Complete Technical Specifications Document

Complete Technical Specifications Document
Motion Control Engineering, Inc.
11380 White Rock Road
Rancho Cordova, CA 95742
voice 916 463 9200
fax 916 463 9201
www.mceinc.com
Specifications,
Elevator Products
Manual # 42-01-SPECS, Rev B1, April 2004
Copyright
Copyright 2004, Motion Control Engineering. All Rights Reserved.
This document may not be reproduced, electronically or mechanically, in whole or in part, without
written permission from Motion Control Engineering.
Trademarks
All trademarks or registered product names appearing in this document are the exclusive property
of the respective owners.
Warning and Disclaimer
Although every effort has been made to make this document as complete and accurate as possible,
Motion Control Engineering and the document authors, publishers, distributors, and
representatives have neither liability nor responsibility for any loss or damage arising from
information contained in this document or from informational errors or omissions. Information
contained in this document shall not be deemed to constitute a commitment to provide service,
equipment, or software by Motion Control Engineering or the document authors, publishers,
distributors, or representatives.
Limited Warranty
Motion Control Engineering (manufacturer) warrants its products for a period of 15 months from
the date of shipment from its factory to be free from defects in workmanship and materials. Any
defect appearing more than 15 months from the date of shipment from the factory shall be
deemed to be due to ordinary wear and tear. Manufacturer, however, assumes no risk or liability for
results of the use of the products purchased from it, including, but without limiting the generality
of the forgoing: (1) The use in combination with any electrical or electronic components, circuits,
systems, assemblies or any other material or equipment (2) Unsuitability of this product for use in
any circuit, assembly or environment. Purchasers’ rights under this warranty shall consist solely of
requiring the manufacturer to repair, or in manufacturer's sole discretion, replace free of charge,
F.O.B. factory, any defective items received at said factory within the said 15 months and
determined by manufacturer to be defective. The giving of or failure to give any advice or
recommendation by manufacturer shall not constitute any warranty by or impose any liability upon
the manufacturer. This warranty constitutes the sole and exclusive remedy of the purchaser and
the exclusive liability of the manufacturer, AND IN LIEU OF ANY AND ALL OTHER WARRANTIES,
EXPRESSED, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY AS TO MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS, FOR PURPOSE SOLD,
DESCRIPTION, QUALITY PRODUCTIVENESS OR ANY OTHER MATTER. In no event will the
manufacturer be liable for special or consequential damages or for delay in performance of this
warranty.
Products that are not manufactured by MCE (such as drives, CRT's, modems, printers, etc.) are not
covered under the above warranty terms. MCE, however, extends the same warranty terms that
the original manufacturer of such equipment provide with their product (refer to the warranty
terms for such products in their respective manual).
In This Manual:
Ongoing research and development have enabled MCE to produce the elevator industry’s most
comprehensive line of elevator control products. This diversified product line, coupled with the
rapid rate of change in microcomputer technology, has created the need for a vehicle to communicate these changes to the decision makers of our industry.
The purpose of this Specifications guide is to keep elevator Consultants, Contractors, and Building Owner/Managers up to date on the latest product developments and features available from
MCE. Please visit us at www.mceinc.com for the latest information on new products as they are
released.
When viewed online as a pdf file, Specifications manual hyperlinks link to related topics and
informational websites. Hyperlinked text is blue. The manual includes:
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Contents: Table of Contents. When viewed online as a pdf file, hyperlinks in the Contents
link to the associated topic in the body of the manual.
Section 1. Using Specifications. How to use the Specifications manual, CD-ROM, and
MCE Services.
Section 2. General Specifications. Specifications common to most MCE equipment.
Section 3. Traction Elevator Controllers, IMC.
Section 4. Traction Elevator Controllers, PTC, VVMC, VFMC.
Section 5. Hydraulic Controllers, PHC, HS
Section 6. Intelligent Overlay System
Section 7. M3 Group System
Section 8. Machines and Motors
Section 9. Controller Options
Section 10. SmartLINK Serial Communication
Section 11. LS Landing Systems
Section 12. TLS Terminal Limit Switches
Section 13. Load Weighers
Section 14. CMS Central Monitoring System
Section 15. Elevator Security
Section 16. Physical Specifications
Section 17. Technical Publications
MCE Philosophy
We developed MCE third-party, universally maintainable control equipment based on a simple
premise: Elevator service contractors should be selected and retained based on customer satisfaction, not access to a service tool.
MCE imposes no restraints on the ability to service and maintain our elevator control systems.
All MCE products are non-proprietary.
As such, parts are available for inventory (not just exchange). Diagnostics are built in. No proprietary service tool is required for any adjustment or maintenance procedure. All manuals and
drawings are provided. Technical training, engineering, and technical support are available to
all. MCE provides direct support to the “end user” and their designated maintenance company.
MCE Direction
We strive to bring together the right people and technology to continually improve elevator performance, while ever simplifying installation, maintenance, and operation. We design, manufacture, and provide the most advanced elevator control systems along with unprecedented
levels of customer service, support, and commitment.
Updates and Copies
MCE Specifications are updated periodically to reflect the latest technological developments
and products. If you are not sure whether the copy you have is current, please call MCE and we
will ensure you receive the most recent edition. If you would like a copy of the Specifications on
CD-ROM, please call.
OEM Products
MCE products carrying MCE identification labels do not have proprietary diagnostics. MCE
may manufacture products for the OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) market that do
not carry MCE identification labels and may have proprietary diagnostics owned by the elevator
manufacturer. Any of the statements below can be used to ensure that non-proprietary diagnostics are furnished regardless of the elevator manufacturer:
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Provide MCE non-proprietary diagnostics.
Provide non-proprietary diagnostics by MCE.
Provide non-proprietary diagnostics.
Product Selection
MCE makes no final recommendation as to the suitability of its products for any specific application. It is the responsibility of the elevator consultant, contractor, or end user to determine
which product is best suited for each particular project.
Section 1. How to use Specifications
MCE Specification Toolset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Using the Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Performance Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Locate Supporting Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Cut and Paste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
The CD-ROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
MCE Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Factory Technical Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-3
Technical Training at Your Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Job Site Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Field Adjustment Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Project Completion Audit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-5
Telephone Hotline Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-5
Field Troubleshooting Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-5
Field Modifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-5
Original Parts/Packages Discounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Premier Support Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Performance Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Section 2. General Specifications
General Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Code Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-2
ADA Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3
Environmental Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3
Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3
Intended Operation of Critical Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3
Status Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-4
Out of Service Timer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-4
Door Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-4
Door Pre-opening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-4
Car and Hall Call Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-4
Fire Service Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-5
Independent Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-5
Simplex Selective Collective Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-5
Simplex Home Landing Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-5
Duplex Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-5
Number of Stops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-5
Leveling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-5
Test Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-6
Relay Panel Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-6
Uncanceled Call Bypass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-6
Anti-nuisance (Photo Eye) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-6
On-board Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-6
Optional Peripherals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-6
Section 3. Traction Elevator Controllers, IMC
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
IMC Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-2
IMC Performa/System 12 SCR Drive Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-4
IMC-SCR/System 12 SCR Drive Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
IMC-AC/Flux Vector Drive Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-8
IMC-MG/Generator Field Control Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-9
Section 4. Traction Controllers, PTC, VVMC, VFMC
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
MODEL PTC RECOMMENDED USE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-2
PTC-SCR Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-3
PTC-AC Series M Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-4
PTC-MG Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-6
VVMC-1000 SCR Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-9
VFMC-1000 AC Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-9
VVMC-1000 MG Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-10
Section 5. Hydraulic Controllers, PHC, HS
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
PHC Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-2
HS Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Section 6. Intelligent Overlay System
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-2
System Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-2
Group Cabinet Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-2
Overlay Interface Cabinet Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-3
Overlay Interface Cabinet Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-4
Section 7. M3 Group System
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
M3 Group System Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
Section 8. Machines and Motors
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
DC Gearless Machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-2
AC Gearless Machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-2
DC Hoist Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-2
AC Hoist Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-2
Motor Generator Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-3
AC Hydraulic Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-3
Section 9. Controller Options
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Attendant Service Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-3
Binary Position Indicator Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-3
Call/Send Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-3
CRT/Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-4
Down Collective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-4
Dumbwaiter Ejector Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-4
Dumbwaiter Queuing Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-4
Earthquake Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-5
Emergency Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-5
Hospital Emergency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-5
Integral Voice Annunciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-6
Keyboard Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-6
Load Weighing Anti-Nuisance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-6
Load Weighing Dispatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-6
Load Weighing Hall Call Bypass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-6
Load Weighing Overload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-6
Load Weighing Pre-Torquing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Manual Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Monitoring with CMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Monitoring from Remote Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Motor Generator Shutdown Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
On-Board Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Power Freight Door Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Rear Doors (Staggered/Independent) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Rear Doors (Walk-Through/Independent) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Serial Communication Car Operating Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Serial Communication Hall Fixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Serial Position Indicator Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Single Automatic Pushbutton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Single Button Collective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Swing Car Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-9
Custom Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-9
Section 10. SmartLINK Serial Communication
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1
SmartLINK for Car Operating Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-2
SmartLINK for Hall Fixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-2
Section 11. LS Landing Systems
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1
LS-STAN, Vane-actuated VS-1 Proximity Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2
LS-QUTE, Steel Tape and Magnetic Strips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3
LS-QUAD-2 for IMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3
LS-QUIK for IMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-4
Section 12. TLS Terminal Limit Switches
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1
TLS-C Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2
TLS-1 Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2
TLS-2 Recommended Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-3
Section 13. Load Weighers
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-1
Isolated Platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-2
Crosshead Deflection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-2
Section 14. CMS Central Monitoring System
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-1
CMS Central Monitoring System for Windows® . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-2
CMS General Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-2
CMS Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-3
Elevator Command Center Computer - Minimum requirements for CMS . . . . . . . . . 14-3
CMS Connection Media Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-3
CMS Functional Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-4
CMS Reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-6
Relational Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-8
Embedded Monitoring Interface (EMI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-8
Communication Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-8
SIS, Security Interface Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-8
Section 15. Elevator Security
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-1
Basic Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-2
Basic Security with CRT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-2
Access Control for Elevators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-3
System Access Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-3
Levels of Access Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-3
Hall Call Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-3
Car Call Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-4
Access Control Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-4
Access Control Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-4
Car Station Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-4
Passenger Access Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-4
Floor Access Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15-5
User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15-5
Report Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15-5
Software Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15-5
Security Interface System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-6
Additional Security Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-7
Section 16. Physical Specifications
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-1
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-1
Standard Controller Enclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-2
Hydraulic Enclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-2
Traction Enclosure (Series M) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-4
Traction Enclosure (Single Door) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-5
Traction Enclosures (Double Door) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-6
Group Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-8
Off-the-Shelf Enclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-9
NEMA 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-9
NEMA 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-9
NEMA 4X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-11
NEMA 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-12
Group Dispatcher (IOS) Overlay Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-13
Filter Enclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-13
Landing System Physical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-15
LS-STAN Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-15
Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-15
Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-15
Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-15
Vane Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-15
LS-QUAD-2 Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-17
Magnetic Sensor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-17
Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-17
Encoder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-18
Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-18
Tape Mounting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-18
LS-QUTE Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-19
Magnetic Sensor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-19
Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-19
Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-19
Tape Mounting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-19
LS-QUIK Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-20
Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-20
Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-20
Encoder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-21
LS-QUIK Vane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-22
Isolated Platform Load Weigher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-23
TLS Terminal Limit Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-27
Section 17. Technical Publications
In This Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-1
Drive System Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-2
Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-2
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-2
Communication is Vital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-2
Drive Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-3
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-4
Static Drives vs Motor Generators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-5
Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-5
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-5
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-5
Power Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-6
Maintainability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-6
Marginally Sized Emergency Generators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-6
Emergency Generators Sensitive to Harmonics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-7
Emergency Generators Sensitive to Power Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-7
Shared Power Distribution Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-7
Marginal AC Power Distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-7
AC Line Current Magnitude Graphs for Motor Generator vs SCR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-8
Current Requirements for SCR Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-8
Gearless Machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-9
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-9
AC Motor Controls for Elevators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-11
Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-11
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-11
Motor Reuse or Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-12
Geared Applications – selection is job dependent: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-12
Most Gearless Applications – DC is still the best choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-13
Retaining an Existing AC Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-13
Slip Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-13
Calculating Slip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-14
Slip Requirements for New Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-14
Using a New AC Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-15
When Buying a New Machine and Motor... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-15
Verify Correct Slip: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-15
Insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-16
When Buying a New Motor and Using an Existing Machine... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-16
Motor Drive Packages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-16
Input Line Impedance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-16
RFI/EMI Demons: The Need for Proper Grounding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-17
How to Reduce the Effect of RFI and EMI: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-17
Grounding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-17
Wiring the Controller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-19
Proper Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-19
RFI Filters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-19
Drive Isolation Transformers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-19
Marginally Sized Emergency Power Generators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-19
Emergency Power Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-20
Emergency Generator Sensitivity to Harmonics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-20
Emergency Generator Tolerance for Regenerated Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-20
AC vs DC SCR Drive Efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-20
Hidden Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-21
Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-21
Heat Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-22
Non-Regenerative AC Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-22
Regenerative AC Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-22
Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-22
Harmonic Analysis and Comparison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-23
Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-23
Elevator Test Tower Research Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-23
Tested Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-23
Testing Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-24
General comments regarding the tests:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-24
Drive Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-24
Evaluating the Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-25
Evaluating the Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-26
Yaskawa Flux Vector VFAC Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-26
Conventional 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-26
12-Pulse DC SCR Drive (MCE System 12). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-27
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-28
Yaskawa Flux Vector VFAC Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-29
Yaskawa Flux Vector VFAC Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-30
Conventional 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-31
Conventional 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-32
12-Pulse SCR Drive (MCE System 12) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-33
12-Pulse DC SCR Drive (MCE SYSTEM 12) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-34
Supplemental Job Site Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-35
Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-35
Tested Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-35
Testing Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-35
Evaluating the Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-35
Conventional 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive - International Towers Building . . . . . . . . . . . 17-35
12-Pulse DC SCR Drive - Plaza Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-35
6-pulse DC SCR drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-36
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-36
Conventional 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-37
Conventional 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-38
12-Pulse SCR Drive (MCE System 12) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-39
12-Pulse DC SCR Drive (MCE System 12). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-40
AC Inverter Drives Electrical Noise & RFI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-41
Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-41
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-41
Static Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-41
Radio Frequency Interference “RFI” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-41
IGBTs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-42
Reducing/Preventing Electrical Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-43
Warnings from Manufacturers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-43
MCE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-43
SAFTRONICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-43
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-44
Elevator Modernization Performance Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-45
Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-45
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17-45
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MCE Specification Toolset
Using the Manual
The CD-ROM
MCE Services
Performance Requirements
1
How to use Specifications
MCE Specification Toolset
The specification toolset includes this hard copy manual, a CD-ROM, and MCE Services.
• Specifications Manual: The manual provides a reference tool, guiding you through
selecting equipment to meet job requirements. The manual is also on the accompanying CD-ROM in .pdf format, with interactive contents and index, and click-on
hyperlinks to hop directly between related topics.
• CD-ROM: The MCE Specifications manual on the CD-ROM (MCESpecifications.pdf)
allows you to read, print, or copy any text sections you want from the manual. Copied sections can then be pasted into your specification documents, regardless of the word processing software you use.
• MCE Services: The third component of your specification toolset is your partnership with
Motion Control Engineering. MCE professionals are available to answer technical questions, provide supporting information, even to provide hands-on assistance when developing specifications or quotations for extensive, multi-car, modernizations or new
installations.
1-1
How to use Specifications
Using the Manual
The manual is organized so that you can quickly:
1. Identify equipment sets to meet specific performance requirements.
2. Immediately locate supporting information about specific components.
3. Copy or “cut and paste” supporting text into your job specification. (Text intended to be
inserted in a specification document is identified by a red “Specification Text” heading.)
Performance Requirements
The charts at the end of this section let you quickly identify specific equipment sets depending
upon job performance requirements including:
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Maximum required car speed
Required motor drive type
Analog or Digital drive control
Motor control implementation
Maximum number of stops
Car Control Groups
Landing system choices
Load weighing choices
Load pre-torque availability
Door operator choices
Hoistway switch support
Hall call support
Annunciator/Indicator support
Security support
Central monitoring support
Locate Supporting Information
Supporting information for equipment listed in the performance charts is provided according to
category in the body of the manual. Where practical, the chart will provide specific page or
section references. If you are reading the manual on-line (pdf format), blue text or blue page
numbers are active links you can click on to immediately jump to the referenced information.
Cut and Paste
When viewing the specifications manual in Adobe Reader, just select the Text Select tool or the
Formatted Text Tool and drag through any text you want to copy. With the text selected, pick
Copy from the Edit menu, or use the Control and C keys, or right-click and select Copy. Then,
open your specification and paste the copied text into your document.
1-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
The CD-ROM
The CD-ROM
The MCE Specifications CD-ROM is mastered in ISO format so you can use any Windows,
Macintosh, or Linux computer that has a CD-ROM drive. Adobe ReaderTM software — the
software you need to open, print, or copy from .pdf files — can be downloaded free from
www.adobe.com if you don’t already have it on your computer.
MCE Services
MCE Services is our name for the supporting relationship and services that add really tremendous value to choosing MCE equipment for your jobs. MCE Services are your key to MCE expertise. If you need specific support or information you don’t see described here, please call and let
us know. We are constantly looking for ways to improve our partnership with you.
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Factory technical training at MCE
Technical training at customer sites
Job site surveys
Field adjustment support and/or training
Project completion audits
Telephone hotline support
Field troubleshooting support
Field modifications
Original Parts packages and discounts
Premier Support Plan
1
Factory Technical Training
Factory Technical Training classes provide better working knowledge of installation, operation,
and maintenance practices for MCE controls. Factory Technical Training has a long history at
MCE and past attendees report that classes reduce installation, adjustment, and
troubleshooting time on the very next job.
Call your MCE sales representative or call us at (916) 463-9200 and ask for MCE Services to
receive a program summary by email or fax including upcoming class dates and a registration
form.
1-3
How to use Specifications
Technical Training at Your Site
Your city or job site might be the most economical choice for technical training, particularly for
groups of four or more trainees. MCE will tailor a program to your individual needs — where
key personnel are trained on the equipment they work with every day. Call (916) 463-9200 and
ask for MCE Services to discuss fees, content, and scheduling options.
Job Site Survey
Job site survey assistance during the initial information gathering phase of a project can save
significant, sometimes critical, time for contractors. Let the control engineers who need the
data assist you in collecting the required information. Call your MCE sales representative or
MCE Services directly at (916) 463 9200.
Specification Text
A job site survey shall be performed by MCE and shall include the preparation of a detailed job
survey report, assistance with measurements, participation in meetings with consultant /
contractor / building owner for clarification and coordination, verification that MCE equipment
will meet project specifications, and coordination of equipment shipments to meet the
installation schedule.
Field Adjustment Training
Field Adjustment Training significantly reduces the amount of time required to install and
adjust a controller. Each day of field adjustment training can save several days of installation /
adjustment time on the present job and provide skills for the future. Call your MCE sales
representative or 916 / 463-9200 and ask for MCE Services for more information.
Specification Text
Field Adjustment Support / Training services shall be provided by MCE and shall include
hands-on adjustment training, installation and adjustment coaching, advice and guidance for
installation and an evaluation to identify and correct any controller-related installation
problems.
1-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
MCE Services
Project Completion Audit
Utilize the skills of a factory trained technician to measure and evaluate the performance of
every car. Includes review to eliminate the most common installation faults. Provides a
performance yardstick for future projects. Ensures that the completed project delivers the
optimum performance that MCE control equipment is capable of providing. Call your MCE
sales representative or 916 / 463-9200 and ask for MCE Services for more information.
Specification Text
Field Adjustment Support / Training services shall be provided by MCE and shall include
hands-on adjustment training, final adjustment coaching and tuning to MCE's high ride quality
standards.
Telephone Hotline Support
Factory trained technicians are available to provide answers to installation, adjustment and
troubleshooting questions. This is your resource for quickly identifying solutions to the most
common problems. No need to struggle...call the experts. Call 916 / 463-9200 and ask for MCE
Services for more information.
Specification Text
Telephone Hotline Support is provided at no cost for products under warranty. Beyond the
warranty period, per-incident service charges apply. All Telephone Hotline Support issues are
logged in the MCE computer system and every call is tracked until the problem is resolved.
Extended service hours are available.
Field Troubleshooting Support
Field Troubleshooting Support can save many frustrating hours spent tracking and resolving
difficult or elusive problems and is particularly valuable when unresolved field problems
persist. Ensure quick resolution to current problems and become better equipped to resolve
future issues more quickly. Call 916 / 463-9200 and ask for MCE Services to discuss scheduling
options and fees.
Specification Text
Field Troubleshooting Support services shall be provided by MCE and shall include in-depth
analysis by a factory-trained technician, troubleshooting and problem resolution, deployment
of the manufacturer's full array of technical resources as required and a trouble-shooting clinic
for contractors' field personnel.
Field Modifications
MCE software, hardware and R&D engineers will develop a custom modification to satisfy your
unique needs. This service can be used to develop enhancements, obtain functions not
originally specified or remedy unanticipated hardware or software issues. Call 916 / 463-9200
and ask for MCE's Field Modifications Team to discuss specific needs.
1-5
1
How to use Specifications
Original Parts/Packages Discounts
We've got your parts, whether you need a single replacement part or recommended spare parts
package. Insist on genuine MCE parts. Discounts are available for volume purchases of
replacement / spare parts, and special pricing applies to recommended spare parts packages.
Call 916 / 463-9200 and ask for the MCE Parts Counter to discuss specific needs.
Premier Support Plan
Premier Support Plan bundles MCE's most requested services and provides them at substantial
savings. Fees are based on the number of controllers in the portfolio and the level of support
required.
Premier Support Plan includes priority 800-number Technical Support, portfolio-wide
extended warranty for all MCE manufactured components and boards, preferred rates for MCE
field services, no charge for MCE Factory Training classes, preferred rates for custom
engineering or software / hardware modifications, unlimited telephone hotline support for all
jobs in customer's maintenance portfolio*, no charge drive exchange (System 12), no charge on
expedited repair service for non-exchange drives and no charge freight back-to-you on MCE
repair or exchange items. Call 916 / 463-9200 and ask for MCE Services for a portfolio.
* Call volume during the current plan year will become the basis for fees in the following year.
1-6 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Performance Requirements
Performance Requirements
To use this chart:
1. Choose the appropriate controller for your application.
2. Turn to the section specified in the selection chart under “Recommended Use” to verify
that the selected controller is appropriate for the application. (If you are reading this on
a computer, just click on blue text to jump immediately to that topic.)
3. Use the sections listed at the end of “Recommended Use” to compile the specification for
your project. Product dimensions are located in Section 16, Physical Specifications.
4. If your traction project requires a group of elevators under dispatch control, refer to
Section 7, M3 Group System for specifications.
5. Select features your project requires from Section 8, Optional Features for Controllers.
6. Refer to the Table of Contents to locate descriptions and specifications for other MCE
products that may be required for your project.
7. Select and specify MCE Services for your project from this section.
Elevator Controller Technology Selection Charts
1
Traction Elevator Controllers - IMC Intelligent Motion Control
Maximum Car Speed
Drive Type
Drive Control
Motor Control Technique
Maximum Number of
Stops
Configuration
Landing Systems
Short Floor
Pre-Torquing
Recommended Use
IMC Performa
IMC-SCR
IMC-AC
IMC-MG
1800 fpm, 9.14 m/s
System 12 SCR
Digital - IMC
Distance & Velocity
Feedback
64
1800 fpm, 9.14 m/s
System 12 SCR
Digital - IMC
Distance & Velocity
Feedback
64
700 fpm, 3.565 m/s
Flux Vector
Digital - IMC
Distance & Velocity
Feedback
64
1800 fpm, 9.14 m/s
Motor Generator
Digital - IMC
Distance & Velocity
Feedback
64
Simplex, M3 Group
LS-QUAD, LS-QUIK
Yes
Yes
Page 3-4
Simplex, M3 Group
LS-QUAD, LS-QUIK
Yes
Yes
Page 3-7
Simplex, M3 Group
LS-QUAD, LS-QUIK
Yes
No
Page 3-8
Simplex, M3 Group
LS-QUAD, LS-QUIK
Yes
Yes
Page 3-9
Traction Elevator Controllers - PTC Programmable
PTC-SCR
Maximum Car Speed
Drive Type
Drive Control
Motor Control Technique
Maximum Number of Stops
Configuration
Landing Systems
Short Floor
Pre-Torquing
Recommended Use
PTC-AC
PTC-MG
350 fpm, 1.78 m/s
6 Pulse SCR
Analog
Velocity Feedback
350 fpm, 1.78 m/s 350 fpm, 1.78 m/s
VVVF
Motor Generator
Analog/Digital
Analog
Open Loop or Veloc- Velocity Feedback
ity Feedback
32
32
32
Simplex, Duplex
Simplex, Duplex
Simplex, Duplex
LS-STAN, LS-QUTE LS-STAN, LS-QUTE LS-STAN, LS-QUTE
No
No
No
No
No
No
Page 4-3
Page 4-4
Page 4-6
1-7
How to use Specifications
Traction Elevator Controllers - VVMC / VFMC Group
VVMC-1000 SCR
Maximum Car Speed
Drive Type
Drive Control
Motor Control Technique
Maximum Number of Stops
Configuration
Landing Systems
Short Floor
Pre-Torquing
Recommended Use
350 fpm, 1.78 m/s
6 Pulse SCR
Analog
Velocity Feedback
64
M3 Group
LS-STAN, LS-QUTE
No
No
Page 4-9
VFMC-1000 AC
350 fpm, 1.78 m/s
VVVF
Analog/Digital
Open Loop or Velocity Feedback
64
M3 Group
LS-STAN, LS-QUTE
No
No
Page 4-9
Hydraulic Elevator Controllers - PHC, HS
HMC-1000 PHC
Maximum Number of Stops
Configuration
Landing Systems
Recommended Use
1-8 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
16
Simplex, Duplex
LS-STAN, LS-QUTE
Page 5-2
HMC-1000 HS
16
M3 Group
LS-STAN, LS-QUTE
Page 5-5
VVMC-1000 MG
350 fpm, 1.78 m/s
Motor Generator
Analog
Velocity Feedback
64
M3 Group
LS-STAN, LS-QUTE
No
No
Page 4-10
• General Specifications
• In This Section
General Specifications
2
General Specifications
This section describes features common to all MCE control systems (iControl specifications published separately). Features unique to a certain type of control are in the
appropriate section of these specifications.
In This Section
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Code Compliance
ADA Requirements
Environmental Considerations
Diagnostics
Intended Operation of Critical Components
Status Indicators
Out of Service Timer
Door Operation
Door Pre-opening
Car and Hall Call Registration
Fire Service Operation
Independent Service
Simplex Selective Collective Operation
Simplex Home Landing Operation
Duplex Operation
2-1
General Specifications
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Number of Stops
Leveling
Test Switch
Relay Panel Inspection
Uncanceled Call Bypass
Anti-nuisance (Photo Eye)
On-board Diagnostics
Optional Peripherals
Code Compliance
The elevator controller shall use a microprocessor based logic system and shall comply with all
applicable elevator and electrical safety codes. Following is a partial list of codes with which
MCE products are in compliance.
For the United States:
• ANSI/ASME A17.1
• CAN/CSA-B44.1/ASME-A17.5
• NEC
For Canada:
• CAN/CSA-B44
• CAN/CSA-B44.1/ASME-A17.5
• CEC C22.1
For Australia:
• AS 1735
For the United Kingdom:
• BS 5655/EN 81
For IMC-SCR; IMC-AC; VVMC-1000; M3 GROUP:
• CE Label
2-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
ADA Requirements
ADA Requirements
The elevator controllers shall comply with Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA).
Leveling Accuracy - The controller shall have a self-leveling feature that shall automatically
bring the car to floor landings within a tolerance of 0.5" (12.7 mm) or better under all loading
conditions up to the rated load.
Hall Lanterns - The controller shall have outputs to drive the visible and audible signals that are
required at each hoistway entrance to indicate which elevator car is answering a call. Audible
signals shall sound once for up, twice for down.
Car Position Indicators - The controller shall have a position indicator output to drive the
required position indicator which shall indicate the corresponding floor numbers as the car
passes or stops at a floor. An audible signal shall sound as the position indicator changes floors.
Optional - The controller shall have a voice annunciator output to announce direction and floor
number.
Environmental Considerations
• Ambient temperature: 32F degrees to 104F degrees (0C degrees to 40C degrees). Higher
temperature ranges are available.
• Humidity: non-condensing up to 95%
• Altitude: Up to 7500 feet (2286 m)
Motion Control Engineering specializes in making control products for adverse environmental
conditions. For example, dust-proof, water-proof, corrosion-resistant, explosion-proof, or air
conditioned controller cabinets can be engineered to meet specific applications. Please contact
MCE Sales Engineering for details.
Diagnostics
The control system shall provide comprehensive means of accessing the computer memory for
elevator diagnostic purposes. It shall have permanent indicators for important elevator statuses
as an integral part of the controller.
Intended Operation of Critical Components
Failure of any single magnetically operated switch, contactor, or relay to release in the intended
manner; the failure of any static control device, speed measuring circuit, or speed pattern generating circuit to operate as intended; the occurrence of a single accidental ground or short circuit shall not permit the car to start or run if any hoistway door or gate interlock is unlocked or
if any hoistway door or car door or gate contact is not in the made position. Furthermore, while
on car top inspection or hoistway access operation, failure of any single magnetically operated
switch, contactor or relay to release in the intended manner, failure of any static control device
to operate as intended or the occurrence of a single accidental ground, shall not permit the car
to move even with the hoistway door locks and car door contacts in the closed or made position.
2-3
2
General Specifications
Status Indicators
Dedicated permanent status indicators shall be provided on the controller to indicate when the
safety string is closed, when the door locks are made, when the elevator is operating at high
speed, when the elevator is on independent service, when the elevator is on Inspection/Access,
when the elevator is on fire service, when the elevator out of service timer has elapsed, and
when the elevator has failed to successfully complete its intended movement. In addition, a
means shall be provided to display other special or error conditions that are detected by the
microprocessor.
Out of Service Timer
An out of service timer (T. O. S.) shall be provided to take the car out of service if the car is
delayed in leaving the landing while there are calls existing in the system.
Door Operation
Door protection timers shall be provided for both the opening and closing directions, which will
protect the door motor and will help prevent the car from getting stuck at a landing. The door
open protection timer shall cease attempting to open the door after a predetermined time in the
event that the doors are prevented from reaching the open position. In the event that the door
closing attempt fails to make up the door locks after a predetermined time, the door close protection timer shall reopen the doors for a short time. If, after a predetermined number of
attempts, the doors cannot successfully be closed, the doors shall be opened and the car
removed from service.
A minimum of four different door standing open times shall be provided. A car call time value
shall predominate when only a car call is canceled. A hall call time value shall predominate
whenever a hall call is canceled. In the event of a door reopen caused by the safety edge, photo
eye, etc., a separate short door time value shall predominate. A separate door standing open
time shall be available for lobby return.
Optional - If the doors are prevented from closing for longer than a predetermined time, door
nudging operation shall cause the doors to move at slow speed in the closed direction. A buzzer
shall sound during the nudging operation.
Door Pre-opening
When selected, this option shall start to open the doors when the car is in final leveling, 3" (76.2
mm) from the floor. If pre-opening is not selected, the doors shall remain closed until the car is
at the floor, at which time the doors shall commence opening.
Car and Hall Call Registration
Car and hall call registration and lamp acknowledgment shall be by means of a single wire per
call, in addition to the ground and the power bus. Systems that register the call with one wire,
and light the call acknowledgment lamp with a separate wire can be handled using relays.
2-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Fire Service Operation
Fire Service Operation
Fire Phase I emergency recall operation, alternate level Phase I emergency recall operation and
Phase II emergency in-car operation shall be provided according to applicable local codes.
Independent Service
Independent service operation shall be provided in such a way that actuation of a key switch in
the car operating panel will cancel any existing car calls, and hold the doors open at the landing.
The car will then respond only to car calls. Car and hoistway doors will only close with constant
pressure on a car call push-button or door close button. While on independent service, hall
arrival lanterns or jamb mounted arrival lanterns shall be inoperative.
Simplex Selective Collective Operation
Simplex selective collective automatic operation shall be provided for all single car installations.
Operation of one or more car or hall call pushbuttons shall cause the car to start and run automatically, provided the hoistway door interlocks and car door contacts are closed. The car shall
stop at the first car or hall call set for the direction of travel. Stops shall be made in the order in
which car or hall calls set for the direction of travel are reached, regardless of the order in which
they were registered. If only hall calls set for the opposite direction of travel of the elevator exist
ahead of the car, the car shall proceed to the most distant hall call, reverse direction, and start
collecting the calls.
