7015_Models_R30,_R40,_and_R50_CPU_Enclosure_Ope..

7015_Models_R30,_R40,_and_R50_CPU_Enclosure_Ope..
7015 Models R30, R40, and R50
CPU Enclosure
Operator Guide
Third Edition (April 1997)
This edition notice applies to the 7015 Model R30, R40, and R50 CPU Enclosure Operator Guide.
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any country where such
provisions are inconsistent with local law: THIS PUBLICATION IS PRINTED “AS IS” WITHOUT
WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some
states do not allow disclaimer of express or implied warranties in certain transactions; therefore, this
statement may not apply to you.
This publication could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically made
to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. The
manufacturer may make improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or program(s) described in this
publication at any time, without notice.
It is possible that this publication may contain reference to, or information about, products (machines and
programs), programming, or services that are not announced in your country. Such references or information
must not be construed to mean that such products, programming, or services will be offered in your country.
Any reference to a licensed program in this publication is not intended to state or imply that you can use only
the licensed program indicated. You can use any functionally equivalent program instead.
AIX is a registered trademark of International Business Machines.
Medeco is a trademark of Medeco Company.
Micro Channel is a trademark of International Business Machines.
SystemGuard is a trademark of International Business Machines.
Velcro is a trademark of Velcro Industries.
Copyright International Business Machines Corporation, 1994, 1997. All rights reserved.
Note to US Government Users – Documentation and programs related to restricted rights – Use, duplication,
or disclosure is subject to the restrictions set forth in the GSA ADP Schedule Contract.
Table of Contents
Communications Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
vii
Safety Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xi
About This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xiii
Chapter 1. CPU Enclosure Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPU Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Front View with Bezel Door Closed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Front View with Bezel Door Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPU Enclosure with Connectors (Rear View) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
1-1
1-2
1-2
1-3
Chapter 2. Using the CPU Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Information about Multiple Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Operator Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operator Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Key Mode Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electronic Mode Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading the Operator Panel Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Reset/Scroll Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the 3.5-Inch Diskette Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the CD-ROM Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type B Bezel (CD-ROM and CD-ROM2) CD-ROM Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Type C Bezel CD-ROM Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the 1/4-Inch Internal Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Status Light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 1/4-Inch Tape Cartridges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Loading the 1/4-Inch Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unloading the 1/4-Inch Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cleaning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Information for 5.0GB 8 mm Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of 8 mm Tape Cartridges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tape Cartridge Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 8 mm Tape Cartridges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Considerations for 8 mm Data Cartridges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating in Harsh Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8 mm Data Cartridge Erasure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tape Cartridge Data Efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the 5.0GB 8 mm Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Status Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Loading the 8 mm Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unloading the 8 mm Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cleaning the Tape Path on the 5.0GB 8 mm Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
2-1
2-2
2-2
2-3
2-6
2-7
2-8
2-9
2-13
2-13
2-15
2-19
2-19
2-20
2-21
2-22
2-22
2-22
2-25
2-25
2-25
2-26
2-26
2-26
2-27
2-27
2-27
2-29
2-29
2-31
2-32
2-33
Preface
iii
iv
General Information for 4.0GB 4 mm Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of 4 mm Tape Cartridges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tape Cartridge Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 4 mm Tape Cartridges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Considerations for 4 mm Data Cartridges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating in Harsh Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4 mm Data Cartridge Erasure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tape Cartridge Data Capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the 4.0GB 4 mm Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Status Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Loading the 4 mm Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unloading the 4 mm Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cleaning the Tape Path on the 4.0GB 4 mm Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-34
2-35
2-35
2-36
2-36
2-36
2-37
2-37
2-37
2-38
2-38
2-40
2-41
2-42
Chapter 3. Using SystemGuard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Bring-Up MicroProcessor Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Operator Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Consoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical and Electronic Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Phases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stand-By Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Init Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boot Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Run-Time Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Parameters and Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with SystemGuard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display BUMP Error Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enable Service Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disable Service Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Boot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Off-Line Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Set National Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Some Common SystemGuard Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing SystemGuard For Your Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reloading the Flash EEPROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
3-1
3-2
3-2
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-4
3-4
3-4
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-9
3-10
3-11
3-21
3-22
3-25
3-25
3-25
3-25
3-25
3-26
3-28
3-32
3-38
3-39
3-58
3-60
Chapter 4. AC Rack Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AC Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AC Rack with CPU Enclosure (Front View) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-1
4-1
4-1
Operator Guide
AC Rack Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-2
AC Rack with External Device Container, Cable Channel, and Rack Attachment Plate 4-2
Power Distribution Bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-3
Cluster Power Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-4
Uninterruptible Power Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-5
Power Distribution Unit (Supported) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-6
System Unit Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-8
SCSI-2 Drawer (Supported) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-8
AC Rack Cables and the CPU Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-10
Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-10
Location Codes and Identification Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-13
Location Code Format for SCSI Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-13
Location Code Format for, 7135, 9333, and 9334 Expansion Units . . . . . . . . . . .
4-13
SCSI Drawer ID Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-14
SCSI Device Address Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-15
Cover Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-15
Creating Cover Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-16
Location Code Format for Non-SCSI Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-18
Non-SCSI Drawer ID Label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-18
Location Code Table for SCSI and Non-SCSI Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4-19
Chapter 5. Using the AC Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the AC Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Methods of Starting the AC Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stopping the AC Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stopping the AC Rack Containing a PDU – Under Ordinary Conditions . . . . . . .
Immediately Stopping the AC Rack Containing a PDU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stopping the AC Rack Containing a PDB – Under Ordinary Conditions . . . . . . .
Immediately Stopping the AC Rack Containing a PDB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-1
5-1
5-1
5-7
5-7
5-8
5-9
5-10
Chapter 6. Description – -48 V dc Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
-48 V dc Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Distribution Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Cable Paths and the CPU Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Location Codes and Identification Labels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-1
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-3
Chapter 7. Using the -48 V dc Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Key Mode Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the -48 V dc Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Methods of Starting the -48 V dc Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Manually Starting the -48 V dc Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stopping the -48 V dc Rack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stopping the -48 V dc Rack under Ordinary Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stopping the -48 V dc Rack Immediately . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-2
7-2
7-3
7-3
7-4
Chapter 8. Using the Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Programs Operating Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostics on a System Unit Attached to Another System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Console Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Identifying the Terminal Type to the AIX operating system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running Diagnostic Programs From Tape Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-1
8-1
8-1
8-1
8-1
8-2
Preface
v
Running the Diagnostic Programs from Disk or From a Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running the Diagnostic Programs from the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Running the Diagnostic Programs from a TTY Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Modes of Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintenance Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Concurrent Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Standalone Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Exerciser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPU and Memory Testing and Error Log Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reading a Flashing 888 Message on a Multi-Line Operator Panel Display . . . . . . .
Step 1. Determine the Type of Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 2. Reading the Type 102 Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crash Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dump Progress Indicators (Dump Status Codes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 3. Reading the Type 103 and 105 Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 4. Other Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8-2
8-2
8-3
8-7
8-7
8-8
8-9
8-10
8-11
8-12
8-12
8-12
8-13
8-13
8-14
8-14
Chapter 9. Introduction to Tasks and Service Aids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-1
Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-1
Run Diagnostics Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-2
Run Error Log Analysis Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-2
Display or Change Diagnostic Run Time Options Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-2
Process Supplemental Media Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-3
Service Aids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-3
AIX Shell Prompt Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-4
Backup/Restore Media Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-4
Bit Error Rate Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-4
BUMP (Bringup Micro–Processor) Service Aids (Display or Change BUMP Configuration
Task) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-4
Diagnostic Package Utility Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-5
Dials and LPFK Configuration Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-5
Dials and LPFKs Configuration Service Aid Before Version 4.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-5
Configure Dials and LPFKs Task Version 4.2+ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-5
Disk Based Diagnostic Update Service Aid and Update Disk Based Diagnostic Task
9-6
Disk Based Diagnostic Update Service Aid Before Version 4.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-6
Update Disk Based Diagnostic Task Version 4.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-6
Disk Maintenance Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-6
Disk to Disk Copy Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-6
Display/Alter Sector Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-7
Disk Media Service Aids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-7
Optical Disk Service Aids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-8
Diskette Media Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-9
Display/Alter Bootlist Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-9
Display or Change Configuration or Vital Product Data (VPD) Service Aid . . . . . . .
9-9
Display Vital Product Data (VPD) Service Aid and Display Hardware Vital Product Data
Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-9
Display Software Product Data Pre-version 4.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-9
Display Software Product Data Beginning with Version 4.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-10
Display Configuration Service Aid and Display Configuration and Resource List Task 9-10
Change Hardware Vital Product Data Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-10
vi
Operator Guide
Display and Change Diagnostic Test List Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display or Change Key Modes (Display or Change Electronic Mode Switch Task)
Display Previous Diagnostic Results Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Display Test Patterns Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generic Microcode Download Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Error Report Service Aid and Display Hardware Error Log Task . . . . . . .
Local Area Network Service Aid and Local Area Network Analyzer Task . . . . . . . . .
Microcode Download Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiprocessor Service Aid (Display or Change Multiprocessor Configuration Task)
Periodic Diagnostics Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Product Topology Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Bus Service Aid and SCSI Bus Analyzer Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SCSI Tape Utilities Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Service Aids for use with Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Service Hints Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SSA Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trace Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7318 Serial Communications Network Server Service Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9-10
9-11
9-11
9-11
9-11
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-13
9-13
9-13
9-14
9-14
9-15
9-15
9-15
9-16
Chapter 10. Using the System Verification Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 1. Considerations before Running This Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 2. Loading the Diagnostic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 3. Running System Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 4. Additional System Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Step 5. Stopping the Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10-1
10-1
10-2
10-2
10-3
10-3
Chapter 11. Hardware Problem Determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11-1
Appendix A. SystemGuard Test Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Test Groups Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Test Group Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BUMP Quick I/O Tests Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
JTAG Test Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Direct I/O Test Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPU Test Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DCB and Memory Test Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interrupt Tests Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CPU MultiProcessor Test Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-1
A-1
A-3
A-3
A-8
A-8
A-11
A-12
A-19
A-20
Appendix B. Modifying SystemGuard Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default Parameter Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Flags and Parameters Under AIX Service Aids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying Diagnostic Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying the Modem and Site Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Saving or Restoring Flags and Configuration Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying the Remote Authorization Flag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Stand-by Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Maintenance Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AIX Diag Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying the Dial-Out Authorization Flag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Maintenance Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-1
B-1
B-3
B-3
B-3
B-3
B-3
B-3
B-4
B-4
B-4
B-4
Preface
vii
viii
AIX Diag Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying Dial-In Phone Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Maintenance Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AIX Diag Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying Dial-Out Phone Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Maintenance Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AIX Diag Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying the Electronic Mode Switch from Service Line Flag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SystemGuard Maintenance Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AIX Diag Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reloading the Flash EEPROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reloading the Flash EEPROM (stand-by phase) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reloading the Flash EEPROM (run-time phase) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B-4
B-5
B-5
B-5
B-5
B-5
B-5
B-6
B-6
B-6
B-7
B-7
B-7
B-7
Appendix C. SystemGuard Remote Operation Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terminal Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Flags and Parameters Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modem Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Initializing a Modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Testing Dial-Out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-1
C-1
C-2
C-4
C-6
C-6
Appendix D: Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ordering Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Reorder Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-1
D-2
D-3
Appendix E. Operator Panel Display Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-On (PON) Test Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power-On Self-Test (POST) Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuration Program Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Load Progress Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E-1
E-1
E-3
E-6
E-12
Appendix F. System Power States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MAIN_STANDBY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SBB_GATEWAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SBB_ECMD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SBB_PCMD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SBB_MENU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WAIT_POWER_ON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IPL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WAIT_REBUILDING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Turn System Power On from the BUMP Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Turn System Power On Using the Power-on Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F-1
F-1
F-1
F-1
F-2
F-2
F-2
F-2
F-3
F-3
F-3
F-3
F-4
Glossary: Special Terms Used in SystemGuard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
X-1
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
X-3
Operator Guide
Communications Statements
The following statement applies to this product. The statement for other products intended
for use with this product appears in their accompanying manuals.
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Statement
Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is
operated in a commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can
radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the
instruction manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications.
Operation of this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful
interference in which case the user will be required to correct the interference at his
own expense.
Properly shielded and grounded cables and connectors must be used in order to meet FCC
emission limits. Neither the provider nor the manufacturer are responsible for any radio or
television interference caused by using other than recommended cables and connectors or
by unauthorized changes or modifications to this equipment. Unauthorized changes or
modifications could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following
two conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must
accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired
operation.
United Kingdom Telecommunications Safety Requirements
This equipment is manufactured to the International Safety Standard EN60950 and as such
is approved in the UK under the General Approval Number NS/G/1234/J/100003 for indirect
connection to the public telecommunication network.
The network adapter interfaces housed within this equipment are approved separately, each
one having its own independent approval number. These interface adapters, supplied by the
manufacturer, do not use or contain excessive voltages. An excessive voltage is one which
exceeds 70.7 V peak ac or 120 V dc. They interface with this equipment using Safe Extra
Low Voltages only. In order to maintain the separate (independent) approval of the
manufacturer’s adapters, it is essential that other optional cards, not supplied by the
manufacturer, do not use main voltages or any other excessive voltages. Seek advice from a
competent engineer before installing other adapters not supplied by the manufacturer.
European Union (EU) Statement
This product is in conformity with the protection requirements of EU Council Directive
89/336/EEC on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to
electromagnetic compatibility.
Neither the provider nor the manufacturer can accept responsibility for any failure to satisfy
the protection requirements resulting from a non-recommended modification of the product,
including the fitting of option cards not supplied by the manufacturer.
This product has been tested and found to comply with the limits for Class A Information
Technology Equipment according to CISPR 22 / European Standard EN 55022. The limits
Preface
ix
for Class A equipment were derived for commercial and industrial environments to provide
reasonable protection against interference with licensed communication equipment.
Attention: This is a Class A product. In a domestic environment this product may cause
radio interference in which case the user may be required to take adequate measures.
International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Statement
This product has been designed and built to comply with IEC Standard 950.
Avis de conformité aux normes du ministère des Communications du
Canada
Cet appareil numérique de la classe A respecte toutes les exigences du Réglement sur le
matériel brouilleur du Canada.
Canadian Department of Communications Compliance Statement
This Class A digital apparatus meets the requirements of the Canadian
Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations.
VCCI Statement
The following is a summary of the VCCI Japanese statement in the box above.
This equipment is in the Class 1 category (information equipment to be used in
commercial and/or industrial areas) and conforms to the standards set by the Voluntary Control Council For Interference by Data Processing Equipment and Electronic Office Machines aimed at preventing radio interference in commercial and/
or industrial areas.
Consequently, when used in a residential area or in an adjacent area thereto, radio
interference may be caused to radios and TV receivers, etc.
Read the instructions for correct handling. VCCI–1.
x
Operator Guide
Radio Protection for Germany
Dieses Gerät ist berechtigt in Übereinstimmung mit dem deutschen EMVG vom 9.Nov.92
das EG-Konformitätszeichen zu führen.
Der Aussteller der Konformitätserklärung ist die IBM Germany.
Dieses Gerät erfüllt die Bedingungen der EN 55022 Klasse A. Für diese Klasse von Geräten
gilt folgende Bestimmung nach dem EMVG:
Geräte dürfen an Orten, für die sie nicht ausreichend entstört sind, nur mit besonderer
Genehmigung des Bundesministers für Post und Telekommunikation oder des Bundesamtes
für Post und Telekommunikation betrieben werden. Die Genehmigung wird erteilt, wenn
keine elektromagnetischen Störungen zu erwarten sind.
(Auszug aus dem EMVG vom 9.Nov.92, Para.3, Abs.4)
Hinweis:
Dieses Genehmigungsverfahren ist von der Deutschen Bundespost noch nicht veröffentlicht
worden.
Preface
xi
xii
Operator Guide
Safety Notices
Note: For a translation of these notices see the System Unit Safety Information, form
number SA23-2652.
Definitions of Safety Notices
A danger notice indicates the presence of a hazard that has the potential of causing death
or serious personal injury.
Danger notices appear on the following pages:
4-11
7-1
A caution notice indicates the presence of a hazard that has the potential of causing
moderate or minor personal injury.
Caution notices appear on the following pages:
2-13
2-15
4-3
4-6
4-7
4-11
5-3
5-5
7-1
An attention notice indicates an action that could cause damage to a program, device,
system, or data.
Preface
xiii
Laser Safety Information
The optical drive in this system unit is a laser product. The optical drive has a label that
identifies its classification. The label, located on the drive, is shown below.
CLASS 1 LASER PRODUCT
LASER KLASSE 1
LUOKAN 1 LASERLAITE
APPAREIL A LASER DE CLASSE 1
TO IEC 825:1984 CENELEC EN 60 825:1991
The optical drive in this system unit is certified in the U.S. to conform to the requirements of
the Department of Health and Human Services 21 Code of Federal Regulations (DHHS 21
CFR) Subchapter J for Class 1 laser products. Elsewhere, the drive is certified to conform to
the requirements of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 825 (1st edition
1984) and CENELEC EN 60 825:1991 for Class 1 laser products.
CAUTION:
A class 3 laser is contained in the device. Do not attempt to operate the drive while it
is disassembled. Do not attempt to open the covers of the drive as it is not
serviceable and is to be replaced as a unit.
Class 1 laser products are not considered to be hazardous. The optical drive contains
internally a Class 3B gallium-arsenide laser that is nominally 30 milliwatts at 830
nanometers. The design incorporates a combination of enclosures, electronics, and
redundant interlocks such that there is no exposure to laser radiation above a Class 1 level
during normal operation, user maintenance, or servicing conditions.
xiv
Operator Guide
About This Book
This book provides information about the operator controls and the devices installed in the
7015 system unit.
Definition of Machine Names and Model Numbers
The models of CPU Enclosures referred to in this book are the 7015 Model R30, R40, and
R50. References to CPU Enclosures in this book apply to the 7015 Models R30, R40, or
R50 CPU Enclosures.
Note: This publication is used with a system containing the 7015 CPU Enclosure, or any
system that is upgraded from a system containing the 7015 CPU Drawer or
Enclosure to a Model R30, R40, or R50 CPU Enclosure.
ISO 9000
ISO 9000 registered quality systems were used in the development and manufacturing of
this product.
Related Publications
The 7015 Model R30, R40, and R50 CPU Enclosure Installation and Service Guide, form
number SA23-2743, provides installation and maintenance information for the CPU
enclosure.
The 7015 Model R00 Rack Installation and Service Guide, form number SA23-2744,
provides installation and maintenance information for the rack.
The AIX System Management Guide: Operating System and Devices manual, form number
SC23-2525, contains information about using the operating system with options and
devices.
The AIX Problem Solving Guide and Reference (form number SC23-2606), is the first book
you should use when you have a problem with the system unit. It contains procedures for
determining if the problem is hardware or software related.
The 9348 Customer Information manual, form number SA21-9567, contains operating and
cleaning instructions for the tape unit.
The Site and Hardware Planning Information manual, form number SA38-0508, provides
information for planning the installation of a RISC System/6000.
The Adapters, Devices, and Cable Information manual, form number SA23-2764, contains
information to indentify adapters, service some devices, and design or service some cable
layouts.
The System Unit Safety Information manual, form number SA23-2652, contains translations
of danger and caution notices.
Preface
xv
Chapter 1. CPU Enclosure Description
This chapter contains information about system unit features, parts, and devices on the
7015 Model R30, R40, or R50 CPU Enclosures.
CPU Enclosure
The 7015 CPU Enclosures are rack-mounted CPUs containing a CPU module, I/O module,
media module, and a power supply with a possible optional second power supply.
The CPU module is located in the front half of the CPU enclosure and contains CPU cards,
memory cards, and an I/O card.
The media module is located above the CPU module at the front of the CPU enclosure and
contains a disk drive, CD-ROM drive, an optional media position for either a 5.0GB 8 mm
tape drive, 4GB 4 mm tape drive, 1/4-inch tape drive, or another CD-ROM drive, and an
operator panel assembly containing a 3.5-inch diskette drive. The R50 Media Module has a
position for an optional second disk drive.
The I/O module is located in the rear half of the CPU enclosure and contains two I/O planars
containing a total of 16 Micro Channel adapter slots. The power supply and optional second
power supply position are located above the adapter positions.
A system interface board (SIB) is located next to the I/O module and contains an RS485 port
(in) an RS485 port (out), a Battery Backup Unit (BBU) connector, parallel port, serial port 1,
serial port 2, and serial port 3.
The CPU Enclosure can be installed in a 7015 Model R00 rack with other optional
compatible drawers and devices such as disk drive drawers and SCSI media drawers. The
power distribution system in a 7015 Model R00 rack can contain either a power distribution
bus, power distribution unit, or a battery backup unit. For information about options and
compatible optional drawers that can be used with the 7015 Model R30 CPU Enclosure in a
7015 Model R00 rack, see the Adapters, Devices, and Cable Information manual, form
number SA23-2764.
Description
1-1
Front View with Bezel Door Closed
Bezel Door
(Closed Position)
Front View with Bezel Door Open
Optional
Media
Position
1-2
Operator Guide
CD-ROM Drive
Operator
Panel
3.5-Inch
Diskette
Drive
CPU Enclosure with Connectors (Rear View)
Battery
Backup Unit
Connector
RS485 (In)
RS485 (Out)
Parallel
Port
Serial
Port 1
Serial
Port 2
Serial
Port 3
1/1
1/3
1/2
1/5
1/4
1/7
1/6
Adapter Locations
0/1
1/8
0/3
0/2
0/5
0/4
0/7
0/6
0/8
Adapter Locations
Description
1-3
1-4
Operator Guide
Chapter 2. Using the CPU Enclosure
This chapter contains information about using the CPU Enclosure and using devices
installed in the CPU Enclosure.
For information about using a -48 V dc system unit, refer to Chapter 6.
General Information about Multiple Systems
If your system is attached to another system, certain actions performed by an operator can
affect either one or both systems, and these actions may require further consideration
before any changes are made to either system. Some actions requiring further consideration
are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
Starting and stopping the communications with the other systems
Running diagnostics on one of the systems
Analyzing the error log information
Installing adapters or devices on any of the systems
Using the wrap plugs with the diagnostics
When this system unit is attached to another system, make sure you isolate this system unit
before stopping the operating system or running diagnostic programs. Some system cable
changes (such as installing wrap plugs or removing a device from the configuration) may
require the operator to perform an action on the attached system before making the cable
changes on this system.
Using the CPU Enclosure
2-1
The Operator Panel
The operator panel is located behind the front bezel door. To access the operator panel,
rotate the top of the front bezel door downward.
The operator panel is controlled by the CPU and a special microprocessor located on the I/O
card, called SystemGuard.
Operator Controls
Power
Light
Power
Button
3.5-Inch Diskette Drive
In-Use Light
3.5-Inch
Diskette Drive
Diskette
Eject
Button
Normal
Secure
Service
Reset/Scroll Button
Operator Panel Display
Key Mode Switch
Power Button
Used to switch the power to the system on or off
Power Light
Green LED: When lit, indicates all voltages in the power supply
are present and within specified limits and all fans are running.
The power-on light is also used to help analyze power and
cooling problems.
Reset/Scroll Button
Used to reset the system unit, depending on the position of the
key mode switch. Also used to scroll the messages on the
Operator Panel Display.
Operator Panel Display Displays status indication of the system
2-2
Key Mode Switch
Is a switch with three positions labeled:
Diskette Drive
Receives 3.5-inch diskettes
Operator Guide
,
, and
.
Setting the Key Mode Switch
The key mode switch has three positions:
•
•
•
– Normal
– Secure
– Service
The switch is used to establish the initial program load (IPL) path. The IPL loads the system
programs, checks the system hardware, and prepares the system for user operation.
Before starting the system unit for normal day-to-day operation, set the key mode switch to
the Normal (
) position. This permits the operating system to load after the power-on
self-tests (POSTs) are completed.
This system has an electronic mode switch feature. This feature allows the operator to
change the IPL mode from the SystemGuard console or system console without changing
the physical key mode switch. This function is controlled by flags (permissions). The
functions of the electronic mode switch are the same as the physical key mode switch. Refer
to “Physical and Electronic Key” on page 3-4.
Note: It is possible to set the Electronic Mode Switch (E-Key) through SystemGuard
firmware from the local or remote SystemGuard BUMP console. In Normal mode an
electronic key may be used to set Normal, Secure and Service modes. For remote
maintenance, see “Electronic Mode Switch” page 3-4. In Secure and Service
modes, the physical key setting prevails.
Operator Panel
Normal
Secure
Service
Key Mode Switch
Using the CPU Enclosure
2-3
The following table summarizes the operations possible for each key mode position for the
CPU enclosure.
Operation
Key Mode Switch Position
Normal
Secure
Service
Reset/Scroll Key
Enabled
Disabled
Enabled
SystemGuard Console
Active
Enabled
Enabled
Enabled
SystemGuard Console
Debug/Dump
Disabled
Disabled
Enabled
Normal IPL
Enabled
Disabled
Disabled
Service IPL
Disabled
Disabled
Enabled
Note: The name SystemGuard Console refers to the Local Console connected to the S1
port on the system interface board (SIB), and the name Remote Console refers to
the Service Console connected to the S2 port on the system interface board.
Note: Refer to AIX Version 3.2.5 System Management Guide: Operating System and
Devices (form number SC23-2525) and other operating system documentation for
information about the shutdown command and stopping the system unit.
• The Normal position ( OK ):
The Normal position is used for attended operation, which is the usual or normal
placement of the key mode switch when an operator is present and in control of the
operation at the system unit. The Reset/Scroll button is active when the switch is in the
Normal position. The IPL proceeds according to the Normal Mode Bootlist.
Note: If an operating system (software) is not installed, use the Service position for initial
installation.
Attention: Pressing the Reset button when performing a reset via the remote reset port
or when the key mode switch is in the Normal position can cause data to be damaged or
lost if the operating system is running. See “Using the Reset/Scroll Button” on page 2-8
for a description of the Reset button operation.
The system unit can automatically restart if the key mode switch is in the Normal
position. When primary power is restored after a loss of power, the system unit
automatically starts again.
2-4
Operator Guide
• The Secure position (
):
The Secure position prevents the system from doing an IPL. If the operating system is
already loaded, this position does not lock the system console or block system network
communication.
When loading the operating system with the Key Mode Switch in the Secure Position a
200 is displayed. If the Reset/Scroll button is pressed at this point the system resets and
goes through another boot process until a 200 is displayed again.
When the operating system is running, turning the key to the Secure position disables the
Reset/Scroll button. With the key mode switch in this position, a passerby cannot
accidentally press the Reset/Scroll button and cause a loss of data.
The Secure position prevents an autoboot in case of a system crash or checkstop
condition.
• The Service position (
):
Attention: The Reset/Scroll button is active when the key mode switch is in the Service
position. Pressing the Reset button can cause data to be damaged or lost if the operating
system is running.
The Service position is used for attended operation when hardware or software service is
performed. The Service position activates operating system console sequences that
support error determination (debug) and storage printout (dump). In the Service position,
the system unit attempts to IPL from the media drive. The IPL proceeds according to the
Service Mode Bootlist.
The key mode switch is also used for the following:
• To indicate to the diagnostic programs that there is no console available. This is done by
changing the key from Service to Normal and then back to Service when a c31 is
displayed on the operator panel display.
• To start a dump: If the system is running in Normal mode, a manual dump is started with
the key set to Service and pressing the Reset/Scroll button. If the system is running with
the key set to the Service mode, a dump is started by setting the key to Normal and
pressing the Reset/Scroll button.
If there is a problem with the system unit, refer to the AIX Version 4 Problem Solving Guide
and Reference before setting the key mode switch to the Service position or before pressing
the Reset/Scroll button.
Attention: Do not set the key mode switch from Normal (OK) to Service while the system is
booting. Instead, wait until the boot is completed and then change the mode switch setting.
Using the CPU Enclosure
2-5
Electronic Mode Switch
The electronic mode switch (E-key) enables you to remotely change the status of the key
mode switch and:
• places the system for maintenance or debug purpose from a remote location, from
Normal to Service mode, without a person physically being present near the system to
change the key mode switch position,
• assists remote access and service of a customer installed machine from a central
customer hub (CH) or IBM service center and to run off-line and online diagnostics from a
remote location to isolate a problem to the FRU level,
• activates from an enabled terminal (via a software command) the use of the maintenance
features on the remote line
• breaks a remote maintenance session by the service people, if some intrusion attempt is
suspected
• prevents non-authorized access to the system setting the system in Secure mode.
The Electronic Mode Switch has validity only when the operator panel key mode switch is
set to the Normal position. It is able to electronically move the position of the ”key mode
switch” on the operator panel in the following way:
Key Mode
Switch
Electronic
Mode Switch
Status of the System (*)
Normal
Normal
Normal
Service
Service
Secure
Secure
Secure
Set to any mode
Secure
Service
Set to any mode
Service
Note: (*) The status of the system matters only during IPL and in off-line maintenance
mode; once the Operating System is up and running, the key mode status is relavent
only for maintenance application software and diagnostic aids.
The following functions of the key mode switch cannot be performed remotely by setting the
E-Key:
• Indicate to the diagnostic program that no console is available
• Start a manual dump.
See the AIX Version 4 System Management Guide: Communications and Networks and the
keycfg command for detailed information on the electronic mode switch.
Setting the Electronic Mode Switch (E-Key)
See “How to Set the Electronic Key” on page 3-39 for information about setting the
electronic key mode switch.
2-6
Operator Guide
Reading the Operator Panel Display
Attention: If you have a flashing 888 in the Operator Panel Display, do not push the
Reset/Scroll button before you carefully read the related documentation.
The operator panel display has two 16-position rows.
The operator panel display is used for:
• Event indications and problem reporting during Power-On-Self-Test (POST) and
Configuration Methods.
• Progress and command indications when loading diagnostics.
• Event indications during diagnostics when a Console-Display is not available.
• Problem reporting during diagnostics when a Console-Display is not available.
• Check stop indications when the machine cannot recover from a check stop.
• Crash reporting when the machine cannot recover from a crash.
• Dump progress and command indications during dump.
• Problem reporting when there is a power problem.
During POST, the numbers that are displayed indicate the progress of the testing. If an error
is detected that requires attention, the system unit stops, and a flashing 888 is displayed in
the operator panel display to identify the error. If this occurs, refer to the AIX Version 4
Problem Solving Guide and Reference manual.
When the self-tests and configuration methods complete without error, the operator panel
display is blank.
Operator Panel
Operator Panel Display
Using the CPU Enclosure
2-7
Using the Reset/Scroll Button
Attention: When the key mode switch is in the Normal or Service position, pressing the
Reset/Scroll button causes the unit to reset and do an initial program load (IPL). Pressing
the Reset/Scroll button while the operating system is running can result in damaged or lost
data.
The Reset/Scroll button is used to:
• Reset the system unit and cause an IPL when the mode switch is set to Normal or
Service.
• Read out messages (scroll) after a flashing 888 is displayed.
• Start the dump program when a manual dump is needed.
• Sequentially read system configuration in Stand-By Mode and with the key mode switch
in Service position.
Pushing the Reset button once causes an incomplete reset and the system may not restart.
Therefore it is recommended that you push it twice for a complete reset.
When the mode switch is in the Secure position, the Reset/Scroll button is disabled, and you
cannot perform an IPL by pushing the Reset/Scroll button.
Operator Panel
Reset/Scroll Button
2-8
Operator Guide
Using the 3.5-Inch Diskette Drive
The diskette drive is located to the right of the CD-ROM drive on the CPU Enclosure. The
In-Use light is on when the system is accessing the drive.
Do not stop the system unit or remove a diskette when the In Use light is on, or you may
lose some of the data on the diskette.
Note: Stopping the system unit or removing a diskette when the in-use light is on may
cause loss of data on the diskette.
Operator Panel
In-Use Light
3.5-Inch
Diskette Drive
Diskette
Unload
Button
In-Use Light
On when the system is accessing the 3.5-inch diskette drive.
Diskette Unload Button Used to unload the diskette from the drive.
Handling Your Diskettes
Be careful with your diskettes. Because each piece of information occupies such a small
area on the diskette, small scratches, dust, food, or tobacco particles can make the
information unusable. Be sure to remember the following:
• Do not touch the recording surfaces.
• Keep diskettes away from magnets and magnetic field sources such as telephones,
dictation equipment, and electronic calculators.
• Keep diskettes away from extreme heat and cold. The recommended temperature range
is 10 to 60°C (50 to 140°F).
• Proper care helps prevent loss of information.
• Make backup copies of your diskettes regularly.
Using the CPU Enclosure
2-9
Types of 3.5-Inch Diskettes
Attention: Diskette drives and diskettes must be the correct type to store data successfully.
If you use the wrong diskette in your 3.5-inch diskette drive, the data on the diskette could
be destroyed. Some computers operate with 720K-byte diskette drives (no printing on the
diskette-unload button) and use only 1M-byte capacity diskettes. If you are going to be
transferring work between computers that have different diskette drives, be certain the
diskettes are compatible. For more information, refer to your operating system manual.
The diskette drive uses the following 3.5-inch diskettes:
• 1.0MB capacity (stores approximately 720KB of data)
• 2.0MB capacity (stores approximately 1.44MB of data).
Refer to Appendix A for the diskette part numbers.
A 1MB diskette looks like this:
May Be Labeled 2HC
Sliding Metal Shutter
Write-Protect Slot
A 2MB diskette looks like this:
Sliding Metal Shutter
May Be Labeled HD
Write-Protect Slot
Rectangular Cutout
2-10
Operator Guide
Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 3.5-Inch Diskettes
Setting the write-protect tab on a diskette is necessary so that information is not accidentally
lost. When the write-protect tab is set (slot open) on a diskette, information can be read from
the diskette but cannot be written to it.
There is a write-protect tab on the 3.5-inch diskette.
To locate the write-protect tab, turn the diskette over with the label facing down.
• To prevent writing to a diskette, slide the write-protect tab to open the slot.
Diskette with Write-Protect Tab Set
Rear View
(Slot Open)
Write-Protect Tab
• To allow writing to a diskette, slide the write-protect tab to close the slot.
Diskette with Write-Protect Tab Not Set
Rear View
(Slot Closed)
Write-Protect Tab
Using the CPU Enclosure
2-11
Loading and Unloading the 3.5-Inch Diskette
To load a diskette into the drive, first insert the diskette into the 3.5-inch diskette drive with
the labeled metal shutter facing upward and the beveled corner facing to your right and
away from you.
Push the diskette into the drive until you hear a click. The click indicates that the diskette is
securely in the drive.
Labeled Metal Shutter
Diskette
Operator Panel
To unload the diskette, push the diskette unload button. The diskette ejects partially so you
can pull it out of the drive.
Diskette Unload Button
Operator Panel
2-12
Operator Guide
Using the CD-ROM Drive
The CD-ROM drive position is located in the top media position to the left of the operator
panel.
Type B Bezel (CD-ROM and CD-ROM2) CD-ROM Drive
Note: For a translation of this notice, see System Unit Safety Information.
CAUTION:
A Class 3 laser is contained in the device. Do not attempt to operate the device while
it is disassembled. Do not attempt to open the covers of the device, as it is not
serviceable and is to be replaced as a unit.
Type B Bezel (CD-ROM and CD-ROM2):
Unload Button
Status Light
Disc Caddy
Opening
Volume Control
Headphone Jack
The front panel of the drive has an unload button, status light, volume control, headphone
jack, and a disc caddy opening.
When the CD-ROM is set to On, the status light indicates one of several conditions. The
following are status light states and the respective conditions of the CD-ROM drive:
• Off during standby with the caddy loaded or unloaded.
• Blinks when the caddy is inserted and until completion of initialization.
• Blinks slowly when either the lens or disc is dusty (lens should be cleaned by running the
cleaning device).
• Blinks fast when in the audio mode.
• Lights during data transfer operations.
• Lights steady when:
– No disc is in the caddy.
– The disc is in the caddy upside down.
– Some condition exists that should be checked. If this occurs, contact your service
representative.
Using the CPU Enclosure
2-13
Loading the CD-ROM Disc Caddy
Note: The disc caddy is not compatible with the Type C bezel CD-ROM drive.
The CD-ROM media kit contains a CD-ROM diagnostic disc and a disc caddy.
Open the disc caddy and place the CD-ROM disc in the caddy with the printed side up.
Hinged Cover
CD-ROM Disc
(Printed Side Up)
Loading Arrow
Disc Caddy
Insert the disc caddy into the disc caddy opening with the loading arrow towards the
CD-ROM drive and the printed side of the disc up. Push gently on the caddy. The drive
automatically pulls the caddy into the drive and prepares the disc for reading.
Disc Caddy Opening
Disc Caddy
Unloading the CD-ROM Disc Caddy
Push and hold the unload button until the caddy unloads. The CD-ROM drive partially ejects
the caddy from the drive opening. Pull the caddy out of the drive.
Note: The unload button must be pushed and held for a minimum of 2 seconds before the
caddy unloads.
Disc Caddy
Unload Button
If the disc caddy cannot unload and has to be removed manually from the drive, contact
your service representative.
Cleaning the CD-ROM Drive
The CD-ROM drive has an internal cleaning mechanism and does not require an external
lens cleaning device.
2-14
Operator Guide
Type C Bezel CD-ROM Drive
Note: For a translation of this notice, see System Unit Safety Information.
CAUTION:
A Class 3 laser is contained in the device. Do not attempt to operate the device while
it is disassembled. Do not attempt to open the covers of the device, as it is not
serviceable and is to be replaced as a unit.
Type C Bezel
Unload Button
Emergency Eject Hole
Status Light
Disc Loading Door
Volume Control
Headphone Jack
The front panel of the drive has an unload button, status light, volume control, headphone
jack, and a disc loading door.
When the CD-ROM is set to On, the status light indicates one of several conditions. The
following are status light states and the respective conditions of the CD-ROM drive:
• Off during standby.
• Blinks until completion of initialization.
• Blinks slowly when either the lens or disc is dusty (lens should be cleaned by running the
cleaning device).
• Blinks fast when in the audio mode.
• Lights during data transfer operations.
• Lights steady when:
– No disc is in the drive.
– The disc is in the drive upside down.
– Some condition exists that should be checked. If this occurs, contact your service
representative.
Using the CPU Enclosure
2-15
Loading the CD-ROM Drive
Notes:
The disc caddy is not compatible with the Type C bezel CD-ROM drive.
Always handle discs by the edges to avoid leaving fingerprints. Discs can be wiped
with a soft, lint-free cloth or lens tissue. Always wipe in a straight line from the inner
hub to the outer rim.
1. Press the unload button to open the loading drawer.
Unload Button
Disc Drawer
2. With the printed side facing upward, place the disc in the disc drawer. Push gently on the
front of the disc drawer. The drive automatically pulls the disc drawer into the drive and
prepares the disc for reading.
Disc Tray
CD-ROM Disc
(Printed Side Up)
Disc Drawer
2-16
Operator Guide
Unloading the CD-ROM Drive
Note: Always handle discs by the edges to avoid leaving fingerprints. Discs can be wiped
with a soft, lint-free cloth or lens tissue. Always wipe in a straight line from the inner
hub to the outer rim.
1. Push and hold the unload button until the disc drawer comes out. The drive partially
ejects the disc drawer. Pull the disc drawer out until it stops.
Note: The unload button must be pushed and held for a minimum of two seconds before
the disc drawer is partially ejected.
Unload Button
Disc Drawer
2. Wait until the disc drawer ejects out of the drive and stops, and then remove the
CD-ROM disc.
CD-ROM Disc
Disc Drawer
If the disc cannot unload and has to be removed manually from the drive, refer to
“Emergency Eject” on page 2-18. If the disc still does not unload after trying the emergency
eject procedure, contact your service representative.
Using the CPU Enclosure
2-17
Emergency Eject
Note: Execute the following procedure only when the disc drawer does not eject after the
unload button is pressed.
1. Power-off the CD-ROM drive.
2. Insert a straight metal small-diameter rod such as a straightened paper clip into the
emergency eject hole as shown in the figure.
3. Pull the disc drawer out.
Unload Button
Straight Small-Diameter Metal Rod
Eject Hole
Disc Drawer
Cleaning the CD-ROM Drive
The CD-ROM drive has an internal cleaning mechanism and does not require an external
lens cleaning device. The internal cleaning mechanism cleans the head every time a disc is
inserted into the disc drawer.
2-18
Operator Guide
Using the 1/4-Inch Internal Tape Drive
The 1.2 G-byte or the 150 MB 1/4-inch tape drive, if present, is an optional device in the
CPU Enclosure and is located in the bottom media position to the left of the operator panel.
1.2GB Tape Drive
Blue Unload Button
Status Light
Front Panel
150MB Tape Drive
Unload Button
Status Light
Front Panel
Status Light
The status light has no color when it is off. When the status light is on, it may be either green
or red. The colors indicate the status of the drive as follows:
• Green
The green light is on when the drive is in normal operation.
• Amber
Tape-off-spool condition (1.2GB only).
• Red
The red light is on when there is a problem with the drive.
Note: If the red light is on and you cannot solve the problem, see the AIX Problem
Solving Guide and Reference.
• Off
The light is off when the drive is waiting in standby mode.
Using the CPU-Media Enclosure
2-19
Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 1/4-Inch Tape Cartridges
Setting the write-protect tab on a tape cartridge is necessary so that information is not
accidentally lost. When the write-protect tab of a tape cartridge is set (pointing to SAFE),
information can be read from the tape but cannot be written to it.
The write-protect tab positions for a typical tape cartridge are shown in the following
illustration. Use a small screwdriver to turn the arrow to the desired position. The arrow must
be pointing in one of the two directions shown in the illustration.
Not Set
QIC 150
(Point away from SAFE)
QIC 1000
(Point away from lock)
SAFE
Set
QIC 150
(Point to SAFE)
QIC 1000
(Point to lock)
SAFE
Write-Protect Tab Settings
2-20
Operator Guide
Loading the 1/4-Inch Tape Cartridge
A diagram inside the drive opening shows how to load a tape. To load a tape cartridge, push
the unload button. When the button is pushed, the front panel of the drive partially opens
toward the front of the system unit.
Drive Opening
Unload Button
Status Light
Front Panel
Pull the front panel open all the way to the flat position, where it stays without having to be
held open.
Drive Opening
Front Panel
Insert the cartridge into the drive opening as shown in the following illustration. Gently push
the cartridge into the drive opening until the cartridge stops.
Drive Opening
Close the front panel until you hear an audible click.
Unload Button
Status Light
Front Panel
The drive loads the tape from the cartridge and prepares it for reading and writing.
Once a tape cartridge has been inserted and the front panel closed, the tape automatically
rewinds to the beginning.
Using the CPU-Media Enclosure
2-21
Unloading the 1/4-Inch Tape Cartridge
To unload the cartridge, use the same procedure you used for loading except pull the
cartridge from the drive opening.
1. Push the unload button.
2. Pull the front panel open (flat).
3. Pull the tape cartridge out of the drive.
4. Push the front panel closed.
Cleaning
Refer to Appendix A for the 1/4-inch-tape-drive cleaning-kit part number.
Clean the recording head of the tape drive after the first 2 hours of tape movement when
you are using new tape cartridges. If you are using QIC-1000 cartridges and the cartridges
are not new, clean the recording head after every 8 hours of tape movement. If you are
using QIC-150 or QIC-525 cartridges and the cartridges are not new, clean the recording
head after every 12 hours of tape movement.
Use the instructions and materials provided in the cleaning kit to ensure proper operation of
the tape drive.
Media
Environment Considerations for 1/4-Inch Tape Cartridges
Information in this section describes operating and storage conditions including temperature,
relative humidity, and maximum wet bulb data.
Attention: The manufacturer has specified a set of temperature and humidity ranges in
which the 1/4-inch data cartridge can operate with ease. Only regular cleaning procedures
are required when operating the cartridge within this range. The risk of possible data loss is
increased if 1/4-inch tape cartridges are operated, stored, or shipped outside the
temperature or humidity ranges shown in the following table.
Before using a cartridge, always let it adjust (acclimate) to the operating environment. Do
this by placing the cartridge with its container in the operating environment for as long as it
has been away from this environment or for 24 hours, whichever is less.
Acclimation is necessary for any data cartridge that has been exposed to a different humidity
environment or a temperature change of 11°C or 20°F, or more.
Environment Operating Ranges
2-22
Operating Ranges
Non operating Ranges
Temperature Requirements
16° to 32°C (60 to 90°F)
10° to 43° C (50° to
110°F)
Relative Humidity Requirements
(Non condensing)
20% to 80%
20% to 80%
Maximum Wet Bulb Limits
23°C (73°F)
27° C (80°F)
Operator Guide
Retensioning
The tape drive works best when it is operated as a streaming tape. If the tape cartridge has
been operated in the streaming mode, it is not necessary to re-tension the tape. If the tape
is used in a non-streaming mode (many start and stop operations), re-tension the tape after
approximately every 30 minutes.
If the tape drive is on when a tape cartridge is inserted, the drive immediately re-tensions
the tape; this is the default setting. Operating system commands may be used to change
this default setting. Refer to the operating system commands manual for your system for
more information.
Tape Cartridge Compatibility
The 1/4-inch tape drive is a medium-capacity small computer system interface (SCSI) tape
drive. This drive is compatible with existing 1/4-inch streaming tape subsystems, which use
the Quarter-Inch Cartridge Drive Standards, Inc. (QIC) formats.
Refer to Appendix A for the tape cartridge part numbers.
If tape cartridges other than the 1/4-inch tape cartridges listed in Appendix A are used, they
must meet the proposed ANSI X3B5/84-59 “Unrecorded Magnetic Tape Cartridge for
Information Exchange” standard.
Note: Although the preceding ANSI standard allows three different tape lengths––47
meters (155 feet), 189 meters (620 feet), and 311 meters (1020 feet)––the 7207
Tape Drive is designed to be used only with the 189 meters (620 feet) tape length.
The exception is the test tape, and it is supported only for diagnostic use.
Tape Cartridge
Standard
7201–001 or
150MB Internal
Tape Drive
7201–011
7201–012 or
1.2GB Internal
Tape Drive
OEM1 Drives
QIC-24
Read-Only
Read-Only
Read-Only
Read/Write
QIC-120
Read/Write
Read/Write
Read/Write
Read/Write
QIC-150
Read/Write
Read/Write
Read/Write
Read/Write
Read/Write
Read/Write
Read/Write
Read/Write
Read/Write
QIC-525
QIC-1000
Notes:
1. Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) – QIC compliance.
2. Supports error correction code (ECC) error recovery.
Using the CPU-Media Enclosure
2-23
Tape Cartridge Data Efficiency
Note: For maximum efficiency, operate the 1/4-inch tape drive in the streaming mode
whenever possible.
The 1/4-inch tape cartridge efficiency is defined as the amount of data that can be stored on
the cartridge and the data rate at which the data can be read from the tape cartridge. When
in use, the tape in the cartridge is moved at a constant speed. The speed for the QIC-150 is
72 inches per second. The speed for the QIC-1000 is 80 inches per second. The following
variables affect the amount of data that can be stored on a tape cartridge:
• Streaming mode or non-streaming mode
• Size of the data file
• Number of file marks per file
• Tape length
• Variable post/preamble
• Compatibility mode (QIC-120/QIC-150/QIC-525/QIC-1000)
2-24
Operator Guide
General Information for 5.0GB 8 mm Tape Drive
Note: The 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive, if present, is an optional device in the CPU Enclosure
and is located in the bottom media position to the left of the operator panel.
Recommendations
• Use only data grade 8 mm tape cartridges. These cartridges are identified by either a
“Data,” “D,” or “D8” marking on the data cartridge. Use of video-grade cartridges can
damage the 8 mm tape drive and can void the warranty of your 8 mm tape drive.
• Remove the tape cartridge from the tape drive when it is not in use, and store the
cartridge in the cartridge case.
• Do not open the door on the data tape cartridge. This door covers and protects the
magnetic tape material from dirt, dust, and damage.
• Avoid touching the tape since this can cause loss of data.
• Back up and then discard any tape cartridge that repeatedly produces error messages.
The error information is in the system error log.
• Clean the tape path regularly according to the cleaning procedure of the 8-mm tape drive.
Use only recommended cleaning cartridges; other cleaning cartridges can permanently
damage your 8 mm tape drive.
Attention: Do not use video-grade cartridges in the 8 mm tape drive. Video grade tapes
may be unreliable and may cause permanent damage to the 8-mm tape drive.
Types of 8 mm Tape Cartridges
Refer to Appendix A for tape cartridge part numbers.
• Test Tape Cartridge: This is a specially labeled tape cartridge that is in the media kit with
the 8 mm tape drive. Use this cartridge only when checking the operation of the drive or
running diagnostics; do not use it to save programs or data.
• Data Tape Cartridge: This is an unlabeled blank tape cartridge that is in the media kit.
Use this cartridge for saving your programs or data. The same data tape cartridge can be
used in a 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive.
• Cleaning Tape Cartridge: Use this cartridge for cleaning the 8 mm tape path. For more
information, see “Cleaning the Tape Path on the 5.0GB 8 mm Tape Drive” on page 2-33.
Using the CPU-Media Enclosure
2-25
Tape Cartridge Compatibility
The 8 mm tape drive is compatible with existing 8-mm tape subsystems that comply with the
American National Standard (ANSI) X3B5/89–136, Helical-scan Digital Computer Tape
Cartridge, 8 mm for Information Exchange. Data compression effectively increases the
cartridge capacity and data transfer rate for the 5.0GB tape cartridges.
