Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud

Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Reference Architecture
for SUSE OpenStack
Cloud
Last update: 17 September 2015
Configuration Reference Number: CLDSUSTXX54
Provides both high-value and
high-performance options for
OpenStack implementations.
Outlines scalable and highly
available OpenStack
deployment options.
Includes recommended
configurations for Lenovo
System x and ThinkServer
platforms.
Includes validated and tested
deployment and sizing guides.
Kai Huang (Lenovo)
Yixuan Huang (Lenovo)
Srihari Angaluri (Lenovo)
Patrick Quairoli (SUSE)
Bryan Gartner (SUSE)
Michael Echavarria (SUSE)
Check for Updates
Table of Contents
1
Introduction ................................................................................................ 1
2
Business problem and business value ................................................... 2
2.1
Enterprise private cloud .......................................................................................................... 2
2.1.2
MSPs and CSPs ..................................................................................................................... 2
2.2
3
Business problem .................................................................................................... 2
2.1.1
Business value ......................................................................................................... 2
2.2.1
Enterprise IaaS Private Cloud customers ................................................................................ 3
2.2.2
MSPs and CSPs ..................................................................................................................... 3
Requirements ............................................................................................. 4
3.1
Functional requirements........................................................................................... 4
3.2
Non-functional requirements .................................................................................... 5
4
Architectural overview .............................................................................. 6
5
Component model ..................................................................................... 8
6
5.1
OpenStack components ........................................................................................... 8
5.2
SUSE OpenStack Cloud components.................................................................... 10
Operational model ....................................................................................11
6.1
6.1.1
Rack servers......................................................................................................................... 14
6.1.2
Network switches .................................................................................................................. 16
6.2
Control Plane Nodes .............................................................................................. 17
6.3
Compute Nodes ..................................................................................................... 19
6.4
Storage Nodes ....................................................................................................... 20
6.5
Networking ............................................................................................................. 21
6.6
System management ............................................................................................. 24
6.6.1
Lenovo XClarity .................................................................................................................... 24
6.6.2
Subscription Management Tool (SMT) for SUSE Linux Enterprise ......................................... 25
6.6.3
SUSE Manager ..................................................................................................................... 25
6.7
ii
Hardware ............................................................................................................... 14
Deployment example ............................................................................................. 26
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
6.8
7
8
Subscription and licensing considerations ............................................................. 27
6.8.1
SUSE subscription model...................................................................................................... 27
6.8.2
SUSE OpenStack Cloud Admin plus Control Node ................................................................ 27
6.8.3
SUSE OpenStack Compute Node ......................................................................................... 27
6.8.4
SUSE Enterprise Storage...................................................................................................... 27
6.8.5
Sample subscription.............................................................................................................. 28
Deployment considerations.................................................................... 29
7.1
Preparation ............................................................................................................ 29
7.2
Server configuration ............................................................................................... 29
7.3
Best practices ........................................................................................................ 30
Appendix: Lenovo Bill of Materials ........................................................ 31
8.1
ThinkServer BOM .................................................................................................. 31
8.1.1
Administration Server............................................................................................................ 31
8.1.2
Controller Node..................................................................................................................... 31
8.1.3
Compute Node (VM images are stored on Storage Nodes) ................................................... 32
8.1.4
Storage Node ....................................................................................................................... 32
8.2
System x Servers BOM .......................................................................................... 33
8.2.1
Administration Server............................................................................................................ 33
8.2.2
Controller Node..................................................................................................................... 33
8.2.3
Compute Node (VMs are stored on Compute Nodes) ............................................................ 33
8.2.4
Compute Node (high-performance configuration) .................................................................. 34
8.2.5
Storage Node ....................................................................................................................... 34
8.3
Networking ............................................................................................................. 35
8.3.1
G7028 1GbE Networking ...................................................................................................... 35
8.3.2
G8124E 1GbE Networking .................................................................................................... 35
8.3.3
Console ................................................................................................................................ 35
8.4
Racks ..................................................................................................................... 35
8.5
SUSE software licenses ......................................................................................... 36
8.5.1
Administration Server............................................................................................................ 36
8.5.2
Control Node ........................................................................................................................ 36
8.5.3
Compute Node...................................................................................................................... 36
8.5.4
Storage Node ....................................................................................................................... 36
Resources....................................................................................................... 37
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
1 Introduction
This document describes the Lenovo® reference architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud integrated with
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. The intended audience of this document is IT professionals, technical
architects, sales engineers, and consultants who assist in planning, designing, and implementing SUSE
OpenStack Cloud with Lenovo System x® or ThinkServer® products. This solution is targeted to managed
service providers (MSPs), cloud service providers (CSPs), and customers who require a highly available,
enterprise-quality private Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) cloud. This reference architecture outlines
configurations for both System x and ThinkServer in highly available deployment models. Recommendations
are provided for scaling Compute or Storage Nodes based on virtualization capacity from low-density to
high-density configurations.
The Lenovo hardware provides an ideal infrastructure solution for cloud deployments and spans a broad
spectrum of Intel-based servers, including the ThinkServer, System x, Flex System™, NeXtScale System™,
and BladeCenter® product lines, as well as data center network switches that are designed specifically for
robust, scale-out servers and converged interconnect fabrics. This hardware portfolio provides the full range of
features and functions that are necessary to meet the needs of small businesses all the way up to large
enterprises. Lenovo also uses industry standards in systems management on all of these platforms, which
enables seamless integration into cloud management tools such as OpenStack.
Both Lenovo and SUSE have validated the architecture described in this document.
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
2 Business problem and business value
This section describes the business problem of deploying and maintaining an enterprise-grade cloud solution,
and how the joint solution of the SUSE OpenStack Cloud software with Lenovo hardware addresses it.
2.1
Business problem
Cloud computing is at the forefront of new and exciting trends in enterprise IT today. The following sections
describe the challenges facing enterprise customers, Managed Service Providers (MSPs), and Cloud Service
Providers (CSPs). While these challenges are different for each role, they will all benefit from an OpenStack
Cloud solution.
2.1.1 Enterprise private cloud
Over the past few years, virtualization has helped IT reduce capital investments by increasing the utilization of
available compute resources beyond a simple 1:1 application to a server scenario. While virtualization has
provided a cost-effective means by which customers can utilize computing resources and slow server sprawl, it
has created additional management and investment challenges. Increased server utilization has exposed the
need for persistent monitoring and migration of workloads in a quest for the optimal per-server workload
balancer. While virtualization has reduced the time required to deploy workloads, it has not created the agility
that the modern business demands. Similarly, increased spending on virtualization technology and
management solutions has cut into hardware capital expenditure savings. While virtualization has created
savings, it has not reduced the amount of time spent on administration or systems management. Ultimately, a
business still requires increased agility and responsiveness from IT while it continues to improve resource
utilization and management costs by leveraging existing resources.
2.1.2 MSPs and CSPs
The increasing interest in public clouds has resulted in a number of service providers competing for business
based on cost. Public clouds have allowed customers to switch their hardware acquisition frames of reference
from capital expense (CAPEX) to operational expense (OPEX). Some cloud service providers are evolving
their platforms from pure hardware services (IaaS) to include platform as a service (PaaS) such as web
applications, or software as a service (SaaS) such as email, accounting, etc.
Some service providers have forgone offering the necessary back-end patch and configuration management
infrastructure in order to allow their customers to scale, self-provision, and manage a library of highly available
solutions. Because MSPs and CSPs are competing on razor-thin margins, they focus their efforts on creating a
highly scripted, complex cloud infrastructure to support the evolution of their existing IaaS, PaaS, or SaaS to a
full-fledged cloud.
2.2
Business value
By utilizing cloud computing capabilities in the public cloud, businesses are able to leverage IT resources asneeded without having to make drastic preparations for peak loads. However, many companies are
considering ways to store their data privately rather than storing their data on a public cloud service provider’s
servers in order to reduce security risk, or to ensure data sovereignty and compliance. The solution to this is to
build a private cloud that allows businesses to secure their data behind corporate firewalls. However, deploying
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
and maintaining a cloud has in the past been difficult to do and required extensive knowledge of clustering and
virtualization.