Simplex Home Landing Operation
Optional - If no calls are registered, this operation shall cause the car to travel to a predetermined home landing floor and stop without door operation. If the car is en route to the home
landing and a call appears from the opposite direction, the car shall slow down, stop, and then
accelerate in the opposite direction, toward the call. The home landing function shall cease
instantly upon the appearance of a normal call and the car shall proceed nonstop in response to
any normal call.
Duplex Operation
Duplex operation is a configuration of series PHC and PTC control systems. Duplex configuration, with a computer for each controller, assigns cars on a real time basis using estimated time
of arrival (ETA). Should one computer lose power or become inoperative in any way, the other
computer shall be capable of accepting and answering all hall calls. When both computers are in
operation, only one shall assume the role of dispatching the hall calls to both elevators.
Number of Stops
IMC, VVMC and VFMC traction controllers serve up to 64 landings; PTC traction controllers
serve up to 32 landings; PHC and HS hydraulic controllers serve up to 16 landings.
Leveling
The car shall be equipped with two-way leveling to automatically bring the car level at any landing, within the required range of leveling accuracy, with any load up to full load.
2-5
2
General Specifications
Test Switch
A controller test switch shall be provided. In the test position, this switch shall allow independent operation of the elevator with the door open function deactivated for purposes of adjustment or testing the elevator. The elevator shall not respond to hall calls and shall not interfere
with any other car in a duplex or group installation.
Relay Panel Inspection
A relay panel inspection switch and an up/down switch shall be provided in the controller to
place the elevator on inspection operation and allow the user to move the car in the hoistway.
The car top inspection switch shall render the relay panel inspection switch inoperative.
Uncanceled Call Bypass
A timer shall be provided to limit the amount of time a car is held at a floor due to a defective
hall call or car call, including stuck pushbuttons. Call demand at another floor shall cause the
car, after a predetermined time, to ignore the defective call and continue to provide service in
the building.
Anti-nuisance (Photo Eye)
The controller computer shall cancel all remaining car calls, if an adjustable number of car calls
are answered without the computer detecting a change in the photo eye input.
On-board Diagnostics
The microprocessor boards shall be equipped with on-board diagnostics for ease of troubleshooting and field programmability of specific control variables. Field changes shall be stored
permanently, using non-volatile memory. The microprocessor board shall provide the features
listed below.
On-board diagnostic switches and an alphanumeric display shall provide user-friendly interaction between the mechanic and the controller.
On-board real time clock shall display the time and date and is adjustable by means of on-board
switches.
Field programmability of specific timer values (i.e., door times, MG shutdown time, etc.) may
be viewed and/or altered through use of the on-board switches and pushbuttons.
Optional Peripherals
Optional - As an integral part of the controller, the capability shall be provided to attach on-site
or remote computer peripherals, yielding additional adjustment or diagnostic capabilities.
2-6 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
General
In This Section
IMC General
Performa, System 12
IMC-SCR, System 12
IMC-AC, Flux Vector
IMC-MG, Generator Field
Traction Elevator Controllers, IMC
General
The systems described in this section provide premium performance for gearless or
geared elevator applications. IMC Intelligent Motion Control is a fully digital system
incorporating both distance and velocity feedback. Powerful processing algorithms
eliminate the need for trimpot adjustments. All parameters are set and adjusted
digitally, and stored numerically, via the system’s computer keyboard.
Replacement of components does not require readjustment, in most cases, so system
maintenance is simplified.
The IMC family of controllers can be used with the System 12 SCR drive, AC Flux Vector drive
or Motor-Generator. Each is available as a Simplex or M3 Group System, with configurations to
64 landings and 12 cars. Depending on project requirements, a consultant, contractor or
building owner can choose which control system is appropriate for the specific application.
In This Section
•
•
•
•
•
IMC Recommended Use
IMC Performa/System 12 SCR Drive Recommended Use
IMC-SCR/System 12 SCR Drive Recommended Use
IMC-AC/Flux Vector Drive Recommended Use
IMC-MG/Generator Field Control Recommended Use
3-1
3
Traction Elevator Controllers, IMC
IMC Recommended Use
IMC Intelligent Motion Control represents the latest in digital elevator control technology.
Highly integrated digital logic and motor control enable IMC to deliver premium performance
for applications to 1800 fpm (9.15 mps).
IMC controls continually creates an idealized velocity profile. Exact car position and speed are
tracked using a sophisticated distance and velocity feedback system. By maintaining knowledge
of exact car position, IMC controls are able to provide a high quality ride and the fastest
possible floor-to-floor time. Continuous recalculation of idealized velocity makes IMC ideal for
buildings with nonuniform or short floor heights. IMC group systems use the M3 Group System
described in Section 7 of this specification.
Specification Text, IMC General
The microprocessor system shall be designed specifically for elevator applications and shall use
multiple processors, at least one of which shall be a 32-bit high-performance RISC processor.
Each elevator controller shall use at least four microprocessors in a multi-tasking/
multi-processing environment and have a capacity of 2 megabytes RAM, 2 megabytes EPROM,
and 32 kilobytes of EEPROM.
The drive, microprocessor and controller shall be an integrated system designed for ease of use
with diagnostics and parameter adjustments accessible through the same user interface.
The individual car controller shall have an independent safety processor that learns and
monitors the velocity of the car near the terminal landings. Whenever the car encounters
slowdown limit switches, the actual car velocity shall be compared with the learned velocity. If
an overspeed condition is detected, the car shall be forced to slow down and approach the
terminal landing at reduced speed. The safety processor shall perform its velocity monitoring
function independently of any other logic or motion control processors in the system.
A second independent safety processor shall be provided to monitor the car velocity near the
terminal landings and shall act as the emergency terminal speed (ETS) limiting device. The ETS
monitor shall have an adjustable range that can be modified via software parameters. When an
ETS overspeed is detected the car shall come to an immediate stop, then resume movement at
reduced speed to the terminal landing.
The brake supply shall be capable of providing at least four independently adjustable values of
output voltage in order to provide smooth lifting, holding and releveling. These values shall be
adjusted via computer parameters which control a solid-state brake supply. Adjustment of
resistor values is not acceptable.
All power feed lines to the brake shall be opened by an electro-mechanical switch. A single
ground, short circuit or solid-state control failure shall not prevent the application of the brake.
The control system shall include circuitry to detect insufficient brake current. This failure shall
cause the elevator to be removed from service at the next stop and remain out of service until
the condition is corrected.
3-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
IMC Recommended Use
The individual car controller shall have a software program that uses mathematical methods to
create an idealized velocity profile. The velocity profile shall minimize car travel time. All
system motion parameters including jerk, acceleration and deceleration rates, and so forth,
shall be field programmable with parametric limitations for system dynamics and shall be
stored on an EEPROM in non-volatile memory.
The drive control system shall use an optimized velocity profile in a dual-loop feedback system
based on car position and speed. A velocity feedback device (tachometer or encoder) shall
permit continuous comparison of car speed with the calculated velocity profile to provide
accurate control of acceleration and deceleration right up to and including the final stop,
regardless of direction of travel or load in the car. Drive subsystem control parameters shall be
digitally adjustable through software and shall be stored on an EEPROM in non-volatile
memory.
The system shall provide continuous monitoring of actual car speed and compare it with the
intended speed signal to verify proper and safe operation of the elevator. Should actual speed
vary from intended speed by more than a preset amount, the drive shall shut down the elevator
and drop the brake.
A system shall be included for precise closed loop motor field control, for DC applications. This
system shall regulate motor field current throughout the range of operation via current
feedback from the motor field. The system shall provide motor field current sensing which shall
shut down the elevator if insufficient motor field current is detected.
The system shall provide adaptive gains for optimum control of the elevator throughout its
travel.
3
The system shall use a device to establish incremental car position to an accuracy of 0.1875"
(4.76 mm) or better, using a quadrature signal for the entire length of the hoistway.
Absolute floor number encoding with parity shall be provided at each floor in order for exact
floor position to be read by the computer. The system shall not require movement to a terminal
landing for the purpose of finding correct car position.
The automatic leveling zone shall not extend more than 12" (304.8 mm) above or below the
landing level nor shall the doors begin to open until the car is within 12" (304.8 mm) of the
landing. In addition, the inner leveling zone shall not extend more than 3" (76.2 mm) above or
below the landing. The car shall not move if it stops outside the inner leveling zone unless the
doors are fully closed and locked.
The system shall use an automatic two-way leveling device to control the leveling of the car to
within 0.25" (6.35 mm) or better above or below the landing sill. Overtravel, undertravel, or
rope stretch must be compensated for and the car brought level to the landing.
The car controller shall include a minimum of one serial port for display terminal
communication. The display terminal shall be used to view and alter the individual car
operating parameters such as jerk, acceleration, contract speed, deceleration and leveling.
Remote configuration of individual car operating parameters shall be permitted when the car
controller is attached to a CRT/PC via modem and an established protocol has been followed.
3-3
Traction Elevator Controllers, IMC
A menu-driven CRT display shall provide motor field (where applicable), armature and brake
voltages, armature current, intended and actual car velocities and hoist machine rpm.
A special events calendar shall record (depending on controller type) 250 or 500 noteworthy
events or faults for a particular car. They shall be displayed in chronological order for
examination or review. Data displayed shall include the type of event or fault, the date and time
it occurred, and the position of the car and status of various flags at the time of the occurrence.
Optional - A system for pre-torquing the hoist motor (DC) shall be provided in order to ensure
consistently smooth starts. An electronic load cell is required to implement the pre-torquing
feature.
Optional - Two different landing systems are available, LS-QUAD or LS-QUIK. Refer to Section
11 of this specification for details.
Optional - Failure of the brake to lift as detected by a mechanical switch (if provided) shall cause
the control system to remove the elevator from service at the next stop and remain out of
service until the condition is corrected.
IMC Performa/System 12 SCR Drive Recommended Use
IMC PERFORMA offers top performance with faster and more simplified adjustment for
prestige projects with DC hoist motors. This control features the System 12 DC SCR drive using
12-pulse technology, which inherently minimizes electrical and audible noise.
PERFORMA takes MCE 12-pulse technology to a new level. Sophisticated software simplifies
system setup and operation. Interactive automation reduces motor field and brake calibration
from hours to minutes. Imbedded coaching and context-based help make parameter
adjustment intuitive.
Precise velocity control is achieved using advanced Digital Signal Processing (DSP) and MCE’s
sophisticated velocity control software algorithm.
New, more powerful PERFORMA microprocessors work in tandem with high-resolution digital
components, using software optimization to provide tighter tracking and greater positioning
and leveling accuracy.
IMC PERFORMA offers 12-pulse technology to the independent market; technology exclusively
designed for elevator applications. This product is competitively priced despite its
sophistication and superiority to more commonly known, conventional 6-pulse SCR drives.
IMC PERFORMA should be used when the reliability and maintenance-free characteristics of a
DC SCR drive are desired; and where the lowest possible AC power line noise and disturbance is
required. System 12 is the clear choice when limits are specified for AC power line harmonic
distortion. System 12 also provides a superior power factor when compared to conventional
6-pulse SCR drives.
To create an IMC Performa system specification:
• See Section 2.
• See “IMC Recommended Use” on page 3-2.
• See “Specification Text, IMC Performa with System 12 Drive” on page 3-5.
3-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
IMC Performa/System 12 SCR Drive Recommended Use
Specification Text, IMC Performa with System 12 Drive
The control system shall utilize a 12-pulse SCR drive. The 12-pulse SCR drive shall be designed
as an integral part of the control system providing access and adjustment of all diagnostics and
parameters for the entire elevator control system on a single monitor.
The controller shall provide precise velocity control using advanced Digital Signal Processing
(DSP) technology. A high speed FPGA device shall be dedicated to encoder velocity processing.
The control system display diagnostics shall include on-line, context sensitive parameter
descriptions and help information for fault troubleshooting.
The control system shall be capable of capturing six seconds of event-triggered, real time data
for over 350 controller parameters. Data shall be recorded at 30ms intervals, and the system
shall be capable of displaying both analog and digital values.
The control system shall provide auto-tuning of Motor Field and Brake control values.
The control system shall include dynamic braking to assist in bringing the car to a smooth,
controlled emergency stop and to help limit car speed in the unlikely event of brake failure.
The control system motor field supply shall be current regulated and functionally integrated
with the 12-pulse SCR drive in order to accomplish motor field forcing and armature voltage
limiting.
A drive isolation transformer shall be provided as part of the control system to further reduce
power line distortion and line notching. The transformer shall be matched to the characteristics
of the 12-pulse SCR drive and elevator hoist motor.
Overcurrent protection shall be provided by a current limiting circuit, with a threshold
controlled by a computer system parameter.
Semiconductor fuses shall be provided for catastrophic overcurrent protection, and to protect
the SCRs from damage.
Heatsink over-temperature shall be monitored, and when an over-temperature condition
occurs, the elevator shall removed from service at the next available stop until the condition is
corrected.
Speed regulation shall be +/- 1% or better, whether a tachometer or an encoder is used.
The system shall provide a commutation fault protection system to shut off current flow in the
event of unexpected high current, which may occur during power regeneration back into the AC
line combined with a sudden loss of AC power.
The drive shall not create excessive audible noise in the elevator motor.
The drive shall be a heavy-duty type, capable of delivering sufficient current required to
accelerate the elevator to contract speed with rated load. The drive shall provide speed
regulation.
3-5
3
Traction Elevator Controllers, IMC
A contactor shall be used to disconnect the hoist motor from the output of the drive each time
the elevator stops. This contactor shall be monitored and the elevator shall not be allowed to
start again if the contactor has not returned to the de-energized position when the elevator
stops.
All power feed lines to the brake shall be opened by an electro-mechanical switch. A single
ground, short circuit or solid-state control failure shall not prevent the application of the brake.
The controller shall provide stepless acceleration and deceleration and provide smooth
operation at all speeds.
The controls shall be arranged to continuously monitor the performance of the elevator in such
a way that if the car speed exceeds 150 fpm during access, inspection or leveling, the car shall
shut down immediately, requiring a reset operation.
3-6 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
IMC-SCR/System 12 SCR Drive Recommended Use
IMC-SCR/System 12 SCR Drive Recommended Use
IMC-SCR brings premium performance to elevators with DC hoist motors. This control features
the System 12 DC SCR drive using 12-pulse technology, which inherently minimizes electrical
and audible noise.
IMC-SCR offers 12-pulse technology to the independent market; technology exclusively
designed for elevator applications. This product is competitively priced despite its
sophistication and superiority to more commonly known, conventional 6-pulse SCR drives.
IMC-SCR should be used when the reliability and maintenance-free characteristics of a DC SCR
drive are desired; and where the lowest possible AC power line noise and disturbance is
required. System 12 is the clear choice when limits are specified for AC power line harmonic
distortion. System 12 also provides a superior power factor when compared to conventional
6-pulse SCR drives.
To create an IMC-SCR system specification:
• See Section 2.
• See “IMC Recommended Use” on page 3-2.
• See “Specification Text, IMC-SCR with System 12 Drive” on page 3-7.
Specification Text, IMC-SCR with System 12 Drive
The control system shall utilize a 12-pulse SCR drive. The 12-pulse SCR drive shall be designed
as an integral part of the control system providing access and adjustment of all diagnostics and
parameters for the entire elevator control system on a single monitor.
The control system shall include dynamic braking to assist in bringing the car to a smooth,
controlled stop during emergency stops and to help limit the car speed in the unlikely event of
brake failure.
The control system motor field supply shall be current regulated and functionally integrated
with the 12-pulse SCR drive in order to accomplish armature voltage limiting, as well as other
functions.
A drive isolation transformer shall be provided as part of the control system to further reduce
power line distortion and line notching. This transformer shall be matched to the
characteristics of the 12-pulse SCR drive and to the elevator hoist motor.
Overcurrent protection shall be provided by a current limiting circuit with the threshold
controlled by a computer system parameter.
Semiconductor fuses shall be provided for catastrophic overcurrent protection, and to protect
the SCRs from damage.
Heatsink over-temperature shall be monitored, and when an over-temperature condition
occurs, the elevator shall be removed from service at the next stop until the condition is
corrected.
Speed regulation shall be +/- 1% or better, whether a tachometer or an encoder is used.
The system shall provide a commutation fault protection system to shut off current flow in the
event of unexpected high current, which may occur during power regeneration back into the AC
line combined with a sudden loss of AC power.
3-7
3
Traction Elevator Controllers, IMC
IMC-AC/Flux Vector Drive Recommended Use
IMC-AC with Flux Vector “Field Oriented” technology brings premium performance to
elevators using AC hoist motors. The AC drive is integrated with the IMC controller providing
32-bit processing for smooth pattern generation for any application including short floors.
The regenerative IMC-AC model is ideal for higher speeds and gearless applications. Use the
non-regenerative model for geared applications to 450 fpm. The flux vector drive is capable of
producing full torque at zero speed. IMC-AC provides the highest ride quality and the best
performance time when used in conjunction with an AC motor with a slip specification of 5% or
less, or a NEMA rating of “A” or “B”.
To create an IMC-AC system specification:
• See Section 2.
• See “IMC Recommended Use” on page 3-2.
• See “Specification Text, IMC-AC with Flux Vector Drive” on page 3-8.
Specification Text, IMC-AC with Flux Vector Drive
The flux vector drive shall be capable of producing full torque at zero speed and shall not
require DC injection braking in order to control the stopping of the car.
The drive shall use a three-phase, full-wave bridge rectifier and capacitor bank to provide a DC
voltage bus for the solid-state inverter.
The drive shall use power semiconductor devices and pulse width modulation, with a carrier
frequency of not less than 2 kHz, to synthesize the three-phase, variable voltage variable
frequency output to operate the hoist motor in an essentially synchronous mode.
The drive shall have the capability of being adjusted or programmed to achieve the required
motor voltage, current and frequency, in order to properly match the characteristics of the AC
elevator hoist motor.
The drive shall not create excessive audible noise in the elevator motor.
The drive shall be a heavy-duty type, capable of delivering sufficient current required to
accelerate the elevator to contract speed with rated load. The drive shall provide speed
regulation appropriate to the motor type.
For non-regenerative drives, a means shall be provided for removing regenerated power from
the drive's DC power supply during dynamic braking. This power shall be dissipated in a
resistor bank, which is an integral part of the controller. Failure of the system to remove the
regenerated power shall cause the drive's output to be removed from the hoist motor.
A contactor shall be used to disconnect the hoist motor from the output of the drive unit each
time the elevator stops. This contactor shall be monitored and the elevator shall not start again
if the contactor has not returned to the de-energized position when the elevator stops.
All power feed lines to the brake shall be opened by an electro-mechanical switch. A single
ground, short circuit or solid-state control failure shall not prevent the application of the brake.
The controller shall provide stepless acceleration and deceleration and provide smooth
operation at all speeds.
The power control shall be arranged to continuously monitor the performance of the elevator in
such a way that if the car speed exceeds 150 fpm during access, inspection or leveling, the car
shall shut down immediately, requiring a reset operation.
3-8 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
IMC-MG/Generator Field Control Recommended Use
IMC-MG/Generator Field Control Recommended Use
IMC-MG is recommended for premium performance whenever a motor generator is used to
operate a DC hoist motor. The drive, microprocessor and controller are combined into one fully
integrated system. Sophisticated solid state IGBT devices are used to control the generator
shunt field supply for maximum responsiveness and exceptional performance.
To create an IMC-MG system specification:
• See Section 2.
• See “IMC Recommended Use” on page 3-2.
• See “Specification Text, IMC-MG with Generator Field Control” on page 3-9.
Specification Text, IMC-MG with Generator Field Control
The power control shall have the capability to drive the generator field, positive or negative, to
the degree required to maintain regulation under varying loads.
The main monitor screen shall display the generator shunt field voltage.
The generator shunt field supply shall use IGBTs in a current controlled loop for maximum
response.
3
3-9
Traction Elevator Controllers, IMC
3-10 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
General
In This Section
PTC
PTC-SCR
PTC-AC
PTC-MG
VVMC-1000 SCR
VFMC-1000 AC
VVMC-1000 MG
Traction Controllers, PTC, VVMC, VFMC
General
Systems described in this section can be used for geared traction elevators with DC or
AC motors and speeds up to 350fpm in a simplex, duplex or group system
configuration.
PTC Programmable Traction Control provides low cost, easily programmable elevator
controls for simplex or duplex applications. Combined digital/analog technology and closed
loop (CL) velocity feedback deliver superior performance to 350fpm (1.78 m/s). PTC for AC
applications at speeds below 150fpm (0.76m/s) uses an open loop (OL) configuration.
Standard VVMC-1000 or VFMC-1000 controls, dispatched by an M3 Group System, allow
group configurations with 64 landings and as many as 12 cars.
Depending on project requirements, a consultant, contractor or building owner can choose
which control system is appropriate for the specific application.
In This Section
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
PTC Recommended Use
PTC-SCR Recommended Use
PTC-AC Series M Recommended Use
PTC-MG Recommended Use
VVMC-1000 SCR Recommended Use
VFMC-1000 AC Recommended Use
VVMC-1000 MG Recommended Use
4-1
4
Traction Controllers, PTC, VVMC, VFMC
MODEL PTC RECOMMENDED USE
These products can use either SCR drives, VVVF drives, Flux Vector drives or Motor- Generator
shunt field control. PTC controllers are identified by application as either DC or AC systems.
PTC, using proven solid state devices, provides “stepless” acceleration and deceleration for
smooth elevator operation while significantly improving elevator service for most low-rise to
mid-rise buildings. Use PTC for simplex or duplex applications with up to 32 landings, where
low cost and ease of field programmability are desired.
For DC geared applications to 350 fpm (1.78 m/s), where contract speed can be reached on a
two floor run, use closed loop (CL) configured with either SCR drive or MG drive.
For AC geared applications to 150 fpm (0.76 m/s), use open loop (OL) configuration with VVVF
drive; for speeds over 150 fpm (0.76 m/s), use closed loop (CL) configuration with Flux Vector
drive.
PTC uses discrete and fixed slowdown distances and is not recommended for buildings with
short floors or buildings with substantial variation of floor heights. Consult MCE Sales
Engineers for limitations on floor heights.
Specification Text, General, PTC, VVMC, VFMC
All power feed lines to the brake shall be opened by an electro-mechanical switch. A single
ground, short circuit or solid-state control failure shall not prevent the application of the brake.
The automatic leveling zone shall not extend more than 6" (152.4 mm) above or below the
landing level, nor shall the doors begin to open until the car is within 6" (152.4 mm) of the
landing. In addition, the inner leveling zone shall not extend more than 3" (76.2 mm) above or
below the landing. The car shall not move if it stops outside the inner leveling zone unless the
doors are fully closed and locked.
The system shall use an automatic two-way leveling device to control the leveling of the car to
within 0.25" (6.35 mm) or better above or below the landing sill. Overtravel, undertravel or
rope stretch must be compensated for and the car brought level to the landing sill. (Except in
the case of AC Series M open loop applications)
The closed loop feedback power control shall be arranged to continuously monitor the actual
elevator speed signal from the velocity transducer and compare it with the intended speed
signal to verify proper and safe operation of the elevator. (Except in the case of AC Series M
open loop applications)
During operation of the elevator with an overhauling load (empty car up or loaded car down),
precision speed control shall be obtained by the regulation system used in the power control.
The power control shall have the capability to maintain regulation under varying loads. (Except
in the case of AC Series M open loop applications)
The controller shall provide stepless acceleration and deceleration and smooth operation at all
speeds. The system shall provide the required electrical operation of the elevator control system
including automatic application of the brake, which shall bring the car to rest upon power
failure.
The controller shall include absolute floor encoding which, upon power up, shall move the car
to the closest floor to identify the position of the elevator. With absolute floor encoding it is not
necessary to travel to a terminal to establish floor position.
4-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
PTC-SCR Recommended Use
Optional - LS- STAN or LS-QUTE landing systems can be used with PTC, VVMC and VFMC
controllers, Refer to Section 10 of this specification for details.
Optional - Failure of the brake to lift as detected by a mechanical switch (if provided) shall cause
the control system to take the elevator out of service at the next stop and remain out of service
until the condition is corrected.
PTC-SCR Recommended Use
PTC-SCR, using a six-pulse SCR drive, is an ideal low cost closed loop (CL) control solution for
DC geared elevator applications to 350fpm (1.78 m/s). This control system provides high
reliability with low maintenance cost.
To create a PTC-SCR system specification:
•
•
•
•
See Section 2.
See “Specification Text, General, PTC, VVMC, VFMC” on page 4-2.
See “Specification Text, SCR using 6-PULSE SCR DRIVE” on page 4-3.
See “Specification Text, PTC Programmable Logic” on page 4-7.
Specification Text, SCR using 6-PULSE SCR DRIVE
The controller shall use a six pulse regenerative solid-state drive unit using SCRs to control the
motor armature current. The solid-state power control shall be a closed loop feedback design.
The controller shall be a compact, self-contained unit that shall provide stepless acceleration,
deceleration and regulation at all speeds.
Isolation transformers or line inductors, plus proper filtering to eliminate both electrical and
audible noise of SCR drives, shall be provided. The controller shall use a solid-state drive unit
with solid-state power devices to control the motor field and brake.
A means of sensing motor field current shall be provided which shall cause electric power to be
removed from the armature and brake, unless the direct current flowing in the shunt field of the
motor is sufficient to prevent overspeeding of the motor.
A contactor shall be used to disconnect the hoist motor from the output of the drive unit each
time the elevator stops. This contactor shall be monitored. The elevator shall not start again if
the contactor has not returned to the de-energized position when the elevator stops.
All power feed lines to the brake shall be opened by an electro-mechanical switch. A single
ground, short circuit or solid-state control failure shall not prevent the application of the brake.
The controller shall provide stepless acceleration and deceleration and smooth operation at all
speeds.
The controls shall be arranged to continuously monitor the performance of the elevator in such
a way that if the car speed exceeds 150 fpm during access, inspection or leveling, the car shall
shut down immediately, requiring a reset operation.
The controller shall include absolute floor encoding which, upon power up, shall move the car
to the closest floor to identify the position of the elevator. With absolute floor encoding it is not
necessary to travel to a terminal to establish floor position.
4-3
4
Traction Controllers, PTC, VVMC, VFMC
PTC-AC Series M Recommended Use
PTC-AC Series M is the most versatile control solution for geared elevators with AC hoist
motors. This easily installed and adjusted control system can be configured for most
applications.
Use open loop (OL) VVVF drive to 150fpm (0.76 m/s); use closed loop (CL) FLUX VECTOR
drive to 350fpm (1.78 m/s). PTC-AC Series M non-regenerative control systems use the latest in
AC drive technology and, for many applications, the existing motors can be reused. Consult
your MCE Sales Representative for specific motor recommendations.
To create a PTC-AC Series M specification:
•
•
•
•
•
See Section 2.
See “Specification Text, General, PTC, VVMC, VFMC” on page 4-2.
See “Specification Text, AC Series M using VVVF or Flux Vector Drive” on page 4-4.
See “Specification Text, VVVF Drives” on page 4-9.
See “Specification Text, PTC Programmable Logic” on page 4-7.
To create a PTC-AC Series M Flux Vector system specification:
•
•
•
•
•
See Section 2.
See “Specification Text, General, PTC, VVMC, VFMC” on page 4-2.
See “Specification Text, AC Series M using VVVF or Flux Vector Drive” on page 4-4.
See “Specification Text, Flux Vector Drive ” on page 4-10.
See “Specification Text, PTC Programmable Logic” on page 4-7.
Specification Text, AC Series M using VVVF or Flux Vector Drive
The controller shall use a variable voltage variable frequency drive for the control of three phase
AC induction motors.
The drive shall use a three-phase, full-wave bridge rectifier and capacitor bank to provide a DC
voltage bus for the solid-state inverter.
The drive shall use power semiconductor devices and pulse width modulation, with a carrier
frequency of not less than 2 kHz, to synthesize the three-phase, variable voltage variable
frequency output to operate the hoist motor in an essentially synchronous mode.
The drive shall have the capability of being adjusted or programmed to achieve the required
motor voltage, current and frequency, in order to properly match the characteristics of the AC
elevator hoist motor.
The drive shall not create excessive audible noise in the elevator motor.
The drive shall be a heavy-duty type, capable of delivering sufficient current required to
accelerate the elevator to contract speed with rated load. The drive shall provide speed
regulation appropriate to the motor type.
4-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
PTC-AC Series M Recommended Use
A means shall be provided for removing regenerated power from the drive's DC power supply
during dynamic braking. This power shall be dissipated in a resistor bank, which is an integral
part of the controller. Failure of the system to remove the regenerated power shall cause the
drive's output to be removed from the hoist motor.
A contactor shall be used to disconnect the hoist motor from the output of the drive unit each
time the elevator stops. This contactor shall be monitored. The elevator shall not start again if
the contactor has not returned to the de-energized position when the elevator stops.
All power feed lines to the brake shall be opened by an electro-mechanical switch. A single
ground, short circuit or solid-state control failure shall not prevent the application of the brake.
The controller shall provide stepless acceleration and deceleration and smooth operation at all
speeds.
The controls shall be arranged to continuously monitor the performance of the elevator in such
a way that if the car speed exceeds 150 fpm during access, inspection or leveling, the car shall
shut down immediately, requiring a reset operation.
The controller shall include absolute floor encoding which, upon power up, shall move the car
to the closest floor to identify the position of the elevator. With absolute floor encoding it is not
necessary to travel to a terminal to establish floor position.
The controller shall have an RFI Filter to help reduce EMI and RFI noise.
4
4-5
Traction Controllers, PTC, VVMC, VFMC
PTC-MG Recommended Use
PTC-MG utilizes a field proven drive unit, manufactured by MCE, which employs an analog
pattern generator and integrates control of the generator field, motor field and brake. PTC-MG
is an ideal low cost closed loop (CL) control solution for DC geared elevator applications to
350fpm (1.78 m/s).
To create a PTC- MG system specification:
•
•
•
•
See Section 2.
See “Specification Text, General, PTC, VVMC, VFMC” on page 4-2.
See “Specification Text, MG using Generator Field Control” on page 4-6.
See “Specification Text, PTC Programmable Logic” on page 4-7.
Specification Text, MG using Generator Field Control
The controller shall use a static drive unit using SCRs to control the generator shunt field, hoist
motor field and brake. The solid-state power control shall be of a closed loop feedback design.
The controller shall be a compact, self-contained unit that shall provide stepless acceleration,
deceleration and regulation at all speeds.
The power control shall have the capability to drive the generator field, positive or negative, to a
degree required to maintain regulation under varying loads.
The solid-state power control regulation system shall incorporate linear and/or proportional
amplifiers, precise reference circuit boards, and speed feedback provided by the tachometer,
with output voltage and current proportional to the actual speed of the traction motor.
Regulator action shall be by electronic comparison of a reference signal to the feedback signal
currents and, when any difference is present, the amplifier shall adjust to reduce the difference.
The controller shall use a solid-state drive unit with solid-state power devices to control the
motor field, machine brake and generator shunt field. A means of sensing motor field current
shall be provided which shall cause electric power to be removed from the armature and brake,
unless the direct current flowing in the shunt field of the motor is sufficient to prevent
overspeeding of the motor.
All power feed lines to the brake shall be opened by an electro-mechanical switch. A single
ground, short circuit or solid-state control failure shall not prevent the application of the brake.
The controller shall provide stepless acceleration and deceleration and smooth operation at all
speeds.
The controls shall be arranged to continuously monitor the performance of the elevator in such
a way that if the car speed exceeds 150 fpm during access, inspection or leveling, the car shall
shut down immediately, requiring a reset operation.
The controller shall include absolute floor encoding which, upon power up, shall move the car
to the closest floor to identify the position of the elevator. With absolute floor encoding it is not
necessary to travel to a terminal to establish floor position.
4-6 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
PTC-MG Recommended Use
Specification Text, PTC Programmable Logic
All available options (consult your MCE Sales Representative) or parameters shall be field
programmable without need for any external device or knowledge of any programming
languages. Programmable options and parameters shall be stored in nonvolatile memory.
As a minimum, there shall be a 32-character alphanumeric display to be used for programming
and diagnostics. The programmable parameters and options shall include, but not be limited to,
the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Number of Stops/Openings Served (Each Car)
Simplex/Duplex
Single Automatic Pushbutton
Selective Collective/Single Button Collective
Programmable Fire Code Options
Fire Floors (Main, Alternates)
Floor Encoding (Absolute PI)
Digital PIs/Single Wire PIs
Programmable Door Times
Programmable Motor Limit Timer
Nudging
Emergency Power
Parking Floors
Door Preopening
Hall or Car Gong Selection
Retiring Cam Option for Freight Doors.
