Better communications saves lives 2/2011

Better communications saves lives 2/2011
customer magazine
2/2011
EDR network has
Hungary covered
Users get on board
with RATP's radio
network
Meet the TB3p
Better
communications
saves lives
WHO’S IN THIS ISSUE?
Want to know a little more about some of the experts
who contribute to Key Touch? Look no further.
TAPIO MÄKINEN has undertaken
photoshoots for Key Touch Magazine
and Cassidian. With his photos, Tapio
aims to capture the feelings of places,
events and people. Tapio has single digit
handicap in golf, practises astanga yoga
and is often seen cheering at his boys’
basketball matches.
ANKE STURTZEL is a new member
in the Key Touch crew. She is now joining the team in her function as press
officer. 11 years ago this German fell in
love with Paris where she has lived ever
since. Anke loves - in addition to taking
photos - to rework old furniture in her
spare time.
STÉPHANE BRAUDEL has been a
Key Touch editor since 2008. Currently working within Integrated Systems
marketing in Elancourt, he makes good
use of his two masters degrees in engineering and marketing/sales on the
PPSL project.
TERO PESONEN’s focus is on improving the safety and efficiency of field
operations – from public safety to utilities. So it’s no surprise that the opportunities presented by mission-critical data
have caught his attention.
PIIA NIKULA enjoys amazing opportunities to work with wonderful people
all around the globe in organising Cassidian customer events. She loves outdoor activities like horse riding and
skiing but also enjoys singing and dancing.
JEAN-MICHEL DUMAZERT juggles
his time between Cassidian, his family,
scuba diving and being a local councillor. Since September 2010 he’s now
added to his packed schedule by contributing to Key Touch as TETRAPOL
correspondent.
TIINA SAARISTO is Editor-in-Chief
for Key Touch and has led the team
of editors and contributors since early
2003. Tiina lives with her husband,
daughter and cat in Helsinki, where she
creates quilts and quilted objects.
AILA KOTILAINEN has been with
Key/TETRA Touch more than ten years.
Her favourite stories are about people,
and she’s always keen to make interviews
for the magazine. Many photos in the
magazine are the result of photoshooting
projects she’s arranged during the years.
Key Touch 2/2011- May 2011
Fortecor®, Key Touch®, TETRA Touch® and TETRAPOL
are registered trademarks of Cassidian.
Xerigo™ is a trademark of Cassidian. Java is a registered
trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates.
Other product names and company names mentioned
herein may be trademarks or trade names of their respective owners.
2
www.keytouch.info
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF:
Tiina Saaristo
tiina.saaristo@cassidian.com
EDITOR:
Aila Kotilainen
aila.kotilainen@cassidian.com
LAYOUT:
Spokesman Oy
PRINTED BY:
Libris Oy
© Cassidian 2011.
All rights reserved.
This is not a contractual
document.
Information subject to
change without notice.
EDITORIAL
The fully integrated
public safety communications future
At Cassidian, we are always
impressed by our customers’ challenging missions, dealing with
the consequences of terrorism,
nature’s events, or political unrest, as well as happier occasions
like the recent UK royal wedding.
The bar for security organisations
is rising constantly. We see the results of greater investment in security all around us, from security
checks at airports, to new video
surveillance systems in cities, to
biometric passports and more.
It is also clear that close collaboration across organisations
is vital to cope with new global
challenges, such as cyber-crime,
identity protection over the Internet, or protecting critical infrastructure against man-made or
natural interference.
Meanwhile, facing tight budgetary constraints, our governmental customers are looking at
technologies that can raise the
efficiency of routine tasks. There
is plenty of scope to achieve this
aim by harnessing trends such as
mobile computing and connectivity, biometric sensing and smart
devices, all of which enable IT
processes to run in the field. It’s a
development that helps to release
officers from the chores of officebased paperwork and move them
onto the streets.
In such a complex environment
our customers can benefit from the
integration of systems to provide
holistic security solutions and col-
laborative platforms that allow
first responders to share incidentrelated information effectively.
Reliable, always-available voice
and data communications with increased data capacity are vital.
We expect data applications
to become mission-critical That's
why we strive to bring new data
capabilities to durable solutions
such as TETRA and TETRAPOL,
which can deliver voice and data
under even the most challenging
circumstances. Users are increasingly recognizing the strategic
value of instant availability, security and control brought by such
infrastructure.
To this end, Cassidian offers a
cost-effective software upgrade
(TEDS) to boost the capacity of
TETRA networks and has teamed
up with Alcatel-Lucent to build an
LTE 400 MHz mobile broadband
data solution for professionals.
Something that doesn't exist today. The aim is to use Long Term
Evolution (LTE) technology in the
spectrum used by public safety
and NATO defence customers to
complement digital PMR.
This development will enable
new situational awareness capabilities with video applications
and data-rich mobile applications
for field users via our new vehicle-mounted router. The solution
will provide the flexibility to take
advantage of new data capabilities while allowing roaming into
commercial networks and will
additionally provide hot spot tactical communications around the
vehicle.
Our vision at Cassidian is to
ensure a full-circle security environment in which these critical
communications and applications
are fully collaborative, secured
and controlled. It's what professionals need.
Jean-Michel-Orozco
Vice President,
Head of Sales & Marketing
Cassidian Systems
KeyTouch 2/2011
3
Contents
CUSTOMER WIRE
Editorial
3 The fully integrated public safety
communications future
Full-circle security
10 Mapping out full-circle security
16 Making the most of the digital revolution
26 VIRVE communications saves lives
13
Users get on board with
RATP's radio network
Besides implementing a TETRA network to help it provide transport
services to Paris, RATP is inviting other
organisations to run their communications over the network.
NEW SOLUTIONS
47
Meet the TB3p
TB3p is the world's smartest, smallest TETRA base station. Designed for
the environment, engineered without
compromise.
4
www.keytouch.info
New solutions
47 Meet the TB3p - The world’s smartest, smallest
TETRA base station
Sensational radios
36 One radio, two users, many uses
38 Did you know ….how to make text messages
longer?
Event security
6 TETRA safeguards 1.2 million people at mega
skiing fest
Picture this
18 Facing up to biometrics
53 The future of mobile apps over PMR
Customer wire
13 Users get on board with RATP’s radio network
22 ASTRID helps Belgian bus services run
smoothly
24 EDR network has Hungary covered
42 Rakel beats the saboteurs
43 Rakel safeguards Sweden’s power distribution
In touch
48 Mounting up to defend public safety
52 Videos help you stay one step ahead
54 Where to next for emergency calls?
FULL-CIRCLE SECURITY
26
VIRVE communications saves lives
The idea that better communications
saves lives is much more than a theory
for medical teams at the North Karelia
Central Hospital in Finland.
CUSTOMER WIRE
24
Global security
30 Command centre puts everyone and everything
in the picture
Solutions
28 An eye in the sky
32 Finding French fire fighters in the field
34 IDRs give instant extra coverage
36 Beyond mobility – radio transport
for fixed monitoring
38 Meeting competing demands for voice and data
capacity
40 Smoothing the way for the Smart Grid
42 Easy and safe reporting of radiation information
over Rakel
Feedback
46 What you liked best in Key Touch 1/2011
46 Feedback wins prizes
News
12 Shenzhen Metro trials pave the way
for Universiade
21 New Zealand quake – quick response
from Cassidian
44 Thailand’s Metropolitan Electricity Authority
switches to digital
45 Cyberabad police launches 3,600km2 TETRA
network
45 Inauguration of Parliament network in New Delhi
45 First order from Metro in India
EDR network has
Hungary covered
One of the leading established TETRA
networks in Europe, Hungary’s EDR
continues to be a focus for innovation.
KeyTouch 2/2011
5
Event security
6
www.keytouch.info
T
he Nordic World Ski
Championships in Oslo
racked up ticket sales of
270,000 over the course
of the 11-day competition, as well
as attracting around 50,000 spectators for the opening ceremony
and 650,000 fans at the evening
ceremonies in the city centre. With
a further 300,000 people following
events from outside the stadiums
and along cross-country trails, a
staggering 1.2 million people attended in one way or another.
“Our mission for the Oslo 2011
Championships was to enthuse
and spread winter joy and we can
say with conviction that we have
achieved this,” said Svein Aaser,
chairman of the board of the Oslo
2011 organizing committee at the
closing ceremony.
The event was a result of 2.5
years preparation, led by the
Event security
TETRA safeguards
1.2 million people at
mega skiing fest
Oslo 2011 organizing committee
which consisted of 40 volunteers.
These people dedicated their time
and expertise to diverse functions
in the event preparation. Svein
Magne Karlsen was the committee member responsible for ICT
and managing communications.
His tasks included the selection
and planning of the radio communication system used by the
diverse teams of the games orKeyTouch 2/2011
7
Event security
Svein Magne Karlsen was
responsible for ICT and
managing communications
at the Oslo 2011 Ski Worldchampionships.
8
www.keytouch.info
100% availability
and 100%
coverage
Focusing on core tasks
“TETRA as a modern and secure
communication solution provides the required capacity and
services for managing such a
massive event,” Mr Karlsen told
Key Touch. “However, building
and maintaining a radio network
is not the core task of the games
organisers. That's why we ended
up with a solution from TC Connect, using their existing TETRA
network that has already been in
operation for more than 10 years
in the Oslo area. Outsourcing was
the right choice.”
The TETRA system operated by TC Connect is based on
Cassidian technology. The network normally serves about 1,000
users, with Oslo Metro being
the largest single customer. During the skiing championship the
number of users grew by 650. To
ensure sufficient coverage and capacity, TC Connect added an extra base station at Holmenkollen,
as well as adding extra carriers to
the network.
Security and medical teams,
transportation, parking, sports
teams, doping, juries and the
Event security
ganisation. He soon realised that
TETRA was the only radio technology available to cope with
such a huge celebration of skiing.
organising committee all used
Cassidian TETRA radios. Also
users from police, fire and ambulance service teams were connected to the system for coordinated
communication in case of emergencies. Most of the radios were
the new THR9i model, which is
robust, weather-proof and includes features such as Lifeguard
(man-down) to enhance the personal safety of users.
Getting organised
In addition to providing the TETRA coverage and the radios, TC
Connect was responsible for talk
group planning in co-operation
with the organisers, as well as
radio programming and on-site
support during the games. The
company also trained around 60
key users who then trained their
respective teams to use the radios.
The intuitive, mobile phone-like
user interface of the radios made
the job straightforward.
The organisers wanted 100%
availability and 100% coverage during the event, and that’s
what they got. “Our experience
confirms that we made the right
choice and the system will be
used in other events at Holmenkollen,” says Mr Karlsen.
KeyTouch 2/2011
9
FULL-CIRCLE SECurity
Mapping out
full-circle
security
10
www.keytouch.info
Picture
the scene…
An alert comes into the police control room and officers are dispatched to deal with a speeding driver. They’re hot on his heels as
he crosses the border into a neighbouring country, where local officers join the chase. But the pursuit ends in disaster as the reckless
driver enters a tunnel and crashes. The confined space and thick
smoke make any rescue attempt much more difficult.