Format Mode (C = compression mode)
8 mm Tape Drive
5.0GB
5.0GB (C)
5.0GB
Read/Write
Read/Write
Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 8 mm Tape Cartridges
Setting the write-protect tab on a tape cartridge is necessary so that information is not
accidentally lost. When the write-protect tab of a tape cartridge is set (window closed),
information can be read from the tape but cannot be written to it.
The window on the tape cartridge controls write-protection.
Write-Protect Tab Not Set
Window
Opened
Write-Protect Tab Set
Window
Closed
Environmental Considerations for 8 mm Data Cartridges
Information in this section describes operating and storage conditions including temperature,
relative humidity, and maximum wet bulb data.
Attention: The manufacturer has specified a set of temperature and humidity ranges in
which the 8 mm data cartridge can operate with ease. Only regular cleaning procedures are
required when operating the cartridge within this range. The risk of possible data loss is
increased if 8 mm tape cartridges are operated, stored, or shipped outside the temperature
or humidity ranges shown in the following table.
Before using a cartridge, always let it adjust (acclimate) to the operating environment. Do
this by placing the cartridge with its container in the operating environment for as long as it
has been away from this environment or for 24 hours, whichever is less.
Acclimation is necessary for any data cartridge that has been exposed to a different humidity
environment or a temperature change equal to or greater than 11°C or 20°F.
Operating Ranges
Shipping
Temperature
16° to 32°C
(60° to 90°F)
5° to 32° C
(40° to 90°F)
Relative Humidity
(non-condensing)
20% to 80%
20% to 80%
20% to 80%
26°C (79°F)
26° C (79°F)
26° C (79°F)
Maximum Wet Bulb
2-26
Storage
Operator Guide
–40° to 52° C
(–40° to 125° F)
Operating in Harsh Environments
The 8-mm tape drive is ideally suited to streaming operations, as opposed to tape
movement operations involving multiple stop/starts and random searches. When the tape is
used for frequent stop and start operations, streaming movement is beneficial and should be
used whenever possible. This can be accomplished by ensuring that any save or restore
operation is the only active operation performed by a device connected to this SCSI I/O
controller.
Any tape that has been used outside the ranges specified in the table on this page for an
extended period of time (50 passes in 40 hours of nonstop operation) should not be used as
an archival tape. Exposure to the environment deteriorates the magnetic and physical
strength of the tape. Do not store important data on a tape that has been used outside the
specified ranges; transfer the data to a new tape for reliable archiving.
8 mm Data Cartridge Erasure
Most bulk eraser devices do not have the capability to erase 8-mm data cartridges. To
properly erase an 8 mm data cartridge with a bulk eraser device, the erasure rating must be
at least 1500 oersted.
The 5.0GB 8 mm tape drives erase residual data before writing new data on the data tape.
Tape Cartridge Data Efficiency
The 8 mm tape cartridge efficiency is defined as the amount of data that can be stored on
the cartridge. The following variables affect the amount of data that can be stored on a tape
cartridge:
• Size of the data file
• Number of file marks per file
• File mark size used
• Compatibility mode (5.0GB )
• Media rewrites
The effects of some of these variables are listed in the charts on the following page.
Using the CPU-Media Enclosure
2-27
8 mm Media Capacity vs File Size
5.0GB Mode
Media Capacity (Times 10E9)
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
0.0
1G
100M
10M
1M
100K
10K
Average Data File Size
(One filemark per data file)
Short Filemark
2-28
Operator Guide
Long Filemark
1K
Using the 5.0GB 8 mm Tape Drive
The 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive, if present, is an optional device in the CPU Enclosure and is
located in the bottom media position to the left of the operator panel.
Status Lights
The 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive has two green status lights and one amber status light. The
on/off combinations of the status lights indicate the conditions of the 8 mm tape drive.
Each of the ISO symbols located next to a status light indicates a specific condition of the
tape drive as follows:
Disturbance (amber status light)
Ready (green status light)
Busy (green status light)
Unload Button
Drive Door
Using the CPU-Media Enclosure
2-29
Status Light States
The following table explains the meaning of the green and amber status lights.
Status Lights on the 5.0GB 8 mm Tape Drive
Status Lights
State
On
Status
The power-on self-test (POST) is running, or the
system sent a Reset signal to the 8-mm tape drive.
On
On
Off
Off
Off
Off
Off
One of the following has occurred:
• The power is off.
• The POST has completed successfully, but no
tape cartridge has been inserted.
A tape cartridge is inserted, and the 8-mm tape
drive is performing a tape load/unload operation.
Flashing
Off
On
A tape cartridge has been inserted and the 8-mm
tape drive is ready to receive commands from the
system.
Off
Off
On
The tape is in motion and the 8-mm tape drive is
busy running a device operation.
Flashing
Flashing
Off
The 8-mm tape drive has detected an internal fault
that requires corrective action. If this occurs, see
the following note.
Off
On
or
or
Legend:
Off or On
The tape path requires cleaning. Refer to “Cleaning
the Tape Path on the 5.0GB 8-mm Tape Drive” on
page 2-33.
Off or Flashing
Disturbance
Ready
On
Off
Busy
Flashing
Note: If a fault or an error condition occurs, first try to recover by pressing the unload
button. If this does not correct the fault or error condition, switch off the power to the
8 mm tape drive and then switch on the power to the drive. If the condition continues,
call your service representative.
2-30
Operator Guide
Loading the 8 mm Tape Cartridge
Before loading the tape cartridge, make sure the power is on and the write-protect switch on
the tape cartridge is properly set. Refer to “Setting the Write-Protect Tab” on page 2-26. The
tape drive loads the tape from the cartridge and prepares it for reading and writing.
To load the 8 mm tape cartridge, do the following:
1. Grasp the edges of the 8-mm tape cartridge with the write-protect switch towards you
and the window side of the cartridge towards your left.
2. Slide the tape cartridge into the opening on the front of the 8 mm tape drive until the
loading mechanism pulls the cartridge into the drive and the drive door closes. The ready
status light (green) goes on if the load operation was successful.
Window Side of
Tape Cartridge
Ready Status Light
(Green)
8 mm Tape Cartridge
Write-Protect Switch
The 8 mm tape drive is ready for data operations when the tape cartridge is inserted into the
8-mm tape drive. After the cartridge is inserted into the tape drive, the tape takes about 25
seconds to load; this does not interfere with beginning the data operations.
Commands can be entered while the tape is loading. Any commands to the tape drive start
running once the tape has finished loading. Commands not requiring the tape cartridge run
immediately.
Using the CPU-Media Enclosure
2-31
Unloading the 8 mm Tape Cartridge
Before performing the unload operation, make sure the power to the 8 mm tape drive is on.
To unload and eject the tape cartridge, press the unload button. The 8 mm tape drive
rewinds the tape and then ejects the tape cartridge from the tape drive.
After pressing the unload button, the following will occur:
1. The ready
status light goes off.
2. The busy
status light flashs during the unload operation.
3. The busy
status light goes off when the cartridge is ejected from the tape drive.
Unload Button
8 mm Tape
Cartridge
Ready Status Light
(Green)
Write-Protect Switch
Busy Status Light
(Green)
The time required for a tape to rewind and unload is between 18 seconds and 3 minutes,
depending on the position of the tape when the unload button is pushed.
If the tape cartridge cannot unload and has to be removed manually from the drive, contact
your service representative.
2-32
Operator Guide
Cleaning the Tape Path on the 5.0GB 8 mm Tape Drive
Attention: Do not use video cleaning cartridges in the 8 mm tape drive. Video cleaning
cartridges can damage the 8-mm tape drive. Some video cleaning cartridges are extremely
abrasive. A 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive may be permanently damaged after only a few cleaning
operations using an abrasive-type cleaning cartridge.
The 8-mm tape path should be cleaned either approximately every 30 hours of tape motion
or once a month, whichever occurs first. The 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive counts the number of
hours of tape motion and indicates when the tape path requires cleaning when the lighted
disturbance status light (amber) is on.
More frequent cleaning may be required if the drive is operated in a dusty environment or in
humid conditions. If the dust is allowed to accumulate, the drive has to perform more reads
and writes. This can cause data loss and may be prevented by regularly scheduled cleaning
of the drive.
The cleaning cartridge cleans the 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive 12 times before it needs to be
discarded. If you attempt to use an 8-mm cleaning cartridge more than 12 times, the tape
drive automatically detects the error and ejects the cleaning cartridge with the disturbance
status light (amber) remaining on.
Before loading the cleaning cartridge, make sure the power to the 8-mm tape drive is on.
To load the 8-mm cleaning cartridge, do the following:
1. Grasp the edges of the 8 mm cleaning cartridge with the window side of the cartridge on
your left.
2. Slide the cleaning cartridge into the opening on the front of the 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive
until the loading mechanism pulls the cartridge into the drive.
Window Side of
Cleaning Cartridge
8 mm Cleaning Cartridge
Disturbance Status Light
(Amber)
After the 8 mm cleaning cartridge has been fully inserted into the 8-mm tape drive, the
following cleaning operations are performed automatically:
1. The cleaning tape is loaded into the tape path.
2. The drive is cleaned by moving the cleaning tape forward for approximately 2 minutes.
3. The tape is unloaded, and the cleaning cartridge is ejected from the tape drive when the
cleaning operation is complete.
4. A successful cleaning operation is indicated when the disturbance status light (amber)
goes off.
Using the CPU-Media Enclosure
2-33
General Information for 4.0GB 4 mm Tape Drive
The 4.0GB 4 mm tape drive, if present, is an optional device in the CPU Enclosure and is
located in the bottom media position to the left of the operator panel.
The 4.0GB 4 mm tape drive is an internal streaming tape drive that is used to:
• Save and restore system data files.
• Archive important records.
• Distribute operating system software upgrades.
The 4 mm tape drive can be attached to any system using a single-ended interface meeting
the Small Computer System Interface ll (SCSI-ll) Standard ANSI X3.131-199X Rev. 10h.
The 4 mm tape drive has the following features:
• Capacity of 4.0GB per cartridge. 8 GB is typical with data compression and with DDS2
data cartridges.
The actual capacity per cartridge varies depending on the application and the type of data
cartridge being used.
• Data transfer rate is 400 KBps. 800 KBps is typical with data compression.
Note: Data compression activated is the default setting from the factory. Data
compression is usually controlled by the application software.
• Read and write of DDS llll tape cartridges in 2.0GB per cartridge format.
• A status light that indicates when it is time to clean the tape path.
• Internal diagnostics that are activated when the 4 mm Diagnostic Cartridge is inserted
and loaded into the drive.
• Media recognition system: only data grade media can be used with this tape drive.
The 4 mm tape drive uses a 4 mm data cartridge for saving and restoring your system data.
The 4 mm tape drive is designed to use only 4 mm Digital Data Storage (DDS) cartridges.
These cartridges are identified by the DDS symbols (shown below) somewhere on the data
cartridge.
Digital
Data
Storage
Digital
Data
Storage
2-34
Operator Guide
Recommendations
Attention: Tape cartridges that do not carry the proper DDS symbol cannot be written to
and their use will cause the 4 mm tape drive to report an error.
• Use only 4 mm Digital Data Storage (DDS) cartridges.
Attention: Use of other than recommended cleaning cartridges can damage your tape drive
and will void the drive warranty.
• Clean the tape path by using the recommended cleaning cartridge. Follow the instructions
on the cartridge.
• Back up and then discard any tape cartridge that repeatedly produces error messages.
The error information is in the system error log.
• Do not open the door on the data cartridge that covers the tape. This door protects the
magnetic tape material from dirt, dust, and damage.
• Do not operate in a dusty environment.
• Do not touch the tape material. Any substance transferred to the tape by touching it could
cause loss of data.
Types of 4 mm Tape Cartridges
The 4 mm tape drive is shipped with three 4 mm cartridges to help start your tape
operations immediately. Refer to Appendix A for tape cartridge part numbers.
4 mm Data Cartridge:
Use this non-labeled cartridge for saving or restoring your
programs or data. Additional data cartridges can be ordered.
4 mm Diagnostic Cartridge:
Use this specially labeled cartridge to perform diagnostics on
the drive. Do not use it to save or restore programs or data.
Cleaning Cartridge:
Use this cartridge for cleaning the 4 mm tape path. For more
information, see “Cleaning the Tape Path on the 4.0GB 4 mm
Tape Drive” on page 2-42.
Using the CPU-Media Enclosure
2-35
Tape Cartridge Compatibility
The 4 mm tape drive is compatible with existing 4 mm tape subsystems that are designed to
operate with Digital Data Storage approved media, which meet the following standards:
• For DDS llll
– American National Standard (ANSI) standard, X3.203-191, Helical-scan Digital
Computer Tape Cartridge, 3.81mm.
– European Computer Manufacturers Association (EMCA) standard, EMCA-150,
3.81mm Wide Magnetic Tape Cartridge and DDS llll format.
• For DDS2
– European Computer Manufacturers Association (EMCA) standard, EMCA/TC17/93/20,
3.81mm Wide Magnetic Tape Cartridge for Information Interchange Helical Scan
Recording, DDS2 format.
Because the drive reconfigures itself automatically depending on the media type installed,
the density setting of the drive cannot be changed.
Media Type
Device Configuration
DDS
Read-only
DDS llll
Read/write in 2.0GB mode only.
DDS2
Read in either density; write in 4.0GB mode only.
Non-DDS
Not supported. The cartridge ejects.
Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 4 mm Tape Cartridges
The window on the tape cartridge controls write-protection. When the write-protect tab of a
tape cartridge is set (window open), information can be read from the tape, but cannot be
written to it. When the write-protect tab of a tape cartridge is not set (window closed),
information can be both written to and read from the tape. Trying to write to a 4 mm data
cartridge with the window open causes an error.
Write-Protect Tab Not Set
Window
Closed
Write-Protect Tab Set
Window
Opened
Environmental Considerations for 4 mm Data Cartridges
Information in this section describes operating and storage conditions including temperature,
relative humidity, and maximum wet bulb data.
Attention: The manufacturer has specified a set of temperature and humidity ranges in
which the 4 mm data cartridge can operate with ease. Only regular cleaning procedures, as
described in “Cleaning the Tape Path on the 4.0GB 4 mm Tape Drive” on page 2-42, are
required when operating the cartridge within this range. The risk of possible data loss is
2-36
Operator Guide
increased if 4 mm tape cartridges are operated, stored, or shipped outside the temperature
or humidity ranges shown in the following table.
Before using a cartridge, always let it adjust (acclimate) to the operating environment. Do
this by placing the cartridge with its container in the operating environment for as long as it
has been away from this environment or for 24 hours, whichever is less.
Acclimation is necessary for any data cartridge that has been exposed to a different humidity
environment or a temperature change of 11°C or 20°F or more.
Temperature
Relative Humidity
(non-condensing)
Maximum Wet Bulb
Operating Ranges
Storage
Shipping
16°C to 32°C
(60°F to 90°F)
5°C to 32°C
(40°F to 90°F)
–40°C to 52°C
(–40°F to 125°F)
20 to 80%
20 to 80%
5 to 80%
26°C (79°F)
26°C (79°F)
26° C (79°F)
Operating in Harsh Environments
The 4 mm tape drive is ideally suited to streaming operations, as opposed to tape
movement operations involving multiple stop/starts and random searches. When the tape is
used for frequent stop and start operations, streaming movement is beneficial and should be
used whenever possible. This can be accomplished by ensuring that any save or restore
operation is the only active operation performed by a device connected to this SCSI I/O
controller.
Any tape that has been used outside the ranges specified in the previous table for an
extended period of time (50 passes in 40 hours of nonstop operation) should not be used as
an archival tape. Exposure to the environment deteriorates the magnetic and physical
strength of the tape. Do not store important data on a tape that has been used outside the
specified ranges; transfer the data to a new tape for reliable archiving.
4 mm Data Cartridge Erasure
Most bulk eraser devices do not have the capability to erase 4 mm data cartridges. To
properly erase an 4 mm data cartridge with a bulk eraser device, the erasure rating must be
at least 2000 oersted.
The 4 mm tape drive erases residual data before writing new data on the data tape.
Tape Cartridge Data Capacity
The 4 mm tape cartridge capacity is defined as the amount of data that can be stored on the
cartridge. The following variables affect the amount of data that can be stored on a tape
cartridge:
• Size of the data file
• Number of file marks per file
• Compatibility mode (2GB or 4GB)
• Media rewrites
Using the CPU-Media Enclosure
2-37
Using the 4.0GB 4 mm Tape Drive
The 4.0GB 4 mm tape drive, if present, is an optional device in the CPU Enclosure and is
located in the bottom media position to the left of the operator panel.
Status Lights
The 4.0GB 4 mm tape drive has two green status lights and one amber status light. The on
and off combinations of the status lights indicate the conditions of the 4 mm tape drive.
Each of the International Organization for Standards (ISO) symbols located next to a status
light indicates a specific condition of the tape drive as follows:
Ready (green status light)
Read-Write (green status light)
Disturbance (amber status light)
Drive Door
Unload Button
Status Lights
Green
Green
Amber
Status Light States
The following tables explain the meaning of the green and amber status lights.
Ready
(green)
2-38
Off
No cartridge installed
or fault condition
Steady
Cartridge installed or
loading/unloading
Flashing
Power-on self-test
in progress
Operator Guide
Read-Write
(green)
No cartridge or
no activity
Disturbance
(amber)
No fault condition
Cleaning required
or worn media
Cartridge activity
Fault condition
Status Lights on the 4.0GB 4 mm Tape Drive
Status
Ready
(green)
LED test.
Read-Write
(green)
On 2 seconds On 2 seconds
at power on
at power on
The power-on self-test (POST) is running or
the Diagnostic Cartridge is running.
Flashing
Disturbance
(amber)
On 2 seconds
at power on
Off
Off
One of the following has occurred:
• The power is off.
• The POST has completed successfully,
but no tape cartridge has been loaded.
Off
Off
Off
A tape cartridge has been inserted and
the 4 mm tape drive is ready to receive
commands from the system.
On
Off
Off
On
Flashing
Off
Off
Off
Off
or
Off
or
The tape is in motion and the 4 mm tape drive
is running a device operation or cleaning.
The 4 mm tape drive has detected an internal
fault that requires corrective action such as tape
cartridge failure, high humidity, or no SCSI
terminator. Refer to the service guide or contact
your service representative. (See note below)
The tape path requires cleaning or a poor
quality tape cartridge is being used. See
“Cleaning the Tape Path on the 4.0GB 4 mm
Tape Drive” on page 2-42.
On
Flashing
On
Flashing
Note: If a fault or an error condition occurs, first try to recover by pressing the unload
button. If this does not correct the fault, switch off the power to the 4 mm tape
drive and then switch on the power to the drive. If the condition continues, call
your service representative.
Using the CPU-Media Enclosure
2-39
Loading the 4 mm Tape Cartridge
Before loading the tape cartridge, make sure the power is on and the write-protect switch on
the tape cartridge is properly set. Refer to “Setting the Write-Protect Tab on 4 mm Tape
Cartridges” on page 2-36. The tape drive loads the tape from the cartridge and prepares it
for reading and writing.
To load the 4 mm tape cartridge, do the following:
1. Grasp the edges of the 4 mm tape cartridge with the write-protect tab towards you and
the window side of the cartridge facing up.
2. Slide the tape cartridge into the opening on the front of the 4 mm tape drive until the
loading mechanism pulls the cartridge into the drive and the drive door closes. The ready
status light (green) goes on if the load operation was successful.
Window Side of
Tape Cartridge
Ready Status Light
(Green)
4 mm Tape Cartridge
Write-Protect Tab
Unload Button
The 4 mm tape drive is ready for data operations when the tape cartridge is inserted. After
the cartridge is inserted into the tape drive, the tape takes about 15 seconds to load.
2-40
Operator Guide
Unloading the 4 mm Tape Cartridge
Before performing the unload operation, make sure the power to the 4 mm tape drive is on.
To unload and eject the tape cartridge, press the unload button. The 4 mm tape drive
rewinds the tape and then ejects the tape cartridge from the tape drive.
After pressing the unload button, the following occurs:
1. The Read-Write
status light flashes during the unload operation.
2. The Ready status light and the Read-Write
is ejected from the tape drive.
status light turns off when the cartridge
4 mm Tape Cartridge
Write-Protect Tab
Ready Status Light
(Green)
Unload Button
Read-Write Status Light
(Green)
The time required for a tape to rewind and unload is between 10 seconds and 1.5 minutes,
depending on the position of the tape when the unload button is pushed.
Using the CPU-Media Enclosure
2-41
Cleaning the Tape Path on the 4.0GB 4 mm Tape Drive
The 4 mm tape path should be cleaned either approximately every 30 hours of tape motion
or once a month, whichever occurs first. The 4 mm tape drive monitors the recording quality
of the tape cartridge and indicates that the tape path requires cleaning when the disturbance
status light (amber) is on.
More frequent cleaning may be required if the drive is operated in a dusty environment or in
humid conditions. If the dust is allowed to accumulate, the drive has to perform more reads
and writes. This can cause data loss, and may be prevented by regularly scheduled cleaning
of the drive.
The cleaning cartridge cleans the 4 mm tape drive 50 times before it needs to be discarded.
If you attempt to use a 4 mm cleaning cartridge more than 50 times, the tape drive
automatically detects the error and ejects the cleaning cartridge with the disturbance status
light (amber) remaining on.
Before loading the cleaning cartridge, make sure the power to the 4 mm tape drive is on.
To load the 4 mm cleaning cartridge, do the following:
1. Grasp the edges of the 4 mm cleaning cartridge with the window side of the cartridge
facing up.
2. Slide the cleaning cartridge into the opening on the front of the 4 mm tape drive until the
loading mechanism pulls the cartridge into the drive.
Window Side of
Cleaning Cartridge
Disturbance Status Light
(Amber)
4 mm Cleaning Cartridge
Unload Button
After the 4 mm cleaning cartridge has been fully inserted into the 4 mm tape drive, the
following cleaning operations are performed automatically:
1. The cleaning tape is loaded into the tape path.
2. The drive is cleaned by moving the cleaning tape forward for approximately 30 seconds.
3. The tape is unloaded and the cleaning cartridge is ejected from the tape drive when the
cleaning operation is complete.
4. A successful cleaning operation is indicated when the disturbance status light (amber)
goes off (if it was activated before the cleaning operation).
2-42
Operator Guide
Chapter 3. Using SystemGuard
This chapter introduces the SystemGuard service processor which is included in all
Symmetric Multiprocessor models.
Introduction
SMP servers include a service processor, called SystemGuard, as a standard feature.
SystemGuard continually monitors the hardware as well as the operating system. If, for
instance, a CPU fails, the system detects this, reboots itself automatically and runs the
built-in diagnostics on the hardware. If the CPU is detected as bad during the initial program
load (IPL) or reIPL, the CPU is disabled. Likewise, if memory is detected as bad during IPL
or reIPL, it is disabled.
SystemGuard allows diagnostics and maintenance to be performed either locally or
remotely. The SystemGuard processor makes it possible for these remote systems to be
managed from a central location. SMP servers can even be set up to automatically call a
Service Center if they fail to boot successfully.
The main features of the SystemGuard are:
• Initialization process flow management
• Local as well as remote control of the system (turning power on or off, diagnostics,
reconfiguration, maintenance)
• Console mirroring to make remote actions visible and controllable by the customer
• Dial-out to a support center in case of system boot failure
• Run-Time surveillance
Using SystemGuard
3-1
SystemGuard Power
SystemGuard has its own DC power boundary. This means that even if the system power is
off (power button of the system in the off position), SystemGuard is still powered on, as long
as the CPU enclosure still still has power. This allows control of the system even though the
system is down. The only way to turn off the SystemGuard power is to remove the power
from the CPU enclosure. When starting the entire system, remember to start the expansion
cabinet first if one is connected.
A more detailed description of the system power states can be found in “Appendix G.
System Power States.”
SystemGuard Components
SystemGuard introduces new hardware and firmware components:
• a microprocessor called the Bring-Up MicroProcessor (BUMP)
• a Flash EEPROM
• a Backup EPROM that enables the system to boot in case of a Flash EEPROM failure.
Part of the SystemGuard firmware is stored in the BUMP EPROM; part is in the Flash
EEPROM. The Backup EPROM contains a subset of the Flash EEPROM .
SystemGuard Bring-Up MicroProcessor Overview
The SystemGuard Bring-Up MicroProcessor (BUMP) controls the system when the power is
off or the AIX operating system is stopped. System Guard performs the following:
• Controls the power-on (PON) tests, the power-on self tests (POST) and loading of the
AIX operating system.
• Responds to local or remote BUMP console commands to set the mode or set system
parameters.
• Runs the SystemGuard programs using the STANDBY MENU or the MAINTENANCE
MENU.
• Monitors the “heartbeat” from AIX, if the feature is enabled and AIX is running.
SystemGuard releases control of the system to the AIX operating system after it is loaded. If
the AIX operating system stops or is shutdown, SystemGuard again controls the system.
The BUMP console (attached to S1 port) provides the normal input. The service console
(attached to S2 port) provides remote service access to the BUMP. Access to both of these
consoles is controlled by flags.
3-2
Operator Guide
The Operator Panel
The Operator Panel is the first level of user interface to SystemGuard.
The Operator Panel has the following features:
Power button It should generally stay pushed in all the time if you want to be able to
power on or off the system remotely.
Reset button
It resets SystemGuard to the Init phase and, depending on the key position,
reboots the system to Maintenance or to AIX Multi-User.
LCD display
It is made of two rows of sixteen characters. It displays the word Stand-By
in the Stand-By phase, or it displays the usual three-digit boot up codes.
Physical Key
It uses the international symbols for Normal, Secure and Service modes.
This key should generally stay in the Normal position because the modes
can be changed electronically when the physical key is in the Normal
position.
Diskette Drive
Power Button
Normal
Secure
Power Light
Service
Reset/Scroll
Button
Operator Panel Display
Key Mode Switch
(Physical Key)
In the 7015 R30, R40, and R50 CPU Enclosures the I/O card contains the NVRAM while the
NVRAM battery and the TOD (Time-Of-Day) are located in the Operator Panel. You can
drain NVRAM in the following ways:
removing the I/O card
disconnecting the operator panel
removing the CPU module.
When NVRAM is drained it results in a reset of the TOD to 1969 which affects applications.
Draining NVRAM also causes a loss of configuration data.
Using SystemGuard
3-3
SystemGuard Consoles
SystemGuard works with two types of consoles:
• The Bump Console, which is an ASCII terminal attached to the S1 serial port. This
console provides the normal input to the BUMP. It can be local or remote. The line speed
for the BUMP console must be set to 9600 baud for either type of connection.
• The Service Console, which is an ASCII terminal attached to the S2 serial port. This
console is usually remote and located in a customer support center or a service support
center. This console enables the support center to work with SystemGuard and/or AIX.
The support center needs specific authorization from the customer to access
SystemGuard remotely.
Physical and Electronic Key
Normal, Secure, and Service modes can be set physically by turning the Physical Key or
electronically by executing the electronic key command. The Physical Key and the
Electronic Key together define a state called the System Key. The Electronic Key can only
be turned if the Physical Key is in Normal position. Refer to “How to Set the Electronic Key”
on page 3-39 for details on how to set the Electronic Key.
Following are various Electronic and Physical Key combinations and the resultant System
Key position:
Physical Key
Electronic Key
System Key
normal
normal
normal
normal
service
service
normal
secure
secure
secure
not valid
secure
service
not valid
service
SystemGuard Phases
During boot up, SMP servers go through five different phases: Stand-By, Init, Maintenance,
Boot, and Run-Time.
Stand-By Phase
The Stand-By phase is present anytime the system unit power is off, and the SystemGuard
power is on.
At this phase, the AIX operating system is not yet loaded; the system unit power is not on,
and the word Stand-By is displayed on the Operator Panel display.
The SystemGuard is active, and it can receive commands from the BUMP console or
Service Console (either local or remote). You can enter the SystemGuard Stand-by menu
from this phase.
The Stand-By phase ends when the power button on the Operator Panel is pressed or a
power-on command is entered on the BUMP Console or Service Console.
3-4
Operator Guide
Init Phase
Init phase is entered when the power button on the Operator Panel is pressed on or when
the power-on command is entered on the BUMP Console or Service Console.
If the System Key is in Normal mode, the BUMP runs the built-in or resident power-on
(PON)-tests on the CPU module hardware, IPLs on the first available processor, runs the
functional power on self-tests (POST) on the I/O subsystem to check the system, and finally
loads the AIX operating system.
If the System Key is in Service mode, and if several conditions are met, the system loads
the SystemGuard MAINTENANCE MENU. These conditions are: the Autoservice IPL flag
disabled, the BUMP console enabled, and a Valid Service Contract.
If the System Key is in Secure mode, the system enters the Stall state, and the LCD
displays the three-digit code 200. The initialization of the system stops until the Physical Key
is set to Normal or Service. The Stall state is exited, and control of the system is passed to
AIX.
Maintenance Phase
The maintenance phase is entered from the Init phase if the system key is in service mode.
If the BUMP console present flag is set, the MAINTENANCE MENU is displayed on the
BUMP console, and the system waits for an operator action. The maintenance menu
choices are described on page 3-21. Various maintenance tasks can be performed from this
menu. When maintenance tasks are complete, the system can be booted, powered down, or
reset.
Boot Phase
SystemGuard enters the Boot phase from either the Init phase or the Maintenance phase. In
this phase the system is initialized and control of the system is passed to the operating
system. Control of the two serial ports is switched to the operating system and the Run-Time
phase is entered. If a valid boot block is not found and the system key is set to Service,
SystemGuard returns to the Maintenance phase.
Run-Time Phase
This is the phase where the AIX operating system is in control of the system. The Run-Time
phase is entered once the AIX operating system is loaded and takes control of the consoles.
When AIX is stopped again, for example due to a shutdown, the system goes back to the
Stand-By phase.
Using SystemGuard
3-5
Phase Change (Stand-By to Init)
The phase change from Stand-By to Init is called Crossing the Power boundary. This is
achieved by pushing the power button on the Operator Panel or by typing the keyword
power at the Stand-By prompt (>). Note that if you type power while the power button is not
pushed in, nothing happens until you press the power button. In this case, the power
command has been taken into account by SystemGuard, and you don’t have to reenter it.
The power command is the default power on command sequence, which you can change
from the maintenance menu or AIX service aids.
SystemGuard, checks for a special downloadable diskette (if in Service mode), checks the
Flash EEPROM, and then produces an output. The following is an example of what appears:
BUMP FIRMWARE
– February 16, 1995
ID 07.01 – POWER_ON in EPROM
#
FLOPPY NOT READY!
DO YOU WANT TO UPDATE FLASH FROM LINE S2[y/n]? n
BUMP FIRMWARE
– May 19, 1995
ID xx.xx – POWER_ON in FLASH PROM
The message FLOPPY NOT READY! means that there is no specific downloadable diskette
in the diskette drive.
Note: This message is only displayed when IPLing in Service mode.
The special diskette could be:
• Code to be downloaded into Flash EPROM
• Code to change the VPD in the EEPROMs of the SMP system
3-6
Operator Guide
Power-on (PON) Tests
PON tests are run by SystemGuard whenever the system power comes on. There are two
types of tests:
• A comprehensive set of tests are performed on the processors, cache, memory and
related hardware when the Fast-IPL flag is disabled.
• A minimum core set of tests are performed on the processors, cache, memory and
related hardware during fast-IPL which cannot be turned off.
Following is an example of PON test output for the Fast-IPL type of test.
BUMP FIRMWARE
– February 16, 1995
ID 07.01 – POWER_ON in EPROM
BUMP FIRMWARE
– May 19, 1995
ID 07.04 – POWER_ON in FLASH PROM
– Low Interleaving –
Initial test on CPU 0 – * OK !
Initial test on CPU 1 – * OK !
Initial test on CPU 2 – * OK !
Initial test on CPU 3 – * OK !
Init 1024kb L2 cache by processor
Init 1024kb L2 cache by processor
Init 1024kb L2 cache by processor
Init 1024kb L2 cache by processor
Clearing 128 Mb by processor 0 –>
0 – * OK !
1 – * OK !
2 – * OK !
3 – * OK !
**** OK !
CPU FIRMWARE
– August 4, 1994
Processor 0 on IPL INIT
{{
{{
{{
{{
{{
{{
{{
216
220
288
278
292
286
292
}}
}}
}}
}}
}}
}}
}}
Processor 0 on IPL Start
{{223}}
{{299}}
A flashing 888 is displayed if PON tests cannot start. If the PON test hangs, a three-digit
code corresponding to a failed component is displayed.
Note that the system IPLs on the first available physical processor. If for any reason
processor 0 is not available, the system IPLs on processor 1, and then on 2 so on until a
processor is available. If all the processors are disabled, the PON test fails, and
SystemGuard will treats as a hardware component failure and go into the MAINTENANCE
MENU in Service mode. In Normal mode, the PON test initiates dial-out, if possible, and
goes into Stall state afterward. No IPL proceeds. Processors can be manually enabled again
in Service mode through the MAINTENANCE MENU. This can also be repaired locally by:
• Turning the system power off
• Moving the Physical Key into Service position
• Enabling at least one processor from the STAND-BY MENU
Using SystemGuard
3-7
There are other resident PON tests to check other system resources. These tests are a
subset of the SystemGuard maintenance offline tests, and reside within the flash EPROM.
These tests are divided into the following groups:
BUMP Quick I/O Test Group
These tests check the accessibility and the functions of the
standard and direct I/O components from the BUMP: Async lines
(S1, S2, and S3), EEPROMs, NVRAM, Flash EPROM, and TOD
(Time-Of-Day).
JTAG (Joint Tests Action Group) Test Group
These tests check the chip-to-chip connections using the JTAG
features.
Direct I/O Test Group These tests check the accessibility of the Standard and Direct I/O
components from the CPUs: IONIAN, NVRAM access, EPROM
access, TOD, and the diskette.
CPU Test Group
These tests are performed by all of the processors and check the
status of the CPU cards: processor, address translation, L1 and L2
caches.
DCB (Data CrossBar) and Memory Test Group
These tests check the status of the system planar and memory
cards: data/address lines accessibility, memory components, ECC,
memory refresh (CPU checkstop).
Interrupt Test Group
These tests collectively check the interrupt system: BUMP-CPU,
CPU-CPU (CPU checkstop).
MCA Test Group
Not applicable
CPU Multiprocessor Test Group
These tests check the multiprocessor mechanisms, atomic
instructions, cache coherency, main memory sharing, and
multiresources sharing.
I2C Bus Test Group
The following is an example of the output when running these PON tests:
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
Bump
Bump
Bump
Bump
Bump
Bump
Bump
Bump
Bump
Bump
Bump
Bump
***************
* PON TESTS *
***************
[01.01.00] DEBUG LINE TEST
[01.02.00] S1 ASL (BUMP) TEST
[01.03.01] S2 ASL (REM.) TEST
[01.04.00] S3 ASL (SPE.) TEST
[01.05.00] FLASH EP. CONTENT TEST
[01.06.00] NVRAM CONTENT TEST
[01.07.00] EPROM CONTENT TEST
[01.08.00] TOD TEST
[01.09.00] FLOPPY–D CNT. TEST
[01.10.00] BPP REGISTERS TEST
[01.11.00] MISC. REGS TEST
[06.05.00] TOD–BUMP IT TEST
Note that the PON test can be suppressed if the fast IPL flag is enabled through
SystemGuard.
3-8
Operator Guide
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
Phase Change (Init to Maint)
The maintenance phase is entered from the Init phase if the system key is in service mode.
If the BUMP console present flag is set, the MAINTENANCE MENU is displayed on the
BUMP console, and the system waits for an operator action. The maintenance menu
choices are described on page 3-21. Various maintenance tasks can be performed from this
menu. When maintenance tasks are complete, the system can be booted, powered down, or
reset.
Phase Change (Maint to Boot)
SystemGuard enters the Boot phase from either the Init phase or the Maintenance phase. In
this phase the system is initialized and control of the system is passed to the operating
system.
Phase Change (Boot to AIX Load and Run-Time)
Similar to the entry into the Init phase, there is a distinct line when entering this phase. At
this line, SystemGuard gives up control of the system and passes it to the loaded code
(AIX). This is indicated by the three-digit code 299 on the consoles and Operator Panel.
Since SystemGuard is also giving up control of the two serial lines, nothing can be displayed
on the consoles. The usual three-digit boot indicators are still displayed on the Operator
Panel. Note that the code 570 virtual SCSI devices being configured can take
several minutes for each card in the SMP system.
When the boot indicators have reached c33, AIX has progressed enough to display its own
boot messages on the system console. However, this is no longer the SystemGuard
Console; it is the AIX console.
SystemGuard Parameters and Flags
A certain number of SystemGuard parameters and flags can be changed through different
SystemGuard menus, from the Diagnostics interface and from AIX. Basically, there are four
different groups of flags:
Service contract flags These flags enable Service Console usage, maintenance usage
and determine if dial-out messages are to be sent to IBM or to a
Customer Service Center. These flags are stored in the SID
(System Identification) field of the System EEPROM.
Diagnostics flags
These flags are used to control the service, diagnostics and
maintenance from a customer point of view. For example, the
customer can modify one of these flags to authorize setting the
Electronic Key from the Service Console or to authorize the dial-out.
Modem and Site Configuration flags
These flags allow the customer to customize modem configuration
for the Service Console.
Phone numbers flags These are the dial-in and dial-out phone numbers and the operator
voice number.
Using SystemGuard
3-9
Working with SystemGuard
You can change SystemGuard parameters and flags from different locations They can be
changed from the SystemGuard STAND-BY MENU, the SystemGuard MAINTENANCE
MENU, the Diagnostics interface, and also from AIX.
When the key signal is received, SystemGuard clears the screen and displays the
SystemGuard prompt. At this point, a keyword can be entered. The supported keywords are:
power
This keyword starts the system, exactly as if the power button is pushed.
You can change, disable or enable this keyword: see “Power-On Command
Parameters” on page 3-33 for details. Turning the system power on makes
the system enter the init phase. Thus, if the Key Mode Switch is in the
Service position, and if the AutoService IPL flag is disabled, you enter the
Maintenance Menu.
sbb
This keyword displays the STAND-BY menu.
It is important to understand the following flowchart.
“Stand-By”
on Operator
Panel Display
Normal and Secure
Exit
StandBy
Menu
Stand-By
Mode
Press the Enter key
Service
System
Key
Position
Enter “sbb”
(>) Console Prompt
Enter “power”
Stall State
System
Key
Position
Normal
Service
Auto
Service IPL
Disabled
Yes
BUMP
Console
Enabled
No
No
Yes
Multi-User
AIX
3-10
Operator Guide
Maintenance
Menu
Diagnostics
Secure
When the system is in Stand-By mode and the System Key (Physical or Electronic Key) is in
Service mode, the STAND-BY MENU can be accessed and SystemGuard executed.
If you turn the system unit power on from Stand-By mode with the System Key in the Normal
position, the system boots to AIX Multi-User.
If you turn the system unit power on with the System Key in the Service position, you can go
to the MAINTENANCE MENU or to Diagnostics, depending on the state of three flags:
SystemGuard Console Present, Autoservice IPL, and Service Contract Validity.
If you power on the system with the System Key in Secure, the system stalls.
Here is some information on the meaning of the different flags:
BUMP Console Present flag
When the BUMP console is enabled, the LED codes and System Guard
messages are displayed on the console during the Init phase. If the BUMP
console is not enabled, it is like a regular system; no codes and no
messages are displayed on the console during the Init phase. Only AIX
messages appear when the system starts loading AIX.
Note that if you are running the level 5 of the SystemGuard firmware, the
BUMP Console is disabled by default, and if you enable it, it is disabled after
every shutdown. If your system is in Service mode, you might go to
Diagnostics instead of Maintenance due the SystemGuard Console being
disabled by default.
If you are running level 7 or higher of the SystemGuard firmware, the BUMP
Console is enabled by default and stays enabled after a shutdown.
Autoservice IPL flag
If enabled, this flag means that you want to go to Diagnostics when booting
with the System Key in Service mode.
Service Contract flag
This flag is preset at the factory and is not variable. The Service Contract is
always valid. This flag allows the service center to access the system and
do some maintenance. The Service Contract is set by default to an
unlimited number of days (exactly 32767 days).
SystemGuard Menus
SystemGuard menus are low-level menus; they make extensive use of abbreviations or
acronyms. Refer to the glossary on page X-1 for a full list of these acronyms and
abbreviations.
SystemGuard is menu-driven, and menu choices are usually numbered. Letters are
sometimes used and can be entered in either lowercase or uppercase (SystemGuard is
case insensitive). The letter x is often used to exit the current menu and return to the
previous menu (or leave SystemGuard, if given from the main menu). Commands are only
treated after you press the Enter key. Until you press the Enter key, you can use the
Backspace key to edit a command. If you enter a command that does not match the
available options, a beep signals that an invalid selection has been made.
Using SystemGuard
3-11
Stand-By Menu
The STAND-BY MENU can only be entered when the system is in Stand-By mode (the word
Stand-By must be displayed on the LCD display). Perform the following steps to bring up the
STAND-BY MENU.
1. With Stand-By displayed on the LCD display press the Enter key on the BUMP console.
The Stand-By prompt is the greater than (>) sign.
2. To enter the STAND-BY MENU from here, set the System Key into Service mode, either
by setting the Physical Key to Service or the Electronic Key to Service. To set the
Electronic Key to Service, follow the procedure on page 3-39.
3. Press the Enter key again.
4. Enter the keyword sbb to display the STAND-BY MENU.
The STAND-BY MENU appears with several options, as follows:
For Details,
See the
Following
Pages
3-13
3-15
3-16
3-17
3-18
3-19
STAND–BY MENU :
0
1
2
3
4
5
rev xx.xx
Display Configuration
Set Flags
Set Unit Number
Set Configuration
SSbus Maintenance
I2C Maintenance
Select(x:exit): 0
Note: It is also possible to enter the STAND-BY MENU from the Service Console if the
remote authorization flag is enabled. The Electronic Key can be set from the Service
Console with the same escape sequence.
The STAND-BY MENU allows the system administrator to display the physical configuration
of the system (CPUs, memory, I/O, and so on) and to set flags, such as the Fast IPL flag,
and the BUMP Console Present flag. The Fast IPL flag causes the system to skip the
second phase of the power-on tests. The BUMP Console Present flag allows the BUMP
console to be enabled or disabled during boot up. This menu also enables the service
representative to test the interconnection between the BUMP and different components
through the I2C bus or the SSbus. For instance, it is possible to send a specific string of
characters to the LCD and read the result on the Operator Panel display. Or, it is possible to
turn on the LEDs on the Operator Panel, or to turn on the power supplies and fans without
allowing the system to IPL.
3-12
Operator Guide
How to Display the System Configuration
The system configuration can be displayed through the STAND-BY MENU or through the
MAINTENANCE MENU.
Displaying Configuration through the Stand-By Menu
This option displays the system configuration table. This configuration can be viewed on the
LCD of the Operator Panel if the console is not configured. This is done by pressing the
reset button with the mode switch in the Service position.
To display the configuration of the system, enter the STAND-BY MENU, and from the Main
menu, select Display Configuration (option 0). The first-level screen is displayed with
features and devices that can be configured.
Here is an example of the display configuration screen for a 7013 J Series system. The
screens for the 7015 R30, R40, and R50 are similar:
Display Configuration
SID TM
7013J30 45067
SID Y3 7fffff003935303730370000
CPU conf
CCCCAAAA
FLASH_FW 0704
MM size 0080
OPP
D78610
19H0494
SP
D78605
19H0471
CPU0 D78605
19H6472
CPU2
MC0
D78605
19H0473
MC2
SIB10 E38042
19H0310
SIB11
SIB21
SIB12
SIB22
SIB13
SIB23
SID Y2
UNIT
MM conf
OP_KEY NRM
IOC
CPU1
CPU3
MC1
MC3
PS0
PS1
00045067
PAAAAAAA 40
CCAACCAAAAAAA
E_KEY
SRV
E38030
D78605
96G4400
19H6472
D78605
19H0473
D29655
11H5114
PS2
PS3
Hit Return
Using SystemGuard
3-13
Display Configuration
SIB14
SIB24
SIB15
SIB25
SIB16
SIB26
fc8e000000000000
SIB17
SIB27
MP
D78605
19H0464
MCA 01 C
fc8e000000000000
MCA 02 C
f48e000000000000
MCA 03 C
fc8e000000000000
MCA 04 C
ffde000000000000
MCA 05 C
14e0000000000000
MCA 06 C
fc8e000000000000
MCA 07 C
fc8e000000000000
MCA 08 A
fc8e000000000000
PS04
PS05
PS06
PS07
MPe
MCAe
MCAe
MCAe
MCAe
MCAe
MCAe
MCAe
MCAe
D78605
01 C e1ff000000000000
02 C 708f000000000000
03 C ec8f000000000000
04 C fc8e000000000000
05 C f0ef000000000000
06 C 7f8f000000000000
07 C fc8e000000000000
08 C fc8e000000000000
Hit Return
The meanings of the configuration display fields are as follows:
• SID Y2: This is the system identification information. It is automatically updated when the
lateral planar 2 is changed.
• SID TM: This indicates the type of the model.
• SID Y3: This parameter gives the maintenance contract information in order to enable
service facilities.
• FLASH_FW: This is the Flash EPROM firmware release number. The corresponding
second column gives the memory size expressed in KB.
• CPU Conf: This gives the status information of the CPU module (present, absent,
deconfigured, or temporarily deconfigured).
• MM Conf: This is the status information for the memory DIMM.
• UNIT ssssssss: This gives the unit status information. The corresponding second column
displays the number of RDS devices present in each unit. Each unit is denoted by two
hexadecimal digits (the first stands for RDS1 and the second for RDS2).
• SIBx EC: This indicates the system interface board (SIB) status information and the vital
product data (VPD) identifier.
• PSx EC: The power supply status and the corresponding VPD identifier information is
provided.
• SP EC+s: This parameter gives the status information and the VPD identifier of the
system planar. The technical status information is also included.
• IOC EC+s: This parameter gives the status information and the VPD identifier of the I/O
card (IOC).
• OP EC+s: This field gives the operator panel (OP) VPD values and the corresponding
status information.
3-14
Operator Guide
• CPUx EC+s: The agent status information of the CPU cards and the VPD information is
given.
• MCx EC+s: This field gives the memory card VPD values.
• MCAx loc. code+status: This parameter contains the location code and the status
information of the Micro Channel adapters (MCA). The contents of the 8 programmable
option select (POS) registers are also displayed in the second column.
• MPx EC: This field displays the VPD identifier of the base unit MCA planars. This field
does not appear on 7012 systems.
• MPex EC: This field displays the VPD identifier of the expansion unit MCA planars. This
field does not appear on 7012 systems and appears on 7013 systems only if the system
is attached to a 7013 J01. For 7015 systems, the second MCA planar in the CPU
enclosure is identified in this field.
• OP_KEY xxx: This field gives the value of the physical operator panel key (Key Mode
Switch). The second column shows the value of the electronic key (E_KEY).
Set Flags
Use this option to manage miscellaneous flags. The default values are listed in the following
table:
Flag Parameter and Keyword Default Values
Name
Default Value
Remote Authorization flag
Disabled
BUMP Console Present flag
Enabled
Autoservice IPL flag
Disabled
Extended Tests parameter
Disabled
Power-On Tests in Trace Mode flag
Disabled
Power-On Tests in Loop Mode flag
Disabled
Fast IPL flag
Disabled
Set Electronic Mode Switch to Normal
NRM
1. Enter 1 in the main menu to select this option. The following screen is displayed:
Set Flags
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Remote Authorization
Bump Console Present
Autoservice IPL
Extended Tests
PowerOn Tests in Trace Mode
PowerOn Tests in Loop Mode
Fast IPL
Set Electronic Mode Switch to Normal
Disabled
Enabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
NRM
select(x:exit):
2. To set or reset a particular flag, enter its menu number.
The value set for all flags is permanent until a new change is performed (except for FAST
IPL, which is automatically cleared at boot). For a complete list of default values for flags
Using SystemGuard
3-15
and parameters (set during manufacturing), see the table in “Default Parameter Values” on
page B–1 of the service guide for your system. The following flags can be managed:
• Remote Authorization: Only the local operator can enable this flag to enable remote
maintenance to be performed. Both the local and remote operators can disable it.
• BUMP Console Present: If enabled, SystemGuard displays the MAINTENANCE MENU
on the BUMP console (line S1). If disabled, the MAINTENANCE MENU is not available
on the BUMP console.
• Autoservice IPL: When enabled, this flag enables an automatic IPL even if the Key Mode
Switch is in the Service position, thus avoiding the display of the MAINTENANCE MENU.
• Extended Tests: This parameter determines under what conditions extended power on
self-tests are run at IPL time, after the regular power on self-tests (POSTs). If the
parameter is enabled, the extended tests are run. If the parameter is disabled, the
extended tests are not run.
• Power-On Tests in Trace Mode: When enabled, supports the running of POST tests in
trace mode, which gives extra information about how tests are conducted. A dedicated tty
line is required, this is to be used only when directed by service support personnel.
• Power-On Tests in Loop Mode: When enabled, SystemGuard loops on the POST tests
and does not IPL.
