rodayne Esmay
Diane Hartman
Dennis Lisonbee
Chase Mitchell
Assistant Professor
Thor Anderson
Jan Bentley
Trudy Christensen
Michael Harper
Robert Trim
Michael G. Wisland
Lecturer
Benjamin Floyd
Administrative Support: Katrina S. H.
Van Cott
Office: CS 526
Telephone: 801-863-6217
Advisor: Bonnie Cook
Telephone: 801-863-8403
School of Technology & Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
PROGR AM DESCRIPTION
Digital Media (DGM) prepares students
for a variety of full-time or freelance
employment through a blend of classroom
and hands-on experience. The program
equips students with foundational theories
and processes to develop sound multicommunication structures. The curriculum
integrates graphics, text, animation, video
and audio digital materials to entertain,
educate, and communicate ideas through
meaningful human interaction. DGM
also houses the Administrative Information
Management programs and the Business
Education Certification program.
138
• Digital Animation Technology
• Digital Audio Processing
• Digital Cinema/TV Production
• Information Media Management
• Internet and Web Development
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Because of extensive use of digital media
in nearly every area of our lives, graduates
will find themselves in demand by diverse
organizations which use digital technology
to communicate ideas. For example,
graduates may work with medical teams
to develop training materials to describe
new surgical techniques to physicians,
or work with a team to create a new
children’s educational game. They may
work as video or audio specialists on
a documentary of historic sites, create
an interactive web site to support a
company’s retail efforts or as administrative
information management professionals.
Note: Some DGM courses require students
to use their own laptop computer in the
classroom.
PROGR AMS
Students may receive an Associate
in Applied Science in Administrative
Information Support or Digital Media ,
an Associate in Science in Administrative
Information Management, a Bachelor of
Science in Digital Media, or a Bachelor of
Science in Business/Marketing Education.
For a program listing for Administrative
Information Management see the
Administrative Information Management
section of the catalog.
For a program listing for Business/
Marketing Eduction see the Business/
Marketing Education section of the catalog.
Catalog 2007–2008
AAS in Digital
Communication
Technology
64 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
17 Credits
ENGLISH
• ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
MATHEMATICS
• MAT 1010
Intermediate Algebra
HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS/FOREIGN LANGUAGE
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values (highly recommeded) (3.0)
or Any approved Humanities, Fine Arts, or Foreign
Language Distribution Course
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
• Any approved Behavioral Science, Social or Political Science Distribution Course
BIOLOGY OR PHYSICAL SCIENCE
• Any approved Biology or Physical Science Distribution Course
PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH/SAFETY OR ENVIRONMENT
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or Any approved PE, Safety or Health Distribution
Course
Discipline Core Requirements:
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
30 Credits
Complete the following:
• DGM 1110
Digital Media Essentials I
• DGM 1210 Digital Media Essentials II
• DGM 2130 Digital Audio Essentials
• DGM 2110
Digital Cinema Essentials
• DGM 2120 Web Essentials
• DGM 2210 3D Modeling and Animation Essentials
• DGM 2220 Marketing for Digital Media
• DGM 2240 Interaction Design
• ART 1120
2D Design
or DGM 2250 Principles of Digital Design (3.0)
Elective Requirements:
3.0
4.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
17 Credits
• Complete 17 credits from approved DGM electives 17.0
(see advisor)
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 64 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BS in Digital Media
General Education Requirements:
121 C REDITS
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (recommended for Humanities or Arts
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (recommended for Social Science majors)
(3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
or
•
•
•
•
ART 1120
DGM 2250
DGM 1110
DGM 1210
DGM 2120
DGM 2220
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
50 Credits
2D Design
Principles of Digital Design (3.0)
Digital Media Essentials I
Digital Media Essentials II
Web Essentials
Marketing for Digital Media
3.0
4.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
Utah Valley State
Digital Media
• DGM 2240
• DGM 3220
• DGM 3120
Interaction Design
Digital Media Project Management
Developing Multimedia for Accessibility
• DGM 3130 Digital Storyboarding
or DGM 3870 Web Graphics Applications (3.0)
• DGM 4000 Writing for Digital Media
or ENGL 4310 Advanced Technical Communication (3.0)
• DGM 4310 Senior Projects I
• DGM 4330 Corporate Issues in Multimedia
• DGM 4410 Senior Projects II
Take one of the following sets:
Digital Media:
• DGM 2110
Digital Cinema Essentials (3.0)
• DGM 2130 Digital Audio Essentials (3.0)
• DGM 2210 3D Modeling and Animation Essentials (4.0)
Information Media Management:
• DGM 2300 Records and Information Management (3.0)
• DGM 2230 Exploring Digital Communication
Tools (3.0)
• DGM 3850 Desktop Publishing Skills (3.0)
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
9.0
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă BMED, Business/Marketing Education
Ă DGM, Digital Media
36 Credits
Complete 36 credits (with a minimum of 19 upper divi- 36.0
sion credits) from department approved electives.
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 121 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above, with
no grade lower than a “C” in DGM 1110, DGM 1210,
DGM 2110, DGM 2120, DGM 2130 and DGM 2210.
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Digital Media
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
18 Credits
Prerequisite courses:
• DGM 1110
Digital Media Essentials I (4.0)
• DGM 1210 Digital Media Essentials II (4.0)
• DGM 2130 Digital Audio Essentials (3.0)
• DGM 2110
Digital Cinema Essentials (3.0)
• DGM 2210 3D Modeling and Animation Essentials (4.0)
• DGM 2120 Web Essentials (3.0)
• DGM 2240 Interaction Design (3.0)
Complete the following:
• DGM 3220 Digital Media Project Management
• DGM 4000 Writing for Digital Media
or ENGL 4310 Advanced Technical Communication (3.0)
• DGM 4310 Senior Projects I
• DGM 4330 Corporate Issues in Multimedia
Complete 6 credits from the following:
• DGM 3120 Developing Multimedia for Accessibility (3.0)
• DGM 3130 Digital Storyboarding (3.0)
• DGM 2220 Marketing for Digital Media (3.0)
• DGM 4410 Senior Projects II (3.0)
BS in Technology
Management
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the Technology Management section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in
Digital Media
Emphasis Requirements:
45 Credits
30 Credits
Complete the following:
• DGM 1110
Digital Media Essentials I
• DGM 1210 Digital Media Essentials II
• DGM 2110
Digital Cinema Essentials
• DGM 2120 Web Essentials
• DGM 2130 Digital Audio Essentials
• DGM 2210 3D Modeling and Animation Essentials
• DGM 2220 Marketing for Digital Media
• DGM 2240 Interaction Design
• ART 1120
2D Design
or DGM 2250 Principles of Digital Design (3.0)
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
Complete 15 credits from approved DGM electives
(see advisor)
Utah Valley State
4.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
15.0
Catalog 2007–2008
139
Earth Science
Ear th Science
Department Chair: Daniel Horns
Office: EN 115b
Telephone: 801-863-8582 or 8636295
E-mail: hornsda@uvsc.edu
Advisor: Karli Grover
Office: PS 212a
Telephone: 801-863-8616
E-mail: groverka@uvsc.edu
Program Director for
Environmental Management:
Jim Callison
Office: EN 101
Telephone: 801-863-8697
Faculty:
Professor
Paul Tayler
Associate Professor
Michael Bunds
Eddy Cadet
Jim Callison
Daniel Horns
Assistant Professor
Joel Bradford
William Dinklage
Dan Stephen
Staff:
Administrative Assistant
Kellie D. Hancock
School of Science and Health
Dean: Sam Rushforth
Office: PS 201a
Telephone: 801-863-8980
Associate Dean: Bill Evenson
Office: PS 201e
Telephone: 801-863-6440
Assistant Dean: Lori Barber
Office: BA 205c
Telephone: 801-863-8380
Assistant Dean: Louise Illes
Office: PS 201d
Telephone: 801-863-6040
Assistant Dean: David Jordon
Office: PS 201c
Telephone: 801-863-7160
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Examples of occupations open to
graduates of Earth Science bachelor
programs are: exploration geologist,
hydrogeologist, engineering geologist,
environmental scientist, science manager,
140
science technician, government regulator,
environmental technician, and engineering
technician. Current employment
opportunities for graduates from Earth
Science programs are strong.
PROGR AMS
Students in Earth Science may receive:
Bachelor of Science in Earth Science with
an Emphasis in Geology; Bachelor of
Science in Earth Science with an Emphasis
in Environmental Management; Bachelor
of Science in Earth Science Education;
Bachelor of Science or Arts in Integrated
Studies with an emphasis in Earth Science.
31 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
22 Credits
Environmental Worker Safety
Introduction to Water Reclamation
(3.0)
ENVT 1360 Introduction to Water Treatment
ENVT 1300 Environmental Lab and Sampling
ENVT 3280 Environmental Law
ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
Business Computer Proficiency Exam
MAT 1010
Intermediate Algebra
3.0
or
•
•
•
•
or
•
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Elective Requirements:
4.0
9 Credits
Must take three of the following courses
9.0
• ENVT 3320 Hydraulics of Water (3.0)
• ENVT 1510 Hazardous Materials Emergency
Response (3.0)
• ENVT 3630 Introduction to Geographic
Information Systems (4.0)
• ENVT 3790 Hydrology (3.0)
• ENVT 1270 Environmental Microbiology (3.0)
• ENVT 3330 Water Resources Management (3.0)
AS Pre Major
in Physical Science
63 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
38 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
or HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• PHYS 2210 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I
• PHYS 2220 Physics for Scientists and Engineers
II
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
• PHYS 2225
1 Completion of a minimum of 63 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above
(departments may require a higher GPA).
3 Residency hours: minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
121-123 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
• ENVT 1200
• ENVT 1210
CHEM 1210
CHEM 1215
MATH 1210
MATH 1220
PHYS 2215
Graduation Requirements:
BS in Earth Science
Certificate in Water and
Wastewater
Operations
•
•
•
•
•
• CHEM 2315 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
(1.0)
• CHEM 2325 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
(1.0)
• ENGR 2450 Computational Methods for
Engineering Analysis (3.0)
• GEO 1010
Introduction to Geology (3.0)
• GEO 1220
Historical Geology (3.0)
• GEO 1080 Introduction to Oceanography (3.0)
• MATH 2210 Calculus III (3.0)
• MATH 2040 Principles of Statistics (4.0)
• MATH 2270 Linear Algebra (3.0)
• MATH 2280 Ordinary Differential Equations
(3.0)
• METO 1010 Introduction to Meteorology (3.0)
3.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
1.0
5.0
5.0
1.0
1.0
8 Credits
Complete 8 credits from the following:
• CHEM 1220 Principles of Chemistry II (4.0)
• CHEM 2310 Organic Chemistry I (4.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
4.0
3.0
17 Credits
Principles of Chemistry I
Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory
Calculus I
Calculus II
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
I Lab
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
II Lab
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
8.0
27 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2020
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100
American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100
Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology*
• Physical Science*
• Additional Biology or Physical Science*
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
56 Credits
• BIOL 1010
General Biology
• CHEM 1210 Principles of Chemistry I
• CHEM 1215 Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory
• CHEM 1220 Principles of Chemistry II
• CHEM 1225 Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory
• CHEM 3020 Environmental Chemistry
• GEO 1010
Introduction to Geology
• GEO 1015
Introduction to Geology Laboratory
• GEO 3080 Earth Materials
• GEO 3210
Environmental Geology
• MATH 1060 Trigonometry
• MATH 2040 Principles of Statistics
Complete 21 credits from the following list:
• BIOL 3800
Conservation Biology (3.0)
or BIOL 4500
Principles of Evolution (3.0)
• ENVT 2730 Introduction to Soils (3.0)
• ENVT 3280 Environmental Law (3.0)
• ENVT 3290 Environmental Permits and Reports
(3.0)
• ENVT 3790 Hydrology (3.0)
• ENVT 482R Geologic/Environmental Internship
(1.0)
or GEO 482R
Geologic/Environmental Internship
(1.0)
• GEOG 3630 Introduction to Geographic
Information Systems (4.0)
• GEO 1220
Historical Geology (3.0)
and GEO 1225
Historical Geology Laboratory (1.0)
• GEO 1080
Introduction to Oceanography (3.0)
and GEO 1085
Introduction to Oceanography
Laboratory (1.0)
• GEO 3400 Forensic Geology (4.0)
• METO 1010 Introduction to Meteorology (3.0)
and METO 1020 Introduction to Meteorology
Laboratory (1.0)
• METO 3100 Earth Systems (3.0)
3.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
4.0
4.0
3.0
4.0
21.0
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
* Environmental Management
or Geology
40.0
38.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 121-123 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
3 Grade of C- or better in every GEO course.
Utah Valley State
Earth Science
4 Residency hours--minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
5 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
Note: *This requirement is satisfied within the discipline core
requirements.
Emphasis in Environmental
Management
Emphasis Requirements:
• ENVT 1110
• ENVT 1200
• ENVT 1300
• ENVT 1510
•
•
•
•
ENVT 2560
ENVT 2710
ENVT 1270
ENVT 3850
40 Credits
22 Credits
Introduction to Environmental
Management
Environmental Worker Safety
Environmental Lab and Sampling
Hazardous Materials Emergency
Response
Environmental Health
Environmental Careers
Environmental Microbiology
Environmental Policy
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
18 Credits
Take 18 credits from the following:
18.0
• ENVT 1210 Introduction to Water Reclamation
(3.0)
• ENVT 1360 Introduction to Water Treatment
(3.0)
• ENVT 2600 Skills for Humanitarian Projects
(3.0)
• ENVT 2730 Introduction to Soils (3.0)
• ENVT 282R Environmental Internship (1.0)
• ENVT 3010 Environmental Toxicology (3.0)
• ENVT 3320 Hydraulics of Water (3.0)
• ENVT 3330 Water Resources Management (3.0)
• ENVT 3530 Environmental Management
Systems (3.0)
• ENVT 3630 Introduction to Geographic
Information Systems (4.0)
• ENVT 3550 Site Investigation (3.0)
• ENVT 3700 Current Topics in Environmental
Management (3.0)
• ENVT 3750 Land Use Planning (3.0)
• ENVT 3770 Natural Resources Management
(3.0)
• ENVT 3800 Energy Use on Earth (3.0)
• ENVT 495R Special Projects in Environmental
Management (1.0)
• GEO 4500 Sedimentary Geology (4.0)
• CHEM 2310 Organic Chemistry I (4.0)
Emphasis in Geology
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
MATH 1210
MATH 1220
PHYS 2210
PHYS 2220
•
•
•
•
•
GEO 3200
GEO 3700
GEO 4500
GEO 4510
GEO 4600
38 Credits
38 Credits
Calculus I
Calculus II
Physics for Scientists and Engineers I
Physics for Scientists and Engineers
II
Geologic Hazards
Structure and Tectonics
Sedimentary Geology
Paleontology
Field Experience
BS in Earth Science
Education
5.0
5.0
4.0
4.0
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
121 C REDITS
27 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology*
• Physical Science*
Utah Valley State
and GEO 1085
Additional Biology or Physical Science*
Humanities Distribution
Fine Arts Distribution
Social/Behavioral Science
3.0
3.0
3.0
Discipline Core Requirements:
84 Credits
• PHYS 1040 Elementary Astronomy
• BIOL 1010
General Biology
• BIOL 2500 Environmental Biology
• CHEM 1210 Principles of Chemistry I
• CHEM 1215 Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory
• CHEM 1220 Principles of Chemistry II
• CHEM 1225 Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory
• GEO 1010
Introduction to Geology
• GEO 1015
Introduction to Geology Laboratory
• GEO 3080 Earth Materials
• GEO 3700 Structure and Tectonics
• GEO 4500 Sedimentary Geology
• GEO 4200 Teaching Methods in Science
• MATH 1060 Trigonometry
• METO 3100 Earth Systems
• PHYS 2010 College Physics I
• PHYS 2015
College Physics I Lab
• PHYS 2020 College Physics II
• PHYS 2025 College Physics II Lab
Education Courses
• EDSC 2540 Development of the Adolescent
Student
• EDSP 3400 Exceptional Students
• EDSC 3000 Educational Psychology
• EDSC 3050 Foundations of American Education
• EDSC 4450 Multicultural Instruction/ESL
• EDSC 4440 Content Area Reading and Writing
• EDSC 4550 Secondary Curriculum Instruction
and Assessment
• EDSC 3250 Instructional Media
• EDSC 4200 Classroom Management I
• EDSC 4250 Classroom Management II
• EDSC 4850 Student Teaching--Secondary (4.0)
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
Introduction to Oceanography
Laboratory (1.0)
or METO 1010 Introduction to Meteorology (3.0)
and METO 1020 Introduction to Meteorology
Laboratory (1.0)
Complete three courses from the following:
12.0
• METO 3100 Earth Systems (3.0)
and METO 1020 Introduction to Meteorology
Laboratory (1.0)
or GEO 1015
Introduction to Geology Laboratory
(1.0)
or GEO 1225
Historical Geology Laboratory (1.0)
• GEO 3080 Earth Materials (4.0)
• GEO 3200 Geologic Hazards (4.0)
• GEO 3210
Environmental Geology (4.0)
• GEO 3700 Structure and Tectonics (4.0)
• GEO 4500 Sedimentary Geology (4.0)
• GEO 4510
Paleontology (4.0)
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă ENVT, Environmental Managemen
Ă GEO, Geology
Ă METO, Meteorology
2.0
1.0
1.0
8.0
10 Credits
Any 10 credit hours of the student’s choosing.
10.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 121 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
5 Grade of C- or higher in all GEO, BIOL, and METO
courses.
Note: *This requirement is fulfilled with the core
requirements.
Minor in Earth Science
23 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Complete the following courses: GEO 1010, GEO
1015, MATH 1050, MATH 1060, BIOL 1610 with a
grade of “C-” or higher in each.
2 Complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of college
credit.
3 Apply to the department of Earth Science for admission.
General Education Requirements:
•
•
•
•
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
Discipline Core Requirements:
23 Credits
• GEO 1010
Introduction to Geology
and GEO 1015
Introduction to Geology Laboratory
and GEO 3080 Earth Materials
Complete two from:
• GEO 1020 Prehistoric Life (3.0)
or GEO 1080 Introduction to Oceanography (3.0)
and GEO 1085 Introduction to Oceanography
Laboratory (1.0)
or METO 1010 Introduction to Meteorology (3.0)
and METO 1020 Introduction to Meteorology
Laboratory (1.0)
Complete two from:
• GEO 3200 Geologic Hazards (4.0)
• GEO 3210
Environmental Geology (4.0)
• GEO 3700 Structure and Tectonics (4.0)
• GEO 4500 Sedimentary Geology (4.0)
• GEO 4510
Paleontology (4.0)
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
3.0
1.0
4.0
7.0
8.0
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Earth Science
18 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
2.0
18 Credits
Earth Science Emphasis:
• GEO 1010
Introduction to Geology
3.0
• GEO 1015
Introduction to Geology Laboratory
(highly recommended) (1.0)
Complete one of the following sets (lab is highly
3.0
recommended)
• GEO 1220
Historical Geology (3.0)
and GEO 1225
Historical Geology Laboratory (1.0)
or GEO 1080 Introduction to Oceanography (3.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
141
Education, Elementary
Elementary
Education
Department Chair: Susan
Simmerman
Office: EB 116A
Telephone: 801-863-5097
Department Office Manager: Cathlyn
Schuman
Office: EB 116
Telephone: 801-863-8228
Ridge, Deerfield, Foothill, Greenwood,
Legacy, Lehi, Mt. Mahogany, Orem,
Saratoga Shores, Scera Park, Sego Lily,
Valley View, Vineyard, Westfield, Windsor
Granite School District - Elementary
Schools: Frost, Oakwood
Jordan School District - Elementary
Schools: Herriman, Ridgecrest, Foothills
Nebo School District - Elementary Schools:
Brockbank, Grant, Rees, Salem, Parkview.
Provo School District - Elementary Schools:
Amelia Earhart, Canyon Crest, Provost,
Wasatch.
Elementary Education Faculty:
Professor
Elaine Byrd
Associate Professor
Linda Benson
Briant Farnsworth
Nancy Peterson
Linda Pierce
Assistant Professor
Stan Harward
Susan Simmerman
Elaine Tuft
Field Director: Richard Allred
Office: EB 112b
Telephone: 801-863-6580
Early Childhood Education Faculty:
Associate Professor
Genan Anderson
Lecturer
Tracy Sermon
Advisors:
Leslie Hudson
Office: EB 114F
Telephone: 801-863-8527
Shaunna Requilman
Office: EB 114A
Telephone: 801-863-6555
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Early Childhood Education Program
Career opportunities include teaching in
early childhood programs and child care
centers, Head Start teacher and teacher
aide, teacher aide in elementary schools,
teacher aide in special education classes,
owner and/or director of preschool or child
care centers.
Professional Elementary Teacher Education
Program
Career opportunities primarily result from
admission to and completion of the UVSC
four-year Professional Elementary Teacher
Education program. Students may pursue
a license in Elementary Education (grades
1-8) or a dual license in Elementary
Education and Early Childhood Education
(grades P-8). They may also transfer to
other professional teacher education
programs in the state and nation, or other
areas of professional education. Certain
Elementary Education courses (EDEL) and
Early Childhood Education courses (EDEC)
transfer to other institutions offering these
programs.
DEGREES
Children’s Center
Office: EB 134 & 135
Telephone: 801-863-8146
School of Education
Dean: Briant J. Farnsworth
Office: EB 117B
Telephone: 801-863-8006
Dean’s Assistant: Wendi Hillman
Office: EB 117
Telephone: 801-863-6543
Four Elementary Education or Early
Childhood Education degree options are
available: One-year Certificate in Early
Care and Education, Associate in Science
(AS) in Early Childhood Education or in
Pre-Elementary Education Baccalaureate
degree (BS) with a major in Elementary
Education leading to a Utah State Level I
Teaching License in Elementary Education
(and/or a Dual Licensure with Early
Childhood Education)
PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGR AMS
Elementary Education Partner
Schools:
Alpine School District - Elementary
Schools: Alpine, Aspen, Barrett, Cedar
142
Early Childhood Education
Program
The Early Care and Education program is
Catalog 2007–2008
strongly aligned with community needs and
provides instruction and preparation for
those seeking to work with young children
in preschool and day care facilities. It
provides a strong experiential program
through observations and course work
carried out at the UVSC Children’s Center
where students have the opportunity to
work with young children in a closely
supervised setting. Full time faculty working
with students in the Children’s Center all
hold teaching licenses through the State of
Utah. The Children’s Center is accredited
through NAEYC.
Early Childhood and Pre Education Associate Degree
Program
The Associate Degree in Early Childhood
and Pre - Education are closely aligned
with the professional elementary education
program at UVSC. The Associate
Degree provides a seamless educational
experience whose courses fill preprogram
and program requirements for the
Elementary Education Baccalaureate and
the dual licensure program.
Elementary Teacher Education
Program
The professional teacher education
program at Utah Valley State College is
designed to prepare entry level candidates
for teaching in elementary schools and
early childhood education programs.
Students successfully completing the
professional teacher education program
at Utah Valley State College graduation
and licensure requirements in Elementary
Education receive a baccalaureate degree
from the School of Education, Department
of Elementary Education and a Level I Utah
State Professional Teaching License for
grades 1-8. Elementary Education students
completing additional course requirements
in early childhood earn a dual Level I
Utah State Professional Teaching License
covering grades P-3 and 1-8. The UVSC
teacher education program is accredited by
the Utah State Office of Education and the
Northwest Commission on Colleges and
Universities.
Admission and Retention
Admission to the Elementary Teacher
Education or Elementary Education/
Early Childhood Education program is a
competitive, multi-level process separate
from and in addition to admission to
Utah Valley State College. Meeting the
minimum requirements only qualifies the
student to be considered for admission. It
is likely that all students who meet minimum
requirements will not be admitted due to
enrollment limitations.
Admission to Professional Education
program status is a requirement for
enrollment in professional studies level
Utah Valley State
Elementary Education
courses. Admission criteria include: 1)
Minimum ACT composite score of 20 or
higher with no individual score lower than
18; 2) GPA of 3.0 or higher; 3) A writing
exam; and 4) An interview conducted
by the Teacher Education Selection and
Retention Committee. Acceptance into the
professional program is contingent upon
completion of required pre-professional
program courses as well as meeting
minimum entrance requirements. A
predetermined number of applicants will
be accepted into professional cohorts each
year.
To continue in the professional program,
elementary education students are
expected to maintain all program
standards as stated in the department
transition points policy. They must
maintain expected levels of competence
in all coursework, field work, and student
teaching with no grade lower than a B- in
any professional level course. Additionally,
teacher candidates are expected to
adhere to standards of personal integrity,
responsibility, and citizenship commonly
expected of professional educators.
Persons who hold a valid (current or
expired) Elementary Teaching License may
pursue re-licensing course work through
the Teacher Education Program at UVSC.
Certificate in Early Care and
Education
30 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
• PSY 1100
•
•
or
•
EDEC 1640
EDEC 2300
EDSP 3400
EDEC 2500
• EDEC 2600
• EDEC 2610
• EDEC 2620
• EDEC 2640
• EDEC 2700
• EDEC 2720
• EDEL 2200
28 Credits
Human Development Life Span (C
grade or higher)
Childrens Music and Movement
Including Young Diverse Learners
Exceptional Students (2.0)
Child Development Birth to Eight
Years
Introduction to Early Childhood
Education
Child Guidance
Early Childhood Curriculum
Literacy and Literature for Early
Childhood
Early Childhood Practicum
Early Childhood Assessment
Computer Technology in Education
Elective Requirements:
3.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2 Credits
• Advisor Approval
2.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 30 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above. Cgrade or higher in all program courses unless otherwise
specified.
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 10 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
5 First aid/CPR certification, food handler’s permit, portfolio review and acceptance by Education Committee.
AS Pre Major in Early Childhood
Education
60 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
36 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
Utah Valley State
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
• HIST 1740
• POLS 1000
• POLS 1100
US Economic History (3.0)
American Heritage (3.0)
American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 3100 Health Education for Elementary
Teachers
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• PSY 1100
Human Development Life Span
(“C” grade or higher)
Discipline Core Requirements:
• EDEL 2200
• EDEC 2300
• EDEC 2500
• EDEC 2600
• EDEC 2610
• EDEC 2620
• EDEC 2640
• EDEC 2700
• EDEC 2720
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
23 Credits
Computer Technology in Education
Including Young Diverse Learners
Child Development Birth to Eight
Years
Introduction to Early Childhood
Education
Child Guidance
Early Childhood Curriculum
Literacy and Literature for Early
Childhood
Early Childhood Practicum
Early Childhood Assessment
Elective Requirements:
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
1 Credit
or Any Advisor Approved elective
1.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above. Cgrade or higher in all program classes unless otherwise
specified.
2 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
5 First aid/CPR certification, food handler’s permit,
portfolio review and acceptance by Education
Committee
AS Pre Major in Pre-Elementary
Education
63 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
36 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences (3.0)
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 3100 Health Education for Elementary
Teachers
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• PSY 1100
Human Development Life Span
(Social/Behavioral Science)
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
12 Credits
Complete 12 of course 1000 or higher. The following 12.0
is a list of recommended courses to choose from (the
courses required for a degree in Early Childhood
License are grouped together):
• ART 3400
Fundamentals of Art Education (3.0)
• MUSC 3400 Music in the Elementary School
(2.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 63 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
BS in Early Childhood
Education
123 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
36 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 3100 Health Education for Elementary
Teachers
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• PSY 1100
Human Development Life Span
(C grade or higher)
Discipline Core Requirements:
15 Credits
Complete the following:
• EDEL 2200 Computer Technology in Education
• EDEL 1010
Introduction to Education
• EDEL 2330 Childrens Literature
• EDSP 3400 Exceptional Students
• MATH 2010 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers I
• MATH 2020 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers II
Elective Requirements:
3.0
• DANC 3400 Dance in the Elementary School
(2.0)
• THEA 3713 Childrens Theatre in the Elementary
School (2.0)
• PHIL 3450
Philosophy of Childhood (3.0)
Early Childhood License
• EDEC 2300 Including Young Diverse Learners
(2.0)
• EDEC 2500 Child Development Birth to Eight
Years (3.0)
• EDEC 2600 Introduction to Early Childhood
Education (2.0)
• EDEC 2610 Child Guidance (3.0)
• EDEC 2640 Literacy and Literature for Early
Childhood (3.0)
• EDEC 3620 Curriculum Foundations for
Preprimary (3.0)
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
87 Credits
Pre-Professional Courses:*
• EDEC 2500 Child Development Birth to Eight
Years
• EDEC 2600 Introduction to Early Childhood
Education
• EDEC 2610 Child Guidance
• EDEC 2620 Early Childhood Curriculum
• EDEC 2640 Literacy and Literature for Early
Childhood
• EDEC 2700 Early Childhood Practicum
• EDEC 2720 Early Childhood Assessment
• EDEL 2200 Computer Technology in Education
• EDEL 2330 Childrens Literature
• EDSP 3400 Exceptional Students
• MATH 2010 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers I
• MATH 2020 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers II
Professional Education Courses:
• EDEC 3000 Educational Psychology
• EDEC 3050 Foundations of American Education
• EDEC 3250 Instructional Media
• EDEC 3300 Multicultural Understanding
• EDEC 3350 Curriculum Design and Assessment
• EDEC 4110 Problem Solving Methods in ECE
• EDEC 4120 Early Childhood Science Methods
• EDEC 4130 Creative Arts Methods in ECE
• EDEC 4140 Early Childhood Social Studies
Methods
• EDEC 4200 Classroom Management I
• EDEC 4210 Classroom Management II
• EDEC 4230 Classroom Management III
• EDEC 4240 Classroom Management IV
• EDEC 4400 Literacy Methods I
• EDEC 4410 Literacy Methods II
• EDEC 4420 Language Arts Methods
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
143
Elementary Education
• EDEC 4430
• EDEC 4620
• EDEC 4700
•
or
•
•
EDEC 4860
EDEC 4870
EDEL 4880
EDEL 4980
or EDEC 4980
• PETE 3400
Teaching English as a Second
Language
Differentiation for Special
Populations
Educational Leadership for
Elementary Teachers
Student Teaching Prekindergarten
Student Teaching Kindergarten (4.0)
Student Teaching--Grades 1-3
Elementary Education Capstone
Seminar
Early Childhood Education Capstone Seminar (2.0)
Elementary Classroom Teachers as
Movement Educators
3.0
3.0
• EDEL 4700
1.0
4.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
1 Completion of a minimum of 123 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
NOTE: Application forms are available at the beginning of
each Spring semester, must be completed by March 1st, and
can be obtained in the Education Department, 801-8638527.
Footnotes:
* Students must complete all Pre-Professional and
General Education courses with an overall GPA of 3.0
and be formally admitted into the Teacher Preparation
program before they will be admitted into Professional
courses.