Such a complex situation calls for all-round, seamless co-operation between several different agencies and information systems in
control rooms, vehicles and on handheld terminals. It’s something
we call full-circle security.
XXXXXXXXXXXXX
news
It’s often easier
to appreciate
the benefits of a
concept such as
full-circle security
when we can see
it in action. The
following scenario is
a great example of
how comprehensive
communications
capabilities support
public safety.
Shenzhen Metro trials pave
the way for Universiade
TETRA communications on the Shenzhen Metro will help support the 2011
Universiade sports event
S
uccessful trials have taken place for sections of Shenzhen Metro Line 2 and Line
3. Cassidian is supplying the TETRA networks and equipment to support the Metro project, which will eventually include five lines.
The trial of the first operating section of Line 2
is a major milestone on the way to the delivery of
all five Shenzhen Metro lines. The Shenzhen Metro
Line 3 project runs for 41 kilometers and serves 30
stations, connecting the inner and outer economic
zones and acting as a special line to the venue of
the 2011 Universiade sports event. Shenzhen Metro
chose Cassidian’s TETRA communications solution
to support its services during the Universiade following the success of a similar set-up on the Guangzhou Metro during the Asian Games.
Cassidian provided the first TETRA systems
for Shenzhen Metro Line 1 in 2004. Since then the
communications system has grown in line with the
12
www.keytouch.info
metro network itself and now includes five switches,
125 base stations and 33 DSC. It serves 3,600 wireless
users daily.
The Shenzhen metro lines are built and operated by three companies. With tens of transfer stops
throughout the network, it’s vital that personnel from
different lines and stations can all communicate effectively, regardless of which company they’re part of.
The Cassidian system provides seamless communication along all the lines, offering full TETRA
functionality as users roam from one line to another.
Meanwhile, the virtual private network (VPN) functions supported by the system enable each line to
manage its own subscribers and talk groups separately. All group and individual calls are recorded
and held centrally so that any problems can be reviewed and rectified in the ongoing effort to improve the quality of the metro system.
2
1
In the
control
room…
A call comes in about reckless driving. The
dispatcher locates the incident and identifies
the nearest available response units using the
OM100 mapping application. The map also
shows any fire engines or ambulances that are
in the area.
Officers are dispatched to pursue the suspect
vehicle, which is heading for the border. Their
status switches to show they’re on a mission.
In
the
vehicle…
An officer presses the “start pursuit” button on
his touch screen panel and away they go.
The on-board camera tracks progress and
streams video footage back to the control room.
With the suspect vehicle in their sights and
visible to the on-board image capture system,
the officers run a vehicle check at the touch of a
button. Sure enough, the car is stolen.
3
Behind
the
scenes…
The border is coming up fast and the officers will
need support from the neighbouring force.
The Inter-System Interface (ISI) between the
neighbouring TETRA networks enables controllers to pass on all the relevant information to
their counterparts across the border, who can
then communicate with the field officers from
both forces.
Local officers join the pursuit as it crosses the
border.
4
At the
crash
site…
The suspect is speeding through a tunnel when
disaster strikes and he loses control of the vehicle and crashes.
Officers open a new traffic incident in the
FMIS500 application, which results in a call for
back-up from fire fighters and medics.
The dispatcher forwards a copy of the tunnel
floor plan, together with a photo of the crashed
vehicle taken from CCTV footage in the tunnel.
The officers grab their THR9i handheld radios
and head into the tunnel on foot. They soon lose
touch with the TETRA network, but can still talk
to one another in direct mode.
Even in this hazardous and confusing situation, officers can be confident that if any one of
them stops moving for too long, the man down
function on their radio will alert the rest of the
team that they may need help.
A fire engine arrives at the tunnel entrance
with a TB3p mini base station on board. Once
it’s activated, the officers in the tunnel can communicate with the control room via the network
again.
Police officers and fire fighters manage to
rescue the driver. He seems unhurt, but the
paramedics check him over.
Officers use a handheld scanner to read the
driver’s license and pull up his records so they
can be sure who they’re dealing with.
See it in
action…
Cassidian assembled this scenario
into their TETRA World Congress stand,
where live demos highlighted all these
technologies, applications and features.
And even if you could not get along to
TWC, Key Touch readers can check out
the video online http://www.keytouch.info/
features/videos_and_podcasts/
2
1
In the
control
room…
A call comes in about reckless driving. The
dispatcher locates the incident and identifies
the nearest available response units using the
OM100 mapping application. The map also
shows any fire engines or ambulances that are
in the area.
Officers are dispatched to pursue the suspect
vehicle, which is heading for the border. Their
status switches to show they’re on a mission.
In
the
vehicle…
An officer presses the “start pursuit” button on
his touch screen panel and away they go.
The on-board camera tracks progress and
streams video footage back to the control room.
With the suspect vehicle in their sights and
visible to the on-board image capture system,
the officers run a vehicle check at the touch of a
button. Sure enough, the car is stolen.
3
Behind
the
scenes…
The border is coming up fast and the officers will
need support from the neighbouring force.
The Inter-System Interface (ISI) between the
neighbouring TETRA networks enables controllers to pass on all the relevant information to
their counterparts across the border, who can
then communicate with the field officers from
both forces.
Local officers join the pursuit as it crosses the
border.
4
At the
crash
site…
The suspect is speeding through a tunnel when
disaster strikes and he loses control of the vehicle and crashes.
Officers open a new traffic incident in the
FMIS500 application, which results in a call for
back-up from fire fighters and medics.
The dispatcher forwards a copy of the tunnel
floor plan, together with a photo of the crashed
vehicle taken from CCTV footage in the tunnel.
The officers grab their THR9i handheld radios
and head into the tunnel on foot. They soon lose
touch with the TETRA network, but can still talk
to one another in direct mode.
Even in this hazardous and confusing situation, officers can be confident that if any one of
them stops moving for too long, the man down
function on their radio will alert the rest of the
team that they may need help.
A fire engine arrives at the tunnel entrance
with a TB3p mini base station on board. Once
it’s activated, the officers in the tunnel can communicate with the control room via the network
again.
Police officers and fire fighters manage to
rescue the driver. He seems unhurt, but the
paramedics check him over.
Officers use a handheld scanner to read the
driver’s license and pull up his records so they
can be sure who they’re dealing with.
See it in
action…
Cassidian assembled this scenario
into their TETRA World Congress stand,
where live demos highlighted all these
technologies, applications and features.
And even if you could not get along to
TWC, Key Touch readers can check out
the video online http://www.keytouch.info/
features/videos_and_podcasts/
Picture
the scene…
An alert comes into the police control room and officers are dispatched to deal with a speeding driver. They’re hot on his heels as
he crosses the border into a neighbouring country, where local officers join the chase. But the pursuit ends in disaster as the reckless
driver enters a tunnel and crashes. The confined space and thick
smoke make any rescue attempt much more difficult.
Such a complex situation calls for all-round, seamless co-operation between several different agencies and information systems in
control rooms, vehicles and on handheld terminals. It’s something
we call full-circle security.
XXXXXXXXXXXXX
news
It’s often easier
to appreciate
the benefits of a
concept such as
full-circle security
when we can see
it in action. The
following scenario is
a great example of
how comprehensive
communications
capabilities support
public safety.
Shenzhen Metro trials pave
the way for Universiade
TETRA communications on the Shenzhen Metro will help support the 2011
Universiade sports event
S
uccessful trials have taken place for sections of Shenzhen Metro Line 2 and Line
3. Cassidian is supplying the TETRA networks and equipment to support the Metro project, which will eventually include five lines.
The trial of the first operating section of Line 2
is a major milestone on the way to the delivery of
all five Shenzhen Metro lines. The Shenzhen Metro
Line 3 project runs for 41 kilometers and serves 30
stations, connecting the inner and outer economic
zones and acting as a special line to the venue of
the 2011 Universiade sports event. Shenzhen Metro
chose Cassidian’s TETRA communications solution
to support its services during the Universiade following the success of a similar set-up on the Guangzhou Metro during the Asian Games.
Cassidian provided the first TETRA systems
for Shenzhen Metro Line 1 in 2004. Since then the
communications system has grown in line with the
12
www.keytouch.info
metro network itself and now includes five switches,
125 base stations and 33 DSC. It serves 3,600 wireless
users daily.
The Shenzhen metro lines are built and operated by three companies. With tens of transfer stops
throughout the network, it’s vital that personnel from
different lines and stations can all communicate effectively, regardless of which company they’re part of.
The Cassidian system provides seamless communication along all the lines, offering full TETRA
functionality as users roam from one line to another.
Meanwhile, the virtual private network (VPN) functions supported by the system enable each line to
manage its own subscribers and talk groups separately. All group and individual calls are recorded
and held centrally so that any problems can be reviewed and rectified in the ongoing effort to improve the quality of the metro system.
As well as implementing a TETRA
network to help it provide transport
services to Paris, RATP is inviting
other organisations to run their
communications over the network,
bringing advanced communications
features to a wider audience.
Stéphane Chouet
W
ith a large
resident population
and a huge annual influx of tourists, Paris and its surrounding area needs a transport company that is up to the job. Completing more than 3 billion
customer journeys in 2010, RATP is that company, running
metro trains, buses, tramways and mass rapid transit for
the city.
To support 1,000 trains, 300 stations and 4,500 buses, RATP has a large team of engineering and maintenance personnel, as well as its own 1,000 strong security
department. Add in drivers, ticketing and station staff and
that’s a lot of people who need constant, reliable communications to ensure the transport network runs smoothly.
RATP employees rely on a fully integrated TETRA network from Cassidian, using talk groups that let staff from
all areas of the system communicate when needed, both
for routine jobs and in an emergency. This is all a far cry
from the time when RATP struggled with seven or eight
analogue systems that couldn’t connect to each other,
meaning that people on the buses couldn’t talk to
the people on the Metro.
Currently, 9,000 users benefit from the TETRA network, a number that is soon to rise up
to 15,000, with the addition of the bus fleet.
Advanced TETRA facilities
Stéphane Chouet, Head of business development for communication system for RATP, says:
“With ­TETRA, we have had the ­opportunity to
KeyTouch 2/2011
13
Customer
XXXXXXXXXX
wire
Users get on
board with
RATP’s radio
network
XXXXXXXXXXXXX
Customer wire
modernise and
extend all the internal radio services, such as radio handsets
for train drivers moving out of their driving cabin or
the possibility of many functional evolutions supporting
radical organisational changes for a better RATP performance.”
And it’s not just useful in supporting everyday, routine
work. “This radio network is also a strong asset in case
of a major disaster,” says Stéphane Chouet. “Its
federative and secure features allow real time coordination
14
www.keytouch.info
Communications expertise
Setting up the network involved several challenges,
one of the main ones being to provide
adequate
underground
coverage. Ca-
bles had to be shared between different radio networks,
planning and power budgets needed to be managed and
there had to be successful handovers in the tunnels. The
project met all these challenges and now provides radio
coverage for the TETRA network and the National Police
Radio TETRAPOL Network.