• Fast IPL: When enabled, the long POST tests are not run, shortening the INIT phase.
This feature lets you start the machine quickly, when the test performance is not
necessary. This flag is not permanent. It only remains set until the next IPL, at which point
it is automatically cleared.
• Set Electronic Mode Switch to Normal: This command sets the Electronic Mode Switch to
the Normal position. Keep in mind that the Electronic Mode Switch is only taken into
account if the Key Mode Switch is in the Normal position. The Electronic Mode Switch is
also set to Normal each time the Key Mode Switch is moved.
Set Unit Number
Use this option to assign logical numbers to units that you add to your system.
Whenever a new unit is added, this command must be run to update the unit configuration
table.
Simply enter 2 in the main STAND-BY MENU to select this option. The process of assigning
a unit number is automatic: there is no need to pick a number.
An RS-485 bus interconnects all system and expansion units, each being addressed using a
logical number of 0 or 1. The base unit, where the SystemGuard and the operator panel are
present is the master of the RS-485 bus, and is always given logical number 0. The first
expansion unit is assigned the logical number 1.
3-16
Operator Guide
Set Configuration
This menu option enables you to configure or unconfigure units and devices.
1. Enter 3 in the main menu to select this option.
2. You should then see a first-level screen similar to the following. It displays the units and
devices that can be configured, along with their menu index number:
Set Configuration
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
CPU0
CPU1
CPU2
CPU3
MC0
MC1
MC2
MC3
base MCA
exp MCA
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
UNIT0
UNIT1
UNIT2
UNIT3
UNIT4
UNIT5
UNIT6
UNIT7
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
dev
dev
dev
dev
dev
dev
dev
dev
.
select(x:exit):
3. Enter the menu number to select a particular object. For example, if you enter 10, then a
second-level UNIT0 screen as shown below is displayed.
The second-level screen contains a status column and details about the unit.
UNIT0 Second-level Screen
UNIT0
Set
00 dev0A C
01 dev0A D
02 dev1A C
03 dev1A D
04 dev3A C
05 dev3A D
06 dev4A C
07 dev4A D
08 dev5A C
09 dev5A D
Status
C
A
C
C
C
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
dev5B
dev5B
dev2A
dev2A
dev2B
dev2B
dev3B
dev3B
dev4B
dev4B
Set
C
D
C
D
C
D
C
D
C
D
Status
A
C
D
C
D
select(x:exit):
4. Enter the object’s menu number and then enter one of the following commands:
• C: To configure the device.
• D: To unconfigure the device.
• T: To temporarily unconfigure the device. At the next power on or reset, the device is
automatically reconfigured.
For example: 06 D unconfigures device 4A.
Note: Devices that do not appear in the above list, cannot be changed.
Using SystemGuard
3-17
SSBus Maintenance
This option is used to investigate and check devices on the SSBus and is meant only for
trained service personnel.
Use this option to investigate and check devices on the SSBus.
1. Enter 4 in the main menu to select this option. SystemGuard displays the following
menu, which allows you to read the time of day (TOD) registers and to read or write the
non-volatile random access memory (NVRAM) and lines S1 and S2.
SSBus
Maintenance
Command
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
Read
Write
Read
Read
Read
Read date
Read alarm
Feature
NVRAM
NVRAM
Line S1
Line S2
TOD
TOD
TOD
start–end address
0x40000–0x7ffff
0x000207f0
0x000205f0
0x38000–0x3803e
select(x:exit):
2. To read data:
a. Enter a read command number.
b. When requested, enter the start address (hexadecimal) and the length (in bytes).
c. The data at the given start address for the given length is displayed. Then the prompt
for the start address and length is shown again.
d. You can continue the read operation by pressing the Enter key, in which case a new
block of data is displayed.
e. Enter a . (dot) to end the read operation and redisplay the SSBus MAINTENANCE
MENU.
3. To write data:
a. Enter a write command number. The update is performed one byte at a time.
b. When requested, enter the start address.
c. The contents of the specified location are displayed followed by a blank. Enter a new
value followed by the Enter key.
d. The new value is written at the given address and the contents of the next location
are displayed.
e. Press the Enter key (without entering a value) to skip the current location and move to
the next location. In this case, no write is performed and the next location is shown.
f. Enter a . (dot) to end the write operation and redisplay the SSBus MAINTENANCE
MENU.
3-18
Operator Guide
I2C Maintenance
Use this option to do maintenance operations on the I2C buses of a selected unit, in order to
investigate and check the connected devices. When exiting this menu, the previous status of
the OP and SIB microcontrollers are restored (except for voltage margins).
1. Enter 5 in the main menu to select this option.
2. Some abbreviations used (with their meanings in parentheses) include: rd (read), wr
(write), and OP (operator panel).
I2C
Maintenance
00
01
02
03
04
rd OP status
rd UNIT status
rd EEPROM
margins
on/off OP LEDs
05
06
07
08
wr LCD
rd I/O port SP0
fan speed
powering
select(x:exit):
These options are explained in the following sections.
Read Operator Panel Status
Enter 00 to display the OP status table.
Read Unit Status
First enter 01 to view a unit status table. Then, when requested, enter a unit number to view
its SIB table.
Read the EEPROM
Enter 02 to read the vital product data (VPD) in the EEPROM memory. Select an EEPROM
and enter its menu number to display its contents. For the SIB, PS,SYSID, and MPe
selections, enter a unit number when requested.
EEPROM list
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
SYSID/CABID
OPP
MP
SP
IOC
CPU0
CPU1
CPU2
CPU3
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
MC0
MC1
MC2
MC3
MPe
SIB1
PS
SIB2
select(x:exit):
Using SystemGuard
3-19
Set voltage margins
Note: This option can be only used for error analysis or factory test and must be used only
by trained service personnel. Restore nominal voltage values before restarting other
operations. Any data written on the disk in marginal mode must be removed before
restarting normal operations. Ignore any disk errors when using this option, and
retest the disk in nominal conditions.
Set or Reset Operator Panel LEDs
Enter 04 to set or reset the operator panel display. Select an option and enter its menu
command number.
on/off LEDs
Status
00
01
02
03
off
powoff Green
powon Green
powoff Yellow
powon Yellow
off
select(x:exit):
Write on the Operator Panel Display
Enter 05 to write a given string on the operator panel Display. When requested, enter the
string you want to display.
Read Input Output Ports
Enter 06 to read a given I/O port. The selected I/O port contents are displayed as shown
below (the example contents are hexadecimal):
fe
Hit Return
Power-on or Power-off
Enter 08 to turn a unit’s or device’s power on or off. You can also turn the power of all units
on or off using a broadcast command. Select an option and enter its menu number. These
commands are used to test the power system. When you leave the I2C maintenance menu,
the power of all devices will be turned off.
powering
00
01
02
03
04
05
broadcast
broadcast
unit
unit
device
device
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
select(x:exit):
3-20
Operator Guide
Maintenance Menu
The MAINTENANCE MENU also enables you to display the configuration of the system in a
non-cryptic, easily understandable way, to perform various tests, to continue IPL either from
network, a specific SCSI device or from the boot list, and to set flags concerning various
system operation.
The MAINTENANCE MENU can only be entered by:
1. Enabling the BUMP Console from the STAND-BY MENU.
2. Setting the Autoservice IPL flag to disabled (the default value for this flag is disabled)
from the STAND-BY MENU.
3. Having a Valid Service Contract.
4. Turning the System Key to the Service position.
5. Powering-on the system.
The MAINTENANCE MENU shown below should appear just after the 292 code is
displayed on both the console and the LCD.
For Details,
See the
Following
Pages
3-22
3-25
3-25
3-25
3-25
3-25
3-26
3-28
3-32
3-38
MAINTENANCE MENU (Rev. XX)
0>
1>
2>
3>
4>
5>
6>
7>
8>
9>
DISPLAY CONFIGURATION
DISPLAY BUMP ERROR LOG
ENABLE SERVICE CONSOLE
DISABLE SERVICE CONSOLE
RESET
POWER OFF
SYSTEM BOOT
OFF–LINE TESTS
SET PARAMETERS
SET NATIONAL LANGUAGE
SELECT:
Using SystemGuard
3-21
Display Configuration
Use this option to view the system hardware configuration. This option provides different
screens with the following levels of information:
• System-level information
• Unit-level information
• Device-level information.
Enter 0 in the MAINTENANCE MENU to select the Display Configuration option.
Display Configuration – System Level
This screen displays general system information, such as:
•
•
•
•
Firmware release number.
Machine ID.
Service Contract status.
Total memory size, and other information.
DISPLAY CONFIGURATION
MACHINE TYPE/MODEL: 7013/J30
FIRMWARE RELEASE:
Standby –> 1300
Backup eprom –> 0401
Flash eprom –> 0401
SERVICE CONTRACT:
Last update (yymmdd) –> 941105
Validity–> 360 Days
Remote service support –> Valid
Quick On Call service –> Not valid
AUTO DIAL:
Disable
CONSOLES:
BUMP Console –> Present
Service Console –> Disable – 1200 Baud
SYSTEM ID:
000ABCDE (Contains the serial
number of the unit)
NUMBER OF CPU:
2
MAIN MEMORY SIZE:
128 MByte
PRESENT UNITS:
#0 ,#1
SELECT [Unit# (0–7) or x:exit]:
To view information for a specific unit, enter a unit number. A unit level screen is displayed,
as described on the following pages.
Note: If and expansion unit is not attached, the SELECT [Unit# (0–7) or x:exit]
option does not appear, press Enter to continue to the next screen.
Display Configuration – Unit Level
This is the second screen in the configuration group. When selected, you see two different
types of screens:
• Main Unit
• Expansion Unit.
The main unit screen, shown below, displays unit level parameters such as:
3-22
Operator Guide
• Voltage Margins for CPUs, ASICs, and other components.
• Device status information.
• Options to select various types of devices.
DISPLAY CONFIGURATION – MAIN UNIT
MARGINS VALUE: +5 VOLT –> Normal
CPU (3.65 VOLT) –> Normal
ASIC (3.6 VOLT) –> Normal
SCSI DEVICES:
Present –> #0A,#3A,#4A,#5A,#2A,#2B,#3B,#4B
Deconfigured –> #2B,#4B
PRESENT CPU:
#0
PRESENT MC:
DETAILS: 0>
1>
2>
3>
#0
IOC
SP
CPU
MC
4>
5>
6>
7>
OPP
PS
SIB
MCA
SELECT [Details (0–7) or x:exit]:
1. To see device-level information, enter menu device type number. The device level screen
for choice 0 (I/O card) is shown on page 3-24.
Note: If you select a device type and more than one device of the same type exists, you
are asked to provide a device number. For example, if you enter 2 for CPU devices,
and 2 such device boards exist, then you have to specify CPU0 or CPU1 when
requested.
2. Enter x to return to the system-level display configuration screen.
An expansion unit screen for unit 1 is shown below. It displays:
• Unit serial number.
• Device status information.
• Options to select devices.
DISPLAY CONFIGURATION – UNIT 1
STATUS:
Configured
BP SERIAL Nr.:
000ABCDE (This field contains the serial
number of the expansion unit)
MARGINS VALUE: +5 VOLT –> Normal
SCSI DEVICES:
Present –> #0A,#3A,#4A,#5A,#2A,#2B,#3B,#4B
Deconfigured –> #2B,#4B
DETAILS: 0> PS
1> SIB1
2> SIB2
SELECT [Details (0–2) or x:exit]:
Using SystemGuard
3-23
1. To see device-level information, enter the corresponding command number for the
device. The device-level screen is displayed.
2. Enter x to return to the system-level configuration display screen.
Display Configuration – Device Level
This screen is shown when you select one of the devices of your choice from either the Main
Unit or Unit 1 screen. This option enables viewing of individual device information as shown
in the following representative screen:
• Results of diagnostic tests, such as built-in or power on self-tests (BIST or POST)
• Device specific vital product data (VPD) information such as:
–
–
–
–
–
Engineering change level.
Device field-replaceable unit (FRU) number.
Name of the manufacturer.
Processor component definition (related to the position of the ASICs).
Unit part number.
Note: The VPD information (restricted access) is stored in the embedded EEPROM and on
board permanent memories.
DISPLAY CONFIGURATION – MAIN UNIT (IOC)
BIST/POST: 0x0000
IOC
*EC
*FN
*MN
*PC
*PN
*RL
*RM
*SN
*Y0
VPD:
002 D6
IOC
IBM97N
0001020500020004000101000001
ABCDEFGH (Will contain the part number, depending on
the system)
76971323–03276971316–031
176971331–03176706743–00104010406
A0P0203400000000
00
00ABCDE7013/J30 (CONTAINS THE SERIAL NUMBER
OF THE SYSTEM UNIT
PRESS RETURN TO EXIT:
Enter the Enter key to exit and return to the previous screen.
3-24
Operator Guide
Display BUMP Error Log
Use this option to view the BUMP firmware error log.
1. Enter 1 in the MAINTENANCE MENU to select this option. The contents of the logging
buffer are displayed as shown in the following screen:
DISPLAY BUMP ERROR LOG
EVENT # 1:
40140100000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
SELECT [+:forward event or x:exit]:
2. Use the + and – keys to scroll events on the screen forward and backward, respectively.
3. Press x to exit and return to the main menu.
Enable Service Console
Use this command to enable remote service support on the S2 line by setting the Remote
Authorization flag. Only the local operator can perform this command.
When this flag is enabled, remote service support is possible and all characters sent on line
S1 or line S2 are also sent on the other line.
• Enter 2 in the MAINTENANCE MENU to enable the Remote Authorization flag.
Disable Service Console
Use this command to prevent remote service support by disabling the Remote Authorization
flag. This can be performed as a security measure, for example.
• Enter 3 in the MAINTENANCE MENU to disable the Remote Authorization flag.
Reset
This command simulates the reset action. You can use this command instead of pressing
the Reset button on the operator panel (OP).
1. Enter 4 in the MAINTENANCE MENU.
2. Confirm your action, when requested. The system is restarted from scratch, meaning that
a new initial program load (IPL) will be run.
Power-Off
This command forces an immediate system power off. It is run only after the operator
confirms the action.
1. Enter 5 in the MAINTENANCE MENU.
2. Confirm your action when requested. The system powers off immediately.
Using SystemGuard
3-25
System Boot
This command enables you to begin boot activity.
Enter 6 in the main menu to select this option. The following screen is displayed:
SYSTEM BOOT
0> BOOT FROM LIST
1> BOOT FROM NETWORK
2> BOOT FROM SCSI DEVICE
SELECT [x:exit]:
The menu enables you to boot in three different ways:
• Enter 0 to boot from the normal or service boot list, after completing all the maintenance
activity. The normal or service boot list is used, depending on the key mode.
• Enter 1 to boot from a network. A network boot menu is shown.
• Enter 2 to boot from a SCSI device. A menu enables you to specify the SCSI device
using the location code.
• At this point, a BOOT FROM SCSI DEVICE screen appears. This displays the PRESENT
DEVICE LOCATION CODE. If it is not the device you want to boot from, go through each
option, and change it to the desired BUS, SLOT, SCSI ID, and LUN ID. Option 4 allows
you to change all these options at once. The BOOT FROM SCSI DEVICE screen is
similar to the following:
BOOT FROM SCSI DEVICE
PRESENT DEVICE LOCATION CODE:
(Drawer – Bus#/Slot# – Connector – SCSI ID/LUN) 00070030
COMMANDS: 0>
1>
2>
3>
4>
5>
CHANGE BUS#
CHANGE SLOT#
CHANGE SCSI ID
CHANGE LUN ID
CHANGE DEVICE LOCATION CODE
BOOT FROM SELECTED DEVICE
SELECT [x:exit]:
For the following, perform either steps 1-4 and 6 (commands 0-3 and 5 ) or steps 5 and 6
(commands 4 and 5):
1. Enter 0 to select the bus identification number. The system displays:
BUS# [0>Internal | 1>External or x: exit]
BUS 0 represents the MicroChannel bus 0 in the 7015 R30, R40, and R50. BUS 1
represents Micro Channel bus 1 of the 7015 R30, R40, and R50.
Enter your choice. The displayed location code is updated.
3-26
Operator Guide
2. Enter 1 to select the slot number. The system displays:
SLOT# [1–7 (Internal Bus) | 1–8 (External Bus) or x: exit]
Enter your choice. The displayed location code is updated.
3. Enter 2 to select the SCSI identification number. The system displays:
SCSI ID [0–F or x: exit]
Enter your choice. The displayed location code is updated.
4. Enter 3 to select the logical unit identification number (LUN ID). The system displays:
LUN ID [0–F (8 bit bus) | 00–1F (16 bit bus) or x: exit]
Enter your choice. The displayed location code is updated.
5. Enter 5 to begin the boot. The system leaves the maintenance environment and boots
from the specified SCSI device.
Another method of changing the SCSI Boot Device location code is to select 4 from the
BOOT FROM SCSI DEVICE menu. This method allows you to change the SLOT #, SCSI
ID, and the LUN ID simultaneously. When you make this selection, the system displays:
ENTER LOCATION CODE
(Drawer – Bus#/Slot# – Connector – SCSI ID/LUN):
Enter the new location code in the form AA–BB–CC–DD, where AA is the drawer
number, BB is the bus and slot number, CC is the connector, and DD is the SCSI
identifier and logical unit identifier.
Enter 5 to begin the boot. The system leaves the maintenance environment and boots from
the specified SCSI device.
Using SystemGuard
3-27
Off-Line Tests
Attention: These menus are only to be used when directed by service support personnel.
Some of the tests described require test equipment or resources not available on your
system.
This option under the MAINTENANCE MENU enables you to run the off-line tests in a
controlled and interactive mode.
• Enter 7 in the MAINTENANCE MENU to select the Off Line Tests option. The following
menu is displayed.
OFF-LINE TESTS Menu
The OFF-LINE TESTS main menu, that follows, uses an empty option list by default.
OFF–LINE TESTS
OPTION LIST:
PROCESSOR LIST: Test parameter value
COMMANDS: A>
B>
C>
D>
E>
F>
0>
1>
2>
3>
4>
VERBOSE
VERBOSE++
HALT ON ERROR
LOOP
SCOPE
PROCESSOR
BUILD TEST LIST
MODIFY/DISPLAY TEST LIST
DELETE TEST LIST
EXECUTE TEST LIST
ERROR REPORT INSPECTION
SELECT [x:exit]:
You can modify the option list field by entering the command corresponding to a particular
option. If you want to deselect a particular option (if you want to cancel the option after
selecting it) press the same command once again. In other words, the options are toggled
by the corresponding commands. The available commands are explained as follows:
3-28
A
Sets the verbose option, which displays test execution messages. Without
this option, only test titles and results are displayed.
B
Sets the extra verbose option, which displays the verbose messages, plus
detailed test execution messages. If this option is selected, the verbose
option is redundant and is ignored.
C
Sets the halt on error option, which forces test execution to stop when the
first error is found. In this case, the error message and status are displayed.
D
Sets the loop option, which continuously runs selected tests in a loop while
displaying the test identifier and loop step counter. To stop the tests, press
the Break key (Ctrl-x).
E
Sets the scope option, which continuously runs the first test (in the list of
selected tests) in a loop, without displaying messages. To stop the tests,
press the Break key.
F
Select the processor to run the tests.
Operator Guide
0
Displays the build test menu, which enables you to specify the test list (see
“Build Test List” below).
1
Displays and enables modification of the tests in the build list (see page
3-31).
2
Deletes the tests in the build list, after operator confirmation. Attempting to
delete tests from an empty list causes an error message to be displayed.
3
Runs selected tests (see page 3-32).
4
Displays an error report.
x
Exits this menu and returns to the MAINTENANCE MENU.
Build Test List
This command is used to build a test list, which is a sequence of tests to be run. To build a
test list, perform the following steps:
1. Enter 0 from the OFF-LINE TESTS menu to display the following menu.
BUILD TEST LIST
GROUP
01
04
06
20
DESCRIPTION
BUMP QUICK IO
CPU
INTERRUPT
MULTIPROCESSOR
GROUP
03
05
11
DESCRIPTION
DIRECT IO
DCB AND MEMORY
MCA
COMMANDS: nn> SELECT GROUP
* > ADD ALL AVAILABLE TEST TO TEST LIST
SELECT [x:exit]:
Note: For a description of the test groups, see page A-3.
2. Select a test group of your choice by entering the group ID. For example, to select the
interrupt test group, enter 06.
Note: Use the slash ( / ) character to separate different test groups. For example, enter
01/03/11 specify the BUMP Quick IO, Direct IO, and MCA test groups with default
parameter values.
Using SystemGuard
3-29
3. Once you have selected the test groups, you can specify individual tests within a group.
For example, the following screen enables you to specify individual BUMP Quick IO
tests:
BUILD TEST LIST
GROUP 01 BUMP QUICK IO
TEST
01
03
05
07
09
11
13
51
53
DESCRIPTION
DEBUG LINE
S2 ASL (REMOTE)
FLASH EPROM CONTENT
EPROM CONTENT
FLOPPY-DISK CONTROLLER
MISC REGISTERS
VPD COHERENCY
BPP EXTERNAL L-B FULL
AUTODIAL
TEST
02
04
06
08
10
12
50
52
54
DESCRIPTION
S1 ASL (BUMP)
S3 ASL (SPECIFIC)
NOVRAM CONTENT
TOD
BPP REGISTERS
CPU ACCESS
ASL EXTERNAL L-B
PRINTER
BPP EXTERNAL L-B
COMMANDS: nn> SELECT TEST
* > ADD ALL TEST TO TEST LIST
SELECT [x:exit]:
Attention: Do not run tests from the above list on items that do not exist on your system, a
failure indication will result.
4. Select a particular test by entering the test number. The selected test will be included in
the list with default parameters.
Notes:
1. Use the slash ( / ) character to separate different tests. For example, enter 01/03
to specify tests 1 and 3 with default parameter values.
2. Use the * (asterisk) character to select all available tests.
3. Attempting to add tests to a full test list causes an error message to be displayed.
3-30
Operator Guide
Modify/Display Test List
Once the test list is built, you can use this option to view or modify it. Each test is identified
by a number xxyy, where xx is the group number and yy is the test number.
1. Enter 2 in the OFF-LINE TESTS menu to view or modify the test list. The following menu
is displayed:
MODIFY/DISPLAY TEST LIST
TEST LIST (xxyy: xx = GROUP NUMBER yy = TEST NUMBER):
0101–0102–0103–0104–0105–0106–0107–0108–0109–0110–0111–0112–0150–
0151–0152
COMMANDS: xxyy> SELECT TEST
SELECT [x:exit]:
2. Select the test to be displayed or modified. For example, enter 0302 to select test 2 from
group 3.
3. When a test is selected for modification, the following screen enables you to:
– Display test parameters (both default and current values).
– Modify parameter values (reserved for service people only).
– Delete tests from the list.
TEST: 0101 (01/01) – GROUP 01 BUMP QUICK IO
– TEST 01 DEBUG LINE
PARAMETER[1] = Sub test selection
DEFAULT VALUE = 0x00000000 – PRESENT VALUE =
0x00000000
PARAMETER[2] = Processor number
DEFAULT VALUE = 0x00000008 – PRESENT VALUE =
0x00000008
PARAMETER[3] = Part ID
DEFAULT VALUE = 0xffffffff – PRESENT VALUE =
0xffffffff
COMMANDS: (+: forward test –: backward test)
Pn> CHANGE PARAMETER
D > DELETE TEST
SELECT [x:exit]:
4. The following commands are available:
Pn value [/ Pn value...] This command is reserved for customer service representatives.
D
Deletes the selected test.
+
Scrolls forward in the test parameter list.
–
Scrolls backward in the test parameter list.
x
Exits this menu and returns to the previous menu.
Using SystemGuard
3-31
Execute Test List
This command enables you to run the test list once it is built (and possibly modified). All the
tests in the test list are run one at a time with the selected execution options.
• Enter 3 in the OFF-LINE TESTS main menu to run the selected tests.
The following screen displays the selected execution parameters for the test list.
EXECUTE TEST LIST
OPTION LIST:
PROCESSOR LIST: Test parameter value
>>> ENTER (CTRL_X) TO INTERRUPT TEST EXECUTION <<<
TEST 0101 Running
.. Bump [01.01.00] DEBUG LINE TEST
TEST 0103 Running
.. Bump [01.03.00] S2 ASL (REM.) TEST
PRESS RETURN TO EXIT:
• If the loop option is set, press the Break key to stop test execution. Otherwise, wait for the
tests to finish, and then press the Enter key to exit and return to the previous menu.
Set Parameters
This option under the MAINTENANCE MENU enables you to modify user-settable flags and
parameters.
1. Enter 8 in the MAINTENANCE MENU to select the Parameters Modification option.
2. The following screen is displayed:
SET PARAMETERS
0> POWER–ON COMMAND
1> VOLTAGE MARGINS
2> SET CONFIGURATION
3> PHONE NUMBERS
4> MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS
SELECT [x:exit] :
The following sections explain each of these options in detail.
3-32
Operator Guide
Power-On Command Parameters
During the standby idle phase, the system power can be turned on (and the IPL started) by
entering a BUMP console power-on string through line S1 or a service console power-on
string through line S2 (see “Working with SystemGuard” on page 3-10 for a description of
available keywords). These strings are especially useful to remotely turn on the system
power, without having to press the power button. This option allows you to enable or disable
the power-on command feature and to set the power-on strings. All specified changes only
take effect during the next initialization.
1. Enter 0 in the SET PARAMETERS menu to select this option. The following screen
displays the current settings and provides commands to change them.
POWER–ON COMMAND
PRESENT CONDITIONS: BUMP CONSOLE POWER–ON –> Enable
COMMAND STRING –> power
SERVICE CONSOLE POWER–ON –> Disable
COMMAND STRING –> power
COMMANDS: 0>
1>
2>
3>
4>
5>
ENABLE BUMP CONSOLE POWER–ON
DISABLE BUMP CONSOLE POWER–ON
CHANGE BUMP CONSOLE POWER–ON COMMAND STRING
ENABLE SERVICE CONSOLE POWER–ON
DISABLE SERVICE CONSOLE POWER–ON
CHANGE SERVICE CONSOLE POWER–ON COMMAND STRING
SELECT [x:exit]:
2. Select an action and enter the corresponding number.
Note: The power on string is an ASCII string of 15 characters maximum.
Voltage Margins
This option enables the trained service person to set voltage margins for each unit.
Note: This option can only be used for error analysis or factory test and must be used only
by trained service personnel. Restore nominal voltage values before restarting other
operations. Any data written on the disk in marginal mode must be removed before
restarting normal operations. Ignore any disk errors when using this option, and
retest the disk in nominal conditions.
Using SystemGuard
3-33
Set Configuration
This command is used to configure electronic boards like I/O cards or Micro Channel
adapter (MCA) devices.
1. Enter 2 in the SET PARAMETERS menu to display the SET CONFIGURATION menu as
shown below:
SET CONFIGURATION
0> CPU CARD
1> MEMORY CARD
2> BASIC MCA ADAPTER
3> EXPANSION MCA ADAPTER
SELECT [x:exit]:
2. Select the card or adapter of your choice by entering the appropriate command number.
A second-level screen will list available devices. For example, enter 2 to select
MicroChannel adapter (MCA) devices and display a screen listing available adapters,
similar to the following:
BASIC MCA ADAPTER
0>
1>
2>
3>
BASIC
BASIC
BASIC
BASIC
MCA
MCA
MCA
MCA
ADAPTER
ADAPTER
ADAPTER
ADAPTER
#0
#4
#5
#6
SELECT [x:exit]:
3. Select the particular device which you want to configure. A third-level screen is
displayed. For example, for adapter 0 (zero), you should see a screen similar to:
BASIC MCA ADAPTER #0
PRESENT CONDITIONS: Valid & Enable
COMMANDS: 0> BASIC MCA ADAPTER ENABLE
1> BASIC MCA ADAPTER DISABLE
2> BASIC MCA ADAPTER TEMPORARY DISABLE
SELECT [x:exit]:
4. Enter your choice in the SELECT field.
Phone Numbers
This command is used to set various service support phone numbers.
3-34
Operator Guide
1. Enter 3 in the SET PARAMETERS menu to display the PHONE NUMBERS menu shown
here:
PHONE NUMBERS
0> SERVICE CENTER DIAL–OUT (1) –>
1> SERVICE CENTER DIAL–OUT (2) –>
2> CUSTOMER HUB DIAL–OUT (1) –>
3> CUSTOMER HUB DIAL–OUT (2) –>
4> SYSTEM DIAL–IN –>
5> SYSTEM OPERATOR VOICE –>
SELECT [x:exit] :
2. Select the phone number you wish to modify. After you enter the number, the menu is
redisplayed with the new value. The different phone numbers are explained here:
Service Center Dial-Out Phone Number
This phone number is used by the auto dial-out procedure to
automatically report problems to a remote service center. The first
phone number, marked (1), is the primary number, and the second
is a backup number. By default, no numbers are set.
Customer Hub Dial-Out Phone Number
This phone number is used by the auto dial-out procedure to
automatically report problems to an internal customer service center
(customer hub). The first phone number, marked (1), is the primary
number, and the second is a backup number. By default, no
numbers are set.
System Dial-In Phone Number
This phone number is used by the dial-in procedure. This is the
phone number used by a remote service center expert to connect to
your machine by modem to perform maintenance actions. By
default, no phone number is set.
System Operator Voice Phone Number
This phone number is the voice number of the customer’s system
operator or system administrator. By default, no phone number is
set.
Miscellaneous Parameters
This option enables you to set various flags and parameters. Flags have just two values
(enabled or disabled; or yes or no) and are toggled, while parameters can have many
different values. For a complete list of default values for flags and parameters, see the table
in “Default Parameter Values” on page B–1 of the service guide for your system.
Note: There are some AIX commands which also enable you to view and modify service
information related to diagnostic flags, remote maintenance modem configurations,
and remote maintenance phone numbers. For further information, see the “Changing
Flags and Parameters Under AIX” on page B–3 of the service guide for your system.
Using SystemGuard
3-35
• Enter 4 in the SET PARAMETERS menu to display the MISCELLANEOUS
PARAMETERS menu. The value set for all the flags, except Fast IPL, is permanent until a
new change is made.
MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS
0>
1>
2>
3>
4>
5>
6>
7>
8>
9>
BUMP CONSOLE –> Present
AUTOSERVICE IPL –> Disabled
DIAL_OUT AUTHORIZATION –> Disabled
FAST IPL –> Disabled
SET MODE TO NORMAL WHEN BOOTING –> Enabled
BOOT MULTI–USER AIX IN SERVICE –> Disabled
SERVICE LINE SPEED –> 1200 Line speed
MAINTENANCE PASSWORD
CUSTOMER MAINTENANCE PASSWORD
ELECTRONIC MODE SWITCH FROM SERVICE LINE –> Disabled
SELECT [x:exit]:
BUMP Console Flag Enables the use of a console on line S1 to display the
MAINTENANCE MENU. When disabled, the MAINTENANCE
MENU is not displayed on line S1.
1. Enter 0 to toggle this flag.
2. The new flag status (opposite of the previous state) immediately
takes affect and the system continues to boot.
Autoservice IPL Flag Enables the automatic bootstrap capability, allowing a boot to occur
even if the Mode Switch is in the Service position, thus avoiding the
MAINTENANCE MENU. When disabled, the MAINTENANCE
MENU is entered during the boot phase.
1. Enter 1 to toggle this flag.
2. The new flag status (opposite of the previous state) is displayed.
Dial-Out Authorization Flag
Enables automatic problem reporting to a remote service station
(with line S2) using the auto dial-out procedure. You can set the
dial-out phone numbers: see “Service Center Dial Out Phone
Number” on page 3-35. When disabled, problems are not
automatically reported to a remote service station.
1. Enter 2 to toggle this flag.
2. The new flag status (opposite of the previous state) is displayed.
Fast IPL Flag
Enables the bypass of the execution of extended POST at IPL time.
This flag is not permanent, and when set, is valid for the next
initialization only. It is automatically cleared during the next AIX boot
phase.
• Enter 3 to enable this option.
Set Mode to Normal when Booting Flag
Enables the reset of the Electronic Mode Switch at boot time. When
enabled, the position is forced to Normal during each successful
boot.
1. Enter 4 to toggle this flag.
3-36
Operator Guide
2. The new flag status (opposite of the previous state) is displayed.
Boot Multiuser AIX In Service Flag
Enables multiuser AIX boots to proceed even if the Mode Switch is
in the Service position (when booting by selecting option 6 in the
MAINTENANCE MENU). When the flag is enabled, the system
boots using the bootlist defined for a Normal boot (as when the
mode switch is set to Normal). When disabled and the mode switch
is in the Service position, you cannot perform a mulitiuser AIX boot.
1. Enter 5 to toggle this flag.
2. The new flag status (opposite of the previous state) is displayed.
Service Line Speed Parameter
Defines the speed (baud rate) of the BUMP service line. The default
is 1200.
1. Enter 6 to set this parameter. A menu showing possible line
speeds is displayed.
2. Select a baud rate and enter the corresponding menu number.
Maintenance Password
This command sets the maintenance password, which restricts
access to basic features. If you set this password, you should give it
to service personnel when requested. By default, there is no
password.
1. Enter 7 to set the maintenance password.
2. When requested, enter the password.
Customer Maintenance Password
This command sets the customer maintenance password, which
restricts access to sensitive data such as: power on and power-off
strings; general and customer passwords; and most dial-in and
dial-out phone numbers (except for the remote service center phone
number). If you set this password, you normally should not give it to
service personnel. By default, there is no password.
1. Enter 8 to set the customer maintenance password.
2. When requested, enter the password.
Electronic Mode Switch from Service Line Flag
Enables the modification of the Electronic Mode Switch through line
S2 (the remote maintenance line). When disabled, the Electronic
Mode Switch can only be changed locally.
1. Enter 9 to toggle this flag.
2. The new flag status (opposite of the previous state) is displayed.
Using SystemGuard
3-37
Set National Language
Use this option in the main menu to set the national language used for “SystemGuard”.
Once selected, the effect is immediate and all the console messages are presented in the
selected language.
1. Enter 9 in the MAINTENANCE MENU to select this option. The following menu is
displayed:
0>
1>
2>
3>
SET NATIONAL LANGUAGE
ENGLISH
GERMAN
FRENCH
ITALIAN
SELECT [x:exit]:
2. Select the language of your choice by entering the corresponding command number.
3-38
Operator Guide
Some Common SystemGuard Tasks
The following tasks are done through the STAND-BY and MAINTENANCE MENUs that are
part of SystemGuard. Note that these tasks can also be carried out from AIX diagnostics.
How to Set the Electronic Key
The key can be set electronically, making it easier to provide remote support without
physically touching the machine. You can do this from the Stand-By mode or from AIX.
Setting the Electronic Key from Stand-By Mode
1. Go into Stand-By mode.
2. Press the Enter key to get the prompt displayed (>).
3. Press the Enter key again. The cursor (in block mode) is then superimposed on top of
the prompt.
4. At this point, press the Escape key and then the s key. This turns the Electronic Key to
Service even though the Physical Key is still in Normal position.
5. Press the Enter key again.
6. Enter the keyword, sbb (Stand-By BUMP). You should see the STAND-BY MENU
appear; this is a way to check that the System Key is in Service.
7. Exit from the STAND-BY MENU.
At this step, if you want to go back to Normal, press the Enter key again; then press the
ESC-n key. This puts the Electronic Key to Normal position.
Setting the Electronic Key from AIX
1. While AIX is running, log in as user root.
2. Type the following command to look at the current status of the Electronic Key:
keycfg –d
3. To change the key to Service, type the following command:
keycfg –c service
4. To change the key to Secure, type the following command:
keycfg –c secure
5. To change the key back to Normal, type the following command:
keycfg –c normal
Note that, each time, you can run the keycfg –d command to verify the status of the key.
Displaying Configuration through the Maintenance Menu
The system configuration can also be displayed through the MAINTENANCE MENU. You
will find the same kind of information displayed previously, but in a different and more
readable way.
To get the system configuration from the MAINTENANCE MENU, do the following:
1. Enter the MAINTENANCE MENU.
2. Enter 0 to select DISPLAY CONFIGURATION.
Using SystemGuard
3-39
The configuration display is a good picture of the SystemGuard configuration on one screen.
Here is an example:
DISPLAY CONFIGURATION
MACHINE TYPE/MODEL: 7013J30 45067
FIRMWARE RELEASE:
Standby –> 1600
Backup eprom –> 0701
Flash eprom –> 0704
SERVICE CONTRACT:
Last update (yymmdd) –> 950707
Validity –> Unlimited contract
Remote service support –> Valid
Quick On Call service –> Not valid
AUTO DIAL:
Disabled
CONSOLES:
BUMP Consoles –> Present
Service Console –> Disabled – 1200 Baud
SYSTEM ID:
00045067
NUMBER OF CPU:
4
MAIN MEMORY SIZE:
128 MByte
PRESENT UNITS:
#0
SELECT [Unit #(0–7) or x:exit]:
This screen is self explanatory. The interesting feature here is that you can see the level of
the firmware stored in the BUMP EPROM, the level of the firmware stored in the Flash
EPROM and the level stored in the Backup EPROM.
How to Set Fast IPL
If the Fast IPL flag is enabled, SystemGuard skips the extended POST. By default, the Fast
IPL flag is disabled; enabling it only lasts one reboot.
There are three ways to enable it: through the STAND-BY MENU in Stand-By mode, through
the MAINTENANCE MENU or by using AIX commands.
Setting Fast IPL from the Stand-By Menu
1. Set the System Key in Service.
2. Enter the STAND-BY MENU by entering sbb.
3. Enter 1 to select Set Flags.
4. Check the current status of the Fast IPL Flag. If it is disabled, enter 6 to toggle it to
enabled.
The Fast IPL flag is now enabled; the extended POST is not run when the system boots.
This saves several minutes.
The following information is contained on the SET FLAGS menu:
Set Flags
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Remote Authorization
Bump Console Present
Autoservice IPL
Extended Tests
PowerOn Tests in Trace Mode
PowerOn Tests in Loop Mode
Fast IPL
Set Electronic Mode Switch to Normal
select(x:exit):
3-40
Operator Guide
Disabled
Enabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
Disabled
NRM
Setting Fast IPL through the Maintenance Menu
1. Enter the MAINTENANCE MENU.
2. Enter 8 to select the SET PARAMETERS menu.
3. Enter 4 from the SET PARAMETERS menu to select the MISCELLANEOUS
PARAMETERS Menu.
4. Option 3 in this menu should show the current status of the Fast IPL flag. If it is disabled,
simply enter 3, and the flag is changed to enabled.
Fast IPL is now enabled and will last one reboot.
Setting Fast IPL through AIX
1. Log into AIX as user root.
2. Type in the following command to find the index of the Fast IPL flag and also the current
flag value:
mpcfg –df
Following is the output of the command:
Index
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Name
Remote Authorization
Autoservice IPL
BUMP Console
Dial–Out Authorization
Set Mode to Normal When Booting
Electronic Mode Switch from Service Line
Boot Multi–User AIX in Service
Extended Tests
Power On Tests in Trace Mode
Power On Tests in Loop Mode
Fast IPL
Value
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
3. The index is number 11, and, generally, the current value is zero (0), which means
disabled.
4. Type the following command to change the status of the Fast IPL flag to enabled:
mpcfg –cf 11 1
Where 11 is the index and 1 the value itself; c is for change and f for diagnostics flags.
5. Type the following command just to verify the flag is changed:
mpcfg –df
Using SystemGuard
3-41
How to Set the Service Line Speed
By default, the service line speed is 1200 baud or 2400 baud depending
on the level of SystemGuard. This speed can be changed through the SystemGuard
MAINTENANCE MENU. In order to use the Service Console properly, the terminal
connected to the S2 connector has to be set to the same speed. This speed is not
necessarily the same as the speed defined in AIX for tty1. To avoid changing the speed of
the terminal itself when AIX is running, it is more convenient to have the same speed for the
Service Console and tty1 defined in AIX.
Setting Line Speed through the Maintenance Menu
1. Enter the MAINTENANCE MENU.
2. Enter 8 in this menu to select the SET PARAMETERS menu.
SET PARAMETERS
0>
1>
2>
3>
4>
POWER–ON COMMAND
VOLTAGE MARGINS
SET CONFIGURATION
PHONE NUMBERS
MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS
SELECT (x:exit):
3. Enter 4 in this menu to select the MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS menu.
MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS
0>
1>
2>
3>
4>
5>
6>
7>
8>
9>
BUMP CONSOLE –> Present
AUTOSERVICE IPL –> Disabled
DIAL_OUT AUTHORIZATION –> Disabled
FAST IPL –> Enabled
SET MODE TO NORMAL WHEN BOOTING –> Disabled
BOOT MULTI–USER AIX IN SERVICE –> Disabled
SERVICE LINE SPEED –> 1200 Baud
MAINTENANCE PASSWORD
CUSTOMER MAINTENANCE PASSWORD
ELECTRONIC MODE SWITCH FROM SERVICE LINE –> Disabled
SELECT (x:exit):
4. Enter 6 to set this parameter. A menu showing possible line speeds is displayed.
5. Select a baud rate, and enter the corresponding menu number.
6. Exit from the menu.
3-42
Operator Guide
Setting Line Speed through AIX
1. With AIX up and running, log in as user root.
2. Type the following command to view current settings:
mpcfg –dm
The following is the output of the command:
Index
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Name
Modem Parameters File Name
Service Line Speed
Protocol Inter Data Block Delay
Protocol Time Out
Retry Number
Customer ID
Login ID
Password ID
Value
3. Type the following command to change to desired baud rate:
mpcfg –cm 2 xxxx
where c stands for change, m for modem and site configuration, 2 for the Service
Line Speed index, and xxxx for your desired baud rate (9600, for example).
4. The line speed is changed, but is not effective until a reboot of the system.
How to Authorize the Service Console
The Service Console must be authorized in order to work with SystemGuard. This allows
remote support personnel to log in to SystemGuard. Service Console Authorization must
also be activated to enable mirroring. There are three ways to do it:
Authorizing Service Console through the Stand-By Menu
1. Enter the STAND-BY MENU.
2. Enter 1 from the STAND-BY MENU to select the SET FLAGS menu.
3. Check the status of the Remote Authorization flag. If it is disabled, enter 0 to toggle it to
enabled.
4. Exit from the STAND-BY MENU.
Authorizing Service Console through the Maintenance Menu
1. Enter the MAINTENANCE MENU.
2. Enter 2 to select ENABLE SERVICE CONSOLE.
3. Exit from the MAINTENANCE MENU.
Authorizing Service Console through AIX
1. With AIX running, log in as user root.
2. Type the following command to view the current setting
mpcfg –df
3. Type the following command to change the flag:
mpcfg –cf 1 1
Where –cf is for change flag; 1 is for the index. The last number, 1, is the value of the
flag itself.
Using SystemGuard
3-43
How to Set Up Console Mirroring
Console Mirroring Concepts
Console mirroring is a way to provide the customer a view of what the person working
remotely from the Service Console is doing on the system. When mirroring is active, the
Service Console and the BUMP Console are logically identical, and both are tty0 (tty1 is
disabled when the mirroring starts).
Mirroring only works on the two serial ports, S1 and S2, and their respective ASCII consoles
or terminal emulators. It does not work on the graphical devices. The BUMP Console can be
either local (no modem connected) or remote (through a modem connection). Remote
console connection must be established through dial-in (BUMP does not dial out). The
Service Console is usually remote, connected through a Hayes-compatible modem on the
S2 port; however a local, directly attached console at the S2 port can also be supported.
T
Customer Site
Modem
T
Remote Support Center
S1
System Unit
Modem
S2
When mirroring is active, the customer on the BUMP Console and the support personnel on
the Service Console both see the same output on their screens, and either one may enter
characters. One person can even start typing and the other finish it. For example, the
support personnel may log in as root on the Service Console, and the customer may enter
the root password on the BUMP Console. Therefore, the remote support personnel do not
need to know the root password.
Console mirroring is possible during the following SystemGuard phases: Stand-By, Init and
Run-Time (AIX running).
The prerequisites for console mirroring are:
3-44
• Remote Service Support
1
• /usr/share/modems/mir_modem
file present (for mirroring when AIX is up)
Operator Guide
Setting Up Console Mirroring
In order to setup console mirroring, you need first to authorize the Service Console, and set
up the right line speed. Refer to previous chapters on how to set up the service line speed
and how to authorize the Service Console. Then do the following:
1. While AIX is running, log in as user root.
2. Type the following command to make sure that the Service Contract Validity is greater
than or equal to 0:
mpcfg –dS
The command output is:
Index
1
2
3
4
Name
Remote Service Support
Quick On Call Service
Service Contract Validity
Service Support Type
Value
1
0
32767
Note that mirrord cannot be started if the Service Contract Validity is –1 (No Valid Service
Contract).
3. Wake up the mirror daemon (mirrord) by either switching the Physical Key to Service or
by typing the following command:
keycfg –c service
If mirrord is awakened successfully, you should see the following messages:
mirrord: Wait connection...
mirrord: Remote user connected, mirroring active
4. Type the following command to verify that mirrord is running:
ps –ef|grep mir
The command output is similar to the following:
root
root
2308
6212
1
4552
0 12:08:21
3 12:21:58
–
0
0:00 /usr/sbin/mirrord mir_modem
0:00 grep mir
5. Now, the support personnel should be able to work on the remote console, and the
customer should be able to watch on the BUMP Console what the service personnel
enter on the Service Console.
6. To turn mirroring off, either switch the Physical Key to Normal or type the command:
keycfg –c normal
You should see the following message:
mirrord: mirroring is stopped
If the prerequisite conditions are met, the mirrord daemon is started at boot time, but goes to
sleep until the System Key is set to Service. When mirrord is awakened, it kills all processes
on S2 and pushes the streams mirror module onto the S2 queue.
Since it is assumed that the Service Console is remote, mirrord requires a modem file that
specifies the type and characteristics of the modem. This modem file is required even if the
Service Console is connected locally without modem. Thus, a file with no modem must be
provided. The default name of the modem file is mir_modem. Please refer to the appendix
for supported modem files.
Using SystemGuard
3-45
How to Enable Surveillance
Surveillance is implemented by the survd daemon. This daemon, when started, establishes
a heartbeat between AIX and SystemGuard. In case of an AIX hang, SystemGuard detects
it and reboots the system.
To implement the surveillance, do the following:
1. Enter:
survd –d {number of seconds}
This starts the survd daemon, thereby starting the surveillance. The number of
seconds determines the heartbeat delay time, where ten seconds is the minimum, and
the default is sixty seconds.
2. Carry out this step if you want a hardware reboot:
survd –h
(–h flag sets hardware reboot)
3. To turn off the surveillance, type the following command:
survd –r
Attention: If you issue the command kill –9 <survd_proc_id>, the system reboots
because SystemGuard thinks that AIX hung since it no longer receives a heartbeat.
How to Set Up the Dial-Out Feature
The dial-out feature can be implemented, either through SystemGuard or AIX.
Setting Up Dial-Out from SystemGuard
The dial-out feature is the automatic sending of certain errors to a service center. The
customer must set the Dial-Out Authorization flag. When the Physical Key is in the Normal
position, if a boot fails due to a POST error or boot device not found, a problem report is
sent to the remote service center.
The prerequisites for the dial-out feature are:
• Remote Service Support flag enabled
(1)
• Remote authorization enabled
(1)
• Dial-out authorization enabled
(1)
The dial-out feature uses the dial-out phone numbers listed in SystemGuard configuration.
To add or change phone numbers, do the following:
1. Enter the SystemGuard MAINTENANCE MENU.
2. Enter 8 from this menu to select the SET PARAMETERS menu.
3. Enter 3 from the SET PARAMETERS menu to select the PHONE NUMBERS menu.
4. Select your option, and enter the dial-out number or numbers. There are two service
center and customer hub numbers. These relate to primary (1) and secondary (2)
numbers.
3-46
Operator Guide
Modem Configuration
The modem on line S2 must be configured using an ASCII modem configuration file which
describes various parameters using a specific syntax. AIX uses this file directly. The BUMP
uses the same information (in condensed form) stored in non-volatile memory (NVRAM).
The modem line speed must be correctly set, either by using SystemGuard (see
“Miscellaneous Parameters” on page 1–39 or the diag command. The modem configuration
is used by both the dial-out and dial-in services.
The following table lists the data that BUMP sends to the remote support center.
Parameter
Field Size
Generated By
Magic Number
4
BUMP
Routing Metric
4
BUMP
Login ID
12
AIX Utility
CSS ID
4
BUMP
RETAIN Account Number
12
AIX Utility
General Password
16
AIX Utility
Time Stamp
8
BUMP
Customer System Phone
20
AIX Utility
Customer Operator Phone
20
AIX Utility
Machine Serial Number
10
BUMP or AIX Utility
Machine Device Type
13
BUMP or AIX Utility
Primary Error Code
4
BUMP
Destination
1
BUMP, HUB, or Service Center
SRN LCD Code
64
BUMP
Text Problem Abstract
64
BUMP
Using SystemGuard
3-47
How to Reboot AIX from the Remote Service Console
It is possible for the remote personnel connected via the Service Console to reboot AIX from
the remote site.
Prerequisites
The following procedure must be carried out from the BUMP Console in order to allow AIX to
boot remotely from the Service Console.