BS in
Elementary Education
122 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
36 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 3100 Health Education for Elementary
Teachers
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• PSY 1100
Human Development Life Span
(“C” grade or higher)
Discipline Core Requirements:
• PETE 3400
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
4.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
15 Credits
Complete 14 credits of the following approved
14.0
electives (if not previously taken). Note: the courses
required for a Early Childhood License are grouped
together):
• ART 3400
Fundamentals of Art Education (3.0)
• DANC 3400 Dance in the Elementary
School (2.0)
• MUSC 3400 Music in the Elementary
School (2.0)
• THEA 3713 Childrens Theatre in the Elementary
School (2.0)
Early Childhood License
• EDEC 2500 Child Development Birth to Eight
Years (3.0)
• EDEC 2600 Introduction to Early Childhood
Education (2.0)
• EDEC 2610 Child Guidance (3.0)
• EDEC 2640 Literacy and Literature for Early
Childhood (3.0)
• EDEC 3620 Curriculum Foundations for
Preprimary (3.0)
• EDEC 3800 Assessment for Preprimary (1.0)
• Complete any course 1000 or higher
1.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 122 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA).
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
NOTE: Application forms are available at the beginning of
each Spring semester, must be completed by March 1st, and
can be obtained in the Education Department,
801-863-8527.
Footnotes:
* Students must complete all Pre-Professional and
General Education courses with an overall GPA of 3.0
and be formally admitted into the Teacher Preparation
program before they will be admitted into Professional
courses.
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Due to the technical nature of
material in many of the Education
courses, additional reading and
math instruction may be required.
More information on these potential
requirements will be provided during
advisement.
71 Credits
Pre-Professional Core Requirements:*
• EDEL 1010
Introduction to Education
• EDEL 2200 Computer Technology in Education
• EDEL 2330 Childrens Literature
• EDSP 3400 Exceptional Students
• MATH 2010 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers I
• MATH 2020 Mathematics for Elementary
Teachers II
Professional Education Core Requirements:
• EDEL 3000 Educational Psychology
• EDEL 3050 Foundations of American Education
• EDEL 3250 Instructional Media
• EDEL 3300 Foundations of Bilingual/ESL
Classroom
• EDEL 3350 Curriculum Design and Assessment
• EDEL 4200 Classroom Management I
• EDEL 4210
Classroom Management II
• EDEL 4230
Classroom Management III
• EDEL 4240
Classroom Management IV
• EDEL 4400 Literacy Methods I
• EDEL 4410
Literacy Methods II
• EDEL 4420
Language Arts Methods
• EDEL 4430 Teaching English as a Second
Language
• EDEL 4510
Elementary Math Methods
• EDEL 4520
Elementary Science Methods
• EDEL 4530 Elementary Social Studies Methods
144
• EDEL 4880
• EDEL 4890
• EDEL 4980
Elementary Creative Arts Methods
Differentiation for Special
Populations
Educational Leadership for
Elementary Teachers
Student Teaching--Grades 1-3
Student Teaching--Grades 4-6
Elementary Education Capstone
Seminar
Elementary Classroom Teachers as
Movement Educators
Elective Requirements:
Graduation Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
• EDEL 4540
• EDEL 4620
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă ECFS, Education, Child and Family
Studies
Ă EDEC, Early Childhood Education
Ă EDEL, Elementary Education
Ă EDSP, Special Education
3.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Education, Secondary
Secondary
Education
Department Chair: Roger Wise
Office: EB 116B
Telephone: 801-863-8499
Department Office Manager: Cathy
Schumann
Office: EB 116
Telephone: 801-863-8228
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
PROGR AMS
Career opportunities result from
completion of the UVSC four-year
Professional Teacher Education Program
which qualifies students for a License in
Secondary Education. Certain EDSC
courses transfer to other institutions
offering these programs.
DEGREES
Baccalaureate degrees (BA and BS) are
available in Secondary Education. See
advisor for major and minor requirements.
Secondary Education Faculty:
Professor
Roger Wise
Assistant Professor
Glen Clark
Numsiri Kunakemakorn
Axel Ramirez
Talitha Hudgins
Field Director: Susan Stone
Office: EB 112N
Telephone: 801-863-8587
Advisor: Lexi Powell
Office: EB 114B
Telephone: 863-8217
School of Education
Dean: Briant J. Farnsworth
Office: EB 117B
Telephone: 801-863-8006
College Secondary Education
Committee:
School of Technology and Computing
- Kelly Baird, Ernest Carey, Bonnie Cook,
Diane Hartman, Jan Bentley.
School of Education - Briant Farnsworth,
Numsiri Kunakemakorn, Axel Ramirez,
Roger Wise.
School of Humanities, Arts and Social
Sciences - Douglas Anderson, Dawn
Chase, William Cobb, Kay Smith, Kim
Strunk, Doris Trujillo, Sandy Vogel, David
Wilson
School of Science and Health - Dennis
Allison, Calvin Bond, Vance Hillman,
Daniel Horns, Shaunna McGhie, Christine
Walker, Dee Oyler, Sam Rushforth, Paul
Tayler, Richard Tolman.
Associate Vice President of Academic
Affairs - Karl Worthington
Vice President of Academic Affairs Elizabeth J. Hitch
Utah Valley State
TEACHER EDUCATION
PROGR AMS
Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts
degrees are available in ASL and Deaf
Studies Education,Biology Education,
Business Marketing Education, Chemistry/
Physics Education, Dance Education, Earth
Science Education, English Education,
History Education, Mathematics Education,
Physical Education Teacher Education,
Theatre Arts Education, School Health
Education, and Spanish Education.
The professional teacher education
program at Utah Valley State College is
designed to prepare quality candidates for
teaching in Utah secondary education. All
students who matriculate into the program
must have a major. The Secondary
Education program leads to a License from
the State of Utah to teach in grades 6-12.
The UVSC teacher education program
is accredited by the Utah State Office of
Education and Northwest Association.
Admission to the teacher education
program is a multi-level process separate
from and in addition to admission to
Utah Valley State College. Meeting the
minimum requirements only qualifies the
student to be considered for admission; it is
possible that students who meet minimum
requirements will not be admitted due to
enrollment limitations.
Education students are expected to
maintain all standards at or above levels
required for admission to the Teacher
Education Program and demonstrate
expected levels of competence in all
course work and field activities leading
to a License with no grade lower than
a B- in the professional program and
method courses. Additionally, students
and teacher candidates are expected to
adhere to standards of personal integrity,
responsibility, and citizenship commonly
expected of professional educators.
Persons who hold a valid (current or
expired) Secondary License may pursue relicensing course work through the School
of Education.
Licensure in Secondary
Education
30 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1
2
3
4
Minimum ACT Scores
GPA of 2.75 or higher
A CAAP written exam
An interview directed by the Teacher Education
Selection and Retention Committee.
Discipline Core Requirements:
• EDSC 2540
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
EDSC 3000
EDSC 3050
EDSC 3250
EDSC 4200
EDSC 4250
EDSC 4440
EDSC 4450
EDSC 4550
• EDSC 4850
• EDSP 3400
30 Credits
Development of the Adolescent
Student
Educational Psychology
Foundations of American Education
Instructional Media
Classroom Management I
Classroom Management II
Content Area Reading and Writing
Multicultural Instruction/ESL
Secondary Curriculum Instruction
and Assessment
Student Teaching--Secondary
(4.0)
Exceptional Students
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
4.0
8.0
2.0
Due to the technical nature of
material in many of the Education
courses, additional reading and
math instruction may be required.
More information on these potential
requirements will be provided during
advisement.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă EDSC, Secondry Education
PROGR AM ADMISSION AND
RETENTION
Admission to Professional Education
status is a requirement for enrollment
in professional studies level courses.
Admission criteria include: 1) Minimum
ACT scores; 2) GPA of 2.75 or higher; 3)
A CAAP writing exam; and 4) An interview
directed by the Teacher Education Selection
and Retention Committee. Applicants
are accepted into the Teacher Education
Program Fall and Spring semesters after
meeting entrance requirements.
To continue in the program, Professional
Catalog 2006–2007
145
Electrical Automation and Robotics Technology
Electrical
Automation
and Robotics
Technology
Department of Engineering
Graphics and Design Technology
Department Chair: David Manning
Office: CS 704f
Telephone: 801-863-8085
Program Coordinator: Dave Adams
Office: CS 620
Telephone: 801-863-6052
control, microprocessors, computers, and
robots. Advancement to supervisor and
management positions within the electrical
field is frequently available.
PROGR AMS
Three options are available: Associate
in Applied Science Degree, Associate
in Science Degree, and the Bachelor of
Science in Technology Management. See
Graduation Requirements in catalog for
definitions.
Reminder: an overall grade point average
of 2.0 (C) or above is required for
graduation.
Management (ie Technology Management
or Business Management) course work
older than six years can be counted toward
graduation.
Faculty:
Professor
Larey Lawrence
Associate Professor
Dave Adams
If student chooses HIST 2700 and HIST
2710, the additional three hours may be
used towards a social science distribution
requirement.
• EART 2110
Semiconductors Devices
6.0
• EART 2160
Industrial Solid State Circuit
5.0
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Electrical Automation
30.0
• Semiconductor Instrumentation and Maintenance 30.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 63 semester credits
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours: minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements
Emphasis in
Electrical Automation
•
•
•
•
•
•
EART 1180
EART 1250
EART 1270
EART 2150
EART 2250
EART 2270
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
ECT 101L
EART 1440
EART 144L
EART 1450
EART 145L
EART 2450
• EART 245L
Advisor: Jessie Stewart
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-6597
Advisory Committee: Kent Brown, Porter
Brown Sales, Inc.; Mel Price, Electrical
Automation Specialists; David Dorbaugh,
Kennecott; Amy Rawlinson, IM Flash
Technologies; Russ Terry, Codale Electric
Supply, Inc.
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Electrical Automation and Robotics
Technology students may be employed in
many different occupations found within
the electrical trades. They may work in
mining industries, steel mills, processing
plants, oil refineries, power plants,
manufacturing, semiconductor industries,
electronics companies, and chemical
industries. Job duties may include
construction, fabrication, maintenance,
troubleshooting, repair, calibration, testing,
and design. They may work with automatic
control systems, AC and DC control
components, motors, programmable
146
Students will be limited to 15 hours
of upper division (3000-4000 level)
coursework until matriculation requirements
are complete and students have been
admitted into upper division status.
Students will not be allowed to matriculate
and graduate in the same semester.
Electrical Apprenticeship
Electrical Apprentice courses are offered
for Electrical Apprentices to complete the
Utah State or other related instruction
requirements. See Apprenticeship section
of this catalog for Electrical Apprentice
courses. The Electrical Apprentice courses
can be used as requirements for an AAS
Degree in Apprenticeship. For further
information contact the Apprenticeship
Advisor.
Due to the technical nature of the material
in EART courses, additional reading and
math instruction may be required. More
information will be given during advisement.
AAS in Electrical Automation and
Robotics Technology
63 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
16 Credits
• ENGL 106A Career Writing for Technology--A
• Any approved Humanities or Fine Art
• Any approved Behavioral Science, Social, or Political Science Distribution Course
• Any approved Physical Education, Health, Safety,
or Environment Course
• Any approved Biology or Physical Science
• EART 1050 Applied Electrical Math
Discipline Core Requirements:
• EART 1130
or ECT 1010
or ECT 1060
and ECT 1070
• EART 1260
1.0
2.0
5.0
17 Credits
Basic Electrical
Basic Electronics--DC/AC (4.0)
Electrical Science I (2.0)
Electrical Science II (2.0)
Logic
Catalog 2007–2008
2.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
2.0
Basic Electrical Lab
Electrical Wiring and Code
DC and AC Machines
Hydraulics and Pneumatics
Programmable Logic Controllers 1
Programmable Logic Controllers 2
5.0
2.0
9.0
3.0
5.0
6.0
Emphasis in
Semiconductor Instrumentation
30 Credits
and Maintenance
• ECT 1720
• ECT 281R
Office Manager: Christine Bigelow
Office: CS 704
Telephone: 801-863-8363
30 Credits
30 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
• ECT 285R
• EART 2750
and EART 275L
or ECT 2310
• EART 1250
or BIT 1340
30 Credits
DC/AC Circuits Laboratory
DC Motors
DC Motors Lab
AC Motors
AC Motors Laboratory
Hydraulics and Pneumatics Fundamentals
Hydraulics and Pneumatics Fundamentals Laboratory
System Configurations
Cooperative Work Experience (must
repeat seven times) (1.0)
Cooperative Correlated Class
Programmable Controllers (3.0)
Programmable Controllers Laboratory (2.0)
Microprocessor and Computer
Systems
Electrical Wiring and Code
Electrical Codes (3.0)
2.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
3.0
7.0
1.0
4.0
2.0
AS Pre Major in
Electrical Automation and
Robotics Technology
63 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
16 Credits
• Choose from EART or related courses (1000 level 16.0
or higher)
Elective Requirements:
12 Credits
• Electives (1000 level or higher)
12.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 63 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above
(Department may require a higher GPA.)
Utah Valley State
Electrical Automation and Robotics Technology
3 Residency hours-- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BS in Technology
Management
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the Technology Management section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in Electrical Automation
45 Credits
and Robotics Technology
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
EART 1130
EART 1050
EART 1180
EART 1260
EART 1270
EART 2110
EART 2150
EART 2160
EART 2250
44 Credits
Basic Electrical
Applied Electrical Math
Basic Electrical Lab
Logic
DC and AC Machines
Semiconductors Devices
Hydraulics and Pneumatics
Industrial Solid State Circuit
Programmable Logic Controllers 1
Elective Requirements:
4.0
5.0
5.0
2.0
9.0
6.0
3.0
5.0
5.0
1 Credits
Electives in EART based on chosen option (students
must see advisor for list of approved course options).
1.0
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă EART, Electrical Automation and
Robotics Technology
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
147
Emergency Services
Emergency
Ser vices
'HSDUWPHQW&KDLU-HII0D[ÀHOG
Associate Department Chair: Gary
Noll
Program Coordinators:
Barry Stone, Paramedic
Margaret Mittelman, EMT
Faculty:
Associate Professor
Gary Noll
Jon Shields
Barry Stone
Assistant Professor
Jeff Maxfield
Instructors
Margaret Mittelman
Advisor:
Yudi Lewis
Institute of Emergency Services
and Homeland Security
Utah Fire and Rescue Academy
(UFRA)
Director: Jeff Maxfield
Associate Director: Hugh Connor
Associate Director: Jim Hunter
Porter, Provo City Fire Department; Jeff
Maxfield, Institute of Emergency Services
and Homeland Security; Steve Lutz, Utah
Valley State College; Darryl Pranger, Utah
Valley State College; Wayne Hanewicz,
Utah Valley State College; Larry Marsing,
Utah Valley State College; Ron Morris,
Utah State Fire Marshal; Gary Noll, Utah
Valley State College; Charles Querry, Salt
Lake City Fire Department; Lieutenant
Colonel Bart Berry, Utah National Guard;
Shawn Peppers, Division of Homeland
Security-Private Sector and Critical
Infrastructure; Mary Maughan, Senator’s
Robert Bennett’s Office (ad hoc).
School of Technology And
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Nationally, over 102,000 jobs in
emergency services will be available
in the 2000’s. In Utah approximately
100 openings will be available annually
in city and county fire departments. In
addition, many local industries have private
fire brigades with career opportunities.
Opportunities for employment are
available in fire departments, public safety
departments, and ambulance companies
for firefighters, driver-operators, EMTs,
arson investigators, fire marshals and fire
inspectors. Private industry positions are
available as safety officers, fire marshals,
fire inspectors, and emergency medical
personnel.
2IÀFHDQG7UDLQLQJ)DFLOLWLHV
Provo Airport
3131 Mike Jense Parkway
Telephone: 801-863-7700
Fax: 801-371-0334
http://www.ufra.uvsc.edu
Advisory Committee/Utah Fire Service
Standards and Training Council: Chief
Stephen H. Higgs, Utah State Fire Chiefs’
Association; Brady George, Utah State
Fireman’s Association; Fire Marshal Jim
Guynn, Utah Fire Marshal’s Association;
Training Officer Mike Riley, Utah
Hazardous Materials Institute; Battalion
Chief Eldon Farnsworth, International
Association of Arson Investigators; Fire
Management Coordinator Tracy Dunford,
Utah Division of Forestry, Fire and State
Lands; Craig Golden, Professional
Firefighters of Utah; Battalion Chief James
Bacon, Utah Fire Service Certification
Council; Kevin Kemp, Utah Training
Officers Association.
Advisory Board/Institute of Emergency
Services and Homeland Security: Vincent
Liddiard, Dugway Proving Grounds; Coy
148
CL ASS SCHEDULING
Emergency Services classes are scheduled
to meet the needs of firefighters working
various shift assignments. During each
semester, classes are offered during the
day, afternoons, evenings and weekends.
Classes designed primarily for working
firefighters are scheduled on a weekend
or seminar basis, and are often available
for either college credit or continuing
education credit. The seminar sessions are
not always listed in the College semester
schedule, but are announced through the
bi-monthly Straight Tip newsletter. For
more information on currently scheduled
classes, call (801) 863-7700, or check our
web page at www.ufra.uvsc.edu
PROGR AM REQUIREMENTS FOR
ENROLLMENT
There are departmental enrollment
requirements for Recruit Candidate
Academy courses and Firefighter/
Paramedic courses. Enrollment into certain
off-campus or block course sections each
Catalog 2007–2008
semester may be limited to those with
existing professional certifications and/
or already employed by an emergency
services agency.
Recruit Candidate Academy courses FSF
1310, 1320, 1330, and 1340. Enrollment
is done by means of a program application
process. Prior to enrollment, students must:
1. Complete all UVSC admission
requirements.
2. Meet with an Emergency Services
Advisor.
3. Complete FSF 1000 and FSF 1140
courses with at least a “C-”
4. Obtain COMPASS Writing/DRP scores of
80+/ 77+, or ACT English/ACT Reading
scores of 19+/ 19+, or ACT English/ACT
Composite scores of 19+/19+, or SAT
English score of 500+, or completion
of ENGH 0990 or higher. ACT or SAT
reports may not be older than 10 years.
5. Obtain COMPASS Pre-Algebra score of
70+, or ACT mathematics score of 17+,
or SAT mathematics score of 450+, or
completion of MAT 0990 or higher, ACT
or SAT reports may not be older than 10
years.
6. Successfully complete the Candidate
Physical Ability Test (CPAT) within 9
months of start date.
7. Obtain a physical examination within 6
months of start date
8. Pass a Recruit Candidate Academy
review board.
Paramedic program courses FSE 2500,
2510, 2520, and 2530. Enrollment is
done by means of a program application
process. Prior to enrollment students must:
1. Complete ZOOL 1090 with a grade of
“C” or higher.
2. Obtain COMPASS Writing/DRP scores of
80+/ 77+, or ACT English/ACT Reading
scores of 19+/ 19+, or ACT English/ACT
Composite scores of 19+/19+, or SAT
English score of 500+, or completion
of ENGH 0990 or higher. ACT or SAT
reports may not be older than 10 years.
3. Obtain COMPASS Pre-Algebra score of
70+, or ACT mathematics score of 17+,
or SAT mathematics score of 450+, or
completion of MAT 0990 or higher, or
completion of FSF 1350. ACT or SAT
reports may not be older than 10 years.
4. Be able to comply with criminal
background check requirements of
UCA 26-8a-310 for certification as a
paramedic in the state of Utah.
5. Have at least one year’s experience as
an EMT-Basic and have current CPR
certification.
6. Be at least 18 years old and have a valid
driver’s license.
7. Have current vaccinations, including
Hepatitis B, MMR and Tetanus.
8. Have current TB test results.
Utah Valley State
Emergency Services
9. Complete a medical history form and
obtain a current physical examination.
10. Pass a paramedic course entry
examination and interview.
PROGR AMS
Five options are available: (1) One-Year
Certificate, (2) Associate in Applied Science
Degree, Fire Science Major with a Fire
Officer Specialization or a Firefighter/
Paramedic Specialization or a Wildland Fire
Management Specialization, (3) Associate
in Science (4) Bachelor of Science Degree
in Public Emergency Services Management,
(5) Bachelor of Science in Technology
Management degree with a Technical
Specialty in Fire Science.
Students may earn only one Associate in
Applied Science Degree in Fire Science that
is posted to the UVSC transcript.
Certificate in Firefighter
Recruit Candidate
33 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
33 Credits
Complete the following:
• ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
or ENGL 1060 Career Writing for Technology (3.0)
• FSF 1000
Survey of Fire and Rescue Emergency Services
• FSE 1140
Emergency Medical Technician-Basic
• FSF 1310
Recruit Candidate Academy-Fundamentals
• FSF 1320
Recruit Candidate Academy--Skills
• FSF 1330
Recruit Candidate Academy-Operations
• FSF 1340
Hazardous Materials First Responder
• MAT 1010
Intermediate Algebra
or MAT 1000
Integrated Beginning and Intermediate Algebra (5.0)
3.0
3.0
6.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
Certificate in Paramedic
34 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
34 Credits
Complete the following:
• FSE 2500
Paramedic I
• FSE 2510
Paramedic I Lab
• FSE 2520
Paramedic II
• FSE 2530
Paramedic III
• FSE 2540
Paramedic IV
• FSE 2550
Paramedic Work Experience
• ZOOL 1090 Introduction to Human Anatomy
and Physiology
5.0
3.0
7.0
4.0
6.0
6.0
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above. (Departments may require a higher GPA.) Upon completion, students are eligible to apply for certification as an
Emergency Medical Technician/Paramedic through the
Utah Bureau of Emergency Medical Services.
General Education Requirements:
•
or
•
or
or
ENGL 1010
ENGL 1060
FSF 1350
MAT 1010
MAT 1000
63 C REDITS
16 Credits
Introduction to Writing
3.0
Career Writing for Technology (3.0)
Mathematics for the Fire Service
3.0
Intermediate Algebra (4.0)
Integrated Beginning and Intermediate Algebra (5.0)
Utah Valley State
3.0
3.0
1.0
47.0
47.0
47.0
1 Completion of a minimum of 63 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
Emphasis in Fire Officer
47 Credits
21 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
Choose 21 credits from the following:
• FSO 2020
Incident Command (3.0)
• FSO 2030
Fire Inspector I (3.0)
• FSP 2310
Fire Investigator I (3.0)
• FSO 2050
Fire Protection and Detection
Systems (3.0)
• FSO 2060
Fire Service Management and
Administration (3.0)
• FSO 2080
Building Construction for the Fire
Services (3.0)
• FSO 2090
Fire Officer I (3.0)
• FSO 2100
Fire Supervision and Leadership
(3.0)
• FSO 2110
Fire Instructor I and II (3.0)
• FSW 2500
Wildland/Urban Interface Fire
Protection (3.0)
21.0
FSE 2500
FSE 2510
FSE 2520
FSE 2530
FSE 2540
FSE 2550
• FSW 1420
• FSW 2430
• FSW 2300
• FSW 2400
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
25 Credits
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
16 Credits
• Any Fire Science or related advisor approved
16.0
courses
NOTE: Upon completion, students are eligible to apply for
certification as an Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic through the Utah Bureau of Emergency Medical Services
• FSW 1400
• FSW 1410
3.0
Survey of Fire and Rescue
3.0
Emergency Services
or Sufficient public emergency services work experience
• Fire Science or related advisor approved courses 22.0
5.0
3.0
7.0
4.0
6.0
6.0
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
• FSF 1000
47 Credits
31 Credits
Paramedic I
Paramedic I Lab
Paramedic II
Paramedic III
Paramedic IV
Paramedic Work Experience
Emphasis in
Wildland Fire Management
Quantitative Reasoning (recommended for Humanities or Arts
majors (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (recommended for Social Science majors)
(3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
26 Credits
Emphasis in
Firefighter/Paramedic
•
•
•
•
•
•
• MATH 1030
Discipline Core Requirements:
• Any Fire Science or related advisor approved
26.0
courses
NOTE: Upon completion, students are eligible to apply for
certification at the Fire Inspector I, Fire Investigator, Fire
Service Instructor I, Fire Service Instructor II, Fire Officer
I, and Fire Officer II levels through the Utah Fire Service
Certification system.
Emphasis Requirements:
1 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
Note: CERTIFICATION: Upon completion of courses for
the Basic Recruit Certificate, students are eligible to apply
for certification at the Firefighter I, Firefighter II, Hazardous Materials First Responder-Awareness and Hazardous
Materials First Responder-Operations levels through the
Utah Fire Science Certification System. Students are also
eligible for certification at the Emergency Medical Technician-Basic level through the Utah Bureau of Emergency
Medical Services.
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
8.0
Graduation Requirements:
AAS in Fire Science
• Any approved Humanities, Fine Arts, or Foreign
Language Distribution Course (COMM 1020
Recommended)
• Any approved Behavioral Science, Social, or Political Science Distribution Course (PSY 1010 or SOC
1010 Recommended)
• Any approved Biology or Physical Science Distribution Course
• Any approved Physical Education, Health, Safety or
Environment Course (PES 1097 recommended)
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Fire Officer
• Firefighter/Paramedic
• Wildland Fire Management
47 Credits
29 Credits
Wildland Firefighting Fundamentals
Wildland Firefighter Practicum I
(5.0)
Wildland Firefighter Practicum II
(5.0)
Wildland Firefighter Practicum III
(5.0)
Wildland Firefighter Basics (5.0)
Advanced Wildland Firefighter (5.0)
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
4.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
18 Credits
• Any Fire Science or advisor approved courses
18.0
BS in Public Emergency Services
Management
120 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Discipline Core Requirements:
or
•
•
•
60 C REDITS
•
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
•
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
•
•
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
43 Credits
• FSF 1000
AS Pre Major in
Fire Science
Complete the following:
• ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
• ENGL 2010 Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
35 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
•
Survey of Fire and Rescue Emer3.0
gency Services
Sufficient public emergency services work experience
PESM 3300 Public Program Administration
3.0
PESM 3500 Analytical Research Approaches to 3.0
Public Emergency Services
PESM 3700 Master Planning for Public Emer3.0
gency Services
PESM 3600 Customer and Public Relations for
3.0
the Emergency Services
PESM 3800 Public Administration and Emer3.0
gency Management
PESM 4100 Health and Safety Program Man3.0
agement
PESM 4200 Principles of Disaster and Emer3.0
gency Management
PESM 4500 Managing Emergency Medical
3.0
Services
149
Emergency Services
• PESM 4900
•
•
•
•
Advanced Seminar in Public Emergency Services Leadership
ACC 3000
Financial Managerial and Cost
Accounting Concepts
ENGL 3320 Grant and Proposal Writing
LEGL 3000 Business Law
MGMT 3430 Human Resource Management
Elective Requirements:
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
42 Credits
• Any Fire Science or advisor approved courses.
• Any courses 1000 or higher
21.0
21.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 120 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above, with
completion of each PESM class with a “C-” or higher.
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BS in Technology
Management
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the Technology Management section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in
Fire Science
Emphasis Requirements:
• FSR 2180
• FSR 2700
• FSR 2740
Environmental Rescue (3.0)
Technical Rescue Principles (3.0)
Rope Rescue (3.0)
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
FS, Fire Science
FSD, Fire Science Driver Operator
FSE, Fire Science EMT
FSF, Fire Science Firefighter
FSH, Fire Science, Hazardous Materials
FSO, Fire Science Officer
FSP, Fire Science Inspector
FSR, Fire Science Rescue
FSS, Fire Science Safety
FSW, Fire Science Wildland
PESM, Public and Emergency Services
Management
45 Credits
45 Credits
Complete 45 credits from the following:
45.0
• PESM 3300 Public Program Administration (3.0)
• PESM 3700 Master Planning for Public Emergency Services (3.0)
• PESM 4100 Health and Safety Program Management (3.0)
• PESM 4500 Managing Emergency Medical
Services (3.0)
• PESM 4900 Advanced Seminar in Public Emergency Services Leadership (3.0)
• FSD 1330
Fundamentals of Apparatus Operation (3.0)
• FSD 1340
Fire Apparatus Skill (3.0)
• FSE 2500
Paramedic I (5.0)
• FSE 2510
Paramedic I Lab (3.0)
• FSE 2520
Paramedic II (7.0)
• FSE 2530
Paramedic III (4.0)
• FSE 2540
Paramedic IV (6.0)
• FSE 2550
Paramedic Work Experience (6.0)
• FSF 1000
Survey of Fire and Rescue Emergency Services (3.0)
• FSF 1010
Firefighting Fundamentals I (3.0)
• FSE 1140
Emergency Medical Technician-Basic (6.0)
• FSF 1210
Firefighting Skills I (4.0)
• FSF 1220
Firefighting Fundamentals and Skills
II (3.0)
• FSW 1400
Wildland Firefighting Fundamentals (4.0)
• FSF 1310
Recruit Candidate Academy--Fundamentals (8.0)
• FSF 1320
Recruit Candidate Academy-Skills (3.0)
• FSF 1330
Recruit Candidate Academy--Operations (3.0)
• FSF 1340
Hazardous Materials First Responder (3.0)
• FSF 1350
Mathematics for the Fire Service (3.0)
• FSH 2410
Hazardous Materials Technician
Fundamentals (3.0)
• FSH 2420
Hazardous Materials Technician
Skills (2.0)
• FSH 2440
Hazardous Materials Chemistry (3.0)
• FSO 2020
Incident Command (3.0)
• FSO 2030
Fire Inspector I (3.0)
• FSP 2310
Fire Investigator I (3.0)
• FSO 2050
Fire Protection and Detection
Systems (3.0)
• FSO 2060
Fire Service Management and
Administration (3.0)
• FSO 2080
Building Construction for the Fire
Services (3.0)
• FSO 2090
Fire Officer I (3.0)
• FSO 2100
Fire Supervision and Leadership (3.0)
• FSO 2110
Fire Instructor I and II (3.0)
• FSO 211A
Fire Service Instructor I (1.0)
• FSO 211B
Fire Service Instructor II (2.0)
• FSO 2200
Fire Officer Work Experience (3.0)
• FSW 2500
Wildland/Urban Interface Fire
Protection (3.0)
• FSP 2320
Fire Investigator II (3.0)
• FSP 2350
Public Fire Education I (2.0)
150
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Engineering Graphics and Design Technology
Engineering
Graphics and
Design
Technology
Department Chair: David Manning
Office: CS 704f
Telephone: 801-863-8085 or 801863-8363
Program Coordinator: Robert Price
Office: CS 704c
Telephone: 801-863-8145
Faculty:
Professor
Rod Kendall
Associate Professor
David Manning
Darin Taylor
Assistant Professor
Robert Price
Danial Perry
Instructor
Sid Smith
Visiting Professor
Steven Trane
Office Manager: Christine Bigelow
Office: CS 704
Telephone: 801-863-8363
Advisor: Jessie Stewart
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-6597
Advisory Committees:
Mechanical Drafting: Mike Thompson,
Flowserve; Dan Olsen, Jason Associates
Corporation.
Structural Drafting: Terry Beighley,
Intermountain Bridge Detailers; David
McGowan, Tectonix Steel, Inc.
Architectural Drafting: Kevin Madson, KMA
& Associates; Paul Magleby, Paul Magleby
Construction Inc.
Electrical Drafting: Keith Hegerhorst,
Hegerhorst Power Engineering.
