2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog

2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog
Nova Southeastern University
Undergraduate Student
Catalog
2010–2011
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Fischler School of Education and Human Services
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and
Entrepreneurship
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

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Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

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Nova Southeastern University
Undergraduate Student Catalog
2010–2011
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Fischler School of Education and Human Services
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and
Entrepreneurship
The Nova Southeastern University Undergraduate Student Catalog is a resource for information about academic program
and curriculum requirements, academic policies, procedures for resolving academic and administrative grievances, course
descriptions, and other information relevant to an undergraduate career at Nova Southeastern University (NSU).
The NSU Undergraduate Student Catalog is published twice each year, in the fall and winter semesters. This catalog is
comprised of information pertaining to undergraduate students of the College of Allied Health and Nursing; the Farquhar
College of Arts and Sciences; the Fischler School of Education and Human Services; and the H. Wayne Huizenga School
of Business and Entrepreneurship. Students are bound by policies published in the catalog in effect the semester they enter
the university, unless an agreement is made with appropriate NSU administration officials allowing them to abide by policies
published in a later catalog. Policies and requirements, including fees, are subject to change without notice at any time at the
discretion of the NSU administration. NSU reserves the right to change curriculum, course structure, calendar, graduation
requirements, and costs during the life of this publication. Students are also bound by the NSU Student Handbook and
should be familiar with its contents.
The NSU Undergraduate Student Catalog is published by the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences Office of Information
Services (OIS). For questions and comments about the catalog, contact:
Office of Information Services
Nova Southeastern University
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-8185
Fax: (954) 262-7085
Email: ois@nsu.nova.edu
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

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Nondiscrimination Statement
Consistent with all federal and state laws, rules, regulations, and/or local ordinances (e.g. Title VII, Title VI, Title III, Title II,
Rehab Act, ADA, Title IX), it is the policy of Nova Southeastern University not to engage in discrimination or harassment
against any persons because of race, color, religion or creed, sex, pregnancy, national or ethnic origin, nondisqualifying
disability, age, ancestry, marital status, sexual orientation, unfavorable discharge from the military, veteran status, political
beliefs or affiliations, and to comply with all federal and state nondiscrimination, equal opportunity and affirmative action
laws, orders, and regulations.
This nondiscrimination policy applies to admissions, enrollment, scholarships, loan programs, athletics, employment, and
access to, participation in, and treatment in all university centers, programs, and activities. NSU admits students of any race,
color, religion or creed, sex, pregnancy, national or ethnic origin, nondisqualifying disability, age, ancestry, marital status,
sexual orientation, unfavorable discharge from the military, veteran status, political beliefs or affiliations, and activities
generally accorded or made available to students at NSU and does not discriminate in the administration of its educational
policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school administered programs.
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NSU Accreditations
Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097, Telephone number: (404) 679-4501) to award associate’s,
bachelor’s, master’s, educational specialist, and doctoral degrees. Nova Southeastern University was first accredited by the
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) as Nova University in 1971.
The Bachelor of Health Science–Vascular Sonography Program is accredited by the Commission for the Accreditation of
Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), (1361 Park Street, Clearwater, Florida 33756, Telephone number: (727) 2102350). CAAHEP is the largest programmatic accreditor in the health sciences field. In collaboration with its Committees on
Accreditation, CAAHEP reviews and accredits nearly 2,000 educational programs in nineteen health science occupations.
CAAHEP is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (www.chea.org).
The NSU Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program is accredited as of April 8, 2006, for a period of 5 years by the Commission
on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), (One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, D.C. 20036-1120, Telephone
number: (202) 887-6791). The Nova Southeastern University Baccalaureate Nursing Program is also accredited by the
National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, Inc. (NLNAC), (61 Broadway, 33rd Floor, New York, New York 10006,
Telephone number: 800-669-1656).
The Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP) in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences Division of Math, Science, and
Technology, is accredited from the Commission of Athletic Training Education (CAATE), (2201 Double Creek Drive, Suite
5006, Round Rock, Texas 78664, Telephone number: (512) 733-9700). The CAATE accredits athletic training programs
upon the recommendation of the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. The CAATE provides peer
review of the program’s educational content based on educational standards adopted by national medical and allied health
professional organizations.
The Bachelor of Science in Paralegal Studies Program in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences’ Division of Social and
Behavioral Sciences is approved by the American Bar Association, (321 North Clark Street, Chicago, IL 60610, Telephone
number: 800-285-2221).
The NSU Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education, Exceptional Student Education, Prekindergarten/Primary Education,
Secondary Biology Education, and Secondary Mathematics Education Programs are state-approved, initial teacher
preparation programs.
Bachelor’s degree programs offered in a variety of fields of business and administration by the H. Wayne Huizenga School
of Business and Entrepreneurship are accredited by the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education (IACBE),
(11403 Strang Line Road, Lenexa, Kansas 66215, Telephone number: (913) 631-3009).
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NSU Memberships
Nova Southeastern University is a member of the following organizations:
American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE)
American Association for Higher Education (AAHE)
American Council on Education (ACE)
Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business
Association of American Colleges and Universities
Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB)
Association of Independent Schools of Florida (AISF)
Association for Institutional Research (AIR)
Coalition of Essential Schools (CES)
College Board (CB)
Commission for Independent Education
Conference of Southern Graduate Schools (CSGS)
Council of Graduate Schools (CGS)
Council of Independent Colleges (CIC)
Educational Records Bureau (ERB)
Florida Association of Colleges and Universities (FACU)
Florida Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (FACRAO)
Florida Council of Independent Schools (FCIS)
Foundation for Independent Higher Education (FIHE)
Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU)
Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida (ICUF)
NAFSA: Association of International Educators
National Association of College and University Attorneys (NACUA)
National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO)
National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)
National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS)
National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA)
Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Southeast Florida Career Consortium of Private Universities (SFCC)
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS)
Southern Association of Colleges and University Business Officers (SACUBO)
Southern Regional Education Board’s Electronic Campus (SREC)
University Continuing Education Association (UCES)
www.aacte.org
www.aahe.org
www.acenet.edu
www.aacsb.edu
www.aacu-edu.org
www.agb.org
www.aisfl.com
www.airweb.org
www.essentialschools.org
www.collegeboard.com
www.firn.edu/doe/cie
www.csgs.org
www.cgsnet.org
www.cic.edu
www.erbtest.org
www.facuflorida.com
www.facrao.org
www.fcis.org
www.fihe.org
www.hacu.net
www.icuf.org
www.nafsa.org
www.nacua.org
www.nacubo.org
www.naicu.edu
www.nais.org
www.naspaa.org
www.scup.org
www.stu.edu/orgs/mainframe.html
www.sacs.org
www.sacubo.org
www.electroniccampus.org
www.ucea.edu
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Nova Southeastern University
Undergraduate Student Catalog
2010–2011
Table of Contents
Nondiscrimination Statement���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������4
NSU Accreditations������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������5
NSU Memberships�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������6
Table of Contents���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������7
Letter from the Chancellor������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������10
NSU Mission Statement��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 11
Board of Trustees�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������12
Overview of Undergraduate Studies at NSU��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������13
Formats of Study��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������17
University History�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������18
Campus Facilities�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������18
Academic Calendars��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������19
Exam Schedules��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������26
Undergraduate Correspondence Directory����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������32
NSU Campus Locations���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������35
NSU Student Educational Centers/Instructional Sites�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������36
NSU Health Care Clinics��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������37
Admissions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������39
General Admission Information����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������40
Admission Procedures and Requirements�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������41
Special Programs�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������44
Special Circumstances�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������46
Concurrent Enrollment�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������49
Delayed Enrollment and Reapplication for Admission�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������49
Transfer Credits����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������49
Assessment of Prior Experiences for Academic Credit����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������50
Academic Resources and Procedures�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������53
Academic Advising�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������55
Academic Requirements and Progress����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������56
Academic Requirements—New Students������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������61
Academic Requirements—Writing Across the Curriculum�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������61
Address and Name Changes�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������61
Attendance Policy������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������62
Auditing a Course�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������63
Clinic Exploration Program (CEP)������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������63
Course Credits—Application Toward Multiple Requirements�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������64
Course Delivery����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������64
Course Evaluations����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������65
Declaring and Changing Majors, Minors, and Programs�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������65
Disability Services������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������66
Dropping and Adding Classes������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������67
Dual Admission Programs������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������69
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Enrollment at Other Universities��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������70
Financial Aid���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������71
General Education Program���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������73
Grading System���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������81
Graduation—Degrees, Diplomas, and Commencement��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������85
Graduation Requirements������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������87
Honor Societies and Academic Organizations�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������89
Honors Program���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������93
Internships������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������93
NSU Student Handbook���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������94
Office of Academic Services (OAS)���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������94
Online Course Access and SharkLink������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������95
Orientation������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������96
Pre-Degree Granting Programs���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������96
Problem Resolution Procedures��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������97
Registration��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������100
Repeated Courses���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������102
Scholarships and Grants for Undergraduate Students��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������102
Student Conduct—Academic Integrity��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 112
Student Conduct—NSU Code of Student Conduct�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 114
Technical Help���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 119
Travel Study Programs��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 119
Tuition and Fees�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������121
Veterans’ Benefits����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������127
Withdrawal from Classes�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������129
Withdrawal from the University and Leaves of Absence������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������131
College of Allied Health and Nursing�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������135
Dean’s Message������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������137
Health Professions Division Board of Governors�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������137
Health Professions Division Mission Statement�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������138
College of Allied Health and Nursing Mission Statement�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������138
Introduction to the College of Allied Health and Nursing������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������139
Notice on Professional Examinations�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������139
HPD Library��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������139
HPD Policies and Procedures����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������140
Department of Health Science���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������146
Computer Requirements������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������146
Majors in Health Science�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������146
Nursing Department�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������153
Mission Statement����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������153
Core Values��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������153
Eligibility for Florida R.N. Licensure and Required Disclosure���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������153
Florida Nursing Students Association����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������154
Health Forms (Student Health Records)������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������154
Health Insurance������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������154
Liability (Malpractice) Insurance�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������154
Textbooks and Supplies�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������154
Majors in Nursing�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������155
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������161
Dean’s Message������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������163
Mission Statement����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������163
Introduction to the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������164
Division of Humanities����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������165
Majors in Humanities������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������165
Minors in Humanities������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������176
Division of Math, Science, and Technology��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������184
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Majors in Math, Science, and Technology����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������184
Minors in Math, Science, and Technology����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������198
Certificates in Math, Science, and Technology��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������205
Division of Performing and Visual Arts���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������207
Majors in Performing and Visual Arts�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������207
Minors in Performing and Visual Arts�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������214
Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������216
Majors in Social and Behavioral Sciences���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������216
Minors in Social and Behavioral Sciences���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������222
Certificates in Social and Behavioral Sciences��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������228
Fischler School of Education and Human Services�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������231
Education Provost’s Message����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������233
FSEHS Mission Statement���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������233
Ahead of the Curve��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������234
State Disclosures�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������234
Meeting Facilities�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������234
Certification/Licensure����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������235
Certification Through Course-by-Course Analysis by the Florida Department of Education������������������������������������������235
Dress Code��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������236
Form and Style Guidelines for Student Writing��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������236
Undergraduate Programs in Education��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������237
Associate of Arts Program����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������237
Bachelor of Science Undergraduate Teacher Education Program (UTEP)��������������������������������������������������������������������239
Majors in Education��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������247
Minors����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������266
Add-on Endorsements���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������267
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship����������������������������������������������������������������������������������269
Dean’s Message������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������271
Vision�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������272
Mission���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������272
Philosophy����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������272
Principles������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������272
Ethics Across the Curriculum Policy�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������273
Introduction to the H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship������������������������������������������������������273
Business Programs��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������274
Business Programs Learning Goals�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������274
Majors in Business���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������274
Minors in Business���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������284
Interdisciplinary Programs����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������289
Interdisciplinary Programs����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������290
Course Descriptions��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������299
Course Descriptions�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������301
Administration, Faculty, and Staff Listings��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������405
Office of Undergraduate Admissions������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������407
College of Allied Health and Nursing������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������409
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������412
Fischler School of Education and Human Services�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������423
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship������������������������������������������������������������������������������������431
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Letter from the Chancellor
As chancellor of Nova Southeastern University, I welcome you to our family, whether you are a
full-time student or a working professional joining us part-time or online from another part of the
world. With the help of NSU, you will build the skills necessary to get ahead and stay ahead in
your chosen field, while making a significant contribution to your community and society as a
whole.
NSU is Florida’s largest independent university, based on enrollment, and the seventh largest
independent not-for-profit institution of higher education in the United States. In 1967, NSU
served an entire student body of 17 from one building. Today, we have more than 29,000 students
enrolled in 17 academic centers, with programs offered in virtually every state and many foreign
countries. The university boasts more than 128,000 alumni worldwide.
The NSU learning environment focuses on providing students with high quality educational
opportunities—on campus or off. In our pursuit of excellence, the university holds to certain values
including collaboration, community service, diversity, educational access, entrepreneurship, innovation, and integrity. Each
year, we incorporate new academic programs, encouraging our colleges, schools, and centers to approach ideas and
issues from a multidisciplinary perspective.
The College of Allied Health and Nursing, Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences, Fischler School of Education and
Human Services, and H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship share a commitment to providing
undergraduate students with academic excellence. These colleges and schools offer a diverse spectrum of undergraduate
majors representing the humanities, math, business, and nursing, as well as the social, physical, biological, and health
sciences. In each of these programs, the practical, reality-based curriculum focuses on building strong critical thinking,
communication, research, and clinical skills.
Our educational values are also supported by outstanding campus facilities, ensuring that students have access to stateof-the-art classrooms, laboratories, libraries, and health clinics. NSU is home to the largest library building in the state of
Florida. The stunningly modern 325,000-square-foot Alvin Sherman Library, Research, and Information Technology Center
offers full collections of research materials, specialized databases, popular fiction and nonfiction books, magazines and
journals, CDs, and DVDs. You’ll also find comfortable reading areas, private study rooms, an exhibition gallery, and a oneof-a-kind creation by famed glass artist Dale Chihuly. The Don Taft University Center, a 300,000 square-foot recreation,
athletic, and performing arts complex, provides a focal point for life on our main campus. These facilities translate into an
atmosphere of achievement where our students continue to find the education and preparation they need to compete in the
dynamic, technology-intensive workplace.
Along with your membership to the NSU community comes many rights and responsibilities. This catalog outlines these
rights and responsibilities, university policies and procedures, and university resources. We look forward to a lifelong
partnership with you, our student.
Ray Ferrero, Jr., J.D.
Ray Ferrero, Jr., J.D.
Chancellor, Nova Southeastern University
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NSU Mission Statement
Nova Southeastern University, a private, not-for-profit institution, offers quality academic programs at the undergraduate,
graduate, and professional levels, complementing on-campus educational opportunities and resources with accessible
distance learning programs, and fostering intellectual inquiry, leadership, and commitment to community through engagement
of students and faculty in a dynamic, life-long learning environment.
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Board of Trustees
Ronald G. Assaf, Chair, Retired Founder and Chairman, Sensormatic Electronics Corp.
Barry J. Silverman, M.D., Vice Chair, Orthopedic Surgeon
Ray Ferrero, Jr., J.D., Chancellor, Nova Southeastern University
W. Tinsley Ellis, J.D., Secretary, Attorney, Ellis, Spencer & Butler
Mitchell W. Berger, J.D., Berger Singerman Law Firm, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Keith A, Brown, President & CEO, Chimera, Inc., Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Rick Case, President & CEO, Rick Case Acura
Andrew J. DiBattista, President, Regional Consultants, Inc.
R. Douglas Donn, Chairman, Community Bank
Arthur J. Falcone, CEO & Co-Chairman Falcone Group, Boca Raton, Florida
Sylvia M. Flores, M.D., Internist, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
David W. Horvitz, Chairman, WLD Enterprises, Inc. Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
H. Wayne Huizenga, Chairman, Huizenga Holdings, Inc.
Royal F. Jonas, J.D., Attorney, Jonas & Jonas
Milton Jones, CEO, Regal Trace, Ltd.
Alan B. Levan, Chair & CEO, Bank Atlantic Bancorp
Nell McMillan Lewis, Ed.D., Rumbaugh-Goodwin Institute, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Thomas E. Lynch, President, The Plastridge, Delray Beach, Florida
Joseph R. Millsaps, Realtor, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Albert J. Miniaci, Alfred & Rose Miniaci Foundation, Paramount Coffee Service
Samuel F. Morrison, Former Director, Broward County Library System, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Paul M. Sallarulo, President, Alumni Association, Senior VP – Investments, Alinian Capital Group, LLC, Ft. Lauderdale,
Florida
Richard D. Segal, President & CEO, Seavest, Inc., White Plains, New York
E. Clay Shaw, Former Congressman, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Franklin L. Smith, Ed.D., Vice President, Urban Initiatives Edusoft, Inc.
J. Kenneth Tate, CEO, TKO Apparel, Inc.
Zachariah P. Zachariah, M.D., Cardiologist, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Ex Officio
George I. Platt, J.D., Chair, Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences Board of Advisors, Managing Partner, Shutts & Bowen
LLP, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Martin R. Press, Esq., Chair, Shepard Broad Law Center Board of Governors, Gunster Yoakley & Stewart, P.A., Ft.
Lauderdale, Florida
Michael Zager, Chair, University School Headmaster’s Advisory Board
Honorary Trustee
Hamilton C. Forman
President Emeritus
Abraham S. Fischler, Ed.D.
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Overview of Undergraduate Studies at NSU
Undergraduate courses at NSU emphasize high-quality instruction, small class size, and personal attention from an accomplished
faculty of noted researchers, published authors, journal editors, and consultants. In addition to close faculty-student relationships,
the university provides resources outside the classroom to help NSU undergraduates achieve their academic goals.
All undergraduate students at NSU undertake comprehensive general education coursework within the realms of
composition, mathematics, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and biological and physical sciences. In addition to
general education requirements, the Writing Across the Curriculum initiative requires that written assignments make up at
least 25 percent of the final grade for each course.
Majors are offered in a variety of formats, including day, evening, online, or off-campus programs. Students should check
the appropriate college or school section of this catalog for details about program formats, program requirements, major and
minor descriptions, learning outcomes, and curricula. While students are housed within a specific NSU school or college
based on their major, they may take classes or minor in subjects from any of the other undergraduate colleges.
Undergraduate degree programs at Nova Southeastern University are housed in four colleges/schools:
College of Allied Health and Nursing
The College of Allied Health and Nursing awards two undergraduate degrees: Bachelor of Health Science (B.H.Sc.) and
Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.).
The Bachelor of Health Science degree offers two programs of study including the post-professional Bachelor of Health Science
Online Degree Completion Program for graduates from associate degree, diploma or certificate programs in health care, such as
military-trained health care technicians, radiology technicians, respiratory therapists, dental hygienists, etc. The online B.H.Sc.
course of study is interdisciplinary and is designed to provide career and academic advancement for health care practitioners,
as well as deliver a well-rounded generalist curriculum. This program is designed to be completed all online requiring no oncampus time, thus allowing the opportunity for numerous health care occupations to complete their undergraduate degree
while continuing to work. The other B.H.Sc. program of study is an on-campus first professional entry-level program of study in
Vascular Sonography. These programs of study are offered through NSU’s Department of Health Science.
The Bachelor of Science in Nursing offers the following programs of study: an online R.N. to B.S.N., campus-based R.N. to B.S.N.
in Fort Lauderdale or in Naples/Fort Myers, and pre-licensure B.S.N. options are all available through NSU’s Nursing Department.
Majors
B.H.Sc. Health Science—Online
B.H.Sc. Health Science—Vascular Sonography
B.S.N. Nursing
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
The Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences offers Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in 26 majors organized
in four divisions: the Division of Humanities; the Division of Math, Science, and Technology; the Division of Performing and
Visual Arts; and the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences.
Majors
B.A. American Studies
B.S. Applied Professional Studies with a concentration in
Biological and Physical Sciences
Computer Engineering Technology
Computer Studies
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Information Technology
Pre-Optometry Studies
Pre-Physician Assistant Studies
Psychology
Substance Abuse Studies
B.A. Art
B.A. Arts Administration
B.S. Athletic Training
B.S. Biology (premedical)
B.A. Communication Studies
B.S. Computer Information Systems
B.S. Computer Science
B.S. Criminal Justice
B.A. Dance
B.A. English
B.S. Environmental Science/Studies
B.S. Exercise and Sport Science
B.S. General Studies
B.A. History
B.A. Humanities
B.A. International Studies
B.S. Legal Studies
B.S. Marine Biology
B.A. Music
B.S. Paralegal Studies
B.A. Philosophy
B.S. Psychology
B.S. Sociology
B.A. Theatre
Minors
African Diaspora Studies
Anthropology
Applied Behavior Analysis
Applied Statistics
Arts Administration
Behavioral Neuroscience
Bioinformatics
Chemistry
Computer Information Systems
Counseling
Criminal Justice
Dispute Management and Resolution
English
Exercise Science
Family Studies
Film Studies
Folklore and Mythology
Forensic Psychology
Gender Studies
Graphic Design
History
Humanities
Information Assurance/Security
Information Technology
International Law
International Studies
Irish Studies
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

14
Legal Studies
Marine Biology
Marine Ecology
Marine Microbiology
Mathematics
Media Studies
Medical Humanities
Music
Paralegal Studies
Philosophy
Physics
Psychology
Public Health
Public Relations
Sociology
Spanish
Speech Communication
Substance Abuse Studies
Theatre
Writing
Fischler School of Education and Human Services
The Fischler School of Education and Human Services offers the associate of arts degree in one major.
Major
A.A. Early Childhood Education
The Fischler School of Education and Human Services offers the Bachelor of Science degree in seven majors.
Majors
B.S. Applied Professional Studies with a concentration in Teaching and Learning
B.S. Education with a concentration in Child Development
B.S. Elementary Education
B.S. Exceptional Student Education
B.S. Prekindergarten/Primary Education
B.S. Secondary Biology Education
B.S. Secondary Mathematics Education
Minors
Education
Speech-Language Pathology
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
The H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship offers the Bachelor of Science degree in seven majors
and the Bachelor of Business Administration degree in one major.
Majors
B.B.A. Communication and Sales
B.S. Accounting
B.S. Business Administration
B.S. Finance
B.S. Management
B.S. Marketing
B.S. Sport and Recreation Management
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

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Minors
Accounting
Business (for non-business majors)
Entrepreneurship
Finance
Human Resource Management
International Business
Leadership
Management
Marketing
Sales
Sport and Recreation Management
Specializations for Medical Sciences Preparation
Health science specializations are intended as a guide for students who need to fulfill specific prerequisites for medical
school and health profession graduate school programs. Specializations are available through the Farquhar College of Arts
and Sciences. Many graduate programs require that grades in prerequisite courses are C or better. Requirements may vary
and specific graduate programs may require additional courses in writing, math, social and behavioral sciences, and the
humanities. Students should consult with specific graduate schools to be sure they meet the schools’ requirements.
Available Specializations
Pre-Med
Pre-Dental
Pre-Optometry
Pre-Pharmacy
Pre-Physical Therapy
Pre-Physician Assistant
Pre-Nursing
Certificate Programs
Certificate programs are offered by the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences. Students enrolled in certificate programs are
considered degree-seeking within their declared certification specialty and are eligible to apply for financial aid.
Available Certifications
Database Management Systems
Operating Systems
Paralegal Studies
Substance Abuse Studies
Web Programming and Design
Add-On Endorsements
Add-on endorsements are offered to students of the Fischler School of Education and Human Services. These programs
are comprised of state-approved courses, which allow educators to supplement their certification with additional coverage.
Available Add-On Endorsements
Driver Education
English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) K-12
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

16
Formats of Study
Students choose an educational format that best fits their schedule, lifestyle, and career and family responsibilities. These
formats include on-campus day programs and programs oriented toward students who work. For information about formats
of study available for a specific major, students should contact the individual college or school.
Professional and Liberal Studies (PALS) Program
The Professional and Liberal Studies (PALS) Program is a traditional on-campus day program geared toward recent highschool graduates that leads to either the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences,
Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship.
PALS students study and work in major fields that prepare them to enter careers or continue with graduate studies.
Career Development Program
The Career Development Program is designed for working and professional adults studying in the Farquhar College of
Arts and Sciences, Fischler School of Education and Human Services, or H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and
Entrepreneurship. Courses are offered in the evenings and on weekends on campus and at institutional, industrial, and
other off-campus locations. Many students enrolled in the Career Development Program are employed and have families.
They are a diverse population of individuals, often with considerable practical experience and the desire to play an active
role in their education.
Career Development Online Program
In certain fields of study, NSU allows students to earn a bachelor’s degree, complete a minor, or receive a certification
via the Internet, regardless of where they are located in the world. Classes use asynchronous delivery, which means
coursework can be completed at any time, anywhere. There are no required meetings. However, each course is conducted
with weekly assignments and due dates. In the online environment, students must be self-disciplined and motivated to
succeed. Students who participate in online classes are supported through a variety of technologies and teaching methods:
email, bulletin boards, chatrooms, electronic journals, and links to Web resources. Each student must obtain an NSU
account to access email, course materials, and library resources, and complete an online orientation.
Career Development Off-Campus Program
NSU operates off-campus Student Educational Centers in Jacksonville, Miami-Kendall, Orlando, Fort Myers, Tampa, West
Palm Beach, Las Vegas, the Bahamas, and Jamaica. These centers serve students at a distance from the main campus with
microcomputer labs and video suites equipped with videoconferencing and audiovisual tools. In addition, the centers are
staffed with full-time employees to help with registration, enrollment, IT issues, and financial aid. The Student Educational
Centers create an on-campus atmosphere for students by offering chances to develop friendships and form study groups,
while earning their degree in a convenient and accessible location.
Health Professions Programs
Nova Southeastern University offers undergraduate programs in the fields of health science and nursing through the College
of Allied Health and Nursing. Depending on the program’s admission requirements, students may need previous college
credit or professional experience in order to matriculate into these majors. Students in these programs are not considered
Professional and Liberal Studies (PALS) or Career Development students. Therefore, specific policies and criteria for these
programs are outlined separately in the catalog when appropriate.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

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University History
Sustained growth and unity have made Nova Southeastern University (NSU) the largest independent university in the
state of Florida. This growth accelerated in January 1994, when Nova University and Southeastern University of the Health
Sciences merged to become Nova Southeastern University.
Nova University was chartered in 1964 as a graduate institution in the physical and social sciences. Over time, Nova
added programs in law, education, business, psychology, computer science, oceanography, social and systemic studies,
and hospitality, and, in 1972, introduced its first off-campus course of study, in education. Soon, Nova became nationally
recognized for its innovative distance learning pro­grams. Today, field-based programs are located in 32 other Florida cities,
in nearly 30 other states, and at selected international sites.
While Nova continued to expand its educational reach, Southeastern University of the Health Sciences also took an
expansion course. Southeastern was created by osteo­pathic physicians committed to establishing a College of Osteopathic
Medicine in the Southeast. As a result, Southeastern College of Osteopathic Medicine, as it was first known, opened in
1981. From 1987 to 1997, Southeastern added Colleges of Pharmacy, Optometry, Allied Health, Medical Sciences, and the
College of Dental Medicine, which admitted 88 students in 1997.
The merger of Nova University and Southeastern University of the Health Sciences brought on new possibilities. Prior to 1994,
Nova had evolved with innovative technology and Southeastern expanded to provide much needed health care education.
With the merger, Nova Southeastern University’s resources make possible a more transdisciplinary education. Students have
an opportunity to integrate across the disciplines and understand how their professions relate to society as a whole.
Campus Facilities
Nova Southeastern University maintains four campuses in the Miami-Fort Lauderdale area—the main campus, the East
Campus, the North Miami Beach Campus, and the Oceanographic Center. The university also has student educational
centers or sites in the Bahamas, Jamaica, and Las Vegas, as well as in several Florida locations, including Miami,
Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa, Fort Myers, Miramar, and Palm Beach. The university’s main campus is located on a lush
300-acre site in Fort Lauderdale, 10 miles inland from the Atlantic Ocean and readily accessible via several highways and
Florida’s Turnpike. Main campus provides a central location for most of the university’s 17 colleges and centers, with stateof-the-art classrooms, laboratories, patient simulation training rooms, auditoriums, and computer labs.
Students of the College of Allied Health and Nursing are housed in the Health Professions Division complex, located on
21 acres and encompassing more than 1 million square feet of buildings. The division also comprises the Colleges of
Osteopathic Medicine, Pharmacy, Optometry, Medical Sciences, and Dental Medicine. The university library system also
facilitates NSU’s strong academic research environment. The Alvin Sherman Library, Research, and Information Technology
Center, together with the Rose and Alfred Miniaci Performing Arts Center, serve both NSU’s academic community and the
residents of Broward County.
In recent years, NSU has benefited from campus expansion, with new educational facilities, athletic venues, residence halls,
and performing arts theatres. In recent years, NSU has opened the Jim & Jan Moran Family Center Village, a role model for
early education programs across the country, and the Carl DeSantis Building, home to the H. Wayne Huizenga School of
Business and Entrepreneurship, Graduate School of Computer and Information Sciences, and Fischler School of Education
and Human Services.
In 2006, the university opened the Don Taft University Center, a 260,000 square-foot recreation, athletic, and arts complex in the
center of main campus. The Don Taft University Center is home to an athletic arena and sports venues, as well as classrooms,
a cafeteria, conference and banquet rooms, and a performing and visual arts wing housing a black box theatre, a music recital
hall, rehearsal space, and additional facilities that support the development of theatre, music, art, dance, and other creative
activities. For a full overview of NSU campuses and facilities, refer to the NSU Factbook at www.nova.edu/rpga/factbook.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

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Academic Calendars
The following academic calendars are organized by college or school. The first section contains academic calendars, by major, of
the College of Allied Health and Nursing. The subsequent section lists the academic calendars of the Farquhar College of Arts and
Sciences, Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship.
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Students in the Health Professions Division should contact their program advisor to determine applicable registration times,
drop/add period, and the beginning dates of late registration fees. There may be variation regarding individual class dates
within a semester. Students should check with their program office to confirm the start and end dates of their classes.
Fall 2010
Activity
Date
B.H.Sc.—
Online Program
Date
B.H.Sc.—Vascular
Sonography Program
Date
Nursing—
Entry-Level Track
Date
Nursing—R.N. to
B.S.N./R.N. to M.S.N.
FALL 2010
Mon., Oct. 4–
Sat., Dec. 18, 2010
Mon., Aug. 30–
Fri., Dec. 17, 2010
Mon., Aug. 23–
Fri., Dec. 17, 2010
Mon., Aug. 23–
Fri., Dec. 17, 2010
Registration
Mon., Aug. 9–Mon.,
Oct. 4, 2010
Late Registration Begins
($100 Fee)
N/A
Contact program office.
Contact program office.
Contact program office.
Last Day to Pay Fall Tuition
to Avoid Late Fee ($50)
Thurs., Nov. 4, 2010
University Student Services
Fee ($250)
Fee for fall assessed
upon registration
Fee for fall assessed
upon registration
Fee for fall assessed
upon registration
Fee for fall assessed
upon registration
Last Day to Drop or
Add a Class (100% refund)
Thurs., Oct. 14, 2010
Last Day to Withdraw
(75% refund)
Tues., Oct. 19, 2010
Students in the vascular
sonography program
cannot drop, add, or
withdraw permission of
the program director.
Contact program office
for more information.
Students in the nursing
programs cannot
drop, add, or withdraw
without permission of
the program director.
Contact program office
for more information.
Students in the nursing
programs cannot
drop, add, or withdraw
without permission of
the program director.
Contact program office
for more information.
Last Day to Withdraw
(50% refund)
Sun., Oct. 24, 2010
Drop and Withdrawal Dates
University Holidays and
Special Events
Commencement
Sun. Aug. 29, 2010
Sun. Aug. 29, 2010
Sun. Aug. 29, 2010
Sun. Aug. 29, 2010
Labor Day
(University Closed)
Mon., Sept. 6, 2010
Mon., Sept. 6, 2010
Mon., Sept. 6, 2010
Mon., Sept. 6, 2010
Convocation
Tues., Sept. 7, 2010
Tues., Sept. 7, 2010
Tues., Sept. 7, 2010
Tues., Sept. 7, 2010
No Classes
Wed., Nov. 24, 2010
Wed., Nov. 24, 2010
Wed., Nov. 24, 2010
Wed., Nov. 24, 2010
Thanksgiving
(University Closed)
Thurs., Nov. 25, 2010 Thurs., Nov. 25, 2010
Thurs., Nov. 25, 2010
Thurs., Nov. 25, 2010
University Closed
Fri., Nov. 26, 2010
Fri., Nov. 26, 2010
Fri., Nov. 26, 2010
Fri., Nov. 26, 2010
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

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Activity
Date
B.H.Sc.—
Online Program
Date
B.H.Sc.—Vascular
Sonography Program
Date
Nursing—
Entry-Level Track
Date
Nursing—R.N. to
B.S.N./R.N. to M.S.N.
FALL 2010
Mon., Oct. 4–
Sat., Dec. 18, 2010
Mon., Aug. 30–
Fri., Dec. 17, 2010
Mon., Aug. 23–
Fri., Dec. 17, 2010
Mon., Aug. 23–
Fri., Dec. 17, 2010
Winter Break
(No Classes)
Fri., Dec. 24, 2010–
Sun., Jan. 2, 2011
Sat., Dec. 18, 2010–
Mon., Jan. 3, 2011
Fri., Dec. 17, 2010–
Sun., Jan. 2, 2011
Fri., Dec. 17, 2010–
Sun., Jan. 2, 2011
Winter Closure
(University Closed)
Fri., Dec. 24, 2010–
Sun., Jan. 2, 2011
Fri., Dec. 24, 2010–
Sun., Jan. 2, 2011
Fri., Dec. 24, 2010–
Sun., Jan. 2, 2011
Fri., Dec. 24, 2010–
Sun., Jan. 2, 2011
Winter 2011
Activity
Date
B.H.Sc.—
Online Program
Date
B.H.Sc.—Vascular
Sonography Program
Date
Nursing—
Entry-Level Track
Date
Nursing—R.N. to
B.S.N./R.N. to M.S.N.
WINTER 2011
Mon., Jan. 3–
Sun., Mar. 27, 2011
Mon., Jan. 3–
Fri., Apr. 29, 2011
Mon., Jan. 10–
Sun., May 2, 2011
Mon., Jan. 10–
Fri., April 30, 2011
Registration
Fri., Oct. 1, 2010–
Thurs., Jan. 13, 2011
Late Registration Begins
($100 Fee)
N/A
Contact program office.
Contact program office.
Contact program office.
Last Day to Pay Fall Tuition
to Avoid Late Fee ($50)
Thurs., Feb. 3, 2011
University Student Services
Fee ($250)
Fee for winter
assessed upon
registration
Fee for winter assessed
upon registration
Fee for winter assessed Fee for winter assessed
upon registration
upon registration
Students in the nursing
programs cannot
drop, add, or withdraw
without the permission
of the program director.
Contact program office
for more information.
Students in the nursing
programs cannot
drop, add, or withdraw
without the permission
of the program director.
Contact program office
for more information.
Drop and Withdrawal
Dates
Last Day to Drop or Add a
Class (100% refund)
Thurs., Jan. 13, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw
(75% refund)
Tues., Jan. 18, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw
(50% refund)
Sun., Jan. 23, 2011
Students in the vascular
sonography program
cannot drop, add,
or withdraw without
the permission of the
program director. Contact
program office for more
information.
Mon., Jan. 17, 2011
Mon., Jan. 17, 2011
Mon., Jan. 17, 2011
Mon., Jan. 17, 2011
Sat., April 30–
Sun., May 15, 2011
Mon., March 14–
Fri., March 18, 2011
Mon., March 14–
Fri., March 18, 2011
University Holidays and
Special Events
Martin Luther King
(University Closed)
HPD Spring Break
(No Classes)
Registration for Fall 2011
Contact program office.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

20
Spring 2011
B.H.Sc.—Online Program
Activity
Date
B.H.Sc.—Online Program
SPRING 2011
Mon., April 4–Sun., Jun. 26, 2011
Registration
Mon., February 7–Thurs., April 14, 2011
Late Registration Begins
($100 Fee)
N/A
Last Day to Pay Fall Tuition to Avoid Late Fee ($50)
Wed., May 4, 2011
University Student Services Fee ($250)
Fee for spring assessed upon registration
Drop and Withdrawal Dates
Last Day to Drop or Add a Class (100% refund)
Thurs., April 14, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw (75% refund)
Tues., April 19, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw (50% refund)
Thurs., April 21, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw (no refund)
Fri., April 22, 2011
University Holidays and Special Events
Memorial Day (University Closed)
Mon., May 30, 2011
Summer 2011
B.H.Sc.—Vascular Sonography Program and Nursing Department
Activity
Date
B.H.Sc.—Vascular
Sonography Program
Date
Nursing—
Entry-Level Track
Date
Nursing—R.N. to B.S.N./
R.N. to M.S.N.
SUMMER 2011
Mon., May 16–
Fri., Aug. 20, 2011
Mon., May 16–
Sat., Aug. 6, 2011
Mon., May 16–
Sat., Aug. 6, 2011
Contact program office.
Contact program office.
Contact program office.
Fee for summer assessed
upon registration
Fee for summer assessed Fee for summer assessed
upon registration
upon registration
Students in the vascular
sonography program
cannot drop, add,
or withdraw without
the permission of the
program director. Contact
program office for more
information.
Students in the nursing
programs cannot drop,
add, or withdraw without
the permission of the
program director. Contact
program office for more
information.
Students in the nursing
programs cannot drop,
add, or withdraw without
the permission of the
program director. Contact
program office for more
information.
Memorial Day (University Closed)
Mon., May 30, 2011
Mon., May 30, 2011
Mon., May 30, 2011
Independence Day (University Closed)
Mon., July 4, 2011
Mon., July 4, 2011
Mon., July 4, 2011
Commencement
Sun. Aug. 28, 2011
Sun. Aug. 28, 2011
Sun. Aug. 28, 2011
Registration
Late Registration Begins ($100 Fee)
Last Day to Pay Fall Tuition to Avoid Late Fee ($50)
University Student Services Fee ($250)
Drop and Withdrawal Dates
Last Day to Drop or Add a Class (100% refund)
Last Day to Withdraw (75% refund)
Last Day to Withdraw (50% refund)
Last Day to Withdraw (no refund)
University Holidays and Special Events
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

21
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences,
Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
Fall 2010
Activity
Date
FALL 2010
Monday, Aug. 23–Saturday, Dec. 11, 2010
Class Dates
Semester Classes
Monday, Aug. 23–Saturday, Oct. 9, 2010
Term I Classes
Monday, Aug. 23–Saturday, Oct. 9, 2010
Term II Classes
Monday, Oct. 18–Saturday, Dec. 4, 2010
Registration
Honors and Online Students, and Continuing Athletes (via Academic
Advisor)
Monday, March 15–Sunday, Aug. 22, 2010
New Students (attendance at Orientation required)
Monday, March 22–Sunday, Aug. 22, 2010
Continuing Students (via Academic Advisor or Web)
Monday, March 22–Sunday, Aug. 22, 2010
Late Registration Begins ($100 Fee)
Friday, Aug. 13, 2010
Last Day to Pay Fall Tuition to Avoid Late Fee ($50)
Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2010
University Student Services Fee ($250)
Fee for fall assessed upon registration
www.nova.edu/studentorientation
Orientation
Drop and Withdrawal Dates
Fall Term I and Semester
Drop Prior to 1st Day of Term in Which the Class Begins (100% refund)
Sunday, Aug. 22, 2010
Drop During the First 7 Days of Term (75% refund)
Monday, Aug. 23–Sunday, Aug. 29, 2010
Last Day to Add Classes (Term I and Semester Classes)
Sunday, Aug. 29, 2010
Drop During the 8th Through 14th Days of Term (50% refund)
Monday, Aug. 30–Sunday, Sept. 5, 2010
Last Day to Withdraw (Term I Classes) (No refund)
Sunday, Sept. 26, 2010
Last Day to Withdraw (Semester Classes) (No refund)
Sunday, Oct. 24, 2010
Fall Term II
Drop Prior to 1st Day of Term in Which the Class Begins (100% refund)
Sunday, Oct. 17, 2010
Drop During the First 7 Days of Term (75% refund)
Monday, Oct. 18–Sunday, Oct. 24, 2010
Last Day to Add Classes (Term II)
Sunday, Oct. 24, 2010
Drop During the 8th Through 14th Days of Term (50% refund)
Monday, Oct. 25–Sunday, Oct. 31, 2010
Last Day to Withdraw (Term II Classes) (No refund)
Sunday, Nov. 21, 2010
Exams
Fall Term I Class Dates
Monday, Aug. 23–Saturday, Oct. 9, 2010
Final Exam Dates
Monday, Oct. 11–Saturday, Oct. 16, 2010
Fall Semester Class Dates
Monday, Aug. 23–Saturday, Dec. 4, 2010
Mid-Term Exam Dates
Monday, Oct. 11–Saturday, Oct. 16, 2010
Final Exam Dates
Monday, Dec. 6–Saturday, Dec. 11, 2010
Fall Term II Class Dates
Final Exam Dates
Monday, Oct. 18–Saturday, Dec. 4, 2010
Monday, Dec. 6–Saturday, Dec. 11, 2010
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

22
Activity
Date
FALL 2010
Monday, Aug. 23–Saturday, Dec. 11, 2010
University Holidays and Special Events
Labor Day (University Closed)
Monday, Sept. 6, 2010
Convocation
Tuesday, Sept. 7, 2010
No Classes
Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2010
Thanksgiving (University Closed)
Thursday, Nov. 25, 2010
University Closed
Friday, Nov. 26, 2010
Winter Break (No Classes)
Monday, Dec. 13, 2010–Sunday, Jan. 9, 2011
Winter Closure (University Closed)
Friday, Dec. 24, 2010–Sunday, Jan. 2, 2011
Winter 2011
Activity
Date
WINTER 2011 Monday, Jan. 10–Saturday, May 7, 2011
Class Dates
Semester Classes
Monday, Jan. 10–Saturday, April 30, 2011
Term I Classes
Monday, Jan. 10–Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011
Term II Classes
Monday, March 14–Saturday, April 30, 2011
Registration
Honors and Online Students, and Continuing Athletes
(via Academic Advisor)
Monday, Oct. 25, 2010–Sunday, Jan. 9, 2011
New Students (attendance at Orientation required)
Monday, Nov. 1, 2010–Sunday, Jan. 9, 2011
Continuing Students (via Academic Advisor or Web)
Monday, Nov. 1, 2010–Sunday, Jan. 9, 2011
Late Registration Begins ($100 Fee)
Friday, Dec. 31, 2010
Last Day to Pay Fall Tuition to Avoid Late Fee ($50)
Tuesday, Feb. 8, 2011
University Student Services Fee ($250)
Drop and Withdrawal Dates
Fee for winter assessed upon registration
Winter Term I and Semester
Drop Prior to 1st Day of Term in Which the Class Begins (100% refund)
Sunday, Jan. 9, 2011
Drop During the First 7 Days of Term (75% refund)
Monday, Jan. 10–Sunday, Jan. 16, 2011
Last Day to Add Classes
Sunday, Jan. 16, 2011
Drop During the 8th Through 14th Days of Term (50% refund)
Monday, Jan. 17–Sunday, Jan. 23, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw (Term I Classes) (No refund)
Sunday, Feb. 13, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw (Semester Classes) (No refund)
Sunday, March 20, 2011
Winter Term II
Drop Prior to 1st Day of Term in Which the Class Begins (100% refund)
Sunday, March 13, 2011
Drop During the First 7 Days of Term (75% refund)
Monday, March 14–Sunday, March 20, 2011
Last Day to Add Classes (Term II)
Sunday, March 20, 2011
Drop During the 8th Through 14th Days of Term (50% refund)
Monday, March 21–Sunday, March 27, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw (Term II Classes) (No refund)
Sunday, April 17, 2011
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

23
Activity
Date
WINTER 2011 (201130)
Monday, Jan. 10–Saturday, May 7, 2011
Exams
Winter Term I Class Dates
Monday, Jan. 10–Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011
Final Exam Dates
Monday, Feb. 28–Saturday, March 5, 2011
Winter Semester Class Dates
Monday, Jan. 10–Saturday, Apr. 30, 2011
Mid-Term Exam Dates
Monday, Feb. 28–Saturday, March 5, 2011
Final Exam Dates
Monday, May 2–Saturday, May 7, 2011
Winter Term II Class Dates
Monday, March 14 - Saturday, Apr. 30, 2011
Final Exam Dates
Monday, May 2–Saturday, May 7, 2011
University Holidays and Special Events
Martin Luther King (University Closed)
Monday, Jan. 17, 2011
Spring Break (No Classes)
Monday, March 7–Sunday, March 13, 2011
Registration for Fall 2011 (201220)
Honors and Online Students, and Continuing Athletes
(via Academic Advisor)
Monday, March 21–Sunday, Aug. 22, 2011
New Students (attendance at Orientation required)
Monday, March 28–Sunday, Aug. 22, 2011
Continuing Students (via Academic Advisor or Web)
Monday, March 28–Sunday, Aug. 22, 2011
Summer 2011
Activity
Date
SUMMER 2011 (201150)
Monday, May 16–Saturday, August 6, 2011
Class Dates
Summer 7-Week Classes
Monday, May 16–Saturday, July 9, 2011
Summer 12-Week Classes
Monday, May 16–Saturday, July 30, 2011
Registration
Honors and Online Students, and Continuing Athletes
(via Academic Advisor)
Monday, March 21–Sunday, May 8, 2011
New Students (attendance at Orientation required)
Monday, March 28–Sunday, May 8, 2011
Continuing Students (via Academic Advisor or Web)
Monday, March 28–Sunday, May 8, 2011
Late Registration Begins ($100 Fee)
Friday, May 6, 2011
Last Day to Pay Fall Tuition to Avoid Late Fee ($50)
Tuesday, June 14, 2011
University Student Services Fee ($250)
Fee for summer assessed upon registration
Drop and Withdrawal Dates
Drop Prior to 1st Day of Term in Which the Class Begins (100% refund)
Sunday, May 15, 2011
Drop During the First 7 Days of Term (75% refund)
Monday, May 16–Sunday, May 22, 2011
Last Day to Add Classes
Sunday, May 22, 2011
Drop During the 8th Through 14th Days of Term (50% refund)
Monday, May 23–Sunday, May 29, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw (7-Week Classes) (No Refund)
Sunday, June 19, 2011
Last Day to Withdraw (12-Week Classes) (No Refund)
Sunday, July 3, 2011
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

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Activity
Date
SUMMER 2011 (201150)
Monday, May 16–Saturday, August 6, 2011
Exams
Summer 7-Week Classes
Monday, May 16–Saturday, July 9, 2011
Final Exam Dates for Night Classes
Tuesday, July 5–Saturday, July 9, 2011
Final Exam Dates for Day Classes
Wednesday, July 6–Saturday, July 9, 2011
Summer 12-Week Classes
Monday, May 16–Saturday, July 30, 2011
Final Exam Dates for Night Classes
Monday, Aug. 1–Saturday, Aug. 6, 2011
Final Exam Dates for Day Classes
Wednesday, Aug. 3–Saturday, Aug. 6, 2011
University Holidays and Special Events
Commencement Exercises
Saturday, May 14, 2011
Memorial Day (University Closed)
Monday, May 30, 2011
Independence Day (University Closed)
Monday, July, 4 2011
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

25
Exam Schedules
The following exam schedules are for undergraduate students of the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences, Fischler
School of Education and Human Services, and H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship. The exam
schedules for students of the College of Allied Health and Nursing vary by major. For more information, students are
encouraged to contact their academic advisor.
Fall 2010 Exam Schedule
Term I Final and Semester Mid-Term Exams
Exam Days : Monday, October 11–Saturday, October 16, 2010
Class Meeting Day/Time
Exam Meeting Date/Time
Monday 7:55/8:00 a.m.
Wed., Oct. 13, 2010
8:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.
Monday 9:00 a.m.
Mon., Oct. 11, 2010
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 10:05 a.m.
Wed., Oct. 13, 2010
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 11:10 a.m.
Fri., Oct. 15, 2010
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 1:00 p.m.
Wed., Oct. 13, 2010
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Monday 2:05 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 15, 2010
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Monday 3:10 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 16, 2010
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Monday 4:15 p.m.
Wed., Oct. 13, 2010
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Monday 6:00 p.m.
Mon., Oct. 11, 2010
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Monday 8:00 p.m.
Mon., Oct. 11, 2010
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Tuesday 7:45/8:00 a.m.
Thurs., Oct. 14, 2010
8:00–10:00 a.m.
Tuesday 9:15 a.m.
Tues., Oct. 12, 2010
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Tuesday 10:45 p.m.
Thurs., Oct. 14, 2010
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Tuesday 1:00 p.m.
Tues., Oct. 12, 2010
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Tuesday 2:30 p.m.
Thurs., Oct. 14, 2010
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Tuesday 4:00 p.m.
Tues., Oct. 12, 2010
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Tuesday 6:00 p.m.
Tues., Oct. 12, 2010
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Tuesday 8:00 p.m.
Tues., Oct. 12, 2010
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Wednesday 6:00 p.m.
Wed., Oct. 13, 2010
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Wednesday 8:00 p.m.
Wed., Oct. 13, 2010
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Thursday 6:00 p.m.
Thurs., Oct. 14, 2010
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Thursday 8:00 p.m.
Thurs., Oct. 14, 2010
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Friday 6:00 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 15, 2010
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Friday 8:00 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 15, 2010
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Saturday a.m.
Sat., Oct. 16, 2010
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Saturday p.m.
Sat., Oct. 16, 2010
1:00–3:00 p.m.
conflict
Mon., Oct. 11, 2010
8:00–10:00 a.m.
conflict
Fri., Oct. 15, 2010
8:00–10:00 a.m.
conflict
Sat., Oct. 16, 2010
8:00–10:00 a.m. or 7:00–10:00 a.m.
conflict
Sat., Oct. 16, 2010
3:30–5:30 p.m.
conflict
Tues., Oct. 12, 2010
8:00–10:00 a.m. or 7:00–10:00 a.m.
conflict
Thurs., Oct. 14, 2010
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

26
Exam Days : Monday, October 11–Saturday, October 16, 2010
conflict (3-hour slot)
Mon., Oct. 11, 2010
1:00–4:00 p.m.
conflict (3-hour slot)
Sat., Oct. 16, 2010
3:30–6:30 p.m.
Term II and Semester Final Exams
Exam Days : Monday, December 6–Saturday, December 11, 2010
Class Meeting Day/Time
Exam Meeting Date/Time
Monday 7:55/8:00 a.m.
Wed., Dec. 8, 2010
8:00–10:00 a.m.
Monday 9:00 a.m.
Mon., Dec. 6, 2010
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 10:05 a.m.
Wed., Dec. 8, 2010
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 11:10 a.m.
Fri., Dec. 10, 2010
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 1:00 p.m.
Wed., Dec. 8, 2010
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Monday 2:05 p.m.
Fri., Dec. 10, 2010
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Monday 3:10 p.m.
Fri., Dec. 10, 2010
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Monday 4:15 p.m.
Wed., Dec. 8, 2010
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Monday 6:00 p.m.
Mon., Dec. 6, 2010
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Monday 8:00 p.m.
Mon., Dec. 6, 2010
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Tuesday 7:45/8:00 a.m.
Thurs., Dec. 9, 2010
8:00–10:00 a.m.
Tuesday 9:15 a.m.
Tues., Dec. 7, 2010
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Tuesday 10:45 p.m.
Thurs., Dec. 9, 2010
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Tuesday 1:00 p.m.
Tues., Dec. 7, 2010
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Tuesday 2:30 p.m.
Thurs., Dec. 9, 2010
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Tuesday 4:00 p.m.
Tues., Dec. 7, 2010
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Tuesday 6:00 p.m.
Tues., Dec. 7, 2010
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Tuesday 8:00 p.m.
Tues., Dec. 7, 2010
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Wednesday 6:00 p.m.
Wed., Dec. 8, 2010
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Wednesday 8:00 p.m.
Wed., Dec. 8, 2010
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Thursday 6:00 p.m.
Thurs., Dec. 9, 2010
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Thursday 8:00 p.m.
Thurs., Dec. 9, 2010
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Friday 6:00 p.m.
Fri., Dec. 10, 2010
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Friday 8:00 p.m.
Fri., Dec. 10, 2010
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Saturday a.m.
Sat., Dec. 11, 2010
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Saturday p.m.
Sat., Dec. 11, 2010
1:00–3:00 p.m.
conflict
Mon., Dec. 6, 2010
8:00–10:00 a.m.
conflict
Fri., Dec. 10, 2010
8:00–10:00 a.m.
conflict
Sat., Dec. 11, 2010
8:00–10:00 a.m. or 7:00–10:00 a.m.
conflict
Sat., Dec. 11, 2010
3:30–5:30 p.m.
conflict
Tues., Dec. 7, 2010
8:00–10:00 a.m. or 7:00–10:00 a.m.
conflict
Thurs., Dec. 9, 2010
3:30–5:30 p.m.
conflict (3-hour slot)
Mon., Dec. 6, 2010
1:00–4:00 p.m.
conflict (3-hour slot)
Sat., Dec. 11, 2010
3:30–6:30 p.m.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

27
Winter 2011 Exam Schedule
Term I Final and Semester Mid-Term Exams
Exam Days : Monday, February 28–Saturday, March 5, 2011
Class Meeting Day/Time
Exam Meeting Date/Time
Monday 7:55/8:00 a.m.
Wed., March 2, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
Monday 9:00 a.m.
Mon., February 28, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 10:05 a.m.
Wed., March 2, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 11:10 a.m.
Fri., March 4, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 1:00 p.m.
Wed., March 2, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Monday 2:05 p.m.
Fri., March 4, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Monday 3:10 p.m.
Fri., March 4, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Monday 4:15 p.m.
Wed., March 2, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Monday 6:00 p.m.
Mon., February 28, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Monday 8:00 p.m.
Mon., February 28, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Tuesday 7:45/8:00 a.m.
Thurs., March 3, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
Tuesday 9:15 a.m.
Tues., March 1, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Tuesday 10:45 p.m.
Thurs., March 3, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Tuesday 1:00 p.m.
Tues., March 1, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Tuesday 2:30 p.m.
Thurs., March 3, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Tuesday 4:00 p.m.
Tues., March 1, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Tuesday 6:00 p.m.
Tues., March 1, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Tuesday 8:00 p.m.
Tues., March 1, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Wednesday 6:00 p.m.
Wed., March 2, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Wednesday 8:00 p.m.
Wed., March 2, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Thursday 6:00 p.m.
Thurs., March 3, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Thursday 8:00 p.m.
Thurs., March 3, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Friday 6:00 p.m.
Fri., March 4, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Friday 8:00 p.m.
Fri., March 4, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Saturday a.m.
Sat., March 5, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Saturday p.m.
Sat., March 5, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
conflict
Mon., February 28, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
conflict
Fri., March 4, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
conflict
Sat., March 5, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.**
conflict
Sat., March 5, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
conflict
Tues., March 1, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.**
conflict
Thurs., March 3, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
conflict (3-hour slot)
Mon., February 28, 2011
1:00–4:00 p.m.
conflict (3-hour slot)
Sat., March 5, 2011
3:30–6:30 p.m.
**alternate 3-hour time slot
Sat., March 5/Tues., March 1, 2011
7:00–10:00 a.m.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

28
Term II and Semester Final Exams
Exam Days : Monday, May 2–Saturday, May 7, 2011
Class Meeting Day/Time
Exam Meeting Date/Time
Monday 7:55/8:00 a.m.
Wed., May 4, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
Monday 9:00 a.m.
Mon., May 2, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 10:05 a.m.
Wed., May 4, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 11:10 a.m.
Fri., May 6, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 1:00 p.m.
Wed., May 4, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Monday 2:05 p.m.
Fri., May 6, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Monday 3:10 p.m.
Fri. May 6, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Monday 4:15 p.m.
Wed., May 4, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Monday 6:00 p.m.
Mon., May 2, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Monday 8:00 p.m.
Mon., May 2, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Tuesday 7:45/8:00 a.m.
Thurs., May 5, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
Tuesday 9:15 a.m.
Tues., May 3, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Tuesday 10:45 p.m.
Thurs., May 5, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Tuesday 1:00 p.m.
Tues., May 3, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Tuesday 2:30 p.m.
Thurs., May 5, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Tuesday 4:00 p.m.
Tues., May 3, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Tuesday 6:00 p.m.
Tues., May 3, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Tuesday 8:00 p.m.
Tues., May 3, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Wednesday 6:00 p.m.
Wed., May 4, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Wednesday 8:00 p.m.
Wed., May 4, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Thursday 6:00 p.m.
Thurs., May 5, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Thursday 8:00 p.m.
Thurs., May 5, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Friday 6:00 p.m.
Fri., May 6, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Friday 8:00 p.m.
Fri., May 6, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Saturday a.m.
Sat., May 7, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Saturday p.m.
Sat., May 7, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
conflict
Mon., May 2, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
conflict
Fri., May 6, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
conflict
Sat., May 7, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.**
conflict
Sat., May 7, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
conflict
Tues., May 3, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m. **
conflict
Thurs., May 5, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
conflict (3-hour slot)
Mon., May 2, 2011
1:00–4:00 p.m.
conflict (3-hour slot)
Sat., May 7, 2011
3:30–6:30 p.m.
**alternate 3-hour time slot
Sat., May 7/Tues., May 3, 2011
7:00–10:00 a.m.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

29
Summer 2011 Exam Schedule
7-Week Classes Final Exams
Exam Days : Tuesday, July 5–Saturday, July 9, 2011
Class Meeting Day/Time
Exam Meeting Date/Time
Monday 8:00/8:10 a.m.
Wed., July 6, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
Monday 9:15 a.m.
Fri., July 8, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
Monday 10:00/10:30 a.m.
Wed., July 6, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 12:00/1:00 p.m.
Fri., July 8, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 2:00/2:15 p.m.
Wed., July 6, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Monday 3:30/4:00 p.m.
Fri., July 8, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Monday 6:00 p.m.
Sat., July 9, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 8:00 p.m.
Sat., July 9, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Tuesday 8:00 a.m.
Thurs., July 7, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
Tuesday 9:20/10:45 a.m.
Thurs., July 7, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Tuesday 1:00 p.m.
Thurs., July 7, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Tuesday 2:25/2:45 p.m.
Thurs., July 7, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Tuesday 6:00 p.m.
Tues., July 5, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Tuesday 8:00 p.m.
Tues., July 5, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Wednesday 6:00 p.m.
Wed., July 6, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Wednesday 8:00 p.m.
Wed., July 6, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Thursday 6:00 p.m.
Thurs., July 7, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Thursday 8:00 p.m.
Thurs., July 7, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Friday 6:00 p.m.
Fri., July 8, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Friday 8:00 p.m.
Fri., July 8, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Saturday a.m.
Sat., July 9, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
Saturday p.m.
Sat., July 9, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
conflict
Wed., July 6, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
conflict
Fri., July 8, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

30
12-Week Classes Final Exams
Exam Days : Monday, Aug. 1–Saturday, Aug. 6, 2011
Class Meeting Day/Time
Exam Meeting Date/Time
Monday 8:00 a.m.
Wed., Aug. 3, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
Monday 9:15 a.m.
Fri., Aug. 5, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
Monday 10:30 a.m.
Wed., Aug. 3, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Monday 1:00 p.m.
Fri., Aug. 5, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m..
Monday 2:15 p.m.
Wed., Aug. 3, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Monday 3:30 p.m.
Fri., Aug. 5, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Monday 6:00 p.m.
Mon., Aug. 1, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Monday 8:00 p.m.
Mon., Aug. 1, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Tuesday 8:00 a.m.
Thurs., Aug. 4, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
Tuesday 10:45 p.m.
Thurs., Aug. 4, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Tuesday 1:00 p.m.
Thurs., Aug. 4, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Tuesday 2:45 p.m.
Thurs., Aug. 4, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Tuesday 6:00 p.m.
Tues., Aug. 2, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Tuesday 8:00 p.m.
Tues., Aug. 2, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Wednesday 6:00 p.m.
Wed., Aug. 3, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Wednesday 8:00 p.m.
Wed., Aug. 3, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Thursday 6:00 p.m.
Thurs., Aug. 4, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Thursday 8:00 p.m.
Thurs., Aug. 4, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Friday 6:00 p.m.
Fri., Aug. 5, 2011
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Friday 8:00 p.m.
Fri., Aug. 5, 2011
8:15–10:15 p.m.
Saturday a.m.
Sat., Aug. 6, 2011
10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Saturday p.m.
Sat., Aug. 6, 2011
1:00–3:00 p.m.
conflict
Sat., Aug. 6, 2011
8:00–10:00 a.m.
conflict
Sat., Aug. 6, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
conflict
Wed., Aug. 3, 2011
3:30–5:30 p.m.
conflict
Fri., Aug. 6, 2011
1:00–4:00 p.m.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

31
Undergraduate Correspondence Directory
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Office of the Dean
Richard E. Davis, Ed.D., Dean
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Health Professions Division
Nova Southeastern University
3200 S. University Drive
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33328-2018
Telephone: (954) 262-1205
Fax: (954) 262-1181
Office of Admissions
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Health Professions Division
Nova Southeastern University
3200 S. University Drive
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33328-2018
Telephone: (954) 262-1101
Fax: (954) 262-2282
Email: cahinfo@nsu.nova.edu
Bachelor of Health Science–Vascular Sonography
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Health Professions Division
Nova Southeastern University
3200 S. University Drive
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33328-2018
Telephone: 800-356-0026, ext. 21964
Bachelor of Science in Nursing
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Health Professions Division
Nova Southeastern University
3200 S. University Drive
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33328-2018
Telephone: (954) 262-1703
Bachelor of Health Science–Online
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Health Professions Division
Nova Southeastern University
3200 S. University Drive
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33328-2018
Telephone: 800-356-0026, Ext. 21209
Email: bhsinfo@nsu.nova.edu
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Office of the Dean
Don Rosenblum, Ph.D., Dean
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Nova Southeastern University
Mailman-Hollywood Building, Second Floor
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-8408
Fax: (954) 262-3930
Office of Academic Advising
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Nova Southeastern University
Mailman-Hollywood Building, Third Floor
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-7990
Fax: (954) 262-3709
Office of Academic Services
Nova Southeastern University
Parker Building, Suite 100
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-8350
Fax: (954) 262-3819
Lifelong Learning Institute
Nova Southeastern University
University Park Plaza
3424 South University Drive
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33328-2022
Telephone: (954) 262-8471
Fax: (954) 262-3933
Email: ilr@nsu.nova.edu
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

32
Academic Divisions
Division of Humanities
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Nova Southeastern University
Parker Building, Suite 380
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-8200
Fax: (954) 262-3881
Division of Performing and Visual Arts
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Nova Southeastern University
Don Taft University Center, Performing and Visual Arts
Wing, Suite 337
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-7620
Fax: (954) 262-2470
Division of Math, Science, and Technology
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Nova Southeastern University
Parker Building, Suite 300
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-8301
Fax: (954) 262-3931
Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Nova Southeastern University
Parker Building, Second Floor
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-7941
Fax: (954) 262-3760
Fischler School of Education and Human Services
Undergraduate Education
Fischler School of Education and Human Services
Nova Southeastern University
Carl DeSantis Building, Fourth Floor
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Toll-free: 800-986-3223, ext. 28500
Telephone: (954) 262-7900
Fax: (954) 262-3925
Email: eduinfo@nsu.nova.edu
Office of Enrollment and Recruitment
Fischler School of Education and Human Services
Nova Southeastern University
Carl DeSantis Building, Fourth Floor
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Toll-free: 800-986-3223, ext. 28500
Telephone: (954) 262-7900
Office of Academic Advising
Fischler School of Education and Human Services
Nova Southeastern University
Carl DeSantis Building, Fourth Floor
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Toll-free: 800-986-3223, ext. 28500
Telephone: (954) 262-7900
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
Office of the Dean
D. Michael Fields, Ph.D., Dean
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and
Entrepreneurship
Nova Southeastern University
Carl DeSantis Building
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-5001
Email: info@huizenga.nova.edu
Office of Academic Advising
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and
Entrepreneurship
Nova Southeastern University
Carl DeSantis Building
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-5067
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

33
Office of Recruitment and Admissions
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and
Entrepreneurship
Nova Southeastern University
Carl DeSantis Building
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Toll-free: 800-672-7223, ext. 25168
Telephone: (954) 262-5168
Office of Program Management
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and
Entrepreneurship
Nova Southeastern University
Carl DeSantis Building
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-8041
University-Wide Services
Enrollment and Student Services
Nova Southeastern University
Horvitz Administration Building, One-Stop Shop
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Office of International Students and Scholars
(Office of the University Registrar)
Telephone: (954) 262-7240/7242
Fax: (954) 262-3846
Email: intl@nsu.nova.edu
Office of Student Financial Assistance
Telephone: (954) 262-3380
Fax: (954) 262-3966
Email: finaid@nsu.nova.edu
Office of the University Bursar
Student Accounts: (954) 262-5200
Loan Disbursing: (954) 262-5200
Collections, Perkins Loans: (954) 262-5200
Office of the University Registrar
Telephone: (954) 262-7200
Fax: (954) 262-3256
Transfer Evaluation Services
(Office of the University Registrar)
Telephone: (954) 262-8117
Fax: (954) 262-3846
Email: esstes@nsu.nova.edu
Office of Undergraduate Admissions
Nova Southeastern University
Horvitz Administration Building, Room 192
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-8000
Fax: (954) 262-3811
Email: admissions@nsu.nova.edu
Department of Athletics
Nova Southeastern University
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-8250
Fax: (954) 262-3926
Email: nsuathletics@nsu.nova.edu
Office of Career Development
Nova Southeastern University
Alvin Sherman Library
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-7201
Fax: (954) 262-3897
Email: career@nsu.nova.edu
Office of New Student Orientation
Nova Southeastern University
Rosenthal, Room 205
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-8050
Fax: (954) 262-3233
Email: orientation@nsu.nova.edu
Office of Residential Life and Housing
Nova Southeastern University
Leo Goodwin Sr. Residence Hall
3625 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-7052
Fax: (954) 262-3812
Email: reslife@nsu.nova.edu
Office of Student Affairs
Nova Southeastern University
Rosenthal Student Center
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: (954) 262-7280, Fax: (954) 262-1390
Email: studentaffairs@nsu.nova.edu
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NSU Campus Locations
Main Campus
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone: 800-541-NOVA (6682)
Email: nsuinfo@nsu.nova.edu
East Campus
3100 SW 9th Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33315-3025
Telephone: 800-262-8823
Email: facilities@nova.edu
Oceanographic Center
8000 North Ocean Drive
Dania Beach, Florida 33004-3078
Telephone: 800-39-OCEAN
Email: imcs@nsu.nova.edu
North Miami Beach Campus
Fischler School of Education and Human Services
1750 NE 167th Street
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162-3097
Telephone: 800-986-3223
Email: fgseinfo@nsu.nova.edu
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NSU Student Educational Centers/
Instructional Sites
Bahamas
8 Jean Street, Gleniston Gardens
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 364-6766
Email: nsu-bahamas@nsu.nova.edu
Miami-Kendall, Florida
8585 SW 124th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33183
Telephone: (305) 274-1021
Email: nsu-miami@nsu.nova.edu
Fort Myers, Florida
3650 Colonial Court
Fort Myers, Florida 33913
Telephone: (239) 274-6070
Email: nsu-fortmyers@nsu.nova.edu
Miramar, Florida
2050 Civic Center Place, Third Floor
Miramar, Florida 33025
Telephone: (954) 262-9499
Email: nsu-miramar@nsu.nova.edu
Jacksonville, Florida
6675 Corporate Center Parkway, Suite 115
Jacksonville, Florida 32216
Telephone: (904) 245-8910
Email: nsu-jacksonville@nsu.nova.edu
Orlando, Florida
4850 Millenia Blvd.
Orlando, Florida 32839
Telephone: (407) 264-5600
Email: nsu-orlando@nsu.nova.edu
Jamaica
48 Constant Spring Road
Kingston 10, Jamaica
Telephone: (876) 929-7066
Email: nsu-jamaica@nsu.nova.edu
Palm Beach, Florida
3970 RCA Boulevard, Suite 7000
Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410
Telephone: (561) 622-7018
Email: nsu-palmbeach@nsu.nova.edu
Las Vegas, Nevada
8945 West Russell Road, Suite 170
Las Vegas, Nevada 89148
Telephone: (702) 942-3455
Email: nsu-lasvegas@nsu.nova.edu
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NSU Health Care Clinics
The Health Professions Division Health Care Centers serve as integral parts of the training programs. They also provide a
vital community function by bringing health care service to areas whose medical needs tradition­ally have gone unmet.
NSU Health Care Center at North Miami Beach
1750 NE 167th Street
North Miami Beach, Florida
This facility houses a full-service primary care family medicine prac­tice as well as a state-of-the-art dental center, a
comprehensive optometric clinic and optical dis­pensary to serve the community.
Sanford L. Ziff Health Care Center
3200 South University Drive
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
A primary care facility with state-of-the-art full service radiologic-diagnostic capabilities. Housed here are family medicine,
pediatrics, X-ray, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physical therapy, physical medicine and rehabilitation, optometric clinic,
optical dispensary, and cardiology and other specialty practices (67,000 square feet).
Eye Institute of Fort Lauderdale
The Eye Institute at Fort Lauderdale located in the North Broward Hospital District building at 1111 West Broward Boulevard
provides primary eye care and pediatric/binocular vision services to the urban community in the downtown area as well as
the hospital district patients. Along with routine and emergency eye care, services for early detection and monitoring and
treatment of glaucoma and other eye diseases are provided by students supervised by experienced faculty members in
this state-of-the-art facility. Specialty care, including vision training for children up to 12 years of age, is offered by the Eye
Institute’s pediatric section. A wide selection of frames and lenses for both children and adults are avail­able at reasonable
cost on-site.
Southwest Focal Point Senior Center
301 NW 103rd Avenue
Pembroke Pines, Florida
This facility is designed to service the medical needs of geriatric patients.
Hearing and Balance Center
3600 South University Drive
Davie, Florida
This center services patients who need hearing and balance evalua­tions. Therapeutic intervention is available for pediatric
and adult auditory disorders as well as other disorders of the hearing and bal­ance systems.
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Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

38
Admissions
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

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General Admission Information
Prospective students are strongly urged to contact an admissions counselor, either in person or by phone, to talk about
NSU and the application process. NSU has several admissions offices serving prospective students, depending upon the
program for which the student is applying for admission.
To speak with an admissions counselor, students applying to programs in the College of Allied Health and Nursing, except for
the Entry-Level Nursing Program, should contact the Health Professions Division (HPD) Office of Admissions and Student
Affairs:
Health Professions Division Office of Admissions and Student Affairs
Nova Southeastern University
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Terry Building
3200 S. University Drive
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33328
Toll-free: 800-672-7223, ext. 21101
Telephone: (954) 262-1101
Web site: www.nova.edu/cwis/hpdasa
Students applying to programs in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences, Fischler School of Education and Human Services,
and H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship as well as the Entry-Level Nursing Program in the Health
Professions Division should contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions:
Office of Undergraduate Admissions
Nova Southeastern University
Horvitz Administration Building, Room 192
3301 College Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314-7796
Telephone:
• in Broward County, (954) 262-8000
• in Miami-Dade County, (305) 940-6447, ext. 28000
• from other locations, 800-338-4723, ext. 28000
• from the Caribbean islands and Canada, 800-554-6682 ext. 28000
Fax: (954) 262-3811
Email: admissions@nsu.nova.edu
All prospective undergraduate students applying for acceptance to Nova Southeastern University, regardless of location, format,
or program of study, should send their completed application form, transcripts, a $50 nonrefundable application fee, and any
additional documentation required by their program to Enrollment Processing Services (EPS). If, at any time, a student wishes to
withdraw his or her application from consideration, please do so in writing, directing this correspondence to EPS.
Nova Southeastern University
Enrollment Processing Services
Attn: Undergraduate Admissions (UGA) Please include major if known
P.O. Box 299000
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33329-9905
Students wishing to request information and/or apply for admission to undergraduate programs have the opportunity to
create their own VIP account on the admissions Web page: www.nova.edu/admissions.
See the Overview of Undergraduate Studies at NSU section for more information about undergraduate majors, minors, and
other programs offered by Nova Southeastern University.
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Admission Procedures and Requirements
To learn specific admission policies, procedures, and requirements for each individual program, center, college, or school,
prospective undergraduate students should review the following catalog guidelines, as well as contact an admissions
counselor (see General Admission Information) or visit www.nova.edu/admissions.
Application Deadlines
Prospective undergraduate students may apply for admission and be accepted to NSU on a rolling basis throughout the
entire year. However, students applying for admission to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing—Entry-Level Program must
submit their application no later than May 1 to be considered for admission for the August class and October 1 to be
con­sidered for the January class. However, for all programs, students should apply early to ensure that their application
receives prompt consideration.
For more information on a specific program’s application deadline or how to apply for priority consideration, students should
contact an admissions counselor (see General Admission Information) or refer to www.nova.edu/admissions.
Required Documentation
To apply for admission to Nova Southeastern University, all prospective students must submit a completed application form,
transcripts, a $50 nonrefundable application fee, and any additional documentation required by their program to Enrollment
Processing Services (EPS) (see General Admission Information for the address).
Students are provisionally admitted to an NSU undergraduate degree-seeking program based on a review of unofficial
transcripts and/or fulfillment of program-specific admission requirements. However, full admission is contingent on receipt
of final, official documents and fulfillment of program-specific admission requirements within 90 calendar days from the start
of the semester.
Final, official transcripts must show all courses completed, grades posted, and graduation dates (if applicable). The school
seal must be imprinted or embossed on the tran­script, which should be forwarded in a sealed envelope, directly from the
institution, in order to be considered an official transcript. Photocopies and facsimiles will not be accepted as final, official
transcripts. A final, official transcript reflecting final grades earned is required for each col­lege, university, or professional
school attended, even though transfer credit from one college may appear on another college’s transcript.
If final, official documents and/or program-specific admission requirements are not received and fulfilled by within 90
calendar days from the start of the semester, the student will not be allowed to continue attending class. Financial aid will
not be disbursed and future registrations will not be processed until the student has been fully admitted as a degree-seeking
student and all admission requirements have been satisfied and approved by the appropriate admission office and the
student’s program office.
An admissions committee made up of faculty members and admissions representatives reviews applications and makes a
determination of admittance or non-admittance. Factors affecting the committee’s decision include high school grade point
average (GPA), Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or American College Test (ACT) scores, previous college performance,
recommendations, interviews, and student essays. Applicants must provide high school and college transcripts from all
previous schools attended, whether or not credit was granted. The high school transcript may be omitted for students who
have at least 24 transferable credits from a regionally accredited institution. Students presenting transcripts from nonregionally accredited schools may petition to the director of undergraduate admissions to have their applications reviewed.
Applicants who attended or are graduates of foreign institutions must have coursework from the foreign institutions evaluated
for U.S. institutional equivalence. For more information, see the International Students and Foreign Credentials section in
Special Circumstances.
For information on additional documentation required for admittance into specific majors or programs, students should
review the following individual program requirements.
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41
Bachelor of Health Science—Online and Vascular Sonography Programs
Prospective B.H.Sc. Online and Vascular Sonography students are selected by the Department of Health Science committee
on admissions through consideration of the over­all qualities of the applicant.
The B.H.Sc.—Online program will admit midlevel clini­cians and allied health professionals with diverse education, work,
and life experiences who have demonstrated capacity to pursue the course of study and increasingly responsible positions
in health care. The B.H.Sc.—Vascular Sonography program will admit individuals with diverse education, work, and life
experiences who have demonstrated capacity to pursue the course of study in vascular sonography.
Areas of consideration for both programs include application content, academic record, prior health care experience,
letters of evaluation, and personal motivation. In special circumstances, a personal interview with members of the
committee may be required (phone interview may be substituted). All interview expenses are the respon­sibility of the
applicant.
Many criteria, in addition to academic credentials, play a role in the admission process for the B.H.Sc. Online and Vascular
Sonography programs. While the program allows the student to demon­strate academic capability, it does not assure
admission to any professional school. Admission to the B.H.Sc. Online and Vascular Sonography programs will not guarantee
admis­sion to any other program of Nova Southeastern University.
Upon receipt of the completed applica­tion, fees, credentials, and transcripts, the admissions officers and the College of
Allied Health and Nursing will review all material for evidence of the proper education, training, and back­ground to enter the
B.H.Sc. Online and Vascular Sonography programs.
In addition to the documents described in the Required Documentation section, students applying for entry to the B.H.Sc.—
Online program must submit evidence of the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Completion prior to matriculation of three semester hours (or equivalent) of college-level written composition from a
regionally accredited college or university with a minimum grade of C (GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale). (Effective January
1, 2006.)
An associate’s degree in a field of health from a regionally accredited college or university with a mini­mum cumulative
GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 grading scale OR a diploma or certificate of comple­tion in a field of health care.
In order for this coursework and edu­cation to be considered for credit, an applicant must submit a student-pre­pared
learning portfolio requesting assessment of prior experiences for academic credit. This will describe all traditional,
online, military, and other health care education, as well as work-related experience and health care-related
conferences attended. A resume or CV, tran­scripts, and/or official documentation of attendance must accompany
all prior learning portfolios. The admis­sions committee will review the portfolio to determine the amount of credit
given for prior learning.
Documented evidence demonstrat­ing education or experience in the health care field within the past five years.
All applicants must show evidence of computer skills through course work or self-study prior to the end of the first
term. Students may obtain instruction through the NSU Student Microcomputer Laboratory or other training facilities.
Two letters of evaluation from indi­viduals other than relatives, such as academic advisors, professors, or clinical or
nonclinical supervisors, or community associates.
Graduates from programs other than those from regionally accredited col­leges or universities must submit a studentprepared learning portfo­lio requesting Assessment of Prior Experiences for Academic Credit.
Copies of national and or state pro­fessional certification, licensure, or registration, if applicable.
A complete resume or CV.
In addition to the documents described in the Required Documentation section, students applying for entry to the B.H.Sc.—
Vascular Sonography program must submit evidence of the following:
•
42
A minimum of 30 semester credits (9 credits of Natural and Physical Sciences including 3 required credits in
General or Radiology Physics, 9 credits of Social and Behavioral Sciences, 6 credits of Humanities, 3 credits of
English Composition, and 3 credits of College Math above 1000 level), from a regionally accredited college or
university with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 grading scale. Only courses with a minimum GPA of 2.0
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011