The second challenge was to capture the users’ real
needs and translate these into radio features and communication models, concentrating on the ‘must have’
rather than the ‘nice to have’. The last of these challenges
involved operations - while new TETRA services were
rolled out, the existing analogue networks needed to be
maintained, since the maintenance teams were to be operational in a wide range of systems.
“Through meeting and overcoming these challenges,
RATP has developed a better understanding of the business of its internal customers, as well as the complex
communications environment of urban transportation,” says Stéphane Chouet.
Since 2004, when the first of the network’s
450 base stations were installed, RATP has
developed great experience in designing,
implementing and operating its own fixed and
radio communication systems. RATP also operates third party systems such as GSM coverage
in partnership with the three national mobile operators,
as well as the underground TETRAPOL network of the
National Police, which shares the same leaky cables as
the RATP TETRA network.
There are still challenges to meet as the network develops. Says Chouet: “We need to complete the migration of the new internal users over to the TETRA services,
as well as implement voice and data integration to allow
traffic information to be carried by the network.
“The last important issue is to open up our dedicated
network to external customers. To achieve this, we have
developed the Tétracité concept which will give external customers access to high value radio communications services without investing in a
dedicated network and infrastructure of their
own.”
For RATP, opening up their radio network
gives a better return on investment with extra
commercial revenues, ensuring long term sustainability of a now strategic regional network.
KeyTouch 2/2011
15
Customer
XXXXXXXXXX
wire
between different departments, both above and below
ground.”
In addition to the most common
TETRA features such as group calls,
status and SDS messages, and
emergency calls, the security
force users benefit from Dynamic
Group Number Assignment, as
well as being able to activate
groups on demand for special
events.
As well as employing the system
for its own staff, RATP is spreading the good
news about TETRA by offering its services to external organisations, bringing the prospect of a further 2,000 to
5,000 users coming on board.
This highlights one of the major advantages: different
organisations can use the same TETRA radio network and no-one within or outside the network
can eavesdrop. But what if an organisation’s
structure or members change, changing its
data? To safeguard privacy, it must be possible to make amendments without accessing
data from all of the other organisations.
This is possible in TETRA systems from
Cassidian because they make use of a full Virtual Private
Network (VPN), meaning that organisations can share the
radio network with no danger of compromising their privacy or security.
Full-circle security
Making the
most of the
digital
revolution
The ability to share
information in multiple
formats across multiple
organisations will
promote public safety
without compromise.
It’s a vision that calls
for true interoperability
between networks.
16
www.keytouch.info
D
igital communication is
revolutionising public
safety, with more and
more digital information being
used in daily operations. Passport
information, drivers’ and other licences, IDs, vehicle and personal
data, medical information, images and videos are all resources
that the authorities can draw on,
with field officers already checking, changing, querying and com-
paring this sort of information every day.
Even so, many information
systems remain isolated in silos.
It will take seamless interoperability between systems and the
organisations that use them to
really make the most of this incredible resource. Whether it’s
multiple agencies responding to
a localised crisis in a community
or it’s multiple jurisdictions in-
volved in a high speed chase, the
need for communication between
different networks is clear.
Game-changing data
By 2015, some 90 per cent of mobile traffic will be data, including voice in the form of data. In
contrast to the voice calls coming
into emergency response centres
today, call-takers will therefore
need to organise their responses
Complementary solutions
Systems will be terribly vulnerable if they are based on a single
giant data pipe. Professionals
need robust, dynamically scalable information-sharing that can
move huge amounts of data and
provide narrowband data and
voice communication efficiently
when needed. In other words,
it calls for complementary solutions, with tough, lower-capacity
networks that can be relied on
to keep delivering mission-crit-
ical voice and data, even when
a high-capacity data network is
disrupted.
Interoperable communication
is again a crucial enabler of this
kind of arrangement, but security
is also essential.
Genuine interoperability in
voice and data is only possible
between different organisations
when their communications systems are fully integrated with
effective interfaces. Networks
should also be sufficiently versatile to offer wireless and wired
connections as needed. Finally,
the data itself must be circulated
in a format that is accessible to everyone, so widespread standardisation must be the norm.
Full-circle security
Realising this fully interoperable
vision is the key to delivering the
broader ambition of modern public safety professionals: full-circle
security.
Full-circle security will ultimately deliver a revolution in
public safety, but the most economic and efficient way to implement the technologies that will
enable this brave new world is
evolution based on incremental
investments. Incremental development will avoid catastrophic
discontinuities and makes it possible to maintain smooth upgrade
paths. The communication services that professionals come to
rely on will remain available and
networks will integrate more easily with new subsystems and services without losing the beneficial
features of existing systems.
KeyTouch 2/2011
17
Full-circle security
based a host of different inputs,
including text messages and multimedia video clips. More information is an advantage in preparing to deal with an incident, but
it’s the people in the field that
can best take advantage of this
rich digital data. Anything from
photos and weather alerts to hazardous material information and
GPS co-ordinates could influence
the mission in the field.
So data must be easily shared
within an organisation, but it
should also be possible to share it
with co-operating organisations
when a multi-agency response is
called for.
When the networks and media are designed with sharing
in mind, the added demand for
network capacity must be kept in
mind. The volume of mobile traffic is expected to be 20 times higher in 2015 than it is today. Highcapacity commercial networks
are developing fast, but emergency responders must have systems
in place to deal with exceptional
situations, where general use,
high-capacity routes may well be
out of action.
18
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Picture this
Facing up to
biometrics
T
he only sure way to link an individual to the
identity on their travel documents is to include
unique, tamper-proof information about a
physiological characteristic in the documents.
That characteristic is known as a biometric.
While a variety of characteristics could be used in
theory as biometrics, the winning contender looks to be
the face, especially now that the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has specified facial recognition
as its favoured biometric technology. The ICAO says that
a state may also choose to back up facial recognition with
fingerprints, irises or both, but it’s facial recognition that
will form the basis of interoperable identification technologies right around the world.
Public acceptance is one of the reasons that the ICAO
has opted for facial biometrics. Facial photographs don’t
disclose information that the vast majority of us routinely
let other people see every day. In other words, a facial
photograph is already socially and culturally accepted internationally. Facial images are also collected and verified
routinely as part of the MRP (Machine Readable Passport)
application form process in order to produce a passport
to Doc 9303 standards, which is the key standard for
travel documents published by ICAO.
KeyTouch 2/2011
19
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Picture this
In principle there are lots of different physical
characteristics that can be used to identify individual
people, but faces are set to become the gold standard in
biometrics, as Juhani Viherlahti, Marketing Director for
identity specialist Guiart, explains.
A good-quality
photograph can be
downloaded over a
TETRA network in a
matter of seconds.
send a wide range of images, ranging from views of the crime scene to
biometrics.
Reliable digital technology
Picture this
Security is essential to safeguard all
this information as it flows between
field units and dispatchers. TETRA
networks can send images or other
biometrics of missing persons, suspects or other individuals securely
to the server. A good-quality photograph can be downloaded over the
TETRA network in a matter of seconds so that all the relevant people
can have almost instant access to
essential information.
The impact of fast data
TETRA services for biometric
acquisition
Digital technology is changing how
police, fire departments and forensic investigators use photographs
in their daily work. Images can be
transmitted in seconds and the
long-term consumable cost savings
are significant when they use digital
technology.
Standardisation is critical to
achieve interoperability between different agencies, and ISO standards
form a solid platform on which to
build technologies to support law
enforcement and border control systems. For example all digital cameras produce JPEG standard format
digital images. Similarly, the standard
fingerprint format called WSQ is used
to save ePassport fingerprint images
on the passport microchip. Most
20
www.keytouch.info
identity documentation
follows the same standards as travel documents.
Quality delivers speedy
recognition
High quality facial photographs are essential if automatic border controls are to
operate quickly and smoothly.
It’s therefore important to take
high quality, standard format
facial images in order to prevent
the database from becoming polluted with difficult-to-read images.
In addition to overall facial images and fingerprints, other characteristics such as scars, marks
and tattoos are also important for
identification in law enforcement.
TETRA networks make it easy to
TETRA Release 2 introduced the
TETRA Enhanced Data Service
(TEDS) to support data intensive
applications. TEDS speeds up biometric data transfer to two or three
seconds per image. It takes less
than 10 seconds to send a standard
package of a facial image and two
fingerprints using TEDS. In contrast, a colour image transmitted
over a legacy TETRA network
can take between 10 and 20
seconds, depending on the
available bitrate. It then takes
the same time again to send
the fingerprint information.
In a fast-moving situation, TEDS can make all the
difference.
New
Zealand
quake
– quick response from Cassidian
KeyTouch 2/2011
21
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News
B
oth landline and cellular communications
networks were disrupted by a devastating
earthquake that hit New Zealand on February 22, 2011. This left emergency rescuers
relying heavily on the Cassidian CORP25 Land Mobile Radio (LMR) public safety radio system – which
remained 100% operational throughout the quake
and its many aftershocks -- to co-ordinate their response.
The powerful 6.3-magnitude earthquake struck
near Christchurch, which is the country’s second
largest city with a population of 386,000. It brought
down buildings, power lines and most forms of
communication.
Within hours of the quake,
emergency rescue and relief workers from all over the country came
flooding into the Christchurch
area, which increased traffic on
the CORP25 network beyond its
licensed capacity. This prompted
Tait Radio Communications – the
prime integrator when the system
was originally deployed – to ask
Cassidian to increase the capacity
of the system. Within three hours Cassidian was able
to increase the Subscriber User licenses from 1700 to
2200. Two days later an additional request for 500 licenses came in, which Cassidian processed in under
20 minutes. A third call came 12 hours later for five
additional channels, which again, Cassidian delivered in record time.
“We feel honored to have played a part in helping Tait and the New Zealand Police respond to the
crisis in Christchurch. It is very rewarding to know
that our forces were able to come together with the
singular goal of helping those in need, and that the
software-based nature of our P25 solution enabled
us to react as swiftly as we did to the requests for
more capacity,” says Chuck Sackley, General Manager, Cassidian Communications, Land Mobile Radio.
The CORP25 network was installed in 2008 for
the New Zealand Police, a national agency that
handles more than 600,000 emergency calls a year.
It currently covers three major regions in New Zealand – Wellington, Auckland and Canterbury, where
Christchurch is located.
Customer wire
ASTRID
helps
Belgian bus
services run
smoothly
22
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Transport controllers in the Belgian towns
of Liège and Verviers can communicate
seamlessly as transport operat or TEC
becomes the latest organisation to join
ASTRID, which is one of the world’s most
extensive public safety radio networks.
T
he adoption of ASTRID communications means that
communication between buses and controllers as
they shuttle between the two towns is now seamless,
so changing drivers, controlling schedules and following up in the event of a breakdown are all much easier.