1. Get into the MAINTENANCE MENU (reboot the system with the key in Service mode).
2. Enter 8 in the MAINTENANCE MENU to select the SET PARAMETERS menu.
3. Enter 0 in the SET PARAMETERS menu to select the POWER-ON COMMAND menu.
4. Enter 3 and enable Service Console Power-On.
5. Enter 5 from the same menu, and enter the string power. This string is used for
powering-on the system from the Service Console.
6. Now reboot the system in Normal mode, and log in as user root.
7. Type the following commands:
mpcfg –cf 1 1 to enable Remote Authorization
mpcfg –cf 2 1 to enable Autoservice IPL
mpcfg –cf 6 1 to enable Electronic Mode Switch from S2
mpcfg –cf 7 1 to enable Boot Multi-User AIX in Service
mpcfg –cf 11 1 to enable Fast IPL
8. Type the following command to start console mirroring:
keycfg –c service
Now the system is set up so that the S2 port or the remote console can activate a reboot.
The system can be rebooted either in AIX Multi-User or in Diagnostics to run diagnostics on
the hardware.
Rebooting to AIX Multi-User
1. While AIX is running, log in as user root.
2. Type the command:
shutdown –F –t
and press Enter, to shut down the system.
You can use the –F flag for a fast shutdown and/or a –t flag for a shutdown at a particular
time.
3. Once the system has shut down press Enter, you should see the Stand-By prompt (>).
4. At this prompt, type sbb to get into the STAND-BY MENU.
5. Enter a 1 at the STAND-BY MENU to select the SET FLAGS menu.
6. Enter a 7 to select Set Electronic Mode Switch to Normal
7. Once the Electronic mode switch is set to Normal, exit out of the STAND-BY MENU until
you have your prompt (>).
8. Type power at this prompt; the system should reboot.
9. You should get the AIX login prompt in about ten minutes.
3-48
Operator Guide
Rebooting to Single-User and then to Multi-User
This allows the remote support personnel connected to the system via a modem to the S2
port to shut down and reboot the system in Diagnostics mode for hardware diagnostics
purposes. After running diagnostics, the remote personnel can reboot the system in AIX
Multi-User without having a need to physically touch the machine.
1. While AIX is running, type the command:
shutdown
and press Enter, to shut down the system.
2. Once the system is shutdown press Enter, you see the Stand-By mode prompt (>).
Remember, at this point the Electronic switch is in Service mode. Leave it in Service
mode.
3. At the Stand-By prompt, type the power on keyword for S2 that we had set earlier
(power in our example).
4. The system reboots in Diagnostics. From here, diagnostic tasks can be run.
5. Once completed, activate single-user boot from the Diagnostic’s main menu.
6. You are prompted for a password; enter the root password.
7. Type the following command to reboot in AIX Multi-User:
init 2
8. After about ten minutes, the system should have rebooted and loaded AIX.
9. If S2 was configured as a tty from AIX as well, an AIX login screen should appear on this
remote Service Console.
How to Boot from a SCSI Device
The SMP server can be booted in Service mode from a desired SCSI device, either from the
MAINTENANCE MENU or through the bootlist.
Booting from an SCSI Device through the Maintenance Menu
When the system is booted with the system key in Service position, it either boots in the
MAINTENANCE MENU, in Diagnostics or from a SCSI device, depending upon the various
flag settings.
Note: To be able to boot from an SCSI device other than the boot disk such as a tape
drive, the flag BOOT MULTI-USER AIX IN SERVICE must be disabled. This can be
set through the MAINTENANCE MENU. To check or change this flag, do the
following:
1. Enter the MAINTENANCE MENU; refer to the MAINTENANCE MENU section on page
3-21 for details.
2. From the MAINTENANCE MENU, enter 8 to select the SET PARAMETERS menu.
Using SystemGuard
3-49
3. From this menu, enter 4. to select the MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS menu, which is
similar to the following:
MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS
0>
1>
2>
3>
4>
5>
6>
7>
8>
9>
BUMP CONSOLE –> Present
AUTOSERVICE IPL –> Disabled
DIAL_OUT AUTHORIZATION –> Disabled
FAST IPL –> Enabled
SET MODE TO NORMAL WHEN BOOTING –> Disabled
BOOT MULTI–USER AIX IN SERVICE –> Disabled
SERVICE LINE SPEED –> 1200 Baud
MAINTENANCE PASSWORD
CUSTOMER MAINTENANCE PASSWORD
ELECTRONIC MODE SWITCH FROM SERVICE LINE –> Disabled
SELECT [x:exit]:
4. Check option 5 in this menu (BOOT MULTI-USER AIX IN SERVICE). If it is enabled,
enter 5, and the flag should be changed to disabled.
5. Have another look at the option to make sure it is disabled. Now you are ready to boot off
the SCSI device, off a tape drive for example.
6. Insert the bootable tape into the tape drive.
7. Exit back to the main MAINTENANCE MENU.
8. Enter 6 in the MAINTENANCE MENU to select the SYSTEM BOOT menu, which is
similar to the following:
SYSTEM BOOT
0> BOOT FROM LIST
1> BOOT FROM NETWORK
2> BOOT FROM SCSI DEVICE
SELECT [x:exit]:
9. Enter 2 to boot from an SCSI device. The menu that appears enables you to specify the
SCSI device by using the location code.
3-50
Operator Guide
10.At this point, a BOOT FROM SCSI DEVICE screen appears. This displays the PRESENT
DEVICE LOCATION CODE. If it is not the device you want to boot from, go through each
option and change it to the desired BUS, SLOT, SCSI ID, and LUN ID. Option 4 allows
you to change all these options at once. The BOOT FROM SCSI DEVICE screen is
similar to the following:
BOOT FROM SCSI DEVICE
PRESENT DEVICE LOCATION CODE:
(Drawer – Bus#/Slot# – Connector – SCSI ID/LUN) 000600600
COMMANDS: 0>
1>
2>
3>
4>
5>
CHANGE BUS#
CHANGE SLOT#
CHANGE SCSI ID
CHANGE LUN ID
CHANGE DEVICE LOCATION CODE
BOOT FROM SELECTED DEVICE
SELECT [x:exit]: 5
See page 3-26 for descriptions of these fields.
11. Enter 5 to begin the boot. The system leaves the maintenance environment and boots
from the specified SCSI device.
Booting from an SCSI Device through the Bootlist
The system can be booted from an SCSI device, such as a tape drive, without going through
the MAINTENANCE MENU. In this case, it uses the bootlist to determine the boot device
while in Service mode. The bootlist can be updated through Service Aids in Diagnostics.
Following are the prerequisites for booting from an SCSI device (a tape drive for example) in
Service mode:
• The Autoservice IPL flag must be enabled.
• The Service mode bootlist must be updated (this can be done in AIX Diagnostics by
selecting Service Aids and Display/Alter Bootlist).
• A supported SCSI device, such as a tape drive.
• A bootable SCSI media, such as a bootable tape (install or mksysb).
To boot off this SCSI device, do the following:
1. Switch the System Key to Service.
2. Insert the bootable media in the SCSI device.
3. Turn on the system power.
The system then boots up from this SCSI device. If the boot up is not successful, verify that
the tape is bootable, or clean the media device.
Using SystemGuard
3-51
How to Boot from the Network
The system can be booted from the network through the MAINTENANCE MENU. Network
boot allows a system to be reinstalled via the network and also allows various maintenance
tasks to be carried out on the local machine. Use the following procedure to boot from the
network:
1. Enter the MAINTENANCE MENU.
2. From the MAINTENANCE MENU, enter 8 to select the SYSTEM BOOT menu, which is
similar to the following:
SYSTEM BOOT
0> BOOT FROM LIST
1> BOOT FROM NETWORK
2> BOOT FROM SCSI DEVICE
SELECT [x:exit]: 1
3. From the SYSTEM BOOT menu, enter 1 to select BOOT FROM NETWORK, which is
similar to the following:
MAIN MENU
1.
2.
3.
4.
Select BOOT (Startup) Device
Select Language for these Menus
Send Test Transmission (PING)
Exit Main Menu and Start System (BOOT)
Type the number for your selection, then press ”ENTER”
(Use the ”Backspace” key to correct errors)
4. From the NETWORK BOOT MAIN MENU, enter a 1 to select the Select BOOT (Startup)
Device option.
3-52
Operator Guide
5. The SELECT BOOT (STARTUP) DEVICE menu appears, which is similar to the
following:
SELECT BOOT (STARTUP) DEVICE
Select the device to BOOT (Startup) this machine.
WARNING: If you are using Token–Ring, selection of an
incorrect data rate can result in total disruption of the
Token–Ring network.
”==>” Shows the selected BOOT (startup) device
==>
1. Use Default Boot (Startup) Device
2. Token–Ring: Slot 3, 4 Mb data rate
3. Token–Ring: Slot 3, 16 Mb data rate
4. Ethernet: Slot 4, 15–pin connector
Page 1 of 2
88. Next Page of Select BOOT (Startup) Device Menu
99. Return to Main Menu
Type the number for your selection, then press ”ENTER”
(Use the ”Backspace” key to correct errors)
6. Select the device to boot from. For example, choose 3 to boot from Token-Ring: slot 3,
16 Mb data rate. A screen similar to the following will appear:
SET OR CHANGE NETWORK ADDRESSES
Select an address to change
Currently selected BOOT (startup) device is:
Token–Ring: Slot 2, 16 Mb data rate
Hardware address ................................ 10005AC97CF1
1. Client address
009.003.001.027
(address of this machine)
2. BOOTP server address
009.003.001.008
(address of the remote machine you boot from)
3. Gateway address
000.000.000.000
(Optional, required if gateway used)
97. Return to Select BOOT (Startup) Device Menu (SAVES addresses)
99. Return to Main Menu (SAVES addresses)
Type the number for your selection, then press ”ENTER”
(Use the ”Backspace” key to correct errors)
Using SystemGuard
3-53
7. Enter the appropriate IP addresses, and enter 99 to return to the MAIN MENU. A screen
similar to the following appears:
MAIN MENU
1.
2.
3.
4.
Select BOOT (Startup) Device
Select Language for these Menus
Send Test Transmission (PING)
Exit Main Menu and Start System (BOOT)
Type the number for your selection, then press ”ENTER”
(Use the ”Backspace” key to correct errors)
8. Enter 4 to exit from the menu, and start system boot.
9. A screen similar to the following appears as the system boots off the network:
STARTING SYSTEM (BOOT)
Booting . . .
Token–Ring:
Please wait.
Slot 2, 16 Mb data rate
Hardware address ................................... 10005AC97CF1
Packets Sent
BOOTP
00000
Packets Received
00000
To find out more information on NIM (Network Install Manager), refer to AIX Version 4.1
Network Installation Management Guide and Reference, order number, SC23-2627.
3-54
Operator Guide
How to Disable and Enable Processors
In the SMP servers, it is possible to disable/enable processors. A suspected faulty processor
can be disabled so that the system can run without it. The processors can be
disabled/enabled through the STAND-BY MENU, MAINTENANCE MENU, Diagnostics, or
through AIX commands.
Enabling/Disabling Processors through the Stand-By Menu
1. Enter the STAND-BY MENU; refer to the STAND-BY MENU section on page 3-12.
2. From the STAND-BY MENU, enter 3 to select the Set Configuration menu. A first-level
screen similar to the following appears:
Set Configuration
00 CPU0
01 CPU1
02 CPU2
03 CPU3
04 MC0
05 MC1
06 MC2
07 MC3
08 basic MCA
09 exp MCA
Select(x:exit): 01
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
UNIT0
UNIT1
UNIT2
UNIT3
UNIT4
UNIT5
UNIT6
UNIT7
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
&
dev
dev
dev
dev
dev
dev
dev
dev
The Set Configuration screen displays the units and devices that can be configured,
along with their menu index number. At this step, CPU0 stands for the CPU card 0, not
processor 0.
3. Enter an index number for a CPU card to be looked at. If you select CPU1 (01), for
example, the following screen appears:
CPU1
00
01
02
03
04
05
Set
CPU0
CPU0
CPU0
CPU1
CPU1
CPU1
| Status
C
D
T
C
D
T
C
C
Select(x:exit): 04
4. All the CPUs and their statuses are displayed, where:
• C
stands for configured
• D
stands for disabled
• T
stands for temporarily disabled. It means that at the next power on or reset,
the device is automatically reconfigured.
Using SystemGuard
3-55
5. Enter 04 to deconfigure CPU1. You should see the status changed to D, disabled.
CPU1
00
01
02
03
04
05
Set
CPU0
CPU0
CPU0
CPU1
CPU1
CPU1
| Status
C
D
T
C
D
T
C
D
Select(x:exit):
6. Now, once the system is rebooted, it runs without processor 1.
7. To enable CPU1, follow the same procedure as above, except choose a status C (03 in
this example).
8. Exit the STAND-BY MENU, and continue booting the machine.
Enabling/Disabling Processors through the Maintenance Menu
1. Enter the MAINTENANCE MENU. Refer to the MAINTENANCE MENU section on page
3-21 for details.
2. Enter 8 to select the SET PARAMETERS menu, which is similar to the following:
SET PARAMETERS
0>
1>
2>
3>
4>
POWER–ON COMMAND
VOLTAGE MARGINS
SET CONFIGURATION
PHONE NUMBERS
MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS
SELECT [x:exit]: 2
3. Enter 2 from the SET PARAMETERS menu to select the SET CONFIGURATION menu,
which is similar to the following:
SET CONFIGURATION
0> CPU CARD
1> MEMORY CARD
2> BASIC MCA ADAPTERS
SELECT [x:exit]: 0
CPU CARD [0> CPU0| 1> CPU1 or x:exit]: 1
4. Enter 0 from this menu to select the CPU CARD option.
3-56
Operator Guide
5. The CPU CARD screen appears and looks similar to the following:
CPU CARD – (CPU1)
PRESENT CONDITIONS: PR #0 –> Valid & Enabled
PR #1 –> Valid & Enabled
COMMANDS: 0> ENABLE
1> DISABLE
2> TEMPORARY DISABLE
SELECT [x:exit]:
6. From this screen, you can disable or enable a particular processor on the selected CPU
card. Option 0 enables a CPU; option 1 disables a CPU, and option 2 temporarily
disables a CPU until the next reboot.
Enabling/Disabling Processors through AIX
The processors can be disabled/enabled through AIX as well. This is done through the
cpu_state command. Following is the command with various options:
• To list the processors and view their statuses, type cpu_state –l. The output should
look something like this:
Name
proc0
proc1
proc2
proc3
Cpu
0
1
2
3
Status
enabled
enabled
enabled
enabled
Location
00–0P–00–00
00–0P–00–01
00–0Q–00–00
00–0Q–00–01
• To disable a CPU, CPU1 for example, type cpu_state –d 1. Look at the result with
cpu_state –l:
Name
proc0
proc1
proc2
proc3
Cpu
0
1
2
3
Status
enabled
disabled
enabled
enabled
Location
00–0P–00–00
00–0P–00–01
00–0Q–00–00
00–0Q–00–01
Note: This change does not take effect until after a reboot. After a reboot, the cpu_state
–l command shows:
Name
proc0
proc1
proc2
proc3
Cpu
0
–
1
2
Status
enabled
disabled
enabled
enabled
Location
00–0P–00–00
00–0P–00–01
00–0Q–00–00
00–0Q–00–01
Using SystemGuard
3-57
Customizing SystemGuard For Your Needs
SystemGuard is controlled by several flags. The flags consist of Contract Flags, Operational
Flags, Remote Maintenance Flags, and Test Flags.
Remote Service Flag
This flag is disabled at the factory and must be enabled for remote service
Operational Flags
The Operational Flags are the BUMP Console flag, the AutoService IPL flag, and Set Mode
to Normal When Booting flag, which are enabled at the factory, however, they can be
customized for your needs.
The BUMP Console flag enables the SystemGuard Console attached to Serial Port 1. If
enabled, the console attached to Serial Port 1 is shared with the operating system. It is
recommended that this flag always be enabled if a console is attached to Serial Port 1. This
flag can be set from the Set Flags menu, MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS menu, or the
Service Aids.
The AutoService IPL flag instructs SystemGuard to bypass the MAINTENANCE MENU
when the system is booted in Service Mode. This enables the system to be booted quicker
when installing the operating system and when loading the diagnostics. It is recommended
that this flag always be enabled unless there is a need to use the MAINTENANCE MENU.
This flag can be set from the Set Flags menu, MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS menu, or
the Service Aids.
The Set Mode to Normal When Booting flag instructs SystemGuard to reset the Electronic
Key to Normal when booting. It is recommended that this flag always be enabled. This flag
can be set from the MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS menu or the Service Aids.
Test Flags
The Test Flags are the Boot Multiuser AIX in Service flag, Fast IPL flag, Extended Tests flag,
PowerOn Tests in Loop Mode flag, and PowerOn Tests in Trace Mode flag. They are
disabled at the factory. They are used during testing and do not need to be customized.
Remote Maintenance Flags
The Remote Maintenance Flags are the Remote Authorization flag, Dial-Out Authorization
flag, and Electronic Mode Switch from Service Line flag. They are disabled at the factory,
however, they can be customized for your needs.
The Remote Authorization flag enables the SystemGuard Console to use Serial Port 2 for a
Remote Console and to report problems to a remote site. If enabled, Serial Port 2 is shared
with the operating system. The setting of this flag depends if you are using remote
maintenance or not. This flag can be set from the Set Flags menu, MISCELLANEOUS
PARAMETERS menu, or the Service Aids.
The Dial-Out Authorization flag enables the SystemGuard Console to report problems that
prevent the system from booting to be reported to a remote site via Serial Port 2. The setting
of this flag depends if you are using remote maintenance or not and if you want problems
that prevent the system from booting to be reported to a remote site. This flag can be set
from the Set Flags menu, MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS menu, or the Service Aids. If
this flag is enabled, a Service Center Dial-Out phone number must be set.
The Electronic Mode Switch from Service Line flag enables the Electronic Mode Switch to
be controlled from the Service Console. The setting of this flag depends if you want the
Electronic Mode Switch to be controlled from the Service Line or not. This flag can be set
from the MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS menu or the Service Aids.
3-58
Operator Guide
Phone Numbers
If remote maintenance is used, SystemGuard requires several phone numbers to be
entered. Additional information is provided in “Phone Numbers” on page 3-34.
Service Line Speed Parameters
If remote maintenance is used, SystemGuard requires that the line speed be configured.
The default is 1200 baud. The speed can be set by MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS
menu or the Service Aids.
Modem Parameters
If remote maintenance is used, SystemGuard may require that the Modem Parameters file
be updated. This file can be set by the Service Aids.
Passwords
Passwords are used to protect access to SystemGuard. The passwords are the
Maintenance Password and the Customer Maintenance Password. No passwords are set at
the factory. However, they can be customized for your needs. The Maintenance Password
restricts access to basic features of the MAINTENANCE MENU. If you set the password you
should provide it to your service personnel when requested. The Customer Maintenance
Password restricts access to sensitive customer data. If you set the password you normally
should not provide it to your service personnel. The passwords can be set from the
MISCELLANEOUS PARAMETERS menu.
Using SystemGuard
3-59
Reloading the Flash EEPROM
Follow this procedure to load a new version of SystemGuard into the flash EEPROM. Only
system administrators should perform this procedure.
Prerequisites
To install a new version of the EEPROM firmware, you need either a firmware diskette
containing a binary firmware image, or a file containing the firmware.
You can also update the firmware using a file containing a new firmware version.
Updating the Flash EEPROM (using a firmware diskette)
If the system is not yet powered on, simply insert the firmware diskette in the drive, place the
Mode Switch in the Service position, and then power on the system. The firmware diskette is
identified by a special header which distinguishes it from diskettes containing other data.
The existing firmware recognizes the special header and automatically loads the new
firmware version.
If AIX is already up and running (the run-time phase), reloading the firmware requires more
steps, because you first have to shut down the system, then reboot the machine as
described in the preceding paragraph.
Updating the Flash EEPROM (using a file)
An administrator with root authority can use the AIX diag command to update the EEPROM
firmware using a file. Because this procedure reboots the machine after the update, the root
user who performs this procedure should be the only logged user. If the system is not yet
powered on, power on the system, and log in as the root user without letting other users log
in. Then follow the steps to use when the system is up and running.
If AIX is already up and running (the run-time phase), perform the following steps:
1. Make sure that no other users are logged in to the system (log them out if necessary).
2. Make sure that you have root authority (use the su command if necessary).
3. Enter the diag command or load diagnostics when the Key Mode switch is in the
Service position.
4. Select Service Aids.
5. Select the BUMP Service Aids option.
6. Select the Flash Eprom Download option.
7. Enter the full path name for the file containing the new flash EEPROM image. The image
file installed with the operating system is located in the /usr/lpp/devices.base directory.
8. The system is automatically rebooted.
3-60
Operator Guide
Chapter 4. AC Rack Description
This chapter contains information about the AC 7015 Model R00 rack features and parts.
For information about using the AC 7015 Model R00 rack, refer to Chapter 5.
For information about the DC 7015 Model R00 rack, refer to Chapters 6 and 7.
AC Rack
The 7015 Model R00 rack can contain a CPU Enclosure with other optional compatible
drawers such as disk drive drawers, tape drive drawer, and SCSI device drawer. The power
distribution system in an AC 7015 Model R00 rack supports a power distribution unit with a
battery backup unit (BBU) or is available with a Power Distribution Bus (PDB). A Cluster
Power Controller (CPC) and an Uninterruptable Power Source (UPS) are also available. For
information about options and compatible optional drawers that can be used with a CPU
Enclosure in a 7015 Model R00 rack, see the Site and Hardware Planning Information
manual.
Notes:
1. Errors can occur in the data files if power to the rack is switched off without first
using an appropriate shutdown command to stop the operating system. See your
operating system documentation for information about the shutdown command.
2. A stabilizer is attached to the front of the system unit to prevent it from tipping over
when a drawer is extended to the service position.
AC Rack with CPU Enclosure (Front View)
7015 Model R00 Rack with CPU Enclosure
CPU
Enclosure
Option
Drawers
Stabilizer
AC Rack Description
4-1
AC Rack Features
The AC 7015 rack can contain the following alternate rack features:
• External device container
• Cable channel
• Rack attachment plate
AC Rack with External Device Container, Cable Channel, and Rack
Attachment Plate
External Device
Container
4-2
Operator Guide
Cable Channel
Rack Attachment
Plate
Power Distribution Bus
The power distribution bus (PDB) can be installed in an AC 7015 Model R00 rack with a
7015 CPU Enclosure. The PDB contains six 200 to 240 V ac outlets for providing power to
all the drawers in the rack. Each outlet is connected to a separate circuit breaker for
protection against excessive currents. A battery backup unit is not compatible with a PDB
and cannot be installed in the rack with a PDB.
Note: For a translation of this notice, see the System Unit Safety Information manual.
CAUTION:
The power distribution unit outlets provide 200 to 240 V ac. Use these outlets only for
devices that operate within this voltage range.
Rear View of Rack
Power Distribution Bus
Outlet (6)
Reset Button (6)
Plug for AC Outlet
(Single Phase)
Plug for AC Outlet
(Three Phase)
AC Rack Description
4-3
Cluster Power Control
The cluster power controller (CPC) provides:
• Connectivity between the remote support facility and multiple CPUs through the modem
• Connectivity from any attached CPU to any attached disk drive drawer
• Central power-on and power-off through the TTY.
The CPC provides ports for connection of multiple G Series system units, J Series system
units, and CPU enclosures for power control interface connection of CPUs and disk drive
drawers. The CPC also contains ports for connection of a modem and TTY.
The AC 7015 Model R00 rack can contain two CPCs.
For more information about the CPC, refer to the Cluster Power Control Operator and
Service Guide, form number SA23-2766.
Mounting Screws
Disk Drive Connectors
(PCI Connectors)
Disk Drive Connectors
(RS485 Connectors)
CPU A
1
2
CPU B
1
2
CPU
Connectors
CPU C
1
2
CPU D
1
2
CPC
Expansion
Connectors
CPC Left
1
2
CPC Right
1
2
TTY Connector
Modem Connector
Mounting Screws
4-4
Operator Guide
Rear View of Rack
Uninterruptible Power Source
The uninterruptible power source (UPS) can be installed in a 7015 Model R00 rack. The
UPS contains one power plug (in) and one power outlet (out) for connecting to the power
distribuion bus (PDB).
Front View of Rack
Rear View of Rack
Power
Distribution
Bus (PDB)
Uninterruptible
Power Source
PDB Plug
Connects to
UPS Receptacle
Rear View of UPS
Power Input
Connector
Input Breaker
Voltage Selector
Switch
Power Output
Receptacle
Serial Ports
100–127V
Convenience Outlets
Output Breaker
AC Rack Description
4-5
Power Distribution Unit (Supported)
The power distribution unit supplies 200 to 240 V ac from each of the six AC power outlets.
These outlets provide power to all the drawers in the rack. The optional battery backup unit
attaches to the power distribution unit and can provide 300 V dc to three drawers for 10
minutes. You can attach up to three additional drawers to the battery backup unit by using
the battery backup extender cables.
Note: The battery backup unit can provide power to drawers in your system during power
outages. Power to a terminal that controls your system can be interrupted during
power outages unless the terminal is connected to an uninterruptable power source.
The power distribution unit (PDU) is located inside the rear door at the bottom of the system
unit. Each AC power outlet is controlled by a power select switch located under it. The
switches can be set so that the outlets are either always on or switched on and off by the
power control signal.
Note: For a translation of this notice, see the System Unit Safety Information manual.
CAUTION:
The power distribution unit outlets provide 200 to 240 V ac. Use these outlets only for
devices that operate within this voltage range.
IPO
Connector
Master CB1
Circuit Breaker
AC Power
Outlet
System
Power
Connector
Main
Auxiliary
Power Select
Switch
Power Control Interface (PCI) Connectors
4-6
Operator Guide
Drawer Power
Reset CB
Battery Backup Unit (Supported)
Note: The battery backup unit (BBU) can only be installed in the rack with a power
distribution unit. The BBU cannot be installed in a rack with a power distribution bus.
In addition to supporting other types of drawers in a rack, the BBU can support only
one CPU-type drawer in a rack.
The battery backup unit contains four 12-volt batteries. It is connected to the power
distribution unit and occupies the area immediately above and behind the PDU, as you look
from the rear.
Note: For a translation of this notice, see the System Unit Safety Information manual.
CAUTION:
The battery backup unit outlets provide 300 V dc. Use these outlets only for devices
that operate at this voltage.
Front View
Rear View
Battery
Status
Lights
Fuse
Safety Cover
Battery Status
Connector
In Use
Unavailable
Capacity
Exceeded
Master CB2
Circuit Breaker
DC Power Outlet
The front panel of the battery backup unit has three battery status lights to indicate if the
batteries are in use, unavailable, or if their capacity has been exceeded.
If the In Use light is on, the batteries are supplying power to the attached devices.
If the Unavailable light is on, the batteries need recharging or the unit requires service;
contact your service representative.
If the Capacity Exceeded light is on, the batteries cannot provide the power required by the
attached devices.
AC Rack Description
4-7
System Unit Devices
For more information about system unit devices, refer to the Site and Hardware Planning
Information.
SCSI-2 Drawer (Supported)
Note: Compartment D of the SCSI drawer can contain a 5.0 GB 8 mm tape drive, a 4.0 GB
4 mm tape drive, 1/4-inch tape drive, or a disk drive.
The SCSI drawer shown in the following illustration contains an 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive and
a disk drive. Various media devices and disk drives can be used in the four compartments of
the drawer. See the Site and Hardware Planning Information manual for more information
about the drawer configurations manual.
Compartments
A
B
Power Light
Disk Drive
C
D
5.0GB 8 mm
Tape Drive
4.0GB 4 mm
Tape Drive
8 mm Tape Drive
Note: The SCSI drawer can contain a 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive.
This tape drive uses tapes that can store 5.0GB of information in the normal mode. When
using the 5.0 GB 8 mm tape drive, tapes can store more than 5.0GB of information in the
compressed mode. For more information, see “Using the 5.0GB 8-mm Tape Drive” on page
2-29.
4 mm Tape Drive
Note: The 4 mm tape drive is located in any compartment of the SCSI device drawer. The
4 mm tape drive is located in the bottom media position (to the left of the operator
panel) of the CPU Enclosure.
This tape drive uses tapes that can store 4GB of information in the normal mode. This tape
drive can store up to 8GB when using DDS2 data cartridges, or when in the compressed
mode. For more information, see “Using the 4.0GB 4 mm Tape Drive” on page 2-38.
4-8
Operator Guide
Disk Drive
There are no operator controls on the disk drive.
Because data can become unusable if a disk drive problem occurs, you should back up the
data stored on the disks. See your operating system documentation for information about
using diskettes or tape drives to back up files.
Controls
Under normal conditions, you do not use the controls located behind the cover of the SCSI
drawer. Power to the drawer is switched on and off automatically when power to the CPU
enclosure is switched on and off.
Power
Switch
Fans-Good Light
Compartment
Switch
Power
Light
Power Switch
This switch controls electrical power to all four compartments in the drawer. Under normal
conditions, the switch should be in the | (On) position.
Power Light
This light is on when the drawer receives a power signal from the CPU enclosure. The light
is off when power to the CPU enclosure is switched off, the power switch on the SCSI
drawer is switched off, or there is a power problem within the drawer.
Fans-Good Light
This light is on when the fans in the drawer are operating at the correct speed. The light is
off when a fan operates slowly, stops, or does not start.
Compartment Switches
Each switch controls power to the compartment behind it. Power is connected to a
compartment when the switch is in the On (in) position and the light within the switch is on.
Power is disconnected from a compartment when the switch is in the Off (out) position and
the light within the switch is off. Press the switch to change the On or Off position. Under
normal conditions, these switches should be in the On (in) position.
AC Rack Description
4-9
AC Rack Cables and the CPU Enclosure
Connectors
Rear View of a 7015 Model R30 CPU
Enclosure Installed in a 7015 Model R00 Rack
CPU
Enclosure
Cable
Restraint
Straps
Cluster
Power
Control
(Maximum
of Two in a
Rack)
Power
Distribution
Bus
(Maximum
of Two in a
Rack)
4-10
Operator Guide
Notes:
1. It is recommended that a trained service representative connect or disconnect any
cables attached to the CPU enclosure.
However, if you choose to connect or disconnect cables attached to the system
unit, observe the following safety notices.
2. For a translation of these notices, see the System Unit Safety Information manual.
DANGER
An electrical outlet that is not correctly wired could place hazardous voltage
on metal parts of the system or the devices that attach to the system. It is the
responsibility of the customer to ensure that the outlet is correctly wired and
grounded to prevent an electrical shock.
Before installing or removing signal cables, ensure that the power cables for the
system unit and all attached devices are unplugged.
When adding or removing any additional devices to or from the system, ensure
that the power cables for those devices are unplugged before the signal cables
are connected. If possible, disconnect all power cables from the existing system
before you add a device.
Use one hand, when possible, to connect or disconnect signal cables to prevent a
possible shock from touching two surfaces with different electrical potentials.
During an electrical storm, do not connect cables for display stations, printers,
telephones, or station protectors for communication lines.
CAUTION:
This product is equipped with a 3-wire power cable and plug for the user’s safety. Use
this power cable in conjunction with a properly grounded electrical outlet to avoid
electrical shock.
Attention: This unit may have more than one power supply cord. To completely remove
power, you must disconnect all power supply cords.
AC Rack Description
4-11
Cable Path
Note: It is recommended that a trained service representative connect or disconnect any
cables attached to the CPU enclosure.
However, if you choose to connect or disconnect cables attached to the system unit,
observe the following information.
Use the cable restraint strap located on an attachment holes on the sides of the rack to
attach the cables to the rack.
To open the cable restraint strap, press the release tab while pulling the end of the cable
restraint strap through the locking mechanism.
To attach the cables to the rack, do the following:
1. Open the cable restraint strap.
2. To attach adapter cables to the rack, gather the cables attached to the adapters, and
then place the cable bundle in the cable restraint strap located below the adapters on
your left.
To attach optional adapter cables to the rack, gather the cables attached to the optional
adapters, and then place the cable bundle in the cable restraint strap located below the
optional adapters on your right.
3. Place the end of the cable restraint strap through the locking mechanism, and then pull
the end of the cable restraint strap to tighten the cables against the rack.
Opening the Cable Restraint Strap
Locking
Mechanism
Rear View of Rack
Release
Tab
Adapters
Closing the Cable Restraint Strap
Release
Tab
Locking
Mechanism
4-12
Operator Guide
Cable
Restraint
Straps
Location Codes and Identification Labels
Note: The SCSI drawer is optional in a rack with a CPU Enclosure.
Several types of labels identify the locations of adapters and devices within the system unit.
Numbers on these labels correspond to the location codes that are displayed when the
diagnostic programs isolate a problem.
A location code is used to find the location of a failing device or unit. The location code is
displayed along with the SRN when the diagnostic programs isolate a failure. If the location
code is not known, you can run the Display Previous Diagnostic Results service aid to
display the results of the last time the diagnostic programs were run.
The rack has several labels on the drawers and devices. These help the operator and
service person identify various drawers and devices. The drawer ID should match the slot
location of the adapter that drives it. The SCSI devices may be labeled with a number that
identifies the SCSI address of the device.
Location Code Format for SCSI Devices
The following diagram shows the format of location codes for SCSI drawers.
AB - CD - EF - GH
,HHH is the logical unit number of the device shown in decimal.
SCSI address of the device.
00 - Internal SCSI bus connector.
01 - External SCSI bus connector of a non-integrated
SCSI controller.
0S - External bus connector of an integrated SCSI
controller,
Slot number of the SCSI controller. For the IBM 7012
direct bus attach disk drive, 7 is the rear drive and 8 is
the front drive.
Always 0.
Always 00.
To aid the operator and service person, the rack-type system unit has several identification
labels on drawers and devices. The drawer ID should match the slot location of the adapter
that drives it. SCSI devices may be labeled with a number that identifies the SCSI address
to which the device is set.
Location Code Format for, 7135, 9333, and 9334 Expansion Units
The location code formats for the 7135, 9333, and 9334 expansion units are described in
the publications for the 7135, 9333, and 9334 SCSI expansion units.
AC Rack Description
4-13
SCSI Drawer ID Label
This label contains a two-digit number that identifies the slot in the CPU Enclosure where
the SCSI adapter is located (drawer ID). The number on this label corresponds to the
characters CD in the location code. One label is located in the lower-right corner on the rear
of the drawer, and one is located in the lower-left corner on the front of the drawer (behind
the cover).
Rear View
Drawer ID Label
Front View
Without Cover
Drawer ID Label
4-14
Operator Guide
SCSI Device Address Label
This label contains a one-digit number that identifies the address of the device. The number
on this label corresponds to the character G in the location code. One label is located in the
upper-right corner of each device (behind the cover). A second SCSI device address label is
required for media positions containing dual disk drives and is located below the other SCSI
device address label.
SCSI Device Address Label
Second SCSI Device Address Label for
Media Positions Containing Dual Disk Drives
Cover Label
This label contains a four-digit number that identifies the slot in the CPU Enclosure where
the SCSI adapter is located (drawer ID) and the address of the device. The first two digits of
this number correspond to the characters CD in the location code; the last two digits
correspond to the characters GH. At the customer’s discretion, a cover label may be applied
to the space provided on the cover under each compartment.
Cover
Cover Label
AC Rack Description
4-15
Creating Cover Labels
Note: Either a 5.0GB 8 mm tape drive or a 4.0GB 4 mm tape drive can be installed in the
right media position.
Use the following steps and the sheet of peel-off numbers supplied with your system to
create cover labels for SCSI drawers.
1. Remove the cover from the SCSI drawer by grasping the cover on both sides and pulling
out from the drawer.
2. Look at the drawer ID label located in the lower-left corner of the drawer. The digits on
this label are the first two digits of each cover label.
Drawer ID Label
3. Apply the digits that represent the drawer ID to the left corner of each cover label.
For example: If the drawer ID is 02, apply 02 to the left corner of each cover label.
Cover
Cover Label
0 2
4-16
Operator Guide
0 2
0 2
0 2
4. Look at the SCSI device address label on the bracket for each device. These numbers
are the third digits of the cover labels.
SCSI Device Address Label
5. Apply the digit that represents the SCSI address for a device to the space provided for
the third digit of the cover label for that device.
For example: If the address for a device is 1, apply a 1 to the space provided for the third
digit of the cover label for that device.
0 2 1
0 2 2
0 2 3
0 2 4
6. Apply a 0 to the space provided for the fourth digit of each cover label.
0 2 1 0
0 2 2 0
0 2 3 0
0 2 4 0
7. Install the cover by aligning it with the drawer and then pressing the cover into place.
AC Rack Description
4-17
Location Code Format for Non-SCSI Devices
The following example is for non-SCSI devices. These include planars, memory cards,
adapters, and async distribution boxes.
Use the example to determine the physical location of a device.
Note: The G and H fields each can contain one, two, or three characters.
AB - CD - EF - GH
Async port number or FRU location on a card or planar.
Connector number on an adapter or planar.
Slot number of the adapter, memory card, or adapter for
the identified device
System I/O bus identifier.
Always 0 on workstations. Drawer ID or slot number of the
adapter that drives the drawer in a rack-type system unit.
Always 0.
Non-SCSI Drawer ID Label
This label contains a two-digit number that identifies the slot in the 7015 CPU Enclosure
where the adapter that controls the drawer is located. The number on this label corresponds
to the characters AB in the location code. One label is located in the lower-right corner on
the back of each drawer.
4-18
Operator Guide
Location Code Table for SCSI and Non-SCSI Devices
Use the following table to determine the physical location of a device or unit.
Note: The location code format for 9333 devices is described on the previous page and in
9333 documentation.
Use the following example to identify these two-character pairs: AB-CD-EF-GH.
Pair
Value
Description
AB
00
00
00
00
Workstation-type system unit.
CPU drawer or enclosure in a rack-type system unit.
SCSI device drawer in a rack-type system unit.
SCSI disk drawer in a rack-type system unit.
08
This is not an invalid number. Slot 8 contains a standard SCSI
adapter.
00
00
CPU card.
A device attached to the I/O planar.
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
Adapter in slot 1 of the I/O planar.
Adapter in slot 2 of the I/O planar.
Adapter in slot 3 of the I/O planar.
Adapter in slot 4 of the I/O planar.
Adapter in slot 5 of the I/O planar.
Adapter in slot 6 of the I/O planar.
Adapter in slot 7 of the I/O planar.
Adapter in slot 8 of the I/O planar.
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
0J
Second I/O planar.
Adapter in slot 1 of the second I/O planar
Adapter in slot 2 of the second I/O planar
Adapter in slot 3 of the second I/O planar
Adapter in slot 4 of the second I/O planar
Adapter in slot 5 of the second I/O planar
Adapter in slot 6 of the second I/O planar
Adapter in slot 7 of the second I/O planar
Adapter in slot 8 of the second I/O planar
Graphics adapter slot.
0A
0B
0C
0D
Memory card in slot A on the system/CPU card.
Memory card in slot B on the system/CPU card.
Memory card in slot C on the system/CPU card.
Memory card in slot D on the system/CPU card.
0P
0Q
0R
0S
CPU card located in slot P.
CPU card located in slot Q.
CPU card located in slot R.
CPU card located in slot S.
00
Does not have a connector or software was not able to identify
the connector number.
01
02
03
04
The number of the connector on an adapter card, distribution box,
or planar. If needed, see Chapter 8 for the connector numbering
on your adapter.
0D
0E
0P
Internal diskette connector on the standard I/O planar.
Built-in Ethernet adapter.
Parallel printer connector.
CD
CD
EF
AC Rack Description
4-19
Pair
Value
Description
S1
S2
S3
Serial port 1 connector.
Serial port 2 connector.
Serial Port 3 connector.
11
12
13
14
21
22
23
24
Remote async node 1 on line 1.
Remote async node 2 on line 1.
Remote async node 3 on line 1.
Remote async node 4 on line 1.
Remote async node 1 on line 2.
Remote async node 2 on line 2.
Remote async node 3 on line 2.
Remote async node 4 on line 2.
GH
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Memory module in location 1 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 2 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 3 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 4 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 5 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 6 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 7 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 8 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 9 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 10 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 11 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 12 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 13 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 14 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 15 on the memory card.
Memory module in location 16 on the memory card.
G,HHH
00
For devices other than those listed here
00
thru
15
Port addresses for 8-port async, 16-port async, and 16-port
concentrator distribution boxes.
01
Diskette drive 1
0,000
thru
F,255
SCSI address and logical unit number of the device shown in
decimal.
Note: When a comma appears between the G and H, digits
appearing to the right of the comma are represented in decimal.
Note: See the Appendix A to determine physical location.
4-20
Operator Guide
Chapter 5. Using the AC Rack
This chapter contains information about using, starting, and stopping the AC 7015 Model
R00 rack containing a 7015 CPU Enclosure.
For information about using the DC 7015 Model R00 rack, refer to Chapters 6 and 7.
Starting the AC Rack
Powering on the system unit includes:
1. Pressing the Power On button located on the operator panel of the CPU enclosure.
Note: The CPU enclosure is the source of the power control interface (PCI) signal.
Depending on the signal received, power is either set to On or Off for all drawers
controlled by the PCI signal.
2. Doing an IPL.
Methods of Starting the AC Rack
The four methods of starting the CPU Enclosure installed in an AC rack are as follows:
• Manually. The power is switched on manually, and the system unit does a normal or a
service IPL. The manual method can be performed on a system unit containing either a
power distribution unit (PDU) or a power distribution bus (PDB).
• Remotely. The power is switched on from another location, and the system unit does a
normal IPL. (To use this method, a modem or equivalent device must be attached to the
CPU enclosure with a remote bringup cable.)
• Programmed by date and time. On a specific day and time, the power is switched on, and
the system unit does a normal IPL.
• Recovery after a power failure. When the power is restored, the power is switched on,
and the system unit does a normal IPL.
Only the manual start is described in this book. See your operating system documentation
for information about other methods of starting the system unit. Also refer to “Chapter 3.
Using System Guard” and “Appendix G. System Power States” for additional start up and
shut down procedures.
Using the AC Rack
5-1
Manually Starting by Reloading the Flash EEPROM
Follow this procedure to load a new version of SystemGuard into the flash EEPROM.
Prerequisites
If the system is not yet booted, you need a firmware diskette containing the new version of
the firmware to be loaded. If the system is already booted, you need the full path name of a
file containing the new version of the firmware to be loaded.
Reloading the Flash EEPROM (stand-by phase)
Insert the firmware diskette in the drive, place the Mode Switch in the Service position, and
then turn on the system power. The firmware diskette is identified by a special header which
distinguishes it from diskettes containing other data. The existing firmware recognizes the
special header and automatically loads the new firmware version.
Reloading the Flash EEPROM (run-time phase)
If AIX is already up and running (the run-time phase), reloading the firmware requires more
steps, because the machine is rebooted after the firmware is reloaded. Therefore, the root
user who performs this procedure should be the only logged user. To reload the flash
EEPROM, one method is to shut down the system and reboot using the procedure
“Reloading the Flash EEPROM (stand-by phase)” described above. The other method is:
1. Make sure that no other users are logged in to the system (log them out if necessary).
2. Make sure that you have root user authority (use the su command if necessary).
3. Enter the diag command.
4. Select the BUMP Service Aids option.
5. Select the Flash EEprom Download option.
6. Enter the full path name for the file containing the new flash EEPROM.
7. The system is automatically rebooted
5-2
Operator Guide
Manually Powering On the AC Rack Containing a PDU
1. Set the key mode switch to the Service position.
Operator Panel
Normal
Secure
Service
Key Mode Switch
Note: For a translation of this notice, see the System Unit Safety Information manual.
CAUTION:
This product is equipped with a 3-wire power cable and plug for the user’s safety. Use
this power cable in conjunction with a properly grounded electrical outlet to avoid
electrical shock.
Note: Ensure that the power button is in the off position (button in the out position) before
plugging the CPU enclosure power cord into the power distribution system on your
rack.
2. Plug the system unit power cord into the electrical outlet.
3. If the battery backup unit is installed, set the Master CB2 circuit breaker to On.
Note: Ensure that the key mode switch is set to the Service position to prevent system unit
power from being switched on unexpectedly.
4. Set the Master CB1 circuit breaker to On.
Master CB2
Master CB1
Battery Backup Unit
Power Distribution Unit
Using the AC Rack
5-3
5. Close the rear door of the rack.
6. Plug all external device power cords into the electrical outlets.
7. Switch on power to all external devices attached to the rack (including rack expansion
drawers).
Note: Before setting the Power button to on, wait for the operator panel display to display
the word “Stand-By.”
8. Set the Power button to on (button pushed in).
Operator Panel
Power Button
Normal
Secure
Service
Key Mode Switch
9. If power does not come on, ensure that the power cord is plugged into a grounded
electrical outlet, and refer to “Appendix F. System Power States” for additional startup
and shut down procedures. If this does not solve the problem, refer to the AIX Problem
Solving Guide and Reference manual.
When you press the Power button, the Power light comes on and the system starts
power-on self tests (POST). During the POST, numbers are displayed in the three-digit
display.
5-4
Operator Guide
Manually Powering On the AC Rack with a PDB
Note: Ensure that the key mode switch is set to the Service position to prevent system unit
power from being switched on unexpectedly.
1. Set the key mode switch to the Service position.
Operator Panel
Power Button
Normal
Secure
Service
Key Mode Switch
Note: For a translation of this notice, see the System Unit Safety Information manual.
CAUTION:
This product is equipped with a 3-wire power cable and plug for the user’s safety. Use
this power cable in conjunction with a properly grounded electrical outlet to avoid
electrical shock.
Notes:
Ensure that the power button is in the off position (button in the out position) before
plugging the PDB power cord into the electrical outlet.
If two PDBs are installed in the rack, plug the power cords of both PDBs into the
electrical outlets.
2. Plug the power cord for the power distribution bus into the electrical outlet.
Power
Distribution
Bus
Rear View of Rack
Power Cord
Plug
Using the AC Rack
5-5
3. Plug all drawer power cords into the outlets on the PDB.
4. Close the rear door of the rack.
5. Switch on power to all drawers connected to the PDB.
6. Set the key mode switch to the Normal position.
Note: Before setting the Power button to on, wait for the operator panel display to display
the word “Stand-By.”
7. Set the Power button to on (button pushed in).
Operator Panel
Power Button
Normal
Secure
Service
Key Mode Switch
5-6
Operator Guide
Stopping the AC Rack
Note: The system unit can contain either a power distribution unit (PDU) or a power
distribution bus (PDB).
The following methods can be used to stop (switch off power to) the rack containing either a
PDU or a PDB:
• Under ordinary conditions power is switched off to the CPU Enclosure and to other
drawers if they are connected with the power control cables.
• Immediately. All power is switched off to the drawers in the rack.
• shutdown program power-off. Power is switched off to the CPU Enclosure and to other
drawers if they are connected with the power control cables.
Only the first two methods are described in this book. Refer to the AIX System Management
Guide: Operating System and Devices and other operating system documentation for
information about stopping the rack and the shutdown program power-off method. This
method can be used for any key mode position.
Stopping the AC Rack Containing a PDU – Under Ordinary Conditions
Attention: Use the appropriate shutdown command before you stop the system unit;
failure to do so may result in the loss of data. Refer to AIX System Management Guide:
Operating System and Devices and other operating system documentation for information
about the shutdown command and stopping the system unit.
1. Set the key mode switch to the Service position.
2. Set the Power button to Off (button in the out position).
Operator Panel
Power Button
Normal
Secure
Service
Key Mode Switch
Using the AC Rack
5-7
Attention: This unit may have more than one power supply cord. To completely remove
power, you must disconnect all power supply cords.
3. Switch off power to all external devices attached to the system unit, and then unplug the
device power cords from the electrical outlets.
Note: Because many external devices can be connected to the system unit, it may be
impractical for you to switch off power to all the devices and unplug their power
cords.
4. Open the rear door of the system unit.
5. Set the Master CB1 circuit breaker to Off.
6. If the battery backup unit is installed, set the Master CB2 circuit breaker to Off.
Master CB2
Master CB1
Battery Backup Unit
Power Distribution Unit
7. Unless you are servicing the system while signal cables or power cords are connected to
external devices, unplug the system unit power cord from the electrical outlet.
Immediately Stopping the AC Rack Containing a PDU
Attention: Unpredictable results can occur that affect your data files if you use this method
to stop the CPU enclosure or disk drive drawers.
If you need to switch off all power to the system quickly, set the Master CB1 and CB2 circuit
breakers to off. All power is switched off to the drawers connected to the PDU in this rack.
Other drawers in this rack may be provided power from a PDU in an attached rack.
5-8
Operator Guide
Stopping the AC Rack Containing a PDB – Under Ordinary Conditions
Notes:
Before turning the power off the drawers or external devices, ask the customer about
their system high availability requirements.
Other drawers in this system unit may be provided power from a PDB in an attached
system unit.
Attention: Use the appropriate shutdown command before you stop the system unit;
failure to do so may result in the loss of data. Refer to AIX System Management Guide:
Operating System and Devices and other operating system documentation for information
about the shutdown command and stopping the system unit.