Independent Rear Doors
MCE Standard Security
Emergency Hospital Service
Attendant Service
Anti-nuisance - Light Load Weighing and Photo Eye
4
Field selectable preprogrammed Fire Service operations compliant with the following Fire
Codes:
• ASME A17.1
• California
• Hawaii
• Massachusetts
• City of Chicago
• City of Detroit
• City of Houston
• New York City
• Veterans Administration
• Washington DC
• Australia
• British
• Canadian B44
4-7
Traction Controllers, PTC, VVMC, VFMC
For duplex configurations, each elevator shall have its own computer and dispatching
algorithm. Should one computer lose power or become inoperative in any way, the other
computer shall be capable of accepting and answering all hall calls. When both computers are in
operation, only one shall assume the role of dispatching the hall calls to both elevators.
The dispatching algorithm for assigning hall calls shall be real time, based on estimated time of
arrival (ETA). In calculating the estimated time of arrival for each elevator, the dispatcher shall
consider, but is not limited to, location of each elevator, direction of travel, existing hall call and
car call demands, MG start up time, door time, flight time, lobby removal time penalty and
coincidence calls.
The controller shall have field programmable outputs to activate different functions based on
customer needs. These functions can be outputs such as those listed below.
•
•
•
•
Fire Phase I Return Complete Signal
Fire Phase II Output Signal
Hall Call Reject Signal
Emergency Power Return
The controller shall have field programmable inputs to initiate special operations based on customer needs. These functions can be inputs such as those listed below.
• Fire Phase I Bypass Input
• Fire Phase II Call Cancel Input
• Fire Phase II Hold Input
• MG Shut Down Input
• Attendant Service Input
• Building Security Input
• Hospital Emergency Operation Input
The controller shall include absolute floor encoding which, upon power up, shall move the car
to the closest floor to identify the position of the elevator. With absolute floor encoding it is not
necessary to travel to a terminal to establish floor position.
The controller shall have an RFI Filter to help reduce EMI and RFI noise.
Optional - The controller shall have a serial port for communication with any data or computer
terminal such as a CRT terminal, modem, etc.
Optional - The controller shall have a 3 Phase Line Inductor to match minimum 3% line
impedance recommended by various drive manufacturers.
Optional - The controller shall have a Drive Isolation Transformer, typically used to match line
voltage to motor and drive voltage.
4-8 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
VVMC-1000 SCR Recommended Use
VVMC-1000 SCR Recommended Use
VVMC-1000 SCR used with an M3 Group System provides coordinated dispatching for up to 12
cars serving up to 64 landings. A six-pulse SCR drive provides an ideal, low cost closed loop
(CL) control solution for group operation of DC geared elevators to 350fpm (1.78 m/s). This
control system provides high reliability with low maintenance cost.
To create a VVMC-1000 SCR Group system specification:
• See Section 2.
• See “Specification Text, General, PTC, VVMC, VFMC” on page 4-2.
• See “Specification Text, SCR using 6-PULSE SCR DRIVE” on page 4-3.
VFMC-1000 AC Recommended Use
VFMC-1000 AC used with an M3 Group System provides coordinated dispatching for up to 12
cars serving up to 64 landings. These reliable, value priced controls use VVVF or FLUX
VECTOR drives for AC applications. VFMC-1000 AC is the most versatile control solution for
group operation of geared elevators with AC hoist motors. This easily installed and adjusted
control system can be configured for most applications.
Use open loop (OL) VVVF drive to 150fpm (0.76 m/s); use closed loop (CL) FLUX VECTOR
drive to 350fpm (1.78 m/s). PTC-AC Series M non-regenerative control systems use the latest in
AC drive technology and for many applications the existing motors can be reused. Consult your
MCE Sales Representative for specific motor recommendations.
To create a VFMC-1000 VVVF Group system specification:
•
•
•
•
See Section 2.
See “Specification Text, General, PTC, VVMC, VFMC” on page 4-2.
See “Specification Text, AC Series M using VVVF or Flux Vector Drive” on page 4-4.
See “Specification Text, VVVF Drives” on page 4-9.
4
To create a VFMC-1000 Flux Vector Group system specification:
•
•
•
•
See Section 2.
See “Specification Text, General, PTC, VVMC, VFMC” on page 4-2.
See “Specification Text, AC Series M using VVVF or Flux Vector Drive” on page 4-4.
See “Specification Text, Flux Vector Drive ” on page 4-10.
Specification Text, VVVF Drives
For VVVF applications (open loop), it is recommended that the AC motor have slip
specifications between 8% and 12%, or a NEMA rating of “D”.
The VVVF drive shall be capable of providing a braking pulse to use in the stopping sequence of
the elevator. The braking pulse shall take the form of an adjustable DC current pulse applied to
the AC motor for an adjustable period of time (0 to 0.75 second).
The VVVF drive shall be able to be programmed with different volts per hertz patterns which
shall be used to adjust the drive control characteristics.
4-9
Traction Controllers, PTC, VVMC, VFMC
Specification Text, Flux Vector Drive
For Flux Vector applications (closed loop), it is recommended that the AC motor have a slip
specification of 5% or less, or a NEMA rating of “A” or “B”. The flux vector drive shall be capable
of producing full torque at zero speed. The flux vector drive shall not require DC injection
braking in order to control the stopping of the car. The flux vector drive shall use encoder
feedback to regulate hoist motor speed. The encoder shall be mounted to the motor shaft.
VVMC-1000 MG Recommended Use
VVMC-1000 MG used with an M3 Group System provides coordinated dispatching for up to 12
cars serving up to 64 landings. VVMC-1000 MG uses a field proven drive unit, manufactured by
MCE, which employs an analog pattern generator and integrates control of the generator field,
motor field and brake. VVMC-1000 MG is an ideal low cost closed loop (CL) control solution for
group operation of DC geared elevators to 350fpm (1.78 m/s).
To create a VVMC-1000 MG Group system specifications:
• See Section 2.
• See “Specification Text, General, PTC, VVMC, VFMC” on page 4-2.
• See “Specification Text, MG using Generator Field Control” on page 4-6.
4-10 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
•
•
•
•
General
In This Section
PHC
HS
Hydraulic Controllers, PHC, HS
General
Model HMC-1000 controllers, recognized by the industry for over a decade, provide
field proven reliability for all hydraulic elevator applications. MCE manufactures two
series of Model HMC-1000 controllers for hydraulic elevators, Series “PHC”
(Programmable Hydraulic Controller) and Series “HS”. Depending on project
requirements, a consultant, contractor or building owner can choose which control
system is appropriate for the specific application.
In This Section
• PHC Recommended Use
• HS Recommended Use
5-1
5
Hydraulic Controllers, PHC, HS
PHC Recommended Use
Series PHC Programmable Hydraulic Control brings sophisticated elevator control technology
to hydraulic applications. These systems are ideal when low cost and the flexibility of field
programmable controls is desired.
PHC's user friendly LCD display provides access to a comprehensive list of options, which are
easily programmed using the 32-character alphanumeric display. Everything you need comes
with the controller - no external tools or computers required.
Each PHC model is available in both simplex and duplex configuration for up to 16 landings.
This series duplex configuration (PHC-D), with a computer for each controller, assigns cars on a
real time basis using estimated time of arrival (ETA).
To create a Series PHC specification:
• See Section 2.
• See “Specification Text, PHC & HS General Specifications ” on page 5-2.
• See “Specification Text, PHC Programmable Logic” on page 5-3.
Specification Text, PHC & HS General Specifications
The elevator shall not require the functioning or presence of the microprocessor to operate on
car top inspection or hoistway access operation (if provided) to provide a reliable means of
moving the car if the microprocessor fails.
A motor limit timer function shall be provided which, in case of the pump motor being
energized longer than a predetermined time, shall cause the car to descend to the lowest
landing and park, open the doors automatically and then close them. Car calls shall be canceled
and the car taken out of service automatically. Operation may be restored by cycling the main
line disconnect switch or putting the car on access or inspection operation. Door reopening
devices shall remain operative.
A valve limit timer shall be provided which shall automatically cut off current to the down valve
solenoids if they have been energized longer than a predetermined time. The car calls shall then
be canceled and the car taken out of service automatically. Operation may be restored by cycling
the main line disconnect switch or putting the car on access or inspection operation. Door
reopening devices shall remain operative.
A selector switch shall be provided on the controller to select high or low speed during access or
inspection operation as long as contract speed does not exceed 150 feet per minute.
The controller shall include absolute floor encoding, which upon power up, shall move the car
to the closest floor to identify the position of the elevator.
Optional - Viscosity control (valve design must allow the use of this option) shall cause the car
to accomplish the following operation. If a temperature sensor determines the oil is too cold,
and if there are no calls registered, the car shall go to the bottom landing and, as long as the
doors are closed, the pump motor shall run without the valve coils energized to circulate and
heat the oil to the desired temperature. In the event that the temperature sensor fails, a timer
shall prevent continuous running of the pump motor.
5-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
PHC Recommended Use
Optional - MCE Hydraulic Controllers are available with a battery lowering device pre-wired,
pre-tested and integrated into the standard enclosure. For freight doors applications, a standalone battery lowering device can be provided.
Optional - MCE offers both solid state and mechanical starters for three and six or twelve lead
motors (ATL and Y-Delta). MCE-supplied starters will be mounted within the controller
enclosure unless a remote starter enclosure is specified.
Specification Text, PHC Programmable Logic
All available programming options (consult your MCE Sales Representative) or parameters
shall be field programmable, without need for any external device or knowledge of any programming languages. Programmable options and parameters shall be stored in nonvolatile
memory. As a minimum, there shall be a 32-character alphanumeric display used for programming and diagnostics. Programmable parameters and options shall include, but are not limited
to, the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Number of Stops/Openings Served (Each Car)
Simplex/Duplex
Single Automatic Pushbutton
Selective Collective/Single Button Collective
Programmable Fire Code Options/Fire Floors (Main, Alternates)
Floor Encoding (Absolute PI)
Digital PIs/Single Wire PI’s
Programmable Door Times
Programmable Motor Limit Timer
Nudging
External Car Shutdown Input (e.g., battery lowering device)
External Low Oil Sensor Input
External Viscosity Control Input
Parking Floors
Hall or Car Gong Selection
Retiring Cam Option for Freight Doors
Independent Rear Doors
MCE Standard Security
Emergency Hospital Service
Attendant Service
Anti-nuisance - Light Load Weighing and Photo Eye
5
5-3
Hydraulic Controllers, PHC, HS
Field selectable preprogrammed Fire Service operations compliant with the following Fire
Codes:
• ASME A17.1
• California
• Hawaii
• Massachusetts
• City of Chicago
• City of Detroit
• City of Houston
• New York City
• Veterans Administration
• Washington DC
• Australia
• British
• Canadian B44
For duplex configurations, each elevator shall have its own computer and dispatching
algorithm. Should one computer lose power or become inoperative in any way, the other
computer shall be capable of accepting and answering all hall calls. When both computers are in
operation, only one shall assume the role of dispatching the hall calls to both elevators.
The dispatching algorithm for assigning hall calls shall be real time, based on estimated time of
arrival (ETA). In calculating the estimated time of arrival for each elevator, the dispatcher shall
consider, but not be limited to, the location of the elevator, the direction of travel, the existing
hall call and car call demands, the door time, flight time, lobby removal time penalty and
coincidence calls.
The controller shall have field programmable outputs to activate different functions based on
customer needs. These functions can be outputs as listed below.
•
•
•
•
Fire Phase I Return Complete Signal
Fire Phase II Output Signal
Hall Call Reject Signal
Emergency Power Return Complete
The controller shall have field programmable inputs to initiate special operations based on customer needs. These functions can be inputs as listed below.
• Fire Phase I Bypass Input
• Fire Phase II Call Cancel Input
• Fire Phase II Hold Input
• Attendant Service Input
• Building Security Input
• Hospital Emergency Operation Input
Optional - The controller shall have a serial port for communication with a data or computer
terminal such as a CRT terminal, modem or CMS remote monitoring.
5-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
HS Recommended Use
HS Recommended Use
Series HS using the HMC Group System provides coordinated dispatching for up to twelve
Series HS hydraulic elevator controllers, each serving up to 16 landings. For multiple car
hydraulic group operation use the Series HS controller. Series HS can be used for complex
operations other than group (consult your MCE Sales Representative).
Easily installed, the HMC Group System brings sophisticated traction control dispatching to
hydraulic applications, ensuring the shortest possible waiting time for passengers while
minimizing elevator movement within the building. This series uses an HMC Group System;
refer to Section 7.0.
To create a Series HS specification:
• See Section 2.
• See “Specification Text, PHC & HS General Specifications ” on page 5-2.
5
5-5
Hydraulic Controllers, PHC, HS
5-6 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
•
•
•
•
•
•
General
In This Section
System Hardware
Group Signals
Overlay Inputs
Overlay Outputs
Intelligent Overlay System
General
MCE's IOS Intelligent Overlay System is designed to bring state-of-the-art
microprocessor technology to an existing group of elevators with relay logic controls.
The Intelligent Overlay System uses either M3 or AIM group control technologies. For
M3 Group System specifications and details, refer to Section 7. For AIM Group
specifications and details, refer to Section 8.
IOS Intelligent Overlay System can dramatically reduce hall call “waiting” time while improving
performance and dispatching reliability for older relay logic elevator systems. Since MCE’s
group system does not differentiate between overlay controllers and new MCE controllers, car
controllers can be replaced one at a time. This system modularity provides the flexibility of
incremental modernization which can frequently overcome otherwise insurmountable budget
limitations.
All M3 Group System features are available with the MCE Intelligent Overlay System. These
features include fire service, hospital service, emergency power, security, remote monitoring,
etc. Thus, it is possible to bring an elevator system up to date, meeting code requirements with
an IOS upgrade. Further, in addition to substantially reduced hall call waiting times, IOS
eliminates a majority of the original logic relays, so less maintenance is required. In most cases,
complete dispatching and/or auxiliary cabinets can be removed.
This section covers the basic hardware configuration of the Intelligent Overlay System and
identifies the necessary signals that should be provided, and the signals the group overlay
system generates that are used by the power control subsystem. Providing the proper signals to
the IOS is an essential part of any overlay installation. Therefore, it is important to make sure
adequate documentation is available, and that proper signals are generated and used.
6-1
6
Intelligent Overlay System
In This Section
•
•
•
•
Overlay System Hardware
Group Signals
Overlay Interface Inputs
Overlay Interface Outputs
System Hardware
The Intelligent Overlay System shall consist of a group cabinet and one overlay interface cabinet
per individual car.
The contractor or customer must provide interconnection details in the form of as-built wiring
diagrams, including power control subsystem terminal numbers. Hardware shall be
manufactured according to diagrams provided by the elevator contractor.
The group cabinet shall include the computer and input/output boards necessary for the hall
calls and other signals required for group operation. It shall also include the high speed serial
interface connections to individual overlay interface cabinets, and peripheral equipment such
as CRT terminals, modems and printers.
The overlay interface cabinet shall include the computer, high speed serial interface connection,
input/output boards and relays. The input signals shall be taken from the existing power
control subsystem and connected to the overlay interface cabinet.
Group Cabinet Signals
Inputs to the group cabinet shall be provided to the designated terminals at specified voltages in
the form of a contact closure. The following list includes some of these inputs:
•
•
•
•
Front and/or Rear Hall Call Signals
Main and Alternate Fire Recall Floors
Emergency Power Signal
Spare Inputs are Available for Special Applications
Outputs shall be available for special applications.
Call registration and lamp acknowledgment shall be by means of a single wire per call.
6-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Overlay Interface Cabinet Inputs
Overlay Interface Cabinet Inputs
Inputs to the overlay interface cabinet shall be provided to the designated terminals at specified
voltages in the form of contact closures, and shall include the following inputs:
• Car position shall be provided by contact closures, one per floor. More than one contact
may be closed only when the car is moving from one floor to another. The position shall
change from the previous floor to the new floor when the new floor is first seen. The position shall be the advanced or stopping position and shall be made active prior to the car
being in a position to stop at a floor.
• Signals shall be provided, one for each car call. Call registration and lamp acknowledgment shall be by means of a single wire per call.
• One signal shall indicate activation of each of the following devices: door open button,
door close button, safety edge, photo electric eye, door open limit (open when doors are
fully open), door close limit (open when doors are fully closed), and door zone.
• One signal shall indicate each input (off, hold, and on) from the in-car fire service switch
and the car call cancel button.
• One signal shall be provided to indicate that the car is on inspection.
• One signal shall be provided to indicate that the car is on automatic operation. This signal
shall become inactive if the car is on independent service.
• Two signals shall be provided to indicate that the car is in motion, one for the up direction,
one for the down direction.
• One signal shall be provided to indicate that the car is operating at contract speed or accelerating to contract speed. This signal shall open when the car begins to slow down or is
stopped.
• One signal shall be provided to indicate that the car is loaded to a predetermined capacity
or greater.
In addition to these signals there shall be spare inputs available per car which may be assigned
for a specific purpose.
6
6-3
Intelligent Overlay System
Overlay Interface Cabinet Outputs
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Outputs of the overlay interface cabinet shall be in the form of contact closures.
One signal shall indicate that there is a demand above the position of the car.
One signal shall indicate that there is a demand below the position of the car.
One signal shall indicate that the motor generator may be started in response to a demand.
One signal shall activate to slow down and stop the car.
One signal shall activate the up hall lantern.
One signal shall activate the down hall lantern.
One signal shall activate to open the doors.
One signal shall activate nudging.
One signal shall indicate that the car has accepted Fire Recall Phase I and another signal
shall indicate that the car is in motion in order to bypass the in-car emergency stop switch.
• One signal shall activate the fire warning indicator.
• One signal shall activate the fire warning light.
• One signal shall activate the passing floor gong.
In addition to these signals there shall be additional spare output signals that may be assigned
for a specific purpose.
6-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
• General
• In This Section
• M3 Specifications
M3 Group System
General
The M3 Group System includes a group dispatcher and up to twelve IMC, VVMC,
VFMC traction or HS hydraulic controllers (HS uses HMC Group System). The M3
Group System is based on a state-of-the-art network of microcomputers linked
together through a high speed data communication link.
The Group System analyzes building traffic conditions including, but not limited to the
following: hall call demand, number of assigned hall calls, number of cars in operation, number
of car calls, number of car stops, car position, car direction, anticipated direction of car travel,
car loading, car status, car motion status, car door status, call waiting time, door opening time,
door closing time, coincidence calls and estimated time of car arrival.
The Group System evaluates real time data and selects the best car to serve any given hall call
demand. The assignment of cars, by the Group System, provides efficient handling of varying
traffic demands in terms of passenger waiting time and passenger transit time.
In This Section
• M3 Group System Specifications
7-1
7
M3 Group System
M3 Group System Specifications
The group system shall be based on a multi-tasking/multi-processing network of
microcomputers. As a minimum, a 32-bit embedded RISC controller which operates at 16 MHZ
or faster shall be provided. The Group System's computer shall have the capacity for four
megabytes or more of EPROM plus RAM, and shall provide up to eight industry standard serial
communication ports for use with modems and other peripherals.
Specification Text, M3 Dispatching Algorithm
The dispatching algorithm shall use mathematical modeling and queuing theory to optimize
elevator service to the building. The dispatching algorithm shall minimize the mean waiting
time, the maximum waiting time and the number of late calls.
This algorithm shall cover all two-way traffic demands such as light, medium and heavy traffic
situations. The algorithm shall compile the required physical and statistical data and
parameters that are necessary to perform the above minimization tasks.
Specification Text, Parking Operation
The group system software shall include sophisticated parking programs that provide flexible
parking options allowing the user to select the most efficient parking configuration for a specific
building. Parking floors shall be divided into two groups: lobby parking floors and non-lobby
parking floors. Lobby parking floors are the floors where a lobby function is performed.
Non-lobby parking floors are floors where the car performs a regular parking function.
There shall be any number of user definable lobbies with four levels of priority to allow
maximum system flexibility. More than one car could park at any lobby, and the number of cars
that can park at any lobby shall be field programmable.
There shall be 15 levels of priority for non-lobby parking floors. When all lobby parking floors
are occupied, the next car that is ready to park shall park at the highest priority non-lobby floor.
If all the non-lobby parking floors are of the same priority, then the next car that is ready to
park shall park at the closest non-lobby floor. The priorities for non-lobby parking floors shall
be field programmable and more than one car could park at any non-lobby floor.
For motor generator systems, once a car is parked for a preset time period, its MG shall shut
down. The MG shutdown time shall be field adjustable. A parked car with its MG shutdown
shall not respond to any hall calls unless the Group Supervisor detects that the hall call demand
has increased to a level that requires the service of a shutdown car.
Specification Text, Lobby Operation
A lobby floor is a floor designated to be a lobby. A user programmable option shall allow the
first car that parks at a lobby to park with its doors closed, with its doors open for a
programmable time period, or with its doors open indefinitely.
Specification Text, Time Activated Dispatching Configurations
The group system shall allow eight different system configurations to be programmed by the
user. The programmable parameters for each configuration shall include the dispatching mode
of operation, lobby parking floors, non-lobby parking floors, lobby operation, lobby and
non-lobby parking delay timers, and long wait hall call threshold times. The user can invoke any
of these configurations, any time of the day. There shall be up to 16 time selections for these
configurations.
7-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
M3 Group System Specifications
Specification Text, Traffic Identification Operation
The group system software shall operate as a dynamically balanced system for two-way traffic.
Depending upon the traffic pattern in the building, the Group Supervisor shall automatically
modify the mode of operation to lobby up peak, demand up peak, or demand down peak.
Specification Text, Lobby Up Peak
The lobby up peak mode shall be capable of being initiated by using a switch input, by manual
selection from the keyboard, by a timed configuration or by automatic monitoring of load
weigher inputs and/or the number of up car calls registered at the main lobby floor(s). The
lobby up peak condition shall be classified as low or high and shall be programmable from the
display terminal. A high level of lobby up activity shall assign more cars to the lobby than a low
level.
The lobby up peak program shall handle heavy incoming traffic at one or two lobby landings, at
the same time or at different times. This program shall assign one or more cars to the lobby
depending on the lobby up peak classification for that particular lobby. The first car at the lobby
shall stay with its doors open or closed for a programmable length of time. If more than one car
is assigned to the lobby, then all other cars shall stay at the lobby floor with their doors closed.
The loading car shall stay at the lobby landing for the duration of the up peak interval, unless
dispatched by the loaded car input.
A peak participating car is a car assigned to participate in lobby up peak operation. Depending
on the level of traffic, the system shall assign a variable number of cars for lobby up peak
operation. All non-lobby up and down hall calls shall be assigned to non-peak participating
cars. The selection of cars shall be done dynamically.
Specification Text, Demand Up Peak
Demand up peak mode shall be capable of being initiated by using a switch input, by selection
from the keyboard, by a timed configuration, or as automatically determined by the system.
The demand up peak program shall reverse the car's direction at its highest call and cause it to
travel nonstop to the lowest call in the building. The cars shall collect up calls as they are
encountered until the cars are loaded to a predetermined adjustable level that shall then cause
the cars to bypass hall calls until they make a high call reversal. The next down-traveling car
shall stop, reverse direction at the floor above the floor at which the prior car's load switch
operated and then collect up calls in the same manner as the previous car.
7
Specification Text, Demand Down Peak
Demand down peak mode shall be capable of being initiated by using a switch input, by
selection from the keyboard, by a timed configuration, or automatically as determined by the
system.
The demand down peak mode shall reverse the car's direction at its lowest call and cause it to
travel nonstop to the highest call in the building. The cars shall collect down calls as they are
encountered until the cars are loaded to a predetermined adjustable level that shall then cause
the cars to bypass hall calls until they make a low call reversal. The next up-traveling car shall
stop, reverse direction at the floor below the floor at which the prior car's load switch operated
and then collect down calls in the same manner as the previous car.
7-3
M3 Group System
Specification Text, Emergency Dispatch
In case of a malfunction of the Group System's communication network, the computers
operating the individual car computers shall detect the malfunction and provide emergency
dispatching of all in-service cars.
Specification Text, Emergency Power, Optional
When emergency power is detected by an input, the cars shall be returned to the main lobby one
at a time, and remain there with doors open. Once all cars have been returned to the lobby, one
or more cars may be selected to run under emergency power. Selection of the cars that will run
under emergency power shall be done automatically by the Group Supervisor. This automatic
selection may be overridden through manual selection. The actual number of cars allowed to
run under emergency power shall be a preprogrammed value and the Group Supervisor shall
not allow any more than the preprogrammed number of cars to run on emergency power.
Specification Text, Out-of-Service
The system shall automatically remove any car from the group operation if the car is delayed
from responding to its demand within a field adjustable time period. The system shall
automatically restore any car back to system operation when the reason for the delay has been
corrected.
Specification Text, Loaded Car Dispatch, Optional
Waiting time shall be removed from the main lobby dispatching interval when a car becomes
loaded to a predetermined adjustable level.
Specification Text, Display Terminal
A CRT terminal or an IBM compatible computer shall be provided for the machine room. These
devices shall provide menu driven access to reports and other functions. As a minimum, the
following reports shall be provided:
Job Configuration - This report shall provide a brief description of the system, including the job
number, programmable job name, number of cars, number of landings, openings per landing
for each car, programmable car designation, programmable landing designation, fire service
options, serial communication port definitions, and other system options.
System Performance Graph - This report shall provide elevator system performance data based
on hall call waiting times. At the end of each hour, the number of up and down hall calls and the
up and down waiting time averages shall be calculated and saved in the controller's non-volatile
RAM. This information shall be stored for a minimum of seven days.
Hall Call Distribution - This report shall provide hourly hall call distribution in a tabular format
for each hour, showing the number of hall calls which were answered within 15 second intervals
for each landing and direction, and show the percentage and number of cars that were in service
during a specified time frame. This information shall be stored for at least 24 hours.
Graphic Display of Elevator Status - This report shall provide a graphic display of the elevator
hoistway that gives the user a comprehensive picture of car location, door status, direction of
travel, car calls registered, hall calls registered, hall call assignments, estimated time of arrival
of a car for a registered hall call, wait time of a registered hall call, floor labels, system status,
and a car status window. The per-car status window shall display car status including automatic
7-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
M3 Group System Specifications
operation, inspection, fire service main and alternate, timed out of service, top floor demand
and bottom floor demand.
Entering Hall and Car Calls - The display terminal shall provide a means for entering hall and
car calls using the arrow and enter keys. If the call is valid and registered, a corresponding
symbol shall be displayed on the screen.
Dispatching Parameters - The display terminal shall be capable of monitoring and adjusting the
group dispatching parameters, including, but not limited to, the eight configurations of parking
floors and their priorities, system mode of operation, parking delay times, etc., system
parameters of long hall call wait threshold time and lobby up peak parameters.
Real-Time Clock - The display terminal shall provide the capability to program the group
system's real-time clocks (Group Supervisor and all car controllers).
Car Flags - The display terminal shall provide simultaneous viewing of most individual car flags
to detect important sequential events.
Special Events Calendar - The Group Supervisor shall have the capability to document 250 to
500 important fault conditions or events in a Special Events Calendar. The data shall include
the type of fault or event, the date and time it occurred, and the date and time it was corrected.
The display terminal shall have the capability to display the Special Events Calendar entries in
chronological order to allow the user to examine the documented faults or events. In addition, a
description of each event, probable cause(s) of the fault or event and suggested troubleshooting
tips shall be provided on-line. The capability to clear all the documented faults and events shall
also be provided.
Specification Text, Printer, Optional
A printer shall be provided to allow a permanent copy of reports available from the display
terminal to be obtained for records or easy reference.
Specification Text, SmartLINK for Hall Call Signals, Optional
The group system shall use the SmartLINK for Hall Call Signals serial communication system.
See Section 10 for details about SmartLINK for Hall Call Signals.
Specification Text, Basic Security, Optional
7
The display terminal shall provide the capability to program the adjustable variables and
display information for Basic Security. See Section 15.2 for details about Basic Security.
Specification Text, ACE Security, Optional
The display terminal shall provide the capability to program the adjustable variables and
display information for Access Control for Elevators (ACE). See Section 15 for details about
Access Control for Elevators (ACE).
Specification Text, Security Interface System for Windows, Optional
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7-5
M3 Group System
Specification Text, Central Monitoring System (CMS), Optional
The capability to monitor the M3 Group System from a local and/or remote location using a PC
compatible computer and Central Monitoring System (CMS) software shall be provided. See
Section 14 for details about CMS.
Specification Text, Keyboard Control for Elevators (KCE), Optional
The display terminal, through CMS, shall provide the user with a submenu allowing
programming of certain key functions (Central Monitoring System required). Consult your
MCE Sales Representative.
Specification Text, Multiple System Display (MSD), Optional
The capability shall be provided to simultaneously monitor a number of M3 Group Systems on a
PC compatible computer using an easy-to-understand display. MSD is typically used as a lobby
display where several elevator systems must be monitored at the same time. Up to eight direct
connections or up to sixteen Ethernet connections shall be supported.
Specification Text, Split Bank, Optional
The capability shall be provided to automatically, using a timer table, allow one or more cars to
operate independent of the group system. Split Bank is typically used for freight cars, express
service, shuttle service or swing operation.
7-6 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
•
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•
General
In This Section
DC Gearless Machines
AC Gearless Machines
DC Hoist Motors
AC Hoist Motors
Motor Generator Sets
AC Hydraulic Motors
Machines and Motors
General
MCE offers machines and motors designed specifically for the elevator industry.
Included are DC gearless machines, DC and AC hoist motors, motor generator sets and
AC hydraulic motors, both submersible and dry.
We are pleased to offer Imperial Electric motors, which combine the finest materials
available with unparalleled design and manufacturing expertise. Imperial has built an enviable
reputation for total quality by focusing on contemporary elevator rotating equipment. You can
expect trouble-free installation, extended equipment reliability and responsive service.
MCE may provide motors from various sources in order to meet customer specifications, satisfy
delivery commitments or address the requirements of a particular application. Depending on
project requirements, a consultant or contractor can choose various machines and motors for
their specific application.
8
In This Section
•
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•
•
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•
DC Gearless Machines
AC Gearless Machines
DC Hoist Motors
AC Hoist Motors
Motor Generator Sets
AC Hydraulic Motors
8-1
Machines and Motors
DC Gearless Machines
Imperial DC Gearless machines are provided including a slow-speed DC motor, brake, sheave
and pedestal bearings mounted to a fabricated base. The motor is designed for 230% of rated
current at 70% rated speed. The fields can be forced for acceleration or deceleration. Standard
sheave diameters of 26 inches (660.4-mm), 30 inches (762-mm) and 33 inches (838.2-mm) are
available in a variety of grooving arrangements.
Imperial DC Gearless machines are recommended for speeds up to 1000 fpm. Class B
insulation is standard (class F insulation is available). Sheave groove tolerance is ±0.009 inches
(0.2286mm). Consult your sales engineer for G.S.A. or other special applications.
AC Gearless Machines
Imperial AC Gearless machines are provided including a slow-speed AC permanent magnet
motor, brake, sheave, and bearings. The motor is designed for 200% of rated load. Standard
sheave diameters of 26 inches (660.4mm), 30 inches (762mm), and 33 inches (838.2mm) are
available in a variety of grooving arrangements.
Imperial AC Gearless machines are recommended for speeds up to 1000 fpm. Class F insulation
is standard. Sheave groove tolerance is ±0.009 inches (0.2286mm). Consult your sales
engineer for G.S.A. or other special applications.
DC Hoist Motors
Rugged and dependable, Imperial's DC hoist motors are renowned in the industry. Footmounted configurations are available for use with most popular machines. A variety of flanges
are available, including NEMA C, D, Titan 1, Westinghouse, and others. Standard loop voltage is
240VDC. Special voltages available.
Imperial DC hoist motors have a 60-minute duty cycle and are available in 10 through 75
horsepower at either 1150 or 850 rpm. Specifics: Class B insulation, end thrust with dual ball
bearings and drip-proof construction. Consult your sales engineer for Totally Enclosed NonVentilated (TENV) or other special designs.
AC Hoist Motors
Imperial AC hoist motors are known for dependability. They are configured for foot mounting
with most popular machine designs. A variety of flanges are available, including NEMA C, D,
Titan 1, Westinghouse, and others. Specifics: frame and brackets of rugged cast iron, rotor of die
cast aluminum, laminations of fully processed electrical steel, end thrust with greaseable ball
bearings and drip proof construction. Totally enclosed, fan cooled models are available. Class B
insulation is standard, Class F is available. A 500 C rise in temperature is standard. Motors may
be ordered with factory mounted encoder.