Each day, several hundreds of TEC buses pass through
the Place Saint-Lambert in the centre of Liège, and Yves
Corin is responsible for coordinating the operation from his
control cabin in collaboration with the TEC control centre: “I
must remain constantly in contact with the dispatchers and
over the old communication system, we could not always
understand what the other part was saying. Now that we
use ASTRID, life is so much simpler.”
While Mr. Corin works from the control cabin on Place
Saint-Lambert, Jean-Luc Huppen is one of a team of controllers who drive between 100 and 200km per day around
the transportation network to monitor the different routes.
“We must take care that the transportation network func-
Wide coverage
The Liège-Verviers TEC controllers
have been using 40 ASTRID radios
almost 24 hours a day since summer 2010. Dispatchers also have
a few. As well as improving the
quality of communications, ASTRID has also boosted coverage to
reach across the transport network
as far as the Dutch and German
borders. The old analogue network only allowed the controllers
to communicate in the downtown
area of Liège. And it’s not just the
controllers who are benefiting
from ASTRID. Reliable communications throughout the bus routes
is improving the safety of drivers.
Ready for anything
For the moment, the Liège-Verviers
team only uses ASTRID for voice
communications, but TEC is considering the use of GPS positioning and short data messaging.
Other planned improvements
include coordinating TEC operations with the police forces and
fire and rescue services during
major events such as the City Parade or the Outremeuse Festival.
The 2012 Tour de France will begin in Liège.
“ASTRID will allow us to
communicate easily with all authorities,” says Michel Schoonbroodt, operational director of
TEC Liège-Verviers. “In these
kinds of events, it is essential to
coordinate the knowledge from
transportation personnel with the
police forces. We also wish to reinforce our collaboration to deal
with disasters, even if we’re only
a minor player in these situations. ” For example, TEC helped
to evacuate residents and bussed
in fire fighters when there was a
major gas explosion in the centre
of Liège in January 2010.
Vital statistics for TEC in Liège -Verviers:
11 bus depots
214 lines measuring 4,181
kilometres
129,520,443 passengers per
annum
Nearly 4,855 stops
633 buses cover
40,518,292 km per year
1,825 employees
40 portable radios
Three talk groups for every­
day use and one for incidents
KeyTouch 2/2011
23
Customer wire
tions throughout, from Liège
and Verviers to Maastricht in the
Netherlands and Aachen in Germany. For example, I deal with
cars parked at bus stops and plan
alternative routes if there has been
an accident or a demonstration. In
the event of a storm, ice or snow,
we drive all the routes to make
sure that they are passable.”
ASTRID is also helping Mr.
Huppen: “We must be in constant
contact with the dispatchers. Before, we often did not understand
what they said and it was very
irritating. We had to use mobile
phones instead, but it was expensive. Today, everything is perfect.
We hear and understand each
other and we are more effective.
There’s also a talk group that allows us controllers to communicate between ourselves.”
XXXXXXXXXXXXX
Customer wire
EDR network
has Hungary
covered
One of the leading established TETRA networks in Europe,
Hungary’s EDR continues to be a focus for innovation. Visitors
to TETRA World Congress can see how the network is being
developed to handle data communications
24
www.keytouch.info
out that saw Pro-M achieve national coverage by the end of the
year, a month ahead of schedule.
Today around 270 base stations
continue to provide coverage for
some 42,000 terminals across the
country. Cassidian has supplied
the exchanges, base stations and
a large number of terminals. The
scale of the operation makes EDR
one of the leading TETRA radio
systems in Europe.
EDR has already improved
the Hungarian authorities’ ability to deal with unexpected situations, according to Miklós Takács,
senior TETRA advisor at Pro-M:
“EDR significantly improves the
internal communications within
user organisations and enables
efficient communication between
these bodies. Very high availability greatly contributes to our enhanced response capability and
improved efficiency of cooperation.”
Miklós Takács,
senior TETRA
advisor at
Pro-M
He adds that data security is
another major advantage: “EDR
ensures automatic protection of
information carried over the radio
system. Not only the quality but
also the security of communication
can reach a much higher standard
thanks to air interface encryption
and end-to-end encryption.”
Coverage is the third big win
delivered by EDR, with the nationwide network even covering
hard-to-reach areas such as metro
tunnels. Air-ground-air (AGA)
cells of the network provide sufficient coverage also for air-toground communications.
Serving the Hungarian EU presidency
M
anaging the six-month Hungarian EU presidency is a
major challenge for the EDR network,
which must support the accompanying security operations as delegates
descend on the country for their political and diplomatic meetings.
The planned presidential programme includes a summit, a meeting of foreign ministers and a meeting between the government and the
EU, as well as 17 informal ministerial meetings and 217 sub-ministerial
meetings. The majority of the events
will take place outside Budapest to
avoid transport congestion, and ProM’s professionals have been busy
installing the necessary communications at the key venues, such as the
Royal Castle at Gödöllő, the Museum
of Ethnography and the Anna Grand
Hotel in Balatonfüred.
Improved coverage and capacity
in and around Grassalkovich Castle
in Gödöllő to help communication
between the National Police Headquarters, the Republican Guard
Regiment, the Anti-Terror Centre, the
ambulance and the Disaster Relief
Service. Communications have also
been reinforced along the M31 trunk
road to Gödöllő.
Organisers
expect
between
35,000 and 40,000 foreign visitors
during the six-month presidency.
Many of them will be flying in via Ferihegy Airport. EDR network operator
Pro-M, is therefore supporting the
airport with communications at the
Crisis Management Centre and a vehicle tracking system for the airport
ambulance service The company has
also provided indoor coverage for devices inside the new terminal building
at Budapest Airport.
KeyTouch 2/2011
25
Customer wire
A
s the operator of one
of the world’s more
advanced
public
safety TETRA networks, Hungary’s EDR, Pro-M is
constantly looking to advance the
network’s capabilities. At TETRA
World Congress 2011, Pro-M cooperates in a demonstration of
TETRA Enhanced Data Service
(TEDS), the professional mobile
radio (PMR) standard for wideband data. TEDS enables information-intensive data, such as
images and video, to be transmitted routinely to and from the field.
The operator is also exploring the
possibilities to further develop
TETRA towards broadband.
EDR is used by the police, customs, fire brigades, disaster prevention, ambulance services and
other organisations. The network
first began operations back in
April 2006 in the Budapest area.
This was followed by a rapid roll-
VIRVE
Full-circle security
communications
saves lives
The idea that better
communications
saves lives is much
more than a theory for
medical teams at the
North Karelia Central
Hospital in Finland. It’s
something they know
about personally since
they embraced the use
of digital radios on the
VIRVE network. “At least
two lives have been saved
thanks to this,” says
Jari Hirvonen from the
department of emergency
medicine. “I know
because I was there.”
26
www.keytouch.info
T
oday there are around
580 VIRVE users at the
North Karelia facility, with
48 radios in constant use.
It wasn’t always like that, however.
Back in 2008 almost no one at the
hospital knew how to use digital
communications. The organisation
had 30 radios, but 29 of them were
in storage while the other was rotated
between the 10 people who knew a
little about how to use it. The hospital
realised that people wouldn’t be able
to use the radios in a crisis if they
didn’t use them regularly in their dayto-day operations, so a decision was
taken to get people trained up and
making the most of the advantages
on offer with the VIRVE technology.
The hospital purchased a TETRAsim classroom simulator system
which, in the hands of two employees acting as trainers, has proven its
power in ensuring the competence
of users.
From a modest beginning the
scheme soon snowballed, as personnel increasingly recognised how the
radios could help them in their daily
operations. Today, training in the use
of the radios is part of the standard induction process for medics and many
other new staff at the hospital.
A range of features are now used
routinely, including group calls, emer-
gency calls, SDS and status messages, individual calls and IP packet
data. Some users are also trained in
using the radios in DMO mode. The
TETRAbook “phonebook” feature
guarantees that numbers are always
up to date.
Several applications have proved
especially helpful, such as the Merlot location app, which shows where
mobile emergency response units
are in real time and enables medics
to estimate more accurately when
patients will be arriving.
Life saving at times of trauma
Setting up a trauma alert group has
also helped the most critical patients
by removing significant delays in assembling the teams needed to care
for them. At least one patient each
week generates a trauma alert. The
talk group includes emergency medical care workers, surgeons, anaesthetists, operating theatre, X-ray and
laboratory staff.
Some 15 people are assigned to
the trauma alert group at night and
19 in the day. Before the advent of
VIRVE, it would have taken between
15 and 19 minutes to call everyone
individually using a cell phone. Now
everyone is alerted at once. “This is
a huge saving of time,” says Mr Hirvonen. “26% of patients arriving at
this hospital require attention within
30 minutes, so it can mean the difference between life and death.”
Faster communication also makes
routine procedures run more efficiently at the hospital. For example,
lab technicians used to be called to
take a specimen using a cellphone.
Now that the call goes out instantly
using VIRVE, hospital managers estimate this alone saves around 500
working hours per year.
Other benefits include improved
personal safety, since staff can reach
colleagues at the touch of a button.
Information security and confidentiality is also improved, since VIRVE is
only used by the Finnish authorities.
This means that misdialling a number will not result in information being sent anywhere else, which was
always a possibility with the public
cellular network.
Future potential for the system
All these benefits far outweigh the
fact that the VIRVE radios are a little
bulkier than mobile phones. The only
other drawback mentioned by users
is the lack of a wireless, hands-free
option, which can be a challenge
where medics are trying to keep their
hands sterile.
The hospital has a “wish list” of
possible features that could be in-
Full-circle security
Jari Hirvonen from the
North Karelia Central Hospital,
department of emergency
medicine
cluded in the system in future. “We’d
like to be able to get real-time vitals such as EKG readings from the
field,” says Mr Hirvonen. “We’d also
like to be able to send pictures from
the scene of an incident. This will
help people understand the situation
as they approach the scene, and
help doctors back at the hospital
understand the possible injuries and
prepare to treat patients effectively
when they arrive.”
The North Karelia Central Hospital covers a local population of
around 173,000. The 580 VIRVE
users include personnel from across
the organisation, such as doctors,
theatre staff, laboratory technicians,
emergency medics, x-ray technicians and other, technical personnel.
The department of emergency medicine no longer uses GSM at all.
KeyTouch 2/2011
27
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Solutions
An eye in the sky
Remote controlled flying gadgets may be more familiar to most
people as the robotic toys on every kid’s Christmas list, but
Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) have enormous potential to
provide an “eye in the sky” for public safety authorities looking to
see the big picture.
What is a UAS?
UASs range from small, lightweight micro- and mini-UASs
up to high-altitude, long-endurance (HALE) aircraft. Most
micro- and mini-UASs are launched by hand or using a
small catapult rather like a rubber band. More specialised
vertical-take-off-and-landing UASs do not require any
special launch apparatus since they can hover.