1. Set the key mode switch to the Service position.
2. Set the Power button to off (button in the out position).
Operator Panel
Power Button
Normal
Secure
Service
Key Mode Switch
Attention: This unit may have more than one power supply cord. To completely remove
power, you must disconnect all power supply cords.
Note: Because many external devices can be connected to the system unit, it may be
impractical for you to switch off power to all the devices and unplug their power
cords.
3. Switch off power to all external devices attached to the system unit, and then unplug the
device power cords from the electrical outlets.
Using the AC Rack
5-9
Immediately Stopping the AC Rack Containing a PDB
Attention: Unpredictable results can occur that affect your data files if you use this method
to stop the system unit. If drawers in an attached system unit are receiving power from the
PDB of this system unit, the drawers in the attached rack will lose power when the PDB of
this system unit is unplugged.
If you need to remove all power to the system unit quickly, unplug the PDB power cord from
the customer’s outlet. All power is switched off to the drawers that are connected to the PDB
you unplugged.
Other drawers in the rack may be connected to and receiving power from a PDB in another
rack. If you want to turn the power off the drawers in the rack that are receiving power from a
PDB in another rack, unplug the power cords from the PDB in the other rack.
Rear View of Rack
Power Cord Plug
5-10
Operator Guide
Chapter 6. Description – -48 V dc Rack
This chapter contains information about a -48 V dc rack containing a 7015 CPU Enclosure.
For a description of an AC rack, refer to Chapter 4.
-48 V dc Rack
The DC 7015 Model R00 rack contains a 7015 CPU enclosure with a -48 V dc power
supply. The -48 V dc system contains the following features: cable channel, front and rear
electrical outlet mounting plates, and a power distribution panel (PDP). Your rack may
contain additional drawers, such as a 9333 disk drive drawer.
Power
Distribution
Panel
Cable Channel
CPU
Enclosure
Optional
Drawer
Locations
Electrostatic
Discharge (ESD)
Electrical Outlet
Mounting Plate
Description – -48 V dc Rack
6-1
Power Distribution Panel
The power distribution panel (PDP) is installed in a 7015 Model R00 rack with a 7015 CPU
enclosure containing a -48 V dc power supply. The PDP provides circuit breakers that
protect each drawer in the rack from excess currents and functions as a DC power switch
for switching off power to the rack before servicing.
The PDP contains six circuit breakers consisting of two 50-amp circuit breakers and four 10amp circuit breakers. One of the 50-amp circuit breakers is used to send power to Input A of
the -48 V dc power supply, and the other 50-amp circuit breaker is used to send power to
Input B of the -48 V dc power supply in the CPU enclosure. The four 10-amp circuit
breakers control power to the disk drive drawers in the rack.
The PDP can receive power from a customer’s two separate power sources. With this
arrangement, three circuit breakers receive power from one power source, and the
remaining three circuit breakers receive power from a separate power source. The two 10
amp circuit breakers receiving power from a separate power source can control power to
disk drive drawers in an attached rack.
The PDP contains a connection location on the rear cover for attaching a circuit breaker
alarm light for indicating when any circuit breakers are switched to the off position; the alarm
light is provided by the customer. The circuit breaker switch is on when it is in the up
position, and the switch is off when it is in the down position.
50-Amp
Circuit
Breaker
A1
10-Amp
Circuit
Breaker
A3
A5
50-Amp
Circuit
Breaker
B1
10-Amp
Circuit
Breaker
B3 B5
Circuit Breaker
Position Labels
Covers for Empty
Circuit Breaker
Positions
On Position (Up)
Off Position (Down)
6-2
Operator Guide
Switch
Power Cable Paths and the CPU Enclosure
Note: The following illustration shows the power cable path going from the top of the rack
to the bottom of the rack. The power cables can be connected to the PDP from
above the rack.
Rear View of Rack
Cable Restraint
Mounting Brackets
A -48 V dc
Power Cable
and Return
B -48 V dc
Power Cable
and Return
To Customer’s
B -48 V dc
Power Source
Cable
Restraint
Straps
To Customer’s
A -48 V dc
Power Source
Dual Ground Lugs
Customer’s
Ground Cable
Location Codes and Identification Labels
For information about SCSI and non-SCSI location codes and identification labels, refer to
Chapter 4.
Description – -48 V dc Rack
6-3
6-4
Operator Guide
Chapter 7. Using the -48 V dc Rack
This chapter contains information about using the -48 V dc rack.
For information about using an AC rack and the devices installed in an AC rack, refer to
Chapter 3.
Some devices installed in an AC system with a CPU enclosure containing AC power supply
can be installed in a rack with a CPU enclosure containing a -48 V dc power supply.
Note: For information about using devices contained in the CPU enclosure, refer to
Chapter 2.
Setting the Key Mode Switch
Refer to Chapter 2 for information about setting the key mode switch on the CPU enclosure.
Starting the -48 V dc Rack
DANGER
An electrical outlet that is not correctly wired could place hazardous voltage
on metal parts of the system or the devices that attach to the system. It is the
responsibility of the customer to ensure that the outlet is correctly wired and
grounded to prevent an electrical shock.
Before installing or removing signal cables, ensure that the power cables for the
system unit and all attached devices are unplugged.
When adding or removing any additional devices to or from the system, ensure
that the power cables for those devices are unplugged before the signal cables
are connected. If possible, disconnect all power cables from the existing system
before you add a device.
Use one hand, when possible, to connect or disconnect signal cables to prevent
a possible shock from touching two surfaces with different electrical potentials.
During an electrical storm, do not connect cables for display stations, printers,
telephones, or station protectors for communication lines.
CAUTION:
Energy hazard, remove power before servicing. Disconnect two power supply cords.
Starting the DC rack with a 7015 CPU enclosure includes:
• Ensuring that all circuit breaker switches on the power distribution panel are set to on.
• Starting the CPU enclosure (containing a -48 V dc power supply) by setting the Power
button to on (button pushed in).
Using the -48 V dc Rack
7-1
Methods of Starting the -48 V dc Rack
The four methods of starting the 7015 CPU enclosure installed in a DC rack are as follows:
• Manually. The power is switched on manually, and the rack does a normal or a service
IPL.
• Remotely. The power is switched on from another location, and the rack does a normal
IPL. (To use this method, a modem or equivalent device must be attached to the CPU
enclosure with a remote bring-up cable.)
• Programmed by date and time. On a specific day and time, the power is switched on and
the rack does a normal IPL.
• Recovery after a power failure. When the power is restored, the power is switched on
and the rack does a normal IPL.
Only the manual start is described in this book. See your operating system documentation
for information about other methods of starting the system unit. Also refer to “Chapter 3.
Using System Guard” for additional start up and shut down procedures.
Manually Starting the -48 V dc Rack
1. If the power switches of the attached devices have not been set to On, do it now.
2. Make sure that all of the circuit breaker switches, located on the front of the power
distribution panel, are set to On (up position).
Note: Before setting the Power button to on, wait for the operator panel display to display
the word “Stand-By.”
3. With the key mode switch in the Normal position, start the rack by setting the Power
button to on (button pushed in) located on the operator panel of the CPU enclosure.
4. If power does not come on, ensure that the power cables from the customer’s power
source are correctly connected to the power distribution panel. If this does not solve the
problem, refer to the AIX Problem Solving Guide and Reference manual.
When you press the Power On button, the Power light comes on and the system starts a
power-on self-test (POST). During the POST, numbers are displayed in the three-digit
display.
-48 V dc Rack with CPU Enclosure
Circuit
Breaker
Switches
Power
Distribution
Panel
Power
Button
Power Light
Operator
Panel
Display
CPU
Enclosure
7-2
Operator Guide
Stopping the -48 V dc Rack
The following methods can be used to stop (switch off power to) the rack:
• Under ordinary conditions. Power is switched off to the CPU enclosure and to other
drawers if they are connected using the power control cables.
• Immediately. All power is switched off to the drawers in the rack.
• shutdown program power-off. Power is switched off to the CPU enclosure.
Only the first two methods are described in this book. Refer to the AIX System Management
Guide: Operating System and Devices and other operating system documentation for
information about stopping the rack and the shutdown program power-off method. This
method can be used for any key mode position.
Stopping the -48 V dc Rack under Ordinary Conditions
Attention: Use the appropriate shutdown command before you stop the rack; failure to do
so may result in the loss of data. Refer to AIX System Management Guide: Operating
System and Devices and other operating system documentation for information about the
shutdown command and stopping the rack.
1. Set the key mode switch to the Service position.
2. Set the Power button to off (button in the out position).
3. Set the power switches of the attached devices to Off.
Operator Panel
Power Button
Normal
Secure
Service
Key Mode Switch
Using the -48 V dc Rack
7-3
Stopping the -48 V dc Rack Immediately
Attention: Unpredictable results that affect your data files can occur if you use this method
to stop the rack.
Note: Drawers in this rack may be receiving power from a PDP in another rack.
If you need to switch off all power to the system quickly, set all of the circuit breaker
switches on the power distribution panel to Off (switches in the down position). All power is
switched off to the drawers connected to the PDP in this rack.
-48 V dc Rack with CPU Enclosure
Circuit
Breaker
Switches
Power
Distribution
Panel
CPU
Enclosure
7-4
Operator Guide
Chapter 8. Using the Diagnostics
This chapter describes how to run the diagnostics from the network server.
Diagnostic Programs Operating Considerations
The following items identify some things to consider before using the diagnostic programs.
Note: When possible, run the Online Diagnostics in Service Mode. Online Diagnostics
perform additional functions, compared to Standalone Diagnostics.
Diagnostics on a System Unit Attached to Another System
If your system unit is attached to another system using a network or directly attached to the
channel of another system, see “General Information About Multiple Systems” in this chapter
before running any diagnostic procedures.
Selecting a Console Display
When you run diagnostics from diskettes, from a CD-ROM disc and, under some conditions,
when you run them from disk, you need to select the console display. The diagnostic
programs display c31 in the operator panel display and display instructions on any
direct-attached displays and the terminal attached to the S1 port.
If c31 is displayed, follow the instructions to select the console display. If you do not have a
console display, set the key mode switch to Normal and then back to Service. This signals
the diagnostic programs to use the operator panel display for instructions.
Identifying the Terminal Type to the AIX operating system
Note: This is a different function than selecting a console display.
When you run diagnostics, the AIX operating system must know what type of terminal you
are using. If the terminal type is not known when the menu is
displayed, the diagnostics do not allow you to continue until a terminal is selected from the
option menu. Select hft for adapter-attached displays. This option
sets the TERM environment variable in the AIX operating system.
Undefined Terminal Types
If an undefined terminal type from the option menu is entered, the
menu prompts the user to enter a valid terminal type, and the menu is redisplayed until
either a valid type is entered or the user exits the option.
Resetting the Terminal
If the user enters a terminal type that is valid (according to the option
menu) but is not the correct type for the ASCII terminal being used, difficulty may be
encountered in reading the screen, using the function keys or the Enter key. These
difficulties can be bypassed by pressing Ctrl-C to reset the terminal. The screen display
which results from this resetting action varies with the mode in which the system is being
run:
• Normal or Maintenance Mode – The command prompt appears.
• Service Mode – The terminal type is reset to “dumb”, the Diagnostic Operating
Instruction panel is displayed, and the user is required to go through the Using the Diagnostics
8-1
Running Diagnostic Programs From Tape Drives
To load and execute diagnostics from a tape drive perform the following:
1. Power-on the tape drive if it is an externally attached device.
2. Set the key mode switch to the Service position, and then power-on the system unit.
3. Remove any tape currently in the tape drive.
4. Insert the diagnostic programs tape into the tape drive. Close the tape drive’s door if
applicable.
Running the Diagnostic Programs from Disk or From a Server
Consider the following when you run the diagnostic programs from a disk:
• The diagnostics cannot be loaded and run from a disk until the AIX operating system has
been installed and configured. After the installp command is used to install and configure
the AIX operating system, all three modes of operation are available.
• The diagnostics cannot be loaded on a system (client) from a server if that system is not
set up to IPL from a server over a network. When the system is set up to IPL from a
server, the diagnostics are executed in the same manner as they were from disk.
• If the diagnostics were loaded from disk or a server, you must shutdown the AIX
operating system before powering the system unit off to prevent possible damage to disk
data. This is done in one of two ways:
– If the diagnostic programs were loaded in standalone mode, press the F3 key until
DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS displays; then press the F3 key once
again to shutdown the AIX operating system.
– If the diagnostic programs were loaded in maintenance or concurrent mode, enter the
shutdown –F command.
• Under some conditions c31 may appear in the operator panel display, with instructions
displayed on attached displays and terminals. Follow the instructions to select a console
display or set the key mode switch to Normal and back to Service if you do not have a
console display.
Running the Diagnostic Programs from the Network
Consider the following when you run the diagnostic programs from a network:
• Diagnostics cannot be loaded and run from the network until AIX Version 3.2 or higher
has been installed and configured on the server.
• Your system unit must be configured to receive IPL (initial program load) over the network
or the server must be setup to send a service mode IPL of the diagnostics.
To run the diagnostic programs from the network:
• Enter the shutdown –F command to shut down the operating system.
• Turn the key mode switch to the Service position.
• Turn off the system unit, wait 30 seconds, then turn on the system unit.
8-2
Operator Guide
Running the Diagnostic Programs from a TTY Terminal
Consider the following when you run diagnostic programs using a TTY-type terminal as the
console display:
• See the operator manual for your type of tty terminal to find the key sequences you need
to respond to the diagnostic programs. For the 3151, refer to the 3151 ASCII Display
Station Guide to Operations, form number GA18-2633. For the 3164, refer to the 3164
ASCII Color Display Station Description, form number GA18-2617.
• When the diagnostic programs present display information through the S1 port, certain
attributes are used. These attributes are set as if the diagnostic programs were using a
3161 display terminal. The following tables list attributes for the 3161 ASCII Display
Terminal and for two other ASCII display terminals commonly used with the system.
• If you have a TTY terminal other than a 3151, 3161 or 3164 attached to the S1 port, your
terminal may have different names for the attributes. Use the attribute descriptions in the
following tables to determine the settings for your terminal.
Using the Diagnostics
8-3
General Attributes Always Required
The following general attributes are the default settings for the diagnostic programs. Be sure
your terminal is set to these attributes.
Note: These attributes should be set before the diagnostic programs are loaded.
Refer to the following table.
General
Setup
Attributes
3151
/11/31/41
Settings
3151
/51/61
Settings
Machine
mode
IBM 3151
IBM
3151 PC
Generated
Code Set
8-4
3161/3164
Settings
IBM 3161
or
IBM 3164
Description
The diagnostic programs are set to
emulate use of the 3161 ASCII
Display Terminal. If your terminal can
emulate a 5085, 3161 or 3164
terminal, use the following attribute
settings. Otherwise, refer to your
operator’s manual, compare the
following attribute descriptions with
those of your terminal, and set your
attributes accordingly.
ASCII
Screen
Normal
Normal
Uses the EIA-232 interface protocol.
Row and
Column
24 x 80
24 x 80
Uses the EIA-232 interface protocol.
Scroll
Jump
Jump
Jump
When the last character on the bottom
line is entered, the screen moves
down one line.
Auto LF
Off
Off
Off
For the “On” setting, pressing the
Return key moves the cursor to the
first character position of the next line.
For the “Off” setting, pressing the
Return key moves the cursor to the
first character position of the current
line. The CR and LF characters are
generated by the New line setting.
CRT saver
Off
Off
10
The “10” setting causes the display
screen to go blank if there is no
activity for 10 minutes. When the
system unit sends data or a key is
pressed, the display screen contents
are displayed again.
Line wrap
On
On
On
The cursor moves to the first
character position of the next line in
the page after it reaches the last
character position of the current line in
the page.
Forcing
insert
Off
Off
Operator Guide
General
Setup
Attributes
3151
/11/31/41
Settings
3151
/51/61
Settings
3161/3164
Settings
Tab
Field
Field
Field
The column tab stops are ignored,
and the tab operation depends on the
field attribute character positions.
All
Both inbound data (data to the system
unit) and outbound data (data from the
system unit) to and from the main port
can be transferred to the auxiliary port
without disturbing communications
with the system unit when the Trace
key is pressed.
Trace
Description
Additional Communication Attributes
The following communication attributes are for the 3151, 3161, and 3164 terminals.
Communication 3151/11/
31, /41)
Setup
Settings
Attributes
3151
/51/61,
Settings
3161
/3164
Settings
Operating mode
Echo
Echo
Echo
Data entered from the keyboard on
the terminal is sent to the system unit
for translation and then sent back to
the display screen. Sometimes called
conversational mode.
Line speed
9600 bps
9600 bps
9600 bps
Uses the 9600 bps (bits per second)
line speed to communicate with the
system unit.
Word length
(bits)
8
8
8
Selects eight bits as a data word
length (byte).
Parity
No
No
No
Does not add a parity bit, and is used
together with the word length attribute
to form the 8-bit data word (byte).
Stop bit
1
1
1
Places a bit after a data word (byte).
Turnaround
character
CR
CR
CR
Selects the carriage return (CR)
character as the line turnaround
character.
Interface
EIA-232
EIA-232
EIA-232
Uses the EIA-232 interface protocol.
Line control
IPRTS
IPRTS
IPRTS
Uses the ‘permanent request to send’
(IPRTS) signal to communicate with
system unit.
Break signal
(ms)
500
500
500
The terminal sends a ‘break signal’ to
the system unit within 500 ms after the
Break key is pressed.
Send null
suppress
On
On
Send null
Response delay
(ms)
100
100
Description
Trailing null characters are not sent to
the system unit.
On
Trailing null characters are sent to the
system unit.
100
The terminal waits for 100ms for the
system unit to respond.
Using the Diagnostics
8-5
Additional Keyboard Attributes
The following keyboard attributes are for the keyboard attached to the 3151, 3161, and 3164
terminals.
Keyboard
Setup
Attributes
3151/11/
31 /41
Settings
3151
/51/61)
Settings
3161
/3164
Settings
Enter
Return
Return
Return
The Enter key functions as the Return
key.
Return
New line
New line
New line
The cursor moves to the next line when
the Return key is pressed.
New line
CR
CR
CR
The Return key generates the carriage
return (CR) and the line feed (LF)
characters. The line turnaround occurs
after the CR and LF characters are
generated.
Send
Page
Page
Page
The contents of the current page are sent
to the system unit when the Send key is
pressed.
Insert
character
Space
Space
Space
A blank character is inserted when the
Insert key is pressed.
Description
Additional Printer Attributes
The following printer attributes are for a printer attached to the 3151, 3161, and 3164
terminals.
8-6
Printer
Setup
Attributes
3151/11/
31 /41
Settings
3151
/51/ 61
Settings
3161
/3164
Settings
Line speed
9600
9600
9600
Uses 19200 or 9600 bps (bits per
second) line speed to communicate with
the system unit.
Word
length
(bits)
8
8
8
Selects eight bits as a data word length
(byte).
Parity
Even
Even
No
Stop bit
1
1
1
Characters
ALL
ALL
Line end
CR-LF
Print
Viewport
Print EOL
Off
Print null
Off
Operator Guide
Description
Places a bit after a data word (byte).
Diagnostic Modes of Operation
The diagnostics can be run in three modes:
• Maintenance Mode allows checking of most system resources
• Concurrent Mode allows the normal system functions to continue while selected
resources are being checked.
• Standalone Mode allows checking of all the system devices and features
Maintenance Mode
Maintenance mode runs the diagnostics using the customer’s version of the AIX operating
system. This mode requires that all activity on the AIX operating system be stopped so the
diagnostics have most of the resources available to check. All of the system resources
except the SCSI adapters and the disk drive used for paging can be checked.
Error log analysis is done in maintenance mode when you select the Problem
Determination option on the DIAGNOSTIC MODE SELECTION menu.
The shutdown -m command is used to stop all activity on the AIX operating system and put
the AIX operating system into maintenance mode. Then the diag command is used to load
the diagnostic controller so you can run the diagnostic programs from the menus. After the
diagnostic controller is loaded, follow the normal diagnostic instructions.
Running the Diagnostics in Maintenance Mode
To run the diagnostics in maintenance mode you must be logged on to the customer’s
version of the AIX operating system as root or superuser and use the shutdown -m
and diag commands. Use the following steps to run the diagnostics in maintenance mode:
1. Stop all programs except the AIX operating system (get help if needed).
2. Log onto the AIX operating system as root or superuser.
3. Enter the shutdown -m command.
4. When a message indicates the system is in maintenance mode, enter the diag
command.
Note: It may be necessary to set TERM type again.
5. When DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS is displayed, follow the displayed
instructions to checkout the desired resources.
6. When testing is complete; use the F3 key to return to DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING
INSTRUCTIONS. Then press the F3 key again to return to the AIX operating system
prompt.
7. Press Ctrl-D to log off from root or superuser.
Using the Diagnostics
8-7
Concurrent Mode
Concurrent mode provides a way to run diagnostics on some of the system resources while
the system is running normal system activity.
Because the system is running in normal operation, some of the resources cannot be tested
in concurrent mode. The following resources cannot be tested in concurrent mode:
• SCSI adapters connected to paging devices
• The disk drive used for paging
• Some display adapters.
There are three levels of testing in concurrent mode:
• The share-test level tests a resource while the resource is being shared by programs
running in the normal operation. This testing is mostly limited to normal commands that
test for the presence of a device or adapter.
• The sub-test level tests a portion of a resource while the remaining part of the resource
is being used in normal operation. For example, this test could test one port of a
multiport device while the other ports are being used in normal operation.
• The full-test level requires the device not be assigned to or used by any other
operation. This level of testing on a disk drive may require the use of the varyoff
command. The diagnostics display menus to allow you to vary off the needed
resource.
The diagnostics also display a menu to assign a resource if another resource is needed.
Error log analysis is done in concurrent mode when you select the option on the menu.
To run the diagnostics in concurrent mode you must be logged onto the AIX operating
system and have proper authority to issue the commands (if needed, get help).
The diag command loads the diagnostic controller and displays the diagnostic menus.
Running the Diagnostics in Concurrent Mode
To run diagnostics in concurrent mode, take the following steps:
1. Log on to the AIX operating system as or .
2. Enter the diag command.
3. When the are displayed, follow the
instructions to check out the desired resources.
4. When testing is complete; use the F3 key to return to the . Then press the F3 key again to return to the AIX operating system
prompt. Be sure to vary on any disk drives you had varied to off.
5. Press the Ctrl-D key sequence to log off from or .
8-8
Operator Guide
Standalone Mode
Standalone mode provides the most complete checkout of the system resources. This mode
also requires that no other programs be running on the system.
Standalone mode can be loaded in three ways:
• From removable media. This method is the only method available for those systems
that do not have the AIX operating system installed.
• From a disk within the system unit. This loads the diagnostic programs that are a part
of the AIX operating system. The AIX operating system must be installed and
configured before the diagnostics can run from it.
• On some system units, built-in diagnostics can be run from read-only memory (ROM).
These diagnostics are intended to be used when it is not possible to use the AIX
operating system diagnostic programs. The tests provided by the built-in diagnostic
programs are not as complete as the AIX operating system diagnostic programs.
Running the Diagnostics in Standalone Mode
To run diagnostics in standalone mode, take the following steps:
1. Stop all programs including the AIX operating system (get help if needed).
2. Set the power switch on the system unit to Off.
3. Set the key mode switch to the Service position.
Note: When the diagnostic programs are run from a source other than the network or from
the disk the diagnostics do not check the error log entries.
4. If you want to load the standalone diagnostics from a CD-ROM disc, insert the CD-ROM
diagnostic disc into the CD-ROM drive.
5. If you want to load the diagnostics from the disk, leave diskette and CD-ROM drives
empty.
6. Set the power switch on the system unit to On.
If c07 is displayed, insert the appropriate diagnostic diskette. If necessary, refer to the
CEREADME file for additional information.
If c31 is displayed, follow the instructions to select a console display.
7. After the diagnostic controller loads, appear
on the console display.
If the system unit does not have a console display, the diagnostics run automatically and
loop on the diagnostic test until the system unit power switch is set to Off.
When the diagnostics are run from disk, a is displayed when the tests have
completed.
When the diagnostics are run from diskette, a is displayed when the tests have
completed.
8. If a problem is detected while the diagnostics are loading, a flashing displays in the
operator panel display. Refer to the AIX Version 4 Problem Solving Guide and Reference
manual for further instructions.
9. Follow the displayed instructions to checkout the desired resources.
10.When testing is complete; use the F3 key to return to the .
Using the Diagnostics
8-9
11. If you loaded the diagnostics from the disk, press the F3 key (from a defined terminal) or
press 99 (for an undefined terminal) to shutdown the diagnostics before turning off the
system unit.
Note: Pressing the F3 key (from a defined terminal) produces a “Confirm Exit” popup menu
which offers two options: continuing with the shutdown by pressing F3; or returning
to diagnostics by pressing Enter.
For undefined terminals, pressing 99 produces a full screen menu which offers two
options: continuing with the shutdown by pressing 99 and then Enter; or returning to
diagnostics by pressing Enter.
12.If you loaded the diagnostics from a source other than from a disk or network, turn off the
system unit after the shutdown is complete.
System Exerciser
The System Exerciser tests and exercises devices in an overlap mode and can only be run
from disk in standalone or maintenance mode.
Starting the System Exerciser
When the System Exerciser is selected from the menu, another
menu displays all devices to be tested. Pressing the Enter key starts tests for all of the
devices.
The time required to test all of the devices depends on the number of devices to be tested
and can range from several minutes to approximately one hour for a fully loaded system.
Because some devices require less time to test than others, the number of times a device is
tested under the System Exerciser may be one or more.
Note: If the system contains tape devices, CD-ROM, or diskette drives, you are asked
whether you want to use media in the devices when you are testing.
Display Screens
If the console is a graphics display, normal test patterns are displayed during the tests. After
the graphics adapter test is finished, the standby screen is displayed.
If the console is an async terminal, the standby screen is displayed during testing. The
time-of-day is displayed at the top of the screen and is updated approximately every minute.
After all devices have been tested at least once, a results screen is displayed until either the
Enter key is pressed to restart the System Exerciser or the Exerciser is stopped. If no errors
were detected, the results screen displays the No trouble found message; if errors
have been detected, the results screen displays a list of devices with corresponding errors.
Stopping the System Exerciser
Although the System Exerciser can be stopped at any time, it is best to stop it while the
results screen is displayed. Stopping the Exerciser at other times can cause the loss of test
information.
When the System Exerciser is stopped, the screen displays all tested devices with errors
flagged. Selecting a device that has an error flag provides details such as SRN, location
code, number of times the device was tested, and the number of times an error was
detected.
Using the System Exerciser to Check Out Repairs and Intermittent Problems
The System Exerciser can be used to check out the system following repairs and to identify
intermittent problems.
8-10
Operator Guide
When the System Exerciser is running, most built-in error recovery procedures are turned
off. This can cause occasional errors to be reported that normally have no effect on system
operation. Parts should only be replaced when the following occurs:
• A high number of errors are reported in relation to the number of times the device was
tested.
• Errors reported by the System Exerciser are in the same area as that reported by the
customer.
CPU and Memory Testing and Error Log Analysis
Except for the floating-point tests, all CPU and memory testing on the system units are done
by POST and BIST. Memory is tested entirely by the POST. On systems with RS.9, RS1,
and RS2 processors, bit steering is used to map out defective bits. The POST provides an
error-free memory map. If POST cannot find at least 2MB of good memory, it halts and
display an SRN in the LEDs identifying the problem. If POST finds at least 2MB of good
memory, the memory problems are recorded in the IPL Control Block and the system
continues to boot.
If any memory errors were recorded in the IPL Control Block, they are reported by the Base
System Diagnostics, which must be run to analyze the IPL Control Block. Normally, most
memory problems that are detected by the POST are isolated to a single FRU.
The CPU and memory cannot be tested after the AIX based diagnostics are loaded;
however, they are monitored for correct operation by various checkers such as Checkstop,
Machine Check, Data Storage Interrupt, etc. The checkers may vary by processor type. If
one of these checks intermittently occurs, it is logged in to the error log. To analyze these
errors the Base System Diagnostics must be run in the Problem Determination Mode.
Single-bit memory errors are corrected by ECC (Error Checking and Correction).
Machine Checks occur when there is a double bit error. Except for 7011 system units,
Machine Check problems are isolated to memory cards and memory modules that were
addressed when the error occurred. Depending on the system type and model, this may be
a single memory card and two memory modules, two memory cards and four memory
modules, or four memory cards and eight memory modules, etc. On 7011 system units,
Machine Checks are isolated to two memory modules and the CPU Planar.
Although Checkstops can be caused by things other than the CPU, the diagnostics always
callout the CPU when there is a Checkstop. Machine Checks can cause Checkstops. If both
a Checkstop and a Machine Check are logged, only the Machine Check entry is analyzed.
Note: Normally, the Base System Diagnostics do not analyze any error more than four
days old.
Using the Diagnostics
8-11
Reading a Flashing 888 Message on a Multi-Line Operator
Panel Display
An 888 flashing in the first line of the operator panel display indicates that a hardware or
software error has been detected and that an error message is being displayed. For
additional information about flashing 888 numbers, refer to “System Unit Error Isolation
Features” in Diagnostic Information For Micro Channel Bus Systems.
Step 1. Determine the Type of Message
The first line of the operator panel display should be displaying a line with 888 flashing in it.
1. Get a problem summary form from the AIX Problem Solving Guide and Reference or a
blank sheet of paper to record the characters appearing in the operator panel display.
2. Be sure the key mode switch is set to Normal or Service.
3. Record the three digits following the flashing 888 in the first line of the operator panel
display. This is the message type.
4. In the following list, go to the step for your message type.
Type 102
Go to Step 2.
Type 103
Go to Step 3.
Type 105
Go to Step 3.
Other
Go to Step 4.
Step 2. Reading the Type 102 Message
A 102 message is generated when a software or hardware error occurs during system
execution of an application. Use the following steps and information to determine the
contents of the type 102 message. Refer to the “Crash Codes” and “Dump Progress
Indicators (Dump Status Codes)” on page 8-13.
The following is an example of the first line of the multiline operator panel display;
888 102 RRR SSS
where:
102 = Message type
RRR = Crash code
SSS = Dump status code
1. Record the three digits following the 102 in the first line of the operator panel display, this
is the crash code. Record the three digits immediately following the crash code, this is
the dump status.
2. Look at the second line of the operator panel display and then answer the following
question.
8-12
Operator Guide
Is the second line of the operator panel display blank?
NO
YES
The message has a type 103 or 105 message included in it. Press the Reset button
once, then go to Step 3. Read out the SRN and FRU information for these
message types.
This completes the readout of this message. You must power-off the system unit to
recover from this halt. There are no SRNs associated with this message type.
Go to “Hardware Problem Determination” on page 11-1.
Crash Codes
The following crash codes are part of a Type 102 message.
000
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
300
32x
38x
400
500
501
51x
52x
53x
54x
558
700
800
Unexpected system interrupt.
Machine check because of a memory bus error.
Machine check because of a memory timeout.
Machine check because of a memory card failure.
Machine check because of a out of range address.
Machine check because of an attempt to write to ROS.
Machine check because of an uncorrectable address parity.
Machine check because of an uncorrectable ECC error.
Machine check because of an unidentified error.
Machine check due to an L2 uncorrectable ECC.
Data storage interrupt from the processor.
Data storage interrupt because of an I/O exception from IOCC.
Data storage interrupt because of an I/O exception from SLA.
Instruction storage interrupt.
External interrupt because of a scrub memory bus error.
External interrupt because of an unidentified error.
External interrupt because of a DMA memory bus error.
External interrupt because of an IOCC channel check.
External interrupt from an IOCC bus timeout;x represents the IOCC number.
External interrupt because of an IOCC keyboard check.
There is not enough memory to continue the IPL.
Program interrupt.
Floating point is not available.
Dump Progress Indicators (Dump Status Codes)
The following dump progress indicators, or dump status codes, are part of a Type 102
message.
Note: When a lowercase c is listed, it displays in the lower half of the seven-segment
character position. The leftmost position is blank on the following codes.
0c0
0c2
0c3
0c4
0c5
0c6
0c7
0c8
0c9
The dump completed successfully.
A dump, requested by the user, is started.
The dump is inhibited.
The dump did not complete. A partial dump may be present.
The dump program could not access the dump device.
A dump to the secondary dump device was requested. Make the secondary
dump device ready; then press Ctrl-Alt-Numpad2.
Reserved.
The dump function is disabled.
A dump is in progress.
Using the Diagnostics
8-13
Step 3. Reading the Type 103 and 105 Message
A type 103 and 105 message is generated when a hardware error is detected. Use the
following steps and information to record SRN and FRU location code information.
1. Record all characters following the first 103 or 105 in the first line of the operator panel
display. This is the SRN.
2. Record all characters following the number in the first position on the second line, this is
the location code information for the first FRU.
3. Each time the reset button is pressed the operator panel display scrolls upwards one
line. When all the information has been displayed, the bottom line of the operator panel
display contains a line with 888 flashing. This indicates that the message is being
repeated.
Press the reset button and record the information in the bottom line of the operator panel
display. Continue this exercise until a line with a flashing 888 is displayed. Use the
following information to help identify the information in each line.
Note: X represent any character.
Displayed
Information
Meaning
103 XXX–XXX
SRN being displayed, XXX–XXX is the SRN.
105 XXXX
SRN being displayed, XXXX is the SRN.
1 XX–XX–XX–XX
First FRU location code, XX–XX–XX–XX is the location code.
2 XX–XX–XX–XX
Second FRU location code, XX–XX–XX–XX is the location code.
3 XX–XX–XX–XX
Third FRU location code, XX–XX–XX–XX is the location code.
4 XX–XX–XX–XX
Fourth FRU location code, XX–XX–XX–XX is the location code.
Note: All eleven characters of the location code may not be displayed.
4. If multiple SRNs were recorded start with the SRN recorded first. If that does not fix the
problem try the remaining SRNs in the order recorded until the problem is fixed.
5. When the system halts with a flashing 888 you must power-off the system unit to recover.
Go to “Hardware Problem Determination” on page 11-1.
Step 4. Other Numbers
The only valid message types are types 102, 103, 104, and 105. Type 104 messages are
used by the manufacturing plant and should be ignored. If you have any other number
displayed, take the following actions:
1. Press the Reset button again and again until a flashing 888 appears in the first line of
the operator panel display. If you do not get a flashing 888 in the display, you should
consider the numbers as steady numbers. Go to “Hardware Problem Determination” on
page 11-1.
2. When the flashing 888 is displayed, go to Step 1 on page 8-12.
8-14
Operator Guide
Chapter 9. Introduction to Tasks and Service Aids
Beginning with version 4.2 there are two top level menus seen by the user – Tasks and
Resources. Once a Task has been selected, then a list of resources will be displayed for
selection to run the Task on. Or after selecting a Resource, a set of Tasks is displayed for
selection.
Tasks
Service Aids are invoked via a task selection from the following list:
Note: Refer to page 9-3 for a listing of service aids.
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Add Resource to Resource List
AIX Shell Prompt
Backup and Restore Media
Bit Error Rate Service Aid
Certify Media
Change Hardware Vital Product Data
Configure Dials and LPFKs
Create Customized Diagnostic Configuration Diskette
Delete Resource from Resource List
Disk Maintenance
Display Configuration and Resource List
Display Hardware Error Report
Display Hardware Vital Product Data
Display or Change Bootlist
Display or Change BUMP Configuration
Display or Change Diagnostic Run Time Options
Display or Change Electronic Mode Switch
Display or Change Multi–processor Configuration
Display Previous Diagnostic Results
Display Service Hints
Display Software Product Data
Display Test Patterns
Download Microcode
Format Media
Generic Download Microcode
Periodic Diagnostics
Process Supplemental Media
Product Topology
Run Diagnostics
Run Error Log Analysis
SCSI Bus Analyzer
SSA Service Aids
Update Disk Based Diagnostics
7318 Serial Communications Network Server
Using the Service Aids
9-1
Run Diagnostics Task
The Run Diagnostics task invokes the Resource Selection List menu. When the commit key
is pressed, Diagnostics are run on all selected resources.
The procedures for running the diagnostics depends on the states of the Diagnostics Run
Time Options. The run time options are:
• Display Diagnostic Mode Selection Menus
If this option is on, the Diagnostic Mode Selection Menu is displayed when the commit
key is pressed.
• Include Advanced Diagnostics
If this option is on, Advanced Diagnostics is included.
• Include Error Log Analysis
If this option is on, Error Log Analysis will be included. When running Standalone
Diagnostics with Include Error Log Analysis set to Yes, ELA is only done on the error that
is logged in NVRAM.
• Run Tests Multiple Times
If this option is on, diagnostic is run in loop mode. This option is only valid when running
Online Diagnostics in Service Mode.
Run Error Log Analysis Task
The Run Error Log Analysis task invokes the Resource Selection List menu. When the
commit key is pressed, Error Log Analysis will be run on all selected resources.
Display or Change Diagnostic Run Time Options Task
The Display or Change Diagnostic Run Time Options task allows the diagnostic run time
options to be set.
Note: The run time options are used only when running the Run Diagnostic task.
The run time options are:
• Display Diagnostic Mode Selection Menus
This option allows the user to select whether the DIAGNOSTIC MODE SELECTION
MENU is displayed or not (the default is yes).
• Include Advanced Diagnostics
This option allows the user to select if the Advanced Diagnostics should be included or
not (the default is no).
• Include Error Log Analysis
This option allows the user to select if the Error Log Analysis (ELA) should be included or
not (the default is no).
Note: When running Standalone Diagnostics with Include Error Log Analysis set to Yes,
ELA is only done on the error that is logged in NVRAM.
9-2
Operator Guide
• Run Tests Multiple Times
This option allows the user to select if the diagnostic should be run in loop mode or not
(the default is no).
Note: This option is only displayed when running Online Diagnostics in Service Mode.
Process Supplemental Media Task
This prompts for either diskette or tape media, reads in media using cpio, and executes
diagstart shell script.
Service Aids
The diagnostic contain programs called service aids. The service aids are used to display
data and additional testing.
Options for the service aids are available when the software package for that option is
installed.
Prior to Release version 4.2 the service aids were selected via the Service Aids Selection
Menu. Beginning with version 4.2 the service aids are selected via the Task Selection Menu.
The following service aids are provided:
Service Aid
Page Reference
AIX Shell Prompt Service Aid
9-4
Backup/Restore Media Service Aid
9-4
Bit Error Rate Service Aid
9-4
BUMP Service Aid
9-4
Diagnostic Package Utility Service Aid
9-5
Dials and LPFK Configuration Service Aid
9-5
Disk Based Diagnostic Update Service Aid and Update Disk Based Diagnostic Task
9-6
Disk Maintenance Service Aid
9-6
Disk Media Service Aid
9-7
Disk to Disk Copy Service Aid
9-6
Diskette Media Service Aid
9-9
Display/Alter Bootlist Service Aid
9-9
Display/Alter Sector Service Aid
9-7
Display or Change Configuration or Vital Product Data (VPD) Service Aid
9-9
Display and Change Diagnostic Test List Service Aid
9-10
Display or Change Key Modes Service Aid
9-11
Display Previous Diagnostic Results Service Aid
9-11
Display Test Patterns Service Aid
9-11
Generic Microcode Download Service Aid
9-11
Hardware Error Report Service Aid and Display Hardware Error Log Task
9-12
Local Area Network Service Aid and Local Area Network Analyzer Task
9-12
Microcode Download Service Aid
9-12
Multiprocessor Service Aid
9-12
Using the Service Aids
9-3
Periodic Diagnostics Service Aid
9-13
Product Topology Service Aid
9-13
SCSI Bus Service Aid and SCSI Bus Analyzer Task
9-13
SCSI Tape Utilities Service Aid
9-14
Service Aids for use with Ethernet
9-14
Service Hints Service Aid
9-15
SSA Service Aid
9-15
Trace Service Aid
9-15
7318 Serial Communications Network Server Service Aid
9-16
These service aids are described in the following topics.
AIX Shell Prompt Service Aid
This service aid allows access to the AIX command line. In order to use this service aid the
user must know the root password (when a root password has been established).
Backup/Restore Media Service Aid
This service aid allows verification of backup media and devices. It presents a menu of tape
and diskette devices available for testing and prompts for selection of the desired device. It
then presents a menu of available backup formats and prompts for selection of the desired
format. The supported formats are tar, backup, and cpio. After the device and format are
selected, the service aid backups a known file to the selected device, restores that file to
/tmp, and compares the original file to the restored file. The restored file is also left in /tmp
to allow for visual comparison. All errors are reported.
Bit Error Rate Service Aid
This service aid is used to check the bit error rate for an ESCON adapter to assure that the
link to the host system is functioning properly. To run the ESCON Bit Error Rate Service Aid,
the adapter must be connected, configured, and on–line. If the adapter is not configured
properly, the service aid will not be able to check the bit error rate.
BUMP (Bringup Micro–Processor) Service Aids (Display or
Change BUMP Configuration Task)
This service aid is unique to the SMP system units and provides the following functions:
• Display or Change Remote Support Phone Number
This function allows the remote support phone number to be displayed and altered.
• Display or Change Diagnostics Modes
This function displays a dialog screen that lists the states of all the BUMP (Bringup
Micro–Processor) Diagnostic Flags. The states can be changed via the dialog screen.
9-4
Operator Guide
• Save or Restore Diagnostics Modes and Remote Support Phone Number
This function allows the diagnostics modes and remote support phone number to be
saved and restored. The location of the save area is to be defined.
• Flash EPROM Download
This function updates the Flash EPROM.
Diagnostic Package Utility Service Aid
The Diagnostic Package Utility Service Aid allows the user to perform the following actions:
• Format a 1, 2, or 4MB diskette
This function was moved to the Format Media Task at version 4.2.
• Create a Standalone Diagnostic Package Configuration Diskette
The Standalone Diagnostic Package Configuration Diskette allows the following to be
changed from the console:
– Default refresh rate for a LFT
The refresh rate used by the standalone diagnostic package is 60Hz. If the display’s
refresh rate is 77Hz, then set the refresh rate to 77.
– Different async terminal console
A console configuration file that allows a terminal attached to any RS232 or RS422
adapter to be selected as a console device can be created using this service aid. The
default device is an RS232 tty attached to the first standard serial port (S1).
Dials and LPFK Configuration Service Aid
This service aid provides a tool for configuring and removing dials/LPFKs to the standard
serial ports.
Since 4.1.3 a tty must be defined on the async port before the Dials and LPFKs can be
configured on the port. Before version 4.2 the Dials and LPFKs could only be configured on
the standard serial ports. At version 4.2 the Dials and LPFKs can be configured on any
async port.
Dials and LPFKs Configuration Service Aid Before Version 4.2
The Dials and LPFKs Configuration Service Aid provides a tool for configuring and removing
dials/LPFKs to the native serial ports.
Configure Dials and LPFKs Task Version 4.2+
This service aid has been replaced by the Dials and LPFK Configuration smit task. The
Dials and LPFKs can be configured on any async port. A tty must be in the available state
on the async port before the Dials and LPFKs can be configured on the port. The task
allows an async adapter to be configured, then a tty port defined on the adapter, and then
Dials and LPFKs can be defined on the port. Additional information is documented under
smit.
Using the Service Aids
9-5
Disk Based Diagnostic Update Service Aid and Update Disk
Based Diagnostic Task
This service aid allows fixes (APARs) to be applied.
Disk Based Diagnostic Update Service Aid Before Version 4.2
Prior to version 4.2 this service aid is used to update the diagnostics on the disk drive. The
updates may be new diagnostics or an update to the existing diagnostics. It uses the
installp command to do this.
Update Disk Based Diagnostic Task Version 4.2
Beginning with version 4.2 this service aid is replaced by the Update Disk Based
Diagnostics task. The task invokes the smit Update Software by Fix (APAR) task. The task
allows the input device and APARs to be selected. Any APAR can be installed using this
task. Additional information is documented under smit.
Disk Maintenance Service Aid
This service aid consist of the following:
• Disk to Disk Copy Service Aid
• Display/Alter Sector Service Aid
Disk to Disk Copy Service Aid
Note: To access this service aid refer to the Disk Maintenance Service Aid.
The service aid allows you to recover data from an old drive when replacing it with a new
drive. The service aid only supports copying from a drive to another drive of similar size.
This service aid cannot be used to update to a different size drive. The migratepv
command should be used when updating drives. The service aid recovers all LVM software
reassigned blocks. To prevent corrupted data from being copied to the new drive, the
service aid aborts if an unrecoverable read error is detected. To help prevent possible
problems with the new drive, the service aid aborts if the number of bad blocks being
reassigned reaches a threshold.
The procedure for using this service aid requires that both the old and new disks be installed
in or attached to the system with unique SCSI addresses. This requires that the new disk
drive SCSI address must be set to an address that is not currently in use and the drive be
installed in an empty location. If there are no empty locations, then one of the other drives
has to be removed. Once the copy is complete, only one drive may remain installed. Either
remove the target drive to return to the original configuration, or perform the following
procedure to complete the replacement of the old drive with the new drive.
1. Remove both drives.
2. Set the SCSI address of the new drive to the SCSI address of the old drive.
3. Install the new drive in the old drive’s location.
4. Install any other drives that were removed into their original location.
9-6
Operator Guide
To prevent problems that may occur when running this service aid from disk, it is suggested
that this service aid be run from the diagnostics that are loaded from removable media when
possible.
Display/Alter Sector Service Aid
Note: To access this service aid refer to the Disk Maintenance Service Aid.
This service aid allows you to display and alter information on a disk sector. Care must be
used when using this service aid because inappropriate modification to some disk sectors
may result in total loss of all data on the disk. Sectors are addressed by their decimal sector
number. Data is displayed both in hex and in ASCII. To prevent corrupted data from being
incorrectly corrected, the service aid does not display information that cannot be read
correctly.
Disk Media Service Aids
This service aid consists of a Format, Certify, and Erase service aid for each type of hard
disk supported, and Optical Disk service aid for supported optical disks.
• Certify
Certify reads all of the ID and data fields. It checks for bad data and counts all errors
encountered. If more than 10 hard data errors or more than 1 hard equipment error is
found, the user is prompted to replace the drive. One or less recovered data errors per
megabyte is normal. More than one recoverable data error per megabyte indicates that
the disk should be formatted and certified. Disk errors are not logged during certify.
• Format
Format writes all the disk. The pattern put on the disk is device dependent, i.e. some
drives may put all 0s, while some may put hexadecimal number 5F. No bad block
reassignment occurs
• Format and Certify
Format and Certify does the same as format does. After the Format is completed, Certify
is run. This Certify reassigns all bad blocks encountered.
• Erase Disk
This option can be used to overwrite (remove) all data currently stored in user–accessible
blocks of the disk. The Erase Disk option writes one or more patterns to the disk. An
additional option allows data in a selectable block to be read and displayed on the system
console.
To use the Erase Disk option, specify the number (0–3) of patterns to be written. Select
the patterns to be written; the patterns are written serially. That is, the first pattern is
written to all blocks. Then the next pattern is written to all blocks, overlaying the previous
pattern. A random pattern is written by selecting the ”Write random pattern?” option.
The Erase Disk service aid has not been certified as meeting the Department of Defense
or any other organizations security guidelines. The following steps should be followed if
the data on the drive is to be overwritten:
1. Run the ”Erase Disk” Service Aid to overwrite the data on the drive.
Using the Service Aids
9-7
2. Do a format without certify.
3. Run a second pass of the erase service aid.
For a newly installed drive, you can insure that all blocks on the drive are overwritten with
your pattern if you use the following procedure:
1. Format the drive.
2. Check the defect map by running the Erase Disk Service Aid.
Note: If you use the ”Format and Certify” option, there may be some blocks which get
placed into the grown defect map.
3. If there are bad blocks in the defect map, record the information presented and ensure
that this information is kept with the drive. This data is used later when the drive is to
be overwritten.
4. Use the drive as you would normally.
5. When the drive is no longer needed and is to be erased, run the same version of the
Erase Disk Service Aid which was used in step 2.
Note: Using the same version of the service aid is only critical if there were any bad
blocks found in step 3.
6. Compare the bad blocks which were recorded with the drive in step 3 with those which
now appear in the grown defect map.
Note: If there are differences between the saved data and the newly obtained data,
then all of the sectors on this drive cannot be overwritten. The new bad blocks
are not be overwritten.
7. If the bad block list is the same, continue running the service aid to overwrite the disk
with the chosen pattern(s).
Before version 4.2 the Disk Media Service Aid is entered via the Disk Media selection from
the Service Aid Selection Menu. At version 4.2+ the Disk Media service aid is entered via
the Format Media or Certify Media options from the Task Selection Menu.
Optical Disk Service Aids
The Optical Disk Service Aids consist of Initialize, Format and Certify, and Spare Sector
Availability service aids.
• Initialize
This service aid is used to format the optical disk without certifying it. This option does
not reassign the defective sectors; however, it is a quick way of formatting after cleaning
the disk.
• Format and Certify
This service aid is used to format the optical disk and certify it. The certification process
is drive specific and performs the surface analysis of all user data and spare sectors. The
defective sectors are reassigned.