2.2.1 Enterprise IaaS Private Cloud customers
Owning and managing private clouds has proved to be extremely valuable to companies that choose to
implement them. By rapidly provisioning and de-provisioning IT resources based on business requirements, a
private cloud increases the speed at which companies can react to new market opportunities and customer
needs. Additionally, by providing a centralized, internal location for company data, a private cloud allows
companies to control and secure data using their standard processes. SUSE OpenStack Cloud offers a highly
available, mixed hypervisor private cloud deployment. Based on the OpenStack cloud computing management
software, SUSE OpenStack Cloud enables the dynamic allocation of resources across the private cloud
infrastructure by deploying roles to bare metal Lenovo systems and virtual instances to those nodes, while
continuously monitoring performance and resource usage. This automation is attractive to businesses because
it helps reduce data center costs by maximizing server utilization and increasing workload performance while
reducing effort and increasing agility. SUSE has developed new management and implementation
technologies to decrease the difficulty associated with operating an on-premise private cloud.
SUSE OpenStack Cloud enables enterprises to leverage their existing investments and knowledge in
virtualization technologies such as VMware, Hyper-V, Xen, and KVM. Because SUSE OpenStack Cloud is built
on SUSE Linux Enterprise, it is supported on all major hardware configurations from Lenovo. Through
partnerships and investments in the OpenStack community, SUSE OpenStack Cloud also integrates with
leading storage and networking solutions that support OpenStack.
2.2.2 MSPs and CSPs
OpenStack is one of the world’s largest collaborative development projects, and a vast community continually
improves and updates it. SUSE and Lenovo provide a tested, validated, and supported enterprise solution so
that service providers can benefit from regular feature enhancements and performance improvements for their
customers’ infrastructures. Our joint collaboration and iterative releases provide a robust and manageable
cloud infrastructure solution that provides access to hundreds of partners and ISVs in the OpenStack
ecosystem. Service providers can rapidly implement features to remain competitive with reduced risk of
building their own cloud solution.
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
3 Requirements
This section contains the functional and non-functional requirements for deploying a cloud infrastructure.
3.1
Functional requirements
Table 1 provides a list of functional requirements for a cloud implementation.
Table 1. Functional requirements
Requirement
Description
Device and location independence
Users can access resources regardless of their location or device –
on-premise, off-premise, PC, mobile, etc.
Pooled resources
Computing resources are available to service multiple customers.
There is no location dependency or predefined physical infrastructure
associated with an individual workload.
Self-service provisioning
Services provide end-user access to their assigned resources and
projects and configure, deploy, and track these resources.
On-demand scalability (elasticity)
Compute, storage, and control plans can scale separately as-needed,
either automatically or via self-service, portal-base, on-demand, or
utilization.
Multi-tenancy
A shared pool of computing resources is available to service multiple
customers simultaneously.
Measuring and reporting
Utilization and consumption can be controlled, audited, and reported
on based on the subscribed level of service.
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
3.2
Non-functional requirements
Table 2 provides a list of non-functional requirements for a cloud implementation.
Table 2. Non-functional requirements
Requirement
Description
Automated installation process
Easily and rapidly assigns cloud resource (compute, storage, networking,
etc.) roles to new or existing computing resources with an intuitive
administration interface. Streamlines the installation of private clouds and
allows for later expansion and extensibility.
Enterprise readiness
High Availability for all OpenStack control plane services to remove single
points of failure and allow for ongoing system maintenance. Ready access
to security updates, and certification of many hardware platforms and
documented processes that are used to upgrade the solution over time.
24x7 support.
Interoperable
Support for multiple hypervisors to accommodate heterogeneous
environments or advantageous licensing arrangements. Support for
multiple storage technologies, both for object and block, allowing for
inclusion of existing solutions or new implementations based on
best-of-breed open source technologies. Preservation of OpenStack
application programming interfaces (APIs) and capabilities with compliance
with DefCore requirements.
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
4 Architectural overview
Cloud computing provides an abstraction of a pool of computing resources such as compute, networking, and
storage for consumption by an end user without consideration of the location of the end user or the hosted
resource. Figure 1 provides a simplified view of cloud services that a user interacts with from various devices
and the underlying physical resources they rely upon.
.
Figure 1. Cloud computing concept
SUSE OpenStack Cloud is an IaaS cloud solution that is designed to be fast as well as easy to deploy and
manage. SUSE OpenStack Cloud offers a cloud management solution that helps organizations, MSPs, and
CSPs to provision and manage large pools of compute, storage, and networking resources. This is the fifth
release of SUSE OpenStack Cloud, and it is based on the upstream OpenStack Juno.
SUSE OpenStack Cloud provides the following features:
•
Open source software that is based on the OpenStack Juno release
•
Centralized resource tracking that provides insight into the cloud infrastructure’s activities and capacity
in order to ensure optimized automated deployment of services
•
A self-service portal that enables end users to configure and deploy services as necessary, while also
offering the ability to track resource consumption
•
An image repository from which standardized, preconfigured virtual machines can be published
•
Automated installation processes via Crowbar using predefined scripts for configuring and deploying
the Control Node(s) as well as Compute and Storage Nodes
•
Multi-tenant, role-based provisioning and access control for multiple departments and users within
your organization
•
APIs that enable the integration of third-party software, such as identity management and billing
solutions
•
Heterogeneous hypervisor support for Windows HyperV, VMware, Xen, and KVM
SUSE OpenStack Cloud is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, SUSE Enterprise Storage, OpenStack,
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Crowbar, and Chef. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server is used as the underlying operating system for all cloud
infrastructure machines (also called nodes), while OpenStack, the cloud management layer, works as
the cloud operating system. Crowbar and Chef are used to automatically deploy and manage the OpenStack
nodes from a central administration server. Ceph, a distributed open source storage solution, provides block,
image, and object storage.
Figure 2 provides an architectural overview of the SUSE OpenStack Cloud and shows the logical organization
of the key solution components of the OpenStack-based services.
SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Administration Server
•
•
•
Automated Install
Support Software
Software Repository
Cloud Admin
Dashboard
(Horizon)
Cloud User
OpenStack Juno
SUSE Enterprise Storage
•
•
•
•
•
•
Networking Management
User Projects/Templates
Identity
Orchestration
Dashboard
Monitoring
Figure 2. Architectural overview of SUSE OpenStack Cloud
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
•
•
•
•
Ceph
Block Storage
Images
Object Storage
5 Component model
This section describes the logical component model for SUSE OpenStack Cloud.
5.1
OpenStack components
OpenStack is open source software used for building massively scalable private and public clouds. It consists
of a number of components (as shown in Figure 3) that provide services such as compute (Nova) and
networking (Nova), as well as object, image, and block storage (Swift, Glance, and Cinder, respectively).
These components interact via a networking layer (Neutron), which provides Software Defined Networking
(SDN) and integration with third- party network infrastructure providers. The workload provisioning and
monitoring services provided by orchestration (Heat) and telemetry (Ceilometer), respectively, also interact
with Neutron to communicate with compute and storage resources. The final service, Keystone, provides
identity services for access to the dashboard (Horizon) as well as role-based access to the compute,
networking, and storage resources available to the user for projects. Figure 3 illustrates the core OpenStack
services, with their project code names and a first-order approximation of the layered hierarchy and
dependencies.
Figure 3. OpenStack overview
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Table 3 describes the OpenStack components.
Table 3. OpenStack components
OpenStack service
Project name
Description
Dashboard
Horizon
Provides a web-based, self-service portal used to interact with
underlying OpenStack services, such as launching instances,
assigning IP addresses, and configuring access controls.
Compute
Nova
Manages the lifecycle of compute instances in an OpenStack
environment. Responsibilities include spawning, scheduling, and
decommissioning of virtual machines on demand.
Networking
Neutron
Enables network-connectivity-as-a-service for other OpenStack
services, such as OpenStack compute. Provides an API that
enables users to define networks and the attachments that go into
them. Has a pluggable architecture that supports many popular
networking vendors and technologies.
Object storage
Swift
Stores and retrieves arbitrary, unstructured data objects via a
RESTful, HTTP-based API. It is highly fault-tolerant with its data
replication and scale-out architecture. Its implementation is not like
a file server with mountable directories. Instead, it writes objects
and files to multiple drives, ensuring that data is replicated across a
server cluster.
Block storage
Cinder
Provides persistent block storage to running instances. Its
pluggable driver architecture facilitates the creation and
management of block storage devices.
Identity service
Keystone
Provides an authentication and authorization service for other
OpenStack services. Provides a catalog of endpoints for all
OpenStack services.
Image service
Glance
Stores and retrieves virtual machine disk images. OpenStack
compute makes use of this image service during instance
provisioning.
Telemetry
Ceilometer
Monitors and meters the OpenStack cloud for billing,
benchmarking, scalability, and statistical purposes.