Civil Drafting: Alan York, Provo City; Clyde
Naylor, Utah County; Matt Brown, M.W.
Brown Engineering; Brant Tuttle, Northern
Engineering.
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Utah Valley State
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The Engineering Graphics and Design
Technology program principally prepares
students for drafting (mechanical,
architectural, structural, civil, and /
electronic) and surveying careers. Drafting
jobs are available with architects, cities,
counties, states, the federal government,
engineering and surveying companies,
mines, research and development
companies, and the mechanical, structural
steel, architectural development, and
electronics, construction, and fire
protection industries. In addition, because
of the broad nature of the Engineering
Graphics and Design Technology program,
graduates are prepared to succeed in
most technological fields. For example,
they can work as manufacturing, industrial
engineering, and construction technicians.
They can also work in functional areas
of purchasing, estimating, bidding, plant
management, quality control, expediting,
and sales.
JOB DESCRIPTION –
ENGINEERING GR APHICS AND
DESIGN TECHNOLOGY
Engineering Graphics Technicians (formerly
Drafters/Designers) translate ideas from
design layouts, specifications, rough
sketches, and calculations of engineers &
architects into working drawings, maps,
plans, and illustrations which are used
in making products. They prepare 3D
computer models and 2D drawings using
Computer Aided Drafting, Design, and 3D
modeling systems. They perform design
and drafting work in mechanical, electrical/
electronic, structural, architectural, civil,
piping, and technical illustration fields.
They make mathematical calculations
related to the above fields using algebra,
trigonometry, plane and solid geometry,
applied mechanics, strength of materials
and basic physics.
The Engineering Graphics Technician’s
job requires working closely with both
professional and nonprofessional people.
They also do liaison work between the shop
or field and the engineering office. It is
essential they be neat in appearance and
develop professional work habits.
JOB DESCRIPTION – LAND
SURVEYING
Engineering Graphics Technicians (formerly
Drafters/Designers) translate ideas from
design layouts, specifications, rough
sketches, and calculations of engineers &
architects into working drawings, maps,
Catalog 2007–2008
plans, and illustrations which are used
in making products. They prepare 3D
computer models and 2D drawings using
Computer Aided Drafting, Design, and 3D
modeling systems. They perform design
and drafting work in mechanical, electrical/
electronic, structural, architectural, civil,
piping, and technical illustration fields.
They make mathematical calculations
related to the above fields using algebra,
trigonometry, plane and solid geometry,
applied mechanics, strength of materials
and basic physics.
Surveyors also work closely with the public
so it is imperative that they develop good
human relations skills and professional
work habits.
PROGR AMS
Students in the Engineering Graphics and
Design Technology program may earn
an Associate in Applied Science Degree,
an Associate in Science Degree with a
drafting pre-major or a Bachelor of Science
in Technology Management Degree in
Drafting Technology.
Reminder: an overall grade point average
of 2.0 (C) or above is required for
graduation.
AAS in
Drafting Technology
General Education Requirements:
63 C REDITS
16 Credits
ENGLISH
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 1060
• ENGL 106A
2.0
Introduction to Writing (3.0)
Career Writing for Technology (3.0)
Career Writing for Technology-A (2.0)
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications (3.0)
MATHEMATICS
• EGDT 1600 Technical Math--Algebra
3.0
or MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
• EGDT 1610 Technical Math--Geometry/Trig
3.0
or MATH 1060 Trigonometry (3.0)
3.0
HUMANITITES/FINE ARTS/FOREIGN LANGUAGE
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values (highly recommended) (3.0)
• Any approved Humanities, Fine Arts, or Foreign Language Distribution Course
2.0
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
• MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior (3.0)
• Any approved Behavioral Science, Social, or Political
Science
BIOLOGY OR PHYSICAL SCIENCE
• EGDT 1810
Principles of Technology
2.0
PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH/SAFETY OR
1.0
ENVIRONMENT
• Any approved Physical Education, Health, Safety or
Environment Course
Discipline Core Requirements:
• EGDT 1010
• EGDT 1040
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
EGDT 1070
EGDT 1080
EGDT 1100
EGDT 1200
EGDT 1300
EGDT 1400
EGDT 2020
EGDT 2040
EGDT 2050
EGDT 2600
EGDT 2610
EGDT 2850
39 Credits
Electrical-Electronic Drafting
Computer Aided Drafting-AutoCAD
3 Dimensional Computer Modeling
AutoLisp
Architectural Drafting
Mechanical Drafting
Structural Drafting
Surveying
Descriptive Geometry
Piping Drafting
Plate Layout
Statics
Strength of Materials
Cooperative Correlated Instruction/Orientation
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
0.5
151
Engineering Graphics and Design Technology
• EGDT 2860
• EGDT 2870
Cooperative Correlated Instruction/SkillsUSA
Portfolio and Career Preparation
Elective Requirements:
0.5
1.0
8 Credits
Choose three courses from the following list for a
8.0
minimum of 8 credits:
• EGDT 1060 MicroStation (2.0)
• EGDT 2010 Advanced Electrical--CAD (2.0)
• EGDT 2100 Advanced Architectural--CAD (3.0)
• EGDT 2200 Advanced Mechanical--CAD (3.0)
• EGDT 2300 Advanced Structural--CAD (3.0)
• EGDT 2310 Structural Steel Modeling (3.0)
• EGDT 2400 Surveying Applications (4.0)
• EGDT 2710 Special Problems--Mechanical (2.0)
• EGDT 2720 Special Problems--Surveying (2.0)
• EGDT 2730 Special Problems--Civil Drafting (2.0)
• EGDT 2740 Special Problems--Architectural (2.0)
• EGDT 2750 Special Problems--Architectural
Rendering (2.0)
• EGDT 2760 Special Problems--Structural (2.0)
• EGDT 2780 Special Problems--Electrical (2.0)
• EGDT 281R Cooperative Work Experience (1.0)
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 63 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours-- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements, including a portfolio and exit interview.
AS Pre Major in
Drafting Technology
61 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
8.0
Due to the technical nature of the material
in the following courses, additional reading
and math instruction may be required.
More information will be given during
advisement.
COOPER ATIVE EDUCATION
Cooperative Education is highly
recommended as an elective in these
majors. Two credits may be applied
towards graduation.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă ECT, Electronic and Computer
Technology
Ă EGDT, Engineering Graphics and Design
Technology
Ă TCT, Telecommunications Technology
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
16 Credits
• EGDT or related courses (1000 level or higher)
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
• EGDT 1100 Architectural Drafting
• EGDT 1200 Mechanical Drafting
• EGDT 1300 Structural Drafting
• EGDT 1400 Surveying
• EGDT 2020 Descriptive Geometry
• EGDT 2040 Piping Drafting
• EGDT 2050 Plate Layout
• EGDT 2600 Statics
• EGDT 2610 Strength of Materials
Complete 8 credits from the following:
• EGDT 1060 MicroStation (2.0)
• EGDT 2010 Advanced Electrical--CAD (2.0)
• EGDT 2100 Advanced Architectural--CAD (3.0)
• EGDT 2200 Advanced Mechanical--CAD (3.0)
• EGDT 2300 Advanced Structural--CAD (3.0)
• EGDT 2310 Structural Steel Modeling (3.0)
• EGDT 2400 Surveying Applications (4.0)
16.0
10 Credits
• Electives (1000 level or higher)
10.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 61 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours-- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BS in Technology
Management
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the Technology Management section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in
Drafting Technology
Emphasis Requirements:
45 Credits
45 Credits
Complete the following:
• EGDT 1010 Electrical-Electronic Drafting
• EGDT 1040 Computer Aided Drafting-AutoCAD
• EGDT 1070 3 Dimensional Computer Modeling
• EGDT 1080 AutoLisp
152
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
English and Literature
English and
Literature
Department Chair: Robert Cousins
Telephone: 801-863-8571
Assistant Chair: Christa AlbrechtCrane
Telephone: 801-863-6286
Faculty:
Professor
Karin Anderson
J.D. Davidson
Lawrence S. Harper
Lee Ann Mortensen
Kirk Rasmussen
Paul Tanner
Associate Professor
Jolayne Call
Rob Carney
Robert Cousins
Steve Fullmer
Laura Hamblin
Rick McDonald
Kate McPherson
Deb Thornton
Charles A. Vogel
Sandy Vogel
Jans Wager
Jen Wahlquist
Jan Wellington
Laurie Wood
Assistant Professor
Christa Albrecht-Crane
Mark Crane
Douglas Downs
Stephen Gibson
John Goshert
Scott Hatch
Bonnie Kyburz
David Grant Moss
Julie Nichols
Ryan Simmons
Kay Smith
Brian Whaley
Lecturer
Milo Amosa
Linda Shelton
Lorraine Wallace
Advisor: Dawn Chase
Telephone: 801-863-8574
School of Humanities, Arts, and
Social Sciences
Dean: William W. Cobb, Jr.
Office: LA 209d
Telephone: 801-863-7435
English courses taken at UVSC apply
towards Bachelor, AA/AS and AAS
degrees, minors, diplomas, and certificates.
Courses should transfer to most four-year
Utah Valley State
institutions of higher learning.
• POLS 1100
UVSC’s English program is designed to give
students skill, confidence, and versatility
in writing, speaking, and interpreting
texts. The program provides opportunities
for students to consider and practice the
applications of effective language use in
diverse situations: professional, pragmatic,
social, political, and aesthetic. The
English program emphasizes knowledge
and use of standard English in all written
work, yet incorporates an understanding
that English is a desirably diverse and
variable phenomenon. The courses of
study in English are designed to familiarize
students with much of the traditional canon
of literature. They are also designed to
provide students with the critical and ethical
skills necessary to interrogate this canon,
to incorporate and legitimize their own and
others’ “different” voices, not just in the
academy, but in any of the many situations
in which language influences human
activity.
Students in English at UVSC may choose
from the following program options: BA/BS
in English with an emphasis in Creative
Writing or Literary Studies, BA/BS in English
Education, BA/BS in Integrated Studies with
an emphasis in English, AA/AS Emphasis in
English, AA/AS Technical Communication
Specialization. Minors are available in
Creative Writing, English Education, Literary
Studies, and Technical Communication.
A certification in Technical Writing
is available for students who have a
completed associate’s degree or higher
from a regionally accredited institution of
higher learning and one year of full-time
employment. Students who wish to learn
more about any of these programs should
contact the English/Literature Department
for further information concerning course
requirements.
PROGR AMS
AA/AS Pre Major
in English
60 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
(recommended for Business,
Education, Science, and Health
Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
3.0
American National Government
(3.0)
Compete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• ENGL 2600 Critical Introduction to Literature
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
Select 9 credits from the following:
9.0
• ENGL 2510 American Literature before 1865
(3.0)
• ENGL 2520 American Literature after 1865 (3.0)
• ENGL 2610 British Literature before 1800 (3.0)
• ENGL 2620 British Literature after 1800 (3.0)
Complete a minimum of any two lower-division ENGL
6.0
courses or any lower-division course listed above that
has not been previously completed.
Elective Requirements:
10 Credits
• FOR AS DEGREE:Any course 1000 or higher
• FOR AA DEGREE:One Foreign Language
10.0
10.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
5 For the AA degree, completion of 10 credit hours of
course work from one foreign language.
AA/AS Pre Major in English with
an Emphasis in Technical
Communication
60 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
(recommended for Business,
Education, Science, and Health
Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Coursses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• ENGL 2600 Critical Introduction to Literature
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
• ENGL 2030
• ENGL 2050
• ENGL 2250
3.0
3.0
• FOR AA DEGREE: One Foreign Language
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
Rhetoric of Persuasion
Editing
Creative Process and Imaginative
Writing
or ENGL 225H Creative Process and Imaginative
Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 2310 Technical Communication
Select ONE from the following list:
• ART 1400
Graphic Computer Applications
(3.0)
• ART 2410
Typography and Layout II (3.0)
• INFO 1100 Exploring the Digital Domain (3.0)
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
10 Credits
10.0
153
English and Literature
• FOR AS DEGREE: Any course 1000 or higher
10.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
5 For the AA degree, completion of 10 credit hours of
course work from one foreign language.
BA/BS in English
120 C REDITS
1 Complete the following courses: ENGL 2600, Critical
Introduction to Literature; ENGL 2510, American Literature before 1865, or ENGL 2520, American Literature
after 1865; and ENGL 2610, British Literature before
1800, or ENGL 2620, British Literature after 1800.
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
(recommended for Business,
Education, Science, and Health
Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• ECON 1740 US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
3.0
3.0
3.0
•
or
•
or
•
•
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
22 Credits
ENGL 2510
ENGL 2520
ENGL 2610
ENGL 2620
ENGL 2600
ENGL 3000
American Literature before 1865
3.0
American Literature after 1865 (3.0)
British Literature before 1800
3.0
British Literature after 1800 (3.0)
Critical Introduction to Literature
3.0
Professional Considerations for the 1.0
English Major*
• ENGL 3090 Advanced Writing for English
3.0
Majors**
• ENGL 3890 Contemporary Critical Approaches 3.0
to Literature
• ENGL 4950 Senior Seminar
3.0
Language Core- Complete one of the following:
3.0
• ENGL 3010 Rhetorical Theory (3.0)
• ENGL 3020 Modern English Grammars (3.0)
• ENGL 3040 History of the English Language
(3.0)
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• Creative Writing
24.0
• Literary Studies
24.0
Elective Requirements:
39 Credits
• FOR BA DEGREE: One Foreign Language
• FOR BA DEGREE: Complete any courses 1000
level or higher
• FOR BS DEGREE: Complete any courses 1000
level of higher
• Complete any courses upper division courses
18.0
18.0
36.0
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 120 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
4 For the BA degree, completion of 18 credit hours of
course work from one language to include the 1010,
1020, 2010, and 2020 levels or transferred equivalents.
154
* Should be taken early on in the student’s course of
study, by the junior year at the latest.
** Should be taken early in the student’s junior year, as it
serves as crucial preparation for nearly all upper-division English courses.
Emphasis in Creative Writing
24 Credits
24 Credits
Complete ALL of the following:
• ENGL 3420 Intermediate Fiction Writing
• ENGL 3440 Intermediate Poetry Writing
• ENGL 412R Studies in Literary Genres
Complete TWO from the following:
• ENGL 4420 Advanced Fiction Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 4430 Play Writing for Creative Writers
(3.0)
• ENGL 4440 Advanced Poetry Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 4450 Creative Nonfiction Writing (3.0)
Complete a minimum of any THREE upper-division
ENGL courses or any upper-division course listed
above that has not been previously completed
Emphasis in Literary Studies
Emphasis Requirements:
• MATH 1040
Discipline Core Requirements:
Footnotes:
Emphasis Requirements:
Matriculation Requirements:
General Education Requirements:
5 Residency hours -- minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
9.0
24 Credits
24 Credits
American Literature (complete TWO from the
following):
• ENGL 3510 Early American Literature
• ENGL 3520 Literature of the American Renaissance
• ENGL 3525 American Literary Realism and
Naturalism
• ENGL 3530 Modern American Literature
• ENGL 3540 Contemporary American Literature
British Literature, pre-1800 (complete ONE from the
following):
• ENGL 3610 Medieval Literature
• ENGL 3620 Tudor British Literature
• ENGL 3630 Stuart British Literature
• ENGL 3640 Restoration and 18th Century British
Literature
British Literature, post-1800 (complete ONE of the
following:
• ENGL 3650 Romantic British Literature
• ENGL 3655 Victorian British Literature
• ENGL 3660 Modern British Literature
• ENGL 3670 Contemporary British Literature
Complete any FOUR upper-division ENGL courses or
any upper-division course listed above that has not
been previously completed
BA/BS in English
Education
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
6.0
3.0
3.0
12.0
120 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Completion of AA/AS degree.
2 Complete the following courses: ENGL 2600, Critical
Introduction to Literature; ENGL 2510, American Literature before 1865, or ENGL 2520, American Literature
after 1865; and ENGL 2610, British Literature before
1800, or ENGL 2620, British Literature after 1800.
General Education Requirements:
36 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
Catalog 2007–2008
American Literature before 1865
(3.0)
or ENGL 2520 American Literature after 1865
3.0
• ENGL 2610 British Literature before 1800 (3.0)
or ENGL 2620 British Literature after 1800
3.0
• ENGL 3890 Contemporary Critical Approaches 3.0
to Literature
• ENGL 4210 Methods in Teaching Literacy I
3.0
and ENGL 4220 Methods in Teaching Literacy II
3.0
Language Core (complete ONE from the following)
3.0
• ENGL 3010 Rhetorical Theory (3.0)
• ENGL 3020 Modern English Grammars (3.0)
• ENGL 3040 History of the English Language
(3.0)
American Literature (complete TWO from the following) 6.0
• ENGL 3510 Early American Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3520 Literature of the American Renaissance (3.0)
• ENGL 3525 American Literary Realism and
Naturalism (3.0)
• ENGL 3530 Modern American Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3540 Contemporary American Literature
(3.0)
British Literature, pre-1800 (complete ONE from the
3.0
following:)
• ENGL 3610 Medieval Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3620 Tudor British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3630 Stuart British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3640 Restoration and 18th Century British
Literature (3.0)
British Literature, post-1800 (complete ONE from the
3.0
following):
• ENGL 3650 Romantic British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3655 Victorian British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3660 Modern British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3670 Contemporary British Literature
(3.0)
Complete THREE from the following:
9.0
• ENGL 3090 Advanced Writing for English
Majors (3.0)
• ENGL 3420 Intermediate Fiction Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 3440 Intermediate Poetry Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 3710 Literature by Women (3.0)
• ENGL 373R Literature of Cultures and Places
(3.0)
• ENGL 3740 Literature of the Sacred (3.0)
• ENGL 3760 World Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3780 Mormon Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3820 History of Literary Criticism (3.0)
• ENGL 4010 Studies in Language (3.0)
• ENGL 412R Studies in Literary Genres (3.0)
• ENGL 4250 Adolescent Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 4420 Advanced Fiction Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 4440 Advanced Poetry Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 4450 Creative Nonfiction Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 4570 Studies in the American Novel (3.0)
• ENGL 4620 Chaucer (3.0)
• ENGL 463R Topics in Shakespeare (3.0)
• ENGL 4640 Milton (3.0)
• ENGL 471R Eminent Authors (3.0)
• ENGL 474R Topics in Folklore (3.0)
• ENGL 4760 Multi-ethnic Literature in America
(3.0)
• ENGL 486R Topics in Literature (3.0)
Secondary Education Licensure (ENGL 4210 is substituted
for EDSC 4440):
• EDSC 2540 Development of the Adolescent
2.0
Student
• EDSC 3000 Educational Psychology
3.0
• EDSC 3050 Foundations of American Education 2.0
• EDSC 3250 Instructional Media
2.0
• EDSP 3400 Exceptional Students
2.0
• EDSC 4200 Classroom Management I
1.0
• EDSC 4250 Classroom Management II
1.0
• EDSC 4450 Multicultural Instruction/ESL
2.0
• EDSC 4550 Secondary Curriculum Instruction
4.0
and Assessment
• EDSC 4850 Student Teaching--Secondary
8.0
Elective Requirements:
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
69 Credits
Complete the following:
• ENGL 2600 Critical Introduction to Literature
• ENGL 2510
3.0
15 Credits
• FOR BA DEGREE:One Foreign Language (Foreign 15.0
Language 2020 course fulfills Humanities
Distribution)
• FOR BS DEGREE:Any course 1000 or higher (from 15.0
AA/AS degree).
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 120 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above, with
no grade lower than a B- in licensure and methods
courses. (Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
Utah Valley State
English and Literature
5 For the BA degree, completion of 18 credit hours of
course work from one foreign language to include the
1010, 1020, 2010, and 2020* levels or transferred
equivalents.
Minor in English
Creative Writing
21 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
18 Credits
Introductory Course (complete the following)
• ENGL 2250 Creative Process and Imaginative
Writing (3.0)
or ENGL 225H Creative Process and Imaginative
Writing (3.0)
Creative Writing Courses (complete THREE from the
following)
• ENGL 3420 Intermediate Fiction Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 3440 Intermediate Poetry Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 4420 Advanced Fiction Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 4440 Advanced Poetry Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 4430 Play Writing for Creative Writers
(3.0)
• ENGL 4450 Creative Nonfiction Writing (3.0)
Form and Theory Courses (complete the following)
• ENGL 2600 Critical Introduction to Literature
(3.0)
• ENGL 412R Studies in Literary Genres (3.0)
Elective Requirements:
3.0
9.0
6.0
3 Credits
Choose from the following
• ENGL 373R Literature of Cultures and Places
(3.0)
• ENGL 4350 Senior Project (2.0)
• ENGL 471R Eminent Authors (3.0)
• ENGL 481R Internship (1.0)
• ENGL 486R Topics in Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 490R Directed Readings (1.0)
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Complete all courses with no grade lower than a C-.
Minor in
English Education
18 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Complete the following courses: ENGL 2600, Critical
Introduction to Literature; ENGL 2510, American Literature before 1865, or ENGL 2520, American Literature
after 1865; and ENGL 2610, British Literature before
1800, or ENGL 2620, British Literature after 1800.
2 Must be accepted into a Secondary Education major
Discipline Core Requirements:
18 Credits
• ENGL 2510
American Literature before 1865
(3.0)
or ENGL 2520 American Literature after 1865 (3.0)
• ENGL 2610 British Literature before 1800 (3.0)
or ENGL 2620 British Literature after 1800 (3.0)
• ENGL 2600 Critical Introduction to Literature
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• ENGL 3890 Contemporary Critical Approaches
to Literature
• ENGL 4210 Methods in Teaching Literacy I
• ENGL 4220 Methods in Teaching Literacy II
Choose one from the following:
• ENGL 3010 Rhetorical Theory (3.0)
• ENGL 3020 Modern English Grammars (3.0)
• ENGL 3040 History of the English Language
(3.0)
Complete one from the following:
• ENGL 3510 Early American Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3520 Literature of the American Renaissance (3.0)
• ENGL 3525 American Literary Realism and
Naturalism (3.0)
• ENGL 3530 Modern American Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3540 Contemporary American Literature
(3.0)
Complete one from the following:
• ENGL 3610 Medieval Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3620 Tudor British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3630 Stuart British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3640 Restoration and 18th Century British
Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3650 Romantic British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3655 Victorian British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3660 Modern British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3670 Contemporary British Literature
(3.0)
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
18 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Complete the following courses: ENGL 2600, Critical
Introduction to Literature; ENGL 2510, American Literature before 1865, or ENGL 2520, American Literature
after 1865; and ENGL 2610, British Literature before
1800, or ENGL 2620, British Literature after 1800.
Discipline Core Requirements:
18 Credits
Complete the following:
• ENGL 3090 Advanced Writing for English
Majors
• ENGL 3890 Contemporary Critical Approaches
to Literature
Complete ONE from the following:
• ENGL 3510 Early American Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3520 Literature of the American
Renaissance (3.0)
• ENGL 3525 American Literary Realism and
Naturalism (3.0)
• ENGL 3530 Modern American Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3540 Contemporary American Literature
(3.0)
Complete ONE of the following:
• ENGL 3610 Medieval Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3620 Tudor British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3630 Stuart British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3640 Restoration and 18th Century British
Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3650 Romantic British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3655 Victorian British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3660 Modern British Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3670 Contemporary British Literature
(3.0)
Complete ONE from the following:
• ENGL 3010 Rhetorical Theory (3.0)
• ENGL 3020 Modern English Grammars (3.0)
• ENGL 3040 History of the English Language
(3.0)
• ENGL 4010 Studies in Language (3.0)
Complete ONE from the following:
• ENGL 3420 Intermediate Fiction Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 3440 Intermediate Poetry Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 3710 Literature by Women (3.0)
• ENGL 373R Literature of Cultures and Places
(3.0)
• ENGL 3740 Literature of the Sacred (3.0)
• ENGL 3760 World Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3780 Mormon Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 3820 History of Literary Criticism (3.0)
• ENGL 4010 Studies in Language (3.0)
• ENGL 412R Studies in Literary Genres (3.0)
• ENGL 4420 Advanced Fiction Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 4440 Advanced Poetry Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 4450 Creative Nonfiction Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 4570 Studies in the American Novel (3.0)
• ENGL 4620 Chaucer (3.0)
• ENGL 4630 Shakespeare (3.0)
• ENGL 4640 Milton (3.0)
• ENGL 471R Eminent Authors (3.0)
• ENGL 474R Topics in Folklore (3.0)
• ENGL 4760 Multi-ethnic Literature in America
(3.0)
• ENGL 486R Topics in Literature (3.0)
• ENGL 490R Directed Readings (1.0)
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Topics in Technical Communication
(3.0)
Capstone Course: Complete ONE of the following:
• ENGL 4350 Senior Project (2.0)
• ENGL 481R Internship (1.0) (must be taken for
2 credits)
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in English
Emphasis Requirements:
Certification in Technical
Communication
15 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 AA/AS degree or higher from a regionally accredited
institution of higher learning and one year full-time
employment.
12 Credits
Complete the following:
• ENGL 2050 Editing
• ENGL 2310 Technical Communication
• ENGL 3340 Designing Electronic
Documentation
• ENGL 4310 Advanced Technical
Communication
Elective Requirements:
3.0
18 Credits
18 Credits
Complete the following:
• ENGL 2600 Critical Introduction to Literature
3.0
Complete 15 hours of upper-division ENGL courses.
Course selection must be approved by English advisor. 15.0
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3 Credits
Complete ONE of the following:
• ENGL 3310 Designing Documents for Print
Media (3.0)
• ENGL 3320 Grant and Proposal Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 4320 Document Management (4.0)
• ENGL 436R Topics in Technical Communication
(3.0)
3.0
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă ENGL, English and Literature
Graduation Requirements:
1 Complete all courses with no grade lower than a C-.
3.0
Minor in Technical
Communication
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Complete all courses with no grade lower than a C- and
no grade lower than a B- in methods courses.
Utah Valley State
Minor in English
Literary Studies
• ENGL 436R
20 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Completion of 35 semester credits with a cumulative
GPA: 2.5 minimum.
or Completion of an Associate in Science or an Associate
of Arts degree. Minimum grade of “C” in all courses.
2 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
20 Credits
Complete the following:
• ENGL 2600 Critical Introduction to Literature
or ENGL 3010 Rhetorical Theory (3.0)
or ENGL 4010 Studies in Language (3.0)
• ENGL 4310 Advanced Technical
Communication
Complete FOUR courses from the following:
• ENGL 3050 Advanced Editing and Desktop
Publishing (3.0)
• ENGL 3310 Designing Documents for Print
Media (3.0)
• ENGL 3320 Grant and Proposal Writing (3.0)
• ENGL 3340 Designing Electronic
Documentation (3.0)
• ENGL 4320 Document Management (4.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
12.0
155
English - Basic Composition
English— Basic
Composition
Basic Composition/English as a
Second Language (ESL)
Department Chair: Forrest G.
Williams
Office: LA 234e
Telephone: 801-863-8494
Advisor/Administrative Assistant:
Giovanna Alisa
Office: LA 234a
Telephone: 801-863-8729
Faculty:
Professor
J. Kaye Jeffery
Deborah R. Marrott
Associate Professor
Melinda Bender
Forrest G. Williams
Instructor
Allison McMurtrey
programs include emphasis on accuracy
and clarity in language use, critical
thinking, current events, organizational
skills in speech and writing, comprehending
and responding to written texts, and
using logic and support to present oral
and/or written arguments. The Basic
Composition/ESL Department strives to
accomplish its mission by providing a
learner-centered environment which allows
students to develop self-confidence along
with the skills necessary to succeed in their
academic or occupational endeavors. The
Department uses a variety of instructional
formats including traditional classroom
settings, computerized instruction,
collaborative learning exercises, peer and
individualized tutorials, and individualized
instruction to meet student needs.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă ENGH, English-Basic Composition
Ă ESL, English as a Second Language
School of General Academics
Dean: Bonnie G. Henrie
Office: LA 210c
Telephone: 801-863-8311
Associate Dean: K.D. Taylor
Office: LA 210e
Telephone: 801-863-8949
Assistant Dean: Lisa Lambert
Office: LA 210d
Telephone: 801-863-8741
Administrative Assistant: Frankie
Jensen
Office: LA 210
Telephone: 801-863-6312
OTHER SERVICES
Writing Center:
Academic Tutoring: LA 201
Jennifer Abbot Paul, Manager
Telephone: 801-863-8099
Learning Assistance:
Learning Strategist: Gary Sauter
Office: LA 221p
Telephone: 801-863-7418
The Basic Composition/ESL Department
is dedicated to assisting students and
community members who wish to improve
their writing skills in preparation for taking
college courses or for self-improvement.
Both the Basic Composition and ESL
156
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
English as a Second Language
English as
a Second
Language
Program Director: Kevin Eyraud
Office: LA 234f
Telephone: 801-863-7091
Faculty:
Professor
James Pettersson
Abdou Touati
Assistant Professor
Heidi Condie
Kevin Eyraud
Advisor: Giovana Eaquinto Alisa
Office: LA 234a
Telephone: 801-863-8729
Fax: 801-863-6462
college or in the job market.
• To familiarize international and nonnative English-speaking students with the
American culture
All students are required to take a
placement examination prior to registration
for any courses. Placement/promotion
testing is done at the beginning and
end of each semester. All students who
successfully complete the advanced level
courses and meet the ESL Program exit
criteria are admitted into the college for
their academic studies.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă ENGH, English-Basic Composition
Ă ESL, English as a Second Language
Department of Basic Composition/
English as a Second Language (ESL)
Department Chair: Forrest G. Williams
Office: LA 234e
Telephone: 801-863-8494
School of General Academics
Dean: Bonnie G. Henrie
Office: LA 210c
Telephone: 801-863-8311
Associate Dean: K.D. Taylor
Office: LA 210e
Telephone: 801-863-8949
Assistant Dean: Lisa Lambert
Office: LA 210d
Telephone: 801-863-8741
Administrative Assistant: Frankie Jensen
Office: LA 210
Telephone: 801-863-6312
OTHER SERVICES
Writing Center:
Academic Tutoring: LA 201
Jennifer Abbot Paul, Manager
Telephone: 801-863-8099
The English as a Second Language Program
has three goals:
• To assist international and non-native Englishspeaking students in becoming proficient in
the English communication skills of listening,
speaking, writing and reading.
• To prepare international and non-native
English-speaking students to succeed either in
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
157
Facilities Management
Facilities
Management
institution, but some of the more common
responsibilities are:
• providing environmental control such as
heating and cooling
Department of Construction
Technologies
• maintaining buildings and grounds
Department Chair: Steve Fordham
• supervising personnel
Office: GT 601
Telephone: 801-863-8167
Program Coordinator: Eric Linfield
Office: GT 613d
Telephone: 801-863-8250
• approving changes in existing structures
and approving plans for new facilities
• purchasing
• budgeting and accounting
• preventative maintenance and protection
of physical property
• scheduling regular maintenance of
facilities
• planning and logistics
Faculty:
PROGR AMS
Professor
Bob Dunn
Associate Professor
Fred Davis
DeWayne Erdmann
Steve Fordham
Eric Linfield
Office Manager: Sandra Ozuna
Office: GT 613e
Telephone: 801-863-7405
Advisor: Amy Ostler
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-8138
Two options are available: An Associate
in Applied Science degree and a Bachelor
of Science Degree in Technology
Management.