• Spare Sector Availability
This service aid checks the number of spare sectors available on the optical disk. The
spare sectors are used to reassign when defective sectors are encountered during
normal usage or during a format and certify operation. Low availability of spare sectors
9-8
Operator Guide
indicates that the disk needs to be backed up and replaced. Formatting the disk does not
improve the availability of spare sectors.
Diskette Media Service Aid
This service aid provides a way to verify the data written on a diskette. When this service
aid is selected, a menu asks you to select the type of diskette being verified. The program
then reads all of the ID and data fields on the diskette one time and displays the total
number of bad sectors found. Diskette format support was added in version 4.2.
Prior to version 4.2 the Diskette Media Service Aid was entered via the Diskette Media
selection from the Service Aid Selection Menu. At version 4.2 and later the Diskette Media
Service Aid is entered via the Format Media or Certify Media options from the Task Selection
Menu.
Display/Alter Bootlist Service Aid
This service aid allows the bootlists to be displayed, altered, or erased.
The system attempts to perform an IPL from the first device in the list. If the device is not a
valid IPL device or if the IPL fails, the system proceeds in turn to the other devices in the list
to attempt an IPL.
Display or Change Configuration or Vital Product Data (VPD)
Service Aid
This service aid allows you to display and change configuration data and vital product data
(VPD).
Prior to version 4.2 this service aid was entered via the Service Aid Selection Menu. From
version 4.2 on, this service aid is entered via the Task Selection Menu.
The following are the task selections which appear on the Task Selection Menu:
• Display Configuration and Resource List
• Display Hardware Vital Product Data
• Change Hardware Vital Product Data
• Add or Delete Drawer configuration
Display Vital Product Data (VPD) Service Aid and Display Hardware Vital
Product Data Task
This service aid displays all installed resources along with any VPD for those resources. Use
this service aid when you want to look at the VPD for a specific resource.
Display Software Product Data Pre-version 4.2
This service aid displays information about the installed software.
Using the Service Aids
9-9
Display Software Product Data Beginning with Version 4.2
This service aid displays information about the installed software and provides the following
functions:
• List Installed Software
• List Applied but Not Committed Software Updates
• Show Software Installation History
• Show Fix (APAR) Installation Status
• List Fileset Requisites
• List Fileset Dependents
• List Files Included in a Fileset
• List File Owner by Fileset
Display Configuration Service Aid and Display Configuration and
Resource List Task
This service aid displays the item header only for all installed resources. Use this service aid
when there is no need of seeing the VPD. (No VPD is displayed.)
Change Hardware Vital Product Data Task
Use this service aid to display the Display/Alter VPD Selection Menu. The menu lists all
resources installed on the system. When a resource is selected a menu is displayed that
lists all the VPD for that resource.
Note: The user cannot alter the VPD for a specific resource unless it is not machine
readable.
Display and Change Diagnostic Test List Service Aid
Note: Beginning with version 4.2 this service aid is no longer supported. The Display
Configuration and Resource List, Add Resource to Resource List, and Delete
Resource from Resource List Tasks have replaced it.
This service aid provides a way to:
• Display the Diagnostic Test List
This selection lists all of the resources tested by the diagnostics.
• Add a resource to the Diagnostic Test List
This selection allows resources to be added back to the Diagnostic Test List. The
Diagnostic Test List Menu lists all resources that can be added back to the Diagnostic
Test List.
Note: Only resources that were previously detected by the diagnostics and deleted from
the Diagnostic Test List are listed. If no resources are available to be added, then
none are listed.
• Delete a resource from the Diagnostic Test List
This selection allows resources to be deleted from the Diagnostic Test List. The
9-10
Operator Guide
Diagnostic Test List Menu lists all resources that can be deleted from the Diagnostic Test
List.
Note: Only resources that were previously detected by the diagnostics and have not
been deleted from the Diagnostic Test List is listed. If no resources are available
to be deleted, then none are listed.
Display or Change Key Modes (Display or Change Electronic
Mode Switch Task)
This service aid is unique to the SMP system units and displays the states of the Physical
and Electronic Keys. It also allows the electronic keys to be set.
Display Previous Diagnostic Results Service Aid
Note: This service aid is not available when you load the diagnostics from a source other
than a disk drive or from a network.
Each time the diagnostics produce a service request number (SRN) to report a problem,
information about that problem is logged. The service representative can look at this log to
see which SRNs are recorded. This log also records the results of diagnostic tests that are
run in loop mode.
When this service aid is selected, information on the last problem logged is displayed. The
Page Down and Page Up keys can be used to look at information about previous problems.
This information is not from the error log maintained by the AIX operating system. This
information is stored in the /etc/lpp/diagnostics/data/*.dat file.
Display Test Patterns Service Aid
This service aid provides a means of making adjustments to system display units by
providing displayable test patterns. Through a series of menus the user selects the display
type and test pattern. After the selections are made the test pattern is displayed.
Generic Microcode Download Service Aid
This service aid provides a means of restoring a diskette (or other media) and executing a
restored program. This program does whatever is required to download the microcode onto
the adapter or device.
This service aid is supported in both concurrent and standalone modes from disk, LAN, or
loadable media.
When entered, this service aid displays information about what it does, it then asks for a
microcode diskette to be inserted into the diskette drive. The diskette is in backup format.
The service aid restores the diskette to the /tmp directory and execute a program called
diagucode. Once diagucode has completed, it returns you to the service aid.
Using the Service Aids
9-11
Hardware Error Report Service Aid and Display Hardware Error
Log Task
This service aid provides a tool for viewing the hardware error log and performing error log
analysis. It uses the errpt command to do this.
The Display Error Summary and Display Error Detail selection provide the same type of
report as the errpt command. The Display Error Analysis Summary and Display Error
Analysis Detail selection provide additional analysis. The Error Analysis and Error Analysis
Detail options were removed at 4.1.3.
Local Area Network Service Aid and Local Area Network
Analyzer Task
This service aid and task are used to exercise the LAN communications adapters
(Token–Ring, Ethernet, and Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI). The following services
are available:
• Connectivity testing between two network stations. Data is transferred between the two
stations. This requires the user to input the Internet Addresses of both stations.
• Monitoring ring (Token–Ring only). The ring is monitored for a period of time. Soft and
hard errors are analyzed.
Additional information about this service aid can be found in the Local Area Network
Service Aids CIS.
Prior to version 4.2 this service aid was accessed via the Local Area Network Service
Aids selection of the Service Aid Selection Menu. Beginning with version 4.2 this service
aid is accessed via the Local Area Network Analyzer options from the Task Selection
Menu.
Microcode Download Service Aid
This service aid provides a way to copy device microcode to a device. It is used to update
the microcode on a device. It presents a list of devices that use microcode. The device on
which the microcode is to be installed is selected. The service aid instructs the user on its
use.
Multiprocessor Service Aid (Display or Change Multiprocessor
Configuration Task)
• This service aids is unique to the SMP system units and provides the following functions:
• Display or Change Processor States
This function displays or changes the state of available processors.
• Bind Process
This function provides a tool for binding a process and all its threads to a specified
processor.
9-12
Operator Guide
Periodic Diagnostics Service Aid
This service aid provides a tool for configuring periodic diagnostics and automatic error log
analysis. A hardware resource can be chosen to be tested once a day, at a user specified
time. If the resource cannot be tested because it is busy, error log analysis is performed.
Hardware errors logged against a resource can also be monitored by enabling Automatic
Error Log Analysis. This allows error log analysis to be performed every time a hardware
error is put into the error log. If a problem is detected, a message is posted to the system
console and a mail message sent to the user(s) belonging to the system group with
information about the failure such as Service Request Number.
The service aid provides the following functions:
• Add or delete a resource to the periodic test list
• Modify the time to test a resource
• Display the periodic test list
• Modify the error notification mailing list
• Disable Automatic Error Log Analysis.
Product Topology Service Aid
This service aid provides enhanced product and order quality.
SCSI Bus Service Aid and SCSI Bus Analyzer Task
This service aid provides a means to diagnose a SCSI Bus problem in a free-lance mode.
Prior to version 4.2 the SCSI Bus Service Aid was accessed via the SCSI Bus selection from
the Service Aid Selection Menu. Beginning with version 4.2 the SCSI Bus Service Aid is
accessed via the SCSI Bus Analyzer option from the Task Selection Menu.
To use this service aid, the user should have an understanding of how a SCSI Bus works.
This service aid should be used when the diagnostics cannot communicate with anything on
the SCSI Bus and cannot isolate the problem. Normally the procedure for finding a problem
on the SCSI Bus with this service aid is to start with a single device attached, ensure that it
is working, then start adding additional devices and cables to the bus ensuring that each one
works. This service aid works with any valid SCSI Bus configuration.
The SCSI Bus Service Aid transmits a SCSI Inquiry command to a selectable SCSI
Address. The service aid then waits for a response. If no response is received within a
defined amount of time, the service aid displays a timeout message. If an error occurs or a
response is received, the service aid then displays one of the following messages:
• The service aid transmitted a SCSI Inquiry Command and received a valid response back
without any errors being detected.
• The service aid transmitted a SCSI Inquiry Command and did not receive any response
or error status back.
• The service aid transmitted a SCSI Inquiry Command and the adapter indicated a SCSI
bus error.
• The service aid transmitted a SCSI Inquiry Command and an adapter error occurred.
• The service aid transmitted a SCSI Inquiry Command and a check condition occur.
Using the Service Aids
9-13
When the SCSI Bus Service Aid is entered a description of the service aid is displayed.
Pressing the Enter key will display the Adapter Selection menu. This menu allows the user
to enter which address to transmit the SCSI Inquiry Command.
When the adapter is selected the SCSI Bus Address Selection menu is displayed. This
menu allows the user to enter which address to transmit the SCSI Inquiry Command.
Once the address is selected the SCSI Bus Test Run menu is displayed. This menus allows
the user to transmit the SCSI Inquiry Command by pressing the Enter key. The Service Aid
will then indicate the status of the transmission. When the transmission is completed, the
results of the transmission will be displayed.
Notes:
1. A Check Condition can be returned when there is nothing wrong with the bus or
device.
2. AIX will not allow the command to be sent if the device is in use by another
process.
SCSI Tape Utilities Service Aid
This service aid provides a means to obtain the status or maintenance information from a
SCSI tape drive. Only some models of SCSI tape drive are supported.
The service aid provides the following options:
• Display time since a tape drive was last cleaned.
The time since the drive was last cleaned is displayed onto the screen. In addition, a
message indicating whether the drive is recommended to be cleaned is also displayed.
• Copy a tape drive’s trace table.
The trace table of the tape drive is written to diskettes.
The required diskettes must be formatted for DOS. Writing the trace table may require
several diskettes. The actual number of required diskettes is determined by the service
aid based on the size of the trace table. The names of the data files are of the following
format:
’TRACE<X>.DAT’ where ’X’ is the a sequential diskette number. The complete trace table
will consist of the sequential concatenation of all the diskette data files.
• Display or copy a tape drive’s log sense information.
The service aid provides options to display the log sense information to screen, to copy it
to a DOS formatted diskette or to copy it to a file. The file name ”LOGSENSE.DAT” is
used when the log sense data is written on the diskette. The service aid prompts for a file
name when the log sense data is to be copied to a file.
Service Aids for use with Ethernet
This selection provides a tool for diagnosing Ethernet problems. This service aid is used to
exercise the Ethernet adapter and parts of the Ethernet network. The service aid works by
transmitting a data block to itself. This service aid works with a wrap plug or with any valid
Ethernet network and can be used as a tool to diagnose Ethernet network problems.
9-14
Operator Guide
When the Ethernet service aid is executed, one of the following messages is returned:
• No errors occurred.
• An adapter error occurred.
• A transmit time–out occurred.
• A transmit error occurred.
• A receive time–out occurred.
• A receive error occurred.
• A system error occurred.
• Receive and transmit data did not match.
• An error occurred that could not be identified.
• The configuration indicates that there are no Ethernet adapters in this system unit.
• Another application is currently using the adapter.
• The resource could not be configured.
Service Hints Service Aid
This service aid reads and displays the information in the CEREADME file from the
diagnostics source (diskettes, disk, or CD–ROM). This file contains information that is not in
the publications for this version of the diagnostics. It also contains information about using
this particular version of diagnostics.
Use the Enter key to page forward through the information or the – (dash) and Enter keys to
page backward through the file.
SSA Service Aid
This service aid provides tools for diagnosing and resolving problems on SSA attached
devices. The following tools are provided:
• Set Service Mode
• Link Verification
• Configuration Verification
• Format and Certify Disk
Trace Service Aid
This service aid provides a tool for doing a Trace Dump on the Serial Disk subsystem. It
provides a means of doing a trace and a means to look at the trace data. The service aid is
only supported in 2.x version of diagnostics.
Using the Service Aids
9-15
7318 Serial Communications Network Server Service Aid
This service aid provides a tool for diagnosing terminal server problems.
9-16
Operator Guide
Chapter 10. Using the System Verification Procedure
The system verification procedure is used to check the system for correct operation.
This chapter contains information about pre-procedure considerations and running the
system verification.
Step 1. Considerations before Running This Procedure
• This procedure requires use of all of the system resources. No other activity can be
running on the system while you are doing this procedure. Before starting this procedure,
you should stop all programs and the operating system.
If this system unit is directly attached to another system unit or attached to a network, be
sure communications with the other system unit is stopped. If needed, see Chapter 2 for
more information about multiple system attachments.
• This procedure requires a console terminal attached to the S1 port.
• This procedure runs the diagnostic programs in standalone mode from either your normal
IPL source or from removable media (if installed). If the diagnostic programs are installed
on disk or LAN, these procedures should be run from disk or LAN. (See the operator
manual for your type tty terminal to find the key sequences you need to respond to the
diagnostic programs.)
If you need more information about standalone mode, see “Diagnostic Modes of
Operation” on page 8-7.
• If a console is not selected, the diagnostics stop with c31 in the operator panel display.
The instructions for selecting a console are displayed on any terminal attached to the S1
port. Follow the displayed instructions to select a console display.
• This procedure assumes that the AutoService IPL is enabled. If this flag is disabled, then
the system will display the MIANTENANCE MENU when booting. Refer to Appendix B,
“Modifying Service Support Parameters”, to determine how to verify and change this
flag’s setting; or, when the MAINTENANCE MENU is displayed select System Boot,
then Boot From List, and continue.
• Go to Step 2.
Using the System Verification Procedure
10-1
Step 2. Loading the Diagnostic Programs
1. Stop all application programs running on the operating system.
2. Stop the operating system. (If help is needed, call your 800 support number.)
3. Turn off the system.
4. Set the mode switch to the Service position.
5. If you want to run the diagnostics with removable media, and are running the diagnostics
from a terminal attached to an S1 port, continue with this substep. If not, go to substep 6.
– The console terminal must be attached to the S1 port on the system unit.
– The attributes for the terminal must be set to match the defaults of the diagnostic
programs. (For more information regarding attributes, refer to Chapter 8 “Using the
Diagnostics.”)
– Before changing any settings, record the normal settings, and be sure the terminal
attributes are set to work with the diagnostic programs.
6. Power the system on.
If c31 is displayed, select the console display using the displayed instructions.
7. When the DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS display, go to Step 3.
Step 3. Running System Verification
The should be displayed.
1. Press the Enter key.
2. If the terminal type has not been defined, you must use the Initialize Terminal option on
the FUNCTION SELECTION menu to initialize the operating system environment before
you can continue with the diagnostics. This is a separate and different operation than
selecting the console display.
3. If you want to do a general checkout without much operator action, select the
Diagnostic Routines option on the FUNCTION SELECTION menu.
Note: If you want to do a more complete checkout including the use of wrap plugs, select
the Advanced Diagnostics option on the FUNCTION SELECTION menu. The
advanced diagnostics are primarily for the service representative; the service
representative may instruct you to install wrap plugs to better isolate a problem.
4. Select the System Verification option on the DIAGNOSTIC MODE SELECTION menu.
5. If you want to run a general checkout of all installed resources, select the System
Checkout option on the DIAGNOSTIC SELECTION menu.
If you want to check one particular resource, select that resource on the DIAGNOSTIC
SELECTION menu.
6. Go to Step 4.
10-2
Operator Guide
Step 4. Additional System Verification
The checkout programs end with either the TESTING COMPLETE menu and a message
stating No trouble was found or the A PROBLEM WAS DETECTED ON (Time
stamp) menu with an SRN.
1. Press Enter to return to the DIAGNOSTIC SELECTION menu.
2. If you want to check other resources, select the resource from the list displayed on your
terminal. When you have checked all of the resources you need to check, go to Step 5.
Step 5. Stopping the Diagnostics
1. If you are running the diagnostics from removable media, go to substep 2. If diagnostics
are being run from disk or LAN, the system first should be shut down using the following
procedure:
a. Continue to press F3 until you get to the DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING
INSTRUCTIONS.
b. Press F3 once and follow the displayed instructions to shut down Version 4 of the
operating system.
2. Set the key mode switch to the Normal position.
3. If you changed any attributes on your tty terminal to run the diagnostic programs, change
the settings back to normal.
4. This completes the system verification. Report the SRN to the service organization if you
received one. To do a normal IPL, turn off the system unit and wait 30 seconds; then, set
the power switch of the system unit to On.
Using the System Verification Procedure
10-3
10-4
Operator Guide
Chapter 11. Hardware Problem Determination
If you have an error or failure on your system, this chapter contains steps for obtaining a
service request number (SRN). You report the SRN to the service organization. The service
organization uses the SRN to determine which field replaceable units (FRUs) are needed to
restore the system to correct operation.
Step 1. Considerations before Performing This Procedure
Note: See the operator manual for your type of tty terminal to find the key sequences
you need to respond to the diagnostic programs.
• The diagnostic programs use the console terminal attached to the S1 port.
• This procedure asks you to select the mode you want to run the diagnostic programs in
(standalone, maintenance, or concurrent). If you need more information about the modes,
see “Diagnostic Modes of Operation” on page 8-7.
• If the procedure instructs you to stop the operating system, refer to Chapter 2 for
additional information.
• This procedure assumes that the AutoService IPL is enabled. If this flag is disabled, then
the system displays the MAINTENANCE MENU when booting. Refer to Appendix B,
“Modifying SystemGuard Parameters”, to determine how to verify and change this flag’s
setting; or, when the MAINTENANCE MENU is displayed select System Boot, then
Boot From List, and continue.
• Go to Step 2.
Hardware Problem Determination
11-1
Step 2
(From Step 1)
The AIX operating system contains the diagnostic programs. Other operating systems may
not contain diagnostic programs.
Is AIX operating system used on this system?
NO
YES
Go to Step 21.
Go to Step 3.
Step 3
(From Step 2)
Determine if the AIX operating system is accepting commands.
Is the AIX operating system accepting commands?
NO
Try the following:
1. Stop the operating system.
2. If you cannot stop the operating system, set the power switch on the
system unit to Off; then, go to Step 6.
YES
Go to Step 4.
Step 4
(From Step 3)
Diagnostic tests can be run on many resources while the operating system is running.
However, problem isolation is obtained by running diagnostics in service mode.
Do you want to run the diagnostics in service mode?
11-2
NO
Go to Step 5.
YES
Do the following to shut down your system:
1. At the system prompt, stop the operating system.
2. After the operating system is stopped, set the power switch on the
system unit to Off.
3. Go to Step 6.
Operator Guide
Step 5
(From Step 4)
This step loads concurrent diagnostics.
1. Log on as root or as superuser.
2. Enter the diag command.
3. Wait until the words DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS are displayed, or wait
for three minutes.
Are the DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS displayed without any obvious
console display problems?
NO
Do the following to shut down your system:
1. At the system prompt, stop the operating system.
2. After the operating system is stopped, set the power switch on the
system unit to Off.
3. Go to Step 6.
YES
Go to Step 10.
Hardware Problem Determination
11-3
Step 6
(From Steps 3, 4, 5, 7)
This step loads the diagnostics.
1. Set the mode switch to the Service position.
2. Be sure the power switches of the attached devices are set to On.
3. Set the power switch on the system unit to On.
4. If c31 is displayed, follow the displayed instructions to select a console display. If you
do not have a console display, set the key mode switch to the Normal position and then
set it to the Service position to indicate to the diagnostics there is no console display.
If you cannot select a console display, go to Step 20. Otherwise, continue to the next
substep.
5. Wait until one of the following conditions occurs, then go to the next substep:
• The power-on light does not come on, or it comes on and does not stay on.
• The same number is displayed in the operator panel display for longer than three
minutes, and the power-on light is on.
• The number 888 is flashing in the operator panel display.
• The operator panel display is blank.
• The system stops with two or more numbers between 221 and 296 alternating in the
operator panel display.
• The words DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS are displayed.
11-4
Operator Guide
6. Starting at the top of the following table, find your symptom and follow the instructions
given in the Action column.
Symptom
Action
The system stops with a blank operator
panel display and the words DIAGNOSTIC
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS are
displayed with no obvious problem on the
console display (for example, it is not
distorted or blurred).
Go to Step 10.
The system stops with a blank operator
display and the MAINTENANCE MENU is
displayed.
Select System Boot, then Boot From List,
and continue with this step.
The power-on light does not come on or
comes on and does not stay on.
Check the power cable to the outlet.
Check the circuit breakers and check for
power at the outlet.
If you do not find a problem, record SRN
111–152 and report the problem to the
service organization.
STOP. You have completed these
procedures.
The system stops with a steady (not
The number must be other than c31. See
flashing) number displayed in the operator substep 3 above for this number.
panel display, and the power-on light is on.
Go to Step 7.
The system stops with 888 flashing in the
operator panel display.
Go to Step 8.
The system stops with a blank operator
Go to Step 9.
panel display, and the words DIAGNOSTIC
OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS are not
displayed correctly.
The operator panel display is blank and
the normal system log-in screen is
displayed.
Be sure the mode switch is set to the
Service position.
If the mode switch was not in the Service
position, stop the operating system, set it
to the Service position, and press Reset.
Then repeat this step.
If the mode switch was in the Service
position, record and report SRN 111–102.
STOP. You have completed these
procedures.
The system stops with two or more
numbers between 221 and 296
alternating in the operator panel display.
Go to Step 16.
Hardware Problem Determination
11-5
Step 7
(From Step 6, 18)
The following steps analyze a steady (not flashing) number displayed in the operator panel
display while attempting to load the diagnostics.
operator
panel
Display
Number
200
Action
Be sure the key mode switch is set to the Service position.
If the key mode switch was not in the Service position, set it to the
Service position; then, go to Step 6, substep 4.
If the key mode switch was in the Service position, record and report
SRN 111–200.
STOP. You have completed these procedures.
260, 261, 262
Go to Step 21.
Any other
number
Record and report SRN 101–xxx (where xxx is the number
displayed in the operator panel display).
STOP. You have completed these procedures.
Step 8
(From Steps 6, 18)
A flashing 888 in the operator panel display indicates that a crash message or a diagnostic
message is ready to be read.
1. Use the steps in the “Reading a Flashing 888 Message on a Multi-Line Operator Panel
Display” on page 8-12 to:
• Read all of the message.
• Identify the SRN if applicable.
• Record the remaining numbers for the service representative.
2. If you identified an SRN, go to substep 3. Otherwise, go to substep 5.
3. Record the SRN and any other numbers.
4. Report the SRN to the service organization. Report any other numbers read to the
service representative to determine the location of the failing FRU.
5. STOP. You have completed these procedures.
11-6
Operator Guide
Step 9
(From Steps 6, 18, 20)
The following steps analyze a console display problem.
Find your type of console display in the following table; then, follow the instructions given in
the Action column.
Console Display
Action
Display Device
Go to the your display documentation for
problem determination.
tty terminal
Go to the documentation for problem
determination for this type of terminal.
Step 10
(From Steps 5, 6, 12, 18)
The diagnostic control program loaded correctly.
Press the Enter key.
Is the FUNCTION SELECTION menu displayed?
NO
Go to Step 11.
YES
Go to Step 12.
Hardware Problem Determination
11-7
Step 11
(From Steps 10, 20)
There is a problem with the keyboard.
Find the type of keyboard you are using in the following table; then follow the instructions
given in the Action column.
Keyboard Type
Action
tty-terminal keyboard. This applies to all
attached terminals.
Go to the documentation for problem
determination for this type terminal.
Step 12
(From Step 10)
1. If the terminal type has not been defined, you must use the Initialize Terminal option
on the FUNCTION SELECTION menu to initialize the operating system environment
before you can continue with the diagnostics. This is a separate and different operation
than selecting the console display.
2. Select Diagnostic Routines.
3. Press the Enter key.
4. In the table on the following page, find the menu or system response you received when
you selected Diagnostic Routines; then follow the instructions given in the Action column.
11-8
Operator Guide
System Response
Action
The DIAGNOSTIC MODE SELECTION
menu is displayed.
Select Problem Determination, and
then go to Step 13.
The MISSING RESOURCE menu is
displayed.
Follow the displayed instructions until
either the DIAGNOSTIC SELECTION
menu or an SRN is displayed.
If the DIAGNOSTIC SELECTION menu is
displayed, go to Step 13.
If you get an SRN, record it, and go to
Step 15.
If you get a number in the operator panel
display, go to Step 14.
The NEW RESOURCE menu is
displayed.
Follow the displayed instructions.
Note: Devices attached to serial ports S1
or S2 do not appear on the NEW
RESOURCE menu.
If the DIAGNOSTIC SELECTION menu is
displayed, go to Step 13.
If you get an SRN, record it, and go to
Step 15.
If you do not get an SRN, go to Step 19.
The diagnostics begin testing a resource.
Follow the displayed instructions.
Note: If Problem Determination was
selected from the DIAGNOSTIC MODE
SELECTION menu, and if a recent error
has been logged in the error log, the
diagnostics automatically begin testing the
resource.
If the No Trouble Found screen is
displayed, press Enter.
If another resource is tested, repeat this
step.
If the ADVANCED DIAGNOSTIC
SELECTION menu is displayed, go to
Step 10.
If an SRN is displayed, record it, and go to
Step 15.
Hardware Problem Determination
11-9
Step 13
(From Step 12)
The system checkout option checks all of the resources (available in standalone mode only).
Select and run the diagnostic tests on the resources you are having problems with or run
system checkout to check all of the configured resources. Find the response in the following
table and perform the specific action.
Diagnostic Response
Action
An SRN is displayed.
Go to Step 15.
The system stopped with a number
displayed in the operator panel display.
Go to Step 14.
The TESTING COMPLETE menu and the Press Enter and continue with the testing.
No trouble was found message is
displayed, and you have not tested all of
the resources.
The TESTING COMPLETE menu and the Go to Step 19.
No trouble was found message
displayed and you have tested all of the
Notes: If dials and LPFKs are attached to
resources.
serial ports S1 or S2 and you are running
diagnostics from disk or server, the dials
and LPFKs only appear on the selection
screen if they have been configured by the
user. Use the Dials and LPFKs
Configuration service aid to configure
these devices.
Step 14
(From Steps 12, 13)
A flashing 888 in the operator panel display indicates that a crash message or a diagnostic
message is ready to be read.
1. Use the steps in the “Reading a Flashing 888 Message on a Multi-Line Operator Panel
Display” on page 8-12 to:
• Read all of the message.
• Identify the SRN.
• Record the remaining numbers for the service representative.
2. Record the SRN.
3. Report the SRN to the service organization. Report any other numbers to the service
representative to determine the location of the failing FRU.
4. STOP. You have completed these procedures.
11-10
Operator Guide
Step 15
(From Steps 12, 13)
The diagnostic programs produced an SRN for this problem.
1. Record the SRN and any other numbers.
2. Report the SRN to the service organization.
3. STOP. You have completed these procedures.
Step 16
(From Step 6)
The system stopped with two or more numbers between 221 and 296 alternating in the
operator panel display. This indicates the diagnostics could not load from disk, so the load
program is looking for the diagnostic programs on removable media or some other load
device.
Are you trying to load the diagnostic programs from removable media?
NO
YES
Go to Step 22.
Record and report SRN 111–101.
STOP. You have completed these procedures.
Step 17
(From Steps 21, 22)
When you load the diagnostics from a CD-ROM disc and run them from a tty terminal, the
attributes for the terminal must be set to match the defaults of the diagnostic programs. The
tty terminal must be attached to port S1 on the system unit.
Are you going to load the diagnostics from a CD-ROM disc and run them from a tty
terminal attached to port S1?
NO
Go to Step 18.
YES
Go to “Running the Diagnostic Programs from a TTY Terminal” on page 8-3
and be sure your terminal attributes are set to work with the diagnostic
programs.
Return to Step 18 when you finish checking the attributes. Record any
settings that are changed.
Hardware Problem Determination
11-11
Step 18
(From Step 17)
The following steps analyze a failure to load the diagnostic programs from a disk, or a failure
to determine whether the diagnostic programs are on a disk.
1. Set the power switch on the system unit to Off.
2. Set the key mode switch to the Service position.
3. Insert the diagnostic CD-ROM disc into the CD-ROM drive.
4. Set the power switch on the system unit to On.
5. If c31 is displayed, follow the displayed instructions to select the console display. If no
console display is available, set the key mode switch to the Normal position, and then set
it to the Service position to indicate to the diagnostics that there is no console display.
If you cannot select a console display, go to Step 20. Otherwise, continue to the next
substep.
6. Wait until one of the following conditions occur; then, go to the next substep:
• The system stops with two or more numbers between 221 and 296 alternating in the
operator panel display.
• The same number is displayed in the operator panel display for longer than three
minutes, and the power-on light is on.
• The number 888 is flashing in the operator panel display.
• The operator panel display is blank.
• The words DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS are displayed.
11-12
Operator Guide
7. Starting at the top of the following table, find your symptom; then perform the specific
action.
Symptom
Action
The system stops with a blank operator panel
display, and the words DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING
INSTRUCTIONS are displayed with no obvious
problem on the console display (for example, it is
not distorted or blurred).
Go to Step 10.
The system stops with a blank operator display and
the MAINTENANCE MENU is displayed.
Select System boot, then Boot
From List, and continue with this
step.
The system stops with a blank operator panel
display, and the words DIAGNOSTIC OPERATING
INSTRUCTIONS are not displayed correctly.
Go to Step 9.
The system stops with 260, 261, or 262 displayed
in the operator panel display.
Record and report SRN
111–101.
STOP. You have completed
these procedures.
The system stops with a steady (not flashing)
number displayed in the operator panel display, and
the power-on light is on.
The number must be other than
c07 or c31. See previous
substep 4 for these numbers.
Go to Step 7.
The system stops with 888 flashing in the operator
panel display.
Go to Step 8.
The system stops with two or more numbers
between 221 and 296 alternating in the operator
panel display.
Record and report SRN
111–101.
STOP. You have completed
these procedures.
Step 19
(From Steps 12, 13)
The diagnostics did not find a hardware problem. If you still have a problem, contact your
software support center. If you are attached to another system, refer to General Information
About Multiple Systems on page 2-1 and check your configuration before calling the
software support center.
Step 20
(From Steps 6, 18)
When the c31 halt was present, were the instructions to select a console display
readable with no obvious problems with the display?
NO
Go to Step 9.
YES
Go to Step 11.
Hardware Problem Determination
11-13
Step 21
(From Steps 2 and 7)
An English-only version of diagnostics are provided on CD-ROM disc.
Do you want to run diagnostics from CD-ROM disc?
NO
If you have a problem, call for service, and report the problem.
YES
Go to Step 17.
Step 22
(From Step 16)
An English-only version of diagnostics are provided on CD-ROM disc.
Do you want to run diagnostics from CD-ROM disc?
11-14
NO
Record and report SRN 111–103. Stop. You have completed these
procedures.
YES
Go to Step 17.
Operator Guide
Appendix A. SystemGuard Test Groups
SystemGuard Test Groups Table
The following diagram shows the various test groups and their associated tests. To modify
the test list, the tests have to be selected in the xxyy format, where xx is the group number
and yy is the test number within the group. For example, enter 0106 to specify the NVRAM
test in the BUMP Quick IO test group.
GROUP NO
01
GROUP
BUMP quick IO test
group
TEST NO
TEST
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
Debug Line Test
S1 ASL (BUMP) Test
S2 ASL (REM.) Test
S3 ASL (SPE.) Test
Flash EPROM Content Test
NVRAM Content Test
Eprom Content Test
TOD Test
Floppy Disk controller Test
BPP Registers Test
Misc. register Test
CPU access Test
VPD Coherency Test
50
51
52
53
54
Asynch. lines L–B Test (*)
BPP Ext. L–B Full Test (**)
Printer Test
Dial–Out Test
BPP Ext. L–B Test (*)
02
JTAG test group
01
JTAG Chain Integrity Test
03
Direct IO test group
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
IONIAN – SSGA reg. Test
NVRAM access Test
Super–IO access Test
Flash access Test
Eprom access Test
TOD access Test
IONIAN2 Regs. Test
50
Floppy Disk Ext. Test
01
02
03
04
05
CPU processor Test
Address translation Test
L1 cache Test
L2 cache Test
EEPROM coherency Test
04
CPU test group
SystemGuard Test Groups
A-1
GROUP NO
GROUP
TEST NO
TEST
05
DCB and Memory
test group
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
MM Data lines Test
MM Address lines Test
MM board dec. Test
MM Basic acc. Test
MM components Test
ECC component Test
ECC mechanism Test
Refresh mech. Test
ECC Data lines access. Test
50
MM Full Test (K/H)
06
Interrupt test group
01
02
03
04
05
06
BUMP to CPU interrupt Test
CPU to BUMP interrupt Test
UART to CPU interrupt Test
CPU to CPU interrupt Test
TOD to BUMP interrupt Test
MCA to CPU interrupt Test
11
Disk Accessibility
group
01
02
LSA/WSA SCSI basic Test*
LSA LAN basic Test*
50
51
52
Disk accessibility
LAN external*
Mouse Keyboard
*Test not available on all systems
20
Multi–processor
test group
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
Atomic instructions Test
Caches coherencies Test
DCB ports arbitration Test
TLB Mechanism Test
System IO share Test
Main memory share Test
Multi–resources sharing Test
Multi–processor full Test
Notes:
(*) For Manufacturing people only.
(**) For Field people only.
Some tests in this list are run only if an error is detected by the regular power-on self-tests
(POST). They are run as extended POST tests and include:
1. Multi-Resources Full Tests.
2. Main Memory Full Tests.
Some tests are only available through the Off Line Test Monitor under the maintenance
menu. They are not available and not run during Power On. They are as follows:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
A-2
Asynch. lines L–B Test
BPP Ext. L–B Test
Printer Test
Dial-Out Test
Floppy Disk Ext. Test
MM Full Test
SCSI–D ext. Test.
Operator Guide
SystemGuard Test Group Descriptions
The following is a description of the different test groups and the tests available under them.
All of these tests are performed automatically at Power-On with default parameters. They
can also be performed selectively (selection of test group/subtest/parameter) with user
configured parameters, under the control of the Off Line Test monitor. This is available as
one of the options in the Maintenance Menu under SystemGuard.
BUMP Quick I/O Tests Group
These tests are performed by the BUMP and are launched at Power-On under the control of
Off Line Test monitor, under the Maintenance Menu. These tests check the accessibility and,
the functions of the standard and direct I/O components from the BUMP. This group contains
the following list of tests.
Debug Asynchronus Line Test
This test checks the BUMP availability and access to the Flash EPROM. It consists of the
following sub-test.
Minimum Core Test
This test is performed at Power-On. A specific text on the Debug
console is printed. The operator is required to check the result.
SystemGuard Test Groups
A-3
BUMP, Remote, and Special Asynchronus Lines Test
These tests are meant to check the Asynchronus lines of the Standard I/O and the
Asynchronus Lines controller in the Super I/O. These tests contain sub-tests, which are
described as follows. Each sub-test saves and restores the line parameters. When an error
is detected, it is reported to the operator with a suitable error message.
Internal Registers TestThis test is performed at Power On and does Read / Write operation
of approved values, in the Asynchronus lines register of the Super
I/O. The following registers are checked:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
LCR
SCR
DLL
DLM
IER
MCR
Buffers Exchange Test
This test sends two ASCII characters in the following four
configurations and checks the received characters. This test is in
internal loop back mode and is performed at Power On. The
following eight configurations are used:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
38400 bds 8 bits 2 stop Even parity
19200 bds 8 bits 2 stop Even parity
9600 bds 8 bits 2 stop Even parity
4800 bds 8 bits 2 stop Even parity
1200 bds 8 bits 2 stop Even parity
300 bds 8 bits 2 stop Even parity
150 bds 8 bits 2 stop Even parity
75 bds 8 bits 2 stop Even parity
Junction Signals Test This test is also conducted in internal loop back mode and is
performed at Power On. The following loop backs are used:
1.
2.
3.
4.
RTS –>
DTR –>
OUT1 –>
OUT2 –>
CTS
DSR
R1
DCD
Flash EPROM Test
This test checks the content of the Flash EPROM. It contains one sub-test:
Check-Sum Test
A-4
Operator Guide
In this test Flash EPROM is divided into different areas and Area
CRC is calculated. Then the Registered CRC is read and compared
with the calculated CRC.
NVRAM Test
This test checks the accessibility of NVRAM bytes. It contains the following sub-tests:
NVRAM Data Lines Access Test
This test saves the first NVRAM byte. Then a read / write operation
is done word by word. It restores the first NVRAM byte.
NVRAM Address Lines Access Test
This test reads, writes and compares 2 NVRAM addresses. The
NVRAM addresses involved in this test are saved before testing
and restored after testing.
Stack Area Read / Write Test
This test is for all stack area bytes. It saves the byte, conducts
read/write operation and compares the written word with the read
word. Then it restores the byte.
Permanent Data Areas Test
This test is performed for all permanent data areas with an
associated check sum. Data area check sum is calculated and is
compared with the registered check sum.
EPROM Test
This test is meant to check the EPROM contents. It contains the following sub-tests.
Check-Sum Test
During this test, EPROM is divided in to different areas and CRC is
found for each area. Then this calculated CRC is compared with the
registered CRC.
TOD Test
This test checks the access to the Time Of Day chip and it s functionalities. All values are
saved and retored. It contains the following sub-tests:
MSR register test
This test checks the PS and RS bits of the MSR registers by the
way of write/read operations.
Internal RAM Test
In this test MSR register is initialized and RAM content checking is
done by the way of write / read operations.
Wake-up Mechanism Test
This test includes “Seconds” register reading, wake-up mechanism
activation, MSR reading.
Floppy Disk Controller Test
This test checks the accessibility to the Super I/O chip and the Floppy Disk Controller
embedded in the Super I/O chip. It contains the following sub-test.
DOR Register Test
This test writes, reads and compares a 1 among the 0 bits in the DOR register.
BPP Controller Test
This test checks the accessibility to the Super I/O chip and the Bi-directional Parellel Port
embedded in the Super I/O chip. These tests don’t access the h/w part related to BPP. It
contains the following sub-tests:
Addressing Register Test
This test writes, reads and compares different values in DTR and
CTR registers. It saves and restores the CTR register value.
SystemGuard Test Groups
A-5
DTR Register Test
This test writes, reads and compares a 1 among 0 bits in DTR
registers.
CTR Register Test
This test writes, reads and compares a 1 among 0 bits in CTR
registers. It saves and restores the CTR register value.
Miscellaneous Registers Test
This test checks accessibility to the MC68230 chip and its internal registers. It is made up of
two sub-tests which don’t access the h/w parts connected to MC68230. All the checked
registers are saved and restored.
Data Lines Test
This test writes, reads and compares a 1 among 0 bits in the PGCR
register.
DTR Regsiter Test
In this test following registers are checked, by write, read, and
compare operations.
0.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
PGCR
PSRR
PADDR
PBDDR
PCDDR
PACR
PBCR
CPU accessibility Test
This test checks the minimum dialog that must be available between the BUMP and the
CPUs.
The BUMP puts a code in NVRAM. The launched CPU must modify this code in a specific
way. The BUMP checks that this code has been correctly modified.
Asynchronous lines access test
This test needs an external plug on the asynchronous lines connector; this plug loops the
transmit line to the receive line and the same junction signals to the other ones. A set of
characters is sent on the transmit line and must be read on the receive line. This is also true
for the junction signals.
BPP lines access test
This test needs an external plug on the bidirectional parallel port (BPP) connector; this plug
allows visualization of the output pins of the BPP part on LEDs. The test program switches
on and off these LEDs.
Printer test
This test needs to connect a printer on the BPP port. The test writes a text on this printer.
The control is made by the operator by verifying the printed text.
VPD Coherency Test
This test checks the coherency of VPD data, that are stored in the configuration table.
A-6
Operator Guide
Entry Parameters
Parameters
Name
Definition
Possible Values Default Value
Parameter 1
Sub test #
Subtest Number
0 or 1
0 = All tests linked
Parameter 2
Proc #
Processor Number
8
8 = BUMP
Check–Sum Test
It checks the CRC value for all present VPDs; It checks the CRC value according to the
configuration and it checks the coherency of the configuration.
Asynchr. lines External Loopback Test (ASL EXT.L-B TEST)
Note: This test can only be performed by Field or Manufacturing people.
This test needs an external wrap plug on the asynchronous lines connector. This wrap plug
is used to emulate the far-end async port. This plug loops the transmit line to the receive
line, causing a test signal to loop through the plug from the transmit line to the receive line
and back. In addition, it also loops the junction signals of the “response” category to the
corresponding “request” signals from the async port under test (RTS to CTS and DTR to
DSR). A set of characters is sent on the transmit line and must be read on the receive line.
This is also true for the junction signals.
Entry Parameters
Parameters
Name
Definition
Possible Values Default Value
Parameter 1
Sub test #
Subtest Number
0 to 2
0 = All tests linked
Parameter 2
Proc #
Processor Number
8
8 = BUMP
Parameter 3
Line #
Line number
1, 2, 3
0
Buffers Exchange Test
This test sends two ASCII characters in the following configuration and checks the received
characters. This test is in external loop back mode and is not performed at Power On.
Following configuration is used:
• 9600 bds 8 bits 2 stop No
parity
Junction Signals Test
This test is also performed in external loop back mode and is not performed at Power On.
Following loop backs are used:
• RTS –> CTS
•
| –> DCD
• DTR –> DSR
•
| –> DCD
SystemGuard Test Groups
A-7
BPP External LoopBack Test (BPP EXT L–B TEST)
Note: This test can only be performed by Field or Manufacturing people.
This test checks the accessibility of the Super–IO chip. It saves and restores used registers.
This test is not performed at power on.
Entry Parameters
Parameters
Name
Definition
Possible Values Default Value
Parameter 1
Sub test #
Subtest Number
0 or 1
0 = All tests linked
Parameter 2
Proc #
Processor Number
8
8 = BUMP
JTAG Test Group
These tests check the chip to chip connections using the JTAG features. These tests are run
automatically by the BUMP.
The following three tests are available under this group:
Nodes Detection Test
This test detects all the connections between the chips. These detected nodes can be
stored on a Floppy diskette and loaded to NVRAM under the Maintenance menu, as soon as
a JTAG test is to be performed.
This test uses the JTAG capabilities to read or set the pins of the chips. This test builds a
node which is made up of set of pins which are linked, or pins which are not linked to a
node but directly linked to Vcc or GND (pull-up or pull-down). The nodes are stored in the
“nodes” file.
Fast Test
This test processes all the nodes of the “nodes” file, in order to check the integrity of the
links between the chips. This test checks if an error is present but doesn’t localize the errors.
When an error is detected, the test stops and the error is reported.
Diagnosis Test
This test checks all the nodes of the “nodes” file, looking for any differences between what is
read via JTAG and what has been memorized in the “nodes” file. If an error is detected, it is
stored in the “faults” file. This test is slow but it localizes the problems.
When JTAG tests are selected under the Off Line Test Control, the JTAG Test Monitor menu
is displayed. This menu performs the following main functions,
• Test Execution: Execution of the preceding tests in Normal or Trace mode (step by step).
• Display Nodes files / Faults Files: It is possible to view the entire nodes file / faults file.
• Display Configuration File: To view the h/w specific information (like the input pins,
Tri-stated pins, number of boards, etc).
More information about JTAG tests is awaited.
Direct I/O Test Group
These tests are performed by all processors at Power-On and are under control of the Off
Line Test monitor. These tests check the accessibility of the Standard and Direct I/O
components from the CPUs. The following tests are available under this group.
A-8
Operator Guide
IONIAN-SSGA Registers Test
This test is performed by all the processors and it checks the accessibility from the
processor to the IONIAN and SSGA chips. Following h/w parts are checked.
1. DCB ASIC
2. IONIAN ASIC
3. SSGA ASIC
The following sub-tests are included under the IONIAN-SSGA Registers Test:
IONIAN Registers Test This test operates on the DSC register, CONFIG register,
Personalization register, Bus_Status register. Specific values are
written and read. Values are saved and restored in all the
operations.
SSGA POS Register Test
This test tries to read specific values from each of the POS
registers. For POS 2 and POS 3 a write operation are also
conducted.
SSGA Interrupt Register Test
This test writes and reads specific values from each of the interrupt
registers. The values are then compared. Values are saved and
restored in all the operations. The following registers are operated
upon:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Initial Values Test
XVIR (BUC #0) register
XVIR (BUC #1) register
DSIER register
MFRR register
BUID register
APR register
This test checks the initial values of the IONIAN and SSGA ASICs.
It is only run at PON time.
NVRAM Access and SSBus Access Test
This test is performed by all the processors and is meant to check the accessibility of the SS
Bus from the processor, using NVRAM. This test doesn’t check the NVRAM memory cells.
Memory cells are checked by the BUMP directly. The following H/W parts are checked by
this test:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
DCB ASIC
IONIAN ASIC
SSGA ASIC
SS-Bus
NVRAM Decoding, addressing and reading
This test has the following sub-tests. All the areas which are accessed, are saved at the
beginning and restored at the end.
NVRAM Data Lines Access Test
This test writes and reads four specific words in the working area.
Written values are compared with the read values.
Walking 1 Address Test
This test is used to find the address lines which are at level 0;
address lines which are stuck to other address or data lines.
SystemGuard Test Groups
A-9
Walking 0 Address Test
This test detects the address lines which are cut.
Super I/O and UART Access Test
This test checks the accessibility of the Super I/O chip from the processors. They don’t
check the functional aspects of the Super I/O chip (this is done by the BUMP directly). The
following sub-tests are available under this test:
Super I/O UART 1 Access Test
Specific values are written and read in the data register scratch
SCR. The read values are compared with the written values.
Super I/O UART 2 Access Test
Specific values are written and read in the data register scratch
SCR. The read values are compared with the written values.
16550 UART Access Test
This test writes and reads specific values. These operations are
done on SCR register. Comparison is also done. The read values
are compared with the written values.
Floppy disk Controller Access Test
The data register scratch DOR, is written with specific values. Read
and compare operations are conducted. The read values are
compared with the written values.
Bidirectional Parellel Port Access Test
This test writes and reads specific values. These operations are
done on DTR register. Comparison is done. The read values are
compared with the written values.
Flash EPROM Access Test
This test calculates the checksum of the different parts of the Flash EPROM and compares
the obtained result to the registered result.
EPROM Access Test
This test calculates the checksum of the different parts of the EPROM and compares the
obtained result to the registered result.
TOD Access Test
This test is conducted to check the accessibility of the TOD chip from the processors. It has
two sub-tests. All the registers which are used during the operation are saved in the
beginning and are restored at the end.
Embedded RAM Test Specific values are written, read and compared in this test.
TOD Registers Test
This test operates on SEC_COMP_RAM register. It writes and
reads specific values. Values are compared and if a mismatch is
detected, an error message will be generated.
ION-2 REGS TEST
This test is performed by all the processors and it checks the accessibility from the
processor to the IONIAN2 and DMA slave chips. Following h/w parts are checked.
• DCB ASIC
• IONIAN 2 ASIC
A-10
Operator Guide
Initial Values Test
This test checks the initial values of the IONIAN and SSGA ASICs. It is only run at PON
time.
SSGA Interrupt Registers Test
This test writes and reads specific values from each of the interrupt registers. The values
are then compared. Values are saved and restored in all the operations.
Floppy Disk Access Test
This test needs a formatted diskette in the diskette drive (the diskette content is erased by
the test). The test writes and reads several sectors on the diskette.
CPU Test Group
These tests are performed by all of the processors at Power-On under the control of Off Line
Test Monitor. These tests check the status of the CPU cards. The following tests are
available under this group.
CPU Processor Tests
This test checks the main instructions of the CPU.
• Integer Logical Instructions
• Integer Arithmetic Instructions
• Floating Point Arithmetic Instructions (Single precision)
ADD. TRANSL. TEST
This test checks all the address translation mechanisms available on the machine. This test
is performed by the CPU.
• Block Address Translation
• Segmented Address Translation
Level 1 (primary cache) Test
This test checks the validity of the primary cache, embedded in the processor. This test is
performed automatically at each Power On by the processor internally. The test results are
automatically put in HID0 register. It contains the following sub-test.
HID0.31 Value Test
This test saves the HID0 content, validates the machine check stop
and cache parity check stop bits. Reads the HID0 contents and
restores the saved value.
Level 2 (secondary cache) Test
This test checks the validity of the secondary cache and enables the checking of the
following h/w parts.