Orchestration
Heat
Orchestrates multiple composite cloud applications by using either
the native HOT template format or the AWS CloudFormation
template format, through both an OpenStack-native REST API and
a CloudFormation-compatible Query API.
For more information about OpenStack, see the following websites:
9
•
OpenStack Juno Release Notes
•
What’s new in OpenStack Juno
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
5.2
SUSE OpenStack Cloud components
OpenStack provides a significant portion of the capabilities needed to create and manage pools of compute,
storage, and networking resources in an infrastructure such as a service cloud, and SUSE OpenStack Cloud
supplements those capabilities with other critical components. These include an underlying operating system,
supported hypervisor platform, database, and message queue. SUSE OpenStack Cloud provides all of these
required components, as well as an installation framework, integrated into a seamless solution. Figure 4 shows
the software additions that SUSE provides to OpenStack and the underlying SUSE Linux operating system.
Figure 4. SuSE OpenStack Cloud components
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
6 Operational model
This section describes the operational model verified with Lenovo hardware and SUSE software. It describes
the high-level deployment of OpenStack and SUSE components onto various types of nodes as well as
network, storage, and systems management considerations. The section concludes with example deployment
models that use Lenovo servers and Lenovo RackSwitch™ network switches, along with considerations for
SUSE OpenStack Cloud for optimal enterprise deployments of the overall private cloud solution.
SUSE OpenStack Cloud divides numerous OpenStack components and required services into four different
node roles to simplify deployment and management while improving scalability and distribution of services for
High Availability, as shown in Figure 5.
Figure 5. SUSE OpenStack Cloud nodes
SUSE provides an automated installation framework via Crowbar that utilizes predefined scripts for configuring
and deploying Control, Compute, and Storage Nodes. Crowbar can be described as a convergent state
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
machine that manages the steps required to transform a bare-metal system into a functional resource node
within a private cloud. Through the use of individual Crowbar modules, each known as a “barclamp”, the
framework coordinates a set of actions necessary to set up, configure, and maintain the given service.
Barclamps utilize a Chef Server and its respective “recipes” to deliver the individual steps necessary to
implement each target node. All of these components in the installation framework reside behind the Crowbar
web interface, which is deployed as part of the Administration Server.
With the included SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension (HAE), SUSE OpenStack Cloud can
automatically configure a highly available Control Node cluster. These core OpenStack services are then
highly available, and they are automatically configured in either active/passive or active/active mode,
depending upon the service. This ensures uninterrupted access for cloud users and enables cloud
administrators to deliver enterprise-grade service level agreements (SLAs). In a simple OpenStack Cloud
environment, the OpenStack services can be installed symmetrically on a cluster of 3 Control Nodes, as shown
in Figure 5.
The underlying storage infrastructures for Glance, Cinder, and Swift are provided by SUSE Enterprise Storage
(SES), powered by Ceph as a software-defined storage (SDS) solution for resilient and scalable block and
object storage repositories. This enables organizations to build and utilize cost-efficient and highly scalable
storage using industry-standard servers and disk drives. With Ceph emerging as the private-cloud storage
standard, the SUSE OpenStack Cloud Administration Server can create and integrate these nodes as simply
as any of the other OpenStack services.
Therefore, SUSE OpenStack Cloud, built on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server and SUSE Enterprise Storage,
provides significant value and advantages over other OpenStack distributions including:
•
Certified OpenStack distribution
•
Integration with Ceph distributed storage
•
Award-winning worldwide support
•
SUSE Cloud Administration Server
•
Automated deployment of highly available cloud control plane services
•
Standardized product lifecycle
•
Integrated SUSE update and maintenance processes
•
Support for mixed KVM, Xen, Microsoft Hyper-V, and VMware compute resources
•
Thousands of SUSE-supported IHV and ISV certifications
•
Open APIs for integration with third-party solutions
Table 4 describes the various server roles in the SUSE OpenStack Cloud implementation.
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Table 4. SUSE OpenStack Cloud Nodes
Node name
Node description
Administration
The Administration Server provides all services needed to manage and deploy all other
Server
nodes in the cloud. These services are visible in a web interface and provided by the
Crowbar tool that automates, in conjunction with Chef, all required installation and
configuration tasks. Among the services provided by the Administration Server are
DHCP, DNS, NTP, PXE, and TFTP. The Administration Server also hosts the software
repositories for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server and SUSE OpenStack Cloud, in addition
to the add-on products that are needed for node deployment.
Control Node
The Control Node(s) hosts all OpenStack services needed to orchestrate virtual
machines deployed on the Compute Nodes and storage elements provided by the
Storage Nodes. SUSE OpenStack Cloud guides the provisioning of a database
(PostgreSQL) and message broker (RabbitMQ), which are two essential services
needed for an OpenStack private cloud implementation. These are hosted on the
Control Node(s). The following list of OpenStack components and dependencies run on
the Control Node(s) and specific roles, as applicable:
Storage Node
•
Database (PostgreSQL)
•
RabbitMQ (message broker)
•
Identity (Keystone)
•
Object Storage (Swift option), swift-proxy, swift-ring-compute, plus
swift-dispersion
•
Object Storage (SUSE Enterprise Storage option) RBD, RadosGW,
ceph-glance, ceph-cinder
•
Image (Glance)
•
Block Storage (Cinder), cinder-controller, cinder-volume
•
Networking (Neutron), neutron-server, neutron-l3
•
Compute (Nova), nova-multi-controller
•
Dashboard (Horizon)
•
Telemetry (Ceilometer), ceilometer-server, ceilometer-agent
•
Orchestration (Heat)
The Storage Node(s) is the pool of machines that provides object storage. SUSE
OpenStack Cloud offers two different types of storage: object and block storage. The
OpenStack Swift component can provide object storage. Cinder provides block storage.
It supports several different back ends, including Ceph, that can be deployed during the
installation. Ceph can also be used for object storage and as a substitute for Swift.
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Node name
Node description
Compute Node
The Compute Node(s) is the pool of machines on which the instances are running.
These machines must be equipped with a sufficient number of CPUs and enough RAM
to start several instances. The Control Node effectively distributes instances within the
pool of Compute Nodes and provides the necessary network resources. The OpenStack
compute service (Nova) runs on the Compute Nodes and provides means for setting up,
starting, and stopping virtual machines.
SUSE OpenStack Cloud supports several hypervisors, such as Hyper-V, KVM, VMware
vSphere, and Xen. Each Compute Node can only run one hypervisor at a time. You can
choose which hypervisor to run on which Compute Node when deploying the Nova
barclamp.
6.1
Hardware
The OpenStack software has been validated to run on all Lenovo hardware platforms, including System x, Flex
System, NeXtScale, and ThinkServer. This reference architecture focuses on SUSE OpenStack Cloud
deployed on two Lenovo platforms:
•
Lenovo System x3650 M5 and Lenovo System x3550 M5
•
Lenovo ThinkServer RD550 and Lenovo ThinkServer RD650
6.1.1 Rack servers
Designed for a wide range of business-critical workloads and global verticals, Lenovo’s versatile two-socket,
high-performance rack servers include the 2U System x3650 M5, 2U ThinkServer RD650, 1U System x3550
M5, and 1U ThinkServer RD550.
Built with industry-leading reliability and security and expansive memory and storage capacity, the System
x3650 M5 and x3550 M5 maximize your uptime while accelerating your workloads and protecting against
low-level attacks. Lenovo XClarity simplifies management and speeds up server deployment. Storage
configurations are available for Big Data and High IOPS Analytics.
Engineered with open standards and power-efficient designs, the ThinkServer RD650 and RD550 can help
reduce energy costs and lower total cost of ownership. Hybrid storage models with mixed 3.5" and 2.5" front
drives enable storage tiering. Industry-unique Lenovo AnyBay allows for the insertion of a combination of PCIe,
SAS, and SATA drives in the same bay.
This section provides hardware descriptions of Lenovo System x and ThinkServer servers.
Lenovo System x3650 M5
The Lenovo System x3650 M5 server (as shown in Figure 6 and Figure 7) is an enterprise-class 2U two-socket
versatile server that incorporates outstanding reliability, availability, and serviceability (RAS), security, and high
efficiency for business-critical applications and cloud deployments. It offers a flexible, scalable design and
simple upgrade paths to 26 2.5" hard disk drives (HDDs) or solid-state drives (SSDs), or 14 3.5" HDDs, with
doubled data transfer rate via 12 Gbps serial-attached SCSI (SAS) internal storage connectivity and up to 1.5
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
TB of TruDDR4 Memory. Its onboard Ethernet solution provides four standard embedded Gigabit Ethernet
ports and two optional embedded 10 Gigabit Ethernet ports without occupying PCIe slots.