•
•
•
•
•
on a 4.0 grading may be considered for possible transfer of credit.
All applicants must show evidence of computer skills through course­work or self-study prior to the end of the first
term. Students may obtain instruction through the NSU Student Microcomputer Laboratory or other training facilities.
Two letters of evaluation from indi­viduals other than relatives such as academic advisors, professors, or clinical or
nonclinical supervisors, or community associates.
Graduates from programs other than those from regionally accredited col­leges or universities must submit a studentprepared learning portfo­lio requesting Assessment of Prior Experiences for Academic Credit.
Copies of national and or state pro­fessional certification, licensure or registration, if applicable.
A complete resume or CV.
Bachelor of Science in Nursing
In addition to the documents described in the Required Documentation section, students applying for entry to the Bachelor
of Science in Nursing—Entry-Level Track must submit evidence of the following:
•
•
•
•
Applicants must have completed a minimum of 30 semester hours (or equivalent quarter hours) of specific
undergraduate coursework from a regionally accredited college or uni­versity prior to matriculation into the nursing
program.
Completion of each prerequisite course with a grade of C or higher.
Overall GPA of 2.75 or higher on a 4.0 scale.
Two letters of recommendation from individuals other than relatives (academic instructors, professors, or academic
advisors).
The completed application for entry into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing—Entry-Level Program must be received no
later than May 1 to be considered for admission for the August class and October 1 to be con­sidered for the January
class.
In addition to the documents described in the Required Documentation section, students applying for entry to the Bachelor
of Science in Nursing—R.N. to B.S.N. Track must submit evidence of the following:
•
•
Overall GPA 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale.
Proof of current registered nurse (R.N.) licensure.
Licensure must remain current throughout the program. Students who do not hold a United States (U.S.) nursing
license must receive prior approval from the department chair and College of Allied Health and Nursing dean for
admission into the program.
Applicants must submit two letters of recommendation from individuals other than relatives: one from aca­demic
instructor, professor, or academic advisor and one from a community associate.
The nursing department has rolling admissions for the R.N. to B.S.N. track. Candidates must submit all applications and
transcripts by August 1 for priority consideration for the August entering class and by December 1 for priority consider­ation
for the January entering class. Applications are accepted year round for R.N. to B.S.N. entering classes.
In addition to the documents described in the Required Documentation section, students applying for entry to the Bachelor
of Science in Nursing—R.N. to M.S.N. Track must submit evidence of the following:
Initial admission criteria would be the current admission requirements for the RN to BSN degree:
•
•
•
•
Applicants must have an overall GPA of 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale.
Applicants must have a current/active United States R.N. license. If the applicant resides out of the United States
and does not hold this license, the applicant’s application must be approved by the nursing department chair and
College of Allied Health and Nursing dean.
Students must complete all pre-requisite general education courses prior to beginning the M.S.N.
The student will complete three terms of B.S.N. coursework. At the end of three terms, the student must meet the
3.0 or higher GPA admission requirement for the M.S.N. The 3.0 GPA will be calculated from the B.S.N. courses
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43
•
completed at NSU. Students enrolled in the R.N. to M.S.N. program who do not meet the 3.0 GPA requirements in
the third term will be moved to the R.N. to B.S.N. program and complete the two additional terms for the B.S.N. The
program directors for the R.N. to B.S.N. and the graduate program director will review applicants at the completion
of term III. Written notification to the student regarding their progression into the M.S.N. program will be done by the
nursing department.
Applicants must submit two letters of recommendation from individuals other than relatives: one from aca­demic
instructor, professor, or academic advisor and one from a community associate.
The nursing department has rolling admissions for the R.N. to M.S.N. track. Candidates must submit all applications and
transcripts by August 1 for priority consideration for the August entering class and by December 1 for priority consider­ation
for the January entering class. Applications are accepted year-round for R.N. to M.S.N. entering classes.
Professional and Liberal Studies (PALS) Program—Day Programs
In addition to the documents described in the Required Documentation section, freshman applicants must submit all final
official transcripts reflecting academic coursework prior to enrollment and final grades earned (e.g., current high-school
transcript or GED equivalent), including proof of graduation and SAT or ACT scores, within the first 90 days of the first day
of the semester.
In addition to the documents described in the Required Documentation section, transfer applicants, defined as students
with at least 24 transferable credits from a regionally accredited institution, must submit official, final college transcripts from
all previous schools attended, whether or not credit was awarded, reflecting final grades earned. If, at the time of application,
students have any courses in progress at another institution, a final, official transcript must be submitted.
Professional and Liberal Studies (PALS) Program (day) students, on receiving notification of acceptance, should promptly
inform the Office of Undergraduate Admissions in writing of their intention to enroll and send a $200 deposit to be credited
toward tuition. To receive a refund of tuition deposits, students must rescind their acceptance in writing by May 1 for August
(fall) admission, by September 1 for January (winter) admission, and by January 1 for May (spring/summer) admission.
Career Development Program—Evening/Online/Off-Campus Programs
In addition to the documents described in the Required Documentation section, all applicants to the Career Development
Program must submit proof of high school graduation (or GED equivalent) if they have not previously attended a collegelevel institution. Transfer students, defined as students with at least 24 transferable credits from a regionally accredited
institution, must submit official college transcripts reflecting final grades earned from all previous schools attended, whether
or not credit was awarded. If, at the time of application, students have any courses in progress at another institution, a final,
official transcript reflecting final grades earned must be submitted.
Special Programs
Dual Admission Program Applications
NSU offers dual admission to a select number of highly motivated, academically talented students interested in pursuing
both an undergraduate degree and future graduate studies. For information and a list of dual admission programs, see
the Dual Admission Program section in Academic Resources and Procedures. Students interested in applying for dual
admission programs should speak with an admissions counselor to determine eligibility.
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Honors Program Applications
Students must complete a separate application for Undergraduate Honors Programs, available at www.fcas.nova.edu/
honors/appinfo.cfm. For more information about honors programs, see Honors Program in Academic Resources and
Procedures.
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Special Circumstances
Home-Schooling
Nova Southeastern University welcomes undergraduate applicants who have been home-schooled for their secondary
school education. Home-schooled applicants should provide SAT or ACT scores and a passing GED score to demonstrate
high-school equivalence. As with all candidates for admission, each applicant is considered on his or her individual merits
and potential for academic success at NSU. Acceptance is not based on any one criterion, and in appropriate cases,
requirements for documentation may vary or be modified.
International Students and Foreign Credentials
International students applying to NSU’s main campus, or to any of the university’s Florida Student Educational Centers,
are required to obtain a student (F-1) visa or an exchange visitor (J-1) visa. Students are not permitted to study in the
United States on a visitor (B-2) visa. To apply, international students should send a completed application form and a $50
nonrefundable application fee, following the program’s application instructions.
Transcript Evaluation
Applicants with foreign credentials must have the equivalent of a United States high school diploma. Applicants should
submit all secondary school and college-level transcripts and certificates and provide official English-language translations
for any transcripts that are not already in English. Credits earned at non-U.S. institutions must be evaluated for equivalents
by an outside agency. Applicants are responsible for all evaluation fees. Foreign coursework must be evaluated by one of
the following services:
World Education Services
P.O. Box 745
Old Chelsea Station
New York, New York 10113-0745
Telephone: (212) 966-6311
Email: www.wes.org
Josef Silny & Associates
7101 SW 102nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33173
Telephone: (305) 273-1616
Fax: (305) 273-1338 fax
Web site: www.jsilny.com
Email: info@jsilny.com
Educational Credential Evaluators
P.O. Box 514070
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53203-3470
Telephone: (414) 289-3400
Email: www.ece.org
English Proficiency Requirements
Applicants to the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences, Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and H. Wayne
Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship, whose native language is not English, are required to demonstrate
English proficiency by one of the following methods:
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46
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 213 on the computerized test; 550 on the paper test
format, or 79 on the Internet format.
International English Language Testing System (IELTS) requires a 6.0 on the test module.
Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) with a score of at least 480 in the critical reading section, or the American
College Test (ACT) with a score of at least 20 on the reading section.
Applicants may also show English proficiency by achieving a grade of C or higher in a freshman level English
composition course at a U.S. regionally accredited institution.
Applicants may also show English proficiency by passing Academa II Levels from NSU’s Language Institute.
Test results should be sent directly to the application center. Students who are applying to majors in the College of Allied
Health and Nursing do not need to demonstrate English proficiency.
Financial Documents
International applicants must submit an original bank statement or original letter from a financial institution indicating ability
to meet all costs of education without financial aid from NSU. The minimum amount is determined by a budget prepared
by the NSU Office of Student Financial Assistance. A notarized letter from a sponsor is required if a public or private
organization or an individual sponsors the student. The financial guarantee must include provisions for any dependents who
will be residing with the student in the United States. Students should check with the Office of International Students for
current minimum amounts at www.nova.edu/cwis/registrar/isss/forms.
Medical Insurance
International students must purchase medical insurance (J-1 visas only). Students should contact the international student
academic advisor for further information.
Acceptance Letters and Deposits
After NSU has received all of the above information and has granted admission, an acceptance letter will be sent. The
process of issuing the I-20 will begin only after all final, official documents have been received, and on receipt of a $200
tuition deposit. Requirements for international online students may differ. To receive a refund of tuition deposits, international
students must rescind their acceptance, in writing, by May 1 for August (fall) admission, by September 1 for January (winter)
admission, and by January 1 for May (spring/summer) admission.
Non-Degree-Seeking Students
A non-degree-seeking student is one who wishes to take undergraduate coursework, but does not intend to pursue a degree
at the time of application.
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program
The non-degree-seeking student must meet the following admission requirements in order to take classes in the B.H.Sc.—
Online Program:
•
•
Completion prior to matriculation of three semester hours (or equivalent) of college-level written composition from a
regionally accredited college or university with a minimum grade of C (GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale). (Effective January
1, 2006)
An associate’s degree in a field of health from a regionally accredited college or university with a minimum cumulative
GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 grading scale by
OR
A diploma or certificate of completion in a field of health care.
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Due to the limited number of seats available in the program, preference for admission and registration will be given to
degree-seeking students. Non-degree-seeking students are limited to taking a maximum of nine semester hours of B.H.Sc.
coursework. Enrollment in these courses does not guarantee acceptance into the B.H.Sc. degree program or any other
Nova Southeastern University program.
If after taking classes in the B.H.Sc. program a non-degree-seeking student decides to pursue the B.H.Sc. degree, the
student must resubmit an application to the program to be a degree-seeking student and must meet all the admission
requirements for the B.H.Sc. degree program.
A non-degree-seeking student who, after taking classes in the B.H.Sc. program, decides to apply to be a degree seeking
student may request a transfer of credits taken as a non-degree-seeking student in accordance with the transfer policy of the
B.H.Sc. program. All applicants must show evidence of computer skills through coursework or self-study prior to the end of
the first term. Students may obtain instruction through the NSU Student Microcomputer Laboratory or other training facilities.
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences,
Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
Special (non-degree seeking) students may take up to 24 credit hours or enroll in a specialty program without being admitted
to a degree program. The 24-credit limit does not apply to students who have already earned a baccalaureate degree.
Special students should indicate their status on their application form and submit it with the application fee and a transcript
from the last college attended. Students who have never attended college must submit a transcript indicating completion
of high school or GED equivalent. Once the admissions process is complete, students may register for courses. Special
students are not eligible for a degree unless they follow the regular admissions procedures for degree-seeking students,
including a new application for admission to a degree-seeking program. Additionally, special students are not eligible for
financial aid.
Non-degree seeking students seeking a paralegal certificate must hold a baccalaureate degree. Students in this and other
certificate programs may be eligible for financial aid. Contact an admissions counselor for details.
Resident Aliens
Applicants who are resident aliens must provide proof of resident alien status at the time of application.
Second Bachelor’s Degree
Individuals who already hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, including NSU, may earn a second
bachelor’s degree from NSU by completing a minimum of 30 additional credits toward the second degree. At least 50
percent of the major must be taken at NSU.
Suspensions
Applicants who are currently under suspension or who have been suspended or dismissed from another postsecondary
institution are not eligible for admission to Nova Southeastern University. Applicants may appeal this policy and request a
waiver by the admissions committee. That waiver may be granted only after a review of additional information. Students
who are currently under suspension or who have been suspended or dismissed from NSU should refer to the Academic
Requirements and Progress section in Academic Resources and Procedures for policy information.
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Concurrent Enrollment
Students enrolled at NSU are not generally permitted to be enrolled at other institutions at the same time. Only under
unusual circumstances will permission for concurrent enrollment be granted. See the Enrollment at Other Universities
section in Academic Resources and Procedures for policies and requirements.
Delayed Enrollment and Reapplication
for Admission
Students who apply for admission but do not complete the admissions process, or are admitted but never attended NSU,
may reactivate their applications within a period of 12 months after the intended semester of enrollment. For example, a
student admitted for fall semester must enroll no later than the following fall semester. After the 12 month deadline, students
must reapply for admission and a new application fee will be assessed. Students who wish to apply for readmission must
clear all financial and academic holds from their record before a readmission application is processed.
Transfer Credits
NSU welcomes undergraduate students who have earned college credits at other institutions. Award of transfer credit is
based upon faculty review that focuses on comparability of learning outcomes. Articulation agreements exist with both
public and independent institutions. Because articulation agreements are evaluated periodically, students should contact an
admissions counselor for information on current articulation and transfer agreements.
Students interested in transferring to NSU should contact an admissions counselor to discuss how prior college credits
can be applied toward an NSU degree. Community college students should contact an admissions counselor as early as
possible in their college career in order to choose associate’s degree coursework that will be appropriate for transfer into
their intended NSU bachelor’s degree program.
Transfer credit evaluation will be completed by an academic advisor by the end of the first semester of enrollment. Applicable
credit will be transferred based on all final official transcripts received. Transfer students must provide final official transcripts
from all previously attended colleges for transfer credit evaluation. Students will be advised to take courses based on the
official evaluation in their file.
Official transcripts from all colleges or universities previously attended should be sent directly to:
Nova Southeastern University
Enrollment Processing Services
Attn: Undergraduate Admissions (UGA) Please include major if known
P.O. Box 299000
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33329-9905
NSU may transfer a maximum of 90 eligible semester credits toward a bachelor’s degree, including credit for CLEP,
proficiency exams, and prior experiential learning. Students may transfer a maximum of 30 eligible semester credits towards
the Fischler Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree. Remaining credits and at least 50 percent of credits in the student’s major,
minor, and/or certificate areas must be earned at NSU in regular academic offerings. See the Academic Requirements and
Progress section.
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Transferring NSU Credits to Other Institutions
Credits earned at NSU are eligible for transfer to programs at other institutions. Students should contact the institution of
intended transfer for their policies related to accepting transfer credit.
Assessment of Prior Experiences for
Academic Credit
NSU undergraduates may convert prior professional, military, and other life experiences into academic credit through four
different mechanisms. All requests for prior learning credit must be initiated after 12 credits at NSU, but before students
complete 24 credits. Credits earned through prior learning will be noted on transcripts.
1. General and Subject Testing
Students may meet certain general education, major, and elective requirements in a variety of areas through
objective tests in which they demonstrate specific subject knowledge. These tests include the College Board’s
College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), DANTES Subject Standardized Test (DSST) (formerly known as
DANTES), ACT-PEP exams, and New York University proficiency exams. Students who plan to take these exams
as prerequisites for other courses must successfully complete the exams before registering for more advanced
coursework. Students who enroll in courses that require TECH 1110 (Technology in the Information Age) as a
prerequisite may satisfy the prerequisite by taking an exam that tests their computer knowledge. Students must
contact their academic advisor before taking any exams. See the Office of Academic Services (OAS) section in
Academic Resources and Procedures for more information about testing services.
2. Trade and Technical School Portfolios
Students who have attended trade or technical schools may submit portfolios that describe learning experiences
they believe should be applied for credit in their NSU program. The official review of school portfolios is conducted
by qualified faculty, who will identify courses that may be applied to NSU programs through an examination of
transcripts, previous course syllabi, students’ autobiographies, written narratives describing previous classes, and
other documents. Students interested in requesting academic credit for prior experiences should work directly with
the Office of Transfer Evaluation Services, which is responsible for coordinating this process.
3. Full Portfolios (for course challenges)
Students who intend to challenge a specific college-level course must submit a full portfolio that presents their
knowledge of the course topic. Full portfolios are evaluated by an appropriate faculty member. Students may earn
a maximum of 25 percent of their credits through the full portfolio process. Full portfolios include course syllabi and
descriptions; student resumes and autobiographies; written skill inventories that compare learning experiences with
equivalent course subject matter; and other relevant documents, including certificates, training documents, and
verification of employment. Students interested in submitting a full portfolio for academic credit should work directly
with the Office of Transfer Evaluation Services.
4. Standard Grants
NSU has established a series of standard college credit grants for common, documented learning experiences.
These experiences include certain training courses; military experiences; licenses; and health care industry
training experiences, such as EMT and paramedic training, and nursing education in training hospitals. Specific
documentation is required for each standard grant. The number of credits awarded depends on the major program’s
transfer policies.
For more information about prior learning options, contact the Office of Transfer Evaluation Services at (954) 262-8414 or
800-806-3680.
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Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Credit
Students who have completed Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) courses may receive college
credit toward the bachelor’s degree at NSU. Eligible courses and credit granted vary. Students should consult with an
academic advisor to confirm credit awards. For more information on academic advising, refer to the Academic Advising
section in Academic Resources and Procedures.
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Academic Resources
and Procedures
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Academic Advising
Academic advisors provide students with confidential academic, social, and developmental advising to ensure they receive
the individual attention they need to succeed. It is strongly recommended that all undergraduate students entering a
program, changing specializations/concentrations, requesting transfer of credits, or attempting to meet specific renewal or
certification requirements contact an academic advisor before registering for classes. Academic advisors additionally serve
as liaisons and referral agents by helping students gain needed assistance from other NSU divisions or from the community.
Students should maintain regular contact with their academic advisors throughout their academic career at NSU. Students
are encouraged to consult with an academic advisor if they believe their rights as students are being, or have been, violated.
Students are also encouraged to discuss aspects of their education with faculty members, program administrators, and
directors. For current academic advisor assignments, call or visit the Web site of the appropriate college or school.
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Academic Advising and Administrative Support—
Department of Health Science
Each student is required to contact the program director for academic advising prior to beginning the program. The program
director and the department coordinator will advise and assist the student during their matriculation into the program.
Students may communicate with the director and coordinator via phone, fax, email, or in person if they visit campus.
Department of Health Science–Online
Telephone: (954) 262-1209 for administrative support or (954) 288-9695 for academic advising
Department of Health Science–Vascular Sonography
Telephone: (954) 262-1964
Academic Advising—Nursing Department
A designated nursing faculty member will help students with course selections for each semester. Prior to selecting courses
for the next semester, students should review all nursing program course requirements and tracking. If students have
difficulty with registration or financial aid issues, they should contact their program director immediately for assistance.
Nursing Department
Telephone: (954) 262-1703
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Office of Academic Advising
Telephone: (954) 262-7990
Fischler School of Education and Human Services
Office of Enrollment Services
www.schoolofed.nova.edu/sso
Main Campus Academic Advising
Telephone: (954) 262-7900
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Off-Campus/Online Academic Advising
Telephone: (954) 262-1559
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
Office of Academic Advising
Telephone: (954) 262-5067
www.huizenga.nova.edu/currentStudents/OfficeofAcademicAdvising.cfm
Academic Requirements and Progress
To remain in good academic standing, students must maintain the required minimum grade point average (GPA) or higher
on all credits attempted. Students receiving financial aid should also refer to the Office of Student Financial Assistance
for information about minimum GPA requirements for financial aid programs. Some scholarship opportunities listed in
Scholarships and Grants for Undergraduate Students may also have minimum GPA requirements.
Transcripts
Each student’s academic achievement is reviewed each semester and a transcript is available on WebSTAR. The transcript
includes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Grades and credits earned
Deficiencies (Incompletes, Failures, Probation, etc.)
Semester GPA and cumulative GPA
Honors (Chancellor’s List, etc.)
Withdrawals
Minimum Grade Requirements
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program
Effective for new matriculants in or after January 2006, students will be required to obtain a grade of C or better (greater than
or equal to 2.0 on a 4.0 scale) in every required core course. Students receiving a C-, D+, or D, in a required core course
will be considered to have failed and be required to take the course at its next scheduled offering.
All students receiving an F in a required core course will be required to remediate it by repeating the scheduled course and
achieving a C or better at its next scheduled offering.
Upon achieving a C or better in a repeated course, an E will be noted after the original grade, and that grade will then be
exempt from GPA calculation. The new course grade will be noted on the transcript followed by an I, indicating the new
grade will be included in the GPA calculation. Additional tuition will be charged for any repeated course.
A student who has experienced two or more course failures while in the Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program
may be dismissed from the program. Any course failed on first taking will be considered a course failure. Passing a course
through retake or reexamination does not negate the original failure for purposes of retention in the program.
Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography Program
Students must pass all courses with a C or better in all required courses for the Bachelor of Health Science degree in
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Vascular Sonography. Students who receive a grade of C–, D+, D, or F, in any course (excluding clinical externship)
must remediate through repeating the course at its next scheduled offering or reexamination and achieve a C or better. A
subsequent grade of C–, D+, D, or F, in any course may result in dismissal from the program.
Upon achieving a C or better in a repeated course, an E will be noted after the original grade, and that grade will then be
exempt from GPA calculation. The new course grade will be noted on the transcript, followed by an I, indicating the new
grade will be included in the GPA calculation. Additional tuition will be charged for any repeated course.
For purposes of retention in the B.H.Sc.—Vascular Sonography Program, any course grade below a C will be considered
a course failure. No more than two courses may be passed through remediation. Students are allowed only one C–, D+, D,
F, or W in one didactic vascular (BSV) course. Receipt of a second such grade may result in dismissal from the program.
Bachelor of Science in Nursing
Although faculty members do not believe that grades should be the primary motivation for learning, grades are a reality
everyone faces. The Nursing Department has several policies:
• Each nursing course consists of unique learning objectives, activities, evaluation, and grading procedures. Students
should make sure that they understand how grades are determined in each course and what their accompanying
responsibilities are. Faculty members will distribute specific policies related to each course on paper or via the
Internet. Students are responsible for obtaining a copy and following those course policies.
• Students must earn a grade of C or better in all courses required for the B.S.N., including prerequisite courses,
general education, and health science (BHS) courses. Students who receive a grade of C–, D+, D, D–, F, or W in
one course must repeat the course and achieve a C or better. A subsequent grade of C–, D+, D, D–, F, or W in any
course will result in dismissal from the program.
• Students must earn a grade of C or better in each nursing course that is a prerequisite in order to advance to the
next semester in the nursing program.
• Students must demonstrate a grade of C or better in the didactic nursing course and a P in the clinical component
in order to receive a final grade of C or better.
• Students must meet with the program director to initiate a withdrawal. A student who withdraws without meeting
with the program director may be ineligible to return to the program.
• Entry-level students are required to maintain competence in pharmacology and math. Failure to maintain this
knowledge may result in a course failure.
• Students enrolled in general education or BHS courses will follow the academic course calendar and policies of
those departments.
• Failing grades will be included in calculating the GPA for that term and the cumulative GPA to that point. When the
student successfully repeats the course, the failing grade will then be exempt from the GPA calculation.
Policies relating to graduate courses in the R.N. to M.S.N. program may be found in the Health Professions Division catalog
and the College of Allied Health and Nursing handbook.
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences,
Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
All students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 to be considered in good academic standing.
In some degree programs, students must maintain a higher cumulative grade point average or a higher cumulative grade
point average in major courses. See program information for details.
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Review of Academic Progress
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Course Failures
Failing any course, didactic or fieldwork, will result in the matter being referred to the department’s or program’s Committee
on Student Progress and may lead to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. In some programs, one or more
courses may be designated as prerequisite or core competency coursework and critical for successful completion of the
curriculum, such that failure of a single prerequisite or core competency course may lead to dismissal. Course failures
that require remediation by retake may significantly extend the length of the program of study or require the student to
withdraw from the program until the course is offered again. Students may be charged additional tuition for repeated
courses.
Committee on Student Progress
Each department and program within the College of Allied Health and Nursing—audiology, physician assistant, nursing,
occupational therapy, physical therapy, Bachelor of Health Science, Bachelor of Health Science Vascular Sonography,
Master of Health Science, and Doctor of Health Science—has a Committee on Student Progress (CSP). It is the CSP’s
responsibility to conduct proceedings to determine whether a student is experiencing problems with academic progress or
has violated a regulation, policy, and/or professional or behavioral codes of conduct. The CSP examines individual cases
and makes appropriate recommendations to the program director and/or department chair, who determines the final status
of individual student. Students are advised in writing by the program director and/or department chair, of the decisions and
are bound to comply. CSP recommendations may include, but are not limited to: no action taken, remediation, warnings,
probation, suspension, dismissal, or expulsion. These recommendations can cover one, any combination of, or all of the
following issues: academic, disciplinary, or professional. Students have the right to appeal the decision or recommendation.
A request for appeal must follow the procedures outlined in the College of Allied Health and Nursing Student Handbook
section titled Student Appeals.
Academic Warning, Academic Probation, and Disciplinary Probation
For students in the College of Allied Health and Nursing, the specific program’s Committee on Student Progress (CSP) will
make recommendations to the program director and/or department chair when a student is not making progress toward
meeting degree requirements or is failing to meet the attitudinal and behavioral objectives and/or professional standards of
the program or department. The program director and/or department chair reviews the CSP recommendations and notifies
the student, in writing, of their decision, which may include, but is not limited to, academic warning, academic probation,
or disciplinary probation. This will be noted on the official transcript either as AW (academic warning), AP (academic
probation), or DI (disciplinary probation) to indicate issues related to unprofessional behavior. A student on any type of
probation will be restricted from the following: holding office in any student or college sponsored organization, placement
on the Chancellor’s or Dean’s List, and receiving funds for student-related activities. The college and the Division Office
of Student Affairs will also be notified. The program director and/or department chair and the dean may restrict other
activities. Failure to bring the GPA up to a satisfactory level and to remove failing grades within the academic year may
result in disciplinary dismissal.
Suspension and Dismissal
Failure to complete successfully any repeated course or clinical segment will result in automatic suspension, and may lead
to dismissal, regardless of the student’s GPA. This applies to didactic and field coursework. Failing two or more courses,
didactic or fieldwork, will result in automatic suspension and may lead to dismissal. In some programs, one or more courses
may be designated as prerequisite or core competency coursework and critical for successful completion of the curriculum
such that failure of a single prerequisite or core competency course may lead to dismissal. Any student falling in the above
categories may be required to repeat courses (at his or her expense), at the recommendation of the department chair or the
program director and at the discretion of the dean. Any student with a grade point average below the minimum established
in their individual program of study for two semesters will be suspended and may be dismissed. Unprofessional conduct
may result in dismissal. All dismissals are evaluated by and based on the recommendations of the Committee on Student
Progress. For further information on academic dismissal and the process of appeals, refer to the Problem Resolution
Procedure section of this catalog.
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The college reserves the right, and the student, by his or her act of matriculation, concedes to the college the right to require
withdrawal at any time the college deems it necessary to safeguard its standards of scholarship, professional behavior, and
compliance with regulations, or for such other reasons as are deemed appropriate.
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences,
Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
For students in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences, the Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and the
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship, the Office of the Dean reviews student academic progress at
the end of each semester. Students whose grade point averages (GPA) fall below minimum GPA requirements will receive
notification that they have been placed in one of the categories of academic progress listed below. All of these categories
will become permanently recorded on official student transcripts.
Academic Warning: Students whose semester GPA falls below 2.0 (regardless of the cumulative GPA).
Academic Probation: Students who have been previously placed on academic warning, have attempted at least 12
cumulative credits (including courses from which the student has withdrawn), and have a cumulative GPA below 2.0.
Continued Academic Probation: Students who have been previously placed on Academic Probation, retain a cumulative
GPA below 2.0 but have earned a semester GPA above 2.0. Students who successfully petition and return following
suspension will also be placed on continued academic probation.
Off Academic Probation: Students who achieve a minimum cumulative GPA above 2.0 when previously on academic
probation.
Academic Suspension: Students on academic probation or continued academic probation who fail to earn a minimally
acceptable GPA in the next semester of enrollment. Length of academic suspension is two semesters. Students are
automatically dropped from all registered courses.
Students must petition for readmission by the date indicated on their suspension notice (see Notification and Appeals in
this same section of the catalog). Students who are approved to reenroll after serving academic suspension are readmitted
under continuing academic probation. While serving on academic suspension, students may not make progress in their
NSU degree programs. Credits earned at other institutions during suspension will not be transferred to NSU.
Academic Dismissal: Students who were previously on academic suspension and readmitted will be academically
dismissed if they fail to meet a minimally acceptable semester GPA of 2.0. Students are automatically dropped from all
registered courses.
Academic Dismissal from the university is final. Only documented, extreme extenuating circumstances will be considered in
appeal and in petition to return. Students who wish to contest the decision for academic dismissal may do so by submitting
an appeal within 30 days of the dismissal.
If the student chooses not to appeal or the appeal is denied, the student can petition to return to NSU. The petition to return
must be submitted in writing after two or more years have lapsed since the dismissal.
Letters of appeal and petitions should be submitted to the Office of the Dean of the student’s college. Decision will be given
to the student in writing from the dean of the college of the student or the dean’s designee. If a student’s readmission is
granted, the notation of dismissal will remain on their transcripts, and their status will appear as “continued probation” upon
readmission.
Notification and Appeals
A student placed on academic suspension or academically dismissed will be sent a letter to his/her permanent mailing
address. The student will have until the deadline specified in the academic dismissal or suspension letter to appeal to the
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Academic Progress Committee. The committee includes faculty members from each academic division and a representative
from the Office of Academic Services. The committee reviews appeals for suspension and dismissal. Notification of decisions
will be sent to the permanent mailing address of the student. If the appeal is approved the student will need to contact their
academic advisor to register for the next available course start date. For more information, the student may contact an
academic advisor or the Office of the Dean.
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Academic Requirements—New Students
Students are expected to demonstrate skills appropriate for college-level work.
Professional and Liberal Studies Program
All students in the Professional and Liberal Studies (PALS) Program are encouraged to take appropriate written
communication and mathematics courses during their first semester of enrollment at NSU. Students are placed in these
courses based on standardized (SAT, ACT, or TOEFL) test scores or prior college credit. Students without the above test
scores or college-level writing and/or math will be automatically placed into COMP 1000 and/or MATH 1000 courses.
Students may also take challenge exams to place out of these courses. Each challenge exam may be taken only once. For
specific challenge exam procedures and practice exams, students should contact the Academic Services’ Testing Office.
Tutoring in mathematics and writing is also available through the Office of Academic Services. While students are acquiring
these skills, their enrollment is limited to courses approved by an academic advisor, generally at the 1000 and 2000 levels.
Career Development Programs
Students who enter the Career Development Program without transfer credits in writing and/or mathematics must enroll in
COMP 1000 and/or MATH 1000. Students may take challenge exams in writing and/or mathematics to determine eligibility
for the college-level courses listed in the general education requirements.
Transfer Students
All new transfer students must demonstrate college-level skills in writing and mathematics. Transfer students can do this
by presenting transcripts from previous institutions that indicate comparable courses taken. Alternatively, transfer students
may take the required developmental courses in writing and mathematics or take challenge exams to place out of them.
Academic Requirements—Writing Across
the Curriculum
Each undergraduate course includes written assignments, in the language of instruction, that make up at least 25 percent
of the final course grade. Each course contains at least eight (8) pages (approximately 2,000 words or their equivalent)
of writing, with faculty members providing feedback on these assignments. Written assignments can include (but are not
limited to) the following: essays, summaries, memos, lesson plans, journal entries, lab reports, project proposals, progress
reports, case studies, and project reviews.
Address and Name Changes
NSU maintains student contact information through WebSTAR at www.webstar.nova.edu, including current mailing address
and telephone number. Students should update their records in WebSTAR and notify their academic division if there is a
change in their name and/or contact information.
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Attendance Policy
As the educational process at NSU depends on a close working relationship between students and faculty members, students
are expected to attend class regularly. Specific requirements are established by individual instructors and are communicated
in the syllabus or at the first class meeting. The college or school administration supports faculty attendance requirements.
Students are responsible for the academic consequences resulting from class absences. Missed assignments/tests can be
made up solely at the discretion of the course professor/instructor. Students who miss a class must inform instructors before
the class meeting. Students who miss class because of an illness or other emergency should contact the instructor as soon
as possible to arrange for make-up work. The university reserves the right to administratively withdraw any student from a
course if that student fails to appear on the first scheduled day of class.
Attendance Policy—Health Professions Division (HPD)
At Nova Southeastern University’s Health Professions Division, attendance at all scheduled instructional periods is
mandatory. Students are required to follow the specific center or program policies within the College of Allied Health and
Nursing.
Failure to consider any additional requirement is noted in the evaluation of a student’s academic performance and professional
attitude and may result in a failing grade for the course. Students shall report to the College of Allied Health and Nursing’s
Office of Student Affairs, in writing, the reason for all absences within 24 hours of each occurrence.
Students whose reasons are unacceptable will be subject to disciplinary action. In the event of an emergency absence,
requests for an excused absence must be made to the college’s Office of Student Affairs for a decision. All students are
instructed to consult their specific program handbook with regard to additional or supplemental attendance policies.
1. Excused Absences
a. Illness: The division must be notified as soon as possible, or at the latest, on return to school, of all absences due
to illness. For unusual or prolonged illness, the Office of Student Affairs must be notified as soon as possible. These
absences will be evaluated on an individual basis.
b. Special circumstances: unusual circumstances resulting in absences (e.g., death in the immediate family) must be
cleared with the Office of Student Affairs on an individual basis, preferably before the student is absent from class.
2. Unexcused Absences
Absences not falling into the first category are unexcused absences. The administration realizes that special
circumstances may arise on rare occasions that lead to an unexcused absence. However, unexcused absences are
neither a right nor an entitlement of the student. Unexcused absences may result in a written reprimand from the dean,
with a copy to be placed in the student’s permanent file, plus a loss of 10 percentage points in the course or failure in
the course.
Each laboratory, assignment, or examination missed must be made up at the discretion and convenience of the
instructor. If, in the judgment of the dean, a pattern of absences appears to surface, action may be taken, up to and
including failure in the courses involved or dismissal from college.
3. Clinical Rotations, Placements, Fieldwork, or Externship
Attendance while on clinical rotations follows different procedures, which are noted in the policy and procedures Clinical
Rotation Handbook or Clerkship /Externship Manual distributed prior to going on rotations.
4. Promptness
Promptness is a trait a proper health care practitioner must display. Additionally, tardiness in class disturbs both the
lecturer and other members of the class and is thus markedly inconsiderate and rude. University class hours are from
8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. daily, Monday through Friday. Class schedules are issued from time to time as an aid to faculty
members and students, but the administration reserves the right to make changes, assign Saturday hours, or deviate
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from published schedules without notice.
Classes begin at 10 minutes after the hour. Any student not seated in his or her assigned seat by the time class begins
will be marked absent. Classes finish on the hour. If the student arrives within 20 minutes after the start of class, the
absence will be reduced to a half absence. Students will await the instructor’s arrival until at least 20 minutes after the
specified starting time, unless notified otherwise by an authorized person.
5. Religious Holidays
Absences for major religious and ethnic holidays may be excused at the discretion of the administration. Students are
required to obtain approval for their absences one week prior to the holiday.
Attendance Policy—Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program
All of the B.H.Sc.—Online Program courses are designed in distance learning formats. Each student holds the responsibility
to fulfill all class requirements, access recommended resources, and meet the appropriate deadlines for assignment
submission and exams. Students are required to access and participate in their Web-based class at least once per week to
complete assignments.
Attendance Policy—Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography Program
The overall mandatory attendance policy of NSU’s Health Professions Division relates to all vascular sonography students.
During the clinical year, students are required to complete a total of 1,800 clinical hours in three 16-week semesters. These
hours are mandatory for receiving a Bachelor of Health Science degree with the B.H.Sc.—Vascular Sonography Program.
Each student holds the responsibility for attending class and clinical externship and for understanding the specific policies
regarding attendance for each, including policy and penalty for unexcused absences, within the parameters of the vascular
sonography program and the Health Professions Division. If missed labs, assignments, examinations, or clinical coursework
are to be made up, they will be done at the direction and/or discretion of the ultrasound program director.
Attendance Policy—Nursing Department
Attendance in all classes and clinical experiences is expected. In case of illness or extenuating circumstances, the student
must notify the professor prior to the beginning of class or clinical. Students are responsible for all course content discussed
and/or assigned.
Auditing a Course
Students may register to audit courses. Registration as “audit” must be done prior to the first class meeting. No academic
credit is awarded for audited courses. Students may attend all classes but are not required to take examinations, and a
grade of AU is awarded at the time of registration. Once a student has registered for an audit, the registration may not be
changed back to one in the normal grading system. An audited course may be included in the flat-rate tuition, provided the
total number of credit hours, including credits assigned to audited courses, does not exceed 18. Otherwise, tuition will be
charged at the prevailing, per-credit-hour rate.
Clinic Exploration Program (CEP)
The Clinic Exploration Program (CEP) pairs students with physical and mental health professionals so they can personally
experience a broad range of medical and therapeutic fields. Students in the CEP acquire valuable practical knowledge by
shadowing professionals on the job in many of NSU’s clinics. Working side-by-side with seasoned health professionals,
participants gain a first-hand perspective into possible career options. The program organizes rotations with doctors,
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physical therapists, dentists, certified athletic trainers, and other professionals.
Any undergraduate student can take part in the CEP, regardless of major or professional experience. Program participants
are given a special blue lab jacket to wear during clinical experiences and are assigned a clinic for one or two rotations a
semester. For more information about the program, students can visit www.fcas.nova.edu/currentstudents/cep.
Course Credits—Application Toward
Multiple Requirements
Courses taken to fulfill major, minor, certificate, general education, and other program requirements may generally be
applied to other program requirements. For example, courses used to satisfy major requirements may also be used to
satisfy general education requirements. However, some programs have specific exceptions to this general policy. Students
should consult their academic advisor or division to determine specific policies about application of course credit.
Course Delivery
Classes are scheduled at a variety of times and locations to best meet student schedules and course demand. Classes
may be on-campus, off-campus, day, evening, online, and through independent study. Students should review registration
choices with their academic advisor.
Day
Day classes are aimed primarily at recent high-school graduates and transfer students.
Evening
Evening classes are intended primarily for professional students, although day students may also register for evening
classes. To ensure that students obtain the maximum benefit from the Career Development Program’s accelerated format,
most of the evening courses offered require that assignments for the first class be completed before the first class meeting.
Online
Web-based courses are available to all active NSU students. Students who participate in online classes are supported
through a variety of technologies and teaching methods: email, bulletin boards, chatrooms, electronic journals, and links
to Web resources. Each student must obtain an NSU account to access email, course materials, and library resources.
Students are required to participate in an online orientation before the start of each class.
Online Components of Ground-Based Courses
Ground-based classes may also include some online instruction in addition to regular classroom instruction. Although most
instruction will take place on campus or in site classrooms, some assignments may be administered through Internet-based
sites associated with class textbooks or through the university’s online course management system. Instructors will explain
specific requirements for participation in online components.
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Videoconferenced Courses
Nova Southeastern University reserves the right to record videoconferenced courses without seeking permission or release
forms from students. The recordings are for pedagogical purposes only within the university and will not be shared outside
the university. The recordings act as back-up in case a technical issue occurs and distant-site students are not able to
participate in a class. Students cannot request copies of lectures without the instructor’s approval. Independent Study
Independent study provides qualified students with an opportunity to research a question of interest under faculty supervision.
Students interested in independent study should contact their academic advisor and consult with a faculty member to draw
up a contract outlining student responsibilities. The student, the instructor, and the division’s academic director must sign
the contract. Regular tuition schedules and rates apply to independent study.
Course Evaluations
Course evaluations facilitate the collection of feedback from students about their classes—how they feel about course
content, instructors’ effectiveness, appropriateness of textbook selection, and other as­pects. All evaluations are confidential
and anonymous. Students are urged to be honest and constructive in their remarks. The course evaluation process is
conducted completely online. Students must have an NSU email account to access the course evaluation Web site. Students
may fill out online course evaluations beginning 14 days prior to the start of the session, term, or semester’s exam week.
Evaluations remain open to students for seven days.
Declaring and Changing Majors, Minors,
and Programs
Declaring and Changing Majors
Undergraduate students study and work in major fields that prepare them to enter careers or continue formal education
in graduate and professional school. Students who do not select a major program during the admissions process are
considered “deciding.” All students, including transfer students, must declare a major by the completion of 60 cumulative
credits (including non-NSU credits). Deciding students and students who wish to change their originally declared major
should contact their academic advisor.
Request for Second Major
Pursuing a second major is a serious commitment and requires significant student responsibility. Students may graduate
with a second subject or double major depending on the availability of courses and academic division schedules. Students
who wish to declare a second major must inform their academic advisor.
A request for a second major may be made following completion of 30 credits towards a bachelor’s degree and before 90
credits are earned towards a bachelor’s degree. A student must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher in
order to declare a second major.
In order to declare a second major, students must complete a Request for Second Major Form, which requires signatures
from department leadership in both areas of study. The Request for Second Major Form is a statement of student intent. The
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student is responsible for tracking requirements and prerequisites for both major programs, with guidance and assistance
from departmental advisors. Both majors will be posted to the transcript at the time of conferral of the bachelor’s degree. A
second major will not be added to a transcript following conferral of degree.
Requirements for the second major, as for the first major, are based on the curriculum published in the NSU Undergraduate
Student Catalog for the semester of the student’s entry into the university. For majors subsequently added to the college,
curriculum requirements are based on the catalog in effect during the semester the second major is declared.
Declaring and Conferral of Minors
Students may earn minors in any of NSU’s colleges or schools that offer undergraduate minors. Most courses taken to fulfill
general education and major requirements may also be used to satisfy minor requirements. Some restrictions may apply.
For details, refer to each minor description.
Students may request a minor after having earned a minimum of 30 credits but before earning 90 credits. In order to declare
a minor, students must complete a Request for Minor Form, including signatures from their home major department and
the department hosting the minor. The Request for Minor Form is a statement of student intent. The university will strive to
make courses available to complete the minor in a timely way; however, this is not always possible. A minor will be posted
to the student’s transcript at the time of conferral of the bachelor’s degree. Minors will not be posted following conferral of
the degree.
Changing Program Formats
Students who wish to change degree programs (e.g., Career Development Program to PALS Program, non-degree seeking
to degree seeking, or from a campus-based to an online program) should contact their academic advisor. Transfer credit
and scholarships awarded may not be applicable in all programs. Admission requirements, degree requirements, tuition,
and policies may differ.
Changing Colleges Within NSU
Students who wish to change their major to another housed in a different college or school within Nova Southeastern
University should contact their academic advisor for more information about this process.
Earning a Second Bachelor’s Degree
Individuals who already hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, including NSU, may earn a second bachelor’s
degree from NSU by completing a minimum of 30 additional credits toward the second degree at NSU. At least 50 percent
of major requirements must be taken at NSU.
Disability Services
Student Disability Services in the Office of Student Affairs provides information and individualized accommodations for
students with identified disabilities. To be eligible for disability-related accommodations, students must have a documented
disability as defined by applicable federal and state laws. Accommodations are available to students whose disabilities
include, but are not limited to:
•
•
Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders (ADHD)
Learning Disabilities
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•
•
•
•
•
Psychological Disorders
Visual Impairments
Hearing Impairments
Mobility Impairments
Chronic Health Disorders
Nova Southeastern University complies with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990 by providing reasonable accommodations for individuals with a documented disability. It is the mission of the
Office of Student Disability Services to provide accommodations, support services, and auxiliary aids to qualified students
with disabilities to ensure equal and comprehensive access to University programs, services, and campus facilities.
For information about Student Disability Services, call (954) 262-7189 (800-541-6682, ext. 27189) or go to www.nova.edu/
disabilityservices, where students may submit inquiries by selecting “Contact Us.”
Dropping and Adding Classes
During the drop and add periods, students may modify their schedule by changing classes without any further academic
implications. However, even during the drop and add period, dropping a class may result in a tuition charge or impact a
student’s financial aid. Students may withdraw from a class after the drop period has ended; however, the class will remain
on the student’s permanent transcript (see Withdrawal from Classes). Dropping a course may result in a refund for tuition
paid and will not negatively affect GPA. However, students need to be cautious because dropping classes may affect the
student’s enrollment status and, therefore, eligibility for financial aid. If a student drops below half-time or full-time status,
(whichever was the basis for financial aid awarded), the student may become ineligible for grant aid, loans, and scholarships
which had been awarded prior to the drop. This may cause a reduction in certain types of financial aid and, consequently,
may result in a higher balance due. For students completing a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing, the number of credits
constituting half-time or full-time enrollment may vary. All other students are considered half-time at 6–11 credits and fulltime at 12 credits or above. Students receiving financial aid should consult a financial aid counselor before dropping or
withdrawing from classes to ensure compliance with federal and state standards of academic progress. Student athletes
should also contact the athletic compliance officer. For refund policies related to courses dropped, refer to the Tuition section
of this catalog
Dropping All Courses Prior to the Semester
Students who intend to drop all of their courses for an upcoming semester may not process the full drop through WebSTAR.
Students must contact their academic advisor to process the full drop.
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Students of the College of Allied Health and Nursing are encouraged to contact their program director prior to dropping all
courses.
Drop and Add Periods
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program
Students enrolled in the Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program may add or drop courses on WebSTAR until the tenth
calendar day from the beginning of the term. No academic or financial penalties will be assessed during that time frame. No
grade notation will be entered on the transcript. No classes may be added or dropped after the tenth calendar day of the
term. Dropping a course may affect the loans, scholarships, or grant aid that has been awarded prior to the drop. A student
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may have tuition refunded when dropping a course; however, this may cause a reduction in certain types of financial aid,
which can result in a balance due.
Sequential Programs
The Bachelor in Health Science—Vascular Sonography Program, the Bachelor of Science in Nursing—Entry-Level Track,
and the Bachelor of Science in Nursing—R.N. to B.S.N. Track are sequential programs with lockstep coursework.
Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography Program
Students in the B.H.Sc.—Vascular Sonography Program are not allowed to drop classes, since the curriculum must be
taken concurrently and in a specific sequence, according to the program requirements. Students enter the program, take
the common set of courses in sequence, and graduate together. If a student fails a core sonography course, he or she may
be dismissed from the program. If the student is otherwise in good academic standing, remediation may be provided or the
student may be required to repeat the course in the following year. Students will not be allowed to begin their clinical training
unless all BSV courses are passed with a C or better. Students who experience extenuating circumstances may request a
Leave of Absence (refer to the Withdrawal from the University and Leaves of Absence section).
Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs
Students completing a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing or enrolled in the R.N. to M.S.N. program may drop a course in the
first week of class. Students who would like to drop a nursing course should make an appointment to see the program director
prior to processing the drop. The program director can answer specific questions about tuition refunds and policy guidelines.
All undergraduate nursing programs entail sequential, lockstep coursework. Therefore, students must complete the dropped
course before advancing in the program. Students who wish to be readmitted to a nursing course must notify the program
director at least one term prior to their desired re-entry date. Every effort will be made to accommodate their desire for reenrollment. Re-enrollment in clinical courses is on a space-available basis. Because the second enrollment is the last time
for students to successfully accomplish course objectives, they are encouraged to realistically assess those factors that
inhibited their accomplishment during the previous enrollment (financial limitations, family obligations, personal concerns,
reading skills, etc.). Only when such an assessment has been made and necessary corrective steps taken, should students
attempt a nursing course for the second time.
If students are out of a program area for 12 months or longer, for purposes of re-entry they will be required to pass a test or
tests measuring theoretical and/or clinical competencies.
Policies relating to graduate courses in the R.N. to M.S.N. program may be found in the Health Professions Division catalog
and the College of Allied Health and Nursing handbook.
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences,
Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
For the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences, Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and H. Wayne Huizenga
School of Business and Entrepreneurship, the first two weeks of each term comprise the drop and add periods.
During the drop and add periods, an academic advisor is required to process all transactions. During the first week, students
may add and drop courses. Students who add classes after they have started are responsible for all course requirements.
During the second week, students may only drop classes. Students who intend to drop all courses for a semester must meet
with their academic advisor to process the full drop.
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Dual Admission Programs
NSU offers dual admission to a select number of highly motivated, academically talented students interested in pursuing both an
undergraduate degree and future graduate studies. After students complete their undergraduate requirements, they may complete
their graduate or professional school requirements in one of the university’s graduate or professional schools. Students accepted
for dual admission have a seat reserved in the NSU graduate or professional school they have chosen. In addition, some of the dual
admission programs are combined programs that enable students to complete both the baccalaureate degree and the professional
degree, often in a reduced period. Students can reduce their number of years as an undergraduate and receive the baccalaureate
degree after completing a prescribed number of courses in professional school. These courses also count toward the graduate or
professional degree. The Dual Admission Program is facilitated by the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Available Dual Admission Programs
Au.D. Audiology
Business
• M.S. Accounting
• M.B.A. Business Administration
• M.B.A. Business Administration, with a concentration in Entrepreneurship
• M.B.A. Business Administration, with a concentration in Finance
• M.I.B.A. International Business Administration
• M.P.A. Public Administration
• M.S./HRM Human Resource Management
• M.S.M. Leadership
• M.S. Taxation
M.S. Computer Information Systems
M.S. Computer Science
M.S. Conflict Analysis and Resolution
M.S. Criminal Justice
D.M.D. Dental Medicine
M.S. Education
M.S. Education Master’s Accelerated Program
M.S. Family Therapy
J.D. Law
M.S. Marine Biology
M.S. Mental Health Counseling
B.S. Nursing*
M.O.T. Occupational Therapy
O.D. Optometry
D.O. Osteopathic Medicine
Pharm.D. Pharmacy
D.P.T. Physical Therapy
M.M.S. Physician Assistant
Psychology
• Psy.S. School Psychology
• Psy.D. Clinical Psychology
• Ph.D. Psychology
Speech-Language and Communication Disorders
• M.S. Speech-Language Pathology
• S.L.P.D. Speech-Language Pathology
*The nursing undergraduate dual admission program leads into the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing in the College
of Allied health and Nursing.
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Dual Admission Requirements
Dual admission majors in the Health Professions Division are available to entering freshmen only.
Final admission into the graduate or professional school is contingent on completing the prescribed undergraduate course
of study, maintaining the requisite grades, achieving specific scores on professional school admission tests, and, in some
cases, a final interview with the graduate or professional school admissions committee. Undergraduate scholarships granted
by any college or school do not carry over into graduate and professional programs.
For new students seeking information about dual admission programs, contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at
(954) 262-8000 or at admissions@nsu.nova.edu. For current students seeking information about dual admissions, contact
the Office of the Dean in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences at (954) 262-8092 or email dualadmit@nova.edu.
Enrollment at Other Universities
Students enrolled at NSU are generally not permitted to be concurrently enrolled at other institutions. Once students enroll
at NSU, they may not take courses at other colleges or universities for the purpose of earning an NSU degree without
specific, written approval from their college. Written approval must be obtained before registering for a non-NSU course.
Only under unusual circumstances will permission be granted. Students must carefully check the guidelines of their financial
aid awards and consult with their academic advisors about their transfer credits in advance, to avoid serious ramifications.
Students may take no more than 10 percent of their remaining credits at another university. However, students must meet
NSU’s residency requirements as outlined in the Graduation Requirements section. To request permission to take courses
at other institutions, students must submit a Concurrent/Interim Enrollment Application, which can be obtained from their
academic advisor, and provide catalog descriptions of the courses to their academic advisor prior to enrollment.
College of Allied Health and Nursing’s Bachelor of Health Science Program—online degree completion program may
be permitted, with prior approval, to take courses at other regionally accredited institutions
College of Allied Health and Nursing’s Nursing Programs—may not take required courses at any other college or
university and transfer the credits in, once they have been matriculated into the program
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences—may be permitted, with prior approval, to take courses at other institutions; these
courses may be used only for elective course credit
Fischler School of Education and Human Services—may be permitted, with prior approval, to take courses at other
institutions; these courses may be used only for elective credit or general education credit
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship—may request to take courses at a regionally accredited
institution outside of South Florida or the area serviced by NSU’s Student Educational Centers; these courses may be used
only for elective credit or general education course credit
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Financial Aid
Enrollment and Student Services
Enrollment and Student Services (ESS) is comprised of the Office of Student Financial Assistance (OSFA), the University
Registrar’s Office, the University Bursar’s Office, the One-Stop Shop, the University Call Center, Enrollment Processing
Services, Transfer Evaluation Services, and Health Professions Divisions (HPD) Admissions and Student Services.
Collectively, ESS’s ultimate goal is to effectively meet the information and service needs of all NSU students. The following
is important information regarding financial aid, NSU billing and payment policies, and general financial tips.
Office of Student Financial Assistance
Going to college can be both exciting and financially challenging. The NSU Office of Student Financial Assistance (OSFA)
is dedicated to helping you make smart financial choices while you are in college.
The OSFA administers federal, state, and institutional aid programs such as grants, scholarships, federal work-study funds,
and loans. In order to be eligible for these programs, students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA) at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The NSU Federal School Code is 001509. Florida residents pursuing their first bachelor’s
degree will also be required to complete the NSU State Aid Application to apply for state funds. There are four types of
financial aid available to assist students in meeting the cost of attending college: grants, scholarships, student employment,
and loans.
Financial Aid Checklist
1. Complete the FAFSA and NSU State Aid Application.
Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at www.fafsa.ed.gov annually. It becomes available each
January 1. The earlier you apply, the better chance you have of being considered for maximum available funds. To apply for
Florida grants and scholarships, undergraduate students should also complete the Nova Southeastern University State Aid
Application available on the financial aid Web site: www.nova.edu/financialaid/forms/state_aid_application.pdf.
2. Plan for housing and meal plan.
Your budget includes a housing and meal component. Please ensure that your budget covers these expenses, if you intend
to live on campus.
3. Check your WebSTAR account regularly.
Log in to your WebSTAR account using your NSU ID and PIN at http://webstar.nova.edu/ to regularly check the status of
your financial aid and to ensure that you have no outstanding requirements.
4. Submit additional documents and complete a Master Promissory Note.
If you are interested in receiving student loans, you will be required to complete a Direct Loan Master Promissory Note (MPN)
at www.studentloans.gov. Some students may be required to submit additional documents prior to being awarded. You will
be notified of outstanding requirements via NSU email (accessible through SharkLink). Your requirements (outstanding and
completed) can also be viewed in WebSTAR.
5. Accept, reduce, or decline your loan and federal work-study award(s).
Your financial aid award notice will provide you with detailed instructions on how to accept, reduce, or decline your financial
aid award. Your award will not be disbursed until this step has been completed.
6. Don’t forget to continuously apply for and identify scholarships.
Regularly schedule time for the scholarship search. The best place to start is the scholarship Web page at www.nova.edu/
financialaid/scholarships.
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7. Check your NSU email daily.
NSU email (accessible through SharkLink) and WebSTAR are the official means that the OSFA will use to communicate with
students. Keep up-to-date by checking your NSU email daily.
8. Register for classes (early).
Students awarded federal loans must be enrolled at least half-time. Half-time enrollment is defined as 6 credits per semester
for all undergraduate students. For graduate and first professional students, your program of study defines half-time status.
Enrollment requirements for federal and state grants vary. Familiarize yourself with the enrollment requirements defined by
your program office as well as by the financial aid programs through which you are receiving aid. Be sure to register as early
as possible to ensure timely disbursement of your financial aid funds.
Federal Grants and Scholarships
Grants and scholarships are considered “gift” aid and generally do not have to be repaid. However, if a student drops or
withdraws from any classes for which financial aid has been received, the student may have to return any “unearned” funds.
For more information on grants and scholarships, visit the financial aid Web site at www.nova.edu/financialaid.
Institutional Scholarships
There are numerous scholarships available to help students fund the cost of attending NSU. Generally, scholarships are
awarded to students who meet particular criteria for qualification, such as academic achievement, financial need, field of
study, talent, or athletic ability. The NSU scholarship Web site at www.nova.edu/financialaid/scholarships provides resources
to help you locate and apply for scholarships. New scholarships are regularly added to the Web site, so check it often.
For more information on scholarships and grants, you may also refer to the “Scholarships and Grants for Undergraduate
Students” section of this catalog.
Student Employment
There are three main student employment programs:
• Federal Work-Study (FWS)
• Nova Student Employment (NSE)
• Job Location and Development (JLD)
The Nova Student Employment and Job Location Development programs provide jobs to students regardless of financial
need. The FWS program is need-based and requires the completion of the FAFSA. Students awarded FWS may participate
in the America Reads/America Counts Programs through which students serve as reading or math tutors to elementary
school children. For more information on NSU part-time and full-time student employment, visit www.nova.edu/financialaid/
employment.
Loans
A student loan, unlike a grant and work-study, is borrowed money that must be repaid with interest. Student loan repayment
is a legal obligation. So, before you decide to take out a student loan, determine the amount you will have to repay on the
loan.
As NSU is exclusively participating in the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (DL) Program beginning with the 2010–2011
academic year, all new and continuing student borrowers are required to complete a new Direct Loan Master Promissory
Note (MPN). The only time you are not required to complete a new MPN is if you have received Stafford Loans at a Direct
Lending institution within the past 12 months. For detailed information on loans available to students, visit the financial
aid Web site at www.nova.edu/financialaid/grantsloans. For more information about Direct Lending, visit the news and
announcement section of the financial aid Web site at www.nova.edu/financialaid.
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General Education Program
The General Education Program is designed to foster critical skills by helping students develop the ability to solve problems,
think analytically, and communicate clearly. The program provides a common connection among all NSU undergraduates
through a rigorous set of writing, mathematics, humanities, and social, biological, and physical science requirements. As
a result of the General Education Program, students develop effective communication skills in speaking, listening, writing,
reading, and critical interpretation. The program also helps students place ideas in their proper context and appreciate the
role of different cultural traditions.
General Education Program Mission Statement
Incorporating dynamic resources and methods in various settings, the general education curriculum at NSU provides
opportunities for learners to emerge as thoughtful and responsible citizens prepared for a competitive global
environment.
General Education Program Framework
All students are required to complete general education requirements. Students normally complete general education
requirements by the end of their junior year through a series of courses in the areas of communication (including written
communication and oral communication); mathematics; humanities (including literature, history, ethics, and general
humanities); social and behavioral sciences; and biological and physical sciences.
Using General Education Credits for Major and Minor Requirements
Most courses may count toward both general education and major/minor requirements. Students should refer to their
program curriculum and consult their academic advisor to determine which courses serve both sets of requirements.
General Education Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of the General Education Program, students are expected to:
1. Think critically by
a. Solving problems
b. Analyzing data and concepts
2. Communicate clearly by
a. Speaking effectively
b. Listening effectively
c. Writing effectively
d. Reading effectively
e. Developing clear, coherent, and consistent interpretations
3. Place ideas in their proper context
4. Explain the key elements of a variety of cultural traditions
General Education Requirements
Nova Southeastern University requires that undergraduate students complete 30 credit hours as part of the General
Education Program. Some majors have determined specific courses to be used to satisfy general education requirements.
Students should consult the following curriculum requirements of their college or school and contact their academic advisor
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to determine their major’s specific general education requirement list. Honors courses (with the HONR prefix) may be used
to satisfy general education requirements of the appropriate general education section.
Students should refer to Course Descriptions for specific course prerequisites. Additionally, students should read the
Academic Requirements—New Students section for information on eligibility to take college-level written composition and
mathematics courses, which are required as part of the General Education Program.
Equivalent courses taken at an accredited community college or another university may be considered for a transfer of credit
to fulfill a program’s general education requirements.
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College of Allied Health and Nursing
Students of the College of Allied Health and Nursing are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General
Education Program.
Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program
In order to be eligible to graduate with the B.H.Sc. degree, a student must have completed 30 credit hours of general
education coursework in addition to the B.H.Sc. curriculum with a resulting minimum total of 120 credit hours.
If all general education requirements are not met at the time of admission, they can be obtained concurrently while enrolled
in the B.H.Sc. program. A student can obtain and transfer these courses through NSU’s Farquhar College of Arts and
Sciences or another regionally accredited college or university.
Effective January 1, 2006, prior to matriculation, all applicants must have completed a minimum of three credit hours (or
the equivalent) of college-level written composition from a regionally accredited college or university, receiving a minimum
grade of a C (GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale).
To fulfill general education requirements, students must complete 30 credit hours in accordance with the following criteria:
General Education
Credit Hours
Written Composition—
3 credits above COMP 1000
Must be completed prior to matriculation into the program
3
Mathematics—
3 credits above MATH 1000
3
Humanities—
6 credits in any courses with a prefix of ARTS, HIST, HUMN, LITR, PHIL, SPAN,
THEA, or WRIT
6
Social and Behavioral Sciences—
9 credits in any courses with a prefix of ANTH, COMM, ECN, GEOG, GEST,
GLBS, POLS, PSYC, or SOCL
9
Biological and Physical Sciences—
9 credits in any courses with a prefix of BIOL, CHEM, ENVS, MBIO, or PHYS
9
Total General Education Credit Hours
30
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Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography Program
In order to be eligible to graduate with the Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography (B.H.Sc.) degree a student
must have completed 30 credits hours of general education coursework in addition to the vascular sonography curriculum
with a resulting minimum total of 126 credit hours. General education courses may be completed at any accredited community
college or university.
Only courses with a minimum grade of a C (GPA of 2.0 on a 4.0 grading scale) will be accepted to fulfill general education courses.
To fulfill general education requirements, students must complete 30 credit hours in accordance with the following criteria:
General Education
Written Communication—
3 credits above COMP 1000
Mathematics—
3 credits above MATH 1000
Humanities—
6 credits in any courses with a prefix of ARTS, HIST, HUMN, LITR, PHIL, SPAN,
THEA, or WRIT; 3 credit hours of foreign language recommended
Social and Behavioral Sciences—
9 credits in any courses with a prefix of ANTH, COMM, ECN, GEOG, GEST,
GLBS, POLS, PSYC, or SOCL
Biological and Physical Sciences—
3 credits of physics required and 6 additional credits in any course with prefix of
BIOL, CHEM, ENVS, MBIO, or PHYS
Total General Education Credit Hours
Credit Hours
3
3
6
9
9
30
Bachelor of Science in Nursing—Entry-Level Track
Nursing students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. General education
courses may be completed at any accredited community college or university. Dual enrollment students should follow the
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences’ curriculum plan for Nursing Dual Admissions students. Students must complete the
General Education Program requirements before matriculating into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing—Entry-Level program.
To fulfill general education requirements, students must complete 30 credit hours in accordance with the following criteria:
General Education
Written Communication—
Any written communication course
Humanities—
Any ARTS, HIST, HUMN, LITR, PHIL, THEA, or foreign language
Social and Behavioral Sciences—
One PSYC, one SOCL, Human Growth and Development
Biological and Physical Sciences—
Anatomy and physiology: at least six credit hours (five credit hours of anatomy
and physiology with 3 credit hours of biology may be substituted)
Chemistry: At least 3 credit hours
Microbiology: At least 3 credit hours
General education elective—
Any college-level COMP, MATH, PSYC, SOCL, ARTS, HIST, HUMN, LITR, PHIL,
or foreign language course (courses beginning with 00 are not considered college
level)
Total General Education Credit Hours
Credit Hours
3
3
9
12
3
30
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
Academic Resources and Procedures
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Bachelor of Science in Nursing—R.N. to B.S.N. Track
Nursing students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. General education
courses may be completed at any accredited community college or university. To fulfill general education requirements,
students must complete 30 credit hours in accordance with the following criteria:
General Education
Credit Hours
Written Communication—
Any written communication course
3
Humanities—
Any ARTS, HIST, HUMN, LITR, PHIL, THEA or foreign language
3
Social and Behavioral Sciences—
One PSYC, one SOCL, Human Growth and Development
9
Biological and Physical Sciences—
Credit with R.N. license
12
General education elective—
Any college-level COMP, MATH, PSYC, SOCL, ARTS, HIST, HUMN, LITR, PHIL,
or foreign language course (courses beginning with 00 are not considered college
level)
3
Total General Education Credit Hours
30
Bachelor of Science in Nursing—R.N. to M.S.N. Track
Nursing students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. General education
courses may be completed at any accredited community college or university. Students must complete the General
Education Program requirements before matriculating into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing—R.N. to M.S.N. program.
To fulfill general education requirements, students must complete 30 credit hours in accordance with the following criteria:
General Education
Credit Hours
Written Communication—
Any written communication course
3
Humanities—
Any ARTS, HIST, HUMN, LITR, PHIL, THEA or foreign language
3
Social and Behavioral Sciences—
One PSYC, one SOCL, Human Growth and Development
9
Biological and Physical Sciences—
Credit with R.N. license
12
General education elective—
Any college-level COMP, MATH, PSYC, SOCL, ARTS, HIST, HUMN, LITR, PHIL,
or foreign language course (courses beginning with 00 are not considered college
level)
3
Total General Education Credit Hours
30
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
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Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Students of the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General
Education Program. To fulfill general education requirements, students must complete 30 credit hours in accordance with
the following criteria:
General Education
Credits
Written Composition—
6 COMP credits above COMP 1000
6
Mathematics—
6 MATH credits above MATH 1000
6
Humanities—
6 credits in any courses with a prefix of ARTS, HIST, HUMN, LITR, PHIL, SPAN,
THEA, or WRIT
6
Social and Behavioral Sciences—
6 credits in any courses with a prefix of COMM, ECN, GEOG, GEST, GLBS,
POLS, PSYC, or SOCL
6
Biological and Physical Sciences—
6 credits in any courses with a prefix of BIOL, CHEM, ENVS, MBIO, or PHYS
6
Total General Education Credits
30
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
Academic Resources and Procedures
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Fischler School of Education and Human Services
Fischler School of Education and Human Services students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General
Education Program. To fulfill general education requirements, students must complete 30 credit hours in accordance with
the following criteria:
A.A. Early Childhood Education/B.S. Education
with a Concentration in Child Development
General Education
Written Composition—
COMP 1500 College Writing (3 credits)
3 credits above COMP 1500 (3 credits)
Mathematics—
MATH 1030 Intermediate Algebra (3 credits)
MATH 1040 Algebra for College Students (3 credits)
Humanities—
HIST 1030 or 1040 American History (3 credits)
3 credits in any humanities course with a prefix of ARTS, PHIL, COMM, HUMN, LITR,
or THEA
Social and Behavioral Sciences—
PSYC 1020 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 2350, 2360, 2370, or 2380 (3 credits)
Biological and Physical Sciences—
Life Science (BIOL 1100 Concepts and Connections in Biology, preferred) (3 credits)
Physical Science (PHYS 1020 Concepts in Physical Science, preferred) (3 credits)
Total General Education Credits
Credits
6
6
6
6
6
30
Florida-Based Elementary Education, Exceptional Student Education,
Prekindergarten/Primary Education, Secondary Biology Education**, Secondary
Mathematics Education*, B.S. Middle Grades General Science Education**, B.S.
Middle Grades English Education with ESOL Endorsement, B.S. Secondary English
Education with ESOL Endorsement, B.S. Middle Grades Social Studies Education,
and B.S. Secondary Social Studies Education
General Education
Written Composition—
COMP 1500 College Writing (3 credits)
3 credits above COMP 1500 (3 credits)
Mathematics—
MATH 1040 Algebra for College Students (3 credits)
MATH 1050 Geometry and Logic (3 credits)
Humanities—
HIST 1030 or 1040 American History (3 credits)
3 credits in any humanities course with a prefix of ARTS, PHIL, COMM, HUMN, LITR,
or THEA
Social and Behavioral Sciences—
PSYC 1020 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 2350, 2360, 2370, or 2380
Biological and Physical Sciences—
Life Science (BIOL 1100 Concepts and Connections in Biology, preferred) (3 credits)
Physical Science (PHYS 1020 Concepts in Physical Science, preferred) (3 credits)
Total General Education Credits
Credits
6
6
6
6
6
30
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
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* Requires MATH 1060 Concepts in Statistics and Probability (3 credits) instead of MATH 1050 Geometry and Logic (3
credits)
** Requires BIOL 1040 Environmental Studies (3 credits) instead of BIOL 1100 Concepts and Connections in Biology (3
credits)
Nevada-Based Elementary Education and Exceptional Student Education
General Education
Written Composition—
COMP 1500 College Writing (3 credits)
3 credits above COMP 1500 (3 credits)
Mathematics—
MATH 1030 or higher (3 credits)
MATH 1040 Algebra for College Students (3 credits)
Humanities—
6 credits in any humanities course with a prefix of ARTS, PHIL, COMM, HUMN,
LITR, or THEA
Social and Behavioral Sciences—
PSYC 1020 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 2350, 2360, 2370, or 2380 (3 credits)
Biological and Physical Sciences—
3 credits in Life or Physical Sciences (BIOL 1100, preferred) (3 credits)
3 credits in Life or Physical Sciences (PHYS 1020, preferred) (3 credits)
Total General Education Credits
Credits
6
6
6
6
6
30
Applied Professional Studies with a Concentration in Teaching and Learning
(Jamaica)
General Education
Written Composition—
COMP 1500 College Writing (3 credits)
3 credits above COMP 1500 (3 credits)
Mathematics—
MATH 1030 or higher (3 credits)
MATH 1040 Algebra for College Students (3 credits)
Humanities—
3 credits in any LITR course
3 credits in any humanities course with a prefix of ARTS, PHIL, COMM, HUMN,
LITR, or THEA
Social and Behavioral Sciences—
PSYC 1020 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
3 credits in any PSYC course
Biological and Physical Sciences—
ENVS 1100 Environmental Science I
ENVS 1200 Environmental Science II
Total General Education Credits
Credits
6
6
6
6
6
30
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
Academic Resources and Procedures
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H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
Students of the H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship are required to complete 30 credit hours as
part of the General Education Program. To fulfill general education requirements, students must complete 30 credit hours in
accordance with the following criteria:
General Education
Written Composition—
COMP 1500 College Writing (3 credits)
3 credits above COMP 1000
Mathematics—
MATH 1040 Algebra for College Students or higher (3 credits)
MATH 3020 Applied Statistics (3 credits)
Humanities—
WRIT 3150 Business Writing (3 credits)
3 credits in any course with a prefix of ARTS, FILM, HIST, HUMN, LITR, PHIL,
SPAN, THEA, or WRIT
Social and Behavioral Sciences—
ECN 2020 Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits)
ECN 2025 Principles of Macroeconomics (3 credits)
PSYC 1020 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
Biological and Physical Sciences—
3 credits in any courses with a prefix of BIOL, CHEM, ENVS, MBIO, or PHYS
Total General Education Credits
Credits
6
6
6
9
3
30
Grading System
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Grading Scale
Instructors assign grades based on criteria established in course syllabi.
Department of Health Science
Letter Grade
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
F
GPA Equivalent
4.0
3.7
3.3
3.0
2.7
2.3
2.0 ***
1.7
1.3
1.0
0.0
Nursing Department
Letter Grade
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF
GPA Equivalent
4.0
3.7
3.3
3.0
2.7
2.3
2.0 ***
1.7
1.3
1.0
0.7
0.0
*** Undergraduate programs in the College of Allied Health and Nursing stipulate that students earn a grade of C or better in
all required courses, including prerequisite, general education, and core courses. Students who receive a grade of C–, D+,
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
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D, D–, F, or W in one course must repeat the course and achieve a C or better. A subsequent grade of C–, D+, D, D–, F, or
W in any course will result in dismissal from the program.
Clinical
Students must successfully complete all the components of the clinical evaluation for the course in order to receive a P in
the course.
Transcript Notations
Failing grades will be included in calculating the GPA for that term and the cumulative GPA to that point. Unless otherwise
specified under a particular program, if a student does not pass a course, the failing grade will be noted on the transcript.
When the student successfully repeats the course, an E will be noted after the prior failing grade, and the failing grade will
then be exempt from GPA calculation. The course will then appear a second time on the transcript with the passing grade
indicated followed a notation of I, indicating this grade will be included in the calculation of the GPA.
When a student passes a course by a retake of the course, the minimum passing grade for that degree program will be
recorded as the final grade followed by the notation R (e.g. 70R, 75R or 80R) on the transcript.
When a student passes a course by remediation examination, the minimum passing grade for that degree program will be
recorded as the final grade followed by the notation E (e.g. 70E, 75E, or 80E) on the transcript.
Transcript Notations (in addition to numerical and alpha grades):
I Incomplete
IF Incomplete Fail
IP Incomplete Pass/ In Progress
IW Incomplete Withdraw
W Withdrawal
WP Withdrawal Passing
WF Withdrawal Failing
WU
Administrative Withdraw
AU Audit
P Pass
PH Pass with Honors
F Fail
LE Leave of Absence
E Exempt from GPA (If a student successfully repeats or remediates by reexamination a failed course, an E
may be noted after the prior failing grade, and the failing grade will then be exempt from GPA calculation)
I Included in GPA (If a student successfully repeats or remediates by reexamination a failed course, an I may
be noted after the prior failing grade, and the failing grade will then be included in GPA calculation)
70R Remediation of Course (remediation through retake of course)
AP Academic Probation
AW Academic Warning
DA Academic Dismissal
DC Academic Misconduct Dismissal
AS Academic Suspension
CE Credit by Exam
CD Conditional Dismissal
CL CLEP
CP Continued Probation
DI Disciplinary Probation (may also be used to indicate issues related to unprofessional behavior)
DU Disciplinary Suspension (may also be used to indicate issues related unprofessional behavior)
DE Disciplinary Expulsion (may also be used to indicate issues related to unprofessional behavior)
EQ Credit awarded based on prior experience
EX Expelled
RA Readmitted
RS Reinstated
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
Academic Resources and Procedures
82
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences,
Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
Grading Scale
Instructors assign grades based on criteria established in course syllabi.
Letter Grade
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
F
W
I
P
NG
AU
Description
Excellent
Good
Satisfactory
Marginal
Failure
Withdrawn Without Penalty
Incomplete
Pass
No Grade
(not assigned by instructor)
Audit
GPA Equivalent
4.0
3.7
3.3
3.0
2.7
2.3
2.0
1.7
1.3
1.0
0.0
Grade Point Average and Quality Points
A student’s academic standing for a specific semester or term is indicated by grade point average (GPA). The GPA is
calculated based on letter grades and attempted credits. Overall academic standing is indicated by the cumulative GPA
(CGPA). GPA calculations include NSU coursework only, based on the following formulas and definitions.
•
•
•
•
Quality points = A letter grade’s numerical GPA value MULTIPLIED BY the number of credits assigned to the course
GPA hours = Attempted credits, excluding withdrawals, successfully-completed pass/fail courses, and incompletes
Current semester or term GPA = The total number of quality points for the semester or term DIVIDED BY the total
GPA hours for the semester or term
Cumulative GPA (CGPA) = Total quality points DIVIDED BY total GPA hours
Grade Reports
Student grades are disseminated online via WebSTAR at www.webstar.nova.edu. Legal provisions prohibit the release
of personally identifiable information to anyone other than legally authorized persons. Students are permitted to inspect,
review, and challenge such information as provided by law.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
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Dean’s List
Full-time students in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences, Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and H.
Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship who earn a GPA of 3.5 or higher in the fall or winter semester(s)
qualify for the Dean’s List. Students in the College of Allied Health and Nursing who receive a 90–94 percent GPA are placed
on the Dean’s List for that semester. Dean’s List letters will be mailed to the students and a Dean’s List comment will appear
on their official transcript. Students with grades of I (incomplete) are not eligible for the Dean’s List for that semester.
Chancellor’s List
Students in the College of Allied Health and Sciences who receive a 95 percent GPA or better are placed on the Chancellor’s
List for that semester. A letter of commendation is sent from the chancellor to the student, and the honor is recorded on the
student’s official transcript.
Incomplete
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Department of Health Science Incomplete Policy
A grade of incomplete (I) is issued because of unexpected emergencies, and must be made up within one semester,
or sooner, following the final class date of the course, as stipulated by the course instructor. The course instructor will
determine the method by which an incomplete. Students requesting extensions due to medical or military reasons are
expected to provide official documentation. It is students’ responsibility to consult the instructor and submit the Incomplete
Grade Agreement Form (download available in B.H.Sc. student center) prior to the end of the course. The form must be
signed by the student, instructor, and the B.H.Sc. program director. Students must have successfully completed 50 percent
of the assignments prior to course end and prior to requesting an incomplete grade. Instructors will not accept assignments
received after the date indicated on the agreement, and students’ grades will be assigned according to the work they
completed by the end of the course. A grade of I cannot be given if less than 50 percent of the assignments have been
completed by the official end date of the course. An incomplete grade that has not been changed by the official date in this
agreement will be converted to an F.
Nursing Department Incomplete Policy
When a student has failed to complete the requirements of a course, the student may be given an Incomplete or I grade.
• An Incomplete grade is submitted when the student’s work in a course is incomplete and the student has obtained
the faculty member’s permission to finish the course after the conclusion of the term.
• An Incomplete is normally given only where extenuating circumstances exist or where research or performance
needs to be extended beyond the normal limits of the term and the student is likely to pass the course. Students
who claim extenuating circumstances will be referred to the Committee on Student Progress for a decision.
• Students may request a grade of Incomplete only after the drop/ withdraw date has passed. The decision to grant
such a request will rest with the individual course faculty member. Students have an opportunity to appeal the
decision, if it is negative, to the program director. The decision of the program director is final.
• If the decision is reached to grant an Incomplete, this must be accompanied by a written and signed agreement
between the faculty member and the student. The agreement form will contain the following points:
o The time period in which the course requirements must be completed. This work must be completed by the
last day of the next major term (fall or winter). No further extension is possible.
o The specific requirements that must be completed and the manner in which they are to be completed.
(Include some reference to grading criteria.)
o A provision that if the requirements have not been met by the end of the next major term, a grade of F will
be recorded as the grade for the course.
• A student cannot remove an Incomplete by registering in a subsequent term to retake the course.
• A student who is failing the course at the time extenuating circumstances prevent continuing will not be granted
an incomplete grade. Students who claim extenuating circumstances will be referred to the Committee on Student
Progress for a decision.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
Academic Resources and Procedures
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Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences,
Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
An incomplete grade (I) is awarded only in unusual circumstances. An incomplete grade may be given only when a student
has satisfactorily completed at least 50 percent of the work in a course and when all remaining requirements can be completed
within an agreed upon amount of time following the end of the course. In no event may such time exceed 16 weeks. If the
student does not complete the coursework within the agreed upon time period, the incomplete automatically changes to the
grade earned based on the work accepted by the instructor to date. A grade of zero will be factored in for any missing work. A
student who is absent at the final examination without prior approval is normally not eligible to receive an incomplete grade.
Incomplete grades will be awarded before the end of the course upon the satisfaction of the following conditions:
1. The student has made a request of the instructor.
2. The student, the instructor, and the academic director/assistant dean have signed the contract for removal of an
incomplete grade or agreed on its conditions via email.
Optional Pass/Fail
Students in good academic standing may register for two electives outside their major, minor, or certificate program on a
pass/fail basis. A pass/fail registration will not convert back to a normal registration (i.e., cannot be counted in the GPA). A
failing grade will be reflected in the student’s GPA.
Graduation—Degrees, Diplomas,
and Commencement
Degree Conferral
Students are eligible for graduation when they meet the requirements listed in the NSU Undergraduate Student Catalog in effect
when they entered the university, unless a prior request to follow a more recent catalog has been approved. Degrees are conferred
once a month, by the university’s Board of Trustees once students have met all the criteria for graduation. The conferral date
reflects the last day of the month in which the dean of the appropriate college or school approved the degree application. Once
degrees have been conferred, transcripts and diplomas showing the awarding of the degree are sent to students by mail. Students
must complete a degree application in order to be eligible for degree conferral. Students may apply for their degree online.
Diplomas
The diploma indicates that the student has earned a degree (for example, Bachelor of Arts degree or Bachelor of Science
degree). The diploma does not indicate major. The academic transcript, the official record of work at NSU, indicates degree
or certification earned, major field of study, and minor, if any.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
Academic Resources and Procedures
85
Graduation with Distinction
A student eligible for graduation with a cumulative grade point average of 3.8 or higher, and who has completed at least 54
credits at NSU, is eligible to receive the degree with distinction. Petitions for exceptions to this policy should be submitted
to the following offices:
•
•
•
•
College of Allied Health and Nursing—Program director
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences—Dean (The decision of the dean is final.)
Fischler School of Education and Human Services—Director of undergraduate enrollment and recruitment
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship—Assistant dean of program administration
There are no special ceremonies at Commencement for students graduating with distinction. However, a notation will be
added to the student’s diploma and official transcript.
Graduation with Honors—College of Allied Health and Nursing
Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program
A student eligible for graduation with a cumulative grade point average of 3.8 or higher and at least 54 completed at NSU
is eligible to receive the degree with distinction. Students who have earned fewer than 54 credits at NSU may petition for
graduation with distinction if they have maintained at least a 3.8 GPA in all coursework accepted toward their degree at NSU.
Degree candidates must complete all of the requirements as specified above.
Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography Program
A student eligible for graduation with a cumulative grade point average of 3.8 or higher and at least 96 credits completed at
NSU is eligible to receive the degree with distinction. Students who have earned fewer than 96 credits at NSU may petition
for graduation with distinction if they have maintained at least a 3.8 GPA in all coursework accepted toward their degree at
NSU. Degree candidates must complete all of the requirements as specified above.
Bachelor of Science in Nursing Programs
Students earning the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing with a cumulative GPA of 3.8–4.0 will receive a diploma
inscribed with highest honors. Students with a cumulative GPA of 3.60–3.79 will receive a diploma inscribed with honors.
Policies relating to graduate courses in the R.N. to M.S.N. program may be found in the Health Professions Division catalog
and the College of Allied Health and Nursing handbook.
Commencement
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program
Attendance of graduation ceremonies is not a requirement for distance education students. It is, however, an option that the
department encourages and that takes place once a year (in August). Please contact the department coordinator for more
information.
Graduation fees:
• $75 covers all final costs including diploma printing and distribution.
• A graduation and diploma fee of $225 will be incurred by those stu­dents who elect to participate in the formal, oncampus graduation ceremony (not required).
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
Academic Resources and Procedures
86
Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography Program
Students earning the Bachelor of Health Science in Vascular Sonography degree are required to participate in the college
graduation ceremony held during the month of August. The college will provide each student with the caps and gowns that
will be worn during the graduation ceremony. In addition to the ceremony, there is a dinner for graduates and their families.
Graduation fees:
• $225 graduation and diploma fee
Nursing Department
Students earning the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree are required to participate in the college graduation ceremony
held during the month of August. The college will provide each student with the caps and gowns that will be worn during the
graduation ceremony. In addition to the ceremony, there is a dinner for graduates and their families. The Nova Southeastern
University nursing pin, which can only be purchased by NSU nursing program graduates, will be available for order during
students’ last nursing course.
Nursing students will be notified close to the end of the program of time and dates to fill out paperwork for graduation.
Remember, it is the student’s responsibility to apply for graduation. Attendance at graduation is mandatory. Picture
times will be scheduled through the department.
Policies relating to graduate courses in the R.N. to M.S.N. program may be found in the Health Professions Division catalog
and the College of Allied Health and Nursing handbook.
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences,
Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
Commencement is held once per year in May. It is not necessary for students to attend Commencement to have their
degrees conferred. Degrees are conferred throughout the year.
Graduation Requirements
Minimum Graduation Requirements
College of Allied Health and Nursing
In order to be eligible for a degree from the College of Allied Health and Nursing, all students shall:
1. Successfully complete all academic courses and requirements for the degree
2. Have satisfactorily completed the program of study required for the degree with a minimum grade point average as
established by the individual degree programs
3. Have satisfactorily discharged all financial and library obligations
4. Attend in person the rehearsal and commencement program at which time the degree is conferred
(This is mandatory except in the case of distance-based programs.)
5. Receive recommendation from the department chair and approval by the dean
In addition to the above minimum requirements, each program has specific graduation requirements.
Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program:
• Satisfactorily complete the program of 30 semester hours (minimum) of study in the B.H.Sc. major required for the