Imperial motors designed for VVVF include closed loop, low slip (2-5%), 60 minute duty and
open loop, high slip (10-13%) 30 minute duty. Motors from five to 100 horsepower are available
in speed ranges from 600 to 1800 rpm. Three-phase AC voltages of 200, 208, 230, 440, 460,
480, 550, and 575 are available.
8-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Motor Generator Sets
Motor Generator Sets
Imperial Motor Generator Sets are comprised of an alternating current, constant speed drive
motor coupled to a special DC generator. The drive motor and generator are mounted on a
single, large diameter shaft supported by two ball bearings. Imperial brush rigging is designed
for utmost dependability. Positive contact and accurate alignment are maintained throughout
brush life. Low inertia, constant pressure springs eliminate the need for brush adjustment.
Power ratings of 7.5 KW through 50 KW are available. A 240 DC loop voltage is standard,
special voltages are available. Three-phase AC voltages of 200, 230/460 and 575 are available.
AC Hydraulic Motors
AC Submersible Motors are reliable. These ruggedly built, highly efficient motors are designed
to mount on all major hydraulic pump units. The motor, with its extra-reach, wick-proof leads,
is specially designed and sealed for submerged operation in hydraulic oil. Motors rated for 80
starts per hour are available from 15 through 50 horsepower. Specifics: Motors are 2-pole, 3600
rpm, single ball bearing type with thermostatic overheat-protection. Three-phase AC voltages of
200, 230/460 and 575 are available in Wye Start, Delta Run or Across-the-Line Delta Start
design. All motors are subjected to rigorous factory testing before shipment.
AC Dry Hydraulic Motors are designed for use with belted hydraulic pump systems. These
Imperial motors are exceptionally quiet, highly efficient and built for rugged duty. Totally
Enclosed Fan Cooled (TEFC) designs are available. Motors rated for 80 or 120 starts per hour
are available from 15 through 100 horsepower. Specifics: Motors are 1800 rpm with dual ball
bearing and drip-proof construction. Three-phase AC voltages of 200, 230/460 and 575 are
available in Wye Start, Delta Run or Across-the-Line Delta Start design.
Note
Contact MCE Sales Engineering for more information on stand-alone motor sales.
8
8-3
Machines and Motors
8-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
• General
• In This Section
Controller Options
General
Depending on the application, features and accessories described in this section are
available for MCE controllers as standard or optional. A consultant, contractor or
building owner can choose which features and accessories are appropriate for the
specific application.
Certain features or accessories may not be available on some controllers. Consult your MCE
Sales Representative for further information.
In This Section
•
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Attendant Service Operation
Binary Position Indicator Outputs
Call/Send Operation
CRT/Keyboard
Down Collective
Dumbwaiter Ejector Control
Dumbwaiter Queuing Control
Earthquake Operation
Emergency Power
Hospital Emergency
Integral Voice Annunciation
Keyboard Control
9
9-1
Controller Options
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Load Weighing Anti-Nuisance
Load Weighing Dispatch
Load Weighing Hall Call Bypass
Load Weighing Overload
Load Weighing Pre-torquing
Manual Doors
Monitoring with CMS
Monitoring from Remote Location
Motor-Generator Shutdown Switch
On-Board Diagnostics
Power Freight Door Control
Rear Doors (Staggered/Independent)
Rear Doors (Walk-Through/Independent)
Security
Serial Communication Car Operating Panel
Serial Communication Hall Fixtures
Serial Position Indicator
Single Automatic Pushbutton
Single Button Collective
Swing Car Operation
Custom Software
9-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Attendant Service Operation
Attendant Service Operation
Optional - An attendant service switch shall be provided to initiate the following operations:
• When the car is stopped at a landing, the doors shall open automatically and shall remain
open until closed by the attendant.
• The doors shall be closed by constant pressure on any one of the following controls: the
door close button, a car call button, car switch or the up or down attendant direction buttons.
• The car shall receive hall calls as they are normally assigned by the controller logic system,
but response shall be determined by the attendant. A momentary buzzer shall sound, and
attendant direction lights shall indicate whether the call originated above or below the car.
• A bypass button shall be provided to override hall calls, permitting the attendant to proceed nonstop to a selected call.
• In case of fire service operation, the attendant shall be notified by the audio-visual fire
warning indicator.
Binary Position Indicator Outputs
Optional - The controller shall provide binary coded position indicator (PI) outputs that can be
used to drive certain manufacturer's position indicators.
Call/Send Operation
Optional - This feature is typically used for dumbwaiters or freight elevators. A call/send switch
shall be provided. When placed in the on position, the call/send switch shall initiate the following operations:
• A hall station shall be provided at each landing, consisting of a single call button and a
series of send buttons corresponding to each landing in the building.
• Call - The car shall be called to a floor from the hall call stations by registering a call at that
floor.
• Send - The car shall be sent to a floor from the hall call stations by registering a call for that
floor.
• When the car arrives at a landing, the doors shall open automatically and then be closed by
the hall station door close button. If automatic door close operation is in use, the doors
shall close after a programmable time period.
• The car shall respond to only one call/send demand at a time.
9
9-3
Controller Options
CRT/Keyboard
Optional - The CRT display terminal shall be an easy-to-use, menu driven diagnostic tool
designed to provide essential information about the elevator system to the service technician,
passengers, or to a remote location for security or other purposes. The CRT display terminal
shall consist of a monitor and an IBM style keyboard. A CRT display shall consist of a monitor
only. All CRT display terminal systems shall include the following features:
•
•
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•
Menu-Driven Format
Job Summary Page
Graphic Display of Elevator System Status
Car Flags
Elevator System Performance Pages
The machine room CRT display terminal shall provide the service technician with diagnostic
information about the elevator system to facilitate troubleshooting and evaluation of elevator
system performance.
Note
Certain control products (such as IMC) may require a CRT display terminal for adjustment
purposes.
Optional - The remote CRT display or CRT display terminal can be used in different
applications, such as a lobby terminal (to inform the passengers of car position and direction of
travel) or in a security room or fire control center for use by building personnel. Remote
monitoring uses modem communication or line drivers.
Optional - A printer shall be provided which shall allow the user to print out any of the available
information.
Down Collective
Optional - The controller shall be a down collective system that only responds to down hall calls
above the lobby. The controller shall respond to car calls in the direction of travel. An up
traveling car shall proceed to the highest down hall call and then collect calls in the down
direction of travel. Once the lowest down hall call and car call have been answered, the down
collective process shall be repeated.
Dumbwaiter Ejector Control
Optional - All ejector controls shall be included as an integral part of the controller.
Dumbwaiter Queuing Control
Optional - All cart and tray queuing controls shall be included as an integral part of the
controller.
9-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Earthquake Operation
Earthquake Operation
Controller shall be designed according to applicable code requirements for earthquake
operation.
Emergency Power
Optional - (Traction Elevators) When emergency power is detected, cars shall return to the
main lobby one elevator at a time, and remain there with doors open. While each car is being
returned, all other cars shall be shut down so as not to overload the emergency power generator.
Once all cars have been returned to the lobby, one or more cars may be selected to run under
emergency power, depending on the capability of the emergency power generator. Selection of
cars that run under emergency power shall be done automatically by the group system. This
automatic selection may be overridden through manual selection. The actual number of cars
allowed to run under emergency power shall be a preprogrammed value and the number of cars
allowed to run shall not exceed this value.
Optional - (Hydraulic Elevators) A means of lowering the elevator shall be provided when there
is a power failure. This operation shall bring the car to the lowest landing and allow passengers
to exit the elevator. This operation requires a separate battery operated power supply system.
Emergency power generator control is also available.
Hospital Emergency
Optional - This service shall call any eligible in-service elevator to any floor on an emergency
basis. A medical emergency call switch shall be installed at each floor where medical emergency
service is desired.
When the medical emergency momentary call switch is activated at any floor, the medical
emergency call registered light shall illuminate at that floor only, and the elevator group system
shall instantly select the nearest available elevator to respond to the medical emergency call. All
car calls within the selected car shall be canceled and any landing calls which had previously
been assigned to that car shall be transferred to other cars. If the selected car is traveling away
from the medical emergency call, it shall slow down and stop at the nearest floor, without
opening the doors, reverse direction and proceed nonstop to the medical emergency floor. If the
selected car is traveling toward the medical emergency floor, it shall proceed nonstop to that
floor. If at the time of selection, the car happened to be slowing down for a stop, it shall stop
without opening the doors, then start immediately toward the medical emergency floor.
On arrival at the medical emergency floor, the car shall remain with doors open for a
predetermined time interval. If, after this interval has expired, the car has not been placed on
in-car medical emergency operation, the car shall automatically return to normal service.
A medical emergency key switch shall be located in each car operating station for selecting
in-car medical emergency service. Upon activation of the key switch, the car shall be ready to
accept a call for any floor, and after the doors are closed, proceed nonstop to that floor. The
return of the key switch to the normal position shall restore the car to group operation.
9-5
9
Controller Options
Any car selected to respond to a medical emergency call shall be removed from automatic or
group service and shall accept no additional calls, emergency or otherwise, until it has
completed the initial medical emergency function.
Any eligible car in service may be selected. As additional medical emergency calls are registered
in the system, other eligible cars shall respond as described above, on the basis of one medical
emergency call per car. If all cars are out of service and unable to answer an emergency call, the
medical emergency call registered light shall not illuminate.
Integral Voice Annunciation
Optional - The controller shall include, as an integral part of the controller, a computer voice
annunciator. The contractor shall only need to furnish wiring to the elevator cab and a speaker.
The annunciator shall announce the floor number and the intended direction of travel.
Keyboard Control
Optional - Computer control shall be provided to turn on/off certain elevator functions that are
key operated, such as independent service, swing car operation and so forth. This control shall
be available from a remote station as well as from the machine room. Consult your MCE Sales
Representative.
Load Weighing Anti-Nuisance
Optional - The computer shall cancel all previously registered car calls if the number of car calls
registered exceeds a predetermined adjustable number while the light load function is active. A
load weighing device is required to implement the load weighing anti-nuisance feature (see
Section 13, Load Weigher).
Load Weighing Dispatch
Optional - All door dwell time shall be removed from any lobby landing should cars become
loaded to a predetermined load level. A load weighing device is required to implement the load
weighing dispatch feature (see Section 13, Load Weigher).
Load Weighing Hall Call Bypass
Optional - Cars shall bypass hall calls if loaded to a predetermined load level. A load weighing
device is required to implement the load weighing hall call bypass feature (see Section 13, Load
Weigher).
Load Weighing Overload
Optional - Cars shall remain at the floor with doors open if loaded to a predetermined load level
considered unsafe to move the elevator. A load weighing device is required to implement the
load weighing overload feature (see Section 13, Load Weigher).
9-6 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Load Weighing Pre-Torquing
Load Weighing Pre-Torquing
Optional - A system for pre-torquing of gearless DC hoist motors shall be provided in order to
ensure consistently smooth starts. A load weighing device is required to implement the
pre-torquing feature (see Section 13, Load Weigher).
Manual Doors
Optional - The controller shall include circuitry for the operation of manual doors. The
controller shall provide for the operation of retiring cams, gate release solenoids and other
appurtenances that may be required with manual doors.
Monitoring with CMS
Optional - For Central Monitoring System (CMS), refer to Section 14.
Monitoring from Remote Locations
Optional - Refer to Section 9, CRT/Keyboard.
Motor Generator Shutdown Switch
Optional - A switch shall be provided to control the shutdown of the motor-generator set for
each car. In the “on” or normal position, the motor-generator shall run as the system demand
dictates. When placed in the “off” or shutdown position, the switch shall return the car to the
main lobby landing. When the car arrives at this landing, it shall perform normal door
operation and the motor-generator shall be shut down once the doors are fully closed.
Optionally, the car may be shut down with the doors left open.
On-Board Diagnostics
Each controller shall be provided with on-board diagnostics for quick and easy troubleshooting
of basic functions.
Power Freight Door Control
Optional - Elevator controllers shall include all the logic and power controls required for power
freight door operation. Alternatively, controllers shall provide the necessary interface to operate
with power freight door controllers as manufactured by a freight door manufacturer.
9
9-7
Controller Options
Rear Doors (Staggered/Independent)
All MCE controllers can provide the necessary interface to control staggered rear doors.
Rear Doors (Walk-Through/Independent)
All MCE controllers can provide the necessary interface to control walk-through rear doors.
Security
Optional - Refer to Section 15, Elevator Security for specifications.
Serial Communication Car Operating Panel
Optional - Refer to Section 10, SmartLINK Serial Communication for specifications.
Serial Communication Hall Fixtures
Optional - Refer to Section 10, SmartLINK Serial Communication for specifications.
Serial Position Indicator Driver
Optional - A direct interface shall be provided for CE electronic fixtures using three-wire serial
communication.
Single Automatic Pushbutton
Optional - The controller shall provide automatic operation by means of one button in the car
for each landing served and one button at each landing. If any car or landing button has been
actuated, pressing any other car or landing button shall have no effect on the operation of the
car until the response to the first button has been completed.
Single Button Collective
Optional - The controller shall provide automatic operation by means of one button in the car
for each landing served and one button at each landing. All stops registered by the momentary
actuation of landing or car buttons are made irrespective of the number of buttons actuated or
of the sequence in which the buttons are actuated. With this type of operation, the car stops at
all landings for which buttons have been actuated, making the stops in the order in which the
landings are reached after the buttons have been actuated, but irrespective of its direction of
travel.
9-8 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Swing Car Operation
Swing Car Operation
Optional - Swing car operation shall allow an elevator to be removed from the normal group
system and operate independently of the normal system hall calls. The swing car shall respond
solely to corridor calls entered from a separate hall riser and shall operate as a simplex car when
removed from the group system. The car shall be placed in this mode of operation by a key
switch in the main lobby corridor, car, keyboard or other panels which shall immediately
remove the car from the group system. Any hall calls that had previously been assigned to the
swing car by the group system shall immediately be reassigned to the next most appropriate car
in the system.
Acting as a simplex car, the swing car shall operate from its own independent set of hall calls,
and it shall be possible to assign a parking floor to the swing car without regard to the group
system parking floors. The swing car shall remain under group system control during
emergency recall situations such as fire service operation and emergency power operation.
Swing cars are sometimes required to operate in more then one group such as low rise, high
rise, passenger and service groups. The controllers shall be capable of being configured to meet
this requirement.
Custom Software
Optional - Custom software shall be written to meet project specific requirements. Consult MCE
Sales Engineers for information and pricing.
9
9-9
Controller Options
9-10 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
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General
In This Section
Car Operating Panels
Hall Call Fixtures
SmartLINK Serial Communication
General
MCE SmartLINK Serial Communication options include SmartLINK Serial
Communication for Car Operating Panel and SmartLINK Serial Communication for
Hall Fixtures. Both systems are designed to reduce required wiring and thereby reduce
labor and cost. Depending on project requirements, a consultant or contractor can
choose these systems for the specific application.
In This Section
• Car Operating Panels
• Hall Call Fixtures
10
10-1
SmartLINK Serial Communication
SmartLINK for Car Operating Panels
SmartLINK for Car Operating Panel (COP) provides simplified wiring, reduced installation time
and elimination of heavy, multi-strand traveling cables. At the heart of SmartLINK for COP is
LonWorks® networking technology from Echelon®, integrating advanced semiconductor,
communications and networking technologies using reliable Neuron® chips and transceivers.
With SmartLINK, a four-wire network conveys COP signals to the controller. The COP can have
up to 64 front car calls, 64 rear car calls and 64 call lockout inputs. In addition, another 32
inputs and 32 outputs are available. Of the 32 available inputs, eight are standard. The other 24
are optional and defined in a variable file.
SmartLINK Serial Communication for Car Operating Panel may be used with any MCE traction
elevator controller (SCR, AC or MG) that is part of an M3 or AIM Group System.
Specification Text, Car Operating Panels
Car operating panel signals shall be conveyed to the controller using a four wire serial network.
This network shall use LonWorks® networking technology. The system shall have the
capability to handle signals for up to 64 front car calls,64 rear car calls and 64 call lockout
inputs. In addition, another 32 inputs and 32 outputs shall be available.
SmartLINK for Hall Fixtures
SmartLINK for Hall Fixtures uses a two wire bus to provide power to hall fixtures as well as
two-way communication between the fixtures and the controller. Up to 98 floors, with up to 10
signals per floor, are supported. Node boards at each hall fixture provide power regulation to
ensure constant lamp intensity. The system supports up to four buses, to accommodate
multiple risers and redundancy.
System diagnostics identify the location of most node or lamp failures. Overall system operation
is unaffected by most node failures. A simple decimal floor addressing scheme, plus the ability
to swap node boards with power on the bus, makes for easy installation and maintenance.
Robust circuitry using high voltage logic and low clock frequency provide EMI/RFI immunity,
high ESD protection and minimal radio frequency radiation.
SmartLINK Serial Communication for Hall Fixtures may be used with any M3 or AIM Group
System.
Specification Text, Hall Call Fixtures
Hall fixture signals shall be conveyed to the controller using a two wire bus. The bus shall
provide power to hall fixtures as well as two-way communication between the fixtures and the
controller. The system shall have the capability to support up to 98 floors and up to 10 signals
per floor.
10-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
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General
In This Section
LS-STAN
LS-QUTE
LS-QUAD
LS-QUIK
LS Landing Systems
11
General
MCE manufactures four types of landing systems, LS-STAN, LS-QUTE, LS-QUAD, and
LS- QUIK. Depending on specified requirements, a consultant or contractor can
choose the appropriate landing system for the specific application.
In This Section
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LS-STAN, Vane-Actuated
LS-QUTE, Tape and Magnet
LS-QUAD for IMC
LS-QUIK for IMC
11-1
LS Landing Systems
LS-STAN, Vane-actuated VS-1 Proximity Switch
This product can be used with any elevator control system that requires discrete and fixed
slowdown distances. It can be used with all MCE control systems except IMC (Intelligent
Motion Control), which requires the model LS-QUAD-2 or LS-QUIK landing systems.
The LS-STAN landing system uses MCE's model VS- 1 proximity switches actuated by vanes
located in the hoistway. This landing system should not be used outdoors or in brightly lighted
areas. Model LS-STAN5 is recommended for slower speeds and uses three lanes and five
switches. Model LS-STAN7 is recommended for higher speeds, provides one-floor-run
capability, and uses five lanes and seven switches. Other configurations are available to
accommodate rear doors and other special applications. Consult your MCE Sales
Representative for additional information.
Specification Text, LS-STAN
The hoistway landing system shall use model VS- 1 vane operated infrared optical switches to
sense the position of the elevator in the hoistway. It shall provide stepping, leveling, door zone
and floor encoding signals.
The vane switches shall be installed on a 14-gauge steel enclosure with adequate adjustment
capability, and shall include labeled terminals for electrical interconnection.
The landing system shall include vanes and mounting hardware for vane mounting in the
hoistway.
Switches shall be accurate to 0.0625" (1.59 mm) and the accuracy shall be the same regardless
of direction of travel.
Switches shall not exhibit any interaction when arranged in any compact configuration.
Switch size shall allow horizontal spacing of lanes as close as 2" (50.8 mm), center to center.
11-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
LS-QUTE, Steel Tape and Magnetic Strips
LS-QUTE, Steel Tape and Magnetic Strips
This product can be used with any elevator control system that requires discrete and fixed
slowdown distances. It can be used with all MCE control systems except IMC (Intelligent
Motion Control), which requires the LS-QUAD-2 or LS-QUIK landing systems. The advantage
of the LS-QUTE system is its ease of installation and the fact that it can be used in a brightly
lighted area. Corrosion may result if the steel tape is installed in an environment that is high in
moisture, salt or chemical vapors (stainless steel tape optional). Consult your MCE Sales
Representative for additional information.
Specification Text, LS-QUTE
The landing system shall provide high speed stepping signals, one-floor-run stepping signals,
leveling and door zone signals and optional floor encoding signals. Each output signal shall be
electrically isolated and shall be capable of reliably operating at 120 VAC.
The system shall consist of a steel tape with mounting hardware to accommodate the complete
travel of the elevator, a car top assembly with tape guides and sensors and magnetic strips for
stepping, leveling and floor encoding.
LS-QUAD-2 for IMC
Recommended Use - This landing system is to be used for premium control systems that
require precise knowledge of the position of the elevator for feedback purposes such as IMC
(Intelligent Motion Control). The LS-QUAD-2 can be used for car speeds up to 800 fpm and
travel of less than 300 feet. Corrosion may result if the steel tape is installed in an environment
that is high in moisture, salt or chemical vapors. Consult your MCE Sales Representative for
additional information.
Specification Text, LS-QUAD-2
The hoistway landing system shall be designed to provide the controller with precise
information as to the absolute position of the car in the hoistway. With the car at a landing, the
landing system shall indicate to the controller the actual floor number, so that movement to
terminal landings or specific floors shall not be necessary to establish car location.
A perforated steel tape with holes on 0.75" (19 mm) centers shall be used with dual sensors to
provide a quadrature signal to read the position of the elevator with accuracy of 0.1875" (4.76
mm) resolution over the entire length of the hoistway.
Leveling and door zone signals shall be provided using magnetic strips on the tape.
Magnetic strips on the tape and sensors shall be provided to give a binary coded floor position
with parity check each time the car stops at a floor.
Optional - A version of the landing system shall be available which provides all necessary
circuits for any arrangement of rear doors. This version shall not require additional tapes in the
hoistway and the enclosure dimensions shall be identical to the conventional (non-rear door)
version.
11-3
11
LS Landing Systems
LS-QUIK for IMC
This landing system is to be used for premium control systems that require precise knowledge
of the position of the elevator for feedback purposes such as IMC (Intelligent Motion Control).
The LS-QUIK is recommended for car speeds over 800 fpm or travel greater then 300 feet or
where steel tape is not recommended. Consult your MCE Sales Representative for additional
information.
Specification Text, LS-QUIK
The hoistway landing system shall be designed to provide the controller with precise
information as to the absolute position of the car in the hoistway. When the car is at a landing,
the landing system shall indicate the actual floor number to the controller. As a result,
movement to terminal landings or specific floors shall not be necessary to establish car location
within the building.
A car top mounted, wheel driven encoder shall be used. The encoder shall provide a quadrature
signal to read the position of the elevator with accuracy of 0.1875" (4.76 mm) resolution or
better over the entire length of the hoistway.
Leveling, door zone and floor encoding signals shall be provided by using a single floor
mounted vane coupled with VS-1 sensors.
Optional - A version of the landing system shall be available which provides all necessary
circuits for any arrangement of rear doors.
11-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
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General
In This Section
TLS-C
TLS-1
TLS-2
TLS Terminal Limit Switches
12
General
The TLS Terminal Limit Switch System consists of highly accurate, magnetically
activated switches and actuating magnets. This system is designed specifically for
computer-based elevator control systems and their need for reliable contacts at speeds
up to 2,000 fpm (10 m/s).
The TLS system provides reliable operation with clearances up to 3/4 inch (19mm),
maintaining a high level of accuracy over the complete range of possible car movement within
the hoistway. An ideal alternative to old-style mechanical TM switches and contacts, TLS
eliminates noisy rollers and cams, cumbersome lever arms and the necessity for regular
adjustment and cleaning.
Three models of TLS Terminal Limit Switches are available, TLS-C, TLS-1 and TLS-2. This
system can be used for Normal Terminal Slowdown Device, Emergency Terminal Stopping or
Speed Limiting Device, Access Limit and Earthquake Car-to Counterweight Switch. Depending
on project requirements, a consultant or contractor can choose this system for the specific
application.
In This Section
• TLS-C
• TLS-1
• TLS-2
12-1
TLS Terminal Limit Switches
TLS-C Recommended Use
TLS-C Cartop Terminal Limit Switch System consists of a cartop mounted, magnetically
activated switch array with rail-mounted actuating magnets. There are two models available,
TLS-C-12 (with 12 switches) and TLS-C-16 (with 16 switches). The switches are in an enclosure
designed to be mounted on the cartop, with each switch operated by a magnetic actuator
installed on a bracket with adjustable channel which is mounted to the guide rail. The number
of magnetic actuators is equal to the number of switches, which is also equal to the number of
lanes. The switches are mounted on 1 5/16” centers in easily replaceable modules of four
switches per module. This system is designed specifically for computer-based traction elevator
control systems with car speeds up to 2000 fpm (10 m/s).
Specification Text, TLS-C
The terminal limit switches shall consist of an array of magnetically activated switches and
corresponding actuating magnets. The switch array shall be mounted on the cartop and the
actuating magnets shall be mounted to the guide rail. Mounting brackets for the magnetic
actuators shall be supplied by the manufacturer. The switches shall have hermetically sealed
contacts with tolerance for high temperature and high humidity. The switches shall be
direction-dependent with bi-stable memory. The number of switches required, based on the
speed of the car, shall be determined by the manufacturer.
TLS-1 Recommended Use
TLS-1 Terminal Limit Switches are individually hermetically sealed units. Each switch is
installed on its own bracket in an adjustable channel that is mounted to the guide rail. The
magnetic actuator is installed on a bracket with an adjustable channel mounted to the cartop.
The switches are arranged in a single vertical lane in the hoistway and therefore only one
magnetic actuator is required. TLS-1 can be used for traction elevators up to 1600 fpm (8.13 m/
s).
Specification Text, TLS-1
The terminal limit switches shall consist of magnetically activated switches and an actuating
magnet. The switches shall be mounted to the guide rail and a single magnetic actuator shall be
mounted to the cartop. Mounting brackets for the switches and magnetic actuator shall be
supplied by the manufacturer. The switches shall have hermetically sealed contacts with
tolerance for high temperature and high humidity. The switches shall be direction-dependent
with bi-stable memory. The number of switches required, based on the speed of the car, shall be
determined by the manufacturer.
12-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
TLS-2 Recommended Use
TLS-2 Recommended Use
TLS-2 Terminal Limit Switches are individually hermetically sealed units. The switches are
installed side-by-side on a bracket with adjustable channel that is mounted to the car top. The
magnetic actuators are installed on brackets with an adjustable channel that is mounted to the
guide rail. The number of magnetic actuators is equal to the number of switches, as the switches
are not in a single lane. The switches can be mounted on 3 ½” centers. Because of the width of
the mounting brackets, the practical maximum for this model is three switches. TLS-1 is
typically used in conjunction with other slowdown devices and can be used for traction
elevators up to 1600 fpm (8.13 m/s).
Specification Text, TLS-2
The terminal limit switches shall consist of magnetically activated switches and corresponding
actuating magnets. The switches shall be mounted to the cartop and the magnetic actuators
shall be mounted to the guide rail. Mounting brackets for the switches and magnetic actuators
shall be supplied by the manufacturer. The switches shall have hermetically sealed contacts
with tolerance for high temperature and high humidity. The switches shall be directiondependent with bi-stable memory. The number of switches required, based on the speed of the
car, shall be determined by the manufacturer.
12
12-3
TLS Terminal Limit Switches
12-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
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General
In This Section
Isolated Platform
Crosshead Deflection
Load Weighers
General
13
A load weigher can be used for gearless or geared elevators to provide signals for
various load dispatching operations and for pre-torquing with IMC controllers.
By identifying the load (light, heavy or overload), the system can activate anti-nuisance
car call cancellation, loaded car hall call bypass, lobby up peak mode or overload. For
dispatching, a load weigher can be used with all MCE controllers
For IMC Performa, IMC-SCR and IMC-MG, the load weigher’s signal can be used to adjust the
amount of torque produced by the motor, as the brake lifts, to provide smooth starts. Every time
the car leaves a floor, a new pre-torque value is computed based on how the car is loaded,
ensuring that every start is the smoothest possible.
Depending on project requirements, a consultant or contractor can choose this system for the
specific application.
In This Section
• Isolated Platform
• Crosshead Deflection
13-1
Load Weighers
Isolated Platform
The isolated platform load weigher is recommended for installations with isolated platform
elevator cars that require anti-nuisance, lobby dispatching, load bypass and/or overload. Pretorquing is available for IMC PERFORMA, IMC-SCR and IMC-MG controls.
Specification Text, Isolated Platform Load Weigher
The load weigher shall consist of an inductive proximity switch and an amplifier. The amplifier
output shall be connected to the machine room via two conventional wires (special wiring is not
required). The output circuit shall be virtually impervious to damage from transients or
accidental connection to voltages up to 120 VAC. A controller-mounted input buffer board and
software are required in order to process the signal from the load weigh system.
The proximity switch and amplifier shall be mounted either under the car (preferred position),
or on top of the car. When mounted under the car, a voltage signal is generated that is inversely
proportional to the distance between the bottom of the car floor and the isolated platform
frame. When mounted on top of the car, a voltage signal is generated that is proportional to the
distance between the crosshead and the top of the cab.
Electrical requirements: Input 120 VAC, single phase 50Hz/60Hz, Output 10mA @ 18VDC.
Crosshead Deflection
A crosshead deflection load weigher is required for installations with non-isolated platform
elevator cars.
Specification Text, Crosshead Deflection Load Weigher
The load weigher shall consist of load sensor(s), amplifier(s) and a buffer board. The buffer
output shall be connected to the machine room via two conventional wires (special wiring is not
required). The output circuit shall be virtually impervious to damage from transients or
accidental connection to voltages up to 120 VAC.
The sensor(s) shall be mounted to the crosshead to measure deflection as the elevator is loaded.
The voltage signal generated is directly proportional to the deflection of the crosshead. The
amplifier(s) and buffer board are mounted on the cartop.
Electrical requirements: Input 120 VAC, single phase 50Hz/60Hz, Output 10mA @ 18VDC.
13-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
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General
In This Section
CMS for Windows
CMS Hardware
CMS Functional Spec
Relational Database
Monitoring Interface
Communication Network
CMS Central Monitoring System
General
“CMS” Central Monitoring System for Windows® is a comprehensive elevator
management tool for institutions, contractors, building managers and owners with
many elevators in the same building, in multiple buildings in the same city or even in
different cities. CMS provides interactive monitoring and control for elevators.
Emergency conditions or events are immediately displayed on the system monitor,
maintenance personnel are notified via digital pager activation and a hardcopy is printed. CMS
can be used as a data acquisition and adjustment tool and allows monitoring of selected events,
emergency reports, analysis of elevator system performance, as well as the retrieval of other
system information from a designated central location.
CMS elevator monitoring system consists of following subsystems:
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Central Monitoring System (CMS)
Embedded Monitoring Interface (EMI)
Communication Network (CN)
Security Interface Software (SIS)
In This Section
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CMS for Windows
CMS Hardware
CMS Functional Spec
Relational Database
Monitoring Interface
Communication Network
14-1
14
CMS Central Monitoring System
CMS Central Monitoring System for Windows®
CMS is an interactive Microsoft Windows® based system that runs on an IBM-compatible
personal computer (PC). CMS can be used for elevator modernizations as well as new
installations. CMS can be connected to either an MCE microprocessor-controller or a non-MCE
relay logic elevator control system, when either system has the appropriate interface.
IMC controls with an M3 Group System offers the most extensive range of data retrieval and
monitoring options. For other types of control systems, the level of available monitoring is
dependent on the memory capacity of the controller's microprocessor and its on-line status
with the monitoring system. Please contact your MCE Sales Representative for details.
CMS General Specifications
The Central Monitoring System shall monitor the elevators attached to the system. When an
elevator shutdown occurs, the elevator system shall initiate an emergency call to the elevator
command center. The Central Monitoring System shall receive and process any emergency call
by displaying the event on the monitor screen, sending a message to a pager, and printing the
event on a designated printer.
While connected to the elevator system, the Central Monitoring System shall download and
collect available data, which is organized in a database. This software shall provide easy-to-use
pull-down menus, using the Microsoft Windows® based operating system, allowing the user to
monitor and review the elevator performance database in various formats.
CMS shall also provide proper menus for monitoring the elevator system, and where applicable,
for altering various elevator system parameters. The individual user's interaction level with the
system shall be defined by the monitoring system manager.
14-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
CMS Hardware
CMS Hardware
The Central Monitoring System shall be installed at a designated location appropriate for the
purpose of monitoring all designated control systems. The CMS hardware shall consist of a
personal computer (PC), monitor, printer, and keyboard. It shall contain all the appropriate
internal and externally connected peripheral equipment necessary for that purpose.