Combined with the Intel® Xeon® processor E5-2600 v3 product family, the Lenovo x3650 M5 server offers a
high density of workloads and performance targeted to lower the total cost of ownership (TCO) per virtual
machine. Its flexible, pay-as-you-grow design and great expansion capabilities solidify dependability for any
kind of virtualized workload, with minimal downtime.
The Lenovo x3650 M5 server provides internal storage density of up to 100 TB (with up to 26 2.5" drives) in a
2U form factor with its impressive array of workload-optimized storage configurations. The x3650 M5 offers
easy management and saves floor space and power consumption for the most demanding storage
virtualization use cases by consolidating the storage and server into one system targeted at the Storage Node
roles.
Figure 6. Lenovo x3650 M5 (with 16 2.5" disk bays)
Figure 7. Lenovo x3650 M5 (with 3.5" disk bays)
For more information, see the following websites:
•
System x3650 M5 – Overview
•
System x3650 M5 Product Guide
Lenovo System x3550 M5
The Lenovo System x3550 M5 server (as shown in Figure 8) is a cost- and density-balanced 1U two-socket
rack server. The x3550 M5 features a new, innovative, energy-smart design with up to two Intel Xeon
processors from the high-performance E5-2600 v3 product family of processors; up to 1.5 TB of faster,
energy-efficient TruDDR4 memory; up to twelve 12Gb/s SAS drives; and up to three PCI Express (PCIe) 3.0
I/O expansion slots in an impressive selection of sizes and types. The improved feature set and exceptional
performance of the x3550 M5 is ideal for scalable cloud environments, providing an ideal target for the
Administration Server and for both Control and Compute Node roles.
Figure 8. Lenovo x3550 M5
For more information, see the following websites:
15
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
•
System x3550 M5 - Overview
•
System x3550 M5 Product Guide
Lenovo ThinkServer RD550
The Lenovo® ThinkServer® RD550 (as shown in Figure 9) is a 1U two-socket server that features Intel Xeon
E5-2600 v3 processors and supports up to 768 GB of DDR4 memory, 18 cores, and 36 threads per socket. It
offers the capability to support mix-and-match internal hard disk drive (HDD) and solid-state drive (SSD)
storage with up to twelve 2.5" drive bays, 140 GbE networking capability, up to 8 hot-swap dual rotor fans,
hot-swap redundant power supplies, and a dedicated Gigabit Ethernet out-of-band management port in a
dense 1U design. Given the RD550’s small form-factor and large memory and storage capacity, it is ideal for
Administration, Control, and Compute Node roles.
Figure 9. Lenovo ThinkServer RD550
For more information, see the Lenovo ThinkServer RD550 Product Guide.
Lenovo ThinkServer RD650
The Lenovo® ThinkServer® RD650 (as shown in Figure 10) is an enterprise-class, 2U, two-socket server that
features Intel® Xeon® E5-2600 v3 processors and supports up to 768 GB of DDR4 memory, 18 cores, and 36
threads per socket. With the capability to support mix-and-match internal hard disk drive (HDD) and solid-state
drive (SSD) storage with up to 26 2.5" drive bays, 40 Gbps networking capability, up to 6 hot-swap dual rotor
fans, hot-swap redundant power supplies, and a dedicated Gigabit Ethernet out-of-band management port, the
ThinkServer RD650 provides leading features and capabilities for Compute Node and Storage Node roles.
Figure 10. Lenovo ThinkServer RD650
6.1.2 Network switches
This section provides a hardware description of Lenovo’s enterprise-level networking switches.
Lenovo RackSwitch G8124E
The Lenovo RackSwitch G8124E (as shown in Figure 11) delivers exceptional performance that is both
lossless and low-latency, and it provides high availability and reliability with redundant power supplies and fans
as standard. In addition, RackSwitch G8124E delivers excellent cost savings and a feature-rich design when it
comes to virtualization, Converged Enhanced Ethernet (CEE)/Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE), Internet
16
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI), High Availability, and enterprise-class Layer 2 and Layer 3
functionality.
With support for 10Gb, this 24-port switch is designed for clients who are leveraging 10 Gb Ethernet already or
plan to do so in the future. The G8124E is designed to support Lenovo Virtual Fabric, which provides the ability
to dynamically allocate bandwidth per virtual network interface card (vNIC) in increments of 100 MB, while
being able to adjust over time without downtime.
Figure 11. Lenovo RackSwitch G8124E
For more information, see the RackSwitch G8124E Product Guide.
Lenovo RackSwitch G7028
The Lenovo RackSwitch G7028 (as shown in Figure 12) is a 1 Gb top-of-rack switch that delivers line-rate
Layer 2 performance at a very attractive price. G7028 has 24 10/100/1000BASE-T RJ45 ports and 4 10 Gb
Ethernet SFP+ ports. It typically uses only 45 W of power, helping improve energy efficiency.
Figure 12. Lenovo RackSwitch G7028
For more information, see the RackSwitch G7028 Product Guide.
Lenovo RackSwitch G8052
The Lenovo System Networking RackSwitch G8052 (as shown in Figure 13) is an Ethernet switch that is
designed for the data center and provides a virtualized, cooler, and simpler network solution. The Lenovo
RackSwitch G8052 offers up to 48 1GbE ports and up to four 10GbE ports in a 1U footprint. The G8052 switch
is always available for business-sensitive traffic by using redundant power supplies, fans, and numerous
high-availability features.
Figure 13. Lenovo RackSwitch G8052
For more information, see the RackSwitch G8052 Product Guide.
6.2
Control Plane Nodes
The Administration Server and all Control Nodes in the SUSE OpenStack Cloud run on SUSE Linux Enterprise
Server 11 SP3. The Administration Server provides all services needed to manage and deploy all other nodes
in the cloud. If the Administration Server is not available, new cloud nodes cannot be allocated, and you cannot
add new roles to cloud nodes. The Control Node(s) run a variety of OpenStack services without which the
cloud cannot run properly. Instead of assigning these roles to individual cloud nodes, you can assign them to
several high-availability clusters. SUSE provides the option of configuring these core cloud services in a highly
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
available fashion. SUSE recommends distributing the services across three clusters with multiple nodes per
cluster. This especially includes the roles for database, OpenStack, and network services running on the
Control Node(s).
Figure 14 shows an example of Control Plane component deployment in a recommended cluster partitioning
manner for maximum scalability and highly available operations for the private cloud instance.
Figure 14. High Availability Control Plane cluster
For more information see:
•
The Administration Server
•
The Control Node(s)
•
HA Setup
Table 5 shows the Administration Server configurations.
Table 5. Administration Server configurations
CPU
Memory
Disk
Minimum
6 cores
2 GB
40 GB
Standard
8 cores
8-32 GB
>2 * 600 GB
Table 6 shows the Control Node configurations.
Table 6. Control Node console configurations
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
CPU
Memory
Storage
Minimum
12 cores
2 GB
4 GB
Standard
>24 cores
>64 GB
>2 * 600 GB
For more information about setting up the high-availability Control Nodes, see HA Setup.
6.3
Compute Nodes
The OpenStack Compute service (Nova) runs on the Compute Nodes and provides the means for setting up,
starting, and stopping virtual machines. It is accessed from the OpenStack Dashboard service. The Compute
Node(s) is the pool of machines on which the instances are running. SUSE OpenStack Cloud supports Xen,
KVM, Hyper-V, and VMware hypervisors.
These machines must be equipped with a sufficient number of CPUs and a sufficient amount of RAM and
storage to support several VMs. The Control Node effectively distributes instances within the pool of Compute
Nodes and provides the necessary network resources. Compute Nodes may run on SUSE Linux Enterprise
Server 12. A mix of Compute Nodes running SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP3 and SUSE Linux
Enterprise Server 12 is also supported. Table 7 shows Compute Node configurations.
Table 7. Compute Node configurations
CPU
Memory
Storage
Minimum
12 cores
>4 GB
30 GB
Standard
>24 cores
>128 GB
>6 * 600 GB
The physical Compute Nodes are broken down using the OpenStack’s virtual hardware templates called
“flavors,” as listed in Table 8.