UASs are fully autonomous: they follow a flightplan defined before or during flight by the operator. Some aerial
vehicles require constant piloting from the ground. These
are not true UASs and they cannot be operated without
clear visual contact.
28
www.keytouch.info
How can UASs promote
public safety?
A bird’s eye view provides field commanders with
complete situational awareness, and unmanned systems
provide this “eye in the sky” at lower cost than manned
planes and helicopters.
UASs can be used where it’s too risky or inhospitable
for humans to operate, such as hostile or contaminated
areas. They can also be small and light enough to reach
spaces that manned aircraft could not physically enter.
The biggest barrier of taking full advantage of UASs is
unfinished regulation. In many cases a closed air space is
still needed to operate advanced UASs in civil areas.
•
•
•
•
•
• Real-time images and
video from the air
• Observe and help control
crowds at large events
Use covertly to monitor suspects in siege and hostage situations
Search for a missing person
Support technical crime scene investigation with
pictures of the scene
Surveillance of highway traffic
Create up-to-date maps of specific geographical areas
UASs and fire
and rescue
services
• Get the big picture in an emergency situation
• Search for "hot spots" on the
roof to track the spread of a fire
• Deploy airborne sensors to measure chemical traces
• Monitor the spread of oil spills in coastal areas
• Monitor massive deforestation and river or sea pollutions
KeyTouch 2/2011
29
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Solutions
UASs and
the police
Global
XXXXXXXXXXXXX
security
Command centre puts
Everyone
and everything
in the picture
Cooperation is vital for
emergency organisations.
With a new command and
control system currently
under development,
Cassidian aims to bring
controller and field
personnel together in
a single ‘virtual control
centre.’ With a complete
overview of incident
status literally at their
fingertips, personnel can
interact and react more
easily, more efficiently
and more quickly than
ever before.
30
www.keytouch.info
V
oice
communications
have been the operational backbone of police
and emergency forces
for many years. Although vital and
effective, voice based radio is now
being augmented by a new breed of
multimedia terminals, which would
allow command centre staff and field
personnel to exchange a wealth of
visual data. Next-generation systems
will encourage greater co-operation
between public safety organisations,
thanks largely to the rise of IP-based
networks.
With the need to make more
cost-effective use of human resources also driving the technology,
there is a growing demand for a system that can combine number plate
recognition, video and still photography, text reports, location data
and fast access to databases into
one overarching system that keeps
everyone informed as a security or
emergency situation develops.
Just such a system is now being
developed by Cassidian. Known as
a Virtual Command & Control Centre
for Crisis Management, or VC4M, it
allows a virtual dialogue between all
decision makers during a crisis situation, allowing them to take action
as events occur.
Currently in the prototype stage,
VC4M presents users with a 2D
map on a touch sensitive screen,
showing the location of people,
equipment and incidents, amending
and updating the situation as events
unfold. Interactive icons represent all
resources, from critical places such
as railway stations, schools, and
public buildings, to patrol vehicles
and CCTV cameras.
The sheer simplicity with which
information is presented visually
and can be managed with a simple
In our continuing series of a
­ rticles,
Key Touch® describes the major
­homeland security concepts, based
on Cassidian’s unique experience in the
Global Security business. Cassidian can
manage the conception, realisation and
delivery of turnkey solutions for border
security, large event management,
emergency response, critical site
and infrastructure security.
touch, will transform the way that incidents are handled.
Alarms become intelligent
Documents, videos and pictures from
people at the scene can be shared
easily, while the system also controls
voice communications and messaging with field teams. As well as communicating with ‘in-house’ staff, the
system can also receive alarms from
private organisations such as banks
and shops as well as integrate images from a CCTV network.
The system allows the command
and control centre to receive an ‘intelligent alarm’ with a video sample
showing the event. Command centre staff can then assign the nearest
or most relevant unit to investigate
the incident. The same user friendly
interface gives them complete PMR
capabilities allowing them to set up
conferences with field units, speak
to individuals or exchange text messages. Using an appropriate broadband network, they can access
video clips and send samples to patrols in the field, who can also send
video of events as they happen.
Powerful facilities in the field
Patrol vehicles are equipped with a
camera placed on the dashboard,
filming everything that the patrol
members can see in front of their
vehicle. The patrol members access
the system using a touchpad on the
passenger side of the vehicle. Based
on a 3D map, the touchpad provides
the patrol with a wide range of information, including topographical data
that allows them to see such things
as height of buildings and the best
place to intercept suspects.
Using a touchpad with interactive
icons, the patrol has easy access to
a variety of different resources. The
touchpad also allows the user to fill
in documents that can be enriched
with pictures taken from the camera
and sent to the command and control centre in the form of an alarm or
report. By equipping the touchpad
with functionalities such as RFID
reading or finger print scanning, users can assess passports and identities. The camera can also have
automatic recognition systems such
as licence plate reading.
As it develops, the VC4M system
will respond to the changing needs
of safety and security forces, both
technically and operationally. Providing a common operational picture
that is both up to date and based on
relevant information, VC4M will offer
decision makers and field forces
better visibility on situations, both at
a local and much wider scale.
KeyTouch 2/2011
31
global
Global
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security
Global Security
Changing
chairs
News
B
runo Chapuis from
the French Gendarmerie has taken the
helm of the T
­ ETRAPOL
Users’ Group, which meets
during Cassidian’s Secure
Network operators’ and Users’ Conferences (SNUCs).
Mr Chapuis took over
from Miloš Andrle in
February 2011 in the SNUC
in Seville, which hosted
around 440 delegates. The
­TETRAPOL Users’ Group
typically meet in a closed
session at SNUCs so they can
discuss the features and functions of their networks and
radios in detail.
French fire fighters are the first
to benefit from Cassidian’s latest
innovations in automatic vehicle
location. New capabilities make
operations simpler for field officers
and dispatchers…and save costs
for the brigade
Finding
French fire
fighters in
the field
T
Passing the baton: Bruno (right)
will build on Miloš’ (left) success in
helping TETRAPOL users learn from
each other
32
www.keytouch.info
he automatic vehicle
location (AVL) application for TETRAPOL
is becoming more
flexible. Advanced new capabilities are already enabling French
fire brigades to pull off the frequently difficult task of saving
costs and improving operations
at the same time.
The
latest
release
of
Cassidian’s AVL application for
TETRAPOL helps user organisations to customize the system
to make use of the positioning
equipment that suits them best
– in terms of both cost and operation. There are three major
developments that enable the
improvements.
A trio of advances
First, most of the AVL systems from
Cassidian deployed today use a
GPS control box connected to the
TETRAPOL radio. This box forwards
the location of the vehicle to the AVL
server. The new approach enables
the fire brigades to use the GPS systems that come pre-installed in the
fire fighting vehicles, or another commercial GPS receiver, rather than the
specialist GPS control unit for AVL.
Second, the fire brigades can use
AVL with handheld radios for the first
time, thanks to software that allows
users to connect the radios to commercial GPS receivers, either by wire
– thanks to a micro-loudspeaker with
embedded GPS receiver – or using
Bluetooth. This will enable dispatch-
Solutions
ers to keep track of radio users when
they leave their vehicles, which will
improve safety.
Third, a new web-based AVL display solution eliminates the need for
specialized AVL display units in the
control room. All that’s needed is a
web browser. This approach makes it
much easier to integrate the AVL display with the existing Computer Aided
Dispatching (CAD) system. This would
previously have required a separate
interface with the AVL server, entailing
greater complexity and higher costs.
Taken together, these developments mean that the fire services
can customise the AVL solution using its own components to raise the
efficiency of its operations and lower
its investments.
Keeping track of location
The most obvious benefit of AVL
is that dispatchers can keep track
of the position of their field officers.
Each brigade is currently located
within its geographical administrative
area solution, or department, but the
system enables AVL servers to communicate, so a national CAD could
be instigated if needed.
Keeping track of status
French fire fighters commonly use
status messages to keep the control
centre up to date. The AVL solution
makes this much simpler by enabling
officers to transmit that they’re “on the
road”, “on site” or even “on the way
to the hospital” with a single press of
a button. Up to ten common status
messages can be used in this way,
eliminating the need for an officer to
scroll through a menu, which can be
difficult in emergency situations.
Dispatchers can see at a glance if
a vehicle in the field can take on a new
mission. This can be a huge time saver
for dispatchers, who can use deploy
vehicles that are already close to a
new incident. They can then use the
“mission order” feature to send all the
necessary information out to the team
so they can carry out the new mission
safely without coming back to base.
Feedback on the new location
capabilities from the French fire fighters has been highly positive so far.
Watch out for further developments
from Cassidian as the evolution of
AVL continues.
KeyTouch 2/2011
33
Solutions
IDRs
give instant
extra
coverage
An Independent
Digital Repeater (IDR)
is an easy and cost
efficient way to provide
tactical, standalone
radio coverage almost
instantly. Now a new
generation of IDRs
enables TETRAPOL
users to connect several
IDRs together to provide
wider coverage. It
also provides data
capabilities and
provides field officers
with a vital link to the
control centre.
I
DRs can be deployed by
one person in under a minute without any site preparation. They’re housed in a
compact case complete with all the
accessories needed for a rapid deployment. The existing 2G IDRs are
entirely standalone and only offer
voice communications over a single
channel. The new 3G versions from
Cassidian allow several IDRs to connect together for wider coverage.
34
www.keytouch.info
Create coverage
All kinds of organisations already
benefit from IDRs, which are a much
more cost-effective way of providing tactical coverage than deploying
conventional base stations.
For example, around 200 IDRs
are in use in the Brazilian Proamatec
authority network. This makes it possible for officers to deploy coverage
as needed in a vast country where it
would be too expensive to roll-out a
permanent network. Officers therefore deploy IDRs whenever they need
to establish secure group communication beyond the reach of the main
regional TETRAPOL networks.
In another good example, three
IDRs were deployed in Haiti to provide emergency communications for
rescue workers in the wake of 2010’s
devastating earthquake.
The latest announcement from
Cassidian overcomes some of the
limitations of these existing IDR solutions. First, users can now interconnect several of the new, 3G IDRs via
an IP link, making it possible to provide wider, multi-cell coverage.
Second, it enables the interconnected IDRs to exchange tactical
data with each other, making it possible to visualise the positions of the
radios within the coverage area and
allowing users to swap SMS messages.
The third innovation enables IDRs
to incorporate Radio Access Gate
software and communicate with the
dispatcher. Previous generations of
IDR only enabled field radio users to
talk to each other. This lifeline to the
control centre combines with the arrival of data to enable dispatchers to
monitor the position and operational
status of field personnel who are using radios covered by a 3G IDR. The
control centre can use the information to keep track of how an incident
is evolving.
Build resilience
Security forces and other agencies
operating in critical situations need
to be able to rely absolutely on their
communications network, and the
3G IDRs provide an extra fall-back
facility.