degree (not including CLEP, proficiency examinations, or experiential learning credits)
• Completion of general education, major, and elective requirements as specified by the program at time of admission
resulting in a minimum total of 120 semester hours
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
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•
•
•
•
Attainment of a 2.0 cumulative grade point average
Attainment of a 2.25 grade point average in the major area
Submission of a degree application form before completing registration for the last semester
Fulfillment of all obligations to the library, the student’s program, and the bursar’s office
Bachelor of Health Science in Vascular Sonography:
• Completion of general education, major, and elective requirements as specified by the program at time of admission
resulting in a minimum total of 120 semester hours
• Attainment of a 2.0 cumulative grade point average
• Submission of a degree application form before completing registration for the last semester
• Fulfillment of all obligations to the library, the student’s program, and the bursar’s office
• Recommendation by the director of the B.H.Sc.—Vascular Sonography Program to the dean of the College of Allied
Health and Nursing
Bachelor of Science in Nursing:
• Satisfactorily complete all courses within the program of study required for the degree with a C or better
• Attainment of a 2.0 cumulative GPA
• Fulfillment of all obligations to the university
• Successfully complete all didactic and clinical coursework
Entry-Level Students
• Students will be required to successfully complete one or more diagnostic exams that will measure the readiness
to successfully complete the NCLEX-RN examination and a review course for the NCLEX-RN examination prior to
receiving the final practicum course grade in NUR 4180. The requirements for final exit from the program will be
given to students, in writing, at the beginning of their second year in the program.
• During students’ enrollment in the semester in which they are scheduled to complete all of the program requirements,
students are responsible for applying for graduation and to the Florida Board of Nursing to sit for the National Council
Licensure Exam for Registered Nurse Practice (NCLEX-RN). Students will be required to submit the completed
applications for licensure and the NCLEX-RN exam with accompanying checks to the program director before
receiving grades for the final course.
R.N. to B.S.N. and R.N. to M.S.N. Students
• Students will meet with the program director prior to completion of the last nursing course.
• Policies relating to graduate courses in the R.N. to M.S.N. program may be found in the Health Professions Division
catalog and the College of Allied Health and Nursing handbook.
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences,
Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
All degree-seeking students must be matriculated and complete the minimum credits as designated by their chosen major.
The following conditions are also required:
1. Admission as a degree-seeking candidate in one of the majors
2. Completion of General Education Program requirements
3. Completion of at least 120 credits, including major, minor, general education, specialization, concentration, and
electives coursework, as specified by program requirements
4. Attainment of a 2.0 cumulative grade point average *
5. Attainment of a 2.25 grade point average in the major area *
6. Attainment of a 2.25 grade point average in minors, if selected or required by program
7. Completion, at NSU, of at least 30 credits (not including CLEP, proficiency examinations, or prior experiential
learning credits)
8. Completion of at least 50 percent of the credits in the major area and minor at NSU (not including CLEP, proficiency
examinations, or prior experiential learning credits)
9. Submission of a degree application form and payment of the diploma fee
10. Fulfillment of all obligations to the library, the student’s program, and the Bursar’s Office
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* Degree-seeking students in the Fischler School of Education and Human Services must attain a 2.5 cumulative
grade point average and a 2.5 grade point average in the major area.
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences—Applied Professional Studies Degree Program
To complete the applied professional studies degree program, students must satisfy the following requirements:
1. Complete a minimum of 30 credits at NSU;
2. Complete a minimum of 18 credits in concentration II at NSU;
3. Earn a minimum of 24 credits at or above the 3000 level;
4. Complete the general education requirement;
5. Earn 120 credits toward the Bachelor of Science degree with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 and a minimum
major GPA of 2.25.
Honor Societies and Academic Organizations
This section includes undergraduate organizations and institutes affiliated with Nova Southeastern University.
Honor Societies
Alpha Chi
Alpha Chi is an academic honor society with more than 289 chapters in the United States. To qualify for Alpha Chi, students
must be juniors or seniors, complete a minimum of 24 credits at NSU, and be in the top 10 percent of their major. Qualifying
students are invited to join once a year. Membership in Alpha Chi includes eligibility to compete for local and national
scholarships. Contact the Office of the Dean in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Alpha Phi Sigma
Established in 1942, Alpha Phi Sigma is recognized by both the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences and the Association
of College Honor Societies as the National Criminal Justice Honor Society. NSU’s chapter, Omega Tau, includes members
from both the undergraduate major and the Master of Science program. The mission of Alpha Phi Sigma is to promote
critical thinking, rigorous scholarship, and life-long learning; to keep abreast of the advances in scientific research; to elevate
the ethical standards of the criminal justice professions; and to sustain in the public mind the benefit and necessity of
education and professional training. Alpha Phi Sigma is the largest and only official criminal justice honor society in America.
Beta Beta Beta
Beta Beta Beta (TriBeta) is a society for students, particularly undergraduates, dedicated to improving the understanding
and appreciation of biological study and extending boundaries of human knowledge through scientific research. To join the
NSU chapter (Rho Rho) as a regular member, a student must be a biology major, have an overall GPA of 3.2, at least three
biology courses completed (one of which is above the introductory level), an average of 3.0 or higher in all biology courses,
and 45 credits or more completed toward a degree. Anyone with an interest in biological sciences may join as an associate
member. Contact the Division of Math, Science, and Technology in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Chemical Sciences Honor Society
The Chemical Sciences Honor Society brings together students with high academic achievement in the sciences to promote
science awareness at NSU and help other students who have difficulty mastering chemistry. A minimum 3.3 GPA in science
courses is required for admission into the society. Contact the Division of Math, Science, and Technology in the Farquhar
College of Arts and Sciences.
Kappa Delta Pi
Kappa Delta Pi, International Honor Society in Education, is dedicated to scholarship and excellence in education.
The society is a community of scholars dedicated to worthy ideals: recognize scholarship and excellence in education,
promote the development and dissemination of worthy educational ideals and practices, enhance the continuous growth
and leadership of its diverse membership, foster inquiry and reflection on significant educational issues, and maintain a
high degree of professional fellowship. The Kappa Delta Pi Educational Foundation and local chapters award more than
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$100,000 annually in scholarships for academic study to active members who are undergraduate, graduate, or doctoral
degree-seeking students.
Lambda Epsilon Chi
Nova Southeastern University maintains a charter membership in Lambda Epsilon Chi (LEX), the national honor society
for paralegal/legal assistant studies. The purpose of LEX is to recognize those who have demonstrated superior academic
performance in an established program of paralegal studies offered at an institution that is an institutional member in good
standing of the American Association for Paralegal Education (AAfPE). Students are inducted into LEX twice a year. To
be eligible for induction, a student must have successfully completed two-thirds of the program requirements and have a
cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or higher. Contact the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the Farquhar
College of Arts and Sciences.
Lambda Pi Eta
Lambda Pi Eta (LPH) is the honor society of the National Communication Association. NSU’s Upsilon Zeta chapter of LPH
was chartered in 2005. To be eligible for membership, students must be communication studies majors with a minimum of
60 earned credit hours, a cumulative grade point average of 3.0, at least 12 earned credit hours in communication studies
major courses with at least a 2.5 grade point average in those courses, and be in the top 35 percent of their class. Contact
the Division of Humanities in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Psi Chi
Psi Chi, the U.S. national honor society in psychology, promotes excellence in scholarship and advances the science
of psychology. Membership is open to undergraduate students who meet minimum academic qualifications. Contact the
Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Rho Rho Rho
The Beta Chapter of this honor society was established to recognize outstanding students earning a degree in marine
biology. Members of Rho Rho Rho work to promote awareness of marine biology and appreciation of the marine environment
with students of all majors. Students are inducted into this society each February. To be eligible for induction, the student
must have declared a major or minor in marine biology, completed at least two full semesters (30 credits), completed two
courses at the 2000 level or higher that qualify for the major with an average grade of 3.0 (B) or better, have an overall GPA
of 3.2 or better, and be in good academic standing. Contact the Division of Math, Science, and Technology in the Farquhar
College of Arts and Sciences.
Sigma Beta Delta
The purposes of Sigma Beta Delta are to encourage and recognize scholarship and achievement among students of
business, management, and administration, and to encourage and promote personal and professional improvement. To
be eligible for membership, a business student must rank in the upper 20 percent of the graduating class and be invited to
membership by the faculty officers. Each year, students are notified by mail if they meet the criteria to join Sigma Beta Delta.
Contact the H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship.
Sigma Tau Delta
Alpha Nu Iota is NSU’s chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, the international English honor society. Sigma Tau Delta’s goals are
to recognize academic excellence of students of the English language and literature, as well as the accomplishments of
professional writers. In order to be eligible for membership, students must be an English major or minor, have a minimum
of a B average in English courses, rank at least in the highest thirty-five percent of their class, and have completed at least
three semesters of college work. Contact the Division of Humanities in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
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Academic and Pre-Professional Organizations
Nova Southeastern University supports a diverse group of student organizations. For more university organizations, including
Greek organizations and social, athletic, and service clubs, refer to the NSU Student Handbook.
Accounting Club
The Accounting Club seeks to expose students within the major to the real world necessities required of the field, and
actively promotes jobs and internships offered by locally affiliated organizations. The Accounting Club also embarks on
community service projects, such as free tax preparation for underprivileged members of society, plus social events and
other relationship building activities.
Alpha Kappa Psi
Alpha Kappa Psi is an international co-ed professional business fraternity (for both men and women) standing for the
highest ideals of conduct and achievement in university and professional life. Members include undergraduate, masters and
doctoral students. Alpha Kappa Psi’s core values are brotherhood, knowledge, integrity, service and duty.
American Chemical Society Student Chapter
A student chapter of the national student organization, sponsored by the American Chemical Society (ACS), this organization
serves students interested in chemistry, regardless of their major. Contact the Division of Math, Science, and Technology in
the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Association of Computing Machinery
The NSU student chapter of the Association of Computing Machinery is committed to exposing members and the general
community to developments in the world of information technology and computing. Contact the Division of Math, Science,
and Technology in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Astronomy and Rocket Club
The Astronomy and Rocket Club provides a forum for students and community members interested in astronomy and
space-related issues. Contact the Division of Math, Science, and Technology in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Athletic Training Student Organization
The Athletic Training Student Organization is the pre-professional organization for athletic training students. Contact the
Division of Math, Science, and Technology in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Communication Arts Club
The Communication Arts Club is a social and community service organization for students interested in communication
studies and related fields. Contact the Division of Humanities in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Criminal Justice Club
The Criminal Justice Club meets monthly to discuss matters important to the practice of criminal justice and issues of
concern to criminal justice majors, minors, and all other students. Additionally, the club and its members sponsor practitioner
speakers on campus, trips to agencies and facilities, charity drives and benefits, internship and employment seminars and
exciting student gatherings. The Criminal Justice Club welcomes students from any major or program on campus. Contact
the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Honors Student Association
The Honors Student Association serves as the social organization for the Undergraduate Honors Program community.
Contact the Office of the Dean in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
MAPS
MAPS (Multicultural Association of Pre-Health Students) serves as a source of information for all students pursuing a career
in any of the varied health professions. It assists students in formulating well-defined and realistic strategies for gaining
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admission to an assortment of health programs. Contact the Division of Math, Science, and Technology in the Farquhar
College of Arts and Sciences.
Marine Ecophysiology Research Society
The Marine Ecophysiology Research Society provides a forum for issues related to marine ecology. Contact the Division of
Math, Science, and Technology in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Math Club
The Math Club provides a forum for students and community members interested in mathematics and math-related issues.
Contact the Division of Math, Science, and Technology in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
N.A.T.U.R.E. Club
The N.A.T.U.R.E. Club provides a forum for students and community members interested in natural sciences and naturerelated issues. Contact the Division of Math, Science, and Technology in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
NSU Florida Nursing Students Association
Membership is required in the Florida Nursing Student Association (FNSA) for all students enrolled in the entry-level B.S.N.
program. FNSA is the official liaison between the Nursing Department and the Student Government Association.
Paralegal Society
The Paralegal Society is open to all students and serves to provide members the experience necessary to be marketable
and competitive in the legal field, prepare members for postgraduate studies, and provide a forum for legal professionals to
educate and inform members. Contact the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the Farquhar College of Arts and
Sciences.
Phi Alpha Delta (co-ed pre-law fraternity) and Mock Trial Club
Phi Alpha Delta is a social and pre-professional organization serving students interested in a law career. Contact the
Division of Humanities in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Pre-Dental Society
The Pre-Dental Society serves as a source of information for students pursuing a career in dentistry and assists students
in formulating well-defined and realistic strategies for gaining admission to dental school. Contact the Division of Math,
Science, and Technology in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Pre-Medical Society
The Pre-Medical Society serves as a source of information for students pursuing a career in medicine and assists students
in formulating well-defined and realistic strategies for gaining admission to medical school. Contact the Division of Math,
Science, and Technology in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Pre-Pharmacy Society
The Pre-Pharmacy Society serves as a source of information for students pursuing a career in pharmacy and assists
students in formulating well-defined and realistic strategies for gaining admission to pharmacy school. Contact the Division
of Math, Science, and Technology in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Psychology Club
The Psychology Club serves as a social organization and forum for students interested in psychology, regardless of major.
Contact the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Society of Physics Students
The Society of Physics Students (SPS), a chapter of the national student organization sponsored by the American Institute
of Physics (AIP), serves students interested in physics, regardless of major. Contact the Division of Math, Science, and
Technology in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Spanish Club
The Spanish Club serves as a social organization for students interested in Spanish language and cultures. Contact the
Division of Humanities in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
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Honors Program
The Undergraduate Honors Program fosters intellectual community both within and across academic disciplines by offering
special coursework, reading groups, and workshops to help students prepare for graduate school, advanced research,
study abroad, and post-baccalaureate fellowships. The Undergraduate Honors Program is divided into general honors
and divisional honors. Academically talented and motivated students are encouraged to apply to honors programs. The
Undergraduate Honors Program is facilitated by the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
General Honors Program
The General Honors Program of intensive seminars and honors-level general education classes is designed for freshmen
and sophomores. Entering students are invited to participate in the General Honors Program on the basis of prior academic
performance. Approximately 10 percent of each year’s entering student class is invited to participate. Admission to the
university is a prerequisite for admission to the program. Participants are required to complete 15 credits of Honors coursework,
including Honors seminars and honors-level general education classes. Citation requirements for the Undergraduate Honors
Program must be completed at NSU. All Honors courses will be noted on the student’s permanent transcript and students
who successfully complete the requirements of the General Honors Program will be recognized for their accomplishment. In
order to receive an Honors citation, students must hold a cumulative GPA of 3.4 or higher at the time of graduation.
Divisional Honors Program
The Divisional Honors Program of directed study is geared toward juniors and seniors, allowing them to pursue independent
research with faculty mentors. Students in the Divisional Honors Program work on an undergraduate research project under
the direction of a faculty advisor. The program is open to juniors and seniors invited to participate according to criteria
established by each academic program. Participation in the General Honors Program is not a prerequisite for the Divisional
Honors Program. All Honors courses will be noted on the student’s permanent transcript and students who successfully
complete the requirements of the Divisional Honors Program will be recognized for their accomplishment. In order to receive
an Honors citation, students must hold a cumulative GPA of 3.4 or higher at the time of graduation.
Co-Curricular Honors Community
Students in the Undergraduate Honors Program connect classroom experience with experiences outside the classroom,
including travel study, social activities, speakers series, and campus event.
For more information about the Undergraduate Honors Program, contact the Office of the Dean in the Farquhar College of
Arts and Sciences at (954) 262-8408.
Internships
Internships provide opportunities for experiential learning. They provide opportunities for students to experience their
chosen work environment, to make connections with potential future employers, and to network with potential colleagues
and mentors. Students may earn credit for internships that complement and enhance their academic programs.
There are several ways that students wishing to pursue an internship can initiate the process. The student can:
• Meet with a professional in the field who is willing to provide an internship experience and then meet with their
academic advisor.
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• Explore ideas for internships with faculty and then meet with their academic advisor.
• Meet with personnel in the Office of Career Development and discuss options for internships and then meet with
their academic advisor.
• Check the Web or the newspaper for available internships and then meet with their academic advisor.
The process should be initiated at least one month prior to the start of the term in which the internship is requested.
Students interested in pursuing internships should contact their academic advisor to determine eligibility requirements and
to complete an internship enrollment form. Internships are supervised by faculty and must be pre-approved. Regular tuition
schedules and rates apply to internships.
NSU Student Handbook
The NSU Student Handbook addresses general university policies for NSU students, including student life, student rights
and responsibilities, university policies and procedures, and NSU resources. The NSU Student Handbook is located at
www.nova.edy/cwis/studentaffairsforms/ustudenthandbook.pdf.
Office of Academic Services (OAS)
The Office of Academic Services supports the academic progress of all NSU undergraduate students. Among the various
services offered by the office are individualized tutoring in writing, mathematics, and science, as well as a diverse array of
testing services.
Tutoring
Students can receive one-on-one tutoring in writing, math, science, and selected business courses. Tutoring sessions last
45 minutes. Writing tutoring covers all phases of the writing process from brainstorming to editing to APA/MLA formatting.
Tutors do not edit papers for students. Instead, the focus is on working through a portion of the paper to improve writing skills
and help the students become more independent writers.
The Office of Academic Services also offers valuable supplemental resources and services, such as:
• a complete library of math DVDs available for weekly check-out
• a reference library of solution manuals for math and science courses
• a Web site, which features links to additional academic support materials that include writing and study skills
handouts, as well as APA and MLA formatting guidebooks
• a variety of workshops covering academic success skills.
For more information about tutoring services, call OAS at (954) 262-8350 or visit the Web site at www.fcas.nova.edu/
AcademicServices.
Testing
Incoming undergraduate students in consultation with their academic advisors may request to take challenge exams in
writing and mathematics. Other course equivalent examinations available to the students are the College-Level Examination
Program (CLEP), DSST (DANTES subject standardized test), and New York Proficiency Testing in Foreign Languages.
For more information about testing services, call OAS at (954) 262-8374 or visit the Web site at www.fcas.nova.edu/
AcademicServices.
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Online Course Access and SharkLink
Nova Southeastern University handles much of its business online. The NSU Web site www.nova.edu provides links for
current students to access most of the NSU services.
Distance Education Support
Distance education students are provided with NSU computer accounts including email. Students, however, must obtain
their own Internet service providers (ISP) and use their own computer systems (IBM-compatible PC or Apple Macintosh and
an Internet connection). New students receive an orientation and extensive online technical support online access, online
tools and methods, and library resources.
Online interactive learning methods involve Web-based course materials, the electronic library, and online activities that
facilitate frequent student-professor interaction. Faculty members and students interact via online forums using threaded
discussion boards, chat rooms, and email. Students submit assignments through a Web-based learning environment.
Online students have access to books, journal articles, microfiche, dissertations, index searches, catalog searches, and
reference librarians. The online medical database collection at NSU is extensive and includes access to quality subscription
services free of charge to the student.
SharkLink
SharkLink is NSU’s online information portal. With a single username and password, it provides students access to their
NSU email account, online courses and discussion groups, university announcements and calendar reminders, and
student records. All students are assigned an NSU ID that uniquely identifies them and provides them access to the NSU
administrative system (WebSTAR). In addition, students are assigned a SharkLink ID, which is also their NSU email name.
SharkLink can be accessed at https://sharklink.nova.edu. To obtain an NSU ID and/or SharkLink ID, students should visit
www.nova.edu/resources/nsuidentity.html.
Online Course Access
The university uses a secure course management platform for developing and delivering interactive courses and their
components over the Web. Students are granted access to this platform based on registration for online courses. Students
must use their SharkLink login and password in order to access their online courses. All online students must use this
platform when communicating with their program. Course communication will be done through the particular course that the
student is attending.
NSU Email
All official NSU business, such as information on accounts, financial aid, class emails, etc., is done through students’ NSU
email accounts. Students can access NSU email by logging into SharkLink. Students’ SharkLink ID serves as their NSU
email name.
WebSTAR
WebSTAR provides students with online access to check on course availability, register, check their grades, or check their
accounts. Students will use their student ID and receive a special Personal Identification Number (PIN) to access WebSTAR.
It will come to the mailing address listed as the local address at NSU. Students can change their PIN to a password of choice
if desired. Students may also set a password reminder. Students can access WebSTAR by logging into SharkLink.
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Orientation
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Orientation for students of the College of Allied Health and Nursing is organized through the Health Professions Division’s
Office of Admissions and Student Services at (954) 262-1101. New student orientation for the Bachelor of Health Science—
Online Program is available online before the start of the semester through the university’s course management platform.
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences,
Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
The Office of New Student Orientation is a resource center for entering undergraduate students and their families. The office
coordinates all orientation programs for new undergraduate students on main campus. Students attending classes at one of
the university’s off-campus student educational centers should contact their center for orientation programs. Online students
participate in an online orientation. Information is available at www.nova.edu/studentorientation or by calling (954) 262-8050.
Pre-Degree Granting Programs
Nova Southeastern University offers three pre-degree granting programs, for students who have not yet chosen a major or
who do not meet the matriculation requirements of their desired major, but are working toward that goal. These programs
are administered by the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Deciding Program
Many students have not decided which program of study or career path to follow when they enter college. Many change their
minds more than once during their college education. Through the Deciding Program, NSU faculty and staff help students
choose a career path and select a major. Students have the opportunity to explore a variety of interests before declaring a
major field of study.
Students who do not select a major program during the admissions process are considered “deciding.” All students, including
transfer students, must declare a major by the completion of 60 cumulative credits (including non-NSU credits). Deciding
students and students who wish to change their originally declared major should contact their academic advisor.
Pre-Nursing
The Pre-Nursing Program is available to all students who wish to apply for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. The
Pre-Nursing Program is a select dual admissions program into which students may apply upon acceptance to NSU. Prenursing students are enrolled with the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences and must abide by all of the college’s policies.
While at the college, students are eligible for all PALS scholarships. Any scholarship specific to students of the Farquhar
College of Arts and Sciences will terminate once students are matriculated into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing—EntryLevel Program in the College of Allied Health and Nursing. For more information on the admission requirements of the
B.S.N.—Entry-Level Program, refer to the Admission Procedures and Requirements section of the NSU Undergraduate
Student Catalog.
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Problem Resolution Procedures
Nova Southeastern University is committed to maintaining policies and procedures supportive of the student community.
Students must follow specific policies and instructions described in this catalog, in the NSU Student Handbook, and in
course schedules, program brochures, information sheets, and periodic special mailings.
Formal problems or grievances fall into three categories: harassment or discrimination grievances, academic grievances,
and administrative grievances. Detailed instructions on how to submit an academic or administrative grievance are described
below by each college or school. Student athletes should refer to the NSU Student Athlete Guidelines for additional
information about athletics-related problem resolution procedures.
Types of Grievances
For specific information on grievance procedures, refer to the appropriate college’s or school’s contacts in the Levels of
Appeal for Problem Resolution chart. When filing a grievance, students should make every effort to document their claim.
Harassment or Discrimination
Discriminatory conduct based on such factors as ethnicity, religion gender, national origin, disability, age, ancestry, marital
status, sexual orientation, pregnancy, unfavorable discharge from the military, veteran status, or political beliefs, including
but not limited to, violations under all federal and state laws, rules, regulations, and/or acts including, but not limited to, Title
VII, Title VI, Title IX, Title II, Title III, Americans with Disability Act and the Rehab Act are unacceptable and prohibited in the
university.
Students who feel discriminated against by another student, an NSU faculty or staff member, or an employee, should contact
the appropriate academic or administrative director, not the person providing the service or instruction. Students also may
contact the university Title IX coordinator, Gay Holliday, Ed.D., associate dean of student affairs, at (954) 262-7280.
Grade Disputes
Faculty members handle grievances involving the fairness of a grade. Students unable to resolve the grade dispute with a
faculty member should contact the academic director or assistant dean of the division responsible for the course, who will
make a final decision on the fairness of the grade. For specific contacts, see the Levels of Appeal for Problem Resolution
chart. Grade disputes will not be permitted to proceed any further unless evidence of discrimination or a violation of rights
can be demonstrated.
Academic Grievances
Academic grievances are related to classroom and instructor activity. For academic matters, students should follow the
academic grievance process of the college or school offering the course. The Levels of Appeal for Problem Resolution chart
indicates the specific contacts for academic grievances.
Administrative Grievances
Administrative grievances are related to academic policies and administrative actions. For administrative grievances,
students should follow the administrative grievance process for their college or school indicated in the Levels of Appeal for
Problem Resolution chart.
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Grievance Time Limitation
Grievance procedures must be initiated in a timely fashion no later than the end of the semester following the occurrence of
the grievance issue. The student may forfeit all rights under the grievance procedure if each step is not followed within the
prescribed time limit.
Academic and Administrative Grievance Process
Procedures for academic and administrative grievances are outlined below. Specific contacts are indicated in the Levels of
Appeal for Problem Resolution chart. Grievances must begin at the first level contact. Grievances brought to higher level
contacts without previously going through the appropriate academic or administrative grievance procedure will be referred
to the appropriate step in the process, thus delaying problem resolution. Students who are not sure of the appropriate
university employee to contact about an academic or administrative issue should communicate with their advisor or refer to
the Level of Appeal for Problem Resolution chart.
Student Action Request (SAR)
Student Action Requests (SAR) are used to request waivers from specific university, college, or school policies under
unusual circumstances. Students can officially request a waiver from a published academic policy by completing a SAR.
Before a SAR is submitted, students should seek advice from their academic advisor in an effort to resolve their issue of
concern and determine if an official SAR is necessary. NOTE: If a SAR involves changing enrollment status, including
dropping courses, the action may affect students’ eligibility for financial aid (see Withdrawal from Classes in Academic
Resources and Procedures).
How to Submit a Student Action Request
The following information must be included in all Student Action Requests. Requests lacking the required information will
not be reviewed. Students should consult with their academic advisor before submitting a SAR. The SAR should then be
submitted in person to the academic advisor or be sent as a Word document from the student’s official NSU email account
if they cannot meet in person.
1. Student Name
2. Student ID number
3. Major/Program/Site Location
4. Day/Evening Phone Number
5. Mailing Address
6. Email Address
7. Problem: Provide an explanation of the problem and include any pertinent documentation as support.
8. Action Requested: Provide an explanation of the requested action. Include the referring page in the current
undergraduate student catalog for the policy in question or any other relevant information, including specific
courses or terms.
9. Prior Action Taken: Provide a list of all individuals contacted about the problem, including their departments.
For more information on submitting a SAR, students can visit www.fcas.nova.edu/currentstudents/studentactionform.cfm or
the Web site of the school or college in which they are enrolled.
Procedure for Submitting Academic and Administrative Grievances
Academic grievances involve course-related issues originating from classroom or instructor activity. When formal grievance
steps are perceived necessary, students have a right to a fair process and hearing without fear of retribution. Because
grievances can often seem adversarial, it is recommended that students pursue local or departmental resolution to problems
and discuss problems with appropriate parties before resorting to formal grievance steps. Academic difficulties in a class, for
example, should always be discussed first with the faculty member teaching the class.
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Problems that cannot be resolved with the faculty member or party involved should be discussed with an advisor who may
be able to help students pursue an additional step in the process.
If the issue concerns the fairness of a grade, students should refer to Grade Disputes, previously discussed in this Problem
Resolution Procedures section.
Step One: Meet with the faculty member or party involved
Students should discuss their grievance with the appropriate faculty member or party involved no later than the end
of the semester following the occurrence of the grievance issue.
Step Two: Meet with the advisor
Students who feel that their grievance was not satisfactorily resolved after meeting with the faculty member or party
involved should meet with their advisor for guidance in submitting a formal complaint in writing, using a Student
Action Request (SAR).
Prior to submitting the request, students should carefully read and be aware of any consequences if the grievance
involves changes in enrollment status. It is also essential that students maintain copies of relevant documentation
(emails, medical documents, etc.) sent to academic advisors or other NSU personnel. For detailed instructions on
submitting a SAR, students should refer to the preceding Student Action Request section in this catalog.
After receiving, reviewing, and signing the SAR, the advisor will send it to the appropriate party for a decision. Once
a decision has been made, the decision will be communicated to the student at the address on record or to the NSU
email address.
Step Three: Appeal to the college/school administrator or committee (see the Levels of Appeal for Problem
Resolution chart)
After receiving the decision to the SAR, if students feel that based on their expectations the issue was not satisfactorily
resolved, they may appeal in writing to the administrator or committee at the next level (see the Levels of Appeal
for Problem Resolution chart). The appeal should consist of a letter explaining the reason that the students are
requesting the exception to policy and should contain official documentation to support the request. After the appeal
is reviewed, students will be sent a written reply from the appropriate administrator or committee. The response will
be sent to the student’s address on record or to the NSU email address.
Step Four: Final appeal
Students who feel that their issue is still unresolved after receiving the decision of the administrator or committee,
may submit a final appeal, in writing, to the dean or committee indicated in the Levels of Appeal for Problem
Resolution chart. Students will receive a formal response either by mail to the address on record or to their NSU
email account. This decision is final and binding and cannot be appealed.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
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Levels of Appeal for Problem Resolution
Types of
Grievances
Farquhar College of
Arts and Sciences
Harassment or
Discrimination
Refer to Title IX
Coordinator Gay
Holliday, Ed.D.,
Associate Dean of
Student Affairs, at
(954) 262-7280
Grade Dispute
1. Faculty
2. Academic Director
Academic
Grievance
1. Faculty
2. Academic Advisor–
SAR
3. Associate Dean
4. Dean
Administrative
Grievance
1 Party Involved
2. Academic Advisor–
SAR
3. Associate Dean
4. Dean
Fischler School
of Education and
Human Services
Refer to Title IX
Coordinator Gay
Holliday, Ed.D.,
Associate Dean of
Student Affairs, at (954)
262-7280
1. Faculty,
2. Director of UTE
Enrollment
1. Faculty
2. Academic Advisor–
SAR
3. Director of UTE
Enrollment
4. Dean UTEP
1. Party Involved
2. Academic Advisor–
SAR
3. Director of UTE
Enrollment
4. Dean UTEP
Huizenga School
of Business and
Entrepreneurship
Refer to Title IX
Coordinator Gay
Holliday, Ed.D.,
Associate Dean of
Student Affairs, at (954)
262-7280
Health Professions
Division – Nursing
and Health Sciences
Refer to Title IX
Coordinator Gay
Holliday, Ed.D.,
Associate Dean of
Student Affairs, at
(954) 262-7280
1. Faculty,
2. Assistant Dean
1. Faculty
2. Program Director
1. Faculty
2. Academic Advisor–
SAR
3. Assistant Dean
4. Associate Dean
1. Faculty
2. Advisor–SAR
3. Committee on
Student Progress
4. College-Wide
Appeals Committee
1. Party Involved
2. Academic Advisor–
SAR/REP
3. Assistant Dean
4. Associate Dean
1. Party Involved
2. Advisor–SAR
3. Program Director
4. College-Wide
Appeals Committee
Registration
All students must have at least provisional admission status, be officially registered, and pay tuition and fees in order
to attend class and receive a grade. Students should register for the fall, winter, and summer semester during the open
registration period. Students should register for all courses they intend to complete within a semester and not wait until the
semester has started to register for part of a term. Registering for the entire semester allows the NSU Office of Student
Financial Assistance to properly process and disburse the student’s financial aid. An official grade will not be recorded and
credit will not be given for anyone who attends class as an unregistered student. For information on dropping, adding, or
withdrawing from classes, refer to the Dropping and Adding Classes or Withdrawal from Classes sections of this catalog.
Online vs. In-Person Registration
Web registration is available through WebSTAR at www.webstar.nova.edu. Students may register online with WebSTAR
unless they are athletes, new students, NSU employees, returning students on academic probation, or students with
additional holds. A valid NSU Personal Identification Number (PIN) is required to register online. Students who do not know
their PIN should visit www.nova.edu/resources/nsuidentity.html to retrieve their PIN.
Students ineligible for online registration and students who choose not to use online registration must meet with their
academic advisor and provide appropriate written documentation indicating their schedule choices to register for
classes.
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Registration Schedule
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Each semester at NSU consists of two terms, but only one open registration period (see Academic Calendars for dates).
During open registration students should meet with their academic advisor to review class schedules. Timely registration
ensures availability of seats in required classes, reduces the risk of financial aid problems, and decreases demand for lastminute advising appointments. The College of Allied Health and Nursing does not penalize for later registration.
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences,
Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
Open Registration
Each semester at NSU consists of two terms or sessions, but only one open registration period (see Academic Calendars
for dates). Open registration ends ten calendar days before the start of a semester. During open registration students should
meet with their academic advisor to review class schedules. Timely registration ensures availability of seats in required
classes, reduces the risk of financial aid problems, and decreases demand for last-minute advising appointments.
Late Registration
Open registration ends ten calendar days before the start of the semester. Students who initially register for semester
classes after the open registration period are considered to be registering during late registration and must pay a late
registration fee. The late registration fee applies to all courses and all terms within the semester. However, it does not apply
to schedule adjustment (drop/add)changes during each term’s drop and add periods. The late registration fee will be waived
for students newly enrolled that semester. Dropping courses does not result in a refund of late fees. Special permission from
the academic division is required for any registration after the start of the term. Students who register late for classes are
responsible for all course requirements.
Appealing the Late Registration Fee—Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Students of the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences who wish to appeal the late registration fee should send an email to
saf@nsu.nova.edu from their NSU email account. Students should provide their name, NSU ID number, major, term, name
of any other individuals contacted, and a detailed explanation of why they feel they should not have to pay this fee. Upon
receipt, students will receive confirmation that their email has been received and any additional information needed will be
requested at that time.
Each appeal will be reviewed according to the following criteria:
1. Is the student a new student?
2. Did the student register for any courses, for the relevant term, prior to the deadline?
3. Does the student have a valid reason for being unable to register prior to the deadline?
Appeals will be reviewed by the director of the Office of Operations. Appeals that fail to meet minimum criteria will be
denied and the student will be notified by email. Students may appeal a decision to the dean by providing additional written
justification for reversal to the Office of Operations. The decision by the dean is final. Students will receive notification, via
NSU email, if a petition for reversal has been approved.
Student Athlete Eligibility
To retain student athlete eligibility, student athletes are required to carry at least 15 credits each semester.
For further information, athletes should consult the Student Athlete Handbook available from the Department of
Athletics.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
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Closed Classes
Enrollment capacity for each class is carefully determined to reflect the physical limitations of the classroom or lab as
well as the subject’s most effective learning and teaching environment. Once a class has been filled and closed to further
registration, students should meet with their academic advisor for help adjusting schedules and choosing alternative classes
that meet degree program requirements.
Students may appeal to register for closed classes under exceptional circumstances. Student appeals must be made in
writing by the student’s academic advisor to the academic director of the division in which the course is offered. Appeals
should not be directed to course instructors. Academic directors review appeals and may consult instructors when considering
such requests. All appeals must explain why no alternative class will support the student’s degree requirements, explain
why the student was unable to register for the class when space was available, and include a written endorsement from an
academic advisor (e.g., by email).
Appeals will only be considered up to the date of the first class meeting. If a student appeal is granted, the academic director
will authorize the student’s academic advisor in writing (e.g., by email) to register the student. However, the registration must
be processed within 24 hours of the director’s notification. If the registration is not processed within that time period, the
authorization is removed and the student’s space in the closed class may be released to another student.
Repeated Courses
Subject to availability, students may repeat a course to improve the grade in that course, but credit toward graduation will
be granted only once. All enrollments and grades will remain on the transcript and will have a notation that the course has
been repeated. If a student repeats a course, the highest grade will be counted in the student’s cumulative GPA. All grades
earned in each term are included in the calculation of the term GPA. Repeating courses can impact academic standing.
After the course has ended, the student must complete a repeated course form available from his or her academic advisor.
Scholarships and Grants
for Undergraduate Students
Scholarships and grants are available to students from various sources within the university, as well as from external public
and private organizations.
The first step for students interested in financial aid of any kind is to visit the NSU Office of Student Financial Assistance
on the Web for information about deadlines for the FAFSA and other necessary financial aid applications. NSU’s Office of
Student Financial Assistance administers grants, loans, scholarships, and student employment and provides resources
to help students locate funding and plan the financial aspects of their education. For more information about the Office of
Student Financial Assistance, call (954) 262-3380 or go to www.nova.edu/financialaid.
All college and university scholarships and grants are combined with other federal and state financial aid programs to help
meet students’ financial needs. Eligibility requirements vary. Students should note that changes in enrollment during a
semester may affect eligibility for awards with minimum course load requirements (e.g., that require students to be enrolled
full time).
The following directory summarizes undergraduate scholarships and grants offered by Nova Southeastern University. The
first section lists general NSU undergraduate scholarships, for which majors of study do not affect eligibility. The subsequent
sections are categorized by college and describe scholarships and grants for undergraduate students within specific areas
of study.
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NSU Undergraduate Scholarships
Please visit the NSU Scholarship Web site at www.nova.edu/financialaid/scholarships for detailed information regarding
these and other scholarships.
Alvin Sherman Family Scholarships (PALS and Career Development students)
Amount: Varies
Application: Yes; July 15 preferred deadline
Renewal: Yes; requires the completion of 24 credits each academic year and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5
Eligibility: Must be a new student who has been accepted into the Professional and Liberal Studies (PALS) or Career
Development program. Must demonstrate financial need and have a FAFSA on file. Student must have a high school
diploma or transfer with a GPA of at least 3.0. Consideration will be given to single parents or students of single parents.
Contact: Office of Undergraduate Admissions at (954) 262-8000 or admissions@nsu.nova.edu
Barnes and Noble Book Scholarship
Amount: $500
Application: Yes; December 15 deadline
Eligibility: Student must have been registered for the fall semester. Undergraduate and graduate students are eligible.
Consideration will be given for academic excellence. International students are welcome to apply.
Contact: Please submit applications along with most current copies of receipts from the NSU Book Store to the Office
of Student Financial Assistance Scholarship Department.
Broward International Women’s Club Scholarship
Amount: Varies
Application: Yes; April 30 deadline
Eligibility: Must be an international female student pursuing an education at NSU. Have a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or
higher. Include an explanation of financial need in the letter of application.
Contact: Special Events and Projects Department at (954) 262-2110
Broward Leadership Scholarship
Amount: $1000
Application: Not specified
Eligibility: Scholarship is available to incoming students who have been accepted into the Professional and Liberal
Studies (PALS) Program. This is a one-time award and is not renewable. Student must be enrolled full-time to qualify.
Contact: Office of Undergraduate Admissions at (954) 262-8000
Chancellor’s Scholarship (new PALS students only)
Amount: Full-Tuition Scholarship. The award will ensure all tuition charges are met inclusive of other institutional, state,
and federal gift aid packages.
Application: Yes; President’s Scholarship application necessary after being admitted to NSU.
Renewal: Yes; renewable for up to four years of full-time undergraduate studies with a 3.5 overall GPA.
Eligibility: Available to new full-time, freshman PALS students attending the day program at NSU’s main campus. Student
will lose eligibility for these awards if they leave the Professional and Liberal Studies Program before graduation to enroll
in a graduate program, move to the Health Professions Division, enroll in the Career Development Program, or become
a full-time NSU employee.
Contact: Megan Burns, Coordinator of Special Programs, at (954) 262-8065 or bmegan@nova.edu
Dual Admission Scholarships
Amount: $200 per academic year (fall and winter only)
Application: No; awards are automatic based on active participation in the program
Renewal: Yes; automatic renewal up to four years
Eligibility: Scholarship available only to full-time students enrolled in the Dual Admission program. Student must be
in good academic standing (meeting satisfactory progress toward program requirements). Attendance at events and
meetings is required.
Required activities: Attendance at required events and meetings
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
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Contact: Student Services in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences’ Office of the Dean at (954) 262-8053 or
scholarships@nsu.nova.edu.
Electronic Funds Transfer Scholarship
Amount: $2,000
Application: Yes; August 15 deadline
Renewal: No
Eligibility: Be an undergraduate or graduate continuing student with an established GPA of 3.0 or higher at NSU.
Consideration will be given for leadership ability, community/volunteer activities, academic excellence, and demonstrated
financial need, based on FAFSA for the incoming academic year attending.
Contact: Office of Student Financial Assistance at 800-541-6682
Ethel G. and Raymond P. Ferrero Family Scholarship
Amount: $1,250
Application: Yes; August 1 deadline
Eligibility: Consideration will be given for leadership ability, community/volunteer activities, and academic excellence.
Preference is given to graduates of St. Thomas Aquinas High School who have been accepted to NSU’s undergraduate
program.
Contact: Please submit applications along with high school transcripts to the Office of Student Financial Assistance. If
transcripts are not enclosed, the application will not be considered.
Farquhar College Grants (new PALS students only)
Amount: Varies based on unmet financial need (may be awarded in conjunction with an NSU Honor Award); amount
may be adjusted if the student receives other scholarships or grants; tuition-only grant
Application: No; award is determined at the time of admission if a completed FAFSA is on file at NSU.
Renewal: Yes; automatic renewal after the first year; after the second year renewal is based on need and satisfactory
academic progress
Eligibility: Grant is available to new full-time freshman and transfer PALS students attending the day program at NSU’s
main campus. Student must be in good academic standing and enrolled full time. Student will lose eligibility for these
awards if they leave the Professional and Liberal Studies Program before graduation to enroll in a graduate program,
move to the Health Professions Division, enroll in the Career Development Program, or become a full-time NSU
employee.
Contact: Prospective or new students should contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at (954) 262-8000 or
admissions@nsu.nova.edu. Continuing students should contact Student Services in the Office of the Dean at (954)
262-8053 or scholarships@nova.edu.
Gareth Steele Disability Scholarship
Amount: $1000
Application: Open (no deadline)
Eligibility: Must be a Broward County resident, as well as a U.S. citizen or legal resident of Florida with a disability. Be
a recent high school graduate within the past year or be graduating high school within the next school year. A 300 word
essay is required.
Contact: Please send essays to Rae Begley, Scholarship Department, NSU, 3301 College Avenue, Fort Lauderdale,
Florida 33314.
Gold Circle Scholarship Fund
Amount: $2,000
Application: No application required. All students that meet the requirements will be automatically considered for this
fund. Awarding is in July. Those randomly selected will be notified.
Eligibility: Students that demonstrate high financial need. Students must complete a FAFSA/Renewal by April 15 and
must have established a GPA in a university program. Students with the highest GPA and financial need are selected
based on available funds and meeting the priority deadline. The scholarship is renewable with a 3.0 GPA, depending
on available funds.
Contact: Office of Student Financial Assistance at 800-541-6682
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Honors Program Scholarships
Amount: $500 annually
Application: No; awards are automatic based on active participation in the program
Renewal: Yes; Students must maintain a 3.4 cumulative GPA and be active in the Honors Program
Eligibility: Student must be enrolled full-time in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences and in good academic
standing as per the criteria established by the Undergraduate Honors Program. Active participation in the Honors
Program is required.
Contact: Student Services in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences Office of the Dean at (954) 262-8053 or
scholarships@nsu.nova.edu.
Howard Dunbar Scholarship
Amount: $1,000
Application: No Application Required. All students that meet the requirements will be considered for this fund.
Students are selected in July and will be notified.
Eligibility: Must be a male student with demonstrated financial need. A complete FAFSA/Renewal by April 15 and an
established GPA at NSU is required. Students are selected based on available funds, meeting the priority deadline,
highest GPA, and financial need. Scholarship is renewable with a GPA of at least 3.2 depending on available funds.
Contact: Office of Student Financial Assistance at 800-541-6682
Nova Southeastern University Honor Awards (new PALS students only)
Amount: Tuition-only awards. NSU Freshman Honor Award ($1,000-$9,000). NSU Transfer Honor Award ($1,000$5,500)
Application: No; awards are made at the time of admission to NSU based on prior academic achievement.
Renewal: Yes; Automatic renewal after the first year; after the second year renewal is based on the completion of 24
credits during the previous academic year the scholarship was received and maintaining a 3.0 cumulative GPA.
Eligibility: Available to new full-time freshman and transfer PALS students attending the day program at the main
campus; Students will lose eligibility for these awards if they leave the Professional and Liberal Studies Program before
graduation to enroll in a graduate program, move to the Health Professions Division, enroll in the Career Development
Program, or become a full-time NSU employee.
Contact: Office of Undergraduate Admissions at (954) 262-8000 or admissions@nsu.nova.edu
NSU Bright Future Scholars Award
Award Amount: Varies (Full Tuition)
Deadline: Open
Requirements: First time enrollee at NSU, full-time enrollment in an undergraduate program. Must apply for and receive
Florida Residency Access Grant (FRAG). Must meet all eligibility requirements of the Florida Academic Scholars Award
(Bright Futures 100%). Must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the NSU State Aid
Application. Applications are available at www.nova.edu/financialaid/scholarships/institutional.html. Forward application
to the Undergraduate Admissions Office.
Phi Theta Kappa Awards (new PALS transfer students only)
Amount: $1,000, tuition-only award
Application: No; student must show proof of Phi Theta Kappa membership
Renewal: Yes
Eligibility: New PALS transfer students who are members of Phi Theta Kappa. Must maintain a minimum cumulative
GPA of 3.0 and full-time enrollment for the fall and winter semesters.
Contact: Office of Undergraduate Admissions at (954) 262-8000 or admissions@nsu.nova.edu
Residential Life Scholarship
Amount: $6,210 (varies)
Applications: Applications are available at end of January during information session
Eligibility: Scholarship is only available to students who are hired as residential advisers. Must be a registered fulltime student at NSU. Undergraduate students must have a minimum GPA of 2.5; graduate students must have the
minimum cumulative GPA required by their program. Must have one semester live-in experience prior to application,
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
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not necessarily at NSU; OR significant leadership experience. Must be in good judicial standing with the University.
Willingness to make a commitment through the academic year (i.e. August–May).
Contact: Office of Residential Life and Housing at (954) 262-7061 or visit www.nova.edu/reslife/rainfo.html
Trustee Scholarship Fund for Students
Amount: $2,500
Application: Yes; August 1 deadline
Eligibility: Awards are made to first-year-entering Graduate and first-year-entering Undergraduate full-time students.
Leadership ability, community/volunteer activities and academic excellence will be considered in the awarding process.
Minimum GPA is 3.5. Scholarships are renewable with a GPA of 3.2 and depending on available funds. Please submit
applications along with prior schools unofficial transcripts to the Office of Student Financial Services Scholarship
Department. Due to the number of students applying, NSU will only notify the students selected. Please do not fax
applications.
Contact: Office of Student Financial Assistance at 800-541-6682
College of Allied Health and Nursing
There are a number of national, state, and hospital grants available for R.N. students. Additionally, student loan interest
for nursing students is lower than for students seeking other degrees. The Office of Student Financial Assistance and the
College of Allied Health and Nursing are eager to assist students in exploring all possible financial aid options.
Health Professions Division Hispanic Student Scholarship
Amount: Varies
Application: Yes; deadline varies
Eligibility: Must be a Hispanic student enrolled in one of the colleges of NSU Health Professions Division. Student must
be in good academic standing. For more information on requirements/criteria, please contact the HPD Chancellor’s
Office. Awards are based on available funds.
Contact: Office of Student Financial Assistance at 800-541-6682, ext. 21518
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences institutional awards are managed by the Office of the Dean. See specific award
descriptions for eligibility and renewal requirements. These awards are normally discontinued when a student has earned
130 credits in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences or leaves the college to attend another NSU program. Employees
of NSU or sub-contractors of NSU who are receiving full tuition benefits at the university are ineligible to receive these
awards. Awards may be reversed after disbursal if a student has received a tuition waiver from NSU for that particular
semester. Students may petition for scholarship continuation on a semester-by-semester basis to meet requirements for
their primary degree program. Petitions must be submitted in writing to the Office of the Dean. Students who have previously
earned bachelor’s degrees are not eligible for institutional awards if they choose to seek a second bachelor’s degree at
NSU. For information and applications, use the contact information listed below.
Professional and Liberal Studies Book Awards (continuing PALS students only)
Amount: $250 for book expenses
Application: Yes; April 1 deadline
Renewal: No
Eligibility: Continuing PALS students enrolled in a Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences major only; academically
competitive with preference given to upperclassmen.
Contact: Student Services in the Office of the Dean at (954) 262-8053 or scholarships@nsu.nova.edu. Online applications
are available at www.fcas.nova.edu/scholarships/programs.cfm.
Continuing Career Student Grants (Career Development students only)
Amount: $400 per semester based on financial need and academic performance
Application: Yes; Deadline one month prior to start of the semester.
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Renewal: No; Awards are not automatically renewed; students must apply for each year’s award
Eligibility: Full-time Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences students only (Division of Humanities; Division of Math,
Science, and Technology; Division of Performing and Visual Arts; and Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences majors
only); minimum cumulative 2.0 GPA; priority given to full-time students who show continuous enrollment for at least
two of the previous three semesters and display reasonable academic progress (who have successfully completed 24
credits in the previous 12 months). Graduate students are not eligible.
Contact: Student Services in the Office of the Dean at (954) 262-8053 or scholarships@nsu.nova.edu. Online applications
are available at www.fcas.nova.edu/scholarships/programs.cfm.
Dean’s Office Scholarships (PALS and Career Development students)
Amount: Varies
Application: Yes; Deadline one month prior to start of the semester.
Renewal: No; Awards are not automatically renewed; students must apply for each year’s award
Eligibility: Full-time Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences students only (Division of Humanities; Division of Math,
Science, and Technology; Division of Performing and Visual Arts; and Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences majors
only); financial need; minimum NSU cumulative 2.0 GPA; successful and sustained academic performance. Graduate
students are not eligible.
Contact: Student Services in the Office of the Dean at (954) 262-8053 or scholarships@nsu.nova.edu. Online applications
are available at www.fcas.nova.edu/scholarships/programs.cfm.
Performing and Visual Arts Grant (PALS students only)
Amount: Varies per year; talent-based
Application: Yes, plus audition/portfolio
Renewal: No; awards are not automatically renewed; students must apply for each year’s award
Eligibility: Students seeking a bachelor’s degree in arts administration, dance, music, theatre, or art, as well as
undergraduate students who wish to participate in either the Bossa Nova Chorale, dance, orchestra, or Pep Band.
Audition required. NSU employees are not eligible.
Stolzenberg-Doan Scholarship (PALS and Career Development students)
Amount: varies per year
Application: yes; deadline March 1 for Summer and Fall semester travel; deadline October 1 for Winter semester travel.
Renewal: no, but multiple awards permitted based on study abroad opportunities (limit one per year)
Eligibility: Students in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences only, priority given to students majoring in international
studies (business and education majors are not eligible); minimum cumulative 2.5 GPA and a 500 word essay; must
show financial need.
Contact: Student Services in the Office of the Dean at (954) 262-8053 or scholarships@nsu.nova.edu.
The Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences Professional and Liberal Studies Program International Student
Scholarships (continuing PALS students only)
Amount: ranges from $250 to $1,000 per year based on academic achievement and financial need
Application: yes, April 1 deadline
Renewal: no
Eligibility: continuing international PALS students only
Contact: Student Services in the Office of the Dean at (954) 262-8053 or scholarships@nsu.nova.edu. Online applications
are available at www.fcas.nova.edu/scholarships/programs.cfm.
The Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences Professional and Liberal Studies Scholarships (continuing PALS
students only)
Amount: ranges from $250 to $1,500 per year
Application: yes; April 1 deadline
Renewal: no; awards are not automatically renewed; students must apply for each year’s award
Eligibility: continuing PALS students only; based on academic achievement and financial need.
Contact: Student Services in the Office of the Dean at (954) 262-8053 or scholarships@nsu.nova.edu. Online applications
are available at www.fcas.nova.edu/scholarships/programs.cfm.
The Judith Shulimson Memorial Scholarship (PALS and Career Development students)
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Amount: $500 total—$250 for the fall semester and $250 for the winter semester
Application: yes; March 1 deadline
Renewal: one-time nonrenewable award
Eligibility: full-time Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences students only (Division of Humanities; Division of Math,
Science, and Technology; Division of Performing and Visual Arts; and Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences
majors only); minimum 2.8 cumulative GPA; completion of at least two semesters (24 credits) at NSU; demonstrated
commitment to women’s and gender studies; documented evidence of financial need with a completed FAFSA on file.
Graduate students are not eligible.
Contact: Student Services in the Office of the Dean at (954) 262-8053 or scholarships@nsu.nova.edu
The Linda Gordon Memorial Scholarship (PALS and Career Development students)
Amount: $500 total—$250 for the fall semester and $250 for the winter semester
Application: yes; March 1 deadline
Renewal: one-time nonrenewable award
Eligibility: full-time Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences students only (Division of Humanities; Division of Math,
Science, and Technology; Division of Performing and Visual Arts; and Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences
majors only); minimum 2.8 cumulative GPA; completion of at least two semesters (24 credits) at NSU; demonstrated
commitment to travel, social, and environmental concerns; documented evidence of financial need with a completed
FAFSA on file. Graduate students are not eligible.
Contact: Student Services in the Office of the Dean at (954) 262-8053 or scholarships@nsu.nova.edu
Fischler School of Education and Human Services
NSU offers special institutional scholarships and grants for students of the Fischler School of Education and Human Services.
For more information regarding scholarship availability, deadlines, award amounts, and additional requirements, contact the
Office of Student Financial Assistance.
Minority Teacher Education Scholarship
Amount: $4,000 per year (Maximum $12,000)
Application: Yes
Renewal: No
Requirements: Must be an undergraduate minority student majoring in a state-approved teacher education program.
Student must be a permanent resident of Florida and a member of one of the following racial groups: African American/
Black, Hispanic/Latino, Asian American/Pacific Islander, or American Indian/Alaskan Native. Must have earned 60 credit
hours or an AA degree and have not exceeded 18 hours of upper division undergraduate education courses at the time of
application (includes current semester enrollment). Recipients are required to attend a mandatory yearly conference.
Contact: Fischler School of Education and Human Services’ Office of Undergraduate Teacher Education at (954) 262-7900.
Hispanic Community Service Scholarship Award
Amount: $10,000
Application: Yes
Renewal: No
Requirements: Undergraduate students majoring in education and entering junior students who have completed 60 credits
and have been admitted into the Fischler School of Education and Human Services at NSU. Eligible applicants must be of
Hispanic heritage, which is defined as having at least one parent of Hispanic ancestry; be fluent in Spanish; have a minimum
GPA of 3.0; be willing to accept the scholarship at the award ceremony; and be a U.S. citizen.
Contact: Fischler School of Education and Human Services’ Office of Undergraduate Teacher Education at (954) 262-7900.
Kappa Delta Pi—International Honor Society Scholarships
Amount: Varies
Application: Yes; all applications are due in the month of April
Renewal: Applicants may reapply for either the same scholarship that was previously awarded or for a different scholarship.
Applicants may only be awarded one scholarship per academic year.
Requirements: Available for undergraduate and graduate students who are members of Kappa Delta Pi. Students must
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meet all university chapter requirements and participate in numerous chapter and community-related events.
Contact: Fischler School of Education and Human Services’ Office of Undergraduate Teacher Education at (954) 262-7900.
Additional information regarding applications and specific deadlines can be found at www.kdp.org.
President’s Scholarships for five undergraduate students; $500
Harold D. Drummond Scholarships for four undergraduate and graduate students in Elementary Education;
$500
Vincent McGrath Scholarships for two students in Elementary Education; $500
MBNA Scholarship for an undergraduate or graduate student in Special Education; $1,000
Jack Rosen Scholarship for an Elementary Education major with a Science, Math, or Technology focus; $1,000
Frank and Virginia Marsh Scholarships for one undergraduate and one graduate student who write research
papers based on issues that affect teachers and learning; $500
Donna Gail Shaw Scholarship for Chapter Service for one undergraduate, graduate, or doctoral student, or
practicing K-12 educator in the first three years of teaching; $1,000
J. Jay Hostetler Scholarships for four student teachers; $500 (2 awarded in the spring and 2 in the fall)
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
The following scholarships are available to undergraduate students planning to enroll in a business program at the H.
Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship. Business students can access applications at www.huizenga.
nova.edu/FutureStudents/ScholarshipsFuture.cfm.
Alpha Beta Gamma Honors Student Award
Amount: $1000/ year; 1 year
Application: No deadline
Renewal: No
Eligibility: Awards are made to undergraduate transfer students planning to enroll in the Professional and Liberal Studies
(day) Program at the H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship in a business related major. Must
be an Alpha Beta Gamma Honor Student transferring from an accredited community college. Must have a minimum
cumulative GPA of 3.25 (on a 4.0 scale). Contact: Carla Withrow at (954) 262-5149
Broward County Academy of Finance Award – Incoming Students
Amount: $1,000 one-time award
Application: No deadline
Renewal: No
Eligibility: Awards are made to undergraduate freshman day students planning to enroll in a business program at the
Huizenga School. Students must have completed the Broward Academy of Finance Program within the past year. Must
prove financial need based on FAFSA.
Contact: Carla Withrow at (954) 262-5149
Broward County Academy of Finance Fellowship – Incoming Students
Amount: Equivalent to a FULL TUITION fellowship, award amount will vary based upon financial aid package.
Application: Yes; March 1 deadline
Eligibility: Awards are made to undergraduate freshman students planning to enroll in a business program at the
Huizenga School. Students must have completed the Broward Academy of Finance Program within the past year with
an overall GPA of 3.50 (on a 4.0 scale). Students must have a SAT score of 1200 or ACT score of 26 or higher. Must
assist the Huizenga School with recruitment and retention projects as needed (10-20 hours per week) Must be a U.S.
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citizen and Florida resident. Must prove financial need based on FAFSA.
Contact: Carla Withrow at (954) 262-5149
Broward Community College Honors Institute Fellowship – Incoming Students
Amount: Equivalent to a FULL TUITION fellowship, award amount will vary based upon financial aid package.
Application: Deadline not specified
Eligibility: Awards are made to undergraduate transfer students planning to enroll full time in the Professional and
Liberal Studies (day) Program at the Huizenga School in a business related major. Must have earned an A.A. degree
from Broward Community College Honors Institute Program within the past year. Must assist the Huizenga School with
recruitment and retention projects as needed (10–20 hours per week) Must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25
(on a 4.0 scale). Must have a demonstrated leadership involvement in a club or organization Must be a US citizen and
Florida resident. Must prove financial need based on FAFSA.
Contact: Carla Withrow at (954) 262-5149
Community College Transfer Award – Incoming Students
Amount: $100 per course up to $400 per term and a $1000 max. per year
Application: No deadline
Eligibility: Awards are made to undergraduate students planning to enroll in a business program at the Huizenga School.
Students must have earned an A.A .degree from a Florida Community College within the past 3 years. Must have a
minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 (on a 4.0 scale). Must have a minimum one year full-time professional experience.
Must prove financial need based on FAFSA.
Contact: Carla Withrow at (954) 262-5149
DECA Award – Incoming Students
Award Amount: $1,000 one-time award
Application: No deadline
Renewal: No
Eligibility: Awards are made to undergraduate freshman day students planning to enroll in a business program at the
Huizenga School. Students must have been a member of DECA in their local High School. Must prove financial need
based on FAFSA. At Admission must show confirmed membership in the DECA organization.
Contact: Carla Withrow at (954) 262-5149
Eastern Financial Credit Union Scholarship
Amount: $2,500 per year for four years
Application: Deadline not specified
Eligibility: The Eastern Financial Credit Union scholarship is awarded to one new full-time undergraduate day business
student. The award amount equals $2,500 per year for four years; recipients must maintain cumulative GPA of 3.35 in
order to retain scholarship. Applicants must be a United States Citizen, with a minimum cumulative high school GPA of
3.5 (on a 4.0 scale) and a minimum SAT Score of 1100 (ACT Score of 25) and have demonstrate financial need.
Contact: Carla Withrow at (954) 262-5149
Extended Stay America Scholarship – Current Students
Amount: $2,000 one-time award
Application: Yes; September 1 deadline
Renewal: No
Eligibility: Awards are made to undergraduate or graduate students currently enrolled in a business program at the
Huizenga School. Awards are made to current students who demonstrate high academic achievement. Students must
have an earned 24 credits at NSU with a GPA of 3.5 or higher. Students must demonstrate financial need through
FAFSA.
Contact: Carla Withrow at (954) 262-5149
The Falcone Group Scholarship
Amount: $2,500 per year for four years
Application: Deadline not specified
Eligibility: The Falcone Group scholarship is awarded to one new full time undergraduate day business student. The
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award amount equals $2,500 per year for four years; recipients must maintain cumulative GPA of 3.35 in order to retain
scholarship. Applicants must be a United States Citizen, with a minimum cumulative high school GPA of 3.5 (on a 4.0
scale) and a minimum SAT Score of 1100 (ACT Score of 25) and have demonstrate financial need.
Contact: Carla Withrow at (954) 262-5149
H. Wayne Huizenga Scholarship – Incoming Students
Amount: $2,500 per year for four years
Application: Yes; March 1 deadline
Eligibility: Awards are made to undergraduate freshman or transfer students planning to enroll full time in a day business
program (PALS). The award amount equals $2,500 per year for four years; recipients must have a minimum high school
GPA of 3.75 (on a 4.0 scale) and minimum SAT score of 1200 or ACT score of 26. Applicants must be a United States
Citizen. Students must demonstrate involvement with charitable organizations and volunteerism—preference will be given
to those involved with the Boys and Girls Club of America. Students must demonstrate financial need through FAFSA.
Contact: Carla Withrow at (954) 262-5149
Lorraine Thomas Scholarship
Amount: $2,500 per year for four years
Application: Deadline not specified
Eligibility: The Lorraine Thomas scholarship is awarded to one new full time undergraduate day business student. The
award amount equals $2,500 per year for four years; recipients must maintain cumulative GPA of 3.35 in order to retain
scholarship. Applicants must be a United States Citizen, with a minimum cumulative high school GPA of 3.5 (on a 4.0
scale) and a minimum SAT Score of 1100 (ACT Score of 25) and have demonstrate financial need.
Contact: Carla Withrow at (954) 262-5149
Nokie Edwards Scholarship
Amount: $500 per year for four years
Application: Deadline not specified
Eligibility: The Nokie Edwards scholarship is awarded to one new full time undergraduate day business student. The
award amount equals $500 per year for four years; recipients must maintain cumulative GPA of 3.35 in order to retain
scholarship. Applicants must be a United States Citizen, with a minimum cumulative high school GPA of 3.5 (on a 4.0
scale) and a minimum SAT Score of 1100 (ACT Score of 25) and have demonstrate financial need.
Contact: Carla Withrow at (954) 262-5149
Senorita Strachan Scholarship
Amount: 50 percent off full tuition rates
Application: Deadline not specified
Eligibility: The Senorita Strachan Scholarship was developed to assist students enrolling at NSU’s Bahamas Student
Education Centers. Awards are equal to a 50% reduction off full tuition rates as published in the NSU Undergraduate
Student Catalog and do not include fees or other student expenses. Applicants must be new students planning to enroll
in an undergraduate business program at the Huizenga School, Bahamas locations. This is a competitive scholarship
and applicants must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.5 (on a 4.0 scale) from their previous higher education
institution(s), financial need and demonstrated involvement with volunteer work within the Bahamian community.
Contact: Carla Withrow at (954) 262-5149
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Student Conduct—Academic Integrity
Students should refer to the NSU Student Handbook’s full Code of Student Conduct and Academic Responsibility. Conduct
standards, supplementary standards, and university policies and procedures are handled by the NSU Office of the Dean of
Student Affairs or by the individual colleges and schools, as deemed appropriate.
Academic Conduct versus Other Conduct
Nova Southeastern University has established clear expectations regarding student conduct and academic responsibility.
When these standards are violated, significant disciplinary action can be expected, including expulsion from the university.
Students are expected to abide by all university, college, school, and program rules and regulations as well as all federal,
state, and local laws. Students are also expected to comply with the legal and ethical standards of their chosen fields of
study. Violations of academic standards are handled by the Office of the Dean in individual colleges and schools.
Academic Integrity in the Classroom
The university is an academic community and expects its students to manifest a commitment to academic integrity through
rigid observance of standards for academic honesty. Faculty members are committed to uphold the standards of academic
integrity as described in the NSU Student Handbook. They do their utmost to prevent academic misconduct by being
alert to its possibility. If academic misconduct is detected, the faculty member communicates with the student and takes
appropriate grade actions within the scope of the course. Faculty members report all violations of academic honesty to
their college/school administration. Depending on the severity or reoccurrence of the academic misconduct, academic
leadership can impose institutional sanctions. Deans, associate deans, or directors, at their discretion, may immediately
suspend students pending a hearing on charges of violations. Sanctions may include disciplinary probation, suspension, or
expulsion, including notation on the student’s academic transcript. Students found responsible for violations of academic
integrity have the option of appealing the sanctions.
Academic Honesty Policy—College of Allied Health and Nursing
The following policy and procedure apply specifically to the College of Allied Health and Nursing as a supplement to the
policy in the university-wide Student Handbook. Faculty members who have reasonable cause to believe that a student
has committed an act of academic dishonesty may give the student a failing grade for the course and/or refer the student
to the Academic Honesty Committee (AHC) for the College of Allied Health and Nursing for disciplinary recommendations.
The Academic Honesty Committee is composed of faculty representatives from each discipline within the College of Allied
Health and Nursing.
Once a student is referred to the AHC, the student is notified in writing as to his or her right to a formal hearing
before the committee. The committee’s chair will advise the dean of committee recommendations. The dean
will notify the student in writing of the final disciplinary decision. Students have the right to appeal the dean’s
decision within five working days of receipt of notification, by submitting a written appeal to the chair of the appeals
committee.
Appeals not submitted within the aforementioned timeframe shall not be heard.
Code of Academic and Clinical Conduct—Undergraduate Nursing Program
The Nursing Department supports the following Code of Academic and Clinical Conduct adopted by the National Student
Nurses Association (NSNA) House of Delegates in 2001.
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Preamble
Students of nursing have a responsibility to society to learn the academic theory and clinical skills needed to provide
nursing care. The clinical setting presents unique challenges and responsibilities in actively practicing that care while
caring for human beings in a variety of health care environments. The Code of Academic and Clinical Conduct is based
on an understanding that to practice nursing as a student is an agreement to uphold the trust with which society has
placed in us. The statements of the code provide guidance for the nursing student in the personal developments of an
ethical foundation and need not be limited strictly to the academic or clinical environment but can assist in the holistic
development of the person.
A Code for Nursing Students
As students are involved in the clinical and academic environments, nursing faculty members believe that ethical
principles are a necessary guide to professional development. Therefore, within these environments students should:
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Advocate for the rights of all clients
Maintain client confidentiality
Make appropriate action to ensure the safety of clients, self, and others
Provide care for the client in a timely, compassionate, and professional manner
Communicate client care in a truthful, timely, and accurate manner
Actively promote the highest level of moral and ethical principles and accept responsibility for their actions
Promote excellence in nursing by encouraging lifelong learning and professional development
Treat others with respect and promote an environment that respects human rights, values, and choice of cultural
and spiritual belief
Collaborate in every reasonable manner with the academic faculty and clinical staff to ensure the highest quality
of client care
Use every opportunity to improve faculty and clinical staff understanding of the learning needs of nursing students
Encourage faculty members, clinical staff, and peers to mentor nursing students
Refrain from performing any technique or procedure for which the student has not been adequately trained
Refrain from any deliberate action or omission of care in the academic or clinical setting that creates unnecessary
risk of injury to the client, self, or others
Assist the staff nurse or preceptor in ensuring that there is full disclosure and that proper authorizations are
obtained from clients regarding any form of treatment or research
Abstain from the use of substances in the academic and clinical setting that impair judgment.
Strive to achieve and maintain an optimal level of personal health
Support access to treatment and rehabilitation for students who are experiencing impairments related to
substance abuse and mental or physical health issues
Uphold school policies and regulations related to academic and clinical performance, reserving the right to
challenge and critique rules and regulations as per school grievance policy
Academic Integrity—Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
In cases of significant or repeated instances of academic dishonesty, the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences will convene
an Academic Integrity Committee (AIC), comprised of faculty members and students. The AIC will meet only in cases in
which a student wishes to challenge the sanction issued in a case of academic misconduct. The dean of the Farquhar
College of Arts and Sciences may appoint up to five undergraduate students to serve on the AIC. One faculty member from
each academic division serves on the committee, appointed by the academic director. The committee has no minimum
number of members required for action; meetings are conducted based on faculty and student members present.
Students charged with academic misconduct will be notified of the impending sanction and be offered the opportunity
to present mitigating evidence in their defense. If a student chooses to take advantage of this opportunity, the dean will
convene a meeting of the AIC to consider the student’s presentation. Faculty members involved will also be given the
opportunity to present information. Such a review is optional. If a student is unable or unwilling to participate in this review,
there will be no review and the appropriate sanction will be applied.
The Academic Integrity Committee does not review instructors’ evaluation of coursework or decisions on academic
misconduct. Students may appeal a classroom grade consequence of academic misconduct through the instructor and the
academic director. Policies and procedures for appeal of grades are outlined in the Problem Resolution Procedures section,
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located in Academic Resources and Procedures, as well as in the Grievance Process sections within the individual college
and school portions of this catalog.
Following review of students’ presentations, the AIC decides whether a revision of consequences is warranted. The
committee will make a recommendation to the dean, who will then make a final decision.
Student Conduct—NSU Code of
Student Conduct
Excerpt from the 2010-2011 NSU Student Handbook.
Code of Student Conduct and Academic Responsibility
Purpose: This code seeks to promote high standards of behavior and academic integrity by setting forth the responsibilities
of students as members of the university community. Abiding by the code ensures a climate wherein all members of the
university community can exercise their rights of membership.
Code of Student Conduct Statement
The university is a community of scholars in which the ideals of freedom of inquiry, freedom of thought, freedom of
expression, and freedom of the individual are sustained. However, the exercise and preservation of these freedoms
and rights require a respect for the rights of all in the community to enjoy them to the same extent. It is clear that in a
community of learning, willful disruption of the educational process, destruction of property, and interference with the
orderly process of the university as defined by the university administration or with the rights of other members of the
university cannot be tolerated. Students enrolling in the university assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a
manner compatible with the university’s function as an educational institution. To fulfill its functions of imparting and
gaining knowledge, the university retains the power to maintain order within the university and to exclude those who are
disruptive to the educational process.
In support of the Code of Student Conduct, any violations of the Code of Student Conduct and Academic Responsibility and/
or university policies and procedures may result in disciplinary action and/or criminal prosecution. Violations of academic
and/or supplementary standards will be handled through the student’s academic college, center, or school. Violations of
conduct standards, supplementary standards, university policies, and/or procedures will be handled by the Office of the
Dean of Student Affairs or by the individual academic college, center, or school as deemed appropriate.
Changes to the Code of Student Conduct and Academic Responsibility will be posted on the Student Affairs Web site.
Students are required to be familiar with the rules, policies, and Code of Student Conduct and Academic Responsibility.
Nova Southeastern University
Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities
Nova Southeastern University, as a community of women and men, is committed to furthering scholarship, academic
pursuits, and service to our society. As an institution, our purpose is to ensure all students an equal opportunity to fulfill their
intellectual potential through pursuit of the highest standards of academic excellence.
Certain rights and obligations flow from membership in any academic community committed to such goals:
• The rights of personal and intellectual freedom, which are fundamental to the idea of a university
• Scrupulous respect for the equal rights and dignity of others
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Dedication to the scholarly and educational purposes of the university and participation in promoting and ensuring
the academic quality and credibility of the institution
Students are responsible for obtaining, learning, and observing the established university and academic center policies
as listed in all official publications. In addition, students must comply with the legal and ethical standards of the institution,
as well as those of Broward County, the state of Florida, as well as any other laws, rules, and/or regulations of other
jurisdictions. All members of the community should inform the appropriate official of any violation of conduct regulations
A. Academic Standards
The university is an academic community and expects its students to manifest a commitment to academic integrity through
rigid observance of standards for academic honesty. The university can function properly only when its members adhere
to clearly established goals and values. Accordingly, the academic standards are designed to ensure that the principles of
academic honesty are upheld.
The following acts violate the academic honesty standards:
1. Cheating: intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic
exercise
2. Fabrication: intentional and unauthorized falsification or invention of any information or citation in an academic
exercise
3. Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to violate any
provision of this code
4. Plagiarism: the adoption or reproduction of ideas, words, or statements of another person as one’s own without
proper acknowledgment
Students are expected to submit tests and assignments that they have completed without aid or assistance from other
sources. Using sources to provide information without giving credit to the original source is dishonest. Students should
avoid any impropriety or the appearance thereof in taking examinations or completing work in pursuance of their educational
goals.
Students are expected to comply with the following academic standards:
1. Original Work:
Assignments such as course preparations, exams, texts, projects, term papers, practicum, etc., must be the original
work of the student. Original work may include the thoughts and words of another author. Entire thoughts or words
of another author should be identified using quotation marks. At all times, students are expected to comply with
the university and/or program center’s recognized form and style manual and accepted citation practice and policy.
Work is not original when it has been submitted previously by the author or by anyone else for academic credit.
Work is not original when it has been copied or partially copied from any other source, including another student,
unless such copying is acknowledged by the person submitting the work for the credit at the time the work is being
submitted, or unless copying, sharing, or joint authorship is an express part of the assignment. Exams and tests are
original work when no unauthorized aid is given, received, or used before or during the course of the examination,
re-examination, and/or remediation.
2. Referencing the Works of Another Author:
All academic work submitted for credit or as partial fulfillment of course requirements must adhere to each program
center’s specific accepted reference manuals and rules of documentation. Standards of scholarship require that
the writer give proper acknowledgment when the thoughts and words of another author are used. Students must
acquire a style manual approved by their center and become familiar with accepted scholarly and editorial practice
in their program. Students’ work must comport with the adopted citation manual for their particular center.
At Nova Southeastern University, it is plagiarism to represent another person’s work, words, or ideas as one’s own
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without use of a center-recognized method of citation. Deviating from center standards (see above) are considered
plagiarism at Nova Southeastern University.
3. Tendering of Information:
All academic work must be the original work of the student. Knowingly giving or allowing one’s work to be copied,
giving out exam questions or answers, or releasing or selling term papers is prohibited.
4. Acts Prohibited:
Students should avoid any impropriety or the appearance thereof, in taking examinations or completing work in
pursuance of their educational goals. Violations of academic responsibility include, but are not limited to the following:
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Plagiarism
Any form of cheating
Conspiracy to commit academic dishonesty
Misrepresentation
Bribery in an attempt to gain an academic advantage
Forging or altering documents or credentials
Knowingly furnishing false information to the institution
Students in violation will be subjected to disciplinary action.
5. Additional Matters of Ethical Concern:
Where circumstances are such as to place students in positions of power over university personnel, inside or
outside the institution, students should avoid any reasonable suspicion that they have used that power for personal
benefit or in a capricious or arbitrary manner.
B. Conduct Standards
1. Students should not interfere with the rights, safety, or health of members of the university community nor interfere
with other students’ right to learn. Students are expected to abide by all university, center, and program rules and
regulations and all local, state, and federal laws. Violations of conduct standards include, but are not limited to
a. theft (including shoplifting at any university service center, e.g., bookstore, food service facility), robbery, and
related crimes
b. vandalism or destruction of property
c. disruptive behavior / disorderly conduct (e.g., in residence halls and classrooms, or at university-sponsored
events, on or off campus)
d. physical or verbal altercation, assault, battery, domestic violence, or other related crimes
e. gambling
f. possession or use of firearms; pellet, air soft, and paint ball guns; fireworks; explosives; or other dangerous
substances or items
g. possession, transfer, sale, or use of illicit and/or illegal drugs or alcohol if a minor
h. appearance in class or on campus under the apparent influence of drugs or alcohol, illegal or illicit drugs or
chemicals
i. any act or conspiracy to commit an act that is harassing, abusive, or discriminatory or that invades an individual’s
right to privacy; sexual harassment; discrimination and abuse against members of a particular racial, ethnic,
religious, on the basis of sex / gender, sexual orientation, marital status or cultural group and/or any other
protected group or as a result of an individual’s membership in any protected group
j. sexual misconduct
k. stalking
l. unacceptable use of computing resources as defined by the university. Students are also subject to the
Acceptable Use of Computing Resources policy at www.nova.edu/common-lib/policies/aucr.policy.html.
m. impeding or obstructing NSU investigatory, administrative, or judicial proceedings
n. threats of or actual damage to property or physical harm to others
o. “Hazing” means any action or situation that recklessly or intentionally endangers the mental or physical health
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or safety of a student for purposes including, but not limited to, initiation or admission into or affiliation with any
organization operating under the sanction of a postsecondary institution. Hazing includes, but is no limited to,
pressuring or coercing the student into violating state or federal law; any brutality of a physical nature, such
as whipping, beating, branding, or exposure to the elements; forced consumptions of any food, liquor, drug, or
other substance or other forced physical activity that could adversely affect the physical health or safety of the
student; and any activity that would subject the student to extreme mental stress, such as sleep deprivation,
forced exclusion from social contact, forced conduct that could result in extreme embarrassment, or other
forced activity that could adversely affect the mental health or dignity of the student. Hazing does not include
customary athletic events or other similar contests or competitions or any activity or conduct that furthers legal
and legitimate objective. (Florida Hazing Law, 1006.63) Engaging in, supporting, promoting, or sponsoring
hazing or violating university rules governing hazing is prohibited.
failure to pay tuition and fees in a timely manner
embezzlement or misuse of NSU and/or student organizational funds or monies
failure to comply with the directives of NSU officials
violation(s) of the terms or condition of a disciplinary sanction(s) imposed
violation of any policy, procedure, or regulation of the university or any state or federal law, rule, regulation, or
county ordinance
fraud, misrepresentation, forgery, alteration or falsification of any records, information, data, or identity
plagiarism
possession of drug paraphernalia
use of another student’s ID card
2. Students must have authorization from the university to have access to university documents, data, programs, and
other types of information and information systems. Any use of the above without authorization is prohibited.
C. Supplementary Standards
Students are expected to comply with the legal and ethical standards of this institution and those of their chosen field of
study, including the Code of Ethics for Computer Usage. The university and each center or program may prescribe additional
standards for student conduct. Reasonable notice may be provided when additions or changes are made to the standards
for student conduct. Students should refer to their center and/or Student Affairs Web site for policy updates or changes.
D. Violations
Any violation(s) of any of the academic standards, conduct standards, or supplemental standards may result in a complaint
being filed against a student to enforce the Code of Student Conduct and Academic Responsibility. Deans, associate deans,
or directors may, in their discretion, immediately suspend students pending a hearing on charges of academic, conduct, or
supplemental standards violations. Violations of academic, conduct, or supplemental standards are subject to disciplinary
action, up to and including, expulsion from the university. Violations of academic standards will be handled through the
student’s academic college, school, or center. Violations of conduct or supplementary standards will be handled by the
Office of the Dean of Student Affairs or by the individual academic college, school, or center as deemed appropriate.
E. Sanctions
If the student is found in violation of the Code of Student Conduct and Academic Responsibility and/or university policies
and procedures, one or more of the following sanctions may be imposed. The following list is only illustrative. The university
reserves the right to take additional disciplinary action as it deems appropriate.
1. Expulsion:
Permanent dismissal from the university with no right for future readmission under any circumstances. A student
who has been expelled is barred from campus and/or visiting privileges.
2. Suspension:
Mandatory separation from the university for a period of time specified in an order of suspension. An application
for readmission will not be entertained until the period of separation indicated in the suspension order has elapsed.
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Readmission is subject to approval of the university. During the period of suspension, the student is barred from
campus visiting privileges unless specific permission is granted by the dean of student affairs or designee.
3. Temporary Suspension:
Action taken by the dean of student affairs / associate dean of student affairs, which requires a student’s temporary
separation from the university until a final determination is made of whether or not a student is in violation of the
Code of Student Conduct and Academic Responsibility.
4. Final Disciplinary Probation:
A disciplinary sanction serving notice to a student that his / her behavior is in flagrant violation of university standards,
under which the following conditions exist:
a. The sanction is for the remainder of the student’s career and may be reviewed by the dean of student affairs no
sooner than two regular academic semesters or equivalent after the sanction is imposed. After two semesters
in attendance, a student may initiate a request in writing for reduction of the sanction to disciplinary probation,
but must also demonstrate reason to substantiate the request.
b. Another violation of the Code of Student Conduct and Academic Responsibility will at a minimum result in
suspension.
5. Disciplinary Probation:
A disciplinary sanction serving notice to a student that his / her behavior is in serious violation of university
standards. A time period is indicated during which another violation of the Code of Student Conduct and Academic
Responsibility will automatically raise the question of a more severe sanction (suspension or expulsion) if the
student is found in violation.
6. Disciplinary Warning:
A disciplinary sanction serving notice to a student that his / her behavior has not met university standards. This
sanction remains in effect for a designated number of semesters of attendance after which it is expunged from the
student’s file.
7. Verbal Warning:
A verbal warning is a verbal admonition to the student by a university staff member that his / her behavior is
inappropriate. A verbal warning will be noted in the student’s file for a period of time after which it is expunged from
the student’s file.
8. Fines:
Penalty fees payable to the university for violation of certain regulations with the Code of Student Conduct and
Academic Responsibility.
9. Restitution:
Payment made for damages or losses to the university, as directed by the adjudicating body.
10. Restriction or Revocation of Privileges:
Restriction or revocation of privileges is the temporary or permanent loss of privileges, including, but not limited to,
the use of a particular university facility, visitation privileges, and parking privileges.
11. Termination or Change of Residence Hall Contract/Accommodation:
Termination or change of residence hall contract/accommodation is a disciplinary sanction that terminates or
changes the Residence Hall Contract/Accommodation. This should be accompanied by another form of disciplinary
action. It is considered permanent unless lifted by the dean of student affairs / associate dean of student affairs /
director of residential life or designee.
12. Counseling Intervention:
When extreme behavior indicates that counseling may be beneficial, the student may be referred to counseling.
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13. Other Appropriate Action:
Disciplinary action not specifically outlined above, but approved through the dean of student affairs / associate dean
of student affairs or designee.
14. Parent / Legal Guardian Notification:
NSU personnel reserve the right to contact or notify a student’s parent(s) or legal guardian(s) of a minor student,
under 21 years of age, in writing or by phone, when alcohol or drug violations of university policy occur, for other
violations of NSU policy and procedure, and/or when NSU personnel determine a student’s safety and/or welfare
is at risk.
F. Appeal Process
An appeal of disciplinary action taken by the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs or its designee must be made in writing to
the dean of student affairs within 72 hours of the receipt of the written disposition of the hearing. In appealing a disciplinary
decision, the appeal must fall into one of the following categories:
1. The student has new evidence that was not available prior to the original hearing
2. The disciplinary process was not adhered to during the student’s hearing
3. The sanction(s) do not relate appropriately to the violation
A written decision will be provided by the dean of student affairs within a reasonable amount of time from receipt of the
appeal request. The decision of the dean of student affairs will be final.
For appeals of disciplinary action taken by individual colleges, centers, or schools, please consult the preceding Student
Conduct—Academic Integrity section of this catalog.
Technical Help
The Online Computing Help Desk of NSU’s Office of Information Technology provides telephone and email support to
NSU students, faculty, and staff. Support services include assistance with connecting to NSU’s online computing systems;
navigating through the secure course management platform; resolving Personal Identification Number (PIN) issues;
supporting wireless computing on campus; and configuring various software programs such as Microsoft Outlook, Netscape
Navigator, and Internet Explorer. Contact the Help Desk at (954) 262-4357 (800-541-6682, ext. 24357) or help@nsu.nova.
edu.
Travel Study Programs
Nova Southeastern University is committed to providing undergraduate students with travel study opportunities, the flexibility
to earn college credit and receive financial assistance for travel study, and the support necessary for students to plan and
realize their own, individual travel goals. For more information about study abroad, contact the Office of the Dean in the
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences at (954) 262-8093.
Travel Study Programs Sponsored by
the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
The Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences offers organized travel study programs that award course credits and may
satisfy specific major requirements. Students may also choose to take advantage of organized travel study programs
without receiving credit. Sponsored programs include travel study to England, the Great Barrier Reef, Peru, Ecuador, and
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the Galapagos Islands. In addition to these programs, the college organizes an annual photographic expedition, led by
one of a faculty member, to explore in-depth the natural history and culture of one country. In past years, expeditions have
traveled to Chile, China, Costa Rica, East Africa, Malaysia, and St. Lucia.
Travel Study Programs Sponsored by Other Institutions
Students interested in a specific travel study program offered through another university or institution should contact their
academic advisor to discuss the program and the steps necessary for applying. The Office of the Dean in the Farquhar
College of Arts and Sciences can also help locate shared/sponsored programs to more than 150 countries, some that last
three weeks to as long as one year.
Individually Designed Travel Study Programs
Students may also design and receive credit for their own travel study experiences. Students interested in designing their
own program should contact the Office of the Dean in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences to discuss a proposed
trip’s academic and travel details.
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Tuition and Fees
Students should refer to the NSU Student Handbook for more information about tuition payment policies and health insurance
requirements.
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Tuition and Fee Chart 2010–2011
Fee Description
B.H.Sc.–Online
$50
B.H.Sc.–Vascular
Sonography
Entry-level
B.S.N.
R.N. to B.S.N.
$50
$50
Acceptance fee
$500
$500
Deposit
Due July 15 for August start
Due November 15 for January start
$250
$250
$200
Health Professions Division –access fee
$125
$145
$145
Pre-registration fee
$250
Application fee
$50
Registration fee
$25
$25
$25
$25
Late tuition payment fee
(per semester)
$100
$100
$100
$100
Deferment fee (per semester)
$75
$75
$75
$75
Student services fee (per semester)
$125 (one 1-4 credit class OR multiple classes with 3 or fewer total credits)
$250 (one 5 credit class OR multiple classes with 4 or more total credits)
Program tuition (per year)
Florida resident
$17,250
Out-of-state resident
$18,885
$20,395
Program tuition (per credit)
$250
Tuition/credit
$390
$150
Laboratory fee (semester)
Materials Fee
Variable where applicable
SPI National Exam Fee
$200
(posted in winter or summer term)
I.D. Replacement Fee
$20
$20
$20
$20
Application for degree processing fee
(diploma only) (Seniors only)
$75
$75
$75
$75
$150
$150
$150
Commencement Fee (Seniors only)
Diploma Replacement Fee
$30
$30
$30
$30
Official Transcripts
$5
$5
$5
$5
Room rate per semester (varies based
on occupancy and residence hall)
Meal plan per semester (declining
balance)
Contact Residential Life and Housing at (954) 262-7052 or visit