Table 8. OpenStack virtual flavors
Configuration
vCPU
vRAM
Disk (root)
Storage
Tiny
1
512 MB
1 GB
0 GB
Small
1
2 GB
10 GB
20 GB
Medium
2
4 GB
10 GB
40 GB
Large
4
8 GB
10 GB
80 GB
x-Large
8
1 GB
10 GB
160 GB
However, on the specific Lenovo hardware with Intel Xeon v3 platform, this overcommit ratio must be adjusted
to following formulae:
Virtual CPU (vCPU) = Physical Cores * CPU allocation ratio 1(6:1)
1
CPU allocation ratio indicates the number of virtual cores that can be assigned to a node for each physical core. 6:1 is a balanced choice
for performance and cost effectiveness on models with Xeon E5-2600 v3 series processors.
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Virtual Memory (vRAM) = Physical Memory * (RAM allocation ratio2) * (100% - OS reserved)
Virtual Storage = RAW capacity * (RAID deduction rate)
OpenStack’s default flavors follow a CPU overcommit ratio of 16:1 and a vRAM to storage ratio of 1:10. In this
reference architecture, the CPU overcommit ratio is set to 6:1 to match the Intel Xeon v3 processors, and keep
the physical RAM to a storage ratio near the typical flavor designations for the cloud workloads, to maximize
memory utilization. Adjust the ratio as necessary to match any custom flavors if they will be the dominant type
of workload instance.
Using the formula above, calculate the usable virtual resources from a Compute Node’s hardware
configuration.
The example in Table 9 uses medium flavor and a standard System x3650 M5 Compute Node configuration:
Table 9. Example hardware configuration
Component
Virtual resource
VM density
Server
System x3650 M5
Min (60, 86,168) = 60 VM
vCPU
2 * 10 Cores * 6=120 vCPU
120/2 = 60 VM
vRAM
256 GB * 150% * (100%-10%)= 345 GB
345/4 = 86 VM
Storage space
14 * 1.2 TB with RAID-10 = 8.4 TB
8400/(10+40) = 168 VM
In most cases, the virtual machine’s boot disk is stored on the Compute Node. However, if a user chooses to
store the boot disk on the Storage Node, the demand for local storage capacity is largely reduced and only
needs space for the operating system and disk swapping.
6.4
Storage Nodes
Using virtual disks for instances and their persistent storage needs, SUSE OpenStack Cloud employs block
storage that the OpenStack Cinder module provides. Cinder itself needs a back-end storage solution. In
production environments, this is usually a network storage solution. Cinder can use a variety of network
storage back ends, among them solutions from EMC, Fujitsu, or NetApp. In this reference architecture, it is
implemented using a Ceph cluster provisioned with SUSE Enterprise Storage.
SUSE Enterprise Storage provides a reliable and quickly distributed storage architecture that uses x86
hardware platforms. Another common storage user is the Image (Glance), and Ceph can be utilized as the
backing object store for this service.
Deploying SUSE Enterprise Storage (Ceph) within SUSE OpenStack Cloud is fully supported. Deploying the
Ceph-based Storage Nodes is only supported on nodes running SLES 12. Ceph nodes can be deployed using
the same interface that all other SUSE OpenStack Cloud services use.
For large-scale installations, Lenovo recommends separating the monitor nodes from the Ceph OS Daemon
2
RAM allocation ratio is to allocate virtual resources in excess of what is physically available on a host through compression or
de-duplication technology. The hypervisor uses it to improve infrastructure utilization of the RAM allocation ratio = (virtual resource/physical
resource) formula.
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
(OSD) Storage Node. The Ceph cluster requires at least 3 nodes to meet the requirements of both odd and
minimum to start (both for the MON function, needing to be odd and 3 or more; and for the default replication of
3 OSDs). At that point, OSD/Storage Nodes can be added in any quantity, yielding a total that is either even or
odd.
Table 10 shows the Storage Node configurations.
Table 10. Storage Node configurations
CPU
Memory
Storage
Minimum
6 cores
4 GB
Standard
>8 cores
>64 GB
30 GB
>9 * 600 GB
Because the disk is directly managed by Ceph daemon, no RAID should be configured for the disks on a
Storage Node, except for on the OS disks. Storage Node configuration is dependent on the disk capacity and
disk number. For each disk it manages, it requires 2.0-2.6 GB of memory and one CPU core. For example, an
x3650 M5 with 10 HDDs needs at least 5 physical cores (10 logical cores when hyper-threading is enabled)
and 26 GB of memory.
6.5
Networking
SUSE OpenStack Cloud includes a detailed network setup consisting of several networks that are configured
during installation. Some of these networks are for exclusive inter-cloud communication, while others may be
needed to provide external inbound or outbound access. The network configuration on the nodes in the SUSE
OpenStack Cloud network is entirely controlled by the installation framework and Crowbar. Any network
configuration not done with Crowbar (for example, with YaST) will automatically be overwritten, and after the
cloud is deployed, network settings cannot be changed.
Depending upon local requirements, all of these networks may be provided on a single network physical
infrastructure, utilizing VLANs for each subnet, with either a single network interface or an interface shared
across multiple devices combined into a bonded, teamed interface. If local constraints dictate, the
administration network may also be split so that there is one network interface and others are assigned to
others in a dual-network configuration. Figure 15 shows an example network design that meets isolation,
security, and quality of service (QoS) requirements.
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Figure 15. Physical networking
The 1 GbE onboard management port is dedicated for the Integrated Management Module (IMM) and is
connected to the 1GbE RackSwitch G7028 for out-of-band management (the other 1 GbE ports are not
connected).
A dual-port 10Gb Emulex VFA5 Ethernet adapter is installed and connected to two G8124E 24-port 10GbE
Ethernet switches, and is configured in bonding mode to provide redundant networking for the Controller
Nodes, Compute Nodes, and Storage Nodes. These two G8124E switches are interconnected for load
balancing and are fault-tolerant.
Besides physical implementation, security best practices dictate that you should protect the private
administration, storage, and Software Defined Networks (SDNs) to ensure that any traffic from cloud workload
instances is not able to pass through these networks. Table 11 lists the different network types in an OpenStack
cloud deployment.
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Table 11. SUSE OpenStack Networking considerations
Network name
Network description/considerations
Admin
Private network to access the Administration Server and all nodes for
administration purposes. The default setup also lets you access and manage any
available Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) data via Intelligent Platform
Management Interface (IPMI) from this network. If required, BMC access can be
utilized on a separate network.
The following options exist for controlling access to this network:
•
Do not allow access from the outside and keep the Admin network
completely separated
•
Allow access to the Administration Server from a single network (for
example, your company’s administration network) via the “bastion
network” option configured on an additional network card with a fixed IP
address
•
Allow access from one or more networks via a gateway
Private
Private, SUSE OpenStack Cloud internal virtual network. This network is used for
(nova-fixed)
inter-instance communication and provides access to the outside world for the
instances. SUSE OpenStack Cloud automatically provides the required gateway.
Public
This is the only public network that SUSE OpenStack Cloud provides. You can
(nova-floating)
access the Nova Dashboard and all instances (provided they have been equipped
with a floating IP) on this network.
You have the following options for controlling access to this network:
Storage
•
This network can only be accessed via a gateway, which must be
provided externally
•
All SUSE OpenStack Cloud users and administrators must be able to
access the public network
Private, SUSE Cloud internal virtual network. Only Ceph and Swift use this
network. Users should not access it.
Software Defined
Private, SUSE Cloud internal virtual network. This network is used when Neutron
Network (os_sdn)
is configured to use Open vSwitch with GRE tunnelling for the virtual networks.
Users should not access it.
Figure 16 shows how different node types are associated with network namespaces in virtual networks.
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Figure 16. Logical network/VLAN segmentation
6.6
System management
In order to provide the most current features, enhancements, and security patches, it is recommended that
adequate system management tools are used to ensure compliance and consistency of your SUSE
OpenStack Cloud infrastructure. Both Lenovo and SUSE provide a number of solutions that can help maintain
and manage your Lenovo System x and SUSE OpenStack Cloud infrastructure, such as SUSE Subscription
Management Tool and SUSE Manager.
6.6.1 Lenovo XClarity
Lenovo XClarity™ Administrator is a centralized resource management solution that reduces complexity,
speeds up response, and enhances the availability of Lenovo® server systems and solutions. The Lenovo
XClarity Administrator provides agent-free hardware management for Lenovo’s System x® rack servers and
Flex System™ Compute Nodes and components, including the Chassis Management Module (CMM) and Flex
System I/O modules.
Figure 17 shows the Lenovo XClarity Administrator interface, where Flex System components and rack servers
are being managed and can be seen on the dashboard. Lenovo XClarity Administrator is a virtual appliance
that is quickly imported into the current virtualized environment server configuration.