The first level of fall-back occurs
if a base station loses touch with the
main network but is still functioning
as a standalone unit. Dispatchers
can access the communications
within the standalone cell using direct radio access. If the base station
itself is out of order, a 3G IDR can be
deployed rapidly to provide a second
fall-back solution.
Indoors and out
IDR solutions for outdoor deployments are already widely used (in
Brazil and Haiti, for instance), but the
other new development announced
by Cassidian is a solution for indoor
applications. This provides tactical
coverage for teams called to work
in locations such as tunnels or carparks, for instance or may be used
to provide a low-cost, permanent
extension to the normal network
coverage.
Officers can switch between the
main TETRAPOL network and the
IDR cell simply by switching channels on their radios.
These developments are the
latest improvements in IDRs from
Cassidian, but they will not be the
last. The company is already working on developing greater continuity
of radio communication between
regional TETRAPOL networks and
the tactical coverage provided by the
IDRs.
Interconnection of field IDR cell with the IDR cell
of the crisis cell at the control room
Features:
• Geolocation
• SMS
• Satellite link
Geolocation
and voice on
each link
Operating room
AVL server through a terminal
KeyTouch 2/2011
35
Solutions
They also provide data capabilities,
opening up the possibility of using
applications such as GPS positioning in IDR mode.
Sensational radios
One radio, two users,
many uses
It often happens that two people want to use the radio at the
same time in an ambulance or fire-engine. For example, the codriver might talk with the control room or operations leader
while the paramedic may need to call the hospital for details
about the patient's treatment.
Instead of the cost of separate TETRA radios for each user,
there is another way: one TMR880i mobile radio with two CUR3 control units, connected by Split-box.
Developed by Cassidian partner TC Connect of Sweden,
Split-box is a small device with two connections for the control units and one connection for the radio. Needing no external power or additional devices, Split-box allows one CUR-3
mounted on the dashboard, for example, and another in the rear
of the vehicle. A user who needs to use the radio simply presses
the PTT and becomes the active user and can talk.
An example of customers having found this solution useful
and efficient for their operation is the regional fire service in
Burgenland, Austria. By using Split-boxes they can make more
out of their TMR880i radios installed in the fire engines.
36
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P
ublic safety digital radio
networks are renowned
for providing secure, highavailability mobile communications for personnel in the
field, who rely on them in emergency
situations when commercial communication networks could be overwhelmed. What’s less well-known
is that these professional radio networks often provide the most secure
and cost-effective way to deliver
information from fixed points, such
as flood, radiation or fire protection
systems, which also need to get
their messages through in any circumstance.
National networks based on
TETRA and TETRAPOL digital radio
typically serve multiple public safety
agencies that already demand mission-critical performance. Alarms and
other fixed systems can therefore enjoy the same mission-critical benefits
without having to build in extra backup systems. Linking all the fixed data
points into an established national
network also makes integration easier because the same interface design
can be used to integrate each fixed
point into the network, rather than
having to carry out multiple integra-
– radio transport for fixed monitoring
tion projects to integrate with multiple
carriers. Using an existing shared
network is also an extremely cost effective transport solution compared
with building and operating an independent network.
The Finnish authorities have long
embraced this way of using the
VIRVE network. The national network
is already used by the Radiation and
Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) to
collect data from its nationwide network of dose rate monitoring stations. VIRVE also acts as a secure
transmission path for civil protection
sirens, fire station alarms, burglar
and fire alarms on government buildings and hospital alarms.
Other countries have now spotted the potential of using their radio
networks in this way. In Hungary,
for instance, the proposed system
will monitor radiation, while the UAE
wants to use its radio network to
transmit public warnings via sirens,
screens and road signs. Fixed burglar
alarms in shops is another proposal
for UAE, as is providing communication between ambulances and fixed
management systems in hospitals.
In fact, many countries could follow the VIRVE example and replace
their current system of transmitting radiation readings via landline and GPRS to a more reliable
TETRA-based carrier. The same
approach could be used for road
administration, flood monitoring
and alarms, fire stations and civil
protection stations.
STUK is the responsible authority for monitoring radiation
in Finland. It has several different ways of monitoring radiation
in the environment but only the
dose rate monitoring network
reports in real-time. Dose rate
monitoring results are needed so
that timely action is taken to protect people in an affected area.
This requires reliable communication in all situations.
Tracking
radiation levels
F
inland’s Radiation and Nuclear
Safety Authority (STUK) is the
country’s largest user of packet
data on the VIRVE network. Its dose
rate monitoring network uses VIRVE
to transport monitoring results from an
extensive network of fixed monitoring
points around the country. Every ten
minutes, the monitors check radiation
levels and trigger an alarm if the level
in any seven-day period exceeds a
pre-set threshold. To increase redundancy, monitoring results are sent to
three independent systems.
The main transport mechanism is
TETRA IP packet data, with SDS as a
backup. Combining the two systems
brings availability up to nearly 100%.
Each terminal on the monitoring
network has a unique IP address.
Using TCP/IP makes it easy to add
or remove terminals as needed.
The fixed terminals upload readings to the VIRVE network every 10
minutes. Furthermore, because the
communication is two-way, STUK
can apply software updates and other control measures remotely.
KeyTouch 2/2011
37
Solutions
Beyond mobility
SENSATIONAL
XXXXXXXXXXXXX
RADIOS
Did you know …
how to make text
messages longer?
Do you believe that text messages over TETRA can
include only 120 characters, which is the length of
this blue sentence? This is old history. With Cassidian
terminals you can combine messages to allow longer texts of up to 399 characters (the length of this
blue and green text together), which are quicker and
easier to send and receive than separate short messages. And the radios do all the work!
That’s because the sending radio automatically
divides a long message into two or three parts
and sends them individually. The receiving radio puts the parts back together and shows
them all as one message. The whole process
is seamless for the user.
The joining together of messages applies to
normal text messages. In languages using
Arabic, Chinese, Korean or Cyrillic script,
the complete message can include
198 characters.
38
www.keytouch.info
Meeting
competing
demands
for voice
and data
capacity
W
hat separates Joe the police officer from regular, offduty Joe? Probably a lot of
things, but communication
is certainly one of them. Joe may spend lots
of time on-line while off-duty, but a malfunction
in his domestic broadband connection isn’t lifethreatening. At work it’s critical.
Professionals must be able to trust the availability and security of information if they’re going
to rely on it in the field. That’s why so many public authorities have invested in building TETRA
and TETRAPOL networks for voice. But today’s
professionals increasingly expect to be able to
access data on the move, just like they do over
commercial networks, and mission-critical networks are evolving to meet that need.
Joe the police field commander, for instance, wants his field commanding solution to
show the current position and status of each
unit accurately, without impeding his ability to
contact his officers using voice. The same applies to critical information for Hans the fire chief
or Susan, the head of the trauma unit.
A TETRA network can easily deliver the level
of availability that Joe, Hans and Susan expect
during normal operations. But during a major
disaster, the level of network traffic can grow
exponentially and demands a smart solution to
prevent disturbance between voice and data
services.
What is the answer?
With TEDS Direct Access, TEDS data services are independent from voice services and have separate Quality
of Ser­vice (QoS). TEDS data radios receive and send
data directly on the TEDS channel, never us­ing the same
resources as the talk groups and individual calls. Like
a motorway and a high-speed railway running in parallel, the different types of traffic will not impact on each
other.
TEDS Direct Access will be part of the ETSI TETRA standard and the Cassidian Fortecor® TEDS ­implementation.
So for Joe or Hans, applications such as automatic vehicle
location keep them up-to-date with the latest situation using
a TEDS data radio such as the Xerigo™ 3, while a Cassidian
TMR880i or similar TETRA voice radio provides critical voice
contact. Similarly, an ambulance transmits vital patient information such as an ECG trace to Susan at the hospital, while
the paramedic can talk to the team via a voice call.
Conventional or Direct Access
TETRA Conventional
Access
TEDS channel
TEDS channel
TETRA 1 channel
TEDS channel
TETRA 1 channel
TEDS channel
With TETRA Conventional Access,
every TETRA
radio terminal registers on the Main Control
Channel.
According to
TETRA
1 channel
TETRA
1 channel
the service it needs, it is directed to traffic channels (TCH) for voice calls, to packet data channels (PDCH) for packet
data transfer, and to the TEDS channel for high speed data. This mechanism is called TETRA Conventional Access.
Best for: Voice+data terminals such as TEDS capable handportables.
TEDS channel
TEDS channel
TETRA Direct
Access
TETRA 1 channel
TEDS channel
TETRA 1 channel
TEDS channel
TETRA 1 channel
TETRA 1 channel
Using TEDS Direct Access, a radio will not register on the TETRA MCCH but directly on the TEDS carrier. As long
as the TEDS service is available, the radio will do cell re-selection from one TEDS carrier to another without ever
visiting the conventional TETRA side.
Best for: Devices dedicated to data, such as TEDS data radios.
KeyTouch 2/2011
39
Solutions
The TETRA
Enhanced Data
Service (TEDS) is
the TETRA feature
that can bring
data-centric field
operations to life.
Its new extension –
Direct Access – can
bring even more
benefits.
Smoothing the way for the
Smart Grid
Solutions
The Smart Grid concept for power distribution promises to deliver major cost
and environmental benefits, as well as a more robust, high quality power supply.
Realising this vision demands secure communications.
T
he first key characteristic
of the Smart Grid is intelligence. The power distribution system should sense system
overloads and reroute power automatically to prevent or minimise
outages. It should also be able to
respond autonomously to manage
supplies more quickly and efficiently than human operators.
Efficiency is next, with the
Smart Grid able to meet rising
consumer demand without added infrastructure. It should also
accommodate energy from the
entire range of potential sources
and be sufficiently flexible to integrate new technologies as they
come on line.
The Smart Grid will eliminate
sags, spikes and other disturbances in the quality of power, as well
as being more resilient to attacks
and natural disasters.
40
www.keytouch.info
Ultimately, the Smart Grid will
play its part in delivering significant environmental improvements.
Supporting the concept
Communications provide critical support for the Smart Grid.
For example, smart routing and
smart devices can even out peaks
in power consumption and enable
utility companies to reduce excess capacity and redundancy in
the generation network, but only
if they can “talk” to one another.
Reduced redundancy also has the
potential to increase the vulnerability of supplies to disruption,
and only real time informationsharing can mitigate this risk. The
gradual shift from fewer, larger
generators towards many smaller
contributors is another factor that
will drive up signalling traffic.
Dedicated TETRA networks
are more resilient to disruptions
such as natural disasters, accidents and cyber attacks than other networks. This is critical since
disruptions to power supplies
can have huge consequences,
both economically and in human
terms.
Because TETRA is wireless, it’s
also a very cost-efficient way of
deploying last-mile connections.
Initially this will be important for
smart metering and environmental sensoring and it will become
increasingly important later on as
distributed power generation demands more signalling. If a company opted to build a dedicated
LTE network on commercial frequencies, the cost of the frequency licence could be more than the
investment in a Cassidian TETRA
TEDS network and terminals.