Reminder: an overall grade point average
of 2.0 (C) or higher is required for
graduation.
AAS in Facilities
Management
•
•
•
•
•
•
ENGL 1010
EGDT 1600
SOC 1010
PHIL 2050
PHYS 1010
ENVT 1200
• ACRT 2420
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BCCM 1120
BCCM 1270
BIT 1010
BIT 1240
BIT 1330
BIT 1340
ECT 1000
FAC 1010
FAC 1600
• FAC 281R
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The Facilities Management program is
designed to prepare graduates to manage
physical facilities such as resorts, health
care centers, government facilities,
recreational complexes, schools, industrial
plants, and apartment buildings. Wherever
there are buildings to be maintained there
is a career opportunity for the facility
manager.
The job of the facility manager can vary
considerably depending on the employing
158
• FAC 285R
• DGM 2010
• MGMT 2200
• MGMT 3170
18 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Technical Math--Algebra*
Introduction to Sociology
Ethics and Values
Elementary Physics
Environmental Worker Safety
Discipline Core Requirements:
Advisory Committee: Mark Woods
(chairperson), Novell, Inc.; Phil Lott,
Provo School District; Bob Clark, Utah
Valley State College, Physical Plant;
Bob Whimpey, Nature’s Sunshine; Larry
Robinson, Intermountain Healthcare Urban South Region.
63 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BCCM 1120
BCCM 1270
BIT 1010
BIT 1240
BIT 1330
BIT 1340
EGDT 1600
ECT 1000
ENVT 1200
FAC 1010
FAC 1600
Blueprint Reading
Construction Scheduling
Building Codes
Plumbing Codes
Mechanical Codes
Electrical Codes
Technical Math--Algebra
Survey of Electronics
Environmental Worker Safety
Survey of Facilities Management
Survey of Grounds and Building
Maintenance (optional) (3.0)
• FAC 281R
Cooperative Work Experience
(take twice) (1.0)
• FAC 285R
Cooperative Correlated Class
(take twice) (1.0)
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications
2.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
8.0
2.0
3.0
Due to the technical nature of the material
in FAC courses, additional reading and
math instruction may be required. More
information will be given during advisement.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă ACRT, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
Technology
Ă BCCM, Building Construction and
Construction Management
Ă BIT, Building Inspection Technology
Ă CAW, Cabinetry and Architectural
Woodworking
Ă FAC, Facilities Management
Ă LINE, Lineman Technology
Ă WELD, Welding Technology
45 Credits
Heating and Air Conditioning
Controls
Blueprint Reading
Construction Scheduling
Building Codes
Plumbing Codes
Mechanical Codes
Electrical Codes
Survey of Electronics
Survey of Facilities Management
Survey of Grounds and Building
Maintenance (optional) (3.0)
Cooperative Work Experience
(1.0)
Cooperative Correlated Class
(1.0)
Business Computer Proficiency
Business Communications
Entrepreneurship
5.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
8.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 63 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above (departments may require a higher GPA).
3 Residency hours: minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
Footnotes:
* May be substituted with MATH 1030 or higher.
BS in Technology
Management
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the Technology Management section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in
Facilities Management
Emphasis Requirements
• ACRT 2420
45 Credits
45 credits
Heating and Air Conditioning
Controls
Catalog 2007–2008
5.0
Utah Valley State
Finance and Economics
Finance and
Economics
Department Chair: Lowell M.
Glenn
Office: WB 215
Telephone: 801-863-8385
Faculty:
Professor
Norman D. Gardner
Reed Gooch
Ian Wilson
Associate Professor
Lynn Adams
Amir Kia
L. Brent Eagar
Lowell M. Glenn
Faridul Islam
Assistant Professor
Vaughn S. Armstrong
G. David Flint
Abdus Samad
Lecturer
Leonard Pavia
School of Business:
Dean: Stanley Earl Jenne, Ph.D.
Office: WB 128b
Telephone: 801-863-8239
Associate Dean: Janice Gygi
Office: WB 219
Telephone: 801-863-8863
Assistant Dean: Mikki O’Connor
Office: WB 129
Telephone: 801-863-8850
The business world is more competitive
today than in past generations. Decision
makers understand the increasing
importance of getting things right the
first time using business models and
measurement methods to make policy
decisions. The classes taught in the
Department of Finance and Economics are
designed to give students the background
to make professional business decisions.
Experienced faculty work with students
in development of theory and learning
to apply the principles of financial
management, economics, statistics, and
operations management critical to their
professional development. Finally students
are taught to integrate these disciplines
within a strategic management curriculum
during the final semester as they prepare
to move into the professional business
environment.
Utah Valley State
JOB OUTLOOK
The need for economic and financial
decision makers is increasing at all levels
of business and government. Job demand
is high, particularly in larger metropolitan
areas, and the employment outlook is
excellent. Those trained in finance and
economics who also have competence in
information analysis can enter fields such
as fund management, energy, securities,
securities market regulation, or government
financial management. Those with foreign
language capabilities may also have access
to international business, international
finance, import/export, and securities
operations.
Business Core Courses:
• INFO 3120 Principles of Information Systems--A
Managerial Approach
• LEGL 3000 Business Law
• MGMT 3010 Principles of Management
• MGMT 3100 Principles of Finance*
• MGMT 3450 Operations Management*
• MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing
• MGMT 3890 Career Preparation
• MGMT 4800 Strategic Management*
• MGMT 4830 Strategic Management Capstone
Simulation
• MGMT 493R Entrepreneurship Lecture Series (1.0)
or MGMT 495R Executive Lecture Series
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
15 Credits
MGMT 3300
MGMT 3150
MGMT 3400
MGMT 4100
Survey of International Business
Financial Management
Investment Management
Management of Financial
Institutions
• ECON 4320 Mathematical Economics
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
12 Credits
Select 12 credits from the following list:
12.0
• ECON 4150 Public Finance (3.0)
• MGMT 4180 International Finance Management
(3.0)
• MGMT 4400 New Venture Financing (3.0)
• Any Accounting Course Numbered 3010 or higher
A Bachelor of Science Degree (BS) in
Business with a Finance and Banking
Specialization is available for students
interested in this area.
Elective Requirements:
10 Credits
Select 10 credits of General Education courses
10.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 123 semester credits
required in the BS degree; at least 40 credit hours must
be upper-division courses.
2 Overall grade point average 2.0 or above with a
minimum of 2.5 GPA in all School of Business courses.
No grade lower than a “C-” in core and specialization
courses.
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 30 credit hours of
business courses through course attendance at UVSC,
with at least 10 hours earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements. Students are responsible for completing
all prerequisite courses.
NOTE: Students will be limited to 15 hours of upper-division
credit until MATRICULATION is completed.
PROGR AMS
Students interested in finance and
economics may receive a Bachelor of
Science Degree (BS) in Business with
a Finance and Banking Specialization.
An Associate in Science (AS) School of
Business transfer degree is available for
students planning to transfer to another
college or university in Utah. (See the
School of Business section of the catalog
for details on the AS degree.)
Footnotes:
BS in Business Management with
an Emphasis in Finance
and Banking
123 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
36 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
3.0
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
3.0
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
4.0
or An Advanced Placement (AP) Mathematics Test with a
score of 3 or higher
Complete one of the following:
3.0
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
3.0
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
• PES 1097
Fitness for Life
2.0
Distribution Courses
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics * (fulfills Social/
3.0
Behavioral Science credit)
• Biology
3.0
• Physical Science
3.0
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
3.0
• Humanities Distribution
3.0
• Fine Arts Distribution
3.0
Discipline Core Requirements:
** Students will be required to complete the Business
Computer Proficiency exam with a score of 80 percent
or higher on each module or complete the DGM 2010
course or DGM 201A-D modules as necessary with a
score of 80 percent or highter on each module.
* Courses with an asterisk (*) cannot be taken until
student is matriculated.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă ECON, Economics
Ă MGMT, Business Management
50 Credits
Business Foundation Courses:
• ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
• ACC 2020
Managerial Accounting
• Business Computer Proficiency Exam **
or DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
• MATH 1100 Introduction to Calculus
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications *
• ECON 2010 Microeconomics
• MGMT 2340 Business Statistics I
• MGMT 2390 Effective Business Presentations
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
159
General Academics
General
Academics
School of General Academics
Dean: Bonnie Henrie
Office: LA 210c
Telephone: 801-863-8311
E-mail: bonnie.henrie@uvsc.edu
Assistant Dean: Lisa Lambert
Office: LA 210d
Telephone: 801-863-8741
E-mail: lisa.lambert@uvsc.edu
PROGR AMS
AA/AS Pre Major in
General Academics
60 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government 3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities
• Fine Arts
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
25 Credits
• Any course(s) 1000 or higher
• One Language (other than English) to include the
1010, 1020, 2010, 2020 levels, or transferred
15.0
10.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum or 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
5 For the AA degree, completion of 10 credit hours of
course work from one language.
160
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Geography
Geography
Department of History and
Political Science
Department Chair: Keith Snedegar
Department Office: LA 030
Telephone: 801-863-8487
Fax: 801-863-7013
Geography Coordinator: Jon Moore
Administrative Assistant: Paula
Wankier
Faculty:
Assistant Professor
Jon Moore
School of Humanities, Arts, and
Social Sciences
Dean: William W. Cobb, Jr.
Office: LA 209d
Telephone: 801-863-7435
Geography is the study of the interaction
between human, physical and
environmental systems and their distribution
across the surface of the Earth. As a
scientific field, geography is not simply
about discovering where things are, but the
theoretical and analytical understanding
of concepts such as place, space and
connectivity, within several disciplinary
subfields such as cultural, economic, political and environmental geographies.
Geography is a multidisciplinary
field having important linkages with
anthropology, biology, environmental
science, geology, history, political science,
and sociology. Those with training in
geography are prepared to work in a wide
variety of career fields, including cultural
studies, natural resource management,
education, foreign service, law
enforcement, marketing, disaster response,
humanitarian relief, public administration,
real estate, tourism, and urban planning.
Complete 3 credits from the following courses:
• ARCH 1100 Introduction to Archaeology (3.0)
• ECON 1010 Economics as a Social Science (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• GEOG 1300 Survey of World Geography (3.0)
• GEOG 2100 Geography of the United States
(3.0)
• GEOG 3010 Economic Geography (3.0)
• GEOG 3430 Political Geography (3.0)
• GEOG 3630 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (4.0)
• GEOG 3800 Environmental History of the United
States (3.0)
Complete 3 credits from the following courses:
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1010 Introduction to Political Science
(3.0)
• POLS 1020 Political Ideologies (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
• POLS 1440 Introduction to Middle East Politics
(3.0)
• POLS 2200 Introduction to Comparative Politics
(3.0)
• POLS 2100 Introduction to International Relations (3.0)
• POLS 1800 Our Global Community (3.0)
• POLS 2120 Political Parties (3.0)
• POLS 2350 Introduction to Political Theory (3.0)
• POLS 3000 Political Analysis (3.0)
• POLS 3030 State and Local Government (3.0)
• POLS 3100 Survey of International Terrorism
(3.0)
• POLS 3150 Executive Branch (3.0)
• POLS 3200 Legislative Process (3.0)
• POLS 3500 International Relations of the Middle
East (3.0)
• POLS 3590 American Indian Law and Tribal
Government (3.0)
• POLS 3600 International Relations of East Asia
(3.0)
• POLS 480R Internship (2.0)
Complete at least 3 credits from the following courses:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1100
History of Civilization I (3.0)
• HIST 1110
History of Civilization II (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
Complete an additional 9 credits from any GEOG,
HIST, or POLS course 3000 or higher (see advisor).
3.0
3.0
3.0
9.0
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
ARCH, Archaeology
GEOG, Geography
HIST, History
POLS, Political Science
SOSC, Social Science
GEOG 1300 and GEOG 2100 fulfill
general education requirements in the
social science distribution area. Several
geography courses apply toward the
Integrated Studies Social Sciences
emphasis and may serve as electives in
other programs. (See specific program
requirements.)
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Social Sciences
Emphasis Requirements:
Utah Valley State
18 Credits
18 Credits
Catalog 2007–2008
161
History
• ENGL 2010
History
Department of History and
Political Science
Department Chair: Keith Snedegar
Department Office: LA 030
Telephone: 801-863-8487
Fax: 801-863-7013
Administrative Assistant: Paula
Wankier
Faculty:
Professor
William W. Cobb, Jr.
JaNae Brown Haas
Keith Snedegar
Associate Professor
Lyn Ellen Bennett
Assistant Professor
Kathren A. Brown
David R. Wilson
Senior Lecturer
Alexander T. Stecker
Discipline Core Requirements:
Elective Requirements:
Lower division courses in U.S. History
fill general education requirements for
American Institutions; other lower division
courses meet the social science distribution
requirement. Upper division courses may
be applied toward the BA in History, BS in
History Education, or an emphasis in the
four-year Integrated Studies degree.
AA/AS Pre Major in History and
Political Science
62 C REDITS
162
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
16.0
11 Credits
Graduation Requirements:
The History Program at UVSC is dedicated
to providing students with a broad range
of opportunities in general education for
global awareness and informed citizenship
as well as discipline-specific courses for
majors. Our classes lie at the heart of the
collegiate experience. In them we observe
the dynamics of the human condition
through diverse and manifold historical
perspectives. We endeavor to teach in
ways that foster independent thinking, the
analysis of human issues through reading
and discussion, and the development
of writing skills. Students who complete
our programs will be well equipped for
graduate study, and successful careers in
public service or private enterprise.
Introduction to Writing
3.0
• FOR AS DEGREE:Complete any course numbered 11.0
1000 or higher
• FOR AA DEGREE:One Foreign Language
10.0
and Complete any course numbered 1000 or higher
1.0
Dean: William W. Cobb, Jr.
Office: LA 209d
Telephone: 801-863-7435
• ENGL 1010
3.0
16 Credits
• Complete 16 Credits from any ARCH, ECON,
GEOG, HIST, or POLS courses.
School of Humanities, Arts, and
Social Sciences
General Education Requirements:
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
35 Credits
3.0
1 Completion of a minimum of 62 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
5 For the AA degree, completion of 10 credit hours of
course work from one language.
BA in History
120 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
(2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution (Fulfilled by completing
Foreign Language Course 2020)
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
• GEOG 1300 Survey of World Geography
• HIST 1100
History of Civilization I
• HIST 1110
History of Civilization II
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877
• HIST 2710
US History since 1877
Emphasis:
Complete one of the following:
• General History
• Public History
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
27.0
27.0
43 Credits
Catalog 2007–2008
• Any courses numbered 1000 or higher (15 credits 28.0
must be upper division).
• Complete additional 15 hours of one Foreign
15.0
Language.
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 120 credits, 40 of which
must be 3000 level or higher.
2 Minimum UVSC GPA of 2.0 upon graduation.
3 Complete General Education Requirements.
4 Completion of four semesters of one foreign language.
5 Complete one of the two tracks in the Areas of Study
requirements.
6 Complete core courses.
7 Comply with the catalog’s rule on maximum number of
years in the program.
8 Minimum of 30 credits must be taken at UVSC (at least
10 of which must be part of the final 45 credits earned).
NOTES:
Students should frequently consult with his/her advisor on
program requirements.
Emphasis in
General History
27 Credits
6 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
• HIST 3010
• HIST 4990
The Nature of History (3.0)
Senior Research Thesis-Writing
Component (3.0)
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
21 Credits
Complete any three upper-division history courses
9.0
Select at least one course from each Area of Study
12.0
A. European History
• HIST 3110
Greek History (3.0)
• HIST 3130
Roman Republic (3.0)
• HIST 3140
Roman Empire (3.0)
• HIST 3150
Medieval Europe (3.0)
• HIST 3160
Renaissance and Reformation-Europe 1350 to 1600 (3.0)
• HIST 3170
Absolutism Enlightenment and
Revolution--Europe from 1600 to
1815 (3.0)
• HIST 3180
Nineteenth Century Europe (3.0)
• HIST 3190
Twentieth Century Europe (3.0)
• HIST 3320
Modern Britain (3.0)
• HIST 3660
The History of Modern Russia--1864
to Present (3.0)
B. United States History
• HIST 3200
Women in American History to
1870 (3.0)
• HIST 3210
Women in American History since
1870 (3.0)
• HIST 3260
History of Utah (3.0)
• HIST 3460
US Military History (3.0)
• HIST 3520
The United States and Vietnam-1945 to Present (3.0)
• HIST 3730
American Origins to 1790 (3.0)
• HIST 3731
United States History 1790-1890
(3.0)
• HIST 3732
United States History 1890-1945
(3.0)
• HIST 3733
United States History since 1945
(3.0)
• HIST 3800
Environmental History of the United
States (3.0)
• HIST 3810
American Indians to 1815 (3.0)
• HIST 3830
The Contest for Territory--American
Indians and the US 1815-1891 (3.0)
• HIST 3850
The Struggle for Self-determination-American Indians 1891-present
(3.0)
• HIST 3870
Constitutional History to Plessy
1896 (3.0)
• HIST 3880
Constitutional History since Plessy
1896 (3.0)
• HIST 4600
Contemporary American Indian
Political and Social Issues (3.0)
• HIST 4620
History of the American West (3.0)
• HIST 4740
American Revolution (3.0)
• HIST 4750
Civil War/Reconstruction (3.0)
C. World History
• HIST 3030
Introduction to African History (3.0)
• HIST 3040
Colonial Latin America (3.0)
• HIST 3050
Modern Latin America (3.0)
• HIST 3430
Middle East History--1914-Present
(3.0)
• HIST 3530
History of Vietnam (3.0)
• HIST 3540
History of South Africa (3.0)
• HIST 3610
The Modern History of East Asia
(3.0)
• HIST 4300
Violence and Social Conflict in Latin
America (3.0)
• HIST 4430
History of Iran--1900 to Present
(3.0)
D. Public History/Special Topics
• HIST 3020
Introduction to Public History (3.0)
Utah Valley State
History
• HIST 3450
• HIST 3550
• HIST 3800
• HIST 400R
• HIST 4100
• HIST 4130
• HIST 4140
• HIST 420R
• HIST 4320
• HIST 4330
• HIST 435R
• HIST 471R
• HIST 482R
• HIST 490R
The History of World War II (3.0)
Memory and History (3.0)
Environmental History of the United
States (3.0)
History Practicum (3.0)
Jewish History (3.0)
Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust
(3.0)
Genocide in the Twentieth Century
(3.0)
Issues and Topics in Global History
(3.0)
History of Scientific Thought (3.0)
Machines in the Making of History
(3.0)
Issues and Topics in the History of
Science (3.0)
Special Issues and Topics in
American History (3.0)
Public History Internship (2.0)
Independent Study (1.0)
Emphasis in Public History
Emphasis Requirements:
• HIST 3020
• HIST 400R
• HIST 482R
Discipline Core Requirements:
27 Credits
9 Credits
Introduction to Public History (3.0)
History Practicum (3.0)
Public History Internship* (3.0)
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
• PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• ENGL 2510 American Literature before 1865
(3.0)
or ENGL 2520 American Literature after 1865 (3.0)
or ENGL 2610 British Literature before 1800 (3.0)
or ENGL 2620 British Literature after 1800 (3.0)
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
• POLS 1010 Introduction to Political Science
(3.0)
or POLS 2200 Introduction to Comparative Politics
(3.0)
or POLS 2100 Introduction to International Relations (3.0)
3.0
3.0
3.0
18 Credits
Complete any other upper-division history courses
9.0
Complete at least three of the following courses in
9.0
U.S. History
• HIST 3200
Women in American History to
1870 (3.0)
• HIST 3210
Women in American History since
1870 (3.0)
• HIST 3260
History of Utah (3.0)
• HIST 3460
US Military History (3.0)
• HIST 3520
The United States and Vietnam-1945 to Present (3.0)
• HIST 3730
American Origins to 1790 (3.0)
• HIST 3731
United States History 1790-1890
(3.0)
• HIST 3732
United States History 1890-1945
(3.0)
• HIST 3733
United States since 1945 (3.0)
• HIST 3800
Environmental History of the United
States (3.0)
• HIST 3810
American Indians to 1815 (3.0)
• HIST 3830
The Contest for Territory--American
Indians and the US 1815-1891 (3.0)
• HIST 3850
The Struggle for Self-determination-American Indians 1891-present
(3.0)
• HIST 3870
Constitutional History to Plessy
1896 (3.0)
• HIST 3880
Constitutional History since Plessy
1896 (3.0)
• HIST 4600
Contemporary American Indian
Political and Social Issues (3.0)
• HIST 4620
History of the American West (3.0)
• HIST 4740
American Revolution (3.0)
• HIST 4750
Civil War/Reconstruction (3.0)
Footnotes:
* HIST 482R is a variable credit course. Students concentrating in Public History should arrange for internship
experiences that are the equivalent of at least three
credit hours.
BS in History
Education
120 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Completion of at least 30 semester hours of college
credit, 15 hours of which must be taken at UVSC;
2 Completion of the Application for Admission to the
Bachelor of Science Degree in History Education;
3 Completion of HIST 2030 and HIST 2040, or HIST
2700 and HIST 2710;
4 Payment of nonrefundable matriculation fee;
5 Minimum G.P.A. of 2.75.
General Education Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
36 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
Utah Valley State
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
72 Credits
Complete the following:
• HIST 1740
US Economic History
• GEOG 1300 Survey of World Geography
• HIST 1100
History of Civilization I
• HIST 1110
History of Civilization II
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877
• HIST 2710
US History since 1877
• HIST 3010
The Nature of History
• HIST 3260
History of Utah
• HIST 4250
Teaching History in the Secondary
Curriculum
Professional Education Courses
• EDSC 2540 Development of the Adolescent
Student
• EDSC 3000 Educational Psychology
• EDSC 3050 Foundations of American Education
• EDSC 3250 Instructional Media
• EDSC 4200 Classroom Management I
• EDSC 4250 Classroom Management II
• EDSC 4440 Content Area Reading and Writing
• EDSC 4450 Multicultural Instruction/ESL
• EDSC 4550 Secondary Curriculum Instruction
and Assessment
• EDSC 4850 Student Teaching--Secondary (4.0)
• EDSP 3400 Exceptional Students
Choose one course from each of the following five
AREAS OF STUDY*:
United States*
• HIST 3200
Women in American History to
1870 (3.0)
• HIST 3210
Women in American History since
1870 (3.0)
• HIST 3260
History of Utah (3.0)
• HIST 3520
The United States and Vietnam-1945 to Present (3.0)
• HIST 3730
American Origins to 1790 (3.0)
• HIST 3731
United States History 1790-1890
(3.0)
• HIST 3732
United States History 1890-1945
(3.0)
• HIST 3733
United States since 1945 (3.0)
• HIST 3800
Environmental History of the United
States (3.0)
• HIST 3810
American Indians to 1815 (3.0)
• HIST 3830
The Contest for Territory--American
Indians and the US 1815-1891 (3.0)
• HIST 3850
The Struggle for Self-determination-American Indians 1891-present
(3.0)
• HIST 3870
Constitutional History to Plessy
1896 (3.0)
• HIST 3880
Constitutional History since Plessy
1896 (3.0)
• HIST 4600
Contemporary American Indian
Political and Social Issues (3.0)
• HIST 4620
History of the American West (3.0)
• HIST 4740
American Revolution (3.0)
• HIST 4750
Civil War/Reconstruction (3.0)
Latin America*
• HIST 3040
Colonial Latin America (3.0)
• HIST 3050
Modern Latin America (3.0)
• HIST 4300
Violence and Social Conflict in Latin
America (3.0)
Europe/Russia*
• HIST 3110
Greek History (3.0)
• HIST 3130
Roman Republic (3.0)
• HIST 3140
Roman Empire (3.0)
• HIST 3150
Medieval Europe (3.0)
• HIST 3160
Renaissance and Reformation--Europe 1350 to 1600 (3.0)
• HIST 3170
Absolutism Enlightenment and
Revolution--Europe from 1600 to
1815 (3.0)
• HIST 3180
Nineteenth Century Europe (3.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
• HIST 3190
• HIST 3320
• HIST 3660
Twentieth Century Europe (3.0)
Modern Britain (3.0)
The History of Modern Russia--1864
to Present (3.0)
Comparative/Topical*
• HIST 4330
Machines in the Making of History
(3.0)
• HIST 3450
The History of World War II (3.0)
• HIST 3800
Environmental History of the United
States (3.0)
• HIST 4100
Jewish History (3.0)
• HIST 4130
Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust
(3.0)
• HIST 420R
Issues and Topics in Global History
(3.0)
• HIST 4320
History of Scientific Thought (3.0)
• HIST 435R
Issues and Topics in the History of
Science (3.0)
• HIST 471R
Special Issues and Topics in American History (3.0)
Africa/Asia/Middle East*
• HIST 3030
Introduction to African History (3.0)
• HIST 3430
Middle East History--1914-Present (3.0)
• HIST 3530
History of Vietnam (3.0)
• HIST 3540
History of South Africa (3.0)
• HIST 3610
The Modern History of East Asia
(3.0)
• HIST 4430
History of Iran--1900 to Present
(3.0)
Elective Requirements:
12 Credits
• Any courses numbered 1000 or higher.
12.0
Graduation Requirements:
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
4.0
8.0
2.0
15.0
1 Completion of a minimum of 120 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours -- minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
Minor in History
21 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Successful completion of one history course at UVSC.
2 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
HIST 1100
HIST 1110
HIST 2700
HIST 2710
12 Credits
History of Civilization I
History of Civilization II
US History to 1877
US History since 1877
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
9 Credits
• Any three upper division history courses except
HIST 4860 and HIST 4990.
9.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Complete all history courses with a grade of “C-” or
better.
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in History
Discipline Core Requirements:
18 Credits
18 Credits
History Emphasis
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 3010
The Nature of History (3.0)
or HIST 3260
History of Utah (3.0)
or See Advisor
Complete an additional 15 credits from any HIST
course 3000 or higher (see advisor)
3.0
15.0
See Course Descriptions section of the
catalog for detailed course information.
This department manages the following
course prefixes:
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
ARCH, Archaeology
GEOG, Geography
HIST, History
POLS, Political Science
SOSC, Social Science
163
Honors
Honors
Director: Joy Ross
Office: LC 203
Telephone: 801-863-6262
Fax: 801-863-7060
E-mail: rossjo@uvsc.edu
Faculty:
Selected from among departmental faculty
to meet program/course needs.
School of General Academics
Dean: Bonnie Henrie
Office: LA 210c
Telephone: 801-863-8311
Fax: 801-863-7060
E-mail: bonnie.henrie@uvsc.edu
Assistant Dean: Lisa Lambert
Office: LA 210d
Telephone: 801-863-8741
Fax: 801-863-7060
E-mail: lisa.lambert@uvsc.edu
PROGR AM
The Honors Program is a community
of engaged scholars — both students
and faculty — devoted to learning, and
to the wider world. Courses offer an
enriched educational experience beyond
the expectations of regular students,
with outstanding faculty and innovative
classroom approaches. They also stress
critical thinking and analysis through
intensive reading, writing, and discussion.
Beginning Fall 2006, the new Honors
Program will offer upper-division courses
suitable for entering freshmen, transfer,
and continuing UVSC students interested in
graduating with Honors.
The newly expanded Program will also offer
cultural and social events, workshops for
graduate school preparation, and service
and leadership opportunities integrated
into the curriculum. At UVSC, an Honors
Student Advisory Group takes the lead
in design and planning of these events,
collaborating with faculty and Program
administration. Honors students will enjoy
access to an on-campus Study Commons
and a residential option to live with other
Honors students close to campus. Honors
collaborates with the Student Organization
for Academic Research (SOAR), and
Honors students receive mentoring by
Honors professors on building careers,
designing and conducting original projects,
and doing cutting-edge work in the studio,
lab, and field.
The Honors Program seeks to build a
diverse community open to students from
164
a wide cross-section of academic majors.
Its goal is to enhance the educational
experience of students, including the
student body at large, and to connect what
students learn with their professions, their
communities, and the wider world.
prefixes:
Ă HONR, Honors
Admission and Participation
Because we look at the whole person,
admission to Honors is based on GPA,
ACT, high school and college transcripts
showing details of coursework, and a
written response to one of the admission
questions. The Program looks for
students who are motivated by intellectual
curiosity and who exhibit independence,
achievement, and initiative in their studies
and in their lives. For detailed application
and qualification information, see our
website at www.uvsc.edu/honors or contact
the Program Director.
Graduation Criteria
To receive distinction as an Honors
Program graduate, students must:
1. Be admitted to the Honors Program
2. Complete 12-25 credits in Honors
courses, H-recommended sections of
General Education courses, and/or
Honors contracts for major courses.
Credits required depend on a student’s
status at admission to the Program
(freshman,transfer, continuing)
3. Attain a cumulative GPA of no less than
3.25
4. Complete an Honors thesis or project
(topics must be pre-approved by
Director)
5. Complete major and College
requirements for graduation
6. Receive approval from the Program
Director
Curriculum
All Honors students enroll for 1 credit
of Honors Colloquium, beginning with
their first semester in the Program. They
also take at least one of the designated
Honors courses: Ancient Legacies, Modern
Legacies, Interdisciplinary Seminar.
Honors-recommended sections of G.E.
and regular department offerings crosslisted with Honors can be identified in the
class schedule by letter “H” in the fourth
position of the course number. Courses
change each semester, based on student
needs and requests. The following pages
list Honors courses and H-recommended
departmental courses approved at time
of printing. Contact Program Director for
additional course offerings.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Hospitality Management
Hospitality
Management
Department Chair: Douglas G.
Miller
Office: WB 203e
Telephone: 801-863-8859
Faculty:
Professor
Douglas G. Miller
Associate Professor
Yang Huo
Instructor/Program Coordinator:
D. Craig Huish
Advisor: Terry Acord
Office: WB 257b
Telephone: 801-863-8314
and motel management; event planning;
restaurant and institutional food service;
and a number of other areas such as
cruise ship management, amusement
park management, convention and visitor
facilities, and gaming facilities.
The Hospitality Management program also
offers a Bachelor of Science in Hospitality
Management with a track in Food and
Beverage Management for students
interested in food production management.
This track is ideal for those training to be
executive chefs, restaurant production
managers, institutional food service or
restaurant managers. The demand for
management staff in the restaurant industry
is high, particularly for those with culinary
skills. The students will be required to have
a minimum of 15 credit hours in Culinary
Arts courses to complete this track.
* See Culinary Arts Institute section of this
catalog for program.
Advisor: Polly Clauson
Office: WB 257d
Telephone: 801-863-6482
PROGR AMS
Advisor: Mignon Nicol
Office: WB 257c
Telephone: 801-863-8749
Three options are available: Associate
in Applied Science Degree (the only
CAHM accredited program in the state of
Utah); Associate in Science Degree; and
Bachelor of Science Degree in Hospitality
Management.
School of Business
Dean: Stanley Earl Jenne, Ph.D.