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Figure 17. Lenovo XClarity Administrator interface
6.6.2 Subscription Management Tool (SMT) for SUSE Linux Enterprise
The Subscription Management Tool for SUSE® Linux Enterprise, a free add-on product, helps you manage
SUSE Linux Enterprise software updates while maintaining corporate firewall policy or regulatory compliance
requirements. The Subscription Management Tool is a package proxy system that is integrated with SUSE
Customer Center and provides key capabilities locally at the customer site, thus allowing a more secure
centralized deployment.
For more information, see Subscription Management Tool (SMT) for SUSE Linux Enterprise 11.3.
If you already run an SMT server within your organization, you can use it within SUSE OpenStack Cloud.
When using a remote SMT server, update repositories are served directly from the SMT server. These
repositories can be conveniently located on the SUSE OpenStack Cloud Administration Server. Alternatively,
you can deploy an SMT server directly on the SUSE OpenStack Cloud Administration Server, so that you can
update all other resource nodes in your private cloud instance from this host.
6.6.3 SUSE Manager
SUSE Manager is a single, centralized system management solution that delivers best-in-class capabilities for
comprehensively managing SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. SUSE Manager provides automated and
cost-effective software management, system provisioning, and monitoring capabilities that enable you to easily
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
manage your Linux server deployments across physical, virtual, and cloud environments. As a result, you can
decrease total cost of ownership while improving compliance and service quality.
Each client that is managed by SUSE Manager must register with the SUSE Manager server. Therefore, SUSE
Manager support can only be installed after the nodes have been deployed. All of your private cloud resource
nodes can be pointed to a SUSE Manager server for updates, and this is also true of all of your private cloud
workloads.
For more information, see SUSE Manager.
6.7
Deployment example
The Lenovo System x3650 M5, Lenovo System x3550 M5, and Lenovo ThinkServer RD550 previously
described in Section 6.1.1 can be combined into a full-rack SUSE OpenStack Cloud cluster. Figure 18 shows a
balanced configuration of compute, storage, networking, and power. Each server is using standard-type
configuration described in Section 7.2. The VM capacity is calculated on a per-host density basis. For more
information about how to estimate the VM density, see Figure 18.
Components
Capacity
Networking
10 GbE
VM capacity
480 (medium workload)
KVM and Monitor
1
Admin Server
1
Controller Nodes
3
Compute Nodes
8
Storage Nodes
3
Deployment server
1
Local storage
67 TB (RAID-10)
Local IOPS
~ 31000
(67% read, 33% write)
90 TB (with 2 replicas)
External storage
Rack layout
Figure 18. Deployment example 1: Full-rack system
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
6.8
Subscription and licensing considerations
6.8.1 SUSE subscription model
SUSE’s subscription model is based on 3 factors:
1. Term: 1-, 3-, or 5-year subscription
2. Physical or virtual
a. A physical server with 1 or 2 populated sockets requires 1 subscription for 1-2 Sockets or 1-2
virtual machines. To entitle systems with more than 2 sockets, purchase multiples of this
product. For systems that have an odd number of sockets, round up.
b. When used to entitle virtual machines, 1 subscription can be used to run 1-2 virtual machines.
To run more virtual machines, purchase multiples of the product or an unlimited subscription.
3. Support:
a. Standard (12x5)
b. Priority (24x7)
For more information, see the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Subscription Quick Reference Guide.
6.8.2 SUSE OpenStack Cloud Admin plus Control Node
For an initial installation, SUSE sells SUSE OpenStack Cloud Control Node plus Administration Server in a
single SKU. This single SKU includes:
•
One Administration Server with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server subscription
•
One Control Node with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server subscription
•
SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension entitlements
A high-availability cluster requires at least an additional two Control Nodes or an Admin plus Control Node
bundle.
For more information, see SUSE OpenStack Cloud - How to Buy.
6.8.3 SUSE OpenStack Compute Node
Each Compute Node requires a SUSE OpenStack Cloud Compute Node or SUSE OpenStack Cloud Compute
Node for a Microsoft Hyper-V subscription. An Operating System subscription or license is also required for
each Host and Guest running on the Compute Nodes. A SUSE Linux Enterprise Server subscription with
unlimited virtualization has been provided in this reference architecture. SUSE also supports Windows with
Hyper-V and VMware vSphere as hypervisors. Ensure that you follow other manufacturers’ licensing policies. If
at a future time you choose to run the Compute Nodes or individual workloads in a highly available fashion, a
SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension subscription may be required.
For more information, see SUSE OpenStack Cloud - How to Buy.
6.8.4 SUSE Enterprise Storage
SUSE has greatly reduced costs of providing enterprise storage solutions through a simplified storage model.
Each SUSE Enterprise Storage cluster requires a SUSE Enterprise Storage Base Configuration and 4 OSD
27
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Nodes with 1-2 Sockets that include the necessary entitlements for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. The base
configuration includes:
•
4 SUSE Enterprise Storage Nodes (1-2 sockets)
•
3-5 SUSE Enterprise Storage Monitor Nodes (based on redundancy needs)
•
1 SUSE Enterprise Storage Management Node
The storage environment can then be expanded based on the number of nodes (by socket pair) by adding a
SUSE Enterprise Storage Expansion Node, 1 OSD Node with 1-2 Sockets, and the required SUSE Linux
Enterprise Server subscription.
6.8.5 Sample subscription
Quantity*
Description
1
SUSE OpenStack Cloud Node plus Admin Server, x86_64, 1 Instance, Priority subscription, 1or 3-year
2 (a)
SUSE OpenStack Cloud Control Node, x86-64, 1 Instance, L3-Priority subscription, 1- or 3year
3 (b)
SUSE OpenStack Cloud Compute Node, x86-64, 1-2 Sockets, L3-Priority subscription, 1- or 3year
3 (b)
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, x86 and x86-64, 1-2 Sockets with Unlimited Virtual Machines,
Priority subscription, 1- or 3-year
1
SUSE Enterprise Storage Base Configuration, x86-64, 4 OSD Nodes with 1-2 Sockets, Priority
subscription, 1- or 3-year
1 (c)
SUSE Enterprise Storage Expansion Node, x86-64, 1 OSD Node with 1-2 Sockets, Priority
subscription, 1- or 3-year
1 (c)
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, x86 and x86-64, 1-2 Sockets (1-2 Virtual Machines), Priority
subscription, 1- or 3-year
*Possible quantity adjustments:
28
•
(a) increase, if needed, with the number of additional Control Nodes, beyond the first two
•
(b) increase, if needed, with the number of additional Compute Nodes, beyond the three cited
•
(c) add for each Storage Node beyond the first four that are included
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
7 Deployment considerations
7.1
Preparation
As with any large deployment effort, preparation is critical to success. This reference architecture provides a
validated Bill of Materials (BOM) for both Lenovo ThinkServer and Lenovo System x hardware, but care should
be taken to prepare both the server and network hardware. Preparation should include:
•
Reviewing the SUSE OpenStack Cloud Deployment Guide
•
Ensuring that you have consistent and up-to-date firmware releases for server and networking
components
•
Ensuring that ThinkServer and Lenovo System x systems have PXE-capable network interfaces
available for those assigned to the Admin network (disabling PXE boot for other NICs is encouraged)
•
Using BIOS/legacy boot mode
•
Preparing a repository for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server with the most recent patches
•
Planning, configuring, and validating network topology and vLANs
7.2
Server configuration
Figure 19shows the SUSE OpenStack Cloud Administration Server web interface, with an example set of all
node types that are deployed.
Figure 19. SUSE OpenStack Cloud Administration Server web interface
29
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
7.3
Best practices
This section lists SUSE best practices for implementing a solution.
•
Before implementing the solution, make sure to measure actual workload resource usage and adjust
the memory or disks accordingly to avoid imbalanced resource utilization.
•
Uniformity in the type and ordering of storage devices greatly simplifies assignment of the various
OpenStack services and yields optimal performance. Likewise, having the same type and ordering of
network interfaces means less manual work on the software configurations that are necessary to map
to these devices.
•
Use the prepopulated SUSE OpenStack Cloud Administration Appliance with all of the necessary
SUSE Linux Enterprise media and software repositories in order to rapidly deploy SUSE OpenStack
Cloud in PoC stage (available via SUSE Studio).
•
Before proceeding with SUSE Cloud setup, it is imperative that all the software repositories are
mirrored and available on the SUSE OpenStack Cloud Administration Server.
•
Configure a multi-partition setup with a smaller boot partition for automated installation of the operating
system on the resource nodes.