www.nova.edu/reslife for specific room rates and meal plans.
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Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences,
Fischler School of Education and Human Services, and
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
Tuition and Fee Chart 2010–2011
Application fee
$50
Registration fee (per semester)
$25
Late registration fee (per semester)
$100
Late tuition payment fee (per semester)
$100
Deferment fee (per semester)
$75
Student services fee (per semester)
$125 (one 1-4 credit class OR multiple classes
with 3 or fewer total credits)
$250 (one 5 credit class OR multiple classes
with 4 or more total credits)
PALS Programs
Tuition/semester (12-18 credits)
$10,800
Tuition/credit (under 12 credits, additional credits
over 18 credits, summer courses)
$720
Career Development Programs
Main campus tuition/credit
$575
Off-campus program tuition/credit
$445
Online program tuition/credit
$575
Fischler School of Education and Human Services’
online program tuition/credit
$445
Fischler School of Education and Human Services’
A.A. with an emphasis in early childhood education
(A.A./ECE) major tuition/credit
$290
Fischler School of Education and Human Services’
applied professional studies (APS) major in Jamaica,
Elementary Education major in Turks and Caicos Islands
and Bahamas tuition/credit
$350
Laboratory fee (per credit)
$20
Field trip fee (per credit) $5
Materials fee
Variable where applicable
PSYC 4810 practicum insurance
$22
LEGS 2100/LEGS 4110 Lexis/Nexis fee
$40
MUSC 2200/4200 Music Lesson fee (per course)
$200
Application for degree processing fee (diploma only)
(Seniors only)
$75
Transcript fee
$5
Cap and gown fee
Assessed at time of graduation
Room rate per semester
(varies based on occupancy and residence hall)
Contact Residential Life and Housing at
(954) 262-7052 or visit www.nova.edu/reslife
for specific room rates and meal plans.
Meal plan per semester (declining balance)
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Explanation of Tuition Rates
Professional and Liberal Studies (PALS) Program Tuition
All students in the main campus Professional and Liberal Studies (PALS) Program enrolling in 12-18 credit hours per
semester pay flat-rate tuition in the fall and winter semesters. Students will not be charged additional tuition for adding
classes as long as they do not go above the 18-credit hour limit. Each credit above 18-credit hours will be charged on a per
credit basis. Students seeking to register for course loads above 18 credits must request permission from their division or
program’s academic director. Courses dropped do not count in this total.
Students enrolled in 1-11 credits will be charged on a per-credit basis. Students who initially register for 1-11 credits, then add
credits that increase their course load to 12-18 credits, will be charged the full flat-rate tuition. Students who officially drop
courses and fall below 12 credits will have their tuition recalculated on a per-credit basis. Extreme care and consideration
should be taken when deciding to enroll in fewer than 12 credits during a semester. Enrolling in fewer than 12 credit hours
may reduce or eliminate scholarships, and institutional, federal, or other financial aid. A student enrolling in fewer than 12
credit hours (or dropping courses that results in fewer than 12 credits) is encouraged to speak with a financial aid counselor
about the potential negative impact this decision may have on financial aid.
Tuition for the PALS (day) Program during summer terms is charged per credit regardless of the number of enrolled credits.
Career Development Program Tuition
Students in the Career Development Program pay tuition per credit hour. Rates vary depending on location of classes: main
campus, off-campus, or online.
Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program Tuition and Fees
Tuition for all terms commencing in fall 2010 is $250 per credit. Tuition rates are subject to change by the board of trustees
without notice. The following additional fees also apply:
•
•
•
•
•
$50 nonrefundable application fee
An NSU student services fee of $750 is required annually.
Students are responsible for purchas­ing any required textbooks and/or classroom materials.
$75 diploma only fee
A graduation and diploma fee of $225 will be incurred by those stu­dents who elect to participate in the formal, oncampus graduation ceremony (not required).
Tuition waivers and discounts for NSU students, staff, and faculty members will be in accordance with published policy and
administered through the dean of the College of Allied Health and Nursing. Tuition, fees, and pay­ment schedules are subject
to change without notice.
Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography Program Tuition
and Fees
Tuition for the 2010–2011 academic year (subject to change by the board of trustees without notice) is $17,225. The
following additional fees also apply:
•
•
•
•
•
•
$50 nonrefundable application fee
$500 acceptance fee
$250 deposit
$250 preregistration fee
Students are responsible for purchasing any required textbooks, uniforms, white coats and/or class­room materials.
A graduation and diploma fee of $225 will be incurred by those stu­dents who elect to participate in the formal onNova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
Academic Resources and Procedures
123
•
campus graduation ceremony (not required).
A $125 vascular access fee is required yearly. This fee is required to pay for background checks, drug testing (if
required), affiliation agreements, and immunizations
Tuition waivers and discounts for NSU students, staff, and faculty members will be in accordance with published policy and
administered through the dean of the College of Allied Health and Nursing. Tuition, fees, and pay­ment schedules are subject
to change without notice.
Bachelor of Science in Nursing—Entry-Level Track Tuition and Fees
Tuition for the 2010–2011 academic year (subject to change by the board of trustees without notice) is $19,335 for Florida
residents and $21,225 for out-of-state students. The following additional fees also apply:
•
•
•
•
•
•
A Health Professions Division gen­eral access fee of $145 is required each year. An NSU student services fee of
$750 is also required annually.
The acceptance fee is $500. This fee is required to reserve the accepted applicant’s place in the entering first-year
class, but is not refund­able in the event of a withdrawal. It is payable within two weeks of an applicant’s acceptance.
The deposit is $250. This is due July 15 for August admission and November 15 for January admission.
The pre-registration fee is $250. This is due August 1 for August admission and December 1 for January admission.
The lab fee is $150. This is due on or before registration.
Students may incur additional costs in the program, including PDA, FNSA dues, uniforms, and lab coat.
The first semester’s tuition and fees, less the $1,000 previously paid, are due on or before registration day. Tuition for each
subsequent semester is due on or before the appropriate registration day. Students will not be admitted until their financial
obligations have been met.
Each student is required to carry adequate personal medical and hospital insurance. Students may avail themselves of the
hospitalization insurance plan obtainable through the university.
The Office of Student Financial Assistance and the Nursing Department are eager to assist students in exploring all the
grants and loans currently available for nursing students. Do not hesitate to ask for this help.
Bachelor of Science in Nursing—R.N. to B.S.N. and R.N. to M.S.N. Tuition
and Fees
Tuition for the R.N. to B.S.N. track, as well as undergraduate courses in the R.N. to M.S.N. program is $390 per credit hour
for academic year 2010–2011 (subject to change by the board of trustees without notice). A Health Professions Division
general access fee of $145 is required each year. An NSU student services fee of $750 is also required annually.
There are a number of national, Florida, and hospital grants available for the R.N. student. Additionally, student loan interest
for nursing students is lower than for students seeking other degrees. The financial aid office and the nursing department
are eager to assist students in exploring all possible financial aid options. Please do not hesitate to ask for this help.
Tuition rates relating to graduate courses in the R.N. to M.S.N. program may be found in the Health Professions Division
catalog.
Charges and Payments—College of Allied Health and Nursing
Tuition charges in the College of Allied Health and Nursing are automatically calculated when students register for classes.
Students are expected to pay in full at the time of registration, or have completed the necessary paperwork for financial aid
and have been awarded. Students may pay for tuition using credit cards: MasterCard, VISA, or American Express. Credit
card payments may now be made online.
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Course Remediation Cost—College of Allied Health and Nursing
The cost of repeating a course in the Health Professions Division is not covered in the regular tuition. Students who fail
a course, didactic or fieldwork, will be required to repeat the course and will be charged a per semester hour rate as
determined by the executive vice chancellor and provost.
Tuition Payment Options
NSU Payment Plans
NSU students (with the exception of international students) who wish to defer payment of their tuition, fees, and other
institutional charges due at the time of registration may sign up for a 3-month or a 10-month payment plan. The 10-Month
Payment Plan is only available for the fall and winter semesters. For detailed information, visit www.nova.edu/cwis/bursar/
payment.html.
Employer Tuition Assistance Plans
Undergraduates participating in employer tuition assistance programs who wish to defer tuition payment need to
submit a letter of eligibility, a purchase order from their employer, or details of the program from the employer’s
human resources office or the company Web site. They must also provide postdated payments (checks or credit card
authorizations) for the amount of tuition. Payment, of tuition only (not fees), may then be deferred for five weeks after
course completion. A $75 deferment fee is charged for this service and must be paid at registration, along with all other
fees. Students must notify the Office of Student Financial Assistance if they are participating in the Employer Tuition
Assistance Plan.
Florida Prepaid College Plan
NSU accepts and bills the Florida Prepaid College Plan for tuition, fees, and dorm costs. However, the plans are based on
the tuition rates of the tax assisted Florida public colleges and universities. The difference between NSU tuition, fees, and
dorm costs and the allocations through the Florida Prepaid College Plan is the sole responsibility of the student. If a student
is on the unrestricted plan, the student must designate a dollar amount for up to the cost of tuition and fees. Students new
to NSU must contact Florida Prepaid at 800-552-GRAD to authorize NSU for payment. Additionally, each semester, the
student must submit a copy of the front and back of the ID card with a signed statement indicating the number of credits or
the amount to be invoiced. To learn more about the Florida Prepaid College Plan, visit www.myfloridaprepaid.com.
Tuition Deferment/Late Payment Fee
All tuition and fees must be paid within 30 days after the start of the semester. A delay in excess of 30 days will result in
the assessment of a nonrefundable $100 late payment fee, and a hold will be placed on the student account. The hold will
prevent the student from viewing grades, registering for future classes, ordering transcripts or diplomas, and accessing the
Don Taft University Center RecPlex until the financial obligation is reconciled.
Consequences for Nonpayment
The student’s failure to meet financial obligations in accordance with university policy at the end of 70 days will result in an
automatic letter of notification being sent to the student informing him/ her that failure to resolve his/ her financial obligation
within 10 days will result in administrative withdrawal from class. The university bursar shall:
•
•
•
125
Identify those students who have still failed to meet their financial obligation at the end of each 30-day period
Notify those students of their failure to pay
Forward to the program office the names of all students in delinquent status for the program office to take appropriate
administrative action. Those students who fail to meet financial obligations shall not receive any academic credit for
the coursework taken.
Nova Southeastern University ~ Undergraduate Student Catalog ~ 2010–2011
Academic Resources and Procedures
Tuition Refund Policies
Refunds of Admission Deposits
The $200 deposit paid upon admission to the Professional and Liberal Studies (PALS) Program is refundable if requested
by May 1 for fall enrollment, September 1 for winter enrollment, or January 1 for summer enrollment.
Refunds of Tuition and Fees
Pro-rated tuition refunds are limited to the first two weeks of each term (during the add/drop period) according to the policies
outlined below for each program. All fees will be refunded to students prior to the first day of classes for a semester. Nonattendance does not constitute an official drop. Students must formally drop courses in order to be eligible for a refund.
Contact an academic advisor for assistance.
Processing of Refunds
For tuition refund requests to be considered, students must provide written notification to their academic advisor. Refund
amounts are based on the date of written notification, such as the date of sent email (must be from an NSU email account)
or postmark for mailed requests. For general registration, drop/add, and withdrawal policies, refer to Academic Policies and
Procedures.
Refunds for Expelled Students
Students who are expelled from NSU will not receive tuition refunds.
Refunds for Course Cancellations
The university reserves the right to cancel any course or section when registered enrollments are low. The university will
refund 100 percent of tuition and any associated class fees for courses that are cancelled. If a student registered for only
one course, the registration fee and student services fee will also be refunded.
Exceptions to Refund Policies
Refunds or credits to student accounts may be considered after the drop period if proof of exceptional circumstances exists.
Students should contact their academic advisor with questions about exceptional circumstances. Requests for refunds must
be made during the same semester in which courses are scheduled.
It is the student’s responsibility to provide all necessary documentation. Academic advisors will forward requests to appropriate
directors for consideration. See also the Student Action Request (SAR) section in Problem Resolution Procedures.
Specific Program Tuition Refund Policies
Refunds for the Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program
This is the controlling policy for the Bachelor of Health Science online program. Students will receive a 100 percent refund
for each course dropped online through the WebSTAR system by the tenth calendar day of the start of the term. Withdrawals
during the eleventh through twentieth days of term must be accompanied by a written course withdrawal request, sent to the
program office, or no refund will be given the student.
•
•
Drops made through the WebSTAR system during the first 10 days of term: 100 percent
Withdrawals made during the eleventh through fifteenth days of term, when accompanied by an online written
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•
•
withdrawal notice sent to the program office: 75 percent
Withdrawals made during the sixteenth through twentieth days of term when accompanied by an online written
withdrawal notice sent to the program office: 50 percent
Withdrawals after the twentieth day of term: no refund
Professional and Liberal Studies (PALS) Refund Policy
Full-time Professional and Liberal Studies Program (PALS) are charged flat-rate tuition and are not eligible for partial
refunds, regardless of attendance, if the total attempted credits remain between 12 and 18.
Under certain circumstances, PALS students are charged on a per credit basis. These included: part-time PALS students
attempting fewer than 12 credits; PALS students enrolled in more than 18 credits (who are charged per credit for each
credit above 18-credit hours); and all PALS students during the summer terms, regardless of the number of enrolled
credits. For students meeting these circumstances, refunds for droppedclasses are given according to the following
schedule based on calendar days:
•
•
•
•
Drops prior to first day of term in which the class begins: 100 percent
Drops during the first seven days of term: 75 percent
Drops during the eighth through fourteenth days of term: 50 percent
Withdrawals after the fourteenth day of term: no refund
Career Development Program Refund Policy
Tuition for career development students is charged on a per-credit basis. Refunds for dropped classes are given according
to the following schedule based oncalendar days:
•
•
•
•
Drops prior to first day of term in which the class begins: 100 percent
Drops during the first seven days of term: 75 percent
Drops during the eighth through fourteenth days of term: 50 percent
Withdrawals after the fourteenth day of term: no refund
Veterans’ Benefits
The Department of Veterans Affairs educational benefits are designed to provide eligible individuals with an opportunity
for educational and career growth. Eligible veterans and their dependents should contact the veterans benefit specialist
at (954) 262-7236; toll free 800-541-6682, ext. 27236, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5:00
p.m., or visit the veterans benefits Web page at www.nova.edu/financialaid/veterans/index.html. For questions regarding
eligibility, students may also contact the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) at 888-442-4551 or visit their Web site
at www.gibill.va.gov.
Standards of Progress
A student receiving veterans’ benefits must maintain satisfactory progress. Students will be considered to be making
satisfactory progress as long as they meet the academic standards set by their school for retention in their degree programs.
A student who, at the end of any evaluation period, has not attained and maintained satisfactory progress will be certified,
in a probationary status, for only one additional evaluation period. Should this student not attain, and maintain, satisfactory
progress by the end of the probationary period (one evaluation period), the student’s Veterans Affairs (VA) educational
benefits will be terminated for unsatisfactory progress.
A student whose VA educational benefits have been terminated for unsatisfactory progress may petition the school to be
re-certified after one evaluation period has elapsed. To initiate the petition process, students should contact the Office
of Student Financial Assistance VA Benefits representative at 800-541-6682, ext. 27236. The school may re-certify the
student for VA educational benefits only if there is a reasonable likelihood that the student will be able to attain and maintain
satisfactory progress for the remainder of the program.
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For VA payment of benefits purposes, an “I” (Incomplete) designation for a course must be converted to a credit grade
counting toward graduation, or a failing grade, by the end of one calendar year unless permission for a delay is granted by
the academic dean for that program.
An “NG” (no grade) designation for a course must be converted to a credit grade counting toward graduation, or a failing
grade, by the end of one regular semester unless permission for a delay is granted by the academic dean for that program.
Credit for Prior Training (CPT)
Nova Southeastern University complies with federal regulations for veterans’ training in that it is mandatory for all veterans’
benefit recipients to report either prior education and/or training. A student receiving veterans’ benefits who has previous
postsecondary educational training/experience must request official transcript(s) to be sent to the university. If the transcript
has not been received prior to the end of the student‘s second term at Nova Southeastern University, the student cannot
be certified for veterans’ benefits for the upcoming term. The student can be certified for veterans’ benefits only after the
transcript has been received. The school will evaluate the student‘s previous training and/or experience and grant credit as
appropriate. Should credit(s) be accepted and/or granted, the tuition and training time will be reduced proportionately, with
the student eligible for veterans’ benefits and VA so notified.
Grade/Progress Reports for Students Receiving Veterans’ Benefits
Each VA student will be provided a grade/progress report at the end of every evaluation period (e.g., term, semester). A
copy of each report will be placed in the student’s permanent file maintained by the university. The university periodically
furnishes each student with a working transcript that shows current status of grades and earned semester hours for all
courses completed and/or attempted, plus grades for courses in which the student is currently enrolled.
Conduct Policy for Students Receiving Veterans’ Benefits
All VA students are expected to comply with the legal and ethical standards of this institution.
Academic dishonesty and/or nonacademic misconduct will result in disciplinary action. Specific instances of misconduct
include, but are not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, knowingly furnishing false information to the institution, and forging or
altering institution documents and/or academic credentials.
The institution reserves the right to require a student to withdraw at any time for misconduct as described above. It also
reserves the right to impose probation or suspension on a student whose conduct is determined to be unsatisfactory.
Students who feel their rights have been denied are entitled to due process.
Student Conduct
All students are expected to comply with the legal and ethical standards of this institution. Academic dishonesty and/or
nonacademic misconduct will result in disciplinary action. Specific instances of misconduct include, but are not limited to,
cheating, plagiarism, knowingly furnishing false information to the institution, and forging or altering institutional documents
and/or academic credentials.
The institution reserves the right to require a student to withdraw at any time for misconduct as described above. It also
reserves the right to impose probation or suspension on a student whose conduct is determined to be unsatisfactory.
Students who feel their rights have been denied are entitled to due process.
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Withdrawal from Classes
Students may withdraw from a class after the drop and add periods have ended. Withdrawn courses will remain on student
transcripts with a notation of W, but will not affect the student’s GPA. For information about the drop and add periods, see
Dropping and Adding Classes. For the tuition refund schedule during drop and add periods, refer to the Tuition and Fees
section. Contact the appropriate office (i.e., Financial Aid, Bursar’s Office, Loan Disbursing Office) to determine the exact
nature of how changes will affect financial and academic standing.
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Students enrolled in classes offered by the College of Allied Health and Nursing may withdraw from a course or program of
study with consultation and approval of the academic advisor and program director and/or department chair.
Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program
Students must submit a written request for withdrawal to the program director between the eleventh and twentieth calendar
day after the beginning of the class in which the student is enrolled. Students may request withdrawal only if they are in good
standing and not failing the course. A grade of W (withdrawal) or WP (withdraw passing) will be recorded. A withdrawal from
a course requires approval from the program director. Unofficial, late, or poor standing withdrawals may result in a grade of
WF (withdraw failing). Withdrawal from a clinical site may significantly extend the length of the program of study.
Nursing Department
Students may initiate a withdrawal after the first week of the term, after a semester or term’s drop/add period.Students who
would like to withdraw from a nursing course should make an appointment to see the program director for advising. Students
must complete a withdrawal form if they wish to receive a W on their transcripts, rather than an unsatisfactory course grade.
All undergraduate nursing programs entail sequential, lockstep coursework. Therefore, students must complete the course
from which they withdrew before advancing in the program. Students who wish to be readmitted to a nursing course must
notify the program director at least one term prior to their desired re-entry date. Every effort will be made to accommodate
their desire for re-enrollment. Re-enrollment in clinical courses is on a space-available basis. Because the second enrollment
is the last time for students to successfully accomplish course objectives, they are encouraged to realistically assess those
factors that inhibited their accomplishment during the previous enrollment (financial limitations, family obligations, personal
concerns, reading skills, etc.) Only when such an assessment has been made and necessary corrective steps taken, should
students attempt a nursing course for the second time.
If students are out of a program area for 12 months or longer, for purposes of re-entry they will be required to pass a test(s)
measuring theoretical and/or clinical competencies.
Policies relating to the graduate courses of the R.N. to M.S.N. program may be found in the Health Professions Division
catalog and the College of Allied Health and Nursing handbook.
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Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Fischler School of Education and Human Services
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
Students may initiate a withdrawal from a course after the first two weeks from the start of the course. Students may
withdraw from a course with no financial refund or credit up until the end of the week following the halfway point of the
semester or term, depending on the course length. For example, students may withdraw up until the end of the fifth week of
a term for an 8-week course or up until the end of the ninth week of a semester for a 16-week course. For exact dates, refer
to the Academic Calendars section.
There is no financial refund if a student withdraws from a course. Total credits attempted are not reduced by course
withdrawals, nor does this action affect current term financial aid. Withdrawing from a course limits the number of possible
credits earned, which may affect future required academic progress.
Not attending classes does not constitute official withdrawal. A student who stops attending classes will receive grades
based on course requirements and work completed.
Withdrawals cannot be processed in WebSTAR; students who plan to withdraw from a course must notify their academic
advisor. Withdrawal forms must be received and processed by academic divisions prior to withdrawal deadlines.
Withdrawal Dates—Bahamas and Jamaica
The last days to withdraw from courses offered in the Bahamas and Jamaica are:
Bahamas (5-weekend programs): the Monday following the third class/weekend meeting
Jamaica (4-weekend programs): one week from the Monday following the second class/weekend
International Students
Changes in enrollment status may affect eligibility for student visas and immigration status.
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Withdrawal from the University and
Leaves of Absence
Students who plan to withdraw from all courses during a semester and leave the university must contact their academic
advisor before withdrawing. Students who withdraw from the university must formally apply to be considered for readmission
at a later date.
Continuous Enrollment and Withdrawl from the B.H.Sc. Online Program
Although continuous enrollment is not a requirement the program strongly recommends students to enroll in at least two
courses per semester, for the duration of their B.H.Sc. studies. Unless prior approval or a leave of absence has been
granted, students who do not enroll in any classes for two consecutive semesters may be administratively withdrawn (WU)
from the B.H.Sc. program. If a student is administratively withdrawn from the program he or she would be required to petition
the program director in writing for reinstatement in the program.
Withdrawal from the Fischler School of Education and Human Services
Academic Withdrawal from Program (FSEHS Policy 1.05)
Any student who encounters a temporary personal or professional situation that prohibits his/her continued enrollment may
withdraw from his/her program of study by following the Academic Withdrawal procedure 1.05P. Students may withdraw
one time only. Students are not eligible for academic services from faculty or staff during the period of academic withdrawal.
Additional stipulations regarding academic withdrawal:
•
•
Withdrawals do not suspend the time limit for degree completion.
Students are advised to consult the financial aid office concerning possible ramifications for eligibility during periods
of non-enrollment.
Please note: Students who wish to be considered for reinstatement should refer to FSEHS Reinstatement Policy 1.07 and
procedure 1.07P.
Academic Withdrawal Procedure
Students of the Fischler School of Education and Human Services who wish to withdraw from their program of study must
follow the procedure outlined below:
A. Students must submit a request for program withdrawal. A.A., BSCD, Undergraduate Teacher Education Program
(UTEP) students are required to submit their request, in writing, to their academic advisor. The academic advisor will
forward the student’s request to the Office of Enrollment Services. All other FSEHS students must notify the Office
of Enrollment Services, in writing, of their intent to withdraw from their program of study. All students must send their
request via their NSU email account or via U.S. mail (see contact information below). Students must include their
full name, NSU ID number, program name, effective date for program withdrawal, and cluster number (if applicable).
Contact Information:
Off-campus UTEP Students:
Nova Southeastern University
Fischler School of Education and Human Services
Office of Enrollment Services
Attention: Admissions Department
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1750 NE 167th Street
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162
Email: admitteam@nsu.nova.edu
Main-campus UTEP Students:
Nova Southeastern University
Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Office of Undergraduate Admissions
Attention: Admissions Department
3301 College Age
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314
Email: ncsinfo@nsu.nova.edu
All other FSEHS students:
Nova Southeastern University
Fischler School of Education and Human Services
Office of Enrollment Services
Attention: Admissions Department
1750 NE 167th Street
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162
Email: admitteam@nova.edu
1. Upon receipt of written notification from the student, the Admissions Department will process the program
withdrawal. A comment will be posted in the NSU Banner system as a confirmation of the transaction.
2. The Admissions department will send official program withdraw notification to the student via U.S. mail and
NSU email.
3.
4. A copy of the program withdrawal letter will be sent to the Enrollment Processing Services (EPS), placed in
Banner, and in the student’s academic file.
B. Students who are enrolled in courses during a term/session coinciding with the dates of program withdrawal must
drop those courses by following the Course Withdrawal Procedure.
Administrative Withdrawal from Program (FSEHS Policy 1.03)
The Fischler School of Education and Human Services will initiate the administrative withdrawal of a student from their
program of study if any of the following situations occur:
•
•
Students who fail to enroll (i.e., do not register) for one year or more will be administratively withdrawn from the
program.
Students who fail to honor NSU financial obligations will be administratively withdrawn after 90 days of nonpayment.
Please note: Students who are administratively withdrawn are not eligible to receive a tuition refund.
Leaves of Absence
Students who require a leave of absence for less than one year may return and continue their programs without reapplying
to the university. If students have not registered for coursework for more than one year, they must reapply for admission
and their major program’s required curriculum will be reevaluated according to the most recent requirements as listed in the
most current NSU Undergraduate Student Catalog. Students should note that any leave of absence may affect eligibility for
financial aid.
If there is an interruption in studies of more than one calendar year from the end of the last semester enrolled, the student
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must abide by the NSU Undergraduate Student Catalog in effect upon return, or to requirements approved by the student’s
academic program director.
College of Allied Health and Nursing
A student seeking a voluntary leave of absence must submit the request in writing to the program director and/or department
chair. In collaboration with the dean, the director and/or chair will determine and notify the student in writing whether a leave
of absence will be granted and the conditions and time frame under which the student may return to school. In making the
request, the student understands that he or she may not be eligible to return to the program before the next academic year
and may at the discretion of the department chair and or dean, be required to repeat coursework previously taken if the
leave of absence is for an extended period of time, as defined by the department.
Military Leaves of Absence
Students in the military whether active, reserve, or National Guard desiring to take a leave of absence because of military
deployment or changes in orders may request a leave of absence for the duration of the time indicated in their orders. In
order to request military leave of absence, students must contact and supply the Department of Health Science Program
Office with a copy of the orders. Because the B.H.Sc.—Online Program is distance based, students are encouraged, if at all
possible, to continue their studies. As the B.H.Sc.—Vascular Sonography Program is an on-campus, lock-step specialization,
students will be required to meet with the directors upon returning from leave in order to assess and determine the method in
which they may continue their studies. Students who have coursework in progress and request a military leave of absence
will be given a grade of I (Incomplete) for the duration of their deployment.
Upon the completion of military duty and return to the program, students enrolled in the Bachelor of Health Science—Online
Program will have 90 days to complete all incomplete coursework. Students in the Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular
Sonography Program will be required to start at the beginning of the courses that were in progress at the time of his or her
leave.
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College of Allied
Health and Nursing
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College of Allied Health and Nursing
Dean’s Message
Welcome to the College of Allied Health and Nursing. We hope you will find the educational and
academic resources in this catalog helpful. The College of Allied Health and Nursing endeavors
to train allied health professionals in the art of improving the quality of life in the community. We
train allied health professional to become an integral part of the healthcare team and become
community advocates.
If you have any suggestions about the services we provide, the university or the community,
please feel free to contact us.
Richard E. Davis, PA-C, Ed.D.
Richard E. Davis, PA-C, Ed.D.
Dean, College of Allied Health and Nursing
Health Professions Division
Board of Governors
Royal Flagg Jonas, J.D., Chairman
Morton J. Morris, D.O., J.D., Secretary
Daniel Barkus, D.O., Treasurer
Ray Ferrero, Jr., J.D., President
Howard Braverman, O.D.
Daniel M. Finkelstein, D.O.
Rosebud Foster, Ed.D.
Peter Keller, D.D.S.
Howard Neer, D.O.
Marcelino Oliva, D.O.
Anthony Ottaviani, D.O., M.P.H.
David H. Rush
Joel Rush, D.O.
Sandra L. Schwemmer, D.O.
Phillip L. Shettle, D.O.
Barry J. Silverman, M.D.
Robert A. Steele
Sidney J. Stern, O.D.
J. Kenneth Tate
Jay M. Tischenkel, B.Sc., R.Ph.
Sylvia Urlich, M.A.
Emeritus:
Mervin E. Meck, D.O.
Thomas F. Carney, D.O.
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Health Professions Division Mission Statement
The mission of Nova Southeastern University Health Professions Division is to train primary care health practitioners in a
multidisciplinary setting, with an emphasis on medically underserved areas.
The institutional premise is that health professionals should be trained in a multidisciplinary setting and, whenever possible,
with integrated education. The university trains students in concert with other health profession students so that the various
disciplines will learn to work together as a team for the good of the public’s health. During their didactic work, students share
campus facilities and, in some cases, have combined classes. In their clinical experiences, they work together in facilities
operated by the university.
Furthermore, the division aims to educate health care practitioners who will eventually increase the availability of health
care in areas of Florida that suffer from health care shortages. The division aims to alleviate some of these shortages by
exposing the entire student body to the needs, challenges, and rewards of rural, underserved urban, and geriatric care.
Existing curricula require all students to attend ambulatory care clerkships in rural or urban areas, or both, making Nova
Southeastern University strongly oriented toward a pattern of training its students in areas geographically removed from the
health center itself, and to the care of indigent and multicultural population groups.
In doing this, it developed training programs that address the primary care needs of the region’s most medically underserved
populations.
College of Allied Health and Nursing
Mission Statement
In the spirit of improving and maintaining optimum health conditions in the community, the College of Allied Health and
Nursing prepares professionals with essential skills. These skills are necessary for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention
of diseases; for the support of the populace in maintaining proper health and safety; for the management of rehabilitative
processes; and for the education of the community. The College of Allied Health and Nursing endeavors to train both
graduate and undergraduate professionals in the arts of improving the quality of life in the community.
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Introduction to the College of Allied Health
and Nursing
The College of Allied Health and Nursing is committed to providing the highest quality education to students in a variety of
health care disciplines. The College of Allied Health and Nursing offers two degree options, a Bachelor of Health Science
degree and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree:
Health Science
• Bachelor of Health Science–Online
• Bachelor of Health Science–Vascular Sonography
Nursing
• Bachelor of Science in Nursing—Entry-Level Track
• Bachelor of Science in Nursing—R.N. to B.S.N. Track
• Bachelor of Science in Nursing—R.N. to M.S.N. Track
Notice on Professional Examinations
Credits and degrees earned from colleges within the state of Florida that are licensed by the State Board of Independent
Colleges and Universities do not automatically qualify the individual to participate in professional examinations in Florida.
The established procedure requires the appropriate state professional board to review and recognize the colleges granting
the degrees prior to scheduling examinations. Additional information regarding Nova Southeastern University Health
Professions Division and its Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, Pharmacy, Optometry, Allied Health and Nursing, Medical
Sciences, and Dental Medicine may be obtained by contacting the State Board of Independent Colleges and Universities,
Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida. Any student interested in practicing a regulated profession in Florida should
contact the Department of Business and Professional Regulation, 2009 Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee, Florida 32301.
HPD Library
Service Units Learning Resources
The Health Professions Division Library is located on the first floor of the HPD’s Library/Laboratory Building. It contains an
online catalog of holdings with more than 20,000 book titles; 1,500 journal subscriptions; and 1,500 audio and video tapes,
slide sets, and CD-ROMs. Also, 21,000 full-text journals are available online. There are 48 group study rooms equipped with
videotape players and monitors. The HPD library maintains an Internet Web site that allows for access to more than 200
health-related and other electronic databases, including MEDLINE and MDConsult. Students also have checkout privileges
at other NSU libraries, including the Shepard Broad Law Center Library; the Oceanographic Center Library; and the Alvin
Sherman Library, Research, and Information Technology Center (a joint-use facility with the Broward County Board of
County Commissioners).
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HPD Policies and Procedures
Acceptance of Professional Fees
The activities of students are not to be construed as the practice of medicine, optometry, pharmacy, occupational therapy,
physical therapy, physician assistance, vascular sonography, nursing, dentistry, or public health. It is a violation of the law
and contrary to the policy of this university for any unlicensed person to attempt to engage in the professional practice of
health care. Students who are appropriately licensed in a profession may engage in that professional work to the extent
provided by law.
AIDS Policy
The university has adopted the following AIDS policy: Nova Southeastern University Health Professions Division recognizes
its responsibilities for the health and welfare its students and faculty and staff members, as well as its responsibilities to
patients suffering from AIDS or harboring the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). While the division does not subscribe to
compulsory HIV testing either as a screening device or in individual cases, some rotation sites require this test and students
must comply. As an institution of medical learning, the division provides each student/faculty/staff person knowledge to
understand the AIDS problem, including AIDS testing, treatment, and counseling by community services. The division
provides an annual seminar to all students, faculty members, and staff members. The division recommends universal
precautions in all laboratory and clinical settings. The division reserves the right to alter this policy as new information
on AIDS becomes available. Students should consult their physician for HIV testing or treatment immediately following
exposure.
Background Checks
Students are required to authorize the NSU Health Professions Division to obtain background check(s) as per adopted
policy of April 22, 2005. Students may also be required by the Health Professions Division to obtain a background check
or authorize, where appropriate, clinical training facilities to conduct the check and to permit the results provided by the
consumer reporting agency to the NSU Health Professions Division and /or to the clinical training facilities. If the background
check(s) reveal information of concern, which the NSU Health Professions Division may deem unfavorable, the NSU Health
Professions Division will provide the accepted applicant or enrolled student a copy of the report and the document entitled
“A Summary of Your Rights Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act,” and request the individual to provide a detailed written
explanation of the information contained in this report along with appropriate documentation (e.g., police reports). This
information must be returned to the NSU Health Professions Division within 10 business days of the date the communication
is sent or another date specified by the NSU Health Professions Division in its communication with the student.
Offers of admission will not be considered final until the completion of the background check(s), with results deemed
favorable by the NSU Health Professions Division, and, where appropriate, by the clinical training facilities, or if information
received indicates that the student has provided false or misleading statements, has omitted required information, or in any
way is unable to meet the requirements for completion of the program, then the admission may be denied or rescinded, the
student may be disciplined or dismissed, or his or her enrollment terminated.
Following the initial background check(s), students will be asked annually to provide a certification relating to any convictions,
guilty pleas, or no contest pleas to any criminal offense, other than traffic violations.
Certificate of Physical Examination
Students must have a certificate of physical examination completed by their physician. Forms will be distributed by the
Division Office of Admissions and Student Services to each matriculant as part of the admissions package. A current medical
and physical examination is due upon admission. The NSU Health Professions Division Mandatory Immunization Form and
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Certificate of Physical Examination must be completed prior to the orientation date. Students may request that the University
Health Service perform these examinations after matriculation. The University Health Service will make appointments in as
timely a manner as possible, and the appointments, once made, become an obligation of the student, and must be kept.
These certificates (whether done privately or by the university), will be placed in the student’s files.
Additional testing and requirements may be needed based on individual hospital/ agency requirements. These costs will be
the responsibility of the student. Students are not permitted in the on-campus lab or in the clinical setting until the completed
medical records are on file. The health form must be updated annually at the student health center.
If the renewal date for physical requirements occurs during a term, the student must renew prior to the beginning of the
term in which the renewal date occurs. Approved status must be valid for the entire semester in which the student enrolls.
A student who experiences a health problem that may interfere with the ability to provide client care (e.g., surgery, fracture)
must provide a release from their health care provider indicating the ability to participate fully in client care situations. “Light
duty” is not permissible.
•
•
•
A Nova Southeastern University Health Form will be included with acceptance materials. The completed, signed
form must be presented according to the admissions department guidelines.
Basic Life Support (BLS) certification must be valid prior to each term for the duration of the term.
The student should carry a copy of their health/ hospitalization insurance card with them to the clinical agency, as
well as their BLS card.
Core Performance Standards for Admission and Progress
The Nova Southeastern University Health Professions Division is pledged to the admission and matriculation of qualified
students and wishes to acknowledge awareness of laws which prohibit discrimination against anyone on the basis of race,
color, national origin, religion, sex or qualified disability.
Regarding those students with verifiable disabilities, the university will not discriminate against such individuals who are
otherwise qualified, but will expect applicants and students to meet certain minimal technical standards (core performance
standards) as set forth herein with or without reasonable accommodation. In adopting these standards, the university
believes it must keep in mind the ultimate safety of the patients whom its graduates will eventually serve. The standards
reflect what the university believes are reasonable expectations required of health professions students and personnel in
performing common functions.
The holders of health care degrees must have the knowledge and skills to function in a broad variety of clinical situations
and to render a wide spectrum of patient care. In order to carry out the activities described below, candidates for Health
Professions Division degrees must be able to integrate consistently, quickly, and accurately all information received, and
they must have the ability to learn, integrate, analyze, and synthesize data.
Candidates for degrees offered by the Health Professions Division must have, with or without reasonable accommodation,
multiple abilities and skills including intellectual, conceptual, integrative, and quantitative abilities; interpersonal
communication; mobility and strength; motor skills; hearing, visual, tactile, behavioral, and social attributes. Candidates for
admission and progression must be able to perform these abilities and skills in a reasonably independent manner.
Intellectual, Conceptual, Integrative, and Qualitative Abilities
These abilities include measurement, calculation, reasoning, analysis, and synthesis. Problem solving—a critical skill—
requires all of these intellectual abilities. Candidates and students must have critical thinking ability sufficient for good
clinical judgment. This is necessary to identify cause-effect relationships in clinical situations and to develop plans of care.
In addition, candidates and students should be able to comprehend three-dimensional relationships and to understand the
spatial relationships of structures. An individual is expected to be able to perform multiple tasks in a diverse, dynamic, highly
competitive, and challenging learning environment. All individuals are expected to meet their program requirements on a
satisfactory level as determined by HPD administration or the applicable college/program administration.
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Interpersonal Communication
Candidates and students should be able to interact with and observe patients in order to elicit information, examine
patients, describe changes in mood, activity, and posture, and perceive nonverbal communications. They must be able
to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients. Communication includes not only speech but also reading and
writing. They must also be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in all written forms with all members of the health
care team. They must have interpersonal abilities sufficient to interact with individuals, families, and groups from a variety
of social, emotional, cultural, and intellectual backgrounds.
Motor Skills
Candidates and students should have sufficient motor function to execute movements reasonably required to provide
general care and emergency treatment to patients. Examples of emergency treatment reasonably required to some health
care professionals are cardiopulmonary resuscitation, administration of intravenous medication, the application of pressure
to stop bleeding, the opening of obstructed airways, and the ability to calibrate and use various pieces of equipment. Such
actions require coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium and functional use of the senses of
touch and vision. Physical therapy and occupational therapy students must be able to position patients for treatment, as
well as teaching the teaching the functions involving gross and fine movements. Pharmacy candidates and students must
have sufficient motor skills to weigh chemical and pharmaceutical (including intravenous) solutions, prepare prescriptions,
and carry out sterile procedures.
Strength and Mobility
Candidates and students must have sufficient mobility to attend to emergency codes and to perform such maneuvers as CPR
when required. They must have the physical ability to move sufficiently from room to room and to maneuver in small places.
Osteopathic medical students must have the ability to position patients for the administration and delivery of osteopathic
manipulative treatment in a variety of settings and to position and move patients when required. Pharmacy students must
be able to move about within a pharmacy setting and a patient’s room. Physical therapy and occupational therapy students
must be able to administer treatment in a variety of settings and positions and move patients when required.
Hearing
Candidates and students should have sufficient auditory ability to monitor and assess health needs. They must be able to
hear information given by the patient in answer to inquiries; to hear cries for help; to hear features in an examination, such
as the auscultatory sounds; and to be able to monitor equipment.
Visual
Candidates and students must have visual ability sufficient for observation and assessment necessary in patient care.
It must be consistent in many cases with being able to assess asymmetry, range of motion, and tissue texture changes.
Osteopathic Medicine, Optometry, and Physician Assistant students must have sufficient visual ability to use ophthalmologic
instruments. It is necessary to have adequate visual capabilities for proper evaluation and treatment integration. Candidates
and students must be able to observe the patient and the patient’s responses including body language and features of the
examination and treatment. Pharmacy students must be able to interpret prescriptions and medical orders, as well as to
inspect medicine for deterioration or expiration.
Tactile
Candidates and students must have sufficient tactile ability for physical assessment. They must be able to perform palpation,
functions of physical examination, and/or those related to therapeutic intervention. Pharmacy students must be able to
measure and compound, sometimes transferring from container to container and to carry out sterile procedures. Dental
students must be able to deliver appropriate treatment using high technology equipment such as dental drills and surgical
instruments.
Behavioral and Social Attributes
Candidates and students must possess the emotional health required for full use of their intellectual abilities; the exercise
of good judgment; the prompt completion of all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients; and the
development of mature, sensitive, and effective relationship with patients. Candidates and students must be able to physically
tolerate taxing workloads, to adapt to changing environments, to display flexibility, and to learn to function in the face of
uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of many patients. Compassion, integrity, concern for others, interpersonal
skills, interest, and motivation are all personal qualities that will be assessed during the admissions and education process.
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Sensory
Osteopathic students and physician assistants are required to have an enhanced ability to use their sensory skills. These
enhanced tactile and proprioceptive sensory skills are essential for appropriate osteopathic evaluation and treatment of patients.
Dress Code
Students must maintain a neat and clean appearance befitting students attending a professional program. Therefore, attire
should convey a professional appearance whenever the student is on campus or at any off-campus educational site. The
dress code is to be maintained at all times in the Administration Building, classrooms, laboratories, and all areas involved
in providing patient care.
Additionally, the dress code is in force Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. in the library and in other areas
not mentioned above. Those failing to comply may be dismissed from the classroom and/or campus. A written warning
describing the infractio n will be entered into the student’s file.
The following constitutes acceptable and professional attire:
• Students enrolled in all entry level programs must wear their white clinical jackets at all times
• Shirt, tie, slacks, and regular shoes for men, and for women it should be professional business dress, which includes
slacks, pants, or skirt with blouse, or dress and appropriate shoes
• Matching scrub sets, socks, and shoes. No institutional scrubs may be worn by any College of Allied Health and
Nursing student at any time while on campus. Institutional scrubs are those that have the identification symbols or
lettering from the institution that owns or issues them. Those scrubs are marked in locations that are easy to identify
as being part of the inventory of that institution. Students may not wear the following: shorts or cutoffs, mini-skirts
(higher than mid-thigh), jeans (all colors), see-through clothing or halter tops, sandals, flip-flops, T-shirts (as the
outer shirt), jogging or exercise clothing, inappropriately mismatched garments, hats, or caps.
• Students must wear their approved NSU ID badges while on campus.
Students inappropriately dressed or groomed may be requested to leave the campus. In this circumstance, an unexcused
absence will be recorded until the student returns properly attired.
Questionable or disputed cases of dress or grooming shall be presented to the dean, whose decision shall be final. Repeated
violations will be considered improper professional behavior and may result in disciplinary action. When a class requires
special dress (such as the wearing of scrub suits in anatomy laboratory), it will be the only exception to the dress code
allowed during that time.
The dress code is to be observed at all times including midterms and examination periods.
Nursing Uniform Dress Code
Students will wear the prescribed uniform during designated clinicals and be neatly groomed. Scrub suits are worn when
the student is in the hospital, nursing lab, or health care agency under the supervision of a professor. When on campus,
students may wear professional business casual attire with their NSU lab coat or scrubs. Students must adhere to the
Health Professions Division Dress Code outlined above.
•
•
•
•
•
The nursing uniform consists of teal scrubs and a white lab coat with the official NSU Program patch. The scrubs
should be purchased through the NSU bookstore. Students will be fitted for the lab coat at orientation.
The uniform consists of all white, clean professional shoes and plain, unpatterned white hose or socks. Closed toe
shoes will be polished and clean. No colored sneakers or backless shoes will be worn.
Required equipment includes a watch with a second hand, bandage scissors, protective eye gear, a stethoscope,
and a pen light. This equipment may be purchased through the NSU bookstore.
Hair will be neatly arranged and worn off the collar. No adornments will be worn in the hair.
A wedding band and small stud earrings may be worn. Other jewelry is not acceptable when in uniform.
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fingernails will not extend beyond the fingertips. Nail polish will be unchipped and a neutral color. No acrylic nails
or silk wraps are permitted.
The NSU white lab coat with nursing program patch may be worn over the uniform for warmth.
• Students
in
the health care agency collecting clinical data should wear professional attire along with the student’s name pin/
identification badge and NSU white lab coat (no shorts, jeans, tank tops, miniskirts, sandals, etc.).
The wearing of a Nova Southeastern University identification badge is required at all times while on HPD property
or in a clinical agency. A specific agency may also require students to wear agency identification.
Some health care facilities require students to purchase a hospital ID badge in addition to their college name tag.
Baths or showers are to be taken on the morning or afternoon preceding clinicals and on the first opportunity
after clinical experiences. Perfumes and body odor may be offensive or cause allergies to ill clients; therefore,
antiperspirant/ deodorant is required.
Fragrant colognes and perfumes should not be worn to clinical.
Excessive makeup should not be worn to clinical.
Identification Badges
Students must wear identification badges at all times while on campus. ID badges are not transferable. ID badges are
issued at the Division Badge Room. These badges are given to the students at no charge except for replacement.
Identification Requirements and Fieldwork Prerequisites
An affiliated clinical/ fieldwork teaching facility may also require a student to pass a state of Florida Department of Health
screening before rotation. Other requirements, which may be held by the affiliated facility include, but are not limited to,
fingerprinting, criminal background check, urinalysis for drugs and alcohol, and proof of immunization. If a student does not
meet all requirements held by the affiliated facility before the first day of the scheduled placement, the student’s placement
will be canceled, or if the placement has begun, the student will be asked to leave.
Immunization Requirements
Students must have completed the mandatory immunization form. The following immunization procedures are required of
students at the Health Professions Division:
Basic Immunizations: Every student is required to have had an immunization for the following diseases before matriculating
at Nova Southeastern University: diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (or diphtheria-tetanus), varicella (chicken pox), and measlesmumps-rubella. A written memorandum of the immunization given and the date, signed by a physician, must be filed with
the Office of Admissions on the day of registration at the latest. These basic immunizations are the financial responsibility
of the student.
Hepatitis B Vaccine: Since every student at the Health Professions Division potentially can be exposed to this deadly
virus, and since many rotation sites require it of personnel, HPD will administer and require hepatitis B vaccination for every
entering student during the first year. The cost of this vaccination will be supported through the student activities fee.
Tuberculosis: Because of the resurgence of tuberculosis and the possible exposure of students to TB, the Health Professions
Division will require and provide a yearly tuberculosis test for every student. The student activities fee, too, will support this.
Arrangements: The University Health Service will schedule appointments for students for tuberculosis testing and for
hepatitis B vaccination. Because both of these require preparation, any student who does not keep a scheduled vaccination
appointment will be required to pay for the immunization personally. The university is not required to provide alternate sites
for clinical practicum or rotations should immunization be a requirement for placement. Therefore, the student may be
delayed in meeting the graduation requirements of their program.
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Netiquette
In a traditional classroom, students are reminded that behavior that disrupts the class or interferes with other students
and their ability to learn is unacceptable. Any person engaged in disruptive behavior receives a written warning from the
instructor. Students who continue to engage in disruptive behavior after this warning may be administratively withdrawn from
the course.
Similarly, in an online course, any electronic postings, emails, or electronic messages that disrupt the class or interfere
with learning goals and objectives are unacceptable. Electronic communication—the backbone of this online course—must
be civil, respectful, and cordial at all times. Any posting that disrupts or interferes with learning will be removed, and the
author of the posting will receive a written warning. A second disruptive posting will cause the author to be administratively
withdrawn from the course.
Student Insurance Requirement
It is required that each Health Professions Division Student (except those in distance education and R.N. to B.S.N. nursing
programs) carry adequate personal medical and hospitalization insurance. It is strongly suggested that students and their
families avail themselves of the insurance plan obtainable through the university. Information about the policy can be
obtained through the Health Professions Division Admissions and Student Services Office, or by accessing the Web site:
www.nova.edu/smc. Click on to the link for Health Insurance Information. Please note that students will see a charge for
health insurance appear on their student account as part of the academic registration process.
For those students who already have health insurance coverage and do not need the NSU-endorsed insurance plan, this
charge will be removed from their account once proof of coverage has been submitted. To complete the waiver form, go
to www.rec.nova.edu and click on to link for the waiver form. The online waiver is the only process by which insurance
charges will be removed and coverage will be cancelled. Students who fail to complete the waiver form and provide proof of
health insurance by the stated deadline will not be eligible to have charges removed and will continue to be enrolled in the
insurance plan endorsed by NSU.
Visits to Other Institutions
Students in the Health Professions Division may not visit, in an official or presumably official capacity as a professional
school student, any health-related institution (hospital, pharmacy, practitioner’s office, clinic, etc.) or any health school
without express permission of the dean. Visits to relatives or friends who are hospitalized are permitted, provided they are
within visiting hours and all hospital rules are observed.
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Department of Health Science
The Department of Health Science is an interdisciplinary group of programs designed for health professionals with the
desire to advance academically, administratively, or clinically within their profession. The department offers educational
opportunities from entry-level undergraduate to programs for working health professionals, demonstrating the university’s
and college’s commitment to lifelong learning. The Department of Health Science uses innovative online and on-campus
components to achieve its mission of preparing professionals for today’s health care market.
The department offers the Bachelor of Health Science (B.H.Sc.) in an exclusively online format. The department also
houses a pre-eminent, on-campus, entry-level program, the Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography Program,
which is supported by a state-of-the-art vascu­lar teaching laboratory.
Computer Requirements
All students in the department are required to have a computer meeting the minimum requirements listed below.
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Pentium or AMD at 1.00 GHZ or equivalent Macintosh processor
256 MB RAM
Video and monitor capable of 1024 X 768 resolution or higher
CD-ROM drive
Full duplex sound card and speakers
Internet connection with Internet service provider (DSL, cable or satellite highly recommended)
Windows XP or NT or MAC OS
Microsoft Office 2000 or newer with PowerPoint, Word and Excel minimum
Printer capability
Suggested option: laptop computer with wireless Internet capability for use during campus institutes
Majors in Health Science
Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program
The Bachelor of Health Science (B.H.Sc.)—Online Program is an online degree advancement program for graduates from
associate’s degree, diploma, or certificate programs in the health sciences such as military trained health care technicians,
radiology technicians, respiratory therapists, etc. The NSU B.H.Sc. course of study is inter-disciplinary and is designed
to provide career advancement for health care practitioners as well as deliver a well-rounded generalist curriculum. This
cutting-edge program offers the opportunity for numerous health care occupations to complete their under graduate degree
coursework online, conveniently from their own home or office, without compromising career or other obligations.
There have been dramatic changes in the health care market and delivery systems in the United States over the past decade.
As health care becomes increasingly competitive, it becomes more important to distinguish one self professionally and
academically. The Bachelor in Health Science—Online Program is offered via the College of Allied Health and Nursing’s Webbased distance learning technology that allows health care professionals to remain in their current location and employment.
Upon successful completion of the B.H.Sc. program, students are eligible to apply for admission to continue their education
in health sciences in the online Master of Health Science (M.H.Sc.) and later the Doctor of Health Science (D.H.Sc.)
program. Each of these programs is an online degree program, with the M.H.Sc. having no residency requirement and the
D.H.Sc. having a requirement for students to complete two one-week summer institutes.
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Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program Goals
The Bachelor of Health Science will enable students to:
1. Pursue a well-rounded and diverse educational degree completion program for health professionals in an online
environment that allows them to continue gainful employment in their chosen field while attending and completing
course work.
2. Enhance and develop the student’s leadership and health care knowledge through academic inquiry while using
current, practical health care models.
3. Enhance their understanding of diverse populations in health care and to prepare the student to take a leadership
role in the rapidly changing health care environment.
4. Enhance the student’s understanding of the political, social, legal and ethical issues that may be encountered and
have an impact on areas of health care practice.
5. Develop knowledge that helps bridge between clinical care, health care diversity and critical inquiry.
Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program Learning Outcomes
Graduates of the Bachelor of Health Science degree completion program will demonstrate command of the following
learning outcomes as evidenced by their participation in class, completion of class assignments, presentations, projects,
Graduates will be able to:
1. Communicate effectively in writing on a variety of topics related to health care
2. Demonstrate an awareness and appreciation of the delivery of culturally competent health care.
3. Effectively communicate and acknowledge the impact of the legal, ethical, and political environment on health care
policy and delivery.
4. Demonstrate the knowledge and ability to search and retrieve information and materials related to individual clinical
practice issues or overall health policy concerns.
1. Describe and demonstrate management / leadership skills and theories that can be applied in preparation to lead
or manage effectively in a health care environment.
2. Demonstrate knowledge of and effectively apply health care models, theories, and tools to issues impacting health
care delivery
Computer Literacy
Access to and ongoing use of a computer will be required for all students to successfully complete the online programs
and courses in the Department of Health Science. Each student is expected to acquire computer hardware and software
appropriate to the program. Competency in the basic use of a computer and the ability to navigate and interact with the
course and curriculum content is the responsibility of the student and necessary for graduation.
Continuous Enrollment
Although continuous enrollment is not a requirement, the B.H.Sc. program strongly recommends students to enroll in at
least two courses per semester, for the duration of their B.H.Sc. studies.
Online Student Center—Program and Course Communication
All students are required to visit the online student center at least once every two weeks. All communication and programmatic
information will be posted in the online student center. It is required that all B.H.Sc. online students use the online student
center when communicating with the program. All class communication must take place through the university’s secure
course management platform.
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Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program Curriculum
The program requires that a minimum of 30 credit hours of coursework (including 21 credit hours of required core coursework)
be com­pleted through the NSU B.H.Sc. program. A minimum total of 120 credit hours, of which 30 credit hours must fulfill
general education requirements, are required to graduate with the B.H.Sc. degree.
The B.H.Sc—Online Program is designed for completion in a distance-learning format and requires no on-campus time.
The coursework is professor-paced using Web-based delivery. The curriculum and coursework follow a standard 12-week
semester calendar.The curriculum is designed to build upon the existing knowledge base of the health care professional
while focusing on the overall health care picture. Leadership, diversity, and conflict resolution are but a few of the areas
covered in the curriculum.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course
requirements, refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of
this catalog.
Bachelor of Health Science—Online Program Major Requirements (30 credit hours minimum)
The program requires that a minimum of 30 semester hours of course work (including 21 semester hours of required
core course work) be completed through the NSU B.H.Sc. program. A minimum total of 120 semester hours, of which 30
semester hours must fulfill general education requirements, are required in order to graduate with the B.H.Sc. degree.
In order to be eligible to graduate with the B.H.Sc. degree a student must have completed 30 semesters hours of General
Education course work in addition to the B.H.Sc. curriculum with a resulting minimum total of 120 semester hours with a 2.0
cumulative grade point average and a 2.25 grade point average in the B.H.Sc. major.
Effective for new matriculants on or after January 2006, students will be required to obtain a grade of C or better (greater
than or equal to 73 percent) in every required core course. Students receiving a C-, D+, D, or F in a required core course
will be required to retake the course at its next scheduled offering.
Core Courses (21 credit hours)
BHS 3110
Health Care Ethics (3 credit hours)
BHS 3120
Introduction to Epidemiology (3 credit hours)
BHS 3150
Principles of Leadership (3 credit hours)
BHS 3155
Conflict Resolution in Health Care (3 credit hours)
BHS 3160
Health Policy (3 credit hours)
BHS 4000
Cultural Competency in Health Care (3 credit hours)
BHS 4100Academic and Professional Writing (3 credit hours—Must be taken during the first
semester of enrollment in the program)
Major Electives (minimum 9 credits)
The number of major electives requires is variable, based on the number of credit hours accepted for transfer.
BHS 3100 Current Issues in Health Care (3 credit hours)
BHS 3101 History of the US Health System (3 credit hours)
BHS 3130 Research and Design for Health Care (3 credit hours)
BHS 3140 Health Care Practice (3 credit hours)
BHS 3145 Principles of Environmental Health (3 credit hours)
BHS 3151
Health Services Management (3 credit hours)
BHS 3161 Concepts of Health Care Finance (3 credit hours)
BHS 3170 Health Care Delivery Systems (3 credit hours)
BHS 3190 Patient Education in Health Care (3 credit hours)
BHS 3195 Therapeutic Communications for Health Care Professionals (3 credit hours)
BHS 4001
Individuals with Disabilities and Special Needs (3 credit hours)
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BHS 4005 BHS 4006 BHS 4009 BHS 4010 BHS 4011 BHS 4012 BHS 4020 BHS 4031 BHS 4110 BHS 4130 BHS 4140 BHS 4150 BHS 4151
BHS 4152 BHS 4153 BHS 4154 BHS 4160 BHS 5001 Alternative Medicine in Health Care (3 credit hours)
Fundamentals of Chinese Medicine (3 credit hours)
Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (3 credit hours)
Bioterrorism: Health Care Readiness and Response (3 credit hours)
Torture, Violence, and Trauma—Health Care’s Healing Role (3 credit hours)
Topics in Maternal, Child Health (3 credit hours)
Statistics for Health Professions (3 credit hours)
Health Care and Aging (3 credit hours)
Internship* (3 credit hours)
Independent Study* (3 credit hours)
The Science of Sound* (3 credit hours)
Linguistics & Psycholinguistic Variables of Normal Language Development* (3 credit hours)
Neuroanatomy & Neurophysiology of Audition* (3 credit hours)
Speech and Language Disorders for Health Care Practitioners (3 credit hours)
Effect of Hearing Impairment on Speech and Language* (3 credit hours)
Education for Health Professions (3 credit hours)
APA Writing Seminar (3 credit hours)
* Student must receive departmental and academic advisor approval in order to be allowed to register for this
course.
Open/Transfer Electives (60 credit hours)
Students are required to complete 60 credit hours of open/transfer electives, consisting of transfer credits or
additional B.H.Sc. elective coursework.
Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography
This entry-level program is designed to prepare students in the field of vascular sonography and testing,a specialty of diagnostic
medical imaging. Vascular technologists or sonographers use the properties of sound (ultrasound) and other techniques to
detect and assess the anatomy, the physiology and the pathology of the arteries and veins of the body (at the exclusion of the
heart). These conditions include diseases of: the carotid artery system that may lead to stroke, the abdominal aorta and some
other arteries that may lead to aneurysms, the arteries of the upper and lower extremities that may lead to peripheral arterial
disease, and of the veins of the upper and lower extremities that may lead to blood clots or pulmonary embolism.
While vascular diseases are generally thought of as conditions associated with aging with atherosclerosis, other pathologies
can affect the vascular system throughout a lifetime. This vast spectrum of disease renders the field of vascular sonography
challenging and stimulating. The aging of America’s “baby boomers”, the incidence of diabetes mellitus, and the wider use of
ultrasound as a primary imaging tool, among other, have increase the need for qualified vascular technologists or sonographers.
The bachelor’s degree in vascular sonography will provide the students with core technical courses for entry level in the
profession as well as courses designed to prepare students for opportunities in research, management, and education.
Vascular technologists or sonographers are important members of the diagnostic medical imaging or surgical team. They
work closely with radiologists, cardiologists and vascular or general surgeons, as well as other allied professionals. Some
technologists own their own independent laboratories and provide services to physicians and hospitals. Others can seek
careers in the industry among the manufacturers of ultrasound equipment in sales or applications, or plan a future in
research or education.
Graduates of the Nova Southeastern program will be eligible to sit for the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical
Sonography (ARDMS) registry examination. This exam is administered in two parts. The first part (SPI: Sonography
Principles and Instrumentation) is geared toward evaluation of understanding of fundamental concepts in the technology
of ultrasound. Students at Nova Southeastern University will be able to take this portion of the ARDMS exam upon
successful completion of the Ultrasound Physics Course after the first term of the program. The second part of the exam
evaluates knowledge and understanding of anatomy, physiology, pathologies, quality assurance, examination protocols,
etc. Students will be eligible to take this portion of the ARDMS upon graduation. This national registry is required in most
institutions and hospitals for employment, and is the basis for licensing in the States of New Mexico and Oregon.
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Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography Program Objectives
The Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography Program aims:
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To graduate competent vascular technologists who are qualified to perform a variety of standard and specialized
diagnostic vascular procedures
To ensure that graduates are qualified to take and successfully pass the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical
Sonography (ARDMS) registry examination in vascular technology
To prepare graduates for future leadership roles in vascular laboratories ultrasound departments, education and
industry
To enhance the student’s academic skills for pursuing research studies in the field of vascular sonography.
Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography Learning Outcomes
Students completing the Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography Program will be able to:
1. Perform a variety of standard and specialized diagnostic vascular procedures
2. Qualify to sit for the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonography (ARDMS) registry examination for the
Registered Vascular Technologist (RVT)
3. Communicate in a professional manner using written and electronic methods.
4. Demonstrate an awareness and appreciation of the empathy and respect in the delivery of culturally competent
care health care.
5. Communicate and acknowledge the impact that the social and political environment has on the development of
heath care policies and the implications, benefits and ramifications on the delivery of health care.
6. Demonstrate the knowledge and ability to search and retrieve information through electronic means.
7. Describe and demonstrate management / leadership skills and theories, and prepare the student to lead or manage
effectively in a health care environment.
8. Demonstrate understanding of the political, social, legal and ethical issues that may be encountered and have an
impact on areas of health care practice
9. Demonstrate knowledge through the application of health care models, theories and tools in written and discussion
of the issues impacting health care delivery through academic and critical inquiry.
Technical Standards
The profession of diagnostic medical sonographer includes but is not limited to, the following physical, cognitive, auditory,
and visual demands:
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Physical: The ability to lift fifty pounds of weight, the ability to reach up, the ability to stand for up to 80% of the time,
the ability to push or pull equipment and other devices such as wheelchairs or stretchers, manual dexterity to control
the settings on computers and on the ultrasound equipment,
Cognitive: the ability to remember, recall, and analyze information, the ability to work in a noisy environment, the
ability to remain focused despite interruptions, the ability to cope with potentially stressful situations,
Auditory: the ability to hear from both ears within normal auditory range, the ability to distinguish sounds within
normal hearing range,
Visual: the ability to distinguish colors, the ability to monitor the environment and work in dimmed light.
Computer Literacy
Access to and ongoing use of a computer will be required for all students to complete the bachelor’s degree program in
vascular sonography successfully. Each student is expected to acquire computer hardware and software appropriate to the
B.H.Sc.—Vascular Sonography Program. Competency in the basic use of a computer and the ability to navigate and interact
with the course and curriculum content is the responsibility of the student and a requirement for graduation. All applicants
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must show evidence of computer skills through course­work or self-study prior to the end of the first term. Students may
obtain instruction through the NSU Student Microcomputer Laboratory or other training facilities.
Clinical Externship
The clinical externship is devoted primarily to hands-on training in a vascular laboratory. All sonography students must
maintain a functional pager or cell phone at all times during the clinical externship. This expense will be the student’s
responsibility. Students must comply with all policies and procedures of both clinical sites and Nova Southeastern University.
Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography Curriculum
Admission to the program requires the completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours of general education coursework. The
core of the vascular sonography course of study includes 96 credit hours, as a combination of on campus, online, and on
site clinical courses. The entire program requires a total of 126 credit hours for a student to graduate with a Bachelor of
Health Science—Vascular Sonography.
The first year of the course of study is designed as a combination of on campus lectures, hands-on practice in our ultrasound
training laboratory, and online courses. Students will learn the theories and concepts in health care and ultrasound practice
in the on campus lectures and online courses, and apply that knowledge in the ultrasound training laboratory in the first year
and during clinical externships in the second year.
The second year of study will be centered on clinical externships (three externships of 16 weeks each for a total of 48 weeks).
For the clinical externships the students will be placed in a clinical site affiliated with NSU and complete their training for a
minimum of 35 hours per week for 48 weeks. The students will be periodically evaluated by their clinical mentors reporting
to the clinical coordinator in the program at NSU, as well as by the clinical coordinator through visits and online assignments.
The evaluations of technical and analytical competencies will focus on all primary aspects of vascular ultrasound testing.
Online courses are provided to students through NSU computer accounts that include email. Students, however, must
obtain their own Internet service provider (ISP) and their own computer system (IBM-compatible PC or Apple Macintosh).
New students are provided with an orientation and extensive online support on computer and software requirements, online
access, online tools, and methods, and library resources.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course
requirements, refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of
this catalog.
Bachelor of Health Science—Vascular Sonography Major Requirements (96 credit hours)
BHS 3110 BHS 3120 BHS 3130 BHS 3150 BHS 3155 BHS 3160
BHS 4000 BHS 4100 BHS 4110 BSV 3100 BSV 3200 BSV 3220 BSV 3300 BSV 3400 BSV 3500 Health Care Ethics (3 credit hours)
Introduction to Epidemiology (3 credit hours)
Research and Design for Health Care (3 credit hours)
Principles of Leadership (3 credit hours)
Conflict Resolution in Health Care (3 credit hours)
Health Policy (3 credit hours)
Cultural Competency in Health Care (3 credit hours)
Academic and Professional Writing (3 credit hours)
Health Care and Aging (3 credit hours)
Ultrasound Physics I/Lab (3 credit hours)
Ultrasound Physics Review (1 credit hour)
Introduction to Diagnostic Medical Sonography (2 credit hours)
Cerebrovascular Testing/Lab (4 credit hours)
Venous Testing/Lab (4 credit hours)
Peripheral Arterial Testing/Lab (5 credit hours)
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BSV 3600 BSV 3700 FME 5105 BSV 4500 BSV 4600 BSV 4700 PHS 4904 Abdominal Vascular Testing/Lab (5 credit hours)
Clinical Preparation and Review (4 credit hours)
Basic Life Support (1 credit hour)
Clinical Externship I (16 weeks) (12 credit hours)
Clinical Externship II (16 weeks) (12 credit hours)
Clinical Externship III (16 weeks) (12 credit hours)
Advanced Anatomy for Health Professions (4 credit hours)
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Nursing Department
The Nursing Department offers Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) and Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) degree
programs. The B.S.N. may be earned through an entry-level Bachelor of Science in Nursing track or an R.N. to B.S.N.
completion track for registered nurses holding an associate’s degree or diploma in nursing. Students may also earn the
B.S.N. and M.S.N. together through the R.N. to M.S.N. track for registered nurses holding an associate’s degree or diploma
in nursing. All of the programs focus on developing nursing professionals to assume leadership roles in the complex health
care environment.
Mission Statement
The mission of the Nova Southeastern University nursing department is to provide quality, professional undergraduate
and graduate nursing education. We will prepare culturally sensitive and competent nursing leaders who have knowledge
and skills that are relevant, futuristic, and responsive to rapidly changing health care trends and environments within an
atmosphere of scholarly inquiry, professional values, interdisciplinary collaboration and community partnerships.
Core Values
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We respect the diversity and equity of our students, faculty, staff, and community partners.
We embody personal and professional integrity within a supportive, caring environment.
We honor an environment that mentors, empowers, and nurtures students, faculty and staff.
We support teamwork and partnerships to achieve individual, department, university and community goals.
We encourage the development of leadership, accountability, and ownership among students, faculty, staff, and
community partners.
We promote activities that develop and maintain the discipline of nursing.
Eligibility for Florida R.N. Licensure and
Required Disclosure
Applicants to the nursing program who meet all university and departmental requirements will be considered for admission.
Final determination of eligibility to take the NCLEX-RN rests with the Florida Department of Professional Regulation and
Board of Nursing. The licensure application requires disclosure of any criminal history and the disposition of all cases prior
to board review. Applications with previous arrest or disciplinary action on a license will not be authorized to practice nursing
until all documentation is cleared by board staff or reviewed by the board. The only permanent barrier to licensure in Florida
is not having civil rights. Entry into the nursing education program is the prospective student’s decision based upon the
knowledge that he or she may, or may not, be granted a nursing license. Applicants will notify the program director and/
or department chair of any arrest record prior to application for licensure. The graduate is required to meet all reporting
requirements of the Board of Nursing at the time of application to sit for the NCLEX-RN.
Florida Board of Nursing
4052 Bald Cypress Way
BIN CO2
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3252
Telephone: (850) 488-0595
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Florida Nursing Students Association
The Florida Nursing Student Association (FNSA) is the professional organization for nursing students in the state of Florida. It
serves to prepare nursing students to be a member of a professional organization and provides a voice for students at public,
institutional and governmental bodies. Nova Southeastern University Nursing Department has a district chapter of FNSA. All
students are required to become members. Participation in various local, district, state, and national activities is encouraged.
Health Forms (Student Health Records)
The Nursing Department is required to submit to clinical sites satisfactory evidence that each program participant is free
from contagious disease and does not otherwise present a health hazard to hospital clients, employees, volunteers, or
guests prior to his or her participation in the program. Students will be required to follow the requirements of the Health
Professions Division and the clinical agencies. Performance standards for all Health Professions Division students are
identified in HPD Student Handbook. If students are unable to meet the performance standards, they will be asked to obtain
clearance from a physician or nurse practitioner prior to returning to the program. Each year students will provide updates
to their health form, which can be completed at the Student Health Center.
Health Insurance
Nursing students are required to carry health insurance to cover their health care. Students must use this health insurance
for any needs during their clinical/ class times. Any college student may be seen at the Student Health Center. Please bring
a school identification card and an insurance card. At the end of the visit, students will receive a statement showing the
services performed. Payment of all co-payments and deductibles is expected at the time services are rendered. Students
who do have private health insurance must apply for a waiver at www.rec.nova.edu/insure_req.html. Also, review this site
for the coverage requirements for private insurance. Students are responsible for complying with this requirement. Some
insurance policies require a primary care provider (PCP) designation. In such cases, please be sure to designate an NSU
provider prior to visiting NSU’s Health Care Center. For a list of providers and participating insurance carriers, please visit
the Health Care Center Web site at www.nova.edu/HCC/doctors. If students wish to purchase insurance through the NSU
Student Health Plan, contact the Wellness Office at (954) 262-7305.
Liability (Malpractice) Insurance
All nursing students enrolled in clinical nursing courses will pay an insurance fee per academic year to cover the cost of
malpractice insurance.
Textbooks and Supplies
The textbooks and other related reading materials and supplies required for nursing are available for purchase at the Nova
Southeastern University campus bookstore or online. Many of the textbooks purchased for nursing will be purchased during
the first nursing course and used throughout the program. Unless advised otherwise, the Nursing Department recommends
that students do not purchase textbooks required at other course levels until they are ready to enroll in these courses. This
will enable students to have the most current required editions. The department also suggests that students put their names in
all of their textbooks. It is strongly recommended that students do not leave them unattended in the classroom or elsewhere.
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Students should buy their books early. After the first few weeks of the semester, the bookstore returns all books that have
not been purchased to the publishers. Books are expensive, but financial aid is available. Books may also be purchased
online through the NSU bookstore.
In addition to the printed materials, students will also need the following supplies: a watch with a second hand, bandage
scissors, and stethoscope. These are available for purchase at any local uniform shop or via the Internet. All students will
be measured for an NSU lab coat during the orientation.
All entry-level students need to purchase a PDA. The department will notify students during the first term regarding the
specifications of the PDA. Students must have access to a computer with Microsoft Office software.
Majors in Nursing
Bachelor of Science in Nursing Learning Outcomes
The goal of the Nova Southeastern University Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program is to graduate nurses
prepared to:
1. Integrate knowledge, theory, and evidence-based research into current nursing practice
2. Assume a leadership role as the registered professional nurse in healthcare systems and diverse community settings
3. Engage in activities for continued professional growth
Program Outcomes
1. Exhibit leadership that support of healthcare policies that promote safe quality nursing care within complex health
care systems.
2. Integrate evidence-based practices that support decision-making in the delivery of nursing care.
3. Evaluate the effectiveness of patient and family centered nursing care based on nursing theories and evidencebased practice.
4. Incorporate the concepts derived from liberal education to build an understanding of the human experience.
5. Incorporate technology and information management to promote a safe practice environment.
6. Engage in inter-professional collaboration to improve population health while considering fiscal and material
resources in the delivery of safe nursing care.
7. Integrate legal, ethical and professional values within generalist nursing practice.
8. Collaborate with the inter-professional health community to provide culturally and spiritually competent patient and
family centered care in health promotion and disease/injury prevention.
Bachelor of Science in Nursing—Entry-Level Track
The entry-level track is designed for students who are seeking initial licensure as a registered nurse. Upon completion of
121 credits, the student is awarded a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing (B.S.N.) and is eligible to make application
to sit for the national licensure examination for registered nurses (NCLEX-RN). The entry-level nursing track curriculum is
completed following a minimum of 30 credit hours (or equivalent quarter hours) of specific undergraduate coursework. This
coursework may be completed at a community college or another university. Upon completion of the 30 credit hours, the
student may apply to the nursing program.
The remainder of the 91 credit hours may be completed within seven terms (three terms per year) in the nursing program.
Each term is a combination of didactic and clinical courses. The department requires matriculants to complete the entire
program. Individual requests for advanced placement, transfer of credit, or credit for experiential learn­ing will be reviewed
in line with college requirements.
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Bachelor of Science in Nursing—Entry-Level Track Curriculum
Students in the Bachelor of Science in Nursing—Entry-Level Track are required to take 30 credit hours of general education
coursework and 91 credit hours of designated nursing courses, resulting in a total of 121 credit hours necessary for
graduation. Dual enrollment students should follow the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences’ curriculum plan for nursing
dual admissions students. For more information about the pre-nursing specialization, refer to the Specializations section in
the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences’ Division of Math, Science, and Technology portion of this catalog.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course
requirements, refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this
catalog. Students must complete the General Education Program requirements before matriculating into the Bachelor of
Science in Nursing—Entry-Level program.
Bachelor of Science in Nursing—Entry-Level Track Major Requirements (91 credit hours)
Students must complete all pre- and co-requisite nursing courses and be enrolled in the final general education/ BHS course
prior to enrolling in NUR 4150 or NUR 4180. Students who withdraw from general education/B.H.S. courses during the final
term must withdraw from the nursing courses.
BHS 3110
Health Care Ethics (3 credit hours)
BHS or Nursing Elective (3 credit hours)
NUR 3000
Transition to Baccalaureate Nursing Education (3 credit hours)
NUR 3005
Mathematical Applications for Nursing Practice (2 credits)
NUR 3029
Foundations of Health Assessment (3 credit hours)
NUR 3032
Foundations of Pathophysiology (3 credit hours)
NUR 3050
Theoretical Applications in Nursing Research (3 credit hours)
NUR 3130
Foundations of Professional Nursing Practice (6 credit hours)
NUR 3131
Problem-Solving Strategies for Nursing Practice (1 credit)
NUR 3160
Introduction to Professional Nursing (3 credit hours)
NUR 3175
Nursing in Today’s Health Care Environment (3 credits)
NUR 3180
Primary Concepts of Adult Nursing (6 credit hours)
NUR 3191
Pharmacological Basis for Nursing Interventions I (2 credit hours)
NUR 3192
Pharmacological Basis for Nursing Interventions II (2 credit hours)
NUR 3200
Statistical Applications in Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice (3 credit hours)
NUR 3250
Concepts of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing (4 credit hours)
NUR 4020
The Nurse as a Leader and Manager (3 credit hours)
NUR 4030
The Business of Health Care (3 credit hours)
NUR 4110
Advanced Concepts of Adult Nursing II (6 credit hours)
NUR 4120
Advanced Concepts of Adult Nursing III (5 credit hours)
NUR 4130
Concepts of Maternal-Child Nursing and Families (5 credit hours)
NUR 4150
Concepts of Community-Based Nursing Practice (4 credit hours)
NUR 4160
Genetics for Nursing Practice (2 credit hours)
NUR 4180
Nursing Practicum (6 credit hours)
NUT 3000
Nutrition for Health Professionals (3 credit hours)
PHS 4904
Advanced Anatomy for Health Professions (4 credit hours)
Bachelor of Science in Nursing—R.N. to B.S.N. Track
This option is designed for the registered nurse holding an associate’s degree or diploma from a hospital-based nursing school
licensed in the United States who now wants to obtain a B.S.N. If the applicant does not hold this license, the license must be
approved by the nursing department chair and the College of Allied Health and Nursing dean. Failure to comply will result in the
accepted student’s inability to continue with his or her coursework. Students may complete the general education requirements
in conjunction with the R.N. to B.S.N. track. Students are awarded 64 credit hours of prior leaning credits. Individual requests for
advanced placement, transfer of credit, or credit for experiential learning will be reviewed in line with college requirements. Although
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the track may be completed in as little as five terms, some students elect to spread the coursework out over a longer period of time.
Bachelor of Science in Nursing—R.N. to B.S.N. Track Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course
requirements, refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this
catalog. General education courses may be completed at any accredited community college or university.
Bachelor of Science in Nursing—R.N. to B.S.N. Track Major Requirements (91 credits)
Cognate and nursing courses must be completed at NSU.
Cognate Courses (16 credits)
PHS 4904 Advanced Anatomy and Physiology for Health Professions** (4 credits)
NUT 3000 Nutrition for the Health Professional** (3 credits)
BHS 3110 Health Care Ethics (3 credits)
Any BHS or Nursing Elective*** (3 credits)
NUR 3005 Mathematical Applications for Nursing Practice** (2 credits)
NUR 3131
Problem-Solving Strategies for Nursing Practice** (1 credit)
Nursing Courses (75 credits)
NUR 3000 Transition to Baccalaureate Nursing Education (3 credits)
NUR 3013 Transition to Professional Nursing (3 credits)
NUR 3030 Health Assessment (3 credits)
NUR 3031 Pathophysiology (3 credits)
NUR 3050
Theoretical Applications in Nursing Research (3 credit hours)
NUR 3175
Nursing in Today’s Health Care Environment (3 credits)
NUR 3200
Statistical Applications in Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice (3 credit hours)
NUR 4020 The Nurse as a Leader and Manager (3 credits)
NUR 4030 The Business of Health Care (3 credits)
NUR 4150 Community-Based Nursing Practice (4 credits)
NUR 4160 Genetics for Nursing Practice (2 credits)
Prior Learning Nursing Credits** (42 credits)
**Credit with R.N. license
***Please see the Bachelor of Health Science course descriptions.
Master of Science in Nursing—R.N. to M.S.N. Track
This R.N. to M.S.N. option is designed for the reg­istered nurse licensed in the United States who would like to obtain a B.S.N.
and an M.S.N. If the applicant does not hold this license, the license must be approved by the nursing depart­ment chair and
the College of Allied Health and Nursing dean. Failure to comply will result in the accepted student’s inability to continue with
his or her coursework. Although the track may be completed in as little as nine terms, some students may elect to spread the
coursework out over a longer period of time. Students are required to complete the general education requirements prior to
beginning the M.S.N. courses. Students will transition to the M.S.N. courses after meeting the requirements for the M.S.N.
program. The M.S.N. program is totally online and is for nurses with a baccalaureate degree in any field that have an R.N.
license. The master’s degree in nursing prepares the experienced nurse to advance in nursing leadership. There are three
unique tracks to earning the M.S.N., each of which offer an in-depth education by faculty experts in these fields.
1. M.S.N. nursing education for nurses who have a desire to enhance their ability to transition to an academic or staff
development position;
2. M.S.N. public/community health nursing for nurses who desire to improve the health of communities and/or advance
their careers in public health;
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3. M.S.N. health systems leadership for nurses who desire a position of leadership within the unique organizational
environment of health care.
Master of Science in Nursing—R.N. to M.S.N. Track Program Goals
1. Integrate advanced knowledge, theory, and evidence-based research into current nursing practice.
2. Assume as leadership roles in healthcare systems, the diverse community, and the profession including areas
of specialization.
3. Engage in activities for continued professional growth.
Master of Science in Nursing—R.N. to M.S.N. Track Learning Outcomes
1. Exhibits leadership in order to promote quality in nursing practice education within complex organization system;
2. Incorporate scholarly inquiry that exemplifies critical, creative and systems thinking in the advancement of the
practice of nursing;
3. Evaluate practice approaches based on nursing theories and theories from other disciplines and evidencebased practice inquiry for the improvement of patients and population outcomes;
4. Employ information systems technology and inter-professional collaboration to manage and transform clinical
and educational practice;
5. Advocates for healthcare policies that improve population health while balancing humans’ fiscal and material
resources and regulatory processes;
6. Integrate professional values within advanced nursing practice.
Master of Science in Nursing—R.N. to M.S.N. Track Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog. General
education courses may be completed at any accredited community college or university. Students must complete the General
Education Program requirements before matriculating into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing—R.N. to M.S.N. program.
Master of Science in Nursing—R.N. to M.S.N. Major Requirements (91 credits)
Cognate and nursing courses must be completed at NSU.
Cognate Courses (10 credits)
PHS 4904 Advanced Anatomy and Physiology for Health Professions** (4 credits)
NUT 3000 Nutrition for the Health Professional** (3 credits)
NUR3005 Mathematical Applications for Nursing Practice ** (2 credits)
NUR 3131
Problem Solving Strategies for Nursing Practice** (1 credit)
Nursing Courses (81 credits)
NUR 3000 Transition to Baccalaureate Nursing Education (3 credits)
NUR 3013 Transition to Professional Nursing (3 credits)
NUR 3031 Pathophysiology (3 credits)
NUR 3030 Health Assessment (3 credits)
NUR 3175 Nursing in Today’s Health Care Environment (3 credits)
NUR 3200 Statistical Applications in Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice (3 credits)
NUR 4150 Concepts of Community-Based Nursing Practice (4 credits)
NUR 4160 Genetics for Nursing Practice (2 credits)
NUR 4175 Transition to Graduate Studies (9 credits)
NSG 5000 Nurse Leadership Roles in Health Care Systems (3 credits)
NSG 5130 Health Care Policy, Organization & Finance (3 credits)
Prior Learning Nursing Credits** (42 credits)
**Credit with R.N. license
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R.N. to M.S.N.: (The student may complete a specialization in nursing education, health systems leadership or public/
community health nursing (Refer to graduate catalog)
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Farquhar College of
Arts and Sciences
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Farquhar College of
Arts and Sciences
Dean’s Message
Welcome to Nova Southeastern University and the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences. At
NSU, students enroll in a diverse array of majors and minors, working closely with outstanding
faculty members and learning resources, to pursue their educational goals. Our mission is to
serve all undergraduate students with personalized, attentive, caring, and high-quality academic
experiences that support their personal and professional development.
In the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences, we focus on developing critical thinking,
communications, and writing skills and preparing our students in their programs of study with
the tools and specialized knowledge necessary for professional success. Our students receive
a comprehensive education that helps them directly enter the workforce after graduation or
continue their education in graduate or professional school.
We are also focused on preparing students for the challenges of an increasingly diverse and complex global society. We
emphasize intellectual community among our students and faculty members and provide the broad liberal arts background
and values that will support them for a lifetime of well-rounded, engaged citizenship. Regardless of major, students receive
a comprehensive general education program and have the opportunity to explore coursework as well as complementary
combinations of specializations, minors, and double majors that will satisfy their academic and professional needs and their
burgeoning curiosity about new subjects. We also support our students as they pursue study abroad, independent research,
and creative interests that expand their experiences outside of the classroom.
The Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences and Nova Southeastern University provide exceptional opportunities and
experiences. It is an exciting place to be. On behalf of our faculty and staff, I extend best wishes for a successful academic
year and continued progress toward your personal and professional goals.
Don Rosenblum, Ph.D.
Don Rosenblum, Ph.D.
Dean, Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences
Mission Statement
The Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences at Nova Southeastern University provides outstanding programs of study in
humanities, social and behavioral sciences, performing and visual arts, information technology, and biological, environmental,
and physical sciences that enhance critical thinking, effective communication, professional development, lifelong learning,
and responsible citizenship.
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Introduction to the Farquhar College of
Arts and Sciences
The Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences provides a comprehensive interdisciplinary education that prepares students for:
•
•
•
Professional careers
Further exploration through graduate and professional study
Responsible citizenship
The college houses 24 undergraduate majors, 45 undergraduate minors, and five certificate programs organized in four
divisions: the Division of Humanities; the Division of Math, Science, and Technology; the Division of Performing and Visual
Arts; and the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences.
This section includes learning outcomes and curricula for majors, minors, and certificates offered by the Farquhar College
of Arts and Sciences. All other division information, i.e., admissions, general policies, and program delivery, is included in
other applicable catalog sections.
To receive a bachelor’s degree in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences, students must complete at least 120 credits,
including major, minor, general education, and electives coursework. For complete graduation requirements, see the
Graduation Requirements section in Academic Resources and Procedures.
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Division of Humanities
The Division of Humanities offers the Bachelor of Science degree in Legal Studies and the Bachelor of Arts degree in
American Studies, Communication Studies, English, History, Humanities, International Studies, and Philosophy.
Majors in Humanities
American Studies Major
The American studies major is designed to provide students with an interdisciplinary learning experience focusing on critical
examination of American life and culture. The approach of this major is the study of American culture from many directions,
while still viewing America as a whole, rather than from the perspective of a single discipline. The main disciplines of the
major include the arts, literature, history, and humanities. The American studies major gives students a foundation for many
types of graduate study, as well as the pursuit of various careers in fields such as law, government, public relations, and
education.
American Studies Major Learning Outcomes
A successful American studies graduate is expected to:
1. Evaluate American civic issues critically;
2. Synthesize various media and methods from multiple disciplines in an exploration of the construction of the
American character;
3. Evaluate America as a whole cultural category.
American Studies Major Curriculum
Students must complete one required course (3 credits) and courses from three concentrations (36 credits) for a total of 39
credits. At least 18 credits in the major must be at the 3000/4000 level.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
American Studies Major Requirements (39 credits)
Core Course (3 credits)
HUMN 2600
Introduction to American Studies (3 credits)
Students must meet all course criteria in the following areas:
Art and Culture (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following courses:
COMM 3100
Gendered Images in Popular Culture (3 credits)
FILM 3040 Women and Film (3 credits)
FILM 3050 Literature and Film (3 credits)
FILM 3060 Film Noir (3 credits)
HUMN 3610 Harlem Renaissance (3 credits)
HUMN 3620 American Transcendentalism (3 credits)
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Literature (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following courses, including LITR 2020 and LITR 2021:
LITR 2020 American Literature I (required) (3 credits)
LITR 2021 American Literature II (required) (3 credits)
LITR 3230 American Renaissance Literature (3 credits)
LITR 3520 African-American Literature (3 credits)
LITR 4730 Faulkner (3 credits)
History (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following courses, including HIST 1030 and HIST 1040:
HIST 1030 American History to 1865 (required) (3 credits)
HIST 1040 American History Since 1865 (required) (3 credits)
HIST 3010 Constitutional History I (3 credits)
HIST 3020 Constitutional History II (3 credits)
HIST 3130 Vietnam (3 credits)
HIST 3230 The Great Depression (3 credits)
Communication Studies Major
The communication studies major takes a broad approach, giving students a varied background in speech communication,
media studies, and public relations. Students will learn how to write and listen effectively, as well as acquire skills in presentation,