Office: WB 128b
Telephone: 801-863-8239
Associate Dean: Janice Gygi
Office: WB 219
Telephone: 801-863-8863
Assistant Dean: Mikki O’Connor
Office: WB 129
Telephone: 801-863-8850
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
The Hospitality Management program
offers a Bachelor of Science in Hospitality
Management with a track in Hotel/
Restaurant Management for students
interested in management positions in
the hospitality industry. The demand for
management staff in this industry is high,
particularly for those with specialized
hospitality management skills.
The Hospitality Management program
prepares graduates for employment in
one of the fastest growing segments of the
nation’s economy. The addition of several
new convention centers in the state have
dramatically increased the need for hotel
and restaurant facilities. Students are
marketable in a wide range of hospitality
and tourism areas such as: hotel, resort,
Utah Valley State
AAS in
Hospitality Management
65 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
20 Credits
ENGLISH
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
MATHEMATICS
• MAT 1010
Intermediate Algebra
or Any higher Mathematics Course
or Any approved Departmental Mathematics Course
HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS/FOREIGN LANGUAGE
• Ethics and Values (PHIL 2050 recommended)
or Any approved Humanities, Fine Arts, or Foreign
Language Distribution Course
SOCIAL BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
• Any approved Behavioral Science, Social, or
Political Science Distribution Course
BIOLOGY OR PHYSICAL SCIENCE
• Any approved Biology or Physical Science
Distribution Course
PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH/SAFETY OR
ENVIRONMENT
• Any approved Physical Education, Health, Safety or
Environment Course
Discipline Core Requirements:
4.0
HM 1010
Introduction to Hospitality Industry
HM 1110
Food Production Principles
HM 1130
Hotel Operations I
HM 1180
Food and Beverage Management
HM 281R
Cooperative Work Experience (2.0)
HM 3020
Hospitality Managerial Accounting
HM 3390
Hotel Operations II
HM 3640
Food and Beverage Controls
ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
Business Computer Efficiency Exam *
MGMT 2200 Business Communications
MGMT 2250 Job Application and Advancement
Skills
or MGMT 3890 Career Preparation
• ECON 1010 Economics as a Social Science
Elective Requirements:
Six hours of elective credits from HM courses
1 Completion of a minimum of 65 semester credits.
Catalog 2007–2008
* Students will be required to complete the Business
Computer Proficiency exam with a score of 80 percent
or higher on each module or complete the DGM 2010
course or DGM 201A-D modules as necessary with a
score of 80 percent or highter on each module.
AS Pre Major in Hospitality
Management
60 Credits
General Education Requirements:
36 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
3.0
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
3.0
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
4.0
or An Advanced Placement (AP) Mathematics Test with a
score of 3 or higher
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
3.0
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
2.0
Distribution Courses
• Biology
3.0
• Physical Science
3.0
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
3.0
• Humanities Distribution (COMM 1100
3.0
recommended)
• Fine Arts Distribution
3.0
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics (fulfills Social/
3.0
Behavioral Science requirement)
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
or
•
•
18 Credits
ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
HM 1010
Introduction to Hospitality Industry
HM 1130
Hotel Operations I
HM 1180
Food and Beverage Management
Business Computer Proficiency Exam *
DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
MGMT 2200 Business Communications
MGMT 2390 Effective Business Presentations
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6 Credits
Complete six hours of elective credits from HM courses 6.0
Graduation Requirements:
3.0
3.0
1.0
1 Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above with
no grade below a “C-” in hospitality or other School of
Business courses.
3 Residency hours-- a minimum of 20 credit hours
through course attendance at UVSC: at least 16 credits
must be in School of Business
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements. Students are responsible for completing
all prerequisite courses.
Footnotes:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
* Students will be required to complete the business
computer proficiency exam with a score of 80 percent
or higher on each module or complete the DGM 2010
course or DGM 201A-D modules as necessary with a
score of 80 percent or higher on each module.
BS in Business Management with
an Emphasis in Hospitality
Management
124 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
3.0
1.0
3.0
6 Credits
Graduation Requirements:
Footnotes:
Elective Requirements:
3.0
39 Credits
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
or
•
•
•
3.0
3.0
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above with no
grade lower than a “C-” in hospitality or other School of
Business Courses.
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC; at least 16 credits must be
in School of Business courses.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements. Students are responsible for completing
all prerequisite courses.
6.0
36 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
3.0
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
3.0
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
4.0
or An Advanced Placement (AP) Mathematics Test with a
score of 3 or higher
Complete one of the following:
3.0
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
165
Hospitality Management
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
3.0
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
• PES 1097
Fitness for Life
2.0
Distribution Courses
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics* (fulfills Social/
3.0
Behavioral Science credit)
• Biology
3.0
• Physical Science
3.0
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
3.0
• Humanities Distribution
3.0
• Fine Arts Distribution
3.0
Discipline Core Requirements:
50 Credits
Business Foundation Courses:
• ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
• ACC 2020
Managerial Accounting
• Business Computer Proficiency Exam **
or DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
• MATH 1100 Introduction to Calculus
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications *
• ECON 2010 Microeconomics
• MGMT 2340 Business Statistics I
• MGMT 2390 Effective Business Presentations
Business Core Courses:
• INFO 3120 Principles of Information Systems--A
Managerial Approach
• LEGL 3000 Business Law
• MGMT 3010 Principles of Management
• MGMT 3100 Principles of Finance*
• MGMT 3450 Operations Management*
• MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing
• MGMT 3890 Career Preparation
• MGMT 4800 Strategic Management*
• MGMT 4830 Strategic Management Capstone
Simulation
• MGMT 493R Entrepreneurship Lecture Series (1.0)
or MGMT 495R Executive Lecture Series
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
MGMT 3300
MGMT 3200
HM 3020
HM 3390
HM 3640
HM 3710
HM 4550
HM 482R
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
28 Credits
Survey of International Business
Global Tourism
Hospitality Managerial Accounting
Hotel Operations II
Food and Beverage Controls
Marketing of Hospitality Services
Hospitality Industry Management
Internship
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
10 Credits
Select 10 credits of General Education courses
10.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 124 semester credits
required in the BS degree; at least 40 credit hours must
be upper-division courses.
2 Overall grade point average 2.0 or above with a
minimum of 2.5 GPA in all School of Business courses.
No grade lower than a “C-” in core and specialization
courses.
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 30 credit hours of
business courses through course attendance at UVSC,
with at least 10 hours earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements. Students are responsible for completing
all prerequisite courses.
NOTE: Students will be limited to 15 hours of upper-division
credit until MATRICULATION is completed.
Footnotes:
** Students will be required to complete the business
computer proficiency exam with a score of 80 percent
or higher on each module or complete the AIM 1050
course or AIM 105A-F modules as necessary with
a score of 80 percent or higher in each of the six
modules.
* Courses with an asterisk (*) cannot be taken until
student is matriculated.
BS in Hospitality
Management
General Education Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
120 C REDITS
36 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
166
3.0
3.0
and HIST 2710
• HIST 1740
• POLS 1100
US History since 1877 (3.0)
US Economic History (3.0)
American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
71 Credits
HM 1010
HM 1130
HM 1180
HM 3020
HM 3150
HM 3390
HM 3640
HM 3710
HM 4550
HM 482R
ACC 2010
LEGL 3100
MGMT 2200
MGMT 2240
MGMT 2250
Introduction to Hospitality Industry
3.0
Hotel Operations I
3.0
Food and Beverage Management
3.0
Hospitality Managerial Accounting 4.0
Hospitality Finance
3.0
Hotel Operations II
3.0
Food and Beverage Controls
3.0
Marketing of Hospitality Services
3.0
Hospitality Industry Management
3.0
Internship (2.0)
6.0
Financial Accounting
3.0
Hospitality Law
3.0
Business Communications
3.0
Foundations of Business Statistics
3.0
Job Application and Advancement
1.0
Skills
or MGMT 3890 Career Preparation
• MGMT 2390 Effective Business Presentations
3.0
• MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior
3.0
• MGMT 4220 Management Communication
3.0
15.0
Complete one of the following two groups:
Foreign Language Group: Complete the following
levels of the same language
• 1010 Beginning __________I
• 1020 Beginning__________II
• 2010 Intermediate _________I
Additional GE Electives Group
• 1010 Beginning_________I (foreign language)
• MGMT 2340 Business Statistics I
• Non-Business Elective
Elective Requirements:
13 Credits
Complete one of the following two groups:
13.0
Hotel and Restaurant Management Track:
• HM 1110
Food Production Principles (3.0)
• Complete six hours of electives from HM, ACC,
DGM, INFO, LEGL, ECON, or MGMT courses
3000 level or higher.
• Complete four credits of general education
courses
Food and Beverage Track:
• CA 1120
Cooking Skills Development (4.5)
• CA 1130
Baking Skills Development (4.5)
• CA 481R
Cooperative Work Experience (2.0)
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 120 semester credits with
at least 40 credit hours of upper-division classes.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above with
a minimum 2.5 GPA in all School of Business courses;
no grade below “C-” in hospitality or other School of
Business courses
3 Residency hours: minimum of 30 credit hours of
business courses through course attendance at UVSC,
with at least 10 hours earned in the last 45 hours.
At least 12 of the credit hours must be in Hospitality
Management courses.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements. Students are responsible for completing
all prerequisite courses.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă HM, Hospitality Management
Ă MGMT, Business Management
4.0
3.0
Catalog 2007–2009
Utah Valley State
Humanities
or ENGL 2020
Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Humanities
Department of Philosophy and
Humanities
Department Chair: Christine
Weigel
Office: LA 121h
Telephone: 801-863-6191
Department Office: LA 121
Department Telephone: 801-8638352
Faculty:
Professor
Steve Bule
Assistant Professor
Michaela Giesenkirchen
Nancy Rushforth
Artist/Poet in Residence
Alex Caldiero
Discipline Core Requirements:
The discipline of humanities is the study of
human intellectual and artistic creativity
and what the resulting artistic forms reveal
about the human experience. This field
of study draws on other disciplines such
as history, fine arts, literature, intellectual
history, music, foreign languages, theology,
and philosophy to see how these forms
communicate and work together to give an
in-depth record of the meaning of human
life in the past and present. The discipline
also emphasizes the relationship between
the arts, culture, and society.
A background in humanities is helpful in
preparing for employment in education,
business, government, civil and foreign
service, tourism, and in preparation for
graduate studies.
These courses may be used to fulfill
humanities requirements for Associate in
Science, Associate in Arts, and Associate
in Applied Science degrees. In addition
to the requirements for the Humanities
Distribution, students may fulfill the
Optional Requirements portion of the AA/
AS degrees with a Humanities emphasis
by completing 28 additional Humanities
credits.
• HUM 2010
• HUM 2020
• HUM 3500
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
10.0
60 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
3.0
3.0
9 Credits
Arts in Humanistic Traditions I
Arts in Humanistic Traditions II
Approaches to Humanities
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
9 Credits
Students must complete 9 credits from the following:
• HUM 1010
Humanities Through the Arts (3.0)
• HUM 320R Topics in Humanities (1.0) *
• HUM 325R Area Studies in Humanities (3.0)
• HUM 330R Period Studies in Humanities (3.0)
9.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Complete all Humanities courses with a grade of 2.0
(C) or better.
Footnotes:
* Variable credit course
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Humanities
18 Credits
Discipline Core Requirements:
• HUM 2010
• HUM 2020
• HUM 3500
9 Credits
Arts in Humanistic Traditions I
Arts in Humanistic Traditions II
Approaches to Humanities
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
9 Credits
Students must complete 9 credits from the following:
• HUM 1010
Humanities Through the Arts (3.0)
• HUM 320R Topics in Humanities (1.0) *
• HUM 325R Area Studies in Humanities (3.0)
• HUM 330R Period Studies in Humanities (3.0)
9.0
Footnotes:
* Variable credit course
AS Pre Major in
Humanities
62 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
¶ PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă HUM, Humanities
Ă PHIL, Philosophy
Ă RLST, Religious Studies
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
21 Credits
Complete the following:
• HUM 1010
Humanities Through the Arts
• HUM 2010
Arts in Humanistic Traditions I
• HUM 2020
Arts in Humanistic Traditions II
• HUM 320R
Topics in Humanities (1.0)
Complete 9 credits from the following: AVC, ENGL,
HUM, MUSC, PHIL, THEA (1000 level or higher)
Elective Requirements:
AA Pre Major in
Humanities
18 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
Discipline Core Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours-- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
5 For the AA degree, completion of 10 credit hours of
course work from one language.
Dean: William W. Cobb, Jr.
Office: LA 209d
Telephone: 801-863-7435
Minor
in Humanities
1 Enrollment at Utah Valley State College
2 Overall grade point average of a 2.0 (C) or better
3 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC
Graduation Requirements:
School of Humanities, Arts, and
Social Sciences
Utah Valley State
3.0
10 Credits
• Same Foreign Language
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
3.0
15 Credits
Complete the following:
• HUM 1010
Humanities Through the Arts
• HUM 2010
Arts in Humanistic Traditions I
• HUM 2020
Arts in Humanistic Traditions II
• HUM 320R
Topics in Humanities (1.0)
Complete 3 credits from the following: AVC, HUM,
MUSC, PHIL, THEA (1000 level or higher)
Elective Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
9.0
6 Credits
• 1000 level or higher
6.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 62 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours-- minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
Catalog 2007–2008
167
Information Systems and Technology
Information
Systems and
Technology
Department Chair: Floyd Wilkes
Office: CS 601g
Telephone: 801-863-8308
E-mail: wilkesfl@uvsc.edu
Faculty:
Professor
David W. Johnson
Pat Ormond
Floyd Wilkes
Associate Professor
Kim Bartholomew
S. Jeff Cold
George D. Hickman
Keith Mulbery
Advisor: Patti Miner
Office: CS 635
Telephone: 801-863-8408
E-mail: minerpa@uvsc.edu
Information Systems & Technology Advisory
Committee: Chair: Keith Stearman,
President, SureSoft; Mark Crowther,
Software Engineer, Office of Information
Technology, Brigham Young University;
Thomas Freeman, Research Engineering
Manager, Lockheed-Martin; Nathan
Gerber, Web Development Services
Director, Utah Valley State College; Cliff
Higby, Director of Budget, Financial,
Member, and Statistical Records, The
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints; Darrel Martin, Documentation
Training Manager, IHC; Alex Robbio, CoFounder and VP of Business Development,
Belatrix Software Factory; Mitch Stowell,
VP Consulting Services, InfoTrax Systems;
and Daniel Veitkus, VP Global Training
Services, Novell.
School of Technology and
Computing
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
Information technology is at the heart of
today’s business. Companies are constantly
looking to hire technology-savvy college
graduates who will help them achieve
competitive advantage in this new century.
The Information Systems and Technology
(IS&T) Department teaches students how
to be productive team players in today’s
business world through a balanced offering
of certificate, associate, and bachelor’s
degrees in Information Systems and
168
Information Technology.
The mission of the Information Systems
and Technology Department is to provide
technologically progressive courses
and services that are responsive to our
stakeholder community and designed to
enhance the competencies of our students
in applying information technology to
achieve organizational objectives, thus
preparing them for successful employment
and continuing education. IS&T graduates
know how to bring people, information,
and technology together to produce
enterprise solutions.
Our degree programs are based on
national curriculum models developed
by Information Systems and Technology
professionals and educators. The
curriculum is learning outcomes-based and
reflects program requirements promulgated
by the Accreditation Board for Engineering
and Technology (ABET). Our local advisory
committee provides regular guidance in
tailoring the curriculum to local needs.
Our courses are taught by dedicated
faculty with real-world experience
in systems development and the use
of information technologies to meet
organizational and business computing
needs. Faculty help students become
competent in using state-of-the-art
technology, to be critical thinkers, to
practice excellent communication skills, to
develop teamwork and interpersonal skills,
and become life-long learners.
PROGR AMS
The Information Systems and Technology
Department offers two bachelor’s degrees
(BS IS and BS IT), an Associate in Science
(AS) degree, a two-year Associate in
Applied Science (AAS) degree, a one-year
Certificate, and a Minor. In collaboration
with the Department of Technology
Management, the IS&T department offers
a Bachelor of Science in Technology
Management with a Specialization in
Information Systems and Technology.
The Bachelor of Science in Information
Systems (IS) prepares students to become
IS Professionals. Graduates develop and
deploy enterprise-level systems to meet
organizational needs. The focus is on
leveraging business technology for strategic
advantage. The BS IS includes a significant
business component, preparing students
for careers as applications software
developers, business systems information
architects, consultants, e-business
developers, information systems auditors,
programmer/analysts, systems analysts,
and web designer/programmers.
Students completing the Bachelor of
Catalog 2007–2008
Science in Information Technology (IT)
learn to install, manage, and maintain
the computing infrastructure on which
organizational systems run. The BS IT
includes three areas of emphasis: Database
Administration, Enterprise Systems, and
Network Administration and Security. The
Database Administration Concentration
grooms students for employment as
database administrators, data analysts, and
enterprise database architects. Students
in the Enterprise Systems Concentration
pursue careers as Internet developers,
IT consultants, enterprise software
architects, and web administrators. And
the Network Administration and Security
Concentration enables students to work
as data communication consultants,
information security analysts, and network
administrators.
The Bachelor of Science in Technology
Management is a multidisciplinary program
for students wishing to add management
skills to a chosen technology area.
Students graduating with BS Technology
Management – Information Systems and
Technology Specialization are prepared
for careers as project managers and as IT
supervisors.
The Associate in Applied Science (AAS)
in Information Systems and Technology
is a two-year program designed to give
students job-ready skills in computer
operations, IT support (Help Desk),
networking, programming, or web
development. Students complete a
foundational core and then elect a
specialization through a rich set of
technical electives. For students looking
ahead to a bachelor’s degree, the
Associate in Science (AS) in Information
Systems and Technology allows students to
finish their general education requirements
while getting a jump-start on the IS&T core.
In addition to two- and four-year
degree programs in information systems
and information technology, the IS&T
Department offers a Minor and two
specializations in Network Administration.
The Minor in Information Systems gives
students with a business or liberal arts
major, the option of strengthening their
general studies with technical coursework.
For those students interested in computer
networking and server administration, there
are two alternatives - a one-year Certificate
in Network Administration and the Network
Administration Emphasis for those pursuing
a Bachelor’s degree in Integrated Studies.
Certificate in
Network Administration
31 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
25 Credits
Complete the following:
• INFO 1120 Information Systems and
Technology Fundamentals
• INFO 1200 Computer Programming I for IS/IT
3.0
3.0
Utah Valley State
Information Systems and Technology
• INFO 1420
Computer Architecture and Systems
Software
• INFO 1510 UNIX/Linux Operating System
• INFO 2030 Data Communication Fundamentals
• INFO 2050 Database Fundamentals
Communication Requirement:
• ENGL 106A Career Writing for Technology--A
Computation Requirement:
• MAT 1010
Intermediate Algebra
Human Relations Requirement:
• MGMT 2250 Job Application and Advancement
Skills
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
•
4.0
•
1.0
•
6 Credits
Graduation Requirements:
Completion of a minimum of 31 semester credits.
Minimum grade of C- required in all courses.
Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
Residency hours -- minimum of 10 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
AAS in Information Systems
and Technology
65 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
17 Credits
ENGLISH
• ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
3.0
MATHEMATICS
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
4.0
or Any higher Mathematics Course
HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS/FOREIGN LANGUAGE
• Any approved Humanities, Fine Arts, or Foreign
3.0
Language Distribution course
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics (fulfills Social/Be- 3.0
havioral Science)
BIOLOGY OR PHYSICAL SCIENCE
• PHYS 1010
Elementary Physics
3.0
PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH/SAFETY OR ENVIRONMENT
• Any approved Physical Education, Health, Safety or 1.0
Environment Course
Discipline Core Requirements:
42 Credits
Written Communication Requirement:
• ENGL 2010 Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
IT Application Domain Requirement (6.0):
Accounting Domain Option • ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
and ACC 2020
Managerial Accounting or
or ACC 3000
Financial Managerial and Cost
Accounting Concepts (4.0)
and Any approved Accounting- or Business-related
Course (2.0)
Or any other approved IT Application Domain
Core Requirements:
• INFO 1120 Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals
• INFO 1200 Computer Programming I for IS/IT
• INFO 1420 Computer Architecture and Systems
Software
• INFO 1510 Introduction to System Administration--Linux/UNIX
• INFO 2030 Data Communication Fundamentals
• INFO 2050 Database Fundamentals
• INFO 2200 Computer Programming II for IS/IT
• INFO 2450 Web Application Design
• INFO 3030 Networks and Internetworking
• INFO 3410 Database Systems
• INFO 3430 Systems Analysis Design and
Integration
Elective Requirements:
3.0
•
•
Internship (1.0)
Digital Lecture Series (1.0)
Principles of Information Systems--A
Managerial Approach (3.0)
INFO 3420 Web Systems Development I (3.0)
INFO 3440 Enterprise Database Development
(3.0)
INFO 3510 Advanced System Administration-Linux/UNIX (3.0)
INFO 3620 System Administration--Windows
(3.0)
INFO 3630 Advanced System Administration-Windows Server (3.0)
INFO 3660 Information Security--Network
Defense and Countermeasures (3.0)
Any other department-approved elective
3.0
3.0
and HIST 2710
• HIST 1700
• HIST 1740
• POLS 1000
• POLS 1100
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 65 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above with
a minimum 2.5 GPA in all discipline core and elective
courses with no grade lower than a “C-.”
3 Residency hours: minimum of 20 credit hours through
attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completing all
prerequisite courses.
AS Pre Major in
Information Systems
and Technology
61 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
36 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences (3.0)
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics(fulfills Social/Behavioral Science)
• Biology Distribution
• Physical Science Distribution
• An Additional Biology or Physical Science Course
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Humanities Distribution
Discipline Core Requirements:
• MATH 1100
• INFO 1120
• INFO 1200
• INFO 1420
• INFO 1510
• INFO 2050
• INFO 2200
• INFO 2450
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
25 Credits
Introduction to Calculus
Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals
Computer Programming I for IS/IT
Computer Architecture and Systems
Software
Introduction to System Administration--Linux/UNIX
Database Fundamentals
Computer Programming II for IS/IT
Web Application Design
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Graduation Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6 Credits
Choose a minimum of 6 credits from the following:
6.0
• INFO 1000 Computer Programming Concepts
(3.0)
• INFO 2640 Router Management (3.0)
• INFO 2650 Voice and Data Cabling Fundamentals (3.0)
Utah Valley State
•
•
2.0
Choose 6 credits from the following courses :
6.0
• INFO 1000 Computer Programming Concepts
(3.0)
• INFO 2640 Router Management (3.0)
• INFO 2650 Voice and Data Cabling Fundamentals (3.0)
• INFO 2660 Information Security--Fundamentals (3.0)
• INFO 3030 Networks and Internetworking (3.0)
• INFO 3510 Advanced System Administration-Linux/UNIX (3.0)
• INFO 3620 System Administration--Windows
(3.0)
• INFO 3630 Advanced System Administration-Windows Server (3.0)
1
2
3
4
• INFO 281R
• INFO 301R
• INFO 3120
1 Completion of a minimum of 61 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 or above with a
minimum 2.5 GPA in all discipline core and elective
courses with no grade lower than a “C-.”
3 Residency hours: minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completing all
prerequisite courses.
BS in
Information Systems
General Education Requirements:
122 C REDITS
36 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
US History since 1877 (3.0)
American Civilization (3.0)
US Economic History (3.0)
American Heritage (3.0)
American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics (fulfills Social/Behavioral Science)
• Biology Distribution
• Physical Science Distribution
• An Additional Biology or Physical Science Distribution Course
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Humanities Distribution
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
71 Credits
Math Requirements:
• MATH 1100 Introduction to Calculus
• MGMT 2340 Business Statistics I
or MATH 2040 Principles of Statistics (4.0)
IS Environment/Business Foundation Requirements:
• ACC 2010
Financial Accounting
and ACC 2020
Managerial Accounting
or ACC 3000
Financial Managerial and Cost
Accounting Concepts (4.0)
and Any approved Accounting- or Business-related
course (2.0)
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications
• MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior
• MGMT 3100 Principles of Finance
• MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing
IS Core Requirements:
• INFO 1120 Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals
• INFO 1200 Computer Programming I for IS/IT
• INFO 1420 Computer Architecture and Systems
Software
• INFO 1510 Introduction to System Administration--Linux/UNIX
• INFO 2030 Data Communication Fundamentals
• INFO 2050 Database Fundamentals
• INFO 2200 Computer Programming II for IS/IT
• INFO 2450 Web Application Design
• INFO 301R Digital Lecture Series
• INFO 3120 Principles of Information Systems--A
Managerial Approach
• INFO 3410 Database Systems
• INFO 3420 Web Systems Development I
• INFO 3430 Systems Analysis Design and
Integration
• INFO 4050 Global Ethical and Professional
Issues in Technology
or TECH 4050 Global Ethical and Professional
Issues in Technology (3.0)
or CS 3050
Computer Ethics (3.0)
Project Experience:
• INFO 3400 Project Management
or TECH 3400 Project Management (3.0)
• INFO 4550 Senior Project
or INFO 481R Internship (1.0)
Elective Requirements:
3.0
2.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
Select 15 credits from the following:
15.0
• INFO 1000 Computer Programming Concepts
(3.0)
• INFO 2660 Information Security--Fundamentals (3.0)
• INFO 3030 Networks and Internetworking (3.0)
• INFO 3440 Enterprise Database Development
(3.0)
• INFO 3510 Advanced System Administration-Linux/UNIX (3.0)
• INFO 3620 System Administration--Windows
(3.0)
• INFO 3630 Advanced System Administration-Windows Server (3.0)
• INFO 3660 Information Security--Network
Defense and Countermeasures (3.0)
• INFO 4410 Database Administration (3.0)
• INFO 4420 Web Systems Development II (3.0)
• INFO 4440 Software Acquisition Implementation and Integration (3.0)
• INFO 4460 Enterprise Database Architecture
(3.0)
• INFO 459R Current Topics in Information
Systems and Technology (3.0)
• MGMT 3010 Principles of Management (3.0)
• Other approved elective (3.0)
Graduation Requirements:
4.0
3.0
1 Completion of at least 122 semester credits required in
the BS degree; at least 40 credit hours must be upperdivision courses.
169
Information Systems and Technology
2 Overall grade point average 2.0 or above with a minimum of 2.5 GPA in all discipline core, specialty core,
and elective courses with no grade lower than a “C-.”
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completing all
prerequisite courses.
BS in
Information Technology
General Education Requirements:
124 C REDITS
40 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science Distribution
• ENGL 2310 Technical Communication (fulfills
Humanities)
• PHYS 2010 College Physics I (fulfills Physical
Science)
and PHYS 2015
College Physics I Lab
• PHYS 2020 College Physics II (fulfills additional
Biology or Physical Science)
and PHYS 2025 College Physics II Lab
Discipline Core Requirements:
Minor in Information Systems
and Technology
21 C REDITS
Discipline Core Requirements:
Complete one of the following:
• Database Administration
• Enterprise Systems
• Network Administration and Security
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
21.0
21.0
21.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
4.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
1 Completion of at least 124 semester credits required in
the BS degree; at least 40 credit hours must be upperdivision courses.
2 Overall grade point average 2.0 or above with a minimum of 2.5 GPA in all discipline core, specialty core,
and elective courses with no grade lower than a “C-.”
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completing all
prerequisite courses.
Emphasis in
Database Administration
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
21 Credits
21 Credits
Select 21 credits from the following:
• INFO 1510 Introduction to System Administration--Linux/UNIX (3.0)
• INFO 3440 Enterprise Database Development
(3.0)
• INFO 3510 Advanced System Administration-Linux/UNIX (3.0)
• INFO 3630 Advanced System Administration-Windows Server (3.0)
• INFO 4410 Database Administration (3.0)
• INFO 4460 Enterprise Database Architecture
(3.0)
• INFO 4420 Web Systems Development II (3.0)
• Approved Business Elective (3.0)
• Additional Advanced IT Pillar (3.0)
Emphasis in
Enterprise Systems
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
21.0
21 Credits
21 Credits
Select 21 credits from the following, 12 credits must be 21.0
in Business:
• ACC 2010
Financial Accounting (3.0)
and ACC 2020
Managerial Accounting (3.0)
or ACC 3000
Financial Managerial and Cost
Accounting Concepts (4.0)
• MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior (3.0)
• MGMT 3100 Principles of Finance (3.0)
• INFO 3120 Principles of Information Systems--A
Managerial Approach (3.0)
• INFO 3440 Enterprise Database Development
(3.0)
• INFO 4420 Web Systems Development II (3.0)
• INFO 4440 Software Acquisition Implementation and Integration (3.0)
• Additional Advanced IT Pillar (3.0)
Emphasis in Network
Administration and Security
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
Information Systems and
Technology Fundamentals (3.0)
Complete the following:
• INFO 1200 Computer Programming I for IS/IT
• INFO 1420 Computer Architecture and Systems
Software
• INFO 2050 Database Fundamentals
Elective Requirements:
Graduation Requirements:
3.0
2.0
21 Credits
21 Credits
Select 21 credits from the following, 15 credits of which 21.0
must be upper division:
• INFO 1510 Introduction to System Administration--Linux/UNIX (3.0)
• INFO 2640 Router Management (3.0)
• INFO 2650 Voice and Data Cabling Fundamentals (3.0)
• INFO 3510 Advanced System Administration-Linux/UNIX (3.0)
• INFO 3630 Advanced System Administration-Windows Server (3.0)
• INFO 3660 Information Security--Network
Defense and Countermeasures (3.0)
• INFO 4030 Enterprise Network Architectures
and Administration (3.0)
• INFO 4660 Computer Forensics (3.0)
• Additional Advanced IT Pillar (3.0)
3.0
3.0
3.0
12 Credits
Complete 12 credits from the following, 9 credits of
12.0
which must be upper division:
• INFO 1510 Introduction to System Administration--Linux/UNIX (3.0)
• INFO 2030 Data Communication Fundamentals (3.0)
• INFO 2200 Computer Programming II for IS/IT
(3.0)
• INFO 2450 Web Application Design (3.0)
• INFO 2660 Information Security--Fundamentals (3.0)
• INFO 3030 Networks and Internetworking (3.0)
• INFO 3120 Principles of Information Systems--A
Managerial Approach (3.0)
• INFO 3410 Database Systems (3.0)
• INFO 3420 Web Systems Development I (3.0)
• INFO 3440 Enterprise Database Development
(3.0)
• INFO 3510 Advanced System Administration-Linux/UNIX (3.0)
• INFO 3630 Advanced System Administration-Windows Server (3.0)
• INFO 3660 Information Security--Network
Defense and Countermeasures (3.0)
Graduation Requirements:
• To fill the requirements for an information systems and
technology minor students must have no course grade
lower than C- in any of the INFO courses required for
the minor
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in
Computer Networking
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
18 Credits
Prerequisites:
• INFO 1120
Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals (3.0)
• INFO 1200 Computer Programming I for IS/IT
(3.0)
• INFO 1420 Computer Architecture and Systems
Software (3.0)
Complete the following:
• INFO 1510 Introduction to System Administra3.0
tion--Linux/UNIX
• INFO 2030 Data Communication Fundamentals 3.0
• INFO 2660 Information Security--Fundamentals 3.0
9.0
Complete 9 credits from the following:
• INFO 3030 Networks and Internetworking (3.0)
• INFO 3510 Advanced System Administration-Linux/UNIX (3.0)
• INFO 3620 System Administration--Windows
(3.0)
• INFO 3630 Advanced System Administration-Windows Server (3.0)
• INFO 3660 Information Security--Network
Defense and Countermeasures (3.0)
• INFO 4030 Enterprise Network Architectures
and Administration (3.0)
• INFO 4050 Global Ethical and Professional
Issues in Technology (3.0)
or TECH 4050 Global Ethical and Professional
Issues in Technology (3.0)
• INFO 4660 Computer Forensics (3.0)
NOTE: A minimum of 2.5 GPA in all Specialty Core courses
with no grade lower than a C- required for graduation.