•
Because SUSE OpenStack Cloud is configured to always use all unused disks (beyond the first disk,
which is assigned to the operating system), make sure to verify that all of the Compute Node’s
resources are accurately reflected in the inventory before allocating the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server
12-target platform.
30
•
To allow for planned maintenance or unplanned failures, provide enough physical server resources to
handle all VMs in an N-1 configuration.
•
Before planned maintenance, evacuate the instances on the server and gracefully shut down all
running services to avoid inconsistent states or data corruption.
•
Connect two switches using the inter-switch link (ISL) protocol. The number of ports for inter-switch
connection should be at least two.
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
8 Appendix: Lenovo Bill of Materials
This appendix contains the Bill of Materials (BOM) for tested and validated hardware configurations (either
ThinkServer or System x based) for SUSE OpenStack Cloud deployments. There are sections for
Administration Server, Controller Nodes, Compute Nodes, Storage Nodes, networking, and rack options, as
well as license options for SUSE software.
8.1
ThinkServer BOM
This section contains the BOM for the SuSE Cloud configuration using the Lenovo ThinkServers.
Note: The BOM listings for the individual server roles shown below are only for single instances of a respective
server. Depending upon the specific type of SuSE Cloud implementation, i.e. HA or non-HA, you should match
the quantities of the servers as described in the deployment scenarios section.
8.1.1 Administration Server
Part
Description
Quantity
70CV001EUX
ThinkServer RD550, Intel® Xeon® E5-2640v3 (2.6GHz, 20M, 8C, 90W), 1x
1
8 GB 2133MHz DDR4 RDIMM, 4 x 3.5" HS, RAID 510i, 750W Platinum
PSU
4X70F28589
Lenovo ThinkServer 8 GB DDR4-2133MHz (1Rx4) RDIMM
3
4XB0G88745
LTS Gen 5 3.5" 1.2 TB 10K Enterprise SAS 6Gbps Hot-Swap Hard Drive
2
4XC0F28734
Lenovo ThinkServer X520-DA2 PCIe 10Gb 2 Port SFP+ Ethernet Adapter
1
by Intel
8.1.2 Controller Node
Part
Description
Quantity
70CV001EUX
ThinkServer RD550, Intel® Xeon® E5-2640v3 (2.6GHz, 20M, 8C, 90W), 1x
1
8 GB 2133MHz DDR4 RDIMM, 4 x 3.5" HS, RAID 510i, 750W Platinum
PSU
4XG0F28800
Lenovo ThinkServer RD550 Intel Xeon E5-2640 v3 (8C, 90W, 2.6GHz)
1
Processor Option Kit
4X70F28589
Lenovo ThinkServer 8 GB DDR4-2133MHz (1Rx4) RDIMM
3
4XB0F28692
Lenovo ThinkServer RAID 510i RAID 5 Upgrade
1
4XB0G88740
Lenovo ThinkServer Gen 5 3.5" 300 GB 15K Enterprise SAS 12Gbps
3
Hot-Swap Hard Drive
4XC0F28734
Lenovo ThinkServer X520-DA2 PCIe 10Gb 2 Port SFP+ Ethernet Adapter
by Intel
31
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
1
8.1.3 Compute Node (VM images are stored on Storage Nodes)
Part
Description
Quantity
70CV001FUX
ThinkServer RD550, Intel® Xeon® E5-2650v3 (2.3GHz, 25M, 10C, 105W),
1
1 x 8 GB 2133MHz DDR4 RDIMM, 4 x 3.5" HS, RAID 510i, 750W Platinum
PSU
4XG0F28799
Lenovo ThinkServer RD550 Intel Xeon E5-2650 v3 (10C, 105W, 2.3GHz)
1
Processor Option Kit
4X70F28589
Lenovo ThinkServer 8 GB DDR4-2133MHz (1Rx4) RDIMM
15
4XB0G88740
Lenovo ThinkServer Gen 5 3.5" 300 GB 15K Enterprise SAS 12Gbps
2
Hot-Swap Hard Drive
4XC0F28734
Lenovo ThinkServer X520-DA2 PCIe 10Gb 2 Port SFP+ Ethernet Adapter
1
by Intel
8.1.4 Storage Node
Part
Description
Quantity
70D4000CUX
ThinkServer RD650, Intel® Xeon® E5-2620v3 (2.4GHz, 15M, 6C, 85W), 1
1
x 8 GB 2133MHz DDR4 RDIMM), 15 x 3.5" HS/2.5" SSD, RAID 720ix w/1
GB DRAM, 1100W Platinum PSU
4XG0F28819
Lenovo ThinkServer RD650 Intel Xeon E5-2620 v3 (6C, 85W, 2.4GHz)
1
Processor Option Kit
4X70F28589
Lenovo ThinkServer 8 GB DDR4-2133MHz (1Rx4) RDIMM
7
4XB0F28697
Lenovo ThinkServer RAID 720i 2 GB Modular Flash and Supercapacitor
1
Upgrade
4XB0G88740
Lenovo ThinkServer Gen 5 3.5" 6 TB 7.2K Enterprise SATA 6Gbps HS HDD
12
4XF0G45877
Lenovo ThinkServer Gen 5 2.5" 2-Drive Rear Backplane Kit
1
4XB0G45733
Lenovo ThinkServer Gen 5 3.5" 200 GB Enterprise Performance SAS
2
12Gbps Hot-Swap Solid State Drive
4XC0F28734
Lenovo ThinkServer X520-DA2 PCIe 10Gb 2 Port SFP+ Ethernet Adapter
by Intel
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Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
1
8.2
System x Servers BOM
The following section contains the BOM for the SuSE Cloud implementation using Lenovo System x Servers.
Note: The BOM listings for individual server roles shown below are only for single instances of the respective
server. Depending upon the specific type of SuSE Cloud implementation, i.e. HA or non-HA, you should match
the quantities of the servers as described in the deployment scenarios section.
8.2.1 Administration Server
Part
Description
Quantity
5463F2x
Lenovo System x3550 M5, Xeon 8C E5-2640v3 90W 2.6GHz/1866MHz/20 MB,
1
1x16 GB, O/Bay HS 2.5in SATA/SAS, SR M5210, 550W p/s, Rack
00AJ146
1.2 TB 10K 6Gbps SAS 2.5-inch SFF G3HS HDD
2
8.2.2 Controller Node
Part
Description
Quantity
5463F2x
Lenovo System x3550 M5, Xeon 8C E5-2640v3 90W 2.6GHz/1866MHz/20 MB,
1
1x16 GB, O/Bay HS 2.5in SATA/SAS, SR M5210, 550W p/s, Rack
00KA069
Intel Xeon Processor E5-2640 v3 8C 2.6G 20 MB 1866MHz 90W
1
46W0796
16 GB TruDDR4 Memory (2Rx4, 1.2V) PC3-17000 CL152133MHz LP RDIMM
3
47C8664
ServeRAID M5200 Series 2 GB Flash/RAID 5 Upgrade for Lenovo System x
1
00AJ081
300 GB 15k 6Gbps SAS 2.5-" SFF G3HS HDD
3
00D1996
Emulex VFA5 ML2 Dual Port 10GbE SFP+ Adapter for Lenovo System x
1
90Y9430
3m Passive DAC SFP+ Cable
2
8.2.3 Compute Node (VMs are stored on Compute Nodes)
Part
Description
Quantity
5462G2x
Lenovo System x3650 M5, Xeon 10C E5-2650v3 105W, 2.3GHz/2133MHz/25
1
MB, 1x16 GB, O/Bay HS 2.5" SATA/SAS, SR M5210, 550W p/s, Rack
00FK645
Intel Xeon Processor E5-2650 v3 10C 2.3GHz 25 MB 2133MHz 105W
1
46W0796
16 GB TruDDR4 Memory (2Rx4, 1.2V) PC3-17000 CL152133MHz LP RDIMM
15
47C8712
ServeRAID M5200 Series SSD Caching Enabler
1
00AJ156
S3700 200 GB SATA 2.5in MLC G3HS Enterprise SSD
2
00NA301
1.2 TB 10K 12Gbps SAS 2.5" G3HS 512e HDD
14
00D1996
Emulex VFA5 ML2 Dual Port 10GbE SFP+ Adapter for Lenovo System x
1
33
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
90Y9430
3m Passive DAC SFP+ Cable
2
8.2.4 Compute Node (high-performance configuration)
Part
Description
Quantity
5463J2x
Lenovo System x3550 M5, Xeon 12C E5-2680v3 120W, 2.5GHz/2133MHz/30
1
MB, 1x16 GB, O/Bay HS 2.5" SATA/SAS, SR M5210, 750W p/s, Rack
00KA075
Intel Xeon Processor E5-2680 v3 12C 2.5G 30 MB 2133MHz 105W
1
46W0796
16 GB TruDDR4 Memory (2Rx4, 1.2V) PC3-17000 CL15 2133MHz LP RDIMM
23
47C8664
ServeRAID M5200 Series 2 GB Flash/RAID 5 Upgrade for Lenovo System x
1
00FN389
Lenovo 400 GB 12G SAS 2.5" MLC G3HS Enterprise SSD
4
00D1996
Emulex VFA5 ML2 Dual Port 10GbE SFP+ Adapter for Lenovo System x
1
90Y9430
3m Passive DAC SFP+ Cable
2
8.2.5 Storage Node
Part
Description
Quantity
5462D4x
Lenovo System x3650 M5, Xeon 8C E5-2630v3 85W 2.4GHz/1866MHz/20 MB,
1
1x16 GB, O/Bay HS 3.5in SATA/SAS, SR M5210, 750W p/s, Rack
46W0796
16 GB TruDDR4 Memory (2Rx4, 1.2V) PC3-17000 CL152133MHz LP RDIMM
3
47C8664
ServeRAID M5200 Series 2 GB Flash/RAID 5 Upgrade for Lenovo System x
1
00FN173
6 TB 7.2K 6Gbps NL SATA 3.5in G2HS 512e HDD
12
00D1996
Emulex VFA5 ML2 Dual Port 10GbE SFP+ Adapter for Lenovo System x
1
00FN379
Lenovo 200 GB 12G SAS 2.5" MLC G3HS Enterprise SSD
2
00FK658
System x3650 M5 Rear 2x 2.5" HDD Kit
1
90Y9430
3m Passive DAC SFP+ Cable
2
34
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
8.3
Networking
This section contains the BOM for different types of networking switches.