1. CCA2 ASICs (partially)
2. CCD2 ASICs (partially)
3. Secondary cache components.
It contains the following three subtests which are destructive, that is values used are not
restored and they are lost:
Level 2 Cache Accessibility Test
This test checks cache accessibility. First, it calculates the available
memory address. It then validates Level 2 cache and writes 2 MB
SystemGuard Test Groups
A-11
in memory and in cache. Then it reads the second MB from cache
and first MB from the memory.
Level 2 Cache Data Test
This test checks the validity of the static memory RAMs forming the
Level 2 cache. It calculates the memory address available and then
validates the Level 2 cache before writing 1 MB. Then a read
operation is done in word mode and values are compared. Then a
read is done in burst mode and comparison is done.
TAG Data Test
This test checks the availability of the TAG chips of the L2 cache
memory.
Walking 1 TAG Test
This test verifies data integrity.
Walking 0 TAG Test
This test verifies data integrity.
Mini-Addressing TAG Test
This test checks L2 cache addresses.
EEPROM Compatibility Test
This test is done primarily to check the compatibility of the EEPROM contents (VPD code)
with the actual status of the machine. This results in checking of the information coherency.
This test contains the following sub-test:
EEPROM Compatibility Test
During this test, BUMP reads the CPU card VPD and puts the
information in the parameter area. The processor then reads the
PVR register and compares the parameter values with the PVR
register values.
The 2 values are available in the temporary test result area, in
NVRAM.
DCB and Memory Test Group
All of these tests except the Memory Components Test, in this group are performed by all of
the processors. The tests are launched at Power-On and under the control of the Off Line
Test Monitor. This test group checks the status of the System Planar and Memory cards.
The following tests are available in this group.
Data Lines Accessibility Test
This test checks the accessibility for all the data lines to the memory, through DCB ASICs.
The following h/w parts are checked by running this test.
1.
2.
3.
4.
DCB ASICs
SMC ASIC (partially)
Connection of data lines between CPU cards and System Planar ASICs
Connection of data lines between System Planar ASICs and memory chips.
This test consists of four sub-tests. Words manipulated / used are not restored at the end of
the test. This test applies to one of the four memory cards. The following is a description of
the sub-tests.
Work Area Test
A-12
Operator Guide
This sub-test is used to find a working area which is safe enough to
perform other sub-tests. It first calculates the memory location and
0s are written on the first long word and verified. Then 1s are written
and verified. If the verification is OK, the sub-test is ended and the
next sub-test is started.
Walking 1 Data Test
This test basically identifies if any data lines are stuck at level 0 or
to any other data line. This test writes “1s among 0s” pattern on the
cache line. Then it is read and compared.
Walking 0 Data Test
This test isolates the open lines among the data lines. It writes “0s
among 1s” pattern on the cache line. Then it is read and compared.
Transfer Modes On DCB Test
This sub-test is used to check the transfer of 1 to 8 bytes to the
memory. Initially the working area is written with 0s (blanked). Then
a byte is written and placed in the 8 possible locations of the long
word. This is read and compared with the written word for possible
errors.
Address Lines Accessibility Test
This test checks all the address lines access to the main memory, through the SMC ASIC.
The following h/w parts are checked by running this test.
1. SMC ASIC
2. Connection of address lines between CPU cards and System Planar ASICs
3. Connection of address lines between System Planar ASICs and memory chips.
This test consists of three sub-tests. Words manipulated / used are not restored at the end
of the test. This test applies to one of the four memory cards. In case of errors, suitable error
messages are displayed on the console. The following is a description of the sub-tests.
Work Area Test
This subtest is used to find the working area safe enough to perform
the other tests. It first calculates the memory location and 0s are
written on the first long word and verified. Then 1s are written and
verified. If the verification is OK, the sub-test is ended and the next
sub-test is started.
When the test is run automatically during Power On, the next
sub-test is started, only if the results of this verification is OK.
Walking 1 Address Test
This test basically identifies if any address lines are stuck at level 0
or to any other address/data lines. This test writes two defined set
of patterns and the same is read and verified. If it is OK, the process
is repeated with the “1” bit shifted to the end of the working area.
Then the patterns are interchanged and written. If there is any
mismatch between the written word and the read word, suitable
error message is displayed.
Walking 0 Address Test
This test isolates the open lines among the address lines. It writes
two defined set of patterns and the same is read and verified. If it is
OK, the process is repeated with the “0” bit shifted to the beginning
of the working area. Then the patterns are interchanged and
written. If there is any mismatch between the written word and the
read word, suitable error message is displayed.
Memory Boards Decoding Test (MM BOARDS DEC TEST)
This test is performed by all the processors and checks the high order address line to the
main memory, through the DCB ASICs. The following h/w parts are checked by running this
test.
1. SMC ASIC (partially)
SystemGuard Test Groups
A-13
2. Connection of high order address lines between CPU cards and System Planar ASICs
3. Connection of high order address lines between System Planar ASICs and memory
chips.
This test consists of two sub-tests. Words manipulated / used are not restored at the end of
the test. This test is applied to all the memory cards which are present. In case of errors,
suitable error messages are displayed on the console. The following is a description of the
sub-tests.
Work Area Test
This test calculates the memory address available on each board.
Then the first memory card is accessed and read-write-compare
operation is done for a memory location. If the comparison is OK,
then the test proceeds to check the next board. Otherwise a fatal
error message is displayed on the console.
Main Memory Cards Accessibility Test
This test checks whether the high order memory address lines are
open, stuck to level 0, or shorted to any other data line. This is done
in two phases:
First, in Write phase, different patterns will be written on the four
memory cards. This is verified to check the accessibility of the
boards.
In the Read phase, the values are read and the interference
between the boards is checked (if the value written for the first
board, appears when the second board is accessed).
If there are any errors in the preceding operations, they are displayed with suitable error
messages on the console.
A-14
Operator Guide
Basic Main Memory Test
This test is performed by all the processors and it checks the capability to access the main
memory in all kinds of data formats. This test applies to one main memory location and the
words used during the test are not restored.
This test partially checks the DCB ASICs. It consists of the 10 sub-tests that follow. If an
error is detected in any of these tests, a suitable error message is displayed on the console.
Byte Write Checking
A byte is written and verified. If there is mismatch between the read
value and the written value, an error message will be generated.
Aligned Half Word Write Checking
This test writes a half word and checks for the possible errors in the
read value.
Unaligned Half Word Write Checking
This test writes a half word and checks the corrected value against
the read value.
Aligned Word Write Checking
It writes a full word and checks it against the read value. An error
message is generated if a mismatch is detected between the read
value and the written value.
Unaligned Word Write Checking
This test writes an unaligned word and verifies it against the
corrected value.
Aligned Double Word Write Checking
This test checks the access by writing an aligned double word and
does a read verification. If the verification fails, a console error
message appears.
Unaligned Double Word Write Checking
This test writes an unaligned double word and verifies it against the
corrected value.
Multiple Individual Store Checking
Access to the 1MB address is checked through writing. A
comparison is made between written value and the read value.
Addressing tests in Work Mode Checking
Access to the 1MB address is checked through writing. A
comparision is made between written value and the read value.
Aligned Multiple Store Checking
In this test multiple words are written and read back. If the
verification fails, an Aligned Multiple store error is displayed.
Unaligned Multiple Store Checking
This test writes multiple words and checks for misalignment
interrupt. An error message is displayed if it is not set.
SystemGuard Test Groups
A-15
Main Memory Components Test
This test is performed by all the processors to check all the main memory locations. From
the h/w point of view, this test checks the memory chips mounted on the main memory
cards. This test can be launched in two modes, as follows:
1. Bit Map Elaboration Mode: This is at Power On and performed with execution mode
parameter set to 0.
2. Localization Mode: This is possible in the maintenance menu, under the control of
Off Line Test Monitor. It is performed on a selected area with the execution mode
parameter set to 1.
This test has two sub-tests, as follows:
Address in to Address Memory Test
This test is done in two phases.
In the Write phase, the first address to be written is calculated and
the BAT is initialized. Then the last address to be written in the 1MB
block, is found and the writing loop is begun. This loop writes the
address of the location as the data in to the memory location, and
after each write operation the address is incremented. This loop
continues until the working address is equal to the end address. If it
is equal, Read and Compare phase begins.
In the Read and Compare phase, the first address to be read and
compared is found and BATs initialization is done. Then the last
address to read and compare in the 1MB block is calculated. Now,
the Read and Compare loop is begun where each memory location
is read and compared with the theoretical value. In case of no
errors, the loop ends when all the locations have been verified. If an
error is detected, a console message giving the details of the error
is displayed.
Complemented Address in to Address Memory Test
This test is conducted in the same manner as the previous test
except that, the location address is complemented and written.
A-16
Operator Guide
ECC Data Lines Accessibility Test
This test checks the accessiblity for all the data lines to the ECC memory banks, through
SMC ASICs. The following h/w parts are checked by running this test.
• DCB ASICs
• SMC ASICs
• Connection of data lines between CPU daughter boards and MPB ASICs
• Connection of data lines between MPB ASICs and ECC memory chips.
Words manipulated / used are not restored at the end of the test. This test is applied to all
present memory banks.
Entry Parameters
Parameters Name
Definition
Possible Values Default Value
Parameter 1 Sub test #
Subtest Number
0 to 2
0 = All tests
linked
Parameter 2 Proc #
Processor Number
0 to 7
0
Parameter 3 ECC sel.
ECC Selection
0 to 5
See note 1
2
Parameter 4 1st Mem. Bnk Add.
Mem Address (Mb)
0
Parameter 5 2nd Mem. Bnk Add. Mem Address (Mb)
0xffffffff
Parameter 6
3rd
Mem. Bnk Add. Mem Address (Mb)
0xffffffff
Parameter 7
4th
Mem. Bnk Add.
0xffffffff
Parameter 8 SIMM/Bus mode
Mem Address (Mb)
See note 2
0=SIMM number
1=Value of Bus
0
Notes:
1. The different values are:
. 0 –> ECC invalidation,
. 1 –> ECC validation and checkstop detection,
. 2 –> ECC test,
. 3 –> ECC validation and no checkstop detection,
. 4 –> ECC generation checking,
. 5 –> ECC correction checking.
2. If your answer is 0, you get the number of the default DIMM.
If your answer is 1, you get the bus value which enables you to determine the
failing bits.
Work Area Checking
This program calculates the memory address available on each board to perform the sub
tests. If no working area exists, a fatal error message is displayed on the console.
Walking 1 Data Test
This test basically identifies if any ECC data lines are stuck at level 0 or to any other ECC
data line. This test writes a pattern of a single1 bit among 0 bits on the cache line. Then it is
read and compared.
Walking 0 Data Test
This test isolates an open line among the ECC data lines. It writes a pattern of a single 0 bit
among 1 bits on the cache line. Then it is read and compared.
SystemGuard Test Groups
A-17
ECC Memory Component Test
This test is identical to the main memory components test but it is applied to the ECC
memory components.
Error Correction Mechanism Test
This test checks the hardware mechanisms enabling the detection of and the correction of
single bit errors when working with the main memory. It also detects double errors.
Memory Refresh Mechanism Test
This test is performed by all the processors. It checks the mechanism embedded in the SMC
ASIC enabling it to refresh the main memory. This test checks the SMC ASIC h/w partially.
This test contains the following sub-test.
Refresh Mechanism Test
In this test, the memory address is calculated first. Then two
complementary patterns are written in the work area. Then a read
and compare operation is done. If an error is detected, a Memory
read error is displayed. The refresh mechanism is checked in the
following manner.
A read operation is done on another location (other than the one
previously read) till the delay time is over. Then the previous
location is once again read, to verify the presence of the same data
(this is possible, only if the chip is refreshed periodically).
Main Memory full Test
This test performs the most complete test on the main memory, using the Knaizuk-Hartmann
algorithm.
This test is very long (about 20 minutes) when the memory capacity to be checked is large
(2GB). So, it is performed only as an extended test or under the OFF line test monitor
control.
A-18
Operator Guide
Interrupt Tests Group
These tests are performed by the BUMP as well as the processors. They are launched at
Power On and under control of Off Line Test Monitor. They collectively check the interrupt
system. The following tests are available under this group.
BUMP To CPU Interrupt Test
This test is performed jointly by the BUMP and the processor. It contains one sub-test which
checks the capability of the BUMP to generate an interrupt request to one CPU. The errors
can be either detected by the BUMP or by the processor. They are suitably displayed on the
console. This test also checks the following h/w parts:
1. Processor Interrupt Capability
2. Interrupt Management of SSGA.
3. Conrol Logic PLD.
CPU To BUMP Interrupt Test
This test is performed jointly by the BUMP and the processor. It contains one sub-test which
checks the capability of the processor to generate an interrupt request to BUMP. The errors
can be either detected by the BUMP or by the processor. They are suitably displayed on the
console. This test also checks the following h/w parts:
1. BUMP Interrupt Capability
2. Interrupt Management of SSGA.
3. Control Logic PLD.
UART To CPU Interrupt Test
This test is performed by the processor. It has a sub-test which checks the capability of the
Super-I/O Async line to generate an interrupt request to the CPU. The following h/w parts
are checked by the test:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Processor Interrupt Capability
SSGA Interrupt Management
PLD Control Logic
Super-I/O Interrupt Mechanism
Whenever an error is detected by the processor, an error message giving the details of the
error is displayed.
CPU To CPU Interrupt Test
This test checks the capability for a CPU to interrupt another CPU. The two CPUs of the
same card are used (the capability for a CPU to interrupt a CPU located an another CPU
card is not used in this test).
TOD To BUMP Interrupt Test
This test is launched and performed by the BUMP. It has one sub-test to check the interrupt
generating mechanism of the TOD chip.
This test checks the BUMP and TOD h/w during the process. TOD internal registers are not
modified during the test. This test displays error messages during the test if an error is
detected.
SystemGuard Test Groups
A-19
CPU MultiProcessor Test Group
These tests are launched at Power-On and are also available under the control of the Off
Line Tests monitor. These tests check the multi-processor mechanisms, atomic instructions,
cache coherency, main memory sharing, and multi-resources sharing.
The following tests are available under this group.
Atomic Instructions Test
This test checks the mechanisms enabling the protection of the content of the memory in
case of use of some specific instructions, called “atomic instructions”.
Cache Coherency Test
This test is performed by two processors on the same CPU card. It checks the capability of a
CPU card to manage all the H/W systems, maintaining the coherency between all the
caches. This test checks the following H/W parts:
1.
2.
3.
4.
CPU processors (partially)
CCA2 ASICs
CCD ASICs
L2 cache
This test is made of 9 sub-tests, which are launched on two processors, Processor 0 and
Processor 1. Processor 1 is often used to verify the operation started by Processor 0. These
two processors concurrently access the same memory area, with various access modes
enabled. The following is a brief description of the various sub-tests. Suitable error
messages are generated by each test, whenever an error is detected.
Concurrent Coherent Write Access-Copy Back
In this test, both the processors are enabled in Global Copy Back
mode. The snoop mechanism is activated to ensure cache
coherency. Processor 0, writes a half word in memory (actually,
data is in Processor 0 cache). Then Processor 1 writes another half
word in memory (actually, data is in Processor 1 cache). When
Processor 1 is writing, Processor 0 cache updates memory. When
Processor 0 tries to read the full word, Processor 1 cache is erased.
Concurrent Not Coherent Write Access-Copy Back
This test puts both the processors in Local Copy Back Mode. Each
processor does a write-read operation.
The global snoop mechanism is not enabled in this test and the
caches are not coherent. So when Processor 0 is reading memory,
Processor 1 cache is not erased.
Concurrent Coherent Write Access-DCBST from Line Owner
This test verifies the DCBST(update memory) instruction from the
Processor 0. Processor 0 is set to Global Write Through mode and
caching is enabled. The odd processor is uncached without
coherency.
Concurrent Coherent Write Access-DCBF from Line Owner
In this test, Processor 0 is enabled for Write through and Memory
coherency parameters. Processor 0 issues a DCBF (Data Cache
Block Flush) instruction. Processor 1 cache is inhibited and memory
coherency is absent.
Concurrent Coherent Write Access-DCBI from Line Owner
This test verifies the DCBI (Data Cache Block Invalidate)
A-20
Operator Guide
instruction. This is issued by Processor 0 which is set to Global
Copy Back mode. Caching is inhibited for Processor 1.
Paradox Detection: DCBST not from Line Owner
Here, Processor 1 is set to Local Copy Back mode. Memory
coherency is enabled for Processor 0. This test verifies the
incoherency introduced by the Local Copy Back. Execution of
DCBST by Processor 1 is not verified.
Paradox Detection: DCBF not from Line Owner
This test enables the Processor 0 for memory coherency. Processor
1 is set to Local Copy Back mode. The DCBF instruction is run from
Processor 1 and verified.
Paradox Detection: DCBI not from Line Owner
In this test, the DCBI instruction is run by Processor 1 when it is
uncached. The even processor is set to Global Loop Back mode.
Paradox Detection: DCBT not from Line Owner
In this test, Processor 0 is made to verify the result of the DCBT
(Data Cache Block Touch) instruction on the Processor 1 cache.
The odd processor cache is inhibited without coherency. Processor
0 is set to Global Copy Back mode, with memory coherency
enabled.
DCB Ports Arbitration Test
This test checks the different data flows through the DCB asics.
TLB Mechanism Test
This test is performed by two processors on the same CPU card. It contains one sub-test
called “TLB Invalidate in Multiprocessor environment Test”. This test checks the TLB
mechanism. The following h/w parts are also checked by this test:
1. Processors (partially).
2. CCA2 ASICs
3. CCD ASICs.
System I/O Sharing Test
This test is performed by all the processors. It contains one sub-test which checks the
capability of all the processors to simultaneously access the same Standard I/O resources.
Here, it checks the Flash EPROM and NVRAM. It also checks the following h/w parts:
1. DCBs ASICs
2. IONIAN ASICs
3. SSGA ASIC.
The test is launched by the BUMP and performed by all the configured processors. The
BUMP manages the test and reports the global test results.
SystemGuard Test Groups
A-21
Main Memory Sharing Test
This test is launched by the BUMP and performed by all configured processors. It has a
sub-test to check the capability of all the processors to access the main memory. The
following h/w parts are checked during the process:
1.
2.
3.
4.
DCB ASICs
IONIAN ASICs
SSGA ASIC
SMC ASIC
BUMP displays the overall test results.
Multi Resource Sharing Test
BUMP launches and manages the test results. All configured processors perform this test. It
has one sub-test, which checks the capability of all the processors to access the following
I/O resources simultaneously:
1. Main Memory
2. NVRAM
3. Async Lines
The following h/w parts are checked during the process.
1.
2.
3.
4.
DCB ASICs
IONIAN ASICs
SSGA ASIC
SMC ASIC
Multi Resources Full Test
This test is the hardest test performed by the machine. To be fully efficient, it must be:
• launched on three processors at least (one of them is used as a de-synchronize
processor).
• performed during thirty seconds at least. Its main characteristic is to perform random
accesses into main memory, with a very high implication of L1 and L2 caches.
A-22
Operator Guide
Appendix B. Modifying SystemGuard Parameters
Many SystemGuard parameters can be modified in several ways. Some can be modified
using the SystemGuard Stand-By menu, others using the SystemGuard Maintenance menu,
and others using the AIX diag or mpcfg commands or Diagnostic Service Aids. When you
want to modify SystemGuard parameters, the method to use depends on the machine boot
phase (stand-by, init, run-time). This chapter explains how to change some of the more
important flags and parameters depending on the current machine state. For a complete list
of default values for flags and parameters, see the table in “Default Parameter Values” on
page B-1.
The Mode Switch must be in the Service position to use the SystemGuard menus. If the
machine is in the stand-by phase, you must press the Enter key to get the SystemGuard
prompt, and then enter the keyword sbb to display the stand-by menu. If you enter the
power-on keyword (power), or if you turn the power on manually, the machine enters the init
phase and displays the maintenance menu if the AutoService IPL flag is disabled. The
AutoService IPL flag is normally enabled. If the AutoService IPL flag is enabled, then the
flag must be disabled before the maintenance menu can be entered. The AutoService IPL
flag can be disabled when the system is in stand-by phase by pressing the Enter key and
then entering the keyword sbb to display the Stand-by Menu. Select the Set Flags option.
The AutoService IPL flag can now be disabled. The AutoService IPL flag can also be
disabled using the Service Aids.
When changing parameters under the AIX operating system, the Diagnostic Service Aids
are recommended because its menu interface is better suited to interactive use. The mpcfg
command requires the use of command line flags and is better suited for shell scripts. The
command requires root authority. Also, the Service Aids require root authority if entered with
the diag command. They display or change flag values using 0 (zero) for disabled and 1
(one) for enabled. The explanations that follow refer to the Diagnostic Service Aids.
Default Parameter Values
The flags, parameters and keywords used by SystemGuard programs are stored in
non-volatile memory (NVRAM). They are given default values before leaving the factory, as
shown in the table on the following page.
Modifying SystemGuard Parameters
B-1
Flag, Parameter and Keyword Default Values
Name
Default Value
BUMP Console Power-On Command String
Power
Service Console Power-On Command String
Blank (not set)
BUMP Console Power-On Command flag
Enabled
Service Console Power-On Command flag
Disabled
Remote Authorization flag
Disabled
Autoservice IPL flag
Disabled
BUMP Console Present flag
Enabled
BUMP Console Speed
1200
Dial-Out Authorization flag
Disabled
Set Electronic Mode Switch to Normal when
Booting flag
NRM
Electronic Mode Switch from Service Line flag
Disabled
Boot Multiuser AIX in Service flag
Disabled
Fast IPL flag
Disabled
Power-On Tests in Loop Mode flag
Disabled
Power-On Tests in Trace Mode flag
Disabled
Power-On Test Message Mode parameter
1 (verbose mode off: only error messages
shown)
Extended Tests parameter
Disabled
Maintenance Password
Blank (no password set)
Customer Maintenance Password
Blank (no password set)
System Dial-In phone number
Blank (not set)
Service Center Dial-Out phone number
Blank (not set)
Customer Hub Dial-Out phone number
Blank (not set)
System Operator Voice phone number
Blank (not set)
Modem Parameters File Name
Blank
Service Line Speed
1200
Protocol Inter Data Bloc Delay
15
Protocol Time Out
30
Retry Number
2
Customer ID
Blank
Login ID
Blank
Password ID
Blank
Service Contract Validity
Enabled
Remote Service Support
Enabled
Quick On-Call Service
N
Service Support Type
F (ASCII byte x’46’)
B-2
Operator Guide
Changing Flags and Parameters Under AIX Service Aids
The Service Aids are recommended to change the flags. The Service Aids can be entered
using the diag command or by booting diagnostics in service mode. They display or change
flag values using 0 (zero) for disabled and 1 (one) for enabled. The explanations that follow
refer to the Service Aids.
Modifying Diagnostic Flags
Use this procedure to modify diagnostic flags such as the Remote Authorization flag or the
Autoservice IPL flag. Starting from the Service Aids Selection menu:
1. Select the BUMP Service Aids option.
2. Select the Display or Change Flags and Configuration option.
3. Select the Change Diagnostic Flags option to display a menu of diagnostic flags.
4. Select a flag and enter its new value.
Modifying the Modem and Site Configuration
Use this procedure to modify modem and site configuration parameters such as the modem
configuration file name or the service line speed. Starting from the Service Aids Selection
menu:
1. Select the BUMP Service Aids option.
2. Select the Display or Change Flags and Configuration option.
3. Select the Change Modem and Site Configuration option to display a menu.
4. Select a flag and enter its new value.
Saving or Restoring Flags and Configuration Information
Use this procedure to save or to restore the configuration using a file. Starting from the
Service Aids Selection menu:
1. Select the BUMP Service Aids option.
2. Select the Save or Restore Flags and Configuration option.
3. Select either the Save or the Restore option.
Modifying the Remote Authorization Flag
This flag can be changed under SystemGuard using the stand-by or maintenance menus, or
under AIX using the diag command.
SystemGuard Stand-by Menu
Starting from the main stand-by menu:
1. Enter 1 (one) to set flags.
2. Enter 0 (zero) to change the Remote Authorization flag.
Modifying SystemGuard Parameters
B-3
SystemGuard Maintenance Menu
Starting from the main maintenance menu:
• Enter 2 to enable the flag.
OR
• Enter 3 to disable the flag.
AIX Diag Command
Starting from the Service Aids Selection menu:
1. Select the BUMP Service Aids option.
2. Select the Display or Change Flags and Configuration option.
3. Select the Change Diagnostic Flags option.
4. Select the Remote Authorization option.
5. Supply a new flag value (0 or 1).
Modifying the Dial-Out Authorization Flag
This flag can be changed under SystemGuard using the maintenance menu, or under AIX
using the diag command.
SystemGuard Maintenance Menu
Starting from the main maintenance menu:
1. Enter 8 to set parameters.
2. Enter 4 for miscellaneous parameters.
3. Enter 2 to change the Dial-Out Authorization flag.
AIX Diag Command
Starting from the Service Aids Selection menu:
1. Select the BUMP Service Aids option.
2. Select the Display or Change Flags and Configuration option.
3. Select the Change Diagnostic Flags option.
4. Select the Dial-Out Authorization option.
5. Supply a new flag value (0 or 1).
B-4
Operator Guide
Modifying Dial-In Phone Numbers
These parameters can be changed under SystemGuard using the maintenance menu, or
under AIX using the diag command.
SystemGuard Maintenance Menu
Starting from the main maintenance menu:
1. Enter 8 to set parameters.
2. Enter 3 for phone numbers.
3. Enter 4 for the dial-in phone number.
4. Supply a new phone number.
AIX Diag Command
Starting from the Service Aids Selection menu:
1. Select the BUMP Service Aids option.
2. Select the Display or Change Flags and Configuration option.
3. Select the Change Remote Support Phone Numbers option.
4. Select the System Dial-In option.
5. Supply a new phone number.
Modifying Dial-Out Phone Numbers
These parameters can be changed under SystemGuard using the maintenance menu, or
under AIX using the diag command.
SystemGuard Maintenance Menu
Starting from the main maintenance menu:
1. Enter 8 to set parameters.
2. Enter 3 for phone numbers.
3. Select the dial-out phone number to modify (service center or customer hub).
4. Supply a new phone number.
AIX Diag Command
Starting from the Service Aids Selection menu:
1. Select the BUMP Service Aids option.
2. Select the Display or Change Flags and Configuration option.
3. Select the Change Remote Support Phone Numbers option.
4. Select the Service Center Dial-Out or Customer Hub Dial-Out option.
5. Supply a new phone number.
Modifying SystemGuard Parameters
B-5
Modifying the Electronic Mode Switch from Service Line Flag
This flag can be changed under SystemGuard using the maintenance menu, or under AIX
using the diag command.
SystemGuard Maintenance Menu
Starting from the main maintenance menu:
1. Enter 8 to set parameters.
2. Enter 4 for miscellaneous parameters.
3. Enter 9 to change the Electronic Mode Switch from Service Line flag.
AIX Diag Command
Starting from the Service Aids Selection menu:
1. Select the BUMP Service Aids option.
2. Select the Display or Change Flags and Configuration option.
3. Select the Change Diagnostic Flags option.
4. Select the Electronic Mode Switch from Service Line option.
5. Supply a new flag value (0 or 1).
B-6
Operator Guide
Reloading the Flash EEPROM
Follow this procedure to load a new version of SystemGuard into the flash EEPROM, which
may be necessary when you install a new version of AIX for example. Only system
administrators should perform this procedure.
Prerequisites
If the system is not yet booted, you need a firmware diskette containing the new version of
the firmware to be loaded. If the system is already booted, you need the full path name of a
file containing the new version of the firmware to be loaded.
Reloading the Flash EEPROM (stand-by phase)
Insert the firmware diskette in the drive, place the Mode Switch in the Service position, and
then turn the system power on. The firmware diskette is identified by a special header which
distinguishes it from diskettes containing other data. The existing firmware recognizes the
special header and automatically loads the new firmware version.
Reloading the Flash EEPROM (run-time phase)
If AIX is already up and running (the run-time phase), reloading the firmware requires more
steps, because the machine is rebooted after the firmware is reloaded. Therefore, the root
user who performs this procedure should be the only logged user. To reload the flash
EEPROM, one method is to shut down the system and reboot using the procedure
“Reloading the Flash EEPROM (stand-by phase)” described above. The other method is:
1. Make sure that no other users are logged in to the system (log them out if necessary).
2. Make sure that you have root authority (use the su command if necessary).
3. Enter the diag command.
4. Select the BUMP Service Aids option.
5. Select the Flash Eprom Download option.
6. Enter the full path name for the file containing the new flash EEPROM.
7. The system is automatically rebooted
Modifying SystemGuard Parameters
B-7
B-8
Operator Guide
Appendix C. SystemGuard Remote Operation
Configuration
To use the remote operation capabilities of SystemGuard and also allow console mirroring,
you must have flags, parameters and tty configurations properly enabled. Below, are tty0
and tty1 settings, sample modem files and all the parameters that are necessary to allow
remote operations.
Terminal Configuration
The configuration of the tty0 for the S1 port looks similar to the following:
[TOP]
[Entry Fields]
TTY
tty0
TTY type
tty
TTY interface
rs232
Description
Asynchronous
Terminal
Status
Available
Location
00–00–S1–00
Parent adapter
sa0
PORT number
[s1]
Enable LOGIN
disable
BAUD rate
[9600]
PARITY
[none]
BITS per character
[8]
Number of STOP BITS
[1]
TIME before advancing to next port setting [0]
TERMINAL type
[dumb]
FLOW CONTROL to be used
[xon]
OPEN DISCIPLINE to be used
[dtropen]
STTY attributes for RUN time
[hupcl,cread,brkint,
icrnl,opost,tab3,
onlcr,isig,icanon,
echo,echoe,echok,
echoctl,echoke,
imaxbel,iexten]
STTY attributes for LOGIN
[hupcl,cread,echoe,
cs8,ixon,ixoff]
LOGGER name
[]
STATUS of device at BOOT time
[available]
TRANSMIT buffer count
[16]
RECEIVE trigger level
[3]
STREAMS modules to be pushed at OPEN time [ldterm,tioc]
INPUT map file
[none]
OUTPUT map file
[none]
CODESET map file
[sbcs]
SystemGuard Remote Operation Configuration
C-1
The configuration of the tty1 for the S2 port looks similar to the following:
[TOP]
[Entry Fields]
TTY
tty1
TTY type
tty
TTY interface
rs232
Description
Asynchronous
Terminal
Status
Available
Location
00–00–S2–00
Parent adapter
sa1
PORT number
[s2]
Enable LOGIN
disable
BAUD rate
[9600]
PARITY
[none]
BITS per character
[8]
Number of STOP BITS
[1]
TIME before advancing to next port setting [0]
TERMINAL type
[dumb]
FLOW CONTROL to be used
[rts]
OPEN DISCIPLINE to be used
[dtropen]
STTY attributes for RUN time
[hupcl,cread,brkint,
icrnl,opost,tab3,
onlcr,isig,icanon,
echo,echoe,echok,
echoctl,echoke,
imaxbel,iexten]
STTY attributes for LOGIN
[hupcl,cread,echoe,cs8,
ixon,ixoff]
LOGGER name
[]
STATUS of device at BOOT time
[available]
TRANSMIT buffer count
[16]
RECEIVE trigger level
[3]
STREAMS modules to be pushed at OPEN time [ldterm,tioc]
INPUT map file
[none]
OUTPUT map file
[none]
CODESET map file
[sbcs]
Flags and Parameters Settings
These are the minimum SystemGuard parameters/flags settings required for remote
support. These parameters can be displayed and changed with the mpcfg command.
• Modem configuration:
mpcfg –dm
C-2
Index
Name
Value
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Modem Parameters File Name
Service Line Speed
Protocol Inter Data Block Delay
Protocol Time Out
Retry Number
Customer ID
Login ID
Password ID
/usr/share/modems/7851
9600
5
60
2
Operator Guide
The Modem Parameters File Name Value should be set to the file name of your modem
configuration file. The service line speed should be set to your modem and tty capabilities
(9600 is recommended).
• Service flags:
mpcfg –dS
Index
Name
Value
1
2
3
4
Remote Service Support
Quick On Call Service
Service Contract Validity
Service Support Type
1
0
32767
• Diagnostics flags:
mpcfg –df
Index
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Name
Remote Authorization
Autoservice IPL
BUMP Console
Dial–Out Authorization
Set Mode to Normal When Booting
Electronic Mode Switch from Service Line
Boot Multi–user AIX in Service
Extended Tests
Power On Tests in Trace Mode
Power On Tests in Loop Mode
Fast IPL
Value
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
• Phone numbers:
mpcfg –dp
Index
Name
Value
1
2
3
4
5
6
Service Center Dial–Out (1)
Service Center Dial–Out (2)
Customer Hub Dial–Out (1)
Customer Hub Dial–Out (2)
System Dial–In
System Operator Voice
180083001041
The phone number in the Service Center Dial-Out field represents the U.S IBM RETAIN
number. It should be set as appropriate to the geography. Other phone numbers should be
provided based on account-related information.
SystemGuard Remote Operation Configuration
C-3
Modem Configuration Files
If you want to attach a modem to the S2 port to enable automatic problem reporting from
SystemGuard or dial-in access from a remote location, you have to provide a configuration
file for the modem are using. This file is also necessary to use the mirroring capabilities
supported by the AIX mirrord daemon.
The IBM 7851 modem has been tested. Following, are the corresponding configuration files.
These files have a very specific format. You can use either of these files as a template to
build a configuration file for another model of modem. If you do not use any modem for
connecting the Service Console, you need a modem file. An example of the modem file
without a modem is also provided.
This is a sample /usr/share/modems/mir_modem file for console mirroring without using
modems.
ICDelay 1
DefaultTO 10
condout:
connect:
retry:
disconnect:
condin:
condwait:
waitcall:
page:
done
done
done
done
done
done
done
done
This is a sample /usr/share/modems/mir_modem file for console
mirroring using an IBM 7851 modem.
# Tested at 9600bps.
ICDelay 5
DefaultTO 10
CallDelay 120
# AT Attention Code
Q0
screen
# &F1 Set factory profile 1
Q1
screen
# E0 Turn echo off
S0=0
# V0 Use numeric responses
S0=2
# +++ Escape to command mode &W0
profile 0
# H0 Hang–up
# 17=38.4bps; 16=19.2bps; 12=9600bps;
7=busy
condout:
send ”AT&F1E0V0Q0S0=0\r”
expect ”0\r” or ”OK\r”
done
Enable result codes to
Disable result codes to
Automatic answer inhibit
Answer on second ring
Save configuration to
11=4800bps; 10=2400bps;
connect:
send ”ATDT%N\r” # Tone dialing command
expect ”17\r” or ”16\r” or ”12\r” or ”11\r” or ”10\r” busy ”7\r”
timeout 60
done
retry:
send ”A/”
# Redo command
expect ”17\r” or ”16\r” or ”12\r” or ”11\r” or ”10\r” busy ”7\r”
timeout 60
done
C-4
Operator Guide
disconnect: send ”+++ATH0\r”
delay 2
send ”ATQ1V0E0\r”
delay 2
done
condin:
send ”AT&F1E0V0Q0S0=2\r”
expect ”0\r” or ”OK\r\n”
send ”ATQ1&W0\r”
# (there can be no reply)
done
condwait:
send ”AT&F1V0E0Q0S0=2&W0\r”
expect ”0\r” or ”OK\r\n”
done
waitcall:
ignore ”2\r” timeout none
expect ”2\r” timeout 10
expect ”17\r” or ”16\r” or ”12\r” or ”11\r” or ”10\r” busy ”7\r”
timeout 60
done
page:
send ”ATDT%N;\r” # ; = go back to command mode
expect ”0\r” or ”OK\r\n” timeout 60
delay 2
send ”ATH0\r”
expect ”0\r” or ”OK\r\n”
done
SystemGuard Remote Operation Configuration
C-5
Initializing a Modem
Once flags, parameters and configurations have been enabled, the modem can be initialized
to accept incoming calls. This can be done in the following manner:
• Place the System Key to Normal.
• Issue a ps –ef|grep mirrord command.
• Obtain mirrord process ID.
• Issue a kill –9 <mirrord pid>.
• Issue /usr/sbin/mirrord modemfilename.
• Place the System Key into the Service position.
This will start the mirrord process. The disconnect and condin parameters are read from the
appropriate modem file, and the modem is initialized for dial-in activity. After the mirrord
daemon is activated, the System Key should be placed in the Normal position.
Testing Dial-Out
Dial-out or automatic problem reporting can be tested from the SystemGuard Maintenance
Menu using the Offline Test for Dial-out. Successful connection and transmission of data
results in an OK completion.
During the test, the modem configuration file is read, the modem initialized properly, and
data transmitted. If the transmitted line data was to be by an RS-232 line anlayzer, the data
shown would be the disconnect parameters, the condout parameters, the connect
sequence, the BUMP data, the disconnect sequence and the condin sequence. Thus the
modem is initialized for dial-out, data is transmitted, and the modem is initialized to allow
dial-in.
C-6
Operator Guide
Appendix D: Supplies
This appendix contains a list of supplies and the part numbers needed to order them.
Part Number
Description
21F8593
8-mm Cleaning Tape Cartridge
21F8595
8-mm Data Tape Cartridge (5-pack)
21F8763
4-mm Data Tape Cartridge (5-pack)
21F8758
4-mm DDS IIII Data Tape Cartridge (5-pack)
21F8762
4-mm DDS IIII Diagnostic Cartridge
8191160
4-mm DDS 2 Data Cartridge (5-pack)
8191146
4-mm DDS 2 Diagnostic Cartridge
6109660
5.25-Inch, 1.2 MB Blank Diskette
6023450
5.25-Inch, 360 KB Blank Diskette
6404088
3.5-Inch, 1.0 MB Blank Diskette (box of 10)
6404083
3.5-Inch, 2.0 MB Blank Diskette (box of 10)
72X6111
3.5-Inch 4.0MB Blank Diskette (Box of 10)
0352465
1/2-Inch, Head Cleaning Kit
21F8570
1/4-Inch, Cartridge Head Cleaning Kit
21F8732
1/4-Inch, 1.2 GB Data Tape Cartridge (5-pack)
21F8587
1/4-Inch, 525 MB Data Tape Cartridge (5-pack)
21F8588
1/4-Inch, 150 MB Data Tape Cartridge (5-pack)
13F5647
Tape Cleaning Solution
33F8354
Lithium Battery
In the United States, you can order these supplies by calling toll-free 1-800-438-2468, or
you can FAX your inquiry to 1-800-522-3422.
Supplies
D-1
Ordering Keys
For protection against unauthorized key duplication, the key mode switch is equipped with a
Medeco high-security lock. Keys for this lock are a factory restricted series, and duplicate
keys are not available through normal commercial channels. The metal code tag supplied
with your original keys authorizes you to purchase additional keys direct from the Medeco
factory. The additional key supplied and the metal tag should be stored in a secured area.
To obtain information or replacement keys, use the list below to contact the Medeco
distributor most convenient to you. Complete a copy of the order form and mail it to the
distributor. As a safety precaution, Medeco does not honor orders that do not include both
the code tag and the official order form.
Code Tag
D-2
Medeco
Department KLC
P.O. Box 3075
Salem, VA 24153
United States of America
ATM Lock A Safe Co. Pty. Ltd.
11/44 Ourimbah Road, P. O. Box 300
Tweed Head, N.S.W. 2485
Australia
Tel:
011-61-075-36-7600
FAX:
011-61-075-36-7605
Claus Clausen
89a Authur Road
Wimbledon Park, London
SW 19 7DP England
Tel: 011-44-81-946-2823
Fax: 011-44-81-946-2286
Ricardo DeCastro
Calle 22 No 3-30, Ofc. 201
P. O. Box A.A. No. 39955
Bogota, Colombia Sur America
Tel:
011-57-1-268-5827 or 6180
Fax:
011-57-1-268-2628
Y.S. Chae
Geoho Corporation
2nd Fl. Kyung Bldg.
244-7 Poi-Dong
Gangnam-Ku
Seoul, Korea
Tel: 011-82-02-579-1280
FAX: 011-82-02-579-1282
Moshe Rotner
R.M. Rotan Marketing
34 Nordau Street, Herzlia B
P.O. Box 5138, Herzlia
Israel
Tel:
011-972-9-545640
FAX:
011-972-9-584275
Operator Guide
Key Reorder Form
This form, when accompanied by the metal code tag supplied with the original keys,
represents an authorized order for additional factory keys.
Please indicate the quantity required and enclose a check or money order for the
appropriate amount.
Number of keys required________
Please Type or Print Your Return Address
Name__________________________________________________________________
Address________________________________________________________________
City____________________________________________________________________
State_________________________________________________________Zip_______
Country_________________________________________________________________
Select an address from the list provided, and mail this form to that location.
Your key code tag is returned with your new keys.
Note: No orders are processed without both the key tag and this form.
Supplies
D-3
D-4
Operator Guide
Appendix E. Operator Panel Display Numbers
This appendix contains lists of the various numbers and characters that may be displayed in
the three-digit display. The numbers and characters are divided into two broad categories.
The first grouping is those that track power-on testing of the system unit; the second group
provides information about messages that follow a flashing 888 number.
To form an SRN from any steady number that occurs during system power-on test (PON or
POST), add 101- in front of the displayed number.
For more detailed explanations of three-digit display numbers, refer to the AIX Problem
Solving Guide and Reference.
Power-On (PON) Test Indicators
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
111
112
113
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
130
140
142
143
144
151
152
153
154
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
170
180
PON completed successfully; control was passed to IPL ROS.
PON started following Reset.
PON started following power-on Reset.
PON could not determine the system model number.
Equipment conflict; PON could not find the CBA.
PON could not read from the OCS EPROM.
PON failed: CBA not found
OCS stopped; PON detected a module error.
A checkstop occurred during PON; checkstop results could not be logged
out.
Three checkstops have occurred.
PON starting a CRC check on the 8752 EPROM.
PON detected a bad CRC in the first 32K bytes of the OCS EPROM.
PON started a CRC check on the first 32K bytes of the OCS EPROM.
PON detected a bad CRC on the OCS area of NVRAM.
PON started a CRC check on the OCS area of NVRAM.
PON detected a bad CRC on the time-of-day area of NVRAM.
PON started a CRC check on the time-of-day area of NVRAM.
PON detected a bad CRC on the 8752 EPROM.
PON presence test started.
Running PON. (Box Manufacturing Mode Only)
Box manufacturing mode operation.
Invalid memory configuration.
Manufacturing test failure.
PON started AIPGM test code.
PON started DCLST test code.
PON started ACLST test code.
PON started AST test code.
Bad EPOW Signal/Power status signal.
PON being conducted on BUMP I/O
PON being conducted on JTAG
PON being conducted on Direct I/O
PON being conducted on CPU
PON being conducted on DCB and Memory
PON being conducted on Interrupts
PON being conducted on Multiprocessors
Logout in progress.
Operator Panel Display Numbers
E-1
185
186
187
195
888
E-2
Operator Guide
A checkstop condition occurred during the PON.
System logic-generated checkstop (Model 250 only).
Graphics-generated checkstop (Model 250).
PON logout completed.
PON did not start.
Power-On Self-Test (POST) Indicators
20c
21c
22c
23c
24c
25c
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
L2 cache POST error. (The display shows a solid 20c for 5 seconds.)
L2 cache is not detected. (The display shows a solid 21c for 2 seconds.)
Attempting a normal mode IPL from FDDI specified in NVRAM IPL device
list.
Attempting a normal mode IPL from FDDI specified in IPL ROM device list.
Attempting a service mode IPL from FDDI specified in NVRAM IPL device
list.
Attempting a service mode IPL from FDDI specified in IPL ROM device list.
IPL attempted with keylock in the Secure position.
IPL ROM test failed or checkstop occurred (irrecoverable).
Unexpected machine check interrupt.
Unexpected data storage interrupt.
Unexpected instruction storage interrupt.
Unexpected external interrupt.
Unexpected alignment interrupt.
Unexpected program interrupt.
Unexpected floating point unavailable interrupt.
Unexpected SVC interrupt.
Unexpected SVC interrupt.
IPL ROM CRC comparison error (irrecoverable).
RAM POST memory configuration error or no memory found
(irrecoverable).
RAM POST failure (irrecoverable).
Power status register failed (irrecoverable).
A low voltage condition is present (irrecoverable).
IPL ROM code being uncompressed into memory.
End of boot list encountered.
RAM POST is looking for good memory.
RAM POST bit map is being generated.
IPL control block is being initialized.
NVRAM CRC comparison error during AIX IPL(key mode switch in Normal
mode). Reset NVRAM by reaccomplishing IPL in Service mode. For
systems with an internal, direct-bus-attached (DBA) disk, IPL ROM
attempted to perform an IPL from that disk before halting with this operator
panel display value.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from Standard I/O planar-attached devices
specified in NVRAM IPL Devices List.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from SCSI-attached devices specified in
NVRAM IPL Devices List.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from 9333 subsystem device specified in
NVRAM IPL Devices List.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from 7012 DBA disk-attached devices
specified in NVRAM IPL Devices List.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from Ethernet specified in NVRAM IPL
Devices List.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from Token-Ring specified in NVRAM IPL
Devices List.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from NVRAM expansion code.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from NVRAM IPL Devices List; cannot IPL
from any of the listed devices, or there are no valid entries in the Devices
List.
Operator Panel Display Numbers
E-3
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
E-4
Operator Guide
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from adapter feature ROM specified in IPL
ROM Device List.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from Ethernet specified in IPL ROM Device
List.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from Standard I/O planar-attached devices
specified in ROM Default Device List.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from SCSI-attached devices specified in IPL
ROM Default Device List.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from 9333 subsystem device specified in
IPL ROM Device List.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from 7012 DBA disk-attached devices
specified in IPL ROM Default Device List.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from Ethernet specified in IPL ROM Default
Device List.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from Token-Ring specified in IPL ROM
Default Device List.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from Token-Ring specified by the operator.
System failed to IPL from the device chosen by the operator.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from adapter feature ROM.
Attempting a normal boot from devices specified in the NVRAM boot list.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from Standard I/O planar-attached devices
specified in the NVRAM IPL Devices List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from SCSI-attached devices specified in the
NVRAM IPL Devices List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from 9333 subsystem device specified in
the NVRAM IPL Devices List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from 7012 DBA disk-attached devices
specified in the NVRAM IPL Devices List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from Ethernet specified in the NVRAM IPL
Devices List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from Token-Ring specified in the NVRAM
Device List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from NVRAM expansion code.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from the NVRAM IPL Devices List; cannot
IPL from any of the listed devices, or there are no valid entries in the
Devices List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from adapter feature ROM specified in the
IPL ROM Device List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from Ethernet specified in the IPL ROM
Default Device List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from Standard I/O planar-attached devices
specified in the ROM Default Device List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from SCSI-attached devices specified in the
IPL ROM Default Device List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from 9333 subsystem device specified in
the IPL ROM Devices List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from 7012 DBA disk-attached devices
specified in IPL ROM Default Device List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from Ethernet specified in the IPL ROM
Devices List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from Token-Ring specified in the IPL ROM
Devices List.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from Token-Ring specified by the operator.
Attempting a Service mode IPL from FDDI specified by the operator.
260
261
262
263
269
271
272
277
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295
296
297
298
299
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
311
Information is being displayed on the display console.
No supported local system display adapter was found.
Keyboard not detected as being connected to the system’s keyboard port.
Attempting a Normal mode IPL from adapter feature ROM specified in the
NVRAM Device List.
Stalled state - the system is unable to IPL.
Mouse and Mouse port POST.
Tablet Port POST.
Auto Token-Ring LANstreamer MC 32 Adapter
Video ROM scan POST.
FDDI POST.
3com Ethernet POST.
Keyboard POST executing.
Parallel port POST executing.
Serial port POST executing.
POWER Gt1 graphics adapter POST executing.
POWER Gt3 graphics adapter POST executing.
Token-Ring adapter POST executing.
Ethernet adapter POST executing.
Adapter card slots being queried.
POWER GT0 Display Adapter POST.
IOCC POST error (irrecoverable).
Standard I/O POST running.
SCSI POST running.
7012 DBA disk POST running.
IOCC bad TCW SIMM in slot location J being tested.
Graphics Display adapter POST, color or grayscale.
ROM scan POST.
System model number does not compare between OCS and ROS
(irrecoverable).
Attempting a software IPL.
IPL ROM passed control to the loaded program code.
Flash Utility ROM test failed or checkstop occurred (irrecoverable).
Flash Utility ROM: User prompt, move the key to the service position in
order to perform an optional Flash Update. LED 302 only appears if the key
switch is in the secure position. This signals the user that a Flash Update
may be initiated by moving the key switch to the service position. If the key
is moved to the service position then LED 303 is displayed, this signals the
user to press the reset button and select optional Flash Update.
Flash Utility ROM: User prompt, press the reset button in order to perform
an optional Flash Update. LED 302 only appears if the key switch is in the
secure position. This signals the user that a Flash Update may be initiated
by moving the key switch to the service position. If the key is moved to the
service position LED 303 is displayed, this signals the user to press the
reset button and select optional Flash Update.
Flash Utility ROM IOCC POST error (irrecoverable).
Flash Utility ROM standard I/O POST running.
Flash Utility ROM is attempting IPL from Flash Update media device.
Flash Utility ROM system model number does not compare between OCS
and ROM (irrecoverable).