Elevator Command Center Computer - Minimum requirements for CMS
IBM compatible PC with:
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Pentium 233MHz Processor (Recommend 1.6GHz)
32 MB RAM (Recommend 512MB or greater)
1 GB hard disk (Recommend 20 GB or greater)
RS232 Serial ports (2 or more)
Parallel port
3.5" floppy disk drive
CD-ROM Drive
SVGA card
SVGA monitor
Parallel printer with cable (compatible with Microsoft Windows® 98SE, 2000, or XP)
CMS Connection Media Options
• Modem Connectivity: 1 or 2 modems at the PC. Phone lines required. (Recommend 2
modems, one for normal connectivity and one for receiving emergency events.)
• Line Driver Connectivity: 2 Line drivers, one at each end of the communication string.
(Wire connection, good for up to 2 miles.)
• Ethernet Connectivity: Requires Ethernet Terminal Servers at each controller connection
(group, simplex, duplex) and one at the designated CMS Station.
• Serial Connectivity: Serial cable at controller.
14-3
14
CMS Central Monitoring System
CMS Functional Specifications
Graphical User Interface - Central Monitoring System shall run under the Microsoft Windows®
operating system. The user interface shall be based on the standard Windows interface and
shall be similar to other Windows®' programs. If the user knows how to use other Windows'
programs, he or she essentially knows how to use the monitoring system user interface.
While online with the controller, the Central Monitoring System shall provide various real-time
display screens for system monitoring and diagnosis.
Online Help - The Central Monitoring System shall provide a complete and comprehensive
online help system. A context-sensitive help program shall be provided to give the users hints
and explanations of the current task.
Summary - This menu shall give a brief description of the system, including the job number, job
name, number of cars, number of landings, number of openings per landing for each car, car
labels, landing labels, fire service options, serial communication port definitions and other
system options.
Individual Car Flags - This screen shall display a list of the selected car's internally generated
computer flags for diagnostics.
Graphic Hoistway Display - The Central Monitoring System shall display the elevator system
hoistway. That is, users shall be able to view a graphical representation of the elevator hoistway.
The graphic hoistway display shall include, but is not limited to, the following:
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Simulated Hoistway and Car Configuration
Individual Elevator Position
Individual Elevator Car Calls
Individual Elevator Direction
Individual Elevator Door Position
Individual Elevator Status of Operation
Individual Elevator Communication Status
Registered Up and Down Hall Calls
Controller Real-Time Clock Date and Time
M3 Group Mode of Operation
Estimated Time of Arrival (M3 only)
Assigned Hall Calls to Individual Elevator (M3 only)
Hall Call Waiting Time Per Registered Hall Call (M3 only)
Remote Registration of Car and Hall Calls (M3 Only)
System Control and Adjustment (M3 and AIM only) - While online, the software shall provide
various display screens for parameter adjustments.
14-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
CMS Functional Specifications
System Parameter Menu - This menu shall allow the user to view and alter various M3 group
system parameters including:
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Parking Floors and Their Priorities
Hall Call Priority Times Per Landing
Parking Floor Delay Time
Parking Reassignment (Shuffle) Delay Time
Group Mode of Operation
Parameters Which Define Each Mode of Operation
Parameters For Lobby Up Peak Operation
Parameters For Traffic Identification
Time Actuation of Programmed Group Configurations
Change Lobby Floor or Invocation of Dual Lobby Operation
Individual Car Parameters Menu - This menu shall allow the user to view and alter various individual car parameters.
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Door Dwell Times
MG Shut Down Time (If Applicable)
Time Out of Service Time, Nudging Time
Calculated Car Times (Not Adjustable): Door Opening Time, Door Closing Time, Through
Time, Deceleration Time.
Emergency Notification - In case of elevator shutdown or any other designated emergencies,
any attached elevator system shall automatically initiate a call to the Elevator Command Center.
The ECC shall be capable of receiving the call, processing the data and routing the received data
to the proper storage or output device (computer monitor, hard drive or printer). The system
shall have the ability to page designated personnel to notify them of an emergency event.
The ECC shall always be in a ready state to answer an incoming call from any attached elevator
system. This will require the system to have more than one dedicated phone line and modem.
The ECC shall store, in the database, a chronological listing of the emergency reports received
from each attached elevator system. The user shall be able to view or print these reports.
Pager Support - A programmable option shall be available to send a coded message to a
technician's digital pager when the Elevator Command Center receives an emergency event
notification. The system manager shall be able to select the active pagers and shall be able to
program pagers to be active based on a time schedule.
Programmable Events (M3 and AIM only) - The Central Monitoring System shall provide
support for predefined and programmable events. System users shall be able to program the
elevator controllers for the events to be monitored. Events shall be programmable to be stored
in a controller file or be sent to the Elevator Command Center as an emergency event or both.
The user shall be able to define the desired events from a list of controller specific inputs and
outputs.
14-5
14
CMS Central Monitoring System
CMS Reports
The Central Monitoring System shall provide historical and performance reports for all
attached M3 Group Systems. For other controllers, a limited number of reports (the first four in
the list below) are available at all times; any additional reports require the controller to be
continuously online. While viewing the reports, users shall be able to sort and select data to
display the information in which they are interested. In addition to the predefined reports, the
Central Monitoring System shall allow users to create customized reports. Reports shall be
displayed in graphical and tabular formats. The graph type reports (bar graph, line graph and
pie chart) shall be user configurable. Users shall be able to print the available reports. The
reports, which are a function of the type of controller being monitored, shall include the
following: hall call, car call and miscellaneous reports.
Average Wait Time Per Time and Direction (Graphical) - This report shall graphically display
the hall calls average wait time per time and in each direction for the selected time period.
Number of Hall Calls Per Time and Direction (Graphical) - This report shall graphically display
the number of hall calls per time and in each direction for the selected time period.
Group System and Car Controller Faults/Events Report - This report lists all the events
generated by the group system and car computers. The report shall list the date and time each
event has occurred along with a description of the event and its status. System users shall be
able to display this report for multiple elevator systems, for particular events, for specific date
and/or time.
Emergency Faults/Events Report - For a selected time period, this report shall provide a listing
of the emergency events received by the Elevator Command Center. Users shall be able to
display the report for multiple jobs, for particular emergency events, specific date and/or time
and a specific car. The report shall also provide, for the selected time period, summary
information such as the job with most emergencies, car with most emergencies and floors with
most emergencies.
Hall Call Response in 15 Second Intervals (Tabular) - This report shall show the response to all
hall calls registered for a particular elevator system. This report shall show the percentage of
calls responses in 15 second intervals up to 90 seconds, and then greater than 90 seconds.
Hall Call Distribution (Tabular) - This report shall list all the hall calls registered for a particular
elevator system for a selected time period. The list shall include, for every hall call, registration
date and time, assigned car, car door (front or rear), floor where the call was registered, hall call
direction (up or down), hallway (main or auxiliary) and wait time. The report shall also provide,
for the displayed time period, a summary of the most used car, most used floor, total number of
calls, average wait time, minimum wait time and maximum wait time.
Hall Call Performance (Tabular) - This report shall list, for every floor and in each direction (up
and down), number of registered calls, average wait time, maximum wait time and minimum
wait time.
Number of Hall Calls Per Landing and Direction (Graphical) - This report shall graphically
display the number of hall calls for every landing, in each direction (up and down), for the
selected time period.
14-6 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
CMS Functional Specifications
Average Wait Time Per Landing and Direction (Graphical) - This report shall graphically
display the hall calls average wait time for every landing, in each direction, for the selected time
period.
Number of Hall Calls Answered Per Car (Graphical) - This report shall graphically display the
number of hall calls answered by each car in the system for the specified time period.
Percent of Up and Down Hall Calls (Graphical) - This report shall graphically display the
percentage of calls in the up and down directions for the selected time period.
User Customized Hall Call Reports (Tabular and graphical) - Users shall be able to construct
tabular or graphical hall call reports from a list of stored data available in the database.
Car Call Distribution (Tabular) - This report shall list all car calls registered for a particular job
for a selected time period. The list shall include, for every car call, registration date and time,
assigned car, source and destination floors, door (front or rear) and travel time. The report shall
also provide for the selected time period, a summary of the most active car, most traveled-from
floor and most traveled-to floor.
Car Call Performance (Tabular) - This report shall list, for every car in the system, number of
calls, average travel time, minimum travel time and maximum travel time. The user shall be
able to select the display time period.
Number of Car Calls per Car (Graphical) - This report shall graphically display the number of
car calls per car in a selected time period.
Number of Car Calls Per Landing (Graphical) - This report shall graphically display the number
of car calls to every floor for a selected time period.
14
Average Travel Time Per Car (Graphical) - This report shall graphically display the average
travel time for every car for a selected time period.
Average Travel Time Between Source and Destination (Graphical) - This report shall display,
for a selected time period, the average travel time between the source and destination for each
car.
User Customized Car Call Reports (Tabular or Graphical) - Users shall be able to construct
tabular or graphical car call reports from a list of the stored data available in the database.
Access Control for Elevators Reports (Optional) - Several reports shall be available for the
Access Control for Elevators (ACE) security. These reports shall display passenger information,
secured car calls, hall call and car call security configurations. For details about Access Control
for Elevators, refer to Section 14 and to the Elevator Security User Guide, 42-02-S024.
14-7
CMS Central Monitoring System
Relational Database
The system shall be programmable to automatically collect data from all the monitored elevator
systems and update the database.
The system shall provide a multiple level of password protection for the usage of the system.
The system shall include a built-in relational database. All data collected from the monitored
elevator systems shall be stored in the database. Incorporating the relational database shall
allow the system to offer numerous search methods and selection criteria for viewing collected
data.
Different elevator systems may be attached to the system. Consult your MCE Sales Engineer for
details.
Embedded Monitoring Interface (EMI)
For controllers manufactured by MCE, all the necessary interface to the Central Monitoring
System is embedded in the elevator control system. Specify the embedded interface for MCE
controllers by requiring the CMS option for each controller. Any existing MCE controller can be
upgraded to include the embedded interface.
Communication Network
Different communication networks can be used to allow an Embedded Monitoring Interface
(EMI) to communicate with the CMS station. The most popular means of communication are
phone lines using modems, hardwiring using line drivers or Ethernet with built in device
servers installed in the controls. Device servers require a 10Base-T connection to a computer
network supporting TCP/IP protocol.
CMS can be modified to meet customized communication network requirements. Consult your
MCE Sales Representative.
SIS, Security Interface Software
SIS is designed to allow the CMS user to remotely access and manipulate the elevator system
security software. This is a Windows-based software that allows security manipulation using a
PC mouse (point and click). This is true whether the customer has standard elevator security
CRT or the more enhanced Access Control for Elevators (ACE).
14-8 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
General
In This Section
Basic Security
Basic Security/CRT
Access Control (ACE)
Security Interface System
Additional Options
Elevator Security
General
Several elevator security options are available for MCE Controllers.
In This Section
•
•
•
•
•
15
Basic Security
Basic Security with CRT
Access Control for Elevators (ACE)
Security Interface System
Additional Security Options
15-1
Elevator Security
Basic Security
Basic Security provides a means to prevent unauthorized registration of car calls. Basic Security
allows access only to the floor(s) for which a person is authorized. Exiting from the building
shall not be restricted. Basic Security is available on all MCE elevator car controllers, simplex,
duplex and group.
The basic security system shall allow either unrestricted or restricted access to any floor or
combination of floors controlled by the elevator security system. The floor security codes shall
be programmable. The system shall be placed in the security mode by a single input to the
microcomputer system, such as from a key switch, time clock, etc.
Basic Security with CRT
Basic Security with CRT provides a means to prevent unauthorized registration of car calls and/
or hall calls. Basic Security with CRT allows access only to the floor(s) for which a person is
authorized. Access to elevators from specific landings can also be restricted. Basic Security with
CRT is available on all M3 Group Systems and most simplex and duplex systems (consult your
MCE Sales Representative).
Basic Security with CRT shall allow either unrestricted or restricted access to any floor or
combination of floors controlled by the elevator security system. The floor security codes shall
be programmable. The system shall be placed in the security mode by a single input to the
microcomputer system, such as from a key switch, display terminal or software timer table. The
system shall allow the user to program car calls to be secured on a per floor basis. The user shall
be able to program up to eight different configurations and the corresponding time schedule.
While in security mode, all elevators shall park at the lobby in order to prevent unauthorized
access to a floor where an elevator might otherwise park.
The security mode shall render all car call buttons inoperative, except those for floors that have
unrestricted access. Anyone desiring to go to a restricted floor may enter the elevator from any
floor by means of a hall call. A sequence of numbers must then be entered on the car operating
panel by using the normal car call pushbuttons. If the sequence is correct, the desired call lamp
shall light and the car shall proceed to that floor. If the sequence is incorrect, the call shall not
register. The sequence may be reinitiated at any time.
The sequence shall begin with the destination floor button. That button shall begin to flash on/
off after it has been pressed. The rest of the sequence shall consist of a series of up to a
maximum of eight numbers. If a sequence is not recognized, the memory shall be cleared
automatically and the person who entered the improper sequence shall be denied access.
15-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Access Control for Elevators
Access Control for Elevators
“ACE” Access Control for Elevators is MCE's premier elevator security system. ACE offers the
most sophisticated programming capability. ACE provides a wide range of options allowing
building owners and managers the greatest flexibility of any elevator security system available
today. ACE has passenger access codes which may be distributed to allow only authorized
passengers access to building floors.
ACE has multiple security configurations including car call access on a per passenger and/or
per floor basis. The sophisticated software of ACE also provides access control for car and hall
calls.
ACE is available for IMC Performa, IMC-SCR and IMC-AC simplex car controllers and all M3
Group Systems. ACE is programmable through a machine room CRT terminal or an IBM
compatible PC running Security Interface Software (SIS). For the availability of ACE on other
controller types, consult your MCE Sales Representative.
System Access Control
The system shall provide access control, featuring comprehensive programming of the access
level for the entire elevator call system. Each hall call, as well as each car call, shall be
individually programmable for access.
When using access control, every floor can have its own unique access schedule which shall be
completely independent of the access schedule for any other floor in the building. ACE shall also
allow the programming of many other functions such as groups of calls by floor, levels of access,
weekly schedules and so forth.
Levels of Access Control
Locked - Passengers in any elevator car serving a locked floor shall not be able to register car
calls to that locked floor. Optionally, anyone in the elevator lobby on a locked floor shall not be
able to register a hall call (up or down) to bring an elevator car to that locked floor. Any hall or
car calls registered for a floor when it becomes locked shall immediately be canceled.
Unsecured - Passengers shall be able to access any unsecured floor from any car or hall call
without restriction.
Secured - Only passengers with an authorized access code shall be able to register a car call to a
secured floor.
Hall Call Control
Hall calls on each floor shall be set to either locked or unsecured. If a hall call for a particular
floor, direction (up or down), side (front or rear) and for a particular hallway pushbutton riser
(main or auxiliary) is set to locked, then no one shall be able to register that hall call.
If a hall call is set to unsecured, then the hall call shall be registered without restriction.
15-3
15
Elevator Security
Car Call Control
Car calls may be set to one of three states: locked, secured, or unsecured. If a car call for a
particular floor and a particular side (front or rear) is set to locked, then no one shall be able to
register that car call.
If a car call is set to secured, then only passengers with a proper access code shall be able to
register that car call.
If a car call is set to unsecured, that car call shall be registered without restriction.
Access Control Resolution
At the highest resolution, the user shall be able to control access on a per button basis. This
means that every single call button in the system shall be programmable and have its own
unique access schedule. The system shall also include the flexibility to allow the user the option
of combining or grouping calls together, which allows access control at a lower resolution and
makes the job of programming and maintenance more manageable. Additionally, the user could
combine every single car call and hall call in the system into a single combined call. When that
combined call is locked, all calls in the whole system shall be locked. When that call is
unsecured, all calls shall be accepted without restriction.
Access Control Programming
The access control programming feature shall allow the user to program the level of access to be
in effect on specific days of the week and time of day. As an example, a user may wish to lock
certain floors on weekends, while other floors may be unsecured on weekends. A user shall be
able to program access via eight security configurations and a programmable security
configuration timer table. When the time of the event occurs, the event program shall
automatically secure the building in the manner desired.
Car Station Keypad
The system shall provide car call access by using the car pushbutton station(s) as a keypad to
allow authorized passengers to enter their access code. When the access system is activated,
access codes must be used to register calls to any floor that has been designated as a secured
floor.
Passenger Access Control
The passenger access security feature shall provide car call security for each elevator in the
system to any secured floor on an individual passenger basis by using unique individual
passenger access codes. The passenger shall use the car call buttons available in each car to
register the appropriate passenger access code required to go to a floor.
Each passenger shall have their own unique passenger access code, and may be authorized to
have access to a single floor or many different floors by assigning accessible floor number(s) in
the individual's data file. Time restrictions may also be assigned to an individual passenger to
restrict access during certain time periods.
The passenger data file shall include a passenger ID (name), unique personal access code
(number), authorized floor destinations and authorized time window(s).
15-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Access Control for Elevators
Floor Access Control
The floor access security feature shall provide car call security for any secured floor. Access
codes can be assigned on a per floor basis giving each floor a different access code or, if desired,
the system shall allow a single access code to be assigned to more than one floor.
Any passenger with the proper access code shall be permitted to register a car call for that floor.
The passenger shall use the car call buttons in each car to register the appropriate access code.
The access code assigned to a floor shall be used by all passengers going to that floor.
User Interface
The user shall have limited system access through a machine room CRT terminal or any remote
extension of the machine room CRT terminal. The user shall be able to access the system
through an IBM-compatible computer running Central Monitoring System (CMS) software
and/or Security Interface Software (SIS).
The building manager or other authorized personnel with the appropriate system security
password shall be able to program the system, view building access configurations (past,
current and future), print reports and so forth.
Report Generation
A list of passengers who registered secured car calls shall be available on the CRT terminal and
shall be sorted by time and date. The system shall store all events associated with the use of any
individual passenger access code.
Reports shall be generated by an IBM-compatible computer running Central Monitoring
System (CMS) software and/or Security Interface Software (SIS). Users with Security Interface
Software (SIS) shall be able to select and sort the list of car calls to secured floors by date, time,
source floor, destination floor, car number and passenger ID.
The user interface shall let the user see and print a report listing the time and date at which
individual passengers accessed secured floors.
15
Software Switch
The software switch is a logical switch accessed through a machine room CRT terminal or an
IBM compatible computer running Central Monitoring System (CMS) software and/or Security
Interface Software (SIS). When the software switch is on, the building elevator access system
shall be activated and when off, the system will be deactivated.
Specification Text, Special Operations
The access system shall be overridden in case of fire service. As an option, in the case of
independent service, hospital service and other special operations, the system may or may not
be overridden.
15-5
Elevator Security
Security Interface System
Specification Text, Security Interface System, Optional
The capability shall be provided to view the status screens and program the security variables
for Basic Security with CRT or Access Control for Elevators (ACE) security using an IBM
compatible computer running Security Interface Software (SIS).
15-6 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Additional Security Options
Additional Security Options
Specification Text, Central Monitoring, Optional
The capability shall be provided to view the status screens and program the security variables
for Basic Security with CRT or Access Control for Elevators (ACE) security using an IBMcompatible computer running Central Monitoring System (CMS) software and Security
Interface Software (SIS).
Specification Text, Card Reader Interface, Optional
A card reader interface shall be provided. The card reader vendor shall provide a dry contact
output.
Specification Text, Floor Key Lockout, Optional
The control system shall be engineered to provide floor key lockout.
15
15-7
Elevator Security
15-8 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
•
•
•
•
•
•
General
In This Section
Standard Enclosures
Landing Systems
Load Weighers
TLS Switches
Physical Specifications
General
This section is intended to be used as a reference for physical specification of products
described in this specification book. This section describes dimensions, weight, and
special features of the enclosures and accessory products. The specifications given in
this section are primarily for reference and may be changed or modified at any time
without notice.
Note
Where space restrictions apply, multiple enclosures may be needed. Consult your MCE Sales
Representative for special enclosure information.
In This Section
•
•
•
•
Standard Controller Enclosures
Landing System Physical Specifications
Load Weighers
TLS Terminal Limit Switches
16-1
16
Physical Specifications
Standard Controller Enclosures
MCE provides NEMA 1 type enclosures for its standard elevator controller products unless
otherwise specified. NEMA 1 enclosures are intended for indoor use primarily to provide a
degree of protection against contact with the enclosed equipment and against a limited amount
of falling dirt. Following is a list of product types and typical enclosures used with each. The
enclosures may be used interchangeably, depending upon application.
Hydraulic Enclosures
This enclosure is primarily used for PHC, HS and IOS control products. It is a steel enclosure
with an aluminum or steel sub-plate, louvered sides, removable door and is wall mounted with
front access only.
Figure 16.1
Hydraulic Enclosure
11
.00
[22
8.6
]
.00
34
]
3.6
[86
.50
31 ]
0.1
[80
PART NO. 15-01-0001
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
• Part Number: 15-01-0001 (See figure 16.1)
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 31.5 [800. 1] H X 34 [863.6] W X 11 [279.4] D
• Weight full (lbs. [kg]): 135 to 200 [61.29 to 90.8] approximate (depends on product)
16-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Standard Controller Enclosures
Figure 16.2
Hydraulic Enclosure
14
.0
[35 0
5.6
]
.00
36 ]
4.4
[91
.00
42 ]
.8
66
[10
16
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
D/N: 4284 R0
• Part Number: 15-09-0019 (Figure 16.2.)
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 42 [1066.8] H X 36 [914.4] W X 12 [304.8] D
• Weight full (lbs. [kg]: 200-300 [90.7 - 136] approximate (depends on product)
16-3
Physical Specifications
Traction Enclosure (Series M)
This enclosure is used for PTC and VFMC Series M control products. It is a steel enclosure with
an aluminum or steel sub-plate, louvered sides, removable vented resistor box (when required),
removable door, and is wall mounted with front access only.
Figure 16.3
Traction Enclosure, Series M
PART NO. 15-02-0027
0
.00
12 ]
4.8
[30
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
48
.00
[12
0
19
.2]
57
.00
0
[14
47
.8]
7.0
00
7.8
]
[17
0
.00
36 ]
4.4
[91
30
.00
0
[76
2]
THERE ARE LOUVERS ON EACH END
OF THE ENCLOSURE
THERE ARE LOUVERS ON THREE SIDES
OF THE RESISTOR CABINET
• Part Number: 15-02-0027 (See figure 16.3)
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 30 [762] H X 57 [1447.8] W X 12 [304.8] D
• Weight full (lbs. [kg]): 300-400 [136 - 181.4] approximate (depends on product)
16-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Standard Controller Enclosures
Traction Enclosure (Single Door)
This enclosure is used for IMC and PTC control products. It is a steel enclosure with an
aluminum or steel sub-plate, louvered sides, removable vented resistor box (when required),
reversible hinged door with keyed lock, and is floor mounted with front access only.
Figure 16.4
Traction Enclosure, Single Door
0
.00
14 .6]
5
[35
0
.00
11 .4]
9
7
[2
36
[91 .00
4.4
]
DOOR MAY HINGE
FROM EITHER SIDE
0
.50
76 3.1]
4
9
[1
0
.50
61 2.1]
6
[15
16
PART NO. 15-02-0001
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
• Part Number: 15-02-0001 (See figure 16.4)
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 76.5 [1943. 1] H X 36 [914.41] W X 14 [355.6] D
• Weight full (lbs. [kg]): 350 to 550 [158.9 to 249.7] approximate (depends on product)
16-5
Physical Specifications
Traction Enclosures (Double Door)
This enclosure is used for IMC and PTC control products. It is a steel enclosure with an
aluminum or steel sub-plate, louvered sides, removable vented resistor box (when required),
removable hinged double doors with keyed lock, and is floor mounted with front access only.
Figure 16.5
Traction Enclosure, Double Door
.00
16 .4]
6
[40
.00
13 .2]
0
[33
39
.
[99 00
0.6
]
.50
82 .5]
95
0
2
[
7
.43
67 2.9]
1
7
[1
PART NO. 15-02-0035
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
• Part Number: 15-02-0035 (Figure 16.5)
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 82.5 [2095.5] H X 39 [990.6] W X 16 [406.4] D
• Weight full (lbs.[kg]): 395 to 600 [179.3 to 272.4] approximate (depends on product)
16-6 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Standard Controller Enclosures
Figure 16.6
Traction Enclosure, Double Door
.00
16 .4]
6
[40
39
.
[99 00
0.6
]
15
.
[39 50
3.7
]
39
.
[99 00
0.6
]
85
[21 .50
71
.7]
16
PART NO. 15-02-0034
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
• Part Number: 15-02-0034 (Figure 16.6)
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 85.5 [2171.7] H X 54.5 [1384.3] W X 16 [406.4] D
• Weight full (lbs.[kg]): 800 - 900 [362.8 - 408.2] approximate (depends on product)
16-7
Physical Specifications
Group Enclosure
This enclosure is used for the M3 Group System. It is a steel enclosure with a steel swing out
sub-plate, louvered top, hinged door with keyed lock, slide out keyboard tray and CRT rack, and
is floor mounted with front access only.
Figure 16.7
Group Enclosure
0
.00
19 .2]
7
5
[4
24
.
[60 000
9.6
]
.50
70 .7]
90
7
[1
PART NO. 15-03-0003
"M3" GROUP SUPERVISOR
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
• Part Number: 15-03-0003 (See figure 16.7)
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 70.5 [1790.7] H X 24 [609.6] W X 19 [482.6] D
• Weight full (lbs. [kg]): 200 to 300 [90.8 to 136.2] approximate (depends on product)
16-8 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Standard Controller Enclosures
Off-the-Shelf Enclosures
For applications where MCE's standard enclosures are not appropriate, a wide range of off-theshelf NEMA rated enclosures are available from various manufacturers. For physical dimensions and pricing on these enclosures, consult your MCE Sales Representative. Below is a list of
the more commonly used NEMA rated enclosures for elevator applications:
NEMA 1
For special applications or space restrictions in which MCE standard enclosures cannot be
used.
Note
In some cases, multiple enclosures may be needed where space restrictions apply.
NEMA 4
Enclosures are intended for indoor or outdoor use primarily to provide a degree of protection
against windblown dust, rain, splashing water and hose directed water; undamaged by the
formation of ice on the enclosure.
Note
A cooling system may be required for some types of controllers (see dimensions below).
16
16-9
Physical Specifications
Figure 16.8
NEMA 4 Enclosure
24
.6
[62 0"
4.8
]
"
.60
50 ]
.2
85
[12
"
.60
37
]
5
[95
14
.5
[36 0"
8.3
]
72
.60
[18 "
44
]
"
.00
13 ]
2
0.
[33
84
.6
[21 0"
48
.8]
5.0
5
[12 "
3.3
]
"
.25
32 ]
5
9.1
[81
"
.25
38 ]
6
1.
[97
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
•
•
•
•
•
Part Number: 15-09-0136 (See figure 16.8)
Enclosure Dimensions (inch [mm]): 84.6 [2148.8] H X 37.6 [955] W X 24.6 [624.8] D
AC Dimensions (1000 to 4000 BTU) 32.25 [819.15] H X 14.5 [368.3] W X 13 [330.2] D
AC Dimensions (4000 to 8000 BTU) 37.75 [958.85] H X 18.56 [471.43] W X 18 [457.2] D
Weight full (lbs. [kg]): 900 - 1000 [408.2 - 453.6] approximate (depends on product)
16-10 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Standard Controller Enclosures
NEMA 4X
Enclosures are intended for indoor or outdoor use primarily to provide a degree of protection
against corrosion, windblown dust, rain, splashing water and hose-directed water; undamaged
by the formation of ice on the enclosure. NOTE: A cooling system may be required for some
types of controllers (see dimensions below).
Figure 16.9
NEMA 4X Enclosure
16
.00
[40 "
6.4
]
"
.00
49 ]
.6
44
[12
"
.00
36
]
4.4
[91
14
.50
[36 "
8.3
]
"
.00
13 ]
0.2
[33
.75
"
[19
.1]
60
.00
[15 "
24
]
72
.0
[18 0"
28
.8]
"
.25
32 ]
5
9.1
[81
16
"
.25
38
]
1.6
[97
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
•
•
•
•
•
Part Number: 15-09-0145 (See figure 16.9)
Enclosure Dimensions (inch [mm]): 72 [1828.8] H X 36 [914.4] W X 16 [4.6.4] D
AC Dimensions (1000 to 4000 BTU) 32.25 [819.15] H X 14.5 [368.3] W X 13 [330.2] D
AC Dimensions (5000 BTU) 32.875 [832.03] H X 12.5 [317.5] W X 9.5 [241.3] D
Weight full (lbs. [kg]): 800 - 900 [362.8 - 408.2] approximate (depends on product)
16-11
Physical Specifications
NEMA 12
Enclosures are intended for indoor use primarily to provide a degree of protection against dust,
falling dirt and dripping noncorrosive liquids.
Note
A cooling system may be required for some types of controllers (see dimensions below).
Figure 16.10
NEMA 12 Enclosure
16
.00
[40 "
6.4
]
"
.00
57 ]
8
.
47
[14
"
.00
48 ]
.2
19
[12
12
[31
"
1.1
0"
9.0
]
.
86
[22
"
.50
23
]
7
[59
60
.00
[15 "
24
]
.25
]
1.8
8"
[47
.6]
72
.0
[18 0"
28
.8]
"
.50
17 ]
5
.
4
[44
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
•
•
•
•
•
Part Number: 15-09-0056-W (See figure 16.10)
Enclosure Dimensions (inch [mm]): 72 [1828.8] H X 48 [1219.2] W X 16 [406.4] D
AC Dimensions (1000 to 2000 BTU) 17.5 [444.5] H X 12.25 [311.1] W X 9 [228.6] D
AC Dimensions (2000 to 5000 BTU) 32.875 [832.03] H X 12.5 [317.5] W X 9.5 [241.3] D
Weight full (lbs. [kg]): 800 - 900 [362.8 - 408.2] approximate (depends on product)
16-12 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Standard Controller Enclosures
Group Dispatcher (IOS) Overlay Enclosure
(see Hydraulic Enclosure)
Filter Enclosures
Primarily used for 6-pulse and 12-pulse filters, these are steel enclosures with an aluminum or
steel sub-plate, louvered sides, and a removable door with front access only.
Figure 16.11
Filter Enclosure
14
.0
[35 0
5.6
]
.00
26
]
0.4
[66
.00
24
6]
.
09
[6
16
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
• Part Number: 15-09-0050 (See figure 16.11)
• Enclosure Dimensions (inch [mm]): 24 [609.6] H X 26 [660.4] W X 14 [355.6] D
• Weight full (lbs. [kg]): 100 - 200 [45.3 - 90.7] approximate (depends on product)
16-13
Physical Specifications
Figure 16.12
Filter Enclosure
.00
14 ]
5.6
[35
39
.
[99 00
0.6
]
.00
26 4]
.
0
[66
PART NO. 15-02-0016
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
• Part Number: 15-02-0016 (See figure 16.12)
• Enclosure Dimensions (inch [mm]): 26 [660.4] H X 39 [990.4] W X 14 [355.6] D
• Weight full (lbs. [kg]): 200 - 300 [90.7 - 136] approximate (depends on product)
16-14 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Landing System Physical Specifications
Landing System Physical Specifications
LS-STAN Specifications
Refer to Figure 16-13 for LS-STAN.
Sensor
A vane operated infrared proximity switch manufactured by MCE.
• Part Number: VS-1
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 1.92 [48.77] H X 1.93 [49.02] W X 1.95 [49.53] D
• Opening Dim. (inch [mm]): 0.75 [19.05] W X 1. 12 [28.45] D
Power Supply
• Part Number: PS-5A or PS-7A
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 1. 03 2 [26.2 1] H X 4.5 [114, W X 3 [76.2] D
Enclosure
The LS-STAN has a steel enclosure with a rear access screw cover for sensor adjustment; it has
five separately adjustable sensor lanes and slots for adjustability in mounting on the car top.
• Part Number: 15-07-0001
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 16.5 [393.7] H X 10 [254] W X 3.5 [88.9] D
• Weight (lbs. [kg]): 11 [5. 0] approximately (assembled)
Vane Assembly
The P4-VANE- 12# is used for 12 lb. rails or smaller, the P4-VANE-15# is used for 15 lb. or 18 lb.
rails and P4-VANE-30# is used for 22 or 30 lb. rails; they include the mounting hardware and
Unistrut. The vanes are mounted on a P6000 or P7000 Unistrut, are 24" in length, and include
rail clips and mounting hardware.
• Part Number: P4-VANE-12#, P4-VANE-15# or P4-VANE-30#
• Vane Dim. (inch [mm]): 5.875 [149.23] H X 2 [50.8] W X 3.80 [96.52] D
16
16-15
Physical Specifications
Figure 16.13
LS-STAN
LS-STAN POWER SUPPLY
VS-1
.250"
BOTTOM VIEW
SIDE VIEW
.75"
1.92"
.59"
.73"
CONTACT RATING
LIMITS OF
VANE ENTRY
N.O.