understand the role of communication in various settings, identify theories and models of communication, and be conversant
in mass media concepts and practices including publicity and promotion. A communication studies major prepares students for
a wide variety of careers in such fields as journalism, television and radio broadcasting, education, public relations, and law.
Communication Studies Major Learning Outcomes
A successful communication studies graduate is expected to:
1. Present effective messages for diverse interpersonal, small group, public, and mass audiences;
2. Articulate relevant professional ethical standards in communication;
3. Identify, analyze, and articulate significant theories and models of communication.
Communication Studies Major Curriculum
Students must complete communication studies core courses (21 credits) as well as 15 credits in one of three concentrations
for a total of 36 credits. At least 18 credits in the major must be at the 3000/4000 level.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Communication Studies Major Requirements (36 credits)
Core Courses (21 credits)
Select 21 credits from the following courses:
COMM 2100
Mass Media (3 credits)
COMM 2900
Research Methods in Communication (3 credits)
COMM 3110 Communication Theory (3 credits)
COMM 3600
Persuasion (3 credits)
COMM 4900
Special Topics in Communication (3 credits)
HUMN 3010 Communication Traditions (3 credits)
PHIL 3010
Ethical Issues in Communication (3 credits)
SPCH 1010 Public Speaking (3 credits)
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SPCH 2000 Fundamentals of Human Communication (3 credits)
Concentrations (15 credits)
Select one of the following areas of concentration:
Media Studies Concentration (15 credits)
Select 15 credits from the following courses:
COMM 2010 Introduction to Print Journalism (3 credits)
COMM 2200 Introduction to Broadcast Journalism (3 credits)
COMM 2800 Introduction to Field Video Production (3 credits)
COMM 3100 Gendered Images in Popular Culture (3 credits)
COMM 3500 Media Regulation (3 credits)
COMM 3800 Advanced Field Video Production (3 credits)
COMM 4500 Media and Cultural Studies (3 credits)
COMM 4950 Internship in Communication (3 credits)
THEA 2025
Performance for Film and Television (3 credits)
THEA 2200
Vocal Articulation for Media and Stage (3 credits)
Maximum of 3 credits from the following courses:
FILM 3040 Women and Film (3 credits)
FILM 3050 Literature and Film (3 credits)
FILM 3060 Film Noir (3 credits)
FILM 3100 Black Cinema (3 credits)
FILM 4000 History of Film (3 credits)
FILM 4500 Major Directors (3 credits)
FILM 4900 Special Topics in Film (3 credits)
Public Relations Concentration (15 credits)
Complete the following courses:
COMM 3200 Principles of Public Relations (3 credits)
COMM 3500 Media Regulation (3 credits)
COMM 4000 Writing for Public Relations (3 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following courses:
COMM 4500 Media and Cultural Studies (3 credits)
COMM 4950 Internship in Communication (3 credits)
SPCH 3120
Speech Communication for the Professions (3 credits)
Speech Communication Concentration (15 credits)
Select 15 credits from the following courses:
COMM 2300 Intercultural Communication (3 credits)
COMM 3050 Performance Studies (3 credits)
COMM 4500 Media and Cultural Studies (3 credits)
SPCH 2020 Argument and Debate (3 credits)
SPCH 3120 Speech Communication for the Professions (3 credits)
THEA 2025
Performance for Film and Television (3 credits)
THEA 2200
Vocal Articulation for Media and Stage (3 credits)
English Major
The English major is designed to provide students with a background in British, American, and world literatures, literary
criticism and theory, popular culture, and rhetoric and composition. Students in this major will develop critical thinking, close
reading, and analytical and creative writing skills. An English major prepares students for a wide variety of careers in such
fields as education, publishing, law, business, and government.
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English Major Learning Outcomes
A successful English graduate is expected to:
1. Produce written arguments about literary texts;
2. Identify literary periods, authors, and genres;
3. Analyze literary texts as creative expressions, and historical and cultural artifacts.
English Major Curriculum
Students must complete a total of 36 credits in the major. At least 18 credits in the major must be at the 3000/4000 level.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
English Major Requirements (36 credits)
Literature Survey (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following courses:
LITR 2010 British Literature I (3 credits)
LITR 2011 British Literature II (3 credits)
LITR 2020 American Literature I (3 credits)
LITR 2021 American Literature II (3 credits)
LITR 2030 World Literature I (3 credits)
LITR 2031 World Literature II (3 credits)
Literature Core Courses (21 credits)
LITR 3060 History and Structure of the English Language (3 credits)
LITR 4050 Literary Criticism and Theory (3 credits)
Any “Popular Literature and Culture” course (3 credits)
LITR 2110
Detective Fiction (3 credits)
LITR 2120
Science Fiction and Fantasy Literature (3 credits)
Any “Literary Period Studies” course (3 credits)
LITR 3210
British Romantic Literature (3 credits)
LITR 3230
American Renaissance Literature (3 credits)
LITR 3260
Modernist World Literature (3 credits)
Any “Literary Area Studies” course (3 credits)
LITR 3040
Women and Literature (3 credits)
LITR 3510
Irish Literature (3 credits)
LITR 3520
African-American Literature (3 credits)
LITR 3530
Caribbean Literature (3 credits)
LITR 3540
Latin American Literature (3 credits)
Any “Literary Genres” course (3 credits)
LITR 3620
Studies in Poetry (3 credits)
LITR 3630
Studies in the Novel (3 credits)
LITR 3640
Studies in Drama (3 credits)
Any “Major Authors” course (3 credits)
LITR 4720
Shakespeare (3 credits)
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LITR 4730
LITR 4740
LITR 4750
Faulkner (3 credits)
Austen (3 credits)
Morrison (3 credits)
Major Elective (3 credits)
Any 3000/4000-level LITR course (3 credits)
OR
Any of the following courses:
FILM 3050
Literature and Film (3 credits)
HUMN 3400 The Beat Generation (3 credits)
HUMN 3610 The Harlem Renaissance (3 credits)
HUMN 3620 American Transcendentalism (3 credits)
HUMN 3800 Mexican Cult of Death in Myth and Literature (3 credits)
HUMN 4310 The Vampire (3 credits)
History Major
The history major is designed to provide students with a background in American, European, world, and Latin American
history, western civilization, constitutional history, and the intersections between history and culture. Graduates of the
program will have studied one of the most interesting subjects available in a college curriculum: the human past. A history
major will be proficient in research, writing, debate, analysis, and interpretation of a myriad of historical events and patterns
that cross boundaries of time and geography.
History Major Learning Outcomes
A successful history graduate is expected to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Evaluate historical arguments;
Analyze complex historical texts and materials;
Identify the major periods and events of American history and either western or world history;
Identify and explain the cultural forces and influences associated with historical events.
History Major Curriculum
Students must complete a total of 39 credits in the major. At least 18 credits in the major must be at the 3000/4000 level.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
History Major Requirements (39 credits)
Core Courses (6 credits)
HIST 2900
Historical Methods (3 credits)
HIST 4999
Senior Seminar in History (3 credits)
Historical Surveys (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following courses:
HIST 1030
American History to 1865 (3 credits)
HIST 1040
American History Since 1865 (3 credits)
Select one of the following two-course sequences:
HIST 1090
Early Western History (3 credits) and HIST 1110 Modern Western History (3 credits)
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HIST 1150
Early World History (3 credits) and HIST 1160 Modern World History (3 credits)
Intermediate Study (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following courses:
HIST 2130 Formation of Latin America (3 credits)
HIST 2140 Modern Latin America (3 credits)
HIST 2200 Asian History (3 credits)
HIST 2300 Caribbean History (3 credits)
HIST 2400 African History (3 credits)
Advanced Study (18 credits)
Select 18 credits from the following courses:
HIST 3010 Constitutional History I (3 credits)
HIST 3020 Constitutional History II (3 credits)
HIST 3130 Vietnam (3 credits)
HIST 3140 The Holocaust (3 credits)
HIST 3230 The Great Depression (3 credits)
HIST 3240 Irish History (3 credits)
HIST 3300
Contemporary U.S. History (3 credits)
HIST 3400
U.S. Foreign Relations (3 credits)
HIST 3430
Renaissance and Reformation Europe (3 credits)
HIST 3440
Enlightenment and Revolution in Europe (3 credits)
HIST 3450
History of American Immigration (3 credits)
HIST 3510
The Civil War and Reconstruction (3 credits)
HIST 4700
Genocide in the 20th Century and Beyond (3 credits)
HIST 4900 Special Topics in History (3 credits)
HIST 4950
Internship in History (3 credits)
HIST 4990 Independent Study in History (3 credits)
Humanities Major
The humanities major is a student-designed individualized program of study for students wishing to gain a broad
background in the various disciplines included in the liberal arts, such as the arts, history, literature, philosophy, theatre, and
interdisciplinary studies. The courses in this major aid students in developing analytical and communication skills, aesthetic
responsiveness, and intellectual integrity.
Humanities Major Learning Outcomes
A successful humanities graduate is expected to:
1. Critically analyze theories and arguments;
2. Synthesize materials from selected humanities disciplines;
3. Evaluate the role of the humanities in expressing human experience.
Humanities Major Curriculum
In order to complete the humanities major, the student must submit to the director of the Division of Humanities, in consultation
with a full-time member of the faculty in the Division of Humanities, a written prospectus outlining his or her program of
study. The student, the consulting faculty member, and the director must sign the prospectus no later than the end of the
first semester in which the student declares the major. The student’s program of study must also satisfy these requirements:
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
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refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Humanities Major Requirements (39 credits)
The student must complete 12 credits in the humanities core and 27 credits in various humanities disciplines.
Core Courses (12 credits)
Any 9 credits with a HUMN prefix
HUMN 4800
Humanities Capstone (3 credits)
Specializations (27 credits)
Select 9 credits at the 3000/4000 level in three of the following discipline categories:
•
•
•
•
•
Film (FILM prefix)
History (HIST prefix)
Literature (LITR prefix)
Philosophy (PHIL prefix)
Performing and Visual Arts (limited to the following courses):
ARTS 3020
Women in the Arts (3 credits)
ARTS 3300
Myth and Art (3 credits)
ARTS 3400
Non-Western and Modern Art (3 credits)
ARTS 3800
Art History I (3 credits)
ARTS 3850
Art History II (3 credits)
ARTS 4900
Special Topics in the Arts (3 credits)
DANC 3000
Dance History (3 credits)
MUSC 3200 Musicology I (3 credits)
MUSC 3250 Musicology II (3 credits)
THEA 3200
Theatre History I (3 credits)
THEA 3250
Theatre History II (3 credits)
International Studies Major
The international studies major is designed for students who wish to pursue an interdisciplinary approach to the global
environment and who wish to gain a deeper understanding of a particular region outside of the United States. Courses
highlighting the art, culture, history, law, literature, and government of various regions will be offered. Students in this major will
develop critical thinking, close reading, and analytical writing skills. An international studies major prepares students for a wide
variety of careers in such fields as politics, law, business, journalism, education, public relations, research, and government.
International Studies Major Learning Outcomes
The successful international studies graduate is expected to:
1. Analyze material relating to world art, culture, history, law, literature and/or government;
2. Synthesize subject matter from international history, culture, and politics;
3. Demonstrate competency in a foreign language.
International Studies Major Curriculum
In order to complete the international studies major, the student must submit to the director of the Division of Humanities, in
consultation with a full-time member of the faculty in the Division of Humanities, a written prospectus outlining his or her program
of study. The student, the consulting faculty member, and the director must sign the prospectus no later than the end of the
first semester in which the student declares the major. The student’s program of study must also satisfy these requirements:
Students must complete 6 credits of core courses, at least 9 credits in each of two concentrations, a foreign language
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requirement, an international travel study requirement, and a capstone experience. At least 18 credits must be at the
3000/4000 level.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
International Studies Major Requirements (39–51 credits, depending on foreign language)
Core Courses (12 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following courses:
COMM 2300 Intercultural Communication (3 credits)
GEOG 2050 Survey of Geography (3 credits)
INST 1500 Global Issues (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following courses:
HIST 1090
Early Western History (3 credits)
HIST 1110
Modern Western History (3 credits)
HIST 1150 Early World History (3 credits)
HIST 1160
Modern World History (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following courses:
LITR 2010
British Literature I (3 credits)
LITR 2011
British Literature II (3 credits)
LITR 2030
World Literature I (3 credits)
LITR 2031
World Literature II (3 credits)
Concentrations (18 credits)
Select 9 credits in each of the following concentrations:
Art, Literature, and Culture Concentration (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following courses:
ARTS 3300 Myth and Art (3 credits)
ARTS 3350
Irish Art and Architecture (3 credits)
ARTS 3400 Non-Western and Modern Art (3 credits)
HUMN 2300 Introduction to World Mythology (3 credits)
HUMN 2350 Introduction to Folklore (3 credits)
HUMN 2400 Introduction to Celtic Studies (3 credits)
HUMN 3800 Mexican Cult of Death in Myth and Literature (3 credits)
HUMN 4200 Asian Thought (3 credits)
LITR 3210 British Romantic Literature (3 credits)
LITR 3260 Modernist World Literature (3 credits)
LITR 3510 Irish Literature (3 credits)
LITR 3530
Caribbean Literature (3 credits)
LITR 3540
Latin American Literature (3 credits)
LITR 4510
King Arthur (3 credits)
LITR 4720 Shakespeare (3 credits)
LITR 4740
Austen (3 credits)
SPAN 3240
Introduction to Spanish Literature (3 credits)
SPAN 3250 Introduction to Latin American Literature (3 credits)
SPAN 4900 Special Topics in Spanish (3 credits)
History, Law, and Government Concentration (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following courses:
HIST 2130 Formation of Latin America (3 credits)
HIST 2140 Modern Latin America (3 credits)
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HIST 2200 HIST 2300 HIST 2400 HIST 3140 HIST 3240 HIST 3400
LGST 3400 LGST 4410 PHIL 3670
POLS 2010 POLS 3010
Asian History (3 credits)
Caribbean History (3 credits)
African History (3 credits)
The Holocaust (3 credits)
Irish History (3 credits)
U.S. Foreign Relations (3 credits)
Comparative Legal Systems (3 credits)
International Law (3 credits)
Social and Political Philosophy (3 credits)
Comparative Government (3 credits)
Politics of Modern Ireland (3 credits)
Foreign Language Requirement
Students must complete a requirement involving a language relevant to their area of concentration and interest. The
minimum acceptable proficiency level must be equivalent to two years of college or university basic language instruction.
This requirement can be met in a number of ways, not exclusive of the following:
1. Complete the equivalent of at least 12 foreign language credits at NSU
2. Complete the equivalent of at least two years of college-level foreign language courses at a regionally accredited
college or university prior to transfer to NSU
3. Achieve a successful score on a pre-approved language proficiency exam such as the NYU Foreign Language
Proficiency Exam (of those languages available for testing). Students should contact the Office of Academic
Services about appropriate exams.
International Travel Study Requirement (6 credits)
Students must complete a pre-approved international travel study experience equivalent to at least 6 credits (whether through
an NSU-sponsored program or otherwise). This requirement can be met by using more than one study abroad experience.
Capstone Experience Requirement (3 credits)
INST 4800
Crossroads of the Transatlantic World (3 credits)
Legal Studies Major
The legal studies major is designed for students interested in preparing for law school or other graduate study and for those who
want to pursue a humanities major with a legal perspective. The courses in the major assist students in developing analytical and
communication skills and an understanding of economic, political, and social contexts within which legal issues arise.
Legal Studies Major Learning Outcomes
A successful legal studies graduate is expected to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Evaluate the elements of oral and written argument relevant to legal issues;
Explain the historical development of legal systems;
Analyze the economic, political and social contexts of legal decisions and legal systems;
Explain the philosophical issues that arise in law.
Legal Studies Major Curriculum
Students must complete the legal studies core (18 credits), either the pre-law or international law concentration (12 credits), and two
legal studies advanced electives (6 credits) for a total of 36 credits. At least 18 credits in the major must be at the 3000/4000 level.
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General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Legal Studies Major Requirements (36 credits)
Core Courses (18 credits)
LGST 2500
Introduction to Legal Studies (3 credits)
PHIL 1400
Introduction to Logic (3 credits) OR PHIL 2400 Symbolic Logic (3 credits)
PHIL 2000/3010/3180/3200/3360 “Ethics” (3 credits)
PHIL 3510
Ancient Philosophy (3 credits) OR PHIL 3520 Modern Philosophy (3 credits)
PHIL 3660 Philosophy of Law (3 credits) OR PHIL 3670 Social and Political Philosophy (3 credits)
SPCH 2020 Argument and Debate (3 credits)
Concentrations (12 credits)
Select one of the following concentrations:
International Law Concentration (12 credits)
INST 1500 Global Issues (3 credits)
LGST 3400 Comparative Legal Systems (3 credits)
LGST 4410 International Law (3 credits)
POLS 2010 Comparative Government (3 credits)
Pre-Law Concentration (12 credits)
HIST 3010 Constitutional History I (3 credits)
HIST 3020 Constitutional History II (3 credits)
LGST 4000 Legal Research and Trial Advocacy (3 credits)
POLS 1010 American Government and Politics (3 credits)
Advanced Major Electives (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following courses:
LGST 3350 Environmental Law and Policy (3 credits)
LGST 4000 Legal Research and Trial Advocacy (3 credits)
LGST 4050 Civil and Political Liberties (3 credits)
LGST 4100
The First Amendment (3 credits)
LGST 4200
Crime and the Constitution (3 credits)
LGST 4260 Private Law (3 credits)
LGST 4270 Judicial Politics and Process (3 credits)
LGST 4410 International Law (3 credits)
LGST 4900
Special Topics in Legal Studies (3 credits)
LGST 4950 Internship in Legal Studies (3 credits)
Philosophy Major
The philosophy major is designed to provide students with a background in the history and problems of philosophy. Students
in this major will develop critical thinking, close reading, and analytical writing skills. A philosophy major prepares students
for graduate study in philosophy and a wide variety of careers in such fields as education, law, business, and government.
Philosophy Major Learning Outcomes
A philosophy graduate is expected to:
1. Distinguish philosophical from non-philosophical forms of inquiry;
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2. Explain important debates in the history of philosophy;
3. Critically evaluate arguments for philosophical positions.
Philosophy Major Curriculum
Students must complete philosophy core courses (18 credits) as well as 18 credits of philosophy electives for a total of 36
credits. At least 18 credits in the major must be at the 3000/4000 level.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Philosophy Major Requirements (36 credits)
Core Courses (18 credits)
PHIL 1010
Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)
PHIL 1400
Introduction to Logic (3 credits) OR PHIL 2400 Symbolic Logic (3 credits)
PHIL 3510
Ancient Philosophy (3 credits)
PHIL 3520 Modern Philosophy (3 credits)
PHIL 4100
Metaphysics (3 credits) OR PHIL 4200 Epistemology (3 credits)
PHIL 4900
Special Topics in Philosophy (3 credits)
Major Electives (18 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following courses that are not used as required courses:
PHIL 1400
Introduction to Logic (3 credits)
PHIL 2000
Moral Issues (3 credits)
PHIL 2400
Symbolic Logic (3 credits)
PHIL 3010 Ethical Issues in Communication (3 credits)
PHIL 3180
Biomedical Ethics (3 credits)
PHIL 3200
Ethics and Sport (3 credits)
PHIL 3220
Philosophy of Science (3 credits)
PHIL 3360
Environmental Ethics (3 credits)
PHIL 3660
Philosophy of Law (3 credits)
PHIL 3670
Social and Political Philosophy (3 credits)
PHIL 4000
Philosophy of Art (3 credits)
PHIL 4100
Metaphysics (3 credits)
PHIL 4200
Epistemology (3 credits)
No more than two of the following courses may be applied to the major:
PHIL 2000
Moral Issues (3 credits)
PHIL 3010
Ethical Issues in Communication (3 credits)
PHIL 3180
Biomedical Ethics (3 credits)
PHIL 3200 Ethics and Sport (3 credits)
PHIL 3360
Environmental Ethics (3 credits)
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Minors in Humanities
African Diaspora Studies Minor
The African Diaspora studies minor is an interdisciplinary program of study focusing on the history, literature, societies, and
cultures of peoples in the African Diaspora, including Diaspora cultures in the United States of America, the Caribbean,
Europe, and Africa. This minor can be combined with any major and minor. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the
minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
African Diaspora Studies Minor Requirements (15–16 credits)
Core Course (3 credits)
HIST 2400
African History (3 credits)
Select 12 additional credits, 9 of which must be at the 3000/4000 level:
DANC 3000
African Dance (2 credits)
DANC 3300
Latin and Caribbean Dance (2 credits)
FILM 3100
Black Cinema (3 credits)
HIST 2300
Caribbean History (3 credits)
HUMN 3610
The Harlem Renaissance (3 credits)
LITR 3520
African-American Literature (3 credits)
LITR 3530
Caribbean Literature (3 credits)
LITR 4750
Morrison (3 credits)
English Minor
The English minor provides a broad overview of American, British, and world literatures and reinforces effective writing and
analytical skills. Combined with any major program of study, the English minor offers students an opportunity to improve their
critical thinking and writing, a plus for any profession, and also widens students’ perspectives about literary texts of the world
from antiquity to the present. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the English major. A minimum of 9
credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
English Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students must complete 15 credits in any literature (LITR) courses, 9 credits of which must be at the 3000/4000 level.
Film Studies Minor
The Film Studies minor provides a broad overview of the study of film, focusing on genre, history, and aesthetics. Students
will learn how to analyze the elements of film, to recognize historical trends in film, and to comprehend the social contexts
of film. This minor can be combined with any major and minor. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and
cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Film Studies Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students must complete 15 credits in any film (FILM) courses, 9 credits of which must be at the 3000/4000 level.
Folklore and Mythology Minor
The folklore and mythology minor provides students with an overview of the ways that various artistic features of a
culture tell the story of where it has been and where it is going. The folklore and mythology minor deepens students’
understanding of how a culture’s storytelling contributes to its evolution. This minor can be combined with any major and
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minor. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/
certificate programs.
Folklore and Mythology Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students must complete 15 credits from the following list, 9 credits of which must be at the 3000/4000 level:
Select 3 credits from the following courses:
HUMN 2300 Introduction to World Mythology (3 credits)
HUMN 2350 Introduction to Folklore (3 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following courses:
ARTS 3300 Myth and Art (3 credits)
ARTS 3400 Non-Western and Modern Art (3 credits)
COMM 3100
Gendered Images Pop Culture (3 credits)
HUMN 2300 Introduction to World Mythology (3 credits)
HUMN 2350 Introduction to Folklore (3 credits)
HUMN 2400
Introduction to Celtic Studies (3 credits)
HUMN 3800
Mexican Cult of Death in Myth and Literature (3 credits)
HUMN 4100 Death and Dying (3 credits)
HUMN 4200 Asian Thought (3 credits)
HUMN 4310 The Vampire (3 credits)
LITR 4510 King Arthur (3 credits)
Gender Studies Minor
The gender studies minor examines the relationship between biological differences and social inequality, explores the construction
of sexual identity, and analyzes the variations in gender systems that have occurred across cultures over time. Students will
explore the methods and concepts of gender studies in a variety of academic disciplines including film studies, law, literature,
philosophy, psychology, and sociology. Students must complete 6 credits in required courses and 9 credits in elective courses. At
least 9 credits in the minor must be at the 3000/4000 level. This minor can be combined with any major and minor. A minimum of
9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Gender Studies Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Core Courses (6 credits)
GEST 2050 Introduction to Gender Studies (3 credits)
GEST 4900 Special Topics in Gender Studies (3 credits)
Minor Electives (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following courses:
ARTS 3020 Women in the Arts (3 credits)
COMM 3100 Gendered Images in Popular Culture (3 credits)
FILM 3040 Women and Film (3 credits)
LITR 3040 Women and Literature (3 credits)
LITR 4060 Critical Theories and Gender (3 credits)
PHIL 4900 Special Topics in Philosophy (when offered as Issues of Gender and Sex) (3 credits)
PSYC 2110 Human Sexuality (3 credits)
PSYC 3360 Psychology of Gender (3 credits)
PSYC 4600 Biological Bases of Behavior (3 credits)
SOCL 3110 Gender, Sexuality and the Family (3 credits)
SOCL 3300 Gender at Work (3 credits)
History Minor
The history minor provides a broad overview of U.S., European, Latin American, and world history and reinforces effective writing
and analytical skills. Combined with any major program of study, the history minor offers students an opportunity to improve their
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critical thinking and writing, a plus for any profession, and also widens students’ perspectives about historical events of the world
from antiquity to the present. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the history major. A minimum of 9
credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
History Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students must complete 15 credits in any history (HIST) courses, 9 credits of which must be at the 3000/4000 level.
Humanities Minor
The humanities minor provides intellectual challenge and personal development for students who are intrigued by artistic,
social, and ethical questions and who wish to study the relationships among liberal arts disciplines. Combined with a major
in a specialized field, the humanities minor prepares individuals to meet the challenges of the contemporary world. This
minor can be combined with any major and minor except the humanities major. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to
the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Humanities Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students must complete 15 credits in any humanities (HUMN) courses, 9 credits of which must be at the 3000/4000 level.
International Law Minor
The international law minor is designed for those students who seek a broad understanding of the relationships between the
legal systems of different nations as well as regulations, agreements, and treaties maintained between specific nations or by
international organizations. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the legal studies major. A minimum
of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
International Law Minor Requirements (15 credits)
INST 1500 Global Issues (3 credits)
LGST 3400 Comparative Legal Systems (3 credits)
LGST 4410 International Law (3 credits)
Any 3000/4000-level LGST course (3 credits)
POLS 2010 Comparative Government (3 credits)
International Studies Minor
The international studies minor provides a broad international perspective for students who plan careers in business,
government, medical and psychological services, the legal profession, or education. The courses in this minor allow students
to expand their concept of social and ecological responsibility in the global arena. This minor can be combined with any
major and minor except the international studies major. A minimum of 12 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot
be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
International Studies Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Students must complete 18 credits from the following areas, 9 credits of which must be at the 3000/4000 level. A minimum
of 6 credits must be non-Western courses (courses marked with an asterisk).
Core Courses (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following courses:
COMM 2300 Intercultural Communication (3 credits)
GEOG 2050 Survey of Geography (3 credits)
INST 1500 Global Issues (3 credits)
Concentrations (15 credits)
Select 9 credits from either the Arts, Literature, and Culture concentration or from the History, Law, and Government
concentration, and select 6 credits from the other concentration:
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Arts, Literature, and Culture Concentration
ARTS 3300 ARTS 3350
*ARTS 3400 HUMN 2300 HUMN 2350 HUMN 2400 HUMN 3800 *HUMN 4200 LITR 2010 LITR 2011 LITR 2030 LITR 2031 LITR 3210 LITR 3260 LITR 3510 LITR 3530 *LITR 3540
LITR 4510 LITR 4720 LITR 4740 SPAN 3240 *SPAN 3250 SPAN 4900 Myth and Art (3 credits)
Irish Art and Architecture (3 credits)
Non-Western and Modern Art (3 credits)
Introduction to World Mythology (3 credits)
Introduction to Folklore (3 credits)
Introduction to Celtic Studies (3 credits)
Mexican Cult of Death in Myth and Literature (3 credits)
Asian Thought (3 credits)
British Literature I (3 credits)
British Literature II (3 credits)
World Literature I (3 credits)
World Literature II (3 credits)
British Romantic Literature (3 credits)
Modernist World Literature (3 credits)
Irish Literature (3 credits)
Caribbean Literature (3 credits)
Latin American Literature (3 credits)
King Arthur (3 credits)
Shakespeare (3 credits)
Austen (3 credits)
Introduction to Spanish Literature (3 credits)
Introduction to Latin American Literature (3 credits)
Special Topics in Spanish Literature (3 credits)
History, Law, and Government Concentration
HIST 1090 Early Western History (3 credits)
HIST 1110 Modern Western History (3 credits)
*HIST 1150 Early World History (3 credits)
*HIST 1160 Modern World History (3 credits)
*HIST 2130 Formation of Latin America (3 credits)
*HIST 2140 Modern Latin America (3 credits)
*HIST 2200 Asian History (3 credits)
*HIST 2300 Caribbean History (3 credits)
*HIST 2400 African History (3 credits)
HIST 3140 The Holocaust (3 credits)
HIST 3240 Irish History (3 credits)
HIST 3400 U.S. Foreign Relations (3 credits)
LGST 3400 Comparative Legal Systems (3 credits)
LGST 4410
International Law (3 credits)
POLS 2010 Comparative Government (3 credits)
POLS 3010 Politics of Modern Ireland (3 credits)
Irish Studies Minor
The Irish studies minor is an interdisciplinary program of study focusing on the history, literature, societies, and cultures of Ireland,
including the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, and the Irish Diaspora. Students must take at least 9 credits at NSU and up to 6
travel study credits in Ireland or Northern Ireland for a total of 15 credits. This minor can be combined with any major and minor. A
minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Irish Studies Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following courses:
ARTS 3350
Irish Art and Architecture (3 credits)
HIST 3240
Irish History (3 credits)
HIST 4900
Special Topics in History, when taught as an Irish history topic (3 credits)
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HUMN 2400
LITR 3510
POLS 3010
Introduction to Celtic Studies (3 credits)
Irish Literature (3 credits)
Politics of Modern Ireland (3 credits)
Travel Study Requirement (3–6 credits)
In addition, students must take one or two travel study courses in Ireland or Northern Ireland, preferably after completing
at least one of the above core NSU courses. These travel study courses may include any of the following subjects and
would be offered as Special Topics courses:
Irish Art and Architecture
Irish Film
Irish Language (Gaelic)
Irish Literature and Politics
Transatlantic Currents: Ireland and America in the Modern Era
Qualifying travel study credit may also be earned through participation in pre-approved programs offered through partner
institutions. For more information, students should contact their academic advisor.
Legal Studies Minor
The legal studies minor is designed to prepare students in any major for law school. The minor emphasizes skills required
for admission into law school and success once there. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the
legal studies major. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/
minors/certificate programs.
Legal Studies Minor Requirements (15 credits)
HIST 3010 HIST 3020 LGST 4000 PHIL 1400
POLS 1010 Constitutional History I (3 credits)
Constitutional History II (3 credits)
Legal Research and Trial Advocacy (3 credits)
Introduction to Logic (3 credits) OR PHIL 2400 Symbolic Logic (3 credits)
American Government and Politics (3 credits)
Media Studies Minor
The media studies minor is designed to give students a critical overview of media in society, emphasizing theoretical
perspectives on film, radio, television, print and broadcast journalism, and advertising. This minor can be combined with any
major and minor except the communication studies major. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot
be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Media Studies Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students must complete 15 credits from the following list, 9 credits of which must be at the 3000/4000 level:
COMM 2010 Introduction to Print Journalism (3 credits)
COMM 2200
Introduction to Broadcast Journalism (3 credits)
COMM 2100 Mass Media (3 credits)
COMM 3100 Gendered Images in Popular Culture (3 credits)
COMM 3110 Communication Theory (3 credits)
COMM 3500
Media Regulation (3 credits)
COMM 3600
Persuasion (3 credits)
COMM 4500
Media and Cultural Studies (3 credits)
COMM 4900 Special Topics in Communication (3 credits)
Maximum of 6 credit hours from:
FILM 3040 Women and Film (3 credits)
FILM 3050 Literature and Film (3 credits)
FILM 3060 Film Noir (3 credits)
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FILM 3100
Black Cinema (3 credits)
FILM 4000
History of Film (3 credits)
FILM 4500
Major Directors (3 credits)
FILM 4900
Special Topics in Film (3 credits)
PHIL 3010 Ethical Issues in Communication (3 credits)
SPCH 1010
Public Speaking (3 credits)
THEA 2025
Performance for Film and Television (3 credits)
THEA 2200
Voice and Articulation for Media and Stage (3 credits)
Medical Humanities Minor
The medical humanities minor is designed to give students an overview of the ways that the medical arts and sciences
intersect and interact with various disciplines in the humanities, in such ways as art and medicine, bioethics, the history
of medicine, literature and medicine, music and medicine, medicine in the performing arts, medicine and philosophy, and
medicine and law. This minor can be combined with any major and minor. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the
minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Medical Humanities Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students must complete 15 credits from the following list, 9 credits of which must be at the 3000/4000 level:
HUMN 2200 HUMN 4100 LITR 3500 PHIL 3180 PHIL 3220 PSYC 2470 Introduction to Medical Humanities (3 credits)
Death and Dying (3 credits)
Literature and Medicine (3 credits)
Biomedical Ethics (3 credits)
Philosophy of Science (3 credits)
Loss, Grief, and Bereavement (3 credits)
Philosophy Minor
The philosophy minor provides students with a broad overview of philosophical issues and problems, as well as reinforcing
effective writing and analytical skills. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the philosophy major. A
minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Philosophy Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students must complete 15 credits in any philosophy (PHIL) courses, at least 9 credits of which must be at the 3000/4000
level and no more than one of the following:
PHIL 2000/3010/3180/3200/3360
Public Relations Minor
The public relations minor offers students an opportunity to develop a sub-specialization in the area of public relations.
Students pursuing this minor area of study will focus on communication theory and strategy as they pertain to the promotion
and maintenance of organizational image management. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the
communication studies major. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward any
other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Public Relations Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students must complete 15 credits from the following two areas, at least 9 credits of which must be at the 3000/4000 level:
Core Courses (9 credits)
COMM 3110 Communication Theory (3 credits)
COMM 3200 Principles of Public Relations (3 credits)
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COMM 4000 Writing for Public Relations (3 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following courses:
COMM 2010 Introduction to Print Journalism (3 credits)
COMM 2200 Introduction to Broadcast Journalism (3 credits)
COMM 3500 Media Regulation (3 credits)
COMM 3600 Persuasion (3 credits)
PHIL 3010 Ethical Issues in Communication (3 credits)
SPCH 1010 Public Speaking (3 credits)
SPCH 3120 Speech Communication for the Professions (3 credits)
THEA 2200 Voice and Articulation for Media and Stage (3 credits)
Spanish Minor
The Spanish minor provides students with focused study in Spanish language and literature, as well as focused study of
culture in Spanish-speaking countries around the world. This minor can be combined with any major and minor. A minimum
of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Spanish Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students must complete 15 credits in any Spanish (SPAN) courses, 9 credits of which must be at the 3000/4000 level.
Speech Communication Minor
The speech communication minor provides students with a focused study of spoken discourse, emphasizing both the theory
and practice of speech communication. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the communication
studies major. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/
minors/certificate programs.
Speech Communication Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students must complete 15 credits from the following list, 9 credits of which must be at the 3000/4000 level:
COMM 2300 COMM 3110 COMM 3600
HUMN 3010 PHIL 3010 SPCH 1010 SPCH 2000 SPCH 2020 SPCH 3120 THEA 2025
THEA 2200
Intercultural Communication (3 credits)
Communication Theory (3 credits)
Persuasion (3 credits)
Communication Traditions (3 credits)
Ethical Issues in Communication (3 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
Fundamentals of Human Communication (3 credits)
Argument and Debate (3 credits)
Speech Communication for the Professions (3 credits)
Performance for Film and Television (3 credits)
Voice and Articulation for Media and Stage (3 credits)
Writing Minor
The writing minor provides a broad overview of various types of writing and reinforces techniques of analysis and expression.
Students will learn how to write in various genres by reading models of published authors and participating in writing course
workshops. The writing in the minor will focus on analytical and professional writing skills, as well as creative writing. This
minor can be combined with any major and minor. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be
counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Writing Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students must complete 15 credits from the following list, 9 credits of which must be at the 3000/4000 level:
WRIT 2500 Introduction to Creative Writing (3 credits)
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WRIT 3020 WRIT 3030 WRIT 3150 WRIT 3160 WRIT 4900 Poetry Workshop (3 credits)
Fiction Workshop (3 credits)
Business Writing (3 credits)
Scientific and Technical Writing (3 credits)
Special Topics in Writing (3 credits)
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Division of Math, Science,
and Technology
The Division of Math, Science, and Technology offers the Bachelor of Science degree in Athletic Training*, Biology
(premedical)*, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Environmental Science/Studies, Exercise and Sport
Science*, and Marine Biology*. The division also administers biological and physical sciences, computer engineering
technology, computer studies, and information technology concentrations for the college’s interdisciplinary major in applied
professional studies.
*These majors are available only to students enrolled in the Professional and Liberal Studies (PALS) Program (day students
on campus).
Majors in Math, Science, and Technology
Athletic Training Major
The athletic training major is designed to prepare students to become competent allied health care professionals who
specialize in injury and illness prevention, assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation for physically active people. The
curriculum provides a balance between classroom instruction and clinical experience that prepares students to become
competent allied health care professionals in clinics, colleges, universities, high schools, and other settings.
NSU’s athletic training major, established in 2003, is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training
Education (CAATE), effective March 2007. Athletic training students will graduate with a Bachelor of Science degree in
Athletic Training and will be eligible to sit for the Board of Certification (BOC) examination. The athletic training major
is designed to ensure that students who graduate from the program meet all requirements necessary to pass the BOC
examination.
Athletic Training Program Goals
The athletic training program will:
1. Develop communication, critical thinking, and professional skills to prepare students for the allied health field of
athletic training;
2. Meet the standards, guidelines, and requirements for accreditation and from governing organizations such as the
National Trainers’ Association (NATA), the Board of Certification (BOC), and the Commission on Accreditation of
Athletic Training Education (CAATE);
3. Provide an effective and interactive learning environment as well as a solid educational foundation both in didactic
and clinical experience settings. The program will utilize modern educational media and advanced technology
regularly in the clinical and educational settings. It will expose students to hands-on experiences, clinical settings,
and professionals representing a wide range of allied and medical health care professions. Students will receive
clinical instruction by professionals representing other medical and allied health disciplines, such as medical doctors,
physical therapists, physician assistants, occupational therapists, and osteopathic physicians;
4. Create an optimal learning community of faculty, clinical athletic trainers, and students that will provide quality health
care for NSU’s NCAA Division II intercollegiate athletic programs and varied affiliated sites at all levels of sport, from
grade school to professional sports teams;
5. Prepare program students to attain graduate or professional school placement, or entry-level employment within
six months of graduating from the program. Additionally, program graduates will obtain state licensure and other
necessary professional designations from the appropriate regulatory agencies in the states where they will be
employed.
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6. Athletic Training Major Learning Outcomes
A successful athletic training graduate is expected to:
1. Demonstrate the ability to prevent, evaluate, treat, rehabilitate, and document athletic related injuries in the of field
of athletic training;
2. Analyze and comprehend the physical, psychological, and emotional demands of physically active individuals and
the sports medicine professionals involved in their care;
3. Develop the effective communication skills necessary for a successful allied health care career in athletic training;
4. Illustrate and differentiate the ethical practices as it relates to athlete/patient care.
Athletic Training Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Athletic Training Major Requirements (54 credits)
During the athletic training program’s first two semesters, the pre-professional year, students must successfully complete all
introductory coursework: ATTR 1100 Introduction to Athletic Training, ATTR 1200 Principles of Athletic Training, and ATTR
1300 Emergency Care. During the pre-professional year, students are also required to spend 100 hours observing certified
athletic trainers in a variety of settings.
Core Courses (54 credits)
ATTR 1100 Introduction to Athletic Training (1 credit)
ATTR 1200 Principles of Athletic Training (3 credits)
ATTR 1300 Emergency Care (3 credits)
ATTR 1400 Health and Fitness (3 credits)
ATTR 2100 Injury Evaluation I /Lab (3 credits)
ATTR 2200 Injury Evaluation II /Lab (3 credits)
ATTR 2210 Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training I (1 credit)
ATTR 2220 Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training II (1 credit)
ATTR 2300 Sports Nutrition (3 credits)
ATTR 2400 Strength and Conditioning (3 credits)
ATTR 3100 General Medicine in Sport (3 credits)
ATTR 3230 Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training III (1 credit)
ATTR 3240 Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training IV (1 credit)
ATTR 3300 Therapeutic Modalities/Lab (4 credits)
ATTR 3500 Rehabilitation of Athletic Injury and Laboratory (4 credits)
ATTR 4100 Athletic Training Administration (3 credits)
BIOL 1400 Introductory Cell Biology (3 credits)
BIOL 3312 Human Anatomy and Physiology/Lab (5 credits)
EXSC 3700 Kinesiology (3 credits)
EXSC 3710 Exercise Physiology (3 credits)
Major Electives (optional)
ATTR 4300 Applied Research in Athletic Training (3 credits)
ATTR 4950 Internship in Athletic Training (3 credits)
Athletic Training Major Phases
Students admitted into the athletic training major must first complete the pre-professional (Level I) phase of the Athletic Training
Education Program (ATEP). The pre-professional phase includes successful completion of six courses: ATTR 1100 (Introduction
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to Athletic Training), ATTR 1200 (Principles of Athletic Training), ATTR 1300 (Emergency Care), ATTR 1400 (Health & Fitness),
BIOL 1400 (Introduction to Cell Biology) or equivalent, and BIOL 3312 (Human Anatomy and Physiology/Lab) or equivalent. In
addition, each student must complete a minimum number of clinical experience hours as part of the ATTR 1100 and ATTR 1200
courses observing ATEP Approved Clinical Instructors (i.e., Certified Athletic Trainers, Physical Therapists) in a variety of settings.
After successfully completing all Level I requirements as listed below, students will be eligible to enter the professional
phase of the ATEP. Transfer students are eligible for this major but must complete all program requirements (Level I–III) at
Nova Southeastern University for degree completion. There are additional opportunities for the Level IV student to complete
an internship, in the area of Sports Medicine.
The NSU Athletic Training Education Program is nationally accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training
Education (CAATE). Upon the completion of this program, students will be eligible to sit for the Board of Certification (BOC)
examination to become a Certified Athletic Trainer (ATC).
Level I (Pre-Professional Phase) Completion Requirements:
1. Successful completion of ATTR 1100, ATTR 1200, ATTR 1300, ATTR 1400, BIOL 1400, and BIOL 3312 with lab.
2. Complete the Athletic Training Student Portfolio; sign the Technical Standards and comply with other accreditation
documents as part of ATTR 1100 and ATTR 1200 course requirements.
3. Complete 100 clinical observation hours, supervised by an Approved Clinical Instructor as required by ATTR 1100
and ATTR 1200.
Level II (Professional Phase) Completion Requirements:
1. Successful completion of ATTR 2100, ATTR 2200, ATTR 2210, ATTR 2220, ATTR 2300, ATTR 2400, and ATTR
3300 with lab.
2. First Aid and CPR for the Professional Rescuer (or equivalent) certifications, as required for clinical experience
hours.
3. Complete a minimum of 300 clinical experience hours, supervised by an Approved Clinical Instructor as part of both
ATTR 2210 and ATTR 2220 course requirements.
Level III (Professional Phase) Completion Requirements:
1. Successful completion of ATTR 3100, ATTR 3230, ATTR 3240, ATTR 3500 with lab, EXSC 3700, EXSC 3710, and
ATTR 4100.
2. Maintain First Aid and CPR for the Professional Rescuer (or equivalent) certifications, as required for clinical
experience hours.
3. Complete a minimum of 400 clinical experience hours, supervised by an Approved Clinical Instructor, as required
by ATTR 3230 and ATTR 3240.
Level IV (Completion Phase) Completion Requirements:
1. Maintain First Aid and CPR for the Professional Rescuer (or equivalent) certifications.
2. Students will be eligible for an elective (ATTR 4300) and an optional Internship (ATTR 4950) that will be supervised
by an Athletic Training Faculty Member at an assigned clinical site off campus to be determined by the student.
3. Complete the Degree requirements as outlined by the Nova Southeastern University Undergraduate Student
Catalog and register for the Board of Certification Examination (BOC).
Regular communication between students and their academic advisors is strongly recommended to ensure that each
student is successfully moving toward graduation. Progress toward graduation requirements (2.25 or higher GPA within the
major and 2.0 or higher cumulative GPA) will be closely monitored at 30 earned credits, 60 earned credits, and 90 earned
credits. Degree conferral will take place upon completion of 120 credits and all course and degree requirements.
Student progress reports will be assessed based on the following standards: “exceeds criteria” (≥ 3.0 major and ≥ 2.5
cumulative GPA), “meets criteria” (2.25-2.99 major GPA and 2.0-2.49 cumulative GPA), and “does not meet criteria” (<2.25
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major GPA and <2.0 cumulative GPA).
Biology (Premedical) Major
The biology major, with a premedical emphasis, provides a strong curriculum in biology with significant study in the physical
sciences. This major can provide the basis for graduate study in specialized fields of biology, for professional training in medical
fields, and for teaching. Professional careers in the medical fields and in biology involve graduate study beyond the baccalaureate
degree; therefore, both the core and the major have been designed to meet the admission requirements of many medical, dental,
pharmacy, optometry, allied health, and veterinary schools, and of schools for graduate study in the biological sciences. Dual
admission and combined programs with the Nova Southeastern University Health Professions Division are available for select,
qualified students. Information on these programs can be obtained from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.
Biology Major Learning Outcomes
A successful biology graduate is expected to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Demonstrate a working knowledge of the scientific method;
Demonstrate essential knowledge of biological sciences;
Demonstrate essential knowledge of physical sciences as they relate to the biological sciences;
Use mathematics to solve scientific problems and evaluate research data;
Demonstrate the ability to use standard laboratory and research techniques to collect and assess data;
Demonstrate an ability to synthesize and integrate biological principles with contemporary issues.
Biology Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Biology Major Requirements (65-69 credits)
Core Courses (45–49 credits)
BIOL 1500 Biology I/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 1510 Biology II/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 3600 Genetics/Lab (4 credits)
CHEM 1300 General Chemistry I/Lab (4 credits)
CHEM 1310 General Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits)
CHEM 2400 Organic Chemistry I/Lab (4 credits)
CHEM 2410 Organic Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits)
OR CHEM 2200 Essentials of Organic Chemistry (4 credits) may be taken in place of Organic Chemistry I and II
(8 credits)
One 2000-level LITR course (3 credits) OR LITR 3500 Literature and Medicine (3 credits)
MATH 2100 Calculus I (4 credits)
MATH 3020
Applied Statistics (3 credits)
One 3000-level PHIL course from the following list:
PHIL 3010
Ethical Issues in Communication (3 credits)
PHIL 3180 Biomedical Ethics (3 credits)
PHIL 3200
Ethics and Sport (3 credits)
PHIL 3220
Philosophy of Science (3 credits)
PHIL 3360 Environmental Ethics (3 credits)
PHYS 2350
Physics I/Lab (4 credits)
PHYS 2360
Physics II/Lab (4 credits)
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Major Electives (20 credits)
BIOL 2600
Medical Terminology (3 credits)
BIOL 3200
General Ecology/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 3300
Invertebrate Zoology/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 3312
Human Anatomy and Physiology/Lab (5 credits) OR BIOL 3320 Anatomy and Physiology I/Lab
(4 credits)
BIOL 3330 Anatomy and Physiology II/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 3400 Microbiology/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 3500
Histology/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 3800 Evolution (3 credits)
BIOL 4200
Neurobiology (3 credits)
BIOL 4300
Microbial Pathogenesis (3 credits)
BIOL 4340 Cellular and Molecular Biology (3 credits)
BIOL 4360
Immunology (3 credits)
BIOL 4380
Discovering Genomics, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics (3 credits)
BIOL 4390
Advanced Experimental Molecular Biology (3 credits)
BIOL 4400
Developmental Biology (3 credits)
CHEM 3650 Biochemistry/Lab (4 credits)
EXSC 3700
Kinesiology (3 credits)
EXSC 3710
Exercise Physiology (3 credits)
MATH 2001
Introduction to Mathematical Models in Biology (3 credits)
MBIO 2410
Marine Biology/Lab (4 credits)
MBIO 3700
Biology of Fishes/Lab (4 credits)
Pre-Health Professions
Health professional schools often require specific courses in addition to those in the biology major. As minimum academic
requirements vary by program and by school, the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences does not prescribe specializations
for students to complete. Instead, students may use the Nova Southeastern University Health Profession Division program
requirements as a general guide to determine graduate school prerequisites. For admission into NSU’s health profession
programs, students must achieve a C or higher in all coursework within that specialization. Requirements may vary and specific
graduate programs may call for additional courses in writing, math, social and behavioral sciences, and the humanities.
Students are strongly encouraged to consult faculty members and academic advisors to discuss their curriculum plan. In
addition, it is recommended that students review Web sites of those professional schools for which an application is being
considered. This review should take place early and often during the academic course of study.
Listed below are Web site links to the entrance requirements of NSU’s health professional programs:
Pre-Health Professions
Prerequisites and Admission Requirements Web Links
Pre-Med
http://medicine.nova.edu/admiss/admissreq.html
Pre-Dental
http://dental.nova.edu/doctoral.html
Pre-Optometry
http://optometry.nova.edu/admissions/admissions.html
Pre-Pharmacy
http://pharmacy.nova.edu/NewWebsite/Admissions1.html
Pre-Physical Therapy
http://www.nova.edu/pt/dpt/admissionreq.html Pre-Physician Assistant
http://www.nova.edu/pa/admissions/index.html Pre-Nursing
http://www.nova.edu/nursing/entry/course_requirements.html Regular communication between students and their academic advisors is strongly recommended to ensure that each
student is successfully moving toward graduation. Progress toward graduation requirements (2.25 or higher GPA within the
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major and 2.0 or higher cumulative GPA) will be closely monitored at 30 earned credits, 60 earned credits, and 90 earned
credits. Degree conferral will take place upon completion of 120 credits and all course and degree requirements.
Student progress reports will be assessed based on the following standards: “exceeds criteria” (≥ 3.0 major and ≥ 2.5
cumulative GPA), “meets criteria” (2.25-2.99 major GPA and 2.0-2.49 cumulative GPA), and “does not meet criteria” (<2.25
major GPA and <2.0 cumulative GPA).
Computer Information Systems Major
The computer information systems (CIS) major prepares the student for a career in the fields of business and information
technology as an information systems specialist, Web developer, multimedia designer, or network specialist. Emphasis is
placed on programming languages, data structures, distributed data processing, multimedia database systems, database
management, networks and data communications, and information systems organization. The CIS curriculum is consistent with
recommendations outlined by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM); it provides a balance between fundamental
computer information systems concepts and the application of those concepts from a future-oriented perspective.
Computer Information Systems Major Learning Outcomes
A successful computer information systems graduate is expected to:
1. Demonstrate understanding of the field of computer information systems, both as an academic discipline and as a
profession within the context of society;
2. Demonstrate understanding of the theoretical foundations of the field of computer information systems
3. Demonstrate knowledge of the essential elements of computer information systems;
4. Apply knowledge of computing and information systems to specific problems and produce solutions;
5. Demonstrate an appreciation for the ethical and societal issues associated with the computing field;
6. Demonstrate the capability for staying current and, more generally, for achieving ongoing self-education in the
information systems discipline;
7. Use current programming languages, software development tools, software systems, database systems, multimedia
systems, and commonplace computing platforms.
Computer Information Systems Major Curriculum
All CIS students are encouraged to select minors, concentrations, or other special programs outside the CIS major.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Computer Information Systems Major Requirements (60 credits)
Major Prerequisites (6 credits)
MATH 2080 Applied Calculus (3 credits)
MATH 3020 Applied Statistics (3 credits)
Note: These two courses may fulfill the General Education 6 credits math requirements.
Core Courses (44 credits)
CSIS 1800 Introduction to Computer and Information Sciences (3 credits)
CSIS 2000 Introduction to Database Systems (3 credits)
CSIS 2050 Discrete Mathematics (3 credits)
CSIS 2100 Computer Programming I (4 credits)
CSIS 3020 Web Programming and Design (3 credits)
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CSIS 3050 CSIS 3100
CSIS 3400 CSIS 3500 CSIS 3750 CSIS 3810
CSIS 4530 CSIS 4900
Assemblers and Assembly Language Programming (4 credits)
Computer Programming II (4 credits)
Data Structures (4 credits)
Networks and Data Communication (3 credits)
Software Engineering (4 credits)
Operating Systems Concepts (3 credits)
Database Management (3 credits)
Directed Project (3 credits) OR CSIS 4950 Internship in Computer Science and Information
Systems (3 credits only)*
Major Electives (10 credits)
Select 10 credits from the following courses:
CSIS 3200 Organization of Programming Language (3 credits)
CSIS 4030 Information Security Technologies (3 credits)
CSIS 4310
Distributed Data Processing (4 credits)
CSIS 4500
Network Security (3 credits)
CSIS 4650 Computer Graphics (3 credits)
CSIS 4840 Unix Operating System Environment (3 credits)
CSIS 4890 Special Topics in Computer Information Systems (3 credits)
CSIS 4900 Directed Project (3–8 credits)*
CSIS 4950 Internship in Computer Science and Information Systems (1–12 credits)*
TECH 3000 Multimedia Design (3 credits)
* The credits counted towards core courses cannot be counted toward electives.
Regular communication between students and their academic advisors is strongly recommended to ensure that each
student is successfully moving toward graduation. Progress toward graduation requirements (2.25 or higher GPA within the
major and 2.0 or higher cumulative GPA) will be closely monitored at 30 earned credits, 60 earned credits, and 90 earned
credits. Degree conferral will take place upon completion of 120 credits and all course and degree requirements.
Student progress reports will be assessed based on the following standards: “exceeds criteria” (≥ 3.0 major and ≥ 2.5
cumulative GPA), “meets criteria” (2.25-2.99 major GPA and 2.0-2.49 cumulative GPA), and “does not meet criteria” (<2.25
major GPA and <2.0 cumulative GPA).
Computer Science Major
The computer science (CS) major deals with the systematic study of algorithms and data structures. The CS curriculum is consistent
with recommendations outlined by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and emphasizes laboratory experience as a
major component of courses. By integrating theory, abstraction, and design, the curriculum bridges the gap between hardware
and software issues. The program provides students with an opportunity to gain in-depth, rigorous instruction in the following nine
areas of computer science (as specified by the national ACM/IEEE Joint Curriculum Task Force): algorithms and data structures,
architecture, artificial intelligence and robotics, database and information retrieval, human-computer communication, numerical
and symbolic computation, operating systems, programming languages, and software methodology and engineering.
Computer Science Major Learning Outcomes
A successful computer science graduate is expected to:
1. Demonstrate understanding of the field of computing, both as an academic discipline and as a profession within the
context of society;
2. Demonstrate understanding of the theoretical foundations of the field of computing;
3. Demonstrate knowledge of the essential elements of computer information systems and computer science;
4. Apply knowledge of computing and information systems to specific problems and produce solutions;
5. Demonstrate an appreciation for the ethical and societal issues associated with the computing field;
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6. Demonstrate the capability for staying current and, more generally, for achieving ongoing self-education in the
computing discipline;
7. Use current programming languages, software development tools, software systems, database systems, multimedia
systems, and commonplace computing platforms.
Computer Science Major Curriculum
All computer science students are encouraged to select minors, concentrations, or other special programs outside the
computer science major.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Computer Science Major Requirements (73 credits)
Major Prerequisites (19 credits)
MATH 2100 Calculus I (4 credits)
MATH 2200 Calculus II (4 credits)
MATH 3020 Applied Statistics (3 credits)
PHYS 2400 Physics I/Lab (4 credits)
PHYS 2500 Physics II/Lab (4 credits)
Note: These courses may fulfill the General Education 12 credits of math/science requirements.
Core Courses (42 credits)
CSIS 1800 Introduction to Computer and Information Sciences (3 credits)
CSIS 2050 Discrete Mathematics (3 credits)
CSIS 2100
Computer Programming I (4 credits)
CSIS 3050 Assemblers and Assembly Language Programming (4 credits)
CSIS 3100 Computer Programming II (4 credits)
CSIS 3400 Data Structures (4 credits)
CSIS 3500 Networks and Data Communication (3 credits)
CSIS 3750 Software Engineering (4 credits)
CSIS 3810 Operating Systems Concepts (3 credits)
CSIS 4050 Computer Architecture (3 credits)
CSIS 4600 Systems Programming (4 credits)
CSIS 4610 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3 credits)
Major Electives (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following courses:
CSIS 3020 Web Programming and Design (3 credits)
CSIS 3060 Digital Design (3 credits)
CSIS 3110 Foundations of Computer Science (4 credits)
CSIS 3530 Artificial Intelligence (3 credits)
CSIS 3610 Numerical Analysis (3 credits)
CSIS 4310 Distributed Data Processing (4 credits)
CSIS 4350 Robotics (3 credits)
CSIS 4530 Database Management (3 credits)
CSIS 4650 Computer Graphics (3 credits)
CSIS 4800 Introduction to Compilers and Interpreters (3 credits)
CSIS 4840 Unix Operating System Environment (3 credits)
CSIS 4880 Special Topics in Computer Science (3 credits)
CSIS 4900 Directed Project (3–8 credits)
CSIS 4950 Internship in Computer Science and Information Systems (1–12 credits)
MATH 4500 Probability and Statistics (3 credits)
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Regular communication between students and their academic advisors is strongly recommended to ensure that each
student is successfully moving toward graduation. Progress toward graduation requirements (2.25 or higher GPA within the
major and 2.0 or higher cumulative GPA) will be closely monitored at 30 earned credits, 60 earned credits, and 90 earned
credits. Degree conferral will take place upon completion of 120 credits and all course and degree requirements.
Student progress reports will be assessed based on the following standards: “exceeds criteria” (≥ 3.0 major and ≥ 2.5
cumulative GPA), “meets criteria” (2.25-2.99 major GPA and 2.0-2.49 cumulative GPA), and “does not meet criteria” (<2.25
major GPA and <2.0 cumulative GPA).
Environmental Science/Studies Major
Students who wish to major in environmental science/studies must select one of two degree tracks. The program is designed
so students will share a common set of courses in their freshman year to ensure that all students gain an overview of the
subject. Upon entering their sophomore year, students will be required to select a specific program of study. Both programs
are designed to be completed within a four-year period. A practicum/internship in the eighth semester is required of all
students.
Track One: Environmental Science
The Environmental Science track provides a comprehensive knowledge of Earth’s physical, chemical, and biotic systems.
Track Two: Environmental Studies
The Environmental Studies track emphasizes both science and society. It is a program with an emphasis on social
issues and how humanity impacts the environment. This track examines the applied side of environmental science
and, specifically, incorporates five “studies” areas: sustainability, marine biology, ecotourism, public health, and natural
history.
In both tracks, students must complete an internship of 6 credits and a 3-credit Special Topics field course.
Environmental Science/Studies Major Learning Outcomes
A successful environmental sciences/studies graduate is expected to:
1. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the scientific method so as to identify, evaluate, and recommend solutions to
environmental problems;
2. Communicate concisely and clearly through public speaking, the publishing of written articles, the construction and
maintenance of a Web site, and photographic documentation either through photography or videography;
3. Formulate strategies to maximize the responsible use of technology as it applies to issues within environmental
science;
4. Identify legal issues relating to environmental science;
5. Apply concepts of environmental science to lifetime vocational aspirations;
6. Demonstrate a behavior of environmental awareness and interest in environmental issues of South Florida;
7. Apply knowledge from the fields of biology, botany, and physical sciences to environmental science;
8. Identify the principles of environmental ethics;
9. Identify concepts relating to the future of environmentalism.
Environmental Science/Studies Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
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Environmental Science/Studies Major Requirements (56 or 52 credits)
Core Courses (24 credits)
ENVS 1100 Environmental Science I (3 credits)
ENVS 1200 Environmental Science II (3 credits)
ENVS 3100 Environmental Issues (3 credits)
ENVS 4300 Industrial Ecology (3 credits)
GEOG 2050 Survey of Geography (3 credits)
GEOG 2260 Geography of Natural Resources (3 credits)
LGST 3350 Environmental Law and Policy (3 credits)
PHIL 3360 Environmental Ethics (3 credits)
Field Course Elective (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following courses:
GEOG 2900
Special Topics in Geography (1–3 credits)
GEOG 3010
Amazonia Cloud Forest Biogeography (3 credits)
GEOG 4900
Advanced Special Topics in Geography (1–3 credits)
Practicum (6 credits)
ENVS 4950 Internship in Environmental Science/Study (two 8 week/3 credit units)
Major Tracks (23 or 19 credits)
Select one of the following tracks:
Track One: Environmental Science (Select 23 credits)
BIOL 3200 General Ecology/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 3400 Microbiology/Lab (4 credits)
CHEM 1300 General Chemistry I/Lab (4 credits)
CHEM 1310 General Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits)
CHEM 2200 Essentials of Organic Chemistry (4 credits)
CHEM 2600 Environmental Chemistry (3 credits)
ENVS 3170
Everglades Ecology and Conversation (3 credits)
Track Two: Environmental Studies (Select 19 credits)
BIOL 1100 Concepts and Connections in Biology (3 credits) OR BIOL 1400 Introduction to Cellular Biology
(3 credits)
BIOL 2250 The Natural History of John U. Lloyd Beach State Park (3 credits)
CHEM 1500 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry (3 credits)
ENVS 3101 Introduction to Public Health (3 credits)
ENVS 3170
Everglades Ecology and Conservation (3 credits)
GEOG 3000 Geography of Ecotourism (3 credits)
MBIO 2410 Marine Biology/Lab (4 credits)
Regular communication between students and their academic advisors is strongly recommended to ensure that each
student is successfully moving toward graduation. Progress toward graduation requirements (2.25 or higher GPA within the
major and 2.0 or higher cumulative GPA) will be closely monitored at 30 earned credits, 60 earned credits, and 90 earned
credits. Degree conferral will take place upon completion of 120 credits and all course and degree requirements.
Student progress reports will be assessed based on the following standards: “exceeds criteria” (≥ 3.0 major and ≥ 2.5
cumulative GPA), “meets criteria” (2.25-2.99 major GPA and 2.0-2.49 cumulative GPA), and “does not meet criteria” (<2.25
major GPA and <2.0 cumulative GPA).
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Exercise and Sport Science Major
The exercise and sport science major provides students with a foundation in the movement sciences, which promotes
improvements in health, fitness, and/or performance for the physically active. The primary goal of this program is to
prepare students for graduate study and research in the various sub-disciplines of exercise and sport sciences, such as
biomechanics, exercise physiology, and motor behavior.
Students graduating from the exercise and sport science major will be able to seek employment as an exercise specialist,
fitness and wellness coordinator, sport performance researcher, and strength and conditioning specialist, as well as enter
professional graduate programs in exercise sciences and other fields with a foundation in the areas of movement sciences.
Exercise and Sport Science Program Goals
The exercise and sport science program will:
1. Meet standards and guidelines from governing organizations such as the National Association for Sports and
Physical Education (NASPE), American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), and American Alliance for Health,
Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (AAHPERD);
2. Prepare graduates for post-graduation placement in graduate school, a professional school, or entry-level
employment within six months of completing the degree program;
3. Develop competent scholars, researchers, physical activity, and sport specialists to meet the workforce needs of a
global society;
4. Prepare graduates to enhance delivery of physical activity, sport, and rehabilitative services for all segments of
society, including special populations such as children and the elderly; persons with disability, injury, and disease;
and athletes.
Exercise and Sport Science Major Learning Outcomes
A successful exercise and sport science graduate is expected to:
1. Demonstrate critical thinking skills related to the areas of physical activity, movement sciences, and sport through
practical experiences;
2. Obtain knowledge of content area specific to chosen career goals, such as strength and conditioning specialist,
coaching, and corporate fitness and wellness, through didactic and internship experiences;
3. Demonstrate the importance of the physical, psychological, and emotional demands of physically active individuals
through didactic and practicum experience.
Exercise and Sport Science Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Exercise and Sport Science Major Requirements (59 credits)
Core Courses (59 credits)
ATTR 1200
Principles of Athletic Training OR EXSC 1200 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3 credits)
ATTR 1300
Emergency Care (3 credits)
ATTR 1400
Health & Fitness (3 credits)
ATTR 2300
Sports Nutrition (3 credits)
ATTR 2400
Strength and Conditioning (3 credits)
BIOL 1400
Introductory Cell Biology (3 credits)
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BIOL 3312 EXSC 3700
EXSC 3710
EXSC 3720
EXSC 3800
EXSC 4100
EXSC 4200
EXSC 4300
EXSC 4400
EXSC 4901
MATH 1040
MATH 3020
PSYC 3400
Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab (5 credits)
Kinesiology (3 credits)
Exercise Physiology (3 credits)
Biomechanics of Human Movement (3 credits)
Exercise Prescription (3 credits)
Adapted Physical Education (3 credits)
Motor Learning/Development (3 credits)
Research Methods in Sport and Physical Education (3 credits)
Exercise and Sport Administration (3 credits)
Practicum in Exercise Science (3 credits)
Algebra for College Students (3 credits)
Applied Statistics (3 credits)
Sport Psychology (3 credits)
Regular communication between students and their academic advisors is strongly recommended to ensure that each
student is successfully moving toward graduation. Progress toward graduation requirements (2.25 or higher GPA within the
major and 2.0 or higher cumulative GPA) will be closely monitored at 30 earned credits, 60 earned credits, and 90 earned
credits. Degree conferral will take place upon completion of 120 credits and all course and degree requirements.
Student progress reports will be assessed based on the following standards: “exceeds criteria” (≥ 3.0 major and ≥ 2.5
cumulative GPA), “meets criteria” (2.25-2.99 major GPA and 2.0-2.49 cumulative GPA), and “does not meet criteria” (<2.25
major GPA and <2.0 cumulative GPA).
Marine Biology Major
The marine biology major is designed to prepare students for a career or further graduate study. The curriculum consists
of a set of core courses in the biological and physical sciences, leading to a degree that is designed as a solid basis for
entering the field of marine biology, as well as preparation for further graduate study in this area. A dual admission combined
bachelor’s-master’s program with the Oceanographic Center is available for select, qualified students. Information on this
program can be obtained from the undergraduate Office of Undergraduate Admissions.
Marine Biology Major Learning Outcomes
A successful marine biology graduate is expected to:
Understand basic scientific principles and methods;
Understand basic biology that incorporates more specific knowledge of marine organisms and habitats;
Appreciate the work of scientists who have contributed to marine biology and oceanography;
Demonstrate knowledge about the global variety of marine community types and their relationships with each other
and terrestrial systems;
5. Demonstrate a detailed understanding of local marine flora and fauna and community types;
6. Demonstrate a working understanding of the wide variety of marine organisms from phylogenetic, physiological,
zoogeographical and ecological perspectives;
7. Understand anthropogenic threats to marine species diversity and marine ecosystem structure;
8. Understand the physical and chemical structure of the world’s oceans;
9. Demonstrate skills in statistical analysis and interpretation, specifically pertaining to science and marine biology;
10. Demonstrate technical skills related to the use of computer programs such as MS Word, Excel, and PowerPoint;
11. Demonstrate oral presentation skills.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Marine Biology Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
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refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Marine Biology Major Requirements (55–61 credits)
Core Courses (36 credits)
BIOL 3200 General Ecology/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 3300 Invertebrate Zoology/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 3600 Genetics/Lab (4 credits)
CHEM 1300 General Chemistry I/Lab (4 credits)
CHEM 1310 General Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits)
MBIO 2410 Marine Biology/Lab (4 credits)
MBIO 2500 Oceanography/Lab (4 credits)
PHYS 2350 General Physics I/Lab (4 credits)
PHYS 2360 General Physics II/Lab (4 credits)
Major Grouped Electives (19–25 credits)
Group I: Classroom based (6–8 credits)
Select 6–8 credits from the following courses:
BIOL 2250 The Natural History of John U. Lloyd Beach State Park (3 credits)
BIOL 3320 Anatomy and Physiology I/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 3330 Anatomy and Physiology II/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 3400 Microbiology/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 3800
Evolution (3 credits)
BIOL 4340
Cellular and Molecular Biology (3 credits)
CHEM 2200 Essentials of Organic Chemistry (4 credits)
CHEM 3650
Biochemistry/Lab (4 credits)
MBIO 3910
Sharks and Their Relatives (3 credits)
SCIE 3210
History of Science (3 credits)
Any TECH/CSIS course (3 credits)
Group II: Required field component (7–9 credits)
Select 7–9 credits from the following courses:
BIOL 3311
Vertebrate Zoology (4 credits)
MBIO 3350 Gulf Stream Ecology (3 credits)
MBIO 3700
Biology of Fishes/Lab (4 credits)
MBIO 3750 Coral Reefs and Coral Communities (3 credits)
MBIO 4900 Special Topics in Marine Biology (1–3 credits)
SCIE 4490 Research Methods (3 credits)
Group III: Lab or field based (6–8 credits)
Select 6–8 credits from the following courses:
BIOL 2950 Field Study at John U. Lloyd Beach State Park (3 credits)
ENVS 3170
Everglades Ecology and Conservation (3 credits)
MBIO 3450
Survey of Marine Mammals (3 credits)
MBIO 4220 Ecology of the Great Barrier Reef (3 credits) AND MBIO 4221 Ecology of the Great Barrier
Reef Field Trip (1 credit) Both of these classes must be taken for Group III credit.
MBIO 4230 Belize Reef Ecology (3 credits)
MBIO 4260 Ecology of the Galapagos Islands (3 credits) AND MBIO 4261 Ecology of the Galapagos
Islands Field Trip (1 credit) Both of these classes must be taken for Group III credit.
MBIO 4350 The Biology and Ecology of the Manatee (3 credits)
MBIO 4910 Advanced Marine Biology Field Topics (1–3 credits)
SCIE 4990 Independent Study in Science (1–12 credits)
Regular communication between students and their academic advisors is strongly recommended to ensure that each
student is successfully moving toward graduation. Progress toward graduation requirements (2.25 or higher GPA within the
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major and 2.0 or higher cumulative GPA) will be closely monitored at 30 earned credits, 60 earned credits, and 90 earned
credits. Degree conferral will take place upon completion of 120 credits and all course and degree requirements.
Student progress reports will be assessed based on the following standards: “exceeds criteria” (≥ 3.0 major and ≥ 2.5
cumulative GPA), “meets criteria” (2.25-2.99 major GPA and 2.0-2.49 cumulative GPA), and “does not meet criteria” (<2.25
major GPA and <2.0 cumulative GPA).
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Minors in Math, Science, and Technology
Applied Statistics Minor
Statistical methods are widely used in science, social and behavioral sciences, business, health professions, and industry.
The applied statistics minor is appropriate for all NSU students with interests in experimental design, data analysis, or
statistical modeling. The minor is designed to enable a student to properly design studies and analyze the resulting data,
and to evaluate statistical methods used in marketing research, biological models, social studies, or their field of study.
Applied Statistics Minor Requirements (15 credits)
The applied statistics minor will require the successful completion of 15 credit hours of statistics courses with a MATH prefix
at the 2000 or higher lever, including at least 9 credit hours at the 3000 level or higher, with the exception of MATH 3020
Applied Statistics I, which is excluded from the minor.
The courses eligible for this minor include (but are not limited to) the following:
MATH 3030 Applied Statistics II (3 credits)
MATH 3300 Introductory Linear Algebra (3 credits)
MATH 4020 Applied Regression Analysis (3 credits)
MATH 4040 Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis (3 credits)
MATH 4080 Introduction to Statistical Computations (3 credits)
MATH 4500
Probability and Statistics (3 credits)
MATH 4900
Special Topics (1–3 credits)
MATH 4990
Independent Study (1–3 credits)
Bioinformatics Minor
Bioinformatics is a new scientific discipline that merges biology, computer science, mathematics, and other areas into a
broad-based field that has profound impacts on all fields of biology. It is the comprehensive application of mathematics
(e.g., probability and statistics), science (e.g., biochemistry), and a core set of problem-solving methods (e.g., computer
algorithms) to the understanding of living systems. The bioinformatics minor provides foundational study in this emerging
field of study.
Bioinformatics Minor Requirements (16 credits)
BIOL 3600 BIOL 4380 BIOL 4390 CSIS 3600 MATH 2001 Genetics/Lab (4 credits)
Discovering Genomics, Proteomics, and Bioinformatics (3 credits)
Advanced Experimental Molecular Biology (3 credits)
Computational Algorithms in Bioinformatics (3 credits)
Introduction to Mathematical Models in Biology I (3 credits)
Chemistry Minor
The fundamental role that chemistry plays in medicine, pharmacy, and the environment can be further explored in the
chemistry minor. Basic, clinical, and field research in these disciplines all involve the application of chemical principles
and techniques. The minor offers advanced courses in chemistry expanding on the base provided by general and organic
chemistry. Cross disciplinary in its approach, the chemistry minor complements the student’s major area of study. This minor
can be combined with any major and minor except the APS major with a concentration in biological and physical sciences.
Chemistry Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Select 18 credits from the following courses:
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CHEM 2200 CHEM 2250 CHEM 2400 CHEM 2410 CHEM 2600 CHEM 3600 CHEM 3650
CHEM 4100 CHEM 4200 CHEM 4300 CHEM 4900 CHEM 4990 Essentials of Organic Chemistry (4 credits)*
Bio-organic Chemistry/Lab (4 credits)
Organic Chemistry I/Lab (4 credits)
Organic Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits)
Environmental Chemistry (3 credits)
Geochemistry (3 credits)
Biochemistry/Lab (4 credits)
Chemical Analysis (3 credits)
Plant Drug Analysis (3 credits)
Clinical Chemistry (3 credits)
Special Topics in Chemistry (1-3 credits)
Independent Study in Chemistry (1–12 credits)
* CHEM 2200 will not be included in the 18 credit requirements when CHEM 2400 or CHEM 2410 is included.
Computer Information Systems Minor
The computer information systems minor is intended for students in any major who wish to acquire more knowledge in
programming, database systems, Web programming, and networking. This minor can be combined with any major and
minor except the computer information systems major. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot
be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Computer Information Systems Minor Requirements (17 credits)
CSIS 2000 CSIS 2100 CSIS 3020 CSIS 3100 CSIS 3500 Introduction to Database Systems (3 credits)
Computer Programming I (4 credits)
Web Programming and Design (3 credits)
Computer Programming II (4 credits)
Networks and Data Communication (3 credits)
Exercise Science Minor
The exercise science minor is designed to provide students with a foundation and theory base in the movement sciences
for the physically active. Additionally, the program offers courses for the student who is interested in the areas of physiology,
biomechanical, and psychological aspects of human function in response to exercise and physical activity. The primary
goal of this program is to supplement academic knowledge for students to study in the exercise science sub-disciplines
(biomechanics, exercise physiology, and motor behavior) and promote entry into professional programs such as athletic
training, medicine, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. The minor is available to PALS (day) students only. Students
must meet all of the prerequisites such as BIOL 3312 Anatomy and Physiology (5 credits). This minor can be combined with
any major and minor except the exercise and sport science major. When combining the athletic training major, a minimum
of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward the major.
Exercise Science Minor Learning Outcomes
A successful exercise science minor is expected to:
1. Demonstrate and explain a strong foundation and theory base in the movement sciences for the physically active;
2. Analyze the physiological, biomechanical, and psychological aspects for human function in response to exercise
and physical activity;
3. Develop and present a physical fitness program.
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Exercise Science Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Core Courses (9 credits)
ATTR 1400 Health and Fitness (3 credits)
ATTR 2400 Strength and Conditioning (3 credits)
EXSC 3800 Exercise Prescription (3 credits)
Minor Electives (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following courses:
ATTR 2300
Sports Nutrition (3 credits)
BIOL 3700 Kinesiology (3 credits)
BIOL 3710 Exercise Physiology (3 credits)
EXSC 3720
Biomechanics of Human Movement (3 credits)*
EXSC 4100 Adapted Physical Education (3 credits)*
EXSC 4200
Motor Learning/Development (3 credits)*
*Athletic training majors are required to select only these elective courses to complete the minor requirements.
Information Assurance/Security Minor
The information assurance/security minor is intended for students in any major who wish to acquire more knowledge about
computer and network security infrastructures and software. Topics covered include general surveys of computer and information
security technologies, legal and ethical aspects of computer security, and related data structures and operating systems.
Information Assurance/Security Minor Requirements (18 credits)
CSIS 3023 CSIS 3500 CSIS 4010 CSIS 4500
Legal and Ethical Aspects of Computing (3 credits)
Network and Data Communication (3 credits)
Computer Security (3 credits)
Network Security (3 credits)
A minimum of 6 credits from the following courses:
CSIS 3050
Assemblers and Assembly Language Programming (4 credits)
CSIS 4030 Information Security Technologies (3 credits)
CSIS 4310
Distributed Data Processing (4 credits)
CSIS 4530
Database Management (3 credits)
MATH 3350
Number Theory (3 credits)
Information Technology Minor
The information technology minor is intended for students in any major who wish to achieve knowledge in information
technology. The tech courses in the minor are designed for students to tailor content and focus activities to their own area
of study or interest. Students must complete 18 hours in this curriculum: twelve hours of required technology courses, three
hours selected from the menu of approved courses, and three hours in a directed technology project in the area of their
choice. The directed research course is taken last and involves original research and/or technology implementation. This
minor can be combined with any major and minor except the computer science and computer information systems majors
and APS major with a concentration in information technology.
Information Technology Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Core Courses (12 credits)
TECH 1110 Technology in the Information Age (or competency) (3 credits)
TECH 2000 Computer Technology: Impact and Implications (3 credits)
TECH 2150 Introduction to Internet Resources (3 credits)
TECH 3000 Multimedia Design (3 credits)
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Minor Elective (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following courses:
TECH 3010
Principles of Web Design (3 credits)
TECH 3520 Emerging Technology in Education (3 credits)
TECH 3530 Multimedia Technology for Educators (3 credits)
TECH 4050 Business Data Communication (3 credits)
TECH 4510 Utilizing Technology to Develop Curriculum (3 credits)
Minor Directed Project (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following courses:
CSIS 4900 Directed Project (3–8 credits)
TECH 4900 Directed Project (1–12 credits)
Marine Biology Minor
The marine biology minor focuses on the life processes of marine organisms and is intended for students interested in
the field as a complement to their major curriculum. Biology majors can take the marine biology minor with no additional
prerequisites outside of those required for the biology major. Students in other majors who have taken the appropriate
prerequisites may also pursue this minor. This minor is available to PALS (day) students only. This minor can be combined
with any major and minor except the marine biology major and marine ecology minor.
Marine Biology Minor Requirements (17 credits)
Core Courses (8 credits)
MBIO 2410 Marine Biology/Lab (4 credits)
MBIO 2500 Oceanography/Lab (4 credits)
Minor Electives (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following courses:
BIOL 3200 General Ecology/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 3300 Invertebrate Zoology/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 3311
Vertebrate Zoology/Lab (4 credits)
ENVS 3710
Everglades Ecology and Conservation (3 credits)
MBIO 3350 Gulf Stream Ecology (3 credits)
MBIO 3700
Biology of Fishes/Lab (4 credits)
MBIO 3750 Coral Reefs and Coral Communities (3 credits)
MBIO 3910
Sharks and Their Relatives (3 credits)
MBIO 4220 Ecology of the Great Barrier Reef (3 credits)
MBIO 4221 Ecology of the Great Barrier Reef Field Trip (1 credit)
MBIO 4230 Belize Reef Ecology (3 credits)
MBIO 4260 Ecology of the Galapagos Islands (3 credits)
MBIO 4261
Ecology of the Galapagos Islands Field Trip (1 credit)
MBIO 4350 The Biology and Ecology of the Manatee (3 credits)
MBIO 4900
Special Topics in Marine Biology (1–3 credits)
MBIO 4910
Advanced Marine Biology Field Topics (1–3 credits)
SCIE 4490 Research Methods (3 credits)
Marine Ecology Minor
The marine ecology minor focuses on the interactions among marine organisms and the relationships between these organisms
and their environment. This minor is intended for marine biology majors who want more specific training in marine ecological
science. Students in other majors who meet the prerequisites may also pursue this minor. This minor is available to PALS
(day) students only. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the marine biology minor. When combining
with the marine biology major, a minimum of 6 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward the major.
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Marine Ecology Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Select 15 credits from the following courses:
MBIO 3350 MBIO 3450
MBIO 3700
MBIO 3750 MBIO 3910
MBIO 4220 MBIO 4221 MBIO 4230 MBIO 4260 MBIO 4261
MBIO 4350 MBIO 4900
MBIO 4910 Gulf Stream Ecology (3 credits)
Survey of Marine Mammals (3 credits)
Biology of Fishes/Lab (4 credits)
Coral Reefs and Coral Communities (3 credits)
Sharks and Their Relatives (3 credits)
Ecology of the Great Barrier Reef (3 credits)
Ecology of the Great Barrier Reef Field Trip (1 credit)
Belize Reef Ecology (3 credits)
Ecology of the Galapagos Islands (3 credits)
Ecology of the Galapagos Islands Field Trip (1 credit)
The Biology and Ecology of the Manatee (3 credits)
Special Topics in Marine Biology (1–3 credits)
Advanced Marine Biology Field Topics (1–3 credits)
Marine Microbiology Minor
The marine microbiology minor is intended for the marine biology major who wants specialized training in this field.
The science of microorganisms in the marine environment has become increasingly valuable in biotechnology and the
development of pharmaceutical products. Students in other majors who meet the prerequisites may also pursue this minor.
The minor is available to PALS (day) students only.
Marine Microbiology Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Select 15 credits from the following courses:
BIOL 3400 BIOL 4340 CHEM 2200 CHEM 3650
MBIO 4900 MBIO 4910 Microbiology/Lab (4 credits)
Cellular and Molecular Biology (3 credits)
Essentials of Organic Chemistry (4 credits)
Biochemistry/Lab (4 credits)
Special Topics in Marine Biology (1–3 credits)
Advanced Marine Biology Field Topics (1–3 credits)
Mathematics Minor
Mathematics is extensively used throughout the disciplines, including the sciences, engineering, finance, and social sciences.
For those already engaging in disciplines with higher mathematics courses, the mathematics minor provides an opportunity
to deepen their understanding into their own fields and develop professional tools that may not be commonly available to
their peers. The minor in mathematics is appropriate for all NSU students looking to broaden their mathematical horizons.
Mathematics Minor Requirements (17 credits)
The mathematics minor will require the successful completion of 17 credits hours of MATH prefix courses at the 2000 or
higher level and at least 9 credit hours at the 3000 level or higher.
The courses eligible for this minor include (but are not limited to) the following:
MATH 2100 Calculus I (4 credits)
MATH 2200 Calculus II (4 credits)
MATH 3200
Calculus III (4 credits)
MATH 3250
Euclidean Geometry (3 credits)
MATH 3300 Introductory Linear Algebra (3 credits)
MATH 3350 Number Theory (3 credits)
MATH 3400
Ordinary Differential Equations (3 credits)
MATH 4500
Probability and Statistics (3 credits)
MATH 4900 Special Topics (1–3 credits)
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MATH 4990
Independent Study (1–3 credits)
The following courses are excluded for credit towards the mathematics minor:
MATH 2080 Applied Calculus (3 credits)
MATH 3020
Applied Statistics (3 credits)
MATH 3030
Applied Statistics II (3 credits)
MATH 4020
Applied Regression Analysis (3 credits)
MATH 4040
Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis (3 credits)
MATH 4080 Introduction to Statistical Computations (3 credits)
Physics Minor
The physics minor is intended to provide students with a basic background in physics and related mathematical methods.
A knowledge of physics is useful for students in fields that range from biology and medicine to computer science, as well
as being essential for education majors who intend to teach physical sciences in high school. All students in the minor must
take a core of required courses in mechanics, electromagnetism, and modern physics. The remainder of the minor then
consists of a set of additional physics and mathematics courses chosen by the student, so that the minor can be tailored to
the needs and interests of the individual student. The physics minor consists of 18 credit hours at the 3000 level or above.
Only three hours may be applied to the major. The minor may include up to three hours of independent study, up to three
hours of special topics, and up to three hours of mathematics.
Physics Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Core Courses (12 credits)
PHYS 3500 Introduction to Mechanics (3 credits)
PHYS 3600 Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields (3 credits)
PHYS 3700 Introduction to Modern Physics (3 credits)
PHYS 3750
Modern Physics II (3 credits)
Minor Electives (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following courses:
PHYS 3100 Introduction to Biophysics (3 credits)
PHYS 3300 Fundamentals of Optics (3 credits)
PHYS 3800 Introduction to Elementary Particle Physics (3 credits)
PHYS 4900 Special Topics in Physics (1–3 credits)
PHYS 4990 Independent Study in Physics (1–12 credits)
MATH 3300 Introductory Linear Algebra (3 credits)
MATH 3400
Ordinary Differential Equations (3 credits)
MATH 4050 Advanced Calculus I (3 credits)
MATH 4060 Advanced Calculus II (3 credits)
Public Health Minor
The public health minor focuses on maintaining a healthy society through the control of disease, education about health
and disease prevention, and organized efforts to preserve healthy environments. This minor is intended for students in the
environmental science/studies major as well as for students in other majors who want to learn about the public health field.
This minor is available to both PALS (day) and Career (evening) students.
Public Health Minor Requirements (18 credits)
BIOL 2400 ENVS 3101 ENVS 3201 Applied Microbiology (3 credits)
Introduction to Public Health (3 credits)
Environment, Culture, Ethnicity, and Health (3 credits)
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ENVS 4002 ENVS 4210
ENVS 4310 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (3 credits)
Environmental Epidemiology (3 credits)
Environmental Health (3 credits)
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Certificates in Math, Science,
and Technology
The Division of Math, Science, and Technology offers certificate programs to prepare students for employment in the field
of computer information systems. The CIS certificate programs also provide supplemental training for computer science
professionals and for students in any major who desire expertise in computer information systems. To earn a certificate,
a student must achieve a C or better on all coursework in that certification. The number of certification credits varies. All
courses are available online. The following three computer information systems certificate programs are offered:
Database Management Systems Certificate
The database management systems certificate program prepares students for employment as database developers and
administrators. It also provides supplemental training for computer science professionals and for students in any major who
desire expertise in database systems. Topics covered include programming, database systems, data structures, distributed
data processing, and database management. The certificate requires 28 credits to complete. All courses are available
online. This certificate program can be combined with any major and minor except the computer information systems and
computer science majors, APS major with a concentration in computer studies, and APS major with a concentration in
computer engineering technology.
Database Management Systems Certificate Requirements (28 credits)
CSIS 2000 CSIS 2050 CSIS 2100 CSIS 3020 CSIS 3100 CSIS 3400 CSIS 4310 CSIS 4530 Introduction to Database Systems (3 credits)
Discrete Mathematics (3 credits)
Computer Programming I (4 credits)
Web Programming and Design (3 credits)
Computer Programming II (4 credits)
Data Structures (4 credits)
Distributed Data Processing (4 credits)
Database Management (3 credits)
Operating Systems Certificate
The operating systems certificate program prepares students for employment as system analysts, information systems
specialists, computer information managers, and system programmers. It also provides supplemental training for computer
science professionals and for students in any major who desire expertise in computer operating systems. Topics covered
include programming, database systems, data structures, networking, and operating systems. The certificate requires 27
credits. All courses are available online. This certificate program can be combined with any major and minor except the
computer information systems and computer science majors, APS major with a concentration in computer studies, and APS
major with a concentration in computer engineering technology.
Operating Systems Certificate Requirements (27 credits)
CSIS 2000 CSIS 2050 CSIS 2100 CSIS 3100 CSIS 3400 CSIS 3500 CSIS 3810
CSIS 4840 Introduction to Database Systems (3 credits)
Discrete Mathematics (3 credits)
Computer Programming I (4 credits)
Computer Programming II (4 credits)
Data Structures (4 credits)
Networks and Data Communication (3 credits)
Operating Systems Concepts (3 credits)
Unix Operating System Environment (3 credits)
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Web Programming and Design Certificate
The Web programming and design certificate program prepares students for employment as Web programmers, Web site
developers, Web administrators, Web masters, and Web architects. It also provides supplemental training for computer
science professionals and for students in other majors who desire expertise in Web programming and design. Topics
covered include programming, database systems, Web programming, networking, multimedia, and computer graphics. The
certificate requires 30 credits. All courses are available online. This certificate program can be combined with any major and
minor except the computer information systems and computer science majors, APS major with a concentration in computer
studies, and APS major with a concentration in computer engineering technology.
Web Programming and Design Certificate Requirements (30 credits)
CSIS 2050 CSIS 2100 CSIS 3020 CSIS 3100 CSIS 3400 CSIS 4650 TECH 2150 TECH 3000 Discrete Mathematics (3 credits)
Computer Programming I (4 credits)
Web Programming and Design (3 credits)
Computer Programming II (4 credits)
Data Structures (4 credits)
Computer Graphics (3 credits)
Introduction to Internet Resources (3 credits)
Multimedia Design (3 credits)
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Division of Performing and
Visual Arts
The Division of Performing and Visual Arts offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in Art, Arts Administration, Dance, Music, and
Theatre.
Majors in Performing and Visual Arts
Art Major
The art major is designed to provide students with a dynamic and comprehensive instructional program in the visual arts.
Students may earn a B.A. in Art with concentrations in studio art or graphic design. The art degree program prepares
students for careers as freelance artists or for employment with public and private organizations in the art industry.
Art Major Learning Outcomes
The successful art graduate is expected to:
1. Effectively apply visual design and composition concepts to produce original art;
2. Identify major art movements, the relevant artists and their art;
3. Evaluate art using aesthetic theories.
Art Major Curriculum
Students must complete art core courses (25 credits), 18 credits in one of the two concentrations, and 3 elective credits for
a total of 46 credits.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Art Major Requirements (46 credits)
Core Courses (25 credits)
ARTS 1200 Introduction to Drawing (3 credits)
ARTS 1250 Life Drawing (3 credits)
ARTS 1700 Fundamentals of Color (3 credits)
ARTS 1800 Two-Dimensional Design (3 credits)
ARTS 2200 Digital Photography (3 credits)
ARTS 2800 Three-Dimensional Design (3 credits)
ARTS 3800 Art History I (3 credits)
ARTS 3850 Art History II (3 credits)
ARTS 4995
Senior Project (1 credits)
Concentrations (18 credits)
Select one of the following areas of concentration:
Studio Art Concentration (18 credits)
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Select 18 credits from the following courses:
ARTS 2100
Painting I (3 credits)
ARTS 3100 Painting II (3 credits)
ARTS 3200 Digital Photographic Design (3 credits)
ARTS 3500
Sculpture I (3 credits)
ARTS 3550 Ceramics I (3 credits)
ARTS 3700 Methods and Materials (3 credits)
ARTS 4100 Contemporary Art (3 credits)
ARTS 4300 Experimental Studio Art (3 credits)
ARTS 4400 Installation Art (3 credits)
Graphic Design Concentration (18 credits)
Select 18 credits from the following courses:
ARTS 2410 Graphic Design I (3 credits)
ARTS 2450 Graphic Design II (3 credits)
ARTS 3200 Digital Photographic Design (3 credits)
ARTS 3450 Graphic Design III (3 credits)
ARTS 3650 Typography (3 credits)
ARTS 4200 Contemporary Graphic Design (3 credits)
ARTS 4250 Multimedia and Web Design (3 credits)
ARTS 4500 Professional Print Design (3 credits)
Major Electives (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following courses:
ARTS 2600 Introduction to Arts Administration (3 credits)
ARTS 3020 Women in the Arts (3 credits)
ARTS 3300 Myth and Art (3 credits)
ARTS 3400 Non-Western and Modern Art (3 credits)
PHIL 4000 Philosophy of Art (3 credits)
Arts Administration Major
The Bachelor of Arts in Arts Administration at NSU is designed to give students a varied background in the arts and
administrative skills needed to manage arts organizations. Students will learn to identify administrative issues specifically
related to arts organizations, demonstrate knowledge of the history of at least one area of performing or visual art, and apply
arts administration management principles in a practical work environment within the arts industry. The arts administration
major prepares students for careers in public and private arts organizations.
Arts Administration Major Learning Outcomes
The successful arts administration graduate is expected to:
1. Identify administrative issues specifically related to managing the arts industry;
2. Demonstrate knowledge of the history of at least one area of the performing and/or visual arts;
3. Apply arts administration management principles in a practical work environment within the arts industry.
Arts Administration Major Curriculum
Students must complete arts administration core courses (33 credits), two performing/visual arts history elective courses
(6 credits), and four elective courses (12 credits) for a total of 51 credits.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
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Arts Administration Major Requirements (46 credits)
Core Courses (33 credits)
ACT 2200
Financial Accounting (3 credits)
ACT 2300
Managerial Accounting (3 credits)
ARTS 2600
Introduction to Arts Administration (3 credits)
ARTS 3600
Advanced Arts Administration (3 credits)
ARTS 4950 Internship in the Arts (3 credits) OR
DANC 4950 Internship in Dance (3 credits) OR
MUSC 4950
Internship in Music (3 credits) OR
THEA 4950 Internship in Theatre (3 credits)
COMM 3200 Principles of Public Relations (3 credits)
FIN 3010
Corporation Finance (3 credits)
MGT 2050
Principles of Management (3 credits)
MGT 2150
Business Law (3 credits)
MGT 4170 Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
WRIT 3150 Business Writing (3 credits)
Performing/Visual Arts History (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following courses:
THEA 3200
Theatre History I (3 credits)
THEA 3250
Theatre History II (3 credits)
ARTS 3800
Art History I (3 credits)
ARTS 3850
Art History II (3 credits)
DANC 3200
Dance History (3 credits)
MUSC 3200
Musicology I (3 credits)
MUSC 3250
Musicology II (3 credits)
Electives (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following courses:
ARTS 2410
Graphic Design I (3 credits)
ARTS 2450
Graphic Design II (3 credits)
ARTS 3020
Women in the Arts (3 credits)
ARTS 3300
Myth and Art (3 credits)
ARTS 3400
Non-Western and Modern Art (3 credits)
ARTS 4900
Special Topics in the Arts (3 credits)
COMM 3500
Media Regulation (3 credits)
PHIL 4000
Philosophy of Art (3 credits)
THEA 2060 Technical Theatre (3 credits)
THEA 3500 Stage and Production Management (3 credits)
THEA 4100
Directing for the Stage (3 credits)
THEA 4900
Special Topics in Theatre (3 credits)
Dance Major
The dance major will help students develop in several areas: technical proficiency, historical and cultural perspectives,
personal artistry, and production skills. The major will also provide students with an understanding of how dance fits into a
larger global context through courses in dance history, global perspectives on dance, and contemporary dance techniques.
Students in the major will learn the behind-the-scenes process of putting a show together in a technical theatre class and
will get the opportunity to develop their own unique voice as artists in choreography and dance composition courses. The
dance major prepares graduates for careers in dance performance, choreography, dance education, and advanced study
in a graduate program.
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Dance Major Learning Outcomes
The successful dance graduate is expected to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Exhibit proficiency in various dance techniques and styles;
Identify and evaluate historical, cultural and stylistic forms of dance;
Demonstrate personal artistry in the creation of dance performances;
Explain the movement of the body in relation to dance.
Dance Major Curriculum
Students must complete dance core courses (28 credits), 14 studio credits, and 6 elective credits for a total of 48 credits.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Dance Major Requirements (48 credits)
Core Courses (28 credits)
DANC 1600 Modern Dance (2 credits)
DANC 2100
Dance Lab (1 credit each, must be taken 4 times) (4 credits)
DANC 3100
Dance Improvisation (3 credits)
DANC 3200
Dance History (3 credits)
DANC 3400
Production & Design for Dance (3 credits)
DANC 3500
Global Dance Perspectives (3 credits)
DANC 4000
Dance Composition (3 credits)
DANC 4300
Dance Choreography (3 credits)
THEA 2060
Technical Theatre (3 credits)
THEA 4930 Senior Seminar (1 credit)
Studio Electives (14 credits)
Select 14 credits from the following courses:
DANC 1200
Ballet I (2 credits)
DANC 1400
Jazz Dance I (2 credits)
DANC 2200
Ballet II (2 credits)
DANC 2400
Jazz Dance II (2 credits)
DANC 2600
Modern Dance II (2 credits)
DANC 3000
African Dance (2 credits)
DANC 3300
Latin and Caribbean Dance (2 credits)
DANC 3600
Modern Dance III (2 credits)
DANC 3900
Advanced Studio Technique (2 credits)
Major Electives (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following courses:
ARTS 2600 Introduction to Arts Administration (3 credits)
DANC 1500
Contemporary Dance Techniques (3 credits)
DANC 4900 Special Topics in Dance (3 credits)
DANC 4950 Internship in Dance (3 credits)
DANC 4990 Independent Study in Dance (3 credits)
THEA 2000 Voice & Movement (3 credits)
THEA 3050 Costuming & Make-Up (3 credits)
THEA 3500 Stage and Production Management (3 credits)
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Music Major
The music major includes a four-semester sequence of music theory supplemented by instruction in piano, sight-reading,
and ear training. Musicological studies in the standard repertoire are supplemented with courses specific to the instrument or
voice. Conducting reinforces the integration of the music core with performance and develops leadership abilities. Students
will improve their performance skills in ensembles which perform regularly on campus and throughout South Florida. A
music major prepares students for a wide variety of careers such as professional musician (soloist, chorus, or orchestra
member), musical director, conductor, vocal conductor, and music teacher.
Music Major Learning Outcomes
The successful music graduate is expected to:
1. Demonstrate proficiency in music theory with a 75% degree of accuracy in sight-reading, aural dictation, and score
analysis;
2. Identify various performance practices and styles and apply these to his or her own performance;
3. Perform accurately and musically with technical adeptness.
Music Major Curriculum
Students must complete music core courses (27 credits); 16 performance, vocal, or instrumental credits; and 6 elective
credits for a total of 49 credits.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Music Major Requirements (49 credits)
Core Courses (27 credits)
MUSC 1200
Piano I (3 credits)
MUSC 1250 Piano II (3 credits)
MUSC 1800
Music Theory I (3 credits)
MUSC 1850
Music Theory II (3 credits)
MUSC 2800
Music Theory III (3 credits)
MUSC 2850
Music Theory IV (3 credits)
MUSC 3200
Musicology I (3 credits)
MUSC 3250
Musicology II (3 credits)
MUSC 4000
Conducting (3 credits)
Performance, Vocal, or Instrumental Requirements (16 credits)
MUSC 2200
Applied Lessons I – 1 credit per semester (4 credits)
MUSC 3300
Ensemble – 1 credit per semester (8 credits)
MUSC 4200
Applied Lessons II – 1 credit per semester (4 credits)
Major Electives (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following courses:
MUSC 1500
Beginning Voice (3 credits)
MUSC 2000
Music Performance Ensemble (3 credits)
MUSC 2300
Intermediate Voice Class (3 credits)
MUSC 2500
American Popular Music (3 credits)
MUSC 2900
Vocal Diction (3 credits)
MUSC 3000
Musical Theatre (3 credits)
MUSC 4100 Composition/MIDI (3 credits)
MUSC 4500 Vocal Literature (3 credits)
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MUSC 4600 MUSC 4900
MUSC 4950
MUSC 4990
Instrumental Literature (3 credits)
Special Topics in Music (3 credits)
Internship in Music (3 credits)
Independent Study in Music (3 credits)
Theatre Major
The theatre major takes a broad approach, giving students a varied background in the discipline of theatre. Students will