Options for TETRA
TEDS
TEDS
TEDS
TEDS
TETRA 1TEDS
TEDS
TETRA 1
Option 1 is to build their own
voice and narrowband data TETRA network and deploy highspeed data (TEDS) in selected areas using dedicated single carrier
TEDS Direct Access base stations.
Option 2 is to build a TEDS network dedicated for data.
TEDS
TEDS
TEDS
TEDS
TEDS
TEDS
TEDS
TEDS
In this network, voice services
could be activated when required.
Single carrier TEDS Direct Access
base stations are a very cost-efficient solution for data, and selected carriers can be configured
remotely to provide voice cover.
Option 3 is to subscribe to a
shared, public safety ­TETRA
network. This provides ubiquitous voice coverage for
maintenance personnel. Spectrum efficiency and a lower
total cost of ownership are
also advantages. Network
sharing requires the ability to
prioritise critical services both
between and within organisations, while the Smart Grid
demands an ability to build
additional data-oriented capacity to bypass any bottlenecks. Cassidian supports all
these requirements.
TETRA for every phase of the Smart Grid
T
he Smart Grid is evolving in phases, beginning
with smart metering, progressing to smart
traffic management and ultimately achieving
full integration into an intelligent, distributed system.
At the same time, utility companies want to maintain
voice coverage for engineers working in the field.
Smart Grid data traffic will soon accumulate to a
point where it tests the data transmission capacity of
TETRA networks designed for voice and narrowband
data. Existing voice networks will have been designed
to provide wide coverage for relatively few users, so
they probably won't provide sufficient data capacity in
the longer term.
TB3p mini-base stations provide a solution. They’re
small enough to fit into existing equipment rooms and
equipment cabinets, and the resulting site costs are
therefore negligible. The TB3p can operate in TEDS
Direct Access mode so that a single carrier TB3p base
station can provide up to eight times the SDS capacity and up to 40 times the IP packet data speed of
standard TETRA Main Control Channel or single slot
packet data service.
Xerigo™ 3 TEDS data radios provide the data link
between the base station and the grid elements. The
number of TB3p cells can readily be increased to meet
practically any capacity requirement. Furthermore, as
the TB3p cells are not on hill-tops, the same frequency
can be used nearby without interference, providing
greater spectrum efficiency.
KeyTouch 2/2011
41
Solutions
Utility companies can deploy TETRA communications in several ways.
Solutions
Easy and safe reporting
of radiation information
over Rakel
C
assidian TETRA radios are
being used to make the reporting of radiation readings
quicker, easier and more accurate.
Developed by Cassidian ­distributor
TC Connect, the application uses
Sweden’s RAKEL network to report radiation levels to the Swedish Radiation
Safety Authority (SSM), which is responsible for regular monitoring of radiation levels throughout the country.
Should an accident occur, each
municipality in Sweden has a dose
rate meter for measuring and reporting the radiation values of a particular
location at regular intervals, or when
requested.
So far, each municipality has
reported the measurement values
manually to SSM. To make the procedure more effective, both to reduce
the time for the measurements and
Rakel beats the saboteurs
anuary saw criminal gangs target copper cable around the
Norrbotten area of Sweden,
causing thousands of Comhem cable customers to lose their TV, Internet and telephone connections. Telia
and Tele2 were also targeted, leading to problems for mobile phone
customers. Through it all, the Rakel
public safety network continued to
42
www.keytouch.info
work as usual throughout the disruption cause by the thieves.
“The Rakel network is not as fragile,” says Marko Fagerström, at MSB
who is responsible for the network
roll-out. “It has been built with both
backup power and alternative transmission routes, so it can withstand
extreme conditions.”
to minimize the risk of inaccurately
reported figures, the new solution
has the ability of sending measurements as SDS messages to a central
point at SSM.
A Java™ application allows the
user to enter the measured radiation
value directly into a message template. The message, including the
measured value and the actual time
and location, is sent to a predefined
address. The time stamp is received
automatically from the TETRA network and the location is read from
the radio's built-in GPS.
A development of the solution is
already underway. This connects the
dose rate meter directly to a TETRA
radio, allowing the measurement
value to be transferred automatically
from the instrument. TC Connect has
built a portable water and shockproof housing for the equipment
which can be placed at a measurement location. The application can
be set to send the value at regular
intervals for a predefined period. This
solution is very valuable since it can
work autonomously and can therefore be placed unattended in a radiation area and report the measured
values continuously.
Rakel safeguards
Sweden’s power distribution
feel that commercial cellular services are reliable
enough for such critical applications.
Because Rakel is used by multiple user organisations, it also gives Fortum more flexibility
when working with external partners, and all
the company’s field operatives are now Rakel
users. “The next nut to crack is to adopt Rakel in
the operations centre in Karlstad,” says Mr Olsson. The centre typically takes around 500 calls
per day. The communication system therefore
needs to be able to handle recorded messages,
call queuing and call sourcing.
KeyTouch 2/2011
Customer
XXXXXXXXXX
wire
“W
ithout electricity, we lose the
ability to handle a crisis,” says
Thord Eriksson, director of preparedness and security at Svenska Kraftnät.
Svenska Kraftnät is the national agency responsible for promoting the use of the Rakel
public safety communications network in the
electricity and energy sector, and Mr Eriksson is
clear about the potential advantages: “The availability of communications is key – both in everyday activities when the electricity network needs
maintenance or repairs, and in a crisis situation
when the continued distribution of electricity
will allow society to handle the situation and
minimise the consequences.”
Fortum was the first commercial body to use
Rakel. The company distributes electricity to 1.3
million customers and has used Rakel in its field
operations in Hälsingland since 2007. Fortum
has grown to its current position by acquiring
several different operators, each of which used
to have a different radio communication system.
Rakel has changed all that. “It is a great benefit
to be able to simultaneously deliver a real-time
picture of the situation in the electricity network
and reach 20 control rooms in the chain of distribution at once,” says Jan-Olof Olsson, Rakel
project manager for Fortum.
He adds that one of the biggest benefits of
switching to Rakel so far has been improved
personnel safety: “We need to know where everyone is, how their work is progressing and that
they make their way back safely. Rakel increases
the safety of those who work under difficult circumstances, perhaps alone or in the middle of
the night.” He adds that the company doesn’t
43
XXXXXXXXXXXXX
News
Thailand’s Metropolitan
Electricity Authority switches
to digital with TETRA
T
hailand’s ­Metropolitan Elec­
-tricity Authority (MEA) is
replacing its analogue communication system with a digital
TETRA network. A contract has
been awarded to Digital Research
and Consulting (DRC) who will
undertake the implementation using a platform from Cassidian.
The new, turnkey TETRA
network will provide voice and
data communications for MEA,
including applications for automatic vehicle location, voice recording and picture transmission.
It will interface efficiently with
MEA’s PABX telephone system
and IT network.
Cassidian is supplying, testing
and commissioning one switch,
17 base stations, 13 dispatcher
workstations, 500 handheld radios and 1,250 mobile terminals
as part of the deal. Deliveries are
44
www.keytouch.info
expected to begin later this year
and the project is scheduled for
completion around 18 months after the deal was signed in April.
The network will initially
serve some 1,800 users and will
be able to support at least 5,000
when needed. It will cover the entire area served by MEA, including the Bangkok, Nonthaburi and
Samut Prakarn provinces. MEA
serves over three million customers of all sizes, from residential
consumers to businesses, local
government and NGOs.
The deal marks Cassidian’s
first major network project in
Thailand, but the contract reflects
the company’s position as a leading communications supplier in
the global power supply market.
“This is a very important project for Cassidian, since it is the
first Cassidian TETRA system to
be deployed in Bangkok,” says
Galvin Wong, CEO APAC. “We
are keen to explore more business
opportunities in Thailand and
APAC.”
As a contractor for MEA, DRC
has a proven track record of administering multiple implementations effectively and within
budget constraints and time
schedules.
“Through more than ten years
of experience in telecom projects,
we plan to complete the MEA
project earlier than scheduled,”
says Charn Kulthavarakorn,
DRC Managing Director. “With
Cassidian’s cooperation we are
committing to an 18-month aggressive project timeframe.”
3,600km²
TETRA
network
A
ndhra Pradesh’s chief minister has inaugurated the Cyberabad Police TETRA network.
The 3,600 square kilometre network was
delivered by Cassidian and its Indian value-added reseller, Sanchar Telesystems.
The network comprises nine base stations and
can initially accommodate about 500 users. It provides voice and data/image transmission, including
an Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) system.
“The Cyberabad Police are among the first police
organisations in India to use a secure TETRA communication network of this size and functionality,”
said police commissioner S. Prabhakar Reddy. “This
new communication system will enable the Cyberabad Police to better coordinate their resources in the
event of any emergency or developing law and order
situation within the Cyberabad Commissionerate region surrounding Hyderabad.”
Inauguration
of Parliament network
in New Delhi
T
he Indian Parliament‘s secure TETRA communication network is now fully operational.
This is the first public safety network in India that
combines encrypted TETRA voice, data, automatic
vehicle location (AVL), image transfer, database access and voice/data recording. It’s also software-upgradable to the high-speed data capability (TETRA
Enhanced Data Service, TEDS) in the future.
The system was supplied by Cassidian’s local
value-added reseller Sanchar Telesystems Limited
and inaugurated on 19 November 2010 by the Honorable speaker of the house Smt. Meira Kumar.
First order from
Metro in India
T
he Delhi Metro Rail Corporation has ordered
nearly 1,400 THR880i TETRA terminals through
Cassidian’s local value-added reseller, Sanchar
Telesystems Limited.
The Delhi Metro network currently includes five lines,
running 110 kilometers in total. A planned expansion is
set to more than double the total length in service next
few years.
KeyTouch 2/2011
45
XXXXXXXXXX
News
Cyberabad
police launches
What you liked best in
Key Touch 1/2011
XXXXXXXXXXXXX
Feedback
O
nce again we asked our readers to pick their
favourite article. "TETRA radios beat the big
chill" rocked the polls and was clearly the article that
provoked the most interest. One reason must have
been the fact that professionals living in the northern
hemisphere witnessed some really chilling weather
conditions over the winter.
First runner-up was "TETRA at skiing world
championships", which discussed how TETRA technology helped to co-ordinate events at the Nordic
World Ski Championships in Norway this February. The second runner-up article was called "Did
you know…about flash messages?". Flash messages
have certainly proved useful for many professionals
working in the field.
UP
Co-operation
Simpler and smaller
Cloud computing
Goulash
Using common sense
DOWN
Organisational silos
Ego-centricity
Multi-slot packet data
Quasi-efficiency
Asparagus
46
www.keytouch.info
Feedback
wins
prizes
Tell us what you think about
our latest issue by voting for
the best article in this edition.
Go to www.keytouch.info
and share your views by
voting in the poll.
You can win a prize too!