YELLOW
RED
BLUE N.O.
1.12"
.66"
4.50"
1.95"
60W 125VAC
0.6A 125VAC
MADE IN USA
0.6A 110VAC
.05"
.29"
HOOK UP
WIRES
.315"
.965"
1.50"
1.93"
1.032"
10
3.00"
.00
"
0"
2.0
LS-STAN VANE ASSEMBLY
LS-STAN
13
.00
"
75
5.8
"
UNISTRUT
VANE
15
.50
"
(2) BEAM CLAMPS
2.0
0"
0"
3.5
16-16 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
RAIL
Landing System Physical Specifications
LS-QUAD-2 Specifications
Magnetic Sensor
A magnetically operated switch manufactured by MCE.
• Part Number: LS-PS1
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 0.75 [19.05] bushing and 42 [1066.8] wire
Enclosure
The LS-QUAD-2 has a steel enclosure with a rear access screw cover for sensor adjustment and
has an aluminum front plate for sensor mounting.
• Part Number: 15-07-0007
• Dimension (inch [mm]): 20.8 [528.3] H X 6.5 [165. 1] W X 4.5 [114.3] D
• Weight (lbs. [kg]): 14 [6.36] approximately (assembled)
Figure 16.14
LS-QUAD-2 Enclosure (Rear View)
4.5
00
[11
4.3
]
0
.80
20 ]
3
.
8
[52
16
00
6.5
]
5.1
[16
PART NO. LS-QUAD-2(R)
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
16-17
Physical Specifications
Encoder
The encoders are mounted on the face plate of the LS-QUAD-2. The passage of the steel tape in
front of the encoder optics interrupts beams of light to provide position and speed information
for the pattern generator.
Tape
The tape is perforated with slotted holes.
•
•
•
•
Part Number: 40-10-0003
Dimensions (inch [mm]): 3.11 [78.99] W X. 12 [3.05] thick
Hole Dim. (inch [mm]): 0.375 [9.53] H X.625 [16.88] W with 0.75 [19.05] center to center
Weight (lbs./ft. [kg/m]): 0.1875 [.280]
Tape Mounting
Top and bottom bracket assemblies and mounting hardware are included
• Part Number: TAPE-MT-QUAD
Figure 16.15
LS-QUAD-2 Bottom Tape Mounting
LS-QUAD-2 TAPE MOUNTING
16-18 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Landing System Physical Specifications
LS-QUTE Specifications
Magnetic Sensor
A magnetically operated switch manufactured by MCE.
• Part Number: LS-PS1
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 0.75 [19.05] bushing and 42 [1066.8] wire
Enclosure
The LS-QUTE has a steel enclosure with a rear access screw cover for sensor adjustment and
has an aluminum plate for sensor mounting.
• Part Number: 15-07-0005
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 12 [304.8] H X 5 [127] W X 3 [76.2] D
• Weight (lbs. [kg]): 2.0 [.908] approximately (assembled)
Tape
• Part Number: 40-10-0002-B
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 3.11 [78.99] W X. 12 [3.05] thick
• Weight (lbs/ft. [kg/m]): 0.1875 [.280]
Tape Mounting
Top and bottom bracket assemblies and mounting hardware are included
• Part Number: TAPE-MT-QUTE
Figure 16.16
LS-QUTE Components
3.0
0"
16
"
.00
12
0"
5.0
ENCLOSURE AND TAPE
TAPE MOUNTING
PART NO. TAPE-MT-QUTE
16-19
Physical Specifications
LS-QUIK Specifications
Sensor
A vane operated infrared proximity switch manufactured by MCE.
• Part Number: VS-1 (See figure 16.13)
Enclosure
The LS-QUIK has a steel enclosure with a rear access screw cover for sensor adjustment and has
a steel front plate for sensor mounting.
• Part Number: 15-07-0006
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 20.875 [530.225] H X 6.5 [165. 1] W X 6.625 [168.275] D
• Weight (lbs. [kg]): 14 [6.36] approximately (assembled)
Figure 16.17
LS-QUIK Enclosure
25
6.6 ]
8.3
6
[1
25
4.6 ]
7.5
[11
6.5
0
[16 0
5.1
]
LU
R5
R4
DZ1
DZF
R3
R2
20
.8
[53 75
0.2
]
R1
DZ2
DZR
RO
LD
PR
16-20 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Landing System Physical Specifications
Encoder
The encoder and follower wheel are mounted on the encoder base plate. The encoder base plate
is mounted above the car roller guide assembly. A spring applies pressure to the follower wheel
to ensure proper contact with the guide rail.
• Part Number: LSQK-ENCDR
• Part Number: 11-02-0003 Encoder Base Plate
Figure 16.18
LS-QUIK Wheel Driven Encoder Assembly
ENCODER FOLLOWER
WHEEL - 6.00 [152.4] DIA.
ENCODER
9.0
[22 0
8.6
]
ENCODER PLATFORM
0.250 [6.35] THICK
6.0
[15 0
2.4
0
6.0 ]
2.4
5
[1
]
NOTE: DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
C
3.00
2.00
0.25
REF.
2.00
0.281 R SLOT X 1 LG.
TYP. 4 SLOTS
0.500
16
0.500
3.000
3.000
1.500
1.00
1.12
2.24
6.00
NOTE:DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES (MILIMETERS)
16-21
Physical Specifications
LS-QUIK Vane
This vane is used for absolute floor encoding, as well as door zone and leveling. The vane has
break-out tabs that are removed to encode the various floors.
• Part Number: 40-05-0010
Figure 16.19
LS-QUIK Vane
DETAIL A
SLOT
8 PL.
SEE DETAIL A
NOTE:
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
1.000
[25.4]
0.265
[6.73]
0.750
[19.05]
0.520
[13.21]
3.000
[76.20]
2.000
[50.80]
1.000
[25.4]
2.000
[50.80]
2.000
[50.80]
R 0.250
[6.35]
12.000
[304.80]
0.750
[19.05]
1.500
[38.10]
0.625
[15.88]
2.000
[50.80]
2.000
[50.80]
2.000
[50.80]
2.000
[50.80]
14.000
[355.60]
16-22 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
2.000
[50.80]
2.000
[50.80]
2.040
+0.10
51.82
+2.54
Isolated Platform Load Weigher
Isolated Platform Load Weigher
The isolated platform load weigher consists of the following:
• Part Number: LW-SA-1 Sensor Assembly
• Part Number: 40-02-0094 Target Brackets (2 each)
• Part Number HC-LWIPA Enclosure Assembly
Figure 16.20
Isolated Platform Load Weigher
0
7.0 ]
7.8
[17
9.
[22 00
8.6
]
16
0
3.5 ]
.9
8
[8
11
.
[27 00
9.4
]
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
16-23
Physical Specifications
Figure 16.21
Speaker Enclosure (White)
[17 7.00
7.8 0
]
[17 7.00
7.8 0
]
7
[18 .125
1]
4
[11.40
1.7
]
7
[18 .125
1]
PART NO. 15-08-0001
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
5.600
[142.2]
5.500
[139.7]
16-24 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Isolated Platform Load Weigher
Figure 16.22
Speaker Enclosure, Black
[17 7.00
7.8 0
]
[17 7.00
7.8 0
]
[15 6.25
8.8
]
4
[10.15
5.4
]
[15 6.25
8.8
]
PART NO. 15-08-0003
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
5.500
[139.7]
16
5.500
[139.7]
16-25
Physical Specifications
Figure 16.23
Speaker Enclosure
[18 7.38
7.3
]
[15 6.25
8.7
]
MOUNTING FLANGE
[18 7.15
1.6
]
4
[11.38
1.1
]
PART NO. 15-04-0004
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
4.70
[119.4]
2.35
[59.7]
MOUNTING FLANGE
2.35
[59.7]
4.70
[119.4]
16-26 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
TLS Terminal Limit Switches
TLS Terminal Limit Switches
TLS-C-12 and TLS-C-16 are cartop mounted, magnetically operated switch arrays. TLS-1 is an
individually sealed, magnetically operated switch mounted on its own bracket.
• Part Number: TLS-C-12
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 16.344 [415.1] L X 5.875 [149.2] W X 4 [101.6] D
Figure 16.24
TLS-C-12 Terminal Limit Switches
75
5.8 ]
9.2
[14
16
.3
[41 44
5.1
]
MO
TIO
NC
ON
MO
TR
OL
DE
EN
VO L:
GIN
T
LT
EE
AG LS-C
RIN
MA
E
-___
X A : 25
G.
IN
0V
MP
C.
AC
S:
RE
,
VIS
0.1A 10,
60
IO
M
N:
0.2A P @ HZ /
11
25
5V
0.1AMP @ 0V
DC
A
C
MP 12
@ 0VA
11
C
SE
5V
RIA
DC
L:
MAD
E IN
U.
S.A.
WA
R
MO NIN
R G
SE E TH :
E D AN
IAG O
RA NE LI
M
VE
CIR
CU
IT
0
4.0 ]
1.6
[10
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
16
16-27
Physical Specifications
• Part Number: TLS-C-16
• Dimensions (inch [mm]): 21.625 [21.625] L X 5.875 [149.2] W X 4 [101.6] D
Figure 16.25
TLS-C-16 Terminal Limit Switches
75
5.8 ]
9.2
[14
21
.6
[54 25
9.2
]
MO
TIO
N
CO
NTR
MO
OL
DE
EN
VO L:
GIN
TL
LT
S-C
EE
AG
RIN
MA
E
-___
X A : 25
G.
IN
0V
MP
C.
AC
S:
RE
,
VIS
0.1A 10,
60
IO
M
N:
0.2A P @ HZ /
11
25
5V
0.1AMP @ 0V
DC
MP 12 AC
@ 0VA
11
C
SE
5V
RIA
DC
L:
MA
DE
IN
U.
S.A.
WA
R
MO NIN
R G
SE E TH :
E D AN
IAG O
RA NE LI
M
VE
CIR
CU
IT
0
4.0 ]
1.6
[10
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES [MILLIMETERS]
16-28 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
TLS Terminal Limit Switches
• Part Number: TLS-1
TLS-1 Terminal Limit Switches
F
OF
ON
Figure 16.26
ON
OF
F
16
16-29
Physical Specifications
16-30 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
General
In This Section
Drive System Considerations
MG vs Static Drive
AC Motor Controls
Harmonic Analysis
AC Static Drive/RFI
Modernization
Technical Publications
In This Section
Over time, several “universal” issues affecting elevator installation and/or modernization have repeatedly been of concern. This section contains technical “white” papers
addressing several of these issues, including:
•
•
•
•
•
• Drive System Considerations
Motor Generator vs Static Drives: A look at when it might be appropriate to stay with
motor generator drives rather than switching to static drives.
AC Motor Controls for Elevators: A review of pertinent issues regarding proper application
and installation of AC motors and drives.
Harmonic Analysis and Comparison: A discussion of harmonic analysis and comparison of
DC and AC static drives.
AC Inverter Drives & RFI: A review of the generation of electrical noise and effects of RFI
in AC static drives.
Modernization Performance Charts
17-1
17
Technical Publications
Drive System Considerations
This introductory section provides a preface to the separate white papers, providing information about why they were written, including:
•
•
•
•
Purpose
Overview
Communication is Vital
Drive Technology
Purpose
This Technical Publication discusses drive system considerations for selection of elevator drives
and possible side effects associated with static drives.
Motion Control Engineering, Inc. manufactures elevator control systems using motor
generator and DC-SCR or AC static drives. MCE’s experience as a control system supplier
suggests the need to improve industry understanding regarding the application of elevator
control drive systems.
Overview
Many modernization projects use static drives successfully (either DC-SCR or AC inverter type).
On the other hand, a few projects have presented significant difficulties from which much can
be learned.
As an elevator control system supplier, MCE has become aware of problems that result from the
use of static drives. These situations underscore the need to share experiences and maintain an
open dialogue between elevator control suppliers, consultants, contractors and other interested
parties.
Communication is Vital
Sometimes, neither consultants, contractors or control suppliers recognize a potential problem.
Communication is vital to the successful installation of static drives and it is, of course,
preferable to address as many issues as possible up front. Mutual recognition of potential issues
is the key to a successful project. This is particularly true for modernization.
Occasionally, a problem comes as a total surprise. The result is chaos -- especially for the end
user, who cannot understand how knowledgeable elevator industry people could have failed to
foresee the difficulty. Some specification writers have attempted to address issues in advance by
specifying that, “The contractor and/or control supplier shall be responsible for everything that
may occur as the result of the application of static drives”. This is not a reasonable solution.
To best serve the customer and the industry, it is necessary to establish a continuous dialogue.
There are issues that can be recognized up front and potential difficulties prevented.
Consultants, contractors and control suppliers working as a team can research, evaluate and
resolve issues.
17-2 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Drive System Considerations
An example of an issue not properly identified and adequately addressed is the case where
elevators were converted to DC-SCR static drives. During the completion stages of the project it
was discovered that the existing building power supply was inadequate. What can an owner or,
for that matter, a supplier do when they have no prior knowledge of this type of job specific
condition?
The contractor, consultants and others directly familiar with a project should recognize the
need for power system evaluation. Everyone involved with a modernization project should
remember that existing elevators frequently do not run at contract speed. Further, static drives
may affect AC power distribution systems differently than original DC or AC elevator controls.
Drive Technology
Modern drive technology includes motor generator drives using static field control, DC-SCR
static drives and AC static drives. These state-of-the-art drives raise additional issues for
consideration.
Old relay technology had little or no effect on the AC line. This equipment generated little or no
noise, and operated well with emergency power generators.
Static drives present issues for new construction and retrofitting (modernization) of existing
systems. Static drives are preferred, in most cases, over motor generator drives. For new construction, the static drive option can be evaluated and used as the basis for design of the elevator machine room and the AC power distribution system. For modernization projects, it is
important to recognize the potential for damaging effects from static drives, including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Degraded performance of emergency power generators
Additional heating and induction motor power losses
Audible noise
Interference with sensitive medical equipment
Interference with computers
Interference with radio and television equipment
Noise is generated as a result of static drive switching and the way these devices draw current
from the AC line. Static drives use switching devices, including SCRs, transistors, and IGBTs,
that switch very rapidly producing Radio Frequency Interference (RFI). Static drives also
produce current distortion on the AC line, called Harmonic Distortion.
17
Types of noise include:
• Audible Noise - Airborne
• Physical Noise - Structure conducted
• Electrical Noise - Radiated or conducted
• Radiated Noise from wires connected to a drive becomes an issue when the magnitude
creates RFI that interferes with radio receivers and other devices.
• Conducted Noise transmitted from the drive through electrical conductors can result
in harmonic distortion, line notching, and other disturbances.
While static drives have some unfriendly characteristics, their overall performance makes them
highly desirable. When the implications are understood, static drives frequently provide the
best total solution for elevator control.
17-3
Technical Publications
Conclusion
The MCE Technical Publication series is intended to be an informative catalyst for ongoing
dialogue and sharing of information between consultants, elevator contractors, owners and
other interested parties. MCE Technical Publications are available on our website at
www.mceinc.com.
Don Alley, Chief Engineer
MCE R&D Staff
January 1996
Note
It is MCE’s philosophy to share information with interested parties. To this end MCE grants
unlimited reproduction rights, with proper attribution, to NAVTP and/or NAEC to further engineering and technical excellence within the elevator industry.
17-4 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Static Drives vs Motor Generators
Static Drives vs Motor Generators
Purpose
This Technical Publication examines variables that help determine the suitability of static
drives vs motor generators for any given project.
Motion Control Engineering, Inc. experience with various drive configurations suggests the
need for review of drive considerations by consultants and contractors prior to the selection of a
drive system for any project, whether new installation or modernization.
Overview
Most of today’s elevator control specifications require the utilization of static drives.
Nonetheless, experience shows that there are applications where motor generator control
systems may be a better choice (in fact they may be the only choice). It is important to have a
basic understanding of variables that must be reviewed for proper drive selection.
Introduction
The selection of an elevator drive requires examination of the adequacy of the power
distribution system and possible interference with other devices sharing the power line. After
all variables have been considered, select the drive type (and if necessary, appropriate isolation
and filtering devices) to satisfy the needs of the specific application.
In today’s world, for elevator drive systems, the product of choice is Static drives in lieu of
motor generator sets. Nonetheless, sometimes after thorough evaluation, motor generator
drives may be the most appropriate choice for a particular project. In this bulletin, we evaluate
the merits of these drives and look at some situations in which it might be better to specify
motor generator drives in lieu of static drives.
Old elevator control technology was analog, which created little or no line pollution and worked
well with emergency power generators.
Issues to consider before selecting static drives include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Power consumption
Maintenance
Emergency power generators
Shared power feeders
Equipment sensitive to harmonics
Marginal AC feeders
Gearless motors with straight slots
17
17-5
Technical Publications
Power Consumption
One of the advantages of solid state drives is that they are more efficient then motor generator
sets. There are three elements that contribute to an elevator system’s use of power.
1. The power used by the MG set when running idle. Many are not aware of the fact
that a motor generator draws about 35% to 40% of the full load current when idling. In
other words, if the generator is running while the car is stopped, as much as 40% of full
load current may be drawn to keep the generator running. This current is used for overcoming friction and provide magnetization current for the MG set. Power used for running a generator at idle may translate to about 12% of the power used by the elevator
when running on full load. Note that the generator will be running idle well over 50% of
the time, and sometimes as much as 70% of the time (any time the elevator is stopped at
a floor and the generator is running).
2. MG sets are less efficient than SCR drives. A motor-generator set’s two rotating
elements operate with 72% to 81% efficiency. A static drive used in conjunction with a
line transformer operates with 95% to 97% rectifier-transformer efficiency. By substituting a solid state DC drive for a motor-generator set, drive efficiency can be improved
(from 18% to 33%).
3. The power factor. At leveling speeds, SCR drives have a poorer power factor than MG
sets. On the other hand, MG’s running with no load have fairly poor power factor themselves. Utility rates may or may not penalize for poor power factor. Therefore, some of
the effect of the power savings of static drives may be lost as the result of power factor.
Various elevator companies claim anywhere from 15% to 25% power savings with the use of
SCR drives. From the above, one can see that the actual amount of savings depends on many
elements. However, one could state conservatively that a 15% power savings is likely when
substituting SCR drives for MG sets.
Maintainability
Another advantage of solid state drives is ease of maintenance. Motor generators are high speed
rotating equipment. Therefore, they need periodic lubrication and bearing and brush
replacement. Additionally, brush wear produces carbon dust that can contaminate the machine
room environment. Elimination of MG sets removes the maintenance demand represented by
MG sets.
These are two of the strongest arguments in favor of using static drives instead of motor
generators.
Marginally Sized Emergency Generators
For static drive applications, the emergency power generator must be sized substantially larger
then the total power demand required by elevators. Undersized generators can result in
interaction between the two systems causing trip-off of either the emergency generator or the
static drive.
Some emergency generators are sized so marginally that they are at the theoretical minimum
rating necessary to provide power for the elevators. In actual field conditions, static drives can
place an excessive burden on these generators, resulting in poor elevator operation, trip-off of
generators, trip-off of elevators and other irregularities.
17-6 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Static Drives vs Motor Generators
Compatibility problems result from the generator’s inability to cope with the rapid changes in
current demand that are typical of static drives. Consequences include frequency fluctuations
that can trip either system.
The first step to ensure application of the proper elevator drive system is to review the various
parameters of the existing elevator control equipment, power distribution system, and
emergency power generator. This examination should include full load current, acceleration
current, running current, feeder size, emergency generator capacity and power source (natural
gas, diesel, etc.).
Ask static drive suppliers to provide the AC equivalents for full load current, acceleration
current, running current, and so forth. Discuss the issue of conversion to static drives with the
manufacturers of emergency generators. Note that natural gas generators, where regulation is a
function of gas pressure, are more likely to present a problem than diesel generators. As a rule
of thumb, you could expect anywhere up to about 30% more current drawn by SCR drives than
MG sets. This depends on the efficiency of both the existing MG set and the new SCR drive.
One example of experience with static drives and emergency power regulation is the case of the
emergency generator that would run empty cars, but would only lift fully loaded cars 10 of 22
floors. Regulation had to be readjusted to remedy the problem. When writing specifications you
may wish to require the generator maintenance company’s representative be present during
final testing.
Emergency Generators Sensitive to Harmonics
Static drives generate harmonic distortion that, in some instances, places an excessive burden
on emergency generators. Emergency generators can be sensitive to harmonics or other power
line pollution created by static drives. Ask the emergency generator manufacturer about
sensitivity to harmonics and other noise.
Emergency Generators Sensitive to Power Factor
At low elevator speeds SCR static drives have a worse power factor than motor generator
control systems (at high speed they are similar). KVA ratings for feeder transformers and wire
sizing must be adequate. If emergency generators are sensitive to poor power factor the use of
SCR drives is not recommended. Find out about power factor sensitivity from the emergency
generator manufacturer.
Shared Power Distribution Systems
MG sets may be the best choice if equipment sharing the same power feeders is sensitive to
harmonics and other line noise created by static drives. This can happen in hospitals, financial
centers, airports, government agencies or other similar buildings where electronic devices
(computers, scanners, data transmission equipment, and radio-TV transmission equipment)
are present. In some cases, RFI generated by certain types of static drives, especially VFAC
drives, may cause interference.
Marginal AC Power Distribution
Static drives draw current from the power distribution system differently then motor generator
systems. It is extremely important to note that, in many modernizations where static drives are
to be utilized, the existing elevators may not be running at contract speed. As a result, power
distribution systems may appear to be adequate. After modernization is completed, the power
system may actually be marginal or even insufficient to run the elevators at contract speed.
Here again, thoughtful evaluation of jobsite conditions is required, and motor generator systems may be preferred.
17-7
17
Technical Publications
AC Line Current Magnitude Graphs for Motor Generator vs SCR
The curves in the “Motor Generator vs SCR Drive” graph illustrates the difference between the
way current is taken from the AC line by these two types of devices. The respective AC line
current magnitudes, at full speed, are very similar; however, you can see that there are
substantial differences during acceleration and deceleration. The motor generator system’s
current magnitude during acceleration, has a gradually increasing curve which rises to
maximum current to achieve full speed. The SCR drive has an immediate response, drawing
maximum current throughout acceleration until full speed is achieved. The SCR drive is more
efficient overall, but the brief extra current loads on acceleration and deceleration can create
problems when the normal power distribution system or emergency generator is inadequate.
Figure 17.1
AC Line Current Magnitude — Motor Generator vs SCR
AC Line Current Magnitude
200%
MG
SCR
100%
Acceleration
Start
Full Speed
At Full
Speed
Time
Deceleration
Begin
Slow
Down
Stop
Current Requirements for SCR Drives
A good approximation for calculating the AC equivalent currents for SCR drive applications is:
0.82 X
DC Full Load Amps x Armature Voltage
Line Voltage
The AC equivalent current being taken from the elevator power supply is the sum of the current
calculated above (SCR drive current), plus the AC current required for the controller, door
operator, brake, and motor field. For maximum accuracy when determining AC line
equivalents, it is best to use field data obtained during operation of the elevator at full load and
full speed.
Note
Full load current typically drawn by SCR drives may be about 30% greater than that of the drive
motor for the matching motor generator set.
17-8 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Static Drives vs Motor Generators
Gearless Machines
When the hoist motor is an old gearless type with “straight slots” (motor armature slots relative
to the edges of the motor field poles), torque pulsations may be created during high current
conditions. This effect is subdued with MG sets, but accentuated with SCR drives of any kind.
When retaining this type of hoist motor it is best to modernize using motor generator controls.
Motors with straight slots are often GE or Westinghouse gearless machines dating to pre1930's. A knowledgeable elevator man can usually identify “straight slots” in gearless motors by
visual inspection.
Conclusion
Selecting the best elevator control drive for a particular application is not an exact science.
However, as you have seen, consideration of factors discussed here can increase the likelihood
of success.
Many installation problems result from failure to recognize and consider the issues raised here.
With proper evaluation, the transition from motor generator controls to static drives is, in most
cases, not only desirable but appropriate.
While this publication addresses many issues relating to selection of motor generator vs SCR
drives, it is desirable to continually explore issues relating to drive selection.
MCE’s Technical Publication series is intended to be an informative catalyst for ongoing
dialogue and sharing of information between consultants, elevator contractors, owners and
other interested parties. MCE Technical Publications are available on our website at
www.mceinc.com.
Don Alley, Chief Engineer
MCE R&D Staff
February 1996
17
17-9
Technical Publications
17-10 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
AC Motor Controls for Elevators
AC Motor Controls for Elevators
Purpose
This technical publication is intended as a resource and guide for elevator consultants and
contractors. Pertinent issues regarding proper application and installation of AC motors and
drives are discussed. Information is based on our collective experience designing and
manufacturing both controls and drives. Recommendations are the result of many years of
experience analyzing and resolving customer problems.
Electrical noise, Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) and Electromagnetic Interference (EMI)
are also addressed. Experience suggests that AC drives can generate noise that may affect radiofrequency-sensitive equipment in the building.
An understanding of these phenomena is required in order to select the best possible elevator
drive system for a particular application.
Overview
The application of AC drive technology to various types of AC elevator motors requires a
thorough understanding of the clear advantages and tradeoffs, in order to make the very best
possible choices for AC drives and motors.
In addition, comparison of AC and DC motor and drive technology does not result in a clear-cut
“winning” technology to be applied universally. Rather, each technology has unique advantages
and disadvantages. The choice of either technology must take into account a wide variety of
technical, environmental, and economic factors.
For new building construction, these issues can typically be addressed during the design phase.
However, when modernizing elevator systems in existing buildings, thoughtful consideration is
required. It is important to have a basic understanding of the tradeoffs that represent key
determining factors in the motor and drive selection process.
In the discussion that follows, Variable Frequency AC drives are divided into two categories:
inverter drives and flux vector drives.
• Inverter drives are typically used for low speed, open loop (no encoder) applications. The
simplest type of AC drive, inverter drives are non-regenerative – they do not have the ability to return regenerated energy back to the AC line when overhauling (empty car up or full
load down). Regenerated energy must be dissipated across resistors in the form of heat.
• Flux vector drives are typically used for high performance, closed loop (encoder required)
applications with speeds above 150 fpm. Standard flux vector drives are also non-regenerative, requiring resistors for dissipating regenerated energy.
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Technical Publications
Motor Reuse or Replacement
Geared Applications – selection is job dependent:
Drive and motor selection are affected by the condition of the geared machine. When changing
to a new machine, you may prefer to use an AC motor.
CAR SPEEDS TO 150 FPM (.75 m/s)
• Existing: Old AC motor
• Recommendation: Replace with New AC motor; use inverter drive
• Existing: DC motor in good condition
• Recommendation: Retain DC motor (especially above 40 HP)
• Existing: Old DC motor, below 40 HP
• Recommendation: Replace with New AC motor; use inverter drive (40 HP or above use
Flux Vector Drive).
• Existing: Non-standard motor frame (hard-to-find/expensive replacement)
• Recommendation: Recondition (overhaul/rewind) existing AC motor
• Existing: Building has stringent RFI and EMI requirements
• Recommendation: Avoid changing to AC; however, when changing to AC, system may
require grounding and additional filtering (anticipate costs).
CAR SPEEDS FROM 150 TO 450 FPM (.75 m/s to 2 m/sec)
• Existing: Old AC motor
• Recommendation: Replace with New AC motor; use flux vector drive.
• Existing: DC motor in good condition
• Recommendation: Retain DC motor (especially above 40 HP)
• Existing: Old DC motor, 40 HP or less
• Recommendation: Both DC and AC are good choices.
• Considerations: RFI and EMI requirements; lead time, staff training, etc. If this is your
first conversion to AC there is an increased risk of making costly mistakes (i.e.: such as
incorrect layout of equipment or wiring, no RFI filter, no drive isolation transformer).
• Existing: AC motor above 30 HP or...
Helical gear machine or...
Car speed above 300 fpm or...
More than one car in the machine room
• Recommendation: Considerable heat will be generated when overhauling. This heat must
be removed from the machine room in order to keep the controller cabinet temperature
below 104F degrees.
17-12 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
AC Motor Controls for Elevators
Most Gearless Applications – DC is still the best choice
Unless the DC motor is damaged or defective, replacing it with an AC motor will not result in
improved performance. Furthermore, see comments regarding delay on start. In gearless
applications, since motors operate at low RPM, brush life and commutator maintenance are not
significant issues.
There are two major concerns with AC gearless applications that will drive your decision
making process.
• Heat: The primary concern is generation of very high heat output when overhauling which
must be dissipated. For example, a 40 HP, 2:1 gearless AC with 50% counterweighting
would produce 22KW of regenerated power in the form of heat.
• Cost: The alternative is to use a regenerative AC drive, which avoids the heat problem, but
will cost one-and-one-half to two-and-one-half times as much as a non- regenerative drive
(standard flux vector drive).
Retaining an Existing AC Motor
The following are considerations when retaining an existing AC motor. Note that newer AC
motor designs are more efficient and draw less current than older single or two-speed motors.
When reusing an existing AC motor, drives may have to be oversized (extra cost) in order to
meet motor current requirement.
• Accurate Nameplate Information: Verify motor horsepower, voltage, full load current and
full load RPM.
• Actual Full Load Current: Actual full load current is very important in order to accurately
determine drive size. Particularly with older motors, nameplate data is sometimes inaccurate, illegible or missing. It is recommended that you measure motor current and RPM,
with a full load, in order to calculate motor slip (see chart) and properly size the drive.
• Drive Too Small: If the drive is not sized correctly, making a change in the field requires
not only a drive change, but also changing the resistors in the dynamic braking circuit.
• Drive Too Large: While a drive that is larger than necessary will not typically create problems, there is no reason to buy a larger drive than you need.
Slip Requirements
It is critical to know the exact slip of the motor in order to make the correct drive selection.
Performance of vector drives, for instance, is optimized using low slip motors. You may
encounter more adjustment difficulties when using a higher slip motor. There are some vector
drives which simply will not operate properly with high slip motors.
Reusing an existing high slip motor may result in increased adjustment time (cost) and
variations between UP vs DN speed (when using inverter drives).
Note
For gearless AC motors, calculating motor slip is not necessary because they are designed to
work with modern flux vector drives.
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Technical Publications
Calculating Slip
First, check the Motor Nameplate Data and note Full Load RPM. Find the entry in the following
Synchronous RPM table (under 60Hz or 50Hz as appropriate) that matches your noted Full
Load RPM. (If the exact number is not in the table, use the next higher entry.) Note the
corresponding number of poles listed.
Table 17.1
Determining Number of Motor Poles
Synchronous RPM
Poles
60Hz
50Hz
8
900
750
6
1200
1000
4
1800
1500
Use the number of poles and data from the motor name plate to calculate slip frequency:
First, calculate motor slip frequency using the formula: Fs = F - ((N x P) / 120)
Where:
Fs= Slip frequency (Hz)
F = Motor rated frequency (Hz)
N = Motor rated full load RPM
P = Number of poles.
Next, calculate slip percentage using the formula:
Next, calculate slip percentage using the formula: Slip% = (Fs X 100) / F
Where:
F = Motor rated frequency (Hz)
Fs= Slip frequency
Example
of 1170:
Checking the motor name plate tells you it is a 60Hz motor with Full Load RPM
1. Check the Synchronous RPM table. 1170 is not listed under 60Hz, so you use 1200 and
note that the motor has 6 poles.
2. Calculate Slip Frequency: 60 - ((1170 x 6) / 120) = 1.5
3. Calculate Slip Percentage: (1.5 x 100) / F = 2.5
4. At a Slip Percentage of 2.5, this is a low slip motor.
Slip Requirements for New Motors
(Based on current industry availability for motors to be used with Inverter & Flux Vector
Drives.)
• Inverter Drives: (open loop) Motor slip should be 8% - 10%. There may be minor variations in UP vs DN speed regulation, typical of inverter drives.
• Flux Vector Drives: (closed loop) Motor slip should be 3% or less.
In general, motors with slip less than 5% are considered low slip motors and motors with slip
more than 5% are considered high slip motors. The correct motor slip factor will allow the drive
17-14 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
AC Motor Controls for Elevators
to interact properly with the motor providing good performance. If motor slip is not accurately
specified, the drive may not be able to control the motor properly.