Flash Utility ROM: IOCC TCW memory is being tested.
Flash Utility ROM passed control to a Flash Update Boot Image.
Flash Utility ROM CRC comparison error (irrecoverable).
Operator Panel Display Numbers
E-5
312
313
314
315
318
319
322
323
324
325
Flash Utility ROM RAM POST memory configuration error or no memory
found (irrecoverable).
Flash Utility ROM RAM POST failure (irrecoverable).
Flash Utility ROM Power status register failed (irrecoverable).
Flash Utility ROM detected a low voltage condition.
Flash Utility ROM RAM POST is looking for good memory.
Flash Utility ROM RAM POST bit map is being generated.
CRC error on media Flash Image. No Flash Update performed.
Current Flash Image is being erased.
CRC error on new Flash Image after Update was performed. (Flash Image
is corrupted.)
Flash Update successful and complete.
Configuration Program Indicators
5c0
5c1
5c2
5c3
5c4
5c5
5c6
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
507
508
510
511
512
513
516
517
518
520
521
522
523
524
525
526
527
528
E-6
Operator Guide
Streams-based hardware drive being configured.
Streams-based X.25 protocol being configured.
Streams-based X.25 COMIO emulator driver being configured.
Streams-based X.25 TCP/IP interface driver being configured.
FCS adapter device driver being configured.
SCB network device driver for FCS is being configured.
AIX SNA channel being configured.
Querying Standard I/O slot.
Querying card in Slot 1.
Querying card in Slot 2.
Querying card in Slot 3.
Querying card in Slot 4.
Querying card in Slot 5.
Querying card in Slot 6.
Querying card in Slot 7.
Querying card in Slot 8.
Starting device configuration.
Device configuration completed.
Restoring device configuration files from media.
Restoring basic operating system installation files from media.
Contacting server during network boot.
Mounting client remote file system during network IPL.
Remote mount of the root and /usr file systems failed during network boot.
Bus configuration running.
/etc/init invoked cfgmgr with invalid options; /etc/init has been corrupted
or incorrectly modified (irrecoverable error).
The configuration manager has been invoked with conflicting options
(irrecoverable error).
The configuration manager is unable to access the ODM database
(irrecoverable error).
The configuration manager is unable to access the config. rules object in
the ODM database (irrecoverable error).
The configuration manager is unable to get data from a customized device
object in the ODM database (irrecoverable error).
The configuration manager is unable to get data from a customized device
driver object in the ODM database (irrecoverable error).
The configuration manager was invoked with the phase 1 flag; running
phase 1 at this point is not permitted (irrecoverable error).
The configuration manager cannot find sequence rule, or no program name
was specified in the ODM database (irrecoverable error).
529
530
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
538
539
551
552
553
554
555
556
557
558
559
570
571
572
573
574
575
576
577
578
579
580
581
582
583
584
585
586
587
588
589
590
591
592
593
594
595
596
The configuration manager is unable to update ODM data (irrecoverable
error).
The program savebase returned an error.
The configuration manager is unable to access the PdAt object class
(irrecoverable error).
There is not enough memory to continue (malloc failure); irrecoverable
error.
The configuration manager could not find a configure method for a device.
The configuration manager is unable to acquire database lock
(irrecoverable error).
HIPPI diagnostics interface driver being configured.
The configuration manager encountered more than one sequence rule
specified in the same phase (irrecoverable error).
The configuration manager encountered an error when invoking the
program in the sequence rule.
The configuration manager is going to invoke a configuration method.
The configuration method has terminated, and control has returned to the
configuration manager.
IPL vary-on is running.
IPL varyon failed.
IPL phase 1 is complete.
Unable to define NFS swap device during network boot.
Unable to create NFS swap device during network boot.
Logical Volume Manager encountered error during IPL vary-on.
The root filesystem will not mount.
There is not enough memory to continue the system IPL.
Less than 2 M bytes of good memory are available to load the AIX kernel.
Virtual SCSI devices being configured.
HIPPI common function device driver being configured.
HIPPI IPI-3 master transport driver being configured.
HIPPI IPI-3 slave transport driver being configured.
HIPPI IPI-3 transport services user interface device driver being configured.
A 9570 disk-array driver is being configured.
Generic async device driver being configured.
Generic SCSI device driver being configured.
Generic commo device driver being configured.
Device driver being configured for a generic device.
HIPPI TCPIP network interface driver being configured.
Configuring TCP/IP.
Configuring Token-Ring data link control.
Configuring an Ethernet data link control.
Configuring an IEEE Ethernet data link control.
Configuring an SDLC MPQP data link control.
Configuring a QLLC X.25 data link control.
Configuring a NETBIOS.
Configuring a Bisync Read-Write (BSCRW).
SCSI target mode device being configured.
Diskless remote paging device being configured.
Configuring an LVM device driver.
Configuring an HFT device driver.
Configuring SNA device drivers.
Asynchronous I/O being defined or configured.
X.31 pseudo-device being configured.
SNA DLC/LAPE pseudo-device being configured.
Operator Panel Display Numbers
E-7
597
598
599
600
602
603
604
605
606
607
608
609
610
611
612
614
615
616
617
618
619
620
622
77c
700
701
702
703
704
705
706
707
708
710
711
712
713
714
715
720
721
E-8
Operator Guide
OCS software being configured.
OCS hosts being configured during system reboot.
Configuring FDDI data link control.
Starting network boot portion of /sbin/rc.boot
Configuring network parent devices.
/usr/lib/methods/defsys, /usr/lib/methods/cfgsys, or
/usr/lib/methods/cfgbus failed.
Configuring physical network boot device.
Configuration of physical network boot device failed.
Running /usr/sbin/ifconfig on logical network boot device.
/usr/sbin/ifconfig failed.
Attempting to retrieve the client.info file with tftp. Note that a flashing 608
indicates multiple attempt(s) to retrieve the client_info file are occurring.
The client.info file does not exist or it is zero length.
Attempting remote mount of NFS file system.
Remote mount of the NFS file system failed.
Accessing remote files; unconfiguring network boot device.
Configuring local paging devices.
Configuration of a local paging device failed.
Converting from diskless to dataless configuration.
Diskless to dataless configuration failed.
Configuring remote (NFS) paging devices.
Configuration of a remote (NFS) paging device failed.
Updating special device files and ODM in permanent filesystem with data
from boot RAM filesystem.
Boot process configuring for operating system installation.
Progress indicator. A 1.0 GB 16-bit SCSI disk drive being identified or
configured.
Progress indicator. A 1.1 GB 8-bit SCSI disk drive being identified or
configured.
Progress indicator. A 1.1 GB 16-bit SCSI disk drive is being identified or
configured.
Progress indicator. A 1.1 GB 16-bit differential SCSI disk drive is being
identified or configured.
Progress indicator. A 2.2 GB 8-bit SCSI disk drive is being identified or
configured.
Progress indicator. A 2.2 GB 16-bit SCSI disk drive is being identified or
configured.
The configuration method for the 2.2 GB 16-bit differential SCSI disk drive is
being run. If an irrecoverable error occurs, the system halts.
Progress indicator. A 4.5 GB 16-bit SCSI disk drive is being identified or
configured.
Progress indicator. A 4.5 GB 16-bit differential SCSI disk drive is being
identified or configured.
Progress indicator. A L2 cache is being identified or configured.
POWER GXT150M graphics adapter being identified or configured.
Unknown adapter being identified or configured.
Graphics slot bus configuration is executing.
The IBM ARTIC960 device is being configured.
A video capture adapter is being configured.
The Ultimedia Services audio adapter is being configured. This LED
displays briefly on the panel.
Unknown read/write optical drive type being configured.
Unknown disk or SCSI device being identified or configured.
722
723
724
725
726
727
728
729
730
731
732
733
85c
89c
811
812
813
814
815
816
817
819
821
823
824
825
826
827
828
831
834
835
836
837
838
839
841
842
843
844
845
847
848
849
850
851
852
Unknown disk being identified or configured.
Unknown CD-ROM being identified or configured.
Unknown tape drive being identified or configured.
Unknown display adapter being identified or configured.
Unknown input device being identified or configured.
Unknown async device being identified or configured.
Parallel printer being identified or configured.
Unknown parallel device being identified or configured.
Unknown diskette drive being identified or configured.
PTY being identified or configured.
Unknown SCSI initiator type being configured.
7GB 8mm tape drive being configured.
Progress indicator. Token-Ring High-Performance LAN adapter is being
identified or configured.
Progress indicator. A multimedia SCSI CD-ROM is being identified or
configured.
Processor complex being identified or configured.
Memory being identified or configured.
Battery for time-of-day, NVRAM, and so on being identified or configured, or
system I/O control logic being identified or configured.
NVRAM being identified or configured.
Floating-point processor test
Operator panel logic being identified or configured.
Time-of-day logic being identified or configured.
Graphics input device adapter being identified or configured.
Standard keyboard adapter being identified or configured.
Standard mouse adapter being identified or configured.
Standard tablet adapter being identified or configured.
Standard speaker adapter being identified or configured.
Serial Port 1 adapter being identified or configured.
Parallel port adapter being identified or configured.
Standard diskette adapter being identified or configured.
3151 adapter being identified or configured, or Serial Port 2 being identified
or configured.
64-port async controller being identified or configured.
16-port async concentrator being identified or configured.
128-port async controller being identified or configured.
16-port remote async node being identified or configured.
Network Terminal Accelerator Adapter being identified or configured.
7318 Serial Communications Server being configured.
8-port async adapter (EIA-232) being identified or configured.
8-port async adapter (EIA-422A) being identified or configured.
8-port async adapter (MIL-STD 188) being identified or configured.
7135 RADiant Array disk drive subsystem controller being identified or
configured.
7135 RADiant Array disk drive subsystem drawer being identified or
configured.
16-port serial adapter (EIA-232) being identified or configured.
16-port serial adapter (EIA-422) being identified or configured.
X.25 Interface Co-Processor/2 adapter being identified or configured.
Token-Ring network adapter being identified or configured.
T1/J1 Portmaster adapter being identified or configured.
Ethernet adapter being identified or configured.
Operator Panel Display Numbers
E-9
854
855
857
858
859
861
862
865
866
867
868
869
870
871
872
874
875
876
877
878
880
887
889
890
891
892
893
894
895
896
897
898
899
901
902
903
904
905
908
912
913
914
915
916
917
918
920
921
922
923
924
E-10
Operator Guide
3270 Host Connection Program/6000 connection being identified or
configured.
Portmaster Adapter/A being identified or configured.
FSLA adapter being identified or configured.
5085/5086/5088 adapter being identified or configured.
FDDI adapter being identified or configured.
Optical adapter being identified or configured.
Block Multiplexer Channel Adapter being identified or configured.
ESCON Channel Adapter or emulator being identified or configured.
SCSI adapter being identified or configured.
Async expansion adapter being identified or configured.
SCSI adapter being identified or configured.
SCSI adapter being identified or configured.
Serial disk drive adapter being identified or configured.
Graphics subsystem adapter being identified or configured.
Grayscale graphics adapter being identified or configured.
Color graphics adapter being identified or configured.
Vendor generic communication adapter being configured.
8-bit color graphics processor being identified or configured.
POWER Gt3/POWER Gt4 being identified or configured.
POWER Gt4 graphics processor card being configured.
POWER Gt1 adapter being identified or configured.
Integrated Ethernet adapter being identified or configured.
SCSI adapter being identified or configured.
SCSI-2 Differential Fast/Wide and Single-Ended Fast/Wide Adapter/A.
Vendor SCSI adapter being identified or configured.
Vendor display adapter being identified or configured.
Vendor LAN adapter being identified or configured.
Vendor async/communications adapter being identified or configured.
Vendor IEEE 488 adapter being identified or configured.
Vendor VME bus adapter being identified or configured.
S/370 Channel Emulator adapter being identified or configured.
POWER Gt1x graphics adapter being identified or configured.
3490 attached tape drive being identified or configured.
Vendor SCSI device being identified or configured.
Vendor display device being identified or configured.
Vendor async device being identified or configured.
Vendor parallel device being identified or configured.
Vendor other device being identified or configured.
POWER GXT1000 Graphics subsystem being identified or configured.
2.0GB SCSI-2 differential disk drive being identified or configured.
1.0GB differential disk drive being identified or configured.
5GB 8 mm differential tape drive being identified or configured.
4GB 4 mm tape drive being identified or configured.
Non-SCSI vendor tape adapter being identified or configured.
Progress indicator. 2.0GB 16-bit differential SCSI disk drive is being
identified or configured.
Progress indicator. 2GB 16-bit single-ended SCSI disk drive is being
identified or configured.
Bridge Box being identified or configured.
101 keyboard being identified or configured.
102 keyboard being identified or configured.
Kanji keyboard being identified or configured.
Two-button mouse being identified or configured.
925
926
927
928
929
930
931
933
934
935
936
937
942
943
945
946
947
948
949
950
951
952
953
954
955
956
957
958
959
960
968
970
971
972
973
974
975
977
981
985
986
987
989
990
991
994
995
996
997
998
999
Three-button mouse being identified or configured.
5083 tablet being identified or configured.
5083 tablet being identified or configured.
Standard speaker being identified or configured.
Dials being identified or configured.
Lighted program function keys (LPFK) being identified or configured.
IP router being identified or configured.
Async planar being identified or configured.
Async expansion drawer being identified or configured.
3.5-inch diskette drive being identified or configured.
5.25-inch diskette drive being identified or configured.
An HIPPI adapter is being configured.
POWER GXT 100 graphics adapter being identified or configured.
Progress indicator. 3480 and 3490 control units attached to a System/370
Channel Emulator/A adapter are being identified or configured.
1.0GB SCSI differential disk drive being identified or configured.
Serial port 3 adapter is being identified or configured.
Progress indicator. A 730MB SCSI disk drive is being configured.
Portable disk drive being identified or configured.
Unknown direct bus-attach device being identified or configured.
Missing SCSI device being identified or configured.
670MB SCSI disk drive being identified or configured.
355MB SCSI disk drive being identified or configured.
320MB SCSI disk drive being identified or configured.
400MB SCSI disk drive being identified or configured.
857MB SCSI disk drive being identified or configured.
670MB SCSI disk drive electronics card being identified or configured.
120MB DBA disk drive being identified or configured.
160 MB DBA disk drive being identified or configured.
160MB SCSI disk drive being identified or configured.
1.37GB SCSI disk drive being identified or configured.
1.0GB SCSI disk drive being identified or configured.
Half-inch, 9-track tape drive being identified or configured.
150MB 1/4-inch tape drive being identified or configured.
2.3GB 8 mm SCSI tape drive being identified or configured.
Other SCSI tape drive being identified or configured.
CD-ROM drive being identified or configured.
Progress indicator. An optical disk drive is being identified or configured.
M-Audio Capture and Playback Adapter being identified or configured.
540MB SCSI-2 single-ended disk drive being identified or configured.
M-Video Capture Adapter being identified or configured.
2.4GB SCSI disk drive being identified or configured.
Progress indicator. Enhanced SCSI CD-ROM drive is being identified or
configured.
200MB SCSI disk drive being identified or configured.
2.0GB SCSI-2 single-ended disk drive being identified or configured.
525MB 1/4-inch cartridge tape drive being identified or configured.
5GB 8 mm tape drive being identified or configured.
1.2GB 1/4 inch cartridge tape drive being identified or configured.
Progress indicator. Single-port, multi-protocol communications adapter is
being identified or configured.
FDDI adapter being identified or configured.
2.0GB4 mm tape drive being identified or configured.
7137 or 3514 Disk Array Subsystem being configured.
Operator Panel Display Numbers
E-11
Diagnostic Load Progress Indicators
The following dump progress indicators, or dump status codes, are part of a Type 102
message.
Note: When a lowercase c is listed, it displays in the lower half of the seven-segment
character position. The leftmost position is blank on the following codes.
0c0
0c2
0c3
0c4
0c5
0c6
0c7
0c8
0c9
E-12
Operator Guide
The dump completed successfully.
A dump, requested by the user, is started.
The dump is inhibited.
The dump did not complete. A partial dump may be present.
The dump program could not access the dump device.
A dump to the secondary dump device was requested. Make the secondary
dump device ready; then press Ctrl-Alt-Numpad2.
Reserved.
The dump function is disabled.
A dump is in progress.
Appendix F. System Power States
The state of the system is dependant on the condition of four variable conditions that effect
how the system IPLs or shutsdown. The four conditions are:
• the position of the Power-on button
This button has two positions. It can be pressed in to the On position (position for turning
the power on), or it can be in the out or Off position.
• the position of the system key (physical key mode or electronic key mode)
The system key represents the condition (Normal, Secure, or Service) that the system is
set to by the physical key mode switch or the electronic key mode switch.
• the was_shutdown status
The system keeps a record when it has been shutdown using the shutdown –F
command since the last IPL.
• the power_fault status
The system keeps a record when it receives a power fault condition since the last IPL.
Power States
The state of the system depends on how the variables were set either when the power was
applied to the system, or when the power was removed.
MAIN_STANDBY
This is the initial state of the sytem when power is first applied (by plugging a 7012 G Series
into an electrical outlet, or by setting the main power switch of the 7013 J Series to the On
position for example). When in this state, the BUMP console displays STANDBY, unless the
console is set to display the operator panel display error messages.
The Power-on button and the BUMP console Enter key are polled by the system
continuously for a change in status. The system remains in this state until one of the
following occurs:
• If the Power-on button is initially detected to be in the On position, and the
was_shutdown status is false, the system goes to the WAIT_POWER_ON state.
• If the Power-on button is pressed and changes from the Off position to the On position,
the system goes to the WAIT_POWER_ON state.
• If the Power-on button is pressed and changes from the On position to the Off position,
the system sets the was_shutdown status to false.
• If the BUMP console Enter button is pressed, the system goes to the SBB_GATEWAY
state.
SBB_GATEWAY
In this state the > character is displayed on the BUMP console and the cursor is located two
spaces to the right of the > prompt (> _).
• If the command sbb is entered on the BUMP console, and the system key is in the
Service position, the system goes to the SBB_MENU state.
System Power States
F-1
If the command sbb is entered on the BUMP console, and the system key is in the
Normal position, the system goes to the SBB_ECMD state.
• If the Power-on button is pressed and changes from the On position to the Off position,
the system sets the was_shutdown status to false.
• If the Enter key is pressed on the BUMP console, the system goes to the the
SBB_ECMD state.
• If the power command is entered on the BUMP console, the system goes to the
SBB_PCMD state.
SBB_ECMD
In this state the > character is displayed on the BUMP console but the cursor is located in
_ ).
the same position as the > prompt ( >
This state allows electronic key mode switching to be performed as well as power functions.
The power functions follow below:
• If the Power-on button is initially detected in the On position, and the was_shutdown
status is false, the system goes to the WAIT_POWER_ON state.
• If the Power-on button is pressed and changes from the Off position to the On position,
the system goes to the WAIT_POWER_ON state.
• If the Power-on button is pressed and changes from the On position to the Off position,
the system sets the was_shutdown status to false.
• If the Enter key is pressed on the BUMP console, the system goes to the
SBB_GATEWAY state.
SBB_PCMD
In this state the > character is displayed on the BUMP console but the cursor is located in
_ ).
the same position as the > prompt ( >
• If the Power-on button is initially detected in the On position, the system goes to the
WAIT_POWER_ON state.
• If the Power-on button is pressed and changes from the Off position to the On position,
the system goes to the WAIT_POWER_ON state.
• If the Power-on button is pressed and changes from the On position to the Off position,
the system sets the was_shutdown status to false.
• If the Enter key is pressed on the BUMP console, the system goes to the
SBB_GATEWAY state.
SBB_MENU
This is where the Stand-by (sbb) menu items are displayed. This menu is exited by entering
“x” repeatedly until the menu is exited. When the menu is exited, the system goes to the
MAIN_STANDBY state.
WAIT_POWER_ON
This state displays the message Wait power on....
• If the power_fault status is true (a previously detected fault), the system goes to the
MAIN_STANDBY state.
F-2
Operator Guide
• If the power_fault status is false, the system attempts to power on. If the system then
detects a power fault, the power_fault status is set to true. The system displays an
operator panel LCD error message, and the system goes to the MAIN_STANDBY status.
If no power fault is detected, the system goes to the IPL state.
Note: When the system is in this state, the Power-on button should not be pressed.
IPL
• If the Power-on button is pressed and changes from the On position to the Off position,
the system goes to the WAIT_REBUILDING state.
• If the IPL is successfully completed, the system goes to the Maintenance Menu or to AIX.
AIX
• If the Power-on button is pressed and changes from the On position to the Off position,
the system goes to the WAIT_REBUILDING state.
• If the shutdown –F command is run, the was_shutdown status is set to true and the
system goes to the WAIT_REBUILDING state.
• If the shutdown –Fr command is run, the was_shutdown status remains false, and
the system goes to the WAIT_REBUILDING state.
WAIT_REBUILDING
In this state, the SystemGuard displays the WAIT REBUILDING message on the operator
panel display.
The system monitors the conditions to which the variables are set and does one of the
following:
• If the Power-on button is in the On position, and the was_shutdown status is false, the
system goes to the WAIT_POWER_ON state.
• If the Power-on button is in the On position, and the was_shutdown status is true, or if
the Power-on button is in the Off position, the system goes to the MAIN_STANDBY state.
Note: When the system is in this state, the Power-on button should not be pressed.
How to Turn System Power On from the BUMP Console
This procedure helps get the system power to turn on from the BUMP Console in the event
that your system does not seem to be responding to normal power operations.
From the SystemGuard BUMP console:
1. Check the BUMP console display, then check the list below and go to the appropriate
step.
– If you see a > with the cursor two spaces to the right, go to step 2.
_ , press the Enter key on the bump console and go to step 2.
– If you see a >
– If you see any sbb type menu, type x and then press Enter repeatedly until you exit all
menus, then go to the beginning of step 1.
– If you see nothing on the BUMP console, press the Enter key, then go to the beginning
of step 1.
2. Type power, then press Enter.
System Power States
F-3
If the system power does not turn on, the Power-on button may be in the off position. Go
to the system unit and press the Power-on button (only press the button once),
If the system power still does not turn on there may be an earlier fault condition. Remove
main power from the system unit, wait 30 seconds, and restore main power.
The system should IPL if the Power-on button is in the On position. If the button is not in
the On position, wait until standby is displayed on the LCD then press the Power-on
button one more time
How to Turn System Power On Using the Power-on Button
This procedure helps to get the system power to turn on using the Power-on button in the
event that your system does not seem to be responding to normal power operations.
From the SystemGuard BUMP console:
1. Check the BUMP console display, then check the list below and go to the appropriate
step.
– If you see a > with the cursor two spaces to the right, press Enter on the BUMP
console, go to the beginning of step 1.
_ , go to step 2.
– If you see a >
– If you see any sbb type menu, type x and then press Enter repeatedly until until you
exit all menus, then go to step 1.
– If you see nothing on the BUMP console, go to step 2.
2. Press the Power-on button to the On position (pushed in).
If the system power does not turn on, the Power-on button may have been in the on
position already, wait five seconds and press the Power-on button again.
If the system power still does not turn on there may be an earlier fault condition. Remove
main power from the system unit, wait 30 seconds, and restore main power.
The system should IPL if the Power-on button is in the On position. If the button is not in
the On position, wait until standby is displayed on the LCD then press the Power-on
button one more time.
F-4
Operator Guide
Glossary: Special Terms Used in SystemGuard
BP (back plane). A panel located in the system
unit and used to interconnect boards and devices.
I/O card. A card which handles system I/O and
directly connects to the system planar.
BIST (built in self-test). Tests performed during
the standby phase of the IPL process. The BIST
phase comes ahead of the POST phase.
IPL (initial program load). The first phase of the
system program loading.
JTAG (join test action group).
BUMP (bring-up microprocessor). A
microprocessor which monitors the system,
especially during the various IPL phases before
AIX is loaded.
LCD (liquid crystal display). A low power display
screen. There is a small LCD screen on the
operator panel.
C1D card. See CPU card.
MCA (Micro Channel adapter). An adapter for the
micro channel bus.
CPU card. A card containing the central processor
unit (CPU). CPUn is used to designate the nth CPU
card. For example, CPU2 designates the second
CPU card.
CPU (central processor unit). A primary
processor for general calculations.
MCA Planar. A card with connectors for Micro
Channel adapter cards.
Memory Module. A card containing one (SIMM) or
two (DIMM) rows of memory chips.
MPE. A type of memory card.
DIMM (dual in-line memory module). See
memory module.
MR2. A memory card with 8 8MB memory
modules.
Electronic Mode Switch (also known as E_KEY).
A flag which enables the Key Mode Switch to be
changed without actually moving the physical key.
MR4. A memory card with 8 32MB memory
modules.
EEPROM (electronically erasable
programmable read-only memory). A type of
non-volatile memory used to store firmware
maintenance programs (like SSF) or boot
programs.
MVR (multivoltage regulator). A power supply
unit which regulates several voltage levels for
various system parts (disks, CPUs, memory chips).
NFx. A type of memory card.
NVRAM (non volatile random access memory).
FEPROM (flash electronically erasable
programmable read-only memory). A type of
non-volatile memory used to store firmware
maintenance programs (like SystemGuard) or IPL
programs.
MP. The MCA planar located in the base unit.
E_KEY. See Electronic Mode Switch.
PMA. See MP.
ELM. See I/O planar
PME. See MPe.
FFC (failing function code).
POS (programmable option select). POS
registers are used to specify MCA board options.
FRU (field replaceable unit).
I2C (inter integrated circuit). Special circuits used
to connect devices to a high-speed bus called the
I2C bus.
IOD. See I/O card.
I/O: Input /Output.
MPB. See System planar.
MPe. The MCA planar located in the expansion
unit.
POST (power-on self-test). Tests performed
during the initial phase of the program load
process. The BIST phase comes ahead of the
POST phase.
RDS (removable disk status). The status
information for a removable disk drive (a disk drive
Glossary
X-1
which can be removed without turning the power off
to the entire system).
such as the EEPROM, the flash EEPROM, and the
non-volatile RAM.
ROS (read-only storage). Storage which does not
support writing.
SSF (system service facility). See SystemGuard.
SCSI (small computer system interface). A
standard bus interface used to connect peripherals
such as disk drives or tape drives.
SIB (system interface board). The SIB is a
system board which controls the power supply and
the RS-485 interconnect bus.
SIMM (single in-line memory module). See
memory module.
SMP. Symmetric multiprocessor.
SRN (service request number).
SSBus (subsystem bus). A special bus used to
interconnect the BUMP and some local resources
X-2
Operator Guide
SYSID (system identification). Identifies part of
the EEPROM containing important data such as
the system serial number, remote access rights,
dial-out phone numbers, and other information.
SystemGuard.The firmware maintenance
programs which run on the bring-up
microprocessor (BUMP). It enables an operator to
manage power supplies, check system hardware
status, update various configuration parameters,
investigate problems, and perform tests.
VPD (vital product data). Certain vital product
data (VPD), such as the product serial number and
status information, is stored on each board.
Index
Symbols
-48 V dc rack
containing CPU enclosure, 6-1
description, 6-1
power distribution panel, 6-2
power distribution panel, 6-2
-48 V dc system unit, power cables, 6-3
Numbers
1/4-inch tape cartridge
compatibility, 2-23
efficiency, 2-24–2-29
environment considerations, operating range,
2-22
QIC standards, 2-23
retensioning, 2-23
tape speed, 2-24–2-29
1/4-inch tape drive, 2-19
cleaning, 2-22
recording head, 2-22
status light, 2-19, 2-21
tape cartridge
environment consideration, 2-22
loading, 2-21
setting the write-protect tab, 2-20
unloading, 2-22
unload button, 2-19, 2-21
1/4-inch tape drive, using, 2-19
3.5-inch diskettes, loading and unloading, 2-12
3.5-inch diskette drive
diskette
setting the write-protect tab, 2-11
types, 2-10
in use light, 2-9
unload button, 2-9
using, 2-9
4 mm data cartridge
environmental considerations, 2-36
erasure, 2-37
4 mm tape cartridge
data capacity, 2-37
operating in harsh environments, 2-37
types
cleaning cartridge, 2-35
data cartridge, 2-35
diagnostic cartridge, 2-35
write-protect tab, setting, 2-36
4 mm tape drive
tape cartridge
setting the write-protect tab, 2-36
types, 2-35
using, 4.0 gigabyte tape drive, 2-38
4 mm tape drive, recommendations, 2-35
4.0GB 4 mm tape drive
cleaning the tape path, 2-42
location, 4-8
status light states, 2-38
status lights, 2-38
tape cartridge
loading, 2-40
unloading, 2-41
-48 V dc rack
starting, 7-1
stopping, 7-3
stopping under ordinary conditions, 7-3
using, 7-1
5.0GB 8 mm tape drive
cleaning the tape path, 2-33
general information, 2-25
status light states, 2-30
status lights, 2-29
tape cartridge
loading, 2-31
unloading, 2-32
7015 model R00 rack, 4-1
7318 serial communications network server service
aid, 9-16
8 mm tape cartridges, types
cleaning tape cartridge, 2-25
data tape cartridge, 2-25
test tape cartridge, 2-25
8 mm tape drive
location, 4-8
operating in harsh environments, 2-27
recommendations, 2-25
Index
X-3
tape cartridge
setting the write-protect tab, 2-26
types, 2-25
using, 5.0GB drive, 2-29
attributes required, 8-4
attributes, communication, 8-5
attributes, keyboard, 8-6
attributes, printer, 8-6
A
about this book, xv
AC rack, 4-1
cable path, 4-12
containing a PDB
stopping immediately, 5-10
stopping under ordinary conditions, 5-9
containing a PDU
stopping immediately, 5-8
stopping under ordinary conditions, 5-7
CPU enclosure, 4-1
description, 4-1–4-12
power distribution bus, 4-3
power distribution unit, 4-6
starting, 5-1
stopping, 5-7
using, 5-1
AC system unit cables and CPU enclosure,
connectors, 4-10
adapter locations, 1-3
additional system verification, system verification
procedure, 10-3
AutoserviceIPL Flag, 3-36
B
backup/restore media service aid, 9-4
battery backup unit (BBU). See power distribution
unit
BBU (battery backup unit), 4-7
bezel door, opened, 1-2
bezel, front view, 1-2
bit error rate service aid, 9-4
Boot Multiuser AIX in Service Flag, 3-37
bringup micro-processor service aid, 9-4
BUMPConsole Flag, 3-36
C
cable channel, 4-2
aids, service, 9-1
cable path
AC rack, 4-12
CPU enclosure, 4-12
AIX shell prompt service aid, 9-4
cable restraint strap, 4-12
alternate rack features
cable channel, 4-2
external device container, 4-2
front view of AC 7015 rack
cable channel, 4-2
external device container, 4-2
rack attachment plate, 4-2
rack attachment plate, 4-2
cables, AC system unit, 4-10
CD-ROM drive
cleaning, 2-14
unloading the disc, 2-14
CD-ROM disc caddy
loading, 2-14
unloading, 2-14
CD-ROM drive, type B bezel
disc caddy opening, 2-13
headphone jack, 2-13
loading the disc, 2-14
status light, 2-13
unload button, 2-13
volume control, 2-13
CD-ROM drive, type C bezel
cleaning, 2-18
disc drawer, 2-16
disc loading door, 2-15
emergency eject, 2-18
X-4
Operator Guide
emergency eject hole, 2-15
headphone jack, 2-15
loading the disc, 2-16
status light, 2-15
unload button, 2-15
unloading, 2-17
volume control, 2-15
CD-ROM drive, using, 2-13
change configuration or vital product data service
aid, 9-9
circuit breakers
10 amp, 6-2
50 amp, 6-2
cleaning
1/4-tape drive, 2-22
CD-ROM drive, 2-14
CD-ROM drive, type C bezel, 2-18
tape path
4.0GB 4 mm tape drive, 2-42
5.0 G-byte 8 mm tape drive, 2-33
cluster power control (CPC), 4-4
codes, crash, 8-13
communications statements, ix
compatibility, 8 mm tape cartridge, 2-26
configuration program indicators, E-6
connectors, CPU enclosure, 1-3, 4-10
considerations, system verification procedure, 10-1
cover label, SCSI, 4-15
CPC (cluster power control), 4-4
CPU enclosure
3.5-inch diskette drive, 1-1
8 mm tape drive, 1-1
adapter locations, 1-3
CD-ROM drive, 1-1
connectors, 4-10
description, 1-1–1-4
front view, 4-1
location, 4-1
media device locations, 1-1
operator panel, 2-2
optional media devices, 1-1
parallel port, 1-3
rear view, 1-3
serial ports, 1-3
using, 2-1–2-18
crash, crash codes, 8-13
creating cover labels, 4-16
Customer Maintenance Password, 3-37
D
data efficiency, tape cartridge, 2-27
DC rack, manually starting, 7-2
DC rack, methods of starting, 7-2
DC rack, stopping immediately, 7-4
definition of machine names and model numbers,
xv
devices, system unit, 4-8
diagnostic package utility service aid, 9-5
diagnostic programs
modes for running, 8-7
concurrent mode, 8-8
maintenance mode, 8-7
standalone mode, 8-9
operating considerations, 8-1
attached to a host system, 8-1
identifying a terminal, 8-1
running from a TTY terminal, 8-3
running from disk or a server, 8-2
running from tape drives, 8-2
selecting a console, 8-1
service aids, 9-1
system exerciser, 8-10
diagnostic programs, loading, system verification,
10-2
diagnostics, load progress indicators, E-12
diagnostics, stopping, system verification
procedure, 10-3
Dial–OutAuthorization Flag, 3-36
dials and LPFK configuration service aid, 9-5
disc caddy, 2-14
disc caddy, CD-ROM
loading, 2-14
unloading, 2-14
Index
X-5
disk based diagnostic update service aid, 9-6
disk drive, location, 4-8
disk maintenance service aid, 9-6
disk media service aid, 9-7
disk to disk copy service aid, 9-6
diskette
1MB, 2-10
2MB, 2-10
3.5-inch, setting the write-protect tab, 2-11
handling, 2-9
loading and unloading, 2-12
parts of, 2-10
types, 2-10
diskette drive
See also 3.5-inch diskette drive
3.5-inch, 2-9
diskette media service aid, 9-9
display and change dianostic test list service aid,
9-10
display configuration or vital product data service
aid, 9-9
display hardware error log task, 9-12
display or change BUMP configuration task, 9-4
display or change electronic mode switch task,
9-11
display or change key modes service aid, 9-11
display or change multiprocessor configuration
task, 9-12
display previous diagnostic results service aids,
9-11
display test patterns service aid, 9-11
display, operator panel, 2-7
display/alter bootlist service aid, 9-9
display/alter sector service aid, 9-7
drawer ID label, 4-16
non-SCSI drawer, 4-18
X-6
Operator Guide
E
E-Key. See electronic mode switch
electronic key. See electronic mode switch
electronic mode switch, 2-6
Electronic Mode Switch from Service Line Flag,
3-37
emergency eject, CD-ROM drive, type C bezel,
2-18
environmental considerations
4 mm data cartridge
operating ranges, 2-36
shipping, 2-36
storage, 2-36
8 mm tape cartridges
shipping, 2-26
storage, 2-26
environmental consideratons, 8 mm tape
cartridges, operating ranges, 2-26
erasure
4 mm data cartridge, 2-37
8 mm data cartridge, 2-27
erasure, 4 mm data cartridge, 2-37
erasure, 8 mm data cartridge, 2-27
external device container, 4-2
F
FastIPL Flag, 3-36
flash EEPROM, reloading, B-7
flashing 888, multi-line display, 888 numbers, 8-12
front bezel, 1-2
K
key mode switch
normal IPL, 2-4
normal position, 2-3, 2-4
operations, 2-4
reset button, 2-5
secure position, 2-3, 2-5
service IPL, 2-4
service position, 2-3, 2-5
setting, 2-3, 7-1
keys
ordering, D-2
reorder form, D-3
G
general information
4.0GB 4 mm tape drive, 2-34
5.0GB 8 mm tape drive, 2-25
general information about multiple systems, 2-1
generic microcode download service aid, 9-11
L
label
non-SCSI drawer ID, 4-18
SCSI device address, 4-15
SCSI drawer ID, 4-14
labels, location identification, 4-13
H
hardware error report service aid, 9-12
hardware problem determination, considerations,
11-1
harsh environments
4 mm tape drive, 2-37
8 mm tape cartridge, 2-27
8 mm tape drive, 2-27
harsh environments, 4 mm tape cartridge, 2-37
laser safety information, xiv
loading
1/4-inch tape drive, 2-21
4 mm tape cartridge, 2-40
8 mm tape cartridge, 2-31
CD-ROM disc caddy, 2-14
CD-ROM drive, type C bezel, 2-16
diskette, 2-12
loading diagnostic programs, system verification,
10-2
local area network analyzer task, 9-12
local area network service aid, 9-12
I
ID label, SCSI drawer, 4-14
immediately stopping the rack
containing a PDB, 5-10
containing a PDU, 5-8
location code format
for 9333 and 9334, 4-13
non-SCSI devices, 4-18
SCSI drawer, 4-13
indicators
configuration program, E-6
dump progress, dump status codes, 8-13
Index
X-7
location code table, SCSI and non-SCSI devices,
4-19
location identification labels, 4-13
locations
adapters, 1-3
bezel door, opened, 1-2
front view with bezel door closed, 1-2
operator panel, 2-2
parallel ports, 1-3
RS485 ports, 1-3
serial ports, 1-3
M
Maintenance Password, 3-37
manual starting of AC rack, 5-1
manually starting the DC rack, 7-2
message
determine type, multi-line display, 8-12
other numbers, multi-line display, 8-14
type 102, multi-line display, 8-12
type 103 and 105, multi-line display, 8-14
methods of starting the AC rack, 5-1
manual with a PDB, 5-5
manual with a PDU, 5-3
microcode download service aid, 9-12
key mode switch, 2-3
normal position, 2-4
operator controls, 2-2
key mode switch, 2-2
operator panel display, 2-2
power button, 2-2, 2-9
power light, 2-2, 2-9
reset/scroll button, 2-2
operator panel display, 2-7
reset button, 2-8
secure position, 2-5
service position, 2-5
operator panel display
number lists, E-1
PON (power-on) test indicators, E-1
reading (using), 2-7
uses, 2-7
operator panel display numbers, number lists, see
operator panel display, E-1
operator panel, using, 2-2
optional battery backup unit, 4-7
ordering keys, D-2
P
parallel port, 1-3
PDB (power distribution bus), 4-3
model R00 rack, 4-1
uninterruptible power source (UPS), 4-5
PDP (power distribution panel), 6-2
modifying SystemGuard parameters, B-1
PDU (power distribution unit). See optional battery
backup unit
multiple systems, general information, 2-1
multiprocessor service aid, 9-12
periodic diagnostics service aid, 9-13
PON test indicators, E-1
POST (Power-On Self-Test) indicators, E-3
N
normal IPL, 2-4
power distribution
battery backup unit (BBU), 4-7
cluster power control (CPC), 4-4
power distribtution bus (PDB), 4-3
power distribution panel (PDP), 6-2
power distribution unit (PDU), 4-6
normal position, 2-4
power distribution bus (PDB), 4-3
non-SCSI drawer
ID label, 4-18
location code format, 4-18
power distribution panel (PDP), 6-2
O
operating in harsh environments, 2-27
4 mm tape cartridges, 2-37
operator panel, 3-3
diskette drive, 2-2, 2-9
X-8
Operator Guide
power distribution unit (PDU), 4-6
power states
AIX, F-3
IPL, F-3
MAIN_STANDBY, F-1
SBB_ECMD, F-2
SBB_GATEWAY, F-1
SBB_MENU, F-2
SBB_PCMD, F-2
WAIT_POWER_ON, F-2
WAIT_REBUILDING, F-3
retensioning, 1/4-inch tape cartridge, 2-23
run diagnostics task, 9-2
run error log analysis task, 9-2
running system verification, 10-2
power states, system, F-1
power-on from BUMP console, F-3
power-on test indicators, E-1
S
power-on using the power-on button, F-4
safety notices, xiii
powering on the AC rack
containing a PDB, manual, 5-5
containing a PDU, manual, 5-3
SCSI and non-SCSI devices, location code table,
4-19
problem determination procedure, considerations,
11-1
SCSI bus service aid, 9-13
process supplemental media task, 9-3
product topology service aid, 9-13
programmed starting of AC rack
after a power failure, 5-1
by date and time, 5-1
Q
QIC, 2-23
R
rack, 4-1
rack attachment plate, 4-2
recommendations, use of 4 mm tape drive, 2-35
recommendations, use of 8 mm tape drive, 2-25
related publications, xv
7015 Model R00 Rack Installation and Service
Guide, xv
7015 Model R30 CPU Enclosure Service Guide,
xv
9348 Customer Information, xv
AIX Problem Solving Guide and Reference, xv
AIX System Management Guide: Operating
System and Devices, xv
RISC System/6000 System Overview and
Planning, xv
System Unit Safety Information, xv
remote starting of AC rack, 5-1
reset button
location, 2-3
using. See key mode switch
SCSI bus analyzer task, 9-13
SCSI device address label, 4-15
SCSI drawer
4 mm tape drive, 4-8
8 mm tape drive, 4-8
controls, 4-9
cover label
creating, 4-16
description, 4-15
description, 4-8
device address label, 4-15
disk drive, 4-9
ID label, 4-14
location code format, 4-13
SCSI drawer ID label, 4-14
SCSI tape utilities service aid, 9-14
secure position, 2-5
serial port 1, 1-3
serial port 2, 1-3
serial port 3, 1-3
service aid, service hints, 9-15
service aids, 9-1, 9-7
AIX shell prompt service aid, 9-4
backup/restore media service aid, 9-4
bit error rate service aid, 9-4
bringup micro-processor, 9-4
change diagnostic run time options task, 9-2
diagnostic package utility, 9-5
dials and LPFK configuration, 9-5
disk maintenance, 9-6
disk media, 9-7
disk to disk copy, 9-6
diskbased diagnostic update, 9-6
diskette media, 9-9
Index
X-9
display and change diagnostic test list service
aid, 9-10
display diagnostic run time options task, 9-2
display or change configuration or vital product
data, 9-9
display or change key modes, 9-11
display previous diagnostic results, 9-11
display test patterns, 9-11
display/alter bootlist, 9-9
for use with ethernet, 9-14
generic microcode download, 9-11
hardware error report, 9-12
list, 9-3
local area network, 9-12
microcode download, 9-12
multiprocessor, 9-12
periodic diagnostics, 9-13
process supplemental media task, 9-3
product topology, 9-13
run error log analysis task, 9-2
running diagnostics task, 9-2
SCSI bus, 9-13
SCSI tape utilities, 9-14
SSA, 9-15
trace, 9-15
service aids for use with ethernet, 9-14
service hints service aid, 9-15
Service Line Speed Parameter, 3-37
service position, 2-5
services aids, 7318 serial communications network
server, 9-16
Set Mode to Normal when Booting Flag, 3-36
setting the write-protect tab
1/4-inch tape cartridge, 2-20
3.5-inch diskette, 2-11
4 mm tape cartridge, 2-36
8 mm tape cartridge, 2-26
setting voltage margins, 3-20, 3-33
shutdown command, 7-3
SSA service aid, 9-15
starting the -48 V dc rack, 7-1
starting the AC rack, 5-1
manually, 5-1
methods, 5-1
programmed after power failure, 5-1
programmed by date and time, 5-1
remotely, 5-1
starting the DC rack, 7-2
status light states
4.0GB 4 mm tape drive, 2-38
X-10
Operator Guide
5.0GB 8 mm tape drive, 2-30
status light, 1/4-inch tape drive, 2-19
status lights
4.0 GB 4 mm tape drive, 2-38
5.0GB 8 mm tape drive, 2-29
stopping
immediately
AC rack containing PDB, 5-10
AC rack containing PDU, 5-8
ordinary conditions
-48 V dc rack, 7-3
AC rack containing PDB, 5-9
AC rack containing PDU, 5-7
stopping the -48 V dc rack, 7-3
stopping the AC rack, 5-7
stopping the AC rack, ordinary conditions
containing a PDB, 5-9
containing a PDU, 5-7
stopping the DC rack immediately, 7-4
stopping, immediately, AC rack containing PDB,
5-8
supplies
descriptions, D-1
ordering information, D-1
part numbers, D-1
system power states, F-1
system unit
-48 V dc rack, 6-1
power cables, 6-3
system unit cables, CPU enclosure, 6-3
system verification procedure
additional verification, 10-3
considerations, 10-1
loading diagnostic programs, 10-2
running, 10-2
stopping the diagnostics, 10-3
SystemGuard
BUMP overview, 3-2
common tasks, 3-39
authorize the service console, 3-43
boot from network, 3-52
boot from SCSI device, 3-49
disable processors, 3-55
enable processors, 3-55
enable surveillance, 3-46
reboot AIX from remote service console, 3-48
set fast IPL, 3-40
set the electronic key, 3-39
set the service line speed, 3-42
set up console mirroring, 3-44
set up dial-out feature, 3-46
components, 3-2
console mirroring, 3-44
consoles, 3-4
dial-in phone numbers, modifying, B-5
dial-out authorization flag, modifying, B-4
dial-out phone numbers, modifying, B-5
electronic key, 3-4
electronic mode switch, modifying, B-6
flags, 3-9
flash EEPROM, reloading, B-7
maintenance menu, 3-21
disable service console, 3-25
display BUMP error log, 3-25
display configuration, 3-22
device level, 3-24
system level, 3-22
unit level, 3-22
enable service console, 3-25
off-line tests, 3-28
build test list, 3-29
execute test list, 3-32
modify/display test list, 3-31
power off, 3-25
reset, 3-25
set national language, 3-38
set parameters, 3-32
phone numbers, 3-34
power-on command parameters, 3-33
set configuration, 3-34
voltage margins, 3-33
system boot, 3-26
menus, 3-11
maintenance menu, 3-21
stand-by menu, 3-12
modem configuration, 3-47
modifying service support parameters, B-1
parameters, 3-9
phases, 3-4
boot, 3-5
Boot to AIX load and run-time, 3-9
init, 3-5
init to Boot, 3-9
Maint to Boot, 3-9
maintenance, 3-5
run-time, 3-5
stand-by, 3-4
stand-by to init, 3-6
physical key, 3-4
power, 3-2
remote authorization flag, modifying, B-3
remote operation configuration, C-1
service support parameters
changing flags and parameters, B-3
default values, B-1
stand-by menu, 3-12
display configuration, 3-13
I2C maintenance, 3-19
set configuration, 3-17
set flags, 3-15
set unit number, 3-16
SSbus maintenance, 3-18
test groups, A-1
descriptions, A-3
using, 3-1
working with, 3-10
SystemGuard parameters, modifying, B-1
T
tape cartridge
1/4-inch
environment consideration, 2-22
loading, 2-21
setting the write-protect tab, 2-20
unloading, 2-22
4 mm
compatibility, 2-36
data capacity, 2-37
data efficiency, 2-37
environment considerations, 2-36
erasure, 2-37
loading 4.0G-byte tape drive, 2-40
setting the write-protect tab, 2-36
types, 2-35
unloading 4.0GB tape drive, 2-41
8 mm
compatibility, 2-26
data efficiency, 2-27
environment considerations, 2-26
erasure, 2-27
setting the write-protect tab, 2-26
types, 2-25
compatibility, 2-36
format modes, 2-26
loading 5.0 G-byte 8 mm tape drive, 2-31
unloading, 2-32
tape cartridge compatibility, 4 mm tape cartridge,
2-36
tape cartridge data capacity, 4 mm tape cartridge,
2-37
tape cartridge data efficiency, 2-27
file mark, 2-27
tape drive
1/4-inch, 2-19
Index
X-11
4 mm
4.0 gigabyte, 2-38
general information, 2-34
8 mm, 5.0GB drive, 2-29
tape drive, 4.0GB 4 mm, general information, 2-34
tape drive, 4GB 4 mm, recommendations, 2-35
tape drive, 5.0GB 8 mm, general information, 2-25
tasks, 9-1
display hardware error log, 9-12
display or change BUMP configuration, 9-4
display or change electronic mode switch, 9-11
display or change multiprocessor configuration,
9-12
local area network analyzer, 9-12
process supplemental media, 9-3
run diagnostics, 9-2
run error log analysis task, 9-2
SCSI bus analyzer, 9-13
update disk based diagnostic, 9-6
three-digit display
See also See operator panel display or display
diagnostic load progress indicators, E-12
POST (Power-On Self-Test) indicators, E-3
trace service aid, 9-15
U
uninterruptible power source (UPS), 4-5
unloading
4 mm tape cartridge, 2-41
X-12
Operator Guide
8 mm tape cartridge, 2-32
diskette, 2-12
update disk based diagnostic task, 9-6
UPS (uninterruptible power source), 4-5
using the system verification procedure
addition system verification, 10-3
considerations, 10-1
loading diagnostic programs, 10-2
running system verification, 10-2
stopping the diagnostics, 10-3
V
voltage margins, setting, 3-20, 3-33
W
write-protect tab, setting
1/4-inch tape cartridge, 2-20
3.5-inch diskette, 2-11
4 mm tape cartridge, 2-36
8 mm tape cartridge, 2-26
40H7125
Printed in the U.S.A.
SA23-2742-02
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