learn how to communicate effectively, identify the historical periods and styles of theatre, demonstrate knowledge of and
skill in aspects of technical theatre, such as costuming, lighting, set design and construction, demonstrate skill in public
performance, direct theatrical scenes or productions, and understand the role of drama in culture. A theatre major prepares
students for a wide variety of careers in professional theatre, education, television, and broadcast journalism.
Theatre Major Learning Outcomes
A successful theatre graduate is expected to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Identify the historical, cultural, and stylistic aspects of theatre;
Exhibit skill in technical theatre and design;
Display performance skills in theatrical productions;
Direct theatrical scenes or productions.
Theatre Major Curriculum
Students must complete the theatre core (35 credits), a technical theatre requirement (6 credits), and four major elective
courses (12 credits) for a total of 47 credits. At least 18 credits in the major must be at the 3000/4000 level.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Theatre Major Requirements (47 credits)
Core Courses (29 credits)
LITR 3640 Studies in Drama (3 credits) OR LITR 4720 Shakespeare (3 credits)
THEA 2020 Acting I (3 credits)
THEA 2030
Play Analysis (3 credits)
THEA 2060 Technical Theatre (3 credits)
THEA 2100
Theatre Lab (1 credit each—must take four times)
THEA 3200
Theatre History I (3 credits)
THEA 3250 Theatre History II (3 credits)
THEA 3500
Production and Stage Management (3 credits)
THEA 4100
Directing for the Stage (3 credits)
THEA 4930
Senior Seminar (1 credit)
Technical Theatre Requirement (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following:
THEA 3050
Costuming and Makeup (3 credits)
THEA 3060 Scene Design (3 credits)
THEA 3070
Lighting and Sound Design (3 credit
Major Electives (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following:
COMM 3050
Performance Studies (3 credits)
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THEA 1500
THEA 2000 THEA 2025
THEA 2200
THEA 3020 THEA 4020
THEA 4900 THEA 4950 THEA 4990 Comedy and Improvisation (3 credits)
Voice and Movement (3 credits)
Performance for Film and Television (3 credits)
Vocal Articulation for Media and Stage (3 credits)
Acting II (3 credits)
Acting Styles (3 credits)
Special Topics in Theatre (3 credits)
Internship in Theatre (maximum of 3 credits)
Independent Study in Theatre (1–3 credits)
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Minors in Performing and Visual Arts
Arts Administration Minor
The arts administration minor is designed to help prepare students for management in the arts industry. It gives students an
overview of the application of specific administrative issues to the arts: communication, public relations, writing, development,
policy, education, planning, outreach, and management for arts organizations. This minor can be combined with any major
and minor except the arts administration major.
Arts Administration Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Students must complete the following:
ARTS 2600 Introduction to Arts Administration (3 credits)
ARTS 3600 Advanced Arts Administration (3 credits)
COMM 3200 Principles of Public Relations (3 credits)
MGT 2050 Principles of Management (3 credits)
WRIT 3150 Business Writing (3 credits)
Any 3000/4000-level ARTS, MUSC, or THEA course (3 credits)
Graphic Design Minor
The graphic design minor combines historical knowledge of the design discipline with contemporary problem-solving technical
skills. Students will gain in-depth experience using industry-standard computer software while acquiring an understanding
of graphic design principles and formats. The graphic design minor serves as an excellent complement to many majors,
including marketing, business administration, and communication studies. This minor will better prepare students for their
future careers by offering them marketable skills, enabling them to become more viable in today’s competitive job market.
This major can be combined with any major and minor except the art major.
Graphic Design Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Core Courses (15 credits)
ARTS 1800
Two-Dimensional Design (3 credits)
ARTS 2410 Graphic Design I (3 credits)
ARTS 2450 Graphic Design II (3 credits)
ARTS 3450 Graphic Design III (3 credits)
ARTS 3650 Typography (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following courses:
ARTS 3200 Digital Photographic Design (3 credits)
ARTS 4200 Contemporary Graphic Design (3 credits)
ARTS 4250 Multimedia and Web Design (3 credits)
ARTS 4500 Professional Print Design (3 credits)
ARTS 4900
Special Topics in the Arts (3 credits) (requires faculty permission)
ARTS 4990
Independent Study in the Arts (3 credits) (requires faculty permission)
Music Minor
The music minor at Nova Southeastern University introduces students to theoretical and historical perspectives on the art of
music while allowing them to gain hands-on performing experience through applied lessons, musical ensembles, and voice
classes. The academic understanding and practical skills acquired through a music minor are a great professional asset
for those pursuing careers in fields including education, theatre, speech-language pathology, speech communication, or
therapy. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the music and musical theatre majors.
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Music Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Core Courses (9 credits)
MUSC 1200 Piano I (3 credits)
MUSC 1800 Music Theory I (3 credits)
MUSC 3200 Musicology I OR MUSC 3250 Musicology II (3 credits)
Minor Electives (9 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following courses:
ARTS 1500
Music through History (3 credits)
MUSC 1250 Piano II (3 credits)
MUSC 1500 Beginning Voice (3 credits)
MUSC 1850 Music Theory II (3 credits)
MUSC 2200 Applied Lessons I (1 credit) (may be repeated up to 3 credits)
MUSC 2300 Intermediate Voice (3 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following courses:
MUSC 3000 Musical Theatre (3 credits)
MUSC 3200 Musicology I (3 credits)
MUSC 3250 Musicology II (3 credits)
MUSC 3300 Ensemble (1 credit) (may be repeated up to 3 credits)
MUSC 4200 Applied Lessons II (1 credit (may be repeated up to 3 credits)
MUSC 4900 Special Topics in Music (3 credits)
Theatre Minor
The theatre minor offers students an opportunity to experience the tradition and experience of the theatre. It serves as an
excellent complement to many majors, including English, communication studies, and humanities. This minor will allow
students to branch out from their subject of study and not only learn the tradition and techniques of the theatre, but also be
better equipped to participate confidently in one or more of the co-curricular and extra-curricular experiences that will be
generated by the theatre program. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the musical theatre and
theatre majors.
Theatre Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Students must complete 18 credits from the following list, 9 credits of which must be at the 3000/4000 level.
Core Courses (9 credits)
THEA 2020
Acting I (3 credits)
THEA 2060
Technical Theatre (3 credits)
THEA 3200
Theatre History I (3 credits) OR THEA 3250 Theatre History II (3 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following courses:
COMM 3050 Performance Studies (3 credits)
THEA 1500
Comedy and Improvisation (3 credits)
THEA 2000 Voice and Movement (3 credits)
THEA 2025
Performance for Film and Television (3 credits)
THEA 2030
Play Analysis (3 credits)
THEA 2100
Theatre Laboratory (1 credit each—must take three times)
THEA 2200
Vocal Articulation for Media and Stage (3 credits)
THEA 3020 Acting II (3 credits)
THEA 3050 Costuming and Makeup (3 credits)
THEA 3060 Scene Design (3 credits)
THEA 3070
Lighting and Stage Design (3 credits)
THEA 3500 Production and Stage Management (3 credits)
THEA 4020
Acting Styles (3 credits)
THEA 4100 Directing for the Stage (3 credits)
THEA 4900
Special Topics in Theatre (3 credits)
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Division of Social and
Behavioral Sciences
The Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers the Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice, Paralegal Studies,
Psychology, and Sociology. The division also administers psychology and substance abuse studies concentrations for the
college’s interdisciplinary major in applied professional studies.
Majors in Social and Behavioral Sciences
Criminal Justice Major
The criminal justice major prepares students for academic and professional careers in criminal justice and related fields.
Utilizing a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach, through scholarship, research, and training, students will develop an
understanding of the dynamic interplay between theory and practice in the criminal justice system. Further, students will
understand and appreciate the complex relationship between the three components of the criminal justice system—law
enforcement, the courts, and corrections.
Criminal Justice Major Learning Outcomes
A successful criminal justice graduate is expected to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the major theories, principles, and concepts that govern each of the following
core areas of criminal justice:
a. Law;
b. Law enforcement;
c. Corrections;
d. The court system;
e. Crime causation;
f. Research methods and statistics.
2. Integrate and apply the major theories, principles, and concepts of criminal justice to analyze and evaluate research
and/or applied issues in the field of criminal justice using critical thinking skills, skeptical inquiry, and, where
applicable, the scientific approach;
3. Produce criminal justice information in a clear, concise manner, consistent with relevant professional standards.
Criminal Justice Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Criminal Justice Major Requirements (54 credits)
Core Courses (45 credits)
CRJU 1100
Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 credits)
CRJU 1200
Criminal Law (3 credits)
CRJU 2000
Constitutional Issues (3 credits)
CRJU 2220
Criminology (3 credits)
CRJU 2400 Court Systems and Procedures (3 credits)
CRJU 2500
Ethical Dilemmas and Decisions in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
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CRJU 2600
CRJU 3100 CRJU 3220
CRJU 3250 CRJU 3300 CRJU 3400 CRJU 4000 CRJU 4500 CRJU 4880
Multiculturalism and Crime (3 credits)
Juvenile Delinquency (3 credits)
Policing (3 credits)
Interviewing, Interrogation, and Report Writing (3 credits)
Corrections in America (3 credits)
Criminal Investigations (3 credits)
Victimology (3 credits)
Research Methods in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
Senior Seminar (3 credits)
Major Electives (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following courses:
CRJU 3700
The CSI Effect: Media and Criminal Justice (3 credits)
CRJU 4200
Terrorism and Homeland Security (3 credits)
CRJU 4400
Police Organizational Behavior and Management (3 credits)
CRJU 4600 Gangs in America (3 credits)
CRJU 4900 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (3–6 credits)
CRJU 4950
Internship in Criminal Justice (3–6 credits)
PSYC 2450 Forensic Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 3270
The Psychology of Criminal Behavior (3 credits)
Paralegal Studies Major
The Bachelor of Science degree in Paralegal Studies is approved by the American Bar Association. A paralegal, as defined
by the American Bar Association, is “a person qualified by education, training, or work experience, who is employed or
retained by a lawyer, law office, corporation, governmental agency or other entity, and who performs specifically delegated
substantive legal work for which a lawyer is responsible.” The goal of the program is to prepare students for entry-level
paralegal positions in the common areas of law practice. Paralegals are nonlawyers, and therefore, are prohibited from the
unauthorized practice of law. This program trains paralegals and is not a program for training lawyers or legal administrators.
Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in Paralegal Studies are required to submit a paralegal portfolio at an exit
interview with the program coordinator prior to degree conferral.
Paralegal Studies Program Objectives
The objectives of the Paralegal Studies Program are to:
1. Provide students with a broad-based education in both liberal arts and paralegal studies;
2. Provide paralegal courses that enable students to obtain substantive legal knowledge, develop analytical skills, and
apply the knowledge they have learned to tasks routinely performed by paralegals;
3. Be responsive in course offerings to the needs of paralegals and attorneys;
4. Ensure that students are familiar with the ethical guidelines for paralegals;
5. Provide students with the opportunity to utilize software that is used in most offices dealing with law-related issues;
6. Familiarize students with the paralegal profession and the opportunities that are available to them upon completion
of the program.
Paralegal Studies Major Learning Outcomes
A successful paralegal studies graduate is expected to:
1. Explain the basic theories, doctrines, concepts, and associated principles that comprise the knowledge base of
law, with specific emphasis on torts, contracts, wills and trusts, civil procedure, litigation, family law, business
organizations, real estate, and criminal law;
2. Use critical-thinking skills to analyze and evaluate relevant facts and supporting material;
3. Use communication and interpersonal skills to effectively interact with clients, attorneys, judges, court personnel,
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and coworkers;
4. Categorize, organize, prioritize, and evaluate complex factual and legal issues;
5. Use legal-research skills to research and find statutes, cases, and other primary source material, and to draft legal
documents.
Paralegal Studies Major Curriculum
Paralegal studies majors may take a maximum of 6 major elective credits in Special Topics courses and a maximum of 6
major elective credits in internship courses. LEGS courses offered online require proctored exams at approved sites.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Paralegal Studies Major Requirements (54 credits)
Core Courses (45 credits)
LEGS 1150 Introduction to Law and the Legal Profession (3 credits)
LEGS 2100
Legal Research and Writing I (3 credits)
LEGS 3050
Criminal Law and Procedure (3 credits)
LEGS 3210
Computer Applications for the Legal Profession (3 credits)
LEGS 3260
Real Estate Practice I (3 credits)
LEGS 3300
Torts and Civil Litigation (3 credits)
LEGS 3360
Wills, Trusts and Estates I (3 credits)
LEGS 3400
Business Relations and Organizations (3 credits)
LEGS 3550
Family Law (3 credits)
LEGS 4110 Legal Research and Writing II (3 credits)
LEGS 4270
Real Estate Practice II (3 credits)
LEGS 4310
Advanced Litigation (3 credits)
LEGS 4370
Wills, Trusts, and Estates II (3 credits)
LEGS 4410
Corporate Regulation and Change (3 credits)
SPCH 1010
Public Speaking (3 credits) OR SPCH 2020 Argument and Debate (3 credits)
Major Electives (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following courses:
LEGS 4060 Debtor and Creditor Relations (3 credits)
LEGS 4470 Emerging Technologies and the Legal Profession (3 credits)
LEGS 4560 Elder Law (3 credits)
LEGS 4900 Special Topics in Paralegal Studies (3 credits)
LEGS 4950 Internship in Paralegal Studies (3 credits)
Psychology Major
The psychology major provides students with a solid grounding in the knowledge base of psychology. It encourages students
to integrate and apply knowledge, and allows flexibility in course selection to help students meet their career goals. The
major emphasizes scientific research and application to significant areas of human activities.
The psychology major prepares students for both entry-level jobs in the workforce and advanced professional education
in psychology. Students interested in pursuing a graduate education in psychology should select their electives based
on their specific career interests. For example, students interested in seeking careers as mental health counselors or
clinical psychologists should take additional clinical and counseling courses. Students interested in becoming research/
academic psychologists should take additional courses that sharpen their knowledge in one or more subfields of psychology
(e.g., cognitive psychology, social psychology, or neuroscience). In all cases, students interested in pursuing a psychology
graduate education should consider additional coursework and hands-on experiences (e.g., independent studies) that
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enhance their research and data-analysis skills, as these skills are fundamental to all areas of psychology. Lastly, students
considering graduate education in psychology should a) seek input soon after declaring psychology as their major from
psychology faculty members and their academic advisors regarding general psychology electives to create a knowledge
framework that best prepares them for their specific career goals, and b) consider taking the Graduate Record Examination
(GRE) during their junior year.
Students unsure about which psychology career path they are most interested in pursuing should take as many of their
foundation courses as possible at the start of their program of study to acquire a general sense of each of the major domains
of psychology.
Psychology Major Learning Outcomes
A successful psychology graduate is expected to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the major theories, principles, and concepts that underlie the following core areas
of psychology:
a. Learning, Memory, and/or Cognition
b. Sensation, Perception, and/or Biological Bases of Behavior
c. Human Development
d. Clinical, Abnormal, and/or Personality
e. Social Influences on Thoughts, Feelings, and Behaviors
f. Research Measurement, Design, and Methodology;
2. Integrate and apply the major theories, principles, and concepts of psychology to address research and/or applied
issues in the field of psychology using critical thinking skills, skeptical inquiry, and when possible, the scientific
approach;
3. Present written psychological information in a clear, concise manner that is consistent with professional standards
(i.e., APA format).
Psychology Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Psychology Major Requirements (54 credits)
Core Courses (21 credits)
MATH 3020
Applied Statistics I (3 credits)
PSYC 1020 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 2900
Quantitative Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 3000 Psychological Research Methods (3 credits)
PSYC 3710 History and Theories of Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 3760 Multicultural Issues in Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 4880
Senior Seminar (3 credits)
Major Foundation Course Requirements (18 credits)
Select 3 credits from each of the following 6 foundation areas:
1. Learning, Memory, and/or Cognition
PSYC 2010
Cognitive Processes (3 credits)
PSYC 2300
Behavior Modification (3 credits)
PSYC 3520
Principles of Learning (3 credits)
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2. Sensation, Perception, and/or Biological Bases of Behavior
PSYC 2100
Biological Basis of Behavior (3 credits)
PSYC 3200
Evolutionary Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 3920
Sensation and Perception (3 credits)
PSYC 4300
Psychophysiology (3 credits)
3. Human Development
PSYC 2350
Life-Span Human Development (3 credits)
PSYC 2370
Early Childhood Growth and Development (3 credits)
PSYC 2380
Child and Adolescent Development (3 credits)
4. Clinical, Abnormal, and/or Personality
PSYC 2020
Foundations of Clinical and Counseling Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 3210
Personality (3 credits)
PSYC 3260
Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)
5. Social Influences on Thoughts, Feelings, and Behaviors
PSYC 2160 Social Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 3180
Stereotypes, Prejudice, and Discrimination (3 credits)
PSYC 3360
Psychology of Gender (3 credits)
6. Methods and Application
PSYC 3030 Experimental Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 4800
Practicum in Psychological Research (3 credits)
PSYC 4810
Practicum in Community Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 4840
Advanced Practicum in Psychology (3 credits)
Other Major Electives (15 credits)*
*At least 9 of the 15 credits must be at the 3000/4000 level.
Sociology Major
Sociology focuses on the study of the interactive dynamics of social institutions, organizations, and everyday life. Sociologists
combine humanistic and scientific perspectives to study urban and rural life, family patterns, social change, health care and illness,
crime and violence, social class, technology and communications, social movements, and many other social issues and problems.
More specifically, Sociology is the systematic study of human behavior in social context. It focuses on the study of human
society and social interaction. The discipline examines how we group ourselves (families, social groups, formal organizations,
societies), how we behave in groups (collective action, social change, crime and delinquency), and how characteristics like
age, race, social class, and gender affect our relationships with each other, and with organizations and institutions.
Sociology Major Learning Outcomes
The successful sociology graduate is expected to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the major theories and concepts that underlie the following core areas of sociology:
a. Socialization and Social Interaction;
b. Groups, Organizations, and Social Institutions;
c. Stratification and Social Inequality;
d. Global Cultural Perspectives;
e. Qualitative and/or Quantitative Research Measurement, Design, and Methodology;
2. Describe and analyze the three major sociological approaches: Structural Functional, Social Conflict, and
Symbolic Interaction;
3. Integrate and apply the major theories, principles, and concepts of sociology to address research and/or applied
issues in the field of sociology using critical thinking skills, skeptical inquiry, and the sociological perspective;
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4. Present written sociological information in a clear, concise manner that is consistent with professional standards.
Sociology Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Sociology Major Requirements (45 credits)
Foundation Courses (9 credits)
ANTH 1020
Introduction to Anthropology (3 credits)
MATH 3020 Applied Statistics (3 credits)
Ethical/Moral Issues (choose one of following):
PHIL 2000 Moral Issues (3 credits)
PHIL 3010 Ethical Issues in Communication (3 credits)
PHIL 3180 Biomedical Ethics (3 credits)
PHIL 3200 Ethics and Sport, OR
PHIL 3360 Environmental Ethics (3 credits)
Core Courses (18 credits)
SOCL 1020 Introduction to Sociology (3 credits)
SOCL 2510 Social Problems (3 credits)
SOCL 3000 Research Methods in the Social Sciences (3 credits)
SOCL 3200 Classical Social Theory (3 credits)
SOCL 3400 Contemporary Social Theory (3 credits)
SOCL 4880
Senior Seminar (3 credits)
Major Electives (18 credits)
Select at least six courses with a minimum of 9 credits at the 3000/4000 level from any course with the prefix SOCL that
is not required for the major.
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Minors in Social and Behavioral Sciences
Anthropology Minor
The anthropology minor is intended to acquaint students with the cross-cultural study of people and cultures through the
diverse discipline of anthropology. The anthropology minor includes an overview of anthropological theory and research
methods, of interdisciplinary approaches and cultural studies, as well as an examination of the four sub-fields of anthropology.
This minor can be combined with any major and minor. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot
be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Anthropology Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Core Courses (12 credits)
ANTH 1020
Introduction to Anthropology (3 credits)
ANTH 3200
Anthropological Theories (3 credits)
SOCL 1020
Introduction to Sociology (3 credits)
SOCL 3000
Research Methods in the Social Sciences (3 credits)
Minor Electives (6 credits)
Students must select one additional course from each of the two groups below for a total of 6 credits.
Select 3 credits from the following courses:
SOCL 3500
Race and Ethnicity in the U.S. (3 credits)
SOCL 3700
Ethnic Family Diversity (3 credits)
AND
Select 3 credits from the following courses:
HIST 2130
Formation of Latin America (3 credits)
HIST 2200
Asian History (3 credits)
HIST 2300
Caribbean History (3 credits)
HIST 2400
African History (3 credits)
INST 1500
Global Issues (3 credits)
SOCL 3600
Environmental Sociology (3 credits)
Applied Behavior Analysis Minor
The applied behavior analysis minor is designed to address the growing need for behavior analysts in the community.
Coupled with a major in psychology (or other fields) students will graduate with a strong professional preparation in applied
and research domains. Students will be required to complete up to 670 hours of practicum experience as part of the minor.
This minor can be combined with any major and minor. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot
be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Applied Behavior Analysis Minor Requirements (18 credits)
PSYC 3330
PSYC 3350
PSYC 3370
PSYC 4700
PSYC 4730
PSYC 4760 Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
Assessment in Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
Interventions in Applied Behavior Analysis (3 credits)
Practicum in ABA I (3 credits)
Practicum in ABA II (3 credits)
Practicum in ABA III (3 credits)
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Behavioral Neuroscience Minor
The behavioral neuroscience minor is intended to offer students in-depth training in brain-behavior relations and biological
aspects of psychology. Behavioral neuroscience explores new discoveries and insights in dynamic areas such as the
neurological origins of consciousness, emotion, and psychopathology. This minor is especially helpful for psychology
students preparing for graduate school and for students planning to enter the medical fields who have an interest in brainbehavior relationships. This minor can be combined with any major and minor. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to
the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Behavioral Neuroscience Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Core Courses (6 credits)
PSYC 1020
Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 2100
Biological Bases of Behavior (3 credits)
Minor Electives (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following courses:
BIOL 4200
Neurobiology (3 credits)
PSYC 2010
Cognitive Processes (3 credits)
PSYC 3900
Neuropsychology (3 credits)
PSYC 3920
Sensation and Perception (3 credits)
PSYC 4300
Psychophysiology (3 credits)
PSYC 4400
Hormones and Behavior (3 credits)
Counseling Minor
The counseling minor provides a thorough overview of the counseling and psychotherapy fields. The minor is skills-based,
experiential, and theoretical. Courses focus on both theory and application to provide a preliminary understanding of the
field; an exploration of individual, group, and family therapies; and incorporation of gender and cultural issues. While not the
sole component in preparing students to be counselors, the counseling minor is appropriate for students planning to enter
mental health fields at the bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral levels and for students whose careers will bring them into contact
with mental health professionals. This minor can be combined with any major and minor. A minimum of 9 credits must be
exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Counseling Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Core Course (3 credits)
PSYC 2000 Introduction to the Counseling Profession (3 credits)
Minor Electives (15 credits)
Select 15 credits from the following courses:
PSYC 3450 Foundations of Therapeutic Interviewing (3 credits)
PSYC 3750 Gender and Counseling (3 credits)
PSYC 3800 Current Psychotherapies (3 credits)
PSYC 3950 Brief Therapy (3 credits)
PSYC 4150 Group Counseling in Substance Abuse (3 credits)
PSYC 4200 Cross-Cultural Counseling (3 credits)
PSYC 4810 Practicum in Community Psychology (3 credits) (Note: only counseling sites qualify)
SOCL 3130 Family Systems (3 credits)
Criminal Justice Minor
The criminal justice minor provides students with an overview of the criminal justice system, including its three components—
law enforcement, the courts, and corrections. In this course of study, students explore criminal law and procedure,
constitutional rights of defendants, victimization, correctional theory and practice, and policing. This minor is recommended
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for students interested in criminology, criminal defense or prosecution, and law enforcement-related fields. This minor can
be combined with any major and minor except the criminal justice major.
Criminal Justice Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Core Courses (9 credits)
CRJU 1100 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 credits)
CRJU 1200 Criminal Law (3 credits)
CRJU 2220
Criminology (3 credits)
Minor Electives (9 credits)
Select 9 credits from the following courses:
CRJU 3100 Juvenile Delinquency (3 credits)
CRJU 3200 Policing (3 credits)
CRJU 3300
Corrections (3 credits)
CRJU 3400
Criminal Investigations (3 credits)
CRJU 3700
The CSI Effect: Media and Criminal Justice (3 credits)
CRJU 4000
Victimology (3 credits)
CRJU 4400
Police Organizational Behavior and Management (3 credits)
CRJU 4500
Research Methods in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
CRJU 4600
Gangs in America (3 credits)
CRJU 4200
Terrorism and Homeland Security (3 credits)
CRJU 4880
Senior Seminar (3 credits)
CRJU 4900
Special Topics in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
Dispute Management and Resolution Minor
The dispute management and resolution minor is designed to present students with an overview of some of the major
theories and practices encompassing the field. The minor offers students theoretical, skills-based, and experiential learning
opportunities. Offering new perspectives to a topic which affects everyone, this program examines theories including conflict
causation, escalation, management, and resolution, and cultural aspects of conflict. The minor provides students with a
fundamental understanding and working knowledge of several management and resolution processes including conflict
coaching, negotiation, mediation, and restorative justice. The minor also includes a semester of practicum experience
providing students with the opportunity to practice and enhance their newly learned knowledge and skills for dispute
managements and resolution. This minor can be combined with any major and minor.
Dispute Management and Resolution Minor Requirements (18 credits)
PSYC 2330
ADRB 2000
ADRB 2100
ADRB 3200
ADRB 3300
ADRB 4000
Interpersonal Communication (3 credits)
Introduction to Dispute Resolution (3 credits)
Mediation Theory and Practice (3 credits)
Conflict Management and Resolution Theory (3 credits)
Culture and Conflict (3 credits)
Practicum in Dispute Management and Resolution (3 credits)
Family Studies Minor
The family studies minor examines the North American family and its alternatives from a multicultural, life-span perspective.
It is designed to expose and engage students in a range of topics related to family function and structure in contemporary
society. The minor explores families as social systems and various relational dynamics that function within families, including
diversity and gender. Courses explore the internal dynamics of family functioning while contextualizing family processes
in the larger field of social interactions and practices. This minor provides a framework for the application of theory and
knowledge for students considering working in a variety of public and private social services agencies serving families.
Students minoring in both family studies and sociology may have no more than two sociology courses in common. This
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minor can be combined with any major and minor. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be
counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Family Studies Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Select 18 credits from the following courses:
SOCL 2130 SOCL 2300 SOCL 3110 SOCL 3130 PSYC 3550 SOCL 3700 SOCL 3800 SOCL 4200 Family Relationships (3 credits)
Family Communication (3 credits)
Gender, Sexuality and the Family (3 credits)
Family Systems (3 credits)
Substance Abuse and the Family (3 credits)
Ethnic Family Diversity (3 credits)
Family Life Cycle (3 credits)
Violence and the Family (3 credits)
Forensic Psychology Minor
The forensic psychology minor provides students with an understanding of the interactions between psychology and the
criminal justice and legal systems. This minor will expose students to the basic components of the criminal justice system
and the various roles that forensic psychologists assume within the criminal justice and legal systems. Students in the minor
will explore such topics as: the legal standards related to working as a mental health professional or serving as an expert
witness in the legal and criminal justice systems; common types of forensic evaluations conducted by psychologists for the
courts; roles for psychologists in the screening, evaluating, treatment, and/or training of law enforcement officers; methods
of assisting attorneys in selecting jurors or in evaluating various trial strategies; and psychological research findings that
have relevance to the criminal justice and legal systems. This minor also will discuss some of the factors that contribute
to the development and maintenance of criminal behavior and some of the evaluation and treatment procedures used by
correctional and community mental health workers to manage criminal offenders. The forensic psychology minor is suitable
for criminal justice majors or any individual wishing to pursue a background in psychology and criminal justice. The minor
would be good preparation for those individuals wishing to pursue pre-law or social work and for individuals considering
graduate work in forensic psychology. The forensic minor is open to all non-psychology majors. This minor can be combined
with any major and minor except the psychology major.
Forensic Psychology Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Core Courses (12 credits)
CRJU 1100
Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 credits)
PSYC 1020
Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 2450 Forensic Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 3270
Psychology of Criminal Behavior (3 credits)
Minor Electives (6 credits)
Select 6 credits from the following courses:
PSYC 2160
Social Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 3180 Stereotypes, Prejudices, and Discrimination (3 credits)
PSYC 3260 Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 3600 Criminal Justice and Substance Abuse (3 credits)
PSYC 3760
Multicultural Issues in Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 4050
Psychological Assessment (3 credits)
Paralegal Studies Minor
The paralegal studies minor is designed to expose students to the most common areas of law encountered in a legal and
business context. The minor is not designed to encompass the entire range of skills needed in the paralegal profession.
It is not a program for training paralegals and is not approved by the American Bar Association. The minor is a wonderful
enhancement for those students pursuing other law-related careers or business careers and who desire to understand the
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federal and state legal systems to broaden their legal knowledge and skills. LEGS courses offered online require proctored
exams at approved sites. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the paralegal studies major and
paralegal studies post-baccalaureate certificate.
Paralegal Studies Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Core Courses (6 credits)
LEGS 1150 Introduction to Law and the Legal Profession (3 credits)
LEGS 2100 Legal Research and Writing (3 credits)
Minor Electives (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following courses:
LEGS 3050 Criminal Law and Procedure (3 credits)
LEGS 3260 Real Estate Practice I (3 credits)
LEGS 3300 Torts and Civil Litigation (3 credits)
LEGS 3360 Wills, Trusts, and Estates I (3 credits)
LEGS 3400 Business Relations and Organizations (3 credits)
LEGS 3550 Family Law (3 credits)
Psychology Minor
The psychology minor is intended to provide students with a solid grounding in the knowledge base of psychology and the
opportunity to explore areas of psychology that most closely correspond to their interests and goals. At least three of the
six psychology courses must be 3000-level courses. This minor can be combined with any major and minor except the
psychology major and APS major with a concentration in psychology.
Psychology Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Core Courses (6 credits)
PSYC 1020 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 3710
History and Theories of Psychology (3 credits) OR PSYC 3760 Multicultural Issues in Psychology
(3 credits)
Minor Electives (12 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following courses:
PSYC 2010
Cognitive Processes (3 credits)
PSYC 2020
Foundations of Clinical and Counseling Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 2100
Biological Basis of Behavior (3 credits)
PSYC 2160
Social Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 2350
Life-Span Human Development (3 credits) OR PSYC 2380 Child and Adolescent Development
(3 credits)
PSYC 3000 Psychological Research Methods (3 credits)
PSYC 3210 Personality (3 credits)
PSYC 3260 Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 3520
Principles of Learning (3 credits)
Sociology Minor
The sociology minor is intended to provide students with a solid grounding in the knowledge base of sociology. It covers
social processes and change in a variety of arenas, including families, work, gender, and communities. Students minoring in
both family studies and sociology may have no more than two sociology courses in common. This minor can be combined
with any major and minor except the sociology major.
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Sociology Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Core Courses (9 credits)
SOCL 1020 Introduction to Sociology (3 credits)
SOCL 2130 Family Relationships (3 credits)
SOCL 2510 Social Problems (3 credits)
Minor Electives (9 credits)
Students must select three additional SOCL prefix courses, at the 3000 or 4000 level.
Substance Abuse Studies Minor
The substance abuse studies minor is designed to meet the needs of those who wish to develop a broad base of knowledge
concerning substance abuse problems, resources available for managing these problems, and modes of treatment of the
individual substance abuser. This minor is appropriate for students employed in or wishing to enter the field of substance
abuse treatment, as well as students who feel that the knowledge base provided in this program will be useful to them in
their careers (management, teaching, etc.). Some minor courses are offered only in the evening or on weekends. This minor
can be combined with any major and minor except the APS major with a concentration in substance abuse studies and the
substance abuse studies certificate. A minimum of 9 credits must be exclusive to the minor and cannot be counted toward
any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Substance Abuse Studies Minor Requirements (18 credits)
PSYC 3550 PSYC 3570 PSYC 3580 PSYC 3600 PSYC 3620 PSYC 3630 Substance Abuse and the Family (3 credits)
Psychology and Physiology of Substance Abuse (3 credits)
Rehabilitation Strategies for Substance Abuse (3 credits)
Criminal Justice and Substance Abuse (3 credits)
Drug Prevention and Education (3 credits)
Ethical and Professional Developments (3 credits)
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Certificates in Social and Behavioral Sciences
Paralegal Studies Post-Baccalaureate Certificate
The Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program in Paralegal Studies is approved by the American Bar Association. A paralegal,
as defined by the American Bar Association, is “a person, qualified by education, training or work experience, who is
employed or retained by a lawyer, law office, corporation, governmental agency, or other entity, and who performs specifically
delegated substantive legal work for which a lawyer is responsible.” The goal of the program is to prepare students for
entry-level paralegal positions in the common areas of law practice. Paralegals are nonlawyers and therefore are prohibited
from the unauthorized practice of law. This program trains paralegals and is not a program for training lawyers or legal
administrators.
Students in the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program are required to submit a paralegal portfolio at an exit interview with
the program coordinator prior to certificate conferral. LEGS courses offered online require proctored exams at approved
sites. This certificate program cannot be combined with any major or minor because it is a post-baccalaureate program.
Paralegal Studies Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Requirements (30 credits)
LEGS 1150
LEGS 2100
LEGS 3050
LEGS 3210
LEGS 3260
LEGS 3300
LEGS 3360
LEGS 3400
LEGS 3550
Introduction to Law and the Legal Profession (3 credits)
Legal Research and Writing (3 credits)
Criminal Law and Procedure (3 credits)
Computer Applications for the Legal Profession (3 credits)
Real Estate Practice I (3 credits)
Torts and Civil Litigation (3 credits)
Wills, Trusts, and Estates I (3 credits)
Business Relations and Organizations (3 credits)
Family Law (3 credits)
Students may select one 4000-level LEGS course of their choice as long as they meet the necessary course prerequisites.
Substance Abuse Studies Certificate
NSU is listed as a single-source provider by the Florida Certification Board (FCB). The certificate program in substance
abuse studies prepares students for certification from the Florida Certification Board SS #02. The program is designed so
that interested applicants may pursue certification without interrupting their current careers.
The FCB has three specialty areas for certification: Certified Addictions Professional (CAP), Certified Criminal Justice
Addiction Professional (CCJAP), and Certified Addiction Prevention Professional (CAPP). NSU is the only single source
provider in Florida that offers courses in all three specialty areas. These courses are mainly offered in the evening or on
weekends, but may also be available online and during the day. The substance abuse studies certificate includes six core
and two counseling courses. This certificate program can be combined with any major and minor except the substance
abuse studies minor and APS major with a concentration in substance abuse studies. A minimum of 9 credits must be
exclusive to the certificate and cannot be counted toward any other majors/minors/certificate programs.
Substance Abuse Studies Certificate Requirements (24 credits)
PSYC 3550 PSYC 3570 PSYC 3580 PSYC 3600 PSYC 3620 PSYC 3630 Substance Abuse and the Family (3 credits)
Psychology and Physiology of Substance Abuse (3 credits)
Rehabilitation Strategies for Substance Abuse (3 credits)
Criminal Justice and Substance Abuse (3 credits)
Drug Prevention and Education (3 credits)
Ethical and Professional Developments (3 credits)
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PSYC 3800 PSYC 4150 Current Psychotherapies (3 credits)
Group Counseling in Substance Abuse (3 credits)
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Fischler School of
Education and
Human Services
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Fischler School of
Education and Human Services
Education Provost’s Message
On behalf of the many men and women who are members of the Fischler School of Education and
Human Services learning community, I bring you the best of all that we have to offer and a pledge
to provide quality instruction and service.
We are committed to the successful enhancement of your professional career. To that end we
provide excellent instruction, technology designed to deliver that instruction, and an infrastructure
aimed at supporting your efforts. To that end, we maintain one of the largest library databases
available and employ a host of new initiatives designed to focus on developing new approaches to
teaching and learning.
While you are very special to us, we also remind you that our expectations and standards are high.
We urge you to excel beyond your wildest dreams and explore new vistas. The end result will be recognition by you and
us of your talents, skills, and the acquisition of new knowledge. On behalf of the hundreds of professional men and women
associated with the Fischler School of Education and Human Services, I welcome you to the threshold of a new world.
H. Wells Singleton, Ph.D.
H. Wells Singleton, Ph.D.
Education Provost/University Dean, Fischler School of Education and Human Services
FSEHS Mission Statement
The Fischler School of Education and Human Services (FSEHS) is dedicated to the enhancement and continuing
support of teachers, administrators, trainers, and others working in related helping professions throughout the world.
The school fulfills its commitment to the advancement of education by serving as a resource for practitioners, both
novice and experienced, and by supporting them in their professional self-development.
Because of its commitment to the working professional, the school offers alternative delivery systems that are adaptable
to practitioners’ work schedules and locations. School programs anticipate and reflect the needs of practitioners to
become more effective in their current positions, to fill emerging roles in education and related fields, and to be
prepared to accept changing responsibilities within their own organizations.
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Ahead of the Curve
At the Fischler School of Education and Human Services, our mission requires us to stay “Ahead of the Curve”—in education,
in leadership, and in services. We are dedicated to the enhancement and continuing support of all who desire, provide, or
facilitate education and/or educational options throughout the world. The school fulfills this commitment to the advancement
of education by serving as a resource for practitioners and supporting them in their professional self-development.
Our commitment to the value of the working professional is the basis for our alternative delivery systems that take education
to the learner and adapt it to meet the career needs of the practitioner. Our programs anticipate and reflect the needs of
practitioners to become more effective in their current positions, to fill emerging roles where education is needed, and to
prepare them to accept changing responsibilities within their own organizations.
Consistent with the philosophical views of individual development, motivation, and leadership, FSEHS is also committed
to prepare professional educators who possess both a high sense about their responsibilities as leaders in their society
and who hold themselves to high ethical standards. It is also devoted to the formation of humanistic educators able to
successfully meet the needs of people in a culturally and globally diverse society.
State Disclosures
The following states require these disclosures:
Arizona
Nova Southeastern University is licensed to operate in Arizona by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary
Education.
California
Any questions or problems concerning this institution which have not been satisfactorily answered or resolved by the
institution should be directed to the Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education, 1027 Tenth Street, Fourth
Floor, Sacramento, California 95814; (916) 445-3427.
Nevada
Nova Southeastern University’s Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology Program, Graduate Teacher Education
Program, and the National Ed.D. Program for Educational Leaders are licensed by the Nevada Commission on Postsecondary
Education. The Las Vegas site includes classrooms, technology labs, and administrative offices. All facilities conform to
Clark County building, fire, and business license requirements.
Meeting Facilities
Nova Southeastern University leases classroom facilities in accordance with local health, fire, and safety standards. All
facilities are selected on the basis of their conduciveness to learning.
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Certification/Licensure
The requirements for certification/licensure differ from state to state. Some states do not grant initial certification/licensure
unless transcripts are annotated as having met that state’s approved program.
In Florida, students graduating from a state-approved program and who have passed all portions of the Florida Teacher
Certification Exam (FTCE) with the appropriate Subject Area Examination applicable to the student’s major are eligible for
an initial professional certificate. Actual teacher certification is awarded by the Florida Department of Education, not NSU.
Graduates who seek licensure or endorsement in Nevada must ask NSU to send a Confirmation of Completion form to
the Nevada Department of Education. These forms are available through the Office of Enrollment Services and can be
requested by contacting Academic Advising (800-986-3223, ext. 21559).
The State of Nevada’s Department of Education has amended its rule regarding candidates pursuing initial certification.
Rule NRS 394.150, requires all students at the undergraduate and graduate levels to complete instruction in the United
States and State of Nevada’s constitutions. Students may fulfill this requirement by completing a course in Nevada law or
by providing passing scores on an approved examination.
A state department of education (DOE) reserves the right to change requirements leading to certification/licensure at any
time. Consequently, NSU reserves the right to change requirements in a state-approved program, with or without prior
notice, to reflect changes mandated by the DOE.
For specific requirements and current information regarding teacher certification/licensure, please contact the appropriate
department of education (DOE).
Florida Department of Education
Bureau of Educator Certification
Suite 201, Turlington Building
325 West Gaines Street
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0400
www.fldoe.org/edcert
Telephone Service:
In-state toll-free number: 800-445-6739
Out-of-state number: 850-488-2317
Nevada Department of Education
Teacher Licensing Office
1820 East Sahara Avenue, Suite 205
Las Vegas, Nevada 89104
www.doe.nv.gov/licensing.html
Telephone Service:
(702) 486-6457 (voice mail)
(702) 486-6458 (8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.)
(702) 486-6450 (fax)
Certification Through Course-by-Course
Analysis by the Florida Department
of Education
Some courses are offered for students who already hold a bachelor’s degree in fields other than education and who
desire to obtain certification in specific content areas (see programs of study). Before registering for courses, individuals
seeking courses that may lead to certification must be admitted to NSU as non-degree-seeking students. Certification-only
students assume full risk in interpreting the letter of eligibility needs. NSU recommends that certification-only students
discuss anticipated course offerings with the Teacher Certification Office of the Florida Department of Education, or the local
school district certification officer, before registering for any courses.
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Dress Code
Field Experiences and Clinical Practices (Internships)
All field experience and clinical practice students are expected to abide by the dress code that is in place at the school/
school district at which they are situated. Field experience and clinical practice students must dress professionally and
appropriately for the school setting and/or specific activity. Clothing that is in any way controversial, provocative, and/or
revealing may not be worn. Students are expected to follow good grooming habits and long hair should be worn in a manner
where it will not impede the students’ view of the intern’s face and mouth. Facial piercings (nose, tongue and eyebrow) and/
or the exhibition of inappropriate tattoos is not permitted. If poor judgment is exercised in the manner of dress or grooming,
the student may be asked to leave campus by the school administrator/cooperating teacher/school supervisor until such
time that the situation has been remedied.
Form and Style Guidelines for
Student Writing
The current edition of The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association is the official style guide used
for all written works at the Fischler School of Education and Human Services. All students must adhere to the form and
style requirements outlined by the APA style guide and the Fischler Standard Format document (available online at www.
schoolofed.nova.edu/sso/PDF/fsehs_standard_format.pdf) for all written assignments.
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Undergraduate Programs in Education
The Fischler School of Education and Human Services (FSEHS) offers undergraduate programs in education through
a cooperative agreement with NSU’s Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences. Courses are delivered by both Farquhar
and Fischler faculty. FSEHS undergraduate programs include the Associate of Arts program with an emphasis in Early
Childhood Education (A.A./ECE), the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program (UTEP), the Bachelor of Science in
Education with a concentration in Child Development (BSCD), and the Bachelor of Science in Applied Professional Studies
with a concentration in Teaching and Learning.
Associate of Arts Program
A.A. in Early Childhood Education (A.A./ECE) Program
The Associate of Arts degree with an emphasis in Early Childhood Education has been designed to provide a highly
supportive learning environment in which members of the early childhood community can develop the skills and knowledge
needed to meet the current standards for advanced degrees in the field of early childhood education. The program is a
collaborative effort between the Fischler School of Education and Human Services (FSEHS) and the Farquhar College of
Arts and Sciences. The A.A./ECE program is not designed to lead to certification or licensure.
The A.A./ECE program is structured according to the national and state requirements for associate degree programs in
early childhood education. The program is based on the competencies and guidelines established by the following national
organizations:
• American Associate Degree Early Childhood Educators (ACCESS)
• Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI)
• National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)
• National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS)
• National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)
A.A. in Early Childhood Education Learning Outcomes
Early childhood educators enrolled in the A.A. program will do the following:
1. Develop the skills and knowledge necessary to meet the increased challenges and responsibilities faced in today’s
early childhood settings
2. Learn how to incorporate the best teaching competencies and practices in their work environment
3. Learn to recognize the diverse needs and learning styles of all children in today’s multicultural early childhood
settings
4. Learn how to be responsive to the individual and unique needs of children with special needs
5. Attain a greater assurance of job security and expand their potential for career advancement
6. Increase their computer and technology skills
7. Create a foundation for lifelong learning
Instructional Delivery System
A.A./ECE courses are delivered using an online format or a blended online/on-site model at specified sites in the state
of Florida. Online courses are delivered through the university’s secure course management platform. Blended-model
students will take some courses on-site and other courses online within their curriculum. Online delivery provides access to
coursework at times and places that are convenient for working professionals.
Program Completion Timeline
The formal instructional portion of the program is designed to be completed in two years.
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Program Completion Requirements
To graduate, a student must (a) successfully complete all coursework and apply for degree conferral, (b) maintain a minimum
2.0 grade point average, and (c) meet all financial obligations to the University.
A.A. in Early Childhood Education Curriculum
The program of study is designed to meet the national guidelines and competencies recommended by ACCESS, NAEYC, and
NCATE for the initial preparation of early childhood educators. Professional courses are intended to develop knowledge and
competencies in five key areas that include: (a) child development, (b) curriculum, family, and community, (c) assessment,
(d) special needs, and (e) professionalism.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
A.A. in Early Childhood Education Major Prerequisites (6 credits)
All incoming and current students who have not yet taken COMP 1500 and MATH 1030 are required to complete prerequisite
courses of COMP 1000 and MATH 1000. Students may take a challenge exam, present appropriate transfer credits, or
show evidence of standardized test scores to fulfill these prerequisites.
MATH 1000 COMP 1000 Essential Mathematics (3 credits)
Basic Writing (3 credits)
A.A. in Early Childhood Education Program Requirements (6 credits)
EDUC 2500 TECH SPCH 1010 Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
(3 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
A.A. in Early Childhood Education Major Requirements (24 credits)
Required ECA Courses (21 credits)
ECA 203 Foundations of Early Care and Education (3 credits)
ECA 205 Children with Special Needs (Birth through Age 8) (3 credits)
ECA 218 Child Observation, Record Keeping, and Assessment (3 credits)
ECA 241 Child Guidance (3 credits)
ECA 242 Foundations of Literacy Development (3 credits)
ECA 252 Managing Literacy Environments OR ECA 215 Creative Activities for Young Children
(3 credits)
ECA 267 Literacy Development in Multilingual Communities (3 credits)
Capstone (3 credits)
ECA 285 Professional Behavior in Early Childhood (3 credits)
ECA Electives*
(These are optional courses that will not count toward fulfilling the program credit requirements.)
ECA 101 ECA 112 ECA 114 ECA 270 Introduction to Early Childhood Education: Professionalism, Safety, Health, and Learning
Environment (CDA I) (3 credits)
Introduction to Early Childhood Education: Physical, Cognitive, Communication, and
Creative Development (CDA II) (3 credits)
Introduction to Early Childhood Education: Families, Schools, and Communities (CDA III)
(3 credits)
Administrative of Child Care and Education Programs (3 credits)
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* CDA courses (ECA 101, ECA 112, and ECA 114) and ECA 270 are elective and optional 3 credit courses, but may not be
used towards degree credits. ECA 270 is designed for existing or aspiring administrators and directors.
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 60–66 credits
Bachelor of Science Undergraduate Teacher
Education Program (UTEP)
All undergraduate teacher education programs at Nova Southeastern University are proactive programs designed to
address the current and future needs of classroom educators. The aim of the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program
is to prepare its graduates to enter the teaching profession as developing professionals with knowledge, dispositions, and
skills in three broad domains. These domains are as follows:
Domain 1: Knowledge base and best practices: effective teaching practices including classroom management
• The teacher understands the conceptual, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and
can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for students – (Interstate New
Teacher Assessments and Support (INTASC) Principles/Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAP)/English for
Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Standards).
• The teacher plans instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals
(INTASC/FEAP/ESOL Standards).
• The teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment
that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation (INTASC/FEAP/ESOL
Stanards).
• The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical
thinking, problem solving, and performance skills (INTASC/FEAP).
Domain 2: Sensitivity and responsibility to diverse student needs: students’ academic, social, and emotional needs; at-risk,
ESE, ESOL learners
•The teacher understands how children learn and develop, and can provide learning opportunities that support their
intellectual, social and personal development (INTASC/FEAP/ESOL Standards).
• The teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous
intellectual, social and physical development of the learners (INTASC/FEAP/ESOL Standards).
• The teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities
that are adapted to diverse learners (INTASC/FEAP/ESOL Standards).
Domain 3: Communication and reflection: oral and written communication skills and reflective practice, ongoing engagement
in both as exemplified in partnering with parents and community
• The teacher fosters relationships with school, colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community to support
students’ learning and well-being (INTASC/FEAP/ESOL Standards).
• The teacher uses knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to foster active
inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom (INTASC/FEAP/ESOL Standards).
• The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on others
(students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community) and who actively seeks out opportunities to
grow professionally (INTASC/FEAP/ESOL Standards).
Conceptual Framework
In order to provide quality programs that prepare effective educators, Nova Southeastern University provides teacher
education programs that are structured around a conceptual framework (SUNRISE) and that include the following elements
and characteristics:
Standards-based instructional and leadership programs that link theory to practice with the
Use of data for evaluation, ethical decision-making, and intervention for the
Needs and accommodations for diverse students who provide
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Reflective and ethical practice based on meaningful field and clinical experiences as part of
Innovative and convenient postsecondary delivery systems with a
Shared responsibility for quality education programs and professional advocacy with stakeholders with an
Emphasis on technology and best practices for dynamic learning environments
UTEP Program Goals
The Undergraduate Teacher Education Program remains committed to the following goals:
1. Provide a quality state approved teacher preparation program that incorporates contemporary philosophies and best
practices of teacher preparation.
2. Continue to ensure and enhance the quality and the consistency of program delivery on the Main Campus and at all
off-campus locations including Las Vegas, Jamaica, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the Bahamas.
3. Implement the Teacher Candidate meetings for students majoring in a state approved teacher education program
at all sites. These are designed to enhance students’ understanding and mastery of accomplished practices and
appropriate skills which apply to all majors at all locations.
4. Continue to provide instructional and supervisory support for continuing students during their field experience and
clinical practice so as to ensure they are implementing and assimilating appropriate teacher candidate practices as
delivered through program curricula.
5. Provide adequate resources for adjunct faculty members to improve the quality of instruction and provide opportunities
for professional development. Success in this area is also dependent upon Core Adjunct meetings at all locations and
regular in-service meetings between the ESOL Coordinator and all adjunct instructors.
6. Continue to work with school systems (e.g., Broward, Orange, Seminole and Clark Counties) and communities to
grow initiatives and to assess their needs and identify opportunities toward delivery of specially designed academic
programs (e.g., Prekindergarten/Primary Education and Paraprofessional Development).
7. Remain responsive to the state, federal, and international legislative demands on teaching.
Matriculation Requirements for UTEP Students
Each semester, the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program reviews the academic transcripts of all students identified
as students majoring in a state approved teacher education program. Upon meeting the conditions of matriculation into
the UndergraduateTeacher Education Program, students will become declared education majors and will receive a letter
of notification once they register for their first education course indicating their matriculation status. It is the student’s
responsibility to work with his or her academic advisor to meet the matriculation requirements before registering for any
Benchmark II courses.
1. Florida and Nevada students must comply with the admission requirements established by the Fischler School of
Education and Human Services. Upon admission, students enroll in a state approved education major and declare
themselves as intended teacher candidates.
2. Florida students must earn a grade of C or better in COMP 1500, 3 credits above COMP 1500, MATH 1040, and
MATH 1050 or their equivalents.
3. Nevada students must earn a grade of C or better in COMP 1500, 3 credits above COMP 1500, MATH 1030, and
MATH 1040 or their equivalents.
4. Florida and Nevada students must earn a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher prior to matriculating into an education
major.
5. Florida students must submit documentation that the testing requirement (General Knowledge Test (GKT); College
Level Academic Skills Test (CLAST); or equivalent sections of Praxis I) has been met before registration for any
Benchmark II education course.
6. Nevada students must submit documentation that the testing requirement of the Praxis I has been met before
accumulating 24 credits at NSU.
The director of undergraduate recruitment and enrollment will hear all matriculation petitions.
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Testing Requirements
Florida
The Florida Department of Education requires passing the General Knowledge Test (GKT), College Level Academic Skills
Test (CLAST), or Praxis I equivalents as a requirement for admission into any state-approved teacher education program.
NSU’s Undergraduate Teacher Education Program is a state-approved teacher education program and, therefore, the testing
requirements apply. All CLAST scores passed before July 1, 2002, can also be used for program completion. In addition,
Florida teacher candidates are required to pass the Professional Education Test and the Subject Area Examination portions
of the Florida Teacher Certification Examinations (FTCE) in order to graduate. Testing entrance and exit requirements will
remain in place.
Nevada
Nevada students are required to pass the knowledge skills sections of the Praxis I (or California Basic Educational Skills
Test, CBEST) before accumulating 24 credits at NSU. The appropriate Praxis I knowledge skills sections (also known as
the Paraprofessional Skills Test [PPST]) are reading, writing, and mathematics. In addition, Nevada teacher candidates
are required to pass the Praxis II subtests for professional skills and subject area skills in order to graduate. Students are
advised to confer with their academic advisor as the appropriate subtests vary between the Elementary Education major
and the Exceptional Student Education major.
Matriculation into the Major
Florida students majoring in a state-approved teacher education program must pass all sections of the GKT, CLAST, or
equivalent sections of the Praxis I before matriculating into the major and registering for any course in Benchmark II. Nevada
students must pass all sections of Praxis I before accumulating 24 credits at NSU in order to matriculate. For additional
information, please review the section Matriculation Requirements for UTEP Students. Please note that all CLAST scores
passed before July 1, 2002, can also be used for program completion. Testing entrance requirements will remain in place.
Upon matriculating into the state approved teacher education program, students will subsequently be referred to as teacher
candidates.
Prior to Clinical Practice (Internship)
Florida teacher candidates must pass the FTCE GKT and Professional Education Test to be accepted into the clinical
practice (internship). It is recommended that the Professional Education Test is taken upon completion of all courses
with an EDUC or EDEC (for Prekindergarten/Primary Education majors) prefix. In addition to passing the GKT and
Professional Education Test, acceptance into the clinical practice (internship) is dependent on skill level mastery evidenced
in the teacher candidate portfolio reviews. For more information, please see the section Portfolio Assessment System.
Prior to the Completion of Clinical Practice (Internship)
Florida teacher candidates must pass the appropriate FTCE Subject Area Examination in order to complete the program
while the Nevada teacher candidates must pass the appropriate Praxis II subtest. It is recommended that these tests are
taken as close to the completion of the ELEM, ESED, EECP, or SECE prefix and content specialty courses (i.e., BIOL,
CHEM, ECN, GEOG, HIST, LITR, MATH, PHYS, POLS, and/or SOCL) as possible. Those who do not fulfill these testing
requirements prior to the end of the clinical practice (internship) will not have their degrees conferred. The degree can only be
conferred when all passing FTCE/Praxis test scores have been documented. No letters of completion will be issued unless
all testing requirements are fulfilled and the necessary level of skill mastery has been successfully documented through
the teacher candidate portfolio review process. For more information, please see the section Portfolio Assessment System.
College-Level Academic Skills Test or General Knowledge Test
The CLAST or the GKT is a requirement for entrance into a state-approved teacher education program. The GKT is a
requirement for completion of a teacher preparation program. CLAST scores passed before July 1, 2002, can be used for
program completion. Any remaining sections of the CLAST or those sections taken after July 1, 2002 must be taken through
the GKT to exit the program.
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Portfolio Assessment System
The requirements of the Nevada and Florida state approved teacher education program provide learning opportunities
for teacher candidates to acquire and document mastery of the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support
Consortium (INTASC) Principles and Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAP) standards at the preprofessional
level. Mastery of the INTASC Principles/FEAP standards prepares teacher candidates not only for entry into the
profession but also to be successful educators in their future classrooms for years to come. One method of documenting
of the mastery of the INTASC Principles/FEAP standards is through the use of a portfolio assessment system.
Courses are to be taken in the specified sequence and are identified in the five blocks or benchmarks. There are 12 total
key assessments within the five benchmarks. At least one key assessment is identified as a critical task and is the evidence
of skill acquisition/mastery of the specified INTASC Principles/FEAP standards, Professional Competencies, Subject Area
Competencies and ESOL Standards. The critical tasks/evidences are to be maintained in an individual teacher candidate
portfolio. Instructions for the design of the portfolio may be viewed at www.nova.edu/—karpj/making_a_portfolio.htm.
The portfolio is formally reviewed three times by a full-time UTEP faculty member.
• The initial review occurs when a teacher candidate is registered for EDUC 3501 Benchmark III. This review covers the
competencies documented in critical tasks/evidences from Benchmark I and Benchmark II learning experiences.
• The second review occurs during Benchmark IV, when a teacher candidate is registered for EDUC 4001 Benchmark
IV. This review covers the competencies documented in critical tasks/evidences from Benchmark III and the first half
of Benchmark IV learning experiences.
• The third review, which serves as a final step toward degree conferral, occurs during EDUC 4570 Internship/Seminar,
when a teacher candidate is registered for EDUC 4501 Benchmark V. This review covers the competencies
documented in critical tasks/evidences from the last half of Benchmark IV and the clinical practice (internship) learning
experiences.
All critical tasks are evidences of acquisition/mastery of the INTASC Principles/FEAP standards, et. al., and will be rated
during a review session as “exceeds,” “meets,” or “does not meet” the intended expectations of the assignment with regard
to skill acquisition or mastery of the identified skills at the specified level of competence at that point within the program.
Results of the review are entered into a database whereby reports are accessed by administrators and full-time faculty of
the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program for specific review to ascertain if each teacher candidate is successfully
progressing through the program.
Each assignment that has been identified in a course syllabus as a key assessment is rated by the instructor of the course
through the use of a scoring rubric. Each critical task must receive a score of B- or higher to receive a rating of “meets”
(B-, B, B+) or “exceeds” (A-, A) during a portfolio review session. Key assessments with a score of C+ or lower indicate the
work level does not meet the expected skill level for that point in time in the program and, as a result, must be remediated.
Remediation for key assessments will be applicable only to the grade of the portfolio.
It is the responsibility of the undergraduate state approved teacher education program to provide remediation opportunities
as appropriate, as skill acquisition is cumulative in order to achieve mastery. A teacher candidate will not be allowed to
continue through the program or to achieve degree conferral status without successful remediation of any skills identified
as an area of weakness either at the assignment/course level or at the critical task/evidence level during a portfolio review.
Remediation at the assignment/course level occurs under the leadership of the course instructor. Remediation at the critical
task/evidence level occurs under the leadership of an assigned full-time faculty member via email, compressed video,
Blackboard, and/or phone.
Degree Completion Requirements
Teacher candidates graduating from a Florida state-approved teacher education program must pass all parts of the
Florida Teacher Certification Examination (FTCE) to complete the program. The FTCE is composed of the College Level
Academic Skills Test (CLAST)* or General Knowledge Test (GKT), the Professional Education Test and the Subject Area
Examination. The CLAST* (or Praxis I) or GKT is required for admission into the state-approved teacher education program.
The preferred test required for admission into the state-approved teacher education program is the GKT. The GKT, the
Professional Education Test, and the Subject Area Examination applicable to the teacher candidate’s major are required
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to complete the program. The Professional Education Test of the FTCE must be taken after all courses with an EDUC
(except for internship/seminar) or EDEC prefix have been completed. A passing score is required to receive clinical practice
(internship) placement.
Teacher candidates graduating from a Nevada state-approved teacher education program must pass all parts of the Praxis
tests to complete the program. The Praxis I measures basic academic skills, and the Praxis II test measures general and
subject-specific knowledge and teaching skills. The Praxis I is required before accumulating 24 credits in the major. Passing
scores on the Praxis II tests (teaching skills) appropriate to the teacher candidate’s major are required for degree completion.
The Subject Area Examination of the FTCE must be taken after all courses with an ELEM, ESED, EECP, or SECE prefix
and content specialty courses (i.e., BIOL, CHEM, ECN, GEOG, HIST, LITR, MATH, PHYS, POLS, and/or SOCL) have been
completed. The Subject Area Examination of the FTCE may be taken during the clinical practice (internship) experience.
In addition to passing test scores, evidence of skill acquisition/mastery of the required national and state competencies must
be reflected at the “exceeds” or “meets” level during each of the formal portfolio review sessions and must be documented
at intervals throughout the program. Documentation of skill acquisition/mastery is a program completion requirement of
a state-approved teacher education program. Remediation is required to strengthen any skills identified as an area of
weakness. Remediation must be successful prior to advancement into the next benchmark. A final review of skill acquisition/
mastery and any needed remediation must occur prior to the clinical practice (internship).
It is the teacher candidate’s responsibility to register for and pass the exams in a timely fashion. Placement for the clinical
practice (internship) for Florida students will be deferred for any teacher candidate who lacks passing test scores and
the required skill mastery. It is the responsibility of the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program to design appropriate
activities needed for remediation and to require that passing scores on both the Professional Education and Subject Area
Examinations and documentation of skill mastery be on file prior to degree conferral.
Teacher candidates are required to maintain a 2.5 grade point average or higher to successfully exit the program. Lastly,
please see the section matriculation Requirements for UTEP Students.
*Only CLAST scores passed before July 1, 2002, will be accepted in lieu of the GKT for exiting the state approved program.
Otherwise, all areas of the GKT must be passed to meet the program completion requirements.
Course Load Policy
Students enrolled in the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program at NSU are full-time students if they are registered and
complete 12 or more credits (four or more courses) per 16-week semester. If matriculated teacher candidates wish to take
additional courses (16-18 credits) other than what is prescribed in the benchmark per 16-week semester, they must consult
with their academic advisor to comply with the following requirements:
• Students must have successfully completed all writing and mathematics general education requirements.
• Students must provide passing scores on all parts of the GKT, CLAST, or the equivalent Praxis I sections.
• The student is not employed full-time.
• The student must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher in the major.
Teacher candidates may not be permitted to take more than 18 credits during a 16-week term.
Registration Requirements
Students in the state-approved bachelor’s degree programs who intend to be teacher candidates must meet with their
academic advisor to register for the upcoming term. This registration appointment ensures students enough time to review
curricular requirements regularly with their academic advisor. Courses in the education major must be taken in sequence
according to benchmarks. All general education courses must be successfully completed prior to taking any education
courses in Benchmark II.
Students are encouraged to start the registration process for an upcoming term several months in advance to ensure enough
time to meet with their academic advisor and prepare for the first day of the term. Each course in the education major has a
pre-class assignment due during the first class meeting. Pre-class assignments can be obtained at www.schoolofed.nova.
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edu/undergraduate/syllabi/index.htm. Teacher candidates are expected to have prepared properly for the first class session
by having completed the pre-assignment. Attendance is mandatory for all class sessions. Lack of an appointment time with
an academic advisor will neither prevent any late registration fees that may apply, nor will it negate the requirements of the
pre-class assignment or attendance in class for the first session.
Teacher Candidate Meetings
The Undergraduate Teacher Education Program requires all students to attend Teacher Candidate Meetings, which are
held twice a year (fall and winter semesters) at the Main Campus as well as at all Student Educational Centers. The
purpose of these meetings is to keep all teacher candidates informed of Undergraduate Teacher Education Program
policies, state department of education updates, the portfolio review process, and clinical practice (internship) procedures.
In addition, these meetings allow students to ask questions of full-time faculty members and representatives from the Office
of Placement Services on issues concerning their respective programs of study. Attendance at the Teacher Candidate
Meetings is strongly recommended for student success. Teacher candidates who are completing their program of study
online will have access to the presentation for their review.
Field Experiences
Field experiences have long been recognized as a critical component of teacher preparation programs. These experiences
enable teacher candidates to apply theory and effective practices in actual classrooms and acquire competencies necessary
for successful teaching.
Nova Southeastern University is committed to providing quality field experiences for all students majoring in education as an
integral part of teacher candidate training. Underlying this commitment is the philosophy that field experiences provide a vital
link between educational theory and practice. When a transfer of learning occurs from the university classroom to a real-life
setting, the connection significantly contributes to the professional development of the teacher candidate. Consequently,
all participants are enriched by these experiences. All field experiences are required to be conducted in PK-12 classrooms
under the leadership of a clinically educator trained cooperating teacher who has taught successfully for a minimum of three
years and who meets the established district and state requirements.
The Florida State Legislature has mandated that all students majoring in a state approved teacher education program
participate in a variety of field experiences. Field experiences must begin early in the program and culminate with the
final clinical practice (internship). During these experiences, students should be given the opportunity to demonstrate their
understanding of the INTASC Principles, Florida Educator Accomplished Practices, and Subject Area Competencies.
Students will be provided with guidance and feedback in the field experience setting.
All education courses in Nova Southeastern University’s Undergraduate Teacher Education Program curriculum require
a ten (10) hour field experience component. The field experiences vary depending on the competencies and course
requirements. A supervised field experience occurs in a Benchmark II course (EDUC 3520). If it is determined by the
university supervisor that remediation is needed as a result of the supervised field experience, follow- up supervision will
take place in subsequent courses. All questions about the field experience should be directed to the Office of Placement
Services at (954) 262-7900 or (800) 986-3223 ext 27900.
Clinical Practice (Internship)
Clinical practice (internship) is the final phase of the NSU Undergraduate Teacher Education Program. This 12-week course
includes seminar meetings and 12 weeks of teaching in an area school. Teacher candidates will be placed at a school site
by the internship coordinator in collaboration with school district placement specialists. Teacher candidates will gradually
assume full responsibility for teaching the class to which they are assigned. EDUC 4570 Internship/Seminar is offered each
academic year in the fall and winter semesters at all sites. It is also offered in Las Vegas during the summer term.
EDUC 4570 is a required 12-credit course for all teacher candidates and must be completed at NSU. Students must earn
a C or higher in the Internship/Seminar for program completion. Since it is the terminal course for the degree, it cannot
be transferred from another institution, nor can experience be substituted to satisfy this requirement. The Florida Board of
Education’s Administrative Rule 6A-4.002 does not permit full-time administrative or teaching experience to be a substitution
for the internship for purposes of initial certification.
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Internship Application
It is the teacher candidate’s responsibility to complete and submit the internship application before the deadline. Students
can fill out the internship application online at http://apps.fse.nova.edu/internship/internshipform.aspx.
Fall semester deadline—February 1
Winter semester deadline—August 1
Summer (Las Vegas only) semester deadline—February 1
After the application is received, the applicant’s file is reviewed for completion of all requirements. Teacher candidates
will receive a copy of a completed Internship Audit with a letter indicating their internship status (conditionally approved or
denied). Once all internship requirements are fulfilled, teacher candidates will attend the Internship Orientation/Registration
Meeting. Attendance is mandatory in order to be registered
Internship dates are published in the Academic Calendars section of the catalog. If a teacher candidate does not meet the
entrance requirements listed below, the internship application will be denied until all requirements are met.
Teacher candidates should refer to the Internship Handbook for a complete explanation of policies and procedures covering
the internship program. All questions about the internship program should be directed to the Office of Placement Services
at (954) 262-7900 or 800-986-3223, ext. 27900.
Internship Qualifications
Teacher candidates are considered eligible for the internship if they have met the following criteria:
• Earned the appropriate credits (including all general education requirements, all program requirements, and all
courses required for the major, except the internship)
• A minimum overall GPA of 2.5
• Passed all specified testing requirements (CBEST, CLAST, GKT, or Praxis I and the Professional Education Test)
• Successfully passed the portfolio reviews in Benchmarks III and IV
• Successfully completed EDUC 4200 Simulation Experience-Diversity
Intern placement will be requested upon completion of all specified testing requirements.
Master’s Accelerated Program
Students who have a strong commitment to become highly qualified educators should consider the Master’s Accelerated
Program (MAP) offered by the Fischler School of Education and Human Services. Available only on the Main Campus, this
dual admission program allows students to complete both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in education in an accelerated
format.
Individuals seeking entry into the MAP must be admitted to NSU’s Professional and Liberal Studies (PALS) program. For
more information, call (954) 262-7900 or 800-986-3223, ext 27900.
This rigorous program is for PALS students. Students interested in the MAP are recommended to complete all general
education requirements prior to entering the program. After the general education requirements are completed, the student
will participate in four semesters at the undergraduate level, taking 12 to 18 credits per semester. The 12 to 18 credits taken
per semester, plus the mandatory field experiences, require the students to be very flexible with their time, as courses
can be scheduled Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., with some possible evening, weekend, and online
seminars. NSU arranges the field experience hours with local participating schools.
Students can choose from a bachelor’s degree in either prekindergarten/primary education (age three through grade three),
elementary education (K-6), or exceptional student education (K-12). Students are clustered by major, into a cohort that will
begin and complete the bachelor’s degree portion of the MAP together. The cohort concept fosters a supportive, collegial
learning environment for the students.
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The MAP students who successfully complete the undergraduate coursework within their designated major are conditionally
eligible for admission to the Master of Science in Education program of the Fischler School of Education and Human
Services. While enrolled at the master’s degree level, students are able to complete their final year of study in the MAP and
meet the requirements for a master’s degree in education.
UTEP Programs of Study
The Fischler School of Education and Human Services UTEP offers the following academic programs:
Bachelor of Science degree with the following majors:
Applied Professional Studies (APS) with a concentration in Teaching and Learning
Education with a concentration in Child Development
Education with a concentration in Elementary School Studies
Education with a concentration in Exceptional Learning Styles
Elementary Education
Exceptional Student Education
Middle Grades English Education
Middle Grades General Science Education
Middle Grades Social Studies Education
Prekindergarten/Primary Education (Age Three through Grade Three)
Secondary Biology Education
Secondary English Education
Secondary Mathematics Education
Secondary Social Studies Education
Minors:
Education
Speech-Language Pathology
Add-on Endorsement Areas in ESOL and Driver Education
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Majors in Education
Education Major with a Concentration in Child Development (BSCD)
The Bachelor of Science in Education with a Concentration in Child Development is intended to provide professional training
for students interested in working in the field of education and human services with special interest in the variety of careers
and professions related to working with young children, their families, and communities. The major emphasis of the child
development program is in the early childhood years (birth to age 8). Additional study through electives and an emphasis
area allows students to customize their degrees to meet the needs of their interests and professional needs.
Education Major with a Concentration in Child Development Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
BSCD Program Requirements (9 credits)
EDUC 2500 TECH EECP 3330 ESOL 2903 Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
(3 credits)
Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Cross Cultural Studies (3 credits)
BSCD Concentration Requirements: Child Development (Birth–Age Eight) (66–69 credits)
Lower Division (27 credits)
Block I
ECA 203 ECA 205 ECA 215 ECA 241 ECA 242 Foundations of Early Care and Education (3 credits)
Children with Special Needs (Birth through Age 8) (3 credits)
Creative Activities for Young Children (3 credits)
Child Guidance (3 credits)
Foundations of Literacy Development (3 credits)
Block II
ECA 218 ECA 252 ECA 267 ECA 285 Child Observation, Record Keeping, and Assessment (3 credits)
Managing Literacy Environments (3 credits)
Literacy Development in Multilingual Communities (3 credits)
Professional Behavior in Early Childhood (3 credits)
Upper Division (42 credits)
Block III
ECDP 3321 ECDP 3334 ECDP 3338 ECDP 3340 ECDP 3500 Child Development: Prenatal, Infancy and Toddler Years (Birth – Age 3) (3 credits)
Child Development during the Preschool and Primary Age Years (Ages 4 – 8) (3 credits)
Diversity and Multiculturalism in Child Development (3 credits)
Psychosocial Development during the Preschool Years (3 credits)
Field-based Experiences in Child Development: Assessment I (0 credits)
Block IV
ECDP 3345 ECDP 3349 EDEC 4320 ECDP 4423 ECDP 4100 Parent-Child Relationship during the Early Childhood Years (3 credits)
Fatherhood: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (3 credits)
Cultural Diversity and Family-Community Development (3 credits)
Issues in Child Abuse and Neglect (3 credits)
Field-based Experiences in Child Development: Assessment II (0 credits)
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Additional Core Courses (6 credits)
EECP 4330 Health, Nutrition, Safety and Physical Development in Early Childhood (3 credits)
ECDP 4500 Field-based Experiences in Child Development: Assessment III (0 credits)
ECDP 4990 Advanced Senior Year Seminar (3 credits)
Block V
Emphasis (12 credits)
Students are required to select a minimum of 12 credits in any of the emphasis areas. The emphasis areas provide an
opportunity for studying additional areas of interest and expertise, as well as obtaining professional preparation and
knowledge in the field of early childhood education and child development.
Administration of Early Childhood Education (12 credits)
Applied Behavioral Analysis (12 credits)**
Child Development Associate*** (9 credits)
Developmental Curriculum (12 credits)
Early Literacy (12 credits)
Infant–Toddler Development (12 credits)
Speech-Language Pathology (12 credits)
Open Electives (12 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 120 credits
* Prerequisites
** These courses are offered in collaboration with the Mailman Segal Institute.
*** The curriculum for the Child Development Associate (CDA) area of emphasis includes 9 credits of CDA coursework and
3 credits of coursework from one of the other areas of emphasis.
Elementary Education Major
Elementary Education Major Curriculum—Florida
The Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education is a state-approved initial certification program in Florida that focuses on
training teacher candidates to enter the classroom, while emphasizing the teaching of elementary (grades K–6) students.
This major provides future educators with a foundation in classroom management, curriculum development, and methods
of teaching, as well as skills for teaching elementary-level students. Course content is research based and infuses best
practices in education and strategies for teaching English as a second language (ESOL). The program aligns directly with
the Florida Department of Education’s certification requirements for elementary education (grades K–6) and endorsement
requirements for ESOL.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Elementary Education Program Requirements—Florida (12 credits)
EDUC 2500 SPCH 1010 TECH EDUC 1100 ESOL 2903 Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
(3 credits)
Exploration of the Education Profession (3 credits)
Cross-Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Elementary Education Major Requirements—Florida (63 credits)
Teacher candidates in the state-approved teacher education program in the elementary education major must also keep
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track of program benchmarks within the courses. There are five benchmarks, coinciding with five blocks in the state-approved
teacher education program. At these five benchmarks, teacher candidates provide documentation showing completion of
program requirements. A supervised field experience occurs in EDUC 3520.
Benchmark I
EDUC 3330 ESOL 3340 EDUC 3350 EDUC 3360 Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of TESOL for Teachers (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Education (3 credits)
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
Benchmark II
EDUC 3520 ELEM 3530 ELEM 3540 ELEM 3550 ESED 3561 Principles and Practices of Instruction and Assessment I (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School (3 credits)
Principles and Practices of Instruction and Assessment II (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3 credits)
Families, Professionals, and Exceptionality (3 credits)
enchmark III
B
EDUC 3501
Benchmark III (Portfolio review I) (0 credits)
ELEM 4320 Elementary Classroom Management (3 credits)
ELEM 4340 Methods of Teaching Language Arts through Children’s Literature in the Elementary School
(3 credits)
ELEM 4350 Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (3 credits)
ELEM 4360 Methods of Teaching Literacy in the Elementary School (3 credits)
enchmark IV
B
EDUC 4001
EDUC 4200 ELEM 4530 ELEM 4540 ELEM 4560 ESOL 4565 Benchmark IV (Portfolio review II) (0 credits)
Simulation Experience-Diversity (0 credits)
Integrating Art, Music, and Health Education Across the Curriculum (3 credits)
Reading Assessment I (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Reading across the Elementary Curriculum (3 credits)
Second Language Learning: Theory, Method and Evaluation (3 credits)
enchmark V
B
EDUC 4501
EDUC 4570 Benchmark V (Portfolio review III) (0 credits)
Internship/Seminar (12 credits)
Open Electives (12 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 120 credits
Elementary Education Major Curriculum—Nevada
The Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education is a state-approved initial licensure program in Nevada that focuses on
training teacher candidates to enter the classroom, while emphasizing the teaching of elementary (grades K–6) students.
This major provides future educators with a foundation in classroom management, curriculum development, and methods
of teaching, as well as skills for teaching elementary-level students. Course content is research based and infuses best
practices in education. The program aligns directly with the Nevada Department of Education’s certification requirements
for elementary education (grades K–6).
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Elementary Education Program Requirements—Nevada (9–11 credits)
EDUC 2500 Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
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NLAW 1000
TECH 1110 SPCH 1010 EDUC 1100 Nevada School Law OR EXAM (0–2 credits)
(3 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
Exploration of the Education Profession (3 credits)
Elementary Education Major Requirements—Nevada (69 credits)
Teacher candidates in the state-approved program in the elementary education major must also keep track of program
benchmarks within the courses. There are five benchmarks, coinciding with five blocks in the state-approved program.
At these five benchmarks, teacher candidates provide documentation showing completion of program requirements. A
supervised field experience occurs in EDUC 3520.
Benchmark I
EDUC 3330 EDUC 3350 EDUC 3360 Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Education (3 credits)
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
Benchmark II
EDUC 3520 ELEM 3530 ELEM 3532 ELEM 3540 ELEM 3550 Principles and Practices of Instruction and Assessment I (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School (3 credits)
Science Curriculum for Elementary Education Majors (3 credits)
Principles and Practices of Instruction and Assessment II (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3 credits)
enchmark III
B
EDUC 3501
ELEM 4320 ELEM 4330 ELEM 4340 ELEM 4350 ELEM 4360 Benchmark III (Portfolio review I) (0 credits)
Elementary Classroom Management (3 credits)
Mathematics Curriculum for Elementary Education Majors (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Language Arts through Children’s Literature in the Elementary School (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Literacy in the Elementary School (3 credits)
enchmark IV
B
EDUC 4001
EDUC 4200 ELEM 4530 ELEM 4540 ELEM 4560 Benchmark IV (Portfolio review II) (0 credits)
Simulation Experience-Diversity (0 credits)
Integrating Art, Music, and Health Education Across the Curriculum (3 credits)
Reading Assessment I (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Reading across the Elementary Curriculum (3 credits)
ESOL Courses
ESOL 2903 Cross Cultural Studies (3 credits)
ESOL 4901 Methods of Teaching ESOL (3 credits)
ESOL 4902 Curriculum and Materials Development (3 credits)
enchmark V
B
EDUC 4501
EDUC 4570 Benchmark V (Portfolio review III) (0 credits)
Internship/Seminar (12 credits)
Open Electives (12 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 120 credits
Exceptional Student Education Major
Exceptional Student Education Major Curriculum—Florida
The Bachelor of Science in Exceptional Student Education is a state-approved initial certification program in Florida that
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focuses on preparing teacher candidates to enter the classroom, while emphasizing the teaching of students with multiple
disabilities both within the inclusive classroom and/or in special educational settings. This major provides future educators
with a foundation in the history of special education including current state and federal legislation, as well as preparation in
classroom management, curriculum development, and methods of teaching reading, mathematics, and life skills to special
needs students. Course content is research based and infuses best practices in education and strategies for teaching
English as a second language (ESOL). The program aligns directly with the Florida Department of Education’s certification
requirements for exceptional student education (grades K–12) and endorsement requirements for ESOL.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Exceptional Student Education Program Requirements—Florida (12 credits)
EDUC 2500 SPCH 1010 TECH
EDUC 1100 ESOL 2903 Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
(3 credits)
Exploration of the Education Profession (3 credits)
Cross-Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Exceptional Student Education Major Requirements—Florida (72 credits)
Teacher candidates in the state-approved program in the exceptional student education major must also keep track of
program benchmarks within the courses. There are five benchmarks, coinciding with five blocks in the state-approved
program. At these five benchmarks, teacher candidates provide documentation showing completion of program requirements.
A supervised field experience occurs in EDUC 3520.
Benchmark I
EDUC 3330 ESOL 3340 EDUC 3350 EDUC 3360 Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of TESOL for Teachers (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Education (3 credits)
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
Benchmark II
EDUC 3520 ESED 3530 ESED 3540 ESED 3550 ESED 3570 ESED 3561 Principles and Practices of Instruction and Assessment I (3 credits)
Educational Assessment of Exceptional Students (3 credits)
Introduction to Language Development and Speech Disabilities (3 credits)
Vocational/Functional Life Skills (3 credits)
Foundations of Learning Disabilities (3 credits)
Families, Professionals and Exceptionality (3 credits)
enchmark III
B
EDUC 3501 Benchmark III (Porfolio review I) (0 credits)
ESED 4320 Classroom Management for Typical and Atypical Learners in the Multicultural Classroom (3 credits)
ELEM 4340 Methods of Teaching Language Arts Through Children’s Literature in the Elementary School
(3 credits)
ELEM 4350 Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (3 credits)
ELEM 4360 Methods of Teaching Literacy in the Elementary School (3 credits)
ESED 4360 Classroom Procedures for the Emotionally Handicapped (3 credits)
Benchmark IV
EDUC 4001
EDUC 4200 ESED 4530 ELEM 4540 ESED 4550 ELEM 4560 Benchmark IV (Portfolio review II) (0 credits)
Simulation Experience-Diversity (0 credits)
Classroom Procedures for the Mentally Handicapped (3 credits)
Reading Assessment I (3 credits)
Methods and Materials for Teaching SLD Learners (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Reading across the Elementary Curriculum (3 credits)
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ESOL 4565 Second Language Learning: Theory, Method, and Evaluation (3 credits)
Benchmark V
EDUC 4501
EDUC 4570 Benchmark V (Portfolio review III) (0 credits)
Internship/Seminar (12 credits)
Open Electives (6 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 120 credits
Exceptional Student Education Major Curriculum—Nevada
The Bachelor of Science in Exceptional Student Education is a state-approved initial certification program in Nevada
that focuses on preparing teacher candidates to enter the classroom, while emphasizing the teaching of students with
multiple disabilities both within the inclusive classroom and/or in special educational settings. This major provides future
educators with a foundation in the history of special education including current state and federal legislation, as well as
preparation in classroom management, curriculum development, and methods of teaching reading, mathematics, and life
skills to special needs students. Course content is research based and infuses best practices in education. The program
aligns directly with the Nevada Department of Education’s certification requirements for exceptional student education
(grades K–12).
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Exceptional Student Education Program Requirements—Nevada (9–11 credits)
EDUC 2500 NLAW 1000
TECH SPCH 1010 EDUC 1100 Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
Nevada School Law OR EXAM (0–2 credits)
(3 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
Exploration of the Education Profession (3 credits)
Exceptional Student Education Major Requirements—Nevada (69 credits)
Teacher candidates in the state-approved program in the exceptional student education major must also keep track of
program benchmarks within the courses. There are five benchmarks, coinciding with five blocks in the state-approved
program. At these five benchmarks, teacher candidates provide documentation showing completion of program requirements.
A supervised field experience occurs in EDUC 3520.
Benchmark I
EDUC 3330 EDUC 3350 EDUC 3360 Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Education (3 credits)
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
Benchmark II
EDUC 3520 ESED 3530 ESED 3540 ESED 3550 ESED 3570 ESED 3561 Principles and Practices of Instruction and Assessment I (3 credits)
Educational Assessment of Exceptional Students (3 credits)
Introduction to Language Development and Speech Disabilities (3 credits)
Vocational/Functional Life Skills (3 credits)
Foundations of Learning Disabilities (3 credits)
Families, Professionals, and Exceptionality (3 credits)
enchmark III
B
EDUC 3501
ESED 4320 ELEM 4340 Benchmark III (Portfolio review I) (0 credits)
Classroom Management for Typical and Atypical Learners in the Multicultural Classroom (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Language Arts through Children’s Literature in the Elementary School (3 credits)
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ELEM 4350 ELEM 4360 ESED 4360 Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Literacy in the Elementary School (3 credits)
Classroom Procedures for the Emotionally Handicapped (3 credits)
enchmark IV
B
EDUC 4001
EDUC 4200 ESED 4530 ELEM 4540 ESED 4550 ELEM 4560 ESOL 2903 Benchmark IV (Portfolio review II) (0 credits)
Simulation Experience-Diversity (0 credits)
Classroom Procedures for the Mentally Handicapped (3 credits)
Reading Assessment I (3 credits)
Methods and Materials for Teaching SLD (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Reading across the Elementary Curriculum (3 credits)
Cross Cultural Studies (3 credits)
enchmark V
B
EDUC 4501
EDUC 4570 Benchmark V (Portfolio review III) (0 credits)
Internship/Seminar (12 credits)
Open Electives (12 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 120 credits
Middle Grades English Education Major
The Bachelor of Science in Middle Grades English Education with ESOL endorsement is a state-approved initial certification
program offered by the Nova Southeastern University (NSU) Fischler School of Education and Human Services (FSEHS)
that provides a comprehensive set of pedagogical courses specifically designed for English instruction and assessment, a
specialty component with a variety of English, literature, and speech communication courses composing the content of the
middle grades English based on the Florida Sunshine State English Standards, and the current State-wide assessment in
English (grades 5–9). Course content is research-based and infuses best practices in education and strategies for teaching
English as a second language (ESOL).
Middle Grades English Education Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Middle Grades English Education Program Requirements (9 credits)
EDUC 2500
TECH
EDUC 1100
ESOL 2903
Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
(3 credits)
Exploration of the Education Profession (3 credits)
Cross-Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Middle Grades English Education Major Requirements (66 credits)
Benchmark II
EDUC 3330 ESOL 3340 EDUC 3350 EDUC 3360 Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of TESOL for Teachers (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Ed (3 credits)
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
Benchmark III
EDUC 3501
EDUC 3520 SECE 4370 Benchmark III (Portfolio review I) (0 credits)
Principles & Practices of Instruction and Assessment I (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Middle and Secondary English (3 credits)
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SECE 4320
Middle and Secondary Classroom Management (3 credits)
Benchmark IV
EDUC 4001
EDUC 4200 SECE 4560 ESOL 4565 Benchmark IV (Portfolio review II) (0 credits)
Simulation Experience – Diversity (0 credits)
Methods of Teaching Middle and Secondary Reading (3 credits)
Second Language Learning (3 credits)
English Specialty Courses
SPCH 1010 Public Speaking (3 credits)
LITR 2020 American Literature I (3 credits)
LITR 2021 American Literature II (3 credits)
LITR 2030 World Literature I (3 credits)
LITR 2031 World Literature II (3 credits)
LITR 2010 British Literature I (3 credits)
LITR 3060 History and Structure of the English Language (3 credits)
LITR 3520 African American Literature (3 credits)
LITR 3660 Young Adult Literature (3 credits)
Benchmark V
EDUC 4501
EDUC 4570
Benchmark V (Portfolio review III) (0 credits)
Internship/Seminar (12 credits)
Open Electives (15 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 120 credits
Middle Grades General Science Education Major
The Bachelor of Science in Middle Grades General Science Education is a state-approved initial certification program offered
by the Nova Southeastern University (NSU) Fischler School of Education and Human Services (FSEHS). Students enrolled
as teacher candidates participate in a comprehensive set of education courses introducing modern teaching strategies
pertaining to the diverse learning environment of the modern middle school classroom. The degree program also includes
a set of academic science courses addressing the wide range of science topics in the Florida Next Generation Science
Curriculum Standards for middle school instruction (grades 5–9).
Middle Grades General Science Education Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Middle Grades General Science Education Program Requirements (12 credits)
EDUC 2500
SPCH 1010
TECH
EDUC 1100
ESOL 2903
Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
(3 credits)
Exploration of the Education Profession (3 credits)
Cross-Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Middle Grades General Science Education Major Requirements (59 credits)
Benchmark II
EDUC 3330
ESOL 3340
EDUC 3350
Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of TESOL for Teachers (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Education (3 credits)
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EDUC 3360
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
Benchmark III
EDUC 3501
EDUC 3520
EMDS 3530 SECE 4320 EMDS 4550 Benchmark III (Portfolio review I) (0 credits)
Principles and Practices of Instruction and Assessment I (3 credits)
Science Standards for Middle School (3 credits)
Middle and Secondary Classroom Management (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Middle School Science (3 credits)
Benchmark IV
EDUC 4001
EDUC 4200
SECE 4560
ESOL 4565
Benchmark IV (Portfolio review II) (0 credits)
Simulation Experience-Diversity (0 credits)
Methods of Teaching Middle and Secondary Reading (3 credits)
Second Language Learning (3 credits)
Science Specialty Courses
BIOL 1080 Human Biology (3 credits)
Choose 4 credits from the following three selections:
BIOL 1450 General Biology I (3 credits)
BIOL 1451 General Biology I Lab (1 credit)
BIOL 1500 Biology I/ Lab (4 credits)
Choose 4 credits from the following three selections:
BIOL 1460
General Biology II (3 credits)
BIOL 1461
General Biology II Lab (1 credits)
BIOL 1510
Biology II/ Lab (4 credits)
CHEM 1100 Fundamentals of Chemistry OR CHEM 1150 Essentials of Chemistry (3 credits)
PHYS 2160 Essentials of Earth/Space Science (3 credits)
Benchmark V
EDUC 4501
EDUC 4570
Benchmark V (Portfolio review III) (0 credits)
Internship/Seminar (12 credits)
Open Electives (21 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 122 credits
Middle Grades Social Studies Education Major
The Bachelor of Science in Middle Grades Social Studies Education is a state-approved initial certification program offered
by the Nova Southeastern University (NSU) Fischler School of Education and Human Services (FSEHS) that provides a
comprehensive set of pedagogical courses specifically designed for social studies instruction and assessment, in addition
to a specialty component with a variety of content courses within the social sciences including history, geography, political
science, economics and sociology for middle grades social studies based on the Florida Sunshine State Social Studies
Standards, and the current state-wide assessment in Social Studies (grades 5–9). Course content is research-based and
infuses best practices in education and strategies for teaching social studies at the middle school level (grades 5–9).
Middle Grades Social Studies Education Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
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Middle Grades Social Studies Education Program Requirements (12 credits)
EDUC 2500
SPCH 1010
TECH
EDUC 1100
ESOL 2903
Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
(3 credits)
Exploration of the Education Profession (3 credits)
Cross-Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Middle Grades Social Studies Education Major Requirements (72 credits)
Benchmark II
EDUC 3330
ESOL 3340
EDUC 3350
EDUC 3360
Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of TESOL for Teachers (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Education (3 credits)
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
Benchmark III
EDUC 3501
EDUC 3520
SECE 3530 SECE 4320
Benchmark III (Portfolio review I) (0 credits)
Principles and Practices of Instruction and Assessment I (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Middle and Secondary Social Science (3 credits)
Middle and Secondary Classroom Management (3 credits)
Benchmark IV
EDUC 4001
EDUC 4200
SECE 4560
ESOL 4565
SECE 4565 Benchmark IV (Portfolio review II) (0 credits)
Simulation Experience-Diversity (0 credits)
Methods of Teaching Secondary Reading (3 credits)