Future development of drive technology may broaden the range of acceptable motor slip. For
example, some drive manufacturers have developed “encoderless” vector drives, which can be
thought of as a “missing link” between conventional inverter drives and true flux vector drives
using encoders. These new drives are intended to provide performance superior to an inverter
drive, but below that of a flux vector drive. If an encoderless vector drive is used, follow the
drive manufacturer’s recommendations for motor slip.
Note
The above information on motor slip is intended to be a guide. If a drive manufacturer claims to
be able to handle specific motors, or recommends a particular slip range, their recommendations should be followed.
Using a New AC Motor
When replacing an existing AC or DC motor with a new AC motor, the following issues should
be taken into consideration. A new motor can provide better performance and help reduce
adjustment time (hidden cost). When buying a new motor be sure it is designed for AC drive
applications (proper winding wire insulation).
When Buying a New Machine and Motor...
The object is to select a motor which provides the required HP at contract speed RPM required
by the machine manufacturer. Machine designs typically cover three speed ranges:
• 750 - 900 RPM, Common
• 1050 - 1200 RPM, Most Common
• 1550 -1800 RPM, Less Common
Verify that the RPM required to run the machine at contract speed matches the Full Load RPM
of the motor (or is at least within 5% of the Full Load RPM of the motor). Use Full Load RPM
data – not synchronous RPM data – to select an AC motor.
AC Drive Operating Characteristics
Below full load RPM
Output produced in constant torque mode
Above full load RPM
Output produced in constant HP mode
17
This means that, above full load RPM, AC motor output torque decreases. So the Full Load RPM
of a new motor must be within 5% of the RPM required to run the machine at contract speed.
Verify Correct Slip:
• Inverter drives (open loop): Motor slip should be 8% - 10%. There may be minor variations
in UP vs DN speed regulation, typical of inverter drives. Future development of inverter
drive technology may allow lower slip motors to be used.
• Flux vector drives (closed loop): Motor slip should be 3% or less.
17-15
Technical Publications
Insulation
• Motor winding insulation should be properly specified for AC drive applications.
When Buying a New Motor and Using an Existing Machine...
• New motor Full Load RPM should match existing motor RPM within 5%
Note
Verify the existing motor name plate full load RPM at contract speed.
• Verify correct slip as described above.
• Motor should be designed for AC drive applications (proper winding wire insulation).
Motor Drive Packages
Recognizing the challenge presented by matching the correct AC motor and drive, MCE offers
motor and drive packages. These packages offer the convenience and security of manufacturermatched components for greater assurance of project success.
Drives are factory programmed, based on new motor characteristics, in order to offer
contractors a quicker, simplified installation process and improved system operation.
Input Line Impedance
“Stiffer” AC lines in AC drive applications may cause drive damage due to transients and surges.
Drive manufacturers recommend 3% line impedance minimum. A “stiff” line is defined as one
where voltage drop is less than 3% at the drive input when the drive draws rated input current.
Another example of the effects of line “stiffness” is when a VFAC drive (230V/460V, 25 HP or
less) is connected to a large capacity transformer (600 KVA or greater, or more then 10 times
drive KVA rating). In these cases, an additional AC line reactor is required in order to increase
line impedance. The additional line reactor acts as a resistor, which limits charging current to
the capacitor bank in the drive during AC line transients and surges, protecting the input bridge
rectifier in the drive.
This problem is more critical when line frequency is 50Hz instead of 60HZ, because line
impedance varies proportionately with frequency. A line reactor provides the additional benefit
of reducing voltage harmonic distortion and increasing short circuit capability.
Some older drives used internal inductors to prevent input bridge damage. Unfortunately,
contemporary drives no longer include inductors, which were sacrificed on the altar of
competitive pricing.
Use of an isolation transformer provides the following benefits:
• Helps meet the 3% line impedance requirement
• Provides electrical isolation between drive and power supply, reducing effects of RFI
• Reduces harmonic distortion on the line
17-16 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
AC Motor Controls for Elevators
RFI/EMI Demons: The Need for Proper Grounding
All modern AC drives produce sufficient amounts of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) to
potentially affect the operation of equipment susceptible to this type of noise. The likelihood of
encountering problems with RFI is increased in older buildings, where grounding is either
inadequate or lacking altogether.
IGBT’s as a Noise Source: Modern AC drives use power devices known as Insulated Gate
Bipolar Transistors, or IGBTs. These devices make it possible to minimize annoying audible
noise, using switching frequencies beyond the human audible range. Unfortunately, AC drives
using IGBTs present a high potential for generating Radio Frequency Interference, or RFI.
The fast switching that characterizes these devices generates sharp-edged waveforms with high
frequency components. The most likely complaint is interference with AM band radios in the
500-1600 kHz range. Noise-sensitive devices sharing the same power bus, including computer
and medical equipment, could also be disrupted by interference.
How to Reduce the Effect of RFI and EMI:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Proper grounding, including correct ground conductor sizing
Proper routing of field wiring
Controller design and layout
Use RFI filters
Use drive isolation transformers
Higher installation “standards of care”
Grounding
One contractor experienced multiple elevator system problems that were ultimately determined
to result from the building’s lack of good grounding. A solid earth ground was provided and
many electrical noise problems were eliminated. Still, the elevator controller itself was being
affected by undetermined sources of noise until proper grounding principles were applied.
Proper Grounding Principles
• The ground wire to the equipment cabinet should be as large or larger than the primary AC
power feeders for the controller. Ground wires should be as short as possible. Elevator system grounding should conform to all applicable codes.
• Direct, solid grounding must be provided in the machine room to properly ground the controller and motor. Indirect grounds may not provide proper grounding. Building structure
grounds and water pipes can act as an antenna, radiating RFI noise. Improper grounding
can render an RFI filter ineffective.
• Equipment cabinets should be grounded using a daisy chain or tree layout
• When routing filter wiring, avoid loops (as described above) which can render filters ineffective.
• Conduit containing AC power feeders must not be used for grounding.
17-17
17
Technical Publications
Figure 17.2
Correct Grounding
Figure 17.3
Transformer, Drive, and Motor Ground
Drive Isolation Transformer
(if used)
Delta
Wye
Note: Grounding of the WYE secondary of
the Drive Isolation Transformer should
be accomplished according to the drive
manufacturer recommendation.
AC Drive
Ground
Ground Lug in the MCE Controller
Cabinet
AC Motor
Ground
Building Ground
17-18 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
AC Motor Controls for Elevators
Wiring the Controller
Routing field wiring to the controller is a critical element in a quality installation. Use care to
ensure that:
• Incoming power wiring (to the controller) and outgoing power wiring (to the motor) must
be routed in separate grounded conduits.
• Important: Keep AC power leads separate from the control wires.
• AC motor wiring, both inside and outside the control enclosure, must be kept separate
from any control wiring. This separation requirement includes routing of AC power feeders from the main line disconnect. No other conductors should be in the conduits for
incoming AC power to the controller and outgoing power to the motor.
• Encoder wiring should be placed in a separate grounded conduit for flux vector applications.
Proper Layout
One contractor noticed that, when the controller cabinet door was opened, something affected
operation of the controller’s microcomputers. It was eventually discovered that the problem
was caused by interference from the step down power/isolation transformer, located physically
too close to the front of the controller. The ultimate remedy in this case was placement of a
shield between the transformer and the controller. While other methods may have also worked,
these difficulties are best avoided.
It is important to recognize that, in extreme cases, the AC drive itself can be affected by
electrical noise interference. Elevator machine room equipment must be laid out correctly and
wired properly.
RFI Filters
The use of RFI filters is recommended for all AC applications where a drive isolation
transformer will not be used. MCE’s RFI filter should be specified when AC controls are
ordered.
Drive Isolation Transformers
For applications where RFI is critical (i.e.: hospitals, data processing centers, anywhere RFIsensitive equipment is used), use of a drive isolation transformer is recommended. MCE
can provide the isolation transformer, which should be specified when AC controls are ordered.
17
Marginally Sized Emergency Power Generators
Emergency power generator capacity must be sized substantially larger then the total power
demand of elevator systems – for all static drive applications, AC or DC. Undersized generators
can result in a variety of power-related problems.
Existing emergency power generators may be marginally sized – at the theoretical minimum
rating necessary to power elevators. Under actual field conditions, static drives can place an
excess burden on generators, resulting in poor elevator operation and frequent trip-off of either
or both systems.
Compatibly problems result when the generating system is unable to cope with the rapid
changes in current demand that typify static drives. These resulting frequency fluctuations can
also cause trip-off of both systems.
17-19
Technical Publications
Note that in general, natural gas generators – where regulation is a function of gas pressure –
provide less satisfactory speed regulation (slower reaction to rapid changes in current demand)
than better-regulated diesel-, turbine- and gasoline-driven generators.
Emergency Power Checklist
• Selection of the proper elevator drive system includes a thorough review of the various
parameters of the existing elevator control equipment, power distribution system, and
emergency power generator. This examination should include: full load current, acceleration current, feeder size, emergency generator capacity and power source (natural gas, diesel, etc.).
• Obtain the full load current, acceleration current, and so forth from static drive suppliers
and manufacturers for proper sizing of emergency power generating capacity.
• Discuss the issue of conversion to static drives with the emergency power generator suppliers and manufacturers.
Emergency Generator Sensitivity to Harmonics
Static drives generate harmonic distortion that, in some instances, places an excessive burden
on emergency generators. Emergency generators can be sensitive to harmonics or other power
line pollution created by static drives.
• Ask the emergency power generator manufacturer about system sensitivity to harmonics
and other noise.
Emergency Generator Tolerance for Regenerated Power
When emergency generators are being considered for an installation, their tolerance for
regenerated power must be considered (i.e., the generator’s ability to absorb energy being put
back into the power lines by the AC or DC motor drive). Generally, the larger the elevator load is
in proportion to the total load seen by the emergency generator, the greater is the risk of
emergency generator problems associated with handling regenerated power from the elevators.
Where elevators comprise up to 25% of the total power consumption, as often is the case in
larger buildings, regeneration is seldom a problem. However, when elevators make up a third or
more of the total load, it may increasingly become an issue. The manufacturer of the emergency
generator should be consulted to find how much, if any, regenerated power can be handled.
AC vs DC SCR Drive Efficiency
Generally speaking, the most efficient drive type is the AC regenerative drive, which has unity
power factor under all operating conditions. While it is sometimes claimed that AC drives are
“more efficient” than DC SCR drives, this would only be true of AC regenerative drives.
Comparison between AC non-regenerative drives and DC SCR drives is less clear cut.
A non-regenerative AC drive (by far the most common type) cannot return regenerated energy
back to the AC line when overhauling. Instead, this regenerated energy must be dissipated
across resistors in the form of heat. Therefore, to the extent that regeneration is occurring, the
DC SCR drive in this case is more efficient due to the fact that all elevator DC SCR drives are
regenerative, i.e., capable of returning power back to the power line.
Moreover, when the AC non-regenerative drive dissipates regenerated energy in the form of
heat into the machine room environment, if air conditioning equipment is required to dissipate
this heat energy, the power consumed by the air conditioning further adds to the loss in
17-20 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
AC Motor Controls for Elevators
efficiency for the non-regenerative AC drive. However, this efficiency advantage of DC SCR
drives over AC non-regenerative drives is somewhat tempered by the issue of power factor,
which is highly variable for the DC SCR drive, and closer to unity for the AC non-regenerative
drive.
Whether a system is geared or gearless, the amount of heat energy returned during
regeneration increases in proportion to machine efficiency. The amount of regenerated power
for a 30 HP geared machine, at 64% efficiency, could reach 9KW (or more) of regenerative
power in the form of heat. With gearless machines, at 80%-90% efficiency, heat dissipation can
easily exceed 16 KW of regenerative power for a 30 HP motor. A typical multi-car group will
likely require a heat dissipation system in the machine room. When modernizing, cooling
system capacity must be considered, the necessity of adding heat removal equipment
determined, and future operating costs evaluated.
Hidden Costs
Use of AC drive technology represents the potential for encountering hidden costs that should
be considered at time of purchase. Evaluate the following:
• Risk of improperly matched motor and drive
• Time required for system tuning and adjustment
Reliable, high quality performance should be delivered by an AC system once it is adjusted
properly. However, these systems are less forgiving than DC SCR systems in a number of
critical areas (as discussed in this publication). Proper care is required to protect a seemingly
straightforward modernization project from substantial cost overruns.
AC applications require specialized expertise from both motor and control suppliers, along with
good cooperation and coordination between the two.
Performance
A matched motor and drive pair will deliver the best ride quality. A byproduct of using the
correct motor and drive is reduced adjustment time.
With regard to adjustment, AC systems should be able to achieve performance standards
comparable to that of DC SCR systems, provided that the proper drive and motor are selected.
Recognize that AC drives have an inherent delay in starting, which may affect overall elevator
performance time. Unlike DC applications, where the motor field is energized at all times, in AC
applications, the motor is energized (via power contactor) on demand. Sufficient time must be
allowed for magnetic flux to build within the motor before the brake can be lifted and the
elevator car operated. Delay time may vary from 200 milliseconds to over one second,
depending on motor characteristics. Therefore, all other factors being the same, the AC motor
and drive must tolerate a delay on start which does not exist with DC motors and drives.
Failure to invest sufficient time and attention during the drive and motor selection stage of a
project can result in longer adjustment time. On occasion, it may simply not be possible to
achieve required system performance.
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Technical Publications
Heat Generation
Non-Regenerative AC Drives
In non-regenerative drives, commonly used with geared applications, overhauling energy is
dissipated in the machine room through dynamic braking resistors. The amount of heat
dissipated in the machine room is dependant on car speed, hoist motor horsepower, total car
travel and duty factor. As any of the these factors increase, the amount of heat to be dissipated
increases.
In general, if hoist motor horsepower increases above 30HP, and the elevator travel is over 100
feet, special considerations are required when sizing dynamic braking resistors. The question of
how to remove this heat energy from the machine room must also be addressed.
Regenerative AC Drives
The ultimate solution to disbursing heat energy typically produced by a non-regenerative drive
is to specify a regenerative VFAC drive. While relatively new to the elevator industry, these
drives are quite suitable for gearless AC applications. Unfortunately, these drives presently cost
more than twice what a comparable non-regenerative drive would cost.
Summary
In this publication, we have shown that the application of AC drive technology to various types
of AC elevator motors must rely on a thorough understanding of the clear advantages and
tradeoffs, in order to make the very best possible choices for AC drives and motors.
Our discussion has included examination of tradeoffs or possible drawbacks including the
potential for increased harmonic distortion, radio frequency interference, and other issues that
must be addressed in order to use AC technology successfully.
Comparison of AC and DC motor and drive technology does not result in a clear-cut “winning”
technology to be applied universally. Rather, we have shown that each technology has unique
advantages and disadvantages.
We have tried to arm the reader with as many facts as possible, given the limitations of the size
of this document. As technology evolves, we will endeavor to continue to pass along as much
information as possible to benefit our customers.
MCE R&D Staff
March 1999
17-22 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Harmonic Analysis and Comparison
Harmonic Analysis and Comparison
•
•
•
•
SYSTEM 12 - 12 Pulse SCR Elevator Drive
Conventional Six Pulse Elevator Drive
Flux Vector VFAC Elevator Drive
Includes Supplemental Jobsite Analysis
Purpose
This Technical Publication reports analysis and comparison of AC line harmonic distortion
produced by three modern static drive types.
Motion Control Engineering, Inc. SYSTEM 12 using 12-pulse DC SCR drive technology is
compared to a conventional 6-pulse DC SCR drive and the typical “quiet” variable frequency AC
inverter or flux vector drive. Testing was conducted under “controlled” test tower conditions.
This research study presents a true comparison of drive-generated AC power line distortion
(harmonic distortion).
Elevator Test Tower Research Overview
Most of today’s elevator control specifications require the use of static drives. Increased use and
experience with static drives has focused attention on the potential for AC power supply
distortion and other problems. In many cases AC power line distortion does not become a
major factor. Nevertheless, it is important that everyone dealing with static drives have a basic
understanding of the nature of AC line distortion.
Power supply distortion caused by static drives can result in:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Degraded emergency power generator performance
Induction motor heating
Power losses in transformers
Objectionable audible noise
Interference with sensitive medical equipment, computers, radios and
television
equipment
AC power supply distortion caused by elevator equipment is an issue for consultants,
architecture/engineering firms, contractors and building owners.
This study concludes that use of MCE's SYSTEM 12 drive results in significantly less AC line
distortion than most other types of static drives.
Tested Drives
Three types of static drives were evaluated for generation of harmonic distortion. They are the
types in most frequent use today.
1. MCE’s SYSTEM 12 using 12-pulse DC SCR drive technology for DC motors.
2. A conventional 6-pulse DC SCR drive for DC motors.
3. A variable frequency (VFAC) drive for AC motors. The tested unit is a “quiet” type utilizing “IGBT” devices.
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Technical Publications
Testing Methodology
The geared elevator installed in the test tower at MCE's Research & Development Center in
Rancho Cordova (Sacramento) California was used for the tests.
The same AC power supply, drive isolation transformer, machine and elevator were used for all
tests. An Imperial 20 HP DC motor was used for the DC drive tests. An Imperial 20 HP AC
motor was used for the AC drive test.
It is our judgement that this methodology represents the most equitable possible arrangement
for comparison of the three types of static drives.
The test tower elevator operates at 350 fpm with a 20 HP motor and a 480 VAC 3-phase power
supply. The drive isolation transformer was a 27-KVA unit reconfigurable for conventional SCR
or SYSTEM 12 operation. No line filter was used in any of the three drive tests. A Fluke Model 41
Power Harmonics Analyzer was used for all measurements and computations. Data was
downloaded to a printer.
General comments regarding the tests:
It was decided to measure worst-case conditions for the drives. Results were evaluated during
full load acceleration in the up direction. Up acceleration for the VFAC unit was not as great as
for the DC SCR drives so the current levels were correspondingly lower. Nevertheless, the
waveforms and results for all the tested drives are considered to be typical, accurately
representing each drive type.
Drive Characteristics
1. MCE's SYSTEM 12, with 12-pulse DC SCR technology for elevator control applications, is
a unique 12-pulse 4-quadrant, fully regenerative DC SCR drive utilizing 19 SCRs. Test
results reflect the benefits of this advanced technology.
2. The conventional 6-pulse DC SCR drive was a Baldor Sweo 6-pulse 4-quadrant, fully
regenerative DC SCR drive. This drive is typical of DC SCR drives generally available in
the U.S. for elevator control applications. Test results are applicable to drives such as
Magnetek DSD412, GE DC300E, Reliance, Emerson and others.
3. The VFAC drive evaluated was a Saftronics (Yaskawa) Flux Vector type. In regard to
production of AC line harmonic distortion, the Yaskawa is considered to be typical of
VFAC drives, either conventional or flux vector types. This is the case because the power
supply is simply a 3-phase, six rectifier bridge feeding a capacitor bank, typical of VFAC
designs presently available.
The single exception to universal applicability of test data is a commercially available
VFAC drive claiming very low levels of harmonic distortion. As far as can be determined,
these product claims are accurate; however, cost is approximately two times that of any
competitive drive. Thus, these drives are not considered a viable alternative to the drives
examined in this study.
Furthermore, this particular drive type, along with most other AC drives, radiates RFI
(Radio Frequency Interference) in far greater amounts and across a much wider and
higher band of frequencies than either 6-pulse or 12-pulse DC SCR drives. As a result,
sophisticated containment strategies and careful installation practices are required to
keep radiation in check.
17-24 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Harmonic Analysis and Comparison
Evaluating the Tables
Two pages of data from the Harmonic Analyzer are presented for each of the three drive types
studied. The first page shows the voltage and current waveforms along with graphs showing
relative magnitudes for voltage and current harmonics. The second page presents a tabular
summary of the measurements taken.
The tables contain a considerable amount of information. To compare the AC line distortion
generated by each of the three drives, pay particular attention to:
1. The Total Harmonic Distortion (THD Rms) values for both voltage and, especially, current -- the Voltage Total Harmonic Distortion and the Current Total Harmonic Distortion.
2. The Current Magnitude (IMag) column which shows the actual magnitude,in amperes,
for each harmonic.
THD Rms measurements for current represent the total amount of current the drive is drawing
from, or putting back into, the AC line at frequencies other than the main fundamental
frequency of 60 Hz. These current harmonics originating from the drive are the “junk” that
distorts the AC power line. They can be the cause of AC line problems.
THD Rms measurements for voltage represent the voltage distortion or the amount of
deviation from a perfect 60 Hz sine wave. Voltage Total Harmonic Distortion is the result, or
the effect of the current harmonics that the drive is producing.
There are a number of important facts to consider regarding current and voltage harmonics:
1. Identical current harmonic magnitudes (Current Total Harmonic Distortion) will not
have the same effect on all AC power lines in terms of the amount of voltage harmonics
produced (Voltage Total Harmonic Distortion).
If the AC line is “stiff,” i.e., not easily affected, you can put a lot of current distortion on
the line and voltage distortion measurements may be nominal. If the AC line is “soft” (as
with a marginally sized power supply or a small emergency power generator), very moderate amounts of current distortion can generate considerable Voltage Total Harmonic
Distortion, which can have serious consequences.
2. The Voltage Total Harmonic Distortion measured on the AC line is not only the result of
elevator static drives. Residual base-line values can be measured by turning the drive off
and recording harmonic distortion from other sources. When the static drive is on, measurements will reflect the total distortion including the base-line values plus the contribution of the elevator drive(s).
17-25
17
Technical Publications
Evaluating the Data
The shape of the voltage and current waveforms provides meaningful information for
evaluation of the various types of static drives. The ideal shape for both waveforms is a perfect
sine wave. In all cases the voltage waveform is a close approximation of a sine wave. It is the
current waveform that most clearly illustrates the effect of harmonic distortion generated by
static drives.
The harmonic components generated by static drives can be calculated using the following
formula:
H = nP + 1
where n = 1,2,3....etc. and
P = the pulse number of the diode or SCR bridge
Yaskawa Flux Vector VFAC Drive
The voltage waveform for the VFAC drive has a noticeable flattening at the top and bottom. The
VFAC drive visibly distorted the voltage sine wave, which is not easy to do — the AC line for the
MCE test tower elevator is very stiff.
Examination of the shape of the current waveform reveals the real story insofar as line
distortion being generated by the VFAC drive is concerned. The waveform depicts how the
VFAC drive draws current from the AC line. The current sine wave is obviously distorted. The
VFAC is clearly the worst of all three drive types, a surprise considering the previously
acknowledged superiority of AC technology in the elevator industry. The tests were repeated
numerous times to verify that these figures were correct. Review of published literature
corroborates findings -- suggesting that test results are typical.
Consider the bar graphs showing the relative magnitude of current harmonics. The fifth
harmonic is nearly half the magnitude of the first harmonic. The first harmonic is actually the
60 Hz fundamental -- in the hypothetical ideal power system it would be the only bar
illustrated.
Turning your attention to the data tables, the most important thing to note is the Current Total
Harmonic Distortion (THD Rms under the Current column) at 44.3%. The current magnitude
(IMag) column shows the largest harmonic (fifth) as a percentage of the 60 Hz fundamental, or
12.1 amps/28.4 amps = 42.6%. The VFAC drive demonstrates a propensity to generate
harmonic distortion.
Conventional 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive
The voltage waveform doesn't provide much information because it is very close to a sine wave.
This is confirmed by measured Voltage Total Harmonic Distortion of 2.6% (THD Rms under
the Voltage column). Also note voltage harmonics are almost invisible on the bar graphs.
Examining the current waveform you can see that it is an improvement over the VFAC drive,
but it is still only a rough approximation of a sine wave. Current harmonic distortion is
apparent.
17-26 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Harmonic Analysis and Comparison
For a 6-pulse DC SCR drive, the main harmonics are five, seven, eleven, thirteen and so forth.
These are the same significant harmonics as those in the VFAC drive. This is explained by the
fact that the typical VFAC drive can be considered a 6-pulse system.
Looking at the data table it is important to note that Current Total Harmonic Distortion is
25.9% (THD Rms under the Current column). This is a significant improvement over the VFAC
drive's numbers. The current magnitude (IMag) column shows the largest harmonic (fifth) as a
percentage of the 60 Hz fundamental, or 10.6 amps/45.5 amps = 23.3%. Again, a significant
improvement over the VFAC drive.
12-Pulse DC SCR Drive (MCE SYSTEM 12)
As expected, the voltage waveform doesn't reveal much information because it so closely
approximates a sine wave. The Voltage Total Harmonic Distortion confirms this, measured at
only 2.6%, equal to the 6-pulse DC SCR drive.
The bar graph illustrating voltage harmonics appears identical to the 6-pulse DC SCR drive, but
this is misleading. The AC line is very stiff and hard to effect. Further, the graph represents
residual distortion on the line, not the effect of the 12-pulse DC SCR drive.
The SYSTEM 12 current waveform more closely resembles that of an ideal sine wave than
either waveforms for the 6-pulse DC SCR or VFAC drives. The 12-pulse waveform
shows significant improvement over the other two drive types.
When the current harmonics are examined, one can see they are greatly reduced in comparison
to the other drive types. The significant harmonics for the 12-pulse drive are 11, 13, 23, 25 and
so forth.
Finally, checking the data table, the Current Total Harmonic Distortion is only 13.5% (THD
Rms under the Current column). This represents meaningful improvement over both the VFAC
and 6-pulse DC SCR drives. The current magnitude (IMag) column shows the largest harmonic
(11th) as a percentage of the 60 Hz fundamental, or 4.9 amps/44.3 amps = 11.1%.
The 12-pulse drive offers a factor of two improvement in Total Harmonic Distortion when
compared to the typical 6-pulse DC SCR drive and a factor of four improvement when
compared to the typical VFAC drive.
17
17-27
Technical Publications
Conclusion
The purpose of this technical publication is to provide an awareness of the potential for adverse
AC line distortion when elevators are controlled by static drives. It has been demonstrated how
different types of static drives compare to the state-of-the-art in 12-pulse DC SCR technology.
Data indicates that non-regenerative VFAC drives present the biggest challenge insofar as AC
line distortion is concerned. VFAC drives are also a potential source of RFI noise. Careful
consideration is required when selecting these drives for a particular application.
This study shows that the conventional 6-pulse DC SCR drive definitely is not as clean as a 12pulse DC SCR drive. In cases where there is any concern about AC line distortion use of the 12pulse DC SCR drive is advisable.
Examination of the data supports the conclusion that MCE’s SYSTEM 12 using 12-pulse
technology is the most effective method for minimizing AC line distortion.
The advantages of the 12-pulse drive are grounded in solid theory. The reader may wish to
review, “Application of 12-Pulse Converters -- reducing electrical interference and audible noise
from DC-motor drives” which appeared in the February 1992 issue of Elevator World magazine.
Additional advantages of 12-pulse DC SCR drives are discussed in this article.
Static drive technology continually changes. As improved applications become available the
nature of AC line pollution problems will also change. It is the hope of the authors that MCE’s
series of Technical Publications is informative and a catalyst for ongoing dialogue and sharing
of information between consultants, elevator contractors, owners and other interested parties.
MCE Technical Publications are available on our website at www.mceinc.com.
Don Alley, Chief Engineer
MCE R&D Staff
August 1994
17-28 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Harmonic Analysis and Comparison
Yaskawa Flux Vector VFAC Drive
MCE test tower data; 350 fpm, 20 HP AC motor, full load up acceleration. Ideal voltage and
current should be illustrated as perfect sine waves. Fifth an seventh current harmonics are
severe. The voltage waveform peaks are “flattened” unlike either SCR drive.
Figure 17.4
Yaskawa Flux Vector VFAC Drive
VOLTAGE
1000
50
AMPS
500
VOLTS
CURRENT
100
0
2.08
4.17
6.25
8.34
10.42
12.51
14.59
Time mS
-500
0
2.08
4.17
8.34
10.42
12.51
14.59
Time mS
-50
-100
-1000
CURRENT
VOLTAGE
30
500
25
400
AMPS RMS
VOLTS RMS
6.25
300
20
15
200
10
100
0
5
DC
3
Volts rms
6
9
12
15
18
21
HARMONIC NUMBER
24
27
30
0
DC
2
4
Amps rms
6
8
10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30
HARMONIC NUMBER
17
17-29
Technical Publications
Yaskawa Flux Vector VFAC Drive
MCE test tower data; 350 fpm, 20HP AC motor, full load up acceleration. Data is considered to
be typical for most VFAC drives. RMS Current Total Harmonic Distortion (THD Rms) or 44.3%.
Current magnitude (Imag) of the largest harmonic (fifth) as a percentage of the 60 Hz
fundamental, or 12.1 amps/28.4 amps = 42.6%.
Readings - 11/02/94 08:43:50
Summary Information
Frequency
Power
KW
KVA
KVAR
Peak KW
Phase
Total PF
DPF
Recorded Information
60.0
Voltage
473
652
-2
1.38
3.8
3.8
18
RMS
Peak
DC Offset
Crest
THD Rms
THD Fund
HRMS
13.3
15.0
2.8
38.8
12o lead
0.89
0.98
KFactor
Current
31.7
59.3
-0.4
1.87
44.3
49.4
14.0
7.9
V
A
V
A
V
A
K
RMS
RMS
Peak
Peak
THD-F%
THD-F%
Watts
KVAR
TPF
DPF
Frequency
Harmonic Distortion
DC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Freq.
0.0
60.0
119.9
179.9
239.8
299.8
359.8
419.7
479.7
539.7
599.6
659.6
719.5
799.5
839.5
899.4
959.4
1019.3
1079.3
1139.3
1199.2
1259.3
1319.2
1379.1
1439.1
1499.0
1559.0
1619.0
1678.9
1738.9
1798.8
1858.8
17-30 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
V Mag
2
473
0
1
0
18
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
%V RMS
0.4
100.3
0.1
0.2
0.0
3.8
0.0
0.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.3
0.0
0.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.2
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.1
V NE
0
-12
-154
-75
-11
154
172
-141
72
-41
-146
59
46
120
5
164
42
-38
39
-1
92
53
17
-143
41
-120
134
-144
155
89
113
136
I Mag
0.4
28.4
0.4
1.9
0.1
12.1
0.1
6.1
0.1
0.2
0.1
2.2
0.0
1.2
0.0
0.1
0.0
1.0
0.0
0.5
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.5
0.0
0.3
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.4
0.0
0.2
% I RMS
1.2
90.6
1.3
6.0
0.4
38.7
0.2
19.6
0.2
0.5
0.2
7.1
0.0
3.9
0.1
0.2
0.0
3.1
0.0
1.7
0.1
0.2
0.1
1.7
0.0
0.9
0.1
0.2
0.0
1.1
0.0
0.7
I NE
0
0
65
158
-125
-158
89
9
-84
-11
47
133
-95
-106
150
-128
-165
27
-32
131
44
46
-176
-83
81
7
-54
-37
-70
169
59
-119
Power (KW)
0.0
13.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Harmonic Analysis and Comparison
Conventional 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive
Data taken from MCE test tower; 350 fpm, 20 HP DC motor, full load up acceleration. Ideal
voltage and current should be illustrated as perfect sine waves. Note that the largest current
harmonics are the fifth and seventh. This data is typical and would be identical for a 6-pulse
SCR drive of any manufacturer.
Figure 17.5
Conventional 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive
Voltage
1000
200
500
100
0
2.08
4.17
6.25
8.34
Current
0
10.42 12.51 14.59
2.08
4.17
6.25
Time mS
-1000
Time mS
-200
CURRENT
VOLTAGE
500
50
400
40
AMPS RMS
VOLTS RMS
10.42 12.51 14.59
-100
-500
300
30
200
20
100
10
0
8.34
0
DC
3
Volts rms
6
9
12
15
18
21
HARMONIC NUMBER
24
27
30
DC
2
4
Amps rms
6
8
10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30
HARMONIC NUMBER
17
17-31
Technical Publications
Conventional 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive
Data from MCE test tower, 350 fpm, 20HP DC motor, full load up acceleration. Note
particularly the RMS Current Total Harmonic Distortion (THD RMS of 25.9%). Also note the
current magnitude (Imag) of the largest (fifth) as a percentage of the 60 Hz fundamental, or
10.6 amps/45.5 amps = 23.3%.
Readings - 09/22/94 16:12:57
Summary Information
Frequency
Power
KW
KVA
KVAR
Peak KW
Phase
Total PF
DPF
DC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
60.0
16.8
22.9
14.4
46.8
41o lag
0.74
0.76
Freq.