BS in Technology
Management
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the Technology Management section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in Information
Systems and Technology
Emphasis Requirements:
Catalog 2007–2008
9 Credits
Prerequisite:
• INFO 1120
Emphasis:
4.0
3.0
63 Credits
Math Requirement:
• MATH 1100 Introduction to Calculus
• INFO 2230 Data and Discrete Structures (3.0)
or CS 2300
Discrete Structures I
• MATH 2040 Principles of Statistics
or MGMT 2340 Business Statistics I (3.0)
IT Core Requirements:
• INFO 1120 Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals
• INFO 1420 Computer Architecture and Systems
Software
• INFO 1510 Introduction to System Administration--Linux/UNIX
• INFO 2660 Information Security--Fundamentals
• INFO 301R Digital Lecture Series
• INFO 3430 Systems Analysis Design and
Integration
• CS 4410
Human Factors in Software
Engineering
or DGM 2240 Interaction Design (3.0)
IT Pillar Courses:
• INFO 1200 Computer Programming I for IS/IT
• INFO 2030 Data Communication Fundamentals
• INFO 2050 Database Fundamentals
• INFO 2450 Web Application Design
Advanced IT Pillar Courses:
• INFO 2200 Computer Programming II for IS/IT
Select 3 credits from the following:
• INFO 3030 Networks and Internetworking (3.0)
• INFO 3410 Database Systems (3.0)
• INFO 3420 Web Systems Development I (3.0)
Project Experience:
• INFO 3400 Project Management
or TECH 3400 Project Management (3.0)
• INFO 4550 Senior Project
or INFO 481R Internship (1.0)
IT Application Domain Requirement:
Two specified courses to provide students with knowledge of an application domain of their choice and
interest. (See department advisor for list of approved
courses.)
Some possible application domains are:
• Accounting/IT Auditor
• Business
• Communications
• Computer Science
• Construction
• Criminal Justice
• Forensics
• Geographic Information Systems
• Health professions
170
3.0
3.0
• Hospitality Management
• Manufacturing/Production
• Military Science
• Multimedia/Digital Media
• Physical Sciences
• Social Sciences
Business Domain - (**Required for Enterprise Systems
concentration)
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications (3.0)
• MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing (3.0)
Professional Ethics:
• INFO 4050 Global Ethical and Professional
Issues in Technology
or TECH 4050 Global Ethical and Professional
Issues in Technology (3.0)
or CS 3050
Computer Ethics (3.0)
45 Credits
45 Credits
Utah Valley State
Information Systems and Technology
Specialty Core Requirements (33.0):
• INFO 1120 Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals
• INFO 1200 Computer Programming I for IS/IT
• INFO 1420 Computer Architecture and Systems
Software
• INFO 1510 Introduction to System Administration--Linux/UNIX
• INFO 2030 Data Communication Fundamentals
• INFO 2050 Database Fundamentals
• INFO 2200 Computer Programming II for IS/IT
• INFO 2450 Web Application Design
• INFO 3030 Networks and Internetworking
• INFO 3410 Database Systems
• INFO 3430 Systems Analysis Design and
Integration
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6 Credits
Complete a minimum of 6 credtis from the following: 6.0
• INFO 1000 Computer Programming Concepts
(3.0)
• INFO 1100 Exploring the Digital Domain (3.0)
• INFO 2100 Business Computer Productivity with
IS Technology (3.0)
• INFO 2640 Router Management (3.0)
• INFO 2650 Voice and Data Cabling Fundamentals (3.0)
• INFO 2660 Information Security--Fundamentals (3.0)
• INFO 281R Internship (1.0)
• INFO 301R Digital Lecture Series (1.0)
• INFO 3420 Web Systems Development I (3.0)
• INFO 3440 Enterprise Database Development
(3.0)
• INFO 3510 Advanced System Administration-Linux/UNIX (3.0)
• INFO 3620 System Administration--Windows
(3.0)
• INFO 3630 Advanced System Administration-Windows Server (3.0)
• INFO 3660 Information Security--Network
Defense and Countermeasures (3.0)
• Any approved Accounting- or Business-related Course
up to 6 credits
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă INFO, Information Systems & Technology
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
171
Integrated Studies
Integrated
Studies
Program Director: Scott Abbott
behavioral science, social science and the
arts. Emphases from computer science
and information systems, accounting,
technology and trades and physical
education are also offered as part of this
degree.
SUMMARY OF THE DEGREE
Professor
Scott Abbott
Mark Jeffreys
Laurelyn Whitt
Associate Professor
Alan Clarke
Assistant Professor
Nancy Rushforth
Advisor: Lynne Hetzel
Office: LA 109f
Telephone: 801-863-8455
School of General Academics
Dean: Bonnie G. Henrie
Office: LA 210c
Telephone: 801-863-8311
Associate Dean: K.D. Taylor
Office: LA 210e
Telephone: 801-863-8949
Assistant Dean: Lisa Lambert
Office: LA 210d
Telephone: 801-863-8741
Administrative Assistant: Frankie
Jensen
Office: LA 210
Telephone: 801-863-6312
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
For those completing the Bachelor
Degree in Integrated Studies (IS), many
opportunities exist for advanced and
professional degrees (law school, medical
and dental schools, MBA, MPA, etc)
and in the business environment. Many
employers seek students with skills gained
from liberal arts programs like Integrated
Studies. These skills include the ability
to comprehend diverse material, to
write clearly, to think critically, to work
cooperatively, and to become adept at
problem solving.
CURRICULUM
The individualized nature of the Integrated
Studies degree is attractive to students with
multiple interests who want to develop skills
that are relevant to a variety of careers.
Students integrate course work in emphases
such as science, business, health, literature,
languages, communication, philosophy,
172
Discipline Core Requirements:
• After becoming familiar with the material
on the IS website (http://www.uvsc.edu/
is/), meet with advisor to plan course
work. Various emphases may require
specific courses and minimum grades.
2.5 GPA required for application.
• Become matriculated into Integrated
Studies by submitting an academic plan
which must be signed by department
advisors and the Integrated Studies
committee.
3.0
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
• Complete any courses 1000 or higher (if planning 15.0
to complete a BA degree, see advisor for list of
recommended courses)
Elective Requirements:
Office: LA 109c
Telephone: 801-863-8537
Faculty:
• Humanities Distribution (any 2020 Foreign
language course recommended)
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
10 Credits
• One Language (other than English) to include the 10.0
1010,1020, 2010, 2020 levels, or transferred
equivalents
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements.
5 For the AA degree, completion of 10 credit hours of
course work from one language.
AS Pre Major in
Integrated Studies
60 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
AA Pre Major in
Integrated Studies
60 C REDITS
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government 3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities
• Fine Arts
• Social/Behavioral Science
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
Discipline Core Requirements:
• Complete two approved 18-hour
emphases from the following schools:
Business; Technology and Computing;
Science and Health; Humanities, Arts
and Social Sciences.
• Complete the Integrated Studies
Discipline Core with a minimum grade of
C- in each class.
• Complete forty hours of upper-division
course work.
• Complete thirty hours of course work in
residency at UVSC; at least 10 of these
must be completed at UVSC within the
last 45 credit hours earned.
• For a Bachelor of Arts degree, students
must complete the 2020 class in
the chosen foreign language. For a
Bachelor of Science degree, students
must complete either MATH 1210 or
MATH 2040.
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
Catalog 2007–2008
3.0
3.0
3.0
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
25 Credits
• Complete any courses 1000 or higher
25.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum or 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours--minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BA in
Integrated Studies
123-126 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
3.0
1 An associate in arts or associate in science degree, or
2 Junior status in college with approximately 60 or more
credits.
3 2.5 GPA minimum.
General Education Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
35 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning
(recommended for Humanities or
Arts majors) (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
(recommended for Social Science
majors) (3.0)
3.0
3.0
3.0
Utah Valley State
Integrated Studies
College Algebra (recommended for
Business, Education, Science, and
Health Professions majors) (4.0)
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Any 2020 Foreign Language course
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
• Social/Behavioral Science
• MATH 1050
Discipline Core Requirements:
• ENGL 3030
• IS 3000
•
•
•
•
•
Discipline Core Requirements:
• ENGL 3030
3.0
• IS 3000
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
21 Credits
Writing and Communicating
Effectively in/across Contexts*
Introductory Topics in Integrated
Studies
Topics in Integrated Studies
IS 3500
PHIL 3000+
PHIL 3000+
IS 4980
Integrated Studies Capstone I
IS 499R
Integrated Studies Capstone II
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
36 Credits
• Complete 1 approved Integrated Studies Emphasis 18.0
• Complete another approved Integrated Studies
18.0
Emphasis
Elective Requirements:
31 Credits
• Complete any 1000-level, or higher, courses
31.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 123 semester credits; a
minimum of 40 credits must be upper-division.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours: minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements; students must have “C-” or higher in
the Discipline Core courses (except for the Foreign
Language classes).
5 For the BA degree, completion of 18 credit hours of
course work from one language to include the 1010,
1020, 2010, and 2020 levels or transferred equivalents.
Note: All Emphases are required to have a minimum of 9
upper-division credits (with 12 preferred).
Footnotes:
* Students demonstrating evidence of excellent research
and writing skills in IS 3000 may be exempted from
ENGL 3030.
BS in
Integrated Studies
123-126 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 An associate in arts or associate in science degree, or
2 Junior status in college with approximately 60 or more
credits.
3 2.5 GPA minimum.
General Education Requirements:
36 Credits
Complete the following:
• ENGL 1010 Introduction to Writing
• ENGL 2010 Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National
Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
Utah Valley State
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
•
•
•
•
or
•
•
PHIL 3000+
PHIL 3000+
IS 3500
MATH 1210
MATH 2040
IS 4980
IS 499R
3.0
25 Credits
Writing and Communicating
Effectively in/across Contexts*
Introductory Topics in Integrated
Studies
Topics in Integrated Studies
Calculus I (5.0)
Principles of Statistics
Integrated Studies Capstone I
Integrated Studies Capstone II
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
36 Credits
• Complete 1 approved Integrated Studies Emphasis 18.0
• Complete another approved Integrated Studies
18.0
Emphasis
Elective Requirements:
26 Credits
• Complete any 1000-level, or higher, course
26.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 123 semester credits; a
minimum of 40 credits must be upper-division.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours: minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental
requirements; students must have “C-” or higher in the
Discipline Core courses.
Note: All Emphases are required to have a minimum of 9
upper-division credits (with 12 preferred).
Footnotes:
* Students demonstrating evidence of excellent research
and writing skills in IS 3000 may be exempted from
ENGL 3030.
Emphasis in
Accounting
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
18 Credits
• ACC 3010
Intermediate Accounting I
3.0
• ACC 3020
Intermediate Accounting II
3.0
Choose 12 credits from the following:
12.0
• ACC 3300
Cost Accounting (3.0)
• ACC 3400
Individual Income Tax (3.0)
• ACC 3510
Accounting Information Systems (3.0)
• ACC 4110
Auditing (3.0)
• ACC 4400
Taxation of Corporations/Partnerships/Estates and Trusts (3.0)
NOTE: A minimum of 2.5 GPA in all School of Business
courses, and no grade lower than a C-, required for graduation.
Emphasis in
American Sign Language
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
18 Credits
Prerequisites (see advisor)
• ASL 1010
Beginning American Sign Language
I (5.0)
• ASL 1020
Beginning American Sign Language
II (5.0)
• ASL 2010
Intermediate American Sign Language I (5.0)
• ASL 2020
Intermediate American Sign Language II (3.0)
18.0
Choose 18 credits from the following:
• ASL 3050
Advanced American Sign Language
(3.0)
• ASL 3310
Interpreting I (3.0)
• ASL 3330
Cross-Cultural Communication and
Interpreting (3.0)
• ASL 3510
Deaf Culture to 1817 (3.0)
• ASL 3520
Deaf Culture 1817 to 1970 (3.0)
• ASL 3530
Deaf Culture from 1970 (3.0)
• ASL 3610
ASL Literature (3.0)
• ASL 3800
ASL Deaf Culture Studies (3.0)
• ASL 4410
ASL Linguistics (3.0)
Emphasis in
Anthropology
Emphasis Requirements:
19 Credits
19 Credits
Prerequisites:
• ANTH 1010
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
Social/Cultural Anthropology**
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• ANTH 1020 Biological Anthropology (3.0)
• SOC 3010
Statistics for the Behavioral
Sciences (4.0)
• ANTH 4150 Contemporary Theory and Debates
(3.0)
or ANTH 4160 History of Anthropological Thought
(3.0)
• ANTH 4850 Ethnographic Methods (3.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
Complete 6 additional credits in Anthropology. Three
credits must be upper division.
Footnotes:
** ANTH/PSY/SOC 1010 are introductory courses and
pre-requisites which may not be used in the 19 hours
required for these Integrated Studies Emphases.
Emphasis in Ballet
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
20 Credits
20 Credits
Prerequisites:
• DANC 1330 Studio Workshop--Creative Process
in Dance (1.0)
• DANC 2110 Orientation to Dance (3.0)
• DANC 2670 Introduction to Laban Studies (2.0)
• DANC 3560 World Dance Forms (2.0)
Complete the following:
• DANC 2340 Composition
• DANC 3630 Dance History
• DANC 3670 Movement Analysis
• DANC 4880 Current Issues in Dance
• DANC 4920 Dance as Cultural Practice
Complete 6 credits from the following classes:
• DANC 227R Ballet Technique II (3.0)
• DANC 327R Ballet Technique III (3.0)
• DANC 427R Ballet Technique IV (3.0)
• DANC 428R Ballet Technique V (3.0)
Emphasis in Ballroom Dance
Emphasis Requirements:
Emphasis in Biology
Emphasis Requirements:
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
18 Credits
18 Credits
Biology Emphasis
Prerequisites (see Advisor):
• BIOL 1610
College Biology I (4.0)
• BIOL 1615
College Biology I Laboratory (1.0)
• CHEM 1110 Elementary Chemistry for the Health
Sciences (recommended) (4.0)
Complete the following:
• BIOL 1620
College Biology II
• BIOL 1625
College Biology II Laboratory
• BIOL 4500
Principles of Evolution
• Complete 11 credits (minimum of 9 credits must
be upper-division) from any BIOL, BOT, MICR, or
ZOOL courses except BIOL 1010, ZOOL 1090,
BIOL 494R, BIOL 495R, or BIOL 499R.
Emphasis in
Business Management
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
20 Credits
20 Credits
Prerequisites:
• DANC 1330 Studio Workshop--Creative Process
in Dance (1.0)
• DANC 2110 Orientation to Dance (3.0)
• DANC 2670 Introduction to Laban Studies (2.0)
• DANC 3560 World Dance Forms (2.0)
Complete the following:
• DANC 2340 Composition
• DANC 3630 Dance History
• DANC 3670 Movement Analysis
• DANC 4880 Current Issues in Dance
• DANC 4920 Dance as Cultural Practice
Complete 6 credits from the following classes:
• DANC 1700 American Social Dance I (3.0)
• DANC 1710 International Ballroom
Dance I (1.0)
• DANC 1720 Latin Ballroom Dance I (1.0)
• DANC 2700 American Social Dance II (1.0)
• DANC 2710 International Ballroom
Dance II (1.0)
• DANC 2720 Latin Ballroom Dance II (1.0)
• DANC 370R American Social Dance III (1.0)
• DANC 371R International Ballroom
Dance III (1.0)
• DANC 372R Latin Ballroom Dance III (1.0)
• DANC 3730 American Social Dance Teaching
Methods (2.0)
• DANC 376R Ballroom Dance Company Reserve
Tour Team (2.0)
• DANC 4740 International Ballroom Dance
Teaching Methods (3.0)
• DANC 4750 Latin Ballroom Dance Teaching
Methods (3.0)
• DANC 476R Ballroom Dance Company Tour
Team (2.0)
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
4.0
6.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
11.0
18 Credits
18 Credits
Business Management Emphasis
Prerequisites:
• ACC 3000
Financial Managerial and Cost
Accounting Concepts (4.0)
or ACC 2010
Financial Accounting (3.0)
and ACC 2020
Managerial Accounting (3.0)
• DGM 2010 Basic Computer Proficiency (3.0)
or Business Computer Proficiency Exam *
Complete the following:
3.0
173
Integrated Studies
• INFO 3120
Principles of Information Systems--A 3.0
Managerial Approach
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics
3.0
• MGMT 3010 Principles of Management
3.0
• MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing
3.0
6.0
Complete 6 credits from the following:
• LEGL 3000 Business Law (3.0)
• ECON 2010 Microeconomics (3.0)
• MGMT 3100 Principles of Finance (3.0)
• MGMT 3300 Survey of International Busness (3.0)
• MGMT 3430 Human Resource Management (3.0)
Note: A minimum of 2.5 GPA in all School of Business
courses, and no grade lower than a C-, required for graduation.
Footnotes:
* Must complete the exam with a score of 80 percent or
higher on each module or complete the DGM 2010
course or DGM 201A-D modules as necessary with
a score of 80 percent or higher in each of the six
modules.
Emphasis in Communication
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
18 Credits
Complete one of the following tracks:
18.0
TRACK ONE: ANALYTIC
Complete six credits from the following:
• COMM 2010 Mass Communication and
Society (3.0)
• COMM 2270 Argumentation (3.0)
• COMM 2300 Public Relations (3.0)
• COMM 2400 Organizational
Communication (3.0)
• THEA 2313 Film History I (3.0)
• THEA 2323 Film History II (3.0)
• THEA 2333 Race Class and Gender in Film (3.0)
Complete twelve credits from the following:
• ANTH 3500 Discourse Semiotics and
Representation (3.0)
• COMM 3010 History of Mass
Communication (3.0)
• COMM 3050 Theories of Communication and
Culture (3.0)
• COMM 3320 Cross-Cultural Communications for
International Business (3.0)
• COMM 3400 Film Theory (3.0)
• COMM 3410 Fundamentals of Mediation and
Negotiation (3.0)
• COMM 350R Special Topics in Mass
Communication (3.0)
• COMM 3520 Case Studies in Public
Relations (3.0)
• COMM 3600 Mass Media Ethics and Law (3.0)
• COMM 3620 International Communication (3.0)
• COMM 3700 Free Expression in a Democratic
Society (3.0)
• COMM 3780 Mormon Cultural Studies (3.0)
• COMM 3790 Case Studies in Journalism (3.0)
• COMM 380R Long-Format Video Journalism (3.0)
• COMM 4100 Advanced Mediation and
Negotiation (3.0)
TRACK TWO: APPLIED
Complete all of the following:
• COMM 2130 Television News Writing and
Reporting (3.0)
• COMM 2700 Broadcast Journalism Anchoring
and Producing (3.0)
• COMM 3600 Mass Media Ethics and Law (3.0)
Complete one of the following four classes:
• COMM 2010 Mass Communication and
Society (3.0)
• COMM 2300 Public Relations (3.0)
• COMM 2560 Radio Production (3.0)
• COMM 2790 Magazine Writing (3.0)
Complete one of the following two classes:
• COMM 413R Advanced Television News Writing
and Reporting (3.0)
• COMM 470R On-Air Broadcast Journalism (3.0)
Complete two of the following eight classes:
• COMM 3010 History of Mass
Communication (3.0)
• COMM 3050 Theories of Communication and
Culture (3.0)
• COMM 3520 Case Studies in Public
Relations (3.0)
• COMM 3700 Free Expression in a Democratic
Society (3.0)
• COMM 3790 Case Studies in Journalism (3.0)
• COMM 380R Long-Format Video Journalism (3.0)
• COMM 413R Advanced Television News Writing
and Reporting (3.0)
• COMM 470R On-Air Broadcast Journalism (3.0)
Emphasis in Community Health 18 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
Complete the following:
• HLTH 3200 Principles of Community Health
• HLTH 4050 Foundations of Health Education
• HLTH 3400 Human Diseases
or HLTH 3800 Epidemiology (3.0)
• HLTH 4300 Community Health Ethics (3.0)
or HLTH 4600 Research Methods for Community
Health
Choose 6 credits from the following:
• NUTR 1020 Foundations of Human Nutrition (3.0)
• NUTR 2020 Nutrition Through the Life
Cycle (3.0)
• HLTH 2400 Concepts of Stress Management (3.0)
• HLTH 2800 Human Sexuality (3.0)
• HLTH 2600 Drugs Behavior and Society (3.0)
• HLTH 3000 Health Concepts of Death and
Dying (3.0)
• HLTH 3150 Culture Ecology and Health (3.0)
• HLTH 3240 Womens Health Issues (3.0)
• HLTH 3250 Consumer Health (3.0)
• HLTH 3260 Modifying Health Behavior (2.0)
• HLTH 3300 Health Promotion for Older
Adults (3.0)
• HLTH 4150
Community Health Program Development and Evaluation (3.0)
• HLTH 4250 Health Services Organization and
Policy (3.0)
• HLTH 490R Special Topics in Community Health
(1.0)
Emphasis in
Computer Networking
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
6.0
18 Credits
18 Credits
Prerequisites:
• INFO 1120
Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals (3.0)
Computer Programming I for IS/IT
(3.0)
• INFO 1420 Computer Architecture and Systems
Software (3.0)
Complete the following:
• INFO 1510 Introduction to System Administra3.0
tion--Linux/UNIX
• INFO 2030 Data Communication Fundamentals 3.0
• INFO 2660 Information Security--Fundamentals 3.0
9.0
Complete 9 credits from the following:
• INFO 3030 Networks and Internetworking (3.0)
• INFO 3510 Advanced System Administration-Linux/UNIX (3.0)
• INFO 3620 System Administration--Windows
(3.0)
• INFO 3630 Advanced System Administration-Windows Server (3.0)
• INFO 3660 Information Security--Network
Defense and Countermeasures (3.0)
• INFO 4030 Enterprise Network Architectures
and Administration (3.0)
• INFO 4050 Global Ethical and Professional
Issues in Technology (3.0)
or TECH 4050 Global Ethical and Professional
Issues in Technology (3.0)
• INFO 4660 Computer Forensics (3.0)
NOTE: A minimum of 2.5 GPA in all Specialty Core courses
with no grade lower than a C- required for graduation.
• INFO 1200
Emphasis in Computer Science 18 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
Computer Science Emphasis
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• CS 3250
Java Software Development (3.0)
• CS 3370
C-plus-plus Software Development (3.0)
15.0
Choose 15 credits from the following:
• CS 3240
Introduction to Computational
Theory (3.0)
• CS 3250
Java Software Development (3.0)
• CS 3330
Windows Programming (3.0)
• CS 3370
C-plus-plus Software Development (3.0)
• CS 2450
Software Engineering (3.0)
• CS 4380
Advanced/High-Performance
Computer Architecture (3.0)
• CS 4450
Analysis of Programming Languages
(3.0)
• CS 4490
Compiler Construction (3.0)
NOTE: A minimum GPA of 2.5 in all Specialty Core courses
with no grade lower than a C- required for graduation.
Emphasis in Digital Media
Emphasis Requirements:
174
3.0
3.0
3.0
Catalog 2007–2008
18 Credits
18 Credits
Prerequisite courses:
• DGM 1110
Digital Media Essentials I (4.0)
• DGM 1210 Digital Media Essentials II (4.0)
• DGM 2130 Digital Audio Essentials (3.0)
• DGM 2110
Digital Cinema Essentials (3.0)
• DGM 2210 3D Modeling and Animation Essentials (4.0)
• DGM 2120 Web Essentials (3.0)
• DGM 2240 Interaction Design (3.0)
Complete the following:
• DGM 3220 Digital Media Project Management
• DGM 4000 Writing for Digital Media
or ENGL 4310 Advanced Technical Communication (3.0)
• DGM 4310 Senior Projects I
• DGM 4330 Corporate Issues in Multimedia
Complete 6 credits from the following:
• DGM 3120 Developing Multimedia for Accessibility (3.0)
• DGM 3130 Digital Storyboarding (3.0)
• DGM 2220 Marketing for Digital Media (3.0)
• DGM 4410 Senior Projects II (3.0)
• DGM 4410 Senior Projects II (3.0)
Emphasis in Earth Science
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
18 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
Earth Science Emphasis:
• GEO 1010
Introduction to Geology
3.0
• GEO 1015
Introduction to Geology Laboratory
(highly recommended) (1.0)
Complete one of the following sets (lab is highly
3.0
recommended)
• GEO 1220
Historical Geology (3.0)
and GEO 1225
Historical Geology Laboratory (1.0)
or GEO 1080 Introduction to Oceanography (3.0)
and GEO 1085 Introduction to Oceanography
Laboratory (1.0)
or METO 1010 Introduction to Meteorology (3.0)
and METO 1020 Introduction to Meteorology Laboratory (1.0)
12.0
Complete three courses from the following:
• METO 3100 Earth Systems (3.0)
and METO 1020 Introduction to Meteorology Laboratory (1.0)
or GEO 1015
Introduction to Geology Laboratory (1.0)
or GEO 1225
Historical Geology Laboratory (1.0)
• GEO 3080 Earth Materials (4.0)
• GEO 3200 Geologic Hazards (4.0)
• GEO 3210
Environmental Geology (4.0)
• GEO 3700 Structure and Tectonics (4.0)
• GEO 4500 Sedimentary Geology (4.0)
• GEO 4510
Paleontology (4.0)
Emphasis in
Environmental Studies
Emphasis Requirements:
• ENST 3000
•
or
•
or
ANTH 3150
PHIL 3530
METO 1010
BIOL 2500
18 Credits
9 Credits
Introduction to Environmental
Studies
Culture Ecology and Health
Environmental Ethics (3.0)
Introduction to Meteorology
Environmental Biology (3.0)
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
9 Credits
Complete 3 of the following courses of 3 different pre- 9.0
fixes for a total of 9 credit hours of different prefixes.
Not all 3 courses may come from the same School, and
at least 3-credits must be upper-division.
• BIOL 1010
General Biology (3.0)
• BIOL 2500 Environmental Biology (3.0)
• BIOL 3800 Conservation Biology (3.0)
• BIOL 3700
General Ecology (3.0)
• COMM 3130 The Culture of Nature and Technology (3.0)
• ENVT 3280 Environmental Law (3.0)
• ENVT 3850 Environmental Policy (3.0)
• GEOG 3010 Economic Geography (3.0)
• GEO 3210
Environmental Geology (4.0)
• HIST 4330
Machines in the Making of History
(3.0)
• HIST 3800
Environmental History of the United
States (3.0)
• PHIL 3530
Environmental Ethics (3.0)
• POLS 1800 Our Global Community (3.0)
• SOC 3450
Environmental Sociology (3.0)
• HIST 3260
History of Utah (3.0)
• Any other advisor-approved courses.
Emphasis in French
18 Credits
18 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
Prerequisites (see Advisor):
• FREN 1010 Beginning French I (5.0)
• FREN 1020 Beginning French II (5.0)
• FREN 2010 Intermediate French I (5.0)
Utah Valley State
Integrated Studies
• FREN 2020
• FREN 2050
Intermediate French II (3.0)
Advanced French Grammar and
Composition (3.0)
18.0
Choose 18 credits from the following:
• FREN 3040
Introduction to Literary Genres in
French* (3.0)
or FREN 3050 Advanced French* (3.0)
• FREN 3200 Business French (3.0)
• FREN 3510 Culture and Civilization to 1700
(3.0)
• FREN 3520
Culture and Civilization from 1700
(3.0)
• FREN 3610 French Literature to 1700 (3.0)
• FREN 3620 French Literature from 1700 (3.0)
• FREN 4200 Advanced Business French (3.0)
Footnotes:
* FREN 3040 or 3050 is the prerequisite to all
higher-numbered courses listed in Discipline Core
Requirements.
Emphasis in History
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
18 Credits
History Emphasis
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 3010
The Nature of History (3.0)
or HIST 3260
History of Utah (3.0)
or See Advisor
Complete an additional 15 credits from any HIST
course 3000 or higher (see advisor)
Emphasis in
Hospitality Management
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
15.0
18 Credits
18 Credits
Hospitality Management Emphasis
Complete the following:
• HM 1130
Hotel Operations I
3.0
• HM 3390
Hotel Operations II
3.0
12.0
Complete 12 credits from the following:
• HM 3020
Hospitality Managerial Accounting
(4.0)
• HM 3050
Country Club Management (3.0)
• HM 3150
Hospitality Finance (3.0)
• HM 3200
Global Tourism (3.0)
• HM 3640
Food and Beverage Controls (3.0)
• HM 3710
Marketing of Hospitality Services
(3.0)
• HM 4550
Hospitality Industry Management
(3.0)
• LEGL 3100
Hospitality Law (3.0)
Note: A minimum of 2.5 GPA in all School of Business
courses, and no grade lower than a C- required for
graduation.
Emphasis in Humanities
Emphasis Requirements:
• HUM 2010
• HUM 2020
• HUM 3500
18 Credits
9 Credits
Arts in Humanistic Traditions I
Arts in Humanistic Traditions II
Approaches to Humanities
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
9 Credits
Students must complete 9 credits from the following:
• HUM 1010
Humanities Through the Arts (3.0)
• HUM 320R Topics in Humanities (1.0) *
• HUM 325R Area Studies in Humanities (3.0)
• HUM 330R Period Studies in Humanities (3.0)
9.0
Footnotes:
* Variable credit course
Emphasis in Leadership
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
18 Credits
Leadership (Upper Division) Emphasis
Prerequisites:
• ACC 3000
Financial Managerial and Cost
Accounting Concepts (4.0)
or ACC 2010
Financial Accounting (3.0)
and ACC 2020
Managerial Accounting (3.0)
Complete the following:
• INFO 3120 Principles of Information Systems--A 3.0
Managerial Approach
• ECON 2020 Macroeconomics
3.0
• MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior
3.0
• MGMT 3010 Principles of Management
3.0
• MGMT 3500 Leadership Process
3.0
• MGMT 3600 Principles of Marketing
3.0
Note: A minimum of 2.5 GPA in all School of Business
course, and no grade lower than a C-, required for graduation.