Meet the TB3p The world’s
smartest, smallest TETRA base station
Introducing the TB3p TETRA mini base station. Self-contained, extremely
small and easily transportable. Designed for the environment,
engineered without compromise.
Smallest carbon footprint.
The TB3p’s power consumption is about 40 W, which is
less than 10% than that of
a conventional macro base
station.
Remote management.
There’s no need to visit the
TB3p in person. It can be
operated and maintained over
a remote connection.
Packs a punch. The TB3p offers exactly the same powerful
features as its big brother, from
TEDS to air-interface encryption and from Type 1 Handover
to base station fallback.
Easy to deploy.
The TB3p is easy to
deploy for standalone
or temporary coverage.
Happy anywhere. TB3p
base stations do not need a
costly site so they can save
big money. Base station site
rentals and transmission costs
typically account for up to
80% of operating costs.
Data-ready. Thanks to its
TEDS capability, the TB3p
can provide coverage in data
hot-spots.
Mind the gaps. Use the TB3p
to provide indoor coverage
or plug gaps in the outdoor
network.
Ready for anything. TheTB3p
comes pre-configured, so
setting it up requires no RF
expertise.
Unveiled for the first time at TWC 2011 the TB3p crams big functionality into a tiny
package with a tiny power consumption.
KeyTouch 2/2011
47
XXXXXXXXXXXXX
In Touch
Mounting
to defend
up public safety
Mounted police are an elite bunch, with
just eight officers teamed up with horses in
Helsinki, for example. So what does it take to be
a good mounted police officer?
M
ost police officers can acquire the necessary riding skills for
mounted work with the right training, so what the team
is really looking for are people with the right temperament for a
successful career as a mounted officer. Mounted police may be few
in number but they have an extremely high public profile, so excellent people skills are essential, as is great concentration, since they
48
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In Touch
must be able to control a large and powerful animal safely in the
middle of a crowd.
Riding proficiency is also needed, so the Finnish authorities
provide up to three weeks of intensive training for less experienced riders and everyone takes a placement test before they’re
allowed to mount up on patrol. Their riding skills are honed even
KeyTouch 2/2011
49
In Touch
further by riding lessons twice a
week, developing specialist manoeuvres such as jumping and
dressage.
Special animals too
Riders are just one part of the
overall patrol unit, and it also
takes a special kind of horse to do
police work. The animals must be
calm and healthy, with feet that
can stand up to the wear and tear
of spending most patrols walking
on hard surfaces such as tarmac.
50
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They’re also big, with the vast
majority being more than 170cm
at the shoulders. The Finnish
force buys horses with the right
physical attributes on the open
market, but that’s just the start.
They then need intensive training to get used to dealing with
sudden noises, traffic and crowds
without becoming stressed.
Horses and riders have a demanding schedule. Riders routinely undertake a shift that includes five hours of riding in the
summer and two or three hours
in winter.
Unlike other field officers, the
mounted officers are typically
deployed in pre-planned operations, rather than being called on
to handle emergencies. For example, all eight riders are used to
support the Winter Classic hockey match at the Helsinki Olympic
Stadium. They take part in the
parade and help to manage the
crowd around the main gate. This
means that they’re also on hand
Communication in the saddle
Whether they’re “meeting and
greeting” or controlling a hostile
demonstration, good communication is essential for mounted
officers, as it is for all police personnel on field operations. However, the laptop-based POKE
field command system used by
vehicle-based officers in Helsinki is impractical for users on
horseback, so the mounted team
use hand-held TETRA radios for
voice and status messages over
the VIRVE network. Some officers also use accessories that allow them to operate their radios
hands-free.
The biggest challenge for the
radios is cold weather, since the
riders patrol all year round and
low temperatures can lead rapidly to depleted battery power.
Fortunately, the structure of the
typical day enables regular battery charging.
Horses and riders
engage positively with
the public at fairs and
other public events
to intervene if any trouble starts
up during the match.
It’s also common for the horses and riders to make “celebrity”
appearances at fairs and other
public events, where they engage positively with the public
who enjoy any opportunity to get
some hands-on contact with these
magnificent animals.
The added height of mounted
patrols makes it easier for officers to see and be seen compared
to officers on foot, especially in
KeyTouch 2/2011
51
In Touch
crowds. In fact, officers report
that being on horseback offers the
apparently contradictory benefits
of making them generally more
approachable than when they’re
in a vehicle and giving them
more authority when dealing
with members of the public who
aren’t quite so friendly.
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In touch
Videos help
you stay one
step ahead
Sit back, have a cup of coffee and view our essential
PMR-related videos on the KeyTouch® website.
They are all here: http://www.keytouch.info/features/videos_and_podcasts/
Protecting agents in the field is the aim of the Lifeguard feature available in THR8, THR9i and THR9
Ex radios. The application automatically recognizes
if the radio isn't moving or if it remains in a horizontal position (i.e. officer down) for an excessive time.
Check out the video called "Lifeguard" in the videos
section of the online version of Key Touch.
Did you know that your THR8, THR9, THR9i and
THR9 Ex radios provide automatic positioning between radio users during a call? Watch the "Where
are you" video to discover more.
How will the PMR market evolve to serve its different user groups? Take a look at the Fortecor® section
to see Chief Superintendent Antti Jeronen talk about
how communications could help the police face challenges today and tomorrow.
The same video section provides deeper insights
into communications for security forces. Go to the
video called "High speed data market and trends" to
learn more.
These are just a few examples that will keep you updated on current topics. Please take a look at other illustrative videos at our website at www.keytouch.info
52
www.keytouch.info
The future
of mobile apps
over PMR
Some applications would be welcome on any mobile radio
J
Mapping mark-up
Leaders can mark-up the maps on
their terminal screens with routes or
search areas and send them to the
team. Think urban rescue operations.
Call on
the cloud
Field officers can access tactical information remotely, such as the history and profile of a suspect in a hostage negotiation. This cloud-based
approach reduces the need for data
storage on the terminal.
Video
aggregator
A command centre can pull together civilian video clips of an incident
from the web and send them out to
field officers, enabling them to see
the situation from multiple perspectives.
Time for
a break
Even the most rugged field agent has
to eat. The “find a restaurant” app on
commercial smartphones is a great
example of the kind of application
that could benefit professional radio
users just as much as the rest of us.
Failure is not an option
While using digital technology to track down a doughnut may seem trivial, the big difference between commercial apps
and PMR apps is that many of the emerging professional apps will be mission-critical. Reliability is the key consideration
in potentially life-threatening situations, and only digital PMR can meet that need.
KeyTouch 2/2011
53
Picture this
ust as smartphone apps have
arrived with a bang on commercial networks, professional
users will soon be able to access a
variety of on-line communication
tools over PMR networks.
Sometimes a simple communication link to the command centre is all
a field officer needs, but there is a
growing need for smart applications
to support more efficient, flexible
working practices.
In the not-so-distant future, roleoriented communications, live reporting and intelligent task management will all be available, thanks to a
plethora of value-adding applications
that can be tailored and customised
to meet the needs of different organisations. Some future applications
might literally mean the difference
between life and death, while others
will simply make another hard day at
the (mobile) office a little more comfortable.
There is also a growing need for
PMR terminals to communicate with
other kinds of devices such as biometric passports, RFID tags, information database devices and so on.
Imagine the possibilities…
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In touch
Where to next for
Interoperability that enables
different agencies to work
seamlessly together is
the future of emergency
communications,
according to Terry Hall,
Second Vice President
of APCO International
and Chief of Emergency
Communications
at the York County
Regional Emergency
Communication Center in
Virginia.
Who is Terry Hall?
Terry Hall is the Chief of Emergency Communications for the York-Poquoson-Williamsburg Emergency Communications Center in Yorktown, Virginia. Mr Hall manages the regional 9-1-1 center, and
is the technical systems manager for the regional
P25 radio system that encompasses six localities.
Mr. Hall served as a deputy with the Sheriff’s office for seven years, and worked for 15 years in the
fire services. He has received the Virginia Governor’s Award for Excellencefor leadership and commitment to public safety communications, APCO
International’s Director of the Year, and State EMS
awards of excellence.
Recognized as a leader, not only in Virginia, but
across the United States, Mr. Hall is often called
upon as an expert on issues concerning public
safety, emergency communications and emerging
technologies.
54
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he York County centre is one of the largest
regional 911 handling facilities in Virginia
serving over 150,000 inhabitants, and over
a million visitors a year. It’s a great example of the
seamless approach advocated by Mr. Hall because it
covers York County and the neighbouring cities of Poquoson and Williamsburg, and James City County as
well as Gloucester, and provides seamless mutual aid
throughout Hampton Roads Virginia. “With one call
to 911 you can now reach three law enforcement forces and three fire departments, and have immediate
access to eleven mutual aid fire companies and three
neighbouring law enforcement agencies” he says.
York County was the first 911 centre to deploy
Phase 1 and Phase 2 technology under the Enhanced
911 programme. Phase 1 enables call centre personnel to identify the radio cell from which a caller is
ringing, while Phase 2 attempts to pinpoint the actual location. Nevertheless, over 70% of incoming
emergency calls currently originate from cell phones
and currently over 30% do not provide accurate call
data, so Mr. Hall predicts that Geographic Information System (GIS) technology will be deployed in the
future to make this easier.
T
Lessons from crises
Mr. Hall has been involved in emergency communications for more than 20 years and has seen first-hand
how greater co-operation between agencies can help
in the most difficult situations. As a past member of
Urban Search & Rescue and a current member of a
Disaster Medical Assistance team for instance, he
has been deployed to help in the aftermath of hurricanes such as Katrina, Rita, and Gustav.
The lessons from Katrina in particular sparked
a shift in emergency communications, leading to
$7.5 million of new investment. This resulted in the
deployment of a shared P25 public safety network
overlaid by ORION technology that gives each authority its own interface with the merged system.
The next step is to establish a single virtual Public
Safety Answering Point (PSAP), which is where all
the calls coming into the system will be processed.
This co-operative approach has both operational
and funding advantages, according to Mr. Hall. “We
now have improved emergency management between the Coast Guard, military, state and local authorities,” he says. “At the same time, cost efficiency
has become more important, while open solutions
and a vendor ecosystem promotes competitive procurement processes.”
Beyond voice and text
Looking ahead, the other big trend is towards IP enabled technologies, which will allow new applications
and improve operational effectiveness. For instance,
mapping and video will become commonplace
alongside voice and text transmissions, predicts Mr.
Hall. Voice over IP (VoIP) presents added challenges
for emergency responders since it makes it more difficult to locate callers in trouble. However, the National
Emergency Number Association’s (NENA) i3 plan
aims to explore the IP connection between callers and
the PSAP to glean even more useful information.
Ultimately, the same “anything, anywhere on any
device” philosophy that is already the norm among
many commercial broadband users will spread to
emergency organisations, according to Mr. Hall.
Emergency workers will expect to use multimedia
applications over any device, both in the dispatch
centre and in the field.
KeyTouch 2/2011
55
IN TOUCH
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