0.0
60.0
119.9
179.9
239.8
299.8
359.8
419.7
479.7
539.7
599.6
659.6
719.5
799.5
839.5
899.4
959.4
1019.3
1079.3
1139.3
1199.2
1259.3
1319.2
1379.1
1439.1
1499.0
1559.0
1619.0
1678.9
1738.9
1798.8
1858.8
17-32 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Recorded Information
Voltage
RMS
484
Peak
695
DC Offset -2
Crest
1.44
THD Rms 2.6
THD Fund 2.6
HRMS
12
Current
47.3
65.9
-0.3
1.39
25.9
26.9
12.2
KFactor
5.1
V Mag
2
484
0
1
0
11
0
2
0
0
0
2
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
Harmonic Distortion
%V RMS
V NE
0.3
0
100.3
41
0.1
65
0.1
56
0.0
-105
2.4
130
0.0
-95
0.5
49
0.0
-39
0.0
142
0.0
30
0.5
-90
0.0
-13
0.3
-138
0.0
23
0.1
-98
0.0
84
0.3
108
0.0
94
0.3
39
0.0
-49
0.0
70
0.0
0
0.3
-84
0.0
-40
0.3
-146
0.0
-47
0.0
-136
0.0
41
0.2
86
0.0
96
0.2
34
V
A
V
A
V
A
K
RMS
RMS
Peak
Peak
THD-F%
THD-F%
Watts
KVAR
TPF
DPF
Frequency
I Mag
0.3
45.5
0.7
2.0
0.1
10.6
0.1
3.1
0.1
0.4
0.1
3.3
0.2
2.1
0.1
0.4
0.0
1.7
0.1
1.4
0.0
0.3
0.1
1.1
0.1
1.0
0.1
0.3
0.0
0.7
0.0
0.7
% I RMS
0.6
96.9
1.5
4.2
0.1
22.5
0.2
6.5
0.3
0.8
0.3
7.0
0.3
4.5
0.1
0.8
0.1
3.6
0.1
3.0
0.1
0.7
0.2
2.3
0.2
2.2
0.1
0.6
0.1
1.4
0.1
1.5
Harmonic Analysis and Comparison
12-Pulse SCR Drive (MCE System 12)
Data taken from MCE test tower; 350 fpm, 20 HP DC motor, full load up acceleration. Ideal
voltage and current should be illustrated as perfect sine waves. Note that the largest current
harmonics are the eleventh and thirteenth.
Figure 17.6
MCE 12-Pulse SCR Drive
Current
Voltage
1000
200
500
100
0
2.08
4.17
6.25
8.34
0
10.42 12.51 14.59
-500
2.08
-200
10.42 12.51 14.59
CURRENT
VOLTAGE
500
50
400
40
AMPS RMS
VOLTS RMS
8.34
Time mS
Time mS
300
30
200
20
100
10
DC
6.25
-100
-1000
0
4.17
3
Volts rms
6
9
12
15
18
21
HARMONIC NUMBER
24
27
30
0
DC
2
4
Amps rms
6
8
10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30
HARMONIC NUMBER
17
17-33
Technical Publications
12-Pulse DC SCR Drive (MCE SYSTEM 12)
Data taken from MCE test tower, 350 fpm, 20 HP DC motor, full load up acceleration. Note
particularly the RMS Current Total Harmonic Distortion (THD RMS of 13.5%. Also note the
current magnitude (Imag) of the largest (eleventh) as a percentage of the 60 Hz fundamental, or
4.9 amps/45.3 amps = 11.1%.
Readings - 08/25/94 11:40:17
Summary Information
Frequency
Power
KW
KVA
KVAR
Peak KW
Phase
Total PF
DPF
DC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Recorded Information
60.0
17.8
21.8
12.0
45.1
34o lag
0.82
0.83
Frequency
0.0
60.0
119.9
179.9
239.8
299.8
359.8
419.7
479.7
539.7
599.6
659.6
719.5
799.5
839.5
899.4
959.4
1019.3
1079.3
1139.3
1199.2
1259.3
1319.2
1379.1
1439.1
1499.0
1559.0
1619.0
1678.9
1738.9
1798.8
1858.8
Voltage
RMS
487
Peak
699
DC Offset -2
Crest
1.43
THD Rms 2.6
THD Fund 2.6
HRMS
13
Current
44.7
65.1
-0.3
1.46
13.5
13.6
6.0
KFactor
3.5
V Mag
2
487
1
1
0
12
0
1
0
0
0
3
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
17-34 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Harmonic Distortion
%V RMS
V NE
I Mag
0.4
0
0.3
100.3
34
44.3
0.1
-107
0.1
0.2
70
1.8
0.1
-75
0.1
2.4
86
1.3
0.0
67
0.0
0.3
15
1.4
0.0
138
0.0
0.0
-140
0.4
0.0
165
0.1
0.7
105
4.9
0.0
-97
0.1
0.3
-3
1.5
0.0
-59
0.0
0.0
-25
0.1
0.0
141
0.0
0.1
-57
0.5
0.0
-158
0.0
0.1
12
0.4
0.0
171
0.0
0.0
8
0.1
0.0
26
0.0
0.3
-84
1.4
0.0
-10
0.1
0.3
-146
0.8
0.0
169
0.0
0.0
-65
0.0
0.0
-128
0.0
0.1
157
0.2
0.0
-94
0.0
0.1
-115
0.1
V
A
V
A
V
A
K
RMS
RMS
Peak
Peak
THD-F%
THD-F%
Watts
KVAR
TPF
DPF
Frequency
% I RMS
0.7
99.8
0.1
4.1
0.1
2.9
0.0
3.2
0.1
0.9
0.1
11.1
0.2
3.3
0.1
0.2
0.1
1.2
0.0
0.8
0.0
0.3
0.1
3.0
0.2
1.8
0.1
0.0
0.1
0.4
0.0
0.3
Harmonic Analysis and Comparison
Supplemental Job Site Analysis
Purpose
Supplemental jobsite analysis was undertaken to compare the results of the Test Tower study
with actual jobsite measurements. The general discussions of the Test Tower Research are
applicable to this supplemental study.
Tested Drives
Two types of static drives were evaluated at the jobsite. They are the Magnatek 6-pulse DC SCR
drive and MCE’s SYSTEM 12 using 12-pulse DC SCR drive. The job sites are as follows:
1. 1) International Towers Building -- 700 fpm; 2500 lb capacity; Magnatek 6-pulse drive;
General Dynamics ED machine; 35.4 HP; 115 amp/260 volt armature; 480 AC line voltage.
2. 2)Plaza Building -- 500 fpm; 3000 lb capacity; MCE SYSTEM 12; Otis 131HT machine;
32 HP; 177 amp/150 volt armature; 480 AC line voltage.
Testing Methodology
The gearless elevators were tested using a Fluke Model 41 Power Harmonics Analyzer for all
measurements and computations. Data was take from the primary side of the isolation
transformers and downloaded to a printer. It was decided to measure worst-case conditions for
the drives, which in the absence of test weights, is during empty car acceleration in the down
direction.
Evaluating the Data
Conventional 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive - International Towers Building
The voltage waveform doesn’t provide much information because it is very close to a sine wave.
This is confirmed by measured Voltage Total Harmonic Distortion of 4.1% (THD Rms under the
Voltage column). Note that voltage harmonics are insignificant on the bar graphs.
For a 6-pulse DC SCR drive, the main harmonics are five, seven, eleven, thirteen and so forth.
Looking at the data table it is important to note that Current Total Harmonic Distortion is
26.9% (THD Rms under the Current column). The current magnitude (Imag) column shows the
largest harmonic (fifth) as a percentage of the 60 Hz fundamental, or 13.7 amps/64.7 amps =
21.2%.
12-Pulse DC SCR Drive - Plaza Building
As expected, the 12-pulse voltage waveform doesn’t reveal any more information than the 6Pulse voltage waveform because it also closely approximates a sine wave. The Voltage Total
Harmonic Distortion confirms this, measured at only 2.5% lower than that of the
17-35
17
Technical Publications
6-pulse DC SCR drive.
The SYSTEM 12 current waveform more closely resembles that of an ideal sine wave than the
waveform for the 6-pulse DC SCR. When the current harmonics are examined, one can see they
are greatly reduced in comparison to the 6-pulse drive. The significant harmonics for the 12pulse drive are 11, 13, 23, 25 and so forth.
Finally, checking the data table, the Current Total Harmonic Distortion is only 6.5% (THD
Rms under the Current column). This represents meaningful improvement over the 6-pulse DC
SCR drive. The current magnitude (Imag) column shows the largest harmonic (11th) as a
percentage of the 60 Hz fundamental, or 4.7 amps/93.3 amps = 5.0%.
The Plaza Building SYSTEM 12 drive offers a factor of four improvement in Total Harmonic
Distortion when compared to the International Towers Building 6-pulse DC SCR drive.
Conclusion
The supplemental analysis further validates the hypotheses of the Test Tower Research in that a
12-pulse SCR drive produces substantially less harmonic distortion than other static drives
typically used. It must be noted that levels of Harmonic Distortion will vary from installation to
installation as the result of job-specific variables (current drawn, car direction and loading, line
stiffness, other static drives sharing the line, baseline distortion).
17-36 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Harmonic Analysis and Comparison
Conventional 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive
Data taken from International Tower Building; 700 fpm, 5.4 HP DC motor, empty car down
acceleration. Ideal voltage and current should be illustrated as perfect sine waves. Note that the
largest current harmonics are the fifth and seventh. This data is typical and would be identical
for any 6-pulse SCR drive of any manufacturer.
Figure 17.7
Conventional 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive
Voltage
1000
Current
200
100
500
0
2.08
4.17
6.25
8.34
0
10.42 12.51 14.59
2.08
4.17
6.25
10.42 12.51 14.59
-100
-500
-1000
Time mS
-200
Time mS
CURRENT
VOLTAGE
500
70
60
400
AMPS RMS
VOLTS RMS
8.34
300
200
50
40
30
20
100
0
10
0
DC
3
Volts rms
6
9
12
15
18
21
HARMONIC NUMBER
24
27
30
DC
2
4
Amps rms
6
8
10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30
HARMONIC NUMBER
17
17-37
Technical Publications
Conventional 6-Pulse DC SCR Drive
Data taken from International Tower Building – 700 fpm, 35.4 HP DC motor, empty car down
acceleration. Note particularly the RMS Current Total Harmonic Distortion (THD RMS of
26.9%. Also note the current magnitude (Imag) of the largest (fifth) as a percentage of the 60 Hz
fundamental, or 13.7/64.7 amps = 21.2%.
Readings - 11/03/95 15:59:14
Summary Information
Frequency
Power
KW
KVA
KVAR
Peak KW
Phase
Total PF
DPF
Recorded Information
60.0
Voltage
484
692
-1
1.43
4.1
4.1
20
RMS
Peak
DC Offset
Crest
THD Rms
THD Fund
HRMS
KFactor
7.1
32.5
30.5
39.4
77o lag
0.22
0.22
Current
67.2
97.9
-0.3
1.46
26.9
27.9
18.1
7.5
V RMS
A RMS
V Peak
A Peak
V THD-F%
A THD-F%
K Watts
KVAR
TPF
DPF
Frequency
Harmonic Distortion
DC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Freq.
V Mag
%V RMS
V NE
I Mag
% I RMS
I NE
0.0
60.0
119.9
179.9
239.8
299.8
359.8
419.7
479.7
539.7
599.6
659.6
719.5
799.5
839.5
899.4
959.4
1019.3
1079.3
1139.3
1199.2
1259.3
1319.2
1379.1
1439.1
1499.0
1559.0
1619.0
1678.9
1738.9
1798.8
1858.8
1
484
0
1
0
10
1
7
0
1
0
7
0
5
0
1
0
7
0
5
0
0
0
6
0
5
0
0
0
5
0
5
0.3
100.2
0.1
0.2
0.0
2.0
0.1
1.4
0.0
0.2
0.0
1.4
0.0
1.1
0.0
0.1
0.1
1.4
0.0
1.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
1.2
0.1
1.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
1.0
0.1
1.0
0
77
-68
-127
-27
-175
-37
-94
-31
101
-15
-147
-56
-104
-61
0
-46
-164
-63
-108
-51
-108
-58
179
-59
-117
-77
150
-71
169
-87
-136
0.3
64.7
0.3
1.4
0.2
13.7
0.1
7.5
0.2
0.4
0.2
5.6
0.1
4.1
0.2
0.2
0.2
3.4
0.1
2.6
0.2
0.1
0.2
2.3
0.1
2.0
0.2
0.1
0.2
1.6
0.1
1.6
0.5
96.7
0.5
2.1
0.3
20.5
0.1
11.2
0.3
0.6
0.3
8.3
0.1
6.1
0.3
0.3
0.3
5.1
0.1
3.8
0.3
0.1
0.3
3.4
0.1
2.9
0.3
0.1
0.3
2.4
0.1
2.4
0
0
94
-51
46
-11
98
-14
82
-164
49
-21
56
-32
70
110
39
-38
29
-42
60
-12
15
-53
37
-53
37
-116
0
-64
-2
-71
17-38 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Power
(KW)
0.0
6.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
-0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Harmonic Analysis and Comparison
12-Pulse SCR Drive (MCE System 12)
Data taken from the Plaza Building; 500 fpm, 32 HP DC motor, empty car down acceleration.
Ideal voltage and current should be illustrated as perfect sine waves. Note that the largest
current harmonics are the eleventh and thirteenth.
Figure 17.8
12-Pulse SCR Drive (MCE System 12)
Current
Voltage
1000
200
500
100
0
2.08
4.17
6.25
8.34
0
10.42 12.51 14.59
-500
2.08
4.17
6.25
Time mS
-200
Time mS
CURRENT
500
100
400
80
AMPS RMS
VOLTS RMS
VOLTAGE
300
60
200
40
100
20
DC
10.42 12.51 14.59
-100
-1000
0
8.34
3
Volts rms
6
9
12
15
18
21
HARMONIC NUMBER
24
27
30
0
DC
2
4
Amps rms
6
8
10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30
HARMONIC NUMBER
17
17-39
Technical Publications
12-Pulse DC SCR Drive (MCE System 12)
Data taken from Plaza Building, 500 fpm, 32 HP DC motor, empty car down acceleration. Note
particularly the RMS Current Total Harmonic Distortion (THD RMS of 13.5%. Also note the
current magnitude (Imag) of the largest (eleventh) as a percentage of the 60 Hz fundamental, or
4.7 amps/93.5 amps = 5.0%.
Readings - 11/06/95 15:31:22
Summary Information
Frequency
Power
KW
KVA
KVAR
Peak KW
Phase
Total PF
DPF
DC
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
60.0
39
44
20
85
27o lag
0.89
0.89
Recorded Information
RMS
Peak
DC Offset
Crest
THD Rms
THD Fund
HRMS
KFactor
Voltage
469
645
-2
1.38
2.5
2.5
12
Current
93.7
135.3
-0.4
1.44
6.5
6.6
6.1
1.6
V RMS
A RMS
V Peak
A Peak
V THD-F%
A THD-F%
K Watts
KVAR
TPF
DPF
Frequency
Freq.
V Mag
Harmonic Distortion
%V RMS
V NE
I Mag
% I RMS
I NE
0.0
60.0
119.9
179.9
239.8
299.8
359.8
419.7
479.7
539.7
599.6
659.6
719.5
799.5
839.5
899.4
959.4
1019.3
1079.3
1139.3
1199.2
1259.3
1319.2
1379.1
1439.1
1499.0
1559.0
1619.0
1678.9
1738.9
1798.8
1858.8
2
469
0
1
0
8
0
7
0
1
0
3
0
2
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0.3
100.3
0.1
0.3
0.1
1.7
0.0
1.6
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.6
0.0
0.4
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.4
0.0
0.2
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.3
0.0
0.2
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.2
0.0
0.1
0.4
100.1
0.2
0.5
0.2
1.1
0.0
1.1
0.2
0.1
0.2
5.0
0.1
3.7
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.0
0.2
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.7
0.0
0.4
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.3
0.0
0.1
0
0
143
-167
77
-160
32
137
-91
59
-148
171
124
179
42
84
-69
-60
-169
4
-138
153
136
-179
84
97
-55
-51
-97
-19
-158
-33
17-40 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
0
27
-115
122
-41
-37
18
-168
124
-18
158
131
-112
17
-79
102
-5
-46
89
128
107
-101
-46
98
-146
-84
-79
32
0
-120
-165
51
0.4
93.5
0.2
0.5
0.1
1.0
0.0
1.0
0.1
0.1
0.2
4.7
0.1
3.5
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.3
0.0
0.2
0.0
0.1
0.0
0.7
0.0
0.4
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.3
0.0
0.1
Power
(KW)
0.0
6.8
0.0
0.0
0.0
-0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
AC Inverter Drives Electrical Noise & RFI
AC Inverter Drives Electrical Noise & RFI
Purpose
This Technical Publication discusses electrical noise and Radio Frequency Interference (RFI)
created by AC Inverter drives and possible effects on other equipment.
Motion Control Engineering, Inc. experience with AC inverter drives suggests that they can
generate noise that may affect radio frequency sensitive equipment in the building. This
phenomenon needs to be understood and considered prior to selection of an elevator drive
system.
Overview
It is generally believed that AC inverter drives are the ideal technology providing maximum
power savings, reduced motors cost and lower maintenance costs. AC inverter drives have
tradeoffs that need to be recognized and understood. These tradeoffs (potential drawbacks)
include greater harmonic distortion, radio frequency interference and other idiosyncrasies that
can make typically used AC drives unfriendly.
In most instances, new construction design can address these issues; however, elevator
modernization in existing buildings requires thoughtful consideration. It is important to have a
basic understanding of the tradeoffs that are determining factors in the drive selection process.
Static Drives
MCE Technical Publications “Harmonic Analysis & Comparison” and “Motor Generator vs
SCR” explored considerations for drive selection for a particular elevator control application.
Issues addressed in these publications apply to all static drives, including the typical AC
inverter drive.
Radio Frequency Interference “RFI”
AC inverter drives can produce sufficient amounts of Radio Frequency noise (RFI) that affect
the operation of equipment susceptible to Radio Frequency noise. This is particularly true in
older buildings when grounding is lacking or otherwise inadequate.
One example of a substantial RFI problem is a brick apartment complex, built in the mid 20's,
where the elevator contractor was in the process of modernizing existing AC elevator
equipment. After the first cars were modernized (new controllers included RFI filtering
devices), the building superintendent complained that he was unable to listen to his favorite
radio station because of interference from the elevators. He stated that the vintage AC elevator
controls caused no problems; however, the state-of-the-art static drives generated disruptive
RFI.
The building manager, considering the complaint unfounded, suggested that the
superintendent select a different radio station. The superintendent reported the incident to the
FCC. Subsequently, the contractor received an FCC notice to immediately respond and resolve
the problem.
17-41
17
Technical Publications
At the building the complaint was verified using an inexpensive AC plug in radio and the
superintendent’s portable battery operated radio equipped with all the latest technology. In the
elevator machine room the AC radio was tuned to the AM band and, as expected, there was a
considerable amount of interference. At roof level the battery operated radio, tuned to the same
frequencies, performed slightly better; however, a considerable amount of interference was
evidenced.
In an apartment on the fourth floor, located in the middle of the building, both radios
demonstrated a similar level of interference. Conditions were found to be the same in an
apartment on the first floor. Outside, in the courtyard which is surrounded by many buildings,
AM band station signals were very strong and free of interference.
Simply stepping back inside at the first floor entrance the interference returned. Using the
battery operated radio, as the elevator ran one could hear interference during both acceleration
and deceleration.
The conclusion, later confirmed by the drive manufacturer, was that the building, without a
solid earth ground, was acting as an antenna. Grounding of the elevator drive system and motor
was occurring through water pipes and whatever other steel may have been present in this brick
building.
The drive manufacturer did additional research to identify some probable causes. The
contractor needed to provide a proper earth ground, ground the controller and the motor to this
proper earth ground, and use insulated bushings to isolate other devices from the controller
and motor to prevent grounding to or through the water piping system. These
recommendations are, generally, requirements of the National Electrical Code, but they are
sometimes overlooked. An additional suggestion would have been to try an isolation
transformer. The drive manufacturer subsequently confirmed the transformer may not have
helped in absence of a proper earth ground.
This is one example of how RF noise pollution can unintentionally be propagated throughout a
building. Improper grounding conditions make this possible. Nonetheless, grounding alone
may not be the cause of some RFI problems. Certain incorrect installation and wiring practices
can also create serious RFI problems.
IGBTs
All modern AC Inverter drives use power devices known as Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors
(IGBTs). These devices make it possible to minimize annoying audible noise by using switching
frequencies beyond the audible range. Unfortunately, AC inverter drives using IGBTs, present a
high potential for generating RFI -- Radio Frequency Interference.
Fast switching in these devices generates sharp-edged waveforms with high frequency
components that generate more RFI. The most likely complaint is interference with AM band
radios 500-1600 Khz. Nonetheless, sensitive computers, medical equipment and other noisesensitive devices sharing the same power buss could experience serious interference.
In extreme cases, the AC inverter drive itself can experience electrical noise interference. If
elevator machine room equipment is not correctly laid out and properly wired, the electrical
noise propagated by the elevator drive system can interfere with the elevator controller.
17-42 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
AC Inverter Drives Electrical Noise & RFI
An example is the building lacking a solid grounding system where the elevator system
experienced multiple problems. A solid earth ground was provided to eliminate many electrical
noise problems, yet the elevator controller itself was being affected by undetermined sources of
noise.
The routing of the contractor’s field wiring into the controller was examined and several
deficiencies were found and corrected. It was subsequently determined that the step down
power/isolation transformer required by this particular application was physically located too
close to the front of the controller. With the controller door open, the transformer created
interference that affected the control microcomputers. The remedy was placement of a shield
between the transformer and the controller, although other methods may have also worked.
Reducing/Preventing Electrical Noise
Electrical noise, whether it is conducted or radiated, can create unusual phenomenon that are
difficult to evaluate. To avoid the effects of electrical noise pollution, consider:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Proper grounding including correct ground conductor sizing
Contractors routing of field wiring
Controller and motor isolation to prevent indirect grounds
Controller design and layout
RFI filters
Isolation transformers
Higher standards of care by the installing contractor
Warnings from Manufacturers
MCE
Motion Control Engineering warns, in job specific manuals, “For proper operation of the AC
inverter drive unit in your controller, you must make sure that a direct solid ground is provided
in the machine room to properly ground the controller and the motor.
Indirect grounds such as building structure or water pipe may not provide proper grounding
and could act as an antenna to radiate RFI noise, thus disturbing sensitive equipment in the
building.
17
Improper grounding may also render any RFI filter and isolation transformer ineffective.”
SAFTRONICS
When experiencing RFI problems with AC inverter drives, Saftronics has stated that the first
step is to verify the existence of a proper grounding system. All too often, old commercial or
residential construction relied on “indirect” grounding methods in which the building ground
was accomplished via steel water pipes or conduit instead of through solid, properly sized
conductors. This poor practice increases the likelihood that common mode noise will be
propagated throughout the facility.
17-43
Technical Publications
Conclusion
The phenomenon of AC static drive noise generation can adversely effect many devices
including the controller itself. Nonetheless, AC static drives offer technology that, in numerous
circumstances, can provide more benefits than alternative drives. Awareness of the
circumstances that allow AC static drives to interfere with other devices and proper design
considerations will greatly reduce the effects of these phenomenon.
While this publication addresses AC inverter drives, it is desirable to continually explore issues
relating to emerging AC drive technology.
MCE’s Technical Publication series is intended to be an informative catalyst for ongoing
dialogue and sharing of information between consultants, elevator contractors, owners and
other interested parties. MCE Technical Publications are available on our website at
www.mceinc.com.
Don Alley, Chief Engineer
MCE R&D Staff
January 1996
17-44 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Elevator Modernization Performance Charts
Elevator Modernization Performance Charts
Elevator Performance Data for Representative Buildings
Before and After Modernization with
MCE’s M3 Group System Elevator Dispatching
Purpose
This Technical Publication illustrates the dramatic elevator performance improvement realized
using MCE’s M3 Group System. Each page summarizes actual project data.
Overview
These studies document system performance improvement by comparing average waiting time,
before and after modernization, for a variety of projects.
Impressive reductions in hall call waiting time have been documented up to 83%.
While every building is different, the following collection of individual site studies is useful as a
generalized predictive model for successful elevator system improvement — as measured by
reduced average waiting time — applicable to similar buildings.
The actual performance improvement resulting from a particular scope of work is obviously
based on many factors including: the type of building occupancy, current population and rate of
growth, the efficiency and condition of existing elevator control and dispatching equipment,
and the extent of modernization undertaken.
17
17-45
Technical Publications
75%
Chase Manhattan Bank
Worldwide Headquarters — Low Rise
Reduction
in Hall Call
Wait Time
Manhattan, New York USA
Average Waiting Time
Before Modernization
After Modernization
20
15
10
5
0
7:30-9:30am
9:30-11:30am
11:30am-1:30pm
1:30-3:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
Time of Day
Equipment
Existing:
Otis gearless
Modernized with:
MCE IMC-SCR 12-pulse controls
MCE M3 Group Dispatcher
Project Profile
Cars:
Floors:
Stops:
Speed:
Capacity:
Type:
Traffic Study Detail
Pre-Modernization:
7/25/94 — Delta Traffic Analysis System
Post-Modernization:
1/27/97 — MCE CMS Traffic Analysis Reporting
8
11
10
500 fpm
3,500 lbs
office building
single tenant
Statistics
Calls
Population
BEFORE
AFTER
3,712
3,200
4,443
5,000+
Rev 5/26/98
17-46 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
Elevator Modernization Performance Charts
70%
Chase Manhattan Bank
Worldwide Headquarters — High Rise
Reduction
in Hall Call
Wait Time
Manhattan, New York USA
Average Waiting Time
Before Modernization
After Modernization
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
7:30-9:30am
9:30-11:30am
11:30am-1:30pm
1:30-3:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
Time of Day
Equipment
Existing:
Otis gearless
Modernized with:
MCE IMC-SCR 12-pulse controls
MCE M3 Group Dispatcher
Project Profile
Cars:
Floors:
Stops:
Speed:
Capacity:
Type:
Traffic Study Detail
Pre-Modernization:
7/25/94 — Delta Traffic Analysis System
Post-Modernization:
1/27/97 — MCE CMS Traffic Analysis Reporting
8
52
21
1,200 fpm
3,500 lbs
office building
single tenant
17
Statistics
Calls
Population
BEFORE
AFTER
3,130
3,200
2,496
5,000+
Rev 5/26/98
17-47
Technical Publications
65%
CNN Center - North Tower
One CNN Center
Reduction
in Hall Call
Wait Time
Atlanta, Georgia USA
Average Waiting Time
Before Modernization
After Modernization
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
7:30-9:30am
9:30-11:30am
11:30am-1:30pm
1:30-3:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
Time of Day
Equipment
Existing:
Westinghouse gearless
Modernized with:
MCE IMC-SCR 12-Pulse Controls
MCE M3 Group Dispatcher
Traffic Study Detail
Pre-Modernization:
6/29/95 — EPTi Traffic Analysis System
Post-Modernization:
4/9/96 — MCE Traffic Analysis Reporting
Project Profile
Cars:
Floors:
Stops:
Speed:
Capacity:
Type:
4
12
12
500 fpm
3,000 lbs
office building
multiple tenant
Statistics
Calls
BEFORE
AFTER
2,413
3,258
Rev 9/10/98
17-48 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
59%
Dupont Plaza
Office Building
Reduction
in Hall Call
Wait Time
Miami, FL USA
Average Waiting Time
Before Modernization
After Modernization
25
20
15
10
5
0
7:30-9:30am
9:30-11:30am
11:30am-1:30pm
1:30-3:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
Time of Day
Equipment
Existing:
Otis gearless
Modernized with:
MCE IOS Intelligent Overlay System
MCE M3 Group Dispatcher
Project Profile
Cars:
Floors:
Stops:
Speed:
Type:
3
12
12
700 fpm
office building
multiple tenant
17
Traffic Study Detail
Pre-Modernization:
11/18/91 — Digimetrix Traffic Analysis System
Post-Modernization:
8/5/92 — MCE CMS Traffic Analysis Reporting
Statistics
Calls
BEFORE
AFTER
1,712
1,739
Rev 5/26/98
17-49
Technical Publications
68%
Holiday Inn
750 Kearny Street
Reduction
in Hall Call
Wait Time
San Fransisco, CA USA
Average Waiting Time
Before Modernization
After Modernization
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
7:30-9:30am
9:30-11:30am
11:30am-1:30pm
1:30-3:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
Time of Day
Equipment
Existing:
Otis gearless
Modernized with:
MCE IMC-SCR 12-pulse controls
MCE M3 Group Dispatcher
Project Profile
Cars:
Floors:
Stops:
Speed:
Capacity:
Type:
4
31
31
700 fpm
2,500
hotel
Traffic Study Detail
Pre-Modernization:
10/29/96 — Digimetrix Traffic Analysis System
Post-Modernization:
5/4/98 — MCE CMS Traffic Analysis Reporting
Statistics
Calls
BEFORE
AFTER
3,925
3,590
Rev 5/26/98
17-50 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
54%
Office Building 9
744 P Street — Low Rise
Reduction
in Hall Call
Wait Time
Sacramento, California USA
Average Waiting Time
Before Modernization
After Modernization
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
7:30-9:30am
9:30-11:30am
11:30am-1:30pm
1:30-3:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
Time of Day
Equipment
Existing:
Otis gearless
Modernized with:
MCE IMC-MG Controls
MCE M3 Group Dispatcher
Traffic Study Detail
Pre-Modernization:
5/8/97 — EPTi Traffic Analysis System
Post-Modernization:
9/11/98 — MCE Traffic Analysis Reporting
Project Profile
Cars:
Floors:
Stops:
Speed:
Capacity:
Type:
3
11
11
500 fpm
3,500 lbs
office building
multiple tenant
17
Statistics
Calls
BEFORE
AFTER
1,852
1,995
Rev 9/17/98
17-51
Technical Publications
78%
Office Building 9
744 P Street — High Rise
Reduction
in Hall Call
Wait Time
Sacramento, California USA
Average Waiting Time
Before Modernization
After Modernization
100
80
60
40
20
0
7:30-9:30am
9:30-11:30am
11:30am-1:30pm
1:30-3:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
Time of Day
Equipment
Existing:
Otis gearless
Modernized with:
MCE IMC-MG Controls
MCE M3 Group Dispatcher
Traffic Study Detail
Pre-Modernization:
5/20/97 — EPTi Traffic Analysis System
Post-Modernization:
9/4/98 — MCE Traffic Analysis Reporting
Project Profile
Cars:
Floors:
Stops:
Speed:
Capacity:
Type:
3
18
11
1,000 fpm
3,500 lbs
office building
multiple tenant
Statistics
Calls
BEFORE
AFTER
1,607
1,792
Rev 9/10/98
17-52 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
83%
Rutledge Building
Senate Street
Reduction
in Hall Call
Wait Time
Columbia, South Carolina, USA
Average Waiting Time
Before Modernization
After Modernization
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
7:30-9:30am
9:30-11:30am
11:30am-1:30pm
1:30-3:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
Time of Day
Equipment
Existing:
Otis gearless
Modernized with:
MCE IMC-SCR 12-Pulse Controls
MCE M3 Group Dispatcher
Traffic Study Detail
Pre-Modernization:
5/10/95 — EPTi Traffic Analysis Reporting
Post-Modernization:
9/24/98 — MCE CMS Traffic Analysis Reporting
Project Profile
Cars:
Floors:
Stops:
Speed:
Capacity:
Type:
4
13
13
500 fpm
3,000 lbs
office building
single tenant
17
Statistics
Calls
Population
BEFORE
AFTER
1,900
600
2,536
600
Rev 11/05/98
17-53
Technical Publications
70%
University of Minnesota
Moos Tower
Reduction
in Hall Call
Wait Time
Minneapolis, MN USA
Average Waiting Time
Before Modernization
After Modernization
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
7:30-9:30am
9:30-11:30am
11:30am-1:30pm
1:30-3:30pm
3:30-5:30pm
Time of Day
Equipment
Existing:
Westinghouse gearless
Modernized with:
MCE IMC-SCR 12-pulse controls
MCE M3 Group Dispatcher
Traffic Study Detail
Pre-Modernization:
3/19/96 — Digimetrix Traffic Analysis System
Post-Modernization:
3/18/97 — Digimetrix Traffic Analysis System
Project Profile
Cars:
Floors:
Stops:
Speed:
Capacity:
Type:
6
19
18
700 fpm
4,000 lbs
medical school
Statistics
Calls
BEFORE
AFTER
2,203
3,422
Rev 5/26/98
17-54 Manual # 42-01-SPECS
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