Second Language Learning (3 credits)
Teaching Controversial Topics in Social Studies (3 credits)
Social Studies Specialty Courses
HIST 1040 American History Since 1865 (3 credits)
HIST 1090 Early Western History (3 credits)
HIST 1110 Modern Western History (3 credits)
HIST 2130 Formation of Latin America OR HIST 2140 Modern Latin America (3 credits)
HIST 1150 Early World History (3 credits)
HIST 1160 Modern World History (3 credits)
ECN 2020 Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits)
POLS 1010 American Government and Politics (3 credits)
GEOG 2050 Survey of Geography (3 credits)
SOCL 3130 Family Systems (3 credits)
Benchmark V
EDUC 4501
EDUC 4570
Benchmark V (Portfolio review III) (0 credits)
Internship/Seminar (12 credits)
Open Electives (6 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 120 credits
Prekindergarten/Primary Education
(Age Three Through Grade Three) Major
The Bachelor of Science in Prekindergarten/Primary Education (age three-grade 3) with ESOL endorsement is a state
approved initial certification program in Florida that focuses on training teacher candidates to enter the classroom, while
emphasizing the teaching of early childhood students by combining theoretical components with practical application. This
major provides future educators with a foundation in classroom management, curriculum development, and methods of
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teaching, as well as skills for working with children age three through grade three. Course content is research based and
infuses best practices in education and strategies for teaching English as a second language (ESOL). An emphasis is placed
on the appropriate uses of technology. The program aligns directly with the Florida Department of Education’s certification
requirements for prekindergarten/primary education (age three-grade 3) and endorsement requirements for ESOL.
Prekindergarten/Primary Education Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Prekindergarten/Primary Education Program Requirements (9 credits)
EDUC 2500 SPCH 1010 TECH ESOL 2903 Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
(3 credits)
Cross-Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Prekindergarten/Primary Education Major Requirements (72 credits)
Teacher candidates in the state-approved program in the prekindergarten/primary education (age three through grade
three) major must also keep track of program benchmarks within the courses. There are five benchmarks, coinciding with
five blocks in the state-approved program. At these five benchmarks, teacher candidates provide documentation showing
completion of program requirements. A supervised field experience occurs in EDEC 3520.
Benchmark I
EDEC 3320 EECP 3330 EDEC 3350 Sociological Foundations of Early Childhood Education (3 credits)
Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Meeting the Special Needs of All Students (3 credits)
Benchmark II
EDEC 3520 EDEC 3530 EDUC 3350 EECP 3550 Families in Early Childhood Programs: Challenges and Opportunities (3 credits)
Diagnosis, Assessment, and Evaluation of Young Children (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Education (3 credits)
Child Guidance and Classroom Management (3 credits)
enchmark III
B
EDUC 3501
Benchmark III (Portfolio review I) (0 credits)
EDEC 4320 Cultural Diversity and Family-Community Development (3 credits)
EECP 4330 Health, Nutrition, Safety, and Physical Development in Early Childhood (3 credits)
EECP 4340 Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Teaching Literacy and Language Arts in Early Childhood
Education (3 credits)
EECP 4345 Principles and Practices of Reading and Language Arts Assessment in Early Childhood Education
(3 credits)
enchmark IV
B
EDUC 4001
Benchmark IV (Portfolio review II) (0 credits)
EDUC 4200 Simulation Experience-Diversity (0 credits)
EECP 4520 Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Teaching Reading in Early Childhood (3 credits)
EECP 4530 Developmentally Appropriate Practices for the Integration of Creative Arts Across the Early Childhood
Curriculum (3 credits)
EECP 4545 Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Integrating Math and Science in Early Childhood Education
(3 credits)
EECP 4550 Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Teaching Social Studies in Early Childhood (3 credits)
EECP 4560 Integrating Literacy Throughout the Early Childhood Curriculum (3 credits)
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ESOL Courses (12 credits)
ESOL 4901
Methods of Teaching ESOL (3 credits)
ESOL 4902
ESOL Curriculum and Materials Development (3 credits)
ESOL 4904
Linguistics for ESOL Educators (3 credits)
ESOL 4905
Testing and Evaluation in ESOL (3 credits)
enchmark V
B
EDUC 4501
EDUC 4570 Benchmark V (Portfolio review III) (0 credits)
Internship/Seminar (12 credits)
Open Electives (9 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 120 credits
Secondary Biology Education Major
The Bachelor of Science in Secondary Biology Education is a state-approved initial certification program offered by the Nova
Southeastern University (NSU) Fischler School of Education and Human Services (FSEHS) that provides a comprehensive
set of pedagogical courses specifically designed for biology instruction, a specialty component with a variety of science
courses composing the content of the secondary biological sciences based on the Florida Sunshine State Science Standards,
and the current State-wide assessment in the sciences in (grades 6–12). Biology certification is a specialty certification that
allows teachers to provide instruction at the middle school level as well as many biological and environmental courses at
the high school level.
Secondary Biology Education Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Secondary Biology Education Program Requirements (12 credits)
EDUC 2500 SPCH 1010 TECH
EDUC 1100 ESOL 2903
Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
(3 credits)
Exploration of the Education Profession (3 credits)
Cross-Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Secondary Biology Education Major Requirements (68 credits)
Benchmark II
EDUC 3330 ESOL 3340 EDUC 3350 EDUC 3360 Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of TESOL for Teachers (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Ed (3 credits)
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
enchmark III
B
EDUC 3501
EDUC 3520 SECE 3550 SECE 4320 Benchmark III (Portfolio review I) (0 credits)
Principles and Practices of Instruction and Assessment I (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Secondary Science (3 credits)
Middle and Secondary Classroom Management (3 credits)
enchmark IV
B
EDUC 4001
EDUC 4200 SECE 4560 Benchmark IV (Portfolio review II) (0 credits)
Simulation Experience-Diversity (0 credits)
Methods of Teaching Secondary Reading (3 credits)
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ESOL 4565 Second Language Learning (3 credits)
Biology Specialty Courses
CHEM 1150 Essentials of Chemistry OR CHEM 1100 Fundamentals of Chemistry (3 credits)
BIOL 1070 Basics in Human Heredity (3 credits)
Choose 4 credits from the following three selections:
BIOL 1450 General Biology I (3 credits)
BIOL 1451 General Biology I Lab (1 credits)
BIOL 1500 Biology I/ Lab (4 credits)
Choose 4 credits from the following three selections:
BIOL 1460 General Biology II (3 credits)
BIOL 1461 General Biology II Lab (1 credits)
BIOL 1510 Biology II/ Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 2400 Applied Microbiology (3 credits)
Choose 4 credits from the following three selections:
BIOL 3150 Fundamentals of Ecology (3 credits)
BIOL 3151 Fundamentals of Ecology Lab (1 credits)
BIOL 3200 General Ecology/ Lab (4 credits)
Choose 5 credits from the following three selections:
BIOL 3250 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology (3 credits)
BIOL 3251 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology Lab (2 credits)
BIOL 3312 Human Anatomy and Physiology/Lab (5 credits)
BIOL 3340 Instrumentation and Laboratory Techniques (3 credits)
enchmark V
B
EDUC 4501
EDUC 4570 Benchmark V (Portfolio review III) (0 credits)
Internship/Seminar (12 credits)
Open Electives (9 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 122 credits
Secondary English Education Major
The Bachelor of Science in Secondary English Education with ESOL endorsement is a state-approved initial certification
program offered by the Nova Southeastern University (NSU) Fischler School of Education and Human Services (FSEHS)
that provides a comprehensive set of pedagogical courses specifically designed for English instruction and assessment,
a specialty component with a variety of English, literature, and speech communication courses composing the content of
the secondary English based on the Florida Sunshine State English Standards, and the current State-wide assessment
in English (grades 6–12). Course content is research-based and infuses best practices in education and strategies for
teaching English as a second language (ESOL).
Secondary English Education Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Secondary English Education Program Requirements (9 credits)
EDUC 2500
TECH Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
(3 credits)
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EDUC 1100
ESOL 2903
Exploration of the Education Profession (3 credits)
Cross-Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Secondary English Education Major Requirements (66 credits)
Benchmark II
EDUC 3330 ESOL 3340 EDUC 3350 EDUC 3360 Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of TESOL for Teachers (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Ed (3 credits)
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
Benchmark III
EDUC 3501
EDUC 3520 SECE 4370 SECE 4320
Benchmark III (Portfolio review I) (0 credits)
Principles & Practices of Instruction and Assessment I (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Middle and Secondary English (3 credits)
Middle and Secondary Classroom Management (3 credits)
Benchmark IV
EDUC 4001
EDUC 4200 SECE 4560 ESOL 4565 Benchmark IV (Portfolio review II) (0 credits)
Simulation Experience – Diversity (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Middle and Secondary Reading (3 credits)
Second Language Learning (3 credits)
English Specialty Courses
SPCH 1010 Public Speaking (3 credits)
LITR 2020 American Literature I (3 credits)
LITR 2021 American Literature II (3 credits)
LITR 2030 World Literature I (3 credits)
LITR 2031 World Literature II (3 credits)
LITR 2010 British Literature I (3 credits)
LITR 3060 History and Structure of the English Language (3 credits)
LITR 3520 African American Literature (3 credits)
LITR 3660 Young Adult Literature (3 credits)
Benchmark V
EDUC 4501
EDUC 4570
Benchmark V (Portfolio review I) (0 credits)
Internship/Seminar (12 credits)
Open Electives (15 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 120 credits
Secondary Mathematics Education Major
The Bachelor of Science in Secondary Mathematics Education is a state-approved initial certification program offered
by the Nova Southeastern University (NSU) Fischler School of Education and Human Services (FSEHS) that provides a
comprehensive set of pedagogical courses specifically designed for Mathematics instruction and assessment, a specialty
component with a variety of mathematics courses composing the content of the secondary mathematics based on the
Florida Sunshine State Mathematics Standards, and the current State-wide assessment in mathematics at (grades 6–12).
Mathematics certification is a generic certification that allows teachers to provide instruction at both the middle school level
as well as at the high school level.
Secondary Mathematics Education Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
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refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Secondary Mathematics Education Program Requirements (12 credits)
EDUC 2500 SPCH 1010 TECH
EDUC 1100 ESOL 2903
Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
(3 credits)
Exploration of the Education Profession (3 credits)
Cross-Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Secondary Mathematics Education Major Requirements (65 credits)
Benchmark II
EDUC 3330 ESOL 3340 EDUC 3350 EDUC 3360 Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of TESOL for Teachers (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Education (3 credits)
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
enchmark III
B
EDUC 3501
EDUC 3520 SECE 4350 SECE 4320 Benchmark III (Portfolio review I) (0 credits)
Principles and Practices of Instruction and Assessment I (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Math in Secondary School (3 credits)
Middle and Secondary Classroom Management (3 credits)
enchmark IV
B
EDUC 4001
EDUC 4200 SECE 4560 ESOL 4565 Benchmark IV (Portfolio review II) (0 credits)
Simulation Experience-Diversity (0 credits)
Methods of Teaching Secondary Reading (3 credits)
Second Language Learning (3 credits)
Math Specialty Courses
MATH 1200 Pre-calculus Algebra (3 credits)
MATH 1250 Trigonometry (3 credits)
MATH 2100 Calculus I (4 credits)
MATH 2200 Calculus II (4 credits)
MATH 3020 Applied Statistics (3 credits)
MATH 3250 Euclidean Geometry (3 credits)
MATH 3300 Introductory Linear Algebra (3 credits)
MATH 3350 Number Theory (3 credits)
enchmark V
B
EDUC 4501
EDUC 4570 Benchmark III (Portfolio review III) (0 credits)
Internship/Seminar (12 credits)
Open Electives (15 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 122 credits
Secondary Social Studies Education Major
The Bachelor of Science in Secondary Social Studies Education is a state-approved initial certification program offered
by the Nova Southeastern University Fischler School of Education and Human Services that provides a comprehensive
set of pedagogical courses specifically designed for social studies instruction and assessment, in addition to a specialty
component with a variety of content courses within the social sciences including history, geography, political science,
economics and sociology for secondary social studies based on the Florida Sunshine State Social Studies Standards, and
the current state-wide assessment in Social Studies (grades 6-12). Course content is research-based and infuses best
practices in education and strategies for teaching social studies at the middle and high school level (grades 6-12).
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Secondary Social Studies Education Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Secondary Social Studies Education Program Requirements (12 credits)
EDUC 2500
SPCH 1010
TECH
EDUC 1100
ESOL 2903
Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
(3 credits)
Exploration of the Education Profession (3 credits)
Cross-Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Secondary Social Studies Education Major Requirements (72 credits)
Benchmark II
EDUC 3330
ESOL 3340
EDUC 3350
EDUC 3360
Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of TESOL for Teachers (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Ed (3 credits)
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
Benchmark III
EDUC 3501
EDUC 3520
SECE 3530 SECE 4320
Benchmark III (Portfolio review I) (0 credits)
Principles and Practices of Instruction and Assessment I (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Middle and Secondary Social Science (3 credits)
Middle and Secondary Classroom Management (3 credits)
Benchmark IV
EDUC 4001
EDUC 4200
SECE 4560
ESOL 4565
SECE 4565 Benchmark IV (Portfolio review II) (0 credits)
Simulation Experience-Diversity (0 credits)
Methods of Teaching Secondary Reading (3 credits)
Second Language Learning (3 credits)
Teaching Controversial Topics in Social Studies (3 credits)
Social Studies Specialty Courses
HIST 1040 American History Since 1865 (3 credits)
HIST 1090 Early Western History (3 credits)
HIST 1110 Modern Western History (3 credits)
HIST 2130 Formation of Latin America OR HIST 2140 Modern Latin America (3 credits)
HIST 1150 Early World History (3 credits)
HIST 1160 Modern World History (3 credits)
ECN 2020 Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits)
POLS 1010 American Government and Politics (3 credits)
GEOG 2050 Survey of Geography (3 credits)
SOCL 3130 Family Systems (3 credits)
Benchmark V
EDUC 4501
EDUC 4570
Benchmark V (Portfolio review III) (0 credits)
Internship/Seminar (12 credits)
Open Electives (6 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 120 credits
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Applied Professional Studies Major with a Concentration in Teaching and
Learning (Jamaica)
The Bachelor of Science degree in Applied Professional Studies with a concentration in teaching and learning is offered by
the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences and the Fischler School of Education and Human Services in cooperation with
selected teacher preparation institutions in Jamaica and the Jamaica Teachers’ Association (JTA).
The applied professional studies major with a concentration in teaching and learning is designed for substantial transfer
of previous college credit for general requirements and electives and offers a flexible program for adults who have gained
a significant amount of teaching experience in addition to having earned a teaching diploma in primary education from a
teachers college in Jamaica. Please see the “Interdisciplinary Programs” section of this catalog for more information.
International Undergraduate Teacher Education Program
The International Undergraduate Teacher Education Program (IUTEP) is a non-certification program proposed to be
offered within the Fischler School of Education and Human Services (FSEHS) of Nova Southeastern University (NSU).
It is designed for undergraduate students who have recently relocated to the United States, resulting in an interruption
of their undergraduate academic studies. The IUTEP will also be applicable to other individuals who finished a normal
school program or a technical degree in a Spanish-speaking country, but do not have a bachelor’s degree. Students who
finish the IUTEP will graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Education with a concentration in either Elementary School
Studies or Exceptional Learning Styles. This program is designed to meet the needs of individuals whose native language is
Spanish and would like to enter the teaching profession through an alternative certification route. The instruction for several
courses for the concentrations in Elementary School Studies and Exceptional Learning Styles will be delivered in Spanish
by bilingual instructors.
Education Major with a Concentration in Elementary School Studies Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Elementary School Studies Program Requirements (3 credits)
EDUC 2500
SPCH 1010
Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
Elementary School Studies Concentration Requirements (41 credits)
ESOL 2903 EDUC 3325 EDUC 3360 IUTEP 3100 EDUC 3330 EDUC 3350 IUTEP 3200 ELEM 3520 ELEM 3531
ELEM 3532 IUTEP 3300 ESED 3561 ELEM 4360 IUTEP 3400 ELEM 3530 ELEM 4320 ELEM 4330 263
Cross Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Using Technology Tools and Resources (1 credit)
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
Education Content and Language Learning for ESL Education I (0 credits)
Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Education (3 credits)
Education Content and Language Learning for ESL Education II (0 credits)
Principles and Practices of Instructional and Assessment I (3 credits)
Science Curriculum for Elementary Education Lab (1 credit)
Science Curriculum for Elementary Education (3 credits)
Education Content and Language Learning for ESL Education III (0 credits)
Families, Communities, and Exceptionalities (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Literacy in the Elementary School (3 credits)
Education Content and Language Learning for ESL Education IV (0 credits)
Methods of Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School (3 credits)
Elementary School Classroom Management (3 credits)
Mathematics Curriculum For Elementary Educators (3 credits)
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ELEM 4540 ELEM 4560 Reading Assessment (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Reading Across the Elementary Curriculum (3 credits)
Open Electives (46 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 120 credits
Education Major with a Concentration in Exceptional Learning Styles
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Exceptional Learning Styles Program Requirements (3 credits)
EDUC 2500
SPCH 1010
Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
Exceptional Learning Styles Concentration Requirements (41 credits)
ESOL 2903 EDUC 3325 EDUC 3360 IUTEP 3100 EDUC 3330 EDUC 3350 IUTEP 3200 ELEM 3520 ELEM 3531 ELEM 3532 IUTEP 3300 ESED 3561 ELEM 4360 IUTEP 3400 ESED 3530 ESED 3540 ESED 3550 ESED 4320 ELEM 4540 Cross Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Using Technology Tools and Resources (1 credit)
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
Education Content and Language Learning for ESL Education I (0 credits)
Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Education (3 credits)
Education Content and Language Learning for ESL Education II (0 credits)
Principles and Practices of Instructional and Assessment I (3 credits)
Science Curriculum for Elementary Education Lab (1 credit)
Science Curriculum for Elementary Education (3 credits)
Education Content and Language Learning for ESL Education III (0 credits)
Families, Communities, and Exceptionalities (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Literacy in the Elementary School (3 credits)
Education Content and Language. Learning for ESL Education IV (0 credits)
Educational Assessment of Exceptional Student Education Students (3 credits)
Language and Speech Disabilities (3 credits)
Vocational and Functional Life Skills (3 credits)
Classroom Management for Typical/Atypical Learners in the Multicultural Classroom (3 credits)
Reading Assessment (3 credits)
Open Electives (46 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 120 credits
Elementary Education Major (Turks & Caicos Islands and the Bahamas)
Elementary Education Major Curriculum—Turks & Caicos Islands and the Bahamas
Nova Southeastern University’s Fischler School of Education and Human Services in cooperation with the Turks and
Caicos Islands Ministry of Education and the Bahamas Ministry of Education provide the Bachelor of Science in Elementary
Education which focuses on training current teachers and future teachers to enter the classroom, while emphasizing
the teaching of elementary (grades K–6) students. This major provides future educators with a foundation in classroom
management, curriculum development, and methods of teaching, as well as skills for teaching elementary-level students.
Course content is research based and infuses best practices in education and strategies for teaching English as a second
language (ESOL).
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General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Elementary Education Program Requirements—Turks & Caicos Islands and Bahamas (12 credits)
EDUC 2500
SPCH 1010
TECH
EDUC 1100
ESOL 2903
Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
Public Speaking (3 credits)
(3 credits)
Exploration of the Education Profession (3 credits)
Cross-Cultural Studies (3 credits)
Elementary Education Major Requirements—Turks & Caicos Islands and Bahamas (64 credits)
Benchmark I
EDUC 3325
EDUC 3326
ESOL 3341
EDUC 3351
EDUC 3360
Using Technology Tools and Resources
Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of TESOL for Teachers (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Education (3 credits)
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
Benchmark II
EDUC 3520
ELEM 3530
ELEM 3543
ELEM 3550
ESED 3561
Principles and Practices of Instruction and Assessment I (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School (3 credits)
Student Centered Instruction and Assessment (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3 credits)
Families, Professionals, and Exceptionality (3 credits)
Benchmark III
EDUC 4321
ELEM 4340
ELEM 4350
ELEM 4361
Classroom Management through Conflict Resolution (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Language Arts through Children’s Literature in the Elementary School
(3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Literacy in the Elementary School (3 credits)
Benchmark IV
ELEM 4530
ELEM 4541
ELEM 4561
ESOL 4565
Integrating Art, Music, and Health Education Across the Curriculum (3 credits)
Reading Assessment I (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Reading across the Elementary Curriculum (3 credits)
Second Language Learning: Theory, Method, and Evaluation (3 credits)
Benchmark V
EDUC 4570
Internship/Seminar (12 credits)
Open Electives (14 credits)
Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 120 credits
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Minors
Education Minor
There is consistent growth nationally in the need for elementary education, exceptional student education, and secondary
education level content area teachers. The Undergraduate Teacher Education Program offers a minor in education that
will allow students majoring in English, history, math, life science, or other majors the opportunity to take educational
coursework that may provide opportunities to obtain employment in Grade K-12 classrooms. The education minor will give
students a strong foundation in the teaching basics, necessary to be accepted into an alternative certification program and
enter the teaching profession.
Students must have junior standing in order to enroll in these courses. In addition, the required 10 hours of field experiences
for each course must be completed in an area elementary, middle, or high school. Students will be required to complete any
security clearance processes required by the local school district. For more information regarding policies and necessary
procedures, please refer to the following Web site: www.schoolofed.nova.edu/undergraduate/clinic/index.html.
Education Minor Requirements (18 credits)
All students minoring in education will need to complete the following:
EDUC 3330
ESOL 3340
EDUC 3350
EDUC 3360
EDUC 3520
Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Survey of TESOL for Teachers (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Education (3 credits)
Educational Psychology (3 credits)
Principles and Practices of Instruction and Assessment I (3 credits)
Choose 3 credits from the following:
ELEM 4320
Elementary Classroom Management
ESED 4320
Classroom Management for Typical and Atypical Learners in the Multicultural Classroom
SECE 4320
Secondary Classroom Management
Students must maintain a minimum 2.5 grade point average to be awarded the minor in education.
Speech-Language Pathology Minor
The speech-language pathology minor provides students with a basic understanding of communication sciences and
disorders. All courses offered in the minor are offered only in the evenings at the Main Campus in Fort Lauderdale. All
speech-language pathology courses are only available to degree seeking students.
Speech-Language Pathology Minor Requirements (18 credits)
All students minoring in speech-language pathology will need to complete the following:
CSAD 3010 CSAD 3020 CSAD 3030 CSAD 3040 CSAD 3050 CSAD 4050 Phonetics (3 credits)
Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech-Language and Hearing Mechanisms (3 credits)
Speech-Language Development (3 credits)
Neuroanatomy (3 credits)
Hearing and Speech Science (3 credits)
Audiology (3 credits)
Other courses required prior to beginning a graduate program of study in Speech-Language Pathology:
CSAD 3060 Directed Observation (1 credit)
CSAD 4010 Evaluation of Speech-Language Disorders (3 credits)
CSAD 4030 Treatment of Speech-Language Disorders (3 credits)
CSAD 4070 Rehabilitation for the Hearing Impaired (3 credits)
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Add-on Endorsements
Driver-Education Add-on Endorsement
The Driver Education courses offered at Nova Southeastern University provide the competencies required to meet teacher
certification for teaching high school students basic driver education using Florida Department of Education Driver Education
outlined expectations. The series of three courses lead to an endorsement in Driver Education. Participants will review driving
rules and procedures associated with driving as well as how to implement these procedures using engaging instructional
strategies. Teaching strategies to assist participants with classroom implementation will be used throughout the three
courses in sequence. Sample teaching strategies and curriculum connections will also be included in the three courses.
EDUC 4910 EDUC 4911 EDUC 4912 Introduction to Driver’s Education (3 credits)
Instructional Strategies and Methods for Teaching Advanced Driver Education (3 credits)
Administration and Supervision of Driver Education (3 credits)
English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) K-12
Add-on Endorsement
The state-approved courses leading to the ESOL endorsement enable educators to add additional coverage to their
certification. This will allow them to teach students who are designated as being LEP (limited English proficient) and who
are in ESOL programs. This endorsement is also designed for teacher candidates who are enrolled within the Elementary
Education, Exceptional Student Education, Prekindergarten/Primary Education, Secondary English Education and Middle
Grades English Education majors at Nova Southeastern University in the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program and
are currently working toward teacher certification in Florida, and for educators who are certified in other areas.
To earn the endorsement, students of the Elementary Education and Exceptional Student Education majors who entered the
majors after January 2005 in addition to students enrolled in the Secondary English Education and Middle Grades English
Education majors must satisfactorily complete three state-prescribed courses, totaling 9 semester hours and complete an
ESOL-infused program curriculum in the major. Only the Florida State Department of Education, Office of Certification,
grants the endorsement. While these three courses and ESOL-infused curricula meet the endorsement requirements, NSU
reflects the ESOL endorsement on the transcript.
Registration for these courses should follow the sequence as denoted below:
ESOL 2903 Cross Cultural Studies (3 credits)
ESOL 3340 Survey of TESOL for Teachers (3 credits)
ESOL 4565 Second Language Learning: Theory, Methods, and Evaluation (3 credits)
Students of the prekindergarten/primary education major, as well as students of the elementary education and exceptional
student education majors, who entered the majors before January 2005, must satisfactorily complete five state-prescribed
courses, totaling 15 semester hours, in order to earn the endorsement. Additionally, individuals from other majors who wish
to pursue an ESOL endorsement must complete these five state-prescribed courses, totaling 15 semester hours. While
these five courses meet the ESOL endorsement requirements and will be reflected on the NSU transcript, only the Florida
Department of Education, Office of Certification, grants the endorsement.
Registration for these courses should follow the sequence as denoted below:
ESOL 2903 Cross Cultural Studies (3 credits)
ESOL 4901 Methods of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (3 credits)
ESOL 4902 ESOL Curriculum and Materials (3 credits)
ESOL 4904 Linguistics for ESOL Educators (3 credits)
ESOL 4905 Testing and Evaluation in ESOL (3 credits)
As part of their Bachelor of Science degree program, all degree-seeking education major students who require an ESOL
endorsement by the Florida Department of Education take either the 9-credit hour ESOL endorsement plus ESOL-infused
curriculum OR the 15-credit-hour ESOL endorsement.
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H. Wayne Huizenga
School of Business
and
Entrepreneurship
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H. Wayne Huizenga School of
Business and Entrepreneurship
Dean’s Message
Nova Southeastern University’s H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
does not just talk about the need to transform business education—it lives it.
In an era when business schools are struggling to keep pace with the trends and challenges
faced by the business world, we are pioneering the development of an integrated approach to
leading and managing that will place our graduates at the forefront of management application
and theory.
The Huizenga School is focused on the creation of value for you and the organization for which
you work. This theory-based, intuitive, and pragmatic approach finally brings it all together to
create leaders and managers who will have a holistic approach to life and work. The Huizenga
School’s value-driven management philosophy is a revolutionary approach to leading and
managing that focuses on maximizing value over time. You will learn to balance your perspectives of world cultures, the
United States and its subcultures, and what the customers, suppliers, third parties, employees, competitors, and owners
of your organization value. You will learn how effective leaders and managers manage this juggling act and make good
decisions that lead to positive results.
If you want to be at the cutting edge of management education that gets results for you and your organization in the 21st
century, then the H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship is for you. Our professors bring a mix of
research and practical business experience to the classroom. Our flexible delivery systems and high quality meet the needs
of working professionals, full-time students, and organizations.
The Huizenga School at Nova Southeastern University is committed to serving as your partner in the business world,
preparing you to be strong competitors in this challenging marketplace. We want students who share our excitement about
the future of leading and managing in the 21st century. Together, through this cutting-edge approach to management
education, we will create the foundation of knowledge, skills, and experience on which you can build your future.
D. Michael Fields, Ph.D.
D. Michael Fields, Ph.D.
Dean, H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
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Vision
The H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship is a worldwide provider of academic, professional, and
practical development education for individuals in business, academia, government, and nonprofit organizations, possessing a
recognized reputation for quality using personal relationships and appropriate technology to provide superior real-world
learning experiences for students in a manner that allows education to be an integral part of their lives.
Mission
Our mission is to advance the personal growth and professional development of individuals in business, academia,
government, and nonprofit organizations by providing readily accessible, managerially and entrepreneurially oriented, and
convenient educational opportunities of superior real-world value.
Philosophy
We believe in this fast-paced, rapidly changing world, individuals in business, academia, government, and nonprofit
organizations need convenient, accessible, superior-value educational opportunities. Only by utilizing faculty possessing
scholarly and professional qualifications, providing personal interaction with students, and effectively using technology, can
we prepare students for success.
We can only realize our vision if all faculty and staff of the Huizenga School, with the support of our other stakeholders, are
dedicated to innovation in courses, curricula, delivery methods, and services to students according to students needs.
The success of the Huizenga School is contingent upon the ability of our faculty, staff, and students to apply newly acquired
knowledge to create value in their respective business, academic, government, and nonprofit organizations in particular,
and society as a whole.
Principles
1. Conduct all of our academic affairs with integrity.
2. Be committed to the Huizenga School’s vision, mission, philosophy, and principles.
3. Treat each other with dignity, respect, and sensitivity so as to create a caring environment that allows faculty, staff, and
students to reach their greatest potential.
4. Stay focused on, and anticipate the needs of our constituents so we can prepare our students to be “shapers” of our
society, not mere “reactors.”
5. Set high expectations for ourselves and demonstrate initiative, judgment, flexibility, and teamwork so we may fulfill our
mission and vision.
6. Have a compelling desire to advance the knowledge of how organizations function, and apply this knowledge so that
developing creative solutions is a major focus of life.
7. Have the vision, creativity, openness, and receptivity to challenge the status quo, to create learning and change, and
view our role in the Huizenga School and the University as part of a dynamic process rather than a set of static, fixed
relationships with related tasks.
8. Constantly try to understand the contributions we can make to the vision and mission of the organization, and seek to
contribute where there is a clear, comparative advantage.
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9. Believe that lifelong learning, and the application of that learning, greatly enhances society.
10. Be culturally mature and demonstrate a strong appreciation for diversity and the richness it brings to life and learning.
Vision, Mission, Principles, April 10, 2006
H. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
Ethics Across the Curriculum Policy
Nova Southeastern University faculty believes that a socially responsible institution should not limit the study of ethical issues
only to coursework, but that such study should be an ongoing endeavor, enhancing the experience of the student. To this
end, the faculty is committed to making the study of ethical issues an integral part of the bachelor’s academic program. The
faculty believes that by incorporating the study of ethics throughout the curriculum, students will give additional relevance
and reality to their studies and this will help them to become more responsible and productive citizens.
Introduction to the H. Wayne Huizenga
School of Business and Entrepreneurship
Undergraduate majors in business administration and related fields are offered through the H. Wayne Huizenga School of
Business and Entrepreneurship. Master’s and doctoral degree programs are listed in the Graduate catalog. The information
provided in this section addresses curricular requirements for majors and minors in business administration and related
fields under the direction of the Huizenga School’s faculty and undergraduate business program office. Curricula are subject
to change. Students should consult their academic advisor regarding course selection and program planning.
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Business Programs
The Bachelor of Business Administration and Bachelor of Science degrees offered through the H. Wayne Huizenga School
of Business and Entrepreneurship provide the following majors: accounting, business administration, communication and
sales, finance, marketing, management, and sport and recreation management.
Business Programs Learning Goals
A successful graduate of the Bachelor of Science degree program is expected to:
1. Think critically in terms of conceptualizing issues, analyzing data, and articulating and defending conclusions;
2. Demonstrate professional verbal and written communication skills in an organizational context;
3. Demonstrate an ability to formulate organizational strategies;
4. Recognize the values of, and demonstrate an ability to make, ethical and socially responsible decisions;
5. Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of emerging technologies and use them appropriately to gather,
process, and present information;
6. Demonstrate an understanding of the legal and regulatory issues in an organizational context;
7. Use quantitative skills effectively to solve applied business problems;
8. Use interpersonal skills effectively at the individual, group, and organizational levels;
9. Demonstrate an understanding of the interaction between business and the global economy;
10. Demonstrate an understanding of increasingly diverse cultures within organizational life.
To view the Bachelor of Business Administration degree program learning goals, refer to the Communication and Sales
Major section of this catalog.
Majors in Business
Accounting Major
The accounting major is offered for those students who wish to pursue a career in accounting. The major will also serve
as the foundation for those preparing for the CPA examination. The State Board of Accountancy in Florida requires
an additional 30 credits beyond the bachelor’s degree to qualify for the examination. The Huizenga School offers a
master’s degree designed to satisfy the CPA requirements. Students are cautioned to plan their schedule carefully since
upper-division accounting courses are offered once per year and may be offered only in the evening.
Accounting Major Learning Outcomes
1. Properly apply generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) in the preparation of financial statements;
2. Use appropriate cost and managerial accounting techniques to prepare information for decision making;
3. Demonstrate knowledge of auditing techniques and processes;
4. Correctly apply relevant UCC and tax codes and regulations;
5. Demonstrate knowledge of accounting information systems including the design and documentation of such systems.
Accounting Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Business Core (42 credits)
ACT 2200 274
Financial Accounting (3 credits)
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ACT 2300 FIN 3010 INB 3550 ISM 3660 MGT 2050 MGT 2150 MGT 4100 MGT 4170 MGT 4880 MKT 3050 MKT 3225
MKT 3235
OPS 3880 Managerial Accounting (3 credits)
Corporation Finance (3 credits)
International Business (3 credits)
Management Information Systems (3 credits)
Principles of Management (3 credits)
Business Law I (3 credits)
Business Ethics (3 credits)
Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Business Strategy and Policy (3 credits)
Marketing Principles and Applications (3 credits)
Proven Approaches to Client Relationship Building
Win-Win Relationship Selling
Operations Management (3 credits)
Accounting Program Requirements (6 credits)
Any SPCH elective (3 credits)
3 credits of open general education electives from ARTS, BIOL, CHEM, COMM, ENVS, FILM, GEOG, GEST, GLBS,
HIST, HUMN, LITR, MBIO, PHIL, PHYS, POLS, PSYC, SOCL, or SPAN (3 credits)
Accounting Major Requirements (27 credits)
A grade of C or better must be earned in the following eight courses. Any student earning a grade below a C will be required
to repeat the course.
ACT 3030 Cost Management (3 credits)
ACT 3050 Intermediate Accounting I (3 credits)
ACT 3060 Intermediate Accounting II (3 credits)
ACT 3070 Intermediate Accounting III (3 credits)
ACT 4060
Seminar in Accounting (3 credits)
TXX 3110 Federal Taxation I (3 credits)
ACT 4010 Advanced Accounting (3 credits)
ACT 4050 Accounting Information Systems (3 credits)
ACT 4210 Auditing I (3 credits)
Open Electives (15 credits)
Business Administration Major
The business administration major is aimed at students seeking a bachelor’s degree in preparation for careers in business
and related fields. This major provides general knowledge in business from both the theoretical and practical perspectives.
Students learn the important ingredients effective managers need to not only survive, but also succeed in today’s business
world. This major provides a solid foundation for admission into M.B.A. programs, grades of C or higher are required for
prerequisite courses marked with an asterisk (*).
Business Administration Major Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate an understanding of business principles and financial practices;
2. Apply interpersonal skills, individual, and group behavioral dynamics to business practices for motivating people in
the workplace;
3. Demonstrate the ability to listen, absorb and research business information;
4. Translate business information into effective oral and written communication or action;
5. Demonstrate an understanding of the legal and regulatory issues facing organizations;
6. Recognize and apply current and emerging technology systems and applications to critically and creatively solve
business problems;
7. Recognize and demonstrate the value of ethical and socially responsible decisions;
8. Demonstrate an ability to formulate organizational strategies;
9. Use quantitative skills effectively to solve business problems;
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10. Demonstrate an understanding of the value of diversity as part of the increasing interaction between business and
the global economy.
Business Administration Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Business Core (42 credits)
ACT 2200 ACT 2300 FIN 3010 INB 3550 ISM 3660 MGT 2050 MGT 2150 MGT 4100 MGT 4170 MGT 4880 MKT 3050 MKT 3225
MKT 3235
OPS 3880 Financial Accounting (3 credits)*
Managerial Accounting (3 credits)
Corporation Finance (3 credits)*
International Business (3 credits)
Management Information Systems (3 credits)
Principles of Management (3 credits)
Business Law I (3 credits)
Business Ethics (3 credits)
Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Business Strategy and Policy (3 credits)
Marketing Principles and Applications (3 credits)*
Proven Approaches to Client Relationship Building
Win-Win Relationship Selling
Operations Management (3 credits)
Business Administration Program Requirements (6 credits)
Any SPCH elective (3 credits)
3 credits of open general education electives from ARTS, BIOL, CHEM, COMM, ENVS, FILM, GEOG, GEST, GLBS,
HIST, HUMN, LITR, MBIO, PHIL, PHYS, POLS, PSYC, SOCL, or SPAN (3 credits)
Business Administration Major Requirements (24 credits)
Select one course from each of the following areas (15 credits):
FIN
Finance MGT HRM
Human Resource Management MKT INB
International Business
Management
Marketing
Select three upper-level courses from any of the following areas (9 credits):
ACT
Accounting INB ECN
Economics LED ENT
Entrepreneurship MGT FIN
Finance MKT HRM
Human Resource Management
International Business
Leadership
Management
Marketing
Open Electives (18 credits)
Communication and Sales Major
At the time of publication of the 2010-2011 undergraduate catalog, this planned degree program is completing institutional
review and external accreditation notification.
The Bachelor of Business Administration degree program offers the finest in relevant business education. The program
combines the core essentials of business such as accounting, finance, management, and marketing, with a new set of core
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courses aimed at educating the student in communication and sales concepts so important in today’s job market.
Employers want to know that the person they are hiring is a skilled communicator. The four communications courses will
develop that skill in the student. In addition, the student will take four sales courses that combine sales concepts with realworld sales techniques. NSU has partnered with a world-renowned sales organization, Sandler Systems, Inc., to ensure
students have the necessary skills to differentiate them in the marketplace upon graduation. By taking full advantage of the
state-of-the-art Sales Institute at Nova Southeastern University, students will leave with a real-world skill. Research has
shown that employers are looking for basic business communication and sales skills in all professions in fields ranging from
accounting to fine arts. Sales skills are a necessary part of all occupations, whether one is selling him or herself, an idea,
a new business proposal, or to a new client. NSU business students would benefit from this valuable education whether it
be as a minor or major from any discipline. NSU students from non-business majors will also gain valuable skills for their
profession by pursuing the minor detailed in a later section of this catalog.
Communication and Sales Major Learning Outcomes
1. Think critically in terms of conceptualizing issues, analyzing data, and articulating and defending conclusions;
2. Demonstrate professional verbal and written communication skills in an organizational context;
3. Demonstrate an ability to formulate organizational strategies;
4. Recognize the values of, and demonstrate an ability to make, ethical and socially responsible decisions;
5. Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of emerging technologies and use them appropriately to gather,
process, and present information;
6. Demonstrate an understanding of the legal and regulatory issues in an organizational context;
7. Use quantitative skills effectively to solve applied business problems;
8. Use interpersonal skills effectively at the individual, group, and organizational levels;
9. Demonstrate an understanding of increasingly diverse cultures within organizational life;
10. Demonstrate an ability to understand sales concepts and sales management issues;
11. Be able to use sales techniques in the business environment to promote ideas and strategies.
Communication and Sales Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Business Core (42 credits)
ACT 2200
FIN 3000
FIN 2000
HRM 4160
HRM 4300
ISM 3660
MGT 2050
MGT 2150
MGT 4100
MGT 4170
MGT 4000
MGT 3110
MKT 3050
OPS 3880
Financial Accounting (3 credits)
Introduction to Finance (3 credits)
Personal Finance (3 credits)
Human Resource Management (3 credits)
Managing Workplace Diversity (3 credits)
Management Information Systems (3 credits)
Principles of Management (3 credits)
Business Law I (3 credits)
Business Ethics (3 credits)
Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Introduction to Business Strategy (3 credits)
Career Planning Strategies and Tactics (3 credits)
Marketing Principles and Applications (3 credits)
Operations Management (3 credits)
Communication and Sales Program Requirements (6 credits)
Any SPCH elective (3 credits)
3 credits of open general education electives from ARTS, BIOL, CHEM, COMM, ENVS, FILM, GEOG, GEST, GLBS,
HIST, HUMN, LITR, MBIO, PHIL, PHYS, POLS, PSYC, SOCL, or SPAN (3 credits)
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Communication and Sales Major Requirements (24 credits)
MGT 3020
MGT 3025
MGT 3030
MGT 3040
MKT 3210
MKT 3220
MKT 3230
MKT 3240
Business Communication (3 credits)
Strategic Communication (3 credits)
Business Communication Research (3 credits)
Business Communication Laboratory (3 credits)
Productive Approaches to Relationship Selling (3 credits)
Powerful Communications Techniques for Winning Business (3 credits)
World Class Prospecting & Sales Pursuit Strategies (3 credits)
Technology Enabled CRM & Sales Planning (3 credits)
Optional Internship
MKT 3900
Internship (3 credits)
Open Electives (18 credits)
Finance Major
The finance major is designed for students who want to combine a broad approach to business studies with specialization
in the discipline of finance. Finance majors develop a broad array of analytical skills in business law, international business,
operations management, management, marketing, and accounting. More specialized skills in finance are realized through
the study of foreign currencies, investments, portfolio theory, financial management, money and banking, and forecasting.
Graduates are well prepared to enter the M.B.A. program, professional programs such as law, and/or master’s degree
programs in finance. Graduates are also well prepared to work for a financial institution in credit, trust, or operations, or for
a finance firm in the financial services industry, which includes investment brokerage, real estate, insurance, or financial
planning.
Finance Major Learning Outcomes
1. Think critically about the interrelationships between components of the domestic and international financial and
economic environments, analyze financial statements and market data and make investment choices and
recommendations for financial control;
2. Synthesize and integrate narrative and financial data into a coherent written statement while recognizing the impact
of financial decisions on overall organizational goals. Verbally defend investment recommendations and procedures
for financial analysis;
3. Recognize the value of ethical reporting and problem-solving as part of preparation for licensing examinations
including but not limited to the Series 3, 7, and 63;
4. Master the basic financial techniques to perform computations using financial calculators, Excel for corporate finance
and Excel for investments;
5. Demonstrate the ability to solve a variety of financial problems both in the form of large-scale case study analysis,
and problems involving financial statement analysis, exchange rate movements, investments and portfolio analysis,
banking, and general macroeconomic analysis;
6. Work cooperatively with peers in solving cases, completing applied projects and collaborating on in-class problemsolving;
7. Demonstrate the ability to use strategies frequently employed in international finance including arbitrag opportunities,
hedging foreign currencies, forecasting exchange rates, managing transaction, economic, and translation exposure,
multinational capital budgeting, and long-term financing.
Finance Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Business Core (42 credits)
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ACT 2200 ACT 2300 FIN 3010 INB 3550 ISM 3660 MGT 2050 MGT 2150 MGT 4100 MGT 4170 MGT 4880 MKT 3050 MKT 3225
MKT 3235
OPS 3880 Financial Accounting (3 credits)
Managerial Accounting (3 credits)
Corporation Finance (3 credits)
International Business (3 credits)
Management Information Systems (3 credits)
Principles of Management (3 credits)
Business Law I (3 credits)
Business Ethics (3 credits)
Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Business Strategy and Policy (3 credits)
Marketing Principles and Applications (3 credits)
Proven Approaches to Client Relationship Building
Win-Win Relationship Selling
Operations Management (3 credits)
Finance Program Requirements (6 credits)
ny SPCH elective (3 credits)
A
3 credits of open general education electives from ARTS, BIOL, CHEM, COMM, ENVS, FILM, GEOG, GEST, GLBS,
HIST, HUMN, LITR, MBIO, PHIL, PHYS, POLS, PSYC, SOCL, or SPAN (3 credits)
Finance Major Requirements (24 credits)
ECN 3025 ECN 3210 FIN 3110 FIN 3120 FIN 3130 FIN 3150 FIN 4120 FIN 4550 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3 credits)
Monetary Theory and Policy (3 credits)
Financial Management (3 credits)
Principles of Investments (3 credits)
Securities Analysis (3 credits)
Banking and Financial Institutions (3 credits)
Advanced Financial Management (3 credits)
International Finance and Banking (3 credits)
Open Electives (18 Credits)
Management Major
The management major is designed for working adults who are advancing into supervisory and management positions. The
program provides a broad base of business skills that will prepare students for the challenges and opportunities encountered
in today’s business environment. Successful employment in business requires a background in accounting, computers,
economics, finance, and marketing. Graduates of this program are prepared for a wide variety of career opportunities.
Management Major Learning Outcomes
1. Demonstrate an understanding of business principles and financial practices;
2. Apply interpersonal skills, individual, and group behavioral dynamics to business practices for motivating people in
the workplace;
3. Demonstrate the ability to listen, absorb and research business information;
4. Translate business information into effective oral and written communication or action;
5. Demonstrate an understanding of the legal and regulatory issues facing organizations;
6. Recognize and apply current and emerging technology systems and applications to critically and creatively solve
business problems;
7. Recognize and demonstrate the value of ethical and socially responsible decisions;
8. Demonstrate an ability to formulate organizational strategies;
9. Use quantitative skills effectively to solve business problems;
10. Demonstrate an understanding of the value of diversity as part of the increasing interaction between business and
the global economy.
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Management Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Business Core (42 credits)
ACT 2200 ACT 2300 FIN 3010 INB 3550 ISM 3660 MGT 2050 MGT 2150 MGT 4100 MGT 4170 MGT 4880 MKT 3050 MKT 3225
MKT 3235
OPS 3880 Financial Accounting (3 credits)
Managerial Accounting (3 credits)
Corporation Finance (3 credits)
International Business (3 credits)
Management Information Systems (3 credits)
Principles of Management (3 credits)
Business Law I (3 credits)
Business Ethics (3 credits)
Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Business Strategy and Policy (3 credits)
Marketing Principles and Applications (3 credits)
Proven Approaches to Client Relationship Building
Win-Win Relationship Selling
Operations Management (3 credits)
Management Program Requirements (6 credits)
Any SPCH elective (3 credits)
3 credits of open general education electives from ARTS, BIOL, CHEM, COMM, ENVS, FILM, GEOG, GEST, GLBS,
HIST, HUMN, LITR, MBIO, PHIL, PHYS, POLS, PSYC, SOCL, or SPAN (3 credits)
Management Major Requirements (24 credits)
HRM 4160 INB 4600 LED 3000 MGT 3020 MGT 3050 HRM 3100 HRM 4300 QNT 4610 Human Resource Management (3 credits)
International Management (3 credits)
Introduction to Leadership (3 credits)
Business Communication (3 credits)
Organization Theory (3 credits)
Managing Conflict and Change (3 credits)
Managing Workplace Diversity (3 credits)
Business Research Methods (3 credits)
Open Electives (18 credits)
Marketing Major
The marketing major provides students with an understanding of the important concepts of marketing with an emphasis on
emerging technologies. This major prepares students to practice marketing in a changing, competitive, global environment.
A marketing major offers students a comprehensive understanding of the marketing role in business, including sales,
advertising, retailing, management, market research, and strategy. Marketing positions are available in sales, pricing,
product management, distribution, advertising, and promotion, market research, purchasing, and related fields.
Marketing Major Learning Outcomes
1. Apply in detail the practices and principles common to the marketing function;
2. Apply marketing principles to analyze, plan, implement, and control marketing operations;
3. Demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of brand, product, and marketing management as well as
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advertising, selling, and integrated marketing communication;
4. Demonstrate proficiency in marketing research by making appropriate suggestions to resolve marketingproblems
and interpret marketing research results;
5. Suggest appropriate marketing strategies and tactics for domestic and global business applicable business and
consumer markets;
6. Demonstrate competency of the Internet and interactive marketing technologies as a promotional medium and
distribution channel.
Marketing Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Business Core (42 credits)
ACT 2200 ACT 2300 FIN 3010 INB 3550 ISM 3660 MGT 2050 MGT 2150 MGT 4100 MGT 4170 MGT 4880 MKT 3050 MKT 3225
MKT 3235
OPS 3880 Financial Accounting (3 credits)
Managerial Accounting (3 credits)
Corporation Finance (3 credits)
International Business (3 credits)
Management Information Systems (3 credits)
Principles of Management (3 credits)
Business Law I (3 credits)
Business Ethics (3 credits)
Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Business Strategy and Policy (3 credits)
Marketing Principles and Applications (3 credits)
Proven Approaches to Client Relationship Building
Win-Win Relationship Selling
Operations Management (3 credits)
Marketing Program Requirements (6 credits)
Any SPCH elective (3 credits)
3 credits of open general education electives from ARTS, BIOL, CHEM, COMM, ENVS, FILM, GEOG, GEST,GLBS,
HIST, HUMN, LITR, MBIO, PHIL, PHYS, POLS, PSYC, SOCL, or SPAN (3 credits)
Marketing Major Requirements (24 credits)
MKT 3060 Buyer Behavior (3 credits)
MKT 3100 Marketing Services (3 credits)
MKT 4100 Integrated Marketing Comm. & the Internet (3 credits)
MKT 4700 Marketing Research (3 credits)
MKT 4710 Marketing Strategy (3 credits)
Any MKT Elective (3 credits)
Any MKT Elective (3 credits)
Any MKT Elective (3 credits)
Open Electives (18 credits)
Sport and Recreation Management Major
The sport and recreation management major, available to students enrolled in the Professional and Liberal Studies Program,
prepares students to pursue careers in school and community-based programs, professional sports, and commercial and
agency based programs. The sport and recreation major is available only to students enrolled in the Professional and
Liberal Studies (day) Program on campus.
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Sport and Recreation Management Major Learning Outcomes
1. Work cooperatively with peers in solving cases, preparing and delivering presentations, and creating marketing,
public relations, and sponsorship plans relative to sport;
2. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of economics and finance principles and theories as they apply to sport,
including financing of intercollegiate athletics, stadium funding, economic impact analysis, revenue streams,
ticketing, and fund-raising;
3. Create a complete public relations strategy to support an athlete or sporting event;
4. Demonstrate the ability to analyze legal issues in sport and recreation by applying proper legal theory and drawing
from precedent setting cases;
5. Understand the importance of sport as social phenomena, and demonstrate knowledge regarding the role gender,
race, age, and religion play in the sport context;
6. Recognize the value of ethical thinking and theory in decision making for leaders in sport;
7. Be prepared to apply leadership and planning skills to effectively manage a sport facility or event.
Sport and Recreation Management Major Curriculum
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Business Core (42 credits)
ACT 2200 ACT 2300 ISM 3660 MGT 2050 MGT 4170 MGT 4880 MKT 3225
MKT 3235
SPT 1050 SPT 2150 SPT 2350 SPT 3550 SPT 3650 SPT 4550 Financial Accounting (3 credits)
Managerial Accounting (3 credits)
Management Information Systems (3 credits)
Principles of Management (3 credits)
Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Business Strategy and Policy (3 credits)
Proven Approaches to Client Relationship Building
Win-Win Relationship Selling
Introduction to Sport and Recreation Management (3 credits)
Sport in Society (3 credits)
Ethics in Sport and Recreation Management (3 credits)
Principles of Economics and Finance in Sport (3 credits)
Sport Marketing (3 credits)
Legal Aspects of Sport and Recreation (3 credits)
Sport and Recreation Management Program Requirements (6 credits)
Any SPCH elective (3 credits)
3 credits of open general education electives from ARTS, BIOL, CHEM, COMM, ENVS, FILM, GEOG, GEST,GLBS,
HIST, HUMN, LITR, MBIO, PHIL, PHYS, POLS, PSYC, SOCL, or SPAN (3 credits)
Sport and Recreation Management Major Requirements (24 credits)
LED 3000 Introduction to Leadership (3 credits)
SPT 3150 Facility and Event Management (3 credits)
SPT 4425 Organization and Administration of Sport (3 credits)
SPT 4850 Seminar in Sport and Recreation Management (3 credits)
Any SPT Elective (must have SPT prefix) (3 credits)
Any SPT Elective (must have SPT prefix) (3 credits)
Any SPT Elective (must have SPT prefix) (3 credits)
Any MGT Elective (must have MGT prefix) (3 credits)
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OR Sport and Recreation Management Internship Option (24 credits)
SPT 4850 Seminar in Sport and Recreation Management (3 credits)
SPT 4950 SPT Internship (12 credits)
Any SPT Elective (must have SPT prefix) (3 credits)
Any SPT Elective (must have SPT prefix) (3 credits)
Any SPT Elective (must have SPT prefix) (3 credits)
Open Electives (18 Credits)
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Minors in Business
All students are encouraged to complete one or more minors to prepare them for careers or graduate studies. A minor
requires the completion of 15–18 credits. If a student has taken one or more of the courses listed in the minor as part of his/
her major, a minimum of four additional courses must be successfully completed to earn the minor. A maximum of three
credits may be used from a student’s major courses to satisfy a minor.
Accounting Minor
The minor in accounting provides students with practical accounting knowledge.
Accounting Minor Requirements (15 credits)
All students who minor in accounting are required to complete the courses listed below.
ACT 2200 MGT 2050 Financial Accounting (3 credits)
Principles of Management (3 credits)
Select three courses from the following*:
ACT 2300 Managerial Accounting (3 credits)
ACT 3030 Cost Management (3 credits)
ACT 3050 Intermediate Accounting I (3 credits)
ACT 3060 Intermediate Accounting II (3 credits)
TXX 3110 Federal Taxation I (3 credits)
ACT 4050 Accounting Information Systems (3 credits)
ACT 4210 Auditing I (3 credits)
* Business majors choose four.
Business Minor (Non-business majors)
This minor is designed for students who want exposure to primary topical areas in business to help prepare them for jobs
in business and industry.
Business Minor Requirements (15 credits)
All students who minor in business are required to complete the courses listed below.
MBA Track (18 credits)
ACT 2200 Financial Accounting (3 credits)
ECN 2020 Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits)
FIN 3010 Corporation Finance (3 credits)
MATH 3020 Applied Statistics (3 credits)
MGT 2050 Principles of Management (3 credits)
MKT 3050 Marketing Principles and Application (3 credits)
Generalist Track (15 credits)
Select five courses from any of the following prefixes:
ACT, ECN, ENT, FIN, HRM, INB, ISM, LED, MGT, MKT, OPS, QNT
Entrepreneurship Minor
This minor in entrepreneurship is intended for students who desire a course of study to improve their understanding of the
business environment and entrepreneurial issues related to a business or organization.
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Entrepreneurship Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students who minor in entrepreneurship are required to complete the courses listed below.
MGT 2050 Principles of Management (3 credits)
Select four courses from the following:
LED 3000 Introduction to Leadership (3 credits)
ENT 3100 Small Business Management (3 credits)
MKT 3250 Selling and Sales Management (3 credits)
ENT 4800 Entrepreneurship Experience 3 credits)
ENT 4400 Franchise Management (3 credits)
Finance Minor
This minor is designed for students who are employed, or who would like to pursue a career, with financial institutions.
Finance Minor Requirements (18 credits)
Students who minor in banking and finance are required to complete the courses listed below.
FIN 3010 Corporation Finance (3 credits)
Select five courses from the following:
ECN 3025 Intermediate Macroeconomic (3 credits)
ECN 3210 Monetary Theory and Policy (3 credits)
FIN 3110 Financial Management (3 credits)
FIN 3120 Principles of Investments (3 credits)
FIN 3150 Banking and Financial Institutions (3 credits)
FIN 4550 International Finance and Banking (3 credits)
Human Resource Management Minor
This minor is designed for students who are or would like to be employed in the fields of personnel, training and development,
labor relations, or related areas.
Human Resource Management Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students who minor in human resource management are required to complete the courses listed below.
MGT 2050 Principles of Management (3 credits)
Select four courses from the following:
HRM 4160 Human Resource Management (3 credits)
MGT 4170 Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
HRM 4200 Organization Development and Change (3 credits)
HRM 4250 Strategic Human Resource Management (3 credits)
HRM 4300 Managing Workplace Diversity (3 credits)
HRM 4450 Labor Relations and Negotiations (3 credits)
HRM 4650 International HR Management (3 credits)
HRM 4700 Seminar in Current HR Issues (3 credits)
HRM 4850 Reading in HR Management (3 credits)
International Business Minor
This minor is designed for students employed by, or desiring employment in, multinational companies. Exporters, importers,
freight forwarders, customs brokers, transportation firms, wholesalers, or manufacturers should choose this minor.
International Business Minor Requirements (15 credits)
All students who minor in international business are required to complete the courses listed below.
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MGT 2050 Principles of Management (3 credits)
Select four courses from the following:
MKT 3320 International Marketing (3 credits)
INB 3550 International Business (3 credits)
INB 4300 Export/Import Trade (3 credits)
FIN 4550 International Finance and Banking (3 credits)
INB 4600 International Management (3 credits)
Leadership Minor
The minor in leadership is intended for students who desire a course of study to improve their understanding of the impact
of effective leaders along with an examination of contemporary leadership models and theories describing and explaining
the leadership process.
Leadership Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students who minor in leadership are required to complete the courses listed below.
LED 3000 MGT 2050 Introduction to Leadership (3 credits)
Principles of Management (3 credits)
Select three courses from the following (four courses for business majors):
LED 4100 Great World Leaders (3 credits)
LED 4200 Current Issues in Leadership (3 credits)
LED 4250 Self Leadership in Organizations (3 credits)
LED 4300 Situational Leadership (3 credits)
Management Minor
This minor is designed for working adults who are advancing into supervisory and management positions. The program
provides a broad base of business skills that will prepare students for the challenges and opportunities encountered in
today’s business environment.
Management Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students who minor in management are required to complete the courses listed below.
MGT 2050 Principles of Management (3 credits)
Select four courses from the following:
HRM 4160 Human Resource Management (3 credits)
LED 3000 Introduction to Leadership (3 credits)
MGT 2510 Supervisory Skills (3 credits)
MGT 3020 Business Communication (3 credits)
MGT 3050 Organization Theory (3 credits)
HRM 3100 Managing Conflict and Change (3 credits)
MGT 4100 Business Ethics (3 credits)
MGT 4170 Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
HRM 4300 Managing Workplace Diversity (3 credits)
Marketing Minor
This minor is designed for students who are employed in the fields of advertising, sales, promotion, retail, wholesale, or
related areas or for those who would like to pursue a career in marketing.
Marketing Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students who minor in marketing are required to complete the courses listed below.
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MGT 2050 MKT 3050 Principles of Management (3 credits)
Marketing Principles and Application (3 credits)
Select three courses from the following*:
MKT 3060 Buyer Behavior (3 credits)
MKT 3100 Marketing Services (3 credits)
MKT 3320 International Marketing (3 credits)
MKT 3410 Business and High Technology Marketing (3 credits)
MKT 3510 Customer Value and Relationship Marketing (3 credits)
MKT 4100 Integrated Marketing Comm. & the Internet (3 credits)
MKT 4610 Market Segmentation (3 credits)
MKT 4710 Marketing Strategy (3 credits)
* Business majors choose four.
Sales Minor
The sales minor offers a set of classes aimed at educating the student in sales concepts so important in today’s job
market. The student will take a marketing course plus four sales courses that combine sales concepts with real-world sales
techniques. NSU has partnered with a world-renowned sales organization, Sandler Systems, Inc., to ensure students have
the necessary skills to differentiate them in the marketplace upon graduation. By taking full advantage of the state-of-the-art
Sales Institute at Nova Southeastern University, students will leave with a real-world skill. Sales skills are a necessary part of
all occupations, whether one is selling him or herself, an idea, a new business proposal, or to a new client. All NSU students
would benefit from this valuable business education as a minor or major, regardless of the student’s chosen discipline.
Sales Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students who minor in sales are required to complete the courses listed below.
MKT 3050
MKT 3210
MKT 3220
MKT 3230
MKT 3240
Marketing Principles and Applications (3 credits)
Productive Approaches to Relationship Selling (3 credits)
Powerful Communication Techniques for Winning Business (3 credits)
World Class Prospecting & Sales Pursuit Strategies (3 credits)
Technology Enabled CRM & Sales Planning (3 credits)
Sport and Recreation Management Minor
This minor is designed for students who will be associated with sport in the course of their careers, be it through business,
education, coaching, athletic training or other opportunities.
Sport and Recreation Management Minor Requirements (15 credits)
Students who minor in sport and recreation management are required to complete the courses listed below.
SPT 1050 Introduction to Sport and Recreation Management (3 credits)
Select four courses from the following:
SPT 2150 Sport in Society (3 credits)
SPT 3150 Facility and Event Management (3 credits)
SPT 3200 Sponsorship and Fundraising (3 credits)
SPT 3550 Principles of Economics and Finance in Sport (3 credits)
SPT 3650 Sport Marketing (3 credits)
SPT 3775 Sport Camp Management (3 credits)
SPT 3925 College Athletic Administration (3 credits)
SPT 4425 Organization and Administration of Sport (3 credits)
SPT 4550 Legal Aspects of Sport and Recreation (3 credits)
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Interdisciplinary
Programs
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Interdisciplinary Programs
Applied Professional Studies Major
The Bachelor of Science in Applied Professional Studies (APS) is offered by the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
The concentrations that comprise this major are available through the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences and the
Fischler School of Education and Human Services. The applied professional studies major is available only to students
enrolled in the Career Development Program. It offers a flexible program for adults who have gained significant professional
experience and/or who have earned a large number of college credits toward their particular career goal. It is designed to
allow students to select courses that best fit their career plans. Rather than study in one discipline or area of focus, students
focus on applied practical studies that often draw on subjects in two or more divisions. The APS major may be offered to
students in all locations subject to course availability.
For more information about the applied professional studies major, contact the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences Office
of the Dean at (954) 262-8408. For more information about the applied professional studies major with a concentration in
teaching and learning, please contact the Fischler School of Education and Human Services Office of International Affairs
at (954) 262-8639.
Applied Professional Studies Major Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this major, students should be able to:
1. Analyze, integrate, and synthesize information from both concentrations and demonstrate the relationship of the
information toward a career;
2. Demonstrate:
a. The ability to articulate critically the fundamental theories and principles underlying concentration II;
b. The ability to articulate critically the relationship of the theories and principles of concentration II to concentration
I (where appropriate);
c. The ways in which the theories and principles of concentration II are operationalized in practice, and;
d. Preparation for scholarly pursuit;
3. Communicate the knowledge, skills, and principles acquired through the major in an organized, concise, and
grammatically correct form.
Applied Professional Studies Major Curriculum
A minimum of 24 upper division (3000 and higher) credits must be included in the total required 120 credits. Students may
apply an unlimited number of prior learning credits toward their applied professional studies degree; a minimum of 30 credits
must be completed at NSU. Students majoring in applied professional studies may demonstrate learning competencies for
one of their concentrations through NSU coursework, transfer courses from other institutions, prior learning, or testing (e.g.,
DANTES and CLEP). Specific requirements are:
1. General Education Framework: 30 credits
2. Major Requirements:
a. Concentration I (18 credits prior to entering the major)
b. Concentration II (number of credits depends on the concentration)
3. Open Electives 16–48 credits (depending on the concentration)
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Total Degree Requirements: 120 credits
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
Admission to the Applied Professional Studies Major
Eligibility for the Applied Professional Studies Major
To be eligible for the applied professional studies major, students must:
1. Have completed a minimum of 45 credits prior to applying to the applied professional studies major.
2. Have completed an 18-credit concentration before applying to the applied professional studies major.
Admission Criteria for the Applied Professional Studies Major
In addition to the documents described in the Required Documentation section, applicants to the applied professional
studies major must complete and provide a portfolio containing the following documents. The assistance of an academic
advisor should be sought for advice in the preparation of these documents.
1. A letter of intent in which the student:
a. Identifies his/her career goals;
b. Identifies his/her prior coursework and approved prior learning experiences that comprise concentration I;
c. Provides a rationale for considering concentration I as a coherent body of work;
d. Identifies concentration II and explains how concentrations I and II integrate into an academic program focused
on his/her career goals;
2. Copies of transcripts with the 18-credits that comprise concentration I highlighted;
3. One or more documents such as academic papers, projects, work products, letters of recommendation, written
reviews of prior course work, written reviews of relevant professional experience, etc., that demonstrates the
student’s competency in concentration I. For the teaching and learning concentration, two letters of recommendation
are required. One letter must be from a principal, vice principal, or senior teacher who can attest to the applicant’s
performance as a classroom teacher. The school seal or stamp must be affixed in order for the document to be
considered official. The second letter of recommendation can be from any colleague of the student’s choice.
The portfolio is submitted to the academic advisor for review by the director of the appropriate academic unit.
Admission Criteria for the Applied Professional Studies Major Offered in Jamaica
To determine eligibility to apply to the applied professional studies major with a teaching and learning concentration, offered
in Jamaica, students must meet the following criteria:
•
•
•
Be a graduate from a Jamaica teachers’ college with a minimum of 73 transferrable credits which meet the general
education criteria for the degree
Hold a valid Jamaica teachers’ diploma in primary education
Maintain teaching while completing the program
For entry into the applied professional studies major with a teaching and learning concentration (offered in Jamaica), the
following schools have been reviewed and their earned teaching/instructor diploma is approved for admission:
• Bethlehem Moravian College
• College of Agriculture, Science, and Education (CASE) – formerly, Passley Gardens Teachers College
• Catholic College of Mandeville
• Church Teachers’ College, Jamaica
• GC Foster College of Physical Education, Jamaica
• Mico College, Jamaica
• Moneague College, Jamaica
• Sam Sharpe Teachers’ College, Jamaica
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•
•
•
•
•
Shortwood Teachers’ College, Jamaica
St. Joseph’s Teachers’ College, Jamaica
University of Technology, Jamaica (Teaching Diploma) – formerly, College of Art, Science, and Technology (CAST)
University of the West Indies (Teaching Diploma)
Vocational Training Development Institute (VTDI), Jamaica (Instructor or Teaching Diploma)
Evaluations are needed for any non-U.S. college or institution not listed above. (See International Students and Foreign
Credentials in the Admissions section for more information and a list of approved evaluation agencies.)
Applied Professional Studies Major Concentrations
Students choose one of the following concentrations after consultation with their academic advisor. Not all concentrations
are offered at every location.
Biological and Physical Sciences Concentration
Acceptance into this major is determined by the director of the Division of Math, Science, and Technology.
Major Prerequisites (or equivalents) (9 credits)
COMP 1000
Basic Writing or higher (3 credits)
MATH 1040
College Algebra (3 credits)
MATH 1200
Precalculus Algebra (3 credits)
Program Requirements (8 credits)
These courses can be transferred from a regionally accredited college or university.
Select 8 credits from the following courses:
BIOL 1500 Biology I/Lab (4 credits)
BIOL 1510
Biology II/Lab (4 credits)
CHEM 1300 General Chemistry I/Lab (4 credits)
CHEM 1310 General Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits)
Core Course (3 credits)
BIOL 4901 APS Capstone Course in Biological and Physical Sciences (3 credits)
Major Electives (24–28 credits)
Select seven 2000 or higher level courses. Three courses must be at the 3000-level or higher. At least three of the
courses must be courses that include laboratory. This selection is from the following prefixes:
BIOL, CHEM, PHYS, MBIO, ENVS, SCIE.
Regular communication between students and their academic advisors is strongly recommended to ensure that each
student is successfully moving toward graduation. Progress toward graduation requirements (2.25 or higher GPA within the
major and 2.0 or higher cumulative GPA) will be closely monitored at 30 earned credits, 60 earned credits, and 90 earned
credits. Degree conferral will take place upon completion of 120 credits and all course and degree requirements.
Student progress reports will be assessed based on the following standards: “exceeds criteria” (≥ 3.0 major and ≥ 2.5
cumulative GPA), “meets criteria” (2.25-2.99 major GPA and 2.0-2.49 cumulative GPA), and “does not meet criteria” (<2.25
major GPA and <2.0 cumulative GPA).
Computer Engineering Technology Concentration
This concentration is administered by the Division of Math, Science, and Technology. It is available for students who have
completed a minimum of 45 credits, 18 of which are in specific coursework in one of the following areas: Telecommunications
Engineering Technology, Electronics Engineering Technology, or Computer Engineering Technology. Acceptance into this
major is determined by the director of the Division of Math, Science, and Technology.
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Core Courses (25 credits)
CSIS 2100 Computer Programming I (C/C++) (4 credits)
CSIS 3050 Assemblers and Assembly Language Programming (4 credits)
CSIS 3060 Digital Design (3 credits)
CSIS 3100 Computer Programming II (Java) (4 credits)
CSIS 3400 Data Structures (4 credits)
CSIS 3810
Operating Systems Concepts (3 credits)
CSIS 4901 APS Capstone Directed Independent Study (3 credits)
Major Electives (3 credits)
Select 3 credits from the following courses:
CSIS 3500 Networks and Data Communication (3 credits)
CSIS 4050 Computer Architecture (3 credits)
CSIS 4350 Robotics (3 credits)
CSIS 4650 Computer Graphics (3 credits)
CSIS 4710 Embedded Systems (3 credits)
CSIS 4890
Special Topics in Computer Information Systems (3 credits)
Regular communication between students and their academic advisors is strongly recommended to ensure that each
student is successfully moving toward graduation. Progress toward graduation requirements (2.25 or higher GPA within the
major and 2.0 or higher cumulative GPA) will be closely monitored at 30 earned credits, 60 earned credits, and 90 earned
credits. Degree conferral will take place upon completion of 120 credits and all course and degree requirements.
Student progress reports will be assessed based on the following standards: “exceeds criteria” (≥ 3.0 major and ≥ 2.5
cumulative GPA), “meets criteria” (2.25-2.99 major GPA and 2.0-2.49 cumulative GPA), and “does not meet criteria” (<2.25
major GPA and <2.0 cumulative GPA).
Computer Studies Concentration
Acceptance into this major is determined by the director of the Division of Math, Science, and Technology.
Major Prerequisites (or equivalents) (6 credits)
MATH 1200
Precalculus Algebra (3 credits)
TECH 1110 Technology in Information Age (3 credits)
Core Courses (26–27 credits)
CSIS 1800
Introduction to Computer Science (3 credits)
CSIS 2000 Introduction to Database Systems (3 credits)
CSIS 2050 Discrete Mathematics (3 credits)
CSIS 2100 Computer Programming I (4 credits)
CSIS 3100 Computer Programming II (4 credits)
CSIS 4901
APS Capstone Directed Independent Study (3 credits)
Select 6–7 credits from the following courses:
CSIS 3020 Web Programming and Design (3 credits)
CSIS 3500 Network and Data Communications (3 credits)
CSIS 3750
Software Engineering (4 credits)
CSIS 4890
Special Topics in Computer Information Systems (3 credits)
Regular communication between students and their academic advisors is strongly recommended to ensure that each
student is successfully moving toward graduation. Progress toward graduation requirements (2.25 or higher GPA within the
major and 2.0 or higher cumulative GPA) will be closely monitored at 30 earned credits, 60 earned credits, and 90 earned
credits. Degree conferral will take place upon completion of 120 credits and all course and degree requirements.
Student progress reports will be assessed based on the following standards: “exceeds criteria” (≥ 3.0 major and ≥ 2.5
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cumulative GPA), “meets criteria” (2.25-2.99 major GPA and 2.0-2.49 cumulative GPA), and “does not meet criteria” (<2.25
major GPA and <2.0 cumulative GPA).
Information Technology Concentration
Acceptance into this major is determined by the director of the Division of Math, Science, and Technology.
Core Courses (24 credits)
TECH 1110 Technology in Information Age (3 credits)
TECH 2000 Computer Technology: Impact and Implications (3 credits)
TECH 2150 Introduction to Internet Resources (3 credits)
TECH 4901 APS Capstone Course in Information Technology (3 credits)
Select 12 credits from the following courses:
PHIL 3010 Ethical Issues in Communication (3 credits)
TECH 2130 Business Applications of Microcomputers (3 credits)
TECH 3000 Multimedia Design (3 credits)
TECH 3010
Principles of Web Site Design (3 credits)
TECH 4050 Business Data Communication (3 credits)
Regular communication between students and their academic advisors is strongly recommended to ensure that each
student is successfully moving toward graduation. Progress toward graduation requirements (2.25 or higher GPA within the
major and 2.0 or higher cumulative GPA) will be closely monitored at 30 earned credits, 60 earned credits, and 90 earned
credits. Degree conferral will take place upon completion of 120 credits and all course and degree requirements.
Student progress reports will be assessed based on the following standards: “exceeds criteria” (≥ 3.0 major and ≥ 2.5
cumulative GPA), “meets criteria” (2.25-2.99 major GPA and 2.0-2.49 cumulative GPA), and “does not meet criteria” (<2.25
major GPA and <2.0 cumulative GPA).
Pre-Optometry Studies Concentration
The APS degree with a concentration in pre-optometry studies is only available to students in the Pre-Optometry Program
offered by the College of Optometry. To complete this bachelor’s degree program, students must complete the pre-optometry
studies concentration along with a course in mathematics, a communications course (COMP, LITR, SPCH, or WRIT prefix),
and an additional elective credit to total 30 credits at NSU. OPT and OPTC courses can be viewed in the catalog of the College
of Optometry. Acceptance into this major is determined by the dean or designee in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
Core Courses (23.5 credits)
BIOL 4901
APS Capstone Course in Biological and Physical Sciences (3 credits)
OPT 1011 Histology and Embryology (1 credit)
OPT 1233 Biochemistry (3 credits)
OPT 1323 Microbiology (3 credits)
OPTC 1134 Gross Anatomy/Head and Neck (4 credits)
OPTC 2023 General Neuroanatomy (2.5 credits)
OPTC 2144 General Physiology (4 credits)
PHYS 3300 Fundamentals of Optics (3 credits)
Pre-Physician Assistant Studies Concentration
This concentration is administered by the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences in collaboration with the College of Allied
Health and Nursing. It is available to students enrolled in the Physician Assistant Program located on the main campus in Davie
and at the student educational centers in Fort Myers, Jacksonville, and Orlando, Florida. The curriculum for this concentration
varies by location. Descriptions of courses in this concentration can be viewed in the catalog of the College of Allied Health
and Nursing. Acceptance into this major is determined by the dean or designee in the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences.
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Core Courses (credits vary by location)
Main Campus, Davie
Concentration II (30 credits)
ANA 5420 Anatomy (3 credits)
MIC 5400
Microbiology (3 credits)
PAC 5000
Physical Diagnosis I (3 credits)
PAC 5001
Introduction to the PA Professional (1 credit)
PAC 5010
Core Competencies (1 credit)
PAC 5100
Physical Diagnosis II (3 credits)
PAC 5200
Physical Diagnosis III (3 credits)
PAC 5412
Interpretation and Evaluation of Medical Literature (2 credits)
PCO 5400
Pharmacology I (2 credits)
PCO 5410
Pharmacology II (4 credits)
PHS 5400 Physiology (3 credits)
Orlando Student Educational Center
Concentration II (35 credits)
PAO 5000
Anatomy (5 credits)
PAO 5002
Introduction to the PA Professional (1 credit)
PAO 5100
Physiology (3 credits)
PAO 5200
Microbiology (3 credits)
PAO 5300
Physical Diagnosis I (3 credits)
PAO 5310
Physical Diagnosis II (2 credits)
PAO 5320
Physical Diagnosis III (5 credits)
PAO 5410
Pharmacology I (2 credits)
PAO 5412
Publication Skills & Medical Research (4 credits)
PAO 5420
Pharmacology II (4 credits)
PAO 5560
Clinical Procedures & Surgical Skills (3 credits)
Fort Myers Student Educational Center
Concentration II (35 credits)
PAN 5000
Anatomy (5 credits)
PAN 5002
Introduction to the PA Professional (1 credit)
PAN 5100
Physiology (3 credits)
PAN 5200
Microbiology (3 credits)
PAN 5300
Physical Diagnosis I (3 credits)
PAN 5310
Physical Diagnosis II (3 credits)
PAN 5320
Physical Diagnosis III (5 credits)
PAN 5410
Pharmacology I (2 credits)
PAN 5420
Pharmacology II (4 credits)
PAN 5512
Epidemiology & Interpretation of Medical Literature (3 credits)
PAN 5560
Clinical Procedures & Surgical Skills (3 credits)
Jacksonville Student Educational Center
Concentration II (34 credits)
PAJ 5000
Anatomy (5 credits)
PAJ 5002
Introduction to the PA Professional (1 credit)
PAJ 5100
Physiology (3 credits)
PAJ 5200
Microbiology (3 credits)
PAJ 5300
Physical Diagnosis I (3 credits)
PAJ 5310
Physical Diagnosis II (2 credits)
PAJ 5320
Physical Diagnosis III (5 credits)
PAJ 5410
Pharmacology I (2 credits)
PAJ 5420
Pharmacology II (4 credits)
PAJ 5512
Epidemiology & Interpretation of Medical Literature (3 credits)
PAJ 5570
Clinical Procedures & Surgical Skills (3 credits)
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Psychology Concentration
Acceptance into this major is determined by the director of the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences.
Major Prerequisites (or equivalents) (9 credits):
MATH 3020
Applied Statistics (3 credits)
PSYC 1020
Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 2900
Quantitative Psychology (3 credits)
Core Courses (24 credits)
PSYC 2100 Biological Bases of Behavior (3 credits)
PSYC 2160 Social Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 2350 Life-Span Human Development (3 credits) OR PSYC 2380 Child and Adolescent Development
(3 credits)
PSYC 3000 Psychological Research Methods (3 credits)
PSYC 3210 Personality (3 credits) OR PSYC 3260 Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)
PSYC 3520
Principles of Learning (3 credits)
PSYC 4901
APS Capstone Course in Psychology/Substance Abuse Studies (3 credits)
Select one additional 3000- or 4000-level PSYC course, with assistance from academic advisor (3 credits)
Substance Abuse Studies Concentration
Acceptance into this major is determined by the director of the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences.
Core Courses (27 credits)
PSYC 3550 Substance Abuse and the Family (3 credits)
PSYC 3570 Psychology and Physiology of Substance Abuse (3 credits)
PSYC 3580 Rehabilitation Strategies for Substance Abuse (3 credits)
PSYC 3600 Criminal Justice and Substance Abuse (3 credits)
PSYC 3620 Drug Prevention and Education (3 credits)
PSYC 3630 Ethical and Professional Developments (3 credits)
PSYC 3800 Current Psychotherapies (3 credits)
PSYC 4150 Group Counseling in Substance Abuse (3 credits)
PSYC 4901 APS Capstone Course in Psychology/Substance Abuse Studies (3 credits)
Teaching and Learning Concentration
Nova Southeastern University’s Fischler School of Education and Human Services, in cooperation with selected teacher
preparation institutions in Jamaica and the Jamaica Teachers’ Association (JTA), has developed a Bachelor of Science
degree completion program in applied professional studies (APS) with a concentration in teaching and learning.
The applied professional studies major with a concentration in teaching and learning is designed for substantial transfer
of previous college credit for general requirements and electives and offers a flexible program for adults who have gained
significant professional experience and/or who have earned a large number of college credits toward their particular career
goal. The curriculum builds on the foundations and skills already learned from the completion of a teaching diploma in
primary education from a teachers college in Jamaica.
Acceptance into this major is determined by the dean of the undergraduate teacher education program in the Fischler
School of Education and Human Services.
Program Requirements (15 credits)
Any HIST elective (3 credits)
Any PSYC elective (3 credits)
SPCH 1010, 2020, or 2030 (3 credits)
Any ARTS elective (3 credits)
Any ARTS elective (3 credits)
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Core Courses (41 credits)
Program coursework consists of a total of 41 credits that include credits in the teaching and learning concentration
and a 1-credit science lab.
EDUC 2500
EDUC 3325 EDUC 3326 EDUC 4321 ELEM 4331 ELEM 3533 ELEM 3531 ELEM 3543 EDUC 3351 ELEM 4361 ELEM 4541 ELEM 4561 ESED 4390 EDUC 4970 ESOL 3341 EDUC 3120 Education Pre-enrollment Seminar (0 credits)
Using Technology Tools and Resources (1 credit)
Integrating Instructional Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Classroom Management through Conflict Resolution (3 credits)
Mathematics Curriculum For Elementary Education (3 credits)
Science Curriculum for Elementary Education (3 credits)
Science Curriculum for Elementary Education Lab (1 credit)
Student Centered Instruction and Assessment (3 credits)
Survey of Exceptional Student Education (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Literacy in Elementary School (3 credits)
Reading Assessment (3 credits)
Methods of Teaching Reading Across Elementary Curriculum (3 credits)
Curriculum for Learning Abilities (3 credits)
Advanced Special Topics in Education (3 credits)
Survey of TESOL for Teachers (3 credits)
Communication for Professionals in Education (3 credits)
General Studies Major
The general studies major is a multidisciplinary degree program that allows students to maximize their educational experience
by customizing their study around their individual areas of interest. The major affords students the opportunity to engage in
substantial study in different curricular domains.
The major is comprised of three minors chosen by the student and two core courses (UNIV 2901 Workshop in General
Studies and UNIV 4901 Capstone in General Studies). The core courses form a framework that assists students in focusing
the major. For more information about the general studies major, contact the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences Office
of the Dean at (954) 262-8408.
General Studies Major Learning Outcomes
A successful general studies graduate is expected to:
1. Identify the rationale linking the components comprising the major;
2. Analyze and articulate the fundamental theories and principles underlying the three individual components of the
major;
3. Synthesize the theories and principles underlying each of the three individual components of the major into the
development of a unified, coherent project.
General Studies Major Curriculum
Because the general studies major is a program of the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences, there is a limit on the number
of minors that may be included from other schools/colleges in the university. Students may include no more than one minor
from schools/colleges in the university other than the Farquhar College of Arts and Sciences. The major consists of a
minimum of 49 credits with no fewer than 30 of the credits being at the 3000/4000 level.
General Education Requirements (30 credits)
Students are required to complete 30 credit hours as part of the General Education Program. For specific course requirements,
refer to the General Education Program section in the Academic Resources and Procedures segment of this catalog.
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General Studies Major Requirements (49 credits)
Minor I chosen by student (15 or more credits)
Minor II chosen by student (15 or more credits)
Minor III chosen by student (15 or more credits)
UNIV 2901 Workshop in General Studies (1 credit)
UNIV 4901 Capstone in General Studies (3 credits)
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Course Descriptions
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Course Descriptions
This section lists courses offered at Nova Southeastern University. Refer to the appropriate college or school section for
curriculum requirements. Course descriptions for graduate courses in the R.N. to M.S.N. program may be found in the
Health Professions Division catalog.
ACT—Accounting
ACT 1999 Prior Learning Credits Account (3-12 credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of lower-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in Accounting. This course
is repeatable up to 12 credits.
ACT 2200 Financial Accounting (3 credits)
Provides an introduction to financial accounting and its
decision-making elements. Areas covered are the conceptual
frameworks of accounting, financial statements and their
components, and advance manufacturing environments.
Prerequisite: MATH 1030 or higher.
major area of study or area of career interest. A minimum of
240 hours is required. Prerequisites: cumulative GPA of 2.5
or higher, completion of 36 or more credits towards degree,
and permission from Director. Position must be approved by
Career Services before student may register for this course.
Student can participate in an Internship a maximum of two
semesters.
ACT 3999 Prior Learning Credits Account (3-12 credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of upper-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in Accounting. This course
is repeatable up to 12 credits.
ACT 2300 Managerial Accounting (3 credits)
Integrates the accounting process with the planning,
coordinating, and control functions of the business
organization. Topics include strategic planning, tactical
and operational decision making, budgeting, responsibility
accounting, and performance measurement. Prerequiste:
ACT 2200 or equivalent.
ACT 4010 Advanced Accounting (3 credits)
Study of accounting principles and practices related to
business combinations (accounting for mergers and
acquisitions, constructing consolidated financial statements),
foreign operations (recording foreign currency transactions
and hedging exchange risk, currency translation of foreign
subsidiary financial statements), and local governments.
Examination of the cash flow statement and accounting
changes. Prerequisite: ACT 3070 or equivalent.
ACT 3030 Cost Management (3 credits)
Students learn cost measurement techniques in the
manufacturing and service sectors. Using a strategic
approach, the course examines the design and operation of
cost accounting systems in both traditional and advanced
manufacturing environments. Prerequisite: ACT 2300.
ACT 4050 Accounting Information Systems (3 credits)
Examines the design, construction, and operation of
accounting information systems. Information theory, database
construction, computer hardware and software selection, and
internal control are also covered. Prerequisites: ACT 3070.
ACT 3050 Intermediate Accounting I (3 credits)
Study the conceptual framework of accounting and the
development of the balance sheet and income statement.
Examine the concepts underlying the valuation of current
and non-current assets and current liabilities. Cover the
recognition and measurement of Income. Prerequisite: ACT
2200.
ACT 3060 Intermediate Accounting II (3 credits)
Continuation of Intermediate Accounting I. Study of long-term
liabilities (including bonds, pensions, and leases), interperiod
tax allocation, owners’ equity, and earnings per share.
Prerequisite: ACT 3050.
ACT 3070 Intermediate Accounting III (3 credits)
This course continues the analysis of the accounting
principles used to generate financial statements. Topics
covered include an investigation of stockholder’s equity,
earnings per share, the statement of cash flows, investments,
derivatives, and accounting changes and error correction.
Prerequisite: ACT 3060.
ACT 3900 Acct Internship/Cooperative Ed (3 credits)
Work placement for a period of 16 weeks in the student’s
ACT 4060 Seminar in Accounting (3 credits)
In this course, students will examine current issues in
accounting and review the topics covered on the CMA exam.
Prerequisites: ACT 3030 and ACT 3070, Co-reqisite ACT
4010 and ACT 4050.
ACT 4210 Auditing I (3 credits)
Provides an overview of basic auditing concepts, auditing
standards, and audit programs. Special emphasis is given
to preparing the student for the auditing section of the CPA
examination. Prerequisite: ACT 3060.
ACT 4220 Auditing II (3 credits)
This course explores contemporary issues that have critical
impact on the field of auditing. Questions such as, “What
are the emerging expectations of audits?” and “How can
auditors improve the auditing process?” will be addressed.
Prerequisite: ACT 4210.
ACT 4910 Advance Special Topics (3 credits)
Examines topics in accounting not included in regular course
offerings. Specific content and prerequisites may vary.
Students may re-enroll for special topics covering different
content.
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ACT 4920 Advanced Special Topics (3 credits)
Examines topics in accounting not included in regular course
offerings. Specific content and prerequisites may vary.
Students may re-enroll for special topics covering different
content.
in which anthropologists study people and their ways of life
across cultures and across time. The four major fields of
anthropology will be introduced with an overview of each of
the following perspectives: cultural anthropology, biological
anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics.
ADRB—Dispute Resolution
ANTH 1999 Prior Learning in Anthropology (1-12 credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of lower-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in anthropology. This
course is repeatable up to 12 credits.
ADRB 1999 Prior Lrng-Dispute Resolution (1-12 credits)
ADRB 2000 Introduction to Dispute Resolution (3 credits)
This course provides an introduction to conflict and conflict
resolution and various ways in which conflict resolution can
be practically applied. In addition, the course focuses on
some of the basic theories of conflict escalation and deescalation as well as communication and problem solving
skills with practical application using a variety of techniques.
The course also introduces the student to the process
of negotiating public disputes. Prerequisite: sophomore
standing.
ADRB 2100 Mediation Theory and Practice (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of
mediation, a conflict resolution strategy providing disputing
parties with a confidential and safe process using trained,
neutral, and impartial mediators who support the party’s
efforts to identify address and resolve conflicts. The course
focuses on the problem-solving mediation theory, principles,
and skills and applications of this knowledge in the mediation
setting. Prerequisites: ADRB 2000 and PSYC 2330.
ADRB 3200 Conflict Management and Resolution Theory
(3 credits)
This course examines theory and practices related to the
field of conflict management and resolution. Students will
gain an understanding of the theory behind management and
resolution practices and the implications that research has for
conflict practitioners. Prerequisites: ADRB 2000 and PSYC
2330.
ADRB 3300 Culture and Conflict (3 credits)
This course will explore the roles played by gender, race,
ethnicity, religion and cultures in the development, escalation,
management, and resolution of conflict within and between
groups. The course will examine existing theory and practice
related to the role and impact culture plays in conflict.
Prerequisites: ADRB 2000 and PSYC 2330.
ADRB 4000 Practicum in Dispute Management and
Resolution (3 credits)
This course provides students the opportunity to apply and
enhance their conflict management and resolution skills.
Students will work within a variety of conflict resolution
settings during their practicum experience. The course will
consist of regularly scheduled classes and scheduled hours
in supervised practicum settings. Prerequisite: ADRB 2100.
ANTH—Anthropology
ANTH 1020 Introduction to Anthropology (3 credits)
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the ways
ANTH 3200 Anthropological Theories (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of anthropological theory
from historic to contemporary theorists. We will examine
the theoretical development of the discipline as well as how
anthropological theories are connected to the study of people,
culture and to work in the field. Prerequisite: ANTH 1020
ANTH 3999 Prior Learning in Anthropology (1-12 credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of upper-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in anthropology. This
course is repeatable up to 12 credits.
ARAB—Arabic
ARAB 1210 Elementary Arabic I (3 credits)
Essentials of Arabic language with emphasis on grammar,
vocabulary, writing, and oral skills. Introduction to Arab
culture. Not open to native speakers.
ARAB 1220 Elementary Arabic II (3 credits)
Continuation of the essentials of Arabic language with
emphasis on grammar, vocabulary, writing, and oral skills.
Introduction to Arab culture. Not open to native speakers.
Prerequisite: ARAB 1210.
ARTS—The Arts
ARTS 1200 Introduction to Drawing (3 credits)
This course will emphasize the use of drawing media and
drawing techniques. Students will develop observational
skills and the ability to represent form and space on a two
dimensional plan.
ARTS 1250 Life Drawing (3 credits)
This course will examine the anatomy, proportion, surface
planes and movement of the human form using live models.
Beginning with basic gesture drawings, the course will
progress to detailed figure representations. In addition, the
course will explore the relationship between muscle, light,
movement, and form.
ARTS 1400 The Theater Arts (3 credits)
This course focuses on the arts of the theatre, including
drama, music, dance, and play production, particularly those
plays representing major theatrical trends.
ARTS 1500 Music Through History (3 credits)
This course traces the development of music in Western
culture, with an emphasis on music written and preserved
from the Middle Ages to the present. The course encourages
and enables students to recognize, analyze, and understand
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the materials of music (such as musical instruments and their
properties, and the use of scales, modes and rhythms) as
well as various musical forms (fugue, sonata cycle, overture).
ARTS 1700 Fundamentals of Color (3 credits)
In this course, students develop the foundation to apply basic
design principles to a variety of visual effects. Students will
explore color theory, including additive and subtractive color.
ARTS 1800 Two-Dimensional Design (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the visual organization
of design elements in two-dimensional art and design.
Familiarity with the terminology, concepts and basic materials
utilized in the studio by visual artists will be explored.
ARTS 1999 Prior Learning in the Arts (1-12 credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of lower-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in the arts. This course is
repeatable up to 12 credits.
ARTS 2100 Painting I (3 credits)
This course explores various techniques using a variety of
media in the development of painting skills. The effective
use of color as well as perceptual, emotional/psychological,
technical and aesthetic aspects of painting will be a primary
consideration in all assignments and exercises. Prerequisite:
ARTS 1700.
ARTS 2200 Digital Photography (3 credits)
This course will explore the basic principles of photography
and digital imaging. Camera operation, exposure, effect of the
shutter and aperture, composition for impact, lens selection,
and the qualities of light will be covered.
ARTS 2300 Art and Society (3 credits)
This course examines the ways in which artists and the arts
have influenced Western society from the Renaissance to the
20th century, focusing on painting, sculpture, architecture,
music, dance, and film. Students will also visit local museums
and attend musical and theatrical events as a means of
gaining a greater understanding of the arts. Prerequisite:
COMP 1500
ARTS 2300H Art and Society Honors (3 credits)
This course examines the ways in which artists and the arts
have influenced Western society from the Renaissance to the
20th century, focusing on painting, sculpture, architecture,
music, dance and film. Students will also visit local museums
and attend musical and theatrical events as a means of
gaining a greater understanding of the arts. (Honors students
only.) Prerequisite: COMP 1500
ARTS 2410 Graphic Design I (3 credits)
This course provides an introduction to graphic design.
Students will use current software and technology to create
designs based on color theory and graphic design principles.
The course will familiarize students with basis aesthetic,
technical, historical, and conceptual issues as they relate to
design.
ARTS 2450 Graphic Design II (3 credits)
This course will focus on understanding and developing
effective graphic design concepts and will include a
concentration on photo and image manipulation as well
as typography. The course will also provide students with
technical literacy in the MAC/PC platform. Prerequisite: ARTS
2410
ARTS 2600 Introduction to Arts Administration (3 credits)
This course introduces basic principles, theories, concepts,
processes and practices relating to organizations in the arts
industry. Emphasis will be placed on the structure of the arts
industry, leadership in the arts industry, staffing, volunteerism,
fundraising, and intellectual property. Prerequisite: COMP
1500.
ARTS 2800 Three-Dimensional Design (3 credits)
This course will be a study of perception, emphasizing
the elements and principles of design as a basis of threedimensional work. Emphasis will be placed on materials and
processes for surface treatments. Prerequisite: ARTS 1800.
ARTS 3020 Women in the Arts (3 credits)
A study of the particular contributions of women in art, music,
theatre, and dance. Prerequisites: One ARTS course and
COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020.
ARTS 3100 Painting II (3 credits)
Through the study and practice of painting in oils, acrylics,
and mixed media, students will pursue the development of
a personal creative direction in painting or mixed media.
Participants work on multiple projects and are expected
to develop a command of both technical and conceptual
components of painting. Prerequisite: ARTS 2100.
ARTS 3200 Digital Photopgraphic Design (3 credits)
This course provides the skills and concepts required to
develop professional-quality, pixel-based illustrations and
photo manipulations. The focus of the course will be on both
technical and aesthetic issues, and the relationship of image
manipulation to graphic design. Prerequisite: ARTS 2200.
ARTS 3300 Myth and Art (3 credits)
This course focuses on the relations between verbal and
visual arts, particularly the myths and epics of Europe and
the Mediterranean world, and the later literary, religious, and
artistic traditions developing from them. Prerequisites: One
ARTS course and COMP 2000, Comp 2010, or COMP 2020.
ARTS 3350 Irish Art and Architecture (3 credits)
This course will focus on Irish and Northern Irish art and
architecture from the early medieval era to the 21st century.
Students will work during the first part of the course in a
WebCT format, including readings and discussion on various
aspects of Irish art and architecture, followed by an intensive
study-abroad experience in Ireland and Northern Ireland.
Prerequisite: COMP 2000 or COMP 2020.
ARTS 3400 Non-Western and Modern Art (3 credits)
This course focuses on Asian, Oceanic, African, and Native
American arts and cultures, their discovery by the West, and
their influences on the development of 20th century art and
society. Prerequisites: One ARTS course and COMP 2000,
COMP 2010, or COMP 2020.
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ARTS 3450 Graphic Design III (3 credits)
Students explore the underlying principles of grid theory, text
and display typography, sequence, page layout, and type
and image integration as they relate to a range of publication
design applications. Prerequisites: ARTS 2200 and ARTS
2450.
ARTS 3500 Sculpture I (3 credits)
Through the process of investigation, growth and discovery,
the students will complete hands-on projects using a variety
of media and techniques. In addition, students will explore
the historical and contemporary influence of sculpture.
Prerequisite: ARTS 2800.
ARTS 3550 Ceramics I (3 credits)
Students will create pottery, using multiple techniques such
as hand building as well as throwing on the potter’s wheel.
Students will apply ceramic glazes and firing procedures in
order to produce finished ceramic ware. The course will also
include some discussion of the historical development of the
ceramic arts. Prerequisite: ARTS 2800.
ARTS 3600 Advanced Arts Administration (3 credits)
This course applies the basic principles, theories, concepts,
processes and practices of arts administration to the creation
and management of various types of arts organizations.
Particular emphasis will be placed on audience development,