8.3.1 G7028 1GbE Networking
Part
Description
Quantity
7159BAX
Lenovo RackSwitch G7028 (Rear to Front)
1
39Y7938
2.8m, 10A/100-250V, C13 to IEC 320-C20 Rack Power Cable
2
8.3.2 G8124E 1GbE Networking
Part
Description
Quantity
7159BR6
Lenovo RackSwitch G8124E (Rear to Front)
2
39Y7938
2.8m, 10A/100-250V, C13 to IEC 320-C20 Rack Power Cable
4
90Y9427
1m Passive DAC SFP+ Cable
2
8.3.3 Console
Part
Description
Quantity
1754D1X
Global 2X2X16 Console Manager (GCM16)
1
43V6147
USB Conversion Option (UCO)
16
17238BX
1U 18.5" Standard Console Kit
1
8.4
Racks
This section contains the BOM for the rack.
Part
Description
Quantity
93084PX
Lenovo 42U Enterprise Rack
1
46M4119
IBM 0U 24 C13 Switched and Monitored 32A PDU
2
35
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
8.5
SUSE software licenses
This section contains the BOM for software licenses for different types of servers.
8.5.1 Administration Server
Part
Description
Quantity
00JY341
Lenovo XClarity Administrator, per managed server w/3-year SW S&S
1
00YC090
SUSE OpenStack Cloud Admin Node + Control Node, 1-2 Socket, 1-year
1
00YC091
SUSE OpenStack Cloud Admin Node + Control Node, 1-2 Socket, 3-year
1
8.5.2 Control Node
Part
Description
Quantity
00YC080
SUSE OpenStack Cloud Control Node, 1-2 Socket, 1-year
2
00YC081
SUSE OpenStack Cloud Control Node, 1-2 Socket, 3-year
2
8.5.3 Compute Node
Part
Description
Quantity
00YC092
SUSE OpenStack Cloud Compute Node, 1-2 Socket, 1-year
3
00YC009
3
3
00YC093
SUSE OpenStack Cloud Compute Node, 1-2 Socket, 3-year
3
00YC010
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, 1-2 Sockets, Unlimited VMs, 3-year
3
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, 1-2 Sockets, Unlimited VMs, 1-year
8.5.4 Storage Node
Part
Description
Quantity
00YC106
SUSE Enterprise Storage Base Configuration, 1-2 Socket, 1-year
14
00YC108
SUSE Enterprise Storage Expansion Node, 1-2 Sockets, 1-year
1
00YC006
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, 1-2 Sockets, 1-year
1
00YC107
SUSE Enterprise Storage Base Configuration, 1-2 Socket, 3-year
1
00YC109
SUSE Enterprise Storage Expansion Node, 1-2 Socket, 3-year
1
00YC007
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, 1-2 Sockets, Unlimited VMs, 3-year
1
3
Operating System subscription or license required for host and guests running on Compute Nodes. Follow provider licensing rules.
4
Only one needed for each storage cluster in the cloud.
36
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Resources
•
OpenStack Project:
openstack.org
•
OpenStack Operations Guide:
docs.openstack.org/ops/
•
Lenovo System x3650 M5:
lenovopress.com/tips1193
•
Lenovo System x3550 M5:
lenovopress.com/tips1194
•
Lenovo ThinkServer RD550:
lenovopress.com/tips1248-thinkserver-rd550
•
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server:
suse.com/products/server/
suse.com/documentation/sles11/index.html
suse.com/documentation/sles-12/index.html
•
SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension:
suse.com/products/highavailability/
suse.com/documentation/sle_ha/index.html
•
SUSE OpenStack Cloud
suse.com/products/suse-cloud/
suse.com/documentation/suse-cloud-5/
suse.com/documentation/sle-ha-12/index.html
•
SUSE Enterprise Storage:
suse.com/products/suse-enterprise-storage/
suse.com/documentation/ses-1/index.html
•
SUSE Manager:
suse.com/products/suse-manager/
suse.com/documentation/suse_manager/index.html
•
SUSE Subscription Management Tool:
suse.com/documentation/smt11/index.html
37
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
Trademarks and special notices
© Copyright Lenovo 2015.
References in this document to Lenovo products or services do not imply that Lenovo intends to make them
available in every country.
Lenovo, the Lenovo logo, ThinkServer, ThinkCentre, ThinkVision, ThinkVantage, ThinkPlus and Rescue and
Recovery are trademarks of Lenovo.
IBM, the IBM logo, and ibm.com are trademarks or registered trademarks of International Business Machines
Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both.
Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT, and the Windows logo are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United
States, other countries, or both.
Intel, Intel Inside (logos), MMX, and Pentium are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States, other
countries, or both.
Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.
Information is provided "AS IS" without warranty of any kind.
All customer examples described are presented as illustrations of how those customers have used Lenovo
products and the results they may have achieved. Actual environmental costs and performance characteristics
may vary by customer.
Information concerning non-Lenovo products was obtained from a supplier of these products, published
announcement material, or other publicly available sources and does not constitute an endorsement of such
products by Lenovo. Sources for non-Lenovo list prices and performance numbers are taken from publicly
available information, including vendor announcements and vendor worldwide homepages. Lenovo has not
tested these products and cannot confirm the accuracy of performance, capability, or any other claims related
to non-Lenovo products. Questions on the capability of non-Lenovo products should be addressed to the
supplier of those products.
All statements regarding Lenovo future direction and intent are subject to change or withdrawal without notice,
and represent goals and objectives only. Contact your local Lenovo office or Lenovo authorized reseller for the
full text of the specific Statement of Direction.
Some information addresses anticipated future capabilities. Such information is not intended as a definitive
statement of a commitment to specific levels of performance, function or delivery schedules with respect to any
future products. Such commitments are only made in Lenovo product announcements. The information is
presented here to communicate Lenovo’s current investment and development activities as a good faith effort
to help with our customers' future planning.
Performance is based on measurements and projections using standard Lenovo benchmarks in a controlled
environment. The actual throughput or performance that any user will experience will vary depending upon
considerations such as the amount of multiprogramming in the user's job stream, the I/O configuration, the
storage configuration, and the workload processed. Therefore, no assurance can be given that an individual
user will achieve throughput or performance improvements equivalent to the ratios stated here.
Photographs shown are of engineering prototypes. Changes may be incorporated in production models.
Any references in this information to non-Lenovo websites are provided for convenience only and do not in any
manner serve as an endorsement of those websites. The materials at those websites are not part of the
materials for this Lenovo product and use of those websites is at your own risk.
38
Reference Architecture for SUSE OpenStack Cloud
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