Emphasis in Military Science
Emphasis Requirements:
• MILS 3200
• MILS 3210
• MILS 4200
Small Unit Leadership I
Small Unit Leadership II
The Profession of Arms I
Utah Valley State
18 Credits
18 Credits
3.0
3.0
3.0
• MILS 4210
The Profession of Arms II
3.0
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 3450
The History of World War II (3.0)
• HIST 3520
The United States and Vietnam-1945 to Present (3.0)
• HIST 4740
American Revolution (3.0)
3.0
Complete 3 credits from the following:
• COMM 3520 Case Studies in Public Relations (3.0)
• CJ 3040
Community Policing (3.0)
• ENGL 2310 Technical Communication (3.0)
• DGM 3265 Adult Learning for Instructional
Design (3.0)
• DGM 3290 Developing Digital Media for
Instruction and Training (3.0)
• MGMT 3300 Survey of International Business (3.0)
• MGMT 3320 Cross-Cultural Communications for
International Business (3.0)
• MGMT 3430 Human Resource Management (3.0)
• MGMT 3440 Managing Organizations (3.0)
• POLS 3100 Survey of International Terrorism (3.0)
• POLS 3400 American Foreign Policy (3.0)
• POLS 3600 International Relations of East
Asia (3.0)
Notes:
1 Contracted Army ROTC Cadets must also satisfy the
leadership laboratory and physical fitness terms of their
contract in order to be commissioned officers in the
US Army.
2 Military Science students who select this emphasis may
not choose Physical Education, Outdoor Leadership,
Leadership, or Office Management as their second
emphasis.
Emphasis in Modern Dance
Emphasis Requirements:
20 Credits
20 Credits
Prerequisites:
• DANC 1330 Studio Workshop--Creative Process
in Dance (1.0)
• DANC 2110 Orientation to Dance (3.0)
• DANC 2670 Introduction to Laban Studies (2.0)
• DANC 3560 World Dance Forms (2.0)
Complete the following:
• DANC 2340 Composition
• DANC 3630 Dance History
• DANC 3670 Movement Analysis
• DANC 4880 Current Issues in Dance
• DANC 4920 Dance as Cultural Practice
Complete 6 credits from the following classes:
• DANC 143R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory I (3.0)
• DANC 144R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory I (3.0)
• DANC 243R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory II (3.0)
• DANC 244R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory II (3.0)
• DANC 341R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory III (3.0)
• DANC 342R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory III (3.0)
• DANC 441R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory IV (3.0)
• DANC 442R Modern Dance Technique and
Theory IV (3.0)
Emphasis in Music
Emphasis Requirements:
Catalog 2007–2008
Emphasis in
Office Management
Emphasis Requirements:
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
18 Credits
18 Credits
Prerequisites (see advisor)
• MUSC 1110 Basic Music Theory I (3.0)
• MUSC 1130 Aural Music Skills I (2.0)
• MUSC 1120 Basic Music Theory II (3.0)
• MUSC 1140 Aural Music Skills II (2.0)
• MUSC 2350 Fundamentals of Conducting (2.0)
• MUSC 1400 Introduction to Music
Technology (2.0)
• MUSC 2110 Advanced Music Theory I (3.0)
• MUSC 2120 Advanced Music Theory II (3.0)
• Individual Musicianship Studies: student must
complete 4 credits selected from the following:
• MUSC 150R Individual Piano Instruction (1.0)
• MUSC 151R Individual Voice Instruction (1.0)
• MUSC 152R Individual Woodwind Instruction
(1.0)
• MUSC 153R Individual Brass Instruction (1.0)
• MUSC 154R Individual String Instruction (1.0)
• MUSC 155R Individual Percussion Instruction
(1.0)
• MUSC 156R Individual Guitar Instruction (1.0)
• Performance Group Studies: students must complete 4 credits selected from the following:
• MUSC 120R A Cappella Choir (1.0)
• MUSC 124R UVSC Concert Choir (1.0)
• MUSC 130R Symphonic Band (1.0)
• MUSC 170R Symphony Orchestra (1.0)
Complete the following:
• MUSC 2010 Music History and Literature I
• MUSC 2020 Music History and Literature II
Complete 3 credits from the following. (Each course
may be repeated (3) times toward graduation):
• MUSC 350R Advanced Individual Piano
Instruction (1.0)
• MUSC 351R Advanced Individual Voice
Instruction (1.0)
• MUSC 352R Advanced Individual
Woodwind Instruction (1.0)
• MUSC 353R Advanced Individual Brass
Instrution (1.0)
• MUSC 354R Advanced Individual String
Instruction (1.0)
• MUSC 355R Advanced Individual Percussion
Instruction (1.0)
• MUSC 356R Advanced Individual Guitar
Instruction (1.0)
Complete 3 credits from the following. (Each course
may be repeated (3) times toward graduation):
• MUSC 320R Advanced A Cappella Choir (1.0)
• MUSC 330R Advanced Symphony Band (1.0)
• MUSC 370R Advanced Symphony Orchestra
(1.0)
Complete at least 6 credits from the following (3 credits
must be upper-division):
• MUSC 1800 Introduction to Music Education
(1.0)
• MUSC 3120 Form and Analysis (2.0)
• MUSC 3150 Advanced Instrumental Conducting
(2.0)
• MUSC 4130 Scoring and Arranging (2.0)
• MUSC 4150 Advanced Choral Conducting (2.0)
• MUSC 4600 Jazz Improvisation (1.0)
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
19 Credits
19 Credits
• DGM 2350 Word Processing (3.0)
Prerequisites (can fulfill elective requirements):
• DGM 2360 Spreadsheet Applications (3.0)
• DGM 2370 Database Applications (3.0)
• DGM 3820 Presentation Applications (3.0)
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications (3.0)
Complete the following required courses:
• DGM 2120 Web Essentials
3.0
• DGM 2230 Exploring Digital Communication
2.0
Tools (3.0)
• DGM 4350 Information Workflow Management 3.0
• DGM 3220 Digital Media Project Management 3.0
8.0
Complete 8 or more credits from the following:
• ACC 3000
Financial Managerial and Cost
Accounting Concepts (4.0)
• DGM 3870 Web Graphics Applications (3.0)
• LEGL 3000 Business Law (3.0)
• MGMT 2390 Effective Business Presentations
(3.0)
• MGMT 3430 Human Resource Management
(3.0)
• MGMT 3890 Career Preparation (2.0)
NOTE: A minimum of 2.5 GPA in all discipline core courses
with no grade lower than a C- required for graduation.
Emphasis in Outdoor
Leadership
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
18 Credits
Outdoor Leadership Emphasis
Complete the following:
• REC 3600
Foundations of Recreation and
Leisure
• REC 3100
Recreation Program Planning
• REC 3400
Recreation Administration and Risk
Management
• REC 4000
Outdoor Leadership
Complete 6 credits from the following:
• REC 1527
Rock Climbing I (2.0)
• REC 1525
Mountaineering (2.0)
• REC 1550
Mountain Biking (2.0)
• REC 1350
Scuba Diving I (2.0)
• REC 1351
Scuba Diving II (2.0)
• REC 1505
Whitewater Kayaking I (2.0)
• REC 1528
Rock Climbing II (2.0)
• REC 2005
Ropes Course Facilitation (2.0)
• REC 2010
Avalanche Awareness (2.0)
• REC 1500
Canoeing I (1.0)
• REC 3300
Wilderness Skills (2.0)
Emphasis in Philosophy
Emphasis Requirements:
2.0
3.0
3.0
4.0
6.0
18 Credits
18 Credits
Complete the following:
• PHIL 1250
Logical Thinking and Philosophical
Writing
3.0
175
Integrated Studies
Complete 3 credits from the following:
3.0
• PHIL 1000
Introduction to Philosophy (3.0)
• PHIL 1600
World Religions (3.0)
• PHIL 2010
Ancient-Medieval Philosophy (3.0)
• PHIL 2020
Modern-Contemporary Philosophy
(3.0)
• PHIL 3150
Philosophical Issues in Feminism
(3.0)
• PHIL 3450
Philosophy of Childhood (3.0)
• PHIL 3400
Philosophy of Science (3.0)
• PHIL 290R
Independent Study (1.0)
• PHIL 295R
Directed Readings (1.0)
12.0
Complete 12 credits from the following:
• PHIL 3000
Formal Deductive Logic (3.0)
• PHIL 3800
Introduction to Aesthetics (3.0)
• PHIL 3300
Epistemology (3.0)
• PHIL 3510
Business and Professional Ethics
(3.0)
• PHIL 3600
Philosophy of Religion (3.0)
• PHIL 3530
Environmental Ethics (3.0)
• PHIL 400R
Great Philosophers (3.0)
• PHIL 3700
Social and Political Philosophy (3.0)
• PHIL 4140
History of Analytic Philosophy (3.0)
• PHIL 4480
Philosophy of Language (3.0)
• PHIL 450R
Interdisciplinary Senior Ethics
Seminar (3.0)
• PHIL 451R
Ethical Theory Seminar (3.0)
Emphasis in Physical
Education
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
18 Credits
Physical Education Emphasis
Complete the following:
• PES 2700
Foundations of Physical Education
3.0
and Recreation
• PES 3270
Methods of Teaching Fitness
3.0
• PES 3500
Kinesiology
3.0
• PES 3700
Exercise Physiology
4.0
5.0
Complete 5 credits from the following:
• Any PES 1000 level course except PES 1097, maximum
of 1 credit may be applied to graduation
• Any PES course 2050 or higher
Emphasis in Psychology
Emphasis Requirements:
19 Credits
19 Credits
Prerequisites:
• PSY 1010
General Psychology** (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PSY 2250
Psychology of Interpersonal
Relationships (3.0)
or PSY 2400
Psychology of Personal
3.0
Effectiveness
4.0
• PSY 3010
Statistics for the Behavioral
Sciences*
• PSY 3020
Research Methods for the
3.0
Behavioral Sciences
• Complete 9 additional credits in Psychology. Six
9.0
credits must be upper division, three credits may
be lower or upper division.
Footnotes:
** ANTH/PSY/SOC 1010 are introductory courses and
pre-requisites which may not be used in the 18 hours
required for these Integrated Studies Emphases.
* If students take MGMT 3340 as part of their other
emphasis, they are not required to take PSY/SOC 3010.
They may substitute an upper division PSY course in
its place.
Emphasis in
Religious Studies
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
18 Credits
Prerequisites (see Advisor)
• PHIL 1610
Introduction to Western Religions
(3.0)
• PHIL 1620
Introduction to Eastern Religions
(3.0)
or ANTH 3450 Shamanism and Indigenous Religion
(3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 3600
Philosophy of Religion
• RLST 3650
Approaches to Religious Studies
• RLST 366R
Issues in Religious Studies
Complete 9 credits from the following:
• ANTH 3400 Myth Magic and Religion (3.0)
• ANTH 3450 Shamanism and Indigenous Religion
(3.0)
• ANTH 3460 Anthropology of Mormonism (3.0)
• COMM 3780 Mormon Cultural Studies (3.0)
• ENGL 3740 Literature of the Sacred (3.0)
• ENGL 3780 Mormon Literature (3.0)
• HIST 4100
Jewish History (3.0)
• RLST 3540
Christian Ethics (3.0)
• RLST 3610
Introduction to Christian
Theology (3.0)
• SOC 3400
Sociology of Religion (3.0)
176
Emphasis in Social Sciences
Emphasis Requirements:
Complete 3 credits from the following courses:
• ARCH 1100 Introduction to Archaeology (3.0)
• ECON 1010 Economics as a Social Science (3.0)
• ECON 1740 US Economic History (3.0)
• GEOG 1300 Survey of World Geography (3.0)
• GEOG 2100 Geography of the United States
(3.0)
• GEOG 3010 Economic Geography (3.0)
• GEOG 3430 Political Geography (3.0)
• GEOG 3630 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (4.0)
• GEOG 3800 Environmental History of the United
States (3.0)
Complete 3 credits from the following courses:
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1010 Introduction to Political Science
(3.0)
• POLS 1020 Political Ideologies (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
• POLS 1440 Introduction to Middle East Politics
(3.0)
• POLS 2200 Introduction to Comparative Politics
(3.0)
• POLS 2100 Introduction to International Relations (3.0)
• POLS 1800 Our Global Community (3.0)
• POLS 2120 Political Parties (3.0)
• POLS 2350 Introduction to Political Theory (3.0)
• POLS 3000 Political Analysis (3.0)
• POLS 3030 State and Local Government (3.0)
• POLS 3100 Survey of International Terrorism
(3.0)
• POLS 3150 Executive Branch (3.0)
• POLS 3200 Legislative Process (3.0)
• POLS 3500 International Relations of the Middle
East (3.0)
• POLS 3590 American Indian Law and Tribal
Government (3.0)
• POLS 3600 International Relations of East Asia
(3.0)
• POLS 480R Internship (2.0)
Complete at least 3 credits from the following courses:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1100
History of Civilization I (3.0)
• HIST 1110
History of Civilization II (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
Complete an additional 9 credits from any GEOG,
HIST, or POLS course 3000 or higher (see advisor).
Emphasis in Sociology
3.0
• SPAN 3610
• SPAN 3620
• SPAN 3630
• SPAN 3640
• SPAN 4050
3.0
Spanish Peninsular Literature to
800 (3.0)
Spanish Peninsular Literature from
1800 (3.0)
Spanish American Literature to
1880 (3.0)
Spanish American Literature from
1880 (3.0)
Special Topics in Grammar Usage
and Style (3.0)
Advanced Business Spanish (3.0)
Capstone Seminar (3.0)
• SPAN 4200
• SPAN 4900
Footnotes:
* SPAN 3040 or 3050 is the prerequisite to all highernumbered courses listed in Discipline Core
Requirements.
Emphasis in
Technology Management
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
18 Credits
• Completion of an AA or AS degree with at least 25
credits in a technical specialty.
18.0
Complete 18 credits from the following:
• TECH 3000 Introduction to Technology Management (3.0)
• TECH 3400 Project Management (3.0)
• TECH 3700 Materials Management (3.0)
• TECH 3850 Quality Assurance in Technology
(3.0)
• TECH 4000 Reliability Engineering and Safety
(3.0)
• TECH 4050 Global Ethical and Professional
Issues in Technology (3.0)
• TECH 4200 Technology Marketing and Distribution (3.0)
• TECH 4400 Advanced Project Management
(3.0)
• TECH 4420 Organization Information Technologies (3.0)
• TECH 4820 Current Topics in Technology Management (2.0)
3.0
9.0
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă IS, Integrated Studies
19 Credits
19 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
Prerequisites:
• SOC 1010
Introduction to Sociology** (3.0)
Complete the following:
• SOC 3000
Contemporary Social Theory
3.0
• SOC 3010
Statistics for the Behavioral
4.0
Sciences*
• SOC 3020
Research Methods for the
3.0
Behavioral Sciences
9.0
Complete 9 credits from the following:
• Three (3) credits must be upper division (3000 and
4000), six (6) credits may be upper or lower division (1000 or above). Choose from SOC.
Footnotes:
** ANTH/PSY/SOC 1010 are introductory courses and
pre-requisites which may not be used in the 18 hours
required for these Integrated Studies Emphases.
* If students take MGMT 3340 as part of their other
emphasis, they are not required to take PSY/SOC 3010.
They may substitute an upper division ANTH, PSY, SOC,
or SOWK course in its place.
Emphasis in Spanish
Emphasis Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
9.0
18 Credits
18 Credits
18 Credits
18 Credits
Prerequisites (see Advisor):
• SPAN 1010 Beginning Spanish I (5.0)
• SPAN 1020 Beginning Spanish II (5.0)
• SPAN 2010 Intermediate Spanish I (5.0)
• SPAN 2020 Intermediate Spanish II (3.0)
• SPAN 2050 Advanced Spanish Grammar and
Composition (3.0)
18.0
Complete 18 credits from the following:
• SPAN 3040 Introduction to Literary Genres in
Spanish (3.0) *
or SPAN 3050 Advanced Spanish (3.0) *
• SPAN 3200 Business Spanish (3.0)
• SPAN 3220 Pronunciation Phonetics and Phonology (3.0)
• SPAN 3510 Culture and Civilization--Spain (3.0)
• SPAN 3520 Culture and Civilization--Spanish
America (3.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Internships and Cooperative Education
Internships and
Cooperative
Education
Utah Valley State College encourages
students to extend learning beyond
the classroom by participating in
Internships, Cooperative Education, or
other professional engagement activities.
Students who participate in professionally
engaged activities:
• network with peers, mentors, faculty,
employers, community leaders, and
experienced associates
• acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes
to be successful, and versatile professionals
and citizens
• are confident, competent, creative, and
proactive in becoming intellectually
engaged in their personal pursuits, careers,
and local and global communities
To qualify for Internship or Cooperative
Education–academic credit, it is required
that the experience:
• relate to the student’s major or professional
field of study
• integrate academic and experiential
learning
• be at a professional level of responsibility
appropriate for academic credit
• include written agreements between the
student, employer, and college that outline
responsibilities of the parties
Most academic departments in the college
have integrated Internship or Cooperative
Educational experience into their
curriculum either as a required component
or as an elective. Generally these courses
are designated as 281R (lower division) or
481R (upper division). Some departments
require an associated co-requisite.
Academic programs either offer Internship
or Cooperative Education experience
depending on their fields. Cooperative
Education is generally associated with
technical or engineering fields, but both
Internships and Cooperative Education
experience can be paid or unpaid applied
learning opportunities. Please refer to
specific programs in the catalog for
detailed information.
Approval for enrollment must be obtained
from the department/school Internship
or Cooperative Education Coordinator.
Students declared as a General Academics
major, or those students who would like
to explore career options should consider
enrolling in an exploratory Internship
through the Department of College Success
Studies (CSS).
Utah Valley State
Academic credit for internships or
cooperative work experience is granted
according to learning objectives with the
academic department and the number of
hours a student works during the semester
according to the following formula:
Credit Hours
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Minimum Hours of Work
75
150
225
300
375
450
525
600
Grading for Internship or Cooperative
Education courses is CR (credit granted)
or NC (credit not granted). The maximum
number of Internship or Cooperative
Education credits that may be applied
toward a certificate is eight; a diploma
is 14; an associate or bachelor degree is
16 credit hours. In departments where
substitutions are clearly defined, they
will be listed in the catalog. In other
departments, substitution decisions will be
based on a student’s particular Internship
or Cooperative Work experience and will
be negotiated among the student, the
Coordinator, and the Department Chair.
Center for Career Services and
Student Employment
The College is committed to assisting
students in making intelligent and informed
career choices. The Career Services and
Student Employment Center can assist
students in investigating Internship and
Cooperative Education opportunities by
providing employer leads and information,
helping students construct resumes and
assisting with interview preparation.
Once a student has secured an internship
and met with their Academic Internship
Coordinator, there is a required Internship/
Cooperative Education orientation
provided by the Director of Internship
Services. Information for participation and
scheduling of the Internship Orientation
can be obtained through your Academic
Internship Coordinator or through the
Career Services and Student Employment
Center (863-6364).
Catalog 2007–2008
177
Languages
Languages
interaction, particularly, but not limited to
industry, commerce, and education.
Department of Languages
Department Office: LA 003a
Department Telephone: 801-8638518
Department Chair: Douglas Jensen
Office: LA 003a
Telephone: 801-863-7162
Faculty:
Professor
Liliana Riboldi (Spanish)
Del K. Shumway (Spanish)
Associate Professor
Bryan Eldredge (ASL)
Douglas Jensen (Spanish)
Minnie Mae Wilding-Diaz (ASL)
Assistant Professor
Gregory Briscoe (Spanish)
Debora Ferreira (Portuguese)
Gloria Gilmore (French)
Baldomero Lago (Spanish)
Lecturer
Laura Johnston (German)
Sara Ulloa (Spanish)
Visiting Assistant Professors
Dale Boam
Cynthia Plue (ASL & Deaf Studies)
PROGR AMS
UVSC offers beginning (1000 level) and
intermediate (2000 level) courses in ASL,
Chinese, French, German, Japanese,
Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish, as well
as upper division (3000 level) language
classes in all but Chinese. UVSC courses
support inter-College programs/degrees
that require languages (e.g., Associate
in Arts requires 10 hours of the same
recognized foreign language) and transfer
to other colleges and universities, therein
either partially or completely fulfilling
entrance or degree requirements in
language.
Foreign language courses fulfill AA/AS
Humanities electives and AAS Humanities
requirements.
Language Advisor: Laura
Bailey
Office: LA 013
Telephone: 801-863-8047
Supervisor, Office/Lab: Carol Morgan
Office: LA 003a
Telephone: 801-863-7232
School of Humanities, Arts, and
Social Sciences
Dean: William W. Cobb, Jr.
Office: LA 209d
Telephone: 801-863-7435
ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES
Language expertise has specific application
to a career in language teaching or
translation. It becomes an attending and
often essential skill in any business or
government activity that involves domestic
or international non-English speaking
communities. The fact that business and
government are more and more global
enterprises, coupled with the fact that the
U.S. citizenry is less and less monolingual
English, the demand for language expertise
is increasing throughout all facets of social
178
Culture and Civilization--Spanish
America (see Discipline Core
Requirements above) (3.0)
• SPAN 3610 Spanish Peninsular Literature to
1800 (3.0)
• SPAN 3620 Spanish Peninsular Literature from
1800 (3.0)
• SPAN 3630 Spanish American Literature to
1880 (3.0)
• SPAN 3640 Spanish American Literature from
1880 (3.0)
• SPAN 4200 Advanced Business Spanish (3.0)
Choose 10 credits of upper division electives
• Any course 1000 level or higher *
10.0
45.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 120 credit hours (minimum of 40 upper division)
2 Minimum cumulative G.P.A. of 2.0, with no grade lower
than a “C” for all core and SPAN elective requirements.
3 Completion of General Education requirements
4 Completion of Spanish major core and elective requirements
5 Residency hours--minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
Students should frequently review their program with faculty
or department advisor.
Footnotes:
* For eligible students, the lower division courses 1010,
1020, 2010, and 2020, worth 18 hours will apply here.
BA in Spanish Education 120 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
Foreign Language courses numbered
2020 apply to Humanities Distribution
requirements.
Foreign Language courses fulfill language
requirements for the BA degree.
1 ACT score: 20 composite minimum, no sub-test below
18
2 Passing score on the CAAP exam (3 or higher)
3 Pass a criminal background check, student’s junior year
4 Receive approval from Secondary Ed Selection and
Retention Committee-- formal interview required
5 Meet all other requirements for Secondary Education
Program
General Education Requirements:
BA in Spanish
General Education Requirements:
Faculty Advisors: Gregory Briscoe, Bryan
Eldredge, Debora Ferreira, Douglas
Jensen, Liliana Riboldi, Del Shumway,
Minnie Mae Wilding-Diaz, Sara Ulloa.
or SPAN 3520
120 C REDITS
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Choose one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Choose one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Humanities Distribution [non-language courses
only]
• Social/Behavioral Science
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Biology or Physical Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
15 Credits
• SPAN 3040
3.0
or
•
or
3.0
•
or
•
•
•
Introduction to Literary Genres in
Spanish
SPAN 3050 Advanced Spanish (3.0)
SPAN 3510 Culture and Civilization--Spain
SPAN 3520 Culture and Civilization--Spanish
America (3.0)
SPAN 3060 Oral Proficiency (1.0)
Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI)
SPAN 4050 Special Topics in Grammar Usage
and Style
SPAN 4900 Capstone Seminar
Any upper division Spanish literature course
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
70 Credits
Choose 15 credits from the following:
15.0
• SPAN 3200 Business Spanish (3.0)
• SPAN 3220 Pronunciation Phonetics and Phonology (3.0)
• SPAN 3510 Culture and Civilization--Spain (3.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
36 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
TechnologySpecial Topics in Grammar Usage and Style (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Choose one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses:
• Humanities Distribution [non-language courses
only]
• Social/Behavioral Science
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Biology or Physical Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
• SPAN 3040
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
48 Credits
Introduction to Literary Genres in
Spanish
or SPAN 3050 Advanced Spanish (3.0)
• SPAN 3510 Culture and Civilization--Spain
or SPAN 3520 Culture and Civilization--Spanish
America (3.0)
• SPAN 3060 Oral Proficiency (1.0)
or Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI)
• SPAN 4050 Special Topics in Grammar Usage
and Style
• SPAN 4900 Capstone Seminar
• LANG 4200 Methods of Teaching a Foreign
Language
Education Courses:
• EDSC 2540 Development of the Adolescent
Student
• EDSP 3400 Exceptional Students
• EDSC 3000 Educational Psychology
• EDSC 3050 Foundations of American Education
• EDSC 3250 Instructional Media
• EDSC 4200 Classroom Management I
• EDSC 4250 Classroom Management II
• EDSC 4440 Content Area Reading and Writing
• EDSC 4450 Multicultural Instruction/ESL
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
1.0
1.0
3.0
2.0
Utah Valley State
Languages
• EDSC 4550
Secondary Curriculum Instruction
and Assessment
• EDSC 4850 Student Teaching--Secondary (4.0)
• Any upper division Spanish Literature course
Elective Requirements:
4.0
8.0
3.0
36 Credits
Complete 15 credits of any upper-division SPAN or
LANG courses not previously taken.
Complete 21 credits of any courses 1000-level or
higher.
15.0
21.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Complete a minimum of 120 credit hours with a minimum of 40 upper-division credits.
2 Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 with no grade lower
than a C (2.0) in all core and elective courses.
3 Completion of General Education, Spanish core, and
elective requirements.
4 Meet residency and maximum years in program requirements and any other requirements stated in the College
Catalog or established by the department.
NOTES:
• Students should frequently review their program with
faculty or department advisor.
• Any grade below a C (2.0) in a Spanish core or elective
course will not be accepted toward the major. Students
must maintain an overall GPA of 2.75 or higher and
meet all other graduation requirements stipulated in
the college catalog. Post-BA/BS students must take
30 hours of education courses, fulfill the Math 1050
requirement, and meet all stipulated deadlines.
BA in Deaf Studies
General Education Requirements:
123 C REDITS
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Choose one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
Choose one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Humanities Distribution
• ANTH 1010
Social/Cultural Anthropology
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Biology or Physical Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
• ASL 2040
• ASL 3050
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
31 Credits
ASL Numbers *
Advanced American Sign Language
**
• ASL 3310
Interpreting I
• ASL 3510
Deaf Culture to 1817
• ASL 3520
Deaf Culture 1817 to 1970
• ASL 3530
Deaf Culture from 1970
• ASL 3610
ASL Literature
• ASL 4410
ASL Linguistics
• Any other 4000-level class with an ASL prefix.
Complete at least 6 credits from the following courses:
• ANTH 1070 Multicultural Societies (3.0)
• SOC 1010
Introduction to Sociology (3.0)
• SOC 3000 Contemporary Social Theory (3.0)
• SOC 3200
Race and Minority Relations (3.0)
• SOC 3560
Sociology of Deviance (3.0)
• SOC 3700
Social Inequality (3.0)
• SOC 4400
Social Change (3.0)
• EDEC 3300 Multicultural Understanding (2.0)
• ANTH 3500 Discourse Semiotics and Representation (3.0)
• ANTH 360R People and Cultures of the World
(3.0)
1.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
6.0
Emphasis
Complete one of the following:
• General Deaf Studies
• Interpreting
57.0
57.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 123 credit hours (minimum of 40 upper division)
2 Minimum cumulative G.P.A. of 2.0, with no grade lower
than a “C” for all core and ASL elective requirements.
3 Completion of General Education requirements
Utah Valley State
4 Completion of Deaf Studies major core and elective
requirements
5 Residency hours--minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
Note: Students should frequently review their program with
faculty or department advisor.
Footnotes:
* Requires ASL skills equivalent to those expected at
the completion of ASL 1020. See advisor for more
information.
** Requires ASL skills equivalent to those expected at
the completion of ASL 2020. See advisor for more
information.
Emphasis in
General Deaf Studies
Emphasis Requirements:
57.0 Credits
15 Credits
Complete the following courses:
• LANG 3000 Language and Culture
• ASL 3800
ASL Deaf Culture Studies
• ASL 4450
Deaf-World Discourse
• ASL 4560
Deafness and the Law
• ASL 4550
Multicultural Issues In the DeafWorld
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
42 Credits
DEAF STUDIES ELECTIVES
18.0
Complete 18 credits from among the following:
• LANG 481R Language Internship (This is a
variable credit course. No more
than 5 credits can be applied as
elective requirements. Additional
credits can be applied as general
electives.) (1.0)
• Any 3000- or 4000-level ASL & Deaf Studies
courses that are not part of the core and are not
emphasis requirements.
CULTURE ELECTIVES
3.0
Complete at least 3 credits from the following courses:
• ANTH 1070 Multicultural Societies (3.0)
• SOC 1010
Introduction to Sociology (3.0)
• SOC 3000 Contemporary Social Theory (3.0)
• SOC 3200
Race and Minority Relations (3.0)
• SOC 3560
Sociology of Deviance (3.0)
• SOC 3700
Social Inequality (3.0)
• SOC 4400
Social Change (3.0)
• EDEC 3300 Multicultural Understanding (2.0)
• ANTH 3500 Discourse Semiotics and Representation (3.0)
• ANTH 360R People and Cultures of the World
(3.0)
Complete 21 credits of any 1000 level or higher
21.0
coursework. *
Emphasis in Interpreting
Emphasis Requirements:
57.0 Credits
23 Credits
Complete the following courses:
• ASL 4370
Ethics for Interpreters
• LANG 481R Language Internship (1.0)
Complete 18 credits from the following:
• ASL 3340
Interpreting II--Advanced Techniques (3.0)
• ASL 3380
Transliteration Transliteration (3.0)
• ASL 3320
Physiology of Interpreting (3.0)
• ASL 3370
Sign to Voice Interpreting (3.0)
• ASL 3390
Professional Issues in Interpreting
(3.0)
• ASL 4330
Visual Linguistic Analysis for Interpreters (3.0)
• ASL 4360
Legal Interpreting (3.0)
• ASL 439R
Special Topics in Interpreting (3.0)
Emphasis Elective Requirements:
3.0
2.0
18.0
34 Credits
Choose electives (totaling at least 34 credits) from the 34.0
following courses. Complete two classes from each set
(at least one upper-division course encouraged).