special event planning, program planning, financial planning,
proposal writing, grant writing and advocacy. Prerequisites:
ARTS 2600; COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020.
ARTS 3650 Typography (3 credits)
This course explores the fundamentals of typography
including typographic history, the study of letterforms, terms,
classifications and typeface selection. Through a variety of
projects, structure, layout, and hierarchy of information will be
examined. Prerequisite: ARTS 1800.
ARTS 3700 Methods and Materials (3 credits)
Through a practical exploration of theoretical/conceptual
issues, students will become aware of the complexity and
interrelatedness of the elements of art. Students complete a
series of studio projects emphasizing the awareness, creative
use, and practical application of various materials as a formal
means of visual communication and expression. Prerequisite:
ARTS 3100.
ARTS 3800 Art History I (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the historical
developments in artistic expression from the Prehistoric to
Renaissance period. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010,
or COMP 2020.
repeatable up to 12 credits.
ARTS 4100 Contemporary Art (3 credits)
This course explores the role of art making within the
discourse of contemporary art and culture. The course also
explores the most recent artistic theories and technologies
while enhancing aesthetic awareness and developing the
student’s ability to analyze art. Prerequisite: ARTS 3100.
ARTS 4200 Contemporary Graphic Design (3 credits)
This course explores the role of graphic arts within the
discourse of contemporary graphic design. The course also
explores the latest graphic design theories and technologies
while enhancing aesthetic awareness and developing the
student’s ability to analyze graphic design. Prerequisite:
ARTS 3450.
ARTS 4250 Multimedia & Web Design (3 credits)
This course focuses on the study of layout techniques for the
online environment. Emphasis will be placed on identifying
the target audience and producing Web sites according to
current industry criteria. Relevant legal issues will also be
discussed. Prerequisite: ARTS 3200.
ARTS 4300 Experimental Studio Art (3 credits)
This course applies non-traditional approaches to drawing
and painting, including working from dream imagery,
inventing realities, exploring abstraction, creating new tools to
draw with, and experimenting with mixed media. Prerequisite:
ARTS 3700.
ARTS 4400 Installation Art (3 credits)
This course explores site specific and non-site specific
installation art. Through historical study, students may
incorporate a variety of media including photographs,
paintings, drawings, video performances, and sound and
sculptural materials in works that expand the physical
boundaries of art. Students are introduced to techniques
for documenting the installation project. Prerequisite: ARTS
3700.
ARTS 4500 Professional Print Design (3 credits)
The focus of this course is on multiple page documents and
extended design systems. Students will create professional
print design projects that reflect the range of work designers
encounter in the studio, agency, or corporate design
environment. Print production techniques will be investigated.
Prerequisite: ARTS 3450.
ARTS 3850 Art History II (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the historical
developments in artistic expression from the sixteenth century
to the present. Prerequisite: COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or
COMP 2020.
ARTS 4900 Special Topics in the Arts (3 credits)
This course is designed for students with an interest in a
particular period or genre of art, music, or theatre, specific
artist, composers, dramatists, or topics not covered in
other art, music, or theatre courses. Specific focus to be
announced. May be repeated once for credit, if content
changes and with written consent of division director.
Prerequisites: one ARTS course and COMP 2000, COMP
2010 or COMP 2020.
ARTS 3999 Prior Learning in the Arts (3 credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of upper-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in the arts. This course is
ARTS 4900A Special Topics in the Arts: Handmade Books
(3 credits)
This course is designed for students with an interest in a
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particular period or genre of art, music, or theatre, specific
artist, composers, dramatists, or topics not covered in
other art, music, or theatre courses. Specific focus to be
announced. May be repeated once for credit, if content
changes and with written consent of division director.
Prerequisites: one ARTS course and COMP 2000, COMP
2010 or COMP 2020.
ARTS 4950 Internship in the Arts (3 credits)
Training and practice at a professional arts venue.
Prerequisites: cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher, completion
of 60 or more credit hours, and written consent of a division
director.
ARTS 4990 Independent Study in the Arts (3 credits)
The student selects, and carries out independently, library
and/or empirical research. Faculty supervision is provided on
an individual basis. Written consent of instructor and division
director required. Prerequisites: One ARTS course; COMP
COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP 2020.
ARTS 4995 Senior Project (1 credits)
In this course, students will prepare a portfolio of artwork for
participation in a senior exhibition. Prerequisite: Completion
of at least 90 credits and written consent of the division
director.
ATTR—Athletic Training
ATTR 1100 Introduction to Athletic Training (1 credits)
This course is an introduction to the sports medicine
team, legal considerations, environmental concerns, and
the profession of athletic training. Students will be able to
promote athletic training as a professional discipline in order
to educate athletes, the general public, and the physically
active. This course includes a minimum of 50 hours of
scheduled clinical observations at an approved site, under
the supervision of a Certified Athletic Trainer.
ATTR 1200 Principles of Athletic Training (3 credits)
Emphasis will be on the basic concepts of preventing athletic
injuries, injury recognition and assessment, and care and
treatment procedures for proper management of athletic
injuries. Additionally, students will be instructed in the arts
and skills of taping and wrapping. This course includes a
minimum of 50 hours of scheduled clinical observations at
an approved clinical site, under the supervision of a Certified
Athletic Trainer. Prerequisite: ATTR 1100.
ATTR 1300 Emergency Care and First Aid (3 credits)
Students will learn to recognize, assess, and treat the
acute injuries and illnesses of athletes and others involved
in physical activities, preventing disease transmission,
emergency care of injuries such as splinting, and to provide
proper medical referral.
ATTR 1400 Health and Fitness (3 credits)
This course will provide students with the basic concepts of
health, such as nutritional issues, physiological concerns, and
wellness screening. Students will also gain an appreciation
for lifetime fitness activities and an understanding of how
community programs provide necessary health services to
the general public.
ATTR 1999 Prior Learning Credit in Athletic Training (1-12
credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of lower-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in athletic training. This
course is repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: approval
of director.
ATTR 2100 Injury Evaluation I (3 credits)
Emphasis will be on recognition, assessment, treatment, and
appropriate medical referral of athletic injuries and illnesses
of the lower extremities including the head and the lumbar
spine. Additional emphasis will be placed on the psychosocial
aspects of injury and illness. Only for students matriculated in
the Athletic Training Education Program. Prerequisite: ATTR
1200.
ATTR 2200 Injury Evaluation II (3 credits)
Emphasis will be on recognition, assessment, treatment,
and appropriate medical referral of athletic injuries and
illnesses of the upper extremities, including the head and
cervical spine. Additional emphasis will be placed on clinical
evaluation skills. Only for students matriculated in the Athletic
Training Education Program. Prerequisite: ATTR 2100.
ATTR 2210 Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training I (1
credits)
These courses focus on field experiences and the application
of learned principles from athletic training clinical skills. This
course includes 200 hours of observation in various settings
and specific clinical skills from the previous semester to
facilitate comprehensive learning. Students will be supervised
and given the opportunity to practice learned skills in the
clinical setting. Only for students matriculated in the Athletic
Training Education Program. Prerequisite: ATTR 1200.
ATTR 2220 Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training II (1
credits)
These courses focus on field experiences and the application
of learned principles from athletic training clinical skills. This
course includes 200 hours of observation in various settings
and specific clinical skills from the previous semester to
facilitate comprehensive learning. Students will be supervised
and given the opportunity to practice learned skills in the
clinical setting. Only for students matriculated in the Athletic
Training Education Program. Prerequisite: ATTR 2210.
ATTR 2300 Sports Nutrition (3 credits)
This course includes the study of nutrition, biochemical
processes in energy metabolism, and nutrition-related health
problems. Additional emphasis will be placed on nutrition as it
relates to physical performance, sports, and fitness.
ATTR 2400 Strength and Conditioning (3 credits)
Strength and Conditioning: This course includes the study of
the varied aspects of strength and conditioning in a variety of
sports. In addition to learning and practicing strength training
techniques, students will design a conditioning program and
explain their program to their peers. Prerequisite: ATTR 1400.
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ATTR 3100 General Medicine in Sports (3 credits)
Students will acquire skills and knowledge on the recognition,
treatment, and referral of general medical conditions related
to each of the body systems, including but not limited to
congenital and acquired abnormalities of athletes and other
physically active individuals. Also included are physiological
progression of injuries, illnesses, and diseases. An additional
area of focus is related to pathology, medical diagnostics,
medical interventions (pharmacological and procedural), and
the implications of these for the athlete or others involved in
physical activities. Prerequisite: BIOL 3312 or equivalent.
ATTR 3230 Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training III (1
credits)
These courses focus on field experiences and the
applications of learned principles from athletic training clinical
skills. This course includes 200 hours of observation in
various settings and specific clinical skills from the previous
semester to facilitate comprehensive learning. Students will
be supervised and given the opportunity to practice learned
skills in the clinical setting. Only for students matriculated in
the Athletic Training Education Program. Prerequisite: ATTR
2220.
ATTR 3240 Clinical Experiences in Athletic Training IV (1
credits)
These courses focus on field experiences and the
applications of learned principles from athletic training clinical
skills. This course includes 200 hours of observation in
various settings and specific clinical skills from the previous
semester to facilitate comprehensive learning. Students will
be supervised and given the opportunity to practice learned
skills in the clinical setting. Only for students matriculated in
the Athletic Training Education Program. Prerequisite: ATTR
3230.
ATTR 3300 Therapeutic Modalities/Lab (4 credits)
A study of sports therapy physical agents used to treat
injuries of the musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, and
integumentary systems including, but not limited to
cryotherapy, hydrotherapy, electrotherapy, biofeedback,
and mechanical therapy. Students will apply the techniques
and clinical skills related to the application of therapeutic
modalities. Clinical hours in the athletic training room and
other facilities (see Clinical Experience I through IV) will give
the student the additional opportunity to use the knowledge,
skills, and techniques learned in this course. Only for
students matriculated in the Athletic Training Education
Program. Prerequisite: ATTR 2100.
ATTR 3500 Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries/Lab (4
credits)
The study of the principles of a comprehensive rehabilitation
program; specifically related to design and implementation
of a therapeutic program. Students will learn to incorporate
exercises related to strength, proprioception and
neuromuscular control to achieve sport specific goals and
objectives. Students will assess rehabilitation progress and
criteria for return to competition. Prerequisite: ATTR 3300.
ATTR 3800 Evolution of Sports Medicine (3 credits)
This course will include both lecture material and a weeklong
field experience dedicated to the study of the development
of sports medicine. The course is designed to explore the
clinical practices employed by medical professionals to treat
and rehabilitate sports related injuries. The timeline of the
course will begin with Ancient Greek times and continue
through modern day. Students will be able to understand the
significance of sports medicine development and growth from
the beginning. Prerequisite: COMP 1500.
ATTR 3810 Roman Influence of Sports Medicine (3
credits)
Roman Influence of Sports Medicine: This course will include
both lecture material and a weeklong field experience
dedicated to the study of the Roman Influence of sports
medicine. The course is designed to explore the clinical
practices employed by medical professionals to treat and
rehabilitate sports related injuries. The course will begin
with an in-depth study of Roman Medicine. Students will
be able to understand the significance of sports medicine
development and growth from the beginning. Prerequisite:
COMP 1500.
ATTR 3999 Prior Learning Credit in Athletic Training (1-12
credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of upper-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in athletic training. This
course is repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: approval
of director.
ATTR 4100 Athletic Training Administration (3 credits)
Concepts of legal liability, budget/financial and personnel
management, marketing, public relations, inventory control,
facility design/development/maintenance, and administration
of allied-health care programs will be addressed. Additionally,
the student will discuss the day-to-day supervision,
scheduling and provision of services to athletes and other
physically active individuals offered in the athletic training
room, health-care facilities and other venues.
ATTR 4300 Applied Research in Athletic Training (3
credits)
Research methodology, statistical analysis, data collection,
and writing for publications related to athletic training.
Students will gain a theoretical basis, develop, and write
a research proposal that may be executed and completed
during their senior clinical internship. Only for students
matriculated in the Athletic Training Education Program.
ATTR 4400 Sports Pharmacology (3 credits)
This course will focus on pharmacology for the health
professional in a nonprescribing profession. Focus will be
on pharmaceuticals that are prescribed and used over the
counter by physically active people. Drug actions, indications,
contraindications, and adverse reactions will be covered
along with herbal supplement-drug interactions. Prerequisite:
BIOL 3312 or equivalent.
ATTR 4900 Special Topics in Athletic Training (1-3
credits)
Topics in sports medicine and athletic training that are not
included in a regular course offering. Prerequisites may be
required. Specific content and prerequisites are announced in
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the course schedule for the given term. Students may reenroll
for Special Topics covering different content.
ATTR 4950 Internship in Athletic Training (1-12 credits)
A work experience for 16 weeks in the student’s major area of
study or area of career interest. Consult academic division for
specific details and requirements. Prerequisites: cumulative
GPA of 2.5 or higher, major GPA of 3.0 or higher, completion
of 60 or more credit hours, supervision of instructor, and
permission of academic director.
ATTR 4990 Independent Study in Athletic Training (1-3
credits)
The student selects and independently carries out library and/
or empirical research. Faculty supervision is provided on an
individual basis. Prerequisite: to be determined by the faculty
and the division director.
BHS 3145 Princ of Environmental Health (3 credits)
This course will introduce students to the principles of
environmental health and their importance to human
populations. Some of the topics covered include
Environmental Quality, Occupational Health, Vectorborne and Pandemic Diseases, and Hazardous Materials
Management, and the regulations promulgated to manage
each.
BHS 3150 Principles of Leadership (3 credits)
This course will provide an overview of numerous leadership
theories to prepare the student for a leadership role in
Health Care. The course will critically analyze the differences
between leadership and management
BHS 1999 Prior Learning in Health Sci (1-12 credits)
BHS 3151 Health Services Mgmt (3 credits)
This course will provide an overview of health care and
general management to prepare the student for a managerial
role in Health Care administration. Course topics include
human resource issues and policy, personnel planning,
staffing, development, coaching and training of employees.
BHS 3100 Current Issues in Health Care (3 credits)
This course discusses current issues and concepts regarding
health care to prepare the student with the essential
vocabulary and thought processes to understand and
evaluate the legal, political and ethical challenges facing
health care in the US.
BHS 3155 Conflict Mgmt in HC (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of
the conflict and effective methods and strategies for reducing
the incidence of workplace conflict including employee
-employee conflict, supervisor -subordinate conflict, patientpatient conflict and patient/client - provider conflict.
BHS 3101 History of US Health System (3 credits)
This course will examine the origins and ongoing
development of the US health system. Students will gain
historical understanding of the origins and forces that have
influenced change within the US health care system.
BHS 3160 Health Policy (3 credits)
This course provides the student with a broad understanding
of policy, how health care is organized, dispensed and
how the practitioner can better work in the system. Topics
of discussion include cost control, long term care, quality
control, ethical issues and insurance.
BHS—BHS-Bachelor of Health Science
BHS 3110 Health Care Ethics (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce ethical thinking and
concepts regarding health care to prepare the student
with the essential vocabulary and thought processes to
understand, evaluate and participate in ethical decision
making.
BHS 3120 Introduction to Epidemiology (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to introduce the history and
development of epidemiology in relation to public health and
disease. Communicable, epidemic and endemic as well as
social diseases will be discussed.
BHS 3130 Research/Design for HC (3 credits)
This course is designed as an introduction to critical analysis
of research and medical literature as well as basic research
methods. The course includes an introduction to descriptive
and inferential statistics and research design. Statistical and
research concepts and procedures are combined with an
emphasis on practical health care applications.
BHS 3140 Health Care Practice (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to study the legal implications
of licensing, practice, and contractual employment. The
importance of understanding rules of practice and standards
of care are discussed
BHS 3161 Health Care Finance (3 credits)
The course introduces the fundamental tools, concepts, and
applications aimed at providing students an understanding
of numerous financial theories and techniques utilized in
health care financial management. The course materials are
structured around emerging health care policies and the role
finance and economics play in establishing policy. Cases
studies are drawn from a variety of sources such as health
maintenance organizations, home health agencies, nursing
units, hospitals, and integrated health care systems. Some
topics of discussion also include: concepts of capital financing
for providers, budgeting, financial ethics, payment systems,
provider costs, high cost of health care, and measuring costs.
BHS 3162 Economics of Health Services (3 credits)
This course will teach the student to use economic analysis
to understand critical issues in health care and health
policy. Issues to be studied include the demand for health
care, health insurance markets, managed care, medical
technology, government health care programs, national
health reform, and the pharamaceutical industry. The course
will focus on the US health care sector, but will also examine
health care systems of other countries.
BHS 3170 Health Care Delivery Systems (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview
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and analysis of American health care delivery systems.
An understanding of the economical, social, political and
professional forces that shape the health care delivery
system will be discussed as well as an examination of how
the sistem is organized, how services are delivered, and the
mechanisms by which health care services are financed.
BHS 3190 Patient Educ in Hlth Care (3 credits)
Patient education is an integral part of health care in every
setting, from patient treatment, to health and wellness
promotion, to injury and illness prevention. The focus
of this course is to explore the many issues that impact
patient education, from both a health care professional and
management perspective. Adult education theory, patient/
therapist interaction, communication barriers, strategies
for success, Web-based patient education, documentation,
federal laws and initiatives and standards for patient
education are some of the topics that will be examined.
BHS 3195 Therapeutic Communications (3 credits)
This course covers a variety of general concepts and
contemporary discussions in the area of therapeutic
communications. Attention is paid to self-awareness, basic
communication skills, and therapeutic responses from all
health care professionals.
BHS 3999 Prior Learning in Health Sci (1-12 credits)
BHS 4000 Cultural Competency in HC (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to develop competency and
better understanding when confronted with issues related
to culture, diversity and ethnically based customs, rituals,
alternative health care choices, folk medicine, cultural
structure and viewpoints and the practitioner’s delivery of
health care.
BHS 4001 Disabilities & Special Needs (3 credits)
With the continued graying of the American population and
the extending life expectancy of individuals with disabilities
there are a growing number of individuals facing chronic life
challenges. These individuals are consumers of health care.
It is incumbent on health care providers to understand how
different challenges affect a person¿s abilities. Topics of
discussion include: laws that impact services, the history of
disability care, and specific disabilities and their impact on
functioning.
BHS 4005 Alternative Medicine in HC (3 credits)
This course examines and analyzes alternative and
complimentary medicine and their impact on the healthcare
industry. The approach to the subject is to present selected
alternative and complimentary medicine fields in an
informative, non-judgmental format. Example topics include
acupuncture, chiropractic, herbal medicine, homeopathy,
massage and naturopathic medicine
BHS 4006 Fund. of Chinese Medicine (3 credits)
This course will discuss and analyze the impact, origins and
background of Chinese medicine. It is important to enter this
class with an open mind, and understand that there are other
forms of treatment for disease, different than those taught
in westernized medicine programs. Critical analysis of the
meridians and pathways and various signs and symptoms
associated with disease will be covered.
BHS 4009 Sports Medicine (3 credits)
This course will present a study of athletic injuries and
the principle concepts and practices of Sports Medicine including discussion of; prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and
recovery. The major musculoskeletal portions of the body
will be covered, major preventive measures will be studied,
and the major sports injuries will be addressed. The course
will identify the medical treatments associated with the major
sports injuries.
BHS 4010 Hlth Promotion/Disease Prevent (3 credits)
This course develops the knowledge and skills needed
to work with communities to improve health status of the
Community. Major topics will include health promotion and
disease prevention. Special emphasis will be placed on the
“Healthy People 2010” initiatives.
BHS 4011 Bioter Hlt Care Readiness&Resp (3 credits)
This course uses a systems perspective to provide health
professionals with an understanding of the prevention and
response to the intentional release of armful biologic agents.
Category A diseases will be reviewed including anthrax and
smallpox. Risk assessment and reduction for health care
facilities will be discussed. The structure of public disaster
response agencies and the potential difficulties integrating
with privately-held critical infrastructure will be evaluated.
Tactics and structural components from the class can also be
used in unintentional outbreaks to reduce their impact.
BHS 4012 Torture Violence & Trauma (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of the physical and
psychological effects of torture, violence, and trauma. It
focuses on the relationship between health care professionals
and victims of human rights violations. Discussion topics
include the detection, treatment and documentation of victims
of these events. The course examines the role health care as
it relates to incidents of torture, violence and trauma.
BHS 4020 Topics in Maternal Child Hlth (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of
Maternal and Child Health (MCH) issues and topic areas.
One to two MCH topics will be discussed weekly. To
adequately prepare for class discussion questions and
course assignments, students are expected to complete the
required readings for each session. This course is designated
for individuals who have an interest in working in the area
of maternal and child health, program development and
intervention.
BHS 4031 Statistics for Health Sciences (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce the conceptual
foundation of statistical analysis & statistical reasoning of
health sciences data, and prepare the student to calculate,
interpret and utilize appropriate software packages for basic
statistical analysis.
BHS 4100 Academic/Professional Writing (3 credits)
Must be taken during first semester of enrollment in program)
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to
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the format, content and thought processes for successful
academic and professional writing through utilization of the
NSU B.H.Sc form and style manual as well as introduction to
APA and AMA manuals. An overview of proper sentence and
paragraph structure, grammar, punctuation usage, formatting
and bibliographic referencing will be discussed.
BHS 4154 Effect of Hearing Impairment (3 credits)
Phonologic, morphologic, syntactic and pragmatic aspects of
human communication associated with hearing impairment.
Study of methods of screening hearing-impaired patients for
concomitant speech and language disorders. Prerequisite:
course in normal language development.
BHS 4110 Health Care and Aging (3 credits)
This course examines the psychosocial and cultural
variations associated with maturing and aging. Topics
covered will be an overview of life choices, living wills, and
treatment, as well as cultural implications of senior care.
BHS 4160 Education for Hlth Professions (3 credits)
This course will provide an opportunity to explore learning
theories, learning styles, testing and assessment, education
trends, and utilizing technology in instruction as it relates to
the health professional and professions.
BHS 4130 Statistics for Health Sciences (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce the conceptual
foundation of statistical analysis & statistical reasoning of
health sciences data, and prepare the student to calculate,
interpret and utilize appropriate software packages for basic
statistical analysis.
BHS 5001 APA Writing Seminar (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to the APA
writing form and style. Students will be guided by an
instructor in the use of the APA Publication Manual and the
components of an APA style academic paper as well as
practicum and internship reports. All courses within the BHSc
Program and Department of Health Science require that all
written assignments be submitted in APA form and style
BHS 4140 Independent Study (3 credits)
Students select an area of study in cooperation with the
course advisor and/or program director. The project may
include such items as work-related studies, conference
attendance, grant proposals and or planning documents.
A comprehensive paper will be developed and delivered
according to the NSU BHSc form and style manual. Students
must receive departmental and advisor approval in order to
be allowed to register for this course.
BHS 4150 The Science of Sound (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce students to acoustics.
Students will study production of sound waves in general,
and more specifically the production of sound waves during
speech. Students will also study the characteristics of sound
waves, how sound waves are propagated through a medium,
and the perception of sound.
BHS 4151 Ling.&Psych.Var.Norm.Lang.Dev. (3 credits)
This course will provide an overview of speech and language
development as it relates to the typically developing child
from birth through adolescence. This course will include
topic areas related to the dimensions of communication,
neurological and anatomical basis of communication, models
of speech and language development, and speech-language
differences and diversity
BHS 4152 Neuro of Audition & CNS (3 credits)
This course will provide an introduction to the gross structure
of the brain and spinal cord. Functional relationship of their
parts with emphasis on the auditory and vestibular peripheral
and central nervous systems will be discussed
BHS 4153 Speech & Lang Disorders (3 credits)
Overview of speech and language delays and disorders,
their etiology, and treatment. How health-care practitioners
can identify persons with possible disorders and make
appropriate referrals. Consideration of the communication
needs within health-care system of persons with speechlanguage disorders.
BIOL—Biology
BIOL 1040 Environmental Studies (3 credits)
Overview of environmental science that integrates social,
economic, technical, and political issues. Problems of
ecological disruptions, growth of human populations, land
use, energy, water supplies, food supplies, pesticides, and
pollution are covered.
BIOL 1060 Amoebas to Zebras: Life on Earth (3 credits)
Tiptoe through the tulips, tapeworms, toadstools, tiger sharks,
and tarantulas. This course is an overview of the diversity
of life on earth, introducing the major groups of living things,
from bacteria to mammals, with introductions to basic
concepts in ecology, evolution, and life processes.
BIOL 1060H Amoebas to Zebras: Life on Earth Honors (3
credits)
Tiptoe through the tulips, tapeworms, toadstools, tiger
sharks, and tarantulas. This course is an overview of the
diversity of life on earth, introducing the major groups of
living things, from bacteria to mammals, with introductions to
basic concepts in ecology, evolution, and life processes. This
course includes some laboratories and field trips. Satisfies
the general education requirement in science. Prerequisite:
Honors students only.
BIOL 1070 Basics of Human Heredity (3 credits)
This course examines basic concepts of genetics and
their application to human heredity and diversity. Topics
covered include structure and function of DNA, genes and
chromosomes, the role of genes in heredity, tracing of genetic
traits in family trees, and advances in genetic technologies as
applied to human medicine. This course is not intended for
biology majors. Prerequisite: MATH 1030.
BIOL 1080 Human Biology (3 credits)
This course explores the biology of the human organism
and is designed to provide a framework in which the student
can understand human biology at the cellular, molecular,
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and organismal levels, both in the healthy state and in
the diseased and/or malfunctioning state. The course will
emphasize the process of recognizing choices and the
application of biological knowledge in the decision-making
process. Topics will include a study of the organ systems,
immunity, and reproductive development. This course is not
intended for biology majors.
BIOL 1090 The Age of Dinosaurs (3 credits)
An introduction to the most fascinating period of life on earth-The Mesozoic Era--emphasizing the most famous inhabitants
of the time--the dinosaurs: their kinds, ecology, evolution, life
habits, and eventual extinction. The course also introduces
basic concepts in evolution, geology, and paleontology
needed to understand dinosaurs and the other animals and
plants that populated the Mesozoic world.
BIOL 1100 Concepts and Connections in Biology (3
credits)
Focuses on the fundamental concepts in the life sciences
and helps students make connections to the real world. Basic
functions of life are compared and contrasted among the five
kingdoms. Connections are made between the various life
forms and humans. Life is studied at all levels, from the cell to
the ecosystem. The complementarity of structure and function
is stressed. Evolution is the guiding theme throughout the
course. Prerequisite: MATH 1000 or higher.
BIOL 1101 Concepts and Connections in Biology Lab (1
credits)
Students are taught how to convert scientific themes into
investigative packs for the curious nature of the middle-school
student. The course will be taught in a format that utilizes
easily accessible equipment and supplies and uses resources
that are generally available within the community. Laboratory
exercises connect biology to the student: understanding key
biological concepts of plants, animals, physiology, anatomy,
and heredity genetics.
BIOL 1400 Introductory Cell Biology (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of
cell and molecular biology. It includes the study of atomic,
molecular, cellular structure and function; biochemical
processes and pathways; molecular and classical genetics.
Prerequisite: MATH 1000 or higher.
BIOL 1450 General Biology I (3 credits)
This course is a general introduction to the biological
sciences. It focuses on cellular activities including basic
biochemistry, cell organization and metabolism, cell
reproduction, and genetics. Connections will be drawn
between the above topics and historical and comtemporary
issues. This class does not include a lab. Prerequisite: MATH
1040 or higher and COMP 1000 or higher.
BIOL 1451 General Biology I Lab (1 credits)
An introductory virtual lab course which covers subcellular/
cellular organization and function, biochemistry, energetics,
and classical/molecular genetics. Prerequisite: MATH 1040 or
higher, COMP 1000 or higher. Prerequisite/Corequisite: BIOL
1450.
BIOL 1460 General Biology II (3 credits)
This course is a general introduction to the biological
sciences at the macroscopic level of organization. The course
topics include a survey of the kingdoms of evolution, selection
and population genetics. Additionally, major concepts
regarding plant and animal systems will be addressed. This
class does not include a lab. Prerequisite: MATH 1040 or
higher and COMP 1000 or higher.
BIOL 1461 General Biology II Lab (1 credits)
This lab course includes interactive lessons and natural
history examples. Students will be required to explore the
natural habitat and describe the organisms that they observe.
This course will prepare students to design laboratory
experiments in the key areas of biological sciences.
Prerequisite: MATH 1040 or higher and COMP 1000 or
higher; Prerequisite/Corequisite: BIOL 1460.
BIOL 1480 Biology I (3 credits)
An introduction to the biological sciences for students
interested in pursuing a career in this area. Includes cellular
and molecular organization, cell reproduction, genetics, and
evolution. This class does not include a lab. Prerequisites:
MATH 1040 and COMP 1000.
BIOL 1490 Biology II (3 credits)
Second part of a two-part sequence that includes a survey
of the five kingdoms emphasizing structure and function
in plants and animals. This course does not include a lab.
Prerequisites: MATH 1040 and COMP 1000.
BIOL 1500 Biology I/Lab (4 credits)
An introduction to the biological sciences for students
interested in pursuing a career in this area. Includes
subcellular and cellular organization, structures/function,
biochemistry, classical/molecular genetics, and population
dynamics - all arranged around evolution as a major theme.
Includes laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: MATH 1040 or
higher and COMP 1000 or higher.
BIOL 1510 Biology II/Lab (4 credits)
This course and related labs, the second part of a twopart sequence, introduces the basic principles of biological
science at the level of the organism and above. It focuses on
a survey of the five kingdoms and compares the structure and
function of organ systems in plants and animals. It includes
the study of evolution, phylogenetic relationships, species
diversity and ecological interactions. Prerequisites: BIOL
1500 and MATH 1040 or higher and COMP 1000 or higher.
BIOL 1510H Biology II/Lab Honors (4 credits)
This course and related labs, the second part of a twopart sequence, introduces the basic principles of biological
science at the level of the organism and above. It focuses on
a survey of the five kingdoms and compares the structure and
function of organ systems in plants and animals. It includes
the study of evolution, phylogenetic relationships, species
diversity and ecological interactions. Prerequisites: BIOL
1500 and MATH 1040 or higher and COMP 1000 or higher.
Honors students only.
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BIOL 1520 Biology I Lab Only (1 credits)
An introductory lab course which covers subcellular/cellular
organization, structures and function, biochemistry, classical/
molecular genetics, and population dynamics all arranged
around evolution as a major theme.
BIOL 1530 Biology II Lab Only (1 credits)
An introductory course that includes a survey of the five
kingdoms emphasizing structure and function in plants and
animals. This course does not include a lecture.
BIOL 1999 Prior Learning Credit in Biology (1-12 credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of lower-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in biology. This course is
repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: approval of director.
BIOL 2250 The Natural History of John U. Lloyd Beach
State Park (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of the natural history of
John U. Lloyd Beach State Park. Material to be covered
includes human history, climate, geology, vegetation, flora/
fauna, and environmental conservation issues. This course
is designed to prepare students for internships in the park.
Prerequisites: any BIOL 1000 level course.
BIOL 2400 Applied Microbiology (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to the basic principles of
applied microbiology. It provides an overview of medical
microbiology. It introduces the diversity and importance of
microbes and their physiology. Aspects of pathogenicity and
immunology are stressed. Prerequisites: BIOL 1400 or BIOL
1500; and MATH 1030 or higher.
BIOL 2600 Medical Terminology (3 credits)
This course covers the basic structure of medical terms,
including roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Emphasis will also be
placed on the terminology of body systems. Medical terms
related to anatomy, physiology, pathology, clinical procedures,
laboratory tests, and medical abbreviations will be covered.
Also, students will learn medical terminology related to
specialized areas of medicine such as cancer medicines,
nuclear medicines, radiology/radiotherapy, pharmacology,
and psychiatry. Prerequisite: BIOL 1080, BIOL 1100, BIOL
1400, BIOL 1500, or BIOL 1510.
BIOL 2950 Field Study at John U. Lloyd Beach State Park
(3 credits)
This course provides an opportunity for students to conduct
field studies at John U. Lloyd Beach State Park. Projects
include guiding tours for the public and school groups,
assisting park personnel with exotic plant removal and
native plant rehabilitation, maintaining the nature trail, etc.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2250.
BIOL 3150 Fundamentals of Ecology (3 credits)
The course is an introduction to the fundmental ecological
concepts which illustrate the complex interrelationships
among living organisms (biotic) and with their nonliving environment (abiotic). Topics will include the effect
of ecological processes on individuals, populations,
communities, ecosystems and the planet. In addition, the
course will address how anthropogenic disturbance threatens
the environment and ultimately life on earth. Prerequisite:
BIOL 1450, BIOL 1451, BIOL 1460 and BIOL 1461 or BIOL
1500 and BIOL 1510.
BIOL 3151 Fundamentals of Ecology Lab (1 credits)
This lab course will include interactive lessons and real world
experiences which illustrate the proper use of ecological
instrumentation, measurement techniques and analysis of
collected data. Students will collect ecological data near
their homes in both natural (wild) and urban (man-made)
environments. Student will gain a practical understanding
of how various ecological parameters affect individuals,
populations, communities and ecosystems. In addition, the
course will address how anthropogenic disturbances threaten
the environment and ultimately life on earth. Prerequisite/
Corequisite: BIOL 3150.
BIOL 3180 General Ecology Lab (1 credits)
This field-oriented laboratory course focuses on South Florida
organisms. It will include visits to the Everglades, mangrove,
and coral reef ecosystems. Laboratory experiments will
illustrate ecological concepts. Prerequisites: BIOL 1500 and
BIOL 1510.
BIOL 3190 General Ecology (3 credits)
This course examines the basic principles governing the
interactions among organisms and between organisms and
their environment. Topics include energy flow, population
dynamics, social interactions, competition, predation,
species diversity, ecosystem stability, ecological succession,
biogeochemical cycles, and the impact of man. Prerequisites:
BIOL 1500 and BIOL 1510.
BIOL 3200 General Ecology/Lab (4 credits)
Basic principles governing the interaction of organisms
and their environment including food webs, energy flow,
biogeochemical cycles, factors controlling distribution and
abundance, biological and species interaction, species
diversity, ecosystem stability, ecological succession, and
impact of man. Includes laboratory sessions. Prerequisites:
BIOL 1500 and BIOL 1510.
BIOL 3210 History of Science (3 credits)
This class is designed to acquaint the student with the history
of science, from the onset of rational and organized thought
to the current day. Emphasis will be placed on significant
events, such as the emergence of the first scientific thinkers
of ancient China and Greece, Copernican theory of celestial
bodies, Darwin’s Origin of Species, and the configuration of
DNA.
BIOL 3250 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy and
Physiology (3 credits)
This course is a broad overview of human anatomy and
physiology with comparisons to representative vertebrates
(e.g., fish, amphibian, reptile, bird, and mammal). The form
and function of the human body will be explored using a
systems approach. Connections will be drawn between
major themes including cell theory, homeostasis, evolution,
hierarchy of structure, and unity of form and function for
the selected vertebrates. Prerequisites: (BIOL 1450 and
BIOL 1460) or (BIOL 1500 and BIOL 1510). BIOL 3251 is a
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emphasis in both lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL
1500 or equivalent.
corequisite.
BIOL 3251 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy and
Physiology Lab (2 credits)
This laboratory course parallels the lecture course of the
comparative anatomy and physiology course. The form and
function of the human body will be explored with comparisons
to model vertebrate organisms (fish, frog, turtle, bird, pig,
and cat). Connections will be drawn between major anatomy
and physiology themes including cell theory, homeostasis,
evolution, hierarchy of structure, and unity of form and
function. Prerequisites: (BIOL 1450 and BIOL 1460) or (BIOL
1500 and BIOL 1510). BIOL 3250 is a corequisite.
BIOL 3298 Invertebrate Zoology (3 credits)
Basic invertebrate zoology including introductory anatomy,
physiology, phylogeny, and ecology of major animal phyla
from protozoa through echinoderms with emphasis on marine
organisms. This course does not include a lab.
BIOL 3299 Invertebrate Zoology Lab (1 credits)
Basic invertebrate zoology including introductory anatomy,
physiology, phylogeny, and ecology of major animal phyla
from protozoa through echinoderms with emphasis on marine
organisms. This course does not include a lecture.
BIOL 3321 Anatomy and Physiology I (3 credits)
This is the first part of a two-part course that deals specifically
with form and function of the vertebrate organ systems. The
lecture period stresses human physiology. Although the
lower vertebrates are used for comparative purposes, the
mammalian systems receive major emphasis. This course
does not include a lab. Prerequisite: An introductory, collegelevel biology or zoology course.
BIOL 3322 Anatomy and Physiology I Lab (1 credits)
This is the first part of a two-part course that deals specifically
with form and function of the vertebrate organ systems.
The lab is mainly devoted to gross anatomy. Although the
lower vertebrates are used for comparative purposes, the
mammalian systems will receive major emphasis. This course
does not include a lecture. Prerequisite: An introductory,
college-level biology or zoology course.
BIOL 3300 Invertebrate Zoology/Lab (4 credits)
Basic invertebrate zoology including introductory anatomy,
physiology, phylogeny, and ecology of major animal phyla
from protozoa through echinoderms with emphasis on marine
organisms. Includes laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: BIOL
1500 and BIOL 1510.
BIOL 3330 Anatomy and Physiology II/Lab (4 credits)
This is the second part of a two-part course that deals
specifically with form and function of vertebrate organ
systems. The lecture period stresses human physiology and
the laboratory is devoted to histology and gross anatomy.
The lecture and laboratory are presented in a unified fashion
with the aim that each reinforces the other in presenting a
complete picture of functional morphology. Although lower
vertebrates are used for comparative purposes, human
systems receive major emphasis in both lecture and
laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 3320.
BIOL 3311 Vertebrate Zoology/Lab (4 credits)
This course introduces students to the identification,
systematics, life history, anatomy, and adaptive strategies
of the vertebrates. The course also exposes students to
methods of collecting, preserving, and identifying local
vertebrates, as well as the common techniques used in
vertebrate research. Prerequisite: BIOL 1510
BIOL 3331 Anatomy and Physiology II (3 credits)
This is the second part of a two-part course that deals
specifically with form and function of the vertebrate organ
systems. The lecture period stresses human physiology.
Although the lower vertebrates are used for comparative
purposes, the human systems receive major emphasis. The
course does not include a lab. Prerequisite: BIOL 3320.
BIOL 3312 Human Anatomy and Physiology/Lab (5
credits)
This course deals specifically with form and function
of human systems. The lecture period stresses human
physiology; the laboratory is devoted to anatomy, histology,
and physiology. The lecture and laboratory are presented in
a unified fashion with the aim that each reinforces the other
in presenting a complete picture of functional morphology.
Although lower vertebrates are used for comparative
purposes, human systems receive major emphasis in both
lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 1400 or BIOL 1500.
BIOL 3332 Anatomy and Physiology II Lab (1 credits)
This is a second part of a two-part course that deals
specifically with form and function of the vertebrate organ
systems. The lab is mainly devoted to gross anatomy.
Although the lower vertebrates are used for comparative
purposes, the human systems receive major emphasis. This
course does not include a lecture. Prerequisite: BIOL 3320.
BIOL 3320 Anatomy and Physiology I/Lab (4 credits)
This is the first part of a two-part course that deals specifically
with form and function of vertebrate organ systems. The
lecture period stresses human physiology and the laboratory
is mainly devoted to gross anatomy. However, the lecture and
laboratory are presented in a unified fashion with the aim that
each reinforces the other in presenting a complete picture of
functional morphology. Although lower vertebrates are used
for comparative purposes, mammalian systems receive major
BIOL 3340 Instrumentation and Laboratory Techniques (3
credits)
This intensive laboratory session serves to provide students
hands-on skills and practical applications for doing biological
science. Skills and techniques that have been simulated in
previous courses will actually be performed. There will be an
emphasis on quantitative analysis and completion of formal
laboratory reports. Prerequisites: BIOL 1451, BIOL 1461,
BIOL 2400, BIOL 3312 and CHEM 1100 or CHEM 1150.
BIOL 3398 Microbiology (3 credits)
Introduction to basics of morphology, metabolism, growth,
genetics, enumeration, and control and public health aspects
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of bacteria and viruses, with emphasis on marine processes
and types. This course does not include a lab. Prerequisites:
BIOL 1500, BIOL 1510, and CHEM 1310.
BIOL 3399 Microbiology Lab (1 credits)
Introduction to basics of morphology, metabolism, growth,
genetics, enumeration, and control and public health
aspects of bacteria and viruses, with emphasis on marine
processes and types. This course does not include a lecture.
Prerequisites: BIOL 1500, BIOL 1510, and CHEM 1310.
BIOL 3400 Microbiology/Lab (4 credits)
Introduction to basics of morphology, metabolism, growth,
genetics, enumeration, and control and public health aspects
of bacteria and viruses, with emphasis on marine processes
and types. Includes laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: BIOL
1500 and CHEM 1310.
BIOL 3500 Histology/Lab (4 credits)
Histology is the study of tissues. It is the science of relating
microscopic cell and tissue structure, to function. The lecture
period is devoted to tissue structure and function. In the
laboratory session, students will be taught a systematic
process in identifying histological sections, and how structure
directly relates to function. The lecture and laboratory
sessions will complement each other to provide a complete
understanding of microscopic anatomy and function.
Prerequisite: BIOL 1500 and CHEM 1100 or higher.
BIOL 3590 Genetics (3 credits)
Review of principles of Mendelian and quantitative
inheritance considered at a morphological and molecular
level, including a survey of population genetics, theories of
natural selection, the study of amino acids, and nucleotide
substitutions as “evolutionary clocks.” Prerequisites: BIOL
1500, CHEM 1310 and MATH 3020.
BIOL 3599 Genetics Lab (1 credits)
Review of principles of Mendelian and quantitative
inheritance considered at the morphological and molecular
levels, including a survey of population genetics and theories
of natural selection and the study of amino acids and
nucleotide substitutions as “evolutionary clocks.” This course
does not include a lecture. Prerequisites: BIOL 1500, CHEM
1310 and MATH 3020.
BIOL 3600 Genetics/Lab (4 credits)
Review of principles of Mendelian and quantitative
inheritance considered at a morphological and molecular
level, including a survey of population genetics, theories of
natural selection, the study of amino acids, and nucleotide
substitutions as “evolutionary clocks.” Prerequisites: BIOL
1500, CHEM 1310, and MATH 3020
BIOL 3800 Evolution (3 credits)
This course provides the fundamental principles of
evolutionary biology. Coverage will include history of
evolutionary thought, population and quantitative genetics,
paleobiology and experimental evidence, adaptations and
radiation, biodiversity, evolution and development (evo-devo),
molecular evolution, the impact of neo-darwinian synthesis,
genome evolution, phylogenetics, human evolution,
macroevolution and coevolution. Prerequisites: BIOL 1500
and BIOL 1510, Co-requisite BIOL 3600
BIOL 3999 Prior Learning Credit in Biology (1-12 credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of upper-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in biology. This course is
repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: approval of director.
BIOL 4200 Neurobiology (3 credits)
This course is an introductory survey that covers nerve
function from the molecular level to behavior. The objective is
to give the advanced student in the biological sciences insight
into fundamental mechanisms of nervous integration. The
instructional format will consist of lectures, discussion groups,
computer simulations, and guest lectures by practicing
neuroscientists.
BIOL 4300 Microbial Pathogenesis (3 credits)
An introduction into the molecular mechanisms used by
various microbes (including bacteria and viruses) to infect
and cause disease in their hosts. The course will cover
microbial attachment, virulence factors, host-parasite
interactions, treatment strategies, and mechanisms of drug
resistance. Prerequisites: BIOL 3400 and BIOL 3600.
BIOL 4340 Cellular and Molecular Biology (3 credits)
Molecular and biochemical basis of cell structure and
function. Topics covered include modern methods for
studying cells; cell architecture, growth and divisions;
structure and expression of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genes;
chromosome structure; development; immune system and
cancer biology. This course does not include laboratory
sessions. Prerequisites: BIOL 1500 and CHEM 2310.
BIOL 4350 Cellular and Molecular Biology/Lab (4 credits)
Molecular and biochemical basis of cell structure and
function. Topics covered include modern methods for
studying cells; cell architecture, growth and division; structure
and expression of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genes;
chromosome structure; development; immune system and
cancer biology. This course does not include laboratory
sessions. Prerequisite: BIOL 3312 or BIOL 3330.
BIOL 4360 Immunology (3 credits)
A survey of, and introduction to, immunology, which includes
innate and specific immunity, recognition of antigens,
antibodies, the complement system, cytokines, cancer and
the immune system, and autoimmunity. Prerequisites: BIOL
3330, 3400, and BIOL 3600.
BIOL 4380 Discovering Genomics, Proteomics, and
Bioinformatics (3 credits)
This course provides students with an overview of the
interactions among molecules including DNA, proteins, lipids,
and carbohydrates within cells and in the context of applied
medical, pharmaceutical, and general biological research. A
variety of computer-based tools will be used throughout this
course. Prerequisites: TECH 1110 and one of the following:
BIOL 3600, BIOL 4340, or BIOL 4450.
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BIOL 4390 Advanced Experimental Molecular Biology (3
credits)
This course provides students with an opportunity to conduct
laboratory-based research including experiments and
data analysis in an advanced area of molecular biology,
such as using microarray technology to test hypotheses
of gene expression. Students will learn and practice a
variety of experimental molecular biology techniques such
as RNA extraction, cDNA creation and labeling as well as
hybridization to a microarray. Students will subsequently
analyze their resulting data. Students are required to prepare
a poster describing their experimental work. Prerequisite:
BIOL 4380 or consent of the instructor.
BIOL 4400 Developmental Biology (3 credits)
Principles of human cellular differentiation, morphogenesis,
and development, with comparisons to lower animal forms.
Prerequisites: BIOL 3330 or BIOL 3312.
BIOL 4448 Biochemistry Lab (1 credits)
Chemistry of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids
and principles in enzymology, metabolism, and bioenergetics.
This is a laboratory session course. Prerequisites: BIOL 1500
and CHEM 2200 or CHEM 2410.
written assignments, this course provides students with an
opportunity to integrate previous learning and experience
with a concentration in biological or physical sciences to
form a unique course of academic study. Given that the APS
major is individualized to a large extent based on a student’s
interests and past experiences, this course ordinarily will be
conducted as an independent study and will be taken during
the student’s last semester prior to receipt of their degree.
Prerequisite: to be determined by supervising faculty and the
division director.
BIOL 4902 Special Topics in Biology - Botany (4 credits)
This course provides an introduction to laboratory or field
based botanical sciences, touching on a variety of topics.
The complementary laboratory course helps to reinforce
and elucidate the lecture material. We will explore several
introductory aspects of plant biology including anatomy,
physiology, general plant groups, and ecology. The course
will provide an introduction to plant diversity demonstrating
how plants are essential for life on Earth, how plant function
is related to their form, and the interactions and processes
needed for plants to form complex habitats and ecosystems.
Prerequisite: BIOL 1510.
BIOL 4449 Biochemistry (3 credits)
Chemistry of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic
acids; and principles in enzymology, metabolism, and
bioenergetics. Prerequisites: BIOL 1500 and CHEM 2200 or
CHEM 2410.
BIOL 4950 Internship in Biology (1-12 credits)
A work experience for 16 weeks in the student’s major area of
study or area of career interest. Consult academic division for
specific details and requirements. Prerequisites: cumulative
GPA of 2.5 or higher, major GPA of 3.0 or higher, completion
of 60 or more credit hours, supervision of instructor, and
permission of academic director.
BIOL 4900 Special Topics in Biology (1-3 credits)
Topics in advanced biology that are not included in a regular
course offering. Prerequisites may be required. Specific
content and prerequisites are announced in the course
schedule for the given term. Students may re-enroll for
Special Topics covering different content. Prerequisite: BIOL
1500.
BIOL 4990 Independent Study in Biology (1-3 credits)
The student selects and independently carries out library and/
or empirical research. Faculty supervision is provided on an
individual basis. Prerequisite: to be determined by the faculty
and the division director.
BIOL 4900A Special Topics in Biology - Biodiversity of
North American Ecosystems: Alaska (3 credits)
Topics in advanced biology that are not included in a regular
course offering. Prerequisites may be required. Specific
content and prerequisites are announced in the course
schedule for the given term. Students may re-enroll for
Special Topics covering different content. Prerequisite: BIOL
1510.
BSV—BSV-BSHS Vascular Sonography
BSV 3100 Ultrasound Physics & Lab I (3 credits)
This course is designed to introduce the students to the
fundamental principals of sound and ultrasound. Students will
learn how sound is generated, transmitted, and reflected in
soft tissue.
BIOL 4900B Special Topics in Biology - Biodiversity of
North American Ecosystems: Alaska: Field Course (1
credits)
Topics in advanced biology that are not included in a regular
course offering. Prerequisites may be required. Specific
content and prerequisites are announced in the course
schedule for the given term. Students may re-enroll for
Special Topics covering different content. Prerequisite: BIOL
4900A.
BSV 3110 Advanced Anatomy for Health Pr (4 credits)
This course is a survey of human physiology and includes
functional anatomy. It will be presented in an organ
system approach and will cover cellular physiology and
cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, gastrointestinal, endocrine,
reproductive, and nervous systems. The course emphasizes
the correlation between anatomy and function, clinical
application and uses of anatomical terminology. Students
apply these concepts in the anatomy laboratory setting, using
resources such as cadaver dissection, radiographs, MRI, CT,
and scans.
BIOL 4901 APS Capstone Course in Biological and
Physical Sciences (3 credits)
This course is reserved for students who are enrolled in the
Applied Professional Studies Program. Through a series of
BSV 3200 Ultrasound Physics Review (1 credits)
Ultrasound physics review is designed to integrate the
principles of ultrasound physics with the theoretical and
practical lessons provided in the previous and current
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sessions. Student will learn the fundamentals of image
acquisition and optimization as it pertains to ultrasound
physics.
BSV 3210 Clin Phys (3 credits)
This course is designed to develop general understanding
of human physiology and pathology for the vascular
sonographer. Students will learn the function of the human
system and the overall relationship to the structure of
the human body. More specific vascular physiology and
pathology will be provided in the system courses.
BSV 3211 Pharmacology (1 credits)
This is a brief introduction into the general field of
pharmacology with an emphasis on medications used for
the treatment of vascular disorders. Students will learn basic
understanding of calculation, dosage and administration as
well as common medications generally taken by patients with
chronic illnesses.
BSV 3220 Intro Diagnostic Med Sonograph (2 credits)
This course is designed as an introduction to diagnostic
medical ultrasound and will provide the basis for the core
courses in specific vascular exam modalities studied in
the winter and summer terms. The course will therefore
be primarily taught in the ultrasound training laboratory,
will privilege hands-on and participation over lectures, and
will emphasize: understating of equipments, transducer
manipulation, ergonomics, patient rapport, image production
and optimization. This course will also be strongly link to the
introduction to ultrasound physics course.
BSV 3300 Cerebrovascular Testing/Lab (4 credits)
This course will review the cerebrovascular anatomy and
physiology associated with cerebrovascular disease. The
student will learn the scanning protocols for extra and
intracranial cerebrovascular testing and the diagnostic criteria
for assessing disease. The student will also review various
diagnostic and treatment options for the patient.
BSV 3500 Peripheral Arterial Testing (5 credits)
This course will review the peripheral arterial anatomy and
physiology associated with the peripheral arterial system.
The student will learn the scanning protocols for upper and
lower extremity arterial testing and the diagnostic criterial
for assessing disease. The student will also review various
diagnostic and treatment options for the patient.
BSV 3600 Abdominal Vascular Testing/Lab (5 credits)
This course will review the abdominal anatomy and
physiology associated with visceral vascular disease. The
student will learn the scanning protocols for abdominal
vascular testing and the diagnostic criteria for assessing
disease. The student will also review various diagnostic and
treatment options for the patient.
BSV 3700 Clinical Preparation & Review (4 credits)
Clinical Preparation and Review is a course designed to
review general medical anatomy and physiology, terminology,
treatment, and surgical and non-surgical options used in the
treatment of vascular disease. It is designed to reinforce the
non-technical/ultrasound components of the training including
clinical ethics, diagnostic and treatment options and others
non-imaging skills including EKG, lab correlation and patient/
sonographer interaction. This course is to insure the student
is well prepared for the clinical experience that will follow.
BSV 4500 Clinical Externship I (12 credits)
The first 12 weeks of the clinical externships is designed
mmerse the student to the vascular laboratory and health
care environment. The student will be expected to transport
and or escort patients into the examination room, prepare
patients for procedures, initially observe and later perform
ormal studies as requested by the preceptor and prepare
studies for interpretation. Students will continue complete
competency base assessment reports each week to the
clinical instructor and clinical coordinator.
BSV 4600 Clinical Externship II (12 credits)
This segment of the externship is designed to transition the
student into less directly supervised vascular testing and
more independent scanning. The student will be expected to
complete normal and abnormal studies and write technical
impressions on the studies performed and present and
document findings of the study. Students will continue
complete competency based assessment reports each week
to the clinical instructor and clinical coordinator.
BSV 4700 Clinical Externship III (12 credits)
The final clinical externship is designed to insure the student
has gained an independent level of competency with both
normal and abnormal studies with greater technical expertise
and efficiency. The student will be expected to complete
abnormal studies completely independently, present cases
to the technical and medical director, and write technical
impressions on the studies performed. Students will continue
to complete competency based assessment reports each
week to the clinical instructor and clinical coordinator.
BSV 5105 Basic Life Support (1 credits)
This course is a basic adult CPR course. Students will be
instructed in recognizing the signs and symptoms of both
respiratory and cardiac arrest and the techniques used to
implement cardiac and pulmonary resuscitation. Completion
of the course will result in American Heart Association (AHA)
certification.
CHEM—Chemistry
CHEM 1040 Chemistry and Society (3 credits)
Students in this course are provided with knowledge of
chemical principles principally in terms of concepts. They
will evaluate the importance of scientific inquisitiveness in
everyday life. The course will include, but not be limited to,
topics such as chemical inventions, environmental chemistry
(water, air, pollution regulation, hazardous waste, greenhouse
gases, global warming, soil chemistry, fertilizer, pesticides),
food chemistry (vitamins, minerals, growth hormones, food
additives, preservatives, antioxidants), energy sources
(batteries, fuels, power plants, solar energy, nuclear
reactors), synthetic materials (polymers, ceramics, glass,
fabrics, modern materials, adhesives, paints), medicinal
chemistry (vision, cancer therapy, prescription drugs,
antibiotics, psychoactive drugs), biochemicals (proteins,
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enzymes, carbohydrates, hormones, lipids), consumer
chemicals (cosmetics, cleansing agents, perfumes), and
chemical warfare agents and poisons.
CHEM 1080 History of Chemistry (3 credits)
This course will cover selected aspects concerning the history
of chemistry. The course will present important theories and/
or experiments and their progenitors for several aspects
in the historical development of chemistry. Topics include
atomic theory, chemical bonding, the periodic table, gas laws,
organic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, industrial chemistry,
electrochemistry, spectroscopy, chemical warfare and
explosives, instrumentation, and technology. These topics will
be closely linked to the scientists and their times.
CHEM 1100 Fundamentals of Chemistry (3 credits)
The fundamental laws, principles and theories of atomic
structure, molecular structure and bonding, stoichiometry,
states of matter/solutions, energy changes, and oxidationreduction reactions are presented along with an introduction
to organic chemistry and biochemistry. Prerequisite: MATH
1040 or higher.
CHEM 1101 Fundamentals of Chemistry Lab (1 credits)
The series of lab experiences connects science with both
teaching and real-world application. Students are taught how
to convert scientific themes into investigative packets for
the middle school student. This laboratory course provides
hands-on experiences relevant to the concepts taught in
Fundamentals of Chemistry (CHEM 1100). The lab will be
taught in a format that utilizes accessible equipment and
supplies that would be available or could be assembled in
most middle school classrooms. The scientific method will
be emphasized and students will be involved in developing,
assembling, and conducting the laboratory experiences.
Recording and analyzing data will be done using computer
spreadsheets. Multimedia simulations, the Internet, and
community resources will be employed. During this lab,
students will add to their portfolio of notes, demonstrations,
and resources applicable to the middle school classroom.
This course is taken in conjunction with CHEM 1100.
Prerequisite: MATH 1040.
CHEM 1150 Essentials of Chemistry (3 credits)
A one-semester study of the essentials in chemistry with
a foundation of energy and the nature of matter. Upon this
foundation students will investigate chemical compounds,
chemical reactions, chemical nomenclature, and reaction
stoichiometry. It continues with chemical periodicity,
chemical bonding, and gases. The course concludes with
an introduction to kinetics, equilibrium, acid/base theory, and
redox reactions. Prerequisite: MATH 1040 or higher.
CHEM 1200 Survey of Forensic Science/Lab (4 credits)
This course is structured to introduce the basic disciplines of
forensic science such as fingerprints, drug analysis, arson
investigations and DNA analysis. This course is appropriate
for non-science major students and students who are looking
to pursue the field of forensic science.
CHEM 1280 General Chemistry I Lab (1 credits)
Basic chemical calculations, periodicity, bonding, inorganic
reaction, and kinetics. First half of General Chemistry
Continuum. Prerequisite: MATH 1200.
CHEM 1290 General Chemistry II Lab (1 credits)
Laboratory course which covers thermodynamics, acid-base
reactions, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. This
course does not include a lecture. Prerequisite: CHEM 1300.
CHEM 1300 General Chemistry I/Lab (4 credits)
This course and the related lab is the first part of a twosemester sequence that studies the laws, principles and
theories of: atomic structure, molecular structure and
bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter/solutions, energetics,
oxidation reduction, and laboratory chemistry, including their
applications. CHEM 1300 represents the first half of the
General Chemistry continuum. Prerequisites: MATH 1200.
CHEM 1300H General Chemistry I/Lab Honors (4 credits)
This course and the related lab is the first part of a twosemester sequence that studies the laws, principles and
theories of: atomic structure, molecular structure and
bonding, stoichiometry, states of matter/solutions, energetics,
oxidation reduction, and laboratory chemistry, including their
applications. CHEM 1300 represents the first half of the
General Chemistry continuum. Prerequisites: MATH 1200;
Honors students only.
CHEM 1310 General Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits)
This course and the related lab is the second part of a twosemester sequence that studies atomic structure, molecular
structure and bonding, states of matter/solutions, dynamics
(kinetics and thermodynamics), equilibrium, electrochemistry,
and laboratory chemistry including their applications.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1300.
CHEM 1310H General Chemistry II/Lab Honor (4 credits)
This course and the related lab is the second part of a twosemester sequence that studies atomic structure, molecular
structure and bonding, states of matter/solutions, dynamics
(kinetics and thermodynamics), equilibrium, electrochemistry,
and laboratory chemistry including their applications.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1300; Honors students only.
CHEM 1320 General Chemistry I (3 credits)
Basic chemical calculations, periodicity, bonding, inorganic
reactions, and kinetics. First half of General Chemistry
Continuum. This course does not include a lab. Prerequisites:
MATH 1200 and CHEM 1100, or satisfactory score on
chemistry placement exam.
CHEM 1330 General Chemistry II (3 credits)
Continuation of a General Chemistry Continuum including
thermodynamics, acid-base reactions, electrochemistry,
and nuclear chemistry. This course does not have a lab.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1300.
CHEM 1500 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry (3
credits)
This course teaches the basic principles of chemistry using
examples from the environment. Through a brief introduction
to areas of inorganic, organic, and biochemistry, the diversity
of chemical pollutants in the environment will be explored.
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Emphasis will be placed on environmental issues such as the
sources of chemical pollutants, the reactions that produce
them, and their toxicity. A basic level of algebra is essential.
Prerequisite: MATH 1030 or higher.
CHEM 1999 Prior Learning Credit in Chemistry (1-12
credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of lower-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in chemistry. This course
is repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: approval of
director.
CHEM 2190 Essentials of Organic Chemistry (3 credits)
A one semester study of the structure, nomenclature,
preparation, properties, and reactions of organic compounds,
organized by functional groups and reaction mechanisms.
This course does not include a lab.
CHEM 2200 Essentials of Organic Chemistry (4 credits)
A one-semester study of the structure, nomenclature,
preparation, properties, and reactions of organic compounds,
organized by functional groups and reaction mechanisms.
Includes laboratory sessions. Prerequisite: CHEM 1310.
CHEM 2210 Essentials of Organic Chemistry Lab (1
credits)
A one-semester lab study of the structure, nomenclature,
preparation, properties, and reactions of organic compounds,
organized by functional groups and reaction mechanisms.
This class does not include a lecture.
CHEM 2380 Organic Chemistry I (3 credits)
The chemistry of carbon compounds, including their
structure, nomenclature, preparation, reactions, analysis
and properties. Reaction mechanisms are stressed, within a
functional group framework. This course does not include a
lab. Prerequisite: CHEM 1310.
CHEM 2390 Organic Chemistry II (3 credits)
Continuation of Organic Chemistry I. This course does not
include a lab. Prerequisite: CHEM 2400.
CHEM 2400 Organic Chemistry I/Lab (4 credits)
This course and the related lab is the first part of a twosemester sequence that studies the chemistry of carbon
compounds, including their structure, nomenclature,
preparation, reactions, analysis, and properties. Reaction
mechanisms are stressed within a functional group
framework. The laboratory session introduces basic
laboratory techniques frequently utilized in organic syntheses.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1310.
CHEM 2410 Organic Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits)
This course and the related lab is the second part of a
two-semester sequence that studies the chemistry of
heteroatom-containing carbon compounds, including their
structure, nomenclature, preparation, reactions, analysis,
and properties. Reaction mechanisms within a functional
group framework are stressed. Stability, nucleophilicity
and electrophilicity, spectroscopy, and structure-reactivity
relationships will also be examined. The laboratory session
practices basic organic syntheses. Prerequisite: CHEM 2400.
CHEM 2420 Organic Chemistry I Lab (1 credits)
Laboratory session covering the chemistry of carbon
compounds, including their structure, nomenclature,
preparation, reaction, analysis, and properties. Reaction
mechanisms are stressed within a functional group
framework. This course does not include a lecture.
CHEM 2430 Organic Chemistry II Lab (1 credits)
Continuation of Organic Chemistry I laboratory session. This
course does not include a lecture.
CHEM 2600 Environmental Chemistry (3 credits)
This course introduces the principles and chemical
processes that control chemical reactions in natural systems.
Precipitation, complexation, redox, and absorption will be
applied to aquatic, marine, terrestrial, and atmospheric
systems. Examples will cover wastewater treatment,
pollutant fates, and assessment of environmental outcomes.
Prerequisite: CHEM 2200 or CHEM 2400.
CHEM 3000 Chemical Literature (1 credits)
The history and structure of chemical literature will be
covered. The history, structures and use of literature
search tools will also be covered. The use of chemical
literature searches and the literature itself in the preparation
of scientific proposals and papers will be emphasized.
Prerequisite: CHEM 2410.
CHEM 3101 Chemistry Seminar (3 credits)
This chemistry seminar course is designed to familiarize
students with the availability and expectations of different
chemistry professions, the basic nature of science and
chemistry, ethical issues in chemistry, and the preparation
and critical analysis of research seminars. This will be
done through lectures by departmental faculty, as well as,
seminars by guest speakers and literature research projects.
Prerequisites: CHEM 2410 and CHEM 3000.
CHEM 3240 Bio-Organic Chemistry (3 credits)
This course aims to introduce the principles of organic
chemistry in the context of molecules important in
biochemistry and cell biology. The relevant functional groups,
stereochemistry and reaction mechanisms are explained in
relation to biomolecules, with extra attention for structureactivity relationships, and organic chemistry of enzymecatalyzed reactions. This course does not include a lab
component. Prerequisite: CHEM 2410 & BIOL 1500.
CHEM 3250 Bio-Organic Chemistry (4 credits)
This course aims to introduce the principles of organic
chemistry in the context of molecules important in
biochemistry and cell biology. The relevant functional groups,
stereochemistry and reaction mechanisms are explained in
relation to biomolecules, with extra attention for structureactivity relationships, and organic chemistry of enzymecatalyzed reactions. The course includes laboratory sessions.
Prerequisite: CHEM 2410 & BIOL 1500.
CHEM 3400 Biophysical Chemistry (3 credits)
Biophysical Chemistry covers thermodynamics concepts,
electrochemistry, and introduction to statistical mechanics
and their relation to thermodynamics functions. This course
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will explore a range of topics at the intersection between
chemistry and biology. Prerequisites: Completion of MATH
and PHYSICS sequences, BIOL 1510 and CHEM 2410.
CHEM 3410 Biophysical Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits)
Biophysical Chemistry II is an introduction to the principles of
Statistical Mechanics, and Quantum Mechanics. This course
will explore a range of topics at the intersection between
chemistry and biology. Prerequisite: CHEM 3400
CHEM 3460 Quantitative Analysis/Lab (4 credits)
The quantitation of chemical substances in complex mixture
is the focus of this lab intensive course. Methods of sample
preparation and analysis will be examined. The mathematical
treatment of data to produce quantitative information for
chemical substances will also be emphasized. Prerequisites:
CHEM 1310 or CHEM 1310H.
CHEM 3600 Geochemistry (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to geochemistry. Geochemistry
involves the study of the chemical composition of the
entire Earth, the differentiation of the chemistry of different
parts of the Earth, and the description of the formation,
distribution, and physical and chemical characteristics of the
materials that make up the Earth. How the age of the Earth
is determined and how processes occurring on the Earth
are studied using chemical indicators will be introduced.
Comparisons of differing models for the geochemistry of
the Earth will be introduced and evaluated. The course will
conclude with how human activity impacts the chemical
environment of the Earth. Prerequisite: CHEM 2200 or CHEM
2410.
CHEM 3650 Biochemistry/Lab (4 credits)
The chemical properties of amino acids, monosaccharides,
lipids and nucleotides are discussed. The structure of
proteins, carbohydrates and biological membranes are
studied. Mechanisms of enzymatic catalysis are outlined
in detail with an emphasis on the structure/function of
cofactors. Glycolysis and citric acid cycle are described.
Electron transport and ATP synthesis are discussed in
both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Metabolism of lipids,
amino acids and nucleotides are presented. In addition to
mechanistic studies of biochemical pathways and cycles,
regulation of these processes is also covered. Prerequisites:
BIOL 1500 and CHEM 2200 or CHEM 2410.
CHEM 3700 Physical Chemistry I/Lab (4 credits)
Physical Chemistry I covers thermodynamics, chemical
equilibrium, phase equilibrium, chemistry of solutions, kinetic
theory, and reaction kinetics. Prerequisites: MATH 3100 or
MATH 3400, PHYS 2500, and CHEM 2410.
CHEM 3710 Physical Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits)
Physical Chemistry II is a continuation of the study
of physical chemistry and covers chemical statistics,
quantum mechanics, atomic and molecular spectroscopy,
and molecular structure. This course also includes a lab
which explores lab techniques used in physical chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHEM 3700.
CHEM 3999 Prior Learning Credit in Chemistry (1-12
credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of upper-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in chemistry. This course
is repeatable up to 12 credits. Prerequisite: approval of
director.
CHEM 4005 Inorganic Chemistry I (3 credits)
Inorganic Chemistry I is an introduction to modern inorganic
chemistry. The principles of molecular structure, bonding,
periodicity, band theory, and chemical reactivity with
application to compounds of the main group and transition
elements are covered. Prerequisite: CHEM 2410.
CHEM 4010 Inorganic Chemistry II/Lab (4 credits)
Inorganic Chemistry II/Lab is a continuation of Inorganic
Chemistry I. The course deals with important concepts of
advanced inorganic chemistry including ligand field, reactions
mechanisms, and the 18 electron rule for inorganic and
organometallic compounds. Lab: Modern techniques of
inorganic and organometallic chemistry including experience
with glovebox, Schlenk line, and vacuum line methods.
Prerequisite: CHEM 4005.
CHEM 4100 Chemical Analysis (3 credits)
This is an applied chemistry course designed to emphasize
the typical analytical methods used in chemistry. The
course will focus on wet chemical analysis and chemical
instrumentation. Classical wet methods such as titrimetry,
gravimetry, ion exchange, chromatography, potentiometry,
and electrochemistry will be supplemented with more
modern analytical instrumental methods such as UV-visible
spectrophotometry, FT-IR, GC, fluorimetry, and atomic
spectroscopy (absorption and emission). The course will
also provide a background in quality assurance and quality
control. A sound understanding of the process of error
minimization will also be provided. Prerequisite: CHEM 2200
or CHEM 2410.
CHEM 4101 Senior Chemistry Seminar (1 credits)
This senior seminar course is designed for chemistry major
students in their senior year. It prepares students to give
a seminar on their undergraduate research or a literature
investigation of a related area. Prerequisites: Completion
CHEM 2410 and CHEM 3101.
CHEM 4150 Chemical Instrumentation (4 credits)
This is an applied chemistry course designed to
emphasize the typical instrumentation methods used in
chemistry. The course will focus on chemical analysis and
chemical instrumentation. Classical methods such as gas
chromatography, liquid chromatography, potentiometry, and
electrochemistry will be supplemented with more modern
and analytical instrumental methods such as UV-visible
spectrophotometry, FT-IR, GC, fluorimetry, NMR, and atomic
spectroscopy (absorption and emission). Prerequisites:
CHEM 2410.
CHEM 4200 Plant Drug Analysis (3 credits)
This course introduces the chemical techniques used to
extract, separate, and identify medicinal drugs derived from
plants. Eleven major drug classes--essential oils, alkaloids,
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anthracene derivatives, argutin, bitter principle, coumarin,
flavinoids, cardic glycoside, saponin, pungent principle, and
mustard oil--will be covered. The course also examines the
botanicals they are derived from. By the end of the course,
the student is expected to execute a qualitative screening
of an unknown drug and identify its class and the major
pharmaceutical components present. Prerequisites: CHEM
1300, CHEM 1310, CHEM 2200, or CHEM 2410.
CHEM 4300 Clinical Chemistry (3 credits)
This course examines the application of chemistry and
biochemistry to the diagnosis of human disease. Clinical
laboratory scientists (also known as medical technologists)
perform chemical, microbiological, and immunological tests
on body fluids in a medical laboratory. The results of these
tests are used by physicians and clinicians in preventing,
diagnosing, and treating disease. This course will review
these techniques as they apply to diagnosis and treatment
of disease, organ transplants, therapeutic drug monitoring,
crime investigation, genetic studies, and home testing
kits. The impact of technology on the application of clinical
chemistry will also be examined. Prerequisites: CHEM 2200
or CHEM 2410.
CHEM 4400 Bio-Inorganic Chemistry (3 credits)
This course gives the advanced undergraduate student
an overview of metal sites in biology, i.e. those aspects of
inorganic chemistry that are of relevance to biochemistry.
Metalloproteins will be viewed as elaborated inorganic
complexes. Topics discussed will include the basic ideas of
bonding in coordination compounds, unique features of the
protein ligand, physical methods used to study active sites,
and the correlation of the structures of these sites to their
biological function. Prerequisites: BIOL 1500 and CHEM
1310.
CHEM 4900 Special Topics in Chemistry: Principles of
Medicinal Chemistry (3 credits)
The organic chemistry of medicinal agents: understanding
the relationships between chemical structure and their
individual mode of action. Including the principles involved in
drug discovery and development, and in enzyme-inhibition.
The first half will focus on the chemical and biochemical
background needed to understand modern medicinal
chemistry, whereas the second half will concentrate on the
medicinal chemistry of select receptor-agent interactions.
Prerequisite: CHEM 2410.
CHEM 4900A Special Topics in Chemistry: Principles of
Medicinal Chemistry (3 credits)
The organic chemistry of medicinal agents: understanding
the relationships between chemical structure and their
individual mode of action. Including the principles involved in
drug discovery and development, and in enzyme-inhibition.
The first half will focus on the chemical and biochemical
background needed to understand modern medicinal
chemistry, whereas the second half will concentrate on the
medicinal chemistry of select receptor-agent interactions.
Prerequisite: CHEM 2410.
CHEM 4950 Internship in Chemistry (1-12 credits)
A work experience for 16 weeks in the student’s major area of
study or area of career interest. Consult academic division for
specific details and requirements. Prerequisites: cumulative
GPA of 2.5 or higher, major GPA of 3.0 or higher, completion
of 60 or more credit hours, supervision of instructor, and
permission of academic director.
CHEM 4990 Independent Study in Chemistry (1-12
credits)
The student selects, and carries out independently, library
and/or empirical research. Faculty supervision is provided
on an individual basis. Prerequisite: to be determined by the
faculty and division director.
CHIN—Chinese
CHIN 1210 Elementary Mandarin Chinese I (3 credits)
Essentials of Modern Standard Mandarin Chinese language
with emphasis on reading and oral skills and a limited amount
of writing. Introduction to Chinese cultures. Not open to native
speakers.
CHIN 1220 Elementary Mandarin Chinese II (3 credits)
Continuation of essentials of Modern Standard Mandarin
Chinese language with emphasis on reading and oral skills
and a limited amount of writing. Introduction to Chinese
culture. Not open to native speakers. Prerequisite: CHIN
1210.
COMM—Communication
COMM 1999 Prior Learning in Communications (1-12
credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of lower-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in communication. This
course is repeatable up to 12 credits.
COMM 2010 Introduction to Print Journalism (3 credits)
This course centers on instruction in the forms, methods, and
styles of news and information writing for print publications.
Emphasis will be placed on journalistic research methods,
style conventions, and journalistic ethics. Prerequisite: COMP
2000 or 2020.
COMM 2100 Mass Media (3 credits)
An examination of the impact of technology on the way
we receive and process information and images, the basic
legal and economic structure of the mass media, historical
precedents and events of mass media, the new cultural forms
that have emerged from mass media, and the nature and
implications of developing media technologies. Prerequisite:
COMP 1500.
COMM 2200 Introduction to Broadcast Journalism (3
credits)
Training in the elements of broadcast reporting with emphasis
on the modern electronic news story. Students will learn
the elements of broadcast news, the style and structure
of broadcast news writing, and the technology of radio
production. Prerequisite: COMP 1500.
COMM 2300 Intercultural Communication (3 credits)
The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding
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of communication across cultural boundaries and the role of
diversity in interpersonal, public, and mass communication.
Students will study communication differences across
cultures and the importance of being rhetorically sensitive
when communicating with diverse audiences. Prerequisite:
COMP 1500
public relations on national and international levels. Topics
introduced are organizational behavior and the ways in which
it is shaped, public relations ethics, public relations practice
in private and public arenas, emphasizing management and
public relations strategy. Prerequisites: one COMM or SPCH
course and COMP 2000, 2010 or 2020.
COMM 2800 Introduction to Field Video Production (3
credits)
This course offers an introduction to electronic field
production equipment and techniques for various types of
microphones, cameras, and editing equipment, including
portable field camera set-up, operation, transportation,
and maintenance video editing, lighting, scripting, media
aesthetics, and logistics. Students will learn how to produce
top-quality audio and video footage using shoot preparation,
direction, and production techniques. Students will develop
both their creative and technical skills by engaging in a
combination of production exercises, projects, readings, and
critiques.
COMM 3500 Media Regulation (3 credits)
Media Regulation: Survey of media policy and regulation
emphasizing issues of libel, free speech, privacy,
confidentiality of information and sources, as they pertain to
mass media, advertising, and public relations. Prerequisites:
one COMM course and COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020.
COMM 2900 Research Methods in Communication (3
credits)
This course teaches the student to understand and interpret
research applications, methods and results, and practice
basic research writing skills. Students will become familiar
with qualitative and quantitative research methods commonly
required in communication studies. Prerequisites: One
COMM or SPCH course and COMP 2000 or COMP 2020.
COMM 3050 Performance Studies (3 credits)
This course offers students an opportunity to examine the
many genres of cultural performance theatre, dance, music,
ritual, visual art, performance art, community activism,
storytelling, public gatherings, etc. The course challenges
students to observe social customs and gain a global
understanding of culture and performance through readings,
workshop performances, and lectures. Prerequisites: SPCH
1010, SPCH 1010H, SPCH 1999 or SPCH 2020 and COMP
2000, 2010 or 2020.
COMM 3100 Gendered Images in Popular Culture (3
credits)
This course examines gendered images in popular media
other than literature, including film, music videos, television,
and comic books, and their impact on mainstream America.
Prerequisites: one GEST or COMM course; and COMP 2000,
COMP 2010 or COMP 2020.
COMM 3110 Communication Theory (3 credits)
This course focuses on different theories of communication at
the levels of interpersonal, public, and mass communication.
Students will learn numerous perspectives on the role and
value of human interaction from fundamental communication
theories and models to contemporary theoretical approaches
for understanding the connection between human
communication and human behavior. Prerequisites: one
COMM course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010, or COMP
2020.
COMM 3200 Principles of Public Relations (3 credits)
This course focuses on the nature, role, and scope of
COMM 3600 Persuasion (3 credits)
Students will learn theories and strategies relevant to the
study of public persuasion and social influence. Topics
will focus on the role of persuasion in public address,
advertising, business, politics, government, and social
movements. Students will study the tools and techniques
used to understand audiences for the purposes of marketing
communication messages. Prerequisites: One COMM course
and COMP 2000 or COMP 2020.
COMM 3800 Advanced Field Video Production (3 credits)
This course offers instruction in advanced electronic field
production techniques, including scripting, lighting, portable
field audio and video recording equipment operation,
directing, and video editing. Students will master advanced
creative, production, and aesthetic skills through a
combination of readings, production exercises, individual and
ensemble projects, and portfolio development. As television
is a labor-intensive medium, students should expect to
spend considerable time outside of class to complete the
assignments. Pre-requisite: COMM 2800.
COMM 3999 Prior Learning in Communications (1-12
credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of upper-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in communication. This
course is repeatable up to 12 credits.
COMM 4000 Writing for Public Relations (3 credits)
This course focuses on the process of writing in the practice
of public relations, including research and composition of the
following types of documents/publications: annual reports,
news releases, brochures, communication audits, direct mail
campaigns, newsletters, PSAs, and organization profiles.
Prerequisite: COMM 3200.
COMM 4500 Media and Cultural Studies (3 credits)
This course will provide students with a comprehensive
examination of social theories and their relationship to
the critical understanding of mass communication. The
course will address issues raised by the contemporary
communication environment in relation to people’s complex
interactions with popular media. Students will explore the
relationship between the media and modernity and will
analyze the impact of media on modern societies. The course
will explore some key issues of social theories as applied
to media phenomena, including the concepts of ideology,
hegemony, culture and the public sphere through the work of
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key theorists and case study analysis. Prerequisites: COMM
2900 and COMP 2000 or COMP 2020.
COMM 4900 Special Topics in Communication (3 credits)
This course offers a cross-sectional view of the media
through a focus on a particular medium, theme, or genre.
Specific focus to be announced. May be repeated once for
credit, if content changes and with written consent of division
director. Prerequisites: one COMM course or one SPCH
course; and COMP 2000, COMP 2010 or COMP 2020.
COMM 4950 Internship in Communication (1-12 credits)
A 10-20 hour per week field or work experience for 16 weeks
(or more) in the student’s major area of study. Consult
academic division for specific details and requirements.
Prerequisite: cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher, completion of
60 or more credit hours, and permission of division director.
COMM 4990 Independent Study (3 credits)
The student selects, and carries out independently, library
and/or empirical research. Faculty supervision is provided on
an individual basis. Written consent of instructor and division
director required. Prerequisite: one COMM course; and
COMP 2000, 2010, or 2020.
COMP—Composition
COMP 1000 Basic Writing (3 credits)
A writing workshop emphasizing basic writing skills such as
mechanics, organization, and critical reading. The course
focuses primarily on the writing process; grammar; and the
production of clear, well-structured essays. This course
prepares students for COMP 1500.
COMP 1500 College Writing (3 credits)
A writing workshop with instruction in the principles and skills
of argumentation and critical reading. Students will receive
instruction in basic methods of research and documentation
of sources and in computer use. Prerequisites: SAT Verbal
score of 520, ACT English score of 22, a TOEFL score of
650 (paper) or 280 (computer), a passing Writing Challenge
Exam, or COMP 1000.
COMP 1500H College Writing Honors (3 credits)
A writing workshop with instruction in the principles and skills
of argumentation and critical reading. Students will receive
instruction in methods of research and documentation of
sources and in computer use. Prerequisite: SAT verbal score
of 520, ACT English score of 22, a TOEFL score of 650
(paper) or 280 (computer), a passing score on the Writing
Challenge Exam, or COMP 1000. Honors students only.
COMP 1999 Prior Learning in Composition (1-12 credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of lower-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in composition. This
course is repeatable up to 12 credits.
COMP 2000 Advanced College Writing (3 credits)
A writing workshop with advanced instruction in
argumentation as it applies in various professional settings.
The course also includes additional instruction in critical
reading, research, and writing. Prerequisite: COMP 1500.
COMP 2000H Advanced College Writing Honors (3
credits)
A writing workshop with advanced instruction in
argumentation as it applies in various professional settings.
The course also includes additional instruction in critical
reading, research, and writing. Prerequisite: COMP 1500.
Honors students only.
COMP 2020 Writing About Literature (3 credits)
A writing workshop that provides advanced instruction in
argumentation and an introduction to literary genres that
may include poetry, fiction, drama, and essays. Prerequisite:
COMP 1500.
COMP 3999 Prior Learning in Composition (1-12 credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of upper-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in composition. This
course is repeatable up to 12 credits.
CRJU—Criminal Justice
CRJU 1100 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 credits)
This course includes an overview of the agencies and
individuals that comprise the American criminal justice
system. Students will examine the theories that seek to
explain the “causes” and “cures” of crime. The major focus
is on the development and operation of law enforcement,
courts, and corrections. Topics include history, structure,
functions, and philosophy of the criminal justice system and
its relationship to life in our society.
CRJU 1200 Criminal Law (3 credits)
This course covers the study of substantive criminal law.
Students learn the elements of major crimes and defenses.
Students also examine the distinctions between various state
statutes, the common law, the Bill of Rights, and the Model
Penal Code. Topics include sources of substantive law,
classification of crimes, parties to crime, elements of crimes,
and matters of criminal responsibility.
CRJU 1999 Prior Learning Criminal Justice (1-12 credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of lowerlevel prior learning credit in Criminal Justice. This course is
repeatable up to 12 credits.
CRJU 2000 Constitutional Issues (3 credits)
This course will provide a general review of the U.S.
Constitution and Bill of Rights, especially the constitutional
basis for criminal law and the impact of the Constitution and
its amendments on the criminal justice system. Students also
examine the constitutional aspects of criminal procedure,
including searches, seizures, arrests, interrogation, the
pretrial process, trial, sentencing and appeal. Prerequisite:
CRJU 1100.
CRJU 2220 Criminology (3 credits)
This course is designed to familiarize students with theories
of criminal behavior and basic research methodology in
criminal justice and criminology. Specifically, students
will examine the scientific study of crime and criminals.
Throughout the course various topics will be covered,
including criminological theory, defining and measuring
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crime, contemporary crime patterns and types of crime.
Prerequisites: CRJU 1100.
CRJU 2400 Court Systems and Procedures (3 credits)
The court process is complex and affects both policing and
corrections, this course will delve into the authority, power,
and limitations of the court systems of America. While
focusing on the dynamics of American court systems, each
class will accentuate crucial aspects of law and procedure onthe-books contrasted with law-in-practice. The key personnel
of court system will be highlighted, with an emphasis placed
on authentic real-life situations, not just participant’s ideal
behaviors and actions. Further, controversial issues and
technological changes will be addressed, including their
impact on the contemporary American court systems and
procedures. Prerequisite: CRJU 1100.
CRJU 2500 Ethical Dilemmas and Decisions in Criminal
Justice (3 credits)
This course is designed to acquaint students with an
understanding of the importance of ethics within the United
States Criminal Justice System through applying basic ethical
principles to the three components of the criminal justice
system: the police, the courts and corrections. Prerequisite:
CRJU 1100.
CRJU 2600 Multiculturalism and Crime (3 credits)
This course examines the interplay between race, ethnicity,
gender, sexual orientation, social class, and crime by
exploring the contemporary and historical experience of
marginal groups in the criminal justice system. Widely
held beliefs regarding the treatment of minority groups by
the criminal justice system will be critically evaluated to
understand the relationship between crime and marginality in
theory and practice. The political influence of minority groups
on criminal justice practice and policy formulation is also
examined. Substantive areas explored include racial profiling,
hate crimes, disparate arrest rates and sentencing, (including
the death penalty) of marginal groups, and the experience
of minority practitioners in the criminal justice system.
Prerequisite: CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3100 Juvenile Delinquency (3 credits)
An orientation to the issues, policies and procedures that
make up the juvenile justice system. This course will cover
the historical and theoretical principals of juvenile justice,
including the functions and legal responsibilities of the police,
probation, juvenile court, and the juvenile corrections system
in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on the social
forces that cause children to become involved in the juvenile
justice system. Prerequisite: CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3220 Policing (3 credits)
This course covers the historical development of policing,
current trends, education, training, models of policing and
ethical implications. Students will explore the role that
police play in society as well as their relationship with the
communities that they serve. Additionally, state and federal
levels of law enforcement will be reviewed. Prerequisites:
CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3250 Interviewing, Interrogation, and Report
Writing (3 credits)
This course will cover the gathering of information by
law enforcement officials from individuals in both an
interview and interrogation environment. Emphasis will
be placed upon preparation for questioning, discussion
setting, general questioning techniques, specific offender
type strategies, recognition of deception, obtaining
admissions, documentation of confessions, ethical aspects
of investigations and legal rights of those interviewed/
interrogated. Further, the composition and writing of reports
will be covered with an emphasis on clarity, precision and
brevity. Prerequisites: CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3300 Corrections in America (3 credits)
An analysis of corrections with an in-depth view of the
major components of the field. Emphasis is placed on the
various systems of corrections, the practice of corrections,
institutional custody, community-based corrections, probation
and parole, the correctional client and the death penalty.
Special attention will be given to trends in incarceration rates,
including race, ethnicity, sex, special offenders and enhanced
sentencing. Prerequisite: CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3400 Criminal Investigations (3 credits)
This course will cover the fundamentals of investigation,
crime scene search and recording, the collection,
documenting and submission of evidence, scientific aids to
criminal investigation, interviews and interrogation, followup investigation and case preparation. Emphasis is placed
on the investigation of specific crimes, identification of
information sources and procedures required for the handling
of evidence. Also discussed are the legal elements of the
crimes and field techniques for the gathering of data and
presentation of cases to the courts. Prerequisites: CRJU
1100.
CRJU 3700 The CSI Effect: Media and Criminal Justice (3
credits)
This course illustrates how media coverage and television
programs influence the public’s perception of criminal justice.
Fiction is often mistaken for reality, and this phenomenon,
known as the “CSI Effect,” adds to the assumption that all
criminal cases can be easily solved by the employment of
high-tech forensic science, as depicted on television crime
shows. This course explores the common misperceptions
and their consequences, through real-world examples,
providing students with the ability to critically analyze and
assess information promoted by the media and entertainment
television. Prerequisite: CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3999 Prior Learning in Criminal Justice (1-12
credits)
This course number and prefix indicate award of upper-level
undergraduate prior learning credit in Criminal Justice. This
course is repeatable up to 12 credits.
CRJU 4000 Victimology (3 credits)
This course will examine both the institutional and social
factors and the issues and developments within the legal
process that are relevant to the study of victims of crime.
This includes an examination of the definition of a victim,
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crime, and a historical review of the role of the victim in the
criminal justice system. Topics in this course may include
psychological impacts of crime, the impact of victimization,
legal approaches to victims, services provided to victims,
restorative justice and emerging trends in the field of
victimology. Prerequisite: CRJU 2220.
CRJU 4200 Terrorism and Homeland Security (3 credits)
This course will provide students a comprehensive
introduction to terrorism and homeland security. The
first section of the course will provide students a basic
understanding of terrorism as a definitional, theoretical
and criminological issue. The second section of the course
presents a detailed historical discussion of the birth and
evolution of terrorism movements. The third section focuses
on contemporary international and domestic terrorism.
The final section concentrates on issues surrounding the
prevention of terrorism through homeland security. Critical
thinking will be encouraged through class discussions
of controversial issues where students will be asked to
consider various positions, choose their own approach, and
cite evidence to support their positions. Students will also
have the opportunity to study a specific terrorist group of
interest through the writing and in-depth research paper.
Prerequisites: CRJU 1100.
CRJU 4400 Police Organizational Behavior and
Management (3 credits)
This course is an introduction to management principles as
applied to law enforcement agencies. The student will explore
how the organizational structure and occupational values
of policing affect management actions and organizational
outcomes. Case studies will be used to illustrate and
analyze management issues and decision-making in a police
environment. Topics include police organizational structure,
police personality and occupational values, motivation, police
discipline, police unionization, decision-making, leadership,
and organizational change. Prerequisite: CRJU 3220.
CRJU 4500 Research Methods in Criminal Justice (3
credits)
This is an introductory course in research methodology in
criminal justice. It is designed to introduce the student to
basic concepts and problems encountered in quantitative
and qualitative investigation, including types of data and
measurement, sampling, probability, and research design.
This course will emphasize examples of methodology in the
field and utilize actual data. Prerequisite: CRJU 2220.
CRJU 4600 Gangs in America (3 credits)
This course will cover various aspects of the gang problem
that involve the criminal justice system, including gang
enforcement by law enforcement, gang laws and pending
legislation, gang prosecution, and the effect of the gang
culture on the streets of America. Also discussed are issues
dealing with gang theory, including concepts of street gangs,
graffiti, violence, and gang structure and organization.
Students will explore the reasons why gangs exist, how they
are formed, and the impact of gang crime and victimization
on society.
CRJU 4880 Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
This course provides an in-depth analysis of historical
and contemporary literature in the field of criminal justice.
Students will read classic and contemporary literature and
apply this literature to real life dilemmas in the criminal
justice system. This course challenges students to integrate
and critically examine theories and concepts from criminal
justice literature, appreciate the relationship between theory
and policy, and challenges students to build on skills and
knowledge acquired through earlier academic experience.
Prerequisite: CRJU 4500.
CRJU 4900 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
Topics in criminal justice that are not included in regular
course offerings. Specific content is announced in the course
schedule for a given term. Students may re-enroll for special
topics covering different content. Prerequisites: CRJU 1100
and any other prerequisite deemed appropriate by the
instructor depending on the course topic.
CRJU 4900A Special Topics in Criminal Justice: Ethical
Dilemmas and Decisions in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
This course is designed to acquaint students with an
understanding of the importance of ethics within the United
States Criminal Justice System through applying basic ethical
principles to the three components of the criminal justice
system: the police, the courts and corrections. Prerequisites:
CRJU 2400, CRJU 3200 and CRJU 3300.
CRJU 4900B Special Topics: Multiculturalism and Crime
(3 credits)
This course examines the interplay between race, ethnicity,
gender, sexual orientation, social class, religion and crime
by exploring the contemporary and historical experience
of marginal groups in the criminal justice system. Widely
held beliefs regarding the treatment of minority groups by
the criminal justice system will be critically evaluated to
understand the relationship between crime and marginality in
theory and practice. The political influence of minority groups
on criminal justice practice and policy formulation is also
examined. Substantive areas explored include racial profiling,
hate crimes, disparate arrest rates and sentencing, (including
the death penalty) of marginal groups, and the experience
of minority practitioners in the criminal justice system.
Prerequisites: CRJU 1100 and CRJU 2000.
CRJU 4950 Internship in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide students with an
opportunity to integrate academic and experiential
knowledge. Students will be placed in an agency or
organization, of their choice, related to the practice of criminal
justice. Additionally, students are required to complete a
minimum of 140 hours at the internship placement site
during the 16 weeks of enrollment. Prerequisites: (1) a
minimum grade point average of 2.5 as calculated by NSU;
(2) completion of 60 credit hours and CRJU 4500; (3) an
approved placement site prior to enrolling in the course; and
(4) permission from the academic director.
CRJU 4990 Independent Study in Criminal Justice (3
credits)
The student selects and carries out independently library and/
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or empirical research. Faculty supervision is provided on an
individual basis. Prerequisite: CRJU 1100 or CRJU 1200 and
written consent of instructor and division director.
CSAD—Comm Sci & Disorders
CSAD 2000 Introduction to Hearing, Speech and
Language (3 credits)
Understanding of speech, language, and hearing disorders
and their classifications, manifestations, and etiologies.
CSAD 3010 Phonetics (3 credits)
History, theory, and application of phonetics, including
sampling and transcription techniques.
CSAD 3020 Anatomy & Physiology of the Speech and
Hearing Mechanism (3 credits)
Introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the auditory
and vocal mechanisms.
CSAD 3030 Speech & Language Development (3 credits)
Study of prelinguistic and psycholinguis