SELF AND SPATIAL AWARENESS SET
• THEA 1113
Voice and Diction (3.0)
• COMM 1020 Public Speaking (3.0)
• COMM 1050 Introduction to Speech Communication (3.0)
• DANC 1010 Dance as an Art Form (3.0)
• HUM 1010
Humanities Through the Arts (3.0)
• HUM 3800 Introduction to Aesthetics (3.0)
ETHICS SET
• PHIL 1000
Introduction to Philosophy (3.0)
• PHIL 3520
Bioethics (3.0)
• PHIL 3200
Metaphysics (3.0)
• PHIL 3300
Epistemology (3.0)
• PHIL 3510
Business and Professional Ethics
(3.0)
• PHIL 3700
Social and Political Philosophy (3.0)
SPECIAL INTEREST SET: LAW
• LEGL 1010
Survey of Law (3.0)
Catalog 2007–2008
• LEGL 1110
Civil Litigation and Preparation
(4.0)
• LEGL 290R Law Society (1.0)
• CJ 1300
Introduction to Corrections Process
(3.0)
SPECIAL INTEREST SET: COMMUNITY
• INFO 1000 Computer Programming Concepts
(3.0)
• MGMT 1010 Introduction to Business (3.0)
• PHYS 1010
Elementary Physics (3.0)
• DGM 1210 Digital Media Essentials II (4.0)
• MGMT 1200 Business English (3.0)
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications (3.0)
SPECIAL INTEREST SET: EDUCATION
• CHEM 1010 Introduction to Chemistry (3.0)
• MATH 1100 Introduction to Calculus (4.0)
• EDSC 3050 Foundations of American Education
(2.0)
• EDSP 3400 Exceptional Students (2.0)
• SOC 3430
Sociology of Education (3.0)
• PHIL 4120
Philosophy of Education (3.0)
SPECIAL INTEREST SET: MEDICAL
• ZOOL 1090 Introduction to Human Anatomy
and Physiology (3.0)
• ZOOL 2320 Human Anatomy (4.0)
• ZOOL 2420 Human Physiology (4.0)
BA in ASL and
Deaf Studies Education
123 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 ACT score: 20 composite minimum, no sub-test below
18
2 Passing score on the CAAP exam (3 or higher)
3 Pass a criminal background check, student’s junior year
4 Receive approval from Secondary Ed Selection and
Retention Committee-- formal interview required
5 Meet all other requirements for Secondary Education
Program
General Education Requirements:
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
36 Credits
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
Choose one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government
(3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses:
• Humanities Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Biology or Physical Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
69 Credits
• ASL 3050
Advanced American Sign Language 3.0
*
• ASL 3310
Interpreting I
3.0
or ASL 4410
ASL Linguistics (3.0)
• ASL 3510
Deaf Culture to 1817
3.0
or ASL 3520
Deaf Culture 1817 to 1970 (3.0)
• ASL 3530
Deaf Culture from 1970
3.0
• LANG 4200 Methods of Teaching a Foreign
3.0
Language
• ASL 3610
ASL Literature
3.0
• Any other 3000+ class with an ASL or LANG
21.0
prefix.
Education Courses:
• EDSC 3000 Educational Psychology
3.0
• EDSC 2540 Development of the Adolescent
2.0
Student
• EDSP 3400 Exceptional Students
2.0
• EDSC 3050 Foundations of American Education 2.0
• EDSC 3250 Instructional Media
2.0
• EDSC 4200 Classroom Management I
1.0
• EDSC 4250 Classroom Management II
1.0
• EDSC 4440 Content Area Reading and Writing
3.0
• EDSC 4450 Multicultural Instruction/ESL
2.0
• EDSC 4850 Student Teaching--Secondary (4.0) 8.0
• EDSC 4550 Secondary Curriculum Instruction
4.0
and Assessment
Elective Requirements:
18 Credits
179
Languages
• Complete 18 credits of any courses 1000-level
or higher.
18.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Complete a minimum of 120 credit hours with a minimum of 40 upper-division credits.
2 Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 with no grade lower
than a C (2.0) in all core and elective courses.
3 Completion of General Education, ASL & Deaf Studies
core, and elective requirements.
4 Meet residency and maximum years in program requirements and any other requirements stated in the College
Catalog or established by the department.
NOTES:
• Students should frequently review their program with
faculty or department advisor.
• Any grade below a C (2.0) in an ASL & Deaf Studies core
or elective course will not be accepted toward the major.
Students must maintain an overall GPA of 2.75 or higher
and meet all other graduation requirements stipulated in the
college catalog. Post-BA/BS students must take 30 hours of
education courses, fulfill the Math 1050 requirement, and
meet all stipulated deadlines.
Footnotes:
* Requires ASL skills equivalent to those expected at
the completion of ASL 2020. See advisor for more
information.
Minor in Spanish
18 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Complete ENGL 2010 and 30 hours of college-level
courses other than Spanish with a minimum GPA of 2.0
2 Complete lower division Spanish courses (1010, 1020,
2010, and 2020) or receive the equivalent through
experiential credit (does not apply to native speakers).
3 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
18 Credits
• SPAN 3040
Introduction to Literary Genres in
Spanish (3.0)
or SPAN 3050 Advanced Spanish
• SPAN 3510 Culture and Civilization--Spain (3.0)
or SPAN 3520 Culture and Civilization--Spanish
America
• SPAN 4050 Special Topics in Grammar Usage
and Style
Complete 9 credits from the following:
• SPAN 3200 Business Spanish (3.0)
• SPAN 3220 Pronunciation Phonetics and
Phonology (3.0)
• SPAN 3510 Culture and Civilization--Spain (3.0)
• SPAN 3520 Culture and Civilization--Spanish
America (3.0)
• SPAN 3610 Spanish Peninsular Literature to
1800 (3.0)
• SPAN 3620 Spanish Peninsular Literature from
1800 (3.0)
• SPAN 3630 Spanish American Literature to
1880 (3.0)
• SPAN 3640 Spanish American Literature from
1880 (3.0)
• SPAN 4200 Advanced Business Spanish (3.0)
• SPAN 4900 Capstone Seminar (3.0)
3.0
3.0
3.0
9.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of Baccalaureate Degree.
2 Any grade below a “C” (2.0) in a Spanish Minor course
will not be accepted.
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in
American Sign Language
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
6 Credits
Prerequisites (see advisor)
• ASL 1010
Beginning American Sign Language
I (5.0)
• ASL 1020
Beginning American Sign Language
II (5.0)
• ASL 2010
Intermediate American Sign Language I (5.0)
• ASL 2020
Intermediate American Sign Language II (3.0)
Complete the following:
• ASL 3050
Advanced American Sign Language 3.0
(3.0)
• ASL 3530
Deaf Culture from 1970 (3.0)
3.0
Elective Requirements:
12 Credits
• Complete 12 credits from any 3000 or 4000 level 12.0
ASL or LANG courses not already taken.
180
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
Ă SPAN, Spanish
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in French
18 Credits
18 Credits
Emphasis Requirements:
Prerequisites (see Advisor):
• FREN 1010 Beginning French I (5.0)
• FREN 1020 Beginning French II (5.0)
• FREN 2010 Intermediate French I (5.0)
• FREN 2020 Intermediate French II (3.0)
• FREN 2050 Advanced French Grammar and
Composition (3.0)
18.0
Choose 18 credits from the following:
• FREN 3040
Introduction to Literary Genres in
French* (3.0)
or FREN 3050 Advanced French* (3.0)
• FREN 3200 Business French (3.0)
• FREN 3510 Culture and Civilization to 1700
(3.0)
• FREN 3520
Culture and Civilization from 1700
(3.0)
• FREN 3610 French Literature to 1700 (3.0)
• FREN 3620 French Literature from 1700 (3.0)
• FREN 4200 Advanced Business French (3.0)
Footnotes:
* FREN 3040 or 3050 is the prerequisite to all
higher-numbered courses listed in Discipline Core
Requirements.
BA/BS in
Integrated Studies
123 C REDITS
The following Integrated Studies Emphasis is available (see
the Integrated Studies section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Emphasis in Spanish
Emphasis Requirements:
18 Credits
18 Credits
Prerequisites (see Advisor):
• SPAN 1010 Beginning Spanish I (5.0)
• SPAN 1020 Beginning Spanish II (5.0)
• SPAN 2010 Intermediate Spanish I (5.0)
• SPAN 2020 Intermediate Spanish II (3.0)
• SPAN 2050 Advanced Spanish Grammar and
Composition (3.0)
18.0
Complete 18 credits from the following:
• SPAN 3040 Introduction to Literary Genres in
Spanish (3.0) *
or SPAN 3050 Advanced Spanish (3.0) *
• SPAN 3200 Business Spanish (3.0)
• SPAN 3220 Pronunciation Phonetics and Phonology (3.0)
• SPAN 3510 Culture and Civilization--Spain (3.0)
• SPAN 3520 Culture and Civilization--Spanish
America (3.0)
• SPAN 3610
Spanish Peninsular Literature to
800 (3.0)
• SPAN 3620 Spanish Peninsular Literature from
1800 (3.0)
• SPAN 3630 Spanish American Literature to
1880 (3.0)
• SPAN 3640 Spanish American Literature from
1880 (3.0)
• SPAN 4050 Special Topics in Grammar Usage
and Style (3.0)
• SPAN 4200 Advanced Business Spanish (3.0)
• SPAN 4900 Capstone Seminar (3.0)
Footnotes:
* SPAN 3040 or 3050 is the prerequisite to all highernumbered courses listed in Discipline Core Requirements.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
Ă
ASL, American Sign Language
CHIN, Chinese
FREN, French
GER, German
JPNS Japanese
LANG, Languages
PORT, Portuguese
RUS, Russian
Catalog 2007–2008
Utah Valley State
Legal Studies
Legal Studies
Department Chair: Curtis Fillmore
Office: WB 243
Telephone: 801-863- 8857
Faculty:
Professor
Ellen Hall Loveland
Hugh J. Rode
Associate Professor
W. Brent Bullock
Curtis D. Fillmore
Jill Jasperson
Assistant Professor
Stott Harston
Carolyn Howard
Sandy McGunigall-Smith
Gary Naisbitt
Advisor: Bobbi Gren
Office: WB 247
Telephone: 801-863-8489
E-mail: grenbo@uvsc.edu
Director of Forensic Science: Gary
Naisbitt
Office: WB 247
Telephone: 801-863-8489
Paralegal Studies Advisory
Committee:
Steve Averett, Central Utah Bar Association
President, Practicing Lawyer, and J. Reuben
Clark Law School Librarian; Laurie Hart,
Practicing Lawyer, Callister, Nebeker &
McCullough; Randy S. Kester, Practicing
Lawyer, Young, Kester & Petro; Jonathan
Golightly, Private Sector Paralegal,
Altiris, Inc.; Lesleigh Toews, Public Sector
Paralegal, Fourth District & Juvenile
Courts; Diane Samudio, CLA, Manager of
Paralegals, Symantec Corporation; Carolyn
Howard, J.D., Legal Studies Assistant
Professor, UVSC; Cameron Martin, Ph.D.,
Assistant to the President, UVSC School
Administrator; Hunt Willoughby, Mayor,
Alpine City, Curtis Fillmore, Legal Studies
Program Chair, UVSC; Sharon Hassan,
Student.
School of Business
Dean: Stanley Earl Jenne, Ph.D.
Office: WB 128b
Telephone: 801-863-8239
Associate Dean: Janice Gygi
Office: WB 219
Telephone: 801-863-8863
Assistant Dean: Mikki O’Connor
Office: WB 129
Telephone: 801-863-8850
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
For those trained as paralegals, many
opportunities exist for employment in
traditional private law firms, federal or state
governmental agencies, legal departments
of corporations, banks, insurance
companies and other businesses, such as
title companies, mortgage companies, law
libraries, legal service/legal aid offices,
legal clinics, law offices handling criminal
defense or prosecution work, and law
departments of special interest groups or
associations. Paralegals are non-lawyers
who work under the close supervision of
attorneys.
For those trained in criminal justice,
opportunities exist in law enforcement,
DEA agent, FBI agent, corrections officer,
security officer, private investigator, game
law enforcement officer, immigration
inspector, Alcohol/Tobacco/Firearms
inspector, United States trustee, Internal
Revenue officer, Border Patrol agent,
Consumer Safety inspector, and other fields
depending on chosen option.
The UVSC Legal Studies Department has
the only paralegal training program in Utah
approved by the American Bar Association.
The paralegal minor does not prepare
students for a career as a paralegal. The
minor is not approved by the American Bar
Association
PROGR AMS
Students in Legal Studies may receive
certification in the Utah Law Enforcement
Academy; an Associate in Science Degree
in Criminal Justice or Paralegal Studies;
a Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal
Justice or Paralegal Studies or a Bachelor
of Science Degree in Forensic Science.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
In addition to applying for admission
to Utah Valley State College, paralegal
students must meet the following admission
requirements:
1. Submit Compass Test scores to the
Legal Studies advisor for evaluation.
Applicants who score below the required
level must register for additional courses
in English, reading and/or math.
2. Meet with the Legal Studies advisor.
Cooperative Education
Cooperative education or an internship is
required for paralegal students. A total
of eight credits may be applied toward
graduation.
Department objectives for paralegal
majors:
Utah Valley State
Catalog 2007–2008
1. Every paralegal student must be
competent in legal research, litigation,
document production, and interviewing.
2. Advanced technology is prevalent in
most law offices; and legal assistants are
required to not only be computer literate,
but also be able to use software, to
develop specific computer applications,
to handle spreadsheet analyses, and to
conduct database searches.
3. Students are able to select advanced
classes in legal specialty areas that
appeal to them.
4. Students are required to have actual
work experience as part of their training.
5. Students should demonstrate high ethical
standards and conduct.
Law Enforcement Academy
Director: Steve DeMille
Office: WB 254
Telephone: 801-863-8062
E-mail: demillst@uvsc.edu
Utah Valley State College is a sanctioned
provider of the Utah Law Enforcement
Academy, the basic training program for
certification of law enforcement officers.
The academy is divided into two modules.
The first, or core, provides training
required for certification of reserve officers,
corrections, or special function officers.
The second module continues with training
for certification of an officer with full
police powers (police, deputy sheriff, Utah
Highway Patrol).
AA/AS Pre Major
in Criminal Justice
60 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
3.0
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
3.0
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
3.0
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
2.0
Distribution Courses
• Biology
3.0
• Physical Science
3.0
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
3.0
• Humanities Distribution
3.0
• Fine Arts Distribution
3.0
• Social/Behavioral Science
3.0
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
CJ 1010
CJ 1340
CJ 1350
CJ 1330
CJ 2350
15 Credits
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Criminal Investigations
Introduction to Forensic Science
Criminal Law
Laws of Evidence
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
10 Credits
• FOR AA DEGREE: Must be Foreign Language
10.0
181
Legal Studies
or FOR AS DEGREE: Electives may consist of any
Criminal Justice (CJ) or Paralegal (LEGL) course
that is not part of the core requirements.
10.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 60 semester credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 20 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC
4 For the AA degree, completion of 10 credit hours of
course work from one language.
5 Must have a grade of C- or higher in all core and elective requirements.
AS Pre Major
in Paralegal Studies
62 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
3.0
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
3.0
Social Sciences
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
3.0
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
2.0
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
3.0
• Physical Science
3.0
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
3.0
• Humanities Distribution
3.0
• Fine Arts Distribution
3.0
• Social/Behavioral Science
3.0
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
LEGL 1000
LEGL 1110
LEGL 1220
CJ 1330
LEGL 2190
LEGL 2300
LEGL 2330
21 Credits
Law and the Paralegal
Civil Litigation and Preparation
Legal Research in the Library
Criminal Law
Legal Ethics
Computerized Legal Research
Computer Applications in Law
Elective Requirements:
3.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
6 Credits
• Electives may consist of DGM 2010 and any
6.0
Paralegal (LEGL) course that is not part of the core
requirements.
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 62 or more semester
credits
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above. Must
have a grade of C+ or higher in all Core and elective
requirements.
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 20 credit hours though
course attendance at UVSC. At least 12 of these credits
must be in LEGL or CJ courses.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completing all
prerequisite courses.
BS in Criminal Justice
120 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
• One course that requires MATH 1050 as a prerequisite (excluding MATH 1060)
• An Advanced Placement (AP) Mathematics Test
with a score of 3 or higher
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
182
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
• Physical Science
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
• Humanities Distribution
• Fine Arts Distribution
• Social/Behavioral Science
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
• ART 1050
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
68 Credits
CJ 1010
CJ 1340
CJ 1350
CJ 1300
CJ 1330
CJ 2330
CJ 2350
CJ 3270
CJ 3300
CJ 3400
SOC 3010
CJ 4160
Introduction to Criminal Justice
3.0
Criminal Investigations
3.0
Introduction to Forensic Science
3.0
Introduction to Corrections Process 3.0
Criminal Law
3.0
Juvenile Justice
3.0
Laws of Evidence
3.0
Criminology
3.0
Victimology
3.0
Drugs and Crime
3.0
Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences 4.0
Constitutional Rights and Respon3.0
sibilities
• CJ 4200
Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice
3.0
• CJ 4250
Criminal Justice Career Strategies
1.0
• CJ 4700
Comparative Criminal Justice
3.0
Systems
• CJ 4880
Qualitative Research Methods in
3.0
Criminal Justice
• CJ 4990
Criminal Justice Senior Seminar
3.0
• DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
3.0
or Business Proficiency Exam *
15.0
Choose one of the three options below:
Law Enforcement Option
• CJ 1390
Police Field Operations (3.0)
• CJ 3020
Criminal Justice Management (3.0)
• CJ 3040
Community Policing (3.0)
• CJ 3390
Traffic Theory (3.0)
• Electives (choose from upper-division CJ courses)
Corrections Option
• CJ 3020
Criminal Justice Management (3.0)
• CJ 3060
Corrections in the Community (3.0)
• CJ 3140
Corrections Law (3.0)
• CJ 3360
Prisons--Contemporary Issues and
Dilemmas (3.0)
• Electives (choose from upper-division CJ courses)
Criminal Law Option
• Upper-division LEGL courses
Elective Requirements:
18 Credits
• Complete any 1000 course or higher
17.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 120 or more semester
credits with 40 semester credits from 3000- and 4000level courses.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above. Must
have a grade of C- or higher in all core and elective
requirements.
3 Residency hours: Minimum of 30 credit hours of School
of Business courses through course attendance at
UVSC, with at least 10 hours earned in the last 45
hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completing all
prerequisite courses.
• CJ 1010
Photography I (Recommended for
Fine Arts Distribution)
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Discipline Core Requirements:
3.0
62 Credits
Forensic Science Foundational Courses:
• CJ 1330
Criminal Law
• CJ 1340
Criminal Investigations
• CJ 1350
Introduction to Forensic Science
• CJ 135L
Introduction to Forensic Science
Laboratory
• CJ 2350
Laws of Evidence
• CJ 3880
Professional Practices for the Forensic Scientist
Complete the following:
• BIOL 1015
General Biology Laboratory
• CHEM 1215 Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory
• CHEM 1225 Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory
• CHEM 2310 Organic Chemistry I
• CHEM 2315 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
• CHEM 2325 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory
• CHEM 2320 Organic Chemistry II
• PHYS 2010 College Physics I
• PHYS 2015
College Physics I Lab
• MATH 1210 Calculus I
• MATH 2040 Principles of Statistics
• CJ 3500
Footwear Impression Evidence
or CJ 3520
Tire Imprint Evidence (3.0)
• CJ 3540
Forensic Trace Analysis I
• CJ 3700
Fingerprint Examination I
• CJ 3820
Crime Scene Investigation Techniques I
• CJ 382L
Crime Scene Investigation Techniques Laboratory I
• CJ 3860
Forensic Microscopy
• ART 2450
Digital Imaging
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
4.0
1.0
1.0
4.0
4.0
1.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
1.0
3.0
3.0
21 Credits
Complete 12 credits from the following courses:
12.0
• CJ 3500
Footwear Impression Evidence (3.0)
• CJ 3520
Tire Imprint Evidence (3.0)
• CJ 3550
Forensic Trace Analysis II (3.0)
• CJ 3720
Fingerprint Examination II (3.0)
• CJ 3740
Fingerprint Examination III (3.0)
• CJ 3780
Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (3.0)
• CJ 3800
Computer Forensics and Cyber
Crime (3.0)
• CJ 3850
Marijuana Identification Certificate (3.0)
• CJ 4400
Forensic Chemist (3.0)
• CJ 440L
Forensic Chemist Laboratory (1.0)
• CJ 443R
Directed Research in Forensic Science (2.0)
• CJ 482R
Internship (2.0)
• CHEM 3000 Analytical Chemistry (4.0)
• CHEM 3600 Biological Chemistry (3.0)
• CHEM 3605 Biochemistry Laboratory (1.0)
• CHEM 3700 Forensic Chemistry (3.0)
• CHEM 4000 Instrumental Analysis (2.0)
• CHEM 4005 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (2.0)
• ENGL 4310 Advanced Technical Communication (3.0)
• GEO 3400 Forensic Geology (4.0)
9.0
Complete 9 credits of any courses 3000 or higher
Graduation Requirements:
Footnotes:
* Students will be required to complete the Business
Computer Proficiency exam with a score of 80 percent
or higher on each module or complete the DGM 2010
course or DGM 201A-D modules as necessary with a
score of 80 percent or highter on each module.
BS in Forensic Science
121 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
38 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2020
Introduction to Writing
3.0
Intermediate Writing--Science and
3.0
Technology
• MATH 1050 College Algebra
4.0
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
3.0
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness (2.0)
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life
2.0
Distribution Courses:
• BIOL 1010
General Biology
3.0
• CHEM 1210 Principles of Chemistry I
4.0
• CHEM 1220 Principles of Chemistry II
4.0
• COMM 1020 Public Speaking (Recommended
3.0
for Humanities Distribution)
Catalog 2007–2008
1 Completion of a minimum of 121 or more semester
credits.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above (departments may require a higher GPA).
3 Residency hours: minimum of 30 credit hours through
course attendance at UVSC, with at least 10 hours
earned in the last 45 hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements.
BS in Paralegal Studies
General Education Requirements:
120 C REDITS
35 Credits
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 2010
Introduction to Writing
3.0
Intermediate Writing--Humanities/
3.0
Social Sciences
or ENGL 2020 Intermediate Writing--Science and
Technology (3.0)
3.0
Complete one of the following:
• MATH 1030 Quantitative Reasoning (3.0)
• MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics (3.0)
• MATH 1050 College Algebra (4.0)
• One course that requires MATH 1050 as a prerequisite
(excluding MATH 1060)
• An Advanced Placement (AP) Mathematics Test with a
score of 3 or higher
Complete one of the following:
3.0
• HIST 2700
US History to 1877 (3.0)
and HIST 2710
US History since 1877 (3.0)
• HIST 1700
American Civilization (3.0)
• HIST 1740
US Economic History (3.0)
Utah Valley State
Legal Studies
• POLS 1000 American Heritage (3.0)
• POLS 1100 American National Government (3.0)
Complete the following:
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values
3.0
• HLTH 1100 Personal Health and Wellness
2.0
or PES 1097
Fitness for Life (2.0)
Distribution Courses
• Biology
3.0
• Physical Science
3.0
• Additional Biology or Physical Science
3.0
• Humanities Distribution
3.0
• Fine Arts Distribution
3.0
• Social/Behavioral Science
3.0
Discipline Core Requirements:
65 Credits
• DGM 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
3.0
• MGMT 2250 Job Application and Advancement
1.0
Skills
or MGMT 3890 Career Preparation (2.0)
• LEGL 1000 Law and the Paralegal
3.0
• LEGL 1110
Civil Litigation and Preparation
4.0
• LEGL 1220
Legal Research in the Library
3.0
• CJ 1330
Criminal Law
3.0
• LEGL 2190
Legal Ethics
2.0
• LEGL 2300 Computerized Legal Research
3.0
• CJ 2350
Laws of Evidence
3.0
• LEGL 2330 Computer Applications in Law
3.0
• LEGL 3000 Business Law
3.0
• LEGL 481R
Internship
1.0
• CJ 4160
Constitutional Rights and Respon3.0
sibilities
• SOC 3200
Race and Minority Relations
3.0
• LEGL 3320 Family Law
3.0
• LEGL 4130
Bankruptcy and Collections
3.0
• LEGL 4150
Probates and Estates
3.0
• LEGL 4160
Contract Law
3.0
Area of Specialization:
15.0
• Any LEGL course (Pre-approved by Advisor; 6 credit
hours must be upper-division courses; must be completed with a grade of “C+” or better)
Elective Requirements:
• LEGL 4160
Contract Law (3.0)
Graduation Requirements:
1 Overall grade point average of 2.5 in all School of
Business (LEGL) courses and no grade lower than a C+
in LEGL specialty core and elective courses.
See Course Descriptions section
of the catalog for detailed course
information. This department
manages the following course
prefixes:
Ă CJ, Criminal Justice
Ă LEGL, Legal Studies
19 Credits
• ELECTIVES (Pre-approved by Advisor; 9 credits
must be upper division courses)
19.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Completion of a minimum of 120 or more semester
credits with 40 semester credits from 3000 and 4000
level courses.
2 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above. Must
have a grade of (C+) or higher in all core and elective
requirements.
3 Residency hours-- minimum of 30 credit hours of
School of Business courses through course attendance
at UVSC, with at least 10 hours earned in the last 45
hours.
4 Completion of GE and specified departmental requirements. Students are responsible for completing all
prerequisite courses.
Minor in Criminal Justice
24 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
CJ 1010
CJ 1340
CJ 1330
CJ 2350
12 Credits
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Criminal Investigations
Criminal Law
Laws of Evidence
Elective Requirements:
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
12 Credits
• Complete 12 credits from any CJ upper-division
courses
12.0
Graduation Requirements:
1 Overall grade point average of 2.5 in all School of
Business (CJ) courses and no grade lower than a C- in
CJ specialty core and elective courses.
Minor in
Paralegal Studies
23 C REDITS
Matriculation Requirements:
1 Admitted to a bachelor degree program at UVSC.
Discipline Core Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
LEGL 1000
LEGL 1220
LEGL 2190
LEGL 2300
LEGL 3000
14 Credits
Law and the Paralegal
Legal Research in the Library
Legal Ethics
Computerized Legal Research
Business Law
Elective Requirements:
9 Credits
Choose 9 credits from the following:
• LEGL 3150
Survey of Dispute Resolution (3.0)
• LEGL 3320 Family Law (3.0)
• LEGL 3530 Employment and Labor Law (3.0)
• LEGL 3650 Torts and Personal Injury Law (3.0)
• LEGL 4130
Bankruptcy and Collections (3.0)
• LEGL 4150
Probates and Estates (3.0)
Utah Valley State
3.0
3.0
2.0
3.0
3.0
9.0
Catalog 2007–2008
183
Lineman Technology
Lineman
Technology
Department of Construction
Technologies
Department Chair: Steve Fordham
Office: GT 601
Telephone: 801-863-8167
Program Coordinator: Max Christofferson
Office: GB 242
Telephone: 801-863-7982
Faculty:
Associate Professor
Max Christofferson
Office Manager/Advisor: Jenny
Hoover
Office: GB 243
Telephone: 801-863-7980
Advisory Committee: David Atkinson,
Provo City Power; Brent Thomas, Bountiful
City Light; Steve Crosby, City of Logan;
Leon Fredrickson, Springville City Power;
Jim Brass, Keyrite; Byron Howells, Riter
Engineering; Ken White, Murray City.
voltage from 120 volts to 500 KV. They
may learn the techniques of live line
maintenance to maintain continuity of
service to the customer. They may be
involved in residential, commercial, and
industrial metering and may maintain and
calibrate the metering equipment.
Three options are available: Diploma,
Associate in Applied Science degree,
and the Bachelor of Science Degree in
Technology Management.
54 C REDITS
54 Credits
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2.0
4.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
4.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
5.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
1.0
Graduation Requirements:
Interim Dean: Ernest Carey
Office: CS 720
Telephone: 801-863-8321
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Today both men and women are training
for jobs in the electrical trades — power
generation, transmission, and distribution.
Technicians may work in different types of
jobs within the lineman trades. They may
work in generating plants, or within the
telecommunication industry, or installing
overhead and/or underground fiber optic
cables. They may be required to interpret
and use electrical and electronic test
equipment. They may work in substations
with large power transformers, relaying
equipment, voltage regulators, instrument
transformers, and oil circuit breakers.
They may perform duties as electrical
inspectors and consultants. They use blue
prints, wiring diagrams, schematics and
circuits of all types for troubleshooting,
repair, and maintenance or installation
of electrical components. They may be
required to work in power transmission
and distribution, installation and line
maintenance, and line equipment with
184
AAS in
Lineman Technology
BS in Technology
Management
124 C REDITS
The following Technical Area is available (see the Technology Management section of this catalog for complete
degree requirement listings.)
Specialization in
Lineman Technology
Emphasis Requirements:
•
•
•
•
•
LINE 1110
LINE 1120
LINE 1130
LINE 1140
LINE 1210
•
•
•
•
LINE 1220
LINE 1230
LINE 1240
LINE 2310
•
•
•
•
LINE 2320
LINE 2330
LINE 2340
LINE 2410
51 Credits
51 Credits
Lineman DC Theory and Lab
Residential Wiring
Lineman Applied DC Math
Basic Skill Development and Safety
AC Theory and Transformer Applications
Commercial Wiring
Lineman Applied AC Math
Single/Three-Phase Lines and Safety
Powerline Technician and Safety
Code I
Industrial Wiring
Single and Polyphase Metering
Three-Phase Lines and Safety
Powerline Technician and Safety
Code II
Substation Equipment
High Voltage Substation and Safety
4.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
4.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
4.0
2.0
2.0
5.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
LINEMAN APPRENTICESHIP
64 C REDITS
General Education Requirements:
16 Credits
ENGLISH
• ENGL 1010
• ENGL 1060
2.0
Introduction to Writing (3.0)
Career Writing for Technology*
(3.0)
• ENGL 106A Career Writing for Technology-A (2.0)
• MGMT 2200 Business Communications (3.0)
2.0
MATHEMATICS
• LINE 1130
Lineman Applied DC Math (3.0)*
• MAT 1010
Intermediate Algebra (4.0)
• Any higher Mathematics Course
2.0
HUMANITIES/FINE ARTS/FOREIGN LANGUAGE
• PHIL 2050
Ethics and Values (highly recommended) (3.0)
• Any approved Humanities, Fine Arts, or Foreign Language Distribution Course
2.0
SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
• MGMT 3000 Organizational Behavior (3.0)
• Any approved Behavioral Science, Social, or Political
Science Distribution Course
2.0
BIOLOGY OR PHYSICAL SCIENCE
• EGDT 1810 Principles of Technology (2.0)
• Any approved Biology or Physical Science Distribution
Course
PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH/SAFETY OR ENVI1.0
RONMENT
• Any approved Physical Education, Health, Safety or
Environment Course
5.0
ADDITIONAL CREDITS FROM ANY OF THE ABOVE
Discipline Core Requirements:
4.0
4.0
Graduation Requirements:
• LINE 2430
• LINE 2440
1 Overall grade point average of 2.0 (C) or above.
(Departments may require a higher GPA.)
School of Technology and
Computing
• LINE 2430
• LINE 2440
2.0
2.0
5.0
4.0
* ENGL 1060, LINE 1130, and LINE 1230 do not meet
the General Education requirements for an AS/AA.
Discipline Core Requirements:
Career Writing for Technology--A
Lineman DC Theory and Lab
Residential Wiring
Lineman Applied DC Math
Basic Skill Development and Safety
AC Theory and Transformer Applications
LINE 1220
Commercial Wiring
LINE 1230
Lineman Applied AC Math
LINE 1240
Single/Three-Phase Lines and Safety
LINE 2310
Powerline Technician and Safety
Code I
LINE 2320
Industrial Wiring
LINE 2330
Single and Polyphase Metering
LINE 2340
Three-Phase Lines and Safety
LINE 2410
Powerline Technician and Safety
Code II
LINE 2430
Substation Equipment
LINE 2440
High Voltage Substation and Safety
Social/Behavioral Science
LINE 2320
LINE 2330
LINE 2340
LINE 2410
4.